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Sample records for alternatively spliced variant

  1. Alternative splice variants of the human PD-1 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christian; Ohm-Laursen, Line; Barington, Torben;

    2005-01-01

    PD-1 is an immunoregulatory receptor expressed on the surface of activated T cells, B cells, and monocytes. We describe four alternatively spliced PD-1 mRNA transcripts (PD-1Deltaex2, PD-1Deltaex3, PD-1Deltaex2,3, and PD-1Deltaex2,3,4) in addition to the full length isoform. PD-1Deltaex2 and PD-1......Deltaex3 are generated by alternative splicing where exon 2 (extracellular IgV-like domain) and exon 3 (transmembrane domain) respectively are spliced out. PD-1Deltaex3 is therefore likely to encode a soluble form of PD-1. PD-1Deltaex2,3 lacks exon 2 and 3. These three variants have unaffected open...

  2. Alternative splicing variations in mouse CAPS2: differential expression and functional properties of splicing variants

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    Furuichi Teiichi

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ca2+-dependent activator protein 2 (CAPS2/CADPS2 is a secretory vesicle-associated protein involved in the release of neurotrophin. We recently reported that an aberrant, alternatively spliced CAPS2 mRNA that lacks exon 3 (CAPS2Δexon3 is detected in some patients with autism. Splicing variations in mouse CAPS2 and their expression and functions remain unclear. Results In this study, we defined 31 exons in the mouse CAPS2 gene and identified six alternative splicing variants, CAPS2a-f. CAPS2a is an isoform lacking exons 22 and 25, which encode part of the Munc13-1-homologous domain (MHD. CAPS2b lacks exon 25. CAPS2c lacks exons 11 and 22. CAPS2d, 2e, and 2f have C-terminal deletions from exon 14, exon 12, and exon 5, respectively. On the other hand, a mouse counterpart of CAPS2Δexon3 was not detected in the mouse tissues tested. CAPS2b was expressed exclusively in the brain, and the other isoforms were highly expressed in the brain, but also in some non-neural tissues. In the brain, all isoforms showed predominant expression patterns in the cerebellum. In the developing cerebellum, CAPS2b showed an up-regulated expression pattern, whereas the other isoforms exhibited transiently peaked expression patterns. CAPS2 proteins were mostly recovered in soluble fractions, but some were present in membrane fractions, except for CAPS2c and 2f, both of which lack the PH domain, suggesting that the PH domain is important for membrane association. In contrast to CAPS2a and 2b, CAPS2c showed slightly decreased BDNF-releasing activity, which is likely due to the C-terminal truncation of the PH domain in CAPS2c. Conclusion This study indicates that, in mouse, there are six splicing variants of CAPS2 (CAPS2a-f, and that these are subdivided into two groups: a long form containing the C-terminal MHD and a short form lacking the C-terminal MHD. These results demonstrate that the splicing variations correlate with their expression patterns and

  3. An Alternate Splicing Variant of the Human Telomerase Catalytic Subunit Inhibits Telomerase Activity

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    Xiaoming Yi

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Telomerase, a cellular reverse transcriptase, adds telomeric repeats to chromosome ends. In normal human somatic cells, telomerase is repressed and telomeres progressively shorten, leading to proliferative senescence. Introduction of the telomerase (hTERT cDNA is sufficient to produce telomerase activity and immortalize normal human cells, suggesting that the repression of telomerase activity is transcriptional. The telomerase transcript has been shown to have at least six alternate splicing sites (four insertion sites and two deletion sites, and variants containing both or either of the deletion sites are present during development and in a panel of cancer cell lines we surveyed. One deletion (β site and all four insertions cause premature translation terminations, whereas the other deletion (α site is 36 by and lies within reverse transcriptase (RT motif A, suggesting that this deletion variant may be a candidate as a dominant-negative inhibitor of telomerase. We have cloned three alternately spliced hTERT variants that contain the α,β or both α and,β deletion sites. These alternate splicing variants along with empty vector and wild-type hTERT were introduced into normal human fibroblasts and several telomerase-positive immortal and tumor cell lines. Expression of the α site deletion variant (hTERT α− construct was confirmed by Western blotting. We found that none of the three alternate splicing variants reconstitutes telomerase activity in fibroblasts. However, hTERT α− inhibits telomerase activities in telomerase-positive cells, causes telomere shortening and eventually cell death. This alternately spliced dominant-negative variant may be important in understanding telomerase regulation during development, differentiation and in cancer progression.

  4. Identification of interleukin-26 in the dromedary camel (Camelus dromedarius): Evidence of alternative splicing and isolation of novel splice variants.

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    Premraj, Avinash; Nautiyal, Binita; Aleyas, Abi G; Rasool, Thaha Jamal

    2015-10-01

    Interleukin-26 (IL-26) is a member of the IL-10 family of cytokines. Though conserved across vertebrates, the IL-26 gene is functionally inactivated in a few mammals like rat, mouse and horse. We report here the identification, isolation and cloning of the cDNA of IL-26 from the dromedary camel. The camel cDNA contains a 516 bp open reading frame encoding a 171 amino acid precursor protein, including a 21 amino acid signal peptide. Sequence analysis revealed high similarity with other mammalian IL-26 homologs and the conservation of IL-10 cytokine family domain structure including key amino acid residues. We also report the identification and cloning of four novel transcript variants produced by alternative splicing at the Exon 3-Exon 4 regions of the gene. Three of the alternative splice variants had premature termination codons and are predicted to code for truncated proteins. The transcript variant 4 (Tv4) having an insertion of an extra 120 bp nucleotides in the ORF was predicted to encode a full length protein product with 40 extra amino acid residues. The mRNA transcripts of all the variants were identified in lymph node, where as fewer variants were observed in other tissues like blood, liver and kidney. The expression of Tv2 and Tv3 were found to be up regulated in mitogen induced camel peripheral blood mononuclear cells. IL-26-Tv2 expression was also induced in camel fibroblast cells infected with Camel pox virus in-vitro. The identification of the transcript variants of IL-26 from the dromedary camel is the first report of alternative splicing for IL-26 in a species in which the gene has not been inactivated.

  5. Alternative spliced variants in the pantetheinase family of genes expressed in human neutrophils.

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    Nitto, Takeaki; Inoue, Teruo; Node, Koichi

    2008-12-15

    Pantetheinase (EC 3.5.1.92) is an enzyme that hydrolyzes pantetheine, an intermediate metabolite of coenzyme A, into pantothenic acid (vitamin B(5)) and cysteamine, a potent antioxidant. The pantetheinase gene family consists of three independent genes, pantetheinase/vanin-1/VNN1, GPI-80/VNN2 and vanin-3/VNN3 that are each composed of seven exons. We herein report that human neutrophils express transcripts encoding at least nine splice variants of VNN3 and four splice variants of GPI-80/VNN2. Analysis of the DNA sequence of the human VNN3 gene demonstrated that the VNN3 locus in the human genome as well as the sequence of cDNA clones obtained in this study does not encode the complete VNN3 protein, as previously reported due to a frame shift caused by lack of one nucleotide. Moreover, the VNN3 locus indeed encodes smaller peptides compared to the proteins encoded by the mouse orthologous gene, vanin-3. The anti-GPI-80 monoclonal antibody 3H9 recognized amino acids 120-179 of the GPI-80/VNN2 protein as shown by the results of immunoblotting with recombinant GPI-80/VNN2 variant proteins. Immunoblotting with human neutrophil lysate suggests that the GPI-80/VNN2 variants exist in human neutrophils. The existence of splice variants in the pantetheinase gene family suggests the possibility of alternative roles in addition to canonical enzymatic activity in human neutrophils.

  6. Subcellular localization of human heparanase and its alternative splice variant in COS-7 cells.

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    Sato, Mayumi; Amemiya, Kana; Hayakawa, Sumio; Munakata, Hiroshi

    2008-08-01

    Heparanase, the enzyme that degrades heparan sulfate, has been implicated to play important and characteristic roles in organogenesis, tissue organization, cell migration, and tumor metastasis. Clarification of its expression, its intracellular sorting, and its secretion is, therefore, of much importance to understand its role in cell biology. In addition to the 1.7 Kb transcript previously reported, we detected a 1.5 Kb transcript of human heparanase by RT-PCR. The smaller transcript was shown to be an alternatively spliced variant lacking exon 5, which contains the essential glutamic acid residue required for enzyme activity. When expressed in COS-7 cells this variant did not show any heparanase activity. Full-length heparanase and the exon 5-deleted splice variant were expressed in COS-7 cells and examined by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Both proteins co-localized with calnexin, a marker protein for the endoplasmic reticulum, and they co-immunoprecipitated with calnexin. Both proteins were postulated to be precursors based upon the results of SDS-PAGE analyses. Treatment with endoglycosidases revealed that all potential N-glycosylation sites in the proteins were glycosylated. Tunicamycin treatment of transfected COS-7 cells inhibited N-glycosylation but did not change the subcellular localization. These results indicate that overexpressed heparanase and its splice variant localize to the endoplasmic reticulum independent of glycosylation in COS-7 cells.

  7. Characterization and alternative splicing of the complex I 19-kD subunit in Dunaliella salina: expression and mutual correlation of splice variants under diverse stresses.

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    Cao, Yu; Jin, Nan; Xu, Hui; Liu, Yi; Zhu, Wei Hua; Li, Xin Ran; Qiao, Dai Rong; Cao, Yi

    2010-01-01

    Complex I is the first enzyme in the mitochondrial respiratory chain. It extracts energy from NADH, which is produced by the oxidation of sugars and fats, and traps the energy by virtue of a potential difference or voltage across the mitochondrial inner membrane. Herein, the genomic sequence and four splice variants encoding the complex I 19-kD subunit were isolated from Dunaliella salina. There were four transcripts coding for the complex I 19-kD subunit due to alternative splicing in algae, and the four transcripts were translated to two protein isoforms with varying C-terminals. We report the splicing pattern in the 3'-region of the D. salina 19-kD subunit, in which three of the exons (5, 6, and 7) could be alternatively spliced. Moreover, we found that four alternatively spliced variants were subject to coordinated transcription in response to different stresses by real-time quantitative PCR.

  8. Heat Stress Upregulates the Expression of TLR4 and Its Alternative Splicing Variant in Bama Miniature Pigs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JU Xiang-hong; XU Han-jin; YONG Yan-hong; AN Li-long; XU Ying-mei; JIAO Pei-rong; LIAO Ming

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a cellular mechanism in eukaryotes that results in considerable diversity of gene products. It plays an important role in several diseases and cellular signal regulation. Heat stress is a major factor that induces immunosuppression in pigs. Little is known about the correlation between alternative splicing and heat stress in pigs. Therefore, this study aimed to clone, sequence and quantify the alternative splicing variant of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in Bama miniature pigs (Sus scrofa domestica) following exposure to heat stress. The results showed that the second exon of TLR4 was spliced and 167 bp shorter in the alternative splicing variant, and the protein was putatively identiifed as a type of truncated membrane protein consisting of extramembrane, transmembrane and intramembrane regions lacking a signal peptide. Further, it was not a non-classical secretory protein. Five potential reference genes were screened for their potential as reliable standards to quantify the expression of TLR4 alternative spliced variants by real-time quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The stability of these reference genes was ranked using the geNorm and NormFinder programs, and ribosomal protein L4 (RPL4) and TATA box-binding protein (TBP) were found to be the two genes showing the most stable expression in the in vitro cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) during heat shock. The mRNA level of the TLR4 gene (both classical and spliced) in stressed pigs increased signiifcantly (P<0.05). Further, the expression levels of the alternative spliced variant of TLR4 (TLR4-ASV) showed a 2-3 folds increase in heat-stressed PBMCs as compared to control pigs. The results of the present study suggested that heat shock might modulate the host immune response by regulating the expressions of TLR4 and its alternative splicing variant.

  9. Cloning and functional expression of alternative spliced variants of the ρ1 γ-aminobutyrate receptor

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    Martínez-Torres, Ataúlfo; Vazquez, Ana E.; Panicker, Mitradas M.; Miledi, Ricardo

    1998-01-01

    The ρ1 γ-aminobutyrate receptor (GABAρ1) is expressed predominantly in the retina and forms homomeric GABA-gated Cl− channels that are clearly different from the multisubunit GABAA receptors. In contrast to these, GABAρ1 receptors desensitize very little and are not blocked by bicuculline. In addition to GABAρ1, two new variants were identified in human retina cDNA libraries. Cloning and sequence analysis showed that both variants contain large deletions in the putative extracellular domain of the receptor. These deletions extend from a common 5′ site to different 3′ sites. The cDNA with the largest deletion, named GABAρ1Δ450, contains a complete ORF identical to that of GABAρ1 but missing 450 nt. This cDNA encodes a protein of 323 aa, identical to the GABAρ1, but has a deletion of 150 aa in the amino-terminal extracellular domain. GABAρ1Δ450 mRNA injected into Xenopus oocytes did not produce functional GABA receptors. The second GABAρ1 variant (GABAρ1Δ51) contains a 51-nt deletion. In Xenopus oocytes, GABAρ1Δ51 led to the expression of GABA receptors that had the essential GABAρ1 characteristics of low desensitization and bicuculline resistance. Therefore, alternative splicing increases the coding potential of this gene family expressed in the human retina, but the functional diversity created by the alternative spliced forms is still not understood. PMID:9520485

  10. Identification and characterization of alternatively spliced variants of DNA methyltransferase 3a in mammalian cells.

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    Weisenberger, Daniel J; Velicescu, Mihaela; Preciado-Lopez, Miguel A; Gonzales, Felicidad A; Tsai, Yvonne C; Liang, Gangning; Jones, Peter A

    2002-09-18

    CpG methylation is mediated by the functions of at least three active DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs). While DNMT1 is thought to perform maintenance methylation, the more recently discovered DNMT3a and DNMT3b enzymes are thought to facilitate de novo methylation. Murine Dnmt3a and 3b are developmentally regulated and a new Dnmt3a isoform, Dnmt3a2, has been recently shown to be expressed preferentially in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. Here we have characterized four alternatively spliced variants of human and mouse DNMT3a. These transcripts included a novel exon 1 (1beta) that was spliced into the same exon 2 acceptor splice site used by the original exon 1 (1alpha). Cloning and sequencing of the 5' region of the human DNMT3a gene revealed that exon 1beta was situated upstream of exon 1alpha and that the entire region was contained within a CpG island. We also identified other alternatively spliced species containing intron 4 inclusions that were associated with either exon 1alpha or 1beta. These were expressed at low levels in mouse and human cells. All transcripts were highly conserved between human and mouse. The levels of Dnmt3a mRNA containing exon 1beta were 3-25-fold greater in mouse ES cells than in various somatic cells as determined by semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis, while the levels of exon 1alpha-containing transcripts were slightly higher in human and mouse somatic cells. The preferential expression of the beta transcript in ES cells suggests that this transcript, in addition to Dnmt3a2, may also be important for de novo methylation during development.

  11. Detection of circulating prostate tumor cells: alternative spliced variant of PSM induced false-positive result.

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    Hisatomi, Hisashi; Nagao, Kumi; Kawakita, Mutsuji; Matsuda, Tadashi; Hirata, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Shigeki; Nakamoto, Takaaki; Harasawa, Hiroshi; Kaneko, Noboru; Hikiji, Kazumasa; Tsukada, Yutaka

    2002-11-01

    RT-nested PCR has been introduced as a highly specific and sensitive assay method to detect the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSM) mRNA in peripheral blood. However, appreciable percentages of false-positive cases have been reported. Additionally, primer sets reported previously could not discriminate between PSM and PSM', an alternatively spliced variant, mRNA. These isoforms can be produced from a single gene. Switches in alternative splicing patterns are often controlled with strict cell-type or developmental-stage specificity. Therefore, it is most important to discriminate between PSM mRNA and PSM' mRNA. Using our highly specific primer sets, PSM mRNA was detected in 3 of 24 peripheral blood samples of normal male volunteers (12.5%) and was not detected in peripheral blood of 11 normal female volunteers. PSM' mRNA was detected in 5 of 24 peripheral blood samples of normal male volunteers (20.8%) and in 4 of 11 of normal female volunteers (36.4%). PSM' mRNA induced false-positive results, it is important for genetic diagnosis of prostate cancer to discriminate between PSM and PSM' using our primer sets with high specificity. The advances in the uniquely designed primer sets may allow researchers to detect a real PSM mRNA without PSM' mRNA.

  12. The consensus sequence of FAMLF alternative splice variants is overexpressed in undifferentiated hematopoietic cells

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    W.L. Chen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The familial acute myeloid leukemia related factor gene (FAMLF was previously identified from a familial AML subtractive cDNA library and shown to undergo alternative splicing. This study used real-time quantitative PCR to investigate the expression of the FAMLF alternative-splicing transcript consensus sequence (FAMLF-CS in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from 119 patients with de novo acute leukemia (AL and 104 healthy controls, as well as in CD34+ cells from 12 AL patients and 10 healthy donors. A 429-bp fragment from a novel splicing variant of FAMLF was obtained, and a 363-bp consensus sequence was targeted to quantify total FAMLF expression. Kruskal-Wallis, Nemenyi, Spearman's correlation, and Mann-Whitney U-tests were used to analyze the data. FAMLF-CS expression in PBMCs from AL patients and CD34+ cells from AL patients and controls was significantly higher than in control PBMCs (P<0.0001. Moreover, FAMLF-CS expression in PBMCs from the AML group was positively correlated with red blood cell count (rs =0.317, P=0.006, hemoglobin levels (rs =0.210, P=0.049, and percentage of peripheral blood blasts (rs =0.256, P=0.027, but inversely correlated with hemoglobin levels in the control group (rs =–0.391, P<0.0001. AML patients with high CD34+ expression showed significantly higher FAMLF-CS expression than those with low CD34+ expression (P=0.041. Our results showed that FAMLF is highly expressed in both normal and malignant immature hematopoietic cells, but that expression is lower in normal mature PBMCs.

  13. The consensus sequence of FAMLF alternative splice variants is overexpressed in undifferentiated hematopoietic cells.

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    Chen, W L; Luo, D F; Gao, C; Ding, Y; Wang, S Y

    2015-07-01

    The familial acute myeloid leukemia related factor gene (FAMLF) was previously identified from a familial AML subtractive cDNA library and shown to undergo alternative splicing. This study used real-time quantitative PCR to investigate the expression of the FAMLF alternative-splicing transcript consensus sequence (FAMLF-CS) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 119 patients with de novo acute leukemia (AL) and 104 healthy controls, as well as in CD34+ cells from 12 AL patients and 10 healthy donors. A 429-bp fragment from a novel splicing variant of FAMLF was obtained, and a 363-bp consensus sequence was targeted to quantify total FAMLF expression. Kruskal-Wallis, Nemenyi, Spearman's correlation, and Mann-Whitney U-tests were used to analyze the data. FAMLF-CS expression in PBMCs from AL patients and CD34+ cells from AL patients and controls was significantly higher than in control PBMCs (P < 0.0001). Moreover, FAMLF-CS expression in PBMCs from the AML group was positively correlated with red blood cell count (rs =0.317, P=0.006), hemoglobin levels (rs = 0.210, P = 0.049), and percentage of peripheral blood blasts (rs = 0.256, P = 0.027), but inversely correlated with hemoglobin levels in the control group (rs = -0.391, P < 0.0001). AML patients with high CD34+ expression showed significantly higher FAMLF-CS expression than those with low CD34+ expression (P = 0.041). Our results showed that FAMLF is highly expressed in both normal and malignant immature hematopoietic cells, but that expression is lower in normal mature PBMCs.

  14. Verification of predicted alternatively spliced Wnt genes reveals two new splice variants (CTNNB1 and LRP5 and altered Axin-1 expression during tumour progression

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    Reich Jens G

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Splicing processes might play a major role in carcinogenesis and tumour progression. The Wnt pathway is of crucial relevance for cancer progression. Therefore we focussed on the Wnt/β-catenin signalling pathway in order to validate the expression of sequences predicted as alternatively spliced by bioinformatic methods. Splice variants of its key molecules were selected, which may be critical components for the understanding of colorectal tumour progression and may have the potential to act as biological markers. For some of the Wnt pathway genes the existence of splice variants was either proposed (e.g. β-Catenin and CTNNB1 or described only in non-colon tissues (e.g. GSK3β or hitherto not published (e.g. LRP5. Results Both splice variants – normal and alternative form – of all selected Wnt pathway components were found to be expressed in cell lines as well as in samples derived from tumour, normal and healthy tissues. All splice positions corresponded totally with the bioinformatical prediction as shown by sequencing. Two hitherto not described alternative splice forms (CTNNB1 and LRP5 were detected. Although the underlying EST data used for the bioinformatic analysis suggested a tumour-specific expression neither a qualitative nor a significant quantitative difference between the expression in tumour and healthy tissues was detected. Axin-1 expression was reduced in later stages and in samples from carcinomas forming distant metastases. Conclusion We were first to describe that splice forms of crucial genes of the Wnt-pathway are expressed in human colorectal tissue. Newly described splicefoms were found for β-Catenin, LRP5, GSK3β, Axin-1 and CtBP1. However, the predicted cancer specificity suggested by the origin of the underlying ESTs was neither qualitatively nor significant quantitatively confirmed. That let us to conclude that EST sequence data can give adequate hints for the existence of alternative splicing

  15. Alternative Splicing Variants and DNA Methylation Status of BDNF in Inbred Chicken Lines

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    Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays essential roles in neuronal survival and differentiation, synaptic plasticity, central regulation of energy homeostasis, and neuronal development of the central and peripheral nerve system. Here, we report two new splicing variants of the chicken BDNF g...

  16. Skipping of exons by premature termination of transcription and alternative splicing within intron-5 of the sheep SCF gene: a novel splice variant.

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    Siva Arumugam Saravanaperumal

    Full Text Available Stem cell factor (SCF is a growth factor, essential for haemopoiesis, mast cell development and melanogenesis. In the hematopoietic microenvironment (HM, SCF is produced either as a membrane-bound (- or soluble (+ forms. Skin expression of SCF stimulates melanocyte migration, proliferation, differentiation, and survival. We report for the first time, a novel mRNA splice variant of SCF from the skin of white merino sheep via cloning and sequencing. Reverse transcriptase (RT-PCR and molecular prediction revealed two different cDNA products of SCF. Full-length cDNA libraries were enriched by the method of rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE-PCR. Nucleotide sequencing and molecular prediction revealed that the primary 1519 base pair (bp cDNA encodes a precursor protein of 274 amino acids (aa, commonly known as 'soluble' isoform. In contrast, the shorter (835 and/or 725 bp cDNA was found to be a 'novel' mRNA splice variant. It contains an open reading frame (ORF corresponding to a truncated protein of 181 aa (vs 245 aa with an unique C-terminus lacking the primary proteolytic segment (28 aa right after the D(175G site which is necessary to produce 'soluble' form of SCF. This alternative splice (AS variant was explained by the complete nucleotide sequencing of splice junction covering exon 5-intron (5-exon 6 (948 bp with a premature termination codon (PTC whereby exons 6 to 9/10 are skipped (Cassette Exon, CE 6-9/10. We also demonstrated that the Northern blot analysis at transcript level is mediated via an intron-5 splicing event. Our data refine the structure of SCF gene; clarify the presence (+ and/or absence (- of primary proteolytic-cleavage site specific SCF splice variants. This work provides a basis for understanding the functional role and regulation of SCF in hair follicle melanogenesis in sheep beyond what was known in mice, humans and other mammals.

  17. Ectopic expression of new alternative splice variant of Smac/DIABLO increases mammospheres formation.

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    Martinez-Ruiz, Gustavo U; Victoria-Acosta, Georgina; Vazquez-Santillan, Karla I; Jimenez-Hernandez, Luis; Muñoz-Galindo, Laura; Ceballos-Cancino, Gisela; Maldonado, Vilma; Melendez-Zajgla, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Smac-α is a mitochondrial protein that, during apoptosis, is translocated to the cytoplasm, where it negatively regulates members of the inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) family via the IAP-binding motif (IBM) contained within its amino-terminus. Here, we describe a new alternative splice variant from Smac gene, which we have named Smac-ε. Smac-ε lacks both an IBM and a mitochondrial-targeting signal (MTS) element. Smac-ε mRNA exhibits a tissue-specific expression pattern in healthy human tissues as well as in several cancer cell lines. The steady-state levels of endogenous Smac-ε protein is regulated by the proteasomal pathway. When ectopically expressed, this isoform presents a cytosolic localization and is unable to associate with or to regulate the expression of X-linked Inhibitor of apoptosis protein, the best-studied member of IAP family. Nevertheless, over-expression of Smac-ε increases mammosphere formation. Whole genome expression analyses from these mammospheres show activation of several pro-survival and growth pathways, including Estrogen-Receptor signaling. In conclusion, our results support the functionality of this new Smac isoform.

  18. Differential expressions of the alternatively spliced variant mRNAs of the µ opioid receptor gene, OPRM1, in brain regions of four inbred mouse strains.

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    Jin Xu

    Full Text Available The µ opioid receptor gene, OPRM1, undergoes extensive alternative pre-mRNA splicing in rodents and humans, with dozens of alternatively spliced variants of the OPRM1 gene. The present studies establish a SYBR green quantitative PCR (qPCR assay to more accurately quantify mouse OPRM1 splice variant mRNAs. Using these qPCR assays, we examined the expression of OPRM1 splice variant mRNAs in selected brain regions of four inbred mouse strains displaying differences in µ opioid-induced tolerance and physical dependence: C56BL/6J, 129P3/J, SJL/J and SWR/J. The complete mRNA expression profiles of the OPRM1 splice variants reveal marked differences of the variant mRNA expression among the brain regions in each mouse strain, suggesting region-specific alternative splicing of the OPRM1 gene. The expression of many variants was also strain-specific, implying a genetic influence on OPRM1 alternative splicing. The expression levels of a number of the variant mRNAs in certain brain regions appear to correlate with strain sensitivities to morphine analgesia, tolerance and physical dependence in four mouse strains.

  19. Two Human ACAT2 mRNA Variants Produced by Alternative Splicing and Coding for Novel Isoenzymes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Min YAO; Bo-Liang LI; Can-Hua WANG; Bao-Liang SONG; Xin-Ying YANG; Zhen-Zhen WANG; Wei QI; Zhi-Xin LIN; Catherine C. Y. CHANG; Ta-Yuan CHANG

    2005-01-01

    Acyl coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase 2 (ACAT2) plays an important role in cholesterol absorption. Human ACAT2 is highly expressed in small intestine and fetal liver, but its expression is greatly diminished in adult liver. The full-length human ACAT2 mRNA encodes a protein, designated ACAT2a, with 522 amino acids. We have previously reported the organization of the human ACAT2 gene and the differentiation-dependent promoter activity in intestinal Caco-2 cells. In the current work, two human ACAT2 mRNA variants produced by alternative splicing are cloned and predicted to encode two novel ACAT2 isoforms,named ACAT2b and ACAT2c, with 502 and 379 amino acids, respectively. These mRNA variants differ from ACAT2a mRNA by lack of the exon 4 (ACAT2b mRNA) and exons 4-5 plus 8-9-10 (ACAT2c mRNA).Significantly, comparable amounts of the alternatively spliced ACAT2 mRNA variants were detected by RTPCR, and Western blot analysis confirmed the presence of their corresponding proteins in human liver and intestine cells. Furthermore, phosphorylation and enzymatic activity analyses demonstrated that the novel isoenzymes ACAT2b and ACAT2c lacked the phosphorylatable site SLLD, and their enzymatic activities reduced to 25%-35% of that of ACAT2a. These evidences indicate that alternative splicing produces two human ACAT2 mRNA variants that encode the novel ACAT2 isoenzymes. Our findings might help to understand the regulation of the ACAT2 gene expression under certain physiological and pathological conditions.

  20. Alcoholism and alternative splicing of candidate genes.

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    Sasabe, Toshikazu; Ishiura, Shoichi

    2010-04-01

    Gene expression studies have shown that expression patterns of several genes have changed during the development of alcoholism. Gene expression is regulated not only at the level of transcription but also through alternative splicing of pre-mRNA. In this review, we discuss some of the evidence suggesting that alternative splicing of candidate genes such as DRD2 (encoding dopamine D2 receptor) may form the basis of the mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of alcoholism. These reports suggest that aberrant expression of splice variants affects alcohol sensitivities, and alcohol consumption also regulates alternative splicing. Thus, investigations of alternative splicing are essential for understanding the molecular events underlying the development of alcoholism.

  1. Alternative splice variants of the human centrosome kinase Nek2 exhibit distinct patterns of expression in mitosis.

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    Hames, Rebecca S; Fry, Andrew M

    2002-01-01

    Nek2 is a cell-cycle-regulated protein kinase that localizes to the centrosome and is likely to be involved in regulating centrosome structure at the G(2)/M transition. Here, we localize the functional human Nek2 gene to chromosome 1 and show that alternative polyadenylation signals provide a mechanism for generating two distinct isoforms. Sequencing of products generated by reverse transcriptase PCR, immunoblotting of cell extracts and transfection of antisense oligonucleotides together demonstrate that human Nek2 is expressed as two splice variants. These isoforms, designated Nek2A and Nek2B, are detected in primary blood lymphocytes as well as adult transformed cells. Nek2A and Nek2B, which can form homo- and hetero-dimers, both localize to the centrosome, although only Nek2A can induce centrosome splitting upon overexpression. Importantly, Nek2A and Nek2B exhibit distinct patterns of cell-cycle-dependent expression. Both are present in low amounts in the G(1) phase and exhibit increased abundance in the S and G(2) phases. However, Nek2A disappears in prometaphase-arrested cells, whereas Nek2B remains elevated. These results demonstrate that two alternative splice variants of the human centrosomal kinase Nek2 exist that differ in their expression patterns during mitosis. This has important implications for our understanding of both Nek2 protein kinase regulation and the control of centrosome structure during mitosis.

  2. Expression pattern and function of alternative splice variants of glutamate-gated chloride channel in the housefly Musca domestica.

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    Kita, Tomo; Ozoe, Fumiyo; Ozoe, Yoshihisa

    2014-02-01

    Glutamate-gated chloride channels (GluCls) mediate fast inhibitory neurotransmission in invertebrate nervous systems. cDNAs encoding two alternative splice variants (MdGluClB and C) of the GluCl subunit were cloned from the housefly Musca domestica. The expression patterns of three variants, including the previously reported MdGluClA, differed among the body parts (head, thorax, abdomen, and leg) of the adult housefly and among developmental stages (embryo, larva, pupa, and adult). The MdGluClA and B transcripts were abundant in the central nervous system of the adult, whereas the MdGluClC transcript was expressed in the central nervous system and as the predominant variant in the peripheral tissues. The sensitivities to the agonist glutamate and the allosteric activator ivermectin B1a did not differ between channels containing MdGluCl variants when they were singly or co-expressed in Xenopus oocytes. By contrast, MdGluClA and B channels were more sensitive to the channel blockers fipronil and picrotoxinin than was MdGluClC channels. Heteromeric channels containing different subunit variants were more sensitive to picrotoxinin than were homomeric channels. Heteromeric channels were more sensitive to fipronil than were homomeric MdGluClC channels but not than homomeric MdGluClA and B channels. These results suggest that functionally indistinguishable but pharmacologically distinct GluCls are expressed in a spatially and temporally distinct manner in the housefly.

  3. Alternative splicing of DENND1A, a PCOS candidate gene, generates variant 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, Meng Kian; Speek, Mart; Legeza, Balázs; Modi, Bhavi; Teves, Maria Eugenia; McAllister, Janette M; Strauss, Jerome F; Miller, Walter L

    2016-10-15

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common endocrinopathy characterized by hyperandrogenism and metabolic disorders. The excess androgens may be of both ovarian and adrenal origin. PCOS has a strong genetic component, and genome-wide association studies have identified several candidate genes, notably DENND1A, which encodes connecdenn 1, involved in trafficking of endosomes. DENND1A encodes two principal variants, V1 (1009 amino acids) and V2 (559 amino acids). The androgen-producing ovarian theca cells of PCOS women over-express V2. Knockdown of V2 in these cells reduces androgen production, and overexpression of V2 in normal theca cells confers upon them a PCOS phenotype of increased androgen synthesis. We report that human adrenal NCI-H295A cells express V1 and V2 mRNA and that the V2 isoform is produced by exonization of sequences in intron 20, which generates a unique exon 20A, encoding the C-terminus of V2. As in human theca cells from normal women, forced expression of V2 in NCI-H295A cells resulted in increased abundance of CYP17A1 and CYP11A1 mRNAs. We also found genetic variation in the intronic region 330 bp upstream from exon 20A, which could have the potential to drive the selective expression of V2. There was no clear association with these variants with PCOS when we analyzed genomc DNA from normal women and women with PCOS. Using minigene expression vectors in NCI-H295A cells, this variable region did not consistently favor splicing of the V2 transcript. These findings suggest increased V2 expression in PCOS theca cells is not the result of genomic sequence variation in intron 20.

  4. Apical Scaffolding Protein NHERF2 Modulates the Localization of Alternatively Spliced Plasma Membrane Ca2+ Pump 2B Variants in Polarized Epithelial Cells*

    OpenAIRE

    Padányi, Rita; Xiong, Yuning; Antalffy, Géza; Lór, Krisztina; Pászty, Katalin; STREHLER, EMANUEL E.; Enyedi, Ágnes

    2010-01-01

    The membrane localization of the plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase isoform 2 (PMCA2) in polarized cells is determined by alternative splicing; the PMCA2w/b splice variant shows apical localization, whereas the PMCA2z/b and PMCA2x/b variants are mostly basolateral. We previously reported that PMCA2b interacts with the PDZ protein Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor 2 (NHERF2), but the role of this interaction for the specific membrane localization of PMCA2 is not known. Here we show that co-expressio...

  5. Structural and Functional Characterization of Two Alternative Splicing Variants of Mouse Endothelial Cell-Specific Chemotaxis Regulator (ECSCR

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    Yongchang Chang

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Endothelial cells (ECs that line the lumen of blood vessels are important players in blood vessel formation, and EC migration is a key component of the angiogenic process. Thus, identification of genes that are specifically or preferentially expressed in vascular ECs and in-depth understanding of their biological functions may lead to discovery of new therapeutic targets. We have previously reported molecular characterization of human endothelial cell-specific molecule 2 (ECSM2/endothelial cell-specific chemotaxis regulator (ECSCR. In the present study, we cloned two mouse full-length cDNAs by RT-PCR, which encode two putative ECSCR isoform precursors with considerable homology to the human ECSCR. Nucleotide sequence and exon-intron junction analyses suggested that they are alternative splicing variants (ECSCR isoform-1 and -2, differing from each other in the first and second exons. Quantitative RT-PCR results revealed that isoform-2 is the predominant form, which was most abundant in heart, lung, and muscles, and moderately abundant in uterus and testis. In contrast, the expression of isoform-1 seemed to be more enriched in testis. To further explore their potential cellular functions, we expressed GFP- and FLAG-tagged ECSCR isoforms, respectively, in an ECSCR deficient cell line (HEK293. Interestingly, the actual sizes of either ECSCR-GFP or -FLAG fusion proteins detected by immunoblotting are much larger than their predicted sizes, suggesting that both isoforms are glycoproteins. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that both ECSCR isoforms are localized at the cell surface, which is consistent with the structural prediction. Finally, we performed cell migration assays using mouse endothelial MS1 cells overexpressing GFP alone, isoform-1-GFP, and isoform-2-GFP, respectively. Our results showed that both isoforms significantly inhibited vascular epidermal growth factor (VEGF-induced cell migration. Taken together, we have provided several lines

  6. Alternative splice variants in TIM barrel proteins from human genome correlate with the structural and evolutionary modularity of this versatile protein fold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa-Leyva, Adrián; Montero-Morán, Gabriela; Saab-Rincón, Gloria; Brieba, Luis G; Soberón, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    After the surprisingly low number of genes identified in the human genome, alternative splicing emerged as a major mechanism to generate protein diversity in higher eukaryotes. However, it is still not known if its prevalence along the genome evolution has contributed to the overall functional protein diversity or if it simply reflects splicing noise. The (βα)8 barrel or TIM barrel is one of the most frequent, versatile, and ancient fold encountered among enzymes. Here, we analyze the structural modifications present in TIM barrel proteins from the human genome product of alternative splicing events. We found that 87% of all splicing events involved deletions; most of these events resulted in protein fragments that corresponded to the (βα)2, (βα)4, (βα)5, (βα)6, and (βα)7 subdomains of TIM barrels. Because approximately 7% of all the splicing events involved internal β-strand substitutions, we decided, based on the genomic data, to design β-strand and α-helix substitutions in a well-studied TIM barrel enzyme. The biochemical characterization of one of the chimeric variants suggests that some of the splice variants in the human genome with β-strand substitutions may be evolving novel functions via either the oligomeric state or substrate specificity. We provide results of how the splice variants represent subdomains that correlate with the independently folding and evolving structural units previously reported. This work is the first to observe a link between the structural features of the barrel and a recurrent genetic mechanism. Our results suggest that it is reasonable to expect that a sizeable fraction of splice variants found in the human genome represent structurally viable functional proteins. Our data provide additional support for the hypothesis of the origin of the TIM barrel fold through the assembly of smaller subdomains. We suggest a model of how nature explores new proteins through alternative splicing as a mechanism to diversify the

  7. Alternative Spliced Transcripts as Cancer Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otavia L. Caballero

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic mRNAs are transcribed as precursors containing their intronic sequences. These are subsequently excised and the exons are spliced together to form mature mRNAs. This process can lead to transcript diversification through the phenomenon of alternative splicing. Alternative splicing can take the form of one or more skipped exons, variable position of intron splicing or intron retention. The effect of alternative splicing in expanding protein repertoire might partially underlie the apparent discrepancy between gene number and the complexity of higher eukaryotes. It is likely that more than 50% form. Many cancer-associated genes, such as CD44 and WT1 are alternatively spliced. Variation of the splicing process occurs during tumor progression and may play a major role in tumorigenesis. Furthermore, alternatively spliced transcripts may be extremely useful as cancer markers, since it appears likely that there may be striking contrasts in usage of alternatively spliced transcript variants between normal and tumor tissue than in alterations in the general levels of gene expression.

  8. Alcoholism and Alternative Splicing of Candidate Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshikazu Sasabe

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression studies have shown that expression patterns of several genes have changed during the development of alcoholism. Gene expression is regulated not only at the level of transcription but also through alternative splicing of pre-mRNA. In this review, we discuss some of the evidence suggesting that alternative splicing of candidate genes such as DRD2 (encoding dopamine D2 receptor may form the basis of the mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of alcoholism. These reports suggest that aberrant expression of splice variants affects alcohol sensitivities, and alcohol consumption also regulates alternative splicing. Thus, investigations of alternative splicing are essential for understanding the molecular events underlying the development of alcoholism.

  9. Alternative splicing interference by xenobiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaharieva, Emanuela; Chipman, J Kevin; Soller, Matthias

    2012-06-14

    The protein coding sequence of most eukaryotic genes (exons) is interrupted by non-coding parts (introns), which are excised in a process termed splicing. To generate a mature messenger RNA (mRNA) hundreds of combinatorial protein-protein and RNA-protein interactions are required to splice out often very large introns with high fidelity and accuracy. Inherent to splicing is the use of alternative splice sites generating immense proteomic diversity from a limited number of genes. In humans, alternative splicing is a major mode of regulating gene expression, occurs in over 90% of genes and is particularly abundant in the brain. Only recently, it has been recognized that the complexity of the splicing process makes it susceptible to interference by various xenobiotics. These compounds include antineoplastic substances, commonly used drugs and food supplements and cause a spectrum of effects ranging from deleterious inhibition of general splicing to highly specific modifications of alternative splicing affecting only certain genes. Alterations in splicing have been implicated in numerous diseases such as cancer and neurodegeneration. Splicing regulation plays an important role in the execution of programmed cell death. The switch between anti- and pro-apoptotic isoforms by alternative splice site selection and misregulation of a number of splicing factors impacts on cell survival and disease. Here, our current knowledge is summarized on compounds interfering with general and alternative splicing and of the current methodology to study changes in these processes relevant to the field of toxicology and future risk assessments.

  10. Revised genomic structure of the human ghrelin gene and identification of novel exons, alternative splice variants and natural antisense transcripts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herington Adrian C

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ghrelin is a multifunctional peptide hormone expressed in a range of normal tissues and pathologies. It has been reported that the human ghrelin gene consists of five exons which span 5 kb of genomic DNA on chromosome 3 and includes a 20 bp non-coding first exon (20 bp exon 0. The availability of bioinformatic tools enabling comparative analysis and the finalisation of the human genome prompted us to re-examine the genomic structure of the ghrelin locus. Results We have demonstrated the presence of an additional novel exon (exon -1 and 5' extensions to exon 0 and 1 using comparative in silico analysis and have demonstrated their existence experimentally using RT-PCR and 5' RACE. A revised exon-intron structure demonstrates that the human ghrelin gene spans 7.2 kb and consists of six rather than five exons. Several ghrelin gene-derived splice forms were detected in a range of human tissues and cell lines. We have demonstrated ghrelin gene-derived mRNA transcripts that do not code for ghrelin, but instead may encode the C-terminal region of full-length preproghrelin (C-ghrelin, which contains the coding region for obestatin and a transcript encoding obestatin-only. Splice variants that differed in their 5' untranslated regions were also found, suggesting a role of these regions in the post-transcriptional regulation of preproghrelin translation. Finally, several natural antisense transcripts, termed ghrelinOS (ghrelin opposite strand transcripts, were demonstrated via orientation-specific RT-PCR, 5' RACE and in silico analysis of ESTs and cloned amplicons. Conclusion The sense and antisense alternative transcripts demonstrated in this study may function as non-coding regulatory RNA, or code for novel protein isoforms. This is the first demonstration of putative obestatin and C-ghrelin specific transcripts and these findings suggest that these ghrelin gene-derived peptides may also be produced independently of preproghrelin

  11. Alternative splicing of CARMA2/CARD14 transcripts generates protein variants with differential effect on NF-κB activation and endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scudiero, Ivan; Zotti, Tiziana; Ferravante, Angela; Vessichelli, Mariangela; Vito, Pasquale; Stilo, Romania

    2011-12-01

    The caspase recruitment domain (CARD)-containing proteins CARMA1-3 share high degree of sequence, structure and functional homology. Whereas CARMA1 and CARMA3 have been identified as crucial components of signal transduction pathways that lead to activation of NF-κB transcription factor, little is known about the function of CARMA2. Here we report the identification of two splice variants of CARMA2. One transcript, named CARMA2short (CARMA2sh), is predicted to encode for a CARMA2 polypeptide containing the CARD, coiled coil, and a PDZ domains, but lacking the SH3 and the GuK domains. The second variant, CARMA2cardless (CARMA2cl), encodes for a polypeptide lacking the CARD domain and containing only a portion of the coiled coil domain and a linker region. Expression analysis confirmed the presence of the CARMA2 alternatively spliced transcripts in both human cell lines and tissues. Fluorescence microscopy data show that both splice variants localize in the cytosol. Biochemical experiments indicate that CARMA2sh interacts with TRAF2 and activates NF-κB in a TRAF2-dependent manner. Finally, CARMA2sh variant protects cells from apoptosis induced by different stimuli. Taken together, these results demonstrate that multiple transcripts encoding several CARMA2 isoforms exist in vivo and regulate NF-κB activation and apoptosis.

  12. Nonsense-Mediated Decay of Alternative Precursor mRNA Splicing Variants Is a Major Determinant of the Arabidopsis Steady State Transcriptome[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drechsel, Gabriele; Kahles, André; Kesarwani, Anil K.; Stauffer, Eva; Behr, Jonas; Drewe, Philipp; Rätsch, Gunnar; Wachter, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) surveillance pathway can recognize erroneous transcripts and physiological mRNAs, such as precursor mRNA alternative splicing (AS) variants. Currently, information on the global extent of coupled AS and NMD remains scarce and even absent for any plant species. To address this, we conducted transcriptome-wide splicing studies using Arabidopsis thaliana mutants in the NMD factor homologs UP FRAMESHIFT1 (UPF1) and UPF3 as well as wild-type samples treated with the translation inhibitor cycloheximide. Our analyses revealed that at least 17.4% of all multi-exon, protein-coding genes produce splicing variants that are targeted by NMD. Moreover, we provide evidence that UPF1 and UPF3 act in a translation-independent mRNA decay pathway. Importantly, 92.3% of the NMD-responsive mRNAs exhibit classical NMD-eliciting features, supporting their authenticity as direct targets. Genes generating NMD-sensitive AS variants function in diverse biological processes, including signaling and protein modification, for which NaCl stress–modulated AS-NMD was found. Besides mRNAs, numerous noncoding RNAs and transcripts derived from intergenic regions were shown to be NMD responsive. In summary, we provide evidence for a major function of AS-coupled NMD in shaping the Arabidopsis transcriptome, having fundamental implications in gene regulation and quality control of transcript processing. PMID:24163313

  13. Expression of alternatively spliced variants of Na-Ca-exchanger-1 in experimental colitis: role in reduced colonic contractility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubair, M; Oriowo, M A; Khan, I

    2012-11-01

    Inflammation-induced colonic motility dysfunction is associated with a disturbance in Ca(2+) ion transporting mechanisms. The main objective of this study was to identify the types of Na-Ca-exchanger-1 (NCX-1) variants expressed in the rat colon, and how this was affected by colitis. In addition, the effect of colitis on the possible involvement of NCX-1 in the reduced carbachol-induced contraction of the rat colon was examined. Colitis was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats by intra-rectal instillation of trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid (TNBS). Animals were killed on day 5. Colitis was characterized by estimating myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, body weight, and histological scores. NCX-1 mRNA and protein variants were confirmed by RT-PCR coupled nucleotide sequencing and by Western blot analysis, respectively. Contractility of the colon segments was studied using standard procedure. There was a significant reduction in body weight of TNBS-treated rats. A significant increase in MPO activity and infiltration of inflammatory cells were observed in the inflamed rat colon. RT-PCR coupled nucleotide sequencing identified NCX-1.3 mRNA variant containing exons B and D. Western blot analysis confirmed 70 and 120 kDa molecular mass NCX-1 protein variants in rat colon. There was no significant difference (p > 0.05) in the level of NCX-1 protein variants in inflamed colon as compared to non-colitis controls. Functional experiments demonstrated that NCX in reverse mode played a role in carbachol-induced contraction of colon, and this was not affected by colitis. These findings demonstrated expression of a NCX-1.3 mRNA splice variant, and 70 and 118 kDa protein variants. Inhibition of the reverse mode of NCX-1 was not different in reduced carbachol-induced contraction between the groups. These findings are interpreted to suggest that NCX-1, though expressed did not play a role in reduced contractility in experimental colitis.

  14. Constitutive homo- and hetero-oligomerization of TbetaRII-B, an alternatively spliced variant of the mouse TGF-beta type II receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krishnaveni, Manda S; Hansen, Jakob Lerche; Seeger, Werner

    2006-01-01

    , but the oligomerization pattern and dynamics of TbetaRII splice variants in live cells has not been demonstrated thus far. Using co-immunoprecipitation and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET), we demonstrate that the mouse TbetaRII receptor splice variant TbetaRII-B is capable of forming ligand...

  15. A study of alternative splicing in the pig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillig, Ann-Britt Nygaard; Cirera Salicio, Susanna; Gilchrist, Michael J.;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Since at least half of the genes in mammalian genomes are subjected to alternative splicing, alternative pre-mRNA splicing plays an important contribution to the complexity of the mammalian proteome. Expressed sequence tags (ESTs) provide evidence of a great number of possible...... and mouse, we find putative splice variants in about 30% of the contigs with more than 50 ESTs. Based on the criteria that a minimum of two EST sequences confirmed each splice event, a list of 100 genes with the most distinct tissue-specific alternative splice events was generated from the list...... of candidates. To confirm the tissue specificity of the splice events, 10 genes with functional annotation were randomly selected from which 16 individual splice events were chosen for experimental verification by quantitative PCR (qPCR). Six genes were shown to have tissue specific alternatively spliced...

  16. A liver X receptor (LXR)-{beta} alternative splicing variant (LXRBSV) acts as an RNA co-activator of LXR-{beta}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, Koshi, E-mail: khashi@med.gunma-u.ac.jp [Department of Medicine and Molecular Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Gunma University, Maebashi, Gunma 371-8511 (Japan); Ishida, Emi; Matsumoto, Shunichi; Shibusawa, Nobuyuki; Okada, Shuichi [Department of Medicine and Molecular Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Gunma University, Maebashi, Gunma 371-8511 (Japan); Monden, Tsuyoshi [Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Dokkyo Medical College, Mibu, Tochigi (Japan); Satoh, Tetsurou; Yamada, Masanobu; Mori, Masatomo [Department of Medicine and Molecular Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Gunma University, Maebashi, Gunma 371-8511 (Japan)

    2009-12-25

    We report the isolation and functional characterization of a novel transcriptional co-activator, termed LXRBSV. LXRBSV is an alternative splicing variant of liver X receptor (LXR)-{beta} LXRBSV has an intronic sequence between exons 2 and 3 in the mouse LXR-{beta} gene. The LXRBSV gene is expressed in various tissues including the liver and brain. We sub-cloned LXRBSV into pSG5, a mammalian expression vector, and LXRBSV in pSG5 augmented human Sterol Response Element Binding Protein (SREBP)-1c promoter activity in HepG2 cells in a ligand (TO901317) dependent manner. The transactivation mediated by LXRBSV is selective for LXR-{beta}. The LXRBSV protein was deduced to be 64 amino acids in length; however, a GAL4-LXRBSV fusion protein was not able to induce transactivation. Serial deletion constructs of LXRBSV demonstrated that the intronic sequence inserted in LXRBSV is required for its transactivation activity. An ATG mutant of LXRBSV was able to induce transactivation as wild type. Furthermore, LXRBSV functions in the presence of cycloheximide. Taken together, we have concluded that LXRBSV acts as an RNA transcript not as a protein. In the current study, we have demonstrated for the first time that an alternative splicing variant of a nuclear receptor acts as an RNA co-activator.

  17. Intronic Alus influence alternative splicing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galit Lev-Maor

    Full Text Available Examination of the human transcriptome reveals higher levels of RNA editing than in any other organism tested to date. This is indicative of extensive double-stranded RNA (dsRNA formation within the human transcriptome. Most of the editing sites are located in the primate-specific retrotransposed element called Alu. A large fraction of Alus are found in intronic sequences, implying extensive Alu-Alu dsRNA formation in mRNA precursors. Yet, the effect of these intronic Alus on splicing of the flanking exons is largely unknown. Here, we show that more Alus flank alternatively spliced exons than constitutively spliced ones; this is especially notable for those exons that have changed their mode of splicing from constitutive to alternative during human evolution. This implies that Alu insertions may change the mode of splicing of the flanking exons. Indeed, we demonstrate experimentally that two Alu elements that were inserted into an intron in opposite orientation undergo base-pairing, as evident by RNA editing, and affect the splicing patterns of a downstream exon, shifting it from constitutive to alternative. Our results indicate the importance of intronic Alus in influencing the splicing of flanking exons, further emphasizing the role of Alus in shaping of the human transcriptome.

  18. Methods for Characterization of Alternative RNA Splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Samuel E; Cheng, Chonghui

    2016-01-01

    Quantification of alternative splicing to detect the abundance of differentially spliced isoforms of a gene in total RNA can be accomplished via RT-PCR using both quantitative real-time and semi-quantitative PCR methods. These methods require careful PCR primer design to ensure specific detection of particular splice isoforms. We also describe analysis of alternative splicing using a splicing "minigene" in mammalian cell tissue culture to facilitate investigation of the regulation of alternative splicing of a particular exon of interest.

  19. Inhibitory Effect of CT120B, an Alternative Splice Variant of CT120A,on Lung Cancer Cell Growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong-Ning PAN; Jin-Jun LI; Lin WEI; Ming YAO; Da-Fang WAN; Jian-Ren GU

    2005-01-01

    The expression product of ct120a, a novel gene isolated from human chromosome 17p13.3in our laboratory, was predicted to have seven transmembrane domains and could cause malignant transformation of mouse NIH3T3 cells. There existed an mRNA splicing variant of ct120a, namely ct120b,which had a 96-nucleotide deletion and produced an in-frame loss of 32 amino acids from codon 136 to codon 167 of CT120A. The CT120B protein was predicted to have six transmembrane domains. In this study, we observed that the green fluorescent protein-tagged CT120B was localized on plasma membrane and in cytoplasm in SPC-A-1 cells. The expression of CT120B/A in normal lung tissue and in lung cancer cells was also examined. Results showed that the stable CT120B overexpression in SPC-A-1 cells resulted in a reduction of cell growth rate, and inhibited tumorigenecity and anchorage-independent growth in nude mice. The functions of CT120A and CT120B for cell growth appeared antagonistic. We suggested that the delayed G1/S phase transition might contribute to the inhibitory activities of CT120B on cell growth and that the deleted 32 amino acids missing in CT120B might be essential for the oncogenetic activities of CT120A.

  20. Three new alternative splicing variants of human cytochrome P450 2D6 mRNA in human extratumoral liver tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Zhuge; Ying-Nian Yu

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To identify the new alternative splicing variants of human CYP2D6 in human extratumoral liver tissue with RT-PCR and sequencing.METHODS: Full length of human CYP2D6 cDNAs was amplificated by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) from a human extratumoral liver tissue and cloned into pGEM-T vector. The cDNA was sequenced.Exons from 1 to 4 of human CYP2D6 cDNAs were also amplificated by RT-PCR from extratumoral liver tissues of17 human hepatocellular carcinomas. Some RT-PCR products were sequenced. Exons 1 to 4 of CYP2D6 gene were amplified by PCR from extratumoral liver tissue DNA.Two PCR products from extratumoral liver tissues expressing skipped mRNA were partially sequenced.RESULTS: One of the CYP2D6cDNAs had 470 nucleotides from 79 to 548 (3' portion of exons 1 to 5' portion of exon 4),and was skipped. Exons 1 to 4 of CYP2D6 cDNA were assayed with RT-PCR in 17 extratumoral liver tissues. Both wild type and skipped mRNAs were expressed in 4 samples,only wild type mRNA was expressed in 5 samples, and only skipped mRNA was expressed in 8 samples. Two more variants were identified by sequencing the RT-PCR products of exons 1 to 4 of CYP2D6cDNA. The second variant skipped 411 nucleotides from 175 to 585. This variant was identified in 4 different liver tissues by sequencing the RT-PCR products. We sequenced partially 2 of the PCR products amplified of CYP2D6 exon 1 to exon 4 from extratumoral liver tissue genomic DNA that only expressed skipped mRNA by RT-PCR. No point mutations around exon 1, intron 1, and exon 4, and no deletion in CYP2D6gene were detected. The third variant was the skipped exon 3, and 153 bp was lost.CONCLUSION: Three new alternative splicing variants of CYP2D6 mRNA have been identified. They may not be caused by gene mutation and may lose CYP2D6 activity and act as a down-regulator of CYP2D6.

  1. Alternative splicing of follicle-stimulating hormone receptor pre-mRNA: cloning and characterization of two alternatively spliced mRNA transcripts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Kraaij (Robert); M. Verhoef-Post (Miriam); J.A. Grootegoed (Anton); A.P.N. Themmen (Axel)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractGlycoprotein hormone receptors contain a large extracellular domain that is encoded by multiple exons, facilitating the possibility of expressing alternatively spliced transcripts. We have cloned two new splice variants of the rat follicle-stimulating hormon

  2. Splicing variants of porcine synphilin-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Knud Erik; Madsen, Lone Bruhn; Farajzadeh, Leila;

    2015-01-01

    %) and to mouse (84%) synphilin-1. Three shorter transcript variants of the synphilin-1 gene were identified, all lacking one or more exons. SNCAIP transcripts were detected in most examined organs and tissues and the highest expression was found in brain tissues and lung. Conserved splicing variants and a novel......RNA was investigated by RNAseq. The presented work reports the molecular cloning and characterization of the porcine (Sus scrofa) synphilin-1 cDNA (SNCAIP) and three splice variants hereof. The porcine SNCAIP cDNA codes for a protein (synphilin-1) of 919 amino acids which shows a high similarity to human (90...... splice form of synhilin-1 were found in this study. All synphilin-1 isoforms encoded by the identified transcript variants lack functional domains important for protein degradation....

  3. New alternatively spliced variant of prostate-specific membrane antigen PSM-E suppresses the proliferation, migration and invasiveness of prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Kai-Yuan; Xu, Lin; Zhang, Ding-Mei; Zhang, Xiao-Ming; Zhang, Tian; He, Xia; Wang, Zhu; Feng, Fa-Shen; Qiu, Shao-Peng; Shen, Guan-Xin

    2012-06-01

    PSM-E is a newly discovered alternatively spliced variant of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA). In the current study, its role on the proliferation, invasiveness and migration in prostate cancer cell lines was analyzed. PSM-E and PSMA (as a comparison) eukaryotic expression vectors pcDNA3.0/PSM-E and pcDNA3.0/PSMA were constructed, validated by RT-PCR and Western blotting, and PSMA/PSM-E overexpression PC-3 cell models were built. Gene interference was used to block PSMA and the expression of its splice variants in LNCap cells. Three shRNA fragments were synthesized against PSMA, cloned into the vector pSilencer 2.1-U6-neo, their interference effect was evaluated by RT-PCR and Western blotting, and pSilencer 2.1-U6-neo‑shRNA3 (named p‑shRNA3) was chosen in further analyses. Growth curves were drawn to observe the proliferation change, which showed that PSM-E had the potential to suppress proliferation (PPSM-E interfering LNCap cells (P>0.05). Cross-river test showed that the migration speeds of PSM-E/PC-3 and PSMA/PC-3 were both significantly slower than the vector negative control, and faster in p-shRNA3 interfering LNCap cells compared with its vector negative control (PPSM-E/PC-3 and PSMA/PC-3 (P>0.05). Transwell assay showed that the invasive cells of both PSMA/PC-3 and PSM-E/PC-3 were fewer compared to the vector negative control (PPSM-E was weaker than PSMA (PPSM-E could suppress proliferation, migration and invasiveness of prostate cancer cells. Its suppression effect on cell proliferation is stronger compared to PSMA and the suppression effect on invasiveness is weaker than that of PSMA.

  4. Two new splice variants in porcine PPARGC1A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peelman Luc J

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PPARGC1A is a coactivator with a vital and central role in fat and energy metabolism. It is considered to be a candidate gene for meat quality in pigs and is involved in the development of obesity and diabetes in humans. How its many functions are regulated, is however still largely unclear. Therefore a transcription profile of PPARGC1A in 32 tissues and 4 embryonic developmental stages in the pig was constructed by screening its cDNA for possible splice variants with exon-spanning primers. Findings This led to the discovery of 2 new splice variants in the pig, which were subsequently also detected in human tissues. In these variants, exon 8 was either completely or partly (the last 66 bp were conserved spliced out, potentially coding for a much shorter protein of respectively 337 and 359 amino acids (aa, of which the first 291 aa would be the same compared to the complete protein (796 aa. Conclusion Considering the functional domains of the PPARGC1A protein, it is very likely these splice variants considerably affect the function of the protein and alternative splicing could be one of the mechanisms by which the diverse functions of PPARGC1A are regulated.

  5. Methods for Characterization of Alternative RNA Splicing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Samuel E.; Cheng, Chonghui

    2016-01-01

    Quantification of alternative splicing to detect the abundance of differentially spliced isoforms of a gene in total RNA can be accomplished via RT-PCR using both quantitative real-time and semi-quantitative PCR methods. These methods require careful PCR primer design to ensure specific detection of particular splice isoforms. We also describe analysis of alternative splicing using a splicing “minigene” in mammalian cell tissue culture to facilitate investigation of the regulation of alternative splicing of a particular exon of interest. PMID:26721495

  6. COMMUNICATION: Alternative splicing and genomic stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Kevin

    2004-06-01

    Alternative splicing allows an organism to make different proteins in different cells at different times, all from the same gene. In a cell that uses alternative splicing, the total length of all the exons is much shorter than in a cell that encodes the same set of proteins without alternative splicing. This economical use of exons makes genes more stable during reproduction and development because a genome with a shorter exon length is more resistant to harmful mutations. Genomic stability may be the reason why higher vertebrates splice alternatively. For a broad class of alternatively spliced genes, a formula is given for the increase in their stability.

  7. Honey bee PTEN--description, developmental knockdown, and tissue-specific expression of splice-variants correlated with alternative social phenotypes.

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    Navdeep S Mutti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Phosphatase and TENsin (PTEN homolog is a negative regulator that takes part in IIS (insulin/insulin-like signaling and Egfr (epidermal growth factor receptor activation in Drosophila melanogaster. IIS and Egfr signaling events are also involved in the developmental process of queen and worker differentiation in honey bees (Apis mellifera. Here, we characterized the bee PTEN gene homologue for the first time and begin to explore its potential function during bee development and adult life. RESULTS: Honey bee PTEN is alternatively spliced, resulting in three splice variants. Next, we show that the expression of PTEN can be down-regulated by RNA interference (RNAi in the larval stage, when female caste fate is determined. Relative to controls, we observed that RNAi efficacy is dependent on the amount of PTEN dsRNA that is delivered to larvae. For larvae fed queen or worker diets containing a high amount of PTEN dsRNA, PTEN knockdown was significant at a whole-body level but lethal. A lower dosage did not result in a significant gene down-regulation. Finally, we compared same-aged adult workers with different behavior: nursing vs. foraging. We show that between nurses and foragers, PTEN isoforms were differentially expressed within brain, ovary and fat body tissues. All isoforms were expressed at higher levels in the brain and ovaries of the foragers. In fat body, isoform B was expressed at higher level in the nurse bees. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that PTEN plays a central role during growth and development in queen- and worker-destined honey bees. In adult workers, moreover, tissue-specific patterns of PTEN isoform expression are correlated with differences in complex division of labor between same-aged individuals. Therefore, we propose that knowledge on the roles of IIS and Egfr activity in developmental and behavioral control may increase through studies of how PTEN functions can impact bee social phenotypes.

  8. Expression analysis of a heat-inducible, Myo-inositol-1-phosphate synthase (MIPS) gene from wheat and the alternatively spliced variants of rice and Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, Neetika; Chauhan, Harsh; Khurana, Paramjit

    2012-01-01

    Molecular dissection and a deeper analysis of the heat stress response mechanism in wheat have been poorly understood so far. This study delves into the molecular basis of action of TaMIPS, a heat stress-inducible enzyme that was identified through PCR-select subtraction technology, which is named here as TaMIPS2. MIPS (L-Myo-inositol-phosphate synthase) is important for the normal growth and development in plants. Expression profiling showed that TaMIPS2 is expressed during different developing seed stages upon heat stress. Also, the transcript levels increase in unfertilized ovaries and significant amounts are present during the recovery period providing evidence that MIPS is crucial for its role in heat stress recovery and flower development. Alternatively spliced forms from rice and Arabidopsis were also identified and their expression analysis revealed that apart from heat stress, some of the spliced variants were also inducible by drought, NaCl, Cold, ABA, BR, SA and mannitol. In silico promoter analysis revealed various cis-elements that could contribute for the differential regulation of MIPS in different plant systems. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that MIPS are highly conserved among monocots and dicots and TaMIPS2 grouped specifically with monocots. Comparative analyses was undertaken by different experimental approaches, i.e., semi-quantitative RT-PCR, quantitative RT-PCR, Genevestigator as a reference expression tool and motif analysis to predict the possible function of TaMIPS2 in regulating the different aspects of plant development under abiotic stress in wheat.

  9. Oncogenic Alternative Splicing Switches: Role in Cancer Progression and Prospects for Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Serena Bonomi; Stefania Gallo; Morena Catillo; Daniela Pignataro; Giuseppe Biamonti; Claudia Ghigna

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in the abundance or activities of alternative splicing regulators generate alternatively spliced variants that contribute to multiple aspects of tumor establishment, progression and resistance to therapeutic treatments. Notably, many cancer-associated genes are regulated through alternative splicing suggesting a significant role of this post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism in the production of oncogenes and tumor suppressors. Thus, the study of alternative splicing in cancer ...

  10. Evolutionary conservation of alternative splicing in chicken

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katyal, S.; Gao, Z.; Liu, R.-Z.; Godbout, R.

    2013-01-01

    Alternative splicing represents a source of great diversity for regulating protein expression and function. It has been estimated that one-third to two-thirds of mammalian genes are alternatively spliced. With the sequencing of the chicken genome and analysis of transcripts expressed in chicken tissues, we are now in a position to address evolutionary conservation of alternative splicing events in chicken and mammals. Here, we compare chicken and mammalian transcript sequences of 41 alternatively-spliced genes and 50 frequently accessed genes. Our results support a high frequency of splicing events in chicken, similar to that observed in mammals. PMID:17675855

  11. Diverse alternative back-splicing and alternative splicing landscape of circular RNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Ou; Dong, Rui; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Jia-Lin; Luo, Zheng; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Ling-Ling; Yang, Li

    2016-01-01

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) derived from back-spliced exons have been widely identified as being co-expressed with their linear counterparts. A single gene locus can produce multiple circRNAs through alternative back-splice site selection and/or alternative splice site selection; however, a detailed map of alternative back-splicing/splicing in circRNAs is lacking. Here, with the upgraded CIRCexplorer2 pipeline, we systematically annotated different types of alternative back-splicing and alternative splicing events in circRNAs from various cell lines. Compared with their linear cognate RNAs, circRNAs exhibited distinct patterns of alternative back-splicing and alternative splicing. Alternative back-splice site selection was correlated with the competition of putative RNA pairs across introns that bracket alternative back-splice sites. In addition, all four basic types of alternative splicing that have been identified in the (linear) mRNA process were found within circRNAs, and many exons were predominantly spliced in circRNAs. Unexpectedly, thousands of previously unannotated exons were detected in circRNAs from the examined cell lines. Although these novel exons had similar splice site strength, they were much less conserved than known exons in sequences. Finally, both alternative back-splicing and circRNA-predominant alternative splicing were highly diverse among the examined cell lines. All of the identified alternative back-splicing and alternative splicing in circRNAs are available in the CIRCpedia database (http://www.picb.ac.cn/rnomics/circpedia). Collectively, the annotation of alternative back-splicing and alternative splicing in circRNAs provides a valuable resource for depicting the complexity of circRNA biogenesis and for studying the potential functions of circRNAs in different cells. PMID:27365365

  12. Human retina-specific amine oxidase: genomic structure of the gene (AOC2), alternatively spliced variant, and mRNA expression in retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Y; Noda, S; Mashima, Y; Kudoh, J; Oguchi, Y; Shimizu, N

    1998-07-15

    Previously, we reported the isolation of cDNA for human retina-specific amine oxidase (RAO) and the expression of RAO exclusively in retina. Bacterial artificial chromosome clones containing the human RAO gene (AOC2) were mapped to human chromosome 17q21 (Imamura et al., 1997, Genomics 40: 277-283). Here, we report the complete genomic structure of the RAO gene, including 5' flanking sequence, and mRNA expression in retina. The human RAO gene spans 6 kb and is composed of four exons corresponding to the amino acid sequence 1-530, 530-598, 598-641, and 642-729 separated by three introns of 3000, 310, and 351 bp. Screening of a human retina cDNA library revealed the existence of an alternatively spliced cDNA variant with an additional 81 bp at the end of exon 2. The sizes of exons and the locations of exon/intron boundaries in the human RAO gene showed remarkable similarity to those of the human kidney diamine oxidase gene (AOC1). In situ hybridization revealed that mRNA coding for RAO is expressed preferentially in the ganglion cell layer of the mouse retina. We designed four sets of PCR primers to amplify four exons, which will be valuable for analyzing mutations in patients with ocular diseases affecting the retinal ganglion cell layer.

  13. Splicing variants of porcine synphilin-1

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    Knud Larsen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD, idiopathic and familial, is characterized by degradation of dopaminergic neurons and the presence of Lewy bodies (LB in the substantia nigra. LBs contain aggregated proteins of which α-synuclein is the major component. The protein synphilin-1 interacts and colocalizes with α-synuclein in LBs. The aim of this study was to isolate and characterize porcine synphilin-1 and isoforms hereof with the future perspective to use the pig as a model for Parkinson's disease. The porcine SNCAIP cDNA was cloned by reverse transcriptase PCR. The spatial expression of SNCAIP mRNA was investigated by RNAseq. The presented work reports the molecular cloning and characterization of the porcine (Sus scrofa synphilin-1 cDNA (SNCAIP and three splice variants hereof. The porcine SNCAIP cDNA codes for a protein (synphilin-1 of 919 amino acids which shows a high similarity to human (90% and to mouse (84% synphilin-1. Three shorter transcript variants of the synphilin-1 gene were identified, all lacking one or more exons. SNCAIP transcripts were detected in most examined organs and tissues and the highest expression was found in brain tissues and lung. Conserved splicing variants and a novel splice form of synhilin-1 were found in this study. All synphilin-1 isoforms encoded by the identified transcript variants lack functional domains important for protein degradation.

  14. Designing oligo libraries taking alternative splicing into account

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoshan, Avi; Grebinskiy, Vladimir; Magen, Avner; Scolnicov, Ariel; Fink, Eyal; Lehavi, David; Wasserman, Alon

    2001-06-01

    We have designed sequences for DNA microarrays and oligo libraries, taking alternative splicing into account. Alternative splicing is a common phenomenon, occurring in more than 25% of the human genes. In many cases, different splice variants have different functions, are expressed in different tissues or may indicate different stages of disease. When designing sequences for DNA microarrays or oligo libraries, it is very important to take into account the sequence information of all the mRNA transcripts. Therefore, when a gene has more than one transcript (as a result of alternative splicing, alternative promoter sites or alternative poly-adenylation sites), it is very important to take all of them into account in the design. We have used the LEADS transcriptome prediction system to cluster and assemble the human sequences in GenBank and design optimal oligonucleotides for all the human genes with a known mRNA sequence based on the LEADS predictions.

  15. Learning the sequence determinants of alternative splicing from millions of random sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Alexander B; Patwardhan, Rupali P; Shendure, Jay; Seelig, Georg

    2015-10-22

    Most human transcripts are alternatively spliced, and many disease-causing mutations affect RNA splicing. Toward better modeling the sequence determinants of alternative splicing, we measured the splicing patterns of over two million (M) synthetic mini-genes, which include degenerate subsequences totaling over 100 M bases of variation. The massive size of these training data allowed us to improve upon current models of splicing, as well as to gain new mechanistic insights. Our results show that the vast majority of hexamer sequence motifs measurably influence splice site selection when positioned within alternative exons, with multiple motifs acting additively rather than cooperatively. Intriguingly, motifs that enhance (suppress) exon inclusion in alternative 5' splicing also enhance (suppress) exon inclusion in alternative 3' or cassette exon splicing, suggesting a universal mechanism for alternative exon recognition. Finally, our empirically trained models are highly predictive of the effects of naturally occurring variants on alternative splicing in vivo.

  16. Titin Diversity—Alternative Splicing Gone Wild

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    Wei Guo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Titin is an extremely large protein found in highest concentrations in heart and skeletal muscle. The single mammalian gene is expressed in multiple isoforms as a result of alternative splicing. Although titin isoform expression is controlled developmentally and in a tissue specific manner, the vast number of potential splicing pathways far exceeds those described in any other alternatively spliced gene. Over 1 million human splice pathways for a single individual can be potentially derived from the PEVK region alone. A new splicing pattern for the human cardiac N2BA isoform type has been found in which the PEVK region includes only the N2B type exons. The alterations in splicing and titin isoform expression in human heart disease provide impetus for future detailed study of the splicing mechanisms for this giant protein.

  17. Identification of common genetic variation that modulates alternative splicing.

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    Jeremy Hull

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing of genes is an efficient means of generating variation in protein function. Several disease states have been associated with rare genetic variants that affect splicing patterns. Conversely, splicing efficiency of some genes is known to vary between individuals without apparent ill effects. What is not clear is whether commonly observed phenotypic variation in splicing patterns, and hence potential variation in protein function, is to a significant extent determined by naturally occurring DNA sequence variation and in particular by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. In this study, we surveyed the splicing patterns of 250 exons in 22 individuals who had been previously genotyped by the International HapMap Project. We identified 70 simple cassette exon alternative splicing events in our experimental system; for six of these, we detected consistent differences in splicing pattern between individuals, with a highly significant association between splice phenotype and neighbouring SNPs. Remarkably, for five out of six of these events, the strongest correlation was found with the SNP closest to the intron-exon boundary, although the distance between these SNPs and the intron-exon boundary ranged from 2 bp to greater than 1,000 bp. Two of these SNPs were further investigated using a minigene splicing system, and in each case the SNPs were found to exert cis-acting effects on exon splicing efficiency in vitro. The functional consequences of these SNPs could not be predicted using bioinformatic algorithms. Our findings suggest that phenotypic variation in splicing patterns is determined by the presence of SNPs within flanking introns or exons. Effects on splicing may represent an important mechanism by which SNPs influence gene function.

  18. Functional diversity of human protein kinase splice variants marks significant expansion of human kinome

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    Anamika Krishanpal

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein kinases are involved in diverse spectrum of cellular processes. Availability of draft version of the human genomic data in the year 2001 enabled recognition of repertoire of protein kinases. However, over the years the human genomic data is being refined and the current release of human genomic data has helped us to recognize a larger repertoire of over 900 human protein kinases represented mainly by splice variants. Results Many of these identified protein kinases are alternatively spliced products. Interestingly, some of the human kinase splice variants appear to be significantly diverged in terms of their functional properties as represented by incorporation or absence of one or more domains. Many sets of protein kinase splice variants have substantially different domain organization and in a few sets of splice variants kinase domains belong to different subfamilies of kinases suggesting potential participation in different signal transduction pathways. Conclusions Addition or deletion of a domain between splice variants of multi-domain kinases appears to be a means of generating differences in the functional features of otherwise similar kinases. It is intriguing that marked sequence diversity within the catalytic regions of some of the splice variant kinases result in kinases belonging to different subfamilies. These human kinase splice variants with different functions might contribute to diversity of eukaryotic cellular signaling.

  19. Depolarization-mediated regulation of alternative splicing

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    Alok eSharma

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing in eukaryotes plays an important role in regulating gene expression by selectively including alternative exons. A wealth of information has been accumulated that explains how alternative exons are selected in a developmental stage- or tissue-specific fashion. However, our knowledge of how cells respond to environmental changes to alter alternative splicing is very limited. For example, although a number of alternative exons have been shown to be regulated by calcium level alterations, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. As calcium signaling in neurons plays a crucial role in essential neuronal functions such as learning and memory formation, it is important to understand how this process is regulated at every level in gene expression. The significance of the dynamic control of alternative splicing in response to changes of calcium levels has been largely unappreciated. In this communication, we will summarize the recent advances in calcium signaling-mediated alternative splicing that have provided some insights into the important regulatory mechanisms. In addition to describing the cis-acting RNA elements on the pre-mRNA molecules that respond to changes of intracellular calcium levels, we will summarize how splicing regulators change and affect alternative splicing in this process. We will also discuss a novel mode of calcium-mediated splicing regulation at the level of chromatin structure and transcription.

  20. Silencing of two alternative splicing-derived mRNA variants of chitin synthase 1 gene by RNAi is lethal to the oriental migratory locust, Locusta migratoria manilensis (Meyen).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianzhen; Liu, Xiaojian; Zhang, Jianqin; Li, Daqi; Sun, Yi; Guo, Yaping; Ma, Enbo; Zhu, Kun Yan

    2010-11-01

    Chitin synthases are crucial enzymes responsible for chitin biosynthesis in fungi, nematodes and arthropods. We characterized two alternative splicing-derived variants of chitin synthase 1 gene (LmCHS1) from the oriental migratory locust, Locusta migratoria manilensis (Meyen). Each cDNA of the two variants (LmCHS1A and LmCHS1B) consists of 5116 nucleotides that include a 4728-nucleotide open reading frame (ORF) encoding 1576 amino acid residues, and 67- and 321-bp non-coding regions at the 5'- and 3'-ends of the cDNA, respectively. The two variants differ only in one exon consisting of 177 nucleotides that encode 59 amino acid residues. The amino acid sequences within this alternative splicing region are 75% identical between the two variants. Both variants were expressed in all the developmental stages. However, LmCHS1A was predominately expressed in the integument whereas LmCHS1B was mainly expressed in the trachea. Our RNAi-based gene silencing study resulted in a dramatic reduction in the levels of the corresponding mRNA in the locust nymphs injected with dsRNA of LmCHS1, or either of its two variants, LmCHS1A and LmCHS1B. Consequentially, 95, 88 and 51% of mortalities were observed in the locusts injected with the LmCHS1, LmCHS1A and LmCHS1B dsRNA, respectively. The phenotypes resulted from the injection of LmCHS1A dsRNA were similar to those from the injection of LmCHS1 dsRNA, whereas the locusts injected with LmCHS1B dsRNA exhibited crimpled cuticle phenotype. Our results suggest that both variants of chitin synthase 1 are essential for insect growth and development.

  1. Width of gene expression profile drives alternative splicing.

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    Daniel Wegmann

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing generates an enormous amount of functional and proteomic diversity in metazoan organisms. This process is probably central to the macromolecular and cellular complexity of higher eukaryotes. While most studies have focused on the molecular mechanism triggering and controlling alternative splicing, as well as on its incidence in different species, its maintenance and evolution within populations has been little investigated. Here, we propose to address these questions by comparing the structural characteristics as well as the functional and transcriptional profiles of genes with monomorphic or polymorphic splicing, referred to as MS and PS genes, respectively. We find that MS and PS genes differ particularly in the number of tissues and cell types where they are expressed.We find a striking deficit of PS genes on the sex chromosomes, particularly on the Y chromosome where it is shown not to be due to the observed lower breadth of expression of genes on that chromosome. The development of a simple model of evolution of cis-regulated alternative splicing leads to predictions in agreement with these observations. It further predicts the conditions for the emergence and the maintenance of cis-regulated alternative splicing, which are both favored by the tissue specific expression of splicing variants. We finally propose that the width of the gene expression profile is an essential factor for the acquisition of new transcript isoforms that could later be maintained by a new form of balancing selection.

  2. Alcoholism and Alternative Splicing of Candidate Genes

    OpenAIRE

    Toshikazu Sasabe; Shoichi Ishiura

    2010-01-01

    Gene expression studies have shown that expression patterns of several genes have changed during the development of alcoholism. Gene expression is regulated not only at the level of transcription but also through alternative splicing of pre-mRNA. In this review, we discuss some of the evidence suggesting that alternative splicing of candidate genes such as DRD2 (encoding dopamine D2 receptor) may form the basis of the mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of alcoholism. These reports sugg...

  3. Conserved and species-specific alternative splicing in mammalian genomes

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    Favorov Alexander V

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alternative splicing has been shown to be one of the major evolutionary mechanisms for protein diversification and proteome expansion, since a considerable fraction of alternative splicing events appears to be species- or lineage-specific. However, most studies were restricted to the analysis of cassette exons in pairs of genomes and did not analyze functionality of the alternative variants. Results We analyzed conservation of human alternative splice sites and cassette exons in the mouse and dog genomes. Alternative exons, especially minor-isofom ones, were shown to be less conserved than constitutive exons. Frame-shifting alternatives in the protein-coding regions are less conserved than frame-preserving ones. Similarly, the conservation of alternative sites is highest for evenly used alternatives, and higher when the distance between the sites is divisible by three. The rate of alternative-exon and site loss in mouse is slightly higher than in dog, consistent with faster evolution of the former. The evolutionary dynamics of alternative sites was shown to be consistent with the model of random activation of cryptic sites. Conclusion Consistent with other studies, our results show that minor cassette exons are less conserved than major-alternative and constitutive exons. However, our study provides evidence that this is caused not only by exon birth, but also lineage-specific loss of alternative exons and sites, and it depends on exon functionality.

  4. Novel splicing variant of the human orphan nuclear receptor Nurr1 gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐评议; 乐卫东

    2004-01-01

    Background Nurr1 is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily of transcription factors. The objective of the present study was to identify novel splicing variants of the gene in neuronal and non-neuronal tissues and determine their functions. Methods Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis was used to screen for Nurr1 splice variants in the adult human central nervous system (CNS) and in other tissues such as lymphocytes, and liver, muscle, and kidney cells. Functional assays of the variants were performed by measuring Nurr1 response element (NuRE) transcriptional activity in vitro. Results In this study, the authors identified a novel splicing variant of Nurr1 within exon 5, found in multiple adult human tissues, including lymphocytes, and liver, muscle, and kidney cells, but not in the brain or spinal cord. Sequencing analysis showed the variant has a 75 bp deletion between nucleotides 1402 and 1476. A functional assay of the Nurr1-c splicing variant, performed by measuring NuRE transcriptional activity in vitro, detected a 39% lower level of luciferase (LUC) activity (P<0.05).Conclusion A novel splicing variant of Nurr1 exists in human non-neuronal tissues and functional assays suggest that the variant may act as an alternate transcription regulator.

  5. Cloning and Characterization of Multiple RNA Splicing Variants of LDH-C Gene in Human and Rat

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    Qinglian Zhang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The expression of LDH-C (Lactate dehydrogenase C gene is restricted in mature germ cells; however multiple splice variants of LDH-C expressed in human cancers and yak normal testes were reported recently. In order to know if there are any LDH-C splice variants in human normal testes, we set out to clone the putative variants in human and rat. Four splicing variants in human testes, 1 splicing variant in human spermatozoa, 6 splicing variants in rat testes and 1 splicing variant in rat non-testes tissues (liver, heart and muscle were cloned. The putative polypeptides encoded by these variants were compared with the full-length LDH-C protein, the results showed that these putative polypeptides were truncated LDH-C proteins or truncated LDH-C proteins with a few amino acid residues different at N or C terminal. This suggested that these variants are possibly not used for translation, but targets of nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. Western blotting did not detect any bands with similar molecular weight as the putative polypeptides. RT-PCR showed that the expression levels of the splicing variants were significant during development of rat testes. The results indicate that LDH-C was not silenced by transcriptional repression in non-mature germ cells, but significantly transcripted and alternatively spliced.

  6. Alternative splicing regulates targeting of malate dehydrogenase in Yarrowia lipolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabran, Philomène; Rossignol, Tristan; Gaillardin, Claude; Nicaud, Jean-Marc; Neuvéglise, Cécile

    2012-06-01

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing is a major mechanism contributing to the proteome complexity of most eukaryotes, especially mammals. In less complex organisms, such as yeasts, the numbers of genes that contain introns are low and cases of alternative splicing (AS) with functional implications are rare. We report the first case of AS with functional consequences in the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica. The splicing pattern was found to govern the cellular localization of malate dehydrogenase, an enzyme of the central carbon metabolism. This ubiquitous enzyme is involved in the tricarboxylic acid cycle in mitochondria and in the glyoxylate cycle, which takes place in peroxisomes and the cytosol. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, three genes encode three compartment-specific enzymes. In contrast, only two genes exist in Y. lipolytica. One gene (YlMDH1, YALI0D16753g) encodes a predicted mitochondrial protein, whereas the second gene (YlMDH2, YALI0E14190g) generates the cytosolic and peroxisomal forms through the alternative use of two 3'-splice sites in the second intron. Both splicing variants were detected in cDNA libraries obtained from cells grown under different conditions. Mutants expressing the individual YlMdh2p isoforms tagged with fluorescent proteins confirmed that they localized to either the cytosolic or the peroxisomal compartment.

  7. Alternative splicing of the androgen receptor in polycystic ovary syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Fangfang; Pan, Jiexue; Liu, Ye; Meng, Qing; Lv, Pingping; Qu, Fan; Ding, Guo-Lian; Klausen, Christian; Leung, Peter C. K.; Chan, Hsiao Chang; Yao, Weimiao; Zhou, Cai-Yun; Shi, Biwei; ZHANG, JUNYU; Sheng, Jianzhong

    2015-01-01

    Excess androgens and abnormal follicle development, largely due to ovarian granulosa cell (GC) dysfunction, characterize polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), a common endocrinopathy of women predisposing to infertility. Thus, it is important to understand GC dysfunction. The androgen receptor (AR) is widely believed to be an essential regulator of GC biology. High expression of AR in GCs is primarily considered to associate with PCOS. However, we show that AR alternative splice variants in GCs d...

  8. VEGF Spliced Variants: Possible Role of Anti-Angiogenesis Therapy

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    Caroline Hilmi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis has been targeted in retinopathies, psoriasis, and a variety of cancers (colon, breast, lung, and kidney. Among these tumour types, clear cell renal cell carcinomas (RCCs are the most vascularized tumours due to mutations of the von Hippel Lindau gene resulting in HIF-1 alpha stabilisation and overexpression of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF. Surgical nephrectomy remains the most efficient curative treatment for patients with noninvasive disease, while VEGF targeting has resulted in varying degrees of success for treating metastatic disease. VEGF pre-mRNA undergoes alternative splicing generating pro-angiogenic isoforms. However, the recent identification of novel splice variants of VEGF with anti-angiogenic properties has provided some insight for the lack of current treatment efficacy. Here we discuss an explanation for the relapse to anti-angiogenesis treatment as being due to either an initial or acquired resistance to the therapy. We also discuss targeting angiogenesis via SR (serine/arginine-rich proteins implicated in VEGF splicing.

  9. Investigation of tissue-specific human orthologous alternative splice events in pig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillig, Ann-Britt Nygaard; Jørgensen, Claus Bøttcher; Salicio, Susanna Cirera;

    2010-01-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-mRNA can contribute to differences between tissues or cells either by regulating gene expression or creating proteins with various functions encoded by one gene. The number of investigated alternative splice events in pig has so far been limited. In this study we have...... investigated alternative splice events detected in humans, in orthologous pig genes. A total of 17 genes with predicted exon skipping events were selected for further studies. The splice events for the selected genes were experimentally verified using real-time quantitative PCR analysis (qPCR) with splice......-specific primers in 19 different tissues. The same splice variants as reported in humans were detected in 15 orthologous pig genes, however, the expression pattern predicted in the in silico analyses was only experimentally verified in a few cases. The results support the findings that splice events resulting...

  10. Resolving deconvolution ambiguity in gene alternative splicing

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    Hubbell Earl

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For many gene structures it is impossible to resolve intensity data uniquely to establish abundances of splice variants. This was empirically noted by Wang et al. in which it was called a "degeneracy problem". The ambiguity results from an ill-posed problem where additional information is needed in order to obtain an unique answer in splice variant deconvolution. Results In this paper, we analyze the situations under which the problem occurs and perform a rigorous mathematical study which gives necessary and sufficient conditions on how many and what type of constraints are needed to resolve all ambiguity. This analysis is generally applicable to matrix models of splice variants. We explore the proposal that probe sequence information may provide sufficient additional constraints to resolve real-world instances. However, probe behavior cannot be predicted with sufficient accuracy by any existing probe sequence model, and so we present a Bayesian framework for estimating variant abundances by incorporating the prediction uncertainty from the micro-model of probe responsiveness into the macro-model of probe intensities. Conclusion The matrix analysis of constraints provides a tool for detecting real-world instances in which additional constraints may be necessary to resolve splice variants. While purely mathematical constraints can be stated without error, real-world constraints may themselves be poorly resolved. Our Bayesian framework provides a generic solution to the problem of uniquely estimating transcript abundances given additional constraints that themselves may be uncertain, such as regression fit to probe sequence models. We demonstrate the efficacy of it by extensive simulations as well as various biological data.

  11. Alternative Splicing and Expression Profile Analysis of Expressed Sequence Tags in Domestic Pig

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang Zhang; Lin Tao; Lin Ye; Ling He; Yuan-Zhong Zhu; Yue-Dong Zhu; Yan Zhou

    2007-01-01

    Domestic pig (Sus scrofa domestica) is one of the most important mammals to humans. Alternative splicing is a cellular mechanism in eukaryotes that greatly increases the diversity of gene products. Expression sequence tags (ESTs) have been widely used for gene discovery, expression profile analysis, and alternative splicing detection. In this study, a total of 712,905 ESTs extracted from 101 different nonnormalized EST libraries of the domestic pig were analyzed. These EST libraries cover the nervous system, digestive system, immune system, and meat production related tissues from embryo, newborn, and adult pigs, making contributions to the analysis of alternative splicing variants as well as expression profiles in various stages of tissues. A modified approach was designed to cluster and assemble large EST datasets, aiming to detect alternative splicing together with EST abundance of each splicing variant. Much efforts were made to classify alternative splicing into different types and apply different filters to each type to get more reliable results. Finally, a total of 1,223 genes with average 2.8 splicing variants were detected among 16,540 unique genes. The overview of expression profiles would change when we take alternative splicing into account.

  12. Widespread evolutionary conservation of alternatively spliced exons in caenorhabditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Irimia, Manuel; Rukov, Jakob L; Penny, David

    2007-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) contributes to increased transcriptome and proteome diversity in various eukaryotic lineages. Previous studies showed low levels of conservation of alternatively spliced (cassette) exons within mammals and within dipterans. We report a strikingly different pattern...

  13. Vitamin D and alternative splicing of RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Rui; Chun, Rene F; Lisse, Thomas S; Garcia, Alejandro J; Xu, Jianzhong; Adams, John S; Hewison, Martin

    2015-04-01

    The active form of vitamin D (1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, 1,25(OH)2D) exerts its genomic effects via binding to a nuclear high-affinity vitamin D receptor (VDR). Recent deep sequencing analysis of VDR binding locations across the complete genome has significantly expanded our understanding of the actions of vitamin D and VDR on gene transcription. However, these studies have also promoted appreciation of the extra-transcriptional impact of vitamin D on gene expression. It is now clear that vitamin D interacts with the epigenome via effects on DNA methylation, histone acetylation, and microRNA generation to maintain normal biological functions. There is also increasing evidence that vitamin D can influence pre-mRNA constitutive splicing and alternative splicing, although the mechanism for this remains unclear. Pre-mRNA splicing has long been thought to be a post-transcription RNA processing event, but current data indicate that this occurs co-transcriptionally. Several steroid hormones have been recognized to coordinately control gene transcription and pre-mRNA splicing through the recruitment of nuclear receptor co-regulators that can both control gene transcription and splicing. The current review will discuss this concept with specific reference to vitamin D, and the potential role of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C (hnRNPC), a nuclear factor with an established function in RNA splicing. hnRNPC, has been shown to be involved in the VDR transcriptional complex as a vitamin D-response element-binding protein (VDRE-BP), and may act as a coupling factor linking VDR-directed gene transcription with RNA splicing. In this way hnRNPC may provide an additional mechanism for the fine-tuning of vitamin D-regulated target gene expression. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled '17th Vitamin D Workshop'.

  14. Alternative splicing in colon, bladder, and prostate cancer identified by exon-array analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Kasper; Sørensen, Karina D.; Brems-Eskildsen, Anne Sofie;

    2008-01-01

    Alternative splicing enhances proteome diversity and modulates cancer-associated proteins. To identify tissue- and tumor-specific alternative splicing, we used the GeneChip Human Exon 1.0 ST Array to measure whole-genome exon expression in 102 normal and cancer tissue samples of different stages......, and 18 candidate tumor-specific splicing alterations in colon, bladder, and prostate, respectively, were selected for RT-PCR validation on an independent set of 81 normal and tumor tissue samples. In total, seven genes with tumor-specific splice variants were identified (ACTN1, CALD1, COL6A3, LRRFIP2...... from colon, urinary bladder, and prostate. We identified 2069 candidate alternative splicing events between normal tissue samples from colon, bladder, and prostate and selected 15 splicing events for RT-PCR validation, 10 of which were successfully validated by RT-PCR and sequencing. Furthermore 23, 19...

  15. Functional and evolutionary analysis of alternatively spliced genes is consistent with an early eukaryotic origin of alternative splicing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Irimia, Manuel; Rukov, Jakob Lewin; Penny, David;

    2007-01-01

    Alternative splicing has been reported in various eukaryotic groups including plants, apicomplexans, diatoms, amoebae, animals and fungi. However, whether widespread alternative splicing has evolved independently in the different eukaryotic groups or was inherited from their last common ancestor...

  16. Oncogenic Alternative Splicing Switches: Role in Cancer Progression and Prospects for Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Bonomi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Alterations in the abundance or activities of alternative splicing regulators generate alternatively spliced variants that contribute to multiple aspects of tumor establishment, progression and resistance to therapeutic treatments. Notably, many cancer-associated genes are regulated through alternative splicing suggesting a significant role of this post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism in the production of oncogenes and tumor suppressors. Thus, the study of alternative splicing in cancer might provide a better understanding of the malignant transformation and identify novel pathways that are uniquely relevant to tumorigenesis. Understanding the molecular underpinnings of cancer-associated alternative splicing isoforms will not only help to explain many fundamental hallmarks of cancer, but will also offer unprecedented opportunities to improve the efficacy of anti-cancer treatments.

  17. A Splice Variant of Bardet-Biedl Syndrome 5 (BBS5 Protein that Is Selectively Expressed in Retina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan N Bolch

    Full Text Available Bardet-Biedl syndrome is a complex ciliopathy that usually manifests with some form of retinal degeneration, amongst other ciliary-related deficiencies. One of the genetic causes of this syndrome results from a defect in Bardet-Biedl Syndrome 5 (BBS5 protein. BBS5 is one component of the BBSome, a complex of proteins that regulates the protein composition in cilia. In this study, we identify a smaller molecular mass form of BBS5 as a variant formed by alternative splicing and show that expression of this splice variant is restricted to the retina.Reverse transcription PCR from RNA was used to isolate and identify potential alternative transcripts of Bbs5. A peptide unique to the C-terminus of the BBS5 splice variant was synthesized and used to prepare antibodies that selectively recognized the BBS5 splice variant. These antibodies were used on immunoblots of tissue extracts to determine the extent of expression of the alternative transcript and on tissue slices to determine the localization of expressed protein. Pull-down of fluorescently labeled arrestin1 by immunoprecipitation of the BBS5 splice variant was performed to assess functional interaction between the two proteins.PCR from mouse retinal cDNA using Bbs5-specific primers amplified a unique cDNA that was shown to be a splice variant of BBS5 resulting from the use of cryptic splicing sites in Intron 7. The resulting transcript codes for a truncated form of the BBS5 protein with a unique 24 amino acid C-terminus, and predicted 26.5 kD molecular mass. PCR screening of RNA isolated from various ciliated tissues and immunoblots of protein extracts from these same tissues showed that this splice variant was expressed in retina, but not brain, heart, kidney, or testes. Quantitative PCR showed that the splice variant transcript is 8.9-fold (+/- 1.1-fold less abundant than the full-length transcript. In the retina, the splice variant of BBS5 appears to be most abundant in the connecting cilium

  18. SplicingTypesAnno: annotating and quantifying alternative splicing events for RNA-Seq data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoyong; Zuo, Fenghua; Ru, Yuanbin; Guo, Jiqiang; Yan, Xiaoyan; Sablok, Gaurav

    2015-04-01

    Alternative splicing plays a key role in the regulation of the central dogma. Four major types of alternative splicing have been classified as intron retention, exon skipping, alternative 5 splice sites or alternative donor sites, and alternative 3 splice sites or alternative acceptor sites. A few algorithms have been developed to detect splice junctions from RNA-Seq reads. However, there are few tools targeting at the major alternative splicing types at the exon/intron level. This type of analysis may reveal subtle, yet important events of alternative splicing, and thus help gain deeper understanding of the mechanism of alternative splicing. This paper describes a user-friendly R package, extracting, annotating and analyzing alternative splicing types for sequence alignment files from RNA-Seq. SplicingTypesAnno can: (1) provide annotation for major alternative splicing at exon/intron level. By comparing the annotation from GTF/GFF file, it identifies the novel alternative splicing sites; (2) offer a convenient two-level analysis: genome-scale annotation for users with high performance computing environment, and gene-scale annotation for users with personal computers; (3) generate a user-friendly web report and additional BED files for IGV visualization. SplicingTypesAnno is a user-friendly R package for extracting, annotating and analyzing alternative splicing types at exon/intron level for sequence alignment files from RNA-Seq. It is publically available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/splicingtypes/files/ or http://genome.sdau.edu.cn/research/software/SplicingTypesAnno.html.

  19. Mouse tissues express multiple splice variants of prominin-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristel Kemper

    Full Text Available Prominin-1, a heavily glycosylated pentaspan membrane protein, is mainly known for its function as a marker for (cancer stem cells, although it can also be detected on differentiated cells. Mouse prominin-1 expression is heavily regulated by splicing in eight different variants. The function or the expression pattern of prominin-1 and its splice variants (SVs is thus far unknown. In this study, we analyzed the expression of the prominin-1 splice variants on mRNA level in several mouse tissues and found a broad tissue expression of the majority of SVs, but a specific set of SVs had a much more restricted expression profile. For instance, the testis expressed only SV3 and SV7. Moreover, SV8 was solely detected in the eye. Intriguingly, prominin-1 knockout mice do not suffer from gross abnormalities, but do show signs of blindness, which suggest that SV8 has a specific function in this tissue. In addition, databases searches for putative promoter regions in the mouse prominin-1 gene revealed three potential promoter regions that could be linked to specific SVs. Interestingly, for both SV7 and SV8, a specific potential promoter region could be identified. To conclude, the majority of mouse prominin-1 splice variants are widely expressed in mouse tissues. However, specific expression of a few variants, likely driven by specific promoters, suggests distinct regulation and a potential important function for these variants in certain tissues.

  20. HOLLYWOOD: a comparative relational database of alternative splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holste, Dirk; Huo, George; Tung, Vivian; Burge, Christopher B

    2006-01-01

    RNA splicing is an essential step in gene expression, and is often variable, giving rise to multiple alternatively spliced mRNA and protein isoforms from a single gene locus. The design of effective databases to support experimental and computational investigations of alternative splicing (AS) is a significant challenge. In an effort to integrate accurate exon and splice site annotation with current knowledge about splicing regulatory elements and predicted AS events, and to link information about the splicing of orthologous genes in different species, we have developed the Hollywood system. This database was built upon genomic annotation of splicing patterns of known genes derived from spliced alignment of complementary DNAs (cDNAs) and expressed sequence tags, and links features such as splice site sequence and strength, exonic splicing enhancers and silencers, conserved and non-conserved patterns of splicing, and cDNA library information for inferred alternative exons. Hollywood was implemented as a relational database and currently contains comprehensive information for human and mouse. It is accompanied by a web query tool that allows searches for sets of exons with specific splicing characteristics or splicing regulatory element composition, or gives a graphical or sequence-level summary of splicing patterns for a specific gene. A streamlined graphical representation of gene splicing patterns is provided, and these patterns can alternatively be layered onto existing information in the UCSC Genome Browser. The database is accessible at http://hollywood.mit.edu.

  1. Multi-species sequence comparison reveals conservation of ghrelin gene-derived splice variants encoding a truncated ghrelin peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seim, Inge; Jeffery, Penny L; Thomas, Patrick B; Walpole, Carina M; Maugham, Michelle; Fung, Jenny N T; Yap, Pei-Yi; O'Keeffe, Angela J; Lai, John; Whiteside, Eliza J; Herington, Adrian C; Chopin, Lisa K

    2016-06-01

    The peptide hormone ghrelin is a potent orexigen produced predominantly in the stomach. It has a number of other biological actions, including roles in appetite stimulation, energy balance, the stimulation of growth hormone release and the regulation of cell proliferation. Recently, several ghrelin gene splice variants have been described. Here, we attempted to identify conserved alternative splicing of the ghrelin gene by cross-species sequence comparisons. We identified a novel human exon 2-deleted variant and provide preliminary evidence that this splice variant and in1-ghrelin encode a C-terminally truncated form of the ghrelin peptide, termed minighrelin. These variants are expressed in humans and mice, demonstrating conservation of alternative splicing spanning 90 million years. Minighrelin appears to have similar actions to full-length ghrelin, as treatment with exogenous minighrelin peptide stimulates appetite and feeding in mice. Forced expression of the exon 2-deleted preproghrelin variant mirrors the effect of the canonical preproghrelin, stimulating cell proliferation and migration in the PC3 prostate cancer cell line. This is the first study to characterise an exon 2-deleted preproghrelin variant and to demonstrate sequence conservation of ghrelin gene-derived splice variants that encode a truncated ghrelin peptide. This adds further impetus for studies into the alternative splicing of the ghrelin gene and the function of novel ghrelin peptides in vertebrates.

  2. Alternative-splicing-mediated gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qianliang; Zhou, Tianshou

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is a fundamental process during gene expression and has been found to be ubiquitous in eukaryotes. However, how AS impacts gene expression levels both quantitatively and qualitatively remains to be fully explored. Here, we analyze two common models of gene expression, each incorporating a simple splice mechanism that a pre-mRNA is spliced into two mature mRNA isoforms in a probabilistic manner. In the constitutive expression case, we show that the steady-state molecular numbers of two mature mRNA isoforms follow mutually independent Poisson distributions. In the bursting expression case, we demonstrate that the tail decay of the steady-state distribution for both mature mRNA isoforms that in general are not mutually independent can be characterized by the product of mean burst size and splicing probability. In both cases, we find that AS can efficiently modulate both the variability (measured by variance) and the noise level of the total mature mRNA, and in particular, the latter is always lower than the noise level of the pre-mRNA, implying that AS always reduces the noise. These results altogether reveal that AS is a mechanism of efficiently controlling the gene expression noise.

  3. Splicing-related genes are alternatively spliced upon changes in ambient temperatures in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, Johan; Lammers, Michiel; Busscher-Lange, Jacqueline; Bonnema, Guusje; Rodenburg, Nicole; Proveniers, Marcel C. G.; Angenent, Gerco C.

    2017-01-01

    Plants adjust their development and architecture to small variations in ambient temperature. In a time in which temperatures are rising world-wide, the mechanism by which plants are able to sense temperature fluctuations and adapt to it, is becoming of special interest. By performing RNA-sequencing on two Arabidopsis accession and one Brassica species exposed to temperature alterations, we showed that alternative splicing is an important mechanism in ambient temperature sensing and adaptation. We found that amongst the differentially alternatively spliced genes, splicing related genes are enriched, suggesting that the splicing machinery itself is targeted for alternative splicing when temperature changes. Moreover, we showed that many different components of the splicing machinery are targeted for ambient temperature regulated alternative splicing. Mutant analysis of a splicing related gene that was differentially spliced in two of the genotypes showed an altered flowering time response to different temperatures. We propose a two-step mechanism where temperature directly influences alternative splicing of the splicing machinery genes, followed by a second step where the altered splicing machinery affects splicing of downstream genes involved in the adaptation to altered temperatures. PMID:28257507

  4. The implications of alternative splicing in the ENCODE protein complement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tress, Michael L.; Martelli, Pier Luigi; Frankish, Adam;

    2007-01-01

    Alternative premessenger RNA splicing enables genes to generate more than one gene product. Splicing events that occur within protein coding regions have the potential to alter the biological function of the expressed protein and even to create new protein functions. Alternative splicing has been...

  5. Alternative splicing: a pivotal step between eukaryotic transcription and translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornblihtt, Alberto R; Schor, Ignacio E; Alló, Mariano; Dujardin, Gwendal; Petrillo, Ezequiel; Muñoz, Manuel J

    2013-03-01

    Alternative splicing was discovered simultaneously with splicing over three decades ago. Since then, an enormous body of evidence has demonstrated the prevalence of alternative splicing in multicellular eukaryotes, its key roles in determining tissue- and species-specific differentiation patterns, the multiple post- and co-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms that control it, and its causal role in hereditary disease and cancer. The emerging evidence places alternative splicing in a central position in the flow of eukaryotic genetic information, between transcription and translation, in that it can respond not only to various signalling pathways that target the splicing machinery but also to transcription factors and chromatin structure.

  6. Splicing analysis of 14 BRCA1 missense variants classifies nine variants as pathogenic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlborn, Lise B; Dandanell, Mette; Steffensen, Ane Y;

    2015-01-01

    needed to classify whether these uncertain variants are pathogenic or benign. In this study, we investigated 14 BRCA1 variants by in silico splicing analysis and mini-gene splicing assay. All 14 alterations were missense variants located within the BRCT domain of BRCA1 and had previously been examined...... by functional analysis at the protein level. Results from a validated mini-gene splicing assay indicated that nine BRCA1 variants resulted in splicing aberrations leading to truncated transcripts and thus can be considered pathogenic (c.4987A>T/p.Met1663Leu, c.4988T>A/p.Met1663Lys, c.5072C>T/p.Thr1691Ile, c...... to have no or an uncertain effect on the protein level, whereas one variant (c.5072C>T/p.Thr1691Ile) were shown to have a strong effect on the protein level as well. In conclusion, our study emphasizes that in silico splicing prediction and mini-gene splicing analysis are important for the classification...

  7. Cloning and identification of a new alternative splicing variant of NPCEDRG%一个新的NPCEDRG基因mRNA剪接变异体的克隆及鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯德富; 关勇军; 万恂恂; 谭宇婷; 欧阳咏梅; 余艳辉; 陈主初

    2011-01-01

    Objective To further characterize NPCEDRG transcripts, we cloned and identified alternative splicing variants of NPCEDRG in an NPC cell lines CNE2. Methods 5'-RACE, 3-RACE were used to amplify full-length cDNA sequence of mRNA variants of NPCEDRG from CNE2. The PCR product was then inserted into pMD20 vector. And the positive recombinants were finally confirmed by sequence analysis. Results A new AS variant of NPCEDRG was cloned and identified, which contains a 297 nucleotides CDs and encode a protein consist of 98 aa (MW 10.4, PI 7.1). Conclusion This study clarified the AS variants of NPCEDRG, and a new AS variant of NPCEDRG was successfully cloned and identified, which provide important clues to better understanding of the molecular mechanism of human NPCEDRG gene expression in nasopharyngeal epithelial cells.%目的:克隆并鉴定NPCEDRG基因mRNA剪接变异体.方法:利用5’-RACE、3’-RACE在CNE2细胞中对NPCEDRG基因mRNA剪接变异体进行扩增,T/A克隆入pMD20载体,所获得的阳性重组子经测序证实.结果:成功克隆得到一种新的NPCEDRG基因的mRNA剪接变异体V2,其TSS位于-23 nt处,其CDs为297 bp,编码一种由98个氨基酸组成的蛋白质,其分子量为10.4 kD,等电点为7.1.结论:利用5’-RACE、3’-RACE等技术成功克隆得到一种新的NPCEDRG基因的mRNA剪接变异体,为阐述NPCEDRG基因在鼻咽癌发生发展中的可能作用提供线索.

  8. Quantitative imaging of single mRNA splice variants in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyuwan; Cui, Yi; Lee, Luke P.; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2014-06-01

    Alternative messenger RNA (mRNA) splicing is a fundamental process of gene regulation, and errors in RNA splicing are known to be associated with a variety of different diseases. However, there is currently a lack of quantitative technologies for monitoring mRNA splice variants in cells. Here, we show that a combination of plasmonic dimer probes and hyperspectral imaging can be used to detect and quantify mRNA splice variants in living cells. The probes are made from gold nanoparticles functionalized with oligonucleotides and can hybridize to specific mRNA sequences, forming nanoparticle dimers that exhibit distinct spectral shifts due to plasmonic coupling. With this approach, we show that the spatial and temporal distribution of three selected splice variants of the breast cancer susceptibility gene, BRCA1, can be monitored at single-copy resolution by measuring the hybridization dynamics of the nanoplasmonic dimers. Our study provides insights into RNA and its transport in living cells, which could improve our understanding of cellular protein complexes, pharmacogenomics, genetic diagnosis and gene therapies.

  9. Regulation of splicing factors by alternative splicing and NMD is conserved between kingdoms yet evolutionarily flexible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lareau, Liana F; Brenner, Steven E

    2015-04-01

    Ultraconserved elements, unusually long regions of perfect sequence identity, are found in genes encoding numerous RNA-binding proteins including arginine-serine rich (SR) splicing factors. Expression of these genes is regulated via alternative splicing of the ultraconserved regions to yield mRNAs that are degraded by nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD), a process termed unproductive splicing (Lareau et al. 2007; Ni et al. 2007). As all human SR genes are affected by alternative splicing and NMD, one might expect this regulation to have originated in an early SR gene and persisted as duplications expanded the SR family. But in fact, unproductive splicing of most human SR genes arose independently (Lareau et al. 2007). This paradox led us to investigate the origin and proliferation of unproductive splicing in SR genes. We demonstrate that unproductive splicing of the splicing factor SRSF5 (SRp40) is conserved among all animals and even observed in fungi; this is a rare example of alternative splicing conserved between kingdoms, yet its effect is to trigger mRNA degradation. As the gene duplicated, the ancient unproductive splicing was lost in paralogs, and distinct unproductive splicing evolved rapidly and repeatedly to take its place. SR genes have consistently employed unproductive splicing, and while it is exceptionally conserved in some of these genes, turnover in specific events among paralogs shows flexible means to the same regulatory end.

  10. A novel DNMT3B splice variant expressed in tumor and pluripotent cells modulates genomic DNA methylation patterns and displays altered DNA binding

    OpenAIRE

    Gopalakrishnan, Suhasni; Van Emburgh, Beth O.; Shan, Jixiu; Su, Zhen; Fields, C. Robert; Vieweg, Johannes; Hamazaki, Takashi; Schwartz, Philip H; Terada, Naohiro; Robertson, Keith D.

    2009-01-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic mark essential for mammalian development, genomic stability, and imprinting. DNA methylation patterns are established and maintained by three DNA methyltransferases: DNMT1, DNMT3A, and DNMT3B. Interestingly, all three DNMTs make use of alternative splicing. DNMT3B has nearly 40 known splice variants expressed in a tissue- and disease-specific manner, but very little is known about the role of these splice variants in modulating DNMT3B function. We describe her...

  11. Expression of Human CAR Splicing Variants in BAC-Transgenic Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yu-Kun Jennifer; Lu, Hong; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2012-01-01

    The nuclear receptor constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) is a key regulator for drug metabolism in liver. Human CAR (hCAR) transcripts are subjected to alternative splicing. Some hCAR splicing variants (SVs) have been shown to encode functional proteins by reporter assays. However, in vivo research on the activity of these hCAR SVs has been impeded by the absence of a valid model. This study engineered an hCAR-BAC-transgenic (hCAR-TG) mouse model by integrating the 8.5-kbp hCAR gene as wel...

  12. Discovery of Novel Splice Variants and Regulatory Mechanisms for Microsomal Triglyceride Transfer Protein in Human Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takashi; Swift, Larry L.

    2016-01-01

    Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) is a unique lipid transfer protein essential for the assembly of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins by the liver and intestine. Previous studies in mice identified a splice variant of MTP with an alternate first exon. Splice variants of human MTP have not been reported. Using PCR approaches we have identified two splice variants in human tissues, which we have named MTP-B and MTP-C. MTP-B has a unique first exon (Ex1B) located 10.5 kb upstream of the first exon (Ex1A) for canonical MTP (MTP-A); MTP-C contains both first exons for MTP-A and MTP-B. MTP-B was found in a number of tissues, whereas MTP-C was prominent in brain and testis. MTP-B does not encode a protein; MTP-C encodes the same protein encoded by MTP-A, although MTP-C translation is strongly inhibited by regulatory elements within its 5′-UTR. Using luciferase assays, we demonstrate that the promoter region upstream of exon 1B is quite adequate to drive expression of MTP. We conclude that alternate splicing plays a key role in regulating cellular MTP levels by introducing distinct promoter regions and unique 5′-UTRs, which contain elements that alter translation efficiency, enabling the cell to optimize MTP activity. PMID:27256115

  13. The influence of Argonaute proteins on alternative RNA splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batsché, Eric; Ameyar-Zazoua, Maya

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing of precursor RNAs is an important process in multicellular species because it impacts several aspects of gene expression: from the increase of protein repertoire to the level of expression. A large body of evidences demonstrates that factors regulating chromatin and transcription impact the outcomes of alternative splicing. Argonaute (AGO) proteins were known to play key roles in the regulation of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. More recently, their role in the nucleus of human somatic cells has emerged. Here, we will discuss some of the nuclear functions of AGO, with special emphasis on alternative splicing. The AGO-mediated modulation of alternative splicing is based on several properties of these proteins: their binding to transcripts on chromatin and their interactions with many proteins, especially histone tail-modifying enzymes, HP1γ and splicing factors. AGO proteins may favor a decrease in the RNA-polymerase II kinetics at actively transcribed genes leading to the modulation of alternative splicing decisions. They could also influence alternative splicing through their interaction with core components of the splicing machinery and several splicing factors. We will discuss the modes of AGO recruitment on chromatin at active genes. We suggest that long intragenic antisense transcripts (lincRNA) might be an important feature of genes containing splicing events regulated by AGO.

  14. Molecular heterogeneity and alternative splicing of human lactoperoxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragoso, Miryam A; Torbati, Aliza; Fregien, Nevis; Conner, Gregory E

    2009-02-01

    Human lactoperoxidase (LPO) exists as two distinct molecules independent of glycosylation. The N-terminus of one form is blocked and has not been identified while the other is proteolytically processed at the N-terminus similar to myeloperoxidase. Our analysis identified alternatively spliced human LPO mRNAs that may explain the observed molecular heterogeneity of LPO. Two mRNAs omit propeptide encoding exons while retaining the 5' exon encoding the secretion signal, consistent with the heterogeneity and suggesting a possible functional role for the propeptide. Two LPO forms were expressed using baculovirus and both showed similar enzyme activity. LC/MS/MS analysis of trypsin digested, partially purified, salivary LPO confirmed the larger unprocessed LPO is present in saliva. To compare variant expression patterns, antisera were raised against purified recombinant (rhLPO) as well as against an antigenic peptide sequence within the exons encoding the propeptide region. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated proLPO was differently localized within gland cells compared to other forms of LPO. The data suggested splice variants may contribute to LPO molecular heterogeneity and its regulation by intracellular compartmental localization.

  15. Regulation of Alternative Splicing in Vivo by Overexpression of Antagonistic Splicing Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caceres, Javier F.; Stamm, Stefan; Helfman, David M.; Krainer, Adrian R.

    1994-09-01

    The opposing effects of SF2/ASF and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A1 influence alternative splicing in vitro. SF2/ASF or hnRNP A1 complementary DNAs were transiently overexpressed in HeLa cells, and the effect on alternative splicing of several cotransfected reporter genes was measured. Increased expression of SF2/ASF activated proximal 5' splice sites, promoted inclusion of a neuron-specific exon, and prevented abnormal exon skipping. Increased expression of hnRNP A1 activated distal 5' splice sites. Therefore, variations in the intracellular levels of antagonistic splicing factors influence different modes of alternative splicing in vivo and may be a natural mechanism for tissue-specific or developmental regulation of gene expression.

  16. Alternative Splicing of the Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-Activating Polypeptide Receptor PAC1: Mechanisms of Fine Tuning of Brain Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janna eBlechman

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing of the precursor mRNA encoding for the neuropeptide receptor PAC1/ADCYAP1R1 generates multiple protein products that exhibit pleiotropic activities. Recent studies in mammals and zebrafish have implicated some of these splice isoforms in control of both cellular and body homeostasis. Here, we review the regulation of PAC1 splice variants and their underlying signal transduction and physiological processes in the nervous system.

  17. Quantitative regulation of alternative splicing in evolution and development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Irimia, Manuel; Rukov, Jakob L; Roy, Scott W;

    2009-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is a widespread mechanism with an important role in increasing transcriptome and proteome diversity by generating multiple different products from the same gene. Evolutionary studies of AS have focused primarily on the conservation of alternatively spliced sequences...... layer in complex gene regulatory networks and in the emergence of genetic novelties....

  18. Expression and functional characterization of ABCG1 splice variant ABCG1(666).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Thomas; Bode, Guenther; Lueken, Aloys; Knop, Markus; Kannenberg, Frank; Nofer, Jerzy-Roch; Assmann, Gerd; Seedorf, Udo

    2006-08-07

    The ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCG1 mediates the transport of excess cholesterol from macrophages and other cell types to high density lipoprotein (HDL) but not to lipid-depleted apolipoprotein AI. Several splice variants which may have different functions have been identified in mammals. In the current study, we characterized the human splice variant ABCG1(666), which differs from full-length ABCG1(678) by absence of an internal segment of 12 amino acids (VKQTKRLKGLRK). Accordingly spliced ABCG1 transcripts were detected in macrophages and liver in approximately twofold higher amounts than the alternatively spliced ABCG1 form encoding full-length ABCG1. We used transient and stable expression of ABCG1(666) fusion proteins to characterize glycosylation, subcellular localization, molecular interaction and functions of this ABCG1 variant. It could be demonstrated that ABCG1(666) is located at the cell surface and has the ability to form cholesterol transport competent homodimers which affect cellular cholesterol export in a similar manner as previously characterized forms of ABCG1. Our results support that ABCG1(666) may in fact be the most prominent form of functional ABCG1 expressed in the human.

  19. Functional characterization and identification of mouse Rad51d splice variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Changanamkandath

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The homologous recombination (HR pathway is vital for maintaining genomic integrity through the restoration of double-stranded breaks and interstrand crosslinks. The RAD51 paralogs (RAD51B, RAD51C, RAD51D, XRCC2, XRCC3 are essential for this process in vertebrates, and the RAD51D paralog is unique in that it participates in both HR repair and telomere maintenance. RAD51D is also known to directly interact with the RAD51C and XRCC2 proteins. Rad51d splice variants have been reported in mouse and human tissues, supportive of a role for alternative splicing in HR regulation. The present study evaluated the interaction of the Rad51d splice isoform products with RAD51C and XRCC2 and their expression patterns. Results Yeast-2-hybrid analysis was used to determine that the Mus musculus Rad51d splice variant product RAD51DΔ7b (deleted for residues 219 through 223 was capable of interacting with both RAD51C and XRCC2 and that RAD51D+int3 interacted with XRCC2. In addition, the linker region (residues 54 through 77 of RAD51D was identified as a region that potentially mediates binding with XRCC2. Cellular localization, detected by EGFP fusion proteins, demonstrated that each of the splice variant products tested was distributed throughout the cell similar to the full-length protein. However, none of the splice variants were capable of restoring resistance of Rad51d-deficient cell lines to mitomycin C. RT-PCR expression analysis revealed that Rad51dΔ3 (deleted for exon 3 and Rad51dΔ5 (deleted for exon 5transcripts display tissue specific expression patterns with Rad51dΔ3 being detected in each tissue except ovary and Rad51dΔ5 not detected in mammary gland and testis. These expression studies also led to the identification of two additional Rad51d ubiquitously expressed transcripts, one deleted for both exon 9 and 10 and one deleted for only exon 10. Conclusion These results suggest Rad51d alternative splice variants potentially

  20. Characterization of a novel splicing variant in the RAPTOR gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Chang [Department of Human Genetics, University of Chicago, 920 E. 58th Street, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)], E-mail: csun1@bsd.uchicago.edu; Southard, Catherine; Di Rienzo, Anna [Department of Human Genetics, University of Chicago, 920 E. 58th Street, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2009-03-09

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) plays an essential role in the regulation of cell growth, proliferation and apoptosis. Raptor, the regulatory associated protein of mTOR, is an important member in this signaling pathway. In the present report, we identified and characterized a novel splicing variant of this gene, RAPTOR{sub v}2, in which exons 14-17, 474 bp in total, are omitted from the mRNA. This deletion does not change the open reading frame, but causes a nearly complete absence of HEAT repeats, which were shown to be involved in the binding of mTOR substrates. Real time PCR performed on 48 different human tissues demonstrated the ubiquitous presence of this splice variant. Quantification of mRNA levels in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL) from 56 unrelated HapMap individuals revealed that the expression of this splicing form is quite variable. One synonymous SNP, rs2289759 in exon 14, was predicted by ESEfinder to cause a significant gain/loss of SRp55 and/or SF2/ASF binding sites, and thus potentially influence splicing. This prediction was confirmed by linear regression analysis between the ratio of RAPTOR{sub v}2 to total RAPTOR mRNA levels and the SNP genotype in the above 56 individuals (r = 0.281 and P = 0.036). Moreover, the functional evaluation indicated that this splicing isoform is expected to retain the ability to bind mTOR, but is unlikely to bind mTOR substrates, hence affecting signal transduction and further cell proliferation.

  1. Perturbation of myelin basic protein (Mbp) splice variant expression in developing rat cerebellum following perinatal exposure to methylmercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padhi, Bhaja K; Pelletier, Guillaume

    2012-09-18

    Myelin sheaths surrounding axons are essential for saltatory conduction of nerve impulse in the central nervous system. A major protein constituent of myelin sheaths is produced by the myelin basic protein (Mbp) gene, whose expression in oligodendrocytes is conserved across vertebrates. In rat, five Mbp splice variants resulting from alternative splicing of exons 2, 5 and/or 6 are characterized. We developed a PCR-based strategy to quantify individual Mbp splice variants and characterized a sixth Mbp splice variant lacking only exon 5. This newly identified splice variant is predominantly expressed in developing rat brain and has orthologs in mouse and human. Many neurotoxic chemicals can perturb myelination and Mbp gene expression. Regulation of Mbp gene expression at the post-transcriptional level was assessed following perinatal exposure to neurotoxic methylmercury (2 mg/kg b.w./day). Similar reductions in total and individual Mbp splice variant mRNA levels suggest that methylmercury-induced perturbation in Mbp gene expression occurred as a consequence of decreased oligodendrocyte cell population in absence of a significant impact on its post-transcriptional regulation.

  2. Protein interaction network of alternatively spliced isoforms from brain links genetic risk factors for autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corominas, Roser; Yang, Xinping; Lin, Guan Ning; Kang, Shuli; Shen, Yun; Ghamsari, Lila; Broly, Martin; Rodriguez, Maria; Tam, Stanley; Trigg, Shelly A; Fan, Changyu; Yi, Song; Tasan, Murat; Lemmens, Irma; Kuang, Xingyan; Zhao, Nan; Malhotra, Dheeraj; Michaelson, Jacob J; Vacic, Vladimir; Calderwood, Michael A; Roth, Frederick P; Tavernier, Jan; Horvath, Steve; Salehi-Ashtiani, Kourosh; Korkin, Dmitry; Sebat, Jonathan; Hill, David E; Hao, Tong; Vidal, Marc; Iakoucheva, Lilia M

    2014-04-11

    Increased risk for autism spectrum disorders (ASD) is attributed to hundreds of genetic loci. The convergence of ASD variants have been investigated using various approaches, including protein interactions extracted from the published literature. However, these datasets are frequently incomplete, carry biases and are limited to interactions of a single splicing isoform, which may not be expressed in the disease-relevant tissue. Here we introduce a new interactome mapping approach by experimentally identifying interactions between brain-expressed alternatively spliced variants of ASD risk factors. The Autism Spliceform Interaction Network reveals that almost half of the detected interactions and about 30% of the newly identified interacting partners represent contribution from splicing variants, emphasizing the importance of isoform networks. Isoform interactions greatly contribute to establishing direct physical connections between proteins from the de novo autism CNVs. Our findings demonstrate the critical role of spliceform networks for translating genetic knowledge into a better understanding of human diseases.

  3. Copy number variations in alternative splicing gene networks impact lifespan.

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    Joseph T Glessner

    Full Text Available Longevity has a strong genetic component evidenced by family-based studies. Lipoprotein metabolism, FOXO proteins, and insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathways in model systems have shown polygenic variations predisposing to shorter lifespan. To test the hypothesis that rare variants could influence lifespan, we compared the rates of CNVs in healthy children (0-18 years of age with individuals 67 years or older. CNVs at a significantly higher frequency in the pediatric cohort were considered risk variants impacting lifespan, while those enriched in the geriatric cohort were considered longevity protective variants. We performed a whole-genome CNV analysis on 7,313 children and 2,701 adults of European ancestry genotyped with 302,108 SNP probes. Positive findings were evaluated in an independent cohort of 2,079 pediatric and 4,692 geriatric subjects. We detected 8 deletions and 10 duplications that were enriched in the pediatric group (P=3.33×10(-8-1.6×10(-2 unadjusted, while only one duplication was enriched in the geriatric cohort (P=6.3×10(-4. Population stratification correction resulted in 5 deletions and 3 duplications remaining significant (P=5.16×10(-5-4.26×10(-2 in the replication cohort. Three deletions and four duplications were significant combined (combined P=3.7×10(-4-3.9×10(-2. All associated loci were experimentally validated using qPCR. Evaluation of these genes for pathway enrichment demonstrated ~50% are involved in alternative splicing (P=0.0077 Benjamini and Hochberg corrected. We conclude that genetic variations disrupting RNA splicing could have long-term biological effects impacting lifespan.

  4. Insights into alternative splicing of sarcomeric genes in the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeland, Cornelis J; van den Hoogenhof, Maarten M; Beqqali, Abdelaziz; Creemers, Esther E

    2015-04-01

    Driven by rapidly evolving technologies in next-generation sequencing, alternative splicing has emerged as a crucial layer in gene expression, greatly expanding protein diversity and governing complex biological processes in the cardiomyocyte. At the core of cardiac contraction, the physical properties of the sarcomere are carefully orchestrated through alternative splicing to fit the varying demands on the heart. By the recent discovery of RBM20 and RBM24, two major heart and skeletal muscle-restricted splicing factors, it became evident that alternative splicing events in the heart occur in regulated networks rather than in isolated events. Analysis of knockout mice of these splice factors has shed light on the importance of these fundamental processes in the heart. In this review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of the role and regulation of alternative splicing in the developing and diseased heart, specifically within the sarcomere. Through various examples (titin, myomesin, troponin T, tropomyosin and LDB3) we illustrate how alternative splicing regulates the functional properties of the sarcomere. Finally, we evaluate opportunities and obstacles to modulate alternative splicing in therapeutic approaches for cardiac disease.

  5. A novel splice variant of the decapentaplegic (dpp) gene in the wild silkworm, Bombyx mandarina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Woori; Choi, Jung-Won; Ryul Kim, Seong; Choi, Kwang-Ho; Kim, Kee-Young; Goo, Tae-Won; Park, Seung-Won

    2015-10-23

    Decapentaplegic (dpp) is a member of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily. Although the dpp gene and related pathways are known to play important roles in insect development, few studies have examined its function in Bombyx mori and Bombyx mandarina. To date, there have been no previous reports on novel splice variants of dpp in silkworm. In the present study, we conducted RT-PCR to examine dpp expression in the mid-gut tissue of B. mandarina and discovered a novel dpp isoform. The isoform sequence was confirmed using sequencing analysis and found to have 333 bp deletion compared to full-length cDNA encoding dpp. The deleted sequence encodes a region of the latency associated peptide (LAP) region of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), which may affect the activity and specificity of TGF-β. Using variant calling analyses, we detected 7 candidate single nucleotide variants (SNVs) for different alternative splicing in dpp. This is the first report of a novel splice variant of the dpp gene in B. mandarina and these results provide insight about the domestication process and distinct phenotypic traits of B. mori and B. mandarina.

  6. Genome-wide analysis of alternative splicing in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

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    Thomas Julie

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome-wide computational analysis of alternative splicing (AS in several flowering plants has revealed that pre-mRNAs from about 30% of genes undergo AS. Chlamydomonas, a simple unicellular green alga, is part of the lineage that includes land plants. However, it diverged from land plants about one billion years ago. Hence, it serves as a good model system to study alternative splicing in early photosynthetic eukaryotes, to obtain insights into the evolution of this process in plants, and to compare splicing in simple unicellular photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic eukaryotes. We performed a global analysis of alternative splicing in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using its recently completed genome sequence and all available ESTs and cDNAs. Results Our analysis of AS using BLAT and a modified version of the Sircah tool revealed AS of 498 transcriptional units with 611 events, representing about 3% of the total number of genes. As in land plants, intron retention is the most prevalent form of AS. Retained introns and skipped exons tend to be shorter than their counterparts in constitutively spliced genes. The splice site signals in all types of AS events are weaker than those in constitutively spliced genes. Furthermore, in alternatively spliced genes, the prevalent splice form has a stronger splice site signal than the non-prevalent form. Analysis of constitutively spliced introns revealed an over-abundance of motifs with simple repetitive elements in comparison to introns involved in intron retention. In almost all cases, AS results in a truncated ORF, leading to a coding sequence that is around 50% shorter than the prevalent splice form. Using RT-PCR we verified AS of two genes and show that they produce more isoforms than indicated by EST data. All cDNA/EST alignments and splice graphs are provided in a website at http://combi.cs.colostate.edu/as/chlamy. Conclusions The extent of AS in Chlamydomonas that we observed is much

  7. Benzo[a]pyrene treatment leads to changes in nuclear protein expression and alternative splicing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan Chunlan; Wu Wei [Department of Toxicology, Zhejiang University School of Public Health, 388 Yu-Hang-Tang Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058 (China); Li Haiyan [Department of Toxicology, Zhejiang University School of Public Health, 388 Yu-Hang-Tang Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058 (China); Huzhou Maternity and Child Care Hospital, Huzhou, Zhejiang 313000 (China); Zhang Guanglin [Department of Toxicology, Zhejiang University School of Public Health, 388 Yu-Hang-Tang Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058 (China); Duerksen-Hughes, Penelope J. [Department of Basic Sciences, Loma Linda University School of Medicine, Loma Linda, CA 92354 (United States); Zhu Xinqiang, E-mail: zhuxq@zju.edu.cn [Department of Toxicology, Zhejiang University School of Public Health, 388 Yu-Hang-Tang Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058 (China); Yang Jun, E-mail: gastate@zju.edu.cn [Department of Toxicology, Zhejiang University School of Public Health, 388 Yu-Hang-Tang Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058 (China); Zhejiang-California International Nanosystems Institute, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310029 (China)

    2010-04-01

    Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) is a potent pro-carcinogen generated from the combustion of fossil fuel and cigarette smoke. Previously, using a proteomic approach, we have shown that BaP can induce changes in the expression of many cellular proteins, including transcription regulators. In the present study, using a similar approach, we examined the nuclear protein response to BaP in HeLa cells and found that BaP treatment caused expression changes in many nuclear proteins. Twenty-four of these proteins were successfully identified, several of which are involved in the alternative splicing of mRNA, DNA replication, recombination, and repair. The changed expression levels were further confirmed by immunoblot analysis using specific antibodies for two proteins, Lamin A and mitotic checkpoint protein Bub3. The nuclear localization of these two proteins was also confirmed by confocal microscopy. To determine whether alternative splicing was activated following BaP treatment, we examined Fas and CD44, two genes previously shown to be targets of alternative splicing in respond to DNA damage. While no significant activation of alternative splicing was observed for Fas, CD44 splicing variants were found after BaP treatment. Together, these data show that DNA damage induces dramatic changes in nuclear protein expression, and that alternative splicing might be involved in the cellular response to DNA damage.

  8. Effects of airborne particulate matter on alternative pre-mRNA splicing in colon cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buggiano, Valeria; Petrillo, Ezequiel; Alló, Mariano; Lafaille, Celina [Laboratorio de Fisiología y Biología Molecular, Departamento de Fisiología, Biología Molecular y Celular, IFIBYNE-CONICET, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellón 2, C1428EHA Buenos Aires (Argentina); Redal, María Ana [Instituto de Ciencias Básicas y Medicina Experimental, Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Alghamdi, Mansour A. [Department of Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Meteorology, Environment and Arid Land Agriculture, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Khoder, Mamdouh I. [Department of Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Meteorology, Environment and Arid Land Agriculture, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Center of Excellence in Environmental Studies, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Shamy, Magdy [Department of Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Meteorology, Environment and Arid Land Agriculture, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Muñoz, Manuel J., E-mail: mmunoz@fbmc.fcen.uba.ar [Laboratorio de Fisiología y Biología Molecular, Departamento de Fisiología, Biología Molecular y Celular, IFIBYNE-CONICET, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellón 2, C1428EHA Buenos Aires (Argentina); and others

    2015-07-15

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing plays key roles in determining tissue- and species-specific cell differentiation as well as in the onset of hereditary disease and cancer, being controlled by multiple post- and co-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms. We report here that airborne particulate matter, resulting from industrial pollution, inhibits expression and specifically affects alternative splicing at the 5′ untranslated region of the mRNA encoding the bone morphogenetic protein BMP4 in human colon cells in culture. These effects are consistent with a previously reported role for BMP4 in preventing colon cancer development, suggesting that ingestion of particulate matter could contribute to the onset of colon cell proliferation. We also show that the underlying mechanism might involve changes in transcriptional elongation. This is the first study to demonstrate that particulate matter causes non-pleiotropic changes in alternative splicing. - Highlights: • Airborne particulate matter (PM10) affects alternative splicing in colon cells. • PM10 upregulates one of the two mRNA variants of the growth factor BMP-4. • This variant has a longer 5′ unstranslated region and introduces an upstream AUG. • By regulating BMP-4 mRNA splicing PM10 inhibits total expression of BMP-4 protein. • BMP-4 downregulation was previously reported to be associated to colon cancer.

  9. Synaptic Effects of Munc18-1 Alternative Splicing in Excitatory Hippocampal Neurons.

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    Marieke Meijer

    Full Text Available The munc18-1 gene encodes two splice-variants that vary at the C-terminus of the protein and are expressed at different levels in different regions of the adult mammalian brain. Here, we investigated the expression pattern of these splice variants within the brainstem and tested whether they are functionally different. Munc18-1a is expressed in specific nuclei of the brainstem including the LRN, VII and SOC, while Munc18-1b expression is relatively low/absent in these regions. Furthermore, Munc18-1a is the major splice variant in the Calyx of Held. Synaptic transmission was analyzed in autaptic hippocampal munc18-1 KO neurons re-expressing either Munc18-1a or Munc18-1b. The two splice variants supported synaptic transmission to a similar extent, but Munc18-1b was slightly more potent in sustaining synchronous release during high frequency stimulation. Our data suggest that alternative splicing of Munc18-1 support synaptic transmission to a similar extent, but could modulate presynaptic short-term plasticity.

  10. Synaptic Effects of Munc18-1 Alternative Splicing in Excitatory Hippocampal Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Marieke; Cijsouw, Tony; Toonen, Ruud F; Verhage, Matthijs

    2015-01-01

    The munc18-1 gene encodes two splice-variants that vary at the C-terminus of the protein and are expressed at different levels in different regions of the adult mammalian brain. Here, we investigated the expression pattern of these splice variants within the brainstem and tested whether they are functionally different. Munc18-1a is expressed in specific nuclei of the brainstem including the LRN, VII and SOC, while Munc18-1b expression is relatively low/absent in these regions. Furthermore, Munc18-1a is the major splice variant in the Calyx of Held. Synaptic transmission was analyzed in autaptic hippocampal munc18-1 KO neurons re-expressing either Munc18-1a or Munc18-1b. The two splice variants supported synaptic transmission to a similar extent, but Munc18-1b was slightly more potent in sustaining synchronous release during high frequency stimulation. Our data suggest that alternative splicing of Munc18-1 support synaptic transmission to a similar extent, but could modulate presynaptic short-term plasticity.

  11. Novel splice variants associated with one of the zebrafish dnmt3 genes

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    Mhanni Aizeddin A

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA methylation and the methyltransferases are known to be important in vertebrate development and this may be particularly true for the Dnmt3 family of enzymes because they are thought to be the de novo methyltransferases. Mammals have three Dnmt3 genes; Dnmt3a, Dnmt3b, and Dnmt3L, two of which encode active enzymes and one of which produces an inactive but necessary cofactor. However, due to multiple promoter use and alternative splicing there are actually a number of dnmt3 isoforms present. Six different dnmt3 genes have recently been identified in zebrafish. Results We have examined two of the dnmt3 genes in zebrafish that are located in close proximity in the same linkage group and we find that the two genes are more similar to each other than they are to the other zebrafish dnmt3 genes. We have found evidence for the existence of several different splice variants and alternative splice sites associated with one of the two genes and have examined the relative expression of these genes/variants in a number of zebrafish developmental stages and tissues. Conclusion The similarity of the dnmt3-1 and dnmt3-2 genes suggests that they arose due to a relatively recent gene duplication event. The presence of alternative splice and start sites, reminiscent of what is seen with the human DNMT3s, demonstrates strong parallels between the control/function of these genes across vertebrate species. The dynamic expression levels of these genes/variants suggest that they may well play a role in early development and this is particularly true for dnmt3-2-1 and dnmt3-1. dnmt3-2-1 is the predominantly expressed form prior to zygotic gene activation whereas dnmt3-1 predominates post zygotic gene activation suggesting a distinct developmental role for each.

  12. Classical estrogen receptors and ERα splice variants in the mouse.

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    Debra L Irsik

    Full Text Available Estrogens exert a variety of effects in both reproductive and non-reproductive tissues. With the discovery of ERα splice variants, prior assumptions concerning tissue-specific estrogen signaling need to be re-evaluated. Accordingly, we sought to determine the expression of the classical estrogen receptors and ERα splice variants across reproductive and non-reproductive tissues of male and female mice. Western blotting revealed that the full-length ERα66 was mainly present in female reproductive tissues but was also found in non-reproductive tissues at lower levels. ERα46 was most highly expressed in the heart of both sexes. ERα36 was highly expressed in the kidneys and liver of female mice but not in the kidneys of males. ERβ was most abundant in non-reproductive tissues and in the ovaries. Because the kidney has been reported to be the most estrogenic non-reproductive organ, we sought to elucidate ER renal expression and localization. Immunofluorescence studies revealed ERα66 in the vasculature and the glomerulus. It was also found in the brush border of the proximal tubule and in the cortical collecting duct of female mice. ERα36 was evident in mesangial cells and tubular epithelial cells of both sexes, as well as podocytes of females but not males. ERβ was found primarily in the podocytes in female mice but was also present in the mesangial cells in both sexes. Within the renal cortex, ERα46 and ERα36 were mainly located in the membrane fraction although they were also present in the cytosolic fraction. Given the variability of expression patterns demonstrated herein, identification of the specific estrogen receptors expressed in a tissue is necessary for interpreting estrogenic effects. As this study revealed expression of the ERα splice variants at multiple sites within the kidney, further studies are warranted in order to elucidate the contribution of these receptors to renal estrogen responsiveness.

  13. Identification of alternatively spliced TIMP-1 mRNA in cancer cell lines and colon cancer tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Usher, Pernille Autzen; Sieuwerts, A.M.; Bartels, Annette

    2007-01-01

    TIMP-1 is a promising new candidate as a prognostic marker in colorectal and breast cancer. We now describe the discovery of two alternatively spliced variants of TIMP-1 mRNA. The two variants lacking exon 2 (del-2) and 5 (del-5), respectively, were identified in human cancer cell lines by RT......-PCR. The del-2 variant was, furthermore, detected in extracts from 12 colorectal cancer tissue samples. By western blotting additional bands of lower molecular mass than full-length TIMP-1 were identified in tumor tissue, but not in plasma samples obtained from cancer patients. The two splice variants of TIMP...

  14. Alternative splicing during Arabidopsis flower development results in constitutive and stage-regulated isoforms

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    Haifeng eWang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing (AS is a process in eukaryotic gene expression, in which the primary transcript of a multi-exon gene is spliced into two or more different mature transcripts, thereby increasing proteome diversity. AS is often regulated differentially between different tissues or developmental stages. Recent studies suggested that up to 60% of intron-containing genes in Arabidopsis thaliana undergo AS. Yet little is known about this complicated and important process during floral development. To investigate the preferential expression of different isoforms of individual alternatively spliced genes, we used high throughput RNA-Seq technology to explore the transcriptomes of three floral development stages of Arabidopsis thaliana and obtained information of various alternative splicing events. We identified approximately 24,000 genes that were expressed at one or more of these stages, and found that nearly 25% of multi-exon genes had two or more spliced variants. This is less frequent than the previously reported 40%~60% for multiple organs and stages of A. thaliana, indicating that many genes expressed in floral development function with a single predominant isoform. On the other hand, 1,716 isoforms were differentially expressed between the three stages, suggesting that AS might still play important roles in stage transition during floral development. Moreover, 337 novel transcribed regions were identified and most of them have a single exon. In addition, our analyses provide a comprehensive survey of alternative splicing in floral development and facilitate further genomic and genetic studies.

  15. Cancer-associated splicing variant of tumor suppressor AIMP2/p38: pathological implication in tumorigenesis.

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    Jin Woo Choi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Although ARS-interacting multifunctional protein 2 (AIMP2, also named as MSC p38 was first found as a component for a macromolecular tRNA synthetase complex, it was recently discovered to dissociate from the complex and work as a potent tumor suppressor. Upon DNA damage, AIMP2 promotes apoptosis through the protective interaction with p53. However, it was not demonstrated whether AIMP2 was indeed pathologically linked to human cancer. In this work, we found that a splicing variant of AIMP2 lacking exon 2 (AIMP2-DX2 is highly expressed by alternative splicing in human lung cancer cells and patient's tissues. AIMP2-DX2 compromised pro-apoptotic activity of normal AIMP2 through the competitive binding to p53. The cells with higher level of AIMP2-DX2 showed higher propensity to form anchorage-independent colonies and increased resistance to cell death. Mice constitutively expressing this variant showed increased susceptibility to carcinogen-induced lung tumorigenesis. The expression ratio of AIMP2-DX2 to normal AIMP2 was increased according to lung cancer stage and showed a positive correlation with the survival of patients. Thus, this work identified an oncogenic splicing variant of a tumor suppressor, AIMP2/p38, and suggests its potential for anti-cancer target.

  16. Cancer-Associated Perturbations in Alternative Pre-messenger RNA Splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkreta, Lulzim; Bell, Brendan; Revil, Timothée; Venables, Julian P; Prinos, Panagiotis; Elela, Sherif Abou; Chabot, Benoit

    2013-01-01

    removed by the spliceosome, other splice junctions are not used systematically, generating the phenomenon of alternative splicing. Alternative splicing is therefore the process by which a single species of pre-mRNA can be matured to produce different mRNA molecules (Fig. 1). Depending on the number and types of alternative splicing events, a pre-mRNA can generate from two to several thousands different mRNAs leading to the production of a corresponding number of proteins. It is now believed that the expression of at least 70 % of human genes is subjected to alternative splicing, implying an enormous contribution to proteomic diversity, and by extension, to the development and the evolution of complex animals. Defects in splicing have been associated with human diseases (Caceres and Kornblihtt, Trends Genet 18(4):186-93, 2002, Cartegni et al., Nat Rev Genet 3(4):285-98, 2002, Pagani and Baralle, Nat Rev Genet 5(5):389-96, 2004), including cancer (Brinkman, Clin Biochem 37(7):584-94, 2004, Venables, Bioessays 28(4):378-86, 2006, Srebrow and Kornblihtt, J Cell Sci 119(Pt 13):2635-2641, 2006, Revil et al., Bull Cancer 93(9):909-919, 2006, Venables, Transworld Res Network, 2006, Pajares et al., Lancet Oncol 8(4):349-57, 2007, Skotheim and Nees, Int J Biochem Cell Biol 39:1432-1449, 2007). Numerous studies have now confirmed the existence of specific differences in the alternative splicing profiles between normal and cancer tissues. Although there are a few cases where specific mutations are the primary cause for these changes, global alterations in alternative splicing in cancer cells may be primarily derived from changes in the expression of RNA-binding proteins that control splice site selection. Overall, these cancer-specific differences in alternative splicing offer an immense potential to improve the diagnosis and the prognosis of cancer. This review will focus on the functional impact of cancer-associated alternative splicing variants, the molecular determinants that

  17. Expression and alternative splicing pattern of human telomerase reverse transcriptase in human lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Masachika; Kamma, Hiroshi; Wu, Wenwen; Hamasaki, Makoto; Kaneko, Setsuko; Horiguchi, Hisashi; Matsui-Horiguchi, Miwa; Satoh, Hiroaki

    2004-04-01

    Telomerase activity is generally considered to be necessary for cancer cells to avoid senescence. The expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) is believed to be a rate-limiting step in telomerase activation. Recently, it has been proposed that the alternative splicing of hTERT is also involved in regulation of telomerase activity. However, the regulatory mechanism of telomerase in cancer cells has not been thoroughly investigated. To clarify it in lung cancer cells, we measured the expression of the hTERT transcript, analyzed its alternative splicing by RT-PCR, and compared it with telomerase activity and telomere length. The expression of the hTERT transcript was positively correlated with telomerase activity in lung cancer cells. Cancer cells with high telomerase activity contained 4 splicing variants of hTERT, and the full-length variant was 31.3-54.2% of the total transcripts. Cells of the TKB-20 cell line, which has extremely low telomerase activity, showed a different splicing pattern of hTERT in addition to low expression. The functional full-length variant was scarcely detected in TKB-20 cells, suggesting that the telomerase activity was repressed by alternative splicing of hTERT. Telomere length was not necessarily correlated with telomerase activity or hTERT expression in lung cancer cells. Cells of the TKB-4 cell line that also showed relatively low telomerase activity (as TKB-20 cells) had long telomeres. In conclusion, hTERT expression is regulated at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels in lung cancer cells, and the alternative splicing of hTERT is involved in the control of telomerase activity.

  18. Cephalopod eye evolution was modulated by the acquisition of Pax-6 splicing variants.

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    Yoshida, Masa-aki; Yura, Kei; Ogura, Atsushi

    2014-03-05

    Previous studies have reported that the developmental processes of vertebrate eyes are controlled by four Pax-6 splicing variants, each modulating different downstream genes, whereas those of insect eyes are controlled by duplicated Pax-6 genes. Cephalopods belong to the Protostomes but possess a camera-type eye similar to those in vertebrates. We examined Pax-6 variations in the squid and found five types of Pax-6 splicing variants but no duplication of the Pax-6 gene. In the five splicing variants, the splicing patterns were produced by the combination of two additional exons to the ortholog and one jettisoned exon containing most of the Homeobox domain (HD). These five variants show spatio-temporal patterns of gene expression during development in the squid. Our study suggests that cephalopods acquired Pax-6 splicing variants independent of those in vertebrates and that these variants were similarly utilized in the development of the squid eye.

  19. Alternative splicing of testis-specific lactate dehydrogenase C gene in mammals and pigeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lin; Lin, Yaqiu; Jin, Suyu; Liu, Wei; Xu, Yaou; Zheng, Yucai

    2012-04-01

    The objective of the present study was to confirm the widespread existence of alternative splicing of lactate dehydrogenase c (ldhc) gene in mammals. RT-PCR was employed to amplify cDNAs of ldhc from testes of mammals including pig, dog, rabbit, cat, rat, and mouse, as well as pigeon. Two to six kinds of splice variants of ldhc were observed in the seven species as a result of deletion of one or more exons or insertion of partial sequence of an intron in the mature mRNA. The deleted exons occur mostly in exons 5, 4, 6, and 3. The insertion of a partial sequence of introns, which resulted in an abnormal stop codon in the inserted intron sequence, was observed only in dog and rat. The deletion of exons also resulted in a reading frame shift and formation of a stop codon in some variants. No alternative splicing was observed for ldha and ldhb genes in testis of yak. Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blot analysis revealed no obvious LDH-C4 activity derived from expressed ldhc variants. Our results demonstrated the widespread and unique existence of alternative splicing of ldhc genes in mammals.

  20. LRRTM3 Regulates Excitatory Synapse Development through Alternative Splicing and Neurexin Binding

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    Ji Won Um

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The four members of the LRRTM family (LRRTM1-4 are postsynaptic adhesion molecules essential for excitatory synapse development. They have also been implicated in neuropsychiatric diseases. Here, we focus on LRRTM3, showing that two distinct LRRTM3 variants generated by alternative splicing regulate LRRTM3 interaction with PSD-95, but not its excitatory synapse-promoting activity. Overexpression of either LRRTM3 variant increased excitatory synapse density in dentate gyrus (DG granule neurons, whereas LRRTM3 knockdown decreased it. LRRTM3 also controlled activity-regulated AMPA receptor surface expression in an alternative splicing-dependent manner. Furthermore, Lrrtm3-knockout mice displayed specific alterations in excitatory synapse density, excitatory synaptic transmission and excitability in DG granule neurons but not in CA1 pyramidal neurons. Lastly, LRRTM3 required only specific splice variants of presynaptic neurexins for their synaptogenic activity. Collectively, our data highlight alternative splicing and differential presynaptic ligand utilization in the regulation of LRRTMs, revealing key regulatory mechanisms for excitatory synapse development.

  1. Global genome splicing analysis reveals an increased number of alternatively spliced genes with aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Sofía A; Grochová, Diana; McKenna, Tomás; Borate, Bhavesh; Trivedi, Niraj S; Erdos, Michael R; Eriksson, Maria

    2016-04-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is a key regulatory mechanism for the development of different tissues; however, not much is known about changes to alternative splicing during aging. Splicing events may become more frequent and widespread genome-wide as tissues age and the splicing machinery stringency decreases. Using skin, skeletal muscle, bone, thymus, and white adipose tissue from wild-type C57BL6/J male mice (4 and 18 months old), we examined the effect of age on splicing by AS analysis of the differential exon usage of the genome. The results identified a considerable number of AS genes in skeletal muscle, thymus, bone, and white adipose tissue between the different age groups (ranging from 27 to 246 AS genes corresponding to 0.3-3.2% of the total number of genes analyzed). For skin, skeletal muscle, and bone, we included a later age group (28 months old) that showed that the number of alternatively spliced genes increased with age in all three tissues (P aging disease Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome was performed. The results show that expression of the mutant protein, progerin, is associated with an impaired developmental splicing. As progerin accumulates, the number of genes with AS increases compared to in wild-type skin. Our results indicate the existence of a mechanism for increased AS during aging in several tissues, emphasizing that AS has a more important role in the aging process than previously known.

  2. The functional modulation of epigenetic regulators by alternative splicing

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    Martínez-Balbás Marian

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epigenetic regulators (histone acetyltransferases, methyltransferases, chromatin-remodelling enzymes, etc play a fundamental role in the control of gene expression by modifying the local state of chromatin. However, due to their recent discovery, little is yet known about their own regulation. This paper addresses this point, focusing on alternative splicing regulation, a mechanism already known to play an important role in other protein families, e.g. transcription factors, membrane receptors, etc. Results To this end, we compiled the data available on the presence/absence of alternative splicing for a set of 160 different epigenetic regulators, taking advantage of the relatively large amount of unexplored data on alternative splicing available in public databases. We found that 49 % (70 % in human of these genes express more than one transcript. We then studied their alternative splicing patterns, focusing on those changes affecting the enzyme's domain composition. In general, we found that these sequence changes correspond to different mechanisms, either repressing the enzyme's function (e.g. by creating dominant-negative inhibitors of the functional isoform or creating isoforms with new functions. Conclusion We conclude that alternative splicing of epigenetic regulators can be an important tool for the function modulation of these enzymes. Considering that the latter control the transcriptional state of large sets of genes, we propose that epigenetic regulation of gene expression is itself strongly regulated by alternative splicing.

  3. Abnormalities in Alternative Splicing of Apoptotic Genes and Cardiovascular Diseases

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    Zodwa Dlamini

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is required for normal heart development in the embryo, but has also been shown to be an important factor in the occurrence of heart disease. Alternative splicing of apoptotic genes is currently emerging as a diagnostic and therapeutic target for heart disease. This review addresses the involvement of abnormalities in alternative splicing of apoptotic genes in cardiac disorders including cardiomyopathy, myocardial ischemia and heart failure. Many pro-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family have alternatively spliced isoforms that lack important active domains. These isoforms can play a negative regulatory role by binding to and inhibiting the pro-apoptotic forms. Alternative splicing is observed to be increased in various cardiovascular diseases with the level of alternate transcripts increasing elevated in diseased hearts compared to healthy subjects. In many cases these isoforms appear to be the underlying cause of the disease, while in others they may be induced in response to cardiovascular pathologies. Regardless of this, the detection of alternate splicing events in the heart can serve as useful diagnostic or prognostic tools, while those splicing events that seem to play a causative role in cardiovascular disease make attractive future drug targets.

  4. Expression microarray analysis reveals alternative splicing of LAMA3 and DST genes in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

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    Ryan Li

    Full Text Available Prior studies have demonstrated tumor-specific alternative splicing events in various solid tumor types. The role of alternative splicing in the development and progression of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC is unclear. Our study queried exon-level expression to implicate splice variants in HNSCC tumors.We performed a comparative genome-wide analysis of 44 HNSCC tumors and 25 uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP tissue samples at an exon expression level. In our comparison we ranked genes based upon a novel score-the Maximum-Minimum Exon Score (MMES--designed to predict the likelihood of an alternative splicing event occurring. We validated predicted alternative splicing events using quantitative RT-PCR on an independent cohort.After MMES scoring of 17,422 genes, the top 900 genes with the highest scores underwent additional manual inspection of expression patterns in a graphical analysis. The genes LAMA3, DST, VEGFC, SDHA, RASIP1, and TP63 were selected for further validation studies because of a high frequency of alternative splicing suggested in our graphical analysis, and literature review showing their biological relevance and known splicing patterns. We confirmed TP63 as having dominant expression of the short DeltaNp63 isoform in HNSCC tumor samples, consistent with prior reports. Two of the six genes (LAMA3 and DST validated by quantitative RT-PCR for tumor-specific alternative splicing events (Student's t test, P<0.001.Alternative splicing events of oncologically relevant proteins occur in HNSCC. The number of genes expressing tumor-specific splice variants needs further elucidation, as does the functional significance of selective isoform expression.

  5. Evolution of alternative splicing regulation: changes in predicted exonic splicing regulators are not associated with changes in alternative splicing levels in primates

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    Irimia, Manuel; Rukov, Jakob Lewin; Roy, Scott William

    2009-01-01

    Alternative splicing is tightly regulated in a spatio-temporal and quantitative manner. This regulation is achieved by a complex interplay between spliceosomal (trans) factors that bind to different sequence (cis) elements. cis-elements reside in both introns and exons and may either enhance...... of interspecific differences in these elements on the evolution of alternative splicing levels has not yet been investigated at genomic level. Here we study the effect of interspecific differences in predicted exonic splicing regulators (ESRs) on exon inclusion levels in human and chimpanzee. For this purpose, we...... and changes in alternative splicing levels. This observation holds across different ESR exon positions, exon lengths, and 5' splice site strengths. We suggest that this lack of association is mainly due to the great importance of context for ESR functionality: many ESR-like motifs in primates may have little...

  6. Convergence of Acquired Mutations and Alternative Splicing of CD19 Enables Resistance to CART-19 Immunotherapy

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    Sotillo, Elena; Barrett, David M.; Black, Kathryn L; Bagashev, Asen; Oldridge, Derek; Wu, Glendon; Sussman, Robyn; Lanauze, Claudia; Ruella, Marco; Gazzara, Matthew R.; Martinez, Nicole M.; Harrington, Colleen T.; Chung, Elaine Y.; Perazzelli, Jessica; Hofmann, Ted J.; Maude, Shannon L.; Raman, Pichai; Barrera, Alejandro; Gill, Saar; Lacey, Simon F.; Melenhorst, Jan J.; Allman, David; Jacoby, Elad; Fry, Terry; Mackall, Crystal; Barash, Yoseph; Lynch, Kristen W.; Maris, John M.; Grupp, Stephan A.; Thomas-Tikhonenko, Andrei

    2015-01-01

    The CD19 antigen, expressed on most B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias (B-ALL), can be targeted with chimeric antigen receptor–armed T cells (CART-19), but relapses with epitope loss occur in 10% to 20% of pediatric responders. We detected hemizygous deletions spanning the CD19 locus and de novo frameshift and missense mutations in exon 2 of CD19 in some relapse samples. However, we also discovered alternatively spliced CD19 mRNA species, including one lacking exon 2. Pull-down/siRNA experiments identified SRSF3 as a splicing factor involved in exon 2 retention, and its levels were lower in relapsed B-ALL. Using genome editing, we demonstrated that exon 2 skipping bypasses exon 2 mutations in B-ALL cells and allows expression of the N-terminally truncated CD19 variant, which fails to trigger killing by CART-19 but partly rescues defects associated with CD19 loss. Thus, this mechanism of resistance is based on a combination of deleterious mutations and ensuing selection for alternatively spliced RNA isoforms. Significance CART-19 yield 70% response rates in patients with B-ALL, but also produce escape variants. We discovered that the underlying mechanism is the selection for preexisting alternatively spliced CD19 isoforms with the compromised CART-19 epitope. This mechanism suggests a possibility of targeting alternative CD19 ectodomains, which could improve survival of patients with B-cell neoplasms. PMID:26516065

  7. Alternative splicing of MALT1 controls signalling and activation of CD4+ T cells

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    Meininger, Isabel; Griesbach, Richard A.; HU, DESHENG; Gehring, Torben; Seeholzer, Thomas; Bertossi, Arianna; Kranich, Jan; Oeckinghaus, Andrea; Eitelhuber, Andrea C.; Greczmiel, Ute; Gewies, Andreas; Schmidt-Supprian, Marc; Ruland, Jürgen; Brocker, Thomas; Heissmeyer, Vigo

    2016-01-01

    MALT1 channels proximal T-cell receptor (TCR) signalling to downstream signalling pathways. With MALT1A and MALT1B two conserved splice variants exist and we demonstrate here that MALT1 alternative splicing supports optimal T-cell activation. Inclusion of exon7 in MALT1A facilitates the recruitment of TRAF6, which augments MALT1 scaffolding function, but not protease activity. Naive CD4+ T cells express almost exclusively MALT1B and MALT1A expression is induced by TCR stimulation. We identify...

  8. Auxiliary splice factor U2AF26 and transcription factor Gfi1 cooperate directly in regulating CD45 alternative splicing.

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    Heyd, F.; Dam, G.B. ten; Moroy, T.

    2006-01-01

    By alternative splicing, different isoforms of the transmembrane tyrosine phosphatase CD45 are generated that either enhance or limit T cell receptor signaling. We report here that CD45 alternative splicing is regulated by cooperative action of the splice factor U2AF26 and the transcription factor G

  9. Alternative splicing and extensive RNA editing of human TPH2 transcripts.

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    Maik Grohmann

    Full Text Available Brain serotonin (5-HT neurotransmission plays a key role in the regulation of mood and has been implicated in a variety of neuropsychiatric conditions. Tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH is the rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of 5-HT. Recently, we discovered a second TPH isoform (TPH2 in vertebrates, including man, which is predominantly expressed in brain, while the previously known TPH isoform (TPH1 is primarly a non-neuronal enzyme. Overwhelming evidence now points to TPH2 as a candidate gene for 5-HT-related psychiatric disorders. To assess the role of TPH2 gene variability in the etiology of psychiatric diseases we performed cDNA sequence analysis of TPH2 transcripts from human post mortem amygdala samples obtained from individuals with psychiatric disorders (drug abuse, schizophrenia, suicide and controls. Here we show that TPH2 exists in two alternatively spliced variants in the coding region, denoted TPH2a and TPH2b. Moreover, we found evidence that the pre-mRNAs of both splice variants are dynamically RNA-edited in a mutually exclusive manner. Kinetic studies with cell lines expressing recombinant TPH2 variants revealed a higher activity of the novel TPH2B protein compared with the previously known TPH2A, whereas RNA editing was shown to inhibit the enzymatic activity of both TPH2 splice variants. Therefore, our results strongly suggest a complex fine-tuning of central nervous system 5-HT biosynthesis by TPH2 alternative splicing and RNA editing. Finally, we present molecular and large-scale linkage data evidencing that deregulated alternative splicing and RNA editing is involved in the etiology of psychiatric diseases, such as suicidal behaviour.

  10. Alternative splicing of MALT1 controls signalling and activation of CD4(+) T cells.

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    Meininger, Isabel; Griesbach, Richard A; Hu, Desheng; Gehring, Torben; Seeholzer, Thomas; Bertossi, Arianna; Kranich, Jan; Oeckinghaus, Andrea; Eitelhuber, Andrea C; Greczmiel, Ute; Gewies, Andreas; Schmidt-Supprian, Marc; Ruland, Jürgen; Brocker, Thomas; Heissmeyer, Vigo; Heyd, Florian; Krappmann, Daniel

    2016-04-12

    MALT1 channels proximal T-cell receptor (TCR) signalling to downstream signalling pathways. With MALT1A and MALT1B two conserved splice variants exist and we demonstrate here that MALT1 alternative splicing supports optimal T-cell activation. Inclusion of exon7 in MALT1A facilitates the recruitment of TRAF6, which augments MALT1 scaffolding function, but not protease activity. Naive CD4(+) T cells express almost exclusively MALT1B and MALT1A expression is induced by TCR stimulation. We identify hnRNP U as a suppressor of exon7 inclusion. Whereas selective depletion of MALT1A impairs T-cell signalling and activation, downregulation of hnRNP U enhances MALT1A expression and T-cell activation. Thus, TCR-induced alternative splicing augments MALT1 scaffolding to enhance downstream signalling and to promote optimal T-cell activation.

  11. Evolution of alternative splicing regulation: changes in predicted exonic splicing regulators are not associated with changes in alternative splicing levels in primates.

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    Manuel Irimia

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing is tightly regulated in a spatio-temporal and quantitative manner. This regulation is achieved by a complex interplay between spliceosomal (trans factors that bind to different sequence (cis elements. cis-elements reside in both introns and exons and may either enhance or silence splicing. Differential combinations of cis-elements allows for a huge diversity of overall splicing signals, together comprising a complex 'splicing code'. Many cis-elements have been identified, and their effects on exon inclusion levels demonstrated in reporter systems. However, the impact of interspecific differences in these elements on the evolution of alternative splicing levels has not yet been investigated at genomic level. Here we study the effect of interspecific differences in predicted exonic splicing regulators (ESRs on exon inclusion levels in human and chimpanzee. For this purpose, we compiled and studied comprehensive datasets of predicted ESRs, identified by several computational and experimental approaches, as well as microarray data for changes in alternative splicing levels between human and chimpanzee. Surprisingly, we found no association between changes in predicted ESRs and changes in alternative splicing levels. This observation holds across different ESR exon positions, exon lengths, and 5' splice site strengths. We suggest that this lack of association is mainly due to the great importance of context for ESR functionality: many ESR-like motifs in primates may have little or no effect on splicing, and thus interspecific changes at short-time scales may primarily occur in these effectively neutral ESRs. These results underscore the difficulties of using current computational ESR prediction algorithms to identify truly functionally important motifs, and provide a cautionary tale for studies of the effect of SNPs on splicing in human disease.

  12. Study of USH1 splicing variants through minigenes and transcript analysis from nasal epithelial cells.

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    María José Aparisi

    Full Text Available Usher syndrome type I (USH1 is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by congenital profound deafness, vestibular areflexia and prepubertal retinitis pigmentosa. The first purpose of this study was to determine the pathologic nature of eighteen USH1 putative splicing variants found in our series and their effect in the splicing process by minigene assays. These variants were selected according to bioinformatic analysis. The second aim was to analyze the USH1 transcripts, obtained from nasal epithelial cells samples of our patients, in order to corroborate the observed effect of mutations by minigenes in patient's tissues. The last objective was to evaluate the nasal ciliary beat frequency in patients with USH1 and compare it with control subjects. In silico analysis were performed using four bioinformatic programs: NNSplice, Human Splicing Finder, NetGene2 and Spliceview. Afterward, minigenes based on the pSPL3 vector were used to investigate the implication of selected changes in the mRNA processing. To observe the effect of mutations in the patient's tissues, RNA was extracted from nasal epithelial cells and RT-PCR analyses were performed. Four MYO7A (c.470G>A, c.1342_1343delAG, c.5856G>A and c.3652G>A, three CDH23 (c.2289+1G>A, c.6049G>A and c.8722+1delG and one PCDH15 (c.3717+2dupTT variants were observed to affect the splicing process by minigene assays and/or transcripts analysis obtained from nasal cells. Based on our results, minigenes are a good approach to determine the implication of identified variants in the mRNA processing, and the analysis of RNA obtained from nasal epithelial cells is an alternative method to discriminate neutral Usher variants from those with a pathogenic effect on the splicing process. In addition, we could observe that the nasal ciliated epithelium of USH1 patients shows a lower ciliary beat frequency than control subjects.

  13. A molecular inversion probe assay for detecting alternative splicing

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    Palm Curtis

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Absract Background A sensitive, high-throughput method for monitoring pre-mRNA splicing on a genomic scale is needed to understand the spectrum of alternatively spliced mRNA in human cells. Results We adapted Molecular Inversion Probes (MIPs, a padlock-probe based technology, for the multiplexed capture and quantitation of individual splice events in human tissues. Individual MIP capture probes can be quantified using either DNA microarrays or high-throughput sequencing, which permits independent assessment of each spliced junction. Using our methodology we successfully identified 100% of our positive controls and showed that there is a strong correlation between the data from our alternative splicing MIP (asMIP assay and quantitative PCR. Conclusion The asMIP assay provides a sensitive, accurate and multiplexed means for measuring pre-mRNA splicing. Fully optimized, we estimate that the assay could accommodate a throughput of greater than 20,000 splice junctions in a single reaction. This would represent a significant improvement over existing technologies.

  14. Extensive alternative splicing of the repressor element silencing transcription factor linked to cancer.

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    Guo-Lin Chen

    Full Text Available The repressor element silencing transcription factor (REST is a coordinate transcriptional and epigenetic regulator which functions as a tumor suppressor or an oncogene depending on cellular context, and a truncated splice variant REST4 has been linked to various types of cancer. We performed a comprehensive analysis of alternative splicing (AS of REST by rapid amplification of cDNA ends and PCR amplification of cDNAs from various tissues and cell lines with specific primers. We identified 8 novel alternative exons including an alternate last exon which doubles the REST gene boundary, along with numerous 5'/3' splice sites and ends in the constitutive exons. With the combination of various splicing patterns (e.g. exon skipping and alternative usage of the first and last exons that are predictive of altered REST activity, at least 45 alternatively spliced variants of coding and non-coding mRNA were expressed in a species- and cell-type/tissue-specific manner with individual differences. By examining the repertoire of REST pre-mRNA splicing in 27 patients with kidney, liver and lung cancer, we found that all patients without exception showed differential expression of various REST splice variants between paired tumor and adjacent normal tissues, with striking cell-type/tissue and individual differences. Moreover, we revealed that exon 3 skipping, which causes no frame shift but loss of a domain essential for nuclear translocation, was affected by pioglitazone, a highly selective activator of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ which contributes to cell differentiation and tumorigenesis besides its metabolic actions. Accordingly, this study demonstrates an extensive AS of REST pre-mRNA which redefines REST gene boundary and structure, along with a general but differential link between REST pre-mRNA splicing and various types of cancer. These findings advance our understanding of the complex, context-dependent regulation of

  15. Characterization of splice variants of the genes encoding human mitochondrial HMG-CoA lyase and HMG-CoA synthase, the main enzymes of the ketogenesis pathway.

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    Puisac, Beatriz; Ramos, Mónica; Arnedo, María; Menao, Sebastián; Gil-Rodríguez, María Concepción; Teresa-Rodrigo, María Esperanza; Pié, Angeles; de Karam, Juan Carlos; Wesselink, Jan-Jaap; Giménez, Ignacio; Ramos, Feliciano J; Casals, Nuria; Gómez-Puertas, Paulino; Hegardt, Fausto G; Pié, Juan

    2012-04-01

    The genes HMGCS2 and HMGCL encode the two main enzymes for ketone-body synthesis, mitochondrial HMG-CoA synthase and HMG-CoA lyase. Here, we identify and describe possible splice variants of these genes in human tissues. We detected an alternative transcript of HMGCS2 carrying a deletion of exon 4, and two alternative transcripts of HMGCL with deletions of exons 5 and 6, and exons 5, 6 and 7, respectively. All splice variants maintained the reading frame. However, Western blot studies and overexpression measurements in eukaryotic or prokaryotic cell models did not reveal HL or mHS protein variants. Both genes showed a similar distribution of the inactive variants in different tissues. Surprisingly, the highest percentages were found in tissues where almost no ketone bodies are synthesized: heart, skeletal muscle and brain. Our results suggest that alternative splicing might coordinately block the two main enzymes of ketogenesis in specific human tissues.

  16. Splice variants of Na(V1.7 sodium channels have distinct β subunit-dependent biophysical properties.

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    Clare Farmer

    Full Text Available Genes encoding the α subunits of neuronal sodium channels have evolutionarily conserved sites of alternative splicing but no functional differences have been attributed to the splice variants. Here, using Na(V1.7 as an exemplar, we show that the sodium channel isoforms are functionally distinct when co-expressed with β subunits. The gene, SCN9A, encodes the α subunit of the Na(V1.7 channel, and contains both sites of alternative splicing that are highly conserved. In conditions where the intrinsic properties of the Na(V1.7 splice variants were similar when expressed alone, co-expression of β1 subunits had different effects on channel availability that were determined by splicing at either site in the α subunit. While the identity of exon 5 determined the degree to which β1 subunits altered voltage-dependence of activation (P = 0.027, the length of exon 11 regulated how far β1 subunits depolarised voltage-dependence of inactivation (P = 0.00012. The results could have a significant impact on channel availability, for example with the long version of exon 11, the co-expression of β1 subunits could lead to nearly twice as large an increase in channel availability compared to channels containing the short version. Our data suggest that splicing can change the way that Na(V channels interact with β subunits. Because splicing is conserved, its unexpected role in regulating the functional impact of β subunits may apply to multiple voltage-gated sodium channels, and the full repertoire of β subunit function may depend on splicing in α subunits.

  17. Alternative Splicing of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor IgIII Loops in Cancer

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    Klaus Holzmann

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing of the IgIII loop of fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs 1–3 produces b- and c-variants of the receptors with distinctly different biological impact based on their distinct ligand-binding spectrum. Tissue-specific expression of these splice variants regulates interactions in embryonic development, tissue maintenance and repair, and cancer. Alterations in FGFR2 splicing are involved in epithelial mesenchymal transition that produces invasive, metastatic features during tumor progression. Recent research has elucidated regulatory factors that determine the splice choice both on the level of exogenous signaling events and on the RNA-protein interaction level. Moreover, methodology has been developed that will enable the in depth analysis of splicing events during tumorigenesis and provide further insight on the role of FGFR 1–3 IIIb and IIIc in the pathophysiology of various malignancies. This paper aims to summarize expression patterns in various tumor types and outlines possibilities for further analysis and application.

  18. Structure and function of splice variants of the cardiac voltage-gated sodium channel Na(v)1.5.

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    Schroeter, Annett; Walzik, Stefan; Blechschmidt, Steve; Haufe, Volker; Benndorf, Klaus; Zimmer, Thomas

    2010-07-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels mediate the rapid upstroke of the action potential in excitable tissues. The tetrodotoxin (TTX) resistant isoform Na(v)1.5, encoded by the SCN5A gene, is the predominant isoform in the heart. This channel plays a key role for excitability of atrial and ventricular cardiomyocytes and for rapid impulse propagation through the specific conduction system. During recent years, strong evidence has been accumulated in support of the expression of several Na(v)1.5 splice variants in the heart, and in various other tissues and cell lines including brain, dorsal root ganglia, breast cancer cells and neuronal stem cell lines. This review summarizes our knowledge on the structure and putative function of nine Na(v)1.5 splice variants detected so far. Attention will be paid to the distinct biophysical properties of the four functional splice variants, to the pronounced tissue- and species-specific expression, and to the developmental regulation of Na(v)1.5 splicing. The implications of alternative splicing for SCN5A channelopathies, and for a better understanding of genotype-phenotype correlations, are discussed.

  19. Genome-wide association between DNA methylation and alternative splicing in an invertebrate

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    Flores Kevin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene bodies are the most evolutionarily conserved targets of DNA methylation in eukaryotes. However, the regulatory functions of gene body DNA methylation remain largely unknown. DNA methylation in insects appears to be primarily confined to exons. Two recent studies in Apis mellifera (honeybee and Nasonia vitripennis (jewel wasp analyzed transcription and DNA methylation data for one gene in each species to demonstrate that exon-specific DNA methylation may be associated with alternative splicing events. In this study we investigated the relationship between DNA methylation, alternative splicing, and cross-species gene conservation on a genome-wide scale using genome-wide transcription and DNA methylation data. Results We generated RNA deep sequencing data (RNA-seq to measure genome-wide mRNA expression at the exon- and gene-level. We produced a de novo transcriptome from this RNA-seq data and computationally predicted splice variants for the honeybee genome. We found that exons that are included in transcription are higher methylated than exons that are skipped during transcription. We detected enrichment for alternative splicing among methylated genes compared to unmethylated genes using fisher’s exact test. We performed a statistical analysis to reveal that the presence of DNA methylation or alternative splicing are both factors associated with a longer gene length and a greater number of exons in genes. In concordance with this observation, a conservation analysis using BLAST revealed that each of these factors is also associated with higher cross-species gene conservation. Conclusions This study constitutes the first genome-wide analysis exhibiting a positive relationship between exon-level DNA methylation and mRNA expression in the honeybee. Our finding that methylated genes are enriched for alternative splicing suggests that, in invertebrates, exon-level DNA methylation may play a role in the construction of splice

  20. The bovine Mx1 gene: characterization of the gene structure, alternative splicing, and promoter region.

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    Kojima, Takatoshi; Oshima, Kazunaga; Watanabe, Hiroko; Komatsu, Masanori

    2003-12-01

    The Mx gene encodes an antiviral protein and is induced by type 1 interferons (IFNs). In this study, a new bovine Mx gene (designated Mx1B) was isolated from the endometrial cDNA library of the early pregnant cow. Although the Mx1B cDNA contained a single open reading frame (ORF) the same as the known Mx1, the 5' untranslated region (UTR) and 5' coding region of Mx1B were rather different from the corresponding regions of Mx1. Genomic structure analysis revealed that bovine Mx1B was an alternative splicing variant of Mx1 and had transcription regulatory sequences in the upstream region. RT-PCR and its sequencing identified another Mx1 splicing variant and demonstrated that these bovine Mx1 splicing variants were ubiquitously expressed in various tissues. Furthermore, it was found that all the bovine breeds investigated had identical splice sites of Mx1 and Mx1B. It is speculated that cattle have at least two functional Mx isoforms that might provide strong natural resistance to specific viruses.

  1. A procedure for identifying homologous alternative splicing events

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    Orozco Modesto

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The study of the functional role of alternative splice isoforms of a gene is a very active area of research in biology. The difficulty of the experimental approach (in particular, in its high-throughput version leaves ample room for the development of bioinformatics tools that can provide a useful first picture of the problem. Among the possible approaches, one of the simplest is to follow classical protein function annotation protocols and annotate target alternative splice events with the information available from conserved events in other species. However, the application of this protocol requires a procedure capable of recognising such events. Here we present a simple but accurate method developed for this purpose. Results We have developed a method for identifying homologous, or equivalent, alternative splicing events, based on the combined use of neural networks and sequence searches. The procedure comprises four steps: (i BLAST search for homologues of the two isoforms defining the target alternative splicing event; (ii construction of all possible candidate events; (iii scoring of the latter with a series of neural networks; and (iv filtering of the results. When tested in a set of 473 manually annotated pairs of homologous events, our method showed a good performance, with an accuracy of 0.99, a precision of 0.98 and a sensitivity of 0.93. When no candidates were available, the specificity of our method varied between 0.81 and 0.91. Conclusion The method described in this article allows the identification of homologous alternative splicing events, with a good success rate, indicating that such method could be used for the development of functional annotation of alternative splice isoforms.

  2. Alternative splicing and differential gene expression in colon cancer detected by a whole genome exon array

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    Sugnet Charles

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alternative splicing is a mechanism for increasing protein diversity by excluding or including exons during post-transcriptional processing. Alternatively spliced proteins are particularly relevant in oncology since they may contribute to the etiology of cancer, provide selective drug targets, or serve as a marker set for cancer diagnosis. While conventional identification of splice variants generally targets individual genes, we present here a new exon-centric array (GeneChip Human Exon 1.0 ST that allows genome-wide identification of differential splice variation, and concurrently provides a flexible and inclusive analysis of gene expression. Results We analyzed 20 paired tumor-normal colon cancer samples using a microarray designed to detect over one million putative exons that can be virtually assembled into potential gene-level transcripts according to various levels of prior supporting evidence. Analysis of high confidence (empirically supported transcripts identified 160 differentially expressed genes, with 42 genes occupying a network impacting cell proliferation and another twenty nine genes with unknown functions. A more speculative analysis, including transcripts based solely on computational prediction, produced another 160 differentially expressed genes, three-fourths of which have no previous annotation. We also present a comparison of gene signal estimations from the Exon 1.0 ST and the U133 Plus 2.0 arrays. Novel splicing events were predicted by experimental algorithms that compare the relative contribution of each exon to the cognate transcript intensity in each tissue. The resulting candidate splice variants were validated with RT-PCR. We found nine genes that were differentially spliced between colon tumors and normal colon tissues, several of which have not been previously implicated in cancer. Top scoring candidates from our analysis were also found to substantially overlap with EST-based bioinformatic

  3. Sec16 alternative splicing dynamically controls COPII transport efficiency.

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    Wilhelmi, Ilka; Kanski, Regina; Neumann, Alexander; Herdt, Olga; Hoff, Florian; Jacob, Ralf; Preußner, Marco; Heyd, Florian

    2016-08-05

    The transport of secretory proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi depends on COPII-coated vesicles. While the basic principles of the COPII machinery have been identified, it remains largely unknown how COPII transport is regulated to accommodate tissue- or activation-specific differences in cargo load and identity. Here we show that activation-induced alternative splicing of Sec16 controls adaptation of COPII transport to increased secretory cargo upon T-cell activation. Using splice-site blocking morpholinos and CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome engineering, we show that the number of ER exit sites, COPII dynamics and transport efficiency depend on Sec16 alternative splicing. As the mechanistic basis, we suggest the C-terminal Sec16 domain to be a splicing-controlled protein interaction platform, with individual isoforms showing differential abilities to recruit COPII components. Our work connects the COPII pathway with alternative splicing, adding a new regulatory layer to protein secretion and its adaptation to changing cellular environments.

  4. A subtle alternative splicing event gives rise to a widely expressed human RNase k isoform.

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    Evangelos D Karousis

    Full Text Available Subtle alternative splicing leads to the formation of RNA variants lacking or including a small number of nucleotides. To date, the impact of subtle alternative splicing phenomena on protein biosynthesis has been studied in frame-preserving incidents. On the contrary, mRNA isoforms derived from frame-shifting events were poorly studied and generally characterized as non-coding. This work provides evidence for a frame-shifting subtle alternative splicing event which results in the production of a novel protein isoform. We applied a combined molecular approach for the cloning and expression analysis of a human RNase κ transcript (RNase κ-02 which lacks four consecutive bases compared to the previously isolated RNase κ isoform. RNase κ-02 mRNA is expressed in all human cell lines tested end encodes the synthesis of a 134-amino-acid protein by utilizing an alternative initiation codon. The expression of RNase κ-02 in the cytoplasm of human cells was verified by Western blot and immunofluorescence analysis using a specific polyclonal antibody developed on the basis of the amino-acid sequence difference between the two protein isoforms. The results presented here show that subtle changes during mRNA splicing can lead to the expression of significantly altered protein isoforms.

  5. Effect of exonic splicing regulation on synonymous codon usage in alternatively spliced exons of Dscam

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    Takahashi Aya

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Synonymous codon usage is typically biased towards translationally superior codons in many organisms. In Drosophila, genomic data indicates that translationally optimal codons and splice optimal codons are mostly mutually exclusive, and adaptation to translational efficiency is reduced in the intron-exon boundary regions where potential exonic splicing enhancers (ESEs reside. In contrast to genomic scale analyses on large datasets, a refined study on a well-controlled set of samples can be effective in demonstrating the effects of particular splice-related factors. Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule (Dscam has the largest number of alternatively spliced exons (ASEs known to date, and the splicing frequency of each ASE is accessible from the relative abundance of the transcript. Thus, these ASEs comprise a unique model system for studying the effect of splicing regulation on synonymous codon usage. Results Codon Bias Indices (CBI in the 3' boundary regions were reduced compared to the rest of the exonic regions among 48 and 33 ASEs of exon 6 and 9 clusters, respectively. These regional differences in CBI were affected by splicing frequency and distance from adjacent exons. Synonymous divergence levels between the 3' boundary region and the remaining exonic region of exon 6 ASEs were similar. Additionally, another sensitive comparison of paralogous exonic regions in recently retrotransposed processed genes and their parental genes revealed that, in the former, the differences in CBI between what were formerly the central regions and the boundary regions gradually became smaller over time. Conclusion Analyses of the multiple ASEs of Dscam allowed direct tests of the effect of splice-related factors on synonymous codon usage and provided clear evidence that synonymous codon usage bias is restricted by exonic splicing signals near the intron-exon boundary. A similar synonymous divergence level between the different exonic

  6. Ecotype dependent expression and alternative splicing of epithiospecifier protein (ESP) in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissen, R; Hyldbakk, E; Wang, C-W V; Sørmo, C G; Rossiter, J T; Bones, A M

    2012-03-01

    Epithiospecifier protein (ESP) is responsible for diverting glucosinolate hydrolysis from the generation of isothiocyanates to that of epithionitriles or nitriles, and thereby negatively affects the ability of the plant to defend itself against certain insects. Despite this important role of ESP, little is known about its expression in plant tissues and the regulation thereof. We therefore investigated ESP expression by qPCR and Western blot in different organs during the growth cycle of the two Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes Col-0 and Mt-0. Besides the fact that ESP transcript and protein levels were revealed to be much higher in Mt-0 than in Col-0 in all cases, our qPCR results also indicated that ESP expression is regulated differently in the two A. thaliana ecotypes. No ESP protein was detected by Western blot in any organ or developmental stage for Col-0. During the assays an alternative splice variant of ESP was identified in Col-0, but not Mt-0, leading to a mis-spliced transcript which could explain the low expression levels of ESP in the former ecotype. Analysis of genomic sequences containing the ESP splice sites, of ESP protein level and ESP activity from seven A. thaliana ecotypes showed a positive correlation between the presence of a non-canonical 5' splice site for ESP and the absence of detectable ESP protein levels and ESP activity. When analysing the expression of both transcript variants in Col-0 after treatment with methyl jasmonate, a condition known to "induce ESP", it was indeed the alternative splice variant that was preferentially induced.

  7. The conserved splicing factor SUA controls alternative splicing of the developmental regulator ABI3 in Arabidopsis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sugliani, M.; Brambilla, V.; Clerkx, E.J.M.; Koornneef, M.; Soppe, W.J.J.

    2010-01-01

    ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE3 (ABI3) is a major regulator of seed maturation in Arabidopsis thaliana. We detected two ABI3 transcripts, ABI3- and ABI3-ß, which encode full-length and truncated proteins, respectively. Alternative splicing of ABI3 is developmentally regulated, and the ABI3-ß transcript a

  8. Distinct roles of PTCH2 splice variants in Hedgehog signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahnama, Fahimeh; Toftgård, Rune; Zaphiropoulos, Peter G

    2004-03-01

    The human PTCH2 gene is highly similar to PTCH1, a tumour suppressor gene frequently mutated in basal cell carcinoma and several other tumour types. PTCH1 is a transmembrane protein believed to inhibit another transmembrane protein SMO (Smoothened), which mediates HH (Hedgehog) signalling. In this study, we analysed the biological properties of several PTCH2 splice variants. An mRNA form that lacked the last exon was abundantly expressed in all tissues examined, in contrast with the one that included it. Moreover, a transcript lacking exon 9, which is a part of a conserved sterol-sensing domain, was identified in intestine, prostate and cerebellum. In ovary, spleen, testis, cerebellum and skin, an mRNA lacking both exons 9 and 10 could also be observed. The different PTCH2 isoforms localized in the cytoplasm were capable of internalizing the N-terminal fragment of Sonic HH (Shh-N). Additionally, the PTCH2 gene was found to be a target of HH signalling. PTCH2 promoter regulation assays demonstrated that only one of the PTCH2 variants could inhibit the activity of SHH-N, whereas none was capable of inhibiting the activated form of SMO (SMO-M2) and this contrasts with PTCH1. Despite the fact that the PTCH2 isoforms lacked the ability to inhibit SMO-M2 activity, all PTCH2 variants as well as PTCH1, on co-transfection with Smo, were able to change Smo localization from being largely dispersed in the cytoplasm to the juxtanuclear region. Furthermore, the PTCH2 isoforms and PTCH1 co-localized in doubly transfected cells and an interaction between them was confirmed using immunoprecipitation assays. Using Ptch1-/- mouse cells, it was shown that the PTCH2 variants and PTCH1 differentially act to reconstitute not only the SHH but also the Desert HH-dependent transcriptional response. We conclude that in spite of their structural similarities, the PTCH2 isoforms have distinct functional properties when compared with PTCH1.

  9. Clinical Significance of HER-2 Splice Variants in Breast Cancer Progression and Drug Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Jackson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Overexpression of human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER-2 occurs in 20–30% of breast cancers and confers survival and proliferative advantages on the tumour cells making HER-2 an ideal therapeutic target for drugs like Herceptin. Continued delineation of tumour biology has identified splice variants of HER-2, with contrasting roles in tumour cell biology. For example, the splice variant 16HER-2 (results from exon 16 skipping increases transformation of cancer cells and is associated with treatment resistance; conversely, Herstatin (results from intron 8 retention and p100 (results from intron 15 retention inhibit tumour cell proliferation. This review focuses on the potential clinical implications of the expression and coexistence of HER-2 splice variants in cancer cells in relation to breast cancer progression and drug resistance. “Individualised” strategies currently guide breast cancer management; in accordance, HER-2 splice variants may prove valuable as future prognostic and predictive factors, as well as potential therapeutic targets.

  10. Comparative in vitro and in silico analyses of variants in splicing regions of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes and characterization of novel pathogenic mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Colombo

    Full Text Available Several unclassified variants (UVs have been identified in splicing regions of disease-associated genes and their characterization as pathogenic mutations or benign polymorphisms is crucial for the understanding of their role in disease development. In this study, 24 UVs located at BRCA1 and BRCA2 splice sites were characterized by transcripts analysis. These results were used to evaluate the ability of nine bioinformatics programs in predicting genetic variants causing aberrant splicing (spliceogenic variants and the nature of aberrant transcripts. Eleven variants in BRCA1 and 8 in BRCA2, including 8 not previously characterized at transcript level, were ascertained to affect mRNA splicing. Of these, 16 led to the synthesis of aberrant transcripts containing premature termination codons (PTCs, 2 to the up-regulation of naturally occurring alternative transcripts containing PTCs, and one to an in-frame deletion within the region coding for the DNA binding domain of BRCA2, causing the loss of the ability to bind the partner protein DSS1 and ssDNA. For each computational program, we evaluated the rate of non-informative analyses, i.e. those that did not recognize the natural splice sites in the wild-type sequence, and the rate of false positive predictions, i.e., variants incorrectly classified as spliceogenic, as a measure of their specificity, under conditions setting sensitivity of predictions to 100%. The programs that performed better were Human Splicing Finder and Automated Splice Site Analyses, both exhibiting 100% informativeness and specificity. For 10 mutations the activation of cryptic splice sites was observed, but we were unable to derive simple criteria to select, among the different cryptic sites predicted by the bioinformatics analyses, those actually used. Consistent with previous reports, our study provides evidences that in silico tools can be used for selecting splice site variants for in vitro analyses. However, the latter

  11. Intrasplicing coordinates alternative first exons with alternative splicing in the protein 4.1R gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conboy, John G.; Parra, Marilyn K.; Tan, Jeff S.; Mohandas, Narla; Conboy, John G.

    2008-11-07

    In the protein 4.1R gene, alternative first exons splice differentially to alternative 3' splice sites far downstream in exon 2'/2 (E2'/2). We describe a novel intrasplicing mechanism by which exon 1A (E1A) splices exclusively to the distal E2'/2 acceptor via two nested splicing reactions regulated by novel properties of exon 1B (E1B). E1B behaves as an exon in the first step, using its consensus 5' donor to splice to the proximal E2'/2 acceptor. A long region of downstream intron is excised, juxtaposing E1B with E2'/2 to generate a new composite acceptor containing the E1B branchpoint/pyrimidine tract and E2 distal 3' AG-dinucleotide. Next, the upstream E1A splices over E1B to this distal acceptor, excising the remaining intron plus E1B and E2' to form mature E1A/E2 product. We mapped branch points for both intrasplicing reactions and demonstrated that mutation of the E1B 5' splice site or branchpoint abrogates intrasplicing. In the 4.1R gene, intrasplicing ultimately determines N-terminal protein structure and function. More generally, intrasplicing represents a new mechanism whereby alternative promoters can be coordinated with downstream alternative splicing.

  12. Expression of thyroid stimulating hormone β splice variant in thyroid of mouse with autoimmune thyroiditis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁继红

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the expression of marrowderived thyroid stimulating hormoneβ(TSHβ)splice variant in thyroid of mouse with autoimmune thyroiditis induced by thyroglobulin(Tg)immunization,and to analyze whether TSHβsplice variant participated in the pathological process of autoimmune thyroiditis.Methods Using random number table,forty-eight mice(24 females and 24 males)of 7 to 8 weeks old with body mass 20 to25 g were randomly divided into 4 groups(12 females

  13. Delivering Antisense Morpholino Oligonucleotides to Target Telomerase Splice Variants in Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radan, Lida; Hughes, Chris S; Teichroeb, Jonathan H; Postovit, Lynne-Marie; Betts, Dean H

    2016-01-01

    Morpholino oligonucleotides (MO) are an innovative tool that provides a means for examining and modifying gene expression outcomes by antisense interaction with targeted RNA transcripts. The site-specific nature of their binding facilitates focused modulation to alter splice variant expression patterns. Here we describe the steric-blocking of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) Δα and Δβ splice variants using MO to examine cellular outcomes related to pluripotency and differentiation in human embryonic stem cells.

  14. Alternative splicing of EKLF/KLF1 in murine primary erythroid tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yien, Yvette Y; Gnanapragasam, Merlin Nithya; Gupta, Ritama; Rivella, Stefano; Bieker, James J

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing has emerged as a vital way to expand the functional repertoire of a set number of mammalian genes. For example, such changes can dramatically alter the function and cellular localization of transcription factors. With this in mind, we addressed whether EKLF/KLF1 mRNA, coding for a transcription factor that plays a critical role in erythropoietic gene regulation, is alternatively spliced. We find that EKLF mRNA undergoes exon skipping only in primary tissues and that this splice variant (SV) remains at a very low level in both embryonic and adult erythroid cells, as well as during terminal differentiation. The resultant protein is truncated and partially encodes a non-erythroid Krüppel-like factor amino acid sequence. Its overexpression can alter full-length erythroid Krüppel-like factor function at selected promoters. We discuss these results in the context of stress and with respect to recent global studies on the role of alternative splicing during terminal erythroid differentiation.

  15. Global Genetic Robustness of the Alternative Splicing Machinery in Caenorhabditis elegans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Yang; Breitling, Rainer; Snoek, L. Basten; van der Velde, K. Joeri; Swertz, Morris A.; Riksen, Joost; Jansen, Ritsert C.; Kammenga, Jan E.; Borevitz, J.

    2010-01-01

    Alternative splicing is considered a major mechanism for creating multicellular diversity from a limited repertoire of genes. Here, we performed the first study of genetic variation controlling alternative splicing patterns by comprehensively identifying quantitative trait loci affecting the differe

  16. Cloning, expression and alternative splicing of the novel isoform of hTCP11 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Yong-xin; Zhang, Si-zhong; Wu, Qia-qing;

    2003-01-01

    To identify a novel isoform of hTCP11 gene and investigate its expression and alternative splicing.......To identify a novel isoform of hTCP11 gene and investigate its expression and alternative splicing....

  17. Genetic variations regulate alternative splicing in the 5' untranslated regions of the mouse glioma-associated oncogene 1, Gli1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaphiropoulos Peter G

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alternative splicing is one of the key mechanisms that generate biological diversity. Even though alternative splicing also occurs in the 5' and 3' untranslated regions (UTRs of mRNAs, the understanding of the significance and the regulation of these variations is rather limited. Results We investigated 5' UTR mRNA variants of the mouse Gli1 oncogene, which is the terminal transcriptional effector of the Hedgehog (HH signaling pathway. In addition to identifying novel transcription start sites, we demonstrated that the expression ratio of the Gli1 splice variants in the 5' UTR is regulated by the genotype of the mouse strain analyzed. The GT allele, which contains the consensus intronic dinucleotides at the 5' splice site of intron 1B, favors exon 1B inclusion, while the GC allele, having a weaker 5' splice site sequence, promotes exon 1B skipping. Moreover, the alternative Gli1 5' UTRs had an impact on translational capacity, with the shorter and the exon 1B-skipped mRNA variants being most effective. Conclusions Our findings implicate novel, genome-based mechanisms as regulators of the terminal events in the mouse HH signaling cascade.

  18. Alternative messenger RNA splicing of autophagic gene Beclin 1 in human B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Yu-Na; Liu, Qing-Qing; Zhang, Su-Ping; Yuan, Na; Cao, Yan; Cai, Jin-Yang; Lin, Wei-Wei; Xu, Fei; Wang, Zhi-Jian; Chen, Bo; Wang, Jian-Rong

    2014-01-01

    Beclin 1 is a key factor for initiation and regulation of autophagy, which is a cellular catabolic process involved in tumorigenesis. To investigate the role of alternative splicing of Beclin1 in the regulation of autophagy in leukemia cells, Beclin1 mRNA from 6 different types of cell lines and peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 2 healthy volunteers was reversely transcribed, subcloned, and screened for alternative splicing. New transcript variants were analyzed by DNA sequencing. A transcript variant of Beclin 1 gene carrying a deletion of exon 11, which encoded a C-terminal truncation of Beclin 1 isoform, was found. The alternative isoform was assessed by bioinformatics, immunoblotting and subcellular localization. The results showed that this variable transcript is generated by alternative 3' splicing, and its translational product displayed a reduced activity in induction of autophagy by starvation, indicating that the spliced isoform might function as a dominant negative modulator of autophagy. Our findings suggest that the alternative splicing of Beclin 1 might play important roles in leukemogenesis regulated by autophagy.

  19. Increased dosage of Dyrk1A alters alternative splicing factor (ASF)-regulated alternative splicing of tau in Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jianhua; Zhang, Tianyi; Zhou, Chunlei; Chohan, Muhammad Omar; Gu, Xiaosong; Wegiel, Jerzy; Zhou, Jianhua; Hwang, Yu-Wen; Iqbal, Khalid; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Gong, Cheng-Xin; Liu, Fei

    2008-10-17

    Two groups of tau, 3R- and 4R-tau, are generated by alternative splicing of tau exon 10. Normal adult human brain expresses equal levels of them. Disruption of the physiological balance is a common feature of several tauopathies. Very early in their life, individuals with Down syndrome (DS) develop Alzheimer-type tau pathology, the molecular basis for which is not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that Dyrk1A, a kinase encoded by a gene in the DS critical region, phosphorylates alternative splicing factor (ASF) at Ser-227, Ser-234, and Ser-238, driving it into nuclear speckles and preventing it from facilitating tau exon 10 inclusion. The increased dosage of Dyrk1A in DS brain due to trisomy of chromosome 21 correlates to an increase in 3R-tau level, which on abnormal hyperphosphorylation and aggregation of tau results in neurofibrillary degeneration. Imbalance of 3R- and 4R-tau in DS brain by Dyrk1A-induced dysregulation of alternative splicing factor-mediated alternative splicing of tau exon 10 represents a novel mechanism of neurofibrillary degeneration and may help explain early onset tauopathy in individuals with DS.

  20. The Cancer Exome Generated by Alternative mRNA Splicing Dilutes Predicted HLA Class I Epitope Density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stranzl, Thomas; Larsen, Mette Voldby; Lund, Ole;

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have shown that cancers actively regulate alternative splicing. Altered splicing mechanisms in cancer lead to cancer-specific transcripts different from the pool of transcripts occurring only in healthy tissue. At the same time, altered presentation of HLA class I epitopes...... is frequently observed in various types of cancer. Down-regulation of genes related to HLA class I antigen processing has been observed in several cancer types, leading to fewer HLA class I antigens on the cell surface. Here, we use a peptidome wide analysis of predicted alternative splice forms, based...... on a publicly available database, to show that peptides over-represented in cancer splice variants comprise significantly fewer predicted HLA class I epitopes compared to peptides from normal transcripts. Peptides over-represented in cancer transcripts are in the case of the three most common HLA class I...

  1. HTLV-I antisense transcripts initiating in the 3'LTR are alternatively spliced and polyadenylated

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marriott Susan J

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antisense transcription in retroviruses has been suggested for both HIV-1 and HTLV-I, although the existence and coding potential of these transcripts remain controversial. Thorough characterization is required to demonstrate the existence of these transcripts and gain insight into their role in retrovirus biology. Results This report provides the first complete characterization of an antisense retroviral transcript that encodes the previously described HTLV-I HBZ protein. In this study, we show that HBZ-encoding transcripts initiate in the 3' long terminal repeat (LTR at several positions and consist of two alternatively spliced variants (SP1 and SP2. Expression of the most abundant HBZ spliced variant (SP1 could be detected in different HTLV-I-infected cell lines and importantly in cellular clones isolated from HTLV-I-infected patients. Polyadenylation of HBZ RNA occurred at a distance of 1450 nucleotides downstream of the HBZ stop codon in close proximity of a typical polyA signal. We have also determined that translation mostly initiates from the first exon located in the 3' LTR and that the HBZ isoform produced from the SP1 spliced variant demonstrated inhibition of Tax and c-Jun-dependent transcriptional activation. Conclusion These results conclusively demonstrate the existence of antisense transcription in retroviruses, which likely plays a role in HTLV-I-associated pathogenesis through HBZ protein synthesis.

  2. SplicePie: a novel analytical approach for the detection of alternative, non-sequential and recursive splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulyakhina, Irina; Gazzoli, Isabella; 't Hoen, Peter A C; Verwey, Nisha; den Dunnen, Johan T; den Dunnen, Johan; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Laros, Jeroen F J

    2015-07-13

    Alternative splicing is a powerful mechanism present in eukaryotic cells to obtain a wide range of transcripts and protein isoforms from a relatively small number of genes. The mechanisms regulating (alternative) splicing and the paradigm of consecutive splicing have recently been challenged, especially for genes with a large number of introns. RNA-Seq, a powerful technology using deep sequencing in order to determine transcript structure and expression levels, is usually performed on mature mRNA, therefore not allowing detailed analysis of splicing progression. Sequencing pre-mRNA at different stages of splicing potentially provides insight into mRNA maturation. Although the number of tools that analyze total and cytoplasmic RNA in order to elucidate the transcriptome composition is rapidly growing, there are no tools specifically designed for the analysis of nuclear RNA (which contains mixtures of pre- and mature mRNA). We developed dedicated algorithms to investigate the splicing process. In this paper, we present a new classification of RNA-Seq reads based on three major stages of splicing: pre-, intermediate- and post-splicing. Applying this novel classification we demonstrate the possibility to analyze the order of splicing. Furthermore, we uncover the potential to investigate the multi-step nature of splicing, assessing various types of recursive splicing events. We provide the data that gives biological insight into the order of splicing, show that non-sequential splicing of certain introns is reproducible and coinciding in multiple cell lines. We validated our observations with independent experimental technologies and showed the reliability of our method. The pipeline, named SplicePie, is freely available at: https://github.com/pulyakhina/splicing_analysis_pipeline. The example data can be found at: https://barmsijs.lumc.nl/HG/irina/example_data.tar.gz.

  3. Divergent Expression and Metabolic Functions of Human Glucuronosyltransferases through Alternative Splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouleau, Michèle; Tourancheau, Alan; Girard-Bock, Camille; Villeneuve, Lyne; Vaucher, Jonathan; Duperré, Anne-Marie; Audet-Delage, Yannick; Gilbert, Isabelle; Popa, Ion; Droit, Arnaud; Guillemette, Chantal

    2016-09-27

    Maintenance of cellular homeostasis and xenobiotic detoxification is mediated by 19 human UDP-glucuronosyltransferase enzymes (UGTs) encoded by ten genes that comprise the glucuronidation pathway. Deep RNA sequencing of major metabolic organs exposes a substantial expansion of the UGT transcriptome by alternative splicing, with variants representing 20% to 60% of canonical transcript expression. Nearly a fifth of expressed variants comprise in-frame sequences that may create distinct structural and functional features. Follow-up cell-based assays reveal biological functions for these alternative UGT proteins. Some isoforms were found to inhibit or induce inactivation of drugs and steroids in addition to perturbing global cell metabolism (energy, amino acids, nucleotides), cell adhesion, and proliferation. This work highlights the biological relevance of alternative UGT expression, which we propose increases protein diversity through the evolution of metabolic regulators from specific enzymes.

  4. Alternative splicing regulates kv3.1 polarized targeting to adjust maximal spiking frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yuanzheng; Barry, Joshua; McDougel, Robert; Terman, David; Gu, Chen

    2012-01-13

    Synaptic inputs received at dendrites are converted into digital outputs encoded by action potentials generated at the axon initial segment in most neurons. Here, we report that alternative splicing regulates polarized targeting of Kv3.1 voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels to adjust the input-output relationship. The spiking frequency of cultured hippocampal neurons correlated with the level of endogenous Kv3 channels. Expression of axonal Kv3.1b, the longer form of Kv3.1 splice variants, effectively converted slow-spiking young neurons to fast-spiking ones; this was not the case for Kv1.2 or Kv4.2 channel constructs. Despite having identical biophysical properties as Kv3.1b, dendritic Kv3.1a was significantly less effective at increasing the maximal firing frequency. This suggests a possible role of channel targeting in regulating spiking frequency. Mutagenesis studies suggest the electrostatic repulsion between the Kv3.1b N/C termini, created by its C-terminal splice domain, unmasks the Kv3.1b axonal targeting motif. Kv3.1b axonal targeting increased the maximal spiking frequency in response to prolonged depolarization. This finding was further supported by the results of local application of channel blockers and computer simulations. Taken together, our studies have demonstrated that alternative splicing controls neuronal firing rates by regulating the polarized targeting of Kv3.1 channels.

  5. A novel CDX2 isoform regulates alternative splicing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew E Witek

    Full Text Available Gene expression is a dynamic and coordinated process coupling transcription with pre-mRNA processing. This regulation enables tissue-specific transcription factors to induce expression of specific transcripts that are subsequently amplified by alternative splicing allowing for increased proteome complexity and functional diversity. The intestine-specific transcription factor CDX2 regulates development and maintenance of the intestinal epithelium by inducing expression of genes characteristic of the mature enterocyte phenotype. Here, sequence analysis of CDX2 mRNA from colonic mucosa-derived tissues revealed an alternatively spliced transcript (CDX2/AS that encodes a protein with a truncated homeodomain and a novel carboxy-terminal domain enriched in serine and arginine residues (RS domain. CDX2 and CDX2/AS exhibited distinct nuclear expression patterns with minimal areas of co-localization. CDX2/AS did not activate the CDX2-dependent promoter of guanylyl cyclase C nor inhibit transcriptional activity of CDX2. Unlike CDX2, CDX2/AS co-localized with the putative splicing factors ASF/SF2 and SC35. CDX2/AS altered splicing patterns of CD44v5 and Tra2-β1 minigenes in Lovo colon cancer cells independent of CDX2 expression. These data demonstrate unique dual functions of the CDX2 gene enabling it to regulate gene expression through both transcription (CDX2 and pre-mRNA processing (CDX2/AS.

  6. The role of HMGCR alternative splicing in statin efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    Medina, Marisa Wong; Krauss, Ronald M.

    2009-01-01

    Statins, or 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR) inhibitors, are widely prescribed to lower plasma cholesterol levels and reduce cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Despite the well documented efficacy of statins, there is large inter-individual variation in response. Using a panel of immortalized lymphocyte cell lines incubated with simvastatin, we recently found that the magnitude of expression of an alternatively spliced HMGCR transcript lacking exon 13 was inversely corr...

  7. Neuronal fast activating and meningeal silent modulatory BK channel splice variants cloned from rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Asser Nyander; Jansen-Olesen, Inger; Olesen, Jes

    2011-01-01

    The big conductance calcium-activated K(+) channel (BK) is involved in regulating neuron and smooth muscle cell excitability. Functional diversity of BK is generated by alpha-subunit splice variation and co-expression with beta subunits. Here, we present six different splice combinations cloned...... from rat brain or cerebral vascular/meningeal tissues, of which at least three variants were previously uncharacterized (X1, X2(92), and X2(188)). An additional variant was identified by polymerase chain reaction but not cloned. Expression in Xenopus oocytes showed that the brain-specific X1 variant...... displays reduced current, faster activation, and less voltage sensitivity than the insert-less Zero variant. Other cloned variants Strex and Slo27,3 showed slower activation than Zero. The X1 variant contains sequence inserts in the S1-S2 extracellular loop (8 aa), between intracellular domains RCK1...

  8. Alternative Splicing of G9a Regulates Neuronal Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Fiszbein

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin modifications are critical for the establishment and maintenance of differentiation programs. G9a, the enzyme responsible for histone H3 lysine 9 dimethylation in mammalian euchromatin, exists as two isoforms with differential inclusion of exon 10 (E10 through alternative splicing. We find that the G9a methyltransferase is required for differentiation of the mouse neuronal cell line N2a and that E10 inclusion increases during neuronal differentiation of cultured cells, as well as in the developing mouse brain. Although E10 inclusion greatly stimulates overall H3K9me2 levels, it does not affect G9a catalytic activity. Instead, E10 increases G9a nuclear localization. We show that the G9a E10+ isoform is necessary for neuron differentiation and regulates the alternative splicing pattern of its own pre-mRNA, enhancing E10 inclusion. Overall, our findings indicate that by regulating its own alternative splicing, G9a promotes neuron differentiation and creates a positive feedback loop that reinforces cellular commitment to differentiation.

  9. Involvement of Alternative Splicing in Barley Seed Germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qisen; Zhang, Xiaoqi; Wang, Songbo; Tan, Cong; Zhou, Gaofeng; Li, Chengdao

    2016-01-01

    Seed germination activates many new biological processes including DNA, membrane and mitochondrial repairs and requires active protein synthesis and sufficient energy supply. Alternative splicing (AS) regulates many cellular processes including cell differentiation and environmental adaptations. However, limited information is available on the regulation of seed germination at post-transcriptional levels. We have conducted RNA-sequencing experiments to dissect AS events in barley seed germination. We identified between 552 and 669 common AS transcripts in germinating barley embryos from four barley varieties (Hordeum vulgare L. Bass, Baudin, Harrington and Stirling). Alternative 3' splicing (34%-45%), intron retention (32%-34%) and alternative 5' splicing (16%-21%) were three major AS events in germinating embryos. The AS transcripts were predominantly mapped onto ribosome, RNA transport machineries, spliceosome, plant hormone signal transduction, glycolysis, sugar and carbon metabolism pathways. Transcripts of these genes were also very abundant in the early stage of seed germination. Correlation analysis of gene expression showed that AS hormone responsive transcripts could also be co-expressed with genes responsible for protein biosynthesis and sugar metabolisms. Our RNA-sequencing data revealed that AS could play important roles in barley seed germination.

  10. The Evolutionary Relationship between Alternative Splicing and Gene Duplication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iñiguez, Luis P.; Hernández, Georgina

    2017-01-01

    The protein diversity that exists today has resulted from various evolutionary processes. It is well known that gene duplication (GD) along with the accumulation of mutations are responsible, among other factors, for an increase in the number of different proteins. The gene structure in eukaryotes requires the removal of non-coding sequences, introns, to produce mature mRNAs. This process, known as cis-splicing, referred to here as splicing, is regulated by several factors which can lead to numerous splicing arrangements, commonly designated as alternative splicing (AS). AS, producing several transcripts isoforms form a single gene, also increases the protein diversity. However, the evolution and manner for increasing protein variation differs between AS and GD. An important question is how are patterns of AS affected after a GD event. Here, we review the current knowledge of AS and GD, focusing on their evolutionary relationship. These two processes are now considered the main contributors to the increasing protein diversity and therefore their relationship is a relevant, yet understudied, area of evolutionary study. PMID:28261262

  11. Desmin splice variants causing cardiac and skeletal myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, K Y; Dalakas, M C; Goebel, H H; Ferrans, V J; Semino-Mora, C; Litvak, S; Takeda, K; Goldfarb, L G

    2000-11-01

    Desmin myopathy is a hereditary or sporadic cardiac and skeletal myopathy characterised by intracytoplasmic accumulation of desmin reactive deposits in muscle cells. We have characterised novel splice site mutations in the gene desmin resulting in deletion of the entire exon 3 during the pre-mRNA splicing. Sequencing of cDNA and genomic DNA identified a heterozygous de novo A to G change at the +3 position of the splice donor site of intron 3 (IVS3+3A-->G) in a patient with sporadic skeletal and cardiac myopathy. A G to A transition at the highly conserved -1 nucleotide position of intron 2 affecting the splice acceptor site (IVS2-1G-->A) was found in an unrelated patient with a similar phenotype. Expression of genomic DNA fragments carrying the IVS3+3A-->G and IVS2-1G-->A mutations confirmed that these mutations cause exon 3 deletion. Aberrant splicing leads to an in frame deletion of 32 complete codons and is predicted to result in mutant desmin lacking 32 amino acids from the 1B segment of the alpha helical rod. Functional analysis of the mutant desmin in SW13 (vim-) cells showed aggregation of abnormal coarse clumps of desmin positive material dispersed throughout the cytoplasm. This is the first report on the pathogenic potentials of splice site mutations in the desmin gene.

  12. A DNMT3B alternatively spliced exon and encoded peptide are novel biomarkers of human pluripotent stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sailesh Gopalakrishna-Pillai

    Full Text Available A major obstacle in human stem cell research is the limited number of reagents capable of distinguishing pluripotent stem cells from partially differentiated or incompletely reprogrammed derivatives. Although human embryonic stem cells (hESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs express numerous alternatively spliced transcripts, little attention has been directed at developing splice variant-encoded protein isoforms as reagents for stem cell research. In this study, several genes encoding proteins involved in important signaling pathways were screened to detect alternatively spliced transcripts that exhibited differential expression in pluripotent stem cells (PSCs relative to spontaneously differentiated cells (SDCs. Transcripts containing the alternatively spliced exon 10 of the de novo DNA methyltransferase gene, DNMT3B, were identified that are expressed in PSCs. To demonstrate the utility and superiority of splice variant specific reagents for stem cell research, a peptide encoded by DNMT3B exon 10 was used to generate an antibody, SG1. The SG1 antibody detects a single DNMT3B protein isoform that is expressed only in PSCs but not in SDCs. The SG1 antibody is also demonstrably superior to other antibodies at distinguishing PSCs from SDCs in mixed cultures containing both pluripotent stem cells and partially differentiated derivatives. The tightly controlled down regulation of DNMT3B exon 10 containing transcripts (and exon 10 encoded peptide upon spontaneous differentiation of PSCs suggests that this DNMT3B splice isoform is characteristic of the pluripotent state. Alternatively spliced exons, and the proteins they encode, represent a vast untapped reservoir of novel biomarkers that can be used to develop superior reagents for stem cell research and to gain further insight into mechanisms controlling stem cell pluripotency.

  13. Survivin 2α: a novel Survivin splice variant expressed in human malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honsey Laura E

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Survivin and its alternative splice forms are involved in critical cellular processes, including cell division and programmed cell death. Survivin is expressed in the majority of human cancers, but minimally in differentiated normal tissues. Expression levels correlate with tumor aggressiveness and resistance to therapy. Results In the present study, we identify and characterize a novel survivin isoform that we designate survivin 2α. Structurally, the transcript consists of 2 exons: exon 1 and exon 2, as well as a 3' 197 bp region of intron 2. Acquisition of a new in-frame stop codon within intron 2 results in an open reading frame of 225 nucleotides, predicting a truncated 74 amino acid protein. Survivin 2α is expressed at high levels in several malignant cell lines and primary tumors. Functional assays show that survivin 2α attenuates the anti-apoptotic activity of survivin. Subcellular localization and immunoprecipitation of survivin 2α suggests a physical interaction with survivin. Conclusion We characterized a novel survivin splice variant that we designated survivin 2α. We hypothesize that survivin 2α can alter the anti-apoptotic functions of survivin in malignant cells. Thus survivin 2α may be useful as a therapeutic tool in sensitizing chemoresistant tumor cells to chemotherapy.

  14. Oligonucleotide-induced alternative splicing of serotonin 2C receptor reduces food intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaiyi; Shen, Manli; Gresch, Paul J; Ghamari-Langroudi, Masoud; Rabchevsky, Alexander G; Emeson, Ronald B; Stamm, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    The serotonin 2C receptor regulates food uptake, and its activity is regulated by alternative pre-mRNA splicing. Alternative exon skipping is predicted to generate a truncated receptor protein isoform, whose existence was confirmed with a new antiserum. The truncated receptor sequesters the full-length receptor in intracellular membranes. We developed an oligonucleotide that promotes exon inclusion, which increases the ratio of the full-length to truncated receptor protein. Decreasing the amount of truncated receptor results in the accumulation of full-length, constitutively active receptor at the cell surface. After injection into the third ventricle of mice, the oligonucleotide accumulates in the arcuate nucleus, where it changes alternative splicing of the serotonin 2C receptor and increases pro-opiomelanocortin expression. Oligonucleotide injection reduced food intake in both wild-type and ob/ob mice. Unexpectedly, the oligonucleotide crossed the blood-brain barrier and its systemic delivery reduced food intake in wild-type mice. The physiological effect of the oligonucleotide suggests that a truncated splice variant regulates the activity of the serotonin 2C receptor, indicating that therapies aimed to change pre-mRNA processing could be useful to treat hyperphagia, characteristic for disorders like Prader-Willi syndrome.

  15. Adaptive thermal control of stem gravitropism through alternative RNA splicing in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Jae Yong; Kim, Joo-Young; Park, Chung-Mo

    2015-01-01

    Gravitropism is an important growth movement in response to gravity in virtually all higher plants: the roots showing positive gravitropism and the shoots showing negative gravitropism. The gravitropic orientation of plant organs is also influenced by environmental factors, such as light and temperature. It is known that a zinc finger (ZF)-containing transcription factor SHOOT GRAVITROPISM 5/INDETERMINATE DOMAIN 15 (SGR5/IDD15) mediates the early events of gravitropic responses occurring in inflorescence stems. We have recently found that SGR5 gene undergoes alternative splicing to produce 2 protein variants, the full-size SGR5α transcription factor and the truncated SGR5β form lacking functional ZF motifs. The SGR5β form inhibits SGR5α function possibly by forming nonfunctional heterodimers that are excluded from DNA binding. Notably, SGR5 alternative splicing is accelerated at high temperatures, resulting in a high-level accumulation of SGR5β proteins. Accordingly, transgenic plants overexpressing SGR5β exhibit a reduction in the negative gravitropism of inflorescence stems, as observed in the SGR5-defective mutant. It is proposed that the thermos-responsive alternative splicing of SGR5 gene provides an adaptation strategy by which plants protect the shoots from aerial heat frequently occurring in natural habitats.

  16. HIV-1 Vpr N-terminal tagging affects alternative splicing of the viral genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeyens, Ann; Naessens, Evelien; Van Nuffel, Anouk; Weening, Karin E.; Reilly, Anne-Marie; Claeys, Eva; Trypsteen, Wim; Vandekerckhove, Linos; Eyckerman, Sven; Gevaert, Kris; Verhasselt, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    To facilitate studies on Vpr function in replicating HIV-1, we aimed to tag the protein in an infectious virus. First we showed that N-, but not C-terminal HA/FLAG tagging of Vpr protein preserves Vpr cytopathicity. Cloning the tags into proviral DNA however ablated viral production and replication. By construction of additional viral variants we could show this defect was not protein- but RNA-dependent and sequence specific, and characterized by oversplicing of the genomic RNA. Simulation of genomic RNA folding suggested that introduction of the tag sequence induced an alternative folding structure in a region enriched in splice sites and splicing regulatory sequences. In silico predictions identified the HA/His6-Vpr tagging in HIV-1 to affect mRNA folding less than HA/FLAG-Vpr tagging. In vitro infectivity and mRNA splice pattern improved but did not reach wild-type values. Thus, sequence-specific insertions may interfere with mRNA splicing, possibly due to altered RNA folding. Our results point to the complexity of viral RNA genome sequence interactions. This should be taken into consideration when designing viral manipulation strategies, for both research as for biological interventions. PMID:27721439

  17. Regulation of alternative splicing of Bcl-x by IL-6, GM-CSF and TPA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang You LI; Jia You CHU; Jian Kun YU; Xiao Qin HUANG; Xiao Juan LIU; Li SHI; Yan Chun CHE; Jiu Yong XIE

    2004-01-01

    The splicing of many alternative exons in the precursor messenger RNA (pre-mRNA) is regulated by extracellular factors but the underlying molecular bases remain unclear. Here we report the differential regulation of Bcl-x pre-mRNA splicing by extracellular factors and their distinctrequirements for pre-mRNA elements. In K562 leukemia cells, treatment with interleukin-6 (IL-6) or granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) reduced the proportion of the Bcl-xL variant mRNA while treatment with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA) had no effect. In U251 glioma cells, however, TPA efficientlyincreased the Bcl-xL level. These regulations were also seen for a transfected splicing reporter mini-gene. Further analyses of deletion mutants indicate that nucleotides 1-176 of the downstream intron are required for the IL-6 effect, whereas additional nucleotides 177-284 are essential for the GM-CSF effect. As for the TPA effect, only nucleotides 1-76 are required in the downstream intron. Thus, IL-6, GM-CSF and TPA differentially regulate Bcl-x splicing and require specific intronic pre-mRNA sequences for their respective effects.

  18. Alternative splicing modulates Disabled-1 (Dab1) function in the developing chick retina

    OpenAIRE

    Katyal, Sachin; Godbout, Roseline

    2004-01-01

    The Reelin–Disabled 1 (Dab1)-signaling pathway plays a critical role in neuronal cell positioning in the brain. We have isolated two alternatively spliced variants of Dab1 from chick retina, an early form (chDab1-E) expressed in undifferentiated cells and a late form (chDab1-L) expressed in amacrine and ganglion cells. A key difference between the two forms is the exclusion in chDab1-E of two Src-related tyrosine kinase recognition sites implicated in Reelin-mediated Dab1 tyrosine phosphoryla...

  19. Functional characterisation of an intron retaining K+ transporter of barley reveals intron-mediated alternate splicing

    KAUST Repository

    Shahzad, K.

    2015-01-01

    Intron retention in transcripts and the presence of 5 and 3 splice sites within these introns mediate alternate splicing, which is widely observed in animals and plants. Here, functional characterisation of the K+ transporter, HvHKT2;1, with stably retained introns from barley (Hordeum vulgare) in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), and transcript profiling in yeast and transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) is presented. Expression of intron-retaining HvHKT2;1 cDNA (HvHKT2;1-i) in trk1, trk2 yeast strain defective in K+ uptake restored growth in medium containing hygromycin in the presence of different concentrations of K+ and mediated hypersensitivity to Na+. HvHKT2;1-i produces multiple transcripts via alternate splicing of two regular introns and three exons in different compositions. HKT isoforms with retained introns and exon skipping variants were detected in relative expression analysis of (i) HvHKT2;1-i in barley under native conditions, (ii) in transgenic tobacco plants constitutively expressing HvHKT2;1-i, and (iii) in trk1, trk2 yeast expressing HvHKT2;1-i under control of an inducible promoter. Mixed proportions of three HKT transcripts: HvHKT2;1-e (first exon region), HvHKT2;1-i1 (first intron) and HvHKT2;1-i2 (second intron) were observed. The variation in transcript accumulation in response to changing K+ and Na+ concentrations was observed in both heterologous and plant systems. These findings suggest a link between intron-retaining transcripts and different splice variants to ion homeostasis, and their possible role in salt stress.

  20. CTCF:from insulators to alternative splicing regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alberto R Kornblihtt

    2012-01-01

    The zinc-finger DNA-binding protein CTCF has been known for being a constituent of insulators.A recent paper in Nature reports an unforeseen intragenic role for CTCF that links DNA methylation with alternative splicing.By binding to its target DNA site placed within an alternative exon,CTCF creates a roadblock to transcriptional elongation that favors inclusion of the exon into mature mRNA.DNA methylation prevents CTCF binding,which releases pol Ⅱ transient blockage and promotes exon exclusion.

  1. Translational regulation of human neuronal nitric-oxide synthase by an alternatively spliced 5'-untranslated region leader exon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Derek C; Bevan, Sian C; Choi, Stephen; Robb, G Brett; Millar, Adam; Wang, Yang; Marsden, Philip A

    2003-01-03

    Expression of the neuronal nitric-oxide synthase (nNOS) mRNA is subject to complex cell-specific transcriptional regulation, which is mediated by alternative promoters. Unexpectedly, we identified a 89-nucleotide alternatively spliced exon located in the 5'-untranslated region between exon 1 variants and a common exon 2 that contains the translational initiation codon. Alternative splicing events that do not affect the open reading frame are distinctly uncommon in mammals; therefore, we assessed its functional relevance. Transient transfection of reporter RNAs performed in a variety of cell types revealed that this alternatively spliced exon acts as a potent translational repressor. Stably transfected cell lines confirmed that the alternatively spliced exon inhibited translation of the native nNOS open reading frame. Reverse transcription-PCR and RNase protection assays indicated that nNOS mRNAs containing this exon are common and expressed in both a promoter-specific and tissue-restricted fashion. Mutational analysis identified the functional cis-element within this novel exon, and a secondary structure prediction revealed that it forms a putative stem-loop. RNA electrophoretic mobility shift assay techniques revealed that a specific cytoplasmic RNA-binding complex interacts with this motif. Hence, a unique splicing event within a 5'-untranslated region is demonstrated to introduce a translational control element. This represents a newer model for the translational control of a mammalian mRNA.

  2. Alt Event Finder: a tool for extracting alternative splicing events from RNA-seq data

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou Ao; Breese Marcus R; Hao Yangyang; Edenberg Howard J; Li Lang; Skaar Todd C; Liu Yunlong

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Alternative splicing increases proteome diversity by expressing multiple gene isoforms that often differ in function. Identifying alternative splicing events from RNA-seq experiments is important for understanding the diversity of transcripts and for investigating the regulation of splicing. Results We developed Alt Event Finder, a tool for identifying novel splicing events by using transcript annotation derived from genome-guided construction tools, such as Cufflinks and ...

  3. Genomic organization and the tissue distribution of alternatively spliced isoforms of the mouse Spatial gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattei Marie-Geneviève

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The stromal component of the thymic microenvironment is critical for T lymphocyte generation. Thymocyte differentiation involves a cascade of coordinated stromal genes controlling thymocyte survival, lineage commitment and selection. The "Stromal Protein Associated with Thymii And Lymph-node" (Spatial gene encodes a putative transcription factor which may be involved in T-cell development. In the testis, the Spatial gene is also expressed by round spermatids during spermatogenesis. Results The Spatial gene maps to the B3-B4 region of murine chromosome 10 corresponding to the human syntenic region 10q22.1. The mouse Spatial genomic DNA is organised into 10 exons and is alternatively spliced to generate two short isoforms (Spatial-α and -γ and two other long isoforms (Spatial-δ and -ε comprising 5 additional exons on the 3' site. Here, we report the cloning of a new short isoform, Spatial-β, which differs from other isoforms by an additional alternative exon of 69 bases. This new exon encodes an interesting proline-rich signature that could confer to the 34 kDa Spatial-β protein a particular function. By quantitative TaqMan RT-PCR, we have shown that the short isoforms are highly expressed in the thymus while the long isoforms are highly expressed in the testis. We further examined the inter-species conservation of Spatial between several mammals and identified that the protein which is rich in proline and positive amino acids, is highly conserved. Conclusions The Spatial gene generates at least five alternative spliced variants: three short isoforms (Spatial-α, -β and -γ highly expressed in the thymus and two long isoforms (Spatial-δ and -ε highly expressed in the testis. These alternative spliced variants could have a tissue specific function.

  4. Ratios of Four STAT3 Splice Variants in Human Eosinophils and Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turton, Keren B; Annis, Douglas S; Rui, Lixin; Esnault, Stephane; Mosher, Deane F

    2015-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is a key mediator of leukocyte differentiation and proliferation. The 3' end of STAT3 transcripts is subject to two alternative splicing events. One results in either full-length STAT3α or in STAT3β, which lacks part of the C-terminal transactivation domain. The other is at a tandem donor (5') splice site and results in the codon for Ser-701 being included (S) or excluded (ΔS). Despite the proximity of Ser-701 to the site of activating phosphorylation at Tyr-705, ΔS/S splicing has barely been studied. Sequencing of cDNA from purified eosinophils revealed the presence of four transcripts (S-α, ΔS-α, S-β, and ΔS-β) rather than the three reported in publically available databases from which ΔS-β is missing. To gain insight into regulation of the two alternative splicing events, we developed a quantitative(q) PCR protocol to compare transcript ratios in eosinophils in which STAT3 is upregulated by cytokines, activated B cell diffuse large B cell Lymphoma (DLBCL) cells in which STAT3 is dysregulated, and in germinal center B cell-like DLBCL cells in which it is not. With the exception of one line of activated B cell DLCBL cells, the four variants were found in roughly the same ratios despite differences in total levels of STAT3 transcripts. S-α was the most abundant, followed by S-β. ΔS-α and ΔS-β together comprised 15.6 ± 4.0 % (mean ± SD, n = 21) of the total. The percentage of STAT3β variants that were ΔS was 1.5-fold greater than of STAT3α variants that were ΔS. Inspection of Illumina's "BodyMap" RNA-Seq database revealed that the ΔS variant accounts for 10-26 % of STAT3 transcripts across 16 human tissues, with less variation than three other genes with the identical tandem donor splice site sequence. Thus, it seems likely that all cells contain the S-α, ΔS-α, S-β, and ΔS-β variants of STAT3.

  5. Ratios of Four STAT3 Splice Variants in Human Eosinophils and Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keren B Turton

    Full Text Available Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 is a key mediator of leukocyte differentiation and proliferation. The 3' end of STAT3 transcripts is subject to two alternative splicing events. One results in either full-length STAT3α or in STAT3β, which lacks part of the C-terminal transactivation domain. The other is at a tandem donor (5' splice site and results in the codon for Ser-701 being included (S or excluded (ΔS. Despite the proximity of Ser-701 to the site of activating phosphorylation at Tyr-705, ΔS/S splicing has barely been studied. Sequencing of cDNA from purified eosinophils revealed the presence of four transcripts (S-α, ΔS-α, S-β, and ΔS-β rather than the three reported in publically available databases from which ΔS-β is missing. To gain insight into regulation of the two alternative splicing events, we developed a quantitative(q PCR protocol to compare transcript ratios in eosinophils in which STAT3 is upregulated by cytokines, activated B cell diffuse large B cell Lymphoma (DLBCL cells in which STAT3 is dysregulated, and in germinal center B cell-like DLBCL cells in which it is not. With the exception of one line of activated B cell DLCBL cells, the four variants were found in roughly the same ratios despite differences in total levels of STAT3 transcripts. S-α was the most abundant, followed by S-β. ΔS-α and ΔS-β together comprised 15.6 ± 4.0 % (mean ± SD, n = 21 of the total. The percentage of STAT3β variants that were ΔS was 1.5-fold greater than of STAT3α variants that were ΔS. Inspection of Illumina's "BodyMap" RNA-Seq database revealed that the ΔS variant accounts for 10-26 % of STAT3 transcripts across 16 human tissues, with less variation than three other genes with the identical tandem donor splice site sequence. Thus, it seems likely that all cells contain the S-α, ΔS-α, S-β, and ΔS-β variants of STAT3.

  6. The human 5-HT7 serotonin receptor splice variants: constitutive activity and inverse agonist effects

    OpenAIRE

    Krobert, Kurt A; Levy, Finn Olav

    2002-01-01

    Using membranes from stably or transiently transfected HEK293 cells cultured in 5-HT-free medium and expressing the recombinant human 5-HT7 receptor splice variants (h5-HT7(a), h5-HT7(b) and h5-HT7(d)), we compared their abilities to constitutively activate adenylyl cyclase (AC).All h5-HT7 splice variants elevated basal and forskolin-stimulated AC. The basal AC activity was reduced by the 5-HT7 antagonist methiothepin and this effect was blocked by mesulergine (neutral 5-HT7 antagonist) indic...

  7. CD44 alternative splicing in gastric cancer cells is regulated by culture dimensionality and matrix stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branco da Cunha, Cristiana; Klumpers, Darinka D; Koshy, Sandeep T; Weaver, James C; Chaudhuri, Ovijit; Seruca, Raquel; Carneiro, Fátima; Granja, Pedro L; Mooney, David J

    2016-08-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) cultures often fail to mimic key architectural and physical features of the tumor microenvironment. Advances in biomaterial engineering allow the design of three-dimensional (3D) cultures within hydrogels that mimic important tumor-like features, unraveling cancer cell behaviors that would not have been observed in traditional 2D plastic surfaces. This study determined how 3D cultures impact CD44 alternative splicing in gastric cancer (GC) cells. In 3D cultures, GC cells lost expression of the standard CD44 isoform (CD44s), while gaining CD44 variant 6 (CD44v6) expression. This splicing switch was reversible, accelerated by nutrient shortage and delayed at lower initial cell densities, suggesting an environmental stress-induced response. It was further shown to be dependent on the hydrogel matrix mechanical properties and accompanied by the upregulation of genes involved in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), metabolism and angiogenesis. The 3D cultures reported here revealed the same CD44 alternative splicing pattern previously observed in human premalignant and malignant gastric lesions. These findings indicate that fundamental features of 3D cultures - such as soluble factors diffusion and mechanical cues - influence CD44 expression in GC cells. Moreover, this study provides a new model system to study CD44 dysfunction, whose role in cancer has been in the spotlight for decades.

  8. Alternative splicing modulates Kv channel clustering through a molecular ball and chain mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandany, Nitzan; Marciano, Shir; Magidovich, Elhanan; Frimerman, Teddy; Yehezkel, Rinat; Shem-Ad, Tzilhav; Lewin, Limor; Abdu, Uri; Orr, Irit; Yifrach, Ofer

    2015-03-01

    Ion channel clustering at the post-synaptic density serves a fundamental role in action potential generation and transmission. Here, we show that interaction between the Shaker Kv channel and the PSD-95 scaffold protein underlying channel clustering is modulated by the length of the intrinsically disordered C terminal channel tail. We further show that this tail functions as an entropic clock that times PSD-95 binding. We thus propose a ‘ball and chain’ mechanism to explain Kv channel binding to scaffold proteins, analogous to the mechanism describing channel fast inactivation. The physiological relevance of this mechanism is demonstrated in that alternative splicing of the Shaker channel gene to produce variants of distinct tail lengths resulted in differential channel cell surface expression levels and clustering metrics that correlate with differences in affinity of the variants for PSD-95. We suggest that modulating channel clustering by specific spatial-temporal spliced variant targeting serves a fundamental role in nervous system development and tuning.

  9. Effect of BRCA2 sequence variants predicted to disrupt exonic splice enhancers on BRCA2 transcripts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brewster Brooke L

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic screening of breast cancer patients and their families have identified a number of variants of unknown clinical significance in the breast cancer susceptibility genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2. Evaluation of such unclassified variants may be assisted by web-based bioinformatic prediction tools, although accurate prediction of aberrant splicing by unclassified variants affecting exonic splice enhancers (ESEs remains a challenge. Methods This study used a combination of RT-PCR analysis and splicing reporter minigene assays to assess five unclassified variants in the BRCA2 gene that we had previously predicted to disrupt an ESE using bioinformatic approaches. Results Analysis of BRCA2 c.8308 G > A (p.Ala2770Thr by mRNA analysis, and BRCA2 c.8962A > G (p.Ser2988Gly, BRCA2 c.8972G > A (p.Arg2991His, BRCA2 c.9172A > G (p.Ser3058Gly, and BRCA2 c.9213G > T (p.Glu3071Asp by a minigene assay, revealed no evidence for aberrant splicing. Conclusions These results illustrate the need for improved methods for predicting functional ESEs and the potential consequences of sequence variants contained therein.

  10. Expression of Cyclooxygenase-2 mRNA and Identification of Its Splice Variant in Human Myometrium Obtained from Women in Labor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Yinping; WAN Jingyuan; YE Duyun; WU Ping; HUANG Yanjun; ZHANG Li; ZHOU Xiaoyan; HUANG Yunfeng; YUAN Ping; ZHANG Daijuan

    2005-01-01

    In order to investigate the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in human lower segments of myometrium obtained from women in labor and those not in labor and identify the splicing variant of COX-2, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to detect the expression of COX-2. The primers were designed and synthesized according to the sequence of rat COX-2 splice variant which was discovered firstly by us. Then the splicing variant of COX-2 in human myometrium from woman in labor was identified, cloned into vector and sequenced. The results showed that the expression of COX-2 mRNA was lower in human myometrium obtained from women who were not in labor than that in labor women and a new band of COX-2 was obtained in myometrium from labor woman. The fragment included an unspliced intron, which pitched between exons 7 and 8. It was suggested that COX-2 gene was not only expressed highly in human myometrium from woman in labor, but also produced splicing variant by alternative splicing.

  11. A method of predicting changes in human gene splicing induced by genetic variants in context of cis-acting elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hicks Chindo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polymorphic variants and mutations disrupting canonical splicing isoforms are among the leading causes of human hereditary disorders. While there is a substantial evidence of aberrant splicing causing Mendelian diseases, the implication of such events in multi-genic disorders is yet to be well understood. We have developed a new tool (SpliceScan II for predicting the effects of genetic variants on splicing and cis-regulatory elements. The novel Bayesian non-canonical 5'GC splice site (SS sensor used in our tool allows inference on non-canonical exons. Results Our tool performed favorably when compared with the existing methods in the context of genes linked to the Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD. SpliceScan II was able to predict more aberrant splicing isoforms triggered by the mutations, as documented in DBASS5 and DBASS3 aberrant splicing databases, than other existing methods. Detrimental effects behind some of the polymorphic variations previously associated with Alzheimer's and breast cancer could be explained by changes in predicted splicing patterns. Conclusions We have developed SpliceScan II, an effective and sensitive tool for predicting the detrimental effects of genomic variants on splicing leading to Mendelian and complex hereditary disorders. The method could potentially be used to screen resequenced patient DNA to identify de novo mutations and polymorphic variants that could contribute to a genetic disorder.

  12. Alternative spliced CD1d transcripts in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kambez Hajipouran Benam

    Full Text Available CD1d is a MHC I like molecule which presents glycolipid to natural killer T (NKT cells, a group of cells with diverse but critical immune regulatory functions in the immune system. These cells are required for optimal defence against bacterial, viral, protozoan, and fungal infections, and control of immune-pathology and autoimmune diseases. CD1d is expressed on antigen presenting cells but also found on some non-haematopoietic cells. However, it has not been observed on bronchial epithelium, a site of active host defence in the lungs. Here, we identify for the first time, CD1D mRNA variants and CD1d protein expression on human bronchial epithelial cells, describe six alternatively spliced transcripts of this gene in these cells; and show that these variants are specific to epithelial cells. These findings provide the basis for investigations into a role for CD1d in lung mucosal immunity.

  13. The Dnmt3b splice variant is specifically expressed in in vitro-manipulated blastocysts and their derivative ES cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horii, Takuro; Suetake, Isao; Yanagisawa, Eikichi; Morita, Sumiyo; Kimura, Mika; Nagao, Yasumitsu; Imai, Hiroshi; Tajima, Shoji; Hatada, Izuho

    2011-10-01

    Manipulation of preimplantation embryos in vitro, such as in vitro fertilization (IVF), in vitro culture (IVC), intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) and other assisted reproduction technologies (ART), has contributed to the development of infertility treatment and new animal reproduction methods. However, such embryos often exhibit abnormal DNA methylation patterns in imprinted genes and centromeric satellite repeats. These DNA methylation patterns are established and maintained by three DNA methyltransferases: Dnmt1, Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b. Dnmt3b is responsible for the creation of methylation patterns during the early stage of embryogenesis and consists of many alternative splice variants that affect methylation activity; nevertheless, the roles of these variants have not yet been identified. In this study, we found an alternatively spliced variant of Dnmt3b lacking exon 6 (Dnmt3bΔ6) that is specific to mouse IVC embryos. Dnmt3bΔ6 also showed prominent expression in embryonic stem (ES) cells derived from in vitro manipulated embryos. Interestingly, IVC blastocysts were hypomethylated in centromeric satellite repeat regions that could be susceptible to methylation by Dnmt3b. In vitro methylation activity assays showed that Dnmt3bΔ6 had lower activity than normal Dnmt3b. Our findings suggest that Dnmt3bΔ6 could induce a hypomethylation status especially in in vitro manipulated embryos.

  14. Heterologous Expression of Rat Testis GABAA Receptor β3t Splicing Variant in CHO Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi-feng LI; Yu-guang CHEN; Yuan-chang YAN; Yi-ping LI

    2004-01-01

    Objective To characterize a possible retention function of unique sequence in the 5'end of rat testis GABAA receptor β3t splicing variantMethods Rat testis GABAA receptor β3t splicing variant cDNA was cloned and two eukaryotic expression recombinant plasmids of pEGFP-N1 and pEGFP-C1 were constructed respectively by fusing green fluorescent protein to the N or C-terminus of β3t isoform. The recombinant plasmids were transfected into CHO cells by calcium phosphate co-precipitation method. Fluorescence microscope and laser confocal microscope were used to analyze localization of β3t in the transfected cells. ConA-Texas-Red was used to label cell ER and the localization of rat testis β3t splicing variant in CHO cells was determined.Results When rat testis β3t splicing variant was expressed in CHO cells, two expression patterns were delineated, the distributions of uniform and mainly discrete intracellular compartments respectively. The chimera product failed to be translocated into the cell surface when expressed in CHO cells; whereas the β3 subunit of rat brain was incorporated into the plasma membrane.Conclusion The inability of β3t to target into the ER may be a consequence of the unique 25 specific amino acid segments in the N terminus.

  15. Coding potential of the products of alternative splicing in human.

    KAUST Repository

    Leoni, Guido

    2011-01-20

    BACKGROUND: Analysis of the human genome has revealed that as much as an order of magnitude more of the genomic sequence is transcribed than accounted for by the predicted and characterized genes. A number of these transcripts are alternatively spliced forms of known protein coding genes; however, it is becoming clear that many of them do not necessarily correspond to a functional protein. RESULTS: In this study we analyze alternative splicing isoforms of human gene products that are unambiguously identified by mass spectrometry and compare their properties with those of isoforms of the same genes for which no peptide was found in publicly available mass spectrometry datasets. We analyze them in detail for the presence of uninterrupted functional domains, active sites as well as the plausibility of their predicted structure. We report how well each of these strategies and their combination can correctly identify translated isoforms and derive a lower limit for their specificity, that is, their ability to correctly identify non-translated products. CONCLUSIONS: The most effective strategy for correctly identifying translated products relies on the conservation of active sites, but it can only be applied to a small fraction of isoforms, while a reasonably high coverage, sensitivity and specificity can be achieved by analyzing the presence of non-truncated functional domains. Combining the latter with an assessment of the plausibility of the modeled structure of the isoform increases both coverage and specificity with a moderate cost in terms of sensitivity.

  16. Tracking the evolution of alternatively spliced exons within the Dscam family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vision Todd J

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Dscam gene in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, contains twenty-four exons, four of which are composed of tandem arrays that each undergo mutually exclusive alternative splicing (4, 6, 9 and 17, potentially generating 38,016 protein isoforms. This degree of transcript diversity has not been found in mammalian homologs of Dscam. We examined the molecular evolution of exons within this gene family to locate the point of divergence for this alternative splicing pattern. Results Using the fruit fly Dscam exons 4, 6, 9 and 17 as seed sequences, we iteratively searched sixteen genomes for homologs, and then performed phylogenetic analyses of the resulting sequences to examine their evolutionary history. We found homologs in the nematode, arthropod and vertebrate genomes, including homologs in several vertebrates where Dscam had not been previously annotated. Among these, only the arthropods contain homologs arranged in tandem arrays indicative of mutually exclusive splicing. We found no homologs to these exons within the Arabidopsis, yeast, tunicate or sea urchin genomes but homologs to several constitutive exons from fly Dscam were present within tunicate and sea urchin. Comparing the rate of turnover within the tandem arrays of the insect taxa (fruit fly, mosquito and honeybee, we found the variants within exons 4 and 17 are well conserved in number and spatial arrangement despite 248–283 million years of divergence. In contrast, the variants within exons 6 and 9 have undergone considerable turnover since these taxa diverged, as indicated by deeply branching taxon-specific lineages. Conclusion Our results suggest that at least one Dscam exon array may be an ancient duplication that predates the divergence of deuterostomes from protostomes but that there is no evidence for the presence of arrays in the common ancestor of vertebrates. The different patterns of conservation and turnover among the Dscam exon arrays

  17. Alternative splicing, muscle calcium sensitivity, and the modulation of dragonfly flight performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marden, James H.; Fitzhugh, Gail H.; Wolf, Melisande R.; Arnold, Kristina D.; Rowan, Barry

    1999-01-01

    Calcium sensitivity of myosin cross-bridge activation in striated muscles commonly varies during ontogeny and in response to alterations in muscle usage, but the consequences for whole-organism physiology are not well known. Here we show that the relative abundances of alternatively spliced transcripts of the calcium regulatory protein troponin T (TnT) vary widely in flight muscle of Libellula pulchella dragonflies, and that the mixture of TnT splice variants explains significant portions of the variation in muscle calcium sensitivity, wing-beat frequency, and an index of aerodynamic power output during free flight. Two size-distinguishable morphs differ in their maturational pattern of TnT splicing, yet they show the same relationship between TnT transcript mixture and calcium sensitivity and between calcium sensitivity and aerodynamic power output. This consistency of effect in different developmental and physiological contexts strengthens the hypothesis that TnT isoform variation modulates muscle calcium sensitivity and whole-organism locomotor performance. Modulating muscle power output appears to provide the ecologically important ability to operate at different points along a tradeoff between performance and energetic cost. PMID:10611380

  18. The emergence of alternative 3' and 5' splice site exons from constitutive exons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eli Koren

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Alternative 3' and 5' splice site (ss events constitute a significant part of all alternative splicing events. These events were also found to be related to several aberrant splicing diseases. However, only few of the characteristics that distinguish these events from alternative cassette exons are known currently. In this study, we compared the characteristics of constitutive exons, alternative cassette exons, and alternative 3'ss and 5'ss exons. The results revealed that alternative 3'ss and 5'ss exons are an intermediate state between constitutive and alternative cassette exons, where the constitutive side resembles constitutive exons, and the alternative side resembles alternative cassette exons. The results also show that alternative 3'ss and 5'ss exons exhibit low levels of symmetry (frame-preserving, similar to constitutive exons, whereas the sequence between the two alternative splice sites shows high symmetry levels, similar to alternative cassette exons. In addition, flanking intronic conservation analysis revealed that exons whose alternative splice sites are at least nine nucleotides apart show a high conservation level, indicating intronic participation in the regulation of their splicing, whereas exons whose alternative splice sites are fewer than nine nucleotides apart show a low conservation level. Further examination of these exons, spanning seven vertebrate species, suggests an evolutionary model in which the alternative state is a derivative of an ancestral constitutive exon, where a mutation inside the exon or along the flanking intron resulted in the creation of a new splice site that competes with the original one, leading to alternative splice site selection. This model was validated experimentally on four exons, showing that they indeed originated from constitutive exons that acquired a new competing splice site during evolution.

  19. HuR and TIA1/TIAL1 Are Involved in Regulation of Alternative Splicing of SIRT1 Pre-mRNA

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    Wenhui Zhao

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available SIRT1 is a pleiotropic protein that plays critical and multifunctional roles in metabolism, senescence, longevity, stress-responses, and cancer, and has become an important therapeutic target across a range of diseases. Recent research demonstrated that SIRT1 pre-mRNA undergoes alternative splicing to produce different isoforms, such as SIRT1 full-length and SIRT1-∆Exon8 variants. Previous studies revealed these SIRT1 mRNA splice variants convey different characteristics and functions to the protein, which may in turn explain the multifunctional roles of SIRT1. However, the mechanisms underlying the regulation of SIRT1 alternative splicing remain to be elucidated. Our objective is to search for new pathways that regulate of SIRT1 alternative splicing. Here we describe experiments showing that HuR and TIA1/TIAL1, two kinds of RNA-binding proteins, were involved in the regulation of alternative splicing of SIRT1 pre-mRNA under normal and stress circumstances: HuR increased SIRT1-∆Exon8 by promoting SIRT1 exon 8 exclusion, whereas TIA1/TIAL1 inhibition of the exon 8 exclusion led to a decrease in SIRT1-∆Exon8 mRNA levels. This study provides novel insight into how the alternative splicing of SIRT1 pre-mRNA is regulated, which has fundamental implications for understanding the critical and multifunctional roles of SIRT1.

  20. Splice variants DNMT3B4 and DNMT3B7 overexpression inhibit cell proliferation in 293A cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Guo; Zhang, Ran; Zhang, Shu; Jiang, Shuyuan; Liu, You; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Yanbo; Li, Jinping; Gong, Kerui; Gong, Keri; Hu, Xin-Rong; Jiang, Shi-Wen

    2013-05-01

    DNA methyltransferase 3B (DNMT3B) is critical in abnormal DNA methylation patterns in cancer cells. Nearly 40 alternatively spliced variants of DNMT3B have been reported. DNMT3B4 and DNMT3B7 are two kinds of splice variants of DNMT3B lacking the conserved methyltransferase motif. In this study, the effect of inactivation of DNMT3B variants, DNMT3B4 and DNMT3B7, on cell proliferation was assessed. pCMV-DNMT3B4 and pCMV-DNMT3B7 recombinant plasmids were developed and stably transfected into 293A cells. 293A cells transfected with plasmid pCMV-DNMT3B4 or pCMV-2B were then treated with G418 to the stable cell lines. After that, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide method was used for testing the proliferation level, and flow cytometry was used to test cell cycle distribution of the cell line. The expression of p21 was detected by real-time PCR and Western blot. The methylation status of p21 promoter was detected by methylation-specific PCR (MS-PCR). It was found that DNMT3B4 and DNMT3B7 overexpression could inhibit cell proliferation and increase the expression of p21. Cell cycle analysis demonstrated that inactivation of DNMT3B variants overexpression inhibited cell cycle progression. Inactivation of DNMT3B variants overexpression facilitated p21 expression to delay 293A cell proliferation. These findings indicate that inactivation of DNMT3B variants might play an important role in cell proliferation correlating with the change of p21.

  1. Splice variants of perlucin from Haliotis laevigata modulate the crystallisation of CaCO3.

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    Tanja Dodenhof

    Full Text Available Perlucin is one of the proteins of the organic matrix of nacre (mother of pearl playing an important role in biomineralisation. This nacreous layer can be predominately found in the mollusc lineages and is most intensively studied as a compound of the shell of the marine Australian abalone Haliotis laevigata. A more detailed analysis of Perlucin will elucidate some of the still unknown processes in the complex interplay of the organic/inorganic compounds involved in the formation of nacre as a very interesting composite material not only from a life science-based point of view. Within this study we discovered three unknown Perlucin splice variants of the Australian abalone H. laevigata. The amplified cDNAs vary from 562 to 815 base pairs and the resulting translation products differ predominantly in the absence or presence of a varying number of a 10 mer peptide C-terminal repeat. The splice variants could further be confirmed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-ToF MS analysis as endogenous Perlucin, purified from decalcified abalone shell. Interestingly, we observed that the different variants expressed as maltose-binding protein (MBP fusion proteins in E. coli showed strong differences in their influence on precipitating CaCO3 and that these differences might be due to a splice variant-specific formation of large protein aggregates influenced by the number of the 10 mer peptide repeats. Our results are evidence for a more complex situation with respect to Perlucin functional regulation by demonstrating that Perlucin splice variants modulate the crystallisation of calcium carbonate. The identification of differentially behaving Perlucin variants may open a completely new perspective for the field of nacre biomineralisation.

  2. Comparative cross-species alternative splicing in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ner-Gaon, Hadas; Leviatan, Noam; Rubin, Eitan; Fluhr, Robert

    2007-07-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) can add significantly to genome complexity. Plants are thought to exhibit less AS than animals. An algorithm, based on expressed sequence tag (EST) pairs gapped alignment, was developed that takes advantage of the relatively small intron and exon size in plants and directly compares pairs of ESTs to search for AS. EST pairs gapped alignment was first evaluated in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), rice (Oryza sativa), and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) for which annotated genome sequence is available and was shown to accurately predict splicing events. The method was then applied to 11 plant species that include 17 cultivars for which enough ESTs are available. The results show a large, 3.7-fold difference in AS rates between plant species with Arabidopsis and rice in the lower range and lettuce (Lactuca sativa) and sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) in the upper range. Hence, compared to higher animals, plants show a much greater degree of variety in their AS rates and in some plant species the rates of animal and plant AS are comparable although the distribution of AS types may differ. In eudicots but not monocots, a correlation between genome size and AS rates was detected, implying that in eudicots the mechanisms that lead to larger genomes are a driving force for the evolution of AS.

  3. Analysis of Maxi-K alpha subunit splice variants in human myometrium

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    Morrison John J

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Large-conductance, calcium-activated potassium (Maxi-K channels are implicated in the modulation of human uterine contractions and myometrial Ca2+ homeostasis. However, the regulatory mechanism(s governing the expression of Maxi-K channels with decreased calcium sensitivity at parturition are unclear. The objectives of this study were to investigate mRNA expression of the Maxi-K alpha subunit, and that of its splice variants, in human non-pregnant and pregnant myometrium, prior to and after labour onset, to determine whether altered expression of these splice variants is associated with decreased calcium sensitivity observed at labour onset. Methods Myometrial biopsies were obtained at hysterectomy (non-pregnant, NP, and at Caesarean section, at elective (pregnant not-in-labour, PNL and intrapartum (pregnant in-labour, PL procedures. RNA was extracted from all biopsies and quantitative real-time RT-PCR was used to investigate for possible differential expression of the Maxi-K alpha subunit, and that of its splice variants, between these functionally-distinct myometrial tissue sets. Results RT-PCR analysis identified the presence of a 132 bp and an 87 bp spliced exon of the Maxi-K alpha subunit in all three myometrial tissue sets. Quantitative real-time PCR indicated a decrease in the expression of the Maxi-K alpha subunit with labour onset. While there was no change in the proportion of Maxi-K alpha subunits expressing the 87 bp spliced exon, the proportion of alpha subunits expressing the 132 bp spliced exon was significantly increased with labour onset, compared to both non-pregnant and pregnant not-in-labour tissues. An increased proportion of 132 bp exon-containing alpha subunit variants with labour onset is of interest, as channels expressing this spliced exon have decreased calcium and voltage sensitivities. Conclusions Our findings suggest that decreased Maxi-K alpha subunit mRNA expression in human myometrium at

  4. Characterization, phylogeny, alternative splicing and expression of Sox30 gene

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    Huang Baofeng

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Members of the Sox gene family isolated from both vertebrates and invertebrates have been proved to participate in a wide variety of developmental processes, including sex determination and differentiation. Among these members, Sox30 had been considered to exist only in mammals since its discovery, and its exact function remains unclear. Results Sox30 cDNA was cloned from the Nile tilapia by RT-PCR and RACE. Screening of available genome and EST databases and phylogenetic analysis showed that Sox30 also exists in non-mammalian vertebrates and invertebrates, which was further supported by synteny analyses. Tissue expression in human, mouse and tilapia suggested that Sox30 was probably a gonad-specific gene, which was also supported by the fact that Sox30 EST sequences were obtained from gonads of the animal species. In addition, four alternatively spliced isoforms were isolated from tilapia gonad. Their temporal and spatial expression patterns during normal and sex reversed gonadal development were investigated by RT-PCR and in situ hybridization. Our data suggest that expressions of Sox30 isoforms are related to stage and phenotypic-sex, observed in the germ cells of male gonad and in somatic cells of the female gonad. Conclusions Sox30 is not a gene only existed in mammals, but exists widely throughout the animal kingdom as supported by our bioinformatic, phylogenetic and syntenic analyses. It is very likely that Sox30 is expressed exclusively in gonads. Expression analyses revealed that Sox30 may be involved in female and male gonadal development at different stages by alternative splicing.

  5. FULL-GENOME ANALYSIS OF ALTERNATIVE SPLICING IN MOUSE LIVER AFTER HEPATOTOXICANT EXPOSURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alternative splicing plays a role in determining gene function and protein diversity. We have employed whole genome exon profiling using Affymetrix Mouse Exon 1.0 ST arrays to understand the significance of alternative splicing on a genome-wide scale in response to multiple toxic...

  6. Comprehensive analysis of alternative splicing in rice and comparative analyses with Arabidopsis

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    Mount Stephen M

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, genomic sequencing efforts were finished for Oryza sativa (cultivated rice and Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis. Additionally, these two plant species have extensive cDNA and expressed sequence tag (EST libraries. We employed the Program to Assemble Spliced Alignments (PASA to identify and analyze alternatively spliced isoforms in both species. Results A comprehensive analysis of alternative splicing was performed in rice that started with >1.1 million publicly available spliced ESTs and over 30,000 full length cDNAs in conjunction with the newly enhanced PASA software. A parallel analysis was performed with Arabidopsis to compare and ascertain potential differences between monocots and dicots. Alternative splicing is a widespread phenomenon (observed in greater than 30% of the loci with transcript support and we have described nine alternative splicing variations. While alternative splicing has the potential to create many RNA isoforms from a single locus, the majority of loci generate only two or three isoforms and transcript support indicates that these isoforms are generally not rare events. For the alternate donor (AD and acceptor (AA classes, the distance between the splice sites for the majority of events was found to be less than 50 basepairs (bp. In both species, the most frequent distance between AA is 3 bp, consistent with reports in mammalian systems. Conversely, the most frequent distance between AD is 4 bp in both plant species, as previously observed in mouse. Most alternative splicing variations are localized to the protein coding sequence and are predicted to significantly alter the coding sequence. Conclusion Alternative splicing is widespread in both rice and Arabidopsis and these species share many common features. Interestingly, alternative splicing may play a role beyond creating novel combinations of transcripts that expand the proteome. Many isoforms will presumably have negative

  7. Identification of a New Splice Variant of the Human ABCC6 Transporter

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    Maria Francesca Armentano

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available ABCC6 is a member of the adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette (ABC gene subfamily C that encodes a protein (MRP6 involved in active transport of intracellular compounds to the extracellular environment. Mutations in ABCC6 cause pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE, an autosomal recessive disorder of the connective tissue characterized by progressive calcification of elastic structures in the skin, the eyes, and the cardiovascular system. MRP6 is codified by 31 exons and contains 1503 amino acids. In addition to a full-length transcript of ABCC6, we have identified an alternatively spliced variant of ABCC6 from a cDNA of human liver that lacks exons 19 and 24. The novel isoform was named ABCC6 Δ19Δ24. PCR analysis from cDNA of cell cultures of primary human hepatocites and embryonic kidney confirms the presence of the ABCC6Δ19Δ24 isoform. Western blot analysis of the embryonic kidney cells shows a band corresponding to the molecular weight of the truncated protein.

  8. Genome-wide analysis of SRSF10-regulated alternative splicing by deep sequencing of chicken transcriptome

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    Xuexia Zhou

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Splicing factor SRSF10 is known to function as a sequence-specific splicing activator that is capable of regulating alternative splicing both in vitro and in vivo. We recently used an RNA-seq approach coupled with bioinformatics analysis to identify the extensive splicing network regulated by SRSF10 in chicken cells. We found that SRSF10 promoted both exon inclusion and exclusion. Functionally, many of the SRSF10-verified alternative exons are linked to pathways of response to external stimulus. Here we describe in detail the experimental design, bioinformatics analysis and GO/pathway enrichment analysis of SRSF10-regulated genes to correspond with our data in the Gene Expression Omnibus with accession number GSE53354. Our data thus provide a resource for studying regulation of alternative splicing in vivo that underlines biological functions of splicing regulatory proteins in cells.

  9. Evaluation of a 5-tier scheme proposed for classification of sequence variants using bioinformatic and splicing assay data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walker, Logan C; Whiley, Phillip J; Houdayer, Claude;

    2013-01-01

    of results, and the lack of quantitative data for the aberrant transcripts. We propose suggestions for minimum reporting guidelines for splicing assays, and improvements to the 5-tier splicing classification system to allow future evaluation of its performance as a clinical tool.......Splicing assays are commonly undertaken in the clinical setting to assess the clinical relevance of sequence variants in disease predisposition genes. A 5-tier classification system incorporating both bioinformatic and splicing assay information was previously proposed as a method to provide...... consistent clinical classification of such variants. Members of the ENIGMA Consortium Splicing Working Group undertook a study to assess the applicability of the scheme to published assay results, and the consistency of classifications across multiple reviewers. Splicing assay data were identified for 235...

  10. Alternative splicing modulates Disabled-1 (Dab1) function in the developing chick retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katyal, Sachin; Godbout, Roseline

    2004-01-01

    The Reelin–Disabled 1 (Dab1)-signaling pathway plays a critical role in neuronal cell positioning in the brain. We have isolated two alternatively spliced variants of Dab1 from chick retina, an early form (chDab1-E) expressed in undifferentiated cells and a late form (chDab1-L) expressed in amacrine and ganglion cells. A key difference between the two forms is the exclusion in chDab1-E of two Src-related tyrosine kinase recognition sites implicated in Reelin-mediated Dab1 tyrosine phosphorylation. Retinal cultures transfected with a chDab1-L expression construct undergo a dramatic change in morphology, accompanied by the formation of numerous thin elongated processes, increased tyrosine phosphorylation, activation of Src family kinase(s) and increased levels of the axonal outgrowth protein growth-associated protein-43. In contrast, chDab1-E transfectants retain an undifferentiated morphology. Mutational analysis implicates a specific tyrosine (tyr-198) in the morphological and biochemical alterations associated with chDab1-L expression. We propose that alternative splicing of chDab1 represents an effective and flexible way of regulating the Reelin–Dab1-signaling pathway in a mixed cell population, by ensuring that secreted Reelin activates the signaling cascade only in target neuronal cells. PMID:15057276

  11. Multiple splice variants within the bovine silver homologue (SILV gene affecting coat color in cattle indicate a function additional to fibril formation in melanophores

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    Weikard Rosemarie

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The silver homologue(SILV gene plays a major role in melanosome development. SILV is a target for studies concerning melanoma diagnostics and therapy in humans as well as on skin and coat color pigmentation in many species ranging from zebra fish to mammals. However, the precise functional cellular mechanisms, in which SILV is involved, are still not completely understood. While there are many studies addressing SILV function upon a eumelaneic pigment background, there is a substantial lack of information regarding the further relevance of SILV, e.g. for phaeomelanosome development. Results In contrast to previous results in other species reporting SILV expression exclusively in pigmented tissues, our experiments provide evidence that the bovine SILV gene is expressed in a variety of tissues independent of pigmentation. Our data show that the bovine SILV gene generates an unexpectedly large number of different transcripts occurring in skin as well as in non-pigmented tissues, e.g. liver or mammary gland. The alternative splice sites are generated by internal splicing and primarily remove complete exons. Alternative splicing predominantly affects the repeat domain of the protein, which has a functional key role in fibril formation during eumelanosome development. Conclusion The expression of the bovine SILV gene independent of pigmentation suggests SILV functions exceeding melanosome development in cattle. This hypothesis is further supported by transcript variants lacking functional key elements of the SILV protein relevant for eumelanosome development. Thus, the bovine SILV gene can serve as a model for the investigation of the putative additional functions of SILV. Furthermore, the splice variants of the bovine SILV gene represent a comprehensive natural model to refine the knowledge about functional domains in the SILV protein. Our study exemplifies that the extent of alternative splicing is presumably much higher than

  12. Alternatively Spliced Homologous Exons Have Ancient Origins and Are Highly Expressed at the Protein Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abascal, Federico; Ezkurdia, Iakes; Rodriguez-Rivas, Juan; Rodriguez, Jose Manuel; del Pozo, Angela; Vázquez, Jesús; Valencia, Alfonso; Tress, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing of messenger RNA can generate a wide variety of mature RNA transcripts, and these transcripts may produce protein isoforms with diverse cellular functions. While there is much supporting evidence for the expression of alternative transcripts, the same is not true for the alternatively spliced protein products. Large-scale mass spectroscopy experiments have identified evidence of alternative splicing at the protein level, but with conflicting results. Here we carried out a rigorous analysis of the peptide evidence from eight large-scale proteomics experiments to assess the scale of alternative splicing that is detectable by high-resolution mass spectroscopy. We find fewer splice events than would be expected: we identified peptides for almost 64% of human protein coding genes, but detected just 282 splice events. This data suggests that most genes have a single dominant isoform at the protein level. Many of the alternative isoforms that we could identify were only subtly different from the main splice isoform. Very few of the splice events identified at the protein level disrupted functional domains, in stark contrast to the two thirds of splice events annotated in the human genome that would lead to the loss or damage of functional domains. The most striking result was that more than 20% of the splice isoforms we identified were generated by substituting one homologous exon for another. This is significantly more than would be expected from the frequency of these events in the genome. These homologous exon substitution events were remarkably conserved—all the homologous exons we identified evolved over 460 million years ago—and eight of the fourteen tissue-specific splice isoforms we identified were generated from homologous exons. The combination of proteomics evidence, ancient origin and tissue-specific splicing indicates that isoforms generated from homologous exons may have important cellular roles. PMID:26061177

  13. Alternatively Spliced Homologous Exons Have Ancient Origins and Are Highly Expressed at the Protein Level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Abascal

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing of messenger RNA can generate a wide variety of mature RNA transcripts, and these transcripts may produce protein isoforms with diverse cellular functions. While there is much supporting evidence for the expression of alternative transcripts, the same is not true for the alternatively spliced protein products. Large-scale mass spectroscopy experiments have identified evidence of alternative splicing at the protein level, but with conflicting results. Here we carried out a rigorous analysis of the peptide evidence from eight large-scale proteomics experiments to assess the scale of alternative splicing that is detectable by high-resolution mass spectroscopy. We find fewer splice events than would be expected: we identified peptides for almost 64% of human protein coding genes, but detected just 282 splice events. This data suggests that most genes have a single dominant isoform at the protein level. Many of the alternative isoforms that we could identify were only subtly different from the main splice isoform. Very few of the splice events identified at the protein level disrupted functional domains, in stark contrast to the two thirds of splice events annotated in the human genome that would lead to the loss or damage of functional domains. The most striking result was that more than 20% of the splice isoforms we identified were generated by substituting one homologous exon for another. This is significantly more than would be expected from the frequency of these events in the genome. These homologous exon substitution events were remarkably conserved--all the homologous exons we identified evolved over 460 million years ago--and eight of the fourteen tissue-specific splice isoforms we identified were generated from homologous exons. The combination of proteomics evidence, ancient origin and tissue-specific splicing indicates that isoforms generated from homologous exons may have important cellular roles.

  14. Alternative splicing, promoter methylation, and functional SNPs of sperm flagella 2 gene in testis and mature spermatozoa of Holstein bulls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, F; Yang, B; Ju, Z H; Wang, X G; Qi, C; Zhang, Y; Wang, C F; Liu, H D; Feng, M Y; Chen, Y; Xu, Y X; Zhong, J F; Huang, J M

    2014-02-01

    The sperm flagella 2 (SPEF2) gene is essential for development of normal sperm tail and male fertility. In this study, we characterized first the splice variants, promoter and its methylation, and functional single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the SPEF2 gene in newborn and adult Holstein bulls. Four splice variants were identified in the testes, epididymis, sperm, heart, spleen, lungs, kidneys, and liver tissues through RT-PCR, clone sequencing, and western blot analysis. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the SPEF2 was specifically expressed in the primary spermatocytes, elongated spermatids, and round spermatids in the testes and epididymis. SPEF2-SV1 was differentially expressed in the sperms of high-performance and low-performance adult bulls; SPEF2-SV2 presents the highest expression in testis and epididymis; SPEF2-SV3 was only detected in testis and epididymis. An SNP (c.2851G>T) in exon 20 of SPEF2, located within a putative exonic splice enhancer, potentially produced SPEF2-SV3 and was involved in semen deformity rate and post-thaw cryopreserved sperm motility. The luciferase reporter and bisulfite sequencing analysis suggested that the methylation pattern of the core promoter did not significantly differ between the full-sib bulls that presented hypomethylation in the ejaculated semen and testis. This finding indicates that sperm quality is unrelated to SPEF2 methylation pattern. Our data suggest that alternative splicing, rather than methylation, is involved in the regulation of SPEF2 expression in the testes and sperm and is one of the determinants of sperm motility during bull spermatogenesis. The exonic SNP (c.2851G>T) produces aberrant splice variants, which can be used as a candidate marker for semen traits selection breeding of Holstein bulls.

  15. High-throughput alternative splicing detection using dually constrained correspondence analysis (DCCA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baty, Florent; Klingbiel, Dirk; Zappa, Francesco; Brutsche, Martin

    2015-12-01

    Alternative splicing is an important component of tumorigenesis. Recent advent of exon array technology enables the detection of alternative splicing at a genome-wide scale. The analysis of high-throughput alternative splicing is not yet standard and methodological developments are still needed. We propose a novel statistical approach-Dually Constrained Correspondence Analysis-for the detection of splicing changes in exon array data. Using this methodology, we investigated the genome-wide alteration of alternative splicing in patients with non-small cell lung cancer treated by bevacizumab/erlotinib. Splicing candidates reveal a series of genes related to carcinogenesis (SFTPB), cell adhesion (STAB2, PCDH15, HABP2), tumor aggressiveness (ARNTL2), apoptosis, proliferation and differentiation (PDE4D, FLT3, IL1R2), cell invasion (ETV1), as well as tumor growth (OLFM4, FGF14), tumor necrosis (AFF3) or tumor suppression (TUSC3, CSMD1, RHOBTB2, SERPINB5), with indication of known alternative splicing in a majority of genes. DCCA facilitates the identification of putative biologically relevant alternative splicing events in high-throughput exon array data.

  16. A splice variant of PGRP-LC required for expression of antimicrobial peptides in Anopheles gambiae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUI LIN; LINGMIN ZHANG; CORALIA LUNA; NGO T.HOA; LIANGBIAO ZHENG

    2007-01-01

    Members of the peptidoglycan recognition protein (PGRP) family play essential roles in different manifestations of immune responses in insects. PGRP-LC, one of seven members of this family in the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae produced several spliced variants. Here we show that PGRP-LC, and not other members of the PGRP family nor the six members of the Gram-negative binding protein families, is required for the expression of antimicrobial peptide genes (such as CEC1 and GAM1) under the control of the Imd-Rel2 pathway in an A. gambiae cell line, 4a3A. PGRP-LC produces many splice variants that can be classified into three sub-groups (LC1, LC2 and LC3), based on the carboxyl terminal sequences. RNA interference against one LC1 sub-group resulted in dramatic reduction of CEC1 and GAM1. Over-expression of LC1 a and to a lesser extent LC3a (a member of the LC1 and LC3 sub-group, respectively) in the 4a3A cell line enhances the expression of CEC1 and GAM1. These results demonstrate that the LC1-subgroup splice variants are essential for the expression of CEC1 and GAM1 in A. gambiae cell line.

  17. Elevated Oestrogen Receptor Splice Variant ERαΔ5 Expression in Tumour-adjacent Hormone-responsive Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre L. Martin-Hirsch

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Susceptibility to prostate or endometrial cancer is linked with obesity, a state of oestrogen excess. Oestrogen receptor (ER splice variants may be responsible for the tissue-level of ER activity. Such micro-environmental regulation may modulate cancer initiation and/or progression mechanisms. Real-time reverse transcriptase (RT polymerase chain reaction (PCR was used to quantitatively assess the levels of four ER splice variants (ERαΔ3, ERαΔ5, ERβ2 and ERβ5, plus the full-length parent isoforms ERα and ERβ1, in high-risk [tumour-adjacent prostate (n = 10 or endometrial cancer (n = 9] vs. low-risk [benign prostate (n = 12 or endometrium (n = 9], as well as a comparison of UK (n = 12 vs. Indian (n = 15 benign prostate. All three tissue groups expressed the ER splice variants at similar levels, apart from ERαΔ5. This splice variant was markedly raised in all of the tumour-adjacent prostate samples compared to benign tissues. Immunofluorescence analysis for ERβ2 in prostate tissue demonstrated that such splice variants are present in comparable, if not greater, amounts as the parent full-length isoform. This small pilot study demonstrates the ubiquitous nature of ER splice variants in these tissue sites and suggests that ERαΔ5 may be involved in progression of prostate adenocarcinoma.

  18. Genome-Wide Analysis of Alternative Splicing during Development and Drought Stress in Maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatcher, Shawn R; Danilevskaya, Olga N; Meng, Xin; Beatty, Mary; Zastrow-Hayes, Gina; Harris, Charlotte; Van Allen, Brandon; Habben, Jeffrey; Li, Bailin

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing plays a crucial role in plant development as well as stress responses. Although alternative splicing has been studied during development and in response to stress, the interplay between these two factors remains an open question. To assess the effects of drought stress on developmentally regulated splicing in maize (Zea mays), 94 RNA-seq libraries from ear, tassel, and leaf of the B73 public inbred line were constructed at four developmental stages under both well-watered and drought conditions. This analysis was supplemented with a publicly available series of 53 libraries from developing seed, embryo, and endosperm. More than 48,000 novel isoforms, often with stage- or condition-specific expression, were uncovered, suggesting that developmentally regulated alternative splicing occurs in thousands of genes. Drought induced large developmental splicing changes in leaf and ear but relatively few in tassel. Most developmental stage-specific splicing changes affected by drought were tissue dependent, whereas stage-independent changes frequently overlapped between leaf and ear. A linear relationship was found between gene expression changes in splicing factors and alternative spicing of other genes during development. Collectively, these results demonstrate that alternative splicing is strongly associated with tissue type, developmental stage, and stress condition.

  19. Genome-Wide Analysis of Alternative Splicing during Development and Drought Stress in Maize1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatcher, Shawn R.; Meng, Xin; Beatty, Mary; Zastrow-Hayes, Gina; Harris, Charlotte; Habben, Jeffrey; Li, Bailin

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing plays a crucial role in plant development as well as stress responses. Although alternative splicing has been studied during development and in response to stress, the interplay between these two factors remains an open question. To assess the effects of drought stress on developmentally regulated splicing in maize (Zea mays), 94 RNA-seq libraries from ear, tassel, and leaf of the B73 public inbred line were constructed at four developmental stages under both well-watered and drought conditions. This analysis was supplemented with a publicly available series of 53 libraries from developing seed, embryo, and endosperm. More than 48,000 novel isoforms, often with stage- or condition-specific expression, were uncovered, suggesting that developmentally regulated alternative splicing occurs in thousands of genes. Drought induced large developmental splicing changes in leaf and ear but relatively few in tassel. Most developmental stage-specific splicing changes affected by drought were tissue dependent, whereas stage-independent changes frequently overlapped between leaf and ear. A linear relationship was found between gene expression changes in splicing factors and alternative spicing of other genes during development. Collectively, these results demonstrate that alternative splicing is strongly associated with tissue type, developmental stage, and stress condition. PMID:26582726

  20. Relationship between nucleosome positioning and progesterone-induced alternative splicing in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannone, Camilla; Pohl, Andy; Papasaikas, Panagiotis; Soronellas, Daniel; Vicent, Guillermo P; Beato, Miguel; ValcáRcel, Juan

    2015-03-01

    Splicing of mRNA precursors can occur cotranscriptionally and it has been proposed that chromatin structure influences splice site recognition and regulation. Here we have systematically explored potential links between nucleosome positioning and alternative splicing regulation upon progesterone stimulation of breast cancer cells. We confirm preferential nucleosome positioning in exons and report four distinct profiles of nucleosome density around alternatively spliced exons, with RNA polymerase II accumulation closely following nucleosome positioning. Hormone stimulation induces switches between profile classes, correlating with a subset of alternative splicing changes. Hormone-induced exon inclusion often correlates with higher nucleosome occupancy at the exon or the preceding intronic region and with higher RNA polymerase II accumulation. In contrast, exons skipped upon hormone stimulation display low nucleosome densities even before hormone treatment, suggesting that chromatin structure primes alternative splicing regulation. Skipped exons frequently harbor binding sites for hnRNP AB, a hormone-induced splicing regulator whose knock down prevents some hormone-induced skipping events. Collectively, our results argue that a variety of chromatin architecture mechanisms can influence alternative splicing decisions.

  1. HP1 Is Involved in Regulating the Global Impact of DNA Methylation on Alternative Splicing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahuvi Yearim

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The global impact of DNA methylation on alternative splicing is largely unknown. Using a genome-wide approach in wild-type and methylation-deficient embryonic stem cells, we found that DNA methylation can either enhance or silence exon recognition and affects the splicing of more than 20% of alternative exons. These exons are characterized by distinct genetic and epigenetic signatures. Alternative splicing regulation of a subset of these exons can be explained by heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1, which silences or enhances exon recognition in a position-dependent manner. We constructed an experimental system using site-specific targeting of a methylated/unmethylated gene and demonstrate a direct causal relationship between DNA methylation and alternative splicing. HP1 regulates this gene’s alternative splicing in a methylation-dependent manner by recruiting splicing factors to its methylated form. Our results demonstrate DNA methylation’s significant global influence on mRNA splicing and identify a specific mechanism of splicing regulation mediated by HP1.

  2. Cloning and characterization of the mouse Mcoln1 gene reveals an alternatively spliced transcript not seen in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stahl Stefanie

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mucolipidosis type IV (MLIV is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder characterized by severe neurologic and ophthalmologic abnormalities. Recently the MLIV gene, MCOLN1, has been identified as a new member of the transient receptor potential (TRP cation channel superfamily. Here we report the cloning and characterization of the mouse homologue, Mcoln1, and report a novel splice variant that is not seen in humans. Results The human and mouse genes display a high degree of synteny. Mcoln1 shows 91% amino acid and 86% nucleotide identity to MCOLN1. Also, Mcoln1 maps to chromosome 8 and contains an open reading frame of 580 amino acids, with a transcript length of approximately 2 kb encoded by 14 exons, similar to its human counterpart. The transcript that results from murine specific alternative splicing encodes a 611 amino acid protein that differs at the c-terminus. Conclusions Mcoln1 is highly similar to MCOLN1, especially in the transmembrane domains and ion pore region. Also, the late endosomal/lysosomal targeting signal is conserved, supporting the hypothesis that the protein is localized to these vesicle membranes. To date, there are very few reports describing species-specific splice variants. While identification of Mcoln1 is crucial to the development of mouse models for MLIV, the fact that there are two transcripts in mice suggests an additional or alternate function of the gene that may complicate phenotypic assessment.

  3. PDK2-mediated alternative splicing switches Bnip3 from cell death to cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gang, Hongying; Dhingra, Rimpy; Lin, Junjun; Hai, Yan; Aviv, Yaron; Margulets, Victoria; Hamedani, Mohammad; Thanasupawat, Thatchawan; Leygue, Etienne; Klonisch, Thomas; Davie, James R; Kirshenbaum, Lorrie A

    2015-09-28

    Herein we describe a novel survival pathway that operationally links alternative pre-mRNA splicing of the hypoxia-inducible death protein Bcl-2 19-kD interacting protein 3 (Bnip3) to the unique glycolytic phenotype in cancer cells. While a full-length Bnip3 protein (Bnip3FL) encoded by exons 1-6 was expressed as an isoform in normal cells and promoted cell death, a truncated spliced variant of Bnip3 mRNA deleted for exon 3 (Bnip3Δex3) was preferentially expressed in several human adenocarcinomas and promoted survival. Reciprocal inhibition of the Bnip3Δex3/Bnip3FL isoform ratio by inhibiting pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase isoform 2 (PDK2) in Panc-1 cells rapidly induced mitochondrial perturbations and cell death. The findings of the present study reveal a novel survival pathway that functionally couples the unique glycolytic phenotype in cancer cells to hypoxia resistance via a PDK2-dependent mechanism that switches Bnip3 from cell death to survival. Discovery of the survival Bnip3Δex3 isoform may fundamentally explain how certain cells resist Bnip3 and avert death during hypoxia.

  4. Arrhythmogenic Biophysical Phenotype for SCN5A Mutation S1787N Depends upon Splice Variant Background and Intracellular Acidosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rou-Mu Hu

    Full Text Available SCN5A is a susceptibility gene for type 3 long QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome, and sudden infant death syndrome. INa dysfunction from mutated SCN5A can depend upon the splice variant background in which it is expressed and also upon environmental factors such as acidosis. S1787N was reported previously as a LQT3-associated mutation and has also been observed in 1 of 295 healthy white controls. Here, we determined the in vitro biophysical phenotype of SCN5A-S1787N in an effort to further assess its possible pathogenicity.We engineered S1787N in the two most common alternatively spliced SCN5A isoforms, the major isoform lacking a glutamine at position 1077 (Q1077del and the minor isoform containing Q1077, and expressed these two engineered constructs in HEK293 cells for electrophysiological study. Macroscopic voltage-gated INa was measured 24 hours after transfection with standard whole-cell patch clamp techniques. We applied intracellular solutions with pH7.4 or pH6.7. S1787N in the Q1077 background had WT-like INa including peak INa density, activation and inactivation parameters, and late INa amplitude in both pH 7.4 and pH 6.7. However, with S1787N in the Q1077del background, the percentages of INa late/peak were increased by 2.1 fold in pH 7.4 and by 2.9 fold in pH 6.7 when compared to WT.The LQT3-like biophysical phenotype for S1787N depends on both the SCN5A splice variant and on the intracellular pH. These findings provide further evidence that the splice variant and environmental factors affect the molecular phenotype of cardiac SCN5A-encoded sodium channel (Nav1.5, has implications for the clinical phenotype, and may provide insight into acidosis-induced arrhythmia mechanisms.

  5. The evolutionary fate of alternatively spliced homologous exons after gene duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abascal, Federico; Tress, Michael L; Valencia, Alfonso

    2015-04-29

    Alternative splicing and gene duplication are the two main processes responsible for expanding protein functional diversity. Although gene duplication can generate new genes and alternative splicing can introduce variation through alternative gene products, the interplay between the two processes is complex and poorly understood. Here, we have carried out a study of the evolution of alternatively spliced exons after gene duplication to better understand the interaction between the two processes. We created a manually curated set of 97 human genes with mutually exclusively spliced homologous exons and analyzed the evolution of these exons across five distantly related vertebrates (lamprey, spotted gar, zebrafish, fugu, and coelacanth). Most of these exons had an ancient origin (more than 400 Ma). We found examples supporting two extreme evolutionary models for the behaviour of homologous axons after gene duplication. We observed 11 events in which gene duplication was accompanied by splice isoform separation, that is, each paralog specifically conserved just one distinct ancestral homologous exon. At other extreme, we identified genes in which the homologous exons were always conserved within paralogs, suggesting that the alternative splicing event cannot easily be separated from the function in these genes. That many homologous exons fall in between these two extremes highlights the diversity of biological systems and suggests that the subtle balance between alternative splicing and gene duplication is adjusted to the specific cellular context of each gene.

  6. Spatio-temporal regulations and functions of neuronal alternative RNA splicing in developing and adult brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Takatoshi; Hidaka, Chiharu; Iijima, Yoko

    2016-08-01

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing is a fundamental mechanism that generates molecular diversity from a single gene. In the central nervous system (CNS), key neural developmental steps are thought to be controlled by alternative splicing decisions, including the molecular diversity underlying synaptic wiring, plasticity, and remodeling. Significant progress has been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms and functions of alternative pre-mRNA splicing in neurons through studies in invertebrate systems; however, recent studies have begun to uncover the potential role of neuronal alternative splicing in the mammalian CNS. This article provides an overview of recent findings regarding the regulation and function of neuronal alternative splicing. In particular, we focus on the spatio-temporal regulation of neurexin, a synaptic adhesion molecule, by neuronal cell type-specific factors and neuronal activity, which are thought to be especially important for characterizing neural development and function within the mammalian CNS. Notably, there is increasing evidence that implicates the dysregulation of neuronal splicing events in several neurological disorders. Therefore, understanding the detailed mechanisms of neuronal alternative splicing in the mammalian CNS may provide plausible treatment strategies for these diseases.

  7. Structures of alternatively spliced isoforms of human ketohexokinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Chi H; Asipu, Aruna; Bonthron, David T; Phillips, Simon E V

    2009-03-01

    A molecular understanding of the unique aspects of dietary fructose metabolism may be the key to understanding and controlling the current epidemic of fructose-related obesity, diabetes and related adverse metabolic states in Western populations. Fructose catabolism is initiated by its phosphorylation to fructose 1-phosphate, which is performed by ketohexokinase (KHK). Here, the crystal structures of the two alternatively spliced isoforms of human ketohexokinase, hepatic KHK-C and the peripheral isoform KHK-A, and of the ternary complex of KHK-A with the substrate fructose and AMP-PNP are reported. The structure of the KHK-A ternary complex revealed an active site with both the substrate fructose and the ATP analogue in positions ready for phosphorylation following a reaction mechanism similar to that of the pfkB family of carbohydrate kinases. Hepatic KHK deficiency causes the benign disorder essential fructosuria. The effects of the disease-causing mutations (Gly40Arg and Ala43Thr) have been modelled in the context of the KHK structure.

  8. Ancient nature of alternative splicing and functions of introns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Kemin; Salamov, Asaf; Kuo, Alan; Aerts, Andrea; Grigoriev, Igor

    2011-03-21

    Using four genomes: Chamydomonas reinhardtii, Agaricus bisporus, Aspergillus carbonarius, and Sporotricum thermophile with EST coverage of 2.9x, 8.9x, 29.5x, and 46.3x respectively, we identified 11 alternative splicing (AS) types that were dominated by intron retention (RI; biased toward short introns) and found 15, 35, 52, and 63percent AS of multiexon genes respectively. Genes with AS were more ancient, and number of AS correlated with number of exons, expression level, and maximum intron length of the gene. Introns with tendency to be retained had either stop codons or length of 3n+1 or 3n+2 presumably triggering nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD), but introns retained in major isoforms (0.2-6percent of all introns) were biased toward 3n length and stop codon free. Stopless introns were biased toward phase 0, but 3n introns favored phase 1 that introduced more flexible and hydrophilic amino acids on both ends of introns which would be less disruptive to protein structure. We proposed a model in which minor RI intron could evolve into major RI that could facilitate intron loss through exonization.

  9. Moringa oleifera Gold Nanoparticles Modulate Oncogenes, Tumor Suppressor Genes, and Caspase-9 Splice Variants in A549 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiloke, Charlette; Phulukdaree, Alisa; Anand, Krishnan; Gengan, Robert M; Chuturgoon, Anil A

    2016-10-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNP's) facilitate cancer cell recognition and can be manufactured by green synthesis using nutrient rich medicinal plants such as Moringa oleifera (MO). Targeting dysregulated oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes is crucial for cancer therapeutics. We investigated the antiproliferative effects of AuNP synthesized from MO aqueous leaf extracts (MLAuNP ) in A549 lung and SNO oesophageal cancer cells. A one-pot green synthesis technique was used to synthesise MLAuNP . A549, SNO cancer cells and normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were exposed to MLAuNP and CAuNP to evaluate cytotoxicity (MTT assay); apoptosis was measured by phosphatidylserine (PS) externalization, mitochondrial depolarization (ΔΨm) (flow cytometry), caspase-3/7, -9 activity, and ATP levels (luminometry). The mRNA expression of c-myc, p53, Skp2, Fbw7α, and caspase-9 splice variants was determined using qPCR, while relative protein expression of c-myc, p53, SRp30a, Bax, Bcl-2, Smac/DIABLO, Hsp70, and PARP-1 were determined by Western blotting. MLAuNP and CAuNP were not cytotoxic to PBMCs, whilst its pro-apoptotic properties were confirmed in A549 and SNO cells. MLAuNP significantly increased caspase activity in SNO cells while MLAuNP significantly increased PS externalization, ΔΨm, caspase-9, caspase-3/7 activities, and decreased ATP levels in A549 cells. Also, p53 mRNA and protein levels, SRp30a (P = 0.428), Bax, Smac/DIABLO and PARP-1 24 kDa fragment levels were significantly increased. Conversely, MLAuNP significantly decreased Bcl-2, Hsp70, Skp2, Fbw7α, c-myc mRNA, and protein levels and activated alternate splicing with caspase-9a splice variant being significantly increased. MLAuNP possesses antiproliferative properties and induced apoptosis in A549 cells by activating alternate splicing of caspase-9. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2302-2314, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Specific intracellular localization and antiviral property of genetic and splicing variants in bovine Mx1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Kohji; Nakatsu, Yuichiro; Onogi, Akio; Ueda, Junji; Watanabe, Tomomasa

    2009-12-01

    In bovine Mx1, only an amino acid substitution between Ile and Met at position 120 was detected by the nucleotide sequence and mismatched PCR-RFLP technique. The Ile variant was assumed to distribute mainly in the bovine population since the gene frequency was 79.3%. Furthermore, we cloned water buffalo Mx1 cDNA, which showed 51 nucleotide and 20 amino acid substitutions in comparison with that of the cow. Another kind of Mx1 cDNA, bovine Mx1B cDNA, was found and it was deduced to cause 27 amino acid substitutions at the N-terminus compared to the original Mx1 by alternative splicing. However, no variation was detected in 27 amino acids specific for Mx1B among 29 cows and a water buffalo. We established four kinds of mRNA-expressing 3T3 cells and Vero cells. When infection experiments were performed using recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSVDeltaG*-G), bovine Ile and Met types and water buffalo Mx1 mRNA-expressing cell lines showed equally positive antiviral activities (p Mx1 and Mx1B proteins was examined by a transiently GFP-fused expression system in 3T3 cells. Bovine Mx1 was localized in the cytoplasm, while bovine Mx1B was mainly localized in the nucleus. An arginine-rich nuclear localization signal was found in 27 amino acids specific for Mx1B. N-terminus-deleted Mx1B was only localized in the cytoplasm, and the deleted Mx1B-expressing cell lines showed significantly positive antiviral activities (p < 0.05) against VSVDeltaG*-G.

  11. Alternative pre-mRNA splicing in Drosophila spliceosomal assembly factor RNP-4F during development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetherson, Rebecca A; Strock, Stephen B; White, Kristen N; Vaughn, Jack C

    2006-04-26

    The 5'- and 3'-UTR regions in pre-mRNAs play a variety of roles in controlling eukaryotic gene expression, including translational modulation. Here we report the results of a systematic study of alternative splicing in rnp-4f, which encodes a Drosophila spliceosomal assembly factor. We show that most of the nine introns are constitutively spliced, but several patterns of alternative splicing are observed in two pre-mRNA regions including the 5'-UTR. Intron V is shown to be of recent evolutionary origin and is infrequently spliced, resulting in generation of an in-frame stop codon and a predicted truncated protein lacking a nuclear localization signal, so that alternative splicing regulates its subcellular localization. Intron 0, located in the 5'-UTR, is subject to three different splicing decisions in D. melanogaster. Northern analysis of poly(A+) mRNAs reveals two differently sized rnp-4f mRNA isoforms in this species. A switch in relative isoform abundance occurs during mid-embryo stages, when the larger isoform becomes more abundant. This isoform is shown to represent intron 0 unspliced mRNA, whereas the smaller transcript represents the product of alternative splicing. Comparative genomic analysis predicts that intron 0 is present in diverse Drosophila species. Intron 0 splicing results in loss of an evolutionarily conserved stem-loop constituting a potential cis-regulatory element at the 3'-splice site. A model is proposed for the role of this element both in 5'-UTR alternative splicing decisions and in RNP-4F translational modulation. Preliminary evidences in support of our model are discussed.

  12. Expression of insulin receptor spliced variants and their functional correlates in muscle from patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Torben; Bjørbaek, C; Vestergaard, H;

    1993-01-01

    Due to alternative splicing of exon 11 of the receptor gene, the human insulin receptor exists in two forms, that have distinct tissue-specific expression and are functionally different. Needle biopsies obtained from vastus lateralis muscle from 20 patients with noninsulin-dependent diabetes...... mellitus (NIDDM) and 20 normal control subjects were analyzed for the relative expression of insulin receptor mRNA variants in a novel assay using fluorescence-labeled primers and subsequent analysis on an automated DNA sequencer. In subgroups of patients and control subjects, insulin binding and tyrosine...... kinase activity were examined in wheat germ agglutinin-purified insulin receptors isolated from muscle biopsies. Moreover, insulin-stimulated glucose disposal was studied by means of the euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp technique. No difference in the relative expression of spliced variants...

  13. Unfolding the mystery of alternative splicing through a unique method of in vivo selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ravindra N

    2007-05-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-messenger RNA (pre-mRNA) is a fundamental mechanism of gene regulation in higher eukaryotes. In addition to creating protein diversity, alternative splicing provides the safest mode of gene evolution. Of late, more and more forms of alternatively spliced transcripts (mRNAs) are being discovered for key genes. Some of the alternatively spliced transcripts are also associated with major human diseases. This has created a sense of urgency to find the methods by which regulation of alternative splicing of specific exons could be best understood. Here I review a powerful in vivo selection method that uses a combinatorial library of partially random sequences. Several advantages of this method include in vivo analysis of large sequences, identification of unique sequence motifs, determination of relative strength of splice sites and identification of long-distance interactions including role of RNA structures. This unique method could be applied to identify tissue-specific cis-elements. Similarly, the method is suitable to find cis-elements that become active in response to specific treatments of cells. Considering this unbiased method uses in vivo conditions, it has potential to identify critical regulatory elements as therapeutic targets for a growing number of splicing-associated diseases.

  14. Conserved expression of the glutamate NMDA receptor 1 subunit splice variants during the development of the Siberian hamster suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giles E Duffield

    Full Text Available Glutamate neurotransmission and the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR are central to photic signaling to the master circadian pacemaker located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN. NMDARs also play important roles in brain development including visual input circuits. The functional NMDAR is comprised of multiple subunits, but each requiring the NR1 subunit for normal activity. The NR1 can be alternatively spliced to produce isoforms that confer different functional properties on the NMDAR. The SCN undergoes extensive developmental changes during postnatal life, including synaptogenesis and acquisition of photic signaling. These changes are especially important in the highly photoperiodic Siberian hamster, in which development of sensitivity to photic cues within the SCN could impact early physiological programming. In this study we examined the expression of NR1 isoforms in the hamster at different developmental ages. Gene expression in the forebrain was quantified by in situ hybridization using oligonucleotide probes specific to alternatively spliced regions of the NR1 heteronuclear mRNA, including examination of anterior hypothalamus, piriform cortex, caudate-putamen, thalamus and hippocampus. Gene expression analysis within the SCN revealed the absence of the N1 cassette, the presence of the C2 cassette alone and the combined absence of C1 and C2 cassettes, indicating that the dominant splice variants are NR1-2a and NR1-4a. Whilst we observe changes at different developmental ages in levels of NR1 isoform probe hybridization in various forebrain structures, we find no significant changes within the SCN. This suggests that a switch in NR1 isoform does not underlie or is not produced by developmental changes within the hamster SCN. Consistency of the NR1 isoforms would ensure that the response of the SCN cells to photic signals remains stable throughout life, an important aspect of the function of the SCN as a responder to

  15. Conserved expression of the glutamate NMDA receptor 1 subunit splice variants during the development of the Siberian hamster suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffield, Giles E; Mikkelsen, Jens D; Ebling, Francis J P

    2012-01-01

    Glutamate neurotransmission and the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) are central to photic signaling to the master circadian pacemaker located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). NMDARs also play important roles in brain development including visual input circuits. The functional NMDAR is comprised of multiple subunits, but each requiring the NR1 subunit for normal activity. The NR1 can be alternatively spliced to produce isoforms that confer different functional properties on the NMDAR. The SCN undergoes extensive developmental changes during postnatal life, including synaptogenesis and acquisition of photic signaling. These changes are especially important in the highly photoperiodic Siberian hamster, in which development of sensitivity to photic cues within the SCN could impact early physiological programming. In this study we examined the expression of NR1 isoforms in the hamster at different developmental ages. Gene expression in the forebrain was quantified by in situ hybridization using oligonucleotide probes specific to alternatively spliced regions of the NR1 heteronuclear mRNA, including examination of anterior hypothalamus, piriform cortex, caudate-putamen, thalamus and hippocampus. Gene expression analysis within the SCN revealed the absence of the N1 cassette, the presence of the C2 cassette alone and the combined absence of C1 and C2 cassettes, indicating that the dominant splice variants are NR1-2a and NR1-4a. Whilst we observe changes at different developmental ages in levels of NR1 isoform probe hybridization in various forebrain structures, we find no significant changes within the SCN. This suggests that a switch in NR1 isoform does not underlie or is not produced by developmental changes within the hamster SCN. Consistency of the NR1 isoforms would ensure that the response of the SCN cells to photic signals remains stable throughout life, an important aspect of the function of the SCN as a responder to environmental changes

  16. Genetic variations and alternative splicing. The Glioma associated oncogene 1, GLI1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eZaphiropoulos

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing is a post-transcriptional regulatory process that is attaining stronger recognition as a modulator of gene expression. Alternative splicing occurs when the primary RNA transcript is differentially processed into more than one mature RNAs. This is the result of a variable definition/inclusion of the exons, the sequences that are excised from the primary RNA to form the mature RNAs. Consequently, RNA expression can generate a collection of differentially spliced RNAs, which may distinctly influence subsequent biological events, such as protein synthesis or other biomolecular interactions. Still the mechanisms that control exon definition and exon inclusion are not fully clarified. This mini-review highlights advances in this field as well as the impact of single nucleotide polymorphisms in affecting splicing decisions. The Glioma associated oncogene 1, GLI1, is taken as an example in addressing the role of nucleotide substitutions for splicing regulation.

  17. Capillary electrophoresis analysis of conventional splicing assays: IARC analytical and clinical classification of 31 BRCA2 genetic variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Garibay, Gorka Ruiz; Acedo, Alberto; García-Casado, Zaida; Gutiérrez-Enríquez, Sara; Tosar, Alicia; Romero, Atocha; Garre, Pilar; Llort, Gemma; Thomassen, Mads; Díez, Orland; Pérez-Segura, Pedro; Díaz-Rubio, Eduardo; Velasco, Eladio A; Caldés, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Rare sequence variants in "high-risk" disease genes, often referred as unclassified variants (UVs), pose a serious challenge to genetic testing. However, UVs resulting in splicing alterations can be readily assessed by in vitro assays. Unfortunately, analytical and clinical interpretation of these assays is often challenging. Here, we explore this issue by conducting splicing assays in 31 BRCA2 genetic variants. All variants were assessed by RT-PCR followed by capillary electrophoresis and direct sequencing. If assays did not produce clear-cut outputs (Class-2 or Class-5 according to analytical International Agency for Research on Cancer guidelines), we performed qPCR and/or minigene assays. The latter were performed with a new splicing vector (pSAD) developed by authors of the present manuscript (patent #P201231427 CSIC). We have identified three clinically relevant Class-5 variants (c.682-2A>G, c.7617+1G>A, and c.8954-5A>G), and 27 analytical Class-2 variants (not inducing splicing alterations). In addition, we demonstrate that rs9534262 (c.7806-14T>C) is a BRCA2 splicing quantitative trait locus.

  18. Corticotropin (ACTH) regulates alternative RNA splicing in Y1 mouse adrenocortical tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmer, Bernard P; Cordova, Martha

    2015-06-15

    The stimulatory effect of ACTH on gene expression is well documented and is thought to be a major mechanism by which ACTH maintains the functional and structural integrity of the gland. Previously, we showed that ACTH regulates the accumulation of over 1200 transcripts in Y1 adrenal cells, including a cluster with functions in alternative splicing of RNA. On this basis, we postulated that some of the effects of ACTH on the transcription landscape of Y1 cells are mediated by alternative splicing. In this study, we demonstrate that ACTH regulates the alternative splicing of four transcripts - Gnas, Cd151, Dab2 and Tia1. Inasmuch as alternative splicing potentially affects transcripts from more than two-thirds of the mouse genome, we suggest that these findings are representative of a genome-wide effect of ACTH that impacts on the mRNA and protein composition of the adrenal cortex.

  19. Differential gene expression and alternative splicing between diploid and tetraploid watermelon lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synthetic tetraploid plants have been used for production of seedless triploid watermelon lines being pollinated with diploid plants. When compared to their diploid or triploid counterparts, the tetraploid exhibit wide phenotypic differences. Though many factors, including alternative splicing (AS),...

  20. Alternative splicing generates a smaller assortment of CaV2.1 transcripts in cerebellar Purkinje cells than in the cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanumilli, Srinivasan; Tringham, Elizabeth W; Payne, C Elizabeth; Dupere, Jonathan R B; Venkateswarlu, Kanamarlapudi; Usowicz, Maria M

    2006-01-12

    P/Q-type calcium channels control many calcium-driven functions in the brain. The CACNA1A gene encoding the pore-forming CaV2.1 (alpha1A) subunit of P/Q-type channels undergoes alternative splicing at multiple loci. This results in channel variants with different phenotypes. However, the combinatorial patterns of alternative splice events at two or more loci, and hence the diversity of CaV2.1 transcripts, are incompletely defined for specific brain regions and types of brain neurons. Using RT-PCR and splice variant-specific primers, we have identified multiple CaV2.1 transcript variants defined by different pairs of splice events in the cerebellum of adult rat. We have uncovered new splice variations between exons 28 and 34 (some of which predict a premature stop codon) and a new variation in exon 47 (which predicts a novel extended COOH-terminus). Single cell RT-PCR reveals that each individual cerebellar Purkinje neuron also expresses multiple alternative CaV2.1 transcripts, but the assortment is smaller than in the cerebellum. Two of these variants encode different extended COOH-termini which are not the same as those previously reported in Purkinje cells of the mouse. Our patch-clamp recordings show that calcium channel currents in the soma and dendrites of Purkinje cells are largely inhibited by a concentration of omega-agatoxin IVA selective for P-type over Q-type channels, suggesting that the different transcripts may form phenotypic variants of P-type calcium channels in Purkinje cells. These results expand the known diversity of CaV2.1 transcripts in cerebellar Purkinje cells, and propose the selective expression of distinct assortments of CaV2.1 transcripts in different brain neurons and species.

  1. Alternative Splicing: A Potential Source of Functional Innovation in the Eukaryotic Genome

    OpenAIRE

    Lu Chen; Tovar-Corona, Jaime M.; Urrutia, Araxi O.

    2012-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is a common posttranscriptional process in eukaryotic organisms, by which multiple distinct functional transcripts are produced from a single gene. The release of the human genome draft revealed a much smaller number of genes than anticipated. Because of its potential role in expanding protein diversity, interest in alternative splicing has been increasing over the last decade. Although recent studies have shown that 94% human multiexon genes undergo AS, evolution of...

  2. Correcting for Differential Transcript Coverage Reveals a Strong Relationship between Alternative Splicing and Organism Complexity

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Lu; Bush, Stephen J; Tovar-Corona, Jaime M.; Castillo-Morales, Atahualpa; Urrutia, Araxi O.

    2014-01-01

    What at the genomic level underlies organism complexity? Although several genomic features have been associated with organism complexity, in the case of alternative splicing, which has long been proposed to explain the variation in complexity, no such link has been established. Here, we analyzed over 39 million expressed sequence tags available for 47 eukaryotic species with fully sequenced genomes to obtain a comparable index of alternative splicing estimates, which corrects for the distorti...

  3. An alternative splicing switch shapes neurexin repertoires in principal neurons versus interneurons in the mouse hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thi-Minh; Schreiner, Dietmar; Xiao, Le; Traunmüller, Lisa; Bornmann, Caroline; Scheiffele, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The unique anatomical and functional features of principal and interneuron populations are critical for the appropriate function of neuronal circuits. Cell type-specific properties are encoded by selective gene expression programs that shape molecular repertoires and synaptic protein complexes. However, the nature of such programs, particularly for post-transcriptional regulation at the level of alternative splicing is only beginning to emerge. We here demonstrate that transcripts encoding the synaptic adhesion molecules neurexin-1,2,3 are commonly expressed in principal cells and interneurons of the mouse hippocampus but undergo highly differential, cell type-specific alternative splicing. Principal cell-specific neurexin splice isoforms depend on the RNA-binding protein Slm2. By contrast, most parvalbumin-positive (PV+) interneurons lack Slm2, express a different neurexin splice isoform and co-express the corresponding splice isoform-specific neurexin ligand Cbln4. Conditional ablation of Nrxn alternative splice insertions selectively in PV+ cells results in elevated hippocampal network activity and impairment in a learning task. Thus, PV-cell-specific alternative splicing of neurexins is critical for neuronal circuit function DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22757.001 PMID:27960072

  4. Identification of a novel splice variant of human PD-L1 Mrna encoding an isoform-lacking Igv-like domain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xian-hui HE; Li-hui XU; Yi LIU

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the expression and regulation of PD-1 ligand 1 (PD-L1) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Methods: The cDNA encoding human PD-L1 precursor was cloned from the total RNA extracted from the resting and phorbol dibutyrate plus ionomycin- or phytohemagglutinin-activated PBMC, by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and independent clones were sequenced and analyzed. The expression and subcellular localization were examined in transiently transfected cells. The PD-L1 gene expression in different PBMC was also analyzed by RT-PCR. Results: A novel human PD-L1 splice variant was identified from the activated PBMC. It was generated by splicing out exon 2 encoding an immunoglobulin variable domain (Igv)-like domain but retaining all other exons without a frame-shift. Consequently, the putative translated protein contained all other domains including the transmembrane region except for the Igv-like domain. Furthermore, the conventional isoform was expressed on the plasma surface whereas the novel isoform showed a pattern of intmcellular membrane distribution in transiently transfected K562 cells. In addition, the expression pattern of the PD-L1 splice variant was variable in different individuals and in different cellular status. Conclusion: PD-L1 expression may be regulated at the posttranscriptional level through alternative splicing, and modulation of the PD-L1 isoform expression may influence the outcome of specific immune responses in the peripheral tissues.

  5. Alternative splicing, a new target to block cellular gene expression by poliovirus 2A protease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez, Enrique, E-mail: ealvarez@cbm.uam.es [Centro de Biologia Molecular Severo Ochoa (CSIC-UAM), Nicolas Cabrera, 1 Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Castello, Alfredo; Carrasco, Luis; Izquierdo, Jose M. [Centro de Biologia Molecular Severo Ochoa (CSIC-UAM), Nicolas Cabrera, 1 Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-10-14

    Highlights: {yields} Novel role for poliovirus 2A protease as splicing modulator. {yields} Poliovirus 2A protease inhibits the alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs. {yields} Poliovirus 2A protease blocks the second catalytic step of splicing. -- Abstract: Viruses have developed multiple strategies to interfere with the gene expression of host cells at different stages to ensure their own survival. Here we report a new role for poliovirus 2A{sup pro} modulating the alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs. Expression of 2A{sup pro} potently inhibits splicing of reporter genes in HeLa cells. Low amounts of 2A{sup pro} abrogate Fas exon 6 skipping, whereas higher levels of protease fully abolish Fas and FGFR2 splicing. In vitro splicing of MINX mRNA using nuclear extracts is also strongly inhibited by 2A{sup pro}, leading to accumulation of the first exon and the lariat product containing the unspliced second exon. These findings reveal that the mechanism of action of 2A{sup pro} on splicing is to selectively block the second catalytic step.

  6. High qualitative and quantitative conservation of alternative splicing in Caenorhabditis elegans and Caenorhabditis briggsae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rukov, Jakob Lewin; Irimia, Manuel; Mørk, Søren;

    2007-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is an important contributor to proteome diversity and is regarded as an explanatory factor for the relatively low number of human genes compared with less complex animals. To assess the evolutionary conservation of AS and its developmental regulation, we have investigated...... the qualitative and quantitative expression of 21 orthologous alternative splice events through the development of 2 nematode species separated by 85-110 Myr of evolutionary time. We demonstrate that most of these alternative splice events present in Caenorhabditis elegans are conserved in Caenorhabditis briggsae...... mechanisms controlling AS are to a large extent conserved during the evolution of Caenorhabditis. This strong conservation indicates that both major and minor splice forms have important functional roles and that the relative quantities in which they are expressed are crucial. Our results therefore suggest...

  7. Modification of Alternative Splicing of Bcl-x Pre-mRNA in Bladder Cancer Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Zhaohui; XING Shi'an; CHENG Ping; ZENG Fuqing; LU Gongcheng

    2006-01-01

    To modify the splicing pattern of Bcl-x and compare the effect of this approach with that of the antisense gene therapy in BIU-87 cell line of bladder cancer, by using 5'-Bcl-x AS to target downstream alternative 5'-Bcl-x splice site to shift splicing from Bcl-xL to Bcl-xS and 3'-Bcl-x AS antisense to the 3'-splice site of exon Ⅲ in Bcl-x pre- mRNA to down regulation of Bcl-xL expression,the inhibitory effects on cancer cells by modification of alternative splicing and antisense gene therapy were observed and compared by microscopy, MTT Assay, RT-PCR, FACS, Westhern bloting and clone formation. The growth of cells BIU-87 was inhibited in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Its inhibitory effect began 12 h after the exposure, reaching a maximum value after 72h. The number of cells decreased in S phase and the number increased in G1 phase. The ability to form foci was reduced and the antisense gene therapy was approximately half as efficient as modification of alternative splicing in inducing apoptosis. It is concluded that modification of splicing pattern of Bcl-x pre-mRNA in bladder cancer cell BIU-87 is better than antisense gene therapy in terms of tumor inhibition.

  8. Naturally occurring BRCA2 alternative mRNA splicing events in clinically relevant samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fackenthal, James D; Yoshimatsu, Toshio; Zhang, Bifeng

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: BRCA1 and BRCA2 are the two principal tumour suppressor genes associated with inherited high risk of breast and ovarian cancer. Genetic testing of BRCA1/2 will often reveal one or more sequence variants of uncertain clinical significance, some of which may affect normal splicing patte...

  9. A novel DNMT3B splice variant expressed in tumor and pluripotent cells modulates genomic DNA methylation patterns and displays altered DNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnan, Suhasni; Van Emburgh, Beth O; Shan, Jixiu; Su, Zhen; Fields, C Robert; Vieweg, Johannes; Hamazaki, Takashi; Schwartz, Philip H; Terada, Naohiro; Robertson, Keith D

    2009-10-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic mark essential for mammalian development, genomic stability, and imprinting. DNA methylation patterns are established and maintained by three DNA methyltransferases: DNMT1, DNMT3A, and DNMT3B. Interestingly, all three DNMTs make use of alternative splicing. DNMT3B has nearly 40 known splice variants expressed in a tissue- and disease-specific manner, but very little is known about the role of these splice variants in modulating DNMT3B function. We describe here the identification and characterization of a novel alternatively spliced form of DNMT3B lacking exon 5 within the NH(2)-terminal regulatory domain. This variant, which we term DNMT3B3Delta5 because it is closely related in structure to the ubiquitously expressed DNMT3B3 isoform, is highly expressed in pluripotent cells and brain tissue, is downregulated during differentiation, and is conserved in the mouse. Creation of pluripotent iPS cells from fibroblasts results in marked induction of DNMT3B3Delta5. DNMT3B3Delta5 expression is also altered in human disease, with tumor cell lines displaying elevated or reduced expression depending on their tissue of origin. We then compared the DNA binding and subcellular localization of DNMT3B3Delta5 versus DNMT3B3, revealing that DNMT3B3Delta5 possessed significantly enhanced DNA binding affinity and displayed an altered nuclear distribution. Finally, ectopic overexpression of DNMT3B3Delta5 resulted in repetitive element hypomethylation and enhanced cell growth in a colony formation assay. Taken together, these results show that DNMT3B3Delta5 may play an important role in stem cell maintenance or differentiation and suggest that sequences encoded by exon 5 influence the functional properties of DNMT3B.

  10. Alternatively Spliced Genes as Biomarkers for Schizophrenia, Bipolar Disorder and Psychosis: A Blood-Based Spliceome-Profiling Exploratory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glatt, S J; Chandler, S D; Bousman, C A; Chana, G; Lucero, G R; Tatro, E; May, T; Lohr, J B; Kremen, W S; Everall, I P; Tsuang, M T

    2009-09-01

    OBJECTIVE: Transcriptomic biomarkers of psychiatric diseases obtained from a query of peripheral tissues that are clinically accessible (e.g., blood cells instead of post-mortem brain tissue) have substantial practical appeal to discern the molecular subtypes of common complex diseases such as major psychosis. To this end, spliceome-profiling is a new methodological approach that has considerable conceptual relevance for discovery and clinical translation of novel biomarkers for psychiatric illnesses. Advances in microarray technology now allow for improved sensitivity in measuring the transcriptome while simultaneously querying the "exome" (all exons) and "spliceome" (all alternatively spliced variants). The present study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of spliceome-profiling to discern transcriptomic biomarkers of psychosis. METHODS: We measured exome and spliceome expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 13 schizophrenia patients, nine bipolar disorder patients, and eight healthy control subjects. Each diagnostic group was compared to each other, and the combined group of bipolar disorder and schizophrenia patients was also compared to the control group. Furthermore, we compared subjects with a history of psychosis to subjects without such history. RESULTS: After applying Bonferroni corrections for the 21,866 full-length gene transcripts analyzed, we found significant interactions between diagnostic group and exon identity, consistent with group differences in rates or types of alternative splicing. Relative to the control group, 18 genes in the bipolar disorder group, eight genes in the schizophrenia group, and 15 genes in the combined bipolar disorder and schizophrenia group appeared differentially spliced. Importantly, thirty-three genes showed differential splicing patterns between the bipolar disorder and schizophrenia groups. More frequent exon inclusion and/or over-expression was observed in psychosis. Finally, these observations are

  11. Modulation of alternative splicing with chemical compounds in new therapeutics for human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohe, Kenji; Hagiwara, Masatoshi

    2015-04-17

    Alternative splicing is a critical step where a limited number of human genes generate a complex and diverse proteome. Various diseases, including inherited diseases with abnormalities in the "genome code," have been found to result in an aberrant mis-spliced "transcript code" with correlation to the resulting phenotype. Chemical compound-based and nucleic acid-based strategies are trying to target this mis-spliced "transcript code". We will briefly mention about how to obtain splicing-modifying-compounds by high-throughput screening and overview of what is known about compounds that modify splicing pathways. The main focus will be on RNA-binding protein kinase inhibitors. In the main text, we will refer to diseases where splicing-modifying-compounds have been intensively investigated, with comparison to nucleic acid-based strategies. The information on their involvement in mis-splicing as well as nonsplicing events will be helpful in finding better compounds with less off-target effects for future implications in mis-splicing therapy.

  12. Discovery of a mammalian splice variant of myostatin that stimulates myogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferenc Jeanplong

    Full Text Available Myostatin plays a fundamental role in regulating the size of skeletal muscles. To date, only a single myostatin gene and no splice variants have been identified in mammals. Here we describe the splicing of a cryptic intron that removes the coding sequence for the receptor binding moiety of sheep myostatin. The deduced polypeptide sequence of the myostatin splice variant (MSV contains a 256 amino acid N-terminal domain, which is common to myostatin, and a unique C-terminus of 65 amino acids. Western immunoblotting demonstrated that MSV mRNA is translated into protein, which is present in skeletal muscles. To determine the biological role of MSV, we developed an MSV over-expressing C2C12 myoblast line and showed that it proliferated faster than that of the control line in association with an increased abundance of the CDK2/Cyclin E complex in the nucleus. Recombinant protein made for the novel C-terminus of MSV also stimulated myoblast proliferation and bound to myostatin with high affinity as determined by surface plasmon resonance assay. Therefore, we postulated that MSV functions as a binding protein and antagonist of myostatin. Consistent with our postulate, myostatin protein was co-immunoprecipitated from skeletal muscle extracts with an MSV-specific antibody. MSV over-expression in C2C12 myoblasts blocked myostatin-induced Smad2/3-dependent signaling, thereby confirming that MSV antagonizes the canonical myostatin pathway. Furthermore, MSV over-expression increased the abundance of MyoD, Myogenin and MRF4 proteins (P<0.05, which indicates that MSV stimulates myogenesis through the induction of myogenic regulatory factors. To help elucidate a possible role in vivo, we observed that MSV protein was more abundant during early post-natal muscle development, while myostatin remained unchanged, which suggests that MSV may promote the growth of skeletal muscles. We conclude that MSV represents a unique example of intra-genic regulation in which a

  13. Development and media regulate alternative splicing of a methyltransferase pre-mRNA in Monascus pilosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming-Yong; Miyake, Tsuyoshi

    2009-05-27

    Two alternatively spliced mRNAs (d- and l-MpLaeA) of a methyltransferase gene (MpLaeA) were identified from Monascus pilosus IFO4520 and its mutant MK-1. Alternative splicing of the MpLaeA pre-mRNA occurred in the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR). The alternative splicing patterns of MpLaeA were regulated by the fungal growth stage and the principal nutrients: that is, the short l-MpLaeA mRNA was a constitutive transcript at all growth stages and different carbon or nitrogen sources, but the glutamate and NaNO(3) as main nitrogen source could up-regulate the long d-MpLaeA mRNA form. The long spliced 5'-UTR of d-MpLaeA blocked GFP expression in Escherichia coli , suggesting that d-MpLaeA mRNA was an ineffective spliced mRNA. Down-regulation of MpLaeA by transgenic antisense d-MpLaeA cDNA resulted in decreasing synthesis of monacolin K in M. pilosus. This suggested that the alternative splicing of MpLaeA mRNA might regulate the synthesis of monacolin K.

  14. Exon-centric regulation of pyruvate kinase M alternative splicing via mutually exclusive exons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhenxun Wang; Deblina Chatterjee; Hyun Yong Jeon; Martin Akerman; Matthew G. Vander Heiden; Lewis C. Cantley; Adrian R. Krainer

    2012-01-01

    Alternative splicing of the pyruvate kinase M gene (PK-M) can generate the M2 isoform and promote aerobic glycolysis and tumor growth.However,the cancer-specific alternative splicing regulation of PK-M is not completely understood.Here,we demonstrate that PK-M is regulated by reciprocal affects on the mutually exclusive exons 9 and 10,such that exon 9 is repressed and exon 10 is activated in cancer cells.Strikingly,exonic,rather than intronic,cis-elements are key determinants ef PK-M splicing isoform ratios.Using a systematic sub-exonic duplication approach,we identify a potent exonlc splicing enhancer in exon 10,which differs from its homologous counterpart in exon 9 by only two nucleotides.We identify SRSF3 as one of the cognate factors,and show that this serine/arginine-rich protein activates exon 10 and mediates changes in glucose metabolism.These findings provide mechanistic insights into the complex regulation of alternative splicing of a key regulator of the Warburg effect,and also have implications for other genes with a similar pattern of alternative splicing.

  15. In Vitro and In Vivo Modulation of Alternative Splicing by the Biguanide Metformin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laustriat, Delphine; Gide, Jacqueline; Barrault, Laetitia; Chautard, Emilie; Benoit, Clara; Auboeuf, Didier; Boland, Anne; Battail, Christophe; Artiguenave, François; Deleuze, Jean-François; Bénit, Paule; Rustin, Pierre; Franc, Sylvia; Charpentier, Guillaume; Furling, Denis; Bassez, Guillaume; Nissan, Xavier; Martinat, Cécile; Peschanski, Marc; Baghdoyan, Sandrine

    2015-01-01

    Major physiological changes are governed by alternative splicing of RNA, and its misregulation may lead to specific diseases. With the use of a genome-wide approach, we show here that this splicing step can be modified by medication and demonstrate the effects of the biguanide metformin, on alternative splicing. The mechanism of action involves AMPK activation and downregulation of the RBM3 RNA-binding protein. The effects of metformin treatment were tested on myotonic dystrophy type I (DM1), a multisystemic disease considered to be a spliceopathy. We show that this drug promotes a corrective effect on several splicing defects associated with DM1 in derivatives of human embryonic stem cells carrying the causal mutation of DM1 as well as in primary myoblasts derived from patients. The biological effects of metformin were shown to be compatible with typical therapeutic dosages in a clinical investigation involving diabetic patients. The drug appears to act as a modifier of alternative splicing of a subset of genes and may therefore have novel therapeutic potential for many more diseases besides those directly linked to defective alternative splicing. PMID:26528939

  16. Fusion gene and splice variant analyses in liquid biopsies of lung cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez-Capitán, Ana; Karachaliou, Niki; Pérez-Rosado, Ana; Viteri, Santiago; Morales-Espinosa, Daniela; Rosell, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Obtaining a biopsy of solid tumors requires invasive procedures that strongly limit patient compliance. In contrast, a blood extraction is safe, can be performed at many time points during the course disease and encourages appropriate therapy modifications, potentially improving the patient’s clinical outcome and quality of life. Fusion of the tyrosine kinase genes anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), C-ROS oncogen 1 (ROS 1), rearranged during transfection (RET) and neurotrophic tyrosine kinase 1 (NTRK1) occur in 1–5% of lung adenocarcinomas and constitute therapeutic targets for tyrosine kinase inhibitors. In addition, a MET splicing variant of exon 14, has been reported in 2–4% of lung adenocarcinoma and recent studies suggests that targeted therapies inhibiting MET signaling would be beneficial for patients with this alteration. In this review, we will summarize the new techniques recently developed to detect ALK, RET, ROS and NTRK1 fusions and MET exon 14 splicing variant in liquid biopsy using plasma, serum, circulating tumor cells (CTCs), platelets and exosomes as starting material. PMID:27826534

  17. Identification of a human TFPI-2 splice variant that is upregulated in human tumor tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kisiel Walter

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have shown that the expression of tissue factor pathway inhibitor-2 (TFPI-2, a matrix-associated Kunitz-type serine proteinase inhibitor, is markedly down-regulated in several tumor cells through hypermethylation of the TFPI-2 gene promoter. In the present study, RT-PCR analysis of total RNA from both human normal and tumor cells revealed a novel 289 nucleotide splice variant of the TFPI-2 transcript designated as aberrantly-spliced TFPI-2 (asTFPI-2. Results Nucleotide sequence analyses indicated that asTFPI-2 consists of complete exons II and V, fused with several nucleotides derived from exons III and IV, as well as six nucleotides derived from intron C. 5'- and 3'-RACE analyses of total RNA amplified exclusively the wild-type TFPI-2 transcript, indicating that asTFPI-2 lacks either a 5'-untranslated region (UTR or a 3'-poly (A+ tail. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR analyses revealed that several human tumor cells contain 4 to 50-fold more copies of asTFPI-2 in comparison to normal cells. In spite of the absence of a 5'-UTR or poly (A+ tail, the asTFPI-2 variant exhibited a half-life of ~16 h in tumor cells. Conclusion Our studies reveal the existence of a novel, aberrantly-spliced TFPI-2 transcript predominantly expressed in tumor cells and provides suggestive evidence for an additional mechanism for tumor cells to down-regulate TFPI-2 protein expression enhancing their ability to degrade the extracellular matrix.

  18. The differential roles of Slit2-exon 15 splicing variants in angiogenesis and HUVEC permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yun-Chiu; Chen, Pei-Ni; Wang, Siou-Yu; Liao, Chen-Yi; Lin, Yu-Ying; Sun, Shih-Rhong; Chiu, Chun-Ling; Hsieh, Yih-Shou; Shieh, Jia-Ching; Chang, Jinghua Tsai

    2015-07-01

    Slit2, a secreted glycoprotein, is down-regulated in many cancers. Slit2/Robo signaling pathway plays an important, but controversial, role in angiogenesis. We identified splicing variants of Slit2 at exon 15, Slit2-WT and Slit2-ΔE15, with differential effects on proliferation and invasive capability of lung cancer cells. The aim of this study was to elucidate the differential roles of these exon 15 splicing variants in angiogenesis. Our results revealed that both Slit2-WT and Slit2-ΔE15 inhibit motility of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The conditioned medium (CM) collected from CL1-5/VC or CL1-5/Slit2-WT lung adenocarcinoma cells blocked HUVEC tube formation and angiogenesis on chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay when compared with untreated HUVECs and CAM, respectively. However, CM of CL1-5/Slit2-ΔE15 restored the quality of tubes and the size of vessels. Although both Slit2-WT and Slit2-ΔE15 inhibited permeability induced by CM of cancer cells, Slit2-ΔE15 exhibited stronger effect. These results suggested that Slit2-ΔE15 plays important roles in normalization of blood vessels by enhancing tube quality and tightening endothelial cells, while Slit2-WT only enhances tightening of endothelial cells. It appears that Robo4 is responsible for Slit2 isoform-mediated inhibition of permeability, while neither Robo1 nor Robo4 is required for Slit2-ΔE15-enhanced tube quality. The results of this study suggest that Slit2-ΔE15 splicing form is a promising molecule for normalizing blood vessels around a tumor, which, in turn, may increase efficacy of chemotherapy and radiotherapy.

  19. Alternative splicing of the maize Ac transposase transcript in transgenic sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisson, Ralph; Hellert, Jan; Ringleb, Malte; Machens, Fabian; Kraus, Josef; Hehl, Reinhard

    2010-09-01

    The maize Activator/Dissociation (Ac/Ds) transposable element system was introduced into sugar beet. The autonomous Ac and non-autonomous Ds element excise from the T-DNA vector and integrate at novel positions in the sugar beet genome. Ac and Ds excisions generate footprints in the donor T-DNA that support the hairpin model for transposon excision. Two complete integration events into genomic sugar beet DNA were obtained by IPCR. Integration of Ac leads to an eight bp duplication, while integration of Ds in a homologue of a sugar beet flowering locus gene did not induce a duplication. The molecular structure of the target site indicates Ds integration into a double strand break. Analyses of transposase transcription using RT-PCR revealed low amounts of alternatively spliced mRNAs. The fourth intron of the transposase was found to be partially misspliced. Four different splice products were identified. In addition, the second and third exon were found to harbour two and three novel introns, respectively. These utilize each the same splice donor but several alternative splice acceptor sites. Using the SplicePredictor online tool, one of the two introns within exon two is predicted to be efficiently spliced in maize. Most interestingly, splicing of this intron together with the four major introns of Ac would generate a transposase that lacks the DNA binding domain and two of its three nuclear localization signals, but still harbours the dimerization domain.

  20. Alternative splicing in the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells into cardiac precursors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Salomonis

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The role of alternative splicing in self-renewal, pluripotency and tissue lineage specification of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs is largely unknown. To better define these regulatory cues, we modified the H9 hESC line to allow selection of pluripotent hESCs by neomycin resistance and cardiac progenitors by puromycin resistance. Exon-level microarray expression data from undifferentiated hESCs and cardiac and neural precursors were used to identify splice isoforms with cardiac-restricted or common cardiac/neural differentiation expression patterns. Splice events for these groups corresponded to the pathways of cytoskeletal remodeling, RNA splicing, muscle specification, and cell cycle checkpoint control as well as genes with serine/threonine kinase and helicase activity. Using a new program named AltAnalyze (http://www.AltAnalyze.org, we identified novel changes in protein domain and microRNA binding site architecture that were predicted to affect protein function and expression. These included an enrichment of splice isoforms that oppose cell-cycle arrest in hESCs and that promote calcium signaling and cardiac development in cardiac precursors. By combining genome-wide predictions of alternative splicing with new functional annotations, our data suggest potential mechanisms that may influence lineage commitment and hESC maintenance at the level of specific splice isoforms and microRNA regulation.

  1. Cloning and functional studies of a splice variant of CYP26B1 expressed in vascular cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ateia Elmabsout

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: All-trans retinoic acid (atRA plays an essential role in the regulation of gene expression, cell growth and differentiation and is also important for normal cardiovascular development but may in turn be involved in cardiovascular diseases, i.e. atherosclerosis and restenosis. The cellular atRA levels are under strict control involving several cytochromes P450 isoforms (CYPs. CYP26 may be the most important regulator of atRA catabolism in vascular cells. The present study describes the molecular cloning, characterization and function of atRA-induced expression of a spliced variant of the CYP26B1 gene. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The coding region of the spliced CYP26B1 lacking exon 2 was amplified from cDNA synthesized from atRA-treated human aortic smooth muscle cells and sequenced. Both the spliced variant and full length CYP26B1 was found to be expressed in cultured human endothelial and smooth muscle cells, and in normal and atherosclerotic vessel. atRA induced both variants of CYP26B1 in cultured vascular cells. Furthermore, the levels of spliced mRNA transcript were 4.5 times higher in the atherosclerotic lesion compared to normal arteries and the expression in the lesions was increased 20-fold upon atRA treatment. The spliced CYP26B1 still has the capability to degrade atRA, but at an initial rate one-third that of the corresponding full length enzyme. Transfection of COS-1 and THP-1 cells with the CYP26B1 spliced variant indicated either an increase or a decrease in the catabolism of atRA, probably depending on the expression of other atRA catabolizing enzymes in the cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Vascular cells express the spliced variant of CYP26B1 lacking exon 2 and it is also increased in atherosclerotic lesions. The spliced variant displays a slower and reduced degradation of atRA as compared to the full-length enzyme. Further studies are needed, however, to clarify the substrate specificity and role of the CYP26B1

  2. 肿瘤基因信使RNA可变剪接及其应用%Alternative splicing of tumor associated genes messenger RNA and application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张鑫桐; 岳文涛

    2014-01-01

    可变剪接作为基因的一种修饰方式,是真核细胞表达调控过程的重要因素。它使同一蛋白质编码基因能够产生多种转录本,极大地扩展了遗传信息的应用。在人类肿瘤细胞中前体信使RN A的可变剪接扮演着重要角色,一些重要基因通过可变剪接产生不同于正常细胞中的剪接异构体。这些肿瘤特异性剪接异构体的存在导致了肿瘤的发生、发展。深入探索肿瘤相关基因的可变剪接对肿瘤的诊断、治疗具有重要意义。%As a way of gene modification,alternative splicing is an important factor of eukaryotic gene expression and regulation.It makes various transcripts from one protein-coding gene,and greatly extends the genetic information.Alternative splicing of pre-messenger RNA plays an important role in tumor cells.By alter-native splicing,some important genes can generate splicing variants different from those in normal cells.The existence of tumor-specific splicing variants leads to the occurrence and progression of tumor.Therefore,explo-ration on the alternative splicing of tumor-associated genes may be of great significance in tumor diagnosis and treatment.

  3. DBIRD complex integrates alternative mRNA splicing with RNA polymerase II transcript elongation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Close, Pierre; East, Philip; Dirac-Svejstrup, A Barbara;

    2012-01-01

    Alternative messenger RNA splicing is the main reason that vast mammalian proteomic complexity can be achieved with a limited number of genes. Splicing is physically and functionally coupled to transcription, and is greatly affected by the rate of transcript elongation. As the nascent pre...... and help to integrate transcript elongation with mRNA splicing remain unclear. Here we characterize the human interactome of chromatin-associated mRNP particles. This led us to identify deleted in breast cancer 1 (DBC1) and ZNF326 (which we call ZNF-protein interacting with nuclear mRNPs and DBC1 (ZIRD......)) as subunits of a novel protein complex--named DBIRD--that binds directly to RNAPII. DBIRD regulates alternative splicing of a large set of exons embedded in (A + T)-rich DNA, and is present at the affected exons. RNA-interference-mediated DBIRD depletion results in region-specific decreases in transcript...

  4. Bioinformatic analysis for a new alternatively spliced variant of prostate-specific membrane antigen%前列腺特异性膜抗原新型剪接变异体PSME基因及蛋白的生物信息学分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王铸; 冯发深; 何霞; 关林琳; 徐霖; 张定梅; 罗燕芬; 汪杨; 曹开源

    2012-01-01

    目的 通过对PSME的生物信息学分析,更多的了解该基因及蛋白结构与功能的相关信息.方法 运用生物信息学方法分析PSME基因结构,序列及其编码蛋白的理化性质和结构与功能特征,蛋白相互作用网络以及抗原表位.结果 用ExPASy的Computer PI/Mw、SMA RT等软件对其氨基酸序列进行分析,该蛋白的PI值为6.38,相对分子质量约为78 000.二级结构中α螺旋(H)占34.66%,β折叠(E)占12.93%,无规卷曲占52.41%.PSME信号肽位于1~22位氨基酸,150-248位为肽酶结构域,639~703位为转铁蛋白受体二聚体,且含有多个糖基化位点.通过DNA Star软件分析得到了PSME蛋白的抗原表位.结论 利用生物信息学预测出的结构和功能信息,能为PSME蛋白的相关研究提供信息基础.%This paper focuses on the prediction of structures and functions of a new alternatively spliced variant of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSME) using bioinformatics methods. ExPASy's tools such as computer Pl/Mw, SMART and other software were used to analysis PSME amino acid sequence. Furthermore, protein interaction network was predicated by STRING, and B-cell epitopes of the protein was predicted with DNA Star. We fund that the protein PI value was 6.38, M, was 78 000, A-helix secondary structure (H) accounted for 34.66%, βfold (E) accounted for 12.93%, and random coil accounting for 5Z41%. PSME signal peptide was in the 1-22 bit, peptidase domain wan in 150-248, and TFR dimer in 639-703 bit. Furthermore, PSME was also contained multiple glycosylation sites. The predication of structures and functions lays down a information foundation for the further investigation of PSME.

  5. Differential subcellular localization of the splice variants of the zinc transporter ZnT5 is dictated by the different C-terminal regions.

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    Jared K Thornton

    Full Text Available Zinc is emerging as an important intracellular signaling molecule, as well as fulfilling essential structural and catalytic functions through incorporation in a myriad of zinc metalloproteins so it is important to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of zinc homeostasis, including the subcellular localizations of zinc transporters.Two splice variants of the human SLC30A5 Zn transporter gene (ZnT5 have been reported in the literature. These variants differ at their N- and C-terminal regions, corresponding with the use of different 5' and 3' exons. We demonstrate that full length human ZnT5 variant B is a genuine transcript in human intestinal cells and confirm expression of both variant A and variant B in a range of untreated human tissues by splice variant-specific RT-PCR. Using N- or C-terminal GFP or FLAG fusions of both isoforms of ZnT5 we identify that the differential subcellular localization to the Golgi apparatus and ER respectively is a function of their alternative C-terminal sequences. These different C-terminal regions result from the incorporation into the mature transcript of either the whole of exon 14 (variant B or only the 5' region of exon 14 plus exons 15-17 (variant A.We thus propose that exons 15 to 17 include a signal that results in trafficking of ZnT5 to the Golgi apparatus and that the 3' end of exon 14 includes a signal that leads to retention in the ER.

  6. Genome-wide survey of cold stress regulated alternative splicing in Arabidopsis thaliana with tiling microarray.

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    Noam Leviatan

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing plays a major role in expanding the potential informational content of eukaryotic genomes. It is an important post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism that can increase protein diversity and affect mRNA stability. Alternative splicing is often regulated in a tissue-specific and stress-responsive manner. Cold stress, which adversely affects plant growth and development, regulates the transcription and splicing of plant splicing factors. This can affect the pre-mRNA processing of many genes. To identify cold regulated alternative splicing we applied Affymetrix Arabidopsis tiling arrays to survey the transcriptome under cold treatment conditions. A novel algorithm was used for detection of statistically relevant changes in intron expression within a transcript between control and cold growth conditions. A reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR analysis of a number of randomly selected genes confirmed the changes in splicing patterns under cold stress predicted by tiling array. Our analysis revealed new types of cold responsive genes. While their expression level remains relatively unchanged under cold stress their splicing pattern shows detectable changes in the relative abundance of isoforms. The majority of cold regulated alternative splicing introduced a premature termination codon (PTC into the transcripts creating potential targets for degradation by the nonsense mediated mRNA decay (NMD process. A number of these genes were analyzed in NMD-defective mutants by RT-PCR and shown to evade NMD. This may result in new and truncated proteins with altered functions or dominant negative effects. The results indicate that cold affects both quantitative and qualitative aspects of gene expression.

  7. Genome-wide survey of cold stress regulated alternative splicing in Arabidopsis thaliana with tiling microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leviatan, Noam; Alkan, Noam; Leshkowitz, Dena; Fluhr, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Alternative splicing plays a major role in expanding the potential informational content of eukaryotic genomes. It is an important post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism that can increase protein diversity and affect mRNA stability. Alternative splicing is often regulated in a tissue-specific and stress-responsive manner. Cold stress, which adversely affects plant growth and development, regulates the transcription and splicing of plant splicing factors. This can affect the pre-mRNA processing of many genes. To identify cold regulated alternative splicing we applied Affymetrix Arabidopsis tiling arrays to survey the transcriptome under cold treatment conditions. A novel algorithm was used for detection of statistically relevant changes in intron expression within a transcript between control and cold growth conditions. A reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis of a number of randomly selected genes confirmed the changes in splicing patterns under cold stress predicted by tiling array. Our analysis revealed new types of cold responsive genes. While their expression level remains relatively unchanged under cold stress their splicing pattern shows detectable changes in the relative abundance of isoforms. The majority of cold regulated alternative splicing introduced a premature termination codon (PTC) into the transcripts creating potential targets for degradation by the nonsense mediated mRNA decay (NMD) process. A number of these genes were analyzed in NMD-defective mutants by RT-PCR and shown to evade NMD. This may result in new and truncated proteins with altered functions or dominant negative effects. The results indicate that cold affects both quantitative and qualitative aspects of gene expression.

  8. Comparative analysis of serine/arginine-rich proteins across 27 eukaryotes: insights into sub-family classification and extent of alternative splicing.

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    Dale N Richardson

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing (AS of pre-mRNA is a fundamental molecular process that generates diversity in the transcriptome and proteome of eukaryotic organisms. SR proteins, a family of splicing regulators with one or two RNA recognition motifs (RRMs at the N-terminus and an arg/ser-rich domain at the C-terminus, function in both constitutive and alternative splicing. We identified SR proteins in 27 eukaryotic species, which include plants, animals, fungi and "basal" eukaryotes that lie outside of these lineages. Using RNA recognition motifs (RRMs as a phylogenetic marker, we classified 272 SR genes into robust sub-families. The SR gene family can be split into five major groupings, which can be further separated into 11 distinct sub-families. Most flowering plants have double or nearly double the number of SR genes found in vertebrates. The majority of plant SR genes are under purifying selection. Moreover, in all paralogous SR genes in Arabidopsis, rice, soybean and maize, one of the two paralogs is preferentially expressed throughout plant development. We also assessed the extent of AS in SR genes based on a splice graph approach (http://combi.cs.colostate.edu/as/gmap_SRgenes. AS of SR genes is a widespread phenomenon throughout multiple lineages, with alternative 3' or 5' splicing events being the most prominent type of event. However, plant-enriched sub-families have 57%-88% of their SR genes experiencing some type of AS compared to the 40%-54% seen in other sub-families. The SR gene family is pervasive throughout multiple eukaryotic lineages, conserved in sequence and domain organization, but differs in gene number across lineages with an abundance of SR genes in flowering plants. The higher number of alternatively spliced SR genes in plants emphasizes the importance of AS in generating splice variants in these organisms.

  9. PGC1α -1 Nucleosome Position and Splice Variant Expression and Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Overweight and Obese Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henagan, Tara M; Stewart, Laura K; Forney, Laura A; Sparks, Lauren M; Johannsen, Neil; Church, Timothy S

    2014-01-01

    PGC1α, a transcriptional coactivator, interacts with PPARs and others to regulate skeletal muscle metabolism. PGC1α undergoes splicing to produce several mRNA variants, with the NTPGC1α variant having a similar biological function to the full length PGC1α (FLPGC1α). CVD is associated with obesity and T2D and a lower percentage of type 1 oxidative fibers and impaired mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle, characteristics determined by PGC1α expression. PGC1α expression is epigenetically regulated in skeletal muscle to determine mitochondrial adaptations, and epigenetic modifications may regulate mRNA splicing. We report in this paper that skeletal muscle PGC1α  -1 nucleosome (-1N) position is associated with splice variant NTPGC1α but not FLPGC1α expression. Division of participants based on the -1N position revealed that those individuals with a -1N phased further upstream from the transcriptional start site (UP) expressed lower levels of NTPGC1α than those with the -1N more proximal to TSS (DN). UP showed an increase in body fat percentage and serum total and LDL cholesterol. These findings suggest that the -1N may be a potential epigenetic regulator of NTPGC1α splice variant expression, and -1N position and NTPGC1α variant expression in skeletal muscle are linked to CVD risk. This trial is registered with clinicaltrials.gov, identifier NCT00458133.

  10. PGC1α −1 Nucleosome Position and Splice Variant Expression and Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Overweight and Obese Individuals

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    Tara M. Henagan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available PGC1α, a transcriptional coactivator, interacts with PPARs and others to regulate skeletal muscle metabolism. PGC1α undergoes splicing to produce several mRNA variants, with the NTPGC1α variant having a similar biological function to the full length PGC1α (FLPGC1α. CVD is associated with obesity and T2D and a lower percentage of type 1 oxidative fibers and impaired mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle, characteristics determined by PGC1α expression. PGC1α expression is epigenetically regulated in skeletal muscle to determine mitochondrial adaptations, and epigenetic modifications may regulate mRNA splicing. We report in this paper that skeletal muscle PGC1α  −1 nucleosome (−1N position is associated with splice variant NTPGC1α but not FLPGC1α expression. Division of participants based on the −1N position revealed that those individuals with a −1N phased further upstream from the transcriptional start site (UP expressed lower levels of NTPGC1α than those with the −1N more proximal to TSS (DN. UP showed an increase in body fat percentage and serum total and LDL cholesterol. These findings suggest that the −1N may be a potential epigenetic regulator of NTPGC1α splice variant expression, and −1N position and NTPGC1α variant expression in skeletal muscle are linked to CVD risk. This trial is registered with clinicaltrials.gov, identifier NCT00458133.

  11. Analysis of genetic interaction networks shows that alternatively spliced genes are highly versatile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talavera, David; Sheoran, Ritika; Lovell, Simon C

    2013-01-01

    Alternative splicing has the potential to increase the diversity of the transcriptome and proteome. Where more than one transcript arises from a gene they are often so different that they are quite unlikely to have the same function. However, it remains unclear if alternative splicing generally leads to a gene being involved in multiple biological processes or whether it alters the function within a single process. Knowing that genetic interactions occur between functionally related genes, we have used them as a proxy for functional versatility, and have analysed the sets of genes of two well-characterised model organisms: Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster. Using network analyses we find that few genes are functionally homogenous (only involved in a few functionally-related biological processes). Moreover, there are differences between alternatively spliced genes and genes with a single transcript; specifically, genes with alternatively splicing are, on average, involved in more biological processes. Finally, we suggest that factors other than specific functional classes determine whether a gene is alternatively spliced.

  12. Identifying alternative hyper-splicing signatures in MG-thymoma by exon arrays.

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    Lilach Soreq

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The vast majority of human genes (>70% are alternatively spliced. Although alternative pre-mRNA processing is modified in multiple tumors, alternative hyper-splicing signatures specific to particular tumor types are still lacking. Here, we report the use of Affymetrix Human Exon Arrays to spot hyper-splicing events characteristic of myasthenia gravis (MG-thymoma, thymic tumors which develop in patients with MG and discriminate them from colon cancer changes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We combined GO term to parent threshold-based and threshold-independent ad-hoc functional statistics with in-depth analysis of key modified transcripts to highlight various exon-specific changes. These denote alternative splicing in MG-thymoma tumors compared to healthy human thymus and to in-house and Affymetrix datasets from colon cancer and healthy tissues. By using both global and specific, term-to-parent Gene Ontology (GO statistical comparisons, our functional integrative ad-hoc method allowed the detection of disease-relevant splicing events. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Hyper-spliced transcripts spanned several categories, including the tumorogenic ERBB4 tyrosine kinase receptor and the connective tissue growth factor CTGF, as well as the immune function-related histocompatibility gene HLA-DRB1 and interleukin (IL19, two muscle-specific collagens and one myosin heavy chain gene; intriguingly, a putative new exon was discovered in the MG-involved acetylcholinesterase ACHE gene. Corresponding changes in spliceosome composition were indicated by co-decreases in the splicing factors ASF/SF(2 and SC35. Parallel tumor-associated changes occurred in colon cancer as well, but the majority of the apparent hyper-splicing events were particular to MG-thymoma and could be validated by Fluorescent In-Situ Hybridization (FISH, Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR and mass spectrometry (MS followed by peptide sequencing. Our findings

  13. A New Splice Variant of the Major Subunit of Human Asialoglycoprotein Receptor Encodes a Secreted Form in Hepatocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Jia Liu; Bin Hu; Yan Yang; Zhiyong Ma; Yuan Yu; Shenpei Liu; Baoju Wang; Xiping Zhao; Mengji Lu; Dongliang Yang

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The human asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) is composed of two polypeptides, designated H1 and H2. While variants of H2 have been known for decades, the existence of H1 variants has never been reported. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We identified two splice variants of ASGPR H1 transcripts, designated H1a and H1b, in human liver tissues and hepatoma cells. Molecular cloning of ASGPR H1 variants revealed that they differ by a 117 nucleotide segment corresponding to exon 2 in the ASGPR geno...

  14. Alternative splicing of a group II intron in a surface layer protein gene in Clostridium tetani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, Bonnie A; Simon, Dawn M; Zimmerly, Steven

    2014-02-01

    Group II introns are ribozymes and retroelements found in bacteria, and are thought to have been the ancestors of nuclear pre-mRNA introns. Whereas nuclear introns undergo prolific alternative splicing in some species, group II introns are not known to carry out equivalent reactions. Here we report a group II intron in the human pathogen Clostridium tetani, which undergoes four alternative splicing reactions in vivo. Together with unspliced transcript, five mRNAs are produced, each encoding a distinct surface layer protein isoform. Correct fusion of exon reading frames requires a shifted 5' splice site located 8 nt upstream of the canonical boundary motif. The shifted junction is accomplished by an altered IBS1-EBS1 pairing between the intron and 5' exon. Growth of C. tetani under a variety of conditions did not result in large changes in alternative splicing levels, raising the possibility that alternative splicing is constitutive. This work demonstrates a novel type of gene organization and regulation in bacteria, and provides an additional parallel between group II and nuclear pre-mRNA introns.

  15. Computational Analysis of an Evolutionarily Conserved VertebrateMuscle Alternative Splicing Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Debopriya; Clark, Tyson A.; Schweitzer, Anthony; Marr,Henry; Yamamoto, Miki L.; Parra, Marilyn K.; Arribere, Josh; Minovitsky,Simon; Dubchak, Inna; Blume, John E.; Conboy, John G.

    2006-06-15

    A novel exon microarray format that probes gene expression with single exon resolution was employed to elucidate critical features of a vertebrate muscle alternative splicing program. A dataset of 56 microarray-defined, muscle-enriched exons and their flanking introns were examined computationally in order to investigate coordination of the muscle splicing program. Candidate intron regulatory motifs were required to meet several stringent criteria: significant over-representation near muscle-enriched exons, correlation with muscle expression, and phylogenetic conservation among genomes of several vertebrate orders. Three classes of regulatory motifs were identified in the proximal downstream intron, within 200nt of the target exons: UGCAUG, a specific binding site for Fox-1 related splicing factors; ACUAAC, a novel branchpoint-like element; and UG-/UGC-rich elements characteristic of binding sites for CELF splicing factors. UGCAUG was remarkably enriched, being present in nearly one-half of all cases. These studies suggest that Fox and CELF splicing factors play a major role in enforcing the muscle-specific alternative splicing program, facilitating expression of a set of unique isoforms of cytoskeletal proteins that are critical to muscle cell differentiation. Supplementary materials: There are four supplementary tables and one supplementary figure. The tables provide additional detailed information concerning the muscle-enriched datasets, and about over-represented oligonucleotide sequences in the flanking introns. The supplementary figure shows RT-PCR data confirming the muscle-enriched expression of exons predicted from the microarray analysis.

  16. PDZ-containing proteins: alternative splicing as a source of functional diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierralta, Jimena; Mendoza, Carolina

    2004-12-01

    Scaffold proteins allow specific protein complexes to be assembled in particular regions of the cell at which they organize subcellular structures and signal transduction complexes. This characteristic is especially important for neurons, which are highly polarized cells. Among the domains contained by scaffold proteins, the PSD-95, Discs-large, ZO-1 (PDZ) domains are of particular relevance in signal transduction processes and maintenance of neuronal and epithelial polarity. These domains are specialized in the binding of the carboxyl termini of proteins allowing membrane proteins to be localized by the anchoring to the cytoskeleton mediated by PDZ-containing scaffold proteins. In vivo studies carried out in Drosophila have taught that the role of many scaffold proteins is not limited to a single process; thus, in many cases the same genes are expressed in different tissues and participate in apparently very diverse processes. In addition to the differential expression of interactors of scaffold proteins, the expression of variants of these molecular scaffolds as the result of the alternative processing of the genes that encode them is proving to be a very important source of variability and complexity on a main theme. Alternative splicing in the nervous system is well documented, where specific isoforms play roles in neurotransmission, ion channel function, neuronal cell recognition, and are developmentally regulated making it a major mechanism of functional diversity. Here we review the current state of knowledge about the diversity and the known function of PDZ-containing proteins in Drosophila with emphasis in the role played by alternatively processed forms in the diversity of functions attributed to this family of proteins.

  17. Alternative RNA splicing of KSHV ORF57 produces two different RNA isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majerciak, Vladimir; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2016-01-15

    In lytically infected B cells Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) ORF57 gene encodes two RNA isoforms by alternative splicing of its pre-mRNA, which contains a small, constitutive intron in its 5' half and a large, suboptimal intron in its 3's half. The RNA1 isoform encodes full-length ORF57 and is a major isoform derived from splicing of the constitutive small intron, but retaining the suboptimal large intron as the coding region. A small fraction (splicing to produce a smaller non-coding RNA2 due to lack of a translational termination codon. Both RNAs are cleaved and polyadenylated at the same cleavage site CS83636. The insertion of ORF57 RNA1 into a restriction cutting site in certain mammalian expression vectors activates splicing of the subopitmal intron and produces a truncated ORF57 protein.

  18. In1-ghrelin splicing variant is overexpressed in pituitary adenomas and increases their aggressive features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez-Costa, Alejandro; Gahete, Manuel D; Rivero-Cortés, Esther; Rincón-Fernández, David; Nelson, Richard; Beltrán, Manuel; de la Riva, Andrés; Japón, Miguel A; Venegas-Moreno, Eva; Gálvez, Ma Ángeles; García-Arnés, Juan A; Soto-Moreno, Alfonso; Morgan, Jennifer; Tsomaia, Natia; Culler, Michael D; Dieguez, Carlos; Castaño, Justo P; Luque, Raúl M

    2015-03-04

    Pituitary adenomas comprise a heterogeneous subset of pathologies causing serious comorbidities, which would benefit from identification of novel, common molecular/cellular biomarkers and therapeutic targets. The ghrelin system has been linked to development of certain endocrine-related cancers. Systematic analysis of the presence and functional implications of some components of the ghrelin system, including native ghrelin, receptors and the recently discovered splicing variant In1-ghrelin, in human normal pituitaries (n = 11) and pituitary adenomas (n = 169) revealed that expression pattern of ghrelin system suffers a clear alteration in pituitary adenomasas compared with normal pituitary, where In1-ghrelin is markedly overexpressed. Interestingly, in cultured pituitary adenoma cells In1-ghrelin treatment (acylated peptides at 100 nM; 24-72 h) increased GH and ACTH secretion, Ca(2+) and ERK1/2 signaling and cell viability, whereas In1-ghrelin silencing (using a specific siRNA; 100 nM) reduced cell viability. These results indicate that an alteration of the ghrelin system, specially its In1-ghrelin variant, could contribute to pathogenesis of different pituitary adenomas types, and suggest that this variant and its related ghrelin system could provide new tools to identify novel, more general diagnostic, prognostic and potential therapeutic targets in pituitary tumors.

  19. Fine-scale variation and genetic determinants of alternative splicing across individuals.

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    Jasmin Coulombe-Huntington

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently, thanks to the increasing throughput of new technologies, we have begun to explore the full extent of alternative pre-mRNA splicing (AS in the human transcriptome. This is unveiling a vast layer of complexity in isoform-level expression differences between individuals. We used previously published splicing sensitive microarray data from lymphoblastoid cell lines to conduct an in-depth analysis on splicing efficiency of known and predicted exons. By combining publicly available AS annotation with a novel algorithm designed to search for AS, we show that many real AS events can be detected within the usually unexploited, speculative majority of the array and at significance levels much below standard multiple-testing thresholds, demonstrating that the extent of cis-regulated differential splicing between individuals is potentially far greater than previously reported. Specifically, many genes show subtle but significant genetically controlled differences in splice-site usage. PCR validation shows that 42 out of 58 (72% candidate gene regions undergo detectable AS, amounting to the largest scale validation of isoform eQTLs to date. Targeted sequencing revealed a likely causative SNP in most validated cases. In all 17 incidences where a SNP affected a splice-site region, in silico splice-site strength modeling correctly predicted the direction of the micro-array and PCR results. In 13 other cases, we identified likely causative SNPs disrupting predicted splicing enhancers. Using Fst and REHH analysis, we uncovered significant evidence that 2 putative causative SNPs have undergone recent positive selection. We verified the effect of five SNPs using in vivo minigene assays. This study shows that splicing differences between individuals, including quantitative differences in isoform ratios, are frequent in human populations and that causative SNPs can be identified using in silico predictions. Several cases affected disease-relevant genes and

  20. RNA Polymerase II Elongation at the Crossroads of Transcription and Alternative Splicing

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    Manuel de la Mata

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The elongation phase of transcription lies at the core of several simultaneous and coupled events leading to alternative splicing regulation. Although underestimated in the past, it is at this phase of the transcription cycle where complexes affecting the transcription machinery itself, chromatin structure, posttranscriptional gene regulation and pre-mRNA processing converge to regulate each other or simply to consolidate higher-order complexes and functions. This paper focuses on the multiple processes that take place during transcription elongation which ultimately regulate the outcome of alternative splicing decisions.

  1. Human type II pneumocyte chemotactic responses to CXCR3 activation are mediated by splice variant A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Rong; Lee, Clement M; Gonzales, Linda W; Yang, Yi; Aksoy, Mark O; Wang, Ping; Brailoiu, Eugen; Dun, Nae; Hurford, Matthew T; Kelsen, Steven G

    2008-06-01

    Chemokine receptors control several fundamental cellular processes in both hematopoietic and structural cells, including directed cell movement, i.e., chemotaxis, cell differentiation, and proliferation. We have previously demonstrated that CXCR3, the chemokine receptor expressed by Th1/Tc1 inflammatory cells present in the lung, is also expressed by human airway epithelial cells. In airway epithelial cells, activation of CXCR3 induces airway epithelial cell movement and proliferation, processes that underlie lung repair. The present study examined the expression and function of CXCR3 in human alveolar type II pneumocytes, whose destruction causes emphysema. CXCR3 was present in human fetal and adult type II pneumocytes as assessed by immunocytochemistry, immunohistochemistry, and Western blotting. CXCR3-A and -B splice variant mRNA was present constitutively in cultured type II cells, but levels of CXCR3-B greatly exceeded CXCR3-A mRNA. In cultured type II cells, I-TAC, IP-10, and Mig induced chemotaxis. Overexpression of CXCR3-A in the A549 pneumocyte cell line produced robust chemotactic responses to I-TAC and IP-10. In contrast, I-TAC did not induce chemotactic responses in CXCR3-B and mock-transfected cells. Finally, I-TAC increased cytosolic Ca(2+) and activated the extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase)/protein kinase B kinases only in CXCR3-A-transfected cells. These data indicate that the CXCR3 receptor is expressed by human type II pneumocytes, and the CXCR3-A splice variant mediates chemotactic responses possibly through Ca(2+) activation of both mitogen-activated protein kinase and PI 3-kinase signaling pathways. Expression of CXCR3 in alveolar epithelial cells may be important in pneumocyte repair from injury.

  2. A splice variant of CD44 expressed in the apical ectodermal ridge presents fibroblast growth factors to limb mesenchyme and is required for limb outgrowth

    OpenAIRE

    Sherman, Larry; Wainwright, David; Ponta, Helmut; Herrlich, Peter

    1998-01-01

    Signals from the apical ectodermal ridge (AER) of the developing vertebrate limb, including fibroblast growth factor-8 (FGF-8), can maintain limb mesenchymal cells in a proliferative state. We report here that a specific CD44 splice variant is crucial for the proliferation of these mesenchymal cells. Epitopes carried by this variant colocalize temporally and spatially with FGF-8 in the AER throughout early limb development. A splice variant containing the same sequences expressed on model cel...

  3. Bipartite functions of the CREB co-activators selectively direct alternative splicing or transcriptional activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amelio, Antonio L; Caputi, Massimo; Conkright, Michael D

    2009-09-16

    The CREB regulated transcription co-activators (CRTCs) regulate many biological processes by integrating and converting environmental inputs into transcriptional responses. Although the mechanisms by which CRTCs sense cellular signals are characterized, little is known regarding how CRTCs contribute to the regulation of cAMP inducible genes. Here we show that these dynamic regulators, unlike other co-activators, independently direct either pre-mRNA splice-site selection or transcriptional activation depending on the cell type or promoter context. Moreover, in other scenarios, the CRTC co-activators coordinately regulate transcription and splicing. Mutational analyses showed that CRTCs possess distinct functional domains responsible for regulating either pre-mRNA splicing or transcriptional activation. Interestingly, the CRTC1-MAML2 oncoprotein lacks the splicing domain and is incapable of altering splice-site selection despite robustly activating transcription. The differential usage of these distinct domains allows CRTCs to selectively mediate multiple facets of gene regulation, indicating that co-activators are not solely restricted to coordinating alternative splicing with increase in transcriptional activity.

  4. A novel alternatively spliced isoform of the mu-opioid receptor: functional antagonism

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    Wentworth Sean

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Opioids are the most widely used analgesics for the treatment of clinical pain. They produce their therapeutic effects by binding to μ-opioid receptors (MORs, which are 7 transmembrane domain (7TM G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs, and inhibiting cellular activity. However, the analgesic efficacy of opioids is compromised by side-effects such as analgesic tolerance, dependence and opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH. In contrast to opioid analgesia these side effects are associated with cellular excitation. Several hypotheses have been advanced to explain these phenomena, yet the molecular mechanisms underlying tolerance and OIH remain poorly understood. Results We recently discovered a new human alternatively spliced isoform of MOR (MOR1K that is missing the N-terminal extracellular and first transmembrane domains, resulting in a 6TM GPCR variant. To characterize the pattern of cellular transduction pathways activated by this human MOR1K isoform, we conducted a series of pharmacological and molecular experiments. Results show that stimulation of MOR1K with morphine leads to excitatory cellular effects. In contrast to stimulation of MOR1, stimulation of MOR1K leads to increased Ca2+ levels as well as increased nitric oxide (NO release. Immunoprecipitation experiments further reveal that unlike MOR1, which couples to the inhibitory Gαi/o complex, MOR1K couples to the stimulatory Gαs complex. Conclusion The major MOR1 and the alternative MOR1K isoforms mediate opposite cellular effects in response to morphine, with MOR1K driving excitatory processes. These findings warrant further investigations that examine animal and human MORK1 expression and function following chronic exposure to opioids, which may identify MOR1K as a novel target for the development of new clinically effective classes of opioids that have high analgesic efficacy with diminished ability to produce tolerance, OIH, and other unwanted side-effects.

  5. [Perspectives of RNA interference application in the therapy of diseases associated with defects in alternative RNA splicing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysokiński, Daniel; Błasiak, Janusz

    2012-09-18

    The primary transcript of an eukaryotic gene (pre-mRNA) is composed of coding regions--exons intervened by non-coding introns--which are removed in the RNA splicing process, leading to the formation of mature, intron-free mRNA. Alternative splicing of pre-mRNA is responsible for high complexity of the cellular proteome and expresses effective use of genetic information contained in genomic DNA. Alternative splicing plays important roles in the organism, including apoptosis regulation or development and plasticity of the nervous system. The main role of alternative splicing is differential, dependent on conditions and the cell type, splicing of mRNA, generating diverse transcripts from one gene, and, after the translation, different isoforms of a particular protein. Because of the high complexity of this mechanism, alternative splicing is particularly prone to errors. The perturbations resulting from mutations in the key sequences for splicing regulations are especially harmful. The pathogenesis of numerous diseases results from disturbed alternative RNA splicing, and those include cancers and neurodegenerative disorders. The treatment of these conditions is problematic due to their genetic background and currently RNA interference, which is a common mechanism of eukaryotic gene regulation, is being studied. Initial successes in the attempts of silencing the expression of faulty protein isoforms support the idea of using RNA interference in targeting disease related to disturbances in alternative splicing of RNA.

  6. RNA的可变剪接%Alternative RNA Splicing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱莫寒; 俞宁

    2010-01-01

    在高等真核生物基因组中存在大量的割裂基因,而这些割裂基因的mRNA却是非割裂结构,在这个转化过程中去除内含子的过程就成为RNA的剪接或剪接RNA(RNA splicing).RNA剪接特别是可变剪接是真核基因表达调控研究的重要内容之一.介绍了RNA可变剪接的特点、功能与调控、可变剪接基因以及剪接形式的识别,并对可变剪接的应用进行了举例.

  7. Functional analysis of a large set of BRCA2 exon 7 variants highlights the predictive value of hexamer scores in detecting alterations of exonic splicing regulatory elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giacomo, Daniela; Gaildrat, Pascaline; Abuli, Anna; Abdat, Julie; Frébourg, Thierry; Tosi, Mario; Martins, Alexandra

    2013-11-01

    Exonic variants can alter pre-mRNA splicing either by changing splice sites or by modifying splicing regulatory elements. Often these effects are difficult to predict and are only detected by performing RNA analyses. Here, we analyzed, in a minigene assay, 26 variants identified in the exon 7 of BRCA2, a cancer predisposition gene. Our results revealed eight new exon skipping mutations in this exon: one directly altering the 5' splice site and seven affecting potential regulatory elements. This brings the number of splicing regulatory mutations detected in BRCA2 exon 7 to a total of 11, a remarkably high number considering the total number of variants reported in this exon (n = 36), all tested in our minigene assay. We then exploited this large set of splicing data to test the predictive value of splicing regulator hexamers' scores recently established by Ke et al. (). Comparisons of hexamer-based predictions with our experimental data revealed high sensitivity in detecting variants that increased exon skipping, an important feature for prescreening variants before RNA analysis. In conclusion, hexamer scores represent a promising tool for predicting the biological consequences of exonic variants and may have important applications for the interpretation of variants detected by high-throughput sequencing.

  8. Uncovering the role of p53 splice variants in human malignancy: a clinical perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surget S

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Sylvanie Surget,1,2 Marie P Khoury,1,2 Jean-Christophe Bourdon1,21Dundee Cancer Centre, 2Jacqui Wood Cancer Centre, Ninewells Hospital, University of Dundee, Dundee, UKAbstract: Thirty-five years of research on p53 gave rise to more than 68,000 articles and reviews, but did not allow the uncovering of all the mysteries that this major tumor suppressor holds. How p53 handles the different signals to decide the appropriate cell fate in response to a stress and its implication in tumorigenesis and cancer progression remains unclear. Nevertheless, the uncovering of p53 isoforms has opened new perspectives in the cancer research field. Indeed, the human TP53 gene encodes not only one but at least twelve p53 protein isoforms, which are produced in normal tissues through alternative initiation of translation, usage of alternative promoters, and alternative splicing. In recent years, it became obvious that the different p53 isoforms play an important role in regulating cell fate in response to different stresses in normal cells by differentially regulating gene expression. In cancer cells, abnormal expression of p53 isoforms contributes actively to cancer formation and progression, regardless of TP53 mutation status. They can also be associated with response to treatment, depending on the cell context. The determination of p53 isoform expression and p53 mutation status helps to define different subtypes within a particular cancer type, which would have different responses to treatment. Thus, the understanding of the regulation of p53 isoform expression and their biological activities in relation to the cellular context would constitute an important step toward the improvement of the diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive values of p53 in cancer treatment. This review aims to summarize the involvement of p53 isoforms in cancer and to highlight novel potential therapeutic targets.Keywords: p53, isoforms, p63, p73, alternative splicing, cancer

  9. Inactive DNMT3B splice variants modulate de novo DNA methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Catherine A; Hartono, Stella R; Chédin, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    Inactive DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) 3B splice isoforms are associated with changes in DNA methylation, yet the mechanisms by which they act remain largely unknown. Using biochemical and cell culture assays, we show here that the inactive DNMT3B3 and DNMT3B4 isoforms bind to and regulate the activity of catalytically competent DNMT3A or DNMT3B molecules. DNMT3B3 modestly stimulated the de novo methylation activity of DNMT3A and also counteracted the stimulatory effects of DNMT3L, therefore leading to subtle and contrasting effects on activity. DNMT3B4, by contrast, significantly inhibited de novo DNA methylation by active DNMT3 molecules, most likely due to its ability to reduce the DNA binding affinity of co-complexes, thereby sequestering them away from their substrate. Immunocytochemistry experiments revealed that in addition to their effects on the intrinsic catalytic function of active DNMT3 enzymes, DNMT3B3 and DNMT34 drive distinct types of chromatin compaction and patterns of histone 3 lysine 9 tri-methylation (H3K9me3) deposition. Our findings suggest that regulation of active DNMT3 members through the formation of co-complexes with inactive DNMT3 variants is a general mechanism by which DNMT3 variants function. This may account for some of the changes in DNA methylation patterns observed during development and disease.

  10. Inactive DNMT3B splice variants modulate de novo DNA methylation.

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    Catherine A Gordon

    Full Text Available Inactive DNA methyltransferase (DNMT 3B splice isoforms are associated with changes in DNA methylation, yet the mechanisms by which they act remain largely unknown. Using biochemical and cell culture assays, we show here that the inactive DNMT3B3 and DNMT3B4 isoforms bind to and regulate the activity of catalytically competent DNMT3A or DNMT3B molecules. DNMT3B3 modestly stimulated the de novo methylation activity of DNMT3A and also counteracted the stimulatory effects of DNMT3L, therefore leading to subtle and contrasting effects on activity. DNMT3B4, by contrast, significantly inhibited de novo DNA methylation by active DNMT3 molecules, most likely due to its ability to reduce the DNA binding affinity of co-complexes, thereby sequestering them away from their substrate. Immunocytochemistry experiments revealed that in addition to their effects on the intrinsic catalytic function of active DNMT3 enzymes, DNMT3B3 and DNMT34 drive distinct types of chromatin compaction and patterns of histone 3 lysine 9 tri-methylation (H3K9me3 deposition. Our findings suggest that regulation of active DNMT3 members through the formation of co-complexes with inactive DNMT3 variants is a general mechanism by which DNMT3 variants function. This may account for some of the changes in DNA methylation patterns observed during development and disease.

  11. Anatomical and functional correlation of the endomorphins with mu opioid receptor splice variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbadie, C; Rossi, G C; Orciuolo, A; Zadina, J E; Pasternak, G W

    2002-09-01

    The present study characterizes the relationship between the endogenous mu opioid peptides endomorphin-1 (EM-1) and endomorphin-2 (EM-2) and several splice variants of the cloned mu opioid receptor (MOR-1) encoded by the mu opioid receptor gene (Oprm). Confocal laser microscopy revealed that fibers containing EM-2-like immunoreactivity (-LI) were distributed in close apposition to fibers showing MOR-1-LI (exon 4-LI) and to MOR-1C-LI (exons 7/8/9-LI) in the superficial laminae of the lumbar spinal cord. We also observed colocalization of EM-2-LI and MOR-1-LI in a few fibers of lamina II, and colocalization of EM-2-LI and MOR-1C-LI in laminae I-II, and V-VI. To assess the functional relevance of the MOR-1 variants in endomorphin analgesia, we examined the effects of antisense treatments that targeted individual exons within the Oprm1 gene on EM-1 and EM-2 analgesia in the tail flick test. This antisense mapping study implied mu opioid receptor mechanisms for the endomorphins are distinct from those of morphine or morphine-6beta-glucuronide (M6G).

  12. A functional alternative splicing mutation in AIRE gene causes autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1.

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    Junyu Zhang

    Full Text Available Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS-1 is a rare autosomal recessive disease defined by the presence of two of the three conditions: mucocutaneous candidiasis, hypoparathyroidism, and Addison's disease. Loss-of-function mutations of the autoimmune regulator (AIRE gene have been linked to APS-1. Here we report mutational analysis and functional characterization of an AIRE mutation in a consanguineous Chinese family with APS-1. All exons of the AIRE gene and adjacent exon-intron sequences were amplified by PCR and subsequently sequenced. We identified a homozygous missense AIRE mutation c.463G>A (p.Gly155Ser in two siblings with different clinical features of APS-1. In silico splice-site prediction and minigene analysis were carried out to study the potential pathological consequence. Minigene splicing analysis and subsequent cDNA sequencing revealed that the AIRE mutation potentially compromised the recognition of the splice donor of intron 3, causing alternative pre-mRNA splicing by intron 3 retention. Furthermore, the aberrant AIRE transcript was identified in a heterozygous carrier of the c.463G>A mutation. The aberrant intron 3-retaining transcript generated a truncated protein (p.G155fsX203 containing the first 154 AIRE amino acids and followed by 48 aberrant amino acids. Therefore, our study represents the first functional characterization of the alternatively spliced AIRE mutation that may explain the pathogenetic role in APS-1.

  13. Specific CLK inhibitors from a novel chemotype for regulation of alternative splicing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fedorov, Oleg; Huber, Kilian; Eisenreich, Andreas;

    2011-01-01

    There is a growing recognition of the importance of protein kinases in the control of alternative splicing. To define the underlying regulatory mechanisms, highly selective inhibitors are needed. Here, we report the discovery and characterization of the dichloroindolyl enaminonitrile KH-CB19, a p...

  14. Alternative splicing of cyclooxygenase-1 mRNA in the human iris

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dröge, M.J; van Sorge, A.A; van Haeringen, N.J; Quax, Wim; Zaagsma, Hans; Droge, MJ

    2003-01-01

    dIn homogenates of the human iris, the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) S(+)flurbiprofen has been reported to inhibit cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) 70-fold more potently than in human whole blood. We hypothesized that this difference may be due to alternative splicing of COX-1 mRNA in the human

  15. Stress-induced alternative splice forms of MDM2 and MDMX modulate the p53-pathway in distinct ways.

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    Aishwarya G Jacob

    Full Text Available MDM2 and MDMX are the chief negative regulators of the tumor-suppressor protein p53 and are essential for maintaining homeostasis within the cell. In response to genotoxic stress and also in several cancer types, MDM2 and MDMX are alternatively spliced. The splice variants MDM2-ALT1 and MDMX-ALT2 lack the p53-binding domain and are incapable of negatively regulating p53. However, they retain the RING domain that facilitates dimerization of the full-length MDM proteins. Concordantly, MDM2-ALT1 has been shown to lead to the stabilization of p53 through its interaction with and inactivation of full-length MDM2. The impact of MDM2-ALT1 expression on the p53 pathway and the nature of its interaction with MDMX remain unclear. Also, the role of the architecturally similar MDMX-ALT2 and its influence of the MDM2-MDMX-p53 axis are yet to be elucidated. We show here that MDM2-ALT1 is capable of binding full-length MDMX as well as full-length MDM2. Additionally, we demonstrate that MDMX-ALT2 is able to dimerize with both full-length MDMX and MDM2 and that the expression of MDM2-ALT1 and MDMX-ALT2 leads to the upregulation of p53 protein, and also of its downstream target p21. Moreover, MDM2-ALT1 expression causes cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase in a p53 and p21 dependent manner, which is consistent with the increased levels of p21. Finally we present evidence that MDM2-ALT1 and MDMX-ALT2 expression can activate subtly distinct subsets of p53-transcriptional targets implying that these splice variants can modulate the p53 tumor suppressor pathway in unique ways. In summary, our study shows that the stress-inducible alternative splice forms MDM2-ALT1 and MDMX-ALT2 are important modifiers of the p53 pathway and present a potential mechanism to tailor the p53-mediated cellular stress response.

  16. Human 5–HT4 and 5–HT7 Receptor Splice Variants: Are they Important?

    OpenAIRE

    Coupar, Ian M; Desmond, Paul V; Irving, Helen R.

    2007-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which are encoded by >300 genes in the human genome, are by far the largest class of targets for modern drugs. These macromolecules display inherent adaptability of function, which is partly due to the production of different forms of the receptor protein. These are commonly called ‘isoforms’ or ‘splice variants’ denoting the molecular process of their production/assembly. Not all GPCRs are expressed as splice variants, but certain subclasses of 5–HT recep...

  17. Strengths and weaknesses of EST-based prediction of tissue-specific alternative splicing

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    Vingron Martin

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alternative splicing contributes significantly to the complexity of the human transcriptome and proteome. Computational prediction of alternative splice isoforms are usually based on EST sequences that also allow to approximate the expression pattern of the related transcripts. However, the limited number of tissues represented in the EST data as well as the different cDNA construction protocols may influence the predictive capacity of ESTs to unravel tissue-specifically expressed transcripts. Methods We predict tissue and tumor specific splice isoforms based on the genomic mapping (SpliceNest of the EST consensus sequences and library annotation provided in the GeneNest database. We further ascertain the potentially rare tissue specific transcripts as the ones represented only by ESTs derived from normalized libraries. A subset of the predicted tissue and tumor specific isoforms are then validated via RT-PCR experiments over a spectrum of 40 tissue types. Results Our strategy revealed 427 genes with at least one tissue specific transcript as well as 1120 genes showing tumor specific isoforms. While our experimental evaluation of computationally predicted tissue-specific isoforms revealed a high success rate in confirming the expression of these isoforms in the respective tissue, the strategy frequently failed to detect the expected restricted expression pattern. The analysis of putative lowly expressed transcripts using normalized cDNA libraries suggests that our ability to detect tissue-specific isoforms strongly depends on the expression level of the respective transcript as well as on the sensitivity of the experimental methods. Especially splice isoforms predicted to be disease-specific tend to represent transcripts that are expressed in a set of healthy tissues rather than novel isoforms. Conclusions We propose to combine the computational prediction of alternative splice isoforms with experimental validation for

  18. Modulation of Bcl-x Alternative Splicing Induces Apoptosis of Human Hepatic Stellate Cells

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    Lin Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Liver fibrosis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide due to chronic viral hepatitis and, more recently, from fatty liver diseases. Activation and proliferation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs represent a key aspect of fibrogenesis and are associated with progressive reduction of HSC apoptosis. Bcl-x, an antiapoptotic member of Bcl-2 gene family, plays a role in apoptosis regulation in mammalian cells. Through alternative splicing, the Bcl-x gene yields two major protein isoforms with opposing functions, antiapoptotic Bcl-xL and proapoptotic Bcl-xS. This study aimed to investigate the role of Bcl-x and its alternate splicing in HSC apoptosis. The results indicated that the expression of Bcl-xL was dramatically higher than Bcl-2 in activated human HSCs. The relative expression of Bcl-xL over Bcl-xS increased gradually when HSCs were activated in cell culture, which was consistent with the increase in apoptosis resistance of activated HSCs. Redirection of Bcl-x splicing by an antisense oligonucleotide from the antiapoptotic isoform to the proapoptotic isoform induced death of HSCs without other apoptosis stimuli. We conclude that Bcl-x plays a role in regulation of HSC apoptosis and modulation of Bcl-x alternative splicing may become a novel molecular therapy for liver fibrosis.

  19. Structural insights into RNA recognition by the alternative-splicing regulator muscleblind-like MBNL1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teplova, Marianna; Patel, Dinshaw J. (MSKCC)

    2009-01-15

    Muscleblind-like (MBNL) proteins, regulators of developmentally programmed alternative splicing, harbor tandem CCCH zinc-finger (ZnF) domains that target pre-mRNAs containing YGCU(U/G)Y sequence elements (where Y is a pyrimidine). In myotonic dystrophy, reduced levels of MBNL proteins lead to aberrant alternative splicing of a subset of pre-mRNAs. The crystal structure of MBNL1 ZnF3/4 bound to r(CGCUGU) establishes that both ZnF3 and ZnF4 target GC steps, with site-specific recognition mediated by a network of hydrogen bonds formed primarily with main chain groups of the protein. The relative alignment of ZnF3 and ZnF4 domains is dictated by the topology of the interdomain linker, with a resulting antiparallel orientation of bound GC elements, supportive of a chain-reversal loop trajectory for MBNL1-bound pre-mRNA targets. We anticipate that MBNL1-mediated targeting of looped RNA segments proximal to splice-site junctions could contribute to pre-mRNA alternative-splicing regulation.

  20. Differential expression and alternative splicing of cell cycle genes in imatinib-treated K562 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Lin, Jin; Huang, Lin-Feng; Huang, Bo; Xu, Yan-Mei; Li, Jing; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Jing; Yang, Wei-Ming; Min, Qing-Hua; Wang, Xiao-Zhong

    2015-09-01

    Cancer progression often involves the disorder of the cell cycle, and a number of effective chemotherapeutic drugs have been shown to induce cell cycle arrest. The purpose of this study was to comprehensively investigate the effects of imatinib on the expression profile of cell cycle genes in the chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) K562 cell line. In addition, we also investigated alternative splicing of the cell cycle genes affected by imatinib, since an important relationship has been shown to exist between RNA splicing and cell cycle progression. Exon array analysis was performed using total RNA purified from normal and imatinib-treated K562 cells. We identified 185 differentially expressed genes and 277 alternative splicing events between the two cell groups. A detailed analysis by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) of key genes confirmed the experimental results of the exon array. These results suggested that treatment of K562 cells with imatinib shifts the expression and alternative splicing profiles of several cell cycle-related genes. Importantly, these findings may help improve imatinib treatment strategies in patients with CML and may be useful for imatinib resistance research and CML drug development.

  1. Zebrafish stem/progenitor factor msi2b exhibits two phases of activity mediated by different splice variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochgreb-Hägele, Tatiana; Koo, Daniel E S; Das, Neha M; Bronner, Marianne E

    2014-02-01

    The Musashi (Msi) family of RNA-binding proteins is important in stem and differentiating cells in many species. Here, we present a zebrafish gene/protein trap line gt(msi2b-citrine)(ct) (57) (a) that expresses a Citrine fusion protein with endogenous Msi2b. Our results reveal two phases of Msi2b expression: ubiquitous expression in progenitor cells in the early embryo and later, tissue-specific expression in differentiating cells in the olfactory organ, pineal gland, and subpopulations of neurons in the central nervous system (CNS). Interestingly, this division between early and late phases is paralleled by differential expression of msi2b alternative splicing products. Whereas the full-length and long variant v3 Msi2b predominate at early stages, the later expression of variants in differentiating tissues appears to be tissue specific. Using the gt(msi2b-citrine)(ct) (57) (a), we characterized tissue-specific expression of Msi2b with cellular resolution in subsets of differentiating cells in the olfactory organ, pineal gland, CNS, and ventral neural tube. By performing transcription activator-like effectors nuclease-mediated biallelic genome editing or morpholino knockdown of Msi2b in zebrafish, our results show that early inactivation of Msi2b results in severe embryonic defects including hypertrophy of the ventricles and shortening of the body, consistent with an important role in cell proliferation and survival. Moreover, specific inactivation of Msi2b full-length indicates that this species is essential for the early role of Msi2b. This line provides a valuable tool both for live imaging of the endogenous Msi2b at subcellular resolution and manipulation of Msi2b-expressing cells.

  2. Characterization of a novel five-transmembrane domain cholecystokinin-2 receptor splice variant identified in human tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Claire; Escrieut, Chantal; Clerc, Pascal; Gigoux, Véronique; Waser, Beatrice; Reubi, Jean Claude; Fourmy, Daniel

    2012-02-26

    The cholecystokinin-2 receptor (CCK2R), is expressed in cancers where it contributes to tumor progression. The CCK2R is over-expressed in a sub-set of tumors, allowing its use in tumor targeting with a radiolabel ligand. Since discrepancies between mRNA levels and CCK2R binding sites were noticed, we searched for abnormally spliced variants in tumors from various origins having been previously reported to frequently express cholecystokinin receptors, such as medullary thyroid carcinomas, gastrointestinal stromal tumors, leiomyomas and leiomyosarcomas, and gastroenteropancreatic tumors. A variant of the CCK2R coding for a putative five-transmembrane domains receptor has been cloned. This variant represented as much as 6% of CCK2R levels. Ectopic expression in COS-7 cells revealed that this variant lacks biological activity due to its sequestration in endoplasmic reticulum. When co-expressed with the CCK2R, this variant diminished membrane density of the CCK2R and CCK2R-mediated activity (phospholipase-C and ERK activation). In conclusion, a novel splice variant acting as a dominant negative on membrane density of the CCK2R may be of importance for the pathophysiology of certain tumors and for their in vivo CCK2R-targeting.

  3. Novel RNA structural features of an alternatively splicing group II intron from Clostridium tetani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, Bonnie A; Zimmerly, Steven

    2014-06-01

    Group II introns are ribozymes in bacterial and organellar genomes that function as self-splicing introns and as retroelements. Previously, we reported that the group II intron C.te.I1 of Clostridium tetani alternatively splices in vivo to produce five distinct coding mRNAs. Accurate fusion of upstream and downstream reading frames requires a shifted 5' splice site located 8 nt upstream of the usual 5' GUGYG motif. This site is specified by the ribozyme through an altered intron/exon-binding site 1 (IBS1-EBS1) pairing. Here we use mutagenesis and self-splicing assays to investigate in more detail the significance of the structural features of the C.te.I1 ribozyme. The shifted 5' splice site is shown to be affected by structures in addition to IBS1-EBS1, and unlike other group II introns, C.te.I1 appears to require a spacer between IBS1 and the GUGYG motif. In addition, the mechanism of 3' exon recognition is modified from the ancestral IIB mechanism to a IIA-like mechanism that appears to be longer than the typical single base-pair interaction and may extend up to 4 bp. The novel ribozyme properties that have evolved for C.te.I1 illustrate the plasticity of group II introns in adapting new structural and catalytic properties that can be utilized to affect gene expression.

  4. Integrative genome-wide analysis reveals cooperative regulation of alternative splicing by hnRNP proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huelga, Stephanie C; Vu, Anthony Q; Arnold, Justin D; Liang, Tiffany Y; Liu, Patrick P; Yan, Bernice Y; Donohue, John Paul; Shiue, Lily; Hoon, Shawn; Brenner, Sydney; Ares, Manuel; Yeo, Gene W

    2012-02-23

    Understanding how RNA binding proteins control the splicing code is fundamental to human biology and disease. Here, we present a comprehensive study to elucidate how heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoparticle (hnRNP) proteins, among the most abundant RNA binding proteins, coordinate to regulate alternative pre-mRNA splicing (AS) in human cells. Using splicing-sensitive microarrays, crosslinking and immunoprecipitation coupled with high-throughput sequencing (CLIP-seq), and cDNA sequencing, we find that more than half of all AS events are regulated by multiple hnRNP proteins and that some combinations of hnRNP proteins exhibit significant synergy, whereas others act antagonistically. Our analyses reveal position-dependent RNA splicing maps, in vivo consensus binding sites, a surprising level of cross- and autoregulation among hnRNP proteins, and the coordinated regulation by hnRNP proteins of dozens of other RNA binding proteins and genes associated with cancer. Our findings define an unprecedented degree of complexity and compensatory relationships among hnRNP proteins and their splicing targets that likely confer robustness to cells.

  5. Integrative Genome-wide Analysis Reveals Cooperative Regulation of Alternative Splicing by hnRNP Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie C. Huelga

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how RNA binding proteins control the splicing code is fundamental to human biology and disease. Here, we present a comprehensive study to elucidate how heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoparticle (hnRNP proteins, among the most abundant RNA binding proteins, coordinate to regulate alternative pre-mRNA splicing (AS in human cells. Using splicing-sensitive microarrays, crosslinking and immunoprecipitation coupled with high-throughput sequencing (CLIP-seq, and cDNA sequencing, we find that more than half of all AS events are regulated by multiple hnRNP proteins and that some combinations of hnRNP proteins exhibit significant synergy, whereas others act antagonistically. Our analyses reveal position-dependent RNA splicing maps, in vivo consensus binding sites, a surprising level of cross- and autoregulation among hnRNP proteins, and the coordinated regulation by hnRNP proteins of dozens of other RNA binding proteins and genes associated with cancer. Our findings define an unprecedented degree of complexity and compensatory relationships among hnRNP proteins and their splicing targets that likely confer robustness to cells.

  6. Microbial and Natural Metabolites That Inhibit Splicing: A Powerful Alternative for Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Martínez-Montiel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In eukaryotes, genes are frequently interrupted with noncoding sequences named introns. Alternative splicing is a nuclear mechanism by which these introns are removed and flanking coding regions named exons are joined together to generate a message that will be translated in the cytoplasm. This mechanism is catalyzed by a complex machinery known as the spliceosome, which is conformed by more than 300 proteins and ribonucleoproteins that activate and regulate the precision of gene expression when assembled. It has been proposed that several genetic diseases are related to defects in the splicing process, including cancer. For this reason, natural products that show the ability to regulate splicing have attracted enormous attention due to its potential use for cancer treatment. Some microbial metabolites have shown the ability to inhibit gene splicing and the molecular mechanism responsible for this inhibition is being studied for future applications. Here, we summarize the main types of natural products that have been characterized as splicing inhibitors, the recent advances regarding molecular and cellular effects related to these molecules, and the applications reported so far in cancer therapeutics.

  7. Microbial and Natural Metabolites That Inhibit Splicing: A Powerful Alternative for Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas-Murrieta, Nora Hilda; Martínez-Montiel, Mónica; Gaspariano-Cholula, Mayra Patricia

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotes, genes are frequently interrupted with noncoding sequences named introns. Alternative splicing is a nuclear mechanism by which these introns are removed and flanking coding regions named exons are joined together to generate a message that will be translated in the cytoplasm. This mechanism is catalyzed by a complex machinery known as the spliceosome, which is conformed by more than 300 proteins and ribonucleoproteins that activate and regulate the precision of gene expression when assembled. It has been proposed that several genetic diseases are related to defects in the splicing process, including cancer. For this reason, natural products that show the ability to regulate splicing have attracted enormous attention due to its potential use for cancer treatment. Some microbial metabolites have shown the ability to inhibit gene splicing and the molecular mechanism responsible for this inhibition is being studied for future applications. Here, we summarize the main types of natural products that have been characterized as splicing inhibitors, the recent advances regarding molecular and cellular effects related to these molecules, and the applications reported so far in cancer therapeutics. PMID:27610372

  8. Identification and characterization of NAGNAG alternative splicing in the moss Physcomitrella patens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolte Kathrin

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alternative splicing (AS involving tandem acceptors that are separated by three nucleotides (NAGNAG is an evolutionarily widespread class of AS, which is well studied in Homo sapiens (human and Mus musculus (mouse. It has also been shown to be common in the model seed plants Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa (rice. In one of the first studies involving sequence-based prediction of AS in plants, we performed a genome-wide identification and characterization of NAGNAG AS in the model plant Physcomitrella patens, a moss. Results Using Sanger data, we found 295 alternatively used NAGNAG acceptors in P. patens. Using 31 features and training and test datasets of constitutive and alternative NAGNAGs, we trained a classifier to predict the splicing outcome at NAGNAG tandem splice sites (alternative splicing, constitutive at the first acceptor, or constitutive at the second acceptor. Our classifier achieved a balanced specificity and sensitivity of ≥ 89%. Subsequently, a classifier trained exclusively on data well supported by transcript evidence was used to make genome-wide predictions of NAGNAG splicing outcomes. By generation of more transcript evidence from a next-generation sequencing platform (Roche 454, we found additional evidence for NAGNAG AS, with altogether 664 alternative NAGNAGs being detected in P. patens using all currently available transcript evidence. The 454 data also enabled us to validate the predictions of the classifier, with 64% (80/125 of the well-supported cases of AS being predicted correctly. Conclusion NAGNAG AS is just as common in the moss P. patens as it is in the seed plants A. thaliana and O. sativa (but not conserved on the level of orthologous introns, and can be predicted with high accuracy. The most informative features are the nucleotides in the NAGNAG and in its immediate vicinity, along with the splice sites scores, as found earlier for NAGNAG AS in animals. Our results suggest that the

  9. Identification of the alternative spliced form of the alpha 2/delta subunit of voltage sensitive Ca2+ channels expressed in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilad, B; Shenkar, N; Halevi, S; Trus, M; Atlas, D

    1995-07-07

    The alpha 2/delta subunit of voltage sensitive Ca2+ channels expressed in PC12 has been cloned and partially sequenced. The message observed in Northern blot analysis displays a 7.5 kb transcript, identical in size to mRNA of rabbit skeletal muscle and rat brain. The nucleotide sequence of the cloned alpha 2 subunit of the PC12 specific cDNA is > 99% identical to rat brain sequence and 85% to skeletal muscle. Reverse-transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of the alternative splicing region identifies two deleted regions of 57 bp and 21 bp in PC12 expressed alpha 2/delta transcript. The alternative variant alpha 2e of alpha 2/delta subunit which is expressed in PC12 cells was previously identified in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells. RT-PCR analysis show two different sized alternative PCR fragments in rat lung and none in rat spleen, kidney and intestine. Antibodies prepared against a 19 amino acid peptide within the alternative spliced region effectively inhibits [3H]dopamine release in PC12 cells. This implies that the alternatively spliced region is positioned extracellularly and is involved in regulation of the L-type Ca2+ channel-mediated transmitter release.

  10. PSM/SH2B1 splice variants: critical role in src catalytic activation and the resulting STAT3s-mediated mitogenic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Manchao; Deng, Youping; Riedel, Heimo

    2008-05-01

    A role of PSM/SH2B1 had been shown in mitogenesis and extending to phenotypic cell transformation, however, the underlying molecular mechanism remained to be established. Here, four alternative PSM splice variants and individual functional protein domains were compared for their role in the regulation of Src activity. We found that elevated cellular levels of PSM variants resulted in phenotypic cell transformation and potentiated cell proliferation and survival in response to serum withdrawal. PSM variant activity presented a consistent signature pattern for any tested response of highest activity observed for gamma, followed by delta, alpha, and beta with decreasing activity. PSM-potentiated cell proliferation was sensitive to Src inhibitor herbimycin and PSM and Src were found in the same immune complex. PSM variants were substrates of the Src Tyr kinase and potentiated Src catalytic activity by increasing the V(max) and decreasing the K(m) for ATP with the signature pattern of variant activity. Dominant-negative PSM peptide mimetics including the SH2 or PH domains inhibited Src catalytic activity as well as Src-mediated phenotypic cell transformation. Activation of major Src substrate STAT3 was similarly potentiated by the PSM variants in a Src-dependent fashion or inhibited by PSM domain-specific peptide mimetics. Expression of a dominant-negative STAT3 mutant blocked PSM variant-mediated phenotypic cell transformation. Our results implicate an essential role of the PSM variants in the activation of the Src kinase and the resulting mitogenic response--extending to phenotypic cell transformation and involving the established Src substrate STAT3.

  11. α-Synuclein posttranslational modification and alternative splicing as a trigger for neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Katrin; Ariza, Aurelio

    2013-04-01

    Lewy body diseases include Parkinson disease and dementia with Lewy bodies and are characterized by the widespread distribution of Lewy bodies in virtually every brain area. The main component of Lewy bodies is alpha-synuclein (AS). Accumulating evidence suggests that AS oligomerization and aggregation are strongly associated with the pathogenesis of Lewy body diseases. AS is a small soluble protein with aggregation-prone properties under certain conditions. These properties are enhanced by posttranslational modifications such as phosphorylation, ubiquitination, nitration, and truncation. Accordingly, Lewy bodies contain abundant phosphorylated, nitrated, and monoubiquitinated AS. However, alternative splicing of the AS gene is also known to modify AS aggregation propensities. Splicing gives rise to four related forms of the protein, the main transcript and those that lack exon 4, exon 6, or both. Since AS structure and properties have been extensively studied, it is possible to predict the consequences of the splicing out of the two aforesaid exons. The present review discusses the latest insights on the mechanisms of AS posttranslational modifications and intends to depict their role in the pathogenesis of Lewy body diseases. The implications of deregulated alternative splicing are examined as well, and a hypothesis for the development of the pure form of dementia with Lewy bodies is proposed.

  12. A splice variant in KRT71 is associated with curly coat phenotype of Selkirk Rex cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandolfi, Barbara; Alhaddad, Hasan; Joslin, Shannon E. K.; Khan, Razib; Filler, Serina; Brem, Gottfried; Lyons, Leslie A.

    2013-01-01

    One of the salient features of the domestic cat is the aesthetics of its fur. The Selkirk Rex breed is defined by an autosomal dominant woolly rexoid hair (ADWH) abnormality that is characterized by tightly curled hair shafts. A genome-wide case – control association study was conducted using 9 curly coated Selkirk Rex and 29 controls, including straight-coated Selkirk Rex, British Shorthair and Persian, to localize the Selkirk autosomal dominant rexoid locus (SADRE). Although the control cats were from different breed lineages, they share recent breeding histories and were validated as controls by Bayesian clustering, multi-dimensional scaling and genomic inflation. A significant association was found on cat chromosome B4 (Praw = 2.87 × 10−11), and a unique haplotype spanning ~600 Kb was found in all the curly coated cats. Direct sequencing of four candidate genes revealed a splice site variant within the KRT71 gene associated with the hair abnormality in Selkirk Rex. PMID:23770706

  13. Splicing variant of AIMP2 as an effective target against chemoresistant ovarian cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Woo Choi; Jeong-Won Lee; Jun Ki Kim; Hye-Kyung Jeon; Jung-Joo Choi; Dae Gyu Kim; Byoung-Gie Kim

    2012-01-01

    Chemoresistance is a main cause for the failure of cancer management and intensive investigation is on-going to control chemoresistant (CR) cancers.Although NF-κB has been suggested as one of the potential targets to alleviate chemoresistance of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC),direct targeting of NF-κB may result in an unexpected effect due to the complex regulatory network via NF-κB.Here we show that AIMP2-DX2,a splicing variant of tumor suppressor AIMP2,can be a therapeutic target to control CR EOC.AIMP2-DX2 was often highly expressed in CR EOC both in vitro and in vivo.AIMP2-DX2 compromised the tumor necrosis factor alpha-dependent pro-apoptotic activity of AIMP2 via the competitive inhibition of AIMP2 binding to TRAF2 that plays a pivotal role in the regulation of NF-κB.The direct delivery of siRNA against AIMP2-DX2 into abdominal metastatic tumors of ovarian cancer using a microneedle converged on microendoscopy significantly suppressed the growth rate of tumors.The treated cancer tissues showed an enhanced apoptosis and the decreased TRAF2 level.Thus,we suggest that the downregulation of AIMP2-DX2 can be a potent adjuvant therapeutic approach for CR EOC that resulted from an aberrant activity of NF-κB.

  14. Global analysis of CPSF2-mediated alternative splicing: Integration of global iCLIP and transcriptome profiling data

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    Ashish Misra

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing is a key mechanism for generating proteome diversity, however the mechanisms regulating alternative splicing are poorly understood. Using a genome-wide RNA interference screening strategy, we identified cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor (CPSF and symplekin (SYMPK as cofactors of the well-known splicing regulator RBFOX2. To determine the role of CPSF in alternative splicing on a genome-wide level, we performed paired-end RNA sequencing (RNA-seq to compare splicing events in control cells and RBFOX2 or CPSF2 knockdown cells. We also performed individual-nucleotide resolution UV cross-linking and immunoprecipitation (iCLIP to identify direct binding targets of RBFOX2 and CPSF2. Here, we describe the experimental design, and the quality control and data analyses that were performed on the dataset. The raw sequencing data have been deposited in NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus and are accessible through GEO Series accession number GSE60392.

  15. Alternative Technical Summary Report: Electrometallurgical Treatment Variant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, L.W.

    1995-11-30

    Immobilization is the fixation of the surplus fissile materials in an acceptable matrix such as glass or ceramics to create an environmentally benign form for disposal in a repository. In addition to the traditional characteristics required of an immobilization form to achieve isolation of the fissile material from the biosphere over geologic times, the immobilization form for the Fissile Materials Disposition Program (FMDP) must also possess the property that it is inherently as unattractive and inaccessible as the fissile material from commercial spent fuel. This latter requirement is similar to the wording of the ''spent fuel standard'' invoked in the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) study on plutonium disposition. High-level wastes (HLW) or separated cesium ({sup 137}Cs), can be added with the fissile material into the waste form to create a radiation field that increases the proliferation resistance and decreases reuse by the host nation in the following ways: (1) Plutonium will be diluted with elements that must be removed by extensive chemical processing to return it to weapons-usable purity; (2) The immobilized plutonium canisters will contain approximately 2 tonnes (2000 kg; 2.2 tons) of mass, thereby forcing the use of heavy equipment to move the canisters; (3) A gamma radiation barrier will be added to the immobilized plutonium canisters; the present concept is to add a radiation barrier that is greater than 1 Gy (100 rad) per hour at 1 m (3 ft) 30 years after fabrication; (4) These canisters will then be sealed in casks and emplaced into drifts in a federal repository where they will be monitored for 100 years before the repository is sealed. This immobilization process is shown conceptually in Figure 1. In the electrometallurgical treatment (ET) variant, plutonium-rich residues are shipped to existing Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) facilities where the plutonium is converted to plutonium chloride, dissolved in a molten

  16. Molecular characterization of a CpTRIM35-like protein and its splice variants from whitespotted bamboo shark (Chiloscyllium plagiosum)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xinshang, E-mail: sanmaosound@163.com; Zhao, Heng, E-mail: hengzhao2000@gmail.com; Chen, Yeyu, E-mail: cyyleaf@126.com; Luo, Huiying, E-mail: luohuiying@caas.cn; Yao, Bin, E-mail: binyao@caas.cn

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • A TRIM gene and three splice variants were firstly cloned from elasmobranch fish. • The genes were constitutively expressed with high levels in spleen and kidney. • The gene products were distributed in cytoplasm alone or cytoplasm and nucleus. • As E3 ubiquitin ligases, the proteins differed in immune responses to challenges. - Abstract: The tripartite motif (TRIM) proteins play important roles in a broad range of biological processes, including apoptosis, cell proliferation and innate immunity response. In this study, a TRIM gene and its three splice variants were cloned from an elasmobranch fish—whitespotted bamboo shark (Chiloscyllium plagiosum Bennett). Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the gene was closely related to TRIM35 homologs, thus termed CpTRIM35-like. Deduced CpTRIM35 has a RBCC-PRY/SPRY structure typical of TRIM proteins, and its splice variants (CpTRIM35-1–3) have different truncations at the C-terminus. The gene products were constitutively expressed in adult sharks with the highest levels in spleen and kidney. The different subcellular locations, upregulation upon LPS and poly I:C stimulation, and significant E3 ubiquitin ligase activities suggested their different roles in immune responses as an E3 ubiquitin ligase. This is the first TRIM protein ever characterized in elasmobranch fish.

  17. Alternative splicing of transcripts from crtI and crtYB genes of Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodato, P; Alcaino, J; Barahona, S; Retamales, P; Cifuentes, V

    2003-08-01

    Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous is one of the relevant sources of the carotenoid astaxanthin. In this paper, we describe for the first time cloning of unexpected cDNAs obtained from the crtI and crtYB genes of X. dendrorhous strain UCD 67-385. The cDNA of the crtI gene conserves 80 bp of the first intron, while the cDNA of the crtYB gene conserves 55 bp of the first intron and lacks 111 bp of the second exon. The crtI and crtYB RNAs could be spliced in alternative splice sites, which produced alternative transcripts which could not be translated to active CRTI and CRTYB proteins since they had numerous stop codons in their sequences. The ratio of mature mRNA to alternative mRNA for the crtI gene decreased as a function of the age of the culture, while the cellular content of carotenoids increased. It is possible that splicing to mature or alternative transcripts could regulate the cellular concentrations of phytoene desaturase and phytoene synthase-lycopene cyclase proteins, depending on the physiological or environmental conditions.

  18. Alternative splicing in nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits from Locusta migratoria and its influence on acetylcholine potencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yixi; Liu, Yang; Bao, Haibo; Sun, Huahua; Liu, Zewen

    2017-01-18

    Due to the great abundance within insect central nervous system (CNS), nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) play key roles in insect CNS, which makes it to be the targets of several classes of insecticides, such as neonicotinoids. Insect nAChRs are pentameric complexes consisting of five subunits, and a dozen subunits in one insect species can theoretically comprise diverse nAChRs. The alternative splicing in insect nAChR subunits may increase the diversity of insect nAChRs. In the oriental migratory locust (Locusta migratoria manilensis Meyen), a model insect species with agricultural importance, the alternative splicing was found in six α subunits among nine α and two β subunits, such as missing conserved residues in Loop D from Locα1, Locα6 and Locα9, a 34-residue insertion in Locα8 cytoplasmic loop, and truncated transcripts for Locα4, Locα7 and Locα9. Hybrid nAChRs were successfully constructed in Xenopus oocytes through co-expression with rat β2 and one α subunit from L. migratoria, which included Locα1, Locα2, Locα3, Locα4, Locα5, Locα8 and Locα9. Influences of alternative splicing in Locα1, Locα8 and Locα9 on acetylcholine potency were tested on hybrid nAChRs. The alternative splicing in Locα1 and Locα9 could increase acetylcholine sensitivities on recombinant receptors, while the splicing in Locα8 showed significant influences on the current amplitudes of oocytes. The results revealed that the alternative splicing at or close to the ligand-binding sites, as well as at cytoplasmic regions away from the ligand-binding sites, in insect nAChR subunits would change the agonist potencies on the receptors, which consequently increased nAChR diversity in functional and pharmacological properties.

  19. Alternative Splicing: A Potential Source of Functional Innovation in the Eukaryotic Genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing (AS is a common posttranscriptional process in eukaryotic organisms, by which multiple distinct functional transcripts are produced from a single gene. The release of the human genome draft revealed a much smaller number of genes than anticipated. Because of its potential role in expanding protein diversity, interest in alternative splicing has been increasing over the last decade. Although recent studies have shown that 94% human multiexon genes undergo AS, evolution of AS and thus its potential role in functional innovation in eukaryotic genomes remain largely unexplored. Here we review available evidence regarding the evolution of AS prevalence and functional role. In addition we stress the need to correct for the strong effect of transcript coverage in AS detection and set out a strategy to ultimately elucidate the extent of the role of AS in functional innovation on a genomic scale.

  20. SRRM2, a potential blood biomarker revealing high alternative splicing in Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina A Shehadeh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Parkinson's disease (PD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that affects about five million people worldwide. Diagnosis remains clinical, based on phenotypic patterns. The discovery of laboratory markers that will enhance diagnostic accuracy, allow pre-clinical detection and tracking of disease progression is critically needed. These biomarkers may include transcripts with different isoforms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed extensive analysis on 3 PD microarray experiments available through GEO and found that the RNA splicing gene SRRM2 (or SRm300, sereine/arginine repetitive matrix 2, was the only gene differentially upregulated among all the three PD experiments. SRRM2 expression was not changed in the blood of other neurological diseased patients versus the healthy controls. Using real-time PCR, we report that the shorter transcript of SRRM2 was 1.7 fold (p = 0.008 upregulated in the substantia nigra of PDs vs controls while the longer transcript was 0.4 downregulated in both the substantia nigra (p = 0.03 and amygdala (p = 0.003. To validate our results and test for the possibility of alternative splicing in PD, we performed independent microarray scans, using Affymetrix Exon_ST1 arrays, from peripheral blood of 28 individuals (17 PDs and 11 Ctrls and found a significant upregulation of the upstream (5' exons of SRRM2 and a downregulation of the downstream exons, causing a total of 0.7 fold down regulation (p = 0.04 of the long isoform. In addition, we report novel information about hundreds of genes with significant alternative splicing (differential exonic expression in PD blood versus controls. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The consistent dysregulation of the RNA splicing factor SRRM2 in two different PD neuronal sources and in PD blood but not in blood of other neurologically diseased patients makes SRRM2 a strong candidate gene for PD and draws attention to the role of RNA splicing in the disease.

  1. Effect of SIRT1 and its alternative splicing variant SIRT1-ΔExon8 on senescence model of 293T cells%SIRT1及其选择性剪接变异体SIRT1-ΔExon8在293T细胞衰老模型中的作用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王玥; 杨小荣; 张策

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog 1-full long (SIRT1-FL) and its alternative splicing variant SIRT1-ΔExon8 on the aging process of 293T cells by observing the expression changes of SIRT1 and SIRT1-ΔExon8 in the D-galactose (D-gal) induced senescence model of 293T cells. Methods ①Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK8) was used to determine the effect of D-gal on 293T cells viability at different concentrations (0, 5, 10, 15, 20 g/L). ②The 293T cells were cultured in DMEM high-glucose medium con-taining 10 g/L D-gal at the third passage and amplified to the sixth passage, and the senescence model of the 293T cells was established. β-galactosidase (SA-β-Gal) staining was used to determine the positive rate of senescent cells.③The mRNA expression levels of SIRT1 and SIRT1-ΔExon8 were measured in the 293T cells of the D-gal induced group and the control group by RT-PCR assay. Results ①The CCK-8 assay showed that the 10 g/L D-gal could in-duce 293T cells senescence and avoid extensive injuries. ②The positive rate of senescent cells in the D-gal induced group (74.2±3.6)%was higher than that in the control group (7.7±1.4)% (P<0.05). ③The findings of RT-PCR showed that the mRNA expression levels of SIRT1-FL and SIRT1-ΔExon8 in the 293T cells in the D-gal induced group were decreased by (78.26±0.05)%and (88.03±0.03)%compared with those in the control group, respectively (P<0.05). Conclusion ①SA-β-gal staining shows that the D-gal can induce the senescence model of 293T cells successfully.②The mRNA expression levels of SIRT1-FL and SIRT1-ΔExon8 in the senescence cells group are significantly de-creased compared with those in the control group, suggesting SIRT1-FL and SIRT1-ΔExon8 may be involved in the regulation of 293T cells senescence.%目的:通过观察SIRT1全长(SIRT1-FL)及缺失第8外显子的SIRT1选择性剪接变异体(SIRT1-ΔExon8)在D-半乳糖诱导的293T细胞衰老模型

  2. Rbfox2-coordinated alternative splicing of Mef2d and Rock2 controls myoblast fusion during myogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ravi K; Xia, Zheng; Bland, Christopher S; Kalsotra, Auinash; Scavuzzo, Marissa A; Curk, Tomaz; Ule, Jernej; Li, Wei; Cooper, Thomas A

    2014-08-21

    Alternative splicing plays important regulatory roles during periods of physiological change. During development, a large number of genes coordinately express protein isoform transitions regulated by alternative splicing; however, the mechanisms that coordinate splicing and the functional integration of the resultant tissue-specific protein isoforms are typically unknown. Here we show that the conserved Rbfox2 RNA binding protein regulates 30% of the splicing transitions observed during myogenesis and is required for the specific step of myoblast fusion. Integration of Rbfox2-dependent splicing outcomes from RNA-seq with Rbfox2 iCLIP data identified Mef2d and Rock2 as Rbfox2 splicing targets. Restored activities of Mef2d and Rock2 rescued myoblast fusion in Rbfox2-depleted cultures, demonstrating functional cooperation of protein isoforms generated by coordinated alterative splicing. The results demonstrate that coordinated alternative splicing by a single RNA binding protein modulates transcription (Mef2d) and cell signaling (Rock2) programs to drive tissue-specific functions (cell fusion) to promote a developmental transition.

  3. High resolution analysis of the human transcriptome: detection of extensive alternative splicing independent of transcriptional activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rouet Fabien

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Commercially available microarrays have been used in many settings to generate expression profiles for a variety of applications, including target selection for disease detection, classification, profiling for pharmacogenomic response to therapeutics, and potential disease staging. However, many commercially available microarray platforms fail to capture transcript diversity produced by alternative splicing, a major mechanism for driving proteomic diversity through transcript heterogeneity. Results The human Genome-Wide SpliceArray™ (GWSA, a novel microarray platform, utilizes an existing probe design concept to monitor such transcript diversity on a genome scale. The human GWSA allows the detection of alternatively spliced events within the human genome through the use of exon body and exon junction probes to provide a direct measure of each transcript, through simple calculations derived from expression data. This report focuses on the performance and validation of the array when measured against standards recently published by the Microarray Quality Control (MAQC Project. The array was shown to be highly quantitative, and displayed greater than 85% correlation with the HG-U133 Plus 2.0 array at the gene level while providing more extensive coverage of each gene. Almost 60% of splice events among genes demonstrating differential expression of greater than 3 fold also contained extensive splicing alterations. Importantly, almost 10% of splice events within the gene set displaying constant overall expression values had evidence of transcript diversity. Two examples illustrate the types of events identified: LIM domain 7 showed no differential expression at the gene level, but demonstrated deregulation of an exon skip event, while erythrocyte membrane protein band 4.1 -like 3 was differentially expressed and also displayed deregulation of a skipped exon isoform. Conclusion Significant changes were detected independent of

  4. Analysis of alternative splicing events for cancer diagnosis using a multiplexing nanophotonic biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas, César S; Domínguez-Zotes, Santos; Lechuga, Laura M

    2017-01-25

    Personalized medicine is a promising tool not only for prevention, screening and development of more efficient treatment strategies, but also for diminishing the side effects caused by current therapies. Deciphering gene regulation pathways provides a reliable prognostic analysis to elucidate the origin of grave diseases and facilitate the selection of the most adequate treatment for each individual. Alternative splicing of mRNA precursors is one of these gene regulation pathways and enables cells to generate different protein outputs from the same gene depending on their developmental or homeostatic status. Its deregulation is strongly linked to disease onset and progression constituting a relevant and innovative class of biomarker. Herein we report a highly selective and sensitive nanophotonic biosensor based on the direct monitoring of the aberrant alternative splicing of Fas gene. Unlike conventional methods, the nanobiosensor performs a real-time detection of the specific isoforms in the fM-pM range without any cDNA synthesis or PCR amplification requirements. The nanobiosensor has been proven isoform-specific with no crosshybridization, greatly minimizing detection biases. The demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity make our nanobiosensor ideal for examining significant tumor-associated expression shifts of alternatively spliced isoforms for the early and accurate theranostics of cancer.

  5. Changes in Alternative Splicing in Apis Mellifera Bees Fed Apis Cerana Royal Jelly

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    Shi Yuan Yuan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Western honey bee (Apis mellifera is a social insect characterized by caste differentiation in which the queen bee and worker bees display marked differences in morphology, behavior, reproduction, and longevity despite their identical genomes. The main causative factor in caste differentiation is the food fed to queen larvae, termed royal jelly (RJ. Alternative splicing (AS is an important RNA-mediated post-transcriptional process in eukaryotes. Here we report AS changes in A. mellifera after being fed either A. mellifera RJ or A. cerana RJ. The results demonstrated that the RJ type affected 4 types of AS in adult A. mellifera: exon skipping, intron retention, alternative 5’ splice sites, and alternative 3’splice sites. After feeding with A. cerana RJ, AS occurred in many genes in adult A. mellifera that encode proteins involved in development, growth, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and substance metabolism. This study provides the first evidence that heterospecific RJ can influence the AS of many genes related to honey bee development and growth.

  6. Alternative Splicing in Adhesion- and Motility-Related Genes in Breast Cancer

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    Rosanna Aversa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common tumor and the second leading cause of cancer death among woman, mainly caused by the metastatic spread. Tumor invasiveness is due to an altered expression of adhesion molecules. Among them, semaphorins are of peculiar interest. Cancer cells can manipulate alternative splicing patterns to modulate the expression of adhesion- and motility-related molecules, also at the isoform level. In this study, combining RNA-Sequencing on MCF-7 to targeted experimental validations—in human breast cell lines and breast tumor biopsies—we identified 12 new alternative splicing transcripts in genes encoding adhesion- and motility-related molecules, including semaphorins, their receptors and co-receptors. Among them, a new SEMA3F transcript is expressed in all breast cell lines and breast cancer biopsies, and is translated into a new semaphorin 3F isoform. In silico analysis predicted that most of the new putative proteins lack functional domains, potentially missing some functions and acquiring new ones. Our findings better describe the extent of alternative splicing in breast cancer and highlight the need to further investigate adhesion- and motility-related molecules to gain insights into breast cancer progression.

  7. Alternative Splicing in Adhesion- and Motility-Related Genes in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aversa, Rosanna; Sorrentino, Anna; Esposito, Roberta; Ambrosio, Maria Rosaria; Amato, Angela; Zambelli, Alberto; Ciccodicola, Alfredo; D’Apice, Luciana; Costa, Valerio

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common tumor and the second leading cause of cancer death among woman, mainly caused by the metastatic spread. Tumor invasiveness is due to an altered expression of adhesion molecules. Among them, semaphorins are of peculiar interest. Cancer cells can manipulate alternative splicing patterns to modulate the expression of adhesion- and motility-related molecules, also at the isoform level. In this study, combining RNA-Sequencing on MCF-7 to targeted experimental validations—in human breast cell lines and breast tumor biopsies—we identified 12 new alternative splicing transcripts in genes encoding adhesion- and motility-related molecules, including semaphorins, their receptors and co-receptors. Among them, a new SEMA3F transcript is expressed in all breast cell lines and breast cancer biopsies, and is translated into a new semaphorin 3F isoform. In silico analysis predicted that most of the new putative proteins lack functional domains, potentially missing some functions and acquiring new ones. Our findings better describe the extent of alternative splicing in breast cancer and highlight the need to further investigate adhesion- and motility-related molecules to gain insights into breast cancer progression. PMID:26784191

  8. Systematically differentiating functions for alternatively spliced isoforms through integrating RNA-seq data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eksi, Ridvan; Li, Hong-Dong; Menon, Rajasree; Wen, Yuchen; Omenn, Gilbert S; Kretzler, Matthias; Guan, Yuanfang

    2013-01-01

    Integrating large-scale functional genomic data has significantly accelerated our understanding of gene functions. However, no algorithm has been developed to differentiate functions for isoforms of the same gene using high-throughput genomic data. This is because standard supervised learning requires 'ground-truth' functional annotations, which are lacking at the isoform level. To address this challenge, we developed a generic framework that interrogates public RNA-seq data at the transcript level to differentiate functions for alternatively spliced isoforms. For a specific function, our algorithm identifies the 'responsible' isoform(s) of a gene and generates classifying models at the isoform level instead of at the gene level. Through cross-validation, we demonstrated that our algorithm is effective in assigning functions to genes, especially the ones with multiple isoforms, and robust to gene expression levels and removal of homologous gene pairs. We identified genes in the mouse whose isoforms are predicted to have disparate functionalities and experimentally validated the 'responsible' isoforms using data from mammary tissue. With protein structure modeling and experimental evidence, we further validated the predicted isoform functional differences for the genes Cdkn2a and Anxa6. Our generic framework is the first to predict and differentiate functions for alternatively spliced isoforms, instead of genes, using genomic data. It is extendable to any base machine learner and other species with alternatively spliced isoforms, and shifts the current gene-centered function prediction to isoform-level predictions.

  9. Systematically differentiating functions for alternatively spliced isoforms through integrating RNA-seq data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ridvan Eksi

    Full Text Available Integrating large-scale functional genomic data has significantly accelerated our understanding of gene functions. However, no algorithm has been developed to differentiate functions for isoforms of the same gene using high-throughput genomic data. This is because standard supervised learning requires 'ground-truth' functional annotations, which are lacking at the isoform level. To address this challenge, we developed a generic framework that interrogates public RNA-seq data at the transcript level to differentiate functions for alternatively spliced isoforms. For a specific function, our algorithm identifies the 'responsible' isoform(s of a gene and generates classifying models at the isoform level instead of at the gene level. Through cross-validation, we demonstrated that our algorithm is effective in assigning functions to genes, especially the ones with multiple isoforms, and robust to gene expression levels and removal of homologous gene pairs. We identified genes in the mouse whose isoforms are predicted to have disparate functionalities and experimentally validated the 'responsible' isoforms using data from mammary tissue. With protein structure modeling and experimental evidence, we further validated the predicted isoform functional differences for the genes Cdkn2a and Anxa6. Our generic framework is the first to predict and differentiate functions for alternatively spliced isoforms, instead of genes, using genomic data. It is extendable to any base machine learner and other species with alternatively spliced isoforms, and shifts the current gene-centered function prediction to isoform-level predictions.

  10. Alternative Splicing of a Novel Inducible Exon Diversifies the CASK Guanylate Kinase Domain

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    Jill A. Dembowski

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alternative pre-mRNA splicing has a major impact on cellular functions and development with the potential to fine-tune cellular localization, posttranslational modification, interaction properties, and expression levels of cognate proteins. The plasticity of regulation sets the stage for cells to adjust the relative levels of spliced mRNA isoforms in response to stress or stimulation. As part of an exon profiling analysis of mouse cortical neurons stimulated with high KCl to induce membrane depolarization, we detected a previously unrecognized exon (E24a of the CASK gene, which encodes for a conserved peptide insertion in the guanylate kinase interaction domain. Comparative sequence analysis shows that E24a appeared selectively in mammalian CASK genes as part of a >3,000 base pair intron insertion. We demonstrate that a combination of a naturally defective 5 splice site and negative regulation by several splicing factors, including SC35 (SRSF2 and ASF/SF2 (SRSF1, drives E24a skipping in most cell types. However, this negative regulation is countered with an observed increase in E24a inclusion after neuronal stimulation and NMDA receptor signaling. Taken together, E24a is typically a skipped exon, which awakens during neuronal stimulation with the potential to diversify the protein interaction properties of the CASK polypeptide.

  11. Alternative Splicing of Neuronal Differentiation Factor TRF2 Regulated by HNRNPH1/H2

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    Ioannis Grammatikakis

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available During neuronal differentiation, use of an alternative splice site on the rat telomere repeat-binding factor 2 (TRF2 mRNA generates a short TRF2 protein isoform (TRF2-S capable of derepressing neuronal genes. However, the RNA-binding proteins (RBPs controlling this splicing event are unknown. Here, using affinity pull-down analysis, we identified heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins H1 and H2(HNRNPH as RBPs specifically capable of interacting with the spliced RNA segment (exon 7 of Trf2 pre-mRNA. HNRNPH proteins prevent the production of the short isoform of Trf2 mRNA, as HNRNPH silencing selectively elevates TRF2-S levels. Accordingly, HNRNPH levels decline while TRF2-S levels increase during neuronal differentiation. In addition, CRISPR/Cas9-mediated deletion of hnRNPH2 selectively accelerates the NGF-triggered differentiation of rat pheochromocytoma cells into neurons. In sum, HNRNPH is a splicing regulator of Trf2 pre-mRNA that prevents the expression of TRF2-S, a factor implicated in neuronal differentiation.

  12. Expression Changes and Significance of SIRT1 Alternative Splicing Variants of SIRT1- Exon8 mRNA in the Hippocampus of Young and Aged Mice%SIRT1选择性剪接变异体SIRT1-ΔExon8 mRNA在幼龄和老龄小鼠海马组织的表达改变及意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高瑞君; 李艳丽; 王锐; 高杨; 何泽平; 杨小荣

    2016-01-01

    目的:检测小鼠海马组织中是否存在SIRT1选择性剪接变异体SIRT1-ΔExon8及其mRNA在幼龄和老龄小鼠海马组织的表达水平。方法:选取10只50 d(幼龄)和10只12个月龄(老龄)雄性昆明(KM)小鼠,分别提取海马组织的RNA并进行反转录及PCR,通过琼脂糖凝胶电泳检测海马组织中的SIRT1-ΔExon8 mRNA;采用Real-time PCR(RT-PCR)技术检测SIRT1-ΔExon8 mRNA的表达。结果:幼龄和老龄小鼠海马组织均检测到SIRT1-ΔExon8 mRNA;与幼龄组相比,老龄组小鼠SIRT1-ΔExon8 mRNA表达增加。结论:老龄小鼠海马组织的SIRT1选择性剪接变异体SIRT1-ΔExon8 mRNA较幼龄小鼠的表达增加,因此SIRT1-ΔExon8可能参与了衰老的发生,提示通过调控SIRT1-ΔExon8的表达可能会延缓机体的衰老。%Objective:To detect whether existence of SIRT1 alternatively spliced variants SIRT1-ΔExon8 and its mRNA expression level in young and aged mice hippocampus.Method:A total of 10 cases of 50 days (young)and 10 cases of 12 age (aging)Kunming (KM) male mice were selected,reverse transcription and PCR were carried by extracting RNA from the hippocampus tissue,SIRT1-ΔExon8 mRNA in hippocampus tissue were detected by agarose gel electrophoresis and SIRT1-ΔExon8 mRNA expression were detected by Real-time PCR (RT-PCR) technology.Result:Young and aging mice hippocampus tissue all detected SIRT1-ΔExon8 mRNA. Compared with the young group,SIRT1-ΔExon8 increased expression of mRNA in aging mice. Conclusion:SIRT1 alternative splicing variant of SIRT1-ΔExon8 mRNA expression in aged mice hippocampus tissue is increased than young mice,thus SIRT1-ΔExon8 may be involved in the occurrence of aging,point out regulating the expression of SIRT1-ΔExon8 may delay aging.

  13. Alternative splicing of exon 17 and a missense mutation in exon 20 of the insulin receptor gene in two brothers with a novel syndrome of insulin resistance (congenital fiber-type disproportion myopathy)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorwerk, P; Christoffersen, C T; Müller, J

    1999-01-01

    domain. In the correct spliced variant, the point mutation is silent and results in a normally translated IR. The paternal allele carries a missense mutation in the tyrosine kinase domain. All three cDNA variants were present in the lymphocytes of the patients. Purified IR from 293 cells overexpressing...... to be compound heterozygotes for mutations in the IR gene. The maternal allele was alternatively spliced in exon 17 due to a point mutation in the -1 donor splice site of the exon. The abnormal skipping of exon 17 shifts the amino acid reading frame and leads to a truncated IR, missing the entire tyrosine kinase...... either of the two mutated receptors lacked basal or stimulated IR beta-subunit autophosphorylation. A third brother who inherited both normal alleles has an normal muscle phenotype and insulin sensitivity, suggesting a direct linkage of these IR mutations with the CFTDM phenotype....

  14. Mu Opioid Splice Variant MOR-1K Contributes to the Development of Opioid-Induced Hyperalgesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Folabomi A Oladosu

    Full Text Available A subset of the population receiving opioids for the treatment of acute and chronic clinical pain develops a paradoxical increase in pain sensitivity known as opioid-induced hyperalgesia. Given that opioid analgesics are one of few treatments available against clinical pain, it is critical to determine the key molecular mechanisms that drive opioid-induced hyperalgesia in order to reduce its prevalence. Recent evidence implicates a splice variant of the mu opioid receptor known as MOR-1K in the emergence of opioid-induced hyperalgesia. Results from human genetic association and cell signaling studies demonstrate that MOR-1K contributes to decreased opioid analgesic responses and produces increased cellular activity via Gs signaling. Here, we conducted the first study to directly test the role of MOR-1K in opioid-induced hyperalgesia.In order to examine the role of MOR-1K in opioid-induced hyperalgesia, we first assessed pain responses to mechanical and thermal stimuli prior to, during, and following chronic morphine administration. Results show that genetically diverse mouse strains (C57BL/6J, 129S6, and CXB7/ByJ exhibited different morphine response profiles with corresponding changes in MOR-1K gene expression patterns. The 129S6 mice exhibited an analgesic response correlating to a measured decrease in MOR-1K gene expression levels, while CXB7/ByJ mice exhibited a hyperalgesic response correlating to a measured increase in MOR-1K gene expression levels. Furthermore, knockdown of MOR-1K in CXB7/ByJ mice via chronic intrathecal siRNA administration not only prevented the development of opioid-induced hyperalgesia, but also unmasked morphine analgesia.These findings suggest that MOR-1K is likely a necessary contributor to the development of opioid-induced hyperalgesia. With further research, MOR-1K could be exploited as a target for antagonists that reduce or prevent opioid-induced hyperalgesia.

  15. Carotenogenesis Is Regulated by 5′UTR-Mediated Translation of Phytoene Synthase Splice Variants1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voß, Björn; Maass, Dirk; Beyer, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Phytoene synthase (PSY) catalyzes the highly regulated, frequently rate-limiting synthesis of the first biosynthetically formed carotene. While PSY constitutes a small gene family in most plant taxa, the Brassicaceae, including Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), predominantly possess a single PSY gene. This monogenic situation is compensated by the differential expression of two alternative splice variants (ASV), which differ in length and in the exon/intron retention of their 5′UTRs. ASV1 contains a long 5′UTR (untranslated region) and is involved in developmentally regulated carotenoid formation, such as during deetiolation. ASV2 contains a short 5′UTR and is preferentially induced when an immediate increase in the carotenoid pathway flux is required, such as under salt stress or upon sudden light intensity changes. We show that the long 5′UTR of ASV1 is capable of attenuating the translational activity in response to high carotenoid pathway fluxes. This function resides in a defined 5′UTR stretch with two predicted interconvertible RNA conformations, as known from riboswitches, which might act as a flux sensor. The translation-inhibitory structure is absent from the short 5′UTR of ASV2 allowing to bypass translational inhibition under conditions requiring rapidly increased pathway fluxes. The mechanism is not found in the rice (Oryza sativa) PSY1 5′UTR, consistent with the prevalence of transcriptional control mechanisms in taxa with multiple PSY genes. The translational control mechanism identified is interpreted in terms of flux adjustments needed in response to retrograde signals stemming from intermediates of the plastid-localized carotenoid biosynthesis pathway. PMID:27729470

  16. Alternative splicing of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 produces a secreted isoform that inhibits fibroblast growth factor-induced proliferation and is repressed in urothelial carcinoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Darren C; L'Hôte, Corine G; Kennedy, Wendy; Pitt, Eva; Knowles, Margaret A

    2005-11-15

    Fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) are a family of receptor tyrosine kinases that play key roles in proliferation, differentiation, and tumorigenesis. FGFR3 was identified as the major family member expressed in both normal human urothelium and cultured normal human urothelial (NHU) cells and was expressed as the IIIb isoform. We also identified a splice variant, FGFR3 Delta8-10, lacking exons encoding the COOH-terminal half of immunoglobulin-like domain III and the transmembrane domain. Previous reports have assumed that this is a cancer-specific splice variant. We showed that FGFR3 Delta8-10 is a normal transcript in NHU cells and is translated, N-glycosylated, and secreted. Primary urothelium expressed high levels of FGFR3 transcripts. In culture, levels were reduced in actively proliferating cells but increased at confluence and as cells approached senescence. Cells overexpressing FGFR3 IIIb showed FGF1-induced proliferation, which was inhibited by the addition of FGFR3 Delta8-10. In bladder tumor cell lines derived from aggressive carcinomas, there were significant alterations in the relative expression of isoforms including an overall decrease in the proportion of FGFR3 Delta8-10 and predominant expression of FGFR3 IIIc in some cases. In summary, alternative splicing of FGFR3 IIIb in NHU cells represents a normal mechanism to generate a transcript that regulates proliferation and in bladder cancer, the ratio of FGFR3 isoforms is significantly altered.

  17. fruitless alternative splicing and sex behaviour in insects: an ancient and unforgettable love story?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Marco Salvemini; Catello Polito; Giuseppe Saccone

    2010-09-01

    Courtship behaviours are common features of animal species that reproduce sexually. Typically, males are involved in courting females. Insects display an astonishing variety of courtship strategies primarily based on innate stereotyped responses to various external stimuli. In Drosophila melanogaster, male courtship requires proteins encoded by the fruitless (fru) gene that are produced in different sex-specific isoforms via alternative splicing. Drosophila mutant flies with loss-of-function alleles of the fru gene exhibit blocked male courtship behaviour. However, various individual steps in the courtship ritual are disrupted in fly strains carrying different fru alleles. These findings suggest that fru is required for specific steps in courtship. In distantly related insect species, various fru paralogues were isolated, which shows conservation of sex-specific alternative splicing and protein expression in neural tissues and suggests an evolutionary functional conservation of fru in the control of male-specificcourtship behaviour. In this review, we report the seminal findings regarding the fru gene, its splicing regulation and evolution in insects.

  18. Novel Splice Variants of Bovine Interleukin-1 Receptor-Associated Kinase 2(IRAK2)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xing-ping; LUOREN Zhuo-ma; XU Shang-zhong; GAO Xue; LI Jun-ya; REN Hong-yan; CHEN Jin-bao

    2009-01-01

    Interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinases(IRAKs)are important signaling elements of the toll-like receptors family,which play a role in innate immune responses by coordinating host defense mechanisms.Presently different isoforms of human and murine IRAK2 molecules are cloned,but there is no report on the sequences and structure of bovine IRAK2 gene.In this study,we cloned the bovine IRAK2 gene by RT-PCR and RACE and discovered that there exist two alternative splicing of bovine IRAK2 genes,IRAK2a and IRAK2b(GenBank accession no.EU528620 and EU528621).IRAK2a gene is 2148 bp coding 622 aa,which contains a death domain(aa 14-94)and a kinase domain(aa 205-440),but IRAK2b lacks 147 bp of exon 3 corresponding to IRAK2a,and codes 386 aa which contains only partly kinase domain.

  19. Splice form variant and amino acid changes in MDR49 confers DDT resistance in transgenic Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong, Keon Mook; Sun, Weilin; Clark, John M; Pittendrigh, Barry R

    2016-03-22

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters represent a superfamily of proteins that have important physiological roles in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In insects, ABC transporters have previously been implicated in insecticide resistance. The 91-R strain of Drosophila melanogaster has been intensely selected with DDT over six decades. A recent selective sweeps analysis of 91-R implicated the potential role of MDR49, an ABC transporter, in DDT resistance, however, to date the details of how MDR49 may play a role in resistance have not been elucidated. In this study, we investigated the impact of structural changes and an alternative splicing event in MDR49 on DDT-resistance in 91-R, as compared to the DDT susceptible strain 91-C. We observed three amino acid differences in MDR49 when 91-R was compared with 91-C, and only one isoform (MDR49B) was implicated in DDT resistance. A transgenic Drosophila strain containing the 91-R-MDR49B isoform had a significantly higher LD50 value as compared to the 91-C-MDR49B isoform at the early time points (6 h to 12 h) during DDT exposure. Our data support the hypothesis that the MDR49B isoform, with three amino acid mutations, plays a role in the early aspects of DDT resistance in 91-R.

  20. A new splice variant of the major subunit of human asialoglycoprotein receptor encodes a secreted form in hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The human asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR is composed of two polypeptides, designated H1 and H2. While variants of H2 have been known for decades, the existence of H1 variants has never been reported. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We identified two splice variants of ASGPR H1 transcripts, designated H1a and H1b, in human liver tissues and hepatoma cells. Molecular cloning of ASGPR H1 variants revealed that they differ by a 117 nucleotide segment corresponding to exon 2 in the ASGPR genomic sequence. Thus, ASGPR variant H1b transcript encodes a protein lacking the transmembrane domain. Using an H1b-specific antibody, H1b protein and a functional soluble ASGPR (sASGPR composed of H1b and H2 in human sera and in hepatoma cell culture supernatant were identified. The expression of ASGPR H1a and H1b in Hela cells demonstrated the different cellular loctions of H1a and H1b proteins at cellular membranes and in intracellular compartments, respectively. In vitro binding assays using fluorescence-labeled sASGPR or the substract ASOR revealed that the presence of sASGPR reduced the binding of ASOR to cells. However, ASOR itself was able to enhance the binding of sASGPR to cells expressing membrane-bound ASGPR. Further, H1b expression is reduced in liver tissues from patients with viral hepatitis. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that two naturally occurring ASGPR H1 splice variants are produced in human hepatocytes. A hetero-oligomeric complex sASGPR consists of the secreted form of H1 and H2 and may bind to free substrates in circulation and carry them to liver tissue for uptake by ASGPR-expressing hepatocytes.

  1. Muscleblind-like 1 (Mbnl1) regulates pre-mRNA alternative splicing during terminal erythropoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Albert W; Shi, Jiahai; Wong, Piu; Luo, Katherine L; Trepman, Paula; Wang, Eric T; Choi, Heejo; Burge, Christopher B; Lodish, Harvey F

    2014-07-24

    The scope and roles of regulated isoform gene expression during erythroid terminal development are poorly understood. We identified hundreds of differentiation-associated isoform changes during terminal erythropoiesis. Sequences surrounding cassette exons of skipped exon events are enriched for motifs bound by the Muscleblind-like (MBNL) family of splicing factors. Knockdown of Mbnl1 in cultured murine fetal liver erythroid progenitors resulted in a strong block in erythroid differentiation and disrupted the developmentally regulated exon skipping of Ndel1 mRNA, which is bound by MBNL1 and critical for erythroid terminal proliferation. These findings reveal an unanticipated scope of the alternative splicing program and the importance of Mbnl1 during erythroid terminal differentiation.

  2. Cloning and Alternative Splicing Analysis of Bombyx mori Transformer-2 Gene using Silkworm EST Database

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bao-Long NIU; Zhi-Qi MENG; Yue-Zhi TAO; Shun-Lin LU; Hong-Biao WENG; Li-Hua HE; Wei-Feng SHEN

    2005-01-01

    We have identified Bombyx mori transformer-2 gene (Bmtra-2) cDNA by blasting the EST database of B. mori. It was expressed in the whole life of the male and female silkworm and was observed as a band of 1.3 kb by Northern blot analysis. By comparing corresponding ESTs to the Bmtra-2 DNA sequence,it was revealed that there were eight exons and seven introns, and all splice sites of exons/introns conformed to the GT/AG rule. Bmtra-2 pre-mRNA can produce multiple mRNAs encoding six distinct isoforms of BmTRA-2 protein using an alternative splicing pathway during processing. Six types of Bmtra-2 cDNA clones were identified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. All isoforms of BmTRA-2 protein contain two arginine/serine-rich domains and one RNA recognition motif, showing striking organizational similarity to Drosophila TRA-2 proteins.

  3. Differentiated evolutionary rates in alternative exons and the implications for splicing regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eyras Eduardo

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alternatively spliced exons play an important role in the diversification of gene function in most metazoans and are highly regulated by conserved motifs in exons and introns. Two contradicting properties have been associated to evolutionary conserved alternative exons: higher sequence conservation and higher rate of non-synonymous substitutions, relative to constitutive exons. In order to clarify this issue, we have performed an analysis of the evolution of alternative and constitutive exons, using a large set of protein coding exons conserved between human and mouse and taking into account the conservation of the transcript exonic structure. Further, we have also defined a measure of the variation of the arrangement of exonic splicing enhancers (ESE-conservation score to study the evolution of splicing regulatory sequences. We have used this measure to correlate the changes in the arrangement of ESEs with the divergence of exon and intron sequences. Results We find evidence for a relation between the lack of conservation of the exonic structure and the weakening of the sequence evolutionary constraints in alternative and constitutive exons. Exons in transcripts with non-conserved exonic structures have higher synonymous (dS and non-synonymous (dN substitution rates than exons in conserved structures. Moreover, alternative exons in transcripts with non-conserved exonic structure are the least constrained in sequence evolution, and at high EST-inclusion levels they are found to be very similar to constitutive exons, whereas alternative exons in transcripts with conserved exonic structure have a dS significantly lower than average at all EST-inclusion levels. We also find higher conservation in the arrangement of ESEs in constitutive exons compared to alternative ones. Additionally, the sequence conservation at flanking introns remains constant for constitutive exons at all ESE-conservation values, but increases for

  4. Quantification of hTERT Splice Variants in Melanoma by SYBR Green Real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction Indicates a Negative Regulatory Role for the β Deletion Variant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa F. Lincz

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Telomerase activity is primarily determined by transcriptional regulation of the catalytic subunit, human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT. Several mRNA splice variants for hTERT have been identified, but it is not clear if telomerase activity is determined by the absolute or relative levels of full-length (functional and variant hTERT transcripts. We have developed an SYBR green-based reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay for the enumeration of the four common hTERT mRNA variants and correlated these with telomerase activity and telomere length in 24 human melanoma cell lines. All except five of the lines expressed four hTERT transcripts, with an overall significant level of co-occurrence between absolute mRNA levels of full-length α+/β+ hTERT and the three splice variants α-/β+, α+/β-, and α-/β-. On average, α+/β+ made up the majority (48.1% of transcripts, followed by α+/β- (44.6%, α-/β- (4.4%, and α-/β+ (2.9%. Telomerase activity ranged from 1 to 247 relative telomerase activity and correlated most strongly with the absolute amount of α+/β+ (R = 0.791, P = .000004 and the relative amount of α+/β- (R = -0.465, P = .022. This study shows that telomerase activity in melanoma cells is best determined by the absolute expression of full-length hTERT mRNA and indicates a role for the hTERT β deletion variant in the negative regulation of enzyme activity.

  5. PPS, a large multidomain protein, functions with sex-lethal to regulate alternative splicing in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew L Johnson

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing controls the expression of many genes, including the Drosophila sex determination gene Sex-lethal (Sxl. Sxl expression is controlled via a negative regulatory mechanism where inclusion of the translation-terminating male exon is blocked in females. Previous studies have shown that the mechanism leading to exon skipping is autoregulatory and requires the SXL protein to antagonize exon inclusion by interacting with core spliceosomal proteins, including the U1 snRNP protein Sans-fille (SNF. In studies begun by screening for proteins that interact with SNF, we identified PPS, a previously uncharacterized protein, as a novel component of the machinery required for Sxl male exon skipping. PPS encodes a large protein with four signature motifs, PHD, BRK, TFS2M, and SPOC, typically found in proteins involved in transcription. We demonstrate that PPS has a direct role in Sxl male exon skipping by showing first that loss of function mutations have phenotypes indicative of Sxl misregulation and second that the PPS protein forms a complex with SXL and the unspliced Sxl RNA. In addition, we mapped the recruitment of PPS, SXL, and SNF along the Sxl gene using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP, which revealed that, like many other splicing factors, these proteins bind their RNA targets while in close proximity to the DNA. Interestingly, while SNF and SXL are specifically recruited to their predicted binding sites, PPS has a distinct pattern of accumulation along the Sxl gene, associating with a region that includes, but is not limited to, the SxlPm promoter. Together, these data indicate that PPS is different from other splicing factors involved in male-exon skipping and suggest, for the first time, a functional link between transcription and SXL-mediated alternative splicing. Loss of zygotic PPS function, however, is lethal to both sexes, indicating that its role may be of broad significance.

  6. PPS, a large multidomain protein, functions with sex-lethal to regulate alternative splicing in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew L; Nagengast, Alexis A; Salz, Helen K

    2010-03-05

    Alternative splicing controls the expression of many genes, including the Drosophila sex determination gene Sex-lethal (Sxl). Sxl expression is controlled via a negative regulatory mechanism where inclusion of the translation-terminating male exon is blocked in females. Previous studies have shown that the mechanism leading to exon skipping is autoregulatory and requires the SXL protein to antagonize exon inclusion by interacting with core spliceosomal proteins, including the U1 snRNP protein Sans-fille (SNF). In studies begun by screening for proteins that interact with SNF, we identified PPS, a previously uncharacterized protein, as a novel component of the machinery required for Sxl male exon skipping. PPS encodes a large protein with four signature motifs, PHD, BRK, TFS2M, and SPOC, typically found in proteins involved in transcription. We demonstrate that PPS has a direct role in Sxl male exon skipping by showing first that loss of function mutations have phenotypes indicative of Sxl misregulation and second that the PPS protein forms a complex with SXL and the unspliced Sxl RNA. In addition, we mapped the recruitment of PPS, SXL, and SNF along the Sxl gene using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), which revealed that, like many other splicing factors, these proteins bind their RNA targets while in close proximity to the DNA. Interestingly, while SNF and SXL are specifically recruited to their predicted binding sites, PPS has a distinct pattern of accumulation along the Sxl gene, associating with a region that includes, but is not limited to, the SxlPm promoter. Together, these data indicate that PPS is different from other splicing factors involved in male-exon skipping and suggest, for the first time, a functional link between transcription and SXL-mediated alternative splicing. Loss of zygotic PPS function, however, is lethal to both sexes, indicating that its role may be of broad significance.

  7. Control of fibroblast fibronectin expression and alternative splicing via the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Eric S., E-mail: docew@umich.edu [Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Sagana, Rommel L.; Booth, Adam J.; Yan, Mei; Cornett, Ashley M.; Bloomheart, Christopher A.; Tsui, Jessica L.; Wilke, Carol A.; Moore, Bethany B. [Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ritzenthaler, Jeffrey D.; Roman, Jesse [Department of Medicine, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY (United States); Muro, Andres F. [International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Trieste (Italy)

    2010-10-01

    Fibronectin (FN), a ubiquitous glycoprotein that plays critical roles in physiologic and pathologic conditions, undergoes alternative splicing which distinguishes plasma FN (pFN) from cellular FN (cFN). Although both pFN and cFN can be incorporated into the extracellular matrix, a distinguishing feature of cFN is the inclusion of an alternatively spliced exon termed EDA (for extra type III domain A). The molecular steps involved in EDA splicing are well-characterized, but pathways influencing EDA splicing are less clear. We have previously found an obligate role for inhibition of the tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homologue on chromosome 10 (PTEN), the primary regulator of the PI3K/Akt pathway, in fibroblast activation. Here we show TGF-{beta}, a potent inducer of both EDA splicing and fibroblast activation, inhibits PTEN expression and activity in mesenchymal cells, corresponding with enhanced PI3K/Akt signaling. In pten{sup -/-} fibroblasts, which resemble activated fibroblasts, inhibition of Akt attenuated FN production and decreased EDA alternative splicing. Moreover, inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in pten{sup -/-} cells also blocked FN production and EDA splicing. This effect was due to inhibition of Akt-mediated phosphorylation of the primary EDA splicing regulatory protein SF2/ASF. Importantly, FN silencing in pten{sup -/-} cells resulted in attenuated proliferation and migration. Thus, our results demonstrate that the PI3K/Akt/mTOR axis is instrumental in FN transcription and alternative splicing, which regulates cell behavior.

  8. Poliovirus 2A protease triggers a selective nucleo-cytoplasmic redistribution of splicing factors to regulate alternative pre-mRNA splicing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Álvarez

    Full Text Available Poliovirus protease 2A (2A(pro obstructs host gene expression by reprogramming transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulatory events during infection. Here we demonstrate that expression of 2A(pro induces a selective nucleo-cytoplasm translocation of several important RNA binding proteins and splicing factors. Subcellular fractionation studies, together with immunofluorescence microscopy revealed an asymmetric distribution of HuR and TIA1/TIAR in 2A(pro expressing cells, which modulates splicing of the human Fas exon 6. Consistent with this result, knockdown of HuR or overexpression of TIA1/TIAR, leads to Fas exon 6 inclusion in 2A(pro-expressing cells. Therefore, poliovirus 2A(pro can target alternative pre-mRNA splicing by regulating protein shuttling between the nucleus and the cytoplasm.

  9. Pharmacological profile of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) splice variant translation using a novel drug screening assay: a "quantitative code".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaghi, Valentina; Polacchini, Alessio; Baj, Gabriele; Pinheiro, Vera L M; Vicario, Annalisa; Tongiorgi, Enrico

    2014-10-03

    The neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a key regulator of neuronal development and plasticity. BDNF is a major pharmaceutical target in neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. However, pharmacological modulation of this neurotrophin is challenging because BDNF is generated by multiple, alternatively spliced transcripts with different 5'- and 3'UTRs. Each BDNF mRNA variant is transcribed independently, but translation regulation is unknown. To evaluate the translatability of BDNF transcripts, we developed an in vitro luciferase assay in human neuroblastoma cells. In unstimulated cells, each BDNF 5'- and 3'UTR determined a different basal translation level of the luciferase reporter gene. However, constructs with either a 5'UTR or a 3'UTR alone showed poor translation modulation by BDNF, KCl, dihydroxyphenylglycine, AMPA, NMDA, dopamine, acetylcholine, norepinephrine, or serotonin. Constructs consisting of the luciferase reporter gene flanked by the 5'UTR of one of the most abundant BDNF transcripts in the brain (exons 1, 2c, 4, and 6) and the long 3'UTR responded selectively to stimulation with the different receptor agonists, and only transcripts 2c and 6 were increased by the antidepressants desipramine and mirtazapine. We propose that BDNF mRNA variants represent "a quantitative code" for regulated expression of the protein. Thus, to discriminate the efficacy of drugs in stimulating BDNF synthesis, it is appropriate to use variant-specific in vitro screening tests.

  10. The Survivin −31 Snp in Human Colorectal Cancer Correlates with Survivin Splice Variant Expression and Improved Overall Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna G. Antonacopoulou

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Survivin is involved in the regulation of cell division and survival, two key processes in cancer. The majority of studies on survivin in colorectal cancer (CRC have focused on protein expression and less is known about the expression of survivin splicing variants or survivin gene polymorphisms in CRC. In the present study, the mRNA levels of the five known isoforms of survivin as well as survivin protein were assessed in matched normal and neoplastic colorectal tissue. Moreover, the 9386C/T and −31G/C polymorphisms were investigated.

  11. Detection of recurrent alternative splicing switches in tumor samples reveals novel signatures of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebestyén, Endre; Zawisza, Michał; Eyras, Eduardo

    2015-02-18

    The determination of the alternative splicing isoforms expressed in cancer is fundamental for the development of tumor-specific molecular targets for prognosis and therapy, but it is hindered by the heterogeneity of tumors and the variability across patients. We developed a new computational method, robust to biological and technical variability, which identifies significant transcript isoform changes across multiple samples. We applied this method to more than 4000 samples from the The Cancer Genome Atlas project to obtain novel splicing signatures that are predictive for nine different cancer types, and find a specific signature for basal-like breast tumors involving the tumor-driver CTNND1. Additionally, our method identifies 244 isoform switches, for which the change occurs in the most abundant transcript. Some of these switches occur in known tumor drivers, including PPARG, CCND3, RALGDS, MITF, PRDM1, ABI1 and MYH11, for which the switch implies a change in the protein product. Moreover, some of the switches cannot be described with simple splicing events. Surprisingly, isoform switches are independent of somatic mutations, except for the tumor-suppressor FBLN2 and the oncogene MYH11. Our method reveals novel signatures of cancer in terms of transcript isoforms specifically expressed in tumors, providing novel potential molecular targets for prognosis and therapy. Data and software are available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1061917 and https://bitbucket.org/regulatorygenomicsupf/iso-ktsp.

  12. In1-ghrelin, a splice variant of ghrelin gene, is associated with the evolution and aggressiveness of human neuroendocrine tumors: Evidence from clinical, cellular and molecular parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque, Raul M; Sampedro-Nuñez, Miguel; Gahete, Manuel D; Ramos-Levi, Ana; Ibáñez-Costa, Alejandro; Rivero-Cortés, Esther; Serrano-Somavilla, Ana; Adrados, Magdalena; Culler, Michael D; Castaño, Justo P; Marazuela, Mónica

    2015-08-14

    Ghrelin system comprises a complex family of peptides, receptors (GHSRs), and modifying enzymes [e.g. ghrelin-O-acyl-transferase (GOAT)] that control multiple pathophysiological processes. Aberrant alternative splicing is an emerging cancer hallmark that generates altered proteins with tumorigenic capacity. Indeed, In1-ghrelin and truncated-GHSR1b splicing variants can promote development/progression of certain endocrine-related cancers. Here, we determined the expression levels of key ghrelin system components in neuroendocrine tumor (NETs) and explored their potential functional role. Twenty-six patients with NETs were prospectively/retrospectively studied [72 samples from primary and metastatic tissues (30 normal/42 tumors)] and clinical data were obtained. The role of In1-ghrelin in aggressiveness was studied in vitro using NET cell lines (BON-1/QGP-1). In1-ghrelin, GOAT and GHSR1a/1b expression levels were elevated in tumoral compared to normal/adjacent tissues. Moreover, In1-ghrelin, GOAT, and GHSR1b expression levels were positively correlated within tumoral, but not within normal/adjacent samples, and were higher in patients with progressive vs. with stable/cured disease. Finally, In1-ghrelin increased aggressiveness (e.g. proliferation/migration) of NET cells. Altogether, our data strongly suggests a potential implication of ghrelin system in the pathogenesis and/or clinical outcome of NETs, and warrant further studies on their possible value for the future development of molecular biomarkers with diagnostic/prognostic/therapeutic value.

  13. In1-ghrelin, a splice variant of ghrelin gene, is associated with the evolution and aggressiveness of human neuroendocrine tumors: Evidence from clinical, cellular and molecular parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahete, Manuel D.; Ramos-Levi, Ana; Ibáñez-Costa, Alejandro; Rivero-Cortés, Esther; Serrano-Somavilla, Ana; Adrados, Magdalena; Culler, Michael D.; Castaño, Justo P.; Marazuela, Mónica

    2015-01-01

    Ghrelin system comprises a complex family of peptides, receptors (GHSRs), and modifying enzymes [e.g. ghrelin-O-acyl-transferase (GOAT)] that control multiple pathophysiological processes. Aberrant alternative splicing is an emerging cancer hallmark that generates altered proteins with tumorigenic capacity. Indeed, In1-ghrelin and truncated-GHSR1b splicing variants can promote development/progression of certain endocrine-related cancers. Here, we determined the expression levels of key ghrelin system components in neuroendocrine tumor (NETs) and explored their potential functional role. Twenty-six patients with NETs were prospectively/retrospectively studied [72 samples from primary and metastatic tissues (30 normal/42 tumors)] and clinical data were obtained. The role of In1-ghrelin in aggressiveness was studied in vitro using NET cell lines (BON-1/QGP-1). In1-ghrelin, GOAT and GHSR1a/1b expression levels were elevated in tumoral compared to normal/adjacent tissues. Moreover, In1-ghrelin, GOAT, and GHSR1b expression levels were positively correlated within tumoral, but not within normal/adjacent samples, and were higher in patients with progressive vs. with stable/cured disease. Finally, In1-ghrelin increased aggressiveness (e.g. proliferation/migration) of NET cells. Altogether, our data strongly suggests a potential implication of ghrelin system in the pathogenesis and/or clinical outcome of NETs, and warrant further studies on their possible value for the future development of molecular biomarkers with diagnostic/prognostic/therapeutic value. PMID:26124083

  14. Disabled-1 alternative splicing in human fetal retina and neural tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin Katyal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Reelin-Dab1 signaling pathway plays a critical role in the positioning of migrating neurons, dendrite formation and lamination in the developing central nervous system. We have previously identified two alternatively spliced forms of Dab1 in the developing chick retina: an early form, Dab1-E, expressed in retinal progenitor cells, and a late form, Dab1 or Dab1-L, expressed in amacrine and ganglion cells. Compared to Dab1-L, Dab1-E lacks two exons that encode two Src family kinase (SFK phosphorylation sites. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Both Dab1-L and Dab1-E-like transcripts were identified in human fetal retina. Expression of human Dab1-L in primary chick retinal cultures resulted in Reelin-mediated induction of SFK phosphorylation and formation of neurite-like processes. In contrast, human Dab1-E-expressing cells retained an undifferentiated morphology. The human Dab1 gene is located within a common fragile site, and it has been postulated that it may function as a tumor suppressor. Analysis of Dab1 splice forms in retinoblastoma and neuroblastoma tumor cells revealed relative enrichment of Dab1-L-like (includes exons 7 and 8 and Dab1-E-like (excludes exons 7 and 8 transcripts in retinoblastoma and neuroblastoma, respectively. Treatment of retinoblastoma cell line RB522A with Reelin resulted in increased tyrosine phosphorylation of Dab1. As Nova2 has previously been implicated in the exclusion of exons 9B and 9C in Dab1, we examined the expression of this splicing factor in neuroblastoma and retinoblastoma cell lines. Nova2 was only detected in neuroblastoma cells, suggesting a correlation between Nova2 expression and increased levels of Dab1-E-like splice forms in neuroblastoma. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that alternative splicing of Dab1 is conserved in avian and mammalian species, with Dab1-L driving SFK phosphorylation in both species. Dab1-E- and Dab-L-like isoforms are also expressed in childhood neural tumors, with

  15. Disabled-1 Alternative Splicing in Human Fetal Retina and Neural Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katyal, Sachin; Glubrecht, Darryl D.; Li, Lei; Gao, Zhihua; Godbout, Roseline

    2011-01-01

    Background The Reelin-Dab1 signaling pathway plays a critical role in the positioning of migrating neurons, dendrite formation and lamination in the developing central nervous system. We have previously identified two alternatively spliced forms of Dab1 in the developing chick retina: an early form, Dab1-E, expressed in retinal progenitor cells, and a late form, Dab1 or Dab1-L, expressed in amacrine and ganglion cells. Compared to Dab1-L, Dab1-E lacks two exons that encode two Src family kinase (SFK) phosphorylation sites. Principal Findings Both Dab1-L and Dab1-E-like transcripts were identified in human fetal retina. Expression of human Dab1-L in primary chick retinal cultures resulted in Reelin-mediated induction of SFK phosphorylation and formation of neurite-like processes. In contrast, human Dab1-E-expressing cells retained an undifferentiated morphology. The human Dab1 gene is located within a common fragile site, and it has been postulated that it may function as a tumor suppressor. Analysis of Dab1 splice forms in retinoblastoma and neuroblastoma tumor cells revealed relative enrichment of Dab1-L-like (includes exons 7 and 8) and Dab1-E-like (excludes exons 7 and 8) transcripts in retinoblastoma and neuroblastoma, respectively. Treatment of retinoblastoma cell line RB522A with Reelin resulted in increased tyrosine phosphorylation of Dab1. As Nova2 has previously been implicated in the exclusion of exons 9B and 9C in Dab1, we examined the expression of this splicing factor in neuroblastoma and retinoblastoma cell lines. Nova2 was only detected in neuroblastoma cells, suggesting a correlation between Nova2 expression and increased levels of Dab1-E-like splice forms in neuroblastoma. Conclusions These results indicate that alternative splicing of Dab1 is conserved in avian and mammalian species, with Dab1-L driving SFK phosphorylation in both species. Dab1-E- and Dab-L-like isoforms are also expressed in childhood neural tumors, with preferential enrichment

  16. Molecular cloning, genomic organization, chromosome mapping, tissues expression pattern and identification of a novel splicing variant of porcine CIDEb gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, YanHua; Li, AiHua; Yang, Z Q

    2016-09-09

    Cell death-inducing DNA fragmentation factor-α-like effector b (CIDEb) is a member of the CIDE family of apoptosis-inducing factors, CIDEa and CIDEc have been reported to be Lipid droplets (LDs)-associated proteins that promote atypical LD fusion in adipocytes, and responsible for liver steatosis under fasting and obese conditions, whereas CIDEb promotes lipid storage under normal diet conditions [1], and promotes the formation of triacylglyceride-enriched VLDL particles in hepatocytes [2]. Here, we report the gene cloning, chromosome mapping, tissue distribution, genetic expression analysis, and identification of a novel splicing variant of the porcine CIDEb gene. Sequence analysis shows that the open reading frame of the normal porcine CIDEb isoform covers 660bp and encodes a 219-amino acid polypeptide, whereas its alternative splicing variant encodes a 142-amino acid polypeptide truncated at the fourth exon and comprised of the CIDE-N domain and part of the CIDE-C domain. The deduced amino acid sequence of normal porcine CIDEb shows an 85.8% similarity to the human protein and 80.0% to the mouse protein. The CIDEb genomic sequence spans approximately 6KB comprised of five exons and four introns. Radiation hybrid mapping demonstrated that porcine CIDEb is located at chromosome 7q21 and at a distance of 57cR from the most significantly linked marker, S0334, regions that are syntenic with the corresponding region in the human genome. Tissue expression analysis indicated that normal CIDEb mRNA is ubiquitously expressed in many porcine tissues. It was highly expressed in white adipose tissue and was observed at relatively high levels in the liver, lung, small intestine, lymphatic tissue and brain. The normal version of CIDEb was the predominant form in all tested tissues, whereas the splicing variant was expressed at low levels in all examined tissues except the lymphatic tissue. Furthermore, genetic expression analysis indicated that CIDEb mRNA levels were

  17. Functional analysis of alternative splicing of the FLOWERING LOCUS T orthologous gene in Chrysanthemum morifolium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yachao; Sun, Jing; Cao, Peipei; Zhang, Rong; Fu, Qike; Chen, Sumei; Chen, Fadi; Jiang, Jiafu

    2016-01-01

    As the junction of floral development pathways, the FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) protein called ‘florigen’ plays an important role in the process of plant flowering through signal integration. We isolated four transcripts encoding different isoforms of a FT orthologous gene CmFTL1, from Chrysanthemum morifolium cultivar ‘Jimba’. Sequence alignments suggested that the four transcripts are related to the intron 1. Expression analysis showed that four alternative splicing (AS) forms of CmFTL1 varied depending on the developmental stage of the flower. The functional complement experiment using an Arabidopsis mutant ft-10 revealed that the archetypal and AS forms of CmFTL1 had the function of complementing late flower phenotype in different levels. In addition, transgenic confirmation at transcript level showed CmFTL1 and CmFTL1ast coexist in the same tissue type at the same developmental stage, indicating a post-transcriptional modification of CmFTL1 in Arabidopsis. Moreover, ectopic expression of different AS forms in chrysanthemum resulted in the development of multiple altered phenotypes, varying degrees of early flowering. We found that an alternative splicing form (CmFTL1-astE134) without the exon 2 lacked the ability causing the earlier flower phenotype. The evidence in this study indicates that complex alternative processing of CmFTL1 transcripts in C. morifolium may be associated with flowering regulation and hold some potential for biotechnical engineering to create early-flowering phenotypes in ornamental cultivars. PMID:27917290

  18. Effect of Alternative Splicing of VLDL Receptor on its Ligand Binding and Internalization Capability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    1 IntroductionVery low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDL-R) is a main receptor mediating the uptake of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein(TRL), so it is in all probability to play an important role in the development of atherosclerosis (AS). On account of alternative splicing of O-linked carbohydrate chains in extracellular fragment, VLDL-R can be classified into two isoforms: VLDL-RⅠ with O-linker sugar region, while VLDL-RⅡ without this domain~([1]). But so far, the difference of their function and biological...

  19. Extensive diversification of MHC in Chinese giant salamanders Andrias davidianus (Anda-MHC) reveals novel splice variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Rong; Chen, Zhong-yuan; Wang, Jun; Yuan, Jiang-di; Liao, Xiang-yong; Gui, Jian-Fang; Zhang, Qi-Ya

    2014-02-01

    A series of MHC alleles (including 26 class IA, 27 class IIA, and 17 class IIB) were identified from Chinese giant salamander Andrias davidianus (Anda-MHC). These genes are similar to classical MHC molecules in terms of characteristic domains, functional residues, deduced tertiary structures and genetic diversity. The majority of variation between alleles is found in the putative peptide-binding region (PBR), which is driven by positive Darwinian selection. The coexistence of two isoforms in MHC IA, IIA, and IIB alleles are shown: one full-length transcript and one novel splice variant. Despite lake of the external domains, these variants exhibit similar subcellular localization with the full-length transcripts. Moreover, the expression of MHC isoforms are up-regulated upon in vivo and in vitro stimulation with Andrias davidianus ranavirus (ADRV), suggesting their potential roles in the immune response. The results provide insights into understanding MHC variation and function in this ancient and endangered urodele amphibian.

  20. Evidence for the possible biological significance of the igf-1 gene alternative splicing in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastassios ePhilippou

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I has been implicated in the pathogenesis of prostate cancer (PCa, since it plays a key role in cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. The IGF-I actions are mediated mainly via its binding to the type I IGF receptor (IGF-IR, however IGF-I signaling via insulin receptor (IR and hybrid IGF-I/IR is also evident. Different IGF-I mRNA splice variants, namely IGF-IEa, IGF-IEb and IGF-IEc, are expressed in human cells and tissues. These transcripts encode several IGF-I precursor proteins which contain the same bioactive product (mature IGF-I, however, they differ by the length of their signal peptides on the amino-terminal end and the structure of the extension peptides (E-peptides on the carboxy-terminal end. There is an increasing interest in the possible different role of the IGF-I transcripts and their respective non-(matureIGF-I products in the regulation of distinct biological activities. Moreover, there is strong evidence of a differential expression profile of the IGF-I splice variants in normal vs. PCa tissues and PCa cells, implying that the expression pattern of the various IGF-I transcripts and their respective protein products may possess different functions in cancer biology. Herein, the evidence that the IGF-IEc transcript regulates PCa growth via Ec-peptide specific and IGF-IR/IR-independent signaling is discussed.

  1. Genome-wide identification of Fas/CD95 alternative splicing regulators reveals links with iron homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejedor, J Ramón; Papasaikas, Panagiotis; Valcárcel, Juan

    2015-01-08

    Alternative splicing of Fas/CD95 exon 6 generates either a membrane-bound receptor that promotes, or a soluble isoform that inhibits, apoptosis. Using an automatized genome-wide siRNA screening for alternative splicing regulators of endogenous transcripts in mammalian cells, we identified 200 genes whose knockdown modulates the ratio between Fas/CD95 isoforms. These include classical splicing regulators; core spliceosome components; and factors implicated in transcription and chromatin remodeling, RNA transport, intracellular signaling, and metabolic control. Coherent effects of genes involved in iron homeostasis and pharmacological modulation of iron levels revealed a link between intracellular iron and Fas/CD95 exon 6 inclusion. A splicing regulatory network linked iron levels with reduced activity of the Zinc-finger-containing splicing regulator SRSF7, and in vivo and in vitro assays revealed that iron inhibits SRSF7 RNA binding. Our results uncover numerous links between cellular pathways and RNA processing and a mechanism by which iron homeostasis can influence alternative splicing.

  2. Cloning and identification of NS5ATP2 gene and its spliced variant transactivated by hepatitis C virus non-structural protein 5A

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian Yang; Jun Cheng; Yan Liu; Yuan Hong; Jian-Jun Wang; Shu-Lin Zhang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To clone, identify and study new NS5ATP2 gene and its spliced variant transactivated by hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein 5A.METHODS: On the basis of subtractive cDNA library of genes transactivated by NS5A protein of hepatitis C virus, the coding sequence of new gene and its spliced variant were obtained by bioinformatics method. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)was conducted to amplify NS5ATP2 gene.RESUJLTS: The coding sequence of a new gene and its spliced variant were cloned and identified successfully.CONCLUSION: A new gene has been recognized as the new target transactivated by HCV NS5A protein. These results brought some new clues for studying the biological functions of new genes and pathogenesis of the viral proteins.

  3. Characterization of splice variants of human caspase-activated DNase with CIDE-N structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayascas, José R; Yuste, Víctor J; Solé, Carme; Sánchez-López, Isabel; Segura, Miquel F; Perera, Remei; Comella, Joan X

    2004-05-21

    Internucleosomal DNA fragmentation is an apoptotic event that depends on the activity of different nucleases. Among them, the DNA fragmentation factor B, better known as caspase-activated DNase (CAD), is mainly responsible for this DNA fragmentation in dying cells. CAD is an endonuclease that is chaperoned and inhibited by inhibitor of CAD (ICAD). Activation of CAD needs the cleavage of ICAD by activated caspase-3. During the characterization of the staurosporine-induced apoptotic process in human neuroblastoma cell lines, we have found three novel splice variants of CAD. In all three messengers, the open reading frame is truncated after the second exon of the CAD gene. This truncated open reading frame codifies the CAD protein amino terminal part corresponding to the cell death-inducing DFF45-like effector-N (CIDE-N) domain. We have detected these splicing variants in human tissues and in peripheral white blood cells from 10 unrelated individuals, and their products have been showed to be expressed in certain mouse tissues. We demonstrate that these truncated forms of CAD are soluble proteins that interact with ICAD. We also provided evidences that these CIDE-N forms of CAD promote apoptosis in a caspase-dependent manner.

  4. Effects of eccentric cycling exercise on IGF-I splice variant expression in the muscles of young and elderly people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hameed, M.; Toft, A.D.; Harridge, S.D.

    2008-01-01

    growth factor (MGF) were studied in response to 1 h of eccentric cycling exercise in young and old individuals. Subjects (nine young, aged 20-27 years and eight elderly, aged 67-75 years) completed an eccentric exercise protocol that consisted of 60 min of reverse pedal cycling. Workloads were chosen....... No difference was observed between the baseline levels of the two splice variants between the two subject groups. Eccentric cycling exercise resulted in a significant increase in the mean MGF mRNA in both young and old subjects but did not alter IGF-IEa mRNA levels in either age group. As reported previously......Recovery from micro damage resulting from intensive exercise has been shown to take longer in older muscles. To investigate the factors that may contribute to muscle repair, we have studied the expression of two splice variants of the insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) gene. IGF-IEa and mechano...

  5. Mblk-1 Transcription Factor Family: Its Roles in Various Animals and Regulation by NOL4 Splice Variants in Mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayanagi-Kiya, Seika; Kiya, Taketoshi; Kunieda, Takekazu; Kubo, Takeo

    2017-01-01

    Transcription factors play critical roles in regulation of neural development and functions. A transcription factor Mblk-1 was previously reported from a screen for factors possibly important for the higher brain functions of the honeybee. This review first summarizes how Mblk-1 was identified, and then provides an overview of the studies of Mblk-1 and their homologs. Mblk-1 family proteins are found broadly in animals and are shown to affect transcription activities. Studies have revealed that the mammalian homologs can interact with several cofactors and together regulate transcription. Interestingly, a recent study using the mouse homologs, Mlr1 and Mlr2, showed that one of their cofactor proteins, NOL4, have several splice variants with different effects on the transactivation activities of Mlr proteins. These findings suggest that there is an additional layer of the regulation of Mblk-1 family proteins by cofactor splice variants and provide novel insights into our current understanding of the roles of the conserved transcription factor family. PMID:28125049

  6. Quantitative evaluation of alternatively spliced mRNA isoforms by label-free real-time plasmonic sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas, César S; Carrascosa, L G; Bonnal, S; Valcárcel, J; Lechuga, L M

    2016-04-15

    Alternative splicing of mRNA precursors enables cells to generate different protein outputs from the same gene depending on their developmental or homeostatic status. Its deregulation is strongly linked to disease onset and progression. Current methodologies for monitoring alternative splicing demand elaborate procedures and often present difficulties in discerning between closely related isoforms, e.g. due to cross-hybridization during their detection. Herein, we report a general methodology using a Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) biosensor for label-free monitoring of alternative splicing events in real-time, without any cDNA synthesis or PCR amplification requirements. We applied this methodology to RNA isolated from HeLa cells for the quantification of alternatively spliced isoforms of the Fas gene, involved in cancer progression through regulation of programmed cell death. We demonstrate that our methodology is isoform-specific, with virtually no cross-hybridization, achieving limits of detection (LODs) in the picoMolar (pM) range. Similar results were obtained for the detection of the BCL-X gene mRNA isoforms. The results were independently validated by RT-qPCR, with excellent concordance in the determination of isoform ratios. The simplicity and robustness of this biosensor technology can greatly facilitate the exploration of alternative splicing biomarkers in disease diagnosis and therapy.

  7. Genome-wide analysis of shoot growth-associated alternative splicing in moso bamboo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Long; Hu, Tao; Li, Xueping; Mu, Shaohua; Cheng, Zhanchao; Ge, Wei; Gao, Jian

    2016-08-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) significantly enhances transcriptome complexity and is differentially regulated in a wide variety of physiological processes in plants, including shoot growth. Presently, the functional implications and conservation of AS occurrences are not well understood in the moso bamboo genome. To analyze the global changes in AS during moso bamboo shoot growth, fast-growing shoots collected at seven different heights and culms after leaf expansion were sequenced using the Illumina HiSeq™ 2000 sequencing platform. It was found that approximately 60.74 % of all genes were alternatively spliced, with intron retention (IR) being the most frequent AS event (27.43 %). Statistical analysis demonstrated that variations of AS frequency and AS types were significantly correlated with changes in gene features and gene transcriptional level. According to the phylogenetic analysis of isoform expression data and AS frequency, the bamboo shoot growth could be divided into four different growth periods, including winter bamboo shoot (S1), early growth period (S2-S5), late growth period (S6 and S7), and mature period (CK). In addition, our data also showed that the winter bamboo shoot had the highest number of AS events. Twenty-six putative Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins were identified, producing a total of 109 transcripts. AS events were frequently and specifically regulated by SR splicing factors throughout shoot growth, resulting in changes to the original open reading frame (ORF) and subsequently changes to conserved domains. The AS product-isoforms showed regular expression change during the whole shoot growth period, thus influencing shoot growth. All together, these data indicate that AS events are adjusted to different growth stages, providing briefness and efficient means of gene regulation. This study will provide a very useful clue for future functional analyses.

  8. Predicting the impact of alternative splicing on plant MADS domain protein function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edouard I Severing

    Full Text Available Several genome-wide studies demonstrated that alternative splicing (AS significantly increases the transcriptome complexity in plants. However, the impact of AS on the functional diversity of proteins is difficult to assess using genome-wide approaches. The availability of detailed sequence annotations for specific genes and gene families allows for a more detailed assessment of the potential effect of AS on their function. One example is the plant MADS-domain transcription factor family, members of which interact to form protein complexes that function in transcription regulation. Here, we perform an in silico analysis of the potential impact of AS on the protein-protein interaction capabilities of MIKC-type MADS-domain proteins. We first confirmed the expression of transcript isoforms resulting from predicted AS events. Expressed transcript isoforms were considered functional if they were likely to be translated and if their corresponding AS events either had an effect on predicted dimerisation motifs or occurred in regions known to be involved in multimeric complex formation, or otherwise, if their effect was conserved in different species. Nine out of twelve MIKC MADS-box genes predicted to produce multiple protein isoforms harbored putative functional AS events according to those criteria. AS events with conserved effects were only found at the borders of or within the K-box domain. We illustrate how AS can contribute to the evolution of interaction networks through an example of selective inclusion of a recently evolved interaction motif in the MADS AFFECTING FLOWERING1-3 (MAF1-3 subclade. Furthermore, we demonstrate the potential effect of an AS event in SHORT VEGETATIVE PHASE (SVP, resulting in the deletion of a short sequence stretch including a predicted interaction motif, by overexpression of the fully spliced and the alternatively spliced SVP transcripts. For most of the AS events we were able to formulate hypotheses about the

  9. Functional characterization of BRCA1 gene variants by mini-gene splicing assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, Ane Y; Dandanell, Mette; Jønson, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Mutational screening of the breast cancer susceptibility gene BRCA1 leads to the identification of numerous pathogenic variants such as frameshift and nonsense variants, as well as large genomic rearrangements. The screening moreover identifies a large number of variants, for example, missense...

  10. Expression of NKp46 Splice Variants in Nasal Lavage Following Respiratory Viral Infection: Domain 1-Negative Isoforms Predominate and Manifest Higher Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemer-Avni, Yonat; Kundu, Kiran; Shemesh, Avishai; Brusilovsky, Michael; Yossef, Rami; Meshesha, Mesfin; Solomon-Alemayehu, Semaria; Levin, Shai; Gershoni-Yahalom, Orly; Campbell, Kerry S.; Porgador, Angel

    2017-01-01

    The natural killer (NK) cell activating receptor NKp46/NCR1 plays a critical role in elimination of virus-infected and tumor cells. The NCR1 gene can be transcribed into five different splice variants, but the functional importance and physiological distribution of NKp46 isoforms are not yet fully understood. Here, we shed light on differential expression of NKp46 splice variants in viral respiratory tract infections and their functional difference at the cellular level. NKp46 was the most predominantly expressed natural cytotoxicity receptor in the nasal lavage of patients infected with four respiratory viruses: respiratory syncytia virus, adenovirus, human metapneumovirus, or influenza A. Expression of NKp30 was far lower and NKp44 was absent in all patients. Domain 1-negative NKp46 splice variants (i.e., NKp46 isoform d) were the predominantly expressed isoform in nasal lavage following viral infections. Using our unique anti-NKp46 mAb, D2-9A5, which recognizes the D2 extracellular domain, and a commercial anti-NKp46 mAb, 9E2, which recognizes D1 domain, allowed us to identify a small subset of NKp46 D1-negative splice variant-expressing cells within cultured human primary NK cells. This NKp46 D1-negative subset also showed higher degranulation efficiency in term of CD107a surface expression. NK-92 cell lines expressing NKp46 D1-negative and NKp46 D1-positive splice variants also showed functional differences when interacting with targets. A NKp46 D1-negative isoform-expressing NK-92 cell line showed enhanced degranulation activity. To our knowledge, we provide the first evidence showing the physiological distribution and functional importance of human NKp46 splice variants under pathological conditions. PMID:28261217

  11. Structural basis by which alternative splicing confers specificity in fibroblast growth factor receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Brian K; Igarashi, Makoto; Eliseenkova, Anna V; Plotnikov, Alexander N; Sher, Ifat; Ron, Dina; Aaronson, Stuart A; Mohammadi, Moosa

    2003-03-04

    Binding specificity between fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) and their receptors (FGFRs) is essential for mammalian development and is regulated primarily by two alternatively spliced exons, IIIb ("b") and IIIc ("c"), that encode the second half of Ig-like domain 3 (D3) of FGFRs. FGF7 and FGF10 activate only the b isoform of FGFR2 (FGFR2b). Here, we report the crystal structure of the ligand-binding portion of FGFR2b bound to FGF10. Unique contacts between divergent regions in FGF10 and two b-specific loops in D3 reveal the structural basis by which alternative splicing provides FGF10-FGFR2b specificity. Structure-based mutagenesis of FGF10 confirms the importance of the observed contacts for FGF10 biological activity. Interestingly, FGF10 binding induces a previously unobserved rotation of receptor Ig domain 2 (D2) to introduce specific contacts with FGF10. Hence, both D2 and D3 of FGFR2b contribute to the exceptional specificity between FGF10 and FGFR2b. We propose that ligand-induced conformational change in FGFRs may also play an important role in determining specificity for other FGF-FGFR complexes.

  12. Argonaute-1 binds transcriptional enhancers and controls constitutive and alternative splicing in human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alló, Mariano; Agirre, Eneritz; Bessonov, Sergey; Bertucci, Paola; Gómez Acuña, Luciana; Buggiano, Valeria; Bellora, Nicolás; Singh, Babita; Petrillo, Ezequiel; Blaustein, Matías; Miñana, Belén; Dujardin, Gwendal; Pozzi, Berta; Pelisch, Federico; Bechara, Elías; Agafonov, Dmitry E.; Srebrow, Anabella; Lührmann, Reinhard; Valcárcel, Juan; Eyras, Eduardo; Kornblihtt, Alberto R.

    2014-01-01

    The roles of Argonaute proteins in cytoplasmic microRNA and RNAi pathways are well established. However, their implication in small RNA-mediated transcriptional gene silencing in the mammalian cell nucleus is less understood. We have recently shown that intronic siRNAs cause chromatin modifications that inhibit RNA polymerase II elongation and modulate alternative splicing in an Argonaute-1 (AGO1)-dependent manner. Here we used chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing (ChIP-seq) to investigate the genome-wide distribution of AGO1 nuclear targets. Unexpectedly, we found that about 80% of AGO1 clusters are associated with cell-type-specific transcriptional enhancers, most of them (73%) overlapping active enhancers. This association seems to be mediated by long, rather than short, enhancer RNAs and to be more prominent in intragenic, rather than intergenic, enhancers. Paradoxically, crossing ChIP-seq with RNA-seq data upon AGO1 depletion revealed that enhancer-bound AGO1 is not linked to the global regulation of gene transcription but to the control of constitutive and alternative splicing, which was confirmed by an individual gene analysis explaining how AGO1 controls inclusion levels of the cassette exon 107 in the SYNE2 gene. PMID:25313066

  13. Structural Basis by Which Alternative Splicing Modulates the Organizer Activity of FGF8 in the Brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen,S.; Li, J.; Eliseenkova, A.; Ibrahimi, O.; Lao, Z.; Zhang, F.; Linhardt, R.; Joyner, A.; Mohammadi, M.

    2006-01-01

    Two of the four human FGF8 splice isoforms, FGF8a and FGF8b, are expressed in the mid-hindbrain region during development. Although the only difference between these isoforms is the presence of an additional 11 amino acids at the N terminus of FGF8b, these isoforms possess remarkably different abilities to pattern the midbrain and anterior hindbrain. To reveal the structural basis by which alternative splicing modulates the organizing activity of FGF8, we solved the crystal structure of FGF8b in complex with the 'c' splice isoform of FGF receptor 2 (FGFR2c). Using surface plasmon resonance (SPR), we also characterized the receptor-binding specificity of FGF8a and FGF8b, the 'b' isoform of FGF17 (FGF17b), and FGF18. The FGF8b-FGFR2c structure shows that alternative splicing permits a single additional contact between phenylalanine 32 (F32) of FGF8b and a hydrophobic groove within Ig domain 3 of the receptor that is also present in FGFR1c, FGFR3c, and FGFR4. Consistent with the structure, mutation of F32 to alanine reduces the affinity of FGF8b toward all these receptors to levels characteristic of FGF8a. More importantly, analysis of the mid-hindbrain patterning ability of the FGF8b{sup F32A} mutant in chick embryos and murine midbrain explants shows that this mutation functionally converts FGF8b to FGF8a. Moreover, our data suggest that the intermediate receptor-binding affinities of FGF17b and FGF18, relative to FGF8a and FGF8b, also account for the distinct patterning abilities of these two ligands. We also show that the mode of FGF8 receptor-binding specificity is distinct from that of other FGFs and provide the first biochemical evidence for a physiological FGF8b-FGFR1c interaction during mid-hindbrain development. Consistent with the indispensable role of FGF8 in embryonic development, we show that the FGF8 mode of receptor binding appeared as early as in nematodes and has been preserved throughout evolution.

  14. T Cell Receptor Mediated Calcium Entry Requires Alternatively Spliced Cav1.1 Channels.

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    Didi Matza

    Full Text Available The process of calcium entry in T cells is a multichannel and multi-step process. We have studied the requirement for L-type calcium channels (Cav1.1 α1S subunits during calcium entry after TCR stimulation. High expression levels of Cav1.1 channels were detected in activated T cells. Sequencing and cloning of Cav1.1 channel cDNA from T cells revealed that a single splice variant is expressed. This variant lacks exon 29, which encodes the linker region adjacent to the voltage sensor, but contains five new N-terminal exons that substitute for exons 1 and 2, which are found in the Cav1.1 muscle counterpart. Overexpression studies using cloned T cell Cav1.1 in 293HEK cells (that lack TCR suggest that the gating of these channels was altered. Knockdown of Cav1.1 channels in T cells abrogated calcium entry after TCR stimulation, suggesting that Cav1.1 channels are controlled by TCR signaling.

  15. A mutation in the Srrm4 gene causes alternative splicing defects and deafness in the Bronx waltzer mouse.

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    Yoko Nakano

    Full Text Available Sensory hair cells are essential for hearing and balance. Their development from epithelial precursors has been extensively characterized with respect to transcriptional regulation, but not in terms of posttranscriptional influences. Here we report on the identification and functional characterization of an alternative-splicing regulator whose inactivation is responsible for defective hair-cell development, deafness, and impaired balance in the spontaneous mutant Bronx waltzer (bv mouse. We used positional cloning and transgenic rescue to locate the bv mutation to the splicing factor-encoding gene Ser/Arg repetitive matrix 4 (Srrm4. Transcriptome-wide analysis of pre-mRNA splicing in the sensory patches of embryonic inner ears revealed that specific alternative exons were skipped at abnormally high rates in the bv mice. Minigene experiments in a heterologous expression system confirmed that these skipped exons require Srrm4 for inclusion into the mature mRNA. Sequence analysis and mutagenesis experiments showed that the affected transcripts share a novel motif that is necessary for the Srrm4-dependent alternative splicing. Functional annotations and protein-protein interaction data indicated that the encoded proteins cluster in the secretion and neurotransmission pathways. In addition, the splicing of a few transcriptional regulators was found to be Srrm4 dependent, and several of the genes known to be targeted by these regulators were expressed at reduced levels in the bv mice. Although Srrm4 expression was detected in neural tissues as well as hair cells, analyses of the bv mouse cerebellum and neocortex failed to detect splicing defects. Our data suggest that Srrm4 function is critical in the hearing and balance organs, but not in all neural tissues. Srrm4 is the first alternative-splicing regulator to be associated with hearing, and the analysis of bv mice provides exon-level insights into hair-cell development.

  16. Estradiol regulates alternative splicing of estrogen receptor-alpha mRNA in differentiated NG108-15 neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizawa, Shu; Yamamuro, Yutaka

    2008-03-26

    The biological actions of estrogen are mostly conveyed through interaction with two different types of estrogen receptor (ER), ER-alpha and ER-beta. With regard to ER-alpha, an alternatively spliced form and its translated product, truncated estrogen receptor product-1 (TERP-1), have been identified in the rat pituitary. TERP-1 has the ability to inhibit the ER binding to DNA response element by forming hetero-dimers with the wild-type ER. Furthermore, TERP-1 expression increased concurrently with serum estrogen levels. Although estrogen also plays important roles in the central nervous system, the existence and regulatory mechanism of alternatively spliced ER-alpha mRNA expression has remained unclear. The present study evaluated the expression of the alternatively spliced form of the ER-alpha gene, and examined the influence of a representative ER ligand, 17beta-estradiol (E2), on the expression in differentiated NG108-15 neuronal cells. A real-time RT-PCR analysis using primer sets designed to amplify from exons 3 to 4, exons 4 to 5, exons 5 to 6, exons 6 to 7, and exons 7 to 8 of the mouse ER-alpha gene revealed the existence of alternatively spliced ER-alpha mRNA and its putative transcription initiation site, located between exon 4 and exon 5. Although E2 had no apparent effect on the overall expression of ER-alpha mRNA, it reduced the incidence of the alternatively spliced form of ER-alpha. The down-regulation by E2 predominantly arose via binding to nuclear ERs. The present study demonstrated that alternatively spliced ER-alpha mRNA is expressed in differentiated NG108-15 neuronal cells, and provides evidence for the functional up-regulation of ER-alpha via the ligand-binding activation of ERs.

  17. Alternative Splicing of CHEK2 and Codeletion with NF2 Promote Chromosomal Instability in Meningioma

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    Hong Wei Yang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutations of the NF2 gene on chromosome 22q are thought to initiate tumorigenesis in nearly 50% of meningiomas, and 22q deletion is the earliest and most frequent large-scale chromosomal abnormality observed in these tumors. In aggressive meningiomas, 22q deletions are generally accompanied by the presence of large-scale segmental abnormalities involving other chromosomes, but the reasons for this association are unknown. We find that large-scale chromosomal alterations accumulate during meningioma progression primarily in tumors harboring 22q deletions, suggesting 22q-associated chromosomal instability. Here we show frequent codeletion of the DNA repair and tumor suppressor gene, CHEK2, in combination with NF2 on chromosome 22q in a majority of aggressive meningiomas. In addition, tumor-specific splicing of CHEK2 in meningioma leads to decreased functional Chk2 protein expression. We show that enforced Chk2 knockdown in meningioma cells decreases DNA repair. Furthermore, Chk2 depletion increases centrosome amplification, thereby promoting chromosomal instability. Taken together, these data indicate that alternative splicing and frequent codeletion of CHEK2 and NF2 contribute to the genomic instability and associated development of aggressive biologic behavior in meningiomas.

  18. Comparative Cross-Species Alternative Splicing in Plants1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ner-Gaon, Hadas; Leviatan, Noam; Rubin, Eitan; Fluhr, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) can add significantly to genome complexity. Plants are thought to exhibit less AS than animals. An algorithm, based on expressed sequence tag (EST) pairs gapped alignment, was developed that takes advantage of the relatively small intron and exon size in plants and directly compares pairs of ESTs to search for AS. EST pairs gapped alignment was first evaluated in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), rice (Oryza sativa), and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) for which annotated genome sequence is available and was shown to accurately predict splicing events. The method was then applied to 11 plant species that include 17 cultivars for which enough ESTs are available. The results show a large, 3.7-fold difference in AS rates between plant species with Arabidopsis and rice in the lower range and lettuce (Lactuca sativa) and sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) in the upper range. Hence, compared to higher animals, plants show a much greater degree of variety in their AS rates and in some plant species the rates of animal and plant AS are comparable although the distribution of AS types may differ. In eudicots but not monocots, a correlation between genome size and AS rates was detected, implying that in eudicots the mechanisms that lead to larger genomes are a driving force for the evolution of AS. PMID:17496110

  19. Differential gene expression and alternative splicing between diploid and tetraploid watermelon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saminathan, Thangasamy; Nimmakayala, Padma; Manohar, Sumanth; Malkaram, Sridhar; Almeida, Aldo; Cantrell, Robert; Tomason, Yan; Abburi, Lavanya; Rahman, Mohammad A; Vajja, Venkata G; Khachane, Amit; Kumar, Brajendra; Rajasimha, Harsha K; Levi, Amnon; Wehner, Todd; Reddy, Umesh K

    2015-03-01

    The exploitation of synthetic polyploids for producing seedless fruits is well known in watermelon. Tetraploid progenitors of triploid watermelon plants, compared with their diploid counterparts, exhibit wide phenotypic differences. Although many factors modulate alternative splicing (AS) in plants, the effects of autopolyploidization on AS are still unknown. In this study, we used tissues of leaf, stem, and fruit of diploid and tetraploid sweet watermelon to understand changes in gene expression and the occurrence of AS. RNA-sequencing analysis was performed along with reverse transcription quantitative PCR and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE)-PCR to demonstrate changes in expression and splicing. All vegetative tissues except fruit showed an increased level of AS in the tetraploid watermelon throughout the growth period. The ploidy levels of diploids and the tetraploid were confirmed using a ploidy analyser. We identified 5362 and 1288 genes that were up- and downregulated, respectively, in tetraploid as compared with diploid plants. We further confirmed that 22 genes underwent AS events across tissues, indicating possibilities of generating different protein isoforms with altered functions of important transcription factors and transporters. Arginine biosynthesis, chlorophyllide synthesis, GDP mannose biosynthesis, trehalose biosynthesis, and starch and sucrose degradation pathways were upregulated in autotetraploids. Phloem protein 2, chloroplastic PGR5-like protein, zinc-finger protein, fructokinase-like 2, MYB transcription factor, and nodulin MtN21 showed AS in fruit tissues. These results should help in developing high-quality seedless watermelon and provide additional transcriptomic information related to other cucurbits.

  20. A gammaherpesvirus uses alternative splicing to regulate its tropism and its sensitivity to neutralization.

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    Bénédicte Machiels

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Human gammaherpesviruses are associated with the development of lymphomas and epithelial malignancies. The heterogeneity of these tumors reflects the ability of these viruses to route infection to different cell types at various stages of their lifecycle. While the Epstein Barr virus uses gp42--human leukocyte antigen class II interaction as a switch of cell tropism, the molecular mechanism that orientates tropism of rhadinoviruses is still poorly defined. Here, we used bovine herpesvirus 4 (BoHV-4 to further elucidate how rhadinoviruses regulate their infectivity. In the absence of any gp42 homolog, BoHV-4 exploits the alternative splicing of its Bo10 gene to produce distinct viral populations that behave differently based on the originating cell. While epithelial cells produce virions with high levels of the accessory envelope protein gp180, encoded by a Bo10 spliced product, myeloid cells express reduced levels of gp180. As a consequence, virions grown in epithelial cells are hardly infectious for CD14+ circulating cells, but are relatively resistant to antibody neutralization due to the shielding property of gp180 for vulnerable entry epitopes. In contrast, myeloid virions readily infect CD14+ circulating cells but are easily neutralized. This molecular switch could therefore allow BoHV-4 to promote either, on the one hand, its dissemination into the organism, or, on the other hand, its transmission between hosts.

  1. Targeted alternative splicing of TAF4: a new strategy for cell reprogramming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazantseva, Jekaterina; Sadam, Helle; Neuman, Toomas; Palm, Kaia

    2016-01-01

    Reprogramming of somatic cells has become a versatile tool for biomedical research and for regenerative medicine. In the current study, we show that manipulating alternative splicing (AS) is a highly potent strategy to produce cells for therapeutic applications. We demonstrate that silencing of hTAF4-TAFH activity of TAF4 converts human facial dermal fibroblasts to melanocyte-like (iMel) cells. iMel cells produce melanin and express microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) and its target genes at levels comparable to normal melanocytes. Reprogramming of melanoma cells by manipulation with hTAF4-TAFH activity upon TAFH RNAi enforces cell differentiation towards chondrogenic pathway, whereas ectoptic expression of TAF4 results in enhanced multipotency and neural crest-like features in melanoma cells. In both cell states, iMels and cancer cells, hTAF4-TAFH activity controls migration by supporting E- to N-cadherin switches. From our data, we conclude that targeted splicing of hTAF4-TAFH coordinates AS of other TFIID subunits, underscoring the role of TAF4 in synchronised changes of Pol II complex composition essential for efficient cellular reprogramming. Taken together, targeted AS of TAF4 provides a unique strategy for generation of iMels and recapitulating stages of melanoma progression. PMID:27499390

  2. Toll-Like Receptor 9 Alternatively Spliced Isoform Negatively Regulates TLR9 Signaling in Teleost Fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Nai-Yu; Nagarajan, Govindarajulu; Chiou, Pinwen Peter

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) recognizes and binds unmethylated CpG motifs in DNA, which are found in the genomes of bacteria and DNA viruses. In fish, Tlr9 is highly diverse, with the number of introns ranging from 0 to 4. A fish Tlr9 gene containing two introns has been reported to express two alternatively spliced isoforms, namely gTLR9A (full-length) and gTLR9B (with a truncated Cʹ-terminal signal transducing domain), whose regulation and function remain unclear. Here, we report a unique regulatory mechanism of gTLR9 signaling in orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides), whose gTlr9 sequence also contains two introns. We demonstrated that the grouper gTlr9 gene indeed has the capacity to produce two gTLR9 isoforms via alternative RNA splicing. We found that gTLR9B could function as a negative regulator to suppress gTLR9 signaling as demonstrated by the suppression of downstream gene expression. Following stimulation with CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN), gTLR9A and gTLR9B were observed to translocate into endosomes and co-localize with ODN and the adaptor protein gMyD88. Both gTLR9A and gTLR9B could interact with gMyD88; however, gTLR9B could not interact with downstream IRAK4 and TRAF6. Further analysis of the expression profile of gTlr9A and gTlr9B upon immune-stimulation revealed that the two isoforms were differentially regulated in a time-dependent manner. Overall, these data suggest that fish TLR9B functions as a negative regulator, and that its temporal expression is mediated by alternative RNA splicing. This has not been observed in mammalian TLR9s and might have been acquired relatively recently in the evolution of fish. PMID:25955250

  3. Toll-Like Receptor 9 Alternatively Spliced Isoform Negatively Regulates TLR9 Signaling in Teleost Fish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Fang-Yao Lee

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9 recognizes and binds unmethylated CpG motifs in DNA, which are found in the genomes of bacteria and DNA viruses. In fish, Tlr9 is highly diverse, with the number of introns ranging from 0 to 4. A fish Tlr9 gene containing two introns has been reported to express two alternatively spliced isoforms, namely gTLR9A (full-length and gTLR9B (with a truncated C'-terminal signal transducing domain, whose regulation and function remain unclear. Here, we report a unique regulatory mechanism of gTLR9 signaling in orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides, whose gTlr9 sequence also contains two introns. We demonstrated that the grouper gTlr9 gene indeed has the capacity to produce two gTLR9 isoforms via alternative RNA splicing. We found that gTLR9B could function as a negative regulator to suppress gTLR9 signaling as demonstrated by the suppression of downstream gene expression. Following stimulation with CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN, gTLR9A and gTLR9B were observed to translocate into endosomes and co-localize with ODN and the adaptor protein gMyD88. Both gTLR9A and gTLR9B could interact with gMyD88; however, gTLR9B could not interact with downstream IRAK4 and TRAF6. Further analysis of the expression profile of gTlr9A and gTlr9B upon immune-stimulation revealed that the two isoforms were differentially regulated in a time-dependent manner. Overall, these data suggest that fish TLR9B functions as a negative regulator, and that its temporal expression is mediated by alternative RNA splicing. This has not been observed in mammalian TLR9s and might have been acquired relatively recently in the evolution of fish.

  4. Genome-wide analysis of alternative splicing of pre-mRNA under salt stress in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Ding, Feng

    2014-06-04

    Background: Alternative splicing (AS) of precursor mRNA (pre-mRNA) is an important gene regulation process that potentially regulates many physiological processes in plants, including the response to abiotic stresses such as salt stress.Results: To analyze global changes in AS under salt stress, we obtained high-coverage (~200 times) RNA sequencing data from Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings that were treated with different concentrations of NaCl. We detected that ~49% of all intron-containing genes were alternatively spliced under salt stress, 10% of which experienced significant differential alternative splicing (DAS). Furthermore, AS increased significantly under salt stress compared with under unstressed conditions. We demonstrated that most DAS genes were not differentially regulated by salt stress, suggesting that AS may represent an independent layer of gene regulation in response to stress. Our analysis of functional categories suggested that DAS genes were associated with specific functional pathways, such as the pathways for the responses to stresses and RNA splicing. We revealed that serine/arginine-rich (SR) splicing factors were frequently and specifically regulated in AS under salt stresses, suggesting a complex loop in AS regulation for stress adaptation. We also showed that alternative splicing site selection (SS) occurred most frequently at 4 nucleotides upstream or downstream of the dominant sites and that exon skipping tended to link with alternative SS.Conclusions: Our study provided a comprehensive view of AS under salt stress and revealed novel insights into the potential roles of AS in plant response to salt stress. 2014 Ding et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  5. Alternative splicing of the human gene SYBL1 modulates protein domain architecture of longin VAMP7/TI-VAMP, showing both non-SNARE and synaptobrevin-like isoforms

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    De Franceschi Nicola

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The control of intracellular vesicle trafficking is an ideal target to weigh the role of alternative splicing in shaping genomes to make cells. Alternative splicing has been reported for several Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor Attachment protein REceptors of the vesicle (v-SNAREs or of the target membrane (t-SNARES, which are crucial to intracellular membrane fusion and protein and lipid traffic in Eukaryotes. However, splicing has not yet been investigated in Longins, i.e. the most widespread v-SNAREs. Longins are essential in Eukaryotes and prototyped by VAMP7, Sec22b and Ykt6, sharing a conserved N-terminal Longin domain which regulates membrane fusion and subcellular targeting. Human VAMP7/TI-VAMP, encoded by gene SYBL1, is involved in multiple cell pathways, including control of neurite outgrowth. Results Alternative splicing of SYBL1 by exon skipping events results in the production of a number of VAMP7 isoforms. In-frame or frameshift coding sequence modifications modulate domain architecture of VAMP7 isoforms, which can lack whole domains or domain fragments and show variant or extra domains. Intriguingly, two main types of VAMP7 isoforms either share the inhibitory Longin domain and lack the fusion-promoting SNARE motif, or vice versa. Expression analysis in different tissues and cell lines, quantitative real time RT-PCR and confocal microscopy analysis of fluorescent protein-tagged isoforms demonstrate that VAMP7 variants have different tissue specificities and subcellular localizations. Moreover, design and use of isoform-specific antibodies provided preliminary evidence for the existence of splice variants at the protein level. Conclusions Previous evidence on VAMP7 suggests inhibitory functions for the Longin domain and fusion/growth promoting activity for the Δ-longin molecule. Thus, non-SNARE isoforms with Longin domain and non-longin SNARE isoforms might have somehow opposite regulatory functions

  6. Cell type-restricted activity of hnRNPM promotes breast cancer metastasis via regulating alternative splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yilin; Gao, Xin D; Lee, Jae-Hyung; Huang, Huilin; Tan, Haiyan; Ahn, Jaegyoon; Reinke, Lauren M; Peter, Marcus E; Feng, Yue; Gius, David; Siziopikou, Kalliopi P; Peng, Junmin; Xiao, Xinshu; Cheng, Chonghui

    2014-06-01

    Tumor metastasis remains the major cause of cancer-related death, but its molecular basis is still not well understood. Here we uncovered a splicing-mediated pathway that is essential for breast cancer metastasis. We show that the RNA-binding protein heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein M (hnRNPM) promotes breast cancer metastasis by activating the switch of alternative splicing that occurs during epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Genome-wide deep sequencing analysis suggests that hnRNPM potentiates TGFβ signaling and identifies CD44 as a key downstream target of hnRNPM. hnRNPM ablation prevents TGFβ-induced EMT and inhibits breast cancer metastasis in mice, whereas enforced expression of the specific CD44 standard (CD44s) splice isoform overrides the loss of hnRNPM and permits EMT and metastasis. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that the ubiquitously expressed hnRNPM acts in a mesenchymal-specific manner to precisely control CD44 splice isoform switching during EMT. This restricted cell-type activity of hnRNPM is achieved by competition with ESRP1, an epithelial splicing regulator that binds to the same cis-regulatory RNA elements as hnRNPM and is repressed during EMT. Importantly, hnRNPM is associated with aggressive breast cancer and correlates with increased CD44s in patient specimens. These findings demonstrate a novel molecular mechanism through which tumor metastasis is endowed by the hnRNPM-mediated splicing program.

  7. Androgen receptor splice variant 7 (AR-V7) and drug efficacy in castration-resistant prostate cancer: Biomarker for treatment selection exclusion or inclusion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibrand, Crystal R; Price, Douglas K; Figg, William D

    2016-05-01

    Currently there are no molecular biomarkers used to help guide treatment selection for those patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer. A recent study published in JAMA Oncology (Antonarakis et al.) presents evidence supporting the potential use of androgen receptor splice variant 7 as a biomarker for optimal treatment selection in this population.

  8. Alternatively spliced short and long isoforms of adaptor protein intersectin 1 form complexes in mammalian cells

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    Rynditch A. V.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Intersectin 1 (ITSN1 is an adaptor protein involved in membrane trafficking and cell signaling. Long and short isoforms of ITSN1 (ITSN1-L and ITSN1-S are produced by alternative splicing. The aim of our study was to investigate whether ITSN1-L and ITSN1-S could interact in mammalian cells. Methods. During this study we employed immunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy. Results. We have shown that endogenous ITSN1-S co-precipitates with overexpressed ITSN1-L in PC12, 293 and 293T cells. Long and short isoforms of ITSN1 also co-localize in 293T cells. Conclusions. ITSN1-L and ITSN1-S form complexes in mammalian cells.

  9. Cytoplasmic male sterility of tuber mustard is associated with the alternative spliced mitochondrial T gene transcripts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PEI Yanxi; CHEN Zhujun; CAO Jiashu; CHEN Xuejun; LIU Xiaohui

    2004-01-01

    Two transcripts of T gene, T1170 and T1243, were obtained from the mitochondrial cDNA of tuber mustard CMS line. T1243 was a transcript with an intron unspliced, which has the basic characteristics of type Ⅱ intron. The expressions of the two transcripts were analyzed by reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR). The results showed that, at seedling stage, the expression of T gene was mainly in the form of T1170 but decreased with the development gradually, while the expression abundance of another transcript, T1243, increased gradually. The T1243 was prevalent at the profuse flowering stage. The expression pattern was confirmed by Northern blot analysis. These results suggested that the alternative spliced mitochondrial T gene transcripts were related to CMS of tuber mustard.

  10. Expression of a splice variant of the platelet-activating factor receptor transcript 2 in various human cancer cell lines

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    Ibtissam Youlyouz

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelet-activating factor receptor (PAF-R transcripts were analysed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction in five human cancer cell lines derived from the breast (BT20, SKBR3 and T47D cells, the pancreas (Miapaca cells and the bladder (5637 cells in order to confirm the existence of a splice variant of the PAF-R transcript 2. After cloning and sequencing, we confirmed its existence in all cell lines. It consisted of the PAF-R transcript 2 lengthening with 82 nucleotides from the 3' end of exon 1 of the PAF-R gene. The role of this elongated form of the tissue-type PAF-R transcript in cell physiology remains to be elucidated.

  11. Alternatively spliced myeloid differentiation protein-2 inhibits TLR4-mediated lung inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumurkhuu, Gantsetseg; Dagvadorj, Jargalsaikhan; Jones, Heather D; Chen, Shuang; Shimada, Kenichi; Crother, Timothy R; Arditi, Moshe

    2015-02-15

    We previously identified a novel alternatively spliced isoform of human myeloid differentiation protein-2 (MD-2s) that competitively inhibits binding of MD-2 to TLR4 in vitro. In this study, we investigated the protective role of MD-2s in LPS-induced acute lung injury by delivering intratracheally an adenovirus construct that expressed MD-2s (Ad-MD-2s). After adenovirus-mediated gene transfer, MD-2s was strongly expressed in lung epithelial cells and readily detected in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Compared to adenovirus serotype 5 containing an empty vector lacking a transgene control mice, Ad-MD-2s delivery resulted in significantly less LPS-induced inflammation in the lungs, including less protein leakage, cell recruitment, and expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, such as IL-6, keratinocyte chemoattractant, and MIP-2. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from Ad-MD-2s mice transferred into lungs of naive mice before intratracheal LPS challenge diminished proinflammatory cytokine levels. As house dust mite (HDM) sensitization is dependent on TLR4 and HDM Der p 2, a structural homolog of MD-2, we also investigated the effect of MD-2s on HDM-induced allergic airway inflammation. Ad-MD-2s given before HDM sensitization significantly inhibited subsequent allergic airway inflammation after HDM challenge, including reductions in eosinophils, goblet cell hyperplasia, and IL-5 levels. Our study indicates that the alternatively spliced short isoform of human MD-2 could be a potential therapeutic candidate to treat human diseases induced or exacerbated by TLR4 signaling, such as Gram-negative bacterial endotoxin-induced lung injury and HDM-triggered allergic lung inflammation.

  12. Alternatively spliced myeloid differentiation protein-2 (MD-2s) protein inhibits TLR4-mediated lung inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumurkhuu, Gantsetseg; Dagvadorj, Jargalsaikhan; Jones, Heather D.; Chen, Shuang; Shimada, Kenichi; Crother, Timothy R.; Arditi, Moshe

    2014-01-01

    We previously identified a novel alternatively spliced isoform of human myeloid differentiation protein-2 (MD-2s) that competitively inhibits binding of MD-2 to TLR4 in vitro. Here we investigated the protective role of MD-2s in LPS-induced acute lung injury by delivering intracheally (i.t.) an adenovirus construct that expressed MD-2s (Ad-MD-2s). After adenovirus-mediated gene transfer, MD-2s was strongly expressed in lung epithelial cells and readily detected in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Compared to Ad-EV control mice, Ad-MD-2s delivery resulted in significantly less LPS-induced inflammation in the lungs, including less protein leakage, cell recruitment, and expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, such as IL-6, KC, and MIP-2. BALF from Ad-MD-2s mice transferred into lungs of naive mice before i.t. LPS challenge diminished pro-inflammatory cytokine levels. As house dust mite (HDM) sensitization is dependent on TLR4 and HDM Der p 2, a structural homolog of MD-2, we also investigated the effect of MD-2s on house dust mite (HDM)-induced allergic airway inflammation. Ad-MD-2s given before HDM sensitization significantly inhibited subsequent allergic airway inflammation after HDM challenge, including reductions in eosinophils, goblet cell hyperplasia, and IL-5 levels. Our study indicates that the alternatively spliced short isoform of human MD-2 could be a potential therapeutic candidate to treat human diseases induced or exacerbated by TLR4 signaling, such as Gram-negative bacterial endotoxin-induced lung injury and house dust mite-triggered allergic lung inflammation. PMID:25576596

  13. MAISTAS: a tool for automatic structural evaluation of alternative splicing products.

    KAUST Repository

    Floris, Matteo

    2011-04-15

    MOTIVATION: Analysis of the human genome revealed that the amount of transcribed sequence is an order of magnitude greater than the number of predicted and well-characterized genes. A sizeable fraction of these transcripts is related to alternatively spliced forms of known protein coding genes. Inspection of the alternatively spliced transcripts identified in the pilot phase of the ENCODE project has clearly shown that often their structure might substantially differ from that of other isoforms of the same gene, and therefore that they might perform unrelated functions, or that they might even not correspond to a functional protein. Identifying these cases is obviously relevant for the functional assignment of gene products and for the interpretation of the effect of variations in the corresponding proteins. RESULTS: Here we describe a publicly available tool that, given a gene or a protein, retrieves and analyses all its annotated isoforms, provides users with three-dimensional models of the isoform(s) of his/her interest whenever possible and automatically assesses whether homology derived structural models correspond to plausible structures. This information is clearly relevant. When the homology model of some isoforms of a gene does not seem structurally plausible, the implications are that either they assume a structure unrelated to that of the other isoforms of the same gene with presumably significant functional differences, or do not correspond to functional products. We provide indications that the second hypothesis is likely to be true for a substantial fraction of the cases. AVAILABILITY: http://maistas.bioinformatica.crs4.it/.

  14. SIRT1 undergoes alternative splicing in a novel auto-regulatory loop with p53.

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    Cian J Lynch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The NAD-dependent deacetylase SIRT1 is a nutrient-sensitive coordinator of stress-tolerance, multiple homeostatic processes and healthspan, while p53 is a stress-responsive transcription factor and our paramount tumour suppressor. Thus, SIRT1-mediated inhibition of p53 has been identified as a key node in the common biology of cancer, metabolism, development and ageing. However, precisely how SIRT1 integrates such diverse processes remains to be elucidated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report that SIRT1 is alternatively spliced in mammals, generating a novel SIRT1 isoform: SIRT1-ΔExon8. We show that SIRT1-ΔExon8 is expressed widely throughout normal human and mouse tissues, suggesting evolutionary conservation and critical function. Further studies demonstrate that the SIRT1-ΔExon8 isoform retains minimal deacetylase activity and exhibits distinct stress sensitivity, RNA/protein stability, and protein-protein interactions compared to classical SIRT1-Full-Length (SIRT1-FL. We also identify an auto-regulatory loop whereby SIRT1-ΔExon8 can regulate p53, while in reciprocal p53 can influence SIRT1 splice variation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We characterize the first alternative isoform of SIRT1 and demonstrate its evolutionary conservation in mammalian tissues. The results also reveal a new level of inter-dependency between p53 and SIRT1, two master regulators of multiple phenomena. Thus, previously-attributed SIRT1 functions may in fact be distributed between SIRT1 isoforms, with important implications for SIRT1 functional studies and the current search for SIRT1-activating therapeutics to combat age-related decline.

  15. Long non-coding RNA and alternative splicing modulations in Parkinson's leukocytes identified by RNA sequencing.

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    Lilach Soreq

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The continuously prolonged human lifespan is accompanied by increase in neurodegenerative diseases incidence, calling for the development of inexpensive blood-based diagnostics. Analyzing blood cell transcripts by RNA-Seq is a robust means to identify novel biomarkers that rapidly becomes a commonplace. However, there is lack of tools to discover novel exons, junctions and splicing events and to precisely and sensitively assess differential splicing through RNA-Seq data analysis and across RNA-Seq platforms. Here, we present a new and comprehensive computational workflow for whole-transcriptome RNA-Seq analysis, using an updated version of the software AltAnalyze, to identify both known and novel high-confidence alternative splicing events, and to integrate them with both protein-domains and microRNA binding annotations. We applied the novel workflow on RNA-Seq data from Parkinson's disease (PD patients' leukocytes pre- and post- Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS treatment and compared to healthy controls. Disease-mediated changes included decreased usage of alternative promoters and N-termini, 5'-end variations and mutually-exclusive exons. The PD regulated FUS and HNRNP A/B included prion-like domains regulated regions. We also present here a workflow to identify and analyze long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs via RNA-Seq data. We identified reduced lncRNA expression and selective PD-induced changes in 13 of over 6,000 detected leukocyte lncRNAs, four of which were inversely altered post-DBS. These included the U1 spliceosomal lncRNA and RP11-462G22.1, each entailing sequence complementarity to numerous microRNAs. Analysis of RNA-Seq from PD and unaffected controls brains revealed over 7,000 brain-expressed lncRNAs, of which 3,495 were co-expressed in the leukocytes including U1, which showed both leukocyte and brain increases. Furthermore, qRT-PCR validations confirmed these co-increases in PD leukocytes and two brain regions, the amygdala and substantia

  16. Splice variants of the CaV1.3 L-type calcium channel regulate dendritic spine morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanika, Ruslan; Campiglio, Marta; Pinggera, Alexandra; Lee, Amy; Striessnig, Jörg; Flucher, Bernhard E.; Obermair, Gerald J.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic spines are the postsynaptic compartments of glutamatergic synapses in the brain. Their number and shape are subject to change in synaptic plasticity and neurological disorders including autism spectrum disorders and Parkinson’s disease. The L-type calcium channel CaV1.3 constitutes an important calcium entry pathway implicated in the regulation of spine morphology. Here we investigated the importance of full-length CaV1.3L and two C-terminally truncated splice variants (CaV1.342A and CaV1.343S) and their modulation by densin-180 and shank1b for the morphology of dendritic spines of cultured hippocampal neurons. Live-cell immunofluorescence and super-resolution microscopy of epitope-tagged CaV1.3L revealed its localization at the base-, neck-, and head-region of dendritic spines. Expression of the short splice variants or deletion of the C-terminal PDZ-binding motif in CaV1.3L induced aberrant dendritic spine elongation. Similar morphological alterations were induced by co-expression of densin-180 or shank1b with CaV1.3L and correlated with increased CaV1.3 currents and dendritic calcium signals in transfected neurons. Together, our findings suggest a key role of CaV1.3 in regulating dendritic spine structure. Under physiological conditions it may contribute to the structural plasticity of glutamatergic synapses. Conversely, altered regulation of CaV1.3 channels may provide an important mechanism in the development of postsynaptic aberrations associated with neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:27708393

  17. Antisense oligonucleotide-induced alternative splicing of the APOB mRNA generates a novel isoform of APOB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chew Shern L

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Apolipoprotein B (APOB is an integral part of the LDL, VLDL, IDL, Lp(a and chylomicron lipoprotein particles. The APOB pre-mRNA consists of 29 constitutively-spliced exons. APOB exists as two natural isoforms: the full-length APOB100 isoform, assembled into LDL, VLDL, IDL and Lp(a and secreted by the liver in humans; and the C-terminally truncated APOB48, assembled into chylomicrons and secreted by the intestine in humans. Down-regulation of APOB100 is a potential therapy to lower circulating LDL and cholesterol levels. Results We investigated the ability of 2'O-methyl RNA antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs to induce the skipping of exon 27 in endogenous APOB mRNA in HepG2 cells. These ASOs are directed towards the 5' and 3' splice-sites of exon 27, the branch-point sequence (BPS of intron 26–27 and several predicted exonic splicing enhancers within exon 27. ASOs targeting either the 5' or 3' splice-site, in combination with the BPS, are the most effective. The splicing of other alternatively spliced genes are not influenced by these ASOs, suggesting that the effects seen are not due to non-specific changes in alternative splicing. The skip 27 mRNA is translated into a truncated isoform, APOB87SKIP27. Conclusion The induction of APOB87SKIP27 expression in vivo should lead to decreased LDL and cholesterol levels, by analogy to patients with hypobetalipoproteinemia. As intestinal APOB mRNA editing and APOB48 expression rely on sequences within exon 26, exon 27 skipping should not affect APOB48 expression unlike other methods of down-regulating APOB100 expression which also down-regulate APOB48.

  18. THE GRK4 SUBFAMILY OF G PROTEIN-COUPLED RECEPTOR KINASES: ALTERNATIVE SPLICING, GENE ORGANIZATION, AND SEQUENCE CONSERVATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The GRK4 subfamily of G protein-coupled receptor kinases. Alternative splicing, gene organization, and sequence conservation.Premont RT, Macrae AD, Aparicio SA, Kendall HE, Welch JE, Lefkowitz RJ.Department of Medicine, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Duke Univer...

  19. Increased expression of a novel splice variant of the complement component 4 (C4A) gene in mastitis-infected dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y; Huang, J M; Ju, Z H; Li, Q L; Zhou, L; Li, R L; Li, J B; Shi, F X; Zhong, J F; Wang, C F

    2012-08-29

    The complement system helps in the direct lysis of invading pathogens and modulates phagocytic, humoral and cellular immune responses. Complement 4 is a critical component in complement activity and protection against many bacterial pathogens because it is essential to classical and lectin activation pathways. We used reverse transcription and PCR to investigate alternative splicing and expression of the complement component 4 (C4A) gene in Chinese Holstein cattle. The PCR products were cloned and sequenced. A novel splice variant involving intron 10 was identified, which we named C4A-AS. To examine how C4A gene activity is affected by bovine mastitis, six Chinese Holstein cattle were divided into healthy (non-mastitic) and Staphylococcus aureus-induced mastitic groups. Real-time quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) revealed that the C4A-complete and C4A-AS transcripts are expressed at significantly different levels in healthy cows, while there were no significant differences in the mastitic group (P = 0.257). Expression of C4A-AS increased significantly when mastitis developed. We also examined the expression of C4A-complete and C4A-AS in several tissues (liver, heart, spleen, lung, kidney, tongue, and muscle). The two transcripts were expressed in all of these tissues but there were no significant differences in expression between healthy and mastitic cows. We therefore conclude that the C4A-complete transcript is the main transcript under normal physiological conditions, while C4A-AS is augmented when mastitis develops.

  20. Seemingly neutral polymorphic variants may confer immunity to splicing-inactivating mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Karsten Bork; Sørensen, Suzette; Cartegni, Luca

    2007-01-01

    The idea that point mutations in exons may affect splicing is intriguing and adds an additional layer of complexity when evaluating their possible effects. Even in the best-studied examples, the molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. Here, we use patient cells, model minigenes, and in vitro....... Furthermore, the region of MCAD exon 5 that harbors these elements is nearly identical to the exon 7 region of the survival of motor neuron (SMN) genes that contains the deleterious silent mutation in SMN2, indicating a very similar and finely tuned interplay between regulatory elements in these two genes...

  1. Inactive DNMT3B Splice Variants Modulate De Novo DNA Methylation

    OpenAIRE

    Gordon, Catherine A.; Hartono, Stella R; Frédéric Chédin

    2013-01-01

    Inactive DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) 3B splice isoforms are associated with changes in DNA methylation, yet the mechanisms by which they act remain largely unknown. Using biochemical and cell culture assays, we show here that the inactive DNMT3B3 and DNMT3B4 isoforms bind to and regulate the activity of catalytically competent DNMT3A or DNMT3B molecules. DNMT3B3 modestly stimulated the de novo methylation activity of DNMT3A and also counteracted the stimulatory effects of DNMT3L, therefore l...

  2. Resveratrol, by modulating RNA processing factor levels, can influence the alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Andrea Markus

    Full Text Available Alternative pre-mRNA splicing defects can contribute to, or result from, various diseases, including cancer. Aberrant mRNAs, splicing factors and other RNA processing factors have therefore become targets for new therapeutic interventions. Here we report that the natural polyphenol resveratrol can modulate alternative splicing in a target-specific manner. We transfected minigenes of several alternatively spliceable primary mRNAs into HEK293 cells in the presence or absence of 1, 5, 20 and 50 µM resveratrol and measured exon levels by semi-quantitative PCR after separation by agarose gel electrophoresis. We found that 20 µg/ml and 50 µg/ml of resveratrol affected exon inclusion of SRp20 and SMN2 pre-mRNAs, but not CD44v5 or tau pre-mRNAs. By Western blotting and immunofluorescence we showed that this effect may be due to the ability of resveratrol to change the protein level but not the localization of several RNA processing factors. The processing factors that increased significantly were ASF/SF2, hnRNPA1 and HuR, but resveratrol did not change the levels of RBM4, PTBP1 and U2AF35. By means of siRNA-mediated knockdown we depleted cells of SIRT1, regarded as a major target of resveratrol, and showed that the effect on splicing was not dependent on SIRT1. Our results suggest that resveratrol might be an attractive small molecule to treat diseases in which aberrant splicing has been implicated, and justify more extensive research on the effects of resveratrol on the splicing machinery.

  3. Misregulated alternative splicing of BIN1 is associated with T tubule alterations and muscle weakness in myotonic dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fugier, Charlotte; Klein, Arnaud F; Hammer, Caroline; Vassilopoulos, Stéphane; Ivarsson, Ylva; Toussaint, Anne; Tosch, Valérie; Vignaud, Alban; Ferry, Arnaud; Messaddeq, Nadia; Kokunai, Yosuke; Tsuburaya, Rie; de la Grange, Pierre; Dembele, Doulaye; Francois, Virginie; Precigout, Guillaume; Boulade-Ladame, Charlotte; Hummel, Marie-Christine; Lopez de Munain, Adolfo; Sergeant, Nicolas; Laquerrière, Annie; Thibault, Christelle; Deryckere, François; Auboeuf, Didier; Garcia, Luis; Zimmermann, Pascale; Udd, Bjarne; Schoser, Benedikt; Takahashi, Masanori P; Nishino, Ichizo; Bassez, Guillaume; Laporte, Jocelyn; Furling, Denis; Charlet-Berguerand, Nicolas

    2011-06-01

    Myotonic dystrophy is the most common muscular dystrophy in adults and the first recognized example of an RNA-mediated disease. Congenital myotonic dystrophy (CDM1) and myotonic dystrophy of type 1 (DM1) or of type 2 (DM2) are caused by the expression of mutant RNAs containing expanded CUG or CCUG repeats, respectively. These mutant RNAs sequester the splicing regulator Muscleblind-like-1 (MBNL1), resulting in specific misregulation of the alternative splicing of other pre-mRNAs. We found that alternative splicing of the bridging integrator-1 (BIN1) pre-mRNA is altered in skeletal muscle samples of people with CDM1, DM1 and DM2. BIN1 is involved in tubular invaginations of membranes and is required for the biogenesis of muscle T tubules, which are specialized skeletal muscle membrane structures essential for excitation-contraction coupling. Mutations in the BIN1 gene cause centronuclear myopathy, which shares some histopathological features with myotonic dystrophy. We found that MBNL1 binds the BIN1 pre-mRNA and regulates its alternative splicing. BIN1 missplicing results in expression of an inactive form of BIN1 lacking phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphate-binding and membrane-tubulating activities. Consistent with a defect of BIN1, muscle T tubules are altered in people with myotonic dystrophy, and membrane structures are restored upon expression of the normal splicing form of BIN1 in muscle cells of such individuals. Finally, reproducing BIN1 splicing alteration in mice is sufficient to promote T tubule alterations and muscle weakness, a predominant feature of myotonic dystrophy.

  4. Kinetic properties of alternatively spliced isoforms of laccase-2 from Tribolium castaneum and Anopheles gambiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Maureen J; Sullivan, Lucinda I; Nguyen, Thi D T; Dai, Huaien; Arakane, Yasuyuki; Dittmer, Neal T; Syed, Lateef U; Li, Jun; Hua, Duy H; Kanost, Michael R

    2012-03-01

    Laccase-2 is a highly conserved multicopper oxidase that functions in insect cuticle pigmentation and tanning. In many species, alternative splicing gives rise to two laccase-2 isoforms. A comparison of laccase-2 sequences from three orders of insects revealed eleven positions at which there are conserved differences between the A and B isoforms. Homology modeling suggested that these eleven residues are not part of the substrate binding pocket. To determine whether the isoforms have different kinetic properties, we compared the activity of laccase-2 isoforms from Tribolium castaneum and Anopheles gambiae. We partially purified the four laccases as recombinant enzymes and analyzed their ability to oxidize a range of laccase substrates. The predicted endogenous substrates tested were dopamine, N-acetyldopamine (NADA), N-β-alanyldopamine (NBAD) and dopa, which were detected in T. castaneum previously and in A. gambiae as part of this study. Two additional diphenols (catechol and hydroquinone) and one non-phenolic substrate (2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid)) were also tested. We observed no major differences in substrate specificity between the A and B isoforms. Dopamine, NADA and NBAD were oxidized with catalytic efficiencies ranging from 51 to 550 min⁻¹ mM⁻¹. These results support the hypothesis that dopamine, NADA and NBAD are endogenous substrates for both isoforms of laccase-2. Catalytic efficiencies associated with dopa oxidation were low, ranging from 8 to 30 min⁻¹ mM⁻¹; in comparison, insect tyrosinase oxidized dopa with a catalytic efficiency of 201 min⁻¹ mM⁻¹. We found that dopa had the highest redox potential of the four endogenous substrates, and this property of dopa may explain its poor oxidation by laccase-2. We conclude that laccase-2 splice isoforms are likely to oxidize the same substrates in vivo, and additional experiments will be required to discover any isoform-specific functions.

  5. Combined use of in silico and in vitro splicing assays for interpretation of genomic variants of unknown significance in cardiomyopathies and channelopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hervé Crehalet

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The identification of molecular anomalies in patients with inherited arrhythmias or cardiomyopathies is a multi challenge due to: i the number of genes involved; ii the number of polymorphisms and the fact that most mutations are private; and iii the variable degree of penetrance which complicates family segregation study. Consequently, a number of unclassified variants (UV are found in patients’ DNA and some (outside the canonical GT/AG may affect splicing. Mutational screening on the most prevalent genes involved in arrythmias syndromes or in cardiomyopathies was performed on a cohort made up of 740 unrelated French index probands. To identify splice variants among the identified UVs, a combination of available in silico and in vitro tools were used since transcript is not available. Using this approach, 10 previously identified UVs were reclassified as disease-causing mutations and, more precisely, as haploinsufficiency mutations rather than dominant-negative mutations. Most of them (7 of 10 were observed in MYBPC3. Our study highlighted the importance of the combined use of in silico and in vitro splicing assays to improve the prediction of the functional impact of identified genetic variants. The primary challenge now, with new sequencing technologies, is to distinguish between background polymorphisms and pathogenic mutations. Since splice site mutations can account for almost 50% of disease-causing mutations, recognizing them from among other variations is essential.

  6. Deciphering Transcriptome and Complex Alternative Splicing Transcripts in Mammary Gland Tissues from Cows Naturally Infected with Staphylococcus aureus Mastitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Qiang; Yang, Chun Hong; Zhang, Yan; Sun, Yan; Li, Rong Ling; Wang, Chang Fa; Zhong, Ji Feng; Huang, Jin Ming

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) contributes to the complexity of the mammalian proteome and plays an important role in diseases, including infectious diseases. The differential AS patterns of these transcript sequences between the healthy (HS3A) and mastitic (HS8A) cows naturally infected by Staphylococcus aureus were compared to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying mastitis resistance and susceptibility. In this study, using the Illumina paired-end RNA sequencing method, 1352 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) with higher than twofold changes were found in the HS3A and HS8A mammary gland tissues. Gene ontology and KEGG pathway analyses revealed that the cytokine–cytokine receptor interaction pathway is the most significantly enriched pathway. Approximately 16k annotated unigenes were respectively identified in two libraries, based on the bovine Bos taurus UMD3.1 sequence assembly and search. A total of 52.62% and 51.24% annotated unigenes were alternatively spliced in term of exon skipping, intron retention, alternative 5′ splicing and alternativesplicing. Additionally, 1,317 AS unigenes were HS3A-specific, whereas 1,093 AS unigenes were HS8A-specific. Some immune-related genes, such as ITGB6, MYD88, ADA, ACKR1, and TNFRSF1B, and their potential relationships with mastitis were highlighted. From Chromosome 2, 4, 6, 7, 10, 13, 14, 17, and 20, 3.66% (HS3A) and 5.4% (HS8A) novel transcripts, which harbor known quantitative trait locus associated with clinical mastitis, were identified. Many DEGs in the healthy and mastitic mammary glands are involved in immune, defense, and inflammation responses. These DEGs, which exhibit diverse and specific splicing patterns and events, can endow dairy cattle with the potential complex genetic resistance against mastitis. PMID:27459697

  7. A genome wide analysis of alternative splicing events during the osteogenic differentiation of human cartilage endplate-derived stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Jin; Wang, Honggang; Fan, Xin; Shangguan, Lei; Liu, Huan

    2016-08-01

    Low back pain is a prevalent disease, which leads to suffering and disabilities in a vast number of individuals. Degenerative disc diseases are usually the underlying causes of low back pain. However, the pathogenesis of degenerative disc diseases is highly complex and difficult to determine. Current therapies for degenerative disc diseases are various. In particular, cell-based therapies have proven to be effective and promising. Our research group has previously isolated and identified the cartilage endplate‑derived stem cells. In addition, alternative splicing is a sophisticated regulatory mechanism, which greatly increases cellular complexity and phenotypic diversity of eukaryotic organisms. The present study continued to investigate alternative splicing events in osteogenic differentiation of cartilage endplate‑derived stem cells. An Affymetrix Human Transcriptome Array 2.0 was used to detect splicing changes between the control and differentiated samples. Additionally, molecular function and pathway analysis were also performed. Following rigorous bioinformatics analysis of the data, 3,802 alternatively spliced genes were identified, and 10 of these were selected for validation by reverse transcription‑polymerase chain reaction. Gene ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analysis also revealed numerous enriched GO terms and signaling pathways. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to investigate alternative splicing mechanisms in osteogenic differentiation of stem cells on a genome‑wide scale. The illumination of molecular mechanisms of stem cell osteogenic differentiation may assist the development novel bioengineered methods to treat degenerative disc diseases.

  8. Alternative Splicing of AMPA subunits in Prefrontal Cortical Fields of Cynomolgus Monkeys following Chronic Ethanol Self-Administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glen eAcosta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional impairment of the orbital and medial prefrontal cortex underlies deficits in executive control that characterize addictive disorders, including alcohol addiction. Previous studies indicate that alcohol alters glutamate neurotransmission and one substrate of these effects may be through the reconfiguration of the subunits constituting ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGluR complexes. Glutamatergic transmission is integral to cortico-cortical and cortico-subcortical communication and alcohol-induced changes in the abundance of the receptor subunits and/or their splice variants may result in critical functional impairments of prefrontal cortex in alcohol dependence. To this end, the effects of chronic ethanol self-administration on glutamate receptor ionotropic AMPA (GRIA subunit variant and kainate (GRIK subunit mRNA expression were studied in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC of male cynomolgus monkeys. In DLPFC, total AMPA splice variant expression and total kainate receptor subunit expression were significantly decreased in alcohol drinking monkeys. Expression levels of GRIA3 flip and flop and GRIA4 flop mRNAs in this region were positively correlated with daily ethanol intake and blood ethanol concentrations averaged over the six months prior to necropsy. In OFC, AMPA subunit splice variant expression was reduced in the alcohol treated group. GRIA2 flop mRNA levels in this region were positively correlated with daily ethanol intake and blood ethanol concentrations averaged over the six months prior to necropsy. Results from these studies provide further evidence of transcriptional regulation of iGluR subunits in the primate brain following chronic alcohol self-administration. Additional studies examining the cellular localization of such effects in the framework of primate prefrontal cortical circuitry are warranted.

  9. Characterization of BRCA1 and BRCA2 splicing variants: a collaborative report by ENIGMA consortium members

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Mads; Blanco, Ana; Montagna, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 predispose carriers to early onset breast and ovarian cancer. A common problem in clinical genetic testing is interpretation of variants with unknown clinical significance. The Evidence-based Network for the Interpretation of Germline Mutant Alleles (ENIGMA) consortiu...

  10. G to A substitution in 5{prime} donor splice site of introns 18 and 48 of COL1A1 gene of type I collagen results in different splicing alternatives in osteogenesis imperfecta type I cell strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willing, M.; Deschenes, S. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    We have identified a G to A substitution in the 5{prime} donor splice site of intron 18 of one COL1A1 allele in two unrelated families with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type I. A third OI type I family has a G to A substitution at the identical position in intron 48 of one COL1A1 allele. Both mutations abolish normal splicing and lead to reduced steady-state levels of mRNA from the mutant COL1A1 allele. The intron 18 mutation leads to both exon 18 skipping in the mRNA and to utilization of a single alternative splice site near the 3{prime} end of exon 18. The latter results in deletion of the last 8 nucleotides of exon 18 from the mRNA, a shift in the translational reading-frame, and the creation of a premature termination codon in exon 19. Of the potential alternative 5{prime} splice sites in exon 18 and intron 18, the one utilized has a surrounding nucleotide sequence which most closely resembles that of the natural splice site. Although a G to A mutation was detected at the identical position in intron 48 of one COL1A1 allele in another OI type I family, nine complex alternative splicing patterns were identified by sequence analysis of cDNA clones derived from fibroblast mRNA from this cell strain. All result in partial or complete skipping of exon 48, with in-frame deletions of portions of exons 47 and/or 49. The different patterns of RNA splicing were not explained by their sequence homology with naturally occuring 5{prime} splice sites, but rather by recombination between highly homologous exon sequences, suggesting that we may not have identified the major splicing alternative(s) in this cell strain. Both G to A mutations result in decreased production of type I collagen, the common biochemical correlate of OI type I.

  11. T3 Regulates a Human Macrophage-Derived TSH-β Splice Variant: Implications for Human Bone Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baliram, R; Latif, R; Morshed, S A; Zaidi, M; Davies, T F

    2016-09-01

    TSH and thyroid hormones (T3 and T4) are intimately involved in bone biology. We have previously reported the presence of a murine TSH-β splice variant (TSH-βv) expressed specifically in bone marrow-derived macrophages and that exerted an osteoprotective effect by inducing osteoblastogenesis. To extend this observation and its relevance to human bone biology, we set out to identify and characterize a TSH-β variant in human macrophages. Real-time PCR analyses using human TSH-β-specific primers identified a 364-bp product in macrophages, bone marrow, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells that was sequence verified and was homologous to a human TSH-βv previously reported. We then examined TSH-βv regulation using the THP-1 human monocyte cell line matured into macrophages. After 4 days, 46.1% of the THP-1 cells expressed the macrophage markers CD-14 and macrophage colony-stimulating factor and exhibited typical morphological characteristics of macrophages. Real-time PCR analyses of these cells treated in a dose-dependent manner with T3 showed a 14-fold induction of human TSH-βv mRNA and variant protein. Furthermore, these human TSH-βv-positive cells, induced by T3 exposure, had categorized into both M1 and M2 macrophage phenotypes as evidenced by the expression of macrophage colony-stimulating factor for M1 and CCL-22 for M2. These data indicate that in hyperthyroidism, bone marrow resident macrophages have the potential to exert enhanced osteoprotective effects by oversecreting human TSH-βv, which may exert its local osteoprotective role via osteoblast and osteoclast TSH receptors.

  12. Study of the Expression of Survivin & Its Splice Variants; ΔEx3, 2b and 3b as Diagnostic Molecular Markers in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Babaei

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Survivin is a new member of the Inhibitor Apotosis Protein family (IAP which plays an important role in the regulation of both cell cycle and apoptosis. Its distinct expression in tumor cells as compared to normal adult cells introduces Survivin as the fourth transcriptom demonstrated in tumors. Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among women and scientist`s efforts to classify it has lead to various molecular subtypes and controversial results. Because of the high prevalence of these tumors and lack of suitable molecular markers for diagnosis and prognosis, there are ongoing efforts to find molecular markers which can distinguish nontumoral from tumor tissues. In this study we evaluate the potential usefulness of Survivin and its splice variants ΔEx3, 2b and 3b as molecular markers in breast cancer. Methods: We studied 18 tumor and 17 non tumor adjacent tissues. Transcription levels were measured by Semiquantitative Reverse Transcriptase-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR and normalized by ß2m as an internal control. Results: 1Survivin and its splice variants; Δex3, 2b and 3b showed differentially higher expression levels in tumors than adjacent normal tissues. 2 The expression levels of Survivin, Survivin-ΔEx3 and Survivin-3b were significantly correlated with the type of tumors. 3 Survivin-2b was expressed in a few samples. 4 Survivin-3b was detected only in tumor samples. Also, our results showed that ΔEx3 variant can be introduced as a dominant expressed variant in breast cancer. Conclusion: Our data indicated that the expression of Survivin, Survivin ∆Ex3 and especially, Survivin-3b were correlated with cancerous nature of tumors and Survivin-∆Ex3 was the most common expressed variant in breast carcinomas. These results besides confirming the potential usefulness of Survivin and its splice variants as molecular markers in breast cancer, demonstrated the role of the gene and its splice variants, especially 3b

  13. A hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-3α splicing variant, HIF-3α4 impairs angiogenesis in hypervascular malignant meningiomas with epigenetically silenced HIF-3α4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, Hitoshi [Department of Neurosurgery, Nagoya University School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Department of Neurosurgery, Fukushima Medical University School of Medicine, Fukushima (Japan); Natsume, Atsushi, E-mail: anatsume@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Neurosurgery, Nagoya University School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Iwami, Kenichiro; Ohka, Fumiharu [Department of Neurosurgery, Nagoya University School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Kuchimaru, Takahiro; Kizaka-Kondoh, Shinae [Department of Biomolecular Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology Graduate School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Yokohama (Japan); Ito, Kengo [National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, Aichi (Japan); Saito, Kiyoshi [Department of Neurosurgery, Fukushima Medical University School of Medicine, Fukushima (Japan); Sugita, Sachi; Hoshino, Tsuneyoshi [MICRON Inc.Medical Facilities Support Department, Aichi (Japan); Wakabayashi, Toshihiko [Department of Neurosurgery, Nagoya University School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan)

    2013-03-29

    Highlights: ► HIF-3α4 is silenced by DNA methylation in meningiomas. ► Induction of HIF-3α4 impaired angiogenesis in meningiomas. ► Induction of HIF-3α4 impaired proliferation and oxygen-dependent metabolism. -- Abstract: Hypoxia inducible factor is a dominant regulator of adaptive cellular responses to hypoxia and controls the expression of a large number of genes regulating angiogenesis as well as metabolism, cell survival, apoptosis, and other cellular functions in an oxygen level-dependent manner. When a neoplasm is able to induce angiogenesis, tumor progression occurs more rapidly because of the nutrients provided by the neovasculature. Meningioma is one of the most hypervascular brain tumors, making anti-angiogenic therapy an attractive novel therapy for these tumors. HIF-3α has been conventionally regarded as a dominant-negative regulator of HIF-1α, and although alternative HIF-3α splicing variants are extensively reported, their specific functions have not yet been determined. In this study, we found that the transcription of HIF-3α4 was silenced by the promoter DNA methylation in meningiomas, and inducible HIF-3α4 impaired angiogenesis, proliferation, and metabolism/oxidation in hypervascular meningiomas. Thus, HIF-3α4 could be a potential molecular target in meningiomas.

  14. MYCN controls an alternative RNA splicing program in high-risk metastatic neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shile; Wei, Jun S; Li, Samuel Q; Badgett, Tom C; Song, Young K; Agarwal, Saurabh; Coarfa, Cristian; Tolman, Catherine; Hurd, Laura; Liao, Hongling; He, Jianbin; Wen, Xinyu; Liu, Zhihui; Thiele, Carol J; Westermann, Frank; Asgharzadeh, Shahab; Seeger, Robert C; Maris, John M; Guidry Auvil, Jamie M; Smith, Malcolm A; Kolaczyk, Eric D; Shohet, Jason; Khan, Javed

    2016-02-28

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the aggressive behavior of MYCN driven neuroblastoma (NBL) is under intense investigation; however, little is known about the impact of this family of transcription factors on the splicing program. Here we used high-throughput RNA sequencing to systematically study the expression of RNA isoforms in stage 4 MYCN-amplified NBL, an aggressive subtype of metastatic NBL. We show that MYCN-amplified NBL tumors display a distinct gene splicing pattern affecting multiple cancer hallmark functions. Six splicing factors displayed unique differential expression patterns in MYCN-amplified tumors and cell lines, and the binding motifs for some of these splicing factors are significantly enriched in differentially-spliced genes. Direct binding of MYCN to promoter regions of the splicing factors PTBP1 and HNRNPA1 detected by ChIP-seq demonstrates that MYCN controls the splicing pattern by direct regulation of the expression of these key splicing factors. Furthermore, high expression of PTBP1 and HNRNPA1 was significantly associated with poor overall survival of stage4 NBL patients (p ≤ 0.05). Knocking down PTBP1, HNRNPA1 and their downstream target PKM2, an isoform of pro-tumor-growth, result in repressed growth of NBL cells. Therefore, our study reveals a novel role of MYCN in controlling global splicing program through regulation of splicing factors in addition to its well-known role in the transcription program. These findings suggest a therapeutically potential to target the key splicing factors or gene isoforms in high-risk NBL with MYCN-amplification.

  15. Evolution of the plasma and tissue kallikreins, and their alternative splicing isoforms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vassiliki Lila Koumandou

    Full Text Available Kallikreins are secreted serine proteases with important roles in human physiology. Human plasma kallikrein, encoded by the KLKB1 gene on locus 4q34-35, functions in the blood coagulation pathway, and in regulating blood pressure. The human tissue kallikrein and kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs have diverse expression patterns and physiological roles, including cancer-related processes such as cell growth regulation, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA, the product of the KLK3 gene, is the most widely used biomarker in clinical practice today. A total of 15 KLKs are encoded by the largest contiguous cluster of protease genes in the human genome (19q13.3-13.4, which makes them ideal for evolutionary analysis of gene duplication events. Previous studies on the evolution of KLKs have traced mammalian homologs as well as a probable early origin of the family in aves, amphibia and reptilia. The aim of this study was to address the evolutionary and functional relationships between tissue KLKs and plasma kallikrein, and to examine the evolution of alternative splicing isoforms. Sequences of plasma and tissue kallikreins and their alternative transcripts were collected from the NCBI and Ensembl databases, and comprehensive phylogenetic analysis was performed by Bayesian as well as maximum likelihood methods. Plasma and tissue kallikreins exhibit high sequence similarity in the trypsin domain (>50%. Phylogenetic analysis indicates an early divergence of KLKB1, which groups closely with plasminogen, chymotrypsin, and complement factor D (CFD, in a monophyletic group distinct from trypsin and the tissue KLKs. Reconstruction of the earliest events leading to the diversification of the tissue KLKs is not well resolved, indicating rapid expansion in mammals. Alternative transcripts of each KLK gene show species-specific divergence, while examination of sequence conservation indicates that many annotated human KLK isoforms

  16. Co-option of the piRNA pathway for germline-specific alternative splicing of C. elegans TOR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberán-Soler, Sergio; Fontrodona, Laura; Ribó, Anna; Lamm, Ayelet T; Iannone, Camilla; Cerón, Julián; Lehner, Ben; Valcárcel, Juan

    2014-09-25

    Many eukaryotic genes contain embedded antisense transcripts and repetitive sequences of unknown function. We report that male germline-specific expression of an antisense transcript contained in an intron of C. elegans Target of Rapamycin (TOR, let-363) is associated with (1) accumulation of endo-small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) against an embedded Helitron transposon and (2) activation of an alternative 3' splice site of TOR. The germline-specific Argonaute proteins PRG-1 and CSR-1, which participate in self/nonself RNA recognition, antagonistically regulate the generation of these endo-siRNAs, TOR mRNA levels, and 3' splice-site selection. Supply of exogenous double-stranded RNA against the region of sense/antisense overlap reverses changes in TOR expression and splicing and suppresses the progressive multigenerational sterility phenotype of prg-1 mutants. We propose that recognition of a "nonself" intronic transposon by endo-siRNAs/the piRNA system provides physiological regulation of expression and alternative splicing of a host gene that, in turn, contributes to the maintenance of germline function across generations.

  17. SRSF3 represses the expression of PDCD4 protein by coordinated regulation of alternative splicing, export and translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seung Kuk; Jeong, Sunjoo

    2016-02-05

    Gene expression is regulated at multiple steps, such as transcription, splicing, export, degradation and translation. Considering diverse roles of SR proteins, we determined whether the tumor-related splicing factor SRSF3 regulates the expression of the tumor-suppressor protein, PDCD4, at multiple steps. As we have reported previously, knockdown of SRSF3 increased the PDCD4 protein level in SW480 colon cancer cells. More interestingly, here we showed that the alternative splicing and the nuclear export of minor isoforms of pdcd4 mRNA were repressed by SRSF3, but the translation step was unaffected. In contrast, only the translation step of the major isoform of pdcd4 mRNA was repressed by SRSF3. Therefore, overexpression of SRSF3 might be relevant to the repression of all isoforms of PDCD4 protein levels in most types of cancer cell. We propose that SRSF3 could act as a coordinator of the expression of PDCD4 protein via two mechanisms on two alternatively spliced mRNA isoforms.

  18. HIV-1 infection induces changes in expression of cellular splicing factors that regulate alternative viral splicing and virus production in macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purcell Damian FJ

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Macrophages are important targets and long-lived reservoirs of HIV-1, which are not cleared of infection by currently available treatments. In the primary monocyte-derived macrophage model of infection, replication is initially productive followed by a decline in virion output over ensuing weeks, coincident with a decrease in the levels of the essential viral transactivator protein Tat. We investigated two possible mechanisms in macrophages for regulation of viral replication, which appears to be primarily regulated at the level of tat mRNA: 1 differential mRNA stability, used by cells and some viruses for the rapid regulation of gene expression and 2 control of HIV-1 alternative splicing, which is essential for optimal viral replication. Results Following termination of transcription at increasing times after infection in macrophages, we found that tat mRNA did indeed decay more rapidly than rev or nef mRNA, but with similar kinetics throughout infection. In addition, tat mRNA decayed at least as rapidly in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Expression of cellular splicing factors in uninfected and infected macrophage cultures from the same donor showed an inverse pattern over time between enhancing factors (members of the SR family of RNA binding proteins and inhibitory factors (members of the hnRNP family. While levels of the SR protein SC35 were greatly up-regulated in the first week or two after infection, hnRNPs of the A/B and H groups were down-regulated. Around the peak of virus production in each culture, SC35 expression declined to levels in uninfected cells or lower, while the hnRNPs increased to control levels or above. We also found evidence for increased cytoplasmic expression of SC35 following long-term infection. Conclusion While no evidence of differential regulation of tat mRNA decay was found in macrophages following HIV-1 infection, changes in the balance of cellular splicing factors which regulate alternative

  19. Differential localization and high expression of SURVIVIN splice variants in human embryonic stem cells but not in differentiated cells implicate a role for SURVIVIN in pluripotency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber N. Mull

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The BIRC5 gene encodes the oncofetal protein SURVIVIN, as well as four additional splice variants (ΔEx3, 2B, 3B and 2α. SURVIVIN, an inhibitor of apoptosis, is also a chromosomal passenger protein (CPP. Previous results have demonstrated that SURVIVIN is expressed at high levels in embryonic stem cells and inhibition of SURVIVIN function results in apoptosis, however these studies have not investigated the other four splice variants. In this study, we demonstrate that all variants are expressed at significantly higher levels in human embryonic stem (hES cells than in differentiated cells. We examined the subcellular localization of the three most highly expressed variants. SURVIVIN displayed canonical CPP localization in mitotic cells and cytoplasmic localization in interphase cells. In contrast, SURVIVIN–ΔEx3 and SURVIVIN–2B did not localize as a CPP; SURVIVIN–ΔEx3 was found constitutively in the nucleus while SURVIVIN–2B was distributed along the chromosomes during mitosis and also to the mitotic spindle poles. We used inducible shRNA against SURVIVIN to inhibit expression in a titratable fashion. Using this system, we reduced the mRNA levels of these three variants to approx. 40%, resulting in a concomitant reduction of OCT4 and NANOG mRNA, suggesting a role for the SURVIVIN variants in pluripotency.

  20. Impairment of alternative splice sites defining a novel gammaretroviral exon within gag modifies the oncogenic properties of Akv murine leukemia virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Annette Balle; Lund, Anders H; Kunder, Sandra

    2007-01-01

    to be associated with specific tumor diagnoses or individual viral mutants. CONCLUSION: We present here the first example of a doubly spliced transcript within the group of gammaretroviruses, and we show that mutation of the alternative splice sites that define this novel RNA product change the oncogenic potential......BACKGROUND: Mutations of an alternative splice donor site located within the gag region has previously been shown to broaden the pathogenic potential of the T-lymphomagenic gammaretrovirus Moloney murine leukemia virus, while the equivalent mutations in the erythroleukemia inducing Friend murine...... leukemia virus seem to have no influence on the disease-inducing potential of this virus. In the present study we investigate the splice pattern as well as the possible effects of mutating the alternative splice sites on the oncogenic properties of the B-lymphomagenic Akv murine leukemia virus. RESULTS...

  1. Assessing the impact of alternative splicing on the diversity and evolution of the proteome in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Severing, E.I.

    2011-01-01

    Splicing is one of the key processing steps during the maturation of a gene’s primary transcript into the mRNA molecule used as a template for protein production. Splicing involves the removal of segments called introns and re-joining of the remaining segments called exons. It is by now well e

  2. Analysis of the expression of SDF-1 splicing variants in human colorectal cancer and normal mucosa tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allami, Risala Hussain; Graf, Claudine; Martchenko, Ksenia; Voss, Beatrice; Becker, Marc; Berger, Martin R; Galle, Peter R; Theobald, Matthias; Wehler, Thomas C; Schimanski, Carl C

    2016-03-01

    C-X-C motif chemokine ligand 12 (CXCL12), also termed stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) is a small protein 8-14 kDa in length that is expressed as six isoforms, consisting of SDF-1α, SDF-1β, SDF-1γ, SDF-1δ, SDF-1ε and SDF-1θ. All six isoforms are encoded by the single CXCL12 gene on chromosome 10. This gene regulates leukocyte trafficking and is variably expressed in a number of normal and cancer tissues. The potential role of the novel CXCL12 splice variants as components of the CXCR4 axis in cancer development is not fully understood. The present study aimed to analyze the expression profile of the various SDF-1 isoforms and SDF-1 polymorphisms, and the association with the clinicopathological features and overall survival of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). SDF-1 polymorphism analysis was performed using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis in 73 histologically confirmed human CRC tissue samples at various stages of disease. The expression pattern of the SDF-1 isoforms was analyzed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction in 40 histologically confirmed human CRC tissue samples obtained at various stages of disease, as well as in matched adjacent normal mucosa samples. The presence of the CXCL12 gene polymorphism rs1801157 demonstrated an association with local progression of the primary tumor, as indicated by the T stage. The frequency of the GG genotype was slightly increased in patients with stage 3 and 4 tumors (78.0%) compared with the incidence of the GA/AA genotype (69.5%; P=0.067). The expression of SDF-1β was associated with the presence of metastases (P=0.0656) and the expression of SDF-1γ was significantly associated with tumor size (P=0.0423). The present study is the first to analyze the association between the expression profile of the chemokine CXCL12 splice variants in human CRC tissues and their clinical relevance. The present results reveal that the CXCL12 G801A polymorphism is a low

  3. Alternative Splicing Generates a Diacylglycerol Kinase α Transcript That Acts as a Dominant-Negative Modulator of Superoxide Production in Localized Aggressive Periodontitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Eraldo L.; Kantarci, Alpdogan I.; Hasturk, Hatice; Van Dyke, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Diacylglycerol (DAG), levels of which are tightly regulated by diacylglycerol kinases (DGKs), is a lipid mediator linked to key biologic functions. Members of the DGK family undergo alternative splicing, generating the protein diversity necessary to control different intracellular DAG pools. DGKα function is altered in polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) of patients with localized aggressive periodontitis (LAgP), suggesting a genetic basis. Here, the authors assess DGKα spliced transcripts in human LAgP neutrophils. Methods In an expression library of a patient with LAgP, PMNs were screened for different DGKα transcripts. Real-time polymerase chain reaction and in vitro expression assays were performed to assess the fate of different transcripts on protein translocation and superoxide production in human leukemia cells (HL-60) and COS-7 cells. Results A DGKα transcript that lacks exon 10 (DGKαΔ10) and generates a premature stop codon and a truncated protein was identified as being upregulated in LAgP neutrophils. In vitro assays revealed that DGKαΔ10 translocation occurred even in the absence of important regulatory motifs. Transfection of HL-60 neutrophil-like cells with the DGKαΔ10 spliced variant induced an increase in the stimulated production of su-peroxide anion replicating the phenotype of LAgP PMNs. Conclusion DGKαΔ10 can act as a dominant-negative transcript that can modulate superoxide production and provides an example of genetic regulation of the inflammatory response that may be relevant to human inflammatory diseases such as LAgP. J Periodontol 2014;85:934-943. PMID:24171497

  4. Modulation of Dnmt3b function in vitro by interactions with Dnmt3L, Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b splice variants

    OpenAIRE

    Van Emburgh, Beth O.; Robertson, Keith D.

    2011-01-01

    DNA methylation, an essential regulator of transcription and chromatin structure, is established and maintained by the coordinated action of three DNA methyltransferases: DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B, and the inactive accessory factor DNMT3L. Disruptions in DNMT3B function are linked to carcinogenesis and genetic disease. DNMT3B is also highly alternatively spliced in a tissue- and disease-specific manner. The impact of intra-DNMT3 interactions and alternative splicing on the function of DNMT3 fa...

  5. Identification of a chemical inhibitor for nuclear speckle formation: Implications for the function of nuclear speckles in regulation of alternative pre-mRNA splicing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurogi, Yutaro; Matsuo, Yota; Mihara, Yuki; Yagi, Hiroaki; Shigaki-Miyamoto, Kaya; Toyota, Syukichi; Azuma, Yuko [Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Igarashi, Masayuki [Laboratory of Disease Biology, Institute of Microbial Chemistry, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 141-0021 (Japan); Tani, Tokio, E-mail: ttani@sci.kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan)

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • We identified tubercidin as a compound inducing aberrant formation of the speckles. • Tubercidin causes delocalization of poly (A){sup +}RNAs from nuclear speckles. • Tubercidin induces dispersion of splicing factors from nuclear speckles. • Tubercidin affects alternative pre-mRNA splicing. • Nuclear speckles play a role in regulation of alternative pre-mRNA splicing. - Abstract: Nuclear speckles are subnuclear structures enriched with RNA processing factors and poly (A){sup +} RNAs comprising mRNAs and poly (A){sup +} non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). Nuclear speckles are thought to be involved in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression, such as pre-mRNA splicing. By screening 3585 culture extracts of actinomycetes with in situ hybridization using an oligo dT probe, we identified tubercidin, an analogue of adenosine, as an inhibitor of speckle formation, which induces the delocalization of poly (A){sup +} RNA and dispersion of splicing factor SRSF1/SF2 from nuclear speckles in HeLa cells. Treatment with tubercidin also decreased steady-state MALAT1 long ncRNA, thought to be involved in the retention of SRSF1/SF2 in nuclear speckles. In addition, we found that tubercidin treatment promoted exon skipping in the alternative splicing of Clk1 pre-mRNA. These results suggest that nuclear speckles play a role in modulating the concentration of splicing factors in the nucleoplasm to regulate alternative pre-mRNA splicing.

  6. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of a mouse gene upregulated by lipopolysaccharide treatment reveals alternative splicing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Kejun; Chen, Yaoming; Dai, Zongming; Bi, Yuan; Cai, Tongjian [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032, Shaanxi Province (China); Hou, Lichao [Department of Anesthesiology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032, Shaanxi Province (China); Chai, Yubo; Song, Qinghe; Chen, Sumin [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032, Shaanxi Province (China); Luo, Wenjing, E-mail: luowenj@fmmu.edu.cn [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032, Shaanxi Province (China); Chen, Jingyuan, E-mail: jy_chen@fmmu.edu.cn [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032, Shaanxi Province (China)

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of mouse cells with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) potently initiates an inflammatory response, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. We therefore sought to characterize cDNA sequences of a new mouse LPS-responsive gene, and to evaluate the effects of MLrg. Full-length cDNAs were obtained from LPS-treated NIH3T3 cells. We report that the MLrg gene produces two alternative splice products (GenBank Accession Nos. (DQ316984) and (DQ320011)), respectively, encoding MLrgW and MLrgS polypeptides. Both proteins contain zinc finger and leucine zipper domains and are thus potential regulators of transcription. Expression of MLrgW and MLrgS were robustly upregulated following LPS treatment, and the proteins were localized predominantly in the nuclear membrane and cytoplasm. In stable transfectants over-expressing MLrgW the proportion of cells in G1 phase was significantly reduced, while in cells over-expressing MLrgS the proportion of cells in G2 was significantly increased; both proteins are thus potential regulators of cell cycle progression. Upregulation of MLrgW and MLrgS may be an important component of the LPS inflammatory pathway and of the host response to infection with GNB.

  7. Genome-wide analysis of alternative splicing during human heart development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, He; Chen, Yanmei; Li, Xinzhong; Chen, Guojun; Zhong, Lintao; Chen, Gangbing; Liao, Yulin; Liao, Wangjun; Bin, Jianping

    2016-10-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) drives determinative changes during mouse heart development. Recent high-throughput technological advancements have facilitated genome-wide AS, while its analysis in human foetal heart transition to the adult stage has not been reported. Here, we present a high-resolution global analysis of AS transitions between human foetal and adult hearts. RNA-sequencing data showed extensive AS transitions occurred between human foetal and adult hearts, and AS events occurred more frequently in protein-coding genes than in long non-coding RNA (lncRNA). A significant difference of AS patterns was found between foetal and adult hearts. The predicted difference in AS events was further confirmed using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis of human heart samples. Functional foetal-specific AS event analysis showed enrichment associated with cell proliferation-related pathways including cell cycle, whereas adult-specific AS events were associated with protein synthesis. Furthermore, 42.6% of foetal-specific AS events showed significant changes in gene expression levels between foetal and adult hearts. Genes exhibiting both foetal-specific AS and differential expression were highly enriched in cell cycle-associated functions. In conclusion, we provided a genome-wide profiling of AS transitions between foetal and adult hearts and proposed that AS transitions and deferential gene expression may play determinative roles in human heart development.

  8. Role of six single nucleotide polymorphisms, risk factors in coronary disease, in OLR1 alternative splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejedor, J Ramón; Tilgner, Hagen; Iannone, Camilla; Guigó, Roderic; Valcárcel, Juan

    2015-06-01

    The OLR1 gene encodes the oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor (LOX-1), which is responsible for the cellular uptake of oxidized LDL (Ox-LDL), foam cell formation in atheroma plaques and atherosclerotic plaque rupture. Alternative splicing (AS) of OLR1 exon 5 generates two protein isoforms with antagonistic functions in Ox-LDL uptake. Previous work identified six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in linkage disequilibrium that influence the inclusion levels of OLR1 exon 5 and correlate with the risk of cardiovascular disease. Here we use minigenes to recapitulate the effects of two allelic series (Low- and High-Risk) on OLR1 AS and identify one SNP in intron 4 (rs3736234) as the main contributor to the differences in exon 5 inclusion, while the other SNPs in the allelic series attenuate the drastic effects of this key SNP. Bioinformatic, proteomic, mutational and functional high-throughput analyses allowed us to define regulatory sequence motifs and identify SR protein family members (SRSF1, SRSF2) and HMGA1 as factors involved in the regulation of OLR1 AS. Our results suggest that antagonism between SRSF1 and SRSF2/HMGA1, and differential recognition of their regulatory motifs depending on the identity of the rs3736234 polymorphism, influence OLR1 exon 5 inclusion and the efficiency of Ox-LDL uptake, with potential implications for atherosclerosis and coronary disease.

  9. Effect of Alternative Splicing of VLDL Receptor on its Ligand Binding and Internalization Capability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-Hong LI; Jun TIAN; Tao CHEN; Yi-Qiang ZONG; Yu WANG; Pu YANG; Shen QU

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1 Introduction Very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDL-R) is a main receptor mediating the uptake of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein(TRL), so it is in all probability to play an important role in the development of atherosclerosis(AS). On account of alternative splicing of O-linked carbohydrate chains in extracellular fragment, VLDL-R can be classified into two isoforms: VLDL-R Ⅰ with O-linker sugar region, while VLDL-R Ⅱ without this domain[1].But so far, the difference of their function and biological significance between two isoforms, especially those of VLDL-R Ⅱ has not been clarified. In our research, ldlA7 cell strains stably expressing two isoforms of VLDL-R were obtained through gene clone technology. Binding and internalization of the natural ligands (VLDL and β-VLDL)of two types VLDL-R and their roles in the formation of foam cells were compared to clarify the difference between two isoforms of VLDL-R, and elucidate their roles in the metabolism of lipoprotein and development of AS.

  10. Genome-wide analysis of alternative splicing during human heart development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, He; Chen, Yanmei; Li, Xinzhong; Chen, Guojun; Zhong, Lintao; Chen, Gangbing; Liao, Yulin; Liao, Wangjun; Bin, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) drives determinative changes during mouse heart development. Recent high-throughput technological advancements have facilitated genome-wide AS, while its analysis in human foetal heart transition to the adult stage has not been reported. Here, we present a high-resolution global analysis of AS transitions between human foetal and adult hearts. RNA-sequencing data showed extensive AS transitions occurred between human foetal and adult hearts, and AS events occurred more frequently in protein-coding genes than in long non-coding RNA (lncRNA). A significant difference of AS patterns was found between foetal and adult hearts. The predicted difference in AS events was further confirmed using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis of human heart samples. Functional foetal-specific AS event analysis showed enrichment associated with cell proliferation-related pathways including cell cycle, whereas adult-specific AS events were associated with protein synthesis. Furthermore, 42.6% of foetal-specific AS events showed significant changes in gene expression levels between foetal and adult hearts. Genes exhibiting both foetal-specific AS and differential expression were highly enriched in cell cycle-associated functions. In conclusion, we provided a genome-wide profiling of AS transitions between foetal and adult hearts and proposed that AS transitions and deferential gene expression may play determinative roles in human heart development. PMID:27752099

  11. MITA/STING and Its Alternative Splicing Isoform MRP Restrict Hepatitis B Virus Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuhui; Zhao, Kaitao; Su, Xi; Lu, Lu; Zhao, He; Zhang, Xianwen; Wang, Yun; Wu, Chunchen; Chen, Jizheng; Zhou, Yuan; Hu, Xue; Wang, Yanyi; Lu, Mengji; Chen, Xinwen; Pei, Rongjuan

    2017-01-01

    An efficient clearance of hepatitis B virus (HBV) requires the coordinated work of both the innate and adaptive immune responses. MITA/STING, an adapter protein of the innate immune signaling pathways, plays a key role in regulating innate and adaptive immune responses to DNA virus infection. Previously, we identified an alternatively spliced isoform of MITA/STING, called MITA-related protein (MRP), and found that MRP could specifically block MITA-mediated interferon (IFN) induction while retaining the ability to activate NF-κB. Here, we asked whether MITA/STING and MRP were able to control the HBV replication. Both MITA/STING and MRP significantly inhibited HBV replication in vitro. MITA overexpression stimulated IRF3-IFN pathway; while MRP overexpression activated NF-κB pathway, suggesting these two isoforms may inhibit HBV replication through different ways. Using a hydrodynamic injection (HI) mouse model, we found that HBV replication was reduced following MITA/STING and MRP expression vectors in mice and was enhanced by the knockout of MITA/STING (MITA/STING-/-). The HBV specific humoral and CD8+ T cell responses were impaired in MITA/STING deficient mice, suggesting the participation of MITA/STING in the initiation of host adaptive immune responses. In summary, our data suggest that MITA/STING and MRP contribute to HBV control via modulation of the innate and adaptive responses.

  12. An alternative splicing isoform of MITA antagonizes MITA-mediated induction of type I IFNs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Honghe; Pei, Rongjuan; Zhu, Wandi; Zeng, Rui; Wang, Yun; Wang, Yanyi; Lu, Mengji; Chen, Xinwen

    2014-02-01

    Mediator of IFN regulatory transcription factor 3 activation (MITA) is an important adaptor protein to mediate the induction of type I IFNs. In this study, we identified an alternatively spliced isoform of MITA lacking exon 7, termed MITA-related protein (MRP). MRP shares the N-terminal portion aa 1-253 with MITA but possesses a unique 30-aa sequence at the carboxyl terminal part, therefore lacking the conserved domains including TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1) and cyclic diguanylate binding domain. MRP is expressed in multiple tissues and distinct cell lines. Overexpression of MRP inhibited MITA-mediated activation of IFN-β promoter by sendai virus infection and cyclic diguanylate treatment but enhanced that in HSV-1 infection. Interestingly, MRP expression was reduced after Sendai virus infection but was upregulated after HSV-1 infection. Overexpression of MRP inhibited MITA-mediated induction of IFN-β via TBK1-IFN regulatory transcription factor 3 by disrupting the MITA-TBK1 interaction. However, NF-κB pathway was still activated by MRP, as MRP retained the ability to interact with inducible inhibitor of NF-κB (iκB) kinase. Thus, MRP acts as a dominant negative regulator of MITA-mediated induction of IFN production.

  13. Structural Insights into RNA Recognition by the Alternate-Splicing Regulator CUG-Binding Protein 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M Teplova; J Song; H Gaw; A Teplov; D Patel

    2011-12-31

    CUG-binding protein 1 (CUGBP1) regulates multiple aspects of nuclear and cytoplasmic mRNA processing, with implications for onset of myotonic dystrophy. CUGBP1 harbors three RRM domains and preferentially targets UGU-rich mRNA elements. We describe crystal structures of CUGBP1 RRM1 and tandem RRM1/2 domains bound to RNAs containing tandem UGU(U/G) elements. Both RRM1 in RRM1-RNA and RRM2 in RRM1/2-RNA complexes use similar principles to target UGU(U/G) elements, with recognition mediated by face-to-edge stacking and water-mediated hydrogen-bonding networks. The UG step adopts a left-handed Z-RNA conformation, with the syn guanine recognized through Hoogsteen edge-protein backbone hydrogen-bonding interactions. NMR studies on the RRM1/2-RNA complex establish that both RRM domains target tandem UGUU motifs in solution, whereas filter-binding assays identify a preference for recognition of GU over AU or GC steps. We discuss the implications of CUGBP1-mediated targeting and sequestration of UGU(U/G) elements on pre-mRNA alternative-splicing regulation, translational regulation, and mRNA decay.

  14. Exploring Codon Usage Patterns of Alternatively Spliced Genes in Human Chromosome 1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马飞; 庄永龙; 黄颖; 李衍达

    2004-01-01

    In this study, 414 whole protein-coding sequences (238 004 codons) of alternatively spliced genes of human chromosome 1 have been employed to explore the patterns of codon usage bias among genes. Overall codon usage data analysis indicates that G- and C-ending codons are predominant in the genes. The base usage in all three codon positions suggests a selection-mutation balance. Multivariate statistical analysis reveals that the codon usage variation has a strong positive correlation with the expressivities of the genes (r=0.5790, P<0.0001). All 27 codons identified as optimal are G- and C-ending codons.Correlation analysis shows a strong negative correlation between the gene length and codon adaptation index value (r=-0.2252, P<0.0001), and a significantly positive correlation between the gene length and Nc values (r=0.1876, P<0.0001). These results suggest that the comparatively shorter genes in the genes have higher codon usage bias to maximize translational efficiency, and selection may also contribute to the reduction of highly expressed proteins.

  15. Short antisense-locked nucleic acids (all-LNAs) correct alternative splicing abnormalities in myotonic dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtkowiak-Szlachcic, Agnieszka; Taylor, Katarzyna; Stepniak-Konieczna, Ewa; Sznajder, Lukasz J; Mykowska, Agnieszka; Sroka, Joanna; Thornton, Charles A; Sobczak, Krzysztof

    2015-03-31

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is an autosomal dominant multisystemic disorder caused by expansion of CTG triplet repeats in 3'-untranslated region of DMPK gene. The pathomechanism of DM1 is driven by accumulation of toxic transcripts containing expanded CUG repeats (CUG(exp)) in nuclear foci which sequester several factors regulating RNA metabolism, such as Muscleblind-like proteins (MBNLs). In this work, we utilized very short chemically modified antisense oligonucleotides composed exclusively of locked nucleic acids (all-LNAs) complementary to CUG repeats, as potential therapeutic agents against DM1. Our in vitro data demonstrated that very short, 8- or 10-unit all-LNAs effectively bound the CUG repeat RNA and prevented the formation of CUG(exp)/MBNL complexes. In proliferating DM1 cells as well as in skeletal muscles of DM1 mouse model the all-LNAs induced the reduction of the number and size of CUG(exp) foci and corrected MBNL-sensitive alternative splicing defects with high efficacy and specificity. The all-LNAs had low impact on the cellular level of CUG(exp)-containing transcripts and did not affect the expression of other transcripts with short CUG repeats. Our data strongly indicate that short all-LNAs complementary to CUG repeats are a promising therapeutic tool against DM1.

  16. Characterization of the Sesbania rostrata Phytochelatin Synthase Gene: Alternative Splicing and Function of Four Isoforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng-Fu Xu

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Phytochelatins (PCs play an important role in detoxification of heavy metals in plants. PCs are synthesized from glutathione by phytochelatin synthase (PCS, a dipeptidyltransferase. Sesbania rostrata is a tropical legume plant that can tolerate high concentrations of Cd and Zn. In this study, the S. rostrata PCS gene (SrPCS and cDNAs were isolated and characterized. Southern blot and sequence analysis revealed that a single copy of the SrPCS gene occurs in the S. rostrata genome, and produces four different SrPCS mRNAs and proteins, SrPCS1-SrPCS4, by alternative splicing of the SrPCS pre-mRNA. The SrPCS1 and SrPCS3 proteins conferred Cd tolerance when expressed in yeast cells, whereas the SrPCS2 and SrPCS4 proteins, which lack the catalytic triad and the N-terminal domains, did not. These results suggested that SrPCS1 and SrPCS3 have potential applications in genetic engineering of plants for enhancing heavy metal tolerance and phytoremediation of contaminated soils.

  17. Alarin but not its alternative-splicing form, GALP (Galanin-like peptide) has antimicrobial activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wada, Akihiro, E-mail: a-wada@nagasaki-u.ac.jp [Department of Bacteriology, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 8528523 (Japan); Wong, Pooi-Fong [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Hojo, Hironobu [Department of Applied Biochemistry, Institute of Glycoscience, Tokai University, Kanagawa 2591292 (Japan); Hasegawa, Makoto [Department of Bioscience, Faculty of Bioscience, Nagahama Institute of Bio-Science and Technology, Shiga 5260829 (Japan); Ichinose, Akitoyo [Electron Microscopy Shop Central Laboratory, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 8528523 (Japan); Llanes, Rafael [Institute Pedro Kouri, Havana (Cuba); Kubo, Yoshinao [Division of Cytokine Signaling, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 8528523 (Japan); Senba, Masachika [Department of Pathology, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 8528523 (Japan); Ichinose, Yoshio [Kenya Research Station, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 8528523 (Japan)

    2013-05-03

    Highlights: • Alarin inhibits the growth of E. coli but not S. aureus. • Alarin’s potency is comparable to LL-37 in inhibiting the growth of E. coli. • Alarin can cause bacterial membrane blebbing. • Alalin does not induce hemolysis on erythrocytes. -- Abstract: Alarin is an alternative-splicing form of GALP (galanin-like peptide). It shares only 5 conserved amino acids at the N-terminal region with GALP which is involved in a diverse range of normal brain functions. This study seeks to investigate whether alarin has additional functions due to its differences from GALP. Here, we have shown using a radial diffusion assay that alarin but not GALP inhibited the growth of Escherichia coli (strain ML-35). The conserved N-terminal region, however, remained essential for the antimicrobial activity of alarin as truncated peptides showed reduced killing effect. Moreover, alarin inhibited the growth of E. coli in a similar potency as human cathelicidin LL-37, a well-studied antimicrobial peptide. Electron microscopy further showed that alarin induced bacterial membrane blebbing but unlike LL-37, it did not cause hemolysis of erythrocytes. In addition, alarin is only active against the gram-negative bacteria, E. coli but not the gram-positive bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus. Thus, these data suggest that alarin has potentials as an antimicrobial and should be considered for the development in human therapeutics.

  18. Differential expression of filamin B splice variants in giant cell tumor cells

    OpenAIRE

    Tsui, Joseph Chi-Ching; Lau, Carol Po-Ying; Cheung, Alex Chun; Wong, Kwok-chuen; Huang, Lin; Tsui, Stephen Kwok-Wing; KUMTA, SHEKHAR MADHUKAR

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell tumor of bone (GCT) is the most commonly reported non-malignant bone tumor in Hong Kong. This kind of tumor usually affects people aged 20–40 years. Also, it is well known for recurrence locally, especially when the tumor cannot be removed completely. Filamins are actin-binding proteins which contain three family members, filamin A, B and C. They are the products of three different genes, FLNA, FLNB and FLNC, which can generate various transcript variants in different cell types. I...

  19. The effects of multiple features of alternatively spliced exons on the KA/KS ratio test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Feng-Chi

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The evolution of alternatively spliced exons (ASEs is of primary interest because these exons are suggested to be a major source of functional diversity of proteins. Many exon features have been suggested to affect the evolution of ASEs. However, previous studies have relied on the KA/KS ratio test without taking into consideration information sufficiency (i.e., exon length > 75 bp, cross-species divergence > 5% of the studied exons, leading to potentially biased interpretations. Furthermore, which exon feature dominates the results of the KA/KS ratio test and whether multiple exon features have additive effects have remained unexplored. Results In this study, we collect two different datasets for analysis – the ASE dataset (which includes lineage-specific ASEs and conserved ASEs and the ACE dataset (which includes only conserved ASEs. We first show that information sufficiency can significantly affect the interpretation of relationship between exons features and the KA/KS ratio test results. After discarding exons with insufficient information, we use a Boolean method to analyze the relationship between test results and four exon features (namely length, protein domain overlapping, inclusion level, and exonic splicing enhancer (ESE frequency for the ASE dataset. We demonstrate that length and protein domain overlapping are dominant factors, and they have similar impacts on test results of ASEs. In addition, despite the weak impacts of inclusion level and ESE motif frequency when considered individually, combination of these two factors still have minor additive effects on test results. However, the ACE dataset shows a slightly different result in that inclusion level has a marginally significant effect on test results. Lineage-specific ASEs may have contributed to the difference. Overall, in both ASEs and ACEs, protein domain overlapping is the most dominant exon feature while ESE frequency is the weakest one in affecting

  20. A sugarcane R2R3-MYB transcription factor gene is alternatively spliced during drought stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jinlong; Ling, Hui; Ma, Jingjing; Chen, Yun; Su, Yachun; Lin, Qingliang; Gao, Shiwu; Wang, Hengbo; Que, Youxiong; Xu, Liping

    2017-01-01

    MYB transcription factors of the R2R3-MYB family have been shown to play important roles in many plant processes. A sugarcane R2R3-MYB gene (ScMYB2) and its two alternative forms of transcript (ScMYB2S1 and ScMYB2S2) were identified in this study. The deduced protein of ScMYB2S1 is a typical plant R2R3-MYB protein, while ScMYB2S2 encodes a truncated protein. Real-time qPCR analysis revealed that ScMYB2S1 is suppressed under PEG-simulated drought stress in sugarcane, while ScMYB2S2 is induced at later treatment stage. A senescence symptom was observed when ScMYB2S1 was injected into tobacco leaves mediated by Agrobacterium, but no symptom for ScMYB2S2. Further investigation showed that the expression levels of 4 senescence-associated genes, NtPR-1a, NtNYC1, NtCAT3 and NtABRE, were markedly induced in tobacco leaves after ScMYB2S1-injection, while they were not sensitive to ScMYB2S2-injection. Moreover, MDA and proline were also investigated after injection. Similarly, MDA and proline levels were induced by ABA and ScMYB2S1, while inhibited by ScMYB2S2. We propose that ScMYB2, by alternatively splicing two transcripts (ScMYB2S1 and ScMYB2S2), is involved in an ABA-mediated leaf senescence signaling pathway and play positive role in respond to drought-induced senescence in sugarcane. The results of this study provide information for further research in sugarcane stress processes. PMID:28167824

  1. Misregulation of Alternative Splicing in a Mouse Model of Rett Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronghui Li

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the human MECP2 gene cause Rett syndrome (RTT, a severe neurodevelopmental disorder that predominantly affects girls. Despite decades of work, the molecular function of MeCP2 is not fully understood. Here we report a systematic identification of MeCP2-interacting proteins in the mouse brain. In addition to transcription regulators, we found that MeCP2 physically interacts with several modulators of RNA splicing, including LEDGF and DHX9. These interactions are disrupted by RTT causing mutations, suggesting that they may play a role in RTT pathogenesis. Consistent with the idea, deep RNA sequencing revealed misregulation of hundreds of splicing events in the cortex of Mecp2 knockout mice. To reveal the functional consequence of altered RNA splicing due to the loss of MeCP2, we focused on the regulation of the splicing of the flip/flop exon of Gria2 and other AMPAR genes. We found a significant splicing shift in the flip/flop exon toward the flop inclusion, leading to a faster decay in the AMPAR gated current and altered synaptic transmission. In summary, our study identified direct physical interaction between MeCP2 and splicing factors, a novel MeCP2 target gene, and established functional connection between a specific RNA splicing change and synaptic phenotypes in RTT mice. These results not only help our understanding of the molecular function of MeCP2, but also reveal potential drug targets for future therapies.

  2. PTBP1-dependent regulation of USP5 alternative RNA splicing plays a role in glioblastoma tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izaguirre, Daisy I; Zhu, Wen; Hai, Tao; Cheung, Hannah C; Krahe, Ralf; Cote, Gilbert J

    2012-11-01

    Aberrant RNA splicing is thought to play a key role in tumorigenesis. The assessment of its specific contributions is limited by the complexity of information derived from genome-wide array-based approaches. We describe how performing splicing factor-specific comparisons using both tumor and cell line data sets may more readily identify physiologically relevant tumor-specific splicing events. Affymetrix exon array data derived from glioblastoma (GBM) tumor samples with defined polypyrimidine tract-binding protein 1 (PTBP1) levels were compared with data from U251 GBM cells with and without PTBP1 knockdown. This comparison yielded overlapping gene sets that comprised only a minor fraction of each data set. The identification of a novel GBM-specific splicing event involving the USP5 gene led us to further examine its role in tumorigenesis. In GBM, USP5 generates a shorter isoform 2 through recognition of a 5' splice site within exon 15. Production of the USP5 isoform 2 was strongly correlated with PTBP1 expression in GBM tumor samples and cell lines. Splicing regulation was consistent with the presence of an intronic PTBP1 binding site and could be modulated through antisense targeting of the isoform 2 splice site to force expression of isoform 1 in GBM cells. The forced expression of USP5 isoform 1 in two GBM cell lines inhibited cell growth and migration, implying an important role for USP5 splicing in gliomagenesis. These results support a role for aberrant RNA splicing in tumorigenesis and suggest that changes in relatively few genes may be sufficient to drive the process.

  3. Gene regulation, alternative splicing, and posttranslational modification of troponin subunits in cardiac development and adaptation: a focused review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Juan-Juan; Jin, Jian-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Troponin plays a central role in regulating the contraction and relaxation of vertebrate striated muscles. This review focuses on the isoform gene regulation, alternative RNA splicing, and posttranslational modifications of troponin subunits in cardiac development and adaptation. Transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulations such as phosphorylation and proteolysis modifications, and structure-function relationships of troponin subunit proteins are summarized. The physiological and pathophysiological significances are discussed for impacts on cardiac muscle contractility, heart function, and adaptations in health and diseases.

  4. Expression analysis of a novel pyridoxal kinase messenger RNA splice variant, PKL, in oil rape suffering abiotic stress and phytohormones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Pyridoxal kinase is key enzyme for the biosynthesis of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate, the biologically active form of vitamin B6, in the salvage pathway. A pyridoxal kinase gene, BnPKL (GenBank accession No. DQ463962), was isolated from oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) following water stress through rapid amplification of complementary DNA (cDNA) ends. The results showed that the gene had two splice variants: PKL and PKL2. PKL, the long cDNA, encodes a 334 amino acid protein with a complete ATP-binding site, pyridoxai kinase-binding site and dimer interface site of a pyridoxal kinase, while PKL2, the short cDNA, lacked a partial domain. Southern blot showed that there were two copies in Brassica napus. The expression of BnPKL cDNA could rescue the mutant phenotype of Escherichia coil defective in pyridoxai kinase. Real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed that the relative abundance of two transcripts are modulated by development and environmental stresses.Abscisic acid and NaCI were inclined to decrease PKL expression, but HO and cold temperatures induced the PKL expression. In addition, the PKL expression could be transiently induced by jasmonate acid at an early stage, abscisic acid, salicylic acid and jasmonate acid enhanced the PKL expression in roots. Our results demonstrated that BnPKL was a pyridoxal kinase involved in responses to biotic and abiotic stresses.

  5. Localization and Regulation of the N Terminal Splice Variant of PGC-1α in Adult Skeletal Muscle Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiansheng Shen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The transcriptional coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α regulates expression of genes for metabolism and muscle fiber type. Recently, a novel splice variant of PGC-1α (NT-PGC-1α, amino acids 1–270 was cloned and found to be expressed in muscle. Here we use Flag-tagged NT-PGC-1α to examine the subcellular localization and regulation of NT-PGC-1α in skeletal muscle fibers. Flag-NT-PGC-1α is located predominantly in the myoplasm. Nuclear NT-PGC-1α can be increased by activation of protein kinase A. Activation of p38 MAPK by muscle activity or of AMPK had no effect on the subcellular distribution of NT-PGC-1α. Inhibition of CRM1-mediated export only caused relatively slow nuclear accumulation of NT-PGC-1α, indicating that nuclear export of NT-PGC-1α may be mediated by both CRM1-dependent and -independent pathways. Together these results suggest that the regulation of NT-PGC-1α in muscle fibers may be very different from that of the full-length PGC-1α, which is exclusively nuclear.

  6. A Splice Variant of GNB3 and Peripheral Polyneuropathy in Type 1 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitry A. Chistiakov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abnormalities in G protein-mediated signal transduction could be involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN. Here we test whether the GNB3 C825T variant confers susceptibility to DPN in type 1 diabetes (T1D mellitus. The C825T marker of GNB3 was genotyped in genomic DNA from blood isolated from a total of 213 Russian T1D patients 100 of whom had DPN. Compared to carriers of the wild-type genotype C/C, diabetic subjects with genotypes T/T had significantly increased risk to develop DPN (Odds Ratio (OR of 4.4 (p = 0.001. The adjustment for confounders (age, sex, body mass index, cigarette smoking, and level of reduced glutathione resulted in increase of the OR value up to 4.72 (p = 8.9 × 10-3. The further adjustment for hypertension abolished the association between the GNB3 C825T variant and DPN (OR = 1.95, p = 0.18. Non-complicated subjects homozygous for T/T showed decreased levels of reduced glutathione (T/T: 69 ± 19 vs. C/T: 74 ± 19 vs. C/C: 77 ± 17 μmol/l, p = 0.009. Compared to other GNB3 variants, carriers of the T/T genotype had elevated systolic blood pressure (SBP in complicated (T/T: 115.8 ± 9.1 vs. C/T: 113.3 ± 8.2 vs. C/C: 109.5 ± 8.7 mm/Hg, p = 0.036 and non-complicated T1D patients (T/T: 118.1 ± 8.4 vs. C/T: 116.9 ± 7.9 vs. C/C: 112.1 ± 7.2 mm/Hg, p = 0.02. However, the significance of association between the C825T polymorphism was lost after adjustment for confounding risk factors. In conclusion, the 825T allele of GNB3 is likely to accelerate the development of DPN through primary effects to SBP and hypertension in subgroups of diabetic patients with impaired neurovascular function and advanced oxidative stress.

  7. Molecular cloning, characterization and expression of WAG-2 alternative splicing transcripts in developing spikes of Aegilops tauschii

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SHUHONG WEI

    2016-09-01

    WAG-2 is a C-class MADS-box gene, which is orthologous to AGAMOUS (AG )inArabidopsis. The AG group C-classMADS-box genes are involved in stamen and pistil identity. In this study, two WAG-2 transcripts, namely, WAG-2f and WAG-2g, were isolated and characterized from Aegilops tauschii . The open reading frames of WAG-2f and WAG-2g were 825 and 822 bp, respectively, encoding 275 and 274 amino acid residues. BLAST searches of partial WAG-2 genomic sequence againstthe draft sequence of Ae. tauschii genome database revealed the complex structure of WAG-2 gene, which consisted of seven exons and six introns. TheWAG-2f and WAG-2g cDNAs were two alternative splicing transcripts. The alternative splicing events were produced by an alternative 5 ' splice site. The expression level of WAG-2f transcript, which was extremely weak inyoung spikes of floret primordium formation stage, increased as the spikes developed. The highest expression was observed in the spikes at the anther separation stage. Low expression levels of WAG-2f were also detected at the tetrad stage. The WAG-2g transcript was expressed at all four stages of spike development but at a relatively low level. The expression pattern of thetwo transcripts was distinctly different during floral development, thereby suggesting a functional divergence.

  8. Alternative Splicing and Differential Expression of Two Transcripts of Nicotine Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate Oxidase B Gene from Zea mays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan Lin; Yun Zhang; Ming-Yi Jiang

    2009-01-01

    With the exception of rice, little is known about the existence of respiratory burst oxidase homolog (rboh) gene in cereals. The present study reports the cloning and analysis of a novel rboh gene, termed ZmrbohB, from maize (Zea mays L.). The full-length cDNA of ZmrbohB encodes a 942 amino acid protein containing all of the respiratory burst oxidase homolog catalytically critical motifs.Altemative splicing of ZmrbohB has generated two transcript isoforms, ZmrbohB-α and -β. Spliced transcript ZmrbohB-β retains an unspliced intron 11 that carries a premature termination codon and probably leads to nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. Expression analysis showed that two splice isoforms were differentially expressed in various tissues and at different developmental stages, and the major product was ZmrbohB-α. The transcripts of ZmrbohB-α accumulated markedly when the maize seedlings were subjected to various abiotic stimuli, such as wounding, cold (4℃), heat (40℃), UV and salinity stress. In addition, several abiotic stimuli also affected the alternative splicing pattern of ZmrbohB except wounding. These results provide new insight into roles in the expression regulation of plant rboh genes and suggest that ZmrbohB gene may play a role in response to environmental stresses.

  9. Actions of agonists, fipronil and ivermectin on the predominant in vivo splice and edit variant (RDLbd, I/V of the Drosophila GABA receptor expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Lees

    Full Text Available Ionotropic GABA receptors are the targets for several classes of insecticides. One of the most widely-studied insect GABA receptors is RDL (resistance to dieldrin, originally isolated from Drosophila melanogaster. RDL undergoes alternative splicing and RNA editing, which influence the potency of GABA. Most work has focussed on minority isoforms. Here, we report the first characterisation of the predominant native splice variant and RNA edit, combining functional characterisation with molecular modelling of the agonist-binding region. The relative order of agonist potency is GABA> muscimol> TACA> β-alanine. The I/V edit does not alter the potency of GABA compared to RDLbd. Docking calculations suggest that these agonists bind and activate RDLbdI/V through a similar binding mode. TACA and β-alanine are predicted to bind with lower affinity than GABA, potentially explaining their lower potency, whereas the lower potency of muscimol and isoguvacine cannot be explained structurally from the docking calculations. The A301S (resistance to dieldrin mutation reduced the potency of antagonists picrotoxin, fipronil and pyrafluprole but the I/V edit had no measurable effect. Ivermectin suppressed responses to GABA of RDLbdI/V, RDLbd and RDLbdI/VA301S. The dieldrin resistant variant also showed reduced sensitivity to Ivermectin. This study of a highly abundant insect GABA receptor isoform will help the design of new insecticides.

  10. Expression analysis of an evolutionarily conserved alternative splicing factor, Sfrs10, in age-related macular degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devi Krishna Priya Karunakaran

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is the most common cause of blindness in the elderly population. Hypoxic stress created in the micro-environment of the photoreceptors is thought to be the underlying cause that results in the pathophysiology of AMD. However, association of AMD with alternative splicing mediated gene regulation is not well explored. Alternative Splicing is one of the primary mechanisms in humans by which fewer protein coding genes are able to generate a vast proteome. Here, we investigated the expression of a known stress response gene and an alternative splicing factor called Serine-Arginine rich splicing factor 10 (Sfrs10. Sfrs10 is a member of the serine-arginine (SR rich protein family and is 100% identical at the amino acid level in most mammals. Immunoblot analysis on retinal extracts from mouse, rat, and chicken showed a single immunoreactive band. Further, immunohistochemistry on adult mouse, rat and chicken retinae showed pan-retinal expression. However, SFRS10 was not detected in normal human retina but was observed as distinct nuclear speckles in AMD retinae. This is in agreement with previous reports that show Sfrs10 to be a stress response gene, which is upregulated under hypoxia. The difference in the expression of Sfrs10 between humans and lower mammals and the upregulation of SFRS10 in AMD is further reflected in the divergence of the promoter sequence between these species. Finally, SFRS10+ speckles were independent of the SC35+ SR protein speckles or the HSF1+ stress granules. In all, our data suggests that SFRS10 is upregulated and forms distinct stress-induced speckles and might be involved in AS of stress response genes in AMD.

  11. Variants affecting exon skipping contribute to complex traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Younghee Lee

    Full Text Available DNA variants that affect alternative splicing and the relative quantities of different gene transcripts have been shown to be risk alleles for some Mendelian diseases. However, for complex traits characterized by a low odds ratio for any single contributing variant, very few studies have investigated the contribution of splicing variants. The overarching goal of this study is to discover and characterize the role that variants affecting alternative splicing may play in the genetic etiology of complex traits, which include a significant number of the common human diseases. Specifically, we hypothesize that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in splicing regulatory elements can be characterized in silico to identify variants affecting splicing, and that these variants may contribute to the etiology of complex diseases as well as the inter-individual variability in the ratios of alternative transcripts. We leverage high-throughput expression profiling to 1 experimentally validate our in silico predictions of skipped exons and 2 characterize the molecular role of intronic genetic variations in alternative splicing events in the context of complex human traits and diseases. We propose that intronic SNPs play a role as genetic regulators within splicing regulatory elements and show that their associated exon skipping events can affect protein domains and structure. We find that SNPs we would predict to affect exon skipping are enriched among the set of SNPs reported to be associated with complex human traits.

  12. Alternative splicing of exon 17 and a missense mutation in exon 20 of the insulin receptor gene in two brothers with a novel syndrome of insulin resistance (congenital fiber-type disproportion myopathy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorwerk, P; Christoffersen, C T; Müller, J; Vestergaard, H; Pedersen, O; De Meyts, P

    1999-01-01

    The insulin receptor (IR) in two brothers with a rare syndrome of congenital muscle fiber type disproportion myopathy (CFTDM) associated with diabetes and severe insulin resistance was studied. By direct sequencing of Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphocytes both patients were found to be compound heterozygotes for mutations in the IR gene. The maternal allele was alternatively spliced in exon 17 due to a point mutation in the -1 donor splice site of the exon. The abnormal skipping of exon 17 shifts the amino acid reading frame and leads to a truncated IR, missing the entire tyrosine kinase domain. In the correct spliced variant, the point mutation is silent and results in a normally translated IR. The paternal allele carries a missense mutation in the tyrosine kinase domain. All three cDNA variants were present in the lymphocytes of the patients. Purified IR from 293 cells overexpressing either of the two mutated receptors lacked basal or stimulated IR beta-subunit autophosphorylation. A third brother who inherited both normal alleles has an normal muscle phenotype and insulin sensitivity, suggesting a direct linkage of these IR mutations with the CFTDM phenotype.

  13. Alternative splicing isoforms of synaptotagmin VII in the mouse, rat and human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Mitsunori; Ogata, Yukie; Saegusa, Chika; Kanno, Eiko; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko

    2002-07-01

    Synaptotagmin VII (Syt VII) has been proposed to regulate several different types of Ca2+-dependent exocytosis, but its subcellular localization (lysosome or plasma membrane) and the number of alternative splicing isoforms of Syt VII (single or multiple forms) are matters of controversy. In the present study, we show by reverse transcriptase-PCR analysis that mouse Syt VII has one major isoform (Syt VIIalpha), the original Syt VII, and two minor isoforms (Syt VIIbeta and Syt VIIgamma), which contain unique insertions (of 44 and 116 amino acids respectively) in the spacer domain between the transmembrane and C2 domains of Syt VIIalpha. Similar results were obtained with respect to rat and human Syt VII mRNA expression. An antibody against the N-terminal domain of mouse Syt VII [anti-(Syt VII-N)], which specifically recognized recombinant Syt VII but not other Syt isoforms expressed in COS-7 cells, recognized two major, closely co-migrating bands (p58 and p60) and minor bands of approx. 65 kDa in mouse brain. Immunoaffinity purification of proteins that bind the anti-(Syt VII-N) antibody, and peptide sequence analysis revealed that: (i) the major p58 and p60 bands are identified as adenylate cyclase-associated protein 2; (ii) actin-binding protein is localized at the plasma membrane; and (iii) Syt VIIalpha (65 kDa) is the major Syt VII isoform, but with a much lower expression level than previously thought. It was also shown that FLAG-Syt VII-green-fluorescence-protein fusion protein stably expressed in PC12 cells is localized in the perinuclear region (co-localization with TGN38 protein, even after brefeldin A treatment) and in the tips of neurites (co-localization with Syt I), and not in the plasma membrane.

  14. A Splice Variant of ASC Regulates IL-1β Release and Aggregates Differently from Intact ASC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiko Matsushita

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase recruit domain (ASC is involved in apoptosis and innate immunity and is a major adaptor molecule responsible for procaspase-1 activation. ASC mRNA is encoded by three exons: exons 1 and 3 encode a pyrin domain (PYD and caspase recruit domain (CARD, respectively, and exon 2 encodes a proline and glycine-rich (PGR domain. Here, we identified a variant ASC protein (vASC lacking the PGR domain that was smaller than full length ASC (fASC derived from fully transcribed mRNA and searched for differences in biochemical and biological nature. Both fASC and vASC were found to activate procaspase-1 to a similar degree, but the efficiency of IL-1β excretion was significantly higher for vASC. There was also a marked structural difference observed in the fibrous aggregates formed by fASC and vASC. These results suggest that although the PGR domain is dispensable for procaspase-1 activation, it plays an important role in the regulation of the molecular structure and activity of ASC.

  15. Identification of an Alternative Splicing Product of the Otx2 Gene Expressed in the Neural Retina and Retinal Pigmented Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kole, Christo; Berdugo, Naomi; Da Silva, Corinne; Aït-Ali, Najate; Millet-Puel, Géraldine; Pagan, Delphine; Blond, Frédéric; Poidevin, Laetitia; Ripp, Raymond; Fontaine, Valérie; Wincker, Patrick; Zack, Donald J.; Sahel, José-Alain; Poch, Olivier; Léveillard, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the complexity of alternative splicing in the retina, we sequenced and analyzed a total of 115,706 clones from normalized cDNA libraries from mouse neural retina (66,217) and rat retinal pigmented epithelium (49,489). Based upon clustering the cDNAs and mapping them with their respective genomes, the estimated numbers of genes were 9,134 for the mouse neural retina and 12,050 for the rat retinal pigmented epithelium libraries. This unique collection of retinal of messenger RNAs is maintained and accessible through a web-base server to the whole community of retinal biologists for further functional characterization. The analysis revealed 3,248 and 3,202 alternative splice events for mouse neural retina and rat retinal pigmented epithelium, respectively. We focused on transcription factors involved in vision. Among the six candidates suitable for functional analysis, we selected Otx2S, a novel variant of the Otx2 gene with a deletion within the homeodomain sequence. Otx2S is expressed in both the neural retina and retinal pigmented epithelium, and encodes a protein that is targeted to the nucleus. OTX2S exerts transdominant activity on the tyrosinase promoter when tested in the physiological environment of primary RPE cells. By overexpressing OTX2S in primary RPE cells using an adeno associated viral vector, we identified 10 genes whose expression is positively regulated by OTX2S. We find that OTX2S is able to bind to the chromatin at the promoter of the retinal dehydrogenase 10 (RDH10) gene. PMID:26985665

  16. Identification of an Alternative Splicing Product of the Otx2 Gene Expressed in the Neural Retina and Retinal Pigmented Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kole, Christo; Berdugo, Naomi; Da Silva, Corinne; Aït-Ali, Najate; Millet-Puel, Géraldine; Pagan, Delphine; Blond, Frédéric; Poidevin, Laetitia; Ripp, Raymond; Fontaine, Valérie; Wincker, Patrick; Zack, Donald J; Sahel, José-Alain; Poch, Olivier; Léveillard, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the complexity of alternative splicing in the retina, we sequenced and analyzed a total of 115,706 clones from normalized cDNA libraries from mouse neural retina (66,217) and rat retinal pigmented epithelium (49,489). Based upon clustering the cDNAs and mapping them with their respective genomes, the estimated numbers of genes were 9,134 for the mouse neural retina and 12,050 for the rat retinal pigmented epithelium libraries. This unique collection of retinal of messenger RNAs is maintained and accessible through a web-base server to the whole community of retinal biologists for further functional characterization. The analysis revealed 3,248 and 3,202 alternative splice events for mouse neural retina and rat retinal pigmented epithelium, respectively. We focused on transcription factors involved in vision. Among the six candidates suitable for functional analysis, we selected Otx2S, a novel variant of the Otx2 gene with a deletion within the homeodomain sequence. Otx2S is expressed in both the neural retina and retinal pigmented epithelium, and encodes a protein that is targeted to the nucleus. OTX2S exerts transdominant activity on the tyrosinase promoter when tested in the physiological environment of primary RPE cells. By overexpressing OTX2S in primary RPE cells using an adeno associated viral vector, we identified 10 genes whose expression is positively regulated by OTX2S. We find that OTX2S is able to bind to the chromatin at the promoter of the retinal dehydrogenase 10 (RDH10) gene.

  17. PrimerSeq:Design and Visualization of RT-PCR Primers for Alternative Splicing Using RNA-seq Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Collin Tokheim; Juw Won Park; Yi Xing

    2014-01-01

    The vast majority of multi-exon genes in higher eukaryotes are alternatively spliced and changes in alternative splicing (AS) can impact gene function or cause disease. High-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) has become a powerful technology for transcriptome-wide analysis of AS, but RT-PCR still remains the gold-standard approach for quantifying and validating exon splicing levels. We have developed PrimerSeq, a user-friendly software for systematic design and visualization of RT-PCR primers using RNA-seq data. PrimerSeq incorporates user-provided tran-scriptome profiles (i.e., RNA-seq data) in the design process, and is particularly useful for large-scale quantitative analysis of AS events discovered from RNA-seq experiments. PrimerSeq features a graphical user interface (GUI) that displays the RNA-seq data juxtaposed with the expected RT-PCR results. To enable primer design and visualization on user-provided RNA-seq data and transcript annotations, we have developed PrimerSeq as a stand-alone software that runs on local computers. PrimerSeq is freely available for Windows and Mac OS X along with source code at http://primerseq.sourceforge.net/. With the growing popularity of RNA-seq for transcriptome stud-ies, we expect PrimerSeq to help bridge the gap between high-throughput RNA-seq discovery of AS events and molecular analysis of candidate events by RT-PCR.

  18. Broad spectrum analgesic efficacy of IBNtxA is mediated by exon 11-associated splice variants of the mu-opioid receptor gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieskopf, Jeffrey S.; Pan, Ying-Xian; Marcovitz, Jaclyn; Tuttle, Alexander H.; Majumdar, Susruta; Pidakala, John

    2014-01-01

    Mu-opioids remain vastly important for the treatment of pain, and would represent ideal analgesics if their analgesic effects could be separated from their many side effects. A recently synthesized compound, iodobenzoylnaltrexamide (IBNtxA), acting at 6-transmembrane (6-TM) splice variants of the mu-opioid receptor gene, was shown to have potent analgesic actions against acute, thermal pain accompanied by a vastly improved side-effect profile compared to 7-TM-acting drugs such as morphine. Whether such analgesia can be seen in longer-lasting and non-thermal algesiometric assays is not known. The current study demonstrates potent and efficacious IBNtxA inhibition of a wide variety of assays, including inflammatory and neuropathic hypersensitivity and spontaneous pain. We further demonstrate the dependence of such analgesia on 6-TM mu-opioid receptor variants using isobolographic analysis and the testing of Oprm1 (the mu-opioid receptor gene) exon 11 null mutant mice. Finally, the effect of nerve damage (spared nerve