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Sample records for alternative skin model

  1. Utilization of reconstructed cultured human skin models as an alternative skin for permeation studies of chemical compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Kano, Satoshi; 藤堂, 浩明; 杉江, 謙一; 藤本, 英哲; 中田, 圭一; 徳留, 嘉寛; 橋本, フミ惠; 杉林, 堅次

    2010-01-01

    Two reconstructed human skin models, EpiskinSM and EpiDermTM, have been approved as alternative membranes for skin corrosive/irritation experiments due to their close correlation with animal skin. Such reconstructed human skin models were evaluated as alternative membranes for skin permeation experiments. Seven drugs with different lipophilicities and almost the same molecular weight were used as test penetrants. Relationships were investigated between permeability coefficients (P values) of ...

  2. Spectroscopic and thermal characterization of alternative model biomembranes from shed skins of Bothrops jararaca and Spilotis pullatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Rolim Baby

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Recently, there has been an interest in the use of shed snake skin as alternative model biomembrane for human stratum corneum. This research work presented as objective the qualitative characterization of alternative model biomembranes from Bothrops jararaca and Spilotis pullatus by FT-Raman, PAS-FTIR and DSC. The employed biophysical techniques permitted the characterization of the biomembranes from shed snake skin of B. jararaca and S. pullatus by the identification of vibrational frequencies and endothermic transitions that are similar to those of the human stratum corneum.Existe atualmente interesse no uso da muda de pele de cobra como modelos alternativos de biomembranas da pele humana. O presente trabalho apresentou como objetivo a caracterização qualitativa de modelos alternativos de biomembranas provenientes de mudas de pele de cobra da Bothrops jararaca e Spilotis pullatus por espectroscopia Raman (FT-Raman, espectroscopia fotoacústica no infravermelho (PAS-FTIR e calorimetria exploratória diferencial (DSC. As técnicas biofísicas FT-Raman, PAS-FTIR e DSC permitiram caracterizar qualitativamente os modelos alternativos de biomembranas provenientes das mudas de pele de cobra da B. jararaca e S. pullatus e identificar freqüências vibracionais e transições endotérmicas similares ao estrato córneo humano.

  3. Human skin equivalent as an alternative to animal testing

    OpenAIRE

    Brunner, Herwig; Kersen, Silke; Weimer, Michaela; Mertsching, Heike

    2008-01-01

    The 3-D skin equivalent can be viewed as physiologically comparable to the natural skin and therefore is a suitable alternative for animal testing. This highly differentiated in vitro human skin equivalent is used to assess the efficacy and mode of action of novel agents. This model is generated from primary human keratinocytes on a collagen substrate containing human dermal fibroblasts. It is grown at the air-liquid interface which allows full epidermal stratification and epidermal-dermal in...

  4. Bioengineered Self-assembled Skin as an Alternative to Skin Grafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Climov, Mihail; Medeiros, Erika; Farkash, Evan A.; Qiao, Jizeng; Rousseau, Cecile F.; Dong, Shumin; Zawadzka, Agatha; Racki, Waldemar J.; Al-Musa, Ahmad; Sachs, David H.; Randolph, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    For patients with extensive burns or donor site scarring, the limited availability of autologous and the inevitable rejection of allogeneic skin drive the need for new alternatives. Existing engineered biologic and synthetic skin analogs serve as temporary coverage until sufficient autologous skin is available. Here we report successful engraftment of a self-assembled bilayered skin construct derived from autologous skin punch biopsies in a porcine model. Dermal fibroblasts were stimulated to produce an extracellular matrix and were then seeded with epidermal progenitor cells to generate an epidermis. Autologous constructs were grafted onto partial- and full-thickness wounds. By gross examination and histology, skin construct vascularization and healing were comparable to autologous skin grafts and were superior to an autologous bilayered living cellular construct fabricated with fibroblasts cast in bovine collagen. This is the first demonstration of spontaneous vascularization and permanent engraftment of a self-assembled bilayered bioengineered skin that could supplement existing methods of reconstruction. PMID:27482479

  5. Bioengineered Self-assembled Skin as an Alternative to Skin Grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Climov, Mihail; Medeiros, Erika; Farkash, Evan A; Qiao, Jizeng; Rousseau, Cecile F; Dong, Shumin; Zawadzka, Agatha; Racki, Waldemar J; Al-Musa, Ahmad; Sachs, David H; Randolph, Mark A; Huang, Christene A; Bollenbach, Thomas J

    2016-06-01

    For patients with extensive burns or donor site scarring, the limited availability of autologous and the inevitable rejection of allogeneic skin drive the need for new alternatives. Existing engineered biologic and synthetic skin analogs serve as temporary coverage until sufficient autologous skin is available. Here we report successful engraftment of a self-assembled bilayered skin construct derived from autologous skin punch biopsies in a porcine model. Dermal fibroblasts were stimulated to produce an extracellular matrix and were then seeded with epidermal progenitor cells to generate an epidermis. Autologous constructs were grafted onto partial- and full-thickness wounds. By gross examination and histology, skin construct vascularization and healing were comparable to autologous skin grafts and were superior to an autologous bilayered living cellular construct fabricated with fibroblasts cast in bovine collagen. This is the first demonstration of spontaneous vascularization and permanent engraftment of a self-assembled bilayered bioengineered skin that could supplement existing methods of reconstruction. PMID:27482479

  6. 皮肤刺激实验替代模型的研究新进展%Progress of Research on the Skin Irritation Test Alternative Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    葛善珍; 牛云彤; 卢涛

    2015-01-01

    皮肤刺激性是日常使用化妆品最常见的不良反应之一.人类健康相关产品危险性评价常做皮肤刺激性实验,皮肤刺激性试验是化妆品原料及产品安全性评价的主要项目.传统皮肤刺激试验采用实验动物进行,2013年3月11日欧盟已经禁止销售基于动物实验研发的化妆品原料及产品.随着组织工程技术和现代生物技术的发展,多种替代动物试验的体外模型被开发和应用,新的的皮肤刺激物陆续被发现.欧盟多采纳重组人表皮实验方法作为新体外皮肤实验指南(包括模型Episkin和模型Epiderm),随着体外模型重建技术的不断改善,不仅拓展了皮肤模型的临床应用范围,也必然推动新的敏感而特异的皮肤标志物的发现和应用.%Skin irritation is one of the most common adverse reactions in daily using cosmetics.Risk assessment of Human health related products often do skin irritation test,irritation test is the major projects to aspects of cosmetic of raw materials and product safety assessment.Traditional skin irritation tests use experimental animals.EU ban on animal-tested cosmetics goes into force on 11 March 2013.With the development of the tissue engineering and modem biotechnology,number of alternative animal testing in vitro models have been developed and applied,and new skin irritants were successively found.The EU adoption of experimental methods of recombinant human epidermal skin in vitro experiments as a new guide,such as Episkin and Epiderm.With the improving of vitro model recon-struction technology continues,the scope of the clinical application of skin model has been expanded,and it is bound to promote the discovery and application of new skin sensitive and specific markers.

  7. Human skin equivalent as an alternative to animal testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertsching, Heike; Weimer, Michaela; Kersen, Silke; Brunner, Herwig

    2008-01-01

    The 3-D skin equivalent can be viewed as physiologically comparable to the natural skin and therefore is a suitable alternative for animal testing. This highly differentiated in vitro human skin equivalent is used to assess the efficacy and mode of action of novel agents. This model is generated from primary human keratinocytes on a collagen substrate containing human dermal fibroblasts. It is grown at the air-liquid interface which allows full epidermal stratification and epidermal-dermal interactions to occur. Future emphasis is the establishment of different test systems to investigate wound healing, melanoma research and infection biology. Key features of this skin model are that it can be used as an alternative for in vivo studies, donor tissue can be tailored to the needs of the study and multiple analyses can be carried out at mRNA and protein level. Driven by both ethical and economical incentives, this has already resulted in a shift of the test strategies used by the Pharmaceutical Industry in the early drug development process as reflected by the increased demand for application of cell based assays. It is also a suitable model for testing a wide variety of endpoints including cell viability, the release of proinflammatory mediators, permeation rate, proliferation and biochemical changes. PMID:20204113

  8. Xenobiotic metabolism capacities of human skin in comparison with a 3D-epidermis model and keratinocyte-based cell culture as in vitro alternatives for chemical testing: phase II enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götz, Christine; Pfeiffer, Roland; Tigges, Julia; Ruwiedel, Karsten; Hübenthal, Ulrike; Merk, Hans F; Krutmann, Jean; Edwards, Robert J; Abel, Josef; Pease, Camilla; Goebel, Carsten; Hewitt, Nicola; Fritsche, Ellen

    2012-05-01

    The 7th Amendment to the EU Cosmetics Directive prohibits the use of animals in cosmetic testing for certain endpoints, such as genotoxicity. Therefore, skin in vitro models have to replace chemical testing in vivo. However, the metabolic competence neither of human skin nor of alternative in vitro models has so far been fully characterized, although skin is the first-pass organ for accidentally or purposely (cosmetics and pharmaceuticals) applied chemicals. Thus, there is an urgent need to understand the xenobiotic-metabolizing capacities of human skin and to compare these activities to models developed to replace animal testing. We have measured the activity of the phase II enzymes glutathione S-transferase, UDP-glucuronosyltransferase and N-acetyltransferase in ex vivo human skin, the 3D epidermal model EpiDerm 200 (EPI-200), immortalized keratinocyte-based cell lines (HaCaT and NCTC 2544) and primary normal human epidermal keratinocytes. We show that all three phase II enzymes are present and highly active in skin as compared to phase I. Human skin, therefore, represents a more detoxifying than activating organ. This work systematically compares the activities of three important phase II enzymes in four different in vitro models directly to human skin. We conclude from our studies that 3D epidermal models, like the EPI-200 employed here, are superior over monolayer cultures in mimicking human skin xenobiotic metabolism and thus better suited for dermatotoxicity testing. PMID:22509834

  9. Xenobiotic metabolism capacities of human skin in comparison with a 3D epidermis model and keratinocyte-based cell culture as in vitro alternatives for chemical testing: activating enzymes (Phase I).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götz, Christine; Pfeiffer, Roland; Tigges, Julia; Blatz, Veronika; Jäckh, Christine; Freytag, Eva-Maria; Fabian, Eric; Landsiedel, Robert; Merk, Hans F; Krutmann, Jean; Edwards, Robert J; Pease, Camilla; Goebel, Carsten; Hewitt, Nicola; Fritsche, Ellen

    2012-05-01

    Skin is important for the absorption and metabolism of exposed chemicals such as cosmetics or pharmaceuticals. The Seventh Amendment to the EU Cosmetics Directive prohibits the use of animals for cosmetic testing for certain endpoints, such as genotoxicity; therefore, there is an urgent need to understand the xenobiotic metabolizing capacities of human skin and to compare these activities with reconstructed 3D skin models developed to replace animal testing. We have measured Phase I enzyme activities of cytochrome P450 (CYP) and cyclooxygenase (COX) in ex vivo human skin, the 3D skin model EpiDerm™ (EPI-200), immortalized keratinocyte-based cell lines and primary normal human epidermal keratinocytes. Our data demonstrate that basal CYP enzyme activities are very low in whole human skin and EPI-200 as well as keratinocytes. In addition, activities in monolayer cells differed from organotypic tissues after induction. COX activity was similar in skin, EPI-200 and NHEK cells, but was significantly lower in immortalized keratinocytes. Hence, the 3D model EPI-200 might represent a more suitable model for dermatotoxicological studies. Altogether, these data help to better understand skin metabolism and expand the knowledge of in vitro alternatives used for dermatotoxicity testing. PMID:22509833

  10. Evaluation of a Silicone Membrane as an Alternative to Human Skin for Determining Skin Permeation Parameters of Chemical Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Takashi; Yakumaru, Masafumi; Nishioka, Keisuke; Higashi, Yoshihiro; Sano, Tomohiko; Todo, Hiroaki; Sugibayashi, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of a silicone membrane as an alternative to human skin using the skin permeation parameters of chemical compounds. An in vitro permeation study using 15 model compounds was conducted, and permeation parameters comprising permeability coefficient (P), diffusion parameter (DL(-2)), and partition parameter (KL) were calculated from each permeation profile. Significant correlations were obtained in log P, log DL(-2), and log KL values between the silicone membrane and human skin. DL(-2) values of model compounds, except flurbiprofen, in the silicone membrane were independent of the lipophilicity of the model compounds and were 100-fold higher than those in human skin. For antipyrine and caffeine, which are hydrophilic, KL values in the silicone membrane were 100-fold lower than those in human skin, and P values, calculated as the product of a DL(-2) and KL, were similar. For lipophilic compounds, such as n-butyl paraben and flurbiprofen, KL values for silicone were similar to or 10-fold higher than those in human skin, and P values for silicone were 100-fold higher than those in human skin. Furthermore, for amphiphilic compounds with log Ko/w values from 0.5 to 3.5, KL values in the silicone membrane were 10-fold lower than those in human skin, and P values for silicone were 10-fold higher than those in human skin. The silicone membrane was useful as a human skin alternative in an in vitro skin permeation study. However, depending on the lipophilicity of the model compounds, some parameters may be over- or underestimated. PMID:27581638

  11. Nanofibers Offer Alternative Ways to the Treatment of Skin Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. D. J. Heunis

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Injury to the skin causes a breach in the protective layer surrounding the body. Many pathogens are resistant to antibiotics, rendering conventional treatment less effective. This led to the use of alternative antimicrobial compounds, such as silver ions, in skin treatment. In this review nanofibers, and the incorporation of natural antimicrobial compounds in these scaffolds, are discussed as an alternative way to control skin infections. Electrospinning as a technique to prepare nanofibers is discussed. The possibility of using these structures as drug delivery systems is investigated.

  12. Animal models of skin regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawronska-Kozak, Barbara; Grabowska, Anna; Kopcewicz, Marta; Kur, Anna

    2014-03-01

    Cutaneous injury in the majority of vertebrate animals results in the formation of a scar in the post-injured area. Scar tissues, although beneficial for maintaining integrity of the post-wounded region often interferes with full recovery of injured tissues. The goal of wound-healing studies is to identify mechanisms to redirect reparative pathways from debilitating scar formation to regenerative pathways that lead to normal functionality. To perform such studies models of regeneration, which are rare in mammals, are required. In this review we discussed skin regenerative capabilities present in lower vertebrates and in models of skin scar-free healing in mammals, e.g. mammalian fetuses. However, we especially focused on the attributes of two unusual models of skin scar-free healing capabilities that occur in adult mammals, that is, those associated with nude, FOXN1-deficient mice and in wild-type African spiny mice.

  13. Appraisal of alternative skin model for the study of epidermal restoration following exposure to various environmental stress agents: ionising radiation and UV B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human skin is a major target tissue for ionising radiation (IR) and UV B. We developed a skin explant model and used 2 types of keratinocytes to study survival and oxidative stress induced by these radiations. We examined oxidative damages by measuring R.O.S. produced and cellular anti-oxidant defenses induced. We observed into skin exposed to IR a modulation of genes expression implied in the control of oxidative stress, confirmed by the decrease of catalase, glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase enzymatic activities. The imbalance observed between anti- and pro-apoptotic genes expression shows that keratinocytes apoptosis may be partly dependent on radio-induced R.O.S. production. We showed the difference of radiosensitivity between N.H.E.K. and Ha Ca.T., which may be linked to their differential oxidative responses. In addition, during re-epithelialising, we demonstrated that activated N.H.E.K. after IR express keratin 6, release pro-inflammatory cytokines and proliferate, without modification of their differentiation. Treatment of N.H.E.K. with geranyl geranylacetone (G.G.A.) has a beneficial effect on their radio-induced activation by increasing IL-1 release, their migration in scrapped area and their survival. G.G.A. has an anti apoptotic ability (induction of Hsp70- caspase-3 pathway) and migratory properties (P38/RhoA activation) on N.H.E.K., but after IR, only caspase-3 pathway is induced. This work thus contributes to the understanding of cutaneous damages after IR and G.G.A. mechanism of action which accelerates re-epithelialising. (author)

  14. Construction of new skin models and calculation of skin dose coefficients for electron exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Yeon Soo; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Nguyen, Thang Tat; Choi, Chansoo; Han, Min Cheol; Jeong, Jong Hwi

    2016-08-01

    The voxel-type reference phantoms of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), due to their limited voxel resolutions, cannot represent the 50- μm-thick radiosensitive target layer of the skin necessary for skin dose calculations. Alternatively, in ICRP Publication 116, the dose coefficients (DCs) for the skin were calculated approximately, averaging absorbed dose over the entire skin depth of the ICRP phantoms. This approximation is valid for highly-penetrating radiations such as photons and neutrons, but not for weakly penetrating radiations like electrons due to the high gradient in the dose distribution in the skin. To address the limitation, the present study introduces skin polygon-mesh (PM) models, which have been produced by converting the skin models of the ICRP voxel phantoms to a high-quality PM format and adding a 50- μm-thick radiosensitive target layer into the skin models. Then, the constructed skin PM models were implemented in the Geant4 Monte Carlo code to calculate the skin DCs for external exposures of electrons. The calculated values were then compared with the skin DCs of the ICRP Publication 116. The results of the present study show that for high-energy electrons (≥ 1 MeV), the ICRP-116 skin DCs are, indeed, in good agreement with the skin DCs calculated in the present study. For low-energy electrons (energies. Besides, regardless of the small tissue weighting factor of the skin ( w T = 0.01), the discrepancies in the skin dose were found to result in significant discrepancies in the effective dose, demonstarting that the effective DCs in ICRP-116 are not reliable for external exposure to electrons.

  15. Alternative tsunami models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, A; Lyatskaya, I [Department of Physics, Alabama A and M University, Normal, AL 35762 (United States)], E-mail: arjun.tan@aamu.edu

    2009-01-15

    The interesting papers by Margaritondo (2005 Eur. J. Phys. 26 401) and by Helene and Yamashita (2006 Eur. J. Phys. 27 855) analysed the great Indian Ocean tsunami of 2004 using a simple one-dimensional canal wave model, which was appropriate for undergraduate students in physics and related fields of discipline. In this paper, two additional, easily understandable models, suitable for the same level of readership, are proposed: one, a two-dimensional model in flat space, and two, the same on a spherical surface. The models are used to study the tsunami produced by the central Kuril earthquake of November 2006. It is shown that the two alternative models, especially the latter one, give better representations of the wave amplitude, especially at far-flung locations. The latter model further demonstrates the enhancing effect on the amplitude due to the curvature of the Earth for far-reaching tsunami propagation.

  16. A tiered approach to the use of alternatives to animal testing for the safety assessment of cosmetics: skin irritation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macfarlane, Martin; Jones, Penny; Goebel, Carsten; Dufour, Eric; Rowland, Joanna; Araki, Daisuke; Costabel-Farkas, Margit; Hewitt, Nicola J; Hibatallah, Jalila; Kirst, Annette; McNamee, Pauline; Schellauf, Florian; Scheel, Julia

    2009-07-01

    Evaluation of the skin irritancy and corrosivity potential of an ingredient is a necessity in the safety assessment of cosmetic ingredients. To date, there are two formally validated alternatives to the rabbit Draize test for skin corrosivity in place, namely the rat skin transcutaneous electrical resistance (TER) assay and the Human Skin Model Test using EpiSkin, EpiDerm and SkinEthic reconstructed human epidermal equivalents. For skin irritation, EpiSkin, EpiDerm and SkinEthic are validated as stand-alone test replacements for the rabbit Draize test. Data from these tests are rarely considered in isolation and are evaluated in combination with other factors to establish the overall irritating or corrosive potential of an ingredient. In light of the deadlines established in the Cosmetics Directive for cessation of animal testing for cosmetic ingredients, a COLIPA scientific meeting was held in Brussels on 30th January, 2008 to review the use of alternative approaches and to set up a decision tree approach for their integration into tiered testing strategies for hazard and safety assessment of cosmetic ingredients and their use in products. In conclusion, the safety assessments for skin irritation/corrosion of new chemicals for use in cosmetics can be confidently accomplished using exclusively alternative methods. PMID:19393278

  17. Alternate Gauge Electroweak Model

    CERN Document Server

    Dalton, Bill

    2010-01-01

    We describe an alternate gauge electroweak model that permits neutrinos with mass, and at the same time explains why right-handed neutrinos do not appear in weak interactions. This is a local gauge theory involving a space [V ] of three scalar functions. The standard Lagrangian density for the Yang-Mills field part and Higgs doublet remain invariant. A ma jor change is made in the transformation and corresponding Lagrangian density parts involving the right-handed leptons. A picture involving two types of right-handed leptons emerges. A dichotomy of matter on the [V ] space corresponds to coupled and uncoupled right-handed Leptons. Here, we describe a covariant dipole-mode solution in which the neutral bosons A{\\mu} and Z{\\mu} produce precessions on [V ]. The W {\\pm} {\\mu} bosons provide nutations on [V ], and consequently, provide transitions between the coupled and uncoupled regions. To elucidate the [V ] space matter dichotomy, and to generate the boson masses, we also provide an alternate potential Lagran...

  18. A cell-based in vitro alternative to identify skin sensitizers by gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ethical and economic burden associated with animal testing for assessment of skin sensitization has triggered intensive research effort towards development and validation of alternative methods. In addition, new legislation on the registration and use of cosmetics and chemicals promote the use of suitable alternatives for hazard assessment. Our previous studies demonstrated that human CD34+ progenitor-derived dendritic cells from cord blood express specific gene profiles upon exposure to low molecular weight sensitizing chemicals. This paper presents a classification model based on this cell type which is successful in discriminating sensitizing chemicals from non-sensitizing chemicals based on transcriptome analysis of 13 genes. Expression profiles of a set of 10 sensitizers and 11 non-sensitizers were analyzed by RT-PCR using 9 different exposure conditions and a total of 73 donor samples. Based on these data a predictive dichotomous classifier for skin sensitizers has been constructed, which is referred to as . In a first step the dimensionality of the input data was reduced by selectively rejecting a number of exposure conditions and genes. Next, the generalization of a linear classifier was evaluated by a cross-validation which resulted in a prediction performance with a concordance of 89%, a specificity of 97% and a sensitivity of 82%. These results show that the present model may be a useful human in vitro alternative for further use in a test strategy towards the reduction of animal use for skin sensitization

  19. Modelling of skin exposure from distributed sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fogh, C.L.; Andersson, Kasper Grann

    2000-01-01

    A simple model of indoor air pollution concentrations was used together with experimental results on deposition velocities to skin to calculate the skin dose from an outdoor plume of contaminants, The primary pathway was considered to be direct deposition to the skin from a homogeneously...... distributed air source. The model has been used to show that skin deposition was a significant dose contributor for example when compared to inhalation dose. (C) 2000 British Occupational Hygiene Society, Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  20. Animal model and alternative test to skin antioxidant efficacy assessment%皮肤抗氧化功效评价动物模型及替代方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    步犁; 程树军; 秦瑶; 谈伟君

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress and damage is closely related to skin functional decreased and diseases.Traditional biological evaluation of the skin antioxidant often use animal model through creative a model of local skin injury or disease.With the deepening understanding of the mechanism of skin oxidative damage and the development of in vitro culture techniques,using cultured skin cells or reconstructive skin model test system can be establish a new rapid testing method which can be used in the evaluation and screening of antioxidant effects,as well as mechanisms research and product development.%氧化应激和损伤与多种皮肤功能下降和皮肤疾病密切相关.传统皮肤抗氧化剂的生物学评价多采用局部皮肤损伤模型或疾病动物模型,随着皮肤氧化损伤机制的认识不断深入和体外培养技术的发展,利用体外培养的皮肤细胞或重建的皮肤模型为测试系统,建立新型快速检测方法,可用于抗氧化效应评价和筛查,以及机制研究和产品开发.

  1. SkinEthic Laboratories, a company devoted to develop and produce in vitro alternative methods to animal use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Brugerolle, Anne

    2007-01-01

    SkinEthic Laboratories is a France-based biotechnology company recognised as the world leader in tissue engineering. SkinEthic is devoted to develop and produce reliable and robust in vitro alternative methods to animal use in cosmetic, chemical and pharmaceutical industries. SkinEthic models provide relevant tools for efficacy and safety screening tests in order to support an integrated decision-making during research and development phases. Some screening tests are referenced and validated as alternatives to animal use (Episkin), others are in the process of validation under ECVAM and OECD guidelines. SkinEthic laboratories provide a unique and joined experience of more than 20 years from Episkin SNC and SkinEthic SA. Their unique cell culture process allows in vitro reconstructed human tissues with well characterized histology, functionality and ultrastructure features to be mass produced. Our product line includes skin models: a reconstructed human epidermis with a collagen layer, Episkin, reconstructed human epidermis without or with melanocytes (with a tanning degree from phototype II to VI) and a reconstructed human epithelium, i.e. cornea, and other mucosa, i.e. oral, gingival, oesophageal and vaginal. Our philosophy is based on 3 main commitments: to support our customers by providing robust and reliable models, to ensure training and education in using validated protocols, allowing a large array of raw materials, active ingredients and finished products in solid, liquid, powder, cream or gel form to be screened, and, to provide a dedicated service to our partners.

  2. Prediction of skin sensitizers using alternative methods to animal experimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Henrik; Lindstedt, Malin

    2014-07-01

    Regulatory frameworks within the European Union demand that chemical substances are investigated for their ability to induce sensitization, an adverse health effect caused by the human immune system in response to chemical exposure. A recent ban on the use of animal tests within the cosmetics industry has led to an urgent need for alternative animal-free test methods that can be used for assessment of chemical sensitizers. To date, no such alternative assay has yet completed formal validation. However, a number of assays are in development and the understanding of the biological mechanisms of chemical sensitization has greatly increased during the last decade. In this MiniReview, we aim to summarize and give our view on the recent progress of method development for alternative assessment of chemical sensitizers. We propose that integrated testing strategies should comprise complementary assays, providing measurements of a wide range of mechanistic events, to perform well-educated risk assessments based on weight of evidence. PMID:24548737

  3. Predicting chemically-induced skin reactions. Part II: QSAR models of skin permeability and the relationships between skin permeability and skin sensitization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skin permeability is widely considered to be mechanistically implicated in chemically-induced skin sensitization. Although many chemicals have been identified as skin sensitizers, there have been very few reports analyzing the relationships between molecular structure and skin permeability of sensitizers and non-sensitizers. The goals of this study were to: (i) compile, curate, and integrate the largest publicly available dataset of chemicals studied for their skin permeability; (ii) develop and rigorously validate QSAR models to predict skin permeability; and (iii) explore the complex relationships between skin sensitization and skin permeability. Based on the largest publicly available dataset compiled in this study, we found no overall correlation between skin permeability and skin sensitization. In addition, cross-species correlation coefficient between human and rodent permeability data was found to be as low as R2 = 0.44. Human skin permeability models based on the random forest method have been developed and validated using OECD-compliant QSAR modeling workflow. Their external accuracy was high (Q2ext = 0.73 for 63% of external compounds inside the applicability domain). The extended analysis using both experimentally-measured and QSAR-imputed data still confirmed the absence of any overall concordance between skin permeability and skin sensitization. This observation suggests that chemical modifications that affect skin permeability should not be presumed a priori to modulate the sensitization potential of chemicals. The models reported herein as well as those developed in the companion paper on skin sensitization suggest that it may be possible to rationally design compounds with the desired high skin permeability but low sensitization potential. - Highlights: • It was compiled the largest publicly-available skin permeability dataset. • Predictive QSAR models were developed for skin permeability. • No concordance between skin sensitization and skin

  4. Predicting chemically-induced skin reactions. Part II: QSAR models of skin permeability and the relationships between skin permeability and skin sensitization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, Vinicius M. [Laboratory of Molecular Modeling and Design, Faculty of Pharmacy, Federal University of Goiás, Goiânia, GO 74605-220 (Brazil); Laboratory for Molecular Modeling, Division of Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry, Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Muratov, Eugene [Laboratory for Molecular Modeling, Division of Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry, Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Laboratory of Theoretical Chemistry, A.V. Bogatsky Physical–Chemical Institute NAS of Ukraine, Odessa 65080 (Ukraine); Fourches, Denis [Laboratory for Molecular Modeling, Division of Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry, Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Strickland, Judy; Kleinstreuer, Nicole [ILS/Contractor supporting the NTP Interagency Center for the Evaluation of Alternative Toxicological Methods (NICEATM), P.O. Box 13501, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Andrade, Carolina H. [Laboratory of Molecular Modeling and Design, Faculty of Pharmacy, Federal University of Goiás, Goiânia, GO 74605-220 (Brazil); Tropsha, Alexander, E-mail: alex_tropsha@unc.edu [Laboratory for Molecular Modeling, Division of Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry, Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Skin permeability is widely considered to be mechanistically implicated in chemically-induced skin sensitization. Although many chemicals have been identified as skin sensitizers, there have been very few reports analyzing the relationships between molecular structure and skin permeability of sensitizers and non-sensitizers. The goals of this study were to: (i) compile, curate, and integrate the largest publicly available dataset of chemicals studied for their skin permeability; (ii) develop and rigorously validate QSAR models to predict skin permeability; and (iii) explore the complex relationships between skin sensitization and skin permeability. Based on the largest publicly available dataset compiled in this study, we found no overall correlation between skin permeability and skin sensitization. In addition, cross-species correlation coefficient between human and rodent permeability data was found to be as low as R{sup 2} = 0.44. Human skin permeability models based on the random forest method have been developed and validated using OECD-compliant QSAR modeling workflow. Their external accuracy was high (Q{sup 2}{sub ext} = 0.73 for 63% of external compounds inside the applicability domain). The extended analysis using both experimentally-measured and QSAR-imputed data still confirmed the absence of any overall concordance between skin permeability and skin sensitization. This observation suggests that chemical modifications that affect skin permeability should not be presumed a priori to modulate the sensitization potential of chemicals. The models reported herein as well as those developed in the companion paper on skin sensitization suggest that it may be possible to rationally design compounds with the desired high skin permeability but low sensitization potential. - Highlights: • It was compiled the largest publicly-available skin permeability dataset. • Predictive QSAR models were developed for skin permeability. • No concordance between skin

  5. Skin friction blistering: computer model.

    OpenAIRE

    Xing, Malcolm; Pan, Ning; Zhong, Wen; Maibach, Howard

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: Friction blisters, a common injury in sports and military operations, can adversely effect or even halt performance. Given its frequency and hazardous nature, recent research efforts appear limited. Blistering can be treated as a delamination phenomenon; similar issues in materials science have been extensively investigated in theory and experiment. An obstacle in studying blistering is the difficulty of conducting experiment on humans and animals. Computer modeling thus b...

  6. Validation model for Raman based skin carotenoid detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermakov, Igor V; Gellermann, Werner

    2010-12-01

    Raman spectroscopy holds promise as a rapid objective non-invasive optical method for the detection of carotenoid compounds in human tissue in vivo. Carotenoids are of interest due to their functions as antioxidants and/or optical absorbers of phototoxic light at deep blue and near UV wavelengths. In the macular region of the human retina, carotenoids may prevent or delay the onset of age-related tissue degeneration. In human skin, they may help prevent premature skin aging, and are possibly involved in the prevention of certain skin cancers. Furthermore, since carotenoids exist in high concentrations in a wide variety of fruits and vegetables, and are routinely taken up by the human body through the diet, skin carotenoid levels may serve as an objective biomarker for fruit and vegetable intake. Before the Raman method can be accepted as a widespread optical alternative for carotenoid measurements, direct validation studies are needed to compare it with the gold standard of high performance liquid chromatography. This is because the tissue Raman response is in general accompanied by a host of other optical processes which have to be taken into account. In skin, the most prominent is strongly diffusive, non-Raman scattering, leading to relatively shallow light penetration of the blue/green excitation light required for resonant Raman detection of carotenoids. Also, sizable light attenuation exists due to the combined absorption from collagen, porphyrin, hemoglobin, and melanin chromophores, and additional fluorescence is generated by collagen and porphyrins. In this study, we investigate for the first time the direct correlation of in vivo skin tissue carotenoid Raman measurements with subsequent chromatography derived carotenoid concentrations. As tissue site we use heel skin, in which the stratum corneum layer thickness exceeds the light penetration depth, which is free of optically confounding chromophores, which can be easily optically accessed for in vivo RRS

  7. Validation model for Raman based skin carotenoid detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermakov, Igor V; Gellermann, Werner

    2010-12-01

    Raman spectroscopy holds promise as a rapid objective non-invasive optical method for the detection of carotenoid compounds in human tissue in vivo. Carotenoids are of interest due to their functions as antioxidants and/or optical absorbers of phototoxic light at deep blue and near UV wavelengths. In the macular region of the human retina, carotenoids may prevent or delay the onset of age-related tissue degeneration. In human skin, they may help prevent premature skin aging, and are possibly involved in the prevention of certain skin cancers. Furthermore, since carotenoids exist in high concentrations in a wide variety of fruits and vegetables, and are routinely taken up by the human body through the diet, skin carotenoid levels may serve as an objective biomarker for fruit and vegetable intake. Before the Raman method can be accepted as a widespread optical alternative for carotenoid measurements, direct validation studies are needed to compare it with the gold standard of high performance liquid chromatography. This is because the tissue Raman response is in general accompanied by a host of other optical processes which have to be taken into account. In skin, the most prominent is strongly diffusive, non-Raman scattering, leading to relatively shallow light penetration of the blue/green excitation light required for resonant Raman detection of carotenoids. Also, sizable light attenuation exists due to the combined absorption from collagen, porphyrin, hemoglobin, and melanin chromophores, and additional fluorescence is generated by collagen and porphyrins. In this study, we investigate for the first time the direct correlation of in vivo skin tissue carotenoid Raman measurements with subsequent chromatography derived carotenoid concentrations. As tissue site we use heel skin, in which the stratum corneum layer thickness exceeds the light penetration depth, which is free of optically confounding chromophores, which can be easily optically accessed for in vivo RRS

  8. Multivariate Models for Prediction of Human Skin Sensitization Hazard

    Science.gov (United States)

    One of ICCVAM’s top priorities is the development and evaluation of non-animal approaches to identify potential skin sensitizers. The complexity of biological events necessary for a substance to elicit a skin sensitization reaction suggests that no single alternative method...

  9. Multivariate Models for Prediction of Skin Sensitization Hazard in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    One of ICCVAM’s highest priorities is the development and evaluation of non-animal approaches to identify potential skin sensitizers. The complexity of biological events necessary for a substance to elicit a skin sensitization reaction suggests that no single alternative me...

  10. Elucidation of xenobiotic metabolism pathways in human skin and human skin models by proteomic profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven van Eijl

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human skin has the capacity to metabolise foreign chemicals (xenobiotics, but knowledge of the various enzymes involved is incomplete. A broad-based unbiased proteomics approach was used to describe the profile of xenobiotic metabolising enzymes present in human skin and hence indicate principal routes of metabolism of xenobiotic compounds. Several in vitro models of human skin have been developed for the purpose of safety assessment of chemicals. The suitability of these epidermal models for studies involving biotransformation was assessed by comparing their profiles of xenobiotic metabolising enzymes with those of human skin. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Label-free proteomic analysis of whole human skin (10 donors was applied and analysed using custom-built PROTSIFT software. The results showed the presence of enzymes with a capacity for the metabolism of alcohols through dehydrogenation, aldehydes through dehydrogenation and oxidation, amines through oxidation, carbonyls through reduction, epoxides and carboxylesters through hydrolysis and, of many compounds, by conjugation to glutathione. Whereas protein levels of these enzymes in skin were mostly just 4-10 fold lower than those in liver and sufficient to support metabolism, the levels of cytochrome P450 enzymes were at least 300-fold lower indicating they play no significant role. Four epidermal models of human skin had profiles very similar to one another and these overlapped substantially with that of whole skin. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The proteomics profiling approach was successful in producing a comprehensive analysis of the biotransformation characteristics of whole human skin and various in vitro skin models. The results show that skin contains a range of defined enzymes capable of metabolising different classes of chemicals. The degree of similarity of the profiles of the in vitro models indicates their suitability for epidermal toxicity testing. Overall, these

  11. Novel Inhibitory Effect of N-(2-Hydroxycyclohexylvaliolamine on Melanin Production in a Human Skin Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bum-Ho Bin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Hyper-pigmentation causes skin darkness and medical disorders, such as post-inflammatory melanoderma and melasma. Therefore, the development of anti-melanogenic agents is important for treating these conditions and for cosmetic production. In our previous paper, we demonstrated that the anti-diabetic drug voglibose, a valiolamine derivative, is a potent anti-melanogenic agent. In addition, we proposed an alternative screening strategy to identify valiolamine derivatives with high skin permeability that act as anti-melanogenic agents when applied topically. In this study, we synthesized several valiolamine derivatives with enhanced lipophilicity and examined their inhibitory effects in a human skin model. N-(2-hydroxycyclohexylvaliolamine (HV possesses a stronger inhibitory effect on melanin production than voglibose in a human skin model, suggesting that HV is a more potent anti-melanogenic agent for the skin.

  12. Models to assess perfume diffusion from skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzenbach, R; Bertschi, L

    2001-04-01

    Temperature, fragrance concentration on the skin and power of ventilation have been determined as crucial parameters in fragrance diffusion from skin. A tool has been developed to simulate perfume diffusion from skin over time, allowing headspace analysis and fragrance profile assessments in a highly reproducible way. PMID:18498453

  13. Dermal absorption and skin damage following hydrofluoric acid exposure in an ex vivo human skin model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennerlein, Kathrin; Kiesewetter, Franklin; Kilo, Sonja; Jäger, Thomas; Göen, Thomas; Korinth, Gintautas; Drexler, Hans

    2016-04-25

    The wide industrial use of hydrofluoric acid (HF) poses a high risk for accidental dermal exposure. Despite local and systemic hazards associated with HF, information on percutaneous penetration and tissue damage is rare. In the present ex vivo study, the dermal absorption of HF (detected in terms of fluoride ions) was quantified and the skin damaging potential as a function of concentration and exposure duration was assessed. Percutaneous penetration of HF (c=5, 30, and 50%) at 3 exposure durations (3, 5, and 10 min) was investigated in a static diffusion cell model using freshly excised human skin. Alterations of skin were histologically evaluated. HF rapidly penetrated through skin under formation of a considerable intradermal reservoir (∼ 13-67% of total absorbed fluoride). Histologically, epidermal alterations were detected already after exposure to 5% HF for 3 min. The degree of skin damage increased with rising concentration and exposure duration leading to coagulation necrosis. For HF concentrations of ≥ 30%, skin damage progressed into deeper skin layers. Topically applied HF concentration was the principal parameter determining HF induced skin effects. The intradermal HF retention capacity associated with progression and prolongation of HF induced skin effects must be considered in the review of skin decontamination procedures.

  14. Complementary and alternative medicine in reducing radiation-induced skin toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jennifer J; Cui, Tengjiao; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L; Allen, Glenn O; Li, Jie; Takita, Cristiane; Lally, Brian E

    2014-08-01

    Radiation therapy-induced acute and late effects, particularly skin toxicities, have significant impact on cancer patients' quality of life and long-term survival. To date, no effective topical agents have been routinely used in the clinical setting to prevent skin toxicity. Using SKH-hr1 hairless mice, we investigated two complementary and alternative medicine in their effects on inflammation and ionizing radiation (IR)-induced skin toxicity: Calendula officinalis (CO) and Ching Wan Hung (CWH). They were applied immediately following each IR dosing of 10 Gy/day for 4 days. Skin toxicity and inflammatory factors were evaluated at multiple time points up to 15 days post-radiation. Serum interleukin (IL)-1α, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP1), keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC), and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) were significantly induced by radiation. Both CO and CWH significantly inhibited IR-induced MCP1 (p < 0.01), KC (p < 0.05), and G-CSF (p < 0.001). IR-induced erythema and blood vessel dilation were significantly reduced by CWH (p < 0.001) but not by CO at day 10 post-IR. Both agents inhibited IR-induced IL-1α (p < 0.01), MCP1 (p < 0.05), and vascular endothelial growth factor (p < 0.05). There were continuous inhibitory effects of CWH on IR-induced skin toxicities and inflammation. In contrast, CO treatment resulted in skin reactions compared to IR alone. Our results suggest that both CO and CWH reduce IR-induced inflammation and CWH reduced IR-induced erythema. In summary, CWH showed promising effects in reducing IR-related inflammation and skin toxicities, and future proof-of-principal testing in humans will be critical in evaluating its potential application in preventing IR-induced skin toxicities. PMID:24792319

  15. A dataset on 145 chemicals tested in alternative assays for skin sensitization undergoing prevalidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsch, Andreas; Ryan, Cindy A; Foertsch, Leslie; Emter, Roger; Jaworska, Joanna; Gerberick, Frank; Kern, Petra

    2013-11-01

    Skin sensitization is a key endpoint for cosmetic ingredients, with a forthcoming ban for animal testing in Europe. Four alternative tests have so far been submitted to ECVAM prevalidation: (i) MUSST and (ii) h-Clat assess surface markers on dendritic cell lines, (iii) the direct peptide reactivity assay (DPRA) measures reactivity with model peptides and (iv) the KeratinoSens(TM) assay which is based on detection of Nrf2-induced luciferase. It is anticipated that only an integrated testing strategy (ITS) based on a battery of tests might give a full replacement providing also a sensitization potency assessment, but this concept should be tested with a data-driven analysis. Here we report a database on 145 chemicals reporting the quantitative endpoints measured in a U937- test, the DPRA and KeratinoSens(TM) . It can serve to develop data-driven ITS approaches as we show in a parallel paper and provides a view as to the current ability to predict with in vitro tests as we are entering 2013. It may also serve as reference database when benchmarking new molecules with in vitro based read-across and find use as a reference database when evaluating new tests. The tests and combinations thereof were evaluated for predictivity, and overall a similar predictivity was found as before on three-fold smaller datasets. Analysis of the dose-response parameters of the individual tests indicates a correlation to sensitization potency. Detailed analysis of chemicals false-negative and false-positive in two tests helped to define limitations in the tests but also in the database derived from animal studies. PMID:23576290

  16. Comparison of xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme activities in ex vivo human skin and reconstructed human skin models from SkinEthic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilstein, Joan; Léreaux, Guillaume; Budimir, Natali; Hussler, Georges; Wilkinson, Simon; Duché, Daniel

    2014-09-01

    Skin function is not limited to a physical barrier. According to its total surface area, it is also considered as an extra-hepatic metabolizing organ. In vitro engineered human skins have been developed to replace limited ex vivo normal human skin samples (NHS). Thus, assessing and comparing skin models from SkinEthic [Episkin™, RHE™ and the full thickness model (FTM)] with NHS in terms of metabolic capability are essential. The apparent activities of main cutaneous isoforms of cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenases (CYP1A1/1B1, 2B6/2C18/2E1, 3A5/3A7), esterase, glutathione-S-[(GST), A, M, P, T], N-acetyl-(NAT1), uridinyl-diphosphate glucuronyl-(UDPGT 1A family) and sulfo-(SULT1A1) transferases were determined using probe substrates. Mean activities indicative of CYP1A1/1B1 (expressed as pmol/mg protein/6 h) in RHE™ (2.8) and FTM (2.6) were very similar to NHS (3.0) while Episkin™ showed a higher activity (9.1). Activities of CYP3A5/3A7 in FTM (3.3) and Episkin™ (3.6) were similar to NHS (3.8) while activity in RHE™ (13.3) was higher. CYP2B6/2C18/2E1 activity was below LOQ (0.5) in all skin models and NHS. Comparable intrinsic metabolic clearances were measured between NHS and skin models for esterase, UDPGT, GST and NAT1 activities. SULT1A1 activity toward probe substrates was not detected in skin models and observed at the limit of detection in NHS. Weak cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenases, high esterase and transferase activities suggested that NHS and skin models exhibited limited functionalization and much greater detoxification (hydrolytic and conjugating) capacities. These results demonstrate that skin models are similar to NHS in terms of metabolic functionality toward xenobiotics investigated and useful tools to assess both the local efficiency and safety of cosmetics. PMID:24658324

  17. Toward an Alternative Therapeutic Approach for Skin Infections: Antagonistic Activity of Lactobacilli Against Antibiotic-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafez, Mohamed M; Maghrabi, Ibrahim A; Zaki, Noha M

    2013-09-01

    The wide spread of antimicrobial resistance has urged the need of alternative therapeutic approach. In this context, probiotic lactobacilli have been reported for the prevention and treatment of many gastrointestinal and urogenital infections. However, very little is known about their antagonistic activity against skin pathogens. Accordingly, the present study aimed to investigate the potential of lactobacilli to interfere with pathogenesis features of two antibiotic-resistant skin pathogens, namely methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and multiple-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A total of 49 lactobacilli were recovered, identified and tested for their antagonistic activities against the aforementioned pathogens. Of these, eight isolates were capable of blocking the adherence of pathogens to mammalian cells independent of the skin pathogen tested or model adopted. Moreover, three Lactobacillus isolates (LRA4, LC2 and LR5) effectively prevented the pathogen internalization into epithelial cells in addition to potentiating phagocyte-mediated pathogen killing. Interestingly, the lactobacilli LC2, LF9 and LRA4 markedly inhibited the growth of P. aeruginosa and S. aureus isolates in coculture experiments. Besides, the lactobacilli LRA4, LC2, LR5 and LF9 have counteracted pathogen cytotoxicity. Taken together, the present study revealed some inhibitory activities of lactobacilli against two antibiotic-resistant skin pathogens. Moreover, it revealed two lactobacilli, namely LC2 and LRA4, with antagonistic capacity against different virulence determinants of skin pathogens. These lactobacilli are considered promising probiotic candidates that may represent an alternative therapeutic approach for skin infections.

  18. Alternative Asymmetric Stochastic Volatility Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Asai (Manabu); M.J. McAleer (Michael)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe stochastic volatility model usually incorporates asymmetric effects by introducing the negative correlation between the innovations in returns and volatility. In this paper, we propose a new asymmetric stochastic volatility model, based on the leverage and size effects. The model is

  19. Transfer of radionuclides across skin barriers of animal skin models in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive skin contamination with radionuclides in ionic forms after the permeation across skin models was studied in vitro. Using animal skin models of 5-day-old rat and 9-day-old rat, either intact or stripped, it was found that besides the transepidermal also the transfolicular flux can be important. Stratum corneum was found to be the principal permeation barrier in all cases. The study of penetration - time profiles revealed that permeated amounts were proportional to time in the case of 137Cs+ and 60Co2+, but they showed a local maximum in the case of 147Pm3+. (author)

  20. Xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes in the skin of rat, mouse, pig, guinea pig, man, and in human skin models

    OpenAIRE

    Oesch, F; Fabian, E.; Guth, K.; Landsiedel, R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The exposure of the skin to medical drugs, skin care products, cosmetics, and other chemicals renders information on xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes (XME) in the skin highly interesting. Since the use of freshly excised human skin for experimental investigations meets with ethical and practical limitations, information on XME in models comes in the focus including non-human mammalian species and in vitro skin models. This review attempts to summarize the information available in the ...

  1. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Usage in Skin Diseases and the Positive and Negative Impacts on Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülşen Tükenmez Demirci

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Our purpose was to compare the sosciodemographical differences between Complementary and Alternative medicine (CAM users and non users with skin diseases and to investigate the positive and negative impacts of CAM among patients. Methods: The patients with dermatological conditions attending the dermatology outpatient clinic were enrolled to the study randomly. The sociodemographical properties, diagnosis of the skin diseases, duration of the disease, CAM usage and duration of usage and the positive and negative impacts of the treatments were recorded. Results: A total of 522 (302 female, 220 male, median age 34.8±16.7 patients were enrolled in the study. Eighty-eight patients (16.8% were found to have used a CAM method. The mean age of CAM users (28.2±14.3 were statistically lower than non users (36.0±16.9 (p=0.000 <0.05. The disease duration of CAM users (4.3±5.5 year was statistically longer than non-users (2.8±5.2 year. The CAM methods were mostly preferred in acne vulgaris disease (31.8%, and the mostly used CAM method was herbal therapies (59.1%. We found that 16 (18.2% out of 88 CAM users had side effects from CAM treatment while nine patients (10.3% improved. Conclusion: Complementary and alternative medicine usage is not frequent among skin diseases. The patients with longer disease duration are more prone to use CAM. The side effects rarely occur due to CAM use and we ascertain that very rarely do patients benefit from CAM methods.

  2. Chemically induced skin carcinogenesis: Updates in experimental models (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neagu, Monica; Caruntu, Constantin; Constantin, Carolina; Boda, Daniel; Zurac, Sabina; Spandidos, Demetrios A; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M

    2016-05-01

    Skin cancer is one of the most common malignancies affecting humans worldwide, and its incidence is rapidly increasing. The study of skin carcinogenesis is of major interest for both scientific research and clinical practice and the use of in vivo systems may facilitate the investigation of early alterations in the skin and of the mechanisms involved, and may also lead to the development of novel therapeutic strategies for skin cancer. This review outlines several aspects regarding the skin toxicity testing domain in mouse models of chemically induced skin carcinogenesis. There are important strain differences in view of the histological type, development and clinical evolution of the skin tumor, differences reported decades ago and confirmed by our hands‑on experience. Using mouse models in preclinical testing is important due to the fact that, at the molecular level, common mechanisms with human cutaneous tumorigenesis are depicted. These animal models resemble human skin cancer development, in that genetic changes caused by carcinogens and pro‑inflammatory cytokines, and simultaneous inflammation sustained by pro‑inflammatory cytokines and chemokines favor tumor progression. Drugs and environmental conditions can be tested using these animal models. keeping in mind the differences between human and rodent skin physiology. PMID:26986013

  3. Skin sensitization: Modeling based on skin metabolism simulation and formation of protein conjugates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimitrov, Sabcho; Low, Lawrence; Patlewicz, Grace;

    2005-01-01

    A quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) system for estimating skin sensitization potency has been developed that incorporates skin metabolism and considers the potential of parent chemicals and/or their activated metabolites to react with skin proteins. A training set of diverse...... interactions of chemicals and their metabolites with skin proteins were described by 83 reactions that fall within 39 alerting groups. The SAR/QSAR system developed was able to correctly classify about 80% of the chemicals with significant sensitizing effect and 72% of nonsensitizing chemicals. For some...... alerting groups, three-dimensional (3D)-QSARs were developed to describe the multiplicity of physicochemical, steric, and electronic parameters. These 3D-QSARs, so-called pattern recognition-type models, were applied each time a latent alerting group was identified in a parent chemical or its generated...

  4. Dynamic hysteresis modeling including skin effect using diffusion equation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Souad; Louai, Fatima Zohra; Nait-Said, Nasreddine; Benabou, Abdelkader

    2016-07-01

    An improved dynamic hysteresis model is proposed for the prediction of hysteresis loop of electrical steel up to mean frequencies, taking into account the skin effect. In previous works, the analytical solution of the diffusion equation for low frequency (DELF) was coupled with the inverse static Jiles-Atherton (JA) model in order to represent the hysteresis behavior for a lamination. In the present paper, this approach is improved to ensure the reproducibility of measured hysteresis loops at mean frequency. The results of simulation are compared with the experimental ones. The selected results for frequencies 50 Hz, 100 Hz, 200 Hz and 400 Hz are presented and discussed.

  5. Alternative dimensional models of personality disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Widiger, Thomas A; Simonsen, Erik

    2005-01-01

    The recognition of the many limitations of the categorical model of personality disorder classification has led to the development of quite a number of alternative proposals for a dimensional classification. The purpose of this article is to suggest that future research work toward the integration...... of these alternative proposals within a common hierarchical structure. An illustration of a potential integration is provided using the constructs assessed within existing dimensional models. Suggestions for future research that will help lead toward a common, integrative dimensional model of personality disorder...

  6. In vitro model for decontamination of human skin: formaldehyde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, H; Barbadillo, S; Hui, X; Maibach, H I

    2007-04-01

    Decontamination of a chemical from skin is often an emergency measure. This study utilized an in vitro model to compare the decontamination capacity of three model decontaminant solutions (tap water, isotonic saline, and hypertonic saline). Human cadaver skin was dosed (approximately 0.25 microg on 3 cm(2) per skin) with radio-labeled [(14)C]-formaldehyde. After a defined exposure time (1, 3, and 30 min post-dosing, respectively), the surface skin was washed three times (4ml per time) with each solution. After washing, the skin was stripped with tape discs twice. Lastly, the wash solutions, strippings, receptor fluid, and remainder of skin were liquid scintillation analyzer counted to determine the amounts of formaldehyde. Additionally, an evaporation test at different exposure times (1min, 3min, 15min, 30min, and 60min, respectively) was conducted to monitor formaldehyde % evaporation. There were no statistical differences among these groups except isotonic saline, at 3min post-exposure (in wash solutions), showed a significantly difference (pisotonic saline may be effective in removing formaldehyde from skin. However, results from this model need validation in vivo. The model may provide a facile and robust method of accelerating knowledge of decontamination mechanism and lead to enhanced efficacy. PMID:17123683

  7. Modeling dative alternations of individual children

    OpenAIRE

    Bosch, A.P.J. van den; Bresnan, J.

    2015-01-01

    We address the question whether children can acquire mature use of higher-level grammatical choices from the linguistic input, given only general prior knowledge and learning biases. We do so on the basis of a case study with the dative alternation in English, building on a study by de Marneffe et al. (2012) who model the production of the dative alternation by seven young children, using data from the Child Language Data Exchange System corpus. Using mixed-effects logistic modelling on the a...

  8. Alternative Local Development models from the periphery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Lopez Oropeza

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available As neoliberal capitalism continues to fail on reducing inequities, and continues to fail on fulfilling its promise of a kind of “development” that would allow impoverished men and women to improve their situation and be able to experience a “freedom” which would empower them with new and better opportunities to vanish their many types of “poverties”, new and alternative models raise, presenting a different and inclusive type of development which intends to respond to their particular situations of exclusion and build on an alternative model.

  9. Development of a multiparametric in vitro model of skin sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyard-Nicodème, Muriel; Gerault, Eloise; Platteel, Marion; Peschard, Olivier; Veron, Wilfried; Mondon, Philippe; Pascal, Svinareff; Feuilloley, Marc G J

    2015-01-01

    Most animal experiments on cosmetics safety are prohibited and since March 2013, this obligation includes sensitization tests. However, until now there has been no validated alternative in vitro method. In this work, 400 compounds used in the cosmetic industry were selected to cover the greatest diversity of structures, biological activities and sensitizing potential. These molecules were submitted to a series of tests aimed at reproducing essential steps in sensitization and to distinguish between sensitization and irritations, i.e., transcutaneous permeation (factor A), haptenation (factor B), sensitization cytokines production (factor C) and acute toxicity (factor D). The transcutaneous diffusion was measured on human skin explants using Franz cells. Haptenation was tested in solution on human serum albumin. Sensitization cytokine production was investigated by measurement of interleukin-18 release by keratinocytes. Acute toxicity was determined using an 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide(75) cell viability test. As only sufficiently stable, soluble and detectable compounds are usable, 33, 72, 68 and 68 molecules were finally tested on factors A, B, C and D, respectively, and 32 were completely screened by the four factors. The individual correlation of the four factors with the reference in vivo tests was limited but the combination of these factors led to a correlation between in vivo and in vitro assays of 81.2% and the safety of the test (risk of false negative) reached 96.8%. The techniques employed are simple and inexpensive and this model of four tests appears as a promising technique to evaluate in vitro the skin sensitization potential of unknown molecules. PMID:24496914

  10. Functional testing of topical skin formulations using an optimised ex vivo skin organ culture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidgwick, G P; McGeorge, D; Bayat, A

    2016-07-01

    A number of equivalent-skin models are available for investigation of the ex vivo effect of topical application of drugs and cosmaceuticals onto skin, however many have their drawbacks. With the March 2013 ban on animal models for cosmetic testing of products or ingredients for sale in the EU, their utility for testing toxicity and effect on skin becomes more relevant. The aim of this study was to demonstrate proof of principle that altered expression of key gene and protein markers could be quantified in an optimised whole tissue biopsy culture model. Topical formulations containing green tea catechins (GTC) were investigated in a skin biopsy culture model (n = 11). Punch biopsies were harvested at 3, 7 and 10 days, and analysed using qRT-PCR, histology and HPLC to determine gene and protein expression, and transdermal delivery of compounds of interest. Reduced gene expression of α-SMA, fibronectin, mast cell tryptase, mast cell chymase, TGF-β1, CTGF and PAI-1 was observed after 7 and 10 days compared with treated controls (p numbers in treated biopsies compared with untreated controls at day 7 and day 10 (p animal models in this context, prior to study in a clinical trial environment. PMID:27086034

  11. A novel animal model for skin flap prelamination with biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xianyu; Luo, Xusong; Liu, Fei; Gu, Chuan; Wang, Xi; Yang, Qun; Qian, Yunliang; Yang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Several animal models of skin flap construction were reported using biomaterials in a way similar to prefabrication. However, there are few animal model using biomaterials similar to prelamination, another main way of clinical skin flap construction that has been proved to be reliable. Can biomaterials be added in skin flap prelamination to reduce the use of autogenous tissues? Beside individual clinical attempts, animal model is needed for randomized controlled trial to objectively evaluate the feasibility and further investigation. Combining human Acellular Dermal Matrix (hADM) and autologous skin graft, we prelaminated flaps based on inguinal fascia. One, two, three and four weeks later, hADM exhibited a sound revascularization and host cell infiltration. Prelaminated skin flaps were then raised and microsurgically transplanted back to groin region. Except for flaps after one week of prelamination, flaps from other subgroups successfully reconstructed defects. After six to sixteen weeks of transplantation, hADM was proved to being able to maintain its original structure, having a wealth of host tissue cells and achieving full revascularization.To our knowledge, this is the first animal model of prelaminating skin flap with biomaterials. Success of this animal model indicates that novel flap prelamination with biomaterials is feasible. PMID:27659066

  12. Mass transport model through the skin by microencapsulation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreras, Núria; Alonso, Cristina; Martí, Meritxell; Lis, Manel J

    2015-01-01

    Skin drug delivery can be subdivided into topical and transdermal administration. Transdermal administration can take advantage of chemical and physical strategies that can improve skin permeability and allow drug penetration. In this study, the development of a skin penetration profile was carried out by an in vitro technique for a microencapsulated system of ibuprofen. Release experiments were performed using percutaneous absorption tests to determine the evolution of the principle present in each of the different skin compartments as a function of time. A general kinetic model for a microencapsulated structure as a mass transport system through the skin was applied: [Formula: see text] This model could predict the penetration profile of encapsulated substances through skin from biofunctional textiles as well as estimate the dosage profile of the active principle. The apparent diffusion coefficients found were 1.20 × 10(-7 )cm/s for the stratum corneum and higher for the rest of the skin 6.67 × 10(-6 )cm/s. PMID:26004367

  13. Alternative modeling schemes for propositional calculus problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupama Chanda

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this paper is to discuss alternative approaches to convert a propositional logic problem into a 0-1 integer program. The substitution method proposed by Williams and CNF method is used for modeling and representation of logical inference problem. The similarity between the two fields viz. optimization problems or mathematical programming and deductive logic are shown.

  14. Skin barrier disruption by acetone: observations in a hairless mouse skin model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rissmann, R.; Oudshoorn, M.H.M.; Hennink, W.E.; Ponec, M.; Bouwstra, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    To disrupt the barrier function of the skin, different in vivo methods have been established, e.g., by acetone wiping or tape-stripping. In this study, the acetone-induced barrier disruption of hairless mice was investigated in order to establish a reliable model to study beneficial, long-term effec

  15. Real-time Face Detection using Skin Color Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Yao-xin; LIU Zhi-Qiang; ZHU Xiang-hua

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a new face detection approach to real-time applications, which is based on the skin color model and the morphological filtering. First the non-skin color pixels of the input image are removed based on the skin color model in the YCrCb chrominance space, from which we extract candidate human face regions. Then a mathematical morphological filter is used to remove noisy regions and fill the holes in the candidate skin color regions. We adopt the similarity between the human face features and the candidate face regions to locate the face regions in the original image. We have implemented the algorithm in our smart media system. The experiment results show that this system is effective in real-time applications.

  16. Animal models of skin disease for drug discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avci, Pinar; Sadasivam, Magesh; Gupta, Asheesh; De Melo, Wanessa CMA; Huang, Ying-Ying; Yin, Rui; Rakkiyappan, Chandran; Kumar, Raj; Otufowora, Ayodeji; Nyame, Theodore; Hamblin, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Discovery of novel drugs, treatments, and testing of consumer products in the field of dermatology is a multi-billion dollar business. Due to the distressing nature of many dermatological diseases, and the enormous consumer demand for products to reverse the effects of skin photodamage, aging, and hair loss, this is a very active field. Areas covered In this paper, we will cover the use of animal models that have been reported to recapitulate to a greater or lesser extent the features of human dermatological disease. There has been a remarkable increase in the number and variety of transgenic mouse models in recent years, and the basic strategy for constructing them is outlined. Expert opinion Inflammatory and autoimmune skin diseases are all represented by a range of mouse models both transgenic and normal. Skin cancer is mainly studied in mice and fish. Wound healing is studied in a wider range of animal species, and skin infections such as acne and leprosy also have been studied in animal models. Moving to the more consumer-oriented area of dermatology, there are models for studying the harmful effect of sunlight on the skin, and testing of sunscreens, and several different animal models of hair loss or alopecia. PMID:23293893

  17. [Skin and tissue bank: Operational model for the recovery and preservation of tissues and skin allografts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Flores, Francisco; Sandoval-Zamora, Hugo; Machuca-Rodriguez, Catalina; Barrera-López, Araceli; García-Cavazos, Ricardo; Madinaveitia-Villanueva, Juan Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Tissue storage is a medical process that is in the regulation and homogenisation phase in the scientific world. The international standards require the need to ensure safety and efficacy of human allografts such as skin and other tissues. The activities of skin and tissues banks currently involve their recovery, processing, storage and distribution, which are positively correlated with technological and scientific advances present in current biomedical sciences. A description is presented of the operational model of Skin and Tissue Bank at INR as successful case for procurement, recovery and preservation of skin and tissues for therapeutic uses, with high safety and biological quality. The essential and standard guidelines are presented as keystones for a tissue recovery program based on scientific evidence, and within an ethical and legal framework, as well as to propose a model for complete overview of the donation of tissues and organ programs in Mexico. Finally, it concludes with essential proposals for improving the efficacy of transplantation of organs and tissue programs.

  18. Alternative models for academic family practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yarnall Kimberly SH

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Future of Family Medicine Report calls for a fundamental redesign of the American family physician workplace. At the same time, academic family practices are under economic pressure. Most family medicine departments do not have self-supporting practices, but seek support from specialty colleagues or hospital practice plans. Alternative models for academic family practices that are economically viable and consistent with the principles of family medicine are needed. This article presents several "experiments" to address these challenges. Methods The basis of comparison is a traditional academic family medicine center. Apart of the faculty practice plan, our center consistently operated at a deficit despite high productivity. A number of different practice types and alternative models of service delivery were therefore developed and tested. They ranged from a multi-specialty office arrangement, to a community clinic operated as part of a federally-qualified health center, to a team of providers based in and providing care for residents of an elderly public housing project. Financial comparisons using consistent accounting across models are provided. Results Academic family practices can, at least in some settings, operate without subsidy while providing continuity of care to a broad segment of the community. The prerequisites are that the clinicians must see patients efficiently, and be able to bill appropriately for their payer mix. Conclusion Experimenting within academic practice structure and organization is worthwhile, and can result in economically viable alternatives to traditional models.

  19. Aircraft-skin Infrared Radiation Characteristics Modeling and Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Jianwei; Wang Qiang

    2009-01-01

    One of the most important problems of stealth technology is to evaluate the infrared radiation (IR) level received by IR sensors from fighters to be detected. This article presents a synthetic method for calculating the IR emitted from aircraft-skin. By reckoning the aerodynamic heating and hot engine casing to be the main heat sources of the exposed aircraft-skin, a numerical model of skin temperature distribution is established through computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technique. Based on it, an infrared signature model for solving the complex geometry and structure of a fighter is proposed with the reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) method. Finally, by way of determining the IR intensity from aircraft-skin, the aircraft components that emit the most IR can be identified; and the cooling effects of the main aircraft components on IR intensity are investigated. It is found that reduction by 10 K in the skin temperature of head, vertical stabilizers and wings could lead to decline of more than 8% of the IR intensity on the aircraft-skin in front view while at the broadside of the aircraft, the drops in IR intensity could attain under 8%. The results provide useful reference in designing stealthy aircraft.

  20. Primary skin fibroblasts as a model of Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Auburger, G.; Klinkenberg, M.; Droste, J.A.H.; Marcus, K.; Morales-Gordo, B.; Kunz, W.S.; Brandt, U.; Broccoli, V.; Reichmann, H.; Gispert, S.; Jendrach, M.

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is the second most frequent neurodegenerative disorder. While most cases occur sporadic mutations in a growing number of genes including Parkin (PARK2) and PINK1 (PARK6) have been associated with the disease. Different animal models and cell models like patient skin fibroblasts a

  1. Gigapixel photography for skin cancer surveillance: a novel alternative to total-body photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikailov, Anar; Blechman, Adam

    2013-11-01

    There is substantial evidence supporting the use of cutaneous imaging in combination with standard total-body skin examinations for early detection and treatment of melanoma. In the last 2 decades, total-body photography (TBP) has been widely used in combination with standard total-body skin examinations for active skin cancer surveillance with proven clinical utility; however, the groundbreaking image detail provided by gigapixel photography (GP) could improve dermatologists' ability to monitor suspicious lesions and therefore could serve a critical role in supplementing traditional total-body skin examinations for skin cancer surveillance. Although it has been successfully implemented in other fields, future studies are required to determine the effectiveness of GP in dermatology.

  2. Fibroblast heterogeneity and its implications for engineering organotypic skin models in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriram, Gopu; Bigliardi, Paul Lorenz; Bigliardi-Qi, Mei

    2015-11-01

    Advances in cell culture methods, multidisciplinary research, clinical need to replace lost skin tissues and regulatory need to replace animal models with alternative test methods has led to development of three dimensional models of human skin. In general, these in vitro models of skin consist of keratinocytes cultured over fibroblast-populated dermal matrices. Accumulating evidences indicate that mesenchyme-derived signals are essential for epidermal morphogenesis, homeostasis and differentiation. Various studies show that fibroblasts isolated from different tissues in the body are dynamic in nature and are morphologically and functionally heterogeneous subpopulations. Further, these differences seem to be dictated by the local biological and physical microenvironment the fibroblasts reside resulting in "positional identity or memory". Furthermore, the heterogeneity among the fibroblasts play a critical role in scarless wound healing and complete restoration of native tissue architecture in fetus and oral mucosa; and excessive scar formation in diseased states like keloids and hypertrophic scars. In this review, we summarize current concepts about the heterogeneity among fibroblasts and their role in various wound healing environments. Further, we contemplate how the insights on fibroblast heterogeneity could be applied for the development of next generation organotypic skin models.

  3. Evaluation of the in vivo leishmanicidal activity of amphotericin B emulgel: An alternative for the treatment of skin leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Iluska Martins; Carvalho, Ivana Pereira; de Carvalho, Camila Ernanda Sousa; Brito, Lucas Moreira; da Silva, Andrezza Braga Soares; Conde Júnior, Airton Mendes; de Carvalho, Fernando Aécio Amorim; Carvalho, André Luis Menezes

    2016-05-01

    The American Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (ACL) is an infectious disease that can be fatal. The first line of treatment is pentavalent antimonies. However, due to its potential to develop resistance, Amphotericin B (AmB) started to be used as an alternative medicine. Current treatments are limited, a fact that has led to a growing interesting in developing new therapies. This study aims to evaluate the therapeutic potential in vivo of an amphotericin B + oleic acid (OA) emulgel in the treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis in an experimental model. Strains of Leishmania major MHOM/IL/80/Friendlin of Leishmania major were used. The animals were inoculated subcutaneously. After the development of leishmanial, nodular or ulcerative lesions, the animals were divided into three groups (control, Group A and Group B) and treated twice a day for twelve days. The weight of the animals was measured and the size of the lesions was observed. A histopathological analysis was performed with skin fragments of lesions and with the spleen of animals treated with different treatments (emulgel, AmB 3% emulgel and AmB 3% plus OA 5% emulgel). It was observed that when subjected to treatment with AmB 3% emulgel during the study period using both formulations, with enhancer and without enhancer, ulcerative lesions regress gradually or even complete cure. The quantification of the average number of parasites recovered from the inoculation site was made after the treatment in each group and the differences were considered significant. The treatment with AmB 3% and OA 5% emulgel had the best in vivo therapeutic response, showing good prospects for cutaneous leishmaniasis therapy as an alternative therapy. PMID:26902606

  4. Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Anthony J

    2004-04-01

    Human skin provides a barrier between the host and the physical, chemical, and biological environment. It is also a potential portal of entry for hazardous or infectious agents and a potential target of environmental toxins. Cutaneous vulnerability may take on many forms in the embryo, infant, child, and adolescent. Teratogenic agents may occasionally target skin, as appreciated in the proposed association of the antithyroid medication methimazole, with the congenital malformation known as aplasia cutis congenita. Percutaneous absorption of topically applied substances and the potential for resultant drug toxicities are important considerations in the child. Many topical agents have been associated with systemic toxicity, including alcohol, hexachlorophene, iodine-containing compounds, eutectic mixture of local anesthetics, and lindane. Percutaneous toxicity is of greatest concern in the premature infant, in whom immaturity of the epidermal permeability barrier results in disproportionately increased absorption. Immature drug metabolism capabilities may further contribute to the increased risk in this population. Ultraviolet (UV) radiation exposure, which increases an individual's risk of cutaneous carcinogenesis, may be a particularly significant risk factor when it occurs during childhood. The "critical period hypothesis" suggests that UV exposure early in life increases the risk of eventual development of malignant melanoma. Other risk factors for malignant melanoma may include severe sunburns during childhood, intense intermittent UV exposure, and increased susceptibility of pediatric melanocytes to UV-induced DNA damage. Last, percutaneous exposure to environmental toxins and chemicals, such as insecticides and polychlorinated biphenyls, may differ between children and adults for several reasons, including behavioral patterns, anatomic and physiologic variations, and developmental differences of vital organs. PMID:15060207

  5. Ozone depletion and skin cancer incidence: an integrated modelling approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slaper H; den Elzen MGJ; de Woerd HJ; de Greef J

    1992-01-01

    A decrease in stratospheric ozone, probably caused by chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) emissions, has been observed over large parts of the globe. The incidence of skin cancer is expected to increase due to ozone depletion. An integrated source-risk model is developed and applied to evaluate the increased

  6. An alternative to the standard model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Seungwon; Ko, Pyungwon; Park, Wan-Il [School of Physics, KIAS, Seoul 130-722 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-24

    We present an extension of the standard model to dark sector with an unbroken local dark U(1){sub X} symmetry. Including various singlet portal interactions provided by the standard model Higgs, right-handed neutrinos and kinetic mixing, we show that the model can address most of phenomenological issues (inflation, neutrino mass and mixing, baryon number asymmetry, dark matter, direct/indirect dark matter searches, some scale scale puzzles of the standard collisionless cold dark matter, vacuum stability of the standard model Higgs potential, dark radiation) and be regarded as an alternative to the standard model. The Higgs signal strength is equal to one as in the standard model for unbroken U(1){sub X} case with a scalar dark matter, but it could be less than one independent of decay channels if the dark matter is a dark sector fermion or if U(1){sub X} is spontaneously broken, because of a mixing with a new neutral scalar boson in the models.

  7. Mouse Genetic Models Reveal Surprising Functions of IκB Kinase Alpha in Skin Development and Skin Carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Xiaojun [The Methodist Hospital Research Institute, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Park, Eunmi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Fischer, Susan M. [Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Smithville, TX 78967 (United States); Hu, Yinling, E-mail: huy2@mail.nih.gov [Cancer and Inflammation Program, Center for Cancer Research, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, MD 21701 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Gene knockout studies unexpectedly reveal a pivotal role for IκB kinase alpha (IKKα) in mouse embryonic skin development. Skin carcinogenesis experiments show that Ikkα heterozygous mice are highly susceptible to chemical carcinogen or ultraviolet B light (UVB) induced benign and malignant skin tumors in comparison to wild-type mice. IKKα deletion mediated by keratin 5 (K5).Cre or K15.Cre in keratinocytes induces epidermal hyperplasia and spontaneous skin squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) in Ikkα floxed mice. On the other hand, transgenic mice overexpressing IKKα in the epidermis, under the control of a truncated loricrin promoter or K5 promoter, develop normal skin and show no defects in the formation of the epidermis and other epithelial organs, and the transgenic IKKα represses chemical carcinogen or UVB induced skin carcinogenesis. Moreover, IKKα deletion mediated by a mutation, which generates a stop codon in the Ikkα gene, has been reported in a human autosomal recessive lethal syndrome. Downregulated IKKα and Ikkα mutations and deletions are found in human skin SCCs. The collective evidence not only highlights the importance of IKKα in skin development, maintaining skin homeostasis, and preventing skin carcinogenesis, but also demonstrates that mouse models are extremely valuable tools for revealing the mechanisms underlying these biological events, leading our studies from bench side to bedside.

  8. Collagen Content in Skin and Internal Organs of the Tight Skin Mouse: An Animal Model of Scleroderma

    OpenAIRE

    Jayanthi Manne; Marina Markova; Siracusa, Linda D.; Jimenez, Sergio A.

    2013-01-01

    The Tight Skin mouse is a genetically induced animal model of tissue fibrosis caused by a large in-frame mutation in the gene encoding fibrillin-1 (Fbn-1). We examined the influence of gender on the collagen content of tissues in C57BL/6J wild type (+/+) and mutant Tight Skin (Tsk/+) mice employing hydroxyproline assays. Tissue sections were stained with Masson’s trichrome to identify collagen in situ. Adult Tsk/+ mice skin contains ~15% more collagen, on average, than skin from +/+ mice of t...

  9. Predicting chemically-induced skin reactions. Part II: QSAR models of skin permeability and the relationships between skin permeability and skin sensitization

    OpenAIRE

    Alves, Vinicius M.; Muratov, Eugene; Fourches, Denis; Strickland, Judy; Kleinstreuer, Nicole; Carolina H. Andrade; Tropsha, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Skin permeability is widely considered to be mechanistically implicated in chemically-induced skin sensitization. Although many chemicals have been identified as skin sensitizers, there have been very few reports analyzing the relationships between molecular structure and skin permeability of sensitizers and non-sensitizers. The goals of this study were to: (i) compile, curate, and integrate the largest publicly available dataset of chemicals studied for their skin permeability; (ii) develop ...

  10. Appraisal of alternative skin model for the study of epidermal restoration following exposure to various environmental stress agents: ionising radiation and UV B; Evaluation d'un modele alternatif de peau dans l'etude de l'atteinte epidermique apres exposition a differents agents de stress environnementaux: rayonnements ionisants (RI) et ultra-violets B (UVB)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isoir, M

    2006-06-15

    Human skin is a major target tissue for ionising radiation (IR) and UV B. We developed a skin explant model and used 2 types of keratinocytes to study survival and oxidative stress induced by these radiations. We examined oxidative damages by measuring R.O.S. produced and cellular anti-oxidant defenses induced. We observed into skin exposed to IR a modulation of genes expression implied in the control of oxidative stress, confirmed by the decrease of catalase, glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase enzymatic activities. The imbalance observed between anti- and pro-apoptotic genes expression shows that keratinocytes apoptosis may be partly dependent on radio-induced R.O.S. production. We showed the difference of radiosensitivity between N.H.E.K. and Ha Ca.T., which may be linked to their differential oxidative responses. In addition, during re-epithelialising, we demonstrated that activated N.H.E.K. after IR express keratin 6, release pro-inflammatory cytokines and proliferate, without modification of their differentiation. Treatment of N.H.E.K. with geranyl geranylacetone (G.G.A.) has a beneficial effect on their radio-induced activation by increasing IL-1 release, their migration in scrapped area and their survival. G.G.A. has an anti apoptotic ability (induction of Hsp70- caspase-3 pathway) and migratory properties (P38/RhoA activation) on N.H.E.K., but after IR, only caspase-3 pathway is induced. This work thus contributes to the understanding of cutaneous damages after IR and G.G.A. mechanism of action which accelerates re-epithelialising. (author)

  11. Non-animal models of epithelial barriers (skin, intestine and lung) in research, industrial applications and regulatory toxicology

    OpenAIRE

    Gordon, Sarah; Daneshian, Mardas; Bouwstra, Joke; Caloni, Francesca; Constant, Samuel; Davies, Donna E.; Dandekar, Gudrun; Guzman, Carlos A.; Fabian, Eric; Haltner, Eleonore; Hartung, Thomas; Hasiwa, Nina; Hayden, Patrick; Kandarova, Helena; Khare, Sangeeta

    2015-01-01

    Models of the outer epithelia of the human body - namely the skin, the intestine and the lung - have found valid applications in both research and industrial settings as attractive alternatives to animal testing. A variety of approaches to model these barriers are currently employed in such fields, ranging from the utilization of ex vivo tissue to reconstructed in vitro models, and further to chip-based technologies, synthetic membrane systems and, of increasing current interest, in silico mo...

  12. Tropical bat as mammalian model for skin carotenoid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galván, Ismael; Garrido-Fernández, Juan; Ríos, José; Pérez-Gálvez, Antonio; Rodríguez-Herrera, Bernal; Negro, Juan José

    2016-09-27

    Animals cannot synthesize carotenoid pigments de novo, and must consume them in their diet. Most mammals, including humans, are indiscriminate accumulators of carotenoids but inefficiently distribute them to some tissues and organs, such as skin. This limits the potential capacity of these organisms to benefit from the antioxidant and immunostimulatory functions that carotenoids fulfill. Indeed, to date, no mammal has been known to have evolved physiological mechanisms to incorporate and deposit carotenoids in the skin or hair, and mammals have therefore been assumed to rely entirely on other pigments such as melanins to color their integument. Here we use high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in combination with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HPLC-TOF/MS) to show that the frugivorous Honduran white bat Ectophylla alba colors its skin bright yellow with the deposition of the xanthophyll lutein. The Honduran white bat is thus a mammalian model that may help developing strategies to improve the assimilation of lutein in humans to avoid macular degeneration. This represents a change of paradigm in animal physiology showing that some mammals actually have the capacity to accumulate dietary carotenoids in the integument. In addition, we have also discovered that the majority of the lutein in the skin of Honduran white bats is present in esterified form with fatty acids, thereby permitting longer-lasting coloration and suggesting bright color traits may have an overlooked role in the visual communication of bats. PMID:27621447

  13. Delayed-type skin reaction to the heparin-alternative danaparoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szolar-Platzer, C; Aberer, W; Kränke, B

    2000-11-01

    Eczematous, infiltrated plaques at the site of subcutaneously administered heparin appear to be common. Heparinoids cannot be recommended in general as a substitute for heparin or low molecular weight heparin because delayed-type skin reactions to these molecules can also occur, as demonstrated in this case report. PMID:11044823

  14. Fractional calculus model of electrical impedance applied to human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vosika, Zoran B; Lazovic, Goran M; Misevic, Gradimir N; Simic-Krstic, Jovana B

    2013-01-01

    Fractional calculus is a mathematical approach dealing with derivatives and integrals of arbitrary and complex orders. Therefore, it adds a new dimension to understand and describe basic nature and behavior of complex systems in an improved way. Here we use the fractional calculus for modeling electrical properties of biological systems. We derived a new class of generalized models for electrical impedance and applied them to human skin by experimental data fitting. The primary model introduces new generalizations of: 1) Weyl fractional derivative operator, 2) Cole equation, and 3) Constant Phase Element (CPE). These generalizations were described by the novel equation which presented parameter [Formula: see text] related to remnant memory and corrected four essential parameters [Formula: see text] We further generalized single generalized element by introducing specific partial sum of Maclaurin series determined by parameters [Formula: see text] We defined individual primary model elements and their serial combination models by the appropriate equations and electrical schemes. Cole equation is a special case of our generalized class of models for[Formula: see text] Previous bioimpedance data analyses of living systems using basic Cole and serial Cole models show significant imprecisions. Our new class of models considerably improves the quality of fitting, evaluated by mean square errors, for bioimpedance data obtained from human skin. Our models with new parameters presented in specific partial sum of Maclaurin series also extend representation, understanding and description of complex systems electrical properties in terms of remnant memory effects. PMID:23577065

  15. Fractional calculus model of electrical impedance applied to human skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoran B Vosika

    Full Text Available Fractional calculus is a mathematical approach dealing with derivatives and integrals of arbitrary and complex orders. Therefore, it adds a new dimension to understand and describe basic nature and behavior of complex systems in an improved way. Here we use the fractional calculus for modeling electrical properties of biological systems. We derived a new class of generalized models for electrical impedance and applied them to human skin by experimental data fitting. The primary model introduces new generalizations of: 1 Weyl fractional derivative operator, 2 Cole equation, and 3 Constant Phase Element (CPE. These generalizations were described by the novel equation which presented parameter [Formula: see text] related to remnant memory and corrected four essential parameters [Formula: see text] We further generalized single generalized element by introducing specific partial sum of Maclaurin series determined by parameters [Formula: see text] We defined individual primary model elements and their serial combination models by the appropriate equations and electrical schemes. Cole equation is a special case of our generalized class of models for[Formula: see text] Previous bioimpedance data analyses of living systems using basic Cole and serial Cole models show significant imprecisions. Our new class of models considerably improves the quality of fitting, evaluated by mean square errors, for bioimpedance data obtained from human skin. Our models with new parameters presented in specific partial sum of Maclaurin series also extend representation, understanding and description of complex systems electrical properties in terms of remnant memory effects.

  16. A propagating heat wave model of skin electroporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliquett, Uwe; Gusbeth, Ch; Nuccitelli, Richard

    2008-03-21

    The main barrier to transdermal drug delivery in human skin is the stratum corneum. Pulsed electric fields (PEFs) of sufficient amplitude can create new aqueous pathways across this barrier and enhance drug delivery through the skin. Here, we describe a model of pore formation between adjacent corneocytes that predicts the following sequence of events: (1) the PEF rapidly charges the stratum corneum near the electrode until the transepidermal potential difference is large enough to drive water into a small region of the stratum corneum, creating new aqueous pathways. (2) PEFs then drive a high current density through this newly created electropore to generate Joule heating that warms the pore perimeter. (3) This temperature rise at the perimeter increases the probability of further electroporation there as the local sphingolipids reach their phase transition temperature. (4) This heat-generated wave of further electroporation propagates outward until the surface area of the pore becomes so large that the reduced current density no longer generates sufficient heat to reach the phase transition temperature of the sphingolipids. (5) Cooling and partial recovery occurs after the field pulse. This process yields large, high permeability regions in the stratum corneum at which molecules can more readily cross this skin barrier. We present a model for this process that predicts that the initial radius of the first aqueous pathway is approximately 5nm for a transdermal voltage of 60V at room temperature.

  17. In vitro permeation models for healthy and compromised skin: The Phospholipid Vesicle-based Permeation Assay (PVPA) for skin applications

    OpenAIRE

    Engesland, André

    2015-01-01

    In vitro models with the ability to estimate drug penetration through healthy and compromised skin may reduce animal testing of drugs and cosmetics to a minimum. The phospholipid vesicle based permeation assay (PVPA) is based on a tight barrier composed of liposomes mimicking cells. It was originally made to mimic the intestinal epithelial barrier and in this project further developed to mimic the stratum corneum barrier of the skin. The lipid composition was changed to better mimic the lipid...

  18. A finite element model of the face including an orthotropic skin model under in vivo tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Cormac; Stavness, Ian; Lloyd, John; Fels, Sidney

    2015-01-01

    Computer models of the human face have the potential to be used as powerful tools in surgery simulation and animation development applications. While existing models accurately represent various anatomical features of the face, the representation of the skin and soft tissues is very simplified. A computer model of the face is proposed in which the skin is represented by an orthotropic hyperelastic constitutive model. The in vivo tension inherent in skin is also represented in the model. The model was tested by simulating several facial expressions by activating appropriate orofacial and jaw muscles. Previous experiments calculated the change in orientation of the long axis of elliptical wounds on patients' faces for wide opening of the mouth and an open-mouth smile (both 30(o)). These results were compared with the average change of maximum principal stress direction in the skin calculated in the face model for wide opening of the mouth (18(o)) and an open-mouth smile (25(o)). The displacements of landmarks on the face for four facial expressions were compared with experimental measurements in the literature. The corner of the mouth in the model experienced the largest displacement for each facial expression (∼11-14 mm). The simulated landmark displacements were within a standard deviation of the measured displacements. Increasing the skin stiffness and skin tension generally resulted in a reduction in landmark displacements upon facial expression. PMID:23919890

  19. Cavitation-enhanced delivery of insulin in agar and porcine models of human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feiszthuber, Helga; Bhatnagar, Sunali; Gyöngy, Miklós; Coussios, Constantin-C.

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound-assisted transdermal insulin delivery offers a less painful and less invasive alternative to subcutaneous insulin injections. However, ultrasound-based drug delivery, otherwise known as sonophoresis, is a highly variable phenomenon, in part dependent on cavitation. The aim of the current work is to investigate the role of cavitation in transdermal insulin delivery. Fluorescently stained, soluble Actrapid insulin was placed on the surface of human skin-mimicking materials subjected to 265 kHz, 10% duty cycle focused ultrasound. A confocally and coaxially aligned 5 MHz broadband ultrasound transducer was used to detect cavitation. Two different skin models were used. The first model, 3% agar hydrogel, was insonated with a range of pressures (0.25-1.40 MPa peak rarefactional focal pressure—PRFP), with and without cavitation nuclei embedded within the agar at a concentration of 0.05% w/v. The second, porcine skin was insonated at 1.00 and 1.40 MPa PRFP. In both models, fluorescence measurements were used to determine penetration depth and concentration of delivered insulin. Results show that in agar gel, both insulin penetration depth and concentration only increased significantly in the presence of inertial cavitation, with up to a 40% enhancement. In porcine skin the amount of fluorescent insulin was higher in the epidermis of those samples that were exposed to ultrasound compared to the control samples, but there was no significant increase in penetration distance. The results underline the importance of instigating and monitoring inertial cavitation during transdermal insulin delivery.

  20. Confocal Microscopy for Modeling Electron Microbeam Irradiation of Skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, John H.; Chrisler, William B.; Wang, Xihai; Sowa, Marianne B.

    2011-08-01

    For radiation exposures employing targeted sources such as particle microbeams, the deposition of energy and dose will depend on the spatial heterogeneity of the spample. Although cell structural variations are relatively minor for two-dimensional cell cultures, they can vary significantly for fully differential tissues. Employing high-resolution confocal microscopy, we have determined the spatial distribution, size, and shape of epidermal kerantinocyte nuclei for the full-thickness EpiDerm skin model (MatTek, Ashland, VA). Application of these data to claculate the microdosimetry and microdistribution of energy deposition by an electron microbeam is discussed.

  1. SR 97. Alternative models project. Stochastic continuum modelling of Aberg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widen, H. [Kemakta AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Walker, D. [INTERA KB/DE and S (Sweden)

    1999-08-01

    As part of studies into the siting of a deep repository for nuclear waste, Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) has commissioned the Alternative Models Project (AMP). The AMP is a comparison of three alternative modelling approaches to bedrock performance assessment for a single hypothetical repository, arbitrarily named Aberg. The Aberg repository will adopt input parameters from the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory in southern Sweden. The models are restricted to an explicit domain, boundary conditions and canister location to facilitate the comparison. The boundary conditions are based on the regional groundwater model provided in digital format. This study is the application of HYDRASTAR, a stochastic continuum groundwater flow and transport-modelling program. The study uses 34 realisations of 945 canister locations in the hypothetical repository to evaluate the uncertainty of the advective travel time, canister flux (Darcy velocity at a canister) and F-ratio. Several comparisons of variability are constructed between individual canister locations and individual realisations. For the ensemble of all realisations with all canister locations, the study found a median travel time of 27 years, a median canister flux of 7.1 x 10{sup -4} m/yr and a median F-ratio of 3.3 x 10{sup 5} yr/m. The overall pattern of regional flow is preserved in the site-scale model, as is reflected in flow paths and exit locations. The site-scale model slightly over-predicts the boundary fluxes from the single realisation of the regional model. The explicitly prescribed domain was seen to be slightly restrictive, with 6% of the stream tubes failing to exit the upper surface of the model. Sensitivity analysis and calibration are suggested as possible extensions of the modelling study.

  2. SR 97. Alternative models project. Stochastic continuum modelling of Aberg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of studies into the siting of a deep repository for nuclear waste, Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) has commissioned the Alternative Models Project (AMP). The AMP is a comparison of three alternative modelling approaches to bedrock performance assessment for a single hypothetical repository, arbitrarily named Aberg. The Aberg repository will adopt input parameters from the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory in southern Sweden. The models are restricted to an explicit domain, boundary conditions and canister location to facilitate the comparison. The boundary conditions are based on the regional groundwater model provided in digital format. This study is the application of HYDRASTAR, a stochastic continuum groundwater flow and transport-modelling program. The study uses 34 realisations of 945 canister locations in the hypothetical repository to evaluate the uncertainty of the advective travel time, canister flux (Darcy velocity at a canister) and F-ratio. Several comparisons of variability are constructed between individual canister locations and individual realisations. For the ensemble of all realisations with all canister locations, the study found a median travel time of 27 years, a median canister flux of 7.1 x 10-4 m/yr and a median F-ratio of 3.3 x 105 yr/m. The overall pattern of regional flow is preserved in the site-scale model, as is reflected in flow paths and exit locations. The site-scale model slightly over-predicts the boundary fluxes from the single realisation of the regional model. The explicitly prescribed domain was seen to be slightly restrictive, with 6% of the stream tubes failing to exit the upper surface of the model. Sensitivity analysis and calibration are suggested as possible extensions of the modelling study

  3. Optimising a model-based approach to inferring fear learning from skin conductance responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staib, Matthias; Castegnetti, Giuseppe; Bach, Dominik R

    2015-11-30

    Anticipatory sympathetic arousal is often inferred from skin conductance responses (SCR) and used to quantify fear learning. We have previously provided a model-based approach for this inference, based on a quantitative Psychophysiological Model (PsPM) formulated in non-linear dynamic equations. Here we seek to optimise the inversion of this PsPM. Using two independent fear conditioning datasets, we benchmark predictive validity as the sensitivity to separate the likely presence or absence of the unconditioned stimulus. Predictive validity is optimised across both datasets by (a) using a canonical form of the SCR shape (b) filtering the signal with a bi-directional band-pass filter with cut off frequencies 0.0159 and 5 Hz, (c) simultaneously inverting two trials (d) explicitly modelling skin conductance level changes between trials (e) the choice of the inversion algorithm (f) z-scoring estimates of anticipatory sympathetic arousal from each participant across trials. The original model-based method has higher predictive validity than conventional peak-scoring or an alternative model-based method (Ledalab), and benefits from constraining the model, optimised data preconditioning, and post-processing of ensuing parameters. PMID:26291885

  4. Transplantation of human skin microbiota in models of atopic dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myles, Ian A.; Williams, Kelli W; Reckhow, Jensen D; Jammeh, Momodou L; Pincus, Nathan B; Sastalla, Inka; Saleem, Danial; Stone, Kelly D; Datta, Sandip K

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is characterized by reduced barrier function, reduced innate immune activation, and susceptibility to Staphylococcus aureus. Host susceptibility factors are suggested by monogenic disorders associated with AD-like phenotypes and can be medically modulated. S. aureus contributes to AD pathogenesis and can be mitigated by antibiotics and bleach baths. Recent work has revealed that the skin microbiome differs significantly between healthy controls and patients with AD, including decreased Gram-negative bacteria in AD. However, little is known about the potential therapeutic benefit of microbiome modulation. To evaluate whether parameters of AD pathogenesis are altered after exposure to different culturable Gram-negative bacteria (CGN) collected from human skin, CGN were collected from healthy controls and patients with AD. Then, effects on cellular and culture-based models of immune, epithelial, and bacterial function were evaluated. Representative strains were evaluated in the MC903 mouse model of AD. We found that CGN taken from healthy volunteers but not from patients with AD were associated with enhanced barrier function, innate immunity activation, and control of S. aureus. Treatment with CGN from healthy controls improved outcomes in a mouse model of AD. These findings suggest that a live-biotherapeutic approach may hold promise for treatment of patients with AD.

  5. Development and validation of a tokamak skin effect transformer model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, J. A.; Moret, J.-M.; Coda, S.; Felici, F.; Garrido, I.

    2012-02-01

    A lumped parameter, state space model for a tokamak transformer including the slow flux penetration in the plasma (skin effect transformer model) is presented. The model does not require detailed or explicit information about plasma profiles or geometry. Instead, this information is lumped in system variables, parameters and inputs. The model has an exact mathematical structure built from energy and flux conservation theorems, predicting the evolution and non-linear interaction of plasma current and internal inductance as functions of the primary coil currents, plasma resistance, non-inductive current drive and the loop voltage at a specific location inside the plasma (equilibrium loop voltage). Loop voltage profile in the plasma is substituted by a three-point discretization, and ordinary differential equations are used to predict the equilibrium loop voltage as a function of the boundary and resistive loop voltages. This provides a model for equilibrium loop voltage evolution, which is reminiscent of the skin effect. The order and parameters of this differential equation are determined empirically using system identification techniques. Fast plasma current modulation experiments with random binary signals have been conducted in the TCV tokamak to generate the required data for the analysis. Plasma current was modulated under ohmic conditions between 200 and 300 kA with 30 ms rise time, several times faster than its time constant L/R ≈ 200 ms. A second-order linear differential equation for equilibrium loop voltage is sufficient to describe the plasma current and internal inductance modulation with 70% and 38% fit parameters, respectively. The model explains the most salient features of the plasma current transients, such as the inverse correlation between plasma current ramp rates and internal inductance changes, without requiring detailed or explicit information about resistivity profiles. This proves that a lumped parameter modelling approach can be used to

  6. Simulation-based cutaneous surgical-skill training on a chicken-skin bench model in a medical undergraduate program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Denadai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Because of ethical and medico-legal aspects involved in the training of cutaneous surgical skills on living patients, human cadavers and living animals, it is necessary the search for alternative and effective forms of training simulation. Aims: To propose and describe an alternative methodology for teaching and learning the principles of cutaneous surgery in a medical undergraduate program by using a chicken-skin bench model. Materials and Methods: One instructor for every four students, teaching materials on cutaneous surgical skills, chicken trunks, wings, or thighs, a rigid platform support, needled threads, needle holders, surgical blades with scalpel handles, rat-tooth tweezers, scissors, and marking pens were necessary for training simulation. Results: A proposal for simulation-based training on incision, suture, biopsy, and on reconstruction techniques using a chicken-skin bench model distributed in several sessions and with increasing levels of difficultywas structured. Both feedback and objective evaluations always directed to individual students were also outlined. Conclusion: The teaching of a methodology for the principles of cutaneous surgery using a chicken-skin bench model versatile, portable, easy to assemble, and inexpensive is an alternative and complementary option to the armamentarium of methods based on other bench models described.

  7. Modeling dative alternations of individual children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, A.P.J. van den; Bresnan, J.

    2015-01-01

    We address the question whether children can acquire mature use of higher-level grammatical choices from the linguistic input, given only general prior knowledge and learning biases. We do so on the basis of a case study with the dative alternation in English, building on a study by de Marneffe et a

  8. Region based elimination of noise pixels towards optimized classifier models for skin pixel detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagandeep Kaur

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The extraction of the skin pixels in a human image and rejection of non-skin pixels is called the skin segmentation. Skin pixel detection is the process of extracting the skin pixels in a human image which is typically used as a pre-processing step to extract the face regions from human image. In past, there are several computer vision approaches and techniques have been developed for skin pixel detection. In the process of skin detection, given pixels are been transformed into an appropriate color space such as RGB, HSV etc. And then skin classifier model have been applied to label the pixel into skin or non-skin regions. Here in this research a “Region based elimination of noise pixels and performance analysis of classifier models for skin pixel detection applied on human images” would be performed which involve the process of image representation in color models, elimination of non-skin pixels in the image, and then pre-processing and cleansing of the collected data, feature selection of the human image and then building the model for classifier. In this research and implementation of skin pixels classifier models are proposed with their comparative performance analysis. The definition of the feature vector is simply the selection of skin pixels from the human image or stack of human images. The performance is evaluated by comparing and analysing skin colour segmentation algorithms. During the course of research implementation, efforts are iterative which help in selection of optimized skin classifier based on the machine learning algorithms and their performance analysis.

  9. Contact modelling of human skin: what value to use for the modulus of elasticity?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuilenburg, van J.; Masen, M.A.; Heide, van der E.

    2012-01-01

    In modelling and understanding the contact and friction behaviour of human skin, the elastic modulus of the skin is an important input parameter. For the development of design rules for the engineering of surfaces in contact with the skin an expression that describes the relation between the elastic

  10. The human skin/chick chorioallantoic membrane model accurately predicts the potency of cosmetic allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slodownik, Dan; Grinberg, Igor; Spira, Ram M; Skornik, Yehuda; Goldstein, Ronald S

    2009-04-01

    The current standard method for predicting contact allergenicity is the murine local lymph node assay (LLNA). Public objection to the use of animals in testing of cosmetics makes the development of a system that does not use sentient animals highly desirable. The chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of the chick egg has been extensively used for the growth of normal and transformed mammalian tissues. The CAM is not innervated, and embryos are sacrificed before the development of pain perception. The aim of this study was to determine whether the sensitization phase of contact dermatitis to known cosmetic allergens can be quantified using CAM-engrafted human skin and how these results compare with published EC3 data obtained with the LLNA. We studied six common molecules used in allergen testing and quantified migration of epidermal Langerhans cells (LC) as a measure of their allergic potency. All agents with known allergic potential induced statistically significant migration of LC. The data obtained correlated well with published data for these allergens generated using the LLNA test. The human-skin CAM model therefore has great potential as an inexpensive, non-radioactive, in vivo alternative to the LLNA, which does not require the use of sentient animals. In addition, this system has the advantage of testing the allergic response of human, rather than animal skin. PMID:19054059

  11. Examining Pedestrian Injury Severity Using Alternative Disaggregate Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abay, Kibrom Araya

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the injury severity of pedestrians considering detailed road user characteristics and alternative model specification using a high-quality Danish road accident data. Such detailed and alternative modeling approach helps to assess the sensitivity of empirical inferences to ...

  12. Collagen Content in Skin and Internal Organs of the Tight Skin Mouse: An Animal Model of Scleroderma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayanthi Manne

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Tight Skin mouse is a genetically induced animal model of tissue fibrosis caused by a large in-frame mutation in the gene encoding fibrillin-1 (Fbn-1. We examined the influence of gender on the collagen content of tissues in C57BL/6J wild type (+/+ and mutant Tight Skin (Tsk/+ mice employing hydroxyproline assays. Tissue sections were stained with Masson’s trichrome to identify collagen in situ. Adult Tsk/+ mice skin contains ~15% more collagen, on average, than skin from +/+ mice of the same gender. The heart of Tsk/+ males had significantly more collagen than that of +/+ males. No significant gender differences were found in lungs and kidney collagen content. Overall, the collagen content of Tsk/+ males and +/+ males was higher than that of their Tsk/+ and +/+ female counterparts, respectively. Our data confirm increased deposition of collagen in skin and hearts of Tsk/+ mice; however, the effects of the Tsk mutation on collagen content are both tissue specific and gender specific. These results indicate that comparative studies of collagen content between normal and Tsk/+ mice skin and internal organs must take into account gender differences caused by expression of the androgen receptor.

  13. Hypo-osmotic shock-induced subclinical inflammation of skin in a rat model of disrupted skin barrier function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishi, Chihiro; Minematsu, Takeo; Huang, Lijuan; Mugita, Yuko; Kitamura, Aya; Nakagami, Gojiro; Yamane, Takumi; Yoshida, Mikako; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Funakubo, Megumi; Mori, Taketoshi; Sanada, Hiromi

    2015-03-01

    Aging disrupts skin barrier function and induces xerosis accompanied by pruritus. In many cases, elderly patients complain of pruritus during skin hygiene care, a condition called aquagenic pruritus of the elderly (APE). To date, the pathophysiology and mechanism of action of APE have not been elucidated. We conducted the present study to test the hypothesis that hypo-osmotic shock of epidermal cells induces skin inflammation and elongation of C-fibers by nerve growth factor β (NGFβ) as a basic mechanism of APE. The dorsal skin of HWY rats, which are a model for disrupted skin barrier function, was treated with distilled water (hypotonic treatment [Hypo] group) or normal saline (isotonic treatment [Iso] group) by applying soaked gauze for 7 days. Untreated rats were used as a control (no-treatment [NT] group). Histochemical and immunohistochemical analyses revealed inflammatory responses in the epidermis and the dermal papillary layer in the Hypo group, while no alterations were observed in the Iso or NT groups. Induction of expression and secretion of NGFβ and elongation of C-fibers into the epidermis were found in the Hypo group. In contrast, secretion of NGFβ was significantly lower and elongation of C-fibers was not observed in the Iso group. These results suggest that hypo-osmotic shock-induced inflammatory reactions promote hypersensitivity to pruritus in skin with disrupted barrier function. PMID:25681269

  14. Validation study of the in vitro skin irritation test with the LabCyte EPI-MODEL24.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Hajime; Ando, Yoko; Idehara, Kenji; Katoh, Masakazu; Kosaka, Tadashi; Miyaoka, Etsuyoshi; Shinoda, Shinsuke; Suzuki, Tamie; Yamaguchi, Yoshihiro; Yoshimura, Isao; Yuasa, Atsuko; Watanabe, Yukihiko; Omori, Takashi

    2012-03-01

    A validation study on an in vitro skin irritation assay was performed with the reconstructed human epidermis (RhE) LabCyte EPI-MODEL24, developed by Japan Tissue Engineering Co. Ltd (Gamagori, Japan). The protocol that was followed in the current study was an optimised version of the EpiSkin protocol (LabCyte assay). According to the United Nations Globally Harmonised System (UN GHS) of classification for assessing the skin irritation potential of a chemical, 12 irritants and 13 non-irritants were validated by a minimum of six laboratories from the Japanese Society for Alternatives to Animal Experiments (JSAAE) skin irritation assay validation study management team (VMT). The 25 chemicals were listed in the European Centre for the Validation of Alternative Methods (ECVAM) performance standards. The reconstructed tissues were exposed to the chemicals for 15 minutes and incubated for 42 hours in fresh culture medium. Subsequently, the level of interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 α) present in the conditioned medium was measured, and tissue viability was assessed by using the MTT assay. The results of the MTT assay obtained with the LabCyte EPI-MODEL24 (LabCyte MTT assay) demonstrated high within-laboratory and between-laboratory reproducibility, as well as high accuracy for use as a stand-alone assay to distinguish skin irritants from non-irritants. In addition, the IL-1α release measurements in the LabCyte assay were clearly unnecessary for the success of this model in the classification of chemicals for skin irritation potential. PMID:22558976

  15. A methodology for assessing the market benefits of alternative motor fuels: The Alternative Fuels Trade Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leiby, P.N.

    1993-09-01

    This report describes a modeling methodology for examining the prospective economic benefits of displacing motor gasoline use by alternative fuels. The approach is based on the Alternative Fuels Trade Model (AFTM). AFTM development was undertaken by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of a longer term study of alternative fuels issues. The AFTM is intended to assist with evaluating how alternative fuels may be promoted effectively, and what the consequences of substantial alternative fuels use might be. Such an evaluation of policies and consequences of an alternative fuels program is being undertaken by DOE as required by Section 502(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. Interest in alternative fuels is based on the prospective economic, environmental and energy security benefits from the substitution of these fuels for conventional transportation fuels. The transportation sector is heavily dependent on oil. Increased oil use implies increased petroleum imports, with much of the increase coming from OPEC countries. Conversely, displacement of gasoline has the potential to reduce US petroleum imports, thereby reducing reliance on OPEC oil and possibly weakening OPEC`s ability to extract monopoly profits. The magnitude of US petroleum import reduction, the attendant fuel price changes, and the resulting US benefits, depend upon the nature of oil-gas substitution and the supply and demand behavior of other world regions. The methodology applies an integrated model of fuel market interactions to characterize these effects.

  16. A comparative study of the in vitro permeation of ibuprofen in mammalian skin, the PAMPA model and silicone membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Lin; Patel, Avnish; Sinko, Balint; Bell, Michael; Wibawa, Judata; Hadgraft, Jonathan; Lane, Majella E

    2016-05-30

    Human skin remains the membrane of choice when conducting in vitro studies to determine dermal penetration of active pharmaceutical ingredients or xenobiotics. However there are ethical and safety issues associated with obtaining human tissue. For these reasons synthetic membranes, cell culture models or in silico predictive algorithms have been researched intensively as alternative approaches to predict dermal exposure in man. Porcine skin has also been recommended as an acceptable surrogate for topical or transdermal delivery research. Here we examine the in vitro permeation of a model active, ibuprofen, using human or porcine skin, as well as the Parallel Artificial Membrane Permeation Assay (PAMPA) model and silicone membrane. Finite dose studies were conducted in all models using commercial ibuprofen formulations and simple volatile ibuprofen solutions. The dose applied in the PAMPA model was also varied in order to determine the amount of applied formulation which best simulates typical amounts of topical products applied by patients or consumers. Permeation studies were conducted up to 6h for PAMPA and silicone and up to 48h for human and porcine skin. Cumulative amounts permeated at 6h were comparable for PAMPA and silicone, ranging from 91 to 136μg/cm(2) across the range of formulations studied. At 48h, maximum ibuprofen permeation in human skin ranged from 11 to 38μg/cm(2) and corresponding values in porcine skin were 59-81μg/cm(2). A dose of 1μL was confirmed as appropriate for finite dose studies in the PAMPA model. The formulation which delivered the greatest amount of ibuprofen in human skin was also significantly more efficient than other formulations when evaluated in the PAMPA model. The PAMPA model also discriminated between different formulation types (i.e. gel versus solution) compared with other models. Overall, the results confirm the more permeable nature of the PAMPA, silicone membrane and porcine tissue models to ibuprofen compared with

  17. TAFV Alternative Fuels and Vehicles Choice Model Documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene, D.L.

    2001-07-27

    A model for predicting choice of alternative fuel and among alternative vehicle technologies for light-duty motor vehicles is derived. The nested multinomial logit (NML) mathematical framework is used. Calibration of the model is based on information in the existing literature and deduction based on assuming a small number of key parameters, such as the value of time and discount rates. A spreadsheet model has been developed for calibration and preliminary testing of the model.

  18. Differential Features between Chronic Skin Inflammatory Diseases Revealed in Skin-Humanized Psoriasis and Atopic Dermatitis Mouse Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carretero, Marta; Guerrero-Aspizua, Sara; Illera, Nuria; Galvez, Victoria; Navarro, Manuel; García-García, Francisco; Dopazo, Joaquin; Jorcano, Jose Luis; Larcher, Fernando; del Rio, Marcela

    2016-01-01

    Psoriasis and atopic dermatitis are chronic and relapsing inflammatory diseases of the skin affecting a large number of patients worldwide. Psoriasis is characterized by a T helper type 1 and/or T helper type 17 immunological response, whereas acute atopic dermatitis lesions exhibit T helper type 2-dominant inflammation. Current single gene and signaling pathways-based models of inflammatory skin diseases are incomplete. Previous work allowed us to model psoriasis in skin-humanized mice through proper combinations of inflammatory cell components and disruption of barrier function. Herein, we describe and characterize an animal model for atopic dermatitis using similar bioengineered-based approaches, by intradermal injection of human T helper type 2 lymphocytes in regenerated human skin after partial removal of stratum corneum. In this work, we have extensively compared this model with the previous and an improved version of the psoriasis model, in which T helper type 1 and/or T helper type 17 lymphocytes replace exogenous cytokines. Comparative expression analyses revealed marked differences in specific epidermal proliferation and differentiation markers and immune-related molecules, including antimicrobial peptides. Likewise, the composition of the dermal inflammatory infiltrate presented important differences. The availability of accurate and reliable animal models for these diseases will contribute to the understanding of the pathogenesis and provide valuable tools for drug development and testing. PMID:26763433

  19. Alternative Instructional Models for IVN Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Diane H.; Swan, Michael K.

    This handbook identifies the instructional models found to be effective for distance education using the Interactive Video Network (IVN) system. Each model is summarized briefly and followed by specific suggestions for the use of the model over the IVN system. For each model, information is given on instructor responsibility prior to, during, and…

  20. Stem cells in skin regeneration: biomaterials and computational models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele eTartarini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The increased incidence of diabetes and tumors, associated with global demographic issues (aging and life styles, has pointed out the importance to develop new strategies for the effective management of skin wounds. Individuals affected by these diseases are in fact highly exposed to the risk of delayed healing of the injured tissue that typically leads to a pathological inflammatory state and consequently to chronic wounds. Therapies based on stem cells have been proposed for the treatment of these wounds, thanks to the ability of stem cells to self-renew and specifically differentiate in response to the target bimolecular environment. Here we discuss how advanced biomedical devices can be developed by combining stem cells with properly engineered biomaterials and computational models. Examples include composite skin substitutes and bioactive dressings with controlled porosity and surface topography for controlling the infiltration and differentiation of the cells. In this scenario, mathematical frameworks for the simulation of cell population growth can provide support for the design of bio-constructs, reducing the need of expensive, time-consuming and ethically controversial animal experimentation.

  1. Ozone Ameliorates Doxorubicine-Induced Skin Necrosis - results from an animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesik, Vural; Yuksel, Ramazan; Yigit, Nuri; Saldir, Mehmet; Karabacak, Ercan; Erdem, Galip; Babacan, Oguzhan; Gulgun, Mustafa; Korkmazer, Nadir; Bayrak, Ziya

    2016-09-01

    Doxorubicin (DXR) extravasation result with serious morbidity like skin ulceration and necrosis. The purpose of this study is to determine the protective effects of ozone, olive oil, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), and coenzyme Q10 in the treatment of DXR-induced skin ulcers on rats. After an intradermal injection of DXR on a basis of an animal extravasation model, the materials were topically applied. The ulcer sizes were measured, and a punch biopsy was taken from the extravasation site in which the skin ulcers formed at the end of the experiment. The samples were analyzed for tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin 1-beta (IL1β), malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) enzymes, and examined histopathologically. The ulcer sizes clearly decreased in the study groups, including DMSO, olive oil, ozone plus coenzyme Q10, and ozone plus olive oil groups in comparison with the control group with the exception of the coenzyme Q10 group. The malondialdehyde levels were lower in the DMSO, olive oil, ozone plus olive oil, and ozone plus coenzyme Q10 groups than they were in the control group, but they were not significantly different. The TNF-α level was lower in the DMSO, ozone plus olive oil, coenzyme Q10, and ozone plus coenzyme Q10 groups in comparison with the control group. There was no significant change in the SOD, GSH-Px, and IL1β levels in the study groups in comparison with the control and the sham groups. The ozone plus olive oil group could be considered to be an alternate therapy for skin ulcers due to DXR extravasation. PMID:26286933

  2. Supermodeling by Synchronization of Alternative SPEEDO Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duane, Gregory; Selten, Frank

    2016-04-01

    The supermodeling approach, wherein different imperfect models of the same objective process are dynamically combined in run-time to reduce systematic error, is tested using SPEEDO - a primitive equation atmospheric model coupled to the CLIO ocean model. Three versions of SPEEDO are defined by parameters that differ in a range that arguably mimics differences among state-of-the-art climate models. A fourth model is taken to represent truth. The "true" ocean drives all three model atmospheres. The three models are also connected to one another at every level, with spatially uniform nudging coefficients that are trained so that the three models, which synchronize with one another, also synchronize with truth when data is continuously assimilated, as in weather prediction. The SPEEDO supermodel is evaluated in weather-prediction mode, with nudging to truth. It is found that the supemodel performs better than any of the three models and marginally better than the best weighted average of the outputs of the three models run separately. To evaluate the utility for climate projection, parameters corresponding to green house gas levels are changed in truth and in the three models. The supermodel formed with inter-model connections from the present-CO2 runs no longer give the optimal configuration for the supermodel in the doubled-CO2 realm, but the supermodel with the previously trained connections is still useful as compared to the separate models or averages of their outputs. In ongoing work, a training algorithm is examined that attempts to match the blocked-zonal index cycle of the SPEEDO model atmosphere to truth, rather than simply minimizing the RMS error in the various fields. Such an approach comes closer to matching the model attractor to the true attractor - the desired effect in climate projection - rather than matching instantaneous states. Gradient descent in a cost function defined over a finite temporal window can indeed be done efficiently. Preliminary

  3. Pseudo-skin model for gravel-filled perforations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onyekonwu, M.O. [Laser Engineering Consultants/Uniport, Port Harcourt (Nigeria); Okonkwo, F.C. [University of Port Harcourt Uniport, Port Harcourt (Nigeria)

    1997-11-05

    This paper discusses pressure losses due to flow in perforations filled with gravel or with formation material. These pressure losses are added to the pressure losses caused by convergence to perforations to obtain the pseudo-skin due to gravel-filled perforations. Calculation of the pressure loss due to convergence to perforation is discussed elsewhere. The flow in the perforation tunnel could be turbulent or laminar. Therefore, we calculated the pressure losses in a gravel-filled perforation using Forchheimer`s equation or Darcy`s law. However, we expect that the flow in such tunnels will be turbulent. Results from our model agree with experimental data published elsewhere. Also, our results show that pressure losses during flow through gravel-filled perforations could be substantial. Therefore, productivities of gravel pack completions may differ significantly from perforated completions in competent formation without gravel pack

  4. Prediction of survival with alternative modeling techniques using pseudo values

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. van der Ploeg (Tjeerd); F.R. Datema (Frank); R.J. Baatenburg de Jong (Robert Jan); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The use of alternative modeling techniques for predicting patient survival is complicated by the fact that some alternative techniques cannot readily deal with censoring, which is essential for analyzing survival data. In the current study, we aimed to demonstrate that pseudo

  5. Simulation of Electron-Beam Irradiation of Skin Tissue Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, John H.; Suleiman, Atef; Chrisler, William B.; Sowa, Marianne B.

    2011-01-03

    Monte Carlo simulation of electrons stopping in liquid water was used to model the penetration and dose distribution of electron beams incident on the full-thickness EpiDermTM skin model (MatTek, Ashland, VA). This 3D tissue model has a fully developed basement membrane separating an epidermal layer of keratinocytes in various stages of differentiation from a dermal layer of fibroblast embedded in collagen. The simulations were motivated by a desire to selectively expose the epidermal layer to low linear-energy-transfer (LET) radiation in the presence of a non-irradiated dermal layer. Using the variable energy electron microbeam at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) as a model of device characteristics and irradiation geometry, we find that at the highest beam energy available (90 keV), the estimated 90th percentile of penetration remains in the epidermal layer. To investigate the depth-dose distribution, we calculated lineal energy spectra for 10um thick layers near the 10th, 50th, and 90th percentile of penetration by the 90 keV electron beam. Biphasic spectra showed an increasing component of "stoppers" with increasing depth. Despite changes in the lineal energy spectra, the main effect on dose deposition with increasing depth is the screening effect of tissue above the layer of interest.

  6. Mass transport model through the skin by microencapsulation system

    OpenAIRE

    Carreras, Nuria; Alonso Merino, Cristina; Marti Gelabert, Meritxell; Lis Arias, Manuel José

    2015-01-01

    Skin drug delivery can be subdivided into topical and transdermal administration. Transdermal administration can take advantage of chemical and physical strategies that can improve skin permeability and allow drug penetration. In this study, the development of a skin penetration profile was carried out by an in vitro technique for a microencapsulated system of ibuprofen. Release experiments were performed using percutaneous absorption tests to determine the evolution of the principle present ...

  7. Constraints on alternative models to dark energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent observations of type Ia supernovae strongly support that the universe is accelerating now and decelerated in the recent past. This may be evidence of the breakdown of the standard Friedmann equation. We consider a general modified Friedmann equation. Three different models are analysed in detail. The current supernova data and the Wilkinson microwave anisotropy probe data are used to constrain these models. A detailed analysis of the transition from the deceleration to acceleration phase is also performed

  8. Implications of Alternative Operational Risk Modeling Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Patrick de Fontnouvelle; Eric Rosengren; John Jordan

    2005-01-01

    Quantification of operational risk has received increased attention with the inclusion of an explicit capital charge for operational risk under the new Basle proposal. The proposal provides significant flexibility for banks to use internal models to estimate their operational risk, and the associated capital needed for unexpected losses. Most banks have used variants of value at risk models that estimate frequency, severity, and loss distributions. This paper examines the empirical regulariti...

  9. Evaluating a Skin Sensitization Model and Examining Common Assumptions of Skin Sensitizers (QSAR conference)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skin sensitization is an adverse outcome that has been well studied over many decades. Knowledge of the mechanism of action was recently summarized using the Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) framework as part of the OECD work programme (OECD, 2012). Currently there is a strong focus...

  10. Evaluating a Skin Sensitization Model and Examining Common Assumptions of Skin Sensitizers (ASCCT meeting)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skin sensitization is an adverse outcome that has been well studied over many decades. It was summarized using the adverse outcome pathway (AOP) framework as part of the OECD work programme (OECD, 2012). Currently there is a strong focus on how AOPs can be applied for different r...

  11. Modeling the effect of experimental variables on the in vitro permeation of six model compounds across porcine skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadzovska, Daniela; Brooks, James D; Riviere, Jim E

    2013-02-25

    A majority of quantitative structure-permeability relationships (QSPeRs) predict the permeability coefficient (k(p)) of compounds topically applied as infinite, saturated doses from water vehicles. Alternate delivery vehicles and other experimental variables are rarely incorporated in such models. This research presents the development and statistical validation of QSPeR models that incorporate the effects of penetrant, vehicle, and experimental conditions such as dose volume (finite/infinite), and saturation level (saturated/unsaturated). A composite parameter, a mixture factor (MF), was also included to account for the physicochemical properties of the compound/vehicle mixture components. The resultant models effectively described skin flux and absorption, identifying the summation of hydrogen bond acidity and basicity, excess molar refractivity, dose volume, saturation level, and vehicle as the most prominent factors influencing flux values. The main factors influencing absorption values were the summation of hydrogen bond basicity, dipolarity/polarizability, the McGowan characteristic volume, dose volume, saturation level, and vehicle. The same MF (inverse of the melting point) was considered suitable to describe both flux and absorption. For endpoints involving skin deposition, log propylene glycol solubility was a more suitable MF. Such models show potential for use in drug delivery and toxicology research, specifically in assessing percutaneous absorption data collected under different experimental conditions. PMID:23313919

  12. Modeling the effect of experimental variables on the in vitro permeation of six model compounds across porcine skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadzovska, Daniela; Brooks, James D; Riviere, Jim E

    2013-02-25

    A majority of quantitative structure-permeability relationships (QSPeRs) predict the permeability coefficient (k(p)) of compounds topically applied as infinite, saturated doses from water vehicles. Alternate delivery vehicles and other experimental variables are rarely incorporated in such models. This research presents the development and statistical validation of QSPeR models that incorporate the effects of penetrant, vehicle, and experimental conditions such as dose volume (finite/infinite), and saturation level (saturated/unsaturated). A composite parameter, a mixture factor (MF), was also included to account for the physicochemical properties of the compound/vehicle mixture components. The resultant models effectively described skin flux and absorption, identifying the summation of hydrogen bond acidity and basicity, excess molar refractivity, dose volume, saturation level, and vehicle as the most prominent factors influencing flux values. The main factors influencing absorption values were the summation of hydrogen bond basicity, dipolarity/polarizability, the McGowan characteristic volume, dose volume, saturation level, and vehicle. The same MF (inverse of the melting point) was considered suitable to describe both flux and absorption. For endpoints involving skin deposition, log propylene glycol solubility was a more suitable MF. Such models show potential for use in drug delivery and toxicology research, specifically in assessing percutaneous absorption data collected under different experimental conditions.

  13. Big bang nucleosynthesis - The standard model and alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, David N.

    1991-01-01

    The standard homogeneous-isotropic calculation of the big bang cosmological model is reviewed, and alternate models are discussed. The standard model is shown to agree with the light element abundances for He-4, H-2, He-3, and Li-7 that are available. Improved observational data from recent LEP collider and SLC results are discussed. The data agree with the standard model in terms of the number of neutrinos, and provide improved information regarding neutron lifetimes. Alternate models are reviewed which describe different scenarios for decaying matter or quark-hadron induced inhomogeneities. The baryonic density relative to the critical density in the alternate models is similar to that of the standard model when they are made to fit the abundances. This reinforces the conclusion that the baryonic density relative to critical density is about 0.06, and also reinforces the need for both nonbaryonic dark matter and dark baryonic matter.

  14. Asiaticoside enhances normal human skin cell migration, attachment and growth in vitro wound healing model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong-Hyun; Kim, Hye-Lee; Lee, Mi Hee; You, Kyung Eun; Kwon, Byeong-Ju; Seo, Hyok Jin; Park, Jong-Chul

    2012-10-15

    Wound healing proceeds through a complex collaborative process involving many types of cells. Keratinocytes and fibroblasts of epidermal and dermal layers of the skin play prominent roles in this process. Asiaticoside, an active component of Centella asiatica, is known for beneficial effects on keloid and hypertrophic scar. However, the effects of this compound on normal human skin cells are not well known. Using in vitro systems, we observed the effects of asiaticoside on normal human skin cell behaviors related to healing. In a wound closure seeding model, asiaticoside increased migration rates of skin cells. By observing the numbers of cells attached and the area occupied by the cells, we concluded that asiaticoside also enhanced the initial skin cell adhesion. In cell proliferation assays, asiaticoside induced an increase in the number of normal human dermal fibroblasts. In conclusion, asiaticoside promotes skin cell behaviors involved in wound healing; and as a bioactive component of an artificial skin, may have therapeutic value.

  15. USE OF NON-MAMMALIAN ALTERNATIVE MODELS FOR NEUROTOXICOLOGICAL STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    Peterson, Randall T.; Nass, Richard; Boyd, Windy A; Jonathan H Freedman; Dong, Ke; Narahashi, Toshio

    2008-01-01

    The field of neurotoxicology needs to satisfy two opposing demands: the testing of a growing list of chemicals, and resource limitations and ethical concerns associated with testing using traditional mammalian species. National and international government agencies have defined a need to reduce, refine or replace mammalian species in toxicological testing with alternative testing methods and non-mammalian models. Toxicological assays using alternative animal models may relieve some of this pr...

  16. Developing an Alternative Model for Dental Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayborn, G. Wayne; And Others

    1996-01-01

    The restructuring of the oral health sciences program at the University of Alberta (Canada), in response to drastically reduced funding, is described. Major objectives were to reduce program cost to the university and enhance the institution's scholarly/research profile. The model, used in other countries, separates clinical from academic costs.…

  17. Modeling Equity for Alternative Water Rate Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, R.; Mjelde, J.

    2011-12-01

    The rising popularity of increasing block rates for urban water runs counter to mainstream economic recommendations, yet decision makers in rate design forums are attracted to the notion of higher prices for larger users. Among economists, it is widely appreciated that uniform rates have stronger efficiency properties than increasing block rates, especially when volumetric prices incorporate intrinsic water value. Yet, except for regions where water market purchases have forced urban authorities to include water value in water rates, economic arguments have weakly penetrated policy. In this presentation, recent evidence will be reviewed regarding long term trends in urban rate structures while observing economic principles pertaining to these choices. The main objective is to investigate the equity of increasing block rates as contrasted to uniform rates for a representative city. Using data from four Texas cities, household water demand is established as a function of marginal price, income, weather, number of residents, and property characteristics. Two alternative rate proposals are designed on the basis of recent experiences for both water and wastewater rates. After specifying a reasonable number (~200) of diverse households populating the city and parameterizing each household's characteristics, every household's consumption selections are simulated for twelve months. This procedure is repeated for both rate systems. Monthly water and wastewater bills are also computed for each household. Most importantly, while balancing the budget of the city utility we compute the effect of switching rate structures on the welfares of households of differing types. Some of the empirical findings are as follows. Under conditions of absent water scarcity, households of opposing characters such as low versus high income do not have strong preferences regarding rate structure selection. This changes as water scarcity rises and as water's opportunity costs are allowed to

  18. Modeling and Solving Alternative Financial Solutions Seeking

    OpenAIRE

    Frenod, Emmanuel; Gouigoux, Jean-Philippe; Touré, Landry

    2015-01-01

    International audience In this paper we build a method to optimize Multi-Year Prospective Budgets. First we present a systemic model of Local Community Finances. Then, from two acceptable Multi-Year Prospective Budgets the method implements a Genetic Algorithm to generate a collection of admissible Multi-Year Prospective Budgets among which Decision-Makers can choose. The method is tested on simplified cases and on in operational situation and gives satisfactory results.

  19. Alternative models for restructuring Ontario's electric sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The future of Ontario Hydro and the provincial electrical sector was discussed. Various models proposed for restructuring Ontario's electric sector were described and views of some of the stake holders were presented, among them the views of AMPCO, MEA, the Ontario Chamber of Commerce, IPPSO, Ontario Hydro Management, Energy Probe and the Power Workers' Union. In general, most stake holders were in favour of privatization to some degree except for the Power Workers' Union which was unalterably opposed to privatization, claiming that it would lead to quantum increases in electricity rates. 2 figs

  20. Performance of the N/TERT epidermal model for skin sensitizer identification via Nrf2-Keap1-ARE pathway activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alloul-Ramdhani, Mariam; Tensen, Cornelis P; El Ghalbzouri, Abdoelwaheb

    2014-08-01

    Animal testing of chemical ingredients for cosmetic purposes is prohibited. Therefore there is an urgent need for in vitro models to identify chemical allergens. In human skin, keratinocytes (KCs) are abundantly present and are key players in initiation of allergic contact dermatitis. One of the pathways that has been shown to be induced by sensitizers is the Keap1-Nrf2-ARE pathway. In this study we compared the response of four keratinocyte-based models including (a) primary human KCs, (b) N/TERT monolayer cultures, (c) the Leiden Epidermal models (LEMs) and (d) the N/TERT epidermal models (NEMs). All keratinocyte-based models were subjected to chemical exposure of the sensitizer 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) and irritant Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) at nontoxic concentrations. Activation of the Keap1-Nrf2-ARE pathway was evaluated by measuring Nrf2 protein levels as well as nuclear translocation and activation of transcriptional targets of Nrf2. Results show that the Keap1-Nrf2-ARE pathway is activated by the sensitizer DNCB in monolayer keratinocytes and as well as the LEMs and NEMs and not by the irritant SDS. Collectively our data demonstrate that the N/TERT models respond similarly as primary KCs and could therefore serve as an alternative model for skin sensitizer identification, thereby overcoming the need for primary skin tissue. PMID:24794257

  1. Alternative Dark Energy Models: An Overview

    CERN Document Server

    Lima, J A S

    2004-01-01

    A large number of recent observational data strongly suggest that we live in a flat, accelerating Universe composed of $\\sim$ 1/3 of matter (baryonic + dark) and $\\sim$ 2/3 of an exotic component with large negative pressure, usually named {\\bf Dark Energy} or {\\bf Quintessence}. The basic set of experiments includes: observations from SNe Ia, CMB anisotropies, large scale structure, X-ray data from galaxy clusters, age estimates of globular clusters and old high redshift galaxies (OHRG's). Such results seem to provide the remaining piece of information connecting the inflationary flatness prediction ($\\Omega_{\\rm{T}} = 1$) with astronomical observations. Theoretically, they have also stimulated the current interest for more general models containing an extra component describing this unknown dark energy, and simultaneously accounting for the present accelerating stage of the Universe. An overlook in the literature shows that at least five dark energy candidates have been proposed in the context of general re...

  2. Stratum corneum model membranes: molecular organization in relation to skin barrier function

    OpenAIRE

    Groen, Daniël

    2011-01-01

    The stratum corneum (SC), the thin uppermost layer of the skin, consists of dead flattened skin cells (corneocytes) embedded in a lipid matrix. The lipid matrix is considered to play a crucial role in the skin barrier function. It consists of ceramides (CER), cholesterol (CHOL) and free fatty acids (FFA) forming crystalline lipid lamellae. From studies with native SC and SC lipid models much information has been gained on the phase behavior of the SC lipid matrix. However, little is known abo...

  3. Reflectance spectrometry of normal and bruised human skins: experiments and modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A stochastic photon transport model in multilayer skin tissue combined with reflectance spectroscopy measurements is used to study normal and bruised skins. The model is shown to provide a very good approximation to both normal and bruised real skin tissues by comparing experimental and simulated reflectance spectra. The sensitivity analysis of the skin reflectance spectrum to variations of skin layer thicknesses, blood oxygenation parameter and concentrations of main chromophores is performed to optimize model parameters. The reflectance spectrum of a developed bruise in a healthy adult is simulated, and the concentrations of bilirubin, blood volume fraction and blood oxygenation parameter are determined for different times as the bruise progresses. It is shown that bilirubin and blood volume fraction reach their peak values at 80 and 55 h after contusion, respectively, and the oxygenation parameter is lower than its normal value during 80 h after contusion occurred. The obtained time correlations of chromophore concentrations in developing contusions are shown to be consistent with previous studies. The developed model uses a detailed seven-layer skin approximation for contusion and allows one to obtain more biologically relevant results than those obtained with previous models using one- to three-layer skin approximations. A combination of modeling with spectroscopy measurements provides a new tool for detailed biomedical studies of human skin tissue and for age determination of contusions. (paper)

  4. Research Techniques Made Simple: Skin Carcinogenesis Models: Xenotransplantation Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollo, Maria Rosaria; Antonini, Dario; Cirillo, Luisa; Missero, Caterina

    2016-02-01

    Xenotransplantation is a widely used technique to test the tumorigenic potential of human cells in vivo using immunodeficient mice. Here we describe basic technologies and recent advances in xenotransplantation applied to study squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) of the skin. SCC cells isolated from tumors can either be cultured to generate a cell line or injected directly into mice. Several immunodeficient mouse models are available for selection based on the experimental design and the type of tumorigenicity assay. Subcutaneous injection is the most widely used technique for xenotransplantation because it involves a simple procedure allowing the use of a large number of cells, although it may not mimic the original tumor environment. SCC cell injections at the epidermal-to-dermal junction or grafting of organotypic cultures containing human stroma have also been used to more closely resemble the tumor environment. Mixing of SCC cells with cancer-associated fibroblasts can allow the study of their interaction and reciprocal influence, which can be followed in real time by intradermal ear injection using conventional fluorescent microscopy. In this article, we will review recent advances in xenotransplantation technologies applied to study behavior of SCC cells and their interaction with the tumor environment in vivo.

  5. Molecular Pathogenesis of Skin Fibrosis: Insight from Animal Models

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Gideon P.; Chan, Edwin S. L.

    2010-01-01

    Skin fibrosis occurs in a variety of human diseases, most notably systemic sclerosis (SSc). The end stage of scleroderma in human skin consists of excess collagen deposition in the dermis with loss of adnexal structures and associated adipose tissue. The initiating factors for this process and the early stages are believed to occur through vascular injury and immune dysfunction with a dysregulated inflammatory response. However, because of the insidious onset of the disease, this stage is rar...

  6. Alternatively Activated Mononuclear Phagocytes from the Skin Site of Infection and the Impact of IL-4Rα Signalling on CD4+T Cell Survival in Draining Lymph Nodes after Repeated Exposure to Schistosoma mansoni Cercariae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prendergast, Catriona T.; Sanin, David E.; Mountford, Adrian P.

    2016-01-01

    In a murine model of repeated exposure of the skin to infective Schistosoma mansoni cercariae, events leading to the priming of CD4 cells in the skin draining lymph nodes were examined. The dermal exudate cell (DEC) population recovered from repeatedly (4x) exposed skin contained an influx of mononuclear phagocytes comprising three distinct populations according to their differential expression of F4/80 and MHC-II. As determined by gene expression analysis, all three DEC populations (F4/80-MHC-IIhigh, F4/80+MHC-IIhigh, F4/80+MHC-IIint) exhibited major up-regulation of genes associated with alternative activation. The gene encoding RELMα (hallmark of alternatively activated cells) was highly up-regulated in all three DEC populations. However, in 4x infected mice deficient in RELMα, there was no change in the extent of inflammation at the skin infection site compared to 4x infected wild-type cohorts, nor was there a difference in the abundance of different mononuclear phagocyte DEC populations. The absence of RELMα resulted in greater numbers of CD4+ cells in the skin draining lymph nodes (sdLN) of 4x infected mice, although they remained hypo-responsive. Using mice deficient for IL-4Rα, in which alternative activation is compromised, we show that after repeated schistosome infection, levels of regulatory IL-10 in the skin were reduced, accompanied by increased numbers of MHC-IIhigh cells and CD4+ T cells in the skin. There were also increased numbers of CD4+ T cells in the sdLN in the absence of IL-4Rα compared to cells from singly infected mice. Although their ability to proliferate was still compromised, increased cellularity of sdLN from 4x IL-4RαKO mice correlated with reduced expression of Fas/FasL, resulting in decreased apoptosis and cell death but increased numbers of viable CD4+ T cells. This study highlights a mechanism through which IL-4Rα may regulate the immune system through the induction of IL-10 and regulation of Fas/FasL mediated cell death

  7. Alternatives to Multilevel Modeling for the Analysis of Clustered Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Francis L.

    2016-01-01

    Multilevel modeling has grown in use over the years as a way to deal with the nonindependent nature of observations found in clustered data. However, other alternatives to multilevel modeling are available that can account for observations nested within clusters, including the use of Taylor series linearization for variance estimation, the design…

  8. Quantitative Modeling of the Alternative Pathway of the Complement System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zewde, Nehemiah; Gorham, Ronald D; Dorado, Angel; Morikis, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    The complement system is an integral part of innate immunity that detects and eliminates invading pathogens through a cascade of reactions. The destructive effects of the complement activation on host cells are inhibited through versatile regulators that are present in plasma and bound to membranes. Impairment in the capacity of these regulators to function in the proper manner results in autoimmune diseases. To better understand the delicate balance between complement activation and regulation, we have developed a comprehensive quantitative model of the alternative pathway. Our model incorporates a system of ordinary differential equations that describes the dynamics of the four steps of the alternative pathway under physiological conditions: (i) initiation (fluid phase), (ii) amplification (surfaces), (iii) termination (pathogen), and (iv) regulation (host cell and fluid phase). We have examined complement activation and regulation on different surfaces, using the cellular dimensions of a characteristic bacterium (E. coli) and host cell (human erythrocyte). In addition, we have incorporated neutrophil-secreted properdin into the model highlighting the cross talk of neutrophils with the alternative pathway in coordinating innate immunity. Our study yields a series of time-dependent response data for all alternative pathway proteins, fragments, and complexes. We demonstrate the robustness of alternative pathway on the surface of pathogens in which complement components were able to saturate the entire region in about 54 minutes, while occupying less than one percent on host cells at the same time period. Our model reveals that tight regulation of complement starts in fluid phase in which propagation of the alternative pathway was inhibited through the dismantlement of fluid phase convertases. Our model also depicts the intricate role that properdin released from neutrophils plays in initiating and propagating the alternative pathway during bacterial infection.

  9. Differential Changes in the Peptidergic and the Non-Peptidergic Skin Innervation in Rat Models for Inflammation, Dry Skin Itch, and Dermatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuttenhelm, B.N.; Duraku, L.S.; Dijkstra, J.F.; Walbeehm, E.T.; Holstege, J.C.

    2015-01-01

    Skin innervation is a dynamic process that may lead to changes in nerve fiber density during pathological conditions. We have investigated changes in epidermal nerve fiber density in three different rat models that selectively produce chronic itch (the dry skin model), or itch and inflammation (the

  10. Characterization of dendritic cells subpopulations in skin and afferent lymph in the swine model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Marquet

    Full Text Available Transcutaneous delivery of vaccines to specific skin dendritic cells (DC subsets is foreseen as a promising strategy to induce strong and specific types of immune responses such as tolerance, cytotoxicity or humoral immunity. Because of striking histological similarities between human and pig skin, pig is recognized as the most suitable model to study the cutaneous delivery of medicine. Therefore improving the knowledge on swine skin DC subsets would be highly valuable to the skin vaccine field. In this study, we showed that pig skin DC comprise the classical epidermal langerhans cells (LC and dermal DC (DDC that could be divided in 3 subsets according to their phenotypes: (1 the CD163(neg/CD172a(neg, (2 the CD163(highCD172a(pos and (3 the CD163(lowCD172a(pos DDC. These subtypes have the capacity to migrate from skin to lymph node since we detected them in pseudo-afferent lymph. Extensive phenotyping with a set of markers suggested that the CD163(high DDC resemble the antibody response-inducing human skin DC/macrophages whereas the CD163(negCD172(low DDC share properties with the CD8(+ T cell response-inducing murine skin CD103(pos DC. This work, by showing similarities between human, mouse and swine skin DC, establishes pig as a model of choice for the development of transcutaneous immunisation strategies targeting DC.

  11. Adhesion monitoring of skin grafts by photoacoustic measurement: experiment using rat allograft models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Mutsuo; Sato, Shunichi; Saito, Daizo; Okada, Yoshiaki; Ashida, Hiroshi; Obara, Minoru

    2004-07-01

    Adhesion monitoring of grafted skins is very important in successful treatment of severe burns and traumas. However, current diagnosis of skin grafting is usually done by visual observation, which is not reliable and gives no quantitative information on the skin graft adhesion. When the grafted skin adheres well, neovascularities will be generated in the grafted skin tissue, and therefore adhesion may be monitored by detecting the neovascularities. In this study, we attempted to measure photoacoustic signals originate from the neovascularities by irradiating the grafted skins with 532-nm nanosecond light pulses in rat autograft and allograft models. The measurement showed that immediately after skin grafting, photoacoustic signal originate from the blood in the dermis was negligibly small, while 6 - 24 hours after skin grafting, signal was observed from the dermis in the graft. We did not observe a significant difference between the signals from the autograft and the allograft models. These results indicate that neovascularization would take place within 6 hours after skin grafting, and the rejection reaction would make little effect on adhesion within early hours after grafting.

  12. Optical model for port-wine stain skin and its Monte Carlo simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lanqing; Xiao, Zhengying; Chen, Rong; Wang, Ying

    2008-12-01

    Laser irradiation is the most acceptable therapy for PWS patient at present time. Its efficacy is highly dependent on the energy deposition rules in skin. To achieve optimal PWS treatment parameters a better understanding of light propagation in PWS skin is indispensable. Traditional Monte Carlo simulations using simple geometries such as planar layer tissue model can not provide energy deposition in the skin with enlarged blood vessels. In this paper the structure of normal skin and the pathological character of PWS skin was analyzed in detail and the true structure were simplified into a hybrid layered mathematical model to character two most important aspects of PWS skin: layered structure and overabundant dermal vessels. The basic laser-tissue interaction mechanisms in skin were investigated and the optical parameters of PWS skin tissue at the therapeutic wavelength. Monte Carlo (MC) based techniques were choused to calculate the energy deposition in the skin. Results can be used in choosing optical dosage. Further simulations can be used to predict optimal laser parameters to achieve high-efficacy laser treatment of PWS.

  13. Knockdown of Filaggrin Impairs Diffusion Barrier Function and Increases UV Sensitivity in a Human Skin Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Mildner; J. Jin; L. Eckhart; S. Kezic; F. Gruber; C. Barresi; C. Stremnitzer; M. Buchberger; V. Mlitz; C. Ballaun; B. Sterniczky; D. Födinger; E. Tschachler

    2010-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin gene are associated with ichthyosis vulgaris and atopic dermatitis. To investigate the impact of filaggrin deficiency on the skin barrier, filaggrin expression was knocked down by small interfering RNA (siRNA) technology in an organotypic skin model in vit

  14. A genomic biomarker signature can predict skin sensitizers using a cell-based in vitro alternative to animal tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albrekt Ann-Sofie

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Allergic contact dermatitis is an inflammatory skin disease that affects a significant proportion of the population. This disease is caused by an adverse immune response towards chemical haptens, and leads to a substantial economic burden for society. Current test of sensitizing chemicals rely on animal experimentation. New legislations on the registration and use of chemicals within pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries have stimulated significant research efforts to develop alternative, human cell-based assays for the prediction of sensitization. The aim is to replace animal experiments with in vitro tests displaying a higher predictive power. Results We have developed a novel cell-based assay for the prediction of sensitizing chemicals. By analyzing the transcriptome of the human cell line MUTZ-3 after 24 h stimulation, using 20 different sensitizing chemicals, 20 non-sensitizing chemicals and vehicle controls, we have identified a biomarker signature of 200 genes with potent discriminatory ability. Using a Support Vector Machine for supervised classification, the prediction performance of the assay revealed an area under the ROC curve of 0.98. In addition, categorizing the chemicals according to the LLNA assay, this gene signature could also predict sensitizing potency. The identified markers are involved in biological pathways with immunological relevant functions, which can shed light on the process of human sensitization. Conclusions A gene signature predicting sensitization, using a human cell line in vitro, has been identified. This simple and robust cell-based assay has the potential to completely replace or drastically reduce the utilization of test systems based on experimental animals. Being based on human biology, the assay is proposed to be more accurate for predicting sensitization in humans, than the traditional animal-based tests.

  15. Establishment of an Immortalized Skin Keratinocyte Cell Line Derived from the Animal Model Mastomys coucha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasche, Daniel; Stephan, Sonja; Savelyeva, Larissa; Westermann, Frank; Rösl, Frank

    2016-01-01

    In the present report we describe the establishment of a spontaneous immortalized skin keratinocyte cell line derived from the skin of the multimammate rodent Mastomys coucha. These animals are used in preclinical studies for a variety of human diseases such as infections with nematodes, bacteria and papillomaviruses, especially regarding cutaneous manifestations such as non-melanoma skin cancer. Here we characterize the cells in terms of their origin and cytogenetic features. Searching for genomic signatures, a spontaneous mutation in the splicing donor sequence of Trp53 (G to A transition at the first position of intron 7) could be detected. This point mutation leads to alternative splicing and to a premature stop codon, resulting in a truncated and, in turn, undetectable form of p53, probably contributing to the process of immortalization. Mastomys coucha-derived skin keratinocytes can be used as an in vitro system to investigate molecular and immunological aspects of infectious agent interactions with their host cells. PMID:27533138

  16. Skin carcinogenesis in man and in experimental models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book presents an updated overview of the current state of the art in scientific, experimental and clinical investigations on the generation and the prevention of cancer of the skin. From the achievements presented, marked refinements in the assessment of the risk of cancer, by environmental and endogenous factors, including tumor virus, will be stimulated. They include the problem of the stratospheric 'ozone holes' above both poles of the earth causing much public concern as expressed by current headlines in the media and by the United Nations Environmental Program. Moreover, new ideas will merge for developing specific approaches to explore the mechanistic, i.e. ultimately the molecular-biological, causes of skin cancer and others. In addition, the experimental utilization of oncogens and of other techniques of molecular biology at all levels of the biology of tissues and cells, may open up entirely new facets in the research on skin cancer. Detailed knowledge of the mechanistic aspects of skin carcinogenesis may give important hints with respect to 'tailor-make' and utilize new anti-tumor agents in the therapy of skin cancer for the benefit of the cancer patient. (orig.). 67 figs., 44 tabs

  17. Forecasting Stock Prices by Using Alternative Time Series Models

    OpenAIRE

    Kivilcim Metin; Gulnur Muradoglu

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to compare the forecast performance of alternative time series models, namely VAR in levels, stochastic seasonal models (SSM) and error correction models (ECM) at the Istanbul Stock Exchange (ISE). Considering the emerging market characteristic of the ISE, stock prices are estimated by using, money supply, inflation rate, interest rates, exchange rates and budget deficits. Then, in an out-of-sample forecasting exercise from January 1995 through December 1995, comp...

  18. ALTERNATING DIRECTION FINITE ELEMENT METHOD FOR SOME REACTION DIFFUSION MODELS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江成顺; 刘蕴贤; 沈永明

    2004-01-01

    This paper is concerned with some nonlinear reaction - diffusion models. To solve this kind of models, the modified Laplace finite element scheme and the alternating direction finite element scheme are established for the system of patrical differential equations. Besides, the finite difference method is utilized for the ordinary differential equation in the models. Moreover, by the theory and technique of prior estimates for the differential equations, the convergence analyses and the optimal L2- norm error estimates are demonstrated.

  19. A Viable Alternative: the Scandinavian Model of "Social Democracy"

    OpenAIRE

    Gobbi, Michela

    2003-01-01

    This paper aims at discussing how far the Scandinavian model of "social democracy", which is assumed to be the Swedish model, still represents a viable alternative for the development of other industrial relations systems. The Scandinavian model, characterised by labour market peace and centralised bargaining, is based on two main pillars: "active labour market" and "solidaristic wage" policies. Its "golden age" lasted more than forty years targeting full employment, therefore here it is argu...

  20. Skin Color Detection Model Using Neural Networks and its Performance Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. K. Bhoyar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Skin color detection is used as a preliminary step in numerous computer vision applications like face detection, nudity recognition, hand gesture detection and person identification. In this study we present a pixel based skin color classification approach, for detecting skin pixels and non skin pixels in color images, using a novel neural network symmetric classifier. The neural classifiers used in the literature either uses a symmetric model with single neuron in the output layer or uses two separate neural networks (asymmetric model for each of the skin and non-skin classes. The novelty of our approach is that it has two output layer neurons; one each for skin and non-skin class, instead of using two separate classifiers. Thus by using a single neural network classifier we have improved the separability between these two classes, eliminating additional time complexity that is needed in asymmetric classifier. Approach: Skin samples from web images of people from different ethnic groups were collected and used for training. Ground truth skin segmented images were obtained by using semiautomatic skin segmentation tool developed by the authors. The ground truth database of skin segmented images, thus obtained was used to evaluate the performance of our NN based classifier. Results: With proper selection of optimum classification threshold that varies from image to image the classifier gave the detection rate of more than 90% with 7% false positives on an average, Conclusion/Recommendations: It is observed that the neural network is capable of detecting skin in complex lighting and background environments. The classifier has the ability to classify the skin pixels belonging to people from different ethnic groups even when they are present simultaneously in an image. The proper choice of optimum classification threshold that varies from image to image is an issue here. Automatic computation of this optimum threshold for each

  1. Assessment of the potential skin irritation of lysine-derivative anionic surfactants using mouse fibroblast and human keratinocytes as an alternative to animal testing

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez Molina, Lourdes; Mitjans Arnal, Montserrat; Infante Martínez-Pardo, Ma. Rosa; Vinardell Martínez-Hidalgo, Ma. Pilar

    2004-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study was to identify new surfactants with low skin irritant properties for use in pharmaceutical and cosmetic formulations, employing cell culture as an alternative method to in vivo testing. In addition, we sought to establish whether potential cytotoxic properties were related to the size of the counterions bound to the surfactants. Methods. Cytotoxicity was assessed in the mouse fibroblast cell line 3T6, and the human keratinocyte cell line NCTC 2544, using the MT...

  2. A Model Community Skin Cancer Prevention Project in Maine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine A. Hayden

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of our program was to create and test a community skin cancer prevention project for replication throughout the state of Maine. The project was a collaborative effort of the Maine Cancer Consortium, American Cancer Society (ACS, and the City of Portland, Health and Human Services Department, Public Health Division. Portland, Me, served as the pilot site. The National Cancer Institute (NCI defines skin cancer as a disease in which abnormal cells divide uncontrollably in the outer layers of the skin (1. The American Cancer Society's Facts and Figures 2001 (the latest year for which these figures are available estimated that more than 1 million cases of highly curable basal cell or squamous cell cancers would be diagnosed in the United States that year (2. An estimated 9800 U.S. deaths from cancer were projected as well: 7800 from melanoma, the most serious form of skin cancer, and 2000 from other skin cancers. Melanoma was expected to be diagnosed in about 51,400 Americans in 2001. The incidence rate of melanoma has increased about 3% per year on average since 1981. In 2002, NCI announced that researchers showed for the first time that individual risk of melanoma is associated with the intensity of sunlight that a person receives over a lifetime (3. Target audiences for our program were newborns and their parents, children between 5 and 14 years old and their caregivers, and all people living in the Portland area. Protecting skin from excess sun exposure during childhood and adolescence is important in reducing the risk of all types of skin cancer during adulthood. From our anecdotal evidence, many parents of newborns are unaware that sunscreen is not recommended for babies under 6 months of age, and they need better information about how to protect their newborns from the sun. Teaching children and their caregivers to follow ACS guidelines will help protect their skin for years to come. It will also help children to develop healthy

  3. A novel fully-humanised 3D skin equivalent to model early melanoma invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, David S; Robinson, Neil D P; Caley, Matthew P; Chen, Mei; O’Toole, Edel A; Armstrong, Jane L; Przyborski, Stefan; Lovat, Penny E

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic melanoma remains incurable, emphasising the acute need for improved research models to investigate the underlying biological mechanisms mediating tumour invasion and metastasis, and to develop more effective targeted therapies to improve clinical outcome. Available animal models of melanoma do not accurately reflect human disease and current in vitro human skin equivalent models incorporating melanoma cells are not fully representative of the human skin microenvironment. We have developed a robust and reproducible, fully-humanised 3D skin equivalent comprising a stratified, terminally differentiated epidermis and a dermal compartment consisting of fibroblast-generated extracellular matrix. Melanoma cells incorporated into the epidermis were able to invade through the basement membrane and into the dermis, mirroring early tumour invasion in vivo. Comparison of our novel 3D melanoma skin equivalent with melanoma in situ and metastatic melanoma indicates this model accurately recreates features of disease pathology, making it a physiologically representative model of early radial and vertical growth phase melanoma invasion. PMID:26330548

  4. A novel homogenization procedure to model the skin layers in LF numerical dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Santis, Valerio; Chen, Xi Lin; Cruciani, Silvano; Campi, Tommaso; Feliziani, Mauro

    2016-06-01

    In this study we focus on the validity of the skin layer currently implemented in up-to-date human-body anatomical models employed in low frequency (LF) numerical dosimetry. Indeed, the several layers of the skin structure, i.e. the stratum corneum (SC), dermis, and epidermis are in these models embedded into a unique fairly-thick (2–3 mm) layer encompassing all of them. While a previous work from the authors showed that for normal-standing (or limb-non-touching) postures a single-layer skin model could conservatively estimate the peak electric field induced in the skin, at least a two-layer skin model comprising of the SC and the remaining skin layers should be used for limb-touching exposure scenarios. This implies notable efforts to discretize the tiny SC layer questioning the validity of current anatomical models. A novel strategy based on the homogenization of the several skin layers has been therefore proposed in order to eliminate the SC from the computational domain opening the doors to future LF magnetic applications even for limb-touching scenarios.

  5. Predicting chemically-induced skin reactions. Part I: QSAR models of skin sensitization and their application to identify potentially hazardous compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Repetitive exposure to a chemical agent can induce an immune reaction in inherently susceptible individuals that leads to skin sensitization. Although many chemicals have been reported as skin sensitizers, there have been very few rigorously validated QSAR models with defined applicability domains (AD) that were developed using a large group of chemically diverse compounds. In this study, we have aimed to compile, curate, and integrate the largest publicly available dataset related to chemically-induced skin sensitization, use this data to generate rigorously validated and QSAR models for skin sensitization, and employ these models as a virtual screening tool for identifying putative sensitizers among environmental chemicals. We followed best practices for model building and validation implemented with our predictive QSAR workflow using Random Forest modeling technique in combination with SiRMS and Dragon descriptors. The Correct Classification Rate (CCR) for QSAR models discriminating sensitizers from non-sensitizers was 71–88% when evaluated on several external validation sets, within a broad AD, with positive (for sensitizers) and negative (for non-sensitizers) predicted rates of 85% and 79% respectively. When compared to the skin sensitization module included in the OECD QSAR Toolbox as well as to the skin sensitization model in publicly available VEGA software, our models showed a significantly higher prediction accuracy for the same sets of external compounds as evaluated by Positive Predicted Rate, Negative Predicted Rate, and CCR. These models were applied to identify putative chemical hazards in the Scorecard database of possible skin or sense organ toxicants as primary candidates for experimental validation. - Highlights: • It was compiled the largest publicly-available skin sensitization dataset. • Predictive QSAR models were developed for skin sensitization. • Developed models have higher prediction accuracy than OECD QSAR Toolbox. • Putative

  6. Predicting chemically-induced skin reactions. Part I: QSAR models of skin sensitization and their application to identify potentially hazardous compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, Vinicius M. [Laboratory of Molecular Modeling and Design, Faculty of Pharmacy, Federal University of Goiás, Goiânia, GO 74605-220 (Brazil); Laboratory for Molecular Modeling, Division of Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry, Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Muratov, Eugene [Laboratory for Molecular Modeling, Division of Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry, Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Laboratory of Theoretical Chemistry, A.V. Bogatsky Physical-Chemical Institute NAS of Ukraine, Odessa 65080 (Ukraine); Fourches, Denis [Laboratory for Molecular Modeling, Division of Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry, Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Strickland, Judy; Kleinstreuer, Nicole [ILS/Contractor Supporting the NTP Interagency Center for the Evaluation of Alternative Toxicological Methods (NICEATM), P.O. Box 13501, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Andrade, Carolina H. [Laboratory of Molecular Modeling and Design, Faculty of Pharmacy, Federal University of Goiás, Goiânia, GO 74605-220 (Brazil); Tropsha, Alexander, E-mail: alex_tropsha@unc.edu [Laboratory for Molecular Modeling, Division of Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry, Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Repetitive exposure to a chemical agent can induce an immune reaction in inherently susceptible individuals that leads to skin sensitization. Although many chemicals have been reported as skin sensitizers, there have been very few rigorously validated QSAR models with defined applicability domains (AD) that were developed using a large group of chemically diverse compounds. In this study, we have aimed to compile, curate, and integrate the largest publicly available dataset related to chemically-induced skin sensitization, use this data to generate rigorously validated and QSAR models for skin sensitization, and employ these models as a virtual screening tool for identifying putative sensitizers among environmental chemicals. We followed best practices for model building and validation implemented with our predictive QSAR workflow using Random Forest modeling technique in combination with SiRMS and Dragon descriptors. The Correct Classification Rate (CCR) for QSAR models discriminating sensitizers from non-sensitizers was 71–88% when evaluated on several external validation sets, within a broad AD, with positive (for sensitizers) and negative (for non-sensitizers) predicted rates of 85% and 79% respectively. When compared to the skin sensitization module included in the OECD QSAR Toolbox as well as to the skin sensitization model in publicly available VEGA software, our models showed a significantly higher prediction accuracy for the same sets of external compounds as evaluated by Positive Predicted Rate, Negative Predicted Rate, and CCR. These models were applied to identify putative chemical hazards in the Scorecard database of possible skin or sense organ toxicants as primary candidates for experimental validation. - Highlights: • It was compiled the largest publicly-available skin sensitization dataset. • Predictive QSAR models were developed for skin sensitization. • Developed models have higher prediction accuracy than OECD QSAR Toolbox. • Putative

  7. The development of a 3D immunocompetent model of human skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the first line of defence, skin is regularly exposed to a variety of biological, physical and chemical insults. Therefore, determining the skin sensitization potential of new chemicals is of paramount importance from the safety assessment and regulatory point of view. Given the questionable biological relevance of animal models to human as well as ethical and regulatory pressure to limit or stop the use of animal models for safety testing, there is a need for developing simple yet physiologically relevant models of human skin. Herein, we describe the construction of a novel immunocompetent 3D human skin model comprising of dendritic cells co-cultured with keratinocytes and fibroblasts. This model culture system is simple to assemble with readily-available components and importantly, can be separated into its constitutive individual layers to allow further insight into cell–cell interactions and detailed studies of the mechanisms of skin sensitization. In this study, using non-degradable microfibre scaffolds and a cell-laden gel, we have engineered a multilayer 3D immunocompetent model comprised of keratinocytes and fibroblasts that are interspersed with dendritic cells. We have characterized this model using a combination of confocal microscopy, immuno-histochemistry and scanning electron microscopy and have shown differentiation of the epidermal layer and formation of an epidermal barrier. Crucially the immune cells in the model are able to migrate and remain responsive to stimulation with skin sensitizers even at low concentrations. We therefore suggest this new biologically relevant skin model will prove valuable in investigating the mechanisms of allergic contact dermatitis and other skin pathologies in human. Once fully optimized, this model can also be used as a platform for testing the allergenic potential of new chemicals and drug leads. (paper)

  8. Continuum Mechanical Modelling of Skin-pass Rolling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kijima, Hideo; Bay, Niels

    2007-01-01

    The special contact conditions in skin-pass rolling of steel strip is analyzed by studying plane strain upsetting of thin sheet with low reduction applying long narrow tools and dry friction conditions. An extended sticking region is estimated by an elasto-plastic FEM analysis of the plane strain...

  9. In vitro micro-physiological immune-competent model of the human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadan, Qasem; Ting, Fiona Chia Wan

    2016-05-21

    Skin allergy, in particular, allergic contact dermatitis and irritant contact dermatitis, are common occupational and environmental health problems affecting the quality of life of a significant proportion of the world population. Since all new ingredients to be incorporated into a product are potential skin allergens, it is essential that these ingredients be first tested for their allergenic potential. However, despite the considerable effort using animal models to understand the underlying mechanism of skin sensitization, to date, the molecular and cellular responses due to skin contact with sensitizers are still not fully understood. To replace animal testing and to improve the prediction of skin sensitization, significant attention has been directed to the use of reconstructed organotypic in vitro models of human skin. Here we describe a miniaturized immune competent in vitro model of human skin based on 3D co-culture of immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT) as a model of the epidermis barrier and human leukemic monocyte lymphoma cell line (U937) as a model of human dendritic cells. The biological model was fitted in a microfluidic-based cell culture system that provides a dynamic cellular environment that mimics the in vivo environment of skin. The dynamic perfusion of culture media significantly improved the tight junction formation as evidenced by measuring higher values of TEER compared to static culture. This setting also maintained the high viability of cells over extended periods of time up to 17 days. The perfusion-based culture also allows growth of the cells at the air-liquid interface by exposing the apical side of the cells to air while providing the cell nutrients through a basolateral fluidic compartment. The microsystem has been evaluated to investigate the effect of the chemical and physical (UV irradiation) stimulation on the skin barrier (i.e. the TJ integrity). Three-tiered culture differential stimulation allowed the investigation of the

  10. Preparation and validation of a skin model for the evaluation of intradermal powder injection devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yibin; Winter, Gerhard; Myschik, Julia

    2012-06-01

    A very promising novel needle-free application method is epidermal powder immunisation, a method delivering particulate vaccines into the viable epidermis of human skin where a dense network of immunocompetent cells resides. These antigen-presenting cells (Langerhans cells) are able to recognise antigens, process them and present them to naïve T-cells and induce effective immune responses. Powder injection devices are being developed, and their evaluation is essential before applying them on live animals and individuals. An appropriate skin model will accelerate the development of such injection devices. Different films made from gelatin, silicon and agar were prepared and investigated as skin model candidates for the evaluation of powder injection devices. The mechanical properties of the skin model candidates were measured with an indentation method using a texture analyser, and the results were compared to the properties of human skin and pig skin. The indentation behaviour of the model films and the biological skin samples suggest that gelatin films plasticised with glycerol are very well suitable for a skin model. The mechanical properties of gelatin based films can be tailored by changing the glycerol content in the film making it even possible to simulate human skin with different mechanical properties as the mechanical properties depend on the individual, age, sex and site of injection. The stability of the gelatin films was also investigated under long-term storage. In addition, confocal laser scanning microscopy was used as a novel tool to determine the depths and size of fluorescently labelled particles in the gelatin model. PMID:22484250

  11. Non-invasive bioimpedance of intact skin: mathematical modeling and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The functional integrity and pathology of the skin is reflected in its electrical impedance spectra. Non-invasive electrical impedance measurements of intact skin are dominated by the high impedic stratum corneum in low frequencies and with increasing frequency gradually comes to be dominated by viable skin. Models of this multi-layered organ can increase our understanding of the actual physical properties/dimensions and facilitate better diagnostics in certain applications. Therefore, a mathematical model considering conservation of charge in the various layers of the skin and adjacent electrodes is derived and validated with experimental findings; the latter was carried out on 60 young female subjects. The impact of the stratum corneum thickness, inundation, solvent and cohort size on the electrical properties is studied. Both model parameters and experimental conditions were adjusted for calibration and subsequent validation of the model with measurements. It is found that both the model's thickness of the stratum corneum as well as experimental soaking conditions (both time and saline concentration) affect the fit between the model and measurements. It is concluded that it is essential that the electrical properties of the skin are presented in the context of the ion concentration (if a moisturizer is employed) as well as the soaking time. Further refinements should be made to determine even more accurate dielectrical properties of the stratum corneum and viable skin layers by accounting for the true skin thickness and the heterogeneity of the skin layers—this would be useful in applications where subtle alterations in the skin are of interest

  12. Early Childhood Educators' Experience of an Alternative Physical Education Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsangaridou, Niki; Genethliou, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Alternative instructional and curricular models are regarded as more comprehensive and suitable approaches to providing quality physical education (Kulinna 2008; Lund and Tannehill 2010; McKenzie and Kahan 2008; Metzler 2011; Quay and Peters 2008). The purpose of this study was to describe the impact of the Early Steps Physical Education…

  13. The Costs and Potential Benefits of Alternative Scholarly Publishing Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, John W.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: This paper reports on a study undertaken for the UK Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC), which explored the economic implications of alternative scholarly publishing models. Rather than simply summarising the study's findings, this paper focuses on the approach and presents a step-by-step account of the research process,…

  14. Rethinking borders in a mobile world: An alternative model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walther, Olivier; Retaillé, Denis

    2015-01-01

    national borders. The second section elaborates the fundamentals of an alternative model that is not reliant, as is classical spatial analysis, on points, lines and surfaces to represent movement. The article then presents three types of limits: the confines, the threshold and the horizon, which result...

  15. Rethinking borders in a mobile world: An alternative model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walther, Olivier; Retaillé, Denis

    national borders. The second section elaborates the fundamentals of an alternative model that is not reliant, as is classical spatial analysis, on points, lines and surfaces to represent movement. The article then presents three types of limits: the confines, the threshold and the horizon, which result...

  16. In vitro model adapted to the study of skin ageing induced by air pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecas, Sarah; Boursier, Elsa; Fitoussi, Richard; Vié, Katell; Momas, Isabelle; Seta, Nathalie; Achard, Sophie

    2016-09-30

    More than a barrier against environmental agents, skin reflects individual health and is a visible sign of ageing with the progressive loss of skin integrity. In order to evaluate the consequences of an environmental complex mixture, with tobacco smoke (TS) as model, on cellular and morphological changes, a 3D skin model was used. Morphologically, tissue integrity was intact after one TS-exposure while the superficial layers were drastically reduced after two TS-exposures. However, TS modified epidermal organisation at the molecular level after just one exposure. A decrease in loricrin protein staining was showed in the epidermis, while production of inflammatory cytokines (IL-8, IL-1α, IL-18) and metalloproteinase (MMP-1, MMP-3) were stimulated. Oxidative stress was also illustrated with an increase in 4-HNE protein staining. Moreover, terminal differentiation, cell-cell junction and anchorage gene expression was down-regulated in our model after one TS-exposure. In conclusion, tobacco smoke impacted the fundamental functions of skin, namely tissue anchorage, cornification and skin desquamation. Oxidative stress resulted in skin ageing. The tissue was even reactive with the inflammatory pathways, after one TS-exposure. The 3D-RHE model is appropriate for evaluating the impact of environmental pollutants on skin ageing. PMID:27480279

  17. In vitro model adapted to the study of skin ageing induced by air pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecas, Sarah; Boursier, Elsa; Fitoussi, Richard; Vié, Katell; Momas, Isabelle; Seta, Nathalie; Achard, Sophie

    2016-09-30

    More than a barrier against environmental agents, skin reflects individual health and is a visible sign of ageing with the progressive loss of skin integrity. In order to evaluate the consequences of an environmental complex mixture, with tobacco smoke (TS) as model, on cellular and morphological changes, a 3D skin model was used. Morphologically, tissue integrity was intact after one TS-exposure while the superficial layers were drastically reduced after two TS-exposures. However, TS modified epidermal organisation at the molecular level after just one exposure. A decrease in loricrin protein staining was showed in the epidermis, while production of inflammatory cytokines (IL-8, IL-1α, IL-18) and metalloproteinase (MMP-1, MMP-3) were stimulated. Oxidative stress was also illustrated with an increase in 4-HNE protein staining. Moreover, terminal differentiation, cell-cell junction and anchorage gene expression was down-regulated in our model after one TS-exposure. In conclusion, tobacco smoke impacted the fundamental functions of skin, namely tissue anchorage, cornification and skin desquamation. Oxidative stress resulted in skin ageing. The tissue was even reactive with the inflammatory pathways, after one TS-exposure. The 3D-RHE model is appropriate for evaluating the impact of environmental pollutants on skin ageing.

  18. ALTERNATIVE VALUE-AT-RISK MODELS FOR OPTIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Alfred Lehar

    2000-01-01

    Risk management has become an important issue for banks and corporations, not only because of regulation but also because of risk adjusted performance measurement. Value-at-risk has become an industry standard in risk measurement. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the performance of different value-at-risk models and find out the driving factors of model performance. While most previous studies focus on linear positions, this paper investigates the suitability of alternative approaches for...

  19. Size dependent skin penetration of nanoparticles in murine and porcine dermatitis models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Try, Céline; Moulari, Brice; Béduneau, Arnaud; Fantini, Oscar; Pin, Didier; Pellequer, Yann; Lamprecht, Alf

    2016-03-01

    A major limitation in the current topical treatment of inflammatory skin diseases is the inability to selectively deliver the drug to the inflammation site. Recently, smart drug delivery systems such as nanocarriers are being investigated to enhance the selective deposition of anti-inflammatory drugs in inflamed areas of the skin to achieve higher therapeutic efficacy with minimal side effects. Of such systems, polymeric nanoparticles are considered very efficient carriers for the topical drug delivery. In the current work, poly(l-lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles of nominal sizes of 70nm (NP70) and 300nm (NP300) were studied for their intra-epidermal distribution in murine and pig atopic dermatitis models over time against the respective healthy controls. Confocal laser scanning microscopical examination of skin biopsies was utilized for the qualitative and semi-quantitative analyses of nanoparticles skin deposition and penetration depth. While no skin penetration was found for any of the particles in healthy skin, the accumulation of NP70 was significantly higher than NP300 in inflamed skin (15-fold in mice, 5-fold in pigs). Penetration depth of NP70 decreased over time in mice from 55±3μm to 20±2μm and similar tendencies were observed for the other formulations. In inflamed pig skin, a similar trend was found for the penetration depth (NP70: 46±12μm versus NP300: 23±3μm); however, the NP amount remained constant for the whole analyzed period. Their ability to penetrate specifically into inflamed skin combined with minimal effects on healthy skin underlines small polymeric nanoparticles' potential as selective drug carriers in future treatment of chronic inflammatory skin diseases such as atopic dermatitis.

  20. Effect of Replacing Beef Fat with Chicken Skin on Some Properties of Model System Chicken Emulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aslı Zungur

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Model system chicken emulsions were prepared by replacing 5, 10, 15 and 20 % beef fat with chicken skin. Moisture, protein, fat, ash and pH were determined in raw and heat processed emulsions. Emulsion samples were evaluated for cooking characteristics, TBA values and colour parameters (L*, a*, b*. Addition of chicken skin decreased fat content and increased moisture and protein content of emulsion samples. Chicken skin replacement significantly increased water holding capacity and cooking yield and decreased fluid release. Increasing chicken skin in formulation increased a* and b* values of emulsion samples. Therefore, adding of chicken skin instead of beef fat is useful in improving technological quality and producing low fat formulation.

  1. Stem cells in skin regeneration: biomaterials and computational models

    OpenAIRE

    TARTARINI, D.; Mele, E.

    2016-01-01

    The increased incidence of diabetes and tumors, associated with global demographic issues (aging and life styles), has pointed out the importance to develop new strategies for the effective management of skin wounds. Individuals affected by these diseases are in fact highly exposed to the risk of delayed healing of the injured tissue that typically leads to a pathological inflammatory state and consequently to chronic wounds. Therapies based on stem cells have been proposed for the treatment ...

  2. Skin color modeling using the radiative transfer equation solved by the auxiliary function method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnain, Caroline; Elias, Mady; Frigerio, Jean-Marc

    2007-08-01

    The auxiliary function method is an efficient technique for solving the radiative tranfer equation without adding any assumption and was applied until now only for theoretical stratified media. The first application (to our knowledge) of the method to a real case, the human skin, is presented. This makes it possible to validate the method by comparing model results with experimental reflectance spectra of real skin. An excellent agreement is obtained for a multilayer model of the skin made of 22 sublayers and taking into account the anisotropic phase function of the scatterers. Thus there is the opportunity to develop interest in such models by quantitatively evaluating the influence of the parameters commonly used in the literature that modify skin color, such as the concentration of the scatterers and the thickness of each sublayer.

  3. Skin sensitization risk assessment model using artificial neural network analysis of data from multiple in vitro assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujita-Inoue, Kyoko; Hirota, Morihiko; Ashikaga, Takao; Atobe, Tomomi; Kouzuki, Hirokazu; Aiba, Setsuya

    2014-06-01

    The sensitizing potential of chemicals is usually identified and characterized using in vivo methods such as the murine local lymph node assay (LLNA). Due to regulatory constraints and ethical concerns, alternatives to animal testing are needed to predict skin sensitization potential of chemicals. For this purpose, combined evaluation using multiple in vitro and in silico parameters that reflect different aspects of the sensitization process seems promising. We previously reported that LLNA thresholds could be well predicted by using an artificial neural network (ANN) model, designated iSENS ver.1 (integrating in vitro sensitization tests version 1), to analyze data obtained from two in vitro tests: the human Cell Line Activation Test (h-CLAT) and the SH test. Here, we present a more advanced ANN model, iSENS ver.2, which additionally utilizes the results of antioxidant response element (ARE) assay and the octanol-water partition coefficient (LogP, reflecting lipid solubility and skin absorption). We found a good correlation between predicted LLNA thresholds calculated by iSENS ver.2 and reported values. The predictive performance of iSENS ver.2 was superior to that of iSENS ver.1. We conclude that ANN analysis of data from multiple in vitro assays is a useful approach for risk assessment of chemicals for skin sensitization. PMID:24444449

  4. In vitro skin models as a tool in optimization of drug formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaten, Gøril Eide; Palac, Zora; Engesland, André; Filipović-Grčić, Jelena; Vanić, Željka; Škalko-Basnet, Nataša

    2015-07-30

    (Trans)dermal drug therapy is gaining increasing importance in the modern drug development. To fully utilize the potential of this route, it is important to optimize the delivery of active ingredient/drug into/through the skin. The optimal carrier/vehicle can enhance the desired outcome of the therapy therefore the optimization of skin formulations is often included in the early stages of the product development. A rational approach in designing and optimizing skin formulations requires well-defined skin models, able to identify and evaluate the intrinsic properties of the formulation. Most of the current optimization relies on the use of suitable ex vivo animal/human models. However, increasing restrictions in use and handling of animals and human skin stimulated the search for suitable artificial skin models. This review attempts to provide an unbiased overview of the most commonly used models, with emphasis on their limitations and advantages. The choice of the most applicable in vitro model for the particular purpose should be based on the interplay between the availability, easiness of the use, cost and the respective limitations. PMID:25746955

  5. Effect of Colorspace Transformation, the Illuminance Component, and Color Modeling on Skin Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayaram, S; Schmugge, S; Shin, M C; Tsap, L V

    2004-03-22

    Skin detection is an important preliminary process in human motion analysis. It is commonly performed in three steps: transforming the pixel color to a non-RGB colorspace, dropping the illumination component of skin color, and classifying by modeling the skin color distribution. In this paper, we evaluate the effect of these three steps on the skin detection performance. The importance of this study is a new comprehensive colorspace and color modeling testing methodology that would allow for making the best choices for skin detection. Combinations of nine colorspaces, the presence of the absence of the illuminance component, and the two color modeling approaches are compared. The performance is measured by using a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve on a large dataset of 805 images with manual ground truth. The results reveal that (1) the absence of the illuminance component decreases performance, (2) skin color modeling has a greater impact than colorspace transformation, and (3) colorspace transformations can improve performance in certain instances. We found that the best performance was obtained by transforming the pixel color to the SCT, HSI, or CIELAB colorspaces, keeping the illuminance component, and modeling the color with the histogram approach.

  6. Report of the subgroup on alternative models and new ideas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We summarize some of the work done by the P3 subgroup on Alternative Models and New Ideas. The working group covered a broad range of topics including a constrained Standard Model from an extra dimension, a discussion of recent ideas addressing the strong CP problem, searches for doubly charged higgs bosons in eγ collisions, and an update on discovery limits for extra neutral gauge bosons at hadron colliders. The breadth of topics rejects the many ideas and approaches to physics beyond the Standard Model

  7. Alternative(s) to fractional-diffusion equations in bedload-transport models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancey, Christophe; Mettra, François; Mettraux, Valentin

    2010-05-01

    The idea of stochastic sediment transport models emerged in the 1930s, notably with the doctoral work of Hans A. Einstein (1936). Einstein's seminal work gave impulse to several stochastic models, which usually led to thin-tailed or bounded distributions for the particle-transport rate. Experimental observations together with field surveys suggest that particle-transport rate exhibits frequent and large fluctuations, in particular at low flow rates (i.e., when the bottom shear just exceeds the threshold of incipient motion), which cannot be described using classic distributions used so far for modelling bedload transport (e.g., Hamamori's distribution). The existence of these large and frequent fluctuations could offer a wide field of applications to fractional-derivative theory. Alternative approaches exist as well: in this talk, we explore the potentialities of a birth-death Markov model to model sediment transport within a fixed volume of control. Under steady-uniform-flow conditions, the model predicts that the number of moving particles inside the control volume follows a negative binomial distribution. Although this probability distribution does not enter the family of heavy-tailed distributions, it may give rise to large and frequent fluctuations. We investigate the consequences of these fluctuations on bed dynamics, more especially on the features (growth rate and probability distribution) of nascent bedforms that develop on initially planar beds as a result of intermittent bedload transport.

  8. Skin color modeling using the radiative transfer equation solved by the auxiliary function method: inverse problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnain, Caroline; Elias, Mady; Frigerio, Jean-Marc

    2008-07-01

    In a previous article [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 24, 2196 (2007)] we have modeled skin color using the radiative transfer equation, solved by the auxiliary function method. Three main parameters have been determined as being predominant in the diversity of skin color: the concentrations of melanosomes and of red blood cells and the oxygen saturation of blood. From the reflectance spectrum measured on real Caucasian skin, these parameters are now evaluated by minimizing the standard deviation on the adjusted wavelength range between the experimental spectrum and simulated spectra gathered in a database.

  9. The "skin-skull-brain model": a new instrument for the study of gunshot effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thali, M J; Kneubuehl, B P; Zollinger, U; Dirnhofer, R

    2002-02-18

    In order to create and study wound morphology, a "skin-skull-brain model" had to be designed which would make the laboratory reproduction of a real ballistic injury possible. To simulate the human skin, an artificial skin (a silicon cap) is used. This silicon scalp contains synthetic fibers (artificial leather) to simulate the collagen and fat of the scalp. The artificial skull is a layered polyurethane sphere (19 cm o.d.; and 5, 6, or 7 mm thick) constructed in a specially designed form with a Tabula externa, Tabula interna, and a porous Diploe sandwiched in between. The periostium of the artificial skull is made of latex. This elastic latex layer prevents the bone fragments from scattering after the model has been struck by gunfire. The brain itself is simulated with ordnance gelatin, 10% at 4 degrees C, a material well known in wound ballistics. Gunshots were fired at a distance of 10 m from the model. During the evaluation of the "skin-skull-brain model", it was possible to show that injuries inflicted to this model are fully comparable to the morphology of equivalent real gunshot injuries. Using the "skin-skull-brain model" has some significant advantages: the model is inexpensive, easy to construct, instantly available for use, and eliminates ethics conflicts. The main advantage of such a model is, in comparison with biological substances, the high reproducibility of inflicted traumas. PMID:11909661

  10. Modeling alternative clad behavior for accident tolerant systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy Fuel Cycle Research and Development program has a key goal of helping develop accident tolerant fuels (ATF) through investigating fuel and clad forms. In the current work thermochemical modeling and experiment are being used to assess fuel and clad alternatives. Cladding alternatives that have promise to improve fuel performance under accident conditions include the FeCrAl family of alloys and SiC-based composites. These are high strength and radiation resistant alloys and ceramics that have increased resistance to oxidation as compared to zirconium alloys. Accident modeling codes have indicated substantially increased time to failure and resulting effects. In the current work the thermochemical behavior of these materials are being assessed and the work reported here. (author)

  11. Electrical impedance of human skin and tissue alterations : Mathematical modeling and measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Birgersson, Ulrik

    2012-01-01

    The overall aim of the studies in this thesis is twofold. One is oriented towards calibrating a classifier in differentiating between malignant melanoma and benign nevi of the skin. The other concerns the development of a mathematical model to ascertain the validity of the electrical properties found in literature and to aid in the design and operation of electrodes as well as to broaden the knowledge of the signal distribution in skin. In the pursuit of calibrating a cl...

  12. Topical Curcumin-Based Cream Is Equivalent to Dietary Curcumin in a Skin Cancer Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunal Sonavane

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Skin squamous cell carcinoma (SCC, the most common cancer in the USA, is a growing problem with the use of tanning booths causing sun-damaged skin. Antiproliferative effects of curcumin were demonstrated in an aggressive skin cancer cell line SRB12-p9 (P<0.05 compared to control. Topical formulation was as effective as oral curcumin at suppressing tumor growth in a mouse skin cancer model. Curcumin at 15 mg administered by oral, topical, or combined formulation significantly reduced tumor growth compared to control (P=0.004. Inhibition of pAKT, pS6, p-4EBP1, pSTAT3, and pERK1/2 was noted in SRB12-p9 cells post-curcumin treatment compared to control (P<0.05. Inhibition of pSTAT3 and pERK1/2 was also noted in curcumin-treated groups in vivo. IHC analysis revealed human tumor specimens that expressed significantly more activated pERK (P=0.006 and pS6 (P<0.0001 than normal skin samples. This is the first study to compare topical curcumin to oral curcumin. Our data supports the use of curcumin as a chemopreventive for skin SCC where condemned skin is a significant problem. Prevention strategies offer the best hope of future health care costs in a disease that is increasing in incidence due to increased sun exposure.

  13. Therapeutic efficacy and immunological response of CCL5 antagonists in models of contact skin reaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Canavese

    Full Text Available Skin-infiltrating T-cells play a predominant role in allergic and inflammatory skin diseases such as atopic dermatitis, psoriasis and allergic contact dermatitis. These T-cells are attracted by several chemotactic factors including the chemokine CCL5/RANTES, a CC chemokine inducing both the migration and activation of specific leukocyte subsets. CCL5 has been found to be associated with various cell-mediated hypersensitive disorders such as psoriasis, atopic dermatitis and irritant contact dermatitis. We have used two antagonists, the first, Met-CCL5, a dual CCR1/CCR5 antagonist and the second, a variant in which GAG binding is abrogated, (44AANA(47-CCL5, which acts as a dominant negative inhibitor of CCL5. The antagonists were tested in two models of contact skin reaction. The first, irritant contact dermatitis (ICD is a pathological non-specific inflammatory skin condition arising from the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines by keratinocytes in response to haptens, usually chemicals. The second, contact hypersensitivity (CHS is a T-cell dependent model, mimicking in part the T-cell-mediated skin diseases such as psoriasis. In both models, the CCL5 antagonists showed therapeutic efficacy by reducing swelling by 50% as well as the reduction of soluble mediators in homogenates derived from challenged ears. These results demonstrate that blocking the receptor or the ligand are both effective strategies to inhibit skin inflammation.

  14. Validation of the thermophysiological model by Fiala for prediction of local skin temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Natividad; Psikuta, Agnes; Kuklane, Kalev; Quesada, José Ignacio Priego; de Anda, Rosa María Cibrián Ortiz; Soriano, Pedro Pérez; Palmer, Rosario Salvador; Corberán, José Miguel; Rossi, René Michel; Annaheim, Simon

    2016-05-01

    The most complete and realistic physiological data are derived from direct measurements during human experiments; however, they present some limitations such as ethical concerns, time and cost burden. Thermophysiological models are able to predict human thermal response in a wide range of environmental conditions, but their use is limited due to lack of validation. The aim of this work was to validate the thermophysiological model by Fiala for prediction of local skin temperatures against a dedicated database containing 43 different human experiments representing a wide range of conditions. The validation was conducted based on root-mean-square deviation (rmsd) and bias. The thermophysiological model by Fiala showed a good precision when predicting core and mean skin temperature (rmsd 0.26 and 0.92 °C, respectively) and also local skin temperatures for most body sites (average rmsd for local skin temperatures 1.32 °C). However, an increased deviation of the predictions was observed for the forehead skin temperature (rmsd of 1.63 °C) and for the thigh during exercising exposures (rmsd of 1.41 °C). Possible reasons for the observed deviations are lack of information on measurement circumstances (hair, head coverage interference) or an overestimation of the sweat evaporative cooling capacity for the head and thigh, respectively. This work has highlighted the importance of collecting details about the clothing worn and how and where the sensors were attached to the skin for achieving more precise results in the simulations.

  15. Analytical Solution of Thermal Wave Models on Skin Tissue Under Arbitrary Periodic Boundary Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazlali, R.; Ahmadikia, H.

    2013-01-01

    Modeling and understanding the heat transfer in biological tissues is important in medical thermal therapeutic applications. The biothermomechanics of skin involves interdisciplinary features, such as bioheat transfer, biomechanics, and burn damage. The hyperbolic thermal wave model of bioheat transfer and the parabolic Pennes bioheat transfer equations with blood perfusion and metabolic heat generation are applied for the skin tissue as a finite and semi-infinite domain when the skin surface temperature is suddenly exposed to a source of an arbitrary periodic temperature. These equations are solved analytically by Laplace transform methods. The thermal wave model results indicate that a non-Fourier model has predicted the thermal behavior correctly, compared to that of previous experiments. The results of the thermal wave model show that when the first thermal wave moves from the first boundary, the temperature profiles for finite and semi-infinite domains of skin become separated for these phenomena; the discrepancy between these profiles is negligible. The accuracy of the obtained results is validated through comparisons with existing numerical results. The results demonstrate that the non-Fourier model is significant in describing the thermal behavior of skin tissue.

  16. Development of an in vitro model to study compromised skin: pigskin versus the Phospholipid Vesicle-based Permeation Assay

    OpenAIRE

    Fedreheim, Elena

    2013-01-01

    When the skin barrier is reduced, penetration of topical and transdermal drugs could potentially be enhanced and the risk of systemic effects is increased. The studies analysing penetration through intact or diseased skin are often limited by the variability in obtaining specimens of representative skin. The phospholipid vesicle-based permeation assay is an artificial barrier mimicking human stratum corneum and can be used to determine the permeability of drugs through the skin. The model is ...

  17. Uncertain hybrid model for the response calculation of an alternator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The complex structural dynamic behavior of alternator must be well understood in order to insure their reliable and safe operation. The numerical model is however difficult to construct mainly due to the presence of a high level of uncertainty. The objective of this work is to provide decision support tools in order to assess the vibratory levels in operation before to restart the alternator. Based on info-gap theory, a first decision support tool is proposed: the objective here is to assess the robustness of the dynamical response to the uncertain modal model. Based on real data, the calibration of an info-gap model of uncertainty is also proposed in order to enhance its fidelity to reality. Then, the extended constitutive relation error is used to expand identified mode shapes which are used to assess the vibratory levels. The robust expansion process is proposed in order to obtain robust expanded mode shapes to parametric uncertainties. In presence of lack-of knowledge, the trade-off between fidelity-to-data and robustness-to-uncertainties which expresses that robustness improves as fidelity deteriorates is emphasized on an industrial structure by using both reduced order model and surrogate model techniques. (author)

  18. An Introduction to Alternative Experimental Models in Monitoring Economic Failures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Arturo Ruiz Estrada

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This research paper presents four alternative experimental models for monitoring economic failures. These models include the national production function (NP-Function, the multi-level trade creation and trade diversion analytical framework, the mega-economic structures vulnerability analysis (MSV-Analysis, and the mega-economic surface interactive system. The main objective behind the proposed experimental models in economics is to analyze different macroeconomic scenarios in monitoring and warning of possible unexpected economic failure(s under the use of a new mathematical framework and the application of multidimensional graphs. The proposed alternative experimental models are based on the application of Econographicology. Hence, our models are expected to offer policy-makers and researchers new analytical tools to study the impact and trend of economic failures in the economy of any country from a new perspective. Finally, we suggest the application of three new concepts in the study of economic failures such as Omnia Mobilis (everything is moving, the global structural imbalance principle, and the dynamic imbalance state. Therefore, our findings would certainly help both policy makers and researchers to implement and execute appropriate policies to develop their economies and to protect them from unwanted situations.

  19. Modelling of eddy-current interaction with cracks in the thin-skin regime. Two approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EDF uses TRIFOU code for eddy current testing modelling. This general electromagnetic code is to be further adapted to Non Destructive Testing applications, not only for nuclear NDT but also in other fields such as aeronautical. This paper compares experimental data for aluminium and steel specimens with two methods of solving the forward problem in the thin-skin regime. The first approach is a 3D Finite Element / Boundary Integral Element method (TRIFOU) developed by EDF/RD Division (France). The second approach is specialized for the treatment of surface cracks in the thin-skin regime developed by the University of Surrey (England). In the thin-skin regime, the electromagnetic skin-depth is small compared with the depth of the crack. Such conditions are common in tests on steels and sometimes on aluminium. (K.A.)

  20. Efficacy of skin wash on dermal absorption: an in vitro study on four model compounds of varying solubility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper Bo

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: Following dermal exposure to chemicals causing systemic toxicity, the general advice to avoid further systemic exposure is to wash the skin. The present study uses four model compounds (benzoic acid, glyphosat, caffeine, malathion) with varying size and solubility to substantiate...... this advice and quantify the effect of skin wash following 6 h dermal exposure on subsequent extent of skin penetration and deposition within the skin compartment. METHOD: Percutaneous penetration through human skin is studied in an in vitro model with static diffusion cells. RESULTS: The study demonstrates...

  1. Multimodality pH imaging in a mouse dorsal skin fold window chamber model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Hui Min; Schafer, Rachel; Pagel, Mark M.; Robey, Ian F.; Gmitro, Arthur F.

    2013-03-01

    Upregulate levels of expression and activity of membrane H+ ion pumps in cancer cells drives the extracellular pH (pHe,) to values lower than normal. Furthermore, disregulated pH is indicative of the changes in glycolytic metabolism in tumor cells and has been shown to facilitate extracellular tissue remodeling during metastasis Therefore, measurement of pHe could be a useful cancer biomarker for diagnostic and therapy monitoring evaluation. Multimodality in-vivo imaging of pHe in tumorous tissue in a mouse dorsal skin fold window chamber (DSFWC) model is described. A custom-made plastic window chamber structure was developed that is compatible with both imaging optical and MR imaging modalities and provides a model system for continuous study of the same tissue microenvironment on multiple imaging platforms over a 3-week period. For optical imaging of pHe, SNARF-1 carboxylic acid is injected intravenously into a SCID mouse with an implanted tumor. A ratiometric measurement of the fluorescence signal captured on a confocal microscope reveals the pHe of the tissue visible within the window chamber. This imaging method was used in a preliminary study to evaluate sodium bicarbonate as a potential drug treatment to reverse tissue acidosis. For MR imaging of pHe the chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) was used as an alternative way of measuring pHe in a DSFWC model. ULTRAVIST®, a FDA approved x-ray/CT contrast agent has been shown to have a CEST effect that is pH dependent. A ratiometric analysis of water saturation at 5.6 and 4.2 ppm chemical shift provides a means to estimate the local pHe.

  2. Numerical Modeling on Two phase Fluid flow in a Coupled Fracture-Skin-Matrix System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valsala Kumari, R.; G, S. K.

    2015-12-01

    Multiphase flow modeling studies below the ground surface is very essential for designing suitable remediation strategies for contaminated aquifers and for the development of petroleum and geothermal reservoirs. Presence of fractured bedrock beneath the ground surface will make multiphase flow process more complex due to its highly heterogeneous nature. A major challenge in modeling flow within a fractured rock is to capture the interaction between the high permeability fracture and the low permeability rock-matrix. In some instances, weathering and mineral depositions will lead to formation of an additional layer named fracture-skin at the fracture-matrix interface. Porosity and permeability of fracture-skin may significantly vary from the adjacent rock matrix and this variation will result in different flow and transport behavior within the fracture-skin. In the present study, an attempt has been made to model simultaneous flow of two immiscible phases (water and LNAPL) in a saturated coupled fracture-skin-matrix system. A fully-implicit finite difference model has been developed to simulate the variation of pressure and saturation of fluid phases along the fracture and within the rock-matrix. Sensitivity studies have been done to analyze the effect of change of various fracture-skin parameters such as porosity, diffusion coefficient and thickness on pressure and saturation distribution of both wetting and non-wetting fluid phases. It can be concluded from the study that the presence of fracture-skin is significantly affecting the fluid flow at the fracture-matrix interface and it can also be seen from the study that the flow behavior of both fluid phases is sensitive to fracture-skin parameters.

  3. Setup for investigating gold nanoparticle penetration through reconstructed skin and comparison to published human skin data.

    OpenAIRE

    Labouta, Hagar I; Thude, Sibylle; Schneider, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Owing to the limited source of human skin (HS) and the ethical restrictions of using animals in experiments, in vitro skin equivalents are a possible alternative for conducting particle penetration experiments. The conditions for conducting penetration experiments with model particles, 15-nm gold nanoparticles (AuNP), through nonsealed skin equivalents are described for the first time. These conditions include experimental setup, sterility conditions, effective applied dose determination, ski...

  4. Density dependent hadronic models and the relation between neutron stars and neutron skin thickness

    CERN Document Server

    Avancini, S S; Peres-Menezes, D; Watanabe de Moraes, M M; Providência, C

    2007-01-01

    In the present work we investigate the main differences in the lead neutron skin thickness, binding energy, surface energy and density profiles obtained with two different density dependent relativistic hadronic models, within the Thomas-Fermi approximation. We show that the asymmetry parameter for low momentum transfer polarized electron scattering is not sensitive to the model parametrization differences.

  5. Modelling skin disease: lessons from the worlds of mathematics, physics and computer science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Stephen

    2005-05-01

    Theoretical biology is a field that attempts to understand the complex phenomena of life in terms of mathematical and physical principles. Likewise, theoretical medicine employs mathematical arguments and models as a methodology in approaching the complexities of human disease. Naturally, these concepts can be applied to dermatology. There are many possible methods available in the theoretical investigation of skin disease. A number of examples are presented briefly. These include the mathematical modelling of pattern formation in congenital naevi and erythema gyratum repens, an information-theoretic approach to the analysis of genetic networks in autoimmunity, and computer simulations of early melanoma growth. To conclude, an analogy is drawn between the behaviour of well-known physical processes, such as earthquakes, and the spatio-temporal evolution of skin disease. Creating models in skin disease can lead to predictions that can be investigated experimentally or by observation and offer the prospect of unexpected or important insights into pathogenesis.

  6. Outcome modelling strategies in epidemiology: traditional methods and basic alternatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenland, Sander; Daniel, Rhian; Pearce, Neil

    2016-04-01

    Controlling for too many potential confounders can lead to or aggravate problems of data sparsity or multicollinearity, particularly when the number of covariates is large in relation to the study size. As a result, methods to reduce the number of modelled covariates are often deployed. We review several traditional modelling strategies, including stepwise regression and the 'change-in-estimate' (CIE) approach to deciding which potential confounders to include in an outcome-regression model for estimating effects of a targeted exposure. We discuss their shortcomings, and then provide some basic alternatives and refinements that do not require special macros or programming. Throughout, we assume the main goal is to derive the most accurate effect estimates obtainable from the data and commercial software. Allowing that most users must stay within standard software packages, this goal can be roughly approximated using basic methods to assess, and thereby minimize, mean squared error (MSE).

  7. Outcome modelling strategies in epidemiology: traditional methods and basic alternatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenland, Sander; Daniel, Rhian; Pearce, Neil

    2016-04-01

    Controlling for too many potential confounders can lead to or aggravate problems of data sparsity or multicollinearity, particularly when the number of covariates is large in relation to the study size. As a result, methods to reduce the number of modelled covariates are often deployed. We review several traditional modelling strategies, including stepwise regression and the 'change-in-estimate' (CIE) approach to deciding which potential confounders to include in an outcome-regression model for estimating effects of a targeted exposure. We discuss their shortcomings, and then provide some basic alternatives and refinements that do not require special macros or programming. Throughout, we assume the main goal is to derive the most accurate effect estimates obtainable from the data and commercial software. Allowing that most users must stay within standard software packages, this goal can be roughly approximated using basic methods to assess, and thereby minimize, mean squared error (MSE). PMID:27097747

  8. Life cycle models of conventional and alternative-fueled automobiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclean, Heather Louise

    This thesis reports life cycle inventories of internal combustion engine automobiles with feasible near term fuel/engine combinations. These combinations include unleaded gasoline, California Phase 2 Reformulated Gasoline, alcohol and gasoline blends (85 percent methanol or ethanol combined with 15 percent gasoline), and compressed natural gas in spark ignition direct and indirect injection engines. Additionally, I consider neat methanol and neat ethanol in spark ignition direct injection engines and diesel fuel in compression ignition direct and indirect injection engines. I investigate the potential of the above options to have a lower environmental impact than conventional gasoline-fueled automobiles, while still retaining comparable pricing and consumer benefits. More broadly, the objective is to assess whether the use of any of the alternative systems will help to lead to the goal of a more sustainable personal transportation system. The principal tool is the Economic Input-Output Life Cycle Analysis model which includes inventories of economic data, environmental discharges, and resource use. I develop a life cycle assessment framework to assemble the array of data generated by the model into three aggregate assessment parameters; economics, externalities, and vehicle attributes. The first step is to develop a set of 'comparable cars' with the alternative fuel/engine combinations, based on characteristics of a conventional 1998 gasoline-fueled Ford Taurus sedan, the baseline vehicle for the analyses. I calculate the assessment parameters assuming that these comparable cars can attain the potential thermal efficiencies estimated by experts for each fuel/engine combination. To a first approximation, there are no significant differences in the assessment parameters for the vehicle manufacture, service, fixed costs, and the end-of-life for any of the options. However, there are differences in the vehicle operation life cycle components and the state of technology

  9. Optical spectroscopic studies of animal skin used in modeling of human cutaneous tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drakaki, E.; Makropoulou, M.; Serafetinides, A. A.; Borisova, E.; Avramov, L.; Sianoudis, J. A.

    2007-03-01

    Optical spectroscopy and in particular laser-induced autofluorescence spectroscopy (LIAFS) and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), provide excellent possibilities for real-time, noninvasive diagnosis of different skin tissue pathologies. However, the introduction of optical spectroscopy in routine medical practice demands a statistically important data collection, independent from the laser sources and detectors used. The scientists collect databases either from patients, in vivo, or they study different animal models to obtain objective information for the optical properties of various types of normal and diseased tissue. In the present work, the optical properties (fluorescence and reflectance) of two animal skin models are investigated. The aim of using animal models in optical spectroscopy investigations is to examine the statistics of the light induced effects firstly on animals, before any extrapolation effort to humans. A nitrogen laser (λ=337.1 nm) was used as an excitation source for the autofluorescence measurements, while a tungsten-halogen lamp was used for the reflectance measurements. Samples of chicken and pig skin were measured in vitro and were compared with results obtained from measurements of normal human skin in vivo. The specific features of the measured reflectance and fluorescence spectra are discussed, while the limits of data extrapolation for each skin type are also depicted.

  10. A statistical method for descriminating between alternative radiobiological models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiobiological models assist understanding of the development of radiation damage, and may provide a basis for extrapolating dose-effect curves from high to low dose regions. Many models have been proposed such as multitarget and its modifications, enzymatic models, and those with a quadratic dose response relationship (i.e. αD + βD2 forms). It is difficult to distinguish between these because the statistical techniques used are almost always limited, in that one method can rarely be applied to the whole range of models. A general statistical procedure for parameter estimation (Maximum Liklihood Method) has been found applicable to a wide range of radiobiological models. The curve parameters are estimated using a computerised search that continues until the most likely set of values to fit the data is obtained. When the search is complete two procedures are carried out. First a goodness of fit test is applied which examines the applicability of an individual model to the data. Secondly an index is derived which provides an indication of the adequacy of any model compared with alternative models. Thus the models may be ranked according to how well they fit the data. For example, with one set of data, multitarget types were found to be more suitable than quadratic types (αD + βD2). This method should be of assitance is evaluating various models. It may also be profitably applied to selection of the most appropriate model to use, when it is necessary to extrapolate from high to low doses

  11. Histopathologic Comparison of Radiofrequency and Scalpel Blade on Mice Skin Incisional Wound Healing Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banafshe Gholamhoseini*, Soroush Mohitmafi1, Payam Razeghi Tehrani2 and Sattar Noorialeagha3

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Using a safe and accurate alternative to scalpel blades for various surgical operations has been more considering today. There are many studies about the healing process of various tissues after using different methods like radiofrequency, electro surgery and scalpel blade for the surgical incisions, but choosing the right instrument is very important in cosmetic surgeries.This study was undertaken to get more histopathologic details about the healing process after using either Radiofrequency (RF or Scalpel blade as a skin incision method. So, an experimental study was designed in that 12 mice were randomly divided in three groups with the same situation and two different incisions were cut in each mouse on ventral skin by scalpel blade and radio surgical equipment. The skin specimens from scalpel blade incision as group one sample and radiosurgical incision as group two sample were harvested on the same operation day and a weekly manner to day 21. All samples were stained with Hematoxillin - Eosin and observed under light microscopy. Results showed less tissue contraction at the cutting edge and better collagen alignments in RF incision in comparison to scalpel blade incisions in which having fibrosis and more tissue contraction. These histopathologic findings might be the reason for more elasticity and less scar tissue remaining after skin Radiofrequency surgery.

  12. Skin Colour Segmentation Using Finite Bivariate Pearsonian Type-Iib Mixture Model and K-Means

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.N.Jagadesh

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Skin colour segmentation plays an important role in computer vision, face detection and human related systems. Much work has been reported in literature regarding skin colour detection using Gaussian mixture model. The Gaussian mixture model has certain limitations regarding the assumptions like pixels in each component are mesokurtic, having negative range and it doesn’t adequately represent the variance of the skin distribution under illumination conditions. In this paper we develop and analyze a new skin colour segmentation based on HSI colour space using bivariate Pearsonian type-IIb mixture model. The model parameters are estimated by deriving the updated equation of EM-Algorithm. The initialization ofthe model parameters is done through K-means algorithm and method of moments. The segmentation algorithm is obtained using component maximum likelihood under Bayes frame. The experimental results using hue and saturation as feature vector revealed that the developed method perform better with respect to segmentation performance metrics than that of Gaussian mixture model. This method is useful in face detection and medical diagnostics.

  13. Skin Colour Segmentation Using Finite Bivariate Pearsonian Type-Iib Mixture Model and K-Means

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.N.Jagadesh

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Skin colour segmentation plays an important role in computer vision, face detection and human related systems. Much work has been reported in literature regarding skin colour detection using Gaussian mixture model. The Gaussian mixture model has certain limitations regarding the assumptions like pixels in each component are mesokurtic, having negative range and it doesn’t adequately represent the variance of the skin distribution under illumination conditions. In this paper we develop and analyze a new skin colour segmentation based on HSI colour space using bivariate Pearsonian type-IIb mixture model. The model parameters are estimated by deriving the updated equation of EM-Algorithm. The initialization of the model parameters is done through K-means algorithm and method of moments. The segmentation algorithm is obtained using component maximum likelihood under Bayes frame. The experimental results using hue and saturation as feature vector revealed that the developed method perform better with respect to segmentation performance metrics than that of Gaussian mixture model. This method is useful in face detection and medical diagnostics.

  14. The Swedish model: an alternative to macroeconomic policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALEXANDRE GUEDES VIANA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This paper describes the main details of the Swedish economic model, which began to be structured on the 1930s and achieved its consolidation on the 1950s. The Swedish model is characterized by a macroeconomic policy which provides price stability, fiscal results for selective industrial policies and social active policies, the latter being recognized as a wide universal welfare state. This combination, which contradicts the traditional economic prescriptions, has been successful given the country was agrarian and underdeveloped until the beginni.ng of 20th century and achieved a high social-economic development level on the 1970s. Afterwards, we present the Swedish experiment as an alternative to macroeconomic management, especially due to its uniqueness.

  15. Modelling of the frictional behaviour of the snake skin covered by anisotropic surface nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippov, Alexander E.; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2016-03-01

    Previous experimental data clearly revealed anisotropic friction on the ventral scale surface of snakes. However, it is known that frictional properties of the ventral surface of the snake skin range in a very broad range and the degree of anisotropy ranges as well to a quite strong extent. This might be due to the variety of species studied, diversity of approaches used for the friction characterization, and/or due to the variety of substrates used as a counterpart in the experiments. In order to understand the interactions between the nanostructure arrays of the ventral surface of the snake skin, this study was undertaken, which is aimed at numerical modeling of frictional properties of the structurally anisotropic surfaces in contact with various size of asperities. The model shows that frictional anisotropy appears on the snake skin only on the substrates with a characteristic range of roughness, which is less or comparable with dimensions of the skin microstructure. In other words, scale of the skin relief should reflect an adaptation to the particular range of surfaces asperities of the substrate.

  16. A Robust Skin Colour Segmentation Using Bivariate Pearson Type IIαα (Bivariate Beta Mixture Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.N.Jagadesh

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Probability distributions formulate the basic framework for developing several segmentation algorithms. Among the various segmentation algorithms, skin colour segmentation is one of the most important algorithms for human computer interaction. Due to various random factors influencing the colour space, there does not exist a unique algorithm which serve the purpose of all images. In this paper a novel and new skin colour segmentation algorithms is proposed based on bivariate Pearson type II mixture model since the hue and saturation values always lies between 0 and 1. The bivariate feature vector of the human image is to be modeled with a Pearson type II mixture (bivariate Beta mixture model. Using the EM Algorithm the model parameters are estimated. The segmentation algorithm is developed under Bayesian frame. Through experimentation the proposed skin colour segmentation algorithm performs better with respect to segmentation quality metrics such as PRI, VOI and GCE. The ROC curves plotted for the system also revealed that the proposed algorithm can segment the skin colour more effectively than the algorithm with Gaussian mixture model for some images.

  17. Enhancement of light propagation depth in skin: cross-validation of mathematical modeling methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Kiwoon; Son, Taeyoon; Lee, Kyoung-Joung; Jung, Byungjo

    2009-07-01

    Various techniques to enhance light propagation in skin have been studied in low-level laser therapy. In this study, three mathematical modeling methods for five selected techniques were implemented so that we could understand the mechanisms that enhance light propagation in skin. The five techniques included the increasing of the power and diameter of a laser beam, the application of a hyperosmotic chemical agent (HCA), and the whole and partial compression of the skin surface. The photon density profile of the five techniques was solved with three mathematical modeling methods: the finite element method (FEM), the Monte Carlo method (MCM), and the analytic solution method (ASM). We cross-validated the three mathematical modeling results by comparing photon density profiles and analyzing modeling error. The mathematical modeling results verified that the penetration depth of light can be enhanced if incident beam power and diameter, amount of HCA, or whole and partial skin compression is increased. In this study, light with wavelengths of 377 nm, 577 nm, and 633 nm was used.

  18. An alternative to multiregional two-sex model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, D C; Datta, J

    1992-01-01

    Factors such as female fertility, male fertility, female survival rate, and male survival rate affect the replacement of the present generation by the next generation. This realization led to the formulation of the two-sex population model to replace the one-sex model based on age composition of females alone. In 1975 Rogers introduced the study of one-sex multiregional stable population. In 1987 Nath extended the study of multiregional stable population to two-sex cases. An alternative approach of incorporating the age structure of both the sexes, considering age difference of parents and making use of sex ratio(s), making certain assumptions on female birth rates of the regions constituting the multiregional stable population, was employed to obtain a few female birth models that become stable. In the 4 models the effect on the female birth trajectory was studies using: 1) constant age difference between the parents when the survivors of male cohort are obtained from male cohort; 2) variable age difference between the parents as in 1) ; ; 3) constant age difference between the parents when survivors of male cohort are obtained from survivors of female cohort; and 4) variable age difference between the parents as in 3). The analyzed 4 models consist of female birth models of a multiregional stable population reflecting the effect of constant/variable age difference of parents when survivors of male cohort are obtained from male/female cohort. Models obtained are neither ordinary one-sex models nor ordinary two-sex models. In all the models paternity linked maternity (PLM) function was obtained in place of simple maternity function of the one-sex model and net parenthood function of the two-sex model. With the help of the PLM function, forecasts on future births can be made. As data for PLM function can be obtained more easily than those for net parenthood function, it is expected that the above models will be more suitable for practical applications than the

  19. Alternative modeling methods for plasma-based Rf ion sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veitzer, Seth A., E-mail: veitzer@txcorp.com; Kundrapu, Madhusudhan, E-mail: madhusnk@txcorp.com; Stoltz, Peter H., E-mail: phstoltz@txcorp.com; Beckwith, Kristian R. C., E-mail: beckwith@txcorp.com [Tech-X Corporation, Boulder, Colorado 80303 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Rf-driven ion sources for accelerators and many industrial applications benefit from detailed numerical modeling and simulation of plasma characteristics. For instance, modeling of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) internal antenna H{sup −} source has indicated that a large plasma velocity is induced near bends in the antenna where structural failures are often observed. This could lead to improved designs and ion source performance based on simulation and modeling. However, there are significant separations of time and spatial scales inherent to Rf-driven plasma ion sources, which makes it difficult to model ion sources with explicit, kinetic Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulation codes. In particular, if both electron and ion motions are to be explicitly modeled, then the simulation time step must be very small, and total simulation times must be large enough to capture the evolution of the plasma ions, as well as extending over many Rf periods. Additional physics processes such as plasma chemistry and surface effects such as secondary electron emission increase the computational requirements in such a way that even fully parallel explicit PIC models cannot be used. One alternative method is to develop fluid-based codes coupled with electromagnetics in order to model ion sources. Time-domain fluid models can simulate plasma evolution, plasma chemistry, and surface physics models with reasonable computational resources by not explicitly resolving electron motions, which thereby leads to an increase in the time step. This is achieved by solving fluid motions coupled with electromagnetics using reduced-physics models, such as single-temperature magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), extended, gas dynamic, and Hall MHD, and two-fluid MHD models. We show recent results on modeling the internal antenna H{sup −} ion source for the SNS at Oak Ridge National Laboratory using the fluid plasma modeling code USim. We compare demonstrate plasma temperature equilibration in two

  20. Alternative modeling methods for plasma-based Rf ion sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veitzer, Seth A; Kundrapu, Madhusudhan; Stoltz, Peter H; Beckwith, Kristian R C

    2016-02-01

    Rf-driven ion sources for accelerators and many industrial applications benefit from detailed numerical modeling and simulation of plasma characteristics. For instance, modeling of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) internal antenna H(-) source has indicated that a large plasma velocity is induced near bends in the antenna where structural failures are often observed. This could lead to improved designs and ion source performance based on simulation and modeling. However, there are significant separations of time and spatial scales inherent to Rf-driven plasma ion sources, which makes it difficult to model ion sources with explicit, kinetic Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulation codes. In particular, if both electron and ion motions are to be explicitly modeled, then the simulation time step must be very small, and total simulation times must be large enough to capture the evolution of the plasma ions, as well as extending over many Rf periods. Additional physics processes such as plasma chemistry and surface effects such as secondary electron emission increase the computational requirements in such a way that even fully parallel explicit PIC models cannot be used. One alternative method is to develop fluid-based codes coupled with electromagnetics in order to model ion sources. Time-domain fluid models can simulate plasma evolution, plasma chemistry, and surface physics models with reasonable computational resources by not explicitly resolving electron motions, which thereby leads to an increase in the time step. This is achieved by solving fluid motions coupled with electromagnetics using reduced-physics models, such as single-temperature magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), extended, gas dynamic, and Hall MHD, and two-fluid MHD models. We show recent results on modeling the internal antenna H(-) ion source for the SNS at Oak Ridge National Laboratory using the fluid plasma modeling code USim. We compare demonstrate plasma temperature equilibration in two-temperature MHD

  1. Prediction of human skin permeability using artificial neural network (ANN)modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Long-jian CHEN; Guo-ping LIAN; Lu-jia HAN

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To develop an artificial neural network (ANN) model for predicting skin permeability (log Kp) of new chemical entities. Methods: A large dataset of 215experimental data points was compiled from the literature. The dataset was subdi-vided into 5 subsets and 4 of them were used to train and validate an ANN model.The same 4 datasets were also used to build a multiple linear regression (MLR)model. The remaining dataset was then used to test the 2 models. Abraham descriptors were employed as inputs into the 2 models. Model predictions were compared with the experimental results. In addition, the relationship between log Kp and Abraham descriptors were investigated. Results: The regression re-sults of the MLR model were n=215, determination coefficient (R2)=0.699, mean square error (MSE)=0.243, and F=493.556. The ANN model gave improved results with n=215, R2=0.832, MSE=0.136, and F=1050.653. The ANN model suggests that the relationship between log Kp and Abraham descriptors is non-linear. Conclusion:The study suggests that Abraham descriptors may be used to predict skin permeability, and the ANN model gives improved prediction of skin permeability.

  2. Application of the Aqueous Porous Pathway Model to Quantify the Effect of Sodium Lauryl Sulfate on Ultrasound-Induced Skin Structural Perturbation

    OpenAIRE

    Polat, Baris E.; Seto, Jennifer E.; Blankschtein, Daniel; Langer, Robert

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) on skin structural perturbation when utilized simultaneously with low-frequency sonophoresis (LFS). Pig full-thickness skin (FTS) and pig split-thickness skin (STS) treated with LFS/SLS and LFS were analyzed in the context of the aqueous porous pathway model to quantify skin perturbation through changes in skin pore radius and porosity-to-tortuosity ratio (ε/τ). In addition, skin treatment times required to attain specific leve...

  3. Numerical Modelling of Combined Heat Transfers in a Double Skin Facade - Full Scale Laboratory Experiment Validation

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The present paper presents a numerical modelling of a double skin facade (DSF). The model developed includes a zonal model approach for the mass transfer based on the pressure difference in the DSF. The radiative and convective heat transfers are also taken into account to obtain a global couplingbetween the different phenomena. A full-scale DSF has been experimentallystudied in summer configuration with different airflow rates through the airchannels of the facade and for...

  4. An improved algorithm for model-based analysis of evoked skin conductance responses ☆

    OpenAIRE

    Bach, D R; Friston, K.J.; Dolan, R. J.

    2013-01-01

    Model-based analysis of psychophysiological signals is more robust to noise - compared to standard approaches - and may furnish better predictors of psychological state, given a physiological signal. We have previously established the improved predictive validity of model-based analysis of evoked skin conductance responses to brief stimuli, relative to standard approaches. Here, we consider some technical aspects of the underlying generative model and demonstrate further improvements. Most im...

  5. A mathematical model of amphibian skin epithelium with two types of transporting cellular units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik Hviid; Rasmussen, B E

    1985-01-01

    A computer model of ion transport across amphibian skin epithelium containing two types of cellular units, their relative number and sizes, and a paracellular pathway has been developed. The two cellular units are, a large Na+ transporting compartment representing the major epithelium from stratum...

  6. Modelling the Penetration of Salicylates through Skin Using a Silicone Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Andrew; Parmenter, Emily

    2012-01-01

    A diffusion cell to model the permeation of salicylate drugs through the skin using low-cost materials and a sensitive colorimetric analytical technique is described. The diffusion apparatus has been used at a further education college by a student for her AS-level Extended Project to investigate the permeation rates of salicylic acid…

  7. Modeling the Substrate Skin Effects in Mutual RL Characteristics.,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. de Roest

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this work was to model the influence of the substrateskin effects on the distributed mutual impedance per unit lengthparameters of multiple coupled on-chip interconnects. The proposedanalytic model is based on the frequency-dependent distribution of thecurrent in the silicon substrate and the closed form integrationapproach. It is shown that the calculated frequency-dependentdistributed mutual inductance and the associated mutual resistance arein good agreement with the results obtained from CAD-oriented circuitmodeling technique.

  8. Tissue-on-a-chip design for skin modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Matellán Martín, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Overcoming the challenges that the pharmaceutical industry currently faces requires the development of more sophisticated models of the human body. Tissue- and organ-on-a-chip technologies have arisen as a new enabling platform for organ modeling and drug screening based on bioinspired microfluidic systems. These devices have the potential to replicate the complex tissue architectures and organ-level interactions that dominate the systemic response to a drug. The present work describes the...

  9. The multitrace matrix model: An alternative to Connes NCG and IKKT model

    CERN Document Server

    Ydri, Badis

    2016-01-01

    We present a new multitrace matrix model, which is a generalization of the real quartic one matrix model, exhibiting dynamical emergence of a fuzzy two-sphere and its non-commutative gauge theory. This provides a novel and a much simpler alternative to Connes non-commutative geometry and to the IKKT matrix model for emergent geometry in two dimensions.

  10. Face detection in complex background based on Adaboost algorithm and YCbCr skin color model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Wei; Han, Chunling; Quan, Wei

    2015-12-01

    Face detection is a fundamental and important research theme in the topic of Pattern Recognition and Computer Vision. Now, remarkable fruits have been achieved. Among these methods, statistics based methods hold a dominant position. In this paper, Adaboost algorithm based on Haar-like features is used to detect faces in complex background. The method combining YCbCr skin model detection and Adaboost is researched, the skin detection method is used to validate the detection results obtained by Adaboost algorithm. It overcomes false detection problem by Adaboost. Experimental results show that nearly all non-face areas are removed, and improve the detection rate.

  11. Experimental characterization and damage model of the human skin response to dynamic loadings

    OpenAIRE

    JACQUEMOUD,C; Coret, M; BRUYERE-GARNIER,K; Brunet, M.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this work is to characterize and to model the damage of planar and fibrous soft tissues at high strain rate. As first step, we choose to study the human skin. A dynamic tensile test up to failure is performed on 10x30mm human skin samples. The test is based on the drop test principle and allows loading of samples at a strain rate close to 40 s-1. Classical measurement techniques give global strains whereas a full local strain field is measured on the sample surface by an Imag...

  12. Modelling of human and animal data from skin contact exposures to tritium gas contaminated surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A potential problem in tritium gas handling facilities is the contamination of skin following contact with metal surfaces previously exposed to tritium gas. Experimental work has demonstrated that the urine of humans exposed to such surfaces contained high concentrations of organically bound tritium (OBT) and tritiated water (HTO). Recent experiments with hairless rats demonstrated similar excretion patterns of OBT and HTO in urine; furthermore, they demonstrated that OBT is retained within the skin and can act as a source of tritium to the rest of the body. A dosimetric model based on human and animal observations is proposed and discussed in this paper

  13. Linear and nonlinear quantitative structure-property relationship modelling of skin permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khajeh, A; Modarress, H

    2014-01-01

    In this work, quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) models were developed to estimate skin permeability based on theoretically derived molecular descriptors and a diverse set of experimental data. The newly developed method combining modified particle swarm optimization (MPSO) and multiple linear regression (MLR) was used to select important descriptors and develop the linear model using a training set of 225 compounds. The adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) was used as an efficient nonlinear method to correlate the selected descriptors with experimental skin permeability data (log Kp). The linear and nonlinear models were assessed by internal and external validation. The obtained models with three descriptors show good predictive ability for the test set, with coefficients of determination for the MPSO-MLR and ANFIS models equal to 0.874 and 0.890, respectively. The QSPR study suggests that hydrophobicity (encoded as log P) is the most important factor in transdermal penetration. PMID:24090175

  14. A longitudinal application of three health behaviour models in the context of skin protection behaviour in individuals with occupational skin disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matterne, Uwe; Diepgen, Thomas L; Weisshaar, Elke

    2011-09-01

    Occupational skin disease (OSD) is common, associated with poor prognosis and poses a significant burden to the individual and society. We applied the theory of planned behaviour (TPB), the prototype-willingness model (PWM) and the health action process approach (HAPA) to the prediction and explanation of occupationally relevant skin protection behaviour in individuals with OSD. We used a longitudinal design. In this study, 150 individuals participating in a 3-week inpatient tertiary prevention programme completed measures assessing the constructs of the TPB, PWM and HAPA at admission (T 0), discharge (T 1) and once the individual had returned to work and worked for 4 consecutive weeks (T 2) (n = 117). Intention was measured at T 0 and skin protection behaviour at T 2. Path analysis was used to assess the longitudinal associations of the models' constructs with intention and skin protection behaviour. TPB as well as PWM variables accounted for 30% of variance in behaviour, HAPA variables for 33%. While not all predictions were confirmed by the data, all three models are able to inform us about the formation of skin protection intention and behaviour in individuals with OSD. The findings are discussed in light of future interventions and research. PMID:21678190

  15. Skin-friction drag analysis from the forced convection modeling in simplified underwater swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polidori, G; Taïar, R; Fohanno, S; Mai, T H; Lodini, A

    2006-01-01

    This study deals with skin-friction drag analysis in underwater swimming. Although lower than profile drag, skin-friction drag remains significant and is the second and only other contribution to total drag in the case of underwater swimming. The question arises whether varying the thermal gradient between the underwater swimmer and the pool water may modify the surface shear stress distribution and the resulting skin-friction drag acting on a swimmer's body. As far as the authors are aware, such a question has not previously been addressed. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to quantify the effect of this thermal gradient by using the integral formalism applied to the forced convection theory. From a simplified model in a range of pool temperatures (20-30 degrees C) it was demonstrated that, whatever the swimming speeds, a 5.3% reduction in the skin-friction drag would occur with increasing average boundary-layer temperature provided that the flow remained laminar. However, as the majority of the flow is actually turbulent, a turbulent flow analysis leads to the major conclusion that friction drag is a function of underwater speed, leading to a possible 1.5% reduction for fast swimming speeds above 1m/s. Furthermore, simple correlations between the surface shear stress and resulting skin-friction drag are derived in terms of the boundary-layer temperature, which may be readily used in underwater swimming situations.

  16. Feasibility Study on a Microwave-Based Sensor for Measuring Hydration Level Using Human Skin Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rico Brendtke

    Full Text Available Tissue dehydration results in three major types of exsiccosis--hyper-, hypo-, or isonatraemia. All three types entail alterations of salt concentrations leading to impaired biochemical processes, and can finally cause severe morbidity. The aim of our study was to demonstrate the feasibility of a microwave-based sensor technology for the non-invasive measurement of the hydration status. Electromagnetic waves at high frequencies interact with molecules, especially water. Hence, if a sample contains free water molecules, this can be detected in a reflected microwave signal. To develop the sensor system, human three-dimensional skin equivalents were instituted as a standardized test platform mimicking reproducible exsiccosis scenarios. Therefore, skin equivalents with a specific hydration and density of matrix components were generated and microwave measurements were performed. Hydration-specific spectra allowed deriving the hydration state of the skin models. A further advantage of the skin equivalents was the characterization of the impact of distinct skin components on the measured signals to investigate mechanisms of signal generation. The results demonstrate the feasibility of a non-invasive microwave-based hydration sensor technology. The sensor bears potential to be integrated in a wearable medical device for personal health monitoring.

  17. Mathematical model of alternative mechanism of telomere length maintenance

    CERN Document Server

    Kollár, Richard; Nosek, Jozef; Tomaska, Lubomir

    2014-01-01

    Biopolymer length regulation is a complex process that involves a large number of subprocesses acting simultaneously across multiple spatial and temporal scales. An illustrative example important for genomic stability is the length regulation of telomeres---nucleo-protein structures at the ends of linear chromosomes. Maintenance of telomeres is often facilitated by the enzyme telomerase but, particularly in telomerase-free systems, the maintenance of chromosomal termini depends on alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) mechanisms mediated by recombination. Various linear and circular DNA structures were identified to participate in ALT, however, dynamics of the whole process is still poorly understood. We propose a chemical kinetics model of ALT with kinetic rates systematically derived from the biophysics of DNA diffusion and looping. The reaction system is reduced to a coagulation-fragmentation system by quasi-steady state approximation. The detailed treatment of kinetic rates yields explicit formulae f...

  18. The usual suspects-influence of physicochemical properties on lag time, skin deposition, and percutaneous penetration of nine model compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bo Nielsen, Jesper; Sørensen, Jens Ahm; Nielsen, Flemming

    2009-01-01

    The influence of physicochemical properties of nine model compounds on lag time, skin deposition, and percutaneous penetration was evaluated. Static diffusion cells mounted with human skin were used as the experimental model, and experiments were carried out in accordance with Organization for Ec...

  19. PREDICTIVE MODEL FOR SURVIVAL AND GROWTH OF SALMONELLA TYPHIMURIUM DT104 ON CHICKEN SKIN DURING TEMPERATURE ABUSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    To better predict risk of Salmonella infection from chicken subjected to temperature abuse, a study was undertaken to develop a predictive model for survival and growth of Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 on chicken skin with native micro flora. For model development, chicken skin portions were inocula...

  20. Light-induced autofluorescence of animal skin used in tissue optical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, E.; Bliznakova, I.; Troyanova, P.; Avramov, L.

    2007-07-01

    Light-induced autofluorescence spectroscopy provides many possibilities for medical diagnostics needs for differentiation of tissue pathologies including cancer. For the needs of clinical practice scientists collect spectral data from patients in vivo or they study different tumor models to obtain objective information for fluorescent properties of every kind of normal and diseased tissue. Therefore it is very important to find the most appropriate and close to the human skin samples from the point of view of laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy, which will give the possibility for easier transfer of data obtained in animal models to spectroscopic medical diagnostics in humans. In this study are presented some results for in vitro detection of the autofluorescence signals of the animal skin (pig and chicken) with using of LEDs as excitation sources (maximum emission at 365, 375, 385 and 400 nm). The autofluorescence signals from in vivo human skin were also detected for comparison with the models' results. Specific features of the spectra measured are discussed and there are proposed some of the origins of the fluorescence signals obtained. Fluorescence maxima detected are addressed to the typical fluorophores existing in the cutaneous tissues. Influence of main skin absorbers, namely melanin and hemoglobin, is also discussed.

  1. Three-dimensional model on thermal response of skin subject to laser heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Wensheng; Zhang, Jun; Yang, Fuqian

    2005-04-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) multilayer model based on the skin physical structure is developed to investigate the transient thermal response of human skin subject to laser heating. The temperature distribution of the skin is modeled by the bioheat transfer equation, and the influence of laser heating is expressed as a source term where the strength of the source is a product of a Gaussian shaped incident irradiance, an exponentially shaped axial attenuation, and a time function. The water evaporation and diffusion is included in the model by adding two terms regarding the heat loss due to the evaporation and diffusion, where the rate of water evaporation is determined based on the theory of laminar boundary layer. Cryogen spray cooling (CSC) in laser therapy is studied, as well as its effect on the skin thermal response. The time-dependent equation is discretized using the finite difference method with the Crank-Nicholson scheme and the stability of the numerical method is analyzed. The large sparse linear system resulted from discretizing the governing partial differential equation is solved by a GMRES solver and the expected simulation results are obtained.

  2. 大鼠透皮电阻实验替代皮肤腐蚀性实验的验证%The in vitro rat skin transcutaneous electrical resistance test used as a alternative for traditional skin corrosion test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    俞萍; 胡启之; 陆罗定; 刘协; 董蓉莲

    2009-01-01

    Objective The rat skin transcutaneous electrical resistance(TER) test was established to investigate the practicality of the in vitro method as a alternative for animal experiment to determine skin corrosion of chemicals. Methods The equipment for TER detection was assembled referring to OECD guideline for the testing of chemicals: Guideline 430, in vitro skin corrosion: transcutaneous electrical resistance test (TER) . A group of 11 reference chemicals was adopted to evaluate the performance of this test system. Based on the data obtained from this test system, skin corrosion determination procedure was adjust as below:the test substance was considered to be noncorrosive if the TER values obtained were greater than 15 kΩ; the test substance was considered to be corrosive if the TER values obtained were less than 5 kΩ; when the TER values were between 5 kΩ and 15 kΩ or on either side of the dividing values, the sulforhdamine B dye infiltration capacity was analyzed, if the mean disc dye content was greater than or equal to that of 8 M HCl positive control obtained concurrently, the test substance was considered to be corrosive, otherwise it was considered to be noncorrosive. Results The sensitivity and the specificity of this test system to the reference chemicals adopted were all 100% .Conclusion Although the rat skin transcutaneous electrical resistance test combined with sulforhdamine B dye infiltration capacity analysis had determined the skin corrosion of these limited reference chemicals successfully, more chemicals should be employed to further check the validity of this test system in practice.%目的 通过建立大鼠皮肤透皮电阻(TER)实验,研究运用体外方法替代动物试验检测化学品皮肤腐蚀性的可行性.方法 参照经济合作与发展组织(OECD)体外实验方法指南430(透皮电阻分析法)建立测定系统,使用11种参考物质对该实验体系进行评估.根据本实验系统对参考物质

  3. Assessment of dermal toxicity of nanosilica using cultured keratinocytes, a human skin equivalent model and an in vivo model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yoon-Hee; Kim, Ji Na; Jeong, Sang Hoon; Choi, Jae Eun; Lee, Seung-Ho; Choi, Byeong Hyeok; Lee, Jung Pyo; Sohn, Kyung Hee; Park, Kui Lea; Kim, Meyoung-Kon; Son, Sang Wook

    2010-01-12

    Assessments of skin irritation potentials are important aspects of the development of nanotechnology. Nanosilica is currently being widely used for commercial purposes, but little literature is available on its skin toxicity and irritation potential. This study was designed to determine whether nanosilica has the potential to cause acute cutaneous toxicity, using cultured HaCaT keratinocytes (CHK), a human skin equivalent model (HSEM), and invivo model. Nanosilica was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. We evaluated the cytotoxic effects of nanosilica on CHKs and the HSEM. In addition, we also investigated whether two commercially available nanosilicas with different sizes (7 and 10-20 nm) have different effects. To confirm invitro results, we evaluated the irritation potentials of nanosilicas on rabbit skin. Nanosilicas reduced the cell viabilities of CHKs in a dose-dependent manner. However, the HSEM revealed no irritation at 500 microg/ml of nanosilica. Furthermore, this result concurred with Draize skin irritation test findings. The present study data indicate that nanosilica does not cause acute cutaneous irritation. Furthermore, this study shows that the HSEM used provides more useful screening data than the conventional cell culture model on the relative toxicities of NPs. PMID:19850098

  4. Assessment of dermal toxicity of nanosilica using cultured keratinocytes, a human skin equivalent model and an invivo model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assessments of skin irritation potentials are important aspects of the development of nanotechnology. Nanosilica is currently being widely used for commercial purposes, but little literature is available on its skin toxicity and irritation potential. This study was designed to determine whether nanosilica has the potential to cause acute cutaneous toxicity, using cultured HaCaT keratinocytes (CHK), a human skin equivalent model (HSEM), and invivo model. Nanosilica was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. We evaluated the cytotoxic effects of nanosilica on CHKs and the HSEM. In addition, we also investigated whether two commercially available nanosilicas with different sizes (7 and 10-20 nm) have different effects. To confirm invitro results, we evaluated the irritation potentials of nanosilicas on rabbit skin. Nanosilicas reduced the cell viabilities of CHKs in a dose-dependent manner. However, the HSEM revealed no irritation at 500 μg/ml of nanosilica. Furthermore, this result concurred with Draize skin irritation test findings. The present study data indicate that nanosilica does not cause acute cutaneous irritation. Furthermore, this study shows that the HSEM used provides more useful screening data than the conventional cell culture model on the relative toxicities of NPs.

  5. Empirical validation data sets for double skin facade models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalyanova, Olena; Jensen, Rasmus Lund; Heiselberg, Per

    2008-01-01

    empirical data for validation of DSF modeling with building simulation software were produced within the International Energy Agency (IEA) SHCTask 34 / ECBCS Annex 43. This paper describes the full-scale outdoor experimental test facility, the experimental set-up and the measurements procedure...... in the paper are the temperature gradients in the DSF cavity, the mass flow rate in the naturally ventilated cavity and the resulting heating and cooling load....

  6. Study of the neutron skin thickness of ${}^{208}$Pb in mean field models

    CERN Document Server

    Roca-Maza, X; Viñas, X; Warda, M

    2011-01-01

    We study whether the neutron skin thickness $\\Delta r_{np}$ of ${}^{208}$Pb originates from the bulk or from the surface of the neutron and proton density distributions in mean field models. We find that the size of the bulk contribution to $\\Delta r_{np}$ of ${}^{208}$Pb strongly depends on the slope of the nuclear symmetry energy, while the surface contribution does not. We note that most mean field models predict a neutron density for ${}^{208}$Pb between the halo and skin type limits. We investigate the dependence of parity- violating electron scattering at the kinematics of the PREX experiment on the shape of the nucleon densities predicted by the mean field models for ${}^{208}$Pb. We find an approximate formula for the parity-violating asymmetry in terms of the central radius and the surface diffuseness of the nucleon densities of ${}^{208}$Pb in these models.

  7. Electrode-Skin contact impedance: In vivo measurements on an ovine model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of electrical impedance between the skin and the electrode is an on-going challenge in bio-electronics. This is particularly true in the case of Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT), which uses a large number of skin-contact electrodes and is very sensitive to noise. In the present article, contact impedance is measured and compared for a range of electrodes placed on the thorax of an ovine model. The study has been approved by the Westmead Hospital Animal Ethics Committee. The electrode models that were employed in the research are Ag/AgCl electrodes (E1), commonly used for ECG and EIT measurements in both humans and animal models, stainless steel crocodile clips (E2), typically used on animal models, and novel multi-point dry electrodes in two modifications: bronze plated (E3) and nickel plated (E4). Further, since the contact impedance is mostly attributed to the acellular outer layer of the skin, in our experiment, we attempted to study the effect of this layer by comparing the results when the skin is intact and when electrodes are introduced underneath the skin through small cuts. This boundary effect was assessed by comparison of measurements obtained during E2 skin surface contact, and sub-cutaneous contact (E5). Twelve gauge intradermal needles were also tested as an electrode (E6). The full impedance spectrum, from 500 Hz to 300 kHz, was recorded, analysed and compared. As expected, the contact impedance in the more invasive cases, i.e the electrodes under the skin, is significantly lower than in the non-invasive cases. At the frequency of 50 kHz which is commonly used in lung EIT acquisition, electrodes E3, E4 and E6 demonstrated contact impedance of less than 200 Ω, compared to more than 400 Ω measured for electrodes E1, E2 and E5. In conclusion, the novel multipoint electrodes proved to be best suited for EIT purposes, because they are non-invasive and have lower contact impedance than Ag/AgCl and crocodile clips, in both invasive and

  8. Electrode-Skin contact impedance: In vivo measurements on an ovine model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, D. T.; Kosobrodov, R.; Barry, M. A.; Chik, W.; Jin, C.; Oh, T. I.; Thiagalingam, A.; McEwan, A.

    2013-04-01

    The problem of electrical impedance between the skin and the electrode is an on-going challenge in bio-electronics. This is particularly true in the case of Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT), which uses a large number of skin-contact electrodes and is very sensitive to noise. In the present article, contact impedance is measured and compared for a range of electrodes placed on the thorax of an ovine model. The study has been approved by the Westmead Hospital Animal Ethics Committee. The electrode models that were employed in the research are Ag/AgCl electrodes (E1), commonly used for ECG and EIT measurements in both humans and animal models, stainless steel crocodile clips (E2), typically used on animal models, and novel multi-point dry electrodes in two modifications: bronze plated (E3) and nickel plated (E4). Further, since the contact impedance is mostly attributed to the acellular outer layer of the skin, in our experiment, we attempted to study the effect of this layer by comparing the results when the skin is intact and when electrodes are introduced underneath the skin through small cuts. This boundary effect was assessed by comparison of measurements obtained during E2 skin surface contact, and sub-cutaneous contact (E5). Twelve gauge intradermal needles were also tested as an electrode (E6). The full impedance spectrum, from 500 Hz to 300 kHz, was recorded, analysed and compared. As expected, the contact impedance in the more invasive cases, i.e the electrodes under the skin, is significantly lower than in the non-invasive cases. At the frequency of 50 kHz which is commonly used in lung EIT acquisition, electrodes E3, E4 and E6 demonstrated contact impedance of less than 200 Ω, compared to more than 400 Ω measured for electrodes E1, E2 and E5. In conclusion, the novel multipoint electrodes proved to be best suited for EIT purposes, because they are non-invasive and have lower contact impedance than Ag/AgCl and crocodile clips, in both invasive and

  9. New pseudo-skin model for flow convergence to perforations in competent formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okonkwo, F.C. [University of Port Harcourt, Port Harcourt (Nigeria); Onyekonwu, M.O. [Laser Engineering Consultants/Uniport, Port Harcourt (Nigeria)

    1997-05-01

    Existing models for calculating pseudo-skin due to perforations give values that do not agree with observed values. In this paper we discuss a new analytical model that can be used for calculating pseudo-skin due to flow convergence to perforations. The model was developed by combining Bernoulli and Forchheimer equations. Geertsma`s (1974) correlation was introduced to account for the inertia coefficient {beta}. We used our model to calculate skin factors and productivity ratios (PR) for several perforation parameters. The results were compared with results obtained using existing models. In terms of trend, results from all the models, including our model, agree. For example, the models show that the productivity index increases with increase in perforation length and shot density. Also, our model agrees with Locke`s (1981) finding that if all perforation parameters remain the same, a 90 phasing will give the maximum productivity while 0 phasing will give minimum productivity. Quantitatively, results from our model differ (in some cases significantly) from results from other models. For example, some models predict that for 4 shots/ft (13 shots/m) and 90 phasing, a perforated well will have same productivity as an open-hole completion if the perforation depth is between 4 and 6 in (0.1016-0.1524 m). With our model we predicted that this equivalence will occur if the perforation depth is between 14 and 16 in (0.3556-0.4064 m). We validated our model with field data from Brunei and experimental data published by Muskat and McDowell (1950) and Howard and Watson (1952). Our model applies to wells with perforations in competent (consolidated) formations and for modified Reynold`s number of up to 1000

  10. What is the discrepancy between drug permeation into/across intact and diseased skins? Atopic dermatitis as a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yi-Ping; Yang, Sien-Hung; Lee, Chih-Hung; Aljuffali, Ibrahim A; Kao, Hsiao-Ching; Fang, Jia-You

    2016-01-30

    The discrepancy in drug absorption between healthy and diseased skins is an issue that needs to be elucidated. The present study attempted to explore the percutaneous absorption of drugs via lesional skin by using atopic dermatitis (AD) as a model. Tape-stripping and ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization induced AD-like skin. The lesions were evaluated by physiological parameters, histology, cytokines, and differentiation proteins. The permeants of tacrolimus, 8-methoxypsoralen, methotrexate, and dextran were used to examine in vitro and in vivo cutaneous permeation. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) increased from 5.2 to 27.4 g/m(2)/h by OVA treatment. AD-like lesions were characterized by hyperplasia, skin redness, desquamation, and infiltration of inflammatory cells. Repeated OVA challenge produced a T-helper 2 (Th2) hypersensitivity accompanied by downregulation of filaggrin, involucrin, and integrin β. Tacrolimus, the most lipophilic permeant, revealed an increase of cutaneous deposition by 2.7-fold in AD-like skin compared to intact skin. The transdermal flux of methotrexate and dextran, the hydrophilic permeants, across AD-like skin increased about 18 times compared to the control skin. Surprisingly, AD-like skin showed less skin deposition of 8-methoxypsoralen than intact skin. This may be because the deficient lipids in the atopic-affected stratum corneum (SC) diminished drug partitioning into the superficial skin layer. The fluorescence and confocal microscopic images demonstrated a broad and deep passage of small-molecular and macromolecular dyes into AD-like skin. The results obtained from this report were advantageous for showing how the lesional skin influenced percutaneous absorption. PMID:26657274

  11. Optimising a model-based approach to inferring fear learning from skin conductance responses

    OpenAIRE

    Staib, M.; Castegnetti, G.; Bach, D R

    2015-01-01

    Anticipatory sympathetic arousal is often inferred from skin conductance responses (SCR) and used to quantify fear learning. We have previously provided a model-based approach for this inference, based on a quantitative Psychophysiological Model (PsPM) formulated in non-linear dynamic equations. Here we seek to optimise the inversion of this PsPM. Using two independent fear conditioning datasets, we benchmark predictive validity as the sensitivity to separate the likely presence or absence of...

  12. Modeling skin effect in large magnetized iron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental problem of the calibration of magnetic field in large iron detectors is discussed. Emphasis is laid on techniques based on ballistic measurements as the ones employed by MINOS or OPERA. In particular, we provide analytical formulas to model the behavior of the apparatus in the transient regime, keeping into account eddy current effects and the finite penetration velocity of the driving fields. These formulas ease substantially the design of the calibration apparatus. Results are compared with experimental data coming from a prototype of the OPERA spectrometer

  13. Modeling skin effect in large magnetized iron detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Incurvati, M

    2003-01-01

    The experimental problem of the calibration of magnetic field in large iron detectors is discussed. Emphasis is laid on techniques based on ballistic measurements as the ones employed by MINOS or OPERA.In particular, we provide analytical formulas to model the behavior of the apparatus in the transient regime, keeping into account eddy current effects and the finite penetration velocity of the driving fields. These formulas ease substantially the design of the calibration apparatus.Results are compared with experimental data coming from a prototype of the OPERA spectrometer.

  14. Force sensor in simulated skin and neural model mimic tactile SAI afferent spiking response to ramp and hold stimuli

    OpenAIRE

    Kim Elmer K; Wellnitz Scott A; Bourdon Sarah M; Lumpkin Ellen A; Gerling Gregory J

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The next generation of prosthetic limbs will restore sensory feedback to the nervous system by mimicking how skin mechanoreceptors, innervated by afferents, produce trains of action potentials in response to compressive stimuli. Prior work has addressed building sensors within skin substitutes for robotics, modeling skin mechanics and neural dynamics of mechanotransduction, and predicting response timing of action potentials for vibration. The effort here is unique because...

  15. Influence of the Flexible Liposomes on the Skin Deposition of a Hydrophilic Model Drug, Carboxyfluorescein: Dependency on Their Composition

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed Badran; Khaled Shalaby; Abdullah Al-Omrani

    2012-01-01

    This study focuses on the effect of different flexible liposomes containing sodium cholate, Tween 80, or cineol on skin deposition of carboxyfluorescein (CF). Size distribution, morphology, zeta potential, and stability of the prepared vesicles were evaluated. The influence of these systems on the skin deposition of CF utilizing rat skin as membrane model was investigated. Results showed that all of the investigated liposomes had almost spherical shapes with low polydispersity (PDI 

  16. Alternative Reimbursement Models: Bundled Payment and Beyond: AOA Critical Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwald, A Seth; Bassano, Amy; Wiggins, Stephen; Froimson, Mark I

    2016-06-01

    The Bundled Payments for Care Improvement (BPCI) initiative was begun in January 2013 by the U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) through its Innovation Center authority, which was created by the U.S. Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA). The BPCI program seeks to improve health-care delivery and to ultimately reduce costs by allowing providers to enter into prenegotiated payment arrangements that include financial and performance accountability for a clinical episode in which a risk-and-reward calculus must be determined. BPCI is a contemporary 3-year experiment designed to test the applicability of episode-based payment models as a viable strategy to transform the CMS payment methodology while improving health outcomes. A summary of the 4 models being evaluated in the BPCI initiative is presented in addition to the awardee types and the number of awardees in each model. Data from one of the BPCI-designated pilot sites demonstrate that strategies do exist for successful implementation of an alternative payment model by keeping patients first while simultaneously improving coordination, alignment of care, and quality and reducing cost. Providers will need to embrace change and their areas of opportunity to gain a competitive advantage. Health-care providers, including orthopaedic surgeons, health-care professionals at post-acute care institutions, and product suppliers, all have a role in determining the strategies for success. Open dialogue between CMS and awardees should be encouraged to arrive at a solution that provides opportunity for gainsharing, as this program continues to gain traction and to evolve. PMID:27252442

  17. Alternative face models for 3D face registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salah, Albert Ali; Alyüz, Neşe; Akarun, Lale

    2007-01-01

    3D has become an important modality for face biometrics. The accuracy of a 3D face recognition system depends on a correct registration that aligns the facial surfaces and makes a comparison possible. The best results obtained so far use a one-to-all registration approach, which means each new facial surface is registered to all faces in the gallery, at a great computational cost. We explore the approach of registering the new facial surface to an average face model (AFM), which automatically establishes correspondence to the pre-registered gallery faces. Going one step further, we propose that using a couple of well-selected AFMs can trade-off computation time with accuracy. Drawing on cognitive justifications, we propose to employ category-specific alternative average face models for registration, which is shown to increase the accuracy of the subsequent recognition. We inspect thin-plate spline (TPS) and iterative closest point (ICP) based registration schemes under realistic assumptions on manual or automatic landmark detection prior to registration. We evaluate several approaches for the coarse initialization of ICP. We propose a new algorithm for constructing an AFM, and show that it works better than a recent approach. Finally, we perform simulations with multiple AFMs that correspond to different clusters in the face shape space and compare these with gender and morphology based groupings. We report our results on the FRGC 3D face database.

  18. A catch-up validation study of an in vitro skin irritation test method using reconstructed human epidermis LabCyte EPI-MODEL24.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Hajime; Katoh, Masakazu; Shinoda, Shinsuke; Hagiwara, Saori; Suzuki, Tamie; Izumi, Runa; Yamaguchi, Yoshihiro; Nakamura, Maki; Kasahawa, Toshihiko; Shibai, Aya

    2014-07-01

    Three validation studies were conducted by the Japanese Society for Alternatives to Animal Experiments in order to assess the performance of a skin irritation assay using reconstructed human epidermis (RhE) LabCyte EPI-MODEL24 (LabCyte EPI-MODEL24 SIT) developed by the Japan Tissue Engineering Co., Ltd. (J-TEC), and the results of these studies were submitted to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) for the creation of a Test Guideline (TG). In the summary review report from the OECD, the peer review panel indicated the need to resolve an issue regarding the misclassification of 1-bromohexane. To this end, a rinsing operation intended to remove exposed chemicals was reviewed and the standard operating procedure (SOP) revised by J-TEC. Thereafter, in order to confirm general versatility of the revised SOP, a new validation management team was organized by the Japanese Center for the Validation of Alternative Methods (JaCVAM) to undertake a catch-up validation study that would compare the revised assay with similar in vitro skin irritation assays, per OECD TG No. 439 (2010). The catch-up validation and supplementary studies for LabCyte EPI-MODEL24 SIT using the revised SOPs were conducted at three laboratories. These results showed that the revised SOP of LabCyte EPI-MODEL24 SIT conformed more accurately to the classifications for skin irritation under the United Nations Globally Harmonised System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (UN GHS), thereby highlighting the importance of an optimized rinsing operation for the removal of exposed chemicals in obtaining consistent results from in vitro skin irritation assays.

  19. 3D bioprinting of skin: a state-of-the-art review on modelling, materials, and processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayavenkataraman, S; Lu, W F; Fuh, J Y H

    2016-01-01

    The skin is the largest organ of the body, having a complex multi-layered structure and guards the underlying muscles, bones, ligaments, and internal organs. It serves as the first line of defence to any external stimuli, hence it is the most vulnerable to injury and warrants the need for rapid and reliable regeneration methods. Tissue engineered skin substitutes help overcome the limitations of traditional skin treatment methods, in terms of technology, time, and cost. While there is commendable progress in the treating of superficial wounds and injuries with skin substitutes, treatment of full-thickness injuries, especially with third or fourth degree burns, still looks murkier. Engineering multi-layer skin architecture, conforming to the native skin structure is a tougher goal to achieve with the current tissue engineering methods, if not impossible, restoring all the functions of the native skin. The testing of drugs and cosmetics is another area, where engineered skins are very much needed, with bans being imposed on product testing on animals. Given this greater need, 3D bioprinting is a promising technology that can achieve rapid and reliable production of biomimetic cellular skin substitutes, satisfying both clinical and industrial needs. This paper reviews all aspects related to the 3D bioprinting of skin, right from imaging the injury site, 3D model creation, biomaterials that are used and their suitability, types of cells and their functions, actual bioprinting technologies, along with the challenges and future prospects. PMID:27606434

  20. Model dependence of the neutron-skin thickness on the symmetry energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, C.; Agrawal, B. K.; Centelles, M.; Colò, G.; Roca-Maza, X.; Paar, N.; Viñas, X.; Singh, S. K.; Patra, S. K.

    2016-06-01

    The model dependence in the correlations of the neutron-skin thickness in heavy nuclei with various symmetry-energy parameters is analyzed by using several families of systematically varied microscopic mean-field models. Such correlations show a varying degree of model dependence once the results for all the different families are combined. Some mean-field models associated with similar values of the symmetry-energy slope parameter at saturation density L , and pertaining to different families, yield a greater-than-expected spread in the neutron-skin thickness of the 208Pb nucleus. The effective value of the symmetry-energy slope parameter Leff, determined by using the nucleon density profiles of the finite nucleus and the density derivative S'(ρ ) of the symmetry energy starting from about saturation density up to low densities typical of the surface of nuclei, seems to account for the spread in the neutron-skin thickness for the models with similar L . The differences in the values of Leff are mainly due to the small differences in the nucleon density distributions of heavy nuclei in the surface region and the behavior of the symmetry energy at subsaturation densities.

  1. Dynamic impedance model of the skin-electrode interface for transcutaneous electrical stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Vargas Luna

    Full Text Available Transcutaneous electrical stimulation can depolarize nerve or muscle cells applying impulses through electrodes attached on the skin. For these applications, the electrode-skin impedance is an important factor which influences effectiveness. Various models describe the interface using constant or current-depending resistive-capacitive equivalent circuit. Here, we develop a dynamic impedance model valid for a wide range stimulation intensities. The model considers electroporation and charge-dependent effects to describe the impedance variation, which allows to describe high-charge pulses. The parameters were adjusted based on rectangular, biphasic stimulation pulses generated by a stimulator, providing optionally current or voltage-controlled impulses, and applied through electrodes of different sizes. Both control methods deliver a different electrical field to the tissue, which is constant throughout the impulse duration for current-controlled mode or have a very current peak for voltage-controlled. The results show a predominant dependence in the current intensity in the case of both stimulation techniques that allows to keep a simple model. A verification simulation using the proposed dynamic model shows coefficient of determination of around 0.99 in both stimulation types. The presented method for fitting electrode-skin impedance can be simple extended to other stimulation waveforms and electrode configuration. Therefore, it can be embedded in optimization algorithms for designing electrical stimulation applications even for pulses with high charges and high current spikes.

  2. Model dependence of the neutron-skin thickness on the symmetry energy

    CERN Document Server

    Mondal, C; Centelles, M; Colò, G; Roca-Maza, X; Paar, N; Viñas, X; Singh, S K; Patra, S K

    2016-01-01

    The model dependence in the correlations of the neutron-skin thickness in heavy nuclei with various symmetry energy parameters is analyzed by using several families of systematically varied microscopic mean field models. Such correlations show a varying degree of model dependence once the results for all the different families are combined. Some mean field models associated with similar values of the symmetry energy slope parameter at saturation density $L$, and pertaining to different families, yield a greater-than-expected spread in the neutron-skin thickness of the $^{208}$Pb nucleus. The effective value of the symmetry energy slope parameter $L_{\\rm eff}$, determined by using the nucleon density profiles of the finite nucleus and the density derivative $S^\\prime(\\rho)$ of the symmetry energy starting from about saturation density up to low densities typical of the surface of nuclei, seems to account for the spread in the neutron-skin thickness for the models with similar $L$. The differences in the values...

  3. Scabies mites alter the skin microbiome and promote growth of opportunistic pathogens in a porcine model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pearl M Swe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The resident skin microbiota plays an important role in restricting pathogenic bacteria, thereby protecting the host. Scabies mites (Sarcoptes scabiei are thought to promote bacterial infections by breaching the skin barrier and excreting molecules that inhibit host innate immune responses. Epidemiological studies in humans confirm increased incidence of impetigo, generally caused by Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes, secondary to the epidermal infestation with the parasitic mite. It is therefore possible that mite infestation could alter the healthy skin microbiota making way for the opportunistic pathogens. A longitudinal study to test this hypothesis in humans is near impossible due to ethical reasons. In a porcine model we generated scabies infestations closely resembling the disease manifestation in humans and investigated the scabies associated changes in the skin microbiota over the course of a mite infestation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a 21 week trial, skin scrapings were collected from pigs infected with S. scabies var. suis and scabies-free control animals. A total of 96 skin scrapings were collected before, during infection and after acaricide treatment, and analyzed by bacterial 16S rDNA tag-encoded FLX-titanium amplicon pyrosequencing. We found significant changes in the epidermal microbiota, in particular a dramatic increase in Staphylococcus correlating with the onset of mite infestation in animals challenged with scabies mites. This increase persisted beyond treatment from mite infection and healing of skin. Furthermore, the staphylococci population shifted from the commensal S. hominis on the healthy skin prior to scabies mite challenge to S. chromogenes, which is increasingly recognized as being pathogenic, coinciding with scabies infection in pigs. In contrast, all animals in the scabies-free cohort remained relatively free of Staphylococcus throughout the trial. CONCLUSIONS

  4. Freshwater Planarians as an Alternative Animal Model for Neurotoxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagstrom, Danielle; Cochet-Escartin, Olivier; Zhang, Siqi; Khuu, Cindy; Collins, Eva-Maria S

    2015-09-01

    Traditional toxicology testing has relied on low-throughput, expensive mammalian studies; however, timely testing of the large number of environmental toxicants requires new in vitro and in vivo platforms for inexpensive medium- to high-throughput screening. Herein, we describe the suitability of the asexual freshwater planarian Dugesia japonica as a new animal model for the study of developmental neurotoxicology. As these asexual animals reproduce by binary fission, followed by regeneration of missing body structures within approximately 1 week, development and regeneration occur through similar processes allowing us to induce neurodevelopment "at will" through amputation. This short time scale and the comparable sizes of full and regenerating animals enable parallel experiments in adults and developing worms to determine development-specific aspects of toxicity. Because the planarian brain, despite its simplicity, is structurally and molecularly similar to the mammalian brain, we are able to ascertain neurodevelopmental toxicity that is relevant to humans. As a proof of concept, we developed a 5-step semiautomatic screening platform to characterize the toxicity of 9 known neurotoxicants (consisting of common solvents, pesticides, and detergents) and a neutral agent, glucose, and quantified effects on viability, stimulated and unstimulated behavior, regeneration, and brain structure. Comparisons of our findings with other alternative toxicology animal models, such as zebrafish larvae and nematodes, demonstrated that planarians are comparably sensitive to the tested chemicals. In addition, we found that certain compounds induced adverse effects specifically in developing animals. We thus conclude that planarians offer new complementary opportunities for developmental neurotoxicology animal models. PMID:26116028

  5. Cloud-based Monte Carlo modelling of BSSRDF for the rendering of human skin appearance (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doronin, Alexander; Rushmeier, Holly E.; Meglinski, Igor; Bykov, Alexander V.

    2016-03-01

    We present a new Monte Carlo based approach for the modelling of Bidirectional Scattering-Surface Reflectance Distribution Function (BSSRDF) for accurate rendering of human skin appearance. The variations of both skin tissues structure and the major chromophores are taken into account correspondingly to the different ethnic and age groups. The computational solution utilizes HTML5, accelerated by the graphics processing units (GPUs), and therefore is convenient for the practical use at the most of modern computer-based devices and operating systems. The results of imitation of human skin reflectance spectra, corresponding skin colours and examples of 3D faces rendering are presented and compared with the results of phantom studies.

  6. Cutaneous Surgical Denervation: A Method for Testing the Requirement for Nerves in Mouse Models of Skin Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Shelby C; Brownell, Isaac; Wong, Sunny Y

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous somatosensory nerves function to detect diverse stimuli that act upon the skin. In addition to their established sensory roles, recent studies have suggested that nerves may also modulate skin disorders including atopic dermatitis, psoriasis and cancer. Here, we describe protocols for testing the requirement for nerves in maintaining a cutaneous mechanosensory organ, the touch dome (TD). Specifically, we discuss methods for genetically labeling, harvesting and visualizing TDs by whole-mount staining, and for performing unilateral surgical denervation on mouse dorsal back skin. Together, these approaches can be used to directly compare TD morphology and gene expression in denervated as well as sham-operated skin from the same animal. These methods can also be readily adapted to examine the requirement for nerves in mouse models of skin pathology. Finally, the ability to repeatedly sample the skin provides an opportunity to monitor disease progression at different stages and times after initiation. PMID:27404892

  7. Modelling millimetre wave propagation and absorption in a high resolution skin model: the effect of sweat glands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafirstein, Gal; Moros, Eduardo G.

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the potential effect of sweat gland ducts (SGD) on specific absorption rate (SAR) and temperature distributions during mm-wave irradiation. High resolution electromagnetic and bio-heat transfer models of human skin with SGD were developed using a commercially available simulation software package (SEMCAD X™). The skin model consisted of a 30 µm stratum corneum, 350 µm epidermis and papillary dermis (EPD) and 1000 µm dermis. Five SGD of 60 µm radius and 300 µm height were embedded linearly with 370 µm separation. A WR-10 waveguide positioned 20 µm from the skin surface and delivering 94 GHz electromagnetic radiation was included in the model. Saline conductivity was assigned inside SGD. SAR and temperatures were computed with and without SGD. Despite their small scale, SAR was significantly higher within SGD than in the EPD without SGD. Without SGD, SAR and temperature maxima were in the dermis near EPD. With SGD, SAR maximum was inside SGD while temperature maximum moved to the EPD/stratum-corneum junction. Since the EPD participates actively in perception, the effect of SGD should be taken into account in nociceptive studies involving mm-waves. This research represents a significant step towards higher spatial resolution numerical modelling of the skin and shows that microstructures can play a significant role in mm-wave absorption and induced temperature distributions.

  8. Modelling millimetre wave propagation and absorption in a high resolution skin model: the effect of sweat glands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shafirstein, Gal [Department of Otolaryngology, College of Medicine, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 W. Markham, 543, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States); Moros, Eduardo G, E-mail: shafirsteingal@uams.edu [Division of Radiation Physics and Informatics, Department of Radiation Oncology, College of Medicine, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 W. Markham, 771, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States)

    2011-03-07

    The aim of this work was to investigate the potential effect of sweat gland ducts (SGD) on specific absorption rate (SAR) and temperature distributions during mm-wave irradiation. High resolution electromagnetic and bio-heat transfer models of human skin with SGD were developed using a commercially available simulation software package (SEMCAD X(TM)). The skin model consisted of a 30 {mu}m stratum corneum, 350 {mu}m epidermis and papillary dermis (EPD) and 1000 {mu}m dermis. Five SGD of 60 {mu}m radius and 300 {mu}m height were embedded linearly with 370 {mu}m separation. A WR-10 waveguide positioned 20 {mu}m from the skin surface and delivering 94 GHz electromagnetic radiation was included in the model. Saline conductivity was assigned inside SGD. SAR and temperatures were computed with and without SGD. Despite their small scale, SAR was significantly higher within SGD than in the EPD without SGD. Without SGD, SAR and temperature maxima were in the dermis near EPD. With SGD, SAR maximum was inside SGD while temperature maximum moved to the EPD/stratum-corneum junction. Since the EPD participates actively in perception, the effect of SGD should be taken into account in nociceptive studies involving mm-waves. This research represents a significant step towards higher spatial resolution numerical modelling of the skin and shows that microstructures can play a significant role in mm-wave absorption and induced temperature distributions.

  9. Skin Detection Based on Color Model and Low Level Features Combined with Explicit Region and Parametric Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HARPREET KAUR SAINI

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Skin detection is active research area in the field of computer vision which can be applied in the application of face detection, eye detection, etc. These detection helps in various applications such as driver fatigue monitoring system, surveillance system etc. In Computer vision applications, the color model and representations of the human image in color model is one of major module to detect the skin pixels. The mainstream technology is based on the individual pixels and selection of the pixels to detect the skin part in the whole image. In this thesis implementation, we presents a novel technique for skin color detection incorporating with explicit region based and parametric based approach which gives the better efficiency and performances in terms of skin detection in human images. Color models and image quantization technique is used to extract the regions of the images and to represent the image in a particular color model such as RGB and HSV, and then the parametric based approach is applied by selecting the low level skin features are applied to extract the skin and non-skin pixels of the images. In the first step, our technique uses the state-of-the-art non-parametric approach which we call the template based technique or explicitly defined skin regions technique. Then the low level features of the human skin are being extracted such as edge, corner detection which is also known as parametric method. The experimental results depict the improvement in detection rate of the skin pixels by this novel approach. And in the end we discuss the experimental results to prove the algorithmic improvements.

  10. Scavenging properties of metronidazole on free oxygen radicals in a skin lipid model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Sabrina; Hünerbein, Andreas; Getie, Melkamu; Jäckel, Andreas; Neubert, Reinhard H H

    2007-08-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a vital role in the pathophysiology of the skin disease rosacea, a chronic, genetically-determined and UV-triggered disease, leading to facial redness and blemishes and exhibiting a deep impact on a patient's self-esteem and quality of life. ROS can cause oxidative damage to nucleic acids, sugars, proteins and lipids, thereby contributing to adverse effects on the skin. Metronidazole has been the first-line topical agent therapy for many years; nevertheless the mechanism of action is still not well understood. The therapeutic efficacy of metronidazole has been attributed to its antioxidant effects, which can involve two pathways: decreased generation of ROS within tissues or scavenging and inactivation of existing ROS. Previous investigations have shown that metronidazole reduces ROS by decreasing ROS production in cellular in-vitro systems. The aim of the following study was to demonstrate that metronidazole additionally exhibits antioxidative properties in a cell-free system, by acting as an antioxidant scavenger. A simple skin lipid model (oxidative) system and a complex skin adapted lipid system in conjunction with thiobarbituric acid (TBA) test, a quantitative assay for the detection of malondialdehyde (MDA) and therefore lipid peroxidation, were used to determine the antioxidative properties of metronidazole after UV irradiation. Results clearly show that metronidazole has antioxidative properties in a cell-free environment, acting as a free radical scavenger. Simple skin lipid model: in the presence of 10, 100 and 500 microg mL(-1)metronidazole the MDA concentration was reduced by 25, 36 and 49%, respectively. Complex skin lipid system: in the presence of 100 and 500 microg mL(-1)metronidazole the MDA concentration was reduced by 19 and 34%, respectively. The results obtained in this study and from previous publications strongly suggest that metronidazole exhibits antioxidative effects via two mechanisms: decrease in ROS

  11. Thermal time constant: optimising the skin temperature predictive modelling in lower limb prostheses using Gaussian processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buis, Arjan

    2016-01-01

    Elevated skin temperature at the body/device interface of lower-limb prostheses is one of the major factors that affect tissue health. The heat dissipation in prosthetic sockets is greatly influenced by the thermal conductive properties of the hard socket and liner material employed. However, monitoring of the interface temperature at skin level in lower-limb prosthesis is notoriously complicated. This is due to the flexible nature of the interface liners used which requires consistent positioning of sensors during donning and doffing. Predicting the residual limb temperature by monitoring the temperature between socket and liner rather than skin and liner could be an important step in alleviating complaints on increased temperature and perspiration in prosthetic sockets. To predict the residual limb temperature, a machine learning algorithm – Gaussian processes is employed, which utilizes the thermal time constant values of commonly used socket and liner materials. This Letter highlights the relevance of thermal time constant of prosthetic materials in Gaussian processes technique which would be useful in addressing the challenge of non-invasively monitoring the residual limb skin temperature. With the introduction of thermal time constant, the model can be optimised and generalised for a given prosthetic setup, thereby making the predictions more reliable. PMID:27695626

  12. A Probiotic Preparation Alleviates Atopic Dermatitis-Like Skin Lesions in Murine Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Soo; Kim, Jin-Eung; Yoon, Yeo-Sang; Seo, Jae-Gu; Chung, Myung-Jun; Yum, Do-Young

    2016-04-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease with a complex etiology that encompasses immunologic responses. AD is frequently associated with elevated immunoglobulin (Ig) E levels, and common environmental factors contribute to its pathogenesis. Several recent studies have documented the role of specific lactic acid bacteria in the treatment and prevention of AD in humans and mice. In this study, the efficacy of Duolac ATP, a probiotic preparation, was determined in a mouse model with AD-like skin lesions. Alterations in the cytokine levels and histological staining suggested the alleviation of AD. The in vivo test showed that T helper (Th)2 cytokines, IgE, interleukin (IL)-4, and IL-5, were significantly downregulated, whereas Th1 cytokines, IL-12p40 and interferon (IFN)-γ, were upregulated in all groups of mice treated with Duolac ATP compared to that observed in the group of mice treated with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (DNCB) alone. Moreover, the scratch score decreased in all mice treated with Duolac ATP. Staining of the dorsal area of the mice in each group with hematoxylin and eosin and toluidine blue further confirmed the alleviation of AD in mice orally treated with Duolac ATP. These results suggest that Duolac ATP inhibits the development of AD-like skin lesions in NC/Nga mice by suppressing the Th2 cell response and increasing the Th1 cell response. Thus, Duolac ATP is beneficial and effective for the treatment of AD-like skin lesions. PMID:27123166

  13. Modeling Skin-Layer Salinity: Focus on Seasonal Variability and Global Means

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Y. T.; Lee, T.; Moon, J. H.; Qu, T.; Yueh, S. H.

    2014-12-01

    Due to near-surface salinity stratification, it is problematic to compare satellite-measured surface salinity within the first few centimeters (skin-layer) of the ocean with Argo-measured top-level salinity at 5 m, or with ocean models that do not resolve the skin layer. Although an instrument can be designed to measure the surface salinity, a global scale measurement is currently not available. A regional model can be configured to have a vertical grid in centimeters, but it would be computationally prohibited on a global scale due to time step constraints. Here, we propose an extended surface salinity layer (ESSL) within a global ocean circulation model to diagnose skin SSS without increasing the computational cost, while allowing comparable solutions with both satellite and Argo salinity at the respective depths within the corresponding uncertainty limits. Cross-comparisons with Aquarius and Argo data show that the gridded Aquarius surface salinity has a much stronger seasonal variability than the gridded Argo top-level salinity at 5 m or 10 m, particularly in regions of high precipitation variability, suggesting strong near-surface vertical salinity stratification. The near-surface stratification is well reproduced by the proposed ESSL model. In comparisons with data-assimilated HYCOM results, the ESSL provides much stronger seasonal variability of SSS, similar to the Aquarius observations. The ESS also provides a useful reference for the global mean SSS to constrain the global calibration constants in Aquarius SSS retrieval.

  14. Evaluation of three inverse problem models to quantify skin microcirculation using diffusion-weighted MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordier, G [Ecole Catholique d' Arts et Metiers, Lyon (France); Choi, J; Raguin, L G [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1226 (United States)], E-mail: guy.raguin@mines-nancy.org

    2008-11-01

    Skin microcirculation plays an important role in diseases such as chronic venous insufficiency and diabetes. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide quantitative information with a better penetration depth than other noninvasive methods, such as laser Doppler flowmetry or optical coherence tomography. Moreover, successful MRI skin studies have recently been reported. In this article, we investigate three potential inverse models to quantify skin microcirculation using diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI), also known as q-space MRI. The model parameters are estimated based on nonlinear least-squares (NLS). For each of the three models, an optimal DWI sampling scheme is proposed based on D-optimality in order to minimize the size of the confidence region of the NLS estimates and thus the effect of the experimental noise inherent to DWI. The resulting covariance matrices of the NLS estimates are predicted by asymptotic normality and compared to the ones computed by Monte-Carlo simulations. Our numerical results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed models and corresponding DWI sampling schemes as compared to conventional approaches.

  15. Evaluation of three inverse problem models to quantify skin microcirculation using diffusion-weighted MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skin microcirculation plays an important role in diseases such as chronic venous insufficiency and diabetes. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide quantitative information with a better penetration depth than other noninvasive methods, such as laser Doppler flowmetry or optical coherence tomography. Moreover, successful MRI skin studies have recently been reported. In this article, we investigate three potential inverse models to quantify skin microcirculation using diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI), also known as q-space MRI. The model parameters are estimated based on nonlinear least-squares (NLS). For each of the three models, an optimal DWI sampling scheme is proposed based on D-optimality in order to minimize the size of the confidence region of the NLS estimates and thus the effect of the experimental noise inherent to DWI. The resulting covariance matrices of the NLS estimates are predicted by asymptotic normality and compared to the ones computed by Monte-Carlo simulations. Our numerical results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed models and corresponding DWI sampling schemes as compared to conventional approaches.

  16. Alternative Liquid Fuels Simulation Model (AltSim).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Ryan; Baker, Arnold Barry; Drennen, Thomas E.

    2009-12-01

    The Alternative Liquid Fuels Simulation Model (AltSim) is a high-level dynamic simulation model which calculates and compares the production and end use costs, greenhouse gas emissions, and energy balances of several alternative liquid transportation fuels. These fuels include: corn ethanol, cellulosic ethanol from various feedstocks (switchgrass, corn stover, forest residue, and farmed trees), biodiesel, and diesels derived from natural gas (gas to liquid, or GTL), coal (coal to liquid, or CTL), and coal with biomass (CBTL). AltSim allows for comprehensive sensitivity analyses on capital costs, operation and maintenance costs, renewable and fossil fuel feedstock costs, feedstock conversion ratio, financial assumptions, tax credits, CO{sub 2} taxes, and plant capacity factor. This paper summarizes the structure and methodology of AltSim, presents results, and provides a detailed sensitivity analysis. The Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 sets a goal for the increased use of biofuels in the U.S., ultimately reaching 36 billion gallons by 2022. AltSim's base case assumes EPA projected feedstock costs in 2022 (EPA, 2009). For the base case assumptions, AltSim estimates per gallon production costs for the five ethanol feedstocks (corn, switchgrass, corn stover, forest residue, and farmed trees) of $1.86, $2.32, $2.45, $1.52, and $1.91, respectively. The projected production cost of biodiesel is $1.81/gallon. The estimates for CTL without biomass range from $1.36 to $2.22. With biomass, the estimated costs increase, ranging from $2.19 per gallon for the CTL option with 8% biomass to $2.79 per gallon for the CTL option with 30% biomass and carbon capture and sequestration. AltSim compares the greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) associated with both the production and consumption of the various fuels. EISA allows fuels emitting 20% less greenhouse gases (GHG) than conventional gasoline and diesels to qualify as renewable fuels. This allows several of the

  17. Alternative Liquid Fuels Simulation Model (AltSim).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Ryan; Baker, Arnold Barry; Drennen, Thomas E.

    2009-12-01

    The Alternative Liquid Fuels Simulation Model (AltSim) is a high-level dynamic simulation model which calculates and compares the production and end use costs, greenhouse gas emissions, and energy balances of several alternative liquid transportation fuels. These fuels include: corn ethanol, cellulosic ethanol from various feedstocks (switchgrass, corn stover, forest residue, and farmed trees), biodiesel, and diesels derived from natural gas (gas to liquid, or GTL), coal (coal to liquid, or CTL), and coal with biomass (CBTL). AltSim allows for comprehensive sensitivity analyses on capital costs, operation and maintenance costs, renewable and fossil fuel feedstock costs, feedstock conversion ratio, financial assumptions, tax credits, CO{sub 2} taxes, and plant capacity factor. This paper summarizes the structure and methodology of AltSim, presents results, and provides a detailed sensitivity analysis. The Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 sets a goal for the increased use of biofuels in the U.S., ultimately reaching 36 billion gallons by 2022. AltSim's base case assumes EPA projected feedstock costs in 2022 (EPA, 2009). For the base case assumptions, AltSim estimates per gallon production costs for the five ethanol feedstocks (corn, switchgrass, corn stover, forest residue, and farmed trees) of $1.86, $2.32, $2.45, $1.52, and $1.91, respectively. The projected production cost of biodiesel is $1.81/gallon. The estimates for CTL without biomass range from $1.36 to $2.22. With biomass, the estimated costs increase, ranging from $2.19 per gallon for the CTL option with 8% biomass to $2.79 per gallon for the CTL option with 30% biomass and carbon capture and sequestration. AltSim compares the greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) associated with both the production and consumption of the various fuels. EISA allows fuels emitting 20% less greenhouse gases (GHG) than conventional gasoline and diesels to qualify as renewable fuels. This allows several of the

  18. Big bang nucleosynthesis: The standard model and alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, David N.

    1991-01-01

    Big bang nucleosynthesis provides (with the microwave background radiation) one of the two quantitative experimental tests of the big bang cosmological model. This paper reviews the standard homogeneous-isotropic calculation and shows how it fits the light element abundances ranging from He-4 at 24% by mass through H-2 and He-3 at parts in 10(exp 5) down to Li-7 at parts in 10(exp 10). Furthermore, the recent large electron positron (LEP) (and the stanford linear collider (SLC)) results on the number of neutrinos are discussed as a positive laboratory test of the standard scenario. Discussion is presented on the improved observational data as well as the improved neutron lifetime data. Alternate scenarios of decaying matter or of quark-hadron induced inhomogeneities are discussed. It is shown that when these scenarios are made to fit the observed abundances accurately, the resulting conlusions on the baryonic density relative to the critical density, omega(sub b) remain approximately the same as in the standard homogeneous case, thus, adding to the robustness of the conclusion that omega(sub b) approximately equals 0.06. This latter point is the driving force behind the need for non-baryonic dark matter (assuming omega(sub total) = 1) and the need for dark baryonic matter, since omega(sub visible) is less than omega(sub b).

  19. Mathematical model of alternative mechanism of telomere length maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollár, Richard; Bod'ová, Katarína; Nosek, Jozef; Tomáška, L'ubomír

    2014-03-01

    Biopolymer length regulation is a complex process that involves a large number of biological, chemical, and physical subprocesses acting simultaneously across multiple spatial and temporal scales. An illustrative example important for genomic stability is the length regulation of telomeres—nucleoprotein structures at the ends of linear chromosomes consisting of tandemly repeated DNA sequences and a specialized set of proteins. Maintenance of telomeres is often facilitated by the enzyme telomerase but, particularly in telomerase-free systems, the maintenance of chromosomal termini depends on alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) mechanisms mediated by recombination. Various linear and circular DNA structures were identified to participate in ALT, however, dynamics of the whole process is still poorly understood. We propose a chemical kinetics model of ALT with kinetic rates systematically derived from the biophysics of DNA diffusion and looping. The reaction system is reduced to a coagulation-fragmentation system by quasi-steady-state approximation. The detailed treatment of kinetic rates yields explicit formulas for expected size distributions of telomeres that demonstrate the key role played by the J factor, a quantitative measure of bending of polymers. The results are in agreement with experimental data and point out interesting phenomena: an appearance of very long telomeric circles if the total telomere density exceeds a critical value (excess mass) and a nonlinear response of the telomere size distributions to the amount of telomeric DNA in the system. The results can be of general importance for understanding dynamics of telomeres in telomerase-independent systems as this mode of telomere maintenance is similar to the situation in tumor cells lacking telomerase activity. Furthermore, due to its universality, the model may also serve as a prototype of an interaction between linear and circular DNA structures in various settings.

  20. Studying mast cells in peripheral tolerance by using a skin transplantation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Victor C; Le Mercier, Isabelle; Nowak, Elizabeth C; Noelle, Randolph J

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) play an important role in both inflammatory and immunosuppressive responses [1]. The importance of MCs in maintaining peripheral tolerance was discovered in a FoxP3(+) regulatory T-cell (Treg)-mediated skin transplant model [2]. MCs can directly mediate tolerance by releasing anti-inflammatory mediators (reviewed in ref. 3) or by interacting with other immune cells in the graft. Here we will present protocols used to study the role of MCs in peripheral tolerance with the emphasis on how MCs can regulate T-cell functionality. First we will introduce the skin transplant model followed by reconstitution of mast cell-deficient mice (B6.Cg-Kit (W-sh) ). This includes the preparation of MCs from the bone marrow. Finally the methods used to study the influence of MCs on T-cell responses and Treg functionality will be presented by modulating the balance between tolerance and inflammation. PMID:25388268

  1. Evaluation of cationic polyamidoamine dendrimers’ dermal toxicity in the rat skin model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winnicka K

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Katarzyna Winnicka,1 Magdalena Wroblewska,1 Katarzyna Sosnowska,1 Halina Car,2 Irena Kasacka3 1Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Medical University of Bialystok, Bialystok, Poland; 2Department of Experimental Pharmacology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Medical University of Bialystok, Bialystok, Poland; 3Department of Histology and Cytophysiology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Medical University of Bialystok, Bialystok, Poland Abstract: Polyamidoamine (PAMAM dendrimers are multi-branched, three-dimensional polymers with unique architecture, which makes these molecules attractive for medical and pharmaceutical applications. Using PAMAM as drug carriers for topical delivery might be beneficial as they only produce a transient effect without skin irritation. To evaluate the dermal toxicity of cationic PAMAM dendrimers generation 2 and generation 3, skin irritation studies were performed in vivo in the rat skin model. After 10 days topical application of various concentrations of PAMAM-NH2 (0.3 mg/mL, 3 mg/mL, 6 mg/mL, 30 mg/mL, 300 mg/mL, skin irritation was evaluated by visual, histopathological, and immunohistochemical examination. Microscopic assessment after hematoxylin-eosin staining revealed significant morphological changes of epidermal cells after application of PAMAM-NH2 at a concentration of ≥6 mg/mL. Morphological alterations of epidermal cells included cytoplasmic vacuolization of keratinocytes in the basal and spinous layers. Cytomorphological changes in keratinocytes, overall picture of the epidermis, and histopathological changes in the dermis were dose dependent. Detected alterations concerned hyperplasia of connective tissue fibers and leukocyte infiltration. Visible granulocyte infiltration in the upper dermis and sockets formed by necrotic, cornified cells in the hyperplastic foci of epithelium were also noted. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that increased nuclear immunoreactivity to PCNA correlated with

  2. Setup for investigating gold nanoparticle penetration through reconstructed skin and comparison to published human skin data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labouta, Hagar I.; Thude, Sibylle; Schneider, Marc

    2013-06-01

    Owing to the limited source of human skin (HS) and the ethical restrictions of using animals in experiments, in vitro skin equivalents are a possible alternative for conducting particle penetration experiments. The conditions for conducting penetration experiments with model particles, 15-nm gold nanoparticles (AuNP), through nonsealed skin equivalents are described for the first time. These conditions include experimental setup, sterility conditions, effective applied dose determination, skin sectioning, and skin integrity check. Penetration at different exposure times (two and 24 h) and after tissue fixation (fixed versus unfixed skin) are examined to establish a benchmark in comparison to HS in an attempt to get similar results to HS experiments presented earlier. Multiphoton microscopy is used to detect gold luminescence in skin sections. λex=800 nm is used for excitation of AuNP and skin samples, allowing us to determine a relative index for particle penetration. Despite the observed overpredictability of penetration into skin equivalents, they could serve as a first fast screen for testing the behavior of nanoparticles and extrapolate their penetration behavior into HS. Further investigations are required to test a wide range of particles of different physicochemical properties to validate the skin equivalent-human skin particle penetration relationship.

  3. An alternative tectonic model for the Yarlung Zangbo suture zone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The new field investigations along the Yarlung Zangbo ophiolites zone show that these series underwent low green-schist metamorphism and were then fractured and occurred as slabs in tectonic melanges,without regional tectonic polarity.No large shear zone in north-south direction has been identified between ophiolite bodies and flysch layers on both side and a conformable contact relationship can be observed locally between them.A great mass of tectonic mélange has been substantiated as submarine olistolith bodies.The Mesozoic sedimentary facies and its evolution in both north and south of the ophiolite zone are corresponding in time.The ophiolite zone has often been divided into parallel branches,separated by narrow flysch slats.There is also a similarity of the Paleozoic and the basement of the High Himalaya,Lhasa and Qiangtang Terranes,and they are distinctly different from those of the Indian continent.The geologic information does not warrant a postulate that the Himalaya and Tibet were once separated by a great ocean;it is therefore consistent with an alternative tectonic model by back-arc basin collapse with its juvenile narrow oceanic crust.The real plate tectonic suture,the Neotethys might be covered under the Miocene Siwalik molasse in the southern slope of the High Himalaya range.Based on the new model,the Neotethyan ocean floor was subducted beneath the Asia since the Late Triassic.The outer continental margin of Eurasia was split from the Lhasa Terrane so that a back-arc basin came into existence.Hemi-pelagic and deep sea sediments were deposited before the Late Cretaceous flysch sedimentation,with the linear juvenile oceanic crust when back-arc volcanism occurred in the Gandese region.The Yarlung Zangbo back-arc basin was eventually eliminated when the High Himalayas were sutured onto Eurasia.The ocean floor lightly underthrusted to north and south sides,sediments of the basin were deformed as fold-thrusting.The Neotethys was eliminated during the

  4. Prophylaxis of Diallyl Disulfide on Skin Carcinogenic Model via p21-dependent Nrf2 stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Yunlong; Wei, Zhonghong; Tao, Li; Wang, Siliang; Zhang, Feng; Shen, Cunsi; Wu, Hongyan; Liu, Zhaoguo; Zhu, Pingting; Wang, Aiyun; Chen, Wenxing; Lu, Yin

    2016-01-01

    Cancer prevention through intake of biologically active natural products appears to be an accessible way to reduce the risk of cancer. Diallyl disulfide (DADS), a major garlic derivative, has exhibited potential role in cancer therapy. The study is aimed to evaluate the prophylactic effect of DADS in chemically induced mouse skin carcinogenesis and investigate the molecular targets mediated by DADS. Two-stage chemically induced carcinogenesis model by cutaneous application of DMBA and subsequent TPA was established to study the prophylactic effect of DADS. As a result, we observed that DADS dose-dependently attenuated skin tumor incidence and multiplicity in the model mice, which was related to the up-regulation of a bunch of antioxidant enzymes activities and the nuclear accumulation of Nrf2. Furthermore, we developed skin carcinogenesis in Nrf2 knockout mice which could reverse the activity of DADS. Finally, we uncovered the underlying mechanism that DADS promoted the endogenous interaction between p21 and Nrf2, which was critical for impairing the Keap1-mediated degradation of Nrf2. Based on the results, we concluded that DADS was a promising cancer chemoprevention agent and suggested a garlic-rich diet might be beneficial to reduce the cancer risk in our daily life. PMID:27759091

  5. Computational modeling indicates that surface pressure can be reliably conveyed to tactile receptors even amidst changes in skin mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuxiang; Baba, Yoshichika; Lumpkin, Ellen A; Gerling, Gregory J

    2016-07-01

    Distinct patterns in neuronal firing are observed between classes of cutaneous afferents. Such differences may be attributed to end-organ morphology, distinct ion-channel complements, and skin microstructure, among other factors. Even for just the slowly adapting type I afferent, the skin's mechanics for a particular specimen might impact the afferent's firing properties, especially given the thickness and elasticity of skin can change dramatically over just days. Here, we show computationally that the skin can reliably convey indentation magnitude, rate, and spatial geometry to the locations of tactile receptors even amid changes in skin's structure. Using finite element analysis and neural dynamics models, we considered the skin properties of six mice that span a representative cohort. Modeling the propagation of the surface stimulus to the interior of the skin demonstrated that there can be large variance in stresses and strains near the locations of tactile receptors, which can lead to large variance in static firing rate. However, variance is significantly reduced when the stimulus tip is controlled by surface pressure and compressive stress is measured near the end organs. This particular transformation affords the least variability in predicted firing rates compared with others derived from displacement, force, strain energy density, or compressive strain. Amid changing skin mechanics, stimulus control by surface pressure may be more naturalistic and optimal and underlie how animals actively explore the tactile environment. PMID:27098029

  6. Expression and significance of EGFR protein in model of radiation injury in mouse skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: The expression of EGFR protein was studied by SABC immunohistochemistry in 40 cases of model of radiation injury in mouse skin. Methods: Experiment animals were divided into four groups according to radiation dose. Results: The positive rates were 27.0%, 49.3%, 72.2%, 87.6% in 5 Gy group, 15 Gy group, 30 Gy group, 45 Gy group respectively, showing significant difference (P < 0.01). While the positive rate was 10.8% in normal control group, with significant difference (P < 0.01) compared with each radiation group. Conclusion: The enhancement of expression of EGFR in accordance with the increasing of radiation dose in certain dose range might be one important factor related to c-erbB-1 gene activated and enlarged by radiation, and the overexpression of EGFR protein might be related to poor healing in radiation skin injury

  7. Testing multi-alternative decision models with non-stationary evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos eTsetsos

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent research has investigated the process of integrating perceptual evidence towards a decision, converging on a number of sequential sampling choice models, such as variants of race and diffusion models and the non-linear leaky competing accumulator (LCA model. Here we study extensions of these models to multi-alternative choice, considering how well they can account for data from a psychophysical experiment in which the evidence supporting each of the alternatives changes dynamically during the trial, in a way that creates temporal correlations. We find that participants exhibit a tendency to choose an alternative whose evidence profile is temporally anti-correlated with (or dissimilar from that of other alternatives. This advantage of the anti-correlated alternative is well accounted for in the LCA, and provides constraints that challenge several other models of multi-alternative choice.

  8. Improving 2D and 3D Skin In Vitro Models Using Macromolecular Crowding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benny, Paula; Badowski, Cedric; Lane, E Birgitte; Raghunath, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The glycoprotein family of collagens represents the main structural proteins in the human body, and are key components of biomaterials used in modern tissue engineering. A technical bottleneck is the deposition of collagen in vitro, as it is notoriously slow, resulting in sub-optimal formation of connective tissue and subsequent tissue cohesion, particularly in skin models. Here, we describe a method which involves the addition of differentially-sized sucrose co-polymers to skin cultures to generate macromolecular crowding (MMC), which results in a dramatic enhancement of collagen deposition. Particularly, dermal fibroblasts deposited a significant amount of collagen I/IV/VII and fibronectin under MMC in comparison to controls. The protocol also describes a method to decellularize crowded cell layers, exposing significant amounts of extracellular matrix (ECM) which were retained on the culture surface as evidenced by immunocytochemistry. Total matrix mass and distribution pattern was studied using interference reflection microscopy. Interestingly, fibroblasts, keratinocytes and co-cultures produced cell-derived matrices (CDM) of varying composition and morphology. CDM could be used as "bio-scaffolds" for secondary cell seeding, where the current use of coatings or scaffolds, typically from xenogenic animal sources, can be avoided, thus moving towards more clinically relevant applications. In addition, this protocol describes the application of MMC during the submerged phase of a 3D-organotypic skin co-culture model which was sufficient to enhance ECM deposition in the dermo-epidermal junction (DEJ), in particular, collagen VII, the major component of anchoring fibrils. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of anchoring fibrils in cultures developed with MMC, as compared to controls. This is significant as anchoring fibrils tether the dermis to the epidermis, hence, having a pre-formed mature DEJ may benefit skin graft recipients in terms of graft stability and

  9. Modeling laser speckle imaging of perfusion in the skin (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, Caitlin; Hayakawa, Carole K.; Choi, Bernard

    2016-02-01

    Laser speckle imaging (LSI) enables visualization of relative blood flow and perfusion in the skin. It is frequently applied to monitor treatment of vascular malformations such as port wine stain birthmarks, and measure changes in perfusion due to peripheral vascular disease. We developed a computational Monte Carlo simulation of laser speckle contrast imaging to quantify how tissue optical properties, blood vessel depths and speeds, and tissue perfusion affect speckle contrast values originating from coherent excitation. The simulated tissue geometry consisted of multiple layers to simulate the skin, or incorporated an inclusion such as a vessel or tumor at different depths. Our simulation used a 30x30mm uniform flat light source to optically excite the region of interest in our sample to better mimic wide-field imaging. We used our model to simulate how dynamically scattered photons from a buried blood vessel affect speckle contrast at different lateral distances (0-1mm) away from the vessel, and how these speckle contrast changes vary with depth (0-1mm) and flow speed (0-10mm/s). We applied the model to simulate perfusion in the skin, and observed how different optical properties, such as epidermal melanin concentration (1%-50%) affected speckle contrast. We simulated perfusion during a systolic forearm occlusion and found that contrast decreased by 35% (exposure time = 10ms). Monte Carlo simulations of laser speckle contrast give us a tool to quantify what regions of the skin are probed with laser speckle imaging, and measure how the tissue optical properties and blood flow affect the resulting images.

  10. Alternative Devices for Taking Insulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... KB). Alternate Language URL Alternative Devices for Taking Insulin Page Content On this page: What alternative devices ... the skin. [ Top ] What alternative devices for taking insulin are available? Insulin pens provide a convenient, easy- ...

  11. Modeling, Design and Analysis of a Electrodynamic Levitation System by Considering the Skin Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Rajabi Sabadani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, lift and drag forces of permanent-magnet electrodynamic suspension (PMEDS System have been studied by considering the skin effect. Electrodynamic suspension is based on repulsive force between two magnetic fields with the same polarity. In this research the electrodynamic suspension system consists of a moving permanent magnet block levitated over a flat conducting plate with 2 mm thickness. At first, the analytical model of the PMEDS is proposed. For this propose, permanent magnet poles are modeled by the current sheets. Then the eddy current is calculated on aluminum sheet by considering the skin effect. Finally, the lift and drag forces are calculated in difference speed. The 2D finite element method is utilized to investigate the effect of speed variations on the performance of PMEDS at two different airgap. Two-dimensional finite element model, the accuracy of proposed analytical model is validated. The results of the finite element method are compared with results obtained by analytical model. It shows the accuracy of the analytical model in the estimation of the lift and drag forces of an electrodynamic suspension system.

  12. Skin Detection Based on Color Model and Low Level Features Combined with Explicit Region and Parametric Approaches

    OpenAIRE

    HARPREET KAUR SAINI; DANVIR MANDAL

    2014-01-01

    Skin detection is active research area in the field of computer vision which can be applied in the application of face detection, eye detection, etc. These detection helps in various applications such as driver fatigue monitoring system, surveillance system etc. In Computer vision applications, the color model and representations of the human image in color model is one of major module to detect the skin pixels. The mainstream technology is based on the individual pixels and s...

  13. Non-occlusive topical exposure of human skin in vitro as model for cytotoxicity testing of irritant compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lönnqvist, Susanna; Briheim, Kristina; Kratz, Gunnar

    2016-02-01

    Testing of irritant compounds has traditionally been performed on animals and human volunteers. Animal testing should always be restricted and for skin irritancy mice and rabbits hold poor predictive value for irritant potential in humans. Irritant testing on human volunteers is restricted by the duration subjects can be exposed, and by the subjectivity of interpreting the visual signs of skin irritation. We propose an irritant testing system using viable human full thickness skin with the loss of cell viability in the exposed skin area as end point measurement. Skin was exposed to sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) at 20% concentration by non-occluded topical exposure to establish a positive control response and subsequent test compounds were statistically compared with the 20% SDS response. Cell viability and metabolism were measured with 3-(4,5-dimethyl-thiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The model presents correlation between increased concentration of SDS and decreased viability of cells in the exposed skin area (R(2) = 0.76). We propose the model to be used for cytotoxicity testing of irritant compounds. With fully intact barrier function, the model comprises all cells present in the skin with quantifiable end point measurement. PMID:26446981

  14. Borrelia burgdorferi Induces TLR2-Mediated Migration of Activated Dendritic Cells in an Ex Vivo Human Skin Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagemakers, Alex; van ‘t Veer, Cornelis; Oei, Anneke; van der Pot, Wouter J.; Ahmed, Kalam; van der Poll, Tom; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.; Hovius, Joppe W. R.

    2016-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi is transmitted into the skin of the host where it encounters and interacts with two dendritic cell (DC) subsets; Langerhans cells (LCs) and dermal DCs (DDCs). These cells recognize pathogens via pattern recognition receptors, mature and migrate out of the skin into draining lymph nodes, where they orchestrate adaptive immune responses. In order to investigate the response of skin DCs during the early immunopathogenesis of Lyme borreliosis, we injected B. burgdorferi intradermally into full-thickness human skin and studied the migration of DCs out of the skin, the activation profile and phenotype of migrated cells. We found a significant increase in the migration of LCs and DDCs in response to B. burgdorferi. Notably, migration was prevented by blocking TLR2. DCs migrated from skin inoculated with higher numbers of spirochetes expressed significantly higher levels of CD83 and produced pro-inflammatory cytokines. No difference was observed in the expression of HLA-DR, CD86, CD38, or CCR7. To conclude, we have established an ex vivo human skin model to study DC-B. burgdorferi interactions. Using this model, we have demonstrated that B. burgdorferi-induced DC migration is mediated by TLR2. Our findings underscore the utility of this model as a valuable tool to study immunity to spirochetal infections. PMID:27695100

  15. Monte Carlo modeling (MCML) of light propagation in skin layers for detection of fat thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilubol, Chonnipa; Treerattrakoon, Kiatnida; Mohammed, Waleed S.

    2010-05-01

    Nowadays, most activities require lesser physical actions, which could ultimately lead to accumulation of excessive body fat. The main roles of body fat are to store energy and acts as various kinds of insulators for the body. The thickness of fat layers can be measured to indicate fat-body weight ratio. Exceeding the body-mass index (BMI) could lead to many illnesses regarding obesity. Consequently, many studies have proposed various principles and techniques to measure the amount of fat within one's body. In this paper, infrared interactance in skin layers is studied for investigation of the influence of fat thickness upon photon travelling pattern in skin tissues using Monte Carlo model (MCML). Photon propagation is numerically simulated in simplified multi-layered tissues. The optical coefficients of each skin layers are accounted for different traveling paths of photons that move through random motion. The thickness of fat layer is varied, and changing in optical parameters is observed. Then the statistically obtained data are computed and analyzed for the effect of the fat layer upon reflection percentage using different wavelengths. The calculations have shown increment in the slope of change of reflection percentage versus fat thickness, when using infrared compare to visible light. This technique can be used to construct a mobile device that is capable of measuring the volume fraction of melanin and blood in the epidermis layer and dermis layer, to calculate for the necessary optical coefficients that would be necessary for measurement of fat thickness.

  16. Phenylalanine ab initio models for the simulation of skin natural moisturizing factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, B. G.; Raniero, L. J.; Martin, A. A.; Favero, P. P.

    2013-04-01

    In this study, we evaluated models that can be used to simulate amino acids in biological environments via density functional theory (DFT). The goal was to obtain realistic representations that combine computational economy and result quality when compared to experimental data. We increased the complexity of the models by using a model of an amino acid in a vacuum, followed by a water-solvated amino acid model. To consider pH variation, we simulated zwitterionic and nonionic amino acid configurations. The amino acid chosen for testing was phenylalanine, an aromatic amino acid present in high concentrations in the natural moisturizing factor of skin that plays a fundamental role in ultraviolet protection and vitiligo disease. To validate the models, vibrational modes and electronic properties were calculated and compared to experimental results.

  17. Region based elimination of noise pixels towards optimized classifier models for skin pixel detection

    OpenAIRE

    Gagandeep Kaur; Seema Pahwa

    2015-01-01

    The extraction of the skin pixels in a human image and rejection of non-skin pixels is called the skin segmentation. Skin pixel detection is the process of extracting the skin pixels in a human image which is typically used as a pre-processing step to extract the face regions from human image. In past, there are several computer vision approaches and techniques have been developed for skin pixel detection. In the process of skin detection, given pixels are been transformed into an...

  18. Double-Porosity Models for a Fissured Groundwater Reservoir With Fracture Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moench, Allen F.

    1984-07-01

    Theories of flow to a well in a double-porosity groundwater reservoir are modified to incorporate effects of a thin layer of low-permeability material or fracture skin that may be present at fracture-block interfaces as a result of mineral deposition or alteration. The commonly used theory for flow in double- porosity formations that is based upon the assumption of pseudo-steady state block-to-fissure flow is shown to be a special case of the theory presented in this paper. The latter is based on the assumption of transient block-to-fissure flow with fracture skin. Under conditions where fracture skin has a hydraulic conductivity that is less than that of the matrix rock, it may be assumed to impede the interchange of fluid between the fissures and blocks. Resistance to flow at fracture-block interfaces tends to reduce spatial variation of hydraulic head gradients within the blocks. This provides theoretical justification for neglecting the divergence of flow in the blocks as required by the pseudo-steady state flow model. Coupled boundary value problems for flow to a well discharging at a constant rate were solved in the Laplace domain. Both slab-shaped and sphere-shaped blocks were considered, as were effects of well bore storage and well bore skin. Results obtained by numerical inversion were used to construct dimensionless-type curves that were applied to well test data, for a pumped well and for an observation well, from the fractured volcanic rock terrane of the Nevada Test Site.

  19. A three-dimensional finite element model of the transibial residual limb and prosthetic socket to predict skin temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peery, Jeffrey T; Klute, Glenn K; Blevins, Joanna J; Ledoux, William R

    2006-09-01

    Amputees who wear prosthetic limbs often experience discomfort from blisters and sores due to mechanical insult; these skin conditions are exacerbated by elevated skin temperatures and excessive perspiration within the prosthetic socket. The goal of this study was to create a tool for developing new prostheses that accommodate varying thermal loads arising from everyday activities. A three-dimensional thermal model of a transtibial residual limb and prosthesis was constructed using the finite element (FE) method. Transverse computerized tomography (CT) scans were used to specify the geometry of the residual limb and socket. Thermal properties from the literature were assigned to both biological tissue and prosthetic socket elements. The purpose of this work was to create a model that would aid in testing the effect of new prosthesis designs on skin temperature. To validate its output, the model was used to predict the skin temperature distribution in a common prosthetic socket system (silicone liner, wool sock, and carbon fiber socket) at rest with no mechanical loading. Skin temperatures were generally elevated near muscle and decreased anteriorly and at the distal end. Experimental temperature measurements taken at the skin-prosthesis interface of five human subjects were used to validate the model. Data extracted from the thermal model at anterior, posterior, lateral, and medial locations were typically within one standard deviation of experimental results; the mean temperatures were within 0.3 degree C for each section and were within 0.1 degree C overall.

  20. From Geocentric to Heliocentric Model of the Universe, and the Alternative Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shu-Chiu

    2005-01-01

    A recent study (Liu, 2005a, 2005b) revealed a limited number of alternative models of the universe held by young students in Taiwan and in Germany. In line with the previous findings, these alternative models frequently fall into two groups: earth-centred and sun-centred views, which draw a correspondence to the ideas in the European history of…

  1. Alternative Models of Service, Centralized Machine Operations. Phase II Report. Volume II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technology Management Corp., Alexandria, VA.

    A study was conducted to determine if the centralization of playback machine operations for the national free library program would be feasible, economical, and desirable. An alternative model of playback machine services was constructed and compared with existing network operations considering both cost and service. The alternative model was…

  2. Mathematical model of alternative mechanism of telomere length maintenance

    OpenAIRE

    Kollár, Richard; Bodova, Katarina; Nosek, Jozef; Tomaska, Lubomir

    2014-01-01

    Biopolymer length regulation is a complex process that involves a large number of subprocesses acting simultaneously across multiple spatial and temporal scales. An illustrative example important for genomic stability is the length regulation of telomeres---nucleo-protein structures at the ends of linear chromosomes. Maintenance of telomeres is often facilitated by the enzyme telomerase but, particularly in telomerase-free systems, the maintenance of chromosomal termini depends on alternative...

  3. ANALYSIS OF NON-FOURIER THERMAL BEHAVIOUR FOR MULTI-LAYER SKIN MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Chi Liu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the effect of micro-structural interaction on bioheat transfer in skin, which was stratified into epidermis, dermis, and subcutaneous. A modified non-Fourier equation of bio-heat transfer was developed based on the second-order Taylor expansion of dual-phase-lag model and can be simplified as the bio-heat transfer equations derived from Pennes' model, thermal wave model, and the linearized form of dual-phase-lag model. It is a fourth order partial differential equation, and the boundary conditions at the interface between two adjacent layers become complicated. There are mathematical difficulties in dealing with such a problem. A hybrid numerical scheme is extended to solve the present problem. The numerical results are in a good agreement with the contents of open literature. It evidences the rationality and reliability of the present results.

  4. Analysis of superficial fluorescence patterns in nonmelanoma skin cancer during photodynamic therapy by a dosimetric model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas-García, I.; Fanjul-Vélez, F.; Arce-Diego, J. L.

    2016-03-01

    In this work the superficial fluorescence patterns in different nonmelanoma skin cancers and their photodynamic treatment response are analysed by a fluorescence based dosimetric model. Results show differences of even more than 50% in the fluorescence patterns as photodynamic therapy progresses depending on the malignant tissue type. They demonstrate the great relevance of the biological media as an additional dosimetric factor and contribute to the development of a future customized therapy with the assistance of dosimetric tools to interpret the fluorescence images obtained during the treatment monitoring and the differential photodiagnosis.

  5. Development of an in vivo animal model for skin penetration in hairless rats assessed by mass balance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Lene; Petersen, Mads B; Benfeldt, Eva;

    2002-01-01

    acid and (14)C-butyl salicylate were topically applied. Rapid and differentiated percutaneous absorption of both compounds were shown by urinary excretion data. For (14)C-salicylic acid the amount on the skin surface, in the stratum corneum and in the viable skin was determined. Total mass balance...... rat and free mobility throughout the test period. By consecutive tape stripping, monitored by measurements of transepidermal water loss and confirmed by histological examination of skin biopsies, 10 tape strippings were found to remove the stratum corneum completely. For assessment of the model, (14)C-salicylic...

  6. Modeling the Mechanical Response of In Vivo Human Skin Under a Rich Set of Deformations

    KAUST Repository

    Flynn, Cormac

    2011-03-11

    Determining the mechanical properties of an individual\\'s skin is important in the fields of pathology, biomedical device design, and plastic surgery. To address this need, we present a finite element model that simulates the skin of the anterior forearm and posterior upper arm under a rich set of three-dimensional deformations. We investigated the suitability of the Ogden and Tong and Fung strain energy functions along with a quasi-linear viscoelastic law. Using non-linear optimization techniques, we found material parameters and in vivo pre-stresses for different volunteers. The model simulated the experiments with errors-of-fit ranging from 13.7 to 21.5%. Pre-stresses ranging from 28 to 92 kPa were estimated. We show that using only in-plane experimental data in the parameter optimization results in a poor prediction of the out-of-plane response. The identifiability of the model parameters, which are evaluated using different determinability criteria, improves by increasing the number of deformation orientations in the experiments. © 2011 Biomedical Engineering Society.

  7. Radiation-induced skin injury in the animal model of scleroderma: implications for post-radiotherapy fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown Stephen

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiation therapy is generally contraindicated for cancer patients with collagen vascular diseases (CVD such as scleroderma due to an increased risk of fibrosis. The tight skin (TSK mouse has skin which, in some respects, mimics that of patients with scleroderma. The skin radiation response of TSK mice has not been previously reported. If TSK mice are shown to have radiation sensitive skin, they may prove to be a useful model to examine the mechanisms underlying skin radiation injury, protection, mitigation and treatment. Methods The hind limbs of TSK and parental control C57BL/6 mice received a radiation exposure sufficient to cause approximately the same level of acute injury. Endpoints included skin damage scored using a non-linear, semi-quantitative scale and tissue fibrosis assessed by measuring passive leg extension. In addition, TGF-β1 cytokine levels were measured monthly in skin tissue. Results Contrary to our expectations, TSK mice were more resistant (i.e. 20% to radiation than parental control mice. Although acute skin reactions were similar in both mouse strains, radiation injury in TSK mice continued to decrease with time such that several months after radiation there was significantly less skin damage and leg contraction compared to C57BL/6 mice (p Conclusion TSK mice are not recommended as a model of scleroderma involving radiation injury. The genetic and molecular basis for reduced radiation injury observed in TSK mice warrants further investigation particularly to identify mechanisms capable of reducing tissue fibrosis after radiation injury.

  8. Brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus) skin carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunton, T E

    2000-06-01

    Alternative models using fish species have been tested in liver toxicity and carcinogenesis bioassays. Similar models have not been developed for skin. The brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus) has shown potential as a model for skin carcinogenesis studies due to its sensitivity to environmental chemical pollutants. The present study is an initial morphologic and biochemical characterization of the normal and neoplastic brown bullhead skin to assess its suitability as a model of skin carcinogenesis. Brown bullhead were removed from Back River in the Chesapeake Bay region, an area historically polluted with heavy metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Histology, histochemistry, and electron microscopy were used to stage the morphologic development and progression of neoplasia in skin. The distribution of keratin, a family of structural proteins with altered expression in mammalian tumorigenesis, was analyzed with one and two dimensional gel electrophoresis and nitrocellulose blots of extracts from normal skin. Keratin expression in skin and other organs was also assessed with immunohistochemistry using AE1, AE3, and PCK 26 antibodies, and the proliferation index in skin and neoplasms with PCNA antibody. Skin lesions appeared to progress from hyperplasia through carcinoma, and the proliferation index was increased in papilloma. Also in papilloma, intercellular interdigitations appeared increased and desmosomes decreased which may in future studies correlate with changes in expression of other molecular markers of neoplastic progression. Both Type I and Type II keratin subfamilies were detected in skin using gel electrophoresis with the complimentary keratin blot-binding assay. For further development of the brown bullhead model, future studies can compare and relate these baseline data to alterations in expression of keratin and other markers in fish neoplasms and to molecular events which occur in man. PMID:10930121

  9. Inhibitory effects of low-level laser therapy on skin-flap survival in a rat model

    OpenAIRE

    Baldan, Cristiano S; Masson, Igor FB; Esteves Júnior, Ivaldo; Baldan, Alessandra Maria S; Machado, Aline F P; Casaroto, Raquel A; Liebano, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is a noninvasive option to improve the microcirculation, accelerate the healing process and increase the viability of skin flaps. However, several factors that directly impact the efficacy of LLLT, including wavelength, total energy and irradiation time, among others, must be considered before application. Using a rat model, this experimental, randomized study investigated the effect of LLLT on the viability of skin flaps. The authors describe their surgical tec...

  10. Models for the histologic study of the skin interface with percutaneous biomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Percutaneous devices are critical for health care. Access to tissue, vessels and internal organs afforded by these devices provides the means to treat and monitor many diseases. Unfortunately, such access is not restricted, and infection may compromise the usefulness of the device and even the life of the patient. New biomaterials offer the possibility of maintaining internal access while limiting microbial access, but understanding of the cutaneous/biomaterial interface and models to study this area are limited. This paper focuses on models useful for studying the morphology and biology of the intersection of skin and percutaneous biomaterials. An organ culture and a mouse model are described that offer promising possibilities for improved understanding of this critical interface

  11. Mechanisms and Mediators of Inflammation: Potential Models for Skin Rejection and Targeted Therapy in Vascularized Composite Allotransplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa Hautz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascularized composite allotransplantation (VCA is an effective treatment option for patients suffering from limb loss or severe disfigurement. However, postoperative courses of VCA recipients have been complicated by skin rejection, and long-term immunosuppression remains a necessity for allograft survival. To widen the scope of this quality-of-life improving procedure minimization of immunosuppression in order to limit risks and side effects is needed. In some aspects, the molecular mechanisms and dynamics of skin allograft rejection seem similar to inflammatory skin conditions. T cells are key players in skin rejection and are recruited to the skin via activation of adhesion molecules, cytokines, and chemokines. Blocking these molecules has not only shown success in the treatment of inflammatory dermatoses, but also prolonged graft survival in various models of solid organ transplantation. In addition to T cell recruitment, ectopic lymphoid structures within the allograft associated with chronic rejection in solid organ transplantation might contribute to the strong alloimmune response towards the skin. Selectively targeting the molecules involved offers exciting novel therapeutic options in the prevention and treatment of skin rejection after VCA.

  12. Immunochemistry of a keratinocyte-fibroblast co-culture model for reconstruction of human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischmajer, R; MacDonald, E D; Contard, P; Perlish, J S

    1993-09-01

    Our purpose was to determine differentiation markers of an in vitro co-culture model in which fibroblasts grown in a three-dimensional nylon mesh were recombined with human keratinocytes. The cultures were kept for 5 weeks and then processed for electron microscopy and immunochemistry. The specimens revealed an epidermis, a basal lamina, an anchoring zone, and a dermis. Epidermal differentiation was confirmed by the presence of K10-keratin, trichohyalin, and filaggrin. The basal lamina contained Type IV collagen, laminin, nidogen, and heparan sulfate. Type IV collagen, laminin, and nidogen were also noted in the extracellular matrix. Type VI collagen was present in the anchoring zone and also gave a reticulated pattern in the rest of the dermis. There was a heavy signal for tenascin and fibronectin throughout the dermis. Osteonectin was restricted to the epidermis and dermal fibroblasts. Fibrillin stained at the anchoring zone and dermis but elastin and vitronectin were negative, suggesting early formation of elastic fibrils. Collagen fibrils stained for Types I, III, and V, as well as the amino propeptide of Types I and III procollagen, suggesting newly synthesized collagen. Decorin was present throughout the dermis. The model described appears suitable for in vitro reconstruction of the skin and may be useful to study the development of various supramolecular skin structures.

  13. The Money-Creation Model: An Alternative Pedagogy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Mark; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Presents a teaching model that is consistent with the traditional approach to demonstrating the expansion and contraction of the money supply. Suggests that the model provides a simple and convenient visual image of changes in the monetary system. Describes the model as juxtaposing the behavior of the moneyholding public with that of the…

  14. Alternative Multiple Imputation Inference for Mean and Covariance Structure Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Taehun; Cai, Li

    2012-01-01

    Model-based multiple imputation has become an indispensable method in the educational and behavioral sciences. Mean and covariance structure models are often fitted to multiply imputed data sets. However, the presence of multiple random imputations complicates model fit testing, which is an important aspect of mean and covariance structure…

  15. Comparison of Land Skin Temperature from a Land Model, Remote Sensing, and In-situ Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Aihui; Barlage, Michael; Zeng, Xubin; Draper, Clara Sophie

    2014-01-01

    Land skin temperature (Ts) is an important parameter in the energy exchange between the land surface and atmosphere. Here hourly Ts from the Community Land Model Version 4.0, MODIS satellite observations, and in-situ observations in 2003 were compared. Compared with the in-situ observations over four semi-arid stations, both MODIS and modeled Ts show negative biases, but MODIS shows an overall better performance. Global distribution of differences between MODIS and modeled Ts shows diurnal, seasonal, and spatial variations. Over sparsely vegetated areas, the model Ts is generally lower than the MODIS observed Ts during the daytime, while the situation is opposite at nighttime. The revision of roughness length for heat and the constraint of minimum friction velocity from Zeng et al. [2012] bring the modeled Ts closer to MODIS during the day, and have little effect on Ts at night. Five factors contributing to the Ts differences between the model and MODIS are identified, including the difficulty in properly accounting for cloud cover information at the appropriate temporal and spatial resolutions, and uncertainties in surface energy balance computation, atmospheric forcing data, surface emissivity, and MODIS Ts data. These findings have implications for the cross-evaluation of modeled and remotely sensed Ts, as well as the data assimilation of Ts observations into Earth system models.

  16. Hyperoxygenation attenuated a murine model of atopic dermatitis through raising skin level of ROS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung-Ran Kim

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a chronic inflammatory skin disease resulting from excessive stimulation of immune cells. Traditionally, reactive oxygen species (ROS have been implicated in the progression of inflammatory diseases, but several opposing observations suggest the protective role of ROS in inflammatory disease. Recently, we demonstrated ROS prevented imiquimod-induced psoriatic dermatitis through enhancing regulatory T cell function. Thus, we hypothesized AD might also be attenuated in elevated levels of ROS through tissue hyperoxygenation, such as by hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT or applying an oxygen-carrying chemical, perfluorodecalin (PFD. Elevated levels of ROS in the skin have been demonstrated directly by staining with dihydroethidum as well as indirectly by immunohistochemistry (IHC for indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO. A murine model of AD was developed by repeated application of a chemical irritant (1% 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene and house dust mite (Dermatophagoide farinae extract on one ear of BALB/c mice. The results showed treatment with HBOT or PFD significantly attenuated AD, comparably with 0.1% prednicarbate without any signs of side effects, such as telangiectasia. The expressions of interleukin-17A and interferon-γ were also decreased in the AD lesions by treatment with HBOT or PFD. Enhanced expression of IDO and reduced level of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, in association with increased frequency of FoxP3+ regulatory T cells in the AD lesions, might be involved in the underlying mechanism of oxygen therapy. Taken together, it was suggested that tissue hyperoxygenation, by HBOT or treatment with PFD, might attenuate AD through enhancing skin ROS level.

  17. Alternative Functional In Vitro Models of Human Intestinal Epithelia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda L Kauffman

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Physiologically relevant sources of absorptive intestinal epithelial cells are crucial for human drug transport studies. Human adenocarcinoma-derived intestinal cell lines, such as Caco-2, offer conveniences of easy culture maintenance and scalability, but do not fully recapitulate in vivo intestinal phenotypes. Additional sources of renewable physiologically relevant human intestinal cells would provide a much needed tool for drug discovery and intestinal physiology. We sought to evaluate and compare two alternative sources of human intestinal cells, commercially available primary human intestinal epithelial cells (hInEpCs and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC-derived intestinal cells to Caco-2, for use in in vitro transwell monolayer intestinal transport assays. To achieve this for iPSC-derived cells, our previously described 3-dimensional intestinal organogenesis method was adapted to transwell differentiation. Intestinal cells were assessed by marker expression through immunocytochemical and mRNA expression analyses, monolayer integrity through Transepithelial Electrical Resistance (TEER measurements and molecule permeability, and functionality by taking advantage the well-characterized intestinal transport mechanisms. In most cases, marker expression for primary hInEpCs and iPSC-derived cells appeared to be as good as or better than Caco-2. Furthermore, transwell monolayers exhibited high TEER with low permeability. Primary hInEpCs showed molecule efflux indicative of P-glycoprotein transport. Primary hInEpCs and iPSC-derived cells also showed neonatal Fc receptor-dependent binding of immunoglobulin G variants. Primary hInEpCs and iPSC-derived intestinal cells exhibit expected marker expression and demonstrate basic functional monolayer formation, similar to or better than Caco-2. These cells could offer an alternative source of human intestinal cells for understanding normal intestinal epithelial physiology and drug transport.

  18. Evaluating Alternate Biokinetic Models for Trace Pollutant Cometabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Li; Binning, Philip John; Smets, Barth F.

    2015-01-01

    Mathematical models of cometabolic biodegradation kinetics can improve our understanding of the relevant microbial reactions and allow us to design in situ or in-reactor applications of cometabolic bioremediation. A variety of models are available, but their ability to describe experimental data...... has not been systematically evaluated for a variety of operational/experimental conditions. Here five different models were considered: first-order; MichaelisMenten; reductant; competition; and combined models. The models were assessed on their ability to fit data from simulated batch experiments...... different parameter sets to simulate each experiment. Parameter nonuniqueness was likely to be due to the parameter correlation. These results suggest that the cometabolic models must be further developed if they are to reliably simulate experimental and operational data....

  19. Interaction of 1.319 μm laser with skin: an optical-thermal-damage model and experimental validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Luguang; Yang, Zaifu; Wang, Jiarui

    2014-09-01

    With the widespread use of high-power laser systems operating within the wavelength region of approximately 1.3 to 1.4 μm, it becomes very necessary to refine the laser safety guidelines setting the exposure limits for the eye and skin. In this paper, an optical-thermal-damage model was developed to simulate laser propagation, energy deposition, heat transfer and thermal damage in the skin for 1.319 μm laser irradiation. Meanwhile, an experiment was also conducted in vitro to measure the tempreture history of a porcine skin specimen irradiated by a 1.319 μm laser. Predictions from the model included light distribution in the skin, temperature response and thermal damge level of the tissue. It was shown that the light distribution region was much larger than that of the incident laser at the wavelength of 1.319 μm, and the maximum value of the fluence rate located on the interior region of the skin, not on the surface. By comparing the calculated temperature curve with the experimentally recorded temperautre data, good agreement was shown betweeen them, which validated the numerical model. The model also indicated that the damage integral changed little when the temperature of skin tissue was lower than about 55 °C, after that, the integral increased rapidly and denatunation of the tissue would occur. Based on this model, we can further explore the damage mechanisms and trends for the skin and eye within the wavelength region of 1.3 μm to 1.4 μm, incorporating with in vivo experimental investigations.

  20. On an Estimation Method for an Alternative Fractionally Cointegrated Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlini, Federico; Łasak, Katarzyna

    In this paper we consider the Fractional Vector Error Correction model proposed in Avarucci (2007), which is characterized by a richer lag structure than models proposed in Granger (1986) and Johansen (2008, 2009). We discuss the identification issues of the model of Avarucci (2007), following...... the ideas in Carlini and Santucci de Magistris (2014) for the model of Johansen (2008, 2009). We propose a 4-step estimation procedure that is based on the switching algorithm employed in Carlini and Mosconi (2014) and the GLS procedure in Mosconi and Paruolo (2014). The proposed procedure provides...

  1. A Bayesian Alternative for Multi-objective Ecohydrological Model Specification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Y.; Marshall, L. A.; Sharma, A.; Ajami, H.

    2015-12-01

    Process-based ecohydrological models combine the study of hydrological, physical, biogeochemical and ecological processes of the catchments, which are usually more complex and parametric than conceptual hydrological models. Thus, appropriate calibration objectives and model uncertainty analysis are essential for ecohydrological modeling. In recent years, Bayesian inference has become one of the most popular tools for quantifying the uncertainties in hydrological modeling with the development of Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) techniques. Our study aims to develop appropriate prior distributions and likelihood functions that minimize the model uncertainties and bias within a Bayesian ecohydrological framework. In our study, a formal Bayesian approach is implemented in an ecohydrological model which combines a hydrological model (HyMOD) and a dynamic vegetation model (DVM). Simulations focused on one objective likelihood (Streamflow/LAI) and multi-objective likelihoods (Streamflow and LAI) with different weights are compared. Uniform, weakly informative and strongly informative prior distributions are used in different simulations. The Kullback-leibler divergence (KLD) is used to measure the dis(similarity) between different priors and corresponding posterior distributions to examine the parameter sensitivity. Results show that different prior distributions can strongly influence posterior distributions for parameters, especially when the available data is limited or parameters are insensitive to the available data. We demonstrate differences in optimized parameters and uncertainty limits in different cases based on multi-objective likelihoods vs. single objective likelihoods. We also demonstrate the importance of appropriately defining the weights of objectives in multi-objective calibration according to different data types.

  2. Clinical system model for monitoring the physiological status of jaundice by extracting bilirubin components from skin diffuse reflectance spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Alla S.; Clark, Joseph; Beyette, Fred R., Jr.

    2009-02-01

    Neonatal jaundice is a medical condition which occurs in newborns as a result of an imbalance between the production and elimination of bilirubin. The excess bilirubin in the blood stream diffuses into the surrounding tissue leading to a yellowing of the skin. As the bilirubin levels rise in the blood stream, there is a continuous exchange between the extra vascular bilirubin and bilirubin in the blood stream. Exposure to phototherapy alters the concentration of bilirubin in the vascular and extra vascular regions by causing bilirubin in the skin layers to be broken down. Thus, the relative concentration of extra vascular bilirubin is reduced leading to a diffusion of bilirubin out of the vascular region. Diffuse reflectance spectra from human skin contains physiological and structural information of the skin and nearby tissue. A diffuse reflectance spectrum must be captured before and after blanching in order to isolate the intravascular and extra vascular bilirubin. A new mathematical model is proposed with extra vascular bilirubin concentration taken into consideration along with other optical parameters in defining the diffuse reflectance spectrum from human skin. A nonlinear optimization algorithm has been adopted to extract the optical properties (including bilirubin concentration) from the skin reflectance spectrum. The new system model and nonlinear algorithm have been combined to enable extraction of Bilirubin concentrations within an average error of 10%.

  3. Paracrine Factors from Irradiated Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Improve Skin Regeneration and Angiogenesis in a Porcine Burn Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Stefan; Mittermayr, Rainer; Nickl, Stefanie; Haider, Thomas; Lebherz-Eichinger, Diana; Beer, Lucian; Mitterbauer, Andreas; Leiss, Harald; Zimmermann, Matthias; Schweiger, Thomas; Keibl, Claudia; Hofbauer, Helmut; Gabriel, Christian; Pavone-Gyöngyösi, Mariann; Redl, Heinz; Tschachler, Erwin; Mildner, Michael; Ankersmit, Hendrik Jan

    2016-04-29

    Burn wounds pose a serious threat to patients and often require surgical treatment. Skin grafting aims to achieve wound closure but requires a well-vascularized wound bed. The secretome of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) has been shown to improve wound healing and angiogenesis. We hypothesized that topical application of the PBMC secretome would improve the quality of regenerating skin, increase angiogenesis, and reduce scar formation after burn injury and skin grafting in a porcine model. Full-thickness burn injuries were created on the back of female pigs. Necrotic areas were excised and the wounds were covered with split-thickness mesh skin grafts. Wounds were treated repeatedly with either the secretome of cultured PBMCs (Sec(PBMC)), apoptotic PBMCs (Apo-Sec(PBMC)), or controls. The wounds treated with Apo-Sec(PBMC) had an increased epidermal thickness, higher number of rete ridges, and more advanced epidermal differentiation than controls. The samples treated with Apo-Sec(PBMC) had a two-fold increase in CD31+ cells, indicating more angiogenesis. These data suggest that the repeated application of Apo-Sec(PBMC) significantly improves epidermal thickness, angiogenesis, and skin quality in a porcine model of burn injury and skin grafting.

  4. Paracrine Factors from Irradiated Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Improve Skin Regeneration and Angiogenesis in a Porcine Burn Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Stefan; Mittermayr, Rainer; Nickl, Stefanie; Haider, Thomas; Lebherz-Eichinger, Diana; Beer, Lucian; Mitterbauer, Andreas; Leiss, Harald; Zimmermann, Matthias; Schweiger, Thomas; Keibl, Claudia; Hofbauer, Helmut; Gabriel, Christian; Pavone-Gyöngyösi, Mariann; Redl, Heinz; Tschachler, Erwin; Mildner, Michael; Ankersmit, Hendrik Jan

    2016-01-01

    Burn wounds pose a serious threat to patients and often require surgical treatment. Skin grafting aims to achieve wound closure but requires a well-vascularized wound bed. The secretome of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) has been shown to improve wound healing and angiogenesis. We hypothesized that topical application of the PBMC secretome would improve the quality of regenerating skin, increase angiogenesis, and reduce scar formation after burn injury and skin grafting in a porcine model. Full-thickness burn injuries were created on the back of female pigs. Necrotic areas were excised and the wounds were covered with split-thickness mesh skin grafts. Wounds were treated repeatedly with either the secretome of cultured PBMCs (Sec(PBMC)), apoptotic PBMCs (Apo-Sec(PBMC)), or controls. The wounds treated with Apo-Sec(PBMC) had an increased epidermal thickness, higher number of rete ridges, and more advanced epidermal differentiation than controls. The samples treated with Apo-Sec(PBMC) had a two-fold increase in CD31+ cells, indicating more angiogenesis. These data suggest that the repeated application of Apo-Sec(PBMC) significantly improves epidermal thickness, angiogenesis, and skin quality in a porcine model of burn injury and skin grafting. PMID:27125302

  5. A clinically based service limitation option for alternative model rural hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscovice, I; Wellever, A; Sales, A; Chen, M M; Christianson, J

    1993-01-01

    Alternative model rural hospitals are designed to address problems faced by small, isolated rural hospitals. Typically, hospital regulations are reduced in exchange for a limit on the services that alternative models may offer. The most common service limitation is a limit on length of stay (LOS), a method with little empirical or conceptual support. The purpose of this article is to present a clinically based service limitation for alternative model rural hospitals, such as the rural primary care hospital. The proposal is based on an analysis of Medicare discharges from rural hospitals most likely to convert and the judgments of a technical advisory panel of rural clinicians. PMID:10135339

  6. Establishment of Mus Skin Photo-damage Model by 8-MOP plus UVA Irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Hong; LI Jiawen; ZHANG Li

    2007-01-01

    To establish a simple and reliable animal model of skin photo-damage, 20 mice were treated with 8-MOP and exposed to UVA (UVA 320-400 nm) for 24 h. After irradiation, the structure of the epidermis and dermis, collagen fibers, elastic fibers were observed by using HE staining and Weigert technique and compared with the normal controls. The acanthosis and epidemis proliferation with accompanying hyperkeratosis and parakeratosis were observed. Inflammatory infiltration was noted in the dermis. The elastic fibers became coarse, irregularly arranged and clustered, with their number increased. The collagen fibers showed obvious degeneration and some amorphous materials could also be observed. The blood vessels were irregularly dilated and vascular walls were thickened, with infiltration of inflammatory cells. It is concluded that murine photodamage model can be quickly, conveniently and reliably established by means of 8-MOP/UVA.

  7. Modulating effects of oatmeal extracts in the sodium lauryl sulfate skin irritancy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vié, K; Cours-Darne, S; Vienne, M P; Boyer, F; Fabre, B; Dupuy, P

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the anti-inflammatory activity of two topically applied oatmeal extracts, i.e. Avena sativa and Avena Rhealba, using the sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) irritation model. At baseline, test areas on the volar surface of the upper arms of 12 healthy individuals were pretreated with the two extracts and their vehicle (petrolatum ointment) under occlusion for 2 h, and one site was left untreated. Then a patch with a 1% SLS solution was applied to the test sites for 24 h. Irritation was determined at each period by measuring by chromametry and laser-Doppler. In a dose-ranging study with the Avena Rhealba extract alone, the 20 and 30% concentrations exerted a slight inhibition of the a* parameter increase and a marked reduction of the blood flow increase (p oatmeal extracts on skin irritation in the SLS model.

  8. Stochastic Greybox Modeling of an Alternating Activated Sludge Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halvgaard, Rasmus Fogtmann; Munk-Nielsen, T.; Tychsen, P.;

    Summary of key findings We found a greybox model for state estimation and control of the BioDenitro process based on a reduced ASM1. We then applied Maximum Likelihood Estimation on measurements from a real full-scale waste water treatment plant to estimate the model parameters. The estimation...

  9. A framework for quantifying net benefits of alternative prognostic models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapsomaniki, Eleni; White, Ian R; Wood, Angela M;

    2012-01-01

    New prognostic models are traditionally evaluated using measures of discrimination and risk reclassification, but these do not take full account of the clinical and health economic context. We propose a framework for comparing prognostic models by quantifying the public health impact (net benefit...

  10. High and Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation Induce Different Secretome Profiles in a Human Skin Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qibin; Matzke, Melissa M.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Moore, Ronald J.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Hu, Zeping; Monroe, Matthew E.; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.; Morgan, William F.

    2014-03-18

    It is postulated that secreted soluble factors are important contributors of bystander effect and adaptive responses observed in low dose ionizing radiation. Using multidimensional liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry based proteomics, we quantified the changes of skin tissue secretome – the proteins secreted from a full thickness, reconstituted 3-dimensional skin tissue model 48 hr after exposure to 3, 10 and 200 cGy of X-rays. Overall, 135 proteins showed statistical significant difference between the sham (0 cGy) and any of the irradiated groups (3, 10 or 200 cGy) on the basis of Dunnett adjusted t-test; among these, 97 proteins showed a trend of downregulation and 9 proteins showed a trend of upregulation with increasing radiation dose. In addition, there were 21 and 8 proteins observed to have irregular trends with the 10 cGy irradiated group either having the highest or the lowest level among all three radiated doses. Moreover, two proteins, carboxypeptidase E and ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase isozyme L1 were sensitive to ionizing radiation, but relatively independent of radiation dose. Conversely, proteasome activator complex subunit 2 protein appeared to be sensitive to the dose of radiation, as rapid upregulation of this protein was observed when radiation doses were increased from 3, to 10 or 200 cGy. These results suggest that different mechanisms of action exist at the secretome level for low and high doses of ionizing radiation.

  11. Hand Gesture Contour Tracking Based on Skin Color Probability and State Estimation Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu-yu Zhang

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Considering the deficiency of accurate hand gesture contour inaccessible and inefficiency in complex dynamic background in existing methods of hand gesture tracking, a two dimensional skin color probability forecast method is proposed. Based on this, a hand gesture segmentation method of multi-mode and a hand gesture tracking method of state estimation are extended. When hand gesture is segmented, to locate the accurate hand gesture position, this paper combines the Skin Color Probability distribution with the statistical motion information of image blocking. Then the hand region is initiated by the region growth method and the hand gesture segmentation is realized. When hand gesture is tracked, the pixel’s state model is built to estimate the state of pixels after watershed computation. Then the current blocking frame is adaptive threshold segmented and the hand gesture tracking is realized. Experiments show that this method has a strong anti-noise ability in complex background. In addition, it has a better application effect in segment and tracking the hand gesture contour accurately in a real-time way.

  12. Quantitative Proteomic Profiling of Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation Effects in a Human Skin Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawna M. Hengel

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available To assess responses to low-dose ionizing radiation (LD-IR exposures potentially encountered during medical diagnostic procedures, nuclear accidents or terrorist acts, a quantitative proteomic approach was used to identify changes in protein abundance in a reconstituted human skin tissue model treated with 0.1 Gy of ionizing radiation. To improve the dynamic range of the assay, subcellular fractionation was employed to remove highly abundant structural proteins and to provide insight into radiation-induced alterations in protein localization. Relative peptide quantification across cellular fractions, control and irradiated samples was performing using 8-plex iTRAQ labeling followed by online two-dimensional nano-scale liquid chromatography and high resolution MS/MS analysis. A total of 107 proteins were detected with statistically significant radiation-induced change in abundance (>1.5 fold and/or subcellular localization compared to controls. The top biological pathways identified using bioinformatics include organ development, anatomical structure formation and the regulation of actin cytoskeleton. From the proteomic data, a change in proteolytic processing and subcellular localization of the skin barrier protein, filaggrin, was identified, and the results were confirmed by western blotting. This data indicate post-transcriptional regulation of protein abundance, localization and proteolytic processing playing an important role in regulating radiation response in human tissues.

  13. Alternative GMM Methods for Nonlinear Panel Data Models

    OpenAIRE

    Breitung, Jörg; Lechner, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Not available in German. Frühere Version: Breitung, J. and M. Lechner (1998), Altenative GMM Methods for Nonlinear Panel Data models, discussion paper 81, SFB 373 Humbold-Universität zu Berlin. Download Volltext: (pdf, 263 kb)

  14. Pluralism an an Alternative Model for the Human Ecologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaff, Vivian Z.

    1980-01-01

    Examines some of the arguments used to support the view that residential segregation of ethnic and racial groups is necessarily disintegrative. Suggests that pluralism should receive greater attention as a model of residential segregation. (Author/JLF)

  15. Evaluation and comparison of alternative fleet-level selective maintenance models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleet-level selective maintenance refers to the process of identifying the subset of maintenance actions to perform on a fleet of repairable systems when the maintenance resources allocated to the fleet are insufficient for performing all desirable maintenance actions. The original fleet-level selective maintenance model is designed to maximize the probability that all missions in a future set are completed successfully. We extend this model in several ways. First, we consider a cost-based optimization model and show that a special case of this model maximizes the expected value of the number of successful missions in the future set. We also consider the situation in which one or more of the future missions may be canceled. These models and the original fleet-level selective maintenance optimization models are nonlinear. Therefore, we also consider an alternative model in which the objective function can be linearized. We show that the alternative model is a good approximation to the other models. - Highlights: • Investigate nonlinear fleet-level selective maintenance optimization models. • A cost based model is used to maximize the expected number of successful missions. • Another model is allowed to cancel missions if reliability is sufficiently low. • An alternative model has an objective function that can be linearized. • We show that the alternative model is a good approximation to the other models

  16. Configurational analysis as an alternative way of modeling sales response

    OpenAIRE

    Aarnio, Susanna

    2013-01-01

    Objectives of the Study The objectives of the study are both managerial and methodological. On the one hand, the aim is to apply a novel research approach, fuzzy set qualitative comparative analysis or fsQCA (see f. ex. Ragin, 2000; Rihoux & Ragin, 2009), to sales response modeling and thus, create a response model for the case company to identify complex, configurational causalities affecting the company's sales volumes within the chosen product category. On the other hand, to goal is to ...

  17. Alternative regression models to assess increase in childhood BMI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansmann Ulrich

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Body mass index (BMI data usually have skewed distributions, for which common statistical modeling approaches such as simple linear or logistic regression have limitations. Methods Different regression approaches to predict childhood BMI by goodness-of-fit measures and means of interpretation were compared including generalized linear models (GLMs, quantile regression and Generalized Additive Models for Location, Scale and Shape (GAMLSS. We analyzed data of 4967 children participating in the school entry health examination in Bavaria, Germany, from 2001 to 2002. TV watching, meal frequency, breastfeeding, smoking in pregnancy, maternal obesity, parental social class and weight gain in the first 2 years of life were considered as risk factors for obesity. Results GAMLSS showed a much better fit regarding the estimation of risk factors effects on transformed and untransformed BMI data than common GLMs with respect to the generalized Akaike information criterion. In comparison with GAMLSS, quantile regression allowed for additional interpretation of prespecified distribution quantiles, such as quantiles referring to overweight or obesity. The variables TV watching, maternal BMI and weight gain in the first 2 years were directly, and meal frequency was inversely significantly associated with body composition in any model type examined. In contrast, smoking in pregnancy was not directly, and breastfeeding and parental social class were not inversely significantly associated with body composition in GLM models, but in GAMLSS and partly in quantile regression models. Risk factor specific BMI percentile curves could be estimated from GAMLSS and quantile regression models. Conclusion GAMLSS and quantile regression seem to be more appropriate than common GLMs for risk factor modeling of BMI data.

  18. Nuclear mass formula with a neutron skin degree of freedom and finite-range model for the surface energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility of extending the model used by Moeller and Nix in 1980 to calculate nuclear masses and fission barriers for nuclei throughout the periodic system to include provision for the existence of a neutron skin is studied. The model gives excellent fit to masses and fission barriers and improves predictions of isotopic trends in charge radii

  19. On the mathematical modeling of wound healing angiogenesis in skin as a reaction-transport process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A Flegg

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the last thirty years, numerous research groups have attempted to provide mathematical descriptions of the skin wound healing process. The development of theoretical models of the interlinked processes that underlie the healing mechanism has yielded considerable insight into aspects of this critical phenomenon that remain difficult to investigate empirically. In particular, the mathematical modeling of angiogenesis, i.e. capillary sprout growth has offered new paradigms for the understanding of this highly complex and crucial step in the healing pathway. With the recent advances in imaging and cell tracking, the time is now ripe for an appraisal of the utility and importance of mathematical modeling in wound healing angiogenesis research. The purpose of this review is to pedagogically elucidate the conceptual principles that have underpinned the development of mathematical descriptions of wound healing angiogenesis, specifically those that have utilized a continuum reaction-transport framework, and highlight the contribution that such models have made towards the advancement of research in this field. We aim to draw attention to the common assumptions made when developing models of this nature, thereby bringing into focus the advantages and limitations of this approach. A deeper integration of mathematical modeling techniques into the practice of wound healing angiogenesis research promises new perspectives for advancing our knowledge in this area. To this end we detail several open problems related to the understanding of wound healing angiogenesis, and outline how these issues could be addressed through closer cross-disciplinary collaboration.

  20. Modelling the effect of structural QSAR parameters on skin penetration using genetic programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, K. K.; Do, D. Q.

    2010-09-01

    In order to model relationships between chemical structures and biological effects in quantitative structure–activity relationship (QSAR) data, an alternative technique of artificial intelligence computing—genetic programming (GP)—was investigated and compared to the traditional method—statistical. GP, with the primary advantage of generating mathematical equations, was employed to model QSAR data and to define the most important molecular descriptions in QSAR data. The models predicted by GP agreed with the statistical results, and the most predictive models of GP were significantly improved when compared to the statistical models using ANOVA. Recently, artificial intelligence techniques have been applied widely to analyse QSAR data. With the capability of generating mathematical equations, GP can be considered as an effective and efficient method for modelling QSAR data.

  1. Numerical modelling of salt diapirism and the surrounding temperature field during thin-skinned extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieulot, Cedric; Harms, Guido

    2016-04-01

    The occurrence of salt diapirs is strongly associated with potential geothermal and hydrocarbon energy sources. Many numerical modelling studies of diapirism have been done in the past, though very few of these in fact use geologically realistic settings and materials. Besides, only analogue and structural studies have been done on full scale diapirism during thin-skinned extension. Two-dimensional numerical modelling of this problem using a Finite Element code aims at addressing the following questions: which geometrical or material parameters affect the growth rate and shape of the diapir and how? what is the effect of this diapirism on the temperature field and surface heat flux? How does the inclusion of simple surface processes influence these observations to first order ? Our results show that, in compliance with both analogue modelling and structural geological studies, a diapir formed during thin-skinned extension undergoes three phases: reactional piercement, active piercement and passive piercement. Extension rates directly influence the total time required for the diapir to reach the surface, as well as how long the system remains in a state of reactional diapirism, which both affect the shape of the resulting diapir. Erosion efficiency is found to affect the growth rate of the diapir during its active stage and the total rising time, which affects in turn its the shape. The density contrast between the salt and the sediments also influences the growth rate during active and passive piercement. Finally, the temperature surrounding a rising diapir (especially in the region above it) is found to be heightened by a few dozens of degrees.

  2. Promotion of accelerated repair in a radiation impaired wound healing model in murine skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surgical resection of many tumours following radiotherapy is well established as the preferred approach to eradicating the disease. However, prior irradiation compromises the healing of surgical wounds in 30-60% of cases, depending on the site of treatment. There is a need therefore, to understand the deficit in the repair process and to develop therapeutic interventions that may help address this problem. To this end, the aims of this thesis were to characterise a wound healing model in irradiated murine skin and to investigate the effects of topical- compounds and therapeutic modalities upon this wound healing model. Full-thickness dorsal skin excisions were made within a pre-irradiated area (20Gy) in male Balb/c mice and wounds were made in a corresponding area in control animals. Biopsies were removed for histological and immunohistochemical analysis, whilst wound closure experiments were used to determine effects of topical compounds and therapeutic modalities (Low Intensity Laser Therapy, Therapeutic Ultrasound and Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation) upon the rate of repair. X-ray irradiation (20Gy) caused a significant delay in the rate of wound closure, whilst histological results indicated that prior irradiation delays the influx of inflammatory cells, delays wound reepithelialisation and reduces granulation tissue formation and collagen deposition. Macrophage and endothelial cell numbers were found to be significantly lower in the irradiated wounds when compared to unirradiated control wounds. Furthermore, apoptosis was affected by irradiation. Although results failed to support any claimed stimulatory effects of various therapeutic modalities upon wound healing, topical application of glucans were shown to have a slight beneficial effect upon the rate of repair. In conclusion, the observed cellular effects caused by irradiation may be a result of permanent damage to stem cells and their ability to replicate and reproduce. Furthermore, the

  3. Modeling mixtures of thyroid gland function disruptors in a vertebrate alternative model, the zebrafish eleutheroembryo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maternal thyroxine (T4) plays an essential role in fetal brain development, and even mild and transitory deficits in free-T4 in pregnant women can produce irreversible neurological effects in their offspring. Women of childbearing age are daily exposed to mixtures of chemicals disrupting the thyroid gland function (TGFDs) through the diet, drinking water, air and pharmaceuticals, which has raised the highest concern for the potential additive or synergic effects on the development of mild hypothyroxinemia during early pregnancy. Recently we demonstrated that zebrafish eleutheroembryos provide a suitable alternative model for screening chemicals impairing the thyroid hormone synthesis. The present study used the intrafollicular T4-content (IT4C) of zebrafish eleutheroembryos as integrative endpoint for testing the hypotheses that the effect of mixtures of TGFDs with a similar mode of action [inhibition of thyroid peroxidase (TPO)] was well predicted by a concentration addition concept (CA) model, whereas the response addition concept (RA) model predicted better the effect of dissimilarly acting binary mixtures of TGFDs [TPO-inhibitors and sodium-iodide symporter (NIS)-inhibitors]. However, CA model provided better prediction of joint effects than RA in five out of the six tested mixtures. The exception being the mixture MMI (TPO-inhibitor)-KClO4 (NIS-inhibitor) dosed at a fixed ratio of EC10 that provided similar CA and RA predictions and hence it was difficult to get any conclusive result. There results support the phenomenological similarity criterion stating that the concept of concentration addition could be extended to mixture constituents having common apical endpoints or common adverse outcomes. - Highlights: • Potential synergic or additive effect of mixtures of chemicals on thyroid function. • Zebrafish as alternative model for testing the effect of mixtures of goitrogens. • Concentration addition seems to predict better the effect of mixtures of

  4. Modeling mixtures of thyroid gland function disruptors in a vertebrate alternative model, the zebrafish eleutheroembryo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thienpont, Benedicte; Barata, Carlos [Department of Environmental Chemistry, Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research (IDAEA, CSIC), Jordi Girona, 18-26, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Raldúa, Demetrio, E-mail: drpqam@cid.csic.es [Department of Environmental Chemistry, Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research (IDAEA, CSIC), Jordi Girona, 18-26, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Maladies Rares: Génétique et Métabolisme (MRGM), University of Bordeaux, EA 4576, F-33400 Talence (France)

    2013-06-01

    Maternal thyroxine (T4) plays an essential role in fetal brain development, and even mild and transitory deficits in free-T4 in pregnant women can produce irreversible neurological effects in their offspring. Women of childbearing age are daily exposed to mixtures of chemicals disrupting the thyroid gland function (TGFDs) through the diet, drinking water, air and pharmaceuticals, which has raised the highest concern for the potential additive or synergic effects on the development of mild hypothyroxinemia during early pregnancy. Recently we demonstrated that zebrafish eleutheroembryos provide a suitable alternative model for screening chemicals impairing the thyroid hormone synthesis. The present study used the intrafollicular T4-content (IT4C) of zebrafish eleutheroembryos as integrative endpoint for testing the hypotheses that the effect of mixtures of TGFDs with a similar mode of action [inhibition of thyroid peroxidase (TPO)] was well predicted by a concentration addition concept (CA) model, whereas the response addition concept (RA) model predicted better the effect of dissimilarly acting binary mixtures of TGFDs [TPO-inhibitors and sodium-iodide symporter (NIS)-inhibitors]. However, CA model provided better prediction of joint effects than RA in five out of the six tested mixtures. The exception being the mixture MMI (TPO-inhibitor)-KClO{sub 4} (NIS-inhibitor) dosed at a fixed ratio of EC{sub 10} that provided similar CA and RA predictions and hence it was difficult to get any conclusive result. There results support the phenomenological similarity criterion stating that the concept of concentration addition could be extended to mixture constituents having common apical endpoints or common adverse outcomes. - Highlights: • Potential synergic or additive effect of mixtures of chemicals on thyroid function. • Zebrafish as alternative model for testing the effect of mixtures of goitrogens. • Concentration addition seems to predict better the effect of

  5. Identification of Errors in the Hanford Site-Wide Groundwater Flow Model by Inverse Modeling of Alternative Conceptual Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, C. R.; Scheibe, T. D.; Vermeul, V. R.; Wurstner, S. K.; Thorne, P. D.; Freedman, V. L.; Murray, C. J.; Bergeron, M. P.

    2002-12-01

    A regional-scale, three-dimensional groundwater flow and transport modeling effort has been undertaken to quantify the environmental consequences of past waste disposal activities and support ongoing environmental management activities at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site. An important aspect of this effort is the identification and quantification of uncertainties associated with model predictions. It is recognized that such uncertainties arise not only from selection of inappropriate groundwater model parameters (parameter error), but also from the underlying conceptualization of the groundwater system (model error). Therefore, we have adopted an approach to uncertainty characterization that involves the evaluation of multiple alternative conceptual models (ACMs) within an inverse modeling framework. The initial step in implementation of the framework was the development of a multi-processor implementation of the UCODE inverse modeling system and application of the inverse framework to update parameter estimates from a prior deterministic model. A preliminary first-order uncertainty analysis was performed based on the model results. At the same time, site geologists developed an improved conceptual model of the 3D structure of the aquifer system. Inverse modeling of the updated conceptual model led to estimates of some parameters, especially specific yield, that were not plausible, indicating that there were problems with the conceptual model. As a result, additional ACMs were developed and subjected to inverse analysis, including an alternative with modified boundary conditions (leaky underlying bedrock), an alternative incorporating surface recharge modifications based on surface run-on from an adjacent topographic feature, and an alternative incorporating an improved description of the timing and volume of waste discharges arriving at the water table (upper model boundary). Model predictions of transient hydraulic heads under each ACM were compared

  6. The Confidence Model: An Alternative Approach to Alleviating Communication Apprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Arden K.

    Recognizing that each student is different in terms of communication apprehension and needed skills, the confidence model attempts to provide instruction in anxiety reduction and skill development, combining the features of both the behavior therapy and the rhetoritherapy theories of communication apprehension. The rational emotive therapy used in…

  7. Modeling Health Insurance Expansions: Effects of Alternate Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remler, Dahlia K.; Zivin, Joshua Graff; Glied, Sherry A.

    2004-01-01

    Estimates of the costs and consequences of many types of public policy proposals play an important role in the development and adoption of particular policy programs. Estimates of the same, or similar, policies that employ different modeling approaches can yield widely divergent results. Such divergence often undermines effective policymaking.…

  8. Culture-Specific Counseling: An Alternative Training Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwachuku, Uchenna T.; Ivey, Allen E.

    1991-01-01

    Promotes culture-specific counseling approach, which starts with the culture and its people and searches out natural helping styles. Uses case model drawn from African-Igbo culture and applies anthropological constructs that seek to discover more culturally sensitive approach to counseling theory, to training in counseling skills and knowledge,…

  9. Peristomal skin complications are common, expensive, and difficult to manage: a population based cost modeling study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Meisner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Peristomal skin complications (PSCs are the most common post-operative complications following creation of a stoma. Living with a stoma is a challenge, not only for the patient and their carers, but also for society as a whole. Due to methodological problems of PSC assessment, the associated health-economic burden of medium to longterm complications has been poorly described. AIM: The aim of the present study was to create a model to estimate treatment costs of PSCs using the standardized assessment Ostomy Skin Tool as a reference. The resultant model was applied to a real-life global data set of stoma patients (n = 3017 to determine the prevalence and financial burden of PSCs. METHODS: Eleven experienced stoma care nurses were interviewed to get a global understanding of a treatment algorithm that formed the basis of the cost analysis. The estimated costs were based on a seven week treatment period. PSC costs were estimated for five underlying diagnostic categories and three levels of severity. The estimated treatment costs of severe cases of PSCs were increased 2-5 fold for the different diagnostic categories of PSCs compared with mild cases. French unit costs were applied to the global data set. RESULTS: The estimated total average cost for a seven week treatment period (including appliances and accessories was 263€ for those with PSCs (n = 1742 compared to 215€ for those without PSCs (n = 1172. A co-variance analysis showed that leakage level had a significant impact on PSC cost from 'rarely/never' to 'always/often' p<0.00001 and from 'rarely/never' to 'sometimes' p = 0.0115. CONCLUSION: PSCs are common and troublesome and the consequences are substantial, both for the patient and from a health economic viewpoint. PSCs should be diagnosed and treated at an early stage to prevent long term, debilitating and expensive complications.

  10. Rat epidermal keratinocyte organotypic culture (ROC) as a model for chemically induced skin irritation testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential of rat epidermal keratinocyte (REK) organotypic culture (ROC) with proper stratum corneum barrier as a model for screening skin irritants was evaluated. The test chemicals were selected from ECETOC database (1995) and the observed in vitro irritation potential was compared to ECETOC in vivo primary irritation index (PII), to EU risk phrases, and to the harmonized OECD criteria. Chemicals were applied onto the stratum corneum surface of ROC for 30 min and samples were taken from the underlying medium at 4 and 8 h after exposure. Cell membrane integrity (determined by LDH assay) and pro-inflammatory effect (determined by IL-1α release) were verified at both time points and correlated to PII values. The best correlation (R 2 = 0.831) was seen with LDH leakage test. Based on obtained data, chemicals were classified according to criteria defined by EU and OECD. From 12 chemicals, only two were incorrectly classified according to OECD criteria when using LDH leakage and IL-1α release as irritation markers. At the end of experiment, chemical-treated ROC cultures were fixed and histological changes were assessed. Typical signs for irritation were lightly stained cytoplasm, condensed nuclei, cellular vacuolization, eosinophilic cytoplasms, and blebbing. These irritation effects of chemicals were graded visually into four classes (A-D). The extent of morphological perturbations of the cultures mostly correlated with PII. The present results indicate the validity of the ROC model in predicting skin irritation potential of chemicals and show that the use of set of irritation markers with different mechanistic responses gives more information on irritation than if only one marker was used

  11. Occupational skin diseases: a successful model for multidisciplinary networking in preventive medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John, Swen Malte

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Occupational dermatoses (OD have topped the list of occupational diseases in Germany for years. Presently, approximately 16,000 new OD cases are officially reported to public statutory employers’ liability insurance bodies, each year. The disease burden is high not only for individuals but also for society as a whole. Estimated annual economic costs in Germany due to sick-leave and lack of productivity due to OD are more than 1.5 billion euros. Thus, in recent years, various pilot initiatives aiming to improve prevention of occupational skin diseases (of various degrees of severity have been developed and recently evaluated in Osnabrück. These activities have been funded by statutory employers’ liability insurance schemes. Concepts underpinning these initiatives include multidisciplinary skin protection teaching programs for various high-risk professions, which turned out to be pivotal for the success of these projects. A corollary of this work is a nationwide multi-step intervention approach currently implemented by the public statutory insurance system. This approach offers quick preventive help for all levels of severity of OD. These nation-wide activities are accompanied by a national Prevention Campaign: Skin 2007/2008 (Figure 1 (Fig. 1, which focuses mainly on primary prevention. Despite the high prevalence of OD and its poor prognosis, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying individual susceptibility to develop chronic irritant dermatitis. Skin irritation tests are thus far of only limited value. Presently, our institution, in collaboration with Amsterdam universities, focuses on immunogenetic risk factors potentially involved in individual susceptibility to OD in order to improve pre-employment counseling and predictive skin testing. For early secondary prevention, the so-called dermatologist’s procedure was recently up-dated in order to provide more rapid dermatological consultation. Additionally, combined

  12. The alternative Iranian model of living renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmonico, Francis L

    2012-09-01

    The experience of the Iranian model should be carefully considered by those who suggest a pilot trial of a regulated market in organ sales. Mahdavi-Mazdeh's candid report makes clear that a fixed price as the basis of regulation is not possible. Iran is proceeding with an independent program of deceased organ donation in cities such as Shiraz. Mahdavi-Mazdeh's report is encouraging for the prospect of a revitalized expansion of deceased donation.

  13. Site characterization alternatives for numerical models of a deep excavation

    OpenAIRE

    Sau, Núria; Arroyo Alvarez de Toledo, Marcos; Gens Solé, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    A cut-and-cover railway tunnel site on the outskirts of Barcelona benefited from an extensive site investigation campaign. During the construction of the tunnel, the displacement of the wall as well as the of soil beneath was recorded. A 2D numerical model of the excavation sequence was established. The large amount of site investigation data allowed a systematic comparative approach. Four different soil characterization strategies were mimicked, deliberately ignoring one or another subset...

  14. Personality disorders in DSM-5: emerging research on the alternative model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morey, Leslie C; Benson, Kathryn T; Busch, Alexander J; Skodol, Andrew E

    2015-04-01

    The current categorical classification of personality disorders, originally introduced in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-III), has been found to suffer from numerous shortcomings that hamper its usefulness for research and for clinical application. The Personality and Personality Disorders Work Group for DSM-5 was charged with developing an alternative model that would address many of these concerns. The developed model involved a hybrid dimensional/categorical model that represented personality disorders as combinations of core impairments in personality functioning with specific configurations of problematic personality traits. The Board of Trustees of the American Psychiatric Association did not accept the Task Force recommendation to implement this novel approach, and thus this alternative model was included in Sect. III of the DSM-5 among concepts requiring additional study. This review provides an overview of the emerging research on this alternative model, addressing each of the primary components of the model.

  15. Alternative DFN model based on initial site investigations at Simpevarp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darcel, C. [Itasca Consultants, Ecully (France); Davy, S.A.P.; Bour, O.; Dreuzy, J.R. de [Geosciences, Rennes (France)

    2004-12-01

    In this report, we provide a first-order analysis of the fracture network at the Simpevarp site. The first order model is the fracture distribution function, noted, fdf, which provides the number of fractures having a given orientation and length, and belonging to a given volume of observation. The first-order distribution model does not describe higher-order correlation between fracture parameters, such as a possible dependency of fracture length distribution with orientations. We also check that most of the information is contained in this 1st-order distribution model, and that dividing the fracture networks into different sets do not bring a better statistical description. The fracture distribution function contains 3 main distributions: the probability distribution of fracture orientations, the dependency on the size of the sampling domain that may exhibit non-trivial scaling in case of fractal correlations, and the fracture-length density distribution, which appears to be well fitted by a power law. The main scaling parameters are the fractal dimension and the power-law exponent of the fracture length distribution. The former was found to be about equal to the embedding dimension, meaning that fractal correlations are weak and can be neglected in the DFN model. The latter depends on geology, that is either lithology or grain size, with values that ranges from 3.2 for granite-like outcrops to 4 for diorite or monzodiorite outcrops, as well as for the large-scale lineament maps. When analyzing the consistency of the different datasets (boreholes, outcrops, lineament maps), we found that two different DFNs can be described: the first one is derived from the fdf of the outcrop with fine-grained size lithology, and is valid across all scales investigated in this study, from the highly-fractured cores to large-scale maps; the second one is derived from the fdf of the outcrops with coarse-grained size lithology, and is found consistent with cores that present the

  16. Decolonisation of MRSA, S. aureus and E. coli by cold-atmospheric plasma using a porcine skin model in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Maisch

    Full Text Available In the last twenty years new antibacterial agents approved by the U.S. FDA decreased whereas in parallel the resistance situation of multi-resistant bacteria increased. Thus, community and nosocomial acquired infections of resistant bacteria led to a decrease in the efficacy of standard therapy, prolonging treatment time and increasing healthcare costs. Therefore, the aim of this work was to demonstrate the applicability of cold atmospheric plasma for decolonisation of Gram-positive (Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, Methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus and Gram-negative bacteria (E. coli using an ex vivo pig skin model. Freshly excised skin samples were taken from six month old female pigs (breed: Pietrain. After application of pure bacteria on the surface of the explants these were treated with cold atmospheric plasma for up to 15 min. Two different plasma devices were evaluated. A decolonisation efficacy of 3 log(10 steps was achieved already after 6 min of plasma treatment. Longer plasma treatment times achieved a killing rate of 5 log(10 steps independently from the applied bacteria strains. Histological evaluations of untreated and treated skin areas upon cold atmospheric plasma treatment within 24 h showed no morphological changes as well as no significant degree of necrosis or apoptosis determined by the TUNEL-assay indicating that the porcine skin is still vital. This study demonstrates for the first time that cold atmospheric plasma is able to very efficiently kill bacteria applied to an intact skin surface using an ex vivo porcine skin model. The results emphasize the potential of cold atmospheric plasma as a new possible treatment option for decolonisation of human skin from bacteria in patients in the future without harming the surrounding tissue.

  17. Measuring the effects of topically applied skin optical clearing agents and modeling the effects and consequences for laser therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkruysse, Wim; Khan, Misbah; Choi, Bernard; Svaasand, Lars O.; Nelson, J. Stuart

    2005-04-01

    Human skin prepared with an optical clearing agent manifests reduced scattering as a result of de-hydration and refractive index matching. This has potentially large effects for laser therapies of several skin lesions such as port wine stain, hair removal and tattoo removal. With most topically applied clearing agents the clearing effect is limited because they penetrate poorly through the intact superficial skin layer (stratum corneum). Agent application modi other than topical are impractical and have limited the success of optical clearing in laser dermatology. In recent reports, however, a mixture of lipofylic and hydrofylic agents was shown to successfully penetrate through the intact stratum corneum layer which has raised new interest in this field. Immediately after application, the optical clearing effect is superficial and, as the agent diffuses through the skin, reduced scattering is manifested in deeper skin layers. For practical purposes as well as to maximize therapeutic success, it is important to quantify the reduced scattering as well as the trans-cutaneous transport dynamics of the agent. We determined the time and tissue depth resolved effects of optically cleared skin by inserting a microscopic reflector array in the skin. Depth dependent light intensity was measured by quantifying the signal of the reflector array with optical coherence tomography. A 1-dimensional mass diffusion model was used to estimate a trans-cutaneous transport diffusion constant for the clearing agent mixture. The results are used in Monte Carlo modeling to determine the optimal time of laser treatment after topical application of the optical clearing agent.

  18. Two-layer optical model of skin for early, non-invasive detection of wound development on the diabetic foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudovsky, Dmitry; Nouvong, Aksone; Schomacker, Kevin; Pilon, Laurent

    2010-02-01

    Foot ulceration is a debilitating comorbidity of diabetes that may result in loss of mobility and amputation. Optical detection of cutaneous tissue changes due to inflammation and necrosis at the preulcer site could constitute a preventative strategy. A commercial hyperspectral oximetry system was used to measure tissue oxygenation on the feet of diabetic patients. A previously developed predictive index was used to differentiate preulcer tissue from surrounding healthy tissue with a sensitivity of 92% and specificity of 80%. To improve prediction accuracy, an optical skin model was developed treating skin as a two-layer medium and explicitly accounting for (i) melanin content and thickness of the epidermis, (ii) blood content and hemoglobin saturation of the dermis, and (iii) tissue scattering in both layers. Using this forward model, an iterative inverse method was used to determine the skin properties from hyperspectral images of preulcerative areas. The use of this information in lowering the false positive rate was discussed.

  19. Modeling of Alternative Compositions of Recycled Wrought Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevorkijan, Varužan

    2013-08-01

    Nowadays, a significant part of postconsumed wrought aluminum scrap is still used for the production of comparatively cheaper cast alloys, in that way losing an important part of the potential added value. The share of postconsumed scrap in wrought aluminum alloys could be increased either by sorting to fractions with the required chemical composition and/or by broadening the standard compositional tolerance limits of alloying elements. The first solution requires hand or automatic sorting of postconsumed scrap as alloys or groups of alloys to the degree of separation sufficient to enable the blending of standard compositions of wrought alloys; the second solution is much more radical, predicting changes in the existing standards for wrought aluminum alloys toward nonstandard alloys but yet having properties acceptable for customers. In this case, the degree of separation of incoming postconsumed scrap required is much less demanding. The model presented in this work enables the design of optimal (standard and nonstandard recycling-friendly) compositions and properties of wrought aluminum alloys with significantly increased amounts of postconsumed scrap. The following two routes were modeled in detail: (I) the blending of standard and nonstandard compositions of wrought aluminum alloys starting from postconsumed aluminum scrap sorted to various degrees simulated by the model and (II) changing the initial standard composition of wrought aluminum alloys to nonstandard "recycling-friendly" ones, with broader concentration tolerance limits of alloying elements and without influencing the selected alloy properties, specified in advance. The applied algorithms were found to be very useful in the industrial design of both procedures: (I) the computation of the required chemical composition of the scrap streams obtained by sorting (or, in other words, the postconsumed scrap sorting level), necessary for achieving the standard wrought alloy composition and (II) the

  20. The Asian Epidemic Model: a process model for exploring HIV policy and programme alternatives in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, T; Peerapatanapokin, W

    2004-08-01

    Process models offer opportunities to explore the effectiveness of different programme and policy alternatives by varying input behaviours and model parameters to reflect programmatic/policy effects. The Asian Epidemic Model (AEM) has been designed to reflect the primary groups and transmission modes driving HIV transmission in Asia. The user adjusts AEM fitting parameters until HIV prevalence outputs from the model agree with observed epidemiological trends. The AEM resultant projections are closely tied to the epidemiological and behavioural data in the country. In Thailand and Cambodia they have shown good agreement with observed epidemiological trends in surveillance populations and with changes in HIV transmission modes, AIDS cases, male:female ratios over time, and other external validation checks. By varying the input behaviours and STI trends, one can examine the impact of different prevention efforts on the future course of the epidemic. In conclusion, the AEM is a semi-empirical model, which has worked well in Asian settings. It provides a useful tool for policy and programme analysis in Asian countries. PMID:15249695

  1. Matrix Model for Choosing Green Marketing Sustainable Strategic Alternatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cătălina Sitnikov

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Green marketing examines the symbiotic role played by marketing in ensuring sustainable business, exploring issues concerning the environment and the way strategic decisions can influence it. At present, the environmental issues concern more and more the competitive approach any organization can implement. Based on this approach, organizations can gain competitive advantage by managing environmental variables and by developing and implementing green marketing strategies. Considering the importance and impact of green marketing, by using theoretical concepts and defining a set of research directions, the paper and the research conducted were focused on creating a matrix model for choosing the optimal green marketing strategy, oriented towards competitive advantage. The model is based on the correlation that can be established among the generic strategies of competitive advantage, the variables of extended marketing mix (7Ps and the green marketing strategy matrix. There are also analyzed the implications that may be generated within a company by the adoption of a green marketing strategy and its role in promoting the environmental benefits of products.

  2. Concurrent Reflectance Confocal Microscopy and Laser Doppler Flowmetry to Improve Skin Cancer Imaging: A Monte Carlo Model and Experimental Validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowla, Alireza; Taimre, Thomas; Lim, Yah Leng; Bertling, Karl; Wilson, Stephen J; Prow, Tarl W; Soyer, H Peter; Rakić, Aleksandar D

    2016-01-01

    Optical interrogation of suspicious skin lesions is standard care in the management of skin cancer worldwide. Morphological and functional markers of malignancy are often combined to improve expert human diagnostic power. We propose the evaluation of the combination of two independent optical biomarkers of skin tumours concurrently. The morphological modality of reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is combined with the functional modality of laser Doppler flowmetry, which is capable of quantifying tissue perfusion. To realize the idea, we propose laser feedback interferometry as an implementation of RCM, which is able to detect the Doppler signal in addition to the confocal reflectance signal. Based on the proposed technique, we study numerical models of skin tissue incorporating two optical biomarkers of malignancy: (i) abnormal red blood cell velocities and concentrations and (ii) anomalous optical properties manifested through tissue confocal reflectance, using Monte Carlo simulation. We also conduct a laboratory experiment on a microfluidic channel containing a dynamic turbid medium, to validate the efficacy of the technique. We quantify the performance of the technique by examining a signal to background ratio (SBR) in both the numerical and experimental models, and it is shown that both simulated and experimental SBRs improve consistently using this technique. This work indicates the feasibility of an optical instrument, which may have a role in enhanced imaging of skin malignancies. PMID:27598157

  3. Concurrent Reflectance Confocal Microscopy and Laser Doppler Flowmetry to Improve Skin Cancer Imaging: A Monte Carlo Model and Experimental Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowla, Alireza; Taimre, Thomas; Lim, Yah Leng; Bertling, Karl; Wilson, Stephen J.; Prow, Tarl W.; Soyer, H. Peter; Rakić, Aleksandar D.

    2016-01-01

    Optical interrogation of suspicious skin lesions is standard care in the management of skin cancer worldwide. Morphological and functional markers of malignancy are often combined to improve expert human diagnostic power. We propose the evaluation of the combination of two independent optical biomarkers of skin tumours concurrently. The morphological modality of reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is combined with the functional modality of laser Doppler flowmetry, which is capable of quantifying tissue perfusion. To realize the idea, we propose laser feedback interferometry as an implementation of RCM, which is able to detect the Doppler signal in addition to the confocal reflectance signal. Based on the proposed technique, we study numerical models of skin tissue incorporating two optical biomarkers of malignancy: (i) abnormal red blood cell velocities and concentrations and (ii) anomalous optical properties manifested through tissue confocal reflectance, using Monte Carlo simulation. We also conduct a laboratory experiment on a microfluidic channel containing a dynamic turbid medium, to validate the efficacy of the technique. We quantify the performance of the technique by examining a signal to background ratio (SBR) in both the numerical and experimental models, and it is shown that both simulated and experimental SBRs improve consistently using this technique. This work indicates the feasibility of an optical instrument, which may have a role in enhanced imaging of skin malignancies. PMID:27598157

  4. Concurrent Reflectance Confocal Microscopy and Laser Doppler Flowmetry to Improve Skin Cancer Imaging: A Monte Carlo Model and Experimental Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Mowla

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Optical interrogation of suspicious skin lesions is standard care in the management of skin cancer worldwide. Morphological and functional markers of malignancy are often combined to improve expert human diagnostic power. We propose the evaluation of the combination of two independent optical biomarkers of skin tumours concurrently. The morphological modality of reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM is combined with the functional modality of laser Doppler flowmetry, which is capable of quantifying tissue perfusion. To realize the idea, we propose laser feedback interferometry as an implementation of RCM, which is able to detect the Doppler signal in addition to the confocal reflectance signal. Based on the proposed technique, we study numerical models of skin tissue incorporating two optical biomarkers of malignancy: (i abnormal red blood cell velocities and concentrations and (ii anomalous optical properties manifested through tissue confocal reflectance, using Monte Carlo simulation. We also conduct a laboratory experiment on a microfluidic channel containing a dynamic turbid medium, to validate the efficacy of the technique. We quantify the performance of the technique by examining a signal to background ratio (SBR in both the numerical and experimental models, and it is shown that both simulated and experimental SBRs improve consistently using this technique. This work indicates the feasibility of an optical instrument, which may have a role in enhanced imaging of skin malignancies.

  5. Concurrent Reflectance Confocal Microscopy and Laser Doppler Flowmetry to Improve Skin Cancer Imaging: A Monte Carlo Model and Experimental Validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowla, Alireza; Taimre, Thomas; Lim, Yah Leng; Bertling, Karl; Wilson, Stephen J; Prow, Tarl W; Soyer, H Peter; Rakić, Aleksandar D

    2016-09-01

    Optical interrogation of suspicious skin lesions is standard care in the management of skin cancer worldwide. Morphological and functional markers of malignancy are often combined to improve expert human diagnostic power. We propose the evaluation of the combination of two independent optical biomarkers of skin tumours concurrently. The morphological modality of reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is combined with the functional modality of laser Doppler flowmetry, which is capable of quantifying tissue perfusion. To realize the idea, we propose laser feedback interferometry as an implementation of RCM, which is able to detect the Doppler signal in addition to the confocal reflectance signal. Based on the proposed technique, we study numerical models of skin tissue incorporating two optical biomarkers of malignancy: (i) abnormal red blood cell velocities and concentrations and (ii) anomalous optical properties manifested through tissue confocal reflectance, using Monte Carlo simulation. We also conduct a laboratory experiment on a microfluidic channel containing a dynamic turbid medium, to validate the efficacy of the technique. We quantify the performance of the technique by examining a signal to background ratio (SBR) in both the numerical and experimental models, and it is shown that both simulated and experimental SBRs improve consistently using this technique. This work indicates the feasibility of an optical instrument, which may have a role in enhanced imaging of skin malignancies.

  6. Response-surface models for deterministic effects of localized irradiation of the skin by discrete {beta}/{gamma} -emitting sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, B.R.

    1995-12-01

    Individuals who work at nuclear reactor facilities can be at risk for deterministic effects in the skin from exposure to discrete {Beta}- and {gamma}-emitting ({Beta}{gamma}E) sources (e.g., {Beta}{gamma}E hot particles) on the skin or clothing. Deterministic effects are non-cancer effects that have a threshold and increase in severity as dose increases (e.g., ulcer in skin). Hot {Beta}{gamma}E particles are {sup 60}Co- or nuclear fuel-derived particles with diameters > 10 {mu}m and < 3 mm and contain at least 3.7 kBq (0.1 {mu}Ci) of radioactivity. For such {Beta}{gamma}E sources on the skin, it is the beta component of the dose that is most important. To develop exposure limitation systems that adequately control exposure of workers to discrete {Beta}{gamma}E sources, models are needed for systems that adequately control exposure of workers to discrete {Beta}{gamma}E sources, models are needed for evaluating the risk of deterministic effects of localized {Beta} irradiation of the skin. The purpose of this study was to develop dose-rate and irradiated-area dependent, response-surface models for evaluating risks of significant deterministic effects of localized irradiation of the skin by discrete {Beta}{gamma}E sources and to use modeling results to recommend approaches to limiting occupational exposure to such sources. The significance of the research results as follows: (1) response-surface models are now available for evaluating the risk of specific deterministic effects of localized irradiation of the skin; (2) modeling results have been used to recommend approaches to limiting occupational exposure of workers to {Beta} radiation from {Beta}{gamma}E sources on the skin or on clothing; and (3) the generic irradiated-volume, weighting-factor approach to limiting exposure can be applied to other organs including the eye, the ear, and organs of the respiratory or gastrointestinal tract and can be used for both deterministic and stochastic effects.

  7. The effect of low dose ionizing radiation on homeostasis and functional integrity in an organotypic human skin model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neubeck, Claere von [German Cancer Consortium DKTK partner site Dresden, OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden, Fetscherstrasse 74, 01307 Dresden (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Geniza, Matthew J. [Molecular and Cellular Biology Program, Oregon State University, Corvallis OR 97331 (United States); Kauer, Paula M.; Robinson, R. Joe; Chrisler, William B. [Health Impacts and Exposure Science, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 (United States); Sowa, Marianne B., E-mail: marianne.sowa@pnnl.gov [Health Impacts and Exposure Science, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Low doses of high LET radiation influence skin homeostasis. • Effects on proliferation and differentiation profiles are LET dependent. • Skin barrier function is not compromised following low dose exposure. - Abstract: Outside the protection of Earth's atmosphere, astronauts are exposed to low doses of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation. Future NASA plans for deep space missions or a permanent settlement on the moon are limited by the health risks associated with space radiation exposures. There is a paucity of direct epidemiological data for low dose exposures to space radiation-relevant high LET ions. Health risk models are used to estimate the risk for such exposures, though these models are based on high dose experiments. There is increasing evidence, however, that low and high dose exposures result in different signaling events at the molecular level, and may involve different response mechanisms. Further, despite their low abundance, high LET particles have been identified as the major contributor to health risk during manned space flight. The human skin is exposed in every external radiation scenario, making it an ideal epithelial tissue model in which to study radiation induced effects. Here, we exposed an in vitro three dimensional (3-D) human organotypic skin tissue model to low doses of high LET oxygen (O), silicon (Si) and iron (Fe) ions. We measured proliferation and differentiation profiles in the skin tissue and examined the integrity of the skin's barrier function. We discuss the role of secondary particles in changing the proportion of cells receiving a radiation dose, emphasizing the possible impact on radiation-induced health issues in astronauts.

  8. Development of Versatile Compressor Modeling using Approximation Techniques for Alternative Refrigerants Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL; Shrestha, Som S [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Refrigerants are the life-blood of vapor compression systems that are widely used in Heating, Ventilation, Air-Conditioning, and Refrigeration (HVAC&R) applications. The HVAC&R community is currently transitioning from main-stream refrigerants that have high Global Warming Potential (GWP) to alternative lower-GWP refrigerants. During this transition, it is important to account for the life cycle climate performance of alternative refrigerants since their performance will be different than that of higher-GWP refrigerants. This requires the evaluation of the system performance with the new refrigerants. Unfortunately, it is extremely difficult to predict the realistic performance of new alternative refrigerants without experimental validation. One of the main challenges in this regard is modeling the compressor performance with high fidelity due to the complex interaction of operating parameters, geometry, boundary conditions, and fluid properties. High fidelity compressor models are computationally expensive and require significant pre-processing to evaluate the performance of alternative refrigerants. This paper presents a new approach to modeling compressor performance when alternative refrigerants are used. The new modeling concept relies on using existing compressor performance to create an approximate model that captures the dependence of compressor performance on key operating parameters and fluid properties. The model can be built using a myriad of approximation techniques. This paper focuses on Kriging-based techniques to develop higher fidelity approximate compressor models. Baseline and at least one alternative refrigerant performance data are used to build the model. The model accuracy was evaluated by comparing the model results with compressor performance data using other refrigerants. Preliminary results show that the approximate model can predict the compressor mass flow rate and power consumption within 5%.

  9. Alternative models for two crystal structures of bovine rhodopsin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenkamp, Ronald E., E-mail: stenkamp@u.washington.edu [Departments of Biological Structure and Biochemistry, Biomolecular Structure Center, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2008-08-01

    Two crystal structures of rhodopsin that were originally described using trigonal symmetry can be interpreted in a hexagonal unit cell with a smaller asymmetric unit. The space-group symmetry of two crystal forms of rhodopsin (PDB codes 1gzm and 2j4y; space group P3{sub 1}) can be re-interpreted as hexagonal (space group P6{sub 4}). Two molecules of the G protein-coupled receptor are present in the asymmetric unit in the trigonal models. However, the noncrystallographic twofold axes parallel to the c axis can be treated as crystallographic symmetry operations in the hexagonal space group. This halves the asymmetric unit and makes all of the protein molecules equivalent in these structures. Corrections for merohedral twinning were also applied in the refinement in the higher symmetry space group for one of the structures (2j4y)

  10. Design, modeling, and optimization of compliant tensegrity fabrics for the reduction of turbulent skin friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Haoxiang; Bewley, Thomas R.

    2003-07-01

    In this project, we have designed a new type of flexible surface, which we call a tensegrity fabric, and simulated the interaction of this flexible surface with a near-wall turbulent flow. The fabric is constructed by weaving together both members in tension (tendons) and members in compression (bars) to form a plate-class tensegrity structure, then covering this discrete flexible structure with a continuous flexible membrane. We have modeled the flow/structure interaction by coupling a spectral Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) code resolving the (continuous) turbulent flow system and an efficient structural dynamics code which simulates direclty the motion of the (discrete) extensive, small-scale, and interconnected tensegrity structure. The structural dynamics code used was developed by Prof. Robert Skelton's lab at UC San Diego. An immersed boundary method is used to capture the effect of the moving boundary in the DNS, and a simple tessellation strategy is used to lump the distributed fluid forces (skin friction and pressure) acting on the membrane onto the nearby nodes of the tensegrity structure. Our ultimate goal is to use this new simulation tool to optimize the design of the tensegrity structure (specifically, the orientation, stiffness, mass, and damping of each of the individual tendons and bars in the unit cell upon which the tensegrity structure is based). Our objective in this optimization is to tune the compliance properties of the fabric in such a way as to reduce the skin-friction drag induced at teh flow/structure interface by weakening the vortices near the wall in the overlying turbulent flow.

  11. Modeling the Effects of Harvest Alternatives on Mitigating Oak Decline in a Central Hardwood Forest Landscape.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen J Wang

    Full Text Available Oak decline is a process induced by complex interactions of predisposing factors, inciting factors, and contributing factors operating at tree, stand, and landscape scales. It has greatly altered species composition and stand structure in affected areas. Thinning, clearcutting, and group selection are widely adopted harvest alternatives for reducing forest vulnerability to oak decline by removing susceptible species and declining trees. However, the long-term, landscape-scale effects of these different harvest alternatives are not well studied because of the limited availability of experimental data. In this study, we applied a forest landscape model in combination with field studies to evaluate the effects of the three harvest alternatives on mitigating oak decline in a Central Hardwood Forest landscape. Results showed that the potential oak decline in high risk sites decreased strongly in the next five decades irrespective of harvest alternatives. This is because oak decline is a natural process and forest succession (e.g., high tree mortality resulting from intense competition would eventually lead to the decrease in oak decline in this area. However, forest harvesting did play a role in mitigating oak decline and the effectiveness varied among the three harvest alternatives. The group selection and clearcutting alternatives were most effective in mitigating oak decline in the short and medium terms, respectively. The long-term effects of the three harvest alternatives on mitigating oak decline became less discernible as the role of succession increased. The thinning alternative had the highest biomass retention over time, followed by the group selection and clearcutting alternatives. The group selection alternative that balanced treatment effects and retaining biomass was the most viable alternative for managing oak decline. Insights from this study may be useful in developing effective and informed forest harvesting plans for managing oak

  12. The natural alternative: protozoa as cellular models for Legionella infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Christine; Harrison, Christopher F; Hilbi, Hubert

    2014-01-01

    The severe pneumonia known as Legionnaires' disease occurs following infection by the Gram-negative bacterium Legionella pneumophila. Normally resident in fresh-water sources, Legionella are subject to predation by eukaryotic phagocytes such as amoeba and ciliates. To counter this, L. pneumophila has evolved a complex system of effector proteins which allow the bacteria to hijack the phagocytic vacuole, hiding and replicating within their erstwhile killers. These same mechanisms allow L. pneumophila to hijack another phagocyte, lung-based macrophages, which thus avoids a vital part of the immune system and leads to infection. The course of infection can be divided into five main categories: pathogen uptake, formation of the replication-permissive vacuole, intracellular replication, host cell response, and bacterial exit. L. pneumophila effector proteins target every stage of this process, interacting with secretory, endosomal, lysosomal, retrograde and autophagy pathways, as well as with mitochondria. Each of these steps can be studied in protozoa or mammalian cells, and the knowledge gained can be readily applied to human pathogenicity. Here we describe the manner whereby L. pneumophila infects host protozoa, the various techniques which are available to analyse these processes and the implications of this model for Legionella virulence and the pathogenesis of Legionnaires' disease.

  13. A constriction resistance model of conjugated polymer based piezoresistive sensors for electronic skin applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalili, N; Naguib, H E; Kwon, R H

    2016-05-14

    Human intervention can be replaced through the development of tools resulting from utilization of sensing devices possessing a wide range of applications including humanoid robots or remote and minimally invasive surgeries. Similar to the five human senses, sensors interface with their surroundings to stimulate a suitable response or action. The sense of touch which arises in human skin is among the most challenging senses to emulate due to its ultra high sensitivity. This has brought forth novel challenging issues to consider in the field of biomimetic robotics. In this work, using a multiphase reaction, a polypyrrole (PPy) based hydrogel is developed as a resistive type pressure sensor with an intrinsically elastic microstructure stemming from three dimensional hollow spheres. It is shown that the electrical conductivity of the fabricated PPy based piezoresistive sensors is enhanced as a result of adding conductive fillers and therefore, endowing the sensors with a higher sensitivity. A semi-analytical constriction resistance based model accounting for the real contact area between the PPy hydrogel sensors and the electrode along with the dependency of the contact resistance change on the applied load is developed. The model is then solved using a Monte Carlo technique and its corresponding sensitivity is obtained. Comparing the results with their experimental counterparts, the proposed modeling methodology offers a good tracking ability. PMID:27035514

  14. Development, fabrication, and modeling of highly sensitive conjugated polymer based piezoresistive sensors in electronic skin applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalili, Nazanin; Naguib, Hani E.; Kwon, Roy H.

    2016-04-01

    Human intervention can be replaced through development of tools resulted from utilizing sensing devices possessing a wide range of applications including humanoid robots or remote and minimally invasive surgeries. Similar to the five human senses, sensors interface with their surroundings to stimulate a suitable response or action. The sense of touch which arises in human skin is among the most challenging senses to emulate due to its ultra high sensitivity. This has brought forth novel challenging issues to consider in the field of biomimetic robotics. In this work, using a multiphase reaction, a polypyrrole (PPy) based hydrogel is developed as a resistive type pressure sensor with an intrinsically elastic microstructure stemming from three dimensional hollow spheres. Furthermore, a semi-analytical constriction resistance model accounting for the real contact area between the PPy hydrogel sensors and the electrode along with the dependency of the contact resistance change on the applied load is developed. The model is then solved using a Monte Carlo technique and the sensitivity of the sensor is obtained. The experimental results showed the good tracking ability of the proposed model.

  15. Mathematical Model and Analysis of Negative Skin Friction of Pile Group in Consolidating Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gangqiang Kong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to calculate negative skin friction (NSF of pile group embedded in a consolidating soil, the dragload calculating formulas of single pile were established by considering Davis one-dimensional nonlinear consolidation soils settlement and hyperbolic load-transfer of pile-soil interface. Based on effective influence area theory, a simple semiempirical mathematical model of analysis for predicting the group effect of pile group under dragload was described. The accuracy and reliability of mathematical models built in this paper were verified by practical engineering comparative analysis. Case studies were studied, and the prediction values were found to be in good agreement with those of measured values. Then, the influences factors, such as, soil consolidation degree, the initial volume compressibility coefficient, and the stiffness of bearing soil, were analyzed and discussed. The results show that the mathematical models considering nonlinear soil consolidation and group effect can reflect the practical NSF of pile group effectively and accurately. The results of this paper can provide reference for practical pile group embedded in consolidating soil under NSF design and calculation.

  16. Numerical Modelling of Combined Heat Transfers in a Double Skin Façade - Full Scale Laboratory Experiment Validation

    OpenAIRE

    Kuznik, Frédéric; Catalina, Tiberiu; Gauzere, Lucie; Woloszyn, Monika; Roux, Jean-Jacques

    2011-01-01

    International audience The present paper presents a numerical modelling of a double skin façade (DSF). The model developed includes a zonal model approach for the mass transfer based on the pressure difference in the DSF. The radiative and convective heat transfers are also taken into account to obtain a global couplingbetween the different phenomena. A full-scale DSF has been experimentallystudied in summer configuration with different airflow rates through the airchannels of the façade a...

  17. Panton-Valentine leukocidin does play a role in the early stage of Staphylococcus aureus skin infections: a rabbit model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urszula Lipinska

    Full Text Available Despite epidemiological data linking necrotizing skin infections with the production of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL, the contribution of this toxin to the virulence of S. aureus has been highly discussed as a result of inconclusive results of in vivo studies. However, the majority of these results originate from experiments using mice, an animal species which neutrophils--the major target cells for PVL--are highly insensitive to the action of this leukocidin. In contrast, the rabbit neutrophils have been shown to be as sensitive to PVL action as human cells, making the rabbit a better experimental animal to explore the PVL role. In this study we examined whether PVL contributes to S. aureus pathogenicity by means of a rabbit skin infection model. The rabbits were injected intradermally with 10(8 cfu of either a PVL positive community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus isolate, its isogenic PVL knockout or a PVL complemented knockout strain, and the development of skin lesions was observed. While all strains induced skin infection, the wild type strain produced larger lesions and a higher degree of skin necrosis compared to the PVL knockout strain in the first week after the infection. The PVL expression in the rabbits was indirectly confirmed by a raise in the serum titer of anti-LukS-PV antibodies observed only in the rabbits infected with PVL positive strains. These results indicate that the rabbit model is more suitable for studying the role of PVL in staphylococcal diseases than other animal models. Further, they support the epidemiological link between PVL producing S. aureus strains and necrotizing skin infections.

  18. Development of a rate model to investigate contributions of anatomic and physiologic determinants of in vivo skin permeation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleischer, N.M.

    1991-01-01

    The skin is a heterogeneous, bi-directional impediment to chemical flux, in which the stratum corneum is a major, though not the sole, rate-limiting barrier layer to permeation. Systemic toxicity following dermal exposure to environmental chemicals and use of skin as a portal for systemic administration of drugs have led to extensive investigations of the inward flux of xenobiotics applied to the outer surface of skin. Those investigations mainly utilized in vitro experimental systems that were limited by the absence of normal physiologic functions. The objective of the present research was to investigate an in vivo skin permeation model system that was sensitive to perturbations of skin capillary physiology and stratum corneum. A [open quotes]fuzzy[close quotes] rat model system was devised that employed outward cutaneous migration of a systemically administered permeation probe, isoflurane. Specially devised, transdermal vapor collection devices were used to capture the outward flux of isoflurane through the skin. Isoflurane flux measurements, coupled with blood isoflurane concentrations, were used to calculate cutaneous permeability coefficients (K[sub p]) of isolflurane, as an index of permeation, under various conditions of normal or perturbed cutaneous physiologic states. Physiologic perturbations were performed to test the sensitivity of the model system to detect effects of minoxidil-mediated vasodilation, phenylephrine-mediated vasoconstriction, and leukotriene D[sub 4]-mediated increased capillary permeability on the outward flux of isoflurane. Tape stripping and topical ether-ethanol application produced either physical removal or chemical disruption of the stratum corneum, respectively. Minoxidil, leukotriene D[sub 4], tape stripping of stratum corneum, and topical ether-ethanol experiments produced statistically significant increases (52 to 193%) in the K[sub p's], while phenylephrine had no significant effect on isoflurane permeation.

  19. Aging Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... email address Submit Home > Healthy Aging > Wellness Healthy Aging Aging skin More information on aging skin When it ... treated early. Return to top More information on Aging skin Read more from womenshealth.gov Varicose Veins ...

  20. Skin Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your skin is your body's largest organ. It covers and protects your body. Your skin Holds body fluids in, preventing dehydration Keeps harmful ... it Anything that irritates, clogs, or inflames your skin can cause symptoms such as redness, swelling, burning, ...

  1. Bromelain nanoparticles protect against 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene induced skin carcinogenesis in mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, Priyanka; Pant, Aditya B; Shukla, Yogeshwer; Chaudhari, Bhushan; Kumar, Pradeep; Gupta, Kailash C

    2015-04-01

    Conventional cancer chemotherapy leads to severe side effects, which limits its use. Nanoparticles (NPs) based delivery systems offer an effective alternative. Several evidences highlight the importance of Bromelain (BL), a proteolytic enzyme, as an anti-tumor agent which however has been limited due to the requirement of high doses at the tumor site. Therefore, we illustrate the development of BL loaded poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) NPs that show enhanced anti-tumor effects compared to free BL. The formulated NPs with a mean particle size of 130.4 ± 8.81 nm exhibited sustained release of BL. Subsequent investigation revealed enhanced anti-tumor ability of NPs in 2-stage skin tumorigenesis mice model. Reduction in average number of tumors (∼ 2.3 folds), delay in tumorigenesis (∼ 2 weeks), percent tumorigenesis (∼ 4 folds), and percent mortality rate as well as a reduction in the average tumor volume (∼ 2.5 folds) in mice as compared to free BL were observed. The NPs were found to be superior in exerting chemopreventive effects over chemotherapeutic effects at 10 fold reduced dose than free BL, validated by the enhanced ability of NPs (∼ 1.8 folds) to protect the DNA from induced damage. The effects were also supported by histopathological evaluations. NPs were also capable of modulating the expression of pro-apoptotic (P53, Bax) and anti-apoptotic (Bcl2) proteins. Therefore, our findings demonstrate that developed NPs formulation could be used to improve the efficacy of chemotherapy by exerting chemo-preventive effects against induced carcinogenesis at lower dosages. PMID:25619920

  2. Surface tension in a compressible liquid-drop model: Effects on nuclear density and neutron skin thickness

    OpenAIRE

    Iida, Kei; Oyamatsu, Kazuhiro

    2004-01-01

    We examine whether or not the surface tension acts to increase the nucleon density in the nuclear interior within a compressible liquid-drop model. We find that it depends on the density dependence of the surface tension, which may in turn be deduced from the neutron skin thickness of stable nuclei.

  3. Nuclear mass formula with a neutron skin degree of freedom and finite-range model for the surface energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, P.; Myers, W.D.

    1984-03-01

    We study the possibility of extending the model used by Moeller and Nix in 1980 to calculate nuclear masses and fission barriers for nuclei throughout the periodic system, to describe compressibility effects and the existence of a neutron skin. 9 references. (WHK)

  4. Dermal uptake and percutaneous penetration of ten flame retardants in a human skin ex vivo model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Marie; Vorkamp, Katrin; Jensen, Niels Martin;

    2016-01-01

    The dermal uptake and percutaneous penetration of ten organic flame retardants was measured using an ex vivo human skin model. The studied compounds were DBDPE, BTBPE, TBP-DBPE, EH-TBB, BEH-TEBP, α, β and γ-HBCDD as well as syn- and anti-DDC-CO. Little or none of the applied flame retardants was ...

  5. An alternative to the standard spatial econometric approaches in hedonic house price models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veie, Kathrine Lausted; Panduro, Toke Emil

    Hedonic models are subject to spatially correlated errors which are a symptom of omitted spatial variables, mis-specification or mismeasurement. Methods have been developed to address this problem through the use of spatial econometrics or spatial fixed effects. However, often spatial correlation...... is modeled without much consideration of the theoretical implications of the chosen model or treated as a nuisance to be dealt with holding little interest of its own. We discuss the limitations of current standard spatial approaches and demonstrate, both empirically and theoretically the generalized...... additive model as an alternative. The generalized additive model is compared with the spatial error model and the fixed effects model. We find the generalized additive model to be a solid alternative to the standard approaches, having less restrictive assumptions about the omitted spatial processes while...

  6. Modelling silviculture alternatives for managing Pinus pinea L. forest in North-East Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piqu-Nicalau, M.; Rio, M. del; Calama, R.; Montero, G.

    2011-07-01

    A yield model was developed to simulate silviculture alternatives for Pinus pinea L. in north-east Spain (Catalonia). The model uses several functions to estimate the main silvicultural parameters at stand level and a disaggregation system to predict diameter distributions. From a network of 75 temporary plots a system of equations to predict stand variables was simultaneously fitted for two stand density types, namely low and high density stands, using the three stage least-squares method (3SLS). The diameter distributions were estimated by the Weibull distribution function using the parameter recovery method (PRM) and the method of moments. Based on this yield model, two silviculture alternatives were simulated for each stand density type and site class, resulting in 16 silviculture scenarios. The yield model and silviculture alternatives offer a management tool and a guide for the sustainable forest management of even aged Pinus pinea forests in this region. (Author) 56 refs.

  7. An alternative method for modeling the size distribution of top wealth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuanjun; You, Shibing

    2016-09-01

    The Pareto distribution has been widely applied in modeling the distribution of wealth, as well as top incomes, cities and firms. However, recent evidence has shown that the Pareto distribution is not consistent with many situations in which it was previously considered applicable. We propose an alternative method for estimating the upper tail distribution of wealth and suggest a new Lorenz curve for building models to provide such estimates. Applying our new models to the Forbes World's Billionaire Lists, we show that they significantly outperform the Pareto Lorenz curve as well as some other popular alternatives.

  8. In vivo characterization of early-stage radiation skin injury in a mouse model by two-photon microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Won Hyuk; Shim, Sehwan; Wang, Taejun; Yoon, Yeoreum; Jang, Won-Suk; Myung, Jae Kyung; Park, Sunhoo; Kim, Ki Hean

    2016-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) injury is tissue damage caused by high energy electromagnetic waves such as X-ray and gamma ray. Diagnosis and treatment of IR injury are difficult due to its characteristics of clinically latent post-irradiation periods and the following successive and unpredictable inflammatory bursts. Skin is one of the many sensitive organs to IR and bears local injury upon exposure. Early-stage diagnosis of IR skin injury is essential in order to maximize treatment efficiency and to prevent the aggravation of IR injury. In this study, early-stage changes of the IR injured skin at the cellular level were characterized in an in vivo mouse model by two-photon microscopy (TPM). Various IR doses were applied to the mouse hind limbs and the injured skin regions were imaged daily for 6 days after IR irradiation. Changes in the morphology and distribution of the epidermal cells and damage of the sebaceous glands were observed before clinical symptoms. These results showed that TPM is sensitive to early-stage changes of IR skin injury and may be useful for its diagnosis. PMID:26755422

  9. Effect of Varying the Angle of Attack of the Scales on a Biomimetic Shark Skin Model on Embedded Vortex Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheelus, Jennifer; Lang, Amy; Bradshaw, Michael; Jones, Emily; Afroz, Farhana; Motta, Philip; Habegger, Maria

    2012-11-01

    The skin of fast-swimming sharks is proposed to have mechanisms to reduce drag and delay flow separation. The skin of fast-swimming and agile sharks is covered with small teeth-like denticles on the order of 0.2 mm. The shortfin mako is one of the fastest and most agile ocean predators creating the need to minimize its pressure drag by controlling flow separation. Biological studies of the shortfin mako skin have shown the passive bristling angle of their denticles to exceed 50 degrees in areas on the flank corresponding to the locations likely to experience separation first. It has been shown that for an angle of attack of 90 degrees, vortices form within these cavities and impose a partial slip condition at the surface of the cavity. This experiment focuses on smaller angles of attack for denticle bristling, closer to the range thought to be achieved on real shark skin. A 3-D bristled shark skin model with varying angle of attack, embedded below a boundary layer, was used to study the formation of cavity vortices through fluorescent dye visualization and Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV). The effect of varying angle of attack on vortex formation will be discussed.

  10. Integrated Computational Solution for Predicting Skin Sensitization Potential of Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Konda Leela Sarath Kumar; Tangadpalliwar, Sujit R.; Aarti Desai; Vivek K Singh; Abhay Jere

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Skin sensitization forms a major toxicological endpoint for dermatology and cosmetic products. Recent ban on animal testing for cosmetics demands for alternative methods. We developed an integrated computational solution (SkinSense) that offers a robust solution and addresses the limitations of existing computational tools i.e. high false positive rate and/or limited coverage. Results The key components of our solution include: QSAR models selected from a combinatorial set, simil...

  11. Compact thermal modeling methodology for predicting skin temperature of passively cooled devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compact thermal modeling of microelectronic systems has recently attracted considerable attention. The present work aims at developing resistor-capacitor (RC) thermal models for predicting time-dependent surface temperature of a passively cooled device. The developed models mimic typical fanless systems cooled by dissipating heat to the surroundings through the enclosure back case by natural convection and radiation. In order to establish a baseline for checking the accuracy of the compact thermal model, the same problem was modeled using three-dimensional, transient, Navier–Stokes equations that were solved numerically by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. For constructing Foster RC-network ladders and to find best-fit thermal constants, temperature step responses of the hot-spot were obtained by applying known power pulses on the discrete heat source. Special attention was paid to the characteristics of the RC-network ladders for obtaining a reasonably accurate numerical scheme for real-time calculation of hot-spot surface temperature. In the present study it is demonstrated that the thermal constants (R, τ) are strong functions of the input power. An alternative usage of formulation for multi-ladder Foster RC-network, incorporating time-dependent thermal constants is show-cased. The suggested methodology can be used for non-linear problems involving time- and power-dependent boundary conditions. - Highlights: • A resistor–capacitor (RC) thermal model for predicting surface temperature of passively cooled devices was developed. • It was found that RC-thermal coefficients pertinent to passive systems are power dependent. • An alternative numerical solution was developed to address non-linearity in natural convection and radiation problems

  12. Alternative Models of Entrance Exams and Access to Higher Education: The Case of the Czech Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konecny, Tomas; Basl, Josef; Myslivecek, Jan; Simonova, Natalie

    2012-01-01

    The study compares the potential effects of a university admission exam model based on program-specific knowledge and an alternative model relying on general study aptitude (GSA) in the context of a strongly stratified educational system with considerable excess of demand over supply of university education. Using results of the "Sonda Maturant…

  13. GY SAMPLING THEORY AND GEOSTATISTICS: ALTERNATE MODELS OF VARIABILITY IN CONTINUOUS MEDIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the sampling theory developed by Pierre Gy, sample variability is modeled as the sum of a set of seven discrete error components. The variogram used in geostatisties provides an alternate model in which several of Gy's error components are combined in a continuous mode...

  14. An alternative parameterization of Bayesian logistic hierarchical models for mixed treatment comparisons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pechlivanoglou, Petros; Abegaz, Fentaw; Postma, Maarten J; Wit, Ernst

    2015-01-01

    Mixed treatment comparison (MTC) models rely on estimates of relative effectiveness from randomized clinical trials so as to respect randomization across treatment arms. This approach could potentially be simplified by an alternative parameterization of the way effectiveness is modeled. We introduce

  15. A new structural model of the Pachitea Basin, Peru: Interaction of thick-skinned tectonics and salt detached thrusting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, J.; Rebaza, J.; Westlund, D.; Stratton, M.; Alegria, C.

    2015-11-01

    We present four new structural transects, a new seismo-stratigraphic correlation, a refined structural model and new shortening rates for the Pachitea Basin (=PB), Peru. Our results are based on the integration and detailed interpretation of newly acquired industry seismic (2D, 2005 vintage), existing well data, existing and proprietary surface geology data and newly acquired aero magnetic data (2007 vintage). Our assessment confirms the presence of at least four distinct structural styles in the area, thick-skinned structures, thin-skinned detachment thrusting, salt-tectonics and localized strike-slip tectonics. Based on seismo-stratigraphic correlations we conclude that the oldest rocks carried to outcrop by the San Matias (=SM) thrust are of Jurassic age. We interpret the thin-skinned master detachment to be located in varying positions, directly below or above, autochtonous salt pillows. Timing assessment of the SM thrust sheet reveals that it has been active from at least ˜5 Ma to post-2 Ma, supporting regionally published timing data for this latitude. Positive topographic surface expressions indicate ongoing contraction along the mountain front of the Peruvian Eastern Cordillera (=EC). Across the PB we calculate between 2.6% and 5.5% for thick-skinned shortening and at least 25.5% for the thin-skinned shortening. For the SM thrust sheet we calculate a slip-rate of ˜1-1.6 mm/yr, which is in line with published slip rates on individual thrusts from around the world. Observations along the SM thrust system indicate that thin- and thick-skinned systems interact mechanically, and that they have been active intermittently. We conclude that the location of salt pillows as well as pre-existing or growing basement-involved structures helped trigger the SM thrust. Different types of salt bodies are present in the PB, autochtonous pillows, slightly thrusted pillows and allochtonous diapirs. Our results provide new insight into the structural interplay, particularly

  16. Progressive collapse analysis using updated models for alternate path analysis after a blast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskew, Edward; Jang, Shinae; Bertolaccini, Kelly

    2016-04-01

    Progressive collapse is of rising importance within the structural engineering community due to several recent cases. The alternate path method is a design technique to determine the ability of a structure to sustain the loss of a critical element, or elements, and still resist progressive collapse. However, the alternate path method only considers the removal of the critical elements. In the event of a blast, significant damage may occur to nearby members not included in the alternate path design scenarios. To achieve an accurate assessment of the current condition of the structure after a blast or other extreme event, it may be necessary to reduce the strength or remove additional elements beyond the critical members designated in the alternate path design method. In this paper, a rapid model updating technique utilizing vibration measurements is used to update the structural model to represent the real-time condition of the structure after a blast occurs. Based upon the updated model, damaged elements will either have their strength reduced, or will be removed from the simulation. The alternate path analysis will then be performed, but only utilizing the updated structural model instead of numerous scenarios. After the analysis, the simulated response from the analysis will be compared to failure conditions to determine the buildings post-event condition. This method has the ability to incorporate damage to noncritical members into the analysis. This paper will utilize numerical simulations based upon a unified facilities criteria (UFC) example structure subjected to an equivalent blast to validate the methodology.

  17. Modeling alternatives for basin-level hydropower development: 1. Optimization methods and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shoou-Yuh; Liaw, Shu-Liang; Railsback, Steven F.; Sale, Michael J.

    1992-10-01

    Development of multiple hydroelectric projects at navigation dams on large river systems can result in a number of environmental impacts, including potential reductions in dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations. This study presents a method for generating hydropower development alternatives for evaluation by planners by quantifying the trade-offs between water quality and power generation. This method employs a Streeter-Phelps model to simulate DO and the bounded implicit enumeration algorithm to solve an optimization model formulated to maximize hydroelectric energy production. A portion of the upper Ohio River basin was selected to illustrate the methodology. The results indicate that various alternatives that meet the specified DO constraints can be generated efficiently. These alternatives are nearly optimal solutions with respect to the modeled objectives but are different with respect to decision variables.

  18. Prolonged viability of human organotypic skin explant in culture method (hOSEC)*

    OpenAIRE

    Frade, Marco Andrey Cipriani; de Andrade, Thiago Antônio Moretti; Aguiar, Andréia Fernanda Carvalho Leone; Guedes, Flávia Araújo; Leite, Marcel Nani; Passos, Williane Rodrigues; Coelho, Eduardo Barbosa; Das, Pranab Kummar

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Currently, the cosmetic industry is overwhelmed in keeping up with the safety assessment of the increasing number of new products entering the market. To meet such demand, research centers have explored alternative methods to animal testing and also the large number of volunteers necessary for preclinical and clinical tests. OBJECTIVES: This work describes the human skin ex-vivo model (hOSEC: Human Organotypic Skin Explant Culture) as an alternative to test the effectiveness of co...

  19. Force sensor in simulated skin and neural model mimic tactile SAI afferent spiking response to ramp and hold stimuli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Elmer K

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The next generation of prosthetic limbs will restore sensory feedback to the nervous system by mimicking how skin mechanoreceptors, innervated by afferents, produce trains of action potentials in response to compressive stimuli. Prior work has addressed building sensors within skin substitutes for robotics, modeling skin mechanics and neural dynamics of mechanotransduction, and predicting response timing of action potentials for vibration. The effort here is unique because it accounts for skin elasticity by measuring force within simulated skin, utilizes few free model parameters for parsimony, and separates parameter fitting and model validation. Additionally, the ramp-and-hold, sustained stimuli used in this work capture the essential features of the everyday task of contacting and holding an object. Methods This systems integration effort computationally replicates the neural firing behavior for a slowly adapting type I (SAI afferent in its temporally varying response to both intensity and rate of indentation force by combining a physical force sensor, housed in a skin-like substrate, with a mathematical model of neuronal spiking, the leaky integrate-and-fire. Comparison experiments were then conducted using ramp-and-hold stimuli on both the spiking-sensor model and mouse SAI afferents. The model parameters were iteratively fit against recorded SAI interspike intervals (ISI before validating the model to assess its performance. Results Model-predicted spike firing compares favorably with that observed for single SAI afferents. As indentation magnitude increases (1.2, 1.3, to 1.4 mm, mean ISI decreases from 98.81 ± 24.73, 54.52 ± 6.94, to 41.11 ± 6.11 ms. Moreover, as rate of ramp-up increases, ISI during ramp-up decreases from 21.85 ± 5.33, 19.98 ± 3.10, to 15.42 ± 2.41 ms. Considering first spikes, the predicted latencies exhibited a decreasing trend as stimulus rate increased, as is

  20. New Therapy of Skin Repair Combining Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells with Sodium Carboxymethylcellulose Scaffold in a Pre-Clinical Rat Model

    OpenAIRE

    Cristiano Rodrigues; de Assis, Adriano M.; Moura, Dinara J.; Graziele Halmenschlager; Jenifer Saffi; Léder Leal Xavier; Marilda da Cruz Fernandes; Márcia Rosângela Wink

    2014-01-01

    Lesions with great loss of skin and extensive burns are usually treated with heterologous skin grafts, which may lead rejection. Cell therapy with mesenchymal stem cells is arising as a new proposal to accelerate the healing process. We tested a new therapy consisting of sodium carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) as a biomaterial, in combination with adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs), to treat skin lesions in an in vivo rat model. This biomaterial did not affect membrane viability and induced a sma...

  1. Adaptive-Wave Alternative for the Black-Scholes Option Pricing Model

    OpenAIRE

    Ivancevic, Vladimir G.

    2009-01-01

    A nonlinear wave alternative for the standard Black-Scholes option-pricing model is presented. The adaptive-wave model, representing 'controlled Brownian behavior' of financial markets, is formally defined by adaptive nonlinear Schr\\"odinger (NLS) equations, defining the option-pricing wave function in terms of the stock price and time. The model includes two parameters: volatility (playing the role of dispersion frequency coefficient), which can be either fixed or stochastic, and adaptive ma...

  2. An alternative to the standard spatial econometric approaches in hedonic house price models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Graevenitz, Kathrine; Panduro, Toke Emil

    2015-01-01

    Omitted, misspecified, or mismeasured spatially varying characteristics are a cause for concern in hedonic house price models. Spatial econometrics or spatial fixed effects have become popular ways of addressing these concerns. We discuss the limitations of standard spatial approaches to hedonic...... modeling and demonstrate the spatial generalized additive model as an alternative. Parameter estimates for several spatially varying regressors are shown to be sensitive to the scale of the fixed effects and bandwidth dimension used to control for omitted variables. This sensitivity reflects...

  3. Physical modeling of human skin optical properties using milk and erythrocytes mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pravdin, Alexander B.; Utz, Sergei R.; Kochubey, Vyacheslav I.

    1995-12-01

    We offer a two-layer dermis-like model phantom with controlled concentration of absorbers and scatterers; namely, the mixture of whole milk diluted with isotonic solution and suspension of washed human erythrocytes - as one layer, and teflon base - as another. The optimum milk dilution was determined, and wavelength dependencies of phantom remittance (R) over the range 480 - 680 nm were obtained. We use the mixtures with physiological concentrations of erythrocytes which corresponded to 2 - 18% per volume blood content in human papillary dermis and upper blood plexus. Phantom remittance spectra for the cases of 2% and 4% blood content virtually coincide with remittance spectra of normal and erythema human skin. Collimated transmittance (T) of blood-milk layer was also measured. At 500 nm we estimated the range of linearity of D and D' (D equals $min1gT, D' equals -1gR) dependence on blood content: offset from linearity was observed near 5 - 6% and 10% of blood, respectively.

  4. Nitisinone improves eye and skin pigmentation defects in a mouse model of oculocutaneous albinism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onojafe, Ighovie F; Adams, David R; Simeonov, Dimitre R; Zhang, Jun; Chan, Chi-Chao; Bernardini, Isa M; Sergeev, Yuri V; Dolinska, Monika B; Alur, Ramakrishna P; Brilliant, Murray H; Gahl, William A; Brooks, Brian P

    2011-10-01

    Mutation of the tyrosinase gene (TYR) causes oculocutaneous albinism, type 1 (OCA1), a condition characterized by reduced skin and eye melanin pigmentation and by vision loss. The retinal pigment epithelium influences postnatal visual development. Therefore, increasing ocular pigmentation in patients with OCA1 might enhance visual function. There are 2 forms of OCA1, OCA-1A and OCA-1B. Individuals with the former lack functional tyrosinase and therefore lack melanin, while individuals with the latter produce some melanin. We hypothesized that increasing plasma tyrosine concentrations using nitisinone, an FDA-approved inhibitor of tyrosine degradation, could stabilize tyrosinase and improve pigmentation in individuals with OCA1. Here, we tested this hypothesis in mice homozygous for either the Tyrc-2J null allele or the Tyrc-h allele, which model OCA-1A and OCA-1B, respectively. Only nitisinone-treated Tyrc-h/c-h mice manifested increased pigmentation in their fur and irides and had more pigmented melanosomes. High levels of tyrosine improved the stability and enzymatic function of the Tyrc-h protein and also increased overall melanin levels in melanocytes from a human with OCA-1B. These results suggest that the use of nitisinone in OCA-1B patients could improve their pigmentation and potentially ameliorate vision loss. PMID:21968110

  5. Tanning Shade Gradations of Models in Mainstream Fitness and Muscle Enthusiast Magazines: Implications for Skin Cancer Prevention in Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basch, Corey H; Hillyer, Grace Clarke; Ethan, Danna; Berdnik, Alyssa; Basch, Charles E

    2015-07-01

    Tanned skin has been associated with perceptions of fitness and social desirability. Portrayal of models in magazines may reflect and perpetuate these perceptions. Limited research has investigated tanning shade gradations of models in men's versus women's fitness and muscle enthusiast magazines. Such findings are relevant in light of increased incidence and prevalence of melanoma in the United States. This study evaluated and compared tanning shade gradations of adult Caucasian male and female model images in mainstream fitness and muscle enthusiast magazines. Sixty-nine U.S. magazine issues (spring and summer, 2013) were utilized. Two independent reviewers rated tanning shade gradations of adult Caucasian male and female model images on magazines' covers, advertisements, and feature articles. Shade gradations were assessed using stock photographs of Caucasian models with varying levels of tanned skin on an 8-shade scale. A total of 4,683 images were evaluated. Darkest tanning shades were found among males in muscle enthusiast magazines and lightest among females in women's mainstream fitness magazines. By gender, male model images were 54% more likely to portray a darker tanning shade. In this study, images in men's (vs. women's) fitness and muscle enthusiast magazines portrayed Caucasian models with darker skin shades. Despite these magazines' fitness-related messages, pro-tanning images may promote attitudes and behaviors associated with higher skin cancer risk. To date, this is the first study to explore tanning shades in men's magazines of these genres. Further research is necessary to identify effects of exposure to these images among male readers. PMID:25038234

  6. Skin Biomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyhrquist, N; Salava, A; Auvinen, P; Lauerma, A

    2016-05-01

    The cutaneous microbiome has been investigated broadly in recent years and some traditional perspectives are beginning to change. A diverse microbiome exists on human skin and has a potential to influence pathogenic microbes and modulate the course of skin disorders, e.g. atopic dermatitis. In addition to the known dysfunctions in barrier function of the skin and immunologic disturbances, evidence is rising that frequent skin disorders, e.g. atopic dermatitis, might be connected to a dysbiosis of the microbial community and changes in the skin microbiome. As a future perspective, examining the skin microbiome could be seen as a potential new diagnostic and therapeutic target in inflammatory skin disorders.

  7. Flow Measurements over Embedded Cavities Modeling the Microgeometry of Bristled Shark Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Amy; Hidalgo, Pablo

    2008-11-01

    Certain species of sharks (e.g. shortfin mako) have a skin structure that results in a bristling of their denticles (scales) during increased swimming speeds. This unique surface geometry results in the formation of a 3D array of cavities (d-type roughness geometry) within the shark skin, thus causing it to potentially act as a means of boundary layer control. In order to further understand the effectiveness of this complex geometry, ProE was used to replicate the bristled shark skin of the shortfin mako using a rapid prototyping machine. Two simplified geometries of the shark skin, including 2D transverse cavities and a 3D array of staggered cavities, were also studied. Boundary layer measurements using DPIV were obtained and compared for all three geometries. Of particular interest is the role that the riblets, on the face of the denticles, appear to play in forming an organized array of embedded vortices within the surface. Patent pending.

  8. Cell kinetics in a model of artificial skin. An immunohistochemical and flow cytometric analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Casasco

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Bioengineered organs raised in vitro are candidate substitutes for natural organs in biological, pharmacological and clinical applications. We have studied cell kinetics in a human skin equivalent (HSE using a combined immunohistochemical and flow cytometric approach. Morphological analysis has shown that, relative to unstimulated natural skin, cell proliferation mainly occurs in the basal layer of the epidermal equivalent. Immunohistochemical and flow cytometric measurements of the growth fraction suggested a cell turnover comparable to that of natural skin. Immunohistochemical labelling indices matched well with flow cytometric data. These observations are consistent with morphological and histochemical data demonstrating normal cell differentiation and tissue architecture in HSE and suggest that such HSE may be a usefull substitute for human skin.

  9. Are Free Ion Activity Models Sufficient Alternatives to Biotic Ligand Models in Evaluating Metal Toxic Impacts in Terrestrial Environments?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owsianiak, Mikolaj; Rosenbaum, Ralph K.; Larsen, Henrik Fred;

    is low and alternatives must be found. In this study, we compared published terrestrial BLMs and their potential alternatives such as free ion activity models (FIAM), for applicability in addressing metal toxic impacts in terrestrial environments. A set of 1300 soils representative for the whole world......, respectively. In all cases, predictions of FIAMs fall within the range of values predicted with BLMs, and toxicity ratio of copper to nickel is accurately predicted with both models. us, both models are able to distinguish between the two metals in terms of their average toxicity. Given that the calculated...

  10. Testing alternative ground water models using cross-validation and other methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foglia, L.; Mehl, S.W.; Hill, M.C.; Perona, P.; Burlando, P.

    2007-01-01

    Many methods can be used to test alternative ground water models. Of concern in this work are methods able to (1) rank alternative models (also called model discrimination) and (2) identify observations important to parameter estimates and predictions (equivalent to the purpose served by some types of sensitivity analysis). Some of the measures investigated are computationally efficient; others are computationally demanding. The latter are generally needed to account for model nonlinearity. The efficient model discrimination methods investigated include the information criteria: the corrected Akaike information criterion, Bayesian information criterion, and generalized cross-validation. The efficient sensitivity analysis measures used are dimensionless scaled sensitivity (DSS), composite scaled sensitivity, and parameter correlation coefficient (PCC); the other statistics are DFBETAS, Cook's D, and observation-prediction statistic. Acronyms are explained in the introduction. Cross-validation (CV) is a computationally intensive nonlinear method that is used for both model discrimination and sensitivity analysis. The methods are tested using up to five alternative parsimoniously constructed models of the ground water system of the Maggia Valley in southern Switzerland. The alternative models differ in their representation of hydraulic conductivity. A new method for graphically representing CV and sensitivity analysis results for complex models is presented and used to evaluate the utility of the efficient statistics. The results indicate that for model selection, the information criteria produce similar results at much smaller computational cost than CV. For identifying important observations, the only obviously inferior linear measure is DSS; the poor performance was expected because DSS does not include the effects of parameter correlation and PCC reveals large parameter correlations. ?? 2007 National Ground Water Association.

  11. 皮肤致敏反应体外替代方法的研究现状%Research Situation of in vitro Alternative Methods to Evaluate Skin Sensitization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪丽玲; 周庆云

    2012-01-01

    皮肤是人体最大的器官,也是外源化学物入侵机体的第一道天然屏障.化学物作用于皮肤常常导致接触性过敏性皮炎.传统上常常采用豚鼠致敏试验来评价化学物的致敏性.然而,动物试验周期长,结果主观性强,变异程度大,加之如今动物保护主义对动物福利的呼声高涨,替代试验成为必然的发展趋势.本文拟就近年来在皮肤变态反应研究中的替代试验方法进行综述.%The skin is the largest body's organ, and also the first natural barrier to protect the body from the invasion of chemicals. The chemicals often cause the allergic contact dermatitis. Traditionally, the guinea pig sensitization test is often used to evaluate the allergenicity of chemicals. However, as this test has some disadvantages such as too long test cycle, and subjective and variable results, and collides with animal welfare and protection, an alternative test has become the inevitable trend of development. This article reviews the alternative tests in the study on skin allergy in the recent years.

  12. Dermal uptake and percutaneous penetration of ten flame retardants in a human skin ex vivo model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederiksen, Marie; Vorkamp, Katrin; Jensen, Niels Martin; Sørensen, Jens Ahm; Knudsen, Lisbeth E; Sørensen, Lars S; Webster, Thomas F; Nielsen, Jesper B

    2016-11-01

    The dermal uptake and percutaneous penetration of ten organic flame retardants was measured using an ex vivo human skin model. The studied compounds were DBDPE, BTBPE, TBP-DBPE, EH-TBB, BEH-TEBP, α, β and γ-HBCDD as well as syn- and anti-DDC-CO. Little or none of the applied flame retardants was recovered in either type of the receptor fluids used (physiological and worst-case). However, significant fractions were recovered in the skin depot, particularly in the upper skin layers. The primary effect of the worst-case receptor fluid was deeper penetration into the skin. The recovered mass was used to calculate lower- and upper-bound permeability coefficients kp. Despite large structural variation between the studied compounds, a clear, significant decreasing trend of kp was observed with increasing log Kow. The results indicate that the dermis may provide a significant barrier for these highly lipophilic compounds. However, based on our results, dermal uptake should be considered in exposure assessments, though it may proceed in a time-lagged manner compared to less hydrophobic compounds. PMID:27513551

  13. Modeling of a sedimentary rock alternative for the siting of the radioactive waste disposal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here are described the main concepts, the approximations, and all those simulation aspects that characterize the modeling performed using the unsaturated saturated approach for porous media. The objective of this work is to obtain a generic description of a sedimentary rock soil as an alternative site for the low and intermediate level radioactive waste disposal system. (author)

  14. Alternating Renewal Process Models for Behavioral Observation: Simulation Methods, Software, and Validity Illustrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pustejovsky, James E.; Runyon, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Direct observation recording procedures produce reductive summary measurements of an underlying stream of behavior. Previous methodological studies of these recording procedures have employed simulation methods for generating random behavior streams, many of which amount to special cases of a statistical model known as the alternating renewal…

  15. A study of the diffusion of alternative fuel vehicles : An agent-based modeling approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Ting; Gensler, Sonja; Garcia, Rosanna

    2011-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the use of an agent-based model (ABM) to investigate factors that can speed the diffusion of eco-innovations, namely alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs). The ABM provides the opportunity to consider the interdependencies inherent between key participants in the automotive indust

  16. The New Alternative DSM-5 Model for Personality Disorders: Issues and Controversies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Jeffrey S.; Risler, Edwin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Assess the new alternative "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders", fifth edition (DSM-5) model for personality disorders (PDs) as it is seen by its creators and critics. Method: Follow the DSM revision process by monitoring the American Psychiatric Association website and the publication of pertinent journal…

  17. Alternative Models to Deliver Developmental Math: Issues of Use and Student Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosiewicz, Holly; Ngo, Federick; Fong, Kristen

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Changing how community colleges deliver developmental education has become a key policy lever to increase student achievement. Alternative development education models reduce the amount of time a student spends in remediation, provide students with supplemental instruction and support, and contextualize content to align with student…

  18. An Alternative Counseling Model for Alcohol Abuse in College: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, B. Grant; Curry, Jennifer; Freeman, Mark S.; Kuch, Tyson H.

    2010-01-01

    Abstinence education remains a prevailing approach for addressing college student alcohol abuse. This case study illustrates an alternative method of intervening that combines motivational interviewing, harm reduction, and a brief solution-focused model. The counseling approach illustrated emphasizes reduction in, rather than abstinence from,…

  19. Model for the ready definition and approximate comparison of alternative high voltage transmission systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-12-01

    A model of generic overhead transmission systems in the range of 362 to 1200 kV ac, and +-400 to +-800 kV dc is developed. Such generic systems are to include (a) transmission from generation to load, and (b) interconnection of two large integrated systems, with and without the existence of an underlying, lower voltage network in either case. The model provides a means whereby an engineer with some experience in power systems planning can make a reconnaissance study of alternatives within a relatively short span of time and with fair accuracy. Given an amount of power to be transferred over a specified distance, the model can be used: to define the workable alternatives in terms of voltages, number of lines, series compensation, and certain other factors affecting transfer capability; to delineate other salient features of the selected alternatives, notably shunt compensation requirements; and to compare the alternatives in terms of potentially relevant benefits and costs. The significant properties of the model, the basis and assumptions necessary to its formulation, instructions for its use, and inherent limitations upon the accuracy to be expected are described.

  20. Logit model utilization in additional and alternative income estimation of farms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Bórawski

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Particular attention was paid to profitability of additional and alternative income sources, mainly ostrich and fallow deers. The analysis was presented using Logit model. The survey proved that the profitability of ostrich production was determined by basic herd, farmers’ age and own sawings. In fallow deers production the most important were basic herd and own savings.

  1. Simulating plastic surgery: from human skin tensile tests, through hyperelastic finite element models to real-time haptics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapeer, R J; Gasson, P D; Karri, V

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, we provide a summary of a number of experiments we conducted to arrive at a prototype real-time simulator for plastic surgical interventions such as skin flap repair and inguinal herniotomy. We started our research with a series of in-vitro tensile stress tests on human skin, harvested from female patients undergoing plastic reconstructive surgery. We then used the acquired stress-strain data to fit hyperelastic models. Three models were considered: General Polynomial, Reduced Polynomial and Ogden. Only Reduced Polynomial models were found to be stable, hence they progressed to the next stage to be used in an explicit finite element model aimed at real-time performance in conjunction with a haptic feedback device. A total Lagrangian formulation with the half-step central difference method was employed to integrate the dynamic equation of motion of the mesh. The mesh was integrated into two versions of a real-time skin simulator: a single-threaded version running on a computer's main central processing unit and a multi-threaded version running on the computer's graphics card. The latter was achieved by exploiting recent advances in programmable graphics technology.

  2. The effect of low dose ionizing radiation on homeostasis and functional integrity in an organotypic human skin model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    von Neubeck, Claere; Geniza, Matthew; Kauer, Paula M.; Robinson, Joseph E.; Chrisler, William B.; Sowa, Marianne B.

    2015-05-01

    Outside the protection of earth’s atmosphere, astronauts are exposed to low doses of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation. Future NASA plans for deep space missions or a permanent settlement on the moon are limited by the health risks associated with space radiation exposures. There is a paucity of direct epidemiological data for low dose exposures to space radiation-relevant high LET ions. Health risk models are used to estimate the risk for such exposures, though these models are based on high dose experiments. There is increasing evidence, however, that low and high dose exposures result in different signaling events at the molecular level, and may involve different response mechanisms. Further, despite their low abundance, high LET particles have been identified as the major contributor to health risk during manned space flight. The human skin is exposed in every external radiation scenario, making it an ideal epithelial tissue model in which to study radiation induced effects. Here, we exposed an in vitro three dimensional (3-D) human organotypic skin tissue model to low doses of high LET oxygen (O), silicon (Si) and iron (Fe) ions. We measured proliferation and differentiation profiles in the skin tissue and examined the integrity of the skin’s barrier function. We discuss the role of secondary particles in changing the proportion of cells receiving a radiation dose, emphasizing the possible impact on radiation-induced health issues in astronauts.

  3. Clinical Utility of the DSM-5 Alternative Model of Personality Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Bo; Markon, Kristian; Simonsen, Erik;

    2015-01-01

    In Section III, Emerging Measures and Models, DSM-5 presents an Alternative Model of Personality Disorders, which is an empirically based model of personality pathology measured with the Level of Personality Functioning Scale (LPFS) and the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5). These novel...... was to evaluate the clinical utility of this alternative model of personality disorders. Method. We administered the LPFS and the PID-5 to psychiatric outpatients diagnosed with personality disorders and other nonpsychotic disorders. The personality profiles of six characteristic patients were inspected...... (involving a comparison of presenting problems, history, and diagnoses) and used to formulate treatment considerations. We also considered 6 specific personality disorder types that could be derived from the profiles as defined in the DSM-5 Section III criteria. Results. Using the LPFS and PID-5, we were...

  4. Viscoelastic Characteristics of Fins, Muscle and Skin in Crucian Carp (Carassius Auratus) Described by the Fractional Zener Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ming; JIA Lai-Bing; YIN Xie-Zhen

    2011-01-01

    @@ Fish are supposed to be able to adapt to various underwater environments.The mechanical properties of the body of a fish is of essential importance in order to explore the source of high efficiency during fish swimming.We investigate the viscoelastic properties of the fins, muscle and skin of Crucian carp(carassius auratus).A fractional Zener model is used to fit the relaxation force and the results show that the model can describe the relaxation process well.With a Fourier transform, we discuss the response functions of the fins, muscle and skin of Crucian carp under the external excitation of a harmonic force.Comparison of these results with the cruising frequency of Crucian carp shows that the dissipation due to internal viscoelasticity during cruising is small.

  5. The polyadenylation code: a unified model for the regulation of mRNA alternative polyadenylation*

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Ryan; Shi, Yongsheng

    2014-01-01

    The majority of eukaryotic genes produce multiple mRNA isoforms with distinct 3′ ends through a process called mRNA alternative polyadenylation (APA). Recent studies have demonstrated that APA is dynamically regulated during development and in response to environmental stimuli. A number of mechanisms have been described for APA regulation. In this review, we attempt to integrate all the known mechanisms into a unified model. This model not only explains most of previous results, but also prov...

  6. The macroeconomic forecasting performance of autoregressive models with alternative specifications of time-varying volatility

    OpenAIRE

    CLARK, Todd E.; Francesco Ravazzolo

    2012-01-01

    This paper compares alternative models of time-varying macroeconomic volatility on the basis of the accuracy of point and density forecasts of macroeconomic variables. In this analysis, we consider both Bayesian autoregressive and Bayesian vector autoregressive models that incorporate some form of time-varying volatility, precisely stochastic volatility (both with constant and time-varying autoregressive coeffi cients), stochastic volatility following a stationary AR process, stochastic volat...

  7. Variations in the optical scattering properties of skin in murine animal models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabro, Katherine; Curtis, Allison; Galarneau, Jean-Rene; Krucker, Thomas; Bigio, Irving J.

    2011-03-01

    In the work presented here, the optical scattering properties of mouse skin are investigated in depth with the use of Elastic Scattering Spectroscopy (ESS). In particular, sources of variation that lead to experimental error are identified and examined. The thickness of the dermal layer of the skin is determined to be the primary source of variation due to its high collagen content. Specifically, gender differences in skin thickness are found to cause increases in the reflectance and scattering coefficient value by a factor of two in males as opposed to females. Changes in the hair growth cycle are found to influence scattering strength not only due to changes in skin thickness, but also from melanin collection in hair follicles. Because direct and/or indirect measurement of mouse skin is common in the development of novel biomedical optics techniques (optical biopsy, molecular imaging, in vivo monitoring of glucose/blood oxygenation, etc.), the purpose of this work is to identify sources of experimental variation that may arise in these studies such that care can be taken to avoid or compensate for their affects.

  8. The risk of hydroquinone and sunscreen over-absorption via photodamaged skin is not greater in senescent skin as compared to young skin: nude mouse as an animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chi-Feng; Chen, Wei-Yu; Aljuffali, Ibrahim A; Shih, Hui-Chi; Fang, Jia-You

    2014-08-25

    Intrinsic aging and photoaging modify skin structure and components, which subsequently change percutaneous absorption of topically applied permeants. The purpose of this study was to systematically evaluate drug/sunscreen permeation via young and senescent skin irradiated by ultraviolet (UV) light. Both young and senescent nude mice were subjected to UVA (10 J/cm(2)) and/or UVB radiation (175 mJ/cm(2)). Physiological parameters, immunohistology, and immunoblotting were employed to examine the aged skin. Hydroquinone and sunscreen permeation was determined by in vitro Franz cell. In vivo skin absorption was documented using a hydrophilic dye, rhodamine 123 (log P=-0.4), as a permeant. UVA exposure induced cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) upregulation. Epidermal tight junction (TJ) were degraded by UVA. UVB increased transepidermal water loss (TEWL) from 13 to 24 g/m(2)/h. Hyperplasia and inflammation, but not loss of TJ, were also observed in UVB-treated skin. UVA+UVB- and UVA-irradiated skin demonstrated similar changes in histology and biomarkers. UVA+UVB or UVA exposure increased hydroquinone flux five-fold. A negligible alteration of hydroquinone permeation was shown with UVB exposure. Hydroquinone exhibited a lower penetration through senescent skin than young skin. Both UVA and UVB produced enhancement of oxybenzone flux and skin uptake. However, the amount of increase was less than that of hydroquinone delivery. Photoaging did not augment skin absorption of sunscreens with higher lipophilicity, including avobenzone and ZnO. Exposure to UVA generally increased follicular entrance of these permeants, which showed two- to three-fold greater follicular uptake compared to the untreated group. Photoaging had less impact on drug/sunscreen absorption with more lipophilic permeants. Percutaneous absorption did not increase in skin subjected to both intrinsic and extrinsic aging. PMID:24858384

  9. Modeling how shark and dolphin skin patterns control transitional wall-turbulence vorticity patterns using spatiotemporal phase reset mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Promode R.; Hellum, Aren M.

    2014-10-01

    Many slow-moving biological systems like seashells and zebrafish that do not contend with wall turbulence have somewhat organized pigmentation patterns flush with their outer surfaces that are formed by underlying autonomous reaction-diffusion (RD) mechanisms. In contrast, sharks and dolphins contend with wall turbulence, are fast swimmers, and have more organized skin patterns that are proud and sometimes vibrate. A nonlinear spatiotemporal analytical model is not available that explains the mechanism underlying control of flow with such proud patterns, despite the fact that shark and dolphin skins are major targets of reverse engineering mechanisms of drag and noise reduction. Comparable to RD, a minimal self-regulation model is given for wall turbulence regeneration in the transitional regime--laterally coupled, diffusively--which, although restricted to pre-breakdown durations and to a plane close and parallel to the wall, correctly reproduces many experimentally observed spatiotemporal organizations of vorticity in both laminar-to-turbulence transitioning and very low Reynolds number but turbulent regions. We further show that the onset of vorticity disorganization is delayed if the skin organization is treated as a spatiotemporal template of olivo-cerebellar phase reset mechanism. The model shows that the adaptation mechanisms of sharks and dolphins to their fluid environment have much in common.

  10. Using a GIS model to assess terrestrial salamander response to alternative forest management plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, E J; Murphy, N L; Crow, T R

    2001-11-01

    A GIS model predicting the spatial distribution of terrestrial salamander abundance based on topography and forest age was developed using parameters derived from the literature. The model was tested by sampling salamander abundance across the full range of site conditions used in the model. A regression of the predictions of our GIS model against these sample data showed that the model has a modest but significant ability to predict both salamander abundance and mass per unit area. The model was used to assess the impacts of alternative management plans for the Hoosier National Forest (Indiana, USA) on salamanders. These plans differed in the spatial delineation of management areas where timber harvest was permitted, and the intensity of timber harvest within those management areas. The spatial pattern of forest openings produced by alternative forest management scenarios based on these plans was projected over 150 years using a timber-harvest simulator (HARVEST). We generated a predictive map of salamander abundance for each scenario over time, and summarized each map by calculating mean salamander abundance and the mean colonization distance (average distance from map cells with low predicted abundance to those with relatively high abundance). Projected salamander abundance was affected more by harvest rate (area harvested each decade) than by the management area boundaries. The alternatives had a varying effect on the mean distance salamanders would have to travel to colonize regenerating stands. Our GIS modeling approach is an example of a spatial analytical tool that could help resource management planners to evaluate the potential ecological impact of management alternatives. PMID:11775500

  11. Establishment and application of minigene models for studying pre-mRNA alternative splicing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jing; CHEN Xianhua; LIN Wanmin; LI Lishu; HAN Yu; XU Ping

    2004-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to establish a minigene model for studying pre-mRNA alternative splicing. To prepare the minigene DNA constructs, with human or mouse genomic DNA as templates, GluR-B , FGF-2R and Zis "minigene" fragments were amplified using PCR and cloned to the eukaryotic expression vectors. The three constructed minigenes and the expression vectors of Tra2?1 and Zis2 were co-transfected in Hela cells. RT-PCR analysis was performed to semi-quantitatively determine the spliced products from the minigenes. The results demonstrated that the constructed minigenes are useful in studying the pre-mRNA alternative splicing in cultured cells. With the established Zis minigene, we for the first time found that Zis2 isoform regulates the alternative splicing of Zis minigene.

  12. Sagging Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... turkey neck,” this occurs as skin loses its elasticity and in cases where individuals have lost a ... technique or procedure is appropriate for my skin type? Did the doctor show me before-and-after ...

  13. Skin Dictionary

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... resources Meet our partners Español Donate Diseases and treatments Acne and rosacea Bumps and growths Color problems Contagious skin diseases Cosmetic treatments Dry / sweaty skin Eczema / dermatitis Hair and scalp ...

  14. Skin Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... skin condition cannot be diagnosed by the patient's history and what the physician finds on examination alone. Confirming a clinical diagnosis may also be necessary prior to starting therapy. Skin biopsy types are as follows: Shave biopsies Punch biopsies ...

  15. Skin tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranoski, S

    2001-08-01

    Skin tears are a serious, painful problem for older patients. Find out how your staff can recognize patients at risk, what they can do to prevent skin tears, and how to manage them effectively if they occur.

  16. Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States. The two most common types ... face, neck, hands, and arms. Another type of skin cancer, melanoma, is more dangerous but less common. Anyone ...

  17. SKIN CANCER

    OpenAIRE

    Made Putri Hendaria; AAGN Asmarajaya; Sri Maliawan

    2013-01-01

    Skin is an organ which protect the human body from the environment. It was build by milion cells. According to the changes in human lifestyle which tends to unhealthy life, increasing ultraviolet radiation, toxins, and genetics makes the cells who build the skin do the abnormal growth being cancer cells. Classification of skin cancer is according the most common three types, they are Basal Cell Carcinoma, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, and Malignant Melanoma. More than 3,5 milion skin cancer cases ...

  18. Deformable skinning on bones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Bent Dalgaard; Petersen, Kim Steen; Jakobsen, Bjarke

    2001-01-01

    Applying skin to a model is a relatively simple task to implement. Nonetheless it seems that no good resource exists that describes both the concepts and math necessary to understand and implement skinning. The intention of this article is an attempt to give a thoroughly description of the theore...

  19. Exercise Activates p53 and Negatively Regulates IGF-1 Pathway in Epidermis within a Skin Cancer Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Miao; King, Brenee; Ewert, Emily; Su, Xiaoyu; Mardiyati, Nur; Zhao, Zhihui; Wang, Weiqun

    2016-01-01

    Exercise has been previously reported to lower cancer risk through reducing circulating IGF-1 and IGF-1-dependent signaling in a mouse skin cancer model. This study aims to investigate the underlying mechanisms by which exercise may down-regulate the IGF-1 pathway via p53 and p53-related regulators in the skin epidermis. Female SENCAR mice were pair-fed an AIN-93 diet with or without 10-week treadmill exercise at 20 m/min, 60 min/day and 5 days/week. Animals were topically treated with TPA 2 hours before sacrifice and the target proteins in the epidermis were analyzed by both immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Under TPA or vehicle treatment, MDM2 expression was significantly reduced in exercised mice when compared with sedentary control. Meanwhile, p53 was significantly elevated. In addition, p53-transcriptioned proteins, i.e., p21, IGFBP-3, and PTEN, increased in response to exercise. There was a synergy effect between exercise and TPA on the decreased MDM2 and increased p53, but not p53-transcripted proteins. Taken together, exercise appeared to activate p53, resulting in enhanced expression of p21, IGFBP-3, and PTEN that might induce a negative regulation of IGF-1 pathway and thus contribute to the observed cancer prevention by exercise in this skin cancer model. PMID:27509024

  20. Skin Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your skin changes as you age. You might notice wrinkles, age spots and dryness. Your skin also becomes thinner and loses fat, making it ... heal, too. Sunlight is a major cause of skin aging. You can protect yourself by staying out ...

  1. An Empirical Validation of Building Simulation Software for Modelling of Double-Skin Facade (DSF)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Olena Kalyanova; Heiselberg, Per; Felsmann, Clemens;

    2009-01-01

    Double-skin facade (DSF) buildings are being built as an attractive, innovative and energy efficient solution. Nowadays, several design tools are used for assessment of thermal and energy performance of DSF buildings. Existing design tools are well-suited for performance assessment of conventional...

  2. Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Identifies Filaggrin and other Targets of Ionizing Radiation in a Human Skin Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Feng; Waters, Katrina M.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Sowa, Marianne B.; Freiin von Neubeck, Claere H.; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Wirgau, Rachel M.; Gristenko, Marina A.; Zhao, Rui; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Stenoien, David L.

    2012-04-17

    Our objective here was to perform a quantitative phosphoproteomic study on a reconstituted human skin tissue to identify low and high dose ionizing radiation dependent signaling in a complex 3-dimensional setting. Application of an isobaric labeling strategy using sham and 3 radiation doses (3, 10, 200 cGy) resulted in the identification of 1113 unique phosphopeptides. Statistical analyses identified 151 phosphopeptides showing significant changes in response to radiation and radiation dose. Proteins responsible for maintaining skin structural integrity including keratins and desmosomal proteins (desmoglein, desmoplakin, plakophilin 1 and 2,) had altered phosphorylation levels following exposure to both low and high doses of radiation. A phosphorylation site present in multiple copies in the linker regions of human profilaggrin underwent the largest fold change. Increased phosphorylation of these sites coincided with altered profilaggrin processing suggesting a role for linker phosphorylation in human profilaggrin regulation. These studies demonstrate that the reconstituted human skin system undergoes a coordinated response to ionizing radiation involving multiple layers of the stratified epithelium that serve to maintain skin barrier functions and minimize the damaging consequences of radiation exposure.

  3. Pedicled prelaminated capsular flaps for coverage of skin defect in a rat model.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuringa, M.C.; Hartman, E.H.M.; Ruhe, P.Q.; Jansen, J.A.; Spauwen, P.H.M.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY: In reconstructive surgery defects are closed using pedicled or free flaps. By raising these flaps the reconstructive surgeon creates new defects, which in turn are closed primarily or with the use of skin grafts. Inevitably, this results in extra scars that may be visible and may also lead

  4. Modeling a Naturally Ventilated Double Skin Façade with a Building Thermal Simulation Program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Lund; Kalyanova, Olena; Heiselberg, Per

    2008-01-01

    The use of Double Skin Façade (DSF) has increased during the last decade. There are many reasons for this including e.g. aesthetics, sound insulation, improved indoor environment and energy savings. However, the influence on the indoor environment and energy consumption are very difficult...... to predict. This is manly due to the very transient and complex air flow in the naturally ventilated double skin façade cavity. In this paper the modelling of the DSF using a thermal simulation program, BSim, is discussed. The simulations are based on the measured weather boundary conditions......, and the simulation results are compared to the measurement results like energy consumption for cooling, air temperature, temperature gradient and mass flow rate in the DSF cavity, etc. Details about the measurements are reported in \\Kalyanova et al. 2008\\. The thermal simulation program does not at the moment...

  5. Dynamical Complexity of a Spatial Phytoplankton-Zooplankton Model with an Alternative Prey and Refuge Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The spatiotemporal dynamics of a phytoplankton-zooplankton model with an alternative prey and refuge effect is investigated mathematically and numerically. The stability of the equilibrium point and the traveling wave solution of the phytoplankton-zooplankton model are described based on theoretical mathematical work, which provides the basis of the numerical simulation. The numerical analysis shows that refuges have a strong effect on the spatiotemporal dynamics of the model according to the pattern formation. These results may help us to understand prey-predator interactions in water ecosystems. They are also relevant to research into phytoplankton-zooplankton ecosystems.

  6. Fluorescence Spectra of Model Compounds for Light-emitting Alternating Copolymers in Heterogeneous Environments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, the fluorescence spectra of model compounds of light-emitting alternating copolymers, M (TPA-PPV) and M (TPA-PAV) (Scheme 1) were studied and the effect of KNO3 on the interaction between model compounds and ionic micelle-water interface was also investigated. It is found that (I) The fluorescence changes of M (TPA-PPV) are related to the state of CTAB and SDS solution. (II) Aggregated state can be formed in M (TPA-PAV) solution at low concentration of CTAB. (III) Higher concentration of KNO3 may affect the interaction between model compounds and ionic micelle-water interface.

  7. Usefulness of rat skin as a substitute for human skin in the in vitro skin permeation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Hiroyuki; Mano, Yoko; Terasaka, Shuichi; Sakurai, Takanobu; Furuya, Atsushi; Urano, Hidetoshi; Sugibayashi, Kenji

    2011-01-01

    Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats are broadly used in preclinical studies for drug development, so a lot of information for the rats can be obtained especially from pharmacokinetic, pharmacological and toxicological studies. The purpose of this study was to clarify whether SD rat skin can be used to predict human skin permeability. In vitro permeation studies of the three model drugs, nicorandil, isosorbide dinitrate, and flurbiprofen, through human skin and SD rat skin were performed using Franz-type diffusion cells. The permeation rates of the three model drugs through human skin and SD rat skin were determined, and their variations were evaluated. The inter-individual variations in SD rat skin permeability of the three model drugs were much lower than that in human skin permeability, although the permeation rates of the three model drugs through the SD rat skin were about twice those through human skin. In addition, no difference in the skin permeability coefficients of the three model drugs was obtained between fresh SD rat skin and frozen SD rat skin. The markedly smaller variation in the permeability through SD rat skin compared with that through human skin indicated that in vitro permeation studies using SD rat skin would be especially useful for evaluating differences in the skin permeability of the three model drugs as well as for predicting human skin permeability.

  8. TCDD induces dermal accumulation of keratinocyte-derived matrix metalloproteinase-10 in an organotypic model of human skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The epidermis of skin is the first line of defense against the environment. A three dimensional model of human skin was used to investigate tissue-specific phenotypes induced by the environmental contaminant, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Continuous treatment of organotypic cultures of human keratinocytes with TCDD resulted in intracellular spaces between keratinocytes of the basal and immediately suprabasal layers as well as thinning of the basement membrane, in addition to the previously reported hyperkeratinization. These tissue remodeling events were preceded temporally by changes in expression of the extracellular matrix degrading enzyme, matrix metalloproteinase-10 (MMP-10). In organotypic cultures MMP-10 mRNA and protein were highly induced following TCDD treatment. Q-PCR and immunoblot results from TCDD-treated monolayer cultures, as well as indirect immunofluorescence and immunoblot analysis of TCDD-treated organotypic cultures, showed that MMP-10 was specifically contributed by the epidermal keratinocytes but not the dermal fibroblasts. Keratinocyte-derived MMP-10 protein accumulated over time in the dermal compartment of organotypic cultures. TCDD-induced epidermal phenotypes in organotypic cultures were attenuated by the keratinocyte-specific expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1, a known inhibitor of MMP-10. These studies suggest that MMP-10 and possibly other MMP-10-activated MMPs are responsible for the phenotypes exhibited in the basement membrane, the basal keratinocyte layer, and the cornified layer of TCDD-treated organotypic cultures. Our studies reveal a novel mechanism by which the epithelial–stromal microenvironment is altered in a tissue-specific manner thereby inducing structural and functional pathology in the interfollicular epidermis of human skin. - Highlights: • TCDD causes hyperkeratosis and basement membrane changes in a model of human skin. • TCDD induces MMP-10 expression in organotypic cultures

  9. TCDD induces dermal accumulation of keratinocyte-derived matrix metalloproteinase-10 in an organotypic model of human skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Abrew, K. Nadira [Molecular and Environmental Toxicology Center, University of Wisconsin—Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Thomas-Virnig, Christina L.; Rasmussen, Cathy A. [Department of Pathology, University of Wisconsin—Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Bolterstein, Elyse A. [Molecular and Environmental Toxicology Center, University of Wisconsin—Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Schlosser, Sandy J. [Department of Pathology, University of Wisconsin—Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Allen-Hoffmann, B. Lynn, E-mail: blallenh@wisc.edu [Molecular and Environmental Toxicology Center, University of Wisconsin—Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Department of Pathology, University of Wisconsin—Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    The epidermis of skin is the first line of defense against the environment. A three dimensional model of human skin was used to investigate tissue-specific phenotypes induced by the environmental contaminant, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Continuous treatment of organotypic cultures of human keratinocytes with TCDD resulted in intracellular spaces between keratinocytes of the basal and immediately suprabasal layers as well as thinning of the basement membrane, in addition to the previously reported hyperkeratinization. These tissue remodeling events were preceded temporally by changes in expression of the extracellular matrix degrading enzyme, matrix metalloproteinase-10 (MMP-10). In organotypic cultures MMP-10 mRNA and protein were highly induced following TCDD treatment. Q-PCR and immunoblot results from TCDD-treated monolayer cultures, as well as indirect immunofluorescence and immunoblot analysis of TCDD-treated organotypic cultures, showed that MMP-10 was specifically contributed by the epidermal keratinocytes but not the dermal fibroblasts. Keratinocyte-derived MMP-10 protein accumulated over time in the dermal compartment of organotypic cultures. TCDD-induced epidermal phenotypes in organotypic cultures were attenuated by the keratinocyte-specific expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1, a known inhibitor of MMP-10. These studies suggest that MMP-10 and possibly other MMP-10-activated MMPs are responsible for the phenotypes exhibited in the basement membrane, the basal keratinocyte layer, and the cornified layer of TCDD-treated organotypic cultures. Our studies reveal a novel mechanism by which the epithelial–stromal microenvironment is altered in a tissue-specific manner thereby inducing structural and functional pathology in the interfollicular epidermis of human skin. - Highlights: • TCDD causes hyperkeratosis and basement membrane changes in a model of human skin. • TCDD induces MMP-10 expression in organotypic cultures

  10. Cell motility in models of wounded human skin is improved by Gap27 despite raised glucose, insulin and IGFBP-5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reducing Cx43 expression stimulates skin wound healing. This is mimicked in models when Cx43 function is blocked by the connexin mimetic peptide Gap27. IGF-I also stimulates wound healing with IGFBP-5 attenuating its actions. Further, the IGF-I to IGFBP-5 ratio is altered in diabetic skin, where wound closure is impaired. We investigated whether Gap27 remains effective in augmenting scrape-wound closure in human skin wound models simulating diabetes-induced changes, using culture conditions with raised glucose, insulin and IGFBP-5. Gap27 increased scrape-wound closure in normal glucose and insulin (NGI) and to a lesser extent in high glucose and insulin (HGI). IGF-I enhanced scrape-wound closure in keratinocytes whereas IGFBP-5 inhibited this response. Gap27 overcame the inhibitory effects of IGFBP-5 on IGF-I activity. Connexin-mediated communication (CMC) was reduced in HGI, despite raised Cx43, and Gap27 significantly decreased CMC in NGI and HGI. IGF-I and IGFBP-5 did not affect CMC. IGF-I increased keratinocyte proliferation in NGI, and Gap27 increased proliferation in NGI to a greater extent than in HGI. We conclude that IGF-I and Gap27 stimulate scrape-wound closure by independent mechanisms with Gap27 inhibiting Cx43 function. Gap27 can enhance wound closure in diabetic conditions, irrespective of the IGF-I:IGFBP-5 balance. - Highlights: ► Human organotypic and keratinocyte ‘diabetic’ skin models were used to demonstrate the ability of Gap27 to improve scrape-wound closure. ► Gap27 enhanced scrape-wound closure by reducing Cx43-mediated communication, whereas IGFBP-5 retarded cell migration. ► IGF-I and IGFBP-5 did not affect connexin-mediated pathways. ► Gap27 can override altered glucose, insulin, IGF-I, and IGFBP-5 in ‘diabetic’ skin models and thus has therapeutic potential

  11. Cell motility in models of wounded human skin is improved by Gap27 despite raised glucose, insulin and IGFBP-5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Catherine S.; Berends, Rebecca F. [Department of Life Sciences, School of Health and Life Sciences, Glasgow Caledonian University, 70 Cowcaddens Road, Glasgow G4 0BA (United Kingdom); Flint, David J. [Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences, University of Strathclyde, 161 Cathedral Street, Glasgow G4 0RE (United Kingdom); Martin, Patricia E.M., E-mail: Patricia.Martin@gcu.ac.uk [Department of Life Sciences, School of Health and Life Sciences, Glasgow Caledonian University, 70 Cowcaddens Road, Glasgow G4 0BA (United Kingdom)

    2013-02-15

    Reducing Cx43 expression stimulates skin wound healing. This is mimicked in models when Cx43 function is blocked by the connexin mimetic peptide Gap27. IGF-I also stimulates wound healing with IGFBP-5 attenuating its actions. Further, the IGF-I to IGFBP-5 ratio is altered in diabetic skin, where wound closure is impaired. We investigated whether Gap27 remains effective in augmenting scrape-wound closure in human skin wound models simulating diabetes-induced changes, using culture conditions with raised glucose, insulin and IGFBP-5. Gap27 increased scrape-wound closure in normal glucose and insulin (NGI) and to a lesser extent in high glucose and insulin (HGI). IGF-I enhanced scrape-wound closure in keratinocytes whereas IGFBP-5 inhibited this response. Gap27 overcame the inhibitory effects of IGFBP-5 on IGF-I activity. Connexin-mediated communication (CMC) was reduced in HGI, despite raised Cx43, and Gap27 significantly decreased CMC in NGI and HGI. IGF-I and IGFBP-5 did not affect CMC. IGF-I increased keratinocyte proliferation in NGI, and Gap27 increased proliferation in NGI to a greater extent than in HGI. We conclude that IGF-I and Gap27 stimulate scrape-wound closure by independent mechanisms with Gap27 inhibiting Cx43 function. Gap27 can enhance wound closure in diabetic conditions, irrespective of the IGF-I:IGFBP-5 balance. - Highlights: ► Human organotypic and keratinocyte ‘diabetic’ skin models were used to demonstrate the ability of Gap27 to improve scrape-wound closure. ► Gap27 enhanced scrape-wound closure by reducing Cx43-mediated communication, whereas IGFBP-5 retarded cell migration. ► IGF-I and IGFBP-5 did not affect connexin-mediated pathways. ► Gap27 can override altered glucose, insulin, IGF-I, and IGFBP-5 in ‘diabetic’ skin models and thus has therapeutic potential.

  12. Partially Compensatory Multidimensional Item Response Theory Models: Two Alternate Model Forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMars, Christine E.

    2016-01-01

    Partially compensatory models may capture the cognitive skills needed to answer test items more realistically than compensatory models, but estimating the model parameters may be a challenge. Data were simulated to follow two different partially compensatory models, a model with an interaction term and a product model. The model parameters were…

  13. Modelling the effect of an alternative host population on the spread of citrus Huanglongbing

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'A. Vilamiu, Raphael G.; Ternes, Sonia; Laranjeira, Francisco F.; de C. Santos, Tâmara T.

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this work was to model the spread of citrus Huanglongbing (HLB) considering the presence of a population of alternative hosts (Murraya paniculata). We developed a compartmental deterministic mathematical model for representing the dynamics of HLB disease in a citrus orchard, including delays in the latency and incubation phases of the disease in the plants and a delay period on the nymphal stage of Diaphorina citri, the insect vector of HLB in Brazil. The results of numerical simulations indicate that alternative hosts should not play a crucial role on HLB dynamics considering a typical scenario for the Recôncavo Baiano region in Brazil . Also, the current policy of removing symptomatic plants every three months should not be expected to significantly hinder HLB spread.

  14. Reservoir computing as an alternative to traditional artificial neural networks in rainfall-runoff modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. J. de Vos

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Despite theoretical benefits of recurrent artificial neural networks over their feedforward counterparts, it is still unclear whether the former offer practical advantages as rainfall-runoff models. The main drawback of recurrent networks is the increased complexity of the training procedure due to their architecture. This work uses recently introduced, conceptually simple reservoir computing models for one-day-ahead forecasts on twelve river basins in the Eastern United States, and compares them to a variety of traditional feedforward and recurrent models. Two modifications on the reservoir computing models are made to increase the hydrologically relevant information content of their internal state. The results show that the reservoir computing networks outperform feedforward networks and are competitive with state-of-the-art recurrent networks, across a range of performance measures. This, along with their simplicity and ease of training, suggests that reservoir computing models can be considered promising alternatives to traditional artificial neural networks in rainfall-runoff modelling.

  15. A model explaining synchronization of neuron bioelectric frequency under weak alternating low frequency magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moral, A. del, E-mail: delmoral@unizar.es [Laboratorio de Magnetismo, Departamento de Física de Materia Condensada and Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales, Universidad de Zaragoza and Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Laboratorio de Magnetobiología, Departamento de Anatomía e Histología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Centro de Tecnología Biomédica, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28223 Madrid (Spain); Azanza, María J., E-mail: mjazanza@unizar.es [Laboratorio de Magnetobiología, Departamento de Anatomía e Histología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Centro de Tecnología Biomédica, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28223 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-03-01

    A biomagnetic-electrical model is presented that explains rather well the experimentally observed synchronization of the bioelectric potential firing rate (“frequency”), f, of single unit neurons of Helix aspersa mollusc under the application of extremely low frequency (ELF) weak alternating (AC) magnetic fields (MF). The proposed model incorporates to our widely experimentally tested model of superdiamagnetism (SD) and Ca{sup 2+} Coulomb explosion (CE) from lipid (LP) bilayer membrane (SD–CE model), the electrical quadrupolar long range interaction between the bilayer LP membranes of synchronized neuron pairs, not considered before. The quadrupolar interaction is capable of explaining well the observed synchronization. Actual extension of our SD–CE-model shows that the neuron firing frequency field, B, dependence becomes not modified, but the bioelectric frequency is decreased and its spontaneous temperature, T, dependence is modified. A comparison of the model with synchronization experimental results of pair of neurons under weak (B{sub 0}≅0.2–15 mT) AC-MF of frequency f{sub M}=50 Hz is reported. From the deduced size of synchronized LP clusters under B, is suggested the formation of small neuron networks via the membrane lipid correlation. - Highlights: • Neuron pair synchronization under low frequency alternating (AC) magnetic field (MF). • Superdiamagnetism and Ca{sup 2+} Coulomb explosion for AC MF effect in synchronized frequency. • Membrane lipid electrical quadrupolar pair interaction as synchronization mechamism. • Good agreement of model with electrophysiological experiments on mollusc Helix neurons.

  16. Ballistic aggregation: an alternative approach to modeling of silica sol-gel structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grzegorczyk, Marcin; Rybaczuk, Marek; Maruszewski, Krzysztof

    2004-03-01

    An algorithm based on ballistic aggregation is discussed as an alternative to the commonly used, much slower diffusion-based algorithms for modeling of atomic structure of silica gels. The algorithm is shown to be capable of producing a wide range of structures: from extremely porous to compact (dense) ones. The importance of capture distance as a controlling parameter is discussed. Electron microscope images of actual silica gels morphologically very similar to the rendered images of the simulated aggregates are shown.

  17. Alternate Service Delivery Models in Cancer Genetic Counseling: A Mini-Review

    OpenAIRE

    Buchanan, Adam Hudson; Rahm, Alanna Kulchak; Williams, Janet L.

    2016-01-01

    Demand for cancer genetic counseling has grown rapidly in recent years as germline genomic information has become increasingly incorporated into cancer care, and the field has entered the public consciousness through high-profile celebrity publications. Increased demand and existing variability in the availability of trained cancer genetics clinicians place a priority on developing and evaluating alternate service delivery models for genetic counseling. This mini-review summarizes the state o...

  18. Alternative Basic Income Mechanisms: An Evaluation Exercise with a Microeconometric Model

    OpenAIRE

    Colombino, Ugo; Locatelli, Marilena; Narazani, Edlira; Donoghue, Cathal

    2010-01-01

    We develop and estimate a microeconometric model of household labour supply in four European countries representative of different economies and welfare policy regimes: Denmark, Italy, Portugal and the United Kingdom. We then simulate, under the constraint of constant total net tax revenue (fiscal neutrality), the effects of various hypothetical tax-transfer reforms which include alternative versions of a Basic Income policy: Guaranteed Minimum Income, Work Fare, Participation Basic Income an...

  19. On an alternative framework for building virtual cities: supporting urban contextual modelling on demand

    OpenAIRE

    Chengzhi Peng; Chang, David C; Peter Blundell Jones; Bryan Lawson

    2002-01-01

    For various purposes, virtual city applications have been developed around the globe to provide users with online resources and services over the Internet. Following our research on the Sheffield Urban Contextual Databank (SUCoD) project, this paper presents an alternative framework for building virtual cities, which goes beyond conventional static urban modelling. A three-tier system framework is described in conjunction with the design and implementation of the SUCoD prototype. We demonstra...

  20. Evaluation of the zebrafish embryo as an alternative model for hepatotoxicity testing

    OpenAIRE

    Driessen, Marja

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis we showed the applicability of the zebrafish embryo as an alternative model for hepatotoxicity testing using analysis of mechanisms through toxicogenomics. By applying a variety of toxicogenomics techniques, we were able to characterize specific responses. NGS revealed that hepatotoxicity-associated gene expression remains detectable even in non-tissue specific analysis in whole body zebrafish embryo homogenates. Gene and protein expression profiling resulted in identification ...

  1. Brinzolamide-induced retinopathy in neonatal rats: an alternative animal model of retinal neovascularization

    OpenAIRE

    DYOMIN, Y. A.; BILETSKA, P.V.; GAPUNIN, I. D.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Neovascular retinal pathology is steel uncertain. Thus, there is great need to investigate new modeling, diagnostic and treatment technologies. Brinzolamide induces a metabolic acidosis via an alternative biochemical mechanism (bicarbonate loss). In the present study the influence of brinzolamide-induced acidosis on preretinal neovascularization in neonatal rat was investigated. Materials and Methods. In our study we used newborn Wistar rats raised in two litter...

  2. Skin Images Segmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali E. Zaart

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Image segmentation is a fundamental step in many applications of image processing. Skin cancer has been the most common of all new cancers detected each year. At early stage detection of skin cancer, simple and economic treatment can cure it mostly. An accurate segmentation of skin images can help the diagnosis to define well the region of the cancer. The principal approach of segmentation is based on thresholding (classification that is lied to the problem of the thresholds estimation. Approach: The objective of this study is to develop a method to segment the skin images based on a mixture of Beta distributions. We assume that the data in skin images can be modeled by a mixture of Beta distributions. We used an unsupervised learning technique with Beta distribution to estimate the statistical parameters of the data in skin image and then estimate the thresholds for segmentation. Results: The proposed method of skin images segmentation was implemented and tested on different skin images. We obtained very good results in comparing with the same techniques with Gamma distribution. Conclusion: The experiment showed that the proposed method obtained very good results but it requires more testing on different types of skin images.

  3. Comparison of dosimetric mapping of radiation induced skin ulcer animal model in Nud mice and Wistar rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skin ulcer (SU) is the damage caused to the skin by ionizing radiation, becoming evident at the end or after the conclusion of radiotherapeutic treatments. Technological advances have enabled dose increases in radiotherapy protocols, augmenting SU cases. In order to investigate potential therapies for the SU, an animal model (AM) was devised for Wistar rats, based upon the AM of the Nud mice. The AM dose rate (DR) was measured with silicium diode in the gamma irradiator and lead blocks. Three animals were positioned into immobilizers with their dorsal region skin pinched and held up by a suture point fixed in the immobilizer and exposed to 85 Gy. The DR variation in the immobilizer tangential point with the source median plane was non-significant, thus establishing an average DR. Such shielding reduced the DR in the rat in more than 93%. The difference in the immobilizer's dimensions impaired the comparison between the DRs; nevertheless, the DR comparison in the immobilizer tangential point with the source median plane became the reference point for AM comparison. The appearance of SU symptoms and their maximum extensions were similar, notwithstanding the difference regarding their healing periods. The specified dose induced the SU emerging. Mass variation exerted no influence onto the healing, despite having age affected it. The animals, throughout and after the experiment, showed normal health with just the SU symptoms. This work granted us the AM for the Wistar rats, which shall reinforce the investigation of new therapies for SU treatment. (author)

  4. An EPR method for estimating activity of antioxidants in mouse skin using an anthralin-derived radical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Sayo; Matsumoto, Ken-Ichiro; Utsumi, Hideo

    2010-03-01

    Inhibitory effects of intravenously or orally administered antioxidants on the anthralin-derived radical generated in skin (mainly in the epidermis) of living mice by ultraviolet-A (UVA) irradiation were estimated. Anthralin was applied to the dorsal skin of living mice and the mice were then exposed to UVA. The EPR signal intensity in skin tissue strips obtained from mice after anthralin-UVA treatment was measured by an X-band EPR spectrometer. Several common antioxidants such as ascorbate, glutathione and Trolox (a vitamin E analogue) intravenously administered to mice reduced anthralin-derived radical generation. Trolox showed the most prolonged and powerful effect. Intravenous injection of a clinically used cerebral neuroprotective drug, Edarabone (Radicut), also showed depletion for the anthralin-derived radical. Oral administration of a commercialized nutritional supplement (a cocktail of 17 herbals and vitamins) also attenuated the anthralin-derived radical. The anthralin-UVA treatment model for antioxidant activity in the epidermis is a potentially feasible method to estimate activity of antioxidants in the body.

  5. Comparison of dosimetric mapping of radiation induced skin ulcer animal model in Nud mice and Wistar rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, Nelson M.; Mosca, Rodrigo C.; Ferreira, Danilo C.; Somessari, Elizabeth S.R.; Silveira, Carlos Gaia da; Dornelles, Leonardo D.P.; Bueno, Carmem C.; Mathor, Monica B., E-mail: nelsonnininho@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Skin ulcer (SU) is the damage caused to the skin by ionizing radiation, becoming evident at the end or after the conclusion of radiotherapeutic treatments. Technological advances have enabled dose increases in radiotherapy protocols, augmenting SU cases. In order to investigate potential therapies for the SU, an animal model (AM) was devised for Wistar rats, based upon the AM of the Nud mice. The AM dose rate (DR) was measured with silicium diode in the gamma irradiator and lead blocks. Three animals were positioned into immobilizers with their dorsal region skin pinched and held up by a suture point fixed in the immobilizer and exposed to 85 Gy. The DR variation in the immobilizer tangential point with the source median plane was non-significant, thus establishing an average DR. Such shielding reduced the DR in the rat in more than 93%. The difference in the immobilizer's dimensions impaired the comparison between the DRs; nevertheless, the DR comparison in the immobilizer tangential point with the source median plane became the reference point for AM comparison. The appearance of SU symptoms and their maximum extensions were similar, notwithstanding the difference regarding their healing periods. The specified dose induced the SU emerging. Mass variation exerted no influence onto the healing, despite having age affected it. The animals, throughout and after the experiment, showed normal health with just the SU symptoms. This work granted us the AM for the Wistar rats, which shall reinforce the investigation of new therapies for SU treatment. (author)

  6. Effects of Dimethylaminoethanol and Compound Amino Acid on D-Galactose Induced Skin Aging Model of Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A lasting dream of human beings is to reverse or postpone aging. In this study, dimethylaminoethanol (DMAE and compound amino acid (AA in Mesotherapy were investigated for their potential antiaging effects on D-galactose induced aging skin. At 18 days after D-gal induction, each rat was treated with intradermal microinjection of saline, AA, 0.1% DMAE, 0.2% DMAE, 0.1% DMAE + AA, or 0.2% DMAE + AA, respectively. At 42 days after treatment, the skin wound was harvested and assayed. Measurement of epidermal and dermal thickness in 0.1% DMAE + AA and 0.2% DMAE + AA groups appeared significantly thicker than aging control rats. No differences were found in tissue water content among groups. Hydroxyproline in 0.1% DMAE + AA, 0.2% DMAE + AA, and sham control groups was much higher than all other groups. Collagen type I, type III, and MMP-1 expression was highly upregulated in both 0.1% DMAE + AA and 0.2% DMAE + AA groups compared with aging control. In contrast, TIMP-1 expression levels of various aging groups were significantly reduced when compared to sham control. Coinjection of DMAE and AA into target tissue has marked antiaging effects on D-galactose induced skin aging model of rat.

  7. Evaluating alternative models of intra-oceanic subduction of northeastern Panthalassa since the Jurassic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shephard, Grace; Gurnis, Michael; Flament, Nicolas; Mihalynuk, Mitchell; Sigloch, Karin; Gaina, Carmen

    2014-05-01

    Renewed interest in the palaeogeography and deep mantle structure of North America, the Arctic and Northeastern Panthalassa has reignited a discussion of the region's Mesozoic subduction history. In particular, accounting for the origins of numerous accreted terranes, ranging from Gondwana, Laurentia, Baltica, the Tethys, Siberia, China and Panthalassa has facilitated several alternative tectonic scenarios. Kinematic variability is manifested in terms of the origin and timing of ocean basin opening and closure, the evolution of intra-oceanic and/or continental subduction, subduction polarities, relative plate velocities, convergence and the rate of subduction, age of subducting lithosphere and dip of subducting slabs. With ever-increasing detail of global plate motion models, advances in numerical modeling and the resolution of seismic tomography, these alterative plate reconstructions can now be robustly tested within a geodynamic framework. Having generated several alternative plate models since the start of the Jurassic, complete with self-consistent and dynamic plate boundaries, here, we test the spatial and temporal evolution of slabs through forward models of mantle flow. In turn, we undertake a qualitative and quantitative comparison of our modelled present-day mantle structure to that inferred from models of seismic tomography, therefore providing an additional dataset to which plate reconstructions of the region can be iteratively refined.

  8. On the importance of body posture and skin modelling with respect to in situ electric field strengths in magnetic field exposure scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Gernot; Hirtl, Rene

    2016-06-01

    The reference levels and maximum permissible exposure values for magnetic fields that are currently used have been derived from basic restrictions under the assumption of upright standing body models in a standard posture, i.e. with arms laterally down and without contact with metallic objects. Moreover, if anatomical modelling of the body was used at all, the skin was represented as a single homogeneous tissue layer. In the present paper we addressed the possible impacts of posture and skin modelling in scenarios of exposure to a 50 Hz uniform magnetic field on the in situ electric field strength in peripheral tissues, which must be limited in order to avoid peripheral nerve stimulation. We considered different body postures including situations where body parts form large induction loops (e.g. clasped hands) with skin-to-skin and skin-to-metal contact spots and compared the results obtained with a homogeneous single-layer skin model to results obtained with a more realistic two-layer skin representation consisting of a low-conductivity stratum corneum layer on top of a combined layer for the cellular epidermis and dermis. Our results clearly indicated that postures with loops formed of body parts may lead to substantially higher maximum values of induced in situ electric field strengths than in the case of standard postures due to a highly concentrated current density and in situ electric field strength in the skin-to-skin and skin-to-metal contact regions. With a homogeneous single-layer skin, as is used for even the most recent anatomical body models in exposure assessment, the in situ electric field strength may exceed the basic restrictions in such situations, even when the reference levels and maximum permissible exposure values are not exceeded. However, when using the more realistic two-layer skin model the obtained in situ electric field strengths were substantially lower and no violations of the basic restrictions occurred, which can be explained by the

  9. Mathematical Modeling of Double-Skin Facade in Northern Area of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zou Huifen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the operation principles of the double-skin facade (DSF in winter of severe cold area. The paper discussed the main influence factors of building energy consumption, including the heat storage cavity spacing, the air circulation mode, the building envelope, and the building orientation. First, we studied the relationship among the thermal storage cavity spacing, the temperature distribution in the cavity of the DSF, and the indoor temperature. Then, we discussed the influence on the ambient temperature in the building exerted by the air circulation system of the double-skin facade. Finally, we analyzed the influence on the whole building energy consumption of the DSF buildings under the situation of different building envelopes and different building orientations. Based on the results of the numerical simulation, the paper put forward an operation strategy analysis of the DSF buildings in severe cold area, in order to achieve the purpose of building energy saving.

  10. Skin-derived mesenchymal stem cells help restore function to ovaries in a premature ovarian failure mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongmei Lai

    Full Text Available Skin-derived mesenchymal stem cells (SMSCs can differentiate into the three embryonic germ layers. For this reason, they are considered a powerful tool for therapeutic cloning and offer new possibilities for tissue therapy. Recent studies showed that skin-derived stem cells can differentiate into cells expressing germ-cell specific markers in vitro and form oocytes in vivo. The idea that SMSCs may be suitable for the treatment of intractable diseases or traumatic tissue damage has attracted attention. To determine the ability of SMSCs to reactivate injured ovaries, a mouse model with ovaries damaged by busulfan and cyclophosphamide was developed and is described here. Female skin-derived mesenchymal stem cells (F-SMSCs and male skin-derived mesenchymal stem cells (M-SMSCs from red fluorescence protein (RFP transgenic adult mice were used to investigate the restorative effects of SMSCs on ovarian function. Significant increases in total body weight and the weight of reproductive organs were observed in the treated animals. Both F-SMSCs and M-SMSCs were shown to be capable of partially restoring fertility in chemotherapy-treated females. Immunostaining with RFP and anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH antibodies demonstrated that the grafted SMSCs survived, migrated to the recipient ovaries. After SMSCs were administered to the treated mice, real-time PCR showed that the expression levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, TGF-β, IL-8, IL-6, IL-1β, and IFNγ were significantly lower in the ovaries than in the untreated controls. Consistent with this observation, expression of oogenesis marker genes Nobox, Nanos3, and Lhx8 increased in ovaries of SMSCs-treated mice. These findings suggest that SMSCs may play a role within the ovarian follicle microenvironment in restoring the function of damaged ovaries and could be useful in reproductive health.

  11. Nitisinone improves eye and skin pigmentation defects in a mouse model of oculocutaneous albinism

    OpenAIRE

    Onojafe, Ighovie F.; Adams, David R; Simeonov, Dimitre R.; Zhang, Jun; Chan, Chi-Chao; Bernardini, Isa M.; Sergeev, Yuri V.; Dolinska, Monika B.; Alur, Ramakrishna P.; Brilliant, Murray H.; William A Gahl; Brooks, Brian P.

    2011-01-01

    Mutation of the tyrosinase gene (TYR) causes oculocutaneous albinism, type 1 (OCA1), a condition characterized by reduced skin and eye melanin pigmentation and by vision loss. The retinal pigment epithelium influences postnatal visual development. Therefore, increasing ocular pigmentation in patients with OCA1 might enhance visual function. There are 2 forms of OCA1, OCA-1A and OCA-1B. Individuals with the former lack functional tyrosinase and therefore lack melanin, while individuals with th...

  12. A polygenic mouse model of psoriasiform skin disease in CD18-deficient mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Bullard, D C; Scharffetter-Kochanek, K; McArthur, M J; Chosay, J. G.; McBride, M E; Montgomery, C A; Beaudet, A L

    1996-01-01

    Previously, a hypomorphic mutation in CD18 was generated by gene targeting, with homozygous mice displaying increased circulating neutrophil counts, defects in the response to chemically induced peritonitis, and delays in transplantation rejection. When this mutation was backcrossed onto the PL/J inbred strain, virtually all homozygous mice developed a chronic inflammatory skin disease with a mean age of onset of 11 weeks after birth. The disease was characterized by erythema, hair loss, and ...

  13. KHG26792 Inhibits Melanin Synthesis in Mel-Ab Cells and a Skin Equivalent Model

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Hailan; Kim, Jandi; Hahn, Hoh-Gyu; Yun, Jun; Jeong, Hyo-Soon; Yun, Hye-Young; Baek, Kwang Jin; Kwon, Nyoun Soo; Min, Young Sil; Park, Kyoung-Chan; Kim, Dong-Seok

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the effects of KHG26792 (3-(naphthalen-2-yl(propoxy) methyl)azetidine hydrochloride), a potential skin whitening agent, on melanin synthesis and identify the underlying mechanism of action. Our data showed that KHG26792 significantly reduced melanin synthesis in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, KHG26792 downregulated microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) and tyrosinase, the rate-limiting enzyme in melanogenesis, although tyros...

  14. Alternative conceptual models and codes for unsaturated flow in fractured tuff: Preliminary assessments for GWTT-95

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groundwater travel time (GWTT) calculations will play an important role in addressing site-suitability criteria for the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain,Nevada. In support of these calculations, Preliminary assessments of the candidate codes and models are presented in this report. A series of benchmark studies have been designed to address important aspects of modeling flow through fractured media representative of flow at Yucca Mountain. Three codes (DUAL, FEHMN, and TOUGH 2) are compared in these benchmark studies. DUAL is a single-phase, isothermal, two-dimensional flow simulator based on the dual mixed finite element method. FEHMN is a nonisothermal, multiphase, multidimensional simulator based primarily on the finite element method. TOUGH2 is anon isothermal, multiphase, multidimensional simulator based on the integral finite difference method. Alternative conceptual models of fracture flow consisting of the equivalent continuum model (ECM) and the dual permeability (DK) model are used in the different codes

  15. Dye-enhanced multimodal confocal microscopy for noninvasive detection of skin cancers in mouse models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jesung; Mroz, Pawel; Hamblin, Michael R.; Yaroslavsky, Anna N.

    2010-03-01

    Skin cancer is the most common form of human cancer. Its early diagnosis and timely treatment is of paramount importance for dermatology and surgical oncology. In this study, we evaluate the use of reflectance and fluorescence confocal microscopy for detecting skin cancers in an in-vivo trial with B16F10 melanoma and SCCVII squamous cell carcinoma in mice. For the experiments, the mice are anesthetized, then the tumors are infiltrated with aqueous solution of methylene blue and imaged. Reflectance images are acquired at 658 nm. Fluorescence is excited at 658 nm and registered in the range between 690 and 710 nm. After imaging, the mice are sacrificed. The tumors are excised and processed for hematoxylin and eosin histopathology, which is compared to the optical images. The results of the study indicate that in-vivo reflectance images provide valuable information on vascularization of the tumor, whereas the fluorescence images mimic the structural features seen in histopathology. Simultaneous dye-enhanced reflectance and fluorescence confocal microscopy shows promise for the detection, demarcation, and noninvasive monitoring of skin cancer development.

  16. Hemicellulose dressing for skin lesions caused by herpes zoster in a patient with leukemia-an alternative dressing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacon, Julieta; Ferreira, Lydia

    2009-01-01

     Herpes zoster is a painful disease that can develop in immunosuppressed children. Prolonged immunosuppression in leukemia patients can substantially delay healing of herpetic lesions. The purpose of this report was to evaluate the use of hemicellulose dressings as an alternative treatment for extensive herpetic lesions in an immunosuppressed child with leukemia. The hemicellulose dressing was applied to the lesions on the second day after debridement. After 36 days, the lesions were completely healed. The hemicellulose dressing was an effective resource for promoting complete epithelial healing.

  17. Alternative model of the Antonov problem: Generalization with the presence of a mass spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez, L.; García, S. Gómez; Guzmán, F.

    2009-01-01

    We extend the quasiergodic model proposed as an alternative version of the Antonov isothermal model [L. Velazquez and F. Guzman, Phys. Rev. E 68, 066116 (2003)] by including the incidence of a mass spectrum. We propose an iterative procedure inspired by the Newton-Raphson method to solve the resulting nonlinear structure equations. As an example of application, we assume the existence of a mass spectrum with a standard Salpeter form, dN=Cdm/mα . We analyze consequences of this realistic ingredient on the system thermodynamical behavior and perform a quantitative description of the mass segregation effect.

  18. Evaluating environmental and economic consequences of alternative pest management strategies: results of modeling workshops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Richard L.; Andrews, Austin K.; Auble, Gregor T.L.; Ellison, Richard A.; Hamilton, David B.; Roelle, James E.; McNamee, Peter J.

    1983-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) needs a comprehensive method to evaluate the human health and environmental effects of alternative agricultural pest management strategies. This project explored the utility of Adaptive Environmental Assessment (AEA) techniques for meeting this need. The project objectives were to produce models for environmental impact analysis, improve communications, identify research needs and data requirements, and demonstrate a process for resolving conflicts. The project was structured around the construction (in an initial 2 1/2-day workshop) and examination (in a second 2 1/2-day workshop) of a simulation model of a corn agroecosystem.

  19. Radionecrosis skin model induced an athymic mouse nude (Nu/Nu) for development of dermal-epidermal human substitute based regenerative therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neoplasms incidence has increased significantly in recent years and continued population growth and aging will increase the statistics of this illness in the world's diseases. The cancer treatment usually consists in individual or combined use of chemotherapy, surgery and radiotherapy depending on the etiology of the tumor. In cases where radiotherapy is used in addition to the therapeutic effects of radiation, specific complications can occur, and in the skin, these complications can be present with a clinical expression ranging from erythema to radionecrosis, and this latter being the adverse effect with greater severity. The radionecrosis treatment consists in debridement necrotic areas and covering the surgical wounds. Autologous grafts are most commonly used for this covering, however when large areas are affected, allografts can be used for occlusive treatment and the keratinocytes and adipose derived stem cells (ADSC) addition becomes an alternative, due to the knowing for immunomodulatory and regenerative response. For that reason, aiming to simulate the radionecrosis adverse effects, an animal model of induced cutaneous radionecrosis was created, in athymic mouse Nude (Nu/Nu), for developing regenerative therapies based on human dermal-epidermal substitutes containing keratinocytes and ADSC, which proved occlusive as an efficient treatment, furthermore, having this radionecrosis animal model established, new possibilities for treatment of diseases involving dermal regeneration, can be tested. (author)

  20. FEM modeling and histological analyses on thermal damage induced in facial skin resurfacing procedure with different CO2 laser pulse duration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Francesca; Zingoni, Tiziano; Di Cicco, Emiliano; Manetti, Leonardo; Pini, Roberto; Fortuna, Damiano

    2011-07-01

    Laser light is nowadays routinely used in the aesthetic treatments of facial skin, such as in laser rejuvenation, scar removal etc. The induced thermal damage may be varied by setting different laser parameters, in order to obtain a particular aesthetic result. In this work, it is proposed a theoretical study on the induced thermal damage in the deep tissue, by considering different laser pulse duration. The study is based on the Finite Element Method (FEM): a bidimensional model of the facial skin is depicted in axial symmetry, considering the different skin structures and their different optical and thermal parameters; the conversion of laser light into thermal energy is modeled by the bio-heat equation. The light source is a CO2 laser, with different pulse durations. The model enabled to study the thermal damage induced into the skin, by calculating the Arrhenius integral. The post-processing results enabled to study in space and time the temperature dynamics induced in the facial skin, to study the eventual cumulative effects of subsequent laser pulses and to optimize the procedure for applications in dermatological surgery. The calculated data where then validated in an experimental measurement session, performed in a sheep animal model. Histological analyses were performed on the treated tissues, evidencing the spatial distribution and the entity of the thermal damage in the collageneous tissue. Modeling and experimental results were in good agreement, and they were used to design a new optimized laser based skin resurfacing procedure.

  1. Skin Diseases: Skin Health and Skin Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Usually the cause is staphylococcal (staph), but sometimes streptococcus (strep) can cause it, too. It is most ... color or outline, or in any other way. Psoriasis © 2008 Logical Images, Inc. Psoriasis —A skin disease ...

  2. Automated clustering of ensembles of alternative models in protein structure databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingues, Francisco S; Rahnenführer, Jörg; Lengauer, Thomas

    2004-06-01

    Experimentally determined protein structures have been classified in different public databases according to their structural and evolutionary relationships. Frequently, alternative structural models, determined using X-ray crystallography or NMR spectroscopy, are available for a protein. These models can present significant structural dissimilarity. Currently there is no classification available for these alternative structures. In order to classify them, we developed STRuster, an automated method for clustering ensembles of structural models according to their backbone structure. The method is based on the calculation of carbon alpha (Calpha) distance matrices. Two filters are applied in the calculation of the dissimilarity measure in order to identify both large and small (but significant) backbone conformational changes. The resulting dissimilarity value is used for hierarchical clustering and partitioning around medoids (PAM). Hierarchical clustering reflects the hierarchy of similarities between all pairs of models, while PAM groups the models into the 'optimal' number of clusters. The method has been applied to cluster the structures in each SCOP species level and can be easily applied to any other sets of conformers. The results are available at: http://bioinf.mpi-sb.mpg.de/projects/struster/. PMID:15319469

  3. An alternative to evaluate the efficiency of in vitro culture medium using a logistic regression model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Furtado Ferreira

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The evaluation of a culture medium for the in vitro culture of a species is performed using its physical and/or chemical properties. However, the analysis of the experimental results makes it possible to evaluate its quality. In this sense, this work presents an alternative using a logistic model to evaluate the culture medium to be used in vitro. The probabilities provided by this model will be used as a medium evaluator index. The importance of this index is based on the formalization of a statistical criterion for the selection of the adequate culture medium to be used on in vitro culture without excluding its physical and/or chemical properties. To demonstrate this procedure, an experiment determining the ideal medium for the in vitro culture of primary explants of Ipeca [Psychotria ipecacuanha (Brot. Stokes] was evaluated. The differentiation of the culture medium was based on the presence and absence of the growth regulator BAP (6-benzilaminopurine. A logistic model was adjusted as a function of the weight of fresh and dry matter. Minimum, medium and maximum probabilities obtained with this model showed that the culture medium containing BAP was the most adequate for the explant growth. Due to the high discriminative power of these mediums, detected by the model, their use is recommended as an alternative to select culture medium for similar experiments.

  4. Clinical utility of the DSM-5 alternative model of personality disorders: six cases from practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Bo; Markon, Kristian; Simonsen, Erik; Krueger, Robert F

    2015-01-01

    In Section III, Emerging Measures and Models, DSM-5 presents an Alternative Model of Personality Disorders, which is an empirically based model of personality pathology measured with the Level of Personality Functioning Scale (LPFS) and the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5). These novel instruments assess level of personality impairment and pathological traits. Objective. A number of studies have supported the psychometric qualities of the LPFS and the PID-5, but the utility of these instruments in clinical assessment and treatment has not been extensively evaluated. The goal of this study was to evaluate the clinical utility of this alternative model of personality disorders. Method. We administered the LPFS and the PID-5 to psychiatric outpatients diagnosed with personality disorders and other nonpsychotic disorders. The personality profiles of six characteristic patients were inspected (involving a comparison of presenting problems, history, and diagnoses) and used to formulate treatment considerations. We also considered 6 specific personality disorder types that could be derived from the profiles as defined in the DSM-5 Section III criteria. Results. Using the LPFS and PID-5, we were able to characterize the 6 cases in a meaningful and useful manner with regard to understanding and treatment of the individual patient and to match the cases with 6 relevant personality disorder types. Implications for ease of use, communication, and psychotherapy are discussed. Conclusion. Our evaluation generally supported the utility for clinical purposes of the Alternative Model for Personality Disorders in Section III of the DSM-5, although it also identified some areas for refinement. (Journal of Psychiatric Practice 2015;21:3-25).

  5. Integrated decision strategies for skin sensitization hazard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Judy; Zang, Qingda; Kleinstreuer, Nicole; Paris, Michael; Lehmann, David M; Choksi, Neepa; Matheson, Joanna; Jacobs, Abigail; Lowit, Anna; Allen, David; Casey, Warren

    2016-09-01

    One of the top priorities of the Interagency Coordinating Committee for the Validation of Alternative Methods (ICCVAM) is the identification and evaluation of non-animal alternatives for skin sensitization testing. Although skin sensitization is a complex process, the key biological events of the process have been well characterized in an adverse outcome pathway (AOP) proposed by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Accordingly, ICCVAM is working to develop integrated decision strategies based on the AOP using in vitro, in chemico and in silico information. Data were compiled for 120 substances tested in the murine local lymph node assay (LLNA), direct peptide reactivity assay (DPRA), human cell line activation test (h-CLAT) and KeratinoSens assay. Data for six physicochemical properties, which may affect skin penetration, were also collected, and skin sensitization read-across predictions were performed using OECD QSAR Toolbox. All data were combined into a variety of potential integrated decision strategies to predict LLNA outcomes using a training set of 94 substances and an external test set of 26 substances. Fifty-four models were built using multiple combinations of machine learning approaches and predictor variables. The seven models with the highest accuracy (89-96% for the test set and 96-99% for the training set) for predicting LLNA outcomes used a support vector machine (SVM) approach with different combinations of predictor variables. The performance statistics of the SVM models were higher than any of the non-animal tests alone and higher than simple test battery approaches using these methods. These data suggest that computational approaches are promising tools to effectively integrate data sources to identify potential skin sensitizers without animal testing. Published 2016. This article has been contributed to by US Government employees and their work is in the public domain in the USA. PMID:26851134

  6. Topical delivery of 5-aminolevulinic acid-encapsulated ethosomes in a hyperproliferative skin animal model using the CLSM technique to evaluate the penetration behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yi-Ping; Huang, Yaw-Bin; Wu, Pao-Chu; Tsai, Yi-Hung

    2009-11-01

    Psoriasis, an inflammatory skin disease, exhibits recurring itching, soreness, and cracked and bleeding skin. Currently, the topical delivery of 5-aminolevulinic acid-photodynamic therapy (ALA-PDT) is an optional treatment for psoriasis which provides long-term therapeutic effects, is non-toxic and enjoys better compliance with patients. However, the precursor of ALA is hydrophilic, and thus its ability to penetrate the skin is limited. Also, little research has provided a platform to investigate the penetration behavior in disordered skin. We employed a highly potent ethosomal carrier (phosphatidylethanolamine; PE) to investigate the penetration behavior of ALA and the recovery of skin in a hyperproliferative murine model. We found that the application of ethosomes produced a significant increase in cumulative amounts of 5-26-fold in normal and hyperproliferative murine skin samples when compared to an ALA aqueous solution; and the ALA aqueous solution appeared less precise in terms of the penetration mode in hyperproliferative murine skin. After the ethosomes had been applied, the protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) intensity increased about 3.64-fold compared with that of the ALA aqueous solution, and the penetration depth reached 30-80 microm. The results demonstrated that the ethosomal carrier significantly improved the delivery of ALA and the formation of PpIX in both normal and hyperproliferative murine skin samples, and the expression level of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha was reduced after the ALA-ethosomes were applied to treat hyperproliferative murine skin. Furthermore, the results of present study encourage more investigations on the mechanism of the interaction with ethosomes and hyperproliferative murine skin.

  7. Topical delivery of 5-aminolevulinic acid-encapsulated ethosomes in a hyperproliferative skin animal model using the CLSM technique to evaluate the penetration behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yi-Ping; Huang, Yaw-Bin; Wu, Pao-Chu; Tsai, Yi-Hung

    2009-11-01

    Psoriasis, an inflammatory skin disease, exhibits recurring itching, soreness, and cracked and bleeding skin. Currently, the topical delivery of 5-aminolevulinic acid-photodynamic therapy (ALA-PDT) is an optional treatment for psoriasis which provides long-term therapeutic effects, is non-toxic and enjoys better compliance with patients. However, the precursor of ALA is hydrophilic, and thus its ability to penetrate the skin is limited. Also, little research has provided a platform to investigate the penetration behavior in disordered skin. We employed a highly potent ethosomal carrier (phosphatidylethanolamine; PE) to investigate the penetration behavior of ALA and the recovery of skin in a hyperproliferative murine model. We found that the application of ethosomes produced a significant increase in cumulative amounts of 5-26-fold in normal and hyperproliferative murine skin samples when compared to an ALA aqueous solution; and the ALA aqueous solution appeared less precise in terms of the penetration mode in hyperproliferative murine skin. After the ethosomes had been applied, the protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) intensity increased about 3.64-fold compared with that of the ALA aqueous solution, and the penetration depth reached 30-80 microm. The results demonstrated that the ethosomal carrier significantly improved the delivery of ALA and the formation of PpIX in both normal and hyperproliferative murine skin samples, and the expression level of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha was reduced after the ALA-ethosomes were applied to treat hyperproliferative murine skin. Furthermore, the results of present study encourage more investigations on the mechanism of the interaction with ethosomes and hyperproliferative murine skin. PMID:19660544

  8. Effects of Silk Sericin on Incision Wound Healing in a Dorsal Skin Flap Wound Healing Rat Model

    OpenAIRE

    Ersel, Murat; Uyanikgil, Yigit; AKARCA, Funda Karbek; OZCETE, Enver; Altunci, Yusuf Ali; Karabey, Fatih; Cavusoglu, Turker; Meral, Ayfer; Yigitturk, Gurkan; Cetin, Emel Oyku

    2016-01-01

    Background The wound healing process is complex and still poorly understood. Sericin is a silk protein synthesized by silk worms (Bombyx mori). The objective of this study was to evaluate in vivo wound healing effects of a sericin-containing gel formulation in an incision wound model in rats. Material/Methods Twenty-eight Wistar-Albino rats were divided into 4 groups (n=7). No intervention or treatment was applied to the Intact control group. For other groups, a dorsal skin flap (9×3 cm) was ...

  9. Symbolic Models for Nonlinear Time-Varying Time-Delay Systems via Alternating Approximate Bisimulation

    CERN Document Server

    Pola, Giordano; Di Benedetto, Maria Domenica

    2010-01-01

    Time-delay systems are an important class of dynamical systems that provide a solid mathematical framework to deal with many application domains of interest. In this paper we focus on nonlinear control systems with unknown and time-varying delay signals and we propose one approach to the control design of such systems, which is based on the construction of symbolic models. Symbolic models are abstract descriptions of dynamical systems in which one symbolic state and one symbolic input correspond to an aggregate of states and an aggregate of inputs. We first introduce the notion of incremental input-delay-to-state stability and characterize it by means of Liapunov-Krasovskii functionals. We then derive sufficient conditions for the existence of symbolic models that are shown to be alternating approximately bisimilar to the original system. Further results are also derived which prove the computability of the proposed symbolic models in a finite number of steps.

  10. Curious Skin

    OpenAIRE

    Angel, G.

    2010-01-01

    Some of Henry Wellcome’s collection of tattoos on human skin will be on display in our forthcoming Skin exhibition. But how did the Parisian doctor from whom they were acquired come by his macabre collection of tattoos in the first place, and what did they mean to those whose skin they were on? It’s Gemma Angel‘s job to find out…

  11. Comparison of Model Error for Alternative Conceptual Models of Sediment Geometry at the Hanford Site, Southeast Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, C. J.; Savelieva-Trofimova, E. A.; Thorne, P. D.; Xie, Y.; Scheibe, T. D.; Cole, C. R.; Kanevski, M.

    2002-12-01

    A number of uncertainties exist in the hydrogeology of the Hanford Site, and the high costs and risks associated with cleanup of sites contaminated with radioactive wastes requires that the uncertainty associated with alternative remediation decisions must fully reflect the uncertainty associated with these decisions. Prior uncertainty analyses of Hanford groundwater model predictions have focused on uncertainties in model parameters (e.g., hydraulic conductivity) given an assumed conceptual model of hydrogeologic structure. In this study we evaluated predictive uncertainty related to the model structure conceptualization. Our study has focused on two major elements of the hydrogeologic structure of the Hanford Site: the geometry of mud units that occur within the aquifer, and the parameter zonation for hydrologic properties of the uppermost conductive portion of the aquifer. For each structural element, we have developed alternative conceptual models that have been evaluated by inverse modeling. The geometry and continuity of mud units exert a strong influence on groundwater flow and contaminant transport at the site. A detailed study of the spatial distribution of the three mud units was performed using a data set consisting of the presence/absence of each mud unit at several hundred boreholes, as well as the thickness if a mud unit was present. The spatial analysis proceeded in two stages. A series of stochastic simulations of the mud units were prepared using geostatistical methods. The stochastic simulations were numerically ranked and a subset of the best and worst simulations (as determined by the connectedness of the aquifer given the simulated mud distributions) was used as inputs to an inverse model. Inverse modeling was performed using UCODE and a finite element flow and transport code (CFEST) and used to test the fit of over 76,000 observed potentiometric head data for several alternative models of the mud distribution. Those conceptual models included

  12. A water system model for exploring electric energy alternatives in southeastern US basins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electric power generation often involves the use of water for power plant cooling and steam generation, which typically involves the release of cooling water to nearby rivers and lakes. The resulting thermal pollution may negatively impact the ecosystems of these water bodies. Water resource systems models enable the examination of the implications of alternative electric generation on regional water resources. This letter documents the development, calibration, and validation of a climate-driven water resource systems model of the Apalachicola–Chattahoochee–Flint, the Alabama–Coosa–Tallapoosa, and the Tombigbee River basins in the states of Georgia, Alabama, and Florida, in the southeastern US. The model represents different water users, including power plants, agricultural water users, and municipal users. The model takes into account local population, per-capita use estimates, and changes in population growth. The water resources planning model was calibrated and validated against the observed, managed flows through the river systems of the three basins. Flow calibration was performed on land cover, water capacity, and hydraulic conductivity of soil horizons; river water temperature calibration was performed on channel width and slope properties. Goodness-of-fit statistics indicate that under 1980–2010 levels of water use, the model robustly represents major features of monthly average streamflow and water temperatures. The application of this integrated electricity generation–water resources planning model can be used to explore alternative electric generation and water implications. The implementation of this model is explored in the companion paper of this focus issue (Yates et al 2013 Environ. Res. Lett. 8 035042). (letter)

  13. A cumulative decision model for three-alternative choice in concurrent chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Randolph C; McLean, Anthony P

    2016-07-01

    Traditional models for choice in the concurrent-chains procedure have assumed that terminal-link stimuli acquire value as conditioned reinforcers, and that 2-alternative choice provides a measure of relative value according to the matching law. By contrast, the cumulative decision model (CDM; Christensen & Grace, 2010) explains choice as the aggregate effect of comparing delays to a criterion on initial-link responding, not conditioned reinforcement. Here we test whether the CDM can account for choice in 3-alternative concurrent-chains (3ACC) and compare it with the hyperbolic value-added model (HVA; Mazur, 2001), which assumes that choice depends on the increase in conditioned reinforcement value signaled by terminal-link stimuli and has been successful in previous 3ACC research (Mazur, 2000). In Experiment 1, 4 pigeons responded in 3ACC in which the terminal links were fixed-interval schedules, and parameter estimates from fits of CDM and HVA were used to calculate predictions for conditions with variable-interval terminal links. The predictions of CDM were more accurate than those of HVA. In Experiment 2, 7 pigeons responded in 3ACC in which the terminal links were fixed-interval schedules. Although both models described the data well, residuals from HVA fits showed a systematic pattern predicted by CDM, characterized by a third-order polynomial with a negative cubic coefficient. Finally, we conducted a residual meta-analysis (Sutton, Grace, McLean, & Baum, 2008) of data from prior 3ACC studies. HVA residuals showed the same negative cubic pattern as in Experiment 2, whereas no systematic pattern was found in the CDM residuals. Overall, results support the CDM and suggest that the same principles which describe binary choice in concurrent chains generalize without modification to 3-alternative choice. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27379716

  14. The excimer lamp induces cutaneous nerve degeneration and reduces scratching in a dry-skin mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamo, Atsuko; Tominaga, Mitsutoshi; Kamata, Yayoi; Kaneda, Kazuyuki; Ko, Kyi C; Matsuda, Hironori; Kimura, Utako; Ogawa, Hideoki; Takamori, Kenji

    2014-12-01

    Epidermal hyperinnervation, which is thought to underlie intractable pruritus, has been observed in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD). The epidermal expression of axonal guidance molecules has been reported to regulate epidermal hyperinnervation. Previously, we showed that the excimer lamp has antihyperinnervative effects in nonpruritic dry-skin model mice, although epidermal expression of axonal guidance molecules was unchanged. Therefore, we investigated the antipruritic effects of excimer lamp irradiation and its mechanism of action. A single irradiation of AD model mice significantly inhibited itch-related behavior 1 day later, following improvement in the dermatitis score. In addition, irradiation of nerve fibers formed by cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons increased bleb formation and decreased nerve fiber expression of nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyl transferase 2, suggesting degenerative changes in these fibers. We also analyzed whether attaching a cutoff excimer filter (COF) to the lamp, thus decreasing cytotoxic wavelengths, altered hyperinnervation and the production of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD), a DNA damage marker, in dry-skin model mice. Irradiation with COF decreased CPD production in keratinocytes, as well as having an antihyperinnervative effect, indicating that the antipruritic effects of excimer lamp irradiation with COF are due to induction of epidermal nerve degeneration and reduced DNA damage.

  15. The excimer lamp induces cutaneous nerve degeneration and reduces scratching in a dry-skin mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamo, Atsuko; Tominaga, Mitsutoshi; Kamata, Yayoi; Kaneda, Kazuyuki; Ko, Kyi C; Matsuda, Hironori; Kimura, Utako; Ogawa, Hideoki; Takamori, Kenji

    2014-12-01

    Epidermal hyperinnervation, which is thought to underlie intractable pruritus, has been observed in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD). The epidermal expression of axonal guidance molecules has been reported to regulate epidermal hyperinnervation. Previously, we showed that the excimer lamp has antihyperinnervative effects in nonpruritic dry-skin model mice, although epidermal expression of axonal guidance molecules was unchanged. Therefore, we investigated the antipruritic effects of excimer lamp irradiation and its mechanism of action. A single irradiation of AD model mice significantly inhibited itch-related behavior 1 day later, following improvement in the dermatitis score. In addition, irradiation of nerve fibers formed by cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons increased bleb formation and decreased nerve fiber expression of nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyl transferase 2, suggesting degenerative changes in these fibers. We also analyzed whether attaching a cutoff excimer filter (COF) to the lamp, thus decreasing cytotoxic wavelengths, altered hyperinnervation and the production of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD), a DNA damage marker, in dry-skin model mice. Irradiation with COF decreased CPD production in keratinocytes, as well as having an antihyperinnervative effect, indicating that the antipruritic effects of excimer lamp irradiation with COF are due to induction of epidermal nerve degeneration and reduced DNA damage. PMID:24940652

  16. Quantitative Proteomic Profiling of Low Dose Ionizing Radiation Effects in a Human Skin Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hengel, Shawna; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Waters, Katrina M.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Stenoien, David L.

    2014-07-29

    To assess molecular responses to low doses of radiation that may be encountered during medical diagnostic procedures, nuclear accidents, or terrorist acts, a quantitative global proteomic approach was used to identify protein alterations in a reconstituted human skin tissue treated with 10 cGy of ionizing radiation. Subcellular fractionation was employed to remove highly abundant structural proteins and provide insight on radiation induced alterations in protein abundance and localization. In addition, peptides were post-fractionated using high resolution 2-dimensional liquid chromatography to increase the dynamic range of detection of protein abundance and translocation changes. Quantitative data was obtained by labeling peptides with 8-plex isobaric iTRAQ tags. A total of 207 proteins were detected with statistically significant alterations in abundance and/or subcellular localization compared to sham irradiated tissues. Bioinformatics analysis of the data indicated that the top canonical pathways affected by low dose radiation are related to cellular metabolism. Among the proteins showing alterations in abundance, localization and proteolytic processing was the skin barrier protein filaggrin which is consistent with our previous observation that ionizing radiation alters profilaggrin processing with potential effects on skin barrier functions. In addition, a large number of proteases and protease regulators were affected by low dose radiation exposure indicating that altered proteolytic activity may be a hallmark of low dose radiation exposure. While several studies have demonstrated altered transcriptional regulation occurs following low dose radiation exposures, the data presented here indicates post-transcriptional regulation of protein abundance, localization, and proteolytic processing play an important role in regulating radiation responses in complex human tissues.

  17. Integrated Decision Strategies for Skin Sensitization Hazard

    Science.gov (United States)

    One of the top priorities of the Interagency Coordinating Committee for the Validation of Alternative Methods (ICCVAM) is the identification and evaluation of non-animal alternatives for skin sensitization testing. Although skin sensitization is a complex process, the key biologi...

  18. Testing alternative uses of electromagnetic data to reduce the prediction error of groundwater models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse Christensen, Nikolaj; Christensen, Steen; Ferre, Ty Paul A.

    2016-05-01

    In spite of geophysics being used increasingly, it is often unclear how and when the integration of geophysical data and models can best improve the construction and predictive capability of groundwater models. This paper uses a newly developed HYdrogeophysical TEst-Bench (HYTEB) that is a collection of geological, groundwater and geophysical modeling and inversion software to demonstrate alternative uses of electromagnetic (EM) data for groundwater modeling in a hydrogeological environment consisting of various types of glacial deposits with typical hydraulic conductivities and electrical resistivities covering impermeable bedrock with low resistivity (clay). The synthetic 3-D reference system is designed so that there is a perfect relationship between hydraulic conductivity and electrical resistivity. For this system it is investigated to what extent groundwater model calibration and, often more importantly, model predictions can be improved by including in the calibration process electrical resistivity estimates obtained from TEM data. In all calibration cases, the hydraulic conductivity field is highly parameterized and the estimation is stabilized by (in most cases) geophysics-based regularization. For the studied system and inversion approaches it is found that resistivities estimated by sequential hydrogeophysical inversion (SHI) or joint hydrogeophysical inversion (JHI) should be used with caution as estimators of hydraulic conductivity or as regularization means for subsequent hydrological inversion. The limited groundwater model improvement obtained by using the geophysical data probably mainly arises from the way these data are used here: the alternative inversion approaches propagate geophysical estimation errors into the hydrologic model parameters. It was expected that JHI would compensate for this, but the hydrologic data were apparently insufficient to secure such compensation. With respect to reducing model prediction error, it depends on the type

  19. The effect of alpha-ketoglutarate on a piscine skin model: a molecular and morphological study

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, Rita

    2009-01-01

    Dissertação mest., Ciências Biomédicas, Universidade do Algarve, 2009 Alpha-ketoglutarate (AKG) is a key intermediate in the tricarboxylic acid cycle with important functions in glutamate and glutamine metabolism. Its effect after oral administration was studied in adult sea bream Sparus aurata skin and scales in order to evaluate the effect on collagen synthesis. Scales were removed from one side of the body and allowed to regenerate for 14 days; the control group received unt...

  20. Measurement and Modelling of Air Flow Rate in a Naturally Ventilated Double Skin Facade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per; Kalyanova, Olena; Jensen, Rasmus Lund

    2008-01-01

    Air flow rate in a naturally ventilated double skin façade (DSF) is extremely difficult to measure due to the stochastic nature of wind, and as a consequence non-uniform and dynamic flow conditions. This paper describes the results of two different methods to measure the air flow in a full...... by the thermal simulation program, BSim, based on measured weather boundary conditions are compared to the measured air temperature, temperature gradient and mass flow rate in the DSF cavity. The results show that it is possible to predict the temperature distribution and airflow in the DSF although some...

  1. A tribo-mechanical analysis of PVA-based building-blocks for implementation in a 2-layered skin model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales Hurtado, M; de Vries, E G; Zeng, X; van der Heide, E

    2016-09-01

    Poly(vinyl) alcohol hydrogel (PVA) is a well-known polymer widely used in the medical field due to its biocompatibility properties and easy manufacturing. In this work, the tribo-mechanical properties of PVA-based blocks are studied to evaluate their suitability as a part of a structure simulating the length scale dependence of human skin. Thus, blocks of pure PVA and PVA mixed with Cellulose (PVA-Cel) were synthesised via freezing/thawing cycles and their mechanical properties were determined by Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) and creep tests. The dynamic tests addressed to elastic moduli between 38 and 50kPa for the PVA and PVA-Cel, respectively. The fitting of the creep compliance tests in the SLS model confirmed the viscoelastic behaviour of the samples with retardation times of 23 and 16 seconds for the PVA and PVA-Cel, respectively. Micro indentation tests were also achieved and the results indicated elastic moduli in the same range of the dynamic tests. Specifically, values between 45-55 and 56-81kPa were obtained for the PVA and PVA-Cel samples, respectively. The tribological results indicated values of 0.55 at low forces for the PVA decreasing to 0.13 at higher forces. The PVA-Cel blocks showed lower friction even at low forces with values between 0.2 and 0.07. The implementation of these building blocks in the design of a 2-layered skin model (2LSM) is also presented in this work. The 2LSM was stamped with four different textures and their surface properties were evaluated. The hydration of the 2LSM was also evaluated with a corneometer and the results indicated a gradient of hydration comparable to the human skin. PMID:27236420

  2. Regional on-road vehicle running emissions modeling and evaluation for conventional and alternative vehicle technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, H Christopher; Zhai, Haibo; Rouphail, Nagui M

    2009-11-01

    This study presents a methodology for estimating high-resolution, regional on-road vehicle emissions and the associated reductions in air pollutant emissions from vehicles that utilize alternative fuels or propulsion technologies. The fuels considered are gasoline, diesel, ethanol, biodiesel, compressed natural gas, hydrogen, and electricity. The technologies considered are internal combustion or compression engines, hybrids, fuel cell, and electric. Road link-based emission models are developed using modal fuel use and emission rates applied to facility- and speed-specific driving cycles. For an urban case study, passenger cars were found to be the largest sources of HC, CO, and CO(2) emissions, whereas trucks contributed the largest share of NO(x) emissions. When alternative fuel and propulsion technologies were introduced in the fleet at a modest market penetration level of 27%, their emission reductions were found to be 3-14%. Emissions for all pollutants generally decreased with an increase in the market share of alternative vehicle technologies. Turnover of the light duty fleet to newer Tier 2 vehicles reduced emissions of HC, CO, and NO(x) substantially. However, modest improvements in fuel economy may be offset by VMT growth and reductions in overall average speed.

  3. Skin vaccination against cervical cancer associated human papillomavirus with a novel micro-projection array in a mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly J Corbett

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Better delivery systems are needed for routinely used vaccines, to improve vaccine uptake. Many vaccines contain alum or alum based adjuvants. Here we investigate a novel dry-coated densely-packed micro-projection array skin patch (Nanopatch™ as an alternate delivery system to intramuscular injection for delivering an alum adjuvanted human papillomavirus (HPV vaccine (Gardasil® commonly used as a prophylactic vaccine against cervical cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Micro-projection arrays dry-coated with vaccine material (Gardasil® delivered to C57BL/6 mouse ear skin released vaccine within 5 minutes. To assess vaccine immunogenicity, doses of corresponding to HPV-16 component of the vaccine between 0.43 ± 0.084 ng and 300 ± 120 ng (mean ± SD were administered to mice at day 0 and day 14. A dose of 55 ± 6.0 ng delivered intracutaneously by micro-projection array was sufficient to produce a maximal virus neutralizing serum antibody response at day 28 post vaccination. Neutralizing antibody titres were sustained out to 16 weeks post vaccination, and, for comparable doses of vaccine, somewhat higher titres were observed with intracutaneous patch delivery than with intramuscular delivery with the needle and syringe at this time point. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Use of dry micro-projection arrays (Nanopatch™ has the potential to overcome the need for a vaccine cold chain for common vaccines currently delivered by needle and syringe, and to reduce risk of needle-stick injury and vaccine avoidance due to the fear of the needle especially among children.

  4. Alternative business models for establishing fast-charging stations - Part 2; Alternative forretningsmodeller for etablering av hurtigladestasjoner - Del 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-11-01

    This section of the report describes and evaluates potential business models for fast-charging stations. Business models are developed on the basis of market development for electric vehicles and electric vehicle usage patterns analyzed in Part 1 of the project. This report describes a series of models in both the early and maturity stage, where we have distinguished between different user segments and payment models. With the estimated trends in the car fleet and charger use, the prerequisites for profitable quick charging in the downtown area are good, while, due to high construction contribution, you must have a relatively high proportion of subscriptions and a high charge rate to obtain adequate finances in the corridor points.(auth)

  5. Preferred Skin Color Enhancement of Digital Photographic Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huanzhao Zeng

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Reproducing skin colors pleasingly is essential for photographic color reproduction. Moving skin colors toward their preferred skin color center improves the skin color preference. Two main factors to successfully enhance skin colors are: a method to detect skin colors effectively and a method to morph skin colors toward a preferred skin color region properly. This paper starts with introducing a method to enhance skin colors using a static skin color detection model. It significantly improves the color preference for skin colors that are not far off from regular skin tones. To enhance a greater range of skin tones effectively, another method that automatically adapts the skin color detection model to the skin tone of each individual image is proposed. It not only enhances skin colors effectively, but also adjusts the overall image colors to produce more accurate white balance on the image.

  6. Echo state networks as an alternative to traditional artificial neural networks in rainfall–runoff modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. J. de Vos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite theoretical benefits of recurrent artificial neural networks over their feedforward counterparts, it is still unclear whether the former offer practical advantages as rainfall–runoff models. The main drawback of recurrent networks is the increased complexity of the training procedure due to their architecture. This work uses the recently introduced and conceptually simple echo state networks for streamflow forecasts on twelve river basins in the Eastern United States, and compares them to a variety of traditional feedforward and recurrent approaches. Two modifications on the echo state network models are made that increase the hydrologically relevant information content of their internal state. The results show that the echo state networks outperform feedforward networks and are competitive with state-of-the-art recurrent networks, across a range of performance measures. This, along with their simplicity and ease of training, suggests that they can be considered promising alternatives to traditional artificial neural networks in rainfall–runoff modelling.

  7. Echo state networks as an alternative to traditional artificial neural networks in rainfall-runoff modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vos, N. J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite theoretical benefits of recurrent artificial neural networks over their feedforward counterparts, it is still unclear whether the former offer practical advantages as rainfall-runoff models. The main drawback of recurrent networks is the increased complexity of the training procedure due to their architecture. This work uses the recently introduced and conceptually simple echo state networks for streamflow forecasts on twelve river basins in the Eastern United States, and compares them to a variety of traditional feedforward and recurrent approaches. Two modifications on the echo state network models are made that increase the hydrologically relevant information content of their internal state. The results show that the echo state networks outperform feedforward networks and are competitive with state-of-the-art recurrent networks, across a range of performance measures. This, along with their simplicity and ease of training, suggests that they can be considered promising alternatives to traditional artificial neural networks in rainfall-runoff modelling.

  8. Alternative model for assessment administration and analysis: An example from the E-CLASS

    CERN Document Server

    Wilcox, Bethany R; Hobbs, Robert D; Aiken, John M; Welch, Nathan M; Lewandowski, H J

    2016-01-01

    The primary model for dissemination of conceptual and attitudinal assessments that has been used within the physics education research (PER) community is to create a high quality, validated assessment, make it available for a wide range of instructors to use, and provide minimal (if any) support to assist with administration or analysis of the results. Here, we present and discuss an alternative model for assessment dissemination, which is characterized by centralized data collection and analysis. This model also provides a greater degree of support for both researchers and instructors. Specifically, we describe our experiences developing a centralized, automated system for an attitudinal assessment we previously created to examine students' epistemologies and expectations about experimental physics. This system provides a proof-of-concept that we use to discuss the advantages associated with centralized administration and data collection for research-based assessments in PER. We also discuss the challenges t...

  9. A simple model for predicting skin dose for patients undergoing routine chest x-ray examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, the predicted skin doses of patients undergoing routine medical examinations at the Federal Medical Centre, Makurdi were carried out. We have used the Edmond's formula, the modified Edmond's formula and the regression method. Measurements were also made using phantoms and Thermoluminescence Dosimeter (TLD) in place of patients in order to compare the results obtained. The predicted mean chest dose for 100 patients undergoing routine medical examinations at Federal Medical Centre Makurdi was 0.73 mGy using Edmond's formula. The predicted average dose using our modified formula was 0.72 mGy. That using the regression method was 647.9 mGy. We repeated the above measurements with TLD badges using phantoms in place of patients. Twenty-four measurements were carried out. The average skin dose using TLD badges was 1.14 mGy. From these results, it can be seen that, the average dose from the modified Edmond's formula and the regression method closely agree with those obtained from the Edmond's formulae. On the other hand the average dose obtained using phantoms was significantly higher than the previous results. This significant difference may be due to the age associated with the X-ray machine used.

  10. A Distance Model of Intuitionistic Fuzzy Cross Entropy to Solve Preference Problem on Alternatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the field of decision-making, for the multiple attribute decision-making problem with the partially unknown attribute weights, the evaluation information in the form of the intuitionistic fuzzy numbers, and the preference on alternatives, this paper proposes a comprehensive decision model based on the intuitionistic fuzzy cross entropy distance and the grey correlation analysis. The creative model can make up the deficiency that the traditional intuitionistic fuzzy distance measure is easy to cause the confusion of information and can improve the accuracy of distance measure; meanwhile, the grey correlation analysis method, suitable for the small sample and the poor information decision-making, is applied in the evaluation. This paper constructs a mathematical optimization model of maximizing the synthesis grey correlation coefficient between decision-making evaluation values and decision-makers’ subjective preference values, calculates the attribute weights with the known partial weight information, and then sorts the alternatives by the grey correlation coefficient values. Taking venture capital firm as an example, through the calculation and the variable disturbance, we can see that the methodology used in this paper has good stability and rationality. This research makes the decision-making process more scientific and further improves the theory of intuitionistic fuzzy multiple attribute decision-making.

  11. Challenges to complementary and alternative medical research: focal issues influencing integration into a cancer care model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, James; Engebretson, Joan; Garcia, Mary K

    2005-09-01

    Complementary and alternative therapies are increasingly used by cancer patients for palliative and postcancer preventive and/or wellness care. It is critical that evidence-based models be employed to both provide information for patients' use and informed consent and for physicians to advise patients and assess relative risk:benefit ratios of using specific complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) approaches within the cancer care paradigm. Research models for biomedicine have been somewhat limited when applied to broader, more holistic conceptualizations of health common to many forms of CAM. Thus, while numerous challenges to studying CAM exist, a fundamental question is not just what CAM practices should be studied but how CAM should be studied. The authors propose a model that emphasizes methodologic rigor yet approaches CAM research according to relative levels of evidence, meaning, and context, ranging from experimental, quantitative studies of mechanism to qualitative, observational studies of noetic/salutogenic variables. Responsibility for training researchers prepared to meet such challenges rests on both CAM and mainstream academic institutions, and care must be taken to avoid philosophical and practical pitfalls that might befall a myopic perspective of integration. PMID:16113028

  12. An alternative functional renormalization group approach to the single impurity Anderson model

    OpenAIRE

    Kinza, Michael; Ortloff, Jutta; Bauer, Johannes; Honerkamp, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    We present an alternative functional renormalization group (fRG) approach to the single-impurity Anderson model at finite temperatures. Starting with the exact self-energy and interaction vertex of a small system ('core') containing a correlated site, we switch on the hybridization with a non-interacting bath in the fRG-flow and calculate spectra of the correlated site. Different truncations of the RG-flow-equations and choices of the core are compared and discussed. Furthermore we calculate ...

  13. Alternate site infusion: the physician-directed, office-based model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tice, A D

    1996-01-01

    The physician-directed, clinic-based system for alternate site infusion therapy offers the advantages of easy communication and integrated decision making through the close teamwork and particular expertise of the nurse, physician, and pharmacist. With this system, any type of delivery model for home or outpatient IV antibiotic can be administered safely and efficiently. Through the involvement of the physician, it is easy to do clinical outcomes studies and develop bundling of services for risk-sharing contracts under managed care. PMID:8852176

  14. Alternative model for administration and analysis of research-based assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Bethany R.; Zwickl, Benjamin M.; Hobbs, Robert D.; Aiken, John M.; Welch, Nathan M.; Lewandowski, H. J.

    2016-06-01

    Research-based assessments represent a valuable tool for both instructors and researchers interested in improving undergraduate physics education. However, the historical model for disseminating and propagating conceptual and attitudinal assessments developed by the physics education research (PER) community has not resulted in widespread adoption of these assessments within the broader community of physics instructors. Within this historical model, assessment developers create high quality, validated assessments, make them available for a wide range of instructors to use, and provide minimal (if any) support to assist with administration or analysis of the results. Here, we present and discuss an alternative model for assessment dissemination, which is characterized by centralized data collection and analysis. This model provides a greater degree of support for both researchers and instructors in order to more explicitly support adoption of research-based assessments. Specifically, we describe our experiences developing a centralized, automated system for an attitudinal assessment we previously created to examine students' epistemologies and expectations about experimental physics. This system provides a proof of concept that we use to discuss the advantages associated with centralized administration and data collection for research-based assessments in PER. We also discuss the challenges that we encountered while developing, maintaining, and automating this system. Ultimately, we argue that centralized administration and data collection for standardized assessments is a viable and potentially advantageous alternative to the default model characterized by decentralized administration and analysis. Moreover, with the help of online administration and automation, this model can support the long-term sustainability of centralized assessment systems.

  15. Developing a Hierarchical Decision Model to Evaluate Nuclear Power Plant Alternative Siting Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingga, Marwan Mossa

    A strong trend of returning to nuclear power is evident in different places in the world. Forty-five countries are planning to add nuclear power to their grids and more than 66 nuclear power plants are under construction. Nuclear power plants that generate electricity and steam need to improve safety to become more acceptable to governments and the public. One novel practical solution to increase nuclear power plants' safety factor is to build them away from urban areas, such as offshore or underground. To date, Land-Based siting is the dominant option for siting all commercial operational nuclear power plants. However, the literature reveals several options for building nuclear power plants in safer sitings than Land-Based sitings. The alternatives are several and each has advantages and disadvantages, and it is difficult to distinguish among them and choose the best for a specific project. In this research, we recall the old idea of using the alternatives of offshore and underground sitings for new nuclear power plants and propose a tool to help in choosing the best siting technology. This research involved the development of a decision model for evaluating several potential nuclear power plant siting technologies, both those that are currently available and future ones. The decision model was developed based on the Hierarchical Decision Modeling (HDM) methodology. The model considers five major dimensions, social, technical, economic, environmental, and political (STEEP), and their related criteria and sub-criteria. The model was designed and developed by the author, and its elements' validation and evaluation were done by a large number of experts in the field of nuclear energy. The decision model was applied in evaluating five potential siting technologies and ranked the Natural Island as the best in comparison to Land-Based, Floating Plant, Artificial Island, and Semi-Embedded plant.

  16. Growth of MRSA and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a fine-celled foam model containing sessile commensal skin bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oates, Angela; McBain, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Sessile cultures of the skin bacteria Staphylococcus saprophyticus and Corynebacterium xerosis were grown using novel fine-celled foam substrata to test the outcome of challenge by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus or Pseudomonas aeruginosa under three growth medium regimens (simulated sweat, simulated serum or simulated sweat substituted with simulated serum during the microbial challenge). S. saprophyticus and C. xerosis significantly limited MRSA and P. aeruginosa immigration respectively, under the simulated sweat and serum medium regimes. Under the substitution medium regime however, MRSA and P. aeruginosa integrated into pre-established biofilms to a significantly greater extent, attaining cell densities similar to the axenic controls. The outcome of challenge was influenced by the medium composition and test organism but could not be predicted based on planktonic competition assays or growth dynamics. Interactions between skin and wound isolates could be modelled using the fine-celled foam-based system. This model could be used to further investigate interactions and also in preclinical studies of antimicrobial wound care regimens. PMID:26727101

  17. Oily skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... keep your skin clean using warm water and soap, or a soapless cleanser. Clean your face with astringent pads if frequent face washing causes irritation. Use only water-based or oil-free cosmetics if you have oily skin. Your ...

  18. Evaluation of Alternative Conceptual Models Using Interdisciplinary Information: An Application in Shallow Groundwater Recharge and Discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y.; Bajcsy, P.; Valocchi, A. J.; Kim, C.; Wang, J.

    2007-12-01

    Natural systems are complex, thus extensive data are needed for their characterization. However, data acquisition is expensive; consequently we develop models using sparse, uncertain information. When all uncertainties in the system are considered, the number of alternative conceptual models is large. Traditionally, the development of a conceptual model has relied on subjective professional judgment. Good judgment is based on experience in coordinating and understanding auxiliary information which is correlated to the model but difficult to be quantified into the mathematical model. For example, groundwater recharge and discharge (R&D) processes are known to relate to multiple information sources such as soil type, river and lake location, irrigation patterns and land use. Although hydrologists have been trying to understand and model the interaction between each of these information sources and R&D processes, it is extremely difficult to quantify their correlations using a universal approach due to the complexity of the processes, the spatiotemporal distribution and uncertainty. There is currently no single method capable of estimating R&D rates and patterns for all practical applications. Chamberlin (1890) recommended use of "multiple working hypotheses" (alternative conceptual models) for rapid advancement in understanding of applied and theoretical problems. Therefore, cross analyzing R&D rates and patterns from various estimation methods and related field information will likely be superior to using only a single estimation method. We have developed the Pattern Recognition Utility (PRU), to help GIS users recognize spatial patterns from noisy 2D image. This GIS plug-in utility has been applied to help hydrogeologists establish alternative R&D conceptual models in a more efficient way than conventional methods. The PRU uses numerical methods and image processing algorithms to estimate and visualize shallow R&D patterns and rates. It can provide a fast initial

  19. Evaluation of the impact of planning alternative strategies on urban metabolism with the ACASA model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marras, S.; Casula, M.; Pyles, R. D.; Paw U, K. T.; Spano, D.

    2011-12-01

    A crucial point in urban sustainable development is to evaluate the impact that future planning alternatives has on the main factors affecting the citizens liveableness, as the development of the urban heat island or the carbon emissions level. Recent advances in bio-physical sciences have led to new methods and models to estimate energy, water, and carbon fluxes. Also, several studies have addressed urban metabolism issues, but few have integrated the development of numerical tools and methodologies for the analysis of fluxes between a city and its environment with its validation and application in terms of future development alternatives. Over the past several years and most recently within the European Project "BRIDGE", CMCC tested the ACASA (Advanced-Canopy-Atmosphere-Soil Algorithm) land-surface model over agricultural ecosystems (grapes), wild vegetation (forests and Mediterranean maquis), and urban (Florence) or mixed urban/vegetated land (Helsinki). Preliminary results show success in adapting the model to mixed urban systems in each of the main fluxes of interest. The model was improved to adapt it for urban environment, and key parameterizations of leaf-facet scale interactions permit separate accounting of both biogenic and anthropogenic flux sources and sinks, and allow for easy scenario building for simulations designed to test changes in land use or urban planning. In this way, sustainable planning strategies are proposed based on quantitative assessments of energy, water, and carbon fluxes. In this research, three planning alternatives accounting for an increase in urbanization intensity were tested by ACASA in Helsinki (Finland) for the year 2008. Helsinki is located at a high latitude and is characterized by a rapid urbanization that requires a substantial amount of energy for heating. The model behavior for the baseline and alternatives scenarios (i.e., urban classes with low, mid, and high residential intensity) during the entire year was

  20. Considering too few alternatives: The mental model theory of extensional reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalley, Thierry; Schaeken, Walter

    2016-01-01

    When solving a simple probabilistic problem, people tend to build an incomplete mental representation. We observe this pattern in responses to probabilistic problems over a set of premises using the conjunction, disjunction, and conditional propositional connectives. The mental model theory of extensional reasoning explains this bias towards underestimating the number of possibilities: In reckoning with different interpretations of the premises (logical rules, mental model theoretical, and, specific to conditional premises, conjunction and biconditional interpretation) the mental model theory accounts for the majority of observations. Different interpretations of a premise result in a build-up of mental models that are often incomplete. These mental models are processed using either an extensional strategy relying on proportions amongst models, or a conflict monitoring strategy. The consequence of considering too few possibilities is an erroneous probability estimate akin to that faced by decision makers who fail to generate and consider all alternatives, a characteristic of bounded rationality. We compare our results to the results published by Johnson-Laird, Legrenzi, Girotto, Legrenzi, and Caverni [Johnson-Laird, P., Legrenzi, P., Girotto, V., Legrenzi, M., & Caverni, J. (1999). Naive probability: A mental model theory of extensional reasoning. Psychological Review, 106, 62-88. doi: 10. 1037/0033-295X.106.1.62], and we observe lower performance levels than those in the original article. PMID:26046814