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Sample records for alternative silp-scr catalysts

  1. Alternative SILP-SCR Catalysts based on Guanidinium Chromates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due-Hansen, Johannes; Riisager, Anders; Ståhl, Kenny;

    There is an increasing global concern about human caused emissions of pollutants like sulfur and nitrogen oxides to the atmosphere leading to, e.g. smog and acid rain damaging to the human health and the environment. Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx with ammonia as reductant is the most...... efficient method to eliminate NOx from flue gases in stationary sources via the reaction: 4NH3 + 4NO + O2 → 4N2 + 6H2O. The traditionally used heterogeneous SCR catalyst, V2O5-WO3/TiO2, suffers significant deactivation with time due to the presence of relatively large amounts of potassium in the fly ash...... from bio-fuels. Some of the alkali particles reach the SCR catalyst and deactivate the catalyst both by physical pore blocking as well as by chemically deactivating the oxo vanadium sites. Furthermore, the catalyst operates around 375ºC and thus has to be placed in a certain position in the flue gas...

  2. Alternative alkali resistant deNOx catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Putluru, Siva Sankar Reddy; Kristensen, Steffen Buus; Due-Hansen, Johannes;

    2012-01-01

    Alternative alkali resistant deNOx catalysts were prepared using three different supports ZrO2, TiO2 and Mordenite zeolite. The majority of the catalysts were prepared by incipient wetness impregnation of a commercial support, with vanadium, copper or iron precursor, one catalyst was prepared by...

  3. Duplex steam reformer: alternate catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The manufacturing feasibility of a duplex steam reformer tube for potential use in a high temperature gas cooled reactor has been successfully demonstrated. This technique consists of explosively expanding the inner tube into the outer tube. To successfully achieve the desired 0 to 3 mil radial gap between the tubes it is necessary to perform the expansion in two steps with an intermediate anneal. A catalyst design that would have replaced the conventional Raschig rings with a metal supported catalyst has been evaluated and it has been concluded that further development and testing are needed before fabrication of a full scale prototype is warranted. Consequently, the immediate efforts are directed towards reevaluating the incentives for developing a catalyst and the probability of successfully developing a catalyst that could be used for steam reforming

  4. Alternative deNOx catalysts and technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due-Hansen, Johannes

    in the formation of acid rain and photochemical smog. Some basic concepts and reactions regarding the formation and removal of NOx are presented in chapter 1 and 2. Two approaches are undertaken in the present work to reduce the emission of NOx: by means of catalytic removal, and by NO absorption in ionic liquids...... a catalyst less susceptible to the poisons present in the flue gas, a number of catalysts have been synthesized and tested in the present work, all based on commercially available supports. A highly acidic support consisting of sulfated zirconia was chosen based on preliminary studies. A number of different...... permolecule ionic liquid. However, [BMIM]OTf exhibited promising behavior due to its reversible absorption/desorption properties. This in principle allows recycling of the ionic liquid as well as harvesting the NO. The accumulated NO could hereby be used in e.g. the synthesis of nitric acid allowing...

  5. Alternative deNO{sub x} catalysts and technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Due-Hansen, J.

    2010-06-15

    Two approaches are undertaken in the present work to reduce the emission of NO{sub x}: by means of catalytic removal, and by NO absorption in ionic liquids. The commercial catalyst used for the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitrogen oxides exhibits high activity and selectivity towards N{sub 2}. However, the vanadia-titania-based catalyst used is very sensitive to deactivation by alkali-species (primarily potassium), which are typically present in high amounts in the flue gas when biomass is combusted. By co-firing with large amounts of CO{sub 2}-neutral straw or wood (to meet stringent CO{sub 2} emission legislation), the lifetime of the traditional SCR catalyst is thus significantly reduced due to the presence of deactivating species originating from the fuel. To develop a catalyst less susceptible to the poisons present in the flue gas, a number of catalysts have been synthesized and tested in the present work, all based on commercially available supports. A highly acidic support consisting of sulfated zirconia was chosen based on preliminary studies. A number of different active species distributed on the support were investigated, such as iron, copper and vanadium oxides. However, based on the catalysts performance in the SCR reaction and their resistances towards potassium, the most promising candidate of the formulations studied was the vanadia-loaded catalyst, i.e. V{sub 2}O{sub 5}-SO{sub 4}2-ZrO{sub 2}. This work, together with an introduction to the catalytic removal of NO{sub x}, are described in chapter 3. The remainder of the first part is concerned with the catalytic NO{sub x} removal (chapter 4) and it addresses the upscaling of the best catalyst candidate. The catalyst was mixed with the natural binding clay (sepiolite) to upscale the selected catalyst to the monolithic level, suitable for installation in gas stream with high flows, e.g. a flue gas duct of a power plant. A series of catalyst pellets with increasing levels of sepiolite were

  6. Alternative formulations of regenerable flue gas cleanup catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, M.B.; White, M.G.

    1991-01-01

    The major source of man-made SO{sub 2} in the atmosphere is the burning of coal for electric power generation. Coal-fired utility plants are also large sources of NO{sub x} pollution. Regenerable flue gas desulfurization/NO{sub x} abatement catalysts provide one mechanism of simultaneously removing SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} species from flue gases released into the atmosphere. The purpose of this project is to examine routes of optimizing the adsorption efficiency, the adsorption capacity, and the ease of regeneration of regenerable flue gas cleanup catalysts. We are investigating two different mechanisms for accomplishing this goal. The first involves the use of different alkali and alkaline earth metals as promoters for the alumina sorbents to increase the surface basicity of the sorbent and thus adjust the number and distribution of adsorption sites. The second involves investigation of non-aqueous impregnation, as opposed to aqueous impregnation, as a method to obtain an evenly dispersed monolayer of the promoter on the surface.

  7. The Bosch Process-Performance of a Developmental Reactor and Experimental Evaluation of Alternative Catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abney, Morgan B.; Mansell, J. Matthew

    2010-01-01

    Bosch-based reactors have been in development at NASA since the 1960's. Traditional operation involves the reduction of carbon dioxide with hydrogen over a steel wool catalyst to produce water and solid carbon. While the system is capable of completely closing the loop on oxygen and hydrogen for Atmosphere Revitalization, steel wool requires a reaction temperature of 650C or higher for optimum performance. The single pass efficiency of the reaction over steel wool has been shown to be less than 10% resulting in a high recycle stream. Finally, the formation of solid carbon on steel wool ultimately fouls the catalyst necessitating catalyst resupply. These factors result in high mass, volume and power demands for a Bosch system. Interplanetary transportation and surface exploration missions of the moon, Mars, and near-earth objects will require higher levels of loop closure than current technology cannot provide. A Bosch system can provide the level of loop closure necessary for these long-term missions if mass, volume, and power can be kept low. The keys to improving the Bosch system lie in reactor and catalyst development. In 2009, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration refurbished a circa 1980's developmental Bosch reactor and built a sub-scale Bosch Catalyst Test Stand for the purpose of reactor and catalyst development. This paper describes the baseline performance of two commercially available steel wool catalysts as compared to performance reported in the 1960's and 80's. Additionally, the results of sub-scale testing of alternative Bosch catalysts, including nickel- and cobalt-based catalysts, are discussed.

  8. Enantioselective Alternating Copolymerization of Propylene with Carbon Monoxide Using Cationic Palladium-Chiral Diphosphine Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Enantioselective alternating copolymerization of carbon monoxide with propylene was carried out using palladium catalyst modified by 1,4-3,6-dianhydro-2,5-dideoxy-2,5-bis (diphenylphosphino)-L-iditol (DDPPI). The chiral diphosphine was proved to be effective at enantioselective copolymerization. Optical rotation, elemental analysis, 1H, 13C-NMR and IR spectra showed that the copolymer was optically active, isotactic, alternating poly(1,4-ketone) structure.

  9. Oxygen-deficient titania as alternative support for Pt catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anqi Zhao; Justus Masa; Wei Xia

    2014-01-01

    Insufficient electrochemical stability is a major challenge for carbon materials in oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) due to carbon corrosion and insufficient metal-support interactions. In this work, titania is explored as an alternative support for Pt catalysts. Oxygen deficient titania samples including TiO2−x and TiO2−xNy were obtained by thermal treatment of anatase TiO2 under flowing H2 and NH3, respectively. Pt nanoparticles were deposited on the titania by a modified ethylene glycol method. The samples were characterized by N2-physisorption, X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The ORR activity and long-term stability of supported Pt catalysts were evaluated using linear sweep voltammetry and chronoamperometry in 0.1 mol/L HClO4. Pt/TiO2−x and Pt/TiO2−xNy showed higher ORR activities than Pt/TiO2 as indicated by higher onset potentials. Oxygen deficiency in TiO2−x and TiO2−xNy contributed to the high ORR activity due to enhanced charge transfer, as disclosed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy studies. Electrochemical stability studies revealed that Pt/TiO2−x exhibited a higher stability with a lower current decay rate than commercial Pt/C, which can be attributed to the stable oxide support and strong interaction between Pt nanoparticles and the oxygen-deficient TiO2−x support.

  10. Ethylene Oligomerization and Polymerization: Alternative Iron Catalysts beyond 2,6-Bisiminopyridyl Iron Complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suyun Jie; Shu Zhang; Wenjuan Zhang; Yingxia Song; Junxian Hou; Wen-Hua Sun

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction Polyolefin industry arrives the option to transfer from multiple-site systems of the classical Ziegler-Natta catalysts to more sophisticated single-site catalysts. The late-transition metal compounds were traditionally assumed with poor polymerization properties due to the highly competitive chain-termination step, and produced the short-chain oligomers up to 40 carbon atoms (SHOP catalysts). Recently the polyolefins employing latetransition metal complexes as catalysts became a hot research subject with the pioneering works by Brookhart and Gibson. It is promising for nickel catalysts to use solely ethylene as monomer for highly branched polyethylenes, and the designed nickel catalysts were not useful in industry. It is critical time to investigate the relationship of coordination modes of nickel complexes and its catalytic activities and the properties of resultant polyethylenes.

  11. Computational exploration of alternative catalysts for olefin purification: cobalt and copper analogues inspired by nickel bis(dithiolene) electrocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haixia; Brothers, Edward N; Hall, Michael B

    2014-09-15

    Olefin purification is an important process in petrochemistry. The behavior of the nickel bis(dithiolene) complex Ni(S2C2(CF3)2)2 (1(_Ni)) as an electrocatalyst for this process was thoroughly explored experimentally and computationally. Here, computational investigations with the ωB97X-D functional were conducted to explore alternative candidates [M(S2C2(CF3)2)2](n) (M = Co with n = 0, -1, -2, -3 and Cu with n = +1, 0, -1, -2) for olefin purification by using ethylene as a model. The reaction mechanism for these alternative catalysts was calculated to determine if any of these alternatives could block the decomposition route that exists for the Ni catalyst, bind ethylene efficiently to form the adducts, and release ethylene upon reduction. Calculations predict that the neutral cobalt complex 1(_Co) binds and releases olefin upon reduction with low activation barriers. Furthermore, 1(_Co), unlike 1(_Ni), catalyzes the desired reaction without the need of the anion as a cocatalyst. The Co atom directly coordinates with ethylene more favorably than Ni, facilitating the indirect pathway that is found to lead to the formation of the desired interligand adduct. The reduction and oxidation processes involved in the reaction are computed to occur under reasonable experiment conditions. Among the copper complexes, the calculations predict that the anionic copper complex 1(_Cu)(-) also may be an alternative catalyst, whose performance is somewhat worse than 1(_Ni). The reaction of 1(_Cu)(-) with ethylene is predicted to be thermodynamically neutral. New catalysts that need no electrochemical regenerations may be possible by designing appropriate dithiolene ligands for 1(_Cu)(-). PMID:25171059

  12. Alternative catalysts and technologies for NOx removal from biomass- and wastefired plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schill, Leonhard

    removed with the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) using a vanadia-tungsta-titania (VWT) catalyst and ammonia (NH3) as reductant. For application in coal- and gas-red power plants this technology is mature. However, when ring biomass the ue gas contains potassium in large amounts which deactivates...... the VWT catalyst very rapidly. Firing of biomass increased strongly over the past decade and is expected to increase even further in the near future. Also waste incineration creates ue gases that are very challenging to the SCR catalyst. Therefore, SCR units in waste incineration plants are commonly...

  13. Catalyst in alternate energy resources for producing environment friendly clean energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon monoxide, a by-product of the Chemical Process Industries, is a deadly poisonous gas; if released into the atmosphere causes irreparable damage to the environment. A bimetallic catalyst system Ru: Mn doped with different concentrations of 'K' (Potassium) and supported on high surface area alumina support was prepared by co impregnation method, dispersed and reduced at 450 deg. C under hydrogen flow using a closed reactor system at atmospheric pressure for the utilization of poisonous CO gas to produce environmental friendly clean energy. Fischer Tropsch catalyst, when subjected to CO/hydrogenation, gives methane and other hydrocarbon products. The main purpose of this research work was two fold: 1. The powder catalyst when dispersed/reduced on a high surface area oxide support spreads on the surface of the system in a different orientations and shapes. The particle size of the prepared catalysts ranges from 5.0-25.0 nm. The whole system forms a complicated mixture of numerous particles and hence becomes very complicated to study. The characterisation of these randomly oriented particles having different sizes and shapes is a difficult job. This required sensitive UHV spectroscopic techniques like SSIMS, XPS, EEls, XRD and TEM. Their operations needs strong skills. Hence the first aim was to utilize these techniques for the characterization of the prepared catalysts and to establish the usefulness of these techniques in studying such complicated systems. 2. Since Ru is a very good Fischer Tropsch catalyst for the production of aliphatic hydrocarbons product. Our other aim was to find out whether if by surface modification through additives or by surface reconstructing through chemical treatment, we could alter the path of this CO/hydrogenation reaction to produce potentially important unsaturated/aromatic hydrocarbon products. This would serve our dual purpose in which we could use poisonous CO for useful purpose. Hence 'K' potassium as surface modifier is

  14. An alternative preparation method for ion exchanged catalysts: Solid state redox reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, E.; Hagen, A.; Grunwaldt, J.-D.; Roessner, F.

    A new method for modifying zeolites with zinc is proposed. The solid state redox reaction between metallic zinc and ZSM-5 zeolites with different Si/Al ratios was investigated by temperature programmed hydrogen evolution (TPHE), X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and diffuse reflectance...... should be located at the same sites as in catalysts prepared by conventional methods. Combination of XANES and catalytic activity point to zinc being mainly present in tetrahedral geometry under reaction conditions....

  15. STARCH SULFURIC ACID: AN ALTERNATIVE, ECO-FRIENDLY CATALYST FOR BIGINELLI REACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramin Rezaei

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The one-pot multicomponent synthesis of 3,4-dihydropyrimidinone derivatives using starch sulfuric acid as an environmentally friendly biopolymer-based solid acid catalyst from aldehydes, β-keto esters and urea/ thiourea without solvent is described. Compared with classical Biginelli reaction conditions, this new method has the advantage of minimizing the cost operational hazards and environmental pollution, good yields, shorter reaction times and simple work-up.

  16. Functionalized dicationic ionic liquids: Green and efficient alternatives for catalysts in phthalate plasticizers preparation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    NEGAR ZEKRI; REZA FAREGHI-ALAMDARI; ZAHRA KHODARAHMI

    2016-08-01

    Two highly acidic, imidazolium-based, functionalized dicationic ionic liquids (FDCILs) were synthesized and characterized by FTIR, ¹H NMR and¹³ C NMR. The synthesized FDCILs were used as efficient and green catalysts in the synthesis of phthalate plasticizers through esterification of phthalic anhydride (PhA)with ethanol, n-propanol and n-butanol. Among these two FDCILs, (dimethyl-4-sulfobutyl-ammonium) 1,2- ethan-1-methyl-imidazolium-sulfonic acid hydrogen sulfate performed better. The catalytic activity of FDCIL is related to the density of acidic groups on it and the length of the carbon chain in the cationic part. Theinfluences of the reaction temperature, catalyst dosage, and molar ratio of phthalic anhydride to alcohol on the esterification reaction were investigated. The reusability of the catalyst in these reactions was studied too. Theb diester phthalates were obtained up to 98.8% yield. The products can be separated easily by decantation from the reaction mixture.

  17. Alternative formulations of regenerable flue gas cleanup catalysts. Progress report, September 1, 1990--August 31, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, M.B.; White, M.G.

    1991-12-31

    The major source of man-made SO{sub 2} in the atmosphere is the burning of coal for electric power generation. Coal-fired utility plants are also large sources of NO{sub x} pollution. Regenerable flue gas desulfurization/NO{sub x} abatement catalysts provide one mechanism of simultaneously removing SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} species from flue gases released into the atmosphere. The purpose of this project is to examine routes of optimizing the adsorption efficiency, the adsorption capacity, and the ease of regeneration of regenerable flue gas cleanup catalysts. We are investigating two different mechanisms for accomplishing this goal. The first involves the use of different alkali and alkaline earth metals as promoters for the alumina sorbents to increase the surface basicity of the sorbent and thus adjust the number and distribution of adsorption sites. The second involves investigation of non-aqueous impregnation, as opposed to aqueous impregnation, as a method to obtain an evenly dispersed monolayer of the promoter on the surface.

  18. An alternative method for the determination of siloxane activities toward basic equilibration catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MILUTIN N. GOVEDARICA

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The method used is based on the well-known fact that siloxane equilibrates, once formed, do not change their compositions unless some siloxane compound is added, in which case new equilibrium compositions appear. As these composition changes, as well as their dynamics, are caused solely because of the addition of a particular siloxane compound, they are expected to be specific, and should contain information about the siloxane activities toward the applied equilibration catalyst. It was shown that the viscosities of such systems, measured as a function of reaction times, could be used for the determination of the relative activities of siloxanes. Proceeding from this basic assumption, some commonly used siloxanes were tested in equilibrations catalysed with tetramethylammonium hydroxide, TMAH. The siloxanes were: hexamathylcyclotrisiloxane, D3, octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane, D4, tetravinyltetramethylcyclotetrasiloxane, D4Vinyl, hexamethyldisiloxane, MM, and a linear all-methyl oligosiloxane of number average molecular weight of approximately 800. MD8,5M. The following decreasing order of activities toward the TMAH-catalyst was obtained: D3>MD8,5M>D4>D4Vinyl>MM.

  19. Alternative cathodes based on iron phthalocyanine catalysts for mini- or micro-DMFC working at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iron phthalocyanine based cathodes were prepared either by dispersion of FePc on carbon or by electropolymerization of aniline in presence of FeTsPc. The macrocycles based cathodes were compared to a classical commercial Pt/C cathode in a standard three-electrode electrochemical cell and under DMFC conditions at room temperature. It was shown that the molecular dispersion of FeTsPc into a PAni film greatly enhances the activity of the macrocycle catalyst towards oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). But, in the same time, the stability under DMFC conditions is drastically decreased compared to the stability obtained with a FePc/C electrode. It was suggested that this instability of the catalytic film was rather due to the release of the FeTsPc from the polymer than to the destruction of the macrocycle active centre. Even if iron phthalocyanine catalysts display total tolerance to methanol when the anode is fed with a 5 M methanol solution, the comparison between a PAni-FeTsPc/C cathode and a Pt/C cathode in DMFC working conditions is in favor of the Pt/C cathode, in term of maximum achieved power density. However, the ratio (platinum atoms per cm2/number of FeTsPc molecules per cm2) is close to 100, which allows to be optimistic for further enhancement of activity of polymer-FeTsPc electrodes. It was suggested that researches to develop new electron conductive polymers stable under oxidative environment and with a high doping capacity could be a direction to use platinum alternative cathode catalysts in DMFC technology

  20. Nonactivated and Activated Biochar Derived from Bananas as Alternative Cathode Catalyst in Microbial Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haoran Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonactivated and activated biochars have been successfully prepared by bananas at different thermotreatment temperatures. The activated biochar generated at 900°C (Biochar-act900 exhibited improved oxygen reduction reaction (ORR and oxygen evolution reaction (OER performances in alkaline media, in terms of the onset potential and generated current density. Rotating disk electron result shows that the average of 2.65 electrons per oxygen molecule was transferred during ORR of Biochar-act900. The highest power density of 528.2 mW/m2 and the maximum stable voltage of 0.47 V were obtained by employing Biochar-act900 as cathode catalyst, which is comparable to the Pt/C cathode. Owning to these advantages, it is expected that the banana-derived biochar cathode can find application in microbial fuel cell systems.

  1. Nanostructural evolution under reducing conditions of a Pt/CeTbO{sub x} catalyst: A new alternative system as a TWC component[Three Way Catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco, G.; Calvino, J.J.; Cauqui, M.A.; Corchado, P.; Lopez-Cartes, C.; Colliex, C.; Perez-Omil, J.A.; Stephan, O.

    1999-12-01

    By using a combination of high resolution electron microscopy (HREM) and nanoanalytical electron microscopy (EELS-STEM) techniques, the nanoscale evolution of a 5% Pt/Ce{sub 0.8}Tb{sub 0.2}O{sub 2{minus}x} catalyst submitted to reduction in pure hydrogen within the 423--1,173 K range has been investigated. Fine details about the platinum catalytic particles, such as their bulk and surface chemical state, size, shape, or structural relationships with the mixed-oxide support, have been established and their change with reduction temperature monitored. Results indicate that at low reduction temperatures (<773 K) platinum is present in this catalyst in the form of well-faceted metallic particles with clean surfaces. At higher reduction temperatures drastic transformations have been detected.

  2. An alternative synthesis of the breast cancer drug fulvestrant (Faslodex®): catalyst control over C-C bond formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caprioglio, Diego; Fletcher, Stephen P

    2015-10-14

    Fulvestrant (Faslodex®) was synthesized in four steps (35% overall yield) from 6-dehydronandrolone acetate. Catalyst controlled, room temperature, diastereoselective 1,6-addition of the zirconocene derived from commercially available 9-bromonon-1-ene was used in the key C-C bond forming step. PMID:26300021

  3. Catalysis for alternative energy generation

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Summarizes recent problems in using catalysts in alternative energy generation and proposes novel solutions  Reconsiders the role of catalysis in alternative energy generation  Contributors include catalysis and alternative energy experts from across the globe

  4. Homogeneous catalysts

    CERN Document Server

    Chadwick, John C; Freixa, Zoraida; van Leeuwen, Piet W N M

    2011-01-01

    This first book to illuminate this important aspect of chemical synthesis improves the lifetime of catalysts, thus reducing material and saving energy, costs and waste.The international panel of expert authors describes the studies that have been conducted concerning the way homogeneous catalysts decompose, and the differences between homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts. The result is a ready reference for organic, catalytic, polymer and complex chemists, as well as those working in industry and with/on organometallics.

  5. Bimetallic Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinfelt, John H.

    1985-01-01

    Chemical reaction rates can be controlled by varying composition of miniscule clusters of metal atoms. These bimetallic catalysts have had major impact on petroleum refining, where work has involved heterogeneous catalysis (reacting molecules in a phase separate from catalyst.) Experimentation involving hydrocarbon reactions, catalytic…

  6. Titanium Dioxide as a Catalyst Support in Heterogeneous Catalysis

    OpenAIRE

    Samira Bagheri; Nurhidayatullaili Muhd Julkapli; Sharifah Bee Abd Hamid

    2014-01-01

    The lack of stability is a challenge for most heterogeneous catalysts. During operations, the agglomeration of particles may block the active sites of the catalyst, which is believed to contribute to its instability. Recently, titanium oxide (TiO2) was introduced as an alternative support material for heterogeneous catalyst due to the effect of its high surface area stabilizing the catalysts in its mesoporous structure. TiO2 supported metal catalysts have attracted interest due to TiO2 nanopa...

  7. Synthesis of Organic Compounds over Selected Types of Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Mohamed Saad Ismail

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This study provides an overview for the utilization of different catalytic material in the synthesis of organic compounds for important reactions such as heck reaction, aldol reaction, Diels- Alder and other reactions. Comparisons between multiple catalysts for the same reaction and justifications for developing new catalyzed materials are discussed. The following topics are introduced in this work; (1 solid base catalysts, (2 clay catalysts, (3 palladium catalysts, and (4 catalysts to produce organic compound from CO2. The features of these catalysts a long with the conjugated reactions and their selectivity are explained in details, also, some alternatives for toxic or polluting catalysts used in industry are suggested.

  8. Magnetic and dendritic catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Deraedt, Christophe; Ruiz, Jaime; Astruc, Didier

    2015-07-21

    The recovery and reuse of catalysts is a major challenge in the development of sustainable chemical processes. Two methods at the frontier between homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis have recently emerged for addressing this problem: loading the catalyst onto a dendrimer or onto a magnetic nanoparticle. In this Account, we describe representative examples of these two methods, primarily from our research group, and compare them. We then describe new chemistry that combines the benefits of these two methods of catalysis. Classic dendritic catalysis has involved either attaching the catalyst covalently at the branch termini or within the dendrimer core. We have used chelating pyridyltriazole ligands to insolubilize catalysts at the termini of dendrimers, providing an efficient, recyclable heterogeneous catalysts. With the addition of dendritic unimolecular micelles olefin metathesis reactions catalyzed by commercial Grubbs-type ruthenium-benzylidene complexes in water required unusually low amounts of catalyst. When such dendritic micelles include intradendritic ligands, both the micellar effect and ligand acceleration promote faster catalysis in water. With these types of catalysts, we could carry out azide alkyne cycloaddition ("click") chemistry with only ppm amounts of CuSO4·5H2O and sodium ascorbate under ambient conditions. Alternatively we can attach catalysts to the surface of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs), essentially magnetite (Fe3O4) or maghemite (γ-Fe2O3), offering the opportunity to recover the catalysts using magnets. Taking advantage of the merits of both of these strategies, we and others have developed a new generation of recyclable catalysts: dendritic magnetically recoverable catalysts. In particular, some of our catalysts with a γ-Fe2O3@SiO2 core and 1,2,3-triazole tethers and loaded with Pd nanoparticles generate strong positive dendritic effects with respect to ligand loading, catalyst loading, catalytic activity and

  9. Photo-oxidation catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, J. Roland; Liu, Ping; Smith, R. Davis

    2009-07-14

    Photo-oxidation catalysts and methods for cleaning a metal-based catalyst are disclosed. An exemplary catalyst system implementing a photo-oxidation catalyst may comprise a metal-based catalyst, and a photo-oxidation catalyst for cleaning the metal-based catalyst in the presence of light. The exposure to light enables the photo-oxidation catalyst to substantially oxidize absorbed contaminants and reduce accumulation of the contaminants on the metal-based catalyst. Applications are also disclosed.

  10. Catalyst Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiib, Hans; Marling, Gitte; Hansen, Peter Mandal

    2014-01-01

    How can architecture promote the enriching experiences of the tolerant, the democratic, and the learning city - a city worth living in, worth supporting and worth investing in? Catalyst Architecture comprises architectural projects, which, by virtue of their location, context and their combination...... of programs, have a role in mediating positive social and/or cultural development. In this sense, we talk about architecture as a catalyst for: sustainable adaptation of the city’s infrastructure appropriate renovation of dilapidated urban districts strengthening of social cohesiveness in the city...

  11. Comparison of Tungsten and Molybdenum Carbide Catalysts for the Hydrodeoxygenation of Oleic Acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollak, S.A.W.; Gosselink, R.J.A.; Es, van D.S.; Bitter, J.H.

    2013-01-01

    Group 6 (W, Mo) metal carbide catalysts are promising alternatives to hydrodesulfurization (NiMo, CoMo) catalysts and group 10 (Pd) type catalysts in the deoxygenation of vegetable fats/oils. Herein, we report a comparison of carbon nanofiber-supported W2C and Mo2C catalysts on activity, selectivity

  12. Nano-catalysts: Bridging the gap between homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Functionalized nanoparticles have emerged as sustainable alternatives to conventional materials, as robust, high-surface-area heterogeneous catalyst supports. We envisioned a catalyst system, which can bridge the homogenous and heterogeneous system. Postsynthetic surface modifica...

  13. Alkali resistant Cu/zeolite deNOx catalysts for flue gas cleaning in biomass fired applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Putluru, Siva Sankar Reddy; Riisager, Anders; Fehrmann, Rasmus

    2011-01-01

    investigate the redox and acidic properties of the catalysts. The poisoning resistivity seems to be due to a combination of high surface area and strong acidity of the Cu/zeolite catalysts. The catalysts might be attractive alternatives to conventional catalysts for deNOx of flue gases from biomass fired...

  14. Mordenite - Type Zeolite SCR Catalysts with Iron or Copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    Cu/mordenite catalysts were found to be highly active for the SCR of NO with NH3 and exhibited high resistance to alkali poisoning. Redox and acidic properties of Cu/mordenite were well preserved after poisoning with potassium unlike that of vanadium catalysts. Fe-mordenite catalysts also revealed...... much higher alkali resistivity than that of commercial V2O5/WO3-TiO2 (VWT) SCR catalyst which is currently used for NOx abatement in stationary installations. Unique support properties like high surface area and surface acidity, which are not available in the commercial VWT catalyst, seem...... to be essential requirements for the high alkali resistance. Mordenite-type zeolite based catalysts could therefore be attractive alternatives to conventional SCR catalysts for biomass fired power plant flue gas treatment....

  15. Solid Catalysts and theirs Application in Biodiesel Production

    OpenAIRE

    Ramli Mat; Rubyatul Adawiyah Samsudin; Mahadhir Mohamed; Anwar Johari

    2012-01-01

    The reduction of oil resources and increasing petroleum price has led to the search for alternative fuel from renewable resources such as biodiesel. Currently biodiesel is produced from vegetable oil using liquid catalysts. Replacement of liquid catalysts with solid catalysts would greatly solve the problems associated with expensive separation methods and corrosion problems, yielding to a cleaner product and greatly decreasing the cost of biodiesel production. In this paper, the development ...

  16. Foundation Flash Catalyst

    CERN Document Server

    Goralski, Greg

    2010-01-01

    This book offers an introduction to Flash Catalyst for designers with intermediate to advanced skills. It discusses where Catalyst sits within the production process and how it communicates with other programs. It covers all of the features of the Flash Catalyst workspace, teaching you how to create designs from scratch, how to build application designs and add functionality, and how to master the Catalyst/Flex workflow. * Introduces Flash Catalyst * Focuses on production process * Covers the interrelation between Flash Catalyst and Photoshop/Illustrator/Flex/Flash What you'll learn Starting f

  17. On the degradation of fuel cell catalyst. From model systems to high surface area catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arenz, M. [Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Dept. of Chemistry

    2010-07-01

    In the presented work, as an alternative accelerated degradation tests in the form of half-cell measurements combined with identical location transmission electron microscopy (IL-TEM){sup 10,} {sup 11} are presented. It is demonstrated that for different catalysts the degradation mechanism can be scrutinized in detail. Thus this approach enables the systematic investigation of fuel cell catalyst degradation in a reduced period of time. (orig.)

  18. Pd Close Coupled Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong Hua SHI; Mao Chu GONG; Yao Qiang CHEN

    2006-01-01

    A catalyst comprised novel high surface area alumina support was prepared to control emission of automobiles. The results showed that prepared catalyst could satisfy the requirements of a high performance close coupled catalyst for its good catalytic activity at low temperature and good stability at high temperature.

  19. Design of heterogeneous catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frey, Anne Mette

    was inspired by a computational screening, suggesting that alloys such as Ni-Fe, Co-Ni, and Co-Fe should show superior activity to the industrially used nickel catalyst. Especially the Ni-Fe system was considered to be interesting, since such alloy catalysts should be both more active and cheaper than...... turned out to work well, and the best catalyst prepared had a C5+ yield almost a factor of two higher than a standard air calcined Co catalyst. In the NH3-SCR reaction it is desirable to develop an active and stable catalyst for NOx removal in automotive applications, since the traditionally used...

  20. Preparation of biodiesel from soybean oil by using heterogeneous catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaniz Ferdous, M. Rakib Uddin, Maksudur R. Khan, M. A. Islam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The predicted shortage of fossil fuels and related environmental concerns has recently attracted significant attention to search alternative fuel. Biodiesel is one of the alternatives to fossil fuel. Now-a-days, most biodiesel is produced by the transesterification of oils using methanol and a homogeneous base catalyst. The use of homogeneous catalysts is normally limited to batch mode processing followed by a catalyst separation step. The immiscible glycerol phase, which accumulates during the course of the reaction, solubilizes the homogeneous base catalyst and therefore, withdraws from the reaction medium. Moreover, other difficulties of using homogeneous base catalysts relate to their sensitivity to free fatty acid (FFA and water and resulting saponification phenomenon. High energy consumption and costly separation of the catalyst from the reaction mixture have inspired the use of heterogeneous catalyst. The use of heterogeneous catalysts does not lead to the formation of soaps through neutralization of FFA and saponification of oil. In the present paper, biodiesel was prepared from crude (soybean oil by transesterification reaction using heterogeneous base catalyst name calcium oxide (CaO. Various reaction parameters were optimized and the biodiesel properties were evaluated.

  1. Preparation of biodiesel from soybean oil by using heterogeneous catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferdous, Kaniz; Rakib Uddin, M.; Islam, M.A. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Polymer Science, Shah Jalal University of Science and Technology, Sylhet 3114 (Bangladesh); Khan, Maksudur R. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Polymer Science, Shah Jalal University of Science and Technology, Sylhet 3114 (Bangladesh); Faculty of Chemical and Natural Resources Engineering, University Malaysia Pahang, 26300 Gambang, Kuantan, Pahang (Malaysia)

    2013-07-01

    The predicted shortage of fossil fuels and related environmental concerns has recently attracted significant attention to search alternative fuel. Biodiesel is one of the alternatives to fossil fuel. Now-a-days, most biodiesel is produced by the transesterification of oils using methanol and a homogeneous base catalyst. The use of homogeneous catalysts is normally limited to batch mode processing followed by a catalyst separation step. The immiscible glycerol phase, which accumulates during the course of the reaction, solubilizes the homogeneous base catalyst and therefore, withdraws from the reaction medium. Moreover, other difficulties of using homogeneous base catalysts relate to their sensitivity to free fatty acid (FFA) and water and resulting saponification phenomenon. High energy consumption and costly separation of the catalyst from the reaction mixture have inspired the use of heterogeneous catalyst. The use of heterogeneous catalysts does not lead to the formation of soaps through neutralization of FFA and saponification of oil. In the present paper, biodiesel was prepared from crude (soybean) oil by transesterification reaction using heterogeneous base catalyst name calcium oxide (CaO). Various reaction parameters were optimized and the biodiesel properties were evaluated.

  2. Environmentally benign production of biodiesel using heterogeneous catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Michikazu

    2009-01-01

    Fuelling the future: The production of esters of higher fatty acids from plant materials is of great interest for the manufacture of biodiesel. Heterogeneous catalysts can provide new routes for the environmentally benign production of biodiesel. Particulate heterogeneous catalysts can be readily separated from products following reaction allowing the catalyst to be reused, generating less waste, and consuming less energy. Diesel engines are simple and powerful, and exhibit many advantages in energy efficiency and cost. Therefore, the production of higher fatty acid esters from plant materials has become of interest in recent years for the manufacture of biodiesel, a clean-burning alternative fuel. The industrial production of biodiesel mostly proceeds in the presence of "soluble" catalysts such as alkali hydroxides and liquid acids. A considerable amount of energy is required for the purification of products and catalyst separation, and furthermore these catalysts are not reusable. This process results in substantial energy wastage and the production of large amounts of chemical waste. Particulate heterogeneous catalysts can be readily separated from products following reaction, allowing the catalyst to be reused and consuming less energy. This Minireview describes the environmentally benign production of biodiesel using heterogeneous catalysts such as solid bases, acid catalysts, and immobilized enzymes. PMID:19180600

  3. Multiphase catalysts for selective reduction of NOx with hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among the existing proposed solutions to reduce emission of NOx there is a promising alternative, the so-called (HC-SCR) selective catalytic reduction of NOx using hydrocarbons as reductant. This thesis is part of a worldwide effort devoted to gain knowledge on the selective catalytic reduction of NOx with hydrocarbons with the final goal to contribute to the development of suitable catalysts for the above mentioned process. Chapter 2 describes the details of the experimental set-up and of the analytical methods employed. Among the catalyst for HC-SCR, Co-based catalyst are known to be active and selective, thus, a study on a series of Co-based catalysts, supported on zeolites, was undertaken and the results are presented in Chapter 3. Correlation between catalytic characteristics and kinetic results are employed to understand the working catalyst and this is used as a basis for catalyst optimization. With the intention to prepare a multi-functional catalyst that will preserve the desired characteristics of the individual components, minimizing their negative aspects, catalysts based on Co-Pt, supported on ZSM-5, were investigated. In Chapter 4 the results of this study are discussed. A bimetallic Co-Pt/ZSM-5 catalysts with low Pt contents (0.1 wt %) showed a synergistic effect by combining high stability and activity of Pt catalysts with the high N2 selectivity of Co catalysts. Furthermore, it was found to be sulfur- and water-tolerant. Its positive qualities brought us to study the mechanism that takes place over this catalyst during HC-SCR. The results of an in-situ i.r mechanistic study over this catalyst is reported in Chapter 5. From the results presented in Chapter 5 a mechanism operating over the Co-Pt/ZSM-5 catalyst is proposed. The modification of Co catalyst with Pt improved the catalysts. However, further improvement was found to be hindered by high selectivity to N2O. Since Rh catalysts are generally less selective to N2O, the modification of Co

  4. Resin Catalyst Hybrids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S. Asaoka

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction: What are resin catalyst hybrids? There are typically two types of resin catalyst. One is acidic resin which representative is polystyrene sulfonic acid. The other is basic resin which is availed as metal complex support. The objective items of this study on resin catalyst are consisting of pellet hybrid, equilibrium hybrid and function hybrid of acid and base,as shown in Fig. 1[1-5].

  5. Alternative security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book contains the following chapters: The Military and Alternative Security: New Missions for Stable Conventional Security; Technology and Alternative Security: A Cherished Myth Expires; Law and Alternative Security: Toward a Just World Peace; Politics and Alternative Security: Toward a More Democratic, Therefore More Peaceful, World; Economics and Alternative Security: Toward a Peacekeeping International Economy; Psychology and Alternative Security: Needs, Perceptions, and Misperceptions; Religion and Alternative Security: A Prophetic Vision; and Toward Post-Nuclear Global Security: An Overview

  6. Alternatives for recovering metals from spent catalysts for hydrotreating of heavy hydrocarbons: a case study; Alternativas para la recuperacion de metales a partir de catalizadores gastados del hidrotratamiento de hidrocarburos pesados: un caso de estudio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, Fernando; Ramirez, Sergio; Ancheyta, Jorge; Mavil, Martha [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: jancheyt@imp.mx

    2008-05-15

    The increasing production of spent hydrotreating catalysts used for processing heavy hydrocarbons and the problems related to their disposal are described in this work. These catalysts contain important amounts of heavy metals such as molybdenum (Mo), nickel (Ni), cobalt (Co) and vanadium (V), which can be recovered and hence an economical benefit may be obtained. The results of experimental tests for alkaline leaching (NaOH) to recover V and Mo, and the effect of operating conditions on metal recovery are also presented. The results show that, in general, the highest recovery of Mo is obtained at pH 8.5 and leaching time of 12 hours, while in the case of V, the highest recovery is observed at pH 9.0 and 8 hours. In both cases, the leaching solution contained 10 wt % alkaline. Based on the experimental information and data from a commercial plant, a preliminary economy study was developed, in which the expected economical benefits of metals recovery from spent catalysts used for hydrotreating heavy hydrocarbon are estimated. [Spanish] En el presente trabajo se describe la problematica de la creciente produccion de catalizadores gastados de los procesos de hidrotratamiento de hidrocarburos pesados. Estos catalizadores contienen cantidades importantes de metales pesados como molibdeno (Mo), niquel (Ni), cobalto (Co) y vanadio (V), que son susceptibles de recuperarse y obtener con ello un beneficio economico. Tambien se presentan resultados de pruebas experimentales de lixiviacion alcalina (NaOH) para la recuperacion de V y Mo, y el efecto de las variables de operacion sobre la recuperacion de metales. En general, se encontro que las mejores recuperaciones de Mo fueron a pH de 8.5 y 12 h, mientras que para el V fueron a pH de 9.0 y 8 h, ambos a una concentracion del agente lixiviante de 10% en peso. Con base en la informacion experimental obtenida y datos de una planta industrial se presenta un estudio economico preliminar, en el que se estiman los beneficios

  7. Catalyst for Ammonia Oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a bimetallic catalyst for ammonia oxidation, a method for producing a bimetallic catalyst for ammonia oxidation and a method for tuning the catalytic activity of a transition metal. By depositing an overlayer of less catalytic active metal onto a more catalytic...

  8. Alloy catalyst material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel alloy catalyst material for use in the synthesis of hydrogen peroxide from oxygen and hydrogen, or from oxygen and water. The present invention also relates to a cathode and an electrochemical cell comprising the novel catalyst material, and the process use...

  9. Heterogeneous hydrogenation catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main types of heterogeneous catalysts used for hydrogenation, the methods for their preparation, and the structure and chemistry of their surfaces are considered, as well as the catalytic activity and the mechanism of action in the hydrogenation of unsaturated and aromatic compounds, of CO, and of carbonyl compounds and in the hydrorefining of fuels. Chief attention is paid to supported Ni catalysts, to the methods for their preparation and physicochemical studies, and to the development of novel catalytic systems through modification. A novel type of catalyst for hydrogenation, viz. metal carbides, is described. Some aspects of the mechanochemical treatment of hydrogenation catalysts, including in situ methods, are discussed. Sulfide catalysts for hydrotreating are also discussed in detail. The bibliography includes 340 references.

  10. Combinatorial evolution of site- and enantioselective catalysts for polyene epoxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtor, Phillip A.; Miller, Scott J.

    2012-12-01

    Selectivity in the catalytic functionalization of complex molecules is a major challenge in chemical synthesis. The problem is magnified when there are several possible stereochemical outcomes and when similar functional groups occur repeatedly within the same molecule. Selective polyene oxidation provides an archetypical example of this challenge. Historically, enzymatic catalysis has provided the only precedents. Although non-enzymatic catalysts that meet some of these challenges became known, a comprehensive solution has remained elusive. Here, we describe low molecular weight peptide-based catalysts, discovered through a combinatorial synthesis and screening protocol, that exhibit site- and enantioselective oxidation of certain positions of various isoprenols. This diversity-based approach, which exhibits features reminiscent of the directed evolution of enzymes, delivers catalysts that compare favourably to the state-of-the-art for the asymmetric oxidation of these compounds. Moreover, the approach culminated in catalysts that exhibit alternative-site selectivity in comparison to oxidation catalysts previously described.

  11. Catalysts, methods of making catalysts, and methods of use

    KAUST Repository

    Renard, Laetitia

    2014-03-06

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for catalysts, methods of making catalysts, methods of using catalysts, and the like. In an embodiment, the method of making the catalysts can be performed in a single step with a metal nanoparticle precursor and a metal oxide precursor, where a separate stabilizing agent is not needed.

  12. Methanol dehydration on carbon-based acid catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Valero-Romero, Mª José; Calvo-Muñoz, Elisa Mª; Ruiz-Rosas, Ramiro; Rodríguez-Mirasol, José; Cordero, Tomás

    2013-01-01

    Methanol dehydration to produce dimethyl ether (DME) is an interesting process for the chemical industry since DME is an important intermediate and a promising clean alternative fuel for diesel engines. Pure or modified γ-aluminas (γ-Al2O3) and zeolites are often used as catalysts for this reaction. However, these materials usually yield non desirable hydrocarbons and undergo fast deactivation. In this work, we study the catalytic conversion of methanol over an acid carbon catalyst obtaine...

  13. Catalyst in Basic Oleochemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Suyenty

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Currently Indonesia is the world largest palm oil producer with production volume reaching 16 million tones per annum. The high crude oil and ethylene prices in the last 3 – 4 years contribute to the healthy demand growth for basic oleochemicals: fatty acids and fatty alcohols. Oleochemicals are starting to replace crude oil derived products in various applications. As widely practiced in petrochemical industry, catalyst plays a very important role in the production of basic oleochemicals. Catalytic reactions are abound in the production of oleochemicals: Nickel based catalysts are used in the hydrogenation of unsaturated fatty acids; sodium methylate catalyst in the transesterification of triglycerides; sulfonic based polystyrene resin catalyst in esterification of fatty acids; and copper chromite/copper zinc catalyst in the high pressure hydrogenation of methyl esters or fatty acids to produce fatty alcohols. To maintain long catalyst life, it is crucial to ensure the absence of catalyst poisons and inhibitors in the feed. The preparation methods of nickel and copper chromite catalysts are as follows: precipitation, filtration, drying, and calcinations. Sodium methylate is derived from direct reaction of sodium metal and methanol under inert gas. The sulfonic based polystyrene resin is derived from sulfonation of polystyrene crosslinked with di-vinyl-benzene. © 2007 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved.[Presented at Symposium and Congress of MKICS 2007, 18-19 April 2007, Semarang, Indonesia][How to Cite: E. Suyenty, H. Sentosa, M. Agustine, S. Anwar, A. Lie, E. Sutanto. (2007. Catalyst in Basic Oleochemicals. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 2 (2-3: 22-31.  doi:10.9767/bcrec.2.2-3.6.22-31][How to Link/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.2.2-3.6.22-31 || or local: http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/6

  14. A catalyst for digital design media

    OpenAIRE

    Orbey, Betül

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to understand whether time restriction along with a 'situational influence on creativity' can act as a catalyst to speed up unique design alternative generation when digital media is being used compared to sketching. In order to achieve this, an experiment with undergraduate architectural design students is conducted. The results are measured with the flexibility and fluidity measures of creativity proposed by the Torrance Test.

  15. Fuel cell development for transportation: Catalyst development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doddapaneni, N. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Fuel cells are being considered as alternate power sources for transportation and stationary applications. With proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells the fuel crossover to cathodes causes severe thermal management and cell voltage drop due to oxidation of fuel at the platinized cathodes. The main goal of this project was to design, synthesize, and evaluate stable and inexpensive transition metal macrocyclic catalysts for the reduction of oxygen and be electrochemically inert towards anode fuels such as hydrogen and methanol.

  16. Study of spent hydrorefining catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aluminonickelmolybdenum catalysts for diesel fuel hydrorefining have been studied by DTA, XSPS, and diffuse reflection spectroscopy. Chemical and phase states of molybdenum compounds in samples of fresh catalyst, regenerated one after one year operation, and clogged with coke catalyst after five year operation, are determined. Chemical reactions and crystal-phase transformations of the molybdenum compounds during catalyst deactivation and regeneration are discussed

  17. Catalyst for microelectromechanical systems microreactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morse, Jeffrey D. (Martinez, CA); Sopchak, David A. (Livermore, CA); Upadhye, Ravindra S. (Pleasanton, CA); Reynolds, John G. (San Ramon, CA); Satcher, Joseph H. (Patterson, CA); Gash, Alex E. (Brentwood, CA)

    2011-11-15

    A microreactor comprising a silicon wafer, a multiplicity of microchannels in the silicon wafer, and a catalyst coating the microchannels. In one embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises a nanostructured material. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises an aerogel. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises a solgel. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises carbon nanotubes.

  18. Catalyst for microelectromechanical systems microreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Jeffrey D.; Sopchak, David A.; Upadhye, Ravindra S.; Reynolds, John G.; Satcher, Joseph H.; Gash, Alex E.

    2010-06-29

    A microreactor comprising a silicon wafer, a multiplicity of microchannels in the silicon wafer, and a catalyst coating the microchannels. In one embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises a nanostructured material. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises an aerogel. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises a solgel. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises carbon nanotubes.

  19. Mesoporous molecular sieve catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højholt, Karen Thrane

    the micropores. Furthermore, preliminary work was done using mesoporous ZSM-5 zeolites as support material for anchoring molecular CoMo6 species for the application as potential bi-functional catalyst in simultaneous hydrodesulfurisation (HDS) and hydrocracking. HDS activity tests revealed that the...... of different catalytic applications. Primarily the zeolites were modified regarding the porosity and the introduction of metals to the framework. The obtained materials were used as solid acid catalysts, as an inert matrix for stabilising metal nanoparticles and as an anchoring material for molecular...... only be used as solid acid catalysts but can also be used as a size-selective matrix. It was shown that it is possible to encapsulate 1-2 nm sized gold nanoparticles by silicalite-1 or ZSM-5 zeolite crystals thereby forming a sintering-stable and substrate size-selective oxidation catalyst. After...

  20. Epoxidation catalyst and process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linic, Suljo; Christopher, Phillip

    2010-10-26

    Disclosed herein is a catalytic method of converting alkenes to epoxides. This method generally includes reacting alkenes with oxygen in the presence of a specific silver catalyst under conditions suitable to produce a yield of the epoxides. The specific silver catalyst is a silver nanocrystal having a plurality of surface planes, a substantial portion of which is defined by Miller indices of (100). The reaction is performed by charging a suitable reactor with this silver catalyst and then feeding the reactants to the reactor under conditions to carry out the reaction. The reaction may be performed in batch, or as a continuous process that employs a recycle of any unreacted alkenes. The specific silver catalyst has unexpectedly high selectivity for epoxide products. Consequently, this general method (and its various embodiments) will result in extraordinarily high epoxide yields heretofore unattainable.

  1. Co-Assembled Supported Catalysts: Synthesis of Nano-Structured Supported Catalysts with Hierarchic Pores through Combined Flow and Radiation Induced Co-Assembled Nano-Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galip Akay

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A novel generic method of silica supported catalyst system generation from a fluid state is presented. The technique is based on the combined flow and radiation (such as microwave, thermal or UV induced co-assembly of the support and catalyst precursors forming nano-reactors, followed by catalyst precursor decomposition. The transformation from the precursor to supported catalyst oxide state can be controlled from a few seconds to several minutes. The resulting nano-structured micro-porous silica supported catalyst system has a surface area approaching 300 m2/g and X-ray Diffraction (XRD-based catalyst size controlled in the range of 1–10 nm in which the catalyst structure appears as lamellar sheets sandwiched between the catalyst support. These catalyst characteristics are dependent primarily on the processing history as well as the catalyst (Fe, Co and Ni studied when the catalyst/support molar ratio is typically 0.1–2. In addition, Ca, Mn and Cu were used as co-catalysts with Fe and Co in the evaluation of the mechanism of catalyst generation. Based on extensive XRD, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM studies, the micro- and nano-structure of the catalyst system were evaluated. It was found that the catalyst and silica support form extensive 0.6–2 nm thick lamellar sheets of 10–100 nm planar dimensions. In these lamellae, the alternate silica support and catalyst layer appear in the form of a bar-code structure. When these lamellae structures pack, they form the walls of a micro-porous catalyst system which typically has a density of 0.2 g/cm3. A tentative mechanism of catalyst nano-structure formation is provided based on the rheology and fluid mechanics of the catalyst/support precursor fluid as well as co-assembly nano-reactor formation during processing. In order to achieve these structures and characteristics, catalyst support must be in the form of silane coated silica nano

  2. Heterogeneous chromium catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to a heterogeneous chromium catalyst system for the polymerisation of ethylene and/or alpha olefins prepared by the steps of: (a) providing a silica-containing support, (b) treating the silica-containing support with a chromium compound to form a chromium-based silica-containing support, (c) activating the chromium-based silica-containing support, (d) chemically reducing the activated chromium-based silica-containing support to produce a precursor catalyst, (e) r...

  3. Aftermarket catalyst durability evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruetsch, R.I.; Cheng, J.P.; Hellman, K.H.

    1986-01-01

    Suppliers have introduced replacement aftermarket catalytic converters which are characterized by design differences from the original equipment converters in the direction of lower costs. The objective of the work reported here was to test a group of nine aftermarket catalysts from three manufacturers for 25,000 miles. Mileage was accumulated on three routes in Maryland and West Virginia characterized by varying degrees of tire wear. All catalysts were dynamometer tested on the same vehicle at the same laboratory.

  4. Application of a mixed metal oxide catalyst to a metallic substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevener, Kathleen M. (Inventor); Lohner, Kevin A. (Inventor); Mays, Jeffrey A. (Inventor); Wisner, Daniel L. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method for applying a mixed metal oxide catalyst to a metallic substrate for the creation of a robust, high temperature catalyst system for use in decomposing propellants, particularly hydrogen peroxide propellants, for use in propulsion systems. The method begins by forming a prepared substrate material consisting of a metallic inner substrate and a bound layer of a noble metal intermediate. Alternatively, a bound ceramic coating, or frit, may be introduced between the metallic inner substrate and noble metal intermediate when the metallic substrate is oxidation resistant. A high-activity catalyst slurry is applied to the surface of the prepared substrate and dried to remove the organic solvent. The catalyst layer is then heat treated to bind the catalyst layer to the surface. The bound catalyst layer is then activated using an activation treatment and calcinations to form the high-activity catalyst system.

  5. On the Deactivation of Cobalt-based Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Cats, K.H.

    2016-01-01

    The Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) process is an attractive way to obtain synthetic liquid fuel from alternative energy sources such as natural gas, coal or biomass. However, the deactivation of the catalyst, consisting of cobalt nanoparticles supported on TiO2, currently hampers the industrial application of the process. Despite many years of research, we still lack the fundamental insights into the mechanism of catalyst deactivation necessary to develop the next generation of FTS catalysts...

  6. Investigation on V2O5 recovery from spent vanadium catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Possibilities of utilization of the spent vanadium catalysts, and especially of recovery of its most expensive component - V2O5, have been investigated. Two methods have been tested; one consisting in sintering the catalyst with appropriate fluxes with subsequent leaching the sinter with water to liberate the vanadium compounds and alternatively a method in which the vanadium compounds were leached from the catalyst with a sodium hydroxide solution with and without the addition of an oxidizing agent. (author). 5 refs, 2 tabs

  7. Catalyst component interactions in nickel/alumina catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiš Erne E.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of nickel loading (5; 10; 20 wt% Ni, temperature of heat treatment (400; 700; 1100°C and way of catalyst preparation on the catalyst component interactions (CCI in the impregnated, mechanical powder mixed and co-precipitated catalyst was investigated. For sample characterization, low temperature nitrogen adsorption (LTNA and X-ray diffraction (XRD were applied. Significant differences were revealed, concerning CCI in dependence of nickel loading, temperature of heat treatment and way of catalyst preparation. The obtained results show that the support metal oxide interactions (SMI in impregnated and co-precipitated catalysts are more intensive than in the mechanical powder mixed catalyst. The degree and intensity of CCI is expressed by the ratio of real and theoretical surface area of the catalyst. This ratio can be used for a quantitative estimation of CCI and it is generally applicable to all types of heterogeneous catalysts.

  8. Deactivation-resistant catalyst for selective catalyst reduction of NOx

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, Anker Degn; Castellino, Francesco; Rams, Per Donskov; Pedersen, Jannik Blaabjerg; Putluru, Siva Sankar Reddy

    2011-01-01

    The present invention relates to a catalyst for selective catalytic reduction of NOx in alkali metal containing flue gas using ammonia as reductant, the catalyst comprising a surface with catalytically active sites, wherein the surface is at least partly coated with a coating comprising at least one metal oxide. In another aspect the present invention relates to the use of said catalyst and to a method of producing said catalyst. In addition, the present invention relates to a method of treat...

  9. Supported organoiridium catalysts for alkane dehydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, R. Thomas; Sattelberger, Alfred P.; Li, Hongbo

    2013-09-03

    Solid supported organoiridium catalysts, a process for preparing such solid supported organoiridium catalysts, and the use of such solid supported organoiridium catalysts in dehydrogenation reactions of alkanes is provided. The catalysts can be easily recovered and recycled.

  10. Dynamics of Catalyst Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Willum; Cavalca, Filippo; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    under gas exposure, dynamic phenomena such as sintering and growth can be observed with sub-Ångstrøm resolution. Metal nanoparticles contain the active sites in heterogeneous catalysts, which are important for many industrial applications including the production of clean fuels, chemicals...... and pharmaceuticals, and the cleanup of exhaust from automobiles and stationary power plants. Sintering, or thermal deactivation, is an important mechanism for the loss of catalyst activity. In order to initiate a systematic study of the dynamics and sintering of nanoparticles, various catalytic systems have been...

  11. Catalysts for Environmental Remediation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrams, B. L.; Vesborg, Peter Christian Kjærgaard

    2013-01-01

    The properties of catalysts used in environmental remediation are described here through specific examples in heterogeneous catalysis and photocatalysis. In the area of heterogeneous catalysis, selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx was used as an example reaction with vanadia and tungsta on...

  12. Tight bifunctional hierarchical catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Højholt, Karen T; Vennestrøm, Peter N R; Tiruvalam, Ramchandra; Beato, Pablo

    2011-12-28

    A new concept to prepare tight bifunctional catalysts has been developed, by anchoring CoMo(6) clusters on hierarchical ZSM-5 zeolites for simultaneous use in HDS and hydrocracking catalysis. The prepared material displays a significant improved activity in HDS catalysis compared to the impregnated counterpart. PMID:22048337

  13. Hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbaraman, Ram; Stamenkovic, Vojislav; Markovic, Nenad; Tripkovic, Dusan

    2016-02-09

    Systems and methods for a hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst are provided. Electrode material includes a plurality of clusters. The electrode exhibits bifunctionality with respect to the hydrogen evolution reaction. The electrode with clusters exhibits improved performance with respect to the intrinsic material of the electrode absent the clusters.

  14. Alternative alkali resistant deNO{sub x} technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buus Kristensen, S.; Due-Hansen, J.; Putluru, S.S.R.; Kunov-Kruse, A.; Fehrmann, R.; Degn Jensen, A.

    2011-04-15

    The aim of the project is to identify, make and test possible alkali resistant deNO{sub x} catalysts for use in biomass, waste or fossil fuelled power plants, where the flue gas typically has a high level of potassium compounds, which rapidly de-activate the traditional V{sub 2}O{sub 5}/TiO{sub 2} catalyst. Furthermore, new technologies are investigated based on a protective coating of the catalyst elements and selective reversible absorption of NO{sub x} with ionic liquids. Several promising alternative deNO{sub x} catalyst types have been made during the project: 1) V, Fe, CU based nano-TiO{sub 2} and nano-TiO{sub 2}-SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} catalysts; 2) V/ZrO{sub 2}-SO{sub 2}- and V/ZrO{sub 2}-CeO{sub 2} catalysts; V, Fe, Cu based Zeolite catalysts; 4) V, Fe, Cu based Heteropoly acid catalysts. Several of these are promising alternatives to the state-of the art industrial reference catalyst. All catalysts prepared in the present project exhibit higher to much higher alkali resistance compared to the commercial reference. Furthermore, two catalysts, i.e. 20 wt% V{sub 2}O-3-TiO{sub 2} nano-catalyst and the 4 wt% CuO-Mordenite zeolite based catalyst have also a higher initial SCR activity compared to the commercial one before alkali poisoning. Thus, those two catalysts might be attractive for SCR deNO{sub x} purposes even under ''normal'' fuel conditions in power plants and elsewhere making them strong candidates for further development. These efforts regarding all the promising catalysts will be pursued after this project has expired through a one year Proof of Concept project granted by the Danish Agency for Science, Technology and Innovation. Also the severe rate of deactivation due to alkali poisons can be avoided by coating the vanadium catalyst with Mg. Overall, the protective coating of SCR catalysts developed in the project seems promising and a patent application has been filed for this technology. Finally, a completely different approach to

  15. Atomic Layer Deposited Catalysts for Fuel Cell Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Anne-Charlotte Elisabeth Birgitta

    techniques. Atomic layer deposition (ALD), on the other hand, is a highly suitable and still relatively unexplored approach for the synthesis of noble metal catalysts. It is a vapor phase growth method, primarily used to deposit thin lms. ALD is based on self-limiting chemical reactions of alternately...

  16. Ni-Based Catalysts for Low Temperature Methane Steam Reforming: Recent Results on Ni-Au and Comparison with Other Bi-Metallic Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Anna M. Venezia; Fabrizio Puleo; Valeria La Parola; Giuseppe Pantaleo; Hongjing Wu; Leonarda F. Liotta

    2013-01-01

    Steam reforming of light hydrocarbons provides a promising method for hydrogen production. Ni-based catalysts are so far the best and the most commonly used catalysts for steam reforming because of their acceptably high activity and significantly lower cost in comparison with alternative precious metal-based catalysts. However, nickel catalysts are susceptible to deactivation from the deposition of carbon, even when operating at steam-to-carbon ratios predicted to be thermodynamically outside...

  17. Optimization of Rhodium-Based Catalysts for Mixed Alcohol Synthesis -- 2011 Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, Mark A.; Gray, Michel J.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Rummel, Becky L.

    2011-10-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been conducting research to investigate the feasibility of producing mixed alcohols from biomass-derived synthesis gas (syngas). In recent years, this research has primarily involved the further development of catalysts containing rhodium and manganese based on the results of earlier catalyst screening tests. Research during FY 2011 continued to examine the performance of RhMn catalysts on alternative supports including selected zeolite, silica, and carbon supports. Catalyst optimization continued using both the Davisil 645 and Merck Grade 7734 silica supports. Research also was initiated in FY 2011, using the both Davisil 645 silica and Hyperion CS-02C-063 carbon supports, to evaluate the potential for further improving catalyst performance, through the addition of one or two additional metals as promoters to the catalysts containing Rh, Mn, and Ir.

  18. Long-Term Testing of Rhodium-Based Catalysts for Mixed Alcohol Synthesis – 2013 Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, Mark A.; Gray, Michel J.; Thompson, Becky L.

    2013-09-23

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been conducting research since 2005 to develop a catalyst for the conversion of synthesis gas (carbon monoxide and hydrogen) into mixed alcohols for use in liquid transportation fuels. Initially, research involved screening possible catalysts based on a review of the literature, because at that time, there were no commercial catalysts available. The screening effort resulted in a decision to focus on catalysts containing rhodium and manganese. Subsequent research identified iridium as a key promoter for this catalyst system. Since then, research has continued to improve rhodium/manganese/iridium-based catalysts, optimizing the relative and total concentrations of the three metals, examining baseline catalysts on alternative supports, and examining effects of additional promoters. Testing was continued in FY 2013 to evaluate the performance and long-term stability of the best catalysts tested to date. Three tests were conducted. A long-term test of over 2300 hr duration at a single set of operating conditions was conducted with the best carbon-supported catalyst. A second test of about 650 hr duration at a single set of operating conditions was performed for comparison using the same catalyst formulation on an alternative carbon support. A third test of about 680 hr duration at a single set of operating conditions was performed using the best silica-supported catalyst tested to date.

  19. Alternative Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find your chapter: search by state Home > Alzheimer's Disease > Treatments > Alternative Treatments Overview What Is Dementia? What Is Alzheimer's? Younger/Early Onset Facts and Figures Know the 10 Signs Stages Inside the Brain: ...

  20. Hydrogen recombiner catalyst test supporting data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britton, M.D.

    1995-01-19

    This is a data package supporting the Hydrogen Recombiner Catalyst Performance and Carbon Monoxide Sorption Capacity Test Report, WHC-SD-WM-TRP-211, Rev 0. This report contains 10 appendices which consist of the following: Mass spectrometer analysis reports: HRC samples 93-001 through 93-157; Gas spectrometry analysis reports: HRC samples 93-141 through 93-658; Mass spectrometer procedure PNL-MA-299 ALO-284; Alternate analytical method for ammonia and water vapor; Sample log sheets; Job Safety analysis; Certificate of mixture analysis for feed gases; Flow controller calibration check; Westinghouse Standards Laboratory report on Bois flow calibrator; and Sorption capacity test data, tables, and graphs.

  1. Hydrogen recombiner catalyst test supporting data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a data package supporting the Hydrogen Recombiner Catalyst Performance and Carbon Monoxide Sorption Capacity Test Report, WHC-SD-WM-TRP-211, Rev 0. This report contains 10 appendices which consist of the following: Mass spectrometer analysis reports: HRC samples 93-001 through 93-157; Gas spectrometry analysis reports: HRC samples 93-141 through 93-658; Mass spectrometer procedure PNL-MA-299 ALO-284; Alternate analytical method for ammonia and water vapor; Sample log sheets; Job Safety analysis; Certificate of mixture analysis for feed gases; Flow controller calibration check; Westinghouse Standards Laboratory report on Bois flow calibrator; and Sorption capacity test data, tables, and graphs

  2. Chemisorption on supported-metal catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, S. G.; Bose, S. M.; Sulston, K. W.

    1988-07-01

    A Gree-function formalism is developed to describe the electronic and chemisorption properties of a supported-metal composite substrate. Within the framework of the tight-binding approximation, the metal catalyst is represented by a finite chain of d-orbitals, while the semi-infinite semiconductor support is characterized by a linear chain of alternating s- and p-orbitals. The Anderson-Newns model is used to calculate the chemisorption energy and adatom charge transfer for hydrogen chemisorption on the Ni/ZnO composite system.

  3. Vapor phase hydrogenation of furfural over nickel mixed metal oxide catalysts derived from layered double hydroxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulmonetti, Taylor P.; Pang, Simon H.; Claure, Micaela Taborga; Lee, Sungsik; Cullen, David A.; Agrawal, Pradeep K.; Jones, Christopher W.

    2016-05-01

    The hydrogenation of furfural is investigated over various reduced nickel mixed metal oxides derived from layered double hydroxides (LDHs) containing Ni-Mg-Al and Ni-Co-Al. Upon reduction, relatively large Ni(0) domains develop in the Ni-Mg-Al catalysts, whereas in the Ni-Co-Al catalysts smaller metal particles of Ni(0) and Co(0), potentially as alloys, are formed, as evidenced by XAS, XPS, STEM and EELS. All the reduced Ni catalysts display similar selectivities towards major hydrogenation products (furfuryl alcohol and tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol), though the side products varied with the catalyst composition. The 1.1Ni-0.8Co-Al catalyst showed the greatest activity per titrated site when compared to the other catalysts, with promising activity compared to related catalysts in the literature. The use of base metal catalysts for hydrogenation of furanic compounds may be a promising alternative to the well-studied precious metal catalysts for making biomass-derived chemicals if catalyst selectivity can be improved in future work by alloying or tuning metal-oxide support interactions.

  4. Solid Catalysts and theirs Application in Biodiesel Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramli Mat

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The reduction of oil resources and increasing petroleum price has led to the search for alternative fuel from renewable resources such as biodiesel. Currently biodiesel is produced from vegetable oil using liquid catalysts. Replacement of liquid catalysts with solid catalysts would greatly solve the problems associated with expensive separation methods and corrosion problems, yielding to a cleaner product and greatly decreasing the cost of biodiesel production. In this paper, the development of solid catalysts and its catalytic activity are reviewed. Solid catalysts are able to perform trans-esterification and esterification reactions simultaneously and able to convert low quality oils with high amount of Free Fatty Acids. The parameters that effect the production of biodiesel are discussed in this paper. Copyright © 2012 by BCREC UNDIP. All rights reservedReceived: 6th April 2012, Revised: 24th October 2012, Accepted: 24th October 2012[How to Cite: R. Mat, R.A. Samsudin, M. Mohamed, A. Johari, (2012. Solid Catalysts and Their Application in Biodiesel Production. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 7(2: 142-149. doi:10.9767/bcrec.7.2.3047.142-149] [How to Link / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.7.2.3047.142-149 ] | View in 

  5. The problem of catalyst deactivation in photocatalytic flue gas treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conventional methods of flue gas purification (SCR and SNCR) utilize large amounts of potentially hazardons NH3. In addition the so-called ''NH3 slip'' must be prevented. Alternative photochemical processes with homogeneous gas reactions do not achieve sufficiently high conversion rates. In order to solve this problem, experiments on photocatalytic reduction of NO were carried out using the heterogeneous photocatalyst TiO2. The results suggest that photocatalytic NO reduction is a promising option for relatively low temperatures, provided that a catalyst is added and the reaction products absorbed on the catalyst Co and N atoms) are removed after production. (orig./BBR)

  6. NiO-PTA supported on ZIF-8 as a highly effective catalyst for hydrocracking of Jatropha oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; He, Jing; Wang, Luying; Li, Rong; Chen, Pan; Rao, Xin; Deng, Lihong; Rong, Long; Lei, Jiandu

    2016-03-01

    Nickel oxide (NiO) and phosphotungstic acid (PTA) supported on a ZIF-8 (NiO-PTA/ZIF-8) catalyst was first synthesized and it showed high activity and good selectivity for the hydrocracking of Jatropha oil. The catalyst was characterized by SEM, SEM-EDS, TEM, N2 adsorption, FT-IR, XRD and XPS. Compared with the NiO-PTA/Al2O3 catalyst, the selectivity of C15-C18 hydrocarbon increased over 36%, and catalytic efficiency increased 10 times over the NiO-PTA/ZIF-8 catalyst. The prepared NiO-PTA/ZIF-8 catalyst was stable for a reaction time of 104 h and the kinetic behavior was also analyzed. This catalyst was found to bypass the presulfurization process, showing promise as an alternative to sulfided catalysts for green diesel production.

  7. Effect of Co and Mo Loading by Impregnation and Ion Exchange Methods on Morphological Properties of Zeolite Y Catalyst

    OpenAIRE

    Didi Dwi Anggoro; Nur Hidayati; Luqman Buchori; Yayuk Mundriyastutik

    2016-01-01

    Coal tar can be used as an alternative raw material for the production of liquid fuels, such as: gasoline and diesel through hydrogenation and cracking process. Hydrogenation and cracking process requires a catalyst which has metal components for hydrogenation reaction and acid components for cracking reaction. In this study, the Co/Zeolite Y and Co-Mo/Zeolite Y catalysts were prepared by impregnation and ion exchange methods. Characterizations of the catalysts were carried out by X-Ray Diffr...

  8. Rape oil transesterification over heterogeneous catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Encinar, J.M.; Martinez, G. [Dpto. Ingenieria Quimica y Quimica Fisica, UEX, Avda. Elvas s/n, 06071-Badajoz (Spain); Gonzalez, J.F. [Dpto. Fisica Aplicada, UEX, Avda Elvas s/n, 06071-Badajoz (Spain); Pardal, A. [Dpto. Ciencias do Ambiente, ESAB, IPBeja, Rua Pedro Soares s/n, 7800-Beja (Portugal)

    2010-11-15

    This work studies the application of KNO{sub 3}/CaO catalyst in the transesterification reaction of triglycerides with methanol. The objective of the work was characterizing the methyl esters for its use as biodiesel in compression ignition motors. The variables affecting the methyl ester yield during the transesterification reaction, such as, amount of KNO{sub 3} impregnated in CaO, the total catalyst content, reaction temperature, agitation rate, and the methanol/oil molar ratio, were investigated to optimize the reaction conditions. The evolution of the process was followed by gas chromatography, determining the concentration of the methyl esters at different reaction times. The biodiesel was characterized by its density, viscosity, cetane index, saponification value, iodine value, acidity index, CFPP (cold filter plugging point), flash point and combustion point, according to ISO norms. The results showed that calcium oxide, impregnated with KNO{sub 3}, have a strong basicity and high catalytic activity as a heterogeneous solid base catalyst. The biodiesel with the best properties was obtained using an amount of KNO{sub 3} of 10% impregnated in CaO, a methanol/oil molar ratio of 6:1, a reaction temperature of 65 C, a reaction time of 3.0 h, and a catalyst total content of 1.0%. In these conditions, the oil conversion was 98% and the final product obtained had very similar characteristics to a no. 2 diesel, and therefore, these methyl esters might be used as an alternative to fossil fuels. (author)

  9. Cosmic alternatives?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Ruth

    2009-04-01

    "Cosmologists are often in error but never in doubt." This pithy characterization by the Soviet physicist Lev Landau sums up the raison d'être of Facts and Speculations in Cosmology. Authors Jayant Narlikar and Geoffrey Burbidge are proponents of a "steady state" theory of cosmology, and they argue that the cosmological community has become fixated on a "Big Bang" dogma, suppressing alternative viewpoints. This book very much does what it says on the tin: it sets out what is known in cosmology, and puts forward the authors' point of view on an alternative to the Big Bang.

  10. CATALYST ACTIVITY MAINTENANCE FOR THE LIQUID PHASE SYNTHESIS GAS-TO-DIMETHYL ETHER PROCESS PART II: DEVELOPMENT OF ALUMINUM PHOSPHATE AS THE DEHYDRATION CATALYST FOR THE SINGLE-STEP LIQUID PHASE SYNGAS-TO-DME PROCESS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang-Dong Peng

    2002-05-01

    At the heart of the single-step liquid phase syngas-to-DME process (LPDME{trademark}) is a catalyst system that can be active as well as stable. In the Alternative Fuels I program, a dual-catalyst system containing a Cu-based commercial methanol synthesis catalyst (BASF S3-86) and a commercial dehydration material ({gamma}-alumina) was demonstrated. It provided the productivity and selectivity expected from the LPDME process. However, the catalyst system deactivated too rapidly to warrant a viable commercial process [1]. The mechanistic investigation in the early part of the DOE's Alternative Fuels II program revealed that the accelerated catalyst deactivation under LPDME conditions is due to detrimental interaction between the methanol synthesis catalyst and methanol dehydration catalyst [2,3]. The interaction was attributed to migration of Cu- and/or Zn-containing species from the synthesis catalyst to the dehydration catalyst. Identification of a dehydration catalyst that did not lead to this detrimental interaction while retaining adequate dehydration activity was elusive. Twenty-nine different dehydration materials were tested, but none showed the desired performance [2]. The search came to a turning point when aluminum phosphate was tested. This amorphous material is prepared by precipitating a solution containing Al(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} and H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} with NH{sub 4}OH, followed by washing, drying and calcination. The aluminum phosphate catalyst has adequate dehydration activity and good stability. It can co-exist with the Cu-based methanol synthesis catalyst without negatively affecting the latter catalyst's stability. This report documents the details of the development of this catalyst. These include initial leads, efforts in improving activity and stability, investigation and development of the best preparation parameters and procedures, mechanistic understanding and resulting preparation guidelines, and the accomplishments of this work.

  11. Oxygen-reducing catalyst layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Dennis P.; Schmoeckel, Alison K.; Vernstrom, George D.; Atanasoski, Radoslav; Wood, Thomas E.; Yang, Ruizhi; Easton, E. Bradley; Dahn, Jeffrey R.; O'Neill, David G.

    2011-03-22

    An oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, and a method of making the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, where the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer includes a catalytic material film disposed on a substrate with the use of physical vapor deposition and thermal treatment. The catalytic material film includes a transition metal that is substantially free of platinum. At least one of the physical vapor deposition and the thermal treatment is performed in a processing environment comprising a nitrogen-containing gas.

  12. Development of GREET Catalyst Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhichao [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Benavides, Pahola T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dunn, Jennifer B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Cronauer, Donald C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-09-01

    In this report, we develop energy and material flows for the production of five different catalysts (tar reforming, alcohol synthesis, Zeolite Socony Mobil-5 [ZSM-5], Mo/Co/ γ-Al2O3, and Pt/ γ-Al2O3) and two chemicals (olivine, dimethyl ether of polyethylene glycol [DEPG]). These compounds and catalysts are now included in the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET™) catalyst module.

  13. Privileged chiral ligands and catalysts

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Qi-Lin

    2011-01-01

    This ultimate ""must have"" and long awaited reference for every chemist working in the field of asymmetric catalysis starts with the core structure of the catalysts, explaining why a certain ligand or catalyst is so successful. It describes in detail the history, the basic structural characteristics, and the applications of these ""privileged catalysts"". A novel concept that gives readers a much deeper insight into the topic.

  14. Reuse of Hydrotreating Spent Catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    All hydro treating catalysts used in petroleum refining processes gradually lose activity through coking, poisoning by metal, sulfur or halides or lose surface area from sintering at high process temperatures. Waste hydrotreating catalyst, which have been used in re-refining of waste lube oil at Alexandria Petroleum Company (after 5 years lifetime) compared with the same fresh catalyst were used in the present work. Studies are conducted on partial extraction of the active metals of spent catalyst (Mo and Ni) using three leaching solvents,4% oxidized oxalic acid, 10% aqueous sodium hydroxide and 10% citric acid. The leaching experiments are conducting on the de coked extrude [un crushed] spent catalyst samples. These steps are carried out in order to rejuvenate the spent catalyst to be reused in other reactions. The results indicated that 4% oxidized oxalic acid leaching solution gave total metal removal 45.6 for de coked catalyst samples while NaOH gave 35% and citric acid gave 31.9 % The oxidized leaching agent was the most efficient leaching solvent to facilitate the metal removal, and the rejuvenated catalyst was characterized by the unchanged crystalline phase The rejuvenated catalyst was applied for hydrodesulfurization (HDS) of vacuum gas oil as a feedstock, under different hydrogen pressure 20-80 bar in order to compare its HDS activity

  15. Hydrodewaxing with mixed zeolite catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chester, A.W.; McHale, W.D.; Yen, J.H.

    1986-03-11

    A process is described for catalytically dewaxing a hydrocarbon lubricating oil feedstock comprising contacting the feedstock with a dewaxing catalyst, the dewaxing catalyst comprising, in combination: (a) a zeolite catalyst having a Constraint Index not less than 1, (b) an acidic catalytic material selected from the group consisting of Mordenite, TEA Mordenite, Dealuminized Y, Ultrastable Y, Rare Earth Y, amorphous silica-alumina chlorinated alumina, ZSM-4 and ZSM-20, and (c) a hydrogenation component, and recovering a dewaxed product. A process is also described for catalytically dewaxing a hydrocarbon lubricating oil feedstock comprising contacting the feedstock with a dewaxing catalyst, the dewaxing catalyst comprising, in combinations: (a) a first zeolite catalyst selected from the group consisting of ZSM-5, ZMS-11, ZSM-12, ZSM-22, ZSM-23, ZSM-34, ZSM-35, ZSM-38, ZSM-48, TMA Offretite and Erionite, (b) a second catalyst selected from the group consisting of ZSM-12, ZSM-22, ZSM-38 and ZSM-48, the second zeolite catalyst being different from the first zeolite catalyst, and (c) a hydrogenation component, and recovering a dewaxed product.

  16. Accelerated deployment of nanostructured hydrotreating catalysts. Final CRADA Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Libera, J.A.; Snyder, S.W.; Mane, A.; Elam, J.W.; Cronauer, D.C.; Muntean, J.A.; Wu, T.; Miller, J.T. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division); ( ES)

    2012-08-27

    Nanomanufacturing offers an opportunity to create domestic jobs and facilitate economic growth. In response to this need, U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy issued a Research Call to develop nanomanufacturing capabilities at the National Laboratories. High performance catalysts represent a unique opportunity to deploy nanomanufacturing technologies. Re-refining of used lube oil offers an opportunity to create manufacturing jobs and decrease dependence on imported petroleum. Improved catalysts are required to produce a better quality product, decrease environmental impact, extend catalyst life, and improve overall economics of lube oil re-refining. Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) in cooperation with Universal Lubricants, Inc. (ULI) and Chemical Engineering Partners (CEP) have carried out a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to prepare nanostructured hydrotreating catalysts using atomic layer deposition (ALD) to exhibit superior performance for the re-refining of used lube oil. We investigated the upgrading of recycled lube oil by hydrogenation using commercial, synthetically-modified commercial catalysts, and synthesized catalysts. A down-flow (trickle bed) catalytic unit was used for the hydrogenation experiments. In addition to carrying out elemental analyses of the various feed and product fractions, characterization was undertaken using H{sup 1} and C{sup 13} NMR. Initially commercial were evaluated. Second these commercial catalysts were promoted with precious metals using atomic layer deposition (ALD). Performance improvements were observed that declined with catalyst aging. An alternate approach was undertaken to deeply upgrade ULI product oils. Using a synthesized catalyst, much lower hydrogenation temperatures were required than commercial catalysts. Other performance improvements were also observed. The resulting lube oil fractions were of high purity even at low reaction severity. The

  17. Growing Alternatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger-Petersen, Mai Corlin

    2014-01-01

    From 2014, Anhui Province will pilot a reform of the residential land market in China, thus integrating rural Anhui in the national housing market. In contrast, artist and activist Ou Ning has proposed the Bishan time money currency, intending to establish an alternative economic circuit in Bishan...

  18. DEHYDROGENATION CATALYST FOR PRODUCTION OF MTBE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objectives of this project were to better understand the effect of different catalyst preparation parameters, the effect of different catalyst treatment parameters, and the mechanism of deactivation. Accordingly, catalysts were made using various preparation methods and with...

  19. Deactivation-resistant catalyst for selective catalyst reduction of NOx

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention relates to a catalyst for selective catalytic reduction of NOx in alkali metal containing flue gas using ammonia as reductant, the catalyst comprising a surface with catalytically active sites, wherein the surface is at least partly coated with a coating comprising at least...

  20. Novel Reforming Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfefferle, Lisa D; Haller, Gary L

    2012-10-16

    Aqueous phase reforming is useful for processing oxygenated hydrocarbons to hydrogen and other more useful products. Current processing is hampered by the fact that oxide based catalysts are not stable under high temperature hydrothermal conditions. Silica in the form of structured MCM-41 is thermally a more stable support for Co and Ni than conventional high surface area amorphous silica but hydrothermal stability is not demonstrated. Carbon nanotube supports, in contrast, are highly stable under hydrothermal reaction conditions. In this project we show that carbon nanotubes are stable high activity/selectivity supports for the conversion of ethylene glycol to hydrogen.

  1. Review of the Production of Biodiesel from Waste Cooking Oil using Solid Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.H. Said

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The need for fossil fuels and the emissions generated from these fuels are increasing daily. Researchers are concerned with global warming as well as climate change; and energy sustainability and material usages are important issues today. Waste cooking oil (WCO can be processed into biodiesel as an alternative fuel to replace diesel. Production of biodiesel using WCO as the feedstock has been of growing interest for the last two decades. A number of research papers related to the improvements in production, raw materials and catalyst selection have been published. This paper reviews the various types of heterogeneous solid catalyst in the production of biodiesel via the transesterification of WCO. The catalysts used can be classified according to their state presence in the transesterification reaction as homogeneous or heterogeneous catalysts. Homogeneous catalysts act in the same liquid phase as the reaction mixture, whereas heterogeneous catalysts act in a solid phase with the reaction mixture. Heterogeneous catalysts are non-corrosive, a green process and environmentally friendly. They can be recycled and used several times, thus offering a more economic pathway for biodiesel production. The advantages and drawbacks of these heterogeneous catalysts are presented. Future work focuses on the application of economically and environmentally friendly solid catalysts in the production of biodiesel using WCO as the raw material.

  2. In-situ characterization of heterogeneous catalysts

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez, Jose A; Chupas, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Helps researchers develop new catalysts for sustainable fuel and chemical production Reviewing the latest developments in the field, this book explores the in-situ characterization of heterogeneous catalysts, enabling readers to take full advantage of the sophisticated techniques used to study heterogeneous catalysts and reaction mechanisms. In using these techniques, readers can learn to improve the selectivity and the performance of catalysts and how to prepare catalysts as efficiently as possible, with minimum waste. In-situ Characterization of Heterogeneous Catalysts feat

  3. Alternative 23

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Alternative 23 is a curated exhibition of works by Steve Aylett, David Blandy & Daniel Locke, Let Me Feel Your Finger First, Laura Oldfield Ford, Plastique Fantastique and Henrik Schrat, including the first screening of Let Me Feel Your Finger First’s Postcolonial Capers. In 1985 DC Comics in the US had taken the commercial decision to unify the complex and contradictory character story arcs from its various strips such as Superman, Batman and Green Lantern. The resultant crossover series...

  4. Nitrogen and sulfur co-doped carbon with three-dimensional ordered macroporosity: An efficient metal-free oxygen reduction catalyst derived from ionic liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hui; Shi, Liang; Lei, Jiaheng; Liu, Dan; Qu, Deyu; Xie, Zhizhong; Du, Xiaodi; Yang, Peng; Hu, Xiaosong; Li, Junsheng; Tang, Haolin

    2016-08-01

    The development of efficient and durable catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is critical for the practical application of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). A novel imidazole based ionic liquid is synthesized in this study and used subsequently for the preparation of a N and S co-doped metal-free catalyst with three dimensional ordered microstructure. The catalyst prepared at 1100 °C showed improved ORR catalytic performance and stability compared to commercial Pt/C catalyst. We demonstrate that the high graphitic N content and high degree of graphitization of the synthesized catalyst is responsible for its superb ORR activity. Our results suggest that the N and S co-doped metal-free catalyst reported here is a promising alternative to traditional ORR catalyst based on noble metal. Furthermore, the current study also demonstrate that importance of morphology engineering in the development of high performance ORR catalyst.

  5. Startup procedure for reforming catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHale, W.D.; Schoennagel, H.J.

    1984-08-14

    Process for reforming a hydrocarbon charge under reforming conditions in a reforming zone containing a sulfur-sensitive metal containing reforming catalyst wherein over-cracking of the charge stock and excessive temperature rise in the reforming zone is suppressed by pre-conditioning the catalyst, prior to contact with the charge, with a reformate of specified octane number and aromatics content.

  6. Doped palladium containing oxidation catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohajeri, Nahid

    2014-02-18

    A supported oxidation catalyst includes a support having a metal oxide or metal salt, and mixed metal particles thereon. The mixed metal particles include first particles including a palladium compound, and second particles including a precious metal group (PMG) metal or PMG metal compound, wherein the PMG metal is not palladium. The oxidation catalyst may also be used as a gas sensor.

  7. Catalysts for low temperature oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toops, Todd J.; Parks, III, James E.; Bauer, John C.

    2016-03-01

    The invention provides a composite catalyst containing a first component and a second component. The first component contains nanosized gold particles. The second component contains nanosized platinum group metals. The composite catalyst is useful for catalyzing the oxidation of carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons, oxides of nitrogen, and other pollutants at low temperatures.

  8. Catalyst design for biorefining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Karen; Lee, Adam F

    2016-02-28

    The quest for sustainable resources to meet the demands of a rapidly rising global population while mitigating the risks of rising CO2 emissions and associated climate change, represents a grand challenge for humanity. Biomass offers the most readily implemented and low-cost solution for sustainable transportation fuels, and the only non-petroleum route to organic molecules for the manufacture of bulk, fine and speciality chemicals and polymers. To be considered truly sustainable, biomass must be derived from resources which do not compete with agricultural land use for food production, or compromise the environment (e.g. via deforestation). Potential feedstocks include waste lignocellulosic or oil-based materials derived from plant or aquatic sources, with the so-called biorefinery concept offering the co-production of biofuels, platform chemicals and energy; analogous to today's petroleum refineries which deliver both high-volume/low-value (e.g. fuels and commodity chemicals) and low-volume/high-value (e.g. fine/speciality chemicals) products, thereby maximizing biomass valorization. This article addresses the challenges to catalytic biomass processing and highlights recent successes in the rational design of heterogeneous catalysts facilitated by advances in nanotechnology and the synthesis of templated porous materials, as well as the use of tailored catalyst surfaces to generate bifunctional solid acid/base materials or tune hydrophobicity. PMID:26755755

  9. Latent catalyst; Senzaisei shokubai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    Epoxy resin, an important function material to support such main industries as electric and electronic devices, automobiles, civil engineering, and building construction, is demanded of development of single liquid type resin having excellent quick hardening performance and storage stability. This requirement comes from environmental problems with an intention of saving energies and reducing resin wastes. The Company, using freely its independent phase separation technology that controls molecular structure of catalysts, developed a latent catalyst having excellent storage stability and high-temperature quick hardening performance. Its major features may be summarized as follows: (1) excellent storage stability at room temperature keeping the product stable for 2.5 months or longer (2 days in conventional products); (2) quick hardening performance hardening the resin in seven seconds at 150 degrees C (equivalent to conventional products); and (3) excellent insulation performance of hardened resin at 140 degrees C of 7 times 10 {sup 13} (ohm) (center dot) cm (2 times 10 {sup 12} (ohm) (center dot) cm in conventional products) (translated by NEDO)

  10. Supported molten-metal catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Ravindra; Singh, Ajeet; Halasz, Istvan; Serban, Manuela

    2001-01-01

    An entirely new class of catalysts called supported molten-metal catalysts, SMMC, which can replace some of the existing precious metal catalysts used in the production of fuels, commodity chemicals, and fine chemicals, as well as in combating pollution. SMMC are based on supporting ultra-thin films or micro-droplets of the relatively low-melting (<600.degree. C.), inexpensive, and abundant metals and semimetals from groups 1, 12, 13, 14, 15 and 16, of the periodic table, or their alloys and intermetallic compounds, on porous refractory supports, much like supported microcrystallites of the traditional solid metal catalysts. It thus provides orders of magnitude higher surface area than is obtainable in conventional reactors containing molten metals in pool form and also avoids corrosion. These have so far been the chief stumbling blocks in the application of molten metal catalysts.

  11. Nanoscale intimacy in bifunctional catalysts for selective conversion of hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zečević, Jovana; Vanbutsele, Gina; de Jong, Krijn P.; Martens, Johan A.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to precisely control nanoscale features is increasingly exploited to develop and improve monofunctional catalysts1–4. Striking effects might also be expected in the case of bifunctional catalysts, which play an important role in hydrocracking of fossil and renewable hydrocarbon sources to provide high-quality diesel fuel5–7. Such bifunctional hydrocracking catalysts contain metal sites and acid sites, and for more than 50 years the so-called ‘intimacy criterion’8 has dictated the maximum distance between the two site types beyond which catalytic activity decreases. The lack of synthesis and material characterization methods with nanometer precision has long prevented in-depth exploration of the criterion, which has often been interpreted simply as ‘the closer the better’ for positioning metal and acid sites8–11. Here we show for a bifunctional catalyst, comprised of an intimate mixture of zeolite Y and alumina binder and with platinum (Pt) metal controllably deposited20,21 on either the zeolite or the binder, that close proximity between metal and zeolite acid sites can be detrimental: the selectivity when cracking large hydrocarbon feedstock molecules for high-quality diesel production is optimized with the catalyst that contains Pt on the binder, i.e. with a larger distance between metal and acid sites. Cracking of the large and complex hydrocarbon molecules typically derived from alternative sources such as gas-to-liquid technology, vegetable oil or algal oil6–7 should thus benefit especially from bifunctional catalysts that avoid locating Pt on the zeolite as the traditionally assumed optimal location. More generally, we anticipate that the ability to spatially organize different active sites at the nanoscale demonstrated here will benefit the further development and optimization of the newly emerging generation of multifunctional catalysts12–15. PMID:26659185

  12. Production of syngas by ethanol reforming on Ni catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catapan, Rafael C.; Oliveira, Amir A.M.; Donadel, Karina; Oliveira, Antonio Pedro N.; Rambo, Carlos R. [Federal University of Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering. Lab. of Combustion and Thermal Systems Engineering], Emails: catapan@labcet.ufsc.br, donadel@emc.ufsc.br, pedronovaes@emc.ufsc.br, rambo@enq.ufsc.br; Oliveira, Therezinha Maria N.; Wagner, Theodoro M. [Universidade da Regiao de Joinville, SC (Brazil). Campus Universitario Bom Retiro], E-mails: tnovais@univille.br, theowag@terra.com.br

    2010-07-01

    In the recent literature, attention has been directed to the development of noble metals based catalysts for the ethanol reforming. However, the high costs and low availability of noble metals, e.g. platinum, as a resource justify the development of alternatives technologically, economically and environmentally viable such as Ni-based catalysts. Here, the thermal decomposition, partial oxidation and steam reforming of ethanol over SiO{sub 2} supported Ni was studied in a packed bed reactor in the 673 - 973 K temperature range at 1 atm. The catalyst was produced from 10% NiO, 5% of bentonite and 85% (wt.) of natural amorphous silica fibers (NASF). Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) evaluation revealed that particles of Ni were homogeneously distributed over the NASF. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns did not show peaks related to silicates in all spectra, which indicates that there is no, apparently, interaction between the nickel catalysts and SiO{sub 2} or devitrification The reactions of ethanol on this catalyst occurs mainly by the dehydrogenation reaction generating acetaldehyde. Further, CH{sub 3}CHO is decomposed to CH{sub 4} and CO. In parallel to this route, ethanol is dehydrated producing ethylene, which is successively dehydrogenated in Ni sites generating carbon on the surface. Also, carbon can be produced by consecutive dehydrogenation of CH{sub 4}. Both reactions contribute to increase the production of H{sub 2} to values higher than those predicted by the thermodynamic equilibrium. (author)

  13. Tungstated zirconia as promising carrier for DeNOx catalysts with improved resistance towards alkali poisoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due-Hansen, Johannes; Kustov, Arkadii; Rasmussen, Søren Birk;

    2006-01-01

    of new alternative catalysts that are more resistant towards poisoning with potassium. Vanadia-based catalysts supported on traditional and tungstated zirconia has been prepared and tested in selective catalytic reduction of NO with ammonia. All prepared catalysts were characterized using N2-BET, XRD......, and NH3-TPD methods. The influence of calcination temperature of zirconia modified with tungsten oxide on the textural characteristics, acidity and catalytic performance was studied. The resistance of the catalysts towards model poisoning with potassium was found to depend dramatically...... on the crystallinity of the zirconia and on the surface acidity. Vanadia supported on tungstated zirconia calcined at 700 8C revealed superior catalytic performance and resistance towards alkali poisoning in comparison with a traditional catalyst. The improved poisoning resistance of the samples based on tungstated...

  14. Energy alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to sharp rise in oil proces after the 1973 Arab-Israeli War, world attention has been focussed on the energy problem. At present the energy problem is limited to the cost and reliability of supply, even though there are enough supplies to go round. However, in the future the problem will be of availability, because in spite of the full exploitation of currently available conventional energy sources, the supply will fall short of demand which will always be increasing. Hence, there is need to develop alternate energy sources, including fast breeder reactors, fusion reactors and MHD. Economic and technical aspects of these energy are discussed. (M.G.B.)

  15. Alternative detente

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of the Chernobyl accident on the disarmament and anti-nuclear movements is discussed. The accident directed attention towards the areas in common rather than the areas of disagreement. It also demonstrated the environmental impact of radioactivity, strengthening the ecological case of the anti-nuclear movement. The issues are discussed for the Western and Eastern bloc countries and the relationship between the two. Sections focus on the Eco-protest, Green politics and economics and on the politics of minority protest and the Green alternative. (U.K.)

  16. Iron Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts Prepared by Solvent-Deficient Precipitation (SDP: Effects of Washing, Promoter Addition Step, and Drying Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle M. Brunner

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A novel, solvent-deficient precipitation (SDP method for catalyst preparation in general and for preparation of iron FT catalysts in particular is reported. Eight catalysts using a 23 factorial design of experiments to identify the key preparation variables were prepared. The catalysts were characterized by electron microprobe, N2 adsorption, TEM, XRD, and ICP. Results show that the morphology of the catalysts, i.e., surface area, pore volume, pore size distribution, crystallite sizes, and promoter distribution are significantly influenced by (1 whether or not the precursor catalyst is washed, (2 the promoter addition step, and (3 the drying condition (temperature. Consequently, the activity, selectivity, and stability of the catalysts determined from fixed-bed testing are also affected by these three variables. Unwashed catalysts prepared by a one-step method and dried at 100 °C produced the most active catalysts for FT synthesis. The catalysts of this study prepared by SDP compared favorably in activity, productivity, and stability with Fe FT catalysts reported in the literature. It is believed that this facile SDP approach has promise for development of future FT catalysts, and also offers a potential alternate route for the preparation of other catalysts for various other applications.

  17. Alternative crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surplus cereal production in the EEC and decreasing product prices, mainly for cereals, has prompted considerable interest for new earnings in arable farming. The objective was to examine whether suggested new crops (fibre, oil, medicinal and alternative grains crops) could be considered as real alternatives. Whether a specific crop can compete economically with cereals and whether there is a market demand for the crop is analyzed. The described possibilities will result in ca. 50,000 hectares of new crops. It is expected that they would not immediately provide increased earnings, but in the long run expected price developments are more positive than for cereals. The area for new crops will not solve the current surplus cereal problem as the area used for new crops is only 3% of that used for cereals. Preconditions for many new crops is further research activities and development work as well as the establishment of processing units and organizational initiatives. Presumably, it is stated, there will then be a basis for a profitable production of new crops for some farmers. (AB) (47 refs.)

  18. Mesoporous acid catalysts for renewable raw-material conversion into chemicals and fuel

    OpenAIRE

    Castanheiro, J; Caiado, M; Farinha, J

    2015-01-01

    Mesoporous catalysts, such as silica (PMOs, MCM-41, SBA-15) and activated carbons, have been used in heterogeneous catalysis, due to a combination of high surface areas and controlled pore sizes. These mesoporous materials have been used as catalyst in a wide range of chemical reactions. Due to environmental pressure and a decrease in fossil fuel sources, alternative fuel sources, such as biomass or renewable feedstock sources, have become increasingly popular. Traditional...

  19. Conversion of Isoprenoid Oil by Catalytic Cracking and Hydrocracking over Nanoporous Hybrid Catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Toshiyuki Kimura; Chen Liu; Xiaohong Li; Takaaki Maekawa; Sachio Asaoka

    2012-01-01

    In order to produce petroleum alternatives from biomass, a significant amount of research has been focused on oils from microalgae due to their origin, which would not affect food availability. Nanoporous hybrid catalysts composed of ns Al2O3 and zeolites have been proven to be very useful compared to traditional catalysts in hydrotreating (HT), hydrocracking (HC), and catalytic cracking (CC) of large molecules. To evaluate the reaction scheme and products from model isoprenoid compounds of m...

  20. Ceramic catalyst materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sault, A.G.; Gardner, T.J. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hanprasopwattanna, A.; Reardon, J.; Datye, A.K. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Hydrous titanium oxide (HTO) ion-exchange materials show great potential as ceramic catalyst supports due to an inherently high ion-exchange capacity which allows facile loading of catalytically active transition metal ions, and an ability to be cast as thin films on virtually any substrate. By coating titania and HTO materials onto inexpensive, high surface area substrates such as silica and alumina, the economics of using these materials is greatly improved, particularly for the HTO materials, which are substantially more expensive in the bulk form than other oxide supports. In addition, the development of thin film forms of these materials allows the catalytic and mechanical properties of the final catalyst formulation to be separately engineered. In order to fully realize the potential of thin film forms of titania and HTO, improved methods for the deposition and characterization of titania and HTO films on high surface area substrates are being developed. By varying deposition procedures, titania film thickness and substrate coverage can be varied from the submonolayer range to multilayer thicknesses on both silica and alumina. HTO films can also be formed, but the quality and reproducibility of these films is not nearly as good as for pure titania films. The films are characterized using a combination of isopropanol dehydration rate measurements, point of zero charge (PZC) measurements, BET surface area, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and elemental analysis. In order to assess the effects of changes in film morphology on catalytic activity, the films are being loaded with MoO{sub 3} using either incipient wetness impregnation or ion-exchange of heptamolybdate anions followed by calcining. The MoO{sub 3} is then sulfided to form MOS{sub 2}, and tested for catalytic activity using pyrene hydrogenation and dibenzothiophene (DBT) desulfurization, model reactions that simulate reactions occurring during coal liquefaction.

  1. Hydrogenated Graphene as Metal-free Catalyst for Fenton-like Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Zhao; Wu-feng Chen; Cheng-fei Yuan; Zi-ye Zhu; Li-feng Yan

    2012-01-01

    Carbonaceous catalysts are potential alternatives to metal catalysts.Graphene has been paid much attention for its high surface area and light weight.Here,hydrogenated graphene has been prepared by a simple gamma ray irradiation of graphene oxide aqueous suspension at room temperature.Transmission electron microscopic,element analysis,X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy,and UV-Vis spectrophotometer studies verified the hydrogenation of graphene.The as-prepared hydrogenated graphene can be used as a metal-free carbonaceous catalyst for the Fenton-like degradation of organic dye in water.

  2. Processing of spent nickel catalyst for fat recovery

    OpenAIRE

    Ibrahim Nasir, Mohammad

    2002-01-01

    Spent nickel catalyst (SNC) have the potential of insulting the quality of the environment in a number of ways. The disposal of SNC will have a pollution effect. Optimum recovery of fat from SNC , could save the environment and reduce the oil loss. Hexane has been the solvent of choice for oil extraction. Alternative solvents that are considered safer have been evaluated. Hexane, isopropanol, ethanol, and heptane were examined using soxhlet extraction. While hexane was more efficient in oil r...

  3. Novel ruthenium-catalyst for hydroesterification of olefins with formates

    OpenAIRE

    Profir, Irina; Beller, Matthias; Fleischer, Ivana

    2014-01-01

    An alternative ruthenium-based catalyst for the hydroesterification of olefins with formates is reported. The good activity of our system is ensured by the use of a bidentate P,N-ligand and ruthenium dodecacarbonyl. A range of formates can be used for selective alkoxycarbonylation of aromatic olefins. In addition, the synthesis of selected aliphatic esters is realized. The proposed active ruthenium complex has been isolated and characterized.

  4. Magnetically Recoverable Ruthenium Catalysts in Organic Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Dong Wang; Didier Astruc

    2014-01-01

    Magnetically recyclable catalysts with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are becoming a major trend towards sustainable catalysts. In this area, recyclable supported ruthenium complexes and ruthenium nanoparticles occupy a key place and present great advantages compared to classic catalysts. In this micro-review, attention is focused on the fabrication of MNP-supported ruthenium catalysts and their catalytic applications in various organic syntheses.

  5. Catalysts for portable, solid state hydrogen genration systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabl, Jason Robert

    Hydrogen and air powered proton exchange membrane fuel cells are a potential alternative to batteries. In portable power systems, the design requirements often focus on cost efficiency, energy density, storability, as well as safety. Ammonia borane (AB), a chemical hydride containing 19.6 wt. % hydrogen, has a high hydrogen capacity and is a stable and non-toxic candidate for storing hydrogen in portable systems. Throughout this work, Department of Energy guidelines for low power portable hydrogen power systems were used as a baseline and comparison with commercially available systems. In order to make this comparison, the system parameters of a system using AB hydrolysis were estimated by developing capacity and cost correlations from the commercial systems and applying them to this work. Supporting experiments were designed to evaluate a system that would use a premixed solid storage bed of AB and a catalyst. This configuration would only require a user input of water in order to initiate the hydrogen production. Using ammonia borane hydrolysis, the hydrogen yield is ˜9 wt. %, when all reactants are considered. In addition to the simplicity of initiating the reaction, hydrolysis of AB has the advantage of suppressing the production of some toxic borazines that are present when AB is thermally decomposed. However, ammonia gas will be formed and this problem must be addressed, as ammonia is damaging to PEM fuel cells. The catalyst focused on throughout this work was Amberlyst - 15; an ion exchange resin with an acid capacity of 4.7 eq/kg and ammonia adsorbent. At less than 0.30/g, this is a cost effective alternative to precious metal catalysts. The testing with this catalyst was compared to a traditional catalyst in literature, 20% platinum in carbon, costing more than 40/g. The Amberlyst catalyst was found to reduce the formation of ammonia in the gas products from ˜3.71 wt. % with the Pt/C catalyst to 90 % to < 30 % over a 70 day aging study. This results

  6. Impeded solid state reactions and transformations in ceramic catalysts supports and catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernő E. Kiss

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Impeded chemical reactions and impeded polymorphous transformation in materials are discussed, as desired effects, for stabilization of ceramic catalyst supports and ceramic based catalysts. This paper gives a short overview about the possibilities of slowing down the aging processes in ceramic catalyst supports and catalysts. Special attention is given to alumina and titania based catalysts.

  7. Energy alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    English. A special committe of the Canadian House of Commons was established on 23 May 1980 to investigate the use of alternative energy sources such as 'gasohol', liquified coal, solar energy, methanol, wind and tidal power, biomass, and propane. In its final report, the committee envisions an energy system for Canada based on hydrogen and electricity, using solar and geothermal energy for low-grade heat. The committe was not able to say which method of generating electricty would dominate in the next century, although it recommends that fossil fuels should not be used. The fission process is not specifically discussed, but the outlook for fusion was investigated, and continued governmental support of fusion research is recommended. The report proposes some improvements in governmental energy organizations and programs

  8. Direct hydroxylation of benzene to phenol - aspects of catalysts development and reaction kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unger, A.; Hiemer, U.; Schwieger, W. [Lehrstuhl fuer Technische Chemie 1, Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen (Germany); Reitzmann, A. [Inst. fuer Chemische Verfahrenstechnik (CVT), Karlsruhe Univ. (Germany); Klemm, E. [DEGUSSA AG, Service Unit Process Technology, Hanau-Wolfgang (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    An alternative route for phenol synthesis is the direct hydroxylation of benzene with nitrous oxide over zeolite catalysts of the ZSM5-type. The disadvantage of this pathway to phenol is the fact that a technically suitable catalyst is not yet available. This is due to low yields and fast deactivation behaviour of the presently-used catalysts. From a scientific point of view one has to state that the reaction mechanism of this single-step reaction is still not clear. The catalyst development requires a systematic study with respect to the chemical, structural and/or morphological properties of the catalytic materials that might have an influence on the performance of the catalyst and/or on the reaction itself. The chance to design the catalyst in a desired way is given by the large variety of parameters that can influence the properties of the zeolite during the synthesis itself or during following post-modification processes. Kinetic measurements offer the possibility to identify mechanism of the reaction and therefore allow conclusions for further improvements of the catalyst design and the reaction conditions itself. The combination of results of both research directions should open an opportunity to derive structure-activity relationships to provide a suitable catalyst for an industrial application. In the present paper we will show first results of an attempt following this described way. (orig.)

  9. Noble metal catalysts in the production of biofuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez, A.

    2013-11-01

    The energy demand is increasing in the world together with the need to ensure energy security and the desire to decrease greenhouse gas emissions. While several renewable alternatives are available for the production of electricity, e.g. solar energy, wind power, and hydrogen, biomass is the only renewable source that can meet the demand for carbon-based liquid fuels and chemicals. The technology applied in the conversion of biomass depends on the type and complexity of the biomass, and the desired fuel. Hydrogen and hydrogen-rich mixtures (synthesis gas) are promising energy sources as they are more efficient and cleaner than existing fuels, especially when they are used in fuel cells. Hydrotreatment is a catalytic process that can be used in the conversion of biomass or biomass-derived liquids into fuels. In autothermal reforming (ATR), catalysts are used in the production of hydrogen-rich mixtures from conventional fuels or bio-fuels. The different nature of biomass and biomass-derived liquids and mineral oil makes the use of catalysts developed for the petroleum industry challenging. This requires the improvement of available catalysts and the development of new ones. To overcome the limitations of conventional hydrotreatment and ATR catalysts, zirconia-supported mono- and bimetallic rhodium, palladium, and platinum catalysts were developed and tested in the upgrading of model compounds for wood-based pyrolysis oil and in the production of hydrogen, using model compounds for gasoline and diesel. Catalysts were also tested in the ATR of ethanol. For comparative purposes commercial catalysts were tested and the results obtained with model compounds were compared with those obtained with real feedstocks (hydrotreatmet tests with wood-based pyrolysis oil and ATR tests with NExBTL renewable diesel). Noble metal catalysts were active and selective in the hydrotreatment of guaiacol used as the model compound for the lignin fraction of wood-based pyrolysis oil and wood

  10. Alumina supported iridium catalysts - preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the method employed in the preparation of alumina supported iridium catalysts, with metal contents between 30 and 40%, that will be used for hydrazine monopropellant decomposition. (author)

  11. Separately supported polymetallic reforming catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kresge, C. T.; Krishnamurthy, S.; McHale, W. D.

    1985-01-15

    There is provided, in accordance with the present invention, a catalyst composition made up of a mixture of two components, one component comprising a minor proportion of platinum and rhenium on a support and the second component comprising a minor proportion of iridium and rhenium on a separate support. A process for reforming a charge stock, such as naphtha, utilizing such catalyst is also provided.

  12. Reaction pathways involved in CH4 conversion on Pd/Al2O3 catalysts : TAP as a powerful tool for the elucidation of the effective role of the metal/support interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger, Pascal

    2016-02-01

    Temporal Analysis of Products (TAP) reactor offers an alternative to draw direct structure/activity relationships checked on Natural Gas-fuelled Vehicle (NGV) catalysts Determination of accurate kinetic constants for methane adsorption from single pulse experiments and subsequent investigation of sequential surface reactions from alternative CH4/O2 pulse experiments provides a straightforward visualization of the involvement of the metal/support interface on freshly-prepared catalysts and the loss of this effect on aged single palladium based catalysts.

  13. Nanoscale intimacy in bifunctional catalysts for selective conversion of hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zecevic, Jovana; Vanbutsele, Gina; de Jong, Krijn P.; Martens, Johan A.

    2015-12-01

    The ability to control nanoscale features precisely is increasingly being exploited to develop and improve monofunctional catalysts. Striking effects might also be expected in the case of bifunctional catalysts, which are important in the hydrocracking of fossil and renewable hydrocarbon sources to provide high-quality diesel fuel. Such bifunctional hydrocracking catalysts contain metal sites and acid sites, and for more than 50 years the so-called intimacy criterion has dictated the maximum distance between the two types of site, beyond which catalytic activity decreases. A lack of synthesis and material-characterization methods with nanometre precision has long prevented in-depth exploration of the intimacy criterion, which has often been interpreted simply as ‘the closer the better’ for positioning metal and acid sites. Here we show for a bifunctional catalyst—comprising an intimate mixture of zeolite Y and alumina binder, and with platinum metal controllably deposited on either the zeolite or the binder—that closest proximity between metal and zeolite acid sites can be detrimental. Specifically, the selectivity when cracking large hydrocarbon feedstock molecules for high-quality diesel production is optimized with the catalyst that contains platinum on the binder, that is, with a nanoscale rather than closest intimacy of the metal and acid sites. Thus, cracking of the large and complex hydrocarbon molecules that are typically derived from alternative sources, such as gas-to-liquid technology, vegetable oil or algal oil, should benefit especially from bifunctional catalysts that avoid locating platinum on the zeolite (the traditionally assumed optimal location). More generally, we anticipate that the ability demonstrated here to spatially organize different active sites at the nanoscale will benefit the further development and optimization of the emerging generation of multifunctional catalysts.

  14. Steam Reforming of Ethylene Glycol over MgAl₂O₄ Supported Rh, Ni, and Co Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mei, Donghai; Lebarbier, Vanessa M.; Xing, Rong; Albrecht, Karl O.; Dagle, Robert A.

    2015-11-25

    Steam reforming of ethylene glycol (EG) over MgAl₂O₄ supported metal (15 wt.% Ni, 5 wt.% Rh, and 15 wt.% Co) catalysts were investigated using combined experimental and theoretical methods. Compared to highly active Rh and Ni catalysts with 100% conversion, the steam reforming activity of EG over the Co catalyst is comparatively lower with only 42% conversion under the same reaction conditions (500°C, 1 atm, 119,000 h⁻¹, S/C=3.3 mol). However, CH₄ selectivity over the Co catalyst is remarkably lower. For example, by varying the gas hour space velocity (GHSV) such that complete conversion is achieved for all the catalysts, CH₄ selectivity for the Co catalyst is only 8%, which is much lower than the equilibrium CH₄ selectivity of ~ 24% obtained for both the Rh and Ni catalysts. Further studies show that varying H₂O concentration over the Co catalyst has a negligible effect on activity, thus indicating zero-order dependence on H₂O. These experimental results suggest that the supported Co catalyst is a promising EG steam reforming catalyst for high hydrogen production. To gain mechanistic insight for rationalizing the lower CH₃ selectivity observed for the Co catalyst, the initial decomposition reaction steps of ethylene glycol via C-O, O-H, C-H, and C-C bond scissions on the Rh(111), Ni(111) and Co(0001) surfaces were investigated using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Despite the fact that the bond scission sequence in the EG decomposition on the three metal surfaces varies, which leads to different reaction intermediates, the lower CH₄ selectivity over the Co catalyst, as compared to the Rh and Ni catalysts, is primarily due to the higher barrier for CH₄ formation. The higher S/C ratio enhances the Co catalyst stability, which can be elucidated by the facile water dissociation and an alternative reaction path to remove the CH species as a coking precursor via the HCOH formation. This work was financially supported by the United

  15. The innovation catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Roger L

    2011-06-01

    A few years ago the software development company Intuit realized that it needed a new approach to galvanizing customers. The company's Net Promoter Score was faltering, and customer recommendations of new products were especially disappointing. Intuit decided to hold a two-day, off-site meeting for the company's top 300 managers with a focus on the role of design in innovation. One of the days was dedicated to a program called Design for Delight. The centerpiece of the day was a PowerPoint presentation by Intuit founder Scott Cook, who realized midway through that he was no Steve Jobs: The managers listened dutifully, but there was little energy in the room. By contrast, a subsequent exercise in which the participants worked through a design challenge by creating prototypes, getting feedback, iterating, and refining, had them mesmerized. The eventual result was the creation of a team of nine design-thinking coaches--"innovation catalysts"--from across Intuit who were made available to help any work group create prototypes, run experiments, and learn from customers. The process includes a "painstorm" (to determine the customer's greatest pain point), a "soljam" (to generate and then winnow possible solutions), and a "code-jam" (to write code "good enough" to take to customers within two weeks). Design for Delight has enabled employees throughout Intuit to move from satisfying customers to delighting them. PMID:21714388

  16. Accelerating process and catalyst development in reforming reactions with high throughput technologies under industrially relevant conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schunk, S.A.; Bollmann, G.; Froescher, A.; Kaiser, H.; Lange de Oliveira, A.; Roussiere, T.; Wasserschaff, G. [hte Aktiengesellschaft, Heidelberg (Germany); Domke, I. [BASF SE, Ludwigshafen (Germany)

    2010-12-30

    like ethane or propane are challenging compositions for hydrogen and syngas production as enhanced catalyst deactivation can be observed in a lot of cases. In our case study we will illustrate how the right choice of reaction conditions and new catalyst developments can open up alternative process options. (II) Reforming of higher carbon containing feed-stocks like ethanol or naphtha containing feeds are difficult to process as the feed-stocks are easily subject to cracking reactions and olefin formation does lead to enhanced coking and ageing of the catalyst. In this case study we intend to illustrate how alternative catalyst concepts and operation under suitable process conditions can lead to improved materials that can operate in reaction corridors of interest. (orig.)

  17. Alternative Splice in Alternative Lice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovar-Corona, Jaime M; Castillo-Morales, Atahualpa; Chen, Lu; Olds, Brett P; Clark, John M; Reynolds, Stuart E; Pittendrigh, Barry R; Feil, Edward J; Urrutia, Araxi O

    2015-10-01

    Genomic and transcriptomics analyses have revealed human head and body lice to be almost genetically identical; although con-specific, they nevertheless occupy distinct ecological niches and have differing feeding patterns. Most importantly, while head lice are not known to be vector competent, body lice can transmit three serious bacterial diseases; epidemictyphus, trench fever, and relapsing fever. In order to gain insights into the molecular bases for these differences, we analyzed alternative splicing (AS) using next-generation sequencing data for one strain of head lice and one strain of body lice. We identified a total of 3,598 AS events which were head or body lice specific. Exon skipping AS events were overrepresented among both head and body lice, whereas intron retention events were underrepresented in both. However, both the enrichment of exon skipping and the underrepresentation of intron retention are significantly stronger in body lice compared with head lice. Genes containing body louse-specific AS events were found to be significantly enriched for functions associated with development of the nervous system, salivary gland, trachea, and ovarian follicle cells, as well as regulation of transcription. In contrast, no functional categories were overrepresented among genes with head louse-specific AS events. Together, our results constitute the first evidence for transcript pool differences in head and body lice, providing insights into molecular adaptations that enabled human lice to adapt to clothing, and representing a powerful illustration of the pivotal role AS can play in functional adaptation. PMID:26169943

  18. Looking for an Alternative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Jack

    1999-01-01

    Argues that high school newspapers might do well to create stronger ties with alternative weeklies. Discusses issues of niche marketing, alternative content, and alternative presentation. Notes that high school papers could learn a lot from alternative newspapers. (SR)

  19. Waste Cooking Oil as an Alternate Feedstock for Biodiesel Production

    OpenAIRE

    M. Rafiqul Islam; K. Chris Watts; Chhetri, Arjun B.

    2008-01-01

    As crude oil price reach a new high, the need for developing alternate fuels has become acute. Alternate fuels should be economically attractive in order to compete with currently used fossil fuels. In this work, biodiesel (ethyl ester) was prepared from waste cooking oil collected from a local restaurant in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. Ethyl alcohol with sodium hydroxide as a catalyst was used for the transesterification process. The fatty acid composition of the final biodiesel esters was ...

  20. Regeneration of Hydrotreating and FCC Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CM Wai; JG Frye; JL Fulton; LE Bowman; LJ Silva; MA Gerber

    1999-09-30

    Hydrotreating, hydrocracking, and fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysts are important components of petroleum refining processes. Hydrotreating and hydrocracking catalysts are used to improve the yield of high-quality light oil fractions from heavier crude oil and petroleum feedstocks containing high levels of impurities. FCC catalysts improve the yield of higher octane gasoline from crude oil. Residuum hydrotreating and cracking catalysts are susceptible to irreversible deactivation caused by adsorption of sulfur and by metals impurities, such as vanadium and nickel. The gradual buildup of these impurities in a hydrotreating catalyst eventually plugs the pores and deactivates it. Nickel and vanadium adversely affect the behavior of cracking catalysts, reducing product yield and quality. Replacing deactivated catalysts represents a significant cost in petroleum refining. Equally important are the costs and potential liabilities associated with treating and disposing spent catalysts. For example, recent US Environmental Protection Agency rulings have listed spent hydrotreating and hydrorefining catalysts as hazardous wastes. FCC catalysts, though more easily disposed of as road-base or as filler in asphalt and cement, are still an economic concern mainly because of the large volumes of spent catalysts generated. New processes are being considered to increase the useful life of catalysts or for meeting more stringent disposal requirements for spent catalysts containing metals. This report discusses a collaborative effort between Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Phillips Petroleum, Inc., to identify promising chemical processes for removing metals adhered to spent hydrodesulfurization (HDS, a type of hydrotreating catalyst) and FCC catalysts. This study, conducted by PNNL, was funded by the US Department of Energy's Bartlesville Project Office. Fresh and spent catalysts were provided by Phillips Petroleum. The FCC catalyst was a rare

  1. Predictive modeling of surface morphology of multicomponent catalysts for their optimum performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Altaf; Shah, Syed Islamuddin

    Multi-component microstructures of artificially engineered catalysts are promising for the best ever performance in alternative fuel production. We have designed and implemented a set of intelligent algorithms capable of predicting the surface morphology of multicomponent catalysts for their optimum performance. For example we come up with three kinds of different catalysts. Based on a database obtained from the density functional theory based kinetic Monte Carlo simulations, the first kind of single component catalytic surface promotes and helps dissociative adsorption of chemical species, but it hinders the diffusion of intermediate species. On the other hand, the second kind of single component catalytic surface promotes the diffusion of intermediate species, but suppresses the reactions and desorption processes. However the third kind of single component catalytic surfaces can significantly enhance reactions among intermediate species. Therefore no single component material surface would be a suitable candidate for becoming a good catalyst. However a combination of all above mentioned kind of materials may exhibit the maximum ever performance. Our algorithm models the surface morphology of these multicomponent catalysts by varying the surface area of each component and also by changing the shape of each component in such a way that the catalyst gives the highest rate of chemical formation. Our results confirm the best ever performance of our artificially engineered catalysts.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of supported polysugar-stabilized palladium nanoparticle catalysts for enhanced hydrodechlorination of trichloroethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palladium (Pd) nanoparticle catalysts were successfully synthesized within an aqueous phase using sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) as a capping ligand which offers a green alternative to conventional nanoparticle synthesis techniques. The CMC-stabilized Pd nanoparticles were subsequently dispersed within support materials using the incipient wetness impregnation technique for utilization in heterogeneous catalyst systems. The unsupported and supported (both calcined and uncalcined) Pd nanoparticle catalysts were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry, x-ray diffraction, and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller surface area measurement and their catalytic activity toward the hydrodechlorination of trichloroethylene (TCE) in aqueous media was examined using homogeneous and heterogeneous catalyst systems, respectively. The unsupported Pd nanoparticles showed considerable activity toward the degradation of TCE, as demonstrated by the reaction kinetics. Although the supported Pd nanoparticle catalysts had a lower catalytic activity than the unsupported particles that were homogeneously dispersed in the aqueous solutions, the supported catalysts retained sufficient activity toward the degradation of TCE. In addition, the use of the hydrophilic Al2O3 support material induced a mass transfer resistance to TCE that affected the initial hydrodechlorination rate. This paper demonstrates that supported Pd catalysts can be applied to the heterogeneous catalytic hydrodechlorination of TCE. (paper)

  3. Influence of Steam Reforming Catalyst Geometry on the Performance of Tubular Reformer – Simulation Calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franczyk Ewelina

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A proper selection of steam reforming catalyst geometry has a direct effect on the efficiency and economy of hydrogen production from natural gas and is a very important technological and engineering issue in terms of process optimisation. This paper determines the influence of widely used seven-hole grain diameter (ranging from 11 to 21 mm, h/d (height/diameter ratio of catalyst grain and Sh/St (hole surface/total cylinder surface in cross-section ratio (ranging from 0.13 to 0.37 on the gas load of catalyst bed, gas flow resistance, maximum wall temperature and the risk of catalyst coking. Calculations were based on the one-dimensional pseudo-homogeneous model of a steam reforming tubular reactor, with catalyst parameters derived from our investigations. The process analysis shows that it is advantageous, along the whole reformer tube length, to apply catalyst forms of h/d = 1 ratio, relatively large dimensions, possibly high bed porosity and Sh/St ≈ 0.30-0.37 ratio. It enables a considerable process intensification and the processing of more natural gas at the same flow resistance, despite lower bed activity, without catalyst coking risk. Alternatively, plant pressure drop can be reduced maintaining the same gas load, which translates directly into diminishing the operating costs as a result of lowering power consumption for gas compression.

  4. Catalyst containing oxygen transport membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Wilson, Jamie Robyn; van Hassel, Bart Antonie

    2012-12-04

    A composite oxygen transport membrane having a dense layer, a porous support layer and an intermediate porous layer located between the dense layer and the porous support layer. Both the dense layer and the intermediate porous layer are formed from an ionic conductive material to conduct oxygen ions and an electrically conductive material to conduct electrons. The porous support layer has a high permeability, high porosity, and a high average pore diameter and the intermediate porous layer has a lower permeability and lower pore diameter than the porous support layer. Catalyst particles selected to promote oxidation of a combustible substance are located in the intermediate porous layer and in the porous support adjacent to the intermediate porous layer. The catalyst particles can be formed by wicking a solution of catalyst precursors through the porous support toward the intermediate porous layer.

  5. Alternating polyesteramides based on 1,4-butylene terephthalamide: 2. alternating polyesteramides based on a single, linear diol (4NTm)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serrano, P.J.M.; Thuss, E.H.L.; Gaymans, R.J.

    1997-01-01

    Strictly alternating polyesteramides consisting of 1,4-butylene terephthalamide and aliphatic diols have been synthesized in the melt in the presence of a titanium catalyst. The influence of diol length on the thermal and mechanical properties was studied. Depending on its structure, the diol took p

  6. Catalysts at work: From integral to spatially resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk; Kimmerle, B.; Baiker, A.;

    2009-01-01

    analytical strategy might be similarly applied in other case studies. The corresponding temperature profiles and the catalytic performance were measured by means of an IR-camera and mass spectrometric analysis. In a more advanced experiment the ignition process of the partial oxidation of methane was...... distribution of Cu(0), Cu(I), Cu(II) species in a Cu/ZnO catalyst loaded in a quartz capillary microreactor could be reconstructed quantitatively on a virtual section through the reactor. An illustrating example for spatially resolved XAS under reaction conditions is the partial oxidation of methane over noble...... metal-based catalysts. In order to obtain spectroscopic information on the spatial variation of the oxidation state of the catalyst inside the reactor XAS spectra were recorded by scanning with a micro-focussed beam along the catalyst bed. Alternatively, full-field transmission imaging was used to...

  7. Catalyst for Decomposition of Nitrogen Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schryer, David R. (Inventor); Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor); Akyurtlu, Ates (Inventor); Akyurtlu, Jale (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    This invention relates generally to a platinized tin oxide-based catalyst. It relates particularly to an improved platinized tin oxide-based catalyst able to decompose nitric oxide to nitrogen and oxygen without the necessity of a reducing gas.

  8. Use of lanthanide catalysts in air electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review on the lanthanide catalysts suitable for the reduction catalysis of oxygen in air electrodes is presented. The kinds of lanthanide indicated to be used as catalysts of oxygen reduction are shown. (A.R.H.)

  9. Novel Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. [DOE patent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollhardt, K.P.C.; Perkins, P.

    Novel compounds are described which are used as improved Fischer-Tropsch catalysts particularly for the conversion of CO + H/sub 2/ to gaseous and liquid hydrocarbons at milder conditions than with prior catalysts.

  10. Biomass processing over gold catalysts

    CERN Document Server

    Simakova, Olga A; Murzin, Dmitry Yu

    2013-01-01

    The book describes the valorization of biomass-derived compounds over gold catalysts. Since biomass is a rich renewable feedstock for diverse platform molecules, including those currently derived from petroleum, the interest in various transformation routes has become intense. Catalytic conversion of biomass is one of the main approaches to improving the economic viability of biorefineries.  In addition, Gold catalysts were found to have outstanding activity and selectivity in many key reactions. This book collects information about transformations of the most promising and important compounds

  11. Rhenium Nanochemistry for Catalyst Preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadim G. Kessler

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The review presents synthetic approaches to modern rhenium-based catalysts. Creation of an active center is considered as a process of obtaining a nanoparticle or a molecule, immobilized within a matrix of the substrate. Selective chemical routes to preparation of particles of rhenium alloys, rhenium oxides and the molecules of alkyltrioxorhenium, and their insertion into porous structure of zeolites, ordered mesoporous MCM matrices, anodic mesoporous alumina, and porous transition metal oxides are considered. Structure-property relationships are traced for these catalysts in relation to such processes as alkylation and isomerization, olefin metathesis, selective oxidation of olefins, methanol to formaldehyde conversion, etc.

  12. Quick Guide to Flash Catalyst

    CERN Document Server

    Elmansy, Rafiq

    2011-01-01

    How do you transform user interface designs created in Photoshop or Illustrator into interactive web pages? It's easier than you think. This guide shows you how to use Adobe Flash Catalyst to create interactive UIs and website wireframes for Rich Internet Applications-without writing a single line of code. Ideal for web designers, this book introduces Flash Catalyst basics with detailed step-by-step instructions and screenshots that illustrate every part of the process. You'll learn hands-on how to turn your static design or artwork into working user interfaces that can be implemented in Fla

  13. Colloidal nanoparticles as catalysts and catalyst precursors for nitrite hydrogenation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Yingnan

    2015-01-01

    The most distinguished advantage to use colloidal methods for catalyst preparation is that the size and the shape of nanoparticles can be manipulated easily under good control, which is normally difficult to achieve by using traditional methods, such as impregnation and precipitation. This facilitat

  14. Catalyst-assisted Probabilistic Entanglement Transformation

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Yuan; Duan, Runyao; Ying, Mingsheng

    2004-01-01

    We are concerned with catalyst-assisted probabilistic entanglement transformations. A necessary and sufficient condition is presented under which there exist partial catalysts that can increase the maximal transforming probability of a given entanglement transformation. We also design an algorithm which leads to an efficient method for finding the most economical partial catalysts with minimal dimension. The mathematical structure of catalyst-assisted probabilistic transformation is carefully...

  15. Cotter's new plant diets on spent catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotter Corp.'s new 60-tpd spent-catalyst processing plant that recovers molybdenum, nickel, tungsten and vanadium products from spent catalysts is described. The company entered the business as a sideline to its main activity--the mining and processing of uranium ore. The spent-catalyst plant contains ammonium carbonate and sodium hydroxide leach circuits to provide the versatility required to recover various metals from a variety of spent catalysts

  16. Polymer-bound rhodium hydroformylation catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Jongsma, Tjeerd

    1992-01-01

    Homogeneous catalysts are superior in activity, selectivity as well as specificity, but heterogeneous catalyst are often preferred in industrial processes, because of their good recoverability and their applicability in continuous flow reactors. It would be of great environmental, commercial and scientific interest to combine the advantages of both catalysts. A route to achieve this goal is to immobilize a potent homogeneous catalyst onto an insoluble resin. In this thesis we have used solubl...

  17. EFFECTS OF CATALYST MORPHOLOGY ON HYDROTREATING REACTIONS

    OpenAIRE

    TYE CHING THIAN

    2008-01-01

    Due to the new environmental regulations for fuel quality, refineries need to process cleaner fuel. This requires an improvement in performance of hydrotreating catalysts. Improvements in catalyst activity require knowledge of the relationships between catalyst morphology and activity. Molybdenum sulfide, the generally agreed catalysts that give the best performance in hydrocracking and hydrotreating was investigated for its morphology effects on hydrotreating reactions. Three types of MoS2 c...

  18. Hydroprocessing full-range of heavy oils and bitumen using ultradispersed catalysts at low severity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peluso, Enzo

    The progressive exhaustion of light crude oils is forcing the petroleum industry to explore new alternatives for the exploitation of unconventional oils. New approaches are searching for technologies able to produce, transport and refine these feedstocks at lower costs, in which symbiotic processes between the enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and the conventional upgrading technologies are under investigation. The process explored in this thesis is an interesting alternative for in-situ upgrading of these crude oils in the presence of ultradispersed (UD) catalysts, which are included as a disperse phase able to circulate along with the processed feed. The objectives of this work are: (a) study the performance of UD catalysts in the presence of a full range (non fractioned) heavy oil and bitumen and (b) evaluate the recyclability of the UD catalysts. Four different heavy crude oils were evaluated in the presence with UD catalysts at a total pressure of 2.8 MPa, residence time of 8 hours and reaction temperatures from 360 up to 400ºC. Thermal and catalytic hydro-processing were compared in terms of conversion and product stability. A comparison between the different crude oils was additionally derived in terms of SARA, initial micro-carbon content and virgin oil stability among other properties. Advantages of catalytic hydro-processing over thermal hydro-processing were evidenced, with UD catalysts playing an essential hydrogenating role while retarding coke formation; microcarbon and asphaltenes reduction in the presence of UD catalysts was observed. To evaluate the feasibility of recycling the UD catalysts, a micro-slurry recycled unit was developed as part of this research. These main results showed: (a) a successful design of this unit, (b) that temperature, LHSV and fractional recycling ratio have more impact on VGO conversion, while pressure has almost no effect, and (c) an UD catalysts agglomeration process was detected, however this process is slow and reversible.

  19. Attrition resistant catalysts and sorbents based on heavy metal poisoned FCC catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gangwal, S.; Jothimurugesan, K.

    1999-07-27

    A heavy metal poisoned, spent FCC catalyst is treated by chemically impregnating the poisoned catalyst with a new catalytic metal or metal salt to provide an attrition resistant catalyst or sorbent for a different catalytic or absorption process, such as catalysts for Fischer-Tropsh Synthesis, and sorbents for removal of sulfur gases from fuel gases and flue-gases. The heavy metal contaminated FCC catalyst is directly used as a support for preparing catalysts having new catalytic properties and sorbents having new sorbent properties, without removing or passivating the heavy metals on the spent FCC catalyst as an intermediate step.

  20. Attrition resistant catalysts and sorbents based on heavy metal poisoned FCC catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gangwal, Santosh (Cary, NC); Jothimurugesan, Kandaswamy (Hampton, VA)

    1999-01-01

    A heavy metal poisoned, spent FCC catalyst is treated by chemically impregnating the poisoned catalyst with a new catalytic metal or metal salt to provide an attrition resistant catalyst or sorbent for a different catalytic or absorption processes, such as catalysts for Fischer-Tropsh Synthesis, and sorbents for removal of sulfur gasses from fuel gases and flue-gases. The heavy metal contaminated FCC catalyst is directly used as a support for preparing catalysts having new catalytic properties and sorbents having new sorbent properties, without removing or "passivating" the heavy metals on the spent FCC catalyst as an intermediate step.

  1. deNOx catalysts for biomass combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Steffen Buus

    , however the alkali in biomass complicate matters. Alkali in biomass severely deactivates the catalyst used for the selective catalytic reduction in matter of weeks, hence a more alkali resistant catalyst is needed. In the thesis a solution to the problem is presented, the nano particle deNOx catalyst...

  2. Silver doped catalysts for treatment of exhaust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Paul Worn (Peoria, IL); Hester, Virgil Raymond (Edelstein, IL); Ragle, Christie Susan (Havana, IL); Boyer, Carrie L. (Shiloh, IL)

    2009-06-02

    A method of making an exhaust treatment element includes washcoating a substrate with a slurry that includes a catalyst support material. At least some of the catalyst support material from the slurry may be transferred to the substrate, and silver metal (Ag) is dispersed within the catalyst support material.

  3. Catalyst for selective oxidation of hydrocarbons

    OpenAIRE

    Álvaro Rodríguez, Mercedes; Amarajothi, Dhakshinamoorthy; García Gómez, Hermenegildo

    2010-01-01

    [EN] The present invention relates to a solid catalyst that includes a metal-organic reticular pattem and an agent promoting the generation of radicals, to a method for obtaining said catalyst and to the use thereof as a catalyst in the selective aerobic oxidation reaction ofhydrocarbons.

  4. Efficient epoxidation of propene using molecular catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markovits, Iulius I. E.; Anthofer, Michael H.; Kolding, Helene; Cokoja, Mirza; Pöthig, Alexander; Raba, Andreas; Herrmann, Wolfgang A.; Fehrmann, Rasmus; Kühn, Fritz E.

    2014-01-01

    The epoxidation of propene is performed in homogeneous phase using various molecular catalysts and H2O2 or tert-butyl hydroperoxide as oxidants. A comparison between some molybdenum catalysts and methyltrioxorhenium (MTO) shows that the well known Re catalyst is the best among the examined...

  5. Biotechnological processes for biodiesel production using alternative oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azocar, Laura; Ciudad, Gustavo [La Frontera Univ., Temuco (Chile). Nucleo Cietifico Tecnologico en Biorrecursos; Heipieper, Hermann J. [Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research-UFZ, Leipzig (Germany). Dept. of Environmental Biotechnology; Navia, Rodrigo [La Frontera Univ., Temuco (Chile). Nucleo Cietifico Tecnologico en Biorrecursos; La Frontera Univ., Temuco (Chile). Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica

    2010-10-15

    As biodiesel (fatty acid methyl ester (FAME)) is mainly produced from edible vegetable oils, crop soils are used for its production, increasing deforestation and producing a fuel more expensive than diesel. The use of waste lipids such as waste frying oils, waste fats, and soapstock has been proposed as low-cost alternative feedstocks. Non-edible oils such as jatropha, pongamia, and rubber seed oil are also economically attractive. In addition, microalgae, bacteria, yeast, and fungi with 20% or higher lipid content are oleaginous microorganisms known as single cell oil and have been proposed as feedstocks for FAME production. Alternative feedstocks are characterized by their elevated acid value due to the high level of free fatty acid (FFA) content, causing undesirable saponification reactions when an alkaline catalyst is used in the transesterification reaction. The production of soap consumes the conventional catalyst, diminishing FAME production yield and simultaneously preventing the effective separation of the produced FAME from the glycerin phase. These problems could be solved using biological catalysts, such as lipases or whole-cell catalysts, avoiding soap production as the FFAs are esterified to FAME. In addition, by-product glycerol can be easily recovered, and the purification of FAME is simplified using biological catalysts. (orig.)

  6. Alternative Fuel Research in Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surgenor, Angela D.; Klettlinger, Jennifer L.; Yen, Chia H.; Nakley, Leah M.

    2011-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center has recently constructed an Alternative Fuels Laboratory which is solely being used to perform Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) reactor studies, novel catalyst development and thermal stability experiments. Facility systems have demonstrated reliability and consistency for continuous and safe operations in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. The purpose of this test facility is to conduct bench scale Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalyst screening experiments while focusing on reducing energy inputs, reducing CO2 emissions and increasing product yields within the F-T process. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is considered a gas to liquid process which reacts syn-gas (a gaseous mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide), over the surface of a catalyst material which is then converted into liquids of various hydrocarbon chain length and product distributions1. These hydrocarbons can then be further processed into higher quality liquid fuels such as gasoline and diesel. The experiments performed in this laboratory will enable the investigation of F-T reaction kinetics to focus on newly formulated catalysts, improved process conditions and enhanced catalyst activation methods. Currently the facility has the capability of performing three simultaneous reactor screening tests, along with a fourth fixed-bed reactor used solely for cobalt catalyst activation.

  7. Perovskite catalysts for oxidative coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Kenneth D.

    1991-01-01

    Perovskites of the structure A.sub.2 B.sub.2 C.sub.3 O.sub.10 are useful as catalysts for the oxidative coupling of lower alkane to heavier hydrocarbons. A is alkali metal; B is lanthanide or lanthanum, cerium, neodymium, samarium, praseodymium, gadolinium or dysprosium; and C is titanium.

  8. Biodiesel production using heterogenous catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    The current transesterification of triacylglycerides (TAG) to produce biodiesel is based on the homogenous catalyst method using strong base such as hydroxides or methoxides. However, this method results in a number of problems: (1) acid pre-treatment is required of feedstocks high in free fatty ac...

  9. Improving Heterogeneous Catalyst Stability for Liquid-phase Biomass Conversion and Reforming

    OpenAIRE

    Héroguel, Florent Emmanuel; Rozmysłowicz, Bartosz; Luterbacher, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Biomass is a possible renewable alternative to fossil carbon sources. Today, many bio-resources can be converted to direct substitutes or suitable alternatives to fossil-based fuels and chemicals. However, catalyst deactivation under the harsh, often liquid-phase reaction conditions required for biomass treatment is a major obstacle to developing processes that can compete with the petrochemical industry. This review presents recently developed strategies to limit reversible and irreversible ...

  10. Biodiesel production from acid oils and ethanol using a solid basic resin as catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the search of an alternative fuel to substitute diesel fuel, biodiesel appears as one of the most promising sources of energy for diesel engines because of its environmental advantages and also due to the evolution of the petroleum market. Refined oil is the conventional raw material for the production of this biofuel; however, its major disadvantage is the high cost of its production. Therefore, frying oils, waste oils, crude oils and/or acid oils are being tested as alternative raw materials; nevertheless, there will be some problems if a homogeneous basic catalyst (NaOH) is employed due to the high amount of free fatty acid present in the raw oil. In this work, the transesterification reaction of acid oil using solid resin, Dowex monosphere 550 A, was studied as an alternative process. Ethanol was employed to have a natural and sustainable final product. The reaction temperature's effects, the initial amount of free fatty acid, the molar ratio of alcohol/oil and the type of catalyst (homogeneous or heterogeneous) over the main reaction are analyzed and their effects compared. The results obtained show that the solid resin is an alternative catalyst to be used to produce fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) by a transesterification reaction with a final conversion over 90%. On the other hand, the time required to achieve this conversion is bigger than the one required using conventional technology which employs a homogeneous basic catalyst. This reaction time needs to be optimized. (author)

  11. Toward Molecular Catalysts by Computer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raugei, Simone; DuBois, Daniel L.; Rousseau, Roger J.; Chen, Shentan; Ho, Ming-Hsun; Bullock, R. Morris; Dupuis, Michel

    2015-02-17

    Rational design of molecular catalysts requires a systematic approach to designing ligands with specific functionality and precisely tailored electronic and steric properties. It then becomes possible to devise computer protocols to predict accurately the required properties and ultimately to design catalysts by computer. In this account we first review how thermodynamic properties such as oxidation-reduction potentials (E0), acidities (pKa), and hydride donor abilities (ΔGH-) form the basis for a systematic design of molecular catalysts for reactions that are critical for a secure energy future (hydrogen evolution and oxidation, oxygen and nitrogen reduction, and carbon dioxide reduction). We highlight how density functional theory allows us to determine and predict these properties within “chemical” accuracy (~ 0.06 eV for redox potentials, ~ 1 pKa unit for pKa values, and ~ 1.5 kcal/mol for hydricities). These quantities determine free energy maps and profiles associated with catalytic cycles, i.e. the relative energies of intermediates, and help us distinguish between desirable and high-energy pathways and mechanisms. Good catalysts have flat profiles that avoid high activation barriers due to low and high energy intermediates. We illustrate how the criterion of a flat energy profile lends itself to the prediction of design points by computer for optimum catalysts. This research was carried out in the Center for Molecular Electro-catalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is operated for the DOE by Battelle.

  12. Thermo-Catalytic Methane Decomposition for Hydrogen Production: Effect of Palladium Promoter on Ni-based Catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Irene Lock Sow Mei; S.S.M. Lock; Dai-Viet N. Vo; Bawadi Abdullah

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen production from the direct thermo-catalytic decomposition of methane is a promising alternative for clean fuel production. However, thermal decomposition of methane can hardly be of any practical and empirical interest in the industry unless highly efficient and effective catalysts, in terms of both catalytic activity and operational lifetime have been developed. In this study, the effect of palladium (Pd) as a promoter onto Ni supported on alumina catalyst has been investigated by u...

  13. Preparation and characterization of bi-metallic nanoparticle catalyst having better anti-coking properties using reverse micelle technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharia, Thomas

    Energy needs are rising on an exponential basis. The mammoth energy sources like coal, natural gas and petroleum are the cause of pollution. The large outcry for an alternate energy source which is environmentally friendly and energy efficient is heard during the past few years. This is where “Clean-Fuel” like hydrogen gained its ground. Hydrogen is mainly produced by steam methane reforming (SMR). An alternate sustainable process which can reduce the cost as well as eliminate the waste products is Tri-reforming. In both these reforming processes nickel is used as catalyst. However as the process goes on the catalyst gets deactivated due to coking on the catalytic surface. This goal of this thesis work was to develop a bi-metallic catalyst which has better anti-coking properties compared to the conventional nickel catalyst. Tin was used to dope nickel. It was found that Ni3Sn complex around a core of Ni is coking resistant compared to pure nickel catalyst. Reverse micelle synthesis of catalyst preparation was used to control the size and shape of catalytic particles. These studies will benefit researches on hydrogen production and catalyst manufactures who work on different bi-metallic combinations.

  14. Synthesis of Ethanol from Syngas over Rh/MCM-41 Catalyst: Effect of Water on Product Selectivity

    OpenAIRE

    Luis Lopez; Jorge Velasco; Vicente Montes; Alberto Marinas; Saul Cabrera; Magali Boutonnet; Sven Järås

    2015-01-01

    The thermochemical processing of biomass is an alternative route for the manufacture of fuel-grade ethanol, in which the catalytic conversion of syngas to ethanol is a key step. The search for novel catalyst formulations, active sites and types of support is of current interest. In this work, the catalytic performance of an Rh/MCM-41 catalyst has been evaluated and compared with a typical Rh/SiO2 catalyst. They have been compared at identical reaction conditions (280 °C and 20 bar), at low ...

  15. Benign by design: catalyst-free in-water, on-water green chemical methodologies in organic synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawande, Manoj B; Bonifácio, Vasco D B; Luque, Rafael; Branco, Paula S; Varma, Rajender S

    2013-06-21

    Catalyst-free reactions developed during the last decade and the latest developments in this emerging field are summarized with a focus on catalyst-free reactions in-water and on-water. Various named reactions, multi-component reactions and the synthesis of heterocyclic compounds are discussed including the use of various energy input systems such as microwave- and ultrasound irradiation, among others. Organic chemists and the practitioners of this art both in academia and industry hopefully will continue to design benign methodologies for organic synthesis in aqueous media under catalyst-free conditions by using alternative energy inputs based on fundamental principles. PMID:23529409

  16. Hydroprocessing using regenerated spent heavy hydrocarbon catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This patent describes a process for hydroprocessing a hydrocarbon feedstock. It comprises: contacting the feedstock with hydrogen under hydroprocessing conditions with a hydroprocessing catalyst wherein the hydroprocessing catalyst contains a total contaminant metals build-up of greater than about 4 wt. % nickel plus vanadium, a hydrogenation component selected from the group consisting of Group VIB metals and Group VIII metals and is regenerated spent hydroprocessing catalyst regenerated by a process comprising the steps: partially decoking the spent catalyst in an initial coke-burning step; impregnating the partially decoked catalyst with a Group IIA metal-containing impregnation solution; and decoking the impregnated catalyst in a final coke-burning step wherein the impregnated catalyst is contacted with an oxygen-containing gas at a temperature of about 600 degrees F to about 1400 degrees F

  17. Autothermal reforming catalyst having perovskite structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumpel, Michael; Liu, Di-Jia

    2009-03-24

    The invention addressed two critical issues in fuel processing for fuel cell application, i.e. catalyst cost and operating stability. The existing state-of-the-art fuel reforming catalyst uses Rh and platinum supported over refractory oxide which add significant cost to the fuel cell system. Supported metals agglomerate under elevated temperature during reforming and decrease the catalyst activity. The catalyst is a perovskite oxide or a Ruddlesden-Popper type oxide containing rare-earth elements, catalytically active firs row transition metal elements, and stabilizing elements, such that the catalyst is a single phase in high temperature oxidizing conditions and maintains a primarily perovskite or Ruddlesden-Popper structure under high temperature reducing conditions. The catalyst can also contain alkaline earth dopants, which enhance the catalytic activity of the catalyst, but do not compromise the stability of the perovskite structure.

  18. OXIDATION OF PHENOL IN AQUEOUS SOLUTION WITH COPPER OXIDE CATALYSTS SUPPORTED ON γ-Al2O3, PILLARED CLAY AND TiO2: COMPARISON OF THE PERFORMANCE AND COSTS ASSOCIATED WITH EACH CATALYST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Pires

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation (CWAO of phenol using copper oxide catalysts supported by γ-Al2O3, TiO2, and pillared clay was evaluated to identify which of these catalysts was the most appropriate for this reaction. The CuO/PILC, CuO/γ-Al2O3 and CuO/TiO2 catalysts were the most successful at removing phenol and resulted in more than 96% conversion. Among these catalysts, CuO/γ-Al2O3 produced the largest amount of CO2, the lowest amount of intermediate products and the lowest amount of copper leaching. These results showed that the CuO/γ-Al2O3catalyst was the best for the end of the reaction. However, the methods used in this study did not allow us to identify the most appropriate reaction time (or catalyst. An alternative approach for this problem was to quantify the costs for each reaction time. Using this approach, the CuO/γ-Al2O3 catalyst was the most economically favorable catalyst when it was used during the first hour of the reaction.

  19. Heteropoly acid promoted V2O5/TiO2 catalysts for NO abatement with ammonia in alkali containing flue gases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Putluru, Siva Sankar Reddy; Jensen, Anker Degn; Riisager, Anders;

    2011-01-01

    catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO with ammonia. The SCR activity of heteropoly acid promoted catalysts was found to be much higher than for unpromoted catalysts. The stability of heteropoly acid promoted catalysts is dependent on calcination temperature and there is a gradual decrease in SCR activity and...... acidity with increase in calcination temperatures. Furthermore, the heteropoly acid promoted V2O5/TiO2 catalysts showed excellent alkali deactivation resistance and might therefore be alternative deNOx catalysts in biomass fired power plants.......V2O5/TiO2 and heteropoly acid promoted V2O5/TiO2 catalysts were prepared and characterized by N2 physisorption, XRPD and NH3-TPD. The influence of the calcination temperature from 400 to 700 1C on crystallinity and acidic properties was studied and compared with the activity for the selective...

  20. Catalyst for Carbon Monoxide Oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Patricia; Brown, Kenneth; VanNorman, John; Brown, David; Upchurch, Billy; Schryer, David; Miller, Irvin

    2010-01-01

    In many applications, it is highly desirable to operate a CO2 laser in a sealed condition, for in an open system the laser requires a continuous flow of laser gas to remove the dissociation products that occur in the discharge zone of the laser, in order to maintain a stable power output. This adds to the operating cost of the laser, and in airborne or space applications, it also adds to the weight penalty of the laser. In a sealed CO2 laser, a small amount of CO2 gas is decomposed in the electrical discharge zone into corresponding quantities of CO and O2. As the laser continues to operate, the concentration of CO2 decreases, while the concentrations of CO and O2 correspondingly increase. The increasing concentration of O2 reduces laser power, because O2 scavenges electrons in the electrical discharge, thereby causing arcing in the electric discharge and a loss of the energetic electrons required to boost CO2 molecules to lasing energy levels. As a result, laser power decreases rapidly. The primary object of this invention is to provide a catalyst that, by composition of matter alone, contains chemisorbed water within and upon its structure. Such bound moisture renders the catalyst highly active and very long-lived, such that only a small quantity of it needs to be used with a CO2 laser under ambient operating conditions. This object is achieved by a catalyst that consists essentially of about 1 to 40 percent by weight of one or more platinum group metals (Pt, Pd, Rh, Ir, Ru, Os, Pt being preferred); about 1 to 90 percent by weight of one or more oxides of reducible metals having multiple valence states (such as Sn, Ti, Mn, Cu, and Ce, with SnO2 being preferred); and about 1 to 90 percent by weight of a compound that can bind water to its structure (such as silica gel, calcium chloride, magnesium sulfate, hydrated alumina, and magnesium perchlorate, with silica gel being preferred). Especially beneficial results are obtained when platinum is present in the

  1. Catalytic decomposition of tar derived from wood waste pyrolysis using Indonesian low grade iron ore as catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicakso, Doni Rahmat; Sutijan, Rochmadi, Budiman, Arief

    2016-06-01

    Low grade iron ore can be used as an alternative catalyst for bio-tar decomposition. Compared to other catalysts, such as Ni, Rd, Ru, Pd and Pt, iron ore is cheaper. The objective of this research was to investigate the effect of using low grade iron ore as catalyst for tar catalytic decomposition in fixed bed reactor. Tar used in this experiment was pyrolysis product of wood waste while the catalyst was Indonesian low grade iron ore. The variables studied were temperatures between 500 - 600 °C and catalyst weight between 0 - 40 gram. The first step, tar was evaporated at 450 °C to produce tar vapor. Then, tar vapor was flowed to fixed bed reactor filled low grade iron ore. Gas and tar vapor from reactor was cooled, then the liquid and uncondensable gas were analyzed by GC/MS. The catalyst, after experiment, was weighed to calculate total carbon deposited into catalyst pores. The results showed that the tar components that were heavy and light hydrocarbon were decomposed and cracked within the iron ore pores to from gases, light hydrocarbon (bio-oil) and carbon, thus decreasing content tar in bio-oil and increasing the total gas product. In conclusion, the more low grade iron ore used as catalyst, the tar content in the liquid decrease, the H2 productivity increased and calorimetric value of bio-oil increased.

  2. Comparison of methods of molybdenum isolation from spent catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alternative methods are proposed of molybdenum precipitation from hydrochloric acid solutions (obtained during acidification of spent catalyst) as precipitations with higher amines or as MoS3 with degree of separation (from aqueous layer) 83-90 and 96-99 mass % respectively. For sulfuric acid media method of MoS3 precipitation with degree of separation 97-99 % is only suitable for variants considered. For molybdenum general separation from tarry organic residue its repeated washout by weak hydrochloric acid or sulfuric acid solutions is proposed

  3. Catalyst activity maintenance study for the liquid phase dimethyl ether process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, X.D.; Toseland, B.A.; Underwood, R.P. [Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, PA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The co-production of dimethyl ether (DME) and methanol from syngas is a process of considerable commercial attractiveness. DME coproduction can double the productivity of a LPMEOH process when using coal-derived syngas. This in itself may offer chemical producers and power companies increased flexibility and more profitable operation. DME is also known as a clean burning liquid fuel; Amoco and Haldor-Topsoe have recently announced the use of DME as an alternative diesel fuel. Moreover, DME can be an interesting intermediate in the production of chemicals such as olefins and vinyl acetate. The current APCl liquid phase dimethyl ether (LPDME) process utilizes a physical mixture of a commercial methanol synthesis catalyst and a dehydration catalyst (e.g., {gamma}-alumina). While this arrangement provides a synergy that results in much higher syngas conversion per pass compared to the methanol-only process, the stability of the catalyst system suffers. The present project is aimed at reducing catalyst deactivation both by understanding the cause(s) of catalyst deactivation and by developing modified catalyst systems. This paper describes the current understanding of the deactivation mechanism.

  4. Conversion of Isoprenoid Oil by Catalytic Cracking and Hydrocracking over Nanoporous Hybrid Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Kimura

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to produce petroleum alternatives from biomass, a significant amount of research has been focused on oils from microalgae due to their origin, which would not affect food availability. Nanoporous hybrid catalysts composed of ns Al2O3 and zeolites have been proven to be very useful compared to traditional catalysts in hydrotreating (HT, hydrocracking (HC, and catalytic cracking (CC of large molecules. To evaluate the reaction scheme and products from model isoprenoid compounds of microalgae oil, nanoporous hybrid catalyst technologies (CC: ns Al2O3/H-USY and ns Al2O3/H-GaAlMFI; HC: [Ni-Mo/γ-Al2O3]/ns Al2O3/H-beta were studied. The major product from CC on ns Al2O3/H-USY was highly aromatic gasoline, while the product from HC was half-isoparaffinic/olefinic kerosene. Although more than 50 wt% of the products from HT/CC on the USY catalyst was liquefied petroleum gas due to overcracking, the product from HT/CC on the MFI catalyst was high-octane-number gasoline. Delightfully, the product from HT/HC was kerosene and its average number was 11, with more than 80 wt% being isoparaffinic. As a result, it was demonstrated that hydrotreating may convert isoprenoid oil from microalgae over nanoporous hybrid catalysts into a variety of products.

  5. Conversion of isoprenoid oil by catalytic cracking and hydrocracking over nanoporous hybrid catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Toshiyuki; Liu, Chen; Li, Xiaohong; Maekawa, Takaaki; Asaoka, Sachio

    2012-01-01

    In order to produce petroleum alternatives from biomass, a significant amount of research has been focused on oils from microalgae due to their origin, which would not affect food availability. Nanoporous hybrid catalysts composed of ns Al₂O₃ and zeolites have been proven to be very useful compared to traditional catalysts in hydrotreating (HT), hydrocracking (HC), and catalytic cracking (CC) of large molecules. To evaluate the reaction scheme and products from model isoprenoid compounds of microalgae oil, nanoporous hybrid catalyst technologies (CC: ns Al₂O₃/H-USY and ns Al₂O₃/H-GaAlMFI; HC: [Ni-Mo/γ-Al₂O₃]/ns Al₂O₃/H-beta) were studied. The major product from CC on ns Al₂O₃/H-USY was highly aromatic gasoline, while the product from HC was half-isoparaffinic/olefinic kerosene. Although more than 50 wt% of the products from HT/CC on the USY catalyst was liquefied petroleum gas due to overcracking, the product from HT/CC on the MFI catalyst was high-octane-number gasoline. Delightfully, the product from HT/HC was kerosene and its average number was 11, with more than 80 wt% being isoparaffinic. As a result, it was demonstrated that hydrotreating may convert isoprenoid oil from microalgae over nanoporous hybrid catalysts into a variety of products. PMID:22791962

  6. Development of Advanced ISS-WPA Catalysts for Organic Oxidation at Reduced Pressure/Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ping; Nalette, Tim; Kayatin, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    The Water Processor Assembly (WPA) at International Space Station (ISS) processes a waste stream via multi-filtration beds, where inorganic and non-volatile organic contaminants are removed, and a catalytic reactor, where low molecular weight organics not removed by the adsorption process are oxidized at elevated pressure in the presence of oxygen and elevated temperature above the normal water boiling point. Operation at an elevated pressure requires a more complex system design compared to a reactor that could operate at ambient pressure. However, catalysts currently available have insufficient activity to achieve complete oxidation of the organic load at a temperature less than the water boiling point and ambient pressure. Therefore, it is highly desirable to develop a more active and efficient catalyst at ambient pressure and a moderate temperature that is less than water boiling temperature. This paper describes our efforts in developing high efficiency water processing catalysts. Different catalyst support structures and coating metals were investigated in subscale reactors and results were compared against the flight WPA catalyst. Detailed improvements achieved on alternate metal catalysts at ambient pressure and 200 F will also be presented in the paper.

  7. Biotemplated Palladium Catalysts Can Be Stabilized on Different Support Materials

    KAUST Repository

    Yates, Matthew D.

    2014-07-30

    © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim. Sustainably biotemplated palladium catalysts generated on different carbon-based support materials are examined for durability under electrochemical (oxidative) and mechanical-stress conditions. Biotemplated catalysts on carbon paper under both stresses retain 95% (at 0.6V) of the initial catalytic activity as opposed to 70% for carbon cloth and 60% for graphite. Graphite electrodes retain 95% of initial catalytic activity under a single stress. Using electrodeposited polyaniline (PANI) and polydimethylsiloxane binder increases the current density after the stress tests by 22%, as opposed to a 30% decrease for Nafion. PANI-coated electrodes retain more activity than carbon-paper electrodes under elevated mechanical (94 versus 70%) or increased oxidative (175 versus 62%) stress. Biotemplated catalytic electrodes may be useful alternatives to synthetically produce catalysts for some electrochemical applications. Sustainable electrode fabrication: The biotemplated synthesis of catalytic porous electrodes is a sustainable process and, according to the results of durability tests under electrochemical and mechanical stress, these electrodes (e.g. the Pd/carbon paper electrode shown in the picture) are durable enough to replace catalytic electrodes based on synthetic materials in certain applications.

  8. Water splitting on semiconductor catalysts under visible-light irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro Yerga, Rufino M; Alvarez Galván, M Consuelo; del Valle, F; Villoria de la Mano, José A; Fierro, José L G

    2009-01-01

    Sustainable hydrogen production is a key target for the development of alternative, future energy systems that will provide a clean and affordable energy supply. The Sun is a source of silent and precious energy that is distributed fairly all over the Earth daily. However, its tremendous potential as a clean, safe, and economical energy source cannot be exploited unless the energy is accumulated or converted into more useful forms. The conversion of solar energy into hydrogen via the water-splitting process, assisted by photo-semiconductor catalysts, is one of the most promising technologies for the future because large quantities of hydrogen can potentially be generated in a clean and sustainable manner. This Minireview provides an overview of the principles, approaches, and research progress on solar hydrogen production via the water-splitting reaction on photo-semiconductor catalysts. It presents a survey of the advances made over the last decades in the development of catalysts for photochemical water splitting under visible-light irradiation. The Minireview also analyzes the energy requirements and main factors that determine the activity of photocatalysts in the conversion of water into hydrogen and oxygen using sunlight. Remarkable progress has been made since the pioneering work by Fujishima and Honda in 1972, but he development of photocatalysts with improved efficiencies for hydrogen production from water using solar energy still faces major challenges. Research strategies and approaches adopted in the search for active and efficient photocatalysts, for example through new materials and synthesis methods, are presented and analyzed. PMID:19536754

  9. Characterization of Catalyst Materials for Production of Aerospace Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Lauren M.; De La Ree, Ana B.; Hepp, Aloysius F.

    2012-01-01

    Due to environmental, economic, and security issues, there is a greater need for cleaner alternative fuels. There will undoubtedly be a shift from crude oil to non-petroleum sources as a feedstock for aviation (and other transportation) fuels. Additionally, efforts are concentrated on reducing costs coupled with fuel production from non-conventional sources. One solution to this issue is Fischer-Tropsch gas-to-liquid technology. Fischer-Tropsch processing of synthesis gas (CO/H2) produces a complex product stream of paraffins, olefins, and oxygenated compounds such as alcohols and aldehydes. The Fisher-Tropsch process can produce a cleaner diesel oil fraction with a high cetane number (typically above 70) without any sulfur or aromatic compounds. This process is most commonly catalyzed by heterogeneous (in this case, silver and platinum) catalysts composed of cobalt supported on alumina or unsupported alloyed iron powders. Physisorption, chemisorptions, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) are described to better understand the potential performance of Fischer-Tropsch cobalt on alumina catalysts promoted with silver and platinum. The overall goal is to preferentially produce C8 to C18 paraffin compounds for use as aerospace fuels. Progress towards this goal will eventually be updated and achieved by a more thorough understanding of the characterization of catalyst materials. This work was supported by NASA s Subsonic Fixed Wing and In-situ Resource Utilization projects.

  10. Synthesis and Characterization of Cluster-Derived Supported Bimetallic Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Richard D; Amiridis, Michael D

    2008-10-10

    New procedures have been developed for synthesizing di- and tri-metallic cluster complexes. The chemical properties of the new complexes have been investigated, particularly toward the activation of molecular hydrogen. These complexes were then converted into bi- and tri-metallic nanoparticles on silica and alumina supports. These nanoparticles were characterized by electron microscopy and were then tested for their ability to produce catalytic hydrogenation of unsaturated hydrocarbons and for the preferential oxidation of CO in the presence of hydrogen. The bi- and tri-metallic nanoparticles exhibited far superior activity and selectivity as hydrogenation catalysts when compared to the individual metallic components. It was found that the addition of tin greatly improved the selectivity of the catalysts for the hydrogenation of polyolefins. The addition of iron improves the catalysts for the selective oxidation of CO by platinum in the presence of hydrogen. The observations should lead to the development of lower cost routes to molecules that can be used to produce polymers and plastics for use by the general public and for procedures to purify hydrogen for use as an alternative energy in the hydrogen economy of the future.

  11. HZSM-5 Catalyst for Cracking Palm Oil to Gasoline: A Comparative Study with and without Impregnation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achmad Roesyadi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available It is important to develop a renewable source of energy to overcome a limited source fossil energy. Palm oil is a potential alternative and environmental friendly energy resource in Indonesia due to high production capacity of this vegetable oil. The research studied effect of catalyst to selectivity of biofuel product from cracking of palm oil. The catalyst consisted of HZSM-5 catalyst with or without impregnation. The research was conducted in two steps, namely catalyst synthesized and catalytic cracking process. HZSM-5 was synthesized using Plank methods. The characterization of the synthesized catalysts used AAS (Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy and BET (Brunaueur Emmet Teller. The cracking was carried out in a fixed bed microreactor with diameter of 1 cm and length of 16 cm which was filled with 0.6 gram catalyst. The Zn/HZSM-5 catalyst was recommended for cracking palm oil for the high selectivity to gasoline. © 2013 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved.(Selected Paper from International Conference on Chemical and Material Engineering (ICCME 2012Received: 28th September 2012; Revised: 19th November 2012; Accepted: 20th December 2012[How to Cite: A. Roesyadi, D. Hariprajitno, N. Nurjannah, S.D. Savitri, (2013. HZSM-5 Catalyst for Cracking Palm Oil to Gasoline: A Comparative Study with and without Impregnation. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 7 (3: 185-190.(doi:10.9767/bcrec.7.3.4045.185-190][Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.7.3.4045.185-190 ] View in  |

  12. Bio-inspired MOF-based Catalysts for Lignin Valorization.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allendorf, Mark D.; Stavila, Vitalie; Ramakrishnan, Parthasarathi; Davis, Ryan Wesley

    2014-09-01

    Lignin is a potentially plentiful source of renewable organics, with ~50Mtons/yr produced by the pulp/paper industry and 200-300 Mtons/yr projected production by a US biofuels industry. This industry must process approximately 1 billion tons of biomass to meet the US Renewable Fuel goals. However, there are currently no efficient processes for converting lignin to value-added chemicals and drop-in fuels. Lignin is therefore an opportunity for production of valuable renewable chemicals, but presents staggering technical and economic challenges due to the quantities of material involved and the strong chemical bonds comprising this polymer. Aggressive chemistries and high temperatures are required to degrade lignin without catalysts. Moreover, chemical non-uniformity among lignins leads to complex product mixtures that tend to repolymerize. Conventional petrochemical approaches (pyrolysis, catalytic cracking, gasification) are energy intensive (400-800 degC), require complicated separations, and remove valuable chemical functionality. Low-temperature (25-200 degC) alternatives are clearly desirable, but enzymes are thermally fragile and incompatible with liquid organic compounds, making them impractical for large-scale biorefining. Alternatively, homogeneous catalysts, such as recently developed vanadium complexes, must be separated from product mixtures, while many heterogenous catalysts involve costly noble metals. The objective of this project is to demonstrate proof of concept that an entirely new class of biomimetic, efficient, and industrially robust synthetic catalysts based on nanoporous Metal- Organic Frameworks (MOFs) can be developed. Although catalytic MOFs are known, catalysis of bond cleavage reactions needed for lignin degradation is completely unexplored. Thus, fundamental research is required that industry and most sponsoring agencies are currently unwilling to undertake. We introduce MOFs infiltrated with titanium and nickel species as catalysts for

  13. Oxygen Assisted Dehydrogenation of Ethane over Alumina Supported Pt-Sn Catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Radstake, Paul B.

    2012-01-01

    The oxygen-assisted dehydrogenation of ethane (ODE) over supported Pt-Sn catalysts seems to be a promising alternative for the conventional steam cracking of ethane for the production of ethylene. However, despite the fact that much research has been performed on this catalytic system during the last years, little is known about the precise role of the Pt-Sn catalyst on the overall product distribution.The focus of this research work lay therefore on gaining a better understanding of the role...

  14. PdAu/C catalysts prepared by plasma sputtering for the electro-oxidation of glycerol

    OpenAIRE

    Mougenot, Mathieu; Caillard, Amaël; Simoes, Mario; Baranton, Steve; Coutanceau, Christophe; Brault, Pascal

    2011-01-01

    Co-sputtered Pd0.7Au0.3 catalyst and alternate sputtered Pd0.35Au0.3Pd0.35 and Au0.15Pd0.7Au0.15 materials were prepared by plasma deposition of Au and Pd atoms on a carbon diffusion layer. Atomic composition and metal loadings were evaluated from EDX and RBS, respectively. The low amount of metal deposited and the resulting low metallic film thickness made TEM and XRD characterizations difficult to perform, therefore, catalyst microstructures and surface compositions were determined from ele...

  15. Optimization of catalyst system reaps economic benefits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Champlin Refining and Chemicals Inc. is learning to optimize its catalyst systems for hydrotreating Venezuelan gas oils through a program of research, pilot plant testing, and commercial unit operation. The economic results of this project have been evaluated, and the benefits are most evident in improvements in product yields and qualities. The project has involved six commercial test runs, to date (Runs 10-15), with a seventh run planned. A summary of the different types of catalyst systems used in the test runs, and the catalyst philosophy that developed is given. Runs 10 and 11 used standard CoMo and NiMo catalysts for heavy gas oils hydrotreating. These catalysts had small pore sizes and suffered high deactivation rates because of metals contamination. When it was discovered that metals contamination was a problem, catalyst options were reviewed

  16. EFFECTS OF CATALYST MORPHOLOGY ON HYDROTREATING REACTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TYE CHING THIAN

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Due to the new environmental regulations for fuel quality, refineries need to process cleaner fuel. This requires an improvement in performance of hydrotreating catalysts. Improvements in catalyst activity require knowledge of the relationships between catalyst morphology and activity. Molybdenum sulfide, the generally agreed catalysts that give the best performance in hydrocracking and hydrotreating was investigated for its morphology effects on hydrotreating reactions. Three types of MoS2 catalysts with different morphology were studied. They are crystalline MoS2, exfoliated MoS2 and MoS2 derived from a precursor, molybdenum naphthenate. Exfoliated MoS2 with minimal long range order, with much higher rim edges has shown relative higher hydrogenation activity. Generally, results of MoS2 catalyst activities in hydrogenation, hydrodesulfurization, hydrodenitrogenation and hydrideoxy¬gena¬tion are in agreement with the rim-edge model.

  17. Steam gasification of carbon: Catalyst properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falconer, J.L.

    1991-09-16

    This research uses several techniques to measure the concentration of catalyst sites and determine their stoichiometry for the catalyzed gasification of carbon. Both alkali and alkaline earth oxides are effective catalysts for accelerating the gasification rate of coal chars, but only a fraction of the catalyst appears to be in a form that is effective for gasification, and the composition of that catalyst is not established. Transient techniques, with {sup 13}C labeling, are being used to study the surface processes, to measure the concentration of active sites, and to determine the specific reaction rates. We have used secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) for both high surface area samples of carbon/alkali carbonate mixtures and for model carbon surfaces with deposited alkali atoms. SIMS provides a direct measure of surface combination of these results can provide knowledge of catalyst dispersion and composition, and thus indicate the way to optimally utilize carbon gasification catalysts.

  18. Nanoparticular metal oxide/anatase catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention concerns a method of preparation of nanoparticular metal oxide catalysts having a narrow particle size distribution. In particular, the invention concerns preparation of nanoparticular metal oxide catalyst precursors comprising combustible crystallization seeds upon which th...... nitrogen oxides with ammonia or urea as reductant, oxidations of alcohols or aldehydes with dioxygen or air to provide aldehydes, ketones or carboxylic acids, and photocatalytic oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs).......The present invention concerns a method of preparation of nanoparticular metal oxide catalysts having a narrow particle size distribution. In particular, the invention concerns preparation of nanoparticular metal oxide catalyst precursors comprising combustible crystallization seeds upon which the...... catalyst metai oxide is co-precipitated with the carrier metal oxide, which crystallization seeds are removed by combustion in a final calcining step. The present invention also concerns processes wherein the nanoparticular metal oxide catalysts of the invention are used, such as SCR (deNOx) reactions of...

  19. Catalysts for decomposing ozone tail gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Chang-an; SUN De-zhi; WANG Hui; LI Wei

    2003-01-01

    The preparation of immobilizing-catalysts for decomposing ozone by using dipping method was studied. XRD, XPS and TEM were used to characterize the catalysts. The three kinds of catalysts were selected preferentially, and their catalytic activities were investigated. The results showed that the catalyst with activated carbon dipping acetate (active components are Mn: Cu = 3:2, active component proportion in catalyst is 15%, calcination temperature is 200℃ ) has the best catalytic activity for ozone decomposing. One gram of catalyst can decompose 17.6 g ozone at initial ozone concentration of 2.5 g/m3 and the residence time in reactor of 0.1 s. The experimental results also indicated that humidity of reaction system had negative effect on catalytic activity.

  20. Fischer-Tropsch Catalyst for Aviation Fuel Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLaRee, Ana B.; Best, Lauren M.; Bradford, Robyn L.; Gonzalez-Arroyo, Richard; Hepp, Aloysius F.

    2012-01-01

    As the oil supply declines, there is a greater need for cleaner alternative fuels. There will undoubtedly be a shift from crude oil to nonpetroleum sources as a feedstock for aviation (and other transportation) fuels. The Fischer-Tropsch process uses a gas mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen which is converted into various liquid hydrocarbons; this versatile gas-to-liquid technology produces a complex product stream of paraffins, olefins, and oxygenated compounds such as alcohols and aldehydes. The Fischer-Tropsch process can produce a cleaner diesel oil fraction with a high cetane number (typically above 70) without any sulfur and aromatic compounds. It is most commonly catalyzed by cobalt supported on alumina, silica, or titania or unsupported alloyed iron powders. Cobalt is typically used more often than iron, in that cobalt is a longer-active catalyst, has lower water-gas shift activity, and lower yield of modified products. Promoters are valuable in improving Fischer-Tropsch catalyst as they can increase cobalt oxide dispersion, enhance the reduction of cobalt oxide to the active metal phase, stabilize a high metal surface area, and improve mechanical properties. Our goal is to build up the specificity of the Fischer-Tropsch catalyst while adding less-costly transition metals as promoters; the more common promoters used in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis are rhenium, platinum, and ruthenium. In this report we will describe our preliminary efforts to design and produce catalyst materials to achieve our goal of preferentially producing C8 to C18 paraffin compounds in the NASA Glenn Research Center Gas-To-Liquid processing plant. Efforts at NASA Glenn Research Center for producing green fuels using non-petroleum feedstocks support both the Sub-sonic Fixed Wing program of Fundamental Aeronautics and the In Situ Resource Utilization program of the Exploration Technology Development and Demonstration program.

  1. Highly Selective Ruthenium Metathesis Catalysts for Ethenolysis

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Renee M.; Keitz, Benjamin K.; Champagne, Timothy M.; Grubbs, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    N-aryl, N-alkyl N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ruthenium metathesis catalysts are highly selective toward the ethenolysis of methyl oleate, giving selectivity as high as 95% for the kinetic, ethenolysis products over the thermodynamic, self-metathesis products. The examples described herein represent some of the most selective NHC-based ruthenium catalysts for ethenolysis reactions to date. Furthermore, many of these catalysts show unusual preference and stability toward propagating as a methyl...

  2. Examining the surfaces in used platinum catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Trumić B.; Stanković D.; Trujić V.

    2009-01-01

    For the purpose of finding more advanced platinum catalyst manufacturing technologies and achieving a higher degree of ammonia oxidation, metallographic characterization has been done on the surface of catalyst gauzes and catalyst gripper gauzes made from platinum and palladium alloys. For the examined samples of gauzes as well as the cross section of the wires, a chemical analysis was provided. The purpose of this paper is the metallographic characterization of examined alloys carried out by...

  3. Catalysts for Dehydrogenation of ammonia boranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinekey, Dennis M.

    2014-12-19

    Several effective homogeneous catalysts for the dehydrogenation of amine boranes have been developed. The best catalyst uses an iridium complex, and is capable of dehydrogenating H3NBH3 (AB) and CH3NH2BH3 (MeAB) at comparable rates. Thermodynamic measurements using this catalyst demonstrate that the dehydrogenation of AB and MeAB is substantially exothermic, which has important implications for regeneration.

  4. Manufacture of Catalyst Systems for Ammonia Conversion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAKH S.V.; SAVENKOV D.A.

    2012-01-01

    Platinum catalyst gauzes have been in use since the moment of development of the process of catalyst oxidation of ammonia for production of nitric acid or hydrocyanic acid.Catalyst gauzes are usually made of platinum or its alloys with rhodium and palladium.These precious metals have remarkable properties that make them ideal catalysts for acceleration of the ammonia/oxygen reaction.In 2008,OJSC "SIC ‘Supermetal’" and Umicore AG&Co.KG launched a production line for Pt-alloy-based catalyst systems to be used for ammonia oxidation in the production of weak nitric acid.Catalyst systems consist of a pack of catalyst gauzes and a pack of catchment gauzes,which are made using flat-bed knitting machines and wire-cloth looms.Today,up-to-date catalyst systems MKSpreciseTM are being manufactured,the basic advantages of which are an individual structure of gauzes and composition of the material,which allows to define precisely the position of each gauze in the catalyst pack,a high activity of the catalyst pack,direct catching of platinum and rhodium in the catalyst system,and a reasonable combination of single- and multilayer types of gauzes.This makes it possible to vary the configuration of the catalyst and select an optimum composition of the system to ensure the maximum efficiency of the ammonia oxidation process.We also produce the catchment systems that allow to find the best decision from the economic point view for each individual case.

  5. Thermally Stable, Latent Olefin Metathesis Catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Renee M.; Fedorov, Alexey; Keitz, Benjamin K.; Grubbs, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    Highly thermally stable N-aryl,N-alkyl N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ruthenium catalysts were designed and synthesized for latent olefin metathesis. These catalysts showed excellent latent behavior toward metathesis reactions, whereby the complexes were inactive at ambient temperature and initiated at elevated temperatures, a challenging property to achieve with second generation catalysts. A sterically hindered N-tert-butyl substituent on the NHC ligand of the ruthenium complex was found to i...

  6. Manganese and Iron Catalysts in Alkyd Paints and Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Hage

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Many paint, ink and coating formulations contain alkyd-based resins which cure via autoxidation mechanisms. Whilst cobalt-soaps have been used for many decades, there is a continuing and accelerating desire by paint companies to develop alternatives for the cobalt soaps, due to likely classification as carcinogens under the REACH (Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals legislation. Alternative driers, for example manganese and iron soaps, have been applied for this purpose. However, relatively poor curing capabilities make it necessary to increase the level of metal salts to such a level that often coloring of the paint formulation occurs. More recent developments include the application of manganese and iron complexes with a variety of organic ligands. This review will discuss the chemistry of alkyd resin curing, the applications and reactions of cobalt-soaps as curing agents, and, subsequently, the paint drying aspects and mechanisms of (model alkyd curing using manganese and iron catalysts.

  7. POLYMER-SUPPORTED LEWIS ACID CATALYSTS. VI. POLYSTYRENE-BONDED STANNIC CHLORIDE CATALYST

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RAN Ruicheng; FU Diankui

    1991-01-01

    A polystyrene-bonded stannic chloride catalyst was synthesized by the method of lithium polystyryl combined with stannic chloride. This catalyst is a polymeric organometallic compound containing 0.25 mmol Sn(IV)/g catalyst. The catalyst showed sufficient stability and catalytic activity in organic reaction such as esterification, acetalation and ketal formation, and it could be reused many times without losing its catalytic activity.

  8. Cationic ruthenium alkylidene catalysts bearing phosphine ligands

    OpenAIRE

    Endo, Koji; Grubbs, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of highly active catalysts and the success of ionic liquid immobilized systems have accelerated attention to a new class of cationic metathesis catalysts. We herein report the facile syntheses of cationic ruthenium catalysts bear-ing bulky phosphine ligands. Simple ligand exchange using silver(I) salts of non-coordinating or weakly coordinating anions pro-vided either PPh3 or chelating Ph2P(CH2)nPPh2 (n = 2 or 3) ligated cationic catalysts. The structures of these newly reported...

  9. Development of high performance catalyst for off-gas treatment system in BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high performance catalyst for off-gas treatment system in boiling water reactor (BWR) has been developed. The hydrogen concentration in the outlets of off-gas recombiners increased at several BWR plants in Japan. These phenomena were caused by deactivation of catalysts for the recombiners, and we assumed two types of deactivation mechanisms. The first cause was an increase of the amount of boehmite in the catalyst support due to alternation of the manufacturing process. The other cause was catalysts being poisoned by cyclic siloxanes that were introduced from the silicone sealant used in the upstream of the off-gas recombiners. The catalysts were manufactured by Pt adhering on alumina support. The conventional catalyst (CAT-A) used the aqueous solution of the chloroplatinic acid for adhesion of Pt. A dechlorination process by autoclave was applied to prevent the equipment at the downstream of the recombiners from stress corrosion cracking, but this process caused the support material to transform into boehmite. The boehmite-rich catalysts were deactivated more easily by organic silicon than gamma alumina-rich catalysts. Therefore, the CAT-A was replaced at many Japanese BWR plants by the improved catalyst (CAT-B), and their support was transformed into more stable gamma alumina by heating at 500degC. However, the siloxanes keep being detected in the off-gas though the source of siloxane had been removed and there still remain possibilities to deactivate the catalysts. Therefore, we have been developing high performance catalyst (CAT-C) that has higher activity and durability against poisoning. We investigated the properties of CAT-C by performance tests and instrumental analyses. The dependency of thermal output of nuclear reactor, and durability against siloxane poisoning were investigated. We found that CAT-C showed higher performance and better properties than CAT-B did. Moreover, we have been developing a modeling method to evaluate the hydrogen recombination

  10. POISON RESISTANT CATALYST DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrew W. Wang

    2001-03-29

    The Alternative Fuels Field Test Unit (AFFTU) is a portable laboratory designed specifically to provide on-site evaluation of potential feedstocks for processes that produce alternative fuels from indigenous raw materials such as coal, natural gas or environmentally disadvantaged carbonaceous feedstocks. Since conversion of these raw materials into feed gas streams can produce a variety of bulk gas compositions, which furthermore can contain a myriad of trace components, it is necessary to evaluate each new feedstock on an individual basis. While it is possible to prepare blended gas mixtures to simulate the bulk composition of a known feedstock, it is neither possible nor cost-effective to simulate adequately the variety of trace chemicals present in that feedstock--some of which may not even be detected by routine analysis. Additionally, the transient composition of the gas during upsets or routine process changes may have an impact on the proposed process that is not foreseen in standard design. To address these concerns, the AFFTU was constructed with the following experimental capabilities: (1) A state-of-the-art gas chromatograph system to perform semi-continuous monitoring of both bulk composition and the concentration of key trace poisons down to one part per billion (ppb). (2) A 30-mL reactor system that can accept up to two feed streams from the customer, allowing a true life test with the actual gas projected for use in the proposed facility. (3) A manifold of four adsorbent beds, located upstream of the reactor, which permits the testing of adsorbents for the removal of contaminants from the feed stream. The effectiveness of these adsorbents may be evaluated either by analysis of the gas upstream and downstream of the bed (or at an intermediate point within the bed) or by observing the impact of the presence or absence of that bed on the actual stability of the catalyst activity. To achieve portability, the AFFTU was constructed in a commercial 48-foot

  11. New Trends in Gold Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonarda F. Liotta

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Gold is an element that has fascinated mankind for millennia. The catalytic properties of gold have been a source of debate, due to its complete chemical inertness when in a bulk form, while it can oxidize CO at temperatures as low as ~200 K when in a nanocrystalline state, as discovered by Haruta in the late 1980s [1]. Since then, extensive activity in both applied and fundamental research on gold has been initiated. The importance of the catalysis by gold represents one of the fasted growing fields in science and is proven by the promising applications in several fields, such as green chemistry and environmental catalysis, in the synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes, as modifiers of Ni catalysts for methane steam and dry reforming reactions and in biological and electrochemistry applications. The range of reactions catalyzed by gold, as well as the suitability of different supports and the influence of the preparation conditions have been widely explored and optimized in applied research [2]. Gold catalysts appeared to be very different from the other noble metal-based catalysts, due to their marked dependence on the preparation method, which is crucial for the genesis of the catalytic activity. Several methods, including deposition-precipitation, chemical vapor deposition and cation adsorption, have been applied for the preparation of gold catalysts over reducible oxides, like TiO2. Among these methods, deposition-precipitation has been the most frequently employed method for Au loading, and it involves the use of tetrachloroauric (III acid as a precursor. On the other hand, the number of articles dealing with Au-loaded acidic supports is smaller than that on basic supports, possibly because the deposition of [AuCl4]− or [AuOHxCl4−x]− species on acidic supports is difficult, due to their very low point of zero charge. Despite this challenge, several groups have reported the use of acidic zeolites as supports for gold. Zeolites

  12. Thermodynamic Properties of Supported Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorte, Raymond J.

    2014-03-26

    The goals of this work were to develop Coulometric Titration as a method for characterizing the thermodynamic redox properties of oxides and to apply this technique to the characterization of ceria- and vanadia-based catalysts. The redox properties of ceria and vanadia are a major part of what makes these materials catalytically active but their properties are also dependent on their structure and the presence of other oxides. Quantifying these properties through the measurement of oxidation energetics was the goal of this work.

  13. Metal organic framework-mediated synthesis of highly active and stable Fischer-Tropsch catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Vera P; Wezendonk, Tim A; Jaén, Juan José Delgado; Dugulan, A Iulian; Nasalevich, Maxim A; Islam, Husn-Ubayda; Chojecki, Adam; Sartipi, Sina; Sun, Xiaohui; Hakeem, Abrar A; Koeken, Ard C J; Ruitenbeek, Matthijs; Davidian, Thomas; Meima, Garry R; Sankar, Gopinathan; Kapteijn, Freek; Makkee, Michiel; Gascon, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Depletion of crude oil resources and environmental concerns have driven a worldwide research on alternative processes for the production of commodity chemicals. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is a process for flexible production of key chemicals from synthesis gas originating from non-petroleum-based sources. Although the use of iron-based catalysts would be preferred over the widely used cobalt, manufacturing methods that prevent their fast deactivation because of sintering, carbon deposition and phase changes have proven challenging. Here we present a strategy to produce highly dispersed iron carbides embedded in a matrix of porous carbon. Very high iron loadings (>40 wt %) are achieved while maintaining an optimal dispersion of the active iron carbide phase when a metal organic framework is used as catalyst precursor. The unique iron spatial confinement and the absence of large iron particles in the obtained solids minimize catalyst deactivation, resulting in high active and stable operation. PMID:25740709

  14. Molecular molybdenum persulfide and related catalysts for generating hydrogen from water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Jeffrey R.; Chang, Christopher J.; Karunadasa, Hemamala I.; Majda, Marcin

    2016-04-19

    New metal persulfido compositions of matter are described. In one embodiment the metal is molybdenum and the metal persulfido complex mimics the structure and function of the triangular active edge site fragments of MoS.sub.2, a material that is the current industry standard for petroleum hydro desulfurization, as well as a promising low-cost alternative to platinum for electrocatalytic hydrogen production. This molecular [(PY5W.sub.2)MoS.sub.2].sup.x+ containing catalyst is capable of generating hydrogen from acidic-buffered water or even seawater at very low overpotentials at a turnover frequency rate in excess of 500 moles H.sub.2 per mole catalyst per second, with a turnover number (over a 20 hour period) of at least 19,000,000 moles H.sub.2 per mole of catalyst.

  15. Morphological transformation during activation and reaction of an iron Fischer-Tropsch catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, N.B.; Kohler, S.; Harrington, M. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this project is to support the development of slurry-phase bubble column processes being studied at the La Porte Alternative Fuel Development Unit. This paper describes the aspects of Sandia`s recent work regarding the advancement and understanding of the iron catalyst used in the slurry phase process. A number of techniques were used to understand the chemical and physical effects of pretreatment and reaction on the attrition and carbon deposition characteristics of iron catalysts. Unless otherwise stated, the data discussed was derived form experiments carried out on the catalyst chosen for the summer 1994 Fischer-Tropsch run at LaPorte, UCI 1185-78-370, (an L 3950 type) that is 88% Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 11% CuO, and 0.052%K{sub 2}O.

  16. Origin of low temperature deactivation of Ni5Ga3 nanoparticles as catalyst for methanol synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gardini, Diego; Sharafutdinov, Irek; Damsgaard, Christian Danvad;

    In an effort to find alternative energy sources capable to compete with fossil fuels, methanol synthesis could represent a realistic solution to store “green” hydrogen produced from electrolysis or photo-induced water splitting. Recently, density functional theory (DFT) calculations [1] proposed Ni...... catalyst for methanol production. Synthesis, followed by deactivation and a series of regeneration steps at increasing temperature in pure H2 has been carried out in a fixed-bed reactor connected to a gas chromatography system. In each regeneration step, CH4 is generated and the activity of the catalyst is......-Ga alloys as active catalysts for methanol production from syngas mixtures and Ni-Ga nanoparticles supported on highly porous silica have been prepared using an incipient wetness impregnation technique from a solution of nickel and gallium nitrates [2]. Tests conducted in a fixed-bed reactor showed that the...

  17. Palladium-tin catalysts for the direct synthesis of H₂O₂ with high selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freakley, Simon J; He, Qian; Harrhy, Jonathan H; Lu, Li; Crole, David A; Morgan, David J; Ntainjua, Edwin N; Edwards, Jennifer K; Carley, Albert F; Borisevich, Albina Y; Kiely, Christopher J; Hutchings, Graham J

    2016-02-26

    The direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) from H2 and O2 represents a potentially atom-efficient alternative to the current industrial indirect process. We show that the addition of tin to palladium catalysts coupled with an appropriate heat treatment cycle switches off the sequential hydrogenation and decomposition reactions, enabling selectivities of >95% toward H2O2. This effect arises from a tin oxide surface layer that encapsulates small Pd-rich particles while leaving larger Pd-Sn alloy particles exposed. We show that this effect is a general feature for oxide-supported Pd catalysts containing an appropriate second metal oxide component, and we set out the design principles for producing high-selectivity Pd-based catalysts for direct H2O2 production that do not contain gold. PMID:26917769

  18. Optimization of Rhodium-Based Catalysts for Mixed Alcohol Synthesis – 2012 Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, Mark A.; Gray, Michel J.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Thompson, Becky L.

    2012-11-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been conducting research to investigate the feasibility of producing mixed alcohols from biomass-derived synthesis gas (syngas). In recent years, this research has primarily involved the further development of catalysts containing rhodium and manganese based on the results of earlier catalyst screening tests. Testing continued in FY 2012 to further improve the Ir-promoted RhMn catalysts on both silica and carbon supports for producing mixed oxygenates from synthesis gas. This testing re-examined selected alternative silica and carbon supports to follow up on some uncertainties in the results with previous test results. Additional tests were conducted to further optimize the total and relative concentrations of Rh, Mn, and Ir, and to examine selected promoters and promoter combinations based on earlier results. To establish optimum operating conditions, the effects of the process pressure and the feed gas composition also were evaluated.

  19. Investigation into the Catalytic Activity of Microporous and Mesoporous Catalysts in the Pyrolysis of Waste Polyethylene and Polypropylene Mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaixin Li

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic pyrolysis behavior of synthesized microporous catalysts (conventional Zeolite Socony Mobil–5 (C-ZSM-5, highly uniform nanocrystalline ZSM-5 (HUN-ZSM-5 and β-zeolite, Mesoporous catalysts (highly hydrothermally stable Al-MCM-41 with accessible void defects (Al-MCM-41(hhs, Kanemite-derived folded silica (KFS-16B and well-ordered Al-SBA-15 (Al-SBA-15(wo were studied with waste polyethylene (PE and polypropylene (PP mixture which are the main constituents in municipal solid waste. All the catalysts were characterized by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD, and NH3-temperature programmed desorption (TPD. The results demonstrated that microporous catalysts exhibited high yields of gas products and high selectivity for aromatics and alkene, whereas the mesoporous catalysts showed high yields of liquid products with considerable amounts of aliphatic compounds. The differences between the microporous and mesoporous catalysts could be attributed to their characteristic acidic and textural properties. A significant amount of C2–C4 gases were produced from both types of catalysts. The composition of the liquid and gas products from catalytic pyrolysis is similar to petroleum-derived fuels. In other words, products of catalytic pyrolysis of plastic waste can be potential alternatives to the petroleum-derived fuels.

  20. Synthesis of Ethanol from Syngas over Rh/MCM-41 Catalyst: Effect of Water on Product Selectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Lopez

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The thermochemical processing of biomass is an alternative route for the manufacture of fuel-grade ethanol, in which the catalytic conversion of syngas to ethanol is a key step. The search for novel catalyst formulations, active sites and types of support is of current interest. In this work, the catalytic performance of an Rh/MCM-41 catalyst has been evaluated and compared with a typical Rh/SiO2 catalyst. They have been compared at identical reaction conditions (280 °C and 20 bar, at low syngas conversion (2.8% and at same metal dispersion (H/Rh = 22%. Under these conditions, the catalysts showed different product selectivities. The differences have been attributed to the concentration of water vapor in the pores of Rh/MCM-41. The concentration of water vapor could promote the water-gas-shift-reaction generating some extra carbon dioxide and hydrogen, which in turn can induce side reactions and change the product selectivity. The extra hydrogen generated could facilitate the hydrogenation of a C2-oxygenated intermediate to ethanol, thus resulting in a higher ethanol selectivity over the Rh/MCM-41 catalyst as compared to the typical Rh/SiO2 catalyst; 24% and 8%, respectively. The catalysts have been characterized, before and after reaction, by N2-physisorption, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, H2-chemisorption, transmission electron microscopy and temperature programmed reduction.

  1. Structured Perovskite-Based Catalysts and Their Application as Three-Way Catalytic Converters—A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvain Keav

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Automotive Three-Way Catalysts (TWC were introduced more than 40 years ago. Despite that, the development of a sustainable TWC still remains a critical research topic owing to the increasingly stringent emission regulations together with the price and scarcity of precious metals. Among other material classes, perovskite-type oxides are known to be valuable alternatives to conventionally used TWC compositions and have demonstrated to be suitable for a wide range of automotive applications, ranging from TWC to Diesel Oxidation Catalysts (DOC, from NOx Storage Reduction catalysts (NSR to soot combustion catalysts. The interest in these catalysts has been revitalized in the past ten years by the introduction of the concept of catalyst regenerability of perovskite-based TWC, which is in principle well applicable to other catalytic processes as well, and by the possibility to reduce the amounts of critical elements, such as precious metals without seriously lowering the catalytic performance. The aim of this review is to show that perovskite-type oxides have the potential to fulfil the requirements (high activity, stability, and possibility to be included into structured catalysts for implementation in TWC.

  2. Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Help a Friend Who Cuts? Complementary and Alternative Medicine KidsHealth > For Teens > Complementary and Alternative Medicine Print ... replacement. continue How Is CAM Different From Conventional Medicine? Conventional medicine is based on scientific knowledge of ...

  3. Assessment of the Pozzolanic Activity of a Spent Catalyst by Conductivity Measurement of Aqueous Suspensions with Calcium Hydroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Velázquez

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The pozzolanic activity of the spent catalyst produced by fluid catalytic cracking (FCC has been studied by various methods in recent years. However, no quick and easy method has been reported for this activity based on the associated studies. In this work, the pozzolanic activity of a spent catalyst was investigated by measuring its electrical conductivity in aqueous suspensions of pozzolan/calcium hydroxide. The behavior of the FCC catalyst residue was compared to that of reactive and inert materials of similar chemical compositions. Further, the influence of temperature on the suspension was studied, and also, a new method was proposed in which the pozzolan/calcium hydroxide ratio was varied (with the initial presence of solid Ca(OH2 in the system. It was concluded that the method is effective, fast and simple for evaluating the high reactivity of the catalyst. Therefore, this method is an alternative for the evaluation of the reactivity of pozzolanic materials.

  4. SnO2 nanocluster supported Pt catalyst with high stability for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tin oxide nanocluster (SnO2) with parallel nanorods was synthesized via a hard template method and explored as the anode catalyst support for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). Single cell test demonstrated that SnO2 supported Pt catalyst (Pt/SnO2) exhibited comparable anode performance with conventional Pt/C. Electrochemical measurements showed that Pt/SnO2 exhibited significantly enhanced electrochemical stability than Pt/C under high potential electro-oxidation and potential cycling. The Pt/SnO2 catalyst reserved most of its electrochemically active surface area (ECA) under 10 h potential hold at 1.6 V while its ECA degradation rate was one order of magnitude lower than Pt/C under potential cycling between 0.6 and 1.2 V. Therefore, SnO2 nanocluster can be considered as a promising alternative anode catalyst support for PEMFCs

  5. European workshop on spent catalysts. Book of abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    In 1999 and 2002 two well attended workshops on recycling, regeneration, reuse and disposal of spent catalysts took place in Frankfurt. This series has been continued in Berlin. The workshop was organized in collaboration with DGMK, the German Society for Petroleum and Coal Science and Technology. Contributions were in the following areas of catalyst deactivation: recycling of spent catalysts in chemical and petrochemical industry, recycling of precious metal catalysts and heterogenous base metal catalysts, legal aspects of transboundary movements, catalyst regeneration, quality control, slurry catalysts, commercial reactivation of hydrotreating catalysts. (uke)

  6. Immobilized Ruthenium Catalyst for Carbon Dioxide Hydrogenation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Min YU; Jin Hua FEI; Yi Ping ZHANG; Xiao Ming ZHENG

    2006-01-01

    Three kinds of cross linked polystyrene resin (PS) supported ruthenium complexes were developed as catalysts for the synthesis of formic acid from carbon dioxide hydrogenation. Many factors, such as the functionalized supports, solvents and ligands, could influence their activities and reuse performances greatly. These immobilized catalysts also offer the industrial advantages such as easy separation.

  7. Advances in Catalyst Deactivation and Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Calvin H. Bartholomew; Morris D. Argyle

    2015-01-01

    Catalyst deactivation, the loss over time of catalytic activity and/or selectivity, is a problem of great and continuing concern in the practice of industrial catalytic processes. Costs to industry for catalyst replacement and process shutdown total tens of billions of dollars per year. [...

  8. Advances in Catalyst Deactivation and Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calvin H. Bartholomew

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Catalyst deactivation, the loss over time of catalytic activity and/or selectivity, is a problem of great and continuing concern in the practice of industrial catalytic processes. Costs to industry for catalyst replacement and process shutdown total tens of billions of dollars per year. [...

  9. Hydrogenation catalyst based on modified carbon nanofibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work was to study the palladium-carboxylated carbon nanofibers (CNF) as a catalyst for the hydrogenation of nitrobenzene model reaction. It is shown that the efficiency of the catalyst obtained more than 6 times higher than that of the industrial counterpart (Pd/C).

  10. Ligand iron catalysts for selective hydrogenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Charles P.; Guan, Hairong

    2010-11-16

    Disclosed are iron ligand catalysts for selective hydrogenation of aldehydes, ketones and imines. A catalyst such as dicarbonyl iron hydride hydroxycyclopentadiene) complex uses the OH on the five member ring and hydrogen linked to the iron to facilitate hydrogenation reactions, particularly in the presence of hydrogen gas.

  11. Finite time extinction of superprocesses with catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Dawson, Donald A.; Fleischmann, Klaus; Mueller, Carl

    2000-01-01

    Consider a catalytic super-Brownian motion $X =X^\\Gamma$ with finite variance branching. Here “catalytic ” means that branching of the reactant $X$ is only possible in the presence of some catalyst. Our intrinsic example of a catalyst is a stable random measure $\\Gamma$ on $\\mathsf{R}$ of index $0

  12. Preparation of Structured Catalysts for VOC Oxidation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ludvíková, Jana; Jirátová, Květa; Kovanda, F.

    - : -, 2014, s. 155-156. ISBN N. [International Symposium on the Scientific Bases for the Preparation of Heterogeneous Catalysts /11./. Louvain-la-Neuve (BE), 06.07.2014-10.07.2014] Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : structured catalysts * transition metal oxides * VOC oxidation Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering

  13. Novel non-platinum metal catalyst material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel non-platinum metal catalyst material for use in low temperature fuel cells and electrolysers and to fuel cells and electrolysers comprising the novel non-platinum metal catalyst material. The present invention also relates to a novel method for synthesizing...

  14. Nanometals and colloids as catalyst precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boennemann, H.H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kohlenforschung (Germany)

    1995-12-01

    Mono- or plurimetallic nanometals and colloids stabilized by surfactant molecules are discussed as pre-prepared precursors for heterogeneous catalysts. This {open_quotes}precursor concept{close_quotes} provides a novel access to supported metal catalysts having active components of controlled particle size, intermetallic ratio and particle structure on surfaces. Possible applications will also be presented.

  15. The origin of organic pollutants from the combustion of alternative fuels: Phase 5/6 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidhu, S.; Graham, J.; Taylor, P.; Dellinger, B. [Univ. of Dayton, OH (United States). Research Inst.

    1998-05-01

    As part of the US Department of Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory program on alternative automotive fuels, the subcontractor has been conducting studies on the origin and fate of organic pollutants from the combustion of alternative fuels. Laboratory experiments were conducted simulating cold start of four alterative fuels (compressed natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, methanol-gasoline mix, and ethanol-gasoline mix) using a commercial three-way catalyst under fuel-lean conditions. This report summarizes the results of these experiments. It appears that temperature of the catalyst is a more important parameter for fuel conversion and pollutant formation than oxygen concentration or fuel composition.

  16. New catalysts for clean environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maijanen, A.; Hase, A. [eds.] [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    VTT launched a Research Programme on Chemical Reaction Mechanisms (CREAM) in 1993. The three-year programme (1993-1995) has focused on reaction mechanisms relevant to process industries and aimed at developing novel catalysts and biocatalysts for forest, food, and specialty chemicals industries as well as for energy production. The preliminary results of this programme have already been presented in the first symposium organized in Espoo in September 1994. To conclude the programme the second symposium is organized in Otaniemi, Espoo on January 29 - 30, 1996. Papers by 19 speakers and 17 poster presentations of the 1996 Symposium are included in this book. The Symposium consists of four sessions: Biotechnology for Natural Fibers Processing, New Biocatalysts, Catalysts for Clean Energy, and New Opportunities for Chemical Industry. The CREAM programme has tried to foresee solutions for the problems challenged by the public concern on environmental aspects, especially dealing with industrial processes and novel use of raw materials and energy. The programme has followed the basic routes that can lead to natural and simple solutions to develop processes in the fields of forest, food fine chemicals, and energy industry. This symposium presents the results of the programme to learn and further discuss together with the international experts that have been invited as keynote speakers. (author)

  17. Nanostructured Basic Catalysts: Opportunities for Renewable Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conner, William C; Huber, George; Auerbach, Scott

    2009-06-30

    This research studied and developed novel basic catalysts for production of renewable chemicals and fuels from biomass. We focused on the development of unique porous structural-base catalysts zeolites. These catalysts were compared to conventional solid base materials for aldol condensation, that were being commercialized for production of fuels from biomass and would be pivotal in future biomass conversion to fuels and chemicals. Specifically, we had studied the aldolpyrolysis over zeolites and the trans-esterification of vegetable oil with methanol over mixed oxide catalysts. Our research has indicated that the base strength of framework nitrogen in nitrogen substituted zeolites (NH-zeolites) is nearly twice as strong as in standard zeolites. Nitrogen substituted catalysts have been synthesized from several zeolites (including FAU, MFI, BEA, and LTL) using NH3 treatment.

  18. Biodiesel production from waste cooking oil using calcined scallop shell as catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Calcined scallop shell was used as low-cost and effective catalyst for biodiesel production. • BDF yield from waste cooking oil reached 86% at 65 °C with a catalyst loading amount of 5 wt%. • Calcined scallop shell showed good reusability. • Calcium glyceroxide played an important role on the reusability of calcined scallop shell. • Water in the waste cooking oil had negative effect on the catalytic activity of calcined scallop shell. - Abstract: Transesterification of waste cooking oil (WCO) and methanol by using calcined scallop shell (CSS) as catalyst was carried out in a closed system for biodiesel fuel (BDF) production. It is found that the optimum calcination temperature for the preparation of CSS was 1000 °C. The effects of transesterification temperature, reaction time, methanol/oil molar ratio and catalyst loading amount on the BDF yield were investigated. Compared with the commercial CaO, CSS showed higher catalytic activity and the BDF yield reached 86% at 65 °C with a catalyst loading amount of 5 wt% (WCO basis) and a reaction time of 2 h. The catalyst was reused for 5 cycles whilst the BDF yield decreased 23%. It is found that CaO in CSS was transferred to calcium glyceroxide after the transesterification reaction, and calcium glyceroxide also showed good catalytic activity and reusability. Furthermore, Water content in WCO had negative effect on BDF yield. It is found that BDF yield reduced 15% due to the occurring of saponification when the water content was increased from 0.64% to 2.48%. It is expected that CCS can be used as an alternative and cheap catalyst for the biodiesel production

  19. Preparation, characterization and application of heterogeneous solid base catalyst for biodiesel production from soybean oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A solid base catalyst was prepared by neodymium oxide loaded with potassium hydroxide and investigated for transesterification of soybean oil with methanol to biodiesel. After loading KOH of 30 wt.% on neodymium oxide followed by calcination at 600 oC, the catalyst gave the highest basicity and the best catalytic activity for this reaction. The obtained catalyst was characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), N2 adsorption-desorption measurements and the Hammett indicator method. The catalyst has longer lifetime and maintained sustained activity after being used for five times, and were noncorrosive and environmentally benign. The separate effects of the molar ratio of methanol to oil, reaction temperature, mass ratio of catalyst to oil and reaction time were investigated. The experimental results showed that a 14:1 M ratio of methanol to oil, addition of 6.0% catalyst, 60 oC reaction temperature and 1.5 h reaction time gave the best results and the biodiesel yield of 92.41% was achieved. The properties of obtained biodiesel are close to commercial diesel fuel and is rated as a realistic fuel as an alternative to diesel. -- Highlights: → Screenings of load and support. → Screenings of loading amount and calcination temperature. → Characterizations (XRD, FTIR, SEM, TGA, N2 adsorption-desorption and the Hammett indicator). → Catalyst was used to convert soybean oil to biodiesel. → Determinations of the properties of biodiesel (density, cetane number, flash point, cold filter plugging point, acid number, water content, ash content and total glycerol content).

  20. A study on production of biodiesel using a novel solid oxide catalyst derived from waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majhi, Samrat; Ray, Srimanta

    2016-05-01

    The issues of energy security, dwindling supply and inflating price of fossil fuel have shifted the global focus towards fuel of renewable origin. Biodiesel, having renewable origin, has exhibited great potential as substitute for fossil fuels. The most common route of biodiesel production is through transesterification of vegetable oil in presence of homogeneous acid or base or solid oxide catalyst. But, the economics of biodiesel is not competitive with respect to fossil fuel due to high cost of production. The vegetable oil waste is a potential alternative for biodiesel production, particularly when disposal of used vegetable oil has been restricted in several countries. The present study evaluates the efficacy of a low-cost solid oxide catalyst derived from eggshell (a food waste) in transesterification of vegetable oil and simulated waste vegetable oil (SWVO). The impact of thermal treatment of vegetable oil (to simulate frying operation) on transesterification using eggshell-derived solid oxide catalyst (ESSO catalyst) was also evaluated along with the effect of varying reaction parameters. The study reported that around 90 % biodiesel yield was obtained with vegetable oil at methanol/oil molar ratio of 18:1 in 3 h reaction time using 10 % ESSO catalyst. The biodiesel produced with ESSO catalyst from SWVO, thermally treated at 150 °C for 24 h, was found to conform with the biodiesel standard, but the yield was 5 % lower compared to that of the untreated oil. The utilization of waste vegetable oil along with waste eggshell as catalyst is significant for improving the overall economics of the biodiesel in the current market. The utilization of waste for societal benefit with the essence of sustainable development is the novelty of this work. PMID:26154033

  1. Depleted uranium management alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report evaluates two management alternatives for Department of Energy depleted uranium: continued storage as uranium hexafluoride, and conversion to uranium metal and fabrication to shielding for spent nuclear fuel containers. The results will be used to compare the costs with other alternatives, such as disposal. Cost estimates for the continued storage alternative are based on a life-cycle of 27 years through the year 2020. Cost estimates for the recycle alternative are based on existing conversion process costs and Capital costs for fabricating the containers. Additionally, the recycle alternative accounts for costs associated with intermediate product resale and secondary waste disposal for materials generated during the conversion process

  2. Multi-Directional Growth of Aligned Carbon Nanotubes Over Catalyst Film Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Kai

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The structure of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs severely depends on the properties of pre-prepared catalyst films. Aiming for the preparation of precisely controlled catalyst film, atomic layer deposition (ALD was employed to deposit uniform Fe2O3 film for the growth of CNT arrays on planar substrate surfaces as well as the curved ones. Iron acetylacetonate and ozone were introduced into the reactor alternately as precursors to realize the formation of catalyst films. By varying the deposition cycles, uniform and smooth Fe2O3 catalyst films with different thicknesses were obtained on Si/SiO2 substrate, which supported the growth of highly oriented few-walled CNT arrays. Utilizing the advantage of ALD process in coating non-planar surfaces, uniform catalyst films can also be successfully deposited onto quartz fibers. Aligned few-walled CNTs can be grafted on the quartz fibers, and they self-organized into a leaf-shaped structure due to the curved surface morphology. The growth of aligned CNTs on non-planar surfaces holds promise in constructing hierarchical CNT architectures in future.

  3. Direct decomposition of methane over SBA-15 supported Ni, Co and Fe based bimetallic catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Synthesis and characterization of Ni, Co and Fe based bimetallic catalysts supported over SBA-15. • Thermocatalytic decomposition of methane over the SBA-15 supported bimetallic catalysts. • Enhanced catalytic efficiency of the bimetallic catalysts for the production of COx free hydrogen and nanocarbon. • Production of value added open tip hollow multi-walled carbon nanotubes. • Crystalline characterization of carbon nanotubes by XRD, Raman and thermogravimetric analysis. - Abstract: Thermocatalytic decomposition of methane is an alternative route for the production of COx-free hydrogen and carbon nanomaterials. In this work, a set of novel Ni, Co and Fe based bimetallic catalysts supported over mesoporous SBA-15 was synthesized by a facile wet impregnation route, characterized for their structural, textural and reduction properties and were successfully used for the methane decomposition. The fine dispersion of metal oxide particles on the surface of SBA-15, without affecting its mesoporous texture was clearly shown in the low angle X-ray diffraction patterns and the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images. The nitrogen sorption analysis showed the reduced specific surface area and pore volume of SBA-15, after metal loading due to the partial filling of hexagonal mesopores by metal species. The results of methane decomposition experiments indicated that all of the bimetallic catalysts were highly active and stable for the reaction at 700 °C even after 300 min of time on stream (TOS). However, a maximum hydrogen yield of ∼56% was observed for the NiCo/SBA-15 catalyst within 30 min of TOS. A high catalytic stability was shown by the CoFe/SBA-15 catalyst with 51% of hydrogen yield during the course of reaction. The catalytic stability of the bimetallic catalysts was attributed to the formation of bimetallic alloys. Moreover, the deposited carbons were found to be in the form of a new set of hollow multi

  4. Direct decomposition of methane over SBA-15 supported Ni, Co and Fe based bimetallic catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pudukudy, Manoj, E-mail: manojpudukudy@gmail.com [Fuel Cell Institute, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, UKM, Bangi 43600, Selangor (Malaysia); Department of Chemical and Process Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, UKM, Bangi 43600, Selangor (Malaysia); Yaakob, Zahira, E-mail: zahirayaakob65@gmail.com [Department of Chemical and Process Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, UKM, Bangi 43600, Selangor (Malaysia); Akmal, Zubair Shamsul [Department of Chemical and Process Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, UKM, Bangi 43600, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Synthesis and characterization of Ni, Co and Fe based bimetallic catalysts supported over SBA-15. • Thermocatalytic decomposition of methane over the SBA-15 supported bimetallic catalysts. • Enhanced catalytic efficiency of the bimetallic catalysts for the production of CO{sub x} free hydrogen and nanocarbon. • Production of value added open tip hollow multi-walled carbon nanotubes. • Crystalline characterization of carbon nanotubes by XRD, Raman and thermogravimetric analysis. - Abstract: Thermocatalytic decomposition of methane is an alternative route for the production of CO{sub x}-free hydrogen and carbon nanomaterials. In this work, a set of novel Ni, Co and Fe based bimetallic catalysts supported over mesoporous SBA-15 was synthesized by a facile wet impregnation route, characterized for their structural, textural and reduction properties and were successfully used for the methane decomposition. The fine dispersion of metal oxide particles on the surface of SBA-15, without affecting its mesoporous texture was clearly shown in the low angle X-ray diffraction patterns and the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images. The nitrogen sorption analysis showed the reduced specific surface area and pore volume of SBA-15, after metal loading due to the partial filling of hexagonal mesopores by metal species. The results of methane decomposition experiments indicated that all of the bimetallic catalysts were highly active and stable for the reaction at 700 °C even after 300 min of time on stream (TOS). However, a maximum hydrogen yield of ∼56% was observed for the NiCo/SBA-15 catalyst within 30 min of TOS. A high catalytic stability was shown by the CoFe/SBA-15 catalyst with 51% of hydrogen yield during the course of reaction. The catalytic stability of the bimetallic catalysts was attributed to the formation of bimetallic alloys. Moreover, the deposited carbons were found to be in the form of a new set of hollow

  5. Alternating polyesteramides based on 1,4-butylene terephthalamide: 3. Alternating polyesteramides based on mixtures of linear diols (4NTm,p)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serrano, P.J.M.; Werff, van der B.A.; Gaymans, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    Strictly alternating polyesteramides consisting of 1,4-butylene terephthalamide diester and mixtures of aliphatic diols have been synthesised in the melt in the presence of a titanium catalyst. To increase the molecular weight a solid state post condensation was applied. The composition was determin

  6. Techno-economic study of different alternatives for biodiesel production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biodiesel has become an attractive diesel fuel substitute due to its environmental benefits since it can be made from renewable resource. However, the high costs surrounding biodiesel production remains the main problem in making it competitive in the fuel market either as a blend or as a neat fuel. More than 80% of the production cost is associated with the feedstock itself and consequently, efforts are focused on developing technologies capable of using lower-cost feedstocks, such as recycled cooking oils and wastes from animal or vegetable oil processing operations. The main issue with spent oils is the high level of free fatty acids found in the recycled materials. The conventional technology employs sodium methoxide as a homogeneous base catalyst for the transesterification reaction and illustrates the drawbacks in working with feedstocks that contain high levels of free fatty acids. On the other hand, homogeneous acidic catalysts are being used for exactly such feedstocks. Both acid and basic homogeneous catalyzed processes require downstream purification equipment to neutralize the catalyst and to purify the biodiesel as well as the glycerol. Recent studies have been conducted to employ heterogeneous catalysts, such acidic or basic solid resins, or immobilized lipases. These catalysts will allow the use of different feedstocks that will permit operation at lower investment costs and will require less downstream process equipment. A conceptual design of these alternative production plants has been done with a techno-economic analysis in order to compare these alternatives. A process simulator was employed to carry out the conceptual design and simulation of each technology. Using these models it was possible to analyze different scenarios and to evaluate productivity, raw material consumption, economic competitiveness, and environmental impacts of each process. (author)

  7. Catalysts, Protection Layers, and Semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chorkendorff, Ib

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen is the simplest solar fuel to produce and in this presentation we shall give a short overview of the pros and cons of various tandem devices [1]. The large band gap semiconductor needs to be in front, but apart from that we can chose to have either the anode in front or back using either...... acid or alkaline conditions. Since most relevant semiconductors are very prone to corrosion the advantage of using buried junctions and using protection layers offering shall be discussed [2-4]. Next we shall discuss the availability of various catalysts for being coupled to these protections layers...... and how their stability may be evaluated [5, 6]. Examples of half-cell reaction using protection layers for both cathode and anode will be discussed though some of recent examples under both alkaline and acidic conditions. Si is a very good low band gap semiconductor and by using TiO2 as a protection...

  8. Comparative investigations of zeolite catalyst deactivation by coking in the conversion of methanol to hydrocarbons

    OpenAIRE

    Evensen, Kjetil Gurholt

    2014-01-01

    With large countries as India and China in tremendous development accompanied by a growing worldwide population, questions arise in how energy demands can be met in the post-oil society. The methanol-to-hydrocarbon process, catalysed by Brønsted acidic zeolites, constitutes an alternative route for the production of gasoline and other valuable hydrocarbons from feedstocks such as natural gas and coal. Catalyst deactivation by coke formation is nevertheless a big concern, and a better understa...

  9. Development of methane oxidation catalysts for different gas turbine combustor concepts

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksson, Sara

    2005-01-01

    Due to continuously stricter regulations regarding emissions from power generation processes, development of existing gas turbine combustors is essential. A promising alternative to conventional flame combustion in gas turbines is catalytic combustion, which can result in ultra low emission levels of NOx, CO and unburned hydrocarbons. The work presented in this thesis concerns the development of methane oxidation catalysts for gas turbine combustors. The application of catalytic combustion to...

  10. Development of catalysts for natural gas-fired gas turbine combustors

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksson, Sara

    2006-01-01

    Due to continuously stricter regulations regarding emissions from power generation processes, further development of existing gas turbine combustors is essential. A promising alternative to conventional flame combustion in gas turbines is catalytic combustion, which can result in ultralow emission levels of NOx, CO and unburned hydrocarbons. The work presented in this thesis concerns the development of methane oxidation catalysts for gas turbine combustors. The application of catalytic combus...

  11. Reaction pathways involved in CH4 conversion on Pd/Al2O3 catalysts : TAP as a powerful tool for the elucidation of the effective role of the metal/support interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal eGRANGER

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Temporal Analysis of Products (TAP reactor offers an alternative to draw direct structure/activity relationships checked on Natural Gas-fuelled Vehicle (NGV catalysts Determination of accurate kinetic constants for methane adsorption from single pulse experiments and subsequent investigation of sequential surface reactions from alternative CH4/O2 pulse experiments provides a straightforward visualization of the involvement of the metal/support interface on freshly-prepared catalysts and the loss of this effect on aged single palladium based catalysts.

  12. Polyphase alternating codes

    CERN Document Server

    Markkanen, Markku

    2007-01-01

    This work introduces a method for constructing polyphase alternating codes in which the length of a code transmission cycle can be $p^m$ or $p-1$, where $p$ is a prime number and $m$ is a positive integer. The relevant properties leading to the construction alternating codes and the algorithm for generating alternating codes is described. Examples of all practical and some not that practical polyphase code lengths are given.

  13. Alternative Solar Indices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lantz, L.J.

    1980-07-01

    Possible alternative Solar Indices which could either be a perturbation from the currently defined Solar Index or possible indices based on current technologies for other media markets are discussed. An overview is given of the current project, including the logic that was utilized in defining its current structure and then alternative indices and definitions are presented and finally, recommendations are made for adopting alternative indices.

  14. On an Alternative Cosmology

    OpenAIRE

    Vankov, A.

    1998-01-01

    The suggested alternative cosmology is based on the idea of barion symmetric universe, in which our home universe is a representative of multitude of typical matter and antimatter universes. This alternative concept gives a physically reasonable explanation of all major problems of the Standard Cosmological Model. Classification Code MSC: Cosmology 524.8 Key words: standard cosmological model, alternative cosmology, barionic symmetry, typical universe, quasars, cosmic rays.

  15. Complex Alternative Splicing

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Jung Woo; Graveley, Brenton R.

    2007-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a powerful means of controlling gene expression and increasing protein diversity. Most genes express a limited number of mRNA isoforms, but there are several examples of genes that use alternative splicing to generate hundreds, thousands, and even tens of thousands of isoforms. Collectively such genes are considered to undergo complex alternative splicing. The best example is the Drosophila Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule (Dscam) gene, which can generate 38,016 is...

  16. Characterization of three-way automotive catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenik, E.A.; More, K.L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States); LaBarge, W. [General Motors-AC Delco Systems, Flint, MI (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    This has been the second year of a CRADA between General Motors - AC Delco Systems (GM-ACDS) and Martin Marietta Energy Systems (MMES) aimed at improved performance/lifetime of platinum-rhodium based three-way-catalysts (TWC) for automotive emission control systems. While current formulations meet existing emission standards, higher than optimum Pt-Rh loadings are often required. In additionk, more stringent emission standards have been imposed for the near future, demanding improved performance and service life from these catalysts. Understanding the changes of TWC conversion efficiency with ageing is a critical need in improving these catalysts.

  17. Oxide catalysts for oxidation of xylene

    OpenAIRE

    Kusman Dossumov; Dina Churina; E. Tulibaev

    2013-01-01

    Polioxide granulated catalysts based on transition and rare earth metals for oxidative conversion of xylene by oxygen have been investigated. It was defined the effect of the composition and concentration of the active phase of oxide catalysts: Cu-Mn-Ln; Cu-Mn-Ce and Cu-Mn-Nd on the o-xylene oxidation. It was found that the Cu-Mn-Ce catalyst has the highest activity at the concentrations of metals: copper – 3.0%; manganese – 3.0%; cerium – 1.0%.

  18. Tungsten imido catalysts for selective ethylene dimerisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Christopher M R; Turner, Zoë R; Buffet, Jean-Charles; O'Hare, Dermot

    2016-02-14

    A tungsten imido complex W(NDipp)Me3Cl (Dipp = 2,6-(i)Pr-C6H3) is active for the selective dimerisation of ethylene to yield 1-butene under mild conditions. Immobilisation and activation of W(NDipp)Cl4(THF) on layered double hydroxides, silica or polymethylaluminoxane yields active solid state catalysts for the selective dimerisation of ethylene. The polymethylaluminoxane-based catalyst displays a turnover frequency (4.0 molC2H4 molW(-1) h(-1)) almost 7 times that of the homogeneous catalyst. PMID:26779579

  19. Alternators. Experience feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Study of the technical aspects of various accidents having occured on nuclear alternators operating in the French 900 MW nuclear plant unit, and the respective solutions and possibilities for application to alternators of the 1000 and 1500 MW power plants. Analysis of the accidents on CP 1 program alternators: accidents caused by vibratory fatigue (cracking of the hydraulic connection pipes of the stator winding, cracking of the hydraulic-electric connection between the stator coiling and the output terminals, cracking of the hydrogen cooler finned tubes), pollution by copper oxide of the stator winding cooling water circuit. Accidents on CP 2 alternators: accident on the shaft sealing joint, striking inside the terminal box

  20. Supported catalyst systems and method of making biodiesel products using such catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Manhoe; Yan, Shuli; Salley, Steven O.; Ng, K. Y. Simon

    2015-10-20

    A heterogeneous catalyst system, a method of preparing the catalyst system and a method of forming a biodiesel product via transesterification reactions using the catalyst system is disclosed. The catalyst system according to one aspect of the present disclosure represents a class of supported mixed metal oxides that include at least calcium oxide and another metal oxide deposited on a lanthanum oxide or cerium oxide support. Preferably, the catalysts include CaO--CeO.sub.2ZLa.sub.2O.sub.3 or CaO--La.sub.2O.sub.3/CeO.sub.2. Optionally, the catalyst may further include additional metal oxides, such as CaO--La.sub.2O.sub.3--GdOxZLa.sub.2O.sub.3.

  1. Electrochemical oxidation of sodium borohydride on carbon supported Pt-Zn nanoparticle bimetallic catalyst and its implications to direct borohydride-hydrogen peroxide fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The Pt-Zn/C catalyst as anode catalyst for DBHFC were facilely synthesized. • The average particle size of Pt-Zn bimetallic nanoparticles is approximately 2.5 nm. • The Zn-doping can apparently improve the catalytic activity for BH4− electrochemical oxidation. • The maximum power density of DBHFC employing Pt-Zn/C as anode catalyst is as high as 79.9 mW cm−2 at 79.5 mA cm−2 and 25 °C. - Abstract: Carbon supported Pt-Zn bimetallic nanoparticle electrocatalysts (Pt-Zn/C) are facilely prepared by a modified NaBH4 reduction method in aqueous solution at room temperature and investigated as alternative anode catalysts for direct borohydride-hydrogen peroxide fuel cell (DBHFC). The physical and electrochemical properties of the as-prepared nanospherical electrocatalysts are investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), cyclic voltammetry (CV), chronoamperometry (CA) and fuel cell test. Based on results of TEM and XRD, the Pt-Zn nanoparticles show average particle size of approximately 2.5 nm on the carbon surface. The fundamental electrochemical results show that the Pt-Zn/C catalysts exhibit much higher catalytic activity and stability for the direct oxidation of BH4− than Pt/C catalyst since Pt atoms are partly substituted by Zn atoms in Pt-Zn catalyst. Among various Pt-Zn catalysts with different compositions, the Pt67Zn33/C catalyst presents the highest catalytic activity for BH4− electrooxidation. The DBHFC using Pt67Zn33/C as anode catalyst and Pt/C as cathode catalyst obtains the maximum power density as high as 79.9 mW cm−2 at 79.5 mA cm−2 and 25 °C

  2. The effects of carbon deposition on catalyst deactivation in high temperature Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Patterson, Veronica A.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, carbonaceous deposits on spent HTFT catalysts were investigated. This research was required in order to better understand the observed loss in productivity observed in the industrial reactors, with the aim of improving the economy of the HTFT process. A host of complementary techniques were employed to systematically determine the composition of a typical catalyst recovered from a reactor. Spent HTFT catalysts are comprised of magnetite and a mixture of iron carbides as well as ...

  3. Advances in HDS catalysts design: relation between catalyst structure and feed composition

    OpenAIRE

    Kagami, Narinobu

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this work is to propose a better understanding of ultra deep HDS for diesel, to contribute to the development of advanced catalysts. The characterization of catalyst structure was examined by XRD, TPR, TPS and Raman spectroscopy. The ranking of catalytic activities were tested using various model compounds, such as thiophenes and dibenzothiophenes. The catalyst with higher stacking type active phase has weaker interaction with the support and can maintain high metal dispersion at h...

  4. The Effect of Time dealumination and Solvent Concentration in Synthesis of Zeolite Catalyst and Catalytic Test for DiEthyl Ether Production Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ethanol is an alternative energy, but its has three distinct disadvantages as a transportation fuel. Its availability is currently limited, and it has a lower volumetric heating value and a lower Reid vapour pressure (RVP) than gasoline. This paper focuses for this disadvantages and to solve this problem can do with converts ethanol to DiEthyl Ether product. This research produced DiEthyl Ether by ethanol dehydration process with zeolite as catalyst. The catalyst synthesis from natural material from District Gunung Kidul, Indonesia. The catalyst produced with dealumination, neutralization, drying and calcination processes. The zeolite catalyst was analysed of Si/Al, X-ray Diffraction and specific surface area. The catalyst product then used for ethanol dehydration to produce DiEthyl Ether. The results shown the biggest surface area is 184,52 m2/gram at catalyst production at 10 hours for time dealumination. The crystallite of catalyst product is similar like shown at diffractogram of XRD analysis. The ratio Si/Al biggest is 313.7 that obtaining at catalyst production with 7 hours for time dealumination. The catalytic test use fixed bed reactor with 1 inci diameter and ethanol fermentation both as feed. The operation condition is 150 deg. C at temperature and atmosphere pressure. The compounds product in liquid phase are diethyl ether, methanol and water.

  5. Low-quality vegetable oils as feedstock for biodiesel production using K-pumice as solid catalyst. Tolerance of water and free fatty acids contents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, L; Borges, M E

    2012-08-15

    Waste oils are a promising alternative feedstock for biodiesel production due to the decrease of the industrial production costs. However, feedstock with high free fatty acids (FFA) content presents several drawbacks when alkaline-catalyzed transesterification reaction is employed in biodiesel production process. Nowadays, to develop suitable processes capable of treating oils with high free fatty acids content, a two-step process for biodiesel production is being investigated. The major problem that it presents is that two catalysts are needed to carry out the whole process: an acidic catalyst for free fatty acids esterification (first step) and a basic catalyst for pretreated product transesterification (second step). The use of a bifunctional catalyst, which allows both reactions to take place simultaneously, could minimize the production costs and time. In the present study, the behavior of pumice, a natural volcanic material used as a heterogeneous catalyst, was tested using oils with several FFA and water contents as feedstock in the transesterification reaction to produce biodiesel. Pumice as a bifunctional solid catalyst, which can catalyze simultaneously the esterification of FFA and the transesterification of fatty acid glycerides into biodiesel, was shown to be an efficient catalyst for the conversion of low-grade, nonedible oil feedstock into biodiesel product. Using this solid catalyst for the transesterification reaction, high FAME yields were achieved when feedstock oils presented a FFA content until approximately 2% wt/wt and a water content until 2% wt/wt. PMID:22799882

  6. Alternative fuels and chemicals from synthesis gas. Quarterly status report number 2, 1 January--31 March 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The overall objectives of this program are to investigate potential technologies for the conversion of synthesis gas to oxygenated and hydrocarbon fuels and industrial chemicals, and to demonstrate the most promising technologies at DOE`s LaPorte, Texas, Slurry Phase Alternative Fuels Development Unit. Results are discussed for the following tasks: liquid phase hydrodynamic run; catalyst activation with CO; new processes for DME (dehydration catalyst screening runs, and experiments using Robinson-Mahoney basket internal and pelletized catalysts); new fuels from DME; and new processes for alcohols and oxygenated fuel additives.

  7. Advanced liquefaction using coal swelling and catalyst dispersion techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis, C.W. (Auburn Univ., AL (United States)); Gutterman, C. (Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States)); Chander, S. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States))

    1992-08-26

    Research in this project centers upon developing a new approach to the direct liquefaction of coal to produce an all-distillate product slate at a sizable cost reduction over current technology. The approach integrates all aspects of the coal liquefaction process including coal selection, pretreatment, coal swelling with catalyst impregnation, coal liquefaction experimentation, product recovery with characterization, alternate bottoms processing, and a technical assessment including an economic evaluation. The project is being carried out under contract to the United States Department of Energy. On May 28, 1992, the Department of Energy authorized starting the experimental aspects of this projects; therefore, experimentation at Amoco started late in this quarterly report period. Research contracts with Auburn University, Pennsylvania State University, and Foster Wheeler Development Corporation were signed during June, 1992, so their work was just getting underway. Their work will be summarized in future quarterly reports. A set of coal samples were sent to Hazen Research for beneficiation. The samples were received and have been analyzed. The literature search covering coal swelling has been up-dated, and preliminary coal swelling experiments were carried out. Further swelling experimentation is underway. An up-date of the literature on the liquefaction of coal using dispersed catalysts is nearing completion; it will be included in the next quarterly report.

  8. Platinum-Bismuth Bimetallic Catalysts: Synthesis, Characterization and Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Saucedo, Jose A, Jr; Xiao, Yang; Varma, Arvind

    2015-01-01

    Bimetallic catalysts have been explored and shown to exhibit unique characteristics which are not present in monometallic catalysts. Platinum is well known as an effective catalyst for oxidation and reduction reactions, and it can be made more effective when bismuth is introduced as a promotor. Thus, the effectiveness of the Pt-Bi catalyst was demonstrated in prior work. What is not clear, however, is the mechanism behind the catalyst function; why addition of bismuth to platinum decreases de...

  9. Enhanced catalyst for conversion of syngas to liquid motor fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Peter K.; Rabo, Jule A.

    1985-01-01

    Synthesis gas comprising carbon monoxide and hydrogen is converted to C.sub.5.sup.+ hydrocarbons suitable for use as liquid motor fuels by contact with a dual catalyst system capable of enhancing the selectivity of said conversion to motor fuel range hydrocarbons and the quality of the resulting motor fuel product. The catalyst composition employs a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst, together with a co-catalyst/support component comprising SAPO silicoaluminophosphate, non-zeolitic molecular sieve catalyst.

  10. Assessment on Commercial Application of Novel S-RHT Catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bian Fengming; Wen Huixin

    2004-01-01

    This article refers to the commercial application assessment of the novel S-RHT catalysts.The application outcome has shown that the catalysts loading was reduced with its performance kept at the original level at the initial and middle stages of operation. The performance of catalysts at the end of operation was analyzed, and factors affecting the performance of the novel catalysts at the end of run were identified to facilitate further improvement of the said catalysts.

  11. FCC Catalysts to Meet Demand of New Era

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Daping

    2008-01-01

    The CGP series FCC catalysts for manufacture of clean gasoline and propylene and the catalyst RSC-2006 for processing inferior residuum with high yield of light distillates are novel catalysts jointly developed by Qilu Catalyst Branch Company of SINOPEC Corp. and the Research Institute of Petroleum Processing (RIPP). The results of commercial application of these catalysts have revealed that they can satisfactorily meet the requirements for environmental protection, good economic benefits and capability for processing inferior FCC feed under new circumstances.

  12. Synthesis of Organic Compounds over Selected Types of Catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Omar Mohamed Saad Ismail

    2011-01-01

    This study provides an overview for the utilization of different catalytic material in the synthesis of organic compounds for important reactions such as heck reaction, aldol reaction, Diels- Alder and other reactions. Comparisons between multiple catalysts for the same reaction and justifications for developing new catalyzed materials are discussed. The following topics are introduced in this work; (1) solid base catalysts, (2) clay catalysts, (3) palladium catalysts, and (4) catalysts to pr...

  13. Preparative characteristics of hydrophobic polymer catalyst for the tritium removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The optimum method for the fabrication of hydrophobic catalyst was selected and the apparatuses for the preparation of catalyst support with high yield was developed for the large scale production. Also, we summarized the method of improving the physical property of the catalyst support, the loading characteristics of Pt metal as a catalyst, and the characteristics of the apparatus for the fabrication of the catalysts on a large scale

  14. HZSM-5 CATALYST FOR CRACKING PALM OIL TO BIODIESEL: A COMPARATIVE STUDY WITH AND WITHOUT PT AND PD IMPREGNATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Budianto

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The Needs of healthy environment and green energy poses a great demand for alternative energy. Biofuel is one of the alternative energy products that are environmentally friendly. Biofuel can be made from plant oils, especially palm oil. Cracking of palm oil into biofuel is constrained by the availability of catalysts. Moreover the available catalyst still gives a low yield. This research aims to study the effect of Pt and Pd impregnation into HZSM-5 catalyst on the catalytic properties. Another aim is to obtain the operating conditions of the catalytic cracking process of palm oil into biofuel which gives the highest yield and selectivity, especially for biodiesel and biogasoline fractions. Catalytic cracking process was carried out in a micro fixed bed reactor with diameter of 1 cm and length of 16 cm. The reactor was filled with a catalyst. The results of the study successfully prove that Pt and Pd impregnated into HZSM-5 catalyst can increase the yield and selectivity of biodiesel. Pd and Pt are highly recommended to increase the yield and selectivity of biodiesel.

  15. Alternative Devices for Taking Insulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... KB). Alternate Language URL Alternative Devices for Taking Insulin Page Content On this page: What alternative devices ... the skin. [ Top ] What alternative devices for taking insulin are available? Insulin pens provide a convenient, easy- ...

  16. Synthesis and Understanding of Novel Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stair, Peter C. [Northwestern University

    2013-07-09

    The research took advantage of our capabilities to perform in-situ and operando Raman spectroscopy on complex systems along with our developing expertise in the synthesis of uniform, supported metal oxide materials to investigate relationships between the catalytically active oxide composition, atomic structure, and support and the corresponding chemical and catalytic properties. The project was organized into two efforts: 1) Synthesis of novel catalyst materials by atomic layer deposition (ALD). 2) Spectroscopic and chemical investigations of coke formation and catalyst deactivation. ALD synthesis was combined with conventional physical characterization, Raman spectroscopy, and probe molecule chemisorption to study the effect of supported metal oxide composition and atomic structure on acid-base and catalytic properties. Operando Raman spectroscopy studies of olefin polymerization leading to coke formation and catalyst deactivation clarified the mechanism of coke formation by acid catalysts.

  17. Moderated ruthenium fischer-tropsch synthesis catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrevaya, Hayim

    1991-01-01

    The subject Fischer-Tropsch catalyst comprises moderated ruthenium on an inorganic oxide support. The preferred moderator is silicon. Preferably the moderator is effectively positioned in relationship to ruthenium particles through simultaneous placement on the support using reverse micelle impregnation.

  18. Heterogeneous Metal Catalysts for Oxidation Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Eaqub Ali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidation reactions may be considered as the heart of chemical synthesis. However, the indiscriminate uses of harsh and corrosive chemicals in this endeavor are threating to the ecosystems, public health, and terrestrial, aquatic, and aerial flora and fauna. Heterogeneous catalysts with various supports are brought to the spotlight because of their excellent capabilities to accelerate the rate of chemical reactions with low cost. They also minimize the use of chemicals in industries and thus are friendly and green to the environment. However, heterogeneous oxidation catalysis are not comprehensively presented in literature. In this short review, we clearly depicted the current state of catalytic oxidation reactions in chemical industries with specific emphasis on heterogeneous catalysts. We outlined here both the synthesis and applications of important oxidation catalysts. We believe it would serve as a reference guide for the selection of oxidation catalysts for both industries and academics.

  19. Brandmodstandsbidrag for alternative isoleringsmaterialer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan de Place

    2001-01-01

    Resume af rapport om alternative isoleringsmaterialers brandmodstandsbidrag, udarbejdet af Dansk Brandteknisk Institut under Energistyrelsens udviklingsprogram "Miljø- og arbejdsmiljøvenlig isolering"......Resume af rapport om alternative isoleringsmaterialers brandmodstandsbidrag, udarbejdet af Dansk Brandteknisk Institut under Energistyrelsens udviklingsprogram "Miljø- og arbejdsmiljøvenlig isolering"...

  20. Anvendelse af alternative isoleringsmaterialer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan de Place

    2003-01-01

    Resume af By og Byg Anvisning 207 om anvendelse af alternative isoleringsmaterialer, udarbejdet af Statens Byggeforskningsinstitut under udviklingsprogrammet "Miljø- og arbejdsmiljøvenlig isolering"......Resume af By og Byg Anvisning 207 om anvendelse af alternative isoleringsmaterialer, udarbejdet af Statens Byggeforskningsinstitut under udviklingsprogrammet "Miljø- og arbejdsmiljøvenlig isolering"...

  1. Highly efficient, quick and green synthesis of biarlys with chitosan supported catalyst using microwave irradiation in the absence of solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, Talat; Açıksöz, Eda; Menteş, Ayfer

    2016-05-20

    The aim of this study was to develop a quick reaction that had high activity with a small amount of catalyst, which could be an eco-friendly alternative technique for the synthesis of biarlys in Suzuki coupling reactions. First, a novel chitosan Schiff base supported Pd(II) catalyst was synthesized, and its structure was illuminated with FTIR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, TG/DTG, SEM/EDAX, XRD, ICP-OES, UV-vis, magnetic moment, and molar conductivity techniques. Subsequently, the catalytic activity of the catalyst was tested in Suzuki CC reactions under microwave irradiation using a solvent-free reaction condition. The catalytic tests showed an excellent activity with a small load of the catalyst (0.02mol%) in 4min. The catalyst showed seven runs without loss of activity, and high values of turnover numbers (TON) and turnover frequency (TOF) were obtained. The novel biopolymer supported Pd(II) catalyst provided much faster reaction times, higher yields, and reusability under microwave heating compared to classic heating methods. PMID:26917390

  2. Innovative synthetic rubbers via ruthenium catalyst systems

    OpenAIRE

    Tuba, Robert; Grubbs, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    The trans-polypentenamer has unique relevance among the synthetic rubbers since it has similar phys. properties to the natural rubber. The polypentenamer additives have propitious effect on the tire properties and have been studied extensively for this application. Polypentenamer synthetic rubber was synthesized by ringopening metathesis polymn. (ROMP) using ruthenium catalyst systems. It was found that the cyclopentene conversion does not depend on the catalyst activity and catal...

  3. Catalyst Deactivation: Control Relevance of Model Assumptions

    OpenAIRE

    Bernt Lie; David M. Himmelblau

    2000-01-01

    Two principles for describing catalyst deactivation are discussed, one based on the deactivation mechanism, the other based on the activity and catalyst age distribution. When the model is based upon activity decay, it is common to use a mean activity developed from the steady-state residence time distribution. We compare control-relevant properties of such an approach with those of a model based upon the deactivation mechanism. Using a continuous stirred tank reactor as an example, we show t...

  4. Heterogeneous Catalyst Deactivation and Regeneration: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Morris D. Argyle; Calvin H. Bartholomew

    2015-01-01

    Deactivation of heterogeneous catalysts is a ubiquitous problem that causes loss of catalytic rate with time. This review on deactivation and regeneration of heterogeneous catalysts classifies deactivation by type (chemical, thermal, and mechanical) and by mechanism (poisoning, fouling, thermal degradation, vapor formation, vapor-solid and solid-solid reactions, and attrition/crushing). The key features and considerations for each of these deactivation types is reviewed in detail with referen...

  5. Preparation of azo compounds with solid catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Corma, Avelino; García Gómez, Hermenegildo; Grirrane, Abdessamad

    2008-01-01

    [EN] The present invention refers to a procedure for preparing azo compounds comprising a reaction between at least: one amine or polyamine, molecular oxygen, a catalyst comprising at least one support selected fkom at least a metal oxide of one of the elements of the groups 3,4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 11 and 13, silica, an anionic laminar compound of hydrotalcite type or its derivatives, active carbon or an organic polymer. In addition, said catalyst may contain nanoparticles of gold.

  6. Method for manufacturing a hydrorefining catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for the manufacture of a highly active and, at the same time, activity-stable hydrorefining catalyst is presented. The catalyst consisting of the combination of nickel-molybdenum(VI) oxide/aluminium oxide achieves an almost complete degradation of sulphur and nitrogen and a hydrogenation of olefins, consuming only little hydrogen. It is used for selective sulphur/nitrogen removal and olefin elimination from hydrocarbon fractions

  7. Coating powdered copper catalyst with yttria sol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Kuan-Ying [Department of Chemical and Engineering and Materials Science, Yuan Ze University, Chung-Li, Taiwan (China); Fuel Cell Center, Yuan Ze University, Chung-Li, Taiwan (China); Shen, Chia-Chieh, E-mail: ccshen@saturn.yzu.edu.tw [Fuel Cell Center, Yuan Ze University, Chung-Li, Taiwan (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yuan Ze University, Chung-Li, Taiwan (China); Graduate School of Renewable Energy Engineering, Yuan Ze University, Chung-Li, Taiwan (China); Lee, Chi-Yuan; Lee, Shuo-Jen [Fuel Cell Center, Yuan Ze University, Chung-Li, Taiwan (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yuan Ze University, Chung-Li, Taiwan (China); Graduate School of Renewable Energy Engineering, Yuan Ze University, Chung-Li, Taiwan (China); Leu, Chih-Hsing [Energy and Environment Research Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Wang, Jung-Hui [Fuel Cell Center, Yuan Ze University, Chung-Li, Taiwan (China); Yeh, Chuin-Tih [Department of Chemical and Engineering and Materials Science, Yuan Ze University, Chung-Li, Taiwan (China); Fuel Cell Center, Yuan Ze University, Chung-Li, Taiwan (China)

    2011-07-15

    Research highlights: {yields} The neutral Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} sol is an effective binder for coating powders of CuZnAl catalyst. {yields} A particle size ratio of 15 for catalyst to binder is suggested for stable coating. {yields} Sufficient stirring is an important step in the catalyst slurry preparation. - Abstract: A commercial Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} sol was tested as a binder for coating CuZnAl catalyst powder onto microchannels of a stainless steel plate (SSP). Coated plates were used to fabricate microchannel reactors that generate hydrogen via the steam reforming of methanol (SRM). Washcoating slurries were prepared by suspending catalyst powders into the sol. Slurry parameters, such as solid content, binder content, pH value, and stir time, were optimized to achieve a stable catalyst coating and good SRM performance. The expected stable coating could be obtained from neutral (pH 7) Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} slurry that is required for a negligible dissolution of the copper component of the catalyst. The experimental coating stability generally improved with the slurry stir time. Observed improvements were attributed to a dispersion of catalyst powders in the slurry through a two-step mechanism: the mechanical disassembly of agglomerated CuZnAl powders into primary particles, and the repelling of dissembled particles through adsorption of positively charged Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} binders. A reasonable reaction temperature of 280 deg. C was found for 95% conversion of methanol in SRM from the resulted microchannel reactors. A low CO fraction of 0.3% was also found in the hydrogen-rich gas reformed.

  8. Atomistic Processes of Catalyst Degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2004-11-27

    The purpose of this cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) between Sasol North America, Inc., and the oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was to improve the stability of alumina-based industrial catalysts through the combination of aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) at ORNL and innovative sample preparation techniques at Sasol. Outstanding progress has been made in task 1, 'Atomistic processes of La stabilization'. STEM investigations provided structural information with single-atom precision, showing the lattice location of La dopant atoms, thus enabling first-principles calculations of binding energies, which were performed in collaboration with Vanderbilt University. The stabilization mechanism turns out to be entirely due to a particularly strong binding energy of the La tom to the {gamma}-alumina surface. The large size of the La atom precludes incorporation of La into the bulk alumina and also strains the surface, thus preventing any clustering of La atoms. Thus highly disperse distribution is achieved and confirmed by STEM images. la also affects relative stability of the exposed surfaces of {gamma}-alumina, making the 100 surface more stable for the doped case, unlike the 110 surface for pure {gamma}-alumina. From the first-principles calculations, they can estimate the increase in transition temperature for the 3% loading of La used commercially, and it is in excellent agreement with experiment. This task was further pursued aiming to generate useable recommendations for the optimization of the preparation techniques for La-doped aluminas. The effort was primarily concentrated on the connection between the boehmitre-{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} phase transition (i.e. catalyst preparation) and the resulting dispersion of La on the {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} surface. It was determined that the La distribution on boehmite was non-uniform and different from that on the {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and thus

  9. Synchrotron radiation studies of supported metal catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metallic clusters supported on refractory oxides have been used extensively for several decades in the production of chemicals and petroleum derived transportation fuels. Catalysts containing more than one metal component are of particular interest since the addition of a second metal provides a method of controlling the selectivity of the catalyst. That is, the second metal can alter the rates of competing reactions in a complex reaction sequence and thus alter the final product distribution of the reaction. In this work the reactions of cyclohexane in hydrogen over silica supported ruthenium and osmium catalysts were studied. Bimetallic catalysts represent an important class of materials that are of interest both scientifically and technologically. Despite the importance and long-standing use of supported metal catalysts, detailed information on the structure of the metal clusters has been difficult to obtain. The development of x-ray absorption spectroscopy with the increasing availability of synchrotron radiation, however, has provided a powerful and versatile tool for studying the structure of these complex systems. Using the Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) technique, it is possible to obtain information on the local atomic structure of supported monometallic catalytic metals and their interaction with the support. In the discussion that follows the authors will focus on results that have been obtained on the structure of supported bimetallic cluster catalysts

  10. Reforming gasoline over catalyst Kr-104

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen' kov, G.M.; Pushkarev, V.P.; Kozlov, N.S.; Varshavskiy, O.M.; Pryakhina, N.Ya.; Glinchak, S.I.; Gorbatsevich, M.F.

    KR-104 is a widely used domestic polymetallic (Pt, Re, Cd, Fe) catalyst for making high octane components of motor fuel. The start-up and performance results of this catalyst on a high capacity LK-6u unit have been presented previously. In the present work, a further study was made of the performance and regeneration characteristics of the catalyst during reforming of a broad cut gasoline fraction in a one million ton per year industrial unit for 45 months. In the first stage of regeneration, the catalyst was reduced at 768 K for 9 hours and then oxychlorinated. During the second stage, the KR-104 was first treated for 8 hours with a hydrogen-containing gas at 768 K and then cooled and blown through with nitrogen. No change in Pt or Re content was observed, although the Cd content dropped markedly after 11 months and then remained constant. The octane number of the catalyzate was 80.4 (motor method, without TEL) and the catalyst lost both activity and selectivity and had to be regenerated after 5 months. The poor performance of the catalyst and its drop in activity are attributed to the high moisture content in the system during the start-up period. 10 references, 3 figures.

  11. Low Cost Autothermal Diesel Reforming Catalyst Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shihadeh, J.; Liu, D.

    2004-01-01

    Catalytic autothermal reforming (ATR) represents an important step of converting fossil fuel to hydrogen rich reformate for use in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stacks. The state-of-the-art reforming catalyst, at present, is a Rh based material which is effective but costly. The objective of our current research is to reduce the catalyst cost by finding an efficient ATR catalyst containing no rhodium. A group of perovskite based catalysts have been synthesized and evaluated under the reforming condition of a diesel surrogate fuel. Hydrogen yield, reforming efficiency, and conversion selectivity to carbon oxides of the catalyst ATR reaction are calculated and compared with the benchmark Rh based material. Several catalyst synthesis improvements were carried out including: 1) selectively doping metals on the A-site and B-site of the perovskite structure, 2) changing the support from perovskite to alumina, 3) altering the method of metal addition, and 4) using transition metals instead of noble metals. It was found that the catalytic activity changed little with modification of the A-site metal, while it displayed considerable dependence on the B-site metal. Perovskite supports performed much better than alumina based supports.

  12. Optimization of transesterification of rubber seed oil using heterogeneous catalyst calcium oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inggrid, Maria; Kristanto, Aldi; Santoso, Herry

    2015-12-01

    Biodiesel is an alternative fuel manufactured with the help of alkali hydroxide catalyst through transesterification reaction of vegetable oil. This study aims to examine methods and the most suitable conditions for transesterification reaction producing biodiesel from crude rubber seed oil by varying process parameters such as the molar ratio of alcohol, CaO amount as the alkaline catalyst, and reaction time. The rubber seed oil has a high level of free fatty acid content, which means the use of homogenous alkaline catalyst gives some technological problems such as soap formation which leaded in difficulty in the separation and purification of the product. Calcium oxide (CaO) is one of the most favorable heterogeneous base catalysts because it's reusable, noncorrosive, and low cost. Pre-treatment was performed by acid esterification with H2SO4 as the catalyst to decrease the content of free fatty acid in the rubber seed oil, in this pretreatment process the 12% FFA of crude oil could be reduced to below 3% FFA. The product after esterification process was then transesterified by alkaline transesterification by varying process parameters to convert triglyceride into biodiesel. The study found that maximum curvature for biodiesel yield occurred at 9:1 molar ratio of alcohol, 5%w catalyst loading, and 3 hours reaction time. Design expert software is used to determine the optimum point from experimental data. The result showed that the optimum yield of methyl ester from transesterification was 73.5 % by mass with 0.69 degree of desirability. The yielded methyl ester was tested for its density, viscosity, acid number, and solubility to meet SNI requirement standards.

  13. Activation Energies of Plasmonic Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngsoo; Dumett Torres, Daniel; Jain, Prashant K

    2016-05-11

    The activation energy of a catalytic reaction serves not only as a metric of the efficacy of a catalyst but also as a potential indicator of mechanistic differences between the catalytic and noncatalytic reaction. However, activation energies are quite underutilized in the field of photocatalysis. We characterize in detail the effect of visible light excitation on the activation enthalpy of an electron transfer reaction photocatalyzed by plasmonic Au nanoparticles. We find that in the presence of visible light photoexcitation, the activation enthalpy of the Au nanoparticle-catalyzed electron transfer reaction is significantly reduced. The reduction in the activation enthalpy depends on the excitation wavelength, the incident laser power, and the strength of a hole scavenger. On the basis of these results, we argue that the activation enthalpy reduction is directly related to the photoelectrochemical potential built-up on the Au nanoparticle under steady-state light excitation, analogous to electrochemical activation. Under optimum light excitation conditions, a potential as high as 240 mV is measured. The findings constitute more precise insights into the mechanistic role and energetic contribution of plasmonic excitation to chemical reactions catalyzed by transition metal nanoparticles. PMID:27064549

  14. Size and Promoter Effects on Stability of Carbon-Nanofiber-Supported Iron-Based Fischer–Tropsch Catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The Fischer–Tropsch Synthesis converts synthesis gas from alternative carbon resources, including natural gas, coal, and biomass, to hydrocarbons used as fuels or chemicals. In particular, iron-based catalysts at elevated temperatures favor the selective production of C2–C4 olefins, which are important building blocks for the chemical industry. Bulk iron catalysts (with promoters) were conventionally used, but these deactivate due to either phase transformation or carbon deposition resulting in disintegration of the catalyst particles. For supported iron catalysts, iron particle growth may result in loss of catalytic activity over time. In this work, the effects of promoters and particle size on the stability of supported iron nanoparticles (initial sizes of 3–9 nm) were investigated at industrially relevant conditions (340 °C, 20 bar, H2/CO = 1). Upon addition of sodium and sulfur promoters to iron nanoparticles supported on carbon nanofibers, initial catalytic activities were high, but substantial deactivation was observed over a period of 100 h. In situ Mössbauer spectroscopy revealed that after 20 h time-on-stream, promoted catalysts attained 100% carbidization, whereas for unpromoted catalysts, this was around 25%. In situ carbon deposition studies were carried out using a tapered element oscillating microbalance (TEOM). No carbon laydown was detected for the unpromoted catalysts, whereas for promoted catalysts, carbon deposition occurred mainly over the first 4 h and thus did not play a pivotal role in deactivation over 100 h. Instead, the loss of catalytic activity coincided with the increase in Fe particle size to 20–50 nm, thereby supporting the proposal that the loss of active Fe surface area was the main cause of deactivation. PMID:27330847

  15. Enhancement of Treatment Efficiency of Recalcitrant Wastewater Containing Textile Dyes Using a Newly Developed Iron Zeolite Socony Mobil-5 Heterogeneous Catalyst.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mushtaq Ahmad

    Full Text Available Fenton oxidation, an advanced oxidation process, is an efficient method for the treatment of recalcitrant wastewaters. Unfortunately, it utilizes H2O2 and iron-based homogeneous catalysts, which lead to the formation of high volumes of sludge and secondary pollutants. To overcome these problems, an alternate option is the usage of heterogeneous catalyst. In this study, a heterogeneous catalyst was developed to provide an alternative solution for homogeneous Fenton oxidation. Iron Zeolite Socony Mobile-5 (Fe-ZSM-5 was synthesized using a new two-step process. Next, the catalyst was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller analysis and tested against a model wastewater containing the azo dye Acid Blue 113. Results showed that the loading of iron particles reduced the surface area of the catalyst from 293.59 to 243.93 m2/g; meanwhile, the average particle size of the loaded material was 12.29 nm. Furthermore, efficiency of the developed catalyst was evaluated by performing heterogeneous Fenton oxidation. Taguchi method was coupled with principal component analysis in order to assess and optimize mineralization efficiency. Experimental results showed that under optimized conditions, over 99.7% degradation and 77% mineralization was obtained, with a 90% reduction in the consumption of the developed catalyst. Furthermore, the developed catalyst was stable and reusable, with less than 2% leaching observed under optimized conditions. Thus, the present study proved that newly developed catalyst has enhanced the oxidation process and reduced the chemicals consumption.

  16. Alternative loop rings

    CERN Document Server

    Goodaire, EG; Polcino Milies, C

    1996-01-01

    For the past ten years, alternative loop rings have intrigued mathematicians from a wide cross-section of modern algebra. As a consequence, the theory of alternative loop rings has grown tremendously. One of the main developments is the complete characterization of loops which have an alternative but not associative, loop ring. Furthermore, there is a very close relationship between the algebraic structures of loop rings and of group rings over 2-groups. Another major topic of research is the study of the unit loop of the integral loop ring. Here the interaction between loop rings and group ri

  17. Catalytic Transformation of Ethylbenzene over Y-Zeolite-based Catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Khattaf, Sulaiman

    2008-11-19

    Catalytic transformation of ethylbenzene (EB) has been investigated over ultrastable Y (USY)-zeolite-based catalysts in a novel riser simulator at different operating conditions. The effect of reaction conditions on EB conversion is reported. The USY catalyst (FCC-Y) was modified by steaming to form a significantly lower acidity catalyst (FCC-SY). The current study shows that the FCC-SY catalyst favors EB disproportionation more than cracking. A comparison has been made between the results of EB conversion over the lowly acidic catalyst (FCC-SY) and the highly acidic catalyst (FCC-Y) under identical conditions. It was observed that increase in catalyst acidity favored cracking of EB at the expense of disproportionation. Kinetic parameters for EB disappearance during disproportionation reaction over the FCC-SY catalyst were calculated using the catalyst activity decay function based on time on stream (TOS). © 2008 American Chemical Society.

  18. Development of Novel Resid Hydrometallization Catalyst RDM-3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Dawei; Niu Chuanfeng; Yang Qinghe; Liu Tao

    2007-01-01

    Based on the reaction mechanism of resid hydrodemetallization,a new catalyst carrier was designed and prepared.As compared with the similar type of catalyst carder,the said new carrier featured a higher pore volume,a larger pore diameter and a weaker surface acidity,which could improve the diffusion performance and stable reaction performance of the catalyst.The active metal components were loaded on the said carrier by a new technique for better metal dispersion,thus the impurity removal rate of the new catalyst,RDM-3,was improved significantly.The commercial test of the RDM-3 catalyst showed that the process of catalyst preparation was stable,the catalyst performance was slightly better than the catalyst prepared in the lab,therefore,the catalyst could be manufactured in commercial scale.

  19. CO methanation over supported bimetallic Ni-Fe catalysts: From computational studies towards catalyst optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kustov, Arkadii; Frey, Anne Mette; Larsen, Kasper Emil;

    2007-01-01

    DFT calculations combined with a computational screening method have previously shown that bimetallic Ni-Fe alloys should be more active than the traditional Ni-based catalyst for CO methanation. That was confirmed experimentally for a number of bimetallic Ni-Fe catalysts supported on MgAl2O4. He...

  20. An alternative process for hydrogenation of sunflower oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana de Cassia de Souza Schneider

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Classic methodologies for hydrogenation of vegetable oils have traditionally been carried out by nickel catalysts under high pressure of H2 and high temperature. An alternative method for hydrogenation of sunflower oil using limonene and palladium-on-carbon was investigated in this study. The use of limonene as a hydrogen donor solvent was proposed in order to avoid high temperature and high-pressure conditions. The catalytic transfer of hydrogenation was studied by using 0.5 to 2% of Pd as a catalyst, a limonene:oil ratio of 3:1, and reaction times from 0.5 to 2 hours. Under these conditions, high selectivities for oleic acid and low concentrations of stearic acid were obtained.

  1. Towards the Rational Design of Nanoparticle Catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Priyabrat

    This research is focused on development of routes towards the rational design of nanoparticle catalysts. Primarily, it is focused on two main projects; (1) the use of imidazolium-based ionic liquids (ILs) as greener media for the design of quasi-homogeneous nanoparticle catalysts and (2) the rational design of heterogeneous-supported nanoparticle catalysts from structured nanoparticle precursors. Each project has different studies associated with the main objective of the design of nanoparticle catalysts. In the first project, imidazolium-based ionic liquids have been used for the synthesis of nanoparticle catalysts. In particular, studies on recyclability, reuse, mode-of-stability, and long-term stability of these ionic-liquid supported nanoparticle catalysts have been done; all of which are important factors in determining the overall "greenness" of such synthetic routes. Three papers have been published/submitted for this project. In the first publication, highly stable polymer-stabilized Au, Pd and bimetallic Au-Pd nanoparticle catalysts have been synthesized in imidazolium-based 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([BMIM]PF6) ionic liquid (Journal of Molecular Catalysis A: Chemical, 2008, 286, 114). The resulting nanoparticles were found to be effective and selective quasi-homogeneous catalysts towards a wide-range of hydrogenation reactions and the catalyst solution was reused for further catalytic reactions with minimal loss in activity. The synthesis of very pure and clean ILs has allowed a platform to study the effects of impurities in the imidazolium ILs on nanoparticle stability. In a later study, a new mode of stabilization was postulated where the presence of low amounts of 1-methylimidazole has substantial effects on the resulting stability of Au and Pd-Au nanoparticles in these ILs (Chemical Communications, 2009, 812). In further continuation of this study, a comparative study involving four stabilization protocols for nanoparticle

  2. Synthesis and characterization of Ni-CeO2 catalysts by the hydrothermal method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the present time the necessity exists to reduce the level of atmospheric pollutants, because these are the main originators of such problems as: the greenhouse effect, acid rain, global heating, among others and that are affecting the human being seriously. In this context, is necessary to look for new solutions that contribute to the improvement of the problems without appealing to limitations in the energy production, because this would imply a non only delay in the economic development, but also in the cultural, technological and of research in our country. An alternative for the energy solution is the use of renewable fuels, because they will decrease the production costs with the time, as well as to diminish the dependence of the fossil fuels, contributing this way to the improvement of the environment quality. The use of the hydrogen as an alternating fuel to the petroleum, is intends as energy solution. The objective of the present work is to develop Ni-CeO2 catalysts through the hydrothermal method for the hydrogen production starting from the partial oxidation reaction of methanol for the clean fuel generation that does not produce polluting emissions to the environment. As well as, to determine the importance of the metallic load in the catalytic activity for which catalysts to 1 and 2% in weight of Ni were prepared. To achieve these objective different techniques were used to characterize the prepared catalysts, as: Temperature Programmed Reduction to evidence the metal-support interaction, Scanning Electron Microscopy (Sem) to determine the morphology of the catalysts, Surface Area (Bet) with respect to the adsorption-desorption of N2 and X-Rays Diffraction (XRD) to know the crystalline structure of the catalysts. Also the catalytic properties (activity and selectivity) were studied under the reaction: CH3OH + 1/2 O2 obtaining as products to the CO2 + 2H2, with the help of the multi-tasks equipment Rig-100 that operated to temperatures among 200 at

  3. Optimal catalyst curves: Connecting density functional theory calculations with industrial reactor design and catalyst selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, C.J.H.; Dahl, Søren; Boisen, A.;

    2002-01-01

    ammonia synthesis activity, to a first approximation, is a function only of the binding energy of nitrogen to the catalyst. Therefore, it is possible to evaluate which nitrogen binding energy is optimal under given reaction conditions. This leads to the concept of optimal catalyst curves, which illustrate...... the nitrogen binding energies of the optimal catalysts at different temperatures, pressures, and synthesis gas compositions. Using this concept together with the ability to prepare catalysts with desired binding energies it is possible to optimize the ammonia process. In this way a link between first......For ammonia synthesis catalysts a volcano-type relationship has been found experimentally. We demonstrate that by combining density functional theory calculations with a microkinetic model the position of the maximum of the volcano curve is sensitive to the reaction conditions. The catalytic...

  4. Influence of catalyst pretreatments on the catalytic oxidation of toluene over nanostructured platinum based spent catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Wang-Geun; Lee, Jae-Wook; Kim, Sang-Chai

    2007-11-01

    In this study, we regenerated a nano-structured platinum based spent catalyst by applying thermal gas and acid pretreatment and examined the influence of treatment on the catalytic oxidation of toluene. The spent catalysts were pretreated with air, hydrogen and six different acid aqueous solutions (HCl, H2SO4, HNO3, H3PO4, CH3COOH and C2H2O4). The physicochemical properties of the parent and its modified catalysts were characterized by XRD, BET, TEM, and ICP. The results of light-off curves showed that air and hydrogen treated catalysts were more active than the parent catalyst. In addition, the catalytic activities of toluene oxidation for acid aqueous treated samples were identical with the order of Pt/Al ratio. PMID:18047055

  5. Seal design alternatives study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results from a study of various sealing alternatives for the WIPP sealing system. Overall, the sealing system has the purpose of reducing to the extent possible the potential for fluids (either gas or liquid) from entering or leaving the repository. The sealing system is divided into three subsystems: drift and panel seals within the repository horizon, shaft seals in each of the four shafts, and borehole seals. Alternatives to the baseline configuration for the WIPP seal system design included evaluating different geometries and schedules for seal component installations and the use of different materials for seal components. Order-of-magnitude costs for the various alternatives were prepared as part of the study. Firm recommendations are not presented, but the advantages and disadvantages of the alternatives are discussed. Technical information deficiencies are identified and studies are outlined which can provide required information

  6. Seal design alternatives study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Sambeek, L.L. [RE/SPEC Inc., Rapid City, SD (US); Luo, D.D.; Lin, M.S.; Ostrowski, W.; Oyenuga, D. [Parsons Brinckerhoff Quade & Douglas, Inc., San Francisco, CA (US)

    1993-06-01

    This report presents the results from a study of various sealing alternatives for the WIPP sealing system. Overall, the sealing system has the purpose of reducing to the extent possible the potential for fluids (either gas or liquid) from entering or leaving the repository. The sealing system is divided into three subsystems: drift and panel seals within the repository horizon, shaft seals in each of the four shafts, and borehole seals. Alternatives to the baseline configuration for the WIPP seal system design included evaluating different geometries and schedules for seal component installations and the use of different materials for seal components. Order-of-magnitude costs for the various alternatives were prepared as part of the study. Firm recommendations are not presented, but the advantages and disadvantages of the alternatives are discussed. Technical information deficiencies are identified and studies are outlined which can provide required information.

  7. An alternative currency

    OpenAIRE

    Frendo, Mario; Duca, Edward

    2013-01-01

    Malta- a tiny island, a minute social reality, a precursory canovaccio of European unification- has a unique asset it ought to be prouder of: culture. http://www.um.edu.mt/think/an-alternative-currency/

  8. Alternatives to Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this website may not be available. Alternatives to nursing homes Before you make any decisions about long ... live and what help you may need. A nursing home may not be your only choice. Discharge ...

  9. Vaginal dryness alternative treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a day. Soybeans contain plant-based substances called isoflavones. These substances have an effect on the body ... soy for vasomotor symptoms: the Herbal Alternatives for Menopause (HALT) Study. Menopause . 2008;15(1):51-58. ...

  10. Alternative fuel information sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    This short document contains a list of more than 200 US sources of information (Name, address, phone number, and sometimes contact) related to the use of alternative fuels in automobiles and trucks. Electric-powered cars are also included.

  11. The alternative library

    OpenAIRE

    Collinson, Timothy; A. Williams

    2004-01-01

    Much time and effort has been devoted to designing and developing library Web sites that are easy to navigate by both new students and experienced researchers. In a review of the Southampton Institute Library it was decided that in addition to updating the existing homepage an alternative would be offered. Drawing on theory relating to user interface design, learning styles and creative thinking, an Alternative Library navigation system was added to the more traditional library homepage. The ...

  12. Alternative fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium resource utilization and economic considerations provide incentives to study alternative fuel cycles as future options to the PHWR natural uranium cycle. Preliminary studies to define the most favourable alternatives and their possible introduction dates are discussed. The important and uncertain components which influence option selection are reviewed, including nuclear capacity growth, uranium availability and demand, economic potential, and required technological developments. Finally, a summary of Ontario Hydro's program to further assess cycle selection and define development needs is given. (auth)

  13. Ultimacy and alternative possibilities

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, John Martin

    2009-01-01

    I explore a key feature of Robert Kane’s libertarianism (about which I have been puzzled for some time). Kane claims that we should separate issues of alternative possibilities from issues of ultimacy, but he further argues that they are connected in a certain way. I call into question this connection, and I continue to argue for a strict separation of considerations pertaining to alternative possibilities and “actual-sequence” considerations.

  14. Des divisions aux alternances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Clemens

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available - From the divisions to the alternations - Society, action and common good give sense to democracy. Society is in fact a set of unmitigated divisions (horizontal and vertical, material and symbolic. Democratic action, since the discourse’s conflicts, doesn’t change the human beings, but things between they, in the alternation of power’s institutions for our only good in common: the body. With this aim, the Basic Income Earth Network is necessary.

  15. Atomic layer deposition-Sequential self-limiting surface reactions for advanced catalyst "bottom-up" synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Junling; Elam, Jeffrey W.; Stair, Peter C.

    2016-06-01

    Catalyst synthesis with precise control over the structure of catalytic active sites at the atomic level is of essential importance for the scientific understanding of reaction mechanisms and for rational design of advanced catalysts with high performance. Such precise control is achievable using atomic layer deposition (ALD). ALD is similar to chemical vapor deposition (CVD), except that the deposition is split into a sequence of two self-limiting surface reactions between gaseous precursor molecules and a substrate. The unique self-limiting feature of ALD allows conformal deposition of catalytic materials on a high surface area catalyst support at the atomic level. The deposited catalytic materials can be precisely constructed on the support by varying the number and type of ALD cycles. As an alternative to the wet-chemistry based conventional methods, ALD provides a cycle-by-cycle "bottom-up" approach for nanostructuring supported catalysts with near atomic precision. In this review, we summarize recent attempts to synthesize supported catalysts with ALD. Nucleation and growth of metals by ALD on oxides and carbon materials for precise synthesis of supported monometallic catalyst are reviewed. The capability of achieving precise control over the particle size of monometallic nanoparticles by ALD is emphasized. The resulting metal catalysts with high dispersions and uniformity often show comparable or remarkably higher activity than those prepared by conventional methods. For supported bimetallic catalyst synthesis, we summarize the strategies for controlling the deposition of the secondary metal selectively on the primary metal nanoparticle but not on the support to exclude monometallic formation. As a review of the surface chemistry and growth behavior of metal ALD on metal surfaces, we demonstrate the ways to precisely tune size, composition and structure of bimetallic metal nanoparticles. The cycle-by-cycle "bottom up" construction of bimetallic (or multiple

  16. Biogasoline Production from Palm Oil Via Catalytic Hydrocracking over Gamma-Alumina Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anondho Wijanarko

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Bio gasoline conversion from palm oil is an alternative energy resources method which can be substituted fossil fuel base energy utilization. Previous research resulted that palm oil can be converted into hydrocarbon by catalytic cracking reaction with γ-alumina catalyst. In this research, catalytic cracking reaction of palm oil by γ-alumina catalyst is done in a stirrer batch reactor with the oil/catalyst weight ratio variation of 100:1, 75:1, and 50:1; at suhue variation of 260 to 340oC and reaction time variation of 1 to 2 hour. Post cracking reaction, bio gasoline yield could be obtained after 2 steps batch distillation. Physical property test result such as density and viscosity of this cracking reaction product and commercial gasoline tended a closed similarity. According to result of the cracking product's density, viscosity and FTIR, it can conclude that optimum yield of the palm oil catalytic cracking reaction could be occurred when oil/catalyst weight ratio 100:1 at 340 oC in 1.5 hour and base on this bio gasoline's FTIR, GC and GC-MS identification results, its hydrocarbons content was resembled to the commercial gasoline. This palm oil catalytic cracking reaction shown 11.8% (v/v in yield and 28.0% (v/v in conversion concern to feed palm oil base and produced a 61.0 octane number's bio gasoline.

  17. Water-gas shift reaction over magnesia-modified Pt/CeO{sub 2} catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duarte de Farias, Andrea M.; Barandas, Ana P.M.G.; Perez, Rafael F.; Fraga, Marco A. [Laboratorio de Catalise, Instituto Nacional de Tecnologia, Av. Venezuela, 82/518 20081-312 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2007-03-20

    Fuel cells have risen as a clean technology for power generation and much effort has been done for converting renewable feedstock in hydrogen. The water-gas shift reaction (WGS) can be applied aiming at reducing the CO concentration in the reformate. As Pt/CeO{sub 2} catalysts have been pointed out as an alternative to the industrial WGS catalysts, the modification of such systems with magnesium was investigated in this work. It was shown that the addition of MgO to Pt/CeO{sub 2} increased the activity and stability of the catalyst irrespective of the preparation method used, either impregnation or co-precipitation. Based on TPR and IR spectroscopy experiments, it was seen that the presence of magnesium improved ceria reduction favoring the creation of OH groups, which are considered the active sites for the WGS reaction. The evolution of the surface species formed under reaction conditions (CO, H{sub 2}O, H{sub 2}) observed by DRIFTS evidenced that the formation of formate species and the generation of CO{sub 2} is closely attached to each other; under a reaction stream containing hydrogen the presence of formate species showed to be more relevant while the CO{sub 2} formation was hindered. It is suggested that the addition of MgO favors the formate decomposition and lower the carbonate concentration on the catalyst surface during WGS reaction. (author)

  18. Hydrogen production by aqueous-phase reforming of glycerol on supported noble metal catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boonyanuwat, A.; Jentys, A.; Lercher, J.A. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Dept. Chemie

    2006-07-01

    Hydrogen produced from renewable feedstocks such as crude glycerol, which is the main by-product formed during bio-diesel production, will develop into an attractive alternative energy source in the near future. A low temperature process is being developed using noble metal catalysts supported on gamma alumina. The overall catalytic activity of the catalysts Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Pd/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Ru/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Rh/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was studied. The activation energy decreased in the order: Pt>Pd>Ni>>Ru>Rh. The H{sub 2} selectivity of Pt was the highest and decreased for Pd > Ni > Ru > Rh. The H{sub 2} selectivity of Pt and Pd supported on gamma alumina was above 90%. The Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst showed a long term stability above 2 weeks using 1%wt glycerol in the feed, which indicates that these catalysts might have a high potential to be used for the aqueous phase reforming process of glycerol. (orig.)

  19. Influence of liquid medium on the activity of a low-alpha Fischer-Tropsch catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gormley, R.J.; Zarochak, M.F.; Deffenbaugh, P.W.; Rao, K.R.P.M.

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this research was to measure activity, selectivity, and the maintenance of these properties in slurry autoclave experiments with a Fischer-Tropsch (FT) catalyst that was used in the {open_quotes}FT II{close_quotes} bubble-column test, conducted at the Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU) at LaPorte, Texas during May 1994. The catalyst contained iron, copper, and potassium and was formulated to produce mainly hydrocarbons in the gasoline range with lesser production of diesel-range products and wax. The probability of chain growth was thus deliberately kept low. Principal goals of the autoclave work have been to find the true activity of this catalyst in a stirred tank reactor, unhindered by heat or mass transfer effects, and to obtain a steady conversion and selectivity over the approximately 15 days of each test. Slurry autoclave testing of the catalyst in heavier waxes also allows insight into operation of larger slurry bubble column reactors. The stability of reactor operation in these experiments, particularly at loadings exceeding 20 weight %, suggests the likely stability of operations on a larger scale.

  20. Tungsten oxide zirconia as solid superacid catalyst for esterification of waste acid oil (dark oil).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young-Moo; Chung, Sang-Ho; Eom, Hee Jun; Lee, Jin-Suk; Lee, Kwan-Young

    2010-09-01

    Biodiesel is a renewable fuel which can be produced through an esterification reaction. The cost of feedstock which resulted in that of biodiesel is a large problem to be resolved. Dark oil from industrial process can be a better alternative for biodiesel production because of its low price. In spite of this, the study of biodiesel production using the dark oil has not been reported. This study provides technical information and catalytic properties on this system. Among the several catalysts, WO(3)/ZrO(2) catalyst was the most effective catalyst in the esterification of the dark oil to fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs). The catalytic reaction parameters were optimized that 20 wt.% WO(3)/ZrO(2) has a high FFA conversion of 96% at 150 degrees C, 0.4 g/ml (oil), 1:9 (oil to alcohol, molar ratio) and 2h reaction time. The physical and chemical properties of the catalyst were characterized by XRD, Raman spectrometer, BET and NH(3)-TPD. PMID:20456949

  1. Preparation of copper catalyst washcoats for methanol steam reforming in microchannels based on nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeifer, P.; Schubert, K. [Institute for Micro Process Engineering, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, POB 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Emig, G. [LTC1, University Erlangen-Nuernberg, Egerlandstrasse 3, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2005-06-07

    The demand of fast load alternations for hydrogen generation by methanol steam reforming for automotive fuel cell application may be met in an excellent manner by microstructured reactors. However, catalyst incorporation is difficult in the micrometer size. By the use of dispersed nanoparticles a washcoating procedure was developed and is explained on the basis of a copper catalyst system. The mixing of CuO particles with other necessary materials like ZnO was examined during high energy ball milling (dry mixing) or dispersing the powders in a solution of cellulose derivatives (wet mixing). For the latter technique the shearing of agglomerates and re-agglomeration were investigated for the pure substances using laser diffraction. The influence of ball milling on particle sizes was determined by adsorption experiments and X-ray diffraction. All mixtures were characterized by temperature programmed reduction (TPR) followed by the measurement of the Cu(0) particle size (X-ray diffraction). A special method based upon X-ray structure analysis was applied for determination of the mixing quality. The relationship between these catalyst properties and additional measurements of the catalyst activity/degradation done was obvious.

  2. High Performance Heteroatoms Quaternary-doped Carbon Catalysts Derived from Shewanella Bacteria for Oxygen Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhaoyan; Ren, Guangyuan; Jiang, Congcong; Lu, Xianyong; Zhu, Ying; Jiang, Lei; Dai, Liming

    2015-11-01

    A novel heteroatoms (N, P, S and Fe) quaternary-doped carbon (HQDC-X, X refers to the pyrolysis temperature) can be fabricated by directly pyrolyzing a gram-negative bacteria, S. oneidensis MR-1 as precursors at 800 °C, 900 °C and 1000 °C under argon atmosphere. These HQDC-X catalysts maintain the cylindrical shape of bacteria after pyrolysis under high temperatures, while heteroatoms including N, P, S and Fe distribute homogeneously on the carbon frameworks. As a result, HQDC-X catalysts exhibit excellent electrocatalytic activity for ORR via a dominant four-electron oxygen reduction pathway in alkaline medium, which is comparable with that of commercial Pt/C. More importantly, HQDC-X catalysts show better tolerance for methanol crossover and CO poisoning effects, long-term durability than commercial Pt/C, which could be promising alternatives to costly Pt-based electrocatalysts for ORR. The method may provide a promising avenue to develop cheap ORR catalysts from inexpensive, scalable and biological recursors.

  3. Synthesis H-Zeolite catalyst by impregnation KI/KIO3 and performance test catalyst for biodiesel production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widayat, W.; Rizky Wicaksono, Adit; Hakim Firdaus, Lukman; Okvitarini, Ndaru

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this research is to produce H-catalyst catalyst that was impregnated with KI/KIO3. The catalyst was analyzed about surface area, X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and performance test of catalyst for biodiesel production. An H-Zeolite catalyst was synthesized from natural zeolite with chemical treatment processing, impregnation KI/KIO3 and physical treatment. The results shows that the surface area of the catalyst by 27.236 m2/g at a concentration of 5% KI. XRD analysis shows peak 2-θ at 23.627o indicating that KI was impregnated on H-zeolite catalyst. The catalyst was tested in production of biodiesel using palm oil with conventional methods for 3 hour at temperature of 70-80 oC. The result for conversion Fatty Acid Methyl Ester (FAME) reached maximum value on 87.91% under production process using catalyst 5% KIO3-H zeolite.

  4. Steam dealkylation catalyst and a method for its activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method of activating a supported catalyst containing oxides of a group viii metal and of a group 1 a metal which comprises heating said catalyst at a rate of 100 to 5000F/hr to a temperature of 6500 to 14000F in a hydrogen atmosphere; maintaining said heated catalyst in a hydrogen atmosphere at 6500 to 14000F for 2 to 30 hours thereby forming a hydrogen-treated catalyst; and maintaining the hydrogen-treated catalyst in a steam-hydrogen atmosphere at 6500 to 14000F for 2 to 20 hours thereby forming a steamed hydrogen-treated catalyst

  5. Catalysts at work: From integral to spatially resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk; Kimmerle, Bertram; Baiker, Alfons; Boye, Pit; Schroer, Christian G.; Glatzel, Pieter; Borca, Camelia N.; Beckmann, Felix; (TUD); (SLS); (IMR-GAC); (ETH Zurich); (ESRF); (TU Dresden)

    2009-09-25

    Spectroscopic studies on heterogeneous catalysts have mostly been done in an integral mode. However, in many cases spatial variations in catalyst structure can occur, e.g. during impregnation of pre-shaped particles, during reaction in a catalytic reactor, or in microstructured reactors as the present overview shows. Therefore, spatially resolved molecular information on a microscale is required for a comprehensive understanding of theses systems, partly in ex situ studies, partly under stationary reaction conditions and in some cases even under dynamic reaction conditions. Among the different available techniques, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is a well-suited tool for this purpose as the different selected examples highlight. Two different techniques, scanning and full-field X-ray microscopy/tomography, are described and compared. At first, the tomographic structure of impregnated alumina pellets is presented using full-field transmission microtomography and compared to the results obtained with a scanning X-ray microbeam technique to analyse the catalyst bed inside a catalytic quartz glass reactor. On the other hand, by using XAS in scanning microtomography, the structure and the distribution of Cu(0), Cu(I), Cu(II) species in a Cu/ZnO catalyst loaded in a quartz capillary microreactor could be reconstructed quantitatively on a virtual section through the reactor. An illustrating example for spatially resolved XAS under reaction conditions is the partial oxidation of methane over noble metal-based catalysts. In order to obtain spectroscopic information on the spatial variation of the oxidation state of the catalyst inside the reactor XAS spectra were recorded by scanning with a micro-focussed beam along the catalyst bed. Alternatively, full-field transmission imaging was used to efficiently determine the distribution of the oxidation state of a catalyst inside a reactor under reaction conditions. The new technical approaches together with quantitative data

  6. TOPICAL REVIEW: Nanostructured catalysts in fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Chuan-Jian; Luo, Jin; Fang, Bin; Wanjala, Bridgid N.; Njoki, Peter N.; Loukrakpam, Rameshwori; Yin, Jun

    2010-02-01

    One of the most important challenges for the ultimate commercialization of fuel cells is the preparation of active, robust, and low-cost catalysts. This review highlights some findings of our investigations in the last few years in developing advanced approaches to nanostructured catalysts that address this challenge. Emphasis is placed on nanoengineering-based fabrication, processing, and characterization of multimetallic nanoparticles with controllable size (1-10 nm), shape, composition (e.g. MlnM2100-n, M1nM2mM3100-n-m, M1@M2, where M (1 or 2) = Pt, Co, Ni, V, Fe, Cu, Pd, W, Ag, Au etc) and morphology (e.g. alloy, core@shell etc). In addition to an overview of the fundamental issues and the recent progress in fuel cell catalysts, results from evaluations of the electrocatalytic performance of nanoengineered catalysts in fuel cell reactions are discussed. This approach differs from other traditional approaches to the preparation of supported catalysts in the ability to control the particle size, composition, phase, and surface properties. An understanding of how the nanoscale properties of the multimetallic nanoparticles differ from their bulk-scale counterparts, and how the interaction between the nanoparticles and the support materials relates to the size sintering or evolution in the thermal activation process, is also discussed. The fact that the bimetallic gold-platinum nanoparticle system displays a single-phase character different from the miscibility gap known for its bulk-scale counterpart serves as an important indication of the nanoscale manipulation of the structural properties, which is useful for refining the design and preparation of the bimetallic catalysts. The insight gained from probing how nanoparticle-nanoparticle and nanoparticle-substrate interactions relate to the size evolution in the activation process of nanoparticles on planar substrates serves as an important guiding principle in the control of nanoparticle sintering on different

  7. New catalysts for exhaust gas cleaning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haerkoenen, M. [Kemira Metalkat Oy, Oulu (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    Major challenge for future catalyst systems was to develop thermally more stable washcoats for close coupled operating conditions and for engines operating under high speed and load conditions. To design these future emission systems extensive research and development was undertaken to develop methods to disperse and stabilize the key catalytic materials for operation at much higher temperatures. Second priority was to design catalysts that are more effective under low temperature exhaust conditions and have improved oxygen storage properties in the washcoats. Incorporating new materials and modified preparation technology a new generation of metallic catalyst formulations emerged, those being trimetallic K6 (Pt:Pd:Rh and bimetallic K7) (Pd+Pd:Rh). The target was to combine the best property of Pt:Rh (good NO{sub x} reduction) with that of the good HC oxidation activity of Pd and to ensure that precious metal/support interactions were positively maintained. Both K6 and K7 concepts contain special catalyst structures with optimized washcoat performance which can be brick converter configuration. Improvement in light-off, thermal stability and transient performance with these new catalyst formulations have clearly been shown in both laboratory and vehicle testing. (author) (20 refs.)

  8. Thermal decomposition of supported lithium nitrate catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz, Maria Lucia [INTEQUI (CONICET-UNSL), 25 de Mayo 384, V. Mercedes, 5730, San Luis (Argentina); Lick, Ileana Daniela [CINDECA (CONICET-UNLP), Calle 47 No 257, La Plata, 1900, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Ponzi, Marta Isabel [INTEQUI (CONICET-UNSL), 25 de Mayo 384, V. Mercedes, 5730, San Luis (Argentina); Castellon, Enrique Rodriguez; Jimenez-Lopez, Antonio [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Cristalografia y Mineralogia. Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Malaga, Campus de Teatinos, 29071 Malaga (Spain); Ponzi, Esther Natalia, E-mail: eponzi@quimica.unlp.edu.ar [CINDECA (CONICET-UNLP), Calle 47 No 257, La Plata, 1900, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2010-02-20

    New catalysts for soot combustion were prepared by impregnation of different supports (SiO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2}.nH{sub 2}O) with a LiNO{sub 3} solution and then characterized by means of FTIR, XPS, TGA and UV-vis spectroscopy, whereby the presence of lithium nitrate in the prepared catalysts was identified and quantified. The soot combustion rate using this series of catalysts (LiNO{sub 3}/support) was compared with the activity of a series of impregnated catalysts prepared using LiOH (Li{sub 2}O/supports). Catalysts prepared using LiNO{sub 3} are found to be more active than those prepared using LiOH. The catalytic performance was also studied with a NO/O{sub 2} mixture in the feed, demonstrating that NO increases the combustion rate of soot, probably as a consequence of lithium oxide forming an 'in situ' nitrate ion.

  9. Characterization of three-way automotive catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenik, E.A.; More, K.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); LaBarge, W. [Delphi Automotive Systems, Flint, MI (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The CRADA between Delphi Automotive Systems (Delphi; formerly General Motors - AC Delco, Systems) and Lockheed Martin Energy Research (LMER) on automotive catalysts was completed at the end of FY96, after a ten month, no-cost extension. The CRADA was aimed at improved performance and lifetime of noble metal based three-way-catalysts (TWC), which are the primary catalytic system for automotive emission control systems. While these TWC can meet the currently required emission standards, higher than optimum noble metal loadings are often required to meet lifetime requirements. In addition, more stringent emission standards will be imposed in the near future, demanding improved performance and service life from these catalysts. Understanding the changes of TWC conversion efficiency with ageing is a critical need in improving these catalysts. Initially in a fresh catalyst, the active material is often distributed on a very fine scale, approaching single atoms or small atomic clusters. As such, a wide range of analytical techniques have been employed to provide high spatial resolution characterization of the evolving state of the catalytic material.

  10. Thermally Stable, Latent Olefin Metathesis Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Renee M; Fedorov, Alexey; Keitz, Benjamin K; Grubbs, Robert H

    2011-12-26

    Highly thermally stable N-aryl,N-alkyl N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ruthenium catalysts were designed and synthesized for latent olefin metathesis. These catalysts showed excellent latent behavior toward metathesis reactions, whereby the complexes were inactive at ambient temperature and initiated at elevated temperatures, a challenging property to achieve with second generation catalysts. A sterically hindered N-tert-butyl substituent on the NHC ligand of the ruthenium complex was found to induce latent behavior toward cross-metathesis reactions, and exchange of the chloride ligands for iodide ligands was necessary to attain latent behavior during ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP). Iodide-based catalysts showed no reactivity toward ROMP of norbornene-derived monomers at 25 °C, and upon heating to 85 °C gave complete conversion of monomer to polymer in less than 2 hours. All of the complexes were very stable to air, moisture, and elevated temperatures up to at least 90 °C, and exhibited a long catalyst lifetime in solution at elevated temperatures. PMID:22282652

  11. BIODIESEL PRODUCTION FROM MICROALGAE OVER HETEROGENEOUS CATALYSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Tuncer; E. S. Umdu; E. Kursat; G. Yilmaz; E. Seker [Izmir Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, Guelbahce Campus, Izmir (Turkey); Y. Durmaz; S. Gokpinar [Ege University, Faculty of Fisheries, Department of Aquaculture, Izmir (Turkey)

    2008-09-30

    The aim of this study is to produce biodiesel from yellow green algae (Nannochloropsis oculata) by using heterogeneous catalysts. Nannochloropsis oculata was preferred due to its high triglyceride content. N. oculata were grown in a batch culture using a flat plate type photobioreactor. After reaching the stationary phase, the algae were harvested, centrifuged and vacuum dried. Its lipid was extracted by using n-hexane. Finally, lipid-hexane mixture was subjected to the transesterification at 50 C using methanol and alumina supported CaO and MgO catalysts. We found that CaO nano-crystals were obtained on 80 wt.% CaO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts, hence resulting in a high CaO dispersion. Our activity results show that the biodiesel yield obtained using CaO and MgO on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts was a factor of two higher than that obtained with NaOH catalyst under the same reaction condition.

  12. RING OPENING COPOLYMERIZATION OF SUCCINIC ANHYDRIDE-ETHYLENE OXIDE BY Al (Ⅲ) ORGANOMETALLIC CATALYSTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xianhai; ZHANG Yifeng; SHEN Zhiquan

    1997-01-01

    Ring opening copolymerization of succinic anhydride (SA) with ethylene oxide (EO)was successfully carried out by using a series of aluminum-based catalyst in 1,4-dioxane at 62±2℃. The results showed that in-situ AlR3-H2O (R=ethyl, iso-butyl) catalysts gave higher molecular weight ((-M)w ~ 104), while Al(OR)3 catalysts gave the higher alternating copolymer structure with slightly lower molecular weight. The in-situ AlR3-H2O systems have been evaluated in more detail for the reaction which showed the optimum H2O/Al molar ratio to be 0.5. The copolymers with different composition (FSA/FEO = 36/64 to 45/55 mol/mol) were synthesized by using different monomer feed ratio. The melting point (Tm), glass transition temperature (Tg) and enthalpy of fusion (ΔHf) of these copolymers are depended on the copolymer composition and in the range of 87~ 102℃,-12 ~ -18℃, and 37 ~ 66J/g, respectively. The second heating scan of DSC also indicated that the higher alternating copolymer was more easily recrystallized. The onset decomposition temperature was more than 300℃ under nitrogen and influenced by the copolymer composition.

  13. Novel anti-flooding poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) catalyst binder for microbial fuel cell cathodes

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Fang

    2012-11-01

    Poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) was investigated as an alternative to Nafion as an air cathode catalyst binder in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Cathodes were constructed around either stainless steel (SS) mesh or copper mesh using PDMS as both catalyst binder and diffusion layer, and compared to cathodes of the same structure having a Nafion binder. With PDMS binder, copper mesh cathodes produced a maximum power of 1710 ± 1 mW m -2, while SS mesh had a slightly lower power of 1680 ± 12 mW m -2, with both values comparable to those obtained with Nafion binder. Cathodes with PDMS binder had stable power production of 1510 ± 22 mW m -2 (copper) and 1480 ± 56 mW m -2 (SS) over 15 days at cycle 15, compared to a 40% decrease in power with the Nafion binder. Cathodes with the PDMS binder had lower total cathode impedance than those with Nafion. This is due to a large decrease in diffusion resistance, because hydrophobic PDMS effectively prevented catalyst sites from filling up with water, improving oxygen mass transfer. The cost of PDMS is only 0.23% of that of Nafion. These results showed that PDMS is a very effective and low-cost alternative to Nafion binder that will be useful for large scale construction of these cathodes for MFC applications. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  14. Alternative fuels for vehicles; Alternative drivmidler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-02-15

    Up until 2020 and onwards the analysis indicates that especially electricity, biogas and natural gas as propellants is economically attractive compared to conventional gasoline and diesel while other fuels have the same or higher costs for petrol and diesel. Especially biogas and electricity will also offer significant reductions in CO{sub 2} emissions, but also hydrogen, methanol, DME and to a lesser extent the second generation bioethanol and most of the other alternative fuels reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. Use of the traditional food-based first generation biofuels involves, at best, only modest climate benefits if land use changes are counted, and at worst, significant negative climate effects. Natural gas as a propellant involves a moderate climate gain, but may play a role for building infrastructure and market for gaseous fuels in large fleets, thereby contributing to the phasing in of biogas for transport. The electric-based automotive fuels are the most effective due to a high efficiency of the engine and an increasing proportion of wind energy in the electricity supply. The methanol track also has a relatively high efficiency. Among the others, the track based on diesel engines (biodiesel) is more effective than the track based on gasoline/Otto engines (gas and ethanol) as a result of the diesel engine's better efficiency. For the heavy vehicles all the selected alternative fuels to varying degrees reduce emissions of CO{sub 2}, particularly DME based on wood. The only exception to this is - as for passenger cars - the propellant synthetic diesel based on coal. (LN).

  15. Selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide with ammonia on Fe-ZSM-5 catalysts prepared by different methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delahay, Gerard; Valade, David; Guzman-Vargas, Ariel; Coq, Bernard [Laboratoire de Materiaux Catalytiques et Catalyse en Chimie Organique, UMR CNRS-ENSCM 5618, ENSCM, 8 rue d l' Ecole Normale, 34296 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France)

    2005-01-28

    Fe-ZSM-5 catalysts, prepared by different methods, have been characterized by TPR and XRD and tested in the NO-SCR by NH{sub 3.} The sublimation method leads to the most active catalysts. Nevertheless the preparation starting from Fe(acac){sub 3}, which is a preparation easy to implement from an industrial point of view, seems to be a very attractive alternative way. On the most active catalyst, Fe(0.83){sub sub}ZSM-5, prepared starting from FeCl{sub 3}, a study of the mechanism was undertaken. In the initial step of the SCR reaction, the oxidation of NO in NO{sub 2}, the re-oxidation of Fe{sup II} species in the active iron oxo species is the slow phase.

  16. Synthesis and Electrochemical Evaluation of Carbon Supported Pt-Co Bimetallic Catalysts Prepared by Electroless Deposition and Modified Charge Enhanced Dry Impregnation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Meynard M. Tengco

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Carbon-supported bimetallic Pt-Co cathode catalysts have been previously identified as higher activity alternatives to conventional Pt/C catalysts for fuel cells. In this work, a series of Pt-Co/C catalysts were synthesized using electroless deposition (ED of Pt on a Co/C catalyst prepared by modified charge enhanced dry impregnation. X-ray diffraction (XRD and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM characterization of the base catalyst showed highly dispersed particles. A basic ED bath containing PtCl62− as the Pt precursor, dimethylamine borane as reducing agent, and ethylenediamine as stabilizing agent successfully targeted deposition of Pt on Co particles. Simultaneous action of galvanic displacement and ED resulted in Pt-Co alloy formation observed in XRD and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (XEDS mapping. In addition, fast deposition kinetics resulted in hollow shell Pt-Co alloy particles while particles with Pt-rich shell and Co-rich cores formed with controlled Pt deposition. Electrochemical evaluation of the Pt-Co/C catalysts showed lower active surface but much higher mass and surface activities for oxygen reduction reaction compared to a commercial Pt/C fuel cell catalyst.

  17. Photocatalytic Denitrogenation over Modiifed Waste FCC Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Liuping; Lin Mei; Huang Yingying; Yan Guiyang; Zheng Binquan; Li Ling

    2013-01-01

    The strontium modiifed waste FCC catalyst was prepared by magnetic stirring method and characterized by X-ray diffractometry (XRD), UV-Vis diffuse relfectance spectrometry (DRS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Meanwhile, its photocatalytic denitrogenation performance was evaluated in terms of its ability to degrade the N-containing simulation oil under visible light. A mixture of strontium nitrate solution (with a concentration of 0.5 mol/L) and waste FCC catalyst was calcined at 400℃for 5 h prior to taking part in the photocatalytic denitrogenation reaction. The test results showed that the photocatalytic degradation rate of pyridine contained in simulation oil in the presence of the strontium modiifed FCC catalyst could reach 92.0%under visible light irradiation for 2.5 h.

  18. Examining the surfaces in used platinum catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trumić B.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available For the purpose of finding more advanced platinum catalyst manufacturing technologies and achieving a higher degree of ammonia oxidation, metallographic characterization has been done on the surface of catalyst gauzes and catalyst gripper gauzes made from platinum and palladium alloys. For the examined samples of gauzes as well as the cross section of the wires, a chemical analysis was provided. The purpose of this paper is the metallographic characterization of examined alloys carried out by way of electronic microscopic scanning, X-rays as well as chemical assays which contributed greatly to a better understanding of the surface deactivation, in other words a better consideration of structural changes occurring on the wire surface.

  19. Heterogeneous Catalyst Deactivation and Regeneration: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris D. Argyle

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Deactivation of heterogeneous catalysts is a ubiquitous problem that causes loss of catalytic rate with time. This review on deactivation and regeneration of heterogeneous catalysts classifies deactivation by type (chemical, thermal, and mechanical and by mechanism (poisoning, fouling, thermal degradation, vapor formation, vapor-solid and solid-solid reactions, and attrition/crushing. The key features and considerations for each of these deactivation types is reviewed in detail with reference to the latest literature reports in these areas. Two case studies on the deactivation mechanisms of catalysts used for cobalt Fischer-Tropsch and selective catalytic reduction are considered to provide additional depth in the topics of sintering, coking, poisoning, and fouling. Regeneration considerations and options are also briefly discussed for each deactivation mechanism.

  20. Selective Oxidations using Nanostructured Heterogeneous Catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mielby, Jerrik Jørgen

    chapter focuses on the use of supported metal catalysts for the selective oxidation of alcohols, which are currently dominated by the platinum group metals. Chapter 2 deals with the most important methods to characterise heterogeneous catalysts, including X-ray powder diffraction, physisorption analysis...... supported gold nanoparticles with particular emphasis on the nature of the active site and the requirements needed to be considered when designing new catalytic systems. Furthermore, the chapter describes some of the most important methods to synthesise small and disperse gold nanoparticles on different...... pressure) without any additives or co-catalysts and afforded the desired imines with high selectivity (up to 99%). The highest catalytic activity was obtained with 5 wt% Ag/Al2O3 in toluene with air as oxidant, although the reaction also occurred under inert atmosphere by releasing H2 into the gas...

  1. Polypropylene obtained through zeolite supported catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Queli C. Bastos

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Propylene polymerizations were carried out with f2C(Flu(CpZrCl2 and SiMe2(Ind2ZrCl2 catalysts supported on silica, zeolite sodic mordenite (NaM and acid mordenite (HM. The polymerizations were performed at different temperatures and varying aluminium/zirconium molar ratios ([Al]/[Zr]. The effect of these reaction parameters on the catalyst activity was investigated using a proposed statistical experimental planning. In the case of f2C(Flu(CpZrCl2, SiO2 and NaM were used as support and the catalyst performance evaluated using toluene and pentane as polymerization solvent. The molecular weight, molecular weight distribution, melting point and crystallinity of the polymers were examined. The results indicate very high activities for the syndiospecific heterogeneous system. Also, the polymers obtained had superior Mw and stereoregularity.

  2. Pyrochlore catalysts for hydrocarbon fuel reforming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, David A.; Shekhawat, Dushyant; Haynes, Daniel; Smith, Mark; Spivey, James J.

    2012-08-14

    A method of catalytically reforming a reactant gas mixture using a pyrochlore catalyst material comprised of one or more pyrochlores having the composition A2B2-y-zB'yB"zO7-.DELTA., where y>0 and z.gtoreq.0. Distribution of catalytically active metals throughout the structure at the B site creates an active and well dispersed metal locked into place in the crystal structure. This greatly reduces the metal sintering that typically occurs on supported catalysts used in reforming reactions, and reduces deactivation by sulfur and carbon. Further, oxygen mobility may also be enhanced by elemental exchange of promoters at sites in the pyrochlore. The pyrochlore catalyst material may be utilized in catalytic reforming reactions for the conversion of hydrocarbon fuels into synthesis gas (H2+CO) for fuel cells, among other uses.

  3. Protein Scaffolding for Small Molecule Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, David [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2014-09-14

    We aim to design hybrid catalysts for energy production and storage that combine the high specificity, affinity, and tunability of proteins with the potent chemical reactivities of small organometallic molecules. The widely used Rosetta and RosettaDesign methodologies will be extended to model novel protein / small molecule catalysts in which one or many small molecule active centers are supported and coordinated by protein scaffolding. The promise of such hybrid molecular systems will be demonstrated with the nickel-phosphine hydrogenase of DuBois et. al.We will enhance the hydrogenase activity of the catalyst by designing protein scaffolds that incorporate proton relays and systematically modulate the local environment of the catalyticcenter. In collaboration with DuBois and Shaw, the designs will be experimentally synthesized and characterized.

  4. Polypropylene obtained through zeolite supported catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Propylene polymerizations were carried out with φ2C(Flu)(Cp)ZrCl2 and SiMe2(Ind)2ZrCl2 catalysts supported on silica, zeolite sodic mordenite (NaM) and acid mordenite (HM). The polymerizations were performed at different temperatures and varying aluminium/zirconium molar ratios ([Al]/[Zr]). The effect of these reaction parameters on the catalyst activity was investigated using a proposed statistical experimental planning. In the case of f2C(Flu)(Cp)ZrCl2, SiO2 and NaM were used as support and the catalyst performance evaluated using toluene and pentane as polymerization solvent. The molecular weight, molecular weight distribution, melting point and crystallinity of the polymers were examined. The results indicate very high activities for the syndiospecific heterogeneous system. Also, the polymers obtained had superior Mw and stereo regularity. (author)

  5. Directed Evolution of Stereoselective Hybrid Catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reetz, Manfred T.

    Whereas the directed evolution of stereoselective enzymes provides a useful tool in asymmetric catalysis, generality cannot be claimed because enzymes as catalysts are restricted to a limited set of reaction types. Therefore, a new concept has been proposed, namely directed evolution of hybrid catalysts in which proteins serve as hosts for anchoring ligand/transition metal entities. Accordingly, appropriate genetic mutagenesis methods are applied to the gene of a given protein host, providing after expression a library of mutant proteins. These are purified and a ligand/transition metal anchored site-specifically. Following en masse ee-screening, the best hit is identified, and the corresponding mutant gene is used as a template for another round of mutagenesis, expression, purification, bioconjugation, and screening. This allows for a Darwinian optimization of transition metal catalysts.

  6. Manipulating the reactivity of nanoscale catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conradsen, Christian Nagstrup

    This thesis presents the results of three different projects, all with focus on heterogeneous catalysis. The first part concerns the investigation of the structure sensitivity of the CO dissociation reaction on a Ru(0 1 54) single crystal and nanoparticulate ruthenium. The second part is an...... investigation of a model Cu/Ru system for ammonia oxidation and the deployment the system on a high surface area support. The last part of the thesis presents the dynamical changes of an industrial Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst during a pretreatment in hydrogen. The structure sensitivity of ruthenium for the CO...... ruthenium. A volcano shaped curve of the activity is found as a function of the copper overlayer thickness. The volcano has an optimum at a copper overlayer thickness of 2 Å corresponding to a coverage of 0.78 ML. The Cu/Ru system is deployed to a real catalyst on a high surface area support. The catalyst...

  7. Productions of palm oil bio diesel whit heterogeneous basic catalysts compared to conventional homogeneous catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conventional process to produce biodiesel involves the presence of homogeneous basic catalysts. However, these catalysts have disadvantages associated to the need of purification steps, which increase the cost of the final product and generate pollution problems caused by the effluents. This paper compares different homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts for the biodiesel production from palm oil. For this, heterogeneous catalysts supported on alumina were prepared and characterized by nitrogen adsorption, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X ray spectroscopy and X ray diffraction. Transesterification of palm oil with methanol was accomplished at 60 celsius degrade and one hour, varying methanol/oil ratio, the type of catalyst and its concentration. Yields of the reaction and purity of the so obtained biodiesel were evaluated. Comparing the catalysts performance, based on the amount, was found that sodium methoxide (CH3 ONa) and potassium carbonate supported on alumina (K2 CO3 /Al2O3) were the catalysts that give the higher purity of biodiesel (96.8 and 95.85% respectively). When was determined the active site quality, by dividing the performance by each mole of active sites, it was found that calcined Na2SO4 /Al2O3 has the most active sites.

  8. Catalyst dispersion and activity under conditions of temperature- staged liquefaction. [Catalyst precursors for molybdenum-based catalyst and iron-based catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, A.; Schobert, H.H.; Mitchell, G.D.; Artok, L.

    1992-07-01

    Two coals, a Texas subbituminous C and a Utah high volatile A bituminous, were used to examine the effects of solvent swelling and catalyst impregnation on liquefaction conversion behavior in temperature staged reactions for 30 minutes each at 275{degree} and 425{degree}C in H{sub 2} and 95:5 H{sub 2}:H{sub 2}S atmospheres. Methanol, pyridine, tetrahydrofuran, and tetrabutylammonium hydroxide were used as swelling agents. Molybdenum-based catalyst precursors were ammonium tetrathiomolybdate, molybdenum trisulfide, molybdenum hexacarbonyl, and bis(tricarbonylcyclopentadienyl-molybdenum). Ferrous sulfate and bis(dicarbonylcyclo-pentadienyliron) served as iron-based catalyst precursors. In addition, ion exchange was used for loading iron onto the subbituminous coal. For most experiments, liquefaction in H{sub 2}:H{sub 2}S was superior to that in H{sub 2}, regardless of the catalyst precursor. The benefit of the H{sub 2}S was greater for the subbituminous, presumably because of its higher iron content relative to the hvab coal. Tetrabutylammonium hydroxide was the only swelling agent to enhance conversion of the hvab coal significantly; it also caused a remarkable increase in conversion of the subbituminous coal. The combined application of solvent swelling and catalyst impregnation also improves liquefaction, mainly through increased oil yields from the hvab coal and increased asphaltenes from the subbituminous. A remarkable effect from use of ammonium tetrathiomolybdate as a catalyst precursor is substantial increase in pristane and phytane yields. Our findings suggest that these compounds are, at least in part, bound to the coal matrix.

  9. Application of Ion Beam Processing Technology in Production of Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykola G. Bannikov, Javed A. Chattha

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the applicability of Ion Beam Processing Technology for making catalysts has been inves-tigated. Ceramic substrates of different shapes and metal fibre tablets were implanted by platinum ions and tested in nitrogen oxides (NOx and carbon monoxide (CO conversion reactions. Effectiveness of the implanted catalysts was compared to that of the commercially produced platinum catalysts made by impregnation. Platinum-implanted catalyst having fifteen times less platinum content showed the same CO conversion efficiency as the commercially pro-duced catalyst. It was revealed that the effectiveness of the platinum-implanted catalyst has complex dependence on the process parameters and the optimum can be achieved by varying the ions energy and the duration of implantation. Investigation of the pore structure showed that ion implantation did not decrease the specific surface area of the catalyst.Key Words: Catalyst, Ion Implantation, Noble metals.

  10. Advanced Aqueous Phase Catalyst Development using Combinatorial Methods Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The use of combinatorial methods is proposed to rapidly screen catalyst formulations for the advanced development of aqueous phase oxidation catalysts with greater...

  11. Calcium and lanthanum solid base catalysts for transesterification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, K. Y. Simon; Yan, Shuli; Salley, Steven O.

    2015-07-28

    In one aspect, a heterogeneous catalyst comprises calcium hydroxide and lanthanum hydroxide, wherein the catalyst has a specific surface area of more than about 10 m.sup.2/g. In another aspect, a heterogeneous catalyst comprises a calcium compound and a lanthanum compound, wherein the catalyst has a specific surface area of more than about 10 m.sup.2/g, and a total basicity of about 13.6 mmol/g. In further another aspect, a heterogeneous catalyst comprises calcium oxide and lanthanum oxide, wherein the catalyst has a specific surface area of more than about 10 m.sup.2/g. In still another aspect, a process for preparing a catalyst comprises introducing a base precipitant, a neutral precipitant, and an acid precipitant to a solution comprising a first metal ion and a second metal ion to form a precipitate. The process further comprises calcining the precipitate to provide the catalyst.

  12. Highly Durable Catalysts for Ignition of Advanced Monopropellants Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Monopropellants are readily ignited or decomposed over a bed of solid catalyst. A serious limitation of existing catalysts in the ignition of advanced...

  13. Alternative Green Solvents Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Phillip R.

    2012-01-01

    Necessary for safe and proper functioning of equipment. Mainly halogenated solvents. Tetrachloride, Trichloroethylene (TCE), CFC-113. No longer used due to regulatory/safety concerns. Precision Cleaning at KSC: Small % of total parts. Used for liquid oxygen (LOX) systems. Dual solvent process. Vertrel MCA (decafluoropentane (DFP) and trons-dichloroethylene) HFE-7100. DFP has long term environmental concerns. Project Goals: a) Identify potential replacements. b) 22 wet chemical processes. c) 3 alternative processes. d) Develop test procedures. e) Contamination and cleaning. f) Analysis. g) Use results to recommend alternative processes. Conclusions: a) No alternative matched Vertrel in this study. b) No clear second place solvent. c) Hydrocarbons- easy; Fluorinated greases- difficult. d) Fluorinated component may be needed in replacement solvent. e) Process may need to make up for shortcoming of the solvent. f) Plasma and SCC02 warrant further testing.

  14. Alternatives for pseudofinite groups

    CERN Document Server

    Houcine, Abderezak Ould

    2012-01-01

    The famous Tits' alternative states that a linear group either contains a nonabelian free group or is soluble-by-(locally finite). We study in this paper similar alternatives in pseudofinite groups. We show for instance that an $\\aleph_{0}$-saturated pseudofinite group either contains a subsemigroup of rank $2$ or is nilpotent-by-(uniformly locally finite). We call a class of finite groups $G$ weakly of bounded rank if the radical $rad(G)$ has a bounded Pr\\"ufer rank and the index of the sockel of $G/rad(G)$ is bounded. We show that an $\\aleph_{0}$-saturated pseudo-(finite weakly of bounded rank) group either contains a nonabelian free group or is nilpotent-by-abelian-by-(uniformly locally finite). We also obtain some relations between this kind of alternatives and amenability.

  15. Ruthenium-based olefin metathesis catalysts bearing pH-responsive ligands: External control of catalyst solubility and activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balof, Shawna Lynn

    2011-12-01

    Sixteen novel, Ru-based olefin metathesis catalysts bearing pH responsive ligands were synthesized. The pH-responsive groups employed with these catalysts included dimethylamino (NMe2) modified NHC ligands as well as N-donor dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP) and 3-(o-pyridyl)propylidene ligands. These pH-responsive ligands provided the means by which the solubility and/or activity profiles of the catalysts produced could be controlled via acid addition. The main goal of this dissertation was to design catalyst systems capable of performing ring opening metathesis (ROMP) and ring closing metathesis (RCM) reactions in both organic and aqueous media. In an effort to quickly gain access to new catalyst structures, a template synthesis for functionalized NHC ligand precursors was designed, in addition to other strategies, to obtain ligand precursors with ancillary NMe2 groups. Kinetic studies for the catalysts produced from these precursors showed external control of catalyst solubility was afforded via protonation of the NMe2 groups of their NHC ligands. Additionally, this protonation afforded external control of catalyst propagation rates for several catalysts. This is the first known independent external control for the propagation rates of ROMP catalysts. The incorporation of pH-responsive N-donor ligands into catalyst structures also provided the means for the external control of metathesis activity, as the protonation of these ligands resulted in an increased initiation rate based on their fast and irreversible dissociation from the metal center. The enhanced external control makes these catalysts applicable to a wide range of applications, some of which have been explored by us and/or through collaboration. Three of the catalysts designed showed remarkable metathesis activity in aqueous media. These catalysts displayed comparable RCM activity in aqueous media to a class of water-soluble catalysts reported by Grubbs et al., considered to be the most active catalyst for

  16. CROTONALDEHYDE HYDROGENATION ON Rh SUPPORTED CATALYSTS

    OpenAIRE

    Reyes, P.; M. Aguirre; Pecchi, G.; Fierro, J.L.G.

    2000-01-01

    The vapor-phase hydrogenation of crotonaldehyde on Rh supported catalysts has been studied. The effect of some variables of preparation in catalysts prepared by the sol-gel and impregnation methods on the surface and catalytic properties were analyzed. It was found, that the porosity of the support has a small effect on the selectivity to the unsaturated alcohol and the presence of partially reducible supports such as ZrO2 and TiO2, may increase the selectivity to crotyl alcohol via an enhanc...

  17. Preliminary toxicological study of Silastic 386 catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D.M.; Drake, G.A.; Holland, L.M.; Jackson, D.E.; London, J.E.; Prine, J.R.; Thomas, R.G.

    1978-06-01

    The calculated acute oral LD/sub 50//sup 30/ values for Silastic 386 catalyst were 1225 mg/kg in mice and 4350 mg/kg in rats. According to classical guidelines, the compound would be slightly to moderately toxic in both species. Skin application studies in the rabbit demonstrated the compound to be mildly irritating. The eye irritation study disclosed the compound to be a severe irritant causing conjunctivitis, photophobia, corneal edema, corneal ulceration, anterior uveitis, and keratitis. The sensitization study in the guinea pig did not show Silastic 386 catalyst to be deleterious in this regard.

  18. Tetraalkylammonium Salts as Hydrogen-Bonding Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirakawa, Seiji; Liu, Shiyao; Kaneko, Shiho; Kumatabara, Yusuke; Fukuda, Airi; Omagari, Yumi; Maruoka, Keiji

    2015-12-21

    Although the hydrogen-bonding ability of the α hydrogen atoms on tetraalkylammonium salts is often discussed with respect to phase-transfer catalysts, catalysis that utilizes the hydrogen-bond-donor properties of tetraalkylammonium salts remains unknown. Herein, we demonstrate hydrogen-bonding catalysis with newly designed tetraalkylammonium salt catalysts in Mannich-type reactions. The structure and the hydrogen-bonding ability of the new ammonium salts were investigated by X-ray diffraction analysis and NMR titration studies. PMID:26564098

  19. Catalysis by nonmetals rules for catalyst selection

    CERN Document Server

    Krylov, Oleg V

    1970-01-01

    Catalysis by Non-metals: Rules of Catalyst Selection presents the development of scientific principles for the collection of catalysts. It discusses the investigation of the mechanism of chemosorption and catalysis. It addresses a series of properties of solid with catalytic activity. Some of the topics covered in the book are the properties of a solid and catalytic activity in oxidation-reduction reactions; the difference of electronegativities and the effective charges of atoms; the role of d-electrons in the catalytic properties of a solid; the color of solids; and proton-acid and proton-ba

  20. Method for the production of methanation catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammer, H.; Hakim, I.

    1976-11-18

    A methanation catalyst is claimed which is produced by precipitation of nickel salts from alcoholic solutions. At the same time, these solutions contain aluminium or magnesium compounds and, in some cases, also a carrier medium. The precipitation agents are alkali boron hydride solutions and alkali carbonate solutions. The precipitate, which is preferably obtained at temperatures between -5 and +5/sup 0/C, consists of a fine mixture of nickel boride, oxide hydrates, and hydroxides of nickel, magnesium, or aluminium. In contrast to the known nickel catalyst masses, it may be processed in air without inert gas. Four examples of preparations with suitable methanation tests are given.

  1. Towards the computational design of solid catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov, Jens Kehlet; Bligaard, Thomas; Rossmeisl, Jan; Christensen, Claus Hviid

    2009-01-01

    Over the past decade the theoretical description of surface reactions has undergone a radical development. Advances in density functional theory mean it is now possible to describe catalytic reactions at surfaces with the detail and accuracy required for computational results to compare favourably...... with experiments. Theoretical methods can be used to describe surface chemical reactions in detail and to understand variations in catalytic activity from one catalyst to another. Here, we review the first steps towards using computational methods to design new catalysts. Examples include screening for...

  2. Bouncing alternatives to inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Lilley, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Although the inflationary paradigm is the most widely accepted explanation for the current cosmological observations, it does not necessarily correspond to what actually happened in the early stages of our Universe. To decide on this issue, two paths can be followed: first, all the possible predictions it makes must be derived thoroughly and compared with available data, and second, all imaginable alternatives must be ruled out. Leaving the first task to all other contributors of this volume, we concentrate here on the second option, focusing on the bouncing alternatives and their consequences.

  3. Renewable and alternative energy

    CERN Document Server

    Curley, Robert

    2011-01-01

    With growing populations across the world consuming Earth's limited oil and natural gas reserves, the environmental and economic toll of energy dependence becomes an increasingly global concern. The development of renewable forms of energy-solar, wind, water, and geothermal, to name a few-offers alternatives to fossil fuels. Consumers are embracing these new modes of energy delivery and use. This extensive volume examines the possibility of a cleaner and more energy efficient future by detailing the historic and emerging technologies behind some the most promising alternative resources.

  4. Domestic energy alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These alternatives include biomass, clean coal, geothermal, hydropower, natural gas, nuclear, solar and photovoltaic, and wind. With the current, volatile situation in the Middle East, this nation's political leaders appear to be left scratching their heads in their attempts to come up with new, sound, energy policies to reduce our dependence on foreign oil. Therefore, the FORTNIGHTLY's editorial staff thought that this might be an opportune time to briefly examine some home-grown and environmentally responsible fuel alternatives to black gold. While some of these electricity-producing technologies are still on the horizon, others are available now

  5. Nickel catalysts for internal reforming in molten carbonate fuel cells

    OpenAIRE

    Berger, R.J.; Doesburg, E.B.M.; Ommen, van, B.; Ross, J.R.H.

    1996-01-01

    Natural gas may be used instead of hydrogen as fuel for the molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) by steam reforming the natural gas inside the MCFC, using a nickel catalyst (internal reforming). The severe conditions inside the MCFC, however, require that the catalyst has a very high stability. In order to find suitable types of nickel catalysts and to obtain more knowledge about the deactivation mechanism(s) occurring during internal reforming, a series of nickel catalysts was prepared and subj...

  6. Fries Rearrangement of Phenyl Acetate over Solid Acid Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A silica-supported zirconium based solid acid (ZS) has been used as catalyst for the Fries rearrangement of phenyl acetate (PA). The catalyst showed a higher PA conversion activity and a much higher selectivity for o-hydroxyacetophenone (o-HAP) than for strongly acidic zeolite catalysts. The supported catalyst was characterized by XRD, IR, XPS, pyridine-TPD and the surface area measurements. The catalytic properties were influenced significantly by pretreatment temperature.

  7. Fries Rearrangement of Phenyl Acetate over Solid Acid Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CanXiongGUO; YanLIU; 等

    2002-01-01

    A silica-supported zirconium based solid acid (ZS) has been used as catalyst for the Fries rearrangement of phenyl acetate (PA). The catalyst showed a higher PA conversion activity and a much higher selectivity for o-hydroxyacetophenone (o-HAP) than for strongly acidic zeolite catalysts. The supported catalyst was characterized by XRD,IR,XPS,pyridine-TPD and the surface area measurements. The catalytic properties were influenced significantly by pretreatment temperature.

  8. Modelling cathode catalyst degradation in polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    OpenAIRE

    Rinaldo, Steven Giordano

    2013-01-01

    Nano-sized Pt particles in the cathode catalyst layer of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell afford a high initial electrochemically active surface-area. However, the gain in active surface area for desired surface reactions is offset in part by enhanced rates of degradation processes that cause losses in catalyst mass, catalyst surface-area, and electrocatalytic activity. The loss of electrochemically active surface-area of the catalyst causes severe performance degradation over relevant lifetim...

  9. New Catalyst for HER and CO2 Hydrogenation for Solar Fuel Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chorkendorff, Ib

    2013-01-01

    sulfides mimics nature’s enzymes for hydrogen evolution when deposited on various supports [1, 2]. When these catalysts are deposited on p-type Si they can harvest the red part of the solar spectrum and potentially be coupled to CO2 hydrogenation [3-5]. Such a system could constitute the cathode part of a...... demonstrated and coupling to CO2 hydrogenation will discussed if time allows.......Hydrogen is the simplest solar fuel to produce and while platinum and other noble metals are efficient catalysts for photoelectrochemical hydrogen evolution, earth-abundant alternatives are needed for largescale use. We have shown that bio-inspired molecular clusters based on transition metal...

  10. Electron microscopy study of the deactivation of nickel based catalysts for bio oil hydrodeoxygenation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gardini, Diego; Mortensen, Peter Mølgaard; Carvalho, Hudson W. P.;

    2014-01-01

    Hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) is proposed as an efficient way to remove oxygen in bio-oil, improving its quality as a more sustainable alternative to conventional fuels in terms of CO2 neutrality and relative short production cycle [1]. Ni and Ni-MoS2 nanoparticles supported on ZrO2 show potential as...... study of this element through STEM-EDX. Moreover, nickel sintering was observed in the KCl poisoned sample and was ascribed once again to the formation of mobile Ni-Cl species upon reaction of HCl with surface oxides [4]. Furthermore, environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM) has been used...... high-pressure (100 bar) catalysts for purification of bio-oil by HDO. However, the catalysts deactivate in presence of sulfur, chlorine and potassium species, which are all naturally occurring in real bio-oil. The deactivation mechanisms of the Ni/ZrO2 have been investigated through scanning...

  11. Efficient Conversion of Carbohydrates to 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF Using ZrCl4 Catalyst in Nitromethane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raju S. Thombal

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Solvent nitromethane along with a variety of metal chloride and mineral acids as catalyst were studied for the synthesis of 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF, a key precursor in the formation of alternative fuel 2,5-dimethylfuran (DMF and other value added chemicals. Reaction time, temperature and catalyst concentration were also systematically studied to achieve highest HMF formation. Among the carbohydrates studied for HMF synthesis, D-fructose and inulin were found particularly most productive yielding >70% and with 100% selectivity using ZrCl4 in nitromethane at 100 oC during 3h. Readily available reagents, solvents, and simple reaction conditions could mark this process promising for HMF formation from biomass.

  12. Kinetic behaviour of commercial catalysts for methane reforming in ethanol steam reforming process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jorge Vicente; Javier Ere˜na; Martin Olazar; Pedro L. Benito; Javier Bilbao; Ana G. Gayubo

    2014-01-01

    Ethanol steam reforming has been studied in a fluidized bed (in order to ensure bed isothermicity) on commercial catalysts for methane reforming. The results allow analyzing the effect of temperature (in 300-700◦C range), and both metal and support nature on the reaction indices (ethanol conversion, yields and selectivities to H2 and byproducts (CO2, CO, CH4 and C2H4O)). Special attention has been paid to catalysts’ stability by comparing the evolution of the reaction indices with time on stream at 500◦C (minimum CO formation) and 700◦C (minimum deactivation by coke deposition). Although they provide a slightly lower H2 yield, the results evidence a good behaviour of Ni based catalysts, indicating that they are an interesting alternative of more expensive Rh based ones.

  13. Plasma–catalyst coupling for volatile organic compound removal and indoor air treatment: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first part of the review summarizes the problem of air pollution and related air-cleaning technologies. Volatile organic compounds in particular have various effects on health and their abatement is a key issue. Different ways to couple non-thermal plasmas with catalytic or adsorbing materials are listed. In particular, a comparison between in-plasma and post-plasma coupling is made. Studies dealing with plasma-induced heterogeneous reactivity are analysed, as well as the possible modifications of the catalyst surface under plasma exposure. As an alternative to the conventional and widely studied plasma–catalyst coupling, a sequential approach has been recently proposed whereby pollutants are first adsorbed onto the material, then oxidized by switching on the plasma. Such a sequential approach is reviewed in detail. (paper)

  14. Mesoporous nitrogen-rich carbon materials as cathode catalysts in microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Ahn, Yongtae

    2014-12-01

    The high cost of the catalyst material used for the oxygen reduction reaction in microbial fuel cell (MFC) cathodes is one of the factors limiting practical applications of this technology. Mesoporous nitrogen-rich carbon (MNC), prepared at different temperatures, was examined as an oxygen reduction catalyst, and compared in performance to Pt in MFCs and electrochemical cells. MNC calcined at 800 °C produced a maximum power density of 979 ± 131 mW m-2 in MFCs, which was 37% higher than that produced using MNC calined at 600 °C (715 ± 152 mW m-2), and only 14% lower than that obtained with Pt (1143 ± 54 mW m-2). The extent of COD removal and coulombic efficiencies were the same for all cathode materials. These results show that MNC could be used as an alternative to Pt in MFCs. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Methane oxidation over noble metal catalysts as related to controlling natural gas vehicle exhaust emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natural gas has considerable potential as an alternative automotive fuel. This paper reports on methane, the principal hydrocarbon species in natural-gas engine exhaust, which has extremely low photochemical reactivity but is a powerful greenhouse gas. Therefore, exhaust emissions of unburned methane from natural-gas vehicles are of particular concern. This laboratory reactor study evaluates noble metal catalysts for their potential in the catalytic removal of methane from natural-gas vehicle exhaust. Temperature run-up experiments show that the methane oxidation activity decreases in the order Pd/Al2O3 > Rh/Al2O3 > Pt/Al2O3. Also, for all the noble metal catalysts studied, methane conversion can be maximized by controlling the O2 concentration of the feedstream at a point somewhat rich (reducing) of stoichiometry

  16. Nano Catalysts for Diesel Engine Emission Remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narula, Chaitanya Kumar [ORNL; Yang, Xiaofan [ORNL; Debusk, Melanie Moses [ORNL; Mullins, David R [ORNL; Mahurin, Shannon Mark [ORNL; Wu, Zili [ORNL

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this project was to develop durable zeolite nanocatalysts with broader operating temperature windows to treat diesel engine emissions to enable diesel engine based equipment and vehicles to meet future regulatory requirements. A second objective was to improve hydrothermal durability of zeolite catalysts to at least 675 C. The results presented in this report show that we have successfully achieved both objectives. Since it is accepted that the first step in NO{sub x} conversion under SCR (selective catalytic reduction) conditions involves NO oxidation to NO{sub 2}, we reasoned that catalyst modification that can enhance NO oxidation at low-temperatures should facilitate NO{sub x} reduction at low temperatures. Considering that Cu-ZSM-5 is a more efficient catalyst than Fe-ZSM-5 at low-temperature, we chose to modify Cu-ZSM-5. It is important to point out that the poor low-temperature efficiency of Fe-ZSM-5 has been shown to be due to selective absorption of NH{sub 3} at low-temperatures rather than poor NO oxidation activity. In view of this, we also reasoned that an increased electron density on copper in Cu-ZSM-5 would inhibit any bonding with NH{sub 3} at low-temperatures. In addition to modified Cu-ZSM-5, we synthesized a series of new heterobimetallic zeolites, by incorporating a secondary metal cation M (Sc{sup 3+}, Fe{sup 3+}, In{sup 3+}, and La{sup 3+}) in Cu exchanged ZSM-5, zeolite-beta, and SSZ-13 zeolites under carefully controlled experimental conditions. Characterization by diffuse-reflectance ultra-violet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) does not permit conclusive structural determination but supports the proposal that M{sup 3+} has been incorporated in the vicinity of Cu(II). The protocols for degreening catalysts, testing under various operating conditions, and accelerated aging

  17. Biomass Conversion over Heteropoly Acid Catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Jizhe

    2015-04-01

    Biomass is a natural resource that is both abundant and sustainable. Its efficient utilization has long been the focus of research and development efforts with the aim to substitute it for fossil-based feedstock. In addition to the production of biofuels (e.g., ethanol) from biomass, which has been to some degree successful, its conversion to high value-added chemicals is equally important. Among various biomass conversion pathways, catalytic conversion is usually preferred, as it provides a cost-effective and eco-benign route to the desired products with high selectivities. The research of this thesis is focused on the conversion of biomass to various chemicals of commercial interest by selective catalytic oxidation. Molecular oxygen is chosen as the oxidant considering its low cost and environment friendly features in comparison with commonly used hydrogen peroxide. However, the activation of molecular oxygen usually requires high reaction temperatures, leading to over oxidation and thus lower selectivities. Therefore, it is highly desirable to develop effective catalysts for such conversion systems. We use kegging-type heteropoly acids (HPAs) as a platform for catalysts design because of their high catalytic activities and ease of medication. Using HPA catalysts allows the conversion taking place at relatively low temperature, which is beneficial to saving production cost as well as to improving the reaction selectivity. The strong acidity of HPA promotes the hydrolysis of biomass of giant molecules (e.g. cellulose), which is the first as well as the most difficult step in the conversion process. Under certain circumstances, a HPA combines the merits of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts, acting as an efficient homogeneous catalyst during the reaction while being easily separated as a heterogeneous catalyst after the reaction. We have successfully applied HPAs in several biomass conversion systems. Specially, we prepared a HPA-based bi-functional catalyst

  18. Moessbauer study of function of magnesium in iron oxide catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YangJie-Xin; MaoLian-Sheng; 等

    1997-01-01

    Moessbauer spectroscopy has been utilized for studying the action of Mg element in iron oxide catalysts used for the dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene to sytrene.The experimental results show that the presence of opportune amount of Mg can enhance the stability and dispersion of catalysts,i.e.Mg is an sueful structure promoter in this kind of catalysts.

  19. 40 CFR 91.329 - Catalyst thermal stress test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Catalyst thermal stress test. 91.329....329 Catalyst thermal stress test. (a) Oven characteristics. The oven used for termally stressing the... stress on catalyst conversion efficiency. (2) The synthetic exhaust gas mixture must have the...

  20. 40 CFR 90.329 - Catalyst thermal stress test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Catalyst thermal stress test. 90.329... Equipment Provisions § 90.329 Catalyst thermal stress test. (a) Oven characteristics. The oven used for... effect of thermal stress on catalyst conversion efficiency. (2) The synthetic exhaust gas mixture...

  1. Coke Accumulation on Catalysts used in a Fluidized Bed Pyrolyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have examined the impact of various solid catalysts on the product distribution resulting from the pyrolysis of biomass. Though catalysts do have a discernible impact, this impact is small. In our bench-top pyrolyzer designed as a catalyst screening tool, we measure bulk product distribution as...

  2. New improved hydrophobic Pt-catalyst for hydrogen isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the studies on preparation methods and applications of the hydrophobic catalysts in deuterium and tritium separation. The objectives of the paper are: (1) to provide a database for selection of the most appropriate catalyst and catalytic packing for above mentioned processes; (2) to evaluate the potentiality of hydrophobic Pt-catalysts in the deuterium and tritium separation; (3) to assess and to find a new procedure for preparation of a new improved hydrophobic catalyst. Unlike the conventional hydrophilic catalysts, the hydrophobic catalysts maintain a high catalytic activity and stability even under the direct contact to liquid water or in the presence of saturated humidity. A large diversity of catalyst types (over 100 catalysts) was prepared and tested for hydrogen isotope separation. The impregnation modes, the type of precursor of active metal, conditions of reduction and waterproofing methods are in detail analysed. As result of this assessment, platinum appears to be the most active catalytic metal and TEFLON is the most hydrophobic agent. A method for preparation of new improved hydrophobic Pt-catalysed has been proposed. The main steps and experimental conditions are largely discussed. The advantages of the hydrophobic catalysts are shown in comparison to hydrophilic catalysts. Some suggestions concerning the deuterium and tritium enrichment by means of hydrophobic catalysts are also discussed.The extension of hydrophobic Pt-catalysts' applications in environmental field is proposed. (author)

  3. Hydrogen atomic pair-ion production on catalyst surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To generate a hydrogen pair-ion plasma consisting of only hydrogen atomic pair ions, i.e., H+ and H- ions, the efficient production of pair ions is required. When discharged hydrogen plasma is irradiated to a Ni catalyst, pair ions are produced on the catalyst surface. It is clarified that hydrogen chemisorption on the catalyst affects pair-ion production.

  4. Hydrogenation of cottonseed oil with nickel, palladium and platinum catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    A number of commercial catalysts have been used to study hydrogenation of cottonseed oil, with the goal of minimizing trans fatty acid (TFA) content. Despite the different temperatures used, catalyst levels, and reaction times, the data from each catalyst type fall on the same curve when the TFA le...

  5. Cumulative effect of transition metals on nitrogen and fluorine co-doped graphite nanofibers: an efficient and highly durable non-precious metal catalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peera, S Gouse; Arunchander, A; Sahu, A K

    2016-08-14

    Nitrogen and fluorine co-doped graphite nanofibers (N/F-GNF) and their cumulative effect with Fe and Co have been developed as an alternative non-precious metal catalyst for efficient oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in acidic media. The synergistic effect between the doped hetero atoms and the co-ordinated Fe and Co towards ORR activity and durability of the catalyst is deeply investigated. A high ORR onset potential comparable with commercial Pt/C catalyst is observed with the Fe-Co/NF-GNF catalyst, which indicates that this catalyst is a potential alternative to Pt/C. A fivefold increase in mass activity is achieved by the Fe-Co/NF-GNF catalyst compared to the simple N/F-GNF catalyst, which endorses the significant role of transition metal atoms in enhancing ORR activity. The advanced Fe-Co/NF-GNF catalyst also exhibits complete tolerance to CH3OH and CO. The Fe-Co/NF-GNF catalyst also exhibits excellent durability towards the ORR with only a 10 mV negative shift in its half wave potential after a 10 000 repeated potential cycling test, whereas in the case of a commercial Pt/C catalyst there was an ∼110 mV negative shift under similar environmental conditions. More stringent corrosive test cycles were also performed by maintaining the cell as high as 1.4 V with a later decrease to 0.6 V vs. RHE for 300 cycles, which showed the excellent durability of the Fe-Co/NF-GNF catalyst in comparison with the Pt/C catalyst. XPS analysis of the Fe-Co/NF-GNF catalyst presents the ORR active chemical states of N (pyridinic-N and graphitic-N) and F (semi-ionic-F) and the co-ordinated sites of Fe and Co species with the dopants. The excellent performance and durability of the Fe-Co/NF-GNF catalyst is due to the synergistic effect between the hetero atoms dopants (N and F) and strong co-ordinating bonds of M-N-C, which protect the graphene layers around the metallic species and greatly mitigates the leaching of Co and Fe during the long term cycling test. The high activity

  6. Imperata cylindrica sp as Novel Silica-Based Heterogeneous Catalysts for Transesterification of Palm Oil Mill Sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngaini, Zainab; Shahrom, Farra Diana; Jamil, Nurfarahen; Wahi, Rafeah; Ahmad, Zainal Abiddin

    2016-06-01

    Biodiesel from palm oil mill sludge (POMS) was prepared in the presence of novel silica-based heterogeneous catalysts derived from Imperata cylindrica sp. Imperatacid and Imperatabase are two types of heterogeneous catalysts derived from Imperata cylindrica sp and characterized using scanning electron microscopy, Energy Dispersive X-ray, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area and pore size measurement. Imperatacid has particle size of 43.1-83.9 µm while Imperatabase in the range of 89-193 µm. Imperatacid was conveniently applied in esterification step to afford > 90 wt% oil in 1:3 (oil/methanol) and 10 wt% catalyst, followed by transesterification with 1 wt% Imperatabase and 1:1 (oil/methanol) for 1 h at 65°C to afford 80% biodiesel with higher percentage of methyl palmitate (48.97%) and methyl oleate (34.14%) compare to conventional homogeneous catalyst. Reusability of the catalyst up to three times afforded biodiesel ranging from 78-80% w/w. The biodiesel was demonstrated onto alternative diesel engine (Megatech(®)-Mark III) and showed proportional increased of torque (ɽ) to biodiesel loading. PMID:27181252

  7. Assessment of research needs for advanced heterogeneous catalysts for energy applications. Final report: Volume 2, Topic reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, G.A.

    1994-04-01

    This report assesses the direction, technical content, and priority of research needs judged to provide the best chance of yielding new and improved heterogeneous catalysts for energy-related applications over the period of 5-20 years. It addresses issues of energy conservation, alternate fuels and feedstocks, and the economics and applications that could alleviate pollution from energy processes. Recommended goals are defined in 3 research thrusts: catalytic science, environmental protection by catalysis, and industrial catalytic applications. This study was conducted by an 11-member panel of experts from industry and academia, including one each from Japan and Europe. This volume first presents an in-depth overview of the role of catalysis in future energy technology in chapter 1; then current catalytic research is critically reviewed and research recommended in 8 topic chapters: catalyst preparation (design and synthesis), catalyst characterization (structure/function), catalyst performance testing, reaction kinetics/reactor design, catalysis for industrial chemicals, catalysis for electrical applications (clean fuels, pollution remediation), catalysis for control of exhaust emissions, and catalysts for liquid transportation fuels from petroleum, coal, residual oil, and biomass.

  8. Synthesis and characterization of Fe–Ni/ɣ-Al2O3 egg-shell catalyst for H2 generation by ammonia decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva, Hugo José Lopes; Nielsen, Morten Godtfred; Fiordaliso, Elisabetta Maria;

    2015-01-01

    the active phase should match with the type of reaction. In this work, a novel synthesis route was developed for the preparation of a Fe–Ni/ɣ-Al2O3 egg-shell catalyst. Egg-shell is a preferred profile considering the highly endothermic nature of ammonia decomposition reaction. The high viscosity of......The Fe–Ni alloyed nanoparticles are a promising alternative to expensive ruthenium-based catalysts for a real-scale application of hydrogen generation by ammonia decomposition. In practical applications, millimeter-sized extrudates are used as catalyst supports, where the spatial distribution of....... The outer-shell region showed the presence of Fe and Ni alloyed nanoparticles with a size of approximately 5nm.. The egg-shell catalyst showed significant higher activity in ammonia decomposition by converting 3 times more ammonia to equilibrium conversion than either egg-white or catalyst with...

  9. Compensated pulsed alternator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention relates to an electromechanical energy converter with inertial energy storage. The device, a single phase, two or multi-pole alternator with stationary field coils, and a rotating armature is provided. The rotor itself may be of laminated steel for slower pulses or for faster pulses should be nonmagnetic and electrically nonconductive in order to allow rapid penetration of the field as the armature coil rotates. The armature coil comprises a plurality of power generating conductors mounted on the rotor. The alternator may also include a stationary or counterrotating compensating coil to increase the output voltage thereof and to reduce the internal impedance of the alternator at the moment of peak output. As the machine voltage rises sinusoidally, an external trigger switch is adapted to be closed at the appropriate time to create the desired output current from said alternator to an external load circuit, and as the output current passes through zero a self-commutating effect is provided to allow the switch to disconnect the generator from the external circuit

  10. Alternatives to Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Children Today, 1994

    1994-01-01

    Notes that our capacity to diffuse conflict rests in our ability to recognize and verbalize feelings, develop empathy, and think of alternatives to violence. Explores the influence of role models and culture on violence and how the media can use violent images effectively in helping us confront a culture of violence. (HTH)

  11. Tracking alternative energy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the third and last article dealing with global energy topics analyzed at the 13th World Energy Congress. The varied particality or applicability of the following alternative energy sources is briefly discussed at a popular level: fusion, solar, ocean thermal energy conversion, waves, winds, tidal, and geothermal

  12. Alternatives to Blood Transfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Blood Transfusion and Donation + - Text Size Download Printable Version [PDF] » TOPICS Document ... Possible risks of blood transfusions Alternatives to blood transfusions Donating blood Blood donation by cancer survivors To learn more References Previous ...

  13. Alternative health insurance schemes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Hans; Hansen, Bodil O.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we present a simple model of health insurance with asymmetric information, where we compare two alternative ways of organizing the insurance market. Either as a competitive insurance market, where some risks remain uninsured, or as a compulsory scheme, where however, the level...

  14. TWTF design alternates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Transuranic Waste Treatment Facility (TWTF) will process transuranic (TRU) waste in retrievable storage at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The costs for a TWTF concept using a slagging pyrolysis incinerator were excessive. Alternate concepts using a slow speed shredder, a rotary kiln incinerator, and concrete immobilization should result in significant cost reductions. These will be included in future TWTF considerations

  15. Alternative and Integrative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are the healthcare rituals practiced by a given culture (eg, Asian, Indian, African). Homeopathic Medicine: This alternative medicine system is based on the principle that “like cures like.” In other words, the same substance ... American Brain Tumor Association 8550 W. Bryn Mawr Ave. ...

  16. Hydrogenation of xylose to xylitol on sponge nickel catalyst: a study of the process and catalyst deactivation kinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Mikkola J.-P.; Salmi T.; Villela A.; Vainio H.; Mäki-Arvela P.; Kalantar A.; Ollonqvist T.; Väyrynen J.; Sjöholm R.

    2003-01-01

    The kinetics of hydrogenation of xylose to xylitol on a sponge nickel catalyst (commonly referred to as Raney Ni catalyst) and of catalyst deactivation were studied. Plausible explanations for the decrease in catalytic activity by means of surface studies, nitrogen adsorption and thermogravimetric analyses of the fresh and spent catalysts are presented. The kinetic parameters of the process were estimated by the use of a semi-competitive model, which allows full competition between the organi...

  17. Hollow cobalt phosphonate spherical hybrid as high-efficiency Fenton catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yun-Pei; Ren, Tie-Zhen; Yuan, Zhong-Yong

    2014-09-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid of cobalt phosphonate hollow nanostructured spheres were prepared in a water-ethanol system through a mild hydrothermal process in the absence of any templates using diethylenetriamine penta(methylene phosphonic acid) as bridging molecule. SEM, TEM and N2 sorption characterization confirmed a hollow spherical micromorphology with well-defined porosity. The structure and chemical states of the hybrid materials were investigated by FT-IR, XPS and thermogravimetric analysis, revealing the homogeneous integrity of inorganic and organic units inside the network. As a heterogeneous catalyst, hollow cobalt phosphonate material exhibited considerable catalytic oxidizing decomposition of methylene blue with sulfate radicals as compared to cobalt phosphonate nanoparticles synthesized in single water system, which could be attributed to enhanced mass transfer and high surface area for the hollow material. Some operational parameters, including pH and reaction temperature, were found to influence the oxidation process. The present results suggest that cobalt phosphonate material can perform as an efficient heterogeneous catalyst for the degradation of organic contaminants, providing insights into the rational design and development of alternative catalysts for wastewater treatment.Organic-inorganic hybrid of cobalt phosphonate hollow nanostructured spheres were prepared in a water-ethanol system through a mild hydrothermal process in the absence of any templates using diethylenetriamine penta(methylene phosphonic acid) as bridging molecule. SEM, TEM and N2 sorption characterization confirmed a hollow spherical micromorphology with well-defined porosity. The structure and chemical states of the hybrid materials were investigated by FT-IR, XPS and thermogravimetric analysis, revealing the homogeneous integrity of inorganic and organic units inside the network. As a heterogeneous catalyst, hollow cobalt phosphonate material exhibited considerable

  18. Studies on mixed metal oxides solid solutions as heterogeneous catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. R. Arandiyan

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a series of perovskite-type mixed oxide LaMo xV1-xO3+δ powder catalysts (x = 0, 0.1, 0.3, 0.5, 0.7, 0.9, and 1.0, with 0.5 < δ < 1.5, prepared by the sol-gel process and calcined at 750ºC, provide an attractive and effective alternative means of synthesizing materials with better control of morphology. Structures of resins obtained during the gel formation process by FT-IR spectroscopy and XRD analysis showed that all the LaMo xV1-xO3+δ samples are single phase perovskite-type solid solutions. The surface area (BET between 2.5 - 5.0 m²/g (x = 0.1 and 1.0 respectively increases with increasing Mo ratio in the samples. They show high purity, good chemical homogeneity, and lower calcinations temperatures as compared with the solid-state chemistry route. SEM coupled to EDS and thermogravimetric analysis/differential thermal analyses (TGA/DTA have been carried out in order to evaluate the homogeneity of the catalyst. Finally, the experimental studies show that the calcination temperature and Mo content exhibited a significant influence on catalytic activity. Among the LaMo xV1-xO3+δ samples, LaMo0.7V0.3O4.2 showed the best catalytic activity for the topic reaction and the best activity and stability for ethane reforming at 850ºC under 8 bar.

  19. Chelating agent assisted heat treatment of carbon supported cobalt oxide nanoparticle for use as cathode catalyst of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cobalt-based catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) have been successfully incorporated cobalt oxide (Co3O4) onto Vulcan XC-72 carbon powder by thermal decomposition of Co-ethylenediamine complex (ethylenediamine, NH2CH2CH2NH2, denoted en) at 850 oC. The catalysts were prepared by adsorbing the cobalt complexes [Co(en)(H2O)4]3+, [Co(en)2(H2O)2]3+ and [Co(en)3]3+ on commercial XC-72 carbon black supports, loading amount of Co with respect to carbon black was about 2%, the resulting materials have been pyrolyzed under nitrogen atmosphere to create CoOx/C catalysts, donated as E1, E2, and E3, respectively. The composite materials were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Chemical compositions of prepared catalysts were determined using inductively-coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). The catalytic activities for ORR have been analyzed by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and linear sweep voltammetry (LSV). The electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction of E2 is superior to that of E1 and E3. Membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) containing the synthesized CoOx/C cathode catalysts were fabricated and evaluated by single cell tests. The E2 cathode performed better than that of E1 and E3 cathode. This can be attributed to the enhanced activity for ORR, in agreement with the composition of the catalyst that CoO co-existed with Co3O4. The maximum power density 73 mW cm-2 was obtained at 0.3 V with a current density of 240 mA cm-2 for E2 and the normalized power density of E2 is larger than that that of commercial 20 wt.% Pt/C-ETEK. -- Highlights: → Non-noble catalysts have been attracting increasing attention due to become a low-cost alternative catalyst for oxygen reduction in PEMFC. → This method for the production of nanoparticle cobalt oxides which can be incorporated into Vulcan XC-72

  20. OCAD University's Imagination Catalyst: a Case Study.

    OpenAIRE

    Reichenbacher, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    In order to provide the context for an incubator case study, this paper provides a brief overview of the support mechanisms for Canadian university-based innovation and commercialization, especially regarding government (federal, provincial, municipal). It then proceeds to describe OCAD University’s specialized commercialization and incubator unit, the Imagination Catalyst, which supports talent

  1. Conversion of dimethyl ether on zeolite catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramova, A.V.; Kulumbegov, R.V.; Khadzhiev, S.N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). A.V. Topchiev Inst. of Petrochemical Synthesis

    2006-07-01

    Catalytic conversion of dimethyl ether to hydrocarbons was investigated using zeolite catalyst ZSM-5 type. 2% MexOy - 60% HZVM(analogue of ZSM-5)/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, (Me = Zn, Ga, Fe, Co, V, Ni) catalyst samples have been obtained. The reaction was carried out in a fixed bed reaction set-up at 350-400 C, pressure 3 MPa, gas mix (% vol.): 24 DME, 76 N{sub 2}, WHSV=1300 l/l-{sub kat.}h. Most effective catalysts of DME conversion are pentasil based catalysts with promoter metals zinc, iron and cobalt by totality DME-conversion, gas and liquid hydrocarbon selectivity, ethylene and propylene content in gas. The best work temperatures are 350 and 375 C, thereupon increasing of temperature to 400 C leads to considerable growth of methane in hydrocarbon gas. Liquid hydrocarbons have high content of aromatics and iso-paraffins. Liquid hydrocarbon product is characterized by high octane number (RON) 90-98. (orig.)

  2. Comparison of environmentally friendly, selective polyurethane catalysts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Strachota, Adam; Strachotová, Beata; Špírková, Milena

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 6 (2008), s. 566-570. ISSN 1042-6914 R&D Projects: GA MPO FT-TA3/034 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : amine catalyst * foam * gelation * kinetics * polyurethane Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 0.706, year: 2008

  3. Catalysts compositions for use in fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Steven S.C.

    2015-12-01

    The present invention generally relates to the generation of electrical energy from a solid-state fuel. In one embodiment, the present invention relates to a solid-oxide fuel cell for generating electrical energy from a carbon-based fuel, and to catalysts for use in a solid-oxide fuel cell.

  4. Computer-Aided Design of Solid Catalysts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holeňa, Martin; Baerns, M.

    Weinheim: Wiley, 2008 - (Ertl, G.; Knözinger, H.; Schüth, F.; Weitkamp, J.), s. 66-81 ISBN 978-3-527-31241-2 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : combinatorial catalysis * design of experiments * catalyst optimization, * evolutionary methods * data analysis * artificial neural networks Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science

  5. Catalyst. Volume 10, Number 3, Spring 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Barbara E., Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "Catalyst" is a publication of the U.S. Department of Education's Higher Education Center for Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse and Violence Prevention. This issue contains the following articles: (1) The National Study of Student Hazing Initial Findings; (2) The Social Norms Marketing Research Project--An Update; (3) Message From William Modzeleski,…

  6. Alkane dehydrogenation over supported chromium oxide catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Schoonheydt, R.A.

    1999-01-01

    The dehydrogenation of alkanes over supported chromium oxide catalysts in the absence of oxygen is of high interest for the industrial production of propene and isobutene. In this review, a critical overview is given of the current knowledge nowadays available about chromium-based dehydrogenation ca

  7. Process for Functionalizing Biomass using Molybdenum Catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention concerns a process for converting biomass into useful organic building blocks for the chemical industry. The process involves the use of molybdenum catalysts of the formula Aa+a(MovXxR1yR2zR3e)a*3-, which may be readily prepared from industrial molybdenum compounds....

  8. Sintering of nickel steam reforming catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sehested, Jens; Larsen, Niels Wessel; Falsig, Hanne; Hinnemann, Berit

    2014-01-01

    The lifetimes of heterogeneous catalysts in many widely used industrial processes are determined by the loss of active surface area. In this context, the underlying physical sintering mechanism and quantitative information about the rate of sintering at industrial conditions are relevant. In this...

  9. SOME PRELIMINARY INFORMATION ON SYNDIOTACTIC POLYSTYRENE CATALYSTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Adolfo Zambelli; Claudio Pellecchia; Leone Oliva; HAN Shimin

    1988-01-01

    Syndiotactic specific polymerization of styrene has been investigated by 13C NMR analysis and isotopic labelling methods. The value of the activation energy involved in the sterie control has been determined. Some information of the number of the active sites and on the life of the catalysts is reported.

  10. Advanced soluble hydroliquefaction and hydrotreating catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laine, R.M. (Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Stoebe, T. (Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1991-11-22

    The purpose of the present program is to develop soluble analogs of surface confined catalysts that can be impregnated directly into the coal structure at low temperatures. This approach should avoid problems related to surface area dependence, a two phase (surface-liquid) reaction system and, mass transport limitations.

  11. Water Uptake in PEMFC Catalyst Layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunterman, Haluna P.; Kwong, Anthony H.; Gostick, Jeffrey T.; Kusoglu, Ahmet; Weber, Adam Z.

    2011-07-01

    Water uptake profiles of proton-exchange-membrane fuel-cell catalyst layers are characterized in the form of capillary-pressure saturation (Pc-S) curves. The curves indicate that the catalyst layers tested are highly hydrophilic and require capillary pressures as low as -80 kPa to eject imbibed water. Comparison of materials made with and without Pt indicates a difference in water ejection and uptake phenomena due to the presence of Pt. The addition of Pt increases the tendency of the catalyst layer to retain water. Dynamic vapor sorption (DVS) is used to characterize the water-vapor sorption onto Nafion, Pt/C, and C surfaces. The DVS results align with the trends found from the Pc-S curves and show an increased propensity for water uptake in the presence of Pt. The effect of the ion in Nafion, sodium or protonated form, is also compared and demonstrates that although the protonation of the Nafion in the catalyst layer also increases hydrophilicity, the effect is not as great as that caused by Pt.

  12. Overview of Support Effects in Hydrotreating Catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michèle Breysse

    2004-01-01

    @@ Industrial hydrotreating (HDT) catalysts are composed of a molybdenum sulfide (or tungsten sulfide) phase promoted by cobalt or nickel and usually supported on alumina. The origin of the almost exclu1sive use of alumina as support has to be ascribed to its outstanding textural and mechanical properties and its relatively low cost[1].

  13. Catalyst. Volume 11, Number 3, Summer 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Barbara E., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Catalyst" is a publication of the U.S. Department of Education's Higher Education Center for Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse and Violence Prevention. This issue contains the following articles: (1) From Competition To Collaboration College Alcohol Prevention in an Era of Competing Risks; (2) A Public Health Approach to Mental Health Promotion; (3)…

  14. Improving performance of catalysts for water electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydendal, Rasmus

    This Ph.D. thesis presents work on non-noble metal oxide catalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction, OER. This reaction is currently a bottleneck in electrolyzer technologies, which are promising for energy storage purposes. In particular, Polymer Electrolyte Membrane, PEM, cells are attractive...

  15. Theoretical studies of homogeneous catalysts mimicking nitrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgrignani, Jacopo; Franco, Duvan; Magistrato, Alessandra

    2011-01-01

    The conversion of molecular nitrogen to ammonia is a key biological and chemical process and represents one of the most challenging topics in chemistry and biology. In Nature the Mo-containing nitrogenase enzymes perform nitrogen 'fixation' via an iron molybdenum cofactor (FeMo-co) under ambient conditions. In contrast, industrially, the Haber-Bosch process reduces molecular nitrogen and hydrogen to ammonia with a heterogeneous iron catalyst under drastic conditions of temperature and pressure. This process accounts for the production of millions of tons of nitrogen compounds used for agricultural and industrial purposes, but the high temperature and pressure required result in a large energy loss, leading to several economic and environmental issues. During the last 40 years many attempts have been made to synthesize simple homogeneous catalysts that can activate dinitrogen under the same mild conditions of the nitrogenase enzymes. Several compounds, almost all containing transition metals, have been shown to bind and activate N₂ to various degrees. However, to date Mo(N₂)(HIPTN)₃N with (HIPTN)₃N= hexaisopropyl-terphenyl-triamidoamine is the only compound performing this process catalytically. In this review we describe how Density Functional Theory calculations have been of help in elucidating the reaction mechanisms of the inorganic compounds that activate or fix N₂. These studies provided important insights that rationalize and complement the experimental findings about the reaction mechanisms of known catalysts, predicting the reactivity of new potential catalysts and helping in tailoring new efficient catalytic compounds. PMID:21221062

  16. Theoretical Studies of Homogeneous Catalysts Mimicking Nitrogenase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Magistrato

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The conversion of molecular nitrogen to ammonia is a key biological and chemical process and represents one of the most challenging topics in chemistry and biology. In Nature the Mo-containing nitrogenase enzymes perform nitrogen ‘fixation’ via an iron molybdenum cofactor (FeMo-co under ambient conditions. In contrast, industrially, the Haber-Bosch process reduces molecular nitrogen and hydrogen to ammonia with a heterogeneous iron catalyst under drastic conditions of temperature and pressure. This process accounts for the production of millions of tons of nitrogen compounds used for agricultural and industrial purposes, but the high temperature and pressure required result in a large energy loss, leading to several economic and environmental issues. During the last 40 years many attempts have been made to synthesize simple homogeneous catalysts that can activate dinitrogen under the same mild conditions of the nitrogenase enzymes. Several compounds, almost all containing transition metals, have been shown to bind and activate N2 to various degrees. However, to date Mo(N2(HIPTN3N with (HIPTN3N= hexaisopropyl-terphenyl-triamidoamine is the only compound performing this process catalytically. In this review we describe how Density Functional Theory calculations have been of help in elucidating the reaction mechanisms of the inorganic compounds that activate or fix N2. These studies provided important insights that rationalize and complement the experimental findings about the reaction mechanisms of known catalysts, predicting the reactivity of new potential catalysts and helping in tailoring new efficient catalytic compounds.

  17. Redox Equilibria in SO2 Oxidation Catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Søren Birk; Eriksen, Kim Michael; Boghosian, Soghomon; Fehrmann, Rasmus

    been carried out regarding the complex and compound formation of V(V) and the formation of V(IV) and V(III) compounds with low solubility causing catalyst deactivation. However, the redox chemistry of vanadium and the complex formation of V(IV) is much less investigated and further information on these...

  18. Catalysts for biobased fuels. New catalyst formulations for vehicles fuelled by biobased motor fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettersson, L.J.; Wahlberg, A.M.; Jaeraas, S.G. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Technology

    1997-12-01

    The long-term objective for the project is to develop tailor-made exhaust gas catalysts for heavy-duty vehicles fuelled by biobased motor fuels operating in urban traffic. In this report an experimental study of catalytic oxidation of ethanol in a laboratory flow reactor is presented. The miniature catalyst samples consisted of monolithic cordierite substrates onto which various combinations of washcoat material and active material were applied. Oxides of Cu and Cu-Mn, as well as different combinations of precious metals were evaluated as active material supported on various washcoat materials. The experimental conditions were chosen in order to simulate the exhaust from a diesel engine fuelled by neat ethanol. Catalyst characterization included measurements of BET surface area and pore size distribution as well as temperature programmed reduction (TPR) analysis. When comparing the TPR profiles with the light-off curves from the ethanol oxidation experiments, we have found an indication of a correlation between activity and reducibility of the catalyst. There also seems to be a correlation between TPR profile and pore size distribution for titania-supported catalysts. When combining two precious metals as active material, a positive synergistic effect has been observed. The light-off temperature (T{sub 50}) is considerably lower for some of these combinations than for the corresponding monometallic catalysts. The base metal oxide catalysts tested were more selective for oxidation of ethanol to carbon dioxide and water than the precious metal catalysts. The results also indicate that the oxidation of nitric oxide to the more hazardous nitrogen dioxide can be suppressed by using a suitable combination of active material and washcoat material 45 refs, 97 figs, 4 tabs

  19. Palladium catalysts deposited on silica materials: Comparison of catalysts based on mesoporous and amorphous supports in Heck reaction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Demel, J.; Čejka, Jiří; Štěpnička, P.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 329, 1-2 (2010), s. 13-20. ISSN 1381-1169 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/09/0561 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : heterogeneous catalysts * immobolized catalysts * supported catalysts Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.872, year: 2010

  20. Design strategies for the molecular level synthesis of supported catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegener, Staci L; Marks, Tobin J; Stair, Peter C

    2012-02-21

    Supported catalysts, metal or oxide catalytic centers constructed on an underlying solid phase, are making an increasingly important contribution to heterogeneous catalysis. For example, in industry, supported catalysts are employed in selective oxidation, selective reduction, and polymerization reactions. Supported structures increase the thermal stability, dispersion, and surface area of the catalyst relative to the neat catalytic material. However, structural and mechanistic characterization of these catalysts presents a formidable challenge because traditional preparations typically afford complex mixtures of structures whose individual components cannot be isolated. As a result, the characterization of supported catalysts requires a combination of advanced spectroscopies for their characterization, unlike homogeneous catalysts, which have relatively uniform structures and can often be characterized using standard methods. Moreover, these advanced spectroscopic techniques only provide ensemble averages and therefore do not isolate the catalytic function of individual components within the mixture. New synthetic approaches are required to more controllably tailor supported catalyst structures. In this Account, we review advances in supported catalyst synthesis and characterization developed in our laboratories at Northwestern University. We first present an overview of traditional synthetic methods with a focus on supported vanadium oxide catalysts. We next describe approaches for the design and synthesis of supported polymerization and hydrogenation catalysts, using anchoring techniques which provide molecular catalyst structures with exceptional activity and high percentages of catalytically significant sites. We then highlight similar approaches for preparing supported metal oxide catalysts using atomic layer deposition and organometallic grafting. Throughout this Account, we describe the use of incisive spectroscopic techniques, including high

  1. Cobalt and Iron Complexes with N-heterocyclic Ligands as Pyrolysis Precursors for Oxygen Reduction Catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cobalt and Iron based catalysts for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR) are a promising alternative to the use of Pt in Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells (PEMFC). A systematic study on the influence of the nitrogenated ligand in the precursor complex on the ORR activity was performed. Several Fe and Co complexes were prepared with different N-heterocyclic ligands, namely: meso-tetra-(4-carboxyphenyl)-porphyrin (TCPP), N-methylimidazole (N-Me-Im), 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole-5-carboxylic acid (ATZC), 2,2′-bis(4,5-dimethylimidazole) (bis-Me-Im), phenanthroline (phen), 2-pyrazinecarboxylic acid (CO2-Pz), 3,6-di-2-pyridyl-1,2,4,5-tetrazine (DPTZ) and 2,4,6-tri(2-pyridyl)-s-triazine (TPTZ), adsorbed on a carbon substrate and submitted to thermal treatment. These ligands comprise five and six membered rings with one to four N-atoms. Key parameters such as the pyrolysis temperature, the complex load and the metal: ligand ratio were studied, in order to optimize the efficiency of the catalysts. The synthesized catalysts were characterized by several physical bulk and surface techniques, namely XRD, TGA, Raman spectroscopy, XPS, EDX and electron microscopies (SEM and TEM). The best catalyst was obtained from a Cobalt-phenanthroline precursor, adsorbed on a mesoporous carbon material, and pyrolyzed at 700 °C. The equilibrium potential was 0.90 V vs NHE (1.0 V for Pt), exchange current density 25 μA cm−2, Tafel slope was 90 mV dec−1, and 4.0 exchanged electrons, less than 9 % in H2O2 yield, and half wave potential only 80 mV lower than that of Platinum (10%). This catalyst exhibited the highest N content as determined by XPS. The electrochemical data of the prepared catalysts were analyzed in the context of the TGA, XRD and XPS information. A correlation between ORR activity and the N content (XPS) was found. This result strongly supports the model that proposes N atoms as the active sites, and provides a rational tool for designing new catalysts

  2. Endurance testing of a WDS catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Water Detritiation System (WDS) of ITER is a safety related component since it is the final barrier against tritium discharge into the environment. Therefore, its subcomponents have to be qualified and predictions on the time evolution of performances have to be made. During the activities devoted to JET WDS, test at lower concentrations of tritium and at small scale have been performed. The goal of this work is to extend the endurance testings and to check early results by tests under relevant conditions. The degradation of the WDS catalyst can strongly affect its separation performances and consequently it will entail a raise of the tritium releases into the environment. If a catalyst based on Teflon material is used for the LPCE column of WDS, the fluoride that may be formed and released due to the tritium presence causes the corrosion of the LPCE column with unpredictable effects. Therefore the quantification of catalyst degradation and the amount of fluoride released is needed for planning the maintenance activities and to predict the operation life time of the WDS components. The manufacturing of hydrophobic catalysts with activity that is not lowered by liquid water determined the rise of interest for the isotopes separation techniques in the hydrogen - water system. The active component of these catalysts is Pt (the only material to be further discussed) that enhances the exchange between the hydrogen and water vapors. The hydrophobic support does not allow the wetting and blocking by water of the active surface. Hydrophobic catalysts were manufactured by two methods: - direct deposition of Pt into the pores of a hydrophobic support (Teflon, carbon monofluoride, poly styrene, styrene di-vinyl benzene, etc.); - deposition on a hydrophilic support, most common charcoal, followed by hydrophobization by silicon oil or by homogenizing with hydrophobic polymer (Teflon, silicon resins). This type of catalysts is one of the most studied groups due to

  3. Cathode catalyst layer using supported Pt catalyst on ordered mesoporous carbon for direct methanol fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hee-Tak; Yoon, Hae-Kwon; Song, In-Seob [Samsung SDI Co. Ltd., 575 Shin-dong, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon-si, Gyeonggi-do 443-391 (Korea); You, Dae Jong; Joo, Sang Hoon; Pak, Chanho; Chang, Hyuk [Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 111, Suwon 440-600 (Korea)

    2008-06-01

    The development of a cathode catalyst layer based on a supported Pt catalyst using an ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) for direct methanol fuel cell is reported. An OMC with a mesopore structure between hexagonally arranged carbon nanorods is prepared using a template method. Platinum nanoparticles are supported on the OMC (Pt/OMC) with high metal loading of 60 wt.%. Compositional and morphological variations are made by varying the ionomer content and by compressing the catalyst layer to detect a parameter that determines the power performance. Increase in power density with decrease in the volume fraction of ionomer in the agglomerate comprising the Pt/OMC and the ionomer indicates that mass transport through the ionomer phase governs the kinetics of oxygen reduction. Impedance spectroscopic analysis suggests that a significant mass-transport limitation occurs at high ionomer content and in the compressed cathode. The power density of the optimum cathode layer, which employs a Pt/OMC catalyst with a Pt loading of 2 mg cm{sup -2}, is greater than that of a catalyst layer with 6 mg cm{sup -2} Pt-black catalyst at a voltage higher than 0.4 V. This would lead to a significant reduction in the cost of the membrane electrode assembly. (author)

  4. Simulation three-way catalyst ageing. Analysis of two conventional catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, L.; Arranz, J.L.; Galan, M.A. [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Textil, Universidad de Salamanca, Salamanca (Spain); Prieto, O.; Trujillano, R.; Holgado, M.J.; Rives, V. [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Universidad de Salamanca, Plaza de la Merced s/n 1-5, 37008 Salamanca (Spain)

    2003-08-08

    Two commercial automobile three-way catalysts (RENAULT) of different configuration: (I) Pt, Rh active phase supported on ceria-promoted alumina washcoat, and (II) Pd, Rh active phase supported on zirconia-ceria-promoted alumina washcoat on cordierite supports, have been compared fresh and aged in a conventional automobile for 100,000km in order to design and to adjust a catalyst ageing method suitable to imitate most relevant conditions of real tests. The characterization techniques were N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption isotherms, powder X-Ray diffraction, elemental chemical analysis and activity tests. Activity tests were: (1) CO, NO and CH{sub 4} conversion versus temperature (from 120 to 500C), and (2) CO, NO and CH{sub 4} conversion versus the ratio between the concentrations of the oxidant and reducing species ({lambda}) at 500C (normal running temperature). Gas composition was close to conventional engine exhaust composition with and without water vapour. A strong deactivation has been observed as a consequence of thermal processes and loss of catalyst washcoat mainly for catalyst (II). Poison concentration along the catalyst has also been shown, however, its influence on catalyst deactivation was not as important as thermal processes were.

  5. Catalysts for Efficient Production of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ted X.; Dong, Yi

    2009-01-01

    Several metal alloys have shown promise as improved catalysts for catalytic thermal decomposition of hydrocarbon gases to produce carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Heretofore almost every experiment on the production of carbon nanotubes by this method has involved the use of iron, nickel, or cobalt as the catalyst. However, the catalytic-conversion efficiencies of these metals have been observed to be limited. The identification of better catalysts is part of a continuing program to develop means of mass production of high-quality carbon nanotubes at costs lower than those achieved thus far (as much as $100/g for purified multi-wall CNTs or $1,000/g for single-wall CNTs in year 2002). The main effort thus far in this program has been the design and implementation of a process tailored specifically for high-throughput screening of alloys for catalyzing the growth of CNTs. The process includes an integral combination of (1) formulation of libraries of catalysts, (2) synthesis of CNTs from decomposition of ethylene on powders of the alloys in a pyrolytic chemical-vapor-decomposition reactor, and (3) scanning- electron-microscope screening of the CNTs thus synthesized to evaluate the catalytic efficiencies of the alloys. Information gained in this process is put into a database and analyzed to identify promising alloy compositions, which are to be subjected to further evaluation in a subsequent round of testing. Some of these alloys have been found to catalyze the formation of carbon nano tubes from ethylene at temperatures as low as 350 to 400 C. In contrast, the temperatures typically required for prior catalysts range from 550 to 750 C.

  6. Nitroaldol reaction over solid base catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akutu, Kazumasa; Kabashima, Hajime; Seki, Tsunetake; Hattori, Hideshi [Center for Advanced Research of Energy Technology, Hokkaido University, Kita-13, Nishi-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan)

    2003-07-10

    Nitroaldol reaction of a nitro compound with a carbonyl compound was carried out over a variety of solid base catalysts to elucidate the activity-determining factors in the nature of the catalysts and in the nature of nitro and carbonyl compounds. Among the catalysts examined, MgO, CaO, Ba(OH){sub 2}, KOH/alumina, KF/alumina, Sr(OH){sub 2}, hydrotalcite, and MgCO{sub 3} exhibited high activity for nitroaldol reaction of nitromethane with propionaldehyde, the activities being in this order. Over these catalysts, the yields exceeded 20% at a reaction temperature of 313K and a reaction time of 1h. Mg(OH){sub 2}, {gamma}-alumina, SrO, Ca(OH){sub 2}, BaCO{sub 3}, SrCO{sub 3}, BaO, and La{sub 2}O{sub 3} exhibited moderate activites; the yield were in the range 20-2%. CaCO{sub 3}, ZrO{sub 2}, and ZnO scarcely showed the activity. It is suggested that strongly basic sites are not required for the reaction because the abstraction of a proton from a nitro compound is easy. The reactivities of the nitro compounds were nitroethane > nitromethane > 2-nitropropane, and those of carbonyl compounds were propionaldehyde>isobutyraldehyde>pivalaldehyde>acetone>benzaldehyde>methylpro pionate. On the basis of IR study of adsorbed reactants and the reactivities of the reactants, the reaction mechanisms are proposed. The reaction proceeds by the nucleophilic addition of the carbanion formed by the abstraction of a proton from nitro compounds to the cationic species formed by the adsorption of carbonyl compounds on the acidic sites (metal cations). The nitroaldol reaction of nitromethane with propionaldehyde over MgO was scarcely poisoned by carbon dioxide and water; nitromethane is so acidic that it is able to be adsorbed on the catalyst on which carbon dioxide or water was preadsorbed.

  7. Process of activation of a palladium catalyst system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolevskiy, Anatoly; Rossin, Joseph A.; Knapke, Michael J.

    2011-08-02

    Improved processes for activating a catalyst system used for the reduction of nitrogen oxides are provided. In one embodiment, the catalyst system is activated by passing an activation gas stream having an amount of each of oxygen, water vapor, nitrogen oxides, and hydrogen over the catalyst system and increasing a temperature of the catalyst system to a temperature of at least 180.degree. C. at a heating rate of from 1-20.degree./min. Use of activation processes described herein leads to a catalyst system with superior NOx reduction capabilities.

  8. Hydroliquefaction of coal with supported catalysts: 1980 status review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polinski, Leon M.; Stiegel, Gary J.; Tischer, Richard E.

    1981-06-01

    The objectives of the program have been to determine catalyst deactivation kinetic models and catalyst deactivation modes for supported Co-Mo and Ni-Mo catalysts used primarily in coal liquefaction via the H-COAL process. Emphasis has been on developing methods to increase catalyst usage by determining how to decrease catalyst replacement rates in the process and how to decrease catalyst poisoning. An important conclusion reached via model analysis and verified by experiment is that larger diameter (1/16 in.) catalysts resist poisoning deactivation much more than smaller (1/32 in.) catalysts over extended periods (60 to 110 hours) of time. If this trend can be verified, it gives a powerful tool for reducing catalyst replacement rate in the H-COAL ebullated bed system by factors of 2 or more. A second conclusion is that poisoning of catalysts occurs by several possible mechanisms or modes. Indirect or direct evidence of all these modes can be presented, though the relative importance of each mechanism has not been established. The modes include (a) poisoning by coking - with gradual increase in C/H ratio (more refractory coke) with time, (b) poisoning by metallization (selective/non-selective adsorption of inorganics such as Ti and Fe on the catalyst), (c) sintering - increase in larger pores/decrease in surface area, and (d) parallel poisoning by irreversible nitrogen compound adsorption.

  9. [Alternatives to animal testing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabre, Isabelle

    2009-11-01

    The use of alternative methods to animal testing are an integral part of the 3Rs concept (refine, reduce, replace) defined by Russel & Burch in 1959. These approaches include in silico methods (databases and computer models), in vitro physicochemical analysis, biological methods using bacteria or isolated cells, reconstructed enzyme systems, and reconstructed tissues. Emerging "omic" methods used in integrated approaches further help to reduce animal use, while stem cells offer promising approaches to toxicologic and pathophysiologic studies, along with organotypic cultures and bio-artificial organs. Only a few alternative methods can so far be used in stand-alone tests as substitutes for animal testing. The best way to use these methods is to integrate them in tiered testing strategies (ITS), in which animals are only used as a last resort. PMID:20669543

  10. Outlook for alternative transportation fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gushee, D.E. [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1996-12-31

    This presentation provides a brief review of regulatory issues and Federal programs regarding alternative fuel use in automobiles. A number of U.S. DOE initiatives and studies aimed at increasing alternative fuels are outlined, and tax incentives in effect at the state and Federal levels are discussed. Data on alternative fuel consumption and alternative fuel vehicle use are also presented. Despite mandates, tax incentives, and programs, it is concluded alternative fuels will have minimal market penetration. 7 refs., 5 tabs.

  11. Monolayer dispersion thresholds and threshold effect displayed by supported catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cun DENG

    2008-01-01

    The principle of spontaneous monolayer dis-persion holds that active components of many supported catalysts will disperse spontaneously onto the surface of the carrier. The monolayer dispersion threshold of the active component on the surface of the carrier can be measured by X-ray diffraction phase-quantitative extra-polation method, etc. By measuring the monolayer disper-sion threshold, beneficial information on the surface structure and dispersion of supported catalysts can be obtained, and the optimal preparative processing condi-tions of the catalysts can be chosen. The proportion of the active component of many supported catalysts can be optimized while its monolayer dispersion threshold is observed. Mutation values of many physicochemical properties of supported catalysts are related to monolayer dispersion thresholds; the threshold effect on catalysts is apparent, and the proposal regarding the threshold effect provides instruction for the research on catalysts.

  12. Concluding remarks: progress toward the design of solid catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Bruce C

    2016-07-01

    The 2016 Faraday Discussion on the topic "Designing New Heterogeneous Catalysts" brought together a group of scientists and engineers to address forefront topics in catalysis and the challenge of catalyst design-which is daunting because of the intrinsic non-uniformity of the surfaces of catalytic materials. "Catalyst design" has taken on a pragmatic meaning which implies the discovery of new and better catalysts on the basis of fundamental understanding of the catalyst structure and performance. The presentations and discussion at the meeting illustrate the rapid progress in this understanding linked with improvements in spectroscopy, microscopy, theory, and catalyst performance testing. The following text includes a statement of recurrent themes in the discussion and examples of forefront science that evidences progress toward catalyst design. PMID:27222485

  13. Near Critical Catalyst Reactant Branching Processes with Controlled Immigration

    CERN Document Server

    Budhiraja, Amarjit

    2012-01-01

    Near critical catalyst-reactant branching processes with controlled immigration are studied. The reactant population evolves according to a branching process whose branching rate is proportional to the total mass of the catalyst. The bulk catalyst evolution is that of a classical continuous time branching process; in addition there is a specific form of immigration. Immigration takes place exactly when the catalyst population falls below a certain threshold, in which case the population is instantaneously replenished to the threshold. Such models are motivated by problems in chemical kinetics where one wants to keep the level of a catalyst above a certain threshold in order to maintain a desired level of reaction activity. A diffusion limit theorem for the scaled processes is presented, in which the catalyst limit is described through a reflected diffusion, while the reactant limit is a diffusion with coefficients that are functions of both the reactant and the catalyst. Stochastic averaging principles under ...

  14. High-throughput screening of binary catalysts for oxygen electroreduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing Hua; Jeon, Min Ku; Woo, Seong Ihl

    2006-01-01

    A series of Pt based and non-Pt catalysts for proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) and direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) have been evaluated towards oxygen reduction, by high-throughput optical screening. Fluorescein was first used as pH indicator for detecting pH change of the electrolyte in the vicinity of cathode caused by oxygen reduction. Arrays of catalyst spot comprised of binary catalysts and pure Pt were prepared by using robotic micro-dispenser. The analysis of fluorescence images has showed that some of Pt based catalysts including PtBi, PtCu, PtSe, PtTe and PtIr, as well as RuFe, as a non-Pt catalyst, exhibited higher activities and methanol tolerance than pure Pt. Moreover, acceptable stability of these catalysts at high potential in acid environment suits them to the requirements of cathode catalyst in PEMFC or DMFC.

  15. Alkali resistivity of Cu based selective catalytic reduction catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Putluru, Siva Sankar Reddy; Jensen, Anker Degn; Riisager, Anders;

    2012-01-01

    The deactivation of V2O5–WO3–TiO2, Cu–HZSM5 and Cu–HMOR plate type monolithic catalysts was investigated when exposed to KCl aerosols in a bench-scale reactor. Fresh and exposed catalysts were characterized by selective catalytic reduction (SCR) activity measurements, scanning electron microscope...... catalysts revealed that the potassium salt not only deposited on the catalyst surface, but also penetrated into the catalyst wall. Thus, the K/M ratio (M = V or Cu) was high on V2O5–WO3–TiO2 catalyst and comparatively less on Cu–HZSM5 and Cu–HMOR catalysts. NH3-TPD revealed that the KCl exposed Cu–HZSM5...

  16. ALTERNATIVE DISPUTE RESOLUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Irina IONESCU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Alternative dispute resolution (ADR includes dispute resolution processes and techniques that act as a means for disagreeing parties to come to an agreement short of litigation. It is a collective term for the ways that parties can settle disputes, with (or without the help of a third party.Despite historic resistance to ADR by many popular parties and their advocates, ADR has gained widespread acceptance among both the general public and the legal profession in recent years. In fact, some courts now require some parties to resort to ADR of some type, before permitting the parties' cases to be tried. The rising popularity of ADR can be explained by the increasing caseload of traditional courts, the perception that ADR imposes fewer costs than litigation, a preference for confidentiality, and the desire of some parties to have greater control over the selection of the individual or individuals who will decide their dispute.Directive 2013/11/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council on alternative dispute resolution for consumer disputes and amending Regulation (EC No 2006/2004 and Directive 2009/22/EC (hereinafter „Directive 2013/11/EU” aims to ensure a high level of consumer protection and the proper functioning of the internal market by ensuring that complaints against traders can be submitted by consumers on a voluntary basis, to entities of alternative disputes which are independent, impartial, transparent, effective, simple,quick and fair.Directive 2013/11/EU establishes harmonized quality requirements for entities applying alternative dispute resolution procedure (hereinafter "ADR entity" to provide the same protection and the same rights of consumers in all Member States.Besides this, the present study is trying to present broadly how are all this trasposed in the romanian legislation.

  17. Alternatives to ECMO.

    OpenAIRE

    Donn, S M

    1994-01-01

    The past decade has witnessed technological advancements which are unparalleled in neonatology. ECMO has been demonstrated to be a powerful rescue treatment, but has perhaps been overutilised and is not universally available. Alternative treatments have been shown to be both safe and efficacious in the management of infants with respiratory failure. Direct head to head clinical trials will probably be necessary to establish appropriate criteria and indications for use, given the wide diversit...

  18. Alternative approaches in IVF

    OpenAIRE

    Fauser, Bart; Bouchard, P.; Coelingh Bennink, H.J.; Collins, John; Devroey, P.; Evers, Johannes; Van Steirteghem, A

    2002-01-01

    textabstractVarious new developments in clinical and basic science which may impact on IVF in the near or distant future will be discussed in this review. These key areas include the regulation of early follicle development and the extended in-vitro culture of oocytes and embryos. Moreover, alternative compounds and ovarian stimulation protocols will be discussed, along with highlights in the development of the cryopreservation of excess oocytes or embryos. Finally, the health economics of IV...

  19. Alternative Dispute Resolution

    OpenAIRE

    Mihaela Irina IONESCU

    2004-01-01

    Alternative dispute resolution (ADR) includes dispute resolution processes and techniques that act as a means for disagreeing parties to come to an agreement short of litigation. It is a collective term for the ways that parties can settle disputes, with (or without) the help of a third party.Despite historic resistance to ADR by many popular parties and their advocates, ADR has gained widespread acceptance among both the general public and the legal profession in recent years. In fact, some ...

  20. Metamaterials critique and alternatives

    CERN Document Server

    Munk, Ben A

    2009-01-01

    A Convincing and Controversial Alternative Explanation of Metamaterials with a Negative Index of Refraction In a book that will generate both support and controversy, one of the world's foremost authorities on periodic structures addresses several of the current fashions in antenna design-most specifically, the popular subject of double negative metamaterials. Professor Munk provides a comprehensive theoretical electromagnetic investigation of the issues and concludes that many of the phenomena claimed by researchers may be impossible. While denying the existence of negative refractio

  1. Alternatives to Higgs scalars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss alternatives to the Higgs Scalar doublet Φ of the minimal standard model. In particular we review technicolor (TC) and extended technicolor (ETC), and show that the threat of flavour changing neutral currents (FCNC's) is avoided by walking TC and/or strongly coupled ETC. The phenomenology of minimal TC and the techni-family is discussed. Finally we consider the possibility that the Higgs doublet Φ is a composite bound state of quarks from the third (or fourth) family

  2. Fixed field alternating gradient

    OpenAIRE

    Machida, Shinji

    2013-01-01

    The concept of a fixed field alternating gradient (FFAG) accelerator was invented in the 1950s. Although many studies were carried out up to the late 1960s, there has been relatively little progress until recently, when it received widespread attention as a type of accelerator suitable for very fast acceleration and for generating high-power beams. In this paper, we describe the principles and design procedure of a FFAG accelerator.

  3. Alternative Fuels: Research Progress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher A.R. Sadiq Al-Baghdadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chapter 1: Pollutant Emissions and Combustion Characteristics of Biofuels and Biofuel/Diesel Blends in Laminar and Turbulent Gas Jet Flames. R. N. Parthasarathy, S. R. Gollahalli Chapter 2: Sustainable Routes for The Production of Oxygenated High-Energy Density Biofuels from Lignocellulosic Biomass. Juan A. Melero, Jose Iglesias, Gabriel Morales, Marta Paniagua Chapter 3: Optical Investigations of Alternative-Fuel Combustion in an HSDI Diesel Engine. T. Huelser, M. Jakob, G. Gruenefeld, P. Adomeit, S. Pischinger Chapter 4: An Insight into Biodiesel Physico-Chemical Properties and Exhaust Emissions Based on Statistical Elaboration of Experimental Data. Evangelos G. Giakoumis Chapter 5: Biodiesel: A Promising Alternative Energy Resource. A.E. Atabani Chapter 6: Alternative Fuels for Internal Combustion Engines: An Overview of the Current Research. Ahmed A. Taha, Tarek M. Abdel-Salam, Madhu Vellakal Chapter 7: Investigating the Hydrogen-Natural Gas Blends as a Fuel in Internal Combustion Engine. ?lker YILMAZ Chapter 8: Conversion of Bus Diesel Engine into LPG Gaseous Engine; Method and Experiments Validation. M. A. Jemni , G. Kantchev , Z. Driss , R. Saaidia , M. S. Abid Chapter 9: Predicting the Combustion Performance of Different Vegetable Oils-Derived Biodiesel Fuels. Qing Shu, ChangLin Yu Chapter 10: Production of Gasoline, Naphtha, Kerosene, Diesel, and Fuel Oil Range Fuels from Polypropylene and Polystyrene Waste Plastics Mixture by Two-Stage Catalytic Degradation using ZnO. Moinuddin Sarker, Mohammad Mamunor Rashid

  4. State alternative route designations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-07-01

    Pursuant to the Hazardous Materials Transportation Act (HMTA), the Department of Transportation (DOT) has promulgated a comprehensive set of regulations regarding the highway transportation of high-level radioactive materials. These regulations, under HM-164 and HM-164A, establish interstate highways as the preferred routes for the transportation of radioactive materials within and through the states. The regulations also provide a methodology by which a state may select alternative routes. First,the state must establish a ``state routing agency,`` defined as an entity authorized to use the state legal process to impose routing requirements on carriers of radioactive material (49 CFR 171.8). Once identified, the state routing agency must select routes in accordance with Large Quantity Shipments of Radioactive Materials or an equivalent routing analysis. Adjoining states and localities should be consulted on the impact of proposed alternative routes as a prerequisite of final route selection. Lastly, the states must provide written notice of DOT of any alternative route designation before the routes are deemed effective.

  5. State alternative route designations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-07-01

    Pursuant to the Hazardous Materials Transportation Act (HMTA), the Department of Transportation (DOT) has promulgated a comprehensive set of regulations regarding the highway transportation of high-level radioactive materials. These regulations, under HM-164 and HM-164A, establish interstate highways as the preferred routes for the transportation of radioactive materials within and through the states. The regulations also provide a methodology by which a state may select alternative routes. First,the state must establish a state routing agency,'' defined as an entity authorized to use the state legal process to impose routing requirements on carriers of radioactive material (49 CFR 171.8). Once identified, the state routing agency must select routes in accordance with Large Quantity Shipments of Radioactive Materials or an equivalent routing analysis. Adjoining states and localities should be consulted on the impact of proposed alternative routes as a prerequisite of final route selection. Lastly, the states must provide written notice of DOT of any alternative route designation before the routes are deemed effective.

  6. Is garlic alternative medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivlin, Richard S

    2006-03-01

    Garlic has been used medicinally since antiquity. In virtually every early civilization known, such as ancient India, Egypt, Rome, China, and Japan, garlic was part of the therapeutic regimen for a variety of maladies. Therefore, the ancient medicinal tradition of garlic use would qualify it as a folk medicine or as an alternative or complementary medicine. But is garlic an alternative to established methods of disease prevention or treatment? Scientists from around the world have identified a number of bioactive substances in garlic that are water soluble (e.g., S-allyl methylcysteine), and fat soluble (e.g., diallyldisulfide). Mechanisms of action are being elucidated by modern technology. The validity of ancient medicine is now being evaluated critically in cell-free systems, animal models, and human populations. Preventive and therapeutic trials of garlic are still in early stages. There are many promising lines of research suggesting the potential effects of garlic. The current state of knowledge does not recognize garlic as a true alternative, but it will likely find a place for garlic as a complement to established methods of disease prevention and treatment. Our goal should be to examine garlic together with other agents to evaluate its possible efficacy and toxicity under conditions of actual use in humans. PMID:16484549

  7. Alternative Energy Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Michaelides, Efstathios E (Stathis)

    2012-01-01

    Alternative Energy Sources is designed to give the reader, a clear view of the role each form of alternative energy may play in supplying the energy needs of the human society in the near and intermediate future (20-50 years).   The two first chapters on energy demand and supply and environmental effects, set the tone as to why the widespread use of alternative energy is essential for the future of human society. The third chapter exposes the reader to the laws of energy conversion processes, as well as the limitations of converting one energy form to another. The sections on exergy give a succinct, quantitative background on the capability/potential of each energy source to produce power on a global scale. The fourth, fifth and sixth chapters are expositions of fission and fusion nuclear energy. The following five chapters (seventh to eleventh) include detailed descriptions of the most common renewable energy sources – wind, solar, geothermal, biomass, hydroelectric – and some of the less common sources...

  8. Nonactivated and Activated Biochar Derived from Bananas as Alternative Cathode Catalyst in Microbial Fuel Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Haoran Yuan; Lifang Deng; Yujie Qi; Noriyuki Kobayashi; Jiahuan Tang

    2014-01-01

    Nonactivated and activated biochars have been successfully prepared by bananas at different thermotreatment temperatures. The activated biochar generated at 900°C (Biochar-act900) exhibited improved oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) performances in alkaline media, in terms of the onset potential and generated current density. Rotating disk electron result shows that the average of 2.65 electrons per oxygen molecule was transferred during ORR of Biochar-act900...

  9. RNA Mediated Evolution of Catalysts for the Production of Alternative Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldheim, Daniel

    2014-11-13

    Sequences that emerge from a RNA in vitro selection represent a genomic archive of functional biomolecules. The archive is much more than a simple list of sequences, however, as it also contains vital and detailed information concerning sequence-function relationships. That is, a “phylogeny” of active sequences can be constructed that can point the way toward a sequence or group of sequences with new functions.

  10. Report of the International Workshop on Animal Disposal Alternatives: from concept to catalyst for change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Brian R

    2007-01-01

    The principle of animal depopulation and animal disposal has been a fundamental approach of veterinary and regulatory interventions for the effective biological containment and eradication of contagious diseases since the science and art of veterinary medicine began. Today's world, however, is one of epidemiological globalisation, changing social values concerning the management of animal populations, and recognition of the environmental consequences associated with animal disposal, especially during animal disease emergencies. It has consequently become apparent that new approaches are required to minimise both the need for mass culling of animals in response to disease occurrences and the associated negative consequences. In addition, where a level of animal depopulation remains the only recourse, it is imperative that the undertaking be conducted in a manner which is socially and environmentally responsible. PMID:20411509

  11. An alternative preparation method for ion exchanged catalysts: Solid state redox reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, E.; Hagen, A.; Grunwaldt, J.-D.; Roessner, F.

    A new method for modifying zeolites with zinc is proposed. The solid state redox reaction between metallic zinc and ZSM-5 zeolites with different Si/Al ratios was investigated by temperature programmed hydrogen evolution (TPHE), X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and diffuse reflectance...

  12. Catalyst Kinetics Analytical Method Study of Ruthenium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kou ming-ze; Zhan hui-ying; Kou zong-yan

    2004-01-01

    Color reactions are used to determine ruthenium utilizing spectrophotometer, but the process need high temperature, long time pyrogenation and miscellaneous extraction and it contaminates the enviroment. As the sensitive degree and simple apparatus of catalyst kinetics analytical method, it was extensively attentcd. The fundmental principle means to determinn a certain chemistry reaction rate accelerated by homogeneous catalyst and determine substantial content using the function of the numerical value of of its and the catalyst concentration. Color acid double azo-reagents (chloro-phosphor group, arsenic group and carboxylic acid group) are sensitive color reagent determining uranium and thorium of lanthanon, but the report is few that it is used to determine ruthenium. Since 1990s, the author studied that the ruthenium was possessed evident catalysis to the fade reaction of oxidant (KIO4, KBrO3) oxidating color acid double azo-reagent in acitidy medium and provided the catalyst kinetics analytical method to determine trace ruthenium.sensitive degree was increased 1 ~2 amount than color reaction. The reaction as:The original concentration of color acid double azo-reagents is A. The instantaneous absorbency after t reaction time is At. In homogeneous catalyst reaction: log(A0/At) = KCRu3+t. Reaction time t is invarible, so log(A0/At) = K' CRu3+t.Color acid double azo-reagents, such as: chlor-azochlorphosphor(CPA-TC),bromic-azochlorphosphor (CPA-TB), DBS-azochlorphosphor(DBS-CPA), DBC-azochlorphosphor (DBC-CPA), DBOK-azochlorpho sphor (DBOK-CPA), p-iodineazochlorphosphor(CPA-PI),p-acetylazochlorphosphor (CPA-PA), azochlorpho sphorⅢ(CPAⅢ), chlor-azoarsenic (TC-AsA),bromic-azoarsenic (TB-AsA), DBS-azoarsenic(DCS-AsA), DCS-azoarsenic(DCS-AsA),azoarsenicⅢ(AsAⅢ), bromicnityrlazoarsenic (DBN-AsA), P-acetylcarboxy lazo-p,P-acetylcarboxylazo, were utilized in catalyst kinetics system. The author obtains the satisfactory results that color acid double azo-rea gents

  13. Novel Attrition-Resistant Fischer Tropsch Catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weast, Logan, E.; Staats, William, R.

    2009-05-01

    There is a strong national interest in the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis process because it offers the possibility of making liquid hydrocarbon fuels from reformed natural gas or coal and biomass gasification products. This project explored a new approach that had been developed to produce active, attrition-resistant Fischer-Tropsch catalysts that are based on glass-ceramic materials and technology. This novel approach represented a promising solution to the problem of reducing or eliminating catalyst attrition and maximizing catalytic activity, thus reducing costs. The technical objective of the Phase I work was to demonstrate that glass-ceramic based catalytic materials for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis have resistance to catalytic deactivation and reduction of particle size superior to traditional supported Fischer-Tropsch catalyst materials. Additionally, these novel glass-ceramic-based materials were expected to exhibit catalytic activity similar to the traditional materials. If successfully developed, the attrition-resistant Fischer-Tropsch catalyst materials would be expected to result in significant technical, economic, and social benefits for both producers and public consumers of Fischer-Tropsch products such as liquid fuels from coal or biomass gasification. This program demonstrated the anticipated high attrition resistance of the glass-ceramic materials. However, the observed catalytic activity of the materials was not sufficient to justify further development at this time. Additional testing documented that a lack of pore volume in the glass-ceramic materials limited the amount of surface area available for catalysis and consequently limited catalytic activity. However, previous work on glass-ceramic catalysts to promote other reactions demonstrated that commercial levels of activity can be achieved, at least for those reactions. Therefore, we recommend that glass-ceramic materials be considered again as potential Fischer-Tropsch catalysts if it can be

  14. Ni-Based Catalysts for Low Temperature Methane Steam Reforming: Recent Results on Ni-Au and Comparison with Other Bi-Metallic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna M. Venezia

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Steam reforming of light hydrocarbons provides a promising method for hydrogen production. Ni-based catalysts are so far the best and the most commonly used catalysts for steam reforming because of their acceptably high activity and significantly lower cost in comparison with alternative precious metal-based catalysts. However, nickel catalysts are susceptible to deactivation from the deposition of carbon, even when operating at steam-to-carbon ratios predicted to be thermodynamically outside of the carbon-forming regime. Reactivity and deactivation by carbon formation can be tuned by modifying Ni surfaces with a second metal, such as Au through alloy formation. In the present review, we summarize the very recent progress in the design, synthesis, and characterization of supported bimetallic Ni-based catalysts for steam reforming. The progress in the modification of Ni with noble metals (such as Au and Ag is discussed in terms of preparation, characterization and pretreatment methods. Moreover, the comparison with the effects of other metals (such as Sn, Cu, Co, Mo, Fe, Gd and B is addressed. The differences of catalytic activity, thermal stability and carbon species between bimetallic and monometallic Ni-based catalysts are also briefly shown.

  15. V{sub 2}O{sub 5}-ZrO{sub 2} catalysts for the oxidative dehydrogenation of propane - influence of the niobium oxide doping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albrecht, S.; Hallmeier, K.H.; Wendt, G. [Leipzig Univ. (Germany). Fakultaet fuer Chemie und Mineralogie; Lippold, G. [Leipzig Univ. (Germany). Fakultaet fuer Physik und Geowissenschaften

    1998-12-31

    The oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of light alkanes is an alternative way for the production of olefins. A wide variety of catalytic systems has been investigated. Vanadium oxide based catalysts were described in the literature as effective catalysts for the ODH of propane. The catalytic activity and selectivity depend on the kind of support material, the kind of dopants and the formation of complex metal oxide phases. In recent papers it was claimed that both orthovanadate and/or pyrovanadate species are selective for the ODH of propane. Niobia based materials were investigated as catalysts for acidic and selective oxidation type reactions. In the ODH of propane niobia exhibited a high selectivity to propene but the conversion of propane was low. V{sub 2}O{sub 5}-Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} catalysts proved to be catalytically active and selective and showed no formation of oxygenates. In the present study the influence of the niobia dopant of the catalytic properties of V{sub 2}O{sub 5}-ZrO{sub 2} catalysts in the ODH of propane was examined. The structural and textural properties of the catalysts were investigated using several methods. (orig.)

  16. Effective Liquid-phase Nitration of Benzene Catalyzed by a Stable Solid Acid Catalyst: Silica Supported Cs2.5H0.5PMo12O40

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silica supported Cs2.5H0.5PMo12O40 catalyst was prepared through sol-gel method with ethyl silicate-40 as silicon resource and characterized by X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption-desorption and potentiometric titration methods. The Cs2.5H0.5PMo12O40 particles with Keggin-type structure well dispersed on the surface of silica, and the catalyst exhibited high surface area and acidity. The catalytic performance of the catalysts for benzene liquid-phase nitration was examined with 65% nitric acid as nitrating agent, and the effects of various parameters were tested, which including temperature, time and amount of catalyst, reactants ratio, especially the recycle of catalyst was emphasized. Benzene was effectively nitrated to mononitro-benzene with high conversion (95%) in optimized conditions. Most importantly, the supported catalyst was proved has excellent stability in the nitration progress, and there were no any other organic solvent and sulfuric acid were used in the reaction system, so the liquid-phase nitration of benzene that we developed was an eco-friendly and attractive alternative for the commercial technology

  17. Alternatives to nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article discusses several possibilities as alternatives to nuclear energy and their relevance to the Philippine case. The major present and future fuel alternatives to petroleum and nuclear energy are coal, geothermal heat, solar energy and hydrogen, the first two of which are being used. Different conversion technologies are also discussed for large scale electricity production namely solar thermal electric conversion (STC), photovoltaic electric power system (PEPS) and ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC). Major environmental considerations affect the choice of energy sources and technologies. We have the problem of long term accumulation of radioactive waste in the case of nuclear energy; in geothermal and fossil-fuels carbon dioxide uranium and accumulation may cause disastrous consequences. With regard to Philippine option, the greatest considerations in selecting alternative energy options would be resources availability - both energy and financial and technology status. For the country's energy plan, coal and geothermal energy are expected to play a significant role. The country's coal resources are 1.4 billion metric tons. For geothermal energy, 25 volcanic centers were identified and has a potential equivalent to 2.5 x 106 million barrels of oil. Solar energy if harnessed, being in the sunbelt, averaging some 2000 hours a year could be an energy source. The present dilemma of the policy maker is whether national resources are better spent on large scale urban-based energy projects or whether those should be focused on small scale, rural oriented installations which produced benefits to the more numerous and poorer members of the population. (RTD)

  18. Catalyst Deactivation: Control Relevance of Model Assumptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernt Lie

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Two principles for describing catalyst deactivation are discussed, one based on the deactivation mechanism, the other based on the activity and catalyst age distribution. When the model is based upon activity decay, it is common to use a mean activity developed from the steady-state residence time distribution. We compare control-relevant properties of such an approach with those of a model based upon the deactivation mechanism. Using a continuous stirred tank reactor as an example, we show that the mechanistic approach and the population balance approach lead to identical models. However, common additional assumptions used for activity-based models lead to model properties that may deviate considerably from the correct one.

  19. Catalyst for reduction of nitrogen oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Kevin C.

    2010-04-06

    A Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalyst was prepared by slurry coating ZSM-5 zeolite onto a cordierite monolith, then subliming an iron salt onto the zeolite, calcining the monolith, and then dipping the monolith either into an aqueous solution of manganese nitrate and cerium nitrate and then calcining, or by similar treatment with separate solutions of manganese nitrate and cerium nitrate. The supported catalyst containing iron, manganese, and cerium showed 80 percent conversion at 113 degrees Celsius of a feed gas containing nitrogen oxides having 4 parts NO to one part NO.sub.2, about one equivalent ammonia, and excess oxygen; conversion improved to 94 percent at 147 degrees Celsius. N.sub.2O was not detected (detection limit: 0.6 percent N.sub.2O).

  20. Homogeneously dispersed multimetal oxygen-evolving catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Zheng, Xueli; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Comin, Riccardo; Bajdich, Michal; García-Melchor, Max; Han, Lili; Xu, Jixian; Liu, Min; Zheng, Lirong; García de Arquer, F Pelayo; Dinh, Cao Thang; Fan, Fengjia; Yuan, Mingjian; Yassitepe, Emre; Chen, Ning; Regier, Tom; Liu, Pengfei; Li, Yuhang; De Luna, Phil; Janmohamed, Alyf; Xin, Huolin L; Yang, Huagui; Vojvodic, Aleksandra; Sargent, Edward H

    2016-04-15

    Earth-abundant first-row (3d) transition metal-based catalysts have been developed for the oxygen-evolution reaction (OER); however, they operate at overpotentials substantially above thermodynamic requirements. Density functional theory suggested that non-3d high-valency metals such as tungsten can modulate 3d metal oxides, providing near-optimal adsorption energies for OER intermediates. We developed a room-temperature synthesis to produce gelled oxyhydroxides materials with an atomically homogeneous metal distribution. These gelled FeCoW oxyhydroxides exhibit the lowest overpotential (191 millivolts) reported at 10 milliamperes per square centimeter in alkaline electrolyte. The catalyst shows no evidence of degradation after more than 500 hours of operation. X-ray absorption and computational studies reveal a synergistic interplay between tungsten, iron, and cobalt in producing a favorable local coordination environment and electronic structure that enhance the energetics for OER. PMID:27013427

  1. Palladium coupling catalysts for pharmaceutical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucet, Henri; Hierso, Jean-Cyrille

    2007-11-01

    This review discusses recent advances made in the area of palladium-catalyzed coupling reactions and describes a selection of the catalytic systems that are useful in the preparation of valuable compounds for the pharmaceutical industry. Most of these types of syntheses have used either simple palladium salts or palladium precursors associated with electron-rich mono- or bidentate phosphine ligands as catalysts. For some reactions, ligands such as triphenyl phosphine, 1,1'-bis(diphenylphosphino)ferrocene, a carbene or a bipyridine have also been employed. Several new procedures for the Suzuki cross-coupling reaction, the activation of aryl chlorides, the functionalization of aromatics and the synthesis of heteroaromatics are discussed. The C-H activation/ functionalization reactions of aryl and heteroaryl derivatives have emerged as powerful tools for the preparation of biaryl compounds, and the recent procedures and catalysts employed in this promising field are also highlighted herein. PMID:17987520

  2. Development of polymer catalyst manufacturing technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heavy water is used as moderator and coolant in Pressurized Heavy Water Power Plants. According to the governmental long-term plan for power supply, Korea is scheduled to construct new six pressurized heavy water power plants till the year 2006. Total heavy water demand for these plants would be 3892 Mg during the period 1992-2006. Reformed hydrogen processes are considered best suited to Korea. Hydrophobic catalysts for this process were manufactured and the performance of hydrogen isotope exchance was investigated. The overall mass transfer coefficients varied between 0.004 and 2.295 m3 HD/m3 Bed.sec. and heavy water separation processes using the catalysts were optimized. (Author)

  3. Pt/C Fuel Cell Catalyst Degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zana, Alessandro

    This thesis investigates the degradation behavior of Pt/C catalysts under simulated automotive conditions. By using the “tool box” synthesis method the Pt loading has been changed from low to high Pt loadings, therefore permitting to study the role of Pt on the degradation of high surface area (HSA......) Pt/C catalyst. Diverse degradation mechanisms have been found to be responsible for the electrochemical surface area loss (ECSA). The different degradation mechanisms have been found to be dependent from the diverse potential windows applied during the stress test. Furthermore the synthesis approach......).  Interestingly increasing the Pt to carbon ratio was found to enhance the ECSA loss during start/stop cycling up to a certain ratio. However, a further increase in the Pt to carbon ratio results in a decrease of the ECSA loss. Moreover a significant difference in the ESCA loss was found between two standard CBs...

  4. Alternate fusion concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review summarizes the status of alternate fusion concepts and plans for their future. The concepts selected for review are those employing electromagnetic confinement for which there have been reasonable predictions of net energy gain from pure fusion and which have shown significant recent development or are the subjects of ongoing international activity. They include advanced tokamaks, stellarators, the spherical torus, reversed-field pinch and dense z-field pinch devices, field reversed configuration, and spheromaks. In addition, an overall view of the status of each concept with respect to achieving ignition and to reactor designs is presented

  5. Alternate fuels; Combustibles alternos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero Paredes R, Hernando; Ambriz G, Juan Jose [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana. Iztapalapa (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    In the definition and description of alternate fuels we must center ourselves in those technological alternatives that allow to obtain compounds that differ from the traditional ones, in their forms to be obtained. In this article it is tried to give an overview of alternate fuels to the conventional derivatives of petroleum and that allow to have a clear idea on the tendencies of modern investigation and the technological developments that can be implemented in the short term. It is not pretended to include all the tendencies and developments of the present world, but those that can hit in a relatively short term, in accordance with agreed with the average life of conventional fuels. Nevertheless, most of the conversion principles are applicable to the spectrum of carbonaceous or cellulosic materials which are in nature, are cultivated or wastes of organic origin. Thus one will approach them in a successive way, the physical, chemical and biological conversions that can take place in a production process of an alternate fuel or the same direct use of the fuel such as burning the sweepings derived from the forests. [Spanish] En la definicion y descripcion de combustibles alternos nos debemos centrar en aquellas alternativas tecnologicas que permitan obtener compuestos que difieren de los tradicionales, al menos en sus formas de ser obtenidos. En este articulo se pretende dar un panorama de los combustibles alternos a los convencionales derivados del petroleo y que permita tener una idea clara sobre las tendencias de la investigacion moderna y los desarrollos tecnologicos que puedan ser implementados en el corto plazo. No se pretende abarcar todas las tendencias y desarrollos del mundo actual, sino aquellas que pueden impactar en un plazo relativamente corto, acordes con la vida media de los combustibles convencionales. Sin embargo, la mayor parte de los principios de conversion son aplicables al espectro de materiales carbonaceos o celulosicos los cuales se

  6. Polyphase alternating codes

    OpenAIRE

    M. Markkanen; Vierinen, J.; Markkanen, J.

    2007-01-01

    We present a new class of alternating codes. Instead of the customary binary phase codes, the new codes utilize either p or p–1 phases, where p is a prime number. The first class of codes has code length pm, where m is a positive integer, the second class has code length p–1. We give an actual construction algorithm, and explain the principles behind it. We ...

  7. Polyphase alternating codes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Markkanen

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available We present a new class of alternating codes. Instead of the customary binary phase codes, the new codes utilize either p or p–1 phases, where p is a prime number. The first class of codes has code length pm, where m is a positive integer, the second class has code length p–1. We give an actual construction algorithm, and explain the principles behind it. We handle a few specific examples in detail. The new codes offer an enlarged collection of code lengths for radar experiments.

  8. Alternate transportation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zertuche, Tony; Mckinnie, James

    1988-01-01

    Three missions have been identified by NASA for a Space Shuttle-supplementing Alternate Transportation System (ATS) encompassing combinations of booster vehicles, crew modules, and service modules: (1) to achieve manned access to orbit for Space Station crew rotation every 90 days, (2) the lofting of a logistics module resupplying the Space Station every 180 days, and (3) the simultaneous launch of both crews and logistics to the Space Station. A reentry glider is considered, in conjunction with the Space Shuttle's unmanned cargo version and the Apollo manned capsule, as an important ATS element. The Titan IV/NUS is used as a booster.

  9. Ni Catalysts Supported on Modified Alumina for Diesel Steam Reforming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonios Tribalis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nickel catalysts are the most popular for steam reforming, however, they have a number of drawbacks, such as high propensity toward coke formation and intolerance to sulfur. In an effort to improve their behavior, a series of Ni-catalysts supported on pure and La-, Ba-, (La+Ba- and Ce-doped γ-alumina has been prepared. The doped supports and the catalysts have been extensively characterized. The catalysts performance was evaluated for steam reforming of n-hexadecane pure or doped with dibenzothiophene as surrogate for sulphur-free or commercial diesel, respectively. The undoped catalyst lost its activity after 1.5 h on stream. Doping of the support with La improved the initial catalyst activity. However, this catalyst was completely deactivated after 2 h on stream. Doping with Ba or La+Ba improved the stability of the catalysts. This improvement is attributed to the increase of the dispersion of the nickel phase, the decrease of the support acidity and the increase of Ni-phase reducibility. The best catalyst of the series doped with La+Ba proved to be sulphur tolerant and stable for more than 160 h on stream. Doping of the support with Ce also improved the catalytic performance of the corresponding catalyst, but more work is needed to explain this behavior.

  10. Optimization of catalyst layer composition for PEMFC using graphene-based oxygen reduction reaction catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong Cheol; Park, Sung Hyeon; Chung, Min Wook; Choi, Chang Hyuck; Kho, Back Kyun; Woo, Seong Ihl

    2015-07-01

    The focus in recent years is on developing high performance non-precious metal catalysts (NPMCs) to reduce the catalyst cost in fuel cells. However, little attention has been paid to improve the utilization of NPMCs. Thus, this study focuses on the optimization of electrode component, particularly the Nafion content. With the synthesized graphene based oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalyst, the catalyst inks were prepared at various Nafion contents with suitable amounts of catalysts sprayed on the gas diffusion media. Twenty different single cells were assembled and measured for polarization, resistance and electrochemical impedance. Electrodes of 66.7 and 50.0% Nafion contents showed the highest performance for hydrogen/oxygen and hydrogen/air operation, respectively. These results were explained using the electrochemical impedance spectra, where the highest performance electrode resulted with the lowest charge transfer resistance. Moreover, negligible change in performance was observed during the 80 h of stability test. The optimization compositions of NPMC-based MEAs were very different to Pt-based MEAs, indicating the importance of optimization studies for the practical use of NPMCs.

  11. Combinatorial synthesis and screening of fuel cell catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraman, Shrisudersan

    Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) are compact power sources that can operate with high efficiencies and low emission of environmentally harmful gases. One of the major barriers impeding the development of PEMFCs as a competitive energy source is the inability of existing anode catalysts to oxidize fuels other than hydrogen at sufficient levels due to catalyst deactivation by carbon monoxide (CO) and other partial oxidation products. The focus of this research is the development and application of combinatorial strategies to construct and interrogate electrooxidation (anode) catalysts pertaining to PEMFCs to discover catalysts with enhanced performance in catalyst deactivating environments. A novel method (known as the "gel-transfer" method) for synthesizing catalyst composition gradient libraries for combinatorial catalyst discovery was developed. This method involved transferring a spatial concentration gradient of precursor metal salts created within a polymer gel on to a solid conducting substrate by electrochemical reduction. Chemically sensitive surface-imaging techniques, namely, scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) and optical screening with a pH-dependent fluorescence probe were used to characterize the combinatorial catalyst samples. The utility of SECM as a screening tool to measure the activity of multicomponent catalyst libraries towards fuel cell electrooxidation reactions was established with simple catalyst libraries including a platinum coverage gradient and platinum-ruthenium and platinum-ruthenium-molybdenum arrays. A platinum-ruthenium surface composition gradient was constructed through the gel-transfer method and its reactivity towards hydrogen oxidation in the presence of a catalyst poison (CO) was mapped using the SECM. Ruthenium composition between 20 and 30% exhibited superior performance than the rest of the binary. The gel-transfer method was extended to construct a ternary platinum-ruthenium-rhodium catalyst library

  12. Highly Active Non-PGM Catalysts Prepared from Metal Organic Frameworks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather M. Barkholtz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Finding inexpensive alternatives to platinum group metals (PGMs is essential for reducing the cost of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs. Numerous materials have been investigated as potential replacements of Pt, of which the transition metal and nitrogen-doped carbon composites (TM/Nx/C prepared from iron doped zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIFs are among the most active ones in catalyzing the oxygen reduction reaction based on recent studies. In this report, we demonstrate that the catalytic activity of ZIF-based TM/Nx/C composites can be substantially improved through optimization of synthesis and post-treatment processing conditions. Ultimately, oxygen reduction reaction (ORR electrocatalytic activity must be demonstrated in membrane-electrode assemblies (MEAs of fuel cells. The process of preparing MEAs using ZIF-based non-PGM electrocatalysts involves many additional factors which may influence the overall catalytic activity at the fuel cell level. Evaluation of parameters such as catalyst loading and perfluorosulfonic acid ionomer to catalyst ratio were optimized. Our overall efforts to optimize both the catalyst and MEA construction process have yielded impressive ORR activity when tested in a fuel cell system.

  13. Clean synthesis of biodiesel over solid acid catalysts of sulfonated mesopolymers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    FDU-15-SO3H,a solid acid material prepared from the sulfonation of FDU-15 mesoporous polymer,has been demonstrated to serve as an efficient catalyst in the esterification of palmitic acid with methanol as well as in the transesterification of fatty acid-edible oil mixture.FDU-15-SO3H achieved an acid conversion of 99.0% when the esterification was carried out at 343 K with a methanol/palmitic acid molar ratio of 6:1 and 5 wt% catalyst loading.It was capable of giving 99.0% yield of fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) when the transesterification of soybean oil was performed at 413 K and the methanol/oil weight ratio of 1:1.FDU-15-SO3H was further applied to the transesterification/esterification of the oil mixtures with a varying ratio of soybean oil to palmitic acid,which simulated the feedstock with a high content of free fatty acids.The yield of FAME reached 95% for the oil mixtures containing 30 wt% palmitic acid.This indicated the sulfonated mesopolymer was a potential catalyst for clean synthesis of fuel alternative of biodiesel from the waste oil without further purification.

  14. Carbon based catalytic briquettes for the reduction of NO. Catalyst scale-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exhaust gases from small and medium stationary sources contain NOx that will be regulated by new European legislation in the coming years. Among all the processes the SCR-NH3 seems to be the more promising one. However, the application of commercial catalysts to these new facilities presents some drawbacks such as the high and narrow operation temperature, its low withdraw to SO2 or its high cost production. In order to improve this technology, in previous works, carbon-supported catalytic briquettes have shown a good kinetic performance under the above commented conditions. In this study, other aspects such as thermal stability, long-term performance, spatial velocity influence and mechanical resistance were evaluated. Finally, a simple economic assessment was carried out providing a three times lower cost production than commercial catalysts. From all the data collected, there are some evidences that these catalyst briquettes will have a good performance in small and medium facilities, being an interesting alternative to commercial ones. (author)

  15. New ruthenium catalysts for asymmetric hydrogenation

    OpenAIRE

    Diaz Valenzuela, Maria Belen

    2007-01-01

    A review on catalytic asymmetric hydrogenation of C=O double bonds is presented in the first chapter. Noyori’s pioneering research on ruthenium complexes containing both phosphine and diamine ligands using [i superscript]PrOH and [t superscript]BuOK is described, this system gave impressive highly chemeo-selectivity for C=O bonds and extremely high enantioselectivity for a range of acetophenone derivatives. Numerous groups have been inspired by Noyori’s catalyst of the ty...

  16. Ruthenium olefin metathesis catalysts containing fluoride

    OpenAIRE

    Guidone, Stefano; Songis, Olivier; Falivene, Laura; Nahra, Fady; Slawin, Alexandra Martha Zoya; Jacobsen, Heiko; Cavallo, Luigi; Cazin, Catherine S. J.

    2015-01-01

    The authors gratefully acknowledge the EC through the 7th framework program (grant CP-FP 211468-2 EUMET), the Royal Society (University Research Fellowship to CSJC) for financial support. The reaction of the ruthenium complex cis-Caz-1 with silver fluoride affords the first example of an active olefin metathesis pre-catalyst containing fluoride ligands. The cis geometry of the precursor complex is key to the successful fluoride exchange reaction. Computational studies highlight the stabili...

  17. deNOx catalysts for biomass combustion

    OpenAIRE

    Kristensen, Steffen Buus; Riisager, Anders; Fehrmann, Rasmus; Nørklit Jensen, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    The present thesis revolves around the challenges involved in removal of nitrogen oxides in biomass fired power plants. Nitrogen oxides are unwanted byproducts formed to some extent during almost any combustion. In coal fired plants these byproducts are removed by selective catalytic reduction, however the alkali in biomass complicate matters. Alkali in biomass severely deactivates the catalyst used for the selective catalytic reduction in matter of weeks,hence a more alkali resistant catalys...

  18. Transformation of methylcyclohexane on an FCC catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rabeharitsara

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The transformation of methylcyclohexane at 723 K over on a USHY sample and on an FCC catalyst composed of 30% USHY and 70% matrix containing 25% Al2O3 was studied. With both samples, C2-C7 alkenes and alkanes, cyclopentane and methylcyclopentane (cracking products, dimethylcyclopentanes and ethylcyclopentane (isomers and aromatics appeared as primary products. The activity and selectivity of fresh samples as well as the influence of coke deposits on porosity and selectivity are discussed.

  19. Fuel cell applications for novel metalloporphyrin catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryba, G.; Shelnutt, J.; Doddapaneni, N.; Zavadil, K.

    1997-04-01

    This project utilized Computer-Aided Molecular Design (CAMD) to develop a new class of metalloporphyrin materials for use as catalysts for two fuel cell reactions. The first reaction is the reduction of oxygen at the fuel cell cathode, and this reaction was the main focus of the research. The second reaction we attempted to catalyze was the oxidation of methanol at the anode. Two classes of novel metalloporphyrins were developed. The first class comprised the dodecaphenylporphyrins whose steric bulk forces them into a non-planar geometry having a pocket where oxygen or methanol is more tightly bound to the porphyrin than it is in the case of planar porphyrins. Significant improvements in the catalytic reduction of oxygen by the dodecaphenyl porphyrins were measured in electrochemical cells. The dodecaphenylporphyrins were further modified by fluorinating the peripheral phenyl groups to varying degrees. The fluorination strongly affected their redox potential, but no effect on their catalytic activity towards oxygen was observed. The second class of porphyrin catalysts was a series of hydrogen-bonding porphyrins whose interaction with oxygen is enhanced. Enhancements in the interaction of oxygen with the porphyrins having hydrogen bonding groups were observed spectroscopically. Computer modeling was performed using Molecular Simulations new CERIUS2 Version 1.6 and a research version of POLYGRAF from Bill Goddard`s research group at the California Institute of Technology. We reoptimized the force field because of an error that was in POLYGRAF and corrected a problem in treatment of the metal in early versions of the program. This improved force field was reported in a J. Am. Chem. Soc. manuscript. Experimental measurements made on the newly developed catalysts included the electrochemical testing in a fuel cell configuration and spectroscopic measurements (UV-Vis, Raman and XPS) to characterize the catalysts.

  20. Bifunctional Catalysts for Alkaline Fuel Cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klápště, Břetislav; Vondrák, Jiří; Velická, Jana

    Vol. 1. Brno : Akademické nakladatelství CERM, 2000 - (Vondrák, J.; Sedlaříková, M.), s. 24.1-24.4 ISBN 80-214-1614-9. [Advanced Batteries and Accumulators /1./. Brno (CZ), 28.08.2000-01.09.2000] R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 216 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4032918; CEZ:MSM 262200010 Keywords : alkaline * catalysts * electrochemistry Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry

  1. Surface coatings and catalyst production by electrodeposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Chester B.; Riley, Clyde; Coble, H. Dwain; Loo, Boon H.

    1987-01-01

    Electrodeposition and electrocodeposition in low gravity are discussed. The goal is to provide a better understanding of the role of convection and buoyancy in the mechanisms of formation of some electrodeposited surfaces, fluid flow in the vicinity of electrodepositing surfaces, the influence of a moving medium upon codeposition, the effect of gravity upon the dispersion (coagulation) of neutral particles that are desired for codeposition and preparation of improved surface coatings and metal catalysts.

  2. Kinetic and Deactivation Studies of Hydrodesulfurization Catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Steiner, Petr

    2002-01-01

    Hydrodesulfurization is an important part of the hydrotreating process. More stringent regulations on the quality of fuels bring new requirements to the catalytic processes. The removal of sulfur has become a key issue in the oil refining and this work aims to address several aspects of the process.Kinetic studies of the hydrodesulfurization reaction over conventional (molybdenum-based) and new (Pt/Y-zeolite) catalysts are reported. The hydrodesulfurization of both the real oil (light gas oil...

  3. Kinetic and Deactivation Studies of Hydrodesulfurization Catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Steiner, Petr

    2002-01-01

    Hydrodesulfurization is an important part of the hydrotreating process. More stringent regulations on the quality of fuels bring new requirements to the catalytic processes. The removal of sulfur has become a key issue in the oil refining and this work aims to address several aspects of the process. Kinetic studies of the hydrodesulfurization reaction over conventional (molybdenum-based) and new (Pt/Y-zeolite) catalysts are reported. The hydrodesulfurization of both the real oil (light gas oi...

  4. Hydrolysis of isocyanic acid on SCR catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsener, M.; Kleemann, M.; Koebel, M. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    Standard SCR catalysts possess high activity for the hydrolysis of HNCO and thus explain the suitability of urea as a selective reducing agent for NO{sub x}. At high space velocities HNCO-slip can get perceptible over the entire temperature range. This can be attributed to the fact that the temperature dependence is strong for the SCR reaction, but weak for the hydrolysis reaction. (author) 3 figs., 5 refs.

  5. Theoretical Studies of Homogeneous Catalysts Mimicking Nitrogenase

    OpenAIRE

    Alessandra Magistrato; Jacopo Sgrignani; Duvan Franco

    2011-01-01

    The conversion of molecular nitrogen to ammonia is a key biological and chemical process and represents one of the most challenging topics in chemistry and biology. In Nature the Mo-containing nitrogenase enzymes perform nitrogen ‘fixation’ via an iron molybdenum cofactor (FeMo-co) under ambient conditions. In contrast, industrially, the Haber-Bosch process reduces molecular nitrogen and hydrogen to ammonia with a heterogeneous iron catalyst under drastic conditions of temperature and pressur...

  6. Oxidation of soot on iron oxide catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Waglöhner, Steffen

    2012-01-01

    This thesis addresses the rational development of an iron oxide based catalyst for soot oxidation. The approach of this development process comprises three research methods, namely mechanistic and kinetic experiments, kinetic and fluid dynamic modelling and structure-activity relations of different types of iron oxides. A combination of this enables the synthesis of an advanced catalytic material, which is transferred to a real DPF system and tested under real diesel exhaust conditions.

  7. Intermediate Ethanol Blends Catalyst Durability Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, Brian H; Sluder, Scott; Knoll, Keith; Orban, John; Feng, Jingyu

    2012-02-01

    In the summer of 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a test program to evaluate the potential impacts of intermediate ethanol blends (also known as mid-level blends) on legacy vehicles and other engines. The purpose of the test program was to develop information important to assessing the viability of using intermediate blends as a contributor to meeting national goals for the use of renewable fuels. Through a wide range of experimental activities, DOE is evaluating the effects of E15 and E20 - gasoline blended with 15% and 20% ethanol - on tailpipe and evaporative emissions, catalyst and engine durability, vehicle driveability, engine operability, and vehicle and engine materials. This report provides the results of the catalyst durability study, a substantial part of the overall test program. Results from additional projects will be reported separately. The principal purpose of the catalyst durability study was to investigate the effects of adding up to 20% ethanol to gasoline on the durability of catalysts and other aspects of the emissions control systems of vehicles. Section 1 provides further information about the purpose and context of the study. Section 2 describes the experimental approach for the test program, including vehicle selection, aging and emissions test cycle, fuel selection, and data handling and analysis. Section 3 summarizes the effects of the ethanol blends on emissions and fuel economy of the test vehicles. Section 4 summarizes notable unscheduled maintenance and testing issues experienced during the program. The appendixes provide additional detail about the statistical models used in the analysis, detailed statistical analyses, and detailed vehicle specifications.

  8. Shareholder Returns for a Catalyst Award

    OpenAIRE

    Arthur, M. M.; Cook, Alison

    2009-01-01

    Using an event study methodology, we examine firm share price reactions to the designation of a Catalyst Award. We find a positive relationship between the human resource award and share price reactions. In addition, we find varying degrees of support that timing, firm size, and labor force composition moderate share price reactions. Specifically, we find that earlier award announcements generate larger share price reactions than more recent award announcements. We also find support that larg...

  9. Development of radioactive platinum group metal catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fission product nuclides generated during the irradiation of reactor fuel include many useful elements, among them platinum group metals such as ruthenium, rhodium and palladium which are of great industrial importance, occur rarely in nature and are highly valuable. In this research, the authors reviewed various PGM recovery methods. Recovery of palladium from seven-component simulated waste solutions was conducted by selective precipitation method. The recovery yield was more than 99.5% and the purity of the product was more than 99%. Wet-proof catalyst was prepared with the recovered palladium. The specific surface area of the catalyst support was more than 400m2/g. The content of palladium impregnated on the support was 1 to 10 wt. %. Hydrogen isotope exchange efficiency of more than 93% to equilibrium with small amount of the catalyst was obtained. It was turned out possible to consider using such palladium or other very low active PGM materials in applications where its activity is unimportant as in nuclear industries. (author). 86 refs., 44 tabs., 88 figs

  10. Development of radioactive platinum group metal catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, H.S.; Kim, Y.S.; Kim, Y.E. [and others

    1999-03-01

    The fission product nuclides generated during the irradiation of reactor fuel include many useful elements, among them platinum group metals such as ruthenium, rhodium and palladium which are of great industrial importance, occur rarely in nature and are highly valuable. In this research, the authors reviewed various PGM recovery methods. Recovery of palladium from seven-component simulated waste solutions was conducted by selective precipitation method. The recovery yield was more than 99.5% and the purity of the product was more than 99%. Wet-proof catalyst was prepared with the recovered palladium. The specific surface area of the catalyst support was more than 400m{sup 2}/g.The content of palladium impregnated on the support was 1 to 10 wt. %. Hydrogen isotope exchange efficiency of more than 93% to equilibrium with small amount of the catalyst was obtained. It was turned out possible to consider using such palladium or other very low active PGM materials in applications where its activity is unimportant as in nuclear industries. (author). 86 refs., 44 tabs., 88 figs.

  11. Influence of hydrogen treatment on SCR catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due-Hansen, Johannes

    reduction (SCR) process, i.e. the catalytic removal of NOx from the flue gas. A series of experiments was conducted to reveal the impact on the NO SCR activity of a industrial DeNOX catalyst (3%V2O5-7%WO3/TiO2) by treatment of H2. Standard conditions were treatment of the SCR catalyst for 60 min with three...... different concentrations of H2 (0-2%) in a 8% O2/N2 mixture, where the SCR activity was measured before and after the hydrogen treatment. The results show that the activity of the SCR catalyst is only negligible affected during exposure to the H2/O2 gas and in all cases it returned reversibly to the initial...... NOx conversion (temporarily higher) after reexposure to the standard NO SCR gas. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) suggests that a fraction of both V(IV) and V(V) were reduced to V(III) during exposure to 2% H2 + 8% O2. However, the distribution of vanadium in oxidation state V(III)-V(V) quickly...

  12. Coprecipitated nickel-alumina methanation catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the last few years there has been a renewed interest in the methanation reaction CO+3H2=CH4+H2O. The investigations described in this thesis were performed in relation to the application of this reaction, within the framework of the so-called 'NFE' project, also called 'ADAM' and 'EVA' project. This project, which has been under investigation in West Germany for some years, aims at the investigation of the feasibility of transporting heat from a nuclear high temperature reactor by means of a chemical cycle. A promising possibility to realize such a cycle exists in applying the combination of the endothermic steam reforming of methane and the exothermic methanation reaction. This thesis describes the investigations into a certain type of methanation catalyst, viz. a coprecipitated nickel-alumina catalyst, with the aim to give more insight into the interrelationship between the preparation conditions on the one hand and catalyst properties such as activity and stability on the other hand. (Auth.)

  13. Developing physicians as catalysts for change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Aaron E; Frush, Karen; Michener, J Lloyd

    2013-11-01

    Failures in care coordination are a reflection of larger systemic shortcomings in communication and in physician engagement in shared team leadership. Traditional medical care and medical education neither focus on nor inspire responses to the challenges of coordinating care across episodes and sites. The authors suggest that the absence of attention to gaps in the continuum of care has led physicians to attempt to function as the glue that holds the health care system together. Further, medical students and residents have little opportunity to provide feedback on care processes and rarely receive the training and support they need to assess and suggest possible improvements.The authors argue that this absence of opportunity has driven cynicism, apathy, and burnout among physicians. They support a shift in culture and medical education such that students and residents are trained and inspired to act as catalysts who initiate and expedite positive changes. To become catalyst physicians, trainees require tools to partner with patients, staff, and faculty; training in implementing change; and the perception of this work as inherent to the role of the physician.The authors recommend that medical schools consider interprofessional training to be a necessary component of medical education and that future physicians be encouraged to grow in areas outside the "purely clinical" realm. They conclude that both physician catalysts and teamwork are essential for improving care coordination, reducing apathy and burnout, and supporting optimal patient outcomes. PMID:24072124

  14. Highly Dispersed Alloy Catalyst for Durability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murthi, Vivek S.; Izzo, Elise; Bi, Wu; Guerrero, Sandra; Protsailo, Lesia

    2013-01-08

    Achieving DOE's stated 5000-hr durability goal for light-duty vehicles by 2015 will require MEAs with characteristics that are beyond the current state of the art. Significant effort was placed on developing advanced durable cathode catalysts to arrive at the best possible electrode for high performance and durability, as well as developing manufacturing processes that yield significant cost benefit. Accordingly, the overall goal of this project was to develop and construct advanced MEAs that will improve performance and durability while reducing the cost of PEMFC stacks. The project, led by UTC Power, focused on developing new catalysts/supports and integrating them with existing materials (membranes and gas diffusion layers (GDLs)) using state-of-the-art fabrication methods capable of meeting the durability requirements essential for automotive applications. Specifically, the project work aimed to lower platinum group metals (PGM) loading while increasing performance and durability. Appropriate catalysts and MEA configuration were down-selected that protects the membrane, and the layers were tailored to optimize the movements of reactants and product water through the cell to maximize performance while maintaining durability.

  15. Alternatives to fundholding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glennerster, H; Cohen, A; Bovell, V

    1998-01-01

    The new Labour government in the United Kingdom is proposing to adapt the reforms begun by the last Thatcher government. In particular, it is proposing to abolish the most controversial element--general practitioner (GP) fundholding. It is looking for alternatives. The study reported here followed and evaluated several such schemes. While fundholders use their purchasing power directly to force change by threatening "exit" to another provider, other GPs have evolved ways of influencing decisions--enhancing their "voice." The authors develop a theory to predict the conditions favoring the relative success of exit and voice strategies in health purchasing, and describe alternative GP-based purchasing schemes and the reasons they evolved in six sample districts. In four of these districts and eight practices in each, fundholding and non-fundholding GPs were then asked to describe their intentions and the outcomes of the purchasing process in which they had participated. Four specialties were taken as examples. The authors compare the relative success of fundholders and non-fundholders in achieving their objectives. PMID:9493753

  16. Alternative Medicine and Your Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Complementary and Alternative Medicine KidsHealth > For Parents > Complementary and Alternative Medicine Print ... works. previous continue How CAM Differs From Traditional Medicine CAM is frequently distinguished by its holistic methods, ...

  17. Pea Island Alternatives Development Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this Alternatives Development Report is to outline,in broad scope, the options, tools and alternatives available to the US Fish and Wildlife Service...

  18. Production of jet fuel from alternative source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eller, Zoltan; Papp, Anita; Hancsok, Jenoe [Pannonia Univ., Veszprem (Hungary). MOL Dept. of Hydrocarbon and Coal Processing

    2013-06-01

    Recent demands for low aromatic content jet fuels have shown significant increase in the last 20 years. This was generated by the growing of aviation. Furthermore, the quality requirements have become more aggravated for jet fuels. Nowadays reduced aromatic hydrocarbon fractions are necessary for the production of jet fuels with good burning properties, which contribute to less harmful material emission. In the recent past the properties of gasolines and diesel gas oils were continuously severed, and the properties of jet fuels will be more severe, too. Furthermore, it can become obligatory to blend alternative components into jet fuels. With the aromatic content reduction there is a possibility to produce high energy content jet fuels with the desirable properties. One of the possibilities is the blending of biocomponents from catalytic hydrogenation of triglycerides. Our aim was to study the possibilities of producing low sulphur and aromatic content jet fuels in a catalytic way. On a CoMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst we studied the possibilities of quality improving of a kerosene fraction and coconut oil mixture depending on the change of the process parameters (temperature, pressure, liquid hourly space velocity, volume ratio). Based on the quality parameters of the liquid products we found that we made from the feedstock in the adequate technological conditions products which have a high smoke point (> 35 mm) and which have reduced aromatic content and high paraffin content (90%), so these are excellent jet fuels, and their stack gases damage the environment less. (orig.)

  19. Alternative splicing and muscular dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Pistoni, Mariaelena; Ghigna, Claudia; Gabellini, Davide

    2010-01-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs is a major contributor to proteomic diversity and to the control of gene expression in higher eukaryotic cells. For this reasons, alternative splicing is tightly regulated in different tissues and developmental stages and its disruption can lead to a wide range of human disorders. The aim of this review is to focus on the relevance of alternative splicing for muscle function and muscle disease. We begin by giving a brief overview of alternative splicing, musc...

  20. Catalyst Needs for Thermochemical Hydrogen Production Cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermochemical cycles can be used to split water through a series of chemical reactions where the net result is the production of hydrogen and oxygen at much lower temperatures than direct thermal decomposition. All chemicals within the cycle are fully recycled and the heat to drive the reactions, which tend to be endothermic, must be provided by a primary energy source. When the primary energy driver is nuclear heat, hydrogen can be generated without producing green-house gases, and can provide independence from our dwindling supplies of fossil fuels. A number of thermochemical cycles can be driven by the primary heat of nuclear reactors, especially a very high temperature reactor (VHTR). The sulfur-based family of thermochemical cycles, including the Sulfur- Iodine cycle (S-I), the Hybrid Sulfur cycle, and the Sulfur-Bromine Hybrid cycle, appears promising for producing hydrogen using nuclear heat. These cycles employ a high-temperature sulfuric acid decomposition reaction step. The reaction produces oxygen and generates SO2, which is used in other reaction steps of the cycles. The reaction takes place from 750 to 900 deg. C, or higher, and is facilitated by heterogeneous catalysts. The S-I cycle produces hydrogen by the catalytic decomposition of HI. The calcium-bromine cycle is also being considered as a nuclear powered thermochemical cycle. The various cycles all present requirements of high temperatures and harsh chemical reaction conditions which present significantly challenging environments for catalytic materials. This work will focus on the catalyst needs of thermochemical cycles that are candidates for being powered by nuclear reactors. Specific catalyst activity and stability testing results will be provided for the decomposition of sulfuric acid for the production of oxygen in the sulfur-based family of cycles and for the catalytic decomposition of hydro-iodic acid for the production of hydrogen in the S-I process. Sulfuric acid decomposition results