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Sample records for alters bacterial colonization

  1. Antibiotic-induced dysbiosis alters host-bacterial interactions and leads to colonic sensory and motor changes in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera, M; Cerdà-Cuéllar, M; Martínez, V

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in the composition of the commensal microbiota (dysbiosis) seem to be a pathogenic component of functional gastrointestinal disorders, mainly irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and might participate in the secretomotor and sensory alterations observed in these patients.We determined if a state antibiotics-induced intestinal dysbiosis is able to modify colonic pain-related and motor responses and characterized the neuro-immune mechanisms implicated in mice. A 2-week antibiotics treatment induced a colonic dysbiosis (increments in Bacteroides spp, Clostridium coccoides and Lactobacillus spp and reduction in Bifidobacterium spp). Bacterial adherence was not affected. Dysbiosis was associated with increased levels of secretory-IgA, up-regulation of the antimicrobial lectin RegIIIγ, and toll-like receptors (TLR) 4 and 7 and down-regulation of the antimicrobial-peptide Resistin-Like Molecule-β and TLR5. Dysbiotic mice showed less goblet cells, without changes in the thickness of the mucus layer. Neither macroscopical nor microscopical signs of inflammation were observed. In dysbiotic mice, expression of the cannabinoid receptor 2 was up-regulated, while the cannabinoid 1 and the mu-opioid receptors were down-regulated. In antibiotic-treated mice, visceral pain-related responses elicited by intraperitoneal acetic acid or intracolonic capsaicin were significantly attenuated. Colonic contractility was enhanced during dysbiosis. Intestinal dysbiosis induce changes in the innate intestinal immune system and modulate the expression of pain-related sensory systems, an effect associated with a reduction in visceral pain-related responses. Commensal microbiota modulates gut neuro-immune sensory systems, leading to functional changes, at least as it relates to viscerosensitivity. Similar mechanisms might explain the beneficial effects of antibiotics or certain probiotics in the treatment of IBS. PMID:25531553

  2. Metabolism links bacterial biofilms and colon carcinogenesis.

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    Johnson, Caroline H; Dejea, Christine M; Edler, David; Hoang, Linh T; Santidrian, Antonio F; Felding, Brunhilde H; Ivanisevic, Julijana; Cho, Kevin; Wick, Elizabeth C; Hechenbleikner, Elizabeth M; Uritboonthai, Winnie; Goetz, Laura; Casero, Robert A; Pardoll, Drew M; White, James R; Patti, Gary J; Sears, Cynthia L; Siuzdak, Gary

    2015-06-01

    Bacterial biofilms in the colon alter the host tissue microenvironment. A role for biofilms in colon cancer metabolism has been suggested but to date has not been evaluated. Using metabolomics, we investigated the metabolic influence that microbial biofilms have on colon tissues and the related occurrence of cancer. Patient-matched colon cancers and histologically normal tissues, with or without biofilms, were examined. We show the upregulation of polyamine metabolites in tissues from cancer hosts with significant enhancement of N(1), N(12)-diacetylspermine in both biofilm-positive cancer and normal tissues. Antibiotic treatment, which cleared biofilms, decreased N(1), N(12)-diacetylspermine levels to those seen in biofilm-negative tissues, indicating that host cancer and bacterial biofilm structures contribute to the polyamine metabolite pool. These results show that colonic mucosal biofilms alter the cancer metabolome to produce a regulator of cellular proliferation and colon cancer growth potentially affecting cancer development and progression.

  3. Early Administration of Probiotics Alters Bacterial Colonization and Limits Diet-Induced Gut Dysfunction and Severity of Necrotizing Enterocolitis in Preterm Pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siggers, Richard H.; Siggers, Jayda; Boye, Mette;

    2008-01-01

    Following preterm birth, bacterial colonization and interal formula feeding predispose neonates to gut dysfunction and necrotizing enterocilitis (NEC), a serious gastrointestinal inflammatory disease. We hypothesized that administration of probiotics would beneficially influence early bacterial...... colonization, thereby reducing the susceptibility to formula-induced gut atrophy, dysfunction, and NEC. Caesarean-delivered preterm pigs were provided total parenteral nutrition (1.5 d) followed by enteral feeding (2d) with porcine colosstrum (COLOS; n= 5), formula (FORM; n = 9), or formula with probiotics...

  4. Microbial colonization and alteration of basaltic glass

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    J. Einen

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms have been reported to be associated with the alteration of the glassy margin of seafloor pillow basalts (Thorseth et al., 2001, 2003; Lysnes et al., 2004. The amount of iron and other biological important elements present in basalts and the vast abundance of basaltic glass in the earth's crust, make glass alteration an important process in global element cycling. To gain further insight into microbial communities associated with glass alteration, five microcosm experiments mimicking seafloor conditions were inoculated with seafloor basalt and incubated for one year. Mineral precipitations, microbial attachment to the glass and glass alteration were visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and the bacterial community composition was fingerprinted by PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE in combination with sequencing. SEM analysis revealed a microbial community with low morphological diversity of mainly biofilm associated and prosthecate microorganisms. Approximately 30 nm thick alteration rims developed on the glass in all microcosms after one year of incubation; this however was also seen in non inoculated controls. Calcium carbonate precipitates showed parallel, columnar and filamentous crystallization habits in the microcosms as well as in the sterile controls. DGGE analysis showed an alteration in bacterial community profiles in the five different microcosms, as a response to the different energy and redox regimes and time. In all microcosms a reduction in number of DGGE bands, in combination with an increase in cell abundance were recorded during the experiment. Sequence analysis showed that the microcosms were dominated by four groups of organisms with phylogenetic affiliation to four taxa: The Rhodospirillaceae, a family containing phototrophic marine organisms, in which some members are capable of heterotrophic growth in darkness and N2 fixation; the family Hyphomicrobiaceae, a group

  5. Bacterial colonization of colonic crypt mucous gel and disease activity in ulcerative colitis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rowan, Fiachra

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: To optimize total bacterial 16S rRNA quantification in microdissected colonic crypts in healthy controls and patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and to characterize the findings with disease activity. BACKGROUND: Microscopic and molecular techniques have recently converged to allow bacterial enumeration in remote anatomic locations [eg, crypt-associated mucous gel (CAMG)]. The aims of this study were to combine laser capture microdissection (LCM) and 16S rRNA-based quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) to determine total bacterial copy number in CAMG both in health and in UC and to characterize the findings with disease activity. METHODS: LCM was used to microdissect CAMG from colonic mucosal biopsies from controls (n = 20) and patients with acute (n = 10) or subacute (n = 10) UC. Pan-bacterial 16S rRNA copy number per millimeter square in samples from 6 locations across the large bowel was obtained by qPCR using Desulfovibrio desulfuricans as a reference strain. Copy numbers were correlated with the UC disease activity index (UCDAI) and the simple clinical colitis activity index (SCCAI). RESULTS: Bacterial colonization of CAMG was detectable in all groups. Copy numbers were significantly reduced in acute UC. In subacute colitis, there was a positive correlation between copy number and UCDAI and SCCAI in the ascending, transverse and sigmoid colon. CONCLUSIONS: This study describes a sensitive method of quantitatively assessing bacterial colonization of the colonic CAMG. A positive correlation was found between CAMG bacterial load and subacute disease activity in UC, whereas detectable bacterial load was reduced in acute UC.

  6. Bacterial adaptation to the gut environment favors successful colonization

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    Rezzonico, Enea; Mestdagh, Renaud; Delley, Michèle; Combremont, Séverine; Dumas, Marc-Emmanuel; Holmes, Elaine; Nicholson, Jeremy; Bibiloni, Rodrigo

    2011-01-01

    Rodent models harboring a simple yet functional human intestinal microbiota provide a valuable tool to study the relationships between mammals and their bacterial inhabitants. In this study, we aimed to develop a simplified gnotobiotic mouse model containing 10 easy-to-grow bacteria, readily available from culture repositories, and of known genome sequence, that overall reflect the dominant commensal bacterial makeup found in adult human feces. We observed that merely inoculating a mix of fresh bacterial cultures into ex-germ free mice did not guarantee a successful intestinal colonization of the entire bacterial set, as mice inoculated simultaneously with all strains only harbored 3 after 21 d. Therefore, several inoculation procedures were tested and levels of individual strains were quantified using molecular tools. Best results were obtained by inoculating single bacterial strains into individual animals followed by an interval of two weeks before allowing the animals to socialize to exchange their commensal microbes. Through this procedure, animals were colonized with almost the complete bacterial set (9/10). Differences in the intestinal composition were also reflected in the urine and plasma metabolic profiles, where changes in lipids, SCFA, and amino acids were observed. We conclude that adaptation of bacterial strains to the host’s gut environment (mono-colonization) may predict a successful establishment of a more complex microbiota in rodents. PMID:22157236

  7. Dynamic alteration of the colonic microbiota in intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury.

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    Fan Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R plays an important role in critical illnesses. Gut flora participate in the pathogenesis of the injury. This study is aimed at unraveling colonic microbiota alteration pattern and identifying specific bacterial species that differ significantly as well as observing colonic epithelium change in the same injury model during the reperfusion time course. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE was used to monitor the colonic microbiota of control rats and experimental rats that underwent 0.5 hour ischemia and 1, 3, 6, 12, 24, and 72 hours following reperfusion respectively. The microbiota similarity, bacterial diversity and species that characterized the dysbiosis were estimated based on the DGGE profiles using a combination of statistical approaches. The interested bacterial species in the gel were cut and sequenced and were subsequently quantified and confirmed with real-time PCR. Meanwhile, the epithelial barrier was checked by microscopy and D-lactate analysis. Colonic flora changed early and differed significantly at 6 hours after reperfusion and then started to recover. The shifts were characterized by the increase of Escherichia coli and Prevotella oralis, and Lactobacilli proliferation together with epithelia healing. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This study shows for the first time that intestinal ischemia-reperfusion results in colonic flora dysbiosis that follows epithelia damage, and identifies the bacterial species that contribute most.

  8. Fucose Sensing Regulates Bacterial Intestinal Colonization

    OpenAIRE

    Pacheco, Alline R.; Curtis, Meredith M.; Ritchie, Jennifer M; Munera, Diana; Matthew K Waldor; Moreira, Cristiano G.; Sperandio, Vanessa

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian gastrointestinal (GI) tract provides a complex and competitive environment for the microbiota 1 . Successful colonization by pathogens depends on scavenging nutrients, sensing chemical signals, competing with the resident bacteria, and precisely regulating expression of virulence genes 2 . The GI pathogen enterohemorrhagic E.coli (EHEC) relies on inter-kingdom chemical sensing systems to regulate virulence gene expression 3–4 . Here we show that these systems control the express...

  9. Elevator buttons as unrecognized sources of bacterial colonization in hospitals

    OpenAIRE

    Kandel, Christopher E; Simor, Andrew E; Donald A Redelmeier

    2014-01-01

    Background: Elevators are ubiquitous and active inside hospitals, potentially facilitating bacterial transmission. The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of bacterial colonization on elevator buttons in large urban teaching hospitals. Methods: A total of 120 elevator buttons and 96 toilet surfaces were swabbed over separate intervals at 3 tertiary care hospitals on weekdays and weekends in Toronto, Ontario. For the elevators, swabs were taken from 2 interior buttons (butto...

  10. Effects of bacterial colonization on the porcine intestinal proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Marianne; Hornshøj, Henrik; Siggers, Richard Harvey;

    2007-01-01

    comparison of 12 animals. Our results showed that bacterial colonization differentially affected mechanisms such as proteolysis, epithelial proliferation, and lipid metabolism, which is in good agreement with previous studies of other germ-free animal models. We have also found that E. coli has a profound...

  11. Fucose sensing regulates bacterial intestinal colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Alline R; Curtis, Meredith M; Ritchie, Jennifer M; Munera, Diana; Waldor, Matthew K; Moreira, Cristiano G; Sperandio, Vanessa

    2012-12-01

    The mammalian gastrointestinal tract provides a complex and competitive environment for the microbiota. Successful colonization by pathogens requires scavenging nutrients, sensing chemical signals, competing with the resident bacteria and precisely regulating the expression of virulence genes. The gastrointestinal pathogen enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) relies on inter-kingdom chemical sensing systems to regulate virulence gene expression. Here we show that these systems control the expression of a novel two-component signal transduction system, named FusKR, where FusK is the histidine sensor kinase and FusR the response regulator. FusK senses fucose and controls expression of virulence and metabolic genes. This fucose-sensing system is required for robust EHEC colonization of the mammalian intestine. Fucose is highly abundant in the intestine. Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron produces multiple fucosidases that cleave fucose from host glycans, resulting in high fucose availability in the gut lumen. During growth in mucin, B. thetaiotaomicron contributes to EHEC virulence by cleaving fucose from mucin, thereby activating the FusKR signalling cascade, modulating the virulence gene expression of EHEC. Our findings suggest that EHEC uses fucose, a host-derived signal made available by the microbiota, to modulate EHEC pathogenicity and metabolism.

  12. Colonization with the enteric protozoa Blastocystis is associated with increased diversity of human gut bacterial microbiota

    OpenAIRE

    Audebert, Christophe; Even, Gaël; Cian, Amandine; ,; Safadi, Dima El; Certad, Gabriela; Delhaes, Laurence; Pereira, Bruno; Nourrisson, Céline; Poirier, Philippe; Wawrzyniak, Ivan; Delbac, Frédéric; Morelle, Christelle; Bastien, Patrick; Lachaud, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in the composition of commensal bacterial populations, a phenomenon known as dysbiosis, are linked to multiple gastrointestinal disorders, such as inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome, or to infections by diverse enteric pathogens. Blastocystis is one of the most common single-celled eukaryotes detected in human faecal samples. However, the clinical significance of this widespread colonization remains unclear, and its pathogenic potential is controversial. To ad...

  13. Colonization with the enteric protozoa Blastocystis is associated with increased diversity of human gut bacterial microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audebert, Christophe; Even, Gaël; Cian, Amandine; Loywick, Alexandre; Merlin, Sophie; Viscogliosi, Eric; Chabé, Magali

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in the composition of commensal bacterial populations, a phenomenon known as dysbiosis, are linked to multiple gastrointestinal disorders, such as inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome, or to infections by diverse enteric pathogens. Blastocystis is one of the most common single-celled eukaryotes detected in human faecal samples. However, the clinical significance of this widespread colonization remains unclear, and its pathogenic potential is controversial. To address the issue of Blastocystis pathogenicity, we investigated the impact of colonization by this protist on the composition of the human gut microbiota. For that purpose, we conducted a cross-sectional study including 48 Blastocystis-colonized patients and 48 Blastocystis-free subjects and performed an Ion Torrent 16S rDNA gene sequencing to decipher the Blastocystis-associated gut microbiota. Here, we report a higher bacterial diversity in faecal microbiota of Blastocystis colonized patients, a higher abundance of Clostridia as well as a lower abundance of Enterobacteriaceae. Our results contribute to suggesting that Blastocystis colonization is usually associated with a healthy gut microbiota, rather than with gut dysbiosis generally observed in metabolic or infectious inflammatory diseases of the lower gastrointestinal tract. PMID:27147260

  14. PLANT MICROBIOME. Salicylic acid modulates colonization of the root microbiome by specific bacterial taxa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebeis, Sarah L; Paredes, Sur Herrera; Lundberg, Derek S; Breakfield, Natalie; Gehring, Jase; McDonald, Meredith; Malfatti, Stephanie; Glavina del Rio, Tijana; Jones, Corbin D; Tringe, Susannah G; Dangl, Jeffery L

    2015-08-21

    Immune systems distinguish "self" from "nonself" to maintain homeostasis and must differentially gate access to allow colonization by potentially beneficial, nonpathogenic microbes. Plant roots grow within extremely diverse soil microbial communities but assemble a taxonomically limited root-associated microbiome. We grew isogenic Arabidopsis thaliana mutants with altered immune systems in a wild soil and also in recolonization experiments with a synthetic bacterial community. We established that biosynthesis of, and signaling dependent on, the foliar defense phytohormone salicylic acid is required to assemble a normal root microbiome. Salicylic acid modulates colonization of the root by specific bacterial families. Thus, plant immune signaling drives selection from the available microbial communities to sculpt the root microbiome.

  15. Tobacco smoking affects bacterial acquisition and colonization in oral biofilms.

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    Kumar, Purnima S; Matthews, Chad R; Joshi, Vinayak; de Jager, Marko; Aspiras, Marcelo

    2011-11-01

    Recent evidence suggests that smoking affects the composition of the disease-associated subgingival biofilm, yet little is known about its effects during the formation of this biofilm. The present investigation was undertaken to examine the contributions of smoking to the composition and proinflammatory characteristics of the biofilm during de novo plaque formation. Marginal and subgingival plaque and gingival crevicular fluid samples were collected from 15 current smokers and from 15 individuals who had never smoked (nonsmokers) following 1, 2, 4, and 7 days of undisturbed plaque formation. 16S rRNA gene cloning and sequencing were used for bacterial identification, and multiplex bead-based flow cytometry was used to quantify the levels of 27 immune mediators. Smokers demonstrated a highly diverse, relatively unstable initial colonization of both marginal and subgingival biofilms, with lower niche saturation than that seen in nonsmokers. Periodontal pathogens belonging to the genera Fusobacterium, Cardiobacterium, Synergistes, and Selenomonas, as well as respiratory pathogens belonging to the genera Haemophilus and Pseudomonas, colonized the early biofilms of smokers and continued to persist over the observation period, suggesting that smoking favors early acquisition and colonization of pathogens in oral biofilms. Smokers also demonstrated an early proinflammatory response to this colonization, which persisted over 7 days. Further, a positive correlation between proinflammatory cytokine levels and commensal bacteria was observed in smokers but not in nonsmokers. Taken together, the data suggest that smoking influences both the composition of the nascent biofilm and the host response to this colonization.

  16. Bacterial Colonization and the Development of Intestinal Defences

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    Hai Ning Shi

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In humans, intestinal defences develop during gestation and, at full term, have the capacity to respond in an appropriate manner to infectious agents and foreign antigens. Before an active protective response can occur, however, the gut must first be exposed to colonizing bacteria. Colonization with diverse intestinal microbes is necessary for the development of important gut defenses such as the synthesis and secretion of polymeric immunoglobulin A and the generation of a balanced T helper (Th cell response. Insights into normal immune physiological development of the gut have been made by studying the germ-free animal and intestinal defenses. These studies have provided insights into the physiology of immune responses. Two important immunological functions are the secretion of polymeric immunoglobulin A to protect the intestinal surface against harmful stimuli and inhibition of the systemic response to commensal bacteria and food proteins (eg, oral tolerance to prevent chronic inflammation. Neither function exists in the germ-free state, but rapidly develops after conventionalization (colonization of the germ-free animal. In the present review, the importance of bacterial colonization on the appearance of normal mucosal immune function and to the clinical consequences of inadequate colonization to the development of disease will be discussed. For example, excessive Th2 activity can lead to atopy, whereas Th1 predominance is found in conditions such as Helicobacter pylori gastritis and Crohn's disease. With the eradication of infectious diseases in developed countries in the past three decades, the incidence of atopic and autoimmune diseases has increased. This epidemiological observation has been explained by the 'hygiene hypothesis', which suggests that a reduction in microbial burden by public health measures has contributed to an immunological imbalance in the intestine. A family of pattern recognition receptors (Toll-like receptors on gut

  17. Bacterial colonization and extinction on marine aggregates: stochastic model of species presence and abundance

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    Kramer, Andrew M; Lyons, M Maille; Dobbs, Fred C; Drake, John M

    2013-01-01

    Organic aggregates provide a favorable habitat for aquatic microbes, are efficiently filtered by shellfish, and may play a major role in the dynamics of aquatic pathogens. Quantifying this role requires understanding how pathogen abundance in the water and aggregate size interact to determine the presence and abundance of pathogen cells on individual aggregates. We build upon current understanding of the dynamics of bacteria and bacterial grazers on aggregates to develop a model for the dynamics of a bacterial pathogen species. The model accounts for the importance of stochasticity and the balance between colonization and extinction. Simulation results suggest that while colonization increases linearly with background density and aggregate size, extinction rates are expected to be nonlinear on small aggregates in a low background density of the pathogen. Under these conditions, we predict lower probabilities of pathogen presence and reduced abundance on aggregates compared with predictions based solely on colonization. These results suggest that the importance of aggregates to the dynamics of aquatic bacterial pathogens may be dependent on the interaction between aggregate size and background pathogen density, and that these interactions are strongly influenced by ecological interactions and pathogen traits. The model provides testable predictions and can be a useful tool for exploring how species-specific differences in pathogen traits may alter the effect of aggregates on disease transmission. PMID:24340173

  18. Taking root: enduring effect of rhizosphere bacterial colonization in mangroves.

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    Newton C M Gomes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mangrove forests are of global ecological and economic importance, but are also one of the world's most threatened ecosystems. Here we present a case study examining the influence of the rhizosphere on the structural composition and diversity of mangrove bacterial communities and the implications for mangrove reforestation approaches using nursery-raised plants. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A barcoded pyrosequencing approach was used to assess bacterial diversity in the rhizosphere of plants in a nursery setting, nursery-raised transplants and native (non-transplanted plants in the same mangrove habitat. In addition to this, we also assessed bacterial composition in the bulk sediment in order to ascertain if the roots of mangrove plants affect sediment bacterial composition. We found that mangrove roots appear to influence bacterial abundance and composition in the rhizosphere. Due to the sheer abundance of roots in mangrove habitat, such an effect can have an important impact on the maintenance of bacterial guilds involved in nutrient cycling and other key ecosystem functions. Surprisingly, we also noted a marked impact of initial nursery conditions on the rhizosphere bacterial composition of replanted mangrove trees. This result is intriguing because mangroves are periodically inundated with seawater and represent a highly dynamic environment compared to the more controlled nursery environment. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In as far as microbial diversity and composition influences plant growth and health, this study indicates that nursery conditions and early microbial colonization patterns of the replants are key factors that should be considered during reforestation projects. In addition to this, our results provide information on the role of the mangrove rhizosphere as a habitat for bacteria from estuarine sediments.

  19. Inhibition of bacterial surface colonization by immobilized silver nanoparticles depends critically on the planktonic bacterial concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Stacy M; Bertuccio, Alex J; Cao, Feng; Lowry, Gregory V; Tilton, Robert D

    2016-04-01

    Immobilization of antimicrobial silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on surfaces has been proposed as a method to inhibit biofouling or as a possible route by which incidental releases of AgNPs may interfere with biofilms in the natural environment or in wastewater treatment. This study addresses the ability of planktonic Pseudomonas fluorescens bacteria to colonize surfaces with pre-adsorbed AgNPs. The ability of the AgNP-coated surfaces to inhibit colonization was controlled by the dissolved silver in the system, with a strong dependence on the initial planktonic cell concentration in the suspension, i.e., a strong inoculum effect. This dependence was attributed to a decrease in dissolved silver ion bioavailability and toxicity caused by its binding to cells and/or cell byproducts. Therefore, when the initial cell concentration was high (∼1×10(7)CFU/mL), an excess of silver binding capacity removed most of the free silver and allowed both planktonic growth and surface colonization directly on the AgNP-coated surface. When the initial cell concentration was low (∼1×10(5)CFU/mL), 100% killing of the planktonic cell inoculum occurred and prevented colonization. When an intermediate initial inoculum concentration (∼1×10(6)CFU/mL) was sufficiently large to prevent 100% killing of planktonic cells, even with 99.97% initial killing, the planktonic population recovered and bacteria colonized the AgNP-coated surface. In some conditions, colonization of AgNP-coated surfaces was enhanced relative to silver-free controls, and the bacteria demonstrated a preferential attachment to AgNP-coated, rather than bare, surface regions. The degree to which the bacterial concentration dictates whether or not surface-immobilized AgNPs can inhibit colonization has significant implications both for the design of antimicrobial surfaces and for the potential environmental impacts of AgNPs. PMID:26771749

  20. Cultivated vaginal microbiomes alter HIV-1 infection and antiretroviral efficacy in colonized epithelial multilayer cultures.

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    Richard B Pyles

    Full Text Available There is a pressing need for modeling of the symbiotic and at times dysbiotic relationship established between bacterial microbiomes and human mucosal surfaces. In particular clinical studies have indicated that the complex vaginal microbiome (VMB contributes to the protection against sexually-transmitted pathogens including the life-threatening human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1. The human microbiome project has substantially increased our understanding of the complex bacterial communities in the vagina however, as is the case for most microbiomes, very few of the community member species have been successfully cultivated in the laboratory limiting the types of studies that can be completed. A genetically controlled ex vivo model system is critically needed to study the complex interactions and associated molecular dialog. We present the first vaginal mucosal culture model that supports colonization by both healthy and dysbiotic VMB from vaginal swabs collected from routine gynecological patients. The immortalized vaginal epithelial cells used in the model and VMB cryopreservation methods provide the opportunity to reproducibly create replicates for lab-based evaluations of this important mucosal/bacterial community interface. The culture system also contains HIV-1 susceptible cells allowing us to study the impact of representative microbiomes on replication. Our results show that our culture system supports stable and reproducible colonization by VMB representing distinct community state types and that the selected representatives have significantly different effects on the replication of HIV-1. Further, we show the utility of the system to predict unwanted alterations in efficacy or bacterial community profiles following topical application of a front line antiretroviral.

  1. Campylobacter jejuni pdxA affects flagellum-mediated motility to alter host colonization.

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    Hiroshi Asakura

    Full Text Available Vitamin B6 (pyridoxal-5'-phosphate, PLP is linked to a variety of biological functions in prokaryotes. Here, we report that the pdxA (putative 4-hydroxy-L-threonine phosphate dehydrogenase gene plays a pivotal role in the PLP-dependent regulation of flagellar motility, thereby altering host colonization in a leading foodborne pathogen, Campylobacter jejuni. A C. jejuni pdxA mutant failed to produce PLP and exhibited a coincident loss of flagellar motility. Mass spectrometric analyses showed a 3-fold reduction in the main flagellar glycan pseudaminic acid (Pse associated with the disruption of pdxA. The pdxA mutant also exhibited reduced growth rates compared with the WT strain. Comparative metabolomic analyses revealed differences in respiratory/energy metabolism between WT C. jejuni and the pdxA mutant, providing a possible explanation for the differential growth fitness between the two strains. Consistent with the lack of flagellar motility, the pdxA mutant showed impaired motility-mediated responses (bacterial adhesion, ERK1/2 activation, and IL-8 production in INT407 cells and reduced colonization of chickens compared with the WT strain. Overall, this study demonstrated that the pdxA gene affects the PLP-mediated flagellar motility function, mainly through alteration of Pse modification, and the disruption of this gene also alters the respiratory/energy metabolisms to potentially affect host colonization. Our data therefore present novel implications regarding the utility of PLP and its dependent enzymes as potent target(s for the control of this pathogen in the poultry host.

  2. Age and feeding system (supplemental feeding versus grazing) modulates colonic bacterial succession and host mucosal immune maturation in goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, J; Lu, Q; Forster, R J; Zhou, C; Wang, M; Kang, J; Tan, Z

    2016-06-01

    The gut microbiome plays important roles in the regulation of gastrointestinal tract functional development and host mucosal immune maturation. This study was conducted to test the hypothesis that age and feeding system (supplemental feeding [Sup] vs. grazing [G]) could alter colonic bacterial diversity and host mucosal immune maturation. Thirty Liuyang black goat kids ( = 4) were slaughtered on d 0, d 7 (nonrumination), d 28, d 42 (transition), and d 70 (rumination). The colonic microbiota was profiled by Miseq sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Host colonic mucosal immune maturation was examined using mRNA level expression of Toll-like receptors (TLR), proinflammatory cytokines, and the Toll-IL-1R (TIR) domain-containing adaptor. A correlation analysis was conducted to elucidate the relationship between bacterial diversity and fermentation parameters and host immune maturation variables. The results showed that α diversity indexes ( diversity indexes increased ( diversity and host mucosal immune maturation are age related, and concentrate supplement could alter bacterial diversity and alleviate overinflammation responses. PMID:27285927

  3. Standard colonic lavage alters the natural state of mucosal-associated microbiota in the human colon.

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    Laura Harrell

    Full Text Available Past studies of the human intestinal microbiota are potentially confounded by the common practice of using bowel-cleansing preparations. We examined if colonic lavage changes the natural state of enteric mucosal-adherent microbes in healthy human subjects.Twelve healthy individuals were divided into three groups; experimental group, control group one, and control group two. Subjects in the experimental group underwent an un-prepped flexible sigmoidoscopy with biopsies. Within two weeks, subjects were given a standard polyethylene glycol-based bowel cleansing preparation followed by a second flexible sigmoidoscopy. Subjects in control group one underwent two un-prepped flexible sigmoidoscopies within one week. Subjects in the second control group underwent an un-prepped flexible sigmoidoscopy followed by a second flexible sigmoidoscopy after a 24-hour clear liquid diet within one week. The mucosa-associated microbial communities from the two procedures in each subject were compared using 16S rRNA gene based terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP, and library cloning and sequencing.Clone library sequencing analysis showed that there were changes in the composition of the mucosa-associated microbiota in subjects after colonic lavage. These changes were not observed in our control groups. Standard bowel preparation altered the diversity of mucosa-associated microbiota. Taxonomic classification did not reveal significant changes at the phylum level, but there were differences observed at the genus level.Standard bowel cleansing preparation altered the mucosal-adherent microbiota in all of our subjects, although the degree of change was variable. These findings underscore the importance of considering the confounding effects of bowel preparation when designing experiments exploring the gut microbiota.

  4. Clostridium difficile suppresses colonic vasoactive intestinal peptide associated with altered motility

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    A. Nassif

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated whether Clostridium difficile toxin alters colonic tissue levels of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP at the expense of changes in colonic motility in the isolated perfused rabbit left colon. Colonic inflammation was induced by the intracolonic administration of 10−8 M C. difflcile toxin. Strain gauge transducers were sewn onto the serosal surface of the colon to evaluate colonic motility. C. difflcile administration produced histologic changes consistent with epithelial damage. This was associated with an increased production of prostaglandin E2 and thromboxane B2. Tissue levels of VIP but not substance P were significantly reduced. This was associated with an increased number of contractions per minute and an average force of each colonic contraction. These results suggest that tissue levels of VIP are suppressed by C. difflcile and may participate in colonic dysmotility during active inflammation.

  5. Cigarette smoking and genetic alterations in sporadic colon carcinomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diergaarde, B.; Vrieling, A.; Kraats, van A.A.; Muijen, van G.N.P.; Kok, F.J.; Kampman, E.

    2003-01-01

    Cigarette smoking has been inconsistently associated with colon cancer risk. To evaluate the hypothesis that smoking is primarily linked to a specific colon tumor subgroup(s), we assessed associations between smoking and the occurrence of mutations in the APC, K-ras and p53 genes, p53 overexpression

  6. Mechanisms and rates of bacterial colonization of sinking aggregates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiørboe, Thomas; Grossart, H.P.; Ploug, H.;

    2002-01-01

    (0 to 2 s(-1)). The rates at which these bacteria colonized artificial aggregates (stationary and sinking) largely agreed with model predictions. We report several findings. (i) Motile bacteria rapidly colonize aggregates, whereas nonmotile bacteria do not. 00 Flow enhances colonization rates. (iii...... frequency, and turn angles) and the hydrodynamic environment (stationary versus sinking aggregates). We then experimentally tested the models with 10 strains of bacteria isolated from marine particles: two strains were nonmotile; the rest were swimming at 20 to 60 mum s(-1) with different tumbling frequency...

  7. Genetic Identification and Risk Factor Analysis of Asymptomatic Bacterial Colonization on Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Xian-Ming; An, Yi; Li, Xue-Bin; Guo, Ji-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Asymptomatic bacterial colonization of cardiovascular implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) is widespread and increases the risk of clinical CIED infection. The aim of the study was to evaluate the incidence of bacterial colonization of generator pockets in patients without signs of infection and to analyze the relationship with clinical infection and risk factors. From June 2011 to December 2012, 78 patients underwent CIED replacement or upgrade. Exclusion criteria included a clinical diagnosis of CIED infection, bacteremia, or infective endocarditis. All patients were examined for evidence of bacterial 16S rDNA on the device and in the surrounding tissues. Infection cases were recorded during follow-up. The bacterial-positive rate was 38.5% (30 cases); the coagulase-negative Staphylococcus detection rate was the highest (9 cases, 11.5%). Positive bacterial DNA results were obtained from pocket tissue in 23.1% of patients (18 cases), and bacterial DNA was detected on the device in 29.5% of patients (23 cases). During follow-up (median 24.6 months), two patients (6.7%, 2/30) became symptomatic with the same species of microorganism, S. aureus and S. epidermidis. Multivariable logistic regression analysis found that the history of bacterial infection, use of antibiotics, application of antiplatelet drugs, replacement frequency, and renal insufficiency were independent risk factors for asymptomatic bacterial colonization. PMID:25530969

  8. Genetic Identification and Risk Factor Analysis of Asymptomatic Bacterial Colonization on Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian-Ming Chu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Asymptomatic bacterial colonization of cardiovascular implantable electronic devices (CIEDs is widespread and increases the risk of clinical CIED infection. The aim of the study was to evaluate the incidence of bacterial colonization of generator pockets in patients without signs of infection and to analyze the relationship with clinical infection and risk factors. From June 2011 to December 2012, 78 patients underwent CIED replacement or upgrade. Exclusion criteria included a clinical diagnosis of CIED infection, bacteremia, or infective endocarditis. All patients were examined for evidence of bacterial 16S rDNA on the device and in the surrounding tissues. Infection cases were recorded during follow-up. The bacterial-positive rate was 38.5% (30 cases; the coagulase-negative Staphylococcus detection rate was the highest (9 cases, 11.5%. Positive bacterial DNA results were obtained from pocket tissue in 23.1% of patients (18 cases, and bacterial DNA was detected on the device in 29.5% of patients (23 cases. During follow-up (median 24.6 months, two patients (6.7%, 2/30 became symptomatic with the same species of microorganism, S. aureus and S. epidermidis. Multivariable logistic regression analysis found that the history of bacterial infection, use of antibiotics, application of antiplatelet drugs, replacement frequency, and renal insufficiency were independent risk factors for asymptomatic bacterial colonization.

  9. Mechanisms linking obesity to altered metabolism in mice colon carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimri, Lili; Saadi, Janan; Peri, Irena; Yehuda-Shnaidman, Einav; Schwartz, Betty

    2015-11-10

    There are an increasing number of reports on obesity being a key risk factor for the development of colon cancer. Our goal in this study was to explore the metabolic networks and molecular signaling pathways linking obesity, adipose tissue and colon cancer. Using in-vivo experiments, we found that mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) and injected with MC38 colon cancer cells develop significantly larger tumors than their counterparts fed a control diet. In ex-vivo experiments, MC38 and CT26 colon cancer cells exposed to conditioned media (CM) from the adipose tissue of HFD-fed mice demonstrated significantly lower oxygen consumption rate as well as lower maximal oxygen consumption rate after carbonyl cyanide-4-trifluoromethoxy-phenylhydrazone treatment. In addition, in-vitro assays showed downregulated expression of mitochondrial genes in colon cancer cells exposed to CM prepared from the visceral fat of HFD-fed mice or to leptin. Interestingly, leptin levels detected in the media of adipose tissue explants co-cultured with MC38 cancer cells were higher than in adipose tissue explants cultures, indicating cross talk between the adipose tissue and the cancer cells. Salient findings of the present study demonstrate that this crosstalk is mediated at least partially by the JNK/STAT3-signaling pathway. PMID:26472027

  10. Global Regulation of Virulence Determinants During Plant Colonization in the Bacterial Phytopathogen, Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii

    OpenAIRE

    Burbank, Lindsey

    2014-01-01

    Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii, the etiological agent of Stewart's wilt, is a bacterial pathogen of sweet corn which colonizes both the apoplast and xylem tissues. During the initial stages of the infection process, the pathogen forms water-soaked lesions through lysis of the plant cells, followed by colonization of the xylem tissue where it can grow to high cell densities and form biofilms. Biofilm formation within the xylem vessels can block water flow, causing the characteristic wiltin...

  11. Impact of different catheter lock strategies on bacterial colonization of permanent central venous hemodialysis catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erb, Stefan; Widmer, Andreas F; Tschudin-Sutter, Sarah; Neff, Ursula; Fischer, Manuela; Dickenmann, Michael; Grosse, Philipp

    2013-12-01

    Thirty-nine hemodialysis patients with permanent central venous catheters were analyzed for bacterial catheter colonization comparing different catheter-lock strategies. The closed needleless Tego connector with sodium chloride lock solution was significantly more frequently colonized with bacteria than the standard catheter caps with antimicrobially active citrate lock solution (odds ratio, 0.22 [95% confidence interval, 0.07-0.71]; P = .011).

  12. Does circumcision alter the periurethral uropathogenic bacterial flora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mushtaq Ahmad Laway

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to assess the pattern of periurethral bacterial flora in uncircumcised boys and to evaluate the effect of circumcision on alteration of periurethral uropathogenic bacterial flora. Materials and Methods: Pattern of periurethral bacterial flora before and after circumcision was studied prospectively in 124 boys. The results were analysed to compare change in bacterial colonisation before and after circumcision. Results: The age range was 6 weeks to 96 months. Most (94.3% of the boys had religious indication and 5.7% had medical indication for circumcision. E. coli, Proteus and Klebsiella were most common periurethral bacterial flora in uncircumcised subjects. Coagulase-negative staphylococcus and Staphylococcus aureus was most common periurethral bacterial flora in circumcised subjects. In 66.1% of circumcised subjects, no bacteria were grown from periurethral region. Conclusion: We conclude that presence of prepuce is associated with great quantity of periurethral bacteria, greater likelihood of the presence of high concentration of uropathogens and high incidence of urinary tract infection (UTI. This study provides circumstantial evidence supporting the idea that early circumcision may be beneficial for prevention of UTI.

  13. Taking Root: Enduring Effect of Rhizosphere Bacterial Colonization in Mangroves

    OpenAIRE

    Newton C.M. Gomes; Cleary, Daniel F. R.; Pinto, Fernando N.; Egas, Conceição; Almeida, Adelaide; Cunha, Angela; Mendonça-Hagler, Leda C. S.; Smalla, Kornelia

    2010-01-01

    Background Mangrove forests are of global ecological and economic importance, but are also one of the world's most threatened ecosystems. Here we present a case study examining the influence of the rhizosphere on the structural composition and diversity of mangrove bacterial communities and the implications for mangrove reforestation approaches using nursery-raised plants. Methodology/Principal Findings A barcoded pyrosequencing approach was used to assess bacterial diversity in the rhizosphe...

  14. Bacterial colonization and gut development in preterm neonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cilieborg, Malene S.; Boye, Mette; Sangild, Per Torp

    2012-01-01

    with no consistent effects of gestational age, delivery mode, diet or probiotic administration, while low bacterial diversity and bacterial overgrowth are commonly associated with NEC. A series of recent studies in preterm pigs show that the mucosa-associated microbiota is affected by delivery method, prematurity...... and NEC progression and that diet has limited effects. Overgrowth of specific groups (e.g. Clostridia) appears to be a consequence of NEC, rather than the cause of NEC. Administration of probiotics either decreases or increases NEC sensitivity in preterm pigs, while in preterm infants probiotics have...

  15. Use of portable electronic devices in a hospital setting and their potential for bacterial colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Amber; Rao, Amitha; Reyes-Sacin, Carlos; Hayakawa, Kayoko; Szpunar, Susan; Riederer, Kathleen; Kaye, Keith; Fishbain, Joel T; Levine, Diane

    2015-03-01

    Portable electronic devices are increasingly being used in the hospital setting. As with other fomites, these devices represent a potential reservoir for the transmission of pathogens. We conducted a convenience sampling of devices in 2 large medical centers to identify bacterial colonization rates and potential risk factors.

  16. Chlorhexidine Gluconate Dressings Reduce Bacterial Colonization Rates in Epidural and Peripheral Regional Catheters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Kerwat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Bacterial colonization of catheter tips is common in regional anesthesia and is a suspected risk factor for infectious complications. This is the first study evaluating the effect of CHG-impregnated dressings on bacterial colonization of regional anesthesia catheters in a routine clinical setting. Methods. In this prospective study, regional anesthesia catheter infection rates were examined in two groups of patients with epidural and peripheral regional catheters. In the first group, regional anesthesia was dressed with a conventional draping. The second group of patients underwent catheter dressing using a CHG-impregnated draping. Removed catheters and the insertion sites were both screened for bacterial colonization. Results. A total of 337 catheters from 308 patients were analysed. There was no significant reduction of local infections in either epidural or peripheral regional anesthesia catheters in both CHG and conventional groups. In the conventional group, 21% of the catheter tips and 41% of the insertion sites showed positive culture results. In the CHG-group, however, only 3% of the catheter tips and 8% of the insertion sites were colonised. Conclusion. CHG dressings significantly reduce bacterial colonization of the tip and the insertion site of epidural and peripheral regional catheters. However, no reductions in rates of local infections were seen.

  17. Subgingival bacterial colonization profiles correlate with gingival tissue gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Handfield Martin

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by the microbiota of the periodontal pocket. We investigated the association between subgingival bacterial profiles and gene expression patterns in gingival tissues of patients with periodontitis. A total of 120 patients undergoing periodontal surgery contributed with a minimum of two interproximal gingival papillae (range 2-4 from a maxillary posterior region. Prior to tissue harvesting, subgingival plaque samples were collected from the mesial and distal aspects of each tissue sample. Gingival tissue RNA was extracted, reverse-transcribed, labeled, and hybridized with whole-genome microarrays (310 in total. Plaque samples were analyzed using checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridizations with respect to 11 bacterial species. Random effects linear regression models considered bacterial levels as exposure and expression profiles as outcome variables. Gene Ontology analyses summarized the expression patterns into biologically relevant categories. Results Wide inter-species variation was noted in the number of differentially expressed gingival tissue genes according to subgingival bacterial levels: Using a Bonferroni correction (p -7, 9,392 probe sets were differentially associated with levels of Tannerella forsythia, 8,537 with Porphyromonas gingivalis, 6,460 with Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, 506 with Eikenella corrodens and only 8 with Actinomyces naeslundii. Cluster analysis identified commonalities and differences among tissue gene expression patterns differentially regulated according to bacterial levels. Conclusion Our findings suggest that the microbial content of the periodontal pocket is a determinant of gene expression in the gingival tissues and provide new insights into the differential ability of periodontal species to elicit a local host response.

  18. Prognostic values of chromosome 18q microsatellite alterations in stage Ⅱ colonic carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the prognostic value of chromosome 18q microsatellite alterations (MA) in stage Ⅱ colon cancer. METHODS: One hundred and six patients with sporadic stage Ⅱ colon cancer were enrolled in this study. DNA was extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor and adjacent normal mucosal tissue samples. MA, including loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and microsatellite instability (MSI), was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction, polyacrylamide gel-electrophoresis and DNA sequencing at 5 micr...

  19. Bacterial filamentation accelerates colonization of adhesive spots embedded in biopassive surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, Jens; Emge, Philippe; Avalos Vizcarra, Ima; Kollmannsberger, Philip; Vogel, Viola

    2013-12-01

    Sessile bacteria adhere to engineered surfaces and host tissues and pose a substantial clinical and economical risk when growing into biofilms. Most engineered and biological interfaces are of chemically heterogeneous nature and provide adhesive islands for bacterial attachment and growth. To mimic either defects in a surface coating of biomedical implants or heterogeneities within mucosal layers (Peyer's patches), we embedded micrometre-sized adhesive islands in a poly(ethylene glycol) biopassive background. We show experimentally and computationally that filamentation of Escherichia coli can significantly accelerate the bacterial surface colonization under physiological flow conditions. Filamentation can thus provide an advantage to a bacterial population to bridge non-adhesive distances exceeding 5 μm. Bacterial filamentation, caused by blocking of bacterial division, is common among bacterial species and can be triggered by environmental conditions or antibiotic treatment. While great awareness exists that the build-up of antibiotic resistance serves as intrinsic survival strategy, we show here that antibiotic treatment can actually promote surface colonization by triggering filamentation, which in turn prevents daughter cells from being washed away. Our combined microfabrication and computational approaches provide quantitative insights into mechanisms that enable biofouling of biopassive surfaces with embedded adhesive spots, even for spot distances that are multiples of the bacterial length.

  20. Propionate alters ion transport by rabbit distal colon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary anions of the colon are short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) produced by intestinal microorganisms from endogenous secretions and dietary fiber. The effects of the SCFA propionate on ion transport by the epithelium of rabbit distal colon were studied on tissues stripped of underlying musculature and mounted in Ussing chambers. When tissues were bathed with NaCl Ringer's solutions at 370C (5% CO2-21mM HCO3, pH 7.4) replacement of 33mM Cl- in both tissue baths by propionate reduced short-circuit current (Isc) from 86 to 35 μA/cm2 and increased transepithelial conductance (G/sub t/) from 3.6 to 5.6mS/cm2. Unidirectional 14C-propionate flux measurements revealed that this ion was secreted at a rate of 0.5μEq/cm2hr. Intracellular measurements with potential and pH sensitive microelectrodes showed that propionate reduced intracellular pH (PH/sub i/) from 6.84 to 6.68 (P 2, decreased G/sub t/ to 5.3mS/cm2, hyperpolarized phi/sub a/ by 5mV (P + secretion

  1. Propionate alters ion transport by rabbit distal colon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horvath, P.J.; Weiser, M.M.; Duffey, M.E.

    1986-03-01

    The primary anions of the colon are short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) produced by intestinal microorganisms from endogenous secretions and dietary fiber. The effects of the SCFA propionate on ion transport by the epithelium of rabbit distal colon were studied on tissues stripped of underlying musculature and mounted in Ussing chambers. When tissues were bathed with NaCl Ringer's solutions at 37/sup 0/C (5% CO/sub 2/-21mM HCO/sub 3/, pH 7.4) replacement of 33mM Cl/sup -/ in both tissue baths by propionate reduced short-circuit current (Isc) from 86 to 35 ..mu..A/cm/sup 2/ and increased transepithelial conductance (G/sub t/) from 3.6 to 5.6mS/cm/sup 2/. Unidirectional /sup 14/C-propionate flux measurements revealed that this ion was secreted at a rate of 0.5..mu..Eq/cm/sup 2/hr. Intracellular measurements with potential and pH sensitive microelectrodes showed that propionate reduced intracellular pH (PH/sub i/) from 6.84 to 6.68 (P < 0.02), depolarized the apical membrane potential (phi/sub a/) by 4mV (P < 0.02) and decreased the membrane fractional resistance (f/sub R/) from .78 to .71 (P < 0.001). Addition of 0.1mM amiloride to the mucosal bath reversed Isc to -18..mu..A/cm/sup 2/, decreased G/sub t/ to 5.3mS/cm/sup 2/, hyperpolarized phi/sub a/ by 5mV (P < 0.05) and increased f/sub R/ to 0.85 (P < 0.001). Amiloride had no effect on pH/sub i/. These results show that propionate can be secreted by rabbit distal colon and that exposure to this SCFA causes cell acidification and electrophysiological changes consistent with H/sup +/ secretion.

  2. Flow Chamber System for the Statistical Evaluation of Bacterial Colonization on Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friederike Menzel

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Biofilm formation on materials leads to high costs in industrial processes, as well as in medical applications. This fact has stimulated interest in the development of new materials with improved surfaces to reduce bacterial colonization. Standardized tests relying on statistical evidence are indispensable to evaluate the quality and safety of these new materials. We describe here a flow chamber system for biofilm cultivation under controlled conditions with a total capacity for testing up to 32 samples in parallel. In order to quantify the surface colonization, bacterial cells were DAPI (4`,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole-stained and examined with epifluorescence microscopy. More than 100 images of each sample were automatically taken and the surface coverage was estimated using the free open source software g’mic, followed by a precise statistical evaluation. Overview images of all gathered pictures were generated to dissect the colonization characteristics of the selected model organism Escherichia coli W3310 on different materials (glass and implant steel. With our approach, differences in bacterial colonization on different materials can be quantified in a statistically validated manner. This reliable test procedure will support the design of improved materials for medical, industrial, and environmental (subaquatic or subaerial applications.

  3. Altered colonic function and microbiota profile in a mouse model of chronic depression

    OpenAIRE

    Park, A J; Collins, J.; BLENNERHASSETT, P. A.; Ghia, J E; Verdu, E. F.; Bercik, P; COLLINS, S. M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Depression often coexists with the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) which is characterized by alterations in gut function. There is emerging evidence that the microbial composition (microbiota) of the gut is altered in IBS, but the basis for this is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to determine whether the induction of chronic depression results in changes in the colonic function and in its microbial community, and to explore underlying mechanisms. Methods Bilateral olfac...

  4. Changes of Bacterial Community Structure in Copper Mine Tailings After Colonization of Reed (Phragmites communis)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yu-Qing; REN Guan-Ju; AN Shu-Qing; SUN Qing-Ye; LIU Chang-Hong; SHUANG Jing-Lei

    2008-01-01

    Soil samples were collected from both bare and vegetated mine tailings to study the changes in bacterial communities and soil chemical properties of copper mine tailings due to reed (Phragmites communis) colonization. The structures of bacterial communities were investigated using culture-independent 16S rRNA gene sequencing method. The bacterial diversity in the bare mine tailing was lower than that of the vegetated mine tailing. The former was dominated by sulfur metabolizing bacteria, whereas the latter was by nitrogen fixing bacteria. The bare mine tailing was acidic (pH = 3.78), whereas the vegetated mine tailing was near neutral (pH = 7.28). The contents of organic matter, total nitrogen, and ammonium acetate-extractable otassium in vegetated mine tailings were significantly higher than those in the bare mine tailings (P < 0.01), whereas available phosphorus and electrical conductivity were significantly lower than those in the bare mine tailings (P < 0.01). The results demonstrated that 16S rRNA gene sequencing could be successfully used to study the bacterial diversity in mine tailings. The colonization of the mine tailings by reed significantly changed the bacterial community and the chemical properties of tailings. The complex interactions between bacteria and plants deserve further investigation.

  5. Bacterial colonization of intravenous catheter materials in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilsdorf, J R; Wilson, K; Beals, T F

    1989-07-01

    Four different intravenous catheter materials, brands Teflon, Silastic, Vialon, and Tecoflex, were evaluated in vitro for bacterial adherence after 2 and 24 hours' incubation in trypticase soy broth and after 2 hours' incubation in nutrient-free phosphate buffer (pH 7.2). The organisms used were Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterobacter aerogenes, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus epidermidis. The significant differences in in vitro adherence of the different bacterial species to the various catheters were then evaluated in vivo by intravenous injection of a single bolus of 1 X 10(5) organisms via tail vein of rats with previously placed catheters in their superior venae cavae. There was no association between the in vitro bacterial adherence and the tendency of the in vivo catheters to become colonized. Results of scanning electron microscopy of clean catheters and those removed from the rats showed obvious differences in surface characteristics and in clot adhesion between the catheters. These characteristics did not correlate with bacterial adherence in vitro or colonization in vivo. It is concluded that laboratory studies of bacterial adherence to, physical characteristics of, and thrombogenicity of intravenous catheters do not necessarily translate into resistance to clinical catheter sepsis. PMID:2500724

  6. Evaluation of bacterial colonization in patients with the diagnosis of mycosis fungoides

    OpenAIRE

    Bengü Nisa Akay; Nehir Parlak; Hatice Şanlı; Alpay Azap

    2014-01-01

    Background and Design: Mycosis fungoides (MF) is the most common form of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL). Bacterial infections are a common complication of MF/Sezary syndrome (SS). Staphylococcus aureus is the most common causes of skin infections in patients with MF/SS. However, the role of infectious agents and their effects on the clinical course is controversial. In this study, we aimed to assess the prevalence of the colonization of bacterial pathogens among individuals with MF/SS in co...

  7. Helicobacter pylori HP0231 Influences Bacterial Virulence and Is Essential for Gastric Colonization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhong

    Full Text Available The Dsb protein family is responsible for introducing disulfide bonds into nascent proteins in prokaryotes, stabilizing the structure of many proteins. Helicobacter pylori HP0231 is a Dsb-like protein, shown to catalyze disulfide bond formation and to participate in redox homeostasis. Notably, many H. pylori virulence factors are stabilized by the formation of disulfide bonds. By employing H. pylori HP0231 deficient strains we analyzed the effect of lack of this bacterial protein on the functionality of virulence factors containing putative disulfide bonds. The lack of H. pylori HP0231 impaired CagA translocation into gastric epithelial cells and reduced VacA-induced cellular vacuolation. Moreover, H. pylori HP0231 deficient bacteria were not able to colonize the gastric mucosa of mice, probably due to compromised motility. Together, our data demonstrate an essential function for H. pylori HP0231 in gastric colonization and proper function of bacterial virulence factors related to gastric pathology.

  8. Evaluation of bacterial colonization in patients with the diagnosis of mycosis fungoides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bengü Nisa Akay

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Mycosis fungoides (MF is the most common form of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL. Bacterial infections are a common complication of MF/Sezary syndrome (SS. Staphylococcus aureus is the most common causes of skin infections in patients with MF/SS. However, the role of infectious agents and their effects on the clinical course is controversial. In this study, we aimed to assess the prevalence of the colonization of bacterial pathogens among individuals with MF/SS in comparison with control subjects. Materials and Methods: Sixty-six patients with MF/SS and 66 healthy control subjects were included in this study. The subjects were swabbed in the nose, throat and axilla and the samples were evaluated according to the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI criteria. Results: The mean age of the patients was 55.9±14.8 years (range: 21-84 years. Forty-eight patients were with ≤stage 2A, 18 were ≥stage 2B SS and MF. No statistically significant difference was observed in the frequency of pathogenic bacteria colonization in the nose and axilla between the two groups. However, in the throat it was statistically higher in MF/SS (p=0.001. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups in terms of S.aureus colonization. The frequency of pathogenic bacteria colonization in the throat cultures were significant (p=0.004 for patients with late stage disease compared to those with early stages, but this was not shown in axilla and nose cultures. Conclusion: In this study, bacterial colonization in the throat and nasal carriage of S.aureus were found to be higher in patients with MF/SS. Further studies on the benefits of controlling this problem, possibly with simple and inexpensive methods that might ameliorates the symptoms such as itching, scaling and erythema are needed.

  9. Bacterial colonization of host cells in the absence of cholesterol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacey D Gilk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Reports implicating important roles for cholesterol and cholesterol-rich lipid rafts in host-pathogen interactions have largely employed sterol sequestering agents and biosynthesis inhibitors. Because the pleiotropic effects of these compounds can complicate experimental interpretation, we developed a new model system to investigate cholesterol requirements in pathogen infection utilizing DHCR24(-/- mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs. DHCR24(-/- MEFs lack the Δ24 sterol reductase required for the final enzymatic step in cholesterol biosynthesis, and consequently accumulate desmosterol into cellular membranes. Defective lipid raft function by DHCR24(-/- MEFs adapted to growth in cholesterol-free medium was confirmed by showing deficient uptake of cholera-toxin B and impaired signaling by epidermal growth factor. Infection in the absence of cholesterol was then investigated for three intracellular bacterial pathogens: Coxiella burnetii, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, and Chlamydia trachomatis. Invasion by S. Typhimurium and C. trachomatis was unaltered in DHCR24(-/- MEFs. In contrast, C. burnetii entry was significantly decreased in -cholesterol MEFs, and also in +cholesterol MEFs when lipid raft-associated α(Vβ(3 integrin was blocked, suggesting a role for lipid rafts in C. burnetii uptake. Once internalized, all three pathogens established their respective vacuolar niches and replicated normally. However, the C. burnetii-occupied vacuole within DHCR24(-/- MEFs lacked the CD63-positive material and multilamellar membranes typical of vacuoles formed in wild type cells, indicating cholesterol functions in trafficking of multivesicular bodies to the pathogen vacuole. These data demonstrate that cholesterol is not essential for invasion and intracellular replication by S. Typhimurium and C. trachomatis, but plays a role in C. burnetii-host cell interactions.

  10. Microbial colonization of contact lenses, tear film deposition, bacterial adhesion and disinfection

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Lívia

    2008-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento em Engenharia Química e Biológica (ramo de conhecimento em Tecnologia Microbiana) Biomedical devices are susceptible of microbial contamination. Adhering bacteria to contact lenses (CLs) may induce ocular infections, being microbial keratitis (MK) the most sight threatening. The present Thesis investigates the role of surface properties and conditioning film on microbial colonization, bacterial adhesion, detachment, viability and disinfection of silicone hy...

  11. Variation in local carrying capacity and the individual fate of bacterial colonizers in the phyllosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Remus-Emsermann, Mitja N P; Tecon, Robin; Kowalchuk, George A.; Leveau, Johan H. J.

    2012-01-01

    Using a phyllosphere model system, we demonstrated that the term ‘carrying capacity', as it is commonly used in microbial ecology, needs to be understood as the sum of many ‘local carrying capacities' in order to better explain and predict the course and outcome of bacterial colonization of an environment. Using a green fluorescent protein-based bioreporter system for the quantification of reproductive success (RS) in individual Erwinia herbicola cells, we were able to reconstruct the contrib...

  12. Variation in local carrying capacity and the individual fate of bacterial colonizers in the phyllosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remus-Emsermann, Mitja N P; Tecon, Robin; Kowalchuk, George A; Leveau, Johan H J

    2012-04-01

    Using a phyllosphere model system, we demonstrated that the term 'carrying capacity', as it is commonly used in microbial ecology, needs to be understood as the sum of many 'local carrying capacities' in order to better explain and predict the course and outcome of bacterial colonization of an environment. Using a green fluorescent protein-based bioreporter system for the quantification of reproductive success (RS) in individual Erwinia herbicola cells, we were able to reconstruct the contribution of individual immigrants to bacterial population sizes on leaves. Our analysis revealed that plant foliage represents to bacteria an environment where individual fate is determined by the local carrying capacity of the site where an immigrant cell lands. With increasing inoculation densities, the RS of most immigrants declined, suggesting that local carrying capacity under the tested conditions was linked to local nutrient availability. Fitting the observed experimental data to an adapted model of phyllosphere colonization indicated that there might exist three types of sites on leaves, which differ in their frequency of occurrence and local carrying capacity. Specifically, our data were consistent with a leaf environment that is characterized by few sites where individual immigrants can produce high numbers of offspring, whereas the remainder of the leaf offered an equal number of sites with low and medium RS. Our findings contribute to a bottom-up understanding of bacterial colonization of leaf surfaces, which includes a quantifiable role of chance in the experience at the individual level and in the outcome at the population level. PMID:22258099

  13. Insights into bacterial colonization of intensive care patients' skin: the effect of chlorhexidine daily bathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassir, N; Papazian, L; Fournier, P-E; Raoult, D; La Scola, B

    2015-05-01

    Skin is a major reservoir of bacterial pathogens in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. The aim of this study was to assess the skin bacterial richness and diversity in ICU patients and the effect of CHG daily bathing on skin microbiota. Twenty ICU patients were included during an interventional period with CHG daily bathing (n = 10) and a control period (n = 10). At day seven of hospitalization, eight skin swab samples (nares, axillary vaults, inguinal creases, manubrium and back) were taken from each patient. The bacterial identification was performed by microbial culturomics. We used the Shannon index to compare the diversity. We obtained 5,000 colonies that yielded 61 bacterial species (9.15 ± 3.7 per patient), including 15 (24.5 %) that had never been cultured from non-pathological human skin before, and three (4.9 %) that had never been cultured from human samples before. Notably, Gram-negative bacteria were isolated from all sites. In the water-and-soap group, there was a higher risk of colonization with Gram-negative bacteria (OR = 6.05, 95 % CI [1.67-21.90]; P = 0.006). In the CHG group, we observed more patients colonized by sporulating bacteria (9/10 vs. 3/10; P = 0.019) with a reduced skin bacterial richness (P = 0.004) and lower diversity (0.37, 95 % CI [0.33; 0.42] vs. 0.50, 95 % CI [0.48; 0.52]). Gram-negative bacteria are frequent and disseminated components of the transient skin flora in ICU patients. CHG daily bathing is associated with a reduction in Gram-negative bacteria colonization together with substantial skin microbiota shifts. PMID:25604707

  14. Influence of prenatal corticosteroids on bacterial colonization in the newborn rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffrin, E J; Carter, E A; Walker, W A; Frieberg, E; Benjamin, J; Israel, E J

    1993-10-01

    The interactions between bacteria and the host's intestinal barrier appear to be important regulators of bacterial colonization. In this study we investigated the effect of prenatal corticosteroids, known to accelerate the intestinal maturation of newborn rats, on bacterial colonization in the rat pup. Pregnant rats were treated with either cortisone acetate or normal saline on days 18-21 of gestation and were allowed to deliver spontaneously. The pups, after normal delivery, were sacrificed at different times during the first 10 days of life. The entire small intestine was removed, and each lumen was flushed to exclude nonadherent, transient organisms and homogenized. Tenfold dilutions were plated on horse-blood agar (total bacteria) and MacConkey's medium (gram-negatives). Quantitation and bacterial typification was determined after 24 h of incubation at 37 degrees C. Total bacteria and gram-negatives found in association with the mucosa were significantly lower in pups prenatally treated with steroids. These changes were not related to any changes in motility or intraluminal digestion. This suggests that the developmental condition of the host's intestinal barrier may be an important regulator of the bacterial microenvironment of the newborn small intestinal mucosa. PMID:8271126

  15. Molecular characterization of total and metabolically active bacterial communities of "white colonizations" in the Altamira Cave, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portillo, M Carmen; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo; Gonzalez, Juan M

    2009-01-01

    Caves with paleolithic paintings are influenced by bacterial development. Altamira Cave (Spain) contains some of the most famous paintings from the Paleolithic era. An assessment of the composition of bacterial communities that have colonized this cave represents a first step in understanding and potentially controlling their proliferation. In this study, areas showing colonization with uncolored microorganisms, referred to as "white colonizations", were analyzed. Microorganisms present in these colonizations were studied using DNA analysis, and those showing significant metabolic activity were detected in RNA-based RNA analysis. Bacterial community fingerprints were obtained both from DNA and RNA analyses, indicating differences between the microorganisms present and metabolically active in these white colonizations. Metabolically active microorganisms represented only a fraction of the total bacterial community present in the colonizations. 16S rRNA gene libraries were used to identify the major representative members of the studied communities. Proteobacteria constituted the most frequently found division both among metabolically active microorganisms (from RNA-based analysis) and those present in the community (from DNA analysis). Results suggest the existence of a huge variety of taxa in white colonizations of the Altamira Cave which represent a potential risk for the conservation of the cave and its paintings. PMID:18984039

  16. Neonatal Bacterial Colonization Predispose to Lower Respiratory Infections in Early Childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vissing, Nadja Hawwa

    2014-01-01

    Lower respiratory infections (LRI) in childhood are common and account for considerable morbidity and health care utilization. The frequency of LRI varies significantly between otherwise healthy children, but extrinsic and intrinsic triggers of such variation are poorly understood. Traditionally...... neonatal airway colonization and risk of the LRI in a validated study cohort, and whether a possible association could be reflected in the early immune response to airway pathogens. In study I we aimed to ascertain the quality of information on child’s health, including asthma, allergy, eczema, respiratory...... of concurrent or later asthma. This suggests a role of pathogenic bacterial colonization of the airways in neonates for subsequent susceptibly to LRI. In Study III we studied a possible association with the immune response to pathogenic bacteria and incidence of LRI during the first 3 years of life. We assessed...

  17. A case of asymptomatic fungal and bacterial colonization of an intragastric balloon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Halil Coskun; Suleyman Bozkurt

    2009-01-01

    Intragastric balloon therapy, as a part of a multidisciplinary weight management program, is an effective short-term intervention for weight loss. Although the insertion procedure is easy and generally well tolerated by patients, a few complications can occur. We report here a heavy smoker with intragastric balloon insertion complicated by colonization with opportunistic organisms. The 27-year-old female, body mass index 35.5 kg/m2, had a BioEnterics. Intragastric Balloon inserted under conscious sedation without any perioperative complications. Six months later, when the standard removal time arrived, the balloon was seen to be covered with a necrotic white-gray material. Microbiological examination revealed Enterobacter cloacae and Candida species yeast colonies. We recommend that asymptomatic fungal and/or bacterial colonization should be considered among the complications of the intragastric balloon procedure, despite its rarity.

  18. Bacterial colonization of metallic surfaces exposed in marine environment. Use of bacterial lipids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Addressing fouling and more particularly biofouling phenomena occurring notably on structures in marine environment, this research thesis first describes the fouling phenomenon (components, sequences of biofouling development, bio-film chemical composition). The author reports the study of the composition of the biological veil (microbiological methods, presentation of the different components), addresses the various types of lipids (bacterial markers and others). Then, after a presentation of the experimental equipment and methods (test cells, sample preparation, gas phase chromatography, hydrogenation and bromination, mass spectrometry), the author discusses the influence of different parameters such as the substrate type, speed, season, chlorination, and correlation with thermal transfer

  19. Urinary pH and urea concentration correlate to the bacterial colonization rate in gastric, colonic, ileal and myoperitoneal bladder augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauvetz, R W; Monda, J M; Kramer, S A; Husmann, D A

    1995-08-01

    We investigated how various types of augmentation cystoplasty alter the native bacteriostatic properties of urine, particularly urinary urea and pH, in the Sprague-Dawley rat. The augmentation cystoplasties studied included 1 cm.2 and 2 cm.2 patches of colon, ileum and stomach as well as myoperitoneal bladder flaps. Augmentations in order of decreasing incidence of bacteriuria and urinary pH are 2 cm.2 ileal greater than 1 cm.2 ileal greater than 2 cm.2 colonic greater than 1 cm.2 colonic greater than myoperitoneal greater than cystotomy alone greater than 1 cm.2 gastric greater than 2 cm.2 gastric. Urinary urea concentrations were similar between cystotomy alone, and myoperitoneal and gastric augments. In contrast, all colonic and ileal augments had significantly lower urea concentrations compared to the aforementioned groups. Our findings suggest that the type and size of augmentation directly affect urinary pH and urea nitrogen concentration, and the incidence of bacteriuria.

  20. Bacterial colonization of enamel in situ investigated using fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ahmad, Ali; Follo, Marie; Selzer, Ann-Carina; Hellwig, Elmar; Hannig, Matthias; Hannig, Christian

    2009-10-01

    Oral biofilms are one of the greatest challenges in dental research. The present study aimed to investigate initial bacterial colonization of enamel surfaces in situ using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) over a 12 h period. For this purpose, bovine enamel slabs were fixed on buccal sites of individual splints worn by six subjects for 2, 6 and 12 h to allow biofilm formation. Specimens were processed for FISH and evaluated with confocal laser-scanning microscopy, using probes for eubacteria, Streptococcus species, Veillonella species, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Actinomyces naeslundii. The number of adherent bacteria increased with time and all tested bacterial species were detected in the biofilm formed in situ. The general percentage composition of the eubacteria did not change over the investigated period, but the number of streptococci, the most frequently detected species, increased significantly with time (2 h: 17.7+/-13.8 %; 6 h: 20.0+/-16.6 %; 12 h: 24.7+/-16.1 %). However, < or =1 % of the surface was covered with bacteria after 12 h of biofilm formation in situ. In conclusion, FISH is an appropriate method for quantifying initial biofilm formation in situ, and the proportion of streptococci increases during the first 12 h of bacterial adherence. PMID:19528150

  1. Nature of bacterial colonization influences transcription of mucin genes in mice during the first week of life

    OpenAIRE

    Bergström Anders; Kristensen Matilde B; Bahl Martin I; Metzdorff Stine B; Fink Lisbeth N; Frøkiær Hanne; Licht Tine R

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Postnatal regulation of the small intestinal mucus layer is potentially important in the development of adult gut functionality. We hypothesized that the nature of bacterial colonization affects mucus gene regulation in early life. We thus analyzed the influence of the presence of a conventional microbiota as well as two selected monocolonizing bacterial strains on the transcription of murine genes involved in mucus layer development during the first week of life. Mouse pu...

  2. Bacterial Colonization and the Expression of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase in Murine Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Eric; Reichner, Jonathan; Robinson Bostom, Leslie; Mastrofrancesco, Balduino; Henry, William; Albina, Jorge

    2002-01-01

    The expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in two different murine wound models was investigated. Animals were subjected to either full-thickness linear skin incision with subcutaneous implantation of sterile polyvinyl alcohol sponges, or to 1.5 × 1.5-cm dorsal skin excision. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction detected iNOS mRNA in all cell samples retrieved from the sponges. Immunoblotting of lysates of inflammatory cells harvested from the sponges failed to detect iNOS protein, and immunohistochemistry of the incisional wound was mildly positive. Inflammatory cells of excisional wounds stained strongly positive for iNOS. Cutaneous wounds were found to be colonized with Staphylococcus aureus. The detection of iNOS in cells from sponges inoculated in vivo with heat-killed bacteria and the reduction of immunohistochemical signal for iNOS in excisional wounds of animals treated with antibiotics support a role of bacteria in the induction of iNOS in wounds. The expression of iNOS in excisional wounds requires interferon-γ and functional lymphocytes because interferon-γ knockout and SCID-Beige mice exhibited attenuated iNOS staining in excisional wounds. The expression of iNOS in the inflammatory cells of murine wounds is a response to bacterial colonization and not part of the normal repair process elicited by sterile tissue injury. PMID:12466130

  3. Reduction in diversity of the colonic mucosa associated bacterial microflora in patients with active inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ott, S.J.; Musfeldt, M; Wenderoth, D F; Hampe, J; Brant, O; Fölsch, U R; Timmis, K N; Schreiber, S

    2004-01-01

    Background and aims: The intestinal bacterial microflora plays an important role in the aetiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). As most of the colonic bacteria cannot be identified by culture techniques, genomic technology can be used for analysis of the composition of the microflora.

  4. Self-assembled poly(ethylene glycol)-co-acrylic acid microgels to inhibit bacterial colonization of synthetic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qichen; Uzunoglu, Emel; Wu, Yong; Libera, Matthew

    2012-05-01

    We explored the use of self-assembled microgels to inhibit the bacterial colonization of synthetic surfaces both by modulating surface cell adhesiveness at length scales comparable to bacterial dimensions (∼1 μm) and by locally storing/releasing an antimicrobial. Poly(ethylene glycol) [PEG] and poly(ethylene glycol)-co-acrylic acid [PEG-AA] microgels were synthesized by suspension photopolymerization. Consistent with macroscopic gels, a pH dependence of both zeta potential and hydrodynamic diameter was observed in AA-containing microgels but not in pure PEG microgels. The microgels were electrostatically deposited onto poly(l-lysine) (PLL) primed silicon to form submonolayer surface coatings. The microgel surface density could be controlled via the deposition time and the microgel concentration in the parent suspension. In addition to their intrinsic antifouling properties, after deposition, the microgels could be loaded with a cationic antimicrobial peptide (L5) because of favorable electrostatic interactions. Loading was significantly higher in PEG-AA microgels than in pure PEG microgels. The modification of PLL-primed Si by unloaded PEG-AA microgels reduced the short-term (6 h) S. epidermidis surface colonization by a factor of 2, and the degree of inhibition increased when the average spacing between microgels was reduced. Postdeposition L5 peptide loading into microgels further reduced bacterial colonization to the extent that, after 10 h of S. epidermidis culture in tryptic soy broth, the colonization of L5-loaded PEG-AA microgel-modified Si was comparable to the very small level of colonization observed on macroscopic PEG gel controls. The fact that these microgels can be deposited by a nonline-of-sight self-assembly process and hinder bacterial colonization opens the possibility of modifying the surfaces of topographically complex biomedical devices and reduces the rate of biomaterial-associated infection. PMID:22519439

  5. Bacterial colonization of the ovarian bursa in dogs with clinically suspected pyometra and in controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, Alejandro; Boyen, Filip; Tas, Olaf; Kitshoff, Adriaan; Polis, Ingeborgh; Van Goethem, Bart; de Rooster, Hilde

    2014-10-15

    Septic peritonitis occurs relatively commonly in dogs. Secondary septic peritonitis is usually associated with perforation of intestines or infected viscera, such as the uterus in pyometra cases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bacterial flora in the ovarian bursae of intact bitches as a potential source of contamination. One hundred forty dogs, clinically suspected of pyometra, were prospectively enrolled. The control group consisted of 26 dogs that underwent elective ovariohysterectomies and 18 dogs with mammary gland tumors that were neutered at the time of mastectomy. Bacteriology samples were taken aseptically at the time of surgery from the bursae and the uterus in all dogs. Twenty-two dogs that were clinically suspected of pyometra had sterile uterine content ("mucometra" cases); the remaining 118 had positive uterine cultures ("pyometra" cases) and septic peritoneal fluid was present in 10% of these cases. Of the 118 pyometra cases, 9 had unilateral and 15 had bilateral bacterial colonization of their ovarian bursae. However, the bacteria from the ovarian bursa were similar to those recovered from the uterine pus in only half of the cases. Furthermore, positive bursae were also seen in one mucometra dog (unilateral) and in four control dogs (two unilateral and two bilateral). The data illustrate that the canine ovarian bursa can harbor bacteria. The biological importance of these isolations remains unclear. PMID:25127745

  6. Bacterial colonization of the ovarian bursa in dogs with clinically suspected pyometra and in controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, Alejandro; Boyen, Filip; Tas, Olaf; Kitshoff, Adriaan; Polis, Ingeborgh; Van Goethem, Bart; de Rooster, Hilde

    2014-10-15

    Septic peritonitis occurs relatively commonly in dogs. Secondary septic peritonitis is usually associated with perforation of intestines or infected viscera, such as the uterus in pyometra cases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bacterial flora in the ovarian bursae of intact bitches as a potential source of contamination. One hundred forty dogs, clinically suspected of pyometra, were prospectively enrolled. The control group consisted of 26 dogs that underwent elective ovariohysterectomies and 18 dogs with mammary gland tumors that were neutered at the time of mastectomy. Bacteriology samples were taken aseptically at the time of surgery from the bursae and the uterus in all dogs. Twenty-two dogs that were clinically suspected of pyometra had sterile uterine content ("mucometra" cases); the remaining 118 had positive uterine cultures ("pyometra" cases) and septic peritoneal fluid was present in 10% of these cases. Of the 118 pyometra cases, 9 had unilateral and 15 had bilateral bacterial colonization of their ovarian bursae. However, the bacteria from the ovarian bursa were similar to those recovered from the uterine pus in only half of the cases. Furthermore, positive bursae were also seen in one mucometra dog (unilateral) and in four control dogs (two unilateral and two bilateral). The data illustrate that the canine ovarian bursa can harbor bacteria. The biological importance of these isolations remains unclear.

  7. Altered Bacterial Profiles in Saliva from Adults with Caries Lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belstrøm, D; Fiehn, N-E; Nielsen, C H;

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to learn whether presence of caries in an adult population was associated with a salivary bacterial profile different from that of individuals without untreated caries. Stimulated saliva samples from 621 participants of the Danish Health Examination Survey were analyzed...

  8. Experimental sulfate amendment alters peatland bacterial community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickman, R J S; Fulthorpe, R R; Coleman Wasik, J K; Engstrom, D R; Mitchell, C P J

    2016-10-01

    As part of a long-term, peatland-scale sulfate addition experiment, the impact of varying sulfate deposition on bacterial community responses was assessed using 16S tag encoded pyrosequencing. In three separate areas of the peatland, sulfate manipulations included an eight year quadrupling of atmospheric sulfate deposition (experimental), a 3-year recovery to background deposition following 5years of elevated deposition (recovery), and a control area. Peat concentrations of methylmercury (MeHg), a bioaccumulative neurotoxin, were measured, the production of which is attributable to a growing list of microorganisms, including many sulfate-reducing Deltaproteobacteria. The total bacterial and Deltaproteobacterial community structures in the experimental treatment differed significantly from those in the control and recovery treatments that were either indistinguishable or very similar to one another. Notably, the relatively rapid return (within three years) of bacterial community structure in the recovery treatment to a state similar to the control, demonstrates significant resilience of the peatland bacterial community to changes in atmospheric sulfate deposition. Changes in MeHg accumulation between sulfate treatments correlated with changes in the Deltaproteobacterial community, suggesting that sulfate may affect MeHg production through changes in the community structure of this group. PMID:27267720

  9. Bacterial Colonization of Cod (Gadus morhua L.) and Halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus) Eggs in Marine Aquaculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Geir Høvik; Olafsen, Jan A.

    1989-01-01

    Aquaculture has brought about increased interest in mass production of marine fish larvae. Problems such as poor egg quality and mass mortality of fish larvae have been prevalent. The intensive incubation techniques that often result in bacterial overgrowth on fish eggs could affect the commensal relationship between the indigenous microflora and opportunistic pathogens and subsequently hamper egg development, hatching, larval health, and ongrowth. Little information about the adherent microflora on fish eggs is available, and the present study was undertaken to describe the microbial ecology during egg development and hatching of two fish species of potential commercial importance in marine aquaculture. Attachment and development of the bacterial flora on cod (Gadus morhua L.) eggs from fertilization until hatching was studied by scanning electron microscopy. The adherent microflora on cod (G. morhua L.) and halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus) eggs during incubation was characterized and grouped by cluster analysis. Marked bacterial growth could be demonstrated 2 h after fertilization, and at hatching eggs were heavily overgrown. Members of the genera Pseudomonas, Alteromonas, Aeromonas, and Flavobacterium were found to dominate on the surface of both cod and halibut eggs. The filamentous bacterium Leucothrix mucor was found on eggs from both species. While growth of L. mucor on halibut eggs was sparse, cod eggs with a hairy appearance due to overgrowth by this bacterium close to hatching were frequently observed. Vibrio fischeri could be detected on cod eggs only, and pathogenic vibrios were not detected. Members of the genera Moraxella and Alcaligenes were found only on halibut eggs. Caulobacter and Seliberia spp. were observed attached to eggs dissected from cod ovaries under sterile conditions, indicating the presence of these bacteria in ovaries before spawning. Adherent strains did not demonstrate antibiotic resistance above a normal level. Attempts to

  10. Nitrogen deposition alters soil chemical properties and bacterial communities in the Inner Mongolia grassland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ximei Zhang; Xingguo Han

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen deposition has dramatically altered biodiversity and ecosystem functioning on the earth; however,its effects on soil bacterial community and the underlying mechanisms of these effects have not been thoroughly examined.Changes in ecosystems caused by nitrogen deposition have traditionally been attributed to increased nitrogen content.In fact,nitrogen deposition not only leads to increased soil total N content,but also changes in the NH4+-N content,NO3--N content and pH,as well as changes in the heterogeneity of the four indexes.The soil indexes for these four factors,their heterogeneity and even the plant community might be routes through which nitrogen deposition alters the bacterial community.Here,we describe a 6-year nitrogen addition experiment conducted in a typical steppe ecosystem to investigate the ecological mechanism by which nitrogen deposition alters bacterial abundance,diversity and composition.We found that various characteristics of the bacterial community were explained by different environmental factors.Nitrogen deposition decreased bacterial abundance that is positively related to soil pH value.In addition,nitrogen addition decreased bacterial diversity,which is negatively related to soil total N content and positively related to soil NO3--N heterogeneity.Finally,nitrogen.addition altered bacterial composition that is significantly related to soil NH4+-N content.Although nitrogen deposition significantly altered plant biomass,diversity and composition,these characteristics of plant community did not have a significant impact on processes of nitrogen deposition that led to alterations in bacterial abundance,diversity and composition.Therefore,more sensitive molecular technologies should be adopted to detect the subtle shifts of microbial community structure induced by the changes of plant community upon nitrogen deposition.

  11. Histologic and ultrastructural alterations of a xenografted human colon adenocarcinoma after treatment with titanocene dichloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köpf-Maier, P

    1988-01-01

    The influence of the antitumor agent titanocene dichloride on the morphologic appearance of a heterotransplanted human colon adenocarcinoma was investigated. The first alterations in tumor cells manifested 12 h after administration of a single dose (40 mg/kg) and consisted of nuclear changes, such as chromatin condensation, enlargement of the nuclear envelope, structural changes of the nucleoli, and formation of segmented nuclei 12 h later; bundles of microfilaments, lipid droplets and inclusion bodies, often containing cellular debris, occurred in the cytoplasm. Intracytoplasmic virus particles of type A were detectable. They were obviously extruded into the extracellular space by a budding process and became extracellular virus particles of type C. Within 24 h after treatment, the mitotic index decreased from 2.5% to 0.3%. Whereas after administration of a single dose, recovery phenomena took place between 2 and 4 days, the severe destruction induced by 3-fold doses of titanocene dichloride (3 X 30 mg/kg), was apparently not reversible. These results confirm the tumor-inhibiting potency of titanocene dichloride against human colon adenocarcinoma and underline the discriminatory power of morphologic studies in the preclinical evaluation of cytostatic drugs against heterotransplanted human tumors. PMID:3384842

  12. Insight into alteration of gut microbiota in Clostridium difficile infection and asymptomatic C. difficile colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lihua; Dong, Danfeng; Jiang, Cen; Li, Zhen; Wang, Xuefeng; Peng, Yibing

    2015-08-01

    Clostridium difficile is well recognized as the common pathogen of nosocomial diarrhea, meanwhile, asymptomatic colonization with C. difficile in part of the population has also drawn public attention. Although gut microbiota is known to play an important role in the pathogenesis of C. difficile infection (CDI), whether there is any alteration of gut microbial composition in asymptomatic C. difficile carriers hasn't been clearly described. The purpose of this study was to explore the differences in gut microbiome among CDI patients, asymptomatic C. difficile carriers and healthy individuals. We performed fecal microbiota analysis on the samples of eight CDI patients, eight asymptomatic C. difficile carriers and nine healthy subjects using 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. CDI patients and asymptomatic carriers showed reduced microbial richness and diversity compared with healthy subjects, accompanied with a paucity of phylum Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes as well as an overabundance of Proteobacteria. Some normally commensal bacteria, especially butyrate producers, were significantly depleted in CDI patients and asymptomatic carriers. Furthermore, the differences observed in microbial community structure between CDI patients and asymptomatic carriers suggested that the gut microbiota may be a potential factor of disease state for CDI. Our study demonstrates the characterization and diversity of gut microbiota in CDI and asymptomatic C. difficile colonization, which will provide new ideas for surveillance of the disease state and development of microbiota-targeted agents for CDI prevention and treatment.

  13. Entamoeba histolytica contains an occludin-like protein that can alter colonic epithelial barrier function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goplen, Michael; Lejeune, Manigandan; Cornick, Steve; Moreau, France; Chadee, Kris

    2013-01-01

    The exact mechanism by which Entamoeba histolytica disrupts the human colonic epithelium and invades the mucosa has yet to be clearly elucidated. E. histolytica produces a diverse array of putative virulent factors such as glycosidase, cysteine proteinases and amebapore that can modulate and/or disrupt epithelial barrier functions. However, it is currently thought that E. histolytica produces numerous other molecules and strategies to disrupt colonic mucosal defenses. In this study, we document a putative mechanism whereby the parasite alters the integrity of human epithelium by expressing a cognate tight junction protein of the host. We detected this protein as "occludin-like" as revealed by immunoblotting and immunoprecipitation studies and visualization by confocal microscopy using antibodies highly specific for human occludin. We propose that E. histolytica occludin-like protein might displace mucosal epithelial occludin-occludin tight junction interactions resulting in epithelial disruption analogous to sub mucosal human dendritic cells sampling luminal contents. These results indicate that E. histolytica occludin is a putative virulent component that can play a role in the pathogenesis of intestinal amebiasis.

  14. Effects of easy-to-perform procedures to reduce bacterial colonization with Streptococcus mutans and Staphylococcus aureus on toothbrushes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hage, Annina; Schneider, Katja; Schlösser, Karolin; Zimmermann, Ortrud; Hornecker, Else; Mausberg, Rainer F.; Frickmann, Hagen; Groß, Uwe; Ziebolz, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that dental caries and periodontitis are the consequence of bacterial colonization and biofilm formation on the enamel surface. The continuous presence of bacterial biofilms on the tooth surface results in demineralization of the tooth enamel and induces an inflammatory reaction of the surrounding gums (gingivitis). The retention and survival of microorganisms on toothbrushes pose a threat of recontamination especially for certain patients at risk for systemic infections originating from the oral cavity, e.g., after T-cell depleted bone marrow transplantation. Thus, the effects of different decolonization schemes on bacterial colonization of toothbrushes were analyzed, in order to demonstrate their applicability to reduce the likelihood of (auto-)reinfections. Toothbrushes were intentionally contaminated with standardized suspensions of Streptococcus mutans or Staphylococcus aureus. Afterwards, the toothbrushes were exposed to rinsing under distilled water, rinsing and drying for 24 h, 0.2% chlorhexidine-based decolonization, or ultraviolet (UV) radiation. The remaining colony forming units were compared with freshly contaminated positive controls. Each experiment was nine-fold repeated. Bi-factorial variance analysis was performed; significance was accepted at P < 0.05. All tested procedures led to a significant reduction of bacteral colonization irrespective of the toothbrush model, the brush head type, or the acitivity state. Chlorhexidine-based decolonization was shown to be superior to rinsing and slightly superior to rinsing and drying for 24 h, while UV radiation was similarly effective as chlorhexidine. UV radiation was slightly less prone to species-dependent limitations of its decolonizing effects by bristle thickness of toothbrushes than chlorhexidin. Reduction of bacterial colonization of toothbrushes might reduce the risk of maintaining bacterial infections of the upper respiratory tract. Accordingly, respective procedures are

  15. Acidic Conditions in the NHE2-/- Mouse Intestine Result in an Altered Mucosa-Associated Bacterial Population with Changes in Mucus Oligosaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melinda A. Engevik

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The mechanisms bacteria use to proliferate and alter the normal bacterial composition remain unknown. The ability to link changes in the intestinal micro-environment, such as ion composition and pH, to bacterial proliferation is clinically advantageous for diseases that involve an altered gut microbiota, such as Inflammatory Bowel Disease, obesity and diabetes. In human and mouse intestine, the apical Na+/H+ exchangers NHE2 and NHE3 affect luminal Na+, water, and pH. Loss of NHE2 results in acidic luminal pH. Since acid resistance systems in gram-positive bacteria are well documented, we hypothesize that gram-positive bacteria would increase in representation in the acidic NHE2-/- intestine. Methods: Intestinal ion composition was measured by fame photometry and chloridometry and pH measured electrochemically. DNA extracted from intestinal flushes or from mucosal scrapings was analyzed by qRT-PCR to examine luminal and mucosa-associated bacterial populations. Epithelial mucus oligosaccharide patterns were examined by histology with FIT-C labeled lectins. Results: Although total luminal and mucosa-associated bacteria were unchanged in NHE2-/- intestine, gram-positive bacterial phyla were increased in the mucosa-associated bacterial population in a region-specific manner. The genera Clostridium and Lactobacillus were increased in the cecum and colon which corresponded to changes in NHE2-/- mucus oligosaccharide composition of mannose, N-acetyglucosamine, N-acetygalactosamine and galactose. Conclusions: Together these data indicate that changes in ion transport induce region-specific bacterial changes, which alter host mucus oligosaccharide patterns. These host-bacterial interactions provide a possible mechanism of niche-development and shed insight on how certain groups proliferate in changing environments and maintain their proliferation by altering the host.

  16. Increased Risk of Pneumonia and Bronchiolitis after Bacterial Colonization of the Airways as Neonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vissing, Nadja Hawwa; Chawes, Bo Lk; Bisgaard, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: The frequency of pneumonia and bronchiolitis exhibits considerable variation in otherwise healthy children, and suspected risk factors explain only a minor proportion of the variation. We hypothesized that alterations in the airway microbiome in early life may be associated with suscep......Rationale: The frequency of pneumonia and bronchiolitis exhibits considerable variation in otherwise healthy children, and suspected risk factors explain only a minor proportion of the variation. We hypothesized that alterations in the airway microbiome in early life may be associated...... with susceptibility to pneumonia and bronchiolitis in young children. Objectives: To investigate the relation between neonatal airway colonization and pneumonia and bronchiolitis during the first three years of life. Methods: Participants comprised children of the COPSAC2000 cohort; a prospective birth cohort study...... of 411 children born to asthmatic mothers. Aspirates from the hypopharynx at age four weeks were cultured for S.pneumoniae, H.influenzae, M.catarrhalis, and S.aureus. Clinical information on pneumonia and bronchiolitis within the first three years of life was prospectively collected by the research...

  17. Visceral hypersensitivity and altered colonic motility after subsidence of inflammation in a rat model of colitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun-Ho La; Tae-Wan Kim; Tae-Sik Sung; Jeoung-Woo Kang; Kyun-Ju Kim; Il-Suk Yang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional bowel disorder characterized by visceral hypersensitivity and altered bowel motility. There is increasing evidence suggesting the role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of IBS, which addresses the possibility that formerly established rat model of colitis could be used as an TBS model after the inflammation subsided.METHODS: Colitis was induced by intracolonic instillation of 4 % acetic acid in male Sprague-Dawley rats. The extent of inflammation was assessed by histological examination and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity assay. After subsidence of colitis, the rats were subjected to rectal distension and restraint stress, then the abdominal withdrawal reflex and the number of stress-induced fecal output were measured,respectively.RESULTS: At 2 days post-induction of colitis, the colon showed characteristic inflammatory changes in histology and 8-fold increase in MPO activity. At 7 days post-induction of colitis, the histological features and MPO activity returned to normal. The rats at 7 days post-induction of colitis showed hypersensitive response to rectal distension without an accompaning change in rectal compliance, and defecated more stools than control animals when under stress.CONCLUSION: These results concur largely with the characteristic features of IBS, visceral hypersensitivity and altered defecation pattern in the absence of detectable disease, suggesting that this animal model is a methodologically convenient and useful model for studying a subset of IBS.

  18. Colonic transit time relates to bacterial metabolism and mucosal turnover in the human gut

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roager, Henrik Munch; Hansen, Lea Benedicte Skov; Bahl, Martin Iain;

    Little is known about how colonic transit time relates to human colonic metabolism, and its importance for host health, although stool consistency, a proxy for colonic transit time, has recently been negatively associated with gut microbial richness. To address the relationships between colonic...... transit time and the gut microbial composition and metabolism, we assessed the colonic transit time of 98 subjects using radiopaque markers, and profiled their gut microbiota by16S rRNA gene sequencingand their urine metabolome by ultra performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Based...... on correlation analyses,we show that colonic transit time is associated with overall gutmicrobial composition, diversity and metabolism. A relatively prolonged colonic transit time associates with high microbial species richness and a shift in colonic metabolismfrom carbohydrate fermentation to protein...

  19. Colonic transit time is related to bacterial metabolism and mucosal turnover in the gut

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roager, Henrik Munch; Hansen, Lea Benedicte Skov; Bahl, Martin Iain;

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about how colonic transit time relates to human colonic metabolism and its importance for host health, although a firm stool consistency, a proxy for a long colonic transit time, has recently been positively associated with gut microbial richness. Here, we show that colonic transit...... time in humans, assessed using radio-opaque markers, is associated with overall gut microbial composition, diversity and metabolism. We find that a long colonic transit time associates with high microbial richness and is accompanied by a shift in colonic metabolism from carbohydrate fermentation...... to protein catabolism as reflected by higher urinary levels of potentially deleterious protein-derived metabolites. Additionally, shorter colonic transit time correlates with metabolites possibly reflecting increased renewal of the colonic mucosa. Together, this suggests that a high gut microbial richness...

  20. Altered Virome and Bacterial Microbiome in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Associated Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaco, Cynthia L; Gootenberg, David B; Zhao, Guoyan; Handley, Scott A; Ghebremichael, Musie S; Lim, Efrem S; Lankowski, Alex; Baldridge, Megan T; Wilen, Craig B; Flagg, Meaghan; Norman, Jason M; Keller, Brian C; Luévano, Jesús Mario; Wang, David; Boum, Yap; Martin, Jeffrey N; Hunt, Peter W; Bangsberg, David R; Siedner, Mark J; Kwon, Douglas S; Virgin, Herbert W

    2016-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is associated with increased intestinal translocation of microbial products and enteropathy as well as alterations in gut bacterial communities. However, whether the enteric virome contributes to this infection and resulting immunodeficiency remains unknown. We characterized the enteric virome and bacterial microbiome in a cohort of Ugandan patients, including HIV-uninfected or HIV-infected subjects and those either treated with anti-retroviral therapy (ART) or untreated. Low peripheral CD4 T cell counts were associated with an expansion of enteric adenovirus sequences and this increase was independent of ART treatment. Additionally, the enteric bacterial microbiome of patients with lower CD4 T counts exhibited reduced phylogenetic diversity and richness with specific bacteria showing differential abundance, including increases in Enterobacteriaceae, which have been associated with inflammation. Thus, immunodeficiency in progressive HIV infection is associated with alterations in the enteric virome and bacterial microbiome, which may contribute to AIDS-associated enteropathy and disease progression. PMID:26962942

  1. COLONIZATION OF VIGNA RADIATA ROOTS BY CHROMIUM RESISTANT BACTERIAL STRAINS OF OCHROBACTRUM INTERMEDIUM, BACILLUS CEREUS AND BREVIBA CTERIUM SP.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MUHAMMAD Faisal; SHAHIDA Hasnain

    2005-01-01

    The present study deals with colonization potential of plant growth promoting bacterial strains ( Ochrobactrum intermedium, Bacillus cereus and Brevibacterium sp. ) on Vigna radiata roots. The roots were heavily colonized with O. intermedium and B. cereus as compared to Brevibacterium sp. O. intermedium mainly colonized rhizoplane while B. cereus occurred both on the rhizoplane and near root zone. O. intermedium and B. cereus were found to be present both on the rhizoplane and near root zone, while Brevibacterium only in the rhizosphere in the form of groups. The cells of B. cereus were found more in the sites where root exudates were existed. From the above results it was observed that the number of O. intermedium cells were large at root exudate site. Fig 2, Tab 1, Ref 15

  2. An audit of the effect of two cord-care regimens on bacterial colonization in newborn infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paes, B; Jones, C C

    1987-03-01

    Proper care of the umbilical cord of newborn infants may prevent later infections. When St Joseph's Hospital in Hamilton, Ontario, started using alcohol instead of triple dye for umbilical cord care, there was a dramatic increase in the incidence of bacterial colonization in newborns in the nursery and, later, in the number of cases of staphylococcus-related skin infections in infants born at the hospital. Follow-up on 1,545 infants revealed that triple dye was significantly more effective than alcohol in reducing the growth of gram-positive organisms, especially Staphylococcus aureus and group B streptococcus, and several gram-negative organisms. Because hospital medical staff had carefully collected data on bacterial colonization, they were quickly aware of the problem and could justify resuming the use of triple dye.

  3. Mucin secretion in germfree rats fed fiber-free and psyllium diets and bacterial mass and carbohydrate fermentation after colonization.

    OpenAIRE

    Cabotaje, L M; Shinnick, F L; Lopéz-Guisa, J M; Marlett, J A

    1994-01-01

    The effect of psyllium on mucin secretion was determined by comparing water-soluble and -insoluble fractions of excreta from germfree rats fed a fiber-free (FF) diet or a diet containing psyllium seed husk (PS). Excreta from the same rats after colonization with a rat mixed cecal culture were separated into water-soluble, plant, and bacterial fractions to compare the remaining carbohydrate and the mass of bacteria. The sugar composition and water solubility of carbohydrate in excreta from ger...

  4. Bacterial Traits Involved in Colonization of Arabidopsis thaliana Roots by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietel, Kristin; Beator, Barbara; Budiharjo, Anto; Fan, Ben; Borriss, Rainer

    2013-03-01

    Colonization studies previously performed with a green-fluorescent-protein, GFP, labeled derivative of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42 revealed that the bacterium behaved different in colonizing surfaces of plant roots of different species (Fan et al., 2012). In order to extend these studies and to elucidate which genes are crucial for root colonization, we applied targeted mutant strains to Arabidopsis seedlings. The fates of root colonization in mutant strains impaired in synthesis of alternative sigma factors, non-ribosomal synthesis of lipopeptides and polyketides, biofilm formation, swarming motility, and plant growth promoting activity were analyzed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Whilst the wild-type strain heavily colonized surfaces of root tips and lateral roots, the mutant strains were impaired in their ability to colonize root tips and most of them were unable to colonize lateral roots. Ability to colonize plant roots is not only dependent on the ability to form biofilms or swarming motility. Six mutants, deficient in abrB-, sigH-, sigD-, nrfA-, yusV and RBAM017410, but not affected in biofilm formation, displayed significantly reduced root colonization. The nrfA- and yusV-mutant strains colonized border cells and, partly, root surfaces but did not colonize root tips or lateral roots.

  5. GPR109A is a G-protein-coupled receptor for the bacterial fermentation product butyrate and functions as a tumor suppressor in colon

    OpenAIRE

    Thangaraju, Muthusamy; Cresci, Gail A.; Liu, Kebin; Ananth, Sudha; Gnanaprakasam, Jaya P.; Browning, Darren D.; Mellinger, John D.; Smith, Sylvia B.; Digby, Gregory J.; Lambert, Nevin A.; Prasad, Puttur D.; Ganapathy, Vadivel

    2009-01-01

    Short-chain fatty acids, generated in colon by bacterial fermentation of dietary fiber, protect against colorectal cancer and inflammatory bowel disease. Among these bacterial metabolites, butyrate is biologically most relevant. GPR109A is a G-protein-coupled receptor for nicotinate, but recognizes butyrate with low affinity. Millimolar concentrations of butyrate are needed to activate the receptor. Although concentrations of butyrate in colonic lumen are sufficient to activate the receptor m...

  6. Time course of peritoneal tissue plasminogen activator after experimental colonic surgery : effect of hyaluronan-based antiadhesive agents and bacterial peritonitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijnen, MMPJ; Holmdahl, L; Kooistra, T; Falk, P; Hendriks, T; van Goor, Harry

    2002-01-01

    Background: This study assessed the peritoneal fibrinolytic response during the first week after colonic surgery in rats with and without bacterial peritonitis, and possible modulation of the response by two hyaluronan-based antiadhesive agents. Methods: A colonic anastomosis was constructed in 90 m

  7. Time course of peritoneal tissue plasminogen activator after experimental colonic surgery: effect of hyaluronan-based antiadhesive agents and bacterial peritonitis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijnen, M.M.P.J.; Holmdahl, L.; Kooistra, T.; Falk, P.; Hendriks, T.; Goor, H. van

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study assessed the peritoneal fibrinolytic response during the first week after colonic surgery in rats with and without bacterial peritonitis, and possible modulation of the response by two hyaluronan-based antiadhesive agents. METHODS: A colonic anastomosis was constructed in 90 m

  8. Distinctive colonization of Bacillus sp. bacteria and the influence of the bacterial biofilm on electrochemical behaviors of aluminum coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdoli, Leila; Suo, Xinkun; Li, Hua

    2016-09-01

    Formation of biofilm is usually essential for the development of biofouling and crucially impacts the corrosion of marine structures. Here we report the attachment behaviors of Bacillus sp. bacteria and subsequent formation of bacterial biofilm on stainless steel and thermal sprayed aluminum coatings in artificial seawater. The colonized bacteria accelerate the corrosion of the steel plates, and markedly enhance the anti-corrosion performances of the Al coatings in early growth stage of the bacterial biofilm. After 7days incubation, the biofilm formed on the steel is heterogeneous while exhibits homogeneous feature on the Al coating. Atomic force microscopy examination discloses inception of formation of local pitting on steel plates associated with significantly roughened surface. Electrochemical testing suggests that the impact of the bacterial biofilm on the corrosion behaviors of marine structures is not decided by the biofilm alone, it is instead attributed to synergistic influence by both the biofilm and physicochemical characteristics of the substratum materials.

  9. Distinctive colonization of Bacillus sp. bacteria and the influence of the bacterial biofilm on electrochemical behaviors of aluminum coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdoli, Leila; Suo, Xinkun; Li, Hua

    2016-09-01

    Formation of biofilm is usually essential for the development of biofouling and crucially impacts the corrosion of marine structures. Here we report the attachment behaviors of Bacillus sp. bacteria and subsequent formation of bacterial biofilm on stainless steel and thermal sprayed aluminum coatings in artificial seawater. The colonized bacteria accelerate the corrosion of the steel plates, and markedly enhance the anti-corrosion performances of the Al coatings in early growth stage of the bacterial biofilm. After 7days incubation, the biofilm formed on the steel is heterogeneous while exhibits homogeneous feature on the Al coating. Atomic force microscopy examination discloses inception of formation of local pitting on steel plates associated with significantly roughened surface. Electrochemical testing suggests that the impact of the bacterial biofilm on the corrosion behaviors of marine structures is not decided by the biofilm alone, it is instead attributed to synergistic influence by both the biofilm and physicochemical characteristics of the substratum materials. PMID:27289310

  10. High body mass alters colonic sensory-motor function and transit in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Delgado-Aros, Silvia; Camilleri, Michael; Garcia, Montse Andreu; Burton, Duane; Busciglio, Irene

    2008-01-01

    There is increased prevalence of abdominal pain and diarrhea and decreased gastric sensation with increased body mass index (BMI). Our hypothesis is that increased BMI is associated with increased colonic motility and sensation. The study aim was to assess effect of BMI on colonic sensory and motor functions and transit. We used a database of colonic tone, compliance, and perception of distensions measured by intracolonic, barostat-controlled balloon, and gastrointestinal transit was measured...

  11. Post-translational glycoprotein modifications regulate colon cancer stem cells and colon adenoma progression in Apc(min/+) mice through altered Wnt receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Huabei; Nagy, Tamas; Pierce, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Deletion of GnT-V (MGAT5), which synthesizes N-glycans with β(1,6)-branched glycans, reduced the compartment of cancer stem cells (CSC) in the her-2 mouse model of breast cancer, leading to delay of tumor onset. Because GnT-V levels are also commonly up-regulated in colon cancer, we investigated their regulation of colon CSC and adenoma development. Anchorage-independent cell growth and tumor formation induced by injection of colon tumor cells into NOD/SCID mice were positively associated with GnT-V levels, indicating regulation of proliferation and tumorigenicity. Using Apc(min/+) mice with different GnT-V backgrounds, knock-out of GnT-V had no significant effect on the number of adenoma/mouse, but adenoma size was significantly reduced and accompanied increased survival of Apc(min/+) mice with GnT-V deletion (p cells, we found that FZD-7 receptors expressed N-linked β(1,6) branching, indicating that FZD-7 can be modified by GnT-V. The aberrant Wnt signaling observed after modulating GnT-V levels is likely to result from altered N-linked β(1,6) branching on FZD-7, thereby affecting Wnt signaling, the compartment of CSC, and tumor progression.

  12. Gene expression profile and genomic alterations in colonic tumours induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giannini Augusto

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Azoxymethane (AOM or 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH-induced colon carcinogenesis in rats shares many phenotypical similarities with human sporadic colon cancer and is a reliable model for identifying chemopreventive agents. Genetic mutations relevant to human colon cancer have been described in this model, but comprehensive gene expression and genomic analysis have not been reported so far. Therefore, we applied genome-wide technologies to study variations in gene expression and genomic alterations in DMH-induced colon cancer in F344 rats. Methods For gene expression analysis, 9 tumours (TUM and their paired normal mucosa (NM were hybridized on 4 × 44K Whole rat arrays (Agilent and selected genes were validated by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Functional analysis on microarray data was performed by GenMAPP/MappFinder analysis. Array-comparative genomic hybridization (a-CGH was performed on 10 paired TUM-NM samples hybridized on Rat genome arrays 2 × 105K (Agilent and the results were analyzed by CGH Analytics (Agilent. Results Microarray gene expression analysis showed that Defcr4, Igfbp5, Mmp7, Nos2, S100A8 and S100A9 were among the most up-regulated genes in tumours (Fold Change (FC compared with NM: 183, 48, 39, 38, 36 and 32, respectively, while Slc26a3, Mptx, Retlna and Muc2 were strongly down-regulated (FC: -500; -376, -167, -79, respectively. Functional analysis showed that pathways controlling cell cycle, protein synthesis, matrix metalloproteinases, TNFα/NFkB, and inflammatory responses were up-regulated in tumours, while Krebs cycle, the electron transport chain, and fatty acid beta oxidation were down-regulated. a-CGH analysis showed that four TUM out of ten had one or two chromosomal aberrations. Importantly, one sample showed a deletion on chromosome 18 including Apc. Conclusion The results showed complex gene expression alterations in adenocarcinomas encompassing many altered pathways. While a-CGH analysis showed a

  13. Comparison of bacterial quantities in left and right colon biopsies and faeces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anna Lyra; Sofia Forssten; Peter Rolny; Yvonne Wettergren; Sampo J Lahtinen; Krista Salli; Lennart Cedg(a)rd

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To compare quantities of predominant and pathogenic bacteria in mucosal and faecal samples.METHODS:Twenty patients undergoing diagnostic colonoscopy with endoscopically and histologically normal mucosa were recruited to the study,14 subjects of which also supplied faecal (F) samples between 15 d to 105 d post colonoscopy.Mucosal biopsies were taken from each subject from the midportion of the ascending colon (right side samples,RM) and the sigmoid (left side samples,LM).Predominant intestinal and mucosal bacteria including clostridial 165 rRNA gene clusters Ⅳ and Ⅹ Ⅳ ab,Bacteroidetes,Enterobacteriaceae,Bifidobacterium spp.,Akkermansia muciniphila (A.muciniphila),Veillonella spp.,Collinsella spp.,Faecalibacterium prausnitzii (F.prausnitzii) and putative pathogens such as Escherichia coli (E.coli),Clostridium difficile (C.difficile),Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) and Staphylococcus aureus (S.aureus) were analysed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR).Host DNA was quantified from the mucosal samples with human glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene targeting qPCR.Paired t tests and the Pearson correlation were applied for statistical analysis.RESULTS:The most prominent bacterial groups were clostridial groups Ⅳ and ⅩⅣa+b and Bacteroidetes and bacterial species F.prausnitzii in both sample types.H.pylori and S.aureus were not detected and C.difficile was detected in only one mucosal sample and three faecal samples.E.coli was detected in less than half of the mucosal samples at both sites,but was present in all faecal samples.All detected bacteria,except Enterobacteriaceae,were present at higher levels in the faeces than in the mucosa,but the different locations in the colon presented comparable quantities (RM,LM and F followed by P1 for RM vs F,P2 for LM vs F and P3 for RM vs LM:4.17±0.60 log10/g,4.16±0.56 log10/g,5.88±1.92 log10/g,P1 =0.011,P2 =0.0069,P3 =0.9778 forA.muciniphila; 6.25 ± 1.3 log10/g,6.09 ± 0.81 log10/g,8.84 ± 1

  14. Lactic acid bacteria colonization and clinical outcome after probiotic supplementation in conventionally treated bacterial vaginosis and vulvovaginal candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrström, Sophia; Daroczy, Katalin; Rylander, Eva; Samuelsson, Carolina; Johannesson, Ulrika; Anzén, Bo; Påhlson, Carl

    2010-09-01

    This randomized double-blind placebo controlled study assessed the vaginal colonization of lactic acid bacteria and clinical outcome. Vaginal capsules containing L gasseri LN40, Lactobacillus fermentum LN99, L. casei subsp. rhamnosus LN113 and P. acidilactici LN23, or placebos were administered for five days to 95 women after conventional treatment of bacterial vaginosis and/or vulvovaginal candidiasis. Vulvovaginal examinations and vaginal samplings were performed before and after administration, after the first and second menstruation, and after six months. Presence of LN strains was assessed using RAPD analysis. LN strains were present 2-3 days after administration in 89% of the women receiving LN strains (placebo: 0%, p vulvovaginal candidiasis lead to vaginal colonization, somewhat fewer recurrences and less malodorous discharge. PMID:20472091

  15. Influenza A virus alters pneumococcal nasal colonization and middle ear infection independently of phase variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wren, John T; Blevins, Lance K; Pang, Bing; King, Lauren B; Perez, Antonia C; Murrah, Kyle A; Reimche, Jennifer L; Alexander-Miller, Martha A; Swords, W Edward

    2014-11-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is both a widespread nasal colonizer and a leading cause of otitis media, one of the most common diseases of childhood. Pneumococcal phase variation influences both colonization and disease and thus has been linked to the bacteria's transition from colonizer to otopathogen. Further contributing to this transition, coinfection with influenza A virus has been strongly associated epidemiologically with the dissemination of pneumococci from the nasopharynx to the middle ear. Using a mouse infection model, we demonstrated that coinfection with influenza virus and pneumococci enhanced both colonization and inflammatory responses within the nasopharynx and middle ear chamber. Coinfection studies were also performed using pneumococcal populations enriched for opaque or transparent phase variants. As shown previously, opaque variants were less able to colonize the nasopharynx. In vitro, this phase also demonstrated diminished biofilm viability and epithelial adherence. However, coinfection with influenza virus ameliorated this colonization defect in vivo. Further, viral coinfection ultimately induced a similar magnitude of middle ear infection by both phase variants. These data indicate that despite inherent differences in colonization, the influenza A virus exacerbation of experimental middle ear infection is independent of the pneumococcal phase. These findings provide new insights into the synergistic link between pneumococcus and influenza virus in the context of otitis media.

  16. Quorum-sensing regulation governs bacterial adhesion, biofilm development, and host colonization in Pantoea stewartii subspecies stewartii

    OpenAIRE

    Koutsoudis, Maria D.; Tsaltas, Dimitrios; Minogue, Timothy D.; von Bodman, Susanne B.

    2006-01-01

    The phytopathogenic bacterium Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii synthesizes stewartan exo/capsular polysaccharide (EPS) in a cell density-dependent manner governed by the EsaI/EsaR quorum-sensing (QS) system. This study analyzes biofilm development and host colonization of the WT and QS regulatory mutant strains of P. stewartii. First, we show that the cell density-dependent synthesis of stewartan EPS, governed by the EsaI/EsaR QS system, is required for proper bacterial adhesion and develop...

  17. Red and infrared laser therapy inhibits in vitro growth of major bacterial species that commonly colonize skin ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa, Natanael Teixeira Alves; Gomes, Rosana Caetano; Santos, Marcos Ferracioli; Brandino, Hugo Evangelista; Martinez, Roberto; de Jesus Guirro, Rinaldo Roberto

    2016-04-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is used in chronic wounds due to its healing effects. However, bacterial species may colonize these wounds and the optimal parameters for effective bacterial inhibition are not clear. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of LLLT on bacterial growth in vitro. Bacterial strains including Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were suspended in saline solution at a concentration of 10(3) cells/ml and exposed to laser irradiation at wavelengths of 660, 830, and 904 nm at fluences of 0 (control), 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 J/cm(2). An aliquot of the irradiated suspension was spread on the surface of petri plates and incubated at 37 °C for quantification of colony-forming unit after 24, 48, and 72 h. Laser irradiation inhibited the growth of S. aureus at all wavelengths and fluences higher than 12 J/cm(2), showing a strong correlation between increase in fluence and bacterial inhibition. However, for P. aeruginosa, LLLT inhibited growth at all wavelengths only at a fluence of 24 J/cm(2). E. coli had similar growth inhibition at a wavelength of 830 nm at fluences of 3, 6, 12, and 24 J/cm(2). At wavelengths of 660 and 904 nm, growth inhibition was only observed at fluences of 12 and 18 J/cm(2), respectively. LLLT inhibited bacterial growth at all wavelengths, for a maximum of 72 h after irradiation, indicating a correlation between bacterial species, fluence, and wavelength. PMID:26886585

  18. Analysis of single root tip microbiomes suggests that distinctive bacterial communities are selected by Pinus sylvestris roots colonized by different ectomycorrhizal fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marupakula, Srisailam; Mahmood, Shahid; Finlay, Roger D

    2016-05-01

    Symbiotic ectomycorrhizal tree roots represent an important niche for interaction with bacteria since the fungi colonizing them have a large surface area and receive a direct supply of photosynthetically derived carbon. We examined individual root tips of Pinus sylvestris at defined time points between 5 days and 24 weeks, identified the dominant fungi colonizing each root tip using Sanger sequencing and the bacterial communities colonizing individual root tips by 454 pyrosequencing. Bacterial colonization was extremely dynamic with statistically significant variation in time and increasing species richness until week 16 (3477 operational taxonomic units). Bacterial community structure of roots colonized by Russula sp. 6 GJ-2013b, Piloderma spp., Meliniomyces variabilis and Paxillus involutus differed significantly at weeks 8 and 16 but diversity declined and significant differences were no longer apparent at week 24. The most common genera were Burkholderia, Sphingopyxsis, Dyella, Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, Actinospica, Aquaspirillum, Acidobacter Gp1, Sphingomonas, Terriglobus, Enhydrobacter, Herbaspirillum and Bradyrhizobium. Many genera had high initial abundance at week 8, declining with time but Dyella and Terriglobus increased in abundance at later time points. In roots colonized by Piloderma spp. several other bacterial genera, such as Actinospica, Bradyrhizobium, Acidobacter Gp1 and Rhizomicrobium appeared to increase in abundance at later sampling points. PMID:26521936

  19. Mucin secretion in germfree rats fed fiber-free and psyllium diets and bacterial mass and carbohydrate fermentation after colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabotaje, L M; Shinnick, F L; Lopéz-Guisa, J M; Marlett, J A

    1994-04-01

    The effect of psyllium on mucin secretion was determined by comparing water-soluble and -insoluble fractions of excreta from germfree rats fed a fiber-free (FF) diet or a diet containing psyllium seed husk (PS). Excreta from the same rats after colonization with a rat mixed cecal culture were separated into water-soluble, plant, and bacterial fractions to compare the remaining carbohydrate and the mass of bacteria. The sugar composition and water solubility of carbohydrate in excreta from germfree rats fed FF diets indicated that a primary fermentable substrate was mucin. PS increased fecal excretion of mucin-derived sugars almost threefold in germfree rats. Fecal carbohydrate was reduced from 619 to 237 mumol/g of dry feces and mostly in the bacterial fraction when rats fed an FF diet were colonized. The total sugar content and the amount of muramic acid, but not bacterial counts and mass, indicated that PS increased fecal bacteria. Fractionation of excreta from PS-fed rats was complicated by a gel which, based on sugar composition, was PS. Sugar composition of the water-soluble fraction from excreta from PS-fed rats suggested that it contained some bacterial component, possibly exopolysaccharides and some of the PS, but not mucin. PS digestibility ranged from 60 to 80%, depending on what fecal fraction was used for output. Because of the presence of PS-derived sugars in the gel and soluble fraction, it was not possible to determine which, if any, of the PS digestibilities was correct. PMID:8017918

  20. Colon cancer and gene alterations: their immunological implications and suggestions for prognostic indices and improvements in biotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contasta, Ida; Pellegrini, Patrizia; Berghella, Anna Maria; Del Beato, Tiziana; Adorno, Domenico

    2006-10-01

    Studies have shown that changes occur in c-Ki-ras, p53, and Bcl2 gene structure and function during the various stages of human colon carcinogenesis. Alterations of these genes are responsible for the establishment of a state of continuous stimulus for cell division and apoptotic inhibition at physiological and pharmacological levels. This paper focuses on the results of our research aimed at investigating how these gene alterations influence tumoral mechanisms on an immunological level and how immunological parameters can be used as prognostic markers for the passage of normal tissue to adenoma and adenoma to carcinoma. Overall, our data suggest that an alteration in the c-Ki-ras gene results in a switch to a suppressive type of immune response, determining an impairment of immune cell activation at both antigen- presenting-cell and T-cell levels. c-Ki-ras gene mutations, p53 deletions, and Bc12 expression, on the other hand, can be used as prognostic markers for the passage of normal tissue to adenoma and adenoma to carcinoma. The p53 oncogene does not appear to impair patients' immunological response further. In conclusion, an evaluation of c-Ki-ras, rather than p53 gene alterations, would seem to be more relevant in colon cancer prevention programs and biotherapy improvement.

  1. Who's on First? Part II: Bacterial and fungal colonization of fresh soil minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitman, T.; Neurath, R.; Zhang, P.; Yuan, T.; Weber, P. K.; Zhou, J.; Pett-Ridge, J.; Firestone, M. K.

    2015-12-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) stabilization by soil minerals is an important mechanism influencing soil C cycling. Microbes make up only a few percent of total SOM, but have a disproportionate impact on SOM cycling. Their direct interactions with soil minerals, however, are not well characterized. We studied colonization of fresh minerals by soil microbes in an Avena barbata (wild oat) California grassland soil microcosm. Examining quartz, ferrihydrite, kaolinite, and the heavy fraction of the native soil, we asked: (1) Do different minerals select for different communities, or do random processes drive the colonization of fresh minerals? (2) What factors influence which taxa colonize fresh minerals? After incubating mesh bags (<18 μm) of minerals buried next to actively growing plant roots for 2 months, we used high-throughput sequencing of 16S and ITS2 genes to characterize the microbial communities colonizing the minerals. We found significant differences between the microbial community composition of different minerals and soil for both bacteria and fungi. We found a higher relative abundance of arbuscular mycorrhial fungi with ferrihydrite and quartz, and nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) imaging of these minerals suggests that some fungal hyphae are moving C directly from roots to mineral surfaces. The enriched presence of both nematode-associated fungi (Pochonia sp.) and bacteria (Candidatus Xiphinematobacter) in the minerals suggests that these minerals may be a habitat for nematodes. Bacteria of the family Chitinophagaceae and genus Janthinobacterium were significantly enriched on both ferrihydrite and quartz minerals, both of which may interact with colonizing fungi. These findings suggest that: (1) Microbial colonization of fresh minerals is not a fully passive or neutral process. (2) Mineral exploration by plant-associated fungi and soil fauna transport may be factors in determining the initial colonization of minerals and subsequent C

  2. Xylo-oligosaccharides and inulin affect genotoxicity and bacterial populations differently in a human colonic simulator challenged with soy protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christophersen, C. T.; Petersen, Anne; Licht, Tine Rask;

    2013-01-01

    High dietary intakes of some protein sources, including soy protein, can increase colonic DNA damage in animals, whereas some carbohydrates attenuate this. We investigated whether inulin and xylo-oligosaccharides (XOS) could be protective against DNA strand breaks by adding them to a human colonic...... cornstarch for 10 day followed by soy protein with 1% XOS or 1% inulin for 10 day. Inulin did not alter genotoxicity but XOS significantly reduced PV genotoxicity and increased DV genotoxicity. Inulin and XOS significantly increased butyrate concentration in the DV but not PV. Numbers of the key butyrate......-producing bacterium Faecalibacterium prausnitzii were significantly increased in the PV and DV by inulin but significantly decreased by XOS in both vessels. Other bacteria examined were also significantly impacted by the carbohydrate treatments or by the vessel (i.e., pH). There was a significant overall inverse...

  3. Nature of bacterial colonization influences transcription of mucin genes in mice during the first week of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bergström Anders

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Postnatal regulation of the small intestinal mucus layer is potentially important in the development of adult gut functionality. We hypothesized that the nature of bacterial colonization affects mucus gene regulation in early life. We thus analyzed the influence of the presence of a conventional microbiota as well as two selected monocolonizing bacterial strains on the transcription of murine genes involved in mucus layer development during the first week of life. Mouse pups (N = 8/group from differently colonized dams: Germ-free (GF, conventional specific pathogen free (SPF, monocolonized with either Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM (Lb or Escherichia coli Nissle (Ec were analyzed by qPCR on isolated ileal tissue sections from postnatal days 1 and 6 (PND1, PND6 after birth with respect to: (i transcription of specific genes involved in mucus production (Muc1-4, Tff3 and (ii amounts of 16S rRNA of Lactobacillus and E. coli. Quantification of 16S rRNA genes was performed to obtain a measure for amounts of colonized bacteria. Results We found a microbiota-independent transcriptional increase of all five mucus genes from PND1 to PND6. Furthermore, the relative level of transcription of certain mucus genes on PND1 was increased by the presence of bacteria. This was observed for Tff3 in the SPF, Ec, and Lb groups; for Muc2 in SPF; and for Muc3 and Muc4 in Ec and Lb, respectively. Detection of bacterial 16S rRNA genes levels above the qPCR detection level occurred only on PND6 and only for some of the colonized animals. On PND6, we found significantly lower levels of Muc1, Muc2 and Muc4 gene transcription for Lb animals with detectable Lactobacillus levels as compared to animals with Lactobacillus levels below the detection limit. Conclusions In summary, our data show that development of the expression of genes encoding secreted (Muc2/Tff3 and membrane-bound (Muc1/Muc3/Muc4 mucus regulatory proteins, respectively, is distinct and

  4. Altered motility and duration of bacterial overgrowth in experimental blind loop syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justus, P G; Mcherron, L E; Ward, T T

    1984-07-01

    To better understand the pathogenesis of the increased motility previously described in the blind loop rat, we studied the relationship between duration of bacterial overgrowth and both myoelectric activity and bacterial flora in this model. Myoelectric studies and quantitative bacterial cultures were performed on self-filling and self-emptying (control) blind loop rats one, two, and three weeks postoperatively. All self-filling blind loop rats had greater random action potential activity and higher frequencies of migrating action potential complexes than controls (P less than 0.05). One-week self-filling blind loop rats had a higher frequency of migrating action potential complexes (P less than 0.05) and a higher ratio of counts of Escherichia coli to Bacteroides species (P less than 0.05) than the two- or three-week self-filling blind loop groups. Thus, qualitative changes in myoelectric activity occur during the development of bacterial overgrowth in the blind loop rat which may reflect evolving alterations in the bacterial flora.

  5. Colonic microbiota alters host susceptibility to infectious colitis by modulating inflammation, redox status, and ion transporter gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, S; Dai, C; Brown, K; Rajendiran, E; Makarenko, S; Baker, J; Ma, C; Halder, S; Montero, M; Ionescu, V A; Klegeris, A; Vallance, B A; Gibson, D L

    2011-07-01

    Individuals vary in their resistance to enteric infections. The role of the intestinal microbiota in altering susceptibility to enteric infection is relatively unknown. Previous studies have identified that C3H/HeOuJ mice suffer 100% mortality during Citrobacter rodentium-induced colitis, whereas C57BL/6 mice recover from infection. The basis for their differences in susceptibility is unclear and has been mainly attributed to differences in host genetics. This study investigated the role of the intestinal microbiota in altering susceptibility to C. rodentium-induced colitis. When the feces of C57BL/6 mice were gavaged into antibiotic treated C3H/HeOuJ mice, the C57BL/6 microflora led to a complete reversal in mortality patterns where 100% of the C3H/HeOuJ mice survived infection. This protection corresponded with reduced colonic pathology and less systemic pathogen load and was associated with increased inflammatory and redox responses with reduced epithelial cell death. C3H/HeOuJ mice are normally susceptible to infection-induced dehydration due to defective expression of colonic ion transporters such as Dra, CA IV, and CA I; expression of these genes was normalized when C3H/HeOuJ mice were colonized with the C57BL/6 microflora. Together, these data reveal that the colonic microbiota play a critical role in protecting against intestinal infection by inducing proinflammatory and prooxidant responses that control pathogen load as well as ion transporter gene expression previously shown to prevent fatal dehydration. Protection of mice from lethal colitis was associated with higher levels of bacteria from Bacteroidetes. This study reveals that the microbiota is sufficient to overcome inherent genetic susceptibility patterns in C3H/HeOuJ mice that cause mortality during C. rodentium infection.

  6. Neutrophil elastase alters the murine gut microbiota resulting in enhanced Salmonella colonization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navkiran Gill

    Full Text Available The intestinal microbiota has been found to play a central role in the colonization of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in the gastrointestinal tract. In this study, we present a novel process through which Salmonella benefit from inflammatory induced changes in the microbiota in order to facilitate disease. We show that Salmonella infection in mice causes recruitment of neutrophils to the gut lumen, resulting in significant changes in the composition of the intestinal microbiota. This occurs through the production of the enzyme elastase by neutrophils. Administration of recombinant neutrophil elastase to infected animals under conditions that do not elicit neutrophil recruitment caused shifts in microbiota composition that favored Salmonella colonization, while inhibition of neutrophil elastase reduced colonization. This study reveals a new relationship between the microbiota and the host during infection.

  7. [Processes of plant colonization by Methylobacterium strains and some bacterial properties ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanovskaia, V A; Stoliar, S M; Malashenko, Iu R; Dodatko, T N

    2001-01-01

    The pink-pigmented facultative methylotrophic bacteria (PPFMB) of the genus Methylobacterium are indespensible inhabitants of the plant phyllosphere. Using maize Zea mays as a model, the ways of plant colonization by PPFMB and some properties of the latter that might be beneficial to plants were studied. A marked strain, Methylobacterium mesophilicum APR-8 (pULB113), was generated to facilitate the detection of the methylotrophic bacteria inoculated into the soil or applied to the maize leaves. Colonization of maize leaves by M. mesophilicum APR-8 (pULB113) occurred only after the bacteria were applied onto the leaf surface. In this case, the number of PPFMB cells on inoculated leaves increased with plant growth. During seed germination, no colonization of maize leaves with M. mesophilicum cells occurred immediately from the soil inoculated with the marked strain. Thus, under natural conditions, colonization of plant leaves with PPFMB seems to occur via soil particle transfer to the leaves by air. PPFMB monocultures were not antagonistic to phytopathogenic bacteria. However, mixed cultures of epiphytic bacteria containing Methylobacterium mesophilicum or M. extorquens did exhibit an antagonistic effect against the phytopathogenic bacteria studied (Xanthomonas camprestris, Pseudomonas syringae, Erwinia carotovora, Clavibacter michiganense, and Agrobacterium tumifaciens). Neither epiphytic and soil strains of Methylobacterium extorquens, M. organophillum, M. mesophilicum, and M. fujisawaense catalyzed ice nucleation. Hence, they cause no frost injury to plants. Thus, the results indicate that the strains of the genus Methylobacterium can protect plants against adverse environmental factors. PMID:11386061

  8. Supplemental dietary inulin of variable chain lengths alters intestinal bacterial populations in young pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Jannine K; Yasuda, Koji; Welch, Ross M; Miller, Dennis D; Lei, Xin Gen

    2010-12-01

    Previously, we showed that supplementation of diets with short-chain inulin (P95), long-chain inulin (HP), and a 50:50 mixture of both (Synergy 1) improved body iron status and altered expression of the genes involved in iron homeostasis and inflammation in young pigs. However, the effects of these 3 types of inulin on intestinal bacteria remain unknown. Applying terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, we determined the abundances of luminal and adherent bacterial populations from 6 segments of the small and large intestines of pigs (n = 4 for each group) fed an iron-deficient basal diet (BD) or the BD supplemented with 4% of P95, Synergy 1, or HP for 5 wk. Compared with BD, all 3 types of inulin enhanced (P inulin on bacterial populations in the lumen contents were found. Meanwhile, all 3 types of inulin suppressed the less desirable bacteria Clostridium spp. and members of the Enterobacteriaceae in the lumen and mucosa of various gut segments. Our findings suggest that the ability of dietary inulin to alter intestinal bacterial populations may partially account for its iron bioavailability-promoting effect and possibly other health benefits.

  9. Rapid bacterial colonization of low-density polyethylene microplastics in coastal sediment microcosms

    OpenAIRE

    Harrison, Jesse P.; Schratzberger, Michaela; Sapp, Melanie; Osborn, A. Mark

    2014-01-01

    Background Synthetic microplastics (≤5-mm fragments) are emerging environmental contaminants that have been found to accumulate within coastal marine sediments worldwide. The ecological impacts and fate of microplastic debris are only beginning to be revealed, with previous research into these topics having primarily focused on higher organisms and/or pelagic environments. Despite recent research into plastic-associated microorganisms in seawater, the microbial colonization of microplastics i...

  10. Honey bees avoid nectar colonized by three bacterial species, but not by a yeast species, isolated from the bee gut.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley P Good

    Full Text Available The gut microflora of the honey bee, Apis mellifera, is receiving increasing attention as a potential determinant of the bees' health and their efficacy as pollinators. Studies have focused primarily on the microbial taxa that appear numerically dominant in the bee gut, with the assumption that the dominant status suggests their potential importance to the bees' health. However, numerically minor taxa might also influence the bees' efficacy as pollinators, particularly if they are not only present in the gut, but also capable of growing in floral nectar and altering its chemical properties. Nonetheless, it is not well understood whether honey bees have any feeding preference for or against nectar colonized by specific microbial species. To test whether bees exhibit a preference, we conducted a series of field experiments at an apiary using synthetic nectar inoculated with specific species of bacteria or yeast that had been isolated from the bee gut, but are considered minor components of the gut microflora. These species had also been found in floral nectar. Our results indicated that honey bees avoided nectar colonized by the bacteria Asaia astilbes, Erwinia tasmaniensis, and Lactobacillus kunkeei, whereas the yeast Metschnikowia reukaufii did not affect the feeding preference of the insects. Our results also indicated that avoidance of bacteria-colonized nectar was caused not by the presence of the bacteria per se, but by the chemical changes to nectar made by the bacteria. These findings suggest that gut microbes may not only affect the bees' health as symbionts, but that some of the microbes may possibly affect the efficacy of A. mellifera as pollinators by altering nectar chemistry and influencing their foraging behavior.

  11. Circulatory shear flow alters the viability and proliferation of circulating colon cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Rong Fan; Travis Emery; Yongguo Zhang; Yuxuan Xia; Jun Sun; Jiandi Wan

    2016-01-01

    During cancer metastasis, circulating tumor cells constantly experience hemodynamic shear stress in the circulation. Cellular responses to shear stress including cell viability and proliferation thus play critical roles in cancer metastasis. Here, we developed a microfluidic approach to establish a circulatory microenvironment and studied circulating human colon cancer HCT116 cells in response to a variety of magnitude of shear stress and circulating time. Our results showed that cell viabili...

  12. Root exudate-induced alterations in Bacillus cereus cell wall contribute to root colonization and plant growth promotion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swarnalee Dutta

    Full Text Available The outcome of an interaction between plant growth promoting rhizobacteria and plants may depend on the chemical composition of root exudates (REs. We report the colonization of tobacco, and not groundnut, roots by a non-rhizospheric Bacillus cereus (MTCC 430. There was a differential alteration in the cell wall components of B. cereus in response to the REs from tobacco and groundnut. Attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy revealed a split in amide I region of B. cereus cells exposed to tobacco-root exudates (TRE, compared to those exposed to groundnut-root exudates (GRE. In addition, changes in exopolysaccharides and lipid-packing were observed in B. cereus grown in TRE-amended minimal media that were not detectable in GRE-amended media. Cell-wall proteome analyses revealed upregulation of oxidative stress-related alkyl hydroperoxide reductase, and DNA-protecting protein chain (Dlp-2, in response to GRE and TRE, respectively. Metabolism-related enzymes like 2-amino-3-ketobutyrate coenzyme A ligase and 2-methylcitrate dehydratase and a 60 kDa chaperonin were up-regulated in response to TRE and GRE. In response to B. cereus, the plant roots altered their exudate-chemodiversity with respect to carbohydrates, organic acids, alkanes, and polyols. TRE-induced changes in surface components of B. cereus may contribute to successful root colonization and subsequent plant growth promotion.

  13. [Significance of deficient bacterial colonization in the pathogenesis of mucosal lesions in experimental blind loop syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menge, H; Germer, C T; Stössel, R; Simes, G; Wagner, J; Hahn, H; Riecken, E O

    1985-07-20

    A complete evaluation of the bacterial flora in jejunal self-filling blind loops was performed. The results show a significant increase in bacteria of the genera E. coli, Streptococcus and Bacteroides. In further experiments, jejunal self-filling blind loops were created in germ-free animals. In spite of the germ-free state the mucosa displayed marked hyperplasia. The same was true when the blind loops had been contaminated with aerobic bacteria. These results demonstrate that other factors in addition to bacterial overgrowth contribute to the mucosal damage observed in self-filling blind loops.

  14. Quorum-sensing regulation governs bacterial adhesion, biofilm development, and host colonization in Pantoea stewartii subspecies stewartii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutsoudis, Maria D; Tsaltas, Dimitrios; Minogue, Timothy D; von Bodman, Susanne B

    2006-04-11

    The phytopathogenic bacterium Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii synthesizes stewartan exo/capsular polysaccharide (EPS) in a cell density-dependent manner governed by the EsaI/EsaR quorum-sensing (QS) system. This study analyzes biofilm development and host colonization of the WT and QS regulatory mutant strains of P. stewartii. First, we show that the cell density-dependent synthesis of stewartan EPS, governed by the EsaI/EsaR QS system, is required for proper bacterial adhesion and development of spatially defined, 3D biofilms. Second, a nonvirulent mutant lacking the esaI gene adheres strongly to surfaces and develops densely packed, less structurally defined biofilms in vitro. This strain appears to be arrested in a low cell density developmental mode. Exposure of this strain to exogenous N-acyl-homoserine lactone counteracts this adhesion phenotype. Third, QS mutants lacking the EsaR repressor attach poorly to surfaces and form amorphous biofilms heavily enmeshed in excess EPS. Fourth, the WT strain disseminates efficiently within the xylem, primarily in a basipetal direction. In contrast, the two QS mutant strains remain largely localized at the site of infection. Fifth, and most significantly, epifluorescence microscopic imaging of infected leaf tissue and excised xylem vessels reveals that the bacteria colonize the xylem with unexpected specificity, particularly toward the annular rings and spiral secondary wall thickenings of protoxylem, as opposed to indiscriminate growth to fill the xylem lumen. These observations are significant to bacterial plant pathogenesis in general and may reveal targets for disease control. PMID:16585516

  15. Dietary flaxseed modulates the colonic microenvironment in healthy C57Bl/6 male mice which may alter susceptibility to gut-associated diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Krista A; Lepp, Dion; Zarepoor, Leila; Monk, Jennifer M; Wu, Wenqing; Tsao, Rong; Liu, Ronghua

    2016-02-01

    Understanding how dietary components alter the healthy baseline colonic microenvironment is important in determining their roles in influencing gut health and gut-associated diseases. Dietary flaxseed (FS) has demonstrated anti-colon cancer effects in numerous rodent models, however, exacerbated acute colonic mucosal injury and inflammation in a colitis model. This study investigates whether FS alters critical aspects of gut health in healthy unchallenged mice, which may help explain some of the divergent effects observed following different gut-associated disease challenges. Four-week-old C57Bl/6 male mice were fed an AIN-93G basal diet (BD) or an isocaloric BD+10% ground FS diet for 3 weeks. FS enhanced colon goblet cell density, mucus production, MUC2 mRNA expression, and cecal short chain fatty acid levels, indicative of beneficial intestinal barrier integrity responses. Additionally, FS enhanced colonic regenerating islet-derived protein 3 gamma (RegIIIγ) and reduced MUC1 and resistin-like molecule beta (RELMβ) mRNA expression which may indicate altered responses in regulating microbial defense and injury repair responses. FS diet altered the fecal microbial community structure (16S rRNA gene profiling), including a 20-fold increase in Prevotella spp. and a 30-fold reduction in Akkermansia muciniphila abundance. A 10-fold reduction in A. muciniphila abundance by FS was also demonstrated in the colon tissue-associated microbiota (quantitative PCR). Furthermore, fecal branched chain fatty acids were increased by FS, indicative of increased microbial-derived putrefactive compounds. In conclusion, consumption of a FS-supplemented diet alters the baseline colonic microenvironment of healthy mice which may modify subsequent mucosal microbial defense and injury-repair responses leading to altered susceptibility to different gut-associated diseases.

  16. Bacterial Societies: Cooperation, Colonization, and Competition in Micro-Scale Ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hol, F.J.H.

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis, I describe experiments aimed at understanding bacterial population dynamics in ecosystems that are spatially structured at the micro-scale. We combine microfabrication and microfluidics to create synthetic ecosystems that have a complex yet well-defined geometry and chemical composit

  17. Impact of Bacterial-Fungal Interactions on the Colonization of the Endosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overbeek, van L.S.; Saikkonen, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Research on different endophyte taxa and the related scientific disciplines have largely developed separately, and comprehensive community-level studies on bacterial and fungal interactions and their importance are lacking. Here, we discuss the transmission modes of bacteria and fungi and the nat

  18. Active Transport of Phosphorylated Carbohydrates Promotes Intestinal Colonization and Transmission of a Bacterial Pathogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon Sit

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Efficient acquisition of extracellular nutrients is essential for bacterial pathogenesis, however the identities and mechanisms for transport of many of these substrates remain unclear. Here, we investigate the predicted iron-binding transporter AfuABC and its role in bacterial pathogenesis in vivo. By crystallographic, biophysical and in vivo approaches, we show that AfuABC is in fact a cyclic hexose/heptose-phosphate transporter with high selectivity and specificity for a set of ubiquitous metabolites (glucose-6-phosphate, fructose-6-phosphate and sedoheptulose-7-phosphate. AfuABC is conserved across a wide range of bacterial genera, including the enteric pathogens EHEC O157:H7 and its murine-specific relative Citrobacter rodentium, where it lies adjacent to genes implicated in sugar sensing and acquisition. C. rodentium ΔafuA was significantly impaired in an in vivo murine competitive assay as well as its ability to transmit infection from an afflicted to a naïve murine host. Sugar-phosphates were present in normal and infected intestinal mucus and stool samples, indicating that these metabolites are available within the intestinal lumen for enteric bacteria to import during infection. Our study shows that AfuABC-dependent uptake of sugar-phosphates plays a critical role during enteric bacterial infection and uncovers previously unrecognized roles for these metabolites as important contributors to successful pathogenesis.

  19. Soil fungal:bacterial ratios are linked to altered carbon cycling

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    Ashish A. Malik

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite several lines of observational evidence, there is a lack of consensus on whether higher fungal:bacterial (F:B ratios directly cause higher soil carbon (C storage. We employed RNA sequencing, protein profiling and isotope tracer techniques to evaluate whether differing F:B ratios are associated with differences in C storage. A mesocosm 13C labeled foliar litter decomposition experiment was performed in two soils that were similar in their physico-chemical properties but differed in microbial community structure, specifically their F:B ratio (determined by PLFA analyses, RNA sequencing and protein profiling; all three corroborating each other. Following litter addition, we observed a consistent increase in abundance of fungal phyla; and greater increases in the fungal dominated soil; implicating the role of fungi in litter decomposition. Litter derived 13C in respired CO2 was consistently lower, and residual 13C in bulk SOM was higher in high F:B soil demonstrating greater C storage potential in the fungal:bacterial dominated soil. We conclude that in this soil system, the increased abundance of fungi in both soils and the altered C cycling patterns in the fungal:bacterial dominated soils highlight the significant role of fungi in litter decomposition and indicate that F:B ratios are linked to higher C storage potential.

  20. Bioaugmentation of Hydrogenispora ethanolica LX-B affects hydrogen production through altering indigenous bacterial community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhiman; Guo, Rongbo; Shi, Xiaoshuang; He, Shuai; Wang, Lin; Dai, Meng; Qiu, Yanling; Dang, Xiaoxiao

    2016-07-01

    Bioaugmentation can facilitate hydrogen production from complex organic substrates, but it still is unknown how indigenous microbial communities respond to the added bacteria. Here, using a Hydrogenispora ethanolica LX-B (named as LX-B) bioaugmentation experiments, the distribution of metabolites and the responses of indigenous bacterial communities were investigated via batch cultivation (BC) and repeated batch cultivation (RBC). In BC the LX-B/sludge ratio of 0.12 achieved substantial high hydrogen yield, which was over twice that of control. In RBC one-time bioaugmentation and repeated batch bioaugmentation of LX-B resulted in the hydrogen yield that was average 1.2-fold and 0.8-fold higher than that in control, respectively. This improved hydrogen production performance mainly benefited from a shift in composition of the indigenous bacterial community caused by LX-B bioaugmentation. The findings represented an important step in understanding the relationship between bioaugmentation, a shift in bacterial communities, and altered bioreactor performance. PMID:27023388

  1. Metabolomics Analysis Identifies Intestinal Microbiota-Derived Biomarkers of Colonization Resistance in Clindamycin-Treated Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Jump, Robin L. P.; Polinkovsky, Alex; Hurless, Kelly; Sitzlar, Brett; Eckart, Kevin; Tomas, Myreen; Deshpande, Abhishek; Nerandzic, Michelle M.; Donskey, Curtis J.

    2014-01-01

    Background The intestinal microbiota protect the host against enteric pathogens through a defense mechanism termed colonization resistance. Antibiotics excreted into the intestinal tract may disrupt colonization resistance and alter normal metabolic functions of the microbiota. We used a mouse model to test the hypothesis that alterations in levels of bacterial metabolites in fecal specimens could provide useful biomarkers indicating disrupted or intact colonization resistance after antibioti...

  2. Bacterial Societies: Cooperation, Colonization, and Competition in Micro-Scale Ecosystems

    OpenAIRE

    Hol, F.J.H.

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis, I describe experiments aimed at understanding bacterial population dynamics in ecosystems that are spatially structured at the micro-scale. We combine microfabrication and microfluidics to create synthetic ecosystems that have a complex yet well-defined geometry and chemical composition. Bacteria that inhabit such ecosystems can be observed at high spatiotemporal resolution using fluorescence microscopy. Using this experimental approach we have gained deeper insight into diver...

  3. Extracts of brown seaweeds can attenuate the bacterial lipopolysaccharide-induced pro-inflammatory response in the porcine colon ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahar, B; O'Doherty, J V; Hayes, M; Sweeney, T

    2012-12-01

    Bioactive compound-rich brown seaweeds are demonstrated to have numerous health benefits including anti-microbial and immunomodulatory bioactivities in the pig intestine. In this study, the immunomodulating effects of extracts of brown seaweed (Ascophyllum nodosum and Fucus serratus) were evaluated on the porcine colon using a bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) ex vivo model. Approximately 1.5 × 1.5 cm of pig colon (n = 6) was stripped of its overlying muscle layer and incubated in 1 mL Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium containing bacterial LPS (10 μg) and seaweed extracts (1 mg). Gene expression of interleukin-8 (IL-8) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFA) were measured using quantitative real time PCR. In contrast to the low level of expression of IL-8, IL-6, and TNFA genes in the colonic tissue at 0 h, LPS treatment increased (P Ascophyllum. Ascophyllum extract reduced (P Ascophyllum and Fucus seaweeds have potential to suppress the pro-inflammatory response induced by the bacterial LPS in the pig colon. PMID:23365280

  4. Mathematical modeling of bacterial track-altering motors: Track cleaving through burnt-bridge ratchets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtylla, Blerta; Keener, James P.

    2015-04-01

    The generation of directed movement of cellular components frequently requires the rectification of Brownian motion. Molecular motor enzymes that use ATP to walk on filamentous tracks are typically involved in cell transport, however, a track-altering motor can arise when an enzyme interacts with and alters its track. In Caulobacter crescentus and other bacteria, an active DNA partitioning (Par) apparatus is employed to segregate replicated chromosome regions to specific locations in dividing cells. The Par apparatus is composed of two proteins: ParA, an ATPase that can form polymeric structures on the nucleoid, and ParB, a protein that can bind and destabilize ParA structures. It has been proposed that the ParB-mediated alteration of ParA structures could be responsible for generating the directed movement of DNA during bacterial division. How precisely these actions are coordinated and translated into directed movement is not clear. In this paper we consider the C. crescentus segregation apparatus as an example of a track altering motor that operates using a so-called burnt-bridge mechanism. We develop and analyze mathematical models that examine how diffusion and ATP-hydrolysis-mediated monomer removal (or cleaving) can be combined to generate directed movement. Using a mean first passage approach, we analytically calculate the effective ParA track-cleaving velocities, effective diffusion coefficient, and other higher moments for the movement a ParB protein cluster that breaks monomers away at random locations on a single ParA track. Our model results indicate that cleaving velocities and effective diffusion constants are sensitive to ParB-induced ATP hydrolysis rates. Our analytical results are in excellent agreement with stochastic simulation results.

  5. A tale of two oxidation states: bacterial colonization of arsenic-rich environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Muller

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Microbial biotransformations have a major impact on contamination by toxic elements, which threatens public health in developing and industrial countries. Finding a means of preserving natural environments-including ground and surface waters-from arsenic constitutes a major challenge facing modern society. Although this metalloid is ubiquitous on Earth, thus far no bacterium thriving in arsenic-contaminated environments has been fully characterized. In-depth exploration of the genome of the beta-proteobacterium Herminiimonas arsenicoxydans with regard to physiology, genetics, and proteomics, revealed that it possesses heretofore unsuspected mechanisms for coping with arsenic. Aside from multiple biochemical processes such as arsenic oxidation, reduction, and efflux, H. arsenicoxydans also exhibits positive chemotaxis and motility towards arsenic and metalloid scavenging by exopolysaccharides. These observations demonstrate the existence of a novel strategy to efficiently colonize arsenic-rich environments, which extends beyond oxidoreduction reactions. Such a microbial mechanism of detoxification, which is possibly exploitable for bioremediation applications of contaminated sites, may have played a crucial role in the occupation of ancient ecological niches on earth.

  6. The bacterial cytoskeleton modulates motility, type 3 secretion, and colonization in Salmonella.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Bulmer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although there have been great advances in our understanding of the bacterial cytoskeleton, major gaps remain in our knowledge of its importance to virulence. In this study we have explored the contribution of the bacterial cytoskeleton to the ability of Salmonella to express and assemble virulence factors and cause disease. The bacterial actin-like protein MreB polymerises into helical filaments and interacts with other cytoskeletal elements including MreC to control cell-shape. As mreB appears to be an essential gene, we have constructed a viable ΔmreC depletion mutant in Salmonella. Using a broad range of independent biochemical, fluorescence and phenotypic screens we provide evidence that the Salmonella pathogenicity island-1 type three secretion system (SPI1-T3SS and flagella systems are down-regulated in the absence of MreC. In contrast the SPI-2 T3SS appears to remain functional. The phenotypes have been further validated using a chemical genetic approach to disrupt the functionality of MreB. Although the fitness of ΔmreC is reduced in vivo, we observed that this defect does not completely abrogate the ability of Salmonella to cause disease systemically. By forcing on expression of flagella and SPI-1 T3SS in trans with the master regulators FlhDC and HilA, it is clear that the cytoskeleton is dispensable for the assembly of these structures but essential for their expression. As two-component systems are involved in sensing and adapting to environmental and cell surface signals, we have constructed and screened a panel of such mutants and identified the sensor kinase RcsC as a key phenotypic regulator in ΔmreC. Further genetic analysis revealed the importance of the Rcs two-component system in modulating the expression of these virulence factors. Collectively, these results suggest that expression of virulence genes might be directly coordinated with cytoskeletal integrity, and this regulation is mediated by the two-component system

  7. Impact of Bacterial-Fungal Interactions on the Colonization of the Endosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Overbeek, Leonard S; Saikkonen, Kari

    2016-03-01

    Research on different endophyte taxa and the related scientific disciplines have largely developed separately, and comprehensive community-level studies on bacterial and fungal interactions and their importance are lacking. Here, we discuss the transmission modes of bacteria and fungi and the nature of their interactions in the endosphere at both the molecular and physiological level. Mixed-community biofilms in the endosphere may have a role in protecting endophytes against encountered stresses, such as from plant defense systems. However, transmission from static (in biofilms) to free-living (planktonic) forms may be crucial for the exploration of new habitable spaces in plants. Important features previously recognized as plant-microbe interactions or antagonism in endophyte genomes and metagenomes are proposed to have essential roles in the modulation of endophyte communities. PMID:26821607

  8. Plant genotype-specific archaeal and bacterial endophytes but similar Bacillus antagonists colonize Mediterranean olive trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry eMueller

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Endophytes have an intimate and often symbiotic interaction with their hosts. Less is known about the composition and function of endophytes in trees. In order to evaluate our hypothesis that plant genotype and origin have a strong impact on both, endophytes of leaves from 10 Olea europaea L. cultivars from the Mediterranean basin growing at a single agricultural site in Spain and from nine wild olive trees located in natural habitats in Greece, Cyprus and on Madeira Island were studied. The composition of the bacterial endophytic communities as revealed by 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing and the subsequent PCoA analysis showed a strong correlation to the plant genotypes. The bacterial distribution patterns were congruent with the plant origins in Eastern and Western areas of the Mediterranean basin. Subsequently, the endophytic microbiome of wild olives was shown to be closely related to those of cultivated olives of the corresponding geographic origins. The olive leaf endosphere harbored mostly Proteobacteria, followed by Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes. The detection of a high portion of archaeal taxa belonging to the phyla Thaumarchaeota, Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota in the amplicon libraries was an unexpected discovery, which was confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR revealing an archaeal portion of up to 35.8%. Although the function of these Archaea for their host plant remains speculative, this finding suggests a significant relevance of archaeal endophytes for plant-microbe interactions. In addition, the antagonistic potential of culturable endophytes was determined; all isolates with antagonistic activity against the olive-pathogenic fungus Verticillium dahliae Kleb. belong to Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. In contrast to the specific global structural diversity, BOX-fingerprints of the antagonistic Bacillus isolates were highly similar and independent of the olive genotype from which they were isolated.

  9. Circulatory shear flow alters the viability and proliferation of circulating colon cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Rong; Emery, Travis; Zhang, Yongguo; Xia, Yuxuan; Sun, Jun; Wan, Jiandi

    2016-06-01

    During cancer metastasis, circulating tumor cells constantly experience hemodynamic shear stress in the circulation. Cellular responses to shear stress including cell viability and proliferation thus play critical roles in cancer metastasis. Here, we developed a microfluidic approach to establish a circulatory microenvironment and studied circulating human colon cancer HCT116 cells in response to a variety of magnitude of shear stress and circulating time. Our results showed that cell viability decreased with the increase of circulating time, but increased with the magnitude of wall shear stress. Proliferation of cells survived from circulation could be maintained when physiologically relevant wall shear stresses were applied. High wall shear stress (60.5 dyne/cm2), however, led to decreased cell proliferation at long circulating time (1 h). We further showed that the expression levels of β-catenin and c-myc, proliferation regulators, were significantly enhanced by increasing wall shear stress. The presented study provides a new insight to the roles of circulatory shear stress in cellular responses of circulating tumor cells in a physiologically relevant model, and thus will be of interest for the study of cancer cell mechanosensing and cancer metastasis.

  10. Therapeutic helminth infection of macaques with idiopathic chronic diarrhea alters the inflammatory signature and mucosal microbiota of the colon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Jana Broadhurst

    Full Text Available Idiopathic chronic diarrhea (ICD is a leading cause of morbidity amongst rhesus monkeys kept in captivity. Here, we show that exposure of affected animals to the whipworm Trichuris trichiura led to clinical improvement in fecal consistency, accompanied by weight gain, in four out of the five treated monkeys. By flow cytometry analysis of pinch biopsies collected during colonoscopies before and after treatment, we found an induction of a mucosal T(H2 response following helminth treatment that was associated with a decrease in activated CD4(+ Ki67+ cells. In parallel, expression profiling with oligonucleotide microarrays and real-time PCR analysis revealed reductions in T(H1-type inflammatory gene expression and increased expression of genes associated with IgE signaling, mast cell activation, eosinophil recruitment, alternative activation of macrophages, and worm expulsion. By quantifying bacterial 16S rRNA in pinch biopsies using real-time PCR analysis, we found reduced bacterial attachment to the intestinal mucosa post-treatment. Finally, deep sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA revealed changes to the composition of microbial communities attached to the intestinal mucosa following helminth treatment. Thus, the genus Streptophyta of the phylum Cyanobacteria was vastly increased in abundance in three out of five ICD monkeys relative to healthy controls, but was reduced to control levels post-treatment; by contrast, the phylum Tenericutes was expanded post-treatment. These findings suggest that helminth treatment in primates can ameliorate colitis by restoring mucosal barrier functions and reducing overall bacterial attachment, and also by altering the communities of attached bacteria. These results also define ICD in monkeys as a tractable preclinical model for ulcerative colitis in which these effects can be further investigated.

  11. Bacterial chitinolytic communities respond to chitin and pH alteration in soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kielak, Anna; Cretoiu, Mariana; Semenov, Alexander;

    2013-01-01

    in moderately acid soil in which the level of chitin, next to the pH, was altered. Examination of chitinase activities revealed fast responses to the added crude chitin, with peaks of enzymatic activity occurring on day 7. PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE)-based analyses of 16S rRNA and chi......A genes showed structural changes of the phylogenetically and functionally based bacterial communities following chitin addition and pH alteration. Pyrosequencing analysis indicated (i) that the diversity of chiA gene types in soil is enormous and (i) that different chiA gene types are selected...... by the addition of chitin at different prevailing soil pH values. Interestingly, a major role of Gram-negative bacteria versus a minor one of Actinobacteria in the immediate response to the added chitin (based on 16S rRNA gene abundance and chiA gene types) was indicated. The results of this study enhance our...

  12. Application of air ions for bacterial de-colonization in air filters contaminated by aerosolized bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yang Seon, E-mail: rup2r@yonsei.ac.kr [School of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei University, 262 Seongsanno, Seodaemun-Gu, Seoul, 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Ki Young, E-mail: yky810921@yonsei.ac.kr [Exhaust Emission Engineering Team, Hyundai Motor Company, Hwaseong 445-706, Republic of Korea (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jae Hong, E-mail: cheap@yonsei.ac.kr [School of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei University, 262 Seongsanno, Seodaemun-Gu, Seoul, 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Jungho, E-mail: hwangjh@yonsei.ac.kr [School of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei University, 262 Seongsanno, Seodaemun-Gu, Seoul, 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-15

    We aerosolized the Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis) bacteria and collected them on membrane filters. Then we generated air ions by applying a high voltage to a carbon fiber tip and applied them to the contaminated filters. The antibacterial efficiency was not significantly affected by the bacteria being Gram-positive or Gram-negative, however, negative ions showed a lower antibacterial efficiency than positive ions to both E. coli and S. epidermidis, even though the concentration of negative air ions was much higher than that of positive air ions. With a field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) images and fluorescence microscopy images using a LIVE/DEAD BacLight Bacterial Viability Kit, electrostatic disruption of the bacteria was found to be the dominant antibacterial effect. - Research Highlights: {yields}This study examined the effects of air ions generated by a carbon fiber ionizer on the inactivation of bioaerosols. {yields}When the ion exposure time and the ion generation concentration were increased, the antibacterial efficiency increased. {yields}The bioaerosols carried a significant number of negative electrical charges. {yields}Negative ions showed lower antibacterial efficiency than positive ions to both E. coli and S. epidermidis, even though the concentration of negative air ions was much higher than that of positive air ions.

  13. beta-Sitosterol inhibits HT-29 human colon cancer cell growth and alters membrane lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, A B; Chen, Y C; Fink, C S; Hennessey, T

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of beta-sitosterol, the main dietary phytosterol on the growth of HT-29 cells, a human colon cancer cell line. In addition, the incorporation of this phytosterol into cellular membranes and how this might influence the lipid composition of the membranes were investigated. Tumor cells were grown in DMEM containing 10% FBS and supplemented with sterols (cholesterol or beta-sitosterol) at final concentrations up to 16 microM. The sterols were supplied to the media in the form of sterol cyclodextrin complexes. The cyclodextrin used was 2-hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin. The sterol to cyclodextrin molar ratio was maintained at 1:300. The study indicated that 8 and 16 microM beta-sitosterol were effective at cel growth inhibition as compared to cholesterol or to the control (no sterol supplementation). After supplementation with 16 microM beta-sitosterol for 9 days, cell growth was only one-third that of cells supplemented with equimolar concentration of cholesterol. No effect was observed on total membrane phospholipid concentration. At 16 microM beta-sitosterol supplementation, membrane cholesterol was reduced by 26%. Cholesterol supplementation resulted in a significant increase in the cholesterol/phospholipid ratio compared to either beta-sitosterol supplemented cells or controls. There was a 50% reduction in membrane sphingomyelin (SM) of cells grown in 16 microM beta-sitosterol. Additional changes were observed in the fatty acid composition of minor phospholipids of beta-sitosterol supplemented cells, such as SM, phosphatidylserine (PS), and phosphatidylinositol (PI). Only in the case of PI, was there an effect of these fatty acid changes on the unsaturation index, beta-sitosterol incorporation resulted in an increase in the U.I. It is possible that the observed growth inhibition by beta-sitosterol may be mediated through the influence of signal transduction pathways that involve membrane phospholipids.

  14. Longevity in mice is promoted by probiotic-induced suppression of colonic senescence dependent on upregulation of gut bacterial polyamine production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuharu Matsumoto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic low-grade inflammation is recognized as an important factor contributing to senescence and age-related diseases. In mammals, levels of polyamines (PAs decrease during the ageing process; PAs are known to decrease systemic inflammation by inhibiting inflammatory cytokine synthesis in macrophages. Reductions in intestinal luminal PAs levels have been associated with intestinal barrier dysfunction. The probiotic strain Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis LKM512 is known to increase intestinal luminal PA concentrations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We supplemented the diet of 10-month-old Crj:CD-1 female mice with LKM512 for 11 months, while the controls received no supplementation. Survival rates were compared using Kaplan-Meier survival curves. LKM512-treated mice survived significantly longer than controls (P<0.001; moreover, skin ulcers and tumors were more common in the control mice. We then analyzed inflammatory and intestinal conditions by measuring several markers using HPLC, ELISA, reverse transcription-quantitative PCR, and histological slices. LKM512 mice showed altered 16S rRNA gene expression of several predominant intestinal bacterial groups. The fecal concentrations of PAs, but not of short-chain fatty acids, were significantly higher in LKM512-treated mice (P<0.05. Colonic mucosal function was also better in LKM512 mice, with increased mucus secretion and better maintenance of tight junctions. Changes in gene expression levels were evaluated using the NimbleGen mouse DNA microarray. LKM512 administration also downregulated the expression of ageing-associated and inflammation-associated genes and gene expression levels in 21-month-old LKM512-treated mice resembled those in 10-month-old untreated (younger mice. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study demonstrated increased longevity in mice following probiotic treatment with LKM512, possibly due to the suppression of chronic low-grade inflammation in the colon

  15. PhyloChip microarray analysis reveals altered gastrointestinal microbial communities in a rat model of colonic hypersensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, T.A.; Holmes, S.; Alekseyenko, A.V.; Shenoy, M.; DeSantis, T.; Wu, C.H.; Andersen, G.L.; Winston, J.; Sonnenburg, J.; Pasricha, P.J.; Spormann, A.

    2010-12-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a chronic, episodic gastrointestinal disorder that is prevalent in a significant fraction of western human populations; and changes in the microbiota of the large bowel have been implicated in the pathology of the disease. Using a novel comprehensive, high-density DNA microarray (PhyloChip) we performed a phylogenetic analysis of the microbial community of the large bowel in a rat model in which intracolonic acetic acid in neonates was used to induce long lasting colonic hypersensitivity and decreased stool water content and frequency, representing the equivalent of human constipation-predominant IBS. Our results revealed a significantly increased compositional difference in the microbial communities in rats with neonatal irritation as compared with controls. Even more striking was the dramatic change in the ratio of Firmicutes relative to Bacteroidetes, where neonatally irritated rats were enriched more with Bacteroidetes and also contained a different composition of species within this phylum. Our study also revealed differences at the level of bacterial families and species. The PhyloChip is a useful and convenient method to study enteric microflora. Further, this rat model system may be a useful experimental platform to study the causes and consequences of changes in microbial community composition associated with IBS.

  16. The Bacterial Microbiota in Inflammatory Lung Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffnagle, Gary B.; Dickson, Robert P.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous lines of evidence, ranging from recent studies back to those in the 1920's, have demonstrated that the lungs are NOT bacteria-free during health. We have recently proposed that the entire respiratory tract should be considered a single ecosystem extending from the nasal and oral cavities to the alveoli, which includes gradients and niches that modulate microbiome dispersion, retention, survival and proliferation. Bacterial exposure and colonization of the lungs during health is most likely constant and transient, respectively. Host microanatomy, cell biology and innate defenses are altered during chronic lung disease, which in turn, alters the dynamics of bacterial turnover in the lungs and can lead to longer term bacterial colonization, as well as blooms of well-recognized respiratory bacterial pathogens. A few new respiratory colonizers have been identified by culture-independent methods, such as Pseudomonas fluorescens; however, the role of these bacteria in respiratory disease remains to be determined. PMID:26122174

  17. NMR study of the 1-{sup 13}C glucose colon bacterial metabolism; Etude du metabolisme bacterien colique du 1-{sup 13}C glucose par RMN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briet, F.; Flourie, B.; Pochart, P.; Rambaud, J.C.; Desjeux, J.F. [Hopital Saint-Lazare, 75 - Paris (France); Dallery, L. [Conservatoire National des Arts et Metiers (CNAM), 75 - Paris (France); Grivet, J.P. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 45 - Orleans-la-Source (France)

    1994-12-31

    The aim of the study is to examine in-vitro and by nuclear magnetic resonance the biological pathways for the fermentation of the 1-{sup 13}C labelled glucose (99 atoms percent) by human colon bacteria. The preparation of the bacterial suspension and the glucose degradation kinetics are presented; the NMR analysis sensitivity and quantification features are discussed and results are presented. 2 figs., 1 ref.

  18. 苄硝唑诱导大鼠结肠超微结构和生化改变%Benznidazole-induced ultrastructural and biochemical alterations in rat colon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Edith Graciela DIAZ; Carmen RODRIGUEZ de CASTRO; María MONTALTO de MECCA; José Alberto CASTRO

    2000-01-01

    AIM: To study the effects of benznidazole (Bz), a drug used in the chemotherapy of the acute and the intermediate phase of Chagas' disease, on the colon of rats. METHODS: Sprague Dawley male rats received Bz 100 mg/kg ig. After 24 h colons were examined by electron microscopy. Concentrations of Bz in colonic tissue were measured by HPLC. Bz nitroreduction was followed by the decrease in the drug concentration using spectrophotometry and HPLC or by covalent binding to proteins of reactive products formed under in vivo and in vitro conditions. RESULTS: Colon mucosa of Bz-treated rats showed intense ultraslrucmral alterations: abundant mucus secretion at the level of the Goblet cells and dilatation of the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi apparatus in epithelial cells. The concentration of Bz in tissue was (59 ±18) and (93±14) nmoL/g (protein) 1 and 3 h after oral administration to rats, respectively. Colonic microsomes anaerobically activated Bz in the presence of NADPH. This activating nitroreductive pathway only involved a minor part of the total Bz and could not be detected spectrophotometrically or by HPLC analysis of the Bz consumed. Reactive metabolites that bound covalently to microsomal proteins were formed in this process.The covalent binding was also observed in vivo 1, 3, 6, and 24 h after administration of the labeled drug to rots. CONCLUSION: Reactive Bz metabolites produced during nitroreductive bioactivation of the drug in the colonic mucosa could interact with proteins and other cellular constituents to cause injury.

  19. AI-2 biosynthesis module in a magnetic nanofactory alters bacterial response via localized synthesis and delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Rohan; Bentley, William E

    2009-02-01

    Nanofactories are nano-dimensioned and comprised of modules serving various functions that alter the response of targeted cells when deployed by locally synthesizing and delivering cargo to the surfaces of the targeted cells. In its basic form, a nanofactory consists of a minimum of two functional modules: a cell capture module and a synthesis module. In this work, magnetic nanofactories that alter the response of targeted bacteria by the localized synthesis and delivery of the "universal" bacterial quorum sensing signal molecule autoinducer AI-2 are demonstrated. The magnetic nanofactories consist of a cell capture module (chitosan-mag nanoparticles) and an AI-2 biosynthesis module that contains both AI-2 biosynthetic enzymes Pfs and LuxS on a fusion protein (His-LuxS-Pfs-Tyr, HLPT) assembled together. HLPT is hypothesized to be more efficient than its constituent enzymes (used separately) at conversion of the substrate SAH to product AI-2 on account of the proximity of the two enzymes within the fusion protein. HLPT is demonstrated to be more active than the constituent enzymes, Pfs and LuxS, over a wide range of experimental conditions. The magnetic nanofactories (containing bound HLPT) are also demonstrated to be more active than free, unbound HLPT. They are also shown to elicit an increased response in targeted Escherichia coli cells, due to the localized synthesis and delivery of AI-2, when compared to the response produced by the addition of AI-2 directly to the cells. Studies investigating the universality of AI-2 and unraveling AI-2 based quorum sensing in bacteria using magnetic nanofactories are envisioned. The prospects of using such multi-modular nanofactories in developing the next generation of antimicrobials based on intercepting and interrupting quorum sensing based signaling are discussed.

  20. Growth promotion and colonization of switchgrass (Panicum virgatum cv. Alamo by bacterial endophyte Burkholderia phytofirmans strain PsJN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Seonhwa

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Switchgrass is one of the most promising bioenergy crop candidates for the US. It gives relatively high biomass yield and can grow on marginal lands. However, its yields vary from year to year and from location to location. Thus it is imperative to develop a low input and sustainable switchgrass feedstock production system. One of the most feasible ways to increase biomass yields is to harness benefits of microbial endophytes. Results We demonstrate that one of the most studied plant growth promoting bacterial endophytes, Burkholderia phytofirmans strain PsJN, is able to colonize and significantly promote growth of switchgrass cv. Alamo under in vitro, growth chamber, and greenhouse conditions. In several in vitro experiments, the average fresh weight of PsJN-inoculated plants was approximately 50% higher than non-inoculated plants. When one-month-old seedlings were grown in a growth chamber for 30 days, the PsJN-inoculated Alamo plants had significantly higher shoot and root biomass compared to controls. Biomass yield (dry weight averaged from five experiments was 54.1% higher in the inoculated treatment compared to non-inoculated control. Similar results were obtained in greenhouse experiments with transplants grown in 4-gallon pots for two months. The inoculated plants exhibited more early tillers and persistent growth vigor with 48.6% higher biomass than controls. We also found that PsJN could significantly promote growth of switchgrass cv. Alamo under sub-optimal conditions. However, PsJN-mediated growth promotion in switchgrass is genotype specific. Conclusions Our results show B. phytofirmans strain PsJN significantly promotes growth of switchgrass cv. Alamo under different conditions, especially in the early growth stages leading to enhanced production of tillers. This phenomenon may benefit switchgrass establishment in the first year. Moreover, PsJN significantly stimulated growth of switchgrass cv. Alamo under sub

  1. Soil Fungal:Bacterial Ratios Are Linked to Altered Carbon Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Ashish A.; Chowdhury, Somak; Schlager, Veronika; Oliver, Anna; Puissant, Jeremy; Vazquez, Perla G. M.; Jehmlich, Nico; von Bergen, Martin; Griffiths, Robert I.; Gleixner, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    Despite several lines of observational evidence, there is a lack of consensus on whether higher fungal:bacterial (F:B) ratios directly cause higher soil carbon (C) storage. We employed RNA sequencing, protein profiling and isotope tracer techniques to evaluate whether differing F:B ratios are associated with differences in C storage. A mesocosm 13C labeled foliar litter decomposition experiment was performed in two soils that were similar in their physico-chemical properties but differed in microbial community structure, specifically their F:B ratio (determined by PLFA analyses, RNA sequencing and protein profiling; all three corroborating each other). Following litter addition, we observed a consistent increase in abundance of fungal phyla; and greater increases in the fungal dominated soil; implicating the role of fungi in litter decomposition. Litter derived 13C in respired CO2 was consistently lower, and residual 13C in bulk SOM was higher in high F:B soil demonstrating greater C storage potential in the F:B dominated soil. We conclude that in this soil system, the increased abundance of fungi in both soils and the altered C cycling patterns in the F:B dominated soils highlight the significant role of fungi in litter decomposition and indicate that F:B ratios are linked to higher C storage potential. PMID:27555839

  2. Rhizospheric Bacterial Strain Brevibacterium casei MH8a Colonizes Plant Tissues and Enhances Cd, Zn, Cu Phytoextraction by White Mustard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Płociniczak, Tomasz; Sinkkonen, Aki; Romantschuk, Martin; Sułowicz, Sławomir; Piotrowska-Seget, Zofia

    2016-01-01

    Environmental pollution by heavy metals has become a serious problem in the world. Phytoextraction, which is one of the plant-based technologies, has attracted the most attention for the bioremediation of soils polluted with these contaminants. The aim of this study was to determine whether the multiple-tolerant bacterium, Brevibacterium casei MH8a isolated from the heavy metal-contaminated rhizosphere soil of Sinapis alba L., is able to promote plant growth and enhance Cd, Zn, and Cu uptake by white mustard under laboratory conditions. Additionally, the ability of the rifampicin-resistant spontaneous mutant of MH8a to colonize plant tissues and its mechanisms of plant growth promotion were also examined. In order to assess the ecological consequences of bioaugmentation on autochthonous bacteria, the phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis was used. The MH8a strain exhibited the ability to produce ammonia, 1-amino-cyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid deaminase, indole 3-acetic acid and HCN but was not able to solubilize inorganic phosphate and produce siderophores. Introduction of MH8a into soil significantly increased S. alba biomass and the accumulation of Cd (208%), Zn (86%), and Cu (39%) in plant shoots in comparison with those grown in non-inoculated soil. Introduced into the soil, MH8a was able to enter the plant and was found in the roots and leaves of inoculated plants thus indicating its endophytic features. PLFA analysis revealed that the MH8a that was introduced into soil had a temporary influence on the structure of the autochthonous bacterial communities. The plant growth-promoting features of the MH8a strain and its ability to enhance the metal uptake by white mustard and its long-term survival in soil as well as its temporary impact on autochthonous microorganisms make the strain a suitable candidate for the promotion of plant growth and the efficiency of phytoextraction. PMID:26909087

  3. Rhizospheric bacterial strain Brevibacterium casei MH8a colonizes plant tissues and enhances Cd, Zn, Cu phytoextraction by white mustard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz ePłociniczak

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Environmental pollution by heavy metals has become a serious problem in the world. Phytoextraction, which is one of the plant-based technologies, has attracted the most attention for the bioremediation of soils polluted with these contaminants.The aim of this study was to determine whether the multiple-tolerant bacterium, Brevibacterium casei MH8a isolated from the heavy metal-contaminated rhizosphere soil of Sinapis alba L., is able to promote plant growth and enhance Cd, Zn and Cu uptake by white mustard under laboratory conditions. Additionally, the ability of the rifampicin-resistant spontaneous mutant of MH8a to colonize plant tissues and its mechanisms of plant growth promotion were also examined. In order to assess the ecological consequences of bioaugmentation on autochthonous bacteria, the phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA analysis was used. The MH8a strain exhibited the ability to produce ammonia, 1-amino-cyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid deaminase, indole 3-acetic acid and HCN but was not able to solubilize inorganic phosphate and produce siderophores. Introduction of MH8a into soil significantly increased S. alba biomass and the accumulation of Cd (208%, Zn (86% and Cu (39% in plant shoots in comparison with those grown in non-inoculated soil. Introduced into the soil, MH8a was able to enter the plant and was found in the roots and leaves of inoculated plants thus indicating its endophytic features. PLFA analysis revealed that the MH8a that was introduced into soil had a temporary influence on the structure of the autochthonous bacterial communities. The plant growth-promoting features of the MH8a strain and its ability to enhance the metal uptake by white mustard and its long-term survival in soil as well as its temporary impact on autochthonous microorganisms make the strain a suitable candidate for the promotion of plant growth and the efficiency of phytoextraction.

  4. Genetic and metabolic signals during acute enteric bacterial infection alter the microbiota and drive progression to chronic inflammatory disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamdar, Karishma; Khakpour, Samira; Chen, Jingyu; Leone, Vanessa; Brulc, Jennifer; Mangatu, Thomas; Antonopoulos, Dionysios A.; Chang, Eugene B; Kahn, Stacy A.; Kirschner, Barbara S; Young, Glenn; DePaolo, R. William

    2016-01-13

    Chronic inflammatory disorders are thought to arise due to an interplay between predisposing host genetics and environmental factors. For example, the onset of inflammatory bowel disease is associated with enteric proteobacterial infection, yet the mechanistic basis for this association is unclear. We have shown previously that genetic defiency in TLR1 promotes acute enteric infection by the proteobacteria Yersinia enterocolitica. Examining that model further, we uncovered an altered cellular immune response that promotes the recruitment of neutrophils which in turn increases metabolism of the respiratory electron acceptor tetrathionate by Yersinia. These events drive permanent alterations in anti-commensal immunity, microbiota composition, and chronic inflammation, which persist long after Yersinia clearence. Deletion of the bacterial genes involved in tetrathionate respiration or treatment using targeted probiotics could prevent microbiota alterations and inflammation. Thus, acute infection can drive long term immune and microbiota alterations leading to chronic inflammatory disease in genetically predisposed individuals.

  5. Dandruff Is Associated with Disequilibrium in the Proportion of the Major Bacterial and Fungal Populations Colonizing the Scalp

    OpenAIRE

    Cécile Clavaud; Roland Jourdain; Avner Bar-Hen; Magali Tichit; Christiane Bouchier; Florence Pouradier; Charles El Rawadi; Jacques Guillot; Florence Ménard-Szczebara; Lionel Breton; Jean-Paul Latgé; Isabelle Mouyna

    2013-01-01

    The bacterial and fungal communities associated with dandruff were investigated using culture-independent methodologies in the French subjects. The major bacterial and fungal species inhabiting the scalp subject's were identified by cloning and sequencing of the conserved ribosomal unit regions (16S for bacterial and 28S-ITS for fungal) and were further quantified by quantitative PCR. The two main bacterial species found on the scalp surface were Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus epi...

  6. Development of a real-time PCR method for the detection of bacterial colonization in rat models of severe acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Jun-sheng; LIU Zhong-hui; LI Chu-jun; WU Xiao-bin; DIAO De-chang; DU Yan-ping; CHEN Jun-rong; LI Yun; WANG Hua-she

    2010-01-01

    Background Techniques for the fast and accurate detection of bacterial infection are critical for early diagnosis, prevention and treatment of bacterial translocation in clinical severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). In this study, the availability of a real-time PCR method in detection of bacterial colonization in SAP rat models was investigated.Methods Samples of blood, mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN), pancreas and liver from 24 specific pathogen-free rats (8 in a control group, 16 in a SAP group) were detected for bacterial infection rates both by agar plate culture and a real-time PCR method, and the results were made contrast.Results Bacterial infection rates of the blood, MLN, pancreas and liver in the SAP group and the control group by the two different methods were almost the same, which were 5/16, 12/16, 15/16, 12/16 in the SAP group compared with 0/8, 1/8, 0/8, 0/8 in the control group by agar plate culture, while 5/16, 10/16, 13/16, 12/16 and 0/8, 1/8, 0/8, 0/8 respectively by a real-time PCR method. Bacterial number was estimated by real-time PCR, which showed that in the same mass of tissues, the pancreas contained more bacteria than the other three kinds of organs in SAP rats (P <0.01), that may be due to the edema, necrosis and hemorrhage existing in the pancreas, making it easier for bacteria to invade and breed.Conclusion Fast and accurate detection of bacterial translocation in SAP rat models could be carried out by a real-time PCR procedure.

  7. Soluble metals in residual oil fly ash alter innate and adaptive pulmonary immune responses to bacterial infection in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The soluble metals of the pollutant, residual oil fly ash (ROFA), have been shown to alter pulmonary bacterial clearance in rats. The goal of this study was to determine the potential effects on both the innate and adaptive lung immune responses after bacterial infection in rats pre-exposed to the soluble metals in ROFA. Sprague-Dawley rats were intratracheally dosed (i.t.) at day 0 with ROFA (R-Total) (1.0 mg/100 g body weight), the soluble fraction of ROFA (R-Soluble), the soluble sample subject to a chelator (R-Chelex), or phosphate-buffered saline (Saline). On day 3, rats were administered an i.t. dose of 5 x 104 Listeria monocytogenes. On days 6, 8, and 10, bacterial pulmonary clearance was monitored and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed on days 3 (pre-infection), 6, 8, and 10. A concentrated first fraction of lavage fluid was retained for analysis of lactate dehydrogenase and albumin to assess lung injury. BAL cell number, phenotype, and production of reactive oxygen (ROS) and nitrogen species (RNS) were assessed, and a variety of cytokines were measured in the BAL fluid. Rats pre-treated with R-Soluble showed elevated lung injury/cytotoxicity and increased cellular influx into the lungs. R-Soluble-treatment also altered ROS, RNS, and cytokine levels, and caused a degree of macrophage and T cell inhibition. These effects of R-Soluble result in increased pulmonary bacterial burden after infection. The results suggest that soluble metals in ROFA increase lung injury and inflammation, and alter both innate and adaptive pulmonary immune responses

  8. Bacterial colonization of disposable soft contact lenses is greater during corneal infiltrative events than during asymptomatic extended lens wear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaridurg, P R; Sharma, S; Willcox, M; Naduvilath, T J; Sweeney, D F; Holden, B A; Rao, G N

    2000-12-01

    Microorganisms, especially gram-negative bacteria, are considered to play a role in the etiology of certain corneal infiltrative events (CIEs) observed during soft contact lens wear. This study explored the possibility of microbial colonization of soft contact lenses as a risk factor leading to CIEs. In a clinical trial conducted from March 1993 to January 1996, 330 subjects wore disposable soft contact lenses on a 6-night extended-wear and disposal schedule. During this period, 4,321 lenses (118 during CIEs; 4,203 during asymptomatic lens wear) were recovered aseptically and analyzed for microbial colonization. A greater percentage of lenses were free from microbial colonization during asymptomatic wear than during CIEs (42 versus 23%; P ocular microbiota. Of the gram-positive bacteria, the incidence of Streptococcus pneumoniae was greater during CIE than during asymptomatic wear (7.6 versus 0.6%; P contact lens acute red eye, and asymptomatic infiltrative keratitis were associated with lens colonization with gram-negative bacteria or S. pneumoniae. Colonization of soft contact lenses with pathogenic bacteria, especially gram-negative bacteria and S. pneumoniae, appears to be a significant risk factor leading to CIE.

  9. Bacterial translocation in rats nonfunctioning diverted distal colon Translocação bacteriana no coto colônico distal desfuncionalizado de ratos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Edilson Leite Pinto Júnior

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate whether the alterations of the diverted colon segment mucosa, evidenced in fecal colitis, would be able to alter Bacterial Translocation (BT. METHODS: Sixty-two Wistar male rats ranging from 220 to 320 grams of weight, were divided in two groups: A (Colostomy and B (Control, with 31 animals each one. In group A, all animals underwent end colostomy, one stoma, in ascending colon; and in the 70th POD was injected in five rats, by rectal route diverted segment - 2ml of a 0.9% saline solution in animals (A1 subgroup; in eight it was inoculated, by rectal route, 2ml of a solution containing Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 (American Type Culture Collection, in a concentration of 10(8 Colony Forming Unit for milliliters (CFU/ml - A2 Subgroup; in ten animals the same solution of E. coli was inoculated, in a concentration of 10(11 CFU/ml (A3 Subgroup; and in eight it was collected part of the mucus found in the diverted distal colonic segment for neutral sugars and total proteins dosage (A4 subgroup. The animals from the group B underwent the same procedures of group A, but with differences in the colostomy confection. In rats from subgroups A1, A2, A3, B1, B2, and B3 2ml of blood were aspirated from the heart, and fragments from mesenteric lymphatic nodule, liver, spleen, lung and kidney taken for microbiological analysis, after their death. This analysis consisted of evidencing the presence of E. coli ATCC 25922 CFU. Mann-Whitney and ANOVA Tests were applied as analytic techniques for association of variables. RESULTS: The occurrence of BT was evidenced only in those animals in which inoculated concentration of E. coli ATCC 25922, reached levels of 10(11CFU/ml, i.e. in Subgroups A3 and B3, although, being significantly greater (80% in those animals without colostomy (subgroup B3 when compared to the ones with colostomy (20% from the subgroup A3 (P OBJETIVO: Investigar se as alterações do cólon desfuncionalizado, evidenciadas na

  10. The deleterious metabolic and genotoxic effects of the bacterial metabolite p-cresol on colonic epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Andriamihaja, Mireille; Lan, Annaig; Beaumont, Martin; Audebert, Marc; Wong, Ximena; Yamada, Kana; Yin, Yulong; Tomé, Daniel; Carrasco Pozo, Catalina; Gotteland, Martin; Kong, Xiangfeng

    2015-01-01

    p-Cresol that is produced by the intestinal microbiota horn the amino acid tyrosine is found at millimolar concentrations in the human feces. The effects of this metabolite On colonic epithelial cells were tested in this study. Using the human colonic epithelial HT-29 Glc(-/+) cell line, we found that 0.8 mM p-cresol inhibits cell proliferation, an effect concomitant with an accumulation of the cells in the 5 phase and with a slight increase of cell detachment without necrotic effect. At this...

  11. Oral mucosal lipids are antibacterial against Porphyromonas gingivalis, induce ultrastructural damage, and alter bacterial lipid and protein compositions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Carol L Fischer; Katherine S Walters; David R Drake; Deborah V Dawson; Derek R Blanchette; Kim A Brogden; Philip W Wertz

    2013-01-01

    Oral mucosal and salivary lipids exhibit potent antimicrobial activity for a variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria;however, little is known about their spectrum of antimicrobial activity or mechanisms of action against oral bacteria. In this study, we examine the activity of two fatty acids and three sphingoid bases against Porphyromonas gingivalis, an important colonizer of the oral cavity implicated in periodontitis. Minimal inhibitory concentrations, minimal bactericidal concentrations, and kill kinetics revealed variable, but potent, activity of oral mucosal and salivary lipids against P. gingivalis, indicating that lipid structure may be an important determinant in lipid mechanisms of activity against bacteria, although specific components of bacterial membranes are also likely important. Electron micrographs showed ultrastructural damage induced by sapienic acid and phytosphingosine and confirmed disruption of the bacterial plasma membrane. This information, coupled with the association of treatment lipids with P. gingivalis lipids revealed via thin layer chromatography, suggests that the plasma membrane is a likely target of lipid antibacterial activity. Utilizing a combination of two-dimensional in-gel electrophoresis and Western blot followed by mass spectroscopy and N-terminus degradation sequencing we also show that treatment with sapienic acid induces upregulation of a set of proteins comprising a unique P. gingivalis stress response, including proteins important in fatty acid biosynthesis, metabolism and energy production, protein processing, cell adhesion and virulence. Prophylactic or therapeutic lipid treatments may be beneficial for intervention of infection by supplementing the natural immune function of endogenous lipids on mucosal surfaces.

  12. Diets high in fermentable protein and fibre alter tight junction protein composition with minor effects on barrier function in piglet colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Jan F; Pieper, Robert; Zakrzewski, Silke S; Günzel, Dorothee; Schulzke, Joerg D; Van Kessel, Andrew G

    2014-03-28

    Protein fermentation end products may damage the colonic mucosa, which could be counteracted by dietary inclusion of fermentable carbohydrates (fCHO). Although fermentable crude protein (fCP) and fCHO are known to affect microbial ecology, their interactive effects on epithelial barrier function are unknown. In the present study, in a 2 × 2 factorial experiment, thirty-two weaned piglets were fed low-fCP/low-fCHO (14·5 % crude protein (CP)/14·5 % total dietary fibre (TDF)), low-fCP/high-fCHO (14·8 % CP/16·6 % TDF), high-fCP/low-fCHO (19·8 % CP/14·5 % TDF) and high-fCP/high-fCHO (20·1 % CP/18·0 % TDF) diets. After 21-23 d, samples of proximal and distal colonic mucosae were investigated in Ussing chambers with respect to the paracellular and transcytotic passages of macromolecules and epithelial ion transport. The high-fCHO diets were found to reduce the permeability of the distal colon to the transcytotic marker horseradish peroxidase (HRP, 44 kDa; P <0·05) and also reduce the paracellular permeation of N-hydroxysuccinimide-biotin into the submucosa (443 Da; P <0·05), whereas that of HRP was decreased by the high-fCP diets (P <0·01). Short-circuit current (active ion transport), transepithelial resistance (barrier function) and charge selectivity were largely unaffected in both the segments. However, the high-fCP diets were found to suppress the aldosterone-induced epithelial Na channel activity (P <0·01) irrespective of fCHO inclusion. The high-fCP diets generally reduced the expression of colonic claudin-1, claudin-2 and claudin-3 (P <0·01), while that of claudin-4 was increased by the high-fCHO diets (P <0·01). The high-fCHO diets also altered the ratio between occludin forms (P <0·05) and increased the expression of tricellulin in the proximal colon, which was not observed with high-fCP diets. In conclusion, dietary fCHO and fCP exerted few and largely independent effects on functional measurements, but altered tight junction

  13. Intracloacal inoculation, an effective screening method for determining the efficacy of probiotic bacterial isolates against Campylobacter colonization in broiler chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campylobacter is a leading cause of foodborne illness worldwide. It is common in poultry, and human infections are often associated with consumption of contaminated poultry products. One strategy to reduce Campylobacter colonization in poultry is by using oral probiotics. Unfortunately, oral probiot...

  14. Transgenic tobacco revealing altered bacterial diversity in the rhizosphere during early plant development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andreote, Fernando D.; Mendes, Rodrigo; Dini-Andreote, Francisco; Rossetto, Priscilla B.; Labate, Carlos A.; Pizzirani-Kleiner, Aline A.; van Elsas, Jan Dirck; Azevedo, Joao L.; Araujo, Welington L.

    2008-01-01

    The rhizosphere constitutes a complex niche that may be exploited by a wide variety of bacteria. Bacterium-plant interactions in this niche can be influenced by factors such as the expression of heterologous genes in the plant. The objective of this work was to describe the bacterial communities ass

  15. Chronic N-amended soils exhibit an altered bacterial community structure in Harvard Forest, MA, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turlapati, Swathi A; Minocha, Rakesh; Bhiravarasa, Premsai S; Tisa, Louis S; Thomas, William K; Minocha, Subhash C

    2013-02-01

    At the Harvard Forest, Petersham, MA, the impact of 20 years of annual ammonium nitrate application to the mixed hardwood stand on soil bacterial communities was studied using 16S rRNA genes pyrosequencing. Amplification of 16S rRNA genes was done using DNA extracted from 30 soil samples (three treatments × two horizons × five subplots) collected from untreated (control), low N-amended (50 kg ha(-1) year(-1)) and high N-amended (150 kg ha(-1) year(-1)) plots. A total of 1.3 million sequences were processed using qiime. Although Acidobacteria represented the most abundant phylum based on the number of sequences, Proteobacteria were the most diverse in terms of operational taxonomic units (OTUs). UniFrac analyses revealed that the bacterial communities differed significantly among soil horizons and treatments. Microsite variability among the five subplots was also evident. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling ordination of normalized OTU data followed by permutational manova further confirmed these observations. Richness indicators and indicator species analyses revealed higher bacterial diversity associated with N amendment. Differences in bacterial diversity and community composition associated with the N treatments were also observed at lower phylogenetic levels. Only 28-35% of the 6 936 total OTUs identified were common to three treatments, while the rest were specific to one treatment or common to two. PMID:22974374

  16. Dandruff is associated with disequilibrium in the proportion of the major bacterial and fungal populations colonizing the scalp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile Clavaud

    Full Text Available The bacterial and fungal communities associated with dandruff were investigated using culture-independent methodologies in the French subjects. The major bacterial and fungal species inhabiting the scalp subject's were identified by cloning and sequencing of the conserved ribosomal unit regions (16S for bacterial and 28S-ITS for fungal and were further quantified by quantitative PCR. The two main bacterial species found on the scalp surface were Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus epidermidis, while Malassezia restricta was the main fungal inhabitant. Dandruff was correlated with a higher incidence of M. restricta and S. epidermidis and a lower incidence of P. acnes compared to the control population (p<0.05. These results suggested for the first time using molecular methods, that dandruff is linked to the balance between bacteria and fungi of the host scalp surface.

  17. Wheat and Rice Growth Stages and Fertilization Regimes Alter Soil Bacterial Community Structure, But Not Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jichen; Xue, Chao; Song, Yang; Wang, Lei; Huang, Qiwei; Shen, Qirong

    2016-01-01

    Maintaining soil fertility and the microbial communities that determine fertility is critical to sustainable agricultural strategies, and the use of different organic fertilizer (OF) regimes represents an important practice in attempts to preserve soil quality. However, little is known about the dynamic response of bacterial communities to fertilization regimes across crop growth stages. In this study, we examined microbial community structure and diversity across eight representative growth stages of wheat-rice rotation under four different fertilization treatments: no nitrogen fertilizer (NNF), chemical fertilizer (CF), organic-inorganic mixed fertilizer (OIMF), and OF. Quantitative PCR (QPCR) and high-throughput sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA gene fragments revealed that growth stage as the best predictor of bacterial community abundance and structure. Additionally, bacterial community compositions differed between wheat and rice rotations. Relative to soils under wheat rotation, soils under rice rotation contained higher relative abundances (RA) of anaerobic and mesophilic microbes and lower RA of aerophilic microbes. With respect to fertilization regime, NNF plots had a higher abundance of nitrogen-fixing Cyanobacteria. OIMF had a lower abundance of ammonia-oxidizing Thaumarchaeota compared with CF. Application of chemical fertilizers (CF and OIMF treatments) significantly increased the abundance of some generally oligotrophic bacteria such those belonging to the Acidobacteria, while more copiotrophic of the phylum Proteobacteria increased with OF application. A high correlation coefficient was found when comparing RA of Acidobacteria based upon QPCR vs. sequence analysis, yet poor correlations were found for the α- and β- Proteobacteria, highlighting the caution required when interpreting these molecular data. In total, crop, fertilization scheme and plant developmental stage all influenced soil microbial community structure, but not total levels of alpha

  18. Wheat and Rice Growth Stages and Fertilization Regimes Alter Soil Bacterial Community Structure, But Not Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jichen; Xue, Chao; Song, Yang; Wang, Lei; Huang, Qiwei; Shen, Qirong

    2016-01-01

    Maintaining soil fertility and the microbial communities that determine fertility is critical to sustainable agricultural strategies, and the use of different organic fertilizer (OF) regimes represents an important practice in attempts to preserve soil quality. However, little is known about the dynamic response of bacterial communities to fertilization regimes across crop growth stages. In this study, we examined microbial community structure and diversity across eight representative growth stages of wheat-rice rotation under four different fertilization treatments: no nitrogen fertilizer (NNF), chemical fertilizer (CF), organic-inorganic mixed fertilizer (OIMF), and OF. Quantitative PCR (QPCR) and high-throughput sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA gene fragments revealed that growth stage as the best predictor of bacterial community abundance and structure. Additionally, bacterial community compositions differed between wheat and rice rotations. Relative to soils under wheat rotation, soils under rice rotation contained higher relative abundances (RA) of anaerobic and mesophilic microbes and lower RA of aerophilic microbes. With respect to fertilization regime, NNF plots had a higher abundance of nitrogen-fixing Cyanobacteria. OIMF had a lower abundance of ammonia-oxidizing Thaumarchaeota compared with CF. Application of chemical fertilizers (CF and OIMF treatments) significantly increased the abundance of some generally oligotrophic bacteria such those belonging to the Acidobacteria, while more copiotrophic of the phylum Proteobacteria increased with OF application. A high correlation coefficient was found when comparing RA of Acidobacteria based upon QPCR vs. sequence analysis, yet poor correlations were found for the α- and β- Proteobacteria, highlighting the caution required when interpreting these molecular data. In total, crop, fertilization scheme and plant developmental stage all influenced soil microbial community structure, but not total levels of alpha

  19. Wheat and Rice Growth Stages and Fertilization Regimes Alter Soil Bacterial Community Structure, But Not Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jichen; Xue, Chao; Song, Yang; Wang, Lei; Huang, Qiwei; Shen, Qirong

    2016-01-01

    Maintaining soil fertility and the microbial communities that determine fertility is critical to sustainable agricultural strategies, and the use of different organic fertilizer (OF) regimes represents an important practice in attempts to preserve soil quality. However, little is known about the dynamic response of bacterial communities to fertilization regimes across crop growth stages. In this study, we examined microbial community structure and diversity across eight representative growth stages of wheat-rice rotation under four different fertilization treatments: no nitrogen fertilizer (NNF), chemical fertilizer (CF), organic–inorganic mixed fertilizer (OIMF), and OF. Quantitative PCR (QPCR) and high-throughput sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA gene fragments revealed that growth stage as the best predictor of bacterial community abundance and structure. Additionally, bacterial community compositions differed between wheat and rice rotations. Relative to soils under wheat rotation, soils under rice rotation contained higher relative abundances (RA) of anaerobic and mesophilic microbes and lower RA of aerophilic microbes. With respect to fertilization regime, NNF plots had a higher abundance of nitrogen–fixing Cyanobacteria. OIMF had a lower abundance of ammonia-oxidizing Thaumarchaeota compared with CF. Application of chemical fertilizers (CF and OIMF treatments) significantly increased the abundance of some generally oligotrophic bacteria such those belonging to the Acidobacteria, while more copiotrophic of the phylum Proteobacteria increased with OF application. A high correlation coefficient was found when comparing RA of Acidobacteria based upon QPCR vs. sequence analysis, yet poor correlations were found for the α- and β- Proteobacteria, highlighting the caution required when interpreting these molecular data. In total, crop, fertilization scheme and plant developmental stage all influenced soil microbial community structure, but not total levels of

  20. Tamsulosin alters levofloxacin pharmacokinetics in prostates derived from rats with acute bacterial prostatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-Dong Qin; Ming-Zhao Xiao; Yuan-Da Zhou; Jing Yang; Hai-Xia He; Yue He; Yang Zeng

    2013-01-01

    The combination of levofloxacin and α1 adrenergic antagonist treatment is the current preferred choice for both bacterial and non-bacterial prostatitis.The aim of this study is to explore the influence of α1 adrenergic antagonists on the pharmacokinetics of levofloxacin using rat models with acute bacterial prostatitis (ABP) induced by direct injection with Escherichia coli(ATCC25922).A total of 96 model rats were randomly assigned into two groups:the experimental group (treated with both tamsulosin and levofloxacin,n=48) and the control group (treated with levofloxacin and solvents,n=48).Six rats from each group were euthanized to collect blood,liver,kidney and prostate samples at the time points of 0.125,0.25,0.5,1,2,4,8 and 12 h after drug administration.The levofloxacin concentrations were detected by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC),and the pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated using the 3p97 software program.There were no obvious differences (P>0.05) between the experimental and control groups in the major pharmacokinetic parameters of levofloxacin,including the halftime (t1/2),time to peak (tpeak),clearance rate (CL),maximum concentration (Cmax) and area under the curve (AUC0~12),in the plasma or in the hepatic and kidney tissues of the model rats.However,in the prostatic tissues,tamsulosin increased the Cmax,prolonged the t1/2 and decreased the CL of levofloxacin (P<0.05).These results indicate that tamsulosin may enhance the effect of levofloxacin in the treatment of bacterial prostatitis without changing the drug concentration in the liver and kidney.

  1. Differences in visceral fat and fat bacterial colonization between ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. An in vivo and in vitro study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Zulian

    Full Text Available Crohn's disease (CD is notably characterized by the expansion of visceral fat with small adipocytes expressing a high proportion of anti-inflammatory genes. Conversely, visceral fat depots in ulcerative colitis (UC patients have never been characterized. Our study aims were a to compare adipocyte morphology and gene expression profile and bacterial translocation in omental (OM and mesenteric (MES adipose tissue of patients with UC and CD, and b to investigate the effect of bacterial infection on adipocyte proliferation in vitro. Specimens of OM and MES were collected from 11 UC and 11 CD patients, processed and examined by light microscopy. Gene expression profiles were evaluated in adipocytes isolated from visceral adipose tissue using microarray and RTqPCR validations. Bacteria within adipose tissue were immuno-detected by confocal scanning laser microscopy. Adipocytes were incubated with Enterococcus faecalis and cells counted after 24 h. Morphology and molecular profile of OM and MES revealed that UC adipose tissue is less inflamed than CD adipose tissue. Genes linked to inflammation, bacterial response, chemotaxis and angiogenesis were down-regulated in adipocytes from UC compared to CD, whereas genes related to metallothioneins, apoptosis pathways and growth factor binding were up-regulated. A dense perinuclear positivity for Enterococcus faecalis was detected in visceral adipocytes from CD, whereas positivity was weak in UC. In vitro bacterial infection was associated with a five-fold increase in the proliferation rate of OM preadipocytes. Compared to UC, visceral adipose tissue from CD is more inflamed and more colonized by intestinal bacteria, which increase adipocyte proliferation. The influence of bacteria stored within adipocytes on the clinical course of IBD warrants further investigations.

  2. Soil bacterial community and functional shifts in response to altered snowpack in moist acidic tundra of northern Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricketts, Michael P.; Poretsky, Rachel S.; Welker, Jeffrey M.; Gonzalez-Meler, Miquel A.

    2016-09-01

    functional potential was inferred using ancestral state reconstruction to approximate functional gene abundance, revealing a decreased abundance of genes required for soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition in the organic layers of the deep snow accumulation zones. These results suggest that predicted climate change scenarios may result in altered soil bacterial community structure and function, and indicate a reduction in decomposition potential, alleviated temperature limitations on extracellular enzymatic efficiency, or both. The fate of stored C in Arctic soils ultimately depends on the balance between these mechanisms.

  3. Changes in bacterial community structure in the colon of pigs fed different experimental diets and after infection with Brachyspira hyodysenteriae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leser, Thomas D.; Lindecrona, Rikke Hvid; Jensen, Tim Kåre;

    2000-01-01

    Bacterial communities in the large intestines of pigs were compared using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis targeting the 16S ribosomal DNA. The pigs were fed different experimental diets based on either modified standard feed or cooked rice supplemented with...

  4. On the determining role of network structure titania in silicone against bacterial colonization: Mechanism and disruption of biofilm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Depan, D.; Misra, R.D.K., E-mail: dmisra@louisiana.edu

    2014-01-01

    Silicone-based biomedical devices are prone to microbial adhesion, which is the primary cause of concern in the functioning of the artificial device. Silicone exhibiting long-term and effective antibacterial ability is highly desirable to prevent implant related infections. In this regard, nanophase titania was incorporated in silicone as an integral part of the silicone network structure through cross-link mechanism, with the objective to reduce bacterial adhesion to a minimum. The bacterial adhesion was studied using crystal violet assay, while the mechanism of inhibition of biofilm formation was studied via electron microscopy. The incorporation of nanophase titania in silicone dramatically reduced the viability of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and the capability to adhere on the surface of hybrid silicone by ∼ 93% in relation to stand alone silicone. The conclusion of dramatic reduction in the viability of S. aureus is corroborated by different experimental approaches including biofilm inhibition assay, zone of inhibition, and through a novel experiment that involved incubation of biofilm with titania nanoparticles. It is proposed that the mechanism of disruption of bacterial film in the presence of titania involves puncturing of the bacterial cell membrane. - Highlights: • Network structure titania in silicone imparts antimicrobial activity. • Ability to microbial adhesion is significantly reduced. • Antimicrobial mechanism involves rupture of biofilm.

  5. 抛弃型水凝胶接触镜的细菌定植%Bacterial colonization of hydrogel disposable contact lenses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bakiah Shabamddin; K Wei Chan; Siti Suraiya Mohd Noor; Zunaina Embong

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To determine the rate of bacterial colonization in hydrogel disposable contact lenses and solutions and to identify the contaminating organisms.METHODS:A cross sectional study with purposive sampling was carried out.One hundred hydrogel contact lenses were collected from wearers among undergraduate students of Health Campus,University Sains Malaysia.All lenses and storage solutions were sent for microbiological culture and gram staining.RESULTS:The majority of study participants were females(98%).The mean age was 21.36±1.63 years.Forty-one subject participants(82%)showed positive bacterial colonization of the lenses.From storage solutions 32% yielded positive colonization by bacteria.The most common organisms were coagulase negative staphyJococcus,Staph aureus and streptococci while Pseudomonas sp.and Serratia sp.were isolated more frequently from contact lenses.CONCLUSION:Contact lens wearing is potentially dangerous as a result of high rate of bacterial colonization of the lenses and its storage solutions.Extreme precaution and adherence to strict hygienic practice is recommended during lens handling and wearing.%目的:确定抛弃型水凝胶接触镜及其护理液细菌定植的比率,并确定污染的病原体.方法:按目的抽样进行横断面研究.从马来西亚Sains大学健康校园的本科学生接触镜配戴者中收集100片水凝胶接触镜.所有的镜片和护理液均送微生物培养和革兰氏染色.结果:大多数的研究参与者为女性(98%).平均年龄21.36±1.63岁.41片接触镜(82%)呈现阳性细菌定植,32%的护理液可见阳性细菌定植.最常见的病原体是凝固酶阴性葡萄球菌、金黄色葡萄球菌和链球菌,而在接触镜中能更频繁地分离出假单胞菌和沙雷氏菌.结论:配戴接触镜有导致镜片和护理液细菌定植的潜在危险.建议在镜片护理和配戴过程中采取最大程度的预防措施并严格遵守卫生做法.

  6. Spaceflight Alters Bacterial Gene Expression and Virulence and Reveals Role for Global Regulator Hfq

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J. W.; Ott, C. M.; zuBentrup, K. Honer; Ramamurthy R.; Quick, L.; Porwollik, S.; Cheng, P.; McClellan, M.; Tsaprailis, G.; Radabaugh, T.; Hunt, A.; Fernandez, D.; Richter, E.; Shah, M.; Kilcoyne, M.; Joshi, L.; Nelman-Gonzalez, M.; Hing, S.; Parra, M.; Dumaras, P.; Norwood, K.; Nickerson, C. A.; Bober, R.; Devich, J.; Ruggles, A.

    2007-01-01

    A comprehensive analysis of both the molecular genetic and phenotypic responses of any organism to the spaceflight environment has never been accomplished due to significant technological and logistical hurdles. Moreover, the effects of spaceflight on microbial pathogenicity and associated infectious disease risks have not been studied. The bacterial pathogen Salmonella typhimurium was grown aboard Space Shuttle mission STS-115 and compared to identical ground control cultures. Global microarray and proteomic analyses revealed 167 transcripts and 73 proteins changed expression with the conserved RNA-binding protein Hfq identified as a likely global regulator involved in the response to this environment. Hfq involvement was confirmed with a ground based microgravity culture model. Spaceflight samples exhibited enhanced virulence in a murine infection model and extracellular matrix accumulation consistent with a biofilm. Strategies to target Hfq and related regulators could potentially decrease infectious disease risks during spaceflight missions and provide novel therapeutic options on Earth.

  7. Altering the growth conditions of Gluconacetobacter xylinus to maximize the yield of bacterial cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruka, Dianne R; Simon, George P; Dean, Katherine M

    2012-06-20

    An extensive matrix of different growth conditions including media, incubation time, inoculum volume, surface area and media volume were investigated in order to maximize the yield of bacterial cellulose produced by Gluconacetobacter xylinus, which will be used as reinforcement material to produce fully biodegradable composites. Crystallinity was shown to be controllable depending on the media and conditions employed. Samples with significant difference in crystallinity in a range from 50% to 95% were produced. Through experimental design, the yield of cellulose was maximized; primarily this involved reactor surface area design, optimized media and the use of mannitol being the highest cellulose-producing carbon source. Increasing the volume of the media did achieve a higher cellulose yield, however this increase was not found to be cost or time effective.

  8. Long acting β2-agonist and corticosteroid restore airway glandular cell function altered by bacterial supernatant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nawrocki-Raby Béatrice

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staphylococcus aureus releases virulence factors (VF that may impair the innate protective functions of airway cells. The aim of this study was to determine whether a long-acting β2 adrenergic receptor agonist (salmeterol hydroxynaphthoate, Sal combined with a corticosteroid (fluticasone propionate, FP was able to regulate ion content and cytokine expression by airway glandular cells after exposure to S. aureus supernatant. Methods A human airway glandular cell line was incubated with S. aureus supernatant for 1 h and then treated with the combination Sal/FP for 4 h. The expression of actin and CFTR proteins was analyzed by immunofluorescence. Videomicroscopy was used to evaluate chloride secretion and X-ray microanalysis to measure the intracellular ion and water content. The pro-inflammatory cytokine expression was assessed by RT-PCR and ELISA. Results When the cells were incubated with S. aureus supernatant and then with Sal/FP, the cellular localisation of CFTR was apical compared to the cytoplasmic localisation in cells incubated with S. aureus supernatant alone. The incubation of airway epithelial cells with S. aureus supernatant reduced by 66% the chloride efflux that was fully restored by Sal/FP treatment. We also observed that Sal/FP treatment induced the restoration of ion (Cl and S and water content within the intracellular secretory granules of airway glandular cells and reduced the bacterial supernatant-dependent increase of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL8 and TNFα. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that treatment with the combination of a corticosteroid and a long-acting β2 adrenergic receptor agonist after bacterial infection restores the airway glandular cell function. Abnormal mucus induced by defective ion transport during pulmonary infection could benefit from treatment with a combination of β2 adrenergic receptor agonist and glucocorticoid.

  9. A three-scale analysis of bacterial communities involved in rocks colonization and soil formation in high mountain environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Alfonso; Ciccazzo, Sonia; Borruso, Luigimaria; Zerbe, Stefan; Daffonchio, Daniele; Brusetti, Lorenzo

    2013-10-01

    Alpha and beta diversities of the bacterial communities growing on rock surfaces, proto-soils, riparian sediments, lichen thalli, and water springs biofilms in a glacier foreland were studied. We used three molecular based techniques to allow a deeper investigation at different taxonomic resolutions: denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, length heterogeneity-PCR, and automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis. Bacterial communities were mainly composed of Acidobacteria, Proteobacteria, and Cyanobacteria with distinct variations among sites. Proteobacteria were more represented in sediments, biofilms, and lichens; Acidobacteria were mostly found in proto-soils; and Cyanobacteria on rocks. Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes were mainly found in biofilms. UniFrac P values confirmed a significant difference among different matrices. Significant differences (P < 0.001) in beta diversity were observed among the different matrices at the genus-species level, except for lichens and rocks which shared a more similar community structure, while at deep taxonomic resolution two distinct bacterial communities between lichens and rocks were found. PMID:23712376

  10. Protecting the herd: the remarkable effectiveness of the bacterial meningitis polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccines in altering transmission dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, David S

    2011-01-01

    Interrupting human-to-human transmission of the agents (Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influenzae, and Streptococcus pneumoniae) of bacterial meningitis by new capsular polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccines (PPCVs) has proven to be a remarkable (and unanticipated) contributor to vaccine effectiveness. Herd immunity accounts for ∼50% of the protection by meningococcal serogroup C PPCVs, pneumococcal PPCV7, and H. influenzae b PPCVs. Nasopharyngeal carriage can be reduced ≥75% for vaccine serotypes; the decrease in carriage is correlated with disease reduction in unvaccinated individuals, and the impact of herd immunity lasts for years. Based on these data, models for using herd immunity in vaccine-based prevention strategies are underway for control of meningitis in sub-Saharan Africa. Although the immunologic basis of herd immunity and impact on microbial biology need more study, protecting the unvaccinated by altering pathogen transmission dynamics is a powerful effect of PPCVs and increasingly important in vaccine introduction, implementation, and evaluation strategies.

  11. The deleterious metabolic and genotoxic effects of the bacterial metabolite p-cresol on colonic epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriamihaja, Mireille; Lan, Annaïg; Beaumont, Martin; Audebert, Marc; Wong, Ximena; Yamada, Kana; Yin, Yulong; Tomé, Daniel; Carrasco-Pozo, Catalina; Gotteland, Martin; Kong, Xiangfeng; Blachier, François

    2015-08-01

    p-Cresol that is produced by the intestinal microbiota from the amino acid tyrosine is found at millimolar concentrations in the human feces. The effects of this metabolite on colonic epithelial cells were tested in this study. Using the human colonic epithelial HT-29 Glc(-/+) cell line, we found that 0.8mM p-cresol inhibits cell proliferation, an effect concomitant with an accumulation of the cells in the S phase and with a slight increase of cell detachment without necrotic effect. At this concentration, p-cresol inhibited oxygen consumption in HT-29 Glc(-/+) cells. In rat normal colonocytes, p-cresol also inhibited respiration. Pretreatment of HT-29 Glc(-/+) cells with 0.8mM p-cresol for 1 day resulted in an increase of the state 3 oxygen consumption and of the cell maximal respiratory capacity with concomitant increased anion superoxide production. At higher concentrations (1.6 and 3.2mM), p-cresol showed similar effects but additionally increased after 1 day the proton leak through the inner mitochondrial membrane, decreasing the mitochondrial bioenergetic activity. At these concentrations, p-cresol was found to be genotoxic toward HT-29 Glc(-/+) and also LS-174T intestinal cells. Lastly, a decreased ATP intracellular content was observed after 3 days treatment. p-Cresol at 0.8mM concentration inhibits colonocyte respiration and proliferation. In response, cells can mobilize their "respiratory reserve." At higher concentrations, p-cresol pretreatment uncouples cell respiration and ATP synthesis, increases DNA damage, and finally decreases the ATP cell content. Thus, we have identified p-cresol as a metabolic troublemaker and as a genotoxic agent toward colonocytes. PMID:25881551

  12. High-fat diet-induced obesity alters nitric oxide-mediated neuromuscular transmission and smooth muscle excitability in the mouse distal colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattarai, Yogesh; Fried, David; Gulbransen, Brian; Kadrofske, Mark; Fernandes, Roxanne; Xu, Hui; Galligan, James

    2016-08-01

    We tested the hypothesis that colonic enteric neurotransmission and smooth muscle cell (SMC) function are altered in mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD). We used wild-type (WT) mice and mice lacking the β1-subunit of the BK channel (BKβ1 (-/-)). WT mice fed a HFD had increased myenteric plexus oxidative stress, a 28% decrease in nitrergic neurons, and a 20% decrease in basal nitric oxide (NO) levels. Circular muscle inhibitory junction potentials (IJPs) were reduced in HFD WT mice. The NO synthase inhibitor nitro-l-arginine (NLA) was less effective at inhibiting relaxations in HFD compared with control diet (CD) WT mice (11 vs. 37%, P < 0.05). SMCs from HFD WT mice had depolarized membrane potentials (-47 ± 2 mV) and continuous action potential firing compared with CD WT mice (-53 ± 2 mV, P < 0.05), which showed rhythmic firing. SMCs from HFD or CD fed BKβ1 (-/-) mice fired action potentials continuously. NLA depolarized membrane potential and caused continuous firing only in SMCs from CD WT mice. Sodium nitroprusside (NO donor) hyperpolarized membrane potential and changed continuous to rhythmic action potential firing in SMCs from HFD WT and BKβ1 (-/-) mice. Migrating motor complexes were disrupted in colons from BKβ1 (-/-) mice and HFD WT mice. BK channel α-subunit protein and β1-subunit mRNA expression were similar in CD and HFD WT mice. We conclude that HFD-induced obesity disrupts inhibitory neuromuscular transmission, SMC excitability, and colonic motility by promoting oxidative stress, loss of nitrergic neurons, and SMC BK channel dysfunction. PMID:27288421

  13. Systematically Altering Bacterial SOS Activity under Stress Reveals Therapeutic Strategies for Potentiating Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Charlie Y; Manning, Sara A; Roggiani, Manuela; Culyba, Matthew J; Samuels, Amanda N; Sniegowski, Paul D; Goulian, Mark; Kohli, Rahul M

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial SOS response is a DNA damage repair network that is strongly implicated in both survival and acquired drug resistance under antimicrobial stress. The two SOS regulators, LexA and RecA, have therefore emerged as potential targets for adjuvant therapies aimed at combating resistance, although many open questions remain. For example, it is not well understood whether SOS hyperactivation is a viable therapeutic approach or whether LexA or RecA is a better target. Furthermore, it is important to determine which antimicrobials could serve as the best treatment partners with SOS-targeting adjuvants. Here we derived Escherichia coli strains that have mutations in either lexA or recA genes in order to cover the full spectrum of possible SOS activity levels. We then systematically analyzed a wide range of antimicrobials by comparing the mean inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and induced mutation rates for each drug-strain combination. We first show that significant changes in MICs are largely confined to DNA-damaging antibiotics, with strains containing a constitutively repressed SOS response impacted to a greater extent than hyperactivated strains. Second, antibiotic-induced mutation rates were suppressed when SOS activity was reduced, and this trend was observed across a wider spectrum of antibiotics. Finally, perturbing either LexA or RecA proved to be equally viable strategies for targeting the SOS response. Our work provides support for multiple adjuvant strategies, while also suggesting that the combination of an SOS inhibitor with a DNA-damaging antibiotic could offer the best potential for lowering MICs and decreasing acquired drug resistance. IMPORTANCE Our antibiotic arsenal is becoming depleted, in part, because bacteria have the ability to rapidly adapt and acquire resistance to our best agents. The SOS pathway, a widely conserved DNA damage stress response in bacteria, is activated by many antibiotics and has been shown to play central role in

  14. Systematically Altering Bacterial SOS Activity under Stress Reveals Therapeutic Strategies for Potentiating Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Charlie Y; Manning, Sara A; Roggiani, Manuela; Culyba, Matthew J; Samuels, Amanda N; Sniegowski, Paul D; Goulian, Mark; Kohli, Rahul M

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial SOS response is a DNA damage repair network that is strongly implicated in both survival and acquired drug resistance under antimicrobial stress. The two SOS regulators, LexA and RecA, have therefore emerged as potential targets for adjuvant therapies aimed at combating resistance, although many open questions remain. For example, it is not well understood whether SOS hyperactivation is a viable therapeutic approach or whether LexA or RecA is a better target. Furthermore, it is important to determine which antimicrobials could serve as the best treatment partners with SOS-targeting adjuvants. Here we derived Escherichia coli strains that have mutations in either lexA or recA genes in order to cover the full spectrum of possible SOS activity levels. We then systematically analyzed a wide range of antimicrobials by comparing the mean inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and induced mutation rates for each drug-strain combination. We first show that significant changes in MICs are largely confined to DNA-damaging antibiotics, with strains containing a constitutively repressed SOS response impacted to a greater extent than hyperactivated strains. Second, antibiotic-induced mutation rates were suppressed when SOS activity was reduced, and this trend was observed across a wider spectrum of antibiotics. Finally, perturbing either LexA or RecA proved to be equally viable strategies for targeting the SOS response. Our work provides support for multiple adjuvant strategies, while also suggesting that the combination of an SOS inhibitor with a DNA-damaging antibiotic could offer the best potential for lowering MICs and decreasing acquired drug resistance. IMPORTANCE Our antibiotic arsenal is becoming depleted, in part, because bacteria have the ability to rapidly adapt and acquire resistance to our best agents. The SOS pathway, a widely conserved DNA damage stress response in bacteria, is activated by many antibiotics and has been shown to play central role in

  15. Systematically Altering Bacterial SOS Activity under Stress Reveals Therapeutic Strategies for Potentiating Antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Charlie Y.; Manning, Sara A.; Roggiani, Manuela; Culyba, Matthew J.; Samuels, Amanda N.; Sniegowski, Paul D.; Goulian, Mark

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The bacterial SOS response is a DNA damage repair network that is strongly implicated in both survival and acquired drug resistance under antimicrobial stress. The two SOS regulators, LexA and RecA, have therefore emerged as potential targets for adjuvant therapies aimed at combating resistance, although many open questions remain. For example, it is not well understood whether SOS hyperactivation is a viable therapeutic approach or whether LexA or RecA is a better target. Furthermore, it is important to determine which antimicrobials could serve as the best treatment partners with SOS-targeting adjuvants. Here we derived Escherichia coli strains that have mutations in either lexA or recA genes in order to cover the full spectrum of possible SOS activity levels. We then systematically analyzed a wide range of antimicrobials by comparing the mean inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and induced mutation rates for each drug-strain combination. We first show that significant changes in MICs are largely confined to DNA-damaging antibiotics, with strains containing a constitutively repressed SOS response impacted to a greater extent than hyperactivated strains. Second, antibiotic-induced mutation rates were suppressed when SOS activity was reduced, and this trend was observed across a wider spectrum of antibiotics. Finally, perturbing either LexA or RecA proved to be equally viable strategies for targeting the SOS response. Our work provides support for multiple adjuvant strategies, while also suggesting that the combination of an SOS inhibitor with a DNA-damaging antibiotic could offer the best potential for lowering MICs and decreasing acquired drug resistance. IMPORTANCE Our antibiotic arsenal is becoming depleted, in part, because bacteria have the ability to rapidly adapt and acquire resistance to our best agents. The SOS pathway, a widely conserved DNA damage stress response in bacteria, is activated by many antibiotics and has been shown to play central role

  16. Does the appearance of drug resistance during therapy alter bacterial susceptibility to opsonophagocytosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmell, C G

    1996-01-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) are common causes of infection in patients undergoing chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). Their ability to survive intracellularly within peritoneal macrophages and to persist within the peritoneum during antibiotic therapy has led to the development of drug resistance during treatment. Strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis (SE) and Staphytococcus haemolyticus (SH) have been isolated from patients with CAPD during treatment with ciprofloxacin. The respective MIC values pre-and post-therapy were SE-0.25 and 128 mg/L and SH-0.50 and 64 mg/L. The susceptibility of each isolate to opsonophagocytosis was measured in vitro using isolated polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) derived from fresh human blood donations. The bacteria were radiolabelled during growth, opsonised in either 1 or 10% serum and their uptake measured No differences were seen between the pre- and post therapy isolates when using 10% serum as opsonic source (18 vs. 21%); with 1% serum the corresponding values were lower (5 and 8% respectively). Similarly their ability to generate a respiratory burst as measured by chemiluminescence (CL) in the phagocytic cells was not diminished in the strains which had developed resistance to ciprofloxacin. The mean CL response to the strains isolated at outset of therapy ranged from 0.35-0.45 cpsc, and to the resistant strains following therapy from 0.36-0.50 cpsc. It is clear from the present investigation that although the bacterial strain became at least 10 times more resistant to ciprofloxacin during therapy, no change in their susceptibility to phagocytosis occurred refuting the idea that the emergence of drug resistant strains during therapy results in "super-bugs" of greater virulence.

  17. Mathematical modeling of bacterial kinetics to predict the impact of antibiotic colonic exposure and treatment duration on the amount of resistant enterobacteria excreted.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thu Thuy Nguyen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Fecal excretion of antibiotics and resistant bacteria in the environment are major public health threats associated with extensive farming and modern medical care. Innovative strategies that can reduce the intestinal antibiotic concentrations during treatments are in development. However, the effect of lower exposure on the amount of resistant enterobacteria excreted has not been quantified, making it difficult to anticipate the impact of these strategies. Here, we introduce a bacterial kinetic model to capture the complex relationships between drug exposure, loss of susceptible enterobacteria and growth of resistant strains in the feces of piglets receiving placebo, 1.5 or 15 mg/kg/day ciprofloxacin, a fluoroquinolone, for 5 days. The model could well describe the kinetics of drug susceptible and resistant enterobacteria observed during treatment, and up to 22 days after treatment cessation. Next, the model was used to predict the expected amount of resistant enterobacteria excreted over an average piglet's lifetime (150 days when varying drug exposure and treatment duration. For the clinically relevant dose of 15 mg/kg/day for 5 days, the total amount of resistant enterobacteria excreted was predicted to be reduced by 75% and 98% when reducing treatment duration to 3 and 1 day treatment, respectively. Alternatively, for a fixed 5-days treatment, the level of resistance excreted could be reduced by 18%, 33%, 57.5% and 97% if 3, 5, 10 and 30 times lower levels of colonic drug concentrations were achieved, respectively. This characterization on in vivo data of the dynamics of resistance to antibiotics in the colonic flora could provide new insights into the mechanism of dissemination of resistance and can be used to design strategies aiming to reduce it.

  18. Contribution of the Collagen-Binding Proteins of Streptococcus mutans to Bacterial Colonization of Inflamed Dental Pulp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Ryota; Ogaya, Yuko; Nakano, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is a major pathogen of dental caries. Collagen-binding proteins (CBPs) (approximately 120 kDa), termed Cnm and Cbm, are regarded as important cell surface antigens related to the adherence of S. mutans to collagenous tissue. Furthermore, CBP-positive S. mutans strains are associated with various systemic diseases involving bacteremia, such as infective endocarditis. Endodontic infection is considered to be an important cause of bacteremia, but little is known regarding the presence of S. mutans in dental pulp tissue. In the present study, the distribution and virulence of S. mutans in dental pulp tissues were investigated by focusing on CBPs. Adhesion and invasion properties of various S. mutans strains were analyzed using human dental pulp fibroblasts (HDPFs). CBP-positive strains had a significantly higher rate of adhesion to HDPFs compared with CBP-defective isogenic mutant strains (Pcanal specimens was then analyzed by PCR. We found that approximately 50% of the root canal specimens were positive for S. mutans. Approximately 20% of these strains were Cnm-positive, while no Cbm-positive strains were isolated. The Cnm-positive strains isolated from the specimens showed adhesion to HDPFs. Our results suggest that CBP-positive S. mutans strains exhibit high colonization in dental pulp. This could be a possible virulence factor for various systemic diseases. PMID:27442266

  19. Photorhabdus adhesion modification protein (Pam) binds extracellular polysaccharide and alters bacterial attachment

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Jones, Robert T

    2010-05-12

    Abstract Background Photorhabdus are Gram-negative nematode-symbiotic and insect-pathogenic bacteria. The species Photorhabdus asymbiotica is able to infect humans as well as insects. We investigated the secreted proteome of a clinical isolate of P. asymbiotica at different temperatures in order to identify proteins relevant to the infection of the two different hosts. Results A comparison of the proteins secreted by a clinical isolate of P. asymbiotica at simulated insect (28°C) and human (37°C) temperatures led to the identification of a small and highly abundant protein, designated Pam, that is only secreted at the lower temperature. The pam gene is present in all Photorhabdus strains tested and shows a high level of conservation across the whole genus, suggesting it is both ancestral to the genus and probably important to the biology of the bacterium. The Pam protein shows limited sequence similarity to the 13.6 kDa component of a binary toxin of Bacillus thuringiensis. Nevertheless, injection or feeding of heterologously produced Pam showed no insecticidal activity to either Galleria mellonella or Manduca sexta larvae. In bacterial colonies, Pam is associated with an extracellular polysaccharide (EPS)-like matrix, and modifies the ability of wild-type cells to attach to an artificial surface. Interestingly, Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) binding studies revealed that the Pam protein itself has adhesive properties. Although Pam is produced throughout insect infection, genetic knockout does not affect either insect virulence or the ability of P. luminescens to form a symbiotic association with its host nematode, Heterorhabditis bacteriophora. Conclusions We studied a highly abundant protein, Pam, which is secreted in a temperature-dependent manner in P. asymbiotica. Our findings indicate that Pam plays an important role in enhancing surface attachment in insect blood. Its association with exopolysaccharide suggests it may exert its effect through mediation of

  20. Photorhabdus adhesion modification protein (Pam binds extracellular polysaccharide and alters bacterial attachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce Susan A

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Photorhabdus are Gram-negative nematode-symbiotic and insect-pathogenic bacteria. The species Photorhabdus asymbiotica is able to infect humans as well as insects. We investigated the secreted proteome of a clinical isolate of P. asymbiotica at different temperatures in order to identify proteins relevant to the infection of the two different hosts. Results A comparison of the proteins secreted by a clinical isolate of P. asymbiotica at simulated insect (28°C and human (37°C temperatures led to the identification of a small and highly abundant protein, designated Pam, that is only secreted at the lower temperature. The pam gene is present in all Photorhabdus strains tested and shows a high level of conservation across the whole genus, suggesting it is both ancestral to the genus and probably important to the biology of the bacterium. The Pam protein shows limited sequence similarity to the 13.6 kDa component of a binary toxin of Bacillus thuringiensis. Nevertheless, injection or feeding of heterologously produced Pam showed no insecticidal activity to either Galleria mellonella or Manduca sexta larvae. In bacterial colonies, Pam is associated with an extracellular polysaccharide (EPS-like matrix, and modifies the ability of wild-type cells to attach to an artificial surface. Interestingly, Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR binding studies revealed that the Pam protein itself has adhesive properties. Although Pam is produced throughout insect infection, genetic knockout does not affect either insect virulence or the ability of P. luminescens to form a symbiotic association with its host nematode, Heterorhabditis bacteriophora. Conclusions We studied a highly abundant protein, Pam, which is secreted in a temperature-dependent manner in P. asymbiotica. Our findings indicate that Pam plays an important role in enhancing surface attachment in insect blood. Its association with exopolysaccharide suggests it may exert its effect

  1. Modulation of Post-Antibiotic Bacterial Community Reassembly and Host Response by Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Erb Downward, John R.; Falkowski, Nicole R.; Mason, Katie L.; Ryan Muraglia; Huffnagle, Gary B.

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of Candida albicans into cefoperazone-treated mice results in changes in bacterial community reassembly. Our objective was to use high-throughput sequencing to characterize at much greater depth the specific changes in the bacterial microbiome. The colonization of C. albicans significantly altered bacterial community reassembly that was evident at multiple taxonomic levels of resolution. There were marked changes in the levels of Bacteriodetes and Lactobacillaceae. Lachnospir...

  2. Impacts of Alterations of Organic Inputs on the Bacterial Community within the sediments of Wind Cave, South Dakota, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelius Marisa K.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Wind Cave (WICA in the Black Hills of South Dakota, like many mostly dry caves in temperate regions is an energy-starved system.The biotic communities that reside in these systems are low in diversity and simple in structure, and sensitive to changes in externalinputs of organic matter. Caves open to tourist traffic offer an opportunity to study the impacts of organic matter amendments in theform of human and rodent hair and dander, clothing lint, material from rodent activity (nesting materials and feces, and algal growthin and around artificial lighting. This study reports on the impacts of carbon amendments from humans and rodents on the bacterialand archaeal communities within the sediments of WICA from annual surveys and from a manipulative study that added lint (‘L’;cellulose plus rodent dander and rodent hair, rodent feces (‘F’, and a combination of both (‘LF’. The survey confirmed that bacterialbiomass was higher in regions of the cave with the highest rates of lint (hair and natural clothing fibers input. The manipulative studyfound that organic amendments in the forms of lint (L and rodent feces (F altered the WICA bacterial community structure in bothabundance and diversity, with the combined lint and feces (LF amendment having the most significant response. The high similarityof the LF and L communities suggests that the cave bacterial community is more carbon than nitrogen limited. The implication ofcave development to management practices is immediate and practical. Even small amounts of lint and organic matter foreign tocave bacteria significantly compromise the integrity of the endemic community resulting in the replacement of undescribed speciesby assemblages with at best, unknown impacts to natural cave features.

  3. Aerobic bacterial microbiota of the conjunctiva in diabetic patients with normal and altered glycated hemoglobin levels in two regions in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Pimentel Moreno

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To study the aerobic bacterial microbiota of the conjunctiva in diabetic patients with regard to the management of diabetes, assessed using glycated hemoglobin levels. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted using conjunctival smears of diabetic patients from both sexes and with different ages, residing in two different Brazilian cities (Sorocaba and Rio Branco. A control group of non-diabetic patients was also included. The diabetic patients were considered to have controlled diabetes when their glycated hemoglobin level was ≤7% and blood glucose level was ≤126 mg/dL. Patients with non-controlled diabetes were those with glycated hemoglobin levels >7% and blood glucose levels >126 mg/dL. The samples obtained were inoculated in Brain-Heart Infusion broth and in culture media for aerobic bacteria (blood and chocolate agars; bacterial growth was evaluated in a microbiology laboratory. Results: A total of 120 eyes of 120 patients were included in the present study. The percentage of cultures in which bacterial growth was observed was greater in diabetic patients, although the difference was not statistically significant (p=0.103. There was a greater trend toward bacterial growth in the conjunctiva of diabetic patients with altered fasting blood glucose. There was no difference in the frequency of bacterial growth on the conjunctiva between diabetic patients with normal or altered glycated hemoglobin levels. In Sorocaba, conjunctival bacterial growth was similar to that observed in Rio Branco. The microorganism most frequently detected in the present study was Staphylococcus epidermidis, followed by Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus mirabilis, and Escherichia coli. Conclusion: There was no difference between diabetic patients with normal or altered glycated hemoglobin levels. The microorganisms found were similar to those found in studies investigating the conjunctival bacterial flora of diabetic and non-diabetic patients.

  4. Transgenic banana plants expressing Xanthomonas wilt resistance genes revealed a stable non-target bacterial colonization structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimusiima, Jean; Köberl, Martina; Tumuhairwe, John Baptist; Kubiriba, Jerome; Staver, Charles; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-12-10

    Africa is among the continents where the battle over genetically modified crops is currently being played out. The impact of GM in Africa could potentially be very positive. In Uganda, researchers have developed transgenic banana lines resistant to banana Xanthomonas wilt. The transgenic lines expressing hrap and pflp can provide a timely solution to the pandemic. However, the impact of the transgenes expression on non-target microorganisms has not yet been investigated. To study this effect, transgenic and control lines were grown under field conditions and their associated microbiome was investigated by 16S rRNA gene profiling combining amplicon sequencing and molecular fingerprinting. Three years after sucker planting, no statistically significant differences between transgenic lines and their non-modified predecessors were detected for their associated bacterial communities. The overall gammaproteobacterial rhizosphere microbiome was highly dominated by Xanthomonadales, while Pseudomonadales and Enterobacteriales were accumulated in the pseudostem. Shannon indices revealed much higher diversity in the rhizosphere than in the pseudostem endosphere. However, the expression of the transgenes did not result in changes in the diversity of Gammaproteobacteria, the closest relatives of the target pathogen. In this field experiment, the expression of the resistance genes appears to have no consequences for non-target rhizobacteria and endophytes.

  5. Hypobaric-hypoxia induces alteration in microbes and microbes-associated enzyme profile in rat colonic samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Chiranjit; Lahiri, Pallavi; Adak, Atanu; Ghosh, Kuntal; Pati, Bikas R; Mondal, Keshab C

    2013-10-01

    Present study deals with the straight impact of hypobaric hypoxia on the quantity and composition of some predominant fecal microflora and its functional aspects. For that, isolated fecal contents of rat were exposed to two different simulated air pressures (70 kPa and 40 kPa) for different time durations (1, 3, and 5 h) and the bacterial community composition was compared with normobaric groups (101.3 kPa). It was found that the total anaerobes, Escherichia coli, Enterbacters spp., Bifidobacterium spp., Clostridium spp. were increased whereas total aerobes were decreased at both hypobaric treatments. The increased number of amplicon was detected in the pressure-treated groups than the control that clearly mentioned the disruption of microbiota structure at different simulated hypobaric-hypoxia. The amylase, protease, tannase, β-glucuronidase, and alkaline phosphatase activities were increased at these atmospheric pressures. Thus, the present investigation demonstrates that the hypobaric hypoxia is an important environmental factor which can strongly modulate the composition of intestinal flora as well as microflora-derived functional aspects. PMID:24215884

  6. Exposure to bacterial signals does not alter pea aphids' survival upon a second challenge or investment in production of winged offspring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bas ter Braak

    Full Text Available Pea aphids have an obligate nutritional symbiosis with the bacteria Buchneraaphidicola and frequently also harbor one or more facultative symbionts. Aphids are also susceptible to bacterial pathogen infections, and it has been suggested that aphids have a limited immune response towards such pathogen infections compared to other, more well-studied insects. However, aphids do possess at least some of the genes known to be involved in bacterial immune responses in other insects, and immune-competent hemocytes. One possibility is that immune priming with microbial elicitors could stimulate immune protection against subsequent bacterial infections, as has been observed in several other insect systems. To address this hypothesis we challenged aphids with bacterial immune elicitors twenty-four hours prior to live bacterial pathogen infections and then compared their survival rates to aphids that were not pre-exposed to bacterial signals. Using two aphid genotypes, we found no evidence for immune protection conferred by immune priming during infections with either Serratia marcescens or with Escherichia coli. Immune priming was not altered by the presence of facultative, beneficial symbionts in the aphids. In the absence of inducible immune protection, aphids may allocate energy towards other defense traits, including production of offspring with wings that could escape deteriorating conditions. To test this, we monitored the ratio of winged to unwinged offspring produced by adult mothers of a single clone that had been exposed to bacterial immune elicitors, to live E. coli infections or to no challenge. We found no correlation between immune challenge and winged offspring production, suggesting that this mechanism of defense, which functions upon exposure to fungal pathogens, is not central to aphid responses to bacterial infections.

  7. Colonization of Crystalline Cellulose by Clostridium cellulolyticum ATCC 35319

    OpenAIRE

    Gelhaye, E.; Gehin, A; Petitdemange, H.

    1993-01-01

    Cellulose colonization by Clostridium cellulolyticum was studied by using [methyl-3H]thymidine incorporation. The colonization process indicated that a part of the bacterial population was released from cellulose to the liquid phase before binding and colonizing another adhesion site of the cellulose. We postulate that cellulose colonization occurs according to the following process: adhesion, colonization, release, and readhesion.

  8. Colon cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colorectal cancer; Cancer - colon; Rectal cancer; Cancer - rectum; Adenocarcinoma - colon; Colon - adenocarcinoma ... In the United States, colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of deaths due to cancer. Early diagnosis can often lead to a complete cure. Almost ...

  9. Long term repeated fire disturbance alters soil bacterial diversity but not the abundance in an Australian wet sclerophyll forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ju-pei; Chen, C R; Lewis, Tom

    2016-01-20

    Effects of fire on biogeochemical cycling in terrestrial ecosystem are widely acknowledged, while few studies have focused on the bacterial community under the disturbance of long-term frequent prescribed fire. In this study, three treatments (burning every two years (B2), burning every four years (B4) and no burning (B0)) were applied for 38 years in an Australian wet sclerophyll forest. Results showed that bacterial alpha diversity (i.e. bacterial OTU) in the top soil (0-10 cm) was significantly higher in the B2 treatment compared with the B0 and B4 treatments. Non-metric multidimensional analysis (NMDS) of bacterial community showed clear separation of the soil bacterial community structure among different fire frequency regimes and between the depths. Different frequency fire did not have a substantial effect on bacterial composition at phylum level or bacterial 16S rRNA gene abundance. Soil pH and C:N ratio were the major drivers for bacterial community structure in the most frequent fire treatment (B2), while other factors (EC, DOC, DON, MBC, NH4(+), TC and TN) were significant in the less frequent burning and no burning treatments (B4 and B0). This study suggested that burning had a dramatic impact on bacterial diversity but not abundance with more frequent fire.

  10. Long term repeated fire disturbance alters soil bacterial diversity but not the abundance in an Australian wet sclerophyll forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ju-Pei; Chen, C. R.; Lewis, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Effects of fire on biogeochemical cycling in terrestrial ecosystem are widely acknowledged, while few studies have focused on the bacterial community under the disturbance of long-term frequent prescribed fire. In this study, three treatments (burning every two years (B2), burning every four years (B4) and no burning (B0)) were applied for 38 years in an Australian wet sclerophyll forest. Results showed that bacterial alpha diversity (i.e. bacterial OTU) in the top soil (0–10 cm) was significantly higher in the B2 treatment compared with the B0 and B4 treatments. Non-metric multidimensional analysis (NMDS) of bacterial community showed clear separation of the soil bacterial community structure among different fire frequency regimes and between the depths. Different frequency fire did not have a substantial effect on bacterial composition at phylum level or bacterial 16S rRNA gene abundance. Soil pH and C:N ratio were the major drivers for bacterial community structure in the most frequent fire treatment (B2), while other factors (EC, DOC, DON, MBC, NH4+, TC and TN) were significant in the less frequent burning and no burning treatments (B4 and B0). This study suggested that burning had a dramatic impact on bacterial diversity but not abundance with more frequent fire.

  11. Long term repeated fire disturbance alters soil bacterial diversity but not the abundance in an Australian wet sclerophyll forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ju-pei; Chen, C R; Lewis, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Effects of fire on biogeochemical cycling in terrestrial ecosystem are widely acknowledged, while few studies have focused on the bacterial community under the disturbance of long-term frequent prescribed fire. In this study, three treatments (burning every two years (B2), burning every four years (B4) and no burning (B0)) were applied for 38 years in an Australian wet sclerophyll forest. Results showed that bacterial alpha diversity (i.e. bacterial OTU) in the top soil (0-10 cm) was significantly higher in the B2 treatment compared with the B0 and B4 treatments. Non-metric multidimensional analysis (NMDS) of bacterial community showed clear separation of the soil bacterial community structure among different fire frequency regimes and between the depths. Different frequency fire did not have a substantial effect on bacterial composition at phylum level or bacterial 16S rRNA gene abundance. Soil pH and C:N ratio were the major drivers for bacterial community structure in the most frequent fire treatment (B2), while other factors (EC, DOC, DON, MBC, NH4(+), TC and TN) were significant in the less frequent burning and no burning treatments (B4 and B0). This study suggested that burning had a dramatic impact on bacterial diversity but not abundance with more frequent fire. PMID:26787458

  12. Maternal antibiotic-induced early changes in microbial colonization selectively modulate colonic permeability and inducible heat shock proteins, and digesta concentrations of alkaline phosphatase and TLR-stimulants in swine offspring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnal, Marie Edith; Zhang, Jing; Erridge, Clett; Smidt, Hauke; Lallès, Jean Paul

    2015-01-01

    Elevated intake of high energy diets is a risk factor for the development of metabolic diseases and obesity. High fat diets cause alterations in colonic microbiota composition and increase gut permeability to bacterial lipopolysaccharide, and subsequent low-grade chronic inflammation in mice. Chr

  13. Metabolomics analysis identifies intestinal microbiota-derived biomarkers of colonization resistance in clindamycin-treated mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin L P Jump

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The intestinal microbiota protect the host against enteric pathogens through a defense mechanism termed colonization resistance. Antibiotics excreted into the intestinal tract may disrupt colonization resistance and alter normal metabolic functions of the microbiota. We used a mouse model to test the hypothesis that alterations in levels of bacterial metabolites in fecal specimens could provide useful biomarkers indicating disrupted or intact colonization resistance after antibiotic treatment. METHODS: To assess in vivo colonization resistance, mice were challenged with oral vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus or Clostridium difficile spores at varying time points after treatment with the lincosamide antibiotic clindamycin. For concurrent groups of antibiotic-treated mice, stool samples were analyzed using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction to assess changes in the microbiota and using non-targeted metabolic profiling. To assess whether the findings were applicable to another antibiotic class that suppresses intestinal anaerobes, similar experiments were conducted with piperacillin/tazobactam. RESULTS: Colonization resistance began to recover within 5 days and was intact by 12 days after clindamycin treatment, coinciding with the recovery bacteria from the families Lachnospiraceae and Ruminococcaceae, both part of the phylum Firmicutes. Clindamycin treatment caused marked changes in metabolites present in fecal specimens. Of 484 compounds analyzed, 146 (30% exhibited a significant increase or decrease in concentration during clindamycin treatment followed by recovery to baseline that coincided with restoration of in vivo colonization resistance. Identified as potential biomarkers of colonization resistance, these compounds included intermediates in carbohydrate or protein metabolism that increased (pentitols, gamma-glutamyl amino acids and inositol metabolites or decreased (pentoses, dipeptides with clindamycin treatment

  14. Long term repeated fire disturbance alters soil bacterial diversity but not the abundance in an Australian wet sclerophyll forest

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Ju-Pei; Chen, C. R.; Lewis, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Effects of fire on biogeochemical cycling in terrestrial ecosystem are widely acknowledged, while few studies have focused on the bacterial community under the disturbance of long-term frequent prescribed fire. In this study, three treatments (burning every two years (B2), burning every four years (B4) and no burning (B0)) were applied for 38 years in an Australian wet sclerophyll forest. Results showed that bacterial alpha diversity (i.e. bacterial OTU) in the top soil (0–10 cm) was signific...

  15. Status of bacterial colonization in infected root canal%感染根管内细菌定植状态的观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭惠杰; 岳林; 高岩

    2011-01-01

    bacteria in the root canals using a scanning electron microscope. Results: Histobacteriologic observation showed that bacteria were found in all the seven specimens, which were clogged with a dense bacterial biofilm in the apical third of the main canal. Bacteria could penetrate into the dentinal tubules about 140 - 1 000 μm. Scanning electron microscopy observation showed that bacteria consisting of cocci, rods and/or filaments with amorphous materials formed the typical biofilm structure in the apical third of the root canals. Conclusion : The findings support the view that bacteria colonizing the root canal system play an essential role in the pathogenesis of periradicular diseases. In all the seven specimens, bacteria usually formed dense aggregates on the root canal walls, penetrating the dentinal tubules in the apical third of the main canal. Dense bacteria and amorphous materials filled the inter-bacterial spaces and formed the typical biofilm structure.

  16. Maternal antibiotic-induced early changes in microbial colonization selectively modulate colonic permeability and inducible heat shock proteins, and digesta concentrations of alkaline phosphatase and TLR-stimulants in swine offspring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Edith Arnal

    Full Text Available Elevated intake of high energy diets is a risk factor for the development of metabolic diseases and obesity. High fat diets cause alterations in colonic microbiota composition and increase gut permeability to bacterial lipopolysaccharide, and subsequent low-grade chronic inflammation in mice. Chronic inflammatory bowel diseases are increasing worldwide and may involve alterations in microbiota-host dialog. Metabolic disorders appearing in later life are also suspected to reflect changes in early programming. However, how the latter affects the colon remains poorly studied. Here, we hypothesized that various components of colonic physiology, including permeability, ion exchange and protective inducible heat shock proteins (HSP are influenced in the short- and long-terms by early disturbances in microbial colonization. The hypothesis was tested in a swine model. Offspring were born to control mothers (n = 12 or mothers treated with the antibiotic (ATB amoxicillin around parturition (n = 11. Offspring were slaughtered between 14 and 42 days of age to study short-term effects. For long-term effects, young adult offspring from the same litters consumed a normal or a palm oil-enriched diet for 4 weeks between 140 and 169 days of age. ATB treatment transiently modified maternal fecal microbiota although the minor differences observed for offspring colonic microbiota were nonsignificant. In the short-term, consistently higher HSP27 and HSP70 levels and transiently increased horseradish peroxidase permeability in ATB offspring colon were observed. Importantly, long-term consequences included reduced colonic horseradish peroxidase permeability, and increased colonic digesta alkaline phosphatase (AP and TLR2- and TLR4-stimulant concentrations in rectal digesta in adult ATB offspring. Inducible HSP27 and HSP70 did not change. Interactions between early ATB treatment and later diet were noted for paracellular permeability and concentrations of colonic

  17. Impact of neonatal intensive care bed configuration on rates of late-onset bacterial sepsis and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julian, Samuel; Burnham, Carey-Ann D.; Sellenriek, Patricia; Shannon, William D.; Hamvas, Aaron; Tarr, Phillip I.; Warner, Barbara B.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Infections cause significant morbidity and mortality in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). The association between nursery design and nosocomial infections has not been delineated. We hypothesized that rates of colonization by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), late-onset sepsis, and mortality are reduced in single-patient rooms. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting NICU in a tertiary referral center. Methods Our NICU is organized into single-patient and open-unit rooms. Clinical datasets including bed location and microbiology results were examined over a 29-month period. Differences in outcomes between bed configurations were determined by Chi-square and Cox regression. Patients All NICU patients. Results Among 1823 patients representing 55,166 patient-days, single-patient and open-unit models had similar incidences of MRSA colonization and MRSA colonization-free survival times. Average daily census was associated with MRSA colonization rates only in single-patient rooms (hazard ratio 1.31, p=0.039), while hand hygiene compliance on room entry and exit was associated with lower colonization rates independent of bed configuration (hazard ratios 0.834 and 0.719 per 1% higher compliance, respectively). Late-onset sepsis rates were similar in single-patient and open-unit models as were sepsis-free survival and the combined outcome of sepsis or death. After controlling for demographic, clinical and unit-based variables, multivariate Cox regression demonstrated that bed configuration had no effect on MRSA colonization, late-onset sepsis, or mortality. Conclusions MRSA colonization rate was impacted by hand hygiene compliance, regardless of room configuration, while average daily census only affected infants in single-patient rooms. Single-patient rooms did not reduce the rates of MRSA colonization, late-onset sepsis or death. PMID:26108888

  18. Omega 3 fatty acids chemosensitize multidrug resistant colon cancer cells by down-regulating cholesterol synthesis and altering detergent resistant membranes composition

    OpenAIRE

    Gelsomino, Giada; Corsetto, Paola A.; Campia, Ivana; Montorfano, Gigliola; Kopecka, Joanna; Castella, Barbara; Gazzano, Elena; Ghigo, Dario; Rizzo, Angela M; Riganti, Chiara

    2013-01-01

    Background The activity of P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and multidrug resistance related protein 1 (MRP1), two membrane transporters involved in multidrug resistance of colon cancer, is increased by high amounts of cholesterol in plasma membrane and detergent resistant membranes (DRMs). It has never been investigated whether omega 3 polyunsatured fatty acids (PUFAs), which modulate cholesterol homeostasis in dyslipidemic syndromes and have chemopreventive effects in colon cancer, may affect the respo...

  19. Microbial colonization of basaltic glasses in hydrothermal organic-rich sediments at Guaymas Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nolwenn eCallac

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Oceanic basalts host diverse microbial communities with various metabolisms involved in C, N, S and Fe biogeochemical cycles which may contribute to mineral and glass alteration processes at, and below the seafloor. In order to study the microbial colonization on basaltic glasses and their potential biotic/abiotic weathering products, two colonization modules called AISICS (Autonomous In Situ Instrumented Colonization System were deployed in hydrothermal deep-sea sediments at the Guaymas Basin for 8 days and 22 days. Each AISICS module contained 18 colonizers (including sterile controls filled with basaltic glasses of contrasting composition. Chemical analyses of ambient fluids sampled through the colonizers showed a greater contribution of hydrothermal fluids (maximum temperature 57.6°C for the module deployed during the longer time period. For each colonizer, the phylogenetic diversity and metabolic function of bacterial and archaeal communities were explored using a molecular approach by cloning and sequencing. Results showed large microbial diversity in all colonizers. The bacterial distribution is primarily linked to the deployment duration, as well as the depth for the short deployment time module. Some 16s rRNA sequences form a new cluster of Epsilonproteobacteria. Within the Archaea the retrieved diversity could not be linked to either duration, depth or substrata. However, mcrA gene sequences belonging to the ANME-1 mcrA-guaymas cluster were found sometimes associated with their putative sulfate-reducers syntrophs depending on the colonizers. Although no specific glass alteration texture was identified, nano-crystals of barite and pyrite were observed in close association with organic matter, suggesting a possible biological mediation. This study gives new insights into the colonization steps of volcanic rock substrates and the capability of microbial communities to exploit new environmental conditions.

  20. Significant alteration of soil bacterial communities and organic carbon decomposition by different long-term fertilization management conditions of extremely low-productivity arable soil in South China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xun, Weibing; Zhao, Jun; Xue, Chao; Zhang, Guishan; Ran, Wei; Wang, Boren; Shen, Qirong; Zhang, Ruifu

    2016-06-01

    Different fertilization managements of red soil, a kind of Ferralic Cambisol, strongly affected the soil properties and associated microbial communities. The association of the soil microbial community and functionality with long-term fertilization management in the unique low-productivity red soil ecosystem is important for both soil microbial ecology and agricultural production. Here, 454 pyrosequencing analysis of 16S recombinant ribonucleic acid genes and GeoChip4-NimbleGen-based functional gene analysis were used to study the soil bacterial community composition and functional genes involved in soil organic carbon degradation. Long-term nitrogen-containing chemical fertilization-induced soil acidification and fertility decline and significantly altered the soil bacterial community, whereas long-term organic fertilization and fallow management improved the soil quality and maintained the bacterial diversity. Short-term quicklime remediation of the acidified soils did not change the bacterial communities. Organic fertilization and fallow management supported eutrophic ecosystems, in which copiotrophic taxa increased in relative abundance and have a higher intensity of labile-C-degrading genes. However, long-term nitrogen-containing chemical fertilization treatments supported oligotrophic ecosystems, in which oligotrophic taxa increased in relative abundance and have a higher intensity of recalcitrant-C-degrading genes but a lower intensity of labile-C-degrading genes. Quicklime application increased the relative abundance of copiotrophic taxa and crop production, although these effects were utterly inadequate. This study provides insights into the interaction of soil bacterial communities, soil functionality and long-term fertilization management in the red soil ecosystem; these insights are important for improving the fertility of unique low-productivity red soil. PMID:26486414

  1. Significant alteration of soil bacterial communities and organic carbon decomposition by different long-term fertilization management conditions of extremely low-productivity arable soil in South China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xun, Weibing; Zhao, Jun; Xue, Chao; Zhang, Guishan; Ran, Wei; Wang, Boren; Shen, Qirong; Zhang, Ruifu

    2016-06-01

    Different fertilization managements of red soil, a kind of Ferralic Cambisol, strongly affected the soil properties and associated microbial communities. The association of the soil microbial community and functionality with long-term fertilization management in the unique low-productivity red soil ecosystem is important for both soil microbial ecology and agricultural production. Here, 454 pyrosequencing analysis of 16S recombinant ribonucleic acid genes and GeoChip4-NimbleGen-based functional gene analysis were used to study the soil bacterial community composition and functional genes involved in soil organic carbon degradation. Long-term nitrogen-containing chemical fertilization-induced soil acidification and fertility decline and significantly altered the soil bacterial community, whereas long-term organic fertilization and fallow management improved the soil quality and maintained the bacterial diversity. Short-term quicklime remediation of the acidified soils did not change the bacterial communities. Organic fertilization and fallow management supported eutrophic ecosystems, in which copiotrophic taxa increased in relative abundance and have a higher intensity of labile-C-degrading genes. However, long-term nitrogen-containing chemical fertilization treatments supported oligotrophic ecosystems, in which oligotrophic taxa increased in relative abundance and have a higher intensity of recalcitrant-C-degrading genes but a lower intensity of labile-C-degrading genes. Quicklime application increased the relative abundance of copiotrophic taxa and crop production, although these effects were utterly inadequate. This study provides insights into the interaction of soil bacterial communities, soil functionality and long-term fertilization management in the red soil ecosystem; these insights are important for improving the fertility of unique low-productivity red soil.

  2. Viral-bacterial interactions in acute otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marom, Tal; Nokso-Koivisto, Johanna; Chonmaitree, Tasnee

    2012-12-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) is a polymicrobial disease, which usually occurs as a complication of viral upper respiratory tract infection (URI). While respiratory viruses alone may cause viral AOM, they increase the risk of bacterial middle ear infection and worsen clinical outcomes of bacterial AOM. URI viruses alter Eustachian tube (ET) function via decreased mucociliary action, altered mucus secretion and increased expression of inflammatory mediators among other mechanisms. Transient reduction in protective functions of the ET allows colonizing bacteria of the nasopharynx to ascend into the middle ear and cause AOM. Advances in research help us to better understand the host responses to viral URI, the mechanisms of viral-bacterial interactions in the nasopharynx and the development of AOM. In this review, we present current knowledge regarding viral-bacterial interactions in the pathogenesis and clinical course of AOM. We focus on the common respiratory viruses and their established role in AOM.

  3. Colonic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diverticulitis - inflammation or infection of pouches in the colon Irritable bowel syndrome - an uncomfortable condition causing abdominal cramping and other symptoms Treatment for colonic diseases varies greatly depending on the disease and its ...

  4. Gut dendritic cell activation links an altered colonic microbiome to mucosal and systemic T-cell activation in untreated HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, S M; Lee, E J; Kotter, C V; Austin, G L; Gianella, S; Siewe, B; Smith, D M; Landay, A L; McManus, M C; Robertson, C E; Frank, D N; McCarter, M D; Wilson, C C

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1-associated disruption of intestinal homeostasis is a major factor contributing to chronic immune activation and inflammation. Dendritic cells (DCs) are crucial in maintaining intestinal homeostasis, but the impact of HIV-1 infection on intestinal DC number and function has not been extensively studied. We compared the frequency and activation/maturation status of colonic myeloid DC (mDC) subsets (CD1c(+) and CD1c(neg)) and plasmacytoid DCs in untreated HIV-1-infected subjects with uninfected controls. Colonic mDCs in HIV-1-infected subjects had increased CD40 but decreased CD83 expression, and CD40 expression on CD1c(+) mDCs positively correlated with mucosal HIV-1 viral load, with mucosal and systemic cytokine production, and with frequencies of activated colon and blood T cells. Percentage of CD83(+)CD1c(+) mDCs negatively correlated with frequencies of interferon-γ-producing colon CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. CD40 expression on CD1c(+) mDCs positively associated with abundance of high prevalence mucosal Prevotella copri and Prevotella stercorea but negatively associated with a number of low prevalence mucosal species, including Rumminococcus bromii. CD1c(+) mDC cytokine production was greater in response to in vitro stimulation with Prevotella species relative to R. bromii. These findings suggest that, during HIV infection, colonic mDCs become activated upon exposure to mucosal pathobiont bacteria leading to mucosal and systemic immune activation. PMID:25921339

  5. Gut Dendritic Cell Activation Links an Altered Colonic Microbiome to Mucosal and Systemic T Cell Activation in Untreated HIV-1 infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, SM; Lee, EJ; Kotter, CV; Austin, GL; Gianella, S; Siewe, B; Smith, DM; Landay, AL; McManus, MC; Robertson, CE; Frank, DN; McCarter, MD; Wilson, CC

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1-associated disruption of intestinal homeostasis is a major factor contributing to chronic immune activation and inflammation. Dendritic cells (DCs) are crucial in maintaining intestinal homeostasis, but the impact of HIV-1 infection on intestinal DC number and function has not been extensively studied. We compared the frequency and activation/maturation status of colonic myeloid DC (mDC) subsets (CD1c+ and CD1cneg) and plasmacytoid DCs in untreated HIV-1-infected subjects with uninfected controls. Colonic mDCs in HIV-1-infected subjects had increased CD40 but decreased CD83 expression, and CD40 expression on CD1c+ mDCs positively correlated with mucosal HIV-1 viral load, with mucosal and systemic cytokine production, and with frequencies of activated colon and blood T cells. Percent of CD83+CD1c+ mDCs negatively correlated with frequencies of IFN-γ-producing colon CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. CD40 expression on CD1c+ mDCs positively associated with abundance of high prevalence mucosal Prevotella copri and P. stercorea, but negatively associated with a number of low prevalence mucosal species including Rumminococcus bromii. CD1c+ mDC cytokine production was greater in response to in vitro stimulation with Prevotella species relative to R. bromii. These findings suggest that during HIV infection, colonic mDCs become activated upon exposure to mucosal pathobiont bacteria leading to mucosal and systemic immune activation. PMID:25921339

  6. Identification of commensal Escherichia coli genes involved in biofilm resistance to pathogen colonization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Da Re

    Full Text Available Protection provided by host bacterial microbiota against microbial pathogens is a well known but ill-understood property referred to as the barrier effect, or colonization resistance. Despite recent genome-wide analyses of host microbiota and increasing therapeutic interest, molecular analysis of colonization resistance is hampered by the complexity of direct in vivo experiments. Here we developed an in vitro-to-in vivo approach to identification of genes involved in resistance of commensal bacteria to exogenous pathogens. We analyzed genetic responses induced in commensal Escherichia coli upon entry of a diarrheagenic enteroaggregative E. coli or an unrelated Klebsiella pneumoniae pathogen into a biofilm community. We showed that pathogens trigger specific responses in commensal bacteria and we identified genes involved in limiting colonization of incoming pathogens within commensal biofilm. We tested the in vivo relevance of our findings by comparing the extent of intestinal colonization by enteroaggregative E. coli and K. pneumoniae pathogens in mice pre-colonized with E. coli wild type commensal strain, or mutants corresponding to identified colonization resistance genes. We demonstrated that the absence of yiaF and bssS (yceP differentially alters pathogen colonization in the mouse gut. This study therefore identifies previously uncharacterized colonization resistance genes and provides new approaches to unravelling molecular aspects of commensal/pathogen competitive interactions.

  7. Host imprints on bacterial genomes--rapid, divergent evolution in individual patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslaw Zdziarski

    Full Text Available Bacteria lose or gain genetic material and through selection, new variants become fixed in the population. Here we provide the first, genome-wide example of a single bacterial strain's evolution in different deliberately colonized patients and the surprising insight that hosts appear to personalize their microflora. By first obtaining the complete genome sequence of the prototype asymptomatic bacteriuria strain E. coli 83972 and then resequencing its descendants after therapeutic bladder colonization of different patients, we identified 34 mutations, which affected metabolic and virulence-related genes. Further transcriptome and proteome analysis proved that these genome changes altered bacterial gene expression resulting in unique adaptation patterns in each patient. Our results provide evidence that, in addition to stochastic events, adaptive bacterial evolution is driven by individual host environments. Ongoing loss of gene function supports the hypothesis that evolution towards commensalism rather than virulence is favored during asymptomatic bladder colonization.

  8. Temperature increases from 55 to 75 C in a two-phase biogas reactor result in fundamental alterations within the bacterial and archaeal community structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rademacher, Antje [Leibniz-Institut fuer Agrartechnik Potsdam-Bornim e.V. (ATB), Potsdam (Germany). Abt. Bioverfahrenstechnik; Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Technischen Umweltschutz; Nolte, Christine; Schoenberg, Mandy; Klocke, Michael [Leibniz-Institut fuer Agrartechnik Potsdam-Bornim e.V. (ATB), Potsdam (Germany). Abt. Bioverfahrenstechnik

    2012-10-15

    Agricultural biogas plants were operated in most cases below their optimal performance. An increase in the fermentation temperature and a spatial separation of hydrolysis/acetogenesis and methanogenesis are known strategies in improving and stabilizing biogas production. In this study, the dynamic variability of the bacterial and archaeal community was monitored within a two-phase leach bed biogas reactor supplied with rye silage and straw during a stepwise temperature increase from 55 to 75 C within the leach bed reactor (LBR), using TRFLP analyses. To identify the terminal restriction fragments that were obtained, bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA gene libraries were constructed. Above 65 C, the bacterial community structure changed from being Clostridiales-dominated toward being dominated by members of the Bacteroidales, Clostridiales, and Thermotogales orders. Simultaneously, several changes occurred, including a decrease in the total cell count, degradation rate, and biogas yield along with alterations in the intermediate production. A bioaugmentation with compost at 70 C led to slight improvements in the reactor performance; these did not persist at 75 C. However, the archaeal community within the downstream anaerobic filter reactor (AF), operated constantly at 55 C, altered by the temperature increase in the LBR. At an LBR temperature of 55 C, members of the Methanobacteriales order were prevalent in the AF, whereas at higher LBR temperatures Methanosarcinales prevailed. Altogether, the best performance of this two-phase reactor was achieved at an LBR temperature of below 65 C, which indicates that this temperature range has a favorable effect on the microbial community responsible for the production of biogas. (orig.)

  9. Central neuropeptide Y receptors are involved in 3rd ventricular ghrelin induced alteration of colonic transit time in conscious fed rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritter Michael

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Feeding related peptides have been shown to be additionally involved in the central autonomic control of gastrointestinal functions. Recent studies have shown that ghrelin, a stomach-derived orexigenic peptide, is involved in the autonomic regulation of GI function besides feeding behavior. Pharmacological evidence indicates that ghrelin effects on food intake are mediated by neuropeptide Y in the central nervous system. Methods In the present study we examine the role of ghrelin in the central autonomic control of GI motility using intracerobroventricular and IP microinjections in a freely moving conscious rat model. Further the hypothesis that a functional relationship between NPY and ghrelin within the CNS exists was addressed. Results ICV injections of ghrelin (0.03 nmol, 0.3 nmol and 3.0 nmol/5 μl and saline controls decreased the colonic transit time up to 43%. IP injections of ghrelin (0.3 nmol – 3.0 nmol kg-1 BW and saline controls decreased colonic transit time dose related. Central administration of the NPY1 receptor antagonist, BIBP-3226, prior to centrally or peripherally administration of ghrelin antagonized the ghrelin induced stimulation of colonic transit. On the contrary ICV-pretreatment with the NPY2 receptor antagonist, BIIE-0246, failed to modulate the ghrelin induced stimulation of colonic motility. Conclusion The results suggest that ghrelin acts in the central nervous system to modulate gastrointestinal motor function utilizing NPY1 receptor dependent mechanisms.

  10. Differences in Visceral Fat and Fat Bacterial Colonization between Ulcerative Colitis and Crohn’s Disease. An In Vivo and In Vitro Study

    OpenAIRE

    Zulian, Alessandra; Cancello, Raffaella; Ruocco, Chiara; Gentilini, Davide; Di Blasio, Anna Maria; Danelli, Piergiorgio; Micheletto, Giancarlo; Cesana, Elisabetta; Invitti, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    Crohn’s disease (CD) is notably characterized by the expansion of visceral fat with small adipocytes expressing a high proportion of anti-inflammatory genes. Conversely, visceral fat depots in ulcerative colitis (UC) patients have never been characterized. Our study aims were a) to compare adipocyte morphology and gene expression profile and bacterial translocation in omental (OM) and mesenteric (MES) adipose tissue of patients with UC and CD, and b) to investigate the effect of bacterial inf...

  11. Differences in Visceral Fat and Fat Bacterial Colonization between Ulcerative Colitis and Crohn’s Disease. An In Vivo and In Vitro Study

    OpenAIRE

    Alessandra Zulian; Raffaella Cancello; Chiara Ruocco; Davide Gentilini; Anna Maria Di Blasio; Piergiorgio Danelli; Giancarlo Micheletto; Elisabetta Cesana; Cecilia Invitti

    2013-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is notably characterized by the expansion of visceral fat with small adipocytes expressing a high proportion of anti-inflammatory genes. Conversely, visceral fat depots in ulcerative colitis (UC) patients have never been characterized. Our study aims were a) to compare adipocyte morphology and gene expression profile and bacterial translocation in omental (OM) and mesenteric (MES) adipose tissue of patients with UC and CD, and b) to investigate the effect of bacterial inf...

  12. Salinity altered root distribution and increased diversity of bacterial communities in the rhizosphere soil of Jerusalem artichoke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui; Hu, Jinxiang; Long, Xiaohua; Liu, Zhaopu; Rengel, Zed

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between roots and bacterial communities in halophytic species is poorly understood. Here, we used Jerusalem artichoke cultivar Nanyu 1 (NY-1) to characterise root distribution patterns and determine diversity and abundance of bacteria in the rhizosphere soil under variable salinity. Root growth was not inhibited within the salinity range 1.2 to 1.9 g salt/kg, but roots were mainly confined to 0-20 cm soil layer vertically and 0-30 cm horizontally from the plant centre. Root concentrations of K(+), Na(+), Mg(2+) and particularly Ca(2+) were relatively high under salinity stress. High salinity stress decreased soil invertase and catalase activity. Using a next-generation, Illumina-based sequencing approach, we determined higher diversity of bacteria in the rhizosphere soil at high than low salinity. More than 15,500 valid reads were obtained, and Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria predominated in all samples, accounting for >80% of the reads. On a genus level, 636 genera were common to the low and high salinity treatments at 0-5 cm and 5-10 cm depth. The abundance of Steroidobacter and Sphingomonas was significantly decreased by increasing salinity. Higher Shannon and Chao 1 indices with increasing severity of salt stress indicated that high salt stress increased diversity in the bacterial communities. PMID:26852800

  13. Manipulation of the Gut Microbiota Reveals Role in Colon Tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zackular, Joseph P.; Baxter, Nielson T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT There is growing evidence that individuals with colonic adenomas and carcinomas harbor a distinct microbiota. Alterations to the gut microbiota may allow the outgrowth of bacterial populations that induce genomic mutations or exacerbate tumor-promoting inflammation. In addition, it is likely that the loss of key bacterial populations may result in the loss of protective functions that are normally provided by the microbiota. We explored the role of the gut microbiota in colon tumorigenesis by using an inflammation-based murine model. We observed that perturbing the microbiota with different combinations of antibiotics reduced the number of tumors at the end of the model. Using the random forest machine learning algorithm, we successfully modeled the number of tumors that developed over the course of the model on the basis of the initial composition of the microbiota. The timing of antibiotic treatment was an important determinant of tumor outcome, as colon tumorigenesis was arrested by the use of antibiotics during the early inflammation period of the murine model. Together, these results indicate that it is possible to predict colon tumorigenesis on the basis of the composition of the microbiota and that altering the gut microbiota can alter the course of tumorigenesis. IMPORTANCE Mounting evidence indicates that alterations to the gut microbiota, the complex community of bacteria that inhabits the gastrointestinal tract, are strongly associated with the development of colorectal cancer. We used antibiotic perturbations to a murine model of inflammation-driven colon cancer to generate eight starting communities that resulted in various severities of tumorigenesis. Furthermore, we were able to quantitatively predict the final number of tumors on the basis of the initial composition of the gut microbiota. These results further bolster the evidence that the gut microbiota is involved in mediating the development of colorectal cancer. As a final proof of

  14. Plasmid-encoded tetracycline efflux pump protein alters bacterial stress responses and ecological fitness of Acinetobacter oleivorans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyerim Hong

    Full Text Available Acquisition of the extracellular tetracycline (TC resistance plasmid pAST2 affected host gene expression and phenotype in the oil-degrading soil bacterium, Acinetobacter oleivorans DR1. Whole-transcriptome profiling of DR1 cells harboring pAST2 revealed that all the plasmid genes were highly expressed under TC conditions, and the expression levels of many host chromosomal genes were modulated by the presence of pAST2. The host energy burden imposed by replication of pAST2 led to (i lowered ATP concentrations, (ii downregulated expression of many genes involved in cellular growth, and (iii reduced growth rate. Interestingly, some phenotypes were restored by deleting the plasmid-encoded efflux pump gene tetH, suggesting that the membrane integrity changes resulting from the incorporation of efflux pump proteins also resulted in altered host response under the tested conditions. Alteration of membrane integrity by tetH deletion was shown by measuring permeability of fluorescent probe and membrane hydrophobicity. The presence of the plasmid conferred peroxide and superoxide resistance to cells, but only peroxide resistance was diminished by tetH gene deletion, suggesting that the plasmid-encoded membrane-bound efflux pump protein provided peroxide resistance. The downregulation of fimbriae-related genes presumably led to reduced swimming motility, but this phenotype was recovered by tetH gene deletion. Our data suggest that not only the plasmid replication burden, but also its encoded efflux pump protein altered host chromosomal gene expression and phenotype, which also alters the ecological fitness of the host in the environment.

  15. Host genetic background influences the response to the opportunistic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection altering cell-mediated immunity and bacterial replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maura De Simone

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common cause of healthcare-associated infections including pneumonia, bloodstream, urinary tract, and surgical site infections. The clinical outcome of P. aeruginosa infections may be extremely variable among individuals at risk and patients affected by cystic fibrosis. However, risk factors for P. aeruginosa infection remain largely unknown. To identify and track the host factors influencing P. aeruginosa lung infections, inbred immunocompetent mouse strains were screened in a pneumonia model system. A/J, BALB/cJ, BALB/cAnNCrl, BALB/cByJ, C3H/HeOuJ, C57BL/6J, C57BL/6NCrl, DBA/2J, and 129S2/SvPasCRL mice were infected with P. aeruginosa clinical strain and monitored for body weight and mortality up to seven days. The most deviant survival phenotypes were observed for A/J, 129S2/SvPasCRL and DBA/2J showing high susceptibility while BALB/cAnNCrl and C3H/HeOuJ showing more resistance to P. aeruginosa infection. Next, one of the most susceptible and resistant mouse strains were characterized for their deviant clinical and immunological phenotype by scoring bacterial count, cell-mediated immunity, cytokines and chemokines profile and lung pathology in an early time course. Susceptible A/J mice showed significantly higher bacterial burden, higher cytokines and chemokines levels but lower leukocyte recruitment, particularly neutrophils, when compared to C3H/HeOuJ resistant mice. Pathologic scores showed lower inflammatory severity, reduced intraluminal and interstitial inflammation extent, bronchial and parenchymal involvement and diminished alveolar damage in the lungs of A/J when compared to C3H/HeOuJ. Our findings indicate that during an early phase of infection a prompt inflammatory response in the airways set the conditions for a non-permissive environment to P. aeruginosa replication and lock the spread to other organs. Host gene(s may have a role in the reduction of cell-mediated immunity playing a critical role in

  16. Host genetic background influences the response to the opportunistic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection altering cell-mediated immunity and bacterial replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Simone, Maura; Spagnuolo, Lorenza; Lorè, Nicola Ivan; Rossi, Giacomo; Cigana, Cristina; De Fino, Ida; Iraqi, Fuad A; Bragonzi, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common cause of healthcare-associated infections including pneumonia, bloodstream, urinary tract, and surgical site infections. The clinical outcome of P. aeruginosa infections may be extremely variable among individuals at risk and patients affected by cystic fibrosis. However, risk factors for P. aeruginosa infection remain largely unknown. To identify and track the host factors influencing P. aeruginosa lung infections, inbred immunocompetent mouse strains were screened in a pneumonia model system. A/J, BALB/cJ, BALB/cAnNCrl, BALB/cByJ, C3H/HeOuJ, C57BL/6J, C57BL/6NCrl, DBA/2J, and 129S2/SvPasCRL mice were infected with P. aeruginosa clinical strain and monitored for body weight and mortality up to seven days. The most deviant survival phenotypes were observed for A/J, 129S2/SvPasCRL and DBA/2J showing high susceptibility while BALB/cAnNCrl and C3H/HeOuJ showing more resistance to P. aeruginosa infection. Next, one of the most susceptible and resistant mouse strains were characterized for their deviant clinical and immunological phenotype by scoring bacterial count, cell-mediated immunity, cytokines and chemokines profile and lung pathology in an early time course. Susceptible A/J mice showed significantly higher bacterial burden, higher cytokines and chemokines levels but lower leukocyte recruitment, particularly neutrophils, when compared to C3H/HeOuJ resistant mice. Pathologic scores showed lower inflammatory severity, reduced intraluminal and interstitial inflammation extent, bronchial and parenchymal involvement and diminished alveolar damage in the lungs of A/J when compared to C3H/HeOuJ. Our findings indicate that during an early phase of infection a prompt inflammatory response in the airways set the conditions for a non-permissive environment to P. aeruginosa replication and lock the spread to other organs. Host gene(s) may have a role in the reduction of cell-mediated immunity playing a critical role in the control of P

  17. Colonic locomotion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dodou, D.

    2006-01-01

    The most effective screening method for colonic cancer is colonoscopy. However, colonoscopy cannot be easily embraced by the population because of the related pain intensity. Robotic devices that pull themselves forward through the colon are a possible alternative. The main challenge for such device

  18. [Colonic balantidiasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González de Canales Simón, P; del Olmo Martínez, L; Cortejoso Hernández, A; Arranz Santos, T

    2000-03-01

    Balantidium coli is a Protozoa that is not usually pathogenic in man, although epidemics have been described in tropical areas. It mainly affects the colon and clinical presentation varies from asymptomatic forms to severe dysenteric syndromes. We present a case of endoscopically diagnosed colonic balantidiasis and review the most important characteristics of this parasite-induced disease. PMID:10804691

  19. Prevention of bacterial adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria

    2010-01-01

    that imposes selection pressure for resistant bacteria. New approaches are urgently needed. Targeting bacterial virulence functions directly is an attractive alternative. An obvious target is bacterial adhesion. Bacterial adhesion to surfaces is the first step in colonization, invasion, and biofilm formation....... As such, adhesion represents the Achilles heel of crucial pathogenic functions. It follows that interference with adhesion can reduce bacterial virulence. Here, we illustrate this important topic with examples of techniques being developed that can inhibit bacterial adhesion. Some of these will become...

  20. Bacterial vaginosis, alterations in vaginal flora and HIV genital shedding among HIV-1-infected women in Mozambique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert D Kirkcaldy

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. We investigated whether abnormal vaginal flora, including bacterial vaginosis (BV, are associated with detection of cervical HIV-1 RNA among HIV-infected women in Mozambique. Methods. We obtained clinical data and vaginal specimens from HIV-infected women registering for their first visit at one of two HIV care clinics in Mozambique. We compared women with detectable cervical HIV viral load (≥40 copies/ml with women with undetectable cervical HIV. Results. We enrolled 106 women. Women with abnormal vaginal flora (intermediate Nugent scores, 4 - 6 were more likely to have detectable cervical HIV RNA then women with normal vaginal flora (adjusted odds ratio 7.2 (95% confidence interval 1.8 - 29.1, adjusted for CD4 count. Women with BV had a non-significantly higher likelihood of detectable cervical HIV than women with normal flora. Conclusions. Abnormal vaginal flora were significantly associated with cervical HIV expression. Further research is needed to confirm this relationship.

  1. Influence Factors of Bacterial Colonization in PICC Cancer Patients at Home%居家PICC肿瘤患者穿刺点细菌定植影响因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘心菊; 侯惠如; 杨晶; 孟凡慧; 王晓媛

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨引起居家PICC肿瘤患者穿刺点细菌定植的相关因素,并进行对策分析。方法选择2015年10—12月于本院PICC维护中心进行PICC维护的肿瘤患者472例穿刺点采样,并进行细菌学培养及观察分析,同时对患者维护情况进行记录。结果 Logistic回归分析显示,性别、维护间期、敷料卷边范围、周围皮肤是否清洁、自理能力、穿刺点增生及导管体外长度为PICC穿刺点定植的影响因素,其中体外长度在4 cm以内能减少细菌定植。微生物检验显示,革兰氏阳性菌为主要定植菌,其中凝固酶阴性葡萄球菌居首位。结论肿瘤患者居家期间PICC穿刺点细菌定植情况需得到重视,应对穿刺点细菌定植高风险者进行针对性预防护理。置管时用心电图进行定位,维护过程中将体外长度控制在4 cm之内,加强对男性患者及家属的健康宣教,维持穿刺点周围皮肤清洁,若穿刺点增生应进行碘酊湿敷,建立有效联络方式,建立完善的社区维护机制、推广洗必泰消毒剂的应用,从而减少PICC穿刺点细菌定植,降低感染率,降低导管相关性感染的发生。%Objective To investigate the correlation factors of bacterial colonization of PICC cancer patients at home and to analyze its influence factors. Methods Puncture point samples of 472 patients admitted to maintenance center from November to December in 2015 were bacteriologically cultured and observed. Results Logistic regression analysis showed that gender, membrane exchange interval, crimping degree, the cleanliness of the surrounding skin, self-care ability, proliferation and exposed length were factors affecting the colonization of PICC puncture points and when exposed length was less than 4cm can reduce the bacterial colonization. Microbe testing showed gram positive bacteria were the main pathogenic bacteria and coagulase negative staphylococci in the first place

  2. Chemopreventive effect of myrtenal on bacterial enzyme activity and the development of 1,2-dimethyl hydrazine-induced aberrant crypt foci in Wistar Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lokesh Kumar Booupathy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Colon cancer remains as a serious health problem around the world despite advances in diagnosis and treatment. Dietary fibers are considered to reduce the risk of colon cancer as they are converted to short chain fatty acids by the presence of anaerobic bacteria in the intestine, but imbalanced diet and high fat consumption may promote tumor formation at different sites, including the large bowel via increased bacterial enzymes activity. The present study was conducted to characterize the inhibitory action of myrtenal on bacterial enzymes and aberrant crypt foci (ACF. Experimental colon carcinogenesis induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine is histologically, morphologically, and anatomically similar to human colonic epithelial neoplasm. Discrete microscopic mucosal lesions such as ACF and malignant tumors function as important biomarkers in the diagnosis of colon cancer. Methylene blue staining was carried out to visualize the impact of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine and myrtenal. Myrtenal-treated animals showed decreased levels of bacterial enzymes such as β-glucuronidase, β-glucosidase, and mucinase. Characteristic changes in the colon were noticed by inhibiting ACF formation in the colon. In conclusion, treatment with myrtenal provided altered pathophysiological condition in colon cancer-bearing animals with evidence of decreased crypt multiplicity and tumor progression.

  3. Mountain Pine Beetles Colonizing Historical and Naïve Host Trees Are Associated with a Bacterial Community Highly Enriched in Genes Contributing to Terpene Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Aaron S.; Aylward, Frank O.; Adams, Sandye M; Erbilgin, Nadir; Aukema, Brian H.; Currie, Cameron R; Suen, Garret; Raffa, Kenneth F.

    2013-01-01

    The mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae, is a subcortical herbivore native to western North America that can kill healthy conifers by overcoming host tree defenses, which consist largely of high terpene concentrations. The mechanisms by which these beetles contend with toxic compounds are not well understood. Here, we explore a component of the hypothesis that beetle-associated bacterial symbionts contribute to the ability of D. ponderosae to overcome tree defenses by assisting with...

  4. Mathematical modeling of bacterial kinetics to predict the impact of antibiotic colonic exposure and treatment duration on the amount of resistant enterobacteria excreted.

    OpenAIRE

    Thu Thuy Nguyen; Jeremie Guedj; Elisabeth Chachaty; Jean de Gunzburg; Antoine Andremont; France Mentré

    2014-01-01

    Fecal excretion of antibiotics and resistant bacteria in the environment are major public health threats associated with extensive farming and modern medical care. Innovative strategies that can reduce the intestinal antibiotic concentrations during treatments are in development. However, the effect of lower exposure on the amount of resistant enterobacteria excreted has not been quantified, making it difficult to anticipate the impact of these strategies. Here, we introduce a bacterial kinet...

  5. Mathematical Modeling of Bacterial Kinetics to Predict the Impact of Antibiotic Colonic Exposure and Treatment Duration on the Amount of Resistant Enterobacteria Excreted

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Thu Thuy; Guedj, Jeremie; Chachaty, Elisabeth; de Gunzburg, Jean; Andremont, Antoine; Mentré, France

    2014-01-01

    Fecal excretion of antibiotics and resistant bacteria in the environment are major public health threats associated with extensive farming and modern medical care. Innovative strategies that can reduce the intestinal antibiotic concentrations during treatments are in development. However, the effect of lower exposure on the amount of resistant enterobacteria excreted has not been quantified, making it difficult to anticipate the impact of these strategies. Here, we introduce a bacterial kinet...

  6. Mountain pine beetles colonizing historical and naive host trees are associated with a bacterial community highly enriched in genes contributing to terpene metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Aaron S; Aylward, Frank O; Adams, Sandye M; Erbilgin, Nadir; Aukema, Brian H; Currie, Cameron R; Suen, Garret; Raffa, Kenneth F

    2013-06-01

    The mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae, is a subcortical herbivore native to western North America that can kill healthy conifers by overcoming host tree defenses, which consist largely of high terpene concentrations. The mechanisms by which these beetles contend with toxic compounds are not well understood. Here, we explore a component of the hypothesis that beetle-associated bacterial symbionts contribute to the ability of D. ponderosae to overcome tree defenses by assisting with terpene detoxification. Such symbionts may facilitate host tree transitions during range expansions currently being driven by climate change. For example, this insect has recently breached the historical geophysical barrier of the Canadian Rocky Mountains, providing access to näive tree hosts and unprecedented connectivity to eastern forests. We use culture-independent techniques to describe the bacterial community associated with D. ponderosae beetles and their galleries from their historical host, Pinus contorta, and their more recent host, hybrid P. contorta-Pinus banksiana. We show that these communities are enriched with genes involved in terpene degradation compared with other plant biomass-processing microbial communities. These pine beetle microbial communities are dominated by members of the genera Pseudomonas, Rahnella, Serratia, and Burkholderia, and the majority of genes involved in terpene degradation belong to these genera. Our work provides the first metagenome of bacterial communities associated with a bark beetle and is consistent with a potential microbial contribution to detoxification of tree defenses needed to survive the subcortical environment. PMID:23542624

  7. Displayed correlation between gene expression profiles and submicroscopic alterations in response to cetuximab, gefitinib and EGF in human colon cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EGFR is frequently overexpressed in colon cancer. We characterized HT-29 and Caco-2, human colon cancer cell lines, untreated and treated with cetuximab or gefitinib alone and in combination with EGF. Cell growth was determined using a variation on the MTT assay. Cell-cycle analysis was conducted by flow cytometry. Immunohistochemistry was performed to evaluate EGFR expression and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) evidenced the ultrastructural morphology. Gene expression profiling was performed using hybridization of the microarray Ocimum Pan Human 40 K array A. Caco-2 and HT-29 were respectively 66.25 and 59.24 % in G0/G1. They maintained this level of cell cycle distribution after treatment, suggesting a predominantly differentiated state. Treatment of Caco-2 with EGF or the two EGFR inhibitors produced a significant reduction in their viability. SEM clearly showed morphological cellular transformations in the direction of cellular death in both cell lines treated with EGFR inhibitors. HT-29 and Caco-2 displayed an important reduction of the microvilli (which also lose their erect position in Caco-2), possibly invalidating microvilli absorption function. HT-29 treated with cetuximab lost their boundary contacts and showed filipodi; when treated with gefitinib, they showed some vesicles: generally membrane reshaping is evident. Both cell lines showed a similar behavior in terms of on/off switched genes upon treatment with cetuximab. The gefitinib global gene expression pattern was different for the 2 cell lines; gefitinib treatment induced more changes, but directly correlated with EGF treatment. In cetuximab or gefitinib plus EGF treatments there was possible summation of the morphological effects: cells seemed more weakly affected by the transformation towards apoptosis. The genes appeared to be less stimulated than for single drug cases. This is the first study to have systematically investigated the effect of cetuximab or gefitinib, alone and in combination

  8. Displayed correlation between gene expression profiles and submicroscopic alterations in response to cetuximab, gefitinib and EGF in human colon cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pezzetti Furio

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background EGFR is frequently overexpressed in colon cancer. We characterized HT-29 and Caco-2, human colon cancer cell lines, untreated and treated with cetuximab or gefitinib alone and in combination with EGF. Methods Cell growth was determined using a variation on the MTT assay. Cell-cycle analysis was conducted by flow cytometry. Immunohistochemistry was performed to evaluate EGFR expression and scanning electron microscopy (SEM evidenced the ultrastructural morphology. Gene expression profiling was performed using hybridization of the microarray Ocimum Pan Human 40 K array A. Results Caco-2 and HT-29 were respectively 66.25 and 59.24 % in G0/G1. They maintained this level of cell cycle distribution after treatment, suggesting a predominantly differentiated state. Treatment of Caco-2 with EGF or the two EGFR inhibitors produced a significant reduction in their viability. SEM clearly showed morphological cellular transformations in the direction of cellular death in both cell lines treated with EGFR inhibitors. HT-29 and Caco-2 displayed an important reduction of the microvilli (which also lose their erect position in Caco-2, possibly invalidating microvilli absorption function. HT-29 treated with cetuximab lost their boundary contacts and showed filipodi; when treated with gefitinib, they showed some vesicles: generally membrane reshaping is evident. Both cell lines showed a similar behavior in terms of on/off switched genes upon treatment with cetuximab. The gefitinib global gene expression pattern was different for the 2 cell lines; gefitinib treatment induced more changes, but directly correlated with EGF treatment. In cetuximab or gefitinib plus EGF treatments there was possible summation of the morphological effects: cells seemed more weakly affected by the transformation towards apoptosis. The genes appeared to be less stimulated than for single drug cases. Conclusion This is the first study to have systematically investigated

  9. Gut Microbiota Imbalance and Base Excision Repair Dynamics in Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Debolina; Kidane, Dawit

    2016-01-01

    Gut microbiota are required for host nutrition, energy balance, and regulating immune homeostasis, however, in some cases, this mutually beneficial relationship becomes twisted (dysbiosis), and the gut flora can incite pathological disorders including colon cancer. Microbial dysbiosis promotes the release of bacterial genotoxins, metabolites, and causes chronic inflammation, which promote oxidative DNA damage. Oxidized DNA base lesions are removed by base excision repair (BER), however, the role of this altered function of BER, as well as microbiota-mediated genomic instability and colon cancer development, is still poorly understood. In this review article, we will discuss how dysbiotic microbiota induce DNA damage, its impact on base excision repair capacity, the potential link of host BER gene polymorphism, and the risk of dysbiotic microbiota mediated genomic instability and colon cancer.

  10. Chromatic alteration on marble surfaces analysed by molecular biology tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Palla

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The patina represents a superficial natural alteration of the constituting matter of the work of art. It emerges from the natural and usual stabilization process that the materials of the surface undergo because of the interaction with outdoor agents characterizing the surrounding environment. Besides, it is not linked to an obvious phenomenon of degradation that can be noticed through the change in the original colour of the matter. This is what we intend when we talk about biological patina usually generated by macro and/or micro-organic colonization (fungi, bacteria, alga which contributes to surface bio-deterioration and thus lead to the formation of orange, red or even brown and dark pigmented areas. The presence of chromatic alterations (rose-coloured areas, as a consequence of bacterial colonization, was most particularly pointed out in different sites, such as in the marble slabs on the facades of both the Cathedral of Siena (Duomo di Siena and the Certosa of Pavia. The present study shows an example of chromatic alteration of the surface of marble works due to bacterial colonization.

  11. Epidemiology and pathogenesis of Moraxella catarrhalis colonization and infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.J.C. Verhaegh (Suzanne)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractMoraxella catarrhalis is part of the normal bacterial flora in the nasopharynx of children, although over the past two decades, it has emerged as a significant bacterial pathogen and not simply a commensal colonizer. The bacterium rapidly colonizes the nasopharynx soon after birth and ma

  12. Dose- and time-dependent gene expression alterations in prostate and colon cancer cells after in vitro exposure to carbon ion and X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadrontherapy is an advanced form of radiotherapy that uses beams of charged particles (such as protons and carbon ions). Compared with conventional radiotherapy, the main advantages of carbon ion therapy are the precise absorbed dose localization, along with an increased relative biological effectiveness (RBE). This high ballistic accuracy of particle beams deposits the maximal dose to the tumor, while damage to the surrounding healthy tissue is limited. Currently, hadrontherapy is being used for the treatment of specific types of cancer. Previous in vitro studies have shown that, under certain circumstances, exposure to charged particles may inhibit cell motility and migration. In the present study, we investigated the expression of four motility-related genes in prostate (PC3) and colon (Caco-2) cancer cell lines after exposure to different radiation types. Cells were irradiated with various absorbed doses (0, 0.5 and 2 Gy) of accelerated 13C-ions at the GANIL facility (Caen, France) or with X-rays. Clonogenic assays were performed to determine the RBE. RT-qPCR analysis showed dose- and time-dependent changes in the expression of CCDC88A, FN1, MYH9 and ROCK1 in both cell lines. However, whereas in PC3 cells the response to carbon ion irradiation was enhanced compared with X-irradiation, the effect was the opposite in Caco-2 cells, indicating cell-type–specific responses to the different radiation types. (author)

  13. The social structure of microbial community involved in colonization resistance

    OpenAIRE

    He, Xuesong; McLean, Jeffrey S.; Guo, Lihong; Lux, Renate; Shi, Wenyuan

    2013-01-01

    It is well established that host-associated microbial communities can interfere with the colonization and establishment of microbes of foreign origins, a phenomenon often referred to as bacterial interference or colonization resistance. However, due to the complexity of the indigenous microbiota, it has been extremely difficult to elucidate the community colonization resistance mechanisms and identify the bacterial species involved. In a recent study, we have established an in vitro mice oral...

  14. 新生儿脐部感染细菌定植的临床分析研究%Clinical study of bacterial colonization and umbilical infections in neonates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马艳; 张欢; 李芳

    2015-01-01

    目的:对新生儿脐部感染细菌定植进行分析研究,以减少新生儿脐部感染率。方法选取2012年3月-2013年3月接收的225例新生儿作为研究对象,随机将其分为干预组114例和对照组111例;对照组采用常规的脐部护理,干预组则采用脐部干预措施,对比两组新生儿脐部细菌感染率及细菌定植率,并探讨新生儿脐部感染的相关因素。结果225例新生儿发生脐部感染45例,感染率为20.0%;观察组感染率为10.5%,对照组为29.7%,两组新生儿脐部感染率比较差异有统计学意义( P<0.05);干预组和对照组的细菌定植率分别为95.6%和92.8%,两组比较差异无统计学意义;而两组新生儿病原菌的感染率只有大肠埃希菌的感染率差异有统计学意义(P<0.05),其他病原菌的感染率差异无统计学意义;脐部感染的原因以脐端消毒不严所致的感染率最高,为55.0%;其次是脐带结扎位置及脐带修剪不净,感染率分别为22.6%和22.2%。结论新生儿脐部是细菌定植的好发部位,因此需要做好新生儿的脐部护理,减少脐部感染的发生。%OBJECTIVE To study the bacterial colonization in neonates with umbilical infections so as to reduce the incidence of umbilical infections in the neonates .METHODS A total of 225 neonates who were enrolled in the hos‐pital from Mar 2012 to Mar 2013 were recruited as the study objects and randomly divided into the intervention group with 114 cases and the control group with 111 cases .The control group was treated with conventional um‐bilical nursing ,while the intervention group was given the umbilical interventions .The incidence of umbilical infec‐tions and the rate of bacterial colonization in neonates were compared between the two groups ,and the related fac‐tors for the umbilical infections in the neonates were explored .RESULTS The umbilical infections

  15. Effect of co-administration of probiotics with polysaccharide based colon targeted delivery systems to optimize site specific drug release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudhviraj, G; Vaidya, Yogyata; Singh, Sachin Kumar; Yadav, Ankit Kumar; Kaur, Puneet; Gulati, Monica; Gowthamarajan, K

    2015-11-01

    Significant clinical success of colon targeted dosage forms has been limited by their inappropriate release profile at the target site. Their failure to release the drug completely in the colon may be attributed to changes in the colonic milieu because of pathological state, drug effect and psychological stress accompanying the diseased state or, a combination of these. Alteration in normal colonic pH and bacterial picture leads to incomplete release of drug from the designed delivery system. We report the effectiveness of a targeted delivery system wherein the constant replenishment of the colonic microbiota is achieved by concomitant administration of probiotics along with the polysaccharide based drug delivery system. Guar gum coated spheroids of sulfasalazine were prepared. In the dissolution studies, these spheroids showed markedly higher release in the simulated colonic fluid. In vivo experiments conducted in rats clearly demonstrated the therapeutic advantage of co-administration of probiotics with guar gum coated spheroids. Our results suggest that concomitant use of probiotics along with the polysaccharide based delivery systems can be a simple strategy to achieve satisfactory colon targeting of drugs.

  16. TM9SF4 is a novel V-ATPase-interacting protein that modulates tumor pH alterations associated with drug resistance and invasiveness of colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozupone, F; Borghi, M; Marzoli, F; Azzarito, T; Matarrese, P; Iessi, E; Venturi, G; Meschini, S; Canitano, A; Bona, R; Cara, A; Fais, S

    2015-10-01

    An inverted pH gradient across the cell membranes is a typical feature of malignant cancer cells that are characterized by extracellular acidosis and cytosol alkalization. These dysregulations are able to create a unique milieu that favors tumor progression, metastasis and chemo/immune-resistance traits of solid tumors. A key event mediating tumor cell pH alterations is an aberrant activation of ion channels and proton pumps such as (H+)-vacuolar-ATPase (V-ATPase). TM9SF4 is a poorly characterized transmembrane protein that we have recently shown to be related to cannibal behavior of metastatic melanoma cells. Here, we demonstrate that TM9SF4 represents a novel V-ATPase-associated protein involved in V-ATPase activation. We have observed in HCT116 and SW480 colon cancer cell lines that TM9SF4 interacts with the ATP6V1H subunit of the V-ATPase V1 sector. Suppression of TM9SF4 with small interfering RNAs strongly reduces assembly of V-ATPase V0/V1 sectors, thus reversing tumor pH gradient with a decrease of cytosolic pH, alkalization of intracellular vesicles and a reduction of extracellular acidity. Such effects are associated with a significant inhibition of the invasive behavior of colon cancer cells and with an increased sensitivity to the cytotoxic effects of 5-fluorouracil. Our study shows for the first time the important role of TM9SF4 in the aberrant constitutive activation of the V-ATPase, and the development of a malignant phenotype, supporting the potential use of TM9SF4 as a target for future anticancer therapies.

  17. Colon Cancer

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-11-05

    In this podcast, Dr. Tom Frieden, CDC Director, discusses colon cancer and the importance of early detection.  Created: 11/5/2013 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 3/6/2014.

  18. Artificially inserting a reticuloendotheliosis virus long terminal repeat into a bacterial artificial chromosome clone of Marek's disease virus (MDV) alters expression of nearby MDV genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taejoong; Mays, Jody; Fadly, Aly; Silva, Robert F

    2011-06-01

    Researchers reported that co-cultivating the JM/102W strain of Marek's disease virus (MDV) with reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) resulted in an REV long terminal repeat (LTR) being inserted into the internal repeat short (IRS) region of JM/102W. When the resulting recombinant virus was serially passed in cell culture, the initial LTR was duplicated and a second LTR spontaneously appeared in the terminal repeat short (TRS) region of the MDV genome. The virus, designated RM1, was significantly attenuated but still induced severe bursal and thymic atrophy (Isfort et al. PNAS 89:991-995). To determine whether the altered phenotype was due solely to the LTR, we cloned the LTR from the RM1 IRS region and inserted it into the IRS region of a very virulent bacterial artificial clone (BAC) of the Md5 strain of MDV, which we designated rMd5-RM1-LTR. During blind passage in duck embryo fibroblast cultures, the initial LTR in the rMd5-RM1-LTR was also duplicated, with LTRs appearing in both IRS and TRS regions of the MDV genome. The inserted LTR sequences and transcripts associated with the MDV open reading frames MDV085, MDV086, SORF2, US1, and US10 were molecularly characterized. The parental Md5 BAC contains a family of transcripts of 3, 2, and 1 kb that all terminate at the end of the US10 gene. The rMd5-RM1-LTR and RM1 viruses both express an additional 4 kb transcript that originates in the LTR and also terminates after US10. Collectively, the data suggest that our engineered rMd5-RM1-LTR virus very closely resembles the RM1 virus in its structure and transcription patterns.

  19. Alteration of interstitial cells of Cajal in the colon of slow transit constipation rats%慢传输型便秘大鼠结肠内Cajal间质细胞的变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭至柔; 谭丽; 黄雪; 秦荔荣

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the alteration of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC)in the colon of slow transit constipation rats and to detect the role of ICC in the slow transit constipation (STC). Methods Thirty-two healthy Wistar rats were randomly divided into control group and model group of slow transit constipation. The rats in model group received diphenoxylate daily by intragastric administration to develop the slow transit constipated model. 100 days later, intestinal transit functions were examined by activated charcoal pushing test. Meanwhile, the expression of ICC was detected by immunohistochemistry and the alteration was analyzed by the computer image analysis system. Results The movement of contents from the proximal to the distal colon and rectum in model rats was significantly slower than that in normal rats. In model rats, the time of discharge of the first black faeces was 686 ± 57 min, significantly longer than that in normal rats 608 ± 46 min(P < 0.05). ICC in model rats was significantly reduced than that of normal rats. This reduction was more significant in the ICC between the inner and outer layers of the muscularis propria. Conclusion The reduction of ICC in the STC model rats suggests that ICC may play an important role in the pathogenesis of STC.%目的:研究慢传榆型便秘(STC)大鼠结肠内cajal间质细胞(ICC)的变化,探讨ICC在STC发病机制中的作用.方法:用复方苯乙哌啶灌胃法建立STC大鼠模型,免疫组化法检测大鼠结肠ICC,分析大鼠结肠不同部位ICC的变化.结果:STC组大鼠结肠ICC比对照组明显减少.结论:STC大鼠结肠内ICC明显减少,提示ICC在STC的发病机制中可能起重要作用.

  20. Bacterial Enhancement of Vinyl Fouling by Algae

    OpenAIRE

    Holmes, Paul E.

    1986-01-01

    The role of bacteria in the development of algae on low-density vinyl was investigated. Unidentified bacterial contaminants in unialgal stock cultures of Phormidium faveolarum and Pleurochloris pyrenoidosa enhanced, by 1 to 2 orders of magnitude, colonization of vinyl by these algae, as determined by epifluorescence microscopy counts and chlorophyll a in extracts of colonized vinyl. Colonization by bacteria always preceded that by algae. Scanning electron microscopy of the colonized Phormidiu...

  1. Hierridin B Isolated from a Marine Cyanobacterium Alters VDAC1, Mitochondrial Activity, and Cell Cycle Genes on HT-29 Colon Adenocarcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Freitas

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hierridin B was isolated from a marine cyanobacterium Cyanobium sp. strain and induced cytotoxicity selectively in HT-29 adenocarcinoma cells. The underlying molecular mechanism was not yet elucidated. Methods: HT-29 cells were exposed to the IC50 concentration of hierridin B (100.2 μM for 48 h. Non-targeted proteomics was performed using 2D gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. The mRNA expression of apoptotic and cell cycle genes were analyzed by real-time PCR. Automated quantification of 160 cytoplasm and mitochondrial parameter was done by fluorescence microscopy using CellProfiler software. Results: Proteomics identified 21 significant different proteins, which belonged to protein folding/synthesis and cell structure amongst others. Increase of VDAC1 protein responsible for formation of mitochondrial channels was confirmed by mRNA expression. A 10-fold decrease of cytoskeleton proteins (STMN1, TBCA provided a link to alterations of the cell cycle. CCNB1 and CCNE mRNA were decreased two-fold, and P21CIP increased 10-fold, indicative of cell cycle arrest. Morphological analysis of mitochondrial parameter confirmed a reduced mitochondrial activity. Conclusion: Hierridin B is a potential anticancer compound that targets mitochondrial activity and function.

  2. Hierridin B Isolated from a Marine Cyanobacterium Alters VDAC1, Mitochondrial Activity, and Cell Cycle Genes on HT-29 Colon Adenocarcinoma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Sara; Martins, Rosário; Costa, Margarida; Leão, Pedro N.; Vitorino, Rui; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Urbatzka, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hierridin B was isolated from a marine cyanobacterium Cyanobium sp. strain and induced cytotoxicity selectively in HT-29 adenocarcinoma cells. The underlying molecular mechanism was not yet elucidated. Methods: HT-29 cells were exposed to the IC50 concentration of hierridin B (100.2 μM) for 48 h. Non-targeted proteomics was performed using 2D gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. The mRNA expression of apoptotic and cell cycle genes were analyzed by real-time PCR. Automated quantification of 160 cytoplasm and mitochondrial parameter was done by fluorescence microscopy using CellProfiler software. Results: Proteomics identified 21 significant different proteins, which belonged to protein folding/synthesis and cell structure amongst others. Increase of VDAC1 protein responsible for formation of mitochondrial channels was confirmed by mRNA expression. A 10-fold decrease of cytoskeleton proteins (STMN1, TBCA) provided a link to alterations of the cell cycle. CCNB1 and CCNE mRNA were decreased two-fold, and P21CIP increased 10-fold, indicative of cell cycle arrest. Morphological analysis of mitochondrial parameter confirmed a reduced mitochondrial activity. Conclusion: Hierridin B is a potential anticancer compound that targets mitochondrial activity and function. PMID:27589771

  3. Get Tested for Colon Cancer: Here's How

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... These tests detect tiny amounts of blood or cells that are shed by large polyps or early ... traces of blood or cancerous material, altered colon cell DNA, in your stools. Your doctor will give ...

  4. [Bacterial vaginosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero Herrero, Daniel; Andreu Domingo, Antonia

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the main cause of vaginal dysbacteriosis in the women during the reproductive age. It is an entity in which many studies have focused for years and which is still open for discussion topics. This is due to the diversity of microorganisms that cause it and therefore, its difficult treatment. Bacterial vaginosis is probably the result of vaginal colonization by complex bacterial communities, many of them non-cultivable and with interdependent metabolism where anaerobic populations most likely play an important role in its pathogenesis. The main symptoms are an increase of vaginal discharge and the unpleasant smell of it. It can lead to serious consequences for women, such as an increased risk of contracting sexually transmitted infections including human immunodeficiency virus and upper genital tract and pregnancy complications. Gram stain is the gold standard for microbiological diagnosis of BV, but can also be diagnosed using the Amsel clinical criteria. It should not be considered a sexually transmitted disease but it is highly related to sex. Recurrence is the main problem of medical treatment. Apart from BV, there are other dysbacteriosis less characterized like aerobic vaginitis of which further studies are coming slowly but are achieving more attention and consensus among specialists. PMID:27474242

  5. Altered colonic mucosal Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid (PUFA derived lipid mediators in ulcerative colitis: new insight into relationship with disease activity and pathophysiology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojgan Masoodi

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Ulcerative colitis (UC is a relapsing inflammatory disorder of unconfirmed aetiology, variable severity and clinical course, characterised by progressive histological inflammation and with elevation of eicosanoids which have a known pathophysiological role in inflammation. Therapeutic interventions targetting eicosanoids (5-aminosalicylates (ASA are effective first line and adjunctive treatments in mild-moderate UC for achieving and sustaining clinical remission. However, the variable clinical response to 5-ASA and frequent deterioration in response to cyclo-oxygenase (COX inhibitors, has prompted an in depth simultaneous evaluation of multiple lipid mediators (including eicosanoids within the inflammatory milieu in UC. We hypothesised that severity of inflammation is associated with alteration of lipid mediators, in relapsing UC. DESIGN: Study was case-control design. Mucosal lipid mediators were determined by LC-MS/MS lipidomics analysis on mucosal biopsies taken from patients attending outpatients with relapsing UC. Univariate and multivariate statistical analyses were used to investigate the association of mucosal lipid mediators, with the disease state and severity graded histologically. RESULTS: Levels of PGE2, PGD2, TXB2, 5-HETE, 11-HETE, 12-HETE and 15-HETE are significantly elevated in inflamed mucosa and correlate with severity of inflammation, determined using validated histological scoring systems. CONCLUSIONS: Our approach of capturing inflammatory mediator signature at different stages of UC by combining comprehensive lipidomics analysis and computational modelling could be used to classify and predict mild-moderate inflammation; however, predictive index is diminished in severe inflammation. This new technical approach could be developed to tailor drug treatments to patients with active UC, based on the mucosal lipid mediator profile.

  6. Bacterial microflora of nectarines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microflora of fruit surfaces has been the best source of antagonists against fungi causing postharvest decays of fruit. However, there is little information on microflora colonizing surfaces of fruits other than grapes, apples, and citrus fruit. We characterized bacterial microflora on nectarine f...

  7. Differences in fungal and bacterial physiology alter soil carbon and nitrogen cycling: synthesizing effects of microbial community structure using the Fungi and Bacteria (FAB) model. (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averill, C.; Hawkes, C. V.; Waring, B. G.

    2013-12-01

    Most biogeochemical models of soil carbon and nitrogen cycling include a simplified representation of the soil microbial community as a single pool, despite good evidence that shifts in the composition or relative abundance of microbial taxa can affect process rates. Incorporating a more realistic depiction of the microbial community in these models may increase their predictive accuracy, but this must be balanced against the feasibility of modeling the enormous diversity present in soil. We propose that explicitly including two major microbial functional groups with distinct physiologies, fungi and bacteria, will improve model predictions. To this end, we created the fungi and bacteria (FAB) model, building off previous enzyme-driven biogeochemical models that explicitly represent microbial physiology. We compared this model to a complementary biogeochemical model that does not include microbial community structure (';single-pool'). We also performed a cross-ecosystem meta-analysis of fungi-to-bacteria ratios to determine if model predictions of community structure matched empirical data. There were large differences in process rates and pool sizes between the single-pool and FAB models. In the FAB model, inorganic N pools were reduced by 5-95% depending on the soil C:N ratio due to bacterial immobilization of fungal mineralization products. This nitrogen subsidy also increased microbial biomass at some C:N ratios. Although there were changes in some components of respiration, particularly overflow respiration, there was no net effect of community structure on total respiration fluxes. The FAB model predicted a breakpoint in the relationship between the ratio of fungi to bacteria and soil C:N, after which the fungi-to-bacteria ratio should begin to increase. Break-point analysis of the meta-analysis data set revealed a consistent pattern and matched the slope of the change in F:B with soil C:N, but not the precise breakpoint. We argue that including microbial

  8. Muc2 protects against lethal infectious colitis by disassociating pathogenic and commensal bacteria from the colonic mucosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirk S B Bergstrom

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Despite recent advances in our understanding of the pathogenesis of attaching and effacing (A/E Escherichia coli infections, the mechanisms by which the host defends against these microbes are unclear. The goal of this study was to determine the role of goblet cell-derived Muc2, the major intestinal secretory mucin and primary component of the mucus layer, in host protection against A/E pathogens. To assess the role of Muc2 during A/E bacterial infections, we inoculated Muc2 deficient (Muc2(-/- mice with Citrobacter rodentium, a murine A/E pathogen related to diarrheagenic A/E E. coli. Unlike wildtype (WT mice, infected Muc2(-/- mice exhibited rapid weight loss and suffered up to 90% mortality. Stool plating demonstrated 10-100 fold greater C. rodentium burdens in Muc2(-/- vs. WT mice, most of which were found to be loosely adherent to the colonic mucosa. Histology of Muc2(-/- mice revealed ulceration in the colon amid focal bacterial microcolonies. Metabolic labeling of secreted mucins in the large intestine demonstrated that mucin secretion was markedly increased in WT mice during infection compared to uninfected controls, suggesting that the host uses increased mucin release to flush pathogens from the mucosal surface. Muc2 also impacted host-commensal interactions during infection, as FISH analysis revealed C. rodentium microcolonies contained numerous commensal microbes, which was not observed in WT mice. Orally administered FITC-Dextran and FISH staining showed significantly worsened intestinal barrier disruption in Muc2(-/- vs. WT mice, with overt pathogen and commensal translocation into the Muc2(-/- colonic mucosa. Interestingly, commensal depletion enhanced C. rodentium colonization of Muc2(-/- mice, although colonic pathology was not significantly altered. In conclusion, Muc2 production is critical for host protection during A/E bacterial infections, by limiting overall pathogen and commensal numbers associated with the colonic

  9. Colonization properties of Campylobacter jejuni in chickens

    OpenAIRE

    Pielsticker, C.; Glünder, G.; Rautenschlein, S.

    2012-01-01

    Campylobacter is the most common bacterial food-borne pathogen worldwide. Poultry and specifically chicken and raw chicken meat is the main source for human Campylobacter infection. Whilst being colonized by Campylobacter spp. chicken in contrast to human, do scarcely develop pathological lesions. The immune mechanisms controlling Campylobacter colonization and infection in chickens are still not clear. Previous studies and our investigations indicate that the ability to ...

  10. Antibiotic use during pregnancy alters the commensal vaginal microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokholm, J; Schjørring, S; Eskildsen, C E; Pedersen, L; Bischoff, A L; Følsgaard, N; Carson, C G; Chawes, B L K; Bønnelykke, K; Mølgaard, A; Jacobsson, B; Krogfelt, K A; Bisgaard, H

    2014-07-01

    Antibiotics may induce alterations in the commensal microbiota of the birth canal in pregnant women. Therefore, we studied the effect of antibiotic administration during pregnancy on commensal vaginal bacterial colonization at gestational week 36. Six hundred and sixty-eight pregnant women from the novel unselected Copenhagen Prospective Studies on Asthma in Childhood (COPSAC2010 ) pregnancy cohort participated in this analysis. Detailed information on oral antibiotic prescriptions during pregnancy filled at the pharmacy was obtained and verified prospectively. Vaginal samples were obtained at pregnancy week 36 and cultured for bacteria. Women who received oral antibiotics during any pregnancy trimester had an increased rate of colonization by Staphylococcus species in the vaginal samples as compared with samples obtained from women without any antibiotic treatment during pregnancy (adjusted OR 1.63, 95% CI 1.06-2.52, p 0.028). Oral antibiotic administration in the third trimester were also associated with increased colonization by Staphylococcus species (adjusted OR 1.98, 95% CI 1.04-3.76, p 0.037). These bacteriological changes were associated with urinary tract infection antibiotics. Women treated in the third trimester of pregnancy were more often colonized by Escherichia coli than women without antibiotic treatment in the third trimester (adjusted OR 1.91, 95% CI 1.04-3.52, p 0.038). This change was associated with respiratory tract infection (RTI) antibiotics. We did not observe any significant changes in vaginal Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptoccocus) or Staphylococcus aureus colonization following antibiotic treatment in pregnancy. Antibiotic administration during pregnancy leads to alterations in the vaginal microbiological ecology prior to birth, with potential morbidity, and long-term effects on the early microbial colonization of the neonate. PMID:24118384

  11. Colon cancer - resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources - colon cancer ... The following organizations are good resources for information on colon cancer : American Cancer Society -- www.cancer.org/cancer/colonandrectumcancer/index Colon Cancer Alliance -- www.ccalliance.org National ...

  12. Antibiotic use during pregnancy alters the commensal vaginal microbiota

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stokholm, J.; Schjørring, S.; Eskildsen, Carl Emil Aae;

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotics may induce alterations in the commensal microbiota of the birth canal in pregnant women. Therefore, we studied the effect of antibiotic administration during pregnancy on commensal vaginal bacterial colonization at gestational week 36. Six hundred and sixty-eight pregnant women from...... the novel unselected Copenhagen Prospective Studies on Asthma in Childhood (COPSAC2010 ) pregnancy cohort participated in this analysis. Detailed information on oral antibiotic prescriptions during pregnancy filled at the pharmacy was obtained and verified prospectively. Vaginal samples were obtained...... at pregnancy week 36 and cultured for bacteria. Women who received oral antibiotics during any pregnancy trimester had an increased rate of colonization by Staphylococcus species in the vaginal samples as compared with samples obtained from women without any antibiotic treatment during pregnancy (adjusted OR 1...

  13. Effect of ageing on colonic mucosal regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ferenc Sipos; Katalin Leiszter; Zsolt Tulassay

    2011-01-01

    The physiologic and pathologic cellular and molecular changes occurring with age in the human colon affect both the inflammatory process leading to mucosal injury and the regenerative capacity of the epithelium. On the one hand, age-related telomere shortening and inflamm-ageing may lead to the development of colonic inflammation, which results in epithelial damage. On the other hand, the altered migration and function of regenerative stem cells, the age-related methylation of mucosal healing-associated genes, together with the alterations of growth factor signaling with age, may be involved in delayed mucosal regeneration. The connections of these alterations to the process of ageing are not fully known. The understanding and customtailored modification of these mechanisms are of great clinical importance with regard to disease prevention and modern therapeutic strategies. Here, we aim to summarize the age-related microscopic and molecular changes of the human colon, as well as their role in altered mucosal healing.

  14. Developmental Changes in Bacterial Colonization and Digestive Function in Ileum of Lambs%山羊羔羊回肠细菌群落定植与消化功能的发育性变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李小鹏; 焦金真; 颜琼娴; 谭支良

    2016-01-01

    本试验旨在研究山羊羔羊回肠细菌群落定植与消化功能的发育性变化。选用44只湘东黑山羊羔羊,随机选择4只在1、7、14日龄(非反刍阶段),28、42(过渡阶段)和56、70日龄(反刍阶段)屠宰取样。采集回肠食糜测定乙酸含量,淀粉酶、纤维素酶和木聚糖酶活性,总细菌数量和部分功能性细菌(普雷氏菌属、甲烷菌、纤维降解菌和淀粉降解菌)占总细菌百分比。结果表明:14日龄开始在回肠食糜中检出乙酸,日龄增长显著提高了其含量( P<0.05),56~70日龄增长最快;日龄增长显著或极显著提高了纤维素酶和木聚糖酶活性( P<0.05或P<0.01);日龄增长极显著提高了总细菌数量和甲烷菌(最早检出在7日龄)、普雷氏杆菌和栖瘤胃普雷氏菌占总细菌百分比( P<0.01);纤维降解菌(琥珀酸丝状杆菌和黄色瘤胃球菌)和淀粉降解菌(嗜淀粉瘤胃杆菌)均在28日龄开始检出。综合得出,山羊羔羊回肠纤维降解消化能力是在28日龄建立之后逐渐完善的,7日龄即可检出大量甲烷菌定植,之后逐渐趋于稳定。%The objective of this study was to investigate the developmental changes in bacterial colonization and digestive function in ileum of lambs.Forty four Xiangdong black lambs were used in this trial, and 4 of them were randomly slaughtered at 1, 7 and 14 days of age ( nonrumination period) , 28 and 42 days of age ( transi-tion period) , and 56 and 70 days of age ( rumination period) , respectively.The ileal chymus was sampled to determine acetate content, activities of amylase, cellulase and xylanase, as well as general bacteria number and selected functional bacterial species ( Prevotella, methanogen, and cellulolytic and amylolytic bacteria) .The results showed as follows:acetate could be detected in ileal chymus of lambs since at 25 days of age, and the content was significantly

  15. Artifically inserting a reticuloendotheliosis virus long terminal repeat into a bacterial artificial chromosome clone of Marek's disease virus (MDV) alters expression of nearby MDV genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The long terminal repeat (LTR) sequence of reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) was inserted into the very virulent Marek’s disease virus (MDV) Md5 bacterial artificial chromosome clone. The insertion site was nearly identical to the REV LTR that was naturally inserted into the JM/102W strain of MDV fo...

  16. Modulatory efficacy of rosmarinic acid on premalignant lesions and antioxidant status in 1,2-dimethylhydrazine induced rat colon carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikkumar, V; Sivagami, G; Vinothkumar, R; Rajkumar, D; Nalini, N

    2012-11-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer related deaths in Western countries and is becoming increasingly common in Asia. Rosmarinic acid (RA), one of the major components of polyphenol possesses attractive remedial features. The purpose of this study is to investigate the possible chemopreventive mechanism of action of RA against 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) induced rat colon carcinogenesis by evaluating the circulatory antioxidant status and colonic bacterial enzymes activities. Additionally, we analyzed the aberrant crypt foci (ACF) formation and multiplicity in the colon of experimental groups. Wistar male rats were divided into six groups. Group 1 was control rats, group 2 rats received RA (10 mg/kg b.w., p.o. everyday), rats in groups 3-6 received DMH (20 mg/kg b.w., s.c.) for the first 4 weeks. In addition to DMH, groups 4-6 received 2.5, 5, and 10 mg/kg b.w. RA respectively. The results revealed that supplementation with RA significantly reduced the formation of ACF and ACF multiplicity in DMH treated rats. Moreover RA supplementation prevented the alterations in circulatory antioxidant enzymes and colonic bacterial enzymes activities. Overall, our results showed that all three doses of RA inhibited carcinogenesis, though the effect of the intermediary dose of 5 mg/kg b.w. was more pronounced. PMID:22960260

  17. The social structure of microbial community involved in colonization resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xuesong; McLean, Jeffrey S; Guo, Lihong; Lux, Renate; Shi, Wenyuan

    2014-03-01

    It is well established that host-associated microbial communities can interfere with the colonization and establishment of microbes of foreign origins, a phenomenon often referred to as bacterial interference or colonization resistance. However, due to the complexity of the indigenous microbiota, it has been extremely difficult to elucidate the community colonization resistance mechanisms and identify the bacterial species involved. In a recent study, we have established an in vitro mice oral microbial community (O-mix) and demonstrated its colonization resistance against an Escherichia coli strain of mice gut origin. In this study, we further analyzed the community structure of the O-mix by using a dilution/regrowth approach and identified the bacterial species involved in colonization resistance against E. coli. Our results revealed that, within the O-mix there were three different types of bacterial species forming unique social structure. They act as 'Sensor', 'Mediator' and 'Killer', respectively, and have coordinated roles in initiating the antagonistic action and preventing the integration of E. coli. The functional role of each identified bacterial species was further confirmed by E. coli-specific responsiveness of the synthetic communities composed of different combination of the identified players. The study reveals for the first time the sophisticated structural and functional organization of a colonization resistance pathway within a microbial community. Furthermore, our results emphasize the importance of 'Facilitation' or positive interactions in the development of community-level functions, such as colonization resistance. PMID:24088624

  18. Muscarinic Receptor Signaling in Colon Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenvinge, Erik C. von, E-mail: evonrose@medicine.umaryland.edu; Raufman, Jean-Pierre [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology & Hepatology, 22 S. Greene Street, N3W62, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Department of Veterans Affairs, VA Maryland Health Care System, 10 North Greene Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States)

    2011-03-02

    According to the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, colon cancer results from accumulating somatic gene mutations; environmental growth factors accelerate and augment this process. For example, diets rich in meat and fat increase fecal bile acids and colon cancer risk. In rodent cancer models, increased fecal bile acids promote colon dysplasia. Conversely, in rodents and in persons with inflammatory bowel disease, low-dose ursodeoxycholic acid treatment alters fecal bile acid composition and attenuates colon neoplasia. In the course of elucidating the mechanism underlying these actions, we discovered that bile acids interact functionally with intestinal muscarinic receptors. The present communication reviews muscarinic receptor expression in normal and neoplastic colon epithelium, the role of autocrine signaling following synthesis and release of acetylcholine from colon cancer cells, post-muscarinic receptor signaling including the role of transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors and activation of the ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways, the structural biology and metabolism of bile acids and evidence for functional interaction of bile acids with muscarinic receptors on human colon cancer cells. In murine colon cancer models, deficiency of subtype 3 muscarinic receptors attenuates intestinal neoplasia; a proof-of-concept supporting muscarinic receptor signaling as a therapeutic target for colon cancer.

  19. Muscarinic Receptor Signaling in Colon Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre Raufman

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available According to the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, colon cancer results from accumulating somatic gene mutations; environmental growth factors accelerate and augment this process. For example, diets rich in meat and fat increase fecal bile acids and colon cancer risk. In rodent cancer models, increased fecal bile acids promote colon dysplasia. Conversely, in rodents and in persons with inflammatory bowel disease, low-dose ursodeoxycholic acid treatment alters fecal bile acid composition and attenuates colon neoplasia. In the course of elucidating the mechanism underlying these actions, we discovered that bile acids interact functionally with intestinal muscarinic receptors. The present communication reviews muscarinic receptor expression in normal and neoplastic colon epithelium, the role of autocrine signaling following synthesis and release of acetylcholine from colon cancer cells, post-muscarinic receptor signaling including the role of transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors and activation of the ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways, the structural biology and metabolism of bile acids and evidence for functional interaction of bile acids with muscarinic receptors on human colon cancer cells. In murine colon cancer models, deficiency of subtype 3 muscarinic receptors attenuates intestinal neoplasia; a proof-of-concept supporting muscarinic receptor signaling as a therapeutic target for colon cancer.

  20. Studies on the Infection, Colonization, and Movement of Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae in Kiwifruit Tissues Using a GFPuv-Labeled Strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiaoning; Huang, Qiling; Zhao, Zhibo; Han, Qingmei; Ke, Xiwang; Qin, Huqiang; Huang, Lili

    2016-01-01

    Kiwifruit bacterial canker, an economically important disease caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae (Psa), has caused severe losses in all major areas of kiwifruit cultivation. Using a GFPuv-labeled strain of Psa, we monitored the invasion, colonization, and movement of the pathogen in kiwifruit twigs, leaves and veins. The pathogen can invade twigs through both wounds and natural openings; the highest number of Psa is obtained in cut tissues. We determined that, following spray inoculation, Psa-GFPuv could infect leaves and cause lesions in the presence and absence of wounds. Light and transmission electron microscopic observations showed that bacterial cells colonize both phloem and xylem vessels. Bacterial infection resulted in marked alterations of host tissues including the disintegration of organelles and degeneration of protoplasts and cell walls. Furthermore, low temperature was conducive to colonization and movement of Psa-GFPuv in kiwifruit tissues. Indeed, the pathogen migrated faster at 4°C than at 16°C or 25°C in twigs. However, the optimum temperature for colonization and movement of Psa in leaf veins was 16°C. Our results, revealing a better understanding of the Psa infection process, might contribute to develop more efficacious disease management strategies. PMID:26999596

  1. A member of the cathelicidin family of antimicrobial peptides is produced in the upper airway of the chinchilla and its mRNA expression is altered by common viral and bacterial co-pathogens of otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGillivary, Glen; Ray, William C; Bevins, Charles L; Munson, Robert S; Bakaletz, Lauren O

    2007-03-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), a component of the innate immune system, play a major role in defense of mucosal surfaces against a wide spectrum of microorganisms such as viral and bacterial co-pathogens of the polymicrobial disease otitis media (OM). To further understand the role of AMPs in OM, we cloned a cDNA encoding a cathelicidin homolog (cCRAMP) from upper respiratory tract (URT) mucosae of the chinchilla, the predominant host used to model experimental OM. Recombinant cCRAMP exhibited alpha-helical secondary structure and killed the three main bacterial pathogens of OM. In situ hybridization showed cCRAMP mRNA production in epithelium of the chinchilla Eustachian tube and RT-PCR was used to amplify cCRAMP mRNA from several other tissues of the chinchilla URT. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of chinchilla middle ear epithelial cells (CMEEs) incubated with either viral (influenza A virus, adenovirus, or RSV) or bacterial (nontypeable H. influenzae, M. catarrhalis, or S. pneumoniae) pathogens associated with OM demonstrated distinct microbe-specific patterns of altered expression. Collectively, these data showed that viruses and bacteria modulate AMP messages in the URT, which likely contributes to the disease course of OM.

  2. Molecular adaptations of Herbaspirillum seropedicae during colonization of the maize rhizosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsanelli, Eduardo; Tadra-Sfeir, Michelle Z; Faoro, Helisson; Pankievicz, Vânia Cs; de Baura, Valter A; Pedrosa, Fábio O; de Souza, Emanuel M; Dixon, Ray; Monteiro, Rose A

    2016-09-01

    Molecular mechanisms of plant recognition and colonization by diazotrophic bacteria are barely understood. Herbaspirillum seropedicae is a Betaproteobacterium capable of colonizing epiphytically and endophytically commercial grasses, to promote plant growth. In this study, we utilized RNA-seq to compare the transcriptional profiles of planktonic and maize root-attached H. seropedicae SmR1 recovered 1 and 3 days after inoculation. The results indicated that nitrogen metabolism was strongly activated in the rhizosphere and polyhydroxybutyrate storage was mobilized in order to assist the survival of H. seropedicae during the early stages of colonization. Epiphytic cells showed altered transcription levels of several genes associated with polysaccharide biosynthesis, peptidoglycan turnover and outer membrane protein biosynthesis, suggesting reorganization of cell wall envelope components. Specific methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins and two-component systems were differentially expressed between populations over time, suggesting deployment of an extensive bacterial sensory system for adaptation to the plant environment. An insertion mutation inactivating a methyl-accepting chemosensor induced in planktonic bacteria, decreased chemotaxis towards the plant and attachment to roots. In summary, analysis of mutant strains combined with transcript profiling revealed several molecular adaptations that enable H. seropedicae to sense the plant environment, attach to the root surface and survive during the early stages of maize colonization. PMID:25923055

  3. Effects of altered groundwater chemistry upon the pH-dependency and magnitude of bacterial attachment during transport within an organically contaminated sandy aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, R.W.; Metge, D.W.; Barber, L.B.; Aiken, G.R.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of a dilute (ionic strength = 5 ?? 10-3 M) plume of treated sewage, with elevated levels (3.9 mg/L) of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), upon the pH-dependency and magnitude of bacterial transport through an iron-laden, quartz sand aquifer (Cape Cod, MA) were evaluated using sets of replicate, static minicolumns. Compared with uncontaminated groundwater, the plume chemistry diminished bacterial attachment under mildly acidic (pH 5.0-6.5) in-situ conditions, in spite of the 5-fold increase in ionic strength and substantively enhanced attachment under more alkaline conditions. The effects of the hydrophobic neutral and total fractions of the plume DOC; modest concentrations of fulvic and humic acids (1.5 mg/L); linear alkyl benzene sulfonate (LAS) (25 mg/L); Imbentin (200 ??g/L), a model nonionic surfactant; sulfate (28 mg/L); and calcium (20 mg/L) varied sharply in response to relatively small changes in pH, although the plume constituents collectively decreased the pH-dependency of bacterial attachment. LAS and other hydrophobic neutrals (collectively representing only ???3% of the plume DOC) had a disproportionately large effect upon bacterial attachment, as did the elevated concentrations of sulfate within the plume. The findings further suggest that the roles of organic plume constituents in transport or bacteria through acidic aquifer sediments can be very different than would be predicted from column studies performed at circumneutral pH and that the inorganic constituents within the plume cannot be ignored.

  4. New lactic acid bacterial strains from traditional Mongolian fermented milk products have altered adhesion to porcine gastric mucin depending on the carbon source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimoto-Nira, Hiromi; Yamasaki, Seishi; Sasaki, Keisuke; Moriya, Naoko; Takenaka, Akio; Suzuki, Chise

    2015-03-01

    Attachment of lactic acid bacteria to the mucosal surface of the gastrointestinal tract is a major property of probiotics. Here, we examined the ability of 21 lactic acid bacterial strains isolated from traditional fermented milk products in Mongolia to adhere to porcine gastric mucin in vitro. Higher attachment was observed with Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus strains 6-8 and 8-1 than with Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (positive control). Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris strain 7-1 adhered to mucin as effectively as did strain GG. Heat inactivation decreased the adhesive ability of strains 6-8 and 8-1 but did not affect strain 7-1. The adhesion of strains 6-8, 7-1 and 8-1 was significantly inhibited when the cells were pretreated with periodate and trypsin, indicating that proteinaceous and carbohydrate-like cell surface compounds are involved in the adhesion of these strains. The adhesion of strain 7-1 was affected by the type of carbohydrate present in the growth medium, being higher with fructose than with lactose, galactose or xylose as the carbon source. The sugar content of 7-1 cells grown on various carbohydrates was negatively correlated with its adhesive ability. We provide new probiotic candidate strains and new information regarding carbohydrate preference that influences lactic acid bacterial adhesion to mucin.

  5. Alterations of the Antioxidant Enzyme Activities are not General Characteristics of the Colonization Process by Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi Alteraciones de las Actividades de Enzimas Antioxidantes no son Características Generales del Proceso de Colonización por Hongos Micorrízicos Arbusculares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yakelin Rodríguez

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Antioxidant system is involved in arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis, but its role during the colonization process is still poorly understood. To gain new insights into the role of antioxidant system during root colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, the activities of key antioxidant enzymes were evaluated in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. roots inoculated with six strains of different genera and species: two Glomus mosseae, Glomus cubense, Glomus intraradices, Glomus sp. and Acaulospora scrobiculata. Glomus cubense and A. scrobiculata strains reached the highest infectivity levels with maximum values of colonization frequency and intensity of 29-10.88% and 18-9.20%, respectively; G. mosseae strains showed an intermediate infectivity, both with 15% of colonization frequency and maximum intensities of 7.647.06%, respectively; while the infectivity levels of Glomus sp. and G. intraradices strains were the lowest with colonization frequency- 13% and intensities- 5.07 and 5.41, respectively. Some activity patterns of peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, and polyphenol oxidase enzymes were not specific for early or late colonization stages neither for the colonization level and type of strain. However, a unique superoxide dismutase-band presents at early colonization and the low level of guaiacol-peroxidase activity at later stages presents in all inoculated roots indicate that these antioxidant responses are independent of colonization degree and strain. Taking together, our data suggest that alterations of the antioxidant enzyme activities are not general characteristics of the colonization process by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, probably having the key role on those responses the specific feature of each strain rather than colonization per se.El sistema antioxidante está involucrado en la simbiosis micorrízico-arbuscular, pero su rol durante el proceso de colonización es aún escasamente comprendido. Para esclarecer el papel del sistema

  6. Cohabitation in the Intestine: Interactions among Helminth Parasites, Bacterial Microbiota, and Host Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Lisa A; Finlay, B Brett; Maizels, Rick M

    2015-11-01

    Both intestinal helminth parasites and certain bacterial microbiota species have been credited with strong immunomodulatory effects. Recent studies reported that the presence of helminth infection alters the composition of the bacterial intestinal microbiota and, conversely, that the presence and composition of the bacterial microbiota affect helminth colonization and persistence within mammalian hosts. This article reviews recent findings on these reciprocal relationships, in both human populations and mouse models, at the level of potential mechanistic pathways and the implications these bear for immunomodulatory effects on allergic and autoimmune disorders. Understanding the multidirectional complex interactions among intestinal microbes, helminth parasites, and the host immune system allows for a more holistic approach when using probiotics, prebiotics, synbiotics, antibiotics, and anthelmintics, as well as when designing treatments for autoimmune and allergic conditions.

  7. Cohabitation in the Intestine: Interactions among Helminth Parasites, Bacterial Microbiota, and Host Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Lisa A; Finlay, B Brett; Maizels, Rick M

    2015-11-01

    Both intestinal helminth parasites and certain bacterial microbiota species have been credited with strong immunomodulatory effects. Recent studies reported that the presence of helminth infection alters the composition of the bacterial intestinal microbiota and, conversely, that the presence and composition of the bacterial microbiota affect helminth colonization and persistence within mammalian hosts. This article reviews recent findings on these reciprocal relationships, in both human populations and mouse models, at the level of potential mechanistic pathways and the implications these bear for immunomodulatory effects on allergic and autoimmune disorders. Understanding the multidirectional complex interactions among intestinal microbes, helminth parasites, and the host immune system allows for a more holistic approach when using probiotics, prebiotics, synbiotics, antibiotics, and anthelmintics, as well as when designing treatments for autoimmune and allergic conditions. PMID:26477048

  8. The effects of short-chain fatty acids on human colon cancer cell phenotype are associated with histone hyperacetylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinnebusch, Brian F; Meng, Shufen; Wu, James T; Archer, Sonia Y; Hodin, Richard A

    2002-05-01

    The short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) butyrate is produced via anaerobic bacterial fermentation within the colon and is thought to be protective in regard to colon carcinogenesis. Although butyrate (C4) is considered the most potent of the SCFA, a variety of other SCFA also exist in the colonic lumen. Butyrate is thought to exert its cellular effects through the induction of histone hyperacetylation. We sought to determine the effects of a variety of the SCFA on colon carcinoma cell growth, differentiation and apoptosis. HT-29 or HCT-116 (wild-type and p21-deleted) cells were treated with physiologically relevant concentrations of various SCFA, and histone acetylation state was assayed by acid-urea-triton-X gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting. Growth and apoptotic effects were studied by flow cytometry, and differentiation effects were assessed using transient transfections and Northern blotting. Propionate (C3) and valerate (C5) caused growth arrest and differentiation in human colon carcinoma cells. The magnitude of their effects was associated with a lesser degree of histone hyperacetylation compared with butyrate. Acetate (C2) and caproate (C6), in contrast, did not cause histone hyperacetylation and also had no appreciable effects on cell growth or differentiation. SCFA-induced transactivation of the differentiation marker gene, intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP), was blocked by histone deacetylase (HDAC), further supporting the critical link between SCFA and histones. Butyrate also significantly increased apoptosis, whereas the other SCFA studied did not. The growth arrest induced by the SCFA was characterized by an increase in the expression of the p21 cell-cycle inhibitor and down-regulation of cyclin B1 (CB1). In p21-deleted HCT-116 colon cancer cells, the SCFA did not alter the rate of proliferation. These data suggest that the antiproliferative, apoptotic and differentiating properties of the various SCFA are linked to the degree of induced histone

  9. Impact of ileocecal resection and concomitant antibiotics on the microbiome of the murine jejunum and colon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony A Devine

    Full Text Available Ileocecal resection (ICR is a commonly required surgical intervention in unmanageable Crohn's disease and necrotizing enterocolitis. However, the impact of ICR, and the concomitant doses of antibiotic routinely given with ICR, on the intestinal commensal microbiota has not been determined. In this study, wild-type C57BL6 mice were subjected to ICR and concomitant single intraperitoneal antibiotic injection. Intestinal lumen contents were collected from jejunum and colon at 7, 14, and 28 days after resection and compared to non-ICR controls. Samples were analyzed by 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing and quantitative PCR. The intestinal microbiota was altered by 7 days after ICR and accompanying antibiotic treatment, with decreased diversity in the colon. Phylogenetic diversity (PD decreased from 11.8 ± 1.8 in non-ICR controls to 5.9 ± 0.5 in 7-day post-ICR samples. There were also minor effects in the jejunum where PD values decreased from 8.3 ± 0.4 to 7.5 ± 1.4. PCoA analysis indicated that bacterial populations 28 days post-ICR differed significantly from non-ICR controls. Moreover, colon and jejunum bacterial populations were remarkably similar 28 days after resection, whereas the initial communities differed markedly. Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes were the predominant phyla in jejunum and colon before ICR; however, Firmicutes became the vastly predominant phylum in jejunum and colon 28 days after ICR. Although the microbiota returned towards a homeostatic state, with re-establishment of Firmicutes as the predominant phylum, we did not detect Bacteroidetes in the colon 28 days after ICR. In the jejunum Bacteroidetes was detected at a 0.01% abundance after this time period. The changes in jejunal and colonic microbiota induced by ICR and concomitant antibiotic injection may therefore be considered as potential regulators of post-surgical adaptive growth or function, and in a setting of active IBD, potential contributors to post

  10. Impact of ileocecal resection and concomitant antibiotics on the microbiome of the murine jejunum and colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, Anthony A; Gonzalez, Antonio; Speck, K Elizabeth; Knight, Rob; Helmrath, Michael; Lund, P Kay; Azcarate-Peril, M Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Ileocecal resection (ICR) is a commonly required surgical intervention in unmanageable Crohn's disease and necrotizing enterocolitis. However, the impact of ICR, and the concomitant doses of antibiotic routinely given with ICR, on the intestinal commensal microbiota has not been determined. In this study, wild-type C57BL6 mice were subjected to ICR and concomitant single intraperitoneal antibiotic injection. Intestinal lumen contents were collected from jejunum and colon at 7, 14, and 28 days after resection and compared to non-ICR controls. Samples were analyzed by 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing and quantitative PCR. The intestinal microbiota was altered by 7 days after ICR and accompanying antibiotic treatment, with decreased diversity in the colon. Phylogenetic diversity (PD) decreased from 11.8 ± 1.8 in non-ICR controls to 5.9 ± 0.5 in 7-day post-ICR samples. There were also minor effects in the jejunum where PD values decreased from 8.3 ± 0.4 to 7.5 ± 1.4. PCoA analysis indicated that bacterial populations 28 days post-ICR differed significantly from non-ICR controls. Moreover, colon and jejunum bacterial populations were remarkably similar 28 days after resection, whereas the initial communities differed markedly. Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes were the predominant phyla in jejunum and colon before ICR; however, Firmicutes became the vastly predominant phylum in jejunum and colon 28 days after ICR. Although the microbiota returned towards a homeostatic state, with re-establishment of Firmicutes as the predominant phylum, we did not detect Bacteroidetes in the colon 28 days after ICR. In the jejunum Bacteroidetes was detected at a 0.01% abundance after this time period. The changes in jejunal and colonic microbiota induced by ICR and concomitant antibiotic injection may therefore be considered as potential regulators of post-surgical adaptive growth or function, and in a setting of active IBD, potential contributors to post-surgical pathophysiology of disease

  11. Salt Reduction in a Model High-Salt Akawi Cheese: Effects on Bacterial Activity, pH, Moisture, Potential Bioactive Peptides, Amino Acids, and Growth of Human Colon Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Akanksha; Shah, Nagendra P

    2016-04-01

    This study evaluated the effects of sodium chloride reduction and its substitution with potassium chloride on Akawi cheese during storage for 30 d at 4 °C. Survival of probiotic bacteria (Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei, and Bifidobacterium longum) and starter bacteria (Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus), angiotensin-converting enzyme-inhibitory and antioxidant activities, and concentrations of standard amino acids as affected by storage in different brine solutions (10% NaCl, 7.5% NaCl, 7.5% NaCl+KCl [1:1], 5% NaCl, and 5% NaCl+KCl [1:1]) were investigated. Furthermore, viability of human colon cells and human colon cancer cells as affected by the extract showing improved peptide profiles, highest release of amino acids and antioxidant activity (that is, from cheese brined in 7.5% NaCl+KCl) was evaluated. Significant increase was observed in survival of probiotic bacteria in cheeses with low salt after 30 d. Calcium content decreased slightly during storage in all cheeses brined in various solutions. Further, no significant changes were observed in ACE-inhibitory activity and antioxidant activity of cheeses during storage. Interestingly, concentrations of 4 essential amino acids (phenylalanine, tryptophan, valine, and leucine) increased significantly during storage in brine solutions containing 7.5% total salt. Low concentration of cheese extract (100 μg/mL) significantly improved the growth of normal human colon cells, and reduced the growth of human colon cancer cells. Overall, the study revealed that cheese extracts from reduced-NaCl brine improved the growth of human colon cells, and the release of essential amino acids, but did not affect the activities of potential bioactive peptides. PMID:26919457

  12. Prophylactic administration of vector-encoded porcine granulocyte-colony stimulating factor reduces Salmonella shedding,tonsil colonization,& microbiota alterations of the gastrointestinal tract in Salmonella-challenged swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmonella colonization of food animals is a concern for animal health and public health as a food safety risk. Various obstacles impede the effort to reduce asymptomatic Salmonella carriage in food animals, including the existence of numerous serovars and the ubiquitous nature of Salmonella. To d...

  13. [Evolution of intrabacterial glucides during differentiation of two types of feces in the colon of the domestic rabbit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnafous, R; Raynaud, P

    1978-02-27

    In the Rabbit, during excretion of hard feces, a correlation exists between the stock of bacterial carbohydrates at the caecal level and the intensity of the bacterial lysis observed in the proximal colon.

  14. Experimental drought reduces the transfer of recently fixed plant carbon to soil microbes and alters the bacterial community composition in a mountain meadow

    OpenAIRE

    Fuchslueger, Lucia; Bahn, Michael; Fritz, Karina; Hasibeder, Roland; Richter, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Drought affects plants and soil microorganisms, but it is still not clear how it alters the carbon (C) transfer at the plant–microbial interface. Here, we tested direct and indirect effects of drought on soil microbes and microbial turnover of recent plant-derived C in a mountain meadow. Microbial community composition was assessed using phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs); the allocation of recent plant-derived C to microbial groups was analysed by pulse-labelling of canopy sections with 13CO2 ...

  15. Uropathogenic E. coli Exploit CEA to Promote Colonization of the Urogenital Tract Mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muenzner, Petra; Kengmo Tchoupa, Arnaud; Klauser, Benedikt; Brunner, Thomas; Putze, Johannes; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Hauck, Christof R

    2016-05-01

    Attachment to the host mucosa is a key step in bacterial pathogenesis. On the apical surface of epithelial cells, members of the human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) family are abundant glycoproteins involved in cell-cell adhesion and modulation of cell signaling. Interestingly, several gram-negative bacterial pathogens target these receptors by specialized adhesins. The prototype of a CEACAM-binding pathogen, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, utilizes colony opacity associated (Opa) proteins to engage CEA, as well as the CEA-related cell adhesion molecules CEACAM1 and CEACAM6 on human epithelial cells. By heterologous expression of neisserial Opa proteins in non-pathogenic E. coli we find that the Opa protein-CEA interaction is sufficient to alter gene expression, to increase integrin activity and to promote matrix adhesion of infected cervical carcinoma cells and immortalized vaginal epithelial cells in vitro. These CEA-triggered events translate in suppression of exfoliation and improved colonization of the urogenital tract by Opa protein-expressing E. coli in CEA-transgenic compared to wildtype mice. Interestingly, uropathogenic E. coli expressing an unrelated CEACAM-binding protein of the Afa/Dr adhesin family recapitulate the in vitro and in vivo phenotype. In contrast, an isogenic strain lacking the CEACAM-binding adhesin shows reduced colonization and does not suppress epithelial exfoliation. These results demonstrate that engagement of human CEACAMs by distinct bacterial adhesins is sufficient to blunt exfoliation and to promote host infection. Our findings provide novel insight into mucosal colonization by a common UPEC pathotype and help to explain why human CEACAMs are a preferred epithelial target structure for diverse gram-negative bacteria to establish a foothold on the human mucosa. PMID:27171273

  16. Uropathogenic E. coli Exploit CEA to Promote Colonization of the Urogenital Tract Mucosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Muenzner

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Attachment to the host mucosa is a key step in bacterial pathogenesis. On the apical surface of epithelial cells, members of the human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA family are abundant glycoproteins involved in cell-cell adhesion and modulation of cell signaling. Interestingly, several gram-negative bacterial pathogens target these receptors by specialized adhesins. The prototype of a CEACAM-binding pathogen, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, utilizes colony opacity associated (Opa proteins to engage CEA, as well as the CEA-related cell adhesion molecules CEACAM1 and CEACAM6 on human epithelial cells. By heterologous expression of neisserial Opa proteins in non-pathogenic E. coli we find that the Opa protein-CEA interaction is sufficient to alter gene expression, to increase integrin activity and to promote matrix adhesion of infected cervical carcinoma cells and immortalized vaginal epithelial cells in vitro. These CEA-triggered events translate in suppression of exfoliation and improved colonization of the urogenital tract by Opa protein-expressing E. coli in CEA-transgenic compared to wildtype mice. Interestingly, uropathogenic E. coli expressing an unrelated CEACAM-binding protein of the Afa/Dr adhesin family recapitulate the in vitro and in vivo phenotype. In contrast, an isogenic strain lacking the CEACAM-binding adhesin shows reduced colonization and does not suppress epithelial exfoliation. These results demonstrate that engagement of human CEACAMs by distinct bacterial adhesins is sufficient to blunt exfoliation and to promote host infection. Our findings provide novel insight into mucosal colonization by a common UPEC pathotype and help to explain why human CEACAMs are a preferred epithelial target structure for diverse gram-negative bacteria to establish a foothold on the human mucosa.

  17. Uropathogenic E. coli Exploit CEA to Promote Colonization of the Urogenital Tract Mucosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muenzner, Petra; Kengmo Tchoupa, Arnaud; Klauser, Benedikt; Brunner, Thomas; Putze, Johannes; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Hauck, Christof R.

    2016-01-01

    Attachment to the host mucosa is a key step in bacterial pathogenesis. On the apical surface of epithelial cells, members of the human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) family are abundant glycoproteins involved in cell-cell adhesion and modulation of cell signaling. Interestingly, several gram-negative bacterial pathogens target these receptors by specialized adhesins. The prototype of a CEACAM-binding pathogen, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, utilizes colony opacity associated (Opa) proteins to engage CEA, as well as the CEA-related cell adhesion molecules CEACAM1 and CEACAM6 on human epithelial cells. By heterologous expression of neisserial Opa proteins in non-pathogenic E. coli we find that the Opa protein-CEA interaction is sufficient to alter gene expression, to increase integrin activity and to promote matrix adhesion of infected cervical carcinoma cells and immortalized vaginal epithelial cells in vitro. These CEA-triggered events translate in suppression of exfoliation and improved colonization of the urogenital tract by Opa protein-expressing E. coli in CEA-transgenic compared to wildtype mice. Interestingly, uropathogenic E. coli expressing an unrelated CEACAM-binding protein of the Afa/Dr adhesin family recapitulate the in vitro and in vivo phenotype. In contrast, an isogenic strain lacking the CEACAM-binding adhesin shows reduced colonization and does not suppress epithelial exfoliation. These results demonstrate that engagement of human CEACAMs by distinct bacterial adhesins is sufficient to blunt exfoliation and to promote host infection. Our findings provide novel insight into mucosal colonization by a common UPEC pathotype and help to explain why human CEACAMs are a preferred epithelial target structure for diverse gram-negative bacteria to establish a foothold on the human mucosa. PMID:27171273

  18. Intramural ganglia in diverticular disease of the colon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macbeth, W. A. A. G.; Hawthorne, J. H. R.

    1965-01-01

    Intramural plexuses were studied in 30 colons, and a plethora of ganglionic tissue was observed in specimens with diverticula when compared with a control series. This alteration in the ganglionic pattern is considered real rather than apparent; the changes are confined to the region of the colon where muscular hypertrophy is present. Images PMID:14247702

  19. Altered membrane lipid dynamics and chemoprevention by non-steroidal anti inflammatory drugs during colon carcinogenesis Alteración de la dinámica de los lípidos de membrana y quimioprevención mediante los fármacos antiinflamatorios no esteroideos en la carcinogénesis de colon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Singh Kanwar

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The present work focuses on the anti-neoplastic role of non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs in modulating the biophysical parameters of the colonic membranes in 1,2-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride (DMH induced carcinogenesis. The steady-state fluorescence polarization technique was applied to assess membrane fluidity, membrane polarity and lipid phase states. The decline in cholesterol content, biosynthesis and cholesterol: phospholipids ratio with DMH treatment indicates more fluidity associated with carcinogenesis. The DMH group had shown lower order parameter indicating more fluidity whereas NSAIDs resulted in increasing the membrane lipid order. The converging effects of these changes were more in membrane phase separations and membrane phase state. In DMH treatment membrane shows lesser phase separation or high polarity, and more liquid crystalline state while for NSAID groups membranes have higher phase separations or low polarity, and more of the gel phase. Further, NSAIDs induced anti-proliferative effects were evidently observed by apoptosis in the colonocytes by using acridine orange-ethidium bromide fluorescent staining and Terminal de-oxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL assay. The results suggest that NSAIDs induced alteration in the membrane biophysical parameters may be an important initiating event for the chemopreventive action.Este trabajo se centra en el papel antineoplásico de los fármacos antiinflamatorios no esteroideos (AINE en la modulación de los parámetros biofísicos de las membranas colónicas en la carcinogénesis inducida por 1,2-dihidrocloruro de dimetilhidracina (DMH. Se aplicó la técnica de polarización de la fluorescencia en estado de equilibrio para evaluar la fluidez de la membrana, su polaridad y los estados de fase lipídica. El declive del contenido de colesterol, la biosíntesis y el cociente colesterol: fosfolípidos con el tratamiento con DMH indica más fluidez

  20. Mutations in the control of virulence sensor gene from Streptococcus pyogenes after infection in mice lead to clonal bacterial variants with altered gene regulatory activity and virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey A Mayfield

    Full Text Available The cluster of virulence sensor (CovS/responder (CovR two-component operon (CovRS regulates ∼15% of the genes of the Group A Streptococcal pyogenes (GAS genome. Bacterial clones containing inactivating mutations in the covS gene have been isolated from patients with virulent invasive diseases. We report herein an assessment of the nature and types of covS mutations that can occur in both virulent and nonvirulent GAS strains, and assess whether a nonvirulent GAS can attain enhanced virulence through this mechanism. A group of mice were infected with a globally-disseminated clonal M1T1 GAS (isolate 5448, containing wild-type (WT CovRS (5448/CovR+S+, or less virulent engineered GAS strains, AP53/CovR+S+ and Manfredo M5/CovR+S+. SpeB negative GAS clones from wound sites and/or from bacteria disseminated to the spleen were isolated and the covS gene was subjected to DNA sequence analysis. Numerous examples of inactivating mutations were found in CovS in all regions of the gene. The mutations found included frame-shift insertions and deletions, and in-frame small and large deletions in the gene. Many of the mutations found resulted in early translation termination of CovS. Thus, the covS gene is a genomic mutagenic target that gives GAS enhanced virulence. In cases wherein CovS- was discovered, these clonal variants exhibited high lethality, further suggesting that randomly mutated covS genes occur during the course of infection, and lead to the development of a more invasive infection.

  1. Insertion of reticuloendotheliosis virus long terminal repeat into a bacterial artificial chromosome clone of a very virulent Marek's disease virus alters its pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mays, Jody K; Silva, Robert F; Kim, Taejoong; Fadly, Aly

    2012-01-01

    Co-cultivation of the JM/102W strain of Marek's disease virus (MDV) with reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) resulted in the generation of a recombinant MDV containing the REV long terminal repeat (LTR) named the RM1 strain of MDV, a strain that was highly attenuated for oncogenicity but induced severe bursal and thymic atrophy. We hypothesize that the phenotypic changes were solely due to the LTR insertion. Furthermore, we hypothesize that insertion of REV LTR into an analogous location in a different MDV would result in a similar phenotypic change. To test these hypotheses, we inserted the REV LTR into a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clone of a very virulent strain of MDV, Md5, and designated the virus rMd5-RM1-LTR. The rMd5-RM1-LTR virus and the rMd5 virus were passaged in duck embryo fibroblast cells for up to 40 passages before pathogenicity studies. Susceptible chickens were inoculated intra-abdominally at hatch with the viruses rMd5-RM1-LTR, rMd5 BAC parental virus, wild-type strain Md5, or strain RM1 of MDV. The rMd5-RM1-LTR virus was attenuated at cell culture passage 40, whereas the rMd5 BAC without RM1 LTR retained its pathogenicity at cell culture passage 40. Using polymerase chain analysis, the RM1 LTR insert was detected in MDV isolated from buffy coat cells collected from chickens inoculated with rMd5-RM1-LTR, but only at 1 week post inoculation. The data suggest that the presence of the RM1 LTR insert within MDV genome for 1 week post inoculation with virus at hatch is sufficient to cause a reduction in pathogenicity of strain Md5 of MDV.

  2. Colonic diverticulitis in adolescents: an index case and associated syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santin, Brian J; Prasad, Vinay; Caniano, Donna A

    2009-10-01

    Diverticular disease of the colon, a common problem among adults, is diagnosed rarely in children. We report an adolescent patient with sigmoid diverticulitis who required operative treatment. Pediatric patients with the complications of diverticula typically have conditions that result in genetic alterations affecting the components of the colonic wall. Our patient had Williams-Beuren syndrome, although Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Marfan syndrome, and cystic fibrosis may also be associated with colonic diverticula in adolescence. Pediatric patients with these disorders who experience abdominal pain should be evaluated for the presence of colonic diverticular complications. PMID:19711089

  3. Effect of Aging on Periodontal Inflammation, Microbial Colonization, and Disease Susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y; Dong, G; Xiao, W; Xiao, E; Miao, F; Syverson, A; Missaghian, N; Vafa, R; Cabrera-Ortega, A A; Rossa, C; Graves, D T

    2016-04-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease induced by a biofilm that forms on the tooth surface. Increased periodontal disease is associated with aging. We investigated the effect of aging on challenge by oral pathogens, examining the host response, colonization, and osteoclast numbers in aged versus young mice. We also compared the results with mice with lineage-specific deletion of the transcription factor FOXO1, which reduces dendritic cell (DC) function. Periodontitis was induced by oral inoculation of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum in young (4 to 5 mo) and aged (14 to 15 mo) mice. Aged mice as well as mice with reduced DC function had decreased numbers of DCs in lymph nodes, indicative of a diminished host response. In vitro studies suggest that reduced DC numbers in lymph nodes of aged mice may involve the effect of advanced glycation end products on DC migration. Surprisingly, aged mice but not mice with genetically altered DC function had greater production of antibody to P. gingivalis, greater IL-12 expression, and more plasma cells in lymph nodes following oral inoculation as compared with young mice. The greater adaptive immune response in aged versus young mice was linked to enhanced levels of P. gingivalis and reduced bacterial diversity. Thus, reduced bacterial diversity in aged mice may contribute to increased P. gingivalis colonization following inoculation and increased periodontal disease susceptibility, reflected by higher TNF levels and osteoclast numbers in the periodontium of aged versus young mice. PMID:26762510

  4. Altered membrane lipid dynamics and chemoprevention by non-steroidal anti inflammatory drugs during colon carcinogenesis Alteración de la dinámica de los lípidos de membrana y quimioprevención mediante los fármacos antiinflamatorios no esteroideos en la carcinogénesis de colon

    OpenAIRE

    S. Singh Kanwar; V. Vaish; S. Nath Sanya

    2011-01-01

    The present work focuses on the anti-neoplastic role of non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in modulating the biophysical parameters of the colonic membranes in 1,2-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride (DMH) induced carcinogenesis. The steady-state fluorescence polarization technique was applied to assess membrane fluidity, membrane polarity and lipid phase states. The decline in cholesterol content, biosynthesis and cholesterol: phospholipids ratio with DMH treatment indicates more f...

  5. Gastric acid reduction leads to an alteration in lower intestinal microflora

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To clarify the alterations in lower intestinal microflora induced by gastric acid reduction, the dynamics of 12 major genera or groups of bacteria comprising the microflora in feces and colonic contents were examined by quantitative real-time PCR in proton pump inhibitor-treated rats and in asymptomatic human subjects with hypochlorhydria. In both rat and human experiments, most genera or groups of intestinal microflora (facultative and obligate anaerobes) proliferated by gastric acid reduction, and marked and significant increases in the Lactobacilli group and Veillonella, oropharyngeal bacteria, were observed. In rats, potent gastric acid inhibition led to a marked and significant increase of intestinal bacteria, including the Bacteroidesfragilis group, while Bifidobacterium, a beneficial bacterial species, remained at a constant level. These results strongly indicate that the gastric acid barrier not only controls the colonization and growth of oropharyngeal bacteria, but also regulates the population and composition of lower intestinal microflora.

  6. Gastric acid reduction leads to an alteration in lower intestinal microflora

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanno, Takayuki [Department of Gastroenterology, Wakayama Medical University, 811-1 Kimiidera, Wakayama-city, Wakayama 641-0012 (Japan); Matsuki, Takahiro [Yakult Central Institute for Microbiological Research, Tokyo (Japan); Oka, Masashi; Utsunomiya, Hirotoshi [Department of Gastroenterology, Wakayama Medical University, 811-1 Kimiidera, Wakayama-city, Wakayama 641-0012 (Japan); Inada, Kenichi [First Department of Pathology, Fujita Health University School of Medicine, Aichi (Japan); Magari, Hirohito; Inoue, Izumi; Maekita, Takao; Ueda, Kazuki; Enomoto, Shotaro; Iguchi, Mikitaka; Yanaoka, Kimihiko; Tamai, Hideyuki [Department of Gastroenterology, Wakayama Medical University, 811-1 Kimiidera, Wakayama-city, Wakayama 641-0012 (Japan); Akimoto, Shigeru [Department of Microbiology, Wakayama Medical University, 811-1 Kimiidera, Wakayama-city, Wakayama 641-0012 (Japan); Nomoto, Koji; Tanaka, Ryuichiro [Yakult Central Institute for Microbiological Research, Tokyo (Japan); Ichinose, Masao, E-mail: ichinose@wakayama-med.ac.jp [Department of Gastroenterology, Wakayama Medical University, 811-1 Kimiidera, Wakayama-city, Wakayama 641-0012 (Japan)

    2009-04-17

    To clarify the alterations in lower intestinal microflora induced by gastric acid reduction, the dynamics of 12 major genera or groups of bacteria comprising the microflora in feces and colonic contents were examined by quantitative real-time PCR in proton pump inhibitor-treated rats and in asymptomatic human subjects with hypochlorhydria. In both rat and human experiments, most genera or groups of intestinal microflora (facultative and obligate anaerobes) proliferated by gastric acid reduction, and marked and significant increases in the Lactobacilli group and Veillonella, oropharyngeal bacteria, were observed. In rats, potent gastric acid inhibition led to a marked and significant increase of intestinal bacteria, including the Bacteroidesfragilis group, while Bifidobacterium, a beneficial bacterial species, remained at a constant level. These results strongly indicate that the gastric acid barrier not only controls the colonization and growth of oropharyngeal bacteria, but also regulates the population and composition of lower intestinal microflora.

  7. An altered intestinal mucosal microbiome in HIV-1 infection is associated with mucosal and systemic immune activation and endotoxemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, S M; Lee, E J; Kotter, C V; Austin, G L; Dong, Z; Hecht, D K; Gianella, S; Siewe, B; Smith, D M; Landay, A L; Robertson, C E; Frank, D N; Wilson, C C

    2014-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infection disrupts the intestinal immune system, leading to microbial translocation and systemic immune activation. We investigated the impact of HIV-1 infection on the intestinal microbiome and its association with mucosal T-cell and dendritic cell (DC) frequency and activation, as well as with levels of systemic T-cell activation, inflammation, and microbial translocation. Bacterial 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing was performed on colon biopsies and fecal samples from subjects with chronic, untreated HIV-1 infection and uninfected control subjects. Colon biopsies of HIV-1-infected subjects had increased abundances of Proteobacteria and decreased abundances of Firmicutes compared with uninfected donors. Furthermore at the genus level, a significant increase in Prevotella and decrease in Bacteroides was observed in HIV-1-infected subjects, indicating a disruption in the Bacteroidetes bacterial community structure. This HIV-1-associated increase in Prevotella abundance was associated with increased numbers of activated colonic T cells and myeloid DCs. Principal coordinates analysis demonstrated an HIV-1-related change in the microbiome that was associated with increased mucosal cellular immune activation, microbial translocation, and blood T-cell activation. These observations suggest that an important relationship exists between altered mucosal bacterial communities and intestinal inflammation during chronic HIV-1 infection. PMID:24399150

  8. Colon capsule endoscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ignacio Fernandez-Urien; Cristina Carretero; Ana Borda; Miguel Mu(n)oz-Navas

    2008-01-01

    Wireless capsule endoscopy has become the first imaging tool for small bowel examination.Recently,new capsule endoscopy applications have been developed,such as esophageal capsule endoscopy and colon capsule endoscopy.Clinical trials results have shown that colon capsule endoscopy is feasible,accurate and safe in patients suffering from colonic diseases.It could be a good alternative in patients refusing conventional colonoscopy or when it is contraindicated.Upcoming studies are needed to demonstrate its utilty for colon cancer screening and other indications such us ulcerative colitis.Comparative studies including both conventional and virtual colonoscopy are also required.

  9. Colonic biogeography in health and ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavelle, Aonghus; Lennon, Grainne; Winter, Desmond C; O'Connell, P Ronan

    2016-09-01

    The relevance of biogeography to the distal gut microbiota has been investigated in both health and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), however multiple factors, including sample type and methodology, microbiota characterization and interpersonal variability make the construction of a core model of colonic biogeography challenging. In addition, how phylogenetic classification relates to immunogenicity and whether consistent alterations in the microbiota are associated with ulcerative colitis (UC) remain open questions. This addendum seeks to review the human colonic microbiota in health and UC as currently understood, in the broader context of the human microbiome. PMID:27662587

  10. Colonization by aerobic bacteria in karst: Laboratory and in situ experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Personne, J.-C.; Poty, F.; Mahler, B.J.; Drogue, C.

    2004-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to investigate the potential for bacterial colonization of different substrates in karst aquifers and the nature of the colonizing bacteria. Laboratory batch experiments were performed using limestone and PVC as substrates, a natural bacterial isolate and a known laboratory strain (Escherichia coli [E. coli]) as inocula, and karst ground water and a synthetic formula as growth media. In parallel, fragments of limestone and granite were submerged in boreholes penetrating two karst aquifers for more than one year; the boreholes are periodically contaminated by enteric bacteria from waste water. Once a month, rock samples were removed and the colonizing bacteria quantified and identified. The batch experiments demonstrated that the natural isolate and E. coli both readily colonized limestone surfaces using karst ground water as the growth medium. In contrast, bacterial colonization of both the limestone and granite substrates, when submerged in the karst, was less intense. More than 300 bacterial strains were isolated over the period sampled, but no temporal pattern in colonization was seen as far as strain, and colonization by E. coli was notably absent, although strains of Salmonella and Citrobacter were each observed once. Samples suspended in boreholes penetrating highly fractured zones were less densely colonized than those in the borehole penetrating a less fractured zone. The results suggest that contamination of karst aquifers by enteric bacteria is unlikely to be persistent. We hypothesize that this may be a result of the high flow velocities found in karst conduits, and of predation of colonizing bacteria by autochthonous zooplankton.

  11. Nuclear microscopy of rat colon epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, M., E-mail: phyrenmq@nus.edu.sg [Centre for Ion Beam Applications (CIBA), Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Rajendran, Reshmi [Lab of Molecular Imaging, Singapore Bioimaging Consotium, 11 Biopolis Way, 02-02 Helios, Singapore 138667 (Singapore); Ng, Mary [Department of Pharmacology, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Udalagama, Chammika; Rodrigues, Anna E.; Watt, Frank [Centre for Ion Beam Applications (CIBA), Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Jenner, Andrew Michael [Illawara Health and Medical Research Institute (IHMRI), University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia)

    2011-10-15

    Using Nuclear microscopy, we have investigated iron distributions in the colons of Sprague Dawley rats, in order to elucidate heme uptake. Four groups of five Sprague Dawley rats (mean weight 180 g) were fed different purified diets containing either heme diet (2.5% w/w hemoglobin), high fat diet (HFD) (18% w/w fat, 1% w/w cholesterol), 'western' diet (combination of hemoglobin 2.5% and 18% fat, 1% cholesterol) or control diet (7% w/w fat). After 4 weeks, animals were sacrificed by exsanguination after anaesthesia. Thin sections of frozen colon tissue were taken, freeze dried and scanned using nuclear microscopy utilising the techniques PIXE, RBS and STIM. The new data acquisition system (IonDaq) developed in CIBA was used to obtain high resolution images and line scans were used to map the iron distributions across the colon boundaries. The nuclear microscope results indicate that when HFD is given in addition to heme, the iron content of the epithelial cells that line the colon decreases, and the zinc in the smooth muscle wall increases. This implies that the level of heme and fat in diet has an important role in colon health, possibly by influencing epithelial cells directly or changing luminal composition such as bacterial flora or levels of metabolites and cytotoxins.

  12. Modulatory effect of troxerutin on biotransforming enzymes and preneoplasic lesions induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine in rat colon carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinothkumar, Rajamanickam; Vinoth Kumar, Rajenderan; Sudha, Mani; Viswanathan, Periyaswamy; Balasubramanian, Thangavel; Nalini, Namasivayam

    2014-02-01

    Colon cancer is the third most global oncologic problem faced by medical fraternity. Troxerutin, a flavonoid present in tea, coffee, cereal grains, and a variety of fruits and vegetables, exhibits various pharmacological and biological activities. This study was carried out to investigate the effect of troxerutin on xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes, colonic bacterial enzymes and the development of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) during 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) induced experimental rat colon carcinogenesis. Male albino Wistar rats were randomly divided into six groups. Group 1 served as control. Group 2 received troxerutin (50 mg/kg b.w., p.o. every day) for 16 weeks. Groups 3-6 received subcutaneous injections of DMH (20 mg/kg b.w.) once a week, for the first four weeks. In addition, groups 4-6 received different doses of troxerutin (12.5, 25, 50 mg/kg b.w., p.o. every day respectively) along with DMH injections. Our results reveal that DMH treated rats exhibited elevated activities of phase I enzymes such as cytochrome P450, cytochrome b5, cytochrome P4502E1, NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase and NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase and reduced activities of phase II enzymes such as glutathione-S-transferase (GST), DT-diaphorase (DTD) and uridine diphospho glucuronyl transferase (UDPGT) in the liver and colonic mucosa of control and experimental rats. Furthermore, the activities of fecal and colonic mucosal bacterial enzymes, such as β-glucronidase, β-glucosidase, β-galactosidase and mucinase were found to be significantly higher in DMH alone treated rats than those of the control rats. On supplementation with troxerutin to DMH treated rats, the alterations in the activities of the biotransforming enzymes, bacterial enzymes and the pathological changes were significantly reversed, the effect being more pronounced when troxerutin was supplemented at the dose of 25 mg/kg b.w. Thus troxerutin could be considered as a good chemopreventive agent against the formation of

  13. Avian resistance to Campylobacter jejuni colonization is associated with an intestinal immunogene expression signature identified by mRNA sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Connell

    Full Text Available Campylobacter jejuni is the most common cause of human bacterial gastroenteritis and is associated with several post-infectious manifestations, including onset of the autoimmune neuropathy Guillain-Barré syndrome, causing significant morbidity and mortality. Poorly-cooked chicken meat is the most frequent source of infection as C. jejuni colonizes the avian intestine in a commensal relationship. However, not all chickens are equally colonized and resistance seems to be genetically determined. We hypothesize that differences in immune response may contribute to variation in colonization levels between susceptible and resistant birds. Using high-throughput sequencing in an avian infection model, we investigate gene expression associated with resistance or susceptibility to colonization of the gastrointestinal tract with C. jejuni and find that gut related immune mechanisms are critical for regulating colonization. Amongst a single population of 300 4-week old chickens, there was clear segregation in levels of C. jejuni colonization 48 hours post-exposure. RNAseq analysis of caecal tissue from 14 C. jejuni-susceptible and 14 C. jejuni-resistant birds generated over 363 million short mRNA sequences which were investigated to identify 219 differentially expressed genes. Significantly higher expression of genes involved in the innate immune response, cytokine signaling, B cell and T cell activation and immunoglobulin production, as well as the renin-angiotensin system was observed in resistant birds, suggesting an early active immune response to C. jejuni. Lower expression of these genes in colonized birds suggests suppression or inhibition of a clearing immune response thus facilitating commensal colonization and generating vectors for zoonotic transmission. This study describes biological processes regulating C. jejuni colonization of the avian intestine and gives insight into the differential immune mechanisms incited in response to commensal

  14. Exploring the chemotactic attraction of Campylobacter jejuni in chicken colonization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vegge, Christina Skovgaard; Brøndsted, Lone; Ingmer, Hanne

    Campylobacter jejuni is the primary food borne bacterial pathogen in the developed world. The most important reservoir for C. jejuni is the gut of chickens, which are colonized commensally and efficiently by this organism. Predominantly the mucus filled crypts of the lower gastrointestinal tract...... are found to be colonized by C. jejuni, and the bacteria are expected to be attracted to this particular environment by chemotaxis. In order to explore the role of chemotaxis in C. jejuni colonization we are construction deletion mutants in the putative chemoreceptors of the sequenced strain NCTC11168...

  15. LEAKAGE OF COLONIC ANASTOMOSIS AFTER COLON RESECTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kanellos I; Pramateftakis MG

    2004-01-01

    Objective To present the diagnosis and management of anastomotic leakage after colon resection. Methods Early diagnosis and urgent therapeutic intervention are required in order to avert life-threatening conditions that may be caused by anastomotic leakage. Results The diagnosis of anastomotic leakage is based on clinical features, peripheral blood investigations and abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan. Major leaks are defined by symptoms of peritonitis and septicaemia due to leakage. Major leaks should be managed operatively. Minor leaks can be managed conservatively with successful outcomes. Conclusion Leakage of colonic anastomosis remains the most serious complication after colon resection. It is a major cause of postoperative morbidity and mortality. A high index of suspicion is required in order to detect early, nonspecific signs of a leakage and urgent surgical intervention is usually required to avert life-threatening events.

  16. Cat Scratch Colon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lourdes Ruiz-Rebollo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past few years, we have read several publications regarding the term “cat scratch colon.” This neologism was developed to define some bright red linear markings seen in the colonic mucosa that resemble scratches made by a cat. We would like to communicate a recent case attended at our institution.

  17. Colon and rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is about the diagnosis, therapy and monitoring of colon cancer. The techniques used are the endoscopy with biopsy in the pre and post operative colon surgery, abdominal ultrasound, chest X-ray studies of hemogram as well as liver and renal function

  18. CT Findings of Colonic Complications Associated with Colon Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Won; Shin, Hyeong Cheol; Kim, Il Young; Kim, Young Tong; Kim, Chang Jin [Cheonan Hospital, Soonchunhyang University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    A broad spectrum of colonic complications can occur in patients with colon cancer. Clinically, some of these complications can obscure the presence of underlying malignancies in the colon and these complications may require emergency surgical management. The complications of the colon that can be associated with colon cancer include obstruction, perforation, abscess formation, acute appendicitis, ischemic colitis and intussusception. Although the majority of these complications only rarely occur, familiarity with the various manifestations of colon cancer complications will facilitate making an accurate diagnosis and administering prompt management in these situations. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to review the CT appearance of the colonic complications associated with colon cancer.

  19. Pathogenic bacteria colonizing the airways in asymptomatic neonates stimulates topical inflammatory mediator release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Følsgaard, Nilofar Vahman; Schjørring, Susanne; Chawes, Bo Lund Krogsgaard;

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Bacterial colonization of neonatal airways with the pathogenic bacterial species, Moraxella catarrhalis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Haemophilus influenzae, is associated with later development of childhood asthma. Objectives: To study a possible association between colonization....... Colonization of the hypopharynx with M. catarrhal's, S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae, and Staphylococcus aureus was assessed simultaneously. The association between immune signatures and bacterial colonization or noncolonized controls was analyzed using conventional statistical methods supplemented...... by a multivariate approach for pattern identification. Measurements and Main Results: Colonization with M. catarrhalis and H. influenzae induced a mixed T helper cell (Th) type 1/Th2/Th17 response with high levels of IL-1 beta (M. catarrhalis, P = 2.2 x 10(-12); H. influenzae, P = 7.1 X 10(-10)), TNF-alpha (M...

  20. Bacteria,inflammation,and colon cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liying Yang; Zhiheng Pei

    2006-01-01

    Our relationship with the colonic bacterial flora has long been viewed as benign,but recent studies suggest that this symbiosis has risks as well as benefits.This relationship requires that the host not only provide a supportive environment for the symbiotic bacteria,but also actively maintain intact mechanisms for properly managing the physiologic stresses that are closely associated with the symbiont's essential survival functions.Failure to do so breaches the hostsymbiont contract,and can result in serious effects on the health of the host.Recent investigations that employ several knockout mouse models reveal the consequences of genetic deficiency in the host regarding these mechanisms,and the latent,pro-inflammatory,tumorigenic nature of normal bacterial flora.Further study of the interactions between normal bacterial flora and hosts could shed light on the etiologies and pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases and related cancers,with implications for human health.

  1. Alteration in the endogenous intestinal flora of swiss webster mice by experimental Angiostrongylus costaricensis infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandack Nobre

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The association between worm infections and bacterial diseases has only recently been emphasized. This study examined the effect of experimental Angiostrongylus costaricensis infection on endogenous intestinal flora of Swiss Webster mice. Eight mice aging six weeks were selected for this experiment. Four were infected with A. costaricensis and the other four were used as controls. Twenty eight days after the worm infection, all mice in both groups were sacrificed and samples of the contents of the ileum and colon were obtained and cultured for aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. In the mice infected with A. costaricensis there was a significant increase in the number of bacteria of the endogenous intestinal flora, accompanied by a decrease in the number of Peptostreptococcus spp. This alteration in the intestinal flora of mice infected by the nematode may help to understand some bacterial infections described in humans.

  2. The intestinal microbiota plays a role in Salmonella-induced colitis independent of pathogen colonization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana B R Ferreira

    Full Text Available The intestinal microbiota is composed of hundreds of species of bacteria, fungi and protozoa and is critical for numerous biological processes, such as nutrient acquisition, vitamin production, and colonization resistance against bacterial pathogens. We studied the role of the intestinal microbiota on host resistance to Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium-induced colitis. Using multiple antibiotic treatments in 129S1/SvImJ mice, we showed that disruption of the intestinal microbiota alters host susceptibility to infection. Although all antibiotic treatments caused similar increases in pathogen colonization, the development of enterocolitis was seen only when streptomycin or vancomycin was used; no significant pathology was observed with the use of metronidazole. Interestingly, metronidazole-treated and infected C57BL/6 mice developed severe pathology. We hypothesized that the intestinal microbiota confers resistance to infectious colitis without affecting the ability of S. Typhimurium to colonize the intestine. Indeed, different antibiotic treatments caused distinct shifts in the intestinal microbiota prior to infection. Through fluorescence in situ hybridization, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism, and real-time PCR, we showed that there is a strong correlation between the intestinal microbiota composition before infection and susceptibility to Salmonella-induced colitis. Members of the Bacteroidetes phylum were present at significantly higher levels in mice resistant to colitis. Further analysis revealed that Porphyromonadaceae levels were also increased in these mice. Conversely, there was a positive correlation between the abundance of Lactobacillus sp. and predisposition to colitis. Our data suggests that different members of the microbiota might be associated with S. Typhimurium colonization and colitis. Dissecting the mechanisms involved in resistance to infection and inflammation will be critical for the development of

  3. Bacterial meningitis by streptococcus agalactiae

    OpenAIRE

    Villarreal-Velásquez Tatiana Paola; Cortés-Daza César Camilo

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: bacterial meningitis is an infectious disease considered a medicalemergency. The timely management has an important impact on the evolution of thedisease. Streptococcus agalactiae, a major causative agent of severe infections innewborns can colonize different tissues, including the central nervous system.Case report: Male patient 47 years old from rural areas, with work activity as amilker of cattle, referred to tertiary care, with disorientation, neck stiffness, and grandmal se...

  4. Alterations of the myenteric plexus of the ileum and the descending colon caused by Toxoplasma gondii (genotype III Alterações do plexo mientérico do íleo e cólon descendente causadas por Toxoplasma gondii (genótipo III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Yae Yamashita Sugauara

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Alterations caused by a genotype III strain of Toxoplasma gondii were assessed with respect to the number and the morphometry of the myenteric neurons in the terminal ileum and the descending colon. Eighteen rats were divided into four groups: Acute Control Group (ACG, n=4; Acute Experimental Group (AEG, n=4; Chronic Control Group (CCG, n=5 and Chronic Experimental Group (CEG, n=5. NaCl solution was administered through gavage to the animals in the ACG and CCG. Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites (10(4 from a genotype III strain were orally administered to the AEG and CEG. Acute Groups were died after 24 hours, and the Chronic Groups after 30 days. Neuronal loss was not observed in both organs. The neurons atrophied in the terminal ileum as the opposite occurred with the neurons at the descending colon during the chronic phase of infection. In the terminal ileum, the neurons atrophied during the chronic phase of the infection as no alteration was found during the acute phase. For the descending colon, the neurons became hypertrophic during the chronic infection in opposition to the atrophy found during the acute phase.Objetivou-se avaliar as alterações causadas por uma cepa genótipo III de Toxoplasma gondii, sobre o número e a morfometria de neurônios mientéricos, do íleo terminal e do cólon descendente. Dividiu-se dezoitos ratos em quatro grupos: controle agudo (GCA, n=4, experimental agudo (GEA, n=4, controle crônico (GCC, n=5 e experimental crônico (GEC, n=5. Os animais do GCA e GCC receberam solução de NaCl por gavagem, e os animais do GEA e GEC 10(4 taquizoítos de uma cepa genótipo III de T. gondii por via oral. Os grupos agudos após 24 horas foram mortos e os crônicos após 30 dias. Observou-se que não houve perda neuronal em ambos os órgãos. No íleo terminal, os neurônios atrofiaram-se na fase crônica da infecção, enquanto nenhuma alteração ocorreu na fase aguda. Já no cólon descendente, os neurônios tornaram

  5. Prophylactic Administration of Vector-Encoded Porcine Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor Reduces Salmonella Shedding, Tonsil Colonization, and Microbiota Alterations of the Gastrointestinal Tract in Salmonella-Challenged Swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearson, Shawn M. D.; Bearson, Bradley L.; Loving, Crystal L.; Allen, Heather K.; Lee, InSoo; Madson, Darin; Kehrli, Marcus E.

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella colonization of food animals is a concern for animal health and public health as a food safety risk. Various obstacles impede the effort to reduce asymptomatic Salmonella carriage in food animals, including the existence of numerous serovars and the ubiquitous nature of Salmonella. To develop an intervention strategy that is non-specific yet effective against diverse Salmonella serovars, we explored the prophylactic use of a cytokine to decrease Salmonella in swine by boosting the host’s innate immune system. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is the major cytokine regulating the production, differentiation, function, and survival of neutrophils. Neutrophils play a critical role in the response to Salmonella; therefore, we evaluated the vectored-delivery of porcine G-CSF as a prophylactic to reduce Salmonella in pigs. Crossbred pigs, 5 weeks of age, were intramuscularly injected with a replication-defective human adenovirus (Ad5) engineered to express porcine G-CSF (Ad5-G-CSF, n = 9). Control pigs received the same Ad5 vector lacking the gene encoding G-CSF (Ad5-empty, n = 7). Four days later, all pigs (n = 16) were intranasally inoculated with 1 × 107 colony forming unit (CFU) of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium UK1. At 2 and 3 days post-challenge with Salmonella, Ad5-G-CSF-treated pigs shed significantly less Salmonella (~103 CFU/g) in their feces than Ad5-empty-treated pigs (~104–105 CFU/g; P structure of Salmonella-challenged pigs was less disturbed post-challenge in the Ad5-G-CSF-treated pigs than the Ad5-empty-treated pigs. This suggests that Ad5-G-CSF administration mitigated changes in the microbial community structure caused by Salmonella challenge. Collectively, these data suggest that delivery of a targeted immunostimulant to enhance neutropoiesis may be a strategy to reduce Salmonella colonization, potentially during periods of immunological stress. PMID:27610361

  6. Prophylactic Administration of Vector-Encoded Porcine Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor Reduces Salmonella Shedding, Tonsil Colonization, and Microbiota Alterations of the Gastrointestinal Tract in Salmonella-Challenged Swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearson, Shawn M D; Bearson, Bradley L; Loving, Crystal L; Allen, Heather K; Lee, InSoo; Madson, Darin; Kehrli, Marcus E

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella colonization of food animals is a concern for animal health and public health as a food safety risk. Various obstacles impede the effort to reduce asymptomatic Salmonella carriage in food animals, including the existence of numerous serovars and the ubiquitous nature of Salmonella. To develop an intervention strategy that is non-specific yet effective against diverse Salmonella serovars, we explored the prophylactic use of a cytokine to decrease Salmonella in swine by boosting the host's innate immune system. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is the major cytokine regulating the production, differentiation, function, and survival of neutrophils. Neutrophils play a critical role in the response to Salmonella; therefore, we evaluated the vectored-delivery of porcine G-CSF as a prophylactic to reduce Salmonella in pigs. Crossbred pigs, 5 weeks of age, were intramuscularly injected with a replication-defective human adenovirus (Ad5) engineered to express porcine G-CSF (Ad5-G-CSF, n = 9). Control pigs received the same Ad5 vector lacking the gene encoding G-CSF (Ad5-empty, n = 7). Four days later, all pigs (n = 16) were intranasally inoculated with 1 × 10(7) colony forming unit (CFU) of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium UK1. At 2 and 3 days post-challenge with Salmonella, Ad5-G-CSF-treated pigs shed significantly less Salmonella (~10(3) CFU/g) in their feces than Ad5-empty-treated pigs (~10(4)-10(5) CFU/g; P Salmonella-challenged pigs was less disturbed post-challenge in the Ad5-G-CSF-treated pigs than the Ad5-empty-treated pigs. This suggests that Ad5-G-CSF administration mitigated changes in the microbial community structure caused by Salmonella challenge. Collectively, these data suggest that delivery of a targeted immunostimulant to enhance neutropoiesis may be a strategy to reduce Salmonella colonization, potentially during periods of immunological stress. PMID:27610361

  7. Colon anastomotic leakage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Achiam, Michael Patrick; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Colon anastomotic leakage remains a serious and common surgical complication. Animal models are valuable to determine the pathophysiological mechanisms and to evaluate possible methods of prevention. The aim of this study was to develop an optimal model of clinical colon anastomotic...... group [0.49 N ± 0.15] (p = 0.091). CONCLUSIONS: This mouse model closely mimics clinical colon anastomotic leakage in humans. The model is of high clinical relevance, since anastomotic leakage has a similar cause, incidence and manifestations in humans....

  8. Genomic instability and colon carcinogenesis: from the perspective of genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinthalapally V Rao

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Colon cancer is the second most lethal cancer; approximately 600,000 people die of it annually in the world. Colon carcinogenesis generally follows a slow and stepwise process of accumulation of mutations under the influence of environmental and epigenetic factors. To adopt a personalized (tailored cancer therapy approach and to improve current strategies for prevention, diagnosis, prognosis and therapy overall, advanced understanding of molecular events associated with colon carcinogenesis is necessary. A contemporary approach that combines genetics, epigenomics and signaling pathways has revealed many genetic/genomic alterations associated with colon cancer progression and their relationships to a genomic instability phenotype prevalent in colon cancer. In this review, we describe the relationship between gene mutations associated with colon carcinogenesis and a genomic instability phenotype, and we discuss possible clinical applications of genomic instability studies. Colon carcinogenesis is associated with frequent mutations in several pathways that include phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K, adenomatous polyposis coli (APC, p53 (TP53, F-box and WD repeat domain containing 7 (FBXW7, transforming growth factor (TGF-beta, chromosome cohesion and KRAS. These genes frequently mutated in pathways affecting colon cancer were designated colon cancer (CAN genes. Aberrations in major colon CAN genes have a causal relationship to genomic instability. Conversely, genomic instability itself plays a role in colon carcinogenesis in experimental settings, as demonstrated in transgenic mouse models with high genomic instability. Thus, there is a feedback-type relationship between CAN gene mutations and genomic instability. These genetic/genomic studies have led to emerging efforts to apply the knowledge to colon cancer prognosis and to targeted therapy.

  9. Laparoscopic Colon Resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... inches to complete the procedure. What are the Advantages of Laparoscopic Colon Resection? Results may vary depending ... type of procedure and patient’s overall condition. Common advantages are: Less postoperative pain May shorten hospital stay ...

  10. Colonization of torrefied grass fibers by plant beneficial microorganisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trifonova, R.D.; Babini, V.; Postma, J.; Ketelaars, J.J.M.H.; Elsas, van J.D.

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the colonization of thermally treated (i.e. torrefied) grass fibers (TGFs), a new prospective ingredient of potting soil. Eleven bacterial strains and one fungus, Coniochaeta ligniaria F/TGF15, all isolated from TGF or its extract after inoculation with a soil microbial co

  11. Colonization of torrefied grass fibers by plant-beneficial microorganisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trifonova, R.; Babini, V.; Postma, J.; Ketelaars, J.J.M.H.; van Elsas, J.D.

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the colonization of thermally treated (i.e. torrefied) grass fibers (TGFs), a new prospective ingredient of potting soil. Eleven bacterial strains and one fungus, Coniochaeta ligniaria F/TGF15, all isolated from TGF or its extract after inoculation with a soil microbial co

  12. Adenocarcinoma in Colonic Interposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahar Grunner

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A 59-year-old female with dysphagia presented to our clinic. In childhood, she underwent colonic interposition due to anastomotic stricture after a previous proximal gastrectomy for gastric ulcer perforation. Imaging studies revealed a space-occupying lesion obstructing the distal interposed colon. At surgery, completion gastrectomy with segmental colectomy was carried out, and Roux-en-Y coloenterostomy and enteroenterostomy were performed.

  13. Dietary factors and the occurence of truncating APC mutations in sporadic colon carcinomas: a Dutch population-based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diergaarde, B.; Geloof, van W.L.; Muijen, van G.N.P.; Kok, F.J.; Kampman, E.

    2003-01-01

    The interactions between environmental factors and the genetic and epigenetic changes that drive colon carcinogenesis are not clear. Dietary factors reported previously to be associated with colon cancer risk may well influence the occurrence of specific somatic alterations in colon tumors. To explo

  14. Intestinal Epithelial Serum Amyloid A Modulates Bacterial Growth In Vitro and Pro-Inflammatory Responses in Mouse Experimental Colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yu

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Serum Amyloid A (SAA is a major acute phase protein of unknown function. SAA is mostly expressed in the liver, but also in other tissues including the intestinal epithelium. SAA reportedly has anti-bacterial effects, and because inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD result from a breakdown in homeostatic interactions between intestinal epithelia and bacteria, we hypothesized that SAA is protective during experimental colitis. Methods Intestinal SAA expression was measured in mouse and human samples. Dextran sodium sulfate (DSS colitis was induced in SAA 1/2 double knockout (DKO mice and in wildtype controls. Anti-bacterial effects of SAA1/2 were tested in intestinal epithelial cell lines transduced with adenoviral vectors encoding the CE/J SAA isoform or control vectors prior to exposure to live Escherichia coli. Results Significant levels of SAA1/SAA2 RNA and SAA protein were detected by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry in mouse colonic epithelium. SAA3 expression was weaker, but similarly distributed. SAA1/2 RNA was present in the ileum and colon of conventional mice and in the colon of germfree mice. Expression of SAA3 was strongly regulated by bacterial lipopolysaccharides in cultured epithelial cell lines, whereas SAA1/2 expression was constitutive and not LPS inducible. Overexpression of SAA1/2 in cultured epithelial cell lines reduced the viability of co-cultured E. coli. This might partially explain the observed increase in susceptibility of DKO mice to DSS colitis. SAA1/2 expression was increased in colon samples obtained from Crohn's Disease patients compared to controls. Conclusions Intestinal epithelial SAA displays bactericidal properties in vitro and could play a protective role in experimental mouse colitis. Altered expression of SAA in intestinal biopsies from Crohn's Disease patients suggests that SAA is involved in the disease process..

  15. The Human Vaginal Bacterial Biota and Bacterial Vaginosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujatha Srinivasan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial biota of the human vagina can have a profound impact on the health of women and their neonates. Changes in the vaginal microbiota have been associated with several adverse health outcomes including premature birth, pelvic inflammatory disease, and acquisition of HIV infection. Cultivation-independent molecular methods have provided new insights regarding bacterial diversity in this important niche, particularly in women with the common condition bacterial vaginosis (BV. PCR methods have shown that women with BV have complex communities of vaginal bacteria that include many fastidious species, particularly from the phyla Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria. Healthy women are mostly colonized with lactobacilli such as Lactobacillus crispatus, Lactobacillus jensenii, and Lactobacillus iners, though a variety of other bacteria may be present. The microbiology of BV is heterogeneous. The presence of Gardnerella vaginalis and Atopobium vaginae coating the vaginal epithelium in some subjects with BV suggests that biofilms may contribute to this condition.

  16. Differential expression of gastric MUC5AC in colonic epithelial cells: TFF3-wired IL1 β/Akt crosstalk-induced mucosal immune response against Shigella dysenteriae infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Subramaniya Bharathi; Murali, Malliga Raman; Devaraj, Halagowder; Devaraj, Sivasithamparam Niranjali

    2012-02-01

    An understanding of the signaling mechanism(s) that regulate the differential expression of gastric mucin MUC5AC in colonic epithelial cells would contribute significantly to investigations of its role in colonic mucosa infected with the bacterial pathogen Shigella dysenteriae. Here we show that S. dysenteriae-Sinduced expression of interleukin-1β upregulates MUC2 expression and the differential expression of MUC5AC. Differential expression of MUC5AC involves crosstalk between interleukin-1β and Akt, whereby the trefoil factor family peptide TFF3 activates Akt by phosphorylation of EGFR. TFF3 also downregulates E-cadherin expression, causing accumulation of β-catenin in the cytosol. Phosphorylation of GSK-3β (inactivated) by activated Akt inhibits ubiquitylation of β-catenin, leading to its nuclear translocation, which then induces the expression of MUC5AC and cyclin D1. Accumulation of cyclin D1 alters the cell cycle, promoting cell survival and proliferation. Human colon HT29MTX cells, which overexpress MUC5AC, were resistant to adherence and invasion of S. dysenteriae when compared with other mucin-secreting HT29 cell types. Thus, during infection with S. dysenteriae, crosstalk between interleukin-1β and Akt wired by TFF3 induces expression of MUC5AC in colonic epithelial cells. Differentially expressed gastric MUC5AC aids in mucosal clearance of S. dysenteriae, inhibiting adherence and invasion of the pathogen to colonic epithelial cells, which protects the host.

  17. 抗感染中心静脉导管在减少导管相关性感染和细菌定植中的临床随机对照研究%Reduction of bacterial colonization and catheter-related infection with antiseptic central venous catheter: a randomized controlled clinical trial

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨钧; 程芮; 公静; 奚晶晶

    2011-01-01

    目的 比较用磺胺嘧啶银和洗必泰抗感染的中心静脉导管(CVC)与普通导管在减少细菌定植和导管相关性感染方面的差异.方法 采用前瞻性、随机对照分析方法,对2007年6月-2009年6月武警总医院ICU收治的70例需要深静脉置管患者进行随机分组,留置双腔抗感染CVC(抗感染组,n=28)和双腔普通CVC(对照组,n=42),两组采用相同的穿刺部位和消毒护理措施,观察记录患者的一般情况、APACHE Ⅱ评分、导管留置天数、拔除导管原因等,通过对导管尖端及皮下部分的细菌半定量培养、血培养以及局部皮肤有无红肿、脓性分泌物来确定有无导管定植(CBC)、导管相关性血流感染(CRBSI)和局部导管相关感染(CRI).采用SPSS 11.5软件包进行统计分析,CVC留置时间与细菌定植和感染发生率采用Kaplan-Meier曲线分析,组间差异比较用Log-rank检验.结果 抗感染组由于感染原因被迫提前拔管1例,占3.6%,对照组9例,占21.4%,比较差异有统计学意义(x2=5.143,P 15 CFU was found by semi-quantitative roll-plate technique from a proximal or distal catheter segment. A catheter-related infection ( CRI) was defined as a colonized catheter with local signs of inflammation. A catheter-related bloodstream infection ( CR-BSI) was defined as a colonized catheter with isolation of the same organism from the patient' s blood with accompanying clinical signs of infection. SPSS 11.5 software was used for statistical analysis. Kaplan Meier curve was used to evaluate the association between CVC retention time and bacterial colonization or infection, and Log-rank test was performed to compare between the groups. Results CVC was removed from 3.6% (1/28) patients of antiseptic group and 21.4% (9/42) patients of control group because of infection (x2 = 5. 143, P 2 weeks, the colonization and infection will increase significantly in both standard or antiseptic CVC, so to shorten the insertion time is an

  18. Bacterial flora of the sigmoid neovagina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Toolenaar; I. Freundt (Ingrid); J.H. Wagenvoort; F.J. Huikeshoven (Frans); M. Vogel; J. Jeekel (Hans); A.C. Drogendijk

    1993-01-01

    textabstractThe bacterial microbiota of 15 sigmoid neovaginas, created in patients with congenital vaginal aplasia or male transsexualism, was studied. No specimen was sterile, and only normal inhabitants of the colon were cultured. The total counts of bacteria were low

  19. Clinical impact of Achromobacter xylosoxidans colonization/infection in patients with cystic fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C. Firmida

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The rate of diagnosis of colonization/infection of the airways with Achromobacter xylosoxidans has increased in cystic fibrosis patients, but its clinical significance is still controversial. This retrospective, case-control study aimed to evaluate the clinical impact of A. xylosoxidans colonization/infection in cystic fibrosis patients. Individuals who were chronically colonized/infected (n=10, intermittently colonized/infected (n=15, and never colonized/infected with A. xylosoxidans (n=18 were retrospectively evaluated during two periods that were 2 years apart. Demographic characteristics, clinical data, lung function, and chronic bacterial co-colonization data were evaluated. Of the total study population, 87% were pediatric patients and 65.1% were female. Individuals chronically colonized/infected with A. xylosoxidans had decreased forced expiratory volume in 1 s (51.7% in the chronic colonization/infection group vs 82.7% in the intermittent colonization/infection group vs 76% in the never colonized/infected group. Compared with the other two groups, the rate of co-colonization with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was higher in individuals chronically colonized/infected with A. xylosoxidans (P=0.002. Changes in lung function over 2 years in the three groups were not significant, although a trend toward a greater decrease in lung function was observed in the chronically colonized/infected group. Compared with the other two groups, there was a greater number of annual hospitalizations in patients chronically colonized/infected with A. xylosoxidans (P=0.033. In cystic fibrosis patients, there was an increased frequency of A. xylosoxidans colonization/infection in children, and lung function was reduced in patients who were chronically colonized/infected with A. xylosoxidans. Additionally, there were no differences in clinical outcomes during the 2-year period, except for an increased number of hospitalizations in patients with A

  20. Whole genome sequencing of bacteria in cystic fibrosis as a model for bacterial genome adaptation and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Poonam; Gupta, Sushim Kumar; Rolain, Jean-Marc

    2014-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) airways harbor a wide variety of new and/or emerging multidrug resistant bacteria which impose a heavy burden on patients. These bacteria live in close proximity with one another, which increases the frequency of lateral gene transfer. The exchange and movement of mobile genetic elements and genomic islands facilitate the spread of genes between genetically diverse bacteria, which seem to be advantageous to the bacterium as it allows adaptation to the new niches of the CF lungs. Niche adaptation is one of the major evolutionary forces shaping bacterial genome composition and in CF the chronic strains adapt and become less virulent. The purpose of this review is to shed light on CF bacterial genome alterations. Next-generation sequencing technology is an exciting tool that may help us to decipher the genome architecture and the evolution of bacteria colonizing CF lungs. PMID:24502835

  1. Bacterial tactic responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armitage, J P

    1999-01-01

    Many, if not most, bacterial species swim. The synthesis and operation of the flagellum, the most complex organelle of a bacterium, takes a significant percentage of cellular energy, particularly in the nutrient limited environments in which many motile species are found. It is obvious that motility accords cells a survival advantage over non-motile mutants under normal, poorly mixed conditions and is an important determinant in the development of many associations between bacteria and other organisms, whether as pathogens or symbionts and in colonization of niches and the development of biofilms. This survival advantage is the result of sensory control of swimming behaviour. Although too small to sense a gradient along the length of the cell, and unable to swim great distances because of buffetting by Brownian motion and the curvature resulting from a rotating flagellum, bacteria can bias their random swimming direction towards a more favourable environment. The favourable environment will vary from species to species and there is now evidence that in many species this can change depending on the current physiological growth state of the cell. In general, bacteria sense changes in a range of nutrients and toxins, compounds altering electron transport, acceptors or donors into the electron transport chain, pH, temperature and even the magnetic field of the Earth. The sensory signals are balanced, and may be balanced with other sensory pathways such as quorum sensing, to identify the optimum current environment. The central sensory pathway in this process is common to most bacteria and most effectors. The environmental change is sensed by a sensory protein. In most species examined this is a transmembrane protein, sensing the external environment, but there is increasing evidence for additional cytoplasmic receptors in many species. All receptors, whether sensing sugars, amino acids or oxygen, share a cytoplasmic signalling domain that controls the activity of a

  2. Bacterial Vaginosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 586. Related Content STDs during Pregnancy Fact Sheet Pregnancy and HIV, Viral Hepatitis, and STD Prevention Pelvic Inflammatory Disease ( ... Bacterial Vaginosis (BV) Chlamydia Gonorrhea Genital Herpes Hepatitis HIV/AIDS & STDs Human Papillomavirus ... STDs See Also Pregnancy Reproductive ...

  3. Bacterial Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Schedules Preteen & Teen Vaccines Meningococcal Disease Sepsis Bacterial Meningitis Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On this ... serious disease. Laboratory Methods for the Diagnosis of Meningitis This manual summarizes laboratory methods used to isolate, ...

  4. Evaluation by computerized morphometry of histopathological alterations of the colon wall in segments with and without intestinal transit in rats Avaliação por morfometria computadorizada das alterações histopatológicas da parede cólica em segmentos com e sem trânsito intestinal em ratos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Vieira de Sousa

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate histopathological alterations of the colon wall in segments with and without intestinal transit, by computer-assisted imaging, and to correlate these with the length of time diversion. METHODS: Thirty male Wistar rats were subjected to intestinal transit diversion by a proximal colostomy and distal mucosa fistula. The animals were divided into three experimental groups according to how long after the initial surgical procedure they were sacrificed: six, twelve and eighteen weeks. Colon segments with and without transit were subjected to histopathological study. The variables colon crypt length, mucosal ulceration, muscle layer thickness of the muscularis mucosa, submucosa and muscularis propria, vascular congestion, number of caliciform cells, inflammatory grade and degree of inflammation, comparing the two colon segments in the different experimental groups were studied. Intestinal crypt length, muscle layer thickness of the mucosa, submucosa and muscularis propria and caliciform cells were measured by computer-assisted imaging method. Mean equality, variance analysis and correlation tests were used in the statistical analysis, and the significance level was set at 5%. RESULTS: Comparison between segments with and without transit showed that the latter presented reduced length of colon crypts and increased muscle layer thickness of the muscularis mucosa, submucosa and muscularis propria. There were greater quantities of ulceration of the mucosal and greater degree of inflammation with increasing time without transit. Mucosal ulceration, submucosal vascular congestion, increased thickness of the submucosal and muscularis propria layers, presence of caliciform cells, inflammatory infiltrate and inflammatory grade correlated significantly with the length of time without transit. CONCLUSIONS: Histological alterations occurred in all layers of the colon wall, in the segments without intestinal transit. Ulcerations in the

  5. Diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đukić Slobodanka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial vaginosis is a common, complex clinical syndrome characterized by alterations in the normal vaginal flora. When symptomatic, it is associated with a malodorous vaginal discharge and on occasion vaginal burning or itching. Under normal conditions, lactobacilli constitute 95% of the bacteria in the vagina. Bacterial vaginosis is associated with severe reduction or absence of the normal H2O2­producing lactobacilli and overgrowth of anaerobic bacteria and Gardnerella vaginalis, Atopobium vaginae, Mycoplasma hominis and Mobiluncus species. Most types of infectious disease are diagnosed by culture, by isolating an antigen or RNA/DNA from the microbe, or by serodiagnosis to determine the presence of antibodies to the microbe. Therefore, demonstration of the presence of an infectious agent is often a necessary criterion for the diagnosis of the disease. This is not the case for bacterial vaginosis, since the ultimate cause of the disease is not yet known. There are a variety of methods for the diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis but no method can at present be regarded as the best. Diagnosing bacterial vaginosis has long been based on the clinical criteria of Amsel, whereby three of four defined criteria must be satisfied. Nugent’s scoring system has been further developed and includes validation of the categories of observable bacteria structures. Up­to­date molecular tests are introduced, and better understanding of vaginal microbiome, a clear definition for bacterial vaginosis, and short­term and long­term fluctuations in vaginal microflora will help to better define molecular tests within the broader clinical context.

  6. Colonization and pathogenicity for American and Chinese bacterial strains carried by pine wood nematodes%中国与美国松材线虫体表细菌在线虫体表对峙及对松苗致病性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贲爱玲; 曾腓力; 乔雪娟; 郑敬荣; 韩正敏

    2013-01-01

    松材线虫体表的细菌存在演替现象,美国松萎蔫病危害不严重的原因可能是松材线虫体表细菌演替的结果.利用美国线虫体表的细菌来替代中国线虫体表的细菌,从而降低中国松萎蔫病的流行,为松萎蔫病的生物防治提供了可能.为此,本研究从3株美国松材线虫体表分离得到15株细菌菌株,并确定MG3、MG4、MG5、MG8、MG9、MG11、MG12为优势菌株.用中国松材线虫体表的4个致病细菌菌株YG1、YG2、YG3、YG4分别和15株美国菌株在实验室条件下进行对峙,发现美国MG4、MG5、MG8、MG9等菌株在松材线虫体表具有很强的竞争能力.用竞争能力最强的3个美国菌株MG5、MG8、MG9,混同无菌松材线虫分别对黑松、马尾松、湿地松和油松进行接种,发现相对于中国YG2菌株,美国菌株MG8和MG9对4种松树的致病性均明显较低.提出美国菌株MG8和MG9可以作为生物防治的候选菌株.%Bacterial succession on the surface of pine wood nematode (PWN) may have a direct impact on the development of pine wilt disease ( PWD) . The objective of this study was to isolate bacteria from PWN in the United States where PWD was not a serious problem and compared with four bacterial strains ( YG1 , YG2, YG3 , YG4) from China. Fifteen bacterial strains including seven dominant strains ( MG3 , MG4, MG5, MG8, MG9, MG11 and MG12) were isolated from 3 PWN originating in the USA. In competition assays, Four ( MG4, MG5 , MG8 and MG9) of the 15 American bacterial strains better colonized sterile PWN than all Chinese strains tested. These three American strains ( MG5 , MG8 , MG9 ) were further compared with one reference Chinese strain ( YG2) for control efficacy using Pinus thunbergii, P. massoniana,P. elliottii and P. tabuliformis as model systems. MG8 and MG9 provided better control of PWD caused by sterile PWN than YG2. These results show that two American strains MG8 and MG9 have great potential as biological control

  7. Uso de bacteriófagos en gallinas de postura infectadas con Salmonella enterica serotipo Enteritidis: prevención de la colonización intestinal y reproductiva Bacteriophage use in laying hens infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis: prevention of intestinal and reproductive colonization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Borie

    2011-01-01

    with phages to control intestinal and reproductive tract colonization of SE in laying hens. 22-week old Hy-Line Brown hens free of Salmonella, were treated with a mixture of three bacteriophages (10(11 PFU/dose/phage and challenged with 2.4 x 10(8 CFU of SE, 24 hours post phage treatment. On day 10 post challenge, hens were euthanatized, and individual samples of cecum, ovary and oviduct, were analyzed using qualitative and quantitative bacteriology. Eggs laid during the experience were collected and processed to detect SE. The incidence of Salmonella in ceca was similar between positive control and treated groups (96.67% and cecal bacterial counts did not present significant differences between them (P > 0.05. In reproductive tissues, phagetherapy was able to slightly reduce the SE count in the ovary (P 0.05. This lytic activity of phages observed in ovaric tissue, encourages further efforts to elucidate the real contribution of bacteriophages as SE biocontrollers in laying hens.

  8. Nutrition and Helicobacter pylori: Host Diet and Nutritional Immunity Influence Bacterial Virulence and Disease Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, Kathryn P; Gaddy, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori colonizes the stomachs of greater than 50% of the world's human population making it arguably one of the most successful bacterial pathogens. Chronic H. pylori colonization results in gastritis in nearly all patients; however in a subset of people, persistent infection with H. pylori is associated with an increased risk for more severe disease outcomes including B-cell lymphoma of mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma) and invasive adenocarcinoma. Research aimed at elucidating determinants that mediate disease progression has revealed genetic differences in both humans and H. pylori which increase the risk for developing gastric cancer. Furthermore, host diet and nutrition status have been shown to influence H. pylori-associated disease outcomes. In this review we will discuss how H. pylori is able to create a replicative niche within the hostile host environment by subverting and modifying the host-generated immune response as well as successfully competing for limited nutrients such as transition metals by deploying an arsenal of metal acquisition proteins and virulence factors. Lastly, we will discuss how micronutrient availability or alterations in the gastric microbiome may exacerbate negative disease outcomes associated with H. pylori colonization. PMID:27688750

  9. Nutrition and Helicobacter pylori: Host Diet and Nutritional Immunity Influence Bacterial Virulence and Disease Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori colonizes the stomachs of greater than 50% of the world's human population making it arguably one of the most successful bacterial pathogens. Chronic H. pylori colonization results in gastritis in nearly all patients; however in a subset of people, persistent infection with H. pylori is associated with an increased risk for more severe disease outcomes including B-cell lymphoma of mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma) and invasive adenocarcinoma. Research aimed at elucidating determinants that mediate disease progression has revealed genetic differences in both humans and H. pylori which increase the risk for developing gastric cancer. Furthermore, host diet and nutrition status have been shown to influence H. pylori-associated disease outcomes. In this review we will discuss how H. pylori is able to create a replicative niche within the hostile host environment by subverting and modifying the host-generated immune response as well as successfully competing for limited nutrients such as transition metals by deploying an arsenal of metal acquisition proteins and virulence factors. Lastly, we will discuss how micronutrient availability or alterations in the gastric microbiome may exacerbate negative disease outcomes associated with H. pylori colonization. PMID:27688750

  10. Understanding your colon cancer risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colon cancer risk factors are things that increase the chance that you could get cancer. Some risk factors ... risk factors never get cancer. Other people get colon cancer but do not have any known risk factors. ...

  11. Treatment Option Overview (Colon Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Colorectal Cancer Colorectal Cancer Screening Research Colon Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Colon Cancer ... Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) and treatment ...

  12. Colonization, competition, and dispersal of pathogens in fluid flow networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siryaporn, Albert; Kim, Minyoung Kevin; Shen, Yi; Stone, Howard A; Gitai, Zemer

    2015-05-01

    The colonization of bacteria in complex fluid flow networks, such as those found in host vasculature, remains poorly understood. Recently, it was reported that many bacteria, including Bacillus subtilis [1], Escherichia coli [2], and Pseudomonas aeruginosa [3, 4], can move in the opposite direction of fluid flow. Upstream movement results from the interplay between fluid shear stress and bacterial motility structures, and such rheotactic-like behavior is predicted to occur for a wide range of conditions [1]. Given the potential ubiquity of upstream movement, its impact on population-level behaviors within hosts could be significant. Here, we find that P. aeruginosa communities use a diverse set of motility strategies, including a novel surface-motility mechanism characterized by counter-advection and transverse diffusion, to rapidly disperse throughout vasculature-like flow networks. These motility modalities give P. aeruginosa a selective growth advantage, enabling it to self-segregate from other human pathogens such as Proteus mirabilis and Staphylococcus aureus that outcompete P. aeruginosa in well-mixed non-flow environments. We develop a quantitative model of bacterial colonization in flow networks, confirm our model in vivo in plant vasculature, and validate a key prediction that colonization and dispersal can be inhibited by modifying surface chemistry. Our results show that the interaction between flow mechanics and motility structures shapes the formation of mixed-species communities and suggest a general mechanism by which bacteria could colonize hosts. Furthermore, our results suggest novel strategies for tuning the composition of multi-species bacterial communities in hosts, preventing inappropriate colonization in medical devices, and combatting bacterial infections. PMID:25843031

  13. POLYSACCHARIDES AND eDNA AID BACTERIAL ATTACHMENT TO POLYMER BRUSH COATINGS (PLL-g-PEG)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Guanghong; Ogaki, Ryosuke; Regina, Viduthalai R.;

    in complete absence of bacterial colonization from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermis, whereas the conventional PLL-g-PEG coatings only resisted colonization by P. aeruginosa and S. aureus, but not S. epidermidis. Colonization patterns were also reflected in single...... of the conventional coating. These results explain why S. epidermidis, which produces polysaccharides and extracellular DNA, could successfully colonize the conventional PLL-g-PEG coatings. The ability of high-density PLL-g-PEG to resist polysaccharides, DNA, and bacterial adhesion of all strains is thus highly...

  14. Colonization, mouse-style

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Searle Jeremy B

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Several recent papers, including one in BMC Evolutionary Biology, examine the colonization history of house mice. As well as background for the analysis of mouse adaptation, such studies offer a perspective on the history of movements of the humans that accidentally transported the mice. See research article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2148/10/325

  15. Colonic interposition: radiographic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agha, F P; Orringer, M B

    1984-04-01

    This report reviews the clinical and radiographic features of 40 patients who underwent visceral esophageal substitution with colon for benign or malignant lesions of the esophagus. The incidence and radiographic identification of complications are discussed. All patients were routinely examined with barium esophagrams on postoperative day 10. If an anastomotic leak was suspected clinically before this time, studies were performed using water-soluble iodinated contrast material. Follow-up barium esophagrams were obtained 1-96 months after operation (average, 60 months) in 24 patients. Eight patients (21%) demonstrated asymptomatic "jejunization" of the colonic mucosa with no attributable clinical manifestations; this finding resolved in 1-3 months, without sequelae, and has not been reported before. The spectrum of ischemic changes in the colonic segment included mucosal edema, spasm, ulceration, loss of haustration, and frank necrosis. Radiographically detectable early postoperative complications included anastomotic leak in six (three pharyngocolic, three cervical esophagocolic) and aspiration of barium into the tracheobronchial tree due to incoordinated swallowing in eight. Late postoperative complications included anastomotic narrowing (12) malfunctioning of the colon due to impaired emptying (five), recurrent aspiration pneumonia (three), small bowel obstruction (three), transhiatal herniation of small bowel through the diaphragmatic hiatus (one), and reflux into the retained bypassed esophagus (one). PMID:6608225

  16. Bacterial dynamics in intestines of the black tiger shrimp and the Pacific white shrimp during Vibrio harveyi exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rungrassamee, Wanilada; Klanchui, Amornpan; Maibunkaew, Sawarot; Karoonuthaisiri, Nitsara

    2016-01-01

    . Our findings provide evidence of intestinal bacterial population altered by a presence of the pathogen in shrimp intestines and intestinal bacterial stability might provide colonization resistance against the invading pathogen in the host shrimp. Hence, intestinal microbial ecology management may potentially contribute to disease prevention in aquaculture.

  17. Exploring the chemotatic attraction of Campylobacter jejuni in chicken colonization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vegge, Christina Skovgaard; Brøndsted, Lone; Ingmer, Hanne

    Campylobacter jejuni is the primary food borne bacterial pathogen in the developed world and the bacteria causes millions of gastroenteritis cases each year. The most important reservoir for C. jejuni is the gut of chickens, which are colonized commensally and efficiently by this organism....... Predominantly the mucus filled crypts of the lower gastrointestinal tract of chickens are found to be colonized by C. jejuni, and the bacteria are expected to be attracted to this particular environment by chemotaxis. From the full genome sequence of C. jejuni NCTC11168 several chemotactic proteins...

  18. Persistence of nasal colonization with human pathogenic bacteria and associated antimicrobial resistance in the German general population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Köck, R; Werner, P; Friedrich, A W; Fegeler, C; Becker, K

    2016-01-01

    The nares represent an important bacterial reservoir for endogenous infections. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of nasal colonization by different important pathogens, the associated antimicrobial susceptibility and risk factors. We performed a prospective cohort study among 1878 nonhospit

  19. External coating of colonic anastomoses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Achiam, Michael Patrick; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    Colon anastomotic leakage remains both a frequent and serious complication in gastrointestinal surgery. External coating of colonic anastomoses has been proposed as a means to lower the rate of this complication. The aim of this review was to evaluate existing studies on external coating of colonic...

  20. Celecoxib Alters the Intestinal Microbiota and Metabolome in Association with Reducing Polyp Burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montrose, David C; Zhou, Xi Kathy; McNally, Erin M; Sue, Erika; Yantiss, Rhonda K; Gross, Steven S; Leve, Nitai D; Karoly, Edward D; Suen, Chen S; Ling, Lilan; Benezra, Robert; Pamer, Eric G; Dannenberg, Andrew J

    2016-09-01

    Treatment with celecoxib, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, reduces formation of premalignant adenomatous polyps in the gastrointestinal tracts of humans and mice. In addition to its chemopreventive activity, celecoxib can exhibit antimicrobial activity. Differing bacterial profiles have been found in feces from colon cancer patients compared with those of normal subjects. Moreover, preclinical studies suggest that bacteria can modulate intestinal tumorigenesis by secreting specific metabolites. In the current study, we determined whether celecoxib treatment altered the luminal microbiota and metabolome in association with reducing intestinal polyp burden in mice. Administration of celecoxib for 10 weeks markedly reduced intestinal polyp burden in APC(Min/+) mice. Treatment with celecoxib also altered select luminal bacterial populations in both APC(Min/+) and wild-type mice, including decreased Lactobacillaceae and Bifidobacteriaceae as well as increased Coriobacteriaceae Metabolomic analysis demonstrated that celecoxib caused a strong reduction in many fecal metabolites linked to carcinogenesis, including glucose, amino acids, nucleotides, and lipids. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis suggested that these changes in metabolites may contribute to reduced cell proliferation. To this end, we showed that celecoxib reduced cell proliferation in the base of normal appearing ileal and colonic crypts of APC(Min/+) mice. Consistent with this finding, lineage tracing indicated that celecoxib treatment reduced the rate at which Lgr5-positive stem cells gave rise to differentiated cell types in the crypts. Taken together, these results demonstrate that celecoxib alters the luminal microbiota and metabolome along with reducing epithelial cell proliferation in mice. We hypothesize that these actions contribute to its chemopreventive activity. Cancer Prev Res; 9(9); 721-31. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27432344

  1. Bacterial carbonatogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several series of experiments in the laboratory as well as in natural conditions teach that the production of carbonate particles by heterotrophic bacteria follows different ways. The 'passive' carbonatogenesis is generated by modifications of the medium that lead to the accumulation of carbonate and bicarbonate ions and to the precipitation of solid particles. The 'active' carbonatogenesis is independent of the metabolic pathways. The carbonate particles are produced by ionic exchanges through the cell membrane following still poorly known mechanisms. Carbonatogenesis appears to be the response of heterotrophic bacterial communities to an enrichment of the milieu in organic matter. The active carbonatogenesis seems to start first. It is followed by the passive one which induces the growth of initially produced particles. The yield of heterotrophic bacterial carbonatogenesis and the amounts of solid carbonates production by bacteria are potentially very high as compared to autotrophic or chemical sedimentation from marine, paralic or continental waters. Furthermore, the bacterial processes are environmentally very ubiquitous; they just require organic matter enrichment. Thus, apart from purely evaporite and autotrophic ones, all Ca and/or Mg carbonates must be considered as from heterotrophic bacterial origin. By the way, the carbon of carbonates comes from primary organic matter. Such considerations ask questions about some interpretations from isotopic data on carbonates. Finally, bacterial heterotrophic carbonatogenesis appears as a fundamental phase in the relationships between atmosphere and lithosphere and in the geo-biological evolution of Earth. (author)

  2. Study shows colon and rectal tumors constitute a single type of cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    The pattern of genomic alterations in colon and rectal tissues is the same regardless of anatomic location or origin within the colon or the rectum, leading researchers to conclude that these two cancer types can be grouped as one, according to The Cancer

  3. Interplay between dietary inducers of GST and the genotype in colon cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slattery, M.L.; Kampman, E.; Samowitz, W.; Caan, B.J.; Potter, J.D.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine if cruciferous vegetables and coffee, two dietary inducers of glutatione-S-transferases, interact with GSTM-1 genotype to alter risk of colon cancer. Data were available on 1579 incident cases of adenocarcinoma of the colon and 1898 population-based controls

  4. Berberine Induces Caspase-Independent Cell Death in Colon Tumor Cells through Activation of Apoptosis-Inducing Factor

    OpenAIRE

    Lihong Wang; Liping Liu; Yan Shi; Hanwei Cao; Rupesh Chaturvedi; M Wade Calcutt; Tianhui Hu; Xiubao Ren; Wilson, Keith T.; D. Brent Polk; Fang Yan

    2012-01-01

    Berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid derived from plants, is a traditional medicine for treating bacterial diarrhea and intestinal parasite infections. Although berberine has recently been shown to suppress growth of several tumor cell lines, information regarding the effect of berberine on colon tumor growth is limited. Here, we investigated the mechanisms underlying the effects of berberine on regulating the fate of colon tumor cells, specifically the mouse immorto-Min colonic epithelial (IM...

  5. Altering host resistance to infections through microbial transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin P Willing

    Full Text Available Host resistance to bacterial infections is thought to be dictated by host genetic factors. Infections by the natural murine enteric pathogen Citrobacter rodentium (used as a model of human enteropathogenic and enterohaemorrhagic E. coli infections vary between mice strains, from mild self-resolving colonization in NIH Swiss mice to lethality in C3H/HeJ mice. However, no clear genetic component had been shown to be responsible for the differences observed with C. rodentium infections. Because the intestinal microbiota is important in regulating resistance to infection, and microbial composition is dependent on host genotype, it was tested whether variations in microbial composition between mouse strains contributed to differences in "host" susceptibility by transferring the microbiota of resistant mice to lethally susceptible mice prior to infection. Successful transfer of the microbiota from resistant to susceptible mice resulted in delayed pathogen colonization and mortality. Delayed mortality was associated with increased IL-22 mediated innate defense including antimicrobial peptides Reg3γ and Reg3β, and immunono-neutralization of IL-22 abrogated the beneficial effect of microbiota transfer. Conversely, depletion of the native microbiota in resistant mice by antibiotics and transfer of the susceptible mouse microbiota resulted in reduced innate defenses and greater pathology upon infection. This work demonstrates the importance of the microbiota and how it regulates mucosal immunity, providing an important factor in susceptibility to enteric infection. Transfer of resistance through microbial transplantation (bacteriotherapy provides additional mechanisms to alter "host" resistance, and a novel means to alter enteric infection and to study host-pathogen interactions.

  6. Diet and epigenetics in colon cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Minna Nystr(o)m; Marja Mutanen

    2009-01-01

    Over the past few years, evidence has accumulated indicating that apart from genetic alterations, epigenetic alterations, through e.g. aberrant promoter methylation, play a major role in the initiation and progression of colorectal cancer (CRC). Even in the hereditary colon cancer syndromes, in which the susceptibility is inherited dominantly, cancer develops only as the result of the progressive accumulation of genetic and epigenetic alterations. Diet can both prevent and induce colon carcinogenesis, for instance, through epigenetic changes, which regulate the homeostasis of the intestinal mucosa. Food-derived compounds are constantly present in the intestine and may shift cellular balance toward harmful outcomes, such as increased susceptibility to mutations. There is strong evidence that a major component of cancer risk may involve epigenetic changes in normal cells that increase the probability of cancer after genetic mutation. The recognition of epigenetic changes as a driving force in colorectal neoplasia would open new areas of research in disease epidemiology, risk assessment, and treatment, especially in mutation carriers who already have an inherited predisposition to cancer.(c) 2009 The WJG Press and Baishideng. All rights reserved.

  7. Moonmilk deposits originate from specific bacterial communities in Altamira Cave (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portillo, Maria C; Gonzalez, Juan M

    2011-01-01

    The influence of bacterial communities on the formation of carbonate deposits such as moonmilk was investigated in Altamira Cave (Spain). The study focuses on the relationship between the bacterial communities at moonmilk deposits and those forming white colonizations, which develop sporadically throughout the cave. Using molecular fingerprinting of the metabolically active bacterial communities detected through RNA analyses, the development of white colonizations and moonmilk deposits showed similar bacterial profiles. White colonizations were able to raise the pH as a result of their metabolism (reaching in situ pH values above 8.5), which was proportional to the nutrient supply. Bacterial activity was analyzed by nanorespirometry showing higher metabolic activity from bacterial colonizations than uncolonized areas. Once carbonate deposits were formed, bacterial activity decreased drastically (down to 5.7% of the white colonization activity). This study reports on a specific type of bacterial community leading to moonmilk deposit formation in a cave environment as a result of bacterial metabolism. The consequence of this process is a macroscopic phenomenon of visible carbonate depositions and accumulation in cave environments. PMID:20717660

  8. Effect of bacterial inoculation, plant genotype and developmental stage on root-associated and endophytic bacterial communities in potato (Solanum tuberosum)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andreote, F.D.; Rocha, da U.N.; Araujo, W.L.; Azevedo, J.L.; Overbeek, van L.S.

    2010-01-01

    Beneficial bacteria interact with plants by colonizing the rhizosphere and roots followed by further spread through the inner tissues, resulting in endophytic colonization. The major factors contributing to these interactions are not always well understood for most bacterial and plant species. It is

  9. On Justification of Colonization

    OpenAIRE

    Skov, Stig; Schrøder, Ulrikke; Mortensen, Marianne; Memic, Inda; Asmussen, Pernille

    2007-01-01

    Abstract The project concerns the justification of the Spanish colonization in America during the 16th and 17th century, examined through the Spanish philosopher Francisco de Vitoria’s (1485 – 1546) Political Writings and the British philosopher John Locke’s (1632- 1704) Two Treatises of Government, in a historical as well as a philosophical context. The main problem has been the dispossession of the Indians and how the philosophers defended the occupation of the lands of America. Vitoria’...

  10. Bacterial Adhesion & Blocking Bacterial Adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk

    2008-01-01

    tract to the microbial flocs in waste water treatment facilities. Microbial biofilms may however also cause a wide range of industrial and medical problems, and have been implicated in a wide range of persistent infectious diseases, including implantassociated microbial infections. Bacterial adhesion...... is the first committing step in biofilm formation, and has therefore been intensely scrutinized. Much however, still remains elusive. Bacterial adhesion is a highly complex process, which is influenced by a variety of factors. In this thesis, a range of physico-chemical, molecular and environmental parameters......, which influence the transition from a planktonic lifestyle to a sessile lifestyle, have been studied. Protein conditioning film formation was found to influence bacterial adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation considerable, and an aqueous extract of fish muscle tissue was shown to significantly...

  11. Bacterial lipases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Ransac, Stéphane; Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Colson, Charles; Heuvel, Margreet van; Misset, Onno

    1994-01-01

    Many different bacterial species produce lipases which hydrolyze esters of glycerol with preferably long-chain fatty acids. They act at the interface generated by a hydrophobic lipid substrate in a hydrophilic aqueous medium. A characteristic property of lipases is called interfacial activation, mea

  12. Giant colon lipoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaman, İsmail; Derici, Hayrullah; Demirpolat, Gülen

    2015-01-01

    Colon lipomas are rare, non-epithelial tumors. They are generally smaller than two centimeters and asymptomatic, they are incidentally diagnosed and do not require treatment. Large and symptomatic colon lipomas are rather rare. Its differential diagnosis is generally made by histopathological examination of the resected specimen. A fifty-year-old female patient presented with the symptoms of abdominal pain, swelling in the abdomen and loss of weight. During colonoscopy, there was a submucosal mass of 8×6 cm, which almost completely obstructed the lumen in the hepatic flexure and was covered by a mucosa that was sporadically ulcerated and necrotic in nature. In magnetic resonance imaging, an ovoid mass with a diameter of 8.5 cm at its widest dimension was detected, which had signal intensity similar to that of adipose tissue. Since the patient was symptomatic and differential diagnosis could not be made, she underwent laparoscopic right hemicolectomy. A submucosal lipoma was detected on histopathological examination of the specimen. The patient was discharged without any problems on post-operative day 7. Definite diagnosis of lipomas before surgery is challenging; they may be mistaken for malignancy, especially if the lesion is large and ulcerated. For large and symptomatic colon lipomas, surgery is required to both prevent complications and rule out malignancy.

  13. Quantitative assay for the colonization ability of heterogeneous bacteria on controlled nanopillar structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The colonization ability of bacteria on biomaterial surfaces is influenced by the morphology of the bacteria and the nanotopography of the biomaterial. However, interactions between the bacterial morphology and nanotopography of biomaterials have not yet been completely elucidated. In this article, we quantitatively characterized the bacterial morphology to illuminate the integrated effects of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) nanopillar arrays on the colonization of bacteria cells with different shapes. Our results demonstrated that the interaction between interpillar spacing and the diameter of the bacterial cells impacted the number of bacterial cells that adhered to different PET substrates. The interpillar spacing of nanopillar arrays promotes bacterial adhesion in a definite range (<50 nm). However, further increasing the interpillar spacing inhibited the adhesion of bacteria to the nanopillar arrays. Moreover, the interpillar spacing also influenced the morphologies of adherent bacterial cells on the PET nanopillar arrays, which consequently facilitated bacterial adhesion to the nanopillar arrays. Our findings enhance the understanding of interactions between controlled nanotopography and bacterial colonization and provide an appropriate parameter for the design of antibacterial materials with nanotopography. (paper)

  14. Colonization by Streptococcus agalactiae during pregnancy: maternal and perinatal prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia El Beitune

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available We reviewed colonization by group B Streptococcus beta-haemolyticus of Lancefield (SGB, or Streptococcus agalactiae, in pregnant women, and the consequences of infection for the mother and newborn infant, including factors that influence the risk for anogenital colonization by SGB. We also examined the methods for diagnosis and prophylaxis of SGB to prevent early-onset invasive neonatal bacterial disease. At present, it is justifiable to adopt anal and vaginal SGB culture as part of differentiated obstetrical care in order to reduce early neonatal infection. The rates, risk factors of maternal and neonatal SGB colonization, as well as the incidence of neonatal disease, may vary in different communities and need to be thoroughly evaluated in each country to allow the most appropriate preventive strategy to be selected.

  15. The problem of bacterial diarrhoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harries, J T

    1976-01-01

    The reported incidence of "pathogenic" bacteria, as judged by serotype, in the stools of children with acute diarrhoea has varied from 4 to 33% over the last twenty years. Techniques such as tissue culture provide a means for detecting enterotoxin-producing strains of bacteria, strains which often do not possess "pathogenic" serotypes. "Pathogenicity" requires redefinition, and the aetiological importance of bacteria in diarrhoea is probably considerably greater than previous reports have indicated. Colonization of the bowel by a pathogen will result in structural and/or mucosal abnormalities, and will depend on a series of complex interactions between the external environment, the pathogen, and the host and its resident bacterial flora. Enteropathogenic bacteria may be broadly classified as (i) invasive (e.g. Shigella, Salmonella and some Escherichia coli) which predominantly affect the distal bowel, or (ii) non-invasive (e.g. Vibrio cholerae and E. coli) which affect the proximal bowel. V. cholerae and E. coli elaborate heat-labile enterotoxins which activate adenylate cyclase and induce small intestinal secretion; the secretory effects of heat-stable E. coli and heat-labile Shigella dysenteriae enterotoxins are not accompanied by cyclase activation. The two major complications of acute diarrhoea are (i) hypernatraemic dehydration with its attendant neurological, renal and vascular lesions, and (ii) protracted diarrhoea which may lead to severe malnutrition. Deconjugation of bile salts and colonization of the small bowel with toxigenic strains of E. coli may be important in the pathophysiology of the protracted diarrhoea syndrome. The control of bacterial diarrhoea requires a corrdinated political, educational, social, public health and scientific attack. Bacterial diarrhoea is a major health problem throughout the world, and carries an appreciable morbidity and mortality. This is particularly the case during infancy, and in those developing parts of the world

  16. Protozoa and their bacterial prey colonize sterile soil fast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altenburger, Andreas; Ekelund, Flemming; Jacobsen, Carsten Suhr

    2010-01-01

    to the atmosphere for a period of 14 months. Bacteria and flagellates occurred in high numbers after 25 days. Ciliates reached high abundance levels after 137 days, followed by amoebae after 245 days. Numbers of distinguishable protozoan morpho-types increased until 245 days after exposure and declined thereafter...

  17. Effects of burn wound excision on bacterial colonization and invasion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barret, JP; Herndon, DN

    2003-01-01

    Rates of survival after thermal injury have improved in the past two decades, and rates of wound infections and sepsis have decreased during the same period. Early excision has been advocated as one of the major factors, but its safety and efficacy and the exact timing of burn excision are still und

  18. On Lactococcus lactis UL719 competitivity and nisin (Nisaplin® capacity to inhibit Clostridium difficile in a model of human colon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe eLe Lay

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is the most frequently identified enteric pathogen in patients with nocosocomially acquired, antibiotic-associated diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis. Although metronidazole and vancomycin were effective, an increasing number of treatment failures and recurrence of C. difficile infection are being reported. Use of probiotics, particularly metabolically active lactic acid bacteria, was recently proposed as an alternative for the medical community. The aim of this study was to assess a probiotic candidate, nisin Z-producer Lactococcus lactis UL719, competitivity and nisin (Nisaplin® capacity to inhibit C. difficile in a model of human colon. Bacterial populations was enumerated by qPCR coupled to PMA treatment. L. lactis UL719 was able to survive and proliferate under simulated human colon, did not alter microbiota composition, but failed to inhibit C. difficile. While a single dose of 19 µmol/L (5× the MIC was not sufficient to inhibit C. difficile, nisin at 76 µmol/L (20× the MIC was effective at killing the pathogen. Nisin (at 76 µmol/L caused some temporary changes in the microbiota with Gram-positive bacteria being the mostly affected. These results highlight the capacity of L. lactis UL719 to survive under simulated human colon and the efficacy of nisin as an alternative in the treatment of C. difficile infections.

  19. Diffuse lymphoid follicles of the colon associated with colonic carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronen, R A; Glick, S N; Teplick, S K

    1984-01-01

    In four patients aged 59-75 years, colonic carcinoma was associated with diffuse lymphoid follicles in the colon. In one case, the prominence and distribution of the lymphoid follicles corresponded to the progression and regression of the tumor bulk. It is extremely unusual to demonstrate lymphoid follicles, particularly diffuse, on barium enema in patients in this age range. The colonic carcinomas and lymphoid follicles are directly related, possibly representing an immune response. PMID:6606941

  20. The gastric microbial community, Helicobacter pylori colonization, and disease

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Miriam E.; Solnick, Jay V.

    2014-01-01

    Long thought to be a sterile habitat, the stomach contains a diverse and unique community of bacteria. One particular inhabitant, Helicobacter pylori, colonizes half of the world’s human population and establishes a decades-long infection that can be asymptomatic, pathogenic, or even beneficial for the host. Many host and bacterial factors are known to influence an individual’s risk of gastric disease, but another potentially important determinant has recently come to light: the host microbio...

  1. [Colonic microbial biocenosis in rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gul'neva, M Iu; Noskov, S M

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the work was to study colonic microbial biocenosis and colonizing ability of opportunistic bacteria in 32 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 30 healthy subjects. RA was diagnosed based on the American Rheumatism Association criteria (1987). Qualitative and quantitative composition of the microflora was detected by a bacteriological method. StatSoft Statistics 6.0 was used to treat the data obtained. RA was associated with significant modification of the intestinal flora, viz. decrease in lactobacteria and significant increase of enterococci, clostridia, colibacteria showing reduced enzymatic activity, and opportunistic species. Also, symbiotic relationships between microorganisms altered. The fraction of bifidobacteria, bacteroids, and lactopositive colibacteria reduced while the abundance of opportunistic enterobacteria and staphylococci was elevated. Opportunistic Enterobacteriaceae were present in urine and nasal mucosa which suggested their translocation from the intestines. It is concluded that changes in intestinal microflora and colonization by opportunistic bacteria enhance the risk of development of co-morbid conditions in patients with RA. PMID:21932563

  2. Preterm Birth and Necrotizing Enterocolitis Alter Gut Colonization in Pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cilieborg, Malene S.; Boye, Mette; Mølbak, Lars;

    2011-01-01

    perfringens predisposes to NEC. By using terminal-RFLP and FISH, we characterized the gut microbiota of preterm, caesarean-delivered, formula-fed pigs (n = 44) with or without NEC and of formula- or colostrum-fed term, and vaginally born pigs (n = 13). A different microbiota with high C. perfringens abundance...

  3. Bacterial Ecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenchel, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial ecology is concerned with the interactions between bacteria and their biological and nonbiological environments and with the role of bacteria in biogeochemical element cycling. Many fundamental properties of bacteria are consequences of their small size. Thus, they can efficiently exploit...... biogeochemical processes are carried exclusively by bacteria. * Bacteria play an important role in all types of habitats including some that cannot support eukaryotic life....

  4. Determination of oropharyngeal pathogenic colonization in the elderly community

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shuang; LI Dong; CHU Yun-zhuo; ZHU Li-ying; LIU Feng-zhi

    2009-01-01

    Background Pneumonia has become the predominant cause of death for the elderly. It is critical to determine the status of oropharyngeal pathogen colonization in the elderly when treating pneumonia. To explore the efficient approaches to treat age-related pneumonia, we determined the status of oropharyngeal pathogenic colonization in the elderly community.Methods Throat swab cultures were used to isolate oropharyngeal pathogens from 706 residents older than 65 years living in the community of Shenyang City. Characteristics of bacterial strains were sorted and identified using drug sensitivity tests.Results Results of bacterial identification showed that 265 out of 706 samples were positive, thereby exhibiting a 37.5% positive rate. There were 290 bacterial strains isolated from the eldedy community in total, of which 248 strains were gram-negative bacilli (GNB) and 42 strains were gram-positive cocci (GNC), accounting for 85.5% and 14.5%, respectively. There were 158 K/ebsie//a pneumoniae strains, representing 54.4% of the all GNB.Conclusion The rate of oropharyngeal GNB colonization in the eldedy community increases and Klebsiella pneumoniae is the most common strain.

  5. Intestinal microbial dysbiosis and colonic epithelial cell hyperproliferation by dietary α-mangostin is independent of mouse strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez-Orozco, Fabiola; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer M; Galley, Jeffrey D; Bailey, Michael T; Clinton, Steven K; Lesinski, Gregory B; Failla, Mark L

    2015-01-01

    Beverages and supplements prepared from mangosteen fruit are claimed to support gut health and immunity, despite the absence of supporting evidence from clinical trials. We recently reported that α-mangostin (α-MG), the most abundant xanthone in mangosteen fruit, altered the intestinal microbiome, promoted dysbiosis, and exacerbated colitis in C57BL/6J mice. The objective of this study was to determine whether induction of dysbiosis by dietary α-MG is limited to the C57BL/6J strain or represents a more generic response to chronic intake of the xanthone on the gut microbiota of mice. C3H, Balb/c, Nude FoxN1nu, and C57BL/6J mice, each demonstrating unique microbiomes, were fed standard diet or diet containing 0.1% α-MG for four weeks. Dietary α-MG significantly altered the cecal and colonic microbiota in all four strains of mice, promoting a reduction in generally assumed beneficial bacterial groups while increasing the abundance of pathogenic bacteria. Consumption of α-MG was associated with reduced abundance of Firmicutes and increased abundance of Proteobacteria. The abundance of Lachnospiraceae, Ruminococcaceae, and Lactobacillaceae was reduced in α-MG-fed mice, while that of Enterobacteriaceae and Enterococcaceae was increased. Dietary α-MG also was associated with increased proliferation of colonic epithelial cells, infiltration of immune cells, infiltration of immune cells and increased fluid content in stool. These results suggest that ingestion of pharmacologic doses of xanthones in mangosteen-containing supplements may adversely alter the gut microbiota and should be used with caution. PMID:25621505

  6. Intestinal Microbial Dysbiosis and Colonic Epithelial Cell Hyperproliferation by Dietary α-Mangostin is Independent of Mouse Strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiola Gutierrez-Orozco

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Beverages and supplements prepared from mangosteen fruit are claimed to support gut health and immunity, despite the absence of supporting evidence from clinical trials. We recently reported that α-mangostin (α-MG, the most abundant xanthone in mangosteen fruit, altered the intestinal microbiome, promoted dysbiosis, and exacerbated colitis in C57BL/6J mice. The objective of this study was to determine whether induction of dysbiosis by dietary α-MG is limited to the C57BL/6J strain or represents a more generic response to chronic intake of the xanthone on the gut microbiota of mice. C3H, Balb/c, Nude FoxN1nu, and C57BL/6J mice, each demonstrating unique microbiomes, were fed standard diet or diet containing 0.1% α-MG for four weeks. Dietary α-MG significantly altered the cecal and colonic microbiota in all four strains of mice, promoting a reduction in generally assumed beneficial bacterial groups while increasing the abundance of pathogenic bacteria. Consumption of α-MG was associated with reduced abundance of Firmicutes and increased abundance of Proteobacteria. The abundance of Lachnospiraceae, Ruminococcaceae, and Lactobacillaceae was reduced in α-MG-fed mice, while that of Enterobacteriaceae and Enterococcaceae was increased. Dietary α-MG also was associated with increased proliferation of colonic epithelial cells, infiltration of immune cells, infiltration of immune cells and increased fluid content in stool. These results suggest that ingestion of pharmacologic doses of xanthones in mangosteen-containing supplements may adversely alter the gut microbiota and should be used with caution.

  7. The role of the colonic flora in maintaining a healthy large bowel mucosa.

    OpenAIRE

    Chapman, M A

    2001-01-01

    This work explores the intricate relationships between bacterial products of fermentation, the short chain fatty acids and the effect that these have on the colonic epithelium and the immune system. It confirms that butyrate is a major energy source for the colonic epithelium and there may be a minor epithelial abnormality in the metabolism of butyrate in patients with ulcerative colitis. Immunological studies suggest that butyrate has an effect on lymphocyte activation and inhibits cell prol...

  8. Fungal infection of the colon

    OpenAIRE

    Praneenararat S

    2014-01-01

    Surat PraneenararatDivision of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, Songkhla, ThailandAbstract: Fungi are pathogens that commonly infect immunocompromised patients and can affect any organs of the body, including the colon. However, the literature provides limited details on colonic infections caused by fungi. This article is an intensive review of information available on the fungi that can cause colon infections. It uses a comparative style so that its con...

  9. Short colon in a cat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An 11-year-old male Japanese domestic cat was referred to the veterinary hospital with a chronic diarrhea and signs of pain and vocalization when defecating. The cat has discharged unformed feces throughout his life. Morphological diagnosis of short colon was made radiographically after barium enema. The ileocolic junction and cecum was located to the left of the midline at the proximal end of the descending colon. Additional endoscopic examination demonstrated the difference in visual structures of the mucosal surface and in histological structures on mucosal biopsy specimens, between the colon and ileum. This is the first report of short colon in a cat in Japan

  10. Bicarbonate secretion by rabbit proximal colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, S K; Smith, P L

    1986-10-01

    Stripped segments of proximal colon (1-6 cm distal to the ampulla caecalis coli) were studied in vitro in Ussing chambers under short-circuit conditions using the pH-stat technique. With glucose and HCO3-CO2 present in the serosal bathing solution only, proximal colon alkalinizes the luminal bathing solution at a rate of 2.1 +/- 0.2 mu eq X h-1 X cm-2 (n = 36). With HCO3-CO2 present in the luminal bathing solution alone, proximal colon does not significantly acidify or alkalinize the serosal bathing solution. Addition of glucose (10 mM) to the luminal bathing solution abolished luminal alkalinization. Removal of HCO3 and CO2 from the serosal bathing solution or replacement of O2 with N2 also abolished luminal alkalinization. Acetazolamide (0.1 mM) added to both bathing solutions did not alter the rate of luminal alkalinization. Ion-replacement studies revealed that the alkalinization process was highly dependent on the presence of Na in the bathing solutions and much less dependent on the presence of Cl. Furthermore, ouabain (0.1 mM) significantly reduced luminal alkalinization. As in rabbit ileum, serosal epinephrine (0.1 mM) did not alter luminal alkalinization but increased serosal alkalinization by a Na-dependent mechanism. These results suggest that luminal alkalinization results from a Na-dependent, active transcellular HCO3 transport process and that a Na-dependent HCO3 absorptive process is activated by adrenergic stimuli. PMID:3766731

  11. Important aspects of the colonization of central venous catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreoli-Pinto, T J; Graziano, K U

    1999-01-01

    This study comprises five different kind of venous central catheters, 103 in total, made of Polyurethane Tecoflex, Polyurethane Vialon, PTFE and PVC, and the influence of their raw material on the microbial colonization. Patients age and sex, besides their clinical conditions, were taken into account, and neither considered as a sample vicious, nor associated with colonization. When the tips of the catheters were asseptically inoculated in Tryptic Soy Broth and Tioglicolate, colonization was detected in 15.5% of the catheters. Coagulase negative Staphylococcus, some of which with biofilm, were the predominant organisms found, although some bacillus have also been detected: Enterobacter aerogenes, Hafnia alvei, Pseudomonas cepacia, Xanthomonas maltophilia and Aeromonas sobria. It was not possible to notice any association between the colonization of the catheters and their raw material, probably due to the influence of a previous contact and linking with blood components. This contact causes a thin coating on the surface of the cathether, which makes all the catheters similar in respect of the attachment of a bacterial cell. So, the colonization depends on the virulence of the organism, much more then on the nature of the catheter. PMID:10326311

  12. Spatial organization of bacterial flora in normal and inflamed intestine:A fluorescence in situ hybridization study in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alexander Swidsinski; Vera Loening-Baucke; Herbert Lochs; Laura P. Hale

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To studythe role of intestinal flora in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).METHODS: The spatial organization of intestinal flora was investigated in normal mice and in two models of murine colitis using fluorescence in situ hybridization.RESULTS: The murine small intestine was nearly bacteriafree. The normal colonic flora was organized in three distinct compartments (crypt, interlaced, and fecal), each with different bacterial compositions. Crypt bacteria were present in the cecum and proximal colon. The fecal compartment was composed of homogeneously mixed bacterial groups that directly contacted the colonic wall in the cecum but were separated from the proximal colonic wall by a dense interlaced layer. Beginning in the middle colon, a mucus gap of growing thickness physically separated all intestinal bacteria from contact with the epithelium. Colonic inflammation was accompanied with a depletion of bacteria within the fecal compartment, a reduced surface area in which feces had direct contact with the colonic wall, increased thickness and spread of the mucus gap, and massive increases of bacterial concentrations in the crypt and interlaced compartments. Adhesive and infiltrative bacteria were observed in inflamed colon only, with dominant Bacteroides species.CONCLUSION: The proximal and distal colons are functionally different organs with respect to the intestinal flora, representing a bioreactor and a Segregation device.The highly organized structure of the colonic flora, its specific arrangement in different colonic segments, and its specialized response to inflammatory stimuli indicate that the intestinal flora is an innate part of host immunity that is under complex control.

  13. O antigen modulates insect vector acquisition of the bacterial plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapicavoli, Jeannette N; Kinsinger, Nichola; Perring, Thomas M; Backus, Elaine A; Shugart, Holly J; Walker, Sharon; Roper, M Caroline

    2015-12-01

    Hemipteran insect vectors transmit the majority of plant pathogens. Acquisition of pathogenic bacteria by these piercing/sucking insects requires intimate associations between the bacterial cells and insect surfaces. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the predominant macromolecule displayed on the cell surface of Gram-negative bacteria and thus mediates bacterial interactions with the environment and potential hosts. We hypothesized that bacterial cell surface properties mediated by LPS would be important in modulating vector-pathogen interactions required for acquisition of the bacterial plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa, the causative agent of Pierce's disease of grapevines. Utilizing a mutant that produces truncated O antigen (the terminal portion of the LPS molecule), we present results that link this LPS structural alteration to a significant decrease in the attachment of X. fastidiosa to blue-green sharpshooter foreguts. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed that this defect in initial attachment compromised subsequent biofilm formation within vector foreguts, thus impairing pathogen acquisition. We also establish a relationship between O antigen truncation and significant changes in the physiochemical properties of the cell, which in turn affect the dynamics of X. fastidiosa adhesion to the vector foregut. Lastly, we couple measurements of the physiochemical properties of the cell with hydrodynamic fluid shear rates to produce a Comsol model that predicts primary areas of bacterial colonization within blue-green sharpshooter foreguts, and we present experimental data that support the model. These results demonstrate that, in addition to reported protein adhesin-ligand interactions, O antigen is crucial for vector-pathogen interactions, specifically in the acquisition of this destructive agricultural pathogen. PMID:26386068

  14. Synchronous colonic malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad Dasharath Hake

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Synchronous colorectal neoplasias, defined as 2 or more primary tumors identified in the same patient and at the same time, are caused by common genetic and environmental factors. Since intraoperative palpation can miss up to 69% of the SN, currently, synchronous neoplastic lesions are usually diagnosed at a preoperative staging by colonoscopy or virtual colonoscopy; according to data from literature, 3% of the patients with SN are affected by different types of malignant lesions while 33-55% shows villous adenomas. Literature also confirms the presence of primitive synchronous cancers; malignant synchronous lesions are very rare, showing the following incidence: between 0,17% and 0.69% in case of 2-3 synchronous lesions, 0.19% in case of 4-5 synchronous lesions. The most voluminous synchronous cancer is called "first primitive" or "index" cancer. When the index cancer is located in the caecum, the incidence of left colon synchronous cancers is higher than when the index cancer is located in the left colon. Colorectal adenomas standard treatment is usually represented by endoscopic polypectomy; indeed only 5% of synchronous colorectal lesions require a surgical treatment. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(9.000: 4212-4215

  15. The plant pathogenic fungus Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici improves bacterial growth and triggers early gene regulations in the biocontrol strain Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf29Arp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barret, M; Frey-Klett, P; Boutin, M; Guillerm-Erckelboudt, A-Y; Martin, F; Guillot, L; Sarniguet, A

    2009-01-01

    In soil, some antagonistic rhizobacteria contribute to reduce root diseases caused by phytopathogenic fungi. Direct modes of action of these bacteria have been largely explored; however, commensal interaction also takes place between these microorganisms and little is known about the influence of filamentous fungi on bacteria. An in vitro confrontation bioassay between the pathogenic fungus Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici (Ggt) and the biocontrol bacterial strain Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf29Arp was set up to analyse bacterial transcriptional changes induced by the fungal mycelium at three time-points of the interaction before cell contact and up until contact. For this, a Pf29Arp shotgun DNA microarray was constructed. Specifity of Ggt effect was assessed in comparison with one of two other filamentous fungi, Laccaria bicolor and Magnaporthe grisea. During a commensal interaction, Ggt increased the growth rate of Pf29Arp. Before contact, Ggt induced bacterial genes involved in mycelium colonization. At contact, genes encoding protein of stress response and a patatin-like protein were up-regulated. Among all the bacterial genes identified, xseB was specifically up-regulated at contact by Ggt but down-regulated by the other fungi. Data showed that the bacterium sensed the presence of the fungus early, but the main gene alteration occurred during bacterial-fungal cell contact. PMID:19121038

  16. Mucin dynamics in intestinal bacterial infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara K Lindén

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacterial gastroenteritis causes morbidity and mortality in humans worldwide. Murine Citrobacter rodentium infection is a model for gastroenteritis caused by the human pathogens enteropathogenic Escherichia coli and enterohaemorrhagic E. coli. Mucin glycoproteins are the main component of the first barrier that bacteria encounter in the intestinal tract. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using Immunohistochemistry, we investigated intestinal expression of mucins (Alcian blue/PAS, Muc1, Muc2, Muc4, Muc5AC, Muc13 and Muc3/17 in healthy and C. rodentium infected mice. The majority of the C. rodentium infected mice developed systemic infection and colitis in the mid and distal colon by day 12. C. rodentium bound to the major secreted mucin, Muc2, in vitro, and high numbers of bacteria were found in secreted MUC2 in infected animals in vivo, indicating that mucins may limit bacterial access to the epithelial surface. In the small intestine, caecum and proximal colon, the mucin expression was similar in infected and non-infected animals. In the distal colonic epithelium, all secreted and cell surface mucins decreased with the exception of the Muc1 cell surface mucin which increased after infection (p<0.05. Similarly, during human infection Salmonella St Paul, Campylobacter jejuni and Clostridium difficile induced MUC1 in the colon. CONCLUSION: Major changes in both the cell-surface and secreted mucins occur in response to intestinal infection.

  17. Get Tested for Colon Cancer: Here's How

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Local Offices Close + - Text Size Get Tested for Colon Cancer [Video] This free video explains the most commonly ... re like most people, the thought of getting colon cancer or even going for a colon cancer test ...

  18. Explant cultures of human colon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Autrup, Herman; Barrett, L.A.; Jackson, F.E.;

    1978-01-01

    Human colonic epithelium has been cultured as explants in a chemically defined medium for periods of 1 to 20 days. The viability of the explants was shown by the preservation of the ultrastructural features of the colonic epithelial cells and by active incorporation of radioactive precursors...... into cellular DNA and protein. A progressive decrease in the number of goblet cells, decrease in the depth of the crypts, and a change from a columnar to a cuboidal epithelium were observed. After 20 days in culture the colonic mucosa consisted of a single layer of cuboidal epithelial cells and a few glands....... The ability to maintain colonic mucosa in culture was subject to both intra- and interindividual variation. Cultured human colonic mucosa also activated a chemical procarcinogen, benzo[a]pyrene, into metabolites which bound to cellular DNA. A 100-fold interindividual variation in this binding was observed....

  19. Novel antimicrobial peptides that inhibit gram positive bacterial exotoxin synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph A Merriman

    Full Text Available Gram-positive bacteria, such as Staphylococcus aureus, cause serious human illnesses through combinations of surface virulence factors and secretion of exotoxins. Our prior studies using the protein synthesis inhibitor clindamycin and signal transduction inhibitors glycerol monolaurate and α-globin and β-globin chains of hemoglobin indicate that their abilities to inhibit exotoxin production by S. aureus are separable from abilities to inhibit growth of the organism. Additionally, our previous studies suggest that inhibition of exotoxin production, in absence of ability to kill S. aureus and normal flora lactobacilli, will prevent colonization by pathogenic S. aureus, while not interfering with lactobacilli colonization. These disparate activities may be important in development of novel anti-infective agents that do not alter normal flora. We initiated studies to explore the exotoxin-synthesis-inhibition activity of hemoglobin peptides further to develop potential agents to prevent S. aureus infections. We tested synthesized α-globin chain peptides, synthetic variants of α-globin chain peptides, and two human defensins for ability to inhibit exotoxin production without significantly inhibiting S. aureus growth. All of these peptides were weakly or not inhibitory to bacterial growth. However, the peptides were inhibitory to exotoxin production with increasing activity dependent on increasing numbers of positively-charged amino acids. Additionally, the peptides could be immobilized on agarose beads or have amino acid sequences scrambled and still retain exotoxin-synthesis-inhibition. The peptides are not toxic to human vaginal epithelial cells and do not inhibit growth of normal flora L. crispatus. These peptides may interfere with plasma membrane signal transduction in S. aureus due to their positive charges.

  20. [Irritable colon and constipation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyenberger, C

    1993-04-20

    Irritable bowel syndrome is a very common clinical problem with a broad spectrum of severity. The management includes a combination of positive diagnosis of typical symptoms with limited investigations to exclude underlying structural or biochemical disorders. Therapeutic trials focus on the relief of predominant symptoms. Identification and modification of factors exacerbating symptoms, behavioural techniques and pharmacologic agents directed to the presumed gastrointestinal motor dysfunction are required. Psychological support by the physician is the most important part of treatment. Chronic constipation may be the predominant symptom of irritable bowel syndrome. Underlying organic disorders must be excluded by clinical examination and endoscopy. Severe chronic constipation requires further investigation of colonic motility and defecation. High fibre diet, osmotic laxatives and procinetic agents may lead to an improvement. In rare cases surgery may be indicated. PMID:8488351

  1. Early changes in microbial colonization selectively modulate intestinal enzymes, but not inducible heat shock proteins in young adult Swine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Edith Arnal

    Full Text Available Metabolic diseases and obesity are developing worldwide in a context of plethoric intake of high energy diets. The intestine may play a pivotal role due to diet-induced alterations in microbiota composition and increased permeability to bacterial lipopolysaccharide inducing metabolic inflammation. Early programming of metabolic disorders appearing in later life is also suspected, but data on the intestine are lacking. Therefore, we hypothesized that early disturbances in microbial colonization have short- and long-lasting consequences on selected intestinal components including key digestive enzymes and protective inducible heat shock proteins (HSP. The hypothesis was tested in swine offspring born to control mothers (n = 12 or mothers treated with the antibiotic amoxicillin around parturition (n = 11, and slaughtered serially at 14, 28 and 42 days of age to assess short-term effects. To evaluate long-term consequences, young adult offspring from the same litters were offered a normal or a fat-enriched diet for 4 weeks between 140 and 169 days of age and were then slaughtered. Amoxicillin treatment transiently modified both mother and offspring microbiota. This was associated with early but transient reduction in ileal alkaline phosphatase, HSP70 (but not HSP27 and crypt depth, suggesting a milder or delayed intestinal response to bacteria in offspring born to antibiotic-treated mothers. More importantly, we disclosed long-term consequences of this treatment on jejunal alkaline phosphatase (reduced and jejunal and ileal dipeptidylpeptidase IV (increased and decreased, respectively of offspring born to antibiotic-treated dams. Significant interactions between early antibiotic treatment and later diet were observed for jejunal alkaline phosphatase and sucrase. By contrast, inducible HSPs were not affected. In conclusion, our data suggest that early changes in bacterial colonization not only modulate intestinal architecture and function transiently

  2. Diverticular Disease of the Colon: Neuromuscular Function Abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassotti, Gabrio; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Bernardini, Nunzia; Dore, Maria P

    2016-10-01

    Colonic diverticular disease is a frequent finding in daily clinical practice. However, its pathophysiological mechanisms are largely unknown. This condition is likely the result of several concomitant factors occurring together to cause anatomic and functional abnormalities, leading as a result to the outpouching of the colonic mucosa. A pivotal role seems to be played by an abnormal colonic neuromuscular function, as shown repeatedly in these patients, and by an altered visceral perception. There is recent evidence that these abnormalities might be related to the derangement of the enteric innervation, to an abnormal distribution of mucosal neuropeptides, and to low-grade mucosal inflammation. The latter might be responsible for the development of visceral hypersensitivity, often causing abdominal pain in a subset of these patients. PMID:27622368

  3. Crohn's disease: ultrastructure of interstitial cells in colonic myenteric plexus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, Jüri J; Vanderwinden, Jean-Marie; Horn, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The role of the interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) in chronic inflammatory bowel disease, i.e., ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), remains unclear. Ultrastructural alterations in ICC in the colonic myenteric plexus (ICC-MP) have been reported previously in UC, but descriptions of ICC......-MP and other interstitial cells in the myenteric region of the colon are lacking for CD. In the present study, we characterized the ultrastructure of interstitial cells, nerves, and glial cells in the myenteric region in Crohn's colitis (CC). In comparison with controls, varicosities of the myenteric bundles......-MP were similar in the various colonic regions. ICC-MP in CC showed no signs of degeneration or cytological changes. As in controls, fibroblast-like cells had abundant coated vesicles but lacked prominent intermediate filaments and caveolae. Macrophages also appeared as in controls. In comparison with ICC...

  4. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jan; Bures; Jiri; Cyrany; Darina; Kohoutova; Miroslav; Frstl; Stanislav; Rejchrt; Jaroslav; Kvetina; Viktor; Vorisek; Marcela; Kopacova

    2010-01-01

    Human intestinal microbiota create a complex polymi-crobial ecology. This is characterised by its high population density, wide diversity and complexity of interaction. Any dysbalance of this complex intestinal microbiome, both qualitative and quantitative, might have serious health consequence for a macro-organism, including small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome (SIBO).SIBO is defined as an increase in the number and/or alteration in the type of bacteria in the upper gastro-intestinal tract. There...

  5. Immunization by a bacterial aerosol

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia-Contreras, Lucila; Wong, Yun-Ling; Muttil, Pavan; Padilla, Danielle; Sadoff, Jerry; DeRousse, Jessica; Germishuizen, Willem Andreas; Goonesekera, Sunali; Elbert, Katharina; Bloom, Barry R.; Miller, Rich; Fourie, P. Bernard; Hickey, Anthony; Edwards, David

    2008-01-01

    By manufacturing a single-particle system in two particulate forms (i.e., micrometer size and nanometer size), we have designed a bacterial vaccine form that exhibits improved efficacy of immunization. Microstructural properties are adapted to alter dispersive and aerosol properties independently. Dried “nanomicroparticle” vaccines possess two axes of nanoscale dimensions and a third axis of micrometer dimension; the last one permits effective micrometer-like physical dispersion, and the form...

  6. Bacterial acquisition in juveniles of several broadcast spawning coral species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koty H Sharp

    Full Text Available Coral animals harbor diverse microorganisms in their tissues, including archaea, bacteria, viruses, and zooxanthellae. The extent to which coral-bacterial associations are specific and the mechanisms for their maintenance across generations in the environment are unknown. The high diversity of bacteria in adult coral colonies has made it challenging to identify species-specific patterns. Localization of bacteria in gametes and larvae of corals presents an opportunity for determining when bacterial-coral associations are initiated and whether they are dynamic throughout early development. This study focuses on the early onset of bacterial associations in the mass spawning corals Montastraea annularis, M. franksi, M. faveolata, Acropora palmata, A. cervicornis, Diploria strigosa, and A. humilis. The presence of bacteria and timing of bacterial colonization was evaluated in gametes, swimming planulae, and newly settled polyps by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH using general eubacterial probes and laser-scanning confocal microscopy. The coral species investigated in this study do not appear to transmit bacteria via their gametes, and bacteria are not detectable in or on the corals until after settlement and metamorphosis. This study suggests that mass-spawning corals do not acquire, or are not colonized by, detectable numbers of bacteria until after larval settlement and development of the juvenile polyp. This timing lays the groundwork for developing and testing new hypotheses regarding general regulatory mechanisms that control bacterial colonization and infection of corals, and how interactions among bacteria and juvenile polyps influence the structure of bacterial assemblages in corals.

  7. Colon interposition for oesophageal replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Pascal A; Gilardoni, Adrian; Trousse, Delphine; D'Journo, Xavier B; Avaro, Jean-Philippe; Doddoli, Christophe; Giudicelli, Roger; Fuentes, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    The choice of the colon as an oesophageal substitute results primarily from the unavailability of the stomach. However, given its durability and function, colon interposition keeps elective indications in patients with benign or malignant oesophageal disease who are potential candidates for long survival. The choice of the colonic portion used for oesophageal reconstruction depends on the required length of the graft, and the encountered colonic vascular anatomy, the last being characterised by the near-invariability of the left colonic vessels, in contrast to the vascular pattern of the right side of the colon. Accordingly, the transverse colon with all or part of the ascending colon is the substitute of choice, positioned in the isoperistaltic direction, and supplied either from the left colic vessels for long grafts or middle colic vessels for shorter grafts. Technical key points are: full mobilisation of the entire colon, identification of the main colonic vessels and collaterals, and a prolonged clamping test to ensure the permeability of the chosen nourishing pedicle. Transposition through the posterior mediastinum in the oesophageal bed is the shortest one and thereby offers the best functional results. When the oesophageal bed is not available, the retrosternal route is the preferred alternative option. The food bolus travelling mainly by gravity makes straightness of the conduit of paramount importance. The proximal anastomosis is a single-layer hand-fashioned end-to-end anastomosis to prevent narrowing. When the stomach is available, the distal anastomosis is best performed at the posterior part of the antrum for the reasons of pedicle positioning and reflux prevention, and a gastric drainage procedure is added when the oesophagus and vagus nerves have been removed. In the other cases, a Roux-en-Y jejunal loop is preferable to prevent bile reflux into the colon. Additional procedures include re-establishment of the colonic continuity, a careful closure of

  8. The microbial metabolites, short chain fatty acids, regulate colonic Treg cell homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Patrick M.; Howitt, Michael R.; Panikov, Nicolai; Michaud, Monia; Gallini, Carey Ann; Bohlooly-Y, Mohammad; Glickman, Jonathan N.; Wendy S. Garrett

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) that express the transcription factor Foxp3 are critical for regulating intestinal inflammation. Candidate microbe approaches have identified bacterial species and strain-specific molecules that can affect intestinal immune responses, including species that modulate Treg responses. Because neither all humans nor mice harbor the same bacterial strains, we posited that more prevalent factors exist that regulate the number and function of colonic Tregs. We determined t...

  9. Bacterial Hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauga, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria predate plants and animals by billions of years. Today, they are the world's smallest cells, yet they represent the bulk of the world's biomass and the main reservoir of nutrients for higher organisms. Most bacteria can move on their own, and the majority of motile bacteria are able to swim in viscous fluids using slender helical appendages called flagella. Low-Reynolds number hydrodynamics is at the heart of the ability of flagella to generate propulsion at the micrometer scale. In fact, fluid dynamic forces impact many aspects of bacteriology, ranging from the ability of cells to reorient and search their surroundings to their interactions within mechanically and chemically complex environments. Using hydrodynamics as an organizing framework, I review the biomechanics of bacterial motility and look ahead to future challenges.

  10. Bacterial hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Lauga, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria predate plants and animals by billions of years. Today, they are the world's smallest cells yet they represent the bulk of the world's biomass, and the main reservoir of nutrients for higher organisms. Most bacteria can move on their own, and the majority of motile bacteria are able to swim in viscous fluids using slender helical appendages called flagella. Low-Reynolds-number hydrodynamics is at the heart of the ability of flagella to generate propulsion at the micron scale. In fact, fluid dynamic forces impact many aspects of bacteriology, ranging from the ability of cells to reorient and search their surroundings to their interactions within mechanically and chemically-complex environments. Using hydrodynamics as an organizing framework, we review the biomechanics of bacterial motility and look ahead to future challenges.

  11. Older age and dietary folate are determinants of genomic and p16-specific DNA methylation in mouse colon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder age and inadequate folate intake are strongly implicated as important risk factors for colon cancer, and each is associated with altered DNA methylation. This study was designed to determine the effect of aging and dietary folate on select features of DNA methylation in the colon that are rele...

  12. Trefoil factor-3 expression in human colon cancer liver metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babyatsky, Mark; Lin, Jing; Yio, Xianyang; Chen, Anli; Zhang, Jie-yu; Zheng, Yan; Twyman, Christina; Bao, Xiuliang; Schwartz, Myron; Thung, Swan; Lawrence Werther, J; Itzkowitz, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Deaths from colorectal cancer are often due to liver metastasis. Trefoil factor-3 (TFF3) is expressed by normal intestinal epithelial cells and its expression is maintained throughout the colon adenoma-carcinoma sequence. Our previous work demonstrated a correlation between TFF3 expression and metastatic potential in an animal model of colon cancer. The aim of this study was to determine whether TFF3 is expressed in human colon cancer liver metastasis (CCLM) and whether inhibiting TFF3 expression in colon cancer cells would alter their invasive potential in vitro. Human CCLMs were analyzed at the mRNA and protein level for TFF3 expression. Two highly metastatic rat colon cancer cell lines that either natively express TFF3 (LN cells) or were transfected with TFF3 (LPCRI-2 cells), were treated with two rat TFF3 siRNA constructs (si78 and si365), and analyzed in an in vitro invasion assay. At the mRNA and protein level, TFF3 was expressed in 17/17 (100%) CCLMs and 10/11 (91%) primary colon cancers, but not in normal liver tissue. By real time PCR, TFF3 expression was markedly inhibited by both siRNA constructs in LN and LPCRI-2 cells. The si365 and si78 constructs inhibited invasion by 44% and 53%, respectively, in LN cells, and by 74% and 50%, respectively, in LPCRI-2 cells. These results provide further evidence that TFF3 contributes to the malignant behavior of colon cancer cells. These observations may have relevance for designing new diagnostic and treatment approaches to colorectal cancer.

  13. Colonic lymphangiomatosis associated with anemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Woo Chul Chung; Hye-Kang Kim; Jin Young Yoo; Jeong Rok Lee; Kang-Moon Lee; Chang Nyol Paik; U-Im Jang; Jin Mo Yang

    2008-01-01

    lymphangioma is an uncommon malformation of lymphatic system.Multiple colonic lymphangioma named as lymphangiomatosis is considered an extremely rare disease.Although lymphangioma is a benign tumor and most colonic lymphangiomas do not cause symptoms and do not require treatment,resection of lymphangioma is necessary in the presence of symptoms such as abdominal pain,bleeding,intussusceptions.We report a case of colonic lymphangiomatosis in a man who presented with abdominal discomfort and anemia,which was diagnosed and treated with endoscopic snare polyperctomy.

  14. Gradient Gel Electrophoresis in a Patient With Recurrent Bacterial Vaginosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estelle Devillard

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective:Gardnerella vaginalis has long been the most common pathogen associated with bacterial vaginosis (BV. We aimed to test our hypothesis that symptoms and signs of BV do not necessarily indicate colonization by this organism, and often will not respond to standard metronidazole or clindamycin treatment.

  15. Citrobacter rodentium mouse model of bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crepin, Valerie F; Collins, James W; Habibzay, Maryam; Frankel, Gad

    2016-10-01

    Infection of mice with Citrobacter rodentium is a robust model to study bacterial pathogenesis, mucosal immunology, the health benefits of probiotics and the role of the microbiota during infection. C. rodentium was first isolated by Barthold from an outbreak of mouse diarrhea in Yale University in 1972 and was 'rediscovered' by Falkow and Schauer in 1993. Since then the use of the model has proliferated, and it is now the gold standard for studying virulence of the closely related human pathogens enteropathogenic and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EPEC and EHEC, respectively). Here we provide a detailed protocol for various applications of the model, including bacterial growth, site-directed mutagenesis, mouse inoculation (from cultured cells and after cohabitation), monitoring of bacterial colonization, tissue extraction and analysis, immune responses, probiotic treatment and microbiota analysis. The main protocol, from mouse infection to clearance and analysis of tissues and host responses, takes ∼5 weeks to complete. PMID:27606775

  16. Gut microbes promote colonic serotonin production through an effect of short-chain fatty acids on enterochromaffin cells

    OpenAIRE

    Reigstad, Christopher S; Salmonson, Charles E.; Rainey, John F.; Szurszewski, Joseph H.; Linden, David R.; Sonnenburg, Justin L.; Farrugia, Gianrico; Kashyap, Purna C.

    2014-01-01

    Gut microbiota alterations have been described in several diseases with altered gastrointestinal (GI) motility, and awareness is increasing regarding the role of the gut microbiome in modulating GI function. Serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] is a key regulator of GI motility and secretion. To determine the relationship among gut microbes, colonic contractility, and host serotonergic gene expression, we evaluated mice that were germ-free (GF) or humanized (HM; ex-GF colonized with human g...

  17. Colon polyps and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronborg, O

    2004-01-01

    Screening for colorectal neoplasia still is the best method of reducing the mortality due to colorectal cancer, and it is to be hoped that fecal occult blood test programs will expand in the near future and be combined with appropriate endoscopy. There are substantial problems with compliance in large programs with occult blood tests as well as endoscopy. Colonography and DNA testing in feces are not yet suitable for population screening. Diagnostic strategies in symptomatic patients are becoming more selective, in the hope of avoiding many superfluous examinations without increasing the risk of missing cancers. New results have confirmed the preventive effect of long-term aspirin use on adenoma recurrence, but the most cost-effective dosage is not clear; the mechanism of action is also uncertain, but seems to involve cyclooxygenase-2. The risk of adenomas does not appear to be associated with low consumption of folate, but with low intake of fiber. A number of biomarkers have been evaluated in polyp patients, but so far surveillance is still based on endoscopic experience, which is less than optimal. Attempts have been made to restrict the number of surveillance endoscopies and reduce the pathologist's workload. The place of argon plasma coagulation has been clearly defined in connection with piecemeal removal of large sessile adenomas. Advances have been achieved in surgery and radiotherapy for rectal cancer, and acute surgery for colonic cancer with severe obstruction will be less common after the introduction of the metal stent. PMID:14722849

  18. Small molecule control of bacterial biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthington, Roberta J; Richards, Justin J; Melander, Christian

    2012-10-01

    Bacterial biofilms are defined as a surface attached community of bacteria embedded in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances that they have produced. When in the biofilm state, bacteria are more resistant to antibiotics and the host immune response than are their planktonic counterparts. Biofilms are increasingly recognized as being significant in human disease, accounting for 80% of bacterial infections in the body and diseases associated with bacterial biofilms include: lung infections of cystic fibrosis patients, colitis, urethritis, conjunctivitis, otitis, endocarditis and periodontitis. Additionally, biofilm infections of indwelling medical devices are of particular concern, as once the device is colonized infection is virtually impossible to eradicate. Given the prominence of biofilms in infectious diseases, there has been an increased effort toward the development of small molecules that will modulate bacterial biofilm development and maintenance. In this review, we highlight the development of small molecules that inhibit and/or disperse bacterial biofilms through non-microbicidal mechanisms. The review discuses the numerous approaches that have been applied to the discovery of lead small molecules that mediate biofilm development. These approaches are grouped into: (1) the identification and development of small molecules that target one of the bacterial signaling pathways involved in biofilm regulation, (2) chemical library screening for compounds with anti-biofilm activity, and (3) the identification of natural products that possess anti-biofilm activity, and the chemical manipulation of these natural products to obtain analogues with increased activity. PMID:22733439

  19. Colon Cleansing: Health or Hype?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Testing? Bugging my dad to save his life Music Therapy Helps People With Cancer Diary of a colon ... Cancer Patients Health Literacy Tests Underutilized; May Improve Elderly Cancer Patients’ Care and Outcomes Majority of Nurses ...

  20. Bacterial Metabolism Shapes the Host-Pathogen Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passalacqua, Karla D; Charbonneau, Marie-Eve; O'Riordan, Mary X D

    2016-06-01

    Bacterial pathogens have evolved to exploit humans as a rich source of nutrients to support survival and replication. The pathways of bacterial metabolism that permit successful colonization are surprisingly varied and highlight remarkable metabolic flexibility. The constraints and immune pressures of distinct niches within the human body set the stage for understanding the mechanisms by which bacteria acquire critical nutrients. In this article we discuss how different bacterial pathogens carry out carbon and energy metabolism in the host and how they obtain or use key nutrients for replication and immune evasion. PMID:27337445

  1. Desulfovibrio bacterial species are increased in ulcerative colitis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rowan, Fiachra

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Debate persists regarding the role of Desulfovibrio subspecies in ulcerative colitis. Combined microscopic and molecular techniques enable this issue to be investigated by allowing precise enumeration of specific bacterial species within the colonic mucous gel. The aim of this study was to combine laser capture microdissection and quantitative polymerase chain reaction to determine Desulfovibrio copy number in crypt-associated mucous gel in health and in acute and chronic ulcerative colitis. METHODS: Colonic mucosal biopsies were harvested from healthy controls (n = 19) and patients with acute (n = 10) or chronic (n = 10) ulcerative colitis. Crypt-associated mucous gel was obtained by laser capture microdissection throughout the colon. Pan-bacterial 16S rRNA and Desulfovibrio copy number\\/mm were obtained by polymerase chain reaction at each locus. Bacterial copy numbers were interrogated for correlation with location and disease activity. Data were evaluated using a combination of ordinary linear methods and linear mixed-effects models to cater for multiple interactions. RESULTS: Desulfovibrio positivity was significantly increased in acute and chronic ulcerative colitis at multiple levels within the colon, and after normalization with total bacterial signal, the relative Desulfovibrio load was increased in acute colitis compared with controls. Desulfovibrio counts did not significantly correlate with age, disease duration, or disease activity but interlevel correlations were found in adjacent colonic segments in the healthy control and chronic ulcerative colitis groups. CONCLUSION: The presence of Desulfovibrio subspecies is increased in ulcerative colitis and the data presented suggest that these bacteria represent an increased percentage of the colonic microbiome in acute ulcerative colitis.

  2. E Durans Strain M4-5 Isolated From Human Colonic Flora Attenuates Intestinal Inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avram-Hananel, L.; Stock, J.; Parlesak, Alexandr;

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro and in vivo effects of a unique high-butyrate-producing bacterial strain from human colonic flora, Enterococcus durans, in prevention and treatment of intestinal inflammation. METHODS: A compartmentalized Caco-2/leukocyte coculture model was...

  3. Mono-colonization with Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM affects the intestinal metabolome in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roager, Henrik Munch; Sulek, Karolina; Skov, Kasper;

    Mono-colonization of germ-free (GF) mice enables the study of specific bacterial species in vivo. Lactobacillus acidophilus is a probiotic strain, however many of the mechanisms behind its health-promoting effect remain unsolved. Here, we studied the effects of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFMTM...

  4. Klebsiella pneumoniae capsule expression is necessary for colonization of large intestines of streptomycin-treated mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Favre-Bonte, S.; Licht, Tine Rask; Forestier, C.;

    1999-01-01

    The role of the Klebsiella pneumoniae capsular polysaccharide (K antigen) during colonization of the mouse large intestine was assessed with mild-type K. pneumoniae LM21 and its isogenic capsule-defective mutant. When bacterial strains were fed alone to mice, the capsulated bacteria persisted....... pneumoniae....

  5. Human commensals producing a novel antibiotic impair pathogen colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipperer, Alexander; Konnerth, Martin C; Laux, Claudia; Berscheid, Anne; Janek, Daniela; Weidenmaier, Christopher; Burian, Marc; Schilling, Nadine A; Slavetinsky, Christoph; Marschal, Matthias; Willmann, Matthias; Kalbacher, Hubert; Schittek, Birgit; Brötz-Oesterhelt, Heike; Grond, Stephanie; Peschel, Andreas; Krismer, Bernhard

    2016-07-28

    The vast majority of systemic bacterial infections are caused by facultative, often antibiotic-resistant, pathogens colonizing human body surfaces. Nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus predisposes to invasive infection, but the mechanisms that permit or interfere with pathogen colonization are largely unknown. Whereas soil microbes are known to compete by production of antibiotics, such processes have rarely been reported for human microbiota. We show that nasal Staphylococcus lugdunensis strains produce lugdunin, a novel thiazolidine-containing cyclic peptide antibiotic that prohibits colonization by S. aureus, and a rare example of a non-ribosomally synthesized bioactive compound from human-associated bacteria. Lugdunin is bactericidal against major pathogens, effective in animal models, and not prone to causing development of resistance in S. aureus. Notably, human nasal colonization by S. lugdunensis was associated with a significantly reduced S. aureus carriage rate, suggesting that lugdunin or lugdunin-producing commensal bacteria could be valuable for preventing staphylococcal infections. Moreover, human microbiota should be considered as a source for new antibiotics. PMID:27466123

  6. Differential Colonization Dynamics of Cucurbit Hosts by Erwinia tracheiphila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrisman, Cláudio M; Deblais, Loïc; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Miller, Sally A

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial wilt is one of the most destructive diseases of cucurbits in the Midwestern and Northeastern United States. Although the disease has been studied since 1900, host colonization dynamics remain unclear. Cucumis- and Cucurbita-derived strains exhibit host preference for the cucurbit genus from which they were isolated. We constructed a bioluminescent strain of Erwinia tracheiphila (TedCu10-BL#9) and colonization of different cucurbit hosts was monitored. At the second-true-leaf stage, Cucumis melo plants were inoculated with TedCu10-BL#9 via wounded leaves, stems, and roots. Daily monitoring of colonization showed bioluminescent bacteria in the inoculated leaf and petiole beginning 1 day postinoculation (DPI). The bacteria spread to roots via the stem by 2 DPI, reached the plant extremities 4 DPI, and the plant wilted 6 DPI. However, Cucurbita plants inoculated with TedCu10-BL#9 did not wilt, even at 35 DPI. Bioluminescent bacteria were detected 6 DPI in the main stem of squash and pumpkin plants, which harbored approximately 10(4) and 10(1) CFU/g, respectively, of TedCu10-BL#9 without symptoms. Although significantly less systemic plant colonization was observed in nonpreferred host Cucurbita plants compared with preferred hosts, the mechanism of tolerance of Cucurbita plants to E. tracheiphila strains from Cucumis remains unknown.

  7. [Lactobacilli and colon carcinoma--A review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shumei; Zhang, Lanwei; Shan, Yujuan

    2015-06-01

    Epidemiological studies showed that incidence of colon carcinoma is increased in the world. There are many difficulties to inhibit colon carcinoma because the causes of inducing colon carcinoma were various and interactive each other. Previous evidence supported the balance of the colonic microflora was critical in inhibiting colon carcinoma and the protection by colonic microflora could be improved by ingesting lactobacilli. Therefore, the biological functions and anticancer effects of lactobacilli attract attention of researchers. In this review we discussed the causes of colon carcinoma; the anticancer mechanisms of lactobacilli on the basis of our own studies. Eventually, we summarized the effects of anticancer of different components and metabolic products extracted from lactobacilli.

  8. Smectite alteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains the proceedings of a second workshop in Washington DC December 8-9, 1983 on the alteration of smectites intended for use as buffer materials in the long-term containment of nuclear wastes. It includes extended summaries of all presentations and a transcript of the detailed scientific discussion. The discussions centered on three main questions: What is the prerequisite for and what is the precise mechanism by which smectite clays may be altered to illite. What are likly sources of potassium with respect to the KBS project. Is it likely that the conversion of smectite to illite will be of importance in the 10 5 to the 10 6 year time frame. The workshop was convened to review considerations and conclusions in connection to these questions and also to broaden the discussion to consider the use of smectite clays as buffer materials for similar applications in different geographical and geological settings. SKBF/KBS technical report 83-03 contains the proceedings from the first workshop on these matters that was held at the State University of New York, Buffalo May 26-27, 1982. (Author)

  9. Survey of bacterial diversity in chronic wounds using Pyrosequencing, DGGE, and full ribosome shotgun sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Wolcott Benjamin M; Rhoads Daniel D; Secor Patrick R; Sun Yan; Dowd Scot E; James Garth A; Wolcott Randall D

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Chronic wound pathogenic biofilms are host-pathogen environments that colonize and exist as a cohabitation of many bacterial species. These bacterial populations cooperate to promote their own survival and the chronic nature of the infection. Few studies have performed extensive surveys of the bacterial populations that occur within different types of chronic wound biofilms. The use of 3 separate16S-based molecular amplifications followed by pyrosequencing, shotgun Sanger ...

  10. Stimulation of colonic mucosal growth associated with oxidized redox status in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Junqiang; Washizawa, Naohiro; Gu, Li H; Levin, Marc S; Wang, Lihua; Rubin, Deborah C; Mwangi, Simon; Srinivasan, Shanthi; Gao, Yuhao; Jones, Dean P; Ziegler, Thomas R

    2007-03-01

    Limited data in animal models suggest that colonic mucosa undergoes adaptive growth following massive small bowel resection (SBR). In vitro data suggest that intestinal cell growth is regulated by reactive oxygen species and redox couples [e.g., glutathione (GSH)/glutathione disulfide (GSSG) and cysteine (Cys)/cystine (CySS) redox]. We investigated the effects of SBR and alterations in redox on colonic growth indexes in rats after either small bowel transection (TX) or 80% midjejunoileal resection (RX). Rats were pair fed +/- blockade of endogenous GSH synthesis with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO). Indexes of colonic growth, proliferation, and apoptosis and GSH/GSSG and Cys/CySS redox potentials (E(h)) were determined. RX significantly increased colonic crypt depth, number of cells per crypt, and epithelial cell proliferation [crypt cell bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation]. Administration of BSO markedly decreased colonic mucosal GSH, GSSG, and Cys concentrations in both TX and RX groups, with a resultant oxidation of GSH/GSSG and Cys/CySS E(h). BSO did not alter colonic crypt cell apoptosis but significantly increased all colonic mucosal growth indexes (crypt depth, cells/crypt, and BrdU incorporation) in both TX and RX groups in a time- and dose-dependent manner. BSO significantly decreased plasma GSH and GSSG, oxidized GSH/GSSG E(h), and increased plasma Cys and CySS concentrations. Collectively, these data provide in vivo evidence indicating that oxidized colonic mucosal redox status stimulates colonic mucosal growth in rats. The data also suggest that GSH is required to maintain normal colonic and plasma Cys/CySS homeostasis in these animal models.

  11. Colonization and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The environmental results of the colonization, process and their consequences are analyzed in the local, national and international order, the activities through which the acts on the means and the nature of these. It is examined the meaning of the sustainable development, the phenomenon of the exhaustion of the ecosystems and their responsible ones. It discusses the importance of the Orinoquia in the mark of the environmental problems in the international order, the region has been intensely exploded by means of intensive production systems, what has led to the exhaustion of these areas in the world environment. The colonist's paper is exposed in the environmental deterioration, in front of the function of the tropical humid forest and it confirms a focus that it approaches the environmental problem from a perspective that makes emphasis in the social component of that problem, in opposition to the conservators where the ecosystem is the only valid reason and the social groups that intervene him, they should simply disappear. It is necessary the necessity to focus of integral way, the colonist's nature like element of a social group, the list that completes in the mark of the nation and their development model, the political economic system and the nationality inside which makes their economic decisions and of production. It is recognized that they are not enough solutions of technical order to impact on the use and sustainable handling of the Orinoquia, but rather it should be contemplated the economic, social, environmental and political aspects of the problem simultaneously, as well as the growing and resolved participation of the social group in their group

  12. Crohn's disease of the colon: ultrastructural changes in submuscular interstitial cells of Cajal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, Jüri J; Vanderwinden, Jean-Marie; Horn, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) at the submuscular border of the human colon (ICC-SMP) are the proposed pacemaker cells of the musculature. In patients with Crohn's disease (CD) of the colon, ICC-SMP showed characteristic cytological changes from controls. The changes comprised secondary...... but were also demonstrable in uninvolved colonic segments. Relationships of ICC to other cells were undisturbed. The changes were selective to ICC-SMP, as glial cells, muscle cells and fibroblast-like cells at the submuscular border showed no cytological alterations compared with controls. Varicosities...

  13. Ca2+ response in neutrophils after exposure to bacterial N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine: delayed response in ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vainer, Ben; Lamberth, Kasper; Brimnes, Jens;

    2003-01-01

    In acute stages of ulcerative colitis (UC), neutrophils migrate from the circulation into inflamed colonic tissue, initiated by yet unknown stimuli. The bacterial peptide N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) is a component of the surface membrane of colonic bacteria such as Escherichia...

  14. Long-term alteration of intestinal microbiota in patients with ulcerative colitis by antibiotic combination therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koido, Shigeo; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Kajiura, Takayuki; Shinozaki, Junko; Suzuki, Manabu; Saito, Keisuke; Takakura, Kazuki; Tsukinaga, Shintaro; Odahara, Shunichi; Yukawa, Toyokazu; Mitobe, Jimi; Kajihara, Mikio; Uchiyama, Kan; Arakawa, Hiroshi; Tajiri, Hisao

    2014-01-01

    Previous work has demonstrated that intestinal bacteria, such as Fusobacterium varium (F. varium), contribute to the clinical activity in ulcerative colitis (UC); thus, an antibiotic combination therapy (amoxicillin, tetracycline, and metronidazole (ATM)) against F. varium can induce and maintain UC remission. Therefore, we investigated whether ATM therapy induces a long-term alteration of intestinal microbiota in patients with UC. Patients with UC were enrolled in a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Biopsy samples at the beginning of the trial and again at 3 months after treatment completion were randomly obtained from 20 patients. The terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) in mucosa-associated bacterial components was examined to assess the alteration of the intestinal microbiota. Profile changes of T-RFLP in mucosa-associated bacterial components were found in 10 of 12 patients in the treatment group and in none of 8 in the placebo group. Dice similarity coefficients using the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic averages (Dice-UPGMA) confirmed that the similarity of mucosal microbiota from the descending colon was significantly decreased after the ATM therapy, and this change was maintained for at least 3 months. Moreover, at 3 months after treatment completion, the F. varium/β-actin ratio, examined by real-time PCR using nested PCR products from biopsy samples, was reduced less than 40% in 8 of 12 treated patients, which was higher, but not significantly, than in 4 of 8 patients in the placebo group. Together, these results suggest that ATM therapy induces long-term alterations in the intestinal microbiota of patients with UC, which may be associated, at least in part, with clinical effects of the therapy. PMID:24489770

  15. Long-term alteration of intestinal microbiota in patients with ulcerative colitis by antibiotic combination therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeo Koido

    Full Text Available Previous work has demonstrated that intestinal bacteria, such as Fusobacterium varium (F. varium, contribute to the clinical activity in ulcerative colitis (UC; thus, an antibiotic combination therapy (amoxicillin, tetracycline, and metronidazole (ATM against F. varium can induce and maintain UC remission. Therefore, we investigated whether ATM therapy induces a long-term alteration of intestinal microbiota in patients with UC. Patients with UC were enrolled in a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Biopsy samples at the beginning of the trial and again at 3 months after treatment completion were randomly obtained from 20 patients. The terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP in mucosa-associated bacterial components was examined to assess the alteration of the intestinal microbiota. Profile changes of T-RFLP in mucosa-associated bacterial components were found in 10 of 12 patients in the treatment group and in none of 8 in the placebo group. Dice similarity coefficients using the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic averages (Dice-UPGMA confirmed that the similarity of mucosal microbiota from the descending colon was significantly decreased after the ATM therapy, and this change was maintained for at least 3 months. Moreover, at 3 months after treatment completion, the F. varium/β-actin ratio, examined by real-time PCR using nested PCR products from biopsy samples, was reduced less than 40% in 8 of 12 treated patients, which was higher, but not significantly, than in 4 of 8 patients in the placebo group. Together, these results suggest that ATM therapy induces long-term alterations in the intestinal microbiota of patients with UC, which may be associated, at least in part, with clinical effects of the therapy.

  16. Helicobacter pylori arginase mutant colonizes arginase Ⅱ knockout mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Songhee H Kim; Melanie L Langford; Jean-Luc Boucher; Traci L Testerman; David J McGee

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of host and bacterial argi-nases in the colonization of mice by Helicobacter pylori (H. Pylori).METHODS: H. Pylori produces a very powerful urease that hydrolyzes urea to carbon dioxide and ammonium, which neutralizes acid. Urease is absolutely essential to H. Pylori pathogenesis; therefore, the urea substrate must be in ample supply for urease to work efficiently. The urea substrate is most likely provided by arginase activity, which hydrolyzes L-arginine to L-ornithine and urea. Previous work has demonstrated that H. Pylori arginase is surprisingly not required for colonization of wild-type mice. Hence, another in vivo source of the critical urea substrate must exist. We hypothesized that the urea source was provided by host arginase Ⅱ, since this enzyme is expressed in the stomach, and H. Pylori has previously been shown to induce the expres-sion of murine gastric arginase Ⅱ. To test this hypoth-esis, wild-type and arginase (rocF) mutant H. Pylori strain SS1 were inoculated into arginase Ⅱ knockout mice. RESULTS: Surprisingly, both the wild-type and rocF mutant bacteria still colonized arginase Ⅱ knock-out mice. Moreover, feeding arginase Ⅱ knockout mice the host arginase inhibitor S-(2-boronoethyl)-L-cysteine (BEC), while inhibiting > 50% of the host arginase Ⅰactivity in several tissues, did not block the ability of the rocF mutant H. Pylori to colonize. In con-trast, BEC poorly inhibited H. Pylori arginase activity. CONCLUSION: The in vivo source for the essential urea utilized by H. Pylori urease is neither bacterial arginase nor host arginase Ⅱ; instead, either residual host arginase Ⅰor agmatinase is probably responsible.

  17. Bacteria from diverse habitats colonize and compete in the mouse gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seedorf, Henning; Griffin, Nicholas W; Ridaura, Vanessa K; Reyes, Alejandro; Cheng, Jiye; Rey, Federico E; Smith, Michelle I; Simon, Gabriel M; Scheffrahn, Rudolf H; Woebken, Dagmar; Spormann, Alfred M; Van Treuren, William; Ursell, Luke K; Pirrung, Megan; Robbins-Pianka, Adam; Cantarel, Brandi L; Lombard, Vincent; Henrissat, Bernard; Knight, Rob; Gordon, Jeffrey I

    2014-10-01

    To study how microbes establish themselves in a mammalian gut environment, we colonized germ-free mice with microbial communities from human, zebrafish, and termite guts, human skin and tongue, soil, and estuarine microbial mats. Bacteria from these foreign environments colonized and persisted in the mouse gut; their capacity to metabolize dietary and host carbohydrates and bile acids correlated with colonization success. Cohousing mice harboring these xenomicrobiota or a mouse cecal microbiota, along with germ-free "bystanders," revealed the success of particular bacterial taxa in invading guts with established communities and empty gut habitats. Unanticipated patterns of ecological succession were observed; for example, a soil-derived bacterium dominated even in the presence of bacteria from other gut communities (zebrafish and termite), and human-derived bacteria colonized germ-free bystander mice before mouse-derived organisms. This approach can be generalized to address a variety of mechanistic questions about succession, including succession in the context of microbiota-directed therapeutics.

  18. Effects of discontinuing cover gowns on a postpartal ward upon cord colonization of the newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaud, M T

    1983-01-01

    To determine if the incidence of bacterial cord colonization in neonates increased when cover gowns were discontinued on a postpartal ward, a study was conducted. All infants who were admitted to and discharged from the well infant nursery at an Army medical center in Denver, Colorado, were cultured at the umbilicus at the time of admission and at discharge. The control group (N = 74) continued to gown as usual; the experimental group (N = 50) did not wear gowns. Visitors in both groups received the same instructions regarding handwashing. For all organisms, the control group demonstrated 80% colonization of infants who were negative on admission, and the experimental group demonstrated a colonization rate of 62%. When the chi square is applied, these data are statistically significant for P = 0.02 and P = 0.05. The experimental group had less colonization than the control group.

  19. Molecular mechanisms linking adipokines to obesity-related colon cancer: focus on leptin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Janice E

    2012-02-01

    Obesity is linked to increased risk of colon cancer, currently the third most common cancer. Consequently rising levels of obesity worldwide are likely to significantly impact on obesity-related colon cancers in the decades to come. Understanding the molecular mechanisms whereby obesity increases colon cancer risk is thus a focus for research to inform strategies to prevent the increasing trend in obesity-related cancers. This review will consider research on deregulation of adipokine signalling, a consequence of altered adipokine hormone secretion from excess adipose tissue, with a focus on leptin, which has been studied extensively as a potential mediator of obesity-related colon cancer. Numerous investigations using colon cell lines in vitro, in vivo studies in rodents and investigations of colon cancer patients illuminate the complexity of the interactions of leptin with colon tissues via leptin receptors expressed by the colon epithelium. Although evidence indicates a role for leptin in proliferation of colon epithelial cells in vitro, this has been contradicted by studies in rodent models. However, recent studies have indicated that leptin may influence inflammatory mediators linked with colon cancer and also promote cell growth dependent on genotype and is implicated in growth promotion of colon cancer cells. Studies in human cancer patients indicate that there may be different tumour sub-types with varying levels of leptin receptor expression, indicating the potential for leptin to induce variable responses in the different tumour types. These studies have provided insights into the complex interplay of adipokines with responsive tissues prone to obesity-related colon cancer. Deregulation of adipokine signalling via adipokine receptors located in the colon appears to be a significant factor in obesity-related colon cancer. Molecular profiling of colon tumours will be a useful tool in future strategies to characterise the influence that adipokines may have

  20. Shifts in diversity and function of lake bacterial communities upon glacier retreat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Hannes; Sommaruga, Ruben

    2016-07-01

    Global climate change is causing a wastage of glaciers and threatening biodiversity in glacier-fed ecosystems. The high turbidity typically found in those ecosystems, which is caused by inorganic particles and result of the erosive activity of glaciers is a key environmental factor influencing temperature and light availability, as well as other factors in the water column. Once these lakes loose hydrological connectivity to glaciers and turn clear, the accompanying environmental changes could represent a potential bottleneck for the established local diversity with yet unknown functional consequences. Here, we study three lakes situated along a turbidity gradient as well as one clear unconnected lake and evaluate seasonal changes in their bacterial community composition and diversity. Further, we assess potential consequences for community functioning. Glacier runoff represented a diverse source community for the lakes and several taxa were able to colonize downstream turbid habitats, although they were not found in the clear lake. Operational taxonomic unit-based alpha diversity and phylogenetic diversity decreased along the turbidity gradient, but metabolic functional diversity was negatively related to turbidity. No evidence for multifunctional redundancy, which may allow communities to maintain functioning upon alterations in diversity, was found. Our study gives a first view on how glacier-fed lake bacterial communities are affected by the melting of glaciers and indicates that diversity and community composition significantly change when hydrological connectivity to the glacier is lost and lakes turn clear. PMID:26771929

  1. Vibrio cholerae Response Regulator VxrB Controls Colonization and Regulates the Type VI Secretion System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew T Cheng

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Two-component signal transduction systems (TCS are used by bacteria to sense and respond to their environment. TCS are typically composed of a sensor histidine kinase (HK and a response regulator (RR. The Vibrio cholerae genome encodes 52 RR, but the role of these RRs in V. cholerae pathogenesis is largely unknown. To identify RRs that control V. cholerae colonization, in-frame deletions of each RR were generated and the resulting mutants analyzed using an infant mouse intestine colonization assay. We found that 12 of the 52 RR were involved in intestinal colonization. Mutants lacking one previously uncharacterized RR, VCA0566 (renamed VxrB, displayed a significant colonization defect. Further experiments showed that VxrB phosphorylation state on the predicted conserved aspartate contributes to intestine colonization. The VxrB regulon was determined using whole genome expression analysis. It consists of several genes, including those genes that create the type VI secretion system (T6SS. We determined that VxrB is required for T6SS expression using several in vitro assays and bacterial killing assays, and furthermore that the T6SS is required for intestinal colonization. vxrB is encoded in a four gene operon and the other vxr operon members also modulate intestinal colonization. Lastly, though ΔvxrB exhibited a defect in single-strain intestinal colonization, the ΔvxrB strain did not show any in vitro growth defect. Overall, our work revealed that a small set of RRs is required for intestinal colonization and one of these regulators, VxrB affects colonization at least in part through its regulation of T6SS genes.

  2. Vibrio cholerae Response Regulator VxrB Controls Colonization and Regulates the Type VI Secretion System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Andrew T; Ottemann, Karen M; Yildiz, Fitnat H

    2015-05-01

    Two-component signal transduction systems (TCS) are used by bacteria to sense and respond to their environment. TCS are typically composed of a sensor histidine kinase (HK) and a response regulator (RR). The Vibrio cholerae genome encodes 52 RR, but the role of these RRs in V. cholerae pathogenesis is largely unknown. To identify RRs that control V. cholerae colonization, in-frame deletions of each RR were generated and the resulting mutants analyzed using an infant mouse intestine colonization assay. We found that 12 of the 52 RR were involved in intestinal colonization. Mutants lacking one previously uncharacterized RR, VCA0566 (renamed VxrB), displayed a significant colonization defect. Further experiments showed that VxrB phosphorylation state on the predicted conserved aspartate contributes to intestine colonization. The VxrB regulon was determined using whole genome expression analysis. It consists of several genes, including those genes that create the type VI secretion system (T6SS). We determined that VxrB is required for T6SS expression using several in vitro assays and bacterial killing assays, and furthermore that the T6SS is required for intestinal colonization. vxrB is encoded in a four gene operon and the other vxr operon members also modulate intestinal colonization. Lastly, though ΔvxrB exhibited a defect in single-strain intestinal colonization, the ΔvxrB strain did not show any in vitro growth defect. Overall, our work revealed that a small set of RRs is required for intestinal colonization and one of these regulators, VxrB affects colonization at least in part through its regulation of T6SS genes.

  3. Development, validation and implementation of an in vitro model for the study of metabolic and immune function in normal and inflamed human colonic epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Gitte

    2015-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), collectively referred to as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), are chronic immune disorders affecting the gastrointestinal tract. The aetiology of IBD remains an enigma, but increasing evidence suggests that the development of IBD may be triggered by a disturbance in the balance between gut commensal bacteria and host response in the intestinal mucosa. It is now known that epithelial cells have the capacity to secrete and respond to a range of immunological mediators and this suggests that these cells play a prominent role in the pathogenesis of IBD. Current knowledge about the intestinal epithelium has mainly been obtained using models based on animal cells, transformed human intestinal cell lines and isolated cells from resected colonic bowel segments. Species difference, malignant origin and confounders related to surgery, obviously make these cell models however less applicable for patophysiological studies. Consequently, there was a clear need for models of representative intestinal epithelial cells that would allow functional and dynamic studies of the differentiated human colonic epithelium in vitro. The primary purpose of this thesis was to explore and validate the optimal conditions for establishing a model based on short-term cultures of human colonic epithelial cells obtained from endoscopical biopsies. The cell cultures were accordingly used to describe the interplay between proinflammatory cytokines and colonic epithelium, with focus on alterations in viability, butyrate metabolism and secretion of a chemokine and metalloproteinases (MMP). Finally, the model was used to characterize expression and activation of receptors like toll like receptor (TLR)9 and peroxisome activated proliferators (PPAR)- known to be important players in regulation of innate and adaptive immune responses in human colonic epithelium. The results showed that it is possible to establish short-term cultures of representative, viable

  4. Characterization of host immunity during persistent vaginal colonization by Group B Streptococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patras, K A; Rösler, B; Thoman, M L; Doran, K S

    2015-11-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus, GBS) is a Gram-positive bacterium, which colonizes the vaginal tract in 10-30% of women. Colonization is transient in nature, and little is known about the host and bacterial factors controlling GBS persistence. Gaining insight into these factors is essential for developing therapeutics to limit maternal GBS carriage and prevent transmission to the susceptible newborn. In this work, we have used human cervical and vaginal epithelial cells, and our established mouse model of GBS vaginal colonization, to characterize key host factors that respond during GBS colonization. We identify a GBS strain that persists beyond a month in the murine vagina, whereas other strains are more readily cleared. Correspondingly, we have detected differential cytokine production in human cell lines after challenge with the persistent strain vs. other GBS strains. We also demonstrate that the persistent strain more readily invades cervical cells compared with vaginal cells, suggesting that GBS may potentially use the cervix as a reservoir to establish long-term colonization. Furthermore, we have identified interleukin-17 production in response to long-term colonization, which is associated with eventual clearance of GBS. We conclude that both GBS strain differences and concurrent host immune responses are crucial in modulating vaginal colonization. PMID:25850655

  5. Colonic Mucosal Epigenome and Microbiome Development in Children and Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    R Alan Harris; Rajesh Shah; Hollister, Emily B.; Rune Rose Tronstad; Nils Hovdenak; Reka Szigeti; James Versalovic; Richard Kellermayer

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic and microbiome changes during pediatric development have been implicated as important elements in the developmental origins of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) including Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), which are linked to early onset colorectal cancer (CRC). Colonic mucosal samples from 22 control children between 3.5 and 17.5 years of age were studied by Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChips and, in 10 cases, by 454 pyrosequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gen...

  6. Impact of probiotics on colonic microflora in patients with colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reddy, B. S.; Ahmed, J.; Macfie, J.;

    2010-01-01

    Background: Probiotics colonise the gut and may exert beneficial effects. The aim of this study was to assess if probiotics change the spectrum of colonic microflora in patients with colitis when taken daily for a period of one month Methods: This is a prospective double blind randomised crossover...... of study. Terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism technique (T-RFLP) and principal component analysis (PCA) on the bacterial community were used to study the faecal mircoflora. Results: Sixteen patients completed the study, 8 had Crohn’s disease and 8 had ulcerative colitis. Median age was 62...... in patients with colitis. This observation might have clinical implications....

  7. Therapeutic Management of Colon Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Maria Todosi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is a major public health problem worldwide, and a major cause of mortality and morbidity. Correct pretherapeutic staging has the role of guiding the management of colon cancer patients. The diagnosis is guided by the clinical symptoms. Chemotherapy is an important part of colon cancer treatment. Chemotherapy regimens are adapted to tumor stage and patient status and have various side effects and variable survival outcomes. International guidelines recommend different treatments depending on the presence or absence of metastases. The primary goal of treatment in nonmetastatic colon cancer is surgical removal of the tumor which could be the first step of the complex therapy or preceded by neoadjuvant therapy, depending on pretherapeutic staging. In resectable nonmetastatic tumors the preferred surgical procedure is colectomy with en bloc removal of regional lymph nodes. The extent of colectomy should be based on tumor location. The management of metastatic colon cancer also targets the therapeutic approach of the metastatic disease. Therapy is standardized and applied according to tumor stage. Surveillance has a major role in therapeutic success, reason why a time schedule and a protocol adapted to the primary lesion are essential. The goal of implementing the recommendations of international guidelines for the treatment of colon cancer is to provide a uniform treatment for this disease in view of improving overall survival of patients.

  8. Effect of heavy metals on bacterial transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H.; Olson, M. S.

    2010-12-01

    Adsorption of metals onto bacteria and soil takes place as stormwater runoff infiltrates into the subsurface. Changes in both bacterial surfaces and soil elemental content have been observed, and may alter the attachment of bacteria to soil surfaces. In this study, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectrometry (EDS) analyses were performed on soil samples equilibrated with synthetic stormwater amended with copper, lead and zinc. The results demonstrate the presence of copper and zinc on soil surfaces. To investigate bacterial attachment behavior, sets of batch sorption experiments were conducted on Escherichia Coli (E. coli) under different chemical conditions by varying solution compositions (nutrient solution vs synthetic stormwater). The adsorption data is best described using theoretical linear isotherms. The equilibrium coefficient (Kd) of E. coli is higher in synthetic stormwater than in nutrient solution without heavy metals. The adsorption of heavy metals onto bacterial surfaces significantly decreases their negative surface charge as determined via zeta potential measurements (-17.0±5.96mv for E. coli equilibrated with synthetic stormwater vs -21.6±5.45mv for E. coli equilibrated with nutrient solution), indicating that bacterial attachment may increase due to the attachment of metals onto bacterial surfaces and their subsequent change in surface charge. The attachment efficiency (α) of bacteria was also calculated and compared for both solution chemistries. Bacterial attachment efficiency (α) in synthetic stormwater is 0.997, which is twice as high as that in nutrient solution(α 0.465). The ratio of bacterial diameter : collector diameter suggests minimal soil straining during bacterial transport. Results suggest that the presence of metals in synthetic stormwater leads to an increase in bacterial attachment to soil surfaces. In terms of designing stormwater infiltration basins, the presence of heavy metals seems to

  9. Fiber, intestinal sterols, and colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C T; Gopalakrishna, G S; Nichols, B L

    1978-03-01

    It has been postulated that dietary fiber's protective effect against the development of colon cancer, diverticular disease, and atherosclerosis may be due to the adsorption and/or dilution of intestinal sterols such as bile acids and neural sterols and their bacterial metabolites by component(s) of fiber. Dietary fiber is made up of four major components-cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, and pectin. There is evidence that hemicellulose and pectin may induce an increase in fecal bile acid excretion in man which may be accompanied by a decrease in serum cholesterol. Natural fibers, such as rolled oats, alfalfa, guar gum, and Bengal gram have been shown to have hypocholesterolemic properties of alfalfa, wheat straw, and some other fibers found considerable amounts of bile acids in vitro. On the other hand, wheat bran, oat hulls, and all the synthetic fibers tested bound only negligible amounts of bile acids under the same conditions. Vegetarians in the United States have lower plasma lipids and different plasma lipoprotein patterns than those of comparable control populations on regular mixed diet. They also have smaller daily fractional turnover rates of cholic acid and deoxycholic acid pool size. In addition, populations on a mixed Western diet, where the rate of large bowel cancer is high (North American, English, Scottish, etc.) degraded and excreted cholesterol and bile acid metabolites to a greater degree than populations where the rate of colon cancer is comparatively low (Ugandan, Japanese, etc). It cannot be denied that the fiber theory linking fiber deficiency with the development of colon cancer and other diseases, is simple, attractive and appears to be firmly based in common sense. When subjected to research studies, however, the situation appears much more complex than expected. Although some progress is being made, the data are often contradictory and confusing, probably due to lack of adequate documentation of fiber intake (e.g., use of dietary fiber

  10. Lessons from Anaplasma phagocytophilum: Chromatin Remodeling by Bacterial Effectors

    OpenAIRE

    Rennoll-Bankert, Kristen E.; Dumler, J. Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens can alter global host gene expression via histone modifications and chromatin remodeling in order to subvert host responses, including those involved with innate immunity, allowing for bacterial survival. Shigella flexneri, Listeria monocytogenes, Chlamydia trachomatis, and Anaplasma phagocytophilum express effector proteins that modify host histones and chromatin structure. A. phagocytophilum modulates granulocyte respiratory burst in part by dampening transcription of se...

  11. Bacterial Cell Surface Damage Due to Centrifugal Compaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peterson, Brandon W.; Sharma, Prashant K.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Busscher, Henk J.

    2012-01-01

    Centrifugal damage has been known to alter bacterial cell surface properties and interior structures, including DNA. Very few studies exist on bacterial damage caused by centrifugation because of the difficulty in relating centrifugation speed and container geometry to the damage caused. Here, we pr

  12. Effects of differing purified cellulose, pectin, and hemicellulose fiber diets on fecal enzymes in 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced rat colon carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, H J

    1986-11-01

    The fecal microflora enzymes, beta-glucuronidase and beta-glucosidase, as well as fecal bacterial counts, were examined during colon carcinogenesis in rats administered parenteral 1,2-dimethylhydrazine and fed nutritionally equivalent diets free of fiber or containing one of three single sources of dietary fiber (cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectin). Whereas pectin-fed animals had increased fecal beta-glucuronidase activities, those fed cellulose and hemicellulose, two fibers protective in dimethylhydrazine colon neoplasia, had decreased activities. Although fecal bacterial counts were not significantly changed, similar differential changes in fecal beta-glucosidase activity were noted: cellulose but not pectin or hemicellulose feeding was associated with reduced activity. Although cellulose fiber may cause differing physiological effects resulting in a reduction in colonic neoplasia development in this experimental animal model, decreased bacterial metabolic enzyme activation of carcinogens or cocarcinogens may lead to diminished exposure of colonic cells to exogenous or endogenous mutagens. PMID:3019527

  13. Effect of different bladder irrigation frequency on urinary tract infections and bacterial colonization of patients with catheterization%不同膀胱冲洗频率对长期留置导尿管患者尿路感染及细菌定植的影响分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    章华双; 傅俊方; 黄生辉

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨不同膀胱冲洗频率对长期留置导尿管患者尿路感染及细菌定植的影响。方法选取长期留置导尿管患者275例,随机分为A、B、C、D 4组,所有患者均以同样的方式进行膀胱冲洗,A组冲洗频率为每天2次,B组每天1次,C组每周2次,D组不进行冲洗。于置管后3、7、14、21 d对4组患者尿路感染发生率进行统计,于置管后21 d行中段尿细菌分离和培养,记录菌落数。结果在3、7、14、21 d时 A 组患者尿路感染率分别为2.99%、10.45%、16.42%和35.82%;B组为0.00%、10.14%、20.29%和33.33%;C组为0.00%、2.86%、10.00%和17.14%;D组为0.00%、10.14%、23.19%和40.58%。治疗后3 d4组患者感染率差别不大,差异无统计学意义( P>0.05);治疗后7、14、21 d时C组患者尿路感染率明显低于其他组,而D组患者明显高于其他组,组间比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。C组患者大肠杆菌、变形杆菌、克雷伯菌、粪链球菌以及其他病原菌菌落数分别为(9.38±0.87)、(6.33±0.54)、(4.97±0.38)、(2.12±0.24)和(0.92±0.06),明显少于其他3组,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论膀胱冲洗可有效降低长期留置导尿管患者尿路感染的发生率,但是频繁冲洗并不可取,每周2次膀胱冲洗是较为合适的膀胱冲洗频率。%Objective To investigate the effect of different bladder irrigation frequency on urinary tract infec‐tions and bacterial colonization of patients with catheterization .Methods A total of 275 patients with long‐term in‐dwelling catheterization were recruited in this study ,and divided into group A ,B ,C ,D randomly .All patients were carried out bladder irrigation in the same manner ,group A (n=67) with flushing frequency 2 times a day ,group B (n=69) with 1 times a day ,group C (n=70) with 2

  14. Polybacterial Periodontal Pathogens Alter Vascular and Gut BH4/nNOS/NRF2-Phase II Enzyme Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandu Gangula

    Full Text Available Periodontal disease is a highly prevalent chronic inflammatory disease and is associated with complex microbial infection in the subgingival cavity. Recently, American Heart Association supported a century old association between periodontal disease and atherosclerotic vascular disease. We have recently shown that polybacterial periodontal infection led to aortic atherosclerosis and modulation of lipid profiles; however the underlying mechanism(s has not been yet demonstrated. Altered nitric oxide (NO synthesis and tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4, a cofactor for nitric oxide synthases (NOS has long been shown to be associated with vascular dysfunction and gastrointestinal motility disorders. We sought to examine the mechanism of periodontal infection leading to altered vascular and gastrointestinal smooth muscle relaxation, focusing on the BH4/nNOS pathways. In addition, we also have investigated how the antioxidant system (NRF2-Phase II enzyme expression in vascular and GI specimens is altered by oral infection. Eight week old male ApoEnull mice were either sham-infected or infected orally for 16 weeks with a mixture of major periodontal bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola and Tannerella forsythia to induce experimental periodontitis. Serum, vascular (mesenteric, stomach, and colon specimens were collected at the end of periodontal pathogen infection. Bacterial infection induced significant (p<0.05 reductions in the levels of BH4,in ratio of BH4:BH2+B and also in nitric oxide levels compared to sham-infected controls. In addition, we identified a significant (p<0.05 reduction in eNOS dimerization, nNOS dimerization and protein expression of BH4 biosynthesis enzymes; GCH-1, DHFR and NRF2 & Phase II enzymes in infected mice versus controls in both mesenteric artery and colon tissues. However, we found no differences in nNOS/BH4 protein expression in stomach tissues of infected and sham-infected mice. This suggests that a polybacterial

  15. Cytokine-mediated PGE2 expression in human colonic fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, E C; Zhu, Y; Andersen, V; Sciaky, D; Cao, H J; Meekins, H; Smith, T J; Lance, P

    1998-10-01

    We investigated prostanoid biogenesis in human colonic fibroblasts (CCD-18Co and 5 primary fibroblast cultures) and epithelial cell lines (NCM460, T84, HT-29, and LS 174T) and the effect of PGE2 on fibroblast morphology. Cytokine-stimulated PGE2 production was measured. PGH synthase-1 and -2 (PGHS-1 and -2) protein and mRNA expression were evaluated. Basal PGE2 levels were low in all cell types (0.15-6.47 ng/mg protein). Treatment for 24 h with interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta; 10 ng/ml) or tumor necrosis factor-alpha (50 ng/ml), respectively, elicited maximal 25- and 6-fold inductions of PGE2 synthesis in CCD-18Co cultures and similar results in primary fibroblast cultures; maximal inductions with IL-1beta in colonic epithelial cell lines were from zero to fivefold. Treatment of CCD-18Co fibroblasts with IL-1beta caused maximal 21- and 53-fold increases, respectively, in PGHS-2 protein and mRNA levels without altering PGHS-1 expression. PGE2 (0.1 micromol/l) elicited a dramatic shape change in selected fibroblasts. Colonic fibroblasts are potentially important as cytokine targets and a source of and target for colonic prostanoids in vivo. PMID:9755052

  16. Colon,rectum and anus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008303 MicroRNA expression profiling in hydrox-ycamptothecin-resistant human colon cancer cell line by microarray.TONG Jinlu(童锦禄), et al. Dept Gastroenterol, Renji Hosp, Med Sch, Shanghai Jiaotong Univ, Shanghai Instit Dig Dis, Shanghai 200001. Chin J Dig 2008;28(4):246-249.Objective To explore the role of a novel regulatory molecule-microRNA in the hydroxycamptothecin-resistant human colon cancer cell line SW1116/HCPTin order to provide a new reversal target for multidrug resistance.

  17. Neurological manifestation of colonic adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzair Chaudhary

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Paraneoplastic neurologic disorders are extremely rare in cancer patients and are most commonly associated with certain tumors, such as ovarian cancer, small cell lung cancer, and breast cancer. We report here a paraneoplastic neurological syndrome in a 53-year-old man with colonic adenocarcinoma with a solitary liver metastasis. His paraneoplastic syndrome was successfully treated by methylprednisolone and primary oncologic therapies including neoadjuvant chemotherapy and definitive surgery. This is also the first documented case of simultaneous manifestation of a sensory neuropathy and limbic encephalitis with colon cancer.

  18. Medullary carcinoma of the colon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiehn, Anne-Marie Kanstrup; Grauslund, Morten; Glenthøj, Anders;

    2015-01-01

    Medullary carcinoma of the colon is a rare variant of colorectal cancer claimed to have a more favorable prognosis than conventional adenocarcinomas. The histopathologic appearance may be difficult to distinguish from poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. The study aimed to evaluate the diagnostic...... differences in CK20 (p = 0.005) expression and in the rate of BRAF mutations (p = 0.0035). In conclusion, medullary carcinomas of the colon are difficult to discriminate from poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma even with the help of immunohistochemical and molecular analyses. This raises the question whether...

  19. Age, sun and substrate: triggers of bacterial communities in lichens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinale, Massimiliano; Steinová, Jana; Rabensteiner, Johannes; Berg, Gabriele; Grube, Martin

    2012-02-01

    Bacterial communities colonize the surfaces of lichens in a biofilm-like manner. The overall structure of the bacterial communities harboured by the lichens shows similarities, in particular the dominance of not yet cultured Alphaproteobacteria. Parameters causing variation in abundance, composition and spatial organization of the lichen-associated bacterial communities are so far poorly understood. As a first step, we used a microscopic approach to test the significance of both lichen-intrinsic and extrinsic environmental factors on the bacterial communities associated with 11 lichen samples, belonging to six species. Some of these species have thalli with a distinct age gradient. A statistically significant effect can be attributed to the age of the thallus parts, which is an intrinsic factor: growing parts of the lichens host bacterial communities that significantly differ from those of the ageing portions of the thalli. The substrate type (rock, tree, understory) and (at a lower extent) the exposition to the sun also affected the bacterial communities. Interestingly, the abundance of bacterial cells in the lichens was also influenced by the same structure-triggering factors. No effect on the composition with main bacterial groups was attributed to different lichen species, differentiated thallus parts or thallus growth type. Our results are important for the experimental designs in lichen-bacterial ecology. PMID:23757225

  20. Effect of leaf type and pesticide exposure on abundance of bacterial taxa in mosquito larval habitats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ephantus J Muturi

    Full Text Available Lentic freshwater systems including those inhabited by aquatic stages of mosquitoes derive most of their carbon inputs from terrestrial organic matter mainly leaf litter. The leaf litter is colonized by microbial communities that provide the resource base for mosquito larvae. While the microbial biomass associated with different leaf species in container aquatic habitats is well documented, the taxonomic composition of these microbes and their response to common environmental stressors is poorly understood. We used indoor aquatic microcosms to determine the abundances of major taxonomic groups of bacteria in leaf litters from seven plant species and their responses to low concentrations of four pesticides with different modes of action on the target organisms; permethrin, malathion, atrazine and glyphosate. We tested the hypotheses that leaf species support different quantities of major taxonomic groups of bacteria and that exposure to pesticides at environmentally relevant concentrations alters bacterial abundance and community structure in mosquito larval habitats. We found support for both hypotheses suggesting that leaf litter identity and chemical contamination may alter the quality and quantity of mosquito food base (microbial communities in larval habitats. The effect of pesticides on microbial communities varied significantly among leaf types, suggesting that the impact of pesticides on natural microbial communities may be highly complex and difficult to predict. Collectively, these findings demonstrate the potential for detritus composition within mosquito larval habitats and exposure to pesticides to influence the quality of mosquito larval habitats.

  1. Examining the Colonization and Survival of E. coli from Varying Host Sources in Drainage Basin Sediments and Stormwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Kyle; Michael Trapp, J

    2016-08-01

    It is widely understood that stormwater drainage has a significant impact on the health of tidal creek systems via regular inputs of runoff from the surrounding watershed. Due to this hydrologic connection, contamination of the upstream drainage basin will have a direct effect on estuaries and tidal creeks that often act as receiving waters. This study focuses on the importance of drainage basin sediments as they enhance the persistence and transport of the fecal indicator bacteria E. coli within a watershed. Experiments presented use microcosm environments with drainage basin sediments and stormwater to investigate E. coli colonization of stagnant waters and to examine the importance of host sources to bacterial survival. A novel method for establishing microcosms using environmental sediments with in situ bacterial populations and sterile overlying waters is used to examine E. coli colonization of the water column in the absence of flow. Colonization of sterile sediment environments also is examined using two common host sources (human and avian). Each experiment uses sediments of varying grain size and organic content to examine the influence of physical characteristics on bacterial prevalence. Results suggest host source of bacteria may be more important to initial bacterial colonization while physical characteristics of drainage basin sediments better explains extended E. coli persistence. Findings also suggest an indirect control of water column bacterial concentration by sediment type and erodibility. PMID:27282707

  2. Nest Material Shapes Eggs Bacterial Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Castellano, Cristina; Tomás, Gustavo; Ruiz-Rodríguez, Magdalena; Martín-Gálvez, David; Soler, Juan José

    2016-01-01

    Selective pressures imposed by pathogenic microorganisms to embryos have selected in hosts for a battery of antimicrobial lines of defenses that includes physical and chemical barriers. Due to the antimicrobial properties of volatile compounds of green plants and of chemicals of feather degrading bacteria, the use of aromatic plants and feathers for nest building has been suggested as one of these barriers. However, experimental evidence suggesting such effects is scarce in the literature. During two consecutive years, we explored experimentally the effects of these nest materials on loads of different groups of bacteria (mesophilic bacteria, Enterobacteriaceae, Staphylococcus and Enterococcus) of eggshells in nests of spotless starlings (Sturnus unicolor) at the beginning and at the end of the incubation period. This was also explored in artificial nests without incubation activity. We also experimentally increased bacterial density of eggs in natural and artificial nests and explored the effects of nest lining treatments on eggshell bacterial load. Support for the hypothetical antimicrobial function of nest materials was mainly detected for the year and location with larger average values of eggshell bacterial density. The beneficial effects of feathers and plants were more easily detected in artificial nests with no incubation activity, suggesting an active role of incubation against bacterial colonization of eggshells. Pigmented and unpigmented feathers reduced eggshell bacterial load in starling nests and artificial nest boxes. Results from artificial nests allowed us to discuss and discard alternative scenarios explaining the detected association, particularly those related to the possible sexual role of feathers and aromatic plants in starling nests. All these results considered together confirm the antimicrobial functionality mainly of feathers but also of plants used as nest materials, and highlight the importance of temporally and geographically

  3. Campylobacter jejuni colonization in wild birds: results from an infection experiment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Waldenström

    Full Text Available Campylobacter jejuni is a common cause of bacterial gastroenteritis in most parts of the world. The bacterium has a broad host range and has been isolated from many animals and environments. To investigate shedding patterns and putative effects on an avian host, we developed a colonization model in which a wild bird species, the European Robin Erithacus rubecula, was inoculated orally with C. jejuni from either a human patient or from another wild bird species, the Song Thrush Turdus philomelos. These two isolates were genetically distinct from each other and provoked very different host responses. The Song Thrush isolate colonized all challenged birds and colonization lasted 6.8 days on average. Birds infected with this isolate also showed a transient but significant decrease in body mass. The human isolate did not colonize the birds and could be detected only in the feces of the birds shortly after inoculation. European Robins infected with the wild bird isolate generated a specific antibody response to C. jejuni membrane proteins from the avian isolate, which also was cross-reactive to membrane proteins of the human isolate. In contrast, European Robins infected with the human isolate did not mount a significant response to bacterial membrane proteins from either of the two isolates. The difference in colonization ability could indicate host adaptations.

  4. Clinical and diagnostic importance of changes of colon at chronic prostatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.M. Popkov

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of researches was studying clinical, microbiological and morphological characteristic of colon at patients at chronic prostatitis, definition of method of pathogenetic therapy on the basis of the received results. Material and methods of investigation. 50 patients at chronic bacterial prostatitis, 50 patients at asymptomatic inflammatory prostatitis and 30 practically healthy males were inspected. Microflora of prostata's secret and colon, morphology and structure of components of diffuse neuroendocrine system of colon were studied. Clinical, microbiological, иммуногистохимические methods and morphometrical analysis were applied. Results. It is defined, that at 74% patients with asymptomatic inflammatory prostatitis irritable bowel syndrome and at 26% - chronic nonulcerative colitis were diagnosed. At all patients at chronic bacterial prostatitis chronic nonulcerative colitis were detected. These variants were correlleted with different types of intestinal dysbiosis and degree of microbe producing of prostate. Use probiotic Bactistatin® at patients with a chronic prostatitis raises clinical efficiency of antibacterial therapy, promotes reduction of inflammatory changes, restoration of its microbic landscape and neuroendocrine homeostasis of colon. inclusion. At chronic prostatitis structural and functional pathology of colon are often registered, they are connected with clinical variant of prostatitis and can mask of prostata's pathology. Using Bactistatin® at patients with a chronic prostatitis is proved and effective

  5. Get Tested for Colon Cancer: Here's How

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... examine the lining by filling the colon with air or with an x-ray blocking liquid and ... virtual colonoscopy. The radiologist fills your colon with air then scans it. The advantages: the procedure takes ...

  6. Get Tested for Colon Cancer: Here's How

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... power to keep colon cancer out of your life. Let me tell you how. Most colon cancers ... the cancer and going on with a normal life. More good news: you have many choices of ...

  7. Drugs Approved for Colon and Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Colon and Rectal Cancer This page ... and rectal cancer that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Colon Cancer Avastin (Bevacizumab) Bevacizumab Camptosar ( ...

  8. Get Tested for Colon Cancer: Here's How

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a look at the entire colon. While some family doctors and internists perform colonoscopy, the test is ... be used whenever possible. If you have a family history of colon cancer or if you have ...

  9. Breast and Colon Cancer Family Registries

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Breast Cancer Family Registry and the Colon Cancer Family Registry were established by the National Cancer Institute as a resource for investigators to use in conducting studies on the genetics and molecular epidemiology of breast and colon cancer.

  10. Five New Genes Linked to Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159556.html Five New Genes Linked to Colon Cancer But researchers say it's ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Scientists have identified five new gene mutations that may be tied to colon cancer. ...

  11. Vitamin D and colon cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lidija; Klampfer

    2014-01-01

    Calcitriol, 1α, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D3(1,25(OH)2D3), the most active form of vitamin D, is a pleotropic hormone with a wide range of biological activities. Due to its ability to regulate calcium and phosphate metabolism, 1,25D3 plays a major role in bone health. In addition, 1,25D3 binds to the vitamin D receptor and thereby regulates the expression of a number of genes which control growth, differentiation and survival of cancer cells. In agreement, the levels of vitamin D3 appear to be an essential determinant for the development and progression of colon cancer and supplementation with vitamin D3 is effective in suppressing intestinal tumorigenesis in animal models. Vitamin D3 has been estimated to lower the incidence of colorectal cancer by 50%, which is consistent with the inverse correlation between dietary vitamin D3 intake or sunlight exposure and human colorectal cancer. Several studies confirmed that increasing vitamin D3 lowers colon cancer incidence, reduces polyp recurrence, and that sufficient levels of vitamin D3 are associated with better overall survival of colon cancer patients. Vitamin D regulates the homeostasis of intestinal epithelium by modulating the oncogenic Wnt signaling pathway and by inhibiting tumor-promoting inflammation. Both activities contribute to the ability of 1,25D3 to prevent the development and progression of colon cancer.

  12. Inhibition of water absorption and selective damage to human colonic mucosa induced by Shiga toxin-2 are enhanced by Escherichia coli O157:H7 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanese, Adriana; Gerhardt, Elizabeth; García, Hugo; Amigo, Natalia; Cataldi, Angel; Zotta, Elsa; Ibarra, Cristina

    2015-05-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains are responsible for a variety of clinical syndromes including bloody and non-bloody diarrhea, hemorrhagic colitis, and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). Although multiple serotypes of STEC have been isolated from hemorrhagic colitis cases, E. coli O157:H7 is by far the most prevalent serotype associated with HUS. Shiga toxin is the major virulence factor of E. coli O157:H7 and is responsible for the more severe symptoms of the infection. However, the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of diarrhea mediated by Stx2 are not well known. In this study, we have determined the effects of E. coli O157:H7 strain 125/99 wild type (wt) on the human colonic mucosa mounted in an Ussing chamber. In response to 125/99wt, an inhibition of water absorption across human colonic mucosa was observed. Histological sections showed severe necrosis with detachment of the surface epithelium, mononuclear inflammatory infiltrate and loss of goblet cells after 1h of incubation with 125/99wt. These alterations were not observed with the isogenic mutant strain lacking stx2 or with the filter-sterilized culture supernatant from the 125/99wt strain. These results indicate that the cell damages in human colon are induced by Stx2, and that Stx2 production is increased by the interaction with bacterial cells. Identification of host cell-derived factors responsible for increasing Stx2 can lead to new strategies for modulating STEC infections. PMID:25794836

  13. Impact of the Colonization by Paralvinella sulfincola on the Microbial Diversity Associated with a Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vent Sulfide Chimney (Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, A.; Juniper, K.; Olagnon, M.; Alain, K.; Desrosiers, G.; Querellou, J.; Cambon-Bonavita, M.

    2002-12-01

    In the early stages of high temperature deep-sea hydrothermal vent chimneys growth, the walls remain porous and allow the escape of hydrothermal fluids as well as an inflow of seawater. This gradual mixing creates sharp thermal and geochemical gradients and provides potential habitats for physiologically diverse microorganisms. The annelid polychaete Paralvinella sulfincola colonizes the external surfaces of these structures, covering them with layered mucous tubes that locally alter the mixing of discharged hydrothermal fluids and surrounding seawater. Modifications of the physical and chemical conditions combined with an accumulation of elemental sulfur (S0) in P. sulfincola mucous tube are thought to be responsible for the deposition of a thin marcassite (FeS2) crust on outer surfaces of anhydrite chimneys (Juniper et al. 1992). This marcassite deposition could partly be induced by a shift in the composition of microbial communities that would to be locally associated with the presence of P. sulfincola. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated the impact of the colonization by P. sulfincola on the microbial communities present at the surface of an active sulfide chimney. Bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes were amplified from DNA extracted from a P. sulfincola tube and from a chimney mineral sample. Using the statistical analysis demonstrated by Singleton et al. (2001), both clone libraries from the chimney sample have been shown to be significantly different from those of the P. sulfincola tube sample, even though the major phylogenetic groups of these libraries were similar. As it has been observed at other deep-sea hydrothermal vent sites, the Epsilon-Proteobacteria and the Deep-sea Hydrothermal Vent Euryarchaeotic Group 1 were the dominant components of both bacterial and archaeal clone libraries. These results seem to indicate that P. sulfincola affect the microbial community composition on high temperature chimneys.

  14. Mechanotransduction in colonic smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, S H; Ennes, H S; Mayer, E A

    1997-11-15

    We evaluated mechanisms which mediate alterations in intracellular biochemical events in response to transient mechanical stimulation of colonic smooth muscle cells. Cultured myocytes from the circular muscle layer of the rabbit distal colon responded to brief focal mechanical deformation of the plasma membrane with a transient increase in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) with peak of 422.7 +/- 43.8 nm above an average resting [Ca2+]i of 104.8 +/- 10.9 nM (n = 57) followed by both rapid and prolonged recovery phases. The peak [Ca2+]i increase was reduced by 50% in the absence of extracellular Ca2+, while the prolonged [Ca2+]i recovery was either abolished or reduced to less than or = 15% of control values. In contrast, no significant effect of gadolinium chloride (100 microM) or lanthanum chloride (25 microM) on either peak transient or prolonged [Ca2+]i recovery was observed. Pretreatment of cells with thapsigargin (1 microM) resulted in a 25% reduction of the mechanically induced peak [Ca2+]i response, while the phospholipase C inhibitor U-73122 had no effect on the [Ca2+]i transient peak. [Ca2+]i transients were abolished when cells previously treated with thapsigargin were mechanically stimulated in Ca2+-free solution, or when Ca2+ stores were depleted by thapsigargin in Ca2+-free solution. Pretreatment with the microfilament disrupting drug cytochalasin D (10 microM) or microinjection of myocytes with an intracellular saline resulted in complete inhibition of the transient. The effect of cytochalasin D was reversible and did not prevent the [Ca2+]i increases in response to thapsigargin. These results suggest a communication, which may be mediated by direct mechanical link via actin filaments, between the plasma membrane and an internal Ca2+ store.

  15. Within-host evolution of bacterial pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didelot, Xavier; Walker, A. Sarah; Peto, Tim E.; Crook, Derrick W.; Wilson, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Whole genome sequencing has opened the way to investigating the dynamics and genomic evolution of bacterial pathogens during colonization and infection of humans. The application of this technology to the longitudinal study of adaptation in the infected host — in particular, the evolution of drug resistance and host adaptation in patients chronically infected with opportunistic pathogens — has revealed remarkable patterns of convergent evolution, pointing to an inherent repeatability of evolution. In this Review, we describe how these studies have advanced our understanding of the mechanisms and principles of within-host genome evolution, and we consider the consequences of findings such as a potent adaptive potential for pathogenicity. Finally, we discuss the possibility that genomics may be used in the future to predict the clinical progression of bacterial infections, and to suggest the best treatment option. PMID:26806595

  16. Toll-like receptor mRNA expression is selectively increased in the colonic mucosa of two animal models relevant to irritable bowel syndrome.

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    Declan P McKernan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS is largely viewed as a stress-related disorder caused by aberrant brain-gut-immune communication and altered gastrointestinal (GI homeostasis. Accumulating evidence demonstrates that stress modulates innate immune responses; however, very little is known on the immunological effects of stress on the GI tract. Toll-like receptors (TLRs are critical pattern recognition molecules of the innate immune system. Activation of TLRs by bacterial and viral molecules leads to activation of NF-kB and an increase in inflammatory cytokine expression. It was our hypothesis that innate immune receptor expression may be changed in the gastrointestinal tract of animals with stress-induced IBS-like symptoms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, our objective was to evaluate the TLR expression profile in the colonic mucosa of two rat strains that display colonic visceral hypersensitivity; the stress-sensitive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY rat and the maternally separated (MS rat. Quantitative PCR of TLR2-10 mRNA in both the proximal and distal colonic mucosae was carried out in adulthood. Significant increases are seen in the mRNA levels of TLR3, 4 & 5 in both the distal and proximal colonic mucosa of MS rats compared with controls. No significant differences were noted for TLR 2, 7, 9 & 10 while TLR 6 could not be detected in any samples in both rat strains. The WKY strain have increased levels of mRNA expression of TLR3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9 & 10 in both the distal and proximal colonic mucosa compared to the control Sprague-Dawley strain. No significant differences in expression were found for TLR2 while as before TLR6 could not be detected in all samples in both strains. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that both early life stress (MS and a genetic predisposition (WKY to stress affect the expression of key sentinels of the innate immune system which may have direct relevance for the molecular pathophysiology of IBS.

  17. Bacterial interference with host epithelial junctional complexes: Probiotic bacteria vs. A/E lesion-forming Escherichia coli

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    TANIA TOPOUZOVA-HRISTOVA

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available During colonization, enteropathogenic (EPEC and enterohaemorrhagic (EHEC Escherichia coli are capable to manipulate host cytoskeleton and colonize gut epithelia by a specific mode of attachment known as the attaching and effacing lesion (A/E lesion. While actin rearrangements during A/E lesion formation have been extensively investigated, the possible alterations of other cytoskeletal elements like those comprising the intercellular junctional complexes (JC of polarized cells during infection have only lately attracted attention. The present mini-review addresses the opposite effects of two groups of bacteria, A/E lesion-forming pathogenic E. coli and probiotic bacterial strains, on JC. JC are important in maintaining gut barrier functions. EPEC and EHEC can disrupt JC which as a consequence leads to reduction in the transepitelial electrical resistance (TER and an increase of the permeability to macromolecules. Probiotic bacteria on the other hand stabilize JC thus increasing TER and reducing permeability to macromolecular markers. Probiotic strains can protect JC integrity of polarized cells from the damage caused by EPEC or EHEC. Together with the promise of these results, of concern is the fact that the outcome of the studies can differ dependent on experimental protocols. Studies with living bacteria and different strain combinations have also put forward strain specific effects. Therefore, an important practical item for future studies is the identification of the molecules synthesized by probiotic bacteria that may be active on JC stability.

  18. Prevention of bacterial adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria

    2010-01-01

    Management of bacterial infections is becoming increasingly difficult due to the emergence and increasing prevalence of bacterial pathogens that are resistant to available antibiotics. Conventional antibiotics generally kill bacteria by interfering with vital cellular functions, an approach that ...

  19. Electrosprayed inulin microparticles for microbiota triggered targeting of colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Arvind K; Sood, Vishesh; Bora, Meghali; Vasita, Rajesh; Katti, Dhirendra S

    2014-11-01

    Inulin, a naturally occurring polysaccharide, was acetylated to make it processable by electrospraying, a facile and single step method for microparticle fabrication. Electrospraying process parameters were optimized for fabrication of spherical and monodisperse indomethacin (IDM) loaded inulin acetate (INA) microparticles. The apparent entrapment efficiency of IDM was determined to be 100%, whereas working encapsulation efficiency was estimated to be 35.39 ± 1.63%. Differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed molecular dispersion of IDM in an amorphous state within the INA matrix. Finally, the results from in vitro release study performed in simulated gastro-intestinal fluids demonstrated that IDM was released only in simulated colonic fluid that contained inulinase. Therefore, this study demonstrates that acetylation of inulin does not alter its susceptibility to inulinase and that microparticles fabricated from INA can be developed as a colon targeting drug delivery system.

  20. Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae uses proteasome inhibitor syringolin A to colonize from wound infection sites.

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    Johana C Misas-Villamil

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Infection of plants by bacterial leaf pathogens at wound sites is common in nature. Plants defend wound sites to prevent pathogen invasion, but several pathogens can overcome spatial restriction and enter leaf tissues. The molecular mechanisms used by pathogens to suppress containment at wound infection sites are poorly understood. Here, we studied Pseudomonas syringae strains causing brown spot on bean and blossom blight on pear. These strains exist as epiphytes that can cause disease upon wounding caused by hail, sand storms and frost. We demonstrate that these strains overcome spatial restriction at wound sites by producing syringolin A (SylA, a small molecule proteasome inhibitor. Consequently, SylA-producing strains are able to escape from primary infection sites and colonize adjacent tissues along the vasculature. We found that SylA diffuses from the primary infection site and suppresses acquired resistance in adjacent tissues by blocking signaling by the stress hormone salicylic acid (SA. Thus, SylA diffusion creates a zone of SA-insensitive tissue that is prepared for subsequent colonization. In addition, SylA promotes bacterial motility and suppresses immune responses at the primary infection site. These local immune responses do not affect bacterial growth and were weak compared to effector-triggered immunity. Thus, SylA facilitates colonization from wounding sites by increasing bacterial motility and suppressing SA signaling in adjacent tissues.

  1. Fermented dairy products modulate Citrobacter rodentium-induced colonic hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, James W; Chervaux, Christian; Raymond, Benoit; Derrien, Muriel; Brazeilles, Rémi; Kosta, Artemis; Chambaud, Isabelle; Crepin, Valerie F; Frankel, Gad

    2014-10-01

    We evaluated the protective effects of fermented dairy products (FDPs) in an infection model, using the mouse pathogen Citrobacter rodentium (CR). Treatment of mice with FDP formulas A, B, and C or a control product did not affect CR colonization, organ specificity, or attaching and effacing lesion formation. Fermented dairy product A (FDP-A), but neither the supernatant from FDP-A nor β-irradiated (IR) FDP-A, caused a significant reduction in colonic crypt hyperplasia and CR-associated pathology. Profiling the gut microbiota revealed that IR-FDP-A promoted higher levels of phylotypes belonging to Alcaligenaceae and a decrease in Lachnospiraceae (Ruminococcus) during CR infection. Conversely, FDP-A prevented a decrease in Ruminococcus and increased Turicibacteraceae (Turicibacter). Importantly, loss of Ruminococcus and Turicibacter has been associated with susceptibility to dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis. Our results demonstrate that viable bacteria in FDP-A reduced CR-induced colonic crypt hyperplasia and prevented the loss of key bacterial genera that may contribute to disease pathology.

  2. Microbiological toxicity of tilmicosin on human colonic microflora in chemostats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Haihong; Yao, Junping; Wu, Qinghua; Wei, Yajing; Dai, Menghong; Iqbal, Zahid; Wang, Xu; Wang, Yulian; Huang, Lingli; Chen, Dongmei; Tao, Yanfei; Liu, Zhenli; Yuan, Zonghui

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the microbiological safety of tilmicosin on human intestinal microflora, four chemostat models of healthy human colonic ecosystems were exposed to tilmicosin (0, 0.436, 4.36, and 43.6 μg/mL) for 7 days. Prior to and during drug exposure, three microbiological endpoints were monitored daily including short-chain fatty acids, bacterial counts and macrolide susceptibility. Colonization resistance of each community was determined by 3 successive daily challenges of Salmonella typhimurium. Genes associated with virulence and macrolide resistance in Enterococcus faecalis were determined by PCR. Transcriptional expression of the virulence gene (gelE) in E. faecalis was determined by real-time RT-PCR. Our results showed that different concentrations of tilmicosin did not disrupt the colonization resistance in each chemostat. During exposure to 4.36 and 43.6 μg/mL tilmicosin, the Bacteroides fragilis population was significantly decreased while the proportion of resistant Enterococci increased. After long-term exposure to the highest concentration (43.6 μg/mL) of tilmicosin, the gelE gene was significantly up-regulated in the high-level macrolide resistant strains that also contained the ermB resistance gene. This study was the first of its kind to evaluate the microbiological toxicity of tilmicosin using a chemostat model. These findings also provide new insight into the co-occurrence of macrolide resistance and virulence in E. faecalis under tilmicosin selective pressure.

  3. CALCIUM AND THE PREVENTION OF COLON CANCER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WELBERG, JWM; KLEIBEUKER, JH; VANDERMEER, R; MULDER, NH; DEVRIES, EGE

    1991-01-01

    Diet is a major determinant of colon cancer risk. Calcium may protect against colon cancer, presumably by binding cytotoxic bile acids and fatty acids. Numerous studies support this proposition. In subjects at risk for colon cancer oral calcium supplementation has been shown to reduce rectal epithel

  4. Polydextrose, Lactitol, and Fructo-Oligosaccharide Fermentation by Colonic Bacteria in a Three-Stage Continuous Culture System

    OpenAIRE

    Probert, Hollie M.; Apajalahti, Juha H. A.; Rautonen, Nina; Stowell, Julian; Glenn R Gibson

    2004-01-01

    In vitro fermentations were carried out by using a model of the human colon to simulate microbial activities of lower gut bacteria. Bacterial populations (and their metabolic products) were evaluated under the effects of various fermentable substrates. Carbohydrates tested were polydextrose, lactitol, and fructo-oligosaccharide (FOS). Bacterial groups of interest were evaluated by fluorescence in situ hybridization as well as by species-specific PCR to determine bifidobacterial species and pe...

  5. Lowbush wild blueberries have the potential to modify gut microbiota and xenobiotic metabolism in the rat colon.

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    Alison Lacombe

    Full Text Available The gastrointestinal tract is populated by an array of microbial species that play an important role in metabolic and immune functions. The composition of microorganisms is influenced by the components of the host's diet and can impact health. In the present study, dietary enrichment of lowbush wild blueberries (LWB was examined to determine their effect on colon microbial composition and their potential in promoting gut health. The microbial composition and functional potential of the colon microbiota from Sprague Dawley rats fed control diets (AIN93 and LWB-enriched diets (AIN93+8% LWB powder substituting for dextrose for 6 weeks were assessed using Illumina shotgun sequencing and bioinformatics tools. Our analysis revealed an alteration in the relative abundance of 3 phyla and 22 genera as representing approximately 14 and 8% of all phyla and genera identified, respectively. The LWB-enriched diet resulted in a significant reduction in the relative abundance of the genera Lactobacillus and Enterococcus. In addition, hierarchal analysis revealed a significant increase in the relative abundance of the phylum Actinobacteria, the order Actinomycetales, and several novel genera under the family Bifidobacteriaceae and Coriobacteriaceae, in the LWB group. Functional annotation of the shotgun sequences suggested that approximately 9% of the 4709 Kyoto Encyclopaedia of Gene and Genome (KEGG hits identified were impacted by the LWB-diet. Open Reading Frames (ORFs assigned to KEGG category xenobiotics biodegradation and metabolism were significantly greater in the LWB-enriched diet compared to the control and included the pathway for benzoate degradation [PATH:ko00362] and glycosaminoglycan degradation [PATH:ko00531]. Moreover, the number of ORFs assigned to the bacterial invasion of epithelial cells [PATH:ko05100] pathway was approximately 8 fold lower in the LWB group compared to controls. This study demonstrated that LWBs have the potential to promote

  6. Lowbush wild blueberries have the potential to modify gut microbiota and xenobiotic metabolism in the rat colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacombe, Alison; Li, Robert W; Klimis-Zacas, Dorothy; Kristo, Aleksandra S; Tadepalli, Shravani; Krauss, Emily; Young, Ryan; Wu, Vivian C H

    2013-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is populated by an array of microbial species that play an important role in metabolic and immune functions. The composition of microorganisms is influenced by the components of the host's diet and can impact health. In the present study, dietary enrichment of lowbush wild blueberries (LWB) was examined to determine their effect on colon microbial composition and their potential in promoting gut health. The microbial composition and functional potential of the colon microbiota from Sprague Dawley rats fed control diets (AIN93) and LWB-enriched diets (AIN93+8% LWB powder substituting for dextrose) for 6 weeks were assessed using Illumina shotgun sequencing and bioinformatics tools. Our analysis revealed an alteration in the relative abundance of 3 phyla and 22 genera as representing approximately 14 and 8% of all phyla and genera identified, respectively. The LWB-enriched diet resulted in a significant reduction in the relative abundance of the genera Lactobacillus and Enterococcus. In addition, hierarchal analysis revealed a significant increase in the relative abundance of the phylum Actinobacteria, the order Actinomycetales, and several novel genera under the family Bifidobacteriaceae and Coriobacteriaceae, in the LWB group. Functional annotation of the shotgun sequences suggested that approximately 9% of the 4709 Kyoto Encyclopaedia of Gene and Genome (KEGG) hits identified were impacted by the LWB-diet. Open Reading Frames (ORFs) assigned to KEGG category xenobiotics biodegradation and metabolism were significantly greater in the LWB-enriched diet compared to the control and included the pathway for benzoate degradation [PATH:ko00362] and glycosaminoglycan degradation [PATH:ko00531]. Moreover, the number of ORFs assigned to the bacterial invasion of epithelial cells [PATH:ko05100] pathway was approximately 8 fold lower in the LWB group compared to controls. This study demonstrated that LWBs have the potential to promote gut health and

  7. Igf1r+/CD34+ immature ICC are putative adult progenitor cells, identified ultrastructurally as fibroblast-like ICC in Ws/Ws rat colon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, X Y; Albertí, E; White, E J;

    2009-01-01

    The colon of Ws/Ws mutant rats shows impairment of pacemaker activity and altered inhibitory neurotransmission. The present study set out to find structural correlates to these findings to resolve mechanisms. In the colon of Ws/Ws rats, interstitial cells of Cajal associated with Auerbach's plexu...

  8. Associations of Probiotics with Vitamin D and Leptin Receptors and their Effects on Colon Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranji, Peyman; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl; Rahmati-Yamchi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of most common causes of cancer-related death worldwide. Recent studies have suggested that microbial and environmental factors including diet and lifestyle can impact on colon cancer development. Vitamin D deficiency and dysfunction of vitamin D receptor (VDR) also correlate with colon cancer. Moreover, leptin, a 16-kDa polypeptide, participates in the regulation of food intake and is associated with other environmental factors affecting colon cancer through the leptin receptor. Altered levels of serum leptin and patterns of expression of its receptor (LPR) may be observed in human colon tumours. Furthermore, the collected data from in vitro and in vivo studies have indicated that consuming probiotic non-pathogenic lactic acid bacteria have beneficial effects on colon cancer. Probiotics, inflammation and vitamin D/VDR have been correlated with leptin and its receptor and are also with colon cancer. Thus, in this paper, we review recent progress on the roles of probiotic, vitamin D/VDR and leptin/LPR in inflammation and colon cancer. PMID:25987012

  9. On the relationship between sialomucin and sulfomucin expression and hydrogenotrophic microbes in the human colonic mucosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A Croix

    Full Text Available The colonic mucus layer is comprised primarily of acidomucins, which provide viscous properties and can be broadly classified into sialomucins or sulfomucins based on the presence of terminating sialic acid or sulfate groups. Differences in acidomucin chemotypes have been observed in diseases such as colorectal cancer and inflammatory bowel disease, and variation in sialo- and sulfomucin content may influence microbial colonization. For example, sulfate derived from sulfomucin degradation may promote the colonization of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB, which through sulfate respiration generate the genotoxic gas hydrogen sulfide. Here, paired biopsies from right colon, left colon, and rectum of 20 subjects undergoing routine screening colonoscopies were collected to enable parallel histochemical and microbiological studies. Goblet cell sialo- and sulfomucins in each biopsy were distinguished histochemically and quantified. Quantitative PCR and multivariate analyses were used to examine the abundance of hydrogenotrophic microbial groups and SRB genera relative to acidomucin profiles. Regional variation was observed in sialomucins and sulfomucins with the greatest abundance of each found in the rectum. Mucin composition did not appear to influence the abundance of SRB or other hydrogenotrophic microbiota but correlated with the composition of different SRB genera. A higher sulfomucin proportion correlated with higher quantities of Desulfobacter, Desulfobulbus and Desulfotomaculum, relative to the predominant Desulfovibrio genus. Thus, acidomucin composition may influence bacterial sulfate respiration in the human colon, which may in turn impact mucosal homeostasis. These results stress the need to consider mucus characteristics in the context of studies of the microbiome that target intestinal diseases.

  10. Hydrogen sulfide lowers proliferation and induces protective autophagy in colon epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya C Wu

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H(2S is a gaseous bacterial metabolite that reaches high levels in the large intestine. In the present study, the effect of H(2S on the proliferation of normal and cancerous colon epithelial cells was investigated. An immortalized colon epithelial cell line (YAMC and a panel of colon cancer cell lines (HT-29, SW1116, HCT116 were exposed to H(2S at concentrations similar to those found in the human colon. H(2S inhibited normal and cancerous colon epithelial cell proliferation as measured by MTT assay. The anti-mitogenic effect of H(2S was accompanied by G(1-phase cell cycle arrest and the induction of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21(Cip. Moreover, exposure to H(2S led to features characteristic of autophagy, including increased formation of LC3B(+ autophagic vacuoles and acidic vesicular organelles as determined by immunofluorescence and acridine orange staining, respectively. Abolition of autophagy by RNA interference targeting Vps34 or Atg7 enhanced the anti-proliferative effect of H(2S. Further mechanistic investigation revealed that H(2S stimulated the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK and inhibited the phosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR and S6 kinase. Inhibition of AMPK significantly reversed H(2S-induced autophagy and inhibition of cell proliferation. Collectively, we demonstrate that H(2S inhibits colon epithelial cell proliferation and induces protective autophagy via the AMPK pathway.

  11. Increased risk of colon cancer in men in the pre-diabetes phase.

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    Adedayo A Onitilo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Historically, studies exploring the association between type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM and cancer lack accurate definition of date of DM onset, limiting temporal analyses. We examined the temporal relationship between colon cancer risk and DM using an electronic algorithm and clinical, administrative, and laboratory data to pinpoint date of DM onset. METHODS: Subjects diagnosed with DM (N = 11,236 between January 1, 1995 and December 31, 2009 were identified and matched at a 5∶1 ratio with 54 365 non-diabetic subjects by age, gender, smoking history, residence, and diagnosis reference date. Colon cancer incidence relative to the reference date was used to develop Cox regression models adjusted for matching variables, body mass index, insurance status, and comorbidities. Primary outcomes measures included hazard ratio (HR and number needed to be exposed for one additional person to be harmed (NNEH. RESULTS: The adjusted HR for colon cancer in men before DM onset was 1.28 (95% CI 1.04-1.58, P = 0.0223 and the NNEH decreased with time, reaching 263 at DM onset. No such difference was observed in women. After DM onset, DM did not appear to alter colon cancer risk in either gender. CONCLUSIONS: Colon cancer risk is increased in diabetic men, but not women, before DM onset. DM did not alter colon cancer risk in men or women after clinical onset. In pre-diabetic men, colon cancer risk increased as time to DM onset decreased, suggesting that the effects of the pre-diabetes phase on colon cancer risk in men are cumulative.

  12. Bacterial Sphingomyelinases and Phospholipases as Virulence Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Díaz, Marietta; Monturiol-Gross, Laura; Naylor, Claire; Alape-Girón, Alberto; Flieger, Antje

    2016-09-01

    Bacterial sphingomyelinases and phospholipases are a heterogeneous group of esterases which are usually surface associated or secreted by a wide variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. These enzymes hydrolyze sphingomyelin and glycerophospholipids, respectively, generating products identical to the ones produced by eukaryotic enzymes which play crucial roles in distinct physiological processes, including membrane dynamics, cellular signaling, migration, growth, and death. Several bacterial sphingomyelinases and phospholipases are essential for virulence of extracellular, facultative, or obligate intracellular pathogens, as these enzymes contribute to phagosomal escape or phagosomal maturation avoidance, favoring tissue colonization, infection establishment and progression, or immune response evasion. This work presents a classification proposal for bacterial sphingomyelinases and phospholipases that considers not only their enzymatic activities but also their structural aspects. An overview of the main physiopathological activities is provided for each enzyme type, as are examples in which inactivation of a sphingomyelinase- or a phospholipase-encoding gene impairs the virulence of a pathogen. The identification of sphingomyelinases and phospholipases important for bacterial pathogenesis and the development of inhibitors for these enzymes could generate candidate vaccines and therapeutic agents, which will diminish the impacts of the associated human and animal diseases. PMID:27307578

  13. [Chemotherapy of severe bacterial infections in pediatrics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guggenbichler, J P

    1983-01-01

    Bacterial infections are frequent events in premature and newborn infants. The reason is a defective specific and nonspecific defence of bacterial organisms. Some immunoglobulins like IgM and IgA including secretory IgA are absent. Premature infants also show a decreased level of IgG. Cellular immunity is anatomically intact but functionally defective. A number of complement factors are lacking, the activation of the alternative pathway is impaired. Newborn infants with perinatal problems like asphyxia or difficult delivery, show defects of leucocyte function like decreased deformability, defective chemotaxis and defective killing of ingested bacteria. Certain diseases, like hypoxia and malformations of immature organ functions in this age group (decreased acid production in the stomach), facilitate bacterial colonization of surface epithelia and the invasion of tissues. Consequences of these pathogenetic mechanisms are an unimpaired propagation of bacterial organisms into the blood and meninges without localization of the infecting organisms at the entry site. Bacterial meningitis is not considered a separate disease entity but a complication of bacteremia and sepsis. Clinical symptoms are nonspecific at the onset of the infection. Fever is frequently absent; decreased appetite, vomiting, a bloated abdomen, diarrhea, tachycardia, tachypnea are early signs of a bacterial infection, a grey mottled appearance, cyanosis, jaundice, petechiae, apneic spells, seizure activity and a metabolic acidosis are symptoms of advanced infection. Successful treatment at this stage is often not possible. Every sign of a decreased well being of a newborn of premature infant warrants laboratory and bacteriologic work up for septicemia.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6316669

  14. Impact of early colonizers on in vitro subgingival biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W Ammann

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of early colonizing species on the structure and the composition of the bacterial community developing in a subgingival 10-species biofilm model system. The model included Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus anginosus, Actinomycesoris, Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. nucleatum, Veillonella dispar, Campylobacter rectus, Prevotella intermedia, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola. Based on literature, we considered Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus anginosus, and Actinomyces oris as early colonizers and examined their role in the biofilms by either a delayed addition to the consortium, or by not inoculating at all the biofilms with these species. We quantitatively evaluated the resulting biofilms by real-time quantitative PCR and further compared the structures using confocal laser scanning microscopy following fluorescence in situ hybridisation. The absence of the early colonizers did not hinder biofilm formation. The biofilms reached the same total counts and developed to normal thickness. However, quantitative shifts in the abundances of individual species were observed. In the absence of streptococci, the overall biofilm structure appeared looser and more dispersed. Moreover, besides a significant increase of P. intermedia and a decrease of P. gingivalis , P. intermedia appeared to form filamented long chains that resembled streptococci. A. oris, although growing to significantly higher abundance in absence of streptococci, did not have a visible impact on the biofilms. Hence, in the absence of the early colonizers, there is a pronounced effect on P. intermedia and P. gingivalis that may cause distinct shifts in the structure of the biofilm. Streptococci possibly facilitate the establishment of P. gingivalis into subgingival biofilms, while in their absence P. intermedia became more dominant and forms elongated chains.

  15. Colonic perforation in Behcet's syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Catherine M Dowling; Arnold DK Hill; Carmel Malone; John J Sheehan; Shona Tormey; Kieran Sheahan; Enda McDermott; Niall J O'Higgins

    2008-01-01

    A 17-year-old gentleman was admitted to our hospital for headache, the differential diagnosis of which included Behcet's syndrome (BS). He developed an acute abdomen and was found to have air under the diaphragm on erect chest X-ray. Subsequent laparotomy revealed multiple perforations throughout the colon. This report describes an unusual complication of Behcets syndrome occurring at the time of presentation and a review of the current literature of reported cases.

  16. Laparoscopic surgery for colon cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Millo, Paolo; Rispoli, Corrado; Rocco, Nicola; Contul, Riccardo Brachet; Fabozzi, Massimiliano; Grivon, Manuela; Nardi, Mario Junior; Allieta, Rosaldo

    2013-01-01

    Colon cancer is a major problem in Western countries and complete surgical resection is the main treatment. Since its introduction the laparoscopic approach has been used to achieve bowel resection with a better postoperative course and better aesthetic outcomes. Initial concerns about the radicality of the resection and the oncologic outcomes have been overcome in the last decade. All over the world large trials have been conducted to compare the laparoscopic approach and the traditional lap...

  17. Gut microbes promote colonic serotonin production through an effect of short-chain fatty acids on enterochromaffin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reigstad, Christopher S; Salmonson, Charles E; Rainey, John F; Szurszewski, Joseph H; Linden, David R; Sonnenburg, Justin L; Farrugia, Gianrico; Kashyap, Purna C

    2015-04-01

    Gut microbiota alterations have been described in several diseases with altered gastrointestinal (GI) motility, and awareness is increasing regarding the role of the gut microbiome in modulating GI function. Serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] is a key regulator of GI motility and secretion. To determine the relationship among gut microbes, colonic contractility, and host serotonergic gene expression, we evaluated mice that were germ-free (GF) or humanized (HM; ex-GF colonized with human gut microbiota). 5-HT reduced contractile duration in both GF and HM colons. Microbiota from HM and conventionally raised (CR) mice significantly increased colonic mRNAs Tph1 [(tryptophan hydroxylase) 1, rate limiting for mucosal 5-HT synthesis; P cell numbers (cells producing 5-HT) were unchanged. Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) promoted TPH1 transcription in BON cells (human EC cell model). Thus, gut microbiota acting through SCFAs are important determinants of enteric 5-HT production and homeostasis. PMID:25550456

  18. Primary lymphoma of the colon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tauro Leo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary lymphoma of the colon is a rare tumor of the gastrointestinal (GI tract and comprises only 0.2-1.2% of all colonic malignancies. The most common variety of colonic lymphoma is non-Hodgkin′s lymphoma (NHL. The GI tract is the most frequently involved site, accounting for 30-40% of all extra nodal lymphomas, approximately 4-20% of which are NHL. The stomach is the most common location of GI lymphomas, followed by the small intestine. Early diagnosis may prevent intestinal perforation; however, the diagnosis is often delayed in most cases. Therapeutic approaches described in two subsets include: Radical tumor resection (hemicolectomy plus multi-agent chemotherapy (polychemotherapy in early stage patients, biopsy plus multidrug chemotherapy in advanced stage patients. Radiotherapy is reserved for specific cases; surgery alone can be considered as an adequate treatment for patients with low-grade NHL disease that does not infiltrate beyond the sub mucosa. Although resection plays an important role in the local control of the disease and in preventing bleeding and/or perforation, it rarely eradicates the lymphoma by itself. Those with limited stage disease may enjoy prolonged survival when treated with aggressive chemotherapy.

  19. PROMISES FOR TREATING COLON CANCER PATIENTS WITH BRAF GENE MUTATION

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    M. Yu. Fedyanin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Colon cancer represents a heterogenous disease group, which differ by cancerogenesis mechanisms, molecular alterations, prognosis and treatment possibilities. In modern clinical practice assessment of KRAS and NRAS genes status is already necessary in order to prescribe anti-EGFR treatment for metastatic disease. A separate poor prognosis group are patients with BRAF mutation. In this review we will focus on biological features of BRAF-mutant colorectal cancer, its epidemiology, clinical features on different stages, treatment choice and promising new treatment possibilities.

  20. Genetic Control of Plant Root Colonization by the Biocontrol agent, Pseudomonas fluorescens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, Benjamin J.; Fletcher, Meghan; Waters, Jordan; Wetmore, Kelly; Blow, Matthew J.; Deutschbauer, Adam M.; Dangl, Jeffry L.; Visel, Axel

    2015-03-19

    Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are a critical component of plant root ecosystems. PGPR promote plant growth by solubilizing inaccessible minerals, suppressing pathogenic microorganisms in the soil, and directly stimulating growth through hormone synthesis. Pseudomonas fluorescens is a well-established PGPR isolated from wheat roots that can also colonize the root system of the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. We have created barcoded transposon insertion mutant libraries suitable for genome-wide transposon-mediated mutagenesis followed by sequencing (TnSeq). These libraries consist of over 105 independent insertions, collectively providing loss-of-function mutants for nearly all genes in the P.fluorescens genome. Each insertion mutant can be unambiguously identified by a randomized 20 nucleotide sequence (barcode) engineered into the transposon sequence. We used these libraries in a gnotobiotic assay to examine the colonization ability of P.fluorescens on A.thaliana roots. Taking advantage of the ability to distinguish individual colonization events using barcode sequences, we assessed the timing and microbial concentration dependence of colonization of the rhizoplane niche. These data provide direct insight into the dynamics of plant root colonization in an in vivo system and define baseline parameters for the systematic identification of the bacterial genes and molecular pathways using TnSeq assays. Having determined parameters that facilitate potential colonization of roots by thousands of independent insertion mutants in a single assay, we are currently establishing a genome-wide functional map of genes required for root colonization in P.fluorescens. Importantly, the approach developed and optimized here for P.fluorescens>A.thaliana colonization will be applicable to a wide range of plant-microbe interactions, including biofuel feedstock plants and microbes known or hypothesized to impact on biofuel-relevant traits including biomass productivity

  1. Three-dimensional MR and axial CT colonography versus conventional colonoscopy for detection of colon pathologies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rahime Haykir; Serdar Karakose; Aydin Karabacakoglu; Mustafa Sahin; Ertugrul Kayacetin

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of MR colonography (MRC) and CT performance in detecting colon lesions, and to compare their sensitivity and specificity with that of conventional colonoscopy.METHODS: Forty-two patients suspected of having colonic lesions, because of rectal bleeding, positive fecal occult blood test results or altered bowel habits,underwent the examinations. After insertion of a rectal tube, the colon was filled with 1000-1500 mL of a mixture of 9 g/L NaCl solution, 15-20 mL of 0.5 mmol/L gadopentetate dimeglumine and 100 mL of iodinized contrast material. Once colonic distension was achieved,three-dimensional gradient-echo (3D-GRE) sequences for MR colonography and complementary MR images were taken in all cases. Immediately after MR colonography,abdominal CT images were taken by spiral CT in the axial and supine position. Then all patients were examined by conventional colonoscopy (CC).RESULTS: The sensitivity and specificity of MRC for colon pathologies were 96.4% and 100%, respectively.The percentage of correct diagnosis by MRC was 97.6%.The sensitivity and specificity of CT for colon pathologies were 92.8%, 100%, respectively. The percentage of correct diagnosis by CT was 95.2%.CONCLUSION: In detecting colon lesions, MRC achieved a diagnostic accuracy similar to CC. However,MRC is minimally invasive, with no need for sedation or analgesics during investigation. There is a lower percentage of perforation risk, and all colon segments can be evaluated due to multi-sectional imaging availability; intramural, extra-intestinal components of colonic lesions, metastasis and any additional lesions can be evaluated easily. MRC and CT colonography are new radiological techniques that promise to be highly sensitive in the detection of colorectal mass and inflammatory bowel lesions.

  2. Bacterial Community Mapping of the Mouse Gastrointestinal Tract

    OpenAIRE

    Gu, Shenghua; Chen, Dandan; Zhang, Jin-Na; Lv, Xiaoman; WANG Kun; Duan, Li-Ping; Nie, Yong; Wu, Xiao-Lei

    2013-01-01

    Keeping mammalian gastrointestinal (GI) tract communities in balance is crucial for host health maintenance. However, our understanding of microbial communities in the GI tract is still very limited. In this study, samples taken from the GI tracts of C57BL/6 mice were subjected to 16S rRNA gene sequence-based analysis to examine the characteristic bacterial communities along the mouse GI tract, including those present in the stomach, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, cecum, colon and feces. Further a...

  3. Recombinant bacterial hemoglobin alters metabolism of Aspergillus niger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofmann, Gerald; Diano, Audrey; Nielsen, Jens

    2009-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger is used extensively for the production of enzymes and organic acids. A major problem in industrial fermentations with this fungus is to ensure sufficient supply of oxygen required for respiratory metabolism of the fungus. In case of oxygen limitation...... behind the strong gpdA promoter from Aspergillus nidulans. Analysis of secreted metabolites, oxygen uptake, CO2 evolution and biomass formation points towards a relief of stress in the mutant expressing VHB when it is exposed to oxygen limitation. Our findings therefore point to an interesting strategy...

  4. Colonization of plants by human pathogenic bacteria in the course of organic vegetable production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Andreas; Fischer, Doreen; Hartmann, Anton; Schmid, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, increasing numbers of outbreaks caused by the consumption of vegetables contaminated with human pathogenic bacteria were reported. The application of organic fertilizers during vegetable production is one of the possible reasons for contamination with those pathogens. In this study laboratory experiments in axenic and soil systems following common practices in organic farming were conducted to identify the minimal dose needed for bacterial colonization of plants and to identify possible factors like bacterial species or serovariation, plant species or organic fertilizer types used, influencing the success of plant colonization by human pathogenic bacteria. Spinach and corn salad were chosen as model plants and were inoculated with different concentrations of Salmonella enterica sv. Weltevreden, Listeria monocytogenes sv. 4b and EGD-E sv. 1/2a either directly (axenic system) or via agricultural soil amended with spiked organic fertilizers (soil system). In addition to PCR- and culture-based detection methods, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was applied in order to localize bacteria on or in plant tissues. Our results demonstrate that shoots were colonized by the pathogenic bacteria at inoculation doses as low as 4 × 10 CFU/ml in the axenic system or 4 × 10(5) CFU/g in the soil system. In addition, plant species dependent effects were observed. Spinach was colonized more often and at lower inoculation doses compared to corn salad. Differential colonization sites on roots, depending on the plant species could be detected using FISH-CLSM analysis. Furthermore, the transfer of pathogenic bacteria to plants via organic fertilizers was observed more often and at lower initial inoculation doses when fertilization was performed with inoculated slurry compared to inoculated manure. Finally, it could be shown that by introducing a simple washing step, the bacterial contamination was reduced in most cases or even was removed completely in some

  5. Investigating bacterial-animal symbioses with light sheet microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taormina, Michael J; Jemielita, Matthew; Stephens, W Zac; Burns, Adam R; Troll, Joshua V; Parthasarathy, Raghuveer; Guillemin, Karen

    2012-08-01

    Microbial colonization of the digestive tract is a crucial event in vertebrate development, required for maturation of host immunity and establishment of normal digestive physiology. Advances in genomic, proteomic, and metabolomic technologies are providing a more detailed picture of the constituents of the intestinal habitat, but these approaches lack the spatial and temporal resolution needed to characterize the assembly and dynamics of microbial communities in this complex environment. We report the use of light sheet microscopy to provide high-resolution imaging of bacterial colonization of the intestine of Danio rerio, the zebrafish. The method allows us to characterize bacterial population dynamics across the entire organ and the behaviors of individual bacterial and host cells throughout the colonization process. The large four-dimensional data sets generated by these imaging approaches require new strategies for image analysis. When integrated with other "omics" data sets, information about the spatial and temporal dynamics of microbial cells within the vertebrate intestine will provide new mechanistic insights into how microbial communities assemble and function within hosts. PMID:22983029

  6. Interactions between Lactobacillus crispatus and Bacterial Vaginosis (BV-Associated Bacterial Species in Initial Attachment and Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly Kay Jefferson

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Certain anaerobic bacterial species tend to predominate the vaginal flora during bacterial vaginosis (BV, with Gardnerella vaginalis being the most common. However, the exact role of G. vaginalis in BV has not yet been determined. The main goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that G. vaginalis is an early colonizer, paving the way for intermediate (e.g., Fusobacterium nucleatum and late colonizers (e.g., Prevotella bivia. Theoretically, in order to function as an early colonizer, species would need to be able to adhere to vaginal epithelium, even in the presence of vaginal lactobacilli. Therefore, we quantified adherence of G. vaginalis and other BV-associated bacteria to an inert surface pre-coated with Lactobacillus crispatus using a new Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH methodology. We found that G. vaginalis had the greatest capacity to adhere in the presence of L. crispatus. Theoretically, an early colonizer would contribute to the adherence and/or growth of additional species, so we next quantified the effect of G. vaginalis biofilms on the adherence and growth of other BV-associated species by quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR technique. Interestingly, G. vaginalis derived a growth benefit from the addition of a second species, regardless of the species. Conversely, G. vaginalis biofilms enhanced the growth of P. bivia, and to a minor extent of F. nucleatum. These results contribute to our understanding of BV biofilm formation and the progression of the disorder.

  7. On the Relationship Between the Colonizers and the Colonized in“Shooting an Elephant”

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pan Li

    2015-01-01

    George Orwell’s“Shooting an Elephant”is reputed as one of his best works for its artistry and keenness. In this essay, the relationship between the colonizers and the colonized is interesting and worth researching. The author of this thesis holds the opinion that besides the common fact that the colonizers dominate the colonized, the colonized, in reverse, also dominate the British colonizers in the text. And this kind of domination is through two aspects, namely the weakness of human nature and the imperialistic creed.

  8. Methylation status at HYAL2 predicts overall and progression-free survival of colon cancer patients under 5-FU chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfütze, Katrin; Benner, Axel; Hoffmeister, Michael; Jansen, Lina; Yang, Rongxi; Bläker, Hendrik; Herpel, Esther; Ulrich, Alexis; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Brenner, Hermann; Burwinkel, Barbara

    2015-12-01

    DNA methylation variations in gene promoter regions are well documented tumor-specific alterations in human malignancies including colon cancer, which may influence tumor behavior and clinical outcome. As a subset of colon cancer patients does not benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy, predictive biomarkers are desirable. Here, we describe that DNA methylation levels at CpG loci of hyaluronoglucosaminidase 2 (HYLA2) could be used to identify stage II and III colon cancer patients who are most likely to benefit from 5-flourouracil (5-FU) chemotherapy with respect to overall survival and progression-free survival. PMID:26453961

  9. Malakoplakia of the colon associated with colonic adenocarcinoma diagnosed in colonic biopsies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Malakoplakia, typically involving the urinary tract, is an uncommon form of chronic inflammation caused by chronic nfections and characterized by accumulation of macrophages. It has also been found in many other sites such as the gastrointestinal tract, pancreas, liver, lymph Snodes, skin, respiratory tract, adrenal gland, vagina and brain. We present a case of a 64-year-old man referred to our hospital with cachexia and radiologic evidence of metastatic tumor of the liver.Colonoscopy revealed a large malignant-appearing polypoid mass of the ascending colon and multiple distinct polyps throughout the rest of the colon. Biopsies of the ascending colon mass confirmed the diagnosis of adenocarcinoma.Histological examination of two of the other polyps revealed malakoplakia which was characterized by aggregates of granular histiocytes with Michaelis-Gutmann bodies and histochemically confirmed with periodic acid-Schiff and von Kossa stains. This is a rare case diagnosed on endoscopic samples. The majority of reported cases were found in surgical specimens. In addition, the endoscopic appearance of multiple polyps is unusual in malakoplakia.

  10. Long-term changes in human colonic Bifidobacterium populations induced by a 5-day oral amoxicillin-clavulanic acid treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangin, Irène; Lévêque, Christophe; Magne, Fabien; Suau, Antonia; Pochart, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the possible modifications due to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (AMC) treatment on total bacteria and on Bifidobacterium species balance in human colonic microbiota. Eighteen healthy volunteers (19 to 36 years old) were given a 875/125 mg dose of AMC twice a day for 5 days. Fecal samples were obtained before and after antibiotic exposure. After total DNA extraction, total bacteria and bifidobacteria were specifically quantified using real-time PCR. Dominant species were monitored over time using bacterial and bifidobacterial Temporal Temperature Gradient gel Electrophoresis (TTGE). At the end of AMC exposure, total bacterial concentrations as well as bifidobacteria concentrations were significantly reduced compared to before AMC exposure:10.7±0.1 log(10) 16S rRNA gene copies/g vs 11.1±0.1 log(10) (p = 0.003) and 8.1±0.5 log(10) 16S rRNA gene copies/g vs 9.4±0.3 log(10) (p = 0.003), respectively. At the same time, the mean similarity percentages of TTGE bacteria and TTGE bifidobacteria profiles were significantly reduced compared to before AMC exposure: 51.6%±3.5% vs 81.4%±2.1% and 55.8%±7.6% vs 84.5%±4.1%, respectively. Occurrence of B. adolescentis, B. bifidum and B. pseudocatenulatum/B. catenulatum species significantly decreased. Occurrence of B. longum remained stable. Moreover, the number of distinct Bifidobacterium species per sample significantly decreased (1.5±0.3 vs 2.3±0.3; p = 0.01). Two months after AMC exposure, the mean similarity percentage of TTGE profiles was 55.6% for bacteria and 62.3% for bifidobacteria. These results clearly demonstrated that a common antibiotic treatment may qualitatively alter the colonic microbiota. Such modifications may have potential long-term physiological consequences.

  11. Long-term changes in human colonic Bifidobacterium populations induced by a 5-day oral amoxicillin-clavulanic acid treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irène Mangin

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess the possible modifications due to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (AMC treatment on total bacteria and on Bifidobacterium species balance in human colonic microbiota. Eighteen healthy volunteers (19 to 36 years old were given a 875/125 mg dose of AMC twice a day for 5 days. Fecal samples were obtained before and after antibiotic exposure. After total DNA extraction, total bacteria and bifidobacteria were specifically quantified using real-time PCR. Dominant species were monitored over time using bacterial and bifidobacterial Temporal Temperature Gradient gel Electrophoresis (TTGE. At the end of AMC exposure, total bacterial concentrations as well as bifidobacteria concentrations were significantly reduced compared to before AMC exposure:10.7±0.1 log(10 16S rRNA gene copies/g vs 11.1±0.1 log(10 (p = 0.003 and 8.1±0.5 log(10 16S rRNA gene copies/g vs 9.4±0.3 log(10 (p = 0.003, respectively. At the same time, the mean similarity percentages of TTGE bacteria and TTGE bifidobacteria profiles were significantly reduced compared to before AMC exposure: 51.6%±3.5% vs 81.4%±2.1% and 55.8%±7.6% vs 84.5%±4.1%, respectively. Occurrence of B. adolescentis, B. bifidum and B. pseudocatenulatum/B. catenulatum species significantly decreased. Occurrence of B. longum remained stable. Moreover, the number of distinct Bifidobacterium species per sample significantly decreased (1.5±0.3 vs 2.3±0.3; p = 0.01. Two months after AMC exposure, the mean similarity percentage of TTGE profiles was 55.6% for bacteria and 62.3% for bifidobacteria. These results clearly demonstrated that a common antibiotic treatment may qualitatively alter the colonic microbiota. Such modifications may have potential long-term physiological consequences.

  12. Nitrate Assimilation Contributes to Ralstonia solanacearum Root Attachment, Stem Colonization, and Virulence

    OpenAIRE

    Dalsing, Beth L.; Allen, Caitilyn

    2014-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum, an economically important plant pathogen, must attach, grow, and produce virulence factors to colonize plant xylem vessels and cause disease. Little is known about the bacterial metabolism that drives these processes. Nitrate is present in both tomato xylem fluid and agricultural soils, and the bacterium's gene expression profile suggests that it assimilates nitrate during pathogenesis. A nasA mutant, which lacks the gene encoding the catalytic subunit of R. solanacear...

  13. A randomized controlled trial of topical tea tree preparation for MRSA colonized wounds

    OpenAIRE

    Rainbow L.P. Lee; Polly H.M. Leung; Wong, Thomas K. S.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of MRSA (Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) colonized wounds in home care residents is expected to grow continuously as a result of the substantial proportion of older people requiring institutionalized care due to chronic disease and declining functional status, which contribute to more frequent skin breakdown and wound formation. Tea tree oil has been claimed to have anti-bacterial, analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects that have been suggested in many...

  14. Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide modification, Lewis antigen expression, and gastric colonization are cholesterol-dependent

    OpenAIRE

    McGee David J; Hildebrandt Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Helicobacter pylori specifically takes up cholesterol and incorporates it into the bacterial membrane, yet little is currently known about cholesterol's physiological roles. We compared phenotypes and in vivo colonization ability of H. pylori grown in a defined, serum-free growth medium, F12 with 1 mg/ml albumin containing 0 to 50 μg/ml cholesterol. Results While doubling times were largely unaffected by cholesterol, other overt phenotypic changes were observed. H. pylori ...

  15. Luminal oxidants selectively modulate electrogenic ion transport in rat colon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Julio M Mayol; Yolanda Adame-Navarrete; Pilar Alarma-Estrany; Elena Molina-Roldan; Fernando Huete-Toral; Jesus A Fernandez-Represa

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of luminal exposure to H2O2 and two related thiol oxidizing agents on basal and stimulated chloride secretion in native colon using electrophysiological and pharmacological approaches.METHODS: Unstripped rat distal colon segments were mounted in Ussing chambers. Potential difference, cal culated resistance and short-circuit current across unstripped colon segments were monitored with a dual voltage/current clamp. Paracellular permeability was assessed by measuring the mucosa-to-serosa flux of a fluorescent probe (FITC).RESULTS: Luminal exposure to hydrogen peroxide transitorily stimulated chloride secretion without altering barrier function. This stimulatory effect could be blocked by basolateral atropine but not indomethacin. The cysteine and methionine oxidizing compounds, phenylarsine oxide and chloramine T respectively, mimicked the effect of H2O2, except for a drop in transcolonic resistance after 30 min. In contrast to the observed stimulatory effect on basal secretion, cAMP-stimulated electrogenic ion trans port was blunted by luminal H2O2. However, the Ca2+-activated response remained unchanged.CONCLUSION: H2O2 may be an important selective modulator of intestinal ion and water secretion in certain pathologic conditions such as inflammation or ischemiareperfusion by multiple mechanisms.

  16. Enteral nutrient solutions. Limiting bacterial growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paauw, J D; Fagerman, K E; McCamish, M A; Dean, R E

    1984-06-01

    Bacterial contamination of enteral nutrient solutions ( ENS ) in FFcess of food product standards is known to occur in the hospital setting. The large amounts of bacteria often given with ENS have been shown to create a reservoir for nosocomial infections, and nonpathogenic bacteria have been implicated. Patient tolerance is dependent on immune status and the bacterial load delivered to the gut. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bacterial growth-sustaining properties of various ENS and to devise methods to limit bacterial growth. Five commercial products were prepared under sterile conditions. After inoculation with approximately 5 X 10(3) organisms/cm3 of Enterobacter cloacae, each solution was hung at room temperature for 24 hours with samples drawn at fixed intervals and plated for bacterial counts. Bacterial growth rates in Ensure, Travasorb , and Vital were markedly higher than those in Precision and Vivonex. Vivonex was noted to contain potassium sorbate (KS) used as a fungistatic agent. Recent studies have identified KS as a broad-spectrum bacteriostatic food preservative that is federally approved for this use. KS (0.03%) was added to Travasorb inoculated with 5 X 10(3) organisms/cm(3) of E. cloacae. The bacterial growth rate was reduced by 75 per cent, and the final count of 2-3 X 10(4) organisms/ml was within the federally regulated limit for milk. This study suggests that initial inoculum, growth rate, and hang time can be altered to provide a significant reduction in final bacterial counts in ENS . PMID:6428286

  17. Depth-dependent differences in community structure of the human colonic microbiota in health.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aonghus Lavelle

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to develop techniques for spatial microbial assessment in humans and to establish colonic luminal and mucosal spatial ecology, encompassing longitudinal and cross-sectional axes. DESIGN: A microbiological protected specimen brush was used in conjunction with a biopsy forceps to sample the colon in nine healthy volunteers undergoing colonoscopy. Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism analysis was used to determine the major variables in the spatial organization of the colonic microbiota. RESULTS: Protected Specimen Brush sampling retrieved region-specific, uncontaminated samples that were enriched for bacterial DNA and depleted in human DNA when compared to biopsy samples. Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism analysis revealed a segmentation of bacterial communities between the luminal brush and biopsy-associated ecological niches with little variability across the longitudinal axis of the colon and reduced diversity in brush samples. CONCLUSION: These results support the concept of a microbiota with little longitudinal variability but with some degree of segregation between luminal and mucosal communities.

  18. Colonization of Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus), by endophytes encoding gfp marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Adalgisa Ribeiro; Araújo, Welington Luiz; Cursino, Luciana; de Barros Rossetto, Priscilla; Mondin, Mateus; Hungria, Mariangela; Azevedo, João Lúcio

    2013-07-01

    This study reports the introduction of gfp marker in two endophytic bacterial strains (Pantoea agglomerans C33.1, isolated from cocoa, and Enterobacter cloacae PR2/7, isolated from citrus) to monitor the colonization in Madagascar perinwinkle (Catharanthus roseus). Stability of the plasmid encoding gfp was confirmed in vitro for at least 72 h of bacterial growth and after the colonization of tissues, under non-selective conditions. The colonization was observed using fluorescence microscopy and enumeration of culturable endophytes in inoculated perinwinkle plants that grew for 10 and 20 days. Gfp-expressing strains were re-isolated from the inner tissues of surface-sterilized roots and stems of inoculated plants, and the survival of the P. agglomerans C33:1gfp in plants 20 days after inoculation, even in the absence of selective pressure, suggests that is good colonizer. These results indicated that both gfp-tagged strains, especially P. agglomerans C33.1, may be useful tools to deliver enzymes or other proteins in plant. PMID:23695435

  19. Meningitis bacteriana Bacterial meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Teresa Alvarado Guevara

    2006-03-01

    causales son virales lo cual conlleva a las diferentes sub-clasificaciones. También en ciertos casos puede ser ocasionada por hongos, bacterias atípicas, micobacterias y parásitos.In Costa Rica the bacterial meningitis had turn into a high-priority subject in which to monitoring epidemiologist. It had been talked about in the last months, to dice an increase in the attention is published of this subject, due to this phenomenon it becomes necessary to make a revision of topic. Meningitis is an inflammation of leptomeninges and colonization of the subarachnoid cerebrospinal fluid (LCR due to different agents, which produces meningeal symptoms (ex. migraine, neck rigidity, and photophobia and pleocytosis in LCR. De pending on the variables to take into account is possible to group it in different classifications, taking into account the time of evolution are possible to be divided in acute or chronic, to first with few hours or days of beginning of the symptoms, whereas the chronicle also presents a silence course but of the disease of approximately 4 weeks of instauration. There is a difference according to its etiologic agent; they can be infectious and non-infectious. Examples of common non-infectious causes include medications (ex, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and antibiotics and carcinomatosis. A classification exists as well according to the causal agent. The acute bacterial meningitis remarks a bacterial origin of the syndrome, which characterizes by the by an acute onset of meningeal symptoms and neutrophilic pleocytosis. Each one of the bacteriological agents, parasitic or fungus finishes by characterizing the different presentations of the clinical features (ex, meningocóccica meningitis, Cryptococcus meningitis. Finally, there is also the aseptic meningitis, denominated in this form because it’s nonpyogenic cellular response caused by many types of agents. The patients show an acute beginning of symptoms, fever and lymphocytic pleocytosis. After

  20. Pulmonary bacterial pathogens in cystic fibrosis patients and antibiotic therapy: a tool for the health workers

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most common and best known genetic disease involving a defect in transepithelial Cl- transport by mutations in the CF gene on chromosome 7, which codes for the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein (CFTR). The most serious symptoms are observed in the lungs, augmenting the risk of bacterial infection. The objective of this review was to describe the bacterial pathogens colonizing patients with cystic fibrosis. A systematic search was conducted usin...