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Sample records for alters adult pain

  1. Back pain in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Jonathan A; Stumbo, Jessica R

    2013-06-01

    This article provides a summary of the many causes of back pain in adults. There is an overview of the history and physical examination with attention paid to red flags that alert the clinician to more worrisome causes of low back pain. An extensive differential diagnosis for back pain in adults is provided along with key historical and physical examination findings. The various therapeutic options are summarized with an emphasis on evidence-based findings. These reviewed treatments include medication, physical therapy, topical treatments, injections, and complementary and alternative medicine. The indications for surgery and specialty referral are also discussed.

  2. A GCH1 haplotype confers sex-specific susceptibility to pain crises and altered endothelial function in adults with sickle cell anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belfer, Inna; Youngblood, Victoria; Darbari, Deepika S; Wang, Zhengyuan; Diaw, Lena; Freeman, Lita; Desai, Krupa; Dizon, Michael; Allen, Darlene; Cunnington, Colin; Channon, Keith M; Milton, Jacqueline; Hartley, Stephen W; Nolan, Vikki; Kato, Gregory J; Steinberg, Martin H; Goldman, David; Taylor, James G

    2014-02-01

    GTP cyclohydrolase (GCH1) is rate limiting for tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) synthesis, where BH4 is a cofactor for nitric oxide (NO) synthases and aromatic hydroxylases. GCH1 polymorphisms are implicated in the pathophysiology of pain, but have not been investigated in African populations. We examined GCH1 and pain in sickle cell anemia where GCH1 rs8007267 was a risk factor for pain crises in discovery (n = 228; odds ratio [OR] 2.26; P = 0.009) and replication (n = 513; OR 2.23; P = 0.004) cohorts. In vitro, cells from sickle cell anemia subjects homozygous for the risk allele produced higher BH4. In vivo physiological studies of traits likely to be modulated by GCH1 showed rs8007267 is associated with altered endothelial dependent blood flow in females with SCA (8.42% of variation; P = 0.002). The GCH1 pain association is attributable to an African haplotype with where its sickle cell anemia pain association is limited to females (OR 2.69; 95% CI 1.21-5.94; P = 0.01) and has the opposite directional association described in Europeans independent of global admixture. The presence of a GCH1 haplotype with high BH4 in populations of African ancestry could explain the association of rs8007267 with sickle cell anemia pain crises. The vascular effects of GCH1 and BH4 may also have broader implications for cardiovascular disease in populations of African ancestry.

  3. Altered Pain Sensitivity in Elderly Women with Chronic Neck Pain

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background Age-related changes occur in both the peripheral and central nervous system, yet little is known about the influence of chronic pain on pain sensitivity in older persons. The aim of this study was to investigate pain sensitivity in elders with chronic neck pain compared to healthy elders. Methods Thirty elderly women with chronic neck pain and 30 controls were recruited. Measures of pain sensitivity included pressure pain thresholds, heat/cold pain thresholds and suprathreshold hea...

  4. Post surgical pain treatment - adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Anesthesiologists Task Force on Acute Pain Management. Anesthesiology . 2012;116:248-73. PMID: 22227789 www.ncbi. ... chap 18. Sherwood ER, Williams CG, Prough DS. Anesthesiology principles, pain management, and conscious sedation. In: Townsend ...

  5. Counseling Adult Clients Experiencing Chronic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Stephanie T.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic pain affects 35% to 57% of the adult population in the United States and results in billions of dollars spent annually in direct health-care costs and lost productivity. Extensive research confirms the considerable role psychological factors play in the experience and expression of chronic pain. The author discusses implications for…

  6. Advances in understanding the mechanisms and management of persistent pain in older adults.

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    Karp, J F; Shega, J W; Morone, N E; Weiner, D K

    2008-07-01

    Older adults with persistent pain are not simply a chronologically older version of younger pain patients. Pain-related disability in older adults may be driven by pain 'homeostenosis', that is, diminished ability to effectively respond to the stress of persistent pain. Some of the comorbidities of ageing that can contribute to pain homeostenosis include cognitive and physical impairments, increased sensitivity to suprathreshold pain stimuli, medical and psychological comorbidities, altered pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, and social isolation. A key distinction between older and younger individuals with persistent pain is the normal and pathological ageing-associated brain changes. These may alter the expression and experience of pain with impaired descending inhibition and dysfunction of pain gating mechanisms. Cognizance of these brain changes is needed to guide appropriate evaluation and treatment approaches. This paper reviews data that support these ageing-associated phenomena. Specifically, we discuss age-related changes in the brain (both normal and pathological) and in pain physiology; changes in experience and expression of pain that occur with dementia and contribute to pain homeostenosis; and unique aspects of age and pain-associated psychological function and their contribution to disability. We also present data demonstrating changes in brain morphology and neuropsychological performance that accompany persistent non-malignant pain in older adults and the treatment implications of these brain changes. Finally, preliminary data are presented on the efficacy of mindfulness meditation, a treatment that has been examined explicitly in older adults and targets optimizing brain function and descending inhibition.

  7. Bogus visual feedback alters movement-evoked pain onset in people with neck pain

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Pain is a protective perceptual response shaped by contextual, psychological and sensory inputs, particularly those that suggest danger to the body. Sensory cues suggesting that a vulnerable body part is moving towards a painful position, may credibly signal danger and thereby modulate pain . In this double-blind repeated-measures experiment, we used virtual reality to investigate whether manipulating visual-proprioceptive cues can alter movement-evoked pain, in 24 people with neck pain. W...

  8. Assessment of pain experience in adults and children after bracket bonding and initial archwire insertion

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    Marcio José da Silva Campos

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Ninety five percent of orthodontic patients routinely report pain, due to alterations in the periodontal ligament and surrounding soft tissues, with intensity and prevalence varying according to age. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to assess toothache and buccal mucosal pain in adults and children during two initial phases of the orthodontic treatment. METHODS: The intensity of toothache and buccal mucosal pain reported by 20 patients, 10 children (11-13 years and 10 adults (18-37 years was recorded with the aid of a Visual Analog Scale (VAS, during 14 days - 7 days with bonded brackets only and 7 days with the initial archwire inserted. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in pain intensity among adults and children. After bracket bonding, 50% of the children and 70% of the adults reported pain. 70% of both groups reported pain after initial archwire insertion. While adults reported constant, low intensity, buccal mucosal pain, the children showed great variation of pain intensity, but with a trend towards decreasing pain during the assessment period. After initial archwire insertion the peaks of toothache intensity and prevalence occurred 24 hours in children and 48 hours in adults. CONCLUSIONS: In general, children reported pain less frequently than adults did, though with greater intensity.

  9. Vagus Nerve Stimulation Affects Pain Perception in Depressed Adults

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    Jeffrey J Borckardt

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous research suggests that vagus nerve stimulation (VNS affects pain perception in epilepsy patients, with acute VNS decreasing pain thresholds and chronic VNS treatment increasing pain thresholds. However, no studies have investigated the effects of VNS on pain perception in chronically depressed adults, nor have controlled, systematic investigations been published on the differential effects of certain VNS device parameters on pain perception.

  10. Pain in adults with cerebral palsy: impact and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogtle, Laura K

    2009-10-01

    Studies of health in adults with cerebral palsy (CP) have identified pain as a significant concern. Investigations regarding incidence, intensity, and location in adults with CP found that increasing age and inactivity appeared to be related to pain. Activity and participation in adults with CP seem to be only moderately affected by presence of pain. Various sources of pain have been identified in adults with CP but have not been well studied. These include orthopedic issues, poor bone mineral density and related fractures, dental and jaw problems, and nutrition-related pain. Limited healthcare utilization studies suggest that adults with CP use healthcare services, especially preventative and rehabilitative services less, and do not consult physicians regarding pain. Medication solutions for chronic pain are not well studied. Botulinum toxin and intrathecal baclofen have been demonstrated to minimize pain; however, the impact of other medications needs further investigation. Other interventions for pain include small studies examining the use of biofeedback and exercise. Larger studies are needed to establish effectiveness. In order to prevent future generations of adults with CP from experiencing high levels of pain, environmental sources of pain need more specific study, as do interventions that are affordable and easily accessed.

  11. Pain in Older Adults: Epidemiology, Impact and Barriers to Management

    OpenAIRE

    Schofield, Pat

    2007-01-01

    There will be increased numbers of older adults in society in the next few decades.Older adults are more likely to have pain problems and other co-morbidities.Generally pain is poorly managed in older adults and this becomes worse when cognitive impairment exists.The impact of chronic pain on older adults will be greater than that of their younger counterparts in terms of social isolation.Attitudes and barriers exist in both the older adults themselves and their younger counterparts.

  12. Altered motor control patterns in whiplash and chronic neck pain

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    Vasseljen Ottar

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Persistent whiplash associated disorders (WAD have been associated with alterations in kinesthetic sense and motor control. The evidence is however inconclusive, particularly for differences between WAD patients and patients with chronic non-traumatic neck pain. The aim of this study was to investigate motor control deficits in WAD compared to chronic non-traumatic neck pain and healthy controls in relation to cervical range of motion (ROM, conjunct motion, joint position error and ROM-variability. Methods Participants (n = 173 were recruited to three groups: 59 patients with persistent WAD, 57 patients with chronic non-traumatic neck pain and 57 asymptomatic volunteers. A 3D motion tracking system (Fastrak was used to record maximal range of motion in the three cardinal planes of the cervical spine (sagittal, frontal and horizontal, and concurrent motion in the two associated cardinal planes relative to each primary plane were used to express conjunct motion. Joint position error was registered as the difference in head positions before and after cervical rotations. Results Reduced conjunct motion was found for WAD and chronic neck pain patients compared to asymptomatic subjects. This was most evident during cervical rotation. Reduced conjunct motion was not explained by current pain or by range of motion in the primary plane. Total conjunct motion during primary rotation was 13.9° (95% CI; 12.2–15.6 for the WAD group, 17.9° (95% CI; 16.1–19.6 for the chronic neck pain group and 25.9° (95% CI; 23.7–28.1 for the asymptomatic group. As expected, maximal cervical range of motion was significantly reduced among the WAD patients compared to both control groups. No group differences were found in maximal ROM-variability or joint position error. Conclusion Altered movement patterns in the cervical spine were found for both pain groups, indicating changes in motor control strategies. The changes were not related to a

  13. Paramedic assessment of pain in the cognitively impaired adult patient

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    Lord Bill

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Paramedics are often a first point of contact for people experiencing pain in the community. Wherever possible the patient's self report of pain should be sought to guide the assessment and management of this complaint. Communication difficulty or disability such as cognitive impairment associated with dementia may limit the patient's ability to report their pain experience, and this has the potential to affect the quality of care. The primary objective of this study was to systematically locate evidence relating to the use of pain assessment tools that have been validated for use with cognitively impaired adults and to identify those that have been recommended for use by paramedics. Methods A systematic search of health databases for evidence relating to the use of pain assessment tools that have been validated for use with cognitively impaired adults was undertaken using specific search criteria. An extended search included position statements and clinical practice guidelines developed by health agencies to identify evidence-based recommendations regarding pain assessment in older adults. Results Two systematic reviews met study inclusion criteria. Weaknesses in tools evaluated by these studies limited their application in assessing pain in the population of interest. Only one tool was designed to assess pain in acute care settings. No tools were located that are designed for paramedic use. Conclusion The reviews of pain assessment tools found that the majority were developed to assess chronic pain in aged care, hospital or hospice settings. An analysis of the characteristics of these pain assessment tools identified attributes that may limit their use in paramedic practice. One tool - the Abbey Pain Scale - may have application in paramedic assessment of pain, but clinical evaluation is required to validate this tool in the paramedic practice setting. Further research is recommended to evaluate the Abbey Pain Scale and to

  14. Adult-age inflammatory pain experience enhances long-term pain vigilance in rats.

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    Sheng-Guang Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous animal studies have illustrated a modulatory effect of neonatal pain experience on subsequent pain-related behaviors. However, the relationship between chronic pain status in adulthood and future pain perception remains unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the current study, we investigated the effects of inflammatory pain experience on subsequent formalin-evoked pain behaviors and fear conditioning induced by noxious stimulation in adult rats. Our results demonstrated an increase of the second but not the first phase of formalin-induced pain behaviors in animals with a history of inflammatory pain that have recovered. Similarly, rats with persistent pain experience displayed facilitated acquisition and prolonged retention of pain-related conditioning. These effects of prior pain experience on subsequent behavior were prevented by repeated morphine administration at an early stage of inflammatory pain. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that chronic pain diseases, if not properly and promptly treated, may have a long-lasting impact on processing and perception of environmental threats. This may increase the susceptibility of patients to subsequent pain-related disorders, even when chronic pain develops in adulthood. These data highlight the importance of treatment of chronic pain at an early stage.

  15. Role of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in persistent pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apkarian, A Vania; Mutso, Amelia A; Centeno, Maria V; Kan, Lixin; Wu, Melody; Levinstein, Marjorie; Banisadr, Ghazal; Gobeske, Kevin T; Miller, Richard J; Radulovic, Jelena; Hen, René; Kessler, John A

    2016-02-01

    The full role of adult hippocampal neurogenesis (AHN) remains to be determined, yet it is implicated in learning and emotional functions, and is disrupted in negative mood disorders. Recent evidence indicates that AHN is decreased in persistent pain consistent with the idea that chronic pain is a major stressor, associated with negative moods and abnormal memories. Yet, the role of AHN in development of persistent pain has remained unexplored. In this study, we test the influence of AHN in postinjury inflammatory and neuropathic persistent pain-like behaviors by manipulating neurogenesis: pharmacologically through intracerebroventricular infusion of the antimitotic AraC; ablation of AHN by x-irradiation; and using transgenic mice with increased or decreased AHN. Downregulating neurogenesis reversibly diminished or blocked persistent pain; oppositely, upregulating neurogenesis led to prolonged persistent pain. Moreover, we could dissociate negative mood from persistent pain. These results suggest that AHN-mediated hippocampal learning mechanisms are involved in the emergence of persistent pain.

  16. A Community Art Therapy Group for Adults with Chronic Pain

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    O'Neill, Aimee; Moss, Hilary

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a community art therapy group for people living with chronic pain. Nine adults were offered 12 weekly group art therapy sessions that included art therapy activities such as guided imagery focusing on body scans followed by art responses and artistic expressions of the pain experience. This pilot group art therapy program is…

  17. Conditioned pain modulation and pressure pain sensitivity in the adult Danish general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovbjerg, S.; Jørgensen, Torben; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars;

    2017-01-01

    Increased pressure pain sensitivity and impaired descending pain control have been associated with chronic pain, but knowledge on the variability in the adult general population is lacking. Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) and descending pain control as assessed by conditioning pain modulation (CPM......) were recorded in a randomly selected sample (n=2199, 53% females) of the Danish adult general population aged 18-70 years. PPTs were recorded over the tibialis anterior muscle and the upper trapezius muscle. CPM was defined as the difference between PPT assessments before and during conditioning...... associated with lower PPTs (PCPM potency was lower in females compared with males (P≤0.003) whereas no association with age was found. Higher education (P≤0.05), premature withdrawal from the cold pressor test (P≤0.02) and high VAS...

  18. Correlations between brain cortical thickness and cutaneous pain thresholds are atypical in adults with migraine.

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    Todd J Schwedt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: Migraineurs have atypical pain processing, increased expectations for pain, and hypervigilance for pain. Recent studies identified correlations between brain structure and pain sensation in healthy adults. The objective of this study was to compare cortical thickness-to-pain threshold correlations in migraineurs to healthy controls. We hypothesized that migraineurs would have aberrant relationships between the anatomical neurocorrelates of pain processing and pain thresholds. METHODS: Pain thresholds to cutaneously applied heat were determined for 31 adult migraineurs and 32 healthy controls. Cortical thickness was determined from magnetic resonance imaging T1-weighted sequences. Regional cortical thickness-to-pain threshold correlations were determined for migraineurs and controls separately using a general linear model whole brain vertex-wise analysis. A pain threshold-by-group interaction analysis was then conducted to estimate regions where migraineurs show alterations in the pain threshold-to-cortical thickness correlations relative to healthy controls. RESULTS: Controls had negative correlations (p<0.01 uncorrected between pain thresholds and cortical thickness in left posterior cingulate/precuneus, right superior temporal, right inferior parietal, and left inferior temporal regions, and a negative correlation (p<0.01 Monte Carlo corrected with a left superior temporal/inferior parietal region. Migraineurs had positive correlations (p<0.01 uncorrected between pain thresholds and cortical thickness in left superior temporal/inferior parietal, right precuneus, right superior temporal/inferior parietal, and left inferior parietal regions. Cortical thickness-to-pain threshold correlations differed between migraine and control groups (p<0.01 uncorrected for right superior temporal/inferior parietal, right precentral, left posterior cingulate/precuneus, and right inferior parietal regions and (p<0.01 Monte Carlo corrected

  19. Evaluation of elbow pain in adults.

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    Kane, Shawn F; Lynch, James H; Taylor, Jonathan C

    2014-04-15

    The elbow is a complex joint designed to withstand a wide range of dynamic exertional forces. The location and quality of elbow pain can generally localize the injury to one of the four anatomic regions: anterior, medial, lateral, or posterior. The history should include questions about the onset of pain, what the patient was doing when the pain started, and the type and frequency of athletic and occupational activities. Lateral and medial epicondylitis are two of the more common diagnoses and often occur as a result of occupational activities. Patients have pain and tenderness over the affected tendinous insertion that are accentuated with specific movements. If lateral and medial epicondylitis treatments are unsuccessful, ulnar neuropathy and radial tunnel syndrome should be considered. Ulnar collateral ligament injuries occur in athletes participating in sports that involve overhead throwing. Biceps tendinopathy is a relatively common source of pain in the anterior elbow; history often includes repeated elbow flexion with forearm supination and pronation. Olecranon bursitis is a common cause of posterior elbow pain and swelling. It can be septic or aseptic, and is diagnosed based on history, physical examination, and bursal fluid analysis if necessary. Plain radiography is the initial choice for the evaluation of acute injuries and is best for showing bony injuries, soft tissue swelling, and joint effusions. Magnetic resonance imaging is the preferred imaging modality for chronic elbow pain. Musculoskeletal ultrasonography allows for an inexpensive dynamic evaluation of commonly injured structures.

  20. Adult tonsillectomy: postoperative pain depends on indications

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    Olaf Zagólski

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Intense pain is one of the most important postoperative complaints after tonsillectomy. It is often described by patients as comparable to the pain that accompanies an acute tonsillitis. Although recurrent tonsillitis is the most frequent indication for surgery, many tonsillectomies are performed due to other indications and these patients may be unfamiliar with such pain. OBJECTIVE: To verify whether individuals with recurrent tonsillitis experience different post-tonsillectomy pain intensity than those with other indications for surgery, with no history of episodes of acute tonsillitis. METHODS: A total of 61 tonsillectomies were performed under general anesthesia, using a potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP laser (to eliminate the potential influence on the study results of forceful dissection of fibrotic tonsils in patients with history of recurrent tonsillitis and multiple ligations of blood vessels within the tonsillar beds. The patients received 37.5 mg Tramadoli hydrochloridum + 325 mg Paracetamol tablets for 10 days. Postoperative variables included the duration of hospital stay, postoperative hemorrhage and readmission rate. The patients reported pain intensity on consecutive days, pain duration, weight loss on postoperative day 10, character, intensity and duration of swallowing difficulties, and the need for additional doses of painkillers. Healing was also assessed. Capsular nerve fibers were histologically examined in the resected tonsils by immunostainings for general and sensory markers. RESULTS: Indications for the surgery were: recurrent acute tonsillitis (34 patients, no history of recurrent tonsillitis: focus tonsil (20 and intense malodour (7. Pain intensity on postoperative days 3-4 and incidence of readmissions due to dehydration were significantly higher in the group with no history of recurrent tonsillitis. No significant differences in relative densities of protein gene product (PGP 9.5- and

  1. ADHD symptoms and pain among adults in England.

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    Stickley, Andrew; Koyanagi, Ai; Takahashi, Hidetoshi; Kamio, Yoko

    2016-12-30

    Prior research has produced conflicting findings on the association between attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and pain, while studies among community-dwelling adults are lacking. This study examined the association between ADHD symptoms and pain in the general adult population, and the extent to which this association is influenced by comorbid common mental disorders (CMDs). Data came from the 2007 Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey which included a representative sample of the English adult household population aged ≥16 years (N=7403). The Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS) Screener was used to obtain information on ADHD symptoms, while pain was assessed by the degree to which it interfered with work activity in the previous month. The Clinical Interview Schedule Revised (CIS-R) was used to evaluate six categories of CMDs. In a binary logistic regression analysis adjusted for socio-demographic factors and physical health conditions, an ADHD symptom score ≥14 was strongly associated with extreme pain (odds ratio [OR]: 3.15, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.09-4.74). The OR was attenuated greatly after further adjustment for CMDs (OR: 1.64, 95% CI: 1.05-2.58) but remained statistically significant. Adults with ADHD symptoms have higher odds for experiencing pain. CMDs are influential in this association but do not fully explain it.

  2. Measurement Properties of the Non-Communicating Adult Pain Checklist (NCAPC): A Pain Scale for Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, Scored in a Clinical Setting

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    Lotan, M.; Moe-Nilssen, R.; Ljunggren, A. E.; Strand, L. I.

    2010-01-01

    The 18 items' Non-Communicating Adult Pain Checklist (NCAPC) has been developed from the 27 items Non-Communicating Children Pain Checklist to better capture pain behavior of adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (IDD). As part of the NCAPC's measurement properties, internal consistency, reliability and sensitivity to pain have…

  3. Correlation between altered central pain processing and concentration of peritoneal fluid inflammatory cytokines in endometriosis patients with chronic pelvic pain.

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    Neziri, Alban Y; Bersinger, Nick A; Andersen, Ole K; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Mueller, Michael D; Curatolo, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Translational research has not yet elucidated whether alterations in central pain processes are related to peripheral inflammatory processes in chronic pain patients. We tested the hypothesis that the concentration of cytokines in the peritoneal fluid of endometriosis patients with chronic pain correlate with parameters of hyperexcitability of the nociceptive system. The concentrations of 15 peritoneal fluid cytokines were measured in 11 patients with chronic pelvic pain and a diagnosis of endometriosis. Six parameters assessing central pain processes were recorded. Positive correlations between concentration of some cytokines in the peritoneal fluid and amplification of central pain processing were found. The results suggest that inflammatory mechanisms may be important in the pathophysiology of altered central pain processes and that cytokines produced in the environment of endometriosis could act as mediators between the peripheral lesion and changes in central nociceptive processes.

  4. Migraine pain location in adult patients from eastern India

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    Chakravarty Ambar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sparse literature documenting the location of pain at the onset of migraine attacks and during established headaches is available. Objectives: A prospective study (2003-05 on 800 adult migraine patients (International Classifications of Headache Disorders (ICHD, 2:1.1, 1.2.1 and 1.6.1 was conducted to document (a sites of onset of pain and (b location of pain during established attacks (in> 50% occasions through semistructured interviews. Results: Demography: N = 800; M:F = 144:656 (1:4.56; age, 16-42 years (mean, 26 years; duration of migraine, 1-18 years (mean, 6.8 years. 87% of the subjects were ethnic Bengalis from the eastern Indian state of West Bengal, Calcutta being the capital city. Migraine types (on the basis of> 50% headache spells: N = 800; 1.1:668 (83.5%; 1.2.1:18 (2.25%; 1.6.1:114 (14.25%. Location of pain at onset: Unilateral onset was present in 41.38% of the patients; of these, 53.17% had eye pain; 8.16%, frontal pain and 38.67%, temporal pain. In 32.25% of the patients, bilateral/central location of pain, mostly bitemporal or at vertex was noted. Cervico-occipital pain onset was noted in 26.43% patients (predominantly occipital, 14.68%; predominantly cervical, 11.75%. Location of established headaches: In 47.4% of the patients, with unilateral ocular or temporal onset, pain remained at the same site. Pain became hemicranial in 32.9%. In most patients, unilateral frontal onset pain (55.5% became bilateral or holocranial. Most bilateral ocular (69.4% and temporal onset (69.7% pains remained at the same location. However, most bifrontal (55.6% and vertex onset (56.9% pains subsequently became holocranial. Most occipital pains at onset became holocranial (45.3%, but cervical pains subsequently became either hemicranial (38.3% or holocranial (36.2%. Conclusions: This study documents location of pain at the onset and during established headaches in migraine patients largely from a specific ethnic group. Migraine with

  5. Postural stability is altered by the stimulation of pain but not warm receptors in humans

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    Corbeil Philippe

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is now recognized that large diameter myelinated afferents provide the primary source of lower limb proprioceptive information for maintaining an upright standing position. Small diameter afferents transmitting noxious stimuli, however, can also influence motor behaviors. Despite the possible influence of pain on motor behaviors, the effects of pain on the postural control system have not been well documented. Methods Two cutaneous heat stimulations (experiment 1: non-noxious 40 degrees C; experiment 2: noxious 45 degrees C were applied bilaterally on the calves of the subject with two thermal grills to stimulate A delta and C warm receptors and nociceptors in order to examine their effects on postural stability. The non-noxious stimulation induced a gentle sensation of warmth and the noxious stimulation induced a perception of heat pain (visual analogue scores of 0 and 46 mm, respectively. For both experiments, ten healthy young adults were tested with and without heat stimulations of the lower limbs while standing upright on a force platform with eyes open, eyes closed and eyes closed with tendon co-vibration of tibialis anterior and triceps surae muscles. The center of pressure displacements were analyzed to examine how both stimulations affected the regulation of quiet standing and if the effects were exacerbated when vision was removed or ankle proprioception perturbed. Results The stimulation of the warm receptors (40 degrees C did not induce any postural deterioration. With pain (45 degrees C, subjects showed a significant increase in standard deviation, range and mean velocity of postural oscillations as well as standard deviation of the center of pressure velocity. The effects of heat pain were exacerbated when subjects had both their eyes closed and ankle tendons vibrated (increased standard deviation of the center of pressure velocity and mean velocity of the center of pressure. Conclusions A non

  6. Management of total cancer pain: A case of young adult

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    Aanchal Satija

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pain due to cancer is one of the most distressing symptoms experienced by the patients at some or the other time during the course of treatment or disease progression. The multidimensional nature of cancer pain is characterized by various dimensions including physical, social, psychological, and spiritual; which together constitute the term "total pain". Young cancer patients illustrate their unique psychological and developmental needs. This case report highlights the concept of "total cancer pain" in a young adult and demonstrates his distinctive social, spiritual, and psychological sufferings. The report emphasizes that addressing all these concerns is considerably significant in order to provide optimal pain relief to the patient. In the present scenario, it has been done by a skillful multiprofessional team communicating effectively with both the patient and the carer.

  7. Single dose oral flurbiprofen for acute postoperative pain in adults

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    Sultan, Asquad; McQuay, Henry J; Moore, R Andrew; Derry, Sheena

    2014-01-01

    Background Flurbiprofen is a non-selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), related to ibuprofen and naproxen, used to treat acute and chronic painful conditions. There is no systematic review of its use in acute postoperative pain. Objectives To assess efficacy, duration of action, and associated adverse events of single dose oral flurbiprofen in acute postoperative pain in adults. Search methods We searched Cochrane CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Oxford Pain Relief Database for studies to January 2009. Selection criteria Randomised, double blind, placebo-controlled trials of single dose orally administered flurbiprofen in adults with moderate to severe acute postoperative pain. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Pain relief or pain intensity data were extracted and converted into the dichotomous outcome of number of participants with at least 50% pain relief over 4 to 6 hours, from which relative risk (RR) and number needed to treat to benefit (NNT) were calculated. Numbers of participants using rescue medication over specified time periods, and time to use of rescue medication, were sought as additional measures of efficacy. Information on adverse events and withdrawals were collected. Main results Eleven studies compared flurbiprofen (699 participants) with placebo (362 participants) in studies lasting 6 to 12 hours. Studies were of adequate reporting quality, and most participants had pain following dental extractions. The dose of flurbiprofen used was 25 mg to 100 mg, with most information for 50 mg and 100 mg. The NNT for at least 50% pain relief over 4 to 6 hours for flurbiprofen 50 mg compared with placebo (692 participants) was 2.7 (2.3 to 3.3) and for 100 mg (416 participants) it was 2.5 (2.0 to 3.1). With flurbiprofen 50 mg and 100 mg 65% to 70% of participants experienced at least 50% pain relief, compared with 25% to 30% with placebo. Rescue medication was used by 25

  8. Long-Term Effects of Chronic Buspirone during Adolescence Reduce the Adverse Influences of Neonatal Inflammatory Pain and Stress on Adaptive Behavior in Adult Male Rats.

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    Butkevich, Irina P; Mikhailenko, Viktor A; Vershinina, Elena A; Aloisi, Anna M; Barr, Gordon A

    2017-01-01

    Neonatal pain and stress induce long-term changes in pain sensitivity and behavior. Previously we found alterations in pain sensitivity in adolescent rats exposed to early-life adverse events. We tested whether these alterations have long-lasting effects and if those effects can be improved by the 5-hydroxytryptamine 1A (5-HT1A) receptor agonist buspirone injected chronically during the adolescent period. This study investigates: (1) effects of inflammatory pain (the injection of formalin into the pad of a hind paw) or stress (short maternal deprivation-isolation, MI), or their combination in 1-2-day-old rats on the adult basal pain, formalin-induced pain, anxiety and depression; (2) effects of adolescent buspirone in adult rats that experienced similar early-life insults. Changes in nociceptive thresholds were evaluated using the hot plate (HP) and formalin tests; levels of anxiety and depression were assessed with the elevated plus maze and forced swim tests respectively. Both neonatal painful and stressful treatments induced long-term alterations in the forced swim test. Other changes in adult behavioral responses were dependent on the type of neonatal treatment. There was a notable lack of long-term effects of the combination of early inflammatory pain and stress of MI on the pain responses, anxiety levels or on the effects of adolescent buspirone. This study provides the first evidence that chronic injection of buspirone in adolescent rats alters antinociceptive and anxiolytic effects limited to adult rats that showed behavioral alterations induced by early-life adverse treatments. These data highlight the role of 5-HT1A receptors in long-term effects of neonatal inflammatory pain and stress of short MI on adaptive behavior and possibility of correction of the pain and psychoemotional behavior that were altered by adverse pain/stress intervention using buspirone during critical adolescent period.

  9. Validity, Sensitivity, and Responsiveness of the 11-Face Faces Pain Scale to Postoperative Pain in Adult Orthopedic Surgery Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Giang, Nguyen; Chiu, Hsiao-Yean; Thai, Duong Hong; Kuo, Shu-Yu; Tsai, Pei-Shan

    2015-10-01

    Pain is common in patients after orthopedic surgery. The 11-face Faces Pain Scale has not been validated for use in adult patients with postoperative pain. To assess the validity of the 11-face Faces Pain Scale and its ability to detect responses to pain medications, and to determine whether the sensitivity of the 11-face Faces Pain Scale for detecting changes in pain intensity over time is associated with gender differences in adult postorthopedic surgery patients. The 11-face Faces Pain Scale was translated into Vietnamese using forward and back translation. Postoperative pain was assessed using an 11-point numerical rating scale and the 11-face Faces Pain Scale on the day of surgery, and before (Time 1) and every 30 minutes after (Times 2-5) the patients had taken pain medications on the first postoperative day. The 11-face Faces Pain Scale highly correlated with the numerical rating scale (r = 0.78, p pain intensity, but not gender-time interaction effect, over the five time points was significant (F = 182.03, p Pain Scale is appropriate for measuring acute postoperative pain in adults.

  10. Juvenile Fibromyalgia: Different from the Adult Chronic Pain Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashikar-Zuck, Susmita; King, Christopher; Ting, Tracy V; Arnold, Lesley M

    2016-04-01

    While a majority of research has focused on adult fibromyalgia (FM), recent evidence has provided insights into the presence and impact of FM in children and adolescents. Commonly referred as juvenile fibromyalgia (JFM), youths, particularly adolescent girls, present with persistent widespread pain and cardinal symptoms observed in adult FM. A majority of youth with JFM continue to experience symptoms into adulthood, which highlights the importance of early recognition and intervention. Some differences are observed between adult and juvenile-onset FM syndrome with regard to comorbidities (e.g., joint hypermobility is common in JFM). Psychological comorbidities are common but less severe in JFM. Compared to adult FM, approved pharmacological treatments for JFM are lacking, but non-pharmacologic approaches (e.g., cognitive-behavioral therapy and exercise) show promise. A number of conceptual issues still remain including (1) directly comparing similarities and differences in symptoms and (2) identifying shared and unique mechanisms underlying FM in adults and youths.

  11. Sex-based differences in brain alterations across chronic pain conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Arpana; Mayer, Emeran A; Fling, Connor; Labus, Jennifer S; Naliboff, Bruce D; Hong, Jui-Yang; Kilpatrick, Lisa A

    2017-01-02

    Common brain mechanisms are thought to play a significant role across a multitude of chronic pain syndromes. In addition, there is strong evidence for the existence of sex differences in the prevalence of chronic pain and in the neurobiology of pain. Thus, it is important to consider sex when developing general principals of pain neurobiology. The goal of the current Mini-Review is to evaluate what is known about sex-specific brain alterations across multiple chronic pain populations. A total of 15 sex difference and 143 single-sex articles were identified from among 412 chronic pain neuroimaging articles. Results from sex difference studies indicate more prominent primary sensorimotor structural and functional alterations in female chronic pain patients compared with male chronic pain patients: differences in the nature and degree of insula alterations, with greater insula reactivity in male patients; differences in the degree of anterior cingulate structural alterations; and differences in emotional-arousal reactivity. Qualitative comparisons of male-specific and female-specific studies appear to be consistent with the results from sex difference studies. Given these differences, mixed-sex studies of chronic pain risk creating biased data or missing important information and single-sex studies have limited generalizability. The advent of large-scale neuroimaging databases will likely aid in building a more comprehensive understanding of sex differences and commonalities in brain mechanisms underlying chronic pain. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Altered central sensitization and pain modulation in the CNS in chronic joint pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Skou, Søren Thorgaard; Nielsen, Thomas Arendt

    2015-01-01

    and central pain mechanisms are not fully understood, and safe and efficient analgesic drugs are not available. The pain associated with joint pain is highly individual, and features from radiological imaging have not demonstrated robust associations with the pain manifestations. In recent years, a variety......Musculoskeletal pain disorders are the second largest contributor to global disability underlining the significance of effective treatments. However, treating chronic musculoskeletal pain, and chronic joint pain (osteoarthritis (OA)) in particular, is challenging as the underlying peripheral...... of human quantitative pain assessment tools (quantitative sensory testing (QST)) have been developed providing new opportunities for profiling patients and reaching a greater understanding of the mechanisms involved in chronic joint pain. As joint pain is a complex interaction between many different pain...

  13. Altered Neural Correlates of Emotion Associated Pain Processing in Persistent Somatoform Pain Disorder: An fMRI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yanli; Yan, Chao; Huang, Tianming; Fan, Mingxia; Liu, Liang; Zhao, Zhiyong; Ni, Kaiji; Jiang, Hong; Huang, Xiao; Lu, Zheng; Wu, Wenyuan; Zhang, Mingyuan; Fan, Xiaoduo

    2016-09-19

    Patients with persistent somatoform pain disorder (PSPD) suffer from long-term pain and emotional conflicts. Recently, accumulating evidence indicated that emotion has a significant role in pain perception of somatoform pain disorder. To further understand the association between emotion and pain-related brain activities, functional activities of patients with PSPD fulfilling ICD-10 criteria and healthy controls were assessed using functional magnetic resonance imaging technology, while participants viewed a series of positive, neutral, or negative pictures with or without pinprick pain stimulation. Results showed that patients with PSPD had altered brain activities in the parietal gyrus, temporal gyrus, posterior cingulate cortex, prefrontal cortex, and parahippocampus in response to pinprick pain stimuli during different emotions compared with the healthy control group. Moreover, patients with PSPD consistently showed hyperactivities in the prefrontal, the fusiform gyrus and the insula in response to negative stimuli under pinprick pain vs. non-pain condition. The current findings provide some insights into the underlying relationship between emotion and pain-related brain activity in patients with PSPD, which is of both theoretical and clinical importance.

  14. Low-frequency BOLD fluctuations demonstrate altered thalamocortical connectivity in diabetic neuropathic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Migliorati Filippo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this paper we explored thalamocortical functional connectivity in a group of eight patients suffering from peripheral neuropathic pain (diabetic pain, and compared it with that of a group of healthy subjects. We hypothesized that functional interconnections between the thalamus and cortex can be altered after years of ongoing chronic neuropathic pain. Results Functional connectivity was studied through a resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI paradigm: temporal correlations between predefined regions of interest (primary somatosensory cortex, ventral posterior lateral thalamic nucleus, medial dorsal thalamic nucleus and the rest of the brain were systematically investigated. The patient group showed decreased resting state functional connectivity between the thalamus and the cortex. Conclusion This supports the idea that chronic pain can alter thalamocortical connections causing a disruption of thalamic feedback, and the view of chronic pain as a thalamocortical dysrhythmia.

  15. Sleep Problems and Pain : A Longitudinal Cohort Study in Emerging Adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonvanie, Irma J; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Rosmalen, Judith G M; Janssens, Karin A M

    2016-01-01

    Sleep and pain are thought to be bidirectional related on a daily basis in adolescents with chronic pain complaints. In addition, sleep problems have been shown to predict the long-term onset of musculoskeletal pain in middle-aged adults. Yet, the long-term effects of sleep problems on pain duration

  16. Pain perception is altered by a nucleotide polymorphism in SCN9A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimann, Frank; Cox, James J; Belfer, Inna; Diatchenko, Luda; Zaykin, Dmitri V; McHale, Duncan P; Drenth, Joost P H; Dai, Feng; Wheeler, Jerry; Sanders, Frances; Wood, Linda; Wu, Tian-Xia; Karppinen, Jaro; Nikolajsen, Lone; Männikkö, Minna; Max, Mitchell B; Kiselycznyk, Carly; Poddar, Minakshi; Te Morsche, Rene H M; Smith, Shad; Gibson, Dustin; Kelempisioti, Anthi; Maixner, William; Gribble, Fiona M; Woods, C Geoffrey

    2010-03-16

    The gene SCN9A is responsible for three human pain disorders. Nonsense mutations cause a complete absence of pain, whereas activating mutations cause severe episodic pain in paroxysmal extreme pain disorder and primary erythermalgia. This led us to investigate whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in SCN9A were associated with differing pain perception in the general population. We first genotyped 27 SCN9A SNPs in 578 individuals with a radiographic diagnosis of osteoarthritis and a pain score assessment. A significant association was found between pain score and SNP rs6746030; the rarer A allele was associated with increased pain scores compared to the commoner G allele (P = 0.016). This SNP was then further genotyped in 195 pain-assessed people with sciatica, 100 amputees with phantom pain, 179 individuals after lumbar discectomy, and 205 individuals with pancreatitis. The combined P value for increased A allele pain was 0.0001 in the five cohorts tested (1277 people in total). The two alleles of the SNP rs6746030 alter the coding sequence of the sodium channel Nav1.7. Each was separately transfected into HEK293 cells and electrophysiologically assessed by patch-clamping. The two alleles showed a difference in the voltage-dependent slow inactivation (P = 0.042) where the A allele would be predicted to increase Nav1.7 activity. Finally, we genotyped 186 healthy females characterized by their responses to a diverse set of noxious stimuli. The A allele of rs6746030 was associated with an altered pain threshold and the effect mediated through C-fiber activation. We conclude that individuals experience differing amounts of pain, per nociceptive stimulus, on the basis of their SCN9A rs6746030 genotype.

  17. Abdominal Pain, the Adolescent and Altered Brain Structure and Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine S Hubbard

    Full Text Available Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS is a functional gastrointestinal (GI disorder of unknown etiology. Although relatively common in children, how this condition affects brain structure and function in a pediatric population remains unclear. Here, we investigate brain changes in adolescents with IBS and healthy controls. Imaging was performed with a Siemens 3 Tesla Trio Tim MRI scanner equipped with a 32-channel head coil. A high-resolution T1-weighted anatomical scan was acquired followed by a T2-weighted functional scan. We used a surface-based morphometric approach along with a seed-based resting-state functional connectivity (RS-FC analysis to determine if groups differed in cortical thickness and whether areas showing structural differences also showed abnormal RS-FC patterns. Patients completed the Abdominal Pain Index and the GI Module of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory to assess abdominal pain severity and impact of GI symptoms on health-related quality of life (HRQOL. Disease duration and pain intensity were also assessed. Pediatric IBS patients, relative to controls, showed cortical thickening in the posterior cingulate (PCC, whereas cortical thinning in posterior parietal and prefrontal areas were found, including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC. In patients, abdominal pain severity was related to cortical thickening in the intra-abdominal area of the primary somatosensory cortex (SI, whereas HRQOL was associated with insular cortical thinning. Disease severity measures correlated with cortical thickness in bilateral DLPFC and orbitofrontal cortex. Patients also showed reduced anti-correlations between PCC and DLPFC compared to controls, a finding that may reflect aberrant connectivity between default mode and cognitive control networks. We are the first to demonstrate concomitant structural and functional brain changes associated with abdominal pain severity, HRQOL related to GI-specific symptoms, and disease

  18. Neuroplastic alteration of TTX-resistant sodium channel with visceral pain and morphine-induced hyperalgesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen J

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Jinghong Chen,1,2,4 Ze-hui Gong,4 Hao Yan,2 Zhijun Qiao,3 Bo-yi Qin41Department of Internal Medicine, Neuroscience Program, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, USA; 2The Divisions of Pharmacy, Pharmacology core lab, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA; 3University of Texas-Pan American, Edinburg, TX, USA; 4Beijing Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Beijing, China Abstract: The discovery of the tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R Na+ channel in nociceptive neurons has provided a special target for analgesic intervention. In a previous study we found that both morphine tolerance and persistent visceral inflammation resulted in visceral hyperalgesia. It has also been suggested that hyperexcitability of sensory neurons due to altered TTX-R Na+ channel properties and expression contributes to hyperalgesia; however, we do not know if some TTX-R Na+ channel property changes can be triggered by visceral hyperalgesia and morphine tolerance, or whether there are similar molecular or channel mechanisms in both situations. To evaluate the effects of morphine tolerance and visceral inflammation on the channel, we investigated the dorsal root ganglia (DRG neuronal change following these chronic treatments. Using whole-cell patch clamp recording, we recorded TTX-R Na+ currents in isolated adult rat lumbar and sacral (L6-S2 DRG neurons from normal and pathologic rats with colon inflammatory pain or chronic morphine treatment. We found that the amplitudes of TTX-R Na+ currents were signiflcantly increased in small-diameter DRG neurons with either morphine tolerance or visceral inflammatory pain. Meanwhile, the result also showed that those treatments altered the kinetics properties of the electrical current (ie, the activating and inactivating speed of the channel was accelerated. Our current results suggested that in both models, visceral chronic inflammatory pain and morphine tolerance causes electrophysiological changes in voltage

  19. Social disruption alters pain and cognition in an animal model of multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linsenbardt, H R; Cook, J L; Young, E E; Vichaya, E G; Young, C R; Reusser, N M; Storts, R; Welsh, C J; Meagher, M W

    2015-11-15

    Although pain and cognitive deficits are widespread and debilitating symptoms of multiple sclerosis (MS), they remain poorly understood. Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) infection is an animal model of MS where disease course is exacerbated by prior stressors. Here chronic infection coupled with prior social stress increased pain behavior and impaired hippocampal-dependent memory consolidation during the demyelinating phase of disease in SJL mice. These results suggest that the TMEV model may be useful in investigating pain and cognitive impairments in MS. However, in contrast to prior Balb/cJ studies, stress failed to consistently alter behavioral and physiological indicators of disease course.

  20. Older adults' pain communication during ambulatory medical visits: an exploration of communication accommodation theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hehl, Jennifer; McDonald, Deborah Dillon

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this descriptive secondary analysis was to explore the use of Communication Accommodation Theory as a framework to examine pain communication strategies used by older adults and their primary care practitioners during medical ambulatory care visits. Ambulatory medical visits for 22 older adults with moderate or greater osteoarthritis pain were audiotaped, transcribed verbatim, and coded by two independent raters for six a priori communication strategies derived from the attuning strategies of Communication Accommodation Theory: (1) patient selecting the pain topic; (2) patient taking a turn; (3) patient maintaining focus on the pain topic; (4) practitioner using an open-ended question without social desirability to start the pain discussion; (5) practitioner encouraging the patient to take a turn by asking open-ended questions; and (6) practitioner interruptions. The majority of practitioners did not start the pain discussion with an open-ended question, but did not interrupt the older adults as they discussed their pain. Five (22.7%) of the older adults did not discuss their osteoarthritis pain during the ambulatory medical visit. The majority of patients took their turn during the pain discussion, but did not maintain focus while describing important osteoarthritis pain information to their practitioner. Practitioners might assist older adults to communicate more information about their pain by initiating the pain discussion with an open-ended pain question. Older adults might provide more pain information to their practitioner by staying on the pain topic until they have completed all of the pain information they wish to discuss with the practitioner.

  1. Does Parkinson's disease lead to alterations in the facial expression of pain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priebe, Janosch A; Kunz, Miriam; Morcinek, Christian; Rieckmann, Peter; Lautenbacher, Stefan

    2015-12-15

    Hypomimia which refers to a reduced degree in facial expressiveness is a common sign in Parkinson's disease (PD). The objective of our study was to investigate how hypomimia affects PD patients' facial expression of pain. The facial expressions of 23 idiopathic PD patients in the Off-phase (without dopaminergic medication) and On-phase (after dopaminergic medication intake) and 23 matched controls in response to phasic heat-pain and a temporal summation procedure were recorded and analyzed for overall and specific alterations using the Facial Action Coding System (FACS). We found reduced overall facial activity in response to pain in PD patients in the Off which was less pronounced in the On. Especially the highly pain-relevant eye-narrowing occurred less frequently in PD patients than in controls in both phases while frequencies of other pain-relevant movements, like upper lip raise (in the On) and contraction of the eyebrows (in both phases), did not differ between groups. Moreover, opening of the mouth (which is often not considered as pain-relevant) was the most frequently displayed movement in PD patients, whereas eye-narrowing was the most frequent movement in controls. Not only overall quantitative changes in the degree of facial pain expressiveness occurred in PD patients but also qualitative changes were found. The latter refer to a strongly affected encoding of the sensory dimension of pain (eye-narrowing) while the encoding of the affective dimension of pain (contradiction of the eyebrows) was preserved. This imbalanced pain signal might affect pain communication and pain assessment.

  2. Network community structure alterations in adult schizophrenia: identification and localization of alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerman-Sinkoff, Dov B; Barch, Deanna M

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of literature suggests functional connectivity alterations in schizophrenia. While findings have been mixed, evidence points towards a complex pattern of hyper-connectivity and hypo-connectivity. This altered connectivity can be represented and analyzed using the mathematical frameworks provided by graph and information theory to represent functional connectivity data as graphs comprised of nodes and edges linking the nodes. One analytic technique in this framework is the determination and analysis of network community structure, which is the grouping of nodes into linked communities or modules. This data-driven technique finds a best-fit structure such that nodes in a given community have greater connectivity with nodes in their community than with nodes in other communities. These community structure representations have been found to recapitulate known neural-systems in healthy individuals, have been used to identify novel functional systems, and have identified and localized community structure alterations in a childhood onset schizophrenia cohort. In the present study, we sought to determine whether community structure alterations were present in an adult onset schizophrenia cohort while stringently controlling for sources of imaging artifacts. Group level average graphs in healthy controls and individuals with schizophrenia exhibited visually similar network community structures and high amounts of normalized mutual information (NMI). However, testing of individual subject community structures identified small but significant alterations in community structure with alterations being driven by changes in node community membership in the somatosensory, auditory, default mode, salience, and subcortical networks.

  3. EFFECT OF MYOFASCIAL RELEASE THERAPY ON PAIN RELATED DISABILITY, QUALITY OF SLEEP AND DEPRESSION IN OLDER ADULTS WITH CHRONIC LOW BACK PAIN

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. B.Arun, MPT, PhD

    2014-01-01

    Low back pain was experienced by 50% of older adults that has threatened to quality of life. The economic cost of low back pain is more in older adults. Various literatures found that there is strong relationships exist between the low back pain and the psychosocial factors like sleep disturbances, depression, mood sway and chronic illness. Studies has found that depression is one of the commonest psychological problem faced by older adults which relates to other factors like pain, sleep dist...

  4. Prevalence and anatomical location of muscle tenderness in adults with nonspecific neck/shoulder pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars L; Hansen, Klaus; Mortensen, Ole S;

    2011-01-01

    Many adults experience bothersome neck/shoulder pain. While research and treatment strategies often focus on the upper trapezius, other neck/shoulder muscles may be affected as well. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the prevalence and anatomical location of muscle tenderness in adults...... with nonspecific neck/shoulder pain....

  5. Relief of abdominal pain by morphine without altering physical signs in acute appendicitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Yong; CHEN Jia-yong; GUO Hao; ZHANG Yi; LIANG Dao-ming; ZHOU Dong; ZHAO Hui; LIN Feng

    2010-01-01

    Background Abdominal pain is a common symptom among patients with acute appendicitis, yet these patients havelong been denied relief from suffering because of widespread misconceptions associated with the use of opioids. Wedetermined whether morphine hydrochloride masked the physical signs in adults with acute appendicitis and assessedthe efficacy of morphine in relieving abdominal pain.Methods A prospective, double-blind, placebo controlled, clinical trial was conducted with 106 adult patients between16 and 70 years old with acute appendicitis. Patients were randomly divided into a morphine group (n=54) or a normalsaline group (n=52). All patients presented with acute abdominal pain with onset within 3 days. The morphine groupreceived hypodermic injection of morphine (0.15 mg/kg; maximum 20 mg) and the control group members were given anequivalent volume of normal saline solution. The clinical symptoms, physical signs, and patients' cooperation duringphysical examination were assessed before and after 30 minutes of morphine or normal saline administration.Results Abdominal pain was significantly relieved and the patients' cooperation was improved in the morphine groupafter 30 minutes treatment compared with the control group and before morphine administration (P0.05).Conclusions Morphine relieved abdominal pain and improved the patients' cooperation for treatment and care.Furthermore, the morphine did not mask the physical signs of acute appendicitis.

  6. Orofacial pain, jaw function, and temporomandibular disorders in adult women with a history of juvenile chronic arthritis or persistent juvenile chronic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakke, M.; Zak, M.; Jensen, B.L.;

    2001-01-01

    Orofacial pain, jaw function, temporomandibular disorders, adult women persistent juvenil chronic arthritis......Orofacial pain, jaw function, temporomandibular disorders, adult women persistent juvenil chronic arthritis...

  7. Chronic pain self-management for older adults: a randomized controlled trial [ISRCTN11899548

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersek, Mary; Turner, Judith A; Cain, Kevin C; Kemp, Carol A

    2004-01-01

    Background Chronic pain is a common and frequently disabling problem in older adults. Clinical guidelines emphasize the need to use multimodal therapies to manage persistent pain in this population. Pain self-management training is a multimodal therapy that has been found to be effective in young to middle-aged adult samples. This training includes education about pain as well as instruction and practice in several management techniques, including relaxation, physical exercise, modification of negative thoughts, and goal setting. Few studies have examined the effectiveness of this therapy in older adult samples. Methods/Design This is a randomized, controlled trial to assess the effectiveness of a pain self-management training group intervention, as compared with an education-only control condition. Participants are recruited from retirement communities in the Pacific Northwest of the United States and must be 65 years or older and experience persistent, noncancer pain that limits their activities. The primary outcome is physical disability, as measured by the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire. Secondary outcomes are depression (Geriatric Depression Scale), pain intensity (Brief Pain Inventory), and pain-related interference with activities (Brief Pain Inventory). Randomization occurs by facility to minimize cross-contamination between groups. The target sample size is 273 enrolled, which assuming a 20% attrition rate at 12 months, will provide us with 84% power to detect a moderate effect size of .50 for the primary outcome. Discussion Few studies have investigated the effects of multimodal pain self-management training among older adults. This randomized controlled trial is designed to assess the efficacy of a pain self-management program that incorporates physical and psychosocial pain coping skills among adults in the mid-old to old-old range. PMID:15285783

  8. Associations between Adult Attachment Dimensions And Attitudes Toward Pain Behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lachlan A McWilliams

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite the important role positive reinforcement of pain behaviour is believed to play in chronic pain, there is a paucity of research regarding factors that influence the provision of such reinforcement. Attachment theory suggests that individuals high in attachment avoidance view the pain behaviour of others in a negative manner and would, therefore, provide little reinforcement of pain behaviour. As an initial step in evaluating this model, relationships between attachment dimensions and attitudes toward pain behaviour were examined. Attachment avoidance was hypothesized to be negatively associated with accepting attitudes toward pain behaviour.

  9. Associations between Adult Attachment Dimensions And Attitudes Toward Pain Behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    McWilliams, Lachlan A; Paul DJ Murphy; S Jeffrey Bailey

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite the important role positive reinforcement of pain behaviour is believed to play in chronic pain, there is a paucity of research regarding factors that influence the provision of such reinforcement. Attachment theory suggests that individuals high in attachment avoidance view the pain behaviour of others in a negative manner and would, therefore, provide little reinforcement of pain behaviour. As an initial step in evaluating this model, relationships between attachment dim...

  10. Coping with chronic pain among younger, middle-aged, and older adults living with neurological injury and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molton, Ivan; Jensen, Mark P; Ehde, Dawn M; Carter, Gregory T; Kraft, George; Cardemas, Diana D

    2008-01-01

    Objective. This article compares use of pain coping strategies among older, middle-aged, and younger adults living with chronic pain and seeks to determine whether the relationship between pain severity and coping is moderated by age. Method. Participants were 464 adults reporting chronic pain secondary to multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injury, or neuromuscular disease. Participants completed a survey including measures of pain severity and the Chronic Pain Coping Inventory. Results. After controlling for clinical and demographic variables, older adults (older than 60) reported a wider range of frequently used strategies and significantly more frequent engagement in activity pacing, seeking social support, and use of coping self-statements than did younger or middle-aged adults. Moderation analyses suggest that, for younger adults, efforts at coping generally increased with greater pain severity, whereas this relationship did not exist for older adults. Discussion. These data suggest differences in the quantity and quality of pain coping among age groups.

  11. Alterations in the Anandamide Metabolism in the Development of Neuropathic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Malek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Endocannabinoids (EC, particularly anandamide (AEA, released constitutively in pain pathways might be accountable for the inhibitory effect on nociceptors. Pathogenesis of neuropathic pain may reflect complex remodeling of the dorsal root ganglia (DRGs and spinal cord EC system. Multiple pathways involved both in the biosynthesis and degradation of AEA have been suggested. We investigated the local synthesis and degradation features of AEA in DRGs and spinal cord during the development and maintenance of pain in a model of chronic constriction injury (CCI. All AEA synthesis and degradation enzymes are present on the mRNA level in DRGs and lumbar spinal cord of intact as well as CCI-treated animals. Deregulation of EC system components was consistent with development of pain phenotype at days 3, 7, and 14 after CCI. The expression levels of enzymes involved in AEA degradation was significantly upregulated ipsilateral in DRGs and spinal cord at different time points. Expression of enzymes of the alternative, sPLA2-dependent and PLC-dependent, AEA synthesis pathways was elevated in both of the analyzed structures at all time points. Our data have shown an alteration of alternative AEA synthesis and degradation pathways, which might contribute to the variation of AEA levels and neuropathic pain development.

  12. Alterations in fecal microbiota composition by probiotic supplementation in healthy adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Nadja B; Bryrup, Thomas; Allin, Kristine H

    2016-01-01

    references of relevant papers. Search terms included healthy adult, probiotic, bifidobacterium, lactobacillus, gut microbiota, fecal microbiota, intestinal microbiota, intervention, and (clinical) trial. RCTs of solely probiotic supplementation and placebo in healthy adults that examined alteration...

  13. Reduction of pain sensitivity after somatosensory therapy in adults with cerebral palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Inmaculada eRiquelme; Anna eZamorano; Pedro eMontoya

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Pain and deficits in somatosensory processing seem to play a relevant role in cerebral palsy (CP). Rehabilitation techniques based on neuroplasticity mechanisms may induce powerful changes in the organization of the primary somatosensory cortex and have been proved to reduce levels of pain and discomfort in neurological pathologies. However, little is known about the efficacy of such interventions for pain sensitivity in CP individuals. Methods. Adults with cerebral palsy participa...

  14. Opioid-induced hyperalgesia in community-dwelling adults with chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooten, W Michael; Lamer, Tim J; Twyner, Channing

    2015-06-01

    The hyperalgesic effects of long-term opioid use in community-dwelling adults with chronic pain have not been widely reported. Therefore, the primary aim of this study was to determine the associations between opioid use and heat pain (HP) perception in a sample of community-dwelling adults with chronic pain. The study cohort involved 187 adults (85 opioid and 102 nonopioid) with chronic pain consecutively admitted to an outpatient interdisciplinary pain treatment program. Heat pain perception was assessed using a validated quantitative sensory test method of levels. An effect of opioid use was observed for nonstandardized (P = 0.004) and standardized (P = 0.005) values of HP 5-0.5 in which values of the opioid group were lower (more hyperalgesic) compared with those of the nonopioid group. HP 5-0.5 is a measure of the slope of the line connecting HP 0.5 (HP threshold) and HP 5 (intermediate measure of HP tolerance). In univariable (P = 0.019) and multiple variable (P = 0.003) linear regression analyses (adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, work status, pain diagnosis, pain severity, depression, and pain catastrophizing), opioid use was associated with lower (more hyperalgesic) nonstandardized values of HP 5-0.5. Similarly, in univariable (P = 0.004) and multiple variable (P = 0.011) linear regression analyses (adjusted for work status, pain diagnosis, pain severity, depression, and pain catastrophizing), opioid use was associated with lower standardized values of HP 5-0.5. In this sample of community-dwelling adults, these observations suggest that long-term opioid use was associated with hyperalgesia independent of other clinical factors known to influence HP perception.

  15. Prevalence and anatomical location of muscle tenderness in adults with nonspecific neck/shoulder pain

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Many adults experience bothersome neck/shoulder pain. While research and treatment strategies often focus on the upper trapezius, other neck/shoulder muscles may be affected as well. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the prevalence and anatomical location of muscle tenderness in adults with nonspecific neck/shoulder pain. Methods Clinical neck/shoulder examination at two large office workplaces in Copenhagen, Denmark. 174 women and 24 men (aged 25-65 years) with ...

  16. Altered emotionality leads to increased pain tolerance in amyloid beta (Abeta1-40) peptide-treated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamplona, Fabrício A; Pandolfo, Pablo; Duarte, Filipe S; Takahashi, Reinaldo N; Prediger, Rui D S

    2010-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the decline in cognitive functions, but it is also related to emotional disturbances. Since pain experience results from a complex integration of sensory, cognitive and affective processes, it is not surprising that AD patients display a distinct pattern of pain responsivity. We evaluated whether mice treated with amyloid beta (Abeta) peptide-thought to be critical in the pathogenesis of AD-exhibit altered pain responses and its relation to altered emotionality. Mice received a single i.c.v. injection of vehicle (PBS) or Abeta fragment (1-40) (400pmol/mice) and after 30 days, they were evaluated in tests of pain (hotplate, footshock-sensitivity), learning/memory (water-maze), emotionality (elevated plus-maze, forced swim) and locomotion (open-field). Abeta(1-40)-treated mice presented similar latencies to the control group in the hotplate test and similar nociceptive flinch threshold in the footshock-sensitivity test. However, they presented an increased jump threshold in footshock-sensitivity, suggesting increased pain tolerance. Altered emotionality was observed in the elevated plus-maze (EPM) and forced-swim tests (FST), suggesting anxiogenic-like and depressive-like states, respectively. A multifactorial principal component analysis (PCA) revealed that jump threshold of the footshock-sensitivity test falls within 'Emotionality' and 'Pain', showing moderate correlation with each one of the components of behavior. Acute treatment with the antidepressant desipramine (10mg/kg, i.p.) reduced the jump threshold (i.e. pain tolerance) and time of immobility in FST (i.e. depressive-like state). Flinch threshold (i.e. pain sensitivity), locomotion and anxiety were not altered with desipramine treatment. These results suggest that Abeta(1-40) peptide increases pain tolerance, but not pain sensitivity in mice, which seems to be linked to alterations in cognitive/emotional components of pain

  17. Long-lasting neonatal inflammation enhances pain responses to subsequent inflammation, but not peripheral nerve injury in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Eun Jeong; Back, Seung Keun; Kim, Myung Ah; Li, Chengjin; Lee, Jaehee; Jeong, Keun Yeong; Na, Heung Sik

    2009-05-01

    The early postnatal period has been suggested to be the vulnerable time for structural and functional reorganization of sensory systems, and painful stimuli at this time may alter neuronal circuits, thereby leading to changes in an individual's response to pain later in life. In the present study, we examined whether inflammatory experience in the early life can affect pain responses to subsequent noxious insults later in life. The two groups of neonatal rats, treated with an inflammatory irritant and untreated, were subjected to inflammation and peripheral nerve injury in adulthood. Neonatal inflammation was induced by injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA, 25 microl) into the hindpaw or tail of newborn rat pups. Adult rats which had suffered from neonatal paw inflammation at P0 were subjected to re-injection of CFA into the paw neonatally exposed to CFA or L5 spinal nerve ligation. Paw thickness and histology of inflamed paw were examined to assess the neonatal inflammation. Adult animals whose tail had been subjected to CFA injection on P3 received tail-innervating nerve injury. The results showed that the neonatal CFA-treated rats suffered from chronic inflammation, confirmed by persistent increase of paw thickness and histological result of inflamed paw. These animals showed enhanced pain responses to re-inflammatory challenge by injection of CFA (200 microl) into the neonatally inflamed paw 8 weeks after birth compared with the neonatally untreated animals. However, neuropathic pain on the hindpaw and the tail which had been induced by peripheral nerve injury in the neonatal CFA-treated group were not different from those of the untreated group. The present data suggest that early neonatal long-lasting inflammation differentially affects pain responses later in life, depending on the types of subsequent noxious insults.

  18. Perioperative dexmedetomidine for acute pain after abdominal surgery in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen Lundorf, Luise; Korvenius Nedergaard, Helene; Møller, Ann Merete

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute postoperative pain is still an issue in patients undergoing abdominal surgery. Postoperative pain and side effects of analgesic treatment, in particular those of opioids, need to be minimized. Opioid-sparing analgesics, possibly including dexmedetomidine, seem a promising avenue...

  19. Caregiver Experiences of Supporting Adults with Intellectual Disabilities in Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findlay, Laura; Williams, Amanda C. de C.; Baum, Sandra; Scior, Katrina

    2015-01-01

    Background: Caregivers have an intimate knowledge of the individuals they care for and are therefore an important source of information on pain experiences. They are often relied upon to recognize pain-related behaviours and report them, but little is known as to how they experience their role. Methods: Information was collected from 11 caregivers…

  20. Altered pain perception in children with chronic tension-type headache: Is this a sign of central sensitisation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soee, AL; Thomsen, LL; Kreiner, S

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this article is to investigate if children (7-17 years) with frequent episodic tension-type headache (FETTH) or chronic TTH (CTTH) have an altered pain perception compared to healthy controls.......The aim of this article is to investigate if children (7-17 years) with frequent episodic tension-type headache (FETTH) or chronic TTH (CTTH) have an altered pain perception compared to healthy controls....

  1. [Systemic analgesia for postoperative pain management in the adult].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binhas, M; Marty, J

    2009-02-01

    Severe postsurgical pain contributes to prolonged hospital stay and is also believed to be a risk factor for the development of chronic pain. Locoregional anesthesia, which results in faster patient recovery with fewer side effects, is favored wherever feasible, but is not applicable to every patient. Systemic analgesics are the most widely used method for providing pain relief in the postoperative period. Improvements in postoperative systemic analgesia for pain management should be applied and predictive factors for severe postoperative pain should be anticipated in order to control pain while minimizing opioid side effects. Predictive factors for severe postoperative pain include severity of preoperative pain, prior use of opiates, female gender, non-laparoscopic surgery, and surgeries involving the knee and shoulder. Pre- and intraoperative use of small doses of ketamine has a preventive effect on postoperative pain. Multimodal or balanced analgesia (the combined use of various analgesic agents) such as NSAID/morphine, NSAID/nefopam, morphine/ketamine improves analgesia with morphine-sparing effects. Nausea and vomiting, the principle side effects of morphine, can be predicted using Apfel's simplified score; patients with a high Apfel score risk should receive preemptive antiemetic agents aimed at different receptor sites, such as preoperative dexamethasone and intraoperative droperidol. Droperidol can be combined with morphine for postoperative patient-controlled anesthesia (PCA). When PCA is used, dosage parameters should be adjusted every day based on pain evaluation. Patients with presurgical opioid requirements will require preoperative administration of their daily opioid maintenance dose before induction of anesthesia: PCA offers useful options for effective postsurgical analgesia using a basal rate equivalent to the patient's hourly oral usage plus bolus doses as required.

  2. Does Acupuncture Alter Pain-related Functional Connectivity of the Central Nervous System? A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal Santiago, María; Tumilty, Steve; Mącznik, Aleksandra; Mani, Ramakrishnan

    2016-08-01

    Acupuncture has been studied for several decades to establish evidence-based clinical practice. This systematic review aims to evaluate evidence for the effectiveness of acupuncture in influencing the functional connectivity of the central nervous system in patients with musculoskeletal pain. A systematic search of the literature was conducted to identify studies in which the central response of acupuncture in patients with musculoskeletal pain was evaluated by neuroimaging techniques. Databases searched were AMED, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, MEDLINE, PEDro, Pubmed, SCOPUS, SPORTDiscuss, and Web of Science. Included studies were assessed by two independent reviewers for their methodological quality by using the Downs and Black questionnaire and for their levels of completeness and transparency in reporting acupuncture interventions by using Standards for Reporting Interventions in Clinical Trials of Acupuncture (STRICTA) criteria. Seven studies met the inclusion criteria. Three studies were randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and four studies were nonrandomized controlled trials (NRCTs). The neuroimaging techniques used were functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and positron emission tomography (PET). Positive effects on the functional connectivity of the central nervous system more consistently occurred during long-term acupuncture treatment. The results were heterogeneous from a descriptive perspective; however, the key findings support acupuncture's ability to alter pain-related functional connectivity in the central nervous system in patients with musculoskeletal pain.

  3. The relationship of adult attachment dimensions to pain-related fear, hypervigilance, and catastrophizing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliams, Lachlan A; Asmundson, Gordon J G

    2007-01-01

    Despite the prominence of fear-avoidance models of chronic pain, there is a paucity of research regarding the origins of pain-related fear. Based on the premise that insecure attachment could be a developmentally based origin of elevated fear of pain, associations between adult attachment dimensions and constructs included in fear-avoidance models of chronic pain were investigated. Consistent with Bartholomew and Horowitz's [Bartholomew K, Horowitz LM. Attachment styles among young adults: a test of a four-category model. J Pers Soc Psychol 1991;61:226-44.] model, attachment was conceptualized as being comprised of a model of self dimension (i.e., degree of anxiety regarding rejection based on beliefs of personal unworthiness) and a model of others dimension (i.e., degree of interpersonal mistrust and discomfort with interpersonal closeness). A large university student sample free of chronic pain (N=278) completed a measure of adult romantic attachment (i.e., Experiences in Close Relationships Questionnaire; [Brennan KA, Clark CL, Shaver PR. Self-report measurement of adult attachment: an integrative overview. In: Simpson JA, Rholes WS, editors. Attachment theory and close relationships. New York: The Guilford Press, 1998. p. 46-76.]), the Fear of Pain Questionnaire-III [McNeil DW, Rainwater AJ. Development of the fear of pain questionnaire - III. J Behav Med 1998;21:389-410.], the Pain Vigilance and Awareness Questionnaire [McCracken LM. Attention to pain in persons with chronic pain: a behavioural approach. Behav Ther 1997;28:271-84.], and the Pain Catastrophizing Scale [Sullivan MJ, Bishop SR, Pivik J. The pain catastrophizing scale: development and validation. Psychol Assess 1995;7:24-532.]. It was hypothesized that insecure attachment would be positively associated with reports of pain-related fear, hypervigilance, and catastrophizing and that the model of self dimension would be the attachment variable most strongly associated with these variables

  4. Quality of life in adults with childhood-onset of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, Edward C T H; van de Sandt-Renkema, Nienke; Krabbe, Paul F M; Aronson, Daniel C; Severijnen, René S V M

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The clinical presentation of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type I (CRPS I) in children differs compared to the presentation in adults. Reported results of treatment of CRPS I in children are usually more favourable and seem better than the reported treatment of adults with CRPS I. We

  5. Scaffolding Young Children's Prosocial Responsiveness: Preschoolers' Responses to Adult Sadness, Anger, and Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denham, Susanne A.; And Others

    Two studies investigated children's responsiveness to an adult's negative emotions (anger, sadness, and pain). The studies also evaluated effects of adult scaffolding (labeling and explaining negative emotions, and requesting help). In the first study, subjects were 55 preschool children between the ages of 33 and 56 months. During individual play…

  6. Effects of neonatal peripheral tissue injury on pain-related behaviors in adult rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-meng LI

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To observe the effects of peripheraltissueinjury in the developmental stage of newborn rats on pain-related behaviors in adult rats. Methods SD rats 1,4,7,14,21 and 28days after birth were selected in thepresent study(4litters at each time point and 10 rats per litter.Each litter of rats was randomly divided intoinjury group(receiving subcutaneous injection of 20μl bee venomand control group(receiving subcutaneous injection of 20μl normal saline, with20 in each group, and then raised for 2 months to adulthood. The baseline pain threshold was observed by measuring spontaneous paw flinching reflex,paw withdrawal thermal latency(PWTLand paw withdrawal mechanical threshold(PWMT, then 50μl 0.4% bee venom was subcutaneously injected to each rat, and the changesinpa in reaction and pain threshold were determined. Results The baseline thermal pain threshold in adult rats receiving bee venom or normal saline at different time points after birth was similar,but baseline mechanical pain threshold in adult rats receiving bee venom at1,4,7and14 days after birth was decreased significantly compared with the adult rats receiving normal saline at corresponding time points(P0.05.Mechanical hyperalgesia was not induced in rats injected with bee venom but induced in adult ratsinjected with normal saline4-21days after birth.Injection of bee venom 21 and 28 days after birth could obviously enhance the bee venom-induced hyperalgesiain adult rats compared with control group(P<0.01. Conclusions Bee venom stimuli at different time points after birth could affect the baseline PWMT and mechanical pain hypersensitivityin adult rats but not the baseline PWTL and thermal pain hypersensitivity. The 21st day maybe a key time point of nervous system development in rats.

  7. Adult NREM parasomnia associated with lancinating throat pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bušková, Jitka; Sonka, Karel

    2014-08-15

    We report the case of a 30-year-old woman presenting with dangerous nocturnal NREM episodes with the clinical feature of lancinating throat pain. We hypothesize that the pain may have represented sensory hallucination analogous to commonly recognized visual images associated with NREM parasomnias. This case is also unusual for probable psychological triggers that could play a role in the pathogenesis of the disease, as evidenced by successful psychotherapy.

  8. Peer volunteers in an integrative pain management program for frail older adults with chronic pain: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Tse, Mimi Mun Yee; Lee, Paul Hong; Ng, Sheung Mei; Tsien-Wong, Bik Kwan; Yeung, Suey Shuk Yu

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic pain is common among the older population. A literature review on pain management program showed that exercise, yoga, massage therapy, Tai Chi, and music therapy could significantly reduce pain. In spite of the proven benefits of pain management programs, these intervention programs were effective only in the short term, and older adults would resume their old habits. It has been suggested that interventions comprising some type of social support have great potential to inc...

  9. p53 protein alterations in adult astrocytic tumors and oligodendrogliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayak Anupma

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: p53 is a tumor suppressor gene implicated in the genesis of a variety of malignancies including brain tumors. Overexpression of the p53 protein is often used as a surrogate indicator of alterations in the p53 gene. AIMS: In this study, data is presented on p53 protein expression in adult cases (>15 years of age of astrocytic (n=152 and oligodendroglial (n=28 tumors of all grades. Of the astrocytic tumors, 86% were supratentorial in location while remaining 14% were located infratentorially - 8 in the the cerebellum and 13 in the brainstem. All the oligodendrogliomas were supratentorial. MATERIALS AND METHODS: p53 protein expression was evaluated on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections using streptavidin biotin immunoperoxidase technique after high temperature antigen retrieval. RESULTS: Overall 52% of supratentorial astrocytic tumors showed p53 immunopositivity with no correlation to the histological grade. Thus, 58.8% of diffuse astrocytomas (WHO Grade II, 53.8% of anaplastic astrocytomas (WHO Grade III and 50% of glioblastomas (WHO Grade IV were p53 protein positive. In contrast, all the infratentorial tumors were p53 negative except for one brainstem glioblastoma. Similarly, pilocytic astrocytomas were uniformly p53 negative irrespective of the location. Among oligodendroglial tumors, the overall frequency of p53 immunopositivity was lower (only 28%, though a trend of positive correlation with the tumor grade was noted - 25% in Grade II and 31.5% in grade III (anaplastic oligodendroglioma. Interestingly, p53 labeling index (p53 LI did not correlate with the histopathological grade in both astrocytic and oligodendroglial tumors. CONCLUSIONS: Thus, this study gives an insight into the genetic and hence biological heterogeneity of gliomas, not only between astrocytic tumors vs. oligodendrogliomas but also within astrocytic tumors with regard to their grade and location. With p53 gene therapy trials in progress, this will

  10. Self-reported pain intensity with the numeric reporting scale in adult dengue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua G X Wong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pain is a prominent feature of acute dengue as well as a clinical criterion in World Health Organization guidelines in diagnosing dengue. We conducted a prospective cohort study to compare levels of pain during acute dengue between different ethnicities and dengue severity. METHODS: Demographic, clinical and laboratory data were collected. Data on self-reported pain was collected using the 11-point Numerical Rating Scale. Generalized structural equation models were built to predict progression to severe disease. RESULTS: A total of 499 laboratory confirmed dengue patients were recruited in the Prospective Adult Dengue Study at Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore. We found no statistically significant differences between pain score with age, gender, ethnicity or the presence of co-morbidity. Pain score was not predictive of dengue severity but highly correlated to patients' day of illness. Prevalence of abdominal pain in our cohort was 19%. There was no difference in abdominal pain score between grades of dengue severity. CONCLUSION: Dengue is a painful disease. Patients suffer more pain at the earlier phase of illness. However, pain score cannot be used to predict a patient's progression to severe disease.

  11. EFFECT OF MYOFASCIAL RELEASE THERAPY ON PAIN RELATED DISABILITY, QUALITY OF SLEEP AND DEPRESSION IN OLDER ADULTS WITH CHRONIC LOW BACK PAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. B.Arun, MPT, PhD

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Low back pain was experienced by 50% of older adults that has threatened to quality of life. The economic cost of low back pain is more in older adults. Various literatures found that there is strong relationships exist between the low back pain and the psychosocial factors like sleep disturbances, depression, mood sway and chronic illness. Studies has found that depression is one of the commonest psychological problem faced by older adults which relates to other factors like pain, sleep disturbances ect.. Physiotherapy has been shown very effective in the management of chronic low back pain. Various approaches in physiotherapy play a major role in rehabilitation of patients with chronic low back pain. This study estimates to find out the effect of myofascial release therapy on pain related disability, quality of sleep and depression in older adults with chronic low back pain. Study is a single group pre test and post test design. 37 Patients with chronic low back pain were selected from a community setup. Selected subjects were undergone 6 weeks of myofascial release therapy along with moist heat therapy. At the end the outcome measured are pain related disability using pain disability index, Quality of sleep using Insomnia severity index and depression using beck depression inventory. The paired ‘t’ test was used to find out the differences between variables. The result showed that there was a significant improvement in the pre test and post test variables. The beck depression inventory was 21.3 (p<0.05%, and the pain disability index was 24.9 (p<0.05%. The study concludes that the myofascial release therapy is very effective in reducing the pain related disability, quality of sleep and depression on older adults with chronic low back pain.

  12. Prevalence of different pain categories based on pain spreading on the bodies of older adults in Sweden: a descriptive-level and multilevel association with demographics, comorbidities, medications, and certain lifestyle factors (PainS65+

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragioti E

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available E Dragioti,1 B Larsson,1 L Bernfort,2 LÅ Levin,2 B Gerdle1 1Pain and Rehabilitation Medicine, 2Division of Health Care Analysis, Department of Medical and Health Sciences (IMH, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden Background and objective: There is limited knowledge about the prevalence of pain and its relation to comorbidities, medication, and certain lifestyle factors in older adults. To address this limitation, this cross-sectional study examined the spreading of pain on the body in a sample of 6611 subjects ≥65 years old (mean age = 75.0 years; standard deviation [SD] = 7.7 living in southeastern Sweden.Methods: Sex, age, comorbidities, medication, nicotine, alcohol intake, and physical activity were analyzed in relation to the following pain categories: local pain (LP (24.1%, regional pain medium (RP-Medium (20.3%, regional pain heavy (RP-Heavy (5.2%, and widespread pain (WSP (1.7%.Results: RP-Medium, RP-Heavy, and WSP were associated more strongly with women than with men (all p<0.01. RP-Heavy was less likely in the 80–84 and >85 age groups compared to the 65–69 age group (both p<0.01. Traumatic injuries, rheumatoid arthritis/osteoarthritis, and analgesics were associated with all pain categories (all p<0.001. An association with gastrointestinal disorders was found in LP, RP-Medium, and RP-Heavy (all p<0.01. Depressive disorders were associated with all pain categories, except for LP (all p<0.05. Disorders of the central nervous system were associated with both RP-Heavy and WSP (all p<0.05. Medication for peripheral vascular disorders was associated with RP-Medium (p<0.05, and hypnotics were associated with RP-Heavy (p<0.01.Conclusion: More than 50% of older adults suffered from different pain spread categories. Women were more likely to experience greater spreading of pain than men. A noteworthy number of common comorbidities and medications were associated with increased likelihood of pain

  13. Proteomic Identification of Altered Cerebral Proteins in the Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Animal Model

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    Francis Sahngun Nahm

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS is a rare but debilitating pain disorder. Although the exact pathophysiology of CRPS is not fully understood, central and peripheral mechanisms might be involved in the development of this disorder. To reveal the central mechanism of CRPS, we conducted a proteomic analysis of rat cerebrum using the chronic postischemia pain (CPIP model, a novel experimental model of CRPS. Materials and Methods. After generating the CPIP animal model, we performed a proteomic analysis of the rat cerebrum using a multidimensional protein identification technology, and screened the proteins differentially expressed between the CPIP and control groups. Results. A total of 155 proteins were differentially expressed between the CPIP and control groups: 125 increased and 30 decreased; expressions of proteins related to cell signaling, synaptic plasticity, regulation of cell proliferation, and cytoskeletal formation were increased in the CPIP group. However, proenkephalin A, cereblon, and neuroserpin were decreased in CPIP group. Conclusion. Altered expression of cerebral proteins in the CPIP model indicates cerebral involvement in the pathogenesis of CRPS. Further study is required to elucidate the roles of these proteins in the development and maintenance of CRPS.

  14. Body Pain Intensity and Interference in Adults (45–53 Years Old): A Cross-Sectional Survey in Chongqing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xianglong; Li, Bing; Liu, Lingli; Zhao, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Culture and national care models matter both in reporting and treatment of pain status. However, most findings on body pain intensity and interference in adults are from Western studies, with little reliable evidence from China. This study aimed to assess body pain intensity and interference and its associations with demographic, socioeconomic characteristics, and health behaviors in adults. A cross-sectional survey was performed to collect data from 1224 adults, who were recruited via multistage stratified random sampling. The SF-36 quality-of-life instrument was used to investigate body pain intensity and interference. Ordinal logistic regression analysis was used in this study. Our results showed that 64.1% of the participants (males: 687; females: 537) reported body pain, and 45.7% of the participants reported body pain interference. Middle-aged respondents who were female, were unmarried/divorced or separated/widowed, had a negative relationship with their family, had poor sleep quality, and were not satisfied with their current living conditions had a higher body pain intensity rating (ordered logistic regression/six-level pain intensity criterion; odds ratios, p < 0.05). Respondents who were unmarried/divorced or separated/widowed, with a low education level, were unemployed, had lower incomes, had a negative relationship with their family, and were not satisfied with their current living conditions had a higher body pain interference rating (ordered logistic regression/five-level pain interference criterion; odds ratios, p < 0.05). In conclusion, an estimated 64.1% of middle-aged adults reported body pain, and 45.7% of middle-aged adults reported body pain interference. These results provide a clue for possible interventions for improving body pain intensity and interference in adults, especially among middle-aged people. These factors should be taken into consideration in the prevention of pain, pain management and treatment planning in order to help

  15. Hip pain in adults: MR imaging appearance of common causes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mengiardi, Bernard; Pfirrmann, Christian W.A.; Hodler, Juerg [Orthopaedic University Hospital Balgrist, Department of Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2007-07-15

    To determine the exact origin of hip pain can be challenging. Symptoms apparently originating from the hip may arise from the pelvis, the sacroiliac joint, the lumbar spine, periarticular structures such as muscles and bursae, or from unexpected sites such as the abdominal wall, the genitourinary tract, or the retroperitoneal space. This article reviews the differential diagnosis of hip pain arising from the hip and surrounding structures and the role of different imaging methods with emphasis on magnetic resonance imaging where most recent advances have occurred. (orig.)

  16. Back pain in adults living in quilombola territories of Bahia, Northeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Rogério Cosme Silva Santos

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To analyze the factors associated with back pain in adults who live in quilombola territories. METHODS A population-based survey was performed on quilombola communities of Vitória da Conquista, state of Bahia, Northeastern Brazil. The sample (n = 750 was established via a raffle of residences. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to investigate sociodemographics and employment characteristics, lifestyle, and health conditions. The outcome was analyzed as a dichotomous variable (Poisson regression. RESULTS The prevalence of back pain was of 39.3%. Age ≥ 30 years and being a smoker were associated with the outcome. The employment status was not related to back pain. CONCLUSIONS The survey identified a high prevalence of back pain in adults. It is suggested to support the restructuring of the local public service in order to outline programs and access to healthy practices, assistance, diagnosis, and treatment of spine problems.

  17. Back pain in adults living in quilombola territories of Bahia, Northeastern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Luis Rogério Cosme Silva; Assunção, Ada Ávila; Lima, Eduardo de Paula

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the factors associated with back pain in adults who live in quilombola territories. METHODS A population-based survey was performed on quilombola communities of Vitória da Conquista, state of Bahia, Northeastern Brazil. The sample (n = 750) was established via a raffle of residences. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to investigate sociodemographics and employment characteristics, lifestyle, and health conditions. The outcome was analyzed as a dichotomous variable (Poisson regression). RESULTS The prevalence of back pain was of 39.3%. Age ≥ 30 years and being a smoker were associated with the outcome. The employment status was not related to back pain. CONCLUSIONS The survey identified a high prevalence of back pain in adults. It is suggested to support the restructuring of the local public service in order to outline programs and access to healthy practices, assistance, diagnosis, and treatment of spine problems. PMID:25372165

  18. Altered cortical responsiveness to pain stimuli after high frequency electrical stimulation of the skin in patients with persistent pain after inguinal hernia repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuel N van den Broeke

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: High Frequency electrical Stimulation (HFS of the skin induces enhanced brain responsiveness expressed as enhanced Event-Related Potential (ERP N1 amplitude to stimuli applied to the surrounding unconditioned skin in healthy volunteers. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether this enhanced ERP N1 amplitude could be a potential marker for altered cortical sensory processing in patients with persistent pain after surgery. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Nineteen male patients; 9 with and 10 without persistent pain after inguinal hernia repair received HFS. Before, directly after and thirty minutes after HFS evoked potentials and the subjective pain intensity were measured in response to electric pain stimuli applied to the surrounding unconditioned skin. RESULTS: The results show that, thirty minutes after HFS, the ERP N1 amplitude observed at the conditioned arm was statistically significantly larger than the amplitude at the control arm across all patients. No statistically significant differences were observed regarding ERP N1 amplitude between patients with and without persistent pain. However, thirty minutes after HFS we did observe statistically significant differences of P2 amplitude at the conditioned arm between the two groups. The P2 amplitude decreased in comparison to baseline in the group of patients with pain. CONCLUSION: The ERP N1 effect, induced after HFS, was not different between patients with vs. without persistent pain. The decreasing P2 amplitude was not observed in the patients without pain and also not in the previous healthy volunteer study and thus might be a marker for altered cortical sensory processing in patients with persistent pain after surgery.

  19. Foot posture and patellar tendon pain among adult volleyball players

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, R. de; Malliaras, P.; Munteanu, S.; Payne, C.; Morrissey, D.; Maffulli, N.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We hypothesized that individuals with a normal foot posture would be less likely to experience patellar tendon pain and pathology than those with a pronated or supinated foot. DESIGN: Observational study. SETTING: Field-based study among competing athletes. PARTICIPANTS: Volleyball player

  20. Foot Posture and Patellar Tendon Pain Among Adult Volleyball Players

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, Reinier; Malliaras, Peter; Munteanu, Shannon; Payne, Craig; Morrissey, Dylan; Maffulli, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    Objective: We hypothesized that individuals with a normal foot posture would be less likely to experience patellar tendon pain and pathology than those with a pronated or supinated foot. Design: Observational study. Setting: Field-based study among competing athletes. Participants: Volleyball player

  1. Physical activity, physical disability, and osteoarthritic pain in older adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hopman-Rock, M.; Kraaimaat, F.W.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.

    1996-01-01

    The relationship between the frequency (chronic, episodic, and sporadic) of arthritic pain in the hip and/or knee, other illness-related variables, physical disability, and a physically active lifestyle was analyzed in community-living subjects aged 55 to 74 years (N = 306). We tested the hypothesis

  2. Reduction of pain sensitivity after somatosensory therapy in adults with cerebral palsy

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    Inmaculada eRiquelme

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Pain and deficits in somatosensory processing seem to play a relevant role in cerebral palsy (CP. Rehabilitation techniques based on neuroplasticity mechanisms may induce powerful changes in the organization of the primary somatosensory cortex and have been proved to reduce levels of pain and discomfort in neurological pathologies. However, little is known about the efficacy of such interventions for pain sensitivity in CP individuals. Methods. Adults with cerebral palsy participated in the study and were randomly assigned to the intervention (n=17 or the control group (n=20. The intervention group received a somatosensory therapy including 4 types of exercises (touch, proprioception, vibration, and stereognosis. All participants were asked to continue their standardized motor therapy during the study period. Several somatosensory (pain and touch thresholds, stereognosis, propioception, texture recognition and motor parameters (fine motor skills were assessed before, immediately after and three months after the therapy (follow-up. Results. Participants of the intervention group showed a significant reduction on pain sensitivity after treatment and at follow-up after three months, whereas participants in the control group displayed increasing pain sensitivity over time. No improvements were found on touch sensitivity, proprioception, texture recognition or fine motor skills. Conclusions. Data suggest the possibility that somatosensory therapy was effective in eliciting changes in central somatosensory processing. This hypothesis may have implications for future neuromodulatory treatment of pain complaints in children and adults with cerebral palsy.

  3. The Impact of Pain Management with Opioids among Older Adults Post Orthopedic Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Barbara; Galik, Elizabeth; Wells, Chris L; Boltz, Marie; Renn, Cynthia L; Dorsey, Susan G

    2016-10-01

    Pain has a significant effect on physical and psychological outcomes for older adults post orthopedic trauma. The purpose of this study was to describe the management of pain among older trauma patients and consider differences between those who received 3 or more dosages daily of opioids versus those who did not. This was a secondary data analysis using data from an intervention study testing the effect of Function Focused Care among older orthopedic trauma patients (FFC-AC). The FFC-AC study was done on trauma units in two acute care settings designated as Level I or II trauma centers from September 2014 to September 2015. All participants from the parent FFC-AC study were included. Data collection for the parent study was done within 24 hours of admission and within 24 hours of discharge and included demographics, medications, assessment of function, physical activity, mood, physical resilience, and whether the patient had pain and their pain intensity. Patient records included all 89 individuals from the parent study, 59 (66%) of whom were female and 82 (92%) were white. Records indicated that those who received more than three dosages per day of opioids had a shorter length of stay, were younger, had more intense pain, and were more resilient compared with those who received less than three dosages per day. This secondary data analysis provides support for the importance of considering pain and pain management among older adults post trauma.

  4. The adult cystic fibrosis patient with abdominal pain: what the radiologist needs to know

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    Liong, S.Y.; Awad, D. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of South Manchester, Wythenshawe Hospital, Manchester (United Kingdom); Jones, A.M. [Department of Respiratory Medicine, University Hospital of South Manchester, Wythenshawe Hospital, Manchester (United Kingdom); Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Sukumar, S.A., E-mail: Sathi.Sukumar@uhsm.nhs.u [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of South Manchester, Wythenshawe Hospital, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-15

    As the life expectancy of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients continues to increase, abdominal manifestations of CF are increasingly being encountered by clinicians and radiologists. Imaging plays an important role in the evaluation of adult CF patients with abdominal pain as a cause is often not discernable clinically. Accurate diagnosis is crucial in these patients as some causes may be managed conservatively, whilst others may require surgical intervention. In this review, we describe clinical presentation, imaging findings, and management of adult CF patients presenting with abdominal pain.

  5. KATP channel subunits in rat dorsal root ganglia: alterations by painful axotomy

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    Gemes Geza

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP channels in neurons mediate neuroprotection, they regulate membrane excitability, and they control neurotransmitter release. Because loss of DRG neuronal KATP currents is involved in the pathophysiology of pain after peripheral nerve injury, we characterized the distribution of the KATP channel subunits in rat DRG, and determined their alterations by painful axotomy using RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. Results PCR demonstrated Kir6.1, Kir6.2, SUR1 and SUR2 transcripts in control DRG neurons. Protein expression for all but Kir6.1 was confirmed by Western blots and immunohistochemistry. Immunostaining of these subunits was identified by fluorescent and confocal microscopy in plasmalemmal and nuclear membranes, in the cytosol, along the peripheral fibers, and in satellite glial cells. Kir6.2 co-localized with SUR1 subunits. Kir6.2, SUR1, and SUR2 subunits were identified in neuronal subpopulations, categorized by positive or negative NF200 or CGRP staining. KATP current recorded in excised patches was blocked by glybenclamide, but preincubation with antibody against SUR1 abolished this blocking effect of glybenclamide, confirming that the antibody targets the SUR1 protein in the neuronal plasmalemmal membrane. In the myelinated nerve fibers we observed anti-SUR1 immunostaining in regularly spaced funneled-shaped structures. These structures were identified by electron microscopy as Schmidt-Lanterman incisures (SLI formed by the Schwann cells. Immunostaining against SUR1 and Kir6.2 colocalized with anti-Caspr at paranodal sites. DRG excised from rats made hyperalgesic by spinal nerve ligation exhibited similar staining against Kir6.2, SUR1 or SUR2 as DRG from controls, but showed decreased prevalence of SUR1 immunofluorescent NF200 positive neurons. In DRG and dorsal roots proximal to axotomy SLI were smaller and showed decreased SUR1 immunofluorescence. Conclusions We

  6. Chronic pain and marijuana use among a nationally representative sample of adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zvolensky, Michael J; Cougle, Jesse R; Bonn-Miller, Marcel O; Norberg, Melissa M; Johnson, Kirsten; Kosiba, Jesse; Asmundson, Gordon J G

    2011-01-01

    This study sought to examine the relations between chronic pain and marijuana use in a large nationally representative survey of adults (n = 5,672; 53% female; M(age) = 45.05, SD = 17.9) conducted in the United States. After controlling for sociodemographic variables, lifetime history of depression, and alcohol abuse/dependence, there was a significant association between lifetime chronic pain and lifetime and current marijuana use. Moreover, current chronic pain was significantly associated with lifetime marijuana use. There was no significant association between current chronic pain and current marijuana use, possibly owing to limited statistical power. Results suggest that there are generally consistent statistically significant relations between chronic pain and marijuana use. Future work is needed to explicate the developmental patterning between chronic pain and marijuana use. This paper presents the potential linkage between chronic pain and marijuana use. Results from this study suggest that it may be beneficial for clinicians to assess for marijuana use among patients suffering from chronic pain. Such patients may be using marijuana as a maladaptive coping strategy.

  7. Effects of active immunisation with myelin basic protein and myelin-derived altered peptide ligand on pain hypersensitivity and neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Chamini J; Lees, Justin G; Duffy, Samuel S; Makker, Preet G S; Fivelman, Brett; Apostolopoulos, Vasso; Moalem-Taylor, Gila

    2015-09-15

    Neuropathic pain is a debilitating condition in multiple sclerosis and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Specific myelin basic protein (MBP) peptides are encephalitogenic, and myelin-derived altered peptide ligands (APLs) are capable of preventing and ameliorating EAE. We investigated the effects of active immunisation with a weakly encephalitogenic epitope of MBP (MBP87-99) and its mutant APL (Cyclo-87-99[A(91),A(96)]MBP87-99) on pain hypersensitivity and neuroinflammation in Lewis rats. MBP-treated rats exhibited significant mechanical and thermal pain hypersensitivity associated with infiltration of T cells, MHC class II expression and microglia activation in the spinal cord, without developing clinical signs of paralysis. Co-immunisation with APL significantly decreased pain hypersensitivity and neuroinflammation emphasising the important role of neuroimmune crosstalk in neuropathic pain.

  8. Influence of TRPV1 on diabetes-induced alterations in thermal pain sensitivity

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    Pauza Mary E

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A common complication associated with diabetes is painful or painless diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN. The mechanisms and determinants responsible for these peripheral neuropathies are poorly understood. Using both streptozotocin (STZ-induced and transgene-mediated murine models of type 1 diabetes (T1D, we demonstrate that Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1 expression varies with the neuropathic phenotype. We have found that both STZ- and transgene-mediated T1D are associated with two distinct phases of thermal pain sensitivity that parallel changes in TRPV1 as determined by paw withdrawal latency (PWL. An early phase of hyperalgesia and a late phase of hypoalgesia are evident. TRPV1-mediated whole cell currents are larger and smaller in dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons collected from hyperalgesic and hypoalgesic mice. Resiniferatoxin (RTX binding, a measure of TRPV1 expression is increased and decreased in DRG and paw skin of hyperalgesic and hypoalgesic mice, respectively. Immunohistochemical labeling of spinal cord lamina I and II, dorsal root ganglion (DRG, and paw skin from hyperalgesic and hypoalgesic mice reveal increased and decreased TRPV1 expression, respectively. A role for TRPV1 in thermal DPN is further suggested by the failure of STZ treatment to influence thermal nociception in TRPV1 deficient mice. These findings demonstrate that altered TRPV1 expression and function contribute to diabetes-induced changes in thermal perception.

  9. Altered force-generating capacity is well-perceived regardless of the pain presence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschamps, Thibault; Magnard, Justine; Jubeau, Marc; Hug, François; Tucker, Kylie

    2016-09-01

    An inability to perceive changes in action capabilities may result in increased risk of injury and/or reduced performance. We investigated whether the perception of ability to perform a maximal single-leg hop was updated when the actual ability to perform the task was reduced due to experimentally altered force-generating capacity and associated pain. Twenty-five healthy volunteers performed a series of maximal isometric voluntary knee extensions (MVC), performance estimates and actual performances of a maximal single-leg hop. The motor tasks were completed for each leg, before (t), and immediately (t), 48 hr (t) and 1 month (t) after, a neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) protocol was used to decrease the force generating capacity of the quadriceps muscle of 1 leg. MVC torque decreased by ∼30% after the NMES protocol for the stimulated leg at t and t (p estimation of performance and actual performance of the maximal single-leg hop at t and t for the test leg (p estimated their performance capabilities during each testing period. This study provides a critical step toward understanding the potential for decreased force-generating capacity and muscle pain to modify the relationship between motor performance and perceived abilities. (PsycINFO Database Record

  10. Pain and anxiety experiences of South African adult burn injury patients during physiotherapy management

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    L.D. Morris

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A dequate management of procedural pain during physiotherapy management plays an important role in building a trusting relationship betweenthe burn victim and the physiotherapist, and in ensuring desirable functional outcomes. However, the burn pain management regimens currently utilized inburn units, primarily consist of traditional pharmacologic analgesics which areassociated with numerous side-effects and alone are often reported as inadequateto alleviate procedural pain, warranting safer and effective adjunct therapies.Prior to the introduction and implementation of adjunct therapies into a developing world, it is imperative that the current situation in a burn unit, in terms of whether or not the pain management regimens in place are adequate, is first assessed, due to cost concerns. The following short report exemplifies the pain and anxiety experiences of a small number of burn injury patients during physiotherapy at the Tygerberg Hospital adult burn unit, South A frica.  It was hypothesized that the results of this study would underpin whether adult burn injury patients in a developing countryrequire adjunct therapies during physiotherapy management to supplement traditional pharmacologic analgesics inmanaging their procedural pain and subsequent anxiety.

  11. Anterior Cingulate Volumetric Alterations in Treatment-Naive Adults with ADHD: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makris, Nikos; Seidman, Larry J.; Valera, Eve M.; Biederman, Joseph; Monuteaux, Michael C.; Kennedy, David N.; Caviness, Verne S., Jr.; Bush, George; Crum, Katherine; Brown, Ariel B.; Faraone, Stephen V.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: We sought to examine preliminary results of brain alterations in anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) in treatment-naive adults with ADHD. The ACC is a central brain node for the integration of cognitive control and allocation of attention, affect and drive. Thus its anatomical alteration may give rise to impulsivity, hyperactivity and…

  12. Quantitative sensory testing of temperature, pain, and touch in adults with Down syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Knegt, N.; Defrin, R.; Schuengel, C.; Lobbezoo, F.; Evenhuis, H.; Scherder, E.

    2015-01-01

    The spinothalamic pathway mediates sensations of temperature, pain, and touch. These functions seem impaired in children with Down syndrome (DS), but have not been extensively examined in adults. The objective of the present study was to compare the spinothalamic-mediated sensory functions between a

  13. Randomized trial of epidural vs. subcutaneous catheters for managing pain after modified Nuss in adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temkit, M’hamed; Ewais, MennatAllah M.; Luckritz, Todd C.; Stearns, Joshua D.; Craner, Ryan C.; Gaitan, Brantley D.; Ramakrishna, Harish; Thunberg, Christopher A.; Weis, Ricardo A.; Myers, Kelly M.; Merritt, Marianne V.; Rosenfeld, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Minimally invasive repair of pectus excavatum (MIRPE) is now performed in adults. Managing adult patients’ pain postoperatively has been challenging due to increased chest wall rigidity and the pressure required for supporting the elevated sternum. The optimal pain management regimen has not been determined. We designed this prospective, randomized trial to compare postoperative pain management and outcomes between thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA) and bilateral subcutaneous infusion pump catheters (On-Q). Methods Patients undergoing MIRPE (modified Nuss) underwent random assignment to TEA or On-Q group. Both groups received intravenous, patient-controlled opioid analgesia, with concomitant delivery of local anesthetic. Primary outcomes were length of stay (LOS), opioid use, and pain scores. Results Of 85 randomly assigned patients, 68 completed the study [52 men, 76.5%; mean (range) age, 32.2 (20.0–58.0) years; Haller index, 5.9 (range, 3.0-26.7)]. The groups were equally matched for preoperative variables; however, the On-Q arm had more patients (60.3%). No significant differences were found between groups in mean daily pain scores (P=0.52), morphine-equivalent opioid usage (P=0.28), or hospital stay 3.5 vs. 3.3 days (TEA vs. On-Q; P=0.55). Thirteen patients randomized to TEA refused the epidural and withdrew from the study because they perceived greater benefit of the On-Q system. Conclusions Postoperative pain management in adults after MIRPE can be difficult. Both continuous local anesthetic delivery by TEA and On-Q catheters with concomitant, intravenous, patient-controlled anesthesia maintained acceptable analgesia with a reasonable LOS. In our cohort, there was preference for the On-Q system for pain management. PMID:27621865

  14. Analgesia for Older Adults with Abdominal or Back Pain in the Emergency Department

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    Mills, Angela M

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the association between age and analgesia for emergency department (ED patients with abdominal or back pain.Methods: Using a fully electronic medical record, we performed a retrospective cohort study of adults presenting with abdominal or back pain to two urban EDs. To assess differences in analgesia administration and time to analgesia between age groups, we used chi-square and Kruskal-Wallis test respectively. To adjust for potential confounders, we used a generalized linear model with log link and Gaussian error.Results: Of 24,752 subjects (mean age 42 years, 65% female, 69% black, mean triage pain score 7.5, the majority (76% had abdominal pain and 61% received analgesia. The ≥80 years group (n=722; 3%, compared to the 65-79 years group (n=2,080; 8% and to the (n=21,950; 89%, was more often female (71 vs. 61 vs. 65%, black (72 vs. 65 vs. 69%, and had a lower mean pain score (6.6 vs. 7.1 vs. 7.6. Both older groups were less likely to receive any analgesia (48 vs. 59 vs. 62%, p<0.0001 and the oldest group less likely to receive opiates (35 vs. 47 vs. 44%, p<0.0001. Of those who received analgesia, both older groups waited longer for their medication (123 vs. 113 vs. 94 minutes; p<0.0001. After controlling for potential confounders, patients ≥80 years were 17% less likely than the <65 years group to receive analgesia (95% CI 14-20%.Conclusion: Older adults who present to the ED for abdominal or back pain are less likely to receive analgesia and wait significantly longer for pain medication compared to younger adults. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(1;43-50.

  15. Altered muscular activation during prone hip extension in women with and without low back pain

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    Arab Amir M

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Altered movement pattern has been associated with the development of low back pain (LBP. The purpose of this study was to investigate the activity pattern of the ipsilateral erector spinae (IES and contralateral erectorspinae (CES, gluteus maximus (GM and hamstring (HAM muscles during prone hip extension (PHE test in women with and without LBP. A cross-sectional non-experimental design was used. Methods Convenience sample of 20 female participated in the study. Subjects were categorized into two groups: with LBP (n = 10 and without LBP (n = 10. The electromyography (EMG signal amplitude of the tested muscles during PHE (normalized to maximum voluntary electrical activity (MVE was measured in the dominant lower extremity in all subjects. Results Statistical analysis revealed greater normalized EMG signal amplitude in women with LBP compared to non-LBP women. There was significant difference in EMG activity of the IES (P = 0.03 and CES (P = 0.03 between two groups. However, no significant difference was found in EMG signals of the GM (P = 0.11 and HAM (P = 0.14 among two groups. Conclusion The findings of this study demonstrated altered activation pattern of the lumbo-pelvic muscles during PHE in the women with chronic LBP. This information is important for investigators using PHE as either an evaluation tool or a rehabilitation exercise.

  16. Equivalent pain relief with and without resection of the posterior tibial tendon in adult flatfoot reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demetracopoulos, Constantine A; DeOrio, James K; Easley, Mark E; Nunley, James A

    2014-01-01

    Transfer of the flexor digitorum longus (FDL) is indicated to compensate for the loss of posterior tibial tendon (PTT) function in the treatment of adult acquired flatfoot deformity (AAFD). The aim of this study was to determine the effect of PTT resection on pain relief following surgical treatment of stage II AAFD. A retrospective review of patients who underwent surgical treatment for stage II AAFD was performed. Patients were divided into two groups based on whether the degenerated PTT was resected or left in situ. A visual analog scale (VAS) score for pain was recorded for each patient preoperatively. Concomitant surgical procedures and the incidence of postoperative pain were also reported for each group. Deformity correction was assessed with standard weight-bearing radiographs. Thirty-four patients with a mean follow-up of 14 months were included in the study. There was no difference in preoperative VAS pain scores, and patients in both groups demonstrated excellent pain relief postoperatively. Five patients in the PTT resection group and one patient in the PTT in situ group reported lateral-sided foot pain postoperatively. Resection of the PTT did not significantly affect postoperative pain relief. Future prospective studies are needed to determine whether resection of the degenerated PTT is necessary at the time of surgery for stage II AAFD.

  17. Pain perception is altered by a nucleotide polymorphism in SCN9A.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reimann, F.; Cox, J.J.; Belfer, I.; Diatchenko, L.; Zaykin, D.V.; McHale, D.P.; Drenth, J.P.H.; Dai, F.; Wheeler, J.; Sanders, F.; Wood, L.; Wu, T.X.; Karppinen, J.; Nikolajsen, L.; Mannikko, M.; Max, M.B.; Kiselycznyk, C.; Poddar, M.; Morsche, R.H.M. te; Smith, S.; Gibson, D.; Kelempisioti, A.; Maixner, W.; Gribble, F.M.; Woods, C.G.

    2010-01-01

    The gene SCN9A is responsible for three human pain disorders. Nonsense mutations cause a complete absence of pain, whereas activating mutations cause severe episodic pain in paroxysmal extreme pain disorder and primary erythermalgia. This led us to investigate whether single nucleotide polymorphisms

  18. FUNCTIONAL PROFILE OF ACTIVE OLDER ADULTS WITH LOW BACK PAIN, ACCORDING TO THE ICF

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    Andersom Ricardo Fréz

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF considers multiples aspects of functionality. It is believed that this tool can help to classify the functionality of older adults with low back pain (LBP . Objectives: To describe the functionality of active older adults with LBP according to the ICF. Methods: A transversal study was conducted using the brief ICF core set for low back pain, to establish functional profiles of 40 older adults. The ICF categories were considered valid when ≥20% of participants showed some disability. Results: Thirty-two of the 35 categories of the brief ICF core set could be considered representative of the sample. Conclusion: The brief ICF core set for LBP results demonstrated that this classification system is representative for describing the functional profile of the sample.

  19. Immune Biomarker Response Depends on Choice of Experimental Pain Stimulus in Healthy Adults: A Preliminary Study

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    Yenisel Cruz-Almeida

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Few studies in healthy subjects have examined the neuroimmune responses associated with specific experimental pain stimuli, while none has measured multiple biomarkers simultaneously. The aim of the present study was to compare the neuro-immune responses following two common experimental pain stimuli: cold pressor test (CPT and focal heat pain (FHP. Eight adults participated in two counterbalanced experimental sessions of FHP or CPT with continuous pain ratings and blood sampling before and 30 minutes after the sessions. Despite similar pain intensity ratings (FHP = 42.2±15.3; CPT = 44.5±34.1; P=0.871, CPT and FHP induced different neuro-immune biomarker responses. CPT was accompanied by significant increases in cortisol (P=0.046 and anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 (P=0.043 with significant decreases in several pro-inflammatory mediators (IL-1β (P=0.028, IL-12 (P=0.012, TNF-α (P=0.039, and MCP-1 (P=0.038. There were nonsignificant biomarker changes during the FHP session. There were close to significant differences between the sessions for IL-1β (P=0.081, IFN-γ (P=0.072, and IL-12 (P=0.053 with biomarkers decreasing after CPT and increasing after FHP. There were stronger associations between catastrophizing and most biomarkers after CPT compared to FHP. Our results suggest that CPT is a stressful and painful stimulus, while FHP is mostly a painful stimulus. Thus, each experimental pain stimulus can activate different neuro-immune cascades, which are likely relevant for the interpretation of studies in chronic pain conditions.

  20. Comparison between kinesiotherapy and back school in the treatment of low back pain in older adults

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    Sonia Maria Marques Gomes Bertolini

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to compare the efficacy of physiotherapy treatment involving kinesiotherapy and back school in older adults’ lowback pain. Methods: study of the case-series type. The pain visual analog scale and the WHOQOL-bref were used for assessingquality of life, and the Timed Up and Go Test was used for testing agility. A total of 21 older adults, who had had low back painfor over three months, participated in the study. The sample was divided in two groups (kinesiotherapy and back school.The older adults were assessed before and after the therapeutic interventions. Results: both groups obtained better scoresin all the variables analyzed in the post-test in relation to the pre-test, and as a result, in the inter-group comparison, theresults did not reveal statistically significant differences (p>0.05. Conclusion: back school and conventional kinesiotherapywere effective in improving the pain, quality-of-life and agility of older adults with low back pain.

  1. Comparison between kinesiotherapy and back school in the treatment of low back pain in older adults

    OpenAIRE

    Sonia Maria Marques Gomes Bertolini; Maria Lúcia Ziroldo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to compare the efficacy of physiotherapy treatment involving kinesiotherapy and back school in older adults’ lowback pain. Methods: study of the case-series type. The pain visual analog scale and the WHOQOL-bref were used for assessingquality of life, and the Timed Up and Go Test was used for testing agility. A total of 21 older adults, who had had low back painfor over three months, participated in the study. The sample was divided in two groups (kinesiotherapy and back school).Th...

  2. Does Scoliosis-Specific Exercise Treatment in Adolescence Alter Adult Quality of Life?

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    Maciej Płaszewski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Health-related quality of life in adults, who in adolescence participated in a scoliosis-specific exercise program, was not previously studied. Design. Cross-sectional study, with retrospective data collection. Material and Methods. Homogenous groups of 68 persons (43 women aged 30.10 (25–39 years, with mild or moderate scoliosis, and 76 (38 women able-bodied persons, aged 30.11 (24–38 years, who 16.5 (12–26 years earlier had completed scoliosis-specific exercise or observation regimes, participated. Their respiratory characteristics did not differ from predicted values. The WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire, Oswestry Disability Questionnaire, and pain scale (VAS were applied. Results. The transformed WHOQOL-BREF scores ranged from 54.6 ± 11.19 in the physical domain in the mild scoliotic subgroup to 77.1 ± 16.05 in the social domain in the able-bodied subgroup. The ODQ values did not generally exceed 5.3 ± 7.53. Inter- and intragroup differences were nonsignificant. Age, marital status, education, and gender were significantly associated with the ODQ scores. Significant association between the ODQ and WHOQOL-BREF social relationships domain scores with the participation in exercise treatment was found. Conclusions. Participants with the history of exercise treatment generally did not differ significantly from their peers who were only under observation. This study cannot conclude that scoliosis-specific exercise treatment in adolescence alters quality of life in adulthood.

  3. The effect of virtual reality on pain and range of motion in adults with burn injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrougher, Gretchen J; Hoffman, Hunter G; Nakamura, Dana; Lezotte, Dennis; Soltani, Maryam; Leahy, Laura; Engrav, Loren H; Patterson, David R

    2009-01-01

    Few studies have empirically investigated the effects of immersive virtual reality (VR) on postburn physical therapy pain control and range of motion (ROM). We performed a prospective, randomized controlled study of the effects of adding VR to standard therapy in adults receiving active-assisted ROM physical therapy, by assessing pain scores and maximal joint ROM immediately before and after therapy on two consecutive days. Thirty-nine inpatients, aged 21 to 57 years (mean 35 years), with a mean TBSA burn of 18% (range, 3-60%) were studied using a within-subject, crossover design. All patients received their regular pretherapy pharmacologic analgesia regimen. During physical therapy sessions on two consecutive days (VR one day and no VR the other day; order randomized), each patient participated in active-assisted ROM exercises with an occupational or physical therapist. At the conclusion of each session, patients provided 0 to 100 Graphic Rating Scale measurements of pain after each 10-minute treatment condition. On the day with VR, patients wore a head-position-tracked, medical care environment-excluding VR helmet with stereophonic sound and interacted in a virtual environment conducive to burn care. ROM measurements for each joint exercised were recorded before and after each therapy session. Because of nonsignificant carryover and order effects, the data were analyzed using simple paired t-tests. VR reduced all Graphic Rating Scale pain scores (worst pain, time spent thinking about the pain, and pain unpleasantness by 27, 37, and 31% respectively), relative to the no VR condition. Average ROM improvement was slightly greater with the VR condition; however, this difference failed to reach clinical or statistical significance (P = .243). Ninety-seven percent of patients reported zero to mild nausea after the VR session. Immersive VR effectively reduced pain and did not impair ROM during postburn physical therapy. VR is easily used in the hospital setting and

  4. Altered Bacterial Profiles in Saliva from Adults with Caries Lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belstrøm, D; Fiehn, N-E; Nielsen, C H

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to learn whether presence of caries in an adult population was associated with a salivary bacterial profile different from that of individuals without untreated caries. Stimulated saliva samples from 621 participants of the Danish Health Examination Survey were analyzed...... using the Human Oral Microbe Identification Microarray technology. Samples from 174 individuals with dental caries and 447 from a control cohort were compared using frequency and levels of identified bacterial taxa/clusters as endpoints. Differences at taxon/cluster level were analyzed using Mann......-Whitney's test with Benjamini-Hochberg correction for multiple comparisons. Principal component analysis was used to visualize bacterial community profiles. A reduced bacterial diversity was observed in samples from subjects with dental caries. Five bacterial taxa (Veillonella parvula, Veillonella atypica...

  5. Evidence-based management of postoperative pain in adults undergoing open inguinal hernia surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joshi, G P; Rawal, N; Kehlet, H

    2012-01-01

    and increased time to home-readiness compared with regional anaesthesia. CONCLUSION: Field block with, or without wound infiltration, either as a sole anaesthetic/analgesic technique or as an adjunct to general anaesthesia, is recommended to reduce postoperative pain. Continuous local anaesthetic infusion......, in English, published between January 1966 and March 2009, assessing analgesic and anaesthetic interventions in adult open hernia surgery, and reporting pain scores, were retrieved from the Embase and MEDLINE databases. In addition to published evidence, clinical practice was taken into account to ensure...... that the recommendations had clinical validity. RESULTS: Of the 334 randomized studies identified, 79 were included. Quantitative analysis suggested that regional anaesthesia was superior to general anaesthesia for reducing postoperative pain. Spinal anaesthesia was associated with a higher incidence of urinary retention...

  6. Prevalence of oral pain and barriers to use of emergency oral care facilities among adult Tanzanians

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    Kahabuka Febronia

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oral pain has been the major cause of the attendances in the dental clinics in Tanzania. Some patients postpone seeing the dentist for as long as two to five days. This study determines the prevalence of oral pain and barriers to use of emergency oral care in Tanzania. Methods Questionnaire data were collected from 1,759 adult respondents aged 18 years and above. The study area covered six urban and eight rural study clusters, which had been selected using the WHO Pathfinder methodology. Chi-square tests and logistic regression analyses were performed to identify associations. Results Forty two percent of the respondents had utilized the oral health care facilities sometimes in their lifetime. About 59% of the respondents revealed that they had suffered from oral pain and/or discomfort within the twelve months that preceded the study, but only 26.5% of these had sought treatment from oral health care facilities. The reasons for not seeking emergency care were: lack of money to pay for treatment (27.9%; self medication (17.6%; respondents thinking that pain would disappear with time (15.7%; and lack of money to pay for transport to the dental clinic (15.0%. Older adults were more likely to report that they had experienced oral pain during the last 12 months than the younger adults (OR = 1.57, CI 1.07–1.57, P dental clinics far from home (OR = 5.31, CI = 2.09–13.54, P and being treated by traditional healer (OR = 5.31, CI = 2.25–12.49, P as reasons for not seeking emergency care from the oral health care facilities than their counterparts from urban areas. Conclusion Oral pain and discomfort were prevalent among adult Tanzanians. Only a quarter of those who experienced oral pain or discomfort sought emergency oral care from oral health care facilities. Self medication was used as an alternative to using oral care facilities mainly by rural residents. Establishing oral care facilities in rural areas is recommended.

  7. Prevalence and anatomical location of muscle tenderness in adults with nonspecific neck/shoulder pain

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    Mortensen Ole S

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many adults experience bothersome neck/shoulder pain. While research and treatment strategies often focus on the upper trapezius, other neck/shoulder muscles may be affected as well. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the prevalence and anatomical location of muscle tenderness in adults with nonspecific neck/shoulder pain. Methods Clinical neck/shoulder examination at two large office workplaces in Copenhagen, Denmark. 174 women and 24 men (aged 25-65 years with nonspecific neck/shoulder pain for a duration of at least 30 days during the previous year and a pain intensity of at least 2 on a modified VAS-scale of 0-10 participated. Exclusion criteria were traumatic injuries or other serious chronic disease. Using a standardized finger pressure of 2 kg, palpable tenderness were performed of eight anatomical neck/shoulder locations in the left and right side on a scale of 'no tenderness', 'some tenderness' and 'severe tenderness'. Results In women, the levator scapulae, neck extensors and infraspinatus showed the highest prevalence of severe tenderness (18-30%. In comparison, the prevalence of severe tenderness in the upper trapezius, occipital border and supraspinatus was 13-19%. Severe tenderness of the medial deltoid was least prevalent (0-1%. In men, the prevalence of severe tenderness in the levator scapulae was 13-21%, and ranged between 0-8% in the remainder of the examined anatomical locations. Conclusions A high prevalence of tenderness exists in several anatomical locations of the neck/shoulder complex among adults with nonspecific neck/shoulder pain. Future research should focus on several neck/shoulder muscles, including the levator scapulae, neck extensors and infraspinatus, and not only the upper trapezius. Trial Registration ISRCTN60264809

  8. Foot pain and functional limitation in healthy adults with hallux valgus: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nix Sheree E

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hallux valgus (HV is a very common deformity of the first metatarsophalangeal joint that often requires surgical correction. However, the association between structural HV deformity and related foot pain and disability is unclear. Furthermore, no previous studies have investigated concerns about appearance and difficulty with footwear in a population with HV not seeking surgical correction. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate foot pain, functional limitation, concern about appearance and difficulty with footwear in otherwise healthy adults with HV compared to controls. Methods Thirty volunteers with HV (radiographic HV angle >15 degrees and 30 matched controls were recruited for this study (50 women, 10 men; mean age 44.4 years, range 20 to 76 years. Differences between groups were examined for self-reported foot pain and disability, satisfaction with appearance, footwear difficulty, and pressure-pain threshold at the first metatarsophalangeal joint. Functional measures included balance tests, walking performance, and hallux muscle strength (abduction and plantarflexion. Mean differences (MD and 95% confidence intervals (CI were calculated. Results All self-report measures showed that HV was associated with higher levels of foot pain and disability and significant concerns about appearance and footwear (p Conclusions These findings show that HV negatively impacts on self-reported foot pain and function, and concerns about foot appearance and footwear in otherwise healthy adults. There was also evidence of impaired hallux muscle strength and increased postural sway in HV subjects compared to controls, although general physical functioning and participation in physical activity were not adversely affected.

  9. Pattern of postoperative pain management among adult surgical patients in a low-resource setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogboli-Nwasor E

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Elizabeth Ogboli-Nwasor,1 Sa’adatu T Sule,2 Lazarus MD Yusufu31Department of Anaesthesia, Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Zaria, Nigeria; 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Zaria, Nigeria; 3Department of Surgery, Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Zaria, NigeriaObjective: Postoperative pain is one of the most common complications of surgery. The pattern of management varies between centers. The current study aimed to study the prescription pattern and the common drugs used in the management of postoperative pain in adult surgical patients at Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital (ABUTH; Zaria, Nigeria.Methods: Following ethical approval, a prospective observational study of consecutive adult patients who had surgery at the ABUTH Zaria was performed from January to December 2005. The data were entered into a proforma and analyzed using the Minitab statistical package.Results: One hundred and thirty-eight patients were included in the study. The age range was 17 to 80 years, with a mean age of 41 years. One hundred and thirty-two (95.7% of the prescriptions were written solely by the surgeon or surgical resident; passive suggestions were given by the anesthetists for only six patients (4.3%. Intermittent intramuscular injections of opioids/opiates were prescribed for 126 patients (91.3%, while nine patients (6.5% received intermittent intramuscular injections with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Oral paracetamol was prescribed for six patients (4.3%, while three patients (2.1% received no postoperative analgesic. Moderate pain was recorded in 48 patients (34.8%, and 90 patients (65.2% had mild pain 8 hours after their operation before subsequent doses of analgesics were given. More females (81 patients [58.7%], than males (42 patients [29.7%] suffered moderate to severe pain. The reported side effects were nausea (reported by 32.6% of patients, dry mouth (21

  10. The somatosensory link: S1 functional connectivity is altered by sustained pain and associated with clinical/autonomic dysfunction in fibromyalgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jieun; Loggia, Marco L.; Cahalan, Christine M.; Harris, Richard E.; Beissner, Florian; Garcia, Ronald G.; Kim, Hyungjun; Wasan, Ajay D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic functional pain syndrome characterized by widespread pain, significant pain catastrophizing, sympathovagal dysfunction, and amplified temporal summation for evoked pain. While several studies have found altered resting brain connectivity in FM, studies have not specifically probed the somatosensory system, and its role in both somatic and non-somatic FM symptomatology. Our objective was to evaluate resting primary somatosensory cortex (S1) connectivity, and explore how sustained, evoked deep-tissue pain modulates this connectivity. Methods We acquired fMRI and electrocardiography data from FM patients and healthy controls (HC) during rest (REST) and sustained mechanical pressure pain (PAIN) over the lower leg. Functional connectivity associated with different S1 subregions was calculated, while S1leg (leg representation) connectivity was contrast between REST and PAIN, and correlated with clinically-relevant measures in FM. Results At REST, FM showed decreased connectivity between multiple ipsilateral and cross-hemispheric S1 subregions, which was correlated with clinical pain severity. PAIN, compared to REST, produced increased S1legconnectivity to bilateral anterior insula in FM, but not in HC. Moreover, in FM, sustained pain-altered S1legconnectivity to anterior insula was correlated with clinical/behavioral pain measures and autonomic responses. Conclusion Our study demonstrates that both somatic and non-somatic dysfunction in FM, including clinical pain, pain catastrophizing, autonomic dysfunction, and amplified temporal summation, are all closely linked with the degree to which evoked deep-tissue pain alters S1 connectivity to salience/affective pain processing regions. Additionally, diminished connectivity between S1 subregions at REST in FM may result from ongoing widespread clinical pain. PMID:25622796

  11. Mood alterations in older adults following acute exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, E F; Pate, D W

    1994-08-01

    Limited research indicates positive affective change following acute bouts of exercise, but whether this improved affect among younger subjects may be generalized to older individuals is not known. The present study, then, examined the effects of a single bout of physical activity among older participants. 16 trained women (Mage = 64.5 +/- 7.6 yr.) completed an abbreviated Profile of Mood States prior to and immediately following a 75-min. session of aerobic line dancing. A series of one-way analyses of variance with repeated measures were used to examine differences between pre- and posttest subscores on mood states. Significant decreases following exercise in scores on Tension, Depression, Fatigue, and Anger and a significant increase in scores on Vigor relative to preexercise (control) scores were found. Global mood was significantly improved after the exercise session. No significant difference was found between pre- and postexercise measures of Confusion. Previous findings of significant improvements in affect immediately after an acute bout of exercise may be generalized to older adults. Repetition with a nonexercised control group is desirable.

  12. Percutaneous Vertebroplasty in Adult Degenerative Scoliosis for Spine Support: Study for Pain Evaluation and Mobility Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios K. Filippiadis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluate the efficacy-safety of percutaneous vertebroplasty (PV as primary treatment in adult degenerative scoliosis. During the last 4 years, PV was performed in 18 adult patients (68 vertebral bodies with back pain due to degenerative scoliotic spine. Under anaesthesia and fluoroscopy, direct access to most deformed vertebral bodies was obtained by 13G needles, and PMMA for vertebroplasty was injected. Scoliosis’ inner arch was supported. Clinical evaluation included immediate and delayed studies of patient’s general condition and neurological status. An NVS scale helped assessing pain relief, life quality, and mobility improvement. Comparing patients’ scores prior to (mean value 8.06±1.3 NVS units, the morning after (mean value 3.11±1.2 NVS units, at 12 (mean value 1.67±1.5 NVS units, and 24 months after vertebroplasty (mean value 1.67±1.5 NVS units treatment, patients presented a mean decrease of 6.39±1.6 NVS units on terms of life quality improvement and pain relief (P=0.000. Overall mobility improved in 18/18 (100% patients. No complications were observed. During follow-up period (mean value 17.66 months, all patients underwent a mean of 1.3 sessions for facet joint and nerve root infiltrations. Percutaneous vertebroplasty in the inner arch seems to be an effective technique for supporting adult degenerative scoliotic spine.

  13. Excision of Painful Bipartite Patella: Good Long-term Outcome in Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parviainen, Mickael; Pihlajamäki, Harri K.

    2008-01-01

    Excision of the accessory bipartite fragment is widely used, but its long-term outcome is not known. We evaluated the outcome after surgical excision of a symptomatic accessory bipartite or multipartite patella fragment in young adult men performing their compulsory military service and determined the incidence of painful bipartite patellae in this group of skeletally mature adults. We followed 25 of 32 patients for a minimum of 10 years (mean, 15 years; range, 10–22 years). The incidence of painful, surgically treated bipartite patella was 9.2 per 100,000 recruits. Patients’ median age at surgery was 20 years. There were 19 superolateral and six lateral bipartite fragments. Other radiographic findings were rare. At followup, the Kujala score mean was 95 points (range, 75–100 points), and osteoarthrotic changes (Kellgren-Lawrence Grade 1) were seen in two knees. No reoperations related to bipartite patella occurred during the followup. Symptomatic bipartite patella is rare and does not seem primarily associated with anatomic deviations, but when incapacitating pain persists despite nonoperative treatment, surgical excision seems to yield reasonable functional outcome and quick recovery with no apparent adverse sequelae. Our data suggest there is no reason to avoid this technically undemanding procedure for treating persistent symptoms of bipartite patella in young adults. Level of Evidence: Level IV, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18607662

  14. Pain and pain-related interference in adults with lower-limb amputation: comparison of knee-disarticulation, transtibial, and transfemoral surgical sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behr, James; Friedly, Janna; Molton, Ivan; Morgenroth, David; Jensen, Mark P; Smith, Douglas G

    2009-01-01

    Pain and pain-related interference with physical function have not been thoroughly studied in individuals who have undergone knee-disarticulation amputations. The principal aim of this study was to determine whether individuals with knee-disarticulation amputations have worse pain and pain-related interference with physical function than do individuals with transtibial or transfemoral amputations. We analyzed cross-sectional survey data provided by 42 adults with lower-limb amputations. These individuals consisted of 14 adults reporting knee-disarticulation amputation in one limb and best-matched cases (14 reporting transfemoral amputation and 14 reporting transtibial amputation) from a larger cross-sectional sample of 472 individuals. Participants were rigorously matched based on time since amputation, reason for amputation, age, sex, diabetes diagnosis, and pain before amputation. Continuous outcome variables were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance. Categorical outcomes were analyzed by Pearson chi-square statistic. Given the relatively small sample size and power concerns, mean differences were also described by estimated effect size (Cohen's d). Of the 42 participants, 83% were male. They ranged in age from 36 to 85 (median = 55.1, standard deviation = 11.0). Most amputations were of traumatic origin (74%), and participants were on average 12.4 years from their amputations at the time of the survey. Individuals with transtibial amputation reported significantly more prosthesis use than did individuals with knee-disarticulation amputation. Amputation levels did not significantly differ in phantom limb pain, residual limb pain, back pain, and pain-related interference with physical function. Estimates of effect size, however, indicated that participants with knee-disarticulation amputation reported less phantom limb pain, phantom limb pain-related interference with physical function, residual limb pain, residual limb pain-related interference with physical

  15. Comparison of hand grip strength and upper limb pressure pain threshold between older adults with or without non-specific shoulder pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Background There is a high prevalence of non-specific shoulder pain associated with upper limb functional limitations in older adults. The purpose of this study was to determine the minimal clinically important differences (MCID) of grip strength and pressure pain threshold (PPT) in the upper limb between older adults with or without non-specific shoulder pain. Methods A case-control study was carried out following the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) criteria. A sample of 132 shoulders (mean ± SD years) with (n = 66; 76.04 ± 7.58) and without (n = 66; 75.05 ± 6.26) non-specific pain were recruited. The grip strength and PPT of the anterior deltoid and extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB) muscles were assessed. Results There were statistically significant differences (mean ± SD; P-value) for anterior deltoid PPT (2.51 ± 0.69 vs 3.68 ± 0.65, kg/cm2; P shoulders with and without non-specific pain, respectively. Discussion The MCID of 1.17 kg/cm2, 1.15 kg/cm2 and 3.84 kg were proposed for anterior deltoid PPT, ECRB PPT and grip strength, respectively, to assess the upper limb of older adults with non-specific shoulder pain after treatment. In addition, univariate and multivariate (linear regression and regression trees) analyses may be used to consider age distribution, sex, pain intensity, grip strength and PPT in older adults including clinical and epidemiological studies with non-specific shoulder pain.

  16. Altered activation of the antagonist muscle during practice compromises motor learning in older adults

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yen-Ting; Kwon, MinHyuk; Fox, Emily J.; Christou, Evangelos A.

    2014-01-01

    Aging impairs the activation of muscle; however, it remains unclear whether it contributes to deficits in motor learning in older adults. The purpose of this study was to determine whether altered activation of antagonistic muscles in older adults during practice inhibits their ability to transfer a motor task ipsilaterally. Twenty young (25.1 ± 3.9 yr; 10 men, 10 women) and twenty older adults (71.5 ± 4.8 yr; 10 men, 10 women) participated. Half of the subjects practiced 100 trials of a rapi...

  17. Establishment and Application of Early Risk Stratification Method for Acute Abdominal Pain in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Zhao, Hong; Zhou, Zhen; Tian, Ci; Xiao, Hong-Li; Wang, Bao-En

    2017-01-01

    Background: Acute abdominal pain is a common symptom of emergency patients. The severity was always evaluated based on physicians’ clinical experience. The aim of this study was to establish an early risk stratification method (ERSM) for addressing adults with acute abdominal pain, which would guide physicians to take appropriate and timely measures following the established health-care policies. Methods: In Cohort 1, the records of 490 patients with acute abdominal pain that developed within the past 72 h were enrolled in this study. Measurement data and numeration data were compared with analysis of variance and Chi-square test, respectively. Multiple regression analysis calculated odd ratio (OR) value. P and OR values showed the impacts of factors. ERSM was established by clinical experts and statistical experts according to Youden index. In Cohort 2, data from 305 patients with acute abdominal pain were enrolled to validate the accuracy of the ERSM. Then, ERSM was prospectively used in clinical practice. Results: The ERSM was established based on the scores of the patient's clinical characteristics: right lower abdominal pain + 3 × diffuse abdominal pain + 3 × cutting abdominal pain + 3 × pain frequency + 3 × pain duration + fever + 2 × vomiting + 5 × stop defecation + 3 × history of abdominal surgery + hypertension history + diabetes history + hyperlipidemia history + pulse + 2 × skin yellowing + 2 × sclera yellowing + 2 × double lung rale + 10 × unconsciousness + 2 × right lower abdominal tenderness + 5 × diffuse abdominal tenderness + 4 × peritoneal irritation + 4 × bowel sounds abnormal + 10 × suspicious diagnosis + white blood cell count + hematocrit + glucose + 2 × blood urea nitrogen + 3 × creatine + 4 × serum albumin + alanine aminotransferase + total bilirubin + 3 × conjugated bilirubin + amylase. When the score was <18, the patient did not need hospitalization. A score of ≥18 and <38 indicated that the patient should be under

  18. Collaborative Care for Older Adults with low back pain by family medicine physicians and doctors of chiropractic (COCOA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goertz, Christine M; Salsbury, Stacie A; Vining, Robert D

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low back pain is a prevalent and debilitating condition that affects the health and quality of life of older adults. Older people often consult primary care physicians about back pain, with many also receiving concurrent care from complementary and alternative medicine providers, most...

  19. Minocycline treatment inhibits microglial activation and alters spinal levels of endocannabinoids in a rat model of neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guasti, Leonardo; Richardson, Denise; Jhaveri, Maulik; Eldeeb, Khalil; Barrett, David; Elphick, Maurice R; Alexander, Stephen P H; Kendall, David; Michael, Gregory J; Chapman, Victoria

    2009-07-01

    Activation of spinal microglia contributes to aberrant pain responses associated with neuropathic pain states. Endocannabinoids (ECs) are present in the spinal cord, and inhibit nociceptive processing; levels of ECs may be altered by microglia which modulate the turnover of endocannabinoids in vitro. Here, we investigate the effect of minocycline, an inhibitor of activated microglia, on levels of the endocannabinoids anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), and the related compound N-palmitoylethanolamine (PEA), in neuropathic spinal cord. Selective spinal nerve ligation (SNL) in rats resulted in mechanical allodynia and the presence of activated microglia in the ipsilateral spinal cord. Chronic daily treatment with minocycline (30 mg/kg, ip for 14 days) significantly reduced the development of mechanical allodynia at days 5, 10 and 14 post-SNL surgery, compared to vehicle-treated SNL rats (P pain states.

  20. Altered activation of the antagonist muscle during practice compromises motor learning in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Ting; Kwon, MinHyuk; Fox, Emily J; Christou, Evangelos A

    2014-08-15

    Aging impairs the activation of muscle; however, it remains unclear whether it contributes to deficits in motor learning in older adults. The purpose of this study was to determine whether altered activation of antagonistic muscles in older adults during practice inhibits their ability to transfer a motor task ipsilaterally. Twenty young (25.1 ± 3.9 yr; 10 men, 10 women) and twenty older adults (71.5 ± 4.8 yr; 10 men, 10 women) participated. Half of the subjects practiced 100 trials of a rapid goal-directed task with ankle dorsiflexion and were tested 1 day later with elbow flexion (transfer). The rest did not perform any ankle practice and only performed the task with elbow flexion. The goal-directed task consisted of rapid movement (180 ms) to match a spatiotemporal target. For each limb, we recorded the EMG burst activity of the primary agonist and antagonist muscles. The rate of improvement during task acquisition (practice) was similar for young and older adults (P > 0.3). In contrast, only young adults were able to transfer the task to the upper limb. Specifically, young adults who practiced ankle dorsiflexion exhibited ∼30% (P movement error and ∼60% (P adults who received equal practice and young adults who did not receive any ankle dorsiflexion practice. These results provide novel evidence that the deficient motor learning in older adults may be related to a differential activation of the antagonist muscle, which compromises their ability to acquire the task during practice.

  1. Fatigue in adults with Marfan syndrome, occurrence and associations to pain and other factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathen, Trine; Velvin, Gry; Rand-Hendriksen, Svend; Robinson, Hilde Stendal

    2014-08-01

    This study aims to investigate how fatigue affects adults with verified Marfan syndrome (MFS) in their daily lives, by examining fatigue levels and prevalence of severe fatigue compared to the general Norwegian population and individuals with other comparable chronic conditions. We investigated associations between socio-demographic characteristics, Marfan-related health problems, pain and fatigue. A cross-sectional study was conducted, using a postal questionnaire including the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS) and questions on socio-demographic characteristics, Marfan-related health problems and pain. One hundred seventeen persons with MFS were invited to participate, 73 answered (62%). Participants reported significantly higher FSS scores and prevalence of severe fatigue compared to the general Norwegian population and patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but lower than for other chronic conditions. Participants with chronic pain reported higher fatigue scores than those without chronic pain. Participants on disability benefits reported higher fatigue scores than participants who were working or enrolled in higher education. Marfan-related health problems like aortic dissection and use of blood pressure medication were not significantly associated with fatigue. In multivariable regression analyses chronic pain and employment status were significantly associated with fatigue. The final multivariable model explained 24% of the variance in fatigue scores. Our results show that fatigue is common in MFS patients and that it interferes with their daily lives. Chronic pain and employment status show significant associations to fatigue. This implies that fatigue is important to address when meeting MFS patients in clinical practice. There is need for more research on fatigue in Marfan syndrome.

  2. Prevalence and severity of pain in adult end-stage renal disease patients on chronic intermittent hemodialysis: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brkovic T

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Tonci Brkovic,1 Eliana Burilovic,2 Livia Puljak3 1Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Nephrology, 2Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital Split, 3Department of Anatomy, Histology and Embryology, Laboratory for Pain Research, University of Split School of Medicine, Split, Croatia Objectives: Understanding the epidemiology of pain in patients on hemodialysis (HD is crucial for further improvement in managing pain. The aim of this study was to systematically review available evidence on the prevalence and severity of pain in adult end-stage renal disease patients on chronic intermittent HD. Materials and methods: We carried out a systematic review of the literature and developed a comprehensive search strategy based on search terms on pain and HD. We searched the databases MEDLINE, Scopus, PsycINFO, and CINAHL from the earliest date of each database to July 24, 2014. Manuscripts in all languages were taken into consideration. Two authors performed each step independently, and all disagreements were resolved after discussion with the third author. The quality of studies was estimated using the STROBE checklist and Cochrane risk-of-bias tool.Results: We included 52 studies with 6,917 participants. The prevalence of acute and chronic pain in HD patients was up to 82% and 92%, respectively. A considerable number of patients suffered from severe pain. Various locations and causes of pain were described, with most of the studies reporting pain in general, pain related to arteriovenous access, headache, and musculoskeletal pain.Conclusion: The findings of this systematic review indicate high prevalence of pain in HD patients and considerable gaps and limitations in the available evidence. Pain in this population should be recognized as a considerable health concern, and the nephrology community should promote pain management in HD patients as a clinical and research priority to improve patients’ quality of life and pain

  3. Alterations in cytochrome P-450 levels in adult rats following neonatal exposure to xenobiotics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zangar, R.C. (Oregon State Univ., Corvallis (United States) Pacific Northwest Laboratories, Richland, WA (United States)); Springer, D.L. (Pacific Northwest Laboratories, Richland, WA (United States)); Buhler, D.R. (Oregon State Univ., Corvallis (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Neonatal exposure to certain xenobiotics has been shown to alter hepatic metabolism in adult rats in a manner that indicates long-term changes in enzyme regulation. Previously, the authors have observed changes in adult testosterone metabolism and in cytochrome P-450 (P-450) mRNA levels in animals neonatally exposed to phenobarbital (PB) or diethylstilbestrol (DES). In order to test for other enzyme alterations, they used Western blot procedures for specific P-450s to analyze hepatic microsomes from adult rats (24 wk old) that had been exposed neonatally to DES, PB, 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA), or pregnenolone 16[alpha]-carbonitrile (PCN). The most striking effects were observed in the DES-treated males: P-4502C6 and an immunologically similar protein were increased 60 and 90%, respectively, relative to control values, but P-4503A2 was decreased by 44%. No changes were observed in the DES-treated males in levels of P-4502E1, P-4502B, or the male-specific P-4502C13. Adult males neonatally treated with PB had 150% increase in levels of anti-P4502B-reactive protein without significant changes in the other enzymes. The DES- and DMBA-treated females had increased levels of the female-specific P-4502C12 of 38 and 48%, respectively, but no other observed alterations. The results confirm that neonatal exposure to DES or PB can cause alterations in adult hepatic cytochrome P-450 levels but show that these chemicals act on different enzymes. Neonatal DMBA resulted in changes in adult females similar to those produced by the synthetic estrogen DES, but did so at about two-thirds lower dose. 37 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Correlation between Intrinsic Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome in Young Adults and Lower Extremity Biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Ohjeoung; Yun, Mijung; Lee, Wanhee

    2014-07-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to evaluate the correlation between intrinsic patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) in young adults and lower extremity biomechanics. [Subjects] This experiment was carried out with sixty (24 men and 32 women), who are normal university students as subjects. [Methods] All subjects underwent 3 clinical evaluations. For distinguishing the intrinsic PFPS from controls, we used the Modified Functional Index Questionnaire (MFIQ), Clarke's test and the Eccentric step test. Based on the results of the tests, subjects who were classified as positive for 2 more tests were allocated to the bilateral or unilateral intrinsic PFPS group (n=14), and the others were allocated to the control group (n=42). These two groups were tested for hamstring tightness, foot overpronation, and static Q-angle and dynamic Q-angle. These are the four lower extremity biomechanic, cited as risk factors of patellofemoral pain syndrome. [Results] The over pronation, static Q-angle and the dynamic Q-angle were not significantly different between the two groups. However, the hamstring tightness of the PFPS group was significantly greater than that of the controls. [Conclusion] We examined individuals for intrinsic patellofemoral pain syndrome in young adults and lower extremity biomechanics. We found a strong correlation between intrinsic PFPS and hamstring tightness.

  5. Adult-onset NREM parasomnia with hypnopompic hallucinatory pain: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantoan, Laura; Eriksson, Sofia H; Nisbet, Angus P; Walker, Matthew C

    2013-02-01

    We report the case of a 43-year-old woman presenting with nocturnal episodes of pain and screaming during sleep starting at age 30. There was no childhood or family history of parasomnia. The events had gradually become more frequent over the years, occurring in the first half of the night within 2 h of sleep onset. There were no triggers, and she had partial amnesia for the events. A diagnosis of adult-onset sleep terrors was made on clinical grounds and supported polysomnographically. Seizures and periodic limb movements were excluded as triggering factors. There was some mild sleep disordered breathing (predominantly non-desaturating hypopnea with a propensity for REM sleep of debatable significance). Imaging of the brain and spine and neurophysiological investigations ruled out lesions, entrapments, or neuropathies as possible causes of pain. Treatment (clonazepam, paroxetine, or gabapentin) was poorly tolerated and made no difference to the nocturnal episodes, while trazodone worsened them. This is the first report of hypnopompic psychic pain in association with a NREM parasomnia. We hypothesize that the pain may represent a sensory hallucination analogous to the more commonly recognized visual NREM parasomnia-associated hypnopompic visual hallucinations and that, as such, it may arise during arousal of the sensory neocortex as confabulatory response.

  6. Nursing intervention protocol for adult patients experiencing chronic low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Mohamed Taha

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a nursing intervention protocol targeting the knowledge and practice of adult patients experiencing low back pain. Design: A quasi-experimental research design. Methods: Pre-post assessment of outcome was used in this study. The study was conducted in the outpatient clinic of the physical therapy department at Zagazig University Hospital and Beni-Suef University Hospital, Egypt. Sample: 40 participants diagnosed with chronic low back pain (lasting for longer than six months. Seven of the 40 dropped out during the follow-up phase for personal or logistical reasons. Tools included sections for demographic characteristics, knowledge and practice assessment; in addition to the Oswestry Disability Index, and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS. Results: The application of an instruction protocol intervention for low back pain was effective in improving patient knowledge and practice, with associated amelioration of the severity of pain and disability among them. The effect was still apparent at the three-month follow-up. Conclusion: It is recommended that the study be replicated using a more robust randomized clinical trial design. Nonetheless, the instruction protocol with the designed booklet may be adopted as an element of the care services offered to patients suffering LBP, given the clear positive effects on patient knowledge, which would undoubtedly help them decide on the most preferential management approach.

  7. [18F]FDG PET/MRI of patients with chronic pain alters management: early experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biswal, Sandip; Behera, Deepak; Yoon, Dae Hyun; Holley, Dawn; Ith, Ma Agnes Martinez; Carroll, Ian; Smuck, Matthew; Hargreaves, Brian [Stanford University School of Medicine, California (United States)

    2015-05-18

    The chronic pain sufferer is currently faced with a lack of objective tools to identify the source of their pain. The overarching goal is to develop clinical [18F]FDG PET/MRI methods to more accurately localize sites of increased neuronal and muscular metabolism or inflammation as it relates to neurogenic sources of pain and to ultimately improve outcomes of chronic pain sufferers. The aims are to 1) correlate imaging findings with location of pain symptomology, 2) predict location of symptoms based on imaging findings alone and 3) to determine whether the imaging results affect current management decisions. Six patients suffering from chronic lower extremity neuropathic pain (4 complex regional pain syndrome, 1 chronic sciatica and 1 neuropathic pain) have been imaged with a PET/MRI system (time-of-flight PET; 3.0T bore) from mid thorax through the feet. All patients underwent PET/MR imaging one hour after a injection of 10mCi [18F]FDG. Two radiologists evaluated PET/MR images (one blinded and the other unblinded to patient exam/history). ROI analysis showed focal increased [18F]FDG uptake in affected nerves and muscle (approx 2-4 times more) over background tissue in various regions of the body in 5 of 6 patients at the site of greatest pain symptoms and other areas of the body (SUVmax of Target 0.9-4.2 vs. Background 0.2-1.2). The radiologist blind to the patient history/exam was able to correctly identify side/location of the symptoms in 5 out of 6 patients. Imaging results were reviewed with the referring physician, who then determined whether a modification in the management plan was needed: 1/6 no change, 2/6 mild modification (e.g., additional diagnostic test ordered) and 3/6 significant modification.

  8. Immunohistochemical analyses of a case of extralobar pulmonary sequestration with chest pain in an adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Ohtsuki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Computed tomography of a Japanese man in his mid-forties with a complaint of right-side chest pain showed a dome-shaped smooth-surfaced mediastinal mass, which was extirpated. The cut surface was highly hemorrhagic and necrotic and not related to the original pulmonary tissues. Although routine sectioning detected bronchial cartilage, immunohistochemical analyses clearly showed the presence of alveolar type II cells; only the alveolar type II cells located at the periphery of this mass showed positive staining for cytokeratins, thyroid transcription factor 1, surfactant protein A, epithelial membrane antigen and Krebs von den Lungen-6. Thus, these analyses are useful for the detection of pulmonary components, even in severely hemorrhagic and necrotic tissues with marked sequestration. The clinical diagnosis was a rare, adult type of extralobar pulmonary sequestration accompanied by chest pain.

  9. Impact of a dedicated infusion clinic for acute management of adults with sickle cell pain crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzkron, Sophie; Carroll, C Patrick; Hill, Peter; David, Mandy; Paul, Nicklaine; Haywood, Carlton

    2015-05-01

    Most adults with sickle cell disease (SCD) receive care for their acute painful episodes in an emergency department (ED) setting. The purpose of this article is to describe the impact of opening a dedicated treatment center for adults with SCD [Sickle Cell Infusion Clinic (SCIC)] on patient outcomes and on hospital discharges for SCD. Descriptive data including demographics, time to first dose of narcotic, and pain scores were collected on patients presenting to the SCIC and ED. Maryland hospital discharge data were obtained from the Maryland Health Services Cost Review Commission. Analyses were conducted using T tests, χ(2) tests, and simple generalized estimating equation regression models accounting for the clustered nature of observations, as appropriate. There were 3,874 visits to the SCIC by 361 unique patients; 85% of those visits resulted in the patient being sent home. During the same time period, there were 3,408 visits to the ED by 558 unique patients with SCD. The overall admission rate from the ED for these patients was 35.9% but decreased significantly over the time period with a rate of 20% in December 2011. There was a significant decrease in readmissions over time for the entire Baltimore Metro area with the likelihood of readmission decreasing by 7% over time. The SCIC model provides adults with SCD access to high quality care that decreases the need for hospital admission. Further research needs to be done to evaluate the cost effectiveness of this model.

  10. Effects of juvenile exposure to predator odor on adolescent and adult anxiety and pain nociception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Ryan J; Dahlborg, Kaitlyn M; O'Loughlin, Lauren E; Bloom, Christopher M

    2014-05-28

    Clinical researchers have tracked patients with early life trauma and noted generalized anxiety disorder, unipolar depression, and risk-taking behaviors developing in late adolescence and into early adulthood. Animal models provide an opportunity to investigate the neural and developmental processes that underlie the relationship between early stress and later abnormal behavior. The present model used repeated exposure to 2,3,5-trimethyl-3-thiazoline (TMT), a component of fox feces, as an unconditioned fear-eliciting stimulus in order to induce stress in juvenile rats aged postnatal day (PND) 23 through 27. After further physical maturation characteristic of the adolescent stage (PND 42), animals were tested using an elevated plus maze (EPM) for anxiety and plantar test (Hargreaves method) for pain to assess any lingering effects of the juvenile stress. To assess how an additional stress later in life affects anxiety and pain nociception, PND 43 rats were exposed to inescapable shock (0.8mA) and again tested on EPM and plantar test. A final testing period was conducted in the adult (PND 63) rats to assess resulting changes in adult behaviors. TMT-exposed rats were significantly more anxious in adolescence than controls, but this difference disappeared after exposure to the secondary stressor. In adulthood, but not in adolescence, TMT-exposed rats demonstrated lower pain sensitivity than controls. These results suggest that early life stress can play a significant role in later anxiety and pain nociception, and offer insight into the development and manifestation of anxiety- and trauma-related disorders.

  11. Reduced pain and inflammation in juvenile and adult rats fed a ketogenic diet.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David N Ruskin

    Full Text Available The ketogenic diet is a high-fat, low-carbohydrate regimen that forces ketone-based rather than glucose-based cellular metabolism. Clinically, maintenance on a ketogenic diet has been proven effective in treating pediatric epilepsy and type II diabetes, and recent basic research provides evidence that ketogenic strategies offer promise in reducing brain injury. Cellular mechanisms hypothesized to be mobilized by ketone metabolism and underlying the success of ketogenic diet therapy, such as reduced reactive oxygen species and increased central adenosine, suggest that the ketolytic metabolism induced by the diet could reduce pain and inflammation. To test the effects of a ketone-based metabolism on pain and inflammation directly, we fed juvenile and adult rats a control diet (standard rodent chow or ketogenic diet (79% fat ad libitum for 3-4 weeks. We then quantified hindpaw thermal nociception as a pain measure and complete Freund's adjuvant-induced local hindpaw swelling and plasma extravasation (fluid movement from the vasculature as inflammation measures. Independent of age, maintenance on a ketogenic diet reduced the peripheral inflammatory response significantly as measured by paw swelling and plasma extravasation. The ketogenic diet also induced significant thermal hypoalgesia independent of age, shown by increased hindpaw withdrawal latency in the hotplate nociception test. Anti-inflammatory and hypoalgesic diet effects were generally more robust in juveniles. The ketogenic diet elevated plasma ketones similarly in both age groups, but caused slowed body growth only in juveniles. These data suggest that applying a ketogenic diet or exploiting cellular mechanisms associated with ketone-based metabolism offers new therapeutic opportunities for controlling pain and peripheral inflammation, and that such a metabolic strategy may offer significant benefits for children and adults.

  12. Altered resting state neuromotor connectivity in men with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome: A MAPP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason J. Kutch

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain network activity associated with altered motor control in individuals with chronic pain is not well understood. Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome (CP/CPPS is a debilitating condition in which previous studies have revealed altered resting pelvic floor muscle activity in men with CP/CPPS compared to healthy controls. We hypothesized that the brain networks controlling pelvic floor muscles would also show altered resting state function in men with CP/CPPS. Here we describe the results of the first test of this hypothesis focusing on the motor cortical regions, termed pelvic-motor, that can directly activate pelvic floor muscles. A group of men with CP/CPPS (N = 28, as well as group of age-matched healthy male controls (N = 27, had resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging scans as part of the Multidisciplinary Approach to the Study of Chronic Pelvic Pain (MAPP Research Network study. Brain maps of the functional connectivity of pelvic-motor were compared between groups. A significant group difference was observed in the functional connectivity between pelvic-motor and the right posterior insula. The effect size of this group difference was among the largest effect sizes in functional connectivity between all pairs of 165 anatomically-defined subregions of the brain. Interestingly, many of the atlas region pairs with large effect sizes also involved other subregions of the insular cortices. We conclude that functional connectivity between motor cortex and the posterior insula may be among the most important markers of altered brain function in men with CP/CPPS, and may represent changes in the integration of viscerosensory and motor processing.

  13. Altered resting state neuromotor connectivity in men with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome: A MAPP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutch, Jason J.; Yani, Moheb S.; Asavasopon, Skulpan; Kirages, Daniel J.; Rana, Manku; Cosand, Louise; Labus, Jennifer S.; Kilpatrick, Lisa A.; Ashe-McNalley, Cody; Farmer, Melissa A.; Johnson, Kevin A.; Ness, Timothy J.; Deutsch, Georg; Harris, Richard E.; Apkarian, A. Vania; Clauw, Daniel J.; Mackey, Sean C.; Mullins, Chris; Mayer, Emeran A.

    2015-01-01

    Brain network activity associated with altered motor control in individuals with chronic pain is not well understood. Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome (CP/CPPS) is a debilitating condition in which previous studies have revealed altered resting pelvic floor muscle activity in men with CP/CPPS compared to healthy controls. We hypothesized that the brain networks controlling pelvic floor muscles would also show altered resting state function in men with CP/CPPS. Here we describe the results of the first test of this hypothesis focusing on the motor cortical regions, termed pelvic-motor, that can directly activate pelvic floor muscles. A group of men with CP/CPPS (N = 28), as well as group of age-matched healthy male controls (N = 27), had resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging scans as part of the Multidisciplinary Approach to the Study of Chronic Pelvic Pain (MAPP) Research Network study. Brain maps of the functional connectivity of pelvic-motor were compared between groups. A significant group difference was observed in the functional connectivity between pelvic-motor and the right posterior insula. The effect size of this group difference was among the largest effect sizes in functional connectivity between all pairs of 165 anatomically-defined subregions of the brain. Interestingly, many of the atlas region pairs with large effect sizes also involved other subregions of the insular cortices. We conclude that functional connectivity between motor cortex and the posterior insula may be among the most important markers of altered brain function in men with CP/CPPS, and may represent changes in the integration of viscerosensory and motor processing. PMID:26106574

  14. Is temporal summation of pain and spinal nociception altered during normal aging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marouf, Rafik; Piché, Mathieu; Rainville, Pierre

    2015-10-01

    This study examines the effect of normal aging on temporal summation (TS) of pain and the nociceptive flexion reflex (RIII). Two groups of healthy volunteers, young and elderly, received transcutaneous electrical stimulation applied to the right sural nerve to assess pain and the nociceptive flexion reflex (RIII-reflex). Stimulus intensity was adjusted individually to 120% of RIII-reflex threshold, and shocks were delivered as a single stimulus or as a series of 5 stimuli to assess TS at 5 different frequencies (0.17, 0.33, 0.66, 1, and 2 Hz). This study shows that robust TS of pain and RIII-reflex is observable in individuals aged between 18 and 75 years and indicates that these effects are comparable between young and older individuals. These results contrast with some previous findings and imply that at least some pain regulatory processes, including TS, may not be affected by normal aging, although this may vary depending on the method.

  15. Postural stability is altered by the stimulation of pain but not warm receptors in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Corbeil Philippe; Blouin Jean-Sébastien; Teasdale Normand

    2003-01-01

    Abstract Background It is now recognized that large diameter myelinated afferents provide the primary source of lower limb proprioceptive information for maintaining an upright standing position. Small diameter afferents transmitting noxious stimuli, however, can also influence motor behaviors. Despite the possible influence of pain on motor behaviors, the effects of pain on the postural control system have not been well documented. Methods Two cutaneous heat stimulations (experiment 1: non-n...

  16. Knee extensor strength is associated with pressure pain thresholds in adults with fibromyalgia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Michael Hooten

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Individuals with fibromyalgia (FM have lower muscle strength and lower pressure pain thresholds (PPT. The primary aim of this study was to determine the associations between muscle strength and PPT in adults with FM to test the hypothesis that greater measures of muscle strength would be associated with greater values of PPT. Secondary aims included determining the effects of pain severity and the peak uptake of oxygen (VO2 on the associations between muscle strength and PPT. METHODS: Knee extensor and flexor strength (N = 69 was measured in the dominant leg using a dynamometer, and PPT was assessed using an electronic algometer. Pain severity was determined using the Multidimensional Pain Inventory, and peak VO2 uptake was quantified using an electronically braked cycle ergometer. RESULTS: Univariable linear regression analysis demonstrated a significant association between PPT (dependent variable and isometric knee extensor (P<.001, isokinetic (60°/s knee extensor (P = .002, and isokinetic (60°/s knee flexor strength (P = .043. In a multiple variable linear regression analysis adjusted for age, sex, pain severity, body mass index and peak VO2 uptake, a significant association was found between PPT and isometric knee extensor strength (P = .008. In a similar multiple variable analysis, a significant association was found between PPT and isokinetic knee extensor strength (P = .044. CONCLUSION: Greater measures of isometric and isokinetic knee extensor strength were significantly associated with greater values of PPT in both univariable and multiple variable linear regression models. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01253395.

  17. Association between dental pain and depression in Korean adults using the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, S E; Park, Y G; Han, K; Min, J A; Kim, S Y

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationships between the prevalence of depression and dental pain using a well characterised, nationally representative, population-based study. This study analysed data from the 2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n = 4886). Oral health status was assessed using the oral health questionnaire, and oral examination was performed by trained dentists. Depression was defined as the participant having been diagnosed as depression during the previous year. Logistic regression was applied to estimate adjusted odds ratios (AOR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), controlling for a range of covariates. Results demonstrated that participants included in 'root canal treatment is necessary' showed higher prevalence of self-reported dental pain; in particular, participants with depression presented more dental pain than those without depression. After adjusting for sociodemographic factors, self-reported dental pain increased in participants with depression. The AOR (95% CI) for having self-reported dental pain was 1·58 (1·08-2·33) in dentists' diagnosis of no dental pain/depression group, 1·62 (1·32-1·98) in dentists' diagnosis of dental pain/no depression group and 2·84 (1·10-7·37) in dentists' diagnosis of dental pain/depression group. It was concluded that depression was associated with dental pain after adjustment for potential confounders in Korean adults. Thus, dentists should consider the possible presence of psychopathology when treating patients with dental pain.

  18. Minocycline treatment inhibits microglial activation and alters spinal levels of endocannabinoids in a rat model of neuropathic pain

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    Elphick Maurice R

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Activation of spinal microglia contributes to aberrant pain responses associated with neuropathic pain states. Endocannabinoids (ECs are present in the spinal cord, and inhibit nociceptive processing; levels of ECs may be altered by microglia which modulate the turnover of endocannabinoids in vitro. Here, we investigate the effect of minocycline, an inhibitor of activated microglia, on levels of the endocannabinoids anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG, and the related compound N-palmitoylethanolamine (PEA, in neuropathic spinal cord. Selective spinal nerve ligation (SNL in rats resulted in mechanical allodynia and the presence of activated microglia in the ipsilateral spinal cord. Chronic daily treatment with minocycline (30 mg/kg, ip for 14 days significantly reduced the development of mechanical allodynia at days 5, 10 and 14 post-SNL surgery, compared to vehicle-treated SNL rats (P P P P P

  19. Runners with patellofemoral pain have altered biomechanics which targeted interventions can modify: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Bradley S; Barton, Christian J; Gallie, Rosa; O'Halloran, Patrick; Morrissey, Dylan

    2016-03-01

    Patellofemoral pain (PFP) is the most prevalent running pathology and associated with multi-level biomechanical factors. This systematic review aims to guide treatment and prevention of PFP by synthesising prospective, observational and intervention studies that measure clinical and biomechanical outcomes in symptomatic running populations. Medline, Web of Science and CINAHL were searched from inception to April 2015 for prospective, case-control or intervention studies in running-related PFP cohorts. Study methodological quality was scored by two independent raters using the modified Downs and Black or PEDro scales, with meta-analysis performed where appropriate. 28 studies were included. Very limited evidence indicates that increased peak hip adduction is a risk factor for PFP in female runners, supported by moderate evidence of a relationship between PFP and increased peak hip adduction, internal rotation and contralateral pelvic drop, as well as reduced peak hip flexion. Limited evidence was also identified that altered peak force and time to peak at foot level is a risk factor for PFP development. Limited evidence from intervention studies indicates that both running retraining and proximal strengthening exercise lead to favourable outcomes in both pain and function, but only running retraining significantly reduces peak hip adduction, suggesting a possible kinematic mechanism. Put together, these findings highlight limited but coherent evidence of altered biomechanics which interventions can alter with resultant symptom change in females with PFP. There is a clear need for high quality prospective studies of intervention efficacy with measurement of explanatory mechanisms.

  20. Opioid Misuse/Abuse and Quality Persistent Pain Management in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yu-Ping; Compton, Peggy

    2016-12-01

    The United States is amid an epidemic of prescription opioid drug abuse, bringing with it not only high rates of overdose, but growing rates of heroin abuse and addiction. Liberal opioid drug prescribing on the part of well-meaning clinicians has in part fueled this epidemic, being correlated to opioid death and addiction treatment admission rates. Misuse and abuse of prescription opioid drugs is greatest among young adults (ages 18 to 25); however, the fastest growing age group for opioid drug misuse/abuse is older (ages 50 to 64). Prescription opioid drug use issues may emerge in the context of persistent pain, and risk factors for misuse/abuse and overdose in older patients with pain require further description. In keeping with national initiatives to combat prescription opioid drug abuse and overdose, current clinical guidelines reflect an "opioid-sparing" approach. To the degree that these guidelines improve persistent pain and opioid drug misuse/abuse outcomes, significant public health benefits will be accrued. Efforts to reduce both require action and are national priorities. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 42(12), 21-30.].

  1. Effects of Reiki on anxiety, depression, pain, and physiological factors in community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richeson, Nancy E; Spross, Judith A; Lutz, Katherine; Peng, Cheng

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of Reiki as an alternative and complementary approach to treating community-dwelling older adults who experience pain, depression, and/or anxiety. Participants (N = 20) were randomly assigned to either an experimental or wait list control group. The pre- and posttest measures included the Hamilton Anxiety Scale, Geriatric Depression Scale-Short Form, Faces Pain Scale, and heart rate and blood pressure. The research design included an experimental component to examine changes in these measures and a descriptive component (semi-structured interview) to elicit information about the experience of having Reiki treatments. Significant differences were observed between the experimental and treatment groups on measures of pain, depression, and anxiety; no changes in heart rate and blood pressure were noted. Content analysis of treatment notes and interviews revealed five broad categories of responses: Relaxation; Improved Physical Symptoms, Mood, and Well-Being; Curiosity and a Desire to Learn More; Enhanced Self-Care; and Sensory and Cognitive Responses to Reiki.

  2. An Unusual Presentation of Adult Tethered Cord Syndrome Associated with Severe Chest and Upper Back Pain

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    Shotaro Kanda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult tethered cord syndrome (ATCS is a rare entity that usually presents with multiple neurological symptoms, including lower extremity pain, backache, lower extremity muscle weakness, and bowel/bladder disturbances. Prompt surgical treatment is often necessary to avoid permanent sequelae. We report a 63-year-old man with sudden-onset severe right chest and upper back pain, followed by urinary retention. His initial workup included computed tomography of the abdomen and pelvis, which showed a presacral mass. His symptom-driven neurological workup focused on the cervical and thoracic spine, the results of which were normal. Pelvic radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbosacral spine showed spina bifida occulta, meningocele, and presacral masses consistent with a teratomatous tumor. His symptoms, except for urinary retention, improved dramatically with surgical treatment. The excised specimen contained a teratomatous lesion plus an organized hematoma. Hematoma formation was suspected as the trigger of his sudden-onset right chest and upper back pain.

  3. Altered orbitofrontal sulcogyral patterns in adult males with high-functioning autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Hiromi; Nakamura, Motoaki; Ohno, Taisei; Itahashi, Takashi; Tanaka, Eizaburo; Ohta, Haruhisa; Yamada, Takashi; Kanai, Chieko; Iwanami, Akira; Kato, Nobumasa; Hashimoto, Ryuichiro

    2014-04-01

    Functions of the orbitofrontal cortex include diverse social, cognitive and affective processes, many of which are abnormal in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Recently, altered orbitofrontal sulcogyral patterns have been revealed in several psychiatric conditions, such as schizophrenia, indicating a possibility that altered orbitofrontal sulcogyral morphology reflects abnormal neurodevelopment. However, the presence of sulcal alterations in ASD remains unexplored. Using structural magnetic resonance imaging, subtypes of the 'H-shaped' sulcus (Type I, II and III, in order of frequency), posterior orbital sulcus (POS) and intermediate orbital sulcus were identified in each hemisphere of adult males with ASD (n = 51) and matched normal controls (n = 55) based on the study by Chiavaras and Petrides. ASD showed a significantly altered distribution of H-shaped sulcal subtypes in both hemispheres, with a significant increase of Type III. A significant alteration in the distribution of sulcal subtypes was also identified in the right hemisphere POS of ASD. Categorical regression analysis revealed that Type I and II expressions predicted a reduced total Autism-Spectrum Quotient score. Furthermore, Type I expression was associated with a reduced 'attention to detail' subscale score. The results demonstrate that altered sulcogyral morphology can be a marker for abnormal neurodevelopment leading to the increased risk of developing autism.

  4. Ethnic differences in the prevalence of knee pain among adults of a community in a cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beh, Hooi Chin; Ng, Chirk Jenn; Teng, Cheong Lieng; Hanafi, Nik Sherina; Choo, Wan Yuen

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the prevalence of knee pain among 3 major ethnic groups in Malaysia. By identifying high-risk groups, preventive measures can be targeted at these populations. Design and setting A cross-sectional survey was carried out in rural and urban areas in a state in Malaysia. Secondary schools were randomly selected and used as sampling units. Participants Adults aged ≥18 years old were invited to answer a self-administered questionnaire on pain experienced over the previous 6 months. Out of 9300 questionnaires distributed, 5206 were returned and 150 participants who did not fall into the 3 ethnic groups were excluded, yielding a total of 5056 questionnaires for analysis. 58.2% (n=2926) were women. 50% (n=2512) were Malays, 41.4% (n=2079) were Chinese and 8.6% (n=434) were Indians. Results 21.1% (n=1069) had knee pain during the previous 6 months. More Indians (31.8%) experienced knee pain compared with Malays (24.3%) and Chinese (15%) (p<0.001). The odds of Indian women reporting knee pain was twofold higher compared with Malay women. There was a rising trend in the prevalence of knee pain with increasing age (p<0.001). The association between age and knee pain appeared to be stronger in women than men. 68.1% of Indians used analgesia for knee pain while 75.4% of Malays and 52.1% of Chinese did so (p<0.001). The most common analgesic used for knee pain across all groups was topical medicated oil (43.7%). Conclusions The prevalence of knee pain in adults was more common in Indian women and older women age groups and Chinese men had the lowest prevalence of knee pain. Further studies should investigate the reasons for these differences. PMID:27909033

  5. Effects of Infantile Repeated Hyperglycemia on Behavioral Alterations in Adult Rats

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    Malihe Moghadami

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Anxiety symptoms have been reported to be present in many patients with diabetes mellitus. However, little is known about the effects of hyperglycemia in critical periods of the central nervous system development. We assessed locomotive, exploratory, and anxiety behaviors in adult rats that remained from infantile repeated hyperglycemia by the open field and elevated plus maze tests. Our findings showed significant hypo activity, reduced locomotive/exploratory activities, increased fear related behaviors, and anxiety state between hyperglycemic and control adult males and the same differences were observed among females. In addition, no significant behavioral alterations between male and female animals were observed. This study determined that repeated increments in daily blood sugar levels in newborns may affect neuronal functions and provide behavioral abnormalities in adults.

  6. Comparison of hand grip strength and upper limb pressure pain threshold between older adults with or without non-specific shoulder pain

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    Cesar Calvo Lobo

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background There is a high prevalence of non-specific shoulder pain associated with upper limb functional limitations in older adults. The purpose of this study was to determine the minimal clinically important differences (MCID of grip strength and pressure pain threshold (PPT in the upper limb between older adults with or without non-specific shoulder pain. Methods A case-control study was carried out following the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE criteria. A sample of 132 shoulders (mean ± SD years with (n = 66; 76.04 ± 7.58 and without (n = 66; 75.05 ± 6.26 non-specific pain were recruited. The grip strength and PPT of the anterior deltoid and extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB muscles were assessed. Results There were statistically significant differences (mean ± SD; P-value for anterior deltoid PPT (2.51 ± 0.69 vs 3.68 ± 0.65, kg/cm2; P < .001, ECRB PPT (2.20 ± 0.60 vs 3.35 ± 0.38 kg/cm2; P < .001 and grip strength (20.78 ± 10.94 vs 24.63 ± 9.38 kg; P = .032 between shoulders with and without non-specific pain, respectively. Discussion The MCID of 1.17 kg/cm2, 1.15 kg/cm2 and 3.84 kg were proposed for anterior deltoid PPT, ECRB PPT and grip strength, respectively, to assess the upper limb of older adults with non-specific shoulder pain after treatment. In addition, univariate and multivariate (linear regression and regression trees analyses may be used to consider age distribution, sex, pain intensity, grip strength and PPT in older adults including clinical and epidemiological studies with non-specific shoulder pain.

  7. Physical, lifestyle, psychological, and social determinants of pain intensity, pain disability, and the number of pain locations in depressed older adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanssen, Denise J. C.; Naarding, Paul; Collard, Rose M.; Comijs, Hannie C.; Oude Voshaar, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    Late-life depression and pain more often co-occur than can be explained by chance. Determinants of pain in late-life depression are unknown, even though knowledge on possible determinants of pain in depression is important for clinical practice. Therefore, the objectives of the present study were 1)

  8. Physiotherapy for pain and disability in adults with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) types I and II

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Background   Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a painful and disabling condition that usually manifests in response to trauma or surgery. When it occurs, it is associated with significant pain and disability. It is thought to arise and persist as a consequence of a maladaptive pro-inflammatory response and disturbances in sympathetically-mediated vasomotor control, together with maladaptive peripheral and central neuronal plasticity. CRPS can be classified into two types: type I (CRPS ...

  9. Factors associated with sexual orientation and gender disparities in chronic pain among U.S. adolescents and young adults

    OpenAIRE

    Sabra L. Katz-Wise; Bethany Everett; Scherer, Emily A.; Holly Gooding; Milliren, Carly E.; S. Bryn Austin

    2015-01-01

    This research investigated factors associated with sexual orientation disparities in chronic pain frequency among youth. Data were analyzed from 4534 female and 3785 male youth from Waves I–IV (1995–2009) of the U.S. National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health. Gender-stratified weighted logistic regression models controlled for sociodemographic characteristics and included sexual orientation (primary predictor) and frequency of three types of chronic pain (outcomes). Models wit...

  10. Effects of strength vs aerobic exercise on pain severity in adults with fibromyalgia: a randomized equivalence trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooten, W Michael; Qu, Wenchun; Townsend, Cynthia O; Judd, Jeffrey W

    2012-04-01

    Strength training and aerobic exercise have beneficial effects on pain in adults with fibromyalgia. However, the equivalence of strengthening and aerobic exercise has not been reported. The primary aim of this randomized equivalence trial involving patients with fibromyalgia admitted to an interdisciplinary pain treatment program was to test the hypothesis that strengthening (n=36) and aerobic (n=36) exercise have equivalent effects (95% confidence interval within an equivalence margin ± 8) on pain, as measured by the pain severity subscale of the Multidimensional Pain Inventory. Secondary aims included determining the effects of strengthening and aerobic exercise on peak Vo(2) uptake, leg strength, and pressure pain thresholds. In an intent-to-treat analysis, the mean (± standard deviation) pain severity scores for the strength and aerobic groups at study completion were 34.4 ± 11.5 and 37.6 ± 11.9, respectively. The group difference was -3.2 (95% confidence interval, -8.7 to 2.3), which was within the equivalence margin of Δ8. Significant improvements in pain severity (Pexercise have important clinical implications that could allow practitioners to target exercise recommendations on the basis of comorbid medical conditions or patient preference for a particular type of exercise. This study found that strength and aerobic exercise had equivalent effects on reducing pain severity among patients with fibromyalgia.

  11. Does Parkinson's disease lead to alterations in the facial expression of pain?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Priebe, Janosch A; Kunz, Miriam; Morcinek, Christian; Rieckmann, Peter; Lautenbacher, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Hypomimia which refers to a reduced degree in facial expressiveness is a common sign in Parkinson's disease (PD). The objective of our study was to investigate how hypomimia affects PD patients' facial expression of pain. The facial expressions of 23 idiopathic PD patients in the Off-phase (without

  12. Amygdala activation by corticosterone alters visceral and somatic pain in cycling female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Jenny K; Greenwood-Van Meerveld, Beverley

    2011-06-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is often seen in women, and symptom severity is known to vary over the menstrual cycle. In addition, activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis enhances symptomology and patients with IBS have increased activation of the amygdala, a brain region known to facilitate HPA output. However, little is known about the effects of amygdala activation during different stages of the menstrual cycle. We therefore investigated the effects of amygdala activation on somatic and visceral pain perception over the rat estrous cycle. Female Wistar rats were implanted with either corticosterone (Cort) or cholesterol as a control onto the dorsal margin of the central amygdala. Visceral sensitivity was quantified by recording the visceromotor response (VMR) to colorectal distension (CRD) and somatic sensitivity was assessed via the Von Frey test. In cholesterol controls, both visceral and somatic sensitivity varied over the estrous cycle. Rats in proestrus/estrus responded to CRD with an increased VMR compared with rats in metestrus/diestrus. Somatic sensitivity followed a similar pattern with enhanced sensitivity during proestrus/estrus compared with metestrus/diestrus. Elevated amygdala Cort induced visceral hypersensitivity during metestrus/diestrus but had no effect during proestrus/estrus. In contrast, elevated amygdala Cort increased somatic sensitivity during both metestrus/diestrus and proestrus/estrous. These results suggests that amygdala activation by Cort eliminates spontaneously occurring differences in visceral and somatic pain perception, which could explain the lowered pain thresholds and higher incidence of somatic pain observed in women with IBS.

  13. Predicting the occurrence of headache and back pain in young adults by biopsychological characteristics assessed at childhood or adolescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kröner-Herwig B

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Birgit Kröner-Herwig, Anastasia Gorbunova, Jennifer Maas Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Georg-Elias-Müller-Institute of Psychology, University of Göttingen, Göttingen, Germany Abstract: The aim of the current study was to identify predictors of recurrent headache and back pain in young adults (aged 18–27 years from data assessed in childhood or adolescence, i.e., 9 years before the final survey. Our interest was whether psychological characteristics contribute to the risk of pain prevalence in adult age when controlling for already empirically supported risk factors such as parental pain, pediatric pain and sex. The study was part of a five-wave epidemiological investigation of >5000 families with children aged between 7 and 14 years when addressed first. In a multiple hierarchical regression analysis, the abovementioned three variables (Block-I variables were entered first followed by five psychological trait variables (Block-II variables: internalizing, anxiety sensitivity, somatosensory amplification, catastrophizing and dysfunctional stress coping to find out the extent of model improvement. The multivariable hierarchical regression analysis confirmed the hypothesis that the Block-I variables significantly enhance the risk of future pain at young adult age. None of the psychological variables did so. Thus, the hypothesis of a significant surplus predictive effect was not confirmed. The amount of total explained variance differed strongly between headache and back pain. In particular, a valid prediction of back pain was not possible. When analyzed separately in simple regression analysis, psychological variables turned out to be significant predictors, however, of very low effect size. The inclusion of Block-I variables in the model clearly reduced the impact of the psychological variables. This risk profile is discussed in the context of the different trajectories of headache and back pain from childhood to

  14. Prescription pain reliever misuse and levels of pain impairment: 3-year course in a nationally representative outpatient sample of US adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novak SP

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Scott P Novak,1 Cristie Glasheen,1 Carl L Roland,2 1Behavioral Health Epidemiology, RTI International, 2Clinical Sciences and Outcomes Evidence, Pfizer Inc., Durham, NC, USA Background: The primary aim of this work was to present the prevalence data from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC, a representative 3-year longitudinal survey (ages 18+ years that captured information on patterns of self-reported pain interference and prescription pain reliever misuse. A second aim was to assess the degree to which the risk of various types of opioid misuse (onset, desistance, and incidence of dependence was related to the longitudinal course of self-reported pain interference over the 3-year period. Methods: We used a two-wave, nationally representative sample of adults (aged 18+ years in which the baseline data were collected during 2001–2002 and a single follow-up was obtained ~3 years later (2004–2005 with 34,332 respondents with complete data on study variables for both waves. Results: Our findings indicated that ~10% reported high pain interference in the past month at each wave. There was tremendous stability in levels of pain, with ~5% reporting consistent levels of high impairment over the 3-year study, a proxy for chronic pain. Levels of pain were more strongly associated with prescription pain reliever misuse concurrently rather than prospectively, and the association was largely linear, with the likelihood of misuse increasing with levels of pain. Finally, health service factors were also prominent predictors of onset, but not the outcomes, of desistance or transitions to problem use. Conclusion: This study is the first to use a nationally representative sample with measures of pain and drug use history collected over an extended period. These results may help provide clinicians with an understanding that the risk of misuse is greatest when pain is active and may help guide the selection of

  15. Social isolation impairs adult neurogenesis in the limbic system and alters behaviors in female prairie voles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberwirth, Claudia; Liu, Yan; Jia, Xixi; Wang, Zuoxin

    2012-09-01

    Disruptions in the social environment, such as social isolation, are distressing and can induce various behavioral and neural changes in the distressed animal. We conducted a series of experiments to test the hypothesis that long-term social isolation affects brain plasticity and alters behavior in the highly social prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster). In Experiment 1, adult female prairie voles were injected with a cell division marker, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU), and then same-sex pair-housed (control) or single-housed (isolation) for 6 weeks. Social isolation reduced cell proliferation, survival, and neuronal differentiation and altered cell death in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and the amygdala. In addition, social isolation reduced cell proliferation in the medial preoptic area and cell survival in the ventromedial hypothalamus. These data suggest that long-term social isolation affects distinct stages of adult neurogenesis in specific limbic brain regions. In Experiment 2, isolated females displayed higher levels of anxiety-like behaviors in both the open field and elevated plus maze tests and higher levels of depression-like behavior in the forced swim test than controls. Further, isolated females showed a higher level of affiliative behavior than controls, but the two groups did not differ in social recognition memory. Together, our data suggest that social isolation not only impairs cell proliferation, survival, and neuronal differentiation in limbic brain areas, but also alters anxiety-like, depression-like, and affiliative behaviors in adult female prairie voles. These data warrant further investigation of a possible link between altered neurogenesis within the limbic system and behavioral changes.

  16. Fetal and neonatal exposure to the endocrine disruptor methoxychlor causes epigenetic alterations in adult ovarian genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zama, Aparna Mahakali; Uzumcu, Mehmet

    2009-10-01

    Exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals during development could alter the epigenetic programming of the genome and result in adult-onset disease. Methoxychlor (MXC) and its metabolites possess estrogenic, antiestrogenic, and antiandrogenic activities. Previous studies showed that fetal/neonatal exposure to MXC caused adult ovarian dysfunction due to altered expression of key ovarian genes including estrogen receptor (ER)-beta, which was down-regulated, whereas ERalpha was unaffected. The objective of the current study was to evaluate changes in global and gene-specific methylation patterns in adult ovaries associated with the observed defects. Rats were exposed to MXC (20 microg/kgxd or 100 mg/kg.d) between embryonic d 19 and postnatal d 7. We performed DNA methylation analysis of the known promoters of ERalpha and ERbeta genes in postnatal d 50-60 ovaries using bisulfite sequencing and methylation-specific PCRs. Developmental exposure to MXC led to significant hypermethylation in the ERbeta promoter regions (P < 0.05), whereas the ERalpha promoter was unaffected. We assessed global DNA methylation changes using methylation-sensitive arbitrarily primed PCR and identified 10 genes that were hypermethylated in ovaries from exposed rats. To determine whether the MXC-induced methylation changes were associated with increased DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) levels, we measured the expression levels of Dnmt3a, Dnmt3b, and Dnmt3l using semiquantitative RT-PCR. Whereas Dnmt3a and Dnmt3l were unchanged, Dnmt3b expression was stimulated in ovaries of the 100 mg/kg MXC group (P < 0.05), suggesting that increased DNMT3B may cause DNA hypermethylation in the ovary. Overall, these data suggest that transient exposure to MXC during fetal and neonatal development affects adult ovarian function via altered methylation patterns.

  17. Daily activity patterns of an adult experiencing lower back pain undergoing electro-acupuncture: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koski, Bonnie L; Dunn, Karen S; Shebuski, Mark R

    2009-12-01

    In the United States, adults experiencing lower back pain (LBP) have reported using alternative health care to manage symptoms. Chiropractic techniques, relaxation, and massage have been cited as the most commonly used alternative therapies. Electro-acupuncture (EA), along with conventional health care, has been found to be a useful complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) modality in alleviating the disability associated with LBP. The purpose of this single-subject case study was to evaluate the daily activity pattern effects of EA and CAM modality usage on pain intensity levels and functional status of an adult experiencing LBP. Activity patterns and pain intensity ratings were recorded for two consecutive weeks through the use of a daily pain diary in natural environments. Results from the data analyses revealed daily LBP intensity ratings ranging from slight to moderate pain. On average, the participant reported using approximately ten CAM modalities per day. The participant reported decreases in pain intensity levels, increases in energy levels, and feeling better after EA and acupuncture treatments, maintaining an exercise and weight loss regimen, taking megavitamins, drinking teas, praying, singing, and using humor, distraction, and relaxation techniques. Use of herbs and too much exercise were the least effective. Findings suggest that for this patient, EA and certain CAM modalities were effective interventions that promoted well-being and self-healing. In addition, the daily pain diary was found to provide rich research and assessment data.

  18. Orexin-A and Endocannabinoid Activation of the Descending Antinociceptive Pathway Underlies Altered Pain Perception in Leptin Signaling Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristino, Luigia; Luongo, Livio; Imperatore, Roberta; Boccella, Serena; Becker, Thorsten; Morello, Giovanna; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Busetto, Giuseppe; Maione, Sabatino; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Pain perception can become altered in individuals with eating disorders and obesity for reasons that have not been fully elucidated. We show that leptin deficiency in ob/ob mice, or leptin insensitivity in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus in mice with high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity, are accompanied by elevated orexin-A (OX-A) levels and orexin receptor-1 (OX1-R)-dependent elevation of the levels of the endocannabinoid, 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), in the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (vlPAG). In ob/ob mice, these alterations result in the following: (i) increased excitability of OX1-R-expressing vlPAG output neurons and subsequent increased OFF and decreased ON cell activity in the rostral ventromedial medulla, as assessed by patch clamp and in vivo electrophysiology; and (ii) analgesia, in both healthy and neuropathic mice. In HFD mice, instead, analgesia is only unmasked following leptin receptor antagonism. We propose that OX-A/endocannabinoid cross talk in the descending antinociceptive pathway might partly underlie increased pain thresholds in conditions associated with impaired leptin signaling.

  19. Gamma-interferon alters globin gene expression in neonatal and adult erythroid cells

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    Miller, B.A.; Perrine, S.P.; Antognetti, G.; Perlmutter, D.H.; Emerson, S.G.; Sieff, C.; Faller, D.V.

    1987-06-01

    The effect of gamma-interferon on fetal hemoglobin synthesis by purified cord blood, fetal liver, and adult bone marrow erythroid progenitors was studied with a radioligand assay to measure hemoglobin production by BFU-E-derived erythroblasts. Coculture with recombinant gamma-interferon resulted in a significant and dose-dependent decrease in fetal hemoglobin production by neonatal and adult, but not fetal, BFU-E-derived erythroblasts. Accumulation of fetal hemoglobin by cord blood BFU-E-derived erythroblasts decreased up to 38.1% of control cultures (erythropoietin only). Synthesis of both G gamma/A gamma globin was decreased, since the G gamma/A gamma ratio was unchanged. Picograms fetal hemoglobin per cell was decreased by gamma-interferon addition, but picograms total hemoglobin was unchanged, demonstrating that a reciprocal increase in beta-globin production occurred in cultures treated with gamma-interferon. No toxic effect of gamma-interferon on colony growth was noted. The addition of gamma-interferon to cultures resulted in a decrease in the percentage of HbF produced by adult BFU-E-derived cells to 45.6% of control. Fetal hemoglobin production by cord blood, fetal liver, and adult bone marrow erythroid progenitors, was not significantly affected by the addition of recombinant GM-CSF, recombinant interleukin 1 (IL-1), recombinant IL-2, or recombinant alpha-interferon. Although fetal progenitor cells appear unable to alter their fetal hemoglobin program in response to any of the growth factors added here, the interaction of neonatal and adult erythroid progenitors with gamma-interferon results in an altered expression of globin genes.

  20. Therapy students' recommendations of physical activity for managing persistent low back pain in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Cormac G; Schofield, Patricia; Martin, Denis J

    2013-07-01

    Negative views of older adults can lead to suboptimal care. For older adults with persistent low back pain (LBP), promotion of physical activity by health care professionals is important. Health care professionals' views of older adults are influenced by their training. This study aimed to compare recommendations for physical activity for managing persistent LBP offered by students in physiotherapy and occupational therapy to an older person vs. a younger person. In a cross-sectional online survey, participants (N = 77) randomly received a vignette of either a 40-yr-old or 70-yr-old patient with persistent LBP. Other than age, the vignettes were identical. There was no difference between the younger and older vignettes in the likelihood of participants making overall appropriate physical activity recommendations--63% vs. 59%, OR (95% CI) = 1.19 (0.48-2.99), p = .71--although there was a trend toward age bias on recommendations specific to daily activity. Postqualification education may be where ageist views need to be addressed.

  1. Altered sympathovagal balance and pain hypersensitivity in TNBS-induced colitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furgała, Agata; Dobrek, Łukasz; Juszczak, Kajetan; Thor, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Pain hypersensitivity, abnormal motility and autonomic dysfunction contribute to functional symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Material and methods The aim of this study was to assess: nociceptive thresholds for mechanical allodynia (MA) and thermal hyperalgesia (TH), intestinal motility (distal colonic transit and emptying), and cardiac autonomic neuropathy (indices of heart rate variability – HRV) in male Wistar rats with experimental trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) induced colitis. To identify a potential vagal contribution the bilateral subdiaphragmatic vagotomy (SDV) was performed. Results Experimental colitis resulted in a significant decrease in pain threshold (MA 23.60 ±2.12, p rats with colitis showed the strongest nociceptive response (MA 22.46 ±3.02, p induces excessive hyperalgesia. PMID:28144278

  2. Neonatal pain-related stress and NFKBIA genotype are associated with altered cortisol levels in preterm boys at school age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunau, Ruth E; Cepeda, Ivan L; Chau, Cecil M Y; Brummelte, Susanne; Weinberg, Joanne; Lavoie, Pascal M; Ladd, Mihoko; Hirschfeld, Aaron F; Russell, Evan; Koren, Gideon; Van Uum, Stan; Brant, Rollin; Turvey, Stuart E

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal pain-related stress is associated with elevated salivary cortisol levels to age 18 months in children born very preterm, compared to full-term, suggesting early programming effects. Importantly, interactions between immune/inflammatory and neuroendocrine systems may underlie programming effects. We examined whether cortisol changes persist to school age, and if common genetic variants in the promoter region of the NFKBIA gene involved in regulation of immune and inflammatory responses, modify the association between early experience and later life stress as indexed by hair cortisol levels, which provide an integrated index of endogenous HPA axis activity. Cortisol was assayed in hair samples from 128 children (83 born preterm ≤ 32 weeks gestation and 45 born full-term) without major sensory, motor or cognitive impairments at age 7 years. We found that hair cortisol levels were lower in preterm compared to term-born children. Downregulation of the HPA axis in preterm children without major impairment, seen years after neonatal stress terminated, suggests persistent alteration of stress system programming. Importantly, the etiology was gender-specific such that in preterm boys but not girls, specifically those with the minor allele for NFKBIA rs2233409, lower hair cortisol was associated with greater neonatal pain (number of skin-breaking procedures from birth to term), independent of medical confounders. Moreover, the minor allele (CT or TT) of NFKBIA rs2233409 was associated with higher secretion of inflammatory cytokines, supporting the hypothesis that neonatal pain-related stress may act as a proinflammatory stimulus that induces long-term immune cell activation. These findings are the first evidence that a long-term association between early pain-related stress and cortisol may be mediated by a genetic variants that regulate the activity of NF-κB, suggesting possible involvement of stress/inflammatory mechanisms in HPA programming in boys born very

  3. Dynamic long-term microstructural and ultrastructural alterations in sensory nerves of rats of paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Yuan; Li Jun; Zhou Junfei; Feng Yi

    2014-01-01

    Background Paclitaxel,as a first line anti-neoplastic compound,frequently produces long-term pain after tumors have been treated.Clinical manifestations are varied and non-specific.Pathology of the nervous system during the development of the neuropathic pain is unclear.Thus,eady diagnosis and treatment is often unsatisfying for patients.This study aimed to promote considerate understanding of the structural alteration of sensory nerves.Methods All rats were simply randomized into 3 groups:paclitaxel group,vehicle group and saline group.An established rat model of paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy (2 mg/kg) was chosen for our research,behavior tests were operated during the procedure of 56 days.All rats were sampled on days 0,3,7,28 and 56.The hind paw plantar skin,sciatic nerves,dorsal root ganglion and attached fibers,and lumbar spinal cord were processed for light and electron microscopy.The differences among 3 groups were analyzed with one-way analysis of vadance (ANOVA).Results We affirmed that paclitaxel-induced mechano-aliodynia and mechano-hyperalgesia occured after a 3-7-day delay,and this pain peaked at day 28 and persisted to day 56.Paclitaxel and vehicle treatment both evoked thermalhyperalgesia.Paclitaxel-induced axonal and myelin sheath degeneration was evident.At days 3 and 7,significant increases in atypical mitochondria in both myelinated axons and C-fibers of paclitaxel-treated nerves indicated that injured mitochondria correlated to specific paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain,and the abnormity sustained till day 56.Microtubule was unaffected in myelinated axons or C-fibers in paclitaxel-or vehicle-treated rats.Significant increase of G ratio was evident with paclitaxel injection at days 7 and 28.Conclusion Our research suggests a causal role for axonal degeneration,abnormalities in axonal mitochondria,and structural modification of axonal microtubules in paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain,and the abnormal mitochondria could be connected

  4. Primary care providers' perspective on prescribing opioids to older adults with chronic non-cancer pain: A qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turner Barbara J

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of opioid medications as treatment for chronic non-cancer pain remains controversial. Little information is currently available regarding healthcare providers' attitudes and beliefs about this practice among older adults. This study aimed to describe primary care providers' experiences and attitudes towards, as well as perceived barriers and facilitators to prescribing opioids as a treatment for chronic pain among older adults. Methods Six focus groups were conducted with a total of 23 physicians and three nurse practitioners from two academically affiliated primary care practices and three community health centers located in New York City. Focus groups were audiotape recorded and transcribed. The data were analyzed using directed content analysis; NVivo software was used to assist in the quantification of identified themes. Results Most participants (96% employed opioids as therapy for some of their older patients with chronic pain, although not as first-line therapy. Providers cited multiple barriers, including fear of causing harm, the subjectivity of pain, lack of education, problems converting between opioids, and stigma. New barriers included patient/family member reluctance to try an opioid and concerns about opioid abuse by family members/caregivers. Studies confirming treatment benefit, validated tools for assessing risk and/or dosing for comorbidities, improved conversion methods, patient education, and peer support could facilitate opioid prescribing. Participants voiced greater comfort using opioids in the setting of delivering palliative or hospice care versus care of patients with chronic pain, and expressed substantial frustration managing chronic pain. Conclusions Providers perceive multiple barriers to prescribing opioids to older adults with chronic pain, and use these medications cautiously. Establishing the long-term safety and efficacy of these medications, generating improved prescribing methods

  5. Does format matter for comprehension of a facial affective scale and a numeric scale for pain by adults with Down syndrome?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.C. de Knegt; H.M. Evenhuis; F. Lobbezoo; C. Schuengel; E.J.A. Scherder

    2013-01-01

    People with intellectual disabilities are at high risk for pain and have communication difficulties. Facial and numeric scales for self-report may aid pain identification. It was examined whether the comprehension of a facial affective scale and a numeric scale for pain in adults with Down syndrome

  6. Mindfulness meditation for the treatment of chronic low back pain in older adults: A randomized controlled pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Morone, Natalia E.; Greco, Carol M.; Weiner, Debra K.

    2007-01-01

    The objectives of this pilot study were to assess the feasibility of recruitment and adherence to an eight-session mindfulness meditation program for community-dwelling older adults with chronic low back pain (CLBP) and to develop initial estimates of treatment effects. It was designed as a randomized, controlled clinical trial. Participants were 37 community-dwelling older adults aged 65 years and older with CLBP of moderate intensity occurring daily or almost every day. Participants were ra...

  7. Effect of duration of smartphone use on muscle fatigue and pain caused by forward head posture in adults

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The effect of duration of smartphone use on neck and shoulder muscle fatigue and pain was investigated in adults with forward head posture. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-four adults with forward head posture were classified into groups by duration of smartphone use: 11 used a smartphone for 10 minutes each (group 1), 12 for 20 minutes each (group 2), and 11 for 30 minutes each (group 3). Fatigue cervical erector spinae and upper trapezius muscles was measured by electromyography, an...

  8. Nanoparticles of Zinc Oxide Reduces Acute Somatic Pain in Adult Female Wistar Rats

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    Mahnaz Kesmati

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: With appearance of nano particles as an important component in modern medicine, and considering to new properties of these components, study of their effects on human health is essential. Since zinc components influences mechanisms of nociception, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of nano zinc oxide as a new source of zinc and important components in pharmaceutical and hygienic cosmetic production on nociception in adult female rats. Materials and Methods: Female rats were divided into groups: control (receiving saline 0.9% and receiving nano ZnO (0.5, 1, and 5 mg/kg. Hot plate and tail flick tests as models of somatic acute pain were used for evaluation of the pain. The mean of latency time in paw licking and tail withdrawal respectively recorded as nociception indexes in each test for every animal. The animal numbers in each group was seven. Results: In tail flick test, nano ZnO (0.5, 1 mg/kg and in the hot plate test in dose of 0.5 mg/kg, induces significant analgesia (p<0.05 and with increasing of dose reduced its analgesic effect. Conclusion: It seems nano ZnO inhibit the nociception mechanisms and these analgesic properties are more efficient in the low doses. Probably by increasing dose of nano particles aggregation phenomenon prevent of anti-nociception effects of nano ZnO.

  9. Extensive and interrelated subcortical white and gray matter alterations in preterm-born adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, C; Bäuml, J G; Daamen, M; Jaekel, J; Neitzel, J; Scheef, L; Busch, B; Baumann, N; Boecker, H; Zimmer, C; Bartmann, P; Wolke, D; Wohlschläger, A M; Sorg, Christian

    2016-05-01

    Preterm birth is a leading cause for impaired neurocognitive development with an increased risk for persistent cognitive deficits in adulthood. In newborns, preterm birth is associated with interrelated white matter (WM) alterations and deep gray matter (GM) loss; however, little is known about the persistence and relevance of these subcortical brain changes. We tested the hypothesis that the pattern of correspondent subcortical WM and GM changes is present in preterm-born adults and has a brain-injury-like nature, i.e., it predicts lowered general cognitive performance. Eighty-five preterm-born and 69 matched term-born adults were assessed by diffusion- and T1-weighted MRI and cognitive testing. Main outcome measures were fractional anisotropy of water diffusion for WM property, GM volume for GM property, and full-scale IQ for cognitive performance. In preterm-born adults, reduced fractional anisotropy was widely distributed ranging from cerebellum to brainstem to hemispheres. GM volume was reduced in the thalamus, striatum, temporal cortices, and increased in the cingulate cortices. Fractional anisotropy reductions were specifically associated with GM loss in thalamus and striatum, with correlation patterns for both regions extensively overlapping in the WM of brainstem and hemispheres. For overlap regions, fractional anisotropy was positively related with both gestational age and full-scale IQ. Results provide evidence for extensive, interrelated, and adverse WM and GM subcortical changes in preterm-born adults. Data suggest persistent brain-injury-like changes of subcortical-cortical connectivity after preterm delivery.

  10. Childhood violence and adult chronic pain among indigenous Sami and non-Sami populations in Norway: a SAMINOR 2 questionnaire study

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    Astrid M. A. Eriksen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Internationally, studies have shown that childhood violence is associated with chronic pain in adulthood. However, to date, this relationship has not been examined in any indigenous population. Objective: The main objectives of this study were to investigate the association between childhood violence and reported chronic pain, number of pain sites and the intensity of pain in adulthood in indigenous Sami and non-Sami adults, and to explore ethnic differences. Design: The study is based on the SAMINOR 2 questionnaire study, a larger population-based, cross-sectional survey on health and living conditions in multiethnic areas with both Sami and non-Sami populations in Mid- and Northern Norway. Our study includes a total of 11,130 adult participants: 2,167 Sami respondents (19.5% and 8,963 non-Sami respondents (80.5%. Chronic pain was estimated by reported pain located in various parts of the body. Childhood violence was measured by reported exposure of emotional, physical and/or sexual violence. Results: Childhood violence was associated with adult chronic pain in several pain sites of the body regardless of ethnicity and gender. Childhood violence was also associated with increased number of chronic pain sites and higher pain intensity compared to those not exposed to childhood violence. However, among Sami men, this association was only significant for pain located in chest, hips/legs and back, and non-significant for increased number of chronic pain sites (adjusted model, and higher pain intensity. Conclusion: Respondents exposed to childhood violence reported more chronic pain in several parts of the body, increased number of chronic pain sites and more intense pain in adulthood than respondents reporting no childhood violence. However, among Sami men, this association was weaker and also not significant for increased number of chronic pain sites and higher pain intensity.

  11. Prevalence of Severe Joint Pain Among Adults with Doctor-Diagnosed Arthritis - United States, 2002-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbour, Kamil E; Boring, Michael; Helmick, Charles G; Murphy, Louise B; Qin, Jin

    2016-10-07

    In the United States, arthritis is a leading cause of disability (1,2); arthritis affected an estimated 52.5 million (22.7%) adults in 2010-2012 and has been projected to affect 78.4 million adults by 2040 (3). Severe joint pain (SJP) can limit function and seriously compromise quality of life (4,5). To determine the prevalence of SJP among adults with doctor-diagnosed arthritis, and the trend in SJP from 2002 to 2014, CDC analyzed data from the National Health Interview Survey. In 2014, approximately one fourth of adults with arthritis had SJP (27.2%). Within selected groups, the age-standardized prevalence of SJP was higher among women (29.2%), non-Hispanic blacks (42.3%), Hispanics (35.8%), and persons with a disability (45.6%), and those who were unable to work (51.9%); prevalence also was higher among those who had fair or poor health (49.1%), obesity (31.7%), heart disease (34.1%), diabetes (40.9%), or serious psychological distress (56.3%). From 2002 to 2014, the age-standardized prevalence of SJP among adults with arthritis did not change (p = 0.14); however, the number of adults with SJP was significantly higher in 2014 (14.6 million) than in 2002 (10.5 million). A strategy to improve pain management (e.g., the 2016 National Pain Strategy*) has been developed, and more widespread dissemination of evidence-based interventions that reduce joint pain in adults with arthritis might reduce the prevalence of SJP.

  12. Trunk Muscle Characteristics of the Multifidi, Erector Spinae, Psoas, and Quadratus Lumborum in Older Adults With and Without Chronic Low Back Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sions, J Megan; Elliott, James M; Pohlig, Ryan T; Hicks, Gregory E

    2017-03-01

    Study Design Cross-sectional study. Objective To determine whether there are differences in trunk muscle characteristics between older adults with and without chronic low back pain (LBP), while controlling for age, sex, and body mass index. Background Muscle support for the trunk is provided by the multifidi, erector spinae, psoas, and quadratus lumborum. Trunk muscle characteristics may be altered with aging and/or chronic LBP. To date, most trunk muscle research has been conducted among younger adults. Given age-related muscle changes, such as reduced size and increased intramuscular fat, studies are needed in older adults, including those comparing older adults with and without LBP. Methods One hundred two older adults with (n = 53) and without (n = 49) chronic LBP were included. Cross-sectional area (CSA) measurements were taken by tracing inside the fascial borders on magnetic resonance images. Pixel intensity summaries were obtained to compute muscle-to-fat indices and relative muscle CSA, that is, CSA void of fat. Right/left averages for levels L2 through L5 were determined. Mixed-design analyses of covariance were used to test for differences between groups, based on LBP presence and sex, across levels (P≤.05). Results Older adults with LBP had a greater average multifidus muscle-to-fat index (0.51 versus 0.49) and smaller average erector spinae relative muscle CSA (8.56 cm(2) versus 9.26 cm(2)) when compared to control participants without LBP. No interactions between LBP status and average muscle characteristics were found for the psoas or quadratus lumborum (P>.05). Conclusion Up to 54% of older adult trunk muscle CSA may be fat. Women have smaller muscles and greater intramuscular fat (at lower spinal levels) than men. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2017;47(3):173-179. Epub 3 Feb 2017. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.7002.

  13. Impact of osteopathic treatment on pain in adult patients with cystic fibrosis--a pilot randomized controlled study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Hubert

    Full Text Available Pain is a common complication in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF and is associated with shorter survival. We evaluated the impact of osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT on pain in adults with CF.A pilot multicenter randomized controlled trial was conducted with three parallel arms: OMT (group A, 16 patients, sham OMT (sham treatment, group B, 8 patients and no treatment (group C, 8 patients. Medical investigators and patients were double-blind to treatment for groups A and B, who received OMT or sham OMT monthly for 6 months. Pain was rated as a composite of its intensity and duration over the previous month. The evolution of chest/back pain after 6 months was compared between group A and groups B+C combined (control group. The evolution of cervical pain, headache and quality of life (QOL were similarly evaluated.There was no statistically significant difference between the treatment and control groups in the decrease of chest/back pain (difference = -2.20 IC95% [-4.81; 0.42], p = 0.098; also, group A did not differ from group B. However, chest/back pain decreased more in groups A (p = 0.002 and B (p = 0.006 than in group C. Cervical pain, headache and QOL scores did not differ between the treatment and control groups.This pilot study demonstrated the feasibility of evaluating the efficacy of OMT to treat the pain of patients with CF. The lack of difference between the group treated with OMT and the control group may be due to the small number of patients included in this trial, which also precludes any definitive conclusion about the greater decrease of pain in patients receiving OMT or sham OMT than in those with no intervention.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01293019.

  14. Surgical management of symptomatic low back pain and monoradicular leg pain in adolescent and young adult patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalevski Svetoslav

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of the present retrospective study is to draw attention to symptomatic low back pain in adolescent patients, in order to encourage earlier diagnosis and surgical treatment. The study assessed the radiological, clinical features and surgical outcomes of 13of this kind of patient. Materials and Methods: Out of a series of 983 consecutive cases (1999-2011 of lumbar disc excisions from our neurosurgical institution, 13-1,32% of the patients were between the ages of 15 and 20 mean 17,84. Fifteen operations, including two reoperations, were performed on this patient group, by a conventional microsurgical procedure. The indications for surgery were failure of conservative treatment, intractable pain and/or progressive neurological impairment. Results: Low back pain and monoradicular sciatica were the main complaints in 77%, but findings of neurological deficits were rare - 1 case. The surgical findings revealed a protruding disc in eleven cases, one lateral recess stenosis and one lumbar synovial cyst. Initially, all patients were treated conservatively by their physicians more than 3 months without success. On the day of discharge, Kirkaldy-Willis criteria results were excellent or good in 92% of patients. The follow-up period ranged from 6 months to 2 years with an average of 1 year and 2 months. The results were excellent in 10 patients and good in 3 patients. Discussion: We demonstrate that the cause of low back pain and monoradicular leg pain in adolescent patients may not only be a cause of herniated lumbar disc or lateral recess narrowing. Very rarely these symptoms may be caused by lumbar synovial cysts. Conclusion: Surgical treatment of adolescent patients is able to relieve the clinical symptoms quickly. Clinical symptoms such as low back pain and leg pain and the neurologic deficit disappear within 3 months after surgery.

  15. The role of values with personal examples in altering the functions of pain: comparison between acceptance-based and cognitive-control-based protocols.

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    Páez-Blarrina, Marisa; Luciano, Carmen; Gutiérrez-Martínez, Olga; Valdivia, Sonsoles; Ortega, José; Rodríguez-Valverde, Miguel

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was twofold. First, to compare the effect of establishing a motivational context of values on pain tolerance, believability, and reported pain, with three experimental conditions: pain acceptance (ACT condition), pain control (CONT condition), or no values (untrained condition). Second, the study aimed to isolate the impact of adding the corresponding coping strategies to both the ACT and the CONT conditions. Thirty adults were randomly assigned to one of the three experimental conditions. The participants went through the pain task in two occasions (Test I and Test II). In Test I, the effects of the ACT-values protocol (which established pain as part of valued action), the CONT-values protocol (which established high pain as opposed to valued action), and the no-values protocol, were compared. In Test II, the effect of adding the corresponding coping strategy to each condition (defusion for ACT vs. suppression for CONT) was examined. Test I showed a clear superiority of the ACT-values protocol in increasing tolerance and lowering pain believability. In Test II, the superiority of the ACT protocol was replicated, while the CONT protocol proved useful to reduce reported pain, in accordance with previous studies.

  16. Does the pain-protective GTP cyclohydrolase haplotype significantly alter the pattern or severity of pain in humans with chronic pancreatitis?

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    Anderson Michelle A

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pain is often a dominant clinical feature of chronic pancreatitis but the frequency and severity is highly variable between subjects. We hypothesized that genetic polymorphisms contribute to variations in clinical pain patterns. Since genetic variations in the GTP cyclohydrolase (GCH1 gene have been reported to protect some patients from pain, we investigated the effect of the "pain protective haplotype" in well characterized patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP or recurrent acute pancreatitis (RAP from the North American Pancreatitis Study 2 (NAPS2. Results Subjects in the NAPS2 study were asked to rank their pain in one of 5 categories reflecting different levels of pain frequency and severity. All subjects were genotyped at rs8007267 and rs3783641 to determine the frequency of the GCH1 pain-protective haplotype. In Caucasian subjects the frequency of the pain-protective GCH1 haplotype was no different in the control group (n = 236, CP patients (n = 265, RAP patients (N = 131, or in CP patients subclassified by pain category compared to previously reported haplotype frequencies in the general Caucasian population. Conclusion The GCH1 pain-protective haplotype does not have a significant effect on pain patterns or severity in RAP or CP. These results are important for helping to define the regulators of visceral pain, and to distinguish different mechanisms of pain.

  17. The relationship of bruxism with craniofacial pain and symptoms from the masticatory system in the adult population.

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    Ciancaglini, R; Gherlone, E F; Radaelli, G

    2001-09-01

    The association of bruxism with craniofacial pain and symptoms of dysfunction of the masticatory system was assessed in a sample of 483 adult subjects, aged 18-75 years and selected from the general population living in the municipality of Segrate, a metropolitan area in northern Italy. Subjects were interviewed by a questionnaire about oral conditions, occurrence of symptoms of masticatory disturbances, craniofacial and neck pain. The overall prevalence of bruxism was 31;4% (95% confidence interval (CI): 27;3-35;5%). At univariate analysis bruxism was significantly associated with craniofacial pain, difficulty in closing the mouth, difficulty in opening the mouth wide or in locking the mouth, temporomandibular joint sounds, pain on movement, a feeling of stiffness or fatigue of the jaws, and neck pain. After adjustment for reciprocal influences and confounding variables, logistic regression analysis disclosed a strong independent association of bruxism with difficulty in closing the mouth (adjusted odds ratio, (OR): 2;84, 95% CI: 1;68-4;48), and a weaker relationship with craniofacial pain (adjusted OR: 1;84, 95% CI: 1;16-2;93) and temporomandibular joint sounds (adjusted OR: 1;64, 95% CI: 1;00-2;69). The findings show that in the general adult population there is a complex connection among bruxism, craniofacial pain and symptoms of masticatory disturbances. Furthermore, they suggest that the most direct relationship of bruxism may be with difficulties in mouth movements, but also an independent association may exist with craniofacial pain and other symptoms of temporomandibular disorder.

  18. Prevalence and awareness of sacroiliac joint alterations on lumbar spine CT in low back pain patients younger than 40 years.

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    Klang, Eyal; Lidar, Merav; Lidar, Zvi; Aharoni, Dvora; Eshed, Iris

    2017-04-01

    Background Computed tomography (CT) examinations of the lumbar spine are commonly performed in patients aged ≤40 years due to low back pain (LBP). Purpose To investigate the prevalence and awareness of radiologists for the presence of structural post-inflammatory/other sacroiliac joint (SIJ) alterations on lumbar spine CTs of young patients with LBP. Material and Methods A total of 484 lumbar spine CT examinations (272 men, 212 women; average age, 31 years; age range, 18-40 years) of patients with LBP in which the entire SIJs were visualized were retrospectively reviewed. SIJs were scored (consensus) by two senior radiologists (study reading) for the presence of post-inflammatory structural SIJ findings or other SIJs alterations. The original reports were compared to the study reading. Fifty CT examinations were re-evaluated for reliability assessment (intra-class correlation coefficient [ICC]). Results A total of 150 (31%) abnormal SIJ examinations were registered (ICC: r = 0.7-0.8; P < 0.0001): suspected sacroiliitis = 50 (10.2%); definite sacroiliitis = 16 (3.3%); osteitis-condensans-ilii = 38 (7.8%); diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis = 24 (5%); degenerative changes = 22 (4.5%); accessory SIJ = 22 (4.5%); and tumor = 1. The SIJs were referenced 39 times (8.0%) in the original readings: pathological findings (n = 15); and normal SIJ (n = 24). Total diagnostic accuracy for these reports only and for the entire readings were 49% and 69%, respectively, and 13% and 1.3%, respectively, for the pathological findings. Conclusion Sacroiliitis and other SIJ alterations are prevalent in young individuals with LBP, albeit, the majority of these alterations are not recognized nor reported by senior radiologists thus may delay efficacious treatment.

  19. Altered formalin-induced pain and Fos induction in the periaqueductal grey of preadolescent rats following neonatal LPS exposure.

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    Ihssane Zouikr

    Full Text Available Animal and human studies have demonstrated that early pain experiences can produce alterations in the nociceptive systems later in life including increased sensitivity to mechanical, thermal, and chemical stimuli. However, less is known about the impact of neonatal immune challenge on future responses to noxious stimuli and the reactivity of neural substrates involved in analgesia. Here we demonstrate that rats exposed to Lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 0.05 mg/kg IP, Salmonella enteritidis during postnatal day (PND 3 and 5 displayed enhanced formalin-induced flinching but not licking following formalin injection at PND 22. This LPS-induced hyperalgesia was accompanied by distinct recruitment of supra-spinal regions involved in analgesia as indicated by significantly attenuated Fos-protein induction in the rostral dorsal periaqueductal grey (DPAG as well as rostral and caudal axes of the ventrolateral PAG (VLPAG. Formalin injections were associated with increased Fos-protein labelling in lateral habenula (LHb as compared to medial habenula (MHb, however the intensity of this labelling did not differ as a result of neonatal immune challenge. These data highlight the importance of neonatal immune priming in programming inflammatory pain sensitivity later in development and highlight the PAG as a possible mediator of this process.

  20. Astrocyte activation in the anterior cingulate cortex and altered glutamatergic gene expression during paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain in mice

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    Willias Masocha

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Spinal astrocyte activation contributes to the pathogenesis of paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain (PINP in animal models. We examined glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP; an astrocyte marker immunoreactivity and gene expression of GFAP, glutamate transporters and receptor subunits by real time PCR in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC at 7 days post first administration of paclitaxel, a time point when mice had developed thermal hyperalgesia. The ACC, an area in the brain involved in pain perception and modulation, was chosen because changes in this area might contribute to the pathophysiology of PINP. GFAP transcripts levels were elevated by more than fivefold and GFAP immunoreactivity increased in the ACC of paclitaxel-treated mice. The 6 glutamate transporters (GLAST, GLT-1 EAAC1, EAAT4, VGLUT-1 and VGLUT-2 quantified were not significantly altered by paclitaxel treatment. Of the 12 ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits transcripts analysed 6 (GLuA1, GLuA3, GLuK2, GLuK3, GLuK5 and GLuN1 were significantly up-regulated, whereas GLuA2, GLuK1, GLuK4, GLuN2A and GLuN2B were not significantly altered and GLuA4 was lowly expressed. Amongst the 8 metabotropic receptor subunits analysed only mGLuR8 was significantly elevated. In conclusion, during PINP there is astrocyte activation, with no change in glutamate transporter expression and differential up-regulation of glutamate receptor subunits in the ACC. Thus, targeting astrocyte activation and the glutamatergic system might be another therapeutic avenue for management of PINP.

  1. Does dance-based therapy increase gait speed in older adults with chronic lower extremity pain: a feasibility study.

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    Krampe, Jean; Wagner, Joanne M; Hawthorne, Kelly; Sanazaro, Deborah; Wong-Anuchit, Choochart; Budhathoki, Chakra; Lorenz, Rebecca A; Raaf, Soren

    2014-01-01

    A decreased gait speed in older adults can lead to dependency when the individuals are no longer able to participate in activities or do things for themselves. Thirty-seven senior apartment residents (31 females; Mean age=80.6 years; SD=8.9) with lower extremity pain/stiffness participated in a feasibility and preliminary efficacy study of 12 weeks (24 sessions). Healthy-Steps dance therapy compared to a wait-list control group. Small improvements in gait speed ([ES]=0.33) were noted for participants completing 19-24 dance sessions. Improvements in gait speed measured by a 10 Meter Walk Test (0.0517 m/s) exceeded 0.05 m/s, a value deemed to be meaningful in community dwelling older adults. These feasibility study findings support the need for additional research using dance-based therapy for older adults with lower extremity pain.

  2. Work participation in adults with Marfan syndrome: Demographic characteristics, MFS related health symptoms, chronic pain, and fatigue.

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    Velvin, Gry; Bathen, Trine; Rand-Hendriksen, Svend; Geirdal, Amy Østertun

    2015-12-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a severe autosomal dominant connective tissue disorder that might influence peoples work ability. This cross sectional study aims to investigate work participation in adults with verified MFS diagnosis and to explore how the health related consequences of MFS and other factors might influence work participation. The prevalence of health problems in young adults compared to older adults with MFS was examined in association to work participation. A postal questionnaire including questions about work participation, demographic characteristics, MFS related health problems, chronic pain, and fatigue was sent to 117 adults with verified MFS (Ghent 1), and 62% answered. Fifty-nine percent were employed or students, significantly lower work participation than the General Norwegian Population (GNP), but higher than the Norwegian population of people with disability. Most young adults worked full-time despite extensive health problems, but the average age for leaving work was low. Few had received any work adaptations prior to retiring from work. In multiple logistic regression analysis, only age, lower educational level and severe fatigue were significantly associated with low work participation; not MFS related health problems or chronic pain. Fatigue appears to be the most challenging health problem to deal with in work, but the covariance is complex. Focus on vocational guidance early in life, more appropriate work adaptations, and psychosocial support might improve the possibility for sustaining in work for adults with MFS. More research about work challenges in adults with MFS is needed.

  3. Renal and hepatotoxic alterations in adult mice on inhalation of specific mixture of organic solvents.

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    Ketan, Vaghasia K; Bhavyata, Kalariya; Linzbuoy, George; Hyacinth, Highland N

    2015-12-01

    This study was aimed at investigating alterations in renal and hepatic toxicity induced by exposing to a combination of three solvents, namely, benzene, toluene and xylene in adult mice. The mice were divided into three groups (control, low-dose-treated (450 ppm) and high-dose (675 ppm) groups) using randomization methods. The treated groups were exposed to vapours of a mixture of benzene, toluene and xylene at doses of 450 and 675 ppm, for 6 h day(-1) for a short-term of 7-day exposure period. The study revealed that the solvent exposure resulted in an increase in the weight of liver and kidney as compared to the control. Biochemical analyses indicated a significant decline in the activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase in both the treated groups, with concomitant increase in lipid peroxidation. Liver aminotransferases (alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase) were elevated with significant alterations in the levels of protein, creatinine and cholesterol in these tissues upon solvent exposure. Correlated with these changes, serum thyroid hormones T3 and T4 were also significantly altered. This study, therefore, demonstrates that inhalation of vapours from the solvent mixture resulted in significant dose-dependent biochemical and functional changes in the vital tissues (liver and kidney) studied. The study has specific relevance since humans are increasingly being exposed to such solvents due to increased industrial use in such combinations.

  4. Thresholds and Tolerance of Physical Pain Among Young Adults Who Self-Injure

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    Katrina McCoy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Prevalence rates of nonsuicidal self-injury among college students range from 17% to 38%. Research indicates that individuals with borderline personality disorder who self-injure sometimes report an absence of pain during self-injury. Furthermore, self-injury in the absence of pain has been associated with more frequent suicide attempts. The present study examined pain thresholds and tolerance among 44 college students (11 who engaged in self-injury and 33 who did not. Pain thresholds and tolerance were measured using an algometer pressure device that was used to produce pain in previous laboratory research. Participants who engaged in self-injury had a higher pain tolerance than those who did not. In addition, participants who engaged in self-injury rated the pain as less intense than participants who did not. ANCOVAs revealed that depression was associated with pain rating and pain tolerance.

  5. Sucrose exposure in early life alters adult motivation and weight gain.

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    Cristianne R M Frazier

    Full Text Available The cause of the current increase in obesity in westernized nations is poorly understood but is frequently attributed to a 'thrifty genotype,' an evolutionary predisposition to store calories in times of plenty to protect against future scarcity. In modern, industrialized environments that provide a ready, uninterrupted supply of energy-rich foods at low cost, this genetic predisposition is hypothesized to lead to obesity. Children are also exposed to this 'obesogenic' environment; however, whether such early dietary experience has developmental effects and contributes to adult vulnerability to obesity is unknown. Using mice, we tested the hypothesis that dietary experience during childhood and adolescence affects adult obesity risk. We gave mice unlimited or no access to sucrose for a short period post-weaning and measured sucrose-seeking, food consumption, and weight gain in adulthood. Unlimited access to sucrose early in life reduced sucrose-seeking when work was required to obtain it. When high-sugar/high-fat dietary options were made freely-available, however, the sucrose-exposed mice gained more weight than mice without early sucrose exposure. These results suggest that early, unlimited exposure to sucrose reduces motivation to acquire sucrose but promotes weight gain in adulthood when the cost of acquiring palatable, energy dense foods is low. This study demonstrates that early post-weaning experience can modify the expression of a 'thrifty genotype' and alter an adult animal's response to its environment, a finding consistent with evidence of pre- and peri-natal programming of adult obesity risk by maternal nutritional status. Our findings suggest the window for developmental effects of diet may extend into childhood, an observation with potentially important implications for both research and public policy in addressing the rising incidence of obesity.

  6. Morphological and functional alterations in adult boar epididymis: Effects of prenatal and postnatal administration of flutamide

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    Chojnacka Katarzyna

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The dynamic cross-talk between epididymal cells is hormonally regulated and, in part, through direct cell-to-cell interactions. To date, no information is available regarding possible impact of anti-androgens on the proteins involved in the gap junctional communication within the boar epididymis. Thus, a question arised whether prenatal or postnatal exposure to an anti-androgen flutamide alters the expression of gap junction protein - connexin43 (Cx43 and androgen receptor (AR expression in the caput, corpus and cauda epididymis and leads to delayed effects on morphology and function of adult pig epididymis. Methods First two experimental groups received flutamide prenatally on gestational days 20-28 and 80-88 (GD20 and GD80 and further two groups were exposed to flutamide postanatally on days 2-10 and 90-98 after birth (PD2 and PD90. Epididymides were collected from adult boars. Routine histology was performed using hematoxylin-eosin staining. The expression of Cx43 and AR were analyzed using immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. Both analyses were supported by quantitative approaches to demonstrate the variations of the expression levels following the treatment. Apoptotic cells were identified using TUNEL assay. Results Histological examination revealed differences in epididymal morphology of flutamide-exposed boars when compared to controls. Scarce spermatic content were seen within the corpus and cauda lumina of GD20, PD2 and PD90 groups. Concomitantly, frequency of epididymal cell apoptosis was significantly higher (p p p p Conclusions The region-specific alterations in the epididymis morphology and scarce spermatic content within the lumina of the corpus and cauda indicate that flutamide can induce delayed effects on the epididymal function of the adult boar by decrease in AR protein levels that results in altered androgen signaling. This may cause disturbances in androgen-dependent processes including Cx43

  7. Altered spinal microRNA-146a and the microRNA-183 cluster contribute to osteoarthritic pain in knee joints.

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    Li, Xin; Kroin, Jeffrey S; Kc, Ranjan; Gibson, Gary; Chen, Di; Corbett, Grant T; Pahan, Kalipada; Fayyaz, Sana; Kim, Jae-Sung; van Wijnen, Andre J; Suh, Joon; Kim, Su-Gwan; Im, Hee-Jeong

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to examine whether altered expression of microRNAs in central nervous system components is pathologically linked to chronic knee joint pain in osteoarthritis. A surgical animal model for knee joint OA was generated by medial meniscus transection in rats followed by behavioral pain tests. Relationships between pathological changes in knee joint and development of chronic joint pain were examined by histology and imaging analyses. Alterations in microRNAs associated with OA-evoked pain sensation were determined in bilateral lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and the spinal dorsal horn by microRNA array followed by individual microRNA analyses. Gain- and loss-of-function studies of selected microRNAs (miR-146a and miR-183 cluster) were conducted to identify target pain mediators regulated by these selective microRNAs in glial cells. The ipsilateral hind leg displayed significantly increased hyperalgesia after 4 weeks of surgery, and sensitivity was sustained for the remainder of the 8-week experimental period (F = 341, p MicroRNA analyses showed that miR-146a and the miR-183 cluster were markedly reduced in the sensory neurons in DRG (L4/L5) and spinal cord from animals experiencing knee joint OA pain. The downregulation of miR-146a and/or the miR-183 cluster in the central compartments (DRG and spinal cord) are closely associated with the upregulation of inflammatory pain mediators. The corroboration between decreases in these signature microRNAs and their specific target pain mediators were further confirmed by gain- and loss-of-function analyses in glia, the major cellular component of the central nervous system (CNS). MicroRNA therapy using miR-146a and the miR-183 cluster could be powerful therapeutic intervention for OA in alleviating joint pain and concomitantly regenerating peripheral knee joint cartilage.

  8. Pain in long-term adult survivors of childhood cancers and their siblings: a report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study.

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    Lu, Qian; Krull, Kevin R; Leisenring, Wendy; Owen, Jason E; Kawashima, Toana; Tsao, Jennie C I; Zebrack, Bradley; Mertens, Ann; Armstrong, Gregory T; Stovall, Marilyn; Robison, Leslie L; Zeltzer, Lonnie K

    2011-11-01

    Little is known about pain among long-term adult survivors of childhood cancers. The study investigated pain prevalence in this population compared with sibling controls and examined pain-related risk factors. Three self-reported pain outcomes including pain conditions, prescription analgesics used, and pain attributed to cancer and treatment were assessed among 10,397 cancer survivors and 3034 sibling controls from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study. Pain conditions (pain/abnormal sensation, migraines, and other headaches) were reported by 12.3%, 15.5%, and 20.5% of survivors, respectively; 16.7% of survivors reported use of prescription analgesics, and 21% attributed pain to cancer and treatment. Risks of reporting pain conditions and using prescription analgesics were higher among survivors than siblings, adjusting for sociodemographic factors. Younger age at diagnosis and a history of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, Wilms tumor, or neuroblastoma (compared to leukemia) were associated with greater risk of reporting pain conditions. A history of bone cancer or soft tissue sarcoma (compared to leukemia) was associated with greater risks of using prescription analgesics and cancer-related pain attribution. Non-brain-directed scatter irradiation was associated with elevated risk for migraines and cancer-related pain attribution. Female gender and lower educational attainment were associated with increased reports of all 3 pain outcomes; minority status, unemployment, and being single were associated with greater risks for reporting pain conditions. These findings contribute to the understanding of pain and associated risk factors among adult survivors of childhood cancer and suggest areas of focus for pain intervention.

  9. The relationship between perceived promotion of autonomy/dependence and pain-related disability in older adults with chronic pain: the mediating role of self-reported physical functioning.

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    Matos, Marta; Bernardes, Sónia F; Goubert, Liesbet

    2016-08-01

    Chronic pain is prevalent among older adults and is usually associated with high levels of functional disability. Social support for the promotion of functional autonomy and dependence has been associated with pain-related disability and self-reported physical functioning. Nevertheless, these relationships need further inquiry. Our aims were to investigate: (1) the relationship between perceived promotion of autonomy/dependence and pain-related disability and (2) the extent to which self-reported physical functioning mediated these relationships. 118 older adults (Mage = 81.0) with musculoskeletal chronic pain completed the Portuguese versions of the revised formal social support for Autonomy and Dependence in Pain Inventory, the pain severity and interference scales of the Brief Pain Inventory, and the physical functioning scale of the Medical Outcomes Study-Short-Form 36 v2. Higher levels of perceived promotion of autonomy were associated with lower pain-related disability; this relationship was partially mediated by self-reported physical functioning (B = -.767, p autonomy and dependence for managing older adults' experience of chronic pain.

  10. Perinatal Nicotine Exposure Increases Obesity Susceptibility in Adult Male Rat Offspring by Altering Early Adipogenesis.

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    Fan, Jie; Zhang, Wan-Xia; Rao, Yi-Song; Xue, Jing-Ling; Wang, Fei-Fei; Zhang, Li; Yan, You-E

    2016-11-01

    The present study aims to evaluate whether perinatal nicotine (NIC) exposure increases obesity susceptibility in adult male rat offspring by altering early adipogenesis. NIC was sc administered (2.0 mg/kg per day) to pregnant rats from gestational day 9 to the time of weaning (postnatal day 28). At weaning, NIC-exposed male pups had an increased body weight and inguinal sc fat mass and a decreased average cell area of adipocyte, which was accompanied by an overexpression of adipogenic and lipogenic genes in the epididymal white adipose tissue. Additionally, the hepatic lipogenic gene levels from NIC-exposed male pups were also affected. At 12 and 26 weeks of age, body weight and fat mass were increased, whereas there was no change in food intake in NIC-exposed male offspring. Adipogenic and lipogenic genes, glucose transporter 4, and leptin mRNA levels were increased, whereas adiponectin mRNA levels were decreased in the epididymal white adipose tissue of NIC-exposed males. The hepatic lipogenic gene expression of NIC-exposed males was increased. NIC-exposed male offspring showed normal glycemia and a higher serum insulin level, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, and homeostasis model assessment of β-cell function. Furthermore, the NIC-exposed male offspring showed higher serum lipids and Castelli index I and lower nonesterified fatty acid. At 26 weeks, in the ip glucose and insulin tolerance tests, the glucose clearance was delayed, and the area under the curve was higher in the NIC-exposed male offspring. In conclusion, perinatal NIC exposure increased obesity susceptibility in adult male rat offspring by altering early adipogenesis.

  11. Shoulder function, pain and health related quality of life in adults with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome-hypermobility type.

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    Johannessen, Elise Christine; Reiten, Helle Sundnes; Løvaas, Helene; Maeland, Silje; Juul-Kristensen, Birgit

    2016-07-01

    Purpose To investigate shoulder function, pain and Health-Related Quality of life (HRQoL) among adults with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome-hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT), compared with the general population (controls). Method In a cross-sectional study using postal survey, 110 patients diagnosed with JHS/EDS-HT and 140 gender- and age-matched healthy controls from Statistics Norway participated. Shoulder function, pain and HRQol were registered by Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index (WOSI), Numerical Rating Scale (NRS), pain drawings, 36-item Short Form (SF-36). Results Eighty-one individuals responded, with response rate 34% (JHS/EDS-HT: 53%, controls: 21%). JHS/EDS-HT had lower shoulder function (WOSI total: 49.9 versus 83.3; p pain intensity (NRS: 6.4 versus 2.7; p shoulder joints were rated as primary painful areas in both groups, with significantly higher frequency in JHS/EDS-HT (neck: 90% versus 27%; shoulder: 80% versus 37%). Further, JHS/EDS-HT most often reported generalized pain (96%). Conclusions Adults with JHS/EDS-HT have impaired shoulder function, increased pain intensity, as well as reduced physical HRQoL compared with controls. Although neck and shoulder were most frequently rated as painful, significantly more JHS/EDS-HT also reported generalized pain compared to controls. Implications for Rehabilitation Adults with JHS/EDS-HT have impaired shoulder function, and most often painful areas in the neck and shoulder joints, which need to be targeted in the treatment strategy. Compared with the general population adults with JHS/EDS-HT have reduced physical HRQoL, supporting a physical approach for this group. Adults with JHS/EDS-HT may present with both specific painful joints and generalized pain.

  12. “I feel so stupid because I can’t give a proper answer…” How older adults describe chronic pain: a qualitative study

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    Clarke Amanda

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over 50% of older adults experience chronic pain. Poorly managed pain threatens independent functioning, limits social activities and detrimentally affects emotional wellbeing. Yet, chronic pain is not fully understood from older adults’ perspectives; subsequently, pain management in later life is not necessarily based on their priorities or needs. This paper reports a qualitative exploration of older adults’ accounts of living with chronic pain, focusing on how they describe pain, with a view to informing approaches to its assessment. Methods Cognitively intact men and women aged over sixty-five who lived in the community opted into the study through responding to advertisements in the media and via contacts with groups and organisations in North-East Scotland. Interviews were transcribed and thematically analysed using a framework approach. Results Qualitative individual interviews and one group interview were undertaken with 23 older adults. Following analysis, the following main themes emerged: diversity in conceptualising pain using a simple numerical score; personalising the meaning of pain by way of stories, similes and metaphors; and, contextualising pain in relation to its impact on activities. Conclusions The importance of attending to individuals’ stories as a meaningful way of describing pain for older adults is highlighted, suggesting that a narrative approach, as recommended and researched in other areas of medicine, may usefully be applied in pain assessment for older adults. Along with the judicious use of numerical tools, this requires innovative methods to elicit verbal accounts, such as using similes and metaphors to help older adults describe and discuss their experience, and contextualising the effects of pain on activities that are important to them.

  13. The visual analogue thermometer and the graphic numeric rating scale: a comparison of self-report instruments for pain measurement in adults with burns.

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    de Jong, A E E; Bremer, M; Hofland, H W C; Schuurmans, M J; Middelkoop, E; van Loey, N E E

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate the adequacy of pain management in burn care, pain measurement is essential. The visual analogue thermometer (VAT) and graphic numeric rating scale (GNRS) are frequently used self-report instruments for burn pain. To legitimise their interchangeable use in research and practice, we aimed to compare self-reports obtained by the VAT and GNRS, the ability of the scales to differentiate background from procedural pain, and to compare potential cutpoints. Adults with acute burns (N=319) participated in the study (67% male, mean age 40.3 years (SD 16), mean TBSA 9.9% (SD 10.4). Correlation coefficients between VAT and GNRS were 0.64 and 0.55 for, respectively, morning and afternoon background pain and 0.51 for procedural pain (pscales could differentiate background from procedural pain: procedural pain was higher (pscales. The results suggest that the instruments cannot be used interchangeably without taking their differences into account.

  14. Nicotine alters MicroRNA expression and hinders human adult stem cell regenerative potential.

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    Ng, Tsz Kin; Carballosa, Carlos M; Pelaez, Daniel; Wong, Hoi Kin; Choy, Kwong Wai; Pang, Chi Pui; Cheung, Herman S

    2013-03-01

    Adult stem cells are critical for the healing process in regenerative medicine. However, cigarette smoking inhibits stem cell recruitment to tissues and delays the wound-healing process. This study investigated the effect of nicotine, a major constituent in the cigarette smoke, on the regenerative potentials of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and periodontal ligament-derived stem cells (PDLSC). The cell proliferation of 1.0 μM nicotine-treated MSC and PDLSC was significantly reduced when compared to the untreated control. Moreover, nicotine also retarded the locomotion of these adult stem cells. Furthermore, their osteogenic differentiation capabilities were reduced in the presence of nicotine as evidenced by gene expression (RUNX2, ALPL, BGLAP, COL1A1, and COL1A2), calcium deposition, and alkaline phosphatase activity analyses. In addition, the microRNA (miRNA) profile of nicotine-treated PDLSC was altered; suggesting miRNAs might play an important role in the nicotine effects on stem cells. This study provided the possible mechanistic explanations on stem cell-associated healing delay in cigarette smoking.

  15. Arthroscopic knee debridement can delay total knee replacement in painful moderate haemophilic arthropathy of the knee in adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Merchan, E Carlos; Gomez-Cardero, Primitivo

    2016-09-01

    The role of arthroscopic debridement of the knee in haemophilia is controversial in the literature. The purpose of this study is to describe the results of arthroscopic knee debridement (AKD), with the aim of determining whether it is possible to delay total knee replacement (TKR) for painful moderate haemophilic arthropathy of the knee in adult patients. In a 14-year period (1998-2011), AKD was performed for moderate haemophilic arthropathy of the knee in 27 patients with haemophilia A. Their average age at operation was 28.6 years (range 26-39 years). Indications for surgery were as follows: more than 90° of knee flexion, flexion deformity less than 30°, good axial alignment of the knee, good patellar alignment, and pain above >60 points in a visual analogue scale [0 (no pain) to 100 points]. Secondary haematological prophylaxis and rehabilitation (physiotherapy) was given for at least 3 months after surgery. Follow-up was for an average of 7.5 years (range 2-14 years). We assessed the clinical outcome before surgery and at the time of latest follow-up using the Knee Society pain and function scores, the range of motion, and the radiological score of the World Federation of Haemophilia. Knee Society pain scores improved from 39 preoperatively to 66 postoperatively, and function scores improved from 36 to 52. Range of motion improved on an average from -15° of extension and 90° of flexion before surgery, to -5° of extension and 110° of flexion at the last follow-up. A radiological deterioration of 2.8 points on average was found. There were two (7.4%) postoperative complications (haemarthroses resolved by joint aspiration). One patient (3.7%) required a TKR 12.5 years later. AKD should be considered in painful moderate haemophilic arthropathy of the knee in adult patients to delay TKR.

  16. Altered synaptic properties during integration of adult-born hippocampal neurons following a seizure insult.

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    Johanna Jackson

    Full Text Available Pathological conditions affect several stages of neurogenesis in the adult brain, including proliferation, survival, cell fate, migration, and functional integration. Here we explored how a pathological environment modulates the heterogeneous afferent synaptic input that shapes the functional properties of newly formed neurons. We analyzed the expression of adhesion molecules and other synaptic proteins on adult-born hippocampal neurons formed after electrically-induced partial status epilepticus (pSE. New cells were labeled with a GFP-retroviral vector one week after pSE. One and three weeks thereafter, synaptic proteins were present on dendritic spines and shafts, but without differences between pSE and control group. In contrast, at six weeks, we found fewer dendritic spines and decreased expression of the scaffolding protein PSD-95 on spines, without changes in expression of the adhesion molecules N-cadherin or neuroligin-1, primarily located at excitatory synapses. Moreover, we detected an increased expression of the inhibitory scaffolding protein gephyrin in newborn but not mature neurons after SE. However, this increase was not accompanied by a difference in GABA expression, and there was even a region-specific decrease in the adhesion molecule neuroligin-2 expression, both in newborn and mature neurons. Neuroligin-2 clusters co-localized with presynaptic cholecystokinin terminals, which were also reduced. The expression of neuroligin-4 and glycine receptor was unchanged. Increased postsynaptic clustering of gephyrin, without an accompanying increase in GABAergic input or neuroligin-2 and -4 expression, the latter important for clustering of GABA(A and glycine receptors, respectively, could imply an increased but altered inhibitory connectivity specific for newborn neurons. The changes were transient and expression of both gephyrin and NL-2 was normalized 3 months post-SE. Our findings indicate that seizure-induced brain pathology alters

  17. Mindfulness meditation for the treatment of chronic low back pain in older adults: a randomized controlled pilot study.

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    Morone, Natalia E; Greco, Carol M; Weiner, Debra K

    2008-02-01

    The objectives of this pilot study were to assess the feasibility of recruitment and adherence to an eight-session mindfulness meditation program for community-dwelling older adults with chronic low back pain (CLBP) and to develop initial estimates of treatment effects. It was designed as a randomized, controlled clinical trial. Participants were 37 community-dwelling older adults aged 65 years and older with CLBP of moderate intensity occurring daily or almost every day. Participants were randomized to an 8-week mindfulness-based meditation program or to a wait-list control group. Baseline, 8-week and 3-month follow-up measures of pain, physical function, and quality of life were assessed. Eighty-nine older adults were screened and 37 found to be eligible and randomized within a 6-month period. The mean age of the sample was 74.9 years, 21/37 (57%) of participants were female and 33/37 (89%) were white. At the end of the intervention 30/37 (81%) participants completed 8-week assessments. Average class attendance of the intervention arm was 6.7 out of 8. They meditated an average of 4.3 days a week and the average minutes per day was 31.6. Compared to the control group, the intervention group displayed significant improvement in the Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire Total Score and Activities Engagement subscale (P=.008, P=.004) and SF-36 Physical Function (P=.03). An 8-week mindfulness-based meditation program is feasible for older adults with CLBP. The program may lead to improvement in pain acceptance and physical function.

  18. Factors associated with sexual orientation and gender disparities in chronic pain among U.S. adolescents and young adults

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    Sabra L. Katz-Wise

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This research investigated factors associated with sexual orientation disparities in chronic pain frequency among youth. Data were analyzed from 4534 female and 3785 male youth from Waves I–IV (1995–2009 of the U.S. National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health. Gender-stratified weighted logistic regression models controlled for sociodemographic characteristics and included sexual orientation (primary predictor and frequency of three types of chronic pain (outcomes. Models with sexual orientation only were compared to models with factors hypothesized to increase or decrease risk of pain. Significant odds ratios (OR for chronic pain frequency (daily/weekly vs. rarely with confidence intervals (CI and associated factors are reported. Compared to same-gender heterosexual females, mostly heterosexuals were more likely to report headaches (OR = 1.40, CI = 1.09, 1.79 and mostly heterosexuals and bisexuals were more likely to report muscle/joint pain (mostly heterosexual OR = 1.69, CI = 1.29, 2.20; bisexual OR = 1.87, CI = 1.03, 3.38. Compared to same-gender heterosexual males, gay males were more likely to report headaches (OR = 2.00, CI = 1.06, 3.82, but less likely to report muscle/joint pain (OR = 0.28, CI = 0.11, 0.74. Significant disparities were attenuated by up to 16% when associated factors were added to the model. Sexual orientation disparities in chronic pain were partially explained by associated factors, but more research is needed to develop intervention and prevention strategies.

  19. Pain measurement as part of primary healthcare of adult patients with sickle cell disease

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    Andreza Aparecida Felix Signorelli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this exploratory, cross-sectional study was to evaluate pain in sickle cell disease patients and aspects related to primary healthcare. METHODS: Data were obtained through home interviews. The assessment instruments (body diagram, Numerical Pain Scale, McGill Pain Questionnaire collected information on the underlying disease and on pain. Data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences program for Windows. Associations between the subgroups of sickle cell disease patients (hemoglobin SS, hemoglobin SC, sickle β-thalassemia and others and pain were analyzed using contingency tables and non-parametric tests of association (classic chi-square, Fisher's and Kruskal-Wallis with a level of 5% (p-value < 0.05 being set for the rejection of the null hypothesis. RESULTS: Forty-seven over 18-year-old patients with sickle cell disease were evaluated. Most were black (78.7% and female (59.6% and the mean age was 30.1 years. The average number of bouts of pain annually was 7.02; pain was predominantly reported by individuals with sickle cell anemia (hemoglobin SS. The intensity of pain (Numeric Pain Scale was 5.5 and the quantitative index (McGill was 35.9. This study also shows that patients presented a high frequency of moderately painful crises in their own homes. CONCLUSION: According to these facts, it is essential that pain related to sickle cell disease is properly identified, quantified, characterized and treated at the three levels of healthcare. In primary healthcare, accurate measurement of pain combined with better care may decrease acute painful episodes and consequently minimize tissue damage, thus improving the patient's overall health.

  20. Paternal and maternal bonding styles in childhood are associated with the prevalence of chronic pain in a general adult population: the Hisayama Study

    OpenAIRE

    Anno, Kozo; Shibata, Mao; Ninomiya, Toshiharu; Iwaki, Rie; Kawata, Hiroshi; Sawamoto, Ryoko; Kubo, Chiharu; Kiyohara, Yutaka; Sudo, Nobuyuki; Hosoi, Masako

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous research has suggested that extraordinary adverse experiences during childhood, such as abuse, are possible risk factors for the development of chronic pain. However, the relationship between the perceived parental bonding style during childhood and chronic pain has been much less studied. Methods In this cross-sectional study, 760 community-dwelling Japanese adults were asked if they had pain that had been present for six months or more. They completed the Parental Bondin...

  1. Altered rate-dependent depression of the spinal H-reflex as an indicator of spinal disinhibition in models of neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee-Kubli, Corinne A G; Calcutt, Nigel A

    2014-02-01

    The unpredictable efficacy of current therapies for neuropathic pain may reflect diverse etiological mechanisms operating between, and within, diseases. As descriptions of pain rarely establish specific mechanisms, a tool that can identify underlying causes of neuropathic pain would be useful in developing patient-specific treatments. Rate-dependent depression (RDD), a measure of the change in amplitude of the Hoffman reflex over consecutive stimulations, is attenuated in diabetic rats that also exhibit impaired spinal γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor function, reduced spinal potassium chloride co-transporter (KCC2) expression, and indices of painful neuropathy. To investigate whether loss of RDD is a reliable indicator of the contribution of spinal GABAergic dysfunction to neuropathic pain, we assessed RDD, tactile allodynia, and formalin-evoked hyperalgesia in 3 models: rats treated acutely with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), diabetic rats treated with the BDNF-sequestering molecule tyrosine receptor kinase B/Fc (TrkB/Fc), and rats with paclitaxel-induced neuropathy. Delivery of BDNF to the spinal cord of normal rats produced RDD deficits and features of painful neuropathy associated with disrupted GABAA receptor-mediated inhibitory function and reduced dorsal spinal KCC2 expression. Treating diabetic rats with TrkB/Fc restored RDD and alleviated indices of painful neuropathy. In paclitaxel-treated rats, RDD was not impaired and behavioral indices of neuropathic pain were not associated with spinal GABAergic dysfunction or reduced dorsal spinal KCC2 expression. Our data reveal BDNF as part of the mechanism underlying spinal cord disinhibition caused by altered GABAA receptor function in diabetic rats and suggest that RDD deficits may be a useful indicator of neuropathic pain states associated with spinal disinhibition, thereby revealing specific therapeutic targets.

  2. Impairment-targeted exercises for older adults with knee pain: protocol for a proof-of-principle study

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    Thomas Elaine

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exercise therapy for knee pain and osteoarthritis remains a key element of conservative treatment, recommended in clinical guidelines. Yet systematic reviews point to only modest benefits from exercise interventions. One reason for this might be that clinical trials tend to use a one-size-fits-all approach to exercise, effectively disregarding the details of their participants' clinical presentations. This uncontrolled before-after study (TargET-Knee-Pain aims to test the principle that exercises targeted at the specific physical impairments of older adults with knee pain may be able to significantly improve those impairments. It is a first step towards testing the effectiveness of this more individually-tailored approach. Methods/Design We aim to recruit 60 participants from an existing observational cohort of community-dwelling older adults with knee pain. Participants will all have at least one of the three physical impairments of weak quadriceps, a reduced range of knee flexion and poor standing balance. Each participant will be asked to undertake a programme of exercises, targeted at their particular combination and degree of impairment(s, over the course of twelve weeks. The exercises will be taught and progressed by an experienced physiotherapist, with reference to a "menu" of agreed exercises for each of the impairments, over the course of six fortnightly home visits, alternating with six fortnightly telephone calls. Primary outcome measures will be isometric quadriceps strength, knee flexion range of motion, timed single-leg standing balance and the "Four Balance Test Scale" at 12 weeks. Key secondary outcome measures will be self-reported levels of pain, stiffness and difficulties with day-to-day functional tasks (WOMAC. Outcome measures will be taken at three time-points (baseline, six weeks and twelve weeks by a study nurse blinded to the exercise status of the participants. Discussion This study (TargET-Knee-Pain

  3. Paracetamol (acetaminophen) administration during neonatal brain development affects cognitive function and alters its analgesic and anxiolytic response in adult male mice.

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    Viberg, Henrik; Eriksson, Per; Gordh, Torsten; Fredriksson, Anders

    2014-03-01

    Paracetamol (acetaminophen) is one of the most commonly used drugs for the treatment of pain and fever in children, both at home and in the clinic, and is now also found in the environment. Paracetamol is known to act on the endocannabinoid system, involved in normal development of the brain. We examined if neonatal paracetamol exposure could affect the development of the brain, manifested as adult behavior and cognitive deficits, as well as changes in the response to paracetamol. Ten-day-old mice were administered a single dose of paracetamol (30 mg/kg body weight) or repeated doses of paracetamol (30 + 30 mg/kg body weight, 4h apart). Concentrations of paracetamol and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) were measured in the neonatal brain, and behavioral testing was done when animals reached adulthood. This study shows that acute neonatal exposure to paracetamol (2 × 30 mg) results in altered locomotor activity on exposure to a novel home cage arena and a failure to acquire spatial learning in adulthood, without affecting thermal nociceptive responding or anxiety-related behavior. However, mice neonatally exposed to paracetamol (2 × 30 mg) fail to exhibit paracetamol-induced antinociceptive and anxiogenic-like behavior in adulthood. Behavioral alterations in adulthood may, in part, be due to paracetamol-induced changes in BDNF levels in key brain regions at a critical time during development. This indicates that exposure to and presence of paracetamol during a critical period of brain development can induce long-lasting effects on cognitive function and alter the adult response to paracetamol in mice.

  4. Anterior knee pain in younger adults as a precursor to subsequent patellofemoral osteoarthritis: a systematic review

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    Thomas Martin J

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patellofemoral osteoarthritis (PFOA is a common form of knee OA in middle and older age, but its relation to PF disorders and symptoms earlier in life is unclear. Our aim was to conduct a systematic review to investigate the strength of evidence for an association between anterior knee pain (AKP in younger adults and subsequent PFOA. Methods The search strategy included electronic databases (Pubmed, EMBASE, AMED, CINAHL, Cochrane, PEDro, SportDiscus: inception to December 2009, reference lists of potentially eligible studies and selected reviews. Full text articles in any language, - identified via English titles and abstracts, were included if they were retrospective or prospective in design and contained quantitative data regarding structural changes indicative of PFOA, incident to original idiopathic AKP. Eligibility criteria were applied to titles, abstracts and full-texts by two independent reviewers. Data extraction included study location, design, date, sampling procedure, sample characteristics, AKP/PFOA definitions, follow-up duration and rate, and main findings. Foreign language articles were translated into English prior to examination. Results Seven articles satisfied eligibility (5 English, 2 German. Only one case-control study directly investigated a link between PFOA and prior AKP, providing level 3b evidence in favour of an association (OR 4.4; 95%CI 1.8, 10.6. Rough estimates of the annual risk of PFOA from the remaining six small, uncontrolled, observational studies (mean follow-up range: 5.7 to 23 years ranged from 0% to 3.4%. This was not the primary aim of these studies, and limitations in design and methodology mean this data should be interpreted with caution. Conclusions There is a paucity of high-quality evidence reporting a link between AKP and PFOA. Further, well-designed cohort studies may be able to fill this evidence gap.

  5. An Experimental Investigation of the Effect of Altered Auditory Feedback on the Conversational Speech of Adults Who Stutter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, Michelle; Packman, Ann; Onslow, Mark; Jones, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the impact on percentage of syllables stuttered of various durations of delayed auditory feedback (DAF), levels of frequency-altered feedback (FAF), and masking auditory feedback (MAF) during conversational speech. Method: Eleven adults who stuttered produced 10-min conversational speech samples during a control condition…

  6. Piloting PrePex for Adult and Adolescent Male Circumcision in South Africa--Pain Is an Issue.

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    Limakatso Lebina

    Full Text Available The World Health Organisation and the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS have recommended the scale-up of Medical Male Circumcision (MMC in countries with high HIV and low MMC prevalence. PrePex device circumcision is proposed as an alternate method for scaling up MMC.Evaluate safety and feasibility of PrePex in South Africa.A multisite prospective cohort PrePex study in adults and adolescents at three MMC clinics. Participants were followed-up 8 times, up to 56 days after PrePex placement.In total, 398 PrePex circumcisions were performed (315 adults and 83 adolescents their median ages were 26 (IQR: 22-30 and 16 years (IQR: 15-17, respectively. The median time for device placement across both groups was 6 minutes (IQR: 5-9 with the leading PrePex sizes being B (30% and C (35% for adults (18-45 years, and A (31% and B (38% for adolescents (14-17 years. Additional sizes (size 12-20 were rarely used, even in the younger age group. Pain of device application was minimal but that of removal was severe. However, described pain abated rapidly and almost no pain was reported 1 hour after removal. The Adverse Events rate were experienced by 2.7% (11/398 of all participants, three of which were serious (2 displacements and 1 self-removal requiring prompt surgery. None of the Adverse Events required hospitalization. The majority of participants returned to work within a day of device placement.Our study shows that PrePex is a safe MMC method, for males 14 years and above. PrePex circumcision had a similar adverse event rate to that reported for surgical MMC, but device removal caused high levels of pain, which subsided rapidly.

  7. Short term aerobic exercise alters the reinforcing value of food in inactive adults.

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    Panek, Leah M; Jones, Kelly R; Temple, Jennifer L

    2014-10-01

    Motivation to eat, or the reinforcing value of food, may be influenced by a number of factors, including physical activity. The purpose of these studies was to test the hypothesis that short-term moderate-vigorous intensity aerobic exercise would alter the reinforcing value of high (HED) and low (LED) energy density foods in inactive adults. The reinforcing value of LED and HED food was measured at baseline and again after two weeks of aerobic exercise. In Experiment 1, 41 participants were randomized to a no exercise condition or aerobic exercise for 3 days per week for two weeks. In Experiment 2, 76 participants were randomized to one of four aerobic exercise frequencies, 0, 1, 3, or 5 days per week for two weeks. In both experiments, exercise reduced the reinforcing value of HED food compared to baseline and to non-exercise controls. In Experiment 2, the 5 day group also showed a significant increase in the reinforcing value of LED food compared to baseline and other exercise frequencies. Liking of HED and LED foods and consumption of HED food were not affected by exercise treatment. Finally, in Experiment 2, the 5 day group reported consuming more energy outside of the laboratory than the other groups. Taken together, these data suggest, in inactive individuals, motivation to obtain HED and LED foods can be altered with a short-term moderate-vigorous intensity exercise intervention. Further research is needed to understand the cognitive and physiological processes involved in food choices paired with exercise.

  8. Effects of acupuncture treatment on natural killer cell activity, pulse rate, and pain reduction for older adults: an uncontrolled, observational study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hidetoshi Mori; Hiroshi Kuge; Tim Hideaki Tanaka; Eiichi Taniwaki; Kazuyo Hanyu; Tateyuki Morisawa

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:The aim of this study was to examine the changes in natural killer (NK) cell activity,pulse rate,and pain intensity among older adults before and after acupuncture treatment.METHODS:Fifty-six individuals (16 males and 40 females),aged 60 to 82 years (mean age 72.4 ± 5.0),who were experiencing pain in the shoulder,low back,or knee,participated in the study.NK cell activity,leukocyte differentiation (granulocytes and lymphocytes),pulse rate,and blood pressure values were obtained.Pain intensity was evaluated by using the visual analog scale (VAS).The Wilcoxon test was used to analyze NK cell activity,leukocytes (granulocyte counts and granulocyte-to-lymphocyte ratio),and the VAS score in accordance with the location of pain complaints before and after acupuncture treatment.RESULTS:NK cell activity decreased after acupuncture treatment for pain in the shoulder-pain and knee-pain groups.Further,the lymphocyte and granulocyte counts increased after acupuncture treatment for the shoulder-pain group.Pulse rate decreased for the shoulder-pain,low-backpain,and knee-pain groups after acupuncture treatment.The VAS score decreased after acupuncture treatment for the shoulder-pain,low-back-pain,and knee-pain groups.CONCLUSION:This study showed that in older adults,acupuncture treatment decreases pulse rate,relieves pain in the shoulder,low back,and knee,and reduces NK-cell activity.

  9. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis along the dorsoventral axis contributes differentially to environmental enrichment combined with voluntary exercise in alleviating chronic inflammatory pain in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jie; Jiang, Ying-Ying; Xu, Ling-Chi; Ma, Long-Yu; Liu, Feng-Yu; Cui, Shuang; Cai, Jie; Liao, Fei-Fei; Wan, You; Yi, Ming

    2017-03-14

    Cognitive behavioral therapy, such as environmental enrichment combined with voluntary exercise (EE-VEx), is under active investigation as an adjunct to pharmaceutical treatment for chronic pain. However, the effectiveness and underlying mechanisms of EE-VEx remain unclear. In mice with intra-plantar injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA), our results revealed that EE-VEx alleviated perceptual, affective and cognitive dimensions of chronic inflammatory pain. These effects of EE-VEx on chronic pain were contingent on the occurrence of adult neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus in a functionally dissociated manner along the dorsoventral axis: neurogenesis in the ventral dentate gyrus participated in alleviating perceptual and affective components of chronic pain by EE-VEx, whereas neurogenesis in the dorsal dentate gyrus was involved in EE-VEx's cognitive-enhancing effects. Chronic inflammatory pain was accompanied by decreased levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the dentate gyrus, which were reversed by EE-VEx. Over-expression of BDNF in the dentate mimicked the effects of EE-VEx. Our results demonstrate distinct contribution of adult hippocampal neurogenesis along the dorsoventral axis to EE-VEx's beneficial effects on different dimensions of chronic pain.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENTEnvironmental enrichment combined with voluntary exercise (EE-VEx) is under active investigation as an adjunct to pharmaceutical treatment for chronic pain, but its effectiveness and underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In a mouse model of inflammatory pain, the present study demonstrates that the beneficial effects of EE-VEx on chronic pain depend on adult neurogenesis with a dorsoventral dissociation along the hippocampal axis. Adult neurogenesis in the ventral dentate gyrus participates in alleviating perceptual and affective components of chronic pain by EE-VEx, whereas that in the dorsal pole is involved in EE-VEx's cognitive-enhancing effects in chronic pain.

  10. Risk Factors and Disability Associated with Low Back Pain in Older Adults in Low- and Middle-Income Countries. Results from the WHO Study on Global AGEing and Adult Health (SAGE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Stewart Williams

    Full Text Available Back pain is a common disabling chronic condition that burdens individuals, families and societies. Epidemiological evidence, mainly from high-income countries, shows positive association between back pain prevalence and older age. There is an urgent need for accurate epidemiological data on back pain in adult populations in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs where populations are ageing rapidly. The objectives of this study are to: measure the prevalence of back pain; identify risk factors and determinants associated with back pain, and describe association between back pain and disability in adults aged 50 years and older, in six LMICs from different regions of the world. The findings provide insights into country-level differences in self-reported back pain and disability in a group of socially, culturally, economically and geographically diverse LMICs.Standardized national survey data collected from adults (50 years and older participating in the World Health Organization (WHO Study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE were analysed. The weighted sample (n = 30, 146 comprised respondents in China, Ghana, India, Mexico, South Africa and the Russian Federation. Multivariable regressions describe factors associated with back pain prevalence and intensity, and back pain as a determinant of disability.Prevalence was highest in the Russian Federation (56% and lowest in China (22%. In the pooled multi-country analyses, female sex, lower education, lower wealth and multiple chronic morbidities were significant in association with past-month back pain (p<0.01. About 8% of respondents reported that they experienced intense back pain in the previous month.Evidence on back pain and its impact on disability is needed in developing countries so that governments can invest in cost-effective education and rehabilitation to reduce the growing social and economic burden imposed by this disabling condition.

  11. The Effects of Qigong for Adults with Chronic Pain: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Zhenggang; Guan, Zhen; Fan, Yuan; Liu, Chuan; Yang, Kehu; Ma, Bin; Wu, Bei

    2015-01-01

    A systematic review was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of qigong as a treatment for chronic pain. Five electronic databases were searched from their date of establishment until July 2014. The review included 10 randomized clinical trials (RCTs) that compared the impacts of qigong on chronic pain with waiting list or placebo or general care. Random effect models and standard mean differences were used to present pain scores. A total of 10 RCTs met inclusion criteria. There was a statistically significant difference on reducing chronic pain between internal qigong and control (SMD: -1.23 95% CI= -2.23, -0.24p = 0.02), external qigong and general care (SMD: -1.53 95% CI= -2.15, -0.91p qigong and placebo (SMD: -0.51 95% CI = 0.95, -0.06p = 0.03), and internal qigong for chronic neck pain at 6 months (SMD: -1.00 95% CI= -1.94, -0.06p = 0.04). The differences between external qigong and control, external qigong and waiting list, internal qigong and waiting list, and external for premenstrual syndromes were not significant. This study showed that internal qigong generated benefits on treating some chronic pain with significant differences. External qigong showed nonsignificant differences in treating chronic pain. Higher quality randomized clinical trials with scientific rigor are needed to establish the effectiveness of qigong in reducing chronic pain.

  12. Functional alterations in neural substrates of geometric reasoning in adults with high-functioning autism.

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    Takashi Yamada

    Full Text Available Individuals with autism spectrum condition (ASC are known to excel in some perceptual cognitive tasks, but such developed functions have been often regarded as "islets of abilities" that do not significantly contribute to broader intellectual capacities. However, recent behavioral studies have reported that individuals with ASC have advantages for performing Raven's (Standard Progressive Matrices (RPM/RSPM, a standard neuropsychological test for general fluid intelligence, raising the possibility that ASC's cognitive strength can be utilized for more general purposes like novel problem solving. Here, the brain activity of 25 adults with high-functioning ASC and 26 matched normal controls (NC was measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to examine neural substrates of geometric reasoning during the engagement of a modified version of the RSPM test. Among the frontal and parietal brain regions involved in fluid intelligence, ASC showed larger activation in the left lateral occipitotemporal cortex (LOTC during an analytic condition with moderate difficulty than NC. Activation in the left LOTC and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC increased with task difficulty in NC, whereas such modulation of activity was absent in ASC. Furthermore, functional connectivity analysis revealed a significant reduction of activation coupling between the left inferior parietal cortex and the right anterior prefrontal cortex during both figural and analytic conditions in ASC. These results indicate altered pattern of functional specialization and integration in the neural system for geometric reasoning in ASC, which may explain its atypical cognitive pattern, including performance on the Raven's Matrices test.

  13. Maternal High Fat Diet Alters Skeletal Muscle Mitochondrial Catalytic Activity in Adult Male Rat Offspring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pileggi, Chantal A.; Hedges, Christopher P.; Segovia, Stephanie A.; Markworth, James F.; Durainayagam, Brenan R.; Gray, Clint; Zhang, Xiaoyuan D.; Barnett, Matthew P. G.; Vickers, Mark H.; Hickey, Anthony J. R.; Reynolds, Clare M.; Cameron-Smith, David

    2016-01-01

    A maternal high-fat (HF) diet during pregnancy can lead to metabolic compromise, such as insulin resistance in adult offspring. Skeletal muscle mitochondrial dysfunction is one mechanism contributing to metabolic impairments in insulin resistant states. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate whether mitochondrial dysfunction is evident in metabolically compromised offspring born to HF-fed dams. Sprague-Dawley dams were randomly assigned to receive a purified control diet (CD; 10% kcal from fat) or a high fat diet (HFD; 45% kcal from fat) for 10 days prior to mating, throughout pregnancy and during lactation. From weaning, all male offspring received a standard chow diet and soleus muscle was collected at day 150. Expression of the mitochondrial transcription factors nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF1) and mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA) were downregulated in HF offspring. Furthermore, genes encoding the mitochondrial electron transport system (ETS) respiratory complex subunits were suppressed in HF offspring. Moreover, protein expression of the complex I subunit, NDUFB8, was downregulated in HF offspring (36%), which was paralleled by decreased maximal catalytic linked activity of complex I and III (40%). Together, these results indicate that exposure to a maternal HF diet during development may elicit lifelong mitochondrial alterations in offspring skeletal muscle. PMID:27917127

  14. Effect of duration of smartphone use on muscle fatigue and pain caused by forward head posture in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seong-Yeol; Koo, Sung-Ja

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] The effect of duration of smartphone use on neck and shoulder muscle fatigue and pain was investigated in adults with forward head posture. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-four adults with forward head posture were classified into groups by duration of smartphone use: 11 used a smartphone for 10 minutes each (group 1), 12 for 20 minutes each (group 2), and 11 for 30 minutes each (group 3). Fatigue cervical erector spinae and upper trapezius muscles was measured by electromyography, and pain before and after the experiment was evaluated using Visual Analog Scale (VAS) scores. [Results] There was a significant difference in the degree of fatigue in the left upper trapezius muscles in group 2 and left cervical erector spinae and bilateral upper trapeziuses group 3. There was a significant difference in fatigue in the left upper trapezius in groups 1 and 3. The VAS showed significant differences in all groups before and after the experiment and between groups 1 and 3. [Conclusion] Pain and fatigue worsened with longer smartphone use. This study provided data on the proper duration of smartphone use. Correct posture and breaks of at least 20 minutes are recommend when using smartphones.

  15. Evaluation of elastic bands for lower extremity resistance training in adults with and without musculo-skeletal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundstrup, E; Jakobsen, M D; Andersen, C H; Bandholm, T; Thorborg, K; Zebis, M K; Andersen, L L

    2014-10-01

    Therapists commonly use elastic bands in resistance exercises during rehabilitation of smaller muscles, such as in the shoulder. However, the effectiveness has not yet been investigated for larger muscle groups. This study investigates muscle activity during lower extremity exercises. Electromyographic (EMG) activity of 10 muscles was measured in 24 women and 18 men during lunges with elastic resistance, lunges with dumbbells, and unilateral leg press in machine using 10 repetition maximum loadings, and normalized to maximal voluntary isometric contraction EMG. Lunges with dumbbells and leg press showed higher activity than lunges with elastic resistance for the vasti and rectus femoris (P < 0.01), whereas lunges with elastic resistance showed higher activity of gluteus maximus, hamstrings, and erector spinae (P < 0.01). Gender, age, and pain in the knees and hip did not influence these findings. However, pain in the lower back decreased muscular activity of the gluteus maximus and vastus medialis (P < 0.01). Lunges with elastic resistance induce high levels of muscle activity in all the large muscle groups at the hip, knee, and back. Importantly, the efficiency of these exercises was equally high regardless of gender, age, and pain in the knees and hip, whereas pain in the lower back led to altered activation strategies.

  16. Altered alignment of the shoulder girdle and cervical spine in patients with insidious onset neck pain and whiplash-associated disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgadottir, Harpa; Kristjansson, Eythor; Mottram, Sarah; Karduna, Andrew; Jonsson, Halldor

    2011-08-01

    Clinical theory suggests that altered alignment of the shoulder girdle has the potential to create or sustain symptomatic mechanical dysfunction in the cervical and thoracic spine. The alignment of the shoulder girdle is described by two clavicle rotations, i.e, elevation and retraction, and by three scapular rotations, i.e., upward rotation, internal rotation, and anterior tilt. Elevation and retraction have until now been assessed only in patients with neck pain. The aim of the study was to determine whether there is a pattern of altered alignment of the shoulder girdle and the cervical and thoracic spine in patients with neck pain. A three-dimensional device measured clavicle and scapular orientation, and cervical and thoracic alignment in patients with insidious onset neck pain (IONP) and whiplash-associated disorder (WAD). An asymptomatic control group was selected for baseline measurements. The symptomatic groups revealed a significantly reduced clavicle retraction and scapular upward rotation as well as decreased cranial angle. A difference was found between the symptomatic groups on the left side, whereas the WAD group revealed an increased scapular anterior tilt and the IONP group a decreased clavicle elevation. These changes may be an important mechanism for maintenance and recurrence or exacerbation of symptoms in patients with neck pain.

  17. Managing chronic pain in adults with haemophilia: current status and call to action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, T J; Kessler, C M

    2015-01-01

    Haemophilic arthroses are associated with acute pain during bleeding episodes and with chronic pain caused by arthritic complications of repeated bleeding into joints. Unlike other conditions (e.g. osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, sickle cell disease), there are limited data on pain management in haemophilia. Management of arthritic individuals and those with sickle cell disease relies heavily on administration of acetaminophen, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and opioid analgesics. In haemophilia, acetaminophen often has limited efficacy at therapeutic doses, offering a narrow dosing range in those with liver disease due to chronic hepatitis C. NSAIDs can effectively manage pain in patients with haemophilia, but these agents are potentially associated with a significant risk of precipitating or exacerbating bleeding complications in an already coagulopathic population. Opioids have proven effective in osteoarthritis and sickle cell disease, but outcomes data in those with haemophilia are virtually non-existent. Patients with haemophilia are at least as vulnerable as other chronic pain populations to opioid-related adverse events and to developing abusive behaviours and addiction. Despite pain management strategies for patients with haemophilia being far from optimal, the predominant precept of haemophilia management still applies. As such, it is critically important to aggressively reverse or prevent acute symptomatic bleeding in a timely and effective manner to at least minimize pain and progressive joint damage. This review should serve as a call to action to prioritize pain management in haemophilia care and spur interest in the development, improvement and standardization of tools to assess and manage acute and chronic pain in haemophilia.

  18. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use in the US Adult Low Back Pain Population

    OpenAIRE

    Ghildayal, Neha; Johnson, Pamela Jo; Evans, Roni L; Kreitzer, Mary Jo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many people suffering from low back pain (LBP) have found conventional medical treatments to be ineffective for managing their LBP and are increasingly turning to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) to find pain relief. A comprehensive picture of CAM use in the LBP population, including all of the most commonly used modalities, is needed. Study Objective: To examine prevalence and perceived benefit of CAM use within the US LBP population by limiting vs nonlimiting LBP and...

  19. Dental pain, socioeconomic status, and dental caries in young male adults from southern Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess dental pain prevalence and its association with dental caries and socioeconomic status in 18-year-old males from Florianópolis, Santa Catarina, Brazil. A cross-sectional study was conducted in a random sample (n = 414) selected from the Brazilian Army conscription list in 2003. Dental pain during the 12 months prior to the interview was recorded as the outcome. Socioeconomic data were obtained through a questionnaire. Dental caries experience was registered...

  20. Abnormal thalamocortical dynamics may be altered by deep brain stimulation: using magnetoencephalography to study phantom limb pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, N J; Jenkinson, N; Kringelbach, M L; Hansen, P C; Pereira, E A; Brittain, J S; Holland, P; Holliday, I E; Owen, S; Stein, J; Aziz, T

    2009-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is used to alleviate chronic pain. Using magnetoencephalography (MEG) to study the mechanisms of DBS for pain is difficult because of the artefact caused by the stimulator. We were able to record activity over the occipital lobe of a patient using DBS for phantom limb pain during presentation of a visual stimulus. This demonstrates that MEG can be used to study patients undergoing DBS provided control stimuli are used to check the reliability of the data. We then asked the patient to rate his pain during and off DBS. Correlations were found between these ratings and power in theta (6-9) and beta bands (12-30). Further, there was a tendency for frequencies under 25 Hz to correlate with each other after a period off stimulation compared with immediately after DBS. The results are interpreted as reflecting abnormal thalamocortical dynamics, previously implicated in painful syndromes.

  1. Enhanced quantal release of excitatory transmitter in anterior cingulate cortex of adult mice with chronic pain

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    Zhao Ming-Gao

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC is a forebrain structure that plays important roles in emotion, learning, memory and persistent pain. Our previous studies have demonstrated that the enhancement of excitatory synaptic transmission was induced by peripheral inflammation and nerve injury in ACC synapses. However, little information is available on their presynaptic mechanisms, since the source of the enhanced synaptic transmission could include the enhanced probability of neurotransmitter release at existing release sites and/or increases in the number of available vesicles. The present study aims to perform quantal analysis of excitatory synapses in the ACC with chronic pain to examine the source of these increases. The quantal analysis revealed that both probability of transmitter release and number of available vesicles were increased in a mouse model of peripheral inflammation, whereas only probability of transmitter release but not number of available vesicles was enhanced in a mouse model of neuropathic pain. In addition, we compared the miniature excitatory postsynaptic potentials (mEPSCs in ACC synapses with those in other pain-related brain areas such as the amygdala and spinal cord. Interestingly, the rate and amplitude of mEPSCs in ACC synapses were significantly lower than those in the amygdala and spinal cord. Our studies provide strong evidences that chronic inflammatory pain increases both probability of transmitter release and number of available vesicles, whereas neuropathic pain increases only probability of transmitter release in the ACC synapses.

  2. Adult Stem Cell as New Advanced Therapy for Experimental Neuropathic Pain Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Franchi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathic pain (NP is a highly invalidating disease resulting as consequence of a lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory system. All the pharmacological treatments today in use give a long lasting pain relief only in a limited percentage of patients before pain reappears making NP an incurable disease. New approaches are therefore needed and research is testing stem cell usage. Several papers have been written on experimental neuropathic pain treatment using stem cells of different origin and species to treat experimental NP. The original idea was based on the capacity of stem cell to offer a totipotent cellular source for replacing injured neural cells and for delivering trophic factors to lesion site; soon the researchers agreed that the capacity of stem cells to contrast NP was not dependent upon their regenerative effect but was mostly linked to a bidirectional interaction between the stem cell and damaged microenvironment resident cells. In this paper we review the preclinical studies produced in the last years assessing the effects induced by several stem cells in different models of neuropathic pain. The overall positive results obtained on pain remission by using stem cells that are safe, of easy isolation, and which may allow an autologous transplant in patients may be encouraging for moving from bench to bedside, although there are several issues that still need to be solved.

  3. [Less pain during puncture by a peripheral venous catheter; a bibliographical review on adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prat González, Irene; Fuentes i Pumarola, Concepció; Bertran Noguer, Carme; Ballester Ferrando, David; Juvinyà Canal, Dolors; Vila Vidal, Dalmau

    2010-06-01

    Canalizing veins is a habitual technique carried out by nurses. Inserting a catheter in a peripheral vein causes pain. The importance of fine quality in nursing treatment implicitly bears on a person's well-being. In daily practice, health professionals do not use any method to reduce pain when inserting a catheter. The authors observations led them to believe in the need to carry out a bibliographical review whose objective was to discover all the methods used to reduce pain caused by puncturing a peripheral vein. Six randomly assigned clinical tests and a meta-analysis evaluate the effectiveness of: The use of Valsalva, an analgesic cream which contains two local amino-amide anesthetics; lidocaine and prylocaine (EMLA) compared to another analgesic cream, Myolaxin; a meta-analysis of twenty studies evaluates the degree by which pain is diminished by one such method: an EMLA cream; an anti-inflammatory skin dressing (diclofenaco), a diclofenaco dressing versus an EMLA anesthetic dressing, 0.25 ml subcutaneous injection of 1% mepivaína, an amida type local anesthetic; and direct photography moments before puncture occurs to use the effects of a flash of light. All these methods studied proved effective in reducing pain. Creams and dressing prove to be unaggressive methods but require some time for application prior to puncture. Using a camera flash, subcutaneous injection of mepivacaine and the application of Valsalva can be effective alternatives to reduce pain when puncturing veins in patients who require emergency care.

  4. Altering Knee Abduction Angular Impulse Using Wedged Insoles for Treatment of Patellofemoral Pain in Runners: A Six-Week Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan T Lewinson

    Full Text Available Determine if a change in internal knee abduction angular impulse (KAAI is related to pain reduction for runners with patellofemoral pain (PFP by comparing lateral and medial wedge insole interventions, and increased KAAI and decreased KAAI groups.Randomized controlled clinical trial (ClinicalTrials.gov ID# NCT01332110.Biomechanics laboratory and community.Thirty-six runners with physician-diagnosed PFP enrolled in the trial, and 27 were analyzed.Runners with PFP were randomly assigned to either an experimental 3 mm lateral wedge or control 6 mm medial wedge group. Participants completed a biomechanical gait analysis to quantify KAAIs with their assigned insole, and then used their assigned insole for six-weeks during their regular runs. Usual pain during running was measured at baseline and at six-week follow-up using a visual analog scale. Statistical tests were performed to identify differences between wedge types, differences between biomechanical response types (i.e. increase or decrease KAAI, as well as predictors of pain reduction.Percent change in KAAI relative to neutral, and % change in pain over six weeks.Clinically meaningful reductions in pain (>33% were measured for both footwear groups; however, no significant differences between footwear groups were found (p = 0.697. When participants were regrouped based on KAAI change (i.e., increase or decrease, again, no significant differences in pain reduction were noted (p = 0.146. Interestingly, when evaluating absolute change in KAAI, a significant relationship between absolute % change in KAAI and % pain reduction was observed (R2 = 0.21; p = 0.030, after adjusting for baseline pain levels.The greater the absolute % change in KAAI during running, the greater the % reduction in pain over six weeks, regardless of wedge type, and whether KAAIs increased or decreased. Lateral and medial wedge insoles were similar in effectiveness for treatment of PFP.Altering KAAI should be a focus of future

  5. “I felt like a new person.” The effects of mindfulness meditation on older adults with chronic pain: qualitative narrative analysis of diary entries

    OpenAIRE

    Morone, Natalia E.; Lynch, Cheryl S.; Greco, Carol M.; Tindle, Hilary A.; Weiner, Debra K.

    2008-01-01

    To identify the effects of mindfulness meditation on older adults with chronic low back pain (CLBP) we conducted a qualitative study based on grounded theory and used content analysis of diary entries from older adults who had participated in a clinical trial of an eight week mindfulness meditation program. Participants were 27 adults ≥ 65 years with CLBP of at least moderate severity and of at least three months duration. We found several themes reflecting the beneficial effects of mindfulne...

  6. Chia seed does not promote weight loss or alter disease risk factors in overweight adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieman, David C; Cayea, Erin J; Austin, Melanie D; Henson, Dru A; McAnulty, Steven R; Jin, Fuxia

    2009-06-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of chia seed (Salvia hispanica L) in promoting weight loss and altering disease risk factors in overweight adults. The hypothesis was that the high dietary fiber and alpha-linolenic (ALA) contents of chia seed would induce a small but significant decrease in body weight and fat and improve disease risk factors. Subjects were randomized to chia seed (CS) and placebo (P) groups, and under single-blinded procedures, ingested 25 g CS or P supplements mixed in 0.25 L water twice daily before the first and last meal for 12 weeks. Ninety nondiseased, overweight/obese men and women between the ages of 20 and 70 years were recruited into the study, with 76 subjects (n = 39 CS, n = 37 P) completing all phases of the study. Pre- and poststudy measures included body mass and composition (dual energy x-ray absorptiometry), inflammation markers from fasting blood samples (C-reactive protein, interleukin 6, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, and tumor necrosis factor alpha), oxidative stress markers (trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity and plasma nitrite), blood pressure, and a serum lipid profile. Plasma ALA increased 24.4% compared to a 2.8% decrease in CS and P, respectively (interaction effect, P = .012). No group differences were measured for changes in plasma eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid (interaction effects, P = .420 and .980, respectively). Pre-to-post measures of body composition, inflammation, oxidative stress, blood pressure, and lipoproteins did not differ between CS and P for both sexes. In conclusion, ingestion of 50 g/d CS vs P for 12 weeks by overweight/obese men and women had no influence on body mass or composition, or various disease risk factor measures.

  7. Arsenite alters heme synthesis in long-term cultures of adult rat hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-González, M G; Hernández, A; López, M L; Mendoza-Figueroa, T; Albores, A

    1999-06-01

    Arsenite (As[III]) effects on the intermediate steps of heme biosynthesis were studied in adult rat hepatocytes seeded on a feeder layer of 3T3 cells (3T3-hepatocytes) and maintained for 2 weeks with culture medium non-supplemented or supplemented with 150 microM 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA). The activities of the intracellular enzymes porphobilinogen deaminase (PBG-D), uroporphyrinogen III synthase (UROIII-S), and uroporphyrinogen III decarboxylase (URO-D), and the intermediary uroporphyrins (URO), coproporphyrins (COPRO) and protoporphyrin IX (PROTO) were determined in these cultures. The 3T3-hepatocytes maintained the activities of PBG-D, UROIII-S and URO-D during 2 weeks and ALA addition to the culture medium increased PBG-D (2-3-fold) and UROIII-S (50%) activities and porphyrin production, which accumulated as PROTO. Exposure to 3.9 microM As(III) inhibited UROIII-S activity (down to 34%), and PBG-D and URO-D activities to a lower extent; these effects were magnified by ALA supplementation. As(III) also produced an intracellular accumulation and a decreased excretion of PROTO, and a 31% reduction of the COPRO/URO ratio in the culture medium. Additionally, As(III) caused cytoplasmic vacuolization and lipid accumulation. Our results show that As(III) exposure selectively inhibits several intermediary enzymes of heme metabolism and affects the intra- and extracellular content of porphyrins and their ratio in the culture medium. They also confirm that 3T3-hepatocytes are a suitable in vitro model to study hepatic heme metabolism and its alterations by hepatotoxic chemicals.

  8. Altered frontocingulate activation during aversive interoceptive processing in young adults transitioning to problem stimulant use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Lorraine Stewart

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Problems associated with stimulant use have been linked to frontocingulate, insular, and thalamic dysfunction during decision-making and alterations in interoceptive processing. However, little is known about how interoception and decision-making interact and contribute to dysfunctions that promote the transition from recreational drug use to abuse or dependence. Here, we investigate brain activation in response to reward, punishment, and uncertainty during an aversive interoceptive challenge in current and former stimulant (cocaine and amphetamine users using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Young adults previously identified as recreational users (n=184 were followed up three years later. Of these, 18 individuals progressed to problem stimulant use (PSU, whereas 15 desisted stimulant use (DSU. PSU, DSU, and 14 healthy comparison subjects (CTL performed a two-choice prediction task at three fixed error rates (20%=reward, 50%=uncertainty, 80%=punishment during which they anticipated and experienced episodes of inspiratory breathing load. Although groups did not differ in insula activation or subjective breathing load ratings, PSU exhibited lower right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG and bilateral anterior cingulate (ACC activation than DSU and CTL during aversive interoceptive processing as well as lower right IFG in response to decision making involving uncertainty. However, PSU exhibited greater bilateral IFG activation than DSU and CTL while making choices within the context of punishing feedback, and both PSU and DSU showed lower thalamic activation during breathing load than CTL. Findings suggest that frontocingulate attenuation, reflecting reduced resources devoted to goal maintenance and action selection in the presence of uncertainty and interoceptive perturbations, may be a biomarker for susceptibility to problem stimulant use.

  9. Neural Progenitor Cells Promote Axonal Growth and Alter Axonal mRNA Localization in Adult Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merianda, Tanuja T.; Jin, Ying

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The inhibitory environment of the spinal cord and the intrinsic properties of neurons prevent regeneration of axons following CNS injury. However, both ascending and descending axons of the injured spinal cord have been shown to regenerate into grafts of embryonic neural progenitor cells (NPCs). Previous studies have shown that grafts composed of glial-restricted progenitors (GRPs) and neural-restricted progenitors (NRPs) can provide a permissive microenvironment for axon growth. We have used cocultures of adult rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons together with NPCs, which have shown significant enhancement of axon growth by embryonic rat GRP and GRPs/NRPs, both in coculture conditions and when DRGs are exposed to conditioned medium from the NPC cultures. This growth-promoting effect of NPC-conditioned medium was also seen in injury-conditioned neurons. DRGs cocultured with GRPs/NRPs showed altered expression of regeneration-associated genes at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. We found that levels of GAP-43 mRNA increased in DRG cell bodies and axons. However, hepcidin antimicrobial peptide (HAMP) mRNA decreased in the cell bodies of DRGs cocultured with GRPs/NRPs, which is distinct from the increase in cell body HAMP mRNA levels seen in DRGs after injury conditioning. Endogenous GAP-43 and β-actin mRNAs as well as reporter RNAs carrying axonally localizing 3'UTRs of these transcripts showed significantly increased levels in distal axons in the DRGs cocultured with GRPs/NRPs. These results indicate that axon growth promoted by NPCs is associated not only with enhanced transcription of growth-associated genes but also can increase localization of some mRNAs into growing axons. PMID:28197547

  10. Does format matter for comprehension of a facial affective scale and a numeric scale for pain by adults with Down syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Knegt, N C; Evenhuis, H M; Lobbezoo, F; Schuengel, C; Scherder, E J A

    2013-10-01

    People with intellectual disabilities are at high risk for pain and have communication difficulties. Facial and numeric scales for self-report may aid pain identification. It was examined whether the comprehension of a facial affective scale and a numeric scale for pain in adults with Down syndrome (DS) varies with presentation format. Adults with DS were included (N=106, mild to severe ID, mean age 37 years), both with (N=57) and without (N=49) physical conditions that may cause pain or discomfort. The Facial Affect Scale (FAS) and a numeric rating scale (NRS) were compared. One subgroup of participants (N=50) had to choose the two items within each format to indicate 'least pain' and 'most pain'. The other subgroup of participants (N=56) had to order three faces of the FAS from 'least pain' to 'most pain', and to answer questions about the magnitude of numbers for the NRS. Comprehension percentages were compared between two subgroups. More participants understood the FAS than the NRS, irrespective of the presentation format. The comprehension percentage for the FAS did not differ between the least-most extremities format and the ordering/magnitude format. In contrast, comprehension percentages for the NRS differed significantly between the least-most extremities format (61%) and the ordering/magnitude format (32%). The inclusion of ordering and magnitude in a presentation format is essential to assess thorough comprehension of facial and numeric scales for self-reported pain. The use of this format does not influence the number of adults with DS who pass the comprehension test for the FAS, but reduces the number of adults with DS who pass the comprehension test for the NRS.

  11. Piloting tailored teaching on nonpharmacologic enhancements for postoperative pain management in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, Susanne M

    2010-09-01

    Despite many advances in the pharmacologic treatment of pain, the issue of unresolved postoperative pain continues to plague patients and health care professionals. Little seems to be known about the reasons why nonpharmacologic methods are not more widely used, particularly as they are commonly low in cost, easy to use, and largely free of adverse side effects. A central question has to do with what patients are taught about nonpharmacologic methods and how a novel mode of teaching can be embedded in practice. A seven-step pre-posttest teaching intervention pilot study was deployed with older joint replacement patients within the context of a translational research model. Results of the teaching pilot showed significant post-teaching changes in subjects' knowledge and attitudes about nonpharmacologic methods for pain management, high satisfaction with the nonpharmacologic methods they chose, and incrementally greater use of the nonpharmacologic methods over the course of the hospital stay. A randomized controlled trial of the study is now in the early planning stages in an effort to obtain generalizable results that will help solidify evidence of the impact of music, imagery, and slow-stroke massage on pain management and confirm the value of patient teaching as an important means of offering patients more options for managing their own pain.

  12. Dental pain, socioeconomic status, and dental caries in young male adults from southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastos João Luiz Dornelles

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess dental pain prevalence and its association with dental caries and socioeconomic status in 18-year-old males from Florianópolis, Santa Catarina, Brazil. A cross-sectional study was conducted in a random sample (n = 414 selected from the Brazilian Army conscription list in 2003. Dental pain during the 12 months prior to the interview was recorded as the outcome. Socioeconomic data were obtained through a questionnaire. Dental caries experience was registered according to the DMFT Index. Analyses included simple and multiple non-conditional logistic regression following a hierarchical approach. Response rate was 95.6%. High rates of inter-examiner agreement were achieved (kappa > 0.83. Dental pain prevalence was 21.2% (95%CI: 17.3-25.1. After adjustment, individuals with one or more untreated caries were 3.2 times more likely (95%CI: 1.7-5.8 to have dental pain compared to caries-free subjects. Conscripts with low family income were 1.8 times more likely (95%CI: 1.0-3.3 to have dental pain than those with higher income.

  13. Dental pain, socioeconomic status, and dental caries in young male adults from southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Luiz Dornelles Bastos

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess dental pain prevalence and its association with dental caries and socioeconomic status in 18-year-old males from Florianópolis, Santa Catarina, Brazil. A cross-sectional study was conducted in a random sample (n = 414 selected from the Brazilian Army conscription list in 2003. Dental pain during the 12 months prior to the interview was recorded as the outcome. Socioeconomic data were obtained through a questionnaire. Dental caries experience was registered according to the DMFT Index. Analyses included simple and multiple non-conditional logistic regression following a hierarchical approach. Response rate was 95.6%. High rates of inter-examiner agreement were achieved (kappa > 0.83. Dental pain prevalence was 21.2% (95%CI: 17.3-25.1. After adjustment, individuals with one or more untreated caries were 3.2 times more likely (95%CI: 1.7-5.8 to have dental pain compared to caries-free subjects. Conscripts with low family income were 1.8 times more likely (95%CI: 1.0-3.3 to have dental pain than those with higher income.

  14. Efficacy and tolerability of carbamazepine for the treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy in adults: a 12-week, open-label, multicenter study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed T

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Tariq Saeed,1 Muhammad Nasrullah,2 Adnan Ghafoor,3 Riaz Shahid,4 Nadeem Islam,5 Mohammad Usman Khattak,6 Neeta Maheshwary,7 Ahson Siddiqi,7 Muhammad Athar Khan81Pakistan Telecommunication Company Ltd, Karachi, Pakistan; 2Cavalary Hospital, Gulberg, Lahore, Pakistan; 3Fauji Foundation Hospital, Rawalpindi, Pakistan; 4Dr Riaz Shahid Clinic, Peshawar Cantt, Peshawar, Pakistan; 5Punjab Employs Social Security Institution, Islamabad, Pakistan; 6Medical B Unit, Hayat Abad Medical Complex, Peshawar, Pakistan; 7Novartis Pharma Pakistan, Karachi, Pakistan; 8Department of Medical Education, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi ArabiaObjective: Anticonvulsants are increasingly being used in the symptomatic management of several neuropathic pain disorders. The present observational study was designed to evaluate the efficacy, tolerability, and quality of life (QoL of carbamazepine use for 12 weeks in patients with painful diabetic neuropathy, in Pakistan.Methods: This was a 12-week, multicenter, open-label, uncontrolled trial in adult type 2 diabetic patients (aged 18–65 years suffering from clinically confirmed neuropathic pain (Douleur Neuropathique en 4 [DN4] score ≥4. Change in neuropathic pain at week 12 compared with baseline was assessed using the Brief Pain Inventory Scale–Short Form (pain severity score and pain interference score. QoL was determined by the American Chronic Pain Association QoL scale. Safety was assessed based on patient reported adverse events (AEs and serious AEs.Results: Of the total 500 screened patients, 452 enrolled and completed the study. The mean (± standard deviation [SD] pain interference score decreased from 4.5±2.0 at baseline to 3.1±1.9 at week 12 (P<0.001. The mean (± SD pain severity score decreased from 5.8±2.0 at baseline to 3.6±2.2 at week 12 (P<0.001. There was a decrease of ≥30% in the pain severity score between visits. The mean (± SD QoL scale score improved from 5.9±1

  15. Relationship between frequent knee pain, obesity, and gait speed in older adults: data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bindawas SM

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Saad M BindawasDepartment of Rehabilitation Sciences, College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi ArabiaBackground: Knee pain (KP causes gait difficulties in older adults and is associated with slow gait speed (GS. Obesity has negative effects on health. GS is an important indicator of health, well-being, and mean life span in older adults and is a strong predictor of future disability and mortality. The relationship between frequent KP, obesity, and GS in older adults remains unclear. Therefore, the present study aimed at examining the relationship between baseline frequent KP and obesity status on GS over time. We hypothesized that frequent KP, obesity, or both would be associated with decreased GS over time.Methods: The data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative were used for this 6-year longitudinal cohort study. We studied 3,118 adults aged between 45 years and 79 years. We grouped the participants into the following four categories according to KP frequency and obesity status at baseline: 1 no KP and nonobese, 2 frequent KP and nonobese, 3 no KP and obese, and 4 frequent KP and obese. GS measurements were based on a 20 m walking test timed using a stopwatch; testing was performed at baseline and over a 6-year follow-up period. Walk pace (m/sec was calculated as the average pace over two trials conducted at clinic visits. General linear mixed models were used to examine the relationships between frequent KP, obesity, and GS.Results: After adjusting for all covariates, at baseline, all the nonobese group with frequent KP (β=-0.06, 95% confidence interval [CI]: -0.07 to -0.04, the obese group with no KP (β=-0.07, 95% CI: -0.1 to -0.04, and the obese group with frequent KP (β=-0.08, 95% CI: -0.1 to -0.05 exhibited decreased GS compared with the nonobese and no KP group. However, the associations between frequent KP, obesity, and GS over time were not statistically significant.Conclusion: Frequent KP alone

  16. Lumbar spine spondylolysis in the adult population: using computed tomography to evaluate the possibility of adult onset lumbar spondylosis as a cause of back pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, Benjamin K.; Southam, Samuel L.; Mlady, Gary W.; Logan, Jeremy; Rosett, Matthew [University of New Mexico School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2010-07-15

    To determine if new onset of low back pain in adults could be secondary to lumbar spondylolysis by establishing the age-related prevalence in the general population by examining patients undergoing computed tomography (CT) for reasons unrelated to back pain. The records of 2,555 patients who had undergone abdominal and pelvic CT in 2008 were reviewed electronically. In order to determine a true representation of the general population, we reviewed all indications for CT, excluding patients with a primary complaint of low back pain as the primary indication for imaging. Equal numbers of patients were separated into age groups by decade to ensure an even distribution of ages for statistical analysis. Patients older than 70 years were grouped together to provide case numbers comparable to those of the other decades. Logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate the significance of the results. Three board-certified radiologists, including two musculoskeletal fellows and a radiology resident, retrospectively evaluated CT scans for lumbar spondylolysis, including unilateral and bilateral defects. Of the 2,555 cases evaluated, there were 203 positive cases of defects of the lumbar pars interarticularis. This corresponded to an overall prevalence of 8.0%. Prevalence per decade was fairly evenly distributed and ranged from 7.0%(ages 30-39 years) to 9.2% (ages 70 years and above). Prevalence of ages 20-49 years was 7.9%, and that of ages 50 years and older was 8.0%. Male to female ratio was 1.5:1. Logistic regression showed no significant increase in spondylolysis based on age. No significant increase in the prevalence of lumbar spondylolysis was demonstrated in patients older than 20 years. This suggests that the development of symptomatic lumbar pars defects do not occur in this population and should not be considered as a rare but potentially treatable cause of new onset low back pain in adults. This study demonstrated an overall prevalence of pars defects of 8

  17. Development of and recovery from long-term pain. A 6-year follow-up study of a cross-section of the adult Danish population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Jørgen; Ekholm, Ola; Sjøgren, Per;

    2004-01-01

    A 6-year follow-up study of a cross-section of the adult Danish population, based on data from the Danish Health and Morbidity Surveys in 1994 and 2000 is presented. The pain populations were identified through the pain intensity verbal rating scale (VRS) included in the Short Form 36. The 2000...... the investigated period, 9.2% of individuals moved from a 'no pain status' to a 'pain status', 7% moved from a 'pain status' to a 'no pain status', and 6.5% maintained their 'pain status'. Significant risk factors for pain development were female gender [odds ratio (OR) 1.5, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.......2-2.0], short education (OR 1.5, CI 1.0-2.2), poor self-rated health (OR 3.3, CI 2.4-4.7), and having at least one long-standing disease (OR 2.6, CI 2.0-3.4). Significant predictors for pain recovery were male gender, younger age, cohabitation status, good self-rated health, good mental health, having no long...

  18. Comparison of Emergency Department Wait Times in Adults with Sickle Cell Disease Versus Other Painful Etiologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulte, Dianne; Lovett, Paris B; Axelrod, David; Crawford, Albert; McAna, John; Powell, Rhea

    2016-09-01

    Sickle cell disease is characterized by intermittent painful crises often requiring treatment in the emergency department (ED). Past examinations of time-to-provider (TTP) in the ED for patients with sickle cell disease demonstrated that these patients may have longer TTP than other patients. Here, we examine TTP for patients presenting for emergency care at a single institution, comparing patients with sickle cell disease to both the general population and to those with other painful conditions, with examination of both institutional and patient factors that might affect wait times. Our data demonstrated that at our institution patients with sickle cell disease have a slightly longer average TTP compared to the general ED population (+16 min.) and to patients with other painful conditions (+4 min.) However, when confounding factors were considered, there was no longer a significant difference between TTP of patients with sickle cell disease and the general population nor between patients with sickle cell disease and those with other painful conditions. Multivariate analyses demonstrated that gender, race, age, high utilizer status, fast track use, time of presentation, acuity and insurance type, were all independently associated with TTP, with acuity, time of presentation and use of fast track having the greatest influence. We concluded that the longer TTP observed in patients with sickle cell disease can at least partially be explained by institutional factors such as the use of fast track protocols. Further work to reduce TTP for sickle cell disease and other patients is needed to optimize care.

  19. Physical exercise and reduction of pain in adults with lower limb osteoarthritis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escalante, Yolanda; Saavedra, Jose M; García-Hermoso, Antonio; Silva, Antonio J; Barbosa, Tiago M

    2010-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a degenerative joint disease. The knee and hip joints are the most frequently affected. Treatments fall into three main categories: pharmacological, non-pharmacological, and surgical. Treatments can be applied alone or in combination. In the last few years, within the non-pharmacological category have been a growing importance of physical exercise programs aimed to reduce pain in knee and hip joints. The purpose of this review was to summarize evidence for the effectiveness and structure of exercise programs on pain in patients with hip and knee osteoarthritis. To that end, several databases were searched, retrieving 33 studies that evaluated the influence of different exercise programs on pain. These studies were grouped according to the characteristics of the exercise program: land-based intervention (strength program, Tai Chi, aerobic program), aquatic intervention (hydrotherapy), and mixed exercise programs. The main conclusions drawn were: (i) despite recommendations for the use of exercise programs as pain therapy in patients with hip and knee osteoarthritis, very few randomized clinical studies were conducted; (ii) the structure of the exercise programs (content, duration, frequency and duration of the session) is very heterogeneous; (iii) on overall, exercise programs based on Tai Chi have better results than mixed exercise programs, but without clear differences.

  20. Neonatal pain: What′s age got to do with it?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda A Hatfield

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The neurobiology of neonatal pain processing, especially in preterm infants, differs significantly from older infants, children, adolescence, and adults. Research suggests that strong painful procedures or repeated mild procedures may permanently modify individual pain processing. Acute injuries at critical developmental periods are risk factors for persistent altered neurodevelopment. The purpose of this narrative review is to present the seminal and current literature describing the unique physiological aspects of neonatal pain processing. Methods: Articles describing the structures and physiological processes that influence neonatal pain were identified from electronic databases Medline, PubMed, and CINAHL. Results: The representation of neonatal pain physiology is described in three processes: Local peripheral nervous system processes, referred to as transduction; spinal cord processing, referred to as transmission and modulation; and supraspinal processing and integration or perception of pain. The consequences of undermanaged pain in preterm infants and neonates are discussed. Conclusion: Although the process and pain responses in neonates bear some similarity to processes and pain responses in older infants, children, adolescence, and adults; there are some pain processes and responses that are unique to neonates rendering them at risk for inadequate pain treatment. Moreover, exposure to repeated painful stimuli contributes to adverse long-term physiologic and behavioral sequelae. With the emergence of studies showing that painful experiences are capable of rewiring the adult brain, it is imperative that we treat neonatal pain effectively .

  1. Pain frequency, severity and QT dispersion in adult patients with sickle cell anemia: correlation with inflammatory markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garadah TS

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Taysir S Garadah,1,2 Ahmed A Jaradat,2 Mohammed E AlAlawi,1 Adla B Hassan,1 Reginald P Sequeira2 1Salmanyia Medical Complex, Ministry of Health, 2College of Medicine and Medical Sciences, Arabian Gulf University, Manama, Kingdom of Bahrain Background: Inflammatory markers are increased during vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC in adult patients with sickle cell anemia (SCA, but this is not clear in clinical steady state. Aim: The present study aims to establish the frequency and intensity of bone pain episodes in adult patients with SCA in clinical steady state and to determine the correlation between different inflammatory markers, other variables including QT dispersion (QTd and pain frequency and intensity in SCA. Patients and methods: Patients were classified into two groups: group 1, those with more than three hospital admissions in the last 6 months, and group 2, those with no hospital admission. Pearson correlation between variables such as body mass index (BMI, level of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α, interleukin-1 (IL-1, C-reactive protein (CRP, hemoglobin (Hb, reticulocyte count, white blood cell count (WBC, ferritin, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, parathormone (PTH, vitamin D3 (25-OH cholecalciferol and bone pain frequency with severity was evaluated. Results: Forty-six patients were enrolled in this study with a mean age of 18.47±5.78 years, with 23 patients in each group. Vitamin D3 and Hb were lower (17.04±5.77 vs 37.59±4.83 ng/L, P<0.01 and 7.96±0.3 vs 8.44±0.27 g/dL, P<0.01, respectively; the inflammatory markers showed significantly higher level of TNF-α, IL-1 and CRP (56.52±5.43 pg/ml, 44.17±4.54 pg/ml and 3.20±0.72 mg/L, respectively, P<0.05; WBC, LDH and reticulocyte count were also significantly higher and the QTd was higher (45.0±2.22 vs 41.55±0.8 ms, P<0.05 in group 1 when compared with group 2. Pearson correlation coefficient showed significant positive correlation between serum level of TNF-α and bone pain frequency

  2. Efficacy and tolerability of carbamazepine for the treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy in adults: a 12-week, open-label, multicenter study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Tariq; Nasrullah, Muhammad; Ghafoor, Adnan; Shahid, Riaz; Islam, Nadeem; Khattak, Mohammad Usman; Maheshwary, Neeta; Siddiqi, Ahson; Khan, Muhammad Athar

    2014-01-01

    Objective Anticonvulsants are increasingly being used in the symptomatic management of several neuropathic pain disorders. The present observational study was designed to evaluate the efficacy, tolerability, and quality of life (QoL) of carbamazepine use for 12 weeks in patients with painful diabetic neuropathy, in Pakistan. Methods This was a 12-week, multicenter, open-label, uncontrolled trial in adult type 2 diabetic patients (aged 18–65 years) suffering from clinically confirmed neuropathic pain (Douleur Neuropathique en 4 [DN4] score ≥4). Change in neuropathic pain at week 12 compared with baseline was assessed using the Brief Pain Inventory Scale–Short Form (pain severity score and pain interference score). QoL was determined by the American Chronic Pain Association QoL scale. Safety was assessed based on patient reported adverse events (AEs) and serious AEs. Results Of the total 500 screened patients, 452 enrolled and completed the study. The mean (± standard deviation [SD]) pain interference score decreased from 4.5±2.0 at baseline to 3.1±1.9 at week 12 (P<0.001). The mean (± SD) pain severity score decreased from 5.8±2.0 at baseline to 3.6±2.2 at week 12 (P<0.001). There was a decrease of ≥30% in the pain severity score between visits. The mean (± SD) QoL scale score improved from 5.9±1.6 at baseline to 8.0±1.7 at week 12. A total of ten (2.2%) patients reported AEs during the study period. No patient discontinued the study due to AEs. Conclusion In this real-life experience study, carbamazepine, when prescribed for 12 weeks to adult diabetic patients suffering from neuropathic pain, showed pain-relief effect, with reduced mean pain severity and mean pain interference scores and with improved QoL and good tolerability profile. PMID:25061334

  3. Genetic alterations related to BRAF-FGFR genes and dysregulated MAPK/ERK/mTOR signaling in adult pilocytic astrocytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Pankaj; Kumar, Anupam; Jha, Prerana; Purkait, Suvendu; Faruq, Mohammed; Suri, Ashish; Suri, Vaishali; Sharma, Mehar C; Sarkar, Chitra

    2016-09-08

    Pilocytic astrocytomas occur rarely in adults and show aggressive tumor behavior. However, their underlying molecular-genetic events are largely uncharacterized. Hence, 59 adult pilocytic astrocytoma (APA) cases of classical histology were studied (MIB-1 LI: 1%-5%). Analysis of BRAF alterations using qRT-PCR, confirmed KIAA1549-BRAF fusion in 11 (19%) and BRAF-gain in 2 (3.4%) cases. BRAF-V600E mutation was noted in 1 (1.7%) case by sequencing. FGFR1-mutation and FGFR-TKD duplication were seen in 7/59 (11.9%) and 3/59 (5%) cases, respectively. Overall 36% of APAs harbored BRAF and/or FGFR genetic alterations. Notably, FGFR related genetic alterations were enriched in tumors of supratentorial region (8/25, 32%) as compared with other locations (P = 0.01). The difference in age of cases with FGFR1-mutation (Mean age ± SD: 37.2 ± 15 years) vs. KIAA1549-BRAF fusion (Mean age ± SD: 25.1 ± 4.1 years) was statistically significant (P = 0.03). Combined BRAF and FGFR alterations were identified in 3 (5%) cases. Notably, the cases with more than one genetic alteration were in higher age group (Mean age ± SD: 50 ± 12 years) as compared with cases with single genetic alteration (Mean age ± SD: 29 ± 10; P = 0.003). Immunopositivity of p-MAPK/p-MEK1 was found in all the cases examined. The pS6-immunoreactivity, a marker of mTOR activation was observed in 34/39 (87%) cases. Interestingly, cases with BRAF and/or FGFR related alteration showed significantly lower pS6-immunostatining (3/12; 25%) as compared with those with wild-type BRAF and/or FGFR (16/27; 59%) (P = 0.04). Further, analysis of seven IDH wild-type adult diffuse astrocytomas (DA) showed FGFR related genetic alterations in 43% cases. These and previous results suggest that APAs are genetically similar to IDH wild-type adult DAs. APAs harbor infrequent BRAF alterations but more frequent FGFR alterations as compared with pediatric cases. KIAA1549-BRAF fusion

  4. New insights into neck-pain-related postural control using measures of signal frequency and complexity in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quek, June; Brauer, S G; Clark, Ross; Treleaven, Julia

    2014-04-01

    There is evidence to implicate the role of the cervical spine in influencing postural control, however the underlying mechanisms are unknown. The aim of this study was to explore standing postural control mechanisms in older adults with neck pain (NP) using measures of signal frequency (wavelet analysis) and complexity (entropy). This cross-sectional study compared balance performance of twenty older adults with (age=70.3±4.0 years) and without (age=71.4±5.1 years) NP when standing on a force platform with eyes open and closed. Anterior-posterior centre-of-pressure data were processed using wavelet analysis and sample entropy. Performance-based balance was assessed using the Timed Up-and-Go (TUG) and Dynamic Gait Index (DGI). The NP group demonstrated poorer functional performance (TUG and DGI, pcontrols. Wavelet analysis revealed that standing postural sway in the NP group was positively skewed towards the lower frequency movement (very-low [0.10-0.39Hz] frequency content, p0.05). Our results demonstrate that older adults with NP have poorer balance than controls. Furthermore, wavelet analysis may reveal unique insights into postural control mechanisms. Given that centre-of-pressure signal movements in the very-low and moderate frequencies are postulated to be associated with vestibular and muscular proprioceptive input respectively, we speculated that, because NP demonstrate a diminished ability to recruit the muscular proprioceptive system compared to controls, they rely more on the vestibular system for postural stability.

  5. Does evidence support physiotherapy management of adult female chronic pelvic pain? A systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loving, Sys; Nordling, Jørgen; Jaszczak, Poul

    2012-01-01

    dysfunction is frequently cited as a possible aetiology. Physiotherapy is therefore recommended as one treatment modality. The aim of this systematic review was to source and critically evaluate the evidence for an effect of physiotherapy on pain, physical activity and quality of life in the treatment...... of female CPP. Methods Electronic databases, conference proceedings, text books and clinical guidelines were searched for quantitative, observational, and prospective clinical intervention studies of female chronic pelvic pain where physiotherapy was a sole or significant component of the intervention...... in the other study types. Physiotherapy treatments varied between studies and were provided in combination with psychotherapeutic modalities and medical management. This did not allow for the ‘stand-alone’ value of physiotherapy to be determined. Heterogeneity across the studies, with respect to participants...

  6. Effects of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction vs Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy and Usual Care on Back Pain and Functional Limitations among Adults with Chronic Low Back Pain: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherkin, Daniel C.; Sherman, Karen J.; Balderson, Benjamin H.; Cook, Andrea J.; Anderson, Melissa L.; Hawkes, Rene J.; Hansen, Kelly E.; Turner, Judith A.

    2016-01-01

    Importance Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) has not been rigorously evaluated for young and middle-aged adults with chronic low back pain. Objective To evaluate the effectiveness for chronic low back pain of MBSR versus usual care (UC) and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). Design, Setting, and Participants Randomized, interviewer-blind, controlled trial in integrated healthcare system in Washington State of 342 adults aged 20–70 years with CLBP enrolled between September 2012 and April 2014 and randomly assigned to MBSR (n = 116), CBT (n = 113), or UC (n = 113). Interventions CBT (training to change pain-related thoughts and behaviors) and MBSR (training in mindfulness meditation and yoga) were delivered in 8 weekly 2-hour groups. UC included whatever care participants received. Main Outcomes and Measures Co-primary outcomes were the percentages of participants with clinically meaningful (≥30%) improvement from baseline in functional limitations (modified Roland Disability Questionnaire [RDQ]; range 0 to 23) and in self-reported back pain bothersomeness (0 to 10 scale) at 26 weeks. Outcomes were also assessed at 4, 8, and 52 weeks. Results Among 342 randomized participants (mean age, 49 (range, 20–70); 225 (66%) women; mean duration of back pain, 7.3 years (range 3 months to 50 years), low back pain, treatment with MBSR and CBT, compared with UC, resulted in greater improvement in back pain and functional limitations at 26 weeks, with no significant differences in outcomes between MBSR and CBT. These findings suggest that MBSR may be an effective treatment option for patients with chronic low back pain. PMID:27002445

  7. Abdominal separation in an adult male patient with acute abdominal pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    We report a male patient with prolonged post-prandial abdominal distension and a sudden onset of epigastric pain initially diagnosed as acute abdomen. The patient had no history of surgery. Physical examination revealed peritonitis and abdominal computed tomography scan showed upper abdominal mesentery intorsion. The patient then underwent surgical intervention. It was found that the descending mesocolon dorsal root was connected to the ascending colon and formed a membrane encapsulating the small intestine...

  8. Clinical reasoning in the evaluation and management of undiagnosed chronic hip pain in a young adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimny, N J

    1998-01-01

    This case report describes the clinical reasoning used to manage chronic left hip pain in a 21-year-old woman who was recreationally active. The patient had a history of possible congenital hip dysplasia (CHD) and known recurrent lateral (external) patellar subluxations on the left side. She complained of experiencing hip pain when walking, sitting, playing soccer, and doing "step aerobics." Hip range of motion (ROM), muscle force, and joint stability problems were assessed. Abnormal movement patterns were observed during gait and step aerobics. Intervention was based on the working hypothesis that periarticular stiffness and muscle weakness from earlier trauma were superimposed on joint instability from CHD. Following intervention, the patient's hip ROM and muscle force improved concurrently with reduction of hip pain, increased ability to participate in recreational activities, and improvement in the movement pattern during step aerobics. An eclectic approach to analysis of the problem was used, combining data unique to the patient with knowledge of CHD and concepts proposed by Cyriax, Maitland, Sahrmann, and others. The clinical reasoning used to establish a basis for treatment and its limitations are discussed.

  9. Endosulfan affects health variables in adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) and induces alterations in larvae development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Velasco-Santamaria, Y. M.; Handy, R. D.; Sloman, K. A.

    2011-01-01

    Adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) were exposed to 0 (control), 0.16 or 0.48 mu g/L of the insecticide, endosulfan, for 28 days. Haematology, whole body ions, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), Na(+)K(+)-ATPase, organ histology and reproduction were assessed in adults. The resulting...... offspring were examined for latent effects on development (heart rate and morphometrics). On day 14, adult fish exposed to 0.16 mu g/L endosulfan showed significantly lower red blood cell counts than those exposed to 0.48 mu g/L endosulfan; adult fish exposed to 0.16 ug/L also showed elevated TBARS compared...... to controls. Both concentrations of endosulfan caused a 4.0 fold increase in Na(+)K(+)-ATPase activity compared to controls (ANOVA, p fish exposed to endosulfan had fewer, enlarged hepatocytes, with cell diameters greater than the controls (ANOVA, p

  10. Performance monitoring is altered in adult ADHD: a familial event-related potential investigation

    OpenAIRE

    McLoughlin, G; Albrecht, B.; Banaschewski, T.; Rothenberger, A.; Brandeis, D; Asherson, P.; Kuntsi, J.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common neurodevelopmental disorder that starts in childhood and frequently persists in adults. Electrophysiological studies in children with ADHD provide evidence for abnormal performance monitoring processes and familial association of these processes with ADHD. It is not yet known whether these processes show the same abnormalities and familial effects in adults. METHOD: We investigated event-related potential (ERP) indices of...

  11. Distribution of myogenic progenitor cells and myonuclei is altered in women with vs. those without chronically painful trapezius muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mackey, Abigail; Andersen, Lars L; Frandsen, Ulrik

    2010-01-01

    It is hypothesized that repeated recruitment of low-threshold motor units is an underlying cause of chronic pain in trapezius myalgia. This study investigated the distribution of satellite cells (SCs), myonuclei, and macrophages in muscle biopsies from the trapezius muscle of 42 women performing ...

  12. Ablation of mouse adult neurogenesis alters olfactory bulb structure and olfactory fear conditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Valley

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Adult neurogenesis replenishes olfactory bulb (OB interneurons throughout the life of most mammals, yet during this constant fl ux it remains unclear how the OB maintains a constant structure and function. In the mouse OB, we investigated the dynamics of turnover and its impact on olfactory function by ablating adult neurogenesis with an x-ray lesion to the subventricular zone (SVZ. Regardless of the magnitude of the lesion to the SVZ, we found no change in the survival of young adult born granule cells (GCs born after the lesion, and a gradual decrease in the population of GCs born before the lesion. After a lesion producing a 96% reduction of incoming adult born GCs to the OB, we found a diminished behavioral fear response to conditioned odor cues but not to audio cues. Interestingly, despite this behavioral defi cit and gradual anatomical changes, we found no electrophysiological changes in the GC population assayed in vivo through dendro-dendritic synaptic plasticity and odor-evoked local fi eld potential oscillations. These data indicate that turnover in the granule cell layer is generally decoupled from the rate of adult neurogenesis, and that OB adult neurogenesis plays a role in a wide behavioral system extending beyond the OB.

  13. Is comorbidity in adolescence a predictor for adult low back pain? A prospective study of a young population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hestbaek, Lise; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte; Kyvik, Kirsten O

    2006-01-01

    ). The predictor variables used in this study were LBP, headache, asthma and atopic disease at baseline; the outcome variable was persistent LBP (>30 days during the past year) at follow-up. Associations between morbidity in 1994 and LBP in 2002 were investigated. RESULTS: LBP, headache and asthma in adolescence...... associated with future LBP and there is a large clustering of LBP, headache and asthma in adolescence.......BACKGROUND: It has previously been shown that low back pain (LBP) often presents already in the teenage years and that previous LBP predicts future LBP. It is also well documented that there is a large degree of comorbidity associated with LBP, both in adolescents and adults. The objective...

  14. Withdrawal of dietary phytoestrogens in adult male rats affects hypothalamic regulation of food intake, induces obesity and alters glucose metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreoli, María Florencia; Stoker, Cora; Rossetti, María Florencia; Alzamendi, Ana; Castrogiovanni, Daniel; Luque, Enrique H; Ramos, Jorge Guillermo

    2015-02-05

    The absence of phytoestrogens in the diet during pregnancy has been reported to result in obesity later in adulthood. We investigated whether phytoestrogen withdrawal in adult life could alter the hypothalamic signals that regulate food intake and affect body weight and glucose homeostasis. Male Wistar rats fed from conception to adulthood with a high phytoestrogen diet were submitted to phytoestrogen withdrawal by feeding a low phytoestrogen diet, or a high phytoestrogen-high fat diet. Withdrawal of dietary phytoestrogens increased body weight, adiposity and energy intake through an orexigenic hypothalamic response characterized by upregulation of AGRP and downregulation of POMC. This was associated with elevated leptin and T4, reduced TSH, testosterone and estradiol, and diminished hypothalamic ERα expression, concomitant with alterations in glucose tolerance. Removing dietary phytoestrogens caused manifestations of obesity and diabetes that were more pronounced than those induced by the high phytoestrogen-high fat diet intake.

  15. Neuropathic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colloca, Luana; Ludman, Taylor; Bouhassira, Didier

    2017-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is caused by a lesion or disease of the somatosensory system, including peripheral fibres (Aβ, Aδ and C fibres) and central neurons, and affects 7-10% of the general population. Multiple causes of neuropathic pain have been described and its incidence is likely to increase owing...... to the ageing global population, increased incidence of diabetes mellitus and improved survival from cancer after chemotherapy. Indeed, imbalances between excitatory and inhibitory somatosensory signalling, alterations in ion channels and variability in the way that pain messages are modulated in the central...... nervous system all have been implicated in neuropathic pain. The burden of chronic neuropathic pain seems to be related to the complexity of neuropathic symptoms, poor outcomes and difficult treatment decisions. Importantly, quality of life is impaired in patients with neuropathic pain owing to increased...

  16. Effects of acupressure on menstrual distress and low back pain in dysmenorrheic young adult women: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huei-Mein; Wang, Hsiu-Hung; Chiu, Min-Huei; Hu, Hsou-Mei

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of acupressure on menstrual distress and low back pain (LBP) in dysmenorrheic young adult women. In all, 129 female students, who had been experiencing dysmenorrhea with LBP during menstruation and who scored more than 4 points on the visual analog scale for pain, were randomly assigned to an experimental group and a control group. The experimental group (n = 65) received acupressure massage three times a week for 30 minutes on the sanyinjiao (SP6), ciliao (BL32), and taichong (Liver 3) acupoints. The control group (n = 64) received only a manual of menstrual health education without acupressure intervention. Data were collected at five time points: at baseline, 30 minutes, and 4, 8, and 12 months after the intervention. During the 12-month follow-up, the experimental group had significantly lower menstrual distress and LBP scores than the control group. Among 65 participants in the experimental group, 53 (82%) reported a moderate to high levels of menstrual distress, 51 (78%) reported moderate to high levels of LBP relief, and 49 (75%) reported moderate to high levels of satisfaction with acupressure. Our findings may serve as a reference for health care professionals and young women to improve self-care during menstruation and help further understand the therapeutic effects of acupressure on menstrual distress and LBP.

  17. Auricular Point Acupressure to Manage Chronic Low Back Pain in Older Adults: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Hsing Yeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This prospective, randomized clinical trial (RCT pilot study was designed to (1 assess the feasibility and tolerability of an easily administered, auricular point acupressure (APA intervention and (2 provide an initial assessment of effect size as compared to a sham treatment. Thirty-seven subjects were randomized to receive either the real or sham APA treatment. All participants were treated once a week for 4 weeks. Self-report measures were obtained at baseline, weekly during treatment, at end-of-intervention (EOI, and at a 1-month follow-up. A dropout rate of 26% in the real APA group and 50% in the sham group was observed. The reduction in worst pain from baseline to EOI was 41% for the real and 5% for the sham group with a Cohen’s effect size of 1.22 P<0.00. Disability scores on the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ decreased in the real group by 29% and were unchanged in the sham group (+3% P<0.00. Given the high dropout rate, results must be interpreted with caution; nevertheless, our results suggest that APA may provide an inexpensive and effective complementary approach for the management of back pain in older adults, and further study is warranted.

  18. Larval Population Density Alters Adult Sleep in Wild-Type Drosophila melanogaster but Not in Amnesiac Mutant Flies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael W. Chi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Sleep has many important biological functions, but how sleep is regulated remains poorly understood. In humans, social isolation and other stressors early in life can disrupt adult sleep. In fruit flies housed at different population densities during early adulthood, social enrichment was shown to increase subsequent sleep, but it is unknown if population density during early development can also influence adult sleep. To answer this question, we maintained Drosophila larvae at a range of population densities throughout larval development, kept them isolated during early adulthood, and then tested their sleep patterns. Our findings reveal that flies that had been isolated as larvae had more fragmented sleep than those that had been raised at higher population densities. This effect was more prominent in females than in males. Larval population density did not affect sleep in female flies that were mutant for amnesiac, which has been shown to be required for normal memory consolidation, adult sleep regulation, and brain development. In contrast, larval population density effects on sleep persisted in female flies lacking the olfactory receptor or83b, suggesting that olfactory signals are not required for the effects of larval population density on adult sleep. These findings show that population density during early development can alter sleep behavior in adulthood, suggesting that genetic and/or structural changes are induced by this developmental manipulation that persist through metamorphosis.

  19. Larval Population Density Alters Adult Sleep in Wild-Type Drosophila melanogaster but Not in Amnesiac Mutant Flies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Michael W; Griffith, Leslie C; Vecsey, Christopher G

    2014-08-11

    Sleep has many important biological functions, but how sleep is regulated remains poorly understood. In humans, social isolation and other stressors early in life can disrupt adult sleep. In fruit flies housed at different population densities during early adulthood, social enrichment was shown to increase subsequent sleep, but it is unknown if population density during early development can also influence adult sleep. To answer this question, we maintained Drosophila larvae at a range of population densities throughout larval development, kept them isolated during early adulthood, and then tested their sleep patterns. Our findings reveal that flies that had been isolated as larvae had more fragmented sleep than those that had been raised at higher population densities. This effect was more prominent in females than in males. Larval population density did not affect sleep in female flies that were mutant for amnesiac, which has been shown to be required for normal memory consolidation, adult sleep regulation, and brain development. In contrast, larval population density effects on sleep persisted in female flies lacking the olfactory receptor or83b, suggesting that olfactory signals are not required for the effects of larval population density on adult sleep. These findings show that population density during early development can alter sleep behavior in adulthood, suggesting that genetic and/or structural changes are induced by this developmental manipulation that persist through metamorphosis.

  20. Exposure to N-Ethyl-N-Nitrosourea in Adult Mice Alters Structural and Functional Integrity of Neurogenic Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capilla-Gonzalez, Vivian; Gil-Perotin, Sara; Ferragud, Antonio; Bonet-Ponce, Luis; Canales, Juan Jose; Garcia-Verdugo, Jose Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that prenatal exposure to the mutagen N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU), a N-nitroso compound (NOC) found in the environment, disrupts developmental neurogenesis and alters memory formation. Previously, we showed that postnatal ENU treatment induced lasting deficits in proliferation of neural progenitors in the subventricular zone (SVZ), the main neurogenic region in the adult mouse brain. The present study is aimed to examine, in mice exposed to ENU, both the structural features of adult neurogenic sites, incorporating the dentate gyrus (DG), and the behavioral performance in tasks sensitive to manipulations of adult neurogenesis. Methodology/Principal Findings 2-month old mice received 5 doses of ENU and were sacrificed 45 days after treatment. Then, an ultrastructural analysis of the SVZ and DG was performed to determine cellular composition in these regions, confirming a significant alteration. After bromodeoxyuridine injections, an S-phase exogenous marker, the immunohistochemical analysis revealed a deficit in proliferation and a decreased recruitment of newly generated cells in neurogenic areas of ENU-treated animals. Behavioral effects were also detected after ENU-exposure, observing impairment in odor discrimination task (habituation-dishabituation test) and a deficit in spatial memory (Barnes maze performance), two functions primarily related to the SVZ and the DG regions, respectively. Conclusions/Significance The results demonstrate that postnatal exposure to ENU produces severe disruption of adult neurogenesis in the SVZ and DG, as well as strong behavioral impairments. These findings highlight the potential risk of environmental NOC-exposure for the development of neural and behavioral deficits. PMID:22238669

  1. Exposure to N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea in adult mice alters structural and functional integrity of neurogenic sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian Capilla-Gonzalez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous studies have shown that prenatal exposure to the mutagen N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU, a N-nitroso compound (NOC found in the environment, disrupts developmental neurogenesis and alters memory formation. Previously, we showed that postnatal ENU treatment induced lasting deficits in proliferation of neural progenitors in the subventricular zone (SVZ, the main neurogenic region in the adult mouse brain. The present study is aimed to examine, in mice exposed to ENU, both the structural features of adult neurogenic sites, incorporating the dentate gyrus (DG, and the behavioral performance in tasks sensitive to manipulations of adult neurogenesis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 2-month old mice received 5 doses of ENU and were sacrificed 45 days after treatment. Then, an ultrastructural analysis of the SVZ and DG was performed to determine cellular composition in these regions, confirming a significant alteration. After bromodeoxyuridine injections, an S-phase exogenous marker, the immunohistochemical analysis revealed a deficit in proliferation and a decreased recruitment of newly generated cells in neurogenic areas of ENU-treated animals. Behavioral effects were also detected after ENU-exposure, observing impairment in odor discrimination task (habituation-dishabituation test and a deficit in spatial memory (Barnes maze performance, two functions primarily related to the SVZ and the DG regions, respectively. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results demonstrate that postnatal exposure to ENU produces severe disruption of adult neurogenesis in the SVZ and DG, as well as strong behavioral impairments. These findings highlight the potential risk of environmental NOC-exposure for the development of neural and behavioral deficits.

  2. Embryonic caffeine exposure acts via A1 adenosine receptors to alter adult cardiac function and DNA methylation in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela L Buscariollo

    Full Text Available Evidence indicates that disruption of normal prenatal development influences an individual's risk of developing obesity and cardiovascular disease as an adult. Thus, understanding how in utero exposure to chemical agents leads to increased susceptibility to adult diseases is a critical health related issue. Our aim was to determine whether adenosine A1 receptors (A1ARs mediate the long-term effects of in utero caffeine exposure on cardiac function and whether these long-term effects are the result of changes in DNA methylation patterns in adult hearts. Pregnant A1AR knockout mice were treated with caffeine (20 mg/kg or vehicle (0.09% NaCl i.p. at embryonic day 8.5. This caffeine treatment results in serum levels equivalent to the consumption of 2-4 cups of coffee in humans. After dams gave birth, offspring were examined at 8-10 weeks of age. A1AR+/+ offspring treated in utero with caffeine were 10% heavier than vehicle controls. Using echocardiography, we observed altered cardiac function and morphology in adult mice exposed to caffeine in utero. Caffeine treatment decreased cardiac output by 11% and increased left ventricular wall thickness by 29% during diastole. Using DNA methylation arrays, we identified altered DNA methylation patterns in A1AR+/+ caffeine treated hearts, including 7719 differentially methylated regions (DMRs within the genome and an overall decrease in DNA methylation of 26%. Analysis of genes associated with DMRs revealed that many are associated with cardiac hypertrophy. These data demonstrate that A1ARs mediate in utero caffeine effects on cardiac function and growth and that caffeine exposure leads to changes in DNA methylation.

  3. Evaluation of the preliminary effectiveness of hand massage therapy on postoperative pain of adults in the intensive care unit after cardiac surgery: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boitor, Mădălina; Martorella, Géraldine; Arbour, Caroline; Michaud, Cécile; Gélinas, Céline

    2015-06-01

    Although many intensive care unit patients experience significant pain, very few studies explored massage to maximize their pain relief. This study aimed to evaluate the preliminary effects of hand massage on pain after cardiac surgery in the adult intensive care unit. A pilot randomized controlled trial was used for this study. The study was conducted in a Canadian medical-surgical intensive care unit. Forty adults who were admitted to the intensive care unit after undergoing elective cardiac surgery in the previous 24 hours participated in the study. They were randomly assigned to the experimental (n = 21) or control (n = 19) group. The experimental group received a 15-minute hand massage, and the control group received a 15-minute hand-holding without massage. In both groups the intervention was followed by a 30-minute rest period. The interventions were offered on 2-3 occasions within 24 hours after surgery. Pain, muscle tension, and vital signs were assessed. Pain intensity and behavioral scores were decreased for the experimental group. Although hand massage decreased muscle tension, fluctuations in vital signs were not significant. This study supports potential benefits of hand massage for intensive care unit postoperative pain management. Although larger randomized controlled trials are necessary, this low-cost nonpharmacologic intervention can be safely administered.

  4. Tri-length laser therapy associated to tecar therapy in the treatment of low-back pain in adults: a preliminary report of a prospective case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osti, Raffaella; Pari, Carlotta; Salvatori, Giada; Massari, Leo

    2015-01-01

    Low-back pain is very frequent, especially in active adult population. There are several different orthopaedic condition that can cause low-back pain, and the pain worsen the quality of life significantly. The treatments vary from drugs, physical therapies, kinesiology, local infiltrations, and so on. Laser therapy has an important role in the treatment of the inflammatory causes of pain, with several studies that demonstrate the efficacy of low and high energy laser therapy in the treatment of low-back pain. Sixty-six consecutive patients with low-back pain with or without leg pain were treated using a combination of Tri-length laser I-Triax® (Mectronic Medicale, Bergamo, Italy) and Pharon® tecar therapy (Mectronic Medicale, Bergamo, Italy). The patients were treated three times a week, every other day, for a total of 10 sessions. Clinical results were evaluated using visual analogic scale for individual pain (0 to 10) and the Oswestry disability scale (ODS). Tests started before the beginning of therapies and 8 weeks after the end of the therapies. Visual analogic scale (VAS) score significantly improved from an average value of 8.1 ± 1.58 pre-treatment to an average value 8-weeks post-treatment of 2.63 ± 2.74 (P low-back pain and leg pain (respectively, VAS from 8.66 ± 1.58 to 2.86 ± 2.94 and ODS from 57.8 ± 15.5 to 23.7 ± 19.5). Low-back pain, associated or not with leg pain, is a very common clinical situation. The treatments of this condition are different, and an important role can be given to the laser therapy. The conclusion of this study is that the association between laser therapy iLux-Triax® and tecar therapy Pharon® in the treatment of low-back pain, with or without leg pain, can significantly reduce pain and improve the quality of life in patients with degenerative and inflammatory problems.

  5. Spinal opioids in adult patients with cancer pain: a systematic review: a European Palliative Care Research Collaborative (EPCRC) opioid guidelines project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurita, Geana Paula; Kaasa, Stein; Sjøgren, Per

    2011-01-01

    A systematic review, undertaken according to an initiative to revise European Association for Palliative Care guidelines on the use of opioids for cancer pain, which aimed to analyse analgesic efficacy and side effects of spinal opioids in adult cancer patients previously treated with systemic...

  6. Peripheral effect of NMDA receptor antagonists on adult rats exposed to neonatal colon pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ChunLin; ElieD.Al-Chaer

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Previous work done by Al-Chaer' s lab has shown that colon irritation (CI) in neonates can lead to chronic visceral hypersensitivity in adult rats, with characteristics of visceral allodynia and hyperalgesia, associated with central neuronal sensitization in the absence of identifiable peripheral pathology (Al-Chaer et al. 2000) . The pathogenesis of

  7. Pain genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Foulkes

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Pain, which afflicts up to 20% of the population at any time, provides both a massive therapeutic challenge and a route to understanding mechanisms in the nervous system. Specialised sensory neurons (nociceptors signal the existence of tissue damage to the central nervous system (CNS, where pain is represented in a complex matrix involving many CNS structures. Genetic approaches to investigating pain pathways using model organisms have identified the molecular nature of the transducers, regulatory mechanisms involved in changing neuronal activity, as well as the critical role of immune system cells in driving pain pathways. In man, mapping of human pain mutants as well as twin studies and association studies of altered pain behaviour have identified important regulators of the pain system. In turn, new drug targets for chronic pain treatment have been validated in transgenic mouse studies. Thus, genetic studies of pain pathways have complemented the traditional neuroscience approaches of electrophysiology and pharmacology to give us fresh insights into the molecular basis of pain perception.

  8. Effect of Reiki therapy on pain and anxiety in adults: an in-depth literature review of randomized trials with effect size calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrane, Susan; Cohen, Susan M

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to calculate the effect of Reiki therapy for pain and anxiety in randomized clinical trials. A systematic search of PubMed, ProQuest, Cochrane, PsychInfo, CINAHL, Web of Science, Global Health, and Medline databases was conducted using the search terms pain, anxiety, and Reiki. The Center for Reiki Research also was examined for articles. Studies that used randomization and a control or usual care group, used Reiki therapy in one arm of the study, were published in 2000 or later in peer-reviewed journals in English, and measured pain or anxiety were included. After removing duplicates, 49 articles were examined and 12 articles received full review. Seven studies met the inclusion criteria: four articles studied cancer patients, one examined post-surgical patients, and two analyzed community dwelling older adults. Effect sizes were calculated for all studies using Cohen's d statistic. Effect sizes for within group differences ranged from d = 0.24 for decrease in anxiety in women undergoing breast biopsy to d = 2.08 for decreased pain in community dwelling adults. The between group differences ranged from d = 0.32 for decrease of pain in a Reiki versus rest intervention for cancer patients to d = 4.5 for decrease in pain in community dwelling adults. Although the number of studies is limited, based on the size Cohen's d statistics calculated in this review, there is evidence to suggest that Reiki therapy may be effective for pain and anxiety. Continued research using Reiki therapy with larger sample sizes, consistently randomized groups, and standardized treatment protocols is recommended.

  9. E-learning module on chronic low back pain in older adults: evidence of effect on medical student objective structured clinical examination performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Debra K; Morone, Natalia E; Spallek, Heiko; Karp, Jordan F; Schneider, Michael; Washburn, Carol; Dziabiak, Michael P; Hennon, John G; Elnicki, D Michael

    2014-06-01

    The Institute of Medicine has highlighted the urgent need to close undergraduate and graduate educational gaps in treating pain. Chronic low back pain (CLBP) is one of the most common pain conditions, and older adults are particularly vulnerable to potential morbidities associated with misinformed treatment. An e-learning case-based interactive module was developed at the University of Pittsburgh Center of Excellence in Pain Education, one of 12 National Institutes of Health-designated centers, to teach students important principles for evaluating and managing CLBP in older adults. A team of six experts in education, information technology, pain management, and geriatrics developed the module. Teaching focused on common errors, interactivity, and expert modeling and feedback. The module mimicked a patient encounter using a standardized patient (the older adult with CLBP) and a pain expert (the patient provider). Twenty-eight medical students were not exposed to the module (Group 1) and 27 were exposed (Group 2). Their clinical skills in evaluating CLBP were assessed using an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE). Mean scores were 62.0 ± 8.6 for Group 1 and 79.5 ± 10.4 for Group 2 (P students (60.7%) and 26 of 27 Group 2 students (96.3%) passed. The CLBP OSCE was one of 10 OSCE stations in which students were tested at the end of a Combined Ambulatory Medicine and Pediatrics Clerkship. There were no between-group differences in performance on eight of the other nine OSCE stations. This module significantly improved medical student clinical skills in evaluating CLBP. Additional research is needed to ascertain the effect of e-learning modules on more-advanced learners and on improving the care of older adults with CLBP.

  10. Prenatal Choline Availability Alters the Context Sensitivity of Pavlovian Conditioning in Adult Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamoureux, Jeffrey A.; Meck, Warren H.; Williams, Christina L.

    2008-01-01

    The effects of prenatal choline availability on Pavlovian conditioning were assessed in adult male rats (3-4 mo). Neither supplementation nor deprivation of prenatal choline affected the acquisition and extinction of simple Pavlovian conditioned excitation, or the acquisition and retardation of conditioned inhibition. However, prenatal choline…

  11. Altered neuronal architecture and plasticity in the visual cortex of adult MMP-3-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aerts, Jeroen; Nys, Julie; Moons, Lieve; Hu, Tjing-Tjing; Arckens, Lutgarde

    2015-09-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are Zn(2+)-dependent endopeptidases considered to be essential for normal brain development and neuroplasticity by modulating extracellular matrix proteins, receptors, adhesion molecules, growth factors and cytoskeletal proteins. Specifically, MMP-3 has recently been implicated in synaptic plasticity, hippocampus-dependent learning and neuronal development and migration in the cerebellum. However, the function(s) of this enzyme in the neocortex is understudied. Therefore, we explored the phenotypical characteristics of the neuronal architecture and the capacity for experience-dependent cortical plasticity in the visual cortex of adult MMP-3-deficient (MMP-3(-/-)) mice. Golgi-Cox stainings revealed a significant reduction in apical dendritic length and an increased number of apical obliques for layer V pyramidal neurons in the visual cortex of adult MMP-3(-/-) mice compared to wild-type (WT) animals. In addition, a significant upregulation of both phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated neurofilament protein (NF)-high, phosphorylated NF-medium, NF-low and α-internexin was detected in the visual cortex of MMP-3(-/-) mice. To assess the effect of MMP-3 deficiency on cortical plasticity, we monocularly enucleated adult MMP-3(-/-) mice and analyzed the reactivation of the contralateral visual cortex 7 weeks post-enucleation. In contrast to previous results in C57Bl/6J adult mice, activity remained confined to the binocular zone and did not expand into the monocular regions indicative for an aberrant open-eye potentiation. Permanent hypoactivity in the monocular cortex lateral and medial to V1 also indicated a lack of cross-modal plasticity. These observations demonstrate that genetic inactivation of MMP-3 has profound effects on the structural integrity and plasticity response of the visual cortex of adult mice.

  12. The use of the bispectral index in the detection of pain in mechanically ventilated adults in the intensive care unit: A review of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Robin Marie; Tousignant-Laflamme, Yannick; Ouellet, Paul; Parenteau-Goudreault, Élizabeth; Cogan, Jennifer; Bourgault, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pain assessment is an immense challenge for clinicians, especially in the context of the intensive care unit, where the patient is often unable to communicate verbally. Several methods of pain assessment have been proposed to assess pain in this environment. These include both behavioural observation scales and evaluation of physiological measurements such as heart rate and blood pressure. Although numerous validation studies pertaining to behavioural observation scales have been published, several limitations associated with using these measures for pain assessment remain. Over the past few years, researchers have been interested in the use of the bispectral index monitoring system as a proxy for the evaluation of encephalography readings to assess the level of anesthesia and, potentially, analgesia. OBJECTIVES: To synthesize the main studies exploring the use of the bispectral index monitoring system for pain assessment, to guide future research in adults under sedation in the intensive care unit. METHOD: The EMBASE, Medline, CINAHL and PsycINFO databases were searched for studies published between 1996 and 2013 that evaluated the use of the bispectral index in assessing pain. RESULTS: Most studies conclude that nociceptive stimulation causes a significant increase in the bispectral index and revealed the importance of controlling certain confounding variables such as the level of sedation. DISCUSSION: Further studies are needed to clearly demonstrate the relationship between nociceptive stimuli and the bispectral index, as well as the specificity of the bispectral index in detecting pain. PMID:25050877

  13. Current Concepts in the Management of Hip Pain in the Young Adult

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Rashid; Abbassian, Ali

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Until recently, surgical management of hip disorders in adults has focused on conventional total hip replacements for advanced arthritis. These have been done mainly in the elderly, and there have been few surgical options in the younger patient. Over the past decade, the treatment of hip disorders in patients less than 55 years of age has changed rapidly; improved diagnostic techniques as well as newer diagnoses have lead to increased surgical options. This article review...

  14. [Reliability and validity of the pain assessment tool in confused older adults--IADIC].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurin, Gislaine; Crossetti, Maria da Graça Oliveira

    2013-12-01

    This is a methodological study, the objective was to conduct the pre-test and validate the psychometric properties of the Pain Assessment Tool in Confused Elderly (IADIC) in the immediate postoperative period. The sample consisted of 104 patients aged 60 years and over in the immediate postoperative perio4 admitted to the recovery room after surgery in a general hospital of Rio Grande do Sul Brasil. Data were collected from April to August 2012. Patients included in the study were diagnosed as confused after application of the Confusion Assessment Method-CAM and possessed age of 71.51 +/- 8.81 years. In the pre-test did not require modifications of the instrument. Upon validation the psychometric properties and internal consistency showed a Cronbach's alpha of 0.88 and reproducibility assessed by the intmraclass coefficient was 0.838. Internal consistency and reproducibility gave IADIC the validity and reliability for use in Brazil.

  15. Electrocardiographic and Blood Pressure Alterations During Electroconvulsive Therapy in Young Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Rumi Demetrio Ortega; Solimene Maria Cecília; Takada Júlio Yoshio; Grupi César José; Giorgi Dante Marcelo; Rigonatti Sérgio Paulo; Luz Protásio Lemos da; Ramires José Antonio Franchini

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE - To study cardiovascular alterations in young patients with no apparent organic disease who underwent electroconvulsive therapy. METHODS - The study comprised 47 healthy patients (22 males and 25 females) with a mean age of 30.3 years, who underwent electroconvulsive therapy. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and continuous electrocardiographic monitoring (Holter monitor) were performed during 24 hours. Blood pressure and heart rate were assessed 4 hours prior to electric shock ...

  16. Alterations in male sexual behaviour, attractiveness and testosterone levels induced by an adult-onset calorie restriction regimen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govic, Antonina; Levay, Elizabeth A; Hazi, Agnes; Penman, Jim; Kent, Stephen; Paolini, Antonio G

    2008-06-26

    Despite an abundance of research on calorie restriction (CR) altering gonadal and appetite regulating hormones, the sexual behavioural consequences of CR remain to be examined systematically. This study compared the sexual behaviour, partner preference, serum testosterone and leptin levels of male adult Hooded Wistar rats administered a CR (continuous 25%, 50% CR or a temporary restriction) with ad libitum fed controls. The temporary restriction (Previous CR) failed to alter sexual behaviour, partner preference and levels of testosterone and leptin. The moderately 25% CR males did not demonstrate an impairment in sexual behaviour but did demonstrate a reduced level of attractiveness to females in one measure of partner preference. Sexual performance was affected by a substantial CR, as the CR 50% group exhibited a longer latency to the first intromission, indicating alteration in sexual arousal. Females also consistently demonstrated a clear preference for the control group compared to the CR 50% group. These findings indicate a possible reduction in the overall reproductive potential of the substantially CR animals. Testosterone levels were equally suppressed by both the 25% and 50% CR, while leptin levels were only reduced in the CR 50% group. Leptin, rather than testosterone, may have influenced the impairment in sexual behaviour only demonstrated by the substantially CR animals. Testosterone, may, however, play a role in modulating the preference of control over CR males, as attractiveness was totally reduced by a substantial CR, and partially reduced by a moderate restricted regimen.

  17. Altered Topology in Information Processing of a Narrated Story in Older Adults with Mild Cognitive Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yogev-Seligmann, Galit; Oren, Noga; Ash, Elissa L; Hendler, Talma; Giladi, Nir; Lerner, Yulia

    2016-05-03

    The ability to store, integrate, and manipulate information declines with aging. These changes occur earlier, faster, and to a greater degree as a result of neurodegeneration. One of the most common and early characteristics of cognitive decline is difficulty with comprehension of information. The neural mechanisms underlying this breakdown of information processing are poorly understood. Using functional MRI and natural stimuli (e.g., stories), we mapped the neural mechanisms by which the human brain accumulates and processes information with increasing duration and complexity in participants with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) and healthy older adults. To explore the mechanisms of information processing, we measured the reliability of brain responses elicited by listening to different versions of a narrated story created by segmenting the story into words, sentences, and paragraphs and then scrambling the segments. Comparing healthy older adults and participants with aMCI revealed that in both groups, all types of stimuli similarly recruited primary auditory areas. However, prominent differences between groups were found at the level of processing long and complex stimuli. In healthy older adults, parietal and frontal regions demonstrated highly synchronized responses in both the paragraph and full story conditions, as has been previously reported in young adults. Participants with aMCI, however, exhibited a robust functional shift of long time scale processing to the pre- and post-central sulci. Our results suggest that participants with aMCI experienced a functional shift of higher order auditory information processing, possibly reflecting a functional response to concurrent or impending neuronal or synaptic loss. This observation might assist in understanding mechanisms of cognitive decline in aMCI.

  18. Repeated exposure of adult rats to transient oxidative stress induces various long-lasting alterations in cognitive and behavioral functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshio Iguchi

    Full Text Available Exposure of neonates to oxidative stress may increase the risk of psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia in adulthood. However, the effects of moderate oxidative stress on the adult brain are not completely understood. To address this issue, we systemically administrated 2-cyclohexen-1-one (CHX to adult rats to transiently reduce glutathione levels. Repeated administration of CHX did not affect the acquisition or motivation of an appetitive instrumental behavior (lever pressing rewarded by a food outcome under a progressive ratio schedule. In addition, response discrimination and reversal learning were not affected. However, acute CHX administration blunted the sensitivity of the instrumental performance to outcome devaluation, and this effect was prolonged in rats with a history of repeated CHX exposure, representing pro-depression-like phenotypes. On the other hand, repeated CHX administration reduced immobility in forced swimming tests and blunted acute cocaine-induced behaviors, implicating antidepressant-like effects. Multivariate analyses segregated a characteristic group of behavioral variables influenced by repeated CHX administration. Taken together, these findings suggest that repeated administration of CHX to adult rats did not cause a specific mental disorder, but it induced long-term alterations in behavioral and cognitive functions, possibly related to specific neural correlates.

  19. Plasticity Induced by Intermittent Theta Burst Stimulation in Bilateral Motor Cortices Is Not Altered in Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daina S. E. Dickins

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have reported that plasticity induced in the motor cortex by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS is attenuated in older adults. Those investigations, however, have focused solely on the stimulated hemisphere. Compared to young adults, older adults exhibit more widespread activity across bilateral motor cortices during the performance of unilateral motor tasks, suggesting that the manifestation of plasticity might also be altered. To address this question, twenty young (65 years underwent intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS whilst attending to the hand targeted by the plasticity-inducing procedure. The amplitude of motor evoked potentials (MEPs elicited by single pulse TMS was used to quantify cortical excitability before and after iTBS. Individual responses to iTBS were highly variable, with half the participants showing an unexpected decrease in cortical excitability. Contrary to predictions, however, there were no age-related differences in the magnitude or manifestation of plasticity across bilateral motor cortices. The findings suggest that advancing age does not influence the capacity for, or manifestation of, plasticity induced by iTBS.

  20. Plasticity Induced by Intermittent Theta Burst Stimulation in Bilateral Motor Cortices Is Not Altered in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickins, Daina S E; Sale, Martin V; Kamke, Marc R

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have reported that plasticity induced in the motor cortex by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is attenuated in older adults. Those investigations, however, have focused solely on the stimulated hemisphere. Compared to young adults, older adults exhibit more widespread activity across bilateral motor cortices during the performance of unilateral motor tasks, suggesting that the manifestation of plasticity might also be altered. To address this question, twenty young (65 years) underwent intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS) whilst attending to the hand targeted by the plasticity-inducing procedure. The amplitude of motor evoked potentials (MEPs) elicited by single pulse TMS was used to quantify cortical excitability before and after iTBS. Individual responses to iTBS were highly variable, with half the participants showing an unexpected decrease in cortical excitability. Contrary to predictions, however, there were no age-related differences in the magnitude or manifestation of plasticity across bilateral motor cortices. The findings suggest that advancing age does not influence the capacity for, or manifestation of, plasticity induced by iTBS.

  1. Anti-Nogo-A Immunotherapy Does Not Alter Hippocampal Neurogenesis after Stroke in Adult Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Daniel J.; Tsai, Shih-Yen; O'Brien, Timothy E.; Farrer, Robert G.; Kartje, Gwendolyn L.

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is a leading cause of adult disability, including cognitive impairment. Our laboratory has previously shown that treatment with function-blocking antibodies against the neurite growth inhibitory protein Nogo-A promotes functional recovery after stroke in adult and aged rats, including enhancing spatial memory performance, for which the hippocampus is critically important. Since spatial memory has been linked to hippocampal neurogenesis, we investigated whether anti-Nogo-A treatment increases hippocampal neurogenesis after stroke. Adult rats were subject to permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion followed 1 week later by 2 weeks of antibody treatment. Cellular proliferation in the dentate gyrus was quantified at the end of treatment, and the number of newborn neurons was determined at 8 weeks post-stroke. Treatment with both anti-Nogo-A and control antibodies stimulated the accumulation of new microglia/macrophages in the dentate granule cell layer, but neither treatment increased cellular proliferation or the number of newborn neurons above stroke-only levels. These results suggest that anti-Nogo-A immunotherapy does not increase post-stroke hippocampal neurogenesis. PMID:27803646

  2. In utero programming alters adult response to chronic mild stress: part 3 of a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Stephanie L; Mileva, Guergana; Huta, Veronika; Bielajew, Catherine

    2014-11-07

    Exposure to stress before birth may lay the foundation for the development of sensitivities or protection from psychiatric disorders while later stress exposure may trigger either their expression or suppression. This report, part three of a longitudinal study conducted in our laboratory, aimed to examine the interaction between early and adult stress and their effects on measures of anxiety and depression. In parts one and two, we reported the effects of gestational stress (GS) in Long Evans rat dams and their juvenile and young adult offspring. In this third and final installment, we evaluated the effects of GS and chronic mild stress (CMS) in the adult female offspring at 6 month and 12 month time-points. The two by two design included a combination of GS and CMS and the appropriate control groups. Using Hierarchical Linear Modeling, main effects of GS on corticosterone level at the 12 month time-point was found while main effects of CMS were seen in body weight, sucrose preference, and corticosterone, and significant interactions between group at the 6 and 12 month time-points. The GS group had the lowest sucrose preference during CMS at 6 months supporting a cumulative effect of early and later life stress. The GS/CMS group showed lower corticosterone at 12 months than the GS/noCMS group indicating a possible mismatch between prenatal programming and later life stress. These results highlight the importance of early life factors in exerting potentially protective effects in models involving later life stress.

  3. Pioglitazone in adult rats reverses immediate postnatal overfeeding-induced metabolic, hormonal, and inflammatory alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boullu-Ciocca, S; Tassistro, V; Dutour, A; Grino, M

    2015-12-01

    Immediate postnatal overfeeding in rats, obtained by reducing the litter size, results in early-onset obesity. Such experimental paradigm programs overweight, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, increased adipose glucocorticoid metabolism [up-regulation of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1)], and overexpression of proinflammatory cytokines in mesenteric adipose tissue (MAT) in adulthood. We studied the effects of pioglitazone, a PPARγ agonist, treatment on the above-mentioned overfeeding-induced alterations. Nine-month-old rats normofed or overfed during the immediate postnatal period were given pioglitazone (3 mg/kg/day) for 6 weeks. Pioglitazone stimulated weight gain and induced a redistribution of adipose tissue toward epididymal location with enhanced plasma adiponectin. Treatment normalized postnatal overfeeding-induced metabolic alterations (increased fasting insulinemia and free fatty acids) and mesenteric overexpression of GR, 11β-HSD11, CD 68, and proinflammatory cytokines mRNAs, including plasminogen-activator inhibitor type 1. Mesenteric GR mRNA levels correlated positively with mesenteric proinflammatory cytokines mRNA concentrations. In vitro incubation of MAT obtained from overfed rats demonstrated that pioglitazone induced a down-regulation of GR gene expression and normalized glucocorticoid-induced stimulation of 11β-HSD1 and plasminogen-activator inhibitor type 1 mRNAs. Our data show for the first time that the metabolic, endocrine, and inflammatory alterations induced by early-onset postnatal obesity can be reversed by pioglitazone at the adulthood. They demonstrate that pioglitazone, in addition to its well-established effect on adipose tissue redistribution and adiponectin secretion, reverses programing-induced adipose GR, 11β-HSD1, and proinflammatory cytokines overexpression, possibly through a GR-dependent mechanism.

  4. Adolescent methylphenidate treatment differentially alters adult impulsivity and hyperactivity in the Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat model of ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somkuwar, S S; Kantak, K M; Bardo, M T; Dwoskin, L P

    2016-02-01

    Impulsivity and hyperactivity are two facets of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Impulsivity is expressed as reduced response inhibition capacity, an executive control mechanism that prevents premature execution of an intermittently reinforced behavior. During methylphenidate treatment, impulsivity and hyperactivity are decreased in adolescents with ADHD, but there is little information concerning levels of impulsivity and hyperactivity in adulthood after adolescent methylphenidate treatment is discontinued. The current study evaluated impulsivity, hyperactivity as well as cocaine sensitization during adulthood after adolescent methylphenidate treatment was discontinued in the Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat (SHR) model of ADHD. Treatments consisted of oral methylphenidate (1.5mg/kg) or water vehicle provided Monday-Friday from postnatal days 28-55. During adulthood, impulsivity was measured in SHR and control strains (Wistar Kyoto and Wistar rats) using differential reinforcement of low rate (DRL) schedules. Locomotor activity and cocaine sensitization were measured using the open-field assay. Adult SHR exhibited decreased efficiency of reinforcement under the DRL30 schedule and greater levels of locomotor activity and cocaine sensitization compared to control strains. Compared to vehicle, methylphenidate treatment during adolescence reduced hyperactivity in adult SHR, maintained the lower efficiency of reinforcement, and increased burst responding under DRL30. Cocaine sensitization was not altered following adolescent methylphenidate in adult SHR. In conclusion, adolescent treatment with methylphenidate followed by discontinuation in adulthood had a positive benefit by reducing hyperactivity in adult SHR rats; however, increased burst responding under DRL compared to SHR given vehicle, i.e., elevated impulsivity, constituted an adverse consequence associated with increased risk for cocaine abuse liability.

  5. Altered cerebellar functional connectivity with intrinsic connectivity networks in adults with major depressive disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Numerous studies have demonstrated the higher-order functions of the cerebellum, including emotion regulation and cognitive processing, and have indicated that the cerebellum should therefore be included in the pathophysiological models of major depressive disorder. The aim of this study was to compare the resting-state functional connectivity of the cerebellum in adults with major depression and healthy controls. METHODS: Twenty adults with major depression and 20 gender-, age-, and education-matched controls were investigated using seed-based resting-state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging. RESULTS: Compared with the controls, depressed patients showed significantly increased functional connectivity between the cerebellum and the temporal poles. However, significantly reduced cerebellar functional connectivity was observed in the patient group in relation to both the default-mode network, mainly including the ventromedial prefrontal cortex and the posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus, and the executive control network, mainly including the superior frontal cortex and orbitofrontal cortex. Moreover, the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale score was negatively correlated with the functional connectivity between the bilateral Lobule VIIb and the right superior frontal gyrus in depressed patients. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrated increased cerebellar coupling with the temporal poles and reduced coupling with the regions in the default-mode and executive control networks in adults with major depression. These differences between patients and controls could be associated with the emotional disturbances and cognitive control function deficits that accompany major depression. Aberrant cerebellar connectivity during major depression may also imply a substantial role for the cerebellum in the pathophysiological models of depression.

  6. Gestational exposure to diethylstilbestrol alters cardiac structure/function, protein expression and DNA methylation in adult male mice progeny

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haddad, Rami, E-mail: rami.haddad@mail.mcgill.ca [Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, Jewish General Hospital, 3755 chemin Cote Ste Catherine, Montréal, Québec, Canada H3T 1E2 (Canada); Division of Experimental Medicine, Department of Medicine, McGill University, 850 Sherbrooke Street, Montréal, Québec, Canada H3A 1A2 (Canada); Kasneci, Amanda, E-mail: amanda.kasneci@mail.mcgill.ca [Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, Jewish General Hospital, 3755 chemin Cote Ste Catherine, Montréal, Québec, Canada H3T 1E2 (Canada); Mepham, Kathryn, E-mail: katherine.mepham@mail.mcgill.ca [Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, Jewish General Hospital, 3755 chemin Cote Ste Catherine, Montréal, Québec, Canada H3T 1E2 (Canada); Division of Experimental Medicine, Department of Medicine, McGill University, 850 Sherbrooke Street, Montréal, Québec, Canada H3A 1A2 (Canada); Sebag, Igal A., E-mail: igal.sebag@mcgill.ca [Division of Cardiology, Jewish General Hospital, 3755 chemin Cote Ste Catherine, Montréal, Québec, Canada H3T 1E2 (Canada); and others

    2013-01-01

    Pregnant women, and thus their fetuses, are exposed to many endocrine disruptor compounds (EDCs). Fetal cardiomyocytes express sex hormone receptors making them potentially susceptible to re-programming by estrogenizing EDCs. Diethylstilbestrol (DES) is a proto-typical, non-steroidal estrogen. We hypothesized that changes in adult cardiac structure/function after gestational exposure to the test compound DES would be a proof in principle for the possibility of estrogenizing environmental EDCs to also alter the fetal heart. Vehicle (peanut oil) or DES (0.1, 1.0 and 10.0 μg/kg/da.) was orally delivered to pregnant C57bl/6n dams on gestation days 11.5–14.5. At 3 months, male progeny were left sedentary or were swim trained for 4 weeks. Echocardiography of isoflurane anesthetized mice revealed similar cardiac structure/function in all sedentary mice, but evidence of systolic dysfunction and increased diastolic relaxation after swim training at higher DES doses. The calcium homeostasis proteins, SERCA2a, phospholamban, phospho-serine 16 phospholamban and calsequestrin 2, are important for cardiac contraction and relaxation. Immunoblot analyses of ventricle homogenates showed increased expression of SERCA2a and calsequestrin 2 in DES mice and greater molecular remodeling of these proteins and phospho-serine 16 phospholamban in swim trained DES mice. DES increased cardiac DNA methyltransferase 3a expression and DNA methylation in the CpG island within the calsequestrin 2 promoter in heart. Thus, gestational DES epigenetically altered ventricular DNA, altered cardiac function and expression, and reduced the ability of adult progeny to cardiac remodel when physically challenged. We conclude that gestational exposure to estrogenizing EDCs may impact cardiac structure/function in adult males. -- Highlights: ► Gestational DES changes cardiac SERCA2a and CASQ2 expression. ► Echocardiography identified systolic dysfunction and increased diastolic relaxation. ► DES

  7. Associations between television viewing and physical activity and low back pain in community-based adults: A cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Sultana Monira; Urquhart, Donna M; Wang, Yuanyuan; Dunstan, David; Shaw, Jonathan E; Magliano, Dianna J; Wluka, Anita E; Cicuttini, Flavia M

    2016-06-01

    Two systematic reviews concluded that there was limited evidence to support an association between physical activity and sedentary behavior and developing low back pain (LBP). The aim of this study was to examine the associations of physical activity and television viewing time with LBP intensity and disability in community-based adults.Five thousand fifty-eight participants (44% men) of the Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle Study had physical activity and television viewing time measured in 1999 to 2000, 2004 to 2005, and 2011 to 2012, and LBP intensity and disability assessed in 2013 to 2014 using the Chronic Pain Grade Questionnaire. Multinomial logistic regressions were used to estimate the odds ratio for LBP intensity and disability associated with physical activity and television viewing time. Analyses were adjusted for age, education, smoking, dietary guideline index score, body mass index, and mental component summary score. To test whether associations of physical activity or television viewing time with LBP intensity and disability were modified by sex, obesity, or age, interactions were tested using the likelihood ratio test.As gender modified the associations between physical activity and television viewing time and LBP disability (P = 0.05), men and women were examined separately. A total of 81.7% men and 82.1% women had LBP. Most men (63.6%) and women (60.2%) had low intensity LBP with fewer having high intensity LBP (18.1% men, 21.5% women). Most participants had no LBP disability (74.5% men, 71.8% women) with the remainder reporting low (15.8% men, 15.3% women) or high (9.7% men, 12.9% women) LBP disability. Insufficient physical activity (television viewing time (≥2 hours/day) was associated with greater prevalence of LBP disability in women (low disability OR 1.35, 95% CI 1.04-1.73; high disability OR 1.29, 95% CI 1.01-1.72).Although it needs to be confirmed in RCTs our findings suggest that targeting time spent watching television

  8. Altered regional homogeneity patterns in adults with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xunheng [School of Biological Science and Medical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China); Key Laboratory of Child Development and Learning Science (Ministry of Education), Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China); Jiao, Yun, E-mail: yunjiao@seu.edu.cn [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Functional Imaging, Department of Radiology, Zhongda Hospital, Medical School of Southeast University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Tang, Tianyu; Wang, Hui; Lu, Zuhong [School of Biological Science and Medical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China); Key Laboratory of Child Development and Learning Science (Ministry of Education), Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China)

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: Investigating the discriminative brain map for patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) based on feature selection and classifier; and identifying patients with ADHD based on the discriminative model. Materials and methods: A dataset of resting state fMRI contains 23 patients with ADHD and 23 healthy subjects were analyzed. Regional homogeneity (ReHo) was extracted from resting state fMRI signals and used as model inputs. Raw ReHo features were ranked and selected in a loop according to their p values. Selected features were trained and tested by support vector machines (SVM) in a cross validation procedure. Cross validation was repeated in feature selection loop to produce optimized model. Results: Optimized discriminative map indicated that the ADHD brains exhibit more increased activities than normal controls in bilateral occipital lobes and left front lobe. The altered brain regions included portions of basal ganglia, insula, precuneus, anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), thalamus, and cerebellum. Correlation coefficients indicated significant positive correlation of inattentive scores with bilateral cuneus and precuneus, and significant negative correlation of hyperactive/impulsive scores with bilateral insula and claustrum. Additionally, the optimized model produced total accuracy of 80% and sensitivity of 87%. Conclusion: ADHD brain regions were more activated than normal controls during resting state. Linear support vector classifier can provide useful discriminative information of altered ReHo patterns for ADHD; and feature selection can improve the performances of classification.

  9. Chronic ketamine produces altered distribution of parvalbumin-positive cells in the hippocampus of adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbagh, Jonathan J; Murtishaw, Andrew S; Bolton, Monica M; Heaney, Chelcie F; Langhardt, Michael; Kinney, Jefferson W

    2013-08-29

    The underlying mechanisms of schizophrenia pathogenesis are not well understood. Increasing evidence supports the glutamatergic hypothesis that posits a hypofunction of the N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor on specific gamma amino-butyric acid (GABA)-ergic neurons may be responsible for the disorder. Alterations in the GABAergic system have been observed in schizophrenia, most notably a change in the expression of parvalbumin (PV) in the cortex and hippocampus. Several reports also suggest abnormal neuronal migration may play a role in the etiology of schizophrenia. The current study examined the positioning and distribution of PV-positive cells in the hippocampus following chronic treatment with the NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine. A robust increase was found in the number of PV-positive interneurons located outside the stratum oriens (SO), the layer where most of these cells are normally localized, as well as an overall numerical increase in CA3 PV cells. These results suggest ketamine leads to an abnormal distribution of PV-positive cells, which may be indicative of aberrant migratory activity and possibly related to the Morris water maze deficits observed. These findings may also be relevant to alterations observed in schizophrenia populations.

  10. Electrocardiographic and Blood Pressure Alterations During Electroconvulsive Therapy in Young Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rumi Demetrio Ortega

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE - To study cardiovascular alterations in young patients with no apparent organic disease who underwent electroconvulsive therapy. METHODS - The study comprised 47 healthy patients (22 males and 25 females with a mean age of 30.3 years, who underwent electroconvulsive therapy. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and continuous electrocardiographic monitoring (Holter monitor were performed during 24 hours. Blood pressure and heart rate were assessed 4 hours prior to electric shock administration, during electric shock administration, and 3 hours after electric shock administration. Arrhythmias and alterations in the ST segment in 24 hours were recorded. RESULTS - On electroconvulsive therapy, a significant increase in blood pressure and heart rate was observed and the measurements returned to basal values after 25 minutes. Three females had tracings with depression of the ST segment suggesting myocardial ischemia prior to and after electroconvulsive therapy. Coronary angiography was normal. No severe cardiac arrhythmias were diagnosed. CONCLUSION - 1 Electroconvulsive therapy is a safe therapeutic modality in psychiatry; 2 it causes a significant increase in blood pressure and heart rate; 3 it may be associated with myocardial ischemia in the absence of coronary obstructive disease; 4 electroconvulsive therapy was not associated with the occurrence of severe cardiac arrhythmias.

  11. Neuromuscular alterations in the dilated ileum of an adult patient with segmental lymphangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paggi, Silvia; Ferrero, Stefano; Braidotti, Paola; de Rai, Paolo; Conte, Dario; Basilisco, Guido

    2008-09-01

    Intestinal lymphangiectasia is a rare condition, which is characterized by the dilation of small bowel lymphatics and presents with signs and symptoms of protein-losing enteropathy. Some patients have complained of occlusive symptoms attributable to the mechanical obstruction caused by the considerable mucosal edema associated with the lymphatic dilation. On the basis of the hypothesis that alterations in the neuromuscular structures controlling clearance function or gut tone may play a role in ileal dilation, we examined the resected ileum of a 48-year-old male patient with segmental lymphangiectasia histologically, immunohistochemically (for S100 protein, PGP 9.5, Bcl-2, neuron-specific enolase, neurofilaments, synaptophysin, and CD117/C-kit), and by means of electron microscopy. Histology showed pseudocystic dilation of the mucosal, submucosal, and muscular lymphatics with fragmentation of the circular and longitudinal muscle layers. Hardly any neural expression of synaptophysin was observed, but the neural structures were otherwise morphologically normal and reacted normally to the other neural markers. This case shows that neuromuscular alterations can be found in the dilated ileum of patients with segmental lymphangiectasia.

  12. Altered Episodic Memory in Introverted Young Adults Carrying the BDNFMet Allele

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bombardier, Andreanne; Beauchemin, Maude; Gosselin, Nadia; Poirier, Judes; De Beaumont, Louis

    2016-01-01

    While most studies have been interested in the distinct, predisposing roles of the common BDNF Val66Met variant and extraversion personality traits on episodic memory, very few studies have looked at the synergistic effects of genetic and personality factors to account for cognitive variance. This is surprising considering recent reports challenging the long-held belief that the BDNFMet variant negatively impacts cognitive function. A total of 75 young healthy adults (26 of them carried at least one copy of the BDNFMet allele) took part in this study consisting of genetic profiling from saliva, personality assessment using the Revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO PI-R) and a short battery of neuropsychological tests. An ANOVA revealed that BDNFMet carriers were significantly less extraverted than BDNFVal carriers (F1,73 = 9.54; p < 0.01; ηp2 = 0.126). Moreover, extraversion was found to significantly moderate the relationship between the BDNF genotype and episodic memory performance (p = 0.03). Subsequent correlational analyses yielded a strong and significant correlation (r = 0.542; p < 0.005) between introversion and delayed episodic memory specific to BDNFMet individuals. The present study suggests that introversion and the BDNFMet variant synergistically interact to reduce episodic memory performance in healthy, young adults. These findings reaffirm that a more accurate explanation of cognitive variance can be achieved by looking at the synergistic effects of genotype and phenotype factors. PMID:27845759

  13. Imipramine reverses alterations in cytokines and BDNF levels induced by maternal deprivation in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Réus, Gislaine Z; Dos Santos, Maria Augusta B; Abelaira, Helena M; Ribeiro, Karine F; Petronilho, Fabrícia; Vuolo, Francieli; Colpo, Gabriela D; Pfaffenseller, Bianca; Kapczinski, Flávio; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Quevedo, João

    2013-04-01

    A growing body of evidence is pointing toward an association between immune molecules, as well brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and the depression. The present study was aimed to evaluate the behavioral and molecular effects of the antidepressant imipramine in maternally deprived adult rats. To this aim, maternally deprived and non-deprived (control group) male rats were treated with imipramine (30mg/kg) once a day for 14 days during their adult phase. Their behavior was then assessed using the forced swimming test. In addition to this, IL-10, TNF-α and IL-1β cytokines were assessed in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). In addition, BDNF protein levels were assessed in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and amygdala. In deprived rats treated with saline was observed an increase on immobility time, compared with non-deprived rats treated with imipramine (pimipramine treatment reversed the effects of maternal deprivation on BDNF and cytokines levels (pimipramine, it is suggested that classic antidepressants could exert their effects by modulating the immune system.

  14. Altered engagement of autobiographical memory networks in adult offspring of postnatally depressed mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, Birthe; Murray, Lynne; Moutsiana, Christina; Fearon, Pasco; Cooper, Peter J; Halligan, Sarah L; Johnstone, Tom

    2016-07-01

    Maternal depression is associated with increased risk for offspring mood and anxiety disorders. One possible impact of maternal depression during offspring development is on the emotional autobiographical memory system. We investigated the neural mechanisms of emotional autobiographical memory in adult offspring of mothers with postnatal depression (N=16) compared to controls (N=21). During fMRI, recordings of participants describing one pleasant and one unpleasant situation with their mother and with a companion, were used as prompts to re-live the situations. Compared to controls we predicted the PND offspring would show: greater activation in medial and posterior brain regions implicated in autobiographical memory and rumination; and decreased activation in lateral prefrontal cortex and decreased connectivity between lateral prefrontal and posterior regions, reflecting reduced control of autobiographical recall. For negative situations, we found no group differences. For positive situations with their mothers, PND offspring showed higher activation than controls in left lateral prefrontal cortex, right frontal pole, cingulate cortex and precuneus, and lower connectivity of right middle frontal gyrus, left middle temporal gyrus, thalamus and lingual gyrus with the posterior cingulate. Our results are consistent with adult offspring of PND mothers having less efficient prefrontal regulation of personally relevant pleasant autobiographical memories.

  15. Altered Episodic Memory in Introverted Young Adults Carrying the BDNFMet Allele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreanne Bombardier

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available While most studies have been interested in the distinct, predisposing roles of the common BDNF Val66Met variant and extraversion personality traits on episodic memory, very few studies have looked at the synergistic effects of genetic and personality factors to account for cognitive variance. This is surprising considering recent reports challenging the long-held belief that the BDNFMet variant negatively impacts cognitive function. A total of 75 young healthy adults (26 of them carried at least one copy of the BDNFMet allele took part in this study consisting of genetic profiling from saliva, personality assessment using the Revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO PI-R and a short battery of neuropsychological tests. An ANOVA revealed that BDNFMet carriers were significantly less extraverted than BDNFVal carriers (F1,73 = 9.54; p < 0.01; ηp2 = 0.126. Moreover, extraversion was found to significantly moderate the relationship between the BDNF genotype and episodic memory performance (p = 0.03. Subsequent correlational analyses yielded a strong and significant correlation (r = 0.542; p < 0.005 between introversion and delayed episodic memory specific to BDNFMet individuals. The present study suggests that introversion and the BDNFMet variant synergistically interact to reduce episodic memory performance in healthy, young adults. These findings reaffirm that a more accurate explanation of cognitive variance can be achieved by looking at the synergistic effects of genotype and phenotype factors.

  16. Potential use of {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT to visualize hypermetabolism associated with muscle pain in patients with adult spinal deformity: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taniguchi, Yuki [The University of Tokyo Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Takahashi, Miwako; Momose, Toshimitsu [The University of Tokyo, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Matsudaira, Ko; Oka, Hiroyuki [The University of Tokyo, Department of Medical Research and Management for Musculoskeletal Pain, 22nd Century Medical and Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)

    2016-11-15

    Patients with adult spinal deformity (ASD) are surgically treated for pain relief; however, visualization of the exact origin of the pain with imaging modalities is still challenging. We report the first case of a 60-year-old female patient who presented with painful degenerative kyphoscoliosis and was evaluated with flourine-18-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT) preoperatively. Because her low back pain was resistant to conservative treatment, she was treated with posterior spinal correction and fusion surgery from Th2 to the ilium. One year after the surgery, her low back pain had disappeared completely. In accordance with her clinical course, {sup 18}F-FDG-PET imaging revealed the uptake of {sup 18}F-FDG in the paravertebral muscles preoperatively and showed the complete absence of uptake at 1 year after surgery. The uptake site coincided with the convex part of each curve of the lumbar spine and was thought to be the result of the increased activity of paravertebral muscles due to their chronic stretched state in the kyphotic posture. This case report suggests the possibility of using {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT to visualize increased activity in paravertebral muscles and the ensuing pain in ASD patients. (orig.)

  17. Electroconvulsive Stimulation, but not Chronic Restraint Stress, Causes Structural Alterations in Adult Rat Hippocampus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Mikkel V.; Wörtwein, Gitta; Pakkenberg, Bente

    2015-01-01

    The neurobiological mechanisms underlying depression are not fully understood. Only a few previous studies have used validated stereological methods to test how stress and animal paradigms of depression affect adult hippocampal neurogenesis and whether antidepressant therapy can counteract possible...... changes in an animal model. Thus, in this study we applied methods that are state of the art in regard to stereological cell counting methods. Using a validated rat model of depression in combination with a clinically relevant schedule of electroconvulsive stimulation, we estimated the total number...... induces depression-like behavior, without significantly changing neurogenesis, the total number of neurons or the volume of the hippocampus. Further, electroconvulsive stimulation prevents stress-induced depression-like behavior and increases neurogenesis. The total number of neurons and the granule cell...

  18. Dietary Mannoheptulose Does Not Significantly Alter Daily Energy Expenditure in Adult Labrador Retrievers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie L McKnight

    Full Text Available Mannoheptulose (MH, a sugar found in avocados that inhibits glycolysis in vitro, has been preliminarily investigated as a novel food ingredient for dogs. This study aimed to determine the effects of dietary MH, delivered as an extract of un-ripened avocado, on energy expenditure (EE in healthy adult Labrador Retriever dogs (total of 12 dogs, 26.99 ± 0.634 kg, 4.9 ± 0.2 y. The study was a double-blind, cross-over with each dog receiving both dietary treatments, control (CON and MH (400 mg/kg of diet; 6 mg/kg BW, in random order. Resting and post-prandial (10 h EE and respiratory quotient (RQ were determined by indirect calorimetry (d 42. The following day, body composition was assessed using dual X-ray absorptiometry. Continuous activity monitoring was conducted using an Atical® accelerometer (d 43-47. A vastus lateralis muscle biopsy was obtained prior to the morning meal (d 49 and 4 h after consumption of their meal (d 56 to determine the protein content and phosphorylation of 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK. Diet did not affect body weight, resting EE or skeletal muscle AMPK phosphorylation. Dogs fed MH had significantly lower post-prandial RQ (p = 0.02 and ratio of fat to lean body mass (p = 0.02. Physical activity during light time periods (but not dark was lower in dogs fed MH (p < 0.05 during weekends, but not on weekdays. These results suggest that MH affects energy balance of adult dogs, but that these effects are not dose dependent and not due to physical activity.

  19. Prenatal inflammation-induced hypoferremia alters dopamine function in the adult offspring in rat: relevance for schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Argel Aguilar-Valles

    Full Text Available Maternal infection during pregnancy has been associated with increased incidence of schizophrenia in the adult offspring. Mechanistically, this has been partially attributed to neurodevelopmental disruption of the dopamine neurons, as a consequence of exacerbated maternal immunity. In the present study we sought to target hypoferremia, a cytokine-induced reduction of serum non-heme iron, which is common to all types of infections. Adequate iron supply to the fetus is fundamental for the development of the mesencephalic dopamine neurons and disruption of this following maternal infection can affect the offspring's dopamine function. Using a rat model of localized injury induced by turpentine, which triggers the innate immune response and inflammation, we investigated the effects of maternal iron supplementation on the offspring's dopamine function by assessing behavioral responses to acute and repeated administration of the dopamine indirect agonist, amphetamine. In addition we measured protein levels of tyrosine hydroxylase, and tissue levels of dopamine and its metabolites, in ventral tegmental area, susbtantia nigra, nucleus accumbens, dorsal striatum and medial prefrontal cortex. Offspring of turpentine-treated mothers exhibited greater responses to a single amphetamine injection and enhanced behavioral sensitization following repeated exposure to this drug, when compared to control offspring. These behavioral changes were accompanied by increased baseline levels of tyrosine hydroxylase, dopamine and its metabolites, selectively in the nucleus accumbens. Both, the behavioral and neurochemical changes were prevented by maternal iron supplementation. Localized prenatal inflammation induced a deregulation in iron homeostasis, which resulted in fundamental alterations in dopamine function and behavioral alterations in the adult offspring. These changes are characteristic of schizophrenia symptoms in humans.

  20. The Effects of Two-Week Swimming Training on Neuropathic Pain Induced by Chronic Constriction Injury and the Expression of GAD65 in Adult Male Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Farzad

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective: Unknown mechanisms are involved in neuropathic pain. Among the non-pharmacological treatments, it seems that physical activity improves neuropathic pain. However, the possible reasons for the effectiveness of regular physical activity on neuropathic pain are unknown. Therefore, the present study was performed to determine the effects of two-week swimming training on the expression of GAD65 enzyme and P2X3 receptor in Chronic Constriction Injury (CCI of the sciatic nerve. Materials & Methods: 40Wistar adult rats were divided into five groups randomly: 1 CCI neuropathic pain with swimming training (CCIST2; 2 CCI neuropathic pain without swimming training (CCI; 3 No CCI neuropathic pain with swimming training (ST2; No CCI neuropathic pain without swimming training (control group; 5 CCI sham surgery (Sham CCI. CCI and CCIST2 groups underwent peripheral nerve injury by four loose ligatures around sciatic nerve. Swimming program included two weeks with five sessions per week, and 30-60 min per session. The protein expressions of GAD65 enzyme and P2X3 receptor were evaluated by western blotting technique. Results: CCI surgery decreased the expression of GAD65, but two weeks swimming training increased expression of GAD65 comparing to CCI and Sham CCI groups (P≤0.001, but P2X3 receptor expression were not significantly different among groups in lumbar segment of rats (P>0.05. Conclusion: Totally, our findings showed that two-week swimming training improves neuropathic pain possibly through maintenance of inhibitory neurons and subsequently increased GAD65, which converts glutamate excitatory neurotransmitter to GABA inhibitory neurotransmitter.

  1. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use in the US Adult Low Back Pain Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghildayal, Neha; Johnson, Pamela Jo; Evans, Roni L; Kreitzer, Mary Jo

    2016-01-01

    背景:许多有腰背痛 (Low Back Pain, LBP) 的人都发现常规药物治疗不足以管理其腰背痛,并越来越多地转向补充和替代医学 (Complementary and Alternative Medicine, CAM) 来疼痛缓解。需要全面描绘 CAM 在 LBP 人群中的使用情况,包括所有最常用的方式。研究目标:通过限制性与非限制性 LBP 考察在美国 LBP 人群中使用 CAM 的普遍性和感知利益,同时评估去年在 LBP 人群中使用 CAM 的几率。方法:数据来自于 2012 年国家健康访谈调查,替代健康补充。我们考察了美国成人 LBP 患者的全国代表性样本(N=9665,未加权)。使用多次逻辑回归估计去年使用 CAM的几率。结果:总体而言,41.2% 的 LBP 人群去年使用了 CAM,其中在限制性 LBP 患者中报告的使用率较高。LBP人群中使用最多的疗法包括草药补充剂、整脊疗法和按摩。多数 LBP人群使用了专用于治疗背痛的 CAM,在使用 CAM 治疗背痛者中,58.1% 感觉受益匪浅。结论:结果表明,CAM 正成为 LBP病患护理越来越重要的组成部分。进一步了解 CAM 在 LBP 人群中的使用方式将帮助卫生保健专业人员作出更加知情的护理决定,并指导研究者发展未来的背痛相关 CAM 研究。.

  2. Botulinum toxin assessment, intervention and aftercare for paediatric and adult niche indications including pain: international consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawicki, B; Sheean, G; Fung, V S C; Goldsmith, S; Morgan, C; Novak, I

    2010-08-01

    Evidence is emerging for the use of botulinum neurotoxin type-A (BoNT-A) for niche indications including pain independent of spasticity. Pain indications such as chronic nociceptive back pain, piriformis syndrome, chronic myofascial pain, pelvic pain, complex regional pain syndrome, facial pain and neuropathic pain are outlined in this paper. Of these, class I evidence is available for the treatment of chronic nociceptive low back pain, piriformis syndrome, myofascial pain, facial pain, neuropathic pain and plantar fasciitis. Peri-operative use of BoNT-A is emerging, with indications including planning for surgery and facilitating surgery, as well as healing and improving analgesia post-operatively. Evidence is limited, although there are some reports that clinicians are successfully using BoNT-A peri-operatively. There is class I evidence showing pre-operative use of BoNT-A has a beneficial effect on outcomes following adductor-release surgery. The use of BoNT for treatment of tremor, other than neck tremor in the setting of cervical dystonia, including evidence for upper limb tremor, cranial tremor and non-dystonic neck tremor is reviewed. The evidence is variable at this stage, and further study is required to develop definitive recommendations for the clinical utility of BoNT-A for these indications.

  3. Beyond pleasure and pain: Facial expression ambiguity in adults and children during intense situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzler, Sofia; Levine, Sarah; van Dick, Rolf; Oertel-Knöchel, Viola; Aviezer, Hillel

    2016-09-01

    According to psychological models as well as common intuition, intense positive and negative situations evoke highly distinct emotional expressions. Nevertheless, recent work has shown that when judging isolated faces, the affective valence of winning and losing professional tennis players is hard to differentiate. However, expressions produced by professional athletes during publicly broadcasted sports events may be strategically controlled. To shed light on this matter we examined if ordinary people's spontaneous facial expressions evoked during highly intense situations are diagnostic for the situational valence. In Experiment 1 we compared reactions with highly intense positive situations (surprise soldier reunions) versus highly intense negative situations (terror attacks). In Experiment 2, we turned to children and compared facial reactions with highly positive situations (e.g., a child receiving a surprise trip to Disneyland) versus highly negative situations (e.g., a child discovering her parents ate up all her Halloween candy). The results demonstrate that facial expressions of both adults and children are often not diagnostic for the valence of the situation. These findings demonstrate the ambiguity of extreme facial expressions and highlight the importance of context in everyday emotion perception. (PsycINFO Database Record

  4. Shoulder function, pain and health related quality of life in adults with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome-hypermobility type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Elise Christine; Reiten, Helle Sundnes; Løvaas, Helene

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate shoulder function, pain and Health-Related Quality of life (HRQoL) among adults with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome-hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT), compared with the general population (controls). Method In a cross-sectional study using postal survey......). Results Eighty-one individuals responded, with response rate 34% (JHS/EDS-HT: 53%, controls: 21%). JHS/EDS-HT had lower shoulder function (WOSI total: 49.9 versus 83.3; p ..., 110 patients diagnosed with JHS/EDS-HT and 140 gender- and age-matched healthy controls from Statistics Norway participated. Shoulder function, pain and HRQol were registered by Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index (WOSI), Numerical Rating Scale (NRS), pain drawings, 36-item Short Form (SF-36...

  5. Detrimental psychophysiological effects of early maternal deprivation in adolescent and adult rodents: altered responses to cannabinoid exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco, Eva M; Adriani, Walter; Llorente, Ricardo; Laviola, Giovanni; Viveros, María-Paz

    2009-04-01

    Environmental rearing conditions during the neonatal period are critical for the establishment of neurobiological factors controlling behavior and stress responsiveness. Early maternal deprivation (MD), consisting of a single 24-h maternal deprivation episode during early neonatal life, has been proposed as an animal model for certain psychopathologies including anxiety, depression and schizophrenic-related disorders. Despite first onset of mental disorders usually occur during adolescence, characterization of MD has been mostly developed in adult animals. We review here a series of experiments that were conducted on rats and mice, in which we analyzed the psychoimmunoendocrine outcomes of MD at both adolescence and adulthood. As a whole our results indicate that MD might promote a depressive-like trait that may be present from adolescence to maturity. Maternally deprived adolescent animals also displayed altered locomotor responses, a reduced interest for social investigation and seemed prone for impulsive behavior. Therefore, MD in rodents is further confirmed as a suitable animal model for the study of neuropsychiatric disorders that might become evident during adolescence. Given the increasing consumption of cannabis derivatives among the juvenile population and the reported comorbidity of neuropsychiatric symptoms with cannabis abuse, we also discuss our results indicating altered responses of maternally deprived adolescent animals to cannabinoid compounds.

  6. Altered Intermittent Rhythmic Delta and Theta Activity in the Electroencephalographies of High Functioning Adult Patients with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endres, Dominique; Maier, Simon; Feige, Bernd; Posielski, Nicole A.; Nickel, Kathrin; Ebert, Dieter; Riedel, Andreas; Philipsen, Alexandra; Perlov, Evgeniy; Tebartz van Elst, Ludger

    2017-01-01

    Background: Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is often associated with epilepsy. Previous studies have also shown increased rates of electroencephalographic (EEG) alteration in ASD patients without epilepsy. The aim of this study was to compare the rate of intermittent rhythmic delta and theta activity (IRDA/IRTA) events between high-functioning adult patients with ASD and matched healthy controls. Materials and Methods: Routine EEG records of 19 ASD patients and 19 matched controls were screened for IRDA/IRTA using a fully data driven analysis with fixed thresholds. IRDA/IRTA rates before and after hyperventilation (HV) as well as the HV-induced difference in IRDA/IRTA rates (HV difference) were analyzed. For inter-group measures, we used the Wilcoxon rank sum test. Results: Significantly increased HV difference was detected in the ASD group (p = 0.0497). However, the groups showed no difference in IRDA/IRTA rates before HV (p = 0.564) and after HV (p = 0.163). Conclusions: The lack of any group differences regarding IRDA/IRTA before HV might be related to the fact that we only studied non-secondary high-functioning autism in a small sample of epilepsy-free adult patients. A significantly increased HV difference might be regarded as a marker of subtle neuronal network instability possibly causing short-term disturbances via local area network inhibition and long-term effects via epileptic encephalopathy. PMID:28265243

  7. Combined effects of major depression, pain and somatic disorders on general functioning in the general adult population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baune, Bernhard T; Caniato, Riccardo N; Garcia-Alcaraz, Miguel A; Berger, Klaus

    2008-08-31

    This study was carried out to assess the prevalence of major depressive disorder (MDD) in persons suffering from pain symptoms in various locations, both with and without comorbid somatic disorders and to analyze the single and combined effects of MDD, pain symptoms and somatic disorders on general functioning in the community. The 12-month prevalence of MDD, somatic disorders and pain symptoms, grouped according to location, were determined among 4181 participants from a community sample. Depression was assessed utilising the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Pain symptoms were self-reported by participants whereas medical diagnoses were validated by medical examinations. General functioning was evaluated utilising the established MOS-SF-36 scale. The prevalence of MDD was significantly increased for persons with pain in any location. In the absence of a somatic disorder, MDD prevalence was highest in persons with abdominal/chest pain (9.3%) and arm or leg pain (7.9%) and lowest in persons with back pain (6.2%). Mental and physical well-being were lowest for persons with both MDD and a somatic disorder, irrespective of pain locations. Increasing numbers of pain locations impaired mental and physical well-being across all groups, but the effect on mental well-being was most marked in participants with MDD and comorbid somatic disorders. The presence of pain increases risk of associated MDD. The number of pain locations experienced, rather than the specific location of pain, has the greatest impact on general functioning. Not only chronic pain, but pain of any type may be an indicator of MDD and decreased general functioning.

  8. Age-dependent alterations of monocyte subsets and monocyte-related chemokine pathways in healthy adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trautwein Christian

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent experimental approaches have unraveled essential migratory and functional differences of monocyte subpopulations in mice. In order to possibly translate these findings into human physiology and pathophysiology, human monocyte subsets need to be carefully revisited in health and disease. In analogy to murine studies, we hypothesized that human monocyte subsets dynamically change during ageing, potentially influencing their functionality and contributing to immunosenescence. Results Circulating monocyte subsets, surface marker and chemokine receptor expression were analyzed in 181 healthy volunteers (median age 42, range 18-88. Unlike the unaffected total leukocyte or total monocyte counts, non-classical CD14+CD16+ monocytes significantly increased with age, but displayed reduced HLA-DR and CX3CR1 surface expression in the elderly. Classical CD14++CD16- monocyte counts did not vary dependent on age. Serum MCP-1 (CCL2, but not MIP1α (CCL3, MIP1β (CCL4 or fractalkine (CX3CL1 concentrations increased with age. Monocyte-derived macrophages from old or young individuals did not differ with respect to cytokine release in vitro at steady state or upon LPS stimulation. Conclusions Our study demonstrates dynamic changes of circulating monocytes during ageing in humans. The expansion of the non-classical CD14+CD16+ subtype, alterations of surface protein and chemokine receptor expression as well as circulating monocyte-related chemokines possibly contribute to the preserved functionality of the monocyte pool throughout adulthood.

  9. Caffeic acid treatment alters the extracellular adenine nucleotide hydrolysis in platelets and lymphocytes of adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Javed; Spanevello, Roselia Maria; Pimentel, Victor Camera; Gutierres, Jessié; Thomé, Gustavo; Cardoso, Andreia; Zanini, Daniela; Martins, Caroline; Palma, Heloisa Einloft; Bagatini, Margarete Dulce; Baldissarelli, Jucimara; Schmatz, Roberta; Leal, Cláudio Alberto Martins; da Costa, Pauline; Morsch, Vera Maria; Schetinger, Maria Rosa Chitolina

    2013-06-01

    This study evaluated the effects of caffeic acid on ectonucleotidase activities such as NTPDase (nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase), Ecto-NPP (nucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase), 5'-nucleotidase and adenosine deaminase (ADA) in platelets and lymphocytes of rats, as well as in the profile of platelet aggregation. Animals were divided into five groups: I (control); II (oil); III (caffeic acid 10 mg/kg); IV (caffeic acid 50 mg/kg); and V (caffeic acid 100 mg/kg). Animals were treated with caffeic acid diluted in oil for 30 days. In platelets, caffeic acid decreased the ATP hydrolysis and increased ADP hydrolysis in groups III, IV and V when compared to control (P<0.05). The 5'-nucleotidase activity was decreased, while E-NPP and ADA activities were increased in platelets of rats of groups III, IV and V (P<0.05). Caffeic acid reduced significantly the platelet aggregation in the animals of groups III, IV and V in relation to group I (P<0.05). In lymphocytes, the NTPDase and ADA activities were increased in all groups treated with caffeic acid when compared to control (P<0.05). These findings demonstrated that the enzymes were altered in tissues by caffeic acid and this compound decreased the platelet aggregation suggesting that caffeic acid should be considered a potentially therapeutic agent in disorders related to the purinergic system.

  10. Aniracetam does not alter cognitive and affective behavior in adult C57BL/6J mice.

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    Thomas W Elston

    Full Text Available There is a growing community of individuals who self-administer the nootropic aniracetam for its purported cognitive enhancing effects. Aniracetam is believed to be therapeutically useful for enhancing cognition, alleviating anxiety, and treating various neurodegenerative conditions. Physiologically, aniracetam enhances both glutamatergic neurotransmission and long-term potentiation. Previous studies of aniracetam have demonstrated the cognition-restoring effects of acute administration in different models of disease. No previous studies have explored the effects of aniracetam in healthy subjects. We investigated whether daily 50 mg/kg oral administration improves cognitive performance in naïve C57BL/6J mice in a variety of aspects of cognitive behavior. We measured spatial learning in the Morris water maze test; associative learning in the fear conditioning test; motor learning in the accelerating rotarod test; and odor discrimination. We also measured locomotion in the open field test, anxiety through the elevated plus maze test and by measuring time in the center of the open field test. We measured repetitive behavior through the marble burying test. We detected no significant differences between the naive, placebo, and experimental groups across all measures. Despite several studies demonstrating efficacy in impaired subjects, our findings suggest that aniracetam does not alter behavior in normal healthy mice. This study is timely in light of the growing community of healthy humans self-administering nootropic drugs.

  11. Deconstructing Chronic Low Back Pain in the Older Adult-Step by Step Evidence and Expert-Based Recommendations for Evaluation and Treatment: Part VII: Insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramoweth, Adam D; Renqvist, Jenna G; Germain, Anne; Buysse, Daniel J; Gentili, Angela; Kochersberger, Gary; Rodriguez, Eric; Rossi, Michelle I; Weiner, Debra K

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE : To present the seventh in a series of articles designed to deconstruct chronic low back pain (CLBP) in older adults. This article focuses on insomnia and presents a treatment algorithm for managing insomnia in older adults, along with a representative clinical case. METHODS : A modified Delphi process was used to develop the algorithm and supportive materials. A multidisciplinary expert panel representing expertise in health psychology and sleep medicine developed the algorithm and supporting documents that were subsequently refined through an iterative process of input from a primary care provider panel. RESULTS : We present an illustrative clinical case and an algorithm to help guide the care of older adults with insomnia, an important contributor to CLBP and disability. Multicomponent cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBTI) and similar treatments (e.g., brief behavioral treatment for insomnia [BBTI]) are the recommended first-line treatment. Medications should be considered only if BBTI/CBTI is suboptimal or not effective and should be prescribed at the lowest effective dose for short periods of time (Insomnia is commonly comorbid with CLBP in older adults and should be routinely evaluated and treated because it is an important contributor to pain and disability. The algorithm presented was structured to assist primary care providers in planning treatment for older adults with CLBP and insomnia.

  12. Prenatal cocaine alters later responses to morphine in adult male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estelles, Josefina; Rodríguez-Arias, Marta; Maldonado, Concepción; Manzanedo, Carmen; Aguilar, María A; Miñarro, José

    2006-08-30

    Mice prenatally exposed to cocaine (25 mg/kg), physiological saline or non-treated during the last 6 days of pregnancy were evaluated as adults for the rewarding properties of 2 mg/kg of morphine, using the conditioned place preference (CPP) procedure. Likewise, isolated animals underwent a social interaction test with conspecifics after receiving the same morphine dose. Unlike control or animals pre-treated with saline, subjects prenatally treated with cocaine did not develop CPP with this dose of morphine. Only cocaine-exposed animals showed increased threat, avoidance and fleeing during the social encounter. No differences in motor effects of morphine were observed. Analysis of monoamines revealed effects of housing conditions, isolated animals having fewer DOPAC but higher levels of HVA than those grouped, but in both groups there was a decrease in DOPAC in cocaine- and saline-treated mice. Prenatal cocaine exposure decreases the response to the rewarding properties of drugs in mature offspring. They also implicate cocaine consumption during pregnancy could affect the response of offspring to take other drugs of abuse.

  13. Methoxychlor induced biochemical alterations and disruption of spermatogenesis in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aly, Hamdy A A; Azhar, Ahmad S

    2013-09-01

    Adult male albino rats were treated orally with methoxychlor at doses of 0, 50, 100 or 200 mg/kg/day for 15 consecutive days. Testicular weight, sperm count and motility were significantly decreased. Methoxychlor at doses of 100 and 200 mg/kg significantly inhibited α-glucosidase activity, while plasma testosterone was significantly decrease by the three dose levels in a dose-related pattern. Testicular activities of 3β-HSD, 17β-HSD, SDH were significantly decreased, while ACP, ALP (except for 50 mg/kg), and LDH were significantly increased. H2O2 production and LPO were significantly increased while the enzymic (SOD, CAT and GPx) and non-enzymic antioxidants (thiol content) were significantly decreased. Caspase-3 activity was significantly increased in a dose related manner. The findings of this study indicate that methoxychlor induces oxidative stress associated with impairment of spermatogenesis, in addition to apoptosis. These data provide insight into the mode of action of methoxychlor-induced toxicity in the rat testis.

  14. Altered resting-state functional connectivity of the insula in young adults with Internet gaming disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin-Tao; Yao, Yuan-Wei; Li, Chiang-Shan R; Zang, Yu-Feng; Shen, Zi-Jiao; Liu, Lu; Wang, Ling-Jiao; Liu, Ben; Fang, Xiao-Yi

    2016-05-01

    The insula has been implicated in salience processing, craving, and interoception, all of which are critical to the clinical manifestations of drug and behavioral addiction. In this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, we examined resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) of the insula and its association with Internet gaming characteristics in 74 young adults with Internet gaming disorder (IGD) and 41 age- and gender-matched healthy control subjects (HCs). In comparison with HCs, IGD subjects (IGDs) exhibited enhanced rsFC between the anterior insula and a network of regions including anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), putamen, angular gyrus, and precuneous, which are involved in salience, craving, self-monitoring, and attention. IGDs also demonstrated significantly stronger rsFC between the posterior insula and postcentral gyrus, precentral gyrus, supplemental motor area, and superior temporal gyrus (STG), which are involved in interoception, movement control, and auditory processing. Furthermore, IGD severity was positively associated with connectivity between the anterior insula and angular gyrus, and STG, and with connectivity between the posterior insula and STG. Duration of Internet gaming was positively associated with connectivity between the anterior insula and ACC. These findings highlight a key role of the insula in manifestation of the core symptoms of IGD and the importance to examine functional abnormalities of the anterior and posterior insula separately in IGDs.

  15. Functional organization of motor cortex of adult macaque monkeys is altered by sensory loss in infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Hui-Xin; Jain, Neeraj; Collins, Christine E; Lyon, David C; Kaas, Jon H

    2010-02-16

    When somatosensory cortex (S1) is deprived of some of its inputs after section of ascending afferents in the dorsal columns of the spinal cord, it reorganizes to overrepresent the surviving inputs. As somatosensory cortex provides guiding sensory information to motor cortex, such sensory loss and representational reorganization could affect the development of the motor map in primary motor cortex (M1), especially if the sensory loss occurs early in development. To address this possibility, the dorsal columns of the spinal cord were sectioned between cervical levels (C3-5) 3-12 days after birth in five macaque monkeys. After 3-5 years of maturation (young adults), we determined how movements were represented in M1 contralateral to the lesion by using microelectrodes to electrically stimulate sites in M1 to evoke movements. Although the details of the motor maps in these five monkeys varied, the forelimb motor maps were abnormal. The representations of digit movements were reduced and abnormally arranged. Current levels for evoking movements from the forelimb region of M1 were in the normal range, but the lowest mean stimulation thresholds were for wrist or elbow instead of digit movements. Incomplete lesions and bilateral lesions produced fewer abnormalities. The results suggest that the development of normal motor cortex maps in M1 depends on sensory feedback from somatosensory maps.

  16. Sugar overconsumption during adolescence selectively alters motivation and reward function in adult rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro F Vendruscolo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There has been a dramatic escalation in sugar intake in the last few decades, most strikingly observed in the adolescent population. Sugar overconsumption has been associated with several adverse health consequences, including obesity and diabetes. Very little is known, however, about the impact of sugar overconsumption on mental health in general, and on reward-related behavioral disorders in particular. This study examined in rats the effects of unlimited access to sucrose during adolescence on the motivation for natural and pharmacological rewards in adulthood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Adolescent rats had free access to 5% sucrose or water from postnatal day 30 to 46. The control group had access to water only. In adulthood, rats were tested for self-administration of saccharin (sweet, maltodextrin (non-sweet, and cocaine (a potent drug of abuse using fixed- and progressive-ratio schedules, and a concentration-response curve for each substance. Adult rats, exposed or not exposed to sucrose, were tested for saccharin self-administration later in life to verify the specificity of adolescence for the sugar effects. Sugar overconsumption during adolescence, but not during adulthood, reduced the subsequent motivation for saccharin and maltodextrin, but not cocaine. This selective decrease in motivation is more likely due to changes in brain reward processing than changes in gustatory perception. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Sugar overconsumption induces a developmental stage-specific chronic depression in reward processing that may contribute to an increase in the vulnerability to reward-related psychiatric disorders.

  17. Constraining eye movement when redirecting walking trajectories alters turning control in healthy young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradeep Ambati, V N; Murray, Nicholas G; Saucedo, Fabricio; Powell, Douglas W; Reed-Jones, Rebecca J

    2013-05-01

    Humans use a specific steering synergy, where the eyes and head lead rotation to the new direction, when executing a turn or change in direction. Increasing evidence suggests that eye movement is critical for turning control and that when the eyes are constrained, or participants have difficulties making eye movements, steering control is disrupted. The purpose of the current study was to extend previous research regarding eye movements and steering control to a functional walking and turning task. This study investigated eye, head, trunk, and pelvis kinematics of healthy young adults during a 90° redirection of walking trajectory under two visual conditions: Free Gaze (the eyes were allowed to move naturally in the environment), and Fixed Gaze (participants were required to fixate the eyes on a target in front). Results revealed significant differences in eye, head, and trunk coordination between Free Gaze and Fixed Gaze conditions (p segments moved together with no significant differences between segment onset times. In addition, the sequence of segment rotation during Fixed Gaze suggested a bottom-up postural perturbation control strategy in place of top-down steering control seen in Free Gaze. The results of this study support the hypothesis that eye movement is critical for the release of the steering synergy for turning control.

  18. Deconstructing Chronic Low Back Pain in the Older Adult – Step by Step Evidence and Expert-Based Recommendations for Evaluation and Treatment: Part III: Fibromyalgia Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemi, Gita; Fang, Meika A.; Breuer, Paula; Cherniak, Paul E.; Gentili, Angela; Hanlon, Joseph T.; Karp, Jordan F.; Morone, Natalia E.; Rodriguez, Eric; Rossi, Michelle I.; Schmader, Kenneth; Weiner, Debra K.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To present the third in a series of articles designed to deconstruct chronic low back pain (CLBP) in older adults. The series presents CLBP as a syndrome, a final common pathway for the expression of multiple contributors rather than a disease localized exclusively to the lumbosacral spine. Each article addresses one of twelve important contributors to pain and disability in older adults with CLBP. This article focuses on fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). Methods A modified Delphi approach was used to create the evaluation and treatment algorithm, the table discussing the rationale behind each of the algorithm components, and the stepped-care drug recommendations. The team involved in the creation of these materials consisted of a principal investigator, a 5-member content expert panel, and a 9-member primary care panel. The evaluation and treatment recommendations were based on availability of medications and other resources within the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) facilities. However, non-VHA panelists were also involved in the development of these materials, which can be applied to both VA and civilian settings. The illustrative clinical case was taken from the clinical practice of the principal investigator. Results Following expert consultations and a review of the literature, we developed an evaluation and treatment algorithm with supporting materials to aid in the care of older adults with CLBP who have concomitant FMS. A case is presented that demonstrates the complexity of pain evaluation and management in older patients with CLBP and concomitant FMS Conclusions Recognition of FMS as a common contributor to CLBP in older adults and initiating treatment targeting both FMS and CLBP will lead to improved outcomes in pain and disability. PMID:26272644

  19. Adult onset global loss of the fto gene alters body composition and metabolism in the mouse.

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    Fiona McMurray

    Full Text Available The strongest BMI-associated GWAS locus in humans is the FTO gene. Rodent studies demonstrate a role for FTO in energy homeostasis and body composition. The phenotypes observed in loss of expression studies are complex with perinatal lethality, stunted growth from weaning, and significant alterations in body composition. Thus understanding how and where Fto regulates food intake, energy expenditure, and body composition is a challenge. To address this we generated a series of mice with distinct temporal and spatial loss of Fto expression. Global germline loss of Fto resulted in high perinatal lethality and a reduction in body length, fat mass, and lean mass. When ratio corrected for lean mass, mice had a significant increase in energy expenditure, but more appropriate multiple linear regression normalisation showed no difference in energy expenditure. Global deletion of Fto after the in utero and perinatal period, at 6 weeks of age, removed the high lethality of germline loss. However, there was a reduction in weight by 9 weeks, primarily as loss of lean mass. Over the subsequent 10 weeks, weight converged, driven by an increase in fat mass. There was a switch to a lower RER with no overall change in food intake or energy expenditure. To test if the phenotype can be explained by loss of Fto in the mediobasal hypothalamus, we sterotactically injected adeno-associated viral vectors encoding Cre recombinase to cause regional deletion. We observed a small reduction in food intake and weight gain with no effect on energy expenditure or body composition. Thus, although hypothalamic Fto can impact feeding, the effect of loss of Fto on body composition is brought about by its actions at sites elsewhere. Our data suggest that Fto may have a critical role in the control of lean mass, independent of its effect on food intake.

  20. Sensorimotor Oscillations Prior to Speech Onset Reflect Altered Motor Networks in Adults Who Stutter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mersov, Anna-Maria; Jobst, Cecilia; Cheyne, Douglas O.; De Nil, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Adults who stutter (AWS) have demonstrated atypical coordination of motor and sensory regions during speech production. Yet little is known of the speech-motor network in AWS in the brief time window preceding audible speech onset. The purpose of the current study was to characterize neural oscillations in the speech-motor network during preparation for and execution of overt speech production in AWS using magnetoencephalography (MEG). Twelve AWS and 12 age-matched controls were presented with 220 words, each word embedded in a carrier phrase. Controls were presented with the same word list as their matched AWS participant. Neural oscillatory activity was localized using minimum-variance beamforming during two time periods of interest: speech preparation (prior to speech onset) and speech execution (following speech onset). Compared to controls, AWS showed stronger beta (15–25 Hz) suppression in the speech preparation stage, followed by stronger beta synchronization in the bilateral mouth motor cortex. AWS also recruited the right mouth motor cortex significantly earlier in the speech preparation stage compared to controls. Exaggerated motor preparation is discussed in the context of reduced coordination in the speech-motor network of AWS. It is further proposed that exaggerated beta synchronization may reflect a more strongly inhibited motor system that requires a stronger beta suppression to disengage prior to speech initiation. These novel findings highlight critical differences in the speech-motor network of AWS that occur prior to speech onset and emphasize the need to investigate further the speech-motor assembly in the stuttering population. PMID:27642279

  1. Long-term hydrocephalus alters the cytoarchitecture of the adult subventricular zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Ordoñez, Tania; Herranz-Pérez, Vicente; Chaichana, Kaisorn L; Rincon-Torroella, Jordina; Rigamonti, Daniele; García-Verdugo, Jose M; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Gonzalez-Perez, Oscar

    2014-11-01

    Hydrocephalus can develop secondarily to a disturbance in production, flow and/or absorption of cerebrospinal fluid. Experimental models of hydrocephalus, especially subacute and chronic hydrocephalus, are few and limited, and the effects of hydrocephalus on the subventricular zone are unclear. The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of long-term obstructive hydrocephalus on the subventricular zone, which is the neurogenic niche lining the lateral ventricles. We developed a new method to induce hydrocephalus by obstructing the aqueduct of Sylvius in the mouse brain, thus simulating aqueductal stenosis in humans. In 120-day-old rodents (n=18 per group), the degree of ventricular dilatation and cellular composition of the subventricular zone were studied by immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy. In adult patients (age>18years), the sizes of the subventricular zone, corpus callosum, and internal capsule were analyzed by magnetic resonance images obtained from patients with and without aqueductal stenosis (n=25 per group). Mice with 60-day hydrocephalus had a reduced number of Ki67+ and doublecortin+cells on immunofluorescence, as well as decreased number of neural progenitors and neuroblasts in the subventricular zone on electron microscopy analysis as compared to non-hydrocephalic mice. Remarkably, a number of extracellular matrix structures (fractones) contacting the ventricular lumen and blood vessels were also observed around the subventricular zone in mice with hydrocephalus. In humans, the widths of the subventricular zone, corpus callosum, and internal capsule in patients with aqueductal stenosis were significantly smaller than age and gender-matched patients without aqueductal stenosis. In summary, supratentorial hydrocephalus reduces the proliferation rate of neural progenitors and modifies the cytoarchitecture and extracellular matrix compounds of the subventricular zone. In humans, this similar process reduces the subventricular

  2. Sensorimotor oscillations prior to speech onset reflect altered motor networks in adults who stutter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna-Maria Mersov

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Adults who stutter (AWS have demonstrated atypical coordination of motor and sensory regions during speech production. Yet little is known of the speech-motor network in AWS in the brief time window preceding audible speech onset. The purpose of the current study was to characterize neural oscillations in the speech-motor network during preparation for and execution of overt speech production in AWS using magnetoencephalography (MEG. Twelve AWS and twelve age-matched controls were presented with 220 words, each word embedded in a carrier phrase. Controls were presented with the same word list as their matched AWS participant. Neural oscillatory activity was localized using minimum-variance beamforming during two time periods of interest: speech preparation (prior to speech onset and speech execution (following speech onset. Compared to controls, AWS showed stronger beta (15-25Hz suppression in the speech preparation stage, followed by stronger beta synchronization in the bilateral mouth motor cortex. AWS also recruited the right mouth motor cortex significantly earlier in the speech preparation stage compared to controls. Exaggerated motor preparation is discussed in the context of reduced coordination in the speech-motor network of AWS. It is further proposed that exaggerated beta synchronization may reflect a more strongly inhibited motor system that requires a stronger beta suppression to disengage prior to speech initiation. These novel findings highlight critical differences in the speech-motor network of AWS that occur prior to speech onset and emphasize the need to investigate further the speech-motor assembly in the stuttering population.

  3. Intravenous Prenatal Nicotine Exposure Alters METH-Induced Hyperactivity, Conditioned Hyperactivity, and BDNF in Adult Rat Offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacy, Ryan T; Brown, Russell W; Morgan, Amanda J; Mactutus, Charles F; Harrod, Steven B

    2016-01-01

    In the USA, approximately 15% of women smoke tobacco cigarettes during pregnancy. In utero tobacco smoke exposure produces somatic growth deficits like intrauterine growth restriction and low birth weight in offspring, but it can also negatively influence neurodevelopmental outcomes in later stages of life, such as an increased incidence of obesity and drug abuse. Animal models demonstrate that prenatal nicotine (PN) alters the development of the mesocorticolimbic system, which is important for organizing goal-directed behavior. In the present study, we determined whether intravenous (IV) PN altered the initiation and/or expression of methamphetamine (METH)-induced locomotor sensitization as a measure of mesocorticolimbic function in adult rat offspring. We also determined whether PN and/or METH exposure altered protein levels of BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor) in the nucleus accumbens, the dorsal striatum, and the prefrontal cortex of adult offspring. BDNF was of interest because of its role in the development and maintenance of the mesocorticolimbic pathway and its ability to modulate neural processes that contribute to drug abuse, such as sensitization of the dopamine system. Dams were injected with IV nicotine (0.05 mg/kg/injection) or saline, 3×/day on gestational days 8-21. Testing was conducted when offspring reached adulthood (around postnatal day 90). Following 3 once daily habituation sessions the animals received a saline injection and baseline locomotor activity was measured. PN and prenatal saline (PS)-exposed offspring then received 10 once daily injections of METH (0.3 mg/kg) to induce locomotor sensitization. The animals received a METH injection (0.3 mg/kg) to assess the expression of sensitization following a 14-day period of no injections. A day later, all animals were injected with saline and conditioned hyperactivity was assessed. Brain tissue was harvested 24 h later. PN animals habituated more slowly to the activity chambers

  4. Is comorbidity in adolescence a predictor for adult low back pain? A prospective study of a young population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leboeuf-Yde Charlotte

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has previously been shown that low back pain (LBP often presents already in the teenage years and that previous LBP predicts future LBP. It is also well documented that there is a large degree of comorbidity associated with LBP, both in adolescents and adults. The objective of this study is to gain a deeper insight into the etiology of low back pain and to possibly develop a tool for early identification of high-risk groups. This is done by investigating whether different types of morbidity in adolescence are associated with LBP in adulthood. Methods Almost 10,000 Danish twins born between 1972 and 1982 were surveyed by means of postal questionnaires in 1994 and again in 2002. The questionnaires dealt with various aspects of general health, including the prevalence of LBP, classified according to number of days affected during the previous year (0, 1–7, 8–30, >30. The predictor variables used in this study were LBP, headache, asthma and atopic disease at baseline; the outcome variable was persistent LBP (>30 days during the past year at follow-up. Associations between morbidity in 1994 and LBP in 2002 were investigated. Results LBP, headache and asthma in adolescence were positively associated with future LBP. There was no association between atopic disease and future LBP. Individuals with persistent LBP at baseline had an odds ratio of 3.5 (2.8–4.5 for future LBP, while the odds ratio for those with persistent LBP, persistent headache and asthma was 4.5 (2.5–8.1. There was a large degree of clustering of these disorders, but atopic disease was not part of this pattern. Conclusion Young people from 12 to 22 years of age with persistent LBP during the previous year have an odds ratio of 3.5 persistent LBP eight years later. Both headache and asthma are also positively associated with future LBP and there is a large clustering of LBP, headache and asthma in adolescence.

  5. Management of the acute painful crisis in sickle cell disease- a re-evaluation of the use of opioids in adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telfer, Paul; Bahal, Nawal; Lo, Alice; Challands, Joanne

    2014-07-01

    Management of the acute painful crisis (APC) of sickle cell disease (SCD) remains unsatisfactory despite advances in the understanding and management of acute pain in other clinical settings. One reason for this is an unsophisticated approach to the use of opioid analgesics for pain management. This applies to haematologists who are responsible for developing acute sickle pain management protocols for their patients, and to health care staff in the acute care setting. The objective of this article is to evaluate the evidence for use of opioids in APC management. We have highlighted the possibilities for improving management by using alternatives to morphine, and intranasal (IN) or transmucosal routes of administration for rapid onset of analgesia in the emergency department (ED). We suggest how experience gained in managing acute sickle pain in children could be extrapolated to adolescents and young adults. We have also questioned whether patients given strong opioids in the acute setting are being safely monitored and what resources are required to ensure efficacy, safety and patient satisfaction. We also identify aspects of care where there are significant differences of opinion, which require further study by randomized controlled trial.

  6. Prenatal arsenic exposure alters gene expression in the adult liver to a proinflammatory state contributing to accelerated atherosclerosis.

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    J Christopher States

    Full Text Available The mechanisms by which environmental toxicants alter developmental processes predisposing individuals to adult onset chronic disease are not well-understood. Transplacental arsenic exposure promotes atherogenesis in apolipoprotein E-knockout (ApoE(-/- mice. Because the liver plays a central role in atherosclerosis, diabetes and metabolic syndrome, we hypothesized that accelerated atherosclerosis may be linked to altered hepatic development. This hypothesis was tested in ApoE(-/- mice exposed to 49 ppm arsenic in utero from gestational day (GD 8 to term. GD18 hepatic arsenic was 1.2 µg/g in dams and 350 ng/g in fetuses. The hepatic transcriptome was evaluated by microarray analysis to assess mRNA and microRNA abundance in control and exposed pups at postnatal day (PND 1 and PND70. Arsenic exposure altered postnatal developmental trajectory of mRNA and microRNA profiles. We identified an arsenic exposure related 51-gene signature at PND1 and PND70 with several hubs of interaction (Hspa8, IgM and Hnf4a. Gene ontology (GO annotation analyses indicated that pathways for gluconeogenesis and glycolysis were suppressed in exposed pups at PND1, and pathways for protein export, ribosome, antigen processing and presentation, and complement and coagulation cascades were induced by PND70. Promoter analysis of differentially-expressed transcripts identified enriched transcription factor binding sites and clustering to common regulatory sites. SREBP1 binding sites were identified in about 16% of PND70 differentially-expressed genes. Western blot analysis confirmed changes in the liver at PND70 that included increases of heat shock protein 70 (Hspa8 and active SREBP1. Plasma AST and ALT levels were increased at PND70. These results suggest that transplacental arsenic exposure alters developmental programming in fetal liver, leading to an enduring stress and proinflammatory response postnatally that may contribute to early onset of atherosclerosis. Genes

  7. Collaborative Care for Older Adults with low back pain by family medicine physicians and doctors of chiropractic (COCOA: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

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    Goertz Christine M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low back pain is a prevalent and debilitating condition that affects the health and quality of life of older adults. Older people often consult primary care physicians about back pain, with many also receiving concurrent care from complementary and alternative medicine providers, most commonly doctors of chiropractic. However, a collaborative model of treatment coordination between these two provider groups has yet to be tested. The primary aim of the Collaborative Care for Older Adults Clinical Trial is to develop and evaluate the clinical effectiveness and feasibility of a patient-centered, collaborative care model with family medicine physicians and doctors of chiropractic for the treatment of low back pain in older adults. Methods/design This pragmatic, pilot randomized controlled trial will enroll 120 participants, age 65 years or older with subacute or chronic low back pain lasting at least one month, from a community-based sample in the Quad-Cities, Iowa/Illinois, USA. Eligible participants are allocated in a 1:1:1 ratio to receive 12 weeks of medical care, concurrent medical and chiropractic care, or collaborative medical and chiropractic care. Primary outcomes are self-rated back pain and disability. Secondary outcomes include general and functional health status, symptom bothersomeness, expectations for treatment effectiveness and improvement, fear avoidance behaviors, depression, anxiety, satisfaction, medication use and health care utilization. Treatment safety and adverse events also are monitored. Participant-rated outcome measures are collected via self-reported questionnaires and computer-assisted telephone interviews at baseline, and at 4, 8, 12, 24, 36 and 52 weeks post-randomization. Provider-rated expectations for treatment effectiveness and participant improvement also are evaluated. Process outcomes are assessed through qualitative interviews with study participants and research clinicians, chart audits

  8. Thoracic spine pain in the general population: Prevalence, incidence and associated factors in children, adolescents and adults. A systematic review

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    Straker Leon M

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thoracic spine pain (TSP is experienced across the lifespan by healthy individuals and is a common presentation in primary healthcare clinical practice. However, the epidemiological characteristics of TSP are not well documented compared to neck and low back pain. A rigorous evaluation of the prevalence, incidence, correlates and risk factors needs to be undertaken in order for epidemiologic data to be meaningfully used to develop evidence-based prevention and treatment recommendations for TSP. Methods A systematic review method was followed to report the evidence describing prevalence, incidence, associated factors and risk factors for TSP among the general population. Nine electronic databases were systematically searched to identify studies that reported either prevalence, incidence, associated factors (cross-sectional study or risk factors (prospective study for TSP in healthy children, adolescents or adults. Studies were evaluated for level of evidence and method quality. Results Of the 1389 studies identified in the literature, 33 met the inclusion criteria for this systematic review. The mean (SD quality score (out of 15 for the included studies was 10.5 (2.0. TSP prevalence data ranged from 4.0–72.0% (point, 0.5–51.4% (7-day, 1.4–34.8% (1-month, 4.8–7.0% (3-month, 3.5–34.8% (1-year and 15.6–19.5% (lifetime. TSP prevalence varied according to the operational definition of TSP. Prevalence for any TSP ranged from 0.5–23.0%, 15.8–34.8%, 15.0–27.5% and 12.0–31.2% for 7-day, 1-month, 1-year and lifetime periods, respectively. TSP associated with backpack use varied from 6.0–72.0% and 22.9–51.4% for point and 7-day periods, respectively. TSP interfering with school or leisure ranged from 3.5–9.7% for 1-year prevalence. Generally, studies reported a higher prevalence for TSP in child and adolescent populations, and particularly for females. The 1 month, 6 month, 1 year and 25 year incidences were 0

  9. Sleep apnea predicts distinct alterations in glucose homeostasis and biomarkers in obese adults with normal and impaired glucose metabolism

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    Hill Nathan R

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Notwithstanding previous studies supporting independent associations between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA and prevalence of diabetes, the underlying pathogenesis of impaired glucose regulation in OSA remains unclear. We explored mechanisms linking OSA with prediabetes/diabetes and associated biomarker profiles. We hypothesized that OSA is associated with distinct alterations in glucose homeostasis and biomarker profiles in subjects with normal (NGM and impaired glucose metabolism (IGM. Methods Forty-five severely obese adults (36 women without certain comorbidities/medications underwent anthropometric measurements, polysomnography, and blood tests. We measured fasting serum glucose, insulin, selected cytokines, and calculated homeostasis model assessment estimates of insulin sensitivity (HOMA-IS and pancreatic beta-cell function (HOMA-B. Results Both increases in apnea-hypopnea index (AHI and the presence of prediabetes/diabetes were associated with reductions in HOMA-IS in the entire cohort even after adjustment for sex, race, age, and BMI (P = 0.003. In subjects with NGM (n = 30, OSA severity was associated with significantly increased HOMA-B (a trend towards decreased HOMA-IS independent of sex and adiposity. OSA-related oxyhemoglobin desaturations correlated with TNF-α (r=-0.76; P = 0.001 in women with NGM and with IL-6 (rho=-0.55; P = 0.035 in women with IGM (n = 15 matched individually for age, adiposity, and AHI. Conclusions OSA is independently associated with altered glucose homeostasis and increased basal beta-cell function in severely obese adults with NGM. The findings suggest that moderate to severe OSA imposes an excessive functional demand on pancreatic beta-cells, which may lead to their exhaustion and impaired secretory capacity over time. The two distinct biomarker profiles linking sleep apnea with NGM and IGM via TNF-α and IL-6 have been discerned in our study to suggest that sleep apnea and particularly

  10. Alterations in intracellular ionic calcium levels in isolated adult rat cardiac myocytes due to the generation of free radicals

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    Burton, K.P.; Nazeran, H.; Hagler, H.K. (Univ. of Texas, Dallas, TX (United States))

    1991-03-15

    Oxygen-derived free radical production has been documented to occur on reperfusion of the ischemic myocardium. Intracellular ionic calcium ((Ca{sup ++}){sub i}) levels in isolated adult rat cardiac myocytes (M) exposed to free radicals were evaluated using the fluorescent calcium indicator, fura-2. The effect of different time periods of free radical exposure and the level of extracellular Ca{sup ++} concentration on altering (Ca{sup ++}){sub i} was examined. The free radical generating system (FRGS) utilized consisted of a HEPES buffered physiological salt solution containing 2.3 mM purine, 2.4. {mu}M iron-loaded transferrin and 0.01 U/ml xanthine oxidase. M maintained in HEPES buffer or the HEPES buffer containing purine and iron-loaded transferrin continued to stimulate, exhibited relatively uniform 340/380 ratios and maintained a rod shape for extended time periods. M continuously exposed to the FRGS showed a significant increase in (Ca{sup ++}){sub i}, became unresponsive to stimulation at 31 {plus minus} 7 (SE) min and eventually exhibited contracture. Exposure to the FRGS for 10 min resulted in a response similar to continuous exposure. M exposed to the FRGS for 5 min exhibited regular Ca{sup ++} transients for 55{plus minus}5 min. M exposed to the FRGS for 10 min and maintained in 2.5 mM Ca{sup ++} versus 1.25 mM Ca{sup ++}, accumulated significantly higher (CA{sup ++}){sub i}. Quiescent myocytes continuously exposed to the FRGS also exhibited a significant increase in (Ca{sup ++}){sub i} over time. Thus, a brief period of free radical exposure may induce subsequent damage. Alterations in Ca{sup ++} flux resulting from the generation of free radicals may possibly contribute to the development of Ca{sup ++} overload and myocardial arrhythmias.

  11. Alterations in Brain Inflammation, Synaptic Proteins, and Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis during Epileptogenesis in Mice Lacking Synapsin2.

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    Deepti Chugh

    Full Text Available Synapsins are pre-synaptic vesicle-associated proteins linked to the pathogenesis of epilepsy through genetic association studies in humans. Deletion of synapsins causes an excitatory/inhibitory imbalance, exemplified by the epileptic phenotype of synapsin knockout mice. These mice develop handling-induced tonic-clonic seizures starting at the age of about 3 months. Hence, they provide an opportunity to study epileptogenic alterations in a temporally controlled manner. Here, we evaluated brain inflammation, synaptic protein expression, and adult hippocampal neurogenesis in the epileptogenic (1 and 2 months of age and tonic-clonic (3.5-4 months phase of synapsin 2 knockout mice using immunohistochemical and biochemical assays. In the epileptogenic phase, region-specific microglial activation was evident, accompanied by an increase in the chemokine receptor CX3CR1, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α, and a decrease in chemokine keratinocyte chemoattractant/ growth-related oncogene. Both post-synaptic density-95 and gephyrin, scaffolding proteins at excitatory and inhibitory synapses, respectively, showed a significant up-regulation primarily in the cortex. Furthermore, we observed an increase in the inhibitory adhesion molecules neuroligin-2 and neurofascin and potassium chloride co-transporter KCC2. Decreased expression of γ-aminobutyric acid receptor-δ subunit and cholecystokinin was also evident. Surprisingly, hippocampal neurogenesis was reduced in the epileptogenic phase. Taken together, we report molecular alterations in brain inflammation and excitatory/inhibitory balance that could serve as potential targets for therapeutics and diagnostic biomarkers. In addition, the regional differences in brain inflammation and synaptic protein expression indicate an epileptogenic zone from where the generalized seizures in synapsin 2 knockout mice may be initiated or spread.

  12. Fibroblast growth factor 10 alters the balance between goblet and Paneth cells in the adult mouse small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Alam, Denise; Danopoulos, Soula; Schall, Kathy; Sala, Frederic G; Almohazey, Dana; Fernandez, G Esteban; Georgia, Senta; Frey, Mark R; Ford, Henri R; Grikscheit, Tracy; Bellusci, Saverio

    2015-04-15

    Intestinal epithelial cell renewal relies on the right balance of epithelial cell migration, proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Intestinal epithelial cells consist of absorptive and secretory lineage. The latter is comprised of goblet, Paneth, and enteroendocrine cells. Fibroblast growth factor 10 (FGF10) plays a central role in epithelial cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation in several organs. The expression pattern of FGF10 and its receptors in both human and mouse intestine and their role in small intestine have yet to be investigated. First, we analyzed the expression of FGF10, FGFR1, and FGFR2, in the human ileum and throughout the adult mouse small intestine. We found that FGF10, FGFR1b, and FGFR2b are expressed in the human ileum as well as in the mouse small intestine. We then used transgenic mouse models to overexpress Fgf10 and a soluble form of Fgfr2b, to study the impact of gain or loss of Fgf signaling in the adult small intestine. We demonstrated that overexpression of Fgf10 in vivo and in vitro induces goblet cell differentiation while decreasing Paneth cells. Moreover, FGF10 decreases stem cell markers such as Lgr5, Lrig1, Hopx, Ascl2, and Sox9. FGF10 inhibited Hes1 expression in vitro, suggesting that FGF10 induces goblet cell differentiation likely through the inhibition of Notch signaling. Interestingly, Fgf10 overexpression for 3 days in vivo and in vitro increased the number of Mmp7/Muc2 double-positive cells, suggesting that goblet cells replace Paneth cells. Further studies are needed to determine the mechanism by which Fgf10 alters cell differentiation in the small intestine.

  13. Early Exposure to Intermediate-Frequency Magnetic Fields Alters Brain Biomarkers without Histopathological Changes in Adult Mice

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    Tin-Tin Win-Shwe

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Recently we have reported that intermediate-frequency magnetic field (IF-MF exposure transiently altered the mRNA expression levels of memory function-related genes in the hippocampi of adult male mice. However, the effects of IF-MF exposure during brain development on neurological biomarkers have not yet been clarified. In the present study, we investigated the effect of IF-MF exposure during development on neurological and immunological markers in the mouse hippocampus in 3- and 7-week-old male mice. Pregnant C57BL/6J mice were exposed to IF-MF (21 kHz, 3.8 mT for one hour per day from organogenesis period day 7 to 17. At adolescence, some IF-MF-exposed mice were further divided into exposure, recovery, and sham-exposure groups. The adolescent-exposure groups were exposed again to IF-MF from postnatal day 27 to 48. The expression of mRNA in the hippocampi was examined using a real-time RT-PCR method, and microglia activation was examined by immunohistochemical analysis. The expression levels of NR1 and NR2B as well as transcription factors (CaMKIV, CREB1, inflammatory mediators (COX2, IL-1 b,TNF-α, and the oxidative stress marker heme-oxygenase (HO-1 were significantly increased in the IF-MF-exposed mice, compared with the control group, in the 7-week-old mice, but not in the 3-week-old mice. Microglia activation was not different between the control and other groups. This study provides the first evidence that early exposure to IF-MF reversibly affects the NMDA receptor, its related signaling pathways, and inflammatory mediators in the hippocampus of young adult mice; these changes are transient and recover after termination of exposure without histopathological changes.

  14. Cancer Pain Physiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk, Sarah; Bannister, Kirsty; Dickenson, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    reorganization within segments of the dorsal horn of the spinal cord receiving nociceptive input from the bone are discussed. Changes in certain neurotransmitters implicated in brain modulation of spinal function are also altered with implications for the affective components of cancer pain. Treatments......Mechanisms of inflammatory and neuropathic pains have been elucidated and translated to patient care by the use of animal models of these pain states. Cancer pain has lagged behind since early animal models of cancer-induced bone pain were based on the systemic injection of carcinoma cells....... This precluded systematic investigation of specific neuronal and pharmacological alterations that occur in cancer-induced bone pain. In 1999, Schwei et al. described a murine model of cancer-induced bone pain that paralleled the clinical condition in terms of pain development and bone destruction, confined...

  15. Perspectives of older adults on co-management of low back pain by doctors of chiropractic and family medicine physicians: a focus group study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyons, K. J.; Salsbury, S. A.; Hondras, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    that allowed exchange of health information between clinics, and practice settings where providers worked in one location. Perceived barriers to the co-management of LBP included the financial costs associated with receiving care from multiple providers concurrently, duplication of tests or imaging, scheduling......Background: While older adults may seek care for low back pain (LBP) from both medical doctors (MDs) and doctors of chiropractic (DCs), co-management between these providers is uncommon. The purposes of this study were to describe the preferences of older adults for LBP co-management by MDs and DCs...... implementation of a MD-DC co-management model. We analyzed the qualitative data using thematic content analysis. Results: Older adults considered LBP co-management by MDs and DCs a positive approach as the professions have complementary strengths. Participants wanted providers who worked in a co-management model...

  16. Breakthrough cancer pain (BTcP): a synthesis of taxonomy, pathogenesis, therapy, and good clinical practice in adult patients in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucco, Furio; Bonezzi, Cesare; Fornasari, Diego

    2014-07-01

    Pain presents in 80% of patients with advanced cancer, and 30% have periods of increased pain due to fluctuating intensity, known as breakthrough cancer pain (BTcP). BTcP is high-intensity, short-duration pain occurring in several episodes per day and is non-responsive to treatment. The clinical approach to BTcP is variable. A review of the literature was performed to provide clinicians and practitioners with a rational synthesis of the ongoing scientific debate on BTcP and to provide a basis for optimal clinical approach to BTcP in adult Italian patients. Data show that circadian exacerbations of pain should be carefully monitored, differentiating, if possible, between fluctuations of background pain (BP), end-of-dose effect, and BTcP. BTcP should be monitored in all care contexts in clinical practice and each care facility must have all the medications and products approved for use in BTcP at their disposal. Data show that knowledge about medications for BTcP is lacking: medications for BTcP treatment are not interchangeable, although containing the same active substance; each physician must know the specific characteristics of each medication, its pharmacological properties, limitations in clinical practice, specifics relating to titration and repeatability of administration, and technical specifics relating to the accessibility and delivery. Importantly, before choosing a rapid-onset opioid (ROO), it is essential to deeply understand the status of patient and the characteristics of their family unit/caregivers, taking into account the patient's progressive loss of autonomy and/or cognitive-relational functionality. When BTcP therapy is initiated or changed, special attention must be paid to training the patient and family members/caregivers, providing clear instructions regarding the timing of drug administration. The patient must already be treated effectively with opioids before introducing ROOs for control of BTcP.

  17. Managing Chronic Pain in Adults with or in Recovery from Substance Use Disorders. Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) Series 54

    Science.gov (United States)

    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Chronic noncancer pain (CNCP) is common in the general population as well as in people who have a substance use disorder (SUD) (Exhibit 1-1). Chronic pain is not harmless; it has physiological, social, and psychological dimensions that can seriously harm health, functioning, and well-being. As a multidimensional condition with both objective and…

  18. Prevalence and “red flags” regarding specified causes of back pain in older adults presenting in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.T.M. Enthoven (Wendy); H.J. Geuze (Hans); J. Scheele (Jantine); S.M. Bierma-Zeinstra (Sita); H.J. Bueving (Herman); A.M. Bohnen (Arthur); W.C. Peul (Wilco); M.W. van Tulder (Maurits); M.Y. Berger (Marjolein Y.); B.W. Koes (Bart); P.A.J. Luijsterburg (Pim)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground. In a small proportion of patients experiencing unspecified back pain, a specified underlying pathology is present. Objective. The purposes of this study were: (1) to identify the prevalence of physician specified causes of back pain and (2) to assess associations between “red

  19. Prevalence and Red Flags Regarding Specified Causes of Back Pain in Older Adults Presenting in General Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Enthoven, Wendy T M; Geuze, Judith; Scheele, Jantine; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M A; Bueving, Herman J; Bohnen, Arthur M; Peul, Wilco C; van Tulder, Maurits W; Berger, Marjolein Y; Koes, Bart W; Luijsterburg, Pim A J

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In a small proportion of patients experiencing unspecified back pain a specified underlying pathology is present. OBJECTIVE: To identify the prevalence of physician-specified causes of back pain and to assess associations between red flags and vertebral fractures, as diagnosed by the pat

  20. Early Developmental Low-Dose Methylmercury Exposure Alters Learning and Memory in Periadolescent but Not Young Adult Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albores-Garcia, Damaris; Hernandez, Alberto J.; Loera, Miriam J.

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have assessed the effects of developmental methylmercury (MeHg) exposure on learning and memory at different ages. The possibility of the amelioration or worsening of the effects has not been sufficiently investigated. This study aimed to assess whether low-dose MeHg exposure in utero and during suckling induces differential disturbances in learning and memory of periadolescent and young adult rats. Four experimental groups of pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were orally exposed to MeHg or vehicle from gestational day 5 to weaning: (1) control (vehicle), (2) 250 μg/kg/day MeHg, (3) 500 μg/kg/day MeHg, and (4) vehicle, and treated on the test day with MK-801 (0.15 mg/kg i.p.), an antagonist of the N-methyl D-aspartate receptor. The effects were evaluated in male offspring through the open field test, object recognition test, Morris water maze, and conditioned taste aversion. For each test and stage assessed, different groups of animals were used. MeHg exposure, in a dose-dependent manner, disrupted exploratory behaviour, recognition memory, spatial learning, and acquisition of aversive memories in periadolescent rats, but alterations were not observed in littermates tested in young adulthood. These results suggest that developmental low-dose exposure to MeHg induces age-dependent detrimental effects. The relevance of decreasing exposure to MeHg in humans remains to be determined. PMID:26885512

  1. Early Developmental Low-Dose Methylmercury Exposure Alters Learning and Memory in Periadolescent but Not Young Adult Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damaris Albores-Garcia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Few studies have assessed the effects of developmental methylmercury (MeHg exposure on learning and memory at different ages. The possibility of the amelioration or worsening of the effects has not been sufficiently investigated. This study aimed to assess whether low-dose MeHg exposure in utero and during suckling induces differential disturbances in learning and memory of periadolescent and young adult rats. Four experimental groups of pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were orally exposed to MeHg or vehicle from gestational day 5 to weaning: (1 control (vehicle, (2 250 μg/kg/day MeHg, (3 500 μg/kg/day MeHg, and (4 vehicle, and treated on the test day with MK-801 (0.15 mg/kg i.p., an antagonist of the N-methyl D-aspartate receptor. The effects were evaluated in male offspring through the open field test, object recognition test, Morris water maze, and conditioned taste aversion. For each test and stage assessed, different groups of animals were used. MeHg exposure, in a dose-dependent manner, disrupted exploratory behaviour, recognition memory, spatial learning, and acquisition of aversive memories in periadolescent rats, but alterations were not observed in littermates tested in young adulthood. These results suggest that developmental low-dose exposure to MeHg induces age-dependent detrimental effects. The relevance of decreasing exposure to MeHg in humans remains to be determined.

  2. Alterations to prepulse inhibition magnitude and latency in adult rats following neonatal treatment with domoic acid and social isolation rearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriott, Amber L; Tasker, R Andrew; Ryan, Catherine L; Doucette, Tracy A

    2016-02-01

    Deficits in perceptual, informational, and attentional processing are consistently identified as a core feature in schizophrenia and related neuropsychiatric disorders. Neonatal injections of low doses of the AMPA/kainate agonist domoic acid (DOM) have previously been shown to alter various aspects of perceptual and attentional processing in adult rats. The current study investigated the effects of combined neonatal DOM treatment with isolation rearing on prepulse inhibition behaviour and relevant neurochemical measures, to assess the usefulness of these paradigms in modeling neurodevelopmental disorders. Daily subcutaneous injections of DOM (20 μg/kg) or saline were administered to male and female rat pups from postnatal days (PND) 8-14. After weaning, rats were either housed alone or in groups of 4. Both the magnitude and latency of prepulse inhibition were determined in adulthood (approximately 4.5 months of age) and post-mortem brain tissue was assayed using Western blot. Social isolation alone significantly lowered PPI magnitude in male (but not female) rats while DOM treatment appeared to make animals refractory to this effect. Combining social isolation and DOM treatment caused an additive decrease in PPI startle latency. No statistically significant differences were found in the expression of D1, D2, TH, GAD65 or GAD67 protein in either the prefrontal cortex or hippocampus, although some tendencies toward differences were noted. We conclude that both neonatal low-dose DOM and social isolation affect prepulse inhibition in rats but that each paradigm exerts these effects through different neuronal signalling systems.

  3. The prevalence and correlates of low back pain in adults: A cross sectional study from Southern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Chankaramangalam Mathew

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Low back pain is a major public health problem all over the world. It is generally assumed that overweight, height and low back pain are related. However, the scientific evidence to support this relationship is not fully conclusive. The aim of this study is to estimate the prevalence of low back pain and its association with height, fat distribution, reproductive history and socioeconomic influence. A representative sample of 401 men and 403 women aged 20 years and above were selected and studied. It is found that 28.4% and 52.9% respectively were having low back pain. Height and fat distribution were found to have no association with low back pain. Both men and women, whose household were in the lower socio economic status reported more back pain (Adjusted odds ratio (AOR for men 1.61, 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.02, 2.55 and AOR for women 1.57, 95% CI: 1.02, 2.34. Men with lower educational qualification reported more back pain (AOR 1.89, 95% CI: 1.08, 3.31. In women, those who have undergone caesarean section (AOR 1.661, 95% CI: 1.02, 2.72 and sterilization (AOR 1.63, 95% CI: 1.09, 2.44 were found to be a positively associated with low back pain. The only socioeconomic link with back pain among women seemed to be manual occupation (AOR 3.33, 95% CI: 1.49, 7.4. The finding confirms the higher burden of back pain on the socially disadvantaged, but cannot yet be explained by known risk factors.

  4. Effect of Co-Morbid Conditions on Persistent Neuropathic Pain after Brachial Plexus Injury in Adult Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudakshetrin, Pongparadee; Chotisukarat, Haruthai; Mandee, Sahatsa

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Neuropathic pain (NeuP) associated with traumatic brachial plexus injury (BPI) can be severe, persistent, and resistant to treatment. Moreover, comorbidity associated with NeuP may worsen the pain and quality of life. This study compared persistent NeuP after BPI between patients with and without co-morbid conditions (psychiatric dysfunction and other painful conditions) and tramadol usage as a second-line agent in combination with an antiepileptic and/or antidepressant during a 2-year follow-up. Methods The medical records of patients diagnosed with BPI referred to a pain center between 2006 and 2010 were reviewed for 2 years retrospectively. Data regarding patient demographics, injury and surgical profiles, characteristics of NeuP and its severity, and treatment received were compared between patients with and without manifesting co-morbid conditions. The NeuP and pain intensity assessments were based on the DN4 questionnaire and a numerical rating scale, respectively. Results Of the 45 patients studied, 24 patients presented with one of the following co-morbid conditions: myofascial pain (21%), psychiatric disorder (17%), phantom limb pain (4%), complex regional pain syndrome (21%), and insomnia (37%). Tramadol was required by 20 patients with co-morbidity and, 9 patients without co-morbidity (ppain score after 2 years was higher in patients with co-morbidity than in those without co-morbidity (ppain following BPI was more common in patients manifesting other painful conditions or psychiatric co-morbidity. A higher proportion of the patients in the co-morbid group required tramadol as a second-line of agent for pain relief.

  5. Asotin Creek Instream Habitat Alteration Projects : Habitat Evaluation, Adult and Juvenile Habitat Utilization and Water Temperature Monitoring : 2001 Progress Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bumgarner, Joseph D.

    2002-01-01

    projects to improve fish habitat. In 1998, the ACCD identified the need for a more detailed analysis of these instream projects to fully evaluate their effectiveness at improving fish habitat. Therefore, ACCD contracted with WDFW's Snake River Lab (SRL) to take pre- and post-construction measurements of the habitat (i.e., pools, LOD, width, depth) at each site, and to evaluate fish use within some of the altered sites. These results have been published annually as progress reports to the ACCD (Bumgarner et al. 1999, Wargo et al. 2000, and Bumgarner and Schuck 2001). The ACCD also contracted with the WDFW SRL to conduct other evaluation and monitoring in the stream such as: (1) conduct snorkel surveys at habitat alteration sites to document fish usage following construction, (2) deploy temperature monitors throughout the basin to document summer water temperatures, and (3) attempt to document adult fish utilization by documenting the number of steelhead redds associated with habitat altered areas. This report provides a summary of pre-construction measurements taken on three proposed Charley Creek habitat sites during 2001, two sites in main Asotin Creek, and one site in George Creek, a tributary that enters in the lower Asotin Creek basin. Further, it provides a comparison of measurements taken pre- and post-construction on three 1999 habitat sites taken two years later, but at similar river flows. It also presents data collected from snorkel surveys, redd counts, and temperature monitoring.

  6. Cultural adaptation and reproducibility validation of the Brazilian Portuguese version of the Pain Assessment in Advanced Dementia (PAINAD-Brazil) scale in non-verbal adult patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Marcia Carla Morete; Minson, Fabiola Peixoto; Lopes, Ana Carolina Biagioni; Laselva, Claudia Regina

    2015-01-01

    Objective To adapt the Pain Assessment in Advanced Dementia (PAINAD) scale to Brazilian Portuguese with respect to semantic equivalence and cultural aspects, and to evaluate the respective psychometric properties (validity, feasibility, clinical utility and inter-rater agreement). Methods Two-stage descriptive, cross-sectional retrospective study involving cultural and semantic validation of the Brazilian Portuguese version of the scale, and investigation of its psychometric properties (validity, reliability and clinical utility). The sample consisted of 63 inpatients presenting with neurological deficits and unable to self-report pain. Results Semantic and cultural validation of the PAINAD scale was easily achieved. The scale indicators most commonly used by nurses to assess pain were “Facial expression”, “Body language” and “Consolability”. The Brazilian Portuguese version of the scale has proved to be valid and accurate; good levels of inter-rater agreement assured reproducibility. Conclusion The scale has proved to be useful in daily routine care of hospitalized adult and elderly patients in a variety of clinical settings. Short application time, ease of use, clear instructions and the simplicity of training required for application were emphasized. However, interpretation of facial expression and consolability should be given special attention during pain assessment training. PMID:25993063

  7. Neonatal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Suellen M

    2014-01-01

    Effective management of procedural and postoperative pain in neonates is required to minimize acute physiological and behavioral distress and may also improve acute and long-term outcomes. Painful stimuli activate nociceptive pathways, from the periphery to the cortex, in neonates and behavioral responses form the basis for validated pain assessment tools. However, there is an increasing awareness of the need to not only reduce acute behavioral responses to pain in neonates, but also to protect the developing nervous system from persistent sensitization of pain pathways and potential damaging effects of altered neural activity on central nervous system development. Analgesic requirements are influenced by age-related changes in both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic response, and increasing data are available to guide safe and effective dosing with opioids and paracetamol. Regional analgesic techniques provide effective perioperative analgesia, but higher complication rates in neonates emphasize the importance of monitoring and choice of the most appropriate drug and dose. There have been significant improvements in the understanding and management of neonatal pain, but additional research evidence will further reduce the need to extrapolate data from older age groups. Translation into improved clinical care will continue to depend on an integrated approach to implementation that encompasses assessment and titration against individual response, education and training, and audit and feedback.

  8. Inability to perform because of pain/injury in elite adult Irish dance: A prospective investigation of contributing factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahalan, R; O'Sullivan, P; Purtill, H; Bargary, N; Ni Bhriain, O; O'Sullivan, K

    2016-06-01

    Previous research in Irish dancing (ID) has recorded high levels of pain/injury. Screening protocols in other genres have been developed to identify at-risk dancers. The aims of the study were to examine the factors that relate to absence from dancing because of musculo-skeletal pain/injury in ID, and to inform guidelines for the development of an evidence-based screening protocol. Baseline subjective data (n = 85) and physical data (n = 84) were gathered. Subjects completed a monthly online questionnaire for 1 year providing data on general physical and psychological health and rates of pain/injury. Subjects were allocated to a "More Time Absent (MTA)" or "Less Time Absent (LTA)" category depending on their duration of absence from performance over the year. Eighty-four subjects completed the year-long follow-up (MTA: n = 32; LTA: n = 52). Two hundred seventy-eight complaints of pain/injury were recorded. Factors significantly associated with membership of the MTA group included greater anger-hostility (P = 0.003), more subjective health complaints (P = 0.026), more severe previous pain/injury (P = 0.017), more general everyday pain (P = 0.020), more body parts affected by pain/injury (P = 0.028), always/often dancing in pain (P = 0.028), and insufficient sleep (P = 0.043). Several biopsychosocial factors appear to be associated with absence from ID because of pain/injury. Biopsychosocial screening protocols and prevention strategies may best identify at-risk dancers.

  9. Interprofessional practices of physiotherapists working with adults with low back pain in Québec’s private sector: results of a qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Collaboration and interprofessional practices are highly valued in health systems, because they are thought to improve outcomes of care for persons with complex health problems, such as low back pain. Physiotherapists, like all health providers, are encouraged to take part in interprofessional practices. However, little is known about these practices, especially for private sector physiotherapists. This study aimed to: 1) explore how physiotherapists working in the private sector with adults with low back pain describe their interprofessional practices, 2) identify factors that influence their interprofessional practices, and 3) identify their perceived effects. Methods Participants were 13 physiotherapists, 10 women/3 men, having between 3 and 21 years of professional experience. For this descriptive qualitative study, we used face-to-face semi-structured interviews and conducted content analysis encompassing data coding and thematic regrouping. Results Physiotherapists described interprofessional practices heterogeneously, including numerous processes such as sharing information and referring. Factors that influenced physiotherapists’ interprofessional practices were related to patients, providers, organizations, and wider systems (e.g. professional system). Physiotherapists mostly viewed positive effects of interprofessional practices, including elements such as gaining new knowledge as a provider and being valued in one’s own role, as well as improvements in overall treatment and outcome. Conclusions This qualitative study offers new insights into the interprofessional practices of physiotherapists working with adults with low back pain, as perceived by the physiotherapists’ themselves. Based on the results, the development of strategies aiming to increase interprofessionalism in the management of low back pain would most likely require taking into consideration factors associated with patients, providers, the organizations within which they

  10. Cortical correlates of an attentional bias to painful and innocuous somatic stimuli in children with recurrent abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Christiane; Zohsel, Katrin; Hohmeister, Johanna; Flor, Herta

    2008-06-01

    Recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) is a common gastrointestinal problem during childhood. It is not only a pediatric health problem, but may represent a risk factor for chronic pain, psychosomatic symptoms, and psychopathological problems later in life. Alterations in central pain processing and an attentional bias to potentially aversive somatic sensations could contribute to the unfavorable outcome of RAP during childhood. Fourteen children with RAP and 15 control children (age: 10-15 year) participated in an attentional task. Children had to respond to rare targets (tones) and ignore frequent either painful (pain threshold) or non-painful mechanical stimuli delivered at the hand. Event-related cortical potentials in response to the somatic stimuli and the tones were measured and stimulus intensity ratings, reaction time and number of errors were obtained. Painful as compared to non-painful stimuli elicited significantly larger N1, P2 and P3 components of the somatosensory-evoked potential (SEP) in all children. The RAP children responded with a significantly larger P3 to both painful and non-painful stimuli. No group differences were found for the auditory-evoked potentials. Perceived stimulus and pain intensity, reaction time and number of errors did not differ between groups. Similar to findings in adults with functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs), children with RAP did not show somatic hyperalgesia as revealed by unaltered pain thresholds and middle latency pain-evoked SEPs. However, they displayed an attentional bias to painful and non-painful (innocuous) somatic stimuli as indicated by an enhanced P3. This may represent an important mechanism not only for the maintenance of RAP, but also for the development of psychosomatic symptoms.

  11. Caffeine Alters Blood Potassium and Catecholamine Concentrations but not the Perception of Pain and Fatigue with a 1 km Cycling Sprint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dean M. Cordingley

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Caffeine has been used by some athletes to improve short-term high-intensity exercise performance; however, the literature is equivocal. Objectives: The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of caffeine on plasma potassium and catecholamine concentrations, pain and fatigue perception, to determine whether potassium ion handling and altered perception related to the central nervous system are associated with enhanced performance during a 1 km cycling time trial.  Methods: Thirteen well trained men with a mean age of 27 ± 6 yrs (body mass: 76.4 ± 6.4 kg, height: 180 ± 7 cm, and max: 57.5 ± 4.6 ml·kg-1·min-1 were recruited.  Participants were randomized to a caffeine (5 mg·kg-1 or a placebo condition using a double blind, cross over design.  Results: Caffeine had no significant effects on the 1 km time-trial performance indicators of time (82.1 ± 2.4 vs. 81.9 ± 3.9s, peak (633.0 ± 83.6 vs. 638.7 ± 110.1 watts or average power (466.0 ± 37.3 vs. 467.5 ± 59.9 watts; caffeine and placebo conditions respectively.  In addition, caffeine had no significant effect on oxygen consumption ( (4.11 ± 0.24 vs 4.06 ± 0.29 L,the perception of pain (5.6 ± 2.4 vs. 5.5 ± 2.6 or fatigue (7.1 ± 1.8 vs.7.1 ± 1.8: caffeine and placebo conditions respectively.  There was a significantly greater increase in post-exercise blood lactate (p<0.05 and catecholamines (p<0.05 as well as a lower pre-exercise blood potassium concentration (p<0.05 in the caffeine condition. Conclusions: The results suggest that caffeine can enhance certain metabolic parameters, but these changes were unable to augment short-distance (1km, high-intensity cycling performance. Keywords: ergogenic, anaerobic exercise, performance, oxygen consumption

  12. Burden of illness associated with painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy among adults seeking treatment in the US: results from a retrospective chart review and cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadosky A

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Alesia Sadosky,1 Caroline Schaefer,2 Rachael Mann,3 Felicia Bergstrom,2 Rebecca Baik,2 Bruce Parsons,1 Srinivas Nalamachu,4 Edward Nieshoff,5 Brett R Stacey,6 Alan Anschel,7 Michael Tuchman81Pfizer Inc, New York, NY, 2Covance Market Access Services Inc, Gaithersburg, MD, 3Covance Market Access Services Inc, San Diego, CA, 4International Clinical Research Institute, Overland Park, KS, 5Rehabilitation Institute of Michigan/Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, 6Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR, 7Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL, 8Palm Beach Neurological Center, Palm Beach Gardens, FL, USABackground: The purpose of this study was to characterize the burden of illness among adult subjects with painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy (pDPN seeking treatment in the US.Methods: This observational study recruited 112 subjects with pDPN during routine visits from general practitioner and specialist sites. Subjects completed a one-time questionnaire, which included demographics, symptom duration, health care resource use, out-of-pocket costs, employment status, and validated measures that assessed pain, functioning, sleep, anxiety and depression, health status, and productivity. Investigators completed a case report form based on a 6-month retrospective chart review to capture clinical information, pDPN-related treatments, and other pDPN-related health care resource use over the past 6 months. Annualized costs were extrapolated based on reported 6-month health care resource use.Results: The mean age of the subjects was 61.1 years, 52.7% were female, and 17.9% were in paid employment. The most common comorbid conditions were sleep disturbance/insomnia (43.8%, depressive symptoms (41.1%, and anxiety (35.7%. The mean pain severity score was 5.2 (0–10 scale, and 79.5% reported moderate or severe pain. The mean pain interference with function score was 5.0 (0–10 scale overall, with 2.0 among mild, 5.1 among moderate, and 7

  13. Music in Reducing Anxiety and Pain in Adult Patients Undergoing Bone Marrow Biopsy for Hematologic Cancers or Other Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-18

    Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Pain; Precancerous Condition; Psychosocial Effects of Cancer and Its Treatment

  14. WITHDRAWN : Exercise therapy for patellofemoral pain syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heintjes, Edith M; Berger, Marjolein; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita Ma; Bernsen, Roos Md; Verhaar, Jan An; Koes, Bart W

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) is a common problem among adolescents and young adults, characterised by retropatellar pain (behind the kneecap) or peripatellar pain (around the kneecap) when ascending or descending stairs, squatting or sitting with flexed knees. Etiology, structures

  15. Moderate long-term modulation of neuropeptide Y in hypothalamic arcuate nucleus induces energy balance alterations in adult rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lígia Sousa-Ferreira

    Full Text Available Neuropeptide Y (NPY produced by arcuate nucleus (ARC neurons has a strong orexigenic effect on target neurons. Hypothalamic NPY levels undergo wide-ranging oscillations during the circadian cycle and in response to fasting and peripheral hormones (from 0.25 to 10-fold change. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of a moderate long-term modulation of NPY within the ARC neurons on food consumption, body weight gain and hypothalamic neuropeptides. We achieved a physiological overexpression (3.6-fold increase and down-regulation (0.5-fold decrease of NPY in the rat ARC by injection of AAV vectors expressing NPY and synthetic microRNA that target the NPY, respectively. Our work shows that a moderate overexpression of NPY was sufficient to induce diurnal over-feeding, sustained body weight gain and severe obesity in adult rats. Additionally, the circulating levels of leptin were elevated but the immunoreactivity (ir of ARC neuropeptides was not in accordance (POMC-ir was unchanged and AGRP-ir increased, suggesting a disruption in the ability of ARC neurons to response to peripheral metabolic alterations. Furthermore, a dysfunction in adipocytes phenotype was observed in these obese rats. In addition, moderate down-regulation of NPY did not affect basal feeding or normal body weight gain but the response to food deprivation was compromised since fasting-induced hyperphagia was inhibited and fasting-induced decrease in locomotor activity was absent.These results highlight the importance of the physiological ARC NPY levels oscillations on feeding regulation, fasting response and body weight preservation, and are important for the design of therapeutic interventions for obesity that include the NPY.

  16. Cardiac-Specific Disruption of GH Receptor Alters Glucose Homeostasis While Maintaining Normal Cardiac Performance in Adult Male Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jara, Adam; Liu, Xingbo; Sim, Don; Benner, Chance M; Duran-Ortiz, Silvana; Qian, Yanrong; List, Edward O; Berryman, Darlene E; Kim, Jason K; Kopchick, John J

    2016-05-01

    GH is considered necessary for the proper development and maintenance of several tissues, including the heart. Studies conducted in both GH receptor null and bovine GH transgenic mice have demonstrated specific cardiac structural and functional changes. In each of these mouse lines, however, GH-induced signaling is altered systemically, being decreased in GH receptor null mice and increased in bovine GH transgenic mice. Therefore, to clarify the direct effects GH has on cardiac tissue, we developed a tamoxifen-inducible, cardiac-specific GHR disrupted (iC-GHRKO) mouse line. Cardiac GH receptor was disrupted in 4-month-old iC-GHRKO mice to avoid developmental effects due to perinatal GHR gene disruption. Surprisingly, iC-GHRKO mice showed no difference vs controls in baseline or postdobutamine stress test echocardiography measurements, nor did iC-GHRKO mice show differences in longitudinal systolic blood pressure measurements. Interestingly, iC-GHRKO mice had decreased fat mass and improved insulin sensitivity at 6.5 months of age. By 12.5 months of age, however, iC-GHRKO mice no longer had significant decreases in fat mass and had developed glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. Furthermore, investigation via immunoblot analysis demonstrated that iC-GHRKO mice had appreciably decreased insulin stimulated Akt phosphorylation, specifically in heart and liver, but not in epididymal white adipose tissue. These changes were accompanied by a decrease in circulating IGF-1 levels in 12.5-month-old iC-GHRKO mice. These data indicate that whereas the disruption of cardiomyocyte GH-induced signaling in adult mice does not affect cardiac function, it does play a role in systemic glucose homeostasis, in part through modulation of circulating IGF-1.

  17. The effect of age on the onset of pain interference in a general population of older adults: prospective findings from the North Staffordshire Osteoarthritis Project (NorStOP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Elaine; Mottram, Sara; Peat, George; Wilkie, Ross; Croft, Peter

    2007-05-01

    Pain that interferes with daily life appears to be strongly age-related in cross-sectional studies, although the nature of this relationship over time has not been established. We have investigated the onset and persistence of pain and pain interference over a 3-year period to determine their association with age in older people. A 3-year follow-up postal survey was conducted of adults aged 50 years and over (n=5366) who had previously been recruited as part of the North Staffordshire Osteoarthritis Project. Four thousand two-hundred and thirty-four completed questionnaires were received (adjusted response 84.7%). The occurrence of pain interference at 3 years was 19.7% in persons free of such pain at baseline, higher in females than males (6.0% difference; 95% CI: 2.6%, 9.3%), and showed a clear age-related trend with a more than twofold increase from 50 to 59 years (16.0%) to the 80+ years (35%). Any pain at follow-up was reported by 48% of those pain-free at recruitment, and this figure was similar for males and females, and across 10-year age-groups. Persistence of pain interference (72.1%) at 3 years was high. In adults aged 50 years and over, the onset of pain that interferes with life shows a clear gender difference and a consistent rise with age into the oldest age-group. This was in strong contrast to the onset of pain which showed no gender or age-related trends. The implications for public health, as for the treatment of the individual, are twofold, relating to efforts to prevent disabling pain from occurring and to understand the factors that accelerate the impact which pain has on everyday life when people reach the oldest ages.

  18. Is there a relationship between pain intensity and postural sway in patients with non-specific low back pain?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruhe, A.; Fejer, R.; Walker, B.

    2011-01-01

    pain intensity and postural sway in adults (aged 50 or less) with non-specific low back pain. Methods: Seventy-seven patients with non-specific low back pain and a matching number of healthy controls were enrolled. Center of pressure parameters were measured by three static bipedal standing tasks of 90...... compared to healthy controls. In addition, regression analysis revealed a significant and linear increase in postural sway with higher pain ratings for all included COP parameters. Statistically significant changes in mean sway velocity in antero-posterior and medio-lateral direction and sway area were......Background: Increased center of pressure excursions are well documented in patients suffering from non-specific low back pain, whereby the altered postural sway includes both higher mean sway velocities and larger sway area. No investigation has been conducted to evaluate a relationship between...

  19. [Degenerative adult scoliosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ramos, C L; Obil-Chavarría, C A; Zárate-Kalfópulos, B; Rosales-Olivares, L M; Alpizar-Aguirre, A; Reyes-Sánchez, A A

    2015-01-01

    Adult scoliosis is a complex three-dimensional rotational deformity of the spine, resulting from the progressive degeneration of the vertebral elements in middle age, in a previously straight spine; a Cobb angle greater than 10° in the coronal plane, which also alters the sagittal and axial planes. It originates an asymmetrical degenerative disc and facet joint, creating asymmetrical loads and subsequently deformity. The main symptom is axial, radicular pain and neurological deficit. Conservative treatment includes drugs and physical therapy. The epidural injections and facet for selectively blocking nerve roots improves short-term pain. Surgical treatment is reserved for patients with intractable pain, radiculopathy and/ or neurological deficits. There is no consensus for surgical indications, however, it must have a clear understanding of the symptoms and clinical signs. The goal of surgery is to decompress neural elements with restoration, modification of the three-dimensional shape deformity and stabilize the coronal and sagittal balance.

  20. Imaging of painful scoliosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, Alun; Saifuddin, Asif [Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital Trust, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom)

    2009-03-15

    Scoliosis is defined as a lateral deviation of the spine from the normal plumb line. Commonly, there is a rotational component and deviation also in the sagittal plane (kyphosis or hyperlordosis). When scoliosis presents in adults, it is often painful. In contrast, back pain in a child is considered rare, and serious underlying pathology should be excluded, particularly since idiopathic scoliosis is typically painless. A painful scoliosis in a child or adolescent, especially if the patient has a left-sided curve, should be examined thoroughly. The aim of this review is to illustrate the causes of a painful scoliosis in children, adolescents and adults. (orig.)

  1. Chronic musculoskeletal pain: review of mechanisms and biochemical biomarkers as assessed by the microdialysis technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerdle B

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Björn Gerdle,1,2 Bijar Ghafouri,1,3 Malin Ernberg,4 Britt Larsson1,21Rehabilitation Medicine, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; 2Pain and Rehabilitation Centre, County Council of Östergötland, Linköping, Sweden; 3Rehabilitation Medicine, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; 4Department of Dental Medicine, Section of Orofacial Pain and Jaw Function, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, SwedenAbstract: Chronic musculoskeletal pain conditions are multifaceted, and approximately 20% of the adult population lives with severe chronic pain, with a higher prevalence in women and in lower income groups. Chronic pain is influenced by and interacts with physical, emotional, psychological, and social factors, and a biopsychosocial framework is increasingly applied in clinical practice. However, there is still a lack of assessment procedures based on the activated neurobiological pain mechanisms (ie, the biological part of the biopsychosocial model of pain, which may be a necessary step for further optimizing outcomes after treatments for patients with chronic pain. It has been suggested that chronic pain conditions are mainly driven by alterations in the central nervous system with little or no peripheral stimuli or nociception. In contrast, other authors argue that such central alterations are driven by peripheral alterations and nociceptive input. Microdialysis is an in vivo method for studying local tissue alterations and allows for sampling of substances in the interstitium of the muscle, where nociceptor free nerve endings are found close to the muscle fibers. The extracellular matrix plays a key role in physiologic functions of cells, including the primary afferent nociceptor. The present review mainly concerns the results of microdialysis studies and how they can contribute to the understanding of activated peripheral nociceptive and pain

  2. Prenatal protein malnutrition alters the proportion but not numbers of parvalbumin-immunoreactive interneurons in the hippocampus of the adult Sprague-Dawley rat

    OpenAIRE

    Lister, James P.; Blatt, Gene J.; Kemper, Thomas L.; Tonkiss, John; DeBassio, William A; GALLER, JANINA R.; Rosene, Douglas L.

    2011-01-01

    Prenatal protein malnutrition alters the structure and function of the adult rat hippocampal formation. The current study examines the effect of prenatal protein malnutrition on numbers of parvalbumin-immunoreactive (PV-IR) GABAergic interneurons, which are important for perisomatic inhibition of hippocampal pyramidal neurons. Brain sections from prenatally protein malnourished and normally nourished rats were stained for parvalbumin and PV-IR neurons were quantified using s...

  3. [Forefoot pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiano, Joël

    2010-03-20

    Forefoot chronic pain is a frequent problem in daily clinical practice. Mechanical pathology of the forefoot, usually called static metatarsalgia, represents the most frequent reason for consultation in pathology of the foot. The cause is a functionnal disorder or anatomic derangement of the forefoot architecture. Metatarsalgia can originate from a wide range of affections. Etiologies of chronic pain are described from medial to lateral with first ray pathologies (hallux valgus, hallux rigidus and sesamoid pathology) and first ray insufficiency, pathologies of the second, third and fourth ray and intermetatarsal spaces (second ray syndrome, Freiberg's disease, Morton neuroma, stress or bone insufficiency metatarsal fractures, intermetatarsal bursitis) and fifth ray pathology (lateral bursitis, quintus varus). Sometimes forefoot pain could also be caused by chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases (rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis) with a risk of structural metatarsophalangeal joints alteration. The pathology of the toes can, more rarely, explain a forefoot pain. So, several pathologic conditions can produce forefoot pain and the diagnostic approach must always be based on the anamnesis and clinical examination. In a second time if the cause is difficult to establish based solely on clinical findings, radiography and ultrasonography are today the most usefull auxiliary investigations.

  4. Economic and humanistic burden of post-trauma and post-surgical neuropathic pain among adults in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parsons B

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Bruce Parsons,1 Caroline Schaefer,2 Rachael Mann,3 Alesia Sadosky,1 Shoshana Daniel,4 Srinivas Nalamachu,5 Brett R Stacey,6 Edward C Nieshoff,7 Michael Tuchman,8 Alan Anschel91Pfizer, Inc, New York, NY, USA; 2Covance Market Access Services, Inc, Gaithersburg, MD, USA; 3Covance Market Access Services, Inc, San Diego, CA, USA; 4Covance Market Access Services, Inc, Conshohocken, PA, USA; 5International Clinical Research Institute, Overland Park, KS, USA; 6Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR, USA; 7Rehabilitation Institute of Michigan/Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, USA; 8Palm Beach Neurological Center, Palm Beach Gardens, FL, USA; 9Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USABackground: Neuropathic pain (NeP can be chronic, debilitating, and can interfere with sleep, functioning, and emotional well being. While there are multiple causes of NeP, few studies have examined the disease burden and treatment patterns associated with post-traumatic/post-surgical (PTPS NeP.Objective: To characterize pain, health status, function, health care resource utilization, lost productivity, and costs among subjects with PTPS NeP in the United States.Methods: This observational study enrolled 100 PTPS NeP subjects recruited during routine visits from general practitioner and specialist sites. Subjects completed a one-time questionnaire with validated measures of pain severity and pain interference, health status, sleep, anxiety and depression, productivity, and study-specific items on demographics, employment status, and out-of-pocket expenses. Investigators completed a case report form based on a 6-month retrospective chart review, recording subjects' clinical characteristics as well as current and previous medications/treatments for NeP. Subjects were stratified into mild, moderate, and severe pain groups.Results: Subjects' demographic characteristics were: mean age of 54.9 years, 53% female, and 22% employed for pay. Mean pain

  5. Female Adults with Patellofemoral Pain Are Characterized by Widespread Hyperalgesia, Which Is Not Affected Immediately by Patellofemoral Joint Loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pazzinatto, Marcella Ferraz; de Oliveira Silva, Danilo; Barton, Christian;

    2016-01-01

    with an extra load equivalent 35% of body mass. PPTs and current knee pain (measured on a visual analogue scale) was assessed before and after the loading protocol. PPTs were measured at four sites around the knee and one remote site on the upper contralateral limb. RESULTS: Females with PFP demonstrated......: Participants were recruited via advertisements in fitness centers, public places for physical activity and universities. SUBJECTS: Thirty-eight females with patellofemoral pain, and 33 female pain-free controls. METHODS: All participant performed a novel PFJ loading protocol involving stair negotiation...... symptoms, lowers the PPTs locally at the knee but has no effect on PPT on the upper contralateral limb. This suggests widespread hyperalgesia is not affected by acute symptom aggravation....

  6. Long-term effects of interprofessional biopsychosocial rehabilitation for adults with chronic non-specific low back pain: a multicentre, quasi-experimental study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Semrau

    Full Text Available Improvement of the long-term effectiveness of multidisciplinary ortho-paedic rehabilitation (MOR in the management of chronic non-specific low back pain (CLBP remains a central issue for health care in Germany. We developed an interprofessional and interdisciplinary, biopsychosocial rehabilitation concept named "PASTOR" to promote self-management in adults with CLBP and compared its effectiveness with the current model of MOR.A multicentre quasi-experimental study with three measurement time points was implemented. 680 adults aged 18 to 65 with CLBP were assed for eligibil-ity in three inpatient rehabilitation centres in Germany. At first the effects of the MOR, with a total extent of 48 hours (control group, were assessed. Thereafter, PASTOR was implemented and evaluated in the same centres (intervention group. It consisted of six interprofessional modules, which were provided on 12 days in fixed groups, with a total extent of 48 hours. Participants were assessed with self-report measures at baseline, discharge, and 12 months for functional ability (primary outcome using the Hannover Functional Ability Questionnaire (FFbH-R and vari-ous secondary outcomes (e.g. pain, health status, physical activity, pain coping, pain-related cognitions.In total 536 participants were consecutively assigned to PASTOR (n=266 or MOR (n=270. At 12 months, complete data of 368 participants was available. The adjusted between-group difference in the FFbH-R at 12 months was 6.58 (95% CI 3.38 to 9.78 using complete data and 3.56 (95% CI 0.45 to 6.67 using available da-ta, corresponding to significant small-to-medium effect sizes of d=0.42 (p<0.001 and d=0.10 (p=0.025 in favour of PASTOR. Further improvements in secondary out-comes were also observed in favour of PASTOR.The interprofessional and interdisciplinary, biopsychosocial rehabilita-tion program PASTOR shows some improvements of the long-term effectiveness of inpatient rehabilitation in the management of adults

  7. Influence of neck pain on cervical movement in the sagittal plane during smartphone use

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Smartphone use reportedly changes posture. However, how neck posture is altered in smartphone users with neck pain is unknown. This study examined changes in the posture of young adults with and without mild neck pain (MNP) when using a smartphone. [Subjects] Thirteen control subjects and 14 subjects with MNP who used smartphones were recruited. [Methods] The upper cervical (UC) and lower cervical (LC) angles in the sagittal plane were measured using an ultrasound-based motion analy...

  8. Catechol-O-methlytransferase inhibition alters pain and anxiety-related volitional behaviors through activation of β-adrenergic receptors in the rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, R. H.; Exposto, F. G.; O’Buckley, S. C.; Westlund, K. N.; Nackley, A. G.

    2015-01-01

    Reduced catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) activity resulting from genetic variation or pharmacological depletion results in enhanced pain perception in humans and nociceptive behaviors in animals. Using phasic mechanical and thermal reflex tests (e.g. von Frey, Hargreaves), recent studies show that acute COMT-dependent pain in rats is mediated by β-adrenergic receptors (βARs). In order to more closely mimic the characteristics of human chronic pain conditions associated with prolonged reductions in COMT, the present study sought to determine volitional pain-related and anxiety-like behavioral responses following sustained as well as acute COMT inhibition using an operant 10–45°C thermal place preference task and a light/dark preference test. In addition, we sought to evaluate the effects of sustained COMT inhibition on generalized body pain by measuring tactile sensory thresholds of the abdominal region. Results demonstrated that acute and sustained administration of the COMT inhibitor OR486 increased pain behavior in response to thermal heat. Further, sustained administration of OR486 increased anxiety behavior in response to bright light, as well as abdominal mechanosensation. Finally, all pain-related behaviors were blocked by the non-selective βAR antagonist propranolol. Collectively, these findings provide the first evidence that stimulation of ARs following acute or chronic COMT inhibition drives cognitive-affective behaviors associated with heightened pain that affects multiple body sites. PMID:25659347

  9. Catechol-O-methyltransferase inhibition alters pain and anxiety-related volitional behaviors through activation of β-adrenergic receptors in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, R H; Exposto, F G; O'Buckley, S C; Westlund, K N; Nackley, A G

    2015-04-02

    Reduced catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) activity resulting from genetic variation or pharmacological depletion results in enhanced pain perception in humans and nociceptive behaviors in animals. Using phasic mechanical and thermal reflex tests (e.g. von Frey, Hargreaves), recent studies show that acute COMT-dependent pain in rats is mediated by β-adrenergic receptors (βARs). In order to more closely mimic the characteristics of human chronic pain conditions associated with prolonged reductions in COMT, the present study sought to determine volitional pain-related and anxiety-like behavioral responses following sustained as well as acute COMT inhibition using an operant 10-45°C thermal place preference task and a light/dark preference test. In addition, we sought to evaluate the effects of sustained COMT inhibition on generalized body pain by measuring tactile sensory thresholds of the abdominal region. Results demonstrated that acute and sustained administration of the COMT inhibitor OR486 increased pain behavior in response to thermal heat. Further, sustained administration of OR486 increased anxiety behavior in response to bright light, as well as abdominal mechanosensation. Finally, all pain-related behaviors were blocked by the non-selective βAR antagonist propranolol. Collectively, these findings provide the first evidence that stimulation of βARs following acute or chronic COMT inhibition drives cognitive-affective behaviors associated with heightened pain that affects multiple body sites.

  10. "Well, it's nobody's responsibility but my own". A qualitative study to explore views about the determinants of health and prevention of knee pain in older adults.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Jinks, Clare

    2010-03-22

    Abstract Background Dahlgren and Whitehead\\'s \\'rainbow\\' outlines key determinants of health and has been widely adopted within public health policy and research. Public understanding regarding the determinants of health is, however, relatively unknown, particularly in relation to common chronic joint problems like knee pain. We aimed to explore individual attitudes to the prevention of knee pain, and assess how people make sense of their lives by using the rainbow model to explore social determinants of health. Methods Twenty-eight semi-structured interviews were undertaken with older adults living in the community. The format of the interview enabled individuals to first tell their story, then the rainbow picture was used to further prompt discussion. Interviews were digitally recorded and transcripts were fully transcribed. Qualitative computer software package NVivo 2 was used to manage the data. Thematic analysis was undertaken. Results Individual responsibility for health was a dominant theme although the role of health and statutory services was also recognised. Barriers to uptake of prevention activities included cultural perceptions, attitudes towards work and perceived costs of prevention activities. Participants used the rainbow for locating their personal life within a wider social, economic and policy context. Conclusions People view individual responsibility as key to maintaining health and draw upon the past, present and future expectations when considering social determinants of their health. The rainbow picture does have relevance at the individual level and can help to formulate more dynamic and contextualised approaches to the prevention of health conditions in community living adults.

  11. Family history of irritable bowel syndrome is the major determinant of persistent abdominal complaints in young adults with a history of pediatric recurrent abdominal pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fabio Pace; Giovanna Zuin; Stefania Di Giacomo; Paola Molteni; Valentina Casini; Massimo Fontana; Gabriele Bianchi Porro

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To assess the late outcome of teen-agers with a previous history of recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) or irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).METHODS: A group of 67 children with RAP referred to the department from January 1986 to December 1995was followed up between 5 and 13 years after the initial diagnosis by means of a structured telephone interview.We hypothesized that those patients with persistent adult IBS-like symptoms would be significantly more likely to report a family history of IBS in comparison with adults with no persistent abdominal complaint.RESULTS: Out of the 52 trackable subjects, 15 were found to present IBS-like symptoms at follow-up (29%)whereas the majority (37 subjects) did not. Subjects with IBS-like symptoms were almost three times more likely to present at least one sibling with similar symptoms compared to subjects not complaining (40.0% vs 16.0%), respectively (P < 0.05 at Student t test).Subjects with IBS-like symptoms also reported a higher prevalence of extra-intestinal symptoms, such as back pain, fibromyalgia, headache, fatigue and sleep disturbances.CONCLUSION: The study confirms previous observations indicating that pediatric RAP can predict later development of IBS. The latter appears to be greatly influenced by intrafamilial aggregation of symptoms,possibly through the learning of a specific illness behavior.

  12. "Well, it's nobody's responsibility but my own." A qualitative study to explore views about the determinants of health and prevention of knee pain in older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Neill Tracey

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dahlgren and Whitehead's 'rainbow' outlines key determinants of health and has been widely adopted within public health policy and research. Public understanding regarding the determinants of health is, however, relatively unknown, particularly in relation to common chronic joint problems like knee pain. We aimed to explore individual attitudes to the prevention of knee pain, and assess how people make sense of their lives by using the rainbow model to explore social determinants of health. Methods Twenty-eight semi-structured interviews were undertaken with older adults living in the community. The format of the interview enabled individuals to first tell their story, then the rainbow picture was used to further prompt discussion. Interviews were digitally recorded and transcripts were fully transcribed. Qualitative computer software package NVivo 2 was used to manage the data. Thematic analysis was undertaken. Results Individual responsibility for health was a dominant theme although the role of health and statutory services was also recognised. Barriers to uptake of prevention activities included cultural perceptions, attitudes towards work and perceived costs of prevention activities. Participants used the rainbow for locating their personal life within a wider social, economic and policy context. Conclusions People view individual responsibility as key to maintaining health and draw upon the past, present and future expectations when considering social determinants of their health. The rainbow picture does have relevance at the individual level and can help to formulate more dynamic and contextualised approaches to the prevention of health conditions in community living adults.

  13. Correlation of non-traumatic neck pain with cervical angle and shoulder retractor power in adult clerical population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isha Avadhut Godbole

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: A forward head posture (or chin poking is perhaps the most common abnormality associated with NP and is commonly defined as the protrusion of the head in the sagittal plane so that the head is placed anterior to the trunk. Forward head posture can occur because of an anterior translation of the head, lower cervical flexion, or both, and it is claimed to be associated with an increase in upper-cervical extension. It is suggested that forward head posture leads to an increase in the compressive forces on the cervical apophyseal joints and posterior part of the vertebra and to changes in connective tissue length and strength (because of stretching of the anterior structures of the neck and shortening of the posterior muscles resulting in pain. The objective of the study was to correlate neck pain with cervical angle and shoulder retractor power in non-traumatic neck pain patients. Methods: 50 clerical workers having non traumatic neck pain were included. Neck pain was measured on VAS, cervical angle was measured using photometric method and shoulder retractor power was measured. Results: VAS showed moderate positive correlation with cervical angles (0.63 and 0.72 and moderate negative correlation with shoulder retractor power (-0.59 and -0.71. A moderate positive correlation of craniocervical angle to VAS seen (0.66 whereas there was negative correlation with shoulder retractors I and II (-0.59 and -0.61 A positive correlation was seen between VAS and craniocervical angle but is moderately negative with shoulder retractors I (Rhomboids and II (Middle trapezius (0.78, 0.04, -0.69 and -0.64. Conclusion: A moderate increase in cranio vertebral and craniocervical angle showed plausible weakness in lower Trapezius and rhomboids among clerks` having Non-traumatic neck pain. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(4.000: 859-862

  14. Pain in Down's Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Mafrica

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Pain is a homeostatic mechanism that intervenes to protect the organism from harmful stimuli that could damage its integrity. It is made up of two components: the sensory-discriminative component, which identifies the provenance and characteristics of the type of pain; and the affective-motivational component, on which emotional reflexes, following the painful sensation, depend.There is a system for pain control at an encephalic and spinal level, principally made up of the periaqueductal grey matter, the periventricular area, the nucleus raphe magnus, and the pain-inhibition complex situated in the posterior horns of the spinal cord. Through the activation of these pain-control systems, the nervous system suppresses the afference of pain signals. Endogenous opioids represent another analgesic system.In the course of various studies on pain transmission in Down patients, the reduced tolerance of pain and the incapacity to give a qualitative and quantitative description emerged in a powerful way. All of these aspects cause difficulty in evaluating pain. This is linked to several learning difficulties. However, it cannot be excluded that in these anomalies of pain perception, both the anatomical and the neurotransmitter alteration, typical of this syndrome, may hold a certain importance.This fact may have important clinical repercussions that could affect the choice of therapeutic and rehabilitative schemes for treatment of pathologies in which pain is the dominant symptom, such as postoperative pain. It could influence research on analgesics that are more suitable for these patients, the evaluation of the depth of analgesia during surgical operation, and ultimately, absence of obvious pain manifestations. In conclusion, alterations of the central nervous system, neurotransmitters, pain transmission, and all related problems should be considered in the management of pain in patients with Down's syndrome, especially by algologists and

  15. Efficacy of an Intrathecal Multidrug Infusion for Pain Control in Older Adults and in End-Stage Malignancies: A Report of Three Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadegh Abdolmohammadi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to explore the effectiveness of an alternative method to manage pain based on a time-limited intrathecal (IT infusion of an analgesic medication mixture. Three patients (69, 64 and 94 years of age with intractable and poorly controlled pain due to bed sores, pelvic metastatic mass, and thoracic vertebra and rib fractures, respectively, were treated. Daily doses of opioids could not be increased due to side effects. An IT catheter (20 G was placed by percutaneous approach in the lumbar area while advancing toward the thoracic region, and was then tunnelled and fixed subcutaneously. It was connected to an external infusion pump with a mixture of bupivacaine 1 mg/mL, naloxone 0.02 ng/mL, ketamine 100 μg/mL, morphine 0.01 mg/mL and clonidine 0.75 μg/mL. The starting rate was 1 mL/h. The pain was mostly controlled at a rate of <1 mL/h. Opioid consumption was reduced dramatically. The catheter was kept in place for one month in the first and third patients, and for six months in the second patient, until his death. Major side effects, such as hypotension, constipation, muscle weakness, sphincter dysfunction, and cognitive or mood deterioration, were not observed with this approach. One patient experienced a urinary tract infection followed by sepsis and meningitis, which was cured by antibiotics. The catheter was removed in this patient. IT infusion with a low-concentration multidrug mixture could be considered as an alternative modality for intractable pain relief in older adults or in malignancies.

  16. Altered postural sway in patients suffering from non-specific neck pain and whiplash associated disorder - A systematic review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruhe Alexander

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Study design Systematic literature review. Objectives To assess differences in center of pressure (COP measures in patients suffering from non-specific neck pain (NSNP or whiplash-associated disorder (WAD compared to healthy controls and any relationship between changes in postural sway and the presence of pain, its intensity, previous pain duration and the perceived level of disability. Summary of Background data Over the past 20 years, the center of pressure (COP has been commonly used as an index of postural stability in standing. While several studies investigated COP excursions in neck pain and WAD patients and compared these to healthy individuals, no comprehensive analysis of the reported differences in postural sway pattern exists. Search methods Six online databases were systematically searched followed by a manual search of the retrieved papers. Selection Criteria Papers comparing COP measures derived from bipedal static task conditions on a force plate of people with NSNP and WAD to those of healthy controls. Data collection and analysis Two reviewers independently screened titles and abstracts for relevance. Screening for final inclusion, data extraction and quality assessment were carried out with a third reviewer to reconcile differences. Results Ten papers met the inclusion criteria. Heterogeneity in study designs prevented pooling of the data and no direct comparison of data across the studies was possible. Instead, a qualitative data analysis was conducted. There was broad consensus that patients with either type of neck pain have increased COP excursions compared to healthy individuals, a difference that was more pronounced in people with WAD. An increased sway in antero-posterior direction was observed in both groups. Conclusions Patients with neck pain (due to either NSNP or WAD exhibit greater postural instability than healthy controls, signified by greater COP excursions irrespective of the COP parameter chosen

  17. Altered aiming movements in Parkinson's disease patients and elderly adults as a function of delays in movement onset

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romero, D.H.; Gemmert, A.W.A. van; Adler, C.H.; Bekkering, H.; Stelmach, G.E.

    2003-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of lengthening the time the hand remains immobilized on an aiming movement performed by Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and elderly adults, and whether visual information could compensate for the effects of delay. In Experiment One, PD patients and elderly adults

  18. Is there a relationship between pain intensity and postural sway in patients with non-specific low back pain?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fejer René

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased center of pressure excursions are well documented in patients suffering from non-specific low back pain, whereby the altered postural sway includes both higher mean sway velocities and larger sway area. No investigation has been conducted to evaluate a relationship between pain intensity and postural sway in adults (aged 50 or less with non-specific low back pain. Methods Seventy-seven patients with non-specific low back pain and a matching number of healthy controls were enrolled. Center of pressure parameters were measured by three static bipedal standing tasks of 90 sec duration with eyes closed in narrow stance on a firm surface. The perceived pain intensity was assessed by a numeric rating scale (NRS-11, an equal number of patients (n = 11 was enrolled per pain score. Results Generally, our results confirmed increased postural instability in pain sufferers compared to healthy controls. In addition, regression analysis revealed a significant and linear increase in postural sway with higher pain ratings for all included COP parameters. Statistically significant changes in mean sway velocity in antero-posterior and medio-lateral direction and sway area were reached with an incremental change in NRS scores of two to three points. Conclusions COP mean velocity and sway area are closely related to self-reported pain scores. This relationship may be of clinical use as an objective monitoring tool for patients under treatment or rehabilitation.

  19. Groin pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain - groin; Lower abdominal pain; Genital pain; Perineal pain ... Common causes of groin pain include: Pulled muscle, tendon, or ligaments in the leg: This problem often occurs in people who play sports such as ...

  20. Early changes in somatosensory function in spinal pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcuzzi, Anna; Dean, Catherine M; Wrigley, Paul J; Hush, Julia M

    2015-02-01

    Alterations in sensory processing have been demonstrated in chronic low back and neck pain. However, it has not been yet systematically summarized how early these changes occur in spinal pain. This systematic review examines the available literature measuring somatosensory function in acute (<6 weeks) and subacute (6-12 weeks) spinal pain. The protocol for this review has been registered on the International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews (PROSPERO). An electronic search of 4 databases was conducted to retrieve studies assessing somatosensory function by quantitative sensory testing in adults with spinal pain of up to 12 weeks duration. Two reviewers independently screened the studies and assessed the risk of bias. Studies were grouped according to spinal pain condition (whiplash injury, idiopathic neck pain, and nonspecific low back pain), and, where possible, meta-analyses were performed for comparable results. Fifteen studies were included. Sources of bias included lack of assessor blinding, unclear sampling methods, and lack of control for confounders. We found that: (1) there is consistent evidence for thermal and widespread mechanical pain hypersensitivity in the acute stage of whiplash, (2) there is no evidence for pain hypersensitivity in the acute and subacute stage of idiopathic neck pain, although the body of evidence is small, and (3) hyperalgesia and spinal cord hyperexcitability have been detected in early stages of nonspecific low back pain, although evidence about widespread effects are conflicting. Future longitudinal research using multiple sensory modalities and standardized testing may reveal the involvement of somatosensory changes in the development and maintenance of chronic pain.

  1. Longitudinal Effects of Physical Inactivity and Obesity on Gait Speed in Older Adults with Frequent Knee Pain: Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad M. Bindawas

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Physical inactivity (PI and obesity are risk factors for many health conditions, including knee pain (KP. The purpose of the present study was to examine the 6-year effects of PI and obesity on gait speed (GS among older adults with frequent KP. This prospective cohort study used data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI. At baseline, we studied 1788 adults aged 45 to 79 years old. We grouped the participants into four categories according to baseline scores on the Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly (PASE and body mass index (BMI. GS was measured using the 20-m timed walk test. Frequent KP was assessed with a self-report questionnaire, and obesity was assessed by BMI (30 kg/m2 or greater. General linear mixed models were conducted using data collected at baseline and 12, 24, 36, 48, and 72 months. After adjusting for all covariates, lower levels of physical activity and obesity were associated with a decrease in GS (β = −0.095, SE = 0.011, p < 0.0001. Our results suggest that both PI and obesity are associated with decreased GS over time in older adults with frequent KP.

  2. Evaluation of elastic bands for lower extremity resistance training in adults with and without musculo-skeletal pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundstrup, E; Jakobsen, M D; Andersen, C H

    2014-01-01

    . Electromyographic (EMG) activity of 10 muscles was measured in 24 women and 18 men during lunges with elastic resistance, lunges with dumbbells, and unilateral leg press in machine using 10 repetition maximum loadings, and normalized to maximal voluntary isometric contraction EMG. Lunges with dumbbells and leg...... these findings. However, pain in the lower back decreased muscular activity of the gluteus maximus and vastus medialis (P 

  3. Prevalência de dor crônica em adultos Prevalencia de dolor cronico en adultos Prevalence of chronic pain in adult workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Clara Giorio Dutra Kreling

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available A dor crônica é um problema de saúde pública que acarreta prejuízos pessoais e sociais. Estudos epidemiológicos de dor crônica no Brasil e no resto do mundo são escassos, principalmente em se tratando de dores não específicas e em populações não vinculadas a serviços de saúde. Foram objetivos desse estudo: identificar a prevalência de dor crônica em adultos trabalhadores; analisar a prevalência de dor crônica conforme o sexo; e analisar a prevalência de dor conforme locais do corpo. Esta pesquisa foi realizada com uma amostra de 505 funcionários da Universidade Estadual de Londrina (Paraná, Brasil, considerando-se uma prevalência esperada de 50%, margem de erro de 4% na estimativa e nível de confiança de 95%. Estabeleceram-se como significativos os valores de pEl dolor crónico es un problema de salud pública que puede acarrear prejuicios personales y sociales. Estudios epidemiológicos del dolor crónico en Brasil y en el resto del mundo son escasos, máxime cuando se trata de los dolores no específicos y en poblaciones que no se vinculam a los servícios de salud. Esse estudio tuvo como objetivos: identificar la prevalencia del dolor crónico em adultos trabajadores; analizar la prevalencia del dolor conforme regiones del cuerpo. Esa investigación fue realizada con una muestra de 505 funcionarios de la Universidad Estadual de Londrina, considerándose una prevalencia esperada de 50%, margen de error de 4% em la estimativa y nivel de confianza de 95%. Se estableció como significativo los valores de pChronic pain is a public health problem which causes personal and social losses. There are few epidemiological studies of chronic pain in Brazil and elsewhere in the world, especially those dealing with non-specific pain, in general population. The objectives of this study were: to identify the prevalence of chronic pain in adult workers; to analyze the prevalence of chronic pain according to gender, and local of pain

  4. Elevated copper levels during larval development cause altered locomotor behavior in the adult carabid beetle Pterostichus cupreus L. (Coleoptera: Carbidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bayley, M; Baatrup, E; Heimbach, U

    1995-01-01

    It is generally believed that copper causes changes in carabid communities indirectly by reducing food availability, because these animals are frequently found to have only slightly elevated metal contents even close to pollution sources. Using computer-centered video tracking, the locomotor...... behavior of adult Pterostichus cupreus carabid beetles was quantified after being raised on copper-contaminated food and soil during larval development. Copper was found to have an acute toxic effect measured in larval mortality, to cause a slight increase in the developmental period of males......, but not to effect the emergence weights of adults of either sex. This toxic effect on the larvae was preserved through pupation to the surviving adults, which were normal in size and appearance, but displayed a dramatically depressed locomotor behavior. Copper analysis of these adults revealed that copper levels...

  5. Larval Population Density Alters Adult Sleep in Wild-Type Drosophila melanogaster but Not in Amnesiac Mutant Flies

    OpenAIRE

    Chi, Michael W.; Leslie C. Griffith; Vecsey, Christopher G.

    2014-01-01

    Sleep has many important biological functions, but how sleep is regulated remains poorly understood. In humans, social isolation and other stressors early in life can disrupt adult sleep. In fruit flies housed at different population densities during early adulthood, social enrichment was shown to increase subsequent sleep, but it is unknown if population density during early development can also influence adult sleep. To answer this question, we maintained Drosophila larvae at a range of pop...

  6. Kidney Dysfunction in Adult Offspring Exposed In Utero to Type 1 Diabetes Is Associated with Alterations in Genome-Wide DNA Methylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-François Gautier

    Full Text Available Fetal exposure to hyperglycemia impacts negatively kidney development and function.Our objective was to determine whether fetal exposure to moderate hyperglycemia is associated with epigenetic alterations in DNA methylation in peripheral blood cells and whether those alterations are related to impaired kidney function in adult offspring.Twenty nine adult, non-diabetic offspring of mothers with type 1 diabetes (T1D (case group were matched with 28 offspring of T1D fathers (control group for the study of their leukocyte genome-wide DNA methylation profile (27,578 CpG sites, Human Methylation 27 BeadChip, Illumina Infinium. In a subset of 19 cases and 18 controls, we assessed renal vascular development by measuring Glomerular Filtration Rate (GFR and Effective Renal Plasma Flow (ERPF at baseline and during vasodilatation produced by amino acid infusion.Globally, DNA was under-methylated in cases vs. controls. Among the 87 CpG sites differently methylated, 74 sites were less methylated and 13 sites more methylated in cases vs. controls. None of these CpG sites were located on a gene known to be directly involved in kidney development and/or function. However, the gene encoding DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1--a key enzyme involved in gene expression during early development--was under-methylated in cases. The average methylation of the 74 under-methylated sites differently correlated with GFR in cases and controls.Alterations in methylation profile imprinted by the hyperglycemic milieu of T1D mothers during fetal development may impact kidney function in adult offspring. The involved pathways seem to be a nonspecific imprinting process rather than specific to kidney development or function.

  7. Altered spinal kinematics and muscle recruitment pattern of the cervical and thoracic spine in people with chronic neck pain during functional task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Sharon M H; Szeto, Grace P Y; Lee, Raymond Y W

    2014-02-01

    Knowledge on the spinal kinematics and muscle activation of the cervical and thoracic spine during functional task would add to our understanding of the performance and interplay of these spinal regions during dynamic condition. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of chronic neck pain on the three-dimensional kinematics and muscle recruitment pattern of the cervical and thoracic spine during an overhead reaching task involving a light weight transfer by the upper limb. Synchronized measurements of the three-dimensional spinal kinematics and electromyographic activities of cervical and thoracic spine were acquired in thirty individuals with chronic neck pain and thirty age- and gender-matched asymptomatic controls. Neck pain group showed a significantly decreased cervical velocity and acceleration while performing the task. They also displayed with a predominantly prolonged coactivation of cervical and thoracic muscles throughout the task cycle. The current findings highlighted the importance to examine differential kinematic variables of the spine which are associated with changes in the muscle recruitment in people with chronic neck pain. The results also provide an insight to the appropriate clinical intervention to promote the recovery of the functional disability commonly reported in patients with neck pain disorders.

  8. Prion replication occurs in endogenous adult neural stem cells and alters their neuronal fate: involvement of endogenous neural stem cells in prion diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aroa Relaño-Ginès

    Full Text Available Prion diseases are irreversible progressive neurodegenerative diseases, leading to severe incapacity and death. They are characterized in the brain by prion amyloid deposits, vacuolisation, astrocytosis, neuronal degeneration, and by cognitive, behavioural and physical impairments. There is no treatment for these disorders and stem cell therapy therefore represents an interesting new approach. Gains could not only result from the cell transplantation, but also from the stimulation of endogenous neural stem cells (NSC or by the combination of both approaches. However, the development of such strategies requires a detailed knowledge of the pathology, particularly concerning the status of the adult neurogenesis and endogenous NSC during the development of the disease. During the past decade, several studies have consistently shown that NSC reside in the adult mammalian central nervous system (CNS and that adult neurogenesis occurs throughout the adulthood in the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricle or the Dentate Gyrus of the hippocampus. Adult NSC are believed to constitute a reservoir for neuronal replacement during normal cell turnover or after brain injury. However, the activation of this system does not fully compensate the neuronal loss that occurs during neurodegenerative diseases and could even contribute to the disease progression. We investigated here the status of these cells during the development of prion disorders. We were able to show that NSC accumulate and replicate prions. Importantly, this resulted in the alteration of their neuronal fate which then represents a new pathologic event that might underlie the rapid progression of the disease.

  9. Endpoints in pediatric pain studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Dijk (Monique); I. Ceelie (Ilse); D. Tibboel (Dick)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractAssessing pain intensity in (preverbal) children is more difficult than in adults. Tools to measure pain are being used as primary endpoints [e.g., pain intensity, time to first (rescue) analgesia, total analgesic consumption, adverse effects, and long-term effects] in studies on the eff

  10. Exercise is More Effective at Altering Gut Microbial Composition and Producing Stable Changes in Lean Mass in Juvenile versus Adult Male F344 Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Mika

    Full Text Available The mammalian intestine harbors a complex microbial ecosystem that influences many aspects of host physiology. Exposure to specific microbes early in development affects host metabolism, immune function, and behavior across the lifespan. Just as the physiology of the developing organism undergoes a period of plasticity, the developing microbial ecosystem is characterized by instability and may also be more sensitive to change. Early life thus presents a window of opportunity for manipulations that produce adaptive changes in microbial composition. Recent insights have revealed that increasing physical activity can increase the abundance of beneficial microbial species. We therefore investigated whether six weeks of wheel running initiated in the juvenile period (postnatal day 24 would produce more robust and stable changes in microbial communities versus exercise initiated in adulthood (postnatal day 70 in male F344 rats. 16S rRNA gene sequencing was used to characterize the microbial composition of juvenile versus adult runners and their sedentary counterparts across multiple time points during exercise and following exercise cessation. Alpha diversity measures revealed that the microbial communities of young runners were less even and diverse, a community structure that reflects volatility and malleability. Juvenile onset exercise altered several phyla and, notably, increased Bacteroidetes and decreased Firmicutes, a configuration associated with leanness. At the genus level of taxonomy, exercise altered more genera in juveniles than in the adults and produced patterns associated with adaptive metabolic consequences. Given the potential of these changes to contribute to a lean phenotype, we examined body composition in juvenile versus adult runners. Interestingly, exercise produced persistent increases in lean body mass in juvenile but not adult runners. Taken together, these results indicate that the impact of exercise on gut microbiota

  11. High-intensity interval training on an aquatic treadmill in adults with osteoarthritis: effect on pain, balance, function, and mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressel, Eadric; Wing, Jessica E; Miller, Andrew I; Dolny, Dennis G

    2014-08-01

    Although aquatic exercise is considered a potentially effective treatment intervention for people with osteoarthritis (OA), previous research has focused primarily on calisthenics in a shallow pool with the inherent limitations on regulating exercise intensity. The purpose of this study was to quantify the efficacy of a 6-week aquatic treadmill exercise program on measures of pain, balance, function, and mobility. Eighteen participants (age = 64.5 ± 10.2 years) with knee OA completed a non-exercise control period followed by a 6-week exercise period. Outcome measures included visual analog scales for pain, posturography for balance, sit-to-stand test for function, and a 10-m walk test for mobility. The exercise protocol included balance training and high-intensity interval training (HIT) in an aquatic treadmill using water jets to destabilize while standing and achieve high ratings of perceived exertion (14-19) while walking. In comparison with pretests, participants displayed reduced joint pain (pre = 50.3 ± 24.8 mm vs. post = 15.8 ± 10.6 mm), improved balance (equilibrium pre = 66.6 ± 11.0 vs. post = 73.5 ± 7.1), function (rising index pre = 0.49 ± 0.19% vs. post = 0.33 ± 0.11%), and mobility (walk pre = 8.6 ± 1.4 s vs. post = 7.8 ± 1.1 s) after participating in the exercise protocol (p = 0.03-0.001). The same benefits were not observed after the non-exercise control period. Adherence to the exercise protocol was exceptional and no participants reported adverse effects, suggesting that aquatic treadmill exercise that incorporates balance and HIT training was well tolerated by patients with OA and may be effective at managing symptoms of OA.

  12. Heart rate variability analysis for newborn infants prolonged pain assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jonckheere, J; Rakza, T; Logier, R; Jeanne, M; Jounwaz, R; Storme, L

    2011-01-01

    Pain management is a general concern for healthcare quality. In the particular context of neonatal care, it's well known that an efficient pain management will decrease mortality and morbidity of newborn infants. Furthermore, the plasticity of developing brain is vulnerable to pain and/or stress, that in turn may cause long term neurodevelopmental changes, including altered pain sensitivity and neuroanatomic and behavioural abnormalities. During neonatal intensive care stay, large number of painful procedures are performed, the majority of which are not accompanied by adequate analgesia. Optimal management requires competent pain assessment which can be especially difficult to perform in this non verbal population. We have developed an instantaneous heart rate variability (HRV) analysis method, non intrusive and user-friendly, based on the ECG signal acquisition. This analysis method enabled us to design parameters related to the influence of pain on the Autonomic Nervous System (ANS) activity. This paper presents the application of this method, previously validated for adults under general anesthesia, to the domain of newborn infants prolonged pain assessment.

  13. Altered functional brain connectivity in a non-clinical sample of young adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocchi, Luca; Bramati, Ivanei E; Zalesky, Andrew; Furukawa, Emi; Fontenelle, Leonardo F; Moll, Jorge; Tripp, Gail; Mattos, Paulo

    2012-12-05

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is characterized by symptoms of inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity that often persist in adulthood. There is a growing consensus that ADHD is associated with abnormal function of diffuse brain networks, but such alterations remain poorly characterized. Using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, we characterized multivariate (complex network measures), bivariate (network-based statistic), and univariate (regional homogeneity) properties of brain networks in a non-clinical, drug-naive sample of high-functioning young men and women with ADHD (nine males, seven females) and a group of matched healthy controls. Data from our sample allowed the isolation of intrinsic functional connectivity alterations specific to ADHD diagnosis and symptoms that are not related to developmental delays, general cognitive dysfunction, or history of medication use. Multivariate results suggested that frontal, temporal, and occipital cortices were abnormally connected locally as well as with the rest of the brain in individuals with ADHD. Results from the network-based statistic support and extend multivariate results by isolating two brain networks comprising regions between which inter-regional connectivity was significantly altered in the ADHD group; namely, a frontal amygdala-occipital network and a frontal temporal-occipital network. Brain behavior correlations further highlighted the key role of altered orbitofrontal-temporal and frontal-amygdala connectivity for symptoms of inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity. All univariate properties were similar between groups. Taken together, results from this study show that the diagnosis and the two main symptom dimensions of ADHD are related to altered intrinsic connectivity in orbitofrontal-temporal-occipital and fronto-amygdala-occipital networks. Accordingly, our findings highlight the importance of extending the conceptualization of ADHD beyond segregated fronto

  14. Magnified visual feedback exacerbates positional variability in older adults due to altered modulation of the primary agonist muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baweja, Harsimran S; Kwon, Minhyuk; Christou, Evangelos A

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether magnified visual feedback during position-holding contractions exacerbates the age-associated differences in motor output variability due to changes in the neural activation of the agonist muscle in the upper and lower limb. Twelve young (18-35 years) and ten older adults (65-85 years) were instructed to accurately match a target position at 5° of index finger abduction and ankle dorsiflexion while lifting 10 % of their 1 repetition maximum (1RM) load. Position was maintained at three different visual angles (0.1°, 1°, and 4°) that varied across trials. Each trial lasted 25 s and visual feedback of position was removed from 15 to 25 s. Positional error was quantified as the root mean square error (RMSE) of the subject's performance from the target. Positional variability was quantified as the standard deviation of the position data. The neural activation of the first dorsal interosseus and tibialis anterior was measured with surface electromyography (EMG). Older adults were less accurate compared with young adults and the RMSE decreased significantly with an increase in visual gain. As expected, and independent of limb, older adults exhibited significantly greater positional variability compared with young adults that was exacerbated with magnification of visual feedback (1° and 4°). This increase in variability at the highest magnification of visual feedback was predicted by a decrease in power from 12 to 30 Hz of the agonist EMG signal. These findings demonstrate that motor control in older adults is impaired by magnified visual feedback during positional tasks.

  15. The disruptive effects of pain on complex cognitive performance and executive control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmund Keogh

    Full Text Available Pain interferes and disrupts attention. What is less clear is how pain affects performance on complex tasks, and the strategies used to ensure optimal outcomes. The aim of the current study was to examine the effect of pain on higher-order executive control processes involved in managing complex tasks. Sixty-two adult volunteers (40 female completed two computer-based tasks: a breakfast making task and a word generation puzzle. Both were complex, involving executive control functions, including goal-directed planning and switching. Half of those recruited performed the tasks under conditions of thermal heat pain, and half with no accompanying pain. Whilst pain did not affect central performance on either task, it did have indirect effects. For the breakfast task, pain resulted in a decreased ability to multitask, with performance decrements found on the secondary task. However, no effects of pain were found on the processes thought to underpin this task. For the word generation puzzle, pain did not affect task performance, but did alter subjective accounts of the processes used to complete the task; pain affected the perceived allocation of time to the task, as well as switching perceptions. Sex differences were also found. When studying higher-order cognitive processes, pain-related interference effects are varied, and may result in subtle or indirect changes in cognition.

  16. Pain inhibits pain; human brainstem mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, A M; Macefield, V G; Henderson, L A

    2016-01-01

    Conditioned pain modulation is a powerful analgesic mechanism, occurring when a painful stimulus is inhibited by a second painful stimulus delivered at a different body location. Reduced conditioned pain modulation capacity is associated with the development of some chronic pain conditions and the effectiveness of some analgesic medications. Human lesion studies show that the circuitry responsible for conditioned pain modulation lies within the caudal brainstem, although the precise nuclei in humans remain unknown. We employed brain imaging to determine brainstem sites responsible for conditioned pain modulation in 54 healthy individuals. In all subjects, 8 noxious heat stimuli (test stimuli) were applied to the right side of the mouth and brain activity measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging. This paradigm was then repeated. However, following the fourth noxious stimulus, a separate noxious stimulus, consisting of an intramuscular injection of hypertonic saline into the leg, was delivered (conditioning stimulus). During this test and conditioning stimulus period, 23 subjects displayed conditioned pain modulation analgesia whereas 31 subjects did not. An individual's analgesic ability was not influenced by gender, pain intensity levels of the test or conditioning stimuli or by psychological variables such as pain catastrophizing or fear of pain. Brain images were processed using SPM8 and the brainstem isolated using the SUIT toolbox. Significant increases in signal intensity were determined during each test stimulus and compared between subjects that did and did not display CPM analgesia (ppain modulation circuitry provides a framework for the future investigations into the neural mechanisms responsible for the maintenance of persistent pain conditions thought to involve altered analgesic circuitry.

  17. Abdominal pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stomach pain; Pain - abdomen; Belly ache; Abdominal cramps; Bellyache; Stomachache ... Almost everyone has pain in the abdomen at some point. Most of the time, it is not serious. How bad your pain is does not always reflect the seriousness ...

  18. Chronic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pain. Psychotherapy, relaxation and medication therapies, biofeedback, and behavior modification may also be employed to treat chronic pain. × ... pain. Psychotherapy, relaxation and medication therapies, biofeedback, and behavior modification may also be employed to treat chronic pain. ...

  19. Heel pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain - heel ... Heel pain is most often the result of overuse. However, it may be caused by an injury. Your heel ... on the heel Conditions that may cause heel pain include: Swelling and pain in the Achilles tendon ...

  20. Flank pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain - side; Side pain ... Flank pain can be a sign of a kidney problem. But, since many organs are in this area, other causes are possible. If you have flank pain and fever , chills, blood in the urine, or ...

  1. Are altered smooth pursuit eye movements related to chronic pain and disability following whiplash injuries? A prospective trial with one-year follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsted, Alice; Jørgensen, Lars Vincents; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte

    2008-01-01

    collision were determined. RESULTS: Results of early eye movement tests were not associated with the prognosis. Reduced smooth pursuit performance when tested in static cervical rotation at the one-year follow-up was significantly associated with higher neck pain intensity at that time (regression...

  2. Adult Neurogenesis in the Female Mouse Hypothalamus: Estradiol and High-Fat Diet Alter the Generation of Newborn Neurons Expressing Estrogen Receptor α

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jane; Nettles, Sabin A.; Byrnes, Elizabeth M.

    2016-01-01

    Estrogens and leptins act in the hypothalamus to maintain reproduction and energy homeostasis. Neurogenesis in the adult mammalian hypothalamus has been implicated in the regulation of energy homeostasis. Recently, high-fat diet (HFD) and estradiol (E2) have been shown to alter cell proliferation and the number of newborn leptin-responsive neurons in the hypothalamus of adult female mice. The current study tested the hypothesis that new cells expressing estrogen receptor α (ERα) are generated in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) and the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMH) of the adult female mouse, hypothalamic regions that are critical in energy homeostasis. Adult mice were ovariectomized and implanted with capsules containing E2 or oil. Within each hormone group, mice were fed an HFD or standard chow for 6 weeks and treated with BrdU to label new cells. Newborn cells that respond to estrogens were identified in the ARC and VMH, of which a subpopulation was leptin sensitive, indicating that the subpopulation consists of neurons. Moreover, there was an interaction between diet and hormone with an effect on the number of these newborn ERα-expressing neurons that respond to leptin. Regardless of hormone treatment, HFD increased the number of ERα-expressing cells in the ARC and VMH. E2 decreased hypothalamic fibroblast growth factor 10 (Fgf10) gene expression in HFD mice, suggesting a role for Fgf10 in E2 effects on neurogenesis. These findings of newly created estrogen-responsive neurons in the adult brain provide a novel mechanism by which estrogens can act in the hypothalamus to regulate energy homeostasis in females. PMID:27679811

  3. Social learning contributions to the etiology and treatment of functional abdominal pain and inflammatory bowel disease in children and adults

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rona L Levy; Shelby L Langer; William E Whitehead

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews empirical work on cognitive and social learning contributions to the etiology and treatment of illness behavior associated with functional abdominal pain and inflammatory bowel disease. A particular emphasis is placed on randomized controlled trials,the majority of which are multi-modal in orientation,incorporating elements of cognitive behavioral therapy,social learning, and relaxation. Based on this review,we offer methodological and clinical suggestions: (1)Research investigations should include adequate sample sizes, long-term follow-up assessments, and a credible,active control group. (2) Standard gastrointestinal practice should include, when appropriate, learning opportunities for patients and family members, for example, instruction regarding the encouragement of wellness behavior.

  4. An epigenetic hypothesis for the genomic memory of pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian eAlvarado

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pain is accompanied with long-term sensory, affective and cognitive disturbances. What are the mechanisms that mediate the long-term consequences of painful experiences and embed them in the genome? We hypothesize that alterations in DNA methylation, an enzymatic covalent modification of cytosine bases in DNA, serve as a genomic memory of pain in the adult cortex. DNA methylation is an epigenetic mechanism for long-term regulation of gene expression. Neuronal plasticity at the neuroanatomical, functional, morphological, physiological and molecular levels has been demonstrated throughout the neuroaxis in response to persistent pain, including in the adult prefrontal cortex (PFC. We have previously reported widespread changes in gene expression and DNA methylation in the PFC many months following peripheral nerve injury. In support of this hypothesis, we show here that up-regulation of a gene involved with synaptic function, Synaptotagmin II (syt2, in the PFC in a chronic pain model is associated with long-term changes in DNA methylation. The challenges of understanding the contributions of epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation within the PFC to pain chronicity and their therapeutic implications are discussed.

  5. An epigenetic hypothesis for the genomic memory of pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado, Sebastian; Tajerian, Maral; Suderman, Matthew; Machnes, Ziv; Pierfelice, Stephanie; Millecamps, Magali; Stone, Laura S; Szyf, Moshe

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pain is accompanied with long-term sensory, affective and cognitive disturbances. What are the mechanisms that mediate the long-term consequences of painful experiences and embed them in the genome? We hypothesize that alterations in DNA methylation, an enzymatic covalent modification of cytosine bases in DNA, serve as a "genomic" memory of pain in the adult cortex. DNA methylation is an epigenetic mechanism for long-term regulation of gene expression. Neuronal plasticity at the neuroanatomical, functional, morphological, physiological and molecular levels has been demonstrated throughout the neuroaxis in response to persistent pain, including in the adult prefrontal cortex (PFC). We have previously reported widespread changes in gene expression and DNA methylation in the PFC many months following peripheral nerve injury. In support of this hypothesis, we show here that up-regulation of a gene involved with synaptic function, Synaptotagmin II (syt2), in the PFC in a chronic pain model is associated with long-term changes in DNA methylation. The challenges of understanding the contributions of epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation within the PFC to pain chronicity and their therapeutic implications are discussed.

  6. Prevalence of acute post-operative pain in patients in adult age-group undergoing inpatient abdominal surgery and correlation of intensity of pain and satisfaction with analgesic management: A cross-sectional single institute-based study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Prashant Kumar; Saikia, Priyam; Lahakar, Mangala

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Considering the paucity of regional data, this study was designed to investigate the prevalence of post-operative pain and determine if there exists any correlation between the intensity of post-operative pain and patient's level of satisfaction with their pain management after inpatient abdominal surgery at an academic tertiary care government centre. Methods: Pain intensity was measured in 120 patients with numeric rating scale at the fifth post-operative hour, second and third post-operative day. A questionnaire was used to measure the level of satisfaction with nurse's and doctor's response to their pain and overall pain management. Results: The prevalence of post-operative pain was 84.17%, 92.5% and 96.66% at the fifth post-operative hour, second and third post-operative day, respectively. Less number of patients experienced severe intensity pain on the third post-operative day (P = 0.00046), whereas the number of patients experiencing mild pain increased (P management was − 0.0218 (P = 0.8107), 0.1307 (P = 0.1553) and 0.0743 (P = 0.4195), respectively. Conclusion: There is a high prevalence of acute post-operative pain in patients undergoing inpatient abdominal surgery at our institute. There is a weak correlation between the intensity of pain and level of satisfaction with pain management.

  7. NCCN Adult Cancer Pain Practice Guidelines%NCCN成人癌性疼痛治疗临床指引(2006.1版)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱红; 于世英

    2006-01-01

    @@ 1 目录 综合筛查及评估(PAIN-1) 急性疼痛处理(PAIN-2) 急性疼痛的后续处理(PAIN-3) 疼痛控制后的随访工作(PAIN-4) 短效类阿片类药物对中重度疼痛的疗效(PAIN-5)

  8. Managing chronic pain in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Patricia

    This article presents the results of a collaborative project between the British Pain Society and British Geriatric Society to produce guidelines on the management of pain in older adults. The guidelines are the first of their kind in the UK and aim to provide best practice for the management of pain to all health professionals working with older adults in any care setting.

  9. Repeated morphine treatment alters polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecule, glutamate decarboxylase-67 expression and cell proliferation in the adult rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Laëtitia; Alonso, Gérard; Normand, Elisabeth; Manzoni, Olivier J

    2005-01-01

    Altered synaptic transmission and plasticity in brain areas involved in reward and learning are thought to underlie the long-lasting effects of addictive drugs. In support of this idea, opiates reduce neurogenesis [A.J. Eisch et al. (2000) Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA, 97, 7579-7584] and enhance long-term potentiation in adult rodent hippocampus [J.M. Harrison et al. (2002) Journal of Neurophysiology, 87, 2464-2470], a key structure of learning and memory processes. Here we studied how repeated morphine treatment and withdrawal affect cell proliferation and neuronal phenotypes in the dentate gyrus-CA3 region of the adult rat hippocampus. Our data showed a strong reduction of cellular proliferation in morphine-dependent animals (54% of control) that was followed by a rebound increase after 1 week withdrawal and a return to normal after 2 weeks withdrawal. Morphine dependence was also associated with a drastic reduction in the expression levels of the polysialylated form of neural cell adhesion molecule (68% of control), an adhesion molecule expressed by newly generated neurons and involved in cell migration and structural plasticity. Polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecule levels quickly returned to normal following withdrawal. In morphine-dependent rats, we found a significant increase of glutamate decarboxylase-67 mRNA transcription (170% of control) in dentate gyrus granular cells which was followed by a marked rebound decrease after 1 week withdrawal and a return to normal after 4 weeks withdrawal. Together, the results show, for the first time, that, in addition to reducing cell proliferation and neurogenesis, chronic exposure to morphine dramatically alters neuronal phenotypes in the dentate gyrus-CA3 region of the adult rat hippocampus.

  10. Embryonic co-exposure to methoxychlor and Clophen A50 alters sexual behavior in adult male quail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halldin, Krister; Axelsson, Jeanette; Brunström, Björn

    2005-04-01

    Embryonic exposure to estrogens and estrogenic pollutants is known to demasculinize sexual behavior in adult male Japanese quail. In the present study, we administered the insecticide methoxychlor to quail eggs at a dose of 150 microg/g egg and then studied sexual behavior and other reproductive variables in adult males. In a second experiment we administered the same dose of methoxychlor together with 10 microg/g egg of the commercial polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) mixture Clophen A50 (CA50) and also CA50 alone. Neither methoxychlor nor CA50 had any significant effects by themselves, but when they were administered together a significant reduction in male sexual behavior was observed. It seems likely that induction of biotransformation enzymes in the embryos by CA50 resulted in increased conversion of methoxychlor to the more estrogenic metabolite 2,2-bis(p-hydroxyphenyl)-1,1,1-trichloroethane (HPTE).

  11. Prenatal exposure to alcohol and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (ecstasy) alters adult hippocampal neurogenesis and causes enduring memory deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canales, Juan J; Ferrer-Donato, Agueda

    2014-01-01

    Recreational drug use among pregnant women is a source of concern due to potential harmful effects of drug exposure on prenatal and infant development. The simultaneous abuse of ecstasy [3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA)] and alcohol is prevalent among young adults, including young expectant mothers. Here, we used a rat model to study the potential risks associated with exposure to alcohol and MDMA during pregnancy. Pregnant rats received alcohol, MDMA, or both alcohol and MDMA by gavage at E13 through E15 twice daily. Female offspring treated prenatally with the combination of alcohol and MDMA, but not those exposed to either drug separately, showed at 3 months of age decreased exploratory activity and impaired working memory function. Prenatal treatment with the combination of alcohol and MDMA decreased proliferation of neuronal precursors in the adult dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, as measured by 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine labelling, and adult neurogenesis, assessed by quantifying doublecortin expression. These results provide the first evidence that the simultaneous abuse of alcohol and ecstasy during pregnancy, even for short periods of time, may cause significant abnormalities in neurocognitive development.

  12. Enantio-alteration of gene transcription associated with bioconcentration in adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) exposed to chiral PCB149

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Tingting; Cui, Feng; Mu, Pengqian; Yang, Yang; Xu, Nana; Yin, Zhiqiang; Jia, Qi; Yang, Shuming; Qiu, Jing; Wang, Chengju

    2016-01-01

    Enantioselective enrichment of chiral PCB149 (2,2’,3,4’,5’,6-hexachlorobiphenyl) was analysed in adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) exposed to the racemate, (‑)-PCB149, and (+)-PCB149. Greater enrichment of (‑)-PCB149 compared to (+) PCB149 was observed following 0.5 ng/L exposure; however, as the exposure time and concentration increased, racemic enrichment was observed in adult fish exposed to the racemate. No biotransformation between the two isomers was observed in fish exposed to single enantiomers. When zebrafish were exposed to different forms of chiral PCB149, enantioselective expression of genes associated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) was observed in brain and liver tissues and enantioselective correlations between bioconcentration and target gene expression levels were observed in brain and liver tissues. The strong positive correlations between expression levels of target genes (alox5a and alox12) and PCB149 bioconcentration suggest that prolonged exposure to the racemate of chiral PCB149 may result in inflammation-associated diseases. Prolonged exposure to (‑)-PCB149 may also affect metabolic pathways such as dehydrogenation and methylation in the brain tissues of adult zebrafish. Hepatic expression levels of genes related to the antioxidant system were significantly negatively correlated with bioconcentration following exposure to (+)-PCB149.

  13. Fibromyalgia is characterized by altered frontal and cerebellar structural covariance brain networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyungjun Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Altered brain morphometry has been widely acknowledged in chronic pain, and recent studies have implicated altered network dynamics, as opposed to properties of individual brain regions, in supporting persistent pain. Structural covariance analysis determines the inter-regional association in morphological metrics, such as gray matter volume, and such structural associations may be altered in chronic pain. In this study, voxel-based morphometry structural covariance networks were compared between fibromyalgia patients (N = 42 and age- and sex-matched pain-free adults (N = 63. We investigated network topology using spectral partitioning, which can delineate local network submodules with consistent structural covariance. We also explored white matter connectivity between regions comprising these submodules and evaluated the association between probabilistic white matter tractography and pain-relevant clinical metrics. Our structural covariance network analysis noted more connections within the cerebellum for fibromyalgia patients, and more connections in the frontal lobe for healthy controls. For fibromyalgia patients, spectral partitioning identified a distinct submodule with cerebellar connections to medial prefrontal and temporal and right inferior parietal lobes, whose gray matter volume was associated with the severity of depression in these patients. Volume for a submodule encompassing lateral orbitofrontal, inferior frontal, postcentral, lateral temporal, and insular cortices was correlated with evoked pain sensitivity. Additionally, the number of white matter fibers between specific submodule regions was also associated with measures of evoked pain sensitivity and clinical pain interference. Hence, altered gray and white matter morphometry in cerebellar and frontal cortical regions may contribute to, or result from, pain-relevant dysfunction in chronic pain patients.

  14. Fibromyalgia is characterized by altered frontal and cerebellar structural covariance brain networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyungjun; Kim, Jieun; Loggia, Marco L.; Cahalan, Christine; Garcia, Ronald G.; Vangel, Mark G.; Wasan, Ajay D.; Edwards, Robert R.; Napadow, Vitaly

    2015-01-01

    Altered brain morphometry has been widely acknowledged in chronic pain, and recent studies have implicated altered network dynamics, as opposed to properties of individual brain regions, in supporting persistent pain. Structural covariance analysis determines the inter-regional association in morphological metrics, such as gray matter volume, and such structural associations may be altered in chronic pain. In this study, voxel-based morphometry structural covariance networks were compared between fibromyalgia patients (N = 42) and age- and sex-matched pain-free adults (N = 63). We investigated network topology using spectral partitioning, which can delineate local network submodules with consistent structural covariance. We also explored white matter connectivity between regions comprising these submodules and evaluated the association between probabilistic white matter tractography and pain-relevant clinical metrics. Our structural covariance network analysis noted more connections within the cerebellum for fibromyalgia patients, and more connections in the frontal lobe for healthy controls. For fibromyalgia patients, spectral partitioning identified a distinct submodule with cerebellar connections to medial prefrontal and temporal and right inferior parietal lobes, whose gray matter volume was associated with the severity of depression in these patients. Volume for a submodule encompassing lateral orbitofrontal, inferior frontal, postcentral, lateral temporal, and insular cortices was correlated with evoked pain sensitivity. Additionally, the number of white matter fibers between specific submodule regions was also associated with measures of evoked pain sensitivity and clinical pain interference. Hence, altered gray and white matter morphometry in cerebellar and frontal cortical regions may contribute to, or result from, pain-relevant dysfunction in chronic pain patients. PMID:25844321

  15. On the mutual effects of pain and emotion: facial pain expressions enhance pain perception and vice versa are perceived as more arousing when feeling pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reicherts, Philipp; Gerdes, Antje B M; Pauli, Paul; Wieser, Matthias J

    2013-06-01

    Perception of emotional stimuli alters the perception of pain. Although facial expressions are powerful emotional cues - the expression of pain especially plays a crucial role for the experience and communication of pain - research on their influence on pain perception is scarce. In addition, the opposite effect of pain on the processing of emotion has been elucidated even less. To further scrutinize mutual influences of emotion and pain, 22 participants were administered painful and nonpainful thermal stimuli while watching dynamic facial expressions depicting joy, fear, pain, and a neutral expression. As a control condition of low visual complexity, a central fixation cross was presented. Participants rated the intensity of the thermal stimuli and evaluated valence and arousal of the facial expressions. In addition, facial electromyography was recorded as an index of emotion and pain perception. Results show that faces per se, compared to the low-level control condition, decreased pain, suggesting a general attention modulation of pain by complex (social) stimuli. The facial response to painful stimulation revealed a significant correlation with pain intensity ratings. Most important, painful thermal stimuli increased the arousal of simultaneously presented pain expressions, and in turn, pain expressions resulted in higher pain ratings compared to all other facial expressions. These findings demonstrate that the modulation of pain and emotion is bidirectional with pain faces being mostly prone to having mutual influences, and support the view of interconnections between pain and emotion. Furthermore, the special relevance of pain faces for the processing of pain was demonstrated.

  16. Altered gene expression and spine density in nucleus accumbens of adolescent and adult male mice exposed to emotional and physical stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Brandon L; Sial, Omar K; Alcantara, Lyonna F; Greenwood, Maria A; Brewer, Jacob S; Rozofsky, John P; Parise, Eric M; Bolaños-Guzmán, Carlos A

    2014-01-01

    Stressful early life experiences are implicated in lifelong health. However, little is known about the consequences of emotional stress (ES) or physical stress (PS) on neurobiology. Therefore, the following set of experiments was designed to assess changes in transcription and translation of key proteins within the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Male adolescent (postnatal day 35) or adult (8-week-old) mice were exposed to ES or PS using a witness social defeat paradigm. Then, 24 h after the last stress session, we measured levels of specific mRNAs and proteins within the NAc. Spine density was also assessed in separate groups of mice. Exposure to ES or PS disrupted extracellular signal-related kinase 2 (ERK2), reduced transcription of ΔFosB and had no effect on cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) mRNA. Western blots revealed that exposure to ES or PS decreased ERK2 phosphorylation in adolescents, whereas the same stress regimen increased ERK2 phosphorylation in adults. Exposure to ES or PS had no effect on ΔFosB or CREB phosphorylation. ES and PS increased spine density in the NAc of adolescent exposed mice, but only exposure to PS increased spine density in adults. Together, these findings demonstrate that exposure to ES or PS is a potent stressor in adolescent and adult mice and can disturb the integrity of the NAc by altering transcription and translation of important signaling molecules in an age-dependent manner. Furthermore, exposure to ES and PS induces substantial synaptic plasticity of the NAc.

  17. Blood Lead Concentration Is Not Altered by High Dose Vitamin D Supplementation in Children and Young Adults with HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groleau, Veronique; Herold, Rachel A; Schall, Joan I; Wagner, Julia L; Dougherty, Kelly A; Zemel, Babette S; Rutstein, Richard M; Stallings, Virginia A

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Optimal vitamin D status is known to have beneficial health effects and vitamin D supplements are commonly used. It has been suggested that vitamin D supplementation may increase blood lead in children and adults with previous lead exposure. The objective was to determine the safety regarding lead toxicity during 12 weeks of high dose vitamin D3 supplementation in children and young adults with HIV. METHODS Subjects with HIV (age 8 to 24 yrs) were randomized to vitamin D3 supplementation of 4000 IU/day or 7000 IU/day and followed at 6 and 12 weeks for changes in 25D and whole blood lead concentration. This was a secondary analysis of a larger study of vitamin D3 supplementation in children and adolescents with HIV. RESULTS In 44 subjects (75% African American), the baseline mean ± SD serum 25D was 48.3 ± 18.6 nmol/L. 50% of subjects had baseline serum 25D 5.0 μg/dL at baseline or during subsequent visits. Whole blood lead and 25D were not correlated at baseline, and were negatively correlated after 12 weeks of supplementation (p= 0.014). Whole blood lead did not differ between those receiving 4000 IU versus 7000 IU of vitamin D3. CONCLUSION High dose vitamin D3 supplementation and the concomitant increased serum 25D did not result in increased whole blood lead concentration in this sample of children and young adults living in a northeastern urban city. PMID:23059649

  18. Role of C-peptide in Altered Lipid Profile among Apparently Healthy Adults of Vijayapura City, Karnataka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrahas M.Kulkarni

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: C-peptide is produced in equimolar concentration during insulin production as inactive molecule by beta islet cells of Langerhans. C-peptide is most useful biomarker of endogenous insulin production. Aim and Objectives: To predict metabolic syndrome in advance by estimation of C-peptide and lipid profile in healthy adults. Material and Methods: Serum C-peptide, fasting blood glucose and lipid profile of 128 healthy individuals were estimated. Adults in the age group of 18 to 60 years of both sexes were included in study. Results: C-peptide levels were increased in 27%, Serum cholesterol in 30%, LDL Cholesterol in 55% and triglyceride levels in 21% of healthy individuals. Significant correlation was observed between C peptide, age, serum cholesterol, LDL and cholesterol LDL ratio in male subjects only. In our study group most of the subjects (both males and females fell in overweight group. Conclusion: Cpeptide level and lipid profile may be considered as useful biomarkers to predict type 2 diabetes mellitus in advance, possibly due to insulin resistance.

  19. Augmented low-Dye tape alters foot mobility and neuromotor control of gait in individuals with and without exercise related leg pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chapman Andrew R

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Augmented low-Dye (ALD tape is frequently used in the management of lower limb musculoskeletal pain and injury, yet our knowledge of its effect is incomplete, especially in regard to its neuromotor effects. Methods We measured electromyographic (EMG activity of twelve lower limb muscles, three-dimensional kinematics of the ankle, knee, hip and pelvis, foot posture and foot mobility to determine the physiological effect of ALD tape. Fourteen females with exercise related leg pain and 14 matched asymptomatic females walked on a treadmill under three conditions: pre-tape, tape and post-tape. A series of repeated measure analysis of variance procedures were performed to investigate differences in EMG, kinematic, foot posture and mobility measurements. Results Application of ALD tape produced reductions in recruitment of tibialis anterior (7.3% and tibialis posterior (6.9%. Large reductions in midfoot mobility (0.45 to 0.63 cm and increases in arch height (0.58 cm, as well as moderate changes in ankle motion in the sagittal (2.0 to 5.3° and transverse planes (4.0 to 4.3° were observed. Reduced muscle activation ( Conclusions This study provides evidence that ALD tape influences muscle recruitment, movement patterns, foot posture and foot mobility. These effects occur in individuals with and without pain, and are dissipated up the kinetic chain. ALD tape should be considered in the management of individuals where increased arch height, reduced foot mobility, reduced ankle abduction and plantar flexion or reduced activation of leg muscles is desired.

  20. Physiotherapy for pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ginnerup-Nielsen, Elisabeth; Christensen, Robin; Thorborg, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To empirically assess the clinical effects of physiotherapy on pain in adults. DESIGN: Using meta-epidemiology, we report on the effects of a 'physiotherapy' intervention on self-reported pain in adults. For each trial, the group difference in the outcome 'pain intensity' was assessed...... as standardised mean differences (SMD) with 95% CIs. Stratified analyses were conducted according to patient population (International Classification of Diseases-10 classes), type of physiotherapy intervention, their interaction, as well as type of comparator group and risks of bias. The quality of the body...... 'no intervention' or of a sham-controlled design were selected. Only articles written in English were eligible. RESULTS: An overall moderate effect of physiotherapy on pain corresponding to 0.65 SD-units (95% CI 0.57 to 0.73) was found based on a moderate inconsistency (I(2)=51%). Stratified...

  1. Inflammation in adult women with a history of child maltreatment: The involvement of mitochondrial alterations and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeck, Christina; Koenig, Alexandra Maria; Schury, Katharina; Geiger, Martha Leonie; Karabatsiakis, Alexander; Wilker, Sarah; Waller, Christiane; Gündel, Harald; Fegert, Jörg Michael; Calzia, Enrico; Kolassa, Iris-Tatjana

    2016-09-01

    The experience of maltreatment during childhood is associated with chronic low-grade inflammation in adulthood. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this pro-inflammatory phenotype remain unclear. Mitochondria were recently found to principally coordinate inflammatory processes via both inflammasome activation and inflammasome-independent pathways. To this end, we hypothesized that alterations in immune cell mitochondrial functioning and oxidative stress might be at the interface between the association of maltreatment experiences during childhood and inflammation. We analyzed pro-inflammatory biomarkers (levels of C-reactive protein, cytokine secretion by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in vitro, PBMC composition, lysophosphatidylcholine levels), serum oxidative stress levels (arginine:citrulline ratio, l-carnitine and acetylcarnitine levels) and mitochondrial functioning (respiratory activity and density of mitochondria in PBMC) in peripheral blood samples collected from 30 women (aged 22-44years) with varying degrees of maltreatment experiences in form of abuse and neglect during childhood. Exposure to maltreatment during childhood was associated with an increased ROS production, higher levels of oxidative stress and an increased mitochondrial activity in a dose-response relationship. Moreover, the increase in mitochondrial activity and ROS production were positively associated with the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines by PBMC. Decreased serum levels of lysophosphatidylcholines suggested higher inflammasome activation with increasing severity of child maltreatment experiences. Together these findings offer preliminary evidence for the association of alterations in immune cell mitochondrial functioning, oxidative stress and the pro-inflammatory phenotype observed in individuals with a history of maltreatment during childhood. The results emphasize that the early prevention of child abuse and neglect warrants more attention, as the

  2. Cholesterol Removal from Adult Skeletal Muscle impairs Excitation-Contraction Coupling and Aging reduces Caveolin-3 and alters the Expression of other Triadic Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genaro eBarrientos

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol and caveolin are integral membrane components that modulate the function/location of many cellular proteins. Skeletal muscle fibers, which have unusually high cholesterol levels in transverse tubules, express the caveolin-3 isoform but its association with transverse tubules remains contentious. Cholesterol removal impairs excitation-contraction coupling in amphibian and mammalian fetal skeletal muscle fibers. Here, we show that treating single muscle fibers from adult mice with the cholesterol removing agent methyl-β-cyclodextrin decreased fiber cholesterol by 26%, altered the location pattern of caveolin-3 and of the voltage dependent calcium channel Cav1.1, and suppressed or reduced electrically evoked Ca2+ transients without affecting membrane integrity or causing sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium depletion. We found that transverse tubules from adult muscle and triad fractions that contain ~10% attached transverse tubules, but not sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes, contained caveolin-3 and Cav1.1; both proteins partitioned into detergent-resistant membrane fractions highly enriched in cholesterol. Aging entails significant deterioration of skeletal muscle function. We found that triad fractions from aged rats had similar cholesterol and RyR1 protein levels compared to triads from young rats, but had lower caveolin-3 and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase and increased Na+/K+-ATPase protein levels. Both triad fractions had comparable NADPH oxidase (NOX activity and protein content of NOX2 subunits (p47phox and gp91phox, implying that NOX activity does not increase during aging. These findings show that partial cholesterol removal impairs excitation-contraction coupling and alters caveolin-3 and Cav1.1 location pattern, and that aging reduces caveolin-3 protein content and modifies the expression of other triadic proteins. We discuss the possible implications of these findings for skeletal muscle function in young and aged

  3. Cortex glial cells activation, associated with lowered mechanical thresholds and motor dysfunction, persists into adulthood after neonatal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanada, Luciana Sayuri; Sato, Karina Laurenti; Machado, Nathalia Leilane Berto; Carmo, Elisabete de Cássia do; Sluka, Kathleen A; Fazan, Valeria Paula Sassoli

    2014-06-01

    We investigated if changes in glial activity in cortical areas that process nociceptive stimuli persisted in adult rats after neonatal injury. Neonatal pain was induced by repetitive needle prickling on the right paw, twice per day for 15 days starting at birth. Wistar rats received either neonatal pain or tactile stimulation and were tested behaviorally for mechanical withdrawal thresholds of the paws and gait alterations, after 15 (P15) or 180 (P180) days of life. Brains from rats on P15 and P180 were immunostained for glial markers (GFAP, MCP-1, OX-42) and the following cortical areas were analyzed for immunoreactivity density: prefrontal, anterior insular, anterior cingulated, somatosensory and motor cortices. Withdrawal thresholds of the stimulated paw remained decreased on P180 after neonatal pain when compared to controls. Neonatal pain animals showed increased density for both GFAP and MCP-1 staining, but not for OX-42, in all investigated cortical areas on both experimental times (P15 and P180). Painful stimuli in the neonatal period produced pain behaviors immediately after injury that persisted in adult life, and was accompanied by increase in the glial markers density in cortical areas that process and interpret pain. Thus, long-lasting changes in cortical glial activity could be, at least in part, responsible for the persistent hyperalgesia in adult rats that suffered from neonatal pain.

  4. The visual analogue thermometer and the graphic numeric rating scale : A comparison of self-report instruments for pain measurement in adults with burns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jong, A. E E; Bremer, M.; Hofland, H. W C; Schuurmans, M. J.; Middelkoop, E.; Van Loey, N. E E

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the adequacy of pain management in burn care, pain measurement is essential. The visual analogue thermometer (VAT) and graphic numeric rating scale (GNRS) are frequently used self-report instruments for burn pain. To legitimise their interchangeable use in research and practice, we aimed

  5. Core Muscle Activity during TRX Suspension Exercises with and without Kinesiology Taping in Adults with Chronic Low Back Pain: Implications for Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley S. M. Fong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to examine the effects of kinesiology taping (KT and different TRX suspension workouts on the amplitude of electromyographic (EMG activity in the core muscles among people with chronic low back pain (LBP. Each participant (total n=21 was exposed to two KT conditions: no taping and taping, while performing four TRX suspension exercises: (1 hamstring curl, (2 hip abduction in plank, (3 chest press, and (4 45-degree row. Right transversus abdominis/internal oblique (TrAIO, rectus abdominis (RA, external oblique (EO, and superficial lumbar multifidus (LMF activity was recorded with surface EMG and expressed as a percentage of the EMG amplitude recorded during a maximal voluntary isometric contraction of the respective muscles. Hip abduction in plank increased TrAIO, RA, and LMF EMG amplitude compared with other TRX positions (P0.05. Hip abduction in plank most effectively activated abdominal muscles, whereas the hamstring curl most effectively activated the paraspinal muscles. Applying KT conferred no immediate benefits in improving the core muscle activation during TRX training in adults with chronic LBP.

  6. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor alters the growth characteristics and genomic imprinting of mouse multipotent adult germline stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Yoon Hee [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Bio-Organ Research Center/Animal Resources Research Center, Konkuk University, Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-Gu, Seoul 143 701 (Korea, Republic of); Gupta, Mukesh Kumar, E-mail: goops@konkuk.ac.kr [Department of Animal Biotechnology, Bio-Organ Research Center/Animal Resources Research Center, Konkuk University, Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-Gu, Seoul 143 701 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Shin Hye [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Bio-Organ Research Center/Animal Resources Research Center, Konkuk University, Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-Gu, Seoul 143 701 (Korea, Republic of); Uhm, Sang Jun [Department of Animal Biotechnology, Bio-Organ Research Center/Animal Resources Research Center, Konkuk University, Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-Gu, Seoul 143 701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hoon Taek, E-mail: htl3675@konkuk.ac.kr [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Bio-Organ Research Center/Animal Resources Research Center, Konkuk University, Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-Gu, Seoul 143 701 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Animal Biotechnology, Bio-Organ Research Center/Animal Resources Research Center, Konkuk University, Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-Gu, Seoul 143 701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-03-10

    This study evaluated the essentiality of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) for in vitro culture of established mouse multipotent adult germline stem (maGS) cell lines by culturing them in the presence of GDNF, leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) or both. We show that, in the absence of LIF, GDNF slows the proliferation of maGS cells and result in smaller sized colonies without any change in distribution of cells to different cell-cycle stages, expression of pluripotency genes and in vitro differentiation potential. Furthermore, in the absence of LIF, GDNF increased the expression of male germ-line genes and repopulated the empty seminiferous tubule of W/W{sup v} mutant mouse without the formation of teratoma. GDNF also altered the genomic imprinting of Igf2, Peg1, and H19 genes but had no effect on DNA methylation of Oct4, Nanog and Stra8 genes. However, these effects of GDNF were masked in the presence of LIF. GDNF also did not interfere with the multipotency of maGS cells if they are cultured in the presence of LIF. In conclusion, our results suggest that, in the absence of LIF, GDNF alters the growth characteristics of maGS cells and partially impart them some of the germline stem (GS) cell-like characteristics.

  7. Prenatal protein malnutrition alters the proportion but not numbers of parvalbumin-immunoreactive interneurons in the hippocampus of the adult Sprague-Dawley rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lister, James P; Blatt, Gene J; Kemper, Thomas L; Tonkiss, John; DeBassio, William A; Galler, Janina R; Rosene, Douglas L

    2011-07-01

    Prenatal protein malnutrition alters the structure and function of the adult rat hippocampal formation. The current study examines the effect of prenatal protein malnutrition on numbers of parvalbumin-immunoreactive (PV-IR) GABAergic interneurons, which are important for perisomatic inhibition of hippocampal pyramidal neurons. Brain sections from prenatally protein malnourished and normally nourished rats were stained for parvalbumin and PV-IR neurons were quantified using stereology in the dentate gyrus, CA3/2 and CA1 subfields, and the subiculum for both cerebral hemispheres. Results demonstrated that prenatal malnutrition did not affect the number of PV-IR interneurons in the hippocampus. Since prenatal protein malnutrition reduces total neuron numbers in the CA1 subfield (1), this results in an altered ratio of PV-IR interneurons to total neuronal numbers (from 1:22.9 in controls to 1:20.5 in malnourished rats). Additionally, there was no hemispheric asymmetry of either PV-IR neuron numbers or ratio of PV-IR:total neuron numbers.

  8. Long-term exposure to xenoestrogens alters some brain monoamines and both serum thyroid hormones and cortisol levels in adult male rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nashwa M. Saied

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to examine the effect of long-term treatment with the phytoestrogen soy isoflavone [(SIF; 43 mg/kg body weight/day] and/or the plastics component bisphenol-A [(BPA; 3 mg/kg body weight/day] on some monoamines in the forebrain and both serum thyroid hormones and cortisol levels of adult rats. Significant increases in serotonin (5-HT and norepinephrine (NE level, and significant decreases in 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA level and 5-HIAA/5-HT ratio, were observed after treatment with SIF or BPA. Level of dopamine (DA was increased in SIF-treated group and decreased in BPA-treated group. Activity of monoamine oxidase (MAO was decreased in all treated groups. The level of serum thyroid hormones (fT3 and fT4 was increased after treatment with SIF and decreased after exposure to BPA, while cortisol level was increased in all treated groups. It may be concluded that long-term exposure to SIF or BPA disrupts monoamine levels in the forebrain of adult rats through alteration in the metabolic pathways of amines and disorders of thyroid hormones and cortisol levels.

  9. Diurnal Variation and Twenty-Four Hour Sleep Deprivation Do Not Alter Supine Heart Rate Variability in Healthy Male Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvsåshagen, Torbjørn; Zak, Nathalia; Norbom, Linn B.; Pedersen, Per Ø.; Quraishi, Sophia H.; Bjørnerud, Atle; Malt, Ulrik F.; Groote, Inge R.; Kaufmann, Tobias; Andreassen, Ole A.; Westlye, Lars T.

    2017-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) has become an increasingly popular index of cardiac autonomic control in the biobehavioral sciences due to its relationship with mental illness and cognitive traits. However, the intraindividual stability of HRV in response to sleep and diurnal disturbances, which are commonly reported in mental illness, and its relationship with executive function are not well understood. Here, in 40 healthy adult males we calculated high frequency HRV—an index of parasympathetic nervous system (PNS) activity—using pulse oximetry during brain imaging, and assessed attentional and executive function performance in a subsequent behavioral test session at three time points: morning, evening, and the following morning. Twenty participants were randomly selected for total sleep deprivation whereas the other 20 participants slept as normal. Sleep deprivation and morning-to-night variation did not influence high frequency HRV at either a group or individual level; however, sleep deprivation abolished the relationship between orienting attention performance and HRV. We conclude that a day of wake and a night of laboratory-induced sleep deprivation do not alter supine high frequency HRV in young healthy male adults. PMID:28151944

  10. CSF markers of Alzheimer’s pathology and microglial activation are associated with altered white matter microstructure in asymptomatic adults at risk for Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melah, Kelsey E; Lu, Sharon Yuan-Fu; Hoscheidt, Siobhan M; Alexander, Andrew L; Adluru, Nagesh; Destiche, Daniel J; Carlsson, Cynthia M; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Okonkwo, Ozioma C; Gleason, Carey E; Dowling, N Maritza; Bratzke, Lisa C; Rowley, Howard A; Sager, Mark A; Asthana, Sanjay; Johnson, Sterling C; Bendlin, Barbara B

    2015-01-01

    Background The immune response in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) involves activation of microglia which may remove β-amyloid. However, overproduction of inflammatory compounds may exacerbate neural damage in Alzheimer’s disease. AD pathology accumulates years before diagnosis, yet the extent to which neuroinflammation is involved in the earliest disease stages is unknown. Objective To determine whether neuroinflammation exacerbates neural damage in preclinical AD. Methods We utilized cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and magnetic resonance imaging collected in 192 asymptomatic late-middle-aged adults (mean age=60.98 years). Neuroinflammatory markers chitinase-3-like protein 1 (YKL-40) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) in CSF were utilized as markers of neuroinflammation. Neural cell damage was assessed using CSF neurofilament light chain protein (NFL), CSF total tau (T-Tau), and neural microstructure assessed with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). With regard to AD pathology, CSF Aβ42 and tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 (P-Tau181) were used as markers of amyloid and tau pathology, respectively. We hypothesized that higher YKL-40 and MCP-1 in the presence of AD pathology would be associated with higher NFL, T-Tau, and altered microstructure on DTI. Results Neuroinflammation was associated with markers of neural damage. Higher CSF YKL-40 was associated with both higher CSF NFL and T-Tau. Inflammation interacted with AD pathology, such that greater MCP-1 and lower Aβ42 was associated with altered microstructure in bilateral frontal and right temporal lobe and that greater MCP-1 and greater P-Tau181 was associated with altered microstructure in precuneus. Conclusion Inflammation may play a role in neural damage in preclinical AD. PMID:26836182

  11. Density of mu-opioid receptors in the hippocampus of adult male and female rats is altered by prenatal morphine exposure and gonadal hormone treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slamberová, Romana; Rimanóczy, Agnes; Bar, Noffar; Schindler, Cheryl J; Vathy, Ilona

    2003-01-01

    The present in vitro autoradiography study demonstrates that prenatal exposure to morphine alters the density of mu-opioid receptors in the hippocampus of adult female but not adult male rats. Prenatal morphine exposure increased the mu-opioid receptor density in the CA1 of ovariectomized (OVX) females and in the CA3 of OVX, estradiol benzoate-plus progesterone (EB+P)-treated females, but decreased it in CA3 of OVX females. There were also hormonal effects on mu-opioid receptor density in adult female rats. In the CA1, only morphine-exposed but not saline-exposed, hormone-treated females (EB, P, or EB+P) had a decrease in mu-opioid receptor density relative to OVX females. Both saline-exposed and morphine-exposed, OVX females after gonadal hormone replacement had a lower density of mu-opioid receptors in the CA3 and in the dentate gyrus (DG) than OVX females. In male rats, there was a decrease in mu-opioid receptor density in the CA1 and CA3 of gonadectomized (GNX), testosterone 17beta-proprionate (TP)-treated males relative to GNX males regardless of prenatal morphine exposure. In the DG, the mu-opioid receptor density was reduced only in morphine-exposed but not in saline-exposed, TP-treated males compared with GNX males. Thus, our data demonstrate that mu-opioid receptor density in the hippocampus is affected by prenatal morphine exposure and by male and female gonadal hormones.

  12. Single episode of mild murine malaria induces neuroinflammation, alters microglial profile, impairs adult neurogenesis, and causes deficits in social and anxiety-like behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Suman K; Tillu, Rucha; Sood, Ankit; Patgaonkar, Mandar; Nanavaty, Ishira N; Sengupta, Arjun; Sharma, Shobhona; Vaidya, Vidita A; Pathak, Sulabha

    2014-11-01

    Cerebral malaria is associated with cerebrovascular damage and neurological sequelae. However, the neurological consequences of uncomplicated malaria, the most prevalent form of the disease, remain uninvestigated. Here, using a mild malaria model, we show that a single Plasmodium chabaudi adami infection in adult mice induces neuroinflammation, neurogenic, and behavioral changes in the absence of a blood-brain barrier breach. Using cytokine arrays we show that the infection induces differential serum and brain cytokine profiles, both at peak parasitemia and 15days post-parasite clearance. At the peak of infection, along with the serum, the brain also exhibited a definitive pro-inflammatory cytokine profile, and gene expression analysis revealed that pro-inflammatory cytokines were also produced locally in the hippocampus, an adult neurogenic niche. Hippocampal microglia numbers were enhanced, and we noted a shift to an activated profile at this time point, accompanied by a striking redistribution of the microglia to the subgranular zone adjacent to hippocampal neuronal progenitors. In the hippocampus, a distinct decline in progenitor turnover and survival was observed at peak parasitemia, accompanied by a shift from neuronal to glial fate specification. Studies in transgenic Nestin-GFP reporter mice demonstrated a decline in the Nestin-GFP(+)/GFAP(+) quiescent neural stem cell pool at peak parasitemia. Although these cellular changes reverted to normal 15days post-parasite clearance, specific brain cytokines continued to exhibit dysregulation. Behavioral analysis revealed selective deficits in social and anxiety-like behaviors, with no change observed in locomotor, cognitive, and depression-like behaviors, with a return to baseline at recovery. Collectively, these findings indicate that even a single episode of mild malaria results in alterations of the brain cytokine profile, causes specific behavioral dysfunction, is accompanied by hippocampal microglial

  13. Chronic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a problem you need to take care of. Chronic pain is different. The pain signals go on ... there is no clear cause. Problems that cause chronic pain include Headache Low back strain Cancer Arthritis ...

  14. Soul Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah L. Jirek

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This study extends prior research on vicarious traumatization and emotion management by exploring a deeper, more life-altering effect of working with traumatized clients—namely, “soul pain.” Analyses of in-depth interviews with 29 advocates working with survivors of physical and sexual violence reveal that, as a direct consequence of hearing countless stories of human brutality, some staff members experience a profound wounding of their spirit. This finding expands our understanding of the occupational hazards of the helping professions by revealing another dimension of advocates’ lives—that of the soul or spirit—that may be affected by their work with trauma survivors.

  15. Mild traumatic brain injury with social defeat stress alters anxiety, contextual fear extinction, and limbic monoamines in adult rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel eDavies

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI produces symptoms similar to those typifying posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD in humans. We sought to determine whether a rodent model of stress concurrent with mTBI produces characteristics of PTSD such as impaired contextual fear extinction, while also examining concurrent alterations to limbic monoamine activity in brain regions relevant to fear and anxiety states. Male rats were exposed to social stress or control conditions immediately prior to mTBI induction, and 6 days later were tested either for anxiety-like behavior using the elevated plus maze (EPM, or for contextual fear conditioning and extinction. Brains were collected 24 hr after EPM testing, and tissue from various limbic regions analyzed for content of monoamines, their precursors and metabolites using HPLC with electrochemical detection. Either social defeat or mTBI alone decreased time spent in open arms of the EPM, indicating greater anxiety-like behavior. However, this effect was enhanced by the combination of treatments. Further, rats exposed to both social defeat and mTBI exhibited greater freezing within extinction sessions compared to all other groups, suggesting impaired contextual fear extinction. Social defeat combined with mTBI also had greater effects on limbic monoamines than either insult alone, particularly with respect to serotonergic effects associated with anxiety and fear learning. The results suggest social stress concurrent with mTBI produces provides a relevant animal model for studying the prevention and treatment of post-concussive psychobiological outcomes.

  16. Moderate dietary protein restriction alters the composition of gut microbiota and improves ileal barrier function in adult pig model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Peixin; Liu, Ping; Song, Peixia; Chen, Xiyue; Ma, Xi

    2017-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate impacts of dietary protein levels on gut bacterial community and gut barrier. The intestinal microbiota of finishing pigs, fed with 16%, 13% and 10% crude protein (CP) in diets, respectively, were investigated using Illumina MiSeq sequencing. The ileal bacterial richness tended to decrease when the dietary protein concentration reduced from 16% to 10%. The proportion of Clostridium_sensu_stricto_1 in ileum significantly decreased, whereas Escherichia-Shigella increased with reduction of protein concentration. In colon, the proportion of Clostridium_sensu_stricto_1 and Turicibacter increased, while the proportion of RC9_gut_group significantly decreased with the dietary protein reduction. Notably, the proportion of Peptostreptococcaceae was higher in both ileum and colon of 13% CP group. As for metabolites, the intestinal concentrations of SCFAs and biogenic amines decreased with the dietary protein reduction. The 10% CP dietary treatment damaged ileal mucosal morphology, and decreased the expression of biomarks of intestinal cells (Lgr5 and Bmi1), whereas the expression of tight junction proteins (occludin and claudin) in 13% CP group were higher than the other two groups. In conclusion, moderate dietary protein restriction (13% CP) could alter the bacterial community and metabolites, promote colonization of beneficial bacteria in both ileum and colon, and improve gut barrier function. PMID:28252026

  17. A Foxp2 Mutation Implicated in Human Speech Deficits Alters Sequencing of Ultrasonic Vocalizations in Adult Male Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabout, Jonathan; Sarkar, Abhra; Patel, Sheel R.; Radden, Taylor; Dunson, David B.; Fisher, Simon E.; Jarvis, Erich D.

    2016-01-01

    Development of proficient spoken language skills is disrupted by mutations of the FOXP2 transcription factor. A heterozygous missense mutation in the KE family causes speech apraxia, involving difficulty producing words with complex learned sequences of syllables. Manipulations in songbirds have helped to elucidate the role of this gene in vocal learning, but findings in non-human mammals have been limited or inconclusive. Here, we performed a systematic study of ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) of adult male mice carrying the KE family mutation. Using novel statistical tools, we found that Foxp2 heterozygous mice did not have detectable changes in USV syllable acoustic structure, but produced shorter sequences and did not shift to more complex syntax in social contexts where wildtype animals did. Heterozygous mice also displayed a shift in the position of their rudimentary laryngeal motor cortex (LMC) layer-5 neurons. Our findings indicate that although mouse USVs are mostly innate, the underlying contributions of FoxP2 to sequencing of vocalizations are conserved with humans.

  18. Long-term exposure to paraquat alters behavioral parameters and dopamine levels in adult zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolotto, Josiane W; Cognato, Giana P; Christoff, Raissa R; Roesler, Laura N; Leite, Carlos E; Kist, Luiza W; Bogo, Mauricio R; Vianna, Monica R; Bonan, Carla D

    2014-04-01

    Chronic exposure to paraquat (Pq), a toxic herbicide, can result in Parkinsonian symptoms. This study evaluated the effect of the systemic administration of Pq on locomotion, learning and memory, social interaction, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression, dopamine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) levels, and dopamine transporter (DAT) gene expression in zebrafish. Adult zebrafish received an i.p. injection of either 10 mg/kg (Pq10) or 20 mg/kg (Pq20) of Pq every 3 days for a total of six injections. Locomotion and distance traveled decreased at 24 h after each injection in both treatment doses. In addition, both Pq10- and Pq20-treated animals exhibited differential effects on the absolute turn angle. Nonmotor behaviors were also evaluated, and no changes were observed in anxiety-related behaviors or social interactions in Pq-treated zebrafish. However, Pq-treated animals demonstrated impaired acquisition and consolidation of spatial memory in the Y-maze task. Interestingly, dopamine levels increased while DOPAC levels decreased in the zebrafish brain after both treatments. However, DAT expression decreased in the Pq10-treated group, and there was no change in the Pq20-treated group. The amount of TH protein showed no significant difference in the treated group. Our study establishes a new model to study Parkinson-associated symptoms in zebrafish that have been chronically treated with Pq.

  19. Postoperative pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, H; Dahl, J B

    1993-01-01

    also modify various aspects of the surgical stress response, and nociceptive blockade by regional anesthetic techniques has been demonstrated to improve various parameters of postoperative outcome. It is therefore stressed that effective control of postoperative pain, combined with a high degree......Treatment of postoperative pain has not received sufficient attention by the surgical profession. Recent developments concerned with acute pain physiology and improved techniques for postoperative pain relief should result in more satisfactory treatment of postoperative pain. Such pain relief may...

  20. Management of chronic visceral pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anne E; Farmer, Adam D; Olesen, Søren S

    2016-01-01

    ' symptoms, adopting an empathic approach and taking time to educate patients. To optimize treatment and outcomes in chronic visceral pain we need to move away from approaches exclusively based on dealing with peripheral nociceptive input toward more holistic strategies, taking into account alterations......Despite marked differences in underlying pathophysiology, the current management of visceral pain largely follows the guidelines derived from the somatic pain literature. The effective management of patients with chronic visceral pain should be multifaceted, including both pharmacological...... in central pain processing....

  1. Altered preparatory pelvic control during the sit-to-stance-to-sit movement in people with non-specific low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claeys, Kurt; Dankaerts, Wim; Janssens, Lotte; Brumagne, Simon

    2012-12-01

    People with non-specific low back pain (LBP) show hampered performance of dynamic tasks such as sit-to-stance-to-sit movement. However, the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess if proprioceptive impairments influence the performance of the sit-to-stance-to-sit movement. First, the proprioceptive steering of 20 healthy subjects and 106 persons with mild LBP was identified during standing using muscle vibration. Second, five sit-to-stance-to-sit repetitions on a stable support and on foam were performed as fast as possible. Total duration, phase duration, center of pressure (COP) displacement, pelvic and thoracic kinematics were analyzed. People with LBP used less lumbar proprioceptive afference for postural control compared to healthy people (P pelvic rotation initiation were recorded to start both movement sequences (P pelvic preparatory movement in the LBP group.

  2. [Treatment of pain in children burns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latarjet, J; Pommier, C; Robert, A; Comparin, J P; Foyatier, J L

    1997-03-01

    Burn injury is considered by children as one of the most painful traumas (just after bone factures). Burn pain in children can and must be controlled as well as for adult patients, with almost identical techniques. Continuous pain from injury and intermittent pain caused by therapeutic procedures must be evaluated and treated separately. Due to very high levels of nociception, satisfactory management of procedural pain requires the use of opioid therapy. Non pharmacological methods are meaningless if pharmacological treatment is not optimal.

  3. Pain distribution in primary care patients with hip osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Erik; Overgaard, Søren; Vestergaard, Jacob T

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hip osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common diagnosis in primary care adult patients presenting with hip pain but pain location and pain distribution in primary care patients with hip OA have been reported inadequately. OBJECTIVE: To describe pain location and pain distribution...

  4. Adolescent social defeat induced alterations in anxious behavior and cognitive flexibility in adult mice: effects of developmental stage and social condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Zhang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Negative social experiences during adolescence increase the risk of psychiatric disorders in adulthood. Using resident-intruder stress, the present study aimed to investigate the effects of adolescent social defeat on emotional and cognitive symptoms associated with psychiatric disorders during adulthood and the effects of the developmental stage and social condition on this process. In experiment 1, animals were exposed to social defeat or manipulation for 10 days during early adolescence (EA, PND 28-37, late adolescence (LA, PND 38-47, and adulthood (ADULT, PND 70-79 and then singly housed until the behavioral tests. Behaviors, including social avoidance of the defeat context and cortically mediated cognitive flexibility in an attentional set-shifting task (AST, were assessed during the week following stress or after 6 weeks during adulthood. We determined that social defeat induced significant and continuous social avoidance across age groups at both time points. The mice that experienced social defeat during adulthood exhibited short-term impairments in reversal learning on the AST that dissipated after 6 weeks. In contrast, social defeat during EA but not LA induced a delayed deficit in extra-dimensional set-shifting in adulthood but not during adolescence. In experiment 2, we further examined the effects of social condition (isolation or social housing after stress on the alterations induced by social defeat during EA in adult mice. The adult mice that had experienced stress during EA exhibited social avoidance similar to the avoidance identified in experiment 1 regardless of the isolation or social housing after the stress. However, social housing after the stress ameliorated the cognitive flexibility deficits induced by early adolescent social defeat in the adult mice, and the social condition had no effect on cognitive function. These findings suggest that the effects of social defeat on emotion and cognitive function are differentially

  5. Alteration of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in estrogen- and androgen-treated adult male leopard frog, Rana pipiens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Jeremy T

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gonadal steroids, in particular 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT and 17 beta-estradiol (E2, have been shown to feed back on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG axis of the ranid frog. However, questions still remain on how DHT and E2 impact two of the less-studied components of the ranid HPG axis, the hypothalamus and the gonad, and if the feedback effects are consistently negative. Thus, the goal of the study was to examine the effects of DHT and E2 upon the HPG axis of the gonadally-intact, sexually mature male leopard frogs, Rana pipiens. Methods R. pipiens were implanted with silastic capsules containing either cholesterol (Ch, a control, DHT, or E2 for 10 or 30 days. At each time point, steroid-induced changes in hypothalamic GnRH and pituitary LH concentrations, circulating luteinizing hormone (LH, and testicular histology were examined. Results Frogs implanted with DHT or E2 for 10 days did not show significant alterations in the HPG axis. In contrast, frogs implanted with hormones for 30 days had significantly lower circulating LH (for both DHT and E2, decreased pituitary LH concentration (for E2 only, and disrupted spermatogenesis (for both DHT and E2. The disruption of spermatogenesis was qualitatively similar between DHT and E2, although the effects of E2 were consistently more potent. In both DHT and E2-treated animals, a marked loss of all pre-meiotic germ cells was observed, although the loss of secondary spermatogonia appeared to be the primary cause of disrupted spermatogenesis. Unexpectedly, the presence of post-meiotic germ cells was either unaffected or enhanced by DHT or E2 treatment. Conclusions Overall, these results showed that both DHT and E2 inhibited circulating LH and disrupted spermatogenesis progressively in a time-dependent manner, with the longer duration of treatment producing the more pronounced effects. Further, the feedback effects exerted by both steroid hormones upon the HPG axis were

  6. Oviposition-altering and ovicidal potentials of five essential oils against female adults of the dengue vector, Aedes aegypti L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warikoo, Radhika; Wahab, Naim; Kumar, Sarita

    2011-10-01

    The oviposition deterrence and ovicidal potential of five different essential oils, peppermint oil (Mentha piperita), basil oil (Ocimum basilicum), rosemary oil (Rosemarinus officinalis), citronella oil (Cymbopogon nardus), and celery seed oil (Apium graveolens), were assessed against female adults of the dengue vector, Aedes aegypti L. Multiple concentration tests were carried out where cups containing 1 mL of different concentrations (100%, 10%, 1%, 0.1%) of the oils and 199 mL of water were used for oviposition. The number of eggs laid and the larvae hatched in each cup were scored to evaluate the oviposition deterrent and ovicidal potentials of the oils. Our investigations revealed that the addition of 100% oil (pure oil) caused complete oviposition deterrence except in A. graveolens which resulted in 75% effective repellency. The use of 10% oil resulted in the maximum deterrence of 97.5% as shown by the M. piperita oil while other oils caused 36-97% oviposition deterrence as against the control. The oviposition medium with 1% oil showed decreased deterrent potential with 30-64% effective repellency, the M. piperita oil being exceptional. However, as the concentrations of the oil were reduced further to 0.1%, the least effective oil observed was A. graveolens (25% ER). Also, the M. piperita oil showed much reduced activity (40%) as compared to the control, while the other oils exhibited 51-58% repellency to oviposition. The studies on the ovicidal effects of these oils revealed that the eggs laid in the water with 100% essential oils did not hatch at all, whereas when 10% oils were used, only the R. officinalis oil resulted in 28% egg hatch. At lower concentrations (1%), the oils of M. piperita, O. basilicum, and C. nardus showed complete egg mortality while those of A. graveolens and R. officinalis resulted in 71% and 34% egg hatches, respectively. When used at 0.1%, the O. basilicum oil was found to be the only effective oil with 100% egg mortality, whereas

  7. The differential mediating effects of pain and depression on the physical and mental dimension of quality of life in Hong Kong Chinese adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fung Vivian BK

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective The impact of pain and depression on health-related quality of life (QoL is widely investigated, yet the pain-depression interactions on QoL remain unclear. This study aims to examine the pain-depression-QoL mediation link. Methods Pain severity were assessed in a sample of Chinese professional teachers (n = 385. The subjects were also assessed on depressive symptoms and QoL. Regression models were fitted to evaluate the pain-depression-QoL relationships. Results About 44% of the sample had 3-5 painful areas in the past 3 months. Shoulder pain (60% and headache (53% were common painful areas. The results of regression analyses showed that pain mediated the effects of depression on the mental aspect of QoL (standardized β = -0.111; Sobel test: z = -3.124, p β = -0.026; Sobel test: z = -4.045, p Conclusions Our study offered tentative evidence that pain and depression impacted differently on the mental and physical aspect of QoL. As these findings were based on a Chinese teacher sample, future studies should employ more representative samples across cultures to verify the present data.

  8. Chronic pain after childhood groin hernia repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aasvang, Eske Kvanner; Kehlet, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In contrast to the well-described 10% risk of chronic pain affecting daily activities after adult groin hernia repair, chronic pain after childhood groin hernia repair has never been investigated. Studies of other childhood surgery before the age of 3 months suggest a risk of increased...... pain responsiveness later in life, but its potential relationship to chronic pain in adult life is unknown. METHODS: This was a nationwide detailed questionnaire study of chronic groin pain in adults having surgery for a groin hernia repair before the age of 5 years (n = 1075). RESULTS: The response...... the age of 3 months (n = 122) did not report groin pain more often or with higher intensity than other patients did. CONCLUSIONS: Groin pain in adult patients operated on for a groin hernia in childhood is uncommon and usually mild and occurs in relation to physical activity. Operation before the age of 3...

  9. Treating Chronic Pain with SSRIs: What Do We Kn