WorldWideScience

Sample records for alternative transcript isoforms

  1. Characterization of novel elongated Parvulin isoforms that are ubiquitously expressed in human tissues and originate from alternative transcription initiation

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    Hartmann-Fatu Cristina

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The peptidyl prolyl cis/trans isomerase (PPIase Parvulin (Par14/PIN4 is highly conserved in all metazoans and is assumed to play a role in cell cycle progression and chromatin remodeling. It is predominantly localized to the nucleus and binds to chromosomal DNA as well as bent oligonucleotides in vitro. Results In this study we confirm by RT-PCR the existence of a longer Parvulin isoform expressed in all tissues examined so far. This isoform contains a 5' extension including a 75 bp extended open reading frame with two coupled SNPs leading to amino acid substitutions Q16R and R18S. About 1% of all Parvulin mRNAs include the novel extension as quantified by real-time PCR. The human Parvulin promoter is TATA-less and situated in a CpG island typical for house keeping genes. Thus, different Parvulin mRNAs seem to arise by alternative transcription initiation. N-terminally extended Parvulin is protected from rapid proteinaseK degradation. In HeLa and HepG2 cell lysates two protein species of about 17 and 28 KDa are detected by an antibody against an epitope within the N-terminal extension. These two bands are also recognized by an antibody towards the PPIase domain of Parvulin. The longer Parvulin protein is encoded by the human genome but absent from rodent, bovine and non-mammalian genomes. Conclusion Due to its molecular weight of 16.6 KDa we denote the novel Parvulin isoform as Par17 following the E. coli Par10 and human Par14 nomenclature. The N-terminal elongation of Par17-QR and Par17-RS suggests these isoforms to perform divergent functions within the eukaryotic cell than the well characterized Par14.

  2. Functional diversity of human basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor TCF4 isoforms generated by alternative 5' exon usage and splicing.

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    Mari Sepp

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transcription factor 4 (TCF4 alias ITF2, E2-2, ME2 or SEF2 is a ubiquitous class A basic helix-loop-helix protein that binds to E-box DNA sequences (CANNTG. While involved in the development and functioning of many different cell types, recent studies point to important roles for TCF4 in the nervous system. Specifically, human TCF4 gene is implicated in susceptibility to schizophrenia and TCF4 haploinsufficiency is the cause of the Pitt-Hopkins mental retardation syndrome. However, the structure, expression and coding potential of the human TCF4 gene have not been described in detail. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present study we used human tissue samples to characterize human TCF4 gene structure and TCF4 expression at mRNA and protein level. We report that although widely expressed, human TCF4 mRNA expression is particularly high in the brain. We demonstrate that usage of numerous 5' exons of the human TCF4 gene potentially yields in TCF4 protein isoforms with 18 different N-termini. In addition, the diversity of isoforms is increased by alternative splicing of several internal exons. For functional characterization of TCF4 isoforms, we overexpressed individual isoforms in cultured human cells. Our analysis revealed that subcellular distribution of TCF4 isoforms is differentially regulated: Some isoforms contain a bipartite nuclear localization signal and are exclusively nuclear, whereas distribution of other isoforms relies on heterodimerization partners. Furthermore, the ability of different TCF4 isoforms to regulate E-box controlled reporter gene transcription is varied depending on whether one or both of the two TCF4 transcription activation domains are present in the protein. Both TCF4 activation domains are able to activate transcription independently, but act synergistically in combination. CONCLUSIONS: Altogether, in this study we have described the inter-tissue variability of TCF4 expression in human and provided evidence

  3. Characterisation of CDKL5 Transcript Isoforms in Human and Mouse.

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    Ralph D Hector

    Full Text Available Mutations in the X-linked Cyclin-Dependent Kinase-Like 5 gene (CDKL5 cause early onset infantile spasms and subsequent severe developmental delay in affected children. Deleterious mutations have been reported to occur throughout the CDKL5 coding region. Several studies point to a complex CDKL5 gene structure in terms of exon usage and transcript expression. Improvements in molecular diagnosis and more extensive research into the neurobiology of CDKL5 and pathophysiology of CDKL5 disorders necessitate an updated analysis of the gene. In this study, we have analysed human and mouse CDKL5 transcript patterns both bioinformatically and experimentally. We have characterised the predominant brain isoform of CDKL5, a 9.7 kb transcript comprised of 18 exons with a large 6.6 kb 3'-untranslated region (UTR, which we name hCDKL5_1. In addition we describe new exonic regions and a range of novel splice and UTR isoforms. This has enabled the description of an updated gene model in both species and a standardised nomenclature system for CDKL5 transcripts. Profiling revealed tissue- and brain development stage-specific differences in expression between transcript isoforms. These findings provide an essential backdrop for the diagnosis of CDKL5-related disorders, for investigations into the basic biology of this gene and its protein products, and for the rational design of gene-based and molecular therapies for these disorders.

  4. Gene isoform specificity through enhancer-associated antisense transcription.

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    Courtney S Onodera

    Full Text Available Enhancers and antisense RNAs play key roles in transcriptional regulation through differing mechanisms. Recent studies have demonstrated that enhancers are often associated with non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs, yet the functional role of these enhancer:ncRNA associations is unclear. Using RNA-Sequencing to interrogate the transcriptomes of undifferentiated mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs and their derived neural precursor cells (NPs, we identified two novel enhancer-associated antisense transcripts that appear to control isoform-specific expression of their overlapping protein-coding genes. In each case, an enhancer internal to a protein-coding gene drives an antisense RNA in mESCs but not in NPs. Expression of the antisense RNA is correlated with expression of a shorter isoform of the associated sense gene that is not present when the antisense RNA is not expressed. We demonstrate that expression of the antisense transcripts as well as expression of the short sense isoforms correlates with enhancer activity at these two loci. Further, overexpression and knockdown experiments suggest the antisense transcripts regulate expression of their associated sense genes via cis-acting mechanisms. Interestingly, the protein-coding genes involved in these two examples, Zmynd8 and Brd1, share many functional domains, yet their antisense ncRNAs show no homology to each other and are not present in non-murine mammalian lineages, such as the primate lineage. The lack of homology in the antisense ncRNAs indicates they have evolved independently of each other and suggests that this mode of lineage-specific transcriptional regulation may be more widespread in other cell types and organisms. Our findings present a new view of enhancer action wherein enhancers may direct isoform-specific expression of genes through ncRNA intermediates.

  5. Gene Isoform Specificity through Enhancer-Associated Antisense Transcription

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    Onodera, Courtney S.; Underwood, Jason G.; Katzman, Sol; Jacobs, Frank; Greenberg, David; Salama, Sofie R.; Haussler, David

    2012-01-01

    Enhancers and antisense RNAs play key roles in transcriptional regulation through differing mechanisms. Recent studies have demonstrated that enhancers are often associated with non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), yet the functional role of these enhancer:ncRNA associations is unclear. Using RNA-Sequencing to interrogate the transcriptomes of undifferentiated mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) and their derived neural precursor cells (NPs), we identified two novel enhancer-associated antisense transcripts that appear to control isoform-specific expression of their overlapping protein-coding genes. In each case, an enhancer internal to a protein-coding gene drives an antisense RNA in mESCs but not in NPs. Expression of the antisense RNA is correlated with expression of a shorter isoform of the associated sense gene that is not present when the antisense RNA is not expressed. We demonstrate that expression of the antisense transcripts as well as expression of the short sense isoforms correlates with enhancer activity at these two loci. Further, overexpression and knockdown experiments suggest the antisense transcripts regulate expression of their associated sense genes via cis-acting mechanisms. Interestingly, the protein-coding genes involved in these two examples, Zmynd8 and Brd1, share many functional domains, yet their antisense ncRNAs show no homology to each other and are not present in non-murine mammalian lineages, such as the primate lineage. The lack of homology in the antisense ncRNAs indicates they have evolved independently of each other and suggests that this mode of lineage-specific transcriptional regulation may be more widespread in other cell types and organisms. Our findings present a new view of enhancer action wherein enhancers may direct isoform-specific expression of genes through ncRNA intermediates. PMID:22937057

  6. Genomic organization and the tissue distribution of alternatively spliced isoforms of the mouse Spatial gene

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    Mattei Marie-Geneviève

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The stromal component of the thymic microenvironment is critical for T lymphocyte generation. Thymocyte differentiation involves a cascade of coordinated stromal genes controlling thymocyte survival, lineage commitment and selection. The "Stromal Protein Associated with Thymii And Lymph-node" (Spatial gene encodes a putative transcription factor which may be involved in T-cell development. In the testis, the Spatial gene is also expressed by round spermatids during spermatogenesis. Results The Spatial gene maps to the B3-B4 region of murine chromosome 10 corresponding to the human syntenic region 10q22.1. The mouse Spatial genomic DNA is organised into 10 exons and is alternatively spliced to generate two short isoforms (Spatial-α and -γ and two other long isoforms (Spatial-δ and -ε comprising 5 additional exons on the 3' site. Here, we report the cloning of a new short isoform, Spatial-β, which differs from other isoforms by an additional alternative exon of 69 bases. This new exon encodes an interesting proline-rich signature that could confer to the 34 kDa Spatial-β protein a particular function. By quantitative TaqMan RT-PCR, we have shown that the short isoforms are highly expressed in the thymus while the long isoforms are highly expressed in the testis. We further examined the inter-species conservation of Spatial between several mammals and identified that the protein which is rich in proline and positive amino acids, is highly conserved. Conclusions The Spatial gene generates at least five alternative spliced variants: three short isoforms (Spatial-α, -β and -γ highly expressed in the thymus and two long isoforms (Spatial-δ and -ε highly expressed in the testis. These alternative spliced variants could have a tissue specific function.

  7. A human Polycomb isoform lacking the Pc box does not participate to PRC1 complexes but forms protein assemblies and represses transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Völkel, Pamela; Le Faou, Perrine; Vandamme, Julien

    2012-01-01

    and alternative splicing events, the human CBX2 locus produces two transcripts: a 5-exon transcript that encodes the 532-amino acid CBX2-1 isoform that contains the conserved chromodomain and Pc box and a 4-exon transcript encoding a shorter isoform, CBX2-2, lacking the Pc box but still possessing a chromodomain....... Using biochemical approaches and a novel in vivo imaging assay, we show that the short CBX2-2 isoform lacking the Pc box, does not participate in PRC1 protein complexes, but self-associates in vivo and forms complexes of high molecular weight. Furthermore, the CBX2 short isoform is still able to repress...

  8. WT1 Alternative Splicing: Role of Its Isoforms in Neuroblastoma.

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    Rasà, Daniela Maria; D'Amico, Agata Grazia; Maugeri, Grazia; Cavallaro, Sebastiano; D'Agata, Velia

    2017-06-01

    Wilms tumor 1 (WT1), a tumor suppressor gene, was originally identified in the homonymous renal neoplasm but is also involved in other cancers. Its function is still unclear, since it acts both as a pro- and an anti-oncogene. At least 14 WT1 transcriptional variants have been described; yet most investigations have focused on a small number of isoforms. We describe their structural features and review the evidence of their involvement in cancer with emphasis on neuroblastoma. In future, full characterization of all WT1 isoforms is expected to identify new molecular tumor markers and/or therapeutic targets.

  9. Cloning, expression and alternative splicing of the novel isoform of hTCP11 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Yong-xin; Zhang, Si-zhong; Wu, Qia-qing

    2003-01-01

    To identify a novel isoform of hTCP11 gene and investigate its expression and alternative splicing.......To identify a novel isoform of hTCP11 gene and investigate its expression and alternative splicing....

  10. SnoI, a novel alternatively spliced isoform of the ski protooncogene homolog, sno.

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    Pearson-White, S

    1993-09-25

    We have cloned and sequenced a novel human isoform of sno, snoI for insertion. SnoI contains 1330 nucleotides inserted in place of 7 nucleotides of the snoN mRNA. Sno is a member of the ski protooncogene family, which has been implicated in muscle development. The two previously known sno alternatively spliced isoforms are snoN (684 amino acids), and snoA (415 amino acids); snoI encodes a truncated isoform of 399 amino acids (44,298 MW). Southern blot experiments show that snoI contains a third alternative exon from the sno gene; a single sno gene can express all three isoforms of sno by alternative splicing. All three isoforms contain the region that is most similar to the ski proto-oncogene. The relationship between snoI and snoN is analogous to that between delta fosB and fosB, where a truncated form of the fosB transcription factor is produced by alternative splicing. We find conservation of human snoI-specific sequences in several mammalian species, in monkey, dog, cow, rabbit and pig, but not in rodents, whereas the common portion of the sno gene is conserved in all vertebrate species tested. SnoN, snoA, and ski mRNAs accumulate in many human tissues including skeletal muscle; the snoI alternative mRNA accumulates more specifically in skeletal muscle. SnoI is also expressed in rhabdomyosarcoma tumor, a tumor that contains differentiated skeletal muscle. The tissue-specific alternative splicing of human snoI, an mRNA in the ski/sno gene family, and the presence of sno mRNAs in muscle are consistent with a proposed role for the sno oncogene in muscle gene regulation.

  11. Semi-supervised Learning Predicts Approximately One Third of the Alternative Splicing Isoforms as Functional Proteins

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    Yanqi Hao

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing acts on transcripts from almost all human multi-exon genes. Notwithstanding its ubiquity, fundamental ramifications of splicing on protein expression remain unresolved. The number and identity of spliced transcripts that form stably folded proteins remain the sources of considerable debate, due largely to low coverage of experimental methods and the resulting absence of negative data. We circumvent this issue by developing a semi-supervised learning algorithm, positive unlabeled learning for splicing elucidation (PULSE; http://www.kimlab.org/software/pulse, which uses 48 features spanning various categories. We validated its accuracy on sets of bona fide protein isoforms and directly on mass spectrometry (MS spectra for an overall AU-ROC of 0.85. We predict that around 32% of “exon skipping” alternative splicing events produce stable proteins, suggesting that the process engenders a significant number of previously uncharacterized proteins. We also provide insights into the distribution of positive isoforms in various functional classes and into the structural effects of alternative splicing.

  12. The Drosophila melanogaster DmCK2beta transcription unit encodes for functionally non-redundant protein isoforms.

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    Jauch, Eike; Wecklein, Heike; Stark, Felix; Jauch, Mandy; Raabe, Thomas

    2006-06-07

    Genes encoding for the two evolutionary highly conserved subunits of a heterotetrameric protein kinase CK2 holoenzyme are present in all examined eukaryotic genomes. Depending on the organism, multiple transcription units encoding for a catalytically active CK2alpha subunit and/or a regulatory CK2beta subunit may exist. The phosphotransferase activity of members of the protein kinase CK2alpha family is thought to be independent of second messengers but is modulated by interaction with CK2beta-like proteins. In the genome of Drosophila melanogaster, one gene encoding for a CK2alpha subunit and three genes encoding for CK2beta-like proteins are present. The X-linked DmCK2beta transcription unit encodes for several CK2beta protein isoforms due to alternative splicing of its primary transcript. We addressed the question whether CK2beta-like proteins are redundant in function. Our in vivo experiments show that variations of the very C-terminal tail of CK2beta isoforms encoded by the X-linked DmCK2beta transcription unit influence their functional properties. In addition, we find that CK2beta-like proteins encoded by the autosomal D. melanogaster genes CK2betates and CK2beta' cannot fully substitute for a loss of CK2beta isoforms encoded by DmCK2beta.

  13. Tumorigenic properties of alternative osteopontin isoforms in mesothelioma

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    Ivanov, Sergey V., E-mail: Sergey.Ivanov@med.nyu.edu [Thoracic Surgery Laboratory, Cardiothoracic Surgery Department, NYU Langone Medical Center, 462 First Ave., Bellevue Hospital, Room 15N20, NY 10016 (United States); Ivanova, Alla V.; Goparaju, Chandra M.V.; Chen, Yuanbin; Beck, Amanda; Pass, Harvey I. [Thoracic Surgery Laboratory, Cardiothoracic Surgery Department, NYU Langone Medical Center, 462 First Ave., Bellevue Hospital, Room 15N20, NY 10016 (United States)

    2009-05-08

    Osteopontin (SPP1) is an inflammatory cytokine that we previously characterized as a diagnostic marker in patients with asbestos-induced malignant mesothelioma (MM). While SPP1 shows both pro- and anti-tumorigenic biological effects, little is known about the molecular basis of these activities. In this study, we demonstrate that while healthy pleura possesses all three differentially spliced SPP1 isoforms (A-C), in clinical MM specimens isoform A is markedly up-regulated and predominant. To provide a clue to possible functions of the SPP1 isoforms we next performed their functional evaluation via transient expression in MM cell lines. As a result, we report that isoforms A-C demonstrate different activities in cell proliferation, wound closure, and invasion assays. These findings suggest different functions for SPP1 isoforms and underline pro-tumorigenic properties of isoforms A and B.

  14. Delayed polarization of mononuclear phagocyte transcriptional program by type I interferon isoforms

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    Wang Ena

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interferon (IFN-α is considered a key modulator of immunopathological processes through a signature-specific activation of mononuclear phagocytes (MPs. This study utilized global transcript analysis to characterize the effects of the entire type I IFN family in comparison to a broad panel of other cytokines on MP previously exposed to Lipopolysaccharide (LPS stimulation in vitro. Results Immature peripheral blood CD14+ MPs were stimulated with LPS and 1 hour later with 42 separate soluble factors including cytokines, chemokines, interleukins, growth factors and IFNs. Gene expression profiling of MPs was analyzed 4 and 9 hours after cytokine stimulation. Four hours after stimulation, the transcriptional analysis of MPs revealed two main classes of cytokines: one associated with the alternative and the other with the classical pathway of MP activation without a clear polarization of type I IFNs effects. In contrast, after 9 hours of stimulation most type I IFN isoforms induced a characteristic and unique transcriptional pattern separate from other cytokines. These "signature" IFNs included; IFN-β, IFN-α2b/α2, IFN-αI, IFN-α2, IFN-αC, IFN-αJ1, IFN-αH2, and INF-α4B and induced the over-expression of 44 genes, all of which had known functional relationships with IFN such as myxovirus resistance (Mx-1, Mx-2, and interferon-induced hepatitis C-associated microtubular aggregation protein. A second group of type I IFNs segregated separately and in closer association with the type II IFN-γ. The phylogenetic relationship of amino acid sequences among type I IFNs did not explain their sub-classification, although differences at positions 94 through 109 and 175 through 189 were present between the signature and other IFNs. Conclusion Seven IFN-α isoforms and IFN-β participate in the late phase polarization of MPs conditioned by LPS. This information broadens the previous view of the central role played by IFN-α in

  15. Molecular analysis of alternative transcripts of equine AXL receptor tyrosine kinase gene

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    Jeong-Woong Park

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective Since athletic performance is a most importance trait in horses, most research focused on physiological and physical studies of horse athletic abilities. In contrast, the molecular analysis as well as the regulatory pathway studies remain insufficient for evaluation and prediction of horse athletic abilities. In our previous study, we identified AXL receptor tyrosine kinase (AXL gene which was expressed as alternative spliced isoforms in skeletal muscle during exercise. In the present study, we validated two AXL alternative splicing transcripts (named as AXLa for long form and AXLb for short form in equine skeletal muscle to gain insight(s into the role of each alternative transcript during exercise. Methods We validated two isoforms of AXL transcripts in horse tissues by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, and then cloned the transcripts to confirm the alternative locus and its sequences. Additionally, we examined the expression patterns of AXLa and AXLb transcripts in horse tissues by quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR. Results Both of AXLa and AXLb transcripts were expressed in horse skeletal muscle and the expression levels were significantly increased after exercise. The sequencing analysis showed that there was an alternative splicing event at exon 11 between AXLa and AXLb transcripts. 3-dimentional (3D prediction of the alternative protein structures revealed that the structural distance of the connective region between fibronectin type 3 (FN3 and immunoglobin (Ig domain was different between two alternative isoforms. Conclusion It is assumed that the expression patterns of AXLa and AXLb transcripts would be involved in regulation of exercise-induced stress in horse muscle possibly through an NF-κB signaling pathway. Further study is necessary to uncover biological function(s and significance of the alternative splicing isoforms in race horse skeletal muscle.

  16. The Impact of Endurance Training on Human Skeletal Muscle Memory, Global Isoform Expression and Novel Transcripts.

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    Maléne E Lindholm

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Regularly performed endurance training has many beneficial effects on health and skeletal muscle function, and can be used to prevent and treat common diseases e.g. cardiovascular disease, type II diabetes and obesity. The molecular adaptation mechanisms regulating these effects are incompletely understood. To date, global transcriptome changes in skeletal muscles have been studied at the gene level only. Therefore, global isoform expression changes following exercise training in humans are unknown. Also, the effects of repeated interventions on transcriptional memory or training response have not been studied before. In this study, 23 individuals trained one leg for three months. Nine months later, 12 of the same subjects trained both legs in a second training period. Skeletal muscle biopsies were obtained from both legs before and after both training periods. RNA sequencing analysis of all 119 skeletal muscle biopsies showed that training altered the expression of 3,404 gene isoforms, mainly associated with oxidative ATP production. Fifty-four genes had isoforms that changed in opposite directions. Training altered expression of 34 novel transcripts, all with protein-coding potential. After nine months of detraining, no training-induced transcriptome differences were detected between the previously trained and untrained legs. Although there were several differences in the physiological and transcriptional responses to repeated training, no coherent evidence of an endurance training induced transcriptional skeletal muscle memory was found. This human lifestyle intervention induced differential expression of thousands of isoforms and several transcripts from unannotated regions of the genome. It is likely that the observed isoform expression changes reflect adaptational mechanisms and processes that provide the functional and health benefits of regular physical activity.

  17. HER4 Cyt1 and Cyt2 Isoforms Regulate Transcription Through Differential Interactions with a Transcriptional Regulator, Yap

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    2011-10-01

    Smad7[29]. However, the primary target of Yap is thought to be the family of TEF/ TEAD transcription factors, shown by Zhao et al. to be required for...phosphorylation of Yap by HER4 isoforms modulate the ability of Yap to regulate TEF/ TEAD -, RunX2-, and p73-dependent transcription. We will also examine...whether HER4 s80–Cyt1 and –Cyt2 interact with the Yap:transcription factor complex, 11    specifically Yap:TEF/ TEAD , and will evaluate the ability

  18. Conditional ablation of the RFX4 isoform 1 transcription factor: Allele dosage effects on brain phenotype.

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    Ping Xu

    Full Text Available Regulatory factor X4 (RFX4 isoform 1 is a recently discovered isoform of the winged helix transcription factor RFX4, which can bind to X-box consensus sequences that are enriched in the promoters of cilia-related genes. Early insertional mutagenesis studies in mice first identified this isoform, and demonstrated that it was crucial for mouse brain development. RFX4 isoform 1 is the only RFX4 isoform significantly expressed in the mouse fetal and adult brain. In this study, we evaluated conditional knock-out (KO mice in which one or two floxed alleles of Rfx4 were deleted early in development through the use of a Sox2-Cre transgene. Heterozygous deletion of Rfx4 resulted in severe, non-communicating congenital hydrocephalus associated with hypoplasia of the subcommissural organ. Homozygous deletion of Rfx4 resulted in formation of a single ventricle in the forebrain, and severe dorsoventral patterning defects in the telencephalon and midbrain at embryonic day 12.5, a collection of phenotypes that resembled human holoprosencephaly. No anatomical abnormalities were noted outside the brain in either case. At the molecular level, transcripts encoded by the cilia-related gene Foxj1 were significantly decreased, and Foxj1 was identified as a direct gene target of RFX4 isoform 1. The phenotypes were similar to those observed in the previous Rfx4 insertional mutagenesis studies. Thus, we provide a novel conditional KO animal model in which to investigate the downstream genes directly and/or indirectly regulated by RFX4 isoform 1. This model could provide new insights into the pathogenesis of obstructive hydrocephalus and holoprosencephaly in humans, both relatively common and disabling birth defects.

  19. Pairwise comparisons of ten porcine tissues identify differential transcriptional regulation at the gene, isoform, promoter and transcription start site level

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    Farajzadeh, Leila; Hornshøj, Henrik; Momeni, Jamal; Thomsen, Bo; Larsen, Knud; Hedegaard, Jakob; Bendixen, Christian; Madsen, Lone Bruhn, E-mail: LoneB.Madsen@agrsci.dk

    2013-08-23

    Highlights: •Transcriptome sequencing yielded 223 mill porcine RNA-seq reads, and 59,000 transcribed locations. •Establishment of unique transcription profiles for ten porcine tissues including four brain tissues. •Comparison of transcription profiles at gene, isoform, promoter and transcription start site level. •Highlights a high level of regulation of neuro-related genes at both gene, isoform, and TSS level. •Our results emphasize the pig as a valuable animal model with respect to human biological issues. -- Abstract: The transcriptome is the absolute set of transcripts in a tissue or cell at the time of sampling. In this study RNA-Seq is employed to enable the differential analysis of the transcriptome profile for ten porcine tissues in order to evaluate differences between the tissues at the gene and isoform expression level, together with an analysis of variation in transcription start sites, promoter usage, and splicing. Totally, 223 million RNA fragments were sequenced leading to the identification of 59,930 transcribed gene locations and 290,936 transcript variants using Cufflinks with similarity to approximately 13,899 annotated human genes. Pairwise analysis of tissues for differential expression at the gene level showed that the smallest differences were between tissues originating from the porcine brain. Interestingly, the relative level of differential expression at the isoform level did generally not vary between tissue contrasts. Furthermore, analysis of differential promoter usage between tissues, revealed a proportionally higher variation between cerebellum (CBE) versus frontal cortex and cerebellum versus hypothalamus (HYP) than in the remaining comparisons. In addition, the comparison of differential transcription start sites showed that the number of these sites is generally increased in comparisons including hypothalamus in contrast to other pairwise assessments. A comprehensive analysis of one of the tissue contrasts, i

  20. Pairwise comparisons of ten porcine tissues identify differential transcriptional regulation at the gene, isoform, promoter and transcription start site level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farajzadeh, Leila; Hornshøj, Henrik; Momeni, Jamal; Thomsen, Bo; Larsen, Knud; Hedegaard, Jakob; Bendixen, Christian; Madsen, Lone Bruhn

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Transcriptome sequencing yielded 223 mill porcine RNA-seq reads, and 59,000 transcribed locations. •Establishment of unique transcription profiles for ten porcine tissues including four brain tissues. •Comparison of transcription profiles at gene, isoform, promoter and transcription start site level. •Highlights a high level of regulation of neuro-related genes at both gene, isoform, and TSS level. •Our results emphasize the pig as a valuable animal model with respect to human biological issues. -- Abstract: The transcriptome is the absolute set of transcripts in a tissue or cell at the time of sampling. In this study RNA-Seq is employed to enable the differential analysis of the transcriptome profile for ten porcine tissues in order to evaluate differences between the tissues at the gene and isoform expression level, together with an analysis of variation in transcription start sites, promoter usage, and splicing. Totally, 223 million RNA fragments were sequenced leading to the identification of 59,930 transcribed gene locations and 290,936 transcript variants using Cufflinks with similarity to approximately 13,899 annotated human genes. Pairwise analysis of tissues for differential expression at the gene level showed that the smallest differences were between tissues originating from the porcine brain. Interestingly, the relative level of differential expression at the isoform level did generally not vary between tissue contrasts. Furthermore, analysis of differential promoter usage between tissues, revealed a proportionally higher variation between cerebellum (CBE) versus frontal cortex and cerebellum versus hypothalamus (HYP) than in the remaining comparisons. In addition, the comparison of differential transcription start sites showed that the number of these sites is generally increased in comparisons including hypothalamus in contrast to other pairwise assessments. A comprehensive analysis of one of the tissue contrasts, i

  1. Splice-mediated Variants of Proteins (SpliVaP) - data and characterization of changes in signatures among protein isoforms due to alternative splicing.

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    Floris, Matteo; Orsini, Massimiliano; Thanaraj, Thangavel Alphonse

    2008-10-02

    It is often the case that mammalian genes are alternatively spliced; the resulting alternate transcripts often encode protein isoforms that differ in amino acid sequences. Changes among the protein isoforms can alter the cellular properties of proteins. The effect can range from a subtle modulation to a complete loss of function. (i) We examined human splice-mediated protein isoforms (as extracted from a manually curated data set, and from a computationally predicted data set) for differences in the annotation for protein signatures (Pfam domains and PRINTS fingerprints) and we characterized the differences & their effects on protein functionalities. An important question addressed relates to the extent of protein isoforms that may lack any known function in the cell. (ii) We present a database that reports differences in protein signatures among human splice-mediated protein isoform sequences. (i) Characterization: The work points to distinct sets of alternatively spliced genes with varying degrees of annotation for the splice-mediated protein isoforms. Protein molecular functions seen to be often affected are those that relate to: binding, catalytic, transcription regulation, structural molecule, transporter, motor, and antioxidant; and the processes that are often affected are nucleic acid binding, signal transduction, and protein-protein interactions. Signatures are often included/excluded and truncated in length among protein isoforms; truncation is seen as the predominant type of change. Analysis points to the following novel aspects: (a) Analysis using data from the manually curated Vega indicates that one in 8.9 genes can lead to a protein isoform of no "known" function; and one in 18 expressed protein isoforms can be such an "orphan" isoform; the corresponding numbers as seen with computationally predicted ASD data set are: one in 4.9 genes and one in 9.8 isoforms. (b) When swapping of signatures occurs, it is often between those of same functional

  2. Alternative staffing services. Contract transcription.

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    Tessier, C

    1992-03-01

    Contract medical transcription services can be of great assistance in meeting the demands for transcription, without jeopardizing patient, physician, or institutional confidentiality. You simply must require the contract service to provide at least the same degree of protection and preservation of confidentiality that you should require inhouse. To achieve this you must make these requirements explicit, comprehensive, comprehensible, believable, and enforceable. Discuss the requirements with prospective contractors. Review them at least annually with existing contractors and when contracts are due for renewal. Be sure to specify the consequence of breaching confidentiality, and if there are breaches, enforce the terms of the contract. Consult your institution's legal counsel both in developing the contract and in enforcing its provisions. Take into consideration your department's and institution's policies, AHIMA's statement on confidentiality, as well as local, state, and federal laws. Above all, never lose sight of the patient. Ultimately, it is not patient information that you are obligated to protect. It is the patient.

  3. The plethora of PMCA isoforms: Alternative splicing and differential expression.

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    Krebs, Joachim

    2015-09-01

    In this review the four different genes of the mammalian plasma membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA) and their spliced isoforms are discussed with respect to their tissue distribution, their differences during development and their importance for regulating Ca²⁺ homeostasis under different conditions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 13th European Symposium on Calcium. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. SnoI, a novel alternatively spliced isoform of the ski protooncogene homolog, sno.

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    Pearson-White, S

    1993-01-01

    We have cloned and sequenced a novel human isoform of sno, snoI for insertion. SnoI contains 1330 nucleotides inserted in place of 7 nucleotides of the snoN mRNA. Sno is a member of the ski protooncogene family, which has been implicated in muscle development. The two previously known sno alternatively spliced isoforms are snoN (684 amino acids), and snoA (415 amino acids); snoI encodes a truncated isoform of 399 amino acids (44,298 MW). Southern blot experiments show that snoI contains a thi...

  5. An alternative splicing isoform of MITA antagonizes MITA-mediated induction of type I IFNs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Honghe; Pei, Rongjuan; Zhu, Wandi; Zeng, Rui; Wang, Yun; Wang, Yanyi; Lu, Mengji; Chen, Xinwen

    2014-02-01

    Mediator of IFN regulatory transcription factor 3 activation (MITA) is an important adaptor protein to mediate the induction of type I IFNs. In this study, we identified an alternatively spliced isoform of MITA lacking exon 7, termed MITA-related protein (MRP). MRP shares the N-terminal portion aa 1-253 with MITA but possesses a unique 30-aa sequence at the carboxyl terminal part, therefore lacking the conserved domains including TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1) and cyclic diguanylate binding domain. MRP is expressed in multiple tissues and distinct cell lines. Overexpression of MRP inhibited MITA-mediated activation of IFN-β promoter by sendai virus infection and cyclic diguanylate treatment but enhanced that in HSV-1 infection. Interestingly, MRP expression was reduced after Sendai virus infection but was upregulated after HSV-1 infection. Overexpression of MRP inhibited MITA-mediated induction of IFN-β via TBK1-IFN regulatory transcription factor 3 by disrupting the MITA-TBK1 interaction. However, NF-κB pathway was still activated by MRP, as MRP retained the ability to interact with inducible inhibitor of NF-κB (iκB) kinase. Thus, MRP acts as a dominant negative regulator of MITA-mediated induction of IFN production.

  6. Pairwise comparisons of ten porcine tissues identify differential transcriptional regulation at the gene, isoform, promoter and transcription start site level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farajzadeh, Leila; Hornshøj, Henrik; Momeni, Jamal

    2013-01-01

    expression level, together with an analysis of variation in transcription start sites, promoter usage, and splicing. Totally, 223 million RNA fragments were sequenced leading to the identification of 59,930 transcribed gene locations and 290,936 transcript variants using Cufflinks with similarity......The transcriptome is the absolute set of transcripts in a tissue or cell at the time of sampling. In this study RNA-Seq is employed to enable the differential analysis of the transcriptome profile for ten porcine tissues in order to evaluate differences between the tissues at the gene and isoform...... of differential transcription start sites showed that the number of these sites is generally increased in comparisons including hypothalamus in contrast to other pairwise assessments. A comprehensive analysis of one of the tissue contrasts, i.e. cerebellum versus heart for differential variation at the gene...

  7. A high quality Arabidopsis transcriptome for accurate transcript-level analysis of alternative splicing

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Runxuan

    2017-04-05

    Alternative splicing generates multiple transcript and protein isoforms from the same gene and thus is important in gene expression regulation. To date, RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) is the standard method for quantifying changes in alternative splicing on a genome-wide scale. Understanding the current limitations of RNA-seq is crucial for reliable analysis and the lack of high quality, comprehensive transcriptomes for most species, including model organisms such as Arabidopsis, is a major constraint in accurate quantification of transcript isoforms. To address this, we designed a novel pipeline with stringent filters and assembled a comprehensive Reference Transcript Dataset for Arabidopsis (AtRTD2) containing 82,190 non-redundant transcripts from 34 212 genes. Extensive experimental validation showed that AtRTD2 and its modified version, AtRTD2-QUASI, for use in Quantification of Alternatively Spliced Isoforms, outperform other available transcriptomes in RNA-seq analysis. This strategy can be implemented in other species to build a pipeline for transcript-level expression and alternative splicing analyses.

  8. New Modularity of DAP-Kinases: Alternative Splicing of the DRP-1 Gene Produces a ZIPk-Like Isoform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoval, Yishay; Berissi, Hanna; Kimchi, Adi; Pietrokovski, Shmuel

    2011-01-01

    DRP-1 and ZIPk are two members of the Death Associated Protein Ser/Thr Kinase (DAP-kinase) family, which function in different settings of cell death including autophagy. DAP kinases are very similar in their catalytic domains but differ substantially in their extra-catalytic domains. This difference is crucial for the significantly different modes of regulation and function among DAP kinases. Here we report the identification of a novel alternatively spliced kinase isoform of the DRP-1 gene, termed DRP-1β. The alternative splicing event replaces the whole extra catalytic domain of DRP-1 with a single coding exon that is closely related to the sequence of the extra catalytic domain of ZIPk. As a consequence, DRP-1β lacks the calmodulin regulatory domain of DRP-1, and instead contains a leucine zipper-like motif similar to the protein binding region of ZIPk. Several functional assays proved that this new isoform retained the biochemical and cellular properties that are common to DRP-1 and ZIPk, including myosin light chain phosphorylation, and activation of membrane blebbing and autophagy. In addition, DRP-1β also acquired binding to the ATF4 transcription factor, a feature characteristic of ZIPk but not DRP-1. Thus, a splicing event of the DRP-1 produces a ZIPk like isoform. DRP-1β is highly conserved in evolution, present in all known vertebrate DRP-1 loci. We detected the corresponding mRNA and protein in embryonic mouse brains and in human embryonic stem cells thus confirming the in vivo utilization of this isoform. The discovery of module conservation within the DAPk family members illustrates a parsimonious way to increase the functional complexity within protein families. It also provides crucial data for modeling the expansion and evolution of DAP kinase proteins within vertebrates, suggesting that DRP-1 and ZIPk most likely evolved from their ancient ancestor gene DAPk by two gene duplication events that occurred close to the emergence of vertebrates

  9. New modularity of DAP-kinases: alternative splicing of the DRP-1 gene produces a ZIPk-like isoform.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yishay Shoval

    Full Text Available DRP-1 and ZIPk are two members of the Death Associated Protein Ser/Thr Kinase (DAP-kinase family, which function in different settings of cell death including autophagy. DAP kinases are very similar in their catalytic domains but differ substantially in their extra-catalytic domains. This difference is crucial for the significantly different modes of regulation and function among DAP kinases. Here we report the identification of a novel alternatively spliced kinase isoform of the DRP-1 gene, termed DRP-1β. The alternative splicing event replaces the whole extra catalytic domain of DRP-1 with a single coding exon that is closely related to the sequence of the extra catalytic domain of ZIPk. As a consequence, DRP-1β lacks the calmodulin regulatory domain of DRP-1, and instead contains a leucine zipper-like motif similar to the protein binding region of ZIPk. Several functional assays proved that this new isoform retained the biochemical and cellular properties that are common to DRP-1 and ZIPk, including myosin light chain phosphorylation, and activation of membrane blebbing and autophagy. In addition, DRP-1β also acquired binding to the ATF4 transcription factor, a feature characteristic of ZIPk but not DRP-1. Thus, a splicing event of the DRP-1 produces a ZIPk like isoform. DRP-1β is highly conserved in evolution, present in all known vertebrate DRP-1 loci. We detected the corresponding mRNA and protein in embryonic mouse brains and in human embryonic stem cells thus confirming the in vivo utilization of this isoform. The discovery of module conservation within the DAPk family members illustrates a parsimonious way to increase the functional complexity within protein families. It also provides crucial data for modeling the expansion and evolution of DAP kinase proteins within vertebrates, suggesting that DRP-1 and ZIPk most likely evolved from their ancient ancestor gene DAPk by two gene duplication events that occurred close to the

  10. Alternative mRNA splicing creates transcripts encoding soluble proteins from most LILR genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Des C; Roghanian, Ali; Brown, Damien P; Chang, Chiwen; Allen, Rachel L; Trowsdale, John; Young, Neil T

    2009-11-01

    Leucocyte Ig-like receptors (LILR) are a family of innate immune receptors expressed on myeloid and lymphoid cells that influence adaptive immune responses. We identified a common mechanism of alternative mRNA splicing, which generates transcripts that encode soluble protein isoforms of the majority of human LILR. These alternative splice variants lack transmembrane and cytoplasmic encoding regions, due to the transcription of a cryptic stop codon present in an intron 5' of the transmembrane encoding exon. The alternative LILR transcripts were detected in cell types that express their membrane-associated isoforms. Expression of the alternative LILRB1 transcript in transfected cells resulted in the release of a soluble approximately 65 Kd LILRB1 protein into culture supernatants. Soluble LILRB1 protein was also detected in the culture supernatants of monocyte-derived DC. In vitro assays suggested that soluble LILRB1 could block the interaction between membrane-associated LILRB1 and HLA-class I. Soluble LILRB1 may act as a dominant negative regulator of HLA-class I-mediated LILRB1 inhibition. Soluble isoforms of the other LILR may function in a comparable way.

  11. Auxiliary splice factor U2AF26 and transcription factor Gfi1 cooperate directly in regulating CD45 alternative splicing.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heyd, F.; Dam, G.B. ten; Moroy, T.

    2006-01-01

    By alternative splicing, different isoforms of the transmembrane tyrosine phosphatase CD45 are generated that either enhance or limit T cell receptor signaling. We report here that CD45 alternative splicing is regulated by cooperative action of the splice factor U2AF26 and the transcription factor

  12. Response of alternative splice isoforms of OsRad9 gene from Oryza sativa to environmental stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Wang, Wenguo; Li, Fosheng; Wang, Qingwei; Wang, Shenghua; Xu, Ying; Chen, Fang

    2017-07-14

    Rad9 protein plays an important role in cell-cycle checkpoint signal transduction in human and yeast cells, but knowledge about Rad9 in plants is limited. This study reports that the Rad9 gene of rice can generate the transcript products OsRad9.1 and OsRad9.2 through alternative splicing. OsRad9.1, with all nine exons, is the main cell-cycle checkpoint protein involved in the response of rice to genotoxic stresses (ultraviolet radiation and antibiotic stress), environmental stresses (drought, salt, and heavy metal stress), and auxin stimuli (2,4-D, IAA, and IBA). Meanwhile, transcript isoform OsRad9.2, which lost exon7 and exon8, showed different preferential stimulation effects on these stresses and pollen development duration. These results might indicat that besides the monitoring and repair of DNA damage, Rad9 might involve in the development of pollen.

  13. Identification of alternatively translated Tetherin isoforms with differing antiviral and signaling activities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis J Cocka

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Tetherin (BST-2/CD317/HM1.24 is an IFN induced transmembrane protein that restricts release of a broad range of enveloped viruses. Important features required for Tetherin activity and regulation reside within the cytoplasmic domain. Here we demonstrate that two isoforms, derived by alternative translation initiation from highly conserved methionine residues in the cytoplasmic domain, are produced in both cultured human cell lines and primary cells. These two isoforms have distinct biological properties. The short isoform (s-Tetherin, which lacks 12 residues present in the long isoform (l-Tetherin, is significantly more resistant to HIV-1 Vpu-mediated downregulation and consequently more effectively restricts HIV-1 viral budding in the presence of Vpu. s-Tetherin Vpu resistance can be accounted for by the loss of serine-threonine and tyrosine motifs present in the long isoform. By contrast, the l-Tetherin isoform was found to be an activator of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB signaling whereas s-Tetherin does not activate NF-κB. Activation of NF-κB requires a tyrosine-based motif found within the cytoplasmic tail of the longer species and may entail formation of l-Tetherin homodimers since co-expression of s-Tetherin impairs the ability of the longer isoform to activate NF-κB. These results demonstrate a novel mechanism for control of Tetherin antiviral and signaling function and provide insight into Tetherin function both in the presence and absence of infection.

  14. VEGF-A isoform-specific regulation of calcium ion flux, transcriptional activation and endothelial cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fearnley, Gareth W; Bruns, Alexander F; Wheatcroft, Stephen B; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2015-04-24

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) regulates many aspects of vascular physiology such as cell migration, proliferation, tubulogenesis and cell-cell interactions. Numerous isoforms of VEGF-A exist but their physiological significance is unclear. Here we evaluated two different VEGF-A isoforms and discovered differential regulation of cytosolic calcium ion flux, transcription factor localisation and endothelial cell response. Analysis of VEGF-A isoform-specific stimulation of VEGFR2-dependent signal transduction revealed differential capabilities for isoform activation of multiple signal transduction pathways. VEGF-A165 treatment promoted increased phospholipase Cγ1 phosphorylation, which was proportional to the subsequent rise in cytosolic calcium ions, in comparison to cells treated with VEGF-A121. A major consequence of this VEGF-A isoform-specific calcium ion flux in endothelial cells is differential dephosphorylation and subsequent nuclear translocation of the transcription factor NFATc2. Using reverse genetics, we discovered that NFATc2 is functionally required for VEGF-A-stimulated endothelial cell migration but not tubulogenesis. This work presents a new mechanism for understanding how VEGF-A isoforms program complex cellular outputs by converting signal transduction pathways into transcription factor redistribution to the nucleus, as well as defining a novel role for NFATc2 in regulating the endothelial cell response. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  15. VEGF-A isoform-specific regulation of calcium ion flux, transcriptional activation and endothelial cell migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth W. Fearnley

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A regulates many aspects of vascular physiology such as cell migration, proliferation, tubulogenesis and cell-cell interactions. Numerous isoforms of VEGF-A exist but their physiological significance is unclear. Here we evaluated two different VEGF-A isoforms and discovered differential regulation of cytosolic calcium ion flux, transcription factor localisation and endothelial cell response. Analysis of VEGF-A isoform-specific stimulation of VEGFR2-dependent signal transduction revealed differential capabilities for isoform activation of multiple signal transduction pathways. VEGF-A165 treatment promoted increased phospholipase Cγ1 phosphorylation, which was proportional to the subsequent rise in cytosolic calcium ions, in comparison to cells treated with VEGF-A121. A major consequence of this VEGF-A isoform-specific calcium ion flux in endothelial cells is differential dephosphorylation and subsequent nuclear translocation of the transcription factor NFATc2. Using reverse genetics, we discovered that NFATc2 is functionally required for VEGF-A-stimulated endothelial cell migration but not tubulogenesis. This work presents a new mechanism for understanding how VEGF-A isoforms program complex cellular outputs by converting signal transduction pathways into transcription factor redistribution to the nucleus, as well as defining a novel role for NFATc2 in regulating the endothelial cell response.

  16. DBATE: database of alternative transcripts expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Valerio; Colantoni, Alessio; Calderone, Alberto; Ausiello, Gabriele; Ferrè, Fabrizio; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela

    2013-01-01

    The use of high-throughput RNA sequencing technology (RNA-seq) allows whole transcriptome analysis, providing an unbiased and unabridged view of alternative transcript expression. Coupling splicing variant-specific expression with its functional inference is still an open and difficult issue for which we created the DataBase of Alternative Transcripts Expression (DBATE), a web-based repository storing expression values and functional annotation of alternative splicing variants. We processed 13 large RNA-seq panels from human healthy tissues and in disease conditions, reporting expression levels and functional annotations gathered and integrated from different sources for each splicing variant, using a variant-specific annotation transfer pipeline. The possibility to perform complex queries by cross-referencing different functional annotations permits the retrieval of desired subsets of splicing variant expression values that can be visualized in several ways, from simple to more informative. DBATE is intended as a novel tool to help appreciate how, and possibly why, the transcriptome expression is shaped. DATABASE URL: http://bioinformatica.uniroma2.it/DBATE/.

  17. Alternative NF-κB Isoforms in the Drosophila Neuromuscular Junction and Brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhou

    Full Text Available The Drosophila NF-κB protein Dorsal is expressed at the larval neuromuscular junction, where its expression appears unrelated to known Dorsal functions in embryonic patterning and innate immunity. Using confocal microscopy with domain-specific antisera, we demonstrate that larval muscle expresses only the B isoform of Dorsal, which arises by intron retention. We find that Dorsal B interacts with and stabilizes Cactus at the neuromuscular junction, but exhibits Cactus independent localization and an absence of detectable nuclear translocation. We further find that the Dorsal-related immune factor Dif encodes a B isoform, reflecting a conservation of B domains across a range of insect NF-κB proteins. Carrying out mutagenesis of the Dif locus via a site-specific recombineering approach, we demonstrate that Dif B is the major, if not sole, Dif isoform in the mushroom bodies of the larval brain. The Dorsal and Dif B isoforms thus share a specific association with nervous system tissues as well as an alternative protein structure.

  18. Pervasive, Coordinated Protein-Level Changes Driven by Transcript Isoform Switching during Meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ze; Otto, George Maxwell; Powers, Emily Nicole; Keskin, Abdurrahman; Mertins, Philipp; Carr, Steven Alfred; Jovanovic, Marko; Brar, Gloria Ann

    2018-02-22

    To better understand the gene regulatory mechanisms that program developmental processes, we carried out simultaneous genome-wide measurements of mRNA, translation, and protein through meiotic differentiation in budding yeast. Surprisingly, we observed that the levels of several hundred mRNAs are anti-correlated with their corresponding protein products. We show that rather than arising from canonical forms of gene regulatory control, the regulation of at least 380 such cases, or over 8% of all measured genes, involves temporally regulated switching between production of a canonical, translatable transcript and a 5' extended isoform that is not efficiently translated into protein. By this pervasive mechanism for the modulation of protein levels through a natural developmental program, a single transcription factor can coordinately activate and repress protein synthesis for distinct sets of genes. The distinction is not based on whether or not an mRNA is induced but rather on the type of transcript produced. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Alternatively spliced short and long isoforms of adaptor protein intersectin 1 form complexes in mammalian cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rynditch A. V.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Intersectin 1 (ITSN1 is an adaptor protein involved in membrane trafficking and cell signaling. Long and short isoforms of ITSN1 (ITSN1-L and ITSN1-S are produced by alternative splicing. The aim of our study was to investigate whether ITSN1-L and ITSN1-S could interact in mammalian cells. Methods. During this study we employed immunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy. Results. We have shown that endogenous ITSN1-S co-precipitates with overexpressed ITSN1-L in PC12, 293 and 293T cells. Long and short isoforms of ITSN1 also co-localize in 293T cells. Conclusions. ITSN1-L and ITSN1-S form complexes in mammalian cells.

  20. Quantitative evaluation of alternatively spliced mRNA isoforms by label-free real-time plasmonic sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas, César S; Carrascosa, L G; Bonnal, S; Valcárcel, J; Lechuga, L M

    2016-04-15

    Alternative splicing of mRNA precursors enables cells to generate different protein outputs from the same gene depending on their developmental or homeostatic status. Its deregulation is strongly linked to disease onset and progression. Current methodologies for monitoring alternative splicing demand elaborate procedures and often present difficulties in discerning between closely related isoforms, e.g. due to cross-hybridization during their detection. Herein, we report a general methodology using a Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) biosensor for label-free monitoring of alternative splicing events in real-time, without any cDNA synthesis or PCR amplification requirements. We applied this methodology to RNA isolated from HeLa cells for the quantification of alternatively spliced isoforms of the Fas gene, involved in cancer progression through regulation of programmed cell death. We demonstrate that our methodology is isoform-specific, with virtually no cross-hybridization, achieving limits of detection (LODs) in the picoMolar (pM) range. Similar results were obtained for the detection of the BCL-X gene mRNA isoforms. The results were independently validated by RT-qPCR, with excellent concordance in the determination of isoform ratios. The simplicity and robustness of this biosensor technology can greatly facilitate the exploration of alternative splicing biomarkers in disease diagnosis and therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. TRIMe7-CypA, an alternative splicing isoform of TRIMCyp in rhesus macaque, negatively modulates TRIM5α activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, Lei; Tang, Yan-Dong; Liu, Jian-Dong; Yu, Chang-Qing; Sun, Liu-Ke; Lin, Yue-Zhi; Wang, Xue-Feng; Wang, Xiaojun; Zhou, Jian-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • TRIMe7-CypA expresses in rhesus and pig-tailed, but not long-tailed macaques. • TRIMe7-CypA does not show the restriction to a HIV-GFP report virus in vitro. • It acts as a negative modulator to TRIM5α likely by competitive inhibition. - Abstract: The existence of innate, host-specific restriction factors is a major obstacle to the development of nonhuman primate models for AIDS studies, and TRIM5α is one of the most important of these restriction factors. In recent years, a TRIM5 chimeric gene that was retrotransposed by a cyclophilin A (CypA) cDNA was identified in certain macaque species. The TRIM5α-CypA fusion protein, TRIMCyp, which was expressed in these monkeys, had lost its restriction ability toward HIV-1. We previously found that TRIMe7-CypA, an alternative splicing isoform of the TRIMCyp transcripts, was expressed in pig-tailed and rhesus macaques but absent in long-tailed macaques. In this study, the anti-HIV-1 activity of TRIMe7-CypA in the rhesus macaque (RhTRIMe7-CypA) was investigated. The over-expression of RhTRIMe7-CypA in CrFK, HeLa and HEK293T cells did not restrict the infection or replication of an HIV-1-GFP reporter virus in these cells. As a positive control, rhesus (rh)TRIM5α strongly inhibited the reporter virus. Intriguingly, the anti-HIV-1 activity of RhTRIM5α was significantly reduced in a dose-dependent manner by the co-repression of RhTRIMe7-CypA. Our data indicate that although the RhTRIMe7-CypA isoform does not appear to restrict HIV-1, it may act as a negative modulator of TRIM family proteins, presumably by competitive inhibition

  2. TRIMe7-CypA, an alternative splicing isoform of TRIMCyp in rhesus macaque, negatively modulates TRIM5α activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Lei [Harbin Veterinary Research Institute of the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Harbin 150001 (China); Tang, Yan-Dong [Harbin Veterinary Research Institute of the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Harbin 150001 (China); Biotechnology Institute of Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Liu, Jian-Dong; Yu, Chang-Qing; Sun, Liu-Ke; Lin, Yue-Zhi; Wang, Xue-Feng [Harbin Veterinary Research Institute of the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Harbin 150001 (China); Wang, Xiaojun, E-mail: xjw@hvri.ac.cn [Harbin Veterinary Research Institute of the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Harbin 150001 (China); Zhou, Jian-Hua, E-mail: jianhua_uc@126.com [Harbin Veterinary Research Institute of the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Harbin 150001 (China); Harbin Pharmaceutical Group Biovaccine Company, Harbin 150069 (China)

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • TRIMe7-CypA expresses in rhesus and pig-tailed, but not long-tailed macaques. • TRIMe7-CypA does not show the restriction to a HIV-GFP report virus in vitro. • It acts as a negative modulator to TRIM5α likely by competitive inhibition. - Abstract: The existence of innate, host-specific restriction factors is a major obstacle to the development of nonhuman primate models for AIDS studies, and TRIM5α is one of the most important of these restriction factors. In recent years, a TRIM5 chimeric gene that was retrotransposed by a cyclophilin A (CypA) cDNA was identified in certain macaque species. The TRIM5α-CypA fusion protein, TRIMCyp, which was expressed in these monkeys, had lost its restriction ability toward HIV-1. We previously found that TRIMe7-CypA, an alternative splicing isoform of the TRIMCyp transcripts, was expressed in pig-tailed and rhesus macaques but absent in long-tailed macaques. In this study, the anti-HIV-1 activity of TRIMe7-CypA in the rhesus macaque (RhTRIMe7-CypA) was investigated. The over-expression of RhTRIMe7-CypA in CrFK, HeLa and HEK293T cells did not restrict the infection or replication of an HIV-1-GFP reporter virus in these cells. As a positive control, rhesus (rh)TRIM5α strongly inhibited the reporter virus. Intriguingly, the anti-HIV-1 activity of RhTRIM5α was significantly reduced in a dose-dependent manner by the co-repression of RhTRIMe7-CypA. Our data indicate that although the RhTRIMe7-CypA isoform does not appear to restrict HIV-1, it may act as a negative modulator of TRIM family proteins, presumably by competitive inhibition.

  3. MITA/STING and Its Alternative Splicing Isoform MRP Restrict Hepatitis B Virus Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuhui; Zhao, Kaitao; Su, Xi; Lu, Lu; Zhao, He; Zhang, Xianwen; Wang, Yun; Wu, Chunchen; Chen, Jizheng; Zhou, Yuan; Hu, Xue; Wang, Yanyi; Lu, Mengji; Chen, Xinwen; Pei, Rongjuan

    2017-01-01

    An efficient clearance of hepatitis B virus (HBV) requires the coordinated work of both the innate and adaptive immune responses. MITA/STING, an adapter protein of the innate immune signaling pathways, plays a key role in regulating innate and adaptive immune responses to DNA virus infection. Previously, we identified an alternatively spliced isoform of MITA/STING, called MITA-related protein (MRP), and found that MRP could specifically block MITA-mediated interferon (IFN) induction while retaining the ability to activate NF-κB. Here, we asked whether MITA/STING and MRP were able to control the HBV replication. Both MITA/STING and MRP significantly inhibited HBV replication in vitro. MITA overexpression stimulated IRF3-IFN pathway; while MRP overexpression activated NF-κB pathway, suggesting these two isoforms may inhibit HBV replication through different ways. Using a hydrodynamic injection (HI) mouse model, we found that HBV replication was reduced following MITA/STING and MRP expression vectors in mice and was enhanced by the knockout of MITA/STING (MITA/STING-/-). The HBV specific humoral and CD8+ T cell responses were impaired in MITA/STING deficient mice, suggesting the participation of MITA/STING in the initiation of host adaptive immune responses. In summary, our data suggest that MITA/STING and MRP contribute to HBV control via modulation of the innate and adaptive responses.

  4. CaMKIIdelta isoforms differentially affect calcium handling but similarly regulate HDAC/MEF2 transcriptional responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tong; Kohlhaas, Michael; Backs, Johannes; Mishra, Shikha; Phillips, William; Dybkova, Nataliya; Chang, Shurong; Ling, Haiyun; Bers, Donald M; Maier, Lars S; Olson, Eric N; Brown, Joan Heller

    2007-11-30

    The delta(B) and delta(C) splice variants of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), which differ by the presence of a nuclear localization sequence, are both expressed in cardiomyocytes. We used transgenic (TG) mice and CaMKII expression in cardiomyocytes to test the hypothesis that the CaMKIIdelta(C) isoform regulates cytosolic Ca(2+) handling and the delta(B) isoform, which localizes to the nucleus, regulates gene transcription. Phosphorylation of CaMKII sites on the ryanodine receptor (RyR) and on phospholamban (PLB) were increased in CaMKIIdelta(C) TG. This was associated with markedly enhanced sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) spark frequency and decreased SR Ca(2+) content in cardiomyocytes. None of these parameters were altered in TG mice expressing the nuclear-targeted CaMKIIdelta(B). In contrast, cardiac expression of either CaMKIIdelta(B) or delta(C) induced transactivation of myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) gene expression and up-regulated hypertrophic marker genes. Studies using rat ventricular cardiomyocytes confirmed that CaMKIIdelta(B) and delta(C) both regulate MEF2-luciferase gene expression, increase histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) association with 14-3-3, and induce HDAC4 translocation from nucleus to cytoplasm, indicating that either isoform can stimulate HDAC4 phosphorylation. Finally, HDAC4 kinase activity was shown to be increased in cardiac homogenates from either CaMKIIdelta(B) or delta(C) TG mice. Thus CaMKIIdelta isoforms have similar effects on hypertrophic gene expression but disparate effects on Ca(2+) handling, suggesting distinct roles for CaMKIIdelta isoform activation in the pathogenesis of cardiac hypertrophy versus heart failure.

  5. The conserved histone deacetylase Rpd3 and the DNA binding regulator Ume6 repress BOI1's meiotic transcript isoform during vegetative growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuchen; Stuparevic, Igor; Xie, Bingning; Becker, Emmanuelle; Law, Michael J; Primig, Michael

    2015-05-01

    BOI1 and BOI2 are paralogs important for the actin cytoskeleton and polar growth. BOI1 encodes a meiotic transcript isoform with an extended 5'-untranslated region predicted to impair protein translation. It is, however, unknown how the isoform is repressed during mitosis, and if Boi1 is present during sporulation. By interpreting microarray data from MATa cells, MATa/α cells, a starving MATα/α control, and a meiosis-impaired rrp6 mutant, we classified BOI1's extended isoform as early meiosis-specific. These results were confirmed by RNA-Sequencing, and extended by a 5'-RACE assay and Northern blotting, showing that meiotic cells induce the long isoform while the mitotic isoform remains detectable during meiosis. We provide evidence via motif predictions, an in vivo binding assay and genetic experiments that the Rpd3/Sin3/Ume6 histone deacetylase complex, which represses meiotic genes during mitosis, also prevents the induction of BOI1's 5'-extended isoform in mitosis by direct binding of Ume6 to its URS1 target. Finally, we find that Boi1 protein levels decline when cells switch from fermentation to respiration and sporulation. The histone deacetylase Rpd3 is conserved, and eukaryotic genes frequently encode transcripts with variable 5'-UTRs. Our findings are therefore relevant for regulatory mechanisms involved in the control of transcript isoforms in multi-cellular organisms. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Proteomic Validation of Transcript Isoforms, Including Those Assembled from RNA-Seq Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tay, Aidan P; Pang, Chi Nam Ignatius; Twine, Natalie a

    2015-01-01

    Human proteome analysis now requires an understanding of protein isoforms. We recently published the PG Nexus pipeline, which facilitates high confidence validation of exons and splice junctions by integrating genomics and proteomics data. Here we comprehensively explore how RNA-seq transcriptomi...

  7. Comparative Analysis of mRNA Isoform Expression in Cardiac Hypertrophy and Development Reveals Multiple Post-Transcriptional Regulatory Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji Yeon; Li, Wencheng; Zheng, Dinghai; Zhai, Peiyong; Zhao, Yun; Matsuda, Takahisa; Vatner, Stephen F.; Sadoshima, Junichi; Tian, Bin

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is enlargement of the heart in response to physiological or pathological stimuli, chiefly involving growth of myocytes in size rather than in number. Previous studies have shown that the expression pattern of a group of genes in hypertrophied heart induced by pressure overload resembles that at the embryonic stage of heart development, a phenomenon known as activation of the “fetal gene program”. Here, using a genome-wide approach we systematically defined genes and pathways regulated in short- and long-term cardiac hypertrophy conditions using mice with transverse aortic constriction (TAC), and compared them with those regulated at different stages of embryonic and postnatal development. In addition, exon-level analysis revealed widespread mRNA isoform changes during cardiac hypertrophy resulting from alternative usage of terminal or internal exons, some of which are also developmentally regulated and may be attributable to decreased expression of Fox-1 protein in cardiac hypertrophy. Genes with functions in certain pathways, such as cell adhesion and cell morphology, are more likely to be regulated by alternative splicing. Moreover, we found 3′UTRs of mRNAs were generally shortened through alternative cleavage and polyadenylation in hypertrophy, and microRNA target genes were generally de-repressed, suggesting coordinated mechanisms to increase mRNA stability and protein production during hypertrophy. Taken together, our results comprehensively delineated gene and mRNA isoform regulation events in cardiac hypertrophy and revealed their relations to those in development, and suggested that modulation of mRNA isoform expression plays an importance role in heart remodeling under pressure overload. PMID:21799842

  8. Identification of mRNA transcripts and immunohistochemical localization of Na/H exchanger isoforms in gerbil inner ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, B R; Ng, L L; Schulte, B A

    1998-09-01

    Recent physiological and pharmacological studies have implicated involvement of the Na/H exchanger (NHE) in regulating inner ear ion homeostasis, but the cellular distribution of this membrane transporter remains unknown. Here reverse transcription and the polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were employed to screen adult gerbil inner ears for mRNA transcripts encoding the four best characterized isoforms of NHE. PCR products spanning selected segments of NHE mRNAs were cloned and sequenced. The putative housekeeping gene NHE-1 was found to be expressed and the 459 bp product shared 98.7% amino acid homology with rat sequence. NHE-2, NHE-3 and NHE-4 cDNA transcripts likewise were detected and the PCR products shared 100, 99.4 and 88.9% amino acid homology, respectively, with their rat counterparts. In addition, the cellular distribution of NHE isoforms 1 and 3 was mapped in the gerbil inner ear by immunostaining with polyclonal antisera against rat antigens. In the cochlea, the antiserum against NHE-1 reacted strongly at the basolateral membrane of strial marginal cells as well as with inner and outer hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons. Less intense staining for NHE-1 was present in subpopulations of fibrocytes in the spiral limbus and in inferior and superior areas of the spiral ligament. In the vestibular system dark and transitional cells expressed abundant NHE-1 as did hair cells and vestibular ganglia neurons. Immunostaining with the antiserum against NHE-3 was limited to the apical surface of marginal cells in the stria vascularis. Based on these data, NHE-1 likely functions primarily to maintain intracellular pH levels in cells where it is found in high abundance. NHE-3, on the other hand, possibly participates in the vectorial transcellular movement of Na+ by strial marginal cells thus helping to maintain the extremely low Na+ level in cochlear endolymph.

  9. Alternatively spliced CD44 isoforms containing exon v10 promote cellular adhesion through the recognition of chondroitin sulfate-modified CD44

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chiu, R K; Droll, A; Dougherty, S T; Carpenito, C; Cooper, D L; Dougherty, G J

    1999-01-01

    Correlations have been noted between the expression of certain alternatively spliced CD44 isoforms and the metastatic propensity of various histologically distinct tumor cell types. The precise mechanism by which particular CD44 isoforms contribute to the metastatic process is, however, unclear. In

  10. Genomic structure and cloning of two transcript isoforms of human Sp8.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Milona (Maria-athina); J.E. Gough (Julie); A.J. Edgar (Alasdair)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: The Specificity proteins (Sp) are a family of transcription factors that have three highly conserved zinc-fingers located towards the carboxy-terminal that bind GC-boxes and assist in the initiation of gene transcription. Human Sp1-7 genes have been

  11. AtRTD2: A Reference Transcript Dataset for accurate quantification of alternative splicing and expression changes in Arabidopsis thaliana RNA-seq data

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Runxuan

    2016-05-06

    Background Alternative splicing is the major post-transcriptional mechanism by which gene expression is regulated and affects a wide range of processes and responses in most eukaryotic organisms. RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) can generate genome-wide quantification of individual transcript isoforms to identify changes in expression and alternative splicing. RNA-seq is an essential modern tool but its ability to accurately quantify transcript isoforms depends on the diversity, completeness and quality of the transcript information. Results We have developed a new Reference Transcript Dataset for Arabidopsis (AtRTD2) for RNA-seq analysis containing over 82k non-redundant transcripts, whereby 74,194 transcripts originate from 27,667 protein-coding genes. A total of 13,524 protein-coding genes have at least one alternatively spliced transcript in AtRTD2 such that about 60% of the 22,453 protein-coding, intron-containing genes in Arabidopsis undergo alternative splicing. More than 600 putative U12 introns were identified in more than 2,000 transcripts. AtRTD2 was generated from transcript assemblies of ca. 8.5 billion pairs of reads from 285 RNA-seq data sets obtained from 129 RNA-seq libraries and merged along with the previous version, AtRTD, and Araport11 transcript assemblies. AtRTD2 increases the diversity of transcripts and through application of stringent filters represents the most extensive and accurate transcript collection for Arabidopsis to date. We have demonstrated a generally good correlation of alternative splicing ratios from RNA-seq data analysed by Salmon and experimental data from high resolution RT-PCR. However, we have observed inaccurate quantification of transcript isoforms for genes with multiple transcripts which have variation in the lengths of their UTRs. This variation is not effectively corrected in RNA-seq analysis programmes and will therefore impact RNA-seq analyses generally. To address this, we have tested different genome

  12. HER4 Cyt1 and Cyt2 Isoforms Regulate Transcription through Differential Interaction with a Transcriptional Regulator, Yap

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    TEAD ...transcriptional  factor  regulated  by  Yap,  and  have  found  that   HER4  forms  complex  with   TEAD ;  however,  this...phosphorylation  of   TEAD .  We  were  also  unable  to  find  any  transcriptional  consequences  of  HER4  interaction  with

  13. High resolution analysis of the human transcriptome: detection of extensive alternative splicing independent of transcriptional activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rouet Fabien

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Commercially available microarrays have been used in many settings to generate expression profiles for a variety of applications, including target selection for disease detection, classification, profiling for pharmacogenomic response to therapeutics, and potential disease staging. However, many commercially available microarray platforms fail to capture transcript diversity produced by alternative splicing, a major mechanism for driving proteomic diversity through transcript heterogeneity. Results The human Genome-Wide SpliceArray™ (GWSA, a novel microarray platform, utilizes an existing probe design concept to monitor such transcript diversity on a genome scale. The human GWSA allows the detection of alternatively spliced events within the human genome through the use of exon body and exon junction probes to provide a direct measure of each transcript, through simple calculations derived from expression data. This report focuses on the performance and validation of the array when measured against standards recently published by the Microarray Quality Control (MAQC Project. The array was shown to be highly quantitative, and displayed greater than 85% correlation with the HG-U133 Plus 2.0 array at the gene level while providing more extensive coverage of each gene. Almost 60% of splice events among genes demonstrating differential expression of greater than 3 fold also contained extensive splicing alterations. Importantly, almost 10% of splice events within the gene set displaying constant overall expression values had evidence of transcript diversity. Two examples illustrate the types of events identified: LIM domain 7 showed no differential expression at the gene level, but demonstrated deregulation of an exon skip event, while erythrocyte membrane protein band 4.1 -like 3 was differentially expressed and also displayed deregulation of a skipped exon isoform. Conclusion Significant changes were detected independent of

  14. The chaperone-like activity of α-synuclein attenuates aggregation of its alternatively spliced isoform, 112-synuclein in vitro: plausible cross-talk between isoforms in protein aggregation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Madhuri Manda

    Full Text Available Abnormal oligomerization and aggregation of α-synuclein (α-syn/WT-syn has been shown to be a precipitating factor in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease (PD. Earlier observations on the induced-alternative splicing of α-syn by Parkinsonism mimetics as well as identification of region specific abnormalities in the transcript levels of 112-synuclein (112-syn in diseased subjects underscores the role of 112-syn in the pathophysiology of PD. In the present study, we sought to identify the aggregation potential of 112-syn in the presence or absence of WT-syn to predict its plausible role in protein aggregation events. Results demonstrate that unlike WT-syn, lack of 28 aa in the C-terminus results in the loss of chaperone-like activity with a concomitant gain in vulnerability to heat-induced aggregation and time-dependent fibrillation. The effects were dose and time-dependent and a significant aggregation of 112-syn was evident at as low as 45 °C following 10 min of incubation. The heat-induced aggregates were found to be ill-defined structures and weakly positive towards Thioflavin-T (ThT staining as compared to clearly distinguishable ThT positive extended fibrils resulting upon 24 h of incubation at 37 °C. Further, the chaperone-like activity of WT-syn significantly attenuated heat-induced aggregation of 112-syn in a dose and time-dependent manner. On contrary, WT-syn synergistically enhanced fibrillation of 112-syn. Overall, the present findings highlight a plausible cross-talk between isoforms of α-syn and the relative abundance of these isoforms may dictate the nature and fate of protein aggregates.

  15. Alternative splicing and extensive RNA editing of human TPH2 transcripts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maik Grohmann

    Full Text Available Brain serotonin (5-HT neurotransmission plays a key role in the regulation of mood and has been implicated in a variety of neuropsychiatric conditions. Tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH is the rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of 5-HT. Recently, we discovered a second TPH isoform (TPH2 in vertebrates, including man, which is predominantly expressed in brain, while the previously known TPH isoform (TPH1 is primarly a non-neuronal enzyme. Overwhelming evidence now points to TPH2 as a candidate gene for 5-HT-related psychiatric disorders. To assess the role of TPH2 gene variability in the etiology of psychiatric diseases we performed cDNA sequence analysis of TPH2 transcripts from human post mortem amygdala samples obtained from individuals with psychiatric disorders (drug abuse, schizophrenia, suicide and controls. Here we show that TPH2 exists in two alternatively spliced variants in the coding region, denoted TPH2a and TPH2b. Moreover, we found evidence that the pre-mRNAs of both splice variants are dynamically RNA-edited in a mutually exclusive manner. Kinetic studies with cell lines expressing recombinant TPH2 variants revealed a higher activity of the novel TPH2B protein compared with the previously known TPH2A, whereas RNA editing was shown to inhibit the enzymatic activity of both TPH2 splice variants. Therefore, our results strongly suggest a complex fine-tuning of central nervous system 5-HT biosynthesis by TPH2 alternative splicing and RNA editing. Finally, we present molecular and large-scale linkage data evidencing that deregulated alternative splicing and RNA editing is involved in the etiology of psychiatric diseases, such as suicidal behaviour.

  16. The DMD locus harbours multiple long non-coding RNAs which orchestrate and control transcription of muscle dystrophin mRNA isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovolenta, Matteo; Erriquez, Daniela; Valli, Emanuele; Brioschi, Simona; Scotton, Chiara; Neri, Marcella; Falzarano, Maria Sofia; Gherardi, Samuele; Fabris, Marina; Rimessi, Paola; Gualandi, Francesca; Perini, Giovanni; Ferlini, Alessandra

    2012-01-01

    The 2.2 Mb long dystrophin (DMD) gene, the largest gene in the human genome, corresponds to roughly 0.1% of the entire human DNA sequence. Mutations in this gene cause Duchenne muscular dystrophy and other milder X-linked, recessive dystrophinopathies. Using a custom-made tiling array, specifically designed for the DMD locus, we identified a variety of novel long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), both sense and antisense oriented, whose expression profiles mirror that of DMD gene. Importantly, these transcripts are intronic in origin and specifically localized to the nucleus and are transcribed contextually with dystrophin isoforms or primed by MyoD-induced myogenic differentiation. Furthermore, their forced ectopic expression in both human muscle and neuronal cells causes a specific and negative regulation of endogenous dystrophin full length isoforms and significantly down-regulate the activity of a luciferase reporter construct carrying the minimal promoter regions of the muscle dystrophin isoform. Consistent with this apparently repressive role, we found that, in muscle samples of dystrophinopathic female carriers, lncRNAs expression levels inversely correlate with those of muscle full length DMD isoforms. Overall these findings unveil an unprecedented complexity of the transcriptional pattern of the DMD locus and reveal that DMD lncRNAs may contribute to the orchestration and homeostasis of the muscle dystrophin expression pattern by either selective targeting and down-modulating the dystrophin promoter transcriptional activity.

  17. ΔBAFF, an Alternate Splice Isoform That Regulates Receptor Binding and Biopresentation of the B Cell Survival Cytokine, BAFF*

    OpenAIRE

    Gavin, Amanda L; Aït-Azzouzene, Djemel; Ware, Carl F.; Nemazee, David

    2003-01-01

    The tumor necrosis family member BAFF is limiting for the survival of follicular B lymphocytes, but excessive BAFF signaling can lead to autoimmunity, suggesting that its activity must be tightly regulated. We have identified a conserved alternate splice isoform of BAFF, called ΔBAFF, which lacks 57 nt encoding the A–A1 loop and is co-expressed with BAFF in many mouse and human myeloid cells. Mouse ΔBAFF appears on the plasma membrane, but unlike BAFF it is inefficiently released by proteolys...

  18. Deep proteomics of mouse skeletal muscle enables quantitation of protein isoforms, metabolic pathways and transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deshmukh, Atul S; Murgia, Marta; Nagaraja, Nagarjuna

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle constitutes 40% of individual body mass and plays vital roles in locomotion and whole-body metabolism. Proteomics of skeletal muscle is challenging due to highly abundant contractile proteins that interfere with detection of regulatory proteins. Using a state-of-the art mass...... spectrometric (MS) workflow and a strategy to map identifications from the C2C12 cell line model to tissues, we identified a total of 10,218 proteins, including skeletal muscle specific transcription factors like myod1 and myogenin and circadian clock proteins. We obtain absolute abundances for proteins...

  19. Efficient cloning of alternatively polyadenylated transcripts via hybridization capture PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampias, Theodoros N; Fragoulis, Emmanuel G; Sideris, Diamantis C

    2012-01-01

    Cloning of alternatively polyadenylated transcripts is crucial for studying gene expression and function. Recent transcriptome analysis has mainly focused on large EST clone collections. However, EST sequencing techniques in many cases are incapable of isolating rare transcripts or address transcript variability. In most cases, 3' RACE is applied for the experimental identification of alternatively polyadenylated transcripts. However, its application may result in nonspecific amplification and false positive products due to the usage of a single gene specific primer. Additionally, internal poly(A) stretches primed by oligo(dT) primer in mRNAs with AU-rich 3'UTR may generate truncated cDNAs. To overcome these limitations, we have developed a simple and rapid approach combining SMART technology for the construction of a full length cDNA library and hybrid capture PCR for the selection and amplification of target cDNAs. Our strategy is characterized by enhanced specificity compared to other conventional RT-PCR and 3' RACE procedures.

  20. Muscle and neural isoforms of agrin increase utrophin expression in cultured myotubes via a transcriptional regulatory mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramolini, A O; Burton, E A; Tinsley, J M; Ferns, M J; Cartaud, A; Cartaud, J; Davies, K E; Lunde, J A; Jasmin, B J

    1998-01-09

    . Furthermore, this increase in transcriptional activity in response to agrin resulted from a greater number of myonuclei expressing the 1.3-kilobase pair utrophin promoter-nlsLacZ construct. Deletion of 800 base pairs 5' from this fragment decreased the basal levels of nlsLacZ expression and abolished the sensitivity of the utrophin promoter to exogenously applied agrin. In addition, site-directed mutagenesis of an N-box motif contained within this 800-base pair fragment demonstrated its essential contribution in this regulatory mechanism. Finally, direct gene transfer studies performed in vivo further revealed the importance of this DNA element for the synapse-specific expression of the utrophin gene along multinucleated muscle fibers. These data show that both muscle and neural isoforms of agrin can regulate expression of the utrophin gene and further indicate that agrin is not only involved in the mechanisms leading to the formation of clusters containing presynthesized synaptic molecules but that it can also participate in the local regulation of genes encoding synaptic proteins. Together, these observations are therefore relevant for our basic understanding of the events involved in the assembly and maintenance of the postsynaptic membrane domain of the neuromuscular junction and for the potential use of utrophin as a therapeutic strategy to counteract the effects of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  1. Mammary Gland Tumor Development in Transgenic Mice Overexpressing Different Isoforms of the CDP/Cux Transcription Factor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cadieux, Chantal

    2008-01-01

    Short CUX1 isoforms were found to be overexpressed in breast cancer cell lines, in human breast tumors and in uterine leiomyomas, suggesting that these proteins play a key role in tumor development and progression...

  2. Mammary Gland Tumor Development in Transgenic Mice Overexpressing Different Isoforms of the CDP/Cux Transcription Factor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cadieux, Chantal

    2007-01-01

    Short CDP/Cux isoforms were found to be overexpressed in breast cancer cell lines, in human breast tumors and in uterine leiomyomas, suggesting that these proteins play a key role in tumor development and progression...

  3. Novel forms of Paired-like homeodomain transcription factor 2 (PITX2): Generation by alternative translation initiation and mRNA splicing

    OpenAIRE

    Bernard Daniel J; Hjalt Tord A; Lamba Pankaj

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Members of the Paired-like homeodomain transcription factor (PITX) gene family, particularly PITX1 and PITX2, play important roles in normal development and in differentiated cell functions. Three major isoforms of PITX2 were previously reported to be produced through both alternative mRNA splicing (PITX2A and PITX2B) and alternative promoter usage (PITX2C). The proteins derived from these mRNAs contain identical homeodomain and carboxyl termini. Differences in the amino-t...

  4. Novel P2 promoter-derived HNF4α isoforms with different N-terminus generated by alternate exon insertion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Jianmin; Levitsky, Lynne L.; Rhoads, David B.

    2009-01-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) is a critical transcription factor for pancreas and liver development and functions in islet β cells to maintain glucose homeostasis. Mutations in the human HNF4A gene lead to maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY1) and polymorphisms are associated with increased risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Expression of six HNF4α variants, three each from two developmentally regulated promoters, has been firmly established. We have now detected a new set of HNF4α variants designated HNF4α10-12 expressed from distal promoter P2. These variants, generated by inclusion of previously undetected exon 1E (human = 222 nt, rodent = 136 nt) following exon 1D have an altered N-terminus but identical remaining reading frame. HNF4α10-α12 are expressed in pancreatic islets (and liver) and exhibit transactivation potentials similar to the corresponding α7-α9 isoforms. DNA-binding analyses implied much higher protein levels of HNF4α10-α12 in liver than expected from the RT-PCR data. Our results provide evidence for a more complex expression pattern of HNF4α than previously appreciated. We recommend inclusion of exon 1E and nearby DNA sequences in screening for HNF4α mutations and polymorphisms in genetic analyses of MODY1 and T2DM.

  5. SMRT has tissue-specific isoform profiles that include a form containing one CoRNR box

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Short, Stephen; Malartre, Marianne; Sharpe, Colin

    2005-01-01

    SMRT acts as a corepressor for a range of transcription factors. The amino-terminal part of the protein includes domains that mainly mediate transcriptional repression whilst the carboxy-terminal part includes domains that interact with nuclear receptors using up to three motifs called CoRNR boxes. The region of the SMRT primary transcript encoding the interaction domains is subject to alternative splicing that varies the inclusion of the third CoRNR box. The profile in mice includes an abundant, novel SMRT isoform that possesses just one CoRNR box. Mouse tissues therefore express SMRT isoforms containing one, two or three CoRNR boxes. In frogs, the SMRT isoform profile is tissue-specific. The mouse also shows distinct profiles generated by differential expression levels of the SMRT transcript isoforms. The formation of multiple SMRT isoforms and their tissue-specific regulation indicates a mechanism, whereby cells can define the repertoire of transcription factors regulated by SMRT

  6. Pleiotropic and isoform-specific functions for Pitx2 in superior colliculus and hypothalamic neuronal development

    OpenAIRE

    Waite, Mindy R.; Skidmore, Jennifer M.; Micucci, Joseph A.; Shiratori, Hidetaka; Hamada, Hiroshi; Martin, James F.; Martin, Donna M.

    2012-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation of gene expression during development is critical for proper neuronal differentiation and migration. Alternative splicing and differential isoform expression have been demonstrated for most mammalian genes, but their specific contributions to gene function are not well understood. In mice, the transcription factor gene Pitx2 is expressed as three different isoforms (PITX2A, PITX2B, and PITX2C) which have unique amino termini and common DNA binding homeodomains and c...

  7. Alternative splicing generates novel Fads3 transcript in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hui Gyu; Kim, Ellen; Liu, Guowen; Kothapalli, Kumar S. D.; Brenna, J. Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Fads3 is the third member of the fatty acid desaturase gene cluster; with at least eight evolutionarily conserved alternative transcripts (AT), having no clearly established function as are known for FADS2 and FADS1. Here we present identification of a novel Fads3 transcript in mice (Fads3AT9), characterize Fads3AT9 expression in mouse tissues and evaluate correlations with metabolite profiles. Total RNA obtained from mouse tissues is reverse-transcribed into cDNA and used as template for PCR reactions. Tissue fatty acids were extracted and quantified by gas chromatography. Sequencing analysis revealed complete absence of exon 2 resulting in an open reading frame of 1239 bp, encoding a putative protein of 412 aa with loss of 37 aa compared to classical Fads3 (Fads3CS). FADS3AT9 retains all the conserved regions characteristic of front end desaturase (cytochrome b5 domain and three histidine repeats). Both Fads3CS and Fads3AT9 are ubiquitously expressed in 11 mouse tissues. Fads3AT9 abundance was greater than Fads3CS in pancreas, liver, spleen, brown adipose tissue and thymus. Fads3CS expression is low in pancreas while Fads3AT9 is over ten-fold greater abundance. The eicosanoid precursor fatty acid 20:4n - 6, the immediate desaturation product of the Fads1 coded Δ5-desaturase, was highest in pancreas where Fads3CS is low. Changes in expression patterns and fatty acid profiles suggest that Fads3AT9 may play a role in the regulation and/or biosynthesis of long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids from precursors. PMID:27216536

  8. Novel FGFR1 mutations in Kallmann syndrome and normosmic idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism: evidence for the involvement of an alternatively spliced isoform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Catarina; Bastos, Margarida; Pignatelli, Duarte; Borges, Teresa; Aragüés, José M; Fonseca, Fernando; Pereira, Bernardo D; Socorro, Sílvia; Lemos, Manuel C

    2015-11-01

    To determine the prevalence of fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) mutations and their predicted functional consequences in patients with idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH). Cross-sectional study. Multicentric. Fifty unrelated patients with IHH (21 with Kallmann syndrome and 29 with normosmic IHH). None. Patients were screened for mutations in FGFR1. The functional consequences of mutations were predicted by in silico structural and conservation analysis. Heterozygous FGFR1 mutations were identified in six (12%) kindreds. These consisted of frameshift mutations (p.Pro33-Alafs*17 and p.Tyr654*) and missense mutations in the signal peptide (p.Trp4Cys), in the D1 extracellular domain (p.Ser96Cys) and in the cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase domain (p.Met719Val). A missense mutation was identified in the alternatively spliced exon 8A (p.Ala353Thr) that exclusively affects the D3 extracellular domain of FGFR1 isoform IIIb. Structure-based and sequence-based prediction methods and the absence of these variants in 200 normal controls were all consistent with a critical role for the mutations in the activity of the receptor. Oligogenic inheritance (FGFR1/CHD7/PROKR2) was found in one patient. Two FGFR1 isoforms, IIIb and IIIc, result from alternative splicing of exons 8A and 8B, respectively. Loss-of-function of isoform IIIc is a cause of IHH, whereas isoform IIIb is thought to be redundant. Ours is the first report of normosmic IHH associated with a mutation in the alternatively spliced exon 8A and suggests that this disorder can be caused by defects in either of the two alternatively spliced FGFR1 isoforms. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The interferon-induced antiviral protein PML (TRIM19) promotes the restriction and transcriptional silencing of lentiviruses in a context-specific, isoform-specific fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masroori, Nasser; Merindol, Natacha; Berthoux, Lionel

    2016-03-22

    The promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein, a type I interferon (IFN-I)-induced gene product and a member of the tripartite motif (TRIM) family, modulates the transcriptional activity of viruses belonging to various families. Whether PML has an impact on the replication of HIV-1 has not been fully addressed, but recent studies point to its possible involvement in the restriction of HIV-1 in human cells and in the maintenance of transcriptional latency in human cell lines in which HIV-1 is constitutively repressed. We investigated further the restriction of HIV-1 and a related lentivirus, SIVmac, by PML in murine cells and in a lymphocytic human cell line. In particular, we studied the relevance of PML to IFN-I-mediated inhibition and the role of individual human isoforms. We demonstrate that both human PML (hPML) and murine PML (mPML) inhibit the early post-entry stages of the replication of HIV-1 and a related lentivirus, SIVmac. In addition, HIV-1 was transcriptionally silenced by mPML and by hPML isoforms I, II, IV and VI in MEFs. This PML-mediated transcriptional repression was attenuated in presence of the histone deacetylase inhibitor SAHA. In contrast, depletion of PML had no effect on HIV-1 gene expression in a human T cell line. PML was found to contribute to the inhibition of HIV-1 by IFN-I. Specifically, IFN-α and IFN-β treatments of MEFs enhanced the PML-dependent inhibition of HIV-1 early replication stages. We show that PML can inhibit HIV-1 and other lentiviruses as part of the IFN-I-mediated response. The restriction takes place at two distinct steps, i.e. reverse transcription and transcription, and in an isoform-specific, cellular context-specific fashion. Our results support a model in which PML activates innate immune antilentiviral effectors. These data are relevant to the development of latency reversal-inducing pharmacological agents, since PML was previously proposed as a pharmacological target for such inhibitors. This study also has

  10. PTENα, a PTEN isoform translated through alternative initiation, regulates mitochondrial function and energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hui; He, Shiming; Yang, Jingyi; Jia, Xinying; Wang, Pan; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Zhong; Zou, Xiajuan; McNutt, Michael A; Shen, Wen Hong; Yin, Yuxin

    2014-05-06

    PTEN is one of the most frequently mutated genes in human cancer. It is known that PTEN has a wide range of biological functions beyond tumor suppression. Here, we report that PTENα, an N-terminally extended form of PTEN, functions in mitochondrial metabolism. Translation of PTENα is initiated from a CUG codon upstream of and in-frame with the coding region of canonical PTEN. Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2A (eIF2A) controls PTENα translation, which requires a CUG-centered palindromic motif. We show that PTENα induces cytochrome c oxidase activity and ATP production in mitochondria. TALEN-mediated somatic deletion of PTENα impairs mitochondrial respiratory chain function. PTENα interacts with canonical PTEN to increase PINK1 protein levels and promote energy production. Our studies demonstrate the importance of eIF2A-mediated alternative translation for generation of protein diversity in eukaryotic systems and provide insights into the mechanism by which the PTEN family is involved in multiple cellular processes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The small FOXP1 isoform predominantly expressed in activated B cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and full-length FOXP1 exert similar oncogenic and transcriptional activity in human B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Keimpema, Martine; Grüneberg, Leonie J; Schilder-Tol, Esther J M; Oud, Monique E C M; Beuling, Esther A; Hensbergen, Paul J; de Jong, Johann; Pals, Steven T; Spaargaren, Marcel

    2017-03-01

    The forkhead transcription factor FOXP1 is generally regarded as an oncogene in activated B cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Previous studies have suggested that a small isoform of FOXP1 rather than full-length FOXP1, may possess this oncogenic activity. Corroborating those studies, we herein show that activated B cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cell lines and primary activated B cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cells predominantly express a small FOXP1 isoform, and that the 5'-end of the Foxp1 gene is a common insertion site in murine lymphomas in leukemia virus- and transposon-mediated insertional mutagenesis screens. By combined mass spectrometry, (quantative) reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction/sequencing, and small interfering ribonucleic acid-mediated gene silencing, we determined that the small FOXP1 isoform predominantly expressed in activated B cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma lacks the N-terminal 100 amino acids of full-length FOXP1. Aberrant overexpression of this FOXP1 isoform (ΔN100) in primary human B cells revealed its oncogenic capacity; it repressed apoptosis and plasma cell differentiation. However, no difference in potency was found between this small FOXP1 isoform and full-length FOXP1. Furthermore, overexpression of full-length FOXP1 or this small FOXP1 isoform in primary B cells and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cell lines resulted in similar gene regulation. Taken together, our data indicate that this small FOXP1 isoform and full-length FOXP1 have comparable oncogenic and transcriptional activity in human B cells, suggesting that aberrant expression or overexpression of FOXP1, irrespective of the specific isoform, contributes to lymphomagenesis. These novel insights further enhance the value of FOXP1 for the diagnostics, prognostics, and treatment of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  12. SSP: an interval integer linear programming for de novo transcriptome assembly and isoform discovery of RNA-seq reads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safikhani, Zhaleh; Sadeghi, Mehdi; Pezeshk, Hamid; Eslahchi, Changiz

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in the sequencing technologies have provided a handful of RNA-seq datasets for transcriptome analysis. However, reconstruction of full-length isoforms and estimation of the expression level of transcripts with a low cost are challenging tasks. We propose a novel de novo method named SSP that incorporates interval integer linear programming to resolve alternatively spliced isoforms and reconstruct the whole transcriptome from short reads. Experimental results show that SSP is fast and precise in determining different alternatively spliced isoforms along with the estimation of reconstructed transcript abundances. The SSP software package is available at http://www.bioinf.cs.ipm.ir/software/ssp. © 2013.

  13. Novel forms of Paired-like homeodomain transcription factor 2 (PITX2: Generation by alternative translation initiation and mRNA splicing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard Daniel J

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Members of the Paired-like homeodomain transcription factor (PITX gene family, particularly PITX1 and PITX2, play important roles in normal development and in differentiated cell functions. Three major isoforms of PITX2 were previously reported to be produced through both alternative mRNA splicing (PITX2A and PITX2B and alternative promoter usage (PITX2C. The proteins derived from these mRNAs contain identical homeodomain and carboxyl termini. Differences in the amino-termini of the proteins may confer functional differences in some contexts. Results Here, we report the identification of two novel PITX2 isoforms. First, we demonstrate that the Pitx2c mRNA generates two protein products, PITX2Cα and PITX2Cβ, via alternative translation initiation. Second, we identified a novel mRNA splice variant, Pitx2b2, which uses the same 5' splice donor in intron 2 as Pitx2b (hereafter referred to as Pitx2b1, but employs an alternative 3' splice acceptor, leading to an in-frame deletion of 39 base pairs relative to Pitx2b1. Pitx2b2 mRNA is expressed in both murine and human pituitary. The data show that in a murine gonadotrope cell line and adult murine pituitary what was previously thought to be PITX2B1 is actually PITX2Cβ, or perhaps PITX2B2. PITX2B1 is expressed at lower levels than previously thought. PITX2Cβ and PITX2B2 activate gonadotrope-specific gene promoter-reporters similarly to known PITX2 isoforms. Conclusion We have identified and characterized two novel isoforms of PITX2, generated by alternative translation initiation (PITX2Cβ and alternative mRNA splicing (PITX2B2. These proteins show similar DNA binding and trans-activation functions as other PITX2 isoforms in vitro, though their conservation across species suggests that they may play distinct, as yet unidentified, roles in vivo.

  14. The Alternative Splicing Regulator Tra2b Is Required for Somitogenesis and Regulates Splicing of an Inhibitory Wnt11b Isoform

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    Darwin S. Dichmann

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing is pervasive in vertebrates, yet little is known about most isoforms or their regulation. transformer-2b (tra2b encodes a splicing regulator whose endogenous function is poorly understood. Tra2b knockdown in Xenopus results in embryos with multiple defects, including defective somitogenesis. Using RNA sequencing, we identify 142 splice changes (mostly intron retention and exon skipping, 89% of which are not in current annotations. A previously undescribed isoform of wnt11b retains the last intron, resulting in a truncated ligand (Wnt11b-short. We show that this isoform acts as a dominant-negative ligand in cardiac gene induction and pronephric tubule formation. To determine the contribution of Wnt11b-short to the tra2b phenotype, we induce retention of intron 4 in wnt11b, which recapitulates the failure to form somites but not other tra2b morphant defects. This alternative splicing of a Wnt ligand adds intricacy to a complex signaling pathway and highlights intron retention as a regulatory mechanism.

  15. UPF2-dependent nonsense-mediated mRNA decay pathway is essential for spermatogenesis by selectively eliminating longer 3'UTR transcripts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bao, Jianqiang; Vitting-Seerup, Kristoffer; Waage, Johannes Eichler

    2016-01-01

    During transcription, most eukaryotic genes generate multiple alternative cleavage and polyadenylation (APA) sites, leading to the production of transcript isoforms with variable lengths in the 3' untranslated region (3'UTR). In contrast to somatic cells, male germ cells, especially pachytene...

  16. Prognostic impact of alternative splicing-derived hMENA isoforms in resected, node-negative, non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bria, Emilio; Di Modugno, Francesca; Sperduti, Isabella; Iapicca, Pierluigi; Visca, Paolo; Alessandrini, Gabriele; Antoniani, Barbara; Pilotto, Sara; Ludovini, Vienna; Vannucci, Jacopo; Bellezza, Guido; Sidoni, Angelo; Tortora, Giampaolo; Radisky, Derek C; Crinò, Lucio; Cognetti, Francesco; Facciolo, Francesco; Mottolese, Marcella; Milella, Michele; Nisticò, Paola

    2014-11-30

    Risk assessment and treatment choice remain a challenge in early non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Alternative splicing is an emerging source for diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic tools. Here, we investigated the prognostic value of the actin cytoskeleton regulator hMENA and its isoforms, hMENA11a and hMENAΔv6, in early NSCLC. The epithelial hMENA11a isoform was expressed in NSCLC lines expressing E-CADHERIN and was alternatively expressed with hMENAΔv6. Enforced expression of hMENAΔv6 or hMENA11a increased or decreased the invasive ability of A549 cells, respectively. hMENA isoform expression was evaluated in 248 node-negative NSCLC. High pan-hMENA and low hMENA11a were the only independent predictors of shorter disease-free and cancer-specific survival, and low hMENA11a was an independent predictor of shorter overall survival, at multivariate analysis. Patients with low pan-hMENA/high hMENA11a expression fared significantly better (P≤0.0015) than any other subgroup. Such hybrid variable was incorporated with T-size and number of resected lymph nodes into a 3-class-risk stratification model, which strikingly discriminated between different risks of relapse, cancer-related death, and death. The model was externally validated in an independent dataset of 133 patients. Relative expression of hMENA splice isoforms is a powerful prognostic factor in early NSCLC, complementing clinical parameters to accurately predict individual patient risk.

  17. Transcription elongation rate has a tissue-specific impact on alternative cleavage and polyadenylation in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaochuan; Freitas, Jaime; Zheng, Dinghai; Oliveira, Marta S; Hoque, Mainul; Martins, Torcato; Henriques, Telmo; Tian, Bin; Moreira, Alexandra

    2017-12-01

    Alternative polyadenylation (APA) is a mechanism that generates multiple mRNA isoforms with different 3'UTRs and/or coding sequences from a single gene. Here, using 3' region extraction and deep sequencing (3'READS), we have systematically mapped cleavage and polyadenylation sites (PASs) in Drosophila melanogaster , expanding the total repertoire of PASs previously identified for the species, especially those located in A-rich genomic sequences. Cis -element analysis revealed distinct sequence motifs around fly PASs when compared to mammalian ones, including the greater enrichment of upstream UAUA elements and the less prominent presence of downstream UGUG elements. We found that over 75% of mRNA genes in Drosophila melanogaster undergo APA. The head tissue tends to use distal PASs when compared to the body, leading to preferential expression of APA isoforms with long 3'UTRs as well as with distal terminal exons. The distance between the APA sites and intron location of PAS are important parameters for APA difference between body and head, suggesting distinct PAS selection contexts. APA analysis of the RpII215 C4 mutant strain, which harbors a mutant RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) with a slower elongation rate, revealed that a 50% decrease in transcriptional elongation rate leads to a mild trend of more usage of proximal, weaker PASs, both in 3'UTRs and in introns, consistent with the "first come, first served" model of APA regulation. However, this trend was not observed in the head, suggesting a different regulatory context in neuronal cells. Together, our data expand the PAS collection for Drosophila melanogaster and reveal a tissue-specific effect of APA regulation by RNAPII elongation rate. © 2017 Liu et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  18. Evolution of transcriptional networks in yeast: alternative teams of transcriptional factors for different species

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    Adriana Muñoz

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The diversity in eukaryotic life reflects a diversity in regulatory pathways. Nocedal and Johnson argue that the rewiring of gene regulatory networks is a major force for the diversity of life, that changes in regulation can create new species. Results We have created a method (based on our new “ping-pong algorithm for detecting more complicated rewirings, where several transcription factors can substitute for one or more transcription factors in the regulation of a family of co-regulated genes. An example is illustrative. A rewiring has been reported by Hogues et al. that RAP1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae substitutes for TBF1/CBF1 in Candida albicans for ribosomal RP genes. There one transcription factor substitutes for another on some collection of genes. Such a substitution is referred to as a “rewiring”. We agree with this finding of rewiring as far as it goes but the situation is more complicated. Many transcription factors can regulate a gene and our algorithm finds that in this example a “team” (or collection of three transcription factors including RAP1 substitutes for TBF1 for 19 genes. The switch occurs for a branch of the phylogenetic tree containing 10 species (including Saccharomyces cerevisiae, while the remaining 13 species (Candida albicans are regulated by TBF1. Conclusions To gain insight into more general evolutionary mechanisms, we have created a mathematical algorithm that finds such general switching events and we prove that it converges. Of course any such computational discovery should be validated in the biological tests. For each branch of the phylogenetic tree and each gene module, our algorithm finds a sub-group of co-regulated genes and a team of transcription factors that substitutes for another team of transcription factors. In most cases the signal will be small but in some cases we find a strong signal of switching. We report our findings for 23 Ascomycota fungi species.

  19. Levels of myosin heavy chain mRNA transcripts and protein isoforms in the fast extensor digitorum longus muscle of 7-month-old rats with chronic thyroid status alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadászová, A; Hudecová, S; Krizanová, O; Soukup, T

    2006-01-01

    We have studied the effect of chronic thyroid status alterations on the myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoform composition (by SDS-PAGE) and on MyHC mRNA levels (by RT-PCR) in the fast extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle of 7-month-old inbred Lewis strain female rats and compared this with corresponding results of the previously studied slow soleus muscle. Our findings show that in the EDL muscle, all four types 1, 2a, 2x/d and 2b of MyHC mRNA transcripts and protein isoforms are present in euthyroid, hypothyroid and hyperthyroid rats, i.e. after chronic treatment with methimazole and T(3), respectively. This is in contrast with the soleus, where only MyHC1 and 2a protein isoforms are expressed under similar conditions. Except for 2x/d MyHC mRNA transcripts in the EDL muscles, there was always significant difference between hypothyroid and hyperthyroid rats both at mRNA and protein levels. From our results we can conclude that extended alteration of the thyroid status leads to typical changes in the expression of MyHC mRNA transcripts and MyHC protein isoforms in the fast EDL and the slow soleus muscles. These changes correspond to those described after shorter periods of altered thyroid status. The characteristic phenotype differences between soleus and EDL muscles remain, however, preserved even after 7 months of thyroid hormone status alteration.

  20. Isoforms of elongation factor eEF1A may be differently regulated at post-transcriptional level in breast cancer progression

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    Vislovukh A. A.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1A exists as two 98 % homologous isoforms: eEF1A1 (A1 and eEF1A2 (A2 which are tissue and development specific. Despite high homology in an open reading frame (ORF region, mRNAs coding for eEF1A1 and eEF1A2 are different in their untranslated regions (UTR, suggesting a possibility of their dissimilar post-transcriptional regulation. Aim. To analyze the existence of cis-acting motifs in the UTRs of EEF1A1/A2 mRNAs, to confirm the possibility of post-transcriptional control of eEF1A1 and eEF1A2 expression. Methods. An ensemble of bioinformatic methods was applied to predict regulatory motifs in the UTRs of EEF1A1/A2 mRNAs. Dual-luciferase reporter assay was employed to detect post-transcriptional regulation of eEF1A1/A2 expression. Results. Numerous regulatory motifs in the UTR of EEF1A1/A2 mRNAs were found bioinformatically. The experimental evidence was obtained for the existence of negative regulation of EEF1A1 and positive regulation of EEF1A2 mRNA in the model of breast cancer development. Conclusions. EEF1A1 and EEF1A2 mRNAs contain distinct motifs in the UTRs and are differently regulated in cancer suggesting the possibility of their control by different cellular signals.

  1. Transcription regulation of AAC3 gene encoding hypoxic isoform of ADP/ATP carrier in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolikova, B.

    2001-01-01

    Two repressoric regions are present in the AAC3 promoter, termed URS1 and URS2. URS1 region is responsible for a carbon source-dependent regulation and plays a role under both, aerobic and anaerobic conditions. By deletion analysis URS1 was localized into the -322/-244 region and was found that the regulation is likely exerted by the repression by non-fermentable or non-repressing fermentable carbon sources than by the activation by repressing carbon source. By computer analysis cis sequences for two potential transcription factors, Rap1 and ERA, were identified within URS1. Rap1 binding into its consensus sequence was proved, effort to find the protein binding to the ERA cis regulatory sequences has failed. By the means of mutational analysis we revealed that the regulation pathway mediating the carbon source-dependent regulation via URS1 differs according to the presence or absence of oxygen in the growth medium. Under aerobic conditions the carbon source-dependent repression is mediated by the ERA factor and the role of Rap1 is only marginal. On the contrary, under anaerobic conditions, the repression is mediated solely by Rap1. AAC1 gene product might be involved in the regulation of the AAC3 gene, the regulation pathway has not been characterized yet. (author)

  2. GAD2 Alternative Transcripts in the Human Prefrontal Cortex, and in Schizophrenia and Affective Disorders.

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    Kasey N Davis

    Full Text Available Genetic variation and early adverse environmental events work together to increase risk for schizophrenia. γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA, the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in adult mammalian brain, plays a major role in normal brain development, and has been strongly implicated in the pathobiology of schizophrenia. GABA synthesis is controlled by two glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD genes, GAD1 and GAD2, both of which produce a number of alternative transcripts. Genetic variants in the GAD1 gene are associated with increased risk for schizophrenia, and reduced expression of its major transcript in the human dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC. No consistent changes in GAD2 expression have been found in brains from patients with schizophrenia. In this work, with the use of RNA sequencing and PCR technologies, we confirmed and tracked the expression of an alternative truncated transcript of GAD2 (ENST00000428517 in human control DLPFC homogenates across lifespan besides the well-known full length transcript of GAD2. In addition, using quantitative RT-PCR, expression of GAD2 full length and truncated transcripts were measured in the DLPFC of patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depression. The expression of GAD2 full length transcript is decreased in the DLPFC of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder patients, while GAD2 truncated transcript is increased in bipolar disorder patients but decreased in schizophrenia patients. Moreover, the patients with schizophrenia with completed suicide or positive nicotine exposure showed significantly higher expression of GAD2 full length transcript. Alternative transcripts of GAD2 may be important in the growth and development of GABA-synthesizing neurons as well as abnormal GABA signaling in the DLPFC of patients with schizophrenia and affective disorders.

  3. DBIRD complex integrates alternative mRNA splicing with RNA polymerase II transcript elongation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Close, Pierre; East, Philip; Dirac-Svejstrup, A Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Alternative messenger RNA splicing is the main reason that vast mammalian proteomic complexity can be achieved with a limited number of genes. Splicing is physically and functionally coupled to transcription, and is greatly affected by the rate of transcript elongation. As the nascent pre-mRNA em...... elongation, particularly across areas encompassing affected exons. Together, these data indicate that the DBIRD complex acts at the interface between mRNP particles and RNAPII, integrating transcript elongation with the regulation of alternative splicing.......Alternative messenger RNA splicing is the main reason that vast mammalian proteomic complexity can be achieved with a limited number of genes. Splicing is physically and functionally coupled to transcription, and is greatly affected by the rate of transcript elongation. As the nascent pre...... and help to integrate transcript elongation with mRNA splicing remain unclear. Here we characterize the human interactome of chromatin-associated mRNP particles. This led us to identify deleted in breast cancer 1 (DBC1) and ZNF326 (which we call ZNF-protein interacting with nuclear mRNPs and DBC1 (ZIRD...

  4. A recombinant Sal k 1 isoform as an alternative to the polymorphic allergen from Salsola kali pollen for allergy diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mas, Salvador; Boissy, Patrice; Monsalve, Rafael I; Cuesta-Herranz, Javier; Díaz-Perales, Araceli; Fernández, Javier; Colás, Carlos; Rodríguez, Rosalía; Barderas, Rodrigo; Villalba, Mayte

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of Amaranthaceae pollen allergy has increased due to the desertification occurring in many countries. In some regions of Spain, Salsola kali is the main cause of pollinosis, at almost the same level as olive and grass pollen. Sal k 1 - the sensitization marker of S. kali pollinosis - is used in clinical diagnosis, but is purified at a low yield from pollen. We aimed to produce a recombinant (r)Sal k 1 able to span the structural and immunological properties of the natural isoforms from pollen, and validate its potential use for diagnosis. Specific cDNA was amplified by PCR, cloned into the pET41b vector and used to transform BL21 (DE3) Escherichia coli cells. Immunoblotting, ELISA, basophil activation and skin-prick tests were used to validate the recombinant protein against Sal k 1 isolated from pollen. Sera and blood cells from S. kali pollen-sensitized patients and specific monoclonal and polyclonal antisera were used. rSal k 1 was produced in bacteria with a yield of 7.5 mg/l of cell culture. The protein was purified to homogeneity and structural and immunologically validated against the natural form. rSal k 1 exhibited a higher IgE cross-reactivity with plant-derived food extracts such as peanut, almond or tomato than with pollen sources such as Platanus acerifolia and Oleaceae members. rSal k 1 expressed in bacteria retains intact structural and immunological properties in comparison to the pollen-derived allergen. It spans the immunological properties of most of the isoforms found in pollen, and it might substitute natural Sal k 1 in clinical diagnosis. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Alternative Splicing of FOXP3-Virtue and Vice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailer, Reiner K W

    2018-01-01

    FOXP3 is the lineage-defining transcription factor of CD4+ CD25+ regulatory T cells. While many aspects of its regulation, interaction, and function are conserved among species, alternatively spliced FOXP3 isoforms are expressed only in human cells. This review summarizes current knowledge about alternative splicing of FOXP3 and the specific functions of FOXP3 isoforms in health and disease. Future perspectives in research and the therapeutic potential of manipulating alternative splicing of FOXP3 are discussed.

  6. Alternative REST Splicing Underappreciated

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Guo-Lin; Miller, Gregory

    2017-01-01

    As a major orchestrator of the cellular epigenome, the repressor element-1 silencing transcription factor (REST) can either repress or activate thousands of genes depending on cellular context, suggesting a highly context-dependent REST function tuned by environmental cues. While REST shows cell-type non-selective active transcription, an N-terminal REST4 isoform caused by alternative splicing - inclusion of an extra exon (N3c) which introduces a pre-mature stop codon - has been implicated in...

  7. Alternative splicing and highly variable cadherin transcripts associated with field-evolved resistance of pink bollworm to bt cotton in India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey A Fabrick

    Full Text Available Evolution of resistance by insect pests can reduce the benefits of insecticidal proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt that are used extensively in sprays and transgenic crops. Despite considerable knowledge of the genes conferring insect resistance to Bt toxins in laboratory-selected strains and in field populations exposed to Bt sprays, understanding of the genetic basis of field-evolved resistance to Bt crops remains limited. In particular, previous work has not identified the genes conferring resistance in any cases where field-evolved resistance has reduced the efficacy of a Bt crop. Here we report that mutations in a gene encoding a cadherin protein that binds Bt toxin Cry1Ac are associated with field-evolved resistance of pink bollworm (Pectinophora gossypiella in India to Cry1Ac produced by transgenic cotton. We conducted laboratory bioassays that confirmed previously reported resistance to Cry1Ac in pink bollworm from the state of Gujarat, where Bt cotton producing Cry1Ac has been grown extensively. Analysis of DNA from 436 pink bollworm from seven populations in India detected none of the four cadherin resistance alleles previously reported to be linked with resistance to Cry1Ac in laboratory-selected strains of pink bollworm from Arizona. However, DNA sequencing of pink bollworm derived from resistant and susceptible field populations in India revealed eight novel, severely disrupted cadherin alleles associated with resistance to Cry1Ac. For these eight alleles, analysis of complementary DNA (cDNA revealed a total of 19 transcript isoforms, each containing a premature stop codon, a deletion of at least 99 base pairs, or both. Seven of the eight disrupted alleles each produced two or more different transcript isoforms, which implicates alternative splicing of messenger RNA (mRNA. This represents the first example of alternative splicing associated with field-evolved resistance that reduced the efficacy of a Bt crop.

  8. Alternative splicing and highly variable cadherin transcripts associated with field-evolved resistance of pink bollworm to bt cotton in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabrick, Jeffrey A; Ponnuraj, Jeyakumar; Singh, Amar; Tanwar, Raj K; Unnithan, Gopalan C; Yelich, Alex J; Li, Xianchun; Carrière, Yves; Tabashnik, Bruce E

    2014-01-01

    Evolution of resistance by insect pests can reduce the benefits of insecticidal proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) that are used extensively in sprays and transgenic crops. Despite considerable knowledge of the genes conferring insect resistance to Bt toxins in laboratory-selected strains and in field populations exposed to Bt sprays, understanding of the genetic basis of field-evolved resistance to Bt crops remains limited. In particular, previous work has not identified the genes conferring resistance in any cases where field-evolved resistance has reduced the efficacy of a Bt crop. Here we report that mutations in a gene encoding a cadherin protein that binds Bt toxin Cry1Ac are associated with field-evolved resistance of pink bollworm (Pectinophora gossypiella) in India to Cry1Ac produced by transgenic cotton. We conducted laboratory bioassays that confirmed previously reported resistance to Cry1Ac in pink bollworm from the state of Gujarat, where Bt cotton producing Cry1Ac has been grown extensively. Analysis of DNA from 436 pink bollworm from seven populations in India detected none of the four cadherin resistance alleles previously reported to be linked with resistance to Cry1Ac in laboratory-selected strains of pink bollworm from Arizona. However, DNA sequencing of pink bollworm derived from resistant and susceptible field populations in India revealed eight novel, severely disrupted cadherin alleles associated with resistance to Cry1Ac. For these eight alleles, analysis of complementary DNA (cDNA) revealed a total of 19 transcript isoforms, each containing a premature stop codon, a deletion of at least 99 base pairs, or both. Seven of the eight disrupted alleles each produced two or more different transcript isoforms, which implicates alternative splicing of messenger RNA (mRNA). This represents the first example of alternative splicing associated with field-evolved resistance that reduced the efficacy of a Bt crop.

  9. Pleiotropic and isoform-specific functions for Pitx2 in superior colliculus and hypothalamic neuronal development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, Mindy R.; Skidmore, Jennifer M.; Micucci, Joseph A.; Shiratori, Hidetaka; Hamada, Hiroshi; Martin, James F.; Martin, Donna M.

    2012-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation of gene expression during development is critical for proper neuronal differentiation and migration. Alternative splicing and differential isoform expression have been demonstrated for most mammalian genes, but their specific contributions to gene function are not well understood. In mice, the transcription factor gene Pitx2 is expressed as three different isoforms (PITX2A, PITX2B, and PITX2C) which have unique amino termini and common DNA binding homeodomains and carboxyl termini. The specific roles of these isoforms in neuronal development are not known. Here we report the onset of Pitx2ab and Pitx2c isoform-specific expression by E9.5 in the developing mouse brain. Using isoform-specific Pitx2 deletion mouse strains, we show that collicular neuron migration requires PITX2AB and that collicular GABAergic differentiation and targeting of hypothalamic projections require unique Pitx2 isoform dosage. These results provide insights into Pitx2 dosage and isoform-specific requirements underlying midbrain and hypothalamic development. PMID:23147109

  10. Human aldehyde dehydrogenase genes: alternatively spliced transcriptional variants and their suggested nomenclature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, William J; Stagos, Dimitrios; Marchitti, Satori A; Nebert, Daniel W; Tipton, Keith F; Bairoch, Amos; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2009-11-01

    The human aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) gene superfamily consists of 19 genes encoding enzymes critical for NAD(P)-dependent oxidation of endogenous and exogenous aldehydes, including drugs and environmental toxicants. Mutations in ALDH genes are the molecular basis of several disease states (e.g. Sjögren-Larsson syndrome, pyridoxine-dependent seizures, and type II hyperprolinemia) and may contribute to the etiology of complex diseases such as cancer and Alzheimer's disease. The aim of this nomenclature update was to identify splice transcriptional variants principally for the human ALDH genes. Data-mining methods were used to retrieve all human ALDH sequences. Alternatively spliced transcriptional variants were determined based on (i) criteria for sequence integrity and genomic alignment; (ii) evidence of multiple independent cDNA sequences corresponding to a variant sequence; and (iii) if available, empirical evidence of variants from the literature. Alternatively spliced transcriptional variants and their encoded proteins exist for most of the human ALDH genes; however, their function and significance remain to be established. When compared with the human genome, rat and mouse include an additional gene, Aldh1a7, in the ALDH1A subfamily. To avoid confusion when identifying splice variants in various genomes, nomenclature guidelines for the naming of such alternative transcriptional variants and proteins are recommended herein. In addition, a web database (www.aldh.org) has been developed to provide up-to-date information and nomenclature guidelines for the ALDH superfamily.

  11. Tissue-specific splicing of a ubiquitously expressed transcription factor is essential for muscle differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, Soji; Faralli, Hervé; Yao, Zizhen; Rakopoulos, Patricia; Palii, Carmen; Cao, Yi; Singh, Kulwant; Liu, Qi-Cai; Chu, Alphonse; Aziz, Arif; Brand, Marjorie; Tapscott, Stephen J; Dilworth, F Jeffrey

    2013-06-01

    Alternate splicing contributes extensively to cellular complexity by generating protein isoforms with divergent functions. However, the role of alternate isoforms in development remains poorly understood. Mef2 transcription factors are essential transducers of cell signaling that modulate differentiation of many cell types. Among Mef2 family members, Mef2D is unique, as it undergoes tissue-specific splicing to generate a muscle-specific isoform. Since the ubiquitously expressed (Mef2Dα1) and muscle-specific (Mef2Dα2) isoforms of Mef2D are both expressed in muscle, we examined the relative contribution of each Mef2D isoform to differentiation. Using both in vitro and in vivo models, we demonstrate that Mef2D isoforms act antagonistically to modulate differentiation. While chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) sequencing analysis shows that the Mef2D isoforms bind an overlapping set of genes, only Mef2Dα2 activates late muscle transcription. Mechanistically, the differential ability of Mef2D isoforms to activate transcription depends on their susceptibility to phosphorylation by protein kinase A (PKA). Phosphorylation of Mef2Dα1 by PKA provokes its association with corepressors. Conversely, exon switching allows Mef2Dα2 to escape this inhibitory phosphorylation, permitting recruitment of Ash2L for transactivation of muscle genes. Thus, our results reveal a novel mechanism in which a tissue-specific alternate splicing event has evolved that permits a ubiquitously expressed transcription factor to escape inhibitory signaling for temporal regulation of gene expression.

  12. Spinach Pyruvate Kinase Isoforms 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baysdorfer, Chris; Bassham, James A.

    1984-01-01

    Pyruvate kinase from spinach (Spinacea oleracea L.) leaves consists of two isoforms, separable by blue agarose chromatography. Both isoforms share similar pH profiles and substrate and alternate nucleotide Km values. In addition, both isoforms are inhibited by oxalate and ATP and activated by AMP. The isoforms differ in their response to three key metabolites; citrate, aspartate, and glutamate. The first isoform is similar to previously reported plant pyruvate kinases in its sensitivity to citrate inhibition. The Ki for this inhibition is 1.2 millimolar citrate. The second isoform is not affected by citrate but is regulated by aspartate and glutamate. Aspartate is an activator with a Ka of 0.05 millimolar, and glutamate is an inhibitor with a Ki of 0.68 millimolar. A pyruvate kinase with these properties has not been previously reported. Based on these considerations, we suggest that the activity of the first isoform is regulated by respiratory metabolism. The second isoform, in contrast, may be regulated by the demand for carbon skeletons for use in ammonia assimilation. PMID:16663425

  13. Alternate splicing of transcripts shape macrophage response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

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    Haroon Kalam

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Transcriptional reprogramming of macrophages upon Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb infection is widely studied; however, the significance of alternate splicing (AS in shaping cellular responses to mycobacterial infections is not yet appreciated. Alternate splicing can influence transcript stability or structure, function and localization of corresponding proteins thereby altering protein stoichiometry and physiological consequences. Using comprehensive analysis of a time-series RNA-seq data obtained from human macrophages infected with virulent or avirulent strains of Mtb, we show extensive remodeling of alternate splicing in macrophage transcriptome. The global nature of this regulation was evident since genes belonging to functional classes like trafficking, immune response, autophagy, redox and metabolism showed marked departure in the pattern of splicing in the infected macrophages. The systemic perturbation of splicing machinery in the infected macrophages was apparent as genes involved at different stages of spliceosome assembly were also regulated at the splicing level. Curiously there was a considerable increase in the expression of truncated/non-translatable variants of several genes, specifically upon virulent infections. Increased expression of truncated transcripts correlated with a decline in the corresponding protein levels. We verified the physiological relevance for one such candidate gene RAB8B; whose truncated variant gets enriched in H37Rv infected cells. Upon tweaking relative abundance of longer or shorter variants of RAB8B transcripts by specialized transduction, mycobacterial targeting to lysosomes could be promoted or blocked respectively, which also resulted in corresponding changes in the bacterial survival. Our results show RAB8B recruitment to the mycobacterial phagosomes is required for phagosome maturation. Thus the abundance of truncated RAB8B variant helps virulent Mtb survival by limiting the RAB8B levels in the

  14. Estimating the similarity of alternative Affymetrix probe sets using transcriptional networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The usefulness of the data from Affymetrix microarray analysis depends largely on the reliability of the files describing the correspondence between probe sets, genes and transcripts. Particularly, when a gene is targeted by several probe sets, these files should give information about the similarity of each alternative probe set pair. Transcriptional networks integrate the multiple correlations that exist between all probe sets and supply much more information than a simple correlation coefficient calculated for two series of signals. In this study, we used the PSAWN (Probe Set Assignment With Networks) programme we developed to investigate whether similarity of alternative probe sets resulted in some specific properties. Findings PSAWNpy delivered a full textual description of each probe set and information on the number and properties of secondary targets. PSAWNml calculated the similarity of each alternative probe set pair and allowed finding relationships between similarity and localisation of probes in common transcripts or exons. Similar alternative probe sets had very low negative correlation, high positive correlation and similar neighbourhood overlap. Using these properties, we devised a test that allowed grouping similar probe sets in a given network. By considering several networks, additional information concerning the similarity reproducibility was obtained, which allowed defining the actual similarity of alternative probe set pairs. In particular, we calculated the common localisation of probes in exons and in known transcripts and we showed that similarity was correctly correlated with them. The information collected on all pairs of alternative probe sets in the most popular 3’ IVT Affymetrix chips is available in tabular form at http://bns.crbm.cnrs.fr/download.html. Conclusions These processed data can be used to obtain a finer interpretation when comparing microarray data between biological conditions. They are particularly well

  15. Positive autoregulation of the transcription factor Pax6 in response to increased levels of either of its major isoforms, Pax6 or Pax6(5a, in cultured cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mason John O

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pax6 is a transcription factor essential for normal development of the eyes and nervous system. It has two major isoforms, Pax6 and Pax6(5a, and the ratios between their expression levels vary within narrow limits. We tested the effects of overexpressing either one or other isoform on endogenous Pax6 expression levels in Neuro2A and NIH3T3 cells. Results We found that both isoforms caused an up-regulation of endogenous Pax6 expression in cells with (Neuro2A or without (NIH3T3 constitutive Pax6 expression. Western blots showed that cells stably transfected with constructs expressing either Pax6 or Pax6(5a contained raised levels of both Pax6 and Pax6(5a. Quantitative RT-PCR confirmed an increase in levels of Pax6(5a mRNA in cells containing Pax6-expressing constructs and an increase in levels of Pax6 mRNA in cells containing Pax6(5a-expressing constructs. The fact that the introduction of constructs expressing only one isoform increased the cellular levels of not only that isoform but also the other indicates that activation of the endogenous Pax6 locus occurred. The ratio between the levels of the two isoforms was maintained close to physiological values. The overexpression of either isoform in neuroblastoma (Neuro2A cell lines also promoted morphological change and an increase in β-III-tubulin expression, indicating an increase in neurogenesis. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that Pax6 can up-regulate production of Pax6 protein from an entire intact endogenous Pax6 locus in its genomic environment. This adds to previous studies showing that Pax6 can up-regulate reporter expression driven by isolated Pax6 regulatory elements. Furthermore, our results suggest that an important function of positive feedback might be to stabilise the relative levels of Pax6 and Pax6(5a.

  16. Strengths and weaknesses of EST-based prediction of tissue-specific alternative splicing

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    Vingron Martin

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alternative splicing contributes significantly to the complexity of the human transcriptome and proteome. Computational prediction of alternative splice isoforms are usually based on EST sequences that also allow to approximate the expression pattern of the related transcripts. However, the limited number of tissues represented in the EST data as well as the different cDNA construction protocols may influence the predictive capacity of ESTs to unravel tissue-specifically expressed transcripts. Methods We predict tissue and tumor specific splice isoforms based on the genomic mapping (SpliceNest of the EST consensus sequences and library annotation provided in the GeneNest database. We further ascertain the potentially rare tissue specific transcripts as the ones represented only by ESTs derived from normalized libraries. A subset of the predicted tissue and tumor specific isoforms are then validated via RT-PCR experiments over a spectrum of 40 tissue types. Results Our strategy revealed 427 genes with at least one tissue specific transcript as well as 1120 genes showing tumor specific isoforms. While our experimental evaluation of computationally predicted tissue-specific isoforms revealed a high success rate in confirming the expression of these isoforms in the respective tissue, the strategy frequently failed to detect the expected restricted expression pattern. The analysis of putative lowly expressed transcripts using normalized cDNA libraries suggests that our ability to detect tissue-specific isoforms strongly depends on the expression level of the respective transcript as well as on the sensitivity of the experimental methods. Especially splice isoforms predicted to be disease-specific tend to represent transcripts that are expressed in a set of healthy tissues rather than novel isoforms. Conclusions We propose to combine the computational prediction of alternative splice isoforms with experimental validation for

  17. Redefining the transcriptional regulatory dynamics of classically and alternatively activated macrophages by deepCAGE transcriptomics

    KAUST Repository

    Roy, S.

    2015-06-27

    Classically or alternatively activated macrophages (M1 and M2, respectively) play distinct and important roles for microbiocidal activity, regulation of inflammation and tissue homeostasis. Despite this, their transcriptional regulatory dynamics are poorly understood. Using promoter-level expression profiling by non-biased deepCAGE we have studied the transcriptional dynamics of classically and alternatively activated macrophages. Transcription factor (TF) binding motif activity analysis revealed four motifs, NFKB1_REL_RELA, IRF1,2, IRF7 and TBP that are commonly activated but have distinct activity dynamics in M1 and M2 activation. We observe matching changes in the expression profiles of the corresponding TFs and show that only a restricted set of TFs change expression. There is an overall drastic and transient up-regulation in M1 and a weaker and more sustainable up-regulation in M2. Novel TFs, such as Thap6, Maff, (M1) and Hivep1, Nfil3, Prdm1, (M2) among others, were suggested to be involved in the activation processes. Additionally, 52 (M1) and 67 (M2) novel differentially expressed genes and, for the first time, several differentially expressed long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) transcriptome markers were identified. In conclusion, the finding of novel motifs, TFs and protein-coding and lncRNA genes is an important step forward to fully understand the transcriptional machinery of macrophage activation.

  18. Conserved alternative and antisense transcripts at the programmed cell death 2 locus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mihola, Ondřej; Forejt, Jiří; Trachtulec, Zdeněk

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 8, - (2007), s. 20 ISSN 1471-2164 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA204/01/0997; GA ČR GA301/05/0738; GA AV ČR IAA5052406; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0520 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : Pdcd2 * antisense * alternative transcript * imprinting Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.180, year: 2007

  19. Alternative splicing of the human gene SYBL1 modulates protein domain architecture of longin VAMP7/TI-VAMP, showing both non-SNARE and synaptobrevin-like isoforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Franceschi Nicola

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The control of intracellular vesicle trafficking is an ideal target to weigh the role of alternative splicing in shaping genomes to make cells. Alternative splicing has been reported for several Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor Attachment protein REceptors of the vesicle (v-SNAREs or of the target membrane (t-SNARES, which are crucial to intracellular membrane fusion and protein and lipid traffic in Eukaryotes. However, splicing has not yet been investigated in Longins, i.e. the most widespread v-SNAREs. Longins are essential in Eukaryotes and prototyped by VAMP7, Sec22b and Ykt6, sharing a conserved N-terminal Longin domain which regulates membrane fusion and subcellular targeting. Human VAMP7/TI-VAMP, encoded by gene SYBL1, is involved in multiple cell pathways, including control of neurite outgrowth. Results Alternative splicing of SYBL1 by exon skipping events results in the production of a number of VAMP7 isoforms. In-frame or frameshift coding sequence modifications modulate domain architecture of VAMP7 isoforms, which can lack whole domains or domain fragments and show variant or extra domains. Intriguingly, two main types of VAMP7 isoforms either share the inhibitory Longin domain and lack the fusion-promoting SNARE motif, or vice versa. Expression analysis in different tissues and cell lines, quantitative real time RT-PCR and confocal microscopy analysis of fluorescent protein-tagged isoforms demonstrate that VAMP7 variants have different tissue specificities and subcellular localizations. Moreover, design and use of isoform-specific antibodies provided preliminary evidence for the existence of splice variants at the protein level. Conclusions Previous evidence on VAMP7 suggests inhibitory functions for the Longin domain and fusion/growth promoting activity for the Δ-longin molecule. Thus, non-SNARE isoforms with Longin domain and non-longin SNARE isoforms might have somehow opposite regulatory functions

  20. Regulatory mechanisms for 3'-end alternative splicing and polyadenylation of the Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein, GFAP, transcript

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blechingberg, Jenny; Lykke-Andersen, Søren; Jensen, Torben Heick

    2007-01-01

    The glial fibrillary acidic protein, GFAP, forms the intermediate cytoskeleton in cells of the glial lineage. Besides the common GFAP alpha transcript, the GFAP epsilon and GFAP kappa transcripts are generated by alternative mRNA 3'-end processing. Here we use a GFAP minigene to characterize...

  1. Identification of T-cell factor-4 isoforms that contribute to the malignant phenotype of hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsedensodnom, Orkhontuya [Liver Research Center, Rhode Island Hospital and The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI (United States); Department of Molecular Biology Cell Biology and Biochemistry, The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI (United States); Koga, Hironori; Rosenberg, Stephen A.; Nambotin, Sarah B.; Carroll, John J.; Wands, Jack R. [Liver Research Center, Rhode Island Hospital and The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI (United States); Kim, Miran, E-mail: Miran_Kim@brown.edu [Liver Research Center, Rhode Island Hospital and The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI (United States)

    2011-04-15

    The Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway is frequently activated in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Downstream signaling events involving the Wnt/{beta}-catenin cascade occur through T-cell factor (TCF) proteins. The human TCF-4 gene is composed of 17 exons with multiple alternative splicing sites. However, the role of different TCF-4 isoforms in the pathogenesis of HCC is unknown. The purpose of this study was to identify and characterize TCF-4 isoforms in HCC. We identified 14 novel TCF-4 isoforms from four HCC cell lines. Functional analysis following transfection and expression in HCC cells revealed distinct effects on the phenotype. The TCF-4J isoform expression produced striking features of malignant transformation characterized by high cell proliferation rate, migration and colony formation even though its transcriptional activity was low. In contrast, the TCF-4K isoform displayed low TCF transcriptional activity; cell proliferation rate and colony formation were reduced as well. Interestingly, TCF-4J and TCF-4K differed by only five amino acids (the SxxSS motif). Thus, these studies suggest that conserved splicing motifs may have a major influence on the transcriptional activity and functional properties of TCF-4 isoforms and alter the characteristics of the malignant phenotype.

  2. Differential genomic targeting of the transcription factor TAL1 in alternate haematopoietic lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palii, Carmen G; Perez-Iratxeta, Carolina; Yao, Zizhen; Cao, Yi; Dai, Fengtao; Davison, Jerry; Atkins, Harold; Allan, David; Dilworth, F Jeffrey; Gentleman, Robert; Tapscott, Stephen J; Brand, Marjorie

    2011-02-02

    TAL1/SCL is a master regulator of haematopoiesis whose expression promotes opposite outcomes depending on the cell type: differentiation in the erythroid lineage or oncogenesis in the T-cell lineage. Here, we used a combination of ChIP sequencing and gene expression profiling to compare the function of TAL1 in normal erythroid and leukaemic T cells. Analysis of the genome-wide binding properties of TAL1 in these two haematopoietic lineages revealed new insight into the mechanism by which transcription factors select their binding sites in alternate lineages. Our study shows limited overlap in the TAL1-binding profile between the two cell types with an unexpected preference for ETS and RUNX motifs adjacent to E-boxes in the T-cell lineage. Furthermore, we show that TAL1 interacts with RUNX1 and ETS1, and that these transcription factors are critically required for TAL1 binding to genes that modulate T-cell differentiation. Thus, our findings highlight a critical role of the cellular environment in modulating transcription factor binding, and provide insight into the mechanism by which TAL1 inhibits differentiation leading to oncogenesis in the T-cell lineage.

  3. Differential CARM1 Isoform Expression in Subcellular Compartments and among Malignant and Benign Breast Tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Shlensky

    Full Text Available Coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1 (CARM1 is a coactivator for ERα and cancer-relevant transcription factors, and can methylate diverse cellular targets including histones. CARM1 is expressed in one of two alternative splice isoforms, full-length CARM1 (CARM1FL and truncated CARM1 (CARM1ΔE15. CARM1FL and CARM1ΔE15 function differently in transcriptional regulation, protein methylation, and mediation of pre-mRNA splicing in cellular models.To investigate the functional roles and the prognosis potential of CARM1 alternative spliced isoforms in breast cancer, we used recently developed antibodies to detect differential CARM1 isoform expression in subcellular compartments and among malignant and benign breast tumors.Immunofluorescence in MDA-MB-231 and BG-1 cell lines demonstrated that CARM1ΔE15 is the dominant isoform expressed in the cytoplasm, and CARM1FL is more nuclear localized. CARM1ΔE15 was found to be more sensitive to Hsp90 inhibition than CARM1FL, indicating that the truncated isoform may be the oncogenic form. Clinical cancer samples did not have significantly higher expression of CARM1FL or CARM1ΔE15 than benign breast samples at the level of mRNA or histology. Furthermore neither CARM1FL nor CARM1ΔE15 expression correlated with breast cancer molecular subtypes, tumor size, or lymph node involvement.The analysis presented here lends new insights into the possible oncogenic role of CARM1ΔE15. This study also demonstrates no obvious association of CARM1 isoform expression and clinical correlates in breast cancer. Recent studies, however, have shown that CARM1 expression correlates with poor prognosis, indicating a need for further studies of both CARM1 isoforms in a large cohort of breast cancer specimens.

  4. Competition of nuclear factor-erythroid 2 factors related transcription factor isoforms, Nrf1 and Nrf2, in antioxidant enzyme induction

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    Nikolai L. Chepelev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the Nrf2 (nuclear factor-erythroid 2 p45 subunit-related factor 2 regulated expression of multiple antioxidant and cytoprotective genes through the electrophile responsive element (EpRE is well established, interaction of Nrf2/EpRE with Nrf1, a closely-related transcription factor, is less well understood. Due to either proteolysis or alternative translation, Nrf1 has been found as proteins of varying size, p120, p95, and p65, which have been described as either activators of EpRE or competitive inhibitors of Nrf2. We investigated the effect of Nrf1 on EpRE-regulated gene expression using the catalytic and modifier subunits of glutamate cysteine ligase (GCLC and GCLM as models and explored the potential role of Nrf1 in altering their expression in aging and upon chronic exposure to airborne nano-sized particulate matter (nPM. Nrf1 knockout resulted in the increased expression of GCLC and GCLM in human bronchial epithelial (HBE1 cells. Overexpression Nrf2 in combination with either p120 or p65 diminished or failed to further increase the GCLC- and GLCM-EpRE luciferase activity. All known forms of Nrf1 protein, remained unchanged in the lungs of mice with age or in response to nPM. Our study shows that Nrf1 could inhibit EpRE activity in vitro, whereas the precise role of Nrf1 in vivo requires further investigations. We conclude that Nrf1 may not be directly responsible for the loss of Nrf2-dependent inducibility of antioxidant and cytoprotective genes observed in aged animals.

  5. Splice Variants of the Human ZC3H14 Gene Generate Multiple Isoforms of a Zinc Finger Polyadenosine RNA Binding Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Sara W.; Apponi, Luciano H.; Cornejo, Omar E.; Kitchen, Chad M.; Valentini, Sandro R.; Pavlath, Grace K.; Dunham, Christine M.; Corbett, Anita H.

    2009-01-01

    The human ZC3H14 gene encodes an evolutionarily conserved Cys3His zinc finger protein that binds specifically to polyadenosine RNA and is thus postulated to modulate post-transcriptional gene expression. Expressed sequence tag data predicts multiple splice variants of both human and mouse ZC3H14. Analysis of ZC3H14 expression in both human cell lines and mouse tissues confirms the presence of multiple alternatively spliced transcripts. Although all of these transcripts encode protein isoforms that contain the conserved C-terminal zinc finger domain, suggesting that they could all bind to polyadenosine RNA, they differ in other functionally important domains. Most of the alternative transcripts encode closely related proteins (termed isoform 1, 2, 3, and 3short) that differ primarily in the inclusion of three small exons, 9, 10, and 11, resulting in predicted protein isoforms ranging from 82 to 64 kDa. Each of these closely related isoforms contains predicted classical nuclear localization signals (cNLS) within exons 7 and 11. Consistent with the presence of these putative nuclear targeting signals, these ZC3H14 isoforms are all localized to the nucleus. In contrast, an additional transcript encodes a smaller protein (34 kDa) with an alternative first exon (isoform 4). Consistent with the absence of the predicted cNLS motifs located in exons 7 and 11, ZC3H14 isoform 4 is localized to the cytoplasm. Both EST data and experimental data suggest that this variant is enriched in testes and brain. Using an antibody that detects endogenous ZC3H14 isoforms 1-3 reveals localization of these isoforms to nuclear speckles. These speckles co-localize with the splicing factor, SC35, suggesting a role for nuclear ZC3H14 in mRNA processing. Taken together, these results demonstrate that multiple transcripts encoding several ZC3H14 isoforms exist in vivo. Both nuclear and cytoplasmic ZC3H14 isoforms could have distinct effects on gene expression mediated by the common Cys3His zinc

  6. The FU gene and its possible protein isoforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nöthen Markus M

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background FU is the human homologue of the Drosophila gene fused whose product fused is a positive regulator of the transcription factor Cubitus interruptus (Ci. Thus, FU may act as a regulator of the human counterparts of Ci, the GLI transcription factors. Since Ci and GLI are targets of Hedgehog signaling in development and morphogenesis, it is expected that FU plays an important role in Sonic, Desert and/or Indian Hedgehog induced cellular signaling. Results The FU gene was identified on chromosome 2q35 at 217.56 Mb and its exon-intron organization determined. The human developmental disorder Syndactyly type 1 (SD1 maps to this region on chromosome 2 and the FU coding region was sequenced using genomic DNA from an affected individual in a linked family. While no FU mutations were found, three single nucleotide polymorphisms were identified. The expression pattern of FU was thoroughly investigated and all examined tissues express FU. It is also clear that different tissues express transcripts of different sizes and some tissues express more than one transcript. By means of nested PCR of specific regions in RT/PCR generated cDNA, it was possible to verify two alternative splicing events. This also suggests the existence of at least two additional protein isoforms besides the FU protein that has previously been described. This long FU and a much shorter isoform were compared for the ability to regulate GLI1 and GLI2. None of the FU isoforms showed any effects on GLI1 induced transcription but the long form can enhance GLI2 activity. Apparently FU did not have any effect on SUFU induced inhibition of GLI. Conclusions The FU gene and its genomic structure was identified. FU is a candidate gene for SD1, but we have not identified a pathogenic mutation in the FU coding region in a family with SD1. The sequence information and expression analyses show that transcripts of different sizes are expressed and subjected to alternative splicing

  7. Abiotic Stresses Cause Differential Regulation of Alternative Splice Forms of GATA Transcription Factor in Rice

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    Priyanka Gupta

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The GATA gene family is one of the most conserved families of transcription factors, playing a significant role in different aspects of cellular processes, in organisms ranging from fungi to angiosperms. GATA transcription factors are DNA-binding proteins, having a class IV zinc-finger motif CX2CX17−20CX2C followed by a highly basic region and are known to bind a consensus sequence WGATAR. In plants, GATAs are known to be involved in light-dependent gene regulation and nitrate assimilation. However, a comprehensive analysis of these GATA gene members has not yet been highlighted in rice when subjected to environmental stresses. In this study, we present an overview of the GATA gene family in rice (OsGATA in terms of, their chromosomal distribution, domain architecture, and phylogeny. Our study has revealed the presence of 28 genes, encoding 35 putative GATA transcription factors belonging to seven subfamilies in the rice genome. Transcript abundance analysis in contrasting genotypes of rice—IR64 (salt sensitive and Pokkali (salt tolerant, for individual GATA members indicated their differential expression in response to various abiotic stresses such as salinity, drought, and exogenous ABA. One of the members of subfamily VII—OsGATA23a, emerged as a multi-stress responsive transcription factor giving elevated expression levels in response to salinity and drought. ABA also induces expression of OsGATA23a by 35 and 55-folds in IR64 and Pokkali respectively. However, OsGATA23b, an alternative splice variant of OsGATA23 did not respond to above-mentioned stresses. Developmental regulation of the OsGATA genes based on a publicly available microarray database showed distinct expression patterns for most of the GATA members throughout different stages of rice development. Altogether, our results suggest inherent roles of diverse OsGATA factors in abiotic stress signaling and also throw some light on the tight regulation of the spliced variants of

  8. Expression of Tropomyosin 2 Gene Isoforms in Human Cardiac Tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Syamalima Dube; Santhi Yalamanchili; Joseph Lachant; Lynn Abbott; Patricia Benz; Poiesz BJ; Dipak K Dube

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that although the transcript levels of TPM1α and TPM1k are expressed in human hearts in comparable levels, the level of TPM1α protein is ~90%. The proteins of TPM1κ and TPM2α are about 5% of the total sarcomeric TM. The TPM2 gene is known to generate three alternatively spliced isoforms, which are designated as TPM2α, TPM2β, and TPM2γ. The expression level of TPM2β and TPM2γ in human hearts is unknown. Using a series of primers pairs and probes for RNA PCR, we foun...

  9. Secreted and Transmembrane αKlotho Isoforms Have Different Spatio-Temporal Profiles in the Brain during Aging and Alzheimer's Disease Progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Massó

    Full Text Available The Klotho protein is a β-glucuronidase, and its overexpression is associated with life extension. Its mechanism of action is not fully understood, although it has been recently reported that αKlotho improves synaptic and cognitive functions, and it may also influence a variety of structures and functions during CNS maturation and aging. The αKlotho gene has two transcripts, one encoding a transmembrane isoform (m-KL, and the other a putative secreted isoform (s-KL. Unfortunately, little is known about the secreted αKlotho isoform, since available antibodies cannot discriminate s-KL from the KL1 domain cleaved from the transmembrane isoform. This study shows, for the first time, that the klotho transcript produced by alternative splicing generates a stable protein (70 kDa, and that in contrast to the transmembrane Klotho isoform, it is ten times more abundant in the brain than in the kidney suggesting that the two isoforms may have different functions. We also studied whether klotho expression in the CNS was influenced by aging, Alzheimer's disease (AD, or a healthy lifestyle, such as voluntary moderate continuous exercise. We observed a strong correlation between high expression levels of the two klotho transcripts and the healthy status of the animals. Expression of Klotho in brain areas decayed more rapidly in the 3xTg-AD model of AD than in healthy animals, whilst moderate continuous exercise in adulthood prevents the decline in expression of both klotho transcripts.

  10. Secreted and Transmembrane αKlotho Isoforms Have Different Spatio-Temporal Profiles in the Brain during Aging and Alzheimer's Disease Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massó, Anna; Sánchez, Angela; Gimenez-Llort, Lydia; Lizcano, Jose Miguel; Cañete, Manuel; García, Belen; Torres-Lista, Virginia; Puig, Meritxell; Bosch, Assumpció; Chillon, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    The Klotho protein is a β-glucuronidase, and its overexpression is associated with life extension. Its mechanism of action is not fully understood, although it has been recently reported that αKlotho improves synaptic and cognitive functions, and it may also influence a variety of structures and functions during CNS maturation and aging. The αKlotho gene has two transcripts, one encoding a transmembrane isoform (m-KL), and the other a putative secreted isoform (s-KL). Unfortunately, little is known about the secreted αKlotho isoform, since available antibodies cannot discriminate s-KL from the KL1 domain cleaved from the transmembrane isoform. This study shows, for the first time, that the klotho transcript produced by alternative splicing generates a stable protein (70 kDa), and that in contrast to the transmembrane Klotho isoform, it is ten times more abundant in the brain than in the kidney suggesting that the two isoforms may have different functions. We also studied whether klotho expression in the CNS was influenced by aging, Alzheimer's disease (AD), or a healthy lifestyle, such as voluntary moderate continuous exercise. We observed a strong correlation between high expression levels of the two klotho transcripts and the healthy status of the animals. Expression of Klotho in brain areas decayed more rapidly in the 3xTg-AD model of AD than in healthy animals, whilst moderate continuous exercise in adulthood prevents the decline in expression of both klotho transcripts. PMID:26599613

  11. Identification of a novel TDRD7 isoforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filonenko V. V.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to investigate the tudor domain-containing protein 7 (TDRD7 subcellular localization, which could be linked to diverse functions of this protein within the cell. Methods. In this study we employed cell imaging technique for detecting TDRD7 subcellular localization, Western blot analysis of HEK293 cell fractions with anti-TDRD7 monoclonal antibodies and bioinformatical search of possible TDRD7 isoforms in Uniprot, Ensemble, UCSC databases. Results. We have observed specific TDRD7-containing structures in cytoplasm as well as in the nucleus in HEK293 cells. The Western blot analysis of subcellular fractions (cytoplasm, mitochondria, nucleus allowed us to detect three lower immunoreactive bands, with the aproximate molecular weight of 130, 110 and 60 kDa (we termed them as TDRD7, TDRD7 and TDRD7 and specific subcellular localization. The bioinformatical analysis of TDRD7 primary structure allowed us to determine two alternative transcripts from TDRD7 gene coding for proteins with calculated molecular weight of 130 and 60 kDa. Conclusion. The presented data demonstrate the existence at protein level of potential TDRD7 isoforms: TDRD7, TDRD7 and TDRD7. The expression profile of these splice variants and their role in cells remains to be elucidated.

  12. Distinct Transcriptional and Alternative Splicing Signatures of Decidual CD4+ T Cells in Early Human Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weihong Zeng

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Decidual CD4+ T (dCD4 T cells are crucial for the maternal-fetal immune tolerance required for a healthy pregnancy outcome. However, their molecular and functional characteristics are not well elucidated. In this study, we performed the first analysis of transcriptional and alternative splicing (AS landscapes for paired decidual and peripheral blood CD4+ T (pCD4 T cells in human early pregnancy using high throughput mRNA sequencing. Our data showed that dCD4 T cells are endowed with a unique transcriptional signature when compared to pCD4 T cells: dCD4 T cells upregulate 1,695 genes enriched in immune system process whereas downregulate 1,011 genes mainly related to mRNA catabolic process and the ribosome. Moreover, dCD4 T cells were observed to be at M phase, and show increased activation, proliferation, and cytokine production, as well as display an effector-memory phenotype and a heterogenous nature containing Th1, Th17, and Treg cell subsets. However, dCD4 T cells undergo a comparable number of upregulated and downregulated AS events, both of which are enriched in the genes related to cellular metabolic process. And the changes at the AS event level do not reflect measurable differences at the gene expression level in dCD4 T cells. Collectively, our findings provide a comprehensive portrait of the unique transcriptional signature and AS profile of CD4+ T cells in human decidua and help us gain more understanding of the functional characteristic of these cells during early pregnancy.

  13. Alternative splicing enriched cDNA libraries identify breast cancer-associated transcripts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Alternative splicing (AS) is a central mechanism in the generation of genomic complexity and is a major contributor to transcriptome and proteome diversity. Alterations of the splicing process can lead to deregulation of crucial cellular processes and have been associated with a large spectrum of human diseases. Cancer-associated transcripts are potential molecular markers and may contribute to the development of more accurate diagnostic and prognostic methods and also serve as therapeutic targets. Alternative splicing-enriched cDNA libraries have been used to explore the variability generated by alternative splicing. In this study, by combining the use of trapping heteroduplexes and RNA amplification, we developed a powerful approach that enables transcriptome-wide exploration of the AS repertoire for identifying AS variants associated with breast tumor cells modulated by ERBB2 (HER-2/neu) oncogene expression. Results The human breast cell line (C5.2) and a pool of 5 ERBB2 over-expressing breast tumor samples were used independently for the construction of two AS-enriched libraries. In total, 2,048 partial cDNA sequences were obtained, revealing 214 alternative splicing sequence-enriched tags (ASSETs). A subset with 79 multiple exon ASSETs was compared to public databases and reported 138 different AS events. A high success rate of RT-PCR validation (94.5%) was obtained, and 2 novel AS events were identified. The influence of ERBB2-mediated expression on AS regulation was evaluated by capillary electrophoresis and probe-ligation approaches in two mammary cell lines (Hb4a and C5.2) expressing different levels of ERBB2. The relative expression balance between AS variants from 3 genes was differentially modulated by ERBB2 in this model system. Conclusions In this study, we presented a method for exploring AS from any RNA source in a transcriptome-wide format, which can be directly easily adapted to next generation sequencers. We identified AS transcripts

  14. The BRCA1-Δ11q Alternative Splice Isoform Bypasses Germline Mutations and Promotes Therapeutic Resistance to PARP Inhibition and Cisplatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yifan; Bernhardy, Andrea J; Cruz, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Breast and ovarian cancer patients harboring BRCA1/2 germline mutations have clinically benefitted from therapy with PARP inhibitor (PARPi) or platinum compounds, but acquired resistance limits clinical impact. In this study, we investigated the impact of mutations on BRCA1 isoform expression and...

  15. Alternative splicing of the maize Ac transposase transcript in transgenic sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisson, Ralph; Hellert, Jan; Ringleb, Malte; Machens, Fabian; Kraus, Josef; Hehl, Reinhard

    2010-09-01

    The maize Activator/Dissociation (Ac/Ds) transposable element system was introduced into sugar beet. The autonomous Ac and non-autonomous Ds element excise from the T-DNA vector and integrate at novel positions in the sugar beet genome. Ac and Ds excisions generate footprints in the donor T-DNA that support the hairpin model for transposon excision. Two complete integration events into genomic sugar beet DNA were obtained by IPCR. Integration of Ac leads to an eight bp duplication, while integration of Ds in a homologue of a sugar beet flowering locus gene did not induce a duplication. The molecular structure of the target site indicates Ds integration into a double strand break. Analyses of transposase transcription using RT-PCR revealed low amounts of alternatively spliced mRNAs. The fourth intron of the transposase was found to be partially misspliced. Four different splice products were identified. In addition, the second and third exon were found to harbour two and three novel introns, respectively. These utilize each the same splice donor but several alternative splice acceptor sites. Using the SplicePredictor online tool, one of the two introns within exon two is predicted to be efficiently spliced in maize. Most interestingly, splicing of this intron together with the four major introns of Ac would generate a transposase that lacks the DNA binding domain and two of its three nuclear localization signals, but still harbours the dimerization domain.

  16. Identification of novel monocistronic HTLV-1 mRNAs encoding functional Rex isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rende, Francesca; Cavallari, Ilaria; Andresen, Vibeke; Valeri, Valerio W; D'Agostino, Donna M; Franchini, Genoveffa; Ciminale, Vincenzo

    2015-07-02

    Human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) gene expression is controlled by the key regulatory proteins Tax and Rex. The concerted action of these proteins results in a two-phase kinetics of viral expression that depends on a time delay between their action. However, it is difficult to explain this delay, as Tax and Rex are produced from the same mRNA. In the present study we investigated whether HTLV-1 may produce novel mRNA species capable of expressing Rex and Tax independently. Results revealed the expression of three alternatively spliced transcripts coding for novel Rex isoforms in infected cell lines and in primary samples from infected patients. One mRNA coded for a Tax isoform and a Rex isoform, and two mRNAs coded for Rex isoforms but not Tax. Functional assays showed that these Rex isoforms exhibit activity comparable to canonic Rex. An analysis of the temporal expression of these transcripts upon ex vivo culture of cells from infected patients and cell lines transfected with a molecular clone of HTLV-1 revealed early expression of the dicistronic tax/rex mRNAs followed by the monocistronic mRNAs coding for Rex isoforms. The production of monocistronic HTLV-1 mRNAs encoding Rex isoforms with comparable activity to canonical Rex, but with distinct timing, would support a prolonged duration of Rex function with gradual loss of Tax, and is consistent with the two-phase expression kinetics. A thorough understanding of these regulatory circuits will shed light on the basis of viral latency and provide groundwork to develop strategies for eradicating persistent infections.

  17. Systematic Profiling of Poly(A)+ Transcripts Modulated by Core 3’ End Processing and Splicing Factors Reveals Regulatory Rules of Alternative Cleavage and Polyadenylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wencheng; You, Bei; Hoque, Mainul; Zheng, Dinghai; Luo, Wenting; Ji, Zhe; Park, Ji Yeon; Gunderson, Samuel I.; Kalsotra, Auinash; Manley, James L.; Tian, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Alternative cleavage and polyadenylation (APA) results in mRNA isoforms containing different 3’ untranslated regions (3’UTRs) and/or coding sequences. How core cleavage/polyadenylation (C/P) factors regulate APA is not well understood. Using siRNA knockdown coupled with deep sequencing, we found that several C/P factors can play significant roles in 3’UTR-APA. Whereas Pcf11 and Fip1 enhance usage of proximal poly(A) sites (pAs), CFI-25/68, PABPN1 and PABPC1 promote usage of distal pAs. Strong cis element biases were found for pAs regulated by CFI-25/68 or Fip1, and the distance between pAs plays an important role in APA regulation. In addition, intronic pAs are substantially regulated by splicing factors, with U1 mostly inhibiting C/P events in introns near the 5’ end of gene and U2 suppressing those in introns with features for efficient splicing. Furthermore, PABPN1 inhibits expression of transcripts with pAs near the transcription start site (TSS), a property possibly related to its role in RNA degradation. Finally, we found that groups of APA events regulated by C/P factors are also modulated in cell differentiation and development with distinct trends. Together, our results support an APA code where an APA event in a given cellular context is regulated by a number of parameters, including relative location to the TSS, splicing context, distance between competing pAs, surrounding cis elements and concentrations of core C/P factors. PMID:25906188

  18. Systematic profiling of poly(A+ transcripts modulated by core 3' end processing and splicing factors reveals regulatory rules of alternative cleavage and polyadenylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wencheng Li

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Alternative cleavage and polyadenylation (APA results in mRNA isoforms containing different 3' untranslated regions (3'UTRs and/or coding sequences. How core cleavage/polyadenylation (C/P factors regulate APA is not well understood. Using siRNA knockdown coupled with deep sequencing, we found that several C/P factors can play significant roles in 3'UTR-APA. Whereas Pcf11 and Fip1 enhance usage of proximal poly(A sites (pAs, CFI-25/68, PABPN1 and PABPC1 promote usage of distal pAs. Strong cis element biases were found for pAs regulated by CFI-25/68 or Fip1, and the distance between pAs plays an important role in APA regulation. In addition, intronic pAs are substantially regulated by splicing factors, with U1 mostly inhibiting C/P events in introns near the 5' end of gene and U2 suppressing those in introns with features for efficient splicing. Furthermore, PABPN1 inhibits expression of transcripts with pAs near the transcription start site (TSS, a property possibly related to its role in RNA degradation. Finally, we found that groups of APA events regulated by C/P factors are also modulated in cell differentiation and development with distinct trends. Together, our results support an APA code where an APA event in a given cellular context is regulated by a number of parameters, including relative location to the TSS, splicing context, distance between competing pAs, surrounding cis elements and concentrations of core C/P factors.

  19. Stochastic principles governing alternative splicing of RNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Jianfei Hu; Eli Boritz; William Wylie; Daniel C Douek

    2017-01-01

    Author summary Alternative RNA splicing within eukaryotic cells enables each gene to generate multiple different mature transcripts which further encode proteins with distinct or even opposing functions. The relative frequencies of the transcript isoforms generated by a particular gene are essential to the maintenance of normal cellular physiology; however, the underlying mechanisms and principles that govern these frequencies are unknown. We analyzed the frequency distribution of all transcr...

  20. Novel human ZAKI-4 isoforms: hormonal and tissue-specific regulation and function as calcineurin inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xia; Kambe, Fukushi; Miyazaki, Takashi; Sarkar, Devanand; Ohmori, Sachiko; Seo, Hisao

    2002-01-01

    We identified a thyroid hormone [3,5,3'-tri-iodothyronine (T(3))]-responsive gene, ZAKI-4, in cultured human skin fibroblasts. It belongs to a family of genes that encode proteins containing a conserved motif. The motif binds to calcineurin and inhibits its phosphatase activity. In the present study, we have demonstrated three different ZAKI-4 transcripts, alpha, beta1 and beta2, in human brain by 5'- and 3'-RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends). The alpha transcript was identical with the one that we originally cloned from human fibroblasts and the other two are novel. The three transcripts are generated by alternative initiation and splicing from a single gene on the short arm of chromosome 6. It is predicted that beta1 and beta2 encode an identical protein product, beta, which differs from alpha in its N-terminus. Since alpha and beta contain an identical C-terminal region harbouring the conserved motif, both isoforms are suggested to inhibit calcineurin activity. Indeed, each isoform associates with calcineurin A and inhibits its activity in a similar manner, suggesting that the difference in N-terminus of each isoform does not affect the inhibitory function on calcineurin. An examination of the expression profile of the three transcripts in 12 human tissues revealed that the alpha transcript is expressed exclusively in the brain, whereas beta transcripts are expressed ubiquitously, most abundantly in brain, heart, skeletal muscle and kidney. It was also demonstrated that human skin fibroblasts express both alpha and beta transcripts, raising the question of which transcript is up-regulated by T(3). It was revealed that T(3) markedly induced the expression of alpha isoform but not of beta. This T(3)-mediated increase in the alpha isoform was associated with a significant decrease in endogenous calcineurin activity. These results suggest that the expression of ZAKI-4 isoforms is subjected to distinct hormonal as well as tissue-specific regulation, constituting

  1. Untranslated Parts of Genes Interpreted: Making Heads or Tails of High-Throughput Transcriptomic Data via Computational Methods: Computational methods to discover and quantify isoforms with alternative untranslated regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szkop, Krzysztof J; Nobeli, Irene

    2017-12-01

    In this review we highlight the importance of defining the untranslated parts of transcripts, and present a number of computational approaches for the discovery and quantification of alternative transcription start and poly-adenylation events in high-throughput transcriptomic data. The fate of eukaryotic transcripts is closely linked to their untranslated regions, which are determined by the position at which transcription starts and ends at a genomic locus. Although the extent of alternative transcription starts and alternative poly-adenylation sites has been revealed by sequencing methods focused on the ends of transcripts, the application of these methods is not yet widely adopted by the community. We suggest that computational methods applied to standard high-throughput technologies are a useful, albeit less accurate, alternative to the expertise-demanding 5' and 3' sequencing and they are the only option for analysing legacy transcriptomic data. We review these methods here, focusing on technical challenges and arguing for the need to include better normalization of the data and more appropriate statistical models of the expected variation in the signal. © 2017 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Identification of Alternative Splicing and Fusion Transcripts in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer by RNA Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yoonki; Kim, Woo Jin; Bang, Chi Young; Lee, Jae Cheol; Oh, Yeon-Mok

    2016-04-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer related death. Alterations in gene sequence, structure, and expression have an important role in the pathogenesis of lung cancer. Fusion genes and alternative splicing of cancer-related genes have the potential to be oncogenic. In the current study, we performed RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) to investigate potential fusion genes and alternative splicing in non-small cell lung cancer. RNA was isolated from lung tissues obtained from 86 subjects with lung cancer. The RNA samples from lung cancer and normal tissues were processed with RNA-seq using the HiSeq 2000 system. Fusion genes were evaluated using Defuse and ChimeraScan. Candidate fusion transcripts were validated by Sanger sequencing. Alternative splicing was analyzed using multivariate analysis of transcript sequencing and validated using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction. RNA-seq data identified oncogenic fusion genes EML4-ALK and SLC34A2-ROS1 in three of 86 normal-cancer paired samples. Nine distinct fusion transcripts were selected using DeFuse and ChimeraScan; of which, four fusion transcripts were validated by Sanger sequencing. In 33 squamous cell carcinoma, 29 tumor specific skipped exon events and six mutually exclusive exon events were identified. ITGB4 and PYCR1 were top genes that showed significant tumor specific splice variants. In conclusion, RNA-seq data identified novel potential fusion transcripts and splice variants. Further evaluation of their functional significance in the pathogenesis of lung cancer is required.

  3. IgE recognition of chimeric isoforms of the honeybee (Apis mellifera) venom allergen Api m 10 evaluated by protein array technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Vaerenbergh, Matthias; De Smet, Lina; Rafei-Shamsabadi, David; Blank, Simon; Spillner, Edzard; Ebo, Didier G; Devreese, Bart; Jakob, Thilo; de Graaf, Dirk C

    2015-02-01

    Api m 10 has recently been established as novel major allergen that is recognized by more than 60% of honeybee venom (HBV) allergic patients. Previous studies suggest Api m 10 protein heterogeneity which may have implications for diagnosis and immunotherapy of HBV allergy. In the present study, RT-PCR revealed the expression of at least nine additional Api m 10 transcript isoforms by the venom glands. Two distinct mechanisms are responsible for the generation of these isoforms: while the previously known variant 2 is produced by an alternative splicing event, novel identified isoforms are intragenic chimeric transcripts. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the identification of chimeric transcripts generated by the honeybee. By a retrospective proteomic analysis we found evidence for the presence of several of these isoforms in the venom proteome. Additionally, we analyzed IgE reactivity to different isoforms by protein array technology using sera from HBV allergic patients, which revealed that IgE recognition of Api m 10 is both isoform- and patient-specific. While it was previously demonstrated that the majority of HBV allergic patients display IgE reactivity to variant 2, our study also shows that some patients lacking IgE antibodies for variant 2 display IgE reactivity to two of the novel identified Api m 10 variants, i.e. variants 3 and 4. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Principles for RNA metabolism and alternative transcription initiation within closely spaced promoters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yun; Pai, Athma A.; Herudek, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian transcriptomes are complex and formed by extensive promoter activity. In addition, gene promoters are largely divergent and initiate transcription of reverse-oriented promoter upstream transcripts (PROMPTs). Although PROMPTs are commonly terminated early, influenced by polyadenylation s...

  5. Studying σ 54-dependent transcription at the single-molecule level using alternating-laser excitation (ALEX) spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilemann, M.; Lymperopoulos, K.; Wigneshweraraj, S. R.; Buck, M.; Kapanidis, A. N.

    2007-07-01

    We present single-molecule fluorescence studies of σ 54-dependent gene-transcription complexes using singlemolecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) and alternating-laser excitation (ALEX) spectroscopy. The ability to study one biomolecule at the time allowed us to resolve and analyze sample heterogeneities and extract structural information on subpopulations and transient intermediates of transcription; such information is hidden in bulk experiments. Using site-specifically labeled σ 54 derivatives and site-specifically labeled promoter-DNA fragments, we demonstrate that we can observe single diffusing σ 54-DNA and transcription-initiation RNA polymerase-σ 54- DNA complexes, and that we can measure distances within such complexes; the identity of the complexes has been confirmed using electrophoretic-mobility-shift assays. Our studies pave the way for understanding the mechanism of abortive initiation and promoter escape in σ 54-dependent transcription.

  6. Oxygen Sensing in Drosophila: Multiple Isoforms of the Prolyl Hydroxylase Fatiga Have Different Capacity to Regulate HIFα/Sima

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekanty, Andrés; Wappner, Pablo

    2010-01-01

    Background The Hypoxia Inducible Factor (HIF) mediates cellular adaptations to low oxygen. Prolyl-4-hydroxylases are oxygen sensors that hydroxylate the HIF alpha-subunit, promoting its proteasomal degradation in normoxia. Three HIF-prolyl hydroxylases, encoded by independent genes, PHD1, PHD2, and PHD3, occur in mammals. PHD2, the longest PHD isoform includes a MYND domain, whose biochemical function is unclear. PHD2 and PHD3 genes are induced in hypoxia to shut down HIF dependent transcription upon reoxygenation, while expression of PHD1 is oxygen-independent. The physiologic significance of the diversity of the PHD oxygen sensors is intriguing. Methodology and Principal Findings We have analyzed the Drosophila PHD locus, fatiga, which encodes 3 isoforms, FgaA, FgaB and FgaC that are originated through a combination of alternative initiation of transcription and alternative splicing. FgaA includes a MYND domain and is homologous to PHD2, while FgaB and FgaC are shorter isoforms most similar to PHD3. Through a combination of genetic experiments in vivo and molecular analyses in cell culture, we show that fgaB but not fgaA is induced in hypoxia, in a Sima-dependent manner, through a HIF-Responsive Element localized in the first intron of fgaA. The regulatory capacity of FgaB is stronger than that of FgaA, as complete reversion of fga loss-of-function phenotypes is observed upon transgenic expression of the former, and only partial rescue occurs after expression of the latter. Conclusions and Significance Diversity of PHD isoforms is a conserved feature in evolution. As in mammals, there are hypoxia-inducible and non-inducible Drosophila PHDs, and a fly isoform including a MYND domain co-exists with isoforms lacking this domain. Our results suggest that the isoform devoid of a MYND domain has stronger regulatory capacity than that including this domain. PMID:20811646

  7. Oxygen sensing in Drosophila: multiple isoforms of the prolyl hydroxylase fatiga have different capacity to regulate HIFalpha/Sima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Julieta M; Centanin, Lazaro; Dekanty, Andrés; Wappner, Pablo

    2010-08-25

    The Hypoxia Inducible Factor (HIF) mediates cellular adaptations to low oxygen. Prolyl-4-hydroxylases are oxygen sensors that hydroxylate the HIF alpha-subunit, promoting its proteasomal degradation in normoxia. Three HIF-prolyl hydroxylases, encoded by independent genes, PHD1, PHD2, and PHD3, occur in mammals. PHD2, the longest PHD isoform includes a MYND domain, whose biochemical function is unclear. PHD2 and PHD3 genes are induced in hypoxia to shut down HIF dependent transcription upon reoxygenation, while expression of PHD1 is oxygen-independent. The physiologic significance of the diversity of the PHD oxygen sensors is intriguing. We have analyzed the Drosophila PHD locus, fatiga, which encodes 3 isoforms, FgaA, FgaB and FgaC that are originated through a combination of alternative initiation of transcription and alternative splicing. FgaA includes a MYND domain and is homologous to PHD2, while FgaB and FgaC are shorter isoforms most similar to PHD3. Through a combination of genetic experiments in vivo and molecular analyses in cell culture, we show that fgaB but not fgaA is induced in hypoxia, in a Sima-dependent manner, through a HIF-Responsive Element localized in the first intron of fgaA. The regulatory capacity of FgaB is stronger than that of FgaA, as complete reversion of fga loss-of-function phenotypes is observed upon transgenic expression of the former, and only partial rescue occurs after expression of the latter. Diversity of PHD isoforms is a conserved feature in evolution. As in mammals, there are hypoxia-inducible and non-inducible Drosophila PHDs, and a fly isoform including a MYND domain co-exists with isoforms lacking this domain. Our results suggest that the isoform devoid of a MYND domain has stronger regulatory capacity than that including this domain.

  8. Enhanced expression of two discrete isoforms of matrix metalloproteinase-2 in experimental and human diabetic nephropathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Soo Kim

    Full Text Available We recently reported on the enhanced expression of two isoforms of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2 in human renal transplantation delayed graft function. These consist of the conventional secreted, full length MMP-2 isoform (FL-MMP-2 and a novel intracellular N-Terminal Truncated isoform (NTT-MMP-2 generated by oxidative stress-mediated activation of an alternate promoter in the MMP-2 first intron. Here we evaluated the effect of hyperglycemia and diabetes mellitus on the in vitro and in vivo expression of the two MMP-2 isoforms.We quantified the abundance of the FL-MMP-2 and NTT-MMP-2 transcripts by qPCR in HK2 cells cultured in high glucose or 4-hydroxy-2-hexenal (HHE and tested the effects of the NF-κB inhibitor pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC. The streptozotocin (STZ murine model of Type I diabetes mellitus and renal biopsies of human diabetic nephropathy were used in this study.Both isoforms of MMP-2 in HK2 cells were upregulated by culture in high glucose or with HHE. PDTC treatment did not suppress high glucose-mediated FL-MMP-2 expression but potently inhibited NTT-MMP-2 expression. With STZ-treated mice, renal cortical expression of both isoforms was increased (FL-MMP-2, 1.8-fold; NTT-MMP-2, greater than 7-fold. Isoform-specific immunohistochemical staining revealed low, but detectable levels of the FL-MMP-2 isoform in controls, while NTT-MMP-2 was not detected. While there was a modest increase in tubular epithelial cell staining for FL-MMP-2 in STZ-treated mice, NTT-MMP-2 was intensely expressed in a basolateral pattern. FL-MMP-2 and NTT-MMP-2 isoform expression as quantified by qPCR were both significantly elevated in renal biopsies of human diabetic nephropathy (12-fold and 3-fold, respectively.The expression of both isoforms of MMP-2 was enhanced in an experimental model of diabetic nephropathy and in human diabetic nephropathy. Selective MMP-2 isoform inhibition could offer a novel approach for the treatment of diabetic renal

  9. SpliceDetector: a software for detection of alternative splicing events in human and model organisms directly from transcript IDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baharlou Houreh, Mandana; Ghorbani Kalkhajeh, Payam; Niazi, Ali; Ebrahimi, Faezeh; Ebrahimie, Esmaeil

    2018-03-22

    In eukaryotes, different combinations of exons lead to multiple transcripts with various functions in protein level, in a process called alternative splicing (AS). Unfolding the complexity of functional genomics through genome-wide profiling of AS and determining the altered ultimate products provide new insights for better understanding of many biological processes, disease progress as well as drug development programs to target harmful splicing variants. The current available tools of alternative splicing work with raw data and include heavy computation. In particular, there is a shortcoming in tools to discover AS events directly from transcripts. Here, we developed a Windows-based user-friendly tool for identifying AS events from transcripts without the need to any advanced computer skill or database download. Meanwhile, due to online working mode, our application employs the updated SpliceGraphs without the need to any resource updating. First, SpliceGraph forms based on the frequency of active splice sites in pre-mRNA. Then, the presented approach compares query transcript exons to SpliceGraph exons. The tool provides the possibility of statistical analysis of AS events as well as AS visualization compared to SpliceGraph. The developed application works for transcript sets in human and model organisms.

  10. Alternative splicing produces two transcripts encoding female-biased pheromone subfamily receptors in the navel orangeworm, Amyelois transitella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen F Garczynski

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Insect odorant receptors are key sensors of environmental odors and members of the lepidopteran pheromone receptor subfamily are thought to play important roles in mate finding by recognizing sex pheromones. Much research has been done to identify putative pheromone receptors in lepidopteran males, but little attention has been given to female counterparts. In this study, degenerate oligonucleotide primers designed against a conserved amino acid region in the C-terminus of lepidopteran pheromone receptors were used in 3’ RACE reactions to identify candidate pheromone receptors expressed in the antennae of female navel orangeworm. Two near full-length transcripts of 1469 nt and 1302 nt encoding the complete open reading frames for proteins of 446 and 425 amino acids, respectively, were identified. Based on BLAST homology and phylogenetic analyses, the putative proteins encoded by these transcripts are members of the lepidopteran pheromone receptor subfamily. Characterization of these transcripts indicates that they are alternatively spliced products of a single gene. Tissue expression studies indicate that the transcripts are female-biased with detection mainly in female antennae. To the best of our knowledge, these transcripts represent the first detection of alternatively spliced female-biased members of the lepidopteran pheromone receptor subfamily.

  11. Regulating retrotransposon activity through the use of alternative transcription start sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Jenna; Steglich, Babett; Smialowska, Agata

    2016-01-01

    . This enforces the use of a downstream TSS and the production of a truncated RNA incapable of reverse transcription and retrotransposition. However, in stressed cells, nucleosome occupancy at LTR elements is reduced, and the TSS shifts to allow for productive transcription. We propose that controlled...... a new mechanism of retrotransposon regulation through transcription start site (TSS) selection by altered nucleosome occupancy. We show that Fun30 chromatin remodelers cooperate to maintain a high level of nucleosome occupancy at retrotransposon-flanking long terminal repeat (LTR) elements...... retrotransposon transcription from a nonproductive TSS allows for rapid stress-induced activation, while preventing uncontrolled transposon activity in the genome....

  12. Structural organization and expression pattern of the canine RPGRIP1 isoforms in retinal tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, Tatyana; Zangerl, Barbara; Goldstein, Orly; Acland, Gregory M; Aguirre, Gustavo D

    2011-05-06

    To examine the structure and expression of RPGRIP1 in dog retina. Determination of the structural analysis and expression pattern of canine RPGRIP1 (cRPGRIP1) was based on cDNA amplification. Absolute quantification of the expression level of cRPGRIP1 splice variants was determined by qRT-PCR. Regulatory structures were examined by computational analysis of comparative genomics. cRPGRIP1 encompasses 25 exons that harbor a 3627-bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding a 1209-amino-acid (aa)-predicted protein. In addition to the main transcript, five full-length and several partial cRPGRIP1 isoforms were identified revealing four alternative 3'-terminal exons--24, 19a, 19c, and 19d--three of which could potentially produce C-terminally truncated proteins that lack the RPGR-interacting domain. A complex organization of the 5'-UTR for the cRPGRIP1 splice products have been described, with a common promoter driving multiple isoforms, including four full-length transcripts using the 3'-terminal exon 24. In addition, a potential alternative internal promoter was revealed to initiate at least two cRPGRIP1 splice variants sharing the same 3'-terminal exon 19c. Transcription initiation sites were highly supported by conserved arrangements of cis-elements predicted in a bioinformatic analysis of orthologous RPGRIP1 promoter regions. The use of alternative transcription start and termination sites results in substantial heterogeneity of cRPGRIP1 transcripts, many of which are likely to have tissue-specific expression. The identified exon-intron structure of cRPGRIP1 isoforms provides a basis for evaluating the gene defects underlying inherited retinal disorders in dogs.

  13. Computational Approaches to Understand Transcriptional Regulation and Alternative Promoter Usage in Mammals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Mette

    understand and cure diseases. The focus of this thesis is transcriptional regulation. The main aim was to gain new insight into transcriptional regulation but a secondary goal was to develop new bioinformatic methods to facilitate future research. Three di erent studies are presented each focusing on di...... into proteins. All cells need di erent proteins in di erent amounts to function properly. The transcription and translation are therefore highly regulated and the regulation is not fully understood. It is important to learn as much as possible about both transcriptional and translational regulation to better...... erent aspects of transcriptional regulation. In the rst study we develop a machine learning framework to predict mRNA production, stalling and elongation of RNA polymerase II using publicly available histone modi cation data. The study reveals new pieces of information about the histone code. Besides...

  14. Cloning, Sequencing, and the Expression of the Elusive Sarcomeric TPM4α Isoform in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipak K. Dube

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In mammals, tropomyosin is encoded by four known TPM genes (TPM1, TPM2, TPM3, and TPM4 each of which can generate a number of TPM isoforms via alternative splicing and/or using alternate promoters. In humans, the sarcomeric isoform(s of each of the TPM genes, except for the TPM4, have been known for a long time. Recently, on the basis of computational analyses of the human genome sequence, the predicted sequence of TPM4α has been posted in GenBank. We designed primer-pairs for RT-PCR and showed the expression of the transcripts of TPM4α and a novel isoform TPM4δ in human heart and skeletal muscle. qRT-PCR shows that the relative expression of TPM4α and TPM4δ is higher in human cardiac muscle. Western blot analyses using CH1 monoclonal antibodies show the absence of the expression of TPM4δ protein (~28 kDa in human heart muscle. 2D western blot analyses with the same antibody show the expression of at least nine distinct tropomyosin molecules with a mass ~32 kD and above in adult heart. By Mass spectrometry, we determined the amino acid sequences of the extracted proteins from these spots. Spot “G” reveals the putative expression of TPM4α along with TPM1α protein in human adult heart.

  15. High-Resolution Mapping and Dynamics of the Transcriptome, Transcription Factors, and Transcription Co-Factor Networks in Classically and Alternatively Activated Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amitabh Das

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are the prime innate immune cells of the inflammatory response, and the combination of multiple signaling inputs derived from the recognition of host factors [e.g., interferon-g (IFN-γ] and invading pathogen products (e.g., toll-like receptors (TLRs agonists are required to maintain essential macrophage function. The profound effects on biological outcomes of inflammation associated with IFN-γ pretreatment (“priming” and TLR4 ligand bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced macrophage activation (M1 or classical activation have long been recognized, but the underlying mechanisms are not well defined. Therefore, we analyzed gene expression profiles of macrophages and identified genes, transcription factors (TFs, and transcription co-factors (TcoFs that are uniquely or highly expressed in IFN-γ-mediated TLR4 ligand LPS-inducible versus only TLR4 ligand LPS-inducible primary macrophages. This macrophage gene expression has not been observed in macrophage cell lines. We also showed that interleukin (IL-4 and IL-13 (M2 or alternative activation elicited the induction of a distinct subset of genes related to M2 macrophage polarization. Importantly, this macrophage gene expression was also associated with promoter conservation. In particular, our approach revealed novel roles for the TFs and TcoFs in response to inflammation. We believe that the systematic approach presented herein is an important framework to better understand the transcriptional machinery of different macrophage subtypes.

  16. Computational Approaches to Understand Transcriptional Regulation and Alternative Promoter Usage in Mammals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Mette

    erent aspects of transcriptional regulation. In the rst study we develop a machine learning framework to predict mRNA production, stalling and elongation of RNA polymerase II using publicly available histone modi cation data. The study reveals new pieces of information about the histone code. Besides...... that the framework is highly applicable to other types of genomic data and can be used in future research. The second study is a thorough study of which factors that in uence the retention of transcription factors between human and mice. The explored factors are the two key transcription factors in adipogensis PPAR...

  17. A minor alternative transcript of the fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase gene produces a protein despite being likely subjected to nonsense-mediated mRNA decay

    OpenAIRE

    Boisclair-Lachance Jean-François; Maresca Antonella; Dreumont Natacha; Bergeron Anne; Tanguay Robert M

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Coupling of alternative splicing with nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) may regulate gene expression. We report here the identification of a nonsense alternative transcript of the fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (fah) gene, which produces a protein despite the fact that it is subject to NMD. Results During the characterization of the effects of the W262X nonsense mutation on FAH mRNA metabolism, two alternative transcripts (del100 and del231) of the fah gene were identified...

  18. The landscape of isoform switches in human cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vitting-Seerup, Kristoffer; Sandelin, Albin Gustav

    2017-01-01

    developed methods for identification and visualization of isoform switches with predicted functional consequences. Using these methods, we characterized isoform switching in RNA-seq data from >5,500 cancer patients covering 12 solid cancer types. Isoform switches with potential functional consequences were...... common, affecting approximately 19% of multiple transcript genes. Among these, isoform switches leading to loss of DNA sequence encoding protein domains were more frequent than expected, particularly in pancancer switches. We identified several isoform switches as powerful biomarkers: 31 switches were...... highly predictive of patient survival independent of cancer types. Our data constitute an important resource for cancer researchers, available through interactive web tools. Moreover, our methods, available as an R package, enable systematic analysis of isoform switches from other RNA-seq datasets...

  19. Expression of various sarcomeric tropomyosin isoforms in equine striated muscles

    OpenAIRE

    Dube, Syamalima; Chionuma, Henry; Matoq, Amr; Alshiekh-Nasany, Ruham; Abbott, Lynn; Poiesz, Bernard J.; Dube, Dipak K.

    2017-01-01

    In order to better understand the training and athletic activity of horses, we must have complete understanding of the isoform diversity of various myofibrillar protein genes like tropomyosin. Tropomyosin (TPM), a coiled-coil dimeric protein, is a component of thin filament in striated muscles. In mammals, four TPM genes (TPM1, TPM2, TPM3, and TPM4) generate a multitude of TPM isoforms via alternate splicing and/or using different promoters. Unfortunately, our knowledge of TPM isoform diversi...

  20. Structural diversity and evolution of the N-terminal isoform-specific region of ecdysone receptor-A and -B1 isoforms in insects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubo Takeo

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ecdysone receptor (EcR regulates various cellular responses to ecdysteroids during insect development. Insects have multiple EcR isoforms with different N-terminal A/B domains that contain the isoform-specific activation function (AF-1 region. Although distinct physiologic functions of the EcR isoforms have been characterized in higher holometabolous insects, they remain unclear in basal direct-developing insects, in which only A isoform has been identified. To examine the structural basis of the EcR isoform-specific AF-1 regions, we performed a comprehensive structural comparison of the isoform-specific region of the EcR-A and -B1 isoforms in insects. Results The EcR isoforms were newly identified in 51 species of insects and non-insect arthropods, including direct-developing ametabolous and hemimetabolous insects. The comprehensive structural comparison revealed that the isoform-specific region of each EcR isoform contained evolutionally conserved microdomain structures and insect subgroup-specific structural modifications. The A isoform-specific region generally contained four conserved microdomains, including the SUMOylation motif and the nuclear localization signal, whereas the B1 isoform-specific region contained three conserved microdomains, including an acidic activator domain-like motif. In addition, the EcR-B1 isoform of holometabolous insects had a novel microdomain at the N-terminal end. Conclusions Given that the nuclear receptor AF-1 is involved in cofactor recruitment and transcriptional regulation, the microdomain structures identified in the isoform-specific A/B domains might function as signature motifs and/or as targets for cofactor proteins that play essential roles in the EcR isoform-specific AF-1 regions. Moreover, the novel microdomain in the isoform-specific region of the holometabolous insect EcR-B1 isoform suggests that the holometabolous insect EcR-B1 acquired additional transcriptional

  1. Structural diversity and evolution of the N-terminal isoform-specific region of ecdysone receptor-A and -B1 isoforms in insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takayuki; Takeuchi, Hideaki; Kubo, Takeo

    2010-02-12

    The ecdysone receptor (EcR) regulates various cellular responses to ecdysteroids during insect development. Insects have multiple EcR isoforms with different N-terminal A/B domains that contain the isoform-specific activation function (AF)-1 region. Although distinct physiologic functions of the EcR isoforms have been characterized in higher holometabolous insects, they remain unclear in basal direct-developing insects, in which only A isoform has been identified. To examine the structural basis of the EcR isoform-specific AF-1 regions, we performed a comprehensive structural comparison of the isoform-specific region of the EcR-A and -B1 isoforms in insects. The EcR isoforms were newly identified in 51 species of insects and non-insect arthropods, including direct-developing ametabolous and hemimetabolous insects. The comprehensive structural comparison revealed that the isoform-specific region of each EcR isoform contained evolutionally conserved microdomain structures and insect subgroup-specific structural modifications. The A isoform-specific region generally contained four conserved microdomains, including the SUMOylation motif and the nuclear localization signal, whereas the B1 isoform-specific region contained three conserved microdomains, including an acidic activator domain-like motif. In addition, the EcR-B1 isoform of holometabolous insects had a novel microdomain at the N-terminal end. Given that the nuclear receptor AF-1 is involved in cofactor recruitment and transcriptional regulation, the microdomain structures identified in the isoform-specific A/B domains might function as signature motifs and/or as targets for cofactor proteins that play essential roles in the EcR isoform-specific AF-1 regions. Moreover, the novel microdomain in the isoform-specific region of the holometabolous insect EcR-B1 isoform suggests that the holometabolous insect EcR-B1 acquired additional transcriptional regulation mechanisms.

  2. Alternate capping mechanisms for transcription of spring viremia of carp virus: evidence for independent mRNA initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, K C; Roy, P

    1980-01-01

    Two alternate mechanisms of mRNA capping for spring viremia of carp virus have been observed. Under normal reaction conditions, a ppG residue of the capping GTP is transferred to a pA moiety of the 5' termini of mRNA transcripts. However, in reaction conditions where GppNHp is used instead of GTP, an alternate capping mechanism occurs whereby a pG residue of the capping GTP is transferred to a ppA moiety of the transcripts. The first mechanism is identical to that described previously for vesicular stomatitis virus (G. Abraham, D. P. Rhodes, and A. K. Banerjee, Nature [London] 255:37-40, 1975; A. K. Banerjee, S. A. Moyer, and D. P. Rhodes, Virology 61:547-558, 1974), and thus appears to be a conserved function during the evolution of rhabdoviruses. The alternate mechanism of capping indicates not only that capping can take place by two procedures, but also that the substrate termini have di- or triphosphate 5' ends, indicating that they are probably independently initiated. An analog of ATP, AppNHp, has been found to completely inhibit the initiation of transcription by spring viremia of carp virus, suggesting that a cleavage between the beta and gamma phosphates of ATP is essential for the initiation of transcription. However, in the presence of GppNHp, uncapped (ppAp and pppAp), capped (GpppAp), and capped methylated (m7GpppAmpAp and GpppAmpAp) transcripts are detected. Size analyses of oligodeoxythymidylic acid-cellulose-bound transcripts resolved by formamide gel electrophoresis demonstrated that full-size mRNA transcripts are synthesized as well as larger RNA species. The presence of GppNHp and S-adenosylhomocysteine in reaction mixtures did not have any effect on the type of unmethylated transcription products. Our results favor a transcription model postulated previously (D. H. L. Bishop, in H. Fraenkel-Conrat and R. R. Wagner, ed., Comprehensive Virology, vol. 10, Plenum Press, New York, 1977; D. H. L. Bishop and A. Flamand, in D. C. Burke and W. C. Russell

  3. Cloning and characterization of the mouse Mcoln1 gene reveals an alternatively spliced transcript not seen in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stahl Stefanie

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mucolipidosis type IV (MLIV is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder characterized by severe neurologic and ophthalmologic abnormalities. Recently the MLIV gene, MCOLN1, has been identified as a new member of the transient receptor potential (TRP cation channel superfamily. Here we report the cloning and characterization of the mouse homologue, Mcoln1, and report a novel splice variant that is not seen in humans. Results The human and mouse genes display a high degree of synteny. Mcoln1 shows 91% amino acid and 86% nucleotide identity to MCOLN1. Also, Mcoln1 maps to chromosome 8 and contains an open reading frame of 580 amino acids, with a transcript length of approximately 2 kb encoded by 14 exons, similar to its human counterpart. The transcript that results from murine specific alternative splicing encodes a 611 amino acid protein that differs at the c-terminus. Conclusions Mcoln1 is highly similar to MCOLN1, especially in the transmembrane domains and ion pore region. Also, the late endosomal/lysosomal targeting signal is conserved, supporting the hypothesis that the protein is localized to these vesicle membranes. To date, there are very few reports describing species-specific splice variants. While identification of Mcoln1 is crucial to the development of mouse models for MLIV, the fact that there are two transcripts in mice suggests an additional or alternate function of the gene that may complicate phenotypic assessment.

  4. Kalrn promoter usage and isoform expression respond to chronic cocaine exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Xin-Ming

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The long-term effects of cocaine on behavior are accompanied by structural changes in excitatory glutamatergic synapses onto the medium spiny neurons of the striatum. The Kalrn gene encodes several functionally distinct isoforms; these multidomain guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs contain additional domains known to interact with phosphatidylinositides as well as with a number of different proteins. Through their activation of Rho proteins and their interactions with other proteins, the different Kalirin isoforms affect cytoskeletal organization. Chronic exposure of adult male rodents to cocaine increases levels of Kalirin 7 in the striatum. When exposed chronically to cocaine, mice lacking Kalirin 7, the major adult isoform, fail to show an increase in dendritic spine density in the nucleus accumbens, show diminished place preference for cocaine, and exhibit increased locomotor activity in response to cocaine. Results The use of alternate promoters and 3'-terminal exons of the mouse Kalrn gene were investigated using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. While the two most distal full-length Kalrn promoters are used equally in the prefrontal cortex, the more proximal of these promoters accounts for most of the transcripts expressed in the nucleus accumbens. The 3'-terminal exon unique to the Kalirin 7 isoform accounts for a greater percentage of the Kalrn transcripts in prefrontal cortex than in nucleus accumbens. Western blot analyses confirmed these differences. Chronic cocaine treatment increases usage of the promoter encoding the Δ-Kalirin isoforms but does not alter full-length Kalirin promoter usage. Usage of the 3'-terminal exon unique to Kalirin 7 increases following chronic cocaine exposure. Conclusions Kalrn promoter and 3'-terminal exon utilization are region-specific. In the nucleus accumbens, cocaine-mediated alterations in promoter usage and 3'-terminal exon usage favor expression of

  5. Alternative splicing of T cell receptor (TCR) alpha chain transcripts containing V alpha 1 or V alpha 14 elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahotka, C; Hansen-Hagge, T E; Bartram, C R

    1995-10-01

    Human acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines represent valuable tools to investigate distinct steps of the complex regulatory pathways underlying T cell receptor recombination and expression. A case in point are V delta 2D delta 3 and subsequent V delta 2D delta 3J alpha rearrangements observed in human leukemic pre-B cells as well as in normal lymphopoiesis. The functional expression of these unusual (VD) delta (JC) alpha hybrids is almost exclusively prevented by alternative splicing events. In this report we show that alternative splicing at cryptic splice donor sites within V elements is not a unique feature of hybrid TCR delta/alpha transcripts. Among seven V alpha families analyzed by RT-PCR, alternatively spliced products were observed in TCR alpha recombinations containing V alpha 1 or V alpha 14 elements. In contrast to normal peripheral blood cells and thymocytes, the leukemia cell line JM expressing functional V alpha 1J alpha 3C alpha transcripts lacked evidence of aberrant TCR alpha RNA species.

  6. Alternative splicing mechanisms orchestrating post-transcriptional gene expression: intron retention and the intron-rich genome of apicomplexan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunghi, Matteo; Spano, Furio; Magini, Alessandro; Emiliani, Carla; Carruthers, Vern B; Di Cristina, Manlio

    2016-02-01

    Apicomplexan parasites including Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium species have complex life cycles that include multiple hosts and differentiation through several morphologically distinct stages requiring marked changes in gene expression. This review highlights emerging evidence implicating regulation of mRNA splicing as a mechanism to prime these parasites for rapid gene expression upon differentiation. We summarize the most important insights in alternative splicing including its role in regulating gene expression by decreasing mRNA abundance via 'Regulated Unproductive Splicing and Translation'. As a related but less well-understood mechanism, we discuss also our recent work suggesting a role for intron retention for precluding translation of stage specific isoforms of T. gondii glycolytic enzymes. We additionally provide new evidence that intron retention might be a widespread mechanism during parasite differentiation. Supporting this notion, recent genome-wide analysis of Toxoplasma and Plasmodium suggests intron retention is more pervasive than heretofore thought. These findings parallel recent emergence of intron retention being more prevalent in mammals than previously believed, thereby adding to the established roles in plants, fungi and unicellular eukaryotes. Deeper mechanistic studies of intron retention will provide important insight into its role in regulating gene expression in apicomplexan parasites and more general in eukaryotic organisms.

  7. Of alphas and betas: distinct and overlapping functions of STAT3 isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewilde, Sarah; Vercelli, Alessandro; Chiarle, Roberto; Poli, Valeria

    2008-05-01

    STAT3 is a pleiotropic factor activated by many different signals including cytokines, growth factors and oncogenes. It is involved in a striking number of functions and can activate distinct repertoires of genes in different contexts. Like other STAT factors, STAT3 exists in two isoforms generated by alternative splicing, the full length STAT3alpha and the truncated STAT3beta, generally thought to act as a dominant negative factor. However, STAT3beta is not transcriptionally inactive and is able to both activate and repress genes depending on cellular environment. These unique properties of the STAT3beta isoform may contribute to the extraordinary functional complexity of STAT3 physiological and pathological actions, revealed by conditional mutagenesis studies and not yet fully understood. With this in mind, we try here to summarize what is known about the structure and function of the alpha and beta STAT3 isoforms, both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, we report unpublished data describing the phenotype of mice where the STAT3alpha isoform was specifically ablated.

  8. Noncoding transcription by alternative rna polymerases dynamically regulates an auxin-driven chromatin loop

    KAUST Repository

    Ariel, Federico D.

    2014-08-01

    The eukaryotic epigenome is shaped by the genome topology in three-dimensional space. Dynamic reversible variations in this epigenome structure directly influence the transcriptional responses to developmental cues. Here, we show that the Arabidopsis long intergenic noncoding RNA (lincRNA) APOLO is transcribed by RNA polymerases II and V in response to auxin, a phytohormone controlling numerous facets of plant development. This dual APOLO transcription regulates the formation of a chromatin loop encompassing the promoter of its neighboring gene PID, a key regulator of polar auxin transport. Altering APOLO expression affects chromatin loop formation, whereas RNA-dependent DNA methylation, active DNA demethylation, and Polycomb complexes control loop dynamics. This dynamic chromatin topology determines PID expression patterns. Hence, the dual transcription of a lincRNA influences local chromatin topology and directs dynamic auxin-controlled developmental outputs on neighboring genes. This mechanism likely underscores the adaptive success of plants in diverse environments and may be widespread in eukaryotes. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.

  9. Examination of Gelatinase Isoforms in Rodent Models of Acute Neurodegenerative Diseases Using Two-Dimensional Zymography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shanyan; Meng, Fanjun; Chen, Zhenzhou; Qu, Zhe; Cui, Jiankun; Gu, Zezong

    2017-01-01

    Pathological activation of gelatinases (matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9; MMP-2/-9) has been shown to cause a number of detrimental outcomes in neurodegenerative diseases. In gel gelatin zymography is a highly sensitive methodology commonly used in revealing levels of gelatinase activity and in separating the proform and active form of gelatinases, based on their different molecular weights. However, this methodology is inadequate in resolving complex enzyme isoforms, because gelatinase expression and activity can be regulated at transcriptional and/or post-translational levels under in vivo conditions resulting in alternation of their isoelectric focusing (IEF) points. In this chapter, we describe an advanced methodology, termed two-dimensional zymography, combining IEF with zymographic electrophoresis under non-reducing conditions to achieve significant improvement in separation of the gelatinase isoforms in both cell-based and in vivo models for acute brain injuries and neuroinflammation.

  10. The function and developmental expression of alternatively spliced isoforms of amphioxus and Xenopus laevis Pax2/5/8 genes: revealing divergence at the invertebrate to vertebrate transition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Short, S.; Kozmik, Zbyněk; Holland, L. Z.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 318, č. 7 (2012), s. 555-571 ISSN 1552-5007 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/10/2141; GA MŠk LH12047 Grant - others:NSF(US) MCB 06-20019 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : Pax2/5/8 * alternative splicing * eye development * amphioxus * Xenopus laevis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.123, year: 2012

  11. Deciphering Transcriptome and Complex Alternative Splicing Transcripts in Mammary Gland Tissues from Cows Naturally Infected with Staphylococcus aureus Mastitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu Ge Wang

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing (AS contributes to the complexity of the mammalian proteome and plays an important role in diseases, including infectious diseases. The differential AS patterns of these transcript sequences between the healthy (HS3A and mastitic (HS8A cows naturally infected by Staphylococcus aureus were compared to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying mastitis resistance and susceptibility. In this study, using the Illumina paired-end RNA sequencing method, 1352 differentially expressed genes (DEGs with higher than twofold changes were found in the HS3A and HS8A mammary gland tissues. Gene ontology and KEGG pathway analyses revealed that the cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction pathway is the most significantly enriched pathway. Approximately 16k annotated unigenes were respectively identified in two libraries, based on the bovine Bos taurus UMD3.1 sequence assembly and search. A total of 52.62% and 51.24% annotated unigenes were alternatively spliced in term of exon skipping, intron retention, alternative 5' splicing and alternative 3' splicing. Additionally, 1,317 AS unigenes were HS3A-specific, whereas 1,093 AS unigenes were HS8A-specific. Some immune-related genes, such as ITGB6, MYD88, ADA, ACKR1, and TNFRSF1B, and their potential relationships with mastitis were highlighted. From Chromosome 2, 4, 6, 7, 10, 13, 14, 17, and 20, 3.66% (HS3A and 5.4% (HS8A novel transcripts, which harbor known quantitative trait locus associated with clinical mastitis, were identified. Many DEGs in the healthy and mastitic mammary glands are involved in immune, defense, and inflammation responses. These DEGs, which exhibit diverse and specific splicing patterns and events, can endow dairy cattle with the potential complex genetic resistance against mastitis.

  12. Deciphering Transcriptome and Complex Alternative Splicing Transcripts in Mammary Gland Tissues from Cows Naturally Infected with Staphylococcus aureus Mastitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Qiang; Yang, Chun Hong; Zhang, Yan; Sun, Yan; Li, Rong Ling; Wang, Chang Fa; Zhong, Ji Feng; Huang, Jin Ming

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) contributes to the complexity of the mammalian proteome and plays an important role in diseases, including infectious diseases. The differential AS patterns of these transcript sequences between the healthy (HS3A) and mastitic (HS8A) cows naturally infected by Staphylococcus aureus were compared to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying mastitis resistance and susceptibility. In this study, using the Illumina paired-end RNA sequencing method, 1352 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) with higher than twofold changes were found in the HS3A and HS8A mammary gland tissues. Gene ontology and KEGG pathway analyses revealed that the cytokine–cytokine receptor interaction pathway is the most significantly enriched pathway. Approximately 16k annotated unigenes were respectively identified in two libraries, based on the bovine Bos taurus UMD3.1 sequence assembly and search. A total of 52.62% and 51.24% annotated unigenes were alternatively spliced in term of exon skipping, intron retention, alternative 5′ splicing and alternative 3ʹ splicing. Additionally, 1,317 AS unigenes were HS3A-specific, whereas 1,093 AS unigenes were HS8A-specific. Some immune-related genes, such as ITGB6, MYD88, ADA, ACKR1, and TNFRSF1B, and their potential relationships with mastitis were highlighted. From Chromosome 2, 4, 6, 7, 10, 13, 14, 17, and 20, 3.66% (HS3A) and 5.4% (HS8A) novel transcripts, which harbor known quantitative trait locus associated with clinical mastitis, were identified. Many DEGs in the healthy and mastitic mammary glands are involved in immune, defense, and inflammation responses. These DEGs, which exhibit diverse and specific splicing patterns and events, can endow dairy cattle with the potential complex genetic resistance against mastitis. PMID:27459697

  13. New isoforms of rat Aquaporin-4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moe, Svein Erik; Sorbo, Jan Gunnar; Søgaard, Rikke

    2008-01-01

    Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) is a brain aquaporin implicated in the pathophysiology of numerous clinical conditions including brain edema. Here we show that rat AQP4 has six cDNA isoforms, formed by alternative splicing. These are named AQP4a-f, where AQP4a and AQP4c correspond to the two classical M1 and M...

  14. Productive resources in students’ ideas about energy: An alternative analysis of Watts’ original interview transcripts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedikt W. Harrer

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available For over 30 years, researchers have investigated students’ ideas about energy with the intent of reforming instructional practice. In this pursuit, Watts contributed an influential study with his 1983 paper “Some alternative views of energy” [Phys. Educ. 18, 213 (1983]. Watts’ “alternative frameworks” continue to be used for categorizing students’ non-normative ideas about energy. Using a resources framework, we propose an alternate analysis of student responses from Watts’ interviews. In our analysis, we show how students’ activated resources about energy are disciplinarily productive. We suggest that fostering seeds of scientific understandings in students’ ideas about energy may play an important role in their development of scientific literacy.

  15. Activation-induced FOXP3 isoform profile in peripheral CD4+ T cells is associated with coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundberg, Anna K; Jonasson, Lena; Hansson, Göran K; Mailer, Reiner K W

    2017-12-01

    The expression of FOXP3 isoforms affects regulatory T (Treg) cell function. Reduced Treg cell function has been associated with coronary artery disease (CAD). However, alternative splicing of FOXP3 in CAD has not been investigated. FOXP3 splice variants and IL17A transcripts in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from stable CAD patients and healthy controls were quantified, and FOXP3 isoform expression in response to T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation or LDL was analyzed by flow cytometry. Compared to healthy controls, CAD patients expressed significantly more FOXP3 transcripts that included exon 2, whereas alternative splicing of exon 7 in correlation with IL17A expression was reduced. Moreover, TCR stimulation, as well as exposure to LDL, decreased alternative splicing of FOXP3 in CD4+ T cells in vitro. Our results demonstrate that blood mononuclear cells in stable CAD patients express a ratio of FOXP3 isoforms that is characteristic for activated CD4+ T cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Profound human/mouse differences in alpha-dystrobrevin isoforms: a novel syntrophin-binding site and promoter missing in mouse and rat

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    Jin Hong

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The dystrophin glycoprotein complex is disrupted in Duchenne muscular dystrophy and many other neuromuscular diseases. The principal heterodimeric partner of dystrophin at the heart of the dystrophin glycoprotein complex in the main clinically affected tissues (skeletal muscle, heart and brain is its distant relative, α-dystrobrevin. The α-dystrobrevin gene is subject to complex transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation, generating a substantial range of isoforms by alternative promoter use, alternative polyadenylation and alternative splicing. The choice of isoform is understood, amongst other things, to determine the stoichiometry of syntrophins (and their ligands in the dystrophin glycoprotein complex. Results We show here that, contrary to the literature, most α-dystrobrevin genes, including that of humans, encode three distinct syntrophin-binding sites, rather than two, resulting in a greatly enhanced isoform repertoire. We compare in detail the quantitative tissue-specific expression pattern of human and mouse α-dystrobrevin isoforms, and show that two major gene features (the novel syntrophin-binding site-encoding exon and the internal promoter and first exon of brain-specific isoforms α-dystrobrevin-4 and -5 are present in most mammals but specifically ablated in mouse and rat. Conclusion Lineage-specific mutations in the murids mean that the mouse brain has fewer than half of the α-dystrobrevin isoforms found in the human brain. Our finding that there are likely to be fundamental functional differences between the α-dystrobrevins (and therefore the dystrophin glycoprotein complexes of mice and humans raises questions about the current use of the mouse as the principal model animal for studying Duchenne muscular dystrophy and other related disorders, especially the neurological aspects thereof.

  17. Molecular cloning and pharmacology of functionally distinct isoforms of the human histamine H(3) receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wellendorph, Petrine; Goodman, M W; Burstein, E S

    2002-01-01

    The pharmacology of histamine H(3) receptors suggests the presence of distinct receptor isoforms or subtypes. We herein describe multiple, functionally distinct, alternatively spliced isoforms of the human H(3) receptor. Combinatorial splicing at three different sites creates at least six distinct...... receptor isoforms, of which isoforms 1, 2, and 4, encode functional proteins. Detailed pharmacology on isoforms 1 (unspliced receptor), and 2 (which has an 80 amino acid deletion within the third intracellular loop of the protein) revealed that both isoforms displayed robust responses to a series of known...... revealed a rank order of potency at both isoforms of clobenpropit>iodophenpropit>thioperamide, and these drugs are fivefold less potent at isoform 2 than isoform 1. To further explore the pharmacology of H(3) receptor function, we screened 150 clinically relevant neuropsychiatric drugs for H(3) receptor...

  18. A minor alternative transcript of the fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase gene produces a protein despite being likely subjected to nonsense-mediated mRNA decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreumont, Natacha; Maresca, Antonella; Boisclair-Lachance, Jean-François; Bergeron, Anne; Tanguay, Robert M

    2005-01-07

    Coupling of alternative splicing with nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) may regulate gene expression. We report here the identification of a nonsense alternative transcript of the fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (fah) gene, which produces a protein despite the fact that it is subject to NMD. During the characterization of the effects of the W262X nonsense mutation on FAH mRNA metabolism, two alternative transcripts (del100 and del231) of the fah gene were identified. Del100 lacks exon 8 and as a consequence, the reading frame is shifted and a premature termination codon appears at the 3'end of exon 10. Exons 8 and 9 are skipped in del231, without any disruption of the reading frame. Specific amplification of these transcripts demonstrate that they are produced through minor alternative splicing pathways, and that they are not caused by the W262X mutation per se. As shown with an antiserum raised against the C-terminal part of the putative DEL100 protein, the del100 transcript produces a protein, expressed at different levels in various human tissues. Interestingly, the del100 transcript seems to be subjected to nonsense-mediated mRNA decay, as its level was stabilized following a cycloheximide treatment. The del100 and del231 transcripts arise due to minor alternative splicing pathways and del100 is likely subjected to nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. However the remaining amount of transcript seems sufficient to produce a protein in different human tissues. This suggests that NMD has a broader role than simply eliminating aberrant transcripts and when coupled to alternative splicing, may act to modulate gene expression, by allowing the production of low amounts of protein.

  19. Localization of human RNase Z isoforms: dual nuclear/mitochondrial targeting of the ELAC2 gene product by alternative translation initiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Rossmanith

    Full Text Available RNase Z is an endonuclease responsible for the removal of 3' extensions from tRNA precursors, an essential step in tRNA biogenesis. Human cells contain a long form (RNase Z(L encoded by ELAC2, and a short form (RNase Z(S; ELAC1. We studied their subcellular localization by expression of proteins fused to green fluorescent protein. RNase Z(S was found in the cytosol, whereas RNase Z(L localized to the nucleus and mitochondria. We show that alternative translation initiation is responsible for the dual targeting of RNase Z(L. Due to the unfavorable context of the first AUG of ELAC2, translation apparently also starts from the second AUG, whereby the mitochondrial targeting sequence is lost and the protein is instead routed to the nucleus. Our data suggest that RNase Z(L is the enzyme involved in both, nuclear and mitochondrial tRNA 3' end maturation.

  20. Global identification of the full-length transcripts and alternative splicing related to phenolic acid biosynthetic genes in Salvia miltiorrhiza

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    Zhichao eXu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Salvianolic acids are among the main bioactive components in Salvia miltiorrhiza, and their biosynthesis has attracted widespread interest. However, previous studies on the biosynthesis of phenolic acids using next-generation sequencing platforms are limited with regard to the assembly of full-length transcripts. Based on hybrid-seq (next-generation and single molecular real-time sequencing of the S. miltiorrhiza root transcriptome, we experimentally identified 15 full-length transcripts and 4 alternative splicing events of enzyme-coding genes involved in the biosynthesis of rosmarinic acid. Moreover, we herein demonstrate that lithospermic acid B accumulates in the phloem and xylem of roots, in agreement with the expression patterns of the identified key genes related to rosmarinic acid biosynthesis. According to co-expression patterns, we predicted that 6 candidate cytochrome P450s and 5 candidate laccases participate in the salvianolic acid pathway. Our results provide a valuable resource for further investigation into the synthetic biology of phenolic acids in S. miltiorrhiza.

  1. MAISTAS: a tool for automatic structural evaluation of alternative splicing products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floris, Matteo; Raimondo, Domenico; Leoni, Guido; Orsini, Massimiliano; Marcatili, Paolo; Tramontano, Anna

    2011-06-15

    Analysis of the human genome revealed that the amount of transcribed sequence is an order of magnitude greater than the number of predicted and well-characterized genes. A sizeable fraction of these transcripts is related to alternatively spliced forms of known protein coding genes. Inspection of the alternatively spliced transcripts identified in the pilot phase of the ENCODE project has clearly shown that often their structure might substantially differ from that of other isoforms of the same gene, and therefore that they might perform unrelated functions, or that they might even not correspond to a functional protein. Identifying these cases is obviously relevant for the functional assignment of gene products and for the interpretation of the effect of variations in the corresponding proteins. Here we describe a publicly available tool that, given a gene or a protein, retrieves and analyses all its annotated isoforms, provides users with three-dimensional models of the isoform(s) of his/her interest whenever possible and automatically assesses whether homology derived structural models correspond to plausible structures. This information is clearly relevant. When the homology model of some isoforms of a gene does not seem structurally plausible, the implications are that either they assume a structure unrelated to that of the other isoforms of the same gene with presumably significant functional differences, or do not correspond to functional products. We provide indications that the second hypothesis is likely to be true for a substantial fraction of the cases. http://maistas.bioinformatica.crs4.it/.

  2. A study of alternative splicing in the pig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillig, Ann-Britt Nygaard; Cirera Salicio, Susanna; Gilchrist, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Since at least half of the genes in mammalian genomes are subjected to alternative splicing, alternative pre-mRNA splicing plays an important contribution to the complexity of the mammalian proteome. Expressed sequence tags (ESTs) provide evidence of a great number of possible...... alternative isoforms. With the EST resource for the domestic pig now containing more than one million porcine ESTs, it is possible to identify alternative splice forms of the individual transcripts in this species from the EST data with some confidence. RESULTS: The pig EST data generated by the Sino...... transcripts with expression patterns matching those of the EST data. The remaining four genes had tissue-restricted expression of alternative spliced transcripts. Five out of the 16 splice events that were experimentally verified were found to be putative pig specific. CONCLUSIONS: In accordance with human...

  3. Transcriptional Auto-Regulation of RUNX1 P1 Promoter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Milka; Hinojosa, Marcela; Trombly, Daniel; Morin, Violeta; Stein, Janet; Stein, Gary; Javed, Amjad; Gutierrez, Soraya E.

    2016-01-01

    RUNX1 a member of the family of runt related transcription factors (RUNX), is essential for hematopoiesis. The expression of RUNX1 gene is controlled by two promoters; the distal P1 promoter and the proximal P2 promoter. Several isoforms of RUNX1 mRNA are generated through the use of both promoters and alternative splicing. These isoforms not only differs in their temporal expression pattern but also exhibit differences in tissue specificity. The RUNX1 isoforms derived from P2 are expressed in a variety of tissues, but expression of P1-derived isoform is restricted to cells of hematopoietic lineage. However, the control of hematopoietic-cell specific expression is poorly understood. Here we report regulation of P1-derived RUNX1 mRNA by RUNX1 protein. In silico analysis of P1 promoter revealed presence of two evolutionary conserved RUNX motifs, 0.6kb upstream of the transcription start site, and three RUNX motifs within 170bp of the 5’UTR. Transcriptional contribution of these RUNX motifs was studied in myeloid and T-cells. RUNX1 genomic fragment containing all sites show very low basal activity in both cell types. Mutation or deletion of RUNX motifs in the UTR enhances basal activity of the RUNX1 promoter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that RUNX1 protein is recruited to these sites. Overexpression of RUNX1 in non-hematopoietic cells results in a dose dependent activation of the RUNX1 P1 promoter. We also demonstrate that RUNX1 protein regulates transcription of endogenous RUNX1 mRNA in T-cell. Finally we show that SCL transcription factor is recruited to regions containing RUNX motifs in the promoter and the UTR and regulates activity of the RUNX1 P1 promoter in vitro. Thus, multiple lines of evidence show that RUNX1 protein regulates its own gene transcription. PMID:26901859

  4. Transcriptional Auto-Regulation of RUNX1 P1 Promoter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milka Martinez

    Full Text Available RUNX1 a member of the family of runt related transcription factors (RUNX, is essential for hematopoiesis. The expression of RUNX1 gene is controlled by two promoters; the distal P1 promoter and the proximal P2 promoter. Several isoforms of RUNX1 mRNA are generated through the use of both promoters and alternative splicing. These isoforms not only differs in their temporal expression pattern but also exhibit differences in tissue specificity. The RUNX1 isoforms derived from P2 are expressed in a variety of tissues, but expression of P1-derived isoform is restricted to cells of hematopoietic lineage. However, the control of hematopoietic-cell specific expression is poorly understood. Here we report regulation of P1-derived RUNX1 mRNA by RUNX1 protein. In silico analysis of P1 promoter revealed presence of two evolutionary conserved RUNX motifs, 0.6kb upstream of the transcription start site, and three RUNX motifs within 170bp of the 5'UTR. Transcriptional contribution of these RUNX motifs was studied in myeloid and T-cells. RUNX1 genomic fragment containing all sites show very low basal activity in both cell types. Mutation or deletion of RUNX motifs in the UTR enhances basal activity of the RUNX1 promoter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that RUNX1 protein is recruited to these sites. Overexpression of RUNX1 in non-hematopoietic cells results in a dose dependent activation of the RUNX1 P1 promoter. We also demonstrate that RUNX1 protein regulates transcription of endogenous RUNX1 mRNA in T-cell. Finally we show that SCL transcription factor is recruited to regions containing RUNX motifs in the promoter and the UTR and regulates activity of the RUNX1 P1 promoter in vitro. Thus, multiple lines of evidence show that RUNX1 protein regulates its own gene transcription.

  5. Dietary arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid regulate liver fatty acid desaturase (FADS) alternative transcript expression in suckling piglets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijendran, Vasuki; Downs, Ian; Tyburczy, Cynthia; Kothapalli, Kumar S. D.; Park, Woo Jung; Blank, Bryant S.; Zimmer, J. Paul; Butt, C.M.; Salem, Norman; Brenna, J. Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Molecular regulation of fatty acid desaturase (Fads) gene expression by dietary arachidonic (ARA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) during early postnatal period, when the demand for long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA) is very high, has not been well defined. The objective of the current study was to determine regulation of liver Fads1, Fads2 and Fads3 classical (CS) and alternative transcripts (AT) expression by dietary ARA and DHA, within the physiological range present in human breast milk, in suckling piglets. Piglets were fed one of six milk replacer formula diets (Formula-reared groups, FR) with varying ARA and DHA content from days 3-28 of age. The ARA/DHA levels of the six formula diets were as follows (% total fatty acid, FA/FA): (A1) 0.1/1.0; (A2) 0.53/1.0; (A3-D3) 0.69/1.0; (A4) 1.1/1.0; (D2) 0.67/0.62; (D1) 0.66/0.33. The control maternal-reared (MR) group remained with the dam. Fads1 expression was not significantly different between FR and MR groups. Fads2 expression was down-regulated significantly in diets with 1:1 ratio of ARA:DHA, compared to MR. Fads2 AT1 expression was highly correlated to Fads2 expression. Fads3 AT7 was the only Fads3 transcript sensitive to dietary LC-PUFA intake and was up-regulated in the formula diets with lowest ARA and DHA content compared to MR. Thus, the present study provides evidence that the proportion of dietary ARA:DHA is a significant determinant of Fads2 expression and LC-PUFA metabolism during the early post-natal period. Further, the data suggest that Fads3 AT7 may have functional significance when dietary supply of ARA and DHA are low during early development. PMID:24075244

  6. Levels of myosin heavy chain mRNA transcripts and protein isoforms in the fast extensor digitorum longus muscle of 7-month-old rats with chronic thyroid status alterations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vadászová, Adriana; Hudecová, S.; Križanová, O.; Soukup, Tomáš

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 6 (2006), s. 707-710 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA304/05/0327 Grant - others:VEGA(SK) 2/4106; NATO(XE) 979876; SAV(SK) APVT-51-027404; MYORES(XE) 511978 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : myosin heavy chain isoforms * thyroid hormones * muscle differentiation Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.093, year: 2006

  7. Transcription factor EBF1 is essential for the maintenance of B cell identity and prevention of alternative fates in committed cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nechanitzky, Robert; Akbas, Duygu; Scherer, Stefanie; Györy, Ildiko; Hoyler, Thomas; Ramamoorthy, Senthilkumar; Diefenbach, Andreas; Grosschedl, Rudolf

    2013-08-01

    The transcription factors EBF1 and Pax5 have been linked to activation of the B cell lineage program and irreversible loss of alternative lineage potential (commitment), respectively. Here we conditionally deleted Ebf1 in committed pro-B cells after transfer into alymphoid mice. We found that those cells converted into innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) and T cells with variable-diversity-joining (VDJ) rearrangements of loci encoding both B cell and T cell antigen receptors. As intermediates in lineage conversion, Ebf1-deficient CD19(+) cells expressing Pax5 and transcriptional regulators of the ILC and T cell fates were detectable. In particular, genes encoding the transcription factors Id2 and TCF-1 were bound and repressed by EBF1. Thus, both EBF1 and Pax5 are required for B lineage commitment by repressing distinct and common determinants of alternative cell fates.

  8. Extraction of transcript diversity from scientific literature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parantu K Shah

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Transcript diversity generated by alternative splicing and associated mechanisms contributes heavily to the functional complexity of biological systems. The numerous examples of the mechanisms and functional implications of these events are scattered throughout the scientific literature. Thus, it is crucial to have a tool that can automatically extract the relevant facts and collect them in a knowledge base that can aid the interpretation of data from high-throughput methods. We have developed and applied a composite text-mining method for extracting information on transcript diversity from the entire MEDLINE database in order to create a database of genes with alternative transcripts. It contains information on tissue specificity, number of isoforms, causative mechanisms, functional implications, and experimental methods used for detection. We have mined this resource to identify 959 instances of tissue-specific splicing. Our results in combination with those from EST-based methods suggest that alternative splicing is the preferred mechanism for generating transcript diversity in the nervous system. We provide new annotations for 1,860 genes with the potential for generating transcript diversity. We assign the MeSH term "alternative splicing" to 1,536 additional abstracts in the MEDLINE database and suggest new MeSH terms for other events. We have successfully extracted information about transcript diversity and semiautomatically generated a database, LSAT, that can provide a quantitative understanding of the mechanisms behind tissue-specific gene expression. LSAT (Literature Support for Alternative Transcripts is publicly available at http://www.bork.embl.de/LSAT/.

  9. Identification of a Sjögren's syndrome susceptibility locus at OAS1 that influences isoform switching, protein expression, and responsiveness to type I interferons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, He; Reksten, Tove Ragna; Ice, John A; Kelly, Jennifer A; Adrianto, Indra; Rasmussen, Astrid; Wang, Shaofeng; He, Bo; Grundahl, Kiely M; Glenn, Stuart B; Miceli-Richard, Corinne; Bowman, Simon; Lester, Sue; Eriksson, Per; Eloranta, Maija-Leena; Brun, Johan G; Gøransson, Lasse G; Harboe, Erna; Guthridge, Joel M; Kaufman, Kenneth M; Kvarnström, Marika; Cunninghame Graham, Deborah S; Patel, Ketan; Adler, Adam J; Farris, A Darise; Brennan, Michael T; Chodosh, James; Gopalakrishnan, Rajaram; Weisman, Michael H; Venuturupalli, Swamy; Wallace, Daniel J; Hefner, Kimberly S; Houston, Glen D; Huang, Andrew J W; Hughes, Pamela J; Lewis, David M; Radfar, Lida; Vista, Evan S; Edgar, Contessa E; Rohrer, Michael D; Stone, Donald U; Vyse, Timothy J; Harley, John B; Gaffney, Patrick M; James, Judith A; Turner, Sean; Alevizos, Ilias; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Rhodus, Nelson L; Segal, Barbara M; Montgomery, Courtney G; Scofield, R Hal; Kovats, Susan; Mariette, Xavier; Rönnblom, Lars; Witte, Torsten; Rischmueller, Maureen; Wahren-Herlenius, Marie; Omdal, Roald; Jonsson, Roland; Ng, Wan-Fai; Nordmark, Gunnel; Lessard, Christopher J; Sivils, Kathy L

    2017-06-01

    Sjögren's syndrome (SS) is a common, autoimmune exocrinopathy distinguished by keratoconjunctivitis sicca and xerostomia. Patients frequently develop serious complications including lymphoma, pulmonary dysfunction, neuropathy, vasculitis, and debilitating fatigue. Dysregulation of type I interferon (IFN) pathway is a prominent feature of SS and is correlated with increased autoantibody titers and disease severity. To identify genetic determinants of IFN pathway dysregulation in SS, we performed cis-expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) analyses focusing on differentially expressed type I IFN-inducible transcripts identified through a transcriptome profiling study. Multiple cis-eQTLs were associated with transcript levels of 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase 1 (OAS1) peaking at rs10774671 (PeQTL = 6.05 × 10-14). Association of rs10774671 with SS susceptibility was identified and confirmed through meta-analysis of two independent cohorts (Pmeta = 2.59 × 10-9; odds ratio = 0.75; 95% confidence interval = 0.66-0.86). The risk allele of rs10774671 shifts splicing of OAS1 from production of the p46 isoform to multiple alternative transcripts, including p42, p48, and p44. We found that the isoforms were differentially expressed within each genotype in controls and patients with and without autoantibodies. Furthermore, our results showed that the three alternatively spliced isoforms lacked translational response to type I IFN stimulation. The p48 and p44 isoforms also had impaired protein expression governed by the 3' end of the transcripts. The SS risk allele of rs10774671 has been shown by others to be associated with reduced OAS1 enzymatic activity and ability to clear viral infections, as well as reduced responsiveness to IFN treatment. Our results establish OAS1 as a risk locus for SS and support a potential role for defective viral clearance due to altered IFN response as a genetic pathophysiological basis of this complex autoimmune disease.

  10. Identification of a Sjögren's syndrome susceptibility locus at OAS1 that influences isoform switching, protein expression, and responsiveness to type I interferons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Sjögren's syndrome (SS is a common, autoimmune exocrinopathy distinguished by keratoconjunctivitis sicca and xerostomia. Patients frequently develop serious complications including lymphoma, pulmonary dysfunction, neuropathy, vasculitis, and debilitating fatigue. Dysregulation of type I interferon (IFN pathway is a prominent feature of SS and is correlated with increased autoantibody titers and disease severity. To identify genetic determinants of IFN pathway dysregulation in SS, we performed cis-expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL analyses focusing on differentially expressed type I IFN-inducible transcripts identified through a transcriptome profiling study. Multiple cis-eQTLs were associated with transcript levels of 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase 1 (OAS1 peaking at rs10774671 (PeQTL = 6.05 × 10-14. Association of rs10774671 with SS susceptibility was identified and confirmed through meta-analysis of two independent cohorts (Pmeta = 2.59 × 10-9; odds ratio = 0.75; 95% confidence interval = 0.66-0.86. The risk allele of rs10774671 shifts splicing of OAS1 from production of the p46 isoform to multiple alternative transcripts, including p42, p48, and p44. We found that the isoforms were differentially expressed within each genotype in controls and patients with and without autoantibodies. Furthermore, our results showed that the three alternatively spliced isoforms lacked translational response to type I IFN stimulation. The p48 and p44 isoforms also had impaired protein expression governed by the 3' end of the transcripts. The SS risk allele of rs10774671 has been shown by others to be associated with reduced OAS1 enzymatic activity and ability to clear viral infections, as well as reduced responsiveness to IFN treatment. Our results establish OAS1 as a risk locus for SS and support a potential role for defective viral clearance due to altered IFN response as a genetic pathophysiological basis of this complex autoimmune disease.

  11. Alternative splice variants of the human PD-1 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christian; Ohm-Laursen, Line; Barington, Torben

    2005-01-01

    PD-1 is an immunoregulatory receptor expressed on the surface of activated T cells, B cells, and monocytes. We describe four alternatively spliced PD-1 mRNA transcripts (PD-1Deltaex2, PD-1Deltaex3, PD-1Deltaex2,3, and PD-1Deltaex2,3,4) in addition to the full length isoform. PD-1Deltaex2 and PD-1...

  12. A Comprehensive Analysis of Alternative Splicing in Paleopolyploid Maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenbin Mei

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Identifying and characterizing alternative splicing (AS enables our understanding of the biological role of transcript isoform diversity. This study describes the use of publicly available RNA-Seq data to identify and characterize the global diversity of AS isoforms in maize using the inbred lines B73 and Mo17, and a related species, sorghum. Identification and characterization of AS within maize tissues revealed that genes expressed in seed exhibit the largest differential AS relative to other tissues examined. Additionally, differences in AS between the two genotypes B73 and Mo17 are greatest within genes expressed in seed. We demonstrate that changes in the level of alternatively spliced transcripts (intron retention and exon skipping do not solely reflect differences in total transcript abundance, and we present evidence that intron retention may act to fine-tune gene expression across seed development stages. Furthermore, we have identified temperature sensitive AS in maize and demonstrate that drought-induced changes in AS involve distinct sets of genes in reproductive and vegetative tissues. Examining our identified AS isoforms within B73 × Mo17 recombinant inbred lines (RILs identified splicing QTL (sQTL. The 43.3% of cis-sQTL regulated junctions are actually identified as alternatively spliced junctions in our analysis, while 10 Mb windows on each side of 48.2% of trans-sQTLs overlap with splicing related genes. Using sorghum as an out-group enabled direct examination of loss or conservation of AS between homeologous genes representing the two subgenomes of maize. We identify several instances where AS isoforms that are conserved between one maize homeolog and its sorghum ortholog are absent from the second maize homeolog, suggesting that these AS isoforms may have been lost after the maize whole genome duplication event. This comprehensive analysis provides new insights into the complexity of AS in maize.

  13. Coding potential of the products of alternative splicing in human.

    KAUST Repository

    Leoni, Guido

    2011-01-20

    BACKGROUND: Analysis of the human genome has revealed that as much as an order of magnitude more of the genomic sequence is transcribed than accounted for by the predicted and characterized genes. A number of these transcripts are alternatively spliced forms of known protein coding genes; however, it is becoming clear that many of them do not necessarily correspond to a functional protein. RESULTS: In this study we analyze alternative splicing isoforms of human gene products that are unambiguously identified by mass spectrometry and compare their properties with those of isoforms of the same genes for which no peptide was found in publicly available mass spectrometry datasets. We analyze them in detail for the presence of uninterrupted functional domains, active sites as well as the plausibility of their predicted structure. We report how well each of these strategies and their combination can correctly identify translated isoforms and derive a lower limit for their specificity, that is, their ability to correctly identify non-translated products. CONCLUSIONS: The most effective strategy for correctly identifying translated products relies on the conservation of active sites, but it can only be applied to a small fraction of isoforms, while a reasonably high coverage, sensitivity and specificity can be achieved by analyzing the presence of non-truncated functional domains. Combining the latter with an assessment of the plausibility of the modeled structure of the isoform increases both coverage and specificity with a moderate cost in terms of sensitivity.

  14. A dynamic ratio of the alpha+ and alpha- isoforms of the tight junction protein ZO-1 is characteristic of Caco-2 cells and correlates with their degree of differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciana, Annarita; Meier, Katharina; Daum, Nicole; Gerbes, Stefan; Veith, Michael; Lehr, Claus-Michael; Minetti, Giampaolo

    2010-05-07

    ZO-1 is a peripheral protein that plays a central role in the macromolecular assembly of tight junctions by interacting with integral proteins (occludin, claudins, JAMs) of the membrane of adjoining cells, with the actin cytoskeleton, and with nuclear factors. Human ZO-1 is expressed in all epithelia and some specialized endothelia as variable amounts of two related isoforms, which originate from the alternatively spliced mRNA transcripts alpha(+) and alpha(-) and whose specific differential role is still unknown. Moreover, little is known about the timing of expression of ZO-1 isoforms at the protein and mRNA level. This study shows that during growth of freshly plated Caco-2 cells, the alpha(+)/alpha(-) ratio increased as a result of simultaneous increase of alpha(+) and decrease of alpha(-). Differences in the isoform ratio also correlated with differences in epithelium differentiation. This was determined by aminopeptidase N measurements of cells grown on conventional substrates and on modified, micro/nano-patterned surfaces. A comparable shift of ZO-1 isoforms was not observed in other tumour cell lines of non-intestinal origin (A549, Calu-3). Pancreatic stem cells, propagated without exogenous differentiation stimuli, displayed a slight, stable prevalence of the alpha(-) isoform. Of the intestinal cell lines examined (Caco-2 and T84), only Caco-2 cells displayed a dramatic shift in isoform expression. This suggests that this tumour cell line retains to a higher degree a developmental programme related to the dynamic of enterocytic differentiation in vivo.

  15. Differential regulation of macropinocytosis by Abi1/Hssh3bp1 isoforms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrycja M Dubielecka

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Macropinocytosis, which is a constitutive cellular process of fluid and macromolecule uptake, is regulated by actin cytoskeleton rearrangements near the plasma membrane. Activation of Rac1, which is proposed to act upstream of the actin polymerization regulatory Wave 2 complex, has been found to correlate with enhanced macropinocytosis. One of the components of the Wave 2 complex is Abi1. Multiple, alternatively spliced isoforms of Abi1 are expressed in mammalian cells, but the functional significance of the various isoforms is unknown.Here, using flow cytometric assay analysis for Alexa Fluor 647, we demonstrate that Abi1 isoforms 2 and 3 differentially regulate macropinocytosis. LNCaP cells expressing isoform 3 had increased macropinocytic uptake that correlated with enhanced cell spreading and higher Rac1 activation in comparison to cells expressing isoform 2. Isoform 2 expressing cells had decreased macropinocytic uptake, but demonstrated greater sensitivity to Rac1 activation. Moreover, more isoform 2 was localized within the cytoplasm in comparison to isoform 3, which was more associated with the plasma membrane. Activated Rac1 was found to specifically bind to a site in exon 10 of isoform 2 in vitro. Because of alternative mRNA splicing, exon 10 is absent from isoform 3, precluding similar binding of activated Rac1. Both isoforms, however, bound to inactive Rac1 through the same non-exon 10 site. Thus, Abi1 isoform 3-containing Wave 2 complex exhibited a differential binding to activated vs. inactive Rac1, whereas isoform 2-containing Wave 2 complex bound activated or inactive Rac1 comparably.Based on these observations, we postulate that Abi1 isoforms differentially regulate macropinocytosis as a consequence of their different relative affinities for activated Rac1 in Wave 2 complex. These findings also raise the possibility that isoform-specific roles occur in other Abi1 functions.

  16. Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3α Is the Main Isoform That Regulates the Transcription Factors Nuclear Factor-Kappa B and cAMP Response Element Binding in Bovine Endothelial Cells Infected with Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavio Silva-García

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3 is a constitutive enzyme implicated in the regulation of cytokine expression and the inflammatory response during bacterial infections. Mammals have two GSK3 isoforms named GSK3α and GSK3β that plays different but often overlapping functions. Although the role of GSK3β in cytokine regulation during the inflammatory response caused by bacteria is well described, GSK3α has not been found to participate in this process. Therefore, we tested if GSK3α may act as a regulatory isoform in the cytokine expression by bovine endothelial cells infected with Staphylococcus aureus because this bacterium is one of the major pathogens that cause tissue damage associated with inflammatory dysfunction. Interestingly, although both isoforms were phosphorylated–inactivated, we consistently observed a higher phosphorylation of GSK3α at Ser21 than that of GSK3β at Ser9 after bacterial challenge. During a temporal course of infection, we characterized a molecular switch from pro-inflammatory cytokine expression (IL-8, promoted by nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB, at an early stage (2 h to an anti-inflammatory cytokine expression (IL-10, promoted by cAMP response element binding (CREB, at a later stage (6 h. We observed an indirect effect of GSK3α activity on NF-κB activation that resulted in a low phosphorylation of CREB at Ser133, a decreased interaction between CREB and the co-activator CREB-binding protein (CBP, and a lower expression level of IL-10. Gene silencing of GSK3α and GSK3β with siRNA indicated that GSK3α knockout promoted the interaction between CREB and CBP that, in turn, increased the expression of IL-10, reduced the interaction of NF-κB with CBP, and reduced the expression of IL-8. These results indicate that GSK3α functions as the primary isoform that regulates the expression of IL-10 in endothelial cells infected with S. aureus.

  17. Framework and resource for more than 11,000 gene-transcript-protein-reaction associations in human metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryu, Jae Yong; Kim, Hyun Uk; Lee, Sang Yup

    2017-01-01

    Alternative splicing plays important roles in generating different transcripts from one gene, and consequently various protein isoforms. However, there has been no systematic approach that facilitates characterizing functional roles of protein isoforms in the context of the entire human metabolism....... Here, we present a systematic framework for the generation of gene-transcript-proteinreaction associations (GeTPRA) in the human metabolism. The framework in this study generated 11,415 GeTPRA corresponding to 1,106 metabolic genes for both principal and nonprincipal transcripts (PTs and NPTs......) of metabolic genes. The framework further evaluates GeTPRA, using a human genome-scale metabolic model (GEM) that is biochemically consistent and transcript-level data compatible, and subsequently updates the human GEM. A generic human GEM, Recon 2M. 1, was developed for this purpose, and subsequently updated...

  18. Roles of the troponin isoforms during indirect flight muscle ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IFMs) undergo post-transcriptional and post-translational isoform changes during pupal to adult metamorphosis to meet the high energy and mechanical demands of flight. Using a newly generated Gal4 strain (UH3-Gal4) which is expressed ...

  19. An alternatively spliced mRNA from the AP-2 gene encodes a negative regulator of transcriptional activation by AP-2.

    OpenAIRE

    Buettner, R; Kannan, P; Imhof, A; Bauer, R; Yim, S O; Glockshuber, R; Van Dyke, M W; Tainsky, M A

    1993-01-01

    AP-2 is a retinoic acid-inducible and developmentally regulated activator of transcription. We have cloned an alternative AP-2 transcript (AP-2B) from the human teratocarcinoma cell line PA-1, which encodes a protein differing in the C terminus from the previously isolated AP-2 protein (AP-2A). This protein contains the activation domain of AP-2 and part of the DNA binding domain but lacks the dimerization domain which is necessary for DNA binding. Analysis of overlapping genomic clones spann...

  20. Isolation of All CD44 Transcripts in Human Epidermis and Regulation of Their Expression by Various Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teye, Kwesi; Numata, Sanae; Ishii, Norito; Krol, Rafal P; Tsuchisaka, Atsunari; Hamada, Takahiro; Koga, Hiroshi; Karashima, Tadashi; Ohata, Chika; Tsuruta, Daisuke; Saya, Hideyuki; Haftek, Marek; Hashimoto, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    CD44, a cell surface proteoglycan, is involved in many biological events. CD44 transcripts undergo complex alternative splicing, resulting in many functionally distinct isoforms. To date, however, the nature of these isoforms in human epidermis has not been adequately determined. In this study, we isolated all CD44 transcripts from normal human epidermis, and studied how their expressions are regulated. By RT-PCR, we found that a number of different CD44 transcripts were expressed in human epidermis, and we obtained all these transcripts from DNA bands in agarose and acrylamide gels by cloning. Detailed sequence analysis revealed 18 CD44 transcripts, 3 of which were novel. Next, we examined effects of 10 different agents on the expression of CD44 transcripts in cultured human keratinocytes, and found that several agents, particularly epidermal growth factor, hydrogen peroxide, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, retinoic acid, calcium and fetal calf serum differently regulated their expressions in various patterns. Furthermore, normal and malignant keratinocytes were found to produce different CD44 transcripts upon serum stimulation and subsequent starvation, suggesting that specific CD44 isoforms are involved in tumorigenesis via different CD44-mediated biological pathways.

  1. Impairment of mature B-cell maintenance upon combined deletion of the alternative NF-?B transcription factors RELB and NF-?B2 in B cells$

    OpenAIRE

    De Silva, Nilushi S.; Silva, Kathryn; Anderson, Michael M.; Bhagat, Govind; Klein, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    B-cell activating factor (BAFF) is critical for the survival and maturation of mature B-cells. BAFF, via the BAFF receptor (BAFFR), activates multiple signaling pathways in B-cells, including the alternative nuclear factor-?B (NF-?B) pathway. The transcription factors RELB and NF-?B2 (p100/p52) are the downstream mediators of the alternative pathway; however, the B-cell-intrinsic functions of these NF-?B subunits have not been studied in vivo using conditional alleles, either individually or ...

  2. Tissue-specific and ubiquitous expression patterns from alternative promoters of human genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin Jacox

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Transcriptome diversity provides the key to cellular identity. One important contribution to expression diversity is the use of alternative promoters, which creates mRNA isoforms by expanding the choice of transcription initiation sites of a gene. The proximity of the basal promoter to the transcription initiation site enables prediction of a promoter's location based on the gene annotations. We show that annotation of alternative promoters regulating expression of transcripts with distinct first exons enables a novel methodology to quantify expression levels and tissue specificity of mRNA isoforms.The use of distinct alternative first exons in 3,296 genes was examined using exon-microarray data from 11 human tissues. Comparing two transcripts from each gene we found that the activity of alternative promoters (i.e., P1 and P2 was not correlated through tissue specificity or level of expression. Furthermore neither P1 nor P2 conferred any bias for tissue-specific or ubiquitous expression. Genes associated with specific diseases produced transcripts whose limited expression patterns were consistent with the tissue affected in disease. Notably, genes that were historically designated as tissue-specific or housekeeping had alternative isoforms that showed differential expression. Furthermore, only a small number of alternative promoters showed expression exclusive to a single tissue indicating that "tissue preference" provides a better description of promoter activity than tissue specificity. When compared to gene expression data in public databases, as few as 22% of the genes had detailed information for more than one isoform, whereas the remainder collapsed the expression patterns from individual transcripts into one profile.We describe a computational pipeline that uses microarray data to assess the level of expression and breadth of tissue profiles for transcripts with distinct first exons regulated by alternative promoters. We conclude that

  3. Abnormalities in Alternative Splicing of Apoptotic Genes and Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zodwa Dlamini

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is required for normal heart development in the embryo, but has also been shown to be an important factor in the occurrence of heart disease. Alternative splicing of apoptotic genes is currently emerging as a diagnostic and therapeutic target for heart disease. This review addresses the involvement of abnormalities in alternative splicing of apoptotic genes in cardiac disorders including cardiomyopathy, myocardial ischemia and heart failure. Many pro-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family have alternatively spliced isoforms that lack important active domains. These isoforms can play a negative regulatory role by binding to and inhibiting the pro-apoptotic forms. Alternative splicing is observed to be increased in various cardiovascular diseases with the level of alternate transcripts increasing elevated in diseased hearts compared to healthy subjects. In many cases these isoforms appear to be the underlying cause of the disease, while in others they may be induced in response to cardiovascular pathologies. Regardless of this, the detection of alternate splicing events in the heart can serve as useful diagnostic or prognostic tools, while those splicing events that seem to play a causative role in cardiovascular disease make attractive future drug targets.

  4. Alternative transcription initiation of the nitrilase gene (BrNIT2) caused by infection with Plasmodiophora brassicae Woron. in Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Sugihiro; Tsushima, Seiya; Kamachi, Shinichiro; Konagaya, Ken-Ichi; Tabei, Yutaka

    2008-12-01

    In clubroot disease, gall formation is induced by infection with the obligate biotroph Plasmodiophora brassicae, and cell hypertrophy is dependent on increased auxin levels. The enzyme nitrilase is suggested to play an important role in auxin biosynthesis in plants. Here, we investigated the expression of nitrilase genes in clubroot disease in Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa L.). We isolated four isogenes of nitrilase (BrNIT1, BrNIT2, BrNIT3, and BrNIT4) from Chinese cabbage. When a BrNIT2-specific probe was used for Northern blot hybridization, enhanced accumulation of a 1.4 kb mRNA and additional shorter transcripts (1.1 kb) were only detected in clubbed roots 25 days postinoculation (dpi) onward. The expression of BrNIT1 was not strongly affected by infection with P. brassicae. BrNIT3 expression was detected in the roots at 10 and 20 dpi, and the expression was less in clubbed roots than in healthy roots at 20 dpi. Analysis of the transcription initiation point of the BrNIT2 gene suggests that 1.1 kb transcripts were generated by alternative transcription initiation between the second intron and the third exon. The sequence from the second intron to half of the third exon (+415 to +1037, 623 bp) had promoter activity in Arabidopsis during clubroot formation. Therefore, our results suggest that transcriptional regulation of BrNIT2 might be involved in auxin overproduction during clubroot development.

  5. Multiple isoforms of β-TrCP display differential activities in the regulation of Wnt signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Eunjeong; Kim, Hyunjoon; Kim, Rokki; Yun, Sangmoon; Kim, Minseong; Han, Jin-Kwan; Costantini, Frank; Jho, Eek-hoon

    2008-01-01

    The F-box proteins β-TrCP 1 and 2 (β-transducin repeat protein) have 2 and 3 isoforms, respectively, due to alternative splicing of exons encoding the N-terminal region. We identified an extra exon in between the previously known exons 1 and 2 of β-TrCP1 and β-TrCP2. Interestingly, sequence analysis suggested that many more isoforms are produced than previously identified, via the alternative splicing of all possible combination of exons II to V of β-TrCP1 and exons II to IV of β-TrCP2. Different mouse tissues show specific expression patterns of the isoforms, and the level of expression of the isoform that has been used in most published papers was very low. Yeast two-hybrid assays show that β-TrCP1 isoforms containing exon III, which are the most highly expressed isoforms in most tissues, do not interact with Skp1. Indirect immunofluorescence analysis of transiently expressed β-TrCP1 isoforms suggests that the presence of exon III causes β-TrCP1 to localize in nuclei. Consistent with the above findings, isoforms including exon III showed a reduced ability to block ectopic embryonic axes induced via injection of Wnt8 or β-catenin in Xenopus embryos. Overall, our data suggest that isoforms of β-TrCPs generated by alternative splicing may have different biological roles. PMID:18929646

  6. Identification and characterization of novel NuMA isoforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Jin, E-mail: petersdu2112@hotmail.com [Key Laboratory for Cell Proliferation and Regulation of the Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing (China); Xu, Zhe [Department of Clinical Laboratory Diagnosis, Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing (China); Core Laboratory for Clinical Medical Research, Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing (China); He, Dacheng [Key Laboratory for Cell Proliferation and Regulation of the Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing (China); Lu, Guanting, E-mail: guantlv@126.com [Beijing DnaLead Science and Technology Co., LTD, Beijing (China)

    2014-11-21

    Highlights: • Seven NuMA isoforms generated by alternative splicing were categorized into 3 groups: long, middle and short. • Both exons 15 and 16 in long NuMA were “hotspot” for alternative splicing. • Lower expression of short NuMA was observed in cancer cells compared with nonneoplastic controls. • Distinct localization pattern of short isoforms indicated different function from that of long and middle NuMA. - Abstract: The large nuclear mitotic apparatus (NuMA) has been investigated for over 30 years with functions related to the formation and maintenance of mitotic spindle poles during mitosis. However, the existence and functions of NuMA isoforms generated by alternative splicing remains unclear. In the present work, we show that at least seven NuMA isoforms (categorized into long, middle and short groups) generated by alternative splicing from a common NuMA mRNA precursor were discovered in HeLa cells and these isoforms differ mainly at the carboxyl terminus and the coiled-coil domains. Two “hotspot” exons with molecular mass of 3366-nt and 42-nt tend to be spliced during alternative splicing in long and middle groups. Furthermore, full-length coding sequences of long and middle NuMA obtained by using fusion PCR were constructed into GFP-tagged vector to illustrate their cellular localization. Long NuMA mainly localized in the nucleus with absence from nucleoli during interphase and translocated to the spindle poles in mitosis. Middle NuMA displayed the similar cell cycle-dependent distribution pattern as long NuMA. However, expression of NuMA short isoforms revealed a distinct subcellular localization. Short NuMA were present in the cytosol during the whole cycle, without colocalization with mitotic apparatus. These results have allowed us tentatively to explore a new research direction for NuMA’s various functions.

  7. Proteogenomic Analysis Identifies a Novel Human SHANK3 Isoform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahad Benthani

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Mutations of the SHANK3 gene have been associated with autism spectrum disorder. Individuals harboring different SHANK3 mutations display considerable heterogeneity in their cognitive impairment, likely due to the high SHANK3 transcriptional diversity. In this study, we report a novel interaction between the Mutated in colorectal cancer (MCC protein and a newly identified SHANK3 protein isoform in human colon cancer cells and mouse brain tissue. Hence, our proteogenomic analysis identifies a new human long isoform of the key synaptic protein SHANK3 that was not predicted by the human reference genome. Taken together, our findings describe a potential new role for MCC in neurons, a new human SHANK3 long isoform and, importantly, highlight the use of proteomic data towards the re-annotation of GC-rich genomic regions.

  8. Alternative Splicing in Plant Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengming Yang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing (AS occurs widely in plants and can provide the main source of transcriptome and proteome diversity in an organism. AS functions in a range of physiological processes, including plant disease resistance, but its biological roles and functional mechanisms remain poorly understood. Many plant disease resistance (R genes undergo AS, and several R genes require alternatively spliced transcripts to produce R proteins that can specifically recognize pathogen invasion. In the finely-tuned process of R protein activation, the truncated isoforms generated by AS may participate in plant disease resistance either by suppressing the negative regulation of initiation of immunity, or by directly engaging in effector-triggered signaling. Although emerging research has shown the functional significance of AS in plant biotic stress responses, many aspects of this topic remain to be understood. Several interesting issues surrounding the AS of R genes, especially regarding its functional roles and regulation, will require innovative techniques and additional research to unravel.

  9. Identification and functional analysis of an alternative promoter of human intersectin 1 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rynditch A. V.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Intersectin 1 (ITSN1 gene encodes an evolutionarily conserved adaptor protein that functions in clathrin-mediated endocytosis, cell signalling, apoptosis and cytoskeleton rearrangements. Its expression is characterized by multiple alternative splicing. Alternative promoter usage is an additional way to create diversity and flexibility in the regulation of gene expression. The aim of this study was to identify possible alternative promoters of ITSN1 gene. Methods. In silico prediction, 5' RACE, RT-PCR and reporter gene expression assay were used for identification and functional characterization of alternative promoter region. Results. We detected an alternative promoter of human ITSN1 gene which is located in intron 5 and generates 5' truncated transcripts containing in-frame ATG codon with strong Kozak sequence and could encode an N-terminally truncated isoforms lacking first EH domain. The region located 246–190 bp upstream of exon 6 is required for alternative promoter activity. ITSN1 transcripts generated from an alternative promoter were detected in human kidney, liver, lung and brain tissues. However, the level of their expression was significantly lower than that of major ITSN1 isoforms. Conclusion. The results obtained suggest that alternative promoter region located in intron 5 of ITSN1 gene functions as a weak promoter. Further experiments are required to clarify the role of 5' truncated ITSN1 transcripts.

  10. Identification and characterization of a novel retinal isoform of dystrophin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D`Souza, V.N.; Sigesmund, D.A.; Man, N. [Hospital for Sick Children and Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    We have shown that dystrophin is required for normal function of the retina as measured by electroretinography (ERG). In these studies a genotype/phenotype correlation was found in which DMD/BMD patients with deletions in the central to distal region of the gene had abnormal ERGs, while patients with deletions in the 5{prime} end of the gene had a mild or normal retinal phenotype. A similar correlation was also observed in the mouse in which the mdx mouse having a mutation in exon 23 had a normal retinal phenotype, whereas the mdx{sup Cv3} mouse (mutation in intron 65) had an abnormal phenotype. Molecular analysis of both human and mouse retina indicated that at least two isoforms of dystrophin are expressed in the retina and localize to the outer plexiform layer, the synaptic junction between the photoreceptors, the bipolar cells, and the horizontal cells. Using a panel of monoclonal dystrophin antisera to analyze mdx mouse retina which does not contain full length dystrophin antisera, we showed that a shorter dystrophin isoform (approximately 260 kDa) was present and contained part of the rod, the cysteine-rich and C-terminal domains. The 5{prime} end of the transcript giving rise to this isoform was characterized and cloned using 5{prime}RACE. Sequence analysis indicated that this transcript contained a novel exon 1 consisting of 240 nucleotides and coded for a unique N-terminus of 13 amino acids. This isoform is distinct from the DP116 dystrophin isoform identified in peripheral nerve. From the functional analysis of DMD patients and dystrophic mice we conclude that this 260 kDa dystrophin isoform is required for normal retinal electrophysiology.

  11. Productive Resources in Students' Ideas about Energy: An Alternative Analysis of Watts' Original Interview Transcripts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrer, Benedikt W.; Flood, Virginia J.; Wittmann, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    For over 30 years, researchers have investigated students' ideas about energy with the intent of reforming instructional practice. In this pursuit, Watts contributed an influential study with his 1983 paper "Some alternative views of energy" ["Phys. Educ." 18, 213 (1983)]. Watts' "alternative frameworks"…

  12. Lytic Infection of Lactococcus lactis by Bacteriophages Tuc2009 and c2 Triggers Alternative Transcriptional Host Responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ainsworth, S.; Zomer, A.L.; Mahony, J.; Sinderen, D. van

    2013-01-01

    Here we present an entire temporal transcriptional profile of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris UC509.9 undergoing lytic infection with two distinct bacteriophages, Tuc2009 and c2. Furthermore, corresponding high-resolution whole-phage genome tiling arrays of both bacteriophages were performed

  13. Control of gene expression during T cell activation: alternate regulation of mRNA transcription and mRNA stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorospe Myriam

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray technology has become highly valuable for identifying complex global changes in gene expression patterns. The effective correlation of observed changes in gene expression with shared transcription regulatory elements remains difficult to demonstrate convincingly. One reason for this difficulty may result from the intricate convergence of both transcriptional and mRNA turnover events which, together, directly influence steady-state mRNA levels. Results In order to investigate the relative contribution of gene transcription and changes in mRNA stability regulation to standard analyses of gene expression, we used two distinct microarray methods which individually measure nuclear gene transcription and changes in polyA mRNA gene expression. Gene expression profiles were obtained from both polyA mRNA (whole-cell and nuclear run-on (newly transcribed RNA across a time course of one hour following the activation of human Jurkat T cells with PMA plus ionomycin. Comparative analysis revealed that regulation of mRNA stability may account for as much as 50% of all measurements of changes in polyA mRNA in this system, as inferred by the absence of any corresponding regulation of nuclear gene transcription activity for these groups of genes. Genes which displayed dramatic elevations in both mRNA and nuclear run-on RNA were shown to be inhibited by Actinomycin D (ActD pre-treatment of cells while large numbers of genes regulated only through altered mRNA turnover (both up and down were ActD-resistant. Consistent patterns across the time course were observed for both transcribed and stability-regulated genes. Conclusion We propose that regulation of mRNA stability contributes significantly to the observed changes in gene expression in response to external stimuli, as measured by high throughput systems.

  14. p100 Deficiency is insufficient for full activation of the alternative NF-κB pathway: TNF cooperates with p52-RelB in target gene transcription.

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    Agnes Lovas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Constitutive activation of the alternative NF-κB pathway leads to marginal zone B cell expansion and disorganized spleen microarchitecture. Furthermore, uncontrolled alternative NF-κB signaling may result in the development and progression of cancer. Here, we focused on the question how does the constitutive alternative NF-κB signaling exert its effects in these malignant processes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To explore the consequences of unrestricted alternative NF-κB activation on genome-wide transcription, we compared gene expression profiles of wild-type and NF-κB2/p100-deficient (p100(-/- primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs and spleens. Microarray experiments revealed only 73 differentially regulated genes in p100(-/- vs. wild-type MEFs. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assays showed in p100(-/- MEFs direct binding of p52 and RelB to the promoter of the Enpp2 gene encoding ENPP2/Autotaxin, a protein with an important role in lymphocyte homing and cell migration. Gene ontology analysis revealed upregulation of genes with anti-apoptotic/proliferative activity (Enpp2/Atx, Serpina3g, Traf1, Rrad, chemotactic/locomotory activity (Enpp2/Atx, Ccl8, and lymphocyte homing activity (Enpp2/Atx, Cd34. Most importantly, biochemical and gene expression analyses of MEFs and spleen, respectively, indicated a marked crosstalk between classical and alternative NF-κB pathways. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results show that p100 deficiency alone was insufficient for full induction of genes regulated by the alternative NF-κB pathway. Moreover, alternative NF-κB signaling strongly synergized both in vitro and in vivo with classical NF-κB activation, thereby extending the number of genes under the control of the p100 inhibitor of the alternative NF-κB signaling pathway.

  15. Levels of myosin heavy chain mRNA transcripts and content of protein isoforms in the slow soleus muscle of 7 month-old rats with altered thyroid status

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vadászová, Adriana; Hudecová, S.; Križanová, O.; Soukup, Tomáš

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 2 (2006), s. 221-225 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GD305/03/H148; GA ČR(CZ) GA304/05/0327 Grant - others:VEGA(SK) 2/6078; SAV(SK) APVT-51-027404; NATO(XE) 979876; MYORES(XE) 511978 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : myosin heavy chain * thyroid hormones status * mRNA transcripts Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.093, year: 2006

  16. Impairment of Mature B Cell Maintenance upon Combined Deletion of the Alternative NF-κB Transcription Factors RELB and NF-κB2 in B Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva, Nilushi S; Silva, Kathryn; Anderson, Michael M; Bhagat, Govind; Klein, Ulf

    2016-03-15

    BAFF is critical for the survival and maturation of mature B cells. BAFF, via BAFFR, activates multiple signaling pathways in B cells, including the alternative NF-κB pathway. The transcription factors RELB and NF-κB2 (p100/p52) are the downstream mediators of the alternative pathway; however, the B cell-intrinsic functions of these NF-κB subunits have not been studied in vivo using conditional alleles, either individually or in combination. We in this study report that B cell-specific deletion of relb led to only a slight decrease in the fraction of mature splenic B cells, whereas deletion of nfkb2 caused a marked reduction. This phenotype was further exacerbated upon combined deletion of relb and nfkb2 and most dramatically affected the maintenance of marginal zone B cells. BAFF stimulation, in contrast to CD40 activation, was unable to rescue relb/nfkb2-deleted B cells in vitro. RNA-sequencing analysis of BAFF-stimulated nfkb2-deleted versus normal B cells suggests that the alternative NF-κB pathway, in addition to its critical role in BAFF-mediated cell survival, may control the expression of genes involved in the positioning of B cells within the lymphoid microenvironment and in the establishment of T cell-B cell interactions. Thus, by ablating the downstream transcription factors of the alternative NF-κB pathway specifically in B cells, we identify in this study a critical role for the combined activity of the RELB and NF-κB2 subunits in B cell homeostasis that cannot be compensated for by the canonical NF-κB pathway under physiological conditions. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  17. Identification and characterization of novel NuMA isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jin; Xu, Zhe; He, Dacheng; Lu, Guanting

    2014-11-21

    The large nuclear mitotic apparatus (NuMA) has been investigated for over 30years with functions related to the formation and maintenance of mitotic spindle poles during mitosis. However, the existence and functions of NuMA isoforms generated by alternative splicing remains unclear. In the present work, we show that at least seven NuMA isoforms (categorized into long, middle and short groups) generated by alternative splicing from a common NuMA mRNA precursor were discovered in HeLa cells and these isoforms differ mainly at the carboxyl terminus and the coiled-coil domains. Two "hotspot" exons with molecular mass of 3366-nt and 42-nt tend to be spliced during alternative splicing in long and middle groups. Furthermore, full-length coding sequences of long and middle NuMA obtained by using fusion PCR were constructed into GFP-tagged vector to illustrate their cellular localization. Long NuMA mainly localized in the nucleus with absence from nucleoli during interphase and translocated to the spindle poles in mitosis. Middle NuMA displayed the similar cell cycle-dependent distribution pattern as long NuMA. However, expression of NuMA short isoforms revealed a distinct subcellular localization. Short NuMA were present in the cytosol during the whole cycle, without colocalization with mitotic apparatus. These results have allowed us tentatively to explore a new research direction for NuMA's various functions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Expression of various sarcomeric tropomyosin isoforms in equine striated muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syamalima Dube

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to better understand the training and athletic activity of horses, we must have complete understanding of the isoform diversity of various myofibrillar protein genes like tropomyosin. Tropomyosin (TPM, a coiled-coil dimeric protein, is a component of thin filament in striated muscles. In mammals, four TPM genes (TPM1, TPM2, TPM3, and TPM4 generate a multitude of TPM isoforms via alternate splicing and/or using different promoters. Unfortunately, our knowledge of TPM isoform diversity in the horse is very limited. Hence, we undertook a comprehensive exploratory study of various TPM isoforms from horse heart and skeletal muscle. We have cloned and sequenced two sarcomeric isoforms of the TPM1 gene called TPM1α and TPM1κ, one sarcomeric isoform of the TPM2 and one of the TPM3 gene, TPM2α and TPM3α respectively. By qRT-PCR using both relative expression and copy number, we have shown that TPM1α expression compared to TPM1κ is very high in heart. On the other hand, the expression of TPM1α is higher in skeletal muscle compared to heart. Further, the expression of TPM2α and TPM3α are higher in skeletal muscle compared to heart. Using western blot analyses with CH1 monoclonal antibody we have shown the high expression levels of sarcomeric TPM proteins in cardiac and skeletal muscle. Due to the paucity of isoform specific antibodies we cannot specifically detect the expression of TPM1κ in horse striated muscle. To the best of our knowledge this is the very first report on the characterization of sarcmeric TPMs in horse striated muscle.

  19. MAISTAS: a tool for automatic structural evaluation of alternative splicing products.

    KAUST Repository

    Floris, Matteo

    2011-04-15

    MOTIVATION: Analysis of the human genome revealed that the amount of transcribed sequence is an order of magnitude greater than the number of predicted and well-characterized genes. A sizeable fraction of these transcripts is related to alternatively spliced forms of known protein coding genes. Inspection of the alternatively spliced transcripts identified in the pilot phase of the ENCODE project has clearly shown that often their structure might substantially differ from that of other isoforms of the same gene, and therefore that they might perform unrelated functions, or that they might even not correspond to a functional protein. Identifying these cases is obviously relevant for the functional assignment of gene products and for the interpretation of the effect of variations in the corresponding proteins. RESULTS: Here we describe a publicly available tool that, given a gene or a protein, retrieves and analyses all its annotated isoforms, provides users with three-dimensional models of the isoform(s) of his/her interest whenever possible and automatically assesses whether homology derived structural models correspond to plausible structures. This information is clearly relevant. When the homology model of some isoforms of a gene does not seem structurally plausible, the implications are that either they assume a structure unrelated to that of the other isoforms of the same gene with presumably significant functional differences, or do not correspond to functional products. We provide indications that the second hypothesis is likely to be true for a substantial fraction of the cases. AVAILABILITY: http://maistas.bioinformatica.crs4.it/.

  20. Alternative exon usage creates novel transcript variants of tumor suppressor SHREW-1 gene with differential tissue expression profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra A. B. Klemmt

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Shrew-1, also called AJAP1, is a transmembrane protein associated with E-cadherin-mediated adherence junctions and a putative tumor suppressor. Apart from its interaction with β-catenin and involvement in E-cadherin internalization, little structure or function information exists. Here we explored shrew-1 expression during postnatal differentiation of mammary gland as a model system. Immunohistological analyses with antibodies against either the extracellular or the cytoplasmic domains of shrew-1 consistently revealed the expression of full-length shrew-1 in myoepithelial cells, but only part of it in luminal cells. While shrew-1 localization remained unaltered in myoepithelial cells, nuclear localization occurred in luminal cells during lactation. Based on these observations, we identified two unknown shrew-1 transcript variants encoding N-terminally truncated proteins. The smallest shrew-1 protein lacks the extracellular domain and is most likely the only variant present in luminal cells. RNA analyses of human tissues confirmed that the novel transcript variants of shrew-1 exist in vivo and exhibit a differential tissue expression profile. We conclude that our findings are essential for the understanding and interpretation of future functional and interactome analyses of shrew-1 variants.

  1. Novel protein isoforms of carcinoembryonic antigen are secreted from pancreatic, gastric and colorectal cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 5 (CEACAM5) is an oncofetal cell surface glycoprotein. Because of its high expression in cancer cells and secretion into serum, CEA has been widely used as a serum tumor marker. Although other members of CEACAM family were investigated for splice variants/variants-derived protein isoforms, few studies about the variants of CEACAM5 have been reported. In this study, we demonstrated the existence of novel CEACAM5 splice variants and splice variant-derived protein isoforms in gastrointestinal cancer cell lines. Results We identified two novel CEACAM5 splice variants in gastrointestinal (pancreatic, gastric, and colorectal) cancer cell lines. One of the variants possessed an alternative minor splice site that allowed generation of GC-AG intron. Furthermore, CEA protein isoforms derived from the novel splice variants were expressed in cancer cell lines and those protein isoforms were secreted into the culture medium. Although CEA protein isoforms always co-existed with the full-length protein, the secretion patterns of these isoforms did not correlate with the expression patterns. Conclusions This is the first study to identify the expression of CEA isoforms derived from the novel splice variants processed on the unique splice site. In addition, we also revealed the secretion of those isoforms from gastrointestinal cancer cell lines. Our findings suggested that discrimination between the full-length and identified protein isoforms may improve the clinical utility of CEA as a tumor marker. PMID:24070190

  2. Nesprins: tissue-specific expression of epsilon and other short isoforms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Thuy Duong

    Full Text Available Nesprin-1-giant and nesprin-2-giant regulate nuclear positioning by the interaction of their C-terminal KASH domains with nuclear membrane SUN proteins and their N-terminal calponin-homology domains with cytoskeletal actin. A number of short isoforms lacking the actin-binding domains are produced by internal promotion. We have evaluated the significance of these shorter isoforms using quantitative RT-PCR and western blotting with site-specific monoclonal antibodies. Within a complete map of nesprin isoforms, we describe two novel nesprin-2 epsilon isoforms for the first time. Epsilon isoforms are similar in size and structure to nesprin-1-alpha. Expression of nesprin isoforms was highly tissue-dependent. Nesprin-2-epsilon-1 was found in early embryonic cells, while nesprin-2-epsilon-2 was present in heart and other adult tissues, but not skeletal muscle. Some cell lines lack shorter isoforms and express only one of the two nesprin genes, suggesting that either of the giant nesprins is sufficient for basic cell functions. For the first time, localisation of endogenous nesprin away from the nuclear membrane was shown in cells where removal of the KASH domain by alternative splicing occurs. By distinguishing between degradation products and true isoforms on western blots, it was found that previously-described beta and gamma isoforms are expressed either at only low levels or with a limited tissue distribution. Two of the shortest alpha isoforms, nesprin-1-alpha-2 and nesprin-2-alpha-1, were found almost exclusively in cardiac and skeletal muscle and a highly conserved and alternatively-spliced exon, available in both nesprin genes, was always included in these tissues. These "muscle-specific" isoforms are thought to form a complex with emerin and lamin A/C at the inner nuclear membrane and mutations in all three proteins cause Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy and/or inherited dilated cardiomyopathy, disorders in which only skeletal muscle and

  3. Molecular Pharmacology of VEGF-A Isoforms: Binding and Signalling at VEGFR2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peach, Chloe J; Mignone, Viviane W; Arruda, Maria Augusta; Alcobia, Diana C; Hill, Stephen J; Kilpatrick, Laura E; Woolard, Jeanette

    2018-04-23

    Vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) is a key mediator of angiogenesis, signalling via the class IV tyrosine kinase receptor family of VEGF Receptors (VEGFRs). Although VEGF-A ligands bind to both VEGFR1 and VEGFR2, they primarily signal via VEGFR2 leading to endothelial cell proliferation, survival, migration and vascular permeability. Distinct VEGF-A isoforms result from alternative splicing of the Vegfa gene at exon 8, resulting in VEGF xxx a or VEGF xxx b isoforms. Alternative splicing events at exons 5⁻7, in addition to recently identified posttranslational read-through events, produce VEGF-A isoforms that differ in their bioavailability and interaction with the co-receptor Neuropilin-1. This review explores the molecular pharmacology of VEGF-A isoforms at VEGFR2 in respect to ligand binding and downstream signalling. To understand how VEGF-A isoforms have distinct signalling despite similar affinities for VEGFR2, this review re-evaluates the typical classification of these isoforms relative to the prototypical, “pro-angiogenic” VEGF 165 a. We also examine the molecular mechanisms underpinning the regulation of VEGF-A isoform signalling and the importance of interactions with other membrane and extracellular matrix proteins. As approved therapeutics targeting the VEGF-A/VEGFR signalling axis largely lack long-term efficacy, understanding these isoform-specific mechanisms could aid future drug discovery efforts targeting VEGF receptor pharmacology.

  4. Transcription and immunolocalization of Runx2/Cbfa1/Pebp2alphaA in developing rodent and human craniofacial tissues: further evidence suggesting osteoclasts phagocytose osteocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronckers, Antonius L. J. J.; Sasaguri, Kenichi; Engelse, Marten A.

    2003-01-01

    Runx2/Cbfa1 is a transcription factor, essential for the osteogenic/chondrogenic and odontogenic lineage. Three isoforms of Cbfa1 have been identified, type I (Pebp2alphaA isoform), type II (til-1 isoform), and type III (Osf2 isoform). Here we examined the expression of the Runx2/Cbfa1 during

  5. The C-terminal domain of Brd2 is important for chromatin interaction and regulation of transcription and alternative splicing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hnilicová, Jarmila; Hozeifi, Samira; Stejskalová, Eva; Dušková, Eva; Poser, I.; Humpolíčková, Jana; Hof, Martin; Staněk, David

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 22 (2013), s. 3557-3568 ISSN 1059-1524 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200520801; GA ČR GAP305/10/0424; GA ČR GBP208/12/G016; GA ČR(CZ) GBP305/12/G034 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : Brd2 * alternative splicing * chromatin Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology; CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry (UFCH-W) Impact factor: 4.548, year: 2013

  6. The group I-like ribozyme DiGIR1 mediates alternative processing of pre-rRNA transcripts in Didymium iridis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vader, Anna; Johansen, Steinar; Nielsen, Henrik

    2002-01-01

    context, and presents a new example of the cost to the host of intron load. This is because the formation of the 7.5-kb RNA is incompatible with the formation of functional ribosomal RNA from the same transcript. In the formation of the 7.5-kb RNA, DiGIR1 catalysed cleavage takes place without prior...... splicing performed by DiGIR2. This contrasts with the processing order leading to mature rRNA and I-DirI mRNA in growing cells, suggesting an interplay between the two ribozymes of a twin-ribozyme intron.......During starvation induced encystment, cells of the myxomycete Didymium iridis accumulate a 7.5-kb RNA that is the result of alternative processing of pre-rRNA. The 5' end corresponds to an internal processing site cleaved by the group I-like ribozyme DiGIR1, located within the twin-ribozyme intron...

  7. MicroRNA-126-mediated control of cell fate in B-cell myeloid progenitors as a potential alternative to transcriptional factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuyama, Kazuki; Ikawa, Tomokatsu; Gentner, Bernhard; Hozumi, Katsuto; Harnprasopwat, Ratanakanit; Lu, Jun; Yamashita, Riu; Ha, Daon; Toyoshima, Takae; Chanda, Bidisha; Kawamata, Toyotaka; Yokoyama, Kazuaki; Wang, Shusheng; Ando, Kiyoshi; Lodish, Harvey F; Tojo, Arinobu; Kawamoto, Hiroshi; Kotani, Ai

    2013-08-13

    Lineage specification is thought to be largely regulated at the level of transcription, where lineage-specific transcription factors drive specific cell fates. MicroRNAs (miR), vital to many cell functions, act posttranscriptionally to decrease the expression of target mRNAs. MLL-AF4 acute lymphocytic leukemia exhibits both myeloid and B-cell surface markers, suggesting that the transformed cells are B-cell myeloid progenitor cells. Through gain- and loss-of-function experiments, we demonstrated that microRNA 126 (miR-126) drives B-cell myeloid biphenotypic leukemia differentiation toward B cells without changing expression of E2A immunoglobulin enhancer-binding factor E12/E47 (E2A), early B-cell factor 1 (EBF1), or paired box protein 5, which are critical transcription factors in B-lymphopoiesis. Similar induction of B-cell differentiation by miR-126 was observed in normal hematopoietic cells in vitro and in vivo in uncommitted murine c-Kit(+)Sca1(+)Lineage(-) cells, with insulin regulatory subunit-1 acting as a target of miR-126. Importantly, in EBF1-deficient hematopoietic progenitor cells, which fail to differentiate into B cells, miR-126 significantly up-regulated B220, and induced the expression of B-cell genes, including recombination activating genes-1/2 and CD79a/b. These data suggest that miR-126 can at least partly rescue B-cell development independently of EBF1. These experiments show that miR-126 regulates myeloid vs. B-cell fate through an alternative machinery, establishing the critical role of miRNAs in the lineage specification of multipotent mammalian cells.

  8. Autocrine VEGF isoforms differentially regulate endothelial cell behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Yamamoto

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF is involved in all the essential biology of endothelial cells, from proliferation to vessel function, by mediating intercellular interactions and monolayer integrity. It is expressed as three major alternative spliced variants. In mice, these are VEGF120, VEGF164, and VEGF188, each with different affinities for extracellular matrices and cell surfaces, depending on the inclusion of heparin-binding sites, encoded by exons 6 and 7. To determine the role of each VEGF isoform in endothelial homeostasis, we compared phenotypes of primary endothelial cells isolated from lungs of mice expressing single VEGF isoforms in normoxic and hypoxic conditions. The differential expression and distribution of VEGF isoforms affect endothelial cell functions, such as proliferation, adhesion, migration and integrity, which are dependent on the stability of and affinity to VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2. We found a correlation between autocrine VEGF164 and VEGFR2 stability, which is also associated with increased expression of proteins involved in cell adhesion. Endothelial cells expressing only VEGF188, which localizes to extracellular matrices or cell surfaces, presented a mesenchymal morphology and weakened monolayer integrity. Cells expressing only VEGF120 lacked stable VEGFR2 and dysfunctional downstream processes, rendering the cells unviable. Endothelial cells expressing these different isoforms in isolation also had differing rates of apoptosis, proliferation, and signaling via nitric oxide (NO synthesis. These data indicate that autocrine signaling of each VEGF isoform has unique functions on endothelial homeostasis and response to hypoxia, due to both distinct VEGF distribution and VEGFR2 stability, which appears to be, at least partly, affected by differential NO production. This study demonstrates that each autocrine VEGF isoform has a distinct effect on downstream functions, namely VEGFR2-regulated endothelial cell

  9. Transcriptional regulation of metabolic pathways, alternative respiration and enterotoxin genes in anaerobic growth of Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Voort, M; Abee, T

    2009-09-01

    To assess genes specifically activated during anaerobic growth that are involved in metabolism and pathogenesis of the foodborne pathogen Bacillus cereus. Growth under anaerobic conditions in Brain Heart Infusion (BHI) broth revealed a reduced growth rate and lower yield as compared to growth under aerobic conditions. Subsequently, comparative transcriptome analysis showed specific genes induced under anaerobic conditions. These included novel genes identified for anaerobic growth of B. cereus, encoding metabolic pathways, such as the arginine deiminase pathway (ArcABDC), formate dehydrogenase (FdhF) and pyruvate formate lyase (Pfl), and alternative respiratory proteins, such as arsenate reductases. Notably, haemolytic enzyme encoding genes were induced during anaerobic growth, and enterotoxin genes were induced in high cell density transition and stationary phases of aerobic cultures. These data point to induction of stress adaptation and pathogenicity factors and rearrangements of expression of metabolic pathways in response to oxygen limitations in B. cereus. The reported changes in gene expression show that the foodborne pathogen B. cereus can adjust to anaerobic conditions, such as encountered in the human GI-tract.

  10. Alternative RNA Structure-Coupled Gene Regulations in Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Chi Chen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Alternative RNA structures (ARSs, or alternative transcript isoforms, are critical for regulating cellular phenotypes in humans. In addition to generating functionally diverse protein isoforms from a single gene, ARS can alter the sequence contents of 5'/3' untranslated regions (UTRs and intronic regions, thus also affecting the regulatory effects of these regions. ARS may introduce premature stop codon(s into a transcript, and render the transcript susceptible to nonsense-mediated decay, which in turn can influence the overall gene expression level. Meanwhile, ARS can regulate the presence/absence of upstream open reading frames and microRNA targeting sites in 5'UTRs and 3'UTRs, respectively, thus affecting translational efficiencies and protein expression levels. Furthermore, since ARS may alter exon-intron structures, it can influence the biogenesis of intronic microRNAs and indirectly affect the expression of the target genes of these microRNAs. The connections between ARS and multiple regulatory mechanisms underline the importance of ARS in determining cell fate. Accumulating evidence indicates that ARS-coupled regulations play important roles in tumorigenesis. Here I will review our current knowledge in this field, and discuss potential future directions.

  11. Detection of VEGF-A(xxx)b isoforms in human tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, David O; Mavrou, Athina; Qiu, Yan; Carter, James G; Hamdollah-Zadeh, Maryam; Barratt, Shaney; Gammons, Melissa V; Millar, Ann B; Salmon, Andrew H J; Oltean, Sebastian; Harper, Steven J

    2013-01-01

    Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-A (VEGF-A) can be generated as multiple isoforms by alternative splicing. Two families of isoforms have been described in humans, pro-angiogenic isoforms typified by VEGF-A165a, and anti-angiogenic isoforms typified by VEGF-A165b. The practical determination of expression levels of alternative isoforms of the same gene may be complicated by experimental protocols that favour one isoform over another, and the use of specific positive and negative controls is essential for the interpretation of findings on expression of the isoforms. Here we address some of the difficulties in experimental design when investigating alternative splicing of VEGF isoforms, and discuss the use of appropriate control paradigms. We demonstrate why use of specific control experiments can prevent assumptions that VEGF-A165b is not present, when in fact it is. We reiterate, and confirm previously published experimental design protocols that demonstrate the importance of using positive controls. These include using known target sequences to show that the experimental conditions are suitable for PCR amplification of VEGF-A165b mRNA for both q-PCR and RT-PCR and to ensure that mispriming does not occur. We also provide evidence that demonstrates that detection of VEGF-A165b protein in mice needs to be tightly controlled to prevent detection of mouse IgG by a secondary antibody. We also show that human VEGF165b protein can be immunoprecipitated from cultured human cells and that immunoprecipitating VEGF-A results in protein that is detected by VEGF-A165b antibody. These findings support the conclusion that more information on the biology of VEGF-A165b isoforms is required, and confirm the importance of the experimental design in such investigations, including the use of specific positive and negative controls.

  12. The Drosophila Z-disc protein Z(210) is an adult muscle isoform of Zasp52, which is required for normal myofibril organization in indirect flight muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chechenova, Maria B; Bryantsev, Anton L; Cripps, Richard M

    2013-02-08

    The Z-disc is a critical anchoring point for thin filaments as they slide during muscle contraction. Therefore, identifying components of the Z-disc is critical for fully comprehending how myofibrils assemble and function. In the adult Drosophila musculature, the fibrillar indirect flight muscles accumulate a >200 kDa Z-disc protein termed Z(210), the identity of which has to date been unknown. Here, we use mass spectrometry and gene specific knockdown studies, to identify Z(210) as an adult isoform of the Z-disc protein Zasp52. The Zasp52 primary transcript is extensively alternatively spliced, and we describe its splicing pattern in the flight muscles, identifying a new Zasp52 isoform, which is the one recognized by the Z(210) antibody. We also demonstrate that Zasp52 is required for the association of α-actinin with the flight muscle Z-disc, and for normal sarcomere structure. These studies expand our knowledge of Zasp isoforms and their functions in muscle. Given the role of Zasp proteins in mammalian muscle development and disease, our results have relevance to mammalian muscle biology.

  13. Reanalysis of RNA-sequencing data reveals several additional fusion genes with multiple isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangaspeska, Sara; Hultsch, Susanne; Edgren, Henrik; Nicorici, Daniel; Murumägi, Astrid; Kallioniemi, Olli

    2012-01-01

    RNA-sequencing and tailored bioinformatic methodologies have paved the way for identification of expressed fusion genes from the chaotic genomes of solid tumors. We have recently successfully exploited RNA-sequencing for the discovery of 24 novel fusion genes in breast cancer. Here, we demonstrate the importance of continuous optimization of the bioinformatic methodology for this purpose, and report the discovery and experimental validation of 13 additional fusion genes from the same samples. Integration of copy number profiling with the RNA-sequencing results revealed that the majority of the gene fusions were promoter-donating events that occurred at copy number transition points or involved high-level DNA-amplifications. Sequencing of genomic fusion break points confirmed that DNA-level rearrangements underlie selected fusion transcripts. Furthermore, a significant portion (>60%) of the fusion genes were alternatively spliced. This illustrates the importance of reanalyzing sequencing data as gene definitions change and bioinformatic methods improve, and highlights the previously unforeseen isoform diversity among fusion transcripts.

  14. Interplay between estrogen receptor and AKT in estradiol-induced alternative splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat-Nakshatri, Poornima; Song, Eun-Kyung; Collins, Nikail R; Uversky, Vladimir N; Dunker, A Keith; O'Malley, Bert W; Geistlinger, Tim R; Carroll, Jason S; Brown, Myles; Nakshatri, Harikrishna

    2013-06-11

    Alternative splicing is critical for generating complex proteomes in response to extracellular signals. Nuclear receptors including estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) and their ligands promote alternative splicing. The endogenous targets of ERα:estradiol (E2)-mediated alternative splicing and the influence of extracellular kinases that phosphorylate ERα on E2-induced splicing are unknown. MCF-7 and its anti-estrogen derivatives were used for the majority of the assays. CD44 mini gene was used to measure the effect of E2 and AKT on alternative splicing. ExonHit array analysis was performed to identify E2 and AKT-regulated endogenous alternatively spliced apoptosis-related genes. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was performed to verify alternative splicing. ERα binding to alternatively spliced genes was verified by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Bromodeoxyuridine incorporation-ELISA and Annexin V labeling assays were done to measure cell proliferation and apoptosis, respectively. We identified the targets of E2-induced alternative splicing and deconstructed some of the mechanisms surrounding E2-induced splicing by combining splice array with ERα cistrome and gene expression array. E2-induced alternatively spliced genes fall into at least two subgroups: coupled to E2-regulated transcription and ERα binding to the gene without an effect on rate of transcription. Further, AKT, which phosphorylates both ERα and splicing factors, influenced ERα:E2 dependent splicing in a gene-specific manner. Genes that are alternatively spliced include FAS/CD95, FGFR2, and AXIN-1. E2 increased the expression of FGFR2 C1 isoform but reduced C3 isoform at mRNA level. E2-induced alternative splicing of FAS and FGFR2 in MCF-7 cells correlated with resistance to FAS activation-induced apoptosis and response to keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), respectively. Resistance of MCF-7 breast cancer cells to the anti-estrogen tamoxifen was associated with ER

  15. P120-catenin isoforms 1A and 3A differently affect invasion and proliferation of lung cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yang; Dong Qianze; Zhao Yue; Dong Xinjun; Miao Yuan; Dai Shundong; Yang Zhiqiang; Zhang Di; Wang Yan; Li Qingchang; Zhao Chen; Wang Enhua

    2009-01-01

    Different isoforms of p120-catenin (p120ctn), a member of the Armadillo gene family, are variably expressed in different tissues as a result of alternative splicing and the use of multiple translation initiation codons. When expressed in cancer cells, these isoforms may confer different properties with respect to cell adhesion and invasion. We have previously reported that the p120ctn isoforms 1 and 3 were the most highly expressed isoforms in normal lung tissues, and their expression level was reduced in lung tumor cells. To precisely define their biological roles, we transfected p120ctn isoforms 1A and 3A into the lung cancer cell lines A549 and NCI-H460. Enhanced expression of p120ctn isoform 1A not only upregulated E-cadherin and β-catenin, but also downregulated the Rac1 activity, and as a result, inhibited the ability of cells to invade. In contrast, overexpression of p120ctn isoform 3A led to the inactivation of Cdc42 and the activation of RhoA, and had a smaller influence on invasion. However, we found that isoform 3A had a greater ability than isoform 1A in both inhibiting the cell cycle and reducing tumor cell proliferation. The present study revealed that p120ctn isoforms 1A and 3A differently regulated the adhesive, proliferative, and invasive properties of lung cancer cells through distinct mechanisms

  16. Alterations in mRNA 3' UTR Isoform Abundance Accompany Gene Expression Changes in Human Huntington's Disease Brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romo, Lindsay; Ashar-Patel, Ami; Pfister, Edith; Aronin, Neil

    2017-09-26

    The huntingtin gene has two mRNA isoforms that differ in their 3' UTR length. The relationship of these isoforms with Huntington's disease is not established. We provide evidence that the abundance of huntingtin 3' UTR isoforms differs between patient and control neural stem cells, fibroblasts, motor cortex, and cerebellum. Huntingtin 3' UTR isoforms, including a mid-3' UTR isoform, have different localizations, half-lives, polyA tail lengths, microRNA sites, and RNA-binding protein sites. Isoform shifts in Huntington's disease motor cortex are not limited to huntingtin; 11% of alternatively polyadenylated genes change the abundance of their 3' UTR isoforms. Altered expression of RNA-binding proteins may be associated with aberrant isoform abundance; knockdown of the RNA-binding protein CNOT6 in control fibroblasts leads to huntingtin isoform differences similar to those in disease fibroblasts. These findings demonstrate that mRNA 3' UTR isoform changes are a feature of molecular pathology in the Huntington's disease brain. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Alternative Oxidase Transcription Factors AOD2 and AOD5 ofNeurospora crassaControl the Expression of Genes Involved in Energy Production and Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zhigang; Smith, Kristina M; Bredeweg, Erin L; Bosnjak, Natasa; Freitag, Michael; Nargang, Frank E

    2017-02-09

    In Neurospora crassa , blocking the function of the standard mitochondrial electron transport chain results in the induction of an alternative oxidase (AOX). AOX transfers electrons directly from ubiquinol to molecular oxygen. AOX serves as a model of retrograde regulation since it is encoded by a nuclear gene that is regulated in response to signals from mitochondria. The N. crassa transcription factors AOD2 and AOD5 are necessary for the expression of the AOX gene. To gain insight into the mechanism by which these factors function, and to determine if they have roles in the expression of additional genes in N. crassa , we constructed strains expressing only tagged versions of the proteins. Cell fractionation experiments showed that both proteins are localized to the nucleus under both AOX inducing and noninducing conditions. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation and high throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq) analysis revealed that the proteins are bound to the promoter region of the AOX gene under both conditions. ChIP-seq also showed that the transcription factors bind to the upstream regions of a number of genes that are involved in energy production and metabolism. Dependence on AOD2 and AOD5 for the expression of several of these genes was verified by quantitative PCR. The majority of ChIP-seq peaks observed were enriched for both AOD2 and AOD5. However, we also observed occasional sites where one factor appeared to bind preferentially. The most striking of these was a conserved sequence that bound large amounts of AOD2 but little AOD5. This sequence was found within a 310 bp repeat unit that occurs at several locations in the genome. Copyright © 2017 Qi et al.

  18. ASpedia: a comprehensive encyclopedia of human alternative splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyung, Daejin; Kim, Jihyun; Cho, Soo Young; Park, Charny

    2018-01-04

    Alternative splicing confers the human genome complexity by increasing the diversity of expressed mRNAs. Hundreds or thousands of splicing regions have been identified through differential alternative splicing analysis of high-throughput datasets. However, it is hard to explain the functional impact of each splicing event. Protein domain formation and nonsense-mediated decay are considered the main functional features of splicing. However, other functional features such as miRNA target sites, phosphorylation sites and single-nucleotide variations are directly affected by alternative splicing and affect downstream function. Hence, we established ASpedia: a comprehensive database for human alternative splicing annotation, which encompasses a range of functions, from genomic annotation to isoform-specific function (ASpedia, http://combio.snu.ac.kr/aspedia). The database provides three features: (i) genomic annotation extracted from DNA, RNA and proteins; (ii) transcription and regulation elements analyzed from next-generation sequencing datasets; and (iii) isoform-specific functions collected from known and published datasets. The ASpedia web application includes three components: an annotation database, a retrieval system and a browser specialized in the identification of human alternative splicing events. The retrieval system supports multiple AS event searches resulting from high-throughput analysis and the AS browser comprises genome tracks. Thus, ASpedia facilitates the systemic annotation of the functional impacts of multiple AS events. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  19. Xcat, a novel mouse model for Nance-Horan syndrome inhibits expression of the cytoplasmic-targeted Nhs1 isoform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kristen M; Wu, Junhua; Duncan, Melinda K; Moy, Chris; Dutra, Amalia; Favor, Jack; Da, Tong; Stambolian, Dwight

    2006-01-15

    Nance-Horan syndrome (NHS) is an X-linked disorder characterized by congenital cataracts, dental anomalies, dysmorphic features and mental retardation. A recent report suggests that the novel gene NHS1 is involved in this disorder due to the presence of point mutations in NHS patients. A possible mouse model for NHS, Xcat, was mapped to a 2.11 Mb interval on the X-chromosome. Sequence and FISH analysis of the X-chromosome region containing the Xcat mutation reveal a large insertion between exons 1 and 2 of the mouse Nhs1 gene. The insertion inhibits the expression of the Nhs1 isoform containing exon 1 and results in exclusive expression of the alternative isoform containing exon 1A. Quantitative RT-PCR of Xcat cDNA shows reduced levels of Nhs1 transcripts. The Nhs1 protein is strongly expressed within the cytoplasm of elongating lens fiber cells from wild-type neonate lens, but is significantly reduced within the Xcat lens. Transient transfection studies of CHO cells with Nhs1-GFP fusion proteins were done to determine whether the amino acids encoded by exon 1 were critical for protein localization. We found the presence of Nhs1 exon 1 critical for localization of the fusion protein to the cytoplasm, whereas fusion proteins lacking Nhs1 exon 1 are predominantly nuclear. These results indicate that the first exon of Nhs1 contains crucial information required for the proper expression and localization of Nhs1 protein. Inhibition of expression of the exon 1 containing isoform results in the abnormal phenotype of Xcat.

  20. Alternative tRNA priming of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcription explains sequence variation in the primer-binding site that has been attributed to APOBEC3G activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Das, Atze T.; Vink, Monique; Berkhout, Ben

    2005-01-01

    It is generally assumed that human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) uses exclusively the cellular tRNA(3)(Lys) molecule as a primer for reverse transcription. We demonstrate that HIV-1 uses not only tRNA(3)(Lys) but also an alternative tRNA primer. This tRNA was termed tRNA(5)(Lys), and the

  1. Muscle-Type Specific Autophosphorylation of CaMKII Isoforms after Paced Contractions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eilers, W.; Gevers, W.; van Overbeek, D.; de Haan, A.; Jaspers, R.T.; Hilbers, P.A.; van Riel, A.C.R.; Flueck, M.

    2014-01-01

    We explored to what extent isoforms of the regulator of excitation-contraction and excitation-transcription coupling, calcium/calmodulin protein kinase II (CaMKII) contribute to the specificity of myocellular calcium sensing between muscle types and whether concentration transients in its

  2. A novel MCPH1 isoform complements the defective chromosome condensation of human MCPH1-deficient cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Gavvovidis

    Full Text Available Biallelic mutations in MCPH1 cause primary microcephaly (MCPH with the cellular phenotype of defective chromosome condensation. MCPH1 encodes a multifunctional protein that notably is involved in brain development, regulation of chromosome condensation, and DNA damage response. In the present studies, we detected that MCPH1 encodes several distinct transcripts, including two major forms: full-length MCPH1 (MCPH1-FL and a second transcript lacking the six 3' exons (MCPH1Δe9-14. Both variants show comparable tissue-specific expression patterns, demonstrate nuclear localization that is mediated independently via separate NLS motifs, and are more abundant in certain fetal than adult organs. In addition, the expression of either isoform complements the chromosome condensation defect found in genetically MCPH1-deficient or MCPH1 siRNA-depleted cells, demonstrating a redundancy of both MCPH1 isoforms for the regulation of chromosome condensation. Strikingly however, both transcripts are regulated antagonistically during cell-cycle progression and there are functional differences between the isoforms with regard to the DNA damage response; MCPH1-FL localizes to phosphorylated H2AX repair foci following ionizing irradiation, while MCPH1Δe9-14 was evenly distributed in the nucleus. In summary, our results demonstrate here that MCPH1 encodes different isoforms that are differentially regulated at the transcript level and have different functions at the protein level.

  3. The group I-like ribozyme DiGIR1 mediates alternative processing of pre-rRNA transcripts in Didymium iridis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vader, Anna; Johansen, Steinar; Nielsen, Henrik

    2002-01-01

    Dir.S956-1. The RNA retains the majority of Dir.S956-1 including the homing endonuclease gene and a small spliceosomal intron, the internal transcribed spacers ITS1 and ITS2, and the large subunit rRNA lacking its two group I introns. The formation of this RNA implies cleavage by DiGIR1 in a new RNA......During starvation induced encystment, cells of the myxomycete Didymium iridis accumulate a 7.5-kb RNA that is the result of alternative processing of pre-rRNA. The 5' end corresponds to an internal processing site cleaved by the group I-like ribozyme DiGIR1, located within the twin-ribozyme intron...... context, and presents a new example of the cost to the host of intron load. This is because the formation of the 7.5-kb RNA is incompatible with the formation of functional ribosomal RNA from the same transcript. In the formation of the 7.5-kb RNA, DiGIR1 catalysed cleavage takes place without prior...

  4. Identification of a novel conserved mixed-isoform B56 regulatory subunit and spatiotemporal regulation of protein phosphatase 2A during Xenopus laevis development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seeling Joni M

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wnt signaling is a key regulator of development and tumorigenesis. Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A, which consists of a catalytic C, a structural A, and a regulatory B subunit, plays diverse roles in Wnt signaling through its B56 subunits. B56 is a multigene family encoding for proteins with a conserved core domain and divergent amino- and carboxy-termini. Ectopic B56α and B56γ reduce β-catenin abundance and B56α reduces Wnt-dependent transcription, suggesting that B56α and B56γ inhibit Wnt signaling. In contrast, B56ε is required for Wnt signaling. Knowledge of where and when B56 subunits are expressed during Xenopus development will aid in our understanding of their roles in Wnt signaling. Results We have undertaken expression analyses of B56α and B56γ in Xenopus laevis. We cloned Xenopus B56α; it is 88% identical to human B56α. Xenopus B56γ is 94% identical with human B56γ, however, a novel evolutionarily conserved mixed-isoform transcript was identified that contains a B56δ-like amino-terminal domain and a B56γ core domain. The B56δ-like variable domain exon is located upstream of the B56γ variable domain exon at the human B56γ locus, suggesting that the mixed-isoform transcript is due to alternative splicing. B56γ transcripts with different 3' ends were identified that lack or possess a 35 base pair sequence, resulting in either a transcript similar to human B56γ1, or an uncharacterized evolutionarily conserved sequence. Real time RT-PCR analyses revealed that B56α is expressed at moderate levels before the midblastula transition (MBT, at reduced levels during gastrulation and neurulation, and at high levels during organogenesis, while B56γ is expressed at low levels until organogenesis. B56α is enriched in the ventral hemisphere pre-MBT, while B56γ is ventrally enriched post-MBT. Aα, Aβ, Cα and Cβ are expressed in early Xenopus development, suggesting the presence of a functional heterotrimer

  5. Identification and evolutionary analysis of tissue-specific isoforms of mitochondrial complex I subunit NDUFV3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Castillo, Sergio; Cabrera-Orefice, Alfredo; Huynen, Martijn A; Arnold, Susanne

    2017-03-01

    Mitochondrial complex I is the largest respiratory chain complex. Despite the enormous progress made studying its structure and function in recent years, potential regulatory roles of its accessory subunits remained largely unresolved. Complex I gene NDUFV3, which occurs in metazoa, contains an extra exon that is only present in vertebrates and thereby evolutionary even younger than the rest of the gene. Alternative splicing of this extra exon gives rise to a short NDUFV3-S and a long NDUFV3-L protein isoform. Complexome profiling revealed that the two NDUFV3 isoforms are constituents of the multi-subunit complex I. Further mass spectrometric analyses of complex I from different murine and bovine tissues showed a tissue-specific expression pattern of NDUFV3-S and NDUFV3-L. Hence, NDUFV3-S was identified as the only isoform in heart and skeletal muscle, whereas in liver, brain, and lung NDUFV3-L was expressed as the dominant isoform, together with NDUFV3-S present in all tissues analyzed. Thus, we identified NDUFV3 as the first out of 30 accessory subunits of complex I present in vertebrate- and tissue-specific isoforms. Interestingly, the tissue-specific expression pattern of NDUFV3-S and NDUFV3-L isoforms was paralleled by changes in kinetic parameters, especially the substrate affinity of complex I. This may indicate a regulatory role of the NDUFV3 isoforms in different vertebrate tissues. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Two type I crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) genes in Morotoge shrimp (Pandalopsis japonica): cloning and expression of eyestalk and pericardial organ isoforms produced by alternative splicing and a novel type I CHH with predicted structure shared with type II CHH peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jeong-Min; Kim, Bo-Kwang; Lee, Jun Hyuck; Kim, Hak Jun; Kang, Chang-Keun; Mykles, Donald L; Kim, Hyun-Woo

    2012-08-01

    Crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) peptide family members play critical roles in growth and reproduction in decapods. Three cDNAs encoding CHH family members (Pj-CHH1ES, Pj-CHH1PO, and Pj-CHH2) were isolated by a combination of bioinformatic analysis and conventional cloning strategies. Pj-CHH1ES and Pj-CHH1PO were products of the same gene that were generated by alternative mRNA splicing, whereas Pj-CHH2 was the product of a second gene. The Pj-CHH1 and Pj-CHH2 genes had four exons and three introns, suggesting the two genes arose from gene duplication. The three cDNAs were classified in the type I CHH subfamily, as the deduced amino acid sequences had a CHH precursor-related peptide sequence positioned between the N-terminal signal sequence and C-terminal mature peptide sequence. The Pj-CHH1ES isoform was expressed at a higher level in the eyestalk X-organ/sinus gland (XO/SG) complex and at a lower level in the gill. The Pj-CHH1PO isoform was expressed at higher levels in the XO/SG complex, brain, abdominal ganglion, and thoracic ganglion and at a lower level in the epidermis. Pj-CHH2 was expressed at a higher level in the thoracic ganglion and at a lower level in the gill. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to quantify the effects of eyestalk ablation on the mRNA levels of the three Pj-CHHs in the brain, thoracic ganglion, and gill. Eyestalk ablation reduced expression of Pj-CHH1ES in the brain and Pj-CHH1PO and Pj-CHH2 in the thoracic ganglion. Sequence alignment of the Pj-CHHs with CHHs from other species indicated that Pj-CHH2 had an additional alanine at position #9 of the mature peptide. Molecular modeling showed that the Pj-CHH2 mature peptide had a short alpha helix (α1) in the N-terminal region, which is characteristic of type II CHHs. This suggests that Pj-CHH2 differs in function from other type I CHHs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The polysaccharide inulin is characterized by an extensive series of periodic isoforms with varying biological actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Peter D; Barclay, Thomas G; Ginic-Markovic, Milena; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2013-01-01

    In studying the molecular basis for the potent immune activity of previously described gamma and delta inulin particles and to assist in production of inulin adjuvants under Good Manufacturing Practice, we identified five new inulin isoforms, bringing the total to seven plus the amorphous form. These isoforms comprise the step-wise inulin developmental series amorphous → alpha-1 (AI-1) → alpha-2 (AI-2) → gamma (GI) → delta (DI) → zeta (ZI) → epsilon (EI) → omega (OI) in which each higher isoform can be made either by precipitating dissolved inulin or by direct conversion from its precursor, both cases using regularly increasing temperatures. At higher temperatures, the shorter inulin polymer chains are released from the particle and so the key difference between isoforms is that each higher isoform comprises longer polymer chains than its precursor. An increasing trend of degree of polymerization is confirmed by end-group analysis using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Inulin isoforms were characterized by the critical temperatures of abrupt phase-shifts (solubilizations or precipitations) in water suspensions. Such (aqueous) “melting” or “freezing” points are diagnostic and occur in strikingly periodic steps reflecting quantal increases in noncovalent bonding strength and increments in average polymer lengths. The (dry) melting points as measured by modulated differential scanning calorimetry similarly increase in regular steps. We conclude that the isoforms differ in repeated increments of a precisely repeating structural element. Each isoform has a different spectrum of biological activities and we show the higher inulin isoforms to be more potent alternative complement pathway activators. PMID:23853206

  8. The C-terminal domain of the nuclear factor I-B2 isoform is glycosylated and transactivates the WAP gene in the JEG-3 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sudit S.; Rosen, Jeffrey M.

    2007-01-01

    The transcription factor nuclear factor I (NFI) has been shown previously both in vivo and in vitro to be involved in the cooperative regulation of whey acidic protein (WAP) gene transcription along with the glucocorticoid receptor and STAT5. In addition, one of the specific NFI isoforms, NFI-B2, was demonstrated in transient co-transfection experiments in JEG cells, which lack endogenous NFI, to be preferentially involved in the cooperative regulation of WAP gene expression. A comparison of the DNA-binding specificities of the different NFI isoforms only partially explained their differential ability to activate the WAP gene transcription. Here, we analyzed the transactivation regions of two NFI isoforms by making chimeric proteins between the NFI-A and B isoforms. Though, their DNA-binding specificities were not altered as compared to the corresponding wild-type transcription factors, the C-terminal region of the NFI-B isoform was shown to preferentially activate WAP gene transcription in cooperation with GR and STAT5 in transient co-transfection assays in JEG-3 cells. Furthermore, determination of serine and threonine-specific glycosylation (O-linked N-acetylglucosamine) of the C-terminus of the NFI-B isoform suggested that the secondary modification by O-GlcNAc might play a role in the cooperative regulation of WAP gene transcription by NFI-B2 and STAT5

  9. A DNMT3B alternatively spliced exon and encoded peptide are novel biomarkers of human pluripotent stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sailesh Gopalakrishna-Pillai

    Full Text Available A major obstacle in human stem cell research is the limited number of reagents capable of distinguishing pluripotent stem cells from partially differentiated or incompletely reprogrammed derivatives. Although human embryonic stem cells (hESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs express numerous alternatively spliced transcripts, little attention has been directed at developing splice variant-encoded protein isoforms as reagents for stem cell research. In this study, several genes encoding proteins involved in important signaling pathways were screened to detect alternatively spliced transcripts that exhibited differential expression in pluripotent stem cells (PSCs relative to spontaneously differentiated cells (SDCs. Transcripts containing the alternatively spliced exon 10 of the de novo DNA methyltransferase gene, DNMT3B, were identified that are expressed in PSCs. To demonstrate the utility and superiority of splice variant specific reagents for stem cell research, a peptide encoded by DNMT3B exon 10 was used to generate an antibody, SG1. The SG1 antibody detects a single DNMT3B protein isoform that is expressed only in PSCs but not in SDCs. The SG1 antibody is also demonstrably superior to other antibodies at distinguishing PSCs from SDCs in mixed cultures containing both pluripotent stem cells and partially differentiated derivatives. The tightly controlled down regulation of DNMT3B exon 10 containing transcripts (and exon 10 encoded peptide upon spontaneous differentiation of PSCs suggests that this DNMT3B splice isoform is characteristic of the pluripotent state. Alternatively spliced exons, and the proteins they encode, represent a vast untapped reservoir of novel biomarkers that can be used to develop superior reagents for stem cell research and to gain further insight into mechanisms controlling stem cell pluripotency.

  10. ROS1 gene rearrangement and expression of splice isoforms in lung cancer, diagnosed by a novel quantitative RT-PCR assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalla C

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Successful treatment of lung cancer (NSCLC patients with ROS1 inhibitors depends on the accurate diagnosis of ROS1 gene rearrangements. The approved FISH tests are low-throughput assays difficult to use in daily diagnostic practice. Immunohistochemistry is currently discussed as screening test. We aimed to devise an alternative, sensitive diagnostic test for the rearrangement of ROS1 and to investigate upregulated ROS1 gene expression as potential target in NSCLC. We developed a qRT-PCR assay adapted to RNA isolated from FFPE material and applied it to 695 NSCLC specimens. The reliability to detect ROS1 rearrangements was evidenced by comparison with FISH and immunohistochemistry. qRT-PCR analysis detected unbalanced ROS1 expression indicative of gene rearrangement in 5 (0.7% and expression of non-rearranged ROS1 transcripts in 65 (9.6% of 680 interpretable tumors. In comparison with FISH, qRT-PCR accurately typed 99% of 5 rearranged and 121 non-rearranged tumors. Immunohistochemistry detected ROS1 protein expression in 7/8 tumors with gene fusions and 6/35 NSCLC with transcriptional upregulation. To elucidate RNA processing, 12 NSCLC were examined by systematic RT-PCR and sequence analysis. In all 12 NSCLC analyzed, up-regulated gene expression independent of translocation was associated with aberrant expression of fetal transcript isoforms identified here. We conclude that our qRT-PCR assay reliably diagnoses and distinguishes ROS1 rearrangements and expression of non-rearranged transcripts. Immunostaining is a suitable screening tool, but re-examination of ROS1 protein expressing cases by qRT-PCR/FISH is compulsory. The expression of ROS1 splice isoforms – shown here for the first time - may be relevant for ROS1 inhibitor therapy in NSCLC.

  11. The Na, K-ATPase β-Subunit Isoforms Expression in Glioblastoma Multiforme: Moonlighting Roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotoli, Deborah; Cejas, Mariana-Mayela; Maeso, María-del-Carmen; Pérez-Rodríguez, Natalia-Dolores; Morales, Manuel; Ávila, Julio

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common form of malignant glioma. Recent studies point out that gliomas exploit ion channels and transporters, including Na, K-ATPase, to sustain their singular growth and invasion as they invade the brain parenchyma. Moreover, the different isoforms of the β-subunit of Na, K-ATPase have been implicated in regulating cellular dynamics, particularly during cancer progression. The aim of this study was to determine the Na, K-ATPase β subunit isoform subcellular expression patterns in all cell types responsible for microenvironment heterogeneity of GBM using immunohistochemical analysis. All three isoforms, β1, β2/AMOG (Adhesion Molecule On Glia) and β3, were found to be expressed in GBM samples. Generally, β1 isoform was not expressed by astrocytes, in both primary and secondary GBM, although other cell types (endothelial cells, pericytes, telocytes, macrophages) did express this isoform. β2/AMOG and β3 positive expression was observed in the cytoplasm, membrane and nuclear envelope of astrocytes and GFAP (Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein) negative cells. Interestingly, differences in isoforms expression have been observed between primary and secondary GBM: in secondary GBM, β2 isoform expression in astrocytes was lower than that observed in primary GBM, while the expression of the β3 subunit was more intense. These changes in β subunit isoforms expression in GBM could be related to a different ionic handling, to a different relationship between astrocyte and neuron (β2/AMOG) and to changes in the moonlighting roles of Na, K-ATPase β subunits as adaptor proteins and transcription factors. PMID:29117147

  12. The Na, K-ATPase β-Subunit Isoforms Expression in Glioblastoma Multiforme: Moonlighting Roles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Rotoli

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most common form of malignant glioma. Recent studies point out that gliomas exploit ion channels and transporters, including Na, K-ATPase, to sustain their singular growth and invasion as they invade the brain parenchyma. Moreover, the different isoforms of the β-subunit of Na, K-ATPase have been implicated in regulating cellular dynamics, particularly during cancer progression. The aim of this study was to determine the Na, K-ATPase β subunit isoform subcellular expression patterns in all cell types responsible for microenvironment heterogeneity of GBM using immunohistochemical analysis. All three isoforms, β1, β2/AMOG (Adhesion Molecule On Glia and β3, were found to be expressed in GBM samples. Generally, β1 isoform was not expressed by astrocytes, in both primary and secondary GBM, although other cell types (endothelial cells, pericytes, telocytes, macrophages did express this isoform. β2/AMOG and β3 positive expression was observed in the cytoplasm, membrane and nuclear envelope of astrocytes and GFAP (Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein negative cells. Interestingly, differences in isoforms expression have been observed between primary and secondary GBM: in secondary GBM, β2 isoform expression in astrocytes was lower than that observed in primary GBM, while the expression of the β3 subunit was more intense. These changes in β subunit isoforms expression in GBM could be related to a different ionic handling, to a different relationship between astrocyte and neuron (β2/AMOG and to changes in the moonlighting roles of Na, K-ATPase β subunits as adaptor proteins and transcription factors.

  13. Deciphering Mineral Homeostasis in Barley Seed Transfer Cells at Transcriptional Level.

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    Behrooz Darbani

    Full Text Available In addition to the micronutrient inadequacy of staple crops for optimal human nutrition, a global downtrend in crop-quality has emerged from intensive breeding for yield. This trend will be aggravated by elevated levels of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide. Therefore, crop biofortification is inevitable to ensure a sustainable supply of minerals to the large part of human population who is dietary dependent on staple crops. This requires a thorough understanding of plant-mineral interactions due to the complexity of mineral homeostasis. Employing RNA sequencing, we here communicate transfer cell specific effects of excess iron and zinc during grain filling in our model crop plant barley. Responding to alterations in mineral contents, we found a long range of different genes and transcripts. Among them, it is worth to highlight the auxin and ethylene signaling factors Arfs, Abcbs, Cand1, Hps4, Hac1, Ecr1, and Ctr1, diurnal fluctuation components Sdg2, Imb1, Lip1, and PhyC, retroelements, sulfur homeostasis components Amp1, Hmt3, Eil3, and Vip1, mineral trafficking components Med16, Cnnm4, Aha2, Clpc1, and Pcbps, and vacuole organization factors Ymr155W, RabG3F, Vps4, and Cbl3. Our analysis introduces new interactors and signifies a broad spectrum of regulatory levels from chromatin remodeling to intracellular protein sorting mechanisms active in the plant mineral homeostasis. The results highlight the importance of storage proteins in metal ion toxicity-resistance and chelation. Interestingly, the protein sorting and recycling factors Exoc7, Cdc1, Sec23A, and Rab11A contributed to the response as well as the polar distributors of metal-transporters ensuring the directional flow of minerals. Alternative isoform switching was found important for plant adaptation and occurred among transcripts coding for identical proteins as well as transcripts coding for protein isoforms. We also identified differences in the alternative-isoform preference between

  14. Deciphering Mineral Homeostasis in Barley Seed Transfer Cells at Transcriptional Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbani, Behrooz; Noeparvar, Shahin; Borg, Søren

    2015-01-01

    In addition to the micronutrient inadequacy of staple crops for optimal human nutrition, a global downtrend in crop-quality has emerged from intensive breeding for yield. This trend will be aggravated by elevated levels of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide. Therefore, crop biofortification is inevitable to ensure a sustainable supply of minerals to the large part of human population who is dietary dependent on staple crops. This requires a thorough understanding of plant-mineral interactions due to the complexity of mineral homeostasis. Employing RNA sequencing, we here communicate transfer cell specific effects of excess iron and zinc during grain filling in our model crop plant barley. Responding to alterations in mineral contents, we found a long range of different genes and transcripts. Among them, it is worth to highlight the auxin and ethylene signaling factors Arfs, Abcbs, Cand1, Hps4, Hac1, Ecr1, and Ctr1, diurnal fluctuation components Sdg2, Imb1, Lip1, and PhyC, retroelements, sulfur homeostasis components Amp1, Hmt3, Eil3, and Vip1, mineral trafficking components Med16, Cnnm4, Aha2, Clpc1, and Pcbps, and vacuole organization factors Ymr155W, RabG3F, Vps4, and Cbl3. Our analysis introduces new interactors and signifies a broad spectrum of regulatory levels from chromatin remodeling to intracellular protein sorting mechanisms active in the plant mineral homeostasis. The results highlight the importance of storage proteins in metal ion toxicity-resistance and chelation. Interestingly, the protein sorting and recycling factors Exoc7, Cdc1, Sec23A, and Rab11A contributed to the response as well as the polar distributors of metal-transporters ensuring the directional flow of minerals. Alternative isoform switching was found important for plant adaptation and occurred among transcripts coding for identical proteins as well as transcripts coding for protein isoforms. We also identified differences in the alternative-isoform preference between the treatments

  15. SRSF3 represses the expression of PDCD4 protein by coordinated regulation of alternative splicing, export and translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seung Kuk; Jeong, Sunjoo

    2016-02-05

    Gene expression is regulated at multiple steps, such as transcription, splicing, export, degradation and translation. Considering diverse roles of SR proteins, we determined whether the tumor-related splicing factor SRSF3 regulates the expression of the tumor-suppressor protein, PDCD4, at multiple steps. As we have reported previously, knockdown of SRSF3 increased the PDCD4 protein level in SW480 colon cancer cells. More interestingly, here we showed that the alternative splicing and the nuclear export of minor isoforms of pdcd4 mRNA were repressed by SRSF3, but the translation step was unaffected. In contrast, only the translation step of the major isoform of pdcd4 mRNA was repressed by SRSF3. Therefore, overexpression of SRSF3 might be relevant to the repression of all isoforms of PDCD4 protein levels in most types of cancer cell. We propose that SRSF3 could act as a coordinator of the expression of PDCD4 protein via two mechanisms on two alternatively spliced mRNA isoforms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. SRSF3 represses the expression of PDCD4 protein by coordinated regulation of alternative splicing, export and translation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Seung Kuk; Jeong, Sunjoo, E-mail: sjsj@dankook.ac.kr

    2016-02-05

    Gene expression is regulated at multiple steps, such as transcription, splicing, export, degradation and translation. Considering diverse roles of SR proteins, we determined whether the tumor-related splicing factor SRSF3 regulates the expression of the tumor-suppressor protein, PDCD4, at multiple steps. As we have reported previously, knockdown of SRSF3 increased the PDCD4 protein level in SW480 colon cancer cells. More interestingly, here we showed that the alternative splicing and the nuclear export of minor isoforms of pdcd4 mRNA were repressed by SRSF3, but the translation step was unaffected. In contrast, only the translation step of the major isoform of pdcd4 mRNA was repressed by SRSF3. Therefore, overexpression of SRSF3 might be relevant to the repression of all isoforms of PDCD4 protein levels in most types of cancer cell. We propose that SRSF3 could act as a coordinator of the expression of PDCD4 protein via two mechanisms on two alternatively spliced mRNA isoforms.

  17. Sequence variation of the human immunodeficiency virus primer-binding site suggests the use of an alternative tRNA(Lys) molecule in reverse transcription

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Das, A. T.; Klaver, B.; Berkhout, B.

    1997-01-01

    Retroviruses use a cellular tRNA molecule as primer for reverse transcription. The complementarity between the 3' end of this tRNA and a sequence near the 5' end of the viral RNA, the primer-binding site (PBS), allows the primer to anneal onto the viral RNA. During reverse transcription 18

  18. Subcellular RNA profiling links splicing and nuclear DICER1 to alternative cleavage and polyadenylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neve, Jonathan; Burger, Kaspar; Li, Wencheng; Hoque, Mainul; Patel, Radhika; Tian, Bin; Gullerova, Monika; Furger, Andre

    2016-01-01

    Alternative cleavage and polyadenylation (APA) plays a crucial role in the regulation of gene expression across eukaryotes. Although APA is extensively studied, its regulation within cellular compartments and its physiological impact remains largely enigmatic. Here, we used a rigorous subcellular fractionation approach to compare APA profiles of cytoplasmic and nuclear RNA fractions from human cell lines. This approach allowed us to extract APA isoforms that are subjected to differential regulation and provided us with a platform to interrogate the molecular regulatory pathways that shape APA profiles in different subcellular locations. Here, we show that APA isoforms with shorter 3' UTRs tend to be overrepresented in the cytoplasm and appear to be cell-type-specific events. Nuclear retention of longer APA isoforms occurs and is partly a result of incomplete splicing contributing to the observed cytoplasmic bias of transcripts with shorter 3' UTRs. We demonstrate that the endoribonuclease III, DICER1, contributes to the establishment of subcellular APA profiles not only by expected cytoplasmic miRNA-mediated destabilization of APA mRNA isoforms, but also by affecting polyadenylation site choice. © 2016 Neve et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  19. Plant MPSS databases: signature-based transcriptional resources for analyses of mRNA and small RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Mayumi; Nobuta, Kan; Vemaraju, Kalyan; Tej, Shivakundan Singh; Skogen, Jeremy W; Meyers, Blake C

    2006-01-01

    MPSS (massively parallel signature sequencing) is a sequencing-based technology that uses a unique method to quantify gene expression level, generating millions of short sequence tags per library. We have created a series of databases for four species (Arabidopsis, rice, grape and Magnaporthe grisea, the rice blast fungus). Our MPSS databases measure the expression level of most genes under defined conditions and provide information about potentially novel transcripts (antisense transcripts, alternative splice isoforms and regulatory intergenic transcripts). A modified version of MPSS has been used to perform deep profiling of small RNAs from Arabidopsis, and we have recently adapted our database to display these data. Interpretation of the small RNA MPSS data is facilitated by the inclusion of extensive repeat data in our genome viewer. All the data and the tools introduced in this article are available at http://mpss.udel.edu.

  20. Isoform Specificity of Protein Kinase Cs in Synaptic Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sossin, Wayne S.

    2007-01-01

    Protein kinase Cs (PKCs) are implicated in many forms of synaptic plasticity. However, the specific isoform(s) of PKC that underlie(s) these events are often not known. We have used "Aplysia" as a model system in order to investigate the isoform specificity of PKC actions due to the presence of fewer isoforms and a large number of documented…

  1. High qualitative and quantitative conservation of alternative splicing in Caenorhabditis elegans and Caenorhabditis briggsae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rukov, Jakob Lewin; Irimia, Manuel; Mørk, Søren

    2007-01-01

    the qualitative and quantitative expression of 21 orthologous alternative splice events through the development of 2 nematode species separated by 85-110 Myr of evolutionary time. We demonstrate that most of these alternative splice events present in Caenorhabditis elegans are conserved in Caenorhabditis briggsae...... mechanisms controlling AS are to a large extent conserved during the evolution of Caenorhabditis. This strong conservation indicates that both major and minor splice forms have important functional roles and that the relative quantities in which they are expressed are crucial. Our results therefore suggest...... that the quantitative regulation of isoform expression levels is an intrinsic part of most AS events. Moreover, our results indicate that AS contributes little to transcript variation in Caenorhabditis genes and that gene duplication may be the major evolutionary mechanism for the origin of novel transcripts in these 2...

  2. Differential Expression of Sox11 and Bdnf mRNA Isoforms in the Injured and Regenerating Nervous Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix L. Struebing

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In both the central nervous system (CNS and the peripheral nervous system (PNS, axonal injury induces changes in neuronal gene expression. In the PNS, a relatively well-characterized alteration in transcriptional activation is known to promote axonal regeneration. This transcriptional cascade includes the neurotrophin Bdnf and the transcription factor Sox11. Although both molecules act to facilitate successful axon regeneration in the PNS, this process does not occur in the CNS. The present study examines the differential expression of Sox11 and Bdnf mRNA isoforms in the PNS and CNS using three experimental paradigms at different time points: (i the acutely injured CNS (retina after optic nerve crush and PNS (dorsal root ganglion after sciatic nerve crush, (ii a CNS regeneration model (retina after optic nerve crush and induced regeneration; and (iii the retina during a chronic form of central neurodegeneration (the DBA/2J glaucoma model. We find an initial increase of Sox11 in both PNS and CNS after injury; however, the expression of Bdnf isoforms is higher in the PNS relative to the CNS. Sustained upregulation of Sox11 is seen in the injured retina following regeneration treatment, while the expression of two Bdnf mRNA isoforms is suppressed. Furthermore, two isoforms of Sox11 with different 3′UTR lengths are present in the retina, and the long isoform is specifically upregulated in later stages of glaucoma. These results provide insight into the molecular cascades active during axonal injury and regeneration in mammalian neurons.

  3. Diversification of the Histone Acetyltransferase GCN5 through Alternative Splicing in Brachypodium distachyon

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    Alexandre Martel

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The epigenetic modulatory SAGA complex is involved in various developmental and stress responsive pathways in plants. Alternative transcripts of the SAGA complex's enzymatic subunit GCN5 have been identified in Brachypodium distachyon. These splice variants differ based on the presence and integrity of their conserved domain sequences: the histone acetyltransferase domain, responsible for catalytic activity, and the bromodomain, involved in acetyl-lysine binding and genomic loci targeting. GCN5 is the wild-type transcript, while alternative splice sites result in the following transcriptional variants: L-GCN5, which is missing the bromodomain and S-GCN5, which lacks the bromodomain as well as certain motifs of the histone acetyltransferase domain. Absolute mRNA quantification revealed that, across eight B. distachyon accessions, GCN5 was the dominant transcript isoform, accounting for up to 90% of the entire transcript pool, followed by L-GCN5 and S-GCN5. A cycloheximide treatment further revealed that the S-GCN5 splice variant was degraded through the nonsense-mediated decay pathway. All alternative BdGCN5 transcripts displayed similar transcript profiles, being induced during early exposure to heat and displaying higher levels of accumulation in the crown, compared to aerial tissues. All predicted protein isoforms localize to the nucleus, which lends weight to their purported epigenetic functions. S-GCN5 was incapable of forming an in vivo protein interaction with ADA2, the transcriptional adaptor that links the histone acetyltransferase subunit to the SAGA complex, while both GCN5 and L-GCN5 interacted with ADA2, which suggests that a complete histone acetyltransferase domain is required for BdGCN5-BdADA2 interaction in vivo. Thus, there has been a diversification in BdGCN5 through alternative splicing that has resulted in differences in conserved domain composition, transcript fate and in vivo protein interaction partners. Furthermore, our

  4. Antiangiogenic VEGF Isoform in Inflammatory Myopathies

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    Nila Volpi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF antiangiogenic isoform A-165b on human muscle in idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM and to compare distribution of angiogenic/antiangiogenic VEGFs, as isoforms shifts are described in other autoimmune disorders. Subjects and Methods. We analyzed VEGF-A165b and VEGF-A by western blot and immunohistochemistry on skeletal muscle biopsies from 21 patients affected with IIM (polymyositis, dermatomyositis, and inclusion body myositis and 6 control muscle samples. TGF-β, a prominent VEGF inductor, was analogously evaluated. Intergroup differences of western blot bands density were statistically examined. Endomysial vascularization, inflammatory score, and muscle regeneration, as pathological parameters of IIM, were quantitatively determined and their levels were confronted with VEGF expression. Results. VEGF-A165b was significantly upregulated in IIM, as well as TGF-β. VEGF-A was diffusely expressed on unaffected myofibers, whereas regenerating/atrophic myofibres strongly reacted for both VEGF-A isoforms. Most inflammatory cells and endomysial vessels expressed both isoforms. VEGF-A165b levels were in positive correlation to inflammatory score, endomysial vascularization, and TGF-β. Conclusions. Our findings indicate skeletal muscle expression of antiangiogenic VEGF-A165b and preferential upregulation in IIM, suggesting that modulation of VEGF-A isoforms may occur in myositides.

  5. Width of gene expression profile drives alternative splicing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Wegmann

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing generates an enormous amount of functional and proteomic diversity in metazoan organisms. This process is probably central to the macromolecular and cellular complexity of higher eukaryotes. While most studies have focused on the molecular mechanism triggering and controlling alternative splicing, as well as on its incidence in different species, its maintenance and evolution within populations has been little investigated. Here, we propose to address these questions by comparing the structural characteristics as well as the functional and transcriptional profiles of genes with monomorphic or polymorphic splicing, referred to as MS and PS genes, respectively. We find that MS and PS genes differ particularly in the number of tissues and cell types where they are expressed.We find a striking deficit of PS genes on the sex chromosomes, particularly on the Y chromosome where it is shown not to be due to the observed lower breadth of expression of genes on that chromosome. The development of a simple model of evolution of cis-regulated alternative splicing leads to predictions in agreement with these observations. It further predicts the conditions for the emergence and the maintenance of cis-regulated alternative splicing, which are both favored by the tissue specific expression of splicing variants. We finally propose that the width of the gene expression profile is an essential factor for the acquisition of new transcript isoforms that could later be maintained by a new form of balancing selection.

  6. Do anti-angiogenic VEGF (VEGFxxxb isoforms exist? A cautionary tale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Harris

    Full Text Available Splicing of the human vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A gene has been reported to generate angiogenic (VEGFxxx and anti-angiogenic (VEGFxxxb isoforms. Corresponding VEGFxxxb isoforms have also been reported in rat and mouse. We examined VEGFxxxb expression in mouse fibrosarcoma cell lines expressing all or individual VEGF isoforms (VEGF120, 164 or 188, grown in vitro and in vivo, and compared results with those from normal mouse and human tissues. Importantly, genetic construction of VEGF164 and VEGF188 expressing fibrosarcomas, in which exon 7 is fused to the conventional exon 8, precludes VEGFxxxb splicing from occurring. Thus, these two fibrosarcoma cell lines provided endogenous negative controls. Using RT-PCR we show that primers designed to simultaneously amplify VEGFxxx and VEGFxxxb isoforms amplified only VEGFxxx variants in both species. Moreover, only VEGFxxx species were generated when mouse podocytes were treated with TGFβ-1, a reported activator of VEGFxxxb splice selection in human podocytes. A VEGF164/120 heteroduplex species was identified as a PCR artefact, specifically in mouse. VEGFxxxb isoform-specific PCR did amplify putative VEGFxxxb species in mouse and human tissues, but unexpectedly also in VEGF188 and VEGF164 fibrosarcoma cells and tumours, where splicing to produce true VEGFxxxb isoforms cannot occur. Moreover, these products were only consistently generated using reverse primers spanning more than 5 bases across the 8b/7 or 8b/5 splice junctions. Primer annealing to VEGFxxx transcripts and amplification of exon 8b primer 'tails' explained the artefactual generation of VEGFxxxb products, since the same products were generated when the PCR reactions were performed with cDNA from VEGF164/VEGF188 'knock-in' vectors used in the generation of single VEGF isoform-expressing transgenic mice from which the fibrosarcoma lines were developed. Collectively, our results highlight important pitfalls in data

  7. Distinct isoforms of the Drosophila Brd4 homologue are present at enhancers, promoters and insulator sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellner, Wendy A; Van Bortle, Kevin; Li, Li; Ramos, Edward; Takenaka, Naomi; Corces, Victor G

    2013-11-01

    Brd4 is a double bromodomain protein that has been shown to interact with acetylated histones to regulate transcription by recruiting Positive Transcription Elongation Factor b to the promoter region. Brd4 is also involved in gene bookmarking during mitosis and is a therapeutic target for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia. The Drosophila melanogaster Brd4 homologue is called Fs(1)h and, like its vertebrate counterpart, encodes different isoforms. We have used ChIP-seq to examine the genome-wide distribution of Fs(1)h isoforms. We are able to distinguish the Fs(1)h-L and Fs(1)h-S binding profiles and discriminate between the genomic locations of the two isoforms. Fs(1)h-S is present at enhancers and promoters and its amount parallels transcription levels. Correlations between the distribution of Fs(1)h-S and various forms of acetylated histones H3 and H4 suggest a preference for binding to H3K9acS10ph. Surprisingly, Fs(1)h-L is located at sites in the genome where multiple insulator proteins are also present. The results suggest that Fs(1)h-S may be responsible for the classical role assigned to this protein, whereas Fs(1)h-L may have a new and unexpected role in chromatin architecture by working in conjunction with insulator proteins to mediate intra- or inter-chromosome interactions.

  8. TauCstF-64 Mediates Correct mRNA Polyadenylation and Splicing of Activator and Repressor Isoforms of the Cyclic AMP-Responsive Element Modulator (CREM) in Mouse Testis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grozdanov, Petar N; Amatullah, Atia; Graber, Joel H; MacDonald, Clinton C

    2016-02-01

    Spermatogenesis is coordinated by the spatial and temporal expression of many transcriptional and posttranscriptional factors. The cyclic AMP-responsive element modulator (CREM) gene encodes both activator and repressor isoforms that act as transcription factors to regulate spermiogenesis. We found that the testis-expressed paralog of CstF-64, tauCstF-64 (gene symbol Cstf2t), is involved in a polyadenylation site choice switch of Crem mRNA and leads to an overall decrease of the Crem mRNAs that are generated from internal promoters in Cstf2t(-/-) mice. More surprisingly, loss of tauCstF-64 also leads to alternative splicing of Crem exon 4, which contains an important activation domain. Thus, testis-specific CREMtau2 isoform protein levels are reduced in Cstf2t(-/-) mice. Consequently, expression of 15 CREM-regulated genes is decreased in testes of Cstf2t(-/-) mice at 25 days postpartum. These effects might further contribute to the infertility phenotype of these animals. This demonstrates that tauCstF-64 is an important stage-specific regulator of Crem mRNA processing that modulates the spatial and temporal expression of downstream stage-specific genes necessary for the proper development of sperm in mice. © 2016 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  9. Evolution of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA catalytic subunit isoforms.

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    Kristoffer Søberg

    Full Text Available The 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP-dependent protein kinase, or protein kinase A (PKA, pathway is one of the most versatile and best studied signaling pathways in eukaryotic cells. The two paralogous PKA catalytic subunits Cα and Cβ, encoded by the genes PRKACA and PRKACB, respectively, are among the best understood model kinases in signal transduction research. In this work, we explore and elucidate the evolution of the alternative 5' exons and the splicing pattern giving rise to the numerous PKA catalytic subunit isoforms. In addition to the universally conserved Cα1/Cβ1 isoforms, we find kinase variants with short N-termini in all main vertebrate classes, including the sperm-specific Cα2 isoform found to be conserved in all mammals. We also describe, for the first time, a PKA Cα isoform with a long N-terminus, paralogous to the PKA Cβ2 N-terminus. An analysis of isoform-specific variation highlights residues and motifs that are likely to be of functional importance.

  10. Genetic disruption of the sh3pxd2a gene reveals an essential role in mouse development and the existence of a novel isoform of tks5.

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    Pilar Cejudo-Martin

    Full Text Available Tks5 is a scaffold protein and Src substrate involved in cell migration and matrix degradation through its essential role in invadosome formation and function. We have previously described that Tks5 is fundamental for zebrafish neural crest cell migration in vivo. In the present study, we sought to investigate the function of Tks5 in mammalian development by analyzing mice mutant for sh3pxd2a, the gene encoding Tks5. Homozygous disruption of the sh3pxd2a gene by gene-trapping in mouse resulted in neonatal death and the presence of a complete cleft of the secondary palate. Interestingly, embryonic fibroblasts from homozygous gene-trap sh3pxd2a mice lacked only the highest molecular weight band of the characteristic Tks5 triplet observed in protein extracts, leaving the lower molecular weight bands unaffected. This finding, together with the existence of two human Expressed Sequence Tags lacking the first 5 exons of SH3PXD2A, made us hypothesize about the presence of a second alternative transcription start site located in intron V. We performed 5'RACE on mouse fibroblasts and isolated a new transcript of the sh3pxd2a gene encoding a novel Tks5 isoform, that we named Tks5β. This novel isoform diverges from the long form of Tks5 in that it lacks the PX-domain, which confers affinity for phosphatidylinositol-3,4-bisphosphate. Instead, Tks5β has a short unique amino terminal sequence encoded by the newly discovered exon 6β; this exon includes a start codon located 29 bp from the 5'-end of exon 6. Tks5β mRNA is expressed in MEFs and all mouse adult tissues analyzed. Tks5β is a substrate for the Src tyrosine kinase and its expression is regulated through the proteasome degradation pathway. Together, these findings indicate the essentiality of the larger Tks5 isoform for correct mammalian development and the transcriptional complexity of the sh3pxd2a gene.

  11. The α and Δ isoforms of CREB1 are required to maintain normal pulmonary vascular resistance.

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    Lili Li

    Full Text Available Chronic hypoxia causes pulmonary hypertension associated with structural alterations in pulmonary vessels and sustained vasoconstriction. The transcriptional mechanisms responsible for these distinctive changes are unclear. We have previously reported that CREB1 is activated in the lung in response to alveolar hypoxia but not in other organs. To directly investigate the role of α and Δ isoforms of CREB1 in the regulation of pulmonary vascular resistance we examined the responses of mice in which these isoforms of CREB1 had been inactivated by gene mutation, leaving only the β isoform intact (CREB(αΔ mice. Here we report that expression of CREB regulated genes was altered in the lungs of CREB(αΔ mice. CREB(αΔ mice had greater pulmonary vascular resistance than wild types, both basally in normoxia and following exposure to hypoxic conditions for three weeks. There was no difference in rho kinase mediated vasoconstriction between CREB(αΔ and wild type mice. Stereological analysis of pulmonary vascular structure showed characteristic wall thickening and lumen reduction in hypoxic wild-type mice, with similar changes observed in CREB(αΔ. CREB(αΔ mice had larger lungs with reduced epithelial surface density suggesting increased pulmonary compliance. These findings show that α and Δ isoforms of CREB1 regulate homeostatic gene expression in the lung and that normal activity of these isoforms is essential to maintain low pulmonary vascular resistance in both normoxic and hypoxic conditions and to maintain the normal alveolar structure. Interventions that enhance the actions of α and Δ isoforms of CREB1 warrant further investigation in hypoxic lung diseases.

  12. Self-splicing of a group IIC intron: 5? exon recognition and alternative 5? splicing events implicate the stem?loop motif of a transcriptional terminator

    OpenAIRE

    Toor, Navtej; Robart, Aaron R.; Christianson, Joshua; Zimmerly, Steven

    2006-01-01

    Bacterial IIC introns are a newly recognized subclass of group II introns whose ribozyme properties have not been characterized in detail. IIC introns are typically located downstream of transcriptional terminator motifs (inverted repeat followed by T's) or other inverted repeats in bacterial genomes. Here we have characterized the self-splicing activity of a IIC intron, B.h.I1, from Bacillus halodurans. B.h.I1 self-splices in vitro through hydrolysis to produce linear intron, but interesting...

  13. Mechanisms of isoform-specific Na/K pump regulation by short- and long-term adrenergic activation in rat ventricular myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jian; Guo, Hui-Cai; Yu, Ding; Wang, Hui-Ci; Li, Jun-Xia; Wang, Yong-Li

    2014-01-01

    Many stressful conditions, including cardiovascular diseases, induce long-term elevations in circulating catecholamines, thereby leading to changes of the Na/K pump and thus affecting myocardial functions. However, only short-term adrenergic regulation of the Na/K pump has been reported. The present study is the first investigation of long-term adrenergic regulation of the Na/K pump and the potential mechanism. After acutely isolated Sprague-Dawley rat myocytes were incubated with noradrenaline or isoprenaline for 24 h, Na/K pump high- (IPH) and low-affinity current (IPL), α-isoform mRNA, and α-isoform protein were examined using patch-clamp, RT-PCR, and Western blotting techniques, respectively. After the short-term incubation, isoprenaline reduced the IPL through a PKA-dependent pathway that involves α1-isoform translocation from the membrane to early endosomes, and noradrenaline increased the IPH through a PKC-dependent pathway that involves α2-isoform translocation from late endosomes to the membrane. After long-term incubation, isoprenaline increased the IPL, α1-isoform mRNA, and α1-isoform protein, and noradrenaline reduced the IPH, α2-isoform mRNA, and α1-isoform protein through a PKA-or PKC-dependent pathway, respectively. These results suggest that long-term adrenergic Na/K pump regulation is isoform-specific and negatively feeds back on the short-term response. Furthermore, long-term regulation involves transcription and translation of the respective α-isoform, whereas short-term regulation involves the translocation of the available α-isoform to the plasma membrane. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Mechanisms of Isoform-Specific Na/K Pump Regulation by Short- and Long-Term Adrenergic Activation in Rat Ventricular Myocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Yin

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Many stressful conditions, including cardiovascular diseases, induce long-term elevations in circulating catecholamines, thereby leading to changes of the Na/K pump and thus affecting myocardial functions. However, only short-term adrenergic regulation of the Na/K pump has been reported. The present study is the first investigation of long-term adrenergic regulation of the Na/K pump and the potential mechanism. Methods: After acutely isolated Sprague-Dawley rat myocytes were incubated with noradrenaline or isoprenaline for 24 h, Na/K pump high- (IPH and low-affinity current (IPL, α-isoform mRNA, and α-isoform protein were examined using patch-clamp, RT-PCR, and Western blotting techniques, respectively. Results: After the short-term incubation, isoprenaline reduced the IPL through a PKA-dependent pathway that involves α1-isoform translocation from the membrane to early endosomes, and noradrenaline increased the IPH through a PKC-dependent pathway that involves α2-isoform translocation from late endosomes to the membrane. After long-term incubation, isoprenaline increased the IPL, α1-isoform mRNA, and α1-isoform protein, and noradrenaline reduced the IPH, α2-isoform mRNA, and α1-isoform protein through a PKA-or PKC-dependent pathway, respectively. Conclusions: These results suggest that long-term adrenergic Na/K pump regulation is isoform-specific and negatively feeds back on the short-term response. Furthermore, long-term regulation involves transcription and translation of the respective α-isoform, whereas short-term regulation involves the translocation of the available α-isoform to the plasma membrane.

  15. Point mutation in the NF2 gene of HEI-193 human schwannoma cells results in the expression of a merlin isoform with attenuated growth suppressive activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepont, Pierig; Stickney, John T.; Foster, Lauren A.; Meng, Jin-Jun; Hennigan, Robert F. [Department of Cell and Cancer Biology, Vontz Center for Molecular Studies, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, 3125 Eden Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0521 (United States); Ip, Wallace [Department of Cell and Cancer Biology, Vontz Center for Molecular Studies, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, 3125 Eden Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0521 (United States)], E-mail: wallace.ip@uc.edu

    2008-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) is a genetic disorder characterized by the formation of bilateral schwannomas of the eighth cranial nerve. Although the protein product of the NF2 gene (merlin) is a classical tumor suppressor, the mechanism by which merlin suppresses cell proliferation is not fully understood. The availability of isolated tumor cells would facilitate a better understanding of the molecular function of merlin, but primary schwannoma cells obtained from patients grow slowly and do not yield adequate numbers for biochemical analysis. In this study, we have examined the NF2 mutation in HEI-193 cells, an immortalized cell line derived from the schwannoma of an NF2 patient. Previous work showed that the NF2 mutation in HEI-193 cells causes a splicing defect in the NF2 transcript. We have confirmed this result and further identified the resultant protein product as an isoform of merlin previously designated as isoform 3. The level of isoform 3 proteins in HEI-193 cells is comparable to the levels of merlin isoforms 1 and 2 in normal human Schwann cells and several other immortalized cell lines. In contrast to many mutant forms of merlin, isoform 3 is as resistant to proteasomal degradation as isoforms 1 and 2 and can interact with each of these isoforms in vivo. Cell proliferation assays showed that, in NF2{sup -/-} mouse embryonic fibroblasts, exogenously expressed merlin isoform 3 does exhibit growth suppressive activity although it is significantly lower than that of identically expressed merlin isoform 1. These results indicate that, although HEI-193 cells have undetectable levels of merlin isoforms 1 and 2, they are, in fact, not a merlin-null model because they express the moderately active growth suppressive merlin isoform 3.

  16. Two-dimensional zymography differentiates gelatinase isoforms in stimulated microglial cells and in brain tissues of acute brain injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shanyan; Meng, Fanjun; Chen, Zhenzhou; Tomlinson, Brittany N; Wesley, Jennifer M; Sun, Grace Y; Whaley-Connell, Adam T; Sowers, James R; Cui, Jiankun; Gu, Zezong

    2015-01-01

    Excessive activation of gelatinases (MMP-2/-9) is a key cause of detrimental outcomes in neurodegenerative diseases. A single-dimension zymography has been widely used to determine gelatinase expression and activity, but this method is inadequate in resolving complex enzyme isoforms, because gelatinase expression and activity could be modified at transcriptional and posttranslational levels. In this study, we investigated gelatinase isoforms under in vitro and in vivo conditions using two-dimensional (2D) gelatin zymography electrophoresis, a protocol allowing separation of proteins based on isoelectric points (pI) and molecular weights. We observed organomercuric chemical 4-aminophenylmercuric acetate-induced activation of MMP-2 isoforms with variant pI values in the conditioned medium of human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells. Studies with murine BV-2 microglial cells indicated a series of proform MMP-9 spots separated by variant pI values due to stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The MMP-9 pI values were shifted after treatment with alkaline phosphatase, suggesting presence of phosphorylated isoforms due to the proinflammatory stimulation. Similar MMP-9 isoforms with variant pI values in the same molecular weight were also found in mouse brains after ischemic and traumatic brain injuries. In contrast, there was no detectable pI differentiation of MMP-9 in the brains of chronic Zucker obese rats. These results demonstrated effective use of 2D zymography to separate modified MMP isoforms with variant pI values and to detect posttranslational modifications under different pathological conditions.

  17. FDM: a graph-based statistical method to detect differential transcription using RNA-seq data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Darshan; Orellana, Christian F; Hu, Yin; Jones, Corbin D; Liu, Yufeng; Chiang, Derek Y; Liu, Jinze; Prins, Jan F

    2011-10-01

    In eukaryotic cells, alternative splicing expands the diversity of RNA transcripts and plays an important role in tissue-specific differentiation, and can be misregulated in disease. To understand these processes, there is a great need for methods to detect differential transcription between samples. Our focus is on samples observed using short-read RNA sequencing (RNA-seq). We characterize differential transcription between two samples as the difference in the relative abundance of the transcript isoforms present in the samples. The magnitude of differential transcription of a gene between two samples can be measured by the square root of the Jensen Shannon Divergence (JSD*) between the gene's transcript abundance vectors in each sample. We define a weighted splice-graph representation of RNA-seq data, summarizing in compact form the alignment of RNA-seq reads to a reference genome. The flow difference metric (FDM) identifies regions of differential RNA transcript expression between pairs of splice graphs, without need for an underlying gene model or catalog of transcripts. We present a novel non-parametric statistical test between splice graphs to assess the significance of differential transcription, and extend it to group-wise comparison incorporating sample replicates. Using simulated RNA-seq data consisting of four technical replicates of two samples with varying transcription between genes, we show that (i) the FDM is highly correlated with JSD* (r=0.82) when average RNA-seq coverage of the transcripts is sufficiently deep; and (ii) the FDM is able to identify 90% of genes with differential transcription when JSD* >0.28 and coverage >7. This represents higher sensitivity than Cufflinks (without annotations) and rDiff (MMD), which respectively identified 69 and 49% of the genes in this region as differential transcribed. Using annotations identifying the transcripts, Cufflinks was able to identify 86% of the genes in this region as differentially transcribed

  18. Effect of Exercise Intensity on Isoform-Specific Expressions of NT-PGC-1α mRNA in Mouse Skeletal Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingyuan Wen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available PGC-1α is an inducible transcriptional coactivator that regulates mitochondrial biogenesis and cellular energy metabolism in skeletal muscle. Recent studies have identified two additional PGC-1α transcripts that are derived from an alternative exon 1 (exon 1b and induced by exercise. Given that the PGC-1α gene also produces NT-PGC-1α transcript by alternative 3′ splicing between exon 6 and exon 7, we have investigated isoform-specific expression of NT-PGC-1α mRNA in mouse skeletal muscle during physical exercise with different intensities. We report here that NT-PGC-1α-a mRNA expression derived from a canonical exon 1 (exon 1a is increased by high-intensity exercise and AMPK activator AICAR in mouse skeletal muscle but not altered by low- and medium-intensity exercise and β2-adrenergic receptor agonist clenbuterol. In contrast, the alternative exon 1b-driven NT-PGC-1α-b (PGC-1α4 and NT-PGC-1α-c are highly induced by low-, medium-, and high-intensity exercise, AICAR, and clenbuterol. Ectopic expression of NT-PGC-1α-a in C2C12 myotube cells upregulates myosin heavy chain (MHC I, MHC II a and Glut4, which represent oxidative fibers, and promotes the expression of mitochondrial genes (Cyc1, COX5B, and ATP5B. In line with gene expression data, citrate synthase activity was significantly increased by NT-PGC-1α-a in C2C12 myotube cells. Our results indicate the regulatory role for NT-PGC-1α-a in mitochondrial biogenesis and adaptation of skeletal muscle to endurance exercise.

  19. Impairment of mature B-cell maintenance upon combined deletion of the alternative NF-κB transcription factors RELB and NF-κB2 in B cells$

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva, Nilushi S.; Silva, Kathryn; Anderson, Michael M.; Bhagat, Govind; Klein, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    B-cell activating factor (BAFF) is critical for the survival and maturation of mature B-cells. BAFF, via the BAFF receptor (BAFFR), activates multiple signaling pathways in B-cells, including the alternative nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway. The transcription factors RELB and NF-κB2 (p100/p52) are the downstream mediators of the alternative pathway; however, the B-cell-intrinsic functions of these NF-κB subunits have not been studied in vivo using conditional alleles, either individually or in combination. We here report that B-cell-specific deletion of relb led to only a slight decrease in the fraction of mature splenic B cells, whereas deletion of nfkb2 caused a marked reduction. This phenotype was further exacerbated upon combined deletion of relb and nfkb2 and most dramatically affected the maintenance of marginal zone B-cells. BAFF-stimulation, in contrast to CD40-activation, was unable to rescue relb/nfkb2-deleted B-cells in vitro. RNA-sequencing analysis of BAFF-stimulated nfkb2-deleted vs. normal B-cells suggests that the alternative NF-κB pathway, in addition to its critical role in BAFF-mediated cell survival, may control the expression of genes involved in the positioning of B-cells within the lymphoid microenvironment and in the establishment of T-cell-B-cell interactions. Thus, by ablating the downstream transcription factors of the alternative NF-κB pathway specifically in B-cells, we here identify a critical role for the combined activity of the RELB and NF-κB2 subunits in B-cell homeostasis that cannot be compensated for by the canonical NF-κB pathway under physiological conditions. PMID:26851215

  20. Differential 3’ processing of specific transcripts expands regulatory and protein diversity across neuronal cell types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jereb, Saša; Hwang, Hun-Way; Van Otterloo, Eric; Govek, Eve-Ellen; Fak, John J; Yuan, Yuan; Hatten, Mary E

    2018-01-01

    Alternative polyadenylation (APA) regulates mRNA translation, stability, and protein localization. However, it is unclear to what extent APA regulates these processes uniquely in specific cell types. Using a new technique, cTag-PAPERCLIP, we discovered significant differences in APA between the principal types of mouse cerebellar neurons, the Purkinje and granule cells, as well as between proliferating and differentiated granule cells. Transcripts that differed in APA in these comparisons were enriched in key neuronal functions and many differed in coding sequence in addition to 3’UTR length. We characterize Memo1, a transcript that shifted from expressing a short 3’UTR isoform to a longer one during granule cell differentiation. We show that Memo1 regulates granule cell precursor proliferation and that its long 3’UTR isoform is targeted by miR-124, contributing to its downregulation during development. Our findings provide insight into roles for APA in specific cell types and establish a platform for further functional studies. PMID:29578408

  1. Activity of the acyl-CoA synthetase ACSL6 isoforms: role of the fatty acid Gate-domains

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    Siliakus Melvin

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activation of fatty acids by acyl-CoA synthetase enzymes is required for de novo lipid synthesis, fatty acid catabolism, and remodeling of biological membranes. Human long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase member 6, ASCL6, is a form present in the plasma membrane of cells. Splicing events affecting the amino-terminus and alternative motifs near the ATP-binding site generate different isoforms of ACSL6. Results Isoforms with different fatty acid Gate-domain motifs have different activity and the form lacking this domain, isoform 3, showed no detectable activity. Enzymes truncated of the first 40 residues generate acyl-CoAs at a faster rate than the full-length protein. The gating residue, which prevents entry of the fatty acid substrate unless one molecule of ATP has already accessed the catalytic site, was identified as a tyrosine for isoform 1 and a phenylalanine for isoform 2 at position 319. All isoforms, with or without a fatty acid Gate-domain, as well as recombinant protein truncated of the N-terminus, can interact to form enzymatic complexes with identical or different isoforms. Conclusion The alternative fatty acid Gate-domain motifs are essential determinants for the activity of the human ACSL6 isoforms, which appear to act as homodimeric enzyme as well as in complex with other spliced forms. These findings provide evidence that the diversity of these enzyme species could produce the variety of acyl-CoA synthetase activities that are necessary to generate and repair the hundreds of lipid species present in membranes.

  2. Differential localization of Acanthamoeba myosin I isoforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Acanthamoeba myosins IA and IB were localized by immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy in vegetative and phagocytosing cells and the total cell contents of myosins IA, IB, and IC were quantified by immunoprecipitation. The quantitative distributions of the three myosin I isoforms were then calculated from these data and the previously determined localization of myosin IC. Myosin IA occurs almost exclusively in the cytoplasm, where it accounts for approximately 50% of the total myosin I, in the cortex beneath phagocytic cups and in association with small cytoplasmic vesicles. Myosin IB is the predominant isoform associated with the plasma membrane, large vacuole membranes and phagocytic membranes and accounts for almost half of the total myosin I in the cytoplasm. Myosin IC accounts for a significant fraction of the total myosin I associated with the plasma membrane and large vacuole membranes and is the only myosin I isoform associated with the contractile vacuole membrane. These data suggest that myosin IA may function in cytoplasmic vesicle transport and myosin I-mediated cortical contraction, myosin IB in pseudopod extension and phagocytosis, and myosin IC in contractile vacuole function. In addition, endogenous and exogenously added myosins IA and IB appeared to be associated with the cytoplasmic surface of different subpopulations of purified plasma membranes implying that the different myosin I isoforms are targeted to specific membrane domains through a mechanism that involves more than the affinity of the myosins for anionic phospholipids. PMID:1447297

  3. Lipoprotein lipase isoelectric point isoforms in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Badia-Villanueva, M.; Carulla, P.; Carrascal, M.

    2014-01-01

    -heparin plasma (PHP), LPL consists of a pattern of more than 8 forms of the same apparent molecular weight, but different isoelectric point (pI). In the present study we describe, for the first time, the existence of at least nine LPL pI isoforms in human PHP, with apparent pI between 6.8 and 8.6. Separation...

  4. Functional studies of sodium pump isoforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Michael Jakob

    The Na+,K+-ATPase is an essential ion pump found in all animal cells. It uses the energy from ATP hydrolysis to export three Na+ and import two K+, both against their chemical gradients and for Na+ also against the electrical potential. Mammals require four Na+,K+-ATPase isoforms that each have...

  5. Filamin isoforms in molluscan smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez-López, Lucía; Hellman, Ulf; Ibarguren, Izaskun; Villamarín, J Antonio

    2012-12-01

    The role of filamin in molluscan catch muscles is unknown. In this work three proteins isolated from the posterior adductor muscle of the sea mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF MS as homologous to mammalian filamin. They were named FLN-270, FLN-230 and FLN-105, according to their apparent molecular weight determined by SDS-PAGE: 270kDa, 230kDa and 105kDa, respectively. Both FLN-270 and FLN-230 contain the C-terminal dimerization domain and the N-terminal actin-binding domain typical of filamins. These findings, together with the data from peptide mass fingerprints, indicate that FLN-270 and FLN-230 are different isoforms of mussel filamin, with FLN-230 being the predominant isoform in the mussel catch muscle. De novo sequencing data revealed structural differences between both filamin isoforms at the rod 2 segment, the one responsible for the interaction of filamin with the most of its binding partners. FLN270 but not FLN230 was phosphorylated in vitro by cAMP-dependent protein kinase. As for the FLN-105, it would be an N-terminal proteolytic fragment generated from the FLN-270 isoform or a C-terminally truncated variant of filamin. On the other hand, a 45-kDa protein that copurifies with mussel catch muscle filamins was identified as the mussel calponin-like protein. The fact that this protein coelutes with the FLN-270 isoform from a gel filtration chromatography suggests a specific interaction between both proteins. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Titin Diversity—Alternative Splicing Gone Wild

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    Wei Guo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Titin is an extremely large protein found in highest concentrations in heart and skeletal muscle. The single mammalian gene is expressed in multiple isoforms as a result of alternative splicing. Although titin isoform expression is controlled developmentally and in a tissue specific manner, the vast number of potential splicing pathways far exceeds those described in any other alternatively spliced gene. Over 1 million human splice pathways for a single individual can be potentially derived from the PEVK region alone. A new splicing pattern for the human cardiac N2BA isoform type has been found in which the PEVK region includes only the N2B type exons. The alterations in splicing and titin isoform expression in human heart disease provide impetus for future detailed study of the splicing mechanisms for this giant protein.

  7. Tropomyosin isoforms differentially affect muscle contractility in the head and body regions in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Dawn E; Watabe, Eichi; Ono, Kanako; Kwak, Euiyoung; Kuroyanagi, Hidehito; Ono, Shoichiro

    2018-03-01

    Tropomyosin, one of major actin-filament binding proteins, regulates actin-myosin interaction and actin filament stability. Multicellular organisms express a number of tropomyosin isoforms, but understanding of isoform-specific tropomyosin functions is incomplete. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has a single tropomyosin gene, lev-11 , which has been reported to express four isoforms by using two separate promoters and alternative splicing. Here, we report a fifth tropomyosin isoform, LEV-11O, which is produced by alternative splicing which includes a newly identified seventh exon, exon 7a. By visualizing specific splicing events in vivo , we find that exon 7a is predominantly selected in a subset of the body wall muscles in the head, while exon 7b, which is alternative to exon 7a, is utilized in the rest of the body. Point mutations in exon 7a and exon 7b cause resistance to levamisole-induced muscle contraction specifically in the head and the main body, respectively. Overexpression of LEV-11O, but not LEV-11A, in the main body results in weak levamisole resistance. These results demonstrate that specific tropomyosin isoforms are expressed in the head and body regions of the muscles and differentially contribute to the regulation of muscle contractility. © 2018 by The American Society for Cell Biology.

  8. RAGE receptor and its soluble isoforms in diabetes mellitus complications

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    Mauren Isfer Anghebem Oliveira

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Chronic hyperglycemia, which is present in all types of diabetes, increases the formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs. The interaction of AGEs with receptor of advanced glycation end-products (RAGE initiates a cascade of pro-inflammatory and pro-coagulant processes that result in oxidative stress, stimulating the formation and accumulation of more AGE molecules. This cyclic process, denominated metabolic memory, may explain the persistency of diabetic vascular complications in patients with satisfactory glycemic control. The RAGE found in several cell membranes is also present in soluble isoforms (esRAGE and cRAGE, which are generated by alternative deoxyribonucleic acid splicing or by proteolytic cleavage. This review focuses on new research into these mediators as potential biomarkers for vascular complications in diabetes.

  9. Abnormalities in alternative splicing of angiogenesis-related genes and their role in HIV-related cancers

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    Mthembu NN

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Nonkululeko N Mthembu,1 Zukile Mbita,2 Rodney Hull,1 Zodwa Dlamini1 1Research, Innovation and Engagements, Mangosuthu University of Technology, Durban, 2Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Biotechnology, University of Limpopo, Sovenga, South Africa Abstract: Alternative splicing of mRNA leads to an increase in proteome biodiversity by allowing the generation of multiple mRNAs, coding for multiple protein isoforms of various structural and functional properties from a single primary pre-mRNA transcript. The protein isoforms produced are tightly regulated in normal development but are mostly deregulated in various cancers. In HIV-infected individuals with AIDS, there is an increase in aberrant alternative splicing, resulting in an increase in HIV/AIDS-related cancers, such as Kaposi’s sarcoma, non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, and cervical cancer. This aberrant splicing leads to abnormal production of protein and is caused by mutations in cis-acting elements or trans-acting factors in angiogenesis-related genes. Restoring the normal regulation of alternative splicing of angiogenic genes would alter the expression of protein isoforms and may confer normal cell physiology in patients with these cancers. This review highlights the abnormalities in alternative splicing of angiogenesis-related genes and their implication in HIV/AIDS-related cancers. This allows us to gain an insight into the pathogenesis of HIV/AIDS-related cancer and in turn elucidate the therapeutic potential of alternatively spliced genes in HIV/AIDS-related malignancies. Keywords: vascular endothelial growth factor, oncogenic viruses, hypoxia induced factor 1, Kaposi’s sarcoma, non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, therapies targeting alternative splicing

  10. Organization and post-transcriptional processing of focal adhesion kinase gene

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    Enslen Hervé

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Focal adhesion kinase (FAK is a non-receptor tyrosine kinase critical for processes ranging from embryo development to cancer progression. Although isoforms with specific molecular and functional properties have been characterized in rodents and chicken, the organization of FAK gene throughout phylogeny and its potential to generate multiple isoforms are not well understood. Here, we study the phylogeny of FAK, the organization of its gene, and its post-transcriptional processing in rodents and human. Results A single orthologue of FAK and the related PYK2 was found in non-vertebrate species. Gene duplication probably occurred in deuterostomes after the echinoderma embranchment, leading to the evolution of PYK2 with distinct properties. The amino acid sequence of FAK and PYK2 is conserved in their functional domains but not in their linker regions, with the absence of autophosphorylation site in C. elegans. Comparison of mouse and human FAK genes revealed the existence of multiple combinations of conserved and non-conserved 5'-untranslated exons in FAK transcripts suggesting a complex regulation of their expression. Four alternatively spliced coding exons (13, 14, 16, and 31, previously described in rodents, are highly conserved in vertebrates. Cis-regulatory elements known to regulate alternative splicing were found in conserved alternative exons of FAK or in the flanking introns. In contrast, other reported human variant exons were restricted to Homo sapiens, and, in some cases, other primates. Several of these non-conserved exons may correspond to transposable elements. The inclusion of conserved alternative exons was examined by RT-PCR in mouse and human brain during development. Inclusion of exons 14 and 16 peaked at the end of embryonic life, whereas inclusion of exon 13 increased steadily until adulthood. Study of various tissues showed that inclusion of these exons also occurred, independently from each other, in a

  11. Alternative promoter usage of the membrane glycoprotein CD36

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    Whatling Carl

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CD36 is a membrane glycoprotein involved in a variety of cellular processes such as lipid transport, immune regulation, hemostasis, adhesion, angiogenesis and atherosclerosis. It is expressed in many tissues and cell types, with a tissue specific expression pattern that is a result of a complex regulation for which the molecular mechanisms are not yet fully understood. There are several alternative mRNA isoforms described for the gene. We have investigated the expression patterns of five alternative first exons of the CD36 gene in several human tissues and cell types, to better understand the molecular details behind its regulation. Results We have identified one novel alternative first exon of the CD36 gene, and confirmed the expression of four previously known alternative first exons of the gene. The alternative transcripts are all expressed in more than one human tissue and their expression patterns vary highly in skeletal muscle, heart, liver, adipose tissue, placenta, spinal cord, cerebrum and monocytes. All alternative first exons are upregulated in THP-1 macrophages in response to oxidized low density lipoproteins. The alternative promoters lack TATA-boxes and CpG islands. The upstream region of exon 1b contains several features common for house keeping gene and monocyte specific gene promoters. Conclusion Tissue-specific expression patterns of the alternative first exons of CD36 suggest that the alternative first exons of the gene are regulated individually and tissue specifically. At the same time, the fact that all first exons are upregulated in THP-1 macrophages in response to oxidized low density lipoproteins may suggest that the alternative first exons are coregulated in this cell type and environmental condition. The molecular mechanisms regulating CD36 thus appear to be unusually complex, which might reflect the multifunctional role of the gene in different tissues and cellular conditions.

  12. 55K isoform of CDK9 associates with Ku70 and is involved in DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Hongbing; Herrmann, Christine H.; Chiang, Karen; Sung, Tzu-Ling; Moon, Sung-Hwan; Donehower, Lawrence A.; Rice, Andrew P.

    2010-01-01

    Positive elongation factor b (P-TEFb) is a cellular protein kinase that is required for RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) transcriptional elongation of protein coding genes. P-TEFb is a set of different molecular complexes, each containing CDK9 as the catalytic subunit. There are two isoforms of the CDK9 protein - the major 42 KDa CDK9 isoform and the minor 55KDa isoform that is translated from an in-frame mRNA that arises from an upstream transcriptional start site. We found that shRNA depletion of the 55K CDK9 protein in HeLa cells induces apoptosis and double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs). The levels of apoptosis and DSBs induced by the depletion were reduced by expression of a 55K CDK9 protein variant resistant to the shRNA, indicating that these phenotypes are the consequence of depletion of the 55K protein and not off-target effects. We also found that the 55K CDK9 protein, but not the 42K CDK9 protein, specifically associates with Ku70, a protein involved in DSB repair. Our findings suggest that the 55K CDK9 protein may function in repair of DNA through an association with Ku70.

  13. Antibody Probes to Estrogen Receptor-alpha Transcript-Specific Upstream Peptides: Alternates ER-alpha Promoter Use and Breast Cancer Etiology/Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-05-01

    cells recovered in the expressed milk of lactating healthy donors as part of a biomarkers study. Preparing for potential handling of ductal lavage...specificity for the assay (Fig. 17). It is quite feasible to isolate sufficient cells from milk samples and our potential collaorator’s lab was able...Speirs, V., 2001. Expression of alternatively spliced estrogen Uht , R.M., Webb, P., 2000. Estrogen receptor pathways to AP-I. J. receptor alpha mRNAs is

  14. Locomotion in Lymphocytes is Altered by Differential PKC Isoform Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaresan, A.; Risin, D.; Pellis, N. R.

    1999-01-01

    Lymphocyte locomotion is critical for proper elicitation of the immune response. Locomotion of immune cells via the interstitium is essential for optimal immune function during wound healing, inflammation and infection. There are conditions which alter lymphocyte locomotion and one of them is spaceflight. Lymphocyte locomotion is severely inhibited in true spaceflight (true microgravity) and in rotating wall vessel culture (modeled microgravity). When lymphocytes are activated prior to culture in modeled microgravity, locomotion is not inhibited and the levels are comparable to those of static cultured lymphocytes. When a phorbol ester (PMA) is used in modeled microgravity, lymphocyte locomotion is restored by 87%. This occurs regardless if PMA is added after culture in the rotating wall vessel or during culture. Inhibition of DNA synthesis also does not alter restoration of lymphocyte locomotion by PMA. PMA is a direct activator of (protein kinase C) PKC . When a calcium ionophore, ionomycin is used it does not possess any restorative properties towards locomotion either alone or collectively with PMA. Since PMA brings about restoration without help from calcium ionophores (ionomycin), it is infer-red that calcium independent PKC isoforms are involved. Changes were perceived in the protein levels of PKC 6 where levels of the protein were downregulated at 24,72 and 96 hours in untreated rotated cultures (modeled microgravity) compared to untreated static (1g) cultures. At 48 hours there is an increase in the levels of PKC & in the same experimental set up. Studies on transcriptional and translational patterns of calcium independent isoforms of PKC such as 8 and E are presented in this study.

  15. Identification of alternatively spliced transcripts for human c-myb: molecular cloning and sequence analysis of human c-myb exon 9A sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, P; Reddy, E P

    1989-12-01

    The murine c-myb gene has been recently shown to code for two protein products of 75kd and 89kd. The 89kd protein appears to be generated from an alternatively spliced mRNA which contains an additional stretch of 363 bases between exons 9 and 10. In this communication, we have examined whether similar alternatively spliced mRNAs of c-myb occur in human cells. Human c-myb exon 9A has been identified and sequenced in a cDNA clone (ML5) generated from the acute myeloid leukemic cell line ML-2. This alternatively spliced exon of c-myb has been found to contain the same number of nucleotides (363bp) as the corresponding mouse exon. Between murine and human exon 9A sequences, 81% sequence homology was found at the DNA level, while the homology at the predicted amino acid level was found to be 73%. A stretch of 14 amino acid residues at the junction of exons 9A and 10 have been found to be conserved between Drosophila and human sequences indicating that this region might perform an essential biological function which was deemed necessary through evolution.

  16. Isoforms of murine and human serum amyloid P component

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybo, Mads; Hackler, R; Kold, B

    1998-01-01

    Isoelectric focusing (IEF) and immunofixation of murine serum amyloid P component (SAP), purified and in serum, showed a distinct and strain-dependent isoform pattern with up to seven bands (pI 5.1-5.7). Neuraminidase treatment caused a shift of the isoforms to more basic pI values, but did...... of isoforms of human SAP required the presence of urea and higher SAP concentrations. TEF and immunofixation of SAP monomers showed five to eight isoforms, ranging from pI 4.7-5.7. IEF of SAP in human serum resulted in a less distinct pattern and more acidic isoforms. As with murine SAP, neuraminidase...

  17. Alternative splicing regulated by butyrate in bovine epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitao Wu

    Full Text Available As a signaling molecule and an inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACs, butyrate exerts its impact on a broad range of biological processes, such as apoptosis and cell proliferation, in addition to its critical role in energy metabolism in ruminants. This study examined the effect of butyrate on alternative splicing in bovine epithelial cells using RNA-seq technology. Junction reads account for 11.28 and 12.32% of total mapped reads between the butyrate-treated (BT and control (CT groups. 201,326 potential splicing junctions detected were supported by ≥ 3 junction reads. Approximately 94% of these junctions conformed to the consensus sequence (GT/AG while ~3% were GC/AG junctions. No AT/AC junctions were observed. A total of 2,834 exon skipping events, supported by a minimum of 3 junction reads, were detected. At least 7 genes, their mRNA expression significantly affected by butyrate, also had exon skipping events differentially regulated by butyrate. Furthermore, COL5A3, which was induced 310-fold by butyrate (FDR <0.001 at the gene level, had a significantly higher number of junction reads mapped to Exon#8 (Donor and Exon#11 (Acceptor in BT. This event had the potential to result in the formation of a COL5A3 mRNA isoform with 2 of the 69 exons missing. In addition, 216 differentially expressed transcript isoforms regulated by butyrate were detected. For example, Isoform 1 of ORC1 was strongly repressed by butyrate while Isoform 2 remained unchanged. Butyrate physically binds to and inhibits all zinc-dependent HDACs except HDAC6 and HDAC10. Our results provided evidence that butyrate also regulated deacetylase activities of classical HDACs via its transcriptional control. Moreover, thirteen gene fusion events differentially affected by butyrate were identified. Our results provided a snapshot into complex transcriptome dynamics regulated by butyrate, which will facilitate our understanding of the biological effects of butyrate and other HDAC

  18. Multiple, but Concerted Cellular Activities of the Human Protein Hap46/BAG-1M and Isoforms

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    Ulrich Gehring

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The closely related human and murine proteins Hap46/BAG-1M and BAG-1, respectively, were discovered more than a decade ago by molecular cloning techniques. These and the larger isoform Hap50/BAG-1L, as well as shorter isoforms, have the ability to interact with a seemingly unlimited array of proteins of completely unrelated structures. This problem was partially resolved when it was realized that molecular chaperones of the hsp70 heat shock protein family are major primary association partners, binding being mediated by the carboxy terminal BAG-domain and the ATP-binding domain of hsp70 chaperones. The latter, in turn, can associate with an almost unlimited variety of proteins through their substrate-binding domains, so that ternary complexes may result. The protein folding activity of hsp70 chaperones is affected by interactions with Hap46/BAG-1M or isoforms. However, there also exist several proteins which bind to Hap46/BAG-1M and isoforms independent of hsp70 mediation. Moreover, Hap46/BAG-1M and Hap50/BAG-1L, but not the shorter isoforms, can bind to DNA in a sequence-independent manner by making use of positively charged regions close to their amino terminal ends. This is the molecular basis for their effects on transcription which are of major physiological relevance, as discussed here in terms of a model. The related proteins Hap50/BAG-1L and Hap46/BAG-1M may thus serve as molecular links between such diverse bioactivities as regulation of gene expression and protein quality control. These activities are coordinated and synergize in helping cells to cope with conditions of external stress. Moreover, they recently became markers for the aggressiveness of several cancer types.

  19. VEGF121b and VEGF165b are weakly angiogenic isoforms of VEGF-A

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    Pio Ruben

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Different isoforms of VEGF-A (mainly VEGF121, VEGF165 and VEGF189 have been shown to display particular angiogenic properties in the generation of a functional tumor vasculature. Recently, a novel class of VEGF-A isoforms, designated as VEGFxxxb, generated through alternative splicing, have been described. Previous studies have suggested that these isoforms may inhibit angiogenesis. In the present work we have produced recombinant VEGF121/165b proteins in the yeast Pichia pastoris and constructed vectors to overexpress these isoforms and assess their angiogenic potential. Results Recombinant VEGF121/165b proteins generated either in yeasts or mammalian cells activated VEGFR2 and its downstream effector ERK1/2, although to a lesser extent than VEGF165. Furthermore, treatment of endothelial cells with VEGF121/165b increased cell proliferation compared to untreated cells, although such stimulation was lower than that induced by VEGF165. Moreover, in vivo angiogenesis assays confirmed angiogenesis stimulation by VEGF121/165b isoforms. A549 and PC-3 cells overexpressing VEGF121b or VEGF165b (or carrying the PCDNA3.1 empty vector, as control and xenotransplanted into nude mice showed increased tumor volume and angiogenesis compared to controls. To assess whether the VEGFxxxb isoforms are differentially expressed in tumors compared to healthy tissues, immunohistochemical analysis was conducted on a breast cancer tissue microarray. A significant increase (p xxxb and total VEGF-A protein expression in infiltrating ductal carcinomas compared to normal breasts was observed. A positive significant correlation (r = 0.404, p = 0.033 between VEGFxxxb and total VEGF-A was found. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that VEGF121/165b are not anti-angiogenic, but weakly angiogenic isoforms of VEGF-A. In addition, VEGFxxxb isoforms are up-regulated in breast cancer in comparison with non malignant breast tissues. These results are to be taken

  20. Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) β has intrinsic, GRα-independent transcriptional activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kino, Tomoshige; Manoli, Irini; Kelkar, Sujata; Wang, Yonghong; Su, Yan A.; Chrousos, George P.

    2009-01-01

    The human glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene produces C-terminal GRβ and GRα isoforms through alternative use of specific exons 9β and α, respectively. We explored the transcriptional activity of GRβ on endogenous genes by developing HeLa cells stably expressing EGFP-GRβ or EGFP. Microarray analyses revealed that GRβ had intrinsic gene-specific transcriptional activity, regulating mRNA expression of a large number of genes negatively or positively. Majority of GRβ-responsive genes was distinct from those modulated by GRα, while GRβ and GRα mutually modulated each other's transcriptional activity in a subpopulation of genes. We did not observe in HCT116 cells nuclear translocation of GRβ and activation of this receptor by RU 486, a synthetic steroid previously reported to bind GRβ and to induce nuclear translocation. Our results indicate that GRβ has intrinsic, GRα-independent, gene-specific transcriptional activity, in addition to its previously reported dominant negative effect on GRα-induced transactivation of GRE-driven promoters.

  1. Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) {beta} has intrinsic, GR{alpha}-independent transcriptional activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kino, Tomoshige, E-mail: kinot@mail.nih.gov [Program in Reproductive and Adult Endocrinology, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bldg. 10, CRC, Rm. 1-3140, 10 Center Drive MSC 1109, Bethesda, MD 20892-1109 (United States); Manoli, Irini [Laboratory of Clinical Investigation, National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (United States); First Department of Pediatrics, Athens University Medical School (United States); Kelkar, Sujata [Program in Reproductive and Adult Endocrinology, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bldg. 10, CRC, Rm. 1-3140, 10 Center Drive MSC 1109, Bethesda, MD 20892-1109 (United States); Wang, Yonghong [Clinical Molecular Profiling Core, Advanced Technology Center, National Cancer Institute (United States); Su, Yan A. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The Catherine Birch McCormick Genomics Center, George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences (United States); Chrousos, George P. [First Department of Pediatrics, Athens University Medical School (United States)

    2009-04-17

    The human glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene produces C-terminal GR{beta} and GR{alpha} isoforms through alternative use of specific exons 9{beta} and {alpha}, respectively. We explored the transcriptional activity of GR{beta} on endogenous genes by developing HeLa cells stably expressing EGFP-GR{beta} or EGFP. Microarray analyses revealed that GR{beta} had intrinsic gene-specific transcriptional activity, regulating mRNA expression of a large number of genes negatively or positively. Majority of GR{beta}-responsive genes was distinct from those modulated by GR{alpha}, while GR{beta} and GR{alpha} mutually modulated each other's transcriptional activity in a subpopulation of genes. We did not observe in HCT116 cells nuclear translocation of GR{beta} and activation of this receptor by RU 486, a synthetic steroid previously reported to bind GR{beta} and to induce nuclear translocation. Our results indicate that GR{beta} has intrinsic, GR{alpha}-independent, gene-specific transcriptional activity, in addition to its previously reported dominant negative effect on GR{alpha}-induced transactivation of GRE-driven promoters.

  2. CD44 isoforms are heterogeneously expressed in breast cancer and correlate with tumor subtypes and cancer stem cell markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsson, Eleonor; Lövgren, Kristina; Fernö, Mårten; Grabau, Dorthe; Borg, Åke; Hegardt, Cecilia; Honeth, Gabriella; Bendahl, Pär-Ola; Saal, Lao H; Gruvberger-Saal, Sofia; Ringnér, Markus; Vallon-Christersson, Johan; Jönsson, Göran; Holm, Karolina

    2011-01-01

    The CD44 cell adhesion molecule is aberrantly expressed in many breast tumors and has been implicated in the metastatic process as well as in the putative cancer stem cell (CSC) compartment. We aimed to investigate potential associations between alternatively spliced isoforms of CD44 and CSCs as well as to various breast cancer biomarkers and molecular subtypes. We used q-RT-PCR and exon-exon spanning assays to analyze the expression of four alternatively spliced CD44 isoforms as well as the total expression of CD44 in 187 breast tumors and 13 cell lines. ALDH1 protein expression was determined by IHC on TMA. Breast cancer cell lines showed a heterogeneous expression pattern of the CD44 isoforms, which shifted considerably when cells were grown as mammospheres. Tumors characterized as positive for the CD44 + /CD24 - phenotype by immunohistochemistry were associated to all isoforms except the CD44 standard (CD44S) isoform, which lacks all variant exons. Conversely, tumors with strong expression of the CSC marker ALDH1 had elevated expression of CD44S. A high expression of the CD44v2-v10 isoform, which retain all variant exons, was correlated to positive steroid receptor status, low proliferation and luminal A subtype. The CD44v3-v10 isoform showed similar correlations, while high expression of CD44v8-v10 was correlated to positive EGFR, negative/low HER2 status and basal-like subtype. High expression of CD44S was associated with strong HER2 staining and also a subgroup of basal-like tumors. Unsupervised hierarchical cluster analysis of CD44 isoform expression data divided tumors into four main clusters, which showed significant correlations to molecular subtypes and differences in 10-year overall survival. We demonstrate that individual CD44 isoforms can be associated to different breast cancer subtypes and clinical markers such as HER2, ER and PgR, which suggests involvement of CD44 splice variants in specific oncogenic signaling pathways. Efforts to link CD44 to

  3. The Role of Insulin Receptor Isoforms in Diabetes and Its Metabolic and Vascular Complications

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    O. Escribano

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The insulin receptor (IR presents by alternative splicing two isoforms: IRA and IRB. The differential physiological and pathological role of both isoforms is not completely known, and it is determinant the different binding affinity for insulin-like growth factor. IRB is more abundant in adult tissues and it exerts mainly the metabolic actions of insulin, whereas IRA is mainly expressed in fetal and prenatal period and exerts mitogenic actions. However, the change in the expression profile of both IR isoforms and its dysregulation are associated with the development of different pathologies, such as cancer, insulin resistance, diabetes, obesity, and atherosclerosis. In some of them, there is a significant increase of IRA/IRB ratio conferring a proliferative and migratory advantage to different cell types and favouring IGF-II actions with a sustained detriment in the metabolic effects of insulin. This review discussed specifically the role of IR isoforms as well as IGF-IR in diabetes and its associated complications as obesity and atherosclerosis. Future research with new IR modulators might be considered as possible targets to improve the treatment of diabetes and its associated complications.

  4. Modified Polyadenylation-Based RT-qPCR Increases Selectivity of Amplification of 3′-MicroRNA Isoforms

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    Charlotte Nejad

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNA (miRNA detection by reverse transcription (RT quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR is the most popular method currently used to measure miRNA expression. Although the majority of miRNA families are constituted of several 3′-end length variants (“isomiRs”, little attention has been paid to their differential detection by RT-qPCR. However, recent evidence indicates that 3′-end miRNA isoforms can exhibit 3′-length specific regulatory functions, underlining the need to develop strategies to differentiate 3′-isomiRs by RT-qPCR approaches. We demonstrate here that polyadenylation-based RT-qPCR strategies targeted to 20–21 nt isoforms amplify entire miRNA families, but that primers targeted to >22 nt isoforms were specific to >21 nt isoforms. Based on this observation, we developed a simple method to increase selectivity of polyadenylation-based RT-qPCR assays toward shorter isoforms, and demonstrate its capacity to help distinguish short RNAs from longer ones, using synthetic RNAs and biological samples with altered isomiR stoichiometry. Our approach can be adapted to many polyadenylation-based RT-qPCR technologies already exiting, providing a convenient way to distinguish long and short 3′-isomiRs.

  5. The Allosterically Unregulated Isoform of ADP-Glucose Pyrophosphorylase from Barley Endosperm Is the Most Likely Source of ADP-Glucose Incorporated into Endosperm Starch1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doan, Danny N.P.; Rudi, Heidi; Olsen, Odd-Arne

    1999-01-01

    We present the results of studies of an unmodified version of the recombinant major barley (Hordeum vulgare) endosperm ADP-glucose pyrophoshorylase (AGPase) expressed in insect cells, which corroborate previous data that this isoform of the enzyme acts independently of the allosteric regulators 3-phosphoglycerate and inorganic phosphate. We also present a characterization of the individual subunits expressed separately in insect cells, showing that the SS AGPase is active in the presence of 3-phosphoglycerate and is inhibited by inorganic phosphate. As a step toward the elucidation of the role of the two AGPase isoforms in barley, the temporal and spatial expression profile of the four barley AGPase transcripts encoding these isoforms were studied. The results show that the steady-state level of beps and bepl, the transcripts encoding the major endosperm isoform, correlated positively with the rate of endosperm starch accumulation. In contrast, blps and blpl, the transcripts encoding the major leaf isoform, were constitutively expressed at a very low steady-state level throughout the barley plant. The implications of these findings for the evolution of plant AGPases are discussed. PMID:10557246

  6. The Allosterically Unregulated Isoform of ADP-Glucose Pyrophosphorylase from Barley Endosperm Is the Most Likely Source of ADP-Glucose Incorporated into Endosperm Starch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doan; Rudi; Olsen

    1999-11-01

    We present the results of studies of an unmodified version of the recombinant major barley (Hordeum vulgare) endosperm ADP-glucose pyrophoshorylase (AGPase) expressed in insect cells, which corroborate previous data that this isoform of the enzyme acts independently of the allosteric regulators 3-phosphoglycerate and inorganic phosphate. We also present a characterization of the individual subunits expressed separately in insect cells, showing that the SS AGPase is active in the presence of 3-phosphoglycerate and is inhibited by inorganic phosphate. As a step toward the elucidation of the role of the two AGPase isoforms in barley, the temporal and spatial expression profile of the four barley AGPase transcripts encoding these isoforms were studied. The results show that the steady-state level of beps and bepl, the transcripts encoding the major endosperm isoform, correlated positively with the rate of endosperm starch accumulation. In contrast, blps and blpl, the transcripts encoding the major leaf isoform, were constitutively expressed at a very low steady-state level throughout the barley plant. The implications of these findings for the evolution of plant AGPases are discussed.

  7. Early detection of skeletal muscle injury by assay of creatine kinase MM isoforms in serum after acute exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Apple, F. S.; Hellsten, Ylva; Clarkson, P. M.

    1988-01-01

    We could detect skeletal muscle injury early after an acute exercise bout by measuring creatine kinase (CK, EC 2.7.3.2) MM isoforms in serum. Eleven men performed 120 alternating-arm, eccentric (muscle lengthening) biceps contractions with the intensity of each contraction being 110% of maximal...

  8. Genome-wide analyses of alternative splicing in plants: opportunities and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbazuk, W Brad; Fu, Yan; McGinnis, Karen M

    2008-09-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) creates multiple mRNA transcripts from a single gene. While AS is known to contribute to gene regulation and proteome diversity in animals, the study of its importance in plants is in its early stages. However, recently available plant genome and transcript sequence data sets are enabling a global analysis of AS in many plant species. Results of genome analysis have revealed differences between animals and plants in the frequency of alternative splicing. The proportion of plant genes that have one or more alternative transcript isoforms is approximately 20%, indicating that AS in plants is not rare, although this rate is approximately one-third of that observed in human. The majority of plant AS events have not been functionally characterized, but evidence suggests that AS participates in important plant functions, including stress response, and may impact domestication and trait selection. The increasing availability of plant genome sequence data will enable larger comparative analyses that will identify functionally important plant AS events based on their evolutionary conservation, determine the influence of genome duplication on the evolution of AS, and discover plant-specific cis-elements that regulate AS. This review summarizes recent analyses of AS in plants, discusses the importance of further analysis, and suggests directions for future efforts.

  9. Genome-wide survey of cold stress regulated alternative splicing in Arabidopsis thaliana with tiling microarray.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noam Leviatan

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing plays a major role in expanding the potential informational content of eukaryotic genomes. It is an important post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism that can increase protein diversity and affect mRNA stability. Alternative splicing is often regulated in a tissue-specific and stress-responsive manner. Cold stress, which adversely affects plant growth and development, regulates the transcription and splicing of plant splicing factors. This can affect the pre-mRNA processing of many genes. To identify cold regulated alternative splicing we applied Affymetrix Arabidopsis tiling arrays to survey the transcriptome under cold treatment conditions. A novel algorithm was used for detection of statistically relevant changes in intron expression within a transcript between control and cold growth conditions. A reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR analysis of a number of randomly selected genes confirmed the changes in splicing patterns under cold stress predicted by tiling array. Our analysis revealed new types of cold responsive genes. While their expression level remains relatively unchanged under cold stress their splicing pattern shows detectable changes in the relative abundance of isoforms. The majority of cold regulated alternative splicing introduced a premature termination codon (PTC into the transcripts creating potential targets for degradation by the nonsense mediated mRNA decay (NMD process. A number of these genes were analyzed in NMD-defective mutants by RT-PCR and shown to evade NMD. This may result in new and truncated proteins with altered functions or dominant negative effects. The results indicate that cold affects both quantitative and qualitative aspects of gene expression.

  10. Genome-wide survey of cold stress regulated alternative splicing in Arabidopsis thaliana with tiling microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leviatan, Noam; Alkan, Noam; Leshkowitz, Dena; Fluhr, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Alternative splicing plays a major role in expanding the potential informational content of eukaryotic genomes. It is an important post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism that can increase protein diversity and affect mRNA stability. Alternative splicing is often regulated in a tissue-specific and stress-responsive manner. Cold stress, which adversely affects plant growth and development, regulates the transcription and splicing of plant splicing factors. This can affect the pre-mRNA processing of many genes. To identify cold regulated alternative splicing we applied Affymetrix Arabidopsis tiling arrays to survey the transcriptome under cold treatment conditions. A novel algorithm was used for detection of statistically relevant changes in intron expression within a transcript between control and cold growth conditions. A reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis of a number of randomly selected genes confirmed the changes in splicing patterns under cold stress predicted by tiling array. Our analysis revealed new types of cold responsive genes. While their expression level remains relatively unchanged under cold stress their splicing pattern shows detectable changes in the relative abundance of isoforms. The majority of cold regulated alternative splicing introduced a premature termination codon (PTC) into the transcripts creating potential targets for degradation by the nonsense mediated mRNA decay (NMD) process. A number of these genes were analyzed in NMD-defective mutants by RT-PCR and shown to evade NMD. This may result in new and truncated proteins with altered functions or dominant negative effects. The results indicate that cold affects both quantitative and qualitative aspects of gene expression.

  11. Alternative Splicing of NOX4 in the Failing Human Heart

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    Zoltán V. Varga

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Increased oxidative stress is a major contributor to the development and progression of heart failure, however, our knowledge on the role of the distinct NADPH oxidase (NOX isoenzymes, especially on NOX4 is controversial. Therefore, we aimed to characterize NOX4 expression in human samples from healthy and failing hearts. Explanted human heart samples (left and right ventricular, and septal regions were obtained from patients suffering from heart failure of ischemic or dilated origin. Control samples were obtained from donor hearts that were not used for transplantation. Deep RNA sequencing of the cardiac transcriptome indicated extensive alternative splicing of the NOX4 gene in heart failure as compared to samples from healthy donor hearts. Long distance PCR analysis with a universal 5′-3′ end primer pair, allowing amplification of different splice variants, confirmed the presence of the splice variants. To assess translation of the alternatively spliced transcripts we determined protein expression of NOX4 by using a specific antibody recognizing a conserved region in all variants. Western blot analysis showed up-regulation of the full-length NOX4 in ischemic cardiomyopathy samples and confirmed presence of shorter isoforms both in control and failing samples with disease-associated expression pattern. We describe here for the first time that NOX4 undergoes extensive alternative splicing in human hearts which gives rise to the expression of different enzyme isoforms. The full length NOX4 is significantly upregulated in ischemic cardiomyopathy suggesting a role for NOX4 in ROS production during heart failure.

  12. Differential expression of metallothionein isoforms in terrestrial snail embryos reflects early life stage adaptation to metal stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baurand, Pierre-Emmanuel; Pedrini-Martha, Veronika; de Vaufleury, Annette; Niederwanger, Michael; Capelli, Nicolas; Scheifler, Renaud; Dallinger, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the expression of three metallothionein (MT) isoform genes (CdMT, CuMT and Cd/CuMT), already known from adults, in the Early Life Stage (ELS) of Cantareus aspersus. This was accomplished by detection of the MT isoform-specific transcription adopting Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) amplification and quantitative Real Time (qRT)-PCR of the three MT genes. Freshly laid eggs were kept for 24 hours under control conditions or exposed to three cadmium (Cd) solutions of increasing concentration (5, 10, and 15 mg Cd/L). The transcription of the three MT isoform genes was detected via PCR in 1, 6 and 12-day-old control or Cd-exposed embryos. Moreover, the transcription of this isoform genes during development was followed by qRT-PCR in 6 and 12-day-old embryos. Our results showed that the CdMT and Cd/CuMT genes, but not the CuMT gene, are expressed in embryos at the first day of development. The transcription of the 3 MT genes in control embryos increased with development time, suggesting that the capacities of metal regulation and detoxification may have gradually increased throughout embryogenesis. However in control embryos, the most highly expressed MT gene was that of the Cd/CuMT isoform, whose transcription levels greatly exceeded those of the other two MT genes. This contrasts with the minor significance of this gene in adult snails and suggests that in embryos, this isoform may play a comparatively more important role in metal physiology compared to adult individuals. This function in adult snails appears not to be related to Cd detoxification. Instead, snail embryos responded to Cd exposure by over-expression of the CdMT gene in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas the expression of the Cd/CuMT gene remained unaffected. Moreover, our study demonstrates the ability of snail embryos to respond very early to Cd exposure by up-regulation of the CdMT gene.

  13. Improvements to previous algorithms to predict gene structure and isoform concentrations using Affymetrix Exon arrays

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    Aramburu Ander

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exon arrays provide a way to measure the expression of different isoforms of genes in an organism. Most of the procedures to deal with these arrays are focused on gene expression or on exon expression. Although the only biological analytes that can be properly assigned a concentration are transcripts, there are very few algorithms that focus on them. The reason is that previously developed summarization methods do not work well if applied to transcripts. In addition, gene structure prediction, i.e., the correspondence between probes and novel isoforms, is a field which is still unexplored. Results We have modified and adapted a previous algorithm to take advantage of the special characteristics of the Affymetrix exon arrays. The structure and concentration of transcripts -some of them possibly unknown- in microarray experiments were predicted using this algorithm. Simulations showed that the suggested modifications improved both specificity (SP and sensitivity (ST of the predictions. The algorithm was also applied to different real datasets showing its effectiveness and the concordance with PCR validated results. Conclusions The proposed algorithm shows a substantial improvement in the performance over the previous version. This improvement is mainly due to the exploitation of the redundancy of the Affymetrix exon arrays. An R-Package of SPACE with the updated algorithms have been developed and is freely available.

  14. Specific Profile of Tau Isoforms in Argyrophylic Grain Disease

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    Alberto Rábano

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Argyrophylic grain disease (AGD is a neurodegenerative condition that has been classified among the sporadic tauopathies. Entities in this group present intracellular aggregates of hyperphosphorylated tau, giving rise to characteristic neuronal and glial inclusions. In different tauopathies, the proportion of several tau isoforms present in the aggregates shows specific patterns. AGD has been tentatively classified in the 4R group (predominance of 4R tau isoforms together with progressive supranuclear palsy and corticobasal degeneration. Pick's disease is included in the 3R group (predominance of 3R isoforms, whereas tau pathology of Alzheimer's disease represents and intermediate group (3 or 4 repeats [3R plus 4R, respectively] isoforms. In this work, we have analyzed tau present in aggregates isolated from brain samples of patients with argyrophylic grain disease. Our results indicate that the main tau isoform present in aggregates obtained from patients with AGD is a hyperphosphorylated isoform containing exons 2 and 10 but lacking exon 3.

  15. Early transcriptional response to aminoglycoside antibiotic suggests alternate pathways leading to apoptosis of sensory hair cells in the mouse inner ear

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    Neil eSegil

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Aminoglycoside antibiotics are the drug of choice for treating many bacterial infections, but their administration results in hearing loss in nearly one fourth of the patients who receive them. Several biochemical pathways have been implicated in aminoglycoside antibiotic ototoxicity; however, little is known about how hair cells respond to aminoglycoside antibiotics at the transcriptome level. Here we have investigated the genome-wide response to the aminoglycoside antibiotic gentamicin. Using organotypic cultures of the perinatal organ of Corti, we performed RNA sequencing using cDNA libraries obtained from FACS-purified hair cells. Within 3 hours of gentamicin treatment, the messenger RNA level of more than three thousand genes in hair cells changed significantly. Bioinformatic analysis of these changes highlighted several known signal transduction pathways, including the JNK pathway and the NF-κB pathway, in addition to genes involved in the stress response, apoptosis, cell cycle control, and DNA damage repair. In contrast, only 698 genes, mainly involved in cell cycle and metabolite biosynthetic processes, were significantly affected in the non-hair cell population. The gene expression profiles of hair cells in response to gentamicin share a considerable similarity with those previously observed in gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity. Our findings suggest that previously observed early responses to gentamicin in hair cells in specific signaling pathways are reflected in changes in gene expression. Additionally, the observed changes in gene expression of cell cycle regulatory genes indicate a disruption of the postmitotic state, which may suggest an alternative pathway regulating gentamicin-induced hair cell death. This work provides a more comprehensive view of aminoglycoside antibiotic ototoxicity, and thus contribute to identifying potential pathways or therapeutic targets to alleviate this important side effect of aminoglycoside

  16. Metallothionein isoform expression by breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, N L; Ackland, M L; Cornish, E J

    2000-08-01

    Expression of metallothionein (MT) isoforms by a human breast cancer cell line, PMC42, which retains many characteristics of normal breast epithelial cells and expresses functional estrogen receptors, was examined because it has been proposed that human breast cancer cells which are estrogen receptor positive can be differentiated from those which are estrogen receptor negative, by failure to express MT-1E [J.A. Friedline, S.H. Garrett, S. Somji, J.H. Todd, D. A. Sens, Differential expression of the MT-1E gene in estrogen-receptor positive and -negative breast cancer cell lines, Am. J. Pathol. 152 (1998) 23-27]. Using RT-PCR, PMC42 cells were found to transcribe genes for the MT isoforms IE, IX and 2A but not 1A or 1H. In order to examine which of the expressed isoforms might protect against metal toxicity, the cells were challenged with high concentrations of zinc and copper. Using competitive RT-PCR, cells resistant to 500 microM zinc showed 7+/-2 fold (SD, n=3) increases in expression of MT-1X and 6+/-3 fold increases in expression of MT-2A compared to control cells in normal media. For cells resistant to 250 microM copper the corresponding increases were 37+/-13 and 60+/-20 fold, whilst for control cells treated with 250 microM copper for only 6 h, increases were 10+/-3 and 6+/-3 fold. There was only a low level of expression of MT-1E in untreated cells and but a >120 fold increase in copper- resistant cells. Thus estrogen receptor positive cells cannot, in general, be differentiated from estrogen receptor negative cells by failure to express MT-1E, as suggested by Friedline et al. (1998). Increased expression of MT-1E, as well as MT-1X and MT-2A, protects against metal toxicity in PMC42 breast cancer cells.

  17. Arogenate Dehydratase Isoforms Differentially Regulate Anthocyanin Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qingbo; Man, Cong; Li, Danning; Tan, Huijuan; Xie, Ye; Huang, Jirong

    2016-12-05

    Anthocyanins, a group of L-phenylalanine (Phe)-derived flavonoids, have been demonstrated to play important roles in plant stress resistance and interactions between plants and insects. Although the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway and its regulatory mechanisms have been extensively studied, it remains unclear whether the level of Phe supply affects anthocyanin biosynthesis. Here, we investigated the roles of arogenate dehydratases (ADTs), the key enzymes that catalyze the conversion of arogenate into Phe, in sucrose-induced anthocyanin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis. Genetic analysis showed that all six ADT isoforms function redundantly in anthocyanin biosynthesis but have differential contributions. ADT2 contributes the most to anthocyanin accumulation, followed by ADT1 and ADT3, and ADT4-ADT6. We found that anthocyanin content is positively correlated with the levels of Phe and sucrose-induced ADT transcripts in seedlings. Consistently, addition of Phe to the medium could dramatically increase anthocyanin content in the wild-type plants and rescue the phenotype of the adt1 adt3 double mutant regarding the anthocyanin accumulation. Moreover, transgenic plants overexpressing ADT4, which appears to be less sensitive to Phe than overexpression of ADT2, hyperaccumulate Phe and produce elevated level of anthocyanins. Taken together, our results suggest that the level of Phe is an important regulatory factor for sustaining anthocyanin biosynthesis. Copyright © 2016 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Alternative Splicing of FOXP3 Controls Regulatory T Cell Effector Functions and Is Associated with Human Atherosclerotic Plaque Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joly, Anne-Laure; Seitz, Christina; Liu, Sang; Kouznetsov, Nikolai V; Gertow, Karl; Westerberg, Lisa S; Paulsson-Berne, Gabrielle; Hansson, Göran K; Andersson, John

    2018-04-04

    Rationale: Regulatory T (Treg) cells suppress immune responses and have been shown to attenuate atherosclerosis. The Treg cell lineage specification factor FOXP3 is essential for Treg cells' ability to uphold immunological tolerance. In humans, FOXP3 exists in several different isoforms, however, their specific role is poorly understood. Objective: To define the regulation and functions of the two major FOXP3 isoforms, FOXP3fl and FOXP3Δ2, as well as to establish whether their expression is associated with ischemic atherosclerotic disease. Methods and Results: Human primary T-cells were transduced with lentiviruses encoding distinct FOXP3 isoforms. The phenotype and function of these cells were analyzed by flow cytometry, in vitro suppression assays and RNA-sequencing. We also assessed the effect of activation on Treg cells isolated from healthy volunteers. Treg cell activation resulted in increased FOXP3 expression that predominantly was made up of FOXP3Δ2. FOXP3Δ2 induced specific transcription of GARP, which functions by tethering the immunosuppressive cytokine TGF-β to the cell membrane of activated Treg cells. RT-PCR was used to determine the impact of alternative splicing of FOXP3 in relation with atherosclerotic plaque stability in a cohort of over 150 patients that underwent carotid endarterectomy. Plaque instability was associated with a lower FOXP3Δ2 transcript usage, when comparing plaques from patients without symptoms and patients with occurrence of recent (<1 month) vascular symptoms including minor stoke, transient ischemic attack or amaurosis fugax. No difference was detected in total levels of FOXP3 mRNA between these two groups. Conclusions: These results suggest that activated Treg cells suppress the atherosclerotic disease process and that FOXP3Δ2 controls a transcriptional program that acts protectively in human atherosclerotic plaques.

  19. The Short Isoform of BRD4 Promotes HIV-1 Latency by Engaging Repressive SWI/SNF Chromatin-Remodeling Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Ryan J; Fozouni, Parinaz; Thomas, Sean; Sy, Hendrik; Zhang, Qiang; Zhou, Ming-Ming; Ott, Melanie

    2017-09-21

    BET proteins commonly activate cellular gene expression, yet inhibiting their recruitment paradoxically reactivates latent HIV-1 transcription. Here we identify the short isoform of BET family member BRD4 (BRD4S) as a corepressor of HIV-1 transcription. We found that BRD4S was enriched in chromatin fractions of latently infected T cells, and it was more rapidly displaced from chromatin upon BET inhibition than the long isoform. BET inhibition induced marked nucleosome remodeling at the latent HIV-1 promoter, which was dependent on the activity of BRG1-associated factors (BAF), an SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex with known repressive functions in HIV-1 transcription. BRD4S directly bound BRG1, a catalytic subunit of BAF, via its bromodomain and extraterminal (ET) domain, and this isoform was necessary for BRG1 recruitment to latent HIV-1 chromatin. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) combined with assay for transposase-accessible chromatin coupled to high-throughput sequencing (ATAC-seq) data, we found that the latent HIV-1 promoter phenotypically resembles endogenous long terminal repeat (LTR) sequences, pointing to a select role of BRD4S-BRG1 complexes in genomic silencing of invasive retroelements. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Potential Role of Activating Transcription Factor 5 during Osteogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Vicari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human adipose-derived stem cells are an abundant population of stem cells readily isolated from human adipose tissue that can differentiate into connective tissue lineages including bone, cartilage, fat, and muscle. Activating transcription factor 5 is a transcription factor of the ATF/cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB family. It is transcribed in two types of mRNAs (activating transcription factor 5 isoform 1 and activating transcription factor 5 isoform 2, encoding the same single 30-kDa protein. Although it is well demonstrated that it regulates the proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis, little is known about its potential role in osteogenic differentiation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression levels of the two isoforms and protein during osteogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells. Our data indicate that activating transcription factor 5 is differentially expressed reaching a peak of expression at the stage of bone mineralization. These findings suggest that activating transcription factor 5 could play an interesting regulatory role during osteogenesis, which would provide a powerful tool to study bone physiology.

  1. Potential Role of Activating Transcription Factor 5 during Osteogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicari, Luisa; Calabrese, Giovanna; Forte, Stefano; Giuffrida, Raffaella; Colarossi, Cristina; Parrinello, Nunziatina Laura; Memeo, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Human adipose-derived stem cells are an abundant population of stem cells readily isolated from human adipose tissue that can differentiate into connective tissue lineages including bone, cartilage, fat, and muscle. Activating transcription factor 5 is a transcription factor of the ATF/cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) family. It is transcribed in two types of mRNAs (activating transcription factor 5 isoform 1 and activating transcription factor 5 isoform 2), encoding the same single 30-kDa protein. Although it is well demonstrated that it regulates the proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis, little is known about its potential role in osteogenic differentiation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression levels of the two isoforms and protein during osteogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells. Our data indicate that activating transcription factor 5 is differentially expressed reaching a peak of expression at the stage of bone mineralization. These findings suggest that activating transcription factor 5 could play an interesting regulatory role during osteogenesis, which would provide a powerful tool to study bone physiology.

  2. Internal translation of the connexin 43 transcript.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salat-Canela, Clàudia; Sesé, Marta; Peula, Cristina; Ramón y Cajal, Santiago; Aasen, Trond

    2014-05-08

    Connexin 43 (Cx43), the most widely expressed gap junction protein, is associated with a number of physiological and pathological conditions. Many functions of Cx43 have been shown to be independent of gap junction formation and only require the expression of Cx43 C-terminal fragments. Recent evidence demonstrated that naturally occurring C-terminal isoforms can be generated via internal translation. Here, we confirm that C-terminal domains of Cx43, particularly the major 20-kDa isoform, can be independently generated and regulated by internal translation of the same single GJA1 gene transcript that encodes full-length Cx43. Through direct RNA transfection experiments, we provide evidence that internal translation is not due to a bona fide cap-independent IRES-mediated mechanism, as upstream ribosomal scanning or translation is required. In addition to the mTOR pathway, we show for the first time, using both inhibitors and cells from knockout mice, that the Mnk1/2 pathway regulates the translation of the main 20-kDa isoform. Internal translation of the Cx43 transcript occurs but is not cap-independent and requires translation upstream of the internal start codon. In addition to the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, the major 20-kDa isoform is regulated by the Mnk1/2 pathway. Our results have major implications for past and future studies describing gap junction-independent functions of Cx43 in cancer and other pathological conditions. This study provides further clues to the signalling pathways that regulate internal mRNA translation, an emerging mechanism that allows for increased protein diversity and functional complexity from a single mRNA transcript.

  3. The role of Dlc1 isoform 2 in K-Ras2(G12D induced thymic cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Golam Sabbir

    Full Text Available The Deleted in liver cancer one (Dlc1 tumor suppressor gene encodes a RhoGTPase activating protein (RhoGAP. The Dlc1 gene has multiple transcriptional isoforms and we have previously established a mouse strain containing a gene trap (gt insertion, which specifically reduces the expression of the 6.1 kb isoform (isoform 2. This gene trapped allele when homozygous results in embryonic lethality and the heterozygous gene trapped mice do not show an increased incidence of cancers, suggesting that cooperating oncogenic changes may be required for transformation. In the present work, we have studied the in vivo cooperation between oncogenic K-Ras2 and Dlc1 genes in tumourigenesis. We have observed an increase in invasive thymic cancers, including both thymomas and lymphomas, resulting in significantly shortened life spans in mice heterozygous for the gt Dlc1 allele and an inducible LSL-K-Ras2(G12D allele compared with the LSL-K-Ras2(G12D only mice. The heterozygous mice showed a high degree of metastasis in the lung. We have found tumour specific selective hypermethylation of the Dlc1 isoform 2 promoter and reduction of the corresponding protein expression in thymic lymphoma (TL and thymic epithelial carcinoma (TEC derived from the thymic tumours. The Dlc1 deficient thymic lymphoma cell lines exhibited increased trans-endothelial cell migration. TEC cell lines also exhibited increased stress fiber formation and Rho activity. Introduction of the three Dlc1 isoforms tagged with GFP into these cells resulted in different morphological changes. These results suggest that loss of expression of only isoform 2 may be sufficient for the development of thymic tumors and metastasis.

  4. Dynamin 1 isoform roles in a mouse model of severe childhood epileptic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asinof, Samuel; Mahaffey, Connie; Beyer, Barbara; Frankel, Wayne N; Boumil, Rebecca

    2016-11-01

    Dynamin 1 is a large neuron-specific GTPase involved in the endocytosis and recycling of pre-synaptic membranes and synaptic vesicles. Mutations in the gene encoding dynamin 1 (DNM1) underlie two epileptic encephalopathy syndromes, Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome and Infantile Spasms. Mice homozygous for the Dnm1 "fitful" mutation, a non-synonymous coding variant in an alternatively spliced exon of Dnm1 (exon 10a; isoform designation: Dnm1a(Ftfl)) have an epileptic encephalopathy-like disorder including lethal early onset seizures, locomotor and neurosensory deficits. Although fitful heterozygotes have milder recurrent seizures later in life, suggesting an additive or semi-dominant mechanism, the molecular etiology must also consider the fact that Dnm1a(Ftfl) exerts a dominant negative effect on endocytosis in vitro. Another complication is that the fitful mutation induces alterations in the relative abundance of Dnm1 splice variants; mutants have a downregulation of Dnm1a and an upregulation of Dnm1b, changes which may contribute to the epileptic pathology. To examine whether Dnm1a loss of function, Dnm1a(Ftfl) dominance or compensation by Dnm1b is the most critical for severe seizures, we studied alternate isoform-specific mutant mice. Mice lacking Dnm1 exon 10a or Dnm1 exon 10b have neither spontaneous seizures nor other overt abnormalities, suggesting that in normal conditions the major role of each isoform is redundant. However, in the presence of Dnm1a(Ftfl) only exon 10a deleted mice experience severe seizures. These results reveal functional differences between Dnm1a and Dnm1b isoforms in the presence of a challenge, i.e. toxic Dnm1(Ftfl), while reinforcing its effect explicitly in this model of severe pediatric epilepsy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Muscle-Type Specific Autophosphorylation of CaMKII Isoforms after Paced Contractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wouter Eilers

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We explored to what extent isoforms of the regulator of excitation-contraction and excitation-transcription coupling, calcium/calmodulin protein kinase II (CaMKII contribute to the specificity of myocellular calcium sensing between muscle types and whether concentration transients in its autophosphorylation can be simulated. CaMKII autophosphorylation at Thr287 was assessed in three muscle compartments of the rat after slow or fast motor unit-type stimulation and was compared against a computational model (CaMuZclE coupling myocellular calcium dynamics with CaMKII Thr287 phosphorylation. Qualitative differences existed between fast- (gastrocnemius medialis and slow-type muscle (soleus for the expression pattern of CaMKII isoforms. Phospho-Thr287 content of δA CaMKII, associated with nuclear functions, demonstrated a transient and compartment-specific increase after excitation, which contrasted to the delayed autophosphorylation of the sarcoplasmic reticulum-associated βM CaMKII. In soleus muscle, excitation-induced δA CaMKII autophosphorylation demonstrated frequency dependence (P = 0.02. In the glycolytic compartment of gastrocnemius medialis, CaMKII autophosphorylation after excitation was blunted. In silico assessment emphasized the importance of mitochondrial calcium buffer capacity for excitation-induced CaMKII autophosphorylation but did not predict its isoform specificity. The findings expose that CaMKII autophosphorylation with paced contractions is regulated in an isoform and muscle type-specific fashion and highlight properties emerging for phenotype-specific regulation of CaMKII.

  6. Revealing the functions of the transketolase enzyme isoforms in Rhodopseudomonas palustris using a systems biology approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Wei Hu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rhodopseudomonas palustris (R. palustris is a purple non-sulfur anoxygenic phototrophic bacterium that belongs to the class of proteobacteria. It is capable of absorbing atmospheric carbon dioxide and converting it to biomass via the process of photosynthesis and the Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB cycle. Transketolase is a key enzyme involved in the CBB cycle. Here, we reveal the functions of transketolase isoforms I and II in R. palustris using a systems biology approach. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By measuring growth ability, we found that transketolase could enhance the autotrophic growth and biomass production of R. palustris. Microarray and real-time quantitative PCR revealed that transketolase isoforms I and II were involved in different carbon metabolic pathways. In addition, immunogold staining demonstrated that the two transketolase isoforms had different spatial localizations: transketolase I was primarily associated with the intracytoplasmic membrane (ICM but transketolase II was mostly distributed in the cytoplasm. Comparative proteomic analysis and network construction of transketolase over-expression and negative control (NC strains revealed that protein folding, transcriptional regulation, amino acid transport and CBB cycle-associated carbon metabolism were enriched in the transketolase I over-expressed strain. In contrast, ATP synthesis, carbohydrate transport, glycolysis-associated carbon metabolism and CBB cycle-associated carbon metabolism were enriched in the transketolase II over-expressed strain. Furthermore, ATP synthesis assays showed a significant increase in ATP synthesis in the transketolase II over-expressed strain. A PEPCK activity assay showed that PEPCK activity was higher in transketolase over-expressed strains than in the negative control strain. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, our results indicate that the two isoforms of transketolase in R. palustris could affect photoautotrophic growth

  7. Functional characterisation of an intron retaining K+ transporter of barley reveals intron-mediated alternate splicing

    KAUST Repository

    Shahzad, K.

    2015-01-01

    Intron retention in transcripts and the presence of 5 and 3 splice sites within these introns mediate alternate splicing, which is widely observed in animals and plants. Here, functional characterisation of the K+ transporter, HvHKT2;1, with stably retained introns from barley (Hordeum vulgare) in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), and transcript profiling in yeast and transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) is presented. Expression of intron-retaining HvHKT2;1 cDNA (HvHKT2;1-i) in trk1, trk2 yeast strain defective in K+ uptake restored growth in medium containing hygromycin in the presence of different concentrations of K+ and mediated hypersensitivity to Na+. HvHKT2;1-i produces multiple transcripts via alternate splicing of two regular introns and three exons in different compositions. HKT isoforms with retained introns and exon skipping variants were detected in relative expression analysis of (i) HvHKT2;1-i in barley under native conditions, (ii) in transgenic tobacco plants constitutively expressing HvHKT2;1-i, and (iii) in trk1, trk2 yeast expressing HvHKT2;1-i under control of an inducible promoter. Mixed proportions of three HKT transcripts: HvHKT2;1-e (first exon region), HvHKT2;1-i1 (first intron) and HvHKT2;1-i2 (second intron) were observed. The variation in transcript accumulation in response to changing K+ and Na+ concentrations was observed in both heterologous and plant systems. These findings suggest a link between intron-retaining transcripts and different splice variants to ion homeostasis, and their possible role in salt stress.

  8. Expression of three galactinol synthase isoforms in Coffea arabica L. and accumulation of raffinose and stachyose in response to abiotic stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Tiago B; Budzinski, Ilara G F; Marur, Celso J; Petkowicz, Carmen L O; Pereira, Luiz F P; Vieira, Luiz G E

    2011-04-01

    Galactinol synthase (EC 2.4.1.123; GolS) catalyzes the first step in the synthesis of raffinose family oligosaccharides (RFOs). Their accumulation in response to abiotic stresses implies a role for RFOs in stress adaptation. In this study, the expression patterns of three isoforms of galactinol synthase (CaGolS1-2-3) from Coffea arabica were evaluated in response to water deficit, salinity and heat stress. All CaGolS isoforms were highly expressed in leaves while little to no expression were detected in flower buds, flowers, plagiotropic shoots, roots, endosperm and pericarp of mature fruits. Transcriptional analysis indicated that the genes were differentially regulated under water deficit, high salt and heat stress. CaGolS1 isoform is constitutively expressed in plants under normal growth conditions and was the most responsive during all stress treatments. CaGolS2 is unique among the three isoforms in that it was detected only under severe water deficit and salt stresses. CaGolS3 was primarily expressed under moderate and severe drought. This isoform was induced only at the third day of heat and under high salt stress. The increase in GolS transcription was not reflected into the amount of galactinol in coffee leaves, as specific glycosyltransferases most likely used galactinol to transfer galactose units to higher homologous oligosaccharides, as suggested by the increase of raffinose and stachyose during the stresses. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Identification of mutations in two major mRNA isoforms of the Chediak–Higashi syndrome gene in human and mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Maria D. F. S.; Barrat, Franck J.; Tchernev, Velizar T.; Nguyen, Quan A.; Mishra, Vishnu S.; Colman, Steven D.; Pastural, Elodie; Dufourcq-Lagelouse, Rémi; Fischer, Alain; Holcombe, Randall F.; Wallace, Margaret R.; Brandt, Stephen J.; de Saint Basile, Geneviève; Kingsmore, Stephen F.

    2010-01-01

    Chediak–Higashi syndrome is an autosomal recessive, immune deficiency disorder of human (CHS) and mouse (beige, bg) that is characterized by abnormal intracellular protein transport to, and from, the lysosome. Recent reports have described the identification of homologous genes that are mutated in human CHS and bg mice. Here we report the sequences of two major mRNA isoforms of the CHS gene in human and mouse. These isoforms differ both in size and in sequence at the 3′ end of their coding domains, with the smaller isoform (~5.8 kb) arising from incomplete splicing and reading through an intron. These mRNAs also differ in tissue distribution of transcription and in predicted biological properties. Novel mutations were identified within the region of the coding domain common to both isoforms in three CHS patients: C→T transitions that generated stop codons (R50X and Q1029X) were found in two patients, and a novel frame-shift mutation (deletion of nucleotides 3073 and 3074 of the coding domain) was found in a third. Northern blots of lymphoblastoid mRNA from CHS patients revealed loss of the largest transcript (~13.5 kb) in two of seven CHS patients, while the small mRNA was undiminished in abundance. These results suggest that the small isoform alone cannot complement Chediak–Higashi syndrome. PMID:9215680

  10. Two Isoforms of Geobacter sulfurreducens PilA Have Distinct Roles in Pilus Biogenesis, Cytochrome Localization, Extracellular Electron Transfer, and Biofilm Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Lubna V.; Sandler, Steven J.

    2012-01-01

    Type IV pili of Geobacter sulfurreducens are composed of PilA monomers and are essential for long-range extracellular electron transfer to insoluble Fe(III) oxides and graphite anodes. A previous analysis of pilA expression indicated that transcription was initiated at two positions, with two predicted ribosome-binding sites and translation start codons, potentially producing two PilA preprotein isoforms. The present study supports the existence of two functional translation start codons for pilA and identifies two isoforms (short and long) of the PilA preprotein. The short PilA isoform is found predominantly in an intracellular fraction. It seems to stabilize the long isoform and to influence the secretion of several outer-surface c-type cytochromes. The long PilA isoform is required for secretion of PilA to the outer cell surface, a process that requires coexpression of pilA with nine downstream genes. The long isoform was determined to be essential for biofilm formation on certain surfaces, for optimum current production in microbial fuel cells, and for growth on insoluble Fe(III) oxides. PMID:22408162

  11. Tocopherol isoforms in parenteral lipid emulsions and neutrophil activation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wanten, G.J.A.; Beunk, J.; Naber, A.H.J.; Swinkels, D.W.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Tocopherol is a lipid-soluble anti-oxidant that exists in several isoforms. Patients on total parenteral nutrition depend on lipid emulsions for their tocopherol intake. In the present study, we analysed the content of tocopherol isoforms in various lipid emulsions. We also

  12. Expression, activation, and role of AKT isoforms in the uterus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabi, François; Asselin, Eric

    2014-11-01

    The three isoforms of AKT: AKT1, AKT2, and AKT3, are crucial regulators of both normal and pathological cellular processes. Each of these isoforms exhibits a high level of homology and functional redundancy with each other. However, while being highly similar and structurally homologous, a rising amount of evidence is showing that each isoform possesses specific targets as well as preferential subcellular localization. The role of AKT has been studied extensively in reproductive processes, but isoform-specific roles are yet to be fully understood. This review will focus on the role of AKT in the uterus and its function in processes related to cell death and proliferation such as embryo implantation, decidualization, endometriosis, and endometrial cancer in an isoform-centric manner. In this review, we will cover the activation of AKT in various settings, localization of isoforms in subcellular compartments, and the effect of isoform expression on cellular processes. To fully understand the dynamic molecular processes taking place in the uterus, it is crucial that we better understand the physiological role of AKT isoforms as well as their function in the emergence of diseases. © 2014 Society for Reproduction and Fertility.

  13. Roles of the troponin isoforms during indirect flight muscle ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Troponin proteins in cooperative interaction with tropomyosin are responsible for controlling the contraction of the striated muscles in response to changes in the intracellular calcium concentration. Contractility of the muscle is determined by the constituent protein isoforms, and the isoforms can switch over from one form to ...

  14. Noncanonical Alternative Polyadenylation Contributes to Gene Regulation in Response to Hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lorenzo, Laura; Sorenson, Reed; Bailey-Serres, Julia; Hunt, Arthur G

    2017-06-01

    Stresses from various environmental challenges continually confront plants, and their responses are important for growth and survival. One molecular response to such challenges involves the alternative polyadenylation of mRNA. In plants, it is unclear how stress affects the production and fate of alternative mRNA isoforms. Using a genome-scale approach, we show that in Arabidopsis thaliana , hypoxia leads to increases in the number of mRNA isoforms with polyadenylated 3' ends that map to 5'-untranslated regions (UTRs), introns, and protein-coding regions. RNAs with 3' ends within protein-coding regions and introns were less stable than mRNAs that end at 3'-UTR poly(A) sites. Additionally, these RNA isoforms were underrepresented in polysomes isolated from control and hypoxic plants. By contrast, mRNA isoforms with 3' ends that lie within annotated 5'-UTRs were overrepresented in polysomes and were as stable as canonical mRNA isoforms. These results indicate that the generation of noncanonical mRNA isoforms is an important feature of the abiotic stress response. The finding that several noncanonical mRNA isoforms are relatively unstable suggests that the production of non-stop and intronic mRNA isoforms may represent a form of negative regulation in plants, providing a conceptual link with mechanisms that generate these isoforms (such as alternative polyadenylation) and RNA surveillance. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  15. Noncanonical Alternative Polyadenylation Contributes to Gene Regulation in Response to Hypoxia[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Stresses from various environmental challenges continually confront plants, and their responses are important for growth and survival. One molecular response to such challenges involves the alternative polyadenylation of mRNA. In plants, it is unclear how stress affects the production and fate of alternative mRNA isoforms. Using a genome-scale approach, we show that in Arabidopsis thaliana, hypoxia leads to increases in the number of mRNA isoforms with polyadenylated 3′ ends that map to 5′-untranslated regions (UTRs), introns, and protein-coding regions. RNAs with 3′ ends within protein-coding regions and introns were less stable than mRNAs that end at 3′-UTR poly(A) sites. Additionally, these RNA isoforms were underrepresented in polysomes isolated from control and hypoxic plants. By contrast, mRNA isoforms with 3′ ends that lie within annotated 5′-UTRs were overrepresented in polysomes and were as stable as canonical mRNA isoforms. These results indicate that the generation of noncanonical mRNA isoforms is an important feature of the abiotic stress response. The finding that several noncanonical mRNA isoforms are relatively unstable suggests that the production of non-stop and intronic mRNA isoforms may represent a form of negative regulation in plants, providing a conceptual link with mechanisms that generate these isoforms (such as alternative polyadenylation) and RNA surveillance. PMID:28559476

  16. Human BLCAP transcript: new editing events in normal and cancerous tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeano, Federica; Leroy, Anne; Rossetti, Claudia; Gromova, Irina; Gautier, Philippe; Keegan, Liam P; Massimi, Luca; Di Rocco, Concezio; O'Connell, Mary A; Gallo, Angela

    2010-07-01

    Bladder cancer-associated protein (BLCAP) is a highly conserved protein among species, and it is considered a novel candidate tumor suppressor gene originally identified from human bladder carcinoma. However, little is known about the regulation or the function of this protein. Here, we show that the human BLCAP transcript undergoes multiple A-to-I editing events. Some of the new editing events alter the highly conserved amino terminus of the protein creating alternative protein isoforms by changing the genetically coded amino acids. We found that both ADAR1 and ADAR2-editing enzymes cooperate to edit this transcript and that different tissues displayed distinctive ratios of edited and unedited BLCAP transcripts. Moreover, we observed a general decrease in BLCAP-editing level in astrocytomas, bladder cancer and colorectal cancer when compared with the related normal tissues. The newly identified editing events, found to be downregulated in cancers, could be useful for future studies as a diagnostic tool to distinguish malignancies or epigenetic changes in different tumors.

  17. Control of seed dormancy in Arabidopsis by a cis-acting noncoding antisense transcript.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedak, Halina; Palusinska, Malgorzata; Krzyczmonik, Katarzyna; Brzezniak, Lien; Yatusevich, Ruslan; Pietras, Zbigniew; Kaczanowski, Szymon; Swiezewski, Szymon

    2016-11-29

    Seed dormancy is one of the most crucial process transitions in a plant's life cycle. Its timing is tightly controlled by the expression level of the Delay of Germination 1 gene (DOG1). DOG1 is the major quantitative trait locus for seed dormancy in Arabidopsis and has been shown to control dormancy in many other plant species. This is reflected by the evolutionary conservation of the functional short alternatively polyadenylated form of the DOG1 mRNA. Notably, the 3' region of DOG1, including the last exon that is not included in this transcript isoform, shows a high level of conservation at the DNA level, but the encoded polypeptide is poorly conserved. Here, we demonstrate that this region of DOG1 contains a promoter for the transcription of a noncoding antisense RNA, asDOG1, that is 5' capped, polyadenylated, and relatively stable. This promoter is autonomous and asDOG1 has an expression profile that is different from known DOG1 transcripts. Using several approaches we show that asDOG1 strongly suppresses DOG1 expression during seed maturation in cis, but is unable to do so in trans Therefore, the negative regulation of seed dormancy by asDOG1 in cis results in allele-specific suppression of DOG1 expression and promotes germination. Given the evolutionary conservation of the asDOG1 promoter, we propose that this cis-constrained noncoding RNA-mediated mechanism limiting the duration of seed dormancy functions across the Brassicaceae.

  18. Akt/PKB isoforms expression in the human lumbar herniated disc: correlation with clinical and MRI findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasku, Dritan; Soufla, Giannoula; Katonis, Pavlos; Tsarouhas, Alexandros; Vakis, Antonis; Spandidos, Demetrios A

    2011-10-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration suggests a complex process influenced by genetics, lifestyle and biomechanics, which accounts for the development of low back pain (LBP) and lumbar radiculopathy, a major cause of musculoskeletal disability in humans. The family of Akt/PKB kinases is a principal mediator in the signal transduction pathways, which contribute to transcriptional regulation, cell growth, proliferation, apoptosis, and survival ability. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the transcriptional profile of the AKT family genes in human herniated discs and the involvement of the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway in human IVD degeneration. Real-time PCR analysis was used to assess the mRNA expression pattern of the three Akt/PKB isoforms in 63 herniated and 10 control disc specimens. Our results showed a significant positive correlation between AKT1 and AKT3 mRNA in herniated discs suggesting a synergistic action between these isoforms in disc herniation. Interestingly, AKT2 mRNA was up-regulated in patients with acute pain during the first 12 months, indicating that AKT2 transcriptional activation may be associated with acute rather than chronic inflammation and phagocytosis. Finally, Akt1/PKB transcription presented a stepwise activation as disc herniation deteriorated. Our findings provide evidence on the transcriptional activation of the Akt/PKB pathway indicating that it is involved in lumbar disc degeneration. There is need for further studies to elucidate the exact role and down-stream signaling action of Akt/PKB isoforms in the pathogenesis of lumbar disc herniation.

  19. 20-Hydroxyecdysone (20E) Primary Response Gene E75 Isoforms Mediate Steroidogenesis Autoregulation and Regulate Developmental Timing in Bombyx*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kang; Tian, Ling; Guo, Zhongjian; Guo, Sanyou; Zhang, Jianzhen; Gu, Shi-Hong; Palli, Subba R.; Cao, Yang; Li, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    The temporal control mechanisms that precisely control animal development remain largely elusive. The timing of major developmental transitions in insects, including molting and metamorphosis, is coordinated by the steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E). 20E involves feedback loops to maintain pulses of ecdysteroid biosynthesis leading to its upsurge, whereas the underpinning molecular mechanisms are not well understood. Using the silkworm Bombyx mori as a model, we demonstrated that E75, the 20E primary response gene, mediates a regulatory loop between ecdysteroid biosynthesis and 20E signaling. E75 isoforms A and C directly bind to retinoic acid receptor-related response elements in Halloween gene promoter regions to induce gene expression thus promoting ecdysteroid biosynthesis and developmental transition, whereas isoform B antagonizes the transcriptional activity of isoform A/C through physical interaction. As the expression of E75 isoforms is differentially induced by 20E, the E75-mediated regulatory loop represents a fine autoregulation of steroidogenesis, which contributes to the precise control of developmental timing. PMID:27365399

  20. Conditional expression of CD44 isoforms in lymphoma cells: influence on hyaluronate binding and tumor growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, J.

    2002-03-01

    CD44 describes a family of surface proteins consisting of many isoforms due to alternative splice of ten 'variant' exons. Members of this family are involved in various processes including hematopoiesis, lymphocyte activation and homing, limb development, wound healing and tumor progression. Clinically, CD44 has been shown to be a prognostic factor for several human cancers. To answer the question which isoform might be relevant for tumor progression and to gain an insight into the mechanism of its function, I established transfectants of the LB lymphoma cell line in which the expression of four CD44 isoforms, namely CD44v3-10, CD44v4-10, CD44v8-10 and CD44s, was controlled by the Tet-off promoter. In the presence of Doxycycline, the expression was repressed. Removal of Doxycycline switched on expression and the maximal CD44 amount was obtained within two days. The transfectants were characterized regarding their ability to bind to the extracellular matrix component hyaluronate (HA). Overexpression of all four CD44 isoforms conferred the ability to bind HA on LB cells. Other glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) were bound in an isotype-specific fashion. CD44v3-10, CD44v4-10 and CD44v8-10 showed high binding affinity to chondroitin A, B and C, and low affinity to heparin, heparan sulfate and keratan sulfate. CD44s could not bind to these GAGs. Among these three variants, the binding ability of CD44v3-10 was the strongest. CD44 clustering seemed to play a crucial role for HA binding. Both CD44s and CD44v8-10 formed reduction-sensitive complexes in LB cells. The complexes are homooligomers or heterooligomers composed of different isoforms. Cys286 in CD44 transmember domain was not responsible for the formation of reduction-sensitive oligomer or for the enhanced HA binding in LB cell line. Using a conditional dimerization system the requirement of CD44 oligomerization for HA binding was directly demonstrated. The induction of oligomerization increased HA binding

  1. Conditional expression of CD44 isoforms in lymphoma cells: influence on hyaluronate binding and tumor growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, J.

    2002-03-01

    CD44 describes a family of surface proteins consisting of many isoforms due to alternative splice of ten 'variant' exons. Members of this family are involved in various processes including hematopoiesis, lymphocyte activation and homing, limb development, wound healing and tumor progression. Clinically, CD44 has been shown to be a prognostic factor for several human cancers. To answer the question which isoform might be relevant for tumor progression and to gain an insight into the mechanism of its function, I established transfectants of the LB lymphoma cell line in which the expression of four CD44 isoforms, namely CD44v3-10, CD44v4-10, CD44v8-10 and CD44s, was controlled by the Tet-off promoter. In the presence of Doxycycline, the expression was repressed. Removal of Doxycycline switched on expression and the maximal CD44 amount was obtained within two days. The transfectants were characterized regarding their ability to bind to the extracellular matrix component hyaluronate (HA). Overexpression of all four CD44 isoforms conferred the ability to bind HA on LB cells. Other glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) were bound in an isotype-specific fashion. CD44v3-10, CD44v4-10 and CD44v8-10 showed high binding affinity to chondroitin A, B and C, and low affinity to heparin, heparan sulfate and keratan sulfate. CD44s could not bind to these GAGs. Among these three variants, the binding ability of CD44v3-10 was the strongest. CD44 clustering seemed to play a crucial role for HA binding. Both CD44s and CD44v8-10 formed reduction-sensitive complexes in LB cells. The complexes are homooligomers or heterooligomers composed of different isoforms. Cys286 in CD44 transmember domain was not responsible for the formation of reduction-sensitive oligomer or for the enhanced HA binding in LB cell line. Using a conditional dimerization system the requirement of CD44 oligomerization for HA binding was directly demonstrated. The induction of oligomerization increased HA binding. Finally, I

  2. Identification and analysis of alternative splicing events in Phaseolus vulgaris and Glycine max.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iñiguez, Luis P; Ramírez, Mario; Barbazuk, William B; Hernández, Georgina

    2017-08-22

    The vast diversification of proteins in eukaryotic cells has been related with multiple transcript isoforms from a single gene that result in alternative splicing (AS) of primary transcripts. Analysis of RNA sequencing data from expressed sequence tags and next generation RNA sequencing has been crucial for AS identification and genome-wide AS studies. For the identification of AS events from the related legume species Phaseolus vulgaris and Glycine max, 157 and 88 publicly available RNA-seq libraries, respectively, were analyzed. We identified 85,570 AS events from P. vulgaris in 72% of expressed genes and 134,316 AS events in 70% of expressed genes from G. max. These were categorized in seven AS event types with intron retention being the most abundant followed by alternative acceptor and alternative donor, representing ~75% of all AS events in both plants. Conservation of AS events in homologous genes between the two species was analyzed where an overrepresentation of AS affecting 5'UTR regions was observed for certain types of AS events. The conservation of AS events was experimentally validated for 8 selected genes, through RT-PCR analysis. The different types of AS events also varied by relative position in the genes. The results were consistent in both species. The identification and analysis of AS events are first steps to understand their biological relevance. The results presented here from two related legume species reveal high conservation, over ~15-20 MY of divergence, and may point to the biological relevance of AS.

  3. A small molecule drug promoting miRNA processing induces alternative splicing of MdmX transcript and rescues p53 activity in human cancer cells overexpressing MdmX protein.

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    Georgios Valianatos

    Full Text Available MdmX overexpression contributes to the development of cancer by inhibiting tumor suppressor p53. A switch in the alternative splicing of MdmX transcript, leading to the inclusion of exon 6, has been identified as the primary mechanism responsible for increased MdmX protein levels in human cancers, including melanoma. However, there are no approved drugs, which could translate these new findings into clinical applications. We analyzed the anti-melanoma activity of enoxacin, a fluoroquinolone antibiotic inhibiting the growth of some human cancers in vitro and in vivo by promoting miRNA maturation. We found that enoxacin inhibited the growth and viability of human melanoma cell lines much stronger than a structurally related fluoroquinolone ofloxacin, which only weakly modulates miRNA processing. A microarray analysis identified a set of miRNAs significantly dysregulated in enoxacin-treated A375 melanoma cells. They had the potential to target multiple signaling pathways required for cancer cell growth, among them the RNA splicing. Recent studies showed that interfering with cellular splicing machinery can result in MdmX downregulation in cancer cells. We, therefore, hypothesized that enoxacin could, by modulating miRNAs targeting splicing machinery, activate p53 in melanoma cells overexpressing MdmX. We found that enoxacin and ciprofloxacin, a related fluoroquinolone capable of promoting microRNA processing, but not ofloxacin, strongly activated wild type p53-dependent transcription in A375 melanoma without causing significant DNA damage. On the molecular level, the drugs promoted MdmX exon 6 skipping, leading to a dose-dependent downregulation of MdmX. Not only in melanoma, but also in MCF7 breast carcinoma and A2780 ovarian carcinoma cells overexpressing MdmX. Together, our results suggest that some clinically approved fluoroquinolones could potentially be repurposed as activators of p53 tumor suppressor in cancers overexpressing Mdm

  4. Expression, processing and transcriptional regulation of granulysin in short-term activated human lymphocytes

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    Groscurth Peter

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Granulysin, a cytotoxic protein expressed in human natural killer cells and activated T lymphocytes, exhibits cytolytic activity against a variety of intracellular microbes. Expression and transcription have been partially characterised in vitro and four transcripts (NKG5, 519, 520, and 522 were identified. However, only a single protein product of 15 kDa was found, which is subsequently processed to an active 9 kDa protein. Results In this study we investigated generation of granulysin in lymphokine activated killer (LAK cells and antigen (Listeria specific T-cells. Semiquantitative RT-PCR revealed NKG5 to be the most prominent transcript. It was found to be up-regulated in a time-dependent manner in LAK cells and antigen specific T-cells and their subsets. Two isoforms of 519 mRNA were up-regulated under IL-2 and antigen stimulation. Moreover, two novel transcripts, without any known function, comprising solely parts of the 5 prime region of the primary transcript, were detected. A significant increase of granulysin expressing LAK cells as well as antigen specific T-cells was shown by fluorescence microscopy. On the subset level, increase in CD4+ granulysin expressing cells was found only under antigen stimulation. Immunoblotting showed the 15 kDa form of granulysin to be present in the first week of stimulation either with IL-2 or with bacterial antigen. Substantial processing to the 9 kDa form was detected during the first week in LAK cells and in the second week in antigen specific T-cells. Conclusion This first comprehensive study of granulysin gene regulation in primary cultured human lymphocytes shows that the regulation of granulysin synthesis in response to IL-2 or bacterial antigen stimulation occurs at several levels: RNA expression, extensive alternative splicing and posttranslational processing.

  5. Two farnesoid X receptor alpha isoforms in Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) are differentially activated in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howarth, Deanna L. [Integrated Toxicology and Environmental Health Program and Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Hagey, Lee R. [Department of Medicine, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Law, Sheran H.W. [Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Ai, Ni [Department of Pharmacology, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Krasowski, Matthew D. [Department of Pathology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA (United States); Ekins, Sean [Department of Pharmacology, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Collaboration in Chemistry, Jenkintown, PA 19046 (United States); Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Moore, John T. [GlaxoSmithKline Discovery Research, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Kollitz, Erin M. [Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Hinton, David E. [Integrated Toxicology and Environmental Health Program and Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Kullman, Seth W., E-mail: swkullma@ncsu.edu [Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States)

    2010-07-01

    The nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor alpha (FXR{alpha}, NR1H4) is activated by bile acids in multiple species including mouse, rat, and human and in this study we have identified two isoforms of Fxr{alpha} in Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes), a small freshwater teleost. Both isoforms share a high amino acid sequence identity to mammalian FXR{alpha} ({approx}70% in the ligand-binding domain). Fxr{alpha}1 and Fxr{alpha}2 differ within the AF1 domain due to alternative splicing at the fourth intron-exon boundary. This process results in Fxr{alpha}1 having an extended N-terminus compared to Fxr{alpha}2. A Gal4DBD-Fxr{alpha}LBD fusion construct was activated by chenodeoxycholic, cholic, deoxycholic and lithocholic acids, and the synthetic agonist GW4064 in transient transactivation assays. Activation of the Gal4DBD-Fxr{alpha}LBD fusion construct was enhanced by addition of PGC-1{alpha}, as demonstrated through titration assays. Surprisingly, when the full-length versions of the two Fxr{alpha} isoforms were compared in transient transfection assays, Fxr{alpha}2 was activated by C{sub 24} bile acids and GW4064, while Fxr{alpha}1 was not significantly activated by any of the compounds tested. Since the only significant difference between the full-length constructs was sequence in the AF1 domain, these experiments highlight a key functional region in the Fxr{alpha} AF1 domain. Furthermore, mammalian two-hybrid studies demonstrated the ability of Fxr{alpha}2, but not Fxr{alpha}1, to interact with PGC-1{alpha} and SRC-1, and supported our results from the transient transfection reporter gene activation assays. These data demonstrate that both mammalian and teleost FXR (Fxr{alpha}2 isoform) are activated by primary and secondary bile acids.

  6. InFusion: Advancing Discovery of Fusion Genes and Chimeric Transcripts from Deep RNA-Sequencing Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin Okonechnikov

    Full Text Available Analysis of fusion transcripts has become increasingly important due to their link with cancer development. Since high-throughput sequencing approaches survey fusion events exhaustively, several computational methods for the detection of gene fusions from RNA-seq data have been developed. This kind of analysis, however, is complicated by native trans-splicing events, the splicing-induced complexity of the transcriptome and biases and artefacts introduced in experiments and data analysis. There are a number of tools available for the detection of fusions from RNA-seq data; however, certain differences in specificity and sensitivity between commonly used approaches have been found. The ability to detect gene fusions of different types, including isoform fusions and fusions involving non-coding regions, has not been thoroughly studied yet. Here, we propose a novel computational toolkit called InFusion for fusion gene detection from RNA-seq data. InFusion introduces several unique features, such as discovery of fusions involving intergenic regions, and detection of anti-sense transcription in chimeric RNAs based on strand-specificity. Our approach demonstrates superior detection accuracy on simulated data and several public RNA-seq datasets. This improved performance was also evident when evaluating data from RNA deep-sequencing of two well-established prostate cancer cell lines. InFusion identified 26 novel fusion events that were validated in vitro, including alternatively spliced gene fusion isoforms and chimeric transcripts that include intergenic regions. The toolkit is freely available to download from http:/bitbucket.org/kokonech/infusion.

  7. InFusion: Advancing Discovery of Fusion Genes and Chimeric Transcripts from Deep RNA-Sequencing Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okonechnikov, Konstantin; Imai-Matsushima, Aki; Paul, Lukas; Seitz, Alexander; Meyer, Thomas F; Garcia-Alcalde, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of fusion transcripts has become increasingly important due to their link with cancer development. Since high-throughput sequencing approaches survey fusion events exhaustively, several computational methods for the detection of gene fusions from RNA-seq data have been developed. This kind of analysis, however, is complicated by native trans-splicing events, the splicing-induced complexity of the transcriptome and biases and artefacts introduced in experiments and data analysis. There are a number of tools available for the detection of fusions from RNA-seq data; however, certain differences in specificity and sensitivity between commonly used approaches have been found. The ability to detect gene fusions of different types, including isoform fusions and fusions involving non-coding regions, has not been thoroughly studied yet. Here, we propose a novel computational toolkit called InFusion for fusion gene detection from RNA-seq data. InFusion introduces several unique features, such as discovery of fusions involving intergenic regions, and detection of anti-sense transcription in chimeric RNAs based on strand-specificity. Our approach demonstrates superior detection accuracy on simulated data and several public RNA-seq datasets. This improved performance was also evident when evaluating data from RNA deep-sequencing of two well-established prostate cancer cell lines. InFusion identified 26 novel fusion events that were validated in vitro, including alternatively spliced gene fusion isoforms and chimeric transcripts that include intergenic regions. The toolkit is freely available to download from http:/bitbucket.org/kokonech/infusion.

  8. Differentiation of Neurons Restricts Arbovirus Replication and Increases Expression of the Alpha Isoform of IRF-7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Kimberly L. W.; Vernon, Patty S.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Susceptibility to alphavirus infection is age dependent, and host maturation is associated with decreased virus replication and less severe encephalitis. To identify factors associated with maturation-dependent restriction of virus replication, we studied AP-7 rat olfactory bulb neuronal cells, which can differentiate in vitro. Differentiation was associated with a 150- to 1,000-fold decrease in replication of the alphaviruses Sindbis virus and Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, as well as La Crosse bunyavirus. Differentiation delayed synthesis of SINV RNA and protein but did not alter the susceptibility of neurons to infection or virion maturation. Additionally, differentiation slowed virus-induced translation arrest and death of infected cells. Differentiation of uninfected AP-7 neurons was associated with changes in expression of antiviral genes. Expression of key transcription factors was increased, including interferon regulatory factor 3 and 7 (IRF-3 and IRF-7) and STAT-1, suggesting that neuronal maturation may enhance the capacity for antiviral signaling upon infection. IRF-7 produced by undifferentiated AP-7 neurons was exclusively the short dominant negative γ-isoform, while that produced by differentiated neurons was the full-length α-isoform. A similar switch in IRF-7 isoforms also occurred in the brains of maturing C57BL/6J mice. Silencing of IRF expression did not improve virus multiplication in differentiated neurons. Therefore, neuronal differentiation is associated with upregulation of transcription factors that activate antiviral signaling, but this alone does not account for maturation-dependent restriction of virus replication. IMPORTANCE Viral encephalomyelitis is an important cause of age-dependent morbidity and mortality. Because mature neurons are not readily regenerated, recovery from encephalitis suggests that mature neurons utilize unique antiviral mechanisms to block infection and/or clear virus. To identify maturational

  9. Does Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) exhibit a gill Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase isoform switch during salinity change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollinger, Rebecca J; Madsen, Steffen S; Bossus, Maryline C; Tipsmark, Christian K

    2016-05-01

    Some euryhaline teleosts exhibit a switch in gill Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (Nka) α isoform when moving between fresh water (FW) and seawater (SW). The present study tested the hypothesis that a similar mechanism is present in Japanese medaka and whether salinity affects ouabain, Mg(2+), Na(+) and K(+) affinity of the gill enzyme. Phylogenetic analysis classified six separate medaka Nka α isoforms (α1a, α1b, α1c, α2, α3a and α3b). Medaka acclimated long-term (>30 days) to either FW or SW had similar gill expression of α1c, α2, α3a and α3b, while both α1a and α1b were elevated in SW. Since a potential isoform shift may rely on early changes in transcript abundance, we conducted two short-term (1-3 days) salinity transfer experiments. FW to SW acclimation induced an elevation of α1b and α1a after 1 and 3 days. SW to FW acclimation reduced α1b after 3 days with no other α isoforms affected. To verify that the responses were typical, additional transport proteins were examined. Gill ncc and nhe3 expression were elevated in FW, while cftr and nkcc1a were up-regulated in SW. This is in accordance with putative roles in ion-uptake and secretion. SW-acclimated medaka had higher gill Nka V max and lower apparent K m for Na(+) compared to FW fish, while apparent affinities for K(+), Mg(2+) and ouabain were unchanged. The present study showed that the Japanese medaka does not exhibit a salinity-induced α isoform switch and therefore suggests that Na(+) affinity changes involve altered posttranslational modification or intermolecular interactions.

  10. VEGF-A isoforms differentially regulate ATF-2-dependent VCAM-1 gene expression and endothelial-leukocyte interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fearnley, Gareth W; Odell, Adam F; Latham, Antony M; Mughal, Nadeem A; Bruns, Alexander F; Burgoyne, Nicholas J; Homer-Vanniasinkam, Shervanthi; Zachary, Ian C; Hollstein, Monica C; Wheatcroft, Stephen B; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2014-08-15

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) regulates many aspects of vascular physiology. VEGF-A stimulates signal transduction pathways that modulate endothelial outputs such as cell migration, proliferation, tubulogenesis, and cell-cell interactions. Multiple VEGF-A isoforms exist, but the biological significance of this is unclear. Here we analyzed VEGF-A isoform-specific stimulation of VCAM-1 gene expression, which controls endothelial-leukocyte interactions, and show that this is dependent on both ERK1/2 and activating transcription factor-2 (ATF-2). VEGF-A isoforms showed differential ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK phosphorylation kinetics. A key feature of VEGF-A isoform-specific ERK1/2 activation and nuclear translocation was increased phosphorylation of ATF-2 on threonine residue 71 (T71). Using reverse genetics, we showed ATF-2 to be functionally required for VEGF-A-stimulated endothelial VCAM-1 gene expression. ATF-2 knockdown blocked VEGF-A-stimulated VCAM-1 expression and endothelial-leukocyte interactions. ATF-2 was also required for other endothelial cell outputs, such as cell migration and tubulogenesis. In contrast, VCAM-1 was essential only for promoting endothelial-leukocyte interactions. This work presents a new paradigm for understanding how soluble growth factor isoforms program complex cellular outputs and responses by modulating signal transduction pathways. © 2014 Fearnley et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  11. Activation of NF-kB by TMPRSS2/ERG fusion isoforms through Toll-like receptor-4

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Jianghua; Cai, Yi; Shao, Long-jiang; Siddiqui, Javed; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Li, Rile; Ren, Chengxi; Ayala, Gustavo; Ittmann, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The TMPRSS2/ERG (T/E) fusion gene is present and thought to be an oncogenic driver of approximately half of all prostate cancers. Fusion of the androgen regulated TMPRSS2 promoter to the ERG oncogene results in constitutive high level expression of ERG which promotes prostate cancer invasion and proliferation. Here we report the characterization of multiple alternatively spliced T/E fusion gene isoforms which have differential affects on invasion and proliferation. We found that T/E fusion ge...

  12. Transcriptional and Posttranscriptional Regulations of the HLA-G Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelli, Erick C.; Veiga-Castelli, Luciana C.; Yaghi, Layale; Donadi, Eduardo A.

    2014-01-01

    HLA-G has a relevant role in immune response regulation. The overall structure of the HLA-G coding region has been maintained during the evolution process, in which most of its variable sites are synonymous mutations or coincide with introns, preserving major functional HLA-G properties. The HLA-G promoter region is different from the classical class I promoters, mainly because (i) it lacks regulatory responsive elements for IFN-γ and NF-κB, (ii) the proximal promoter region (within 200 bases from the first translated ATG) does not mediate transactivation by the principal HLA class I transactivation mechanisms, and (iii) the presence of identified alternative regulatory elements (heat shock, progesterone and hypoxia-responsive elements) and unidentified responsive elements for IL-10, glucocorticoids, and other transcription factors is evident. At least three variable sites in the 3′ untranslated region have been studied that may influence HLA-G expression by modifying mRNA stability or microRNA binding sites, including the 14-base pair insertion/deletion, +3142C/G and +3187A/G polymorphisms. Other polymorphic sites have been described, but there are no functional studies on them. The HLA-G coding region polymorphisms might influence isoform production and at least two null alleles with premature stop codons have been described. We reviewed the structure of the HLA-G promoter region and its implication in transcriptional gene control, the structure of the HLA-G 3′UTR and the major actors of the posttranscriptional gene control, and, finally, the presence of regulatory elements in the coding region. PMID:24741620

  13. Transcriptional and Posttranscriptional Regulations of the HLA-G Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erick C. Castelli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available HLA-G has a relevant role in immune response regulation. The overall structure of the HLA-G coding region has been maintained during the evolution process, in which most of its variable sites are synonymous mutations or coincide with introns, preserving major functional HLA-G properties. The HLA-G promoter region is different from the classical class I promoters, mainly because (i it lacks regulatory responsive elements for IFN-γ and NF-κB, (ii the proximal promoter region (within 200 bases from the first translated ATG does not mediate transactivation by the principal HLA class I transactivation mechanisms, and (iii the presence of identified alternative regulatory elements (heat shock, progesterone and hypoxia-responsive elements and unidentified responsive elements for IL-10, glucocorticoids, and other transcription factors is evident. At least three variable sites in the 3′ untranslated region have been studied that may influence HLA-G expression by modifying mRNA stability or microRNA binding sites, including the 14-base pair insertion/deletion, +3142C/G and +3187A/G polymorphisms. Other polymorphic sites have been described, but there are no functional studies on them. The HLA-G coding region polymorphisms might influence isoform production and at least two null alleles with premature stop codons have been described. We reviewed the structure of the HLA-G promoter region and its implication in transcriptional gene control, the structure of the HLA-G 3′UTR and the major actors of the posttranscriptional gene control, and, finally, the presence of regulatory elements in the coding region.

  14. Isoforms of U1-70k control subunit dynamics in the human spliceosomal U1 snRNP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Hernández

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Most human protein-encoding genes contain multiple exons that are spliced together, frequently in alternative arrangements, by the spliceosome. It is established that U1 snRNP is an essential component of the spliceosome, in human consisting of RNA and ten proteins, several of which are post-translationally modified and exist as multiple isoforms. Unresolved and challenging to investigate are the effects of these post translational modifications on the dynamics, interactions and stability of the particle. Using mass spectrometry we investigate the composition and dynamics of the native human U1 snRNP and compare native and recombinant complexes to isolate the effects of various subunits and isoforms on the overall stability. Our data reveal differential incorporation of four protein isoforms and dynamic interactions of subunits U1-A, U1-C and Sm-B/B'. Results also show that unstructured post-translationally modified C-terminal tails are responsible for the dynamics of Sm-B/B' and U1-C and that their interactions with the Sm core are controlled by binding to different U1-70k isoforms and their phosphorylation status in vivo. These results therefore provide the important functional link between proteomics and structure as well as insight into the dynamic quaternary structure of the native U1 snRNP important for its function.

  15. Structural evolution and tissue-specific expression of tetrapod-specific second isoform of secretory pathway Ca2+-ATPase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pestov, Nikolay B.; Dmitriev, Ruslan I.; Kostina, Maria B.; Korneenko, Tatyana V.; Shakhparonov, Mikhail I.; Modyanov, Nikolai N.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Full-length secretory pathway Ca-ATPase (SPCA2) cloned from rat duodenum. ► ATP2C2 gene (encoding SPCA2) exists only in genomes of Tetrapoda. ► Rat and pig SPCA2 are expressed in intestines, lung and some secretory glands. ► Subcellular localization of SPCA2 may depend on tissue type. ► In rat duodenum, SPCA2 is localized in plasma membrane-associated compartments. -- Abstract: Secretory pathway Ca-ATPases are less characterized mammalian calcium pumps than plasma membrane Ca-ATPases and sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPases. Here we report analysis of molecular evolution, alternative splicing, tissue-specific expression and subcellular localization of the second isoform of the secretory pathway Ca-ATPase (SPCA2), the product of the ATP2C2 gene. The primary structure of SPCA2 from rat duodenum deduced from full-length transcript contains 944 amino acid residues, and exhibits 65% sequence identity with known SPCA1. The rat SPCA2 sequence is also highly homologous to putative human protein KIAA0703, however, the latter seems to have an aberrant N-terminus originating from intron 2. The tissue-specificity of SPCA2 expression is different from ubiquitous SPCA1. Rat SPCA2 transcripts were detected predominantly in gastrointestinal tract, lung, trachea, lactating mammary gland, skin and preputial gland. In the newborn pig, the expression profile is very similar with one remarkable exception: porcine bulbourethral gland gave the strongest signal. Upon overexpression in cultured cells, SPCA2 shows an intracellular distribution with remarkable enrichment in Golgi. However, in vivo SPCA2 may be localized in compartments that differ among various tissues: it is intracellular in epidermis, but enriched in plasma membranes of the intestinal epithelium. Analysis of SPCA2 sequences from various vertebrate species argue that ATP2C2 gene radiated from ATP2C1 (encoding SPCA1) during adaptation of tetrapod ancestors to terrestrial habitats.

  16. Synaptojanin 1: localization on coated endocytic intermediates in nerve terminals and interaction of its 170 kDa isoform with Eps15

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haffner, C; Takei, K; Chen, H

    1997-01-01

    that synaptojanin-170, an alternatively spliced isoform of synaptojanin 1, binds Eps15, a clathrin coat-associated protein. Binding is mediated by the COOH-terminal region of synaptojanin-170 which we show here to be poorly conserved from rat to humans, but to contain in both species three asparagine...

  17. Specific Arabidopsis thaliana malic enzyme isoforms can provide anaplerotic pyruvate carboxylation function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badia, Mariana Beatriz; Mans, Robert; Lis, Alicia V; Tronconi, Marcos Ariel; Arias, Cintia Lucía; Maurino, Verónica Graciela; Andreo, Carlos Santiago; Drincovich, María Fabiana; van Maris, Antonius J A; Gerrard Wheeler, Mariel Claudia

    2017-02-01

    NAD(P)-malic enzyme (NAD(P)-ME) catalyzes the reversible oxidative decarboxylation of malate to pyruvate, CO 2 , and NAD(P)H and is present as a multigene family in Arabidopsis thaliana. The carboxylation reaction catalyzed by purified recombinant Arabidopsis NADP-ME proteins is faster than those reported for other animal or plant isoforms. In contrast, no carboxylation activity could be detected in vitro for the NAD-dependent counterparts. In order to further investigate their putative carboxylating role in vivo, Arabidopsis NAD(P)-ME isoforms, as well as the NADP-ME2del2 (with a decreased ability to carboxylate pyruvate) and NADP-ME2R115A (lacking fumarate activation) versions, were functionally expressed in the cytosol of pyruvate carboxylase-negative (Pyc - ) Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains. The heterologous expression of NADP-ME1, NADP-ME2 (and its mutant proteins), and NADP-ME3 restored the growth of Pyc - S. cerevisiae on glucose, and this capacity was dependent on the availability of CO 2 . On the other hand, NADP-ME4, NAD-ME1, and NAD-ME2 could not rescue the Pyc - strains from C 4 auxotrophy. NADP-ME carboxylation activity could be measured in leaf crude extracts of knockout and overexpressing Arabidopsis lines with modified levels of NADP-ME, where this activity was correlated with the amount of NADP-ME2 transcript. These results indicate that specific A. thaliana NADP-ME isoforms are able to play an anaplerotic role in vivo and provide a basis for the study on the carboxylating activity of NADP-ME, which may contribute to the synthesis of C 4 compounds and redox shuttling in plant cells. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  18. Alternative Splicing Regulated by Butyrate in Bovine Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sitao; Li, Congjun; Huang, Wen; Li, Weizhong; Li, Robert W.

    2012-01-01

    As a signaling molecule and an inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACs), butyrate exerts its impact on a broad range of biological processes, such as apoptosis and cell proliferation, in addition to its critical role in energy metabolism in ruminants. This study examined the effect of butyrate on alternative splicing in bovine epithelial cells using RNA-seq technology. Junction reads account for 11.28 and 12.32% of total mapped reads between the butyrate-treated (BT) and control (CT) groups. 201,326 potential splicing junctions detected were supported by ≥3 junction reads. Approximately 94% of these junctions conformed to the consensus sequence (GT/AG) while ∼3% were GC/AG junctions. No AT/AC junctions were observed. A total of 2,834 exon skipping events, supported by a minimum of 3 junction reads, were detected. At least 7 genes, their mRNA expression significantly affected by butyrate, also had exon skipping events differentially regulated by butyrate. Furthermore, COL5A3, which was induced 310-fold by butyrate (FDR butyrate were detected. For example, Isoform 1 of ORC1 was strongly repressed by butyrate while Isoform 2 remained unchanged. Butyrate physically binds to and inhibits all zinc-dependent HDACs except HDAC6 and HDAC10. Our results provided evidence that butyrate also regulated deacetylase activities of classical HDACs via its transcriptional control. Moreover, thirteen gene fusion events differentially affected by butyrate were identified. Our results provided a snapshot into complex transcriptome dynamics regulated by butyrate, which will facilitate our understanding of the biological effects of butyrate and other HDAC inhibitors. PMID:22720068

  19. Extensive polycistronism and antisense transcription in the mammalian Hox clusters.

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    Gaëll Mainguy

    Full Text Available The Hox clusters play a crucial role in body patterning during animal development. They encode both Hox transcription factor and micro-RNA genes that are activated in a precise temporal and spatial sequence that follows their chromosomal order. These remarkable collinear properties confer functional unit status for Hox clusters. We developed the TranscriptView platform to establish high resolution transcriptional profiling and report here that transcription in the Hox clusters is far more complex than previously described in both human and mouse. Unannotated transcripts can represent up to 60% of the total transcriptional output of a cluster. In particular, we identified 14 non-coding Transcriptional Units antisense to Hox genes, 10 of which (70% have a detectable mouse homolog. Most of these Transcriptional Units in both human and mouse present conserved sizeable sequences (>40 bp overlapping Hox transcripts, suggesting that these Hox antisense transcripts are functional. Hox clusters also display at least seven polycistronic clusters, i.e., different genes being co-transcribed on long isoforms (up to 30 kb. This work provides a reevaluated framework for understanding Hox gene function and dys-function. Such extensive transcriptions may provide a structural explanation for Hox clustering.

  20. Sequence and structure of the rat housekeeping PBG-D isoform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardalda, C A; Batlle, A; Juknat, A A

    1998-08-19

    Porphobilinogen deaminase (PBG-D), a key enzyme in the tetrapyrrole biosynthetic pathway, is encoded by a single gene containing two different promoters. The upstream promoter, found in all cell types, initiates the transcription of the housekeeping PBG-D isoform, whereas the downstream one is erythroid-specific. In this study, we provide the first full sequence of a 1086bp cDNA covering the coding region for the rat ubiquitous PBG-D and its primary amino acid sequence. The cDNA encodes a 39,361 Da protein composed of 361 amino acids. Nucleotide sequence comparison between both isoforms from rat shows similarities of 99.5%, with four changes (C/G) in exon 8 and only one (C/A) in exon 12. Secondary structure prediction reveals that 76.5% of the amino acids from exon 1 are located in a loop. Potential phosphorylation, glycosylation, and myristoylation sites were revealed through motif searches. Housekeeping PBG-D contains coiled-coil segments known to be involved in dynamic rearrangements in the active site. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  1. The combined expression patterns of Ikaros isoforms characterize different hematological tumor subtypes.

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    Carlos A Orozco

    Full Text Available A variety of genetic alterations are considered hallmarks of cancer development and progression. The Ikaros gene family, encoding for key transcription factors in hematopoietic development, provides several examples as genetic defects in these genes are associated with the development of different types of leukemia. However, the complex patterns of expression of isoforms in Ikaros family genes has prevented their use as clinical markers. In this study, we propose the use of the expression profiles of the Ikaros isoforms to classify various hematological tumor diseases. We have standardized a quantitative PCR protocol to estimate the expression levels of the Ikaros gene exons. Our analysis reveals that these levels are associated with specific types of leukemia and we have found differences in the levels of expression relative to five interexonic Ikaros regions for all diseases studied. In conclusion, our method has allowed us to precisely discriminate between B-ALL, CLL and MM cases. Differences between the groups of lymphoid and myeloid pathologies were also identified in the same way.

  2. Distinct Functions of Different scl Isoforms in Zebrafish Definitive Hematopoietic Stem Cell Initiation and Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Yahui

    2011-07-01

    The establishment of entire blood system relies on the multi-potent hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), thus identifying the molecular mechanism in HSC generation is of importance for not only complementing the fundamental knowledge in stem cell biology, but also providing insights to the regenerative therapies. Recent researches have documented the formation of nascent HSCs through a direct transition from ventral aortic endothelium, named as endothelial hematopoietic transition (EHT) process. However, the precise genetic program engaged in this process remains largely elusive. The transcription factor scl plays pivotal and conserved roles in embryonic and adult hematopoiesis from teleosts to mammals. Our lab have previously identified a new truncated scl isoform, scl-beta, which is indispensible for the specification of HSCs in the ventral wall of dorsal aorta (VDA), the zebrafish equivalent of mammalian fetal hematopoietic organ. Here we observe that, by combining time-lapse confocal imaging of transgenic zebrafish and genetic epistasis analysis, scl-beta is expressed in a subset of ventral aortic endothelial cells and critical for their forthcoming transformation to hemogenic endothelium; in contrast, runx1 is required downstream to govern the successful egress of the hemogenic endothelial cells to become naive HSCs. In addition, the traditional known full-length scl-alpha isoform is firstly evidenced to be required for the maintenance or survival of newly formed HSCs in VDA. Collectively our data has established the genetic hierarchy controlling discrete steps in the consecutive process of HSC formation from endothelial cells and further development in VDA.

  3. Distinct functional interactions between actin isoforms and nonsarcomeric myosins.

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    Mirco Müller

    Full Text Available Despite their near sequence identity, actin isoforms cannot completely replace each other in vivo and show marked differences in their tissue-specific and subcellular localization. Little is known about isoform-specific differences in their interactions with myosin motors and other actin-binding proteins. Mammalian cytoplasmic β- and γ-actin interact with nonsarcomeric conventional myosins such as the members of the nonmuscle myosin-2 family and myosin-7A. These interactions support a wide range of cellular processes including cytokinesis, maintenance of cell polarity, cell adhesion, migration, and mechano-electrical transduction. To elucidate differences in the ability of isoactins to bind and stimulate the enzymatic activity of individual myosin isoforms, we characterized the interactions of human skeletal muscle α-actin, cytoplasmic β-actin, and cytoplasmic γ-actin with human myosin-7A and nonmuscle myosins-2A, -2B and -2C1. In the case of nonmuscle myosins-2A and -2B, the interaction with either cytoplasmic actin isoform results in 4-fold greater stimulation of myosin ATPase activity than was observed in the presence of α-skeletal muscle actin. Nonmuscle myosin-2C1 is most potently activated by β-actin and myosin-7A by γ-actin. Our results indicate that β- and γ-actin isoforms contribute to the modulation of nonmuscle myosin-2 and myosin-7A activity and thereby to the spatial and temporal regulation of cytoskeletal dynamics. FRET-based analyses show efficient copolymerization abilities for the actin isoforms in vitro. Experiments with hybrid actin filaments show that the extent of actomyosin coupling efficiency can be regulated by the isoform composition of actin filaments.

  4. Differential Signature of the Centrosomal MARK4 Isoforms in Glioma

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    Ivana Magnani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: MAP/microtubule affinity-regulating kinase 4 (MARK4 is a serine-threonine kinase expressed in two spliced isoforms, MARK4L and MARK4S, of which MARK4L is a candidate for a role in neoplastic transformation. Methods: We performed mutation analysis to identify sequence alterations possibly affecting MARK4 expression. We then investigated the MARK4L and MARK4S expression profile in 21 glioma cell lines and 36 tissues of different malignancy grades, glioblastoma-derived cancer stem cells (GBM CSCs and mouse neural stem cells (NSCs by real-time PCR, immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry. We also analyzed the sub-cellular localisation of MARK4 isoforms in glioma and normal cell lines by immunofluorescence. Results: Mutation analysis rules out sequence variations as the cause of the altered MARK4 expression in glioma. Expression profiling confirms that MARK4L is the predominant isoform, whereas MARK4S levels are significantly decreased in comparison and show an inverse correlation with tumour grade. A high MARK4L/MARK4S ratio also characterizes undifferentiated cells, such as GBM CSCs and NSCs. Accordingly, only MARK4L is expressed in brain neurogenic regions. Moreover, while both MARK4 isoforms are localised to the centrosome and midbody in glioma and normal cells, the L isoform exhibits an additional nucleolar localisation in tumour cells. Conclusions: The observed switch towards MARK4L suggests that the balance between the MARK4 isoforms is carefully guarded during neural differentiation but may be subverted in gliomagenesis. Moreover, the MARK4L nucleolar localisation in tumour cells features this MARK4 isoform as a nucleolus-associated tumour marker.

  5. Core Promoter Plasticity Between Maize Tissues and Genotypes Contrasts with Predominance of Sharp Transcription Initiation Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejía-Guerra, María Katherine; Li, Wei; Galeano, Narmer F; Vidal, Mabel; Gray, John; Doseff, Andrea I; Grotewold, Erich

    2015-12-01

    Core promoters are crucial for gene regulation, providing blueprints for the assembly of transcriptional machinery at transcription start sites (TSSs). Empirically, TSSs define the coordinates of core promoters and other regulatory sequences. Thus, experimental TSS identification provides an essential step in the characterization of promoters and their features. Here, we describe the application of CAGE (cap analysis of gene expression) to identify genome-wide TSSs used in root and shoot tissues of two maize (Zea mays) inbred lines (B73 and Mo17). Our studies indicate that most TSS clusters are sharp in maize, similar to mice, but distinct from Arabidopsis thaliana, Drosophila melanogaster, or zebra fish, in which a majority of genes have broad-shaped TSS clusters. We established that ∼38% of maize promoters are characterized by a broader TATA-motif consensus, and this motif is significantly enriched in genes with sharp TSSs. A noteworthy plasticity in TSS usage between tissues and inbreds was uncovered, with ∼1500 genes showing significantly different dominant TSSs, sometimes affecting protein sequence by providing alternate translation initiation codons. We experimentally characterized instances in which this differential TSS utilization results in protein isoforms with additional domains or targeted to distinct subcellular compartments. These results provide important insights into TSS selection and gene expression in an agronomically important crop. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  6. Alternative splicing of a group II intron in a surface layer protein gene in Clostridium tetani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, Bonnie A; Simon, Dawn M; Zimmerly, Steven

    2014-02-01

    Group II introns are ribozymes and retroelements found in bacteria, and are thought to have been the ancestors of nuclear pre-mRNA introns. Whereas nuclear introns undergo prolific alternative splicing in some species, group II introns are not known to carry out equivalent reactions. Here we report a group II intron in the human pathogen Clostridium tetani, which undergoes four alternative splicing reactions in vivo. Together with unspliced transcript, five mRNAs are produced, each encoding a distinct surface layer protein isoform. Correct fusion of exon reading frames requires a shifted 5' splice site located 8 nt upstream of the canonical boundary motif. The shifted junction is accomplished by an altered IBS1-EBS1 pairing between the intron and 5' exon. Growth of C. tetani under a variety of conditions did not result in large changes in alternative splicing levels, raising the possibility that alternative splicing is constitutive. This work demonstrates a novel type of gene organization and regulation in bacteria, and provides an additional parallel between group II and nuclear pre-mRNA introns.

  7. Molecular and Functional Characterization of a Trypanosoma cruzi Nuclear Adenylate Kinase Isoform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cámara, María de los Milagros; Bouvier, León A.; Canepa, Gaspar E.; Miranda, Mariana R.; Pereira, Claudio A.

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas' disease, is an early divergent eukaryote in which control of gene expression relies mainly in post-transcriptional mechanisms. Transcription levels are globally up and down regulated during the transition between proliferating and non-proliferating life-cycle stages. In this work we characterized a nuclear adenylate kinase isoform (TcADKn) that is involved in ribosome biogenesis. Nuclear adenylate kinases have been recently described in a few organisms, being all related to RNA metabolism. Depending on active transcription and translation, TcADKn localizes in the nucleolus or the cytoplasm. A non-canonical nuclear localization signal was mapped towards the N-terminal of the protein, being the phosphate-binding loop essential for its localization. In addition, TcADKn nuclear exportation depends on the nuclear exportation adapter CRM1. TcADKn nuclear shuttling is governed by nutrient availability, oxidative stress and by the equivalent in T. cruzi of the mammalian TOR (Target of Rapamycin) pathway. One of the biological functions of TcADKn is ribosomal 18S RNA processing by direct interaction with ribosomal protein TcRps14. Finally, TcADKn expression is regulated by its 3′ UTR mRNA. Depending on extracellular conditions, cells modulate protein translation rates regulating ribosome biogenesis and nuclear adenylate kinases are probably key components in these processes. PMID:23409202

  8. Managing brain extracellular K+ during neuronal activity: The physiological role of the Na+/K+-ATPase subunit isoforms

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    Brian Roland eLarsen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available AbstractDuring neuronal activity in the brain, extracellular K+ rises and is subsequently removed to prevent a widespread depolarization. One of the key players in regulating extracellular K+ is the Na+/K+-ATPase, although the relative involvement and physiological impact of the different subunit isoform compositions of the Na+/K+-ATPase remain unresolved. The various cell types in the brain serve a certain temporal contribution in the face of network activity; astrocytes respond directly to the immediate release of K+ from neurons, whereas the neurons themselves become the primary K+ absorbers as activity ends. The kinetic characteristics of the catalytic α subunit isoforms of the Na+/K+-ATPase are, partly, determined by the accessory β subunit with which they combine. The isoform combinations expressed by astrocytes and neurons, respectively, appear to be in line with the kinetic characteristics required to fulfill their distinct physiological roles in clearance of K+ from the extracellular space in the face of neuronal activity.Understanding the nature, impact and effects of the various Na+/K+-ATPase isoform combinations in K+ management in the central nervous system might reveal insights into pathological conditions such as epilepsy, migraine, and spreading depolarization following cerebral ischemia. In addition, particular neurological diseases occur as a result of mutations in the α2- (familial hemiplegic migraine type 2 and α3 isoforms (rapid-onset dystonia parkinsonism/alternating hemiplegia of childhood. This review addresses aspects of the Na+/K+-ATPase in the regulation of extracellular K+ in the central nervous system as well as the related pathophysiology. Understanding the physiological setting in non-pathological tissue would provide a better understanding of the pathological events occurring during disease.

  9. Tropomyosin isoforms bias actin track selection by vertebrate myosin Va

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sckolnick, Maria; Krementsova, Elena B.; Warshaw, David M.; Trybus, Kathleen M.

    2016-01-01

    Tropomyosin (Tpm) isoforms decorate actin with distinct spatial and temporal localization patterns in cells and thus may function to sort actomyosin processes by modifying the actin track affinity for specific myosin isoforms. We examined the effect of three Tpm isoforms on the ability of myosin Va (myoVa) to engage with actin in vitro in the absence or presence of the cargo adapter melanophilin (Mlph), which links myoVa to Rab27a-melanosomes for in vivo transport. We show that both the myosin motor domain and the cargo adapter Mlph, which has an actin-binding domain that acts as a tether, are sensitive to the Tpm isoform. Actin–Tpm3.1 and actin–Tpm1.8 were equal or better tracks compared to bare actin for myoVa-HMM based on event frequency, run length, and speed. The full-length myoVa-Mlph complex showed high-frequency engagement with actin-Tpm3.1 but not with actin-Tpm1.8. Actin–Tpm4.2 excluded both myoVa-HMM and full-length myoVa-Mlph from productive interactions. Of importance, Tpm3.1 is enriched in the dendritic protrusions and cortical actin of melanocytes, where myoVa-Mlph engages in melanosome transport. These results support the hypothesis that Tpm isoforms constitute an “actin–Tpm code” that allows for spatial and temporal sorting of actomyosin function in the cell. PMID:27535431

  10. Post-myocardial infarction exercise training beneficially regulates thyroid hormone receptor isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaohua; Wan, Wenhan; Garza, Michael A; Zhang, John Q

    2017-12-22

    Thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) play a critical role in the expression of genes that are major determinants of myocardial contractility, including α-myosin heavy chain (α-MHC) and β-MHC. After myocardial infarction (MI), changes in myocardial TRs consistently correlate with changes in thyroid hormone (TH) target gene transcription, and this is thought to play a key role in the progression to end-stage heart failure. Interestingly, post-MI exercise training has been shown to beneficially alter TH-target gene transcription and preserve cardiac function without changing serum TH. Therefore, in this study, we investigated whether mild exercise training alters expression of α1 and β1 TR isoforms in post-MI rats. Seven-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent coronary ligation or sham operation, and were assigned to 3 groups (n = 10): sham, sedentary MI (MI-Sed), and exercise MI (MI-Ex). Treadmill training was initiated 1 week post-MI, and gradually increased up to 16 m/min, 5° incline, 50 min/day, 5 days/week, and lasted for a total of 8 weeks. Real-time polymerase chain reaction and gel electrophoresis were performed to quantify changes in TR isoforms. Our results illustrated that mRNA expression of TR-α1 and TR-β1 was higher in both MIs; however, protein electrophoresis data showed that TR-α1 was 1.91-fold higher (P training significantly increases TR-α1 and TR-β1 protein expression, which in turn may upregulate α-MHC and improve myocardial contractile function and prognosis.

  11. Expression of CD150 in tumors of the central nervous system: identification of a novel isoform.

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    Olga Romanets-Korbut

    Full Text Available CD150 (IPO3/SLAM belongs to the SLAM family of receptors and serves as a major entry receptor for measles virus. CD150 is expressed on normal and malignant cells of the immune system. However, little is known about its expression outside the hematopoietic system, especially tumors of the central nervous system (CNS. Although CD150 was not found in different regions of normal brain tissues, our immunohistochemical study revealed its expression in 77.6% of human CNS tumors, including glioblastoma, anaplastic astrocytoma, diffuse astrocytoma, ependymoma, and others. CD150 was detected in the cytoplasm, but not on the cell surface of glioma cell lines, and it was colocalized with the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complex markers. In addition to the full length mRNA of the mCD150 splice isoform, in glioma cells we found a highly expressed novel CD150 transcript (nCD150, containing an 83 bp insert. The insert is derived from a previously unrecognized exon designated Cyt-new, which is located 510 bp downstream of the transmembrane region exon, and is a specific feature of primate SLAMF1. Both mCD150 and nCD150 cDNA variants did not contain any mutations and had the leader sequence. The nCD150 transcript was also detected in normal and malignant B lymphocytes, primary T cells, dendritic cells and macrophages; however, in glioma cells nCD150 was found to be the predominant CD150 isoform. Similarly to mCD150, cell surface expression of nCD150 allows wild type measles virus entry to the cell. Our data indicate that CD150 expression in CNS tumors can be considered a new diagnostic marker and potential target for novel therapeutic approaches.

  12. Twelve actin-encoding cDNAs from the American lobster, Homarus americanus: cloning and tissue expression of eight skeletal muscle, one heart, and three cytoplasmic isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bo Kwang; Kim, Kyoung Sun; Oh, Chul-Woong; Mykles, Donald L; Lee, Sung Gu; Kim, Hak Jun; Kim, Hyun-Woo

    2009-06-01

    Lobster muscles express a diverse array of myofibrillar protein isoforms. Three fiber types (fast, slow-twitch or S1, and slow-tonic or S2) differ qualitatively and quantitatively in myosin heavy and light chains, troponin-T, -I, and -C, paramyosin, and tropomyosin variants. However, little is known about the diversity of actin isoforms present in crustacean tissues. In this report we characterized cDNAs that encode twelve actin isoforms in the American lobster, Homarus americanus: eight from skeletal muscle (Ha-ActinSK1-8), one from heart (Ha-ActinHT1), and three cytoplasmic type actins from hepatopancreas (Ha-ActinCT1-3). All twelve cDNAs were products of distinct genes, as indicated by differences in the 3'-untranslated regions (UTRs). The open reading frames specified polypeptides 376 or 377 amino acids in length. Although key amino residues are conserved in the lobster actins, variations in nearby sequences may affect actin polymerization and/or interactions with other myofibrillar proteins. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction showed muscle fiber type- and tissue-specific expression patterns. Ha-Actin-HT1 was expressed exclusively in heart (87% of the total; 12% of the total was Ha-ActinCT1). Ha-ActinCT1 was expressed in all tissues, while CT2 and CT3 were expressed only in hepatopancreas, with Ha-ActinCT2 as the major isoform (93% of the total). Ha-ActinSK1 and SK2 were the major isoforms (88% and 12% of the total, respectively) in the S1 fibers of crusher claw closer muscle. Fast fibers in the cutter claw closer and deep abdominal muscles differed in SK isoforms. Ha-ActinSK3, SK4, and SK5 were the major isoforms in cutter claw closer muscle (12%, 48%, and 37% of the total, respectively). Ha-ActinSK5 and SK8 were the major isoforms in deep abdominal flexor (31% and 65% of the total, respectively) and extensor (46% and 53% of the total, respectively) muscles, with SK6 and SK7 expressed at low levels. These data indicate that fast

  13. RNAse mapping and quantitation of RNA isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh, Lakshminarayan K; Fasina, Olufemi; Pintel, David J

    2012-01-01

    The ribonuclease protection assay (RPA) has emerged as an important methodology for the detection, mapping, and quantification of RNAs. In this assay, total or cytoplasmic RNAs are hybridized to a high-specific activity antisense radioactive RNA probe synthesized by in vitro transcription from the SP6 or T7 promoter of an appropriate linearized plasmid template by the bacteriophage SP6 or T7 polymerase, respectively. The RNA hybrids are subjected to RNAse digestion and the protected products are resolved by denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to allow detection of specific RNA fragments by subsequent autoradiography. RPAs are highly sensitive, the probes can be specifically targeted, and, when performed in probe excess, are quantitative, making them the method of choice for many analyses of RNA processing events.

  14. Oxygenation properties and isoform diversity of snake hemoglobins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storz, Jay F.; Natarajan, Chandrasekhar; Moriyama, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    Available data suggest that snake hemoglobins (Hbs) are characterized by a combination of unusual structural and functional properties relative to the Hbs of other amniote vertebrates, including oxygenation-linked tetramer- dimer dissociation. However, standardized comparative data are lacking...... for snake Hbs, and the Hb isoform composition of snake red blood cells has not been systematically characterized. Here we present the results of an integrated analysis of snake Hbs and the underlying - and -type globin genes to characterize 1) Hb isoform composition of definitive erythrocytes, and 2......) the oxygenation properties of isolated isoforms as well as composite hemolysates. We used species from three families as subjects for experimental studies of Hb function: South American rattlesnake, Crotalus durissus (Viperidae); Indian python, Python molurus (Pythonidae); and yellow-bellied sea snake, Pelamis...

  15. Cytochrome P450 isoform selectivity in human hepatic theobromine metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Simon; Miners, John O

    1999-01-01

    Aims The plasma clearance of theobromine (TB; 3,7-dimethylxanthine) is known to be induced in cigarette smokers. To determine whether TB may serve as a model substrate for cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A2, or possibly other isoforms, studies were undertaken to identify the individual human liver microsomal CYP isoforms responsible for the conversion of TB to its primary metabolites. Methods The kinetics of formation of the primary TB metabolites 3-methylxanthine (3-MX), 7-methylxanthine (7-MX) and 3,7-dimethyluric acid (3,7-DMU) by human liver microsomes were characterized using a specific hplc procedure. Effects of CYP isoform-selective xenobiotic inhibitor/substrate probes on each pathway were determined and confirmatory studies with recombinant enzymes were performed to define the contribution of individual isoforms to 3-MX, 7-MX and 3,7-DMU formation. Results The CYP1A2 inhibitor furafylline variably inhibited (0–65%) 7-MX formation, but had no effect on other pathways. Diethyldithiocarbamate and 4-nitrophenol, probes for CYP2E1, inhibited the formation of 3-MX, 7-MX and 3,7-DMU by ≈55–60%, 35–55% and 85%, respectively. Consistent with the microsomal studies, recombinant CYP1A2 and CYP2E1 exhibited similar apparent Km values for 7-MX formation and CYP2E1 was further shown to have the capacity to convert TB to both 3-MX and 3,7-DMU. Conclusions Given the contribution of multiple isoforms to 3-MX and 7-MX formation and the negligible formation of 3,7-DMU in vivo, TB is of little value as a CYP isoform-selective substrate in humans. PMID:10215755

  16. Oxygenation properties and isoform diversity of snake hemoglobins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storz, Jay F; Natarajan, Chandrasekhar; Moriyama, Hideaki; Hoffmann, Federico G; Wang, Tobias; Fago, Angela; Malte, Hans; Overgaard, Johannes; Weber, Roy E

    2015-11-01

    Available data suggest that snake hemoglobins (Hbs) are characterized by a combination of unusual structural and functional properties relative to the Hbs of other amniote vertebrates, including oxygenation-linked tetramer-dimer dissociation. However, standardized comparative data are lacking for snake Hbs, and the Hb isoform composition of snake red blood cells has not been systematically characterized. Here we present the results of an integrated analysis of snake Hbs and the underlying α- and β-type globin genes to characterize 1) Hb isoform composition of definitive erythrocytes, and 2) the oxygenation properties of isolated isoforms as well as composite hemolysates. We used species from three families as subjects for experimental studies of Hb function: South American rattlesnake, Crotalus durissus (Viperidae); Indian python, Python molurus (Pythonidae); and yellow-bellied sea snake, Pelamis platura (Elapidae). We analyzed allosteric properties of snake Hbs in terms of the Monod-Wyman-Changeux model and Adair four-step thermodynamic model. Hbs from each of the three species exhibited high intrinsic O2 affinities, low cooperativities, small Bohr factors in the absence of phosphates, and high sensitivities to ATP. Oxygenation properties of the snake Hbs could be explained entirely by allosteric transitions in the quaternary structure of intact tetramers, suggesting that ligation-dependent dissociation of Hb tetramers into αβ-dimers is not a universal feature of snake Hbs. Surprisingly, the major Hb isoform of the South American rattlesnake is homologous to the minor HbD of other amniotes and, contrary to the pattern of Hb isoform differentiation in birds and turtles, exhibits a lower O2 affinity than the HbA isoform. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Alternative security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weston, B.H.

    1990-01-01

    This book contains the following chapters: The Military and Alternative Security: New Missions for Stable Conventional Security; Technology and Alternative Security: A Cherished Myth Expires; Law and Alternative Security: Toward a Just World Peace; Politics and Alternative Security: Toward a More Democratic, Therefore More Peaceful, World; Economics and Alternative Security: Toward a Peacekeeping International Economy; Psychology and Alternative Security: Needs, Perceptions, and Misperceptions; Religion and Alternative Security: A Prophetic Vision; and Toward Post-Nuclear Global Security: An Overview

  18. Ectodermal-Neural Cortex 1 Isoforms Have Contrasting Effects on MC3T3-E1 Osteoblast Mineralization and Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worton, Leah E; Shi, Yan-Chuan; Smith, Elisabeth J; Barry, Simon C; Gonda, Thomas J; Whitehead, Jonathan P; Gardiner, Edith M

    2017-08-01

    The importance of Wnt pathway signaling in development of bone has been well established. Here we investigated the role of a known Wnt target, ENC1 (ectodermal-neural cortex 1; NRP/B), in osteoblast differentiation. Enc1 expression was detected in mouse osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and osteocytes by in situ hybridization, and osteoblastic expression was verified in differentiating primary cultures and MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblast cells, with 57 kDa and 67 kDa ENC1 protein isoforms detected throughout differentiation. Induced knockdown of both ENC1 isoforms reduced alkaline phosphatase staining and virtually abolished MC3T3-E1 mineralization. At culture confluence, Alpl (alkaline phosphatase liver/bone/kidney) expression was markedly reduced compared with control cells, and there was significant and coordinated alteration of other genes involved in cellular phosphate biochemistry. In contrast, with 67 kDa-selective knockdown mineralized nodule formation was enhanced and there was a two-fold increase in Alpl expression at confluence. There was enhanced expression of Wnt/β-catenin target genes with knockdown of both isoforms at this time-point and a five-fold increase in Frzb (Frizzled related protein) with 67 kDa-selective knockdown at mineralization, indicating possible ENC1 interactions with Wnt signaling in osteoblasts. These results are the first to demonstrate a role for ENC1 in the control of osteoblast differentiation. Additionally, the contrasting mineralization phenotypes and transcriptional patterns seen with coordinate knockdown of both ENC1 isoforms vs selective knockdown of 67 kDa ENC1 suggest opposing roles for the isoforms in regulation of osteoblastic differentiation, through effects on Alpl expression and phosphate cellular biochemistry. This study is the first to report differential roles for the ENC1 isoforms in any cell lineage. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 2141-2150, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Physiological relevance and contribution to metal balance of specific and non-specific Metallothionein isoforms in the garden snail, Cantareus aspersus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höckner, Martina; Stefanon, Karin; de Vaufleury, Annette; Monteiro, Freddy; Pérez-Rafael, Sílvia; Palacios, Oscar; Capdevila, Mercè; Atrian, Sílvia; Dallinger, Reinhard

    2011-12-01

    Variable environmental availability of metal ions represents a constant challenge for most organisms, so that during evolution, they have optimised physiological and molecular mechanisms to cope with this particular requirement. Metallothioneins (MTs) are proteins that play a major role in metal homeostasis and as a reservoir. The MT gene/protein systems of terrestrial helicid snails are an invaluable model for the study of metal-binding features and MT isoform-specific functionality of these proteins. In the present study, we characterised three paralogous MT isogenes and their expressed products in the escargot (Cantareus aspersus). The metal-dependent transcriptional activation of the three isogenes was assessed using quantitative Real Time PCR. The metal-binding capacities of the three isoforms were studied by characterising the purified native complexes. All the data were analysed in relation to the trace element status of the animals after metal feeding. Two of the three C. aspersus MT (CaMT) isoforms appeared to be metal-specific, (CaCdMT and CaCuMT, for cadmium and copper respectively). A third isoform (CaCd/CuMT) was non-specific, since it was natively recovered as a mixed Cd/Cu complex. A specific role in Cd detoxification for CaCdMT was revealed, with a 80-90% contribution to the Cd balance in snails exposed to this metal. Conclusive data were also obtained for the CaCuMT isoform, which is involved in Cu homeostasis, sharing about 30-50% of the Cu balance of C. aspersus. No apparent metal-related physiological function was found for the third isoform (CaCd/CuMT), so its contribution to the metal balance of the escargot may be, if at all, of only marginal significance, but may enclose a major interest in evolutionary studies.

  20. Determinants of Isoform-Specific Gating Kinetics of hERG1 Channel: Combined Experimental and Simulation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura L. Perissinotti

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available IKr is the rapidly activating component of the delayed rectifier potassium current, the ion current largely responsible for the repolarization of the cardiac action potential. Inherited forms of long QT syndrome (LQTS (Lees-Miller et al., 1997 in humans are linked to functional modifications in the Kv11.1 (hERG ion channel and potentially life threatening arrhythmias. There is little doubt now that hERG-related component of IKr in the heart depends on the tetrameric (homo- or hetero- channels formed by two alternatively processed isoforms of hERG, termed hERG1a and hERG1b. Isoform composition (hERG1a- vs. the b-isoform has recently been reported to alter pharmacologic responses to some hERG blockers and was proposed to be an essential factor pre-disposing patients for drug-induced QT prolongation. Very little is known about the gating and pharmacological properties of two isoforms in heart membranes. For example, how gating mechanisms of the hERG1a channels differ from that of hERG1b is still unknown. The mechanisms by which hERG 1a/1b hetero-tetramers contribute to function in the heart, or what role hERG1b might play in disease are all questions to be answered. Structurally, the two isoforms differ only in the N-terminal region located in the cytoplasm: hERG1b is 340 residues shorter than hERG1a and the initial 36 residues of hERG1b are unique to this isoform. In this study, we combined electrophysiological measurements for HEK cells, kinetics and structural modeling to tease out the individual contributions of each isoform to Action Potential formation and then make predictions about the effects of having various mixture ratios of the two isoforms. By coupling electrophysiological data with computational kinetic modeling, two proposed mechanisms of hERG gating in two homo-tetramers were examined. Sets of data from various experimental stimulation protocols (HEK cells were analyzed simultaneously and fitted to Markov-chain models (M

  1. Simple method for identification of metallothionein isoforms in cultured human prostate cells by MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rongying; Sens, Donald A; Albrecht, Amy; Garrett, Scott; Somji, Seema; Sens, Mary Ann; Lu, Xiaoning

    2007-06-15

    The present paper describes a rapid method for identification and characterization of human metallothionein (MT) isoforms in complex cell cultures using high-resolution matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF). In the proposed method, the sample preparation of MTs from cultured cells is both simple and fast. It is accomplished by trypsin cleavage of cell proteins into small peptide species, the majority of which are subsequently removed by gel filtration using beads with an exclusion limit of 4000 Da. In contrast to most cell proteins, MTs remain intact (undigested) upon being treated with trypsin, being excluded by the gel beads and thus recovered by low-speed centrifugation. To identify the protein constitutes of the MT preparation, the MT sample is divided into two parts, one for intact protein accurate mass measurement, the other for tryptic digestion followed by MS and MS/MS analyses. In the latter case, the MT proteins are denatured by the addition of EDTA which strips heavy metals from MTs and renders them susceptible to tryptic digestion. The obtained accurate mass with the unique peptide sequences of each MT isoform allows for unambiguous identification of MT isoforms in the prepared mixture. The method has been applied to RWPE-1 cells derived from normal human prostate epithelium. Four MT isoforms, 1E, 1G, 1X, and 2A, have been confidently identified, being primarily acetylated at N-termini. These results are in agreement with the expression of MT mRNAs in RWPE-1 cells determined by real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).

  2. Rice PROTEIN l-ISOASPARTYL METHYLTRANSFERASE isoforms differentially accumulate during seed maturation to restrict deleterious isoAsp and reactive oxygen species accumulation and are implicated in seed vigor and longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petla, Bhanu Prakash; Kamble, Nitin Uttam; Kumar, Meenu; Verma, Pooja; Ghosh, Shraboni; Singh, Ajeet; Rao, Venkateswara; Salvi, Prafull; Kaur, Harmeet; Saxena, Saurabh Chandra; Majee, Manoj

    2016-07-01

    PROTEIN l-ISOASPARTYL O-METHYLTRANSFERASE (PIMT) is a protein-repairing enzyme involved in seed vigor and longevity. However, the regulation of PIMT isoforms during seed development and the mechanism of PIMT-mediated improvement of seed vigor and longevity are largely unknown. In this study in rice (Oryza sativa), we demonstrate the dynamics and correlation of isoaspartyl (isoAsp)-repairing demands and PIMT activity, and their implications, during seed development, germination and aging, through biochemical, molecular and genetic studies. Molecular and biochemical analyses revealed that rice possesses various biochemically active and inactive PIMT isoforms. Transcript and western blot analyses clearly showed the seed development stage and tissue-specific accumulation of active isoforms. Immunolocalization studies revealed distinct isoform expression in embryo and aleurone layers. Further analyses of transgenic lines for each OsPIMT isoform revealed a clear role in the restriction of deleterious isoAsp and age-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation to improve seed vigor and longevity. Collectively, our data suggest that a PIMT-mediated, protein repair mechanism is initiated during seed development in rice, with each isoform playing a distinct, yet coordinated, role. Our results also raise the intriguing possibility that PIMT repairs antioxidative enzymes and proteins which restrict ROS accumulation, lipid peroxidation, etc. in seed, particularly during aging, thus contributing to seed vigor and longevity. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  3. High-throughput proteomics detection of novel splice isoforms in human platelets.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Power, Karen A

    2009-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is an intrinsic regulatory mechanism of all metazoans. Recent findings suggest that 100% of multiexonic human genes give rise to splice isoforms. AS can be specific to tissue type, environment or developmentally regulated. Splice variants have also been implicated in various diseases including cancer. Detection of these variants will enhance our understanding of the complexity of the human genome and provide disease-specific and prognostic biomarkers. We adopted a proteomics approach to identify exon skip events - the most common form of AS. We constructed a database harboring the peptide sequences derived from all hypothetical exon skip junctions in the human genome. Searching tandem mass spectrometry (MS\\/MS) data against the database allows the detection of exon skip events, directly at the protein level. Here we describe the application of this approach to human platelets, including the mRNA-based verification of novel splice isoforms of ITGA2, NPEPPS and FH. This methodology is applicable to all new or existing MS\\/MS datasets.

  4. Analysis of protein isoforms: Can we do it better?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šťastná, Miroslava; Van Eyk, J.E.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 12, 19-20 (2012), s. 2937-2948 ISSN 1615-9853 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : protein isoforms * intact protein analysis * novel proteomic approaches * identification * quantification Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 4.132, year: 2012

  5. Localization and functional characterization of the human NKCC2 isoforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carota, I; Theilig, F; Oppermann, M

    2010-01-01

    inhibited by bumetanide than by furosemide. A sequence analysis of the amino acids encoded by exon 4 variants revealed high similarities between human and rodent NKCC2 isoforms, suggesting that differences in ion transport characteristics between species may be related to sequence variations outside...

  6. Distinct Functions of Endophilin Isoforms in Synaptic Vesicle Endocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jifeng Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Endophilin isoforms perform distinct characteristics in their interactions with N-type Ca2+ channels and dynamin. However, precise functional differences for the endophilin isoforms on synaptic vesicle (SV endocytosis remain unknown. By coupling RNA interference and electrophysiological recording techniques in cultured rat hippocampal neurons, we investigated the functional differences of three isoforms of endophilin in SV endocytosis. The results showed that the amplitude of normalized evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents in endophilin1 knockdown neurons decreased significantly for both single train and multiple train stimulations. Similar results were found using endophilin2 knockdown neurons, whereas endophilin3 siRNA exhibited no change compared with control neurons. Endophilin1 and endophilin2 affected SV endocytosis, but the effect of endophilin1 and endophilin2 double knockdown was not different from that of either knockdown alone. This result suggested that endophilin1 and endophilin2 functioned together but not independently during SV endocytosis. Taken together, our results indicate that SV endocytosis is sustained by endophilin1 and endophilin2 isoforms, but not by endophilin3, in primary cultured hippocampal neurons.

  7. Isoforms of transferrin in psoriasis patients abusing alcohol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Hoefkens (Peter); E.M. Higgins; R.J. Ward (Roberta); H.G. van Eijk (Henk)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractThe different isoforms of transferrin have been quantified by isoelectric focusing in the sera of psoriasis patients with and without a history of abusing alcohol. In both male and female psoriasis subjects abusing alcohol, there were significant increases in the

  8. FSH isoform composition of commercial gonadotrophin preparations: a neglected aspect?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andersen, Claus Yding; Westergaard, Lars Grabow; van Wely, Madelon

    2004-01-01

    The clinical efficacy of commercial gonadotrophin preparations has been the subject of an intense debate during recent years. Arguments have primarily focused on the origin of FSH activity (urine versus recombinant derived) and whether the preparation included LH-like activity. FSH isoform

  9. p63 isoforms regulate metabolism of cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Aguanno, Simona; Barcaroli, Daniela; Rossi, Claudia; Zucchelli, Mirco; Ciavardelli, Domenico; Cortese, Claudio; De Cola, Antonella; Volpe, Silvia; D'Agostino, Daniela; Todaro, Matilde; Stassi, Giorgio; Di Ilio, Carmine; Urbani, Andrea; De Laurenzi, Vincenzo

    2014-04-04

    p63 is an important regulator of epithelial development expressed in different variants containing (TA) or lacking (ΔN) the N-terminal transactivation domain. The different isoforms regulate stem-cell renewal and differentiation as well as cell senescence. Several studies indicate that p63 isoforms also play a role in cancer development; however, very little is known about the role played by p63 in regulating the cancer stem phenotype. Here we investigate the cellular signals regulated by TAp63 and ΔNp63 in a model of epithelial cancer stem cells. To this end, we used colon cancer stem cells, overexpressing either TAp63 or ΔNp63 isoforms, to carry out a proteomic study by chemical-labeling approach coupled to network analysis. Our results indicate that p63 is implicated in a wide range of biological processes, including metabolism. This was further investigated by a targeted strategy at both protein and metabolite levels. The overall data show that TAp63 overexpressing cells are more glycolytic-active than ΔNp63 cells, indicating that the two isoforms may regulate the key steps of glycolysis in an opposite manner. The mass-spectrometry proteomics data of the study have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium ( http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org ) via the PRIDE partner repository with data set identifiers PXD000769 and PXD000768.

  10. Molecular characters and expression analysis of a new isoform of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-10-20

    Oct 20, 2008 ... 2Department of Biotechnology, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009, China. Accepted 3 September, 2008. Using reverse transcriptase- polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), the cDNA encoding a new isoform of the myocyte enhancer factor-2 (BMEF2) was cloned from the brain of the strain ...

  11. Isolation and characterization of multiple abundant lipid transfer protein isoforms in developing sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ah Mi; Lee, Saet Buyl; Cho, Sung Ho; Hwang, Inhwan; Hur, Cheol-Goo; Suh, Mi Chung

    2008-02-01

    Sesame (Sesamum indicum) is an important oilseed crop; approximately 50% of the seed dry weight is storage oil. In a previous report, developing sesame seed expressed sequence tags (ESTs) revealed that ESTs encoding lipid transfer protein (LTPs) were one of the most abundant groups of sesame ESTs. LTP functions in the transfer of wax or cutin monomers and in the defense response against pathogen attack. To study the biological role of the abundant LTP isoforms in developing seeds, 122 ESTs out of 3328 sesame ESTs were analyzed against Arabidopsis and rice proteome databases. LTP fraction, which was partially purified from developing sesame seeds, actively transferred fluorescent phospholipids and bound to fatty acids. Full-length cDNAs of five out of 21 LTP isoforms were isolated and named SiLTP1-SiLTP5. The predicted amino acid sequences of the five SiLTPs harbor typical characteristics of LTPs, including conserved arrangement of cysteine residues. Northern blot analysis revealed that the five SiLTP isoforms were most abundantly expressed in developing seeds, but were also detected in flower tissues. Also, SiLTP3 and SiLTP4 transcripts were expressed in leaves and seed-pot walls, respectively. In addition, SiLTP2 and SiLTP4 transcripts were significantly induced in 6-day-old sesame seedlings by application of NaCl, mannitol, and abscisic acid (ABA). Transient expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-fusion constructs in Arabidopsis protoplasts revealed that SiLTP1 and SiLTP2 were secreted by different pathways. Taken together, the abundant LTPs in developing sesame seeds are involved in lipid transfer into the extracellular matrix. Possible biological roles of SiLTPs related to organ-specific expression and abiotic stresses are discussed.

  12. Hybrid Sequencing of Full-Length cDNA Transcripts of Stems and Leaves in Dendrobium officinale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu He

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Dendrobium officinale is an extremely valuable orchid used in traditional Chinese medicine, so sought after that it has a higher market value than gold. Although the expression profiles of some genes involved in the polysaccharide synthesis have previously been investigated, little research has been carried out on their alternatively spliced isoforms in D. officinale. In addition, information regarding the translocation of sugars from leaves to stems in D. officinale also remains limited. We analyzed the polysaccharide content of D. officinale leaves and stems, and completed in-depth transcriptome sequencing of these two diverse tissue types using second-generation sequencing (SGS and single-molecule real-time (SMRT sequencing technology. The results of this study yielded a digital inventory of gene and mRNA isoform expressions. A comparative analysis of both transcriptomes uncovered a total of 1414 differentially expressed genes, including 844 that were up-regulated and 570 that were down-regulated in stems. Of these genes, one sugars will eventually be exported transporter (SWEET and one sucrose transporter (SUT are expressed to a greater extent in D. officinale stems than in leaves. Two glycosyltransferase (GT and four cellulose synthase (Ces genes undergo a distinct degree of alternative splicing. In the stems, the content of polysaccharides is twice as much as that in the leaves. The differentially expressed GT and transcription factor (TF genes will be the focus of further study. The genes DoSWEET4 and DoSUT1 are significantly expressed in the stem, and are likely to be involved in sugar loading in the phloem.

  13. Gene transcription analysis of carrot allergens by relative quantification with single and duplex reverse transcription real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagon, Jutta; Jansen, Bärbel; Knoppik, Meike; Ehlers, Anke; Kroh, Lothar W; Holzhauser, Thomas; Vieths, Stefan; Broll, Hermann

    2010-01-01

    Single and duplex real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) systems have been developed to quantify specific mRNA transcription of genes coding for the major Daucus carota allergen isoforms Dau c 1.01 and Dau c 1.02. Methods were tested with samples from the local market. Whereas the gene transcription levels for Dau c 1.01 were consistently high in all investigated samples, significant differences for the Dau c 1.02 transcription could be demonstrated in randomly collected market samples. The gene transcription level for the minor Dau c 1.02 variant is about one log below Dau c 1.01. Both formats, single or duplex real-time methods, exhibit ideal cycle threshold (CT) ranges and good reproducibility. In particular, the easily performed duplex real-time PCR system is potentially suited for the selection of hypoallergenic varieties and studying the impact of post-harvesting or environmental conditions.

  14. Sumoylation activates the transcriptional activity of Pax-6, an important transcription factor for eye and brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Qin; Gong, Lili; Deng, Mi; Zhang, Lan; Sun, Shuming; Liu, Jiao; Ma, Haili; Yuan, Dan; Chen, Pei-Chao; Hu, Xiaohui; Liu, Jinping; Qin, Jichao; Xiao, Ling; Huang, Xiao-Qin; Zhang, Jian; Li, David Wan-Cheng

    2010-12-07

    Pax-6 is an evolutionarily conserved transcription factor regulating brain and eye development. Four Pax-6 isoforms have been reported previously. Although the longer Pax-6 isoforms (p46 and p48) bear two DNA-binding domains, the paired domain (PD) and the homeodomain (HD), the shorter Pax-6 isoform p32 contains only the HD for DNA binding. Although a third domain, the proline-, serine- and threonine-enriched activation (PST) domain, in the C termini of all Pax-6 isoforms mediates their transcriptional modulation via phosphorylation, how p32 Pax-6 could regulate target genes remains to be elucidated. In the present study, we show that sumoylation at K91 is required for p32 Pax-6 to bind to a HD-specific site and regulate expression of target genes. First, in vitro-synthesized p32 Pax-6 alone cannot bind the P3 sequence, which contains the HD recognition site, unless it is preincubated with nuclear extracts precleared by anti-Pax-6 but not by anti-small ubiquitin-related modifier 1 (anti-SUMO1) antibody. Second, in vitro-synthesized p32 Pax-6 can be sumoylated by SUMO1, and the sumoylated p32 Pax-6 then can bind to the P3 sequence. Third, Pax-6 and SUMO1 are colocalized in the embryonic optic and lens vesicles and can be coimmunoprecipitated. Finally, SUMO1-conjugated p32 Pax-6 exists in both the nucleus and cytoplasm, and sumoylation significantly enhances the DNA-binding ability of p32 Pax-6 and positively regulates gene expression. Together, our results demonstrate that sumoylation activates p32 Pax-6 in both DNA-binding and transcriptional activities. In addition, our studies demonstrate that p32 and p46 Pax-6 possess differential DNA-binding and regulatory activities.

  15. Alternative additives; Alternative additiver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2007-08-15

    In this project a number of industrial and agricultural waste products have been characterised and evaluated in terms of alkali-getter performance. The intended use is for biomass-fired power stations aiming at reducing corrosion or slagging related problems. The following products have been obtained, characterised and evaluated: 1) Brewery draff 2) Danish de-gassed manure 3) Paper sludge 4) Moulding sand 5) Spent bleaching earth 6) Anorthosite 7) Sand 8) Clay-sludge. Most of the above alternative additive candidates are deemed unsuitable due to insufficient chemical effect and/or expensive requirements for pre-treatment (such as drying and transportation). 3 products were selected for full-scale testing: de-gassed manure, spent bleaching earth and clay slugde. The full scale tests were undertaken at the biomass-fired power stations in Koege, Slagelse and Ensted. Spent bleaching earth (SBE) and clay sludge were the only tested additive candidates that had a proven ability to react with KCl, to thereby reduce Cl-concentrations in deposits, and reduce the deposit flux to superheater tubes. Their performance was shown to nearly as good as commercial additives. De-gassed manure, however, did not evaluate positively due to inhibiting effects of Ca in the manure. Furthermore, de-gassed manure has a high concentration of heavy metals, which imposes a financial burden with regard to proper disposal of the ash by-products. Clay-sludge is a wet clay slurring, and drying and transportation of this product entails substantial costs. Spent bleaching does not require much pre-treatment and is therefore the most promising alternative additive. On the other hand, bleaching earth contains residual plant oil which means that a range of legislation relating to waste combustion comes into play. Not least a waste combustion fee of 330 DKK/tonne. For all alternative (and commercial) additives disposal costs of the increase ash by-products represents a significant cost. This is

  16. Oligophrenin-1 (OPHN1, a gene involved in X-linked intellectual disability, undergoes RNA editing and alternative splicing during human brain development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Barresi

    Full Text Available Oligophrenin-1 (OPHN1 encodes for a Rho-GTPase-activating protein, important for dendritic morphogenesis and synaptic function. Mutations in this gene have been identified in patients with X-linked intellectual disability associated with cerebellar hypoplasia. ADAR enzymes are responsible for A-to-I RNA editing, an essential post-transcriptional RNA modification contributing to transcriptome and proteome diversification. Specifically, ADAR2 activity is essential for brain development and function. Herein, we show that the OPHN1 transcript undergoes post-transcriptional modifications such as A-to-I RNA editing and alternative splicing in human brain and other tissues. We found that OPHN1 editing is detectable already at the 18th week of gestation in human brain with a boost of editing at weeks 20 to 33, concomitantly with OPHN1 expression increase and the appearance of a novel OPHN1 splicing isoform. Our results demonstrate that multiple post-transcriptional events occur on OPHN1, a gene playing an important role in brain function and development.

  17. Transcriptional regulation of xenobiotic detoxification in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Jyoti R.; Horner, Michael A.; Lam, Geanette; Thummel, Carl S.

    2011-01-01

    Living organisms, from bacteria to humans, display a coordinated transcriptional response to xenobiotic exposure, inducing enzymes and transporters that facilitate detoxification. Several transcription factors have been identified in vertebrates that contribute to this regulatory response. In contrast, little is known about this pathway in insects. Here we show that the Drosophila Nrf2 (NF-E2-related factor 2) ortholog CncC (cap ‘n’ collar isoform-C) is a central regulator of xenobiotic detoxification responses. A binding site for CncC and its heterodimer partner Maf (muscle aponeurosis fibromatosis) is sufficient and necessary for robust transcriptional responses to three xenobiotic compounds: phenobarbital (PB), chlorpromazine, and caffeine. Genetic manipulations that alter the levels of CncC or its negative regulator, Keap1 (Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1), lead to predictable changes in xenobiotic-inducible gene expression. Transcriptional profiling studies reveal that more than half of the genes regulated by PB are also controlled by CncC. Consistent with these effects on detoxification gene expression, activation of the CncC/Keap1 pathway in Drosophila is sufficient to confer resistance to the lethal effects of the pesticide malathion. These studies establish a molecular mechanism for the regulation of xenobiotic detoxification in Drosophila and have implications for controlling insect populations and the spread of insect-borne human diseases. PMID:21896655

  18. N Termini of apPDE4 Isoforms Are Responsible for Targeting the Isoforms to Different Cellular Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Deok-Jin; Park, Soo-Won; Lee, Jin-A; Lee, Changhoon; Chae, Yeon-Su; Park, Hyungju; Kim, Min-Jeong; Choi, Sun-Lim; Lee, Nuribalhae; Kim, Hyoung; Kaang, Bong-Kiun

    2010-01-01

    Phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are known to play a key role in the compartmentalization of cAMP signaling; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying intracellular localization of different PDE isoforms are not understood. In this study, we have found that each of the supershort, short, and long forms of apPDE4 showed distinct localization in the…

  19. Cancer metabolism meets systems biology: Pyruvate kinase isoform PKM2 is a metabolic master regulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian V Filipp

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyruvate kinase activity is controlled by a tightly woven regulatory network. The oncofetal isoform of pyruvate kinase (PKM2 is a master regulator of cancer metabolism. PKM2 engages in parallel, feed-forward, positive and negative feedback control contributing to cancer progression. Besides its metabolic role, non-metabolic functions of PKM2 as protein kinase and transcriptional coactivator for c-MYC and hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha are essential for epidermal growth factor receptor activation-induced tumorigenesis. These biochemical activities are controlled by a shift in the oligomeric state of PKM2 that includes acetylation, oxidation, phosphorylation, prolyl hydroxylation and sumoylation. Metabolically active PKM2 tetramer is allosterically regulated and responds to nutritional and stress signals. Metabolically inactive PKM2 dimer is imported into the nucleus and can function as protein kinase stimulating transcription. A systems biology approach to PKM2 at the genome, transcriptome, proteome, metabolome and fluxome level reveals how differences in biomolecular structure translate into a global rewiring of cancer metabolism. Cancer systems biology takes us beyond the Warburg effect, opening unprecedented therapeutic opportunities.

  20. Molecular characterization and expression profiles of four transformer-2 isoforms in the Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Danli; Liu, Yuan; Hui, Min; Song, Chengwen; Liu, Hourong; Cui, Zhaoxia

    2017-07-01

    The transformer-2 ( tra-2) gene plays a key role in the regulatory hierarchy of sexual differentiation in somatic tissues and in the germline of Drosophila melanogaster. In this study, sequences and expression profiles of tra-2 in the Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis were characterized. Four tra-2 isoforms, designated as Estra-2a, Estra-2b, Estra-2c, and Estra-2d, were isolated. They all contained an RNA-recognition motif (RRM) and a linker region, which shared high similarity with other reported tra-2s. Sequence analysis revealed that Estra-2a, Estra-2b and Estra-2c are encoded by the same genomic locus and are generated by alternative splicing of the pre-mRNA. Compared with the other three isoforms, Estra-2d lacks the RS2 domain. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that all four isoforms were highly expressed in the fertilized egg, and in the 2-4 cell and blastula stages compared with larval stages ( P≤0.01), suggesting their maternal origin in early embryonic developmental stages. Notably, Estra-2a was highly expressed in male somatic tissues, while Estra-2c was significantly highly expressed in the ovary. These results suggest that Estra-2c is involved in sexual differentiation of the Chinese mitten crab. Our findings provide basic information for further functional studies of the tra-2 gene/protein in this species.

  1. Translation from a DMD exon 5 IRES results in a functional dystrophin isoform that attenuates dystrophinopathy in humans and mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wein, Nicolas; Vulin, Adeline; Falzarano, Maria S; Szigyarto, Christina Al-Khalili; Maiti, Baijayanta; Findlay, Andrew; Heller, Kristin N; Uhlén, Mathias; Bakthavachalu, Baskar; Messina, Sonia; Vita, Giuseppe; Passarelli, Chiara; Brioschi, Simona; Bovolenta, Matteo; Neri, Marcella; Gualandi, Francesca; Wilton, Steve D; Rodino-Klapac, Louise R; Yang, Lin; Dunn, Diane M; Schoenberg, Daniel R; Weiss, Robert B; Howard, Michael T; Ferlini, Alessandra; Flanigan, Kevin M

    2014-09-01

    Most mutations that truncate the reading frame of the DMD gene cause loss of dystrophin expression and lead to Duchenne muscular dystrophy. However, amelioration of disease severity has been shown to result from alternative translation initiation beginning in DMD exon 6 that leads to expression of a highly functional N-truncated dystrophin. Here we demonstrate that this isoform results from usage of an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) within exon 5 that is glucocorticoid inducible. We confirmed IRES activity by both peptide sequencing and ribosome profiling in muscle from individuals with minimal symptoms despite the presence of truncating mutations. We generated a truncated reading frame upstream of the IRES by exon skipping, which led to synthesis of a functional N-truncated isoform in both human subject-derived cell lines and in a new DMD mouse model, where expression of the truncated isoform protected muscle from contraction-induced injury and corrected muscle force to the same level as that observed in control mice. These results support a potential therapeutic approach for patients with mutations within the 5' exons of DMD.

  2. mRNA Transcript Diversity Creates New Opportunities for Pharmacological Intervention

    OpenAIRE

    Barrie, Elizabeth S.; Smith, Ryan M.; Sanford, Jonathan C.; Sadee, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Most protein coding genes generate multiple RNA transcripts through alternative splicing, variable 3′ and 5′UTRs, and RNA editing. Although drug design typically targets the main transcript, alternative transcripts can have profound physiological effects, encoding proteins with distinct functions or regulatory properties. Formation of these alternative transcripts is tissue-selective and context-dependent, creating opportunities for more effective and targeted therapies with reduced adverse e...

  3. Molecular cloning of four cDNAs encoding prepro-crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) from the eyestalk of the red rock crab Cancer productus: identification of two genetically encoded CHH isoforms and two putative post-translationally derived CHH variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yun-Wei A; Weller, John R; Christie, Andrew E; de la Iglesia, Horacio O

    2008-02-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that the four known sinus gland (SG) isoforms of Cancer productus crustacean hyperglycemic hormone precursor-related peptide (Capr-CPRP I-IV) are differentially distributed in conserved patterns among individual crabs. This finding strongly supported the presence of multiple prepro-crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (chh) transcripts in each crab, as well as the translation and processing of the encoded prepro-hormones. Whether these transcripts contained common or distinct isoforms of CHH remained unknown. To address this question, molecular analyses of the C. productus eyestalk prepro-chhs were undertaken. Using a PCR-based cloning strategy, four prepro-chh cDNAs were characterized: one encoding CPRP I, one encoding CPRP III (found to possess Ile(26) rather than Leu(26) as reported previously), and two encoding CPRP II. No cDNA encoding CPRP IV was identified. The deduced CHH present in the prepro-hormones containing CPRP I and III were identical (Capr-CHH I) and differed from that (Capr-CHH II) present in the two prepro-hormones containing Capr-CPRP II at a single residue, a Thr(5) for Ser(5) substitution. As both CHH isoforms possess Glu at position 1, a cyclization of this residue to pyroglutamine is likely as the peptides mature, as has been seen for the CHHs of other brachyuran species. Likewise, homology to other CHHs suggests all C. productus isoforms are C-terminally amidated. These post-translational modifications would result in four SG isoforms of CHH: Capr-CHH I, Capr-pyro-CHH I, Capr-CHH II, and Capr-pyro-CHH II. Southern blotting supported the hypothesis that at least three prepro-chh transcripts are present in each crab, while dual in situ hybridization-immunohistochemistry localized the transcripts to previously mapped CHH immunopositive somata in the X-organ, the major source of innervation to the SG.

  4. One isoform of Arg/Abl2 tyrosine kinase is nuclear and the other seven cytosolic isoforms differently modulate cell morphology, motility and the cytoskeleton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianchi, Cristina; Torsello, Barbara; Di Stefano, Vitalba; Zipeto, Maria A.; Facchetti, Rita; Bombelli, Silvia; Perego, Roberto A.

    2013-01-01

    The non-receptor tyrosine kinase Abelson related gene (Arg/Abl2) regulates cell migration and morphogenesis by modulating the cytoskeleton. Arg promotes actin-based cell protrusions and spreading, and inhibits cell migration by attenuating stress fiber formation and contractility via activation of the RhoA inhibitor, p190RhoGAP, and by regulating focal adhesion dynamics also via CrkII phosphorylation. Eight full-length Arg isoforms with different N- and C-termini are endogenously expressed in human cells. In this paper, the eight Arg isoforms, subcloned in the pFLAG-CMV2 vector, were transfected in COS-7 cells in order to study their subcellular distribution and role in cell morphology, migration and cytoskeletal modulation. The transfected 1BSCTS Arg isoform has a nuclear distribution and phosphorylates CrkII in the nucleus, whilst the other isoforms are detected in the cytoplasm. The 1BLCTL, 1BSCTL, 1ASCTS isoforms were able to significantly decrease stress fibers, induce cell shrinkage and filopodia-like protrusions with a significant increase in p190RhoGAP phosphorylation. In contrast, 1ALCTL, 1ALCTS, 1ASCTL and 1BLCTS isoforms do not significantly decrease stress fibers and induce the formation of retraction tail-like protrusions. The 1BLCTL and 1ALCTL isoforms have different effects on cell migration and focal adhesions. All these data may open new perspectives to study the mechanisms of cell invasiveness. -Highlights: • Each of the eight Arg isoforms was transfected in COS-7 cells. • Only the 1BSCTS Arg isoform has a nuclear distribution in transfected cells. • The cytoplasmic isoforms and F-actin colocalize cortically and in cell protrusions. • Arg isoforms differently phosphorylate p190RhoGAP and CrkII. • Arg isoforms differently modulate stress fibers, cell protrusions and motility

  5. Ceramide accumulation in L6 skeletal muscle cells due to increased activity of ceramide synthase isoforms has opposing effects on insulin action to those caused by palmitate treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frangioudakis, Georgia; Diakanastasis, Barbara; Liao, Bing-Qing M; Saville, Jennifer T; Hoffman, Nolan J; Mitchell, Todd W; Schmitz-Peiffer, Carsten

    2013-12-01

    An accumulation of ceramides has been implicated in the generation of insulin resistance in skeletal muscle upon an oversupply of fatty acid. Different ceramide species are generated through the actions of ceramide synthases (CerSs), which incorporate specific acyl side chains. We tested whether particular CerS isoforms promoted insulin resistance through the generation of more inhibitory ceramide species, thus representing potential targets for intervention. CerS isoforms CerS1, CerS2, CerS4, CerS5 and CerS6 were overexpressed in L6 myotubes using adenovirus, and cells were treated with palmitate and stimulated with insulin. Alternatively, CerS isoforms were knocked down using siRNAs. Sphingolipids were examined by mass spectrometry and tracer incorporation. Phosphorylation of IRS1 and Akt was measured by immunoblotting, while glucose disposal was assessed by measuring GLUT4 translocation and the incorporation of [(14)C]glucose into glycogen. Palmitate treatment increased the levels of several ceramides but reduced the levels of sphingomyelins, while insulin had no effect. The fatty acid also inhibited insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation and glycogen synthesis. Overexpression of CerS isoforms increased specific ceramides. Unexpectedly, the overexpression of CerS1 and CerS6 promoted insulin action, while no isoform had inhibitory effects. CerS6 knockdown had effects reciprocal to those of CerS6 overexpression. Palmitate may increase intracellular ceramide levels through sphingomyelin hydrolysis as well as de novo synthesis, but no particular species were implicated in the generation of insulin resistance. The modulation of ceramides through an alteration of CerS expression does not affect the action of insulin in the same way as ceramide generation by palmitate treatment. Conversely, certain isoforms promote insulin action, indicating the importance of ceramides in cell function.

  6. Differential Requirement of Human Cytomegalovirus UL112-113 Protein Isoforms for Viral Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schommartz, Tim; Tang, Jiajia; Brost, Rebekka; Brune, Wolfram

    2017-09-01

    The UL112-113 gene is one of the few alternatively spliced genes of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). It codes for four phosphoproteins, p34, p43, p50, and p84, all of which are expressed with early kinetics and accumulate at sites of viral DNA replication within the host cell nucleus. Although these proteins are known to play important, possibly essential, roles in the viral replication cycle, little is known about the contribution of individual UL112-113 protein products. Here we used splice site mutagenesis, intron deletion and substitution, and nonsense mutagenesis to prevent the individual expression of each UL112-113 protein isoform and to investigate the importance of each isoform for viral replication. We show that HCMV mutants lacking p34 or p50 expression replicated to high titers in human fibroblasts and endothelial cells, indicating that these proteins are nonessential for viral replication, while mutant viruses carrying a stop mutation within the p84 coding sequence were severely growth impaired. Viral replication could not be detected upon the inactivation of p43 expression, indicating that this UL112-113 protein is essential for viral replication. We also analyzed the ability of UL112-113 proteins to recruit other viral proteins to intranuclear prereplication compartments. While UL112-113 expression was sufficient to recruit the UL44-encoded viral DNA polymerase processivity factor, it was not sufficient for the recruitment of the viral UL84 and UL117 proteins. Remarkably, both the p43 and p84 isoforms were required for the efficient recruitment of pUL44, which is consistent with their critical role in the viral life cycle. IMPORTANCE Human cytomegalovirus requires gene products from 11 genetic loci for the lytic replication of its genome. One of these loci, UL112-113, encodes four proteins with common N termini by alternative splicing. In this study, we inactivated the expression of each of the four UL112-113 proteins individually and determined their

  7. Longevity Genes Revealed by Integrative Analysis of Isoform-Specific daf-16/FoxO Mutants of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Albert Tzong-Yang; Guo, Chunfang; Itani, Omar A; Budaitis, Breane G; Williams, Travis W; Hopkins, Christopher E; McEachin, Richard C; Pande, Manjusha; Grant, Ana R; Yoshina, Sawako; Mitani, Shohei; Hu, Patrick J

    2015-10-01

    FoxO transcription factors promote longevity across taxa. How they do so is poorly understood. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the A- and F-isoforms of the FoxO transcription factor DAF-16 extend life span in the context of reduced DAF-2 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGFR) signaling. To elucidate the mechanistic basis for DAF-16/FoxO-dependent life span extension, we performed an integrative analysis of isoform-specific daf-16/FoxO mutants. In contrast to previous studies suggesting that DAF-16F plays a more prominent role in life span control than DAF-16A, isoform-specific daf-16/FoxO mutant phenotypes and whole transcriptome profiling revealed a predominant role for DAF-16A over DAF-16F in life span control, stress resistance, and target gene regulation. Integration of these datasets enabled the prioritization of a subset of 92 DAF-16/FoxO target genes for functional interrogation. Among 29 genes tested, two DAF-16A-specific target genes significantly influenced longevity. A loss-of-function mutation in the conserved gene gst-20, which is induced by DAF-16A, reduced life span extension in the context of daf-2/IGFR RNAi without influencing longevity in animals subjected to control RNAi. Therefore, gst-20 promotes DAF-16/FoxO-dependent longevity. Conversely, a loss-of-function mutation in srr-4, a gene encoding a seven-transmembrane-domain receptor family member that is repressed by DAF-16A, extended life span in control animals, indicating that DAF-16/FoxO may extend life span at least in part by reducing srr-4 expression. Our discovery of new longevity genes underscores the efficacy of our integrative strategy while providing a general framework for identifying specific downstream gene regulatory events that contribute substantially to transcription factor functions. As FoxO transcription factors have conserved functions in promoting longevity and may be dysregulated in aging-related diseases, these findings promise to illuminate fundamental

  8. fruitless alternative splicing and sex behaviour in insects

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In Drosophila melanogaster, male courtship requires proteins encoded by the fruitless (fru) gene that are produced in different sex-specific isoforms via alternative splicing. Drosophila mutant flies with loss-of-function alleles of the fru gene exhibit blocked male courtship behaviour. However, various individual steps in the ...

  9. fruitless alternative splicing and sex behaviour in insects: an ancient ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In Drosophila melanogaster, male courtship requires proteins encoded by the fruitless (fru) gene that are produced in different sex-specific isoforms via alternative splicing. Drosophila mutant flies with loss-of-function alleles of the fru gene exhibit blocked male courtship behaviour. However, various individual steps in the ...

  10. Isoform localization of Dectin-1 regulates the signaling quality of anti-fungal immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Mike; Müller, Jörg P; Spies-Weisshart, Bärbel; Gräfe, Christine; Kurzai, Oliver; Hünniger, Kerstin; Hochhaus, Andreas; Scholl, Sebastian; Schnetzke, Ulf

    2017-05-01

    Dectin-1 is recognized as a major receptor for fungal ß-glucans and contributes to anti-fungal immunity. Human monocyte populations express Dectin-1 isoforms A and B, which differ by the presence of a stalk region and its N-linked glycosylation site. Here, we analyzed the expression of both isoforms in human monocyte-derived cells. The cellular localization on cell lines stably expressing either Dectin-1 isoform A or B was studied by flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Intracellular protein signaling and cytokine production were analyzed by immunoblotting and cytometric bead array, respectively. Monocyte-derived cells showed cell type-specific expression of the two isoforms. Glycosylated Dectin-1 isoform A was predominantly localized at the cell surface, non-glycosylated isoform B was retained intracellularly. Inhibition of glycosylation resulted in efficient abrogation of cell surface expression of isoform A. Signaling quality following Dectin-1 stimulation was reduced in isoform B cells. Differential isoform specific cytokine secretion was observed by cytometric bead array. We show here that n-glycosylation of Dectin-1 is crucial for its cell surface expression and consequently signal transduction. Taken together, unique cytokine secretion and varying expression levels of human Dectin-1 isoforms on monocyte-derived cells may indicate distinct isoform usage as a cell type-specific mechanism of regulating anti-fungal immunity. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Isoform-Specific Substrate Inhibition Mechanism of Human Tryptophan Hydroxylase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tidemand, Kasper Damgaard; Peters, Günther H.J.; Harris, Pernille

    2017-01-01

    Tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) catalyzes the initial and rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of serotonin, which is associated with a variety of disorders such as depression and irritable bowel syndrome. TPH exists in two isoforms: TPH1 and TPH2. TPH1 catalyzes the initial step in the synthesis...... of serotonin in the peripheral tissues, while TPH2 catalyzes this step in the brain. In this study, the steady-state kinetic mechanism for the catalytic domain of human TPH1 has been determined. Varying substrate tryptophan (Trp) and tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) results in a hybrid Ping Pong-ordered mechanism...... in which the reaction can either occur through a Ping Pong or a sequential mechanism depending on the concentration of tryptophan. The catalytic domain of TPH1 shares a sequence identity of 81% with TPH2. Despite the high sequence identity, differences in the kinetic parameters of the isoforms have been...

  12. Isoform expression in the multiple soluble malate dehydrogenase of Hoplias malabaricus (Erythrinidae, Characiformes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Aquino-Silva

    Full Text Available Kinetic properties and thermal stabilities of Hoplias malabaricus liver and skeletal muscle unfractionated malate dehydrogenase (MDH, EC 1.1.1.37 and its isolated isoforms were analyzed to further study the possible sMDH-A* locus duplication evolved from a recent tandem duplication. Both A (A1 and A2 and B isoforms had similar optima pH (7.5-8.0. While Hoplias A isoform could not be characterized as thermostable, B could as thermolabile. A isoforms differed from B isoform in having higher Km values for oxaloacetate. The possibly duplicated A2 isoform showed higher substrate affinity than the A1. Hoplias duplicated A isoforms may influence the direction of carbon flow between glycolisis and gluconeogenesis.

  13. Isoform expression in the multiple soluble malate dehydrogenase of Hoplias malabaricus (Erythrinidae, Characiformes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aquino-Silva M. R.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Kinetic properties and thermal stabilities of Hoplias malabaricus liver and skeletal muscle unfractionated malate dehydrogenase (MDH, EC 1.1.1.37 and its isolated isoforms were analyzed to further study the possible sMDH-A* locus duplication evolved from a recent tandem duplication. Both A (A1 and A2 and B isoforms had similar optima pH (7.5-8.0. While Hoplias A isoform could not be characterized as thermostable, B could as thermolabile. A isoforms differed from B isoform in having higher Km values for oxaloacetate. The possibly duplicated A2 isoform showed higher substrate affinity than the A1. Hoplias duplicated A isoforms may influence the direction of carbon flow between glycolisis and gluconeogenesis.

  14. HLA-G allelic variants are associated with differences in the HLA-G mRNA isoform profile and HLA-G mRNA levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Thomas Vauvert F; Hylenius, Sine; Rørbye, Christina

    2003-01-01

    During pregnancy, the human extra-villous trophoblast in the contact zone between maternal and fetal tissue in the placenta does not express the classical MHC class I and II molecules. Instead, HLA-G and -C, and possibly HLA-E, are expressed. HLA-G may modulate the immunological relationship...... between mother and fetus in several ways. Finally, the expression of membrane-bound HLA-G and soluble HLA-G has been proposed to influence the outcome of pregnancy, and an aberrant HLA-G expression in pre-eclamptic placentas and spontaneous abortions has been reported. Here, an association between certain...... HLA-G polymorphisms and the mRNA levels of the different alternatively spliced HLA-G isoforms in first trimester trophoblast cell populations is reported. Several alternatively spliced HLA-G mRNA isoforms, including a 14-bp polymorphism in the 3'UTR end (exon 8) of the HLA-G gene, are expressed...

  15. Isoform-Specific Substrate Inhibition Mechanism of Human Tryptophan Hydroxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tidemand, Kasper D; Peters, Günther H; Harris, Pernille; Stensgaard, Eva; Christensen, Hans E M

    2017-11-21

    Tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) catalyzes the initial and rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of serotonin, which is associated with a variety of disorders such as depression and irritable bowel syndrome. TPH exists in two isoforms: TPH1 and TPH2. TPH1 catalyzes the initial step in the synthesis of serotonin in the peripheral tissues, while TPH2 catalyzes this step in the brain. In this study, the steady-state kinetic mechanism for the catalytic domain of human TPH1 has been determined. Varying substrate tryptophan (Trp) and tetrahydrobiopterin (BH 4 ) results in a hybrid Ping Pong-ordered mechanism in which the reaction can either occur through a Ping Pong or a sequential mechanism depending on the concentration of tryptophan. The catalytic domain of TPH1 shares a sequence identity of 81% with TPH2. Despite the high sequence identity, differences in the kinetic parameters of the isoforms have been identified; i.e., only TPH1 displays substrate tryptophan inhibition. This study demonstrates that the difference can be traced to an active site loop which displays different properties in the TPH isoforms. Steady-state kinetic results of the isoforms, and variants with point mutations in a loop lining the active site, show that the kinetic parameters of only TPH1 are significantly changed upon mutations. Mutations in the active site loop of TPH1 result in an increase in the substrate inhibition constant, K i , and therefore turnover rate. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal that this substrate inhibition mechanism occurs through a closure of the cosubstrate, BH 4 , binding pocket, which is induced by Trp binding.

  16. Regulation of NADPH oxidase 5 by protein kinase C isoforms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Chen

    Full Text Available NADPH oxidase5 (Nox5 is a novel Nox isoform which has recently been recognized as having important roles in the pathogenesis of coronary artery disease, acute myocardial infarction, fetal ventricular septal defect and cancer. The activity of Nox5 and production of reactive oxygen species is regulated by intracellular calcium levels and phosphorylation. However, the kinases that phosphorylate Nox5 remain poorly understood. Previous studies have shown that the phosphorylation of Nox5 is PKC dependent, but this contention was based on the use of pharmacological inhibitors and the isoforms of PKC involved remain unknown. Thus, the major goals of this study were to determine whether PKC can directly regulate Nox5 phosphorylation and activity, to identify which isoforms are involved in the process, and to understand the functional significance of this pathway in disease. We found that a relatively specific PKCα inhibitor, Ro-32-0432, dose-dependently inhibited PMA-induced superoxide production from Nox5. PMA-stimulated Nox5 activity was significantly reduced in cells with genetic silencing of PKCα and PKCε, enhanced by loss of PKCδ and the silencing of PKCθ expression was without effect. A constitutively active form of PKCα robustly increased basal and PMA-stimulated Nox5 activity and promoted the phosphorylation of Nox5 on Ser490, Thr494, and Ser498. In contrast, constitutively active PKCε potently inhibited both basal and PMA-dependent Nox5 activity. Co-IP and in vitro kinase assay experiments demonstrated that PKCα directly binds to Nox5 and modifies Nox5 phosphorylation and activity. Exposure of endothelial cells to high glucose significantly increased PKCα activation, and enhanced Nox5 derived superoxide in a manner that was in prevented by a PKCα inhibitor, Go 6976. In summary, our study reveals that PKCα is the primary isoform mediating the activation of Nox5 and this maybe of significance in our understanding of the vascular

  17. Structural differences between C-terminal regions of tropomyosin isoforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Śliwińska

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Tropomyosins are actin-binding regulatory proteins which overlap end-to-end along the filament. High resolution structures of the overlap regions were determined for muscle and non-muscle tropomyosins in the absence of actin. Conformations of the junction regions bound to actin are unknown. In this work, orientation of the overlap on actin alone and on actin–myosin complex was evaluated by measuring FRET distances between a donor (AEDANS attached to tropomyosin and an acceptor (DABMI bound to actin’s Cys374. Donor was attached to the Cys residue introduced by site-directed mutagenesis near the C-terminal half of the overlap. The recombinant alpha-tropomyosin isoforms used in this study – skeletal muscle skTM, non-muscle TM2 and TM5a, and chimeric TM1b9a had various amino acid sequences of the N- and C-termini involved in the end-to-end overlap. The donor-acceptor distances calculated for each isoform varied between 36.4 Å and 48.1 Å. Rigor binding of myosin S1 increased the apparent FRET distances of skTM and TM2, but decreased the distances separating TM5a and TM1b9a from actin. The results show that isoform-specific sequences of the end-to-end overlaps determine orientations and dynamics of tropomyosin isoforms on actin. This can be important for specificity of tropomyosin in the regulation of actin filament diverse functions.

  18. Apolipoprotein (A) Isoform Distribution and Plasma Lipoprotein (a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Plasma lipoprotein (a) Concentrations and apo(a) isoforms were determined in 101 healthy Nigerian subjects (M=63), F=38; age range 17-68 years), and coronary heart disease (CHD) patients (M=19, F=17, age range 30-79 years). Median Lp(a) level was 24.4 mg/di in the CHD patients and 22.1 mg/di in the controls.

  19. Progesterone receptor isoforms, agonists and antagonists differentially reprogram estrogen signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Hari; Greene, Marianne E; Zarnke, Allison L; Laine, Muriel; Al Abosy, Rose; Chang, Ya-Fang; Dembo, Anna G; Schoenfelt, Kelly; Vadhi, Raga; Qiu, Xintao; Rao, Prakash; Santhamma, Bindu; Nair, Hareesh B; Nickisch, Klaus J; Long, Henry W; Becker, Lev; Brown, Myles; Greene, Geoffrey L

    2018-01-12

    Major roadblocks to developing effective progesterone receptor (PR)-targeted therapies in breast cancer include the lack of highly-specific PR modulators, a poor understanding of the pro- or anti-tumorigenic networks for PR isoforms and ligands, and an incomplete understanding of the cross talk between PR and estrogen receptor (ER) signaling. Through genomic analyses of xenografts treated with various clinically-relevant ER and PR-targeting drugs, we describe how the activation or inhibition of PR differentially reprograms estrogen signaling, resulting in the segregation of transcriptomes into separate PR agonist and antagonist-mediated groups. These findings address an ongoing controversy regarding the clinical utility of PR agonists and antagonists, alone or in combination with tamoxifen, for breast cancer management. Additionally, the two PR isoforms PRA and PRB, bind distinct but overlapping genomic sites and interact with different sets of co-regulators to differentially modulate estrogen signaling to be either pro- or anti-tumorigenic. Of the two isoforms, PRA inhibited gene expression and ER chromatin binding significantly more than PRB. Differential gene expression was observed in PRA and PRB-rich patient tumors and PRA-rich gene signatures had poorer survival outcomes. In support of antiprogestin responsiveness of PRA-rich tumors, gene signatures associated with PR antagonists, but not PR agonists, predicted better survival outcomes. The better patient survival associated with PR antagonists versus PR agonists treatments was further reflected in the higher in vivo anti-tumor activity of therapies that combine tamoxifen with PR antagonists and modulators. This study suggests that distinguishing common effects observed due to concomitant interaction of another receptor with its ligand (agonist or antagonist), from unique isoform and ligand-specific effects will inform the development of biomarkers for patient selection and translation of PR

  20. Nitric oxide synthase isoforms in spontaneous and salt hypertension

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hojná, Silvie; Kuneš, Jaroslav; Zicha, Josef

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 25, Suppl. 2 (2007), S 338-S 338 ISSN 0263-6352. [European Meeting on Hypertension /17./. 15.06.2007-19.06.2007, Milan] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0510 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : nitric oxide synthase isoforms * spontaneous and salt hypertension Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery

  1. Progesterone receptor isoforms, agonists and antagonists differentially reprogram estrogen signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Hari; Greene, Marianne E.; Zarnke, Allison L.; Laine, Muriel; Al Abosy, Rose; Chang, Ya-Fang; Dembo, Anna G.; Schoenfelt, Kelly; Vadhi, Raga; Qiu, Xintao; Rao, Prakash; Santhamma, Bindu; Nair, Hareesh B.; Nickisch, Klaus J.; Long, Henry W.; Becker, Lev; Brown, Myles; Greene, Geoffrey L.

    2018-01-01

    Major roadblocks to developing effective progesterone receptor (PR)-targeted therapies in breast cancer include the lack of highly-specific PR modulators, a poor understanding of the pro- or anti-tumorigenic networks for PR isoforms and ligands, and an incomplete understanding of the cross talk between PR and estrogen receptor (ER) signaling. Through genomic analyses of xenografts treated with various clinically-relevant ER and PR-targeting drugs, we describe how the activation or inhibition of PR differentially reprograms estrogen signaling, resulting in the segregation of transcriptomes into separate PR agonist and antagonist-mediated groups. These findings address an ongoing controversy regarding the clinical utility of PR agonists and antagonists, alone or in combination with tamoxifen, for breast cancer management. Additionally, the two PR isoforms PRA and PRB, bind distinct but overlapping genomic sites and interact with different sets of co-regulators to differentially modulate estrogen signaling to be either pro- or anti-tumorigenic. Of the two isoforms, PRA inhibited gene expression and ER chromatin binding significantly more than PRB. Differential gene expression was observed in PRA and PRB-rich patient tumors and PRA-rich gene signatures had poorer survival outcomes. In support of antiprogestin responsiveness of PRA-rich tumors, gene signatures associated with PR antagonists, but not PR agonists, predicted better survival outcomes. The better patient survival associated with PR antagonists versus PR agonists treatments was further reflected in the higher in vivo anti-tumor activity of therapies that combine tamoxifen with PR antagonists and modulators. This study suggests that distinguishing common effects observed due to concomitant interaction of another receptor with its ligand (agonist or antagonist), from unique isoform and ligand-specific effects will inform the development of biomarkers for patient selection and translation of PR

  2. Association of gamma-tubulin isoforms with tubulin dimers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dráber, Pavel; Sulimenko, Vadym

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 3 (2003), s. 197-198 ISSN 1065-6995. [The Plant Cytoskeleton: functional diversity and biotechnological implication. Kyjev, 23.09.2002-27.09.2002] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA5052004; GA MŠk LN00A026 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : association * gamma-tubulin * isoforms Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.092, year: 2003

  3. Transforming growth factor-β1 regulates fibronectin isoform expression and splicing factor SRp40 expression during ATDC5 chondrogenic maturation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Fei; Gilbert, James R.; Harrison, Gerald; Adams, Christopher S.; Freeman, Theresa; Tao Zhuliang; Zaka, Raihana; Liang Hongyan; Williams, Charlene; Tuan, Rocky S.; Norton, Pamela A.; Hickok, Noreen J.

    2007-01-01

    Fibronectin (FN) isoform expression is altered during chondrocyte commitment and maturation, with cartilage favoring expression of FN isoforms that includes the type II repeat extra domain B (EDB) but excludes extra domain A (EDA). We and others have hypothesized that the regulated splicing of FN mRNAs is necessary for the progression of chondrogenesis. To test this, we treated the pre-chondrogenic cell line ATDC5 with transforming growth factor-β1, which has been shown to modulate expression of the EDA and EDB exons, as well as the late markers of chondrocyte maturation; it also slightly accelerates the early acquisition of a sulfated proteoglycan matrix without affecting cell proliferation. When chondrocytes are treated with TGF-β1, the EDA exon is preferentially excluded at all times whereas the EDB exon is relatively depleted at early times. This regulated alternative splicing of FN correlates with the regulation of alternative splicing of SRp40, a splicing factor facilitating inclusion of the EDA exon. To determine if overexpression of the SRp40 isoforms altered FN and FN EDA organization, cDNAs encoding these isoforms were overexpressed in ATDC5 cells. Overexpression of the long-form of SRp40 yielded an FN organization similar to TGF-β1 treatment; whereas overexpression of the short form of SRp40 (which facilitates EDA inclusion) increased formation of long-thick FN fibrils. Therefore, we conclude that the effects of TGF-β1 on FN splicing during chondrogenesis may be largely dependent on its effect on SRp40 isoform expression

  4. Dissecting the role of the elongation factor 1A isoforms in hepatocellular carcinoma cells by liposome-mediated delivery of siRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farra, Rossella; Scaggiante, Bruna; Guerra, Chiara; Pozzato, Gabriele; Grassi, Mario; Zanconati, Fabrizio; Perrone, Francesca; Ferrari, Cinzia; Trotta, Francesco; Grassi, Gabriele; Dapas, Barbara

    2017-06-20

    Eukaryotic elongation factor 1A (eEF1A), a protein involved in protein synthesis, has two major isoforms, eEF1A1 and eEF1A2. Despite the evidences of their involvement in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the quantitative contribution of each of the two isoforms to the disease is unknown. We depleted the two isoforms by means of siRNAs and studied the effects in three different HCC cell lines. Particular care was dedicated to select siRNAs able to target each of the two isoform without affecting the other one. This is not a trivial aspect due to the high sequence homology between eEF1A1 and eEF1A2. The selected siRNAs can specifically deplete either eEF1A1 or eEF1A2. This, in turn, results in an impairment of cell vitality, growth and arrest in the G1/G0 phase of the cell cycle. Notably, these effects are quantitatively superior following eEF1A1 than eEF1A2 depletion. Moreover, functional tests revealed that the G1/G0 block induced by eEF1A1 depletion depends on the down-regulation of the transcription factor E2F1, a known player in HCC. In conclusion, our data indicate that the independent targeting of the two eEF1A isoforms is effective in reducing HCC cell growth and that eEF1A1 depletion may result in a more evident effect. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Conformational Flexibility Differentiates Naturally Occurring Bet v 1 Isoforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarina Grutsch

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The protein Bet v 1 represents the main cause for allergic reactions to birch pollen in Europe and North America. Structurally homologous isoforms of Bet v 1 can have different properties regarding allergic sensitization and Th2 polarization, most likely due to differential susceptibility to proteolytic cleavage. Using NMR relaxation experiments and molecular dynamics simulations, we demonstrate that the initial proteolytic cleavage sites in two naturally occurring Bet v 1 isoforms, Bet v 1.0101 (Bet v 1a and Bet v 1.0102 (Bet v 1d, are conformationally flexible. Inaccessible cleavage sites in helices and strands are highly flexible on the microsecond-millisecond time scale, whereas those located in loops display faster nanosecond-microsecond flexibility. The data consistently show that Bet v 1.0102 is more flexible and conformationally heterogeneous than Bet v 1.0101. Moreover, NMR hydrogen-deuterium exchange measurements reveal that the backbone amides in Bet v 1.0102 are significantly more solvent exposed, in agreement with this isoform’s higher susceptibility to proteolytic cleavage. The differential conformational flexibility of Bet v 1 isoforms, along with the transient exposure of inaccessible sites to the protein surface, may be linked to proteolytic susceptibility, representing a potential structure-based rationale for the observed differences in Th2 polarization and allergic sensitization.

  6. [Characterization of a malic enzyme isoform V from Mucor circinelloides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingtong; Chen, Haiqin; Song, Yuanda; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Yongquan; Chen, Wei

    2016-02-04

    We aimed at characterizing a malic enzyme isoform V from Mucor circinelloides. me1 gene encoding malic enzyme isoform V was amplified and cloned into expression vector pET28a. High-purity recombinant protein BLME1 was obtained by affinity chromatography using. Ni-NTA column and characterized subsequently. The optimum conditions were pH at 8.0 and temperature at 33 degrees C. Under optimum conditions, BLME1 activity achieved 92.8 U/mg. The K(m) for L-malate and NADP+ were 0.74960 ± 0.06120 mmol/L and 0.22070 ± 0.01810 mmol/L, the V(max) for L-malate and NADP+ were 72.820 ± 1.077 U/mg and 86.110 ± 1.665 U/mg, respectively. In addition, ions played important roles in BLME1 activity; several ions such as Mn2+, Mg2+, Co2+, Ni2+ could activate BLME1, whereas Ca2+, Cu2+ could be used as inhibitors. Additionally, the metabolic intermediates such as oxaloacetic acid and α-ketoglutaric acid inhibited the activity of BLME1, whereas succinic acid activated it. A malic enzyme isoform V from Mucor circinelloides was characterized, providing the references for further studies on this enzyme.

  7. Functional characterization of the HNF4α isoform (HNF4α8) expressed in pancreatic β-cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ihara, Arisa; Yamagata, Kazuya; Nammo, Takao; Miura, Atsuko; Yuan, Ming; Tanaka, Toshiya; Sladek, Frances M.; Matsuzawa, Yuji; Miyagawa, Jun-ichiro; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2005-01-01

    Mutations in the hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF) 4α gene cause a form of maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY1), which is a monogenic form of type 2 diabetes characterized by impaired insulin secretion by pancreatic β-cells. HNF4α is a transcription factor expressed in the liver, kidney, intestine, and pancreatic islet. Multiple splice variants of the HNF4α gene have been identified and an isoform of HNF4α8, an N-terminal splice variant, is expressed in pancreatic β-cells. However, expression levels of HNF4α protein in pancreatic β-cells and the transcriptional activity of HNF4α8 are not yet understood. In the present study, we investigated the expression of HNF4α in β-cells and examined its functional properties. Western blotting and immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the expression of HNF4α protein in pancreatic islets and INS-1 cells was much lower than in the liver. A reporter gene assay showed that the transactivation potential of HNF4α8 was significantly weaker than that of HNF4α2, which is a major isoform in the liver, suggesting that the total level of HNF4α activity is very weak in pancreatic β-cells. We also showed that the N-terminal A/B region of HNF4α8 possessed no activation function and C-terminal F region negatively regulated the transcriptional activity of HNF4α8. The information presented here would be helpful for the better understanding of MODY1/HNF4α diabetes

  8. Alternative Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alternative fuels include gaseous fuels such as hydrogen, natural gas, and propane; alcohols such as ethanol, methanol, and butanol; vegetable and waste-derived oils; and electricity. Overview of alternative fuels is here.

  9. Differential expression, localization and activity of two alternatively spliced isoforms of human APC regulator CDH1.

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Yuan; Ching, Yick-Pang; Ng, Raymond W M; Jin, Dong-Yan

    2003-01-01

    The timely destruction of key regulators through ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis ensures the orderly progression of the cell cycle. The APC (anaphase-promoting complex) is a major component of this degradation machinery and its activation is required for the execution of critical events. Recent studies have just begun to reveal the complex control of the APC through a regulatory network involving WD40 repeat proteins CDC20 and CDH1. In the present paper, we report on the identification and cha...

  10. The α2β2 isoform combination dominates the astrocytic Na+ /K+ -ATPase activity and is rendered nonfunctional by the α2.G301R familial hemiplegic migraine type 2-associated mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoica, Anca; Larsen, Brian Roland; Assentoft, Mette; Holm, Rikke; Holt, Leanne Melissa; Vilhardt, Frederik; Vilsen, Bente; Lykke-Hartmann, Karin; Olsen, Michelle Lynne; MacAulay, Nanna

    2017-11-01

    Synaptic activity results in transient elevations in extracellular K + , clearance of which is critical for sustained function of the nervous system. The K + clearance is, in part, accomplished by the neighboring astrocytes by mechanisms involving the Na + /K + -ATPase. The Na + /K + -ATPase consists of an α and a β subunit, each with several isoforms present in the central nervous system, of which the α2β2 and α2β1 isoform combinations are kinetically geared for astrocytic K + clearance. While transcript analysis data designate α2β2 as predominantly astrocytic, the relative quantitative protein distribution and isoform pairing remain unknown. As cultured astrocytes altered their isoform expression in vitro, we isolated a pure astrocytic fraction from rat brain by a novel immunomagnetic separation approach in order to determine the expression levels of α and β isoforms by immunoblotting. In order to compare the abundance of isoforms in astrocytic samples, semi-quantification was carried out with polyhistidine-tagged Na + /K + -ATPase subunit isoforms expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes as standards to obtain an efficiency factor for each antibody. Proximity ligation assay illustrated that α2 paired efficiently with both β1 and β2 and the semi-quantification of the astrocytic fraction indicated that the astrocytic Na + /K + -ATPase is dominated by α2, paired with β1 or β2 (in a 1:9 ratio). We demonstrate that while the familial hemiplegic migraine-associated α2.G301R mutant was not functionally expressed at the plasma membrane in a heterologous expression system, α2 +/G301R mice displayed normal protein levels of α2 and glutamate transporters and that the one functional allele suffices to manage the general K + dynamics. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Cellular expression, trafficking, and function of two isoforms of human ULBP5/RAET1G.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A Eagle

    Full Text Available The activating immunoreceptor NKG2D is expressed on Natural Killer (NK cells and subsets of T cells. NKG2D contributes to anti-tumour and anti-viral immune responses in vitro and in vivo. The ligands for NKG2D in humans are diverse proteins of the MIC and ULBP/RAET families that are upregulated on the surface of virally infected cells and tumours. Two splicing variants of ULBP5/RAET1G have been cloned previously, but not extensively characterised.We pursue a number of approaches to characterise the expression, trafficking, and function of the two isoforms of ULBP5/RAET1G. We show that both transcripts are frequently expressed in cell lines derived from epithelial cancers, and in primary breast cancers. The full-length transcript, RAET1G1, is predicted to encode a molecule with transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains that are unique amongst NKG2D ligands. Using specific anti-RAET1G1 antiserum to stain tissue microarrays we show that RAET1G1 expression is highly restricted in normal tissues. RAET1G1 was expressed at a low level in normal gastrointestinal epithelial cells in a similar pattern to MICA. Both RAET1G1 and MICA showed increased expression in the gut of patients with celiac disease. In contrast to healthy tissues the RAET1G1 antiserum stained a wide variety or different primary tumour sections. Both endogenously expressed and transfected RAET1G1 was mainly found inside the cell, with a minority of the protein reaching the cell surface. Conversely the truncated splicing variant of RAET1G2 was shown to encode a soluble molecule that could be secreted from cells. Secreted RAET1G2 was shown to downregulate NKG2D receptor expression on NK cells and hence may represent a novel tumour immune evasion strategy.We demonstrate that the expression patterns of ULBP5RAET1G are very similar to the well-characterised NKG2D ligand, MICA. However the two isoforms of ULBP5/RAET1G have very different cellular localisations that are likely to reflect unique

  12. Cellular expression, trafficking, and function of two isoforms of human ULBP5/RAET1G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagle, Robert A; Flack, Gillian; Warford, Anthony; Martínez-Borra, Jesús; Jafferji, Insiya; Traherne, James A; Ohashi, Maki; Boyle, Louise H; Barrow, Alexander D; Caillat-Zucman, Sophie; Young, Neil T; Trowsdale, John

    2009-01-01

    The activating immunoreceptor NKG2D is expressed on Natural Killer (NK) cells and subsets of T cells. NKG2D contributes to anti-tumour and anti-viral immune responses in vitro and in vivo. The ligands for NKG2D in humans are diverse proteins of the MIC and ULBP/RAET families that are upregulated on the surface of virally infected cells and tumours. Two splicing variants of ULBP5/RAET1G have been cloned previously, but not extensively characterised. We pursue a number of approaches to characterise the expression, trafficking, and function of the two isoforms of ULBP5/RAET1G. We show that both transcripts are frequently expressed in cell lines derived from epithelial cancers, and in primary breast cancers. The full-length transcript, RAET1G1, is predicted to encode a molecule with transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains that are unique amongst NKG2D ligands. Using specific anti-RAET1G1 antiserum to stain tissue microarrays we show that RAET1G1 expression is highly restricted in normal tissues. RAET1G1 was expressed at a low level in normal gastrointestinal epithelial cells in a similar pattern to MICA. Both RAET1G1 and MICA showed increased expression in the gut of patients with celiac disease. In contrast to healthy tissues the RAET1G1 antiserum stained a wide variety or different primary tumour sections. Both endogenously expressed and transfected RAET1G1 was mainly found inside the cell, with a minority of the protein reaching the cell surface. Conversely the truncated splicing variant of RAET1G2 was shown to encode a soluble molecule that could be secreted from cells. Secreted RAET1G2 was shown to downregulate NKG2D receptor expression on NK cells and hence may represent a novel tumour immune evasion strategy. We demonstrate that the expression patterns of ULBP5RAET1G are very similar to the well-characterised NKG2D ligand, MICA. However the two isoforms of ULBP5/RAET1G have very different cellular localisations that are likely to reflect unique functionality.

  13. Different N-terminal isoforms of Oct-1 control expression of distinct sets of genes and their high levels in Namalwa Burkitt's lymphoma cells affect a wide range of cellular processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankratova, Elizaveta V; Stepchenko, Alexander G; Portseva, Tatiana; Mogila, Vladic A; Georgieva, Sofia G

    2016-11-02

    Oct-1 transcription factor has various functions in gene regulation. Its expression level is increased in several types of cancer and is associated with poor survival prognosis. Here we identified distinct Oct-1 protein isoforms in human cells and compared gene expression patterns and functions for Oct-1A, Oct-1L, and Oct-1X isoforms that differ by their N-terminal sequences. The longest isoform, Oct-1A, is abundantly expressed and is the main Oct-1 isoform in most of human tissues. The Oct-1L and the weakly expressed Oct-1X regulate the majority of Oct-1A targets as well as additional sets of genes. Oct-1X controls genes involved in DNA replication, DNA repair, RNA processing, and cellular response to stress. The high level of Oct-1 isoforms upregulates genes related to cell cycle progression and activates proliferation both in Namalwa Burkitt's lymphoma cells and primary human fibroblasts. It downregulates expression of genes related to antigen processing and presentation, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, oxidative metabolism, and cell adhesion, thus facilitating pro-oncogenic processes. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  14. Structural evolution and tissue-specific expression of tetrapod-specific second isoform of secretory pathway Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pestov, Nikolay B., E-mail: korn@mail.ibch.ru [Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 117871 (Russian Federation); Dmitriev, Ruslan I.; Kostina, Maria B. [Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 117871 (Russian Federation); Korneenko, Tatyana V. [Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 117871 (Russian Federation); Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Toledo College of Medicine, 3000 Arlington Ave., Toledo, OH 43614 (United States); Shakhparonov, Mikhail I. [Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 117871 (Russian Federation); Modyanov, Nikolai N., E-mail: nikolai.modyanov@utoledo.edu [Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Toledo College of Medicine, 3000 Arlington Ave., Toledo, OH 43614 (United States)

    2012-01-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Full-length secretory pathway Ca-ATPase (SPCA2) cloned from rat duodenum. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ATP2C2 gene (encoding SPCA2) exists only in genomes of Tetrapoda. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rat and pig SPCA2 are expressed in intestines, lung and some secretory glands. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Subcellular localization of SPCA2 may depend on tissue type. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In rat duodenum, SPCA2 is localized in plasma membrane-associated compartments. -- Abstract: Secretory pathway Ca-ATPases are less characterized mammalian calcium pumps than plasma membrane Ca-ATPases and sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPases. Here we report analysis of molecular evolution, alternative splicing, tissue-specific expression and subcellular localization of the second isoform of the secretory pathway Ca-ATPase (SPCA2), the product of the ATP2C2 gene. The primary structure of SPCA2 from rat duodenum deduced from full-length transcript contains 944 amino acid residues, and exhibits 65% sequence identity with known SPCA1. The rat SPCA2 sequence is also highly homologous to putative human protein KIAA0703, however, the latter seems to have an aberrant N-terminus originating from intron 2. The tissue-specificity of SPCA2 expression is different from ubiquitous SPCA1. Rat SPCA2 transcripts were detected predominantly in gastrointestinal tract, lung, trachea, lactating mammary gland, skin and preputial gland. In the newborn pig, the expression profile is very similar with one remarkable exception: porcine bulbourethral gland gave the strongest signal. Upon overexpression in cultured cells, SPCA2 shows an intracellular distribution with remarkable enrichment in Golgi. However, in vivo SPCA2 may be localized in compartments that differ among various tissues: it is intracellular in epidermis, but enriched in plasma membranes of the intestinal epithelium. Analysis of SPCA2 sequences from various vertebrate species argue that ATP2C2

  15. Regulation of glutamine synthetase isoforms in two differentially drought-tolerant rice (Oryza sativa L.) cultivars under water deficit conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kamal Krishna; Ghosh, Shilpi

    2013-02-01

    KEY MESSAGE : The regulation of GS isoforms by WD was organ specific. Two GS isoforms i.e. OsGS1;1 and OsGS2 were differentially regulated in IR-64 (drought-sensitive) and Khitish (drought-tolerant) cultivars of rice. Water deficit (WD) has adverse effect on rice (Oryza sativa L.) and acclimation requires essential reactions of primary metabolism to continue. Rice plants utilize ammonium as major nitrogen source, which is assimilated into glutamine by the reaction of Glutamine synthetase (GS, EC 6.3.1.2). Rice plants possess one gene (OsGS2) for chloroplastic GS2 and three genes (OsGS1;1, OsGS1;2 and OsGS1;3) for cytosolic GS1. Here, we report the effect of WD on regulation of GS isoforms in drought-sensitive (cv. IR-64) and drought-tolerant (cv. Khitish) rice cultivars. Under WD, total GS activity in root and leaf decreased significantly in IR-64 seedlings in comparison to Khitish seedlings. The reduced GS activity in IR-64 leaf was mainly due to decrease in GS2 activity, which correlated with decrease in corresponding transcript and polypeptide contents. GS1 transcript and polypeptide accumulated in leaf during WD, however, GS1 activity was maintained at a constant level. Total GS activity in stem of both the varieties was insensitive to WD. Among GS1 genes, OsGS1;1 expression was differently regulated by WD in the two rice varieties. Its transcript accumulated more abundantly in IR-64 leaf than in Khitish leaf. Following WD, OsGS1;1 mRNA level in stem and root tissues declined in IR-64 and enhanced in Khitish. A steady OsGS1;2 expression patterns were noted in leaf, stem and root of both the cultivars. Results suggest that OsGS2 and OsGS1;1 expression may contribute to drought tolerance of Khitish cultivar under WD conditions.

  16. Allele-Selective Transcriptome Recruitment to Polysomes Primed for Translation: Protein-Coding and Noncoding RNAs, and RNA Isoforms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshan Mascarenhas

    Full Text Available mRNA translation into proteins is highly regulated, but the role of mRNA isoforms, noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs, and genetic variants remains poorly understood. mRNA levels on polysomes have been shown to correlate well with expressed protein levels, pointing to polysomal loading as a critical factor. To study regulation and genetic factors of protein translation we measured levels and allelic ratios of mRNAs and ncRNAs (including microRNAs in lymphoblast cell lines (LCL and in polysomal fractions. We first used targeted assays to measure polysomal loading of mRNA alleles, confirming reported genetic effects on translation of OPRM1 and NAT1, and detecting no effect of rs1045642 (3435C>T in ABCB1 (MDR1 on polysomal loading while supporting previous results showing increased mRNA turnover of the 3435T allele. Use of high-throughput sequencing of complete transcript profiles (RNA-Seq in three LCLs revealed significant differences in polysomal loading of individual RNA classes and isoforms. Correlated polysomal distribution between protein-coding and non-coding RNAs suggests interactions between them. Allele-selective polysome recruitment revealed strong genetic influence for multiple RNAs, attributable either to differential expression of RNA isoforms or to differential loading onto polysomes, the latter defining a direct genetic effect on translation. Genes identified by different allelic RNA ratios between cytosol and polysomes were enriched with published expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs affecting RNA functions, and associations with clinical phenotypes. Polysomal RNA-Seq combined with allelic ratio analysis provides a powerful approach to study polysomal RNA recruitment and regulatory variants affecting protein translation.

  17. The human placenta expresses multiple glucocorticoid receptor isoforms that are altered by fetal sex, growth restriction and maternal asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saif, Z; Hodyl, N A; Hobbs, E; Tuck, A R; Butler, M S; Osei-Kumah, A; Clifton, V L

    2014-04-01

    We have previously identified sex-specific differences in the fetal-placental response to cortisol. Our recent studies suggest that this differential response to cortisol is driven by differences in glucocorticoid receptor (GR) protein function rather than through changes in gene transcription or protein expression. This study was designed to define whether the human placenta expresses different isoforms of the GR and whether expression was altered by fetal sex and maternal asthma. Asthma and non-asthma pregnant women were prospectively recruited at their first antenatal visit and placentae collected at delivery. Placental GR expression was examined in relation to maternal asthma, fetal sex and birthweight. Twelve specific bands for the GR were identified at molecular weights of 94, 91, 81, 74, 69, 68, 65, 60, 55, 50, 48 and 38 kDa. The 12 isoforms were localised to the placental trophoblast and expression varied in relation to cellular location in either the cytoplasm or nucleus, fetal sex, fetal size and the presence and absence of maternal asthma. This is the first study to identify the presence of several protein isoforms of the GR in the human placenta. The data suggest glucocorticoid resistance observed in male placentae may be mediated through increased GRβ, GR A and GR P localisation to the nucleus. While female placentae may be more sensitive to cortisol in the presence of maternal asthma through a decrease in GRβ and an enhancement GRα activity via an interaction with GRα D3 and GRα C. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Application of D-Crustacean Hyperglycemic Hormone Induces Peptidases Transcription and Suppresses Glycolysis-Related Transcripts in the Hepatopancreas of the Crayfish Pontastacus leptodactylus — Results of a Transcriptomic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Moro, Gianluca; Gerdol, Marco; Guarnaccia, Corrado; Mosco, Alessandro; Pallavicini, Alberto; Giulianini, Piero Giulio

    2013-01-01

    The crustacean Hyperglycemic Hormone (cHH) is a neuropeptide present in many decapods. Two different chiral isomers are simultaneously present in Astacid crayfish and their specific biological functions are still poorly understood. The present study is aimed at better understanding the potentially different effect of each of the isomers on the hepatopancreatic gene expression profile in the crayfish Pontastacus leptodactylus, in the context of short term hyperglycemia. Hence, two different chemically synthesized cHH enantiomers, containing either L- or D-Phe3, were injected to the circulation of intermolt females following removal of their X organ-Sinus gland complex. The effects triggered by the injection of the two alternate isomers were detected after one hour through measurement of circulating glucose levels. Triggered changes of the transcriptome expression profile in the hepatopancreas were analyzed by RNA-seq. A whole transcriptome shotgun sequence assembly provided the assumedly complete transcriptome of P. leptodactylus hepatopancreas, followed by RNA-seq analysis of changes in the expression level of many genes caused by the application of each of the hormone isomers. Circulating glucose levels were much higher in response to the D-isoform than to the L-isoform injection, one hour from injection. Similarly, the RNA-seq analysis confirmed a stronger effect on gene expression following the administration of D-cHH, while just limited alterations were caused by the L-isomer. These findings demonstrated a more prominent short term effect of the D-cHH on the transcription profile and shed light on the effect of the D-isomer on specific functional gene groups. Another contribution of the study is the construction of a de novo assembly of the hepatopancreas transcriptome, consisting of 39,935 contigs, that dramatically increases the molecular information available for this species and for crustaceans in general, providing an efficient tool for studying gene

  19. Application of D-Crustacean Hyperglycemic Hormone Induces Peptidases Transcription and Suppresses Glycolysis-Related Transcripts in the Hepatopancreas of the Crayfish Pontastacus leptodactylus - Results of a Transcriptomic Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Manfrin

    Full Text Available The crustacean Hyperglycemic Hormone (cHH is a neuropeptide present in many decapods. Two different chiral isomers are simultaneously present in Astacid crayfish and their specific biological functions are still poorly understood. The present study is aimed at better understanding the potentially different effect of each of the isomers on the hepatopancreatic gene expression profile in the crayfish Pontastacus leptodactylus, in the context of short term hyperglycemia. Hence, two different chemically synthesized cHH enantiomers, containing either L- or D-Phe(3, were injected to the circulation of intermolt females following removal of their X organ-Sinus gland complex. The effects triggered by the injection of the two alternate isomers were detected after one hour through measurement of circulating glucose levels. Triggered changes of the transcriptome expression profile in the hepatopancreas were analyzed by RNA-seq. A whole transcriptome shotgun sequence assembly provided the assumedly complete transcriptome of P. leptodactylus hepatopancreas, followed by RNA-seq analysis of changes in the expression level of many genes caused by the application of each of the hormone isomers. Circulating glucose levels were much higher in response to the D-isoform than to the L-isoform injection, one hour from injection. Similarly, the RNA-seq analysis confirmed a stronger effect on gene expression following the administration of D-cHH, while just limited alterations were caused by the L-isomer. These findings demonstrated a more prominent short term effect of the D-cHH on the transcription profile and shed light on the effect of the D-isomer on specific functional gene groups. Another contribution of the study is the construction of a de novo assembly of the hepatopancreas transcriptome, consisting of 39,935 contigs, that dramatically increases the molecular information available for this species and for crustaceans in general, providing an efficient tool for

  20. Alternative Splicing of L-type CaV1.2 Calcium Channels: Implications in Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenyu Hu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available L-type CaV1.2 calcium channels are the major pathway for Ca2+ influx to initiate the contraction of smooth and cardiac muscles. Alteration of CaV1.2 channel function has been implicated in multiple cardiovascular diseases, such as hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy. Alternative splicing is a post-transcriptional mechanism that expands CaV1.2 channel structures to modify function, pharmacological and biophysical property such as calcium/voltage-dependent inactivation (C/VDI, or to influence its post-translational modulation by interacting proteins such as Galectin-1. Alternative splicing has generated functionally diverse CaV1.2 isoforms that can be developmentally regulated in the heart, or under pathophysiological conditions such as in heart failure. More importantly, alternative splicing of certain exons of CaV1.2 has been reported to be regulated by splicing factors such as RNA-binding Fox-1 homolog 1/2 (Rbfox 1/2, polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTBP1 and RNA-binding motif protein 20 (RBM20. Understanding how CaV1.2 channel function is remodelled in disease will provide better information to guide the development of more targeted approaches to discover therapeutic agents for cardiovascular diseases.

  1. SP-R210 (Myo18A Isoforms as Intrinsic Modulators of Macrophage Priming and Activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linlin Yang

    Full Text Available The surfactant protein (SP-A receptor SP-R210 has been shown to increase phagocytosis of SP-A-bound pathogens and to modulate cytokine secretion by immune cells. SP-A plays an important role in pulmonary immunity by enhancing opsonization and clearance of pathogens and by modulating macrophage inflammatory responses. Alternative splicing of the Myo18A gene results in two isoforms: SP-R210S and SP-R210L, with the latter predominantly expressed in alveolar macrophages. In this study we show that SP-A is required for optimal expression of SP-R210L on alveolar macrophages. Interestingly, pre-treatment with SP-A prepared by different methods either enhances or suppresses responsiveness to LPS, possibly due to differential co-isolation of SP-B or other proteins. We also report that dominant negative disruption of SP-R210L augments expression of receptors including SR-A, CD14, and CD36, and enhances macrophages' inflammatory response to TLR stimulation. Finally, because SP-A is known to modulate CD14, we used a variety of techniques to investigate how SP-R210 mediates the effect of SP-A on CD14. These studies revealed a novel physical association between SP-R210S, CD14, and SR-A leading to an enhanced response to LPS, and found that SP-R210L and SP-R210S regulate internalization of CD14 via distinct macropinocytosis-like mechanisms. Together, our findings support a model in which SP-R210 isoforms differentially regulate trafficking, expression, and activation of innate immune receptors on macrophages.

  2. Titin isoform switching is a major cardiac adaptive response in hibernating grizzly bears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, O Lynne; Robbins, Charles T; Wu, Yiming; Granzier, Henk

    2008-07-01

    The hibernation phenomenon captures biological as well as clinical interests to understand how organs adapt. Here we studied how hibernating grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) tolerate extremely low heart rates without developing cardiac chamber dilation. We evaluated cardiac filling function in unanesthetized grizzly bears by echocardiography during the active and hibernating period. Because both collagen and titin are involved in altering diastolic function, we investigated both in the myocardium of active and hibernating grizzly bears. Heart rates were reduced from 84 beats/min in active bears to 19 beats/min in hibernating bears. Diastolic volume, stroke volume, and left ventricular ejection fraction were not different. However, left ventricular muscle mass was significantly lower (300 +/- 12 compared with 402 +/- 14 g; P = 0.003) in the hibernating bears, and as a result the diastolic volume-to-left ventricular muscle mass ratio was significantly greater. Early ventricular filling deceleration times (106.4 +/- 14 compared with 143.2 +/- 20 ms; P = 0.002) were shorter during hibernation, suggesting increased ventricular stiffness. Restrictive pulmonary venous flow patterns supported this conclusion. Collagen type I and III comparisons did not reveal differences between the two groups of bears. In contrast, the expression of titin was altered by a significant upregulation of the stiffer N2B isoform at the expense of the more compliant N2BA isoform. The mean ratio of N2BA to N2B titin was 0.73 +/- 0.07 in the active bears and decreased to 0.42 +/- 0.03 (P = 0.006) in the hibernating bears. The upregulation of stiff N2B cardiac titin is a likely explanation for the increased ventricular stiffness that was revealed by echocardiography, and we propose that it plays a role in preventing chamber dilation in hibernating grizzly bears. Thus our work identified changes in the alternative splicing of cardiac titin as a major adaptive response in hibernating grizzly

  3. Alternative Promoter Usage in Healthy and Inflamed Tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lilje, Berit

    and cell-lines covering the entire human body. This provides a unique dataset to study gene expression, with promoter level precision. Here we use this large collection of data to study alternative transcription start site usage throughout the human body. We find that many alternative transcription start...... the full-length version. Our results suggest alternative transcription start site usage currently is underappreciated, since these start sites often show high expression compared to canonical start sites. We further show that the usage of alternative transcription start sites can both be tissue specific......, as well as specific to certain differentiation states. By analysing CAGE data from two different inflammatory responses we also find that alternative transcription start site usage is an intrinsic part of the inflammatory response. CAGE was used to map transcription start sites in Caco-2 cells stimulated...

  4. Role of a transcription factor (CREB) in memory processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, A; Giuditta, A

    1997-01-01

    Memory storage includes a short-term phase (STM) which requires the phosphorylation of pre-existing proteins, and a long-term phase (LTM) which needs the novel synthesis of RNA and proteins. Cyclic AMP and a specific transcription factor (cAMP response element binding protein or CREB) play a central role in the formation of LTM in aplysia, drosophila and mice. Following its phosphorylation by protein kinase A, CREB binds to the enhancer element CRE which is located in the upstream region of cAMP-responsive genes, thus triggering transcription. Some of the newly-synthesized proteins are additional transcription factors that ultimately give rise to the activation of late response genes, whose products are responsible for the modification of synaptic efficacy leading to LTM. In aplysia, CREB activation has been interfered with by microinjection of CRE containing oligonucleotides into cultured neurons. Under these conditions LTM is blocked while STM remains unchanged. In drosophila, CREB function has been disrupted using a reverse genetic approach. Thus, LTM has been specifically blocked by the induced expression of a CREB repressor isoform, and enhanced by the induced expression of an activator isoform. In mouse, the role of CREB has been confirmed by behavioural analyses of a knock-out line with a targeted mutation in the CREB gene. In these mutants, learning and STM are normal, whereas LTM is disrupted. On the whole, the data suggest that encoding of long term memories involve highly conserved molecular mechanisms.

  5. A high-performance liquid chromatography assay for quantification of cardiac myosin heavy chain isoform protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemon, Douglas D; Papst, Philip J; Joly, Kristin; Plato, Craig F; McKinsey, Timothy A

    2011-01-01

    Stress signaling in the myocardium results in enhanced expression of fetal β-myosin heavy chain (β-MyHC) and reduced expression of adult α-myosin heavy chain (α-MyHC), with the net outcome of diminished myofibrillar ATPase activity and impaired contractility. Pharmacological approaches aimed at preventing this myosin isoform "switch" could provide therapeutic benefit to patients with heart failure. Myosin isoform protein expression is typically quantified using gel electrophoresis methods, which are time-consuming and prone to variability. Here we describe a facile, reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method for rapidly determining the relative amounts of full-length α- and β-MyHC in rat hearts. The assay was validated using cardiac tissues from rats in which a key transcriptional regulator of MyHC expression, the thyroid hormone receptor, was pharmacologically manipulated. This novel assay should facilitate drug discovery efforts focused on the MyHC axis. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Deconstruction of O-glycosylation-GalNAc-T isoforms direct distinct subsets of the O-glycoproteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjoldager, Katrine T; Joshi, Hiren J; Kong, Yun

    2015-01-01

    nuclease (ZFN)-directed knockout strategy to probe the contributions of the major GalNAc-Ts (GalNAc-T1 and GalNAc-T2) in liver cells and explore how the GalNAc-T repertoire quantitatively affects the O-glycoproteome. We demonstrate that the majority of the O-glycoproteome is covered by redundancy, whereas...... distinct subsets of substrates are modified by non-redundant functions of GalNAc-T1 and GalNAc-T2. The non-redundant O-glycoproteome subsets and specific transcriptional responses for each isoform are related to different cellular processes; for the GalNAc-T2 isoform, these support a role in lipid...... metabolism. The results demonstrate that GalNAc-Ts have different non-redundant glycosylation functions, which may affect distinct cellular processes. The data serves as a comprehensive resource for unique GalNAc-T substrates. Our study provides a new view of the differential regulation of the O...

  7. Refinement of the canine CD1 locus topology and investigation of antibody binding to recombinant canine CD1 isoforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjaerff, Mette; Keller, Stefan M; Fass, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    CD1 molecules are antigen-presenting glycoproteins primarily found on dendritic cells (DCs) responsible for lipid antigen presentation to CD1-restricted T cells. Despite their pivotal role in immunity, little is known about CD1 protein expression in dogs, notably due to lack of isoform-specific a......CD1 molecules are antigen-presenting glycoproteins primarily found on dendritic cells (DCs) responsible for lipid antigen presentation to CD1-restricted T cells. Despite their pivotal role in immunity, little is known about CD1 protein expression in dogs, notably due to lack of isoform...... separate genes. Sequencing of three overlapping bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) spanning the entire canine CD1 locus revealed canCD1A8.2 and canCD1A8.1 to be located in tandem between canCD1A7 and canCD1C, and canCD1A8.1 was consequently renamed canCD1A9. Green fluorescent protein (GFP......)-fused canine CD1 transcripts were recombinantly expressed in 293T cells. All proteins showed a highly positive GFP expression except for canine CD1d and a splice variant of canine CD1a8 lacking exon 3. Probing with a panel of anti-CD1 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) showed that Ca13.9H11 and Ca9.AG5 only...

  8. A cytosolic Ezh1 isoform modulates a PRC2–Ezh1 epigenetic adaptive response in postmitotic cells

    KAUST Repository

    Bodega, Beatrice

    2017-03-27

    The evolution of chromatin-based epigenetic cell memory may be driven not only by the necessity for cells to stably maintain transcription programs, but also by the need to recognize signals and allow plastic responses to environmental stimuli. The mechanistic role of the epigenome in adult postmitotic tissues, however, remains largely unknown. In vertebrates, two variants of the Polycomb repressive complex (PRC2-Ezh2 and PRC2-Ezh1) control gene silencing via methylation of histone H3 on Lys27 (H3K27me). Here we describe a reversible mechanism that involves a novel isoform of Ezh1 (Ezh1β). Ezh1β lacks the catalytic SET domain and acts in the cytoplasm of skeletal muscle cells to control nuclear PRC2-Ezh1 activity in response to atrophic oxidative stress, by regulating Eed assembly with Suz12 and Ezh1α (the canonical isoform) at their target genes. We report a novel PRC2-Ezh1 function that utilizes Ezh1β as an adaptive stress sensor in the cytoplasm, thus allowing postmitotic cells to maintain tissue integrity in response to environmental changes.

  9. Isoform-specific expression of the Coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) in neuromuscular junction and cardiac intercalated discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Christian A; Holland, Paul C; Sinnreich, Michael; Allen, Carol; Sollerbrant, Kerstin; Karpati, George; Nalbantoglu, Josephine

    2004-01-01

    Background The Coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) has a restricted expression pattern in the adult. In skeletal muscle, although CAR is expressed in immature fibers, its transcript levels are barely detectable in mature muscle. This is in contrast to the robust expression observed in the heart. However, both heart and skeletal muscle are susceptible to infection with the Coxsackie B virus which utilizes primarily CAR for cellular internalization. The specific point of viral entry in skeletal and heart muscle remains unknown. Results Using antibodies directed against the extracellular and the cytoplasmic domains of CAR, we show CAR in normal human and mouse skeletal muscle to be a novel component of the neuromuscular junction. In cardiac muscle, CAR immunoreactivity is observed at the level of intercalated discs. We demonstrate a single isoform of CAR to be expressed exclusively at the human neuromuscular junction whereas both predominant CAR isoforms are expressed at the intercalated discs of non-diseased human heart. Conclusion The localization of CAR to these important junctional complexes suggests that CAR may play both a structural and a regulatory role in skeletal and cardiac muscle, and that these complexes may serve as a point of entry for Coxsackie B virus. PMID:15533241

  10. Cap-proximal nucleotides via differential eIF4E binding and alternative promoter usage mediate translational response to energy stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamarkin-Ben-Harush, Ana; Vasseur, Jean-Jacques; Debart, Françoise; Ulitsky, Igor; Dikstein, Rivka

    2017-02-08

    Transcription start-site (TSS) selection and alternative promoter (AP) usage contribute to gene expression complexity but little is known about their impact on translation. Here we performed TSS mapping of the translatome following energy stress. Assessing the contribution of cap-proximal TSS nucleotides, we found dramatic effect on translation only upon stress. As eIF4E levels were reduced, we determined its binding to capped-RNAs with different initiating nucleotides and found the lowest affinity to 5'cytidine in correlation with the translational stress-response. In addition, the number of differentially translated APs was elevated following stress. These include novel glucose starvation-induced downstream transcripts for the translation regulators eIF4A and Pabp, which are also translationally-induced despite general translational inhibition. The resultant eIF4A protein is N-terminally truncated and acts as eIF4A inhibitor. The induced Pabp isoform has shorter 5'UTR removing an auto-inhibitory element. Our findings uncovered several levels of coordination of transcription and translation responses to energy stress.

  11. PSA Isoforms' Velocities for Early Diagnosis of Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidegger, Isabel; Klocker, Helmut; Pichler, Renate; Horninger, Wolfgang; Bektic, Jasmin

    2015-06-01

    Free prostate-specific antigen (fPSA) and its molecular isoforms are suggested for enhancement of PSA testing in prostate cancer (PCa). In the present study we evaluated whether PSA isoforms' velocities might serve as a tool to improve early PCa diagnosis. Our study population included 381 men who had undergone at least one ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy whose pathologic examination yielded PCa or showed no evidence of prostatic malignancy. Serial PSA, fPSA, and proPSA measurements were performed on serum samples covering 7 years prior to biopsy using Beckmann Coulter Access immunoassays. Afterwards, velocities of PSA (PSAV), fPSA% (fPSA%V), proPSA% (proPSA%V) and the ratio proPSA/PSA/V were calculated and their ability to discriminate cancer from benign disease was evaluated. Among 381 men included in the study, 202 (53%) were diagnosed with PCa and underwent radical prostatectomy at our Department. PSAV, fPSA%V, proPSA%V as well as proPSA/PSA/V were able to differentiate significantly between PCa and non-cancerous prostate. The highest discriminatory power between cancer and benign disease has been observed two and one year prior to diagnosis with all measured parameters. Among all measured parameters, fPSA%V showed the best cancer specificity of 45.3% with 90% of sensitivity. In summary, our results highlight the value of PSA isoforms' velocity for early detection of PCa. Especially fPSA%V should be used in the clinical setting to increase cancer detection specificity. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  12. Muscle lim protein isoform negatively regulates striated muscle actin dynamics and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafiadaki, Elizabeth; Arvanitis, Demetrios A; Papalouka, Vasiliki; Terzis, Gerasimos; Roumeliotis, Theodoros I; Spengos, Konstantinos; Garbis, Spiros D; Manta, Panagiota; Kranias, Evangelia G; Sanoudou, Despina

    2014-07-01

    Muscle lim protein (MLP) has emerged as a critical regulator of striated muscle physiology and pathophysiology. Mutations in cysteine and glycine-rich protein 3 (CSRP3), the gene encoding MLP, have been directly associated with human cardiomyopathies, whereas aberrant expression patterns are reported in human cardiac and skeletal muscle diseases. Increasing evidence suggests that MLP has an important role in both myogenic differentiation and myocyte cytoarchitecture, although the full spectrum of its intracellular roles has not been delineated. We report the discovery of an alternative splice variant of MLP, designated as MLP-b, showing distinct expression in neuromuscular disease and direct roles in actin dynamics and muscle differentiation. This novel isoform originates by alternative splicing of exons 3 and 4. At the protein level, it contains the N-terminus first half LIM domain of MLP and a unique sequence of 22 amino acids. Physiologically, it is expressed during early differentiation, whereas its overexpression reduces C2C12 differentiation and myotube formation. This may be mediated through its inhibition of MLP/cofilin-2-mediated F-actin dynamics. In differentiated striated muscles, MLP-b localizes to the sarcomeres and binds directly to Z-disc components, including α-actinin, T-cap and MLP. The findings of the present study unveil a novel player in muscle physiology and pathophysiology that is implicated in myogenesis as a negative regulator of myotube formation, as well as in differentiated striated muscles as a contributor to sarcomeric integrity. © 2014 FEBS.

  13. DISTINCT BEHAVIORAL PHENOTYPES IN MALE MICE LACKING THE THYROID HORMONE RECEPTOR α1 OR β ISOFORMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, Nandini; Morgan, Maria; Pfaff, Donald; Ogawa, Sonoko

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid hormones influence both neuronal development and anxiety via the thyroid hormone receptors (TRs). The TRs are encoded by two different genes, TRα and TRβ. The loss of TRα1 is implicated in increased anxiety in males, possibly via a hippocampal increase in GABAergic activity. We compared both social behaviors and two underlying and related non-social behaviors, state anxiety and responses to acoustic and tactile startle in the gonadally intact TRα1 knockout (α1KO) and TRβ (βKO) male mice to their wild-type counterparts. For the first time, we show an opposing effect of the two TR isoforms, TRα1 and TRβ, in the regulation of state anxiety, with α1 knockout animals (α1KO) showing higher levels of anxiety and βKO males showing less anxiety compared to respective wild-type mice. At odds with the increased anxiety in non-social environments, α1KO males also show lower levels of responsiveness to acoustic and tactile startle stimuli. Consistent with the data that T4 is inhibitory to lordosis in female mice, we show subtly increased sex behavior in α1KO male mice. These behaviors support the idea that TRα1 could be inhibitory to ERα driven transcription that ultimately impacts ERα driven behaviors such as lordosis. The behavioral phenotypes point to novel roles for the TRs, particularly in non-social behaviors such as state anxiety and startle. PMID:23567476

  14. Morphological, histochemical, and myosin isoform analysis of the diaphragm of adult horses, Equus caballus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, M A; Schutt, W A; Hermanson, J W

    1994-03-01

    The horse provides an interesting model for study of the structure and function of the mammalian diaphragm. Multiple regions of diaphragm from seven adult horses were prepared for histochemistry, immunocytochemistry, myosin heavy chain electrophoresis, and native myosin electrophoresis. Two additional adults were dissected to demonstrate myofiber and central tendon morphology and stained for acetylcholinesterase to demonstrate motor endplates. All regions of the adult diaphragm were histochemically characterized by a preponderance of type I fibers with some type IIa fibers. Type IIb fibers were absent in all adult specimens. Myosin heavy chain electrophoresis supported the histochemical study: two isoform bands were present on SDS gels that comigrated at the same rate as rat type I and IIa myosin heavy chain isoforms. No isoform was determined to comigrate with rat type IIb heavy chain isoforms. Native myosin isoform analysis revealed two isoforms that comigrated with rat FM-4 and FM-3 (FM = fast myosin) and two isoforms that comigrated with rat SM-1 and SM-2 (SM = slow myosin) isoforms. In some samples, a third slow native myosin isoform was observed that comigrated at the same rate as the SM-3 of the equine biceps brachii muscle. This doublet (or "triplet") of slow isoforms is unique to some horse muscles compared with other adult animals studied. It is not known if these multiple slow native myosin isoforms confer some functional advantage to the equine muscles. The adult equine diaphragm also differs in its morphology by having a large central tendon compared to that in other mammals, and is predominantly slow in fiber type and myosin isoform composition.

  15. A powerful method for transcriptional profiling of specific cell types in eukaryotes: laser-assisted microdissection and RNA sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc W Schmid

    Full Text Available The acquisition of distinct cell fates is central to the development of multicellular organisms and is largely mediated by gene expression patterns specific to individual cells and tissues. A spatially and temporally resolved analysis of gene expression facilitates the elucidation of transcriptional networks linked to cellular identity and function. We present an approach that allows cell type-specific transcriptional profiling of distinct target cells, which are rare and difficult to access, with unprecedented sensitivity and resolution. We combined laser-assisted microdissection (LAM, linear amplification starting from <1 ng of total RNA, and RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq. As a model we used the central cell of the Arabidopsis thaliana female gametophyte, one of the female gametes harbored in the reproductive organs of the flower. We estimated the number of expressed genes to be more than twice the number reported previously in a study using LAM and ATH1 microarrays, and identified several classes of genes that were systematically underrepresented in the transcriptome measured with the ATH1 microarray. Among them are many genes that are likely to be important for developmental processes and specific cellular functions. In addition, we identified several intergenic regions, which are likely to be transcribed, and describe a considerable fraction of reads mapping to introns and regions flanking annotated loci, which may represent alternative transcript isoforms. Finally, we performed a de novo assembly of the transcriptome and show that the method is suitable for studying individual cell types of organisms lacking reference sequence information, demonstrating that this approach can be applied to most eukaryotic organisms.

  16. BP1, an Isoform of DLX4 Homeoprotein, Negatively Regulates BRCA1 in Sporadic Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluk, Brian J.; Fu, Yebo; Formolo, Trina A.; Zhang, Lei; Hindle, Anne K.; Man, Yan-gao; Siegel, Robert S.; Berg, Patricia E.; Deng, Chuxia; McCaffrey, Timothy A.; Fu, Sidney W.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Several lines of evidence point to an important role for BP1, an isoform of DLX4 homeobox gene, in breast carcinogenesis and progression. BRCA1 is a well-known player in the etiology of breast cancer. While familial breast cancer is often marked by BRCA1 mutation and subsequent loss of heterozygosity, sporadic breast cancers exhibit reduced expression of wild type BRCA1, and loss of BRCA1 expression may result in tumor development and progression. Methods: The Cister algorithm and Genomatix program were used to identify potential BP1 binding sites in BRCA1 gene. Real-time PCR, Western blot and immunohistochemistry analysis were performed to verify the expression of BRCA1 and BP1 in cell lines and breast cancer tissues. Double-stranded siRNA transfection was carried out for silencing BP1 expression. ChIP and EMSA were used to confirm that BP1 specifically binds to BRCA1. Results: A putative BP1 binding site was identified in the first intron of BRCA1, which was confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipiation and electrophoresis mobility shift assay. BP1 and BRCA1 expression were inversely correlated in breast cancer cell lines and tissues, suggesting that BP1 may suppress BRCA1 transcription through consensus sequence binding. Conclusions: BP1 homeoprotein represses BRCA1 expression through direct binding to its first intron, which is consistent with a previous study which identified a novel transcriptional repressor element located more than 500 base pairs into the first intron of BRCA1, suggesting that the first intron plays an important role in the negative regulation of BRCA1. Although further functional studies are necessary to confirm its repressor activity towards BRCA1, the elucidation of the role of BP1 in breast tumorigenesis holds great promise in establishing BP1 as a novel target for drug therapy. PMID:20877436

  17. Modulation of matrix mineralization by Vwc2-like protein and its novel splicing isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohyama, Yoshio; Katafuchi, Michitsuna; Almehmadi, Ahmed; Venkitapathi, Sundharamani; Jaha, Haytham; Ehrenman, Jason; Morcos, Joseph; Aljamaan, Reem; Mochida, Yoshiyuki

    2012-02-03

    In search of new cysteine knot protein (CKP) family members, we found a novel gene called von Willebrand factor C domain-containing protein 2-like (Vwc2l, also known as Brorin-like) and its transcript variants (Vwc2l-1, Vwc2l-2 and Vwc2l-3). Based on the deduced amino acid sequence, Vwc2l-1 has a signal peptide and 2 cysteine-rich (CR) domains, while Vwc2l-2 lacks a part of 2nd CR domain and Vwc2l-3 both CR domains. Although it has been reported that the expression of Brorin-like was predominantly observed in brain, we found that Vwc2l transcript variants were detected in more ubiquitous tissues. In osteoblasts, the induction of Vwc2l expression was observed at matrix mineralization stage. When Vwc2l was stably transfected into osteoblasts, the matrix mineralization was markedly accelerated in Vwc2l-expressing clones compared to that in the control, indicating the modulatory effect of Vwc2l protein on osteoblastic cell function. The mechanistic insight of Vwc2l-modulation was further investigated and we found that the expression of Osterix, one of the key osteogenic markers, was significantly increased by addition of all Vwc2l isoform proteins. Taken together, Vwc2l is a novel secreted protein that promotes matrix mineralization by modulating Osterix expression likely through TGF-β superfamily growth factor signaling pathway. Our data may provide mechanistic insights into the biological functions of this novel CKP member in bone and further suggest a novel approach to enhance osteoblast function, which enables to accerelate bone formation, regeneration and healing. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Differential gene expression and alternative splicing between diploid and tetraploid watermelon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saminathan, Thangasamy; Nimmakayala, Padma; Manohar, Sumanth; Malkaram, Sridhar; Almeida, Aldo; Cantrell, Robert; Tomason, Yan; Abburi, Lavanya; Rahman, Mohammad A; Vajja, Venkata G; Khachane, Amit; Kumar, Brajendra; Rajasimha, Harsha K; Levi, Amnon; Wehner, Todd; Reddy, Umesh K

    2015-03-01

    The exploitation of synthetic polyploids for producing seedless fruits is well known in watermelon. Tetraploid progenitors of triploid watermelon plants, compared with their diploid counterparts, exhibit wide phenotypic differences. Although many factors modulate alternative splicing (AS) in plants, the effects of autopolyploidization on AS are still unknown. In this study, we used tissues of leaf, stem, and fruit of diploid and tetraploid sweet watermelon to understand changes in gene expression and the occurrence of AS. RNA-sequencing analysis was performed along with reverse transcription quantitative PCR and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE)-PCR to demonstrate changes in expression and splicing. All vegetative tissues except fruit showed an increased level of AS in the tetraploid watermelon throughout the growth period. The ploidy levels of diploids and the tetraploid were confirmed using a ploidy analyser. We identified 5362 and 1288 genes that were up- and downregulated, respectively, in tetraploid as compared with diploid plants. We further confirmed that 22 genes underwent AS events across tissues, indicating possibilities of generating different protein isoforms with altered functions of important transcription factors and transporters. Arginine biosynthesis, chlorophyllide synthesis, GDP mannose biosynthesis, trehalose biosynthesis, and starch and sucrose degradation pathways were upregulated in autotetraploids. Phloem protein 2, chloroplastic PGR5-like protein, zinc-finger protein, fructokinase-like 2, MYB transcription factor, and nodulin MtN21 showed AS in fruit tissues. These results should help in developing high-quality seedless watermelon and provide additional transcriptomic information related to other cucurbits. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. The TCF C-clamp DNA binding domain expands the Wnt transcriptome via alternative target recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoverter, Nate P; Zeller, Michael D; McQuade, Miriam M; Garibaldi, Angela; Busch, Anke; Selwan, Elizabeth M; Hertel, Klemens J; Baldi, Pierre; Waterman, Marian L

    2014-12-16

    LEF/TCFs direct the final step in Wnt/β-catenin signalling by recruiting β-catenin to genes for activation of transcription. Ancient, non-vertebrate TCFs contain two DNA binding domains, a High Mobility Group box for recognition of the Wnt Response Element (WRE; 5'-CTTTGWWS-3') and the C-clamp domain for recognition of the GC-rich Helper motif (5'-RCCGCC-3'). Two vertebrate TCFs (TCF-1/TCF7 and TCF-4/TCF7L2) use the C-clamp as an alternatively spliced domain to regulate cell-cycle progression, but how the C-clamp influences TCF binding and activity genome-wide is not known. Here, we used a doxycycline inducible system with ChIP-seq to assess how the C-clamp influences human TCF1 binding genome-wide. Metabolic pulse-labeling of nascent RNA with 4'Thiouridine was used with RNA-seq to connect binding to the Wnt transcriptome. We find that the C-clamp enables targeting to a greater number of gene loci for stronger occupancy and transcription regulation. The C-clamp uses Helper sites concurrently with WREs for gene targeting, but it also targets TCF1 to sites that do not have readily identifiable canonical WREs. The coupled ChIP-seq/4'Thiouridine-seq analysis identified new Wnt target genes, including additional regulators of cell proliferation. Thus, C-clamp containing isoforms of TCFs are potent transcriptional regulators with an expanded transcriptome directed by C-clamp-Helper site interactions. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  20. The novel CXCL12gamma isoform encodes an unstructured cationic domain which regulates bioactivity and interaction with both glycosaminoglycans and CXCR4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cédric Laguri

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: CXCL12alpha, a chemokine that importantly promotes the oriented cell migration and tissue homing of many cell types, regulates key homeostatic functions and pathological processes through interactions with its cognate receptor (CXCR4 and heparan sulfate (HS. The alternative splicing of the cxcl12 gene generates a recently identified isoform, CXCL12gamma, which structure/function relationships remain unexplored. The high occurrence of basic residues that characterize this isoform suggests however that it could feature specific regulation by HS. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using surface plasmon resonance and NMR spectroscopy, as well as chemically and recombinantly produced chemokines, we show here that CXCL12gamma first 68 amino acids adopt a structure closely related to the well described alpha isoform, followed by an unfolded C-terminal extension of 30 amino acids. Remarkably, 60% of these residues are either lysine or arginine, and most of them are clustered in typical HS binding sites. This provides the chemokine with the highest affinity for HP ever observed (Kd = 0.9 nM, and ensures a strong retention of the chemokine at the cell surface. This was due to the unique combination of two cooperative binding sites, one strictly required, found in the structured domain of the protein, the other one being the C-terminus which essentially functions by enhancing the half life of the complexes. Importantly, this peculiar C-terminus also regulates the balance between HS and CXCR4 binding, and consequently the biological activity of the chemokine. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Together these data describe an unusual binding process that gives rise to an unprecedented high affinity between a chemokine and HS. This shows that the gamma isoform of CXCL12, which features unique structural and functional properties, is optimized to ensure its strong retention at the cell surface. Thus, depending on the chemokine isoform to which it binds, HS

  1. Comparative genomic analysis reveals a novel mitochondrial isoform of human rTS protein and unusual phylogenetic distribution of the rTS gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGuire John J

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rTS gene (ENOSF1, first identified in Homo sapiens as a gene complementary to the thymidylate synthase (TYMS mRNA, is known to encode two protein isoforms, rTSα and rTSβ. The rTSβ isoform appears to be an enzyme responsible for the synthesis of signaling molecules involved in the down-regulation of thymidylate synthase, but the exact cellular functions of rTS genes are largely unknown. Results Through comparative genomic sequence analysis, we predicted the existence of a novel protein isoform, rTS, which has a 27 residue longer N-terminus by virtue of utilizing an alternative start codon located upstream of the start codon in rTSβ. We observed that a similar extended N-terminus could be predicted in all rTS genes for which genomic sequences are available and the extended regions are conserved from bacteria to human. Therefore, we reasoned that the protein with the extended N-terminus might represent an ancestral form of the rTS protein. Sequence analysis strongly predicts a mitochondrial signal sequence in the extended N-terminal of human rTSγ, which is absent in rTSβ. We confirmed the existence of rTS in human mitochondria experimentally by demonstrating the presence of both rTSγ and rTSβ proteins in mitochondria isolated by subcellular fractionation. In addition, our comprehensive analysis of rTS orthologous sequences reveals an unusual phylogenetic distribution of this gene, which suggests the occurrence of one or more horizontal gene transfer events. Conclusion The presence of two rTS isoforms in mitochondria suggests that the rTS signaling pathway may be active within mitochondria. Our report also presents an example of identifying novel protein isoforms and for improving gene annotation through comparative genomic analysis.

  2. HIV-1 reverse transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wei-Shau; Hughes, Stephen H

    2012-10-01

    Reverse transcription and integration are the defining features of the Retroviridae; the common name "retrovirus" derives from the fact that these viruses use a virally encoded enzyme, reverse transcriptase (RT), to convert their RNA genomes into DNA. Reverse transcription is an essential step in retroviral replication. This article presents an overview of reverse transcription, briefly describes the structure and function of RT, provides an introduction to some of the cellular and viral factors that can affect reverse transcription, and discusses fidelity and recombination, two processes in which reverse transcription plays an important role. In keeping with the theme of the collection, the emphasis is on HIV-1 and HIV-1 RT.

  3. Prostaglandin D Synthase Isoforms from Cerebrospinal Fluid Vary with Brain Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G. Harrington

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Glutathione independent prostaglandin D synthase (Swissprot P41222, PTGDS has been identified in human cerebrospinal fluid and some changes in PTGDS in relation to disease have been reported. However, little is known of the extent that PTGDS isoforms fluctuate across a large range of congenital and acquired diseases. The purpose of this study was to examine changes in PTGDS isoforms in such a population. Spinal fluid from 22 healthy study participants (normal controls with no classifiable neurological or psychiatric diagnosis was obtained and PTGDS isoforms were identified by specific immunostaining and mass spectrometry after denaturing 2D gel electrophoresis. The PTGDS isoforms in controls consisted of five charge isoforms that were always present and a small number of occasional, low abundance isoforms. A qualitative survey of 98 different people with a wide range of congenital and acquired diseases revealed striking changes. Loss of the control isoforms occurred in congenital malformations of the nervous system. Gain of additional isoforms occurred in some degenerative, most demyelinating and vasculitic diseases, as well as in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. A retrospective analysis of published data that quantified relative amounts of PTGDS in multiple sclerosis, schizophrenia and Parkinson’s disease compared to controls revealed significant dysregulation. It is concluded that qualitative and quantitative fluctuations of cerebrospinal fluid PTGDS isoforms reflect both major and subtle brain pathophysiology.

  4. NHS-A isoform of the NHS gene is a novel interactor of ZO-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shiwani; Koh, Katrina S Y; Collin, Caitlin; Dave, Alpana; McMellon, Amy; Sugiyama, Yuki; McAvoy, John W; Voss, Anne K; Gécz, Jozef; Craig, Jamie E

    2009-08-15

    Mutations in the NHS (Nance-Horan Syndrome) gene lead to severe congenital cataracts, dental defects and sometimes mental retardation. NHS encodes two protein isoforms, NHS-A and -1A that display cell-type dependent differential expression and localization. Here we demonstrate that of these two isoforms, the NHS-A isoform associates with the cell membrane in the presence of intercellular contacts and it immunoprecipitates with the tight junction protein ZO-1 in MDCK (Madin Darby Canine Kidney) epithelial cells and in neonatal rat lens. The NHS-1A isoform however is a cytoplasmic protein. Both Nhs isoforms are expressed during mouse development. Immunolabelling of developing mouse with the anti-NHS antibody that detects both isoforms revealed the protein in the developing head including the eye and brain. It was primarily expressed in epithelium including neural epithelium and certain vascular endothelium but only weakly expressed in mesenchymal cells. In the epithelium and vascular endothelium the protein associated with the cell membrane and co-localized with ZO-1, which indirectly indicates expression of the Nhs-A isoform in these structures. Membrane localization of the protein in the lens vesicle similarly supports Nhs-A expression. In conclusion, the NHS-A isoform of NHS is a novel interactor of ZO-1 and may have a role at tight junctions. This isoform is important in mammalian development especially of the organs in the head.

  5. Calorimetric Study of Helix aspersa Maxima Hemocyanin Isoforms

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    Svetla Todinova

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermal unfolding of hemocyanin isoforms, β-HaH and αD+N-HaH, isolated from the hemolymph of garden snails Helix aspersa maxima, was studied by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. One transition, with an apparent transition temperature (Tm at 79.88°C, was detected in the thermogram of β-HaH in 20 mM HEPES buffer, containing 0.1 M NaCl, 5 mM CaCl2, and 5 mM MgCl2, pH 7.0, at scan rate of 1.0°C min−1. By means of successive annealing procedure, two individual transitions were identified in the thermogram of αD+N-HaH. Denaturation of both hemocyanins was found to be an irreversible process. The scan-rate dependence of the calorimetric profiles indicated that the thermal unfolding of investigated hemocyanins was kinetically controlled. The thermal denaturation of the isoforms β-HaH and αD+N-HaH was described by the two-state irreversible model, and parameters of the Arrhenius equation were calculated.

  6. A Review of Metallothionein Isoforms and their Role in Pathophysiology

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    Senthil kumar M

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Metallothionein (MT is a protein which has several interesting biological effects and has been demonstrated increase focus on the role of MT in various biological systems in the past three decades. The studies on the role of MT were limited with few areas like apoptosis and antioxidants in selected organs even fifty years after its discovery. Now acknowledge the exploration of various isoforms of MT such as MT-I, MT-II, MT-III and MT-IV and other isoforms in various biological systems. Strong evidence exists that MT modulates complex diseases and the immune system in the body but the primary function of MT still remains unknown. This review's main objective is to explore the capability to specifically manipulate MT levels in cells and in animals to provide answers regarding how MT could impact those complex disease scenarios. The experimental result mentioned in this review related among MT, zinc, cadmium, diabetic, heart disease, bone retardation, neuro toxicity, kidney dysfunction, cancer, and brain suggest novel method for exploration and contribute significantly to the growing scientist to research further in this field.

  7. Novel Isoforms of N16 and N19 Families Implicated for the Nacreous Layer Formation in the Pearl Oyster Pinctada fucata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmori, Fumito; Kinoshita, Shigeharu; Funabara, Daisuke; Koyama, Hiroki; Nagai, Kiyohito; Maeyama, Kaoru; Okamoto, Kikuhiko; Asakawa, Shuichi; Watabe, Shugo

    2018-04-01

    Although a wide variety of proteins and genes possibly related to the shell formation in bivalve have been identified, their functions have been only partially approved. We have recently performed deep sequencing of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata using a next-generation sequencer, identifying a dozen of novel gene candidates which are possibly associated with the nacreous layer formation. Among the ESTs, we focused on three novel isoforms (N16-6, N16-7, and N19-2) of N16 and N19 families with reference to five known genes in the families and determined the full-length cDNA sequences of these isoforms. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed that N16-6 was expressed in gill, gonad, adductor muscle, and mantle, whereas N16-7 exclusively in mantle. N19-2 was expressed in all tissues examined. In situ hybridization demonstrated their regional expression in mantle and pearl sac, which well corresponded to those shown by EST analysis previously reported. Shells in the pearl oyster injected with dsRNAs of N16-7 and N19-2 showed abnormal surface appearance in the nacreous layer. Taken together, novel isoforms in N16 and N19 families shown in this study are essential to form the nacreous layer.

  8. Battles and hijacks: Noncod