WorldWideScience

Sample records for alternative medicine treatments

  1. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Treatment Options for Otitis Media

    OpenAIRE

    Marom, Tal; Marchisio, Paola; Tamir, Sharon Ovnat; Torretta, Sara; Gavriel, Haim; Esposito, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Otitis media (OM) has numerous presentations in children. Together with conventional medical therapies aimed to prevent and/or treat OM, a rising number of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatment options can be offered. Since OM is common in children, parents may ask healthcare professionals about possible CAM therapies. Many physicians feel that their knowledge is limited regarding these therapies, and that they desire some information. Therefore, we conducted a liter...

  2. Treatment of Diabetic Gastroparesis by Complementary and Alternative Medicines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Liu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Gastroparesis is a common gastrointestinal complication in diabetes, induced by hyperglycemia and characterized by delayed gastric emptying and upper abdominal symptoms, such asnausea, vomiting, early satiety, bloating and epigastric pain. Diabetic gastroparesis (DGP affects life quality and glycemic control, and is a challenge to treat in both Western and Eastern medicine. Routine treatment in Western medicine includes gastric emptying promoted by prokinetic agents, gastric pacemaking, or surgery combined with lifetime hormono-therapy, all of which have unavoidable side effects and limitations, and are very expensive. Complementary and alternative medical treatments like acupuncture, moxibustion, and massage are becoming more and more attractive because of their effectiveness, fewer side effects, and reliable safety. This article aims to introduce representative methods of complementary and alternative medicine to treat DGP, which were searched in English through Pubmed and in Chinese through CNKI (China Knowledge Resource Integrated Database. Several lines of evidence demonstrated the effects of single or combined complementary alternative therapies on DGP outcomes; however, the mechanisms were rarely investigated. Randomized controlled trials are undoubtedly required in future studies.

  3. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Treatment Options for Otitis Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marom, Tal; Marchisio, Paola; Tamir, Sharon Ovnat; Torretta, Sara; Gavriel, Haim; Esposito, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Otitis media (OM) has numerous presentations in children. Together with conventional medical therapies aimed to prevent and/or treat OM, a rising number of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatment options can be offered. Since OM is common in children, parents may ask healthcare professionals about possible CAM therapies. Many physicians feel that their knowledge is limited regarding these therapies, and that they desire some information. Therefore, we conducted a literature review of CAM therapies for OM, taking into account that many of these treatments, their validity and efficacy and have not been scientifically demonstrated. We performed a search in MEDLINE (accessed via PubMed) using the following terms: “CAM” in conjunction with “OM” and “children. Retrieved publications regarding treatment of OM in children which included these terms included randomized controlled trials, prospective/retrospective studies, and case studies. The following CAM options for OM treatment in children were considered: acupuncture, homeopathy, herbal medicine/phytotherapy, osteopathy, chiropractic, xylitol, ear candling, vitamin D supplement, and systemic and topical probiotics. We reviewed each treatment and described the level of scientific evidence of the relevant publications. The therapeutic approaches commonly associated with CAM are usually conservative, and do not include drugs or surgery. Currently, CAM is not considered by physicians a potential treatment of OM, as there is limited supporting evidence. Further studies are warranted in order to evaluate the potential value of CAM therapies for OM. PMID:26871802

  4. Treatment of Diabetic Gastroparesis by Complementary and Alternative Medicines

    OpenAIRE

    Hao Liu; Bo Yu; Meng Zhang; Kun Liu; Fu-Chun Wang; Xin-Yan Gao

    2015-01-01

    Gastroparesis is a common gastrointestinal complication in diabetes, induced by hyperglycemia and characterized by delayed gastric emptying and upper abdominal symptoms, such asnausea, vomiting, early satiety, bloating and epigastric pain. Diabetic gastroparesis (DGP) affects life quality and glycemic control, and is a challenge to treat in both Western and Eastern medicine. Routine treatment in Western medicine includes gastric emptying promoted by prokinetic agents, gastric pacemaking, or s...

  5. [Hypnosis as an alternative treatment for pain in palliative medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peintinger, Christa; Hartmann, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Pain--which can have a variety of causes--constitutes a severe problem for patients in need of palliative care, because this pain usually dramatically impairs their quality of life. Thus, the more advanced a terminal illness has become, the more hospital staff should focus on holistic treatment, encompassing body, mind and soul of the patient. Apart from conventional medication-based pain therapy, there is also a variety of non-medicinal treatments for pain. One of these methods is hypnosis, an imaginative treatment that activates available resources; it is not only an effective way of alleviating pain, but it also can ease psychological problems at the same time. PMID:19165446

  6. Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Help a Friend Who Cuts? Complementary and Alternative Medicine KidsHealth > For Teens > Complementary and Alternative Medicine Print ... replacement. continue How Is CAM Different From Conventional Medicine? Conventional medicine is based on scientific knowledge of ...

  7. Is garlic alternative medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivlin, Richard S

    2006-03-01

    Garlic has been used medicinally since antiquity. In virtually every early civilization known, such as ancient India, Egypt, Rome, China, and Japan, garlic was part of the therapeutic regimen for a variety of maladies. Therefore, the ancient medicinal tradition of garlic use would qualify it as a folk medicine or as an alternative or complementary medicine. But is garlic an alternative to established methods of disease prevention or treatment? Scientists from around the world have identified a number of bioactive substances in garlic that are water soluble (e.g., S-allyl methylcysteine), and fat soluble (e.g., diallyldisulfide). Mechanisms of action are being elucidated by modern technology. The validity of ancient medicine is now being evaluated critically in cell-free systems, animal models, and human populations. Preventive and therapeutic trials of garlic are still in early stages. There are many promising lines of research suggesting the potential effects of garlic. The current state of knowledge does not recognize garlic as a true alternative, but it will likely find a place for garlic as a complement to established methods of disease prevention and treatment. Our goal should be to examine garlic together with other agents to evaluate its possible efficacy and toxicity under conditions of actual use in humans. PMID:16484549

  8. The role of complementary and alternative medicine in the treatment of eating disorders: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Sarah; Smith, Caroline A; Hay, Phillipa

    2016-04-01

    This systematic review critically appraises the role of complementary and alternative medicine in the treatment of those with an eating disorder. Sixteen studies were included in the review. The results of this review show that the role of complementary and alternative medicine in the treatment of those with an eating disorder is unclear and further studies should be conducted. A potential role was found for massage and bright light therapy for depression in those with Bulimia Nervosa and a potential role for acupuncture and relaxation therapy, in the treatment of State Anxiety, for those with an eating disorder. The role of these complementary therapies in treating eating disorders should only be provided as an adjunctive treatment only. PMID:26970732

  9. Behaviors of Providers of Traditional Korean Medicine Therapy and Complementary and Alternative Medicine Therapy for the Treatment of Cancer Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Jun-Sang Yu; Chun-Bae Kim; Ki-Kyong Kim; Ji-Eun Lee; Min-Young Kim

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: In Korea, cancer is one of the most important causes of death. Cancer patients have sought alternative methods, like complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) together with Western medicine, to treat cancer. Also, there are many kinds of providers of CAM therapy, including providers of Korean oriental medicine therapy. The purpose of this study is to identify the behaviors of Korean oriental medicine therapy and CAM therapy providers who treat cancer patients and to provide bac...

  10. The Chinese approach to complementary and alternative medicine treatment for interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Ran; Ali, Abdullah

    2015-12-01

    Management of interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) remains a challenge due to poor understanding on its etiology. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), as an optional treatment, has been widely used, because no definitive conventional therapy is available. The different domain of CAM provides miscellaneous treatments for IC/BPS, which mainly include dietary modification, nutraceuticals, bladder training, biofeedback, yoga, massage, physical therapy, Qigong, traditional Chinese medicine and acupuncture. Clinical evidence has shown that each therapy can certainly benefit a portion of IC/BPS patients. However, the target patient group of each therapy has not been well studied and randomized, controlled trials are needed to further confirm the efficacy and reliability of CAM on managing IC/BPS. Despite these limitations, CAM therapeutic characteristics including non-invasive and effectiveness for specific patients allow clinicians and patients to realize multimodal and individualized therapy for IC/BPS. PMID:26816867

  11. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Treatment Options for Otitis Media: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marom, Tal; Marchisio, Paola; Tamir, Sharon Ovnat; Torretta, Sara; Gavriel, Haim; Esposito, Susanna

    2016-02-01

    Otitis media (OM) has numerous presentations in children. Together with conventional medical therapies aimed to prevent and/or treat OM, a rising number of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatment options can be offered. Since OM is common in children, parents may ask healthcare professionals about possible CAM therapies. Many physicians feel that their knowledge is limited regarding these therapies, and that they desire some information. Therefore, we conducted a literature review of CAM therapies for OM, taking into account that many of these treatments, their validity and efficacy and have not been scientifically demonstrated.We performed a search in MEDLINE (accessed via PubMed) using the following terms: "CAM" in conjunction with "OM" and "children. Retrieved publications regarding treatment of OM in children which included these terms included randomized controlled trials, prospective/retrospective studies, and case studies.The following CAM options for OM treatment in children were considered: acupuncture, homeopathy, herbal medicine/phytotherapy, osteopathy, chiropractic, xylitol, ear candling, vitamin D supplement, and systemic and topical probiotics. We reviewed each treatment and described the level of scientific evidence of the relevant publications.The therapeutic approaches commonly associated with CAM are usually conservative, and do not include drugs or surgery. Currently, CAM is not considered by physicians a potential treatment of OM, as there is limited supporting evidence. Further studies are warranted in order to evaluate the potential value of CAM therapies for OM. PMID:26871802

  12. Alternative and Integrative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are the healthcare rituals practiced by a given culture (eg, Asian, Indian, African). Homeopathic Medicine: This alternative medicine system is based on the principle that “like cures like.” In other words, the same substance ... American Brain Tumor Association 8550 W. Bryn Mawr Ave. ...

  13. Complementary alternative medicine and nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complementary alternative medicines (CAMs), including food supplements, are taken widely by patients, especially those with cancer. Others take CAMs hoping to improve fitness or prevent disease. Physicians (and patients) may not be aware of the potential side-effects and interactions of CAMs with conventional treatment. Likewise, their known physiological effects could interfere with radiopharmaceutical kinetics, producing abnormal treatment responses and diagnostic results. Nuclear medicine physicians are encouraged to question patients on their intake of CAMs when taking their history prior to radionuclide therapy or diagnosis. The potential effect of CAMs should be considered when unexpected therapeutic or diagnostic results are found. (orig.)

  14. Alternative Medicine and Your Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Complementary and Alternative Medicine KidsHealth > For Parents > Complementary and Alternative Medicine Print ... works. previous continue How CAM Differs From Traditional Medicine CAM is frequently distinguished by its holistic methods, ...

  15. Alternative Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find your chapter: search by state Home > Alzheimer's Disease > Treatments > Alternative Treatments Overview What Is Dementia? What Is Alzheimer's? Younger/Early Onset Facts and Figures Know the 10 Signs Stages Inside the Brain: ...

  16. [Alternative medicine: really an alternative to academic medicine?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happle, R

    2000-06-01

    Numerous courses on alternative medicine are regularly advertised in Deutsches Arzteblatt, the organ of the German Medical Association. The present German legislation likewise supports this form of medicine, and this explains why Iscador, an extract of the mistletoe, is found in the Rote Liste, a directory of commercially available medical drugs, under the heading "cytostatic and antimetastatic drugs" although such beneficial effect is unproven. To give another example, a German health insurance fund was sentenced to pay for acupuncture as a treatment for hepatic failure. This judgement is characteristic of the present German judicial system and represents a victory of "oracling irrationalism" (Popper). The astonishing popularity of alternative medicine can be explained by a revival of romanticism. An intellectually fair opposite position has been delineated by Karl Popper in the form of critical rationalism. It is important to realize, however, that our decision to adhere to rational thinking is made in the innermost depth of our heart but not on the basis of rational arguing. Rather, the decision in favor of reason has a moral dimension. PMID:10907162

  17. IBD and Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alternative Medicine (CAM) Go Back Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) Email Print + Share Crohn’s disease and ulcerative ... Energy Medicine, and Biologically-Based Practices. Mind-Body Medicine Mind-body medicine is a set of interventions ...

  18. Research of alternative medicine formulary for joint pain treatment according to Food Act 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joint is a type of tissue that connects two bones together. The main function of the joint tissues is to reduce the effect of friction that happens between bones resulting from the movement of the body. In a long term effect, the joint became dried and unable to absorb such vibration again. Thus, it will cause inflammation. A survey showed that patients with joints problems prefer the alternative prescription medicine rather than the modern medicines that are recommended by doctors. This is because it does not cost as much and it also can be easily obtained. However, the safety of consuming these products is doubtful and the side effect is unknown. This research is conducted by obtaining alternative prescription medicine for joint medication samples from Chow Kit, Kuala Lumpur area namely Jamu Jarum Emas, Maajun Kuat, Pil Tupai Jantan Asli, Kapsul Ajaib, Sendi Pil, Herba Ikan Haruan Asli, F.O.B., Tunglin Antirheumatic, and Sendi-Plus and the experiment is being tested using X-ray Fluorescence technique and referred to Akta Makanan 1983 to see whether the the medicines is safe to be consumed or not. Six heavy metal elements is stated in the act which are toxic to humans like arsenic, lead, tin, mercury, cadmium, and antimony. The amounts permitted by the act are 1, 2, 40, 0.05, 1 and 1 mg/ kg respectively. From the research, only three heavy metals have the amounts below the maximum amounts permitted by the law that is lead, cadmium, and antimony with the amount of 0.23, 0.23, and 0.04 mg/ kg while the amount of arsenic, lead, and mercury are way exceeds the law with the concentrations of 4.33 ± 0.460, 18.0 ± 1.11, and 0.120 ± 0.007 mg/ kg respectively. All samples manufacturer do not obey the law completely, thus the safety for consuming this products can cause severe effect on human health. (author)

  19. Mind-Body Medicine Practices in Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education Visitor Information RePORT NIH Fact Sheets Home > Mind-Body Medicine Practices in Complementary and Alternative Medicine Small Text Medium Text Large Text Mind-Body Medicine Practices in Complementary and Alternative Medicine ...

  20. Young doctors' views on alternative medicine.

    OpenAIRE

    Reilly, D T

    1983-01-01

    A survey was undertaken to explore attitudes to alternative medicine among 100 general practitioner trainees. A positive attitude emerged from the 86 respondents, with 18 doctors using at least one alternative method themselves and 70 wanting to train in one or more. A total of 31 trainees had referred patients for such treatments; 12 of these doctors made referrals to non-medically qualified practitioners. The most commonly used alternative treatments were hypnosis, manipulation, homoeopathy...

  1. Complementary and alternative medicine in the treatment of refugees and survivors of torture: a review and proposal for action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longacre, McKenna; Silver-Highfield, Ellen; Lama, Puja; Grodin, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Survivors of torture and refugee trauma often have increased needs for mental and physical healthcare. This is due in part to the complex sequelae of trauma, including chronic pain, major depressive disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and somatization. This article reviews the scientific medical literature for the efficacy and feasibility of some complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) modalities including meditation, Ayurveda, pranayama/yogic breathing, massage/body-work, dance/movement, spirituality, yoga, music, Traditional Chinese Medicine and acupuncture, qigong, t'ai chi, chiropractic, homeopathy, aromatherapy and Reiki specifically with respect to survivors of torture and refugee trauma. We report that preliminary research suggests that the certain CAM modalities may prove effective as part of an integrated treatment plan for survivors of torture and refugee trauma. Further research is warranted. PMID:23086004

  2. Herbs, Supplements and Alternative Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Size: A A A Listen En Español Herbs, Supplements and Alternative Medicines It is best to get ... also more likely to use dietary supplements. Using Supplements Safely If you’re one of the many ...

  3. Integrative Medicine and Complementary and Alternative Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 000 this month to find cures. Loading... Integrative Medicine and Complementary and Alternative Therapies Integrative Medicine and Complementary and Alternative Therapies SHARE: Print Glossary ...

  4. Implicit and explicit attitudes towards conventional and complementary and alternative medicine treatments: Introduction of an Implicit Association Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, James A; Hohmann, Cynthia; Lister, Kelsi; Albertyn, Riani; Bradshaw, Renee; Johnson, Christine

    2016-06-01

    This study examined associations between anticipated future health behaviour and participants' attitudes. Three Implicit Association Tests were developed to assess safety, efficacy and overall attitude. They were used to examine preference associations between conventional versus complementary and alternative medicine among 186 participants. A structural equation model suggested only a single implicit association, rather than three separate domains. However, this single implicit association predicted additional variance in anticipated future use of complementary and alternative medicine beyond explicit. Implicit measures should give further insight into motivation for complementary and alternative medicine use. PMID:25104784

  5. Could the products of Indian medicinal plants be the next alternative for the treatment of infections?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Nandagopal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Indian medicinal plants are now recognized to have great potential for preparing clinically useful drugs that could even be used by allopathic physicians. Traditionally, practitioners of Indian medicine have used plant products in powder, syrup or lotion forms, without identification, quantification and dose regulation, unlike their allopathic counterparts. The present review explores the immense potential of the demonstrated effect of Indian medicinal plants on microbes, viruses and parasites. In the present context, with the available talent in the country like pharmaceutical chemists, microbiologists, biotechnologists and interested allopathic physicians, significant national effort towards identification of an "active principle" of Indian medicinal plants to treat human and animal infections should be a priority.

  6. [Herbal medicines alternative to synthetical medicines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, A M; Schilcher, H; Loew, D

    2013-12-16

    Herbal pharmaceuticals in medical practice are similarly used as chemically well defined drugs. Like other synthetical drugs, they are subject to pharmaceutical legislature (AMG) and EU directives. It is to differentiate between phytopharmaceuticals with effectiveness of proven indications and traditional registered herbal medicine. Through the Health Reform Act January 2004 and the policy of the Common Federal Committee (G-BA)on the contractual medical care from March 2009--with four exceptions--Non-prescription Phytopharmaka of the legal Health insurance is no longer (SHI) refundable and must be paid by the patients. The result is that more and more well-established preparations disappear from the market. This article gives an overview of practical relevant indications for herbal medicines, which according to its licensing status, the scientific assessment by the Cochrane Collaboration and the Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG) and evidence-based Medicine (EBM)/ meta-analyzes as an alternative to synthetics can be used. PMID:24934061

  7. Complementary and alternative medicine for multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, S; Knorr, C; Geiger, H; Flachenecker, P

    2008-09-01

    We analyzed characteristics, motivation, and effectiveness of complementary and alternative medicine in a large sample of people with multiple sclerosis. A 53-item survey was mailed to the members of the German Multiple Sclerosis Society, chapter of Baden-Wuerttemberg. Surveys of 1573 patients (48.5 +/- 11.7 years, 74% women, duration of illness 18.1 +/- 10.5 years) were analyzed. In comparison with conventional medicine, more patients displayed a positive attitude toward complementary and alternative medicine (44% vs 38%, P job, and higher education (P < 0.05). Compared with conventional therapies, complementary and alternative medicine rarely showed unwanted side effects (9% vs 59%, P < 0.00001). A total of 52% stated that the initial consultation with their physician lasted less than 15 min. To conclude, main reasons for the use of complementary and alternative medicine include the high rate of side effects and low levels of satisfaction with conventional treatments and brief patients/physicians contacts. PMID:18632773

  8. Alternative approaches for the treatment of airway diseases: focus on nanoparticle medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratemi, E; Sultana Shaik, A; Al Faraj, A; Halwani, R

    2016-08-01

    Despite the various treatment options and international guidelines currently available for the appropriate therapeutic management of asthma, a large population of patients with asthma continues to have poorly controlled disease. There is therefore a need for novel approaches to achieve better asthma control, especially for severe asthmatics. This review discusses the use of nanoparticles for the specific targeting of inflammatory pathways as a promising approach for the effective control of severe persistent asthma as well as other chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:27404025

  9. Alternative Medicine on the Internet

    OpenAIRE

    Muret, Marc

    2000-01-01

    If you go to a bookstore to look for information on a particular health problem you will have a choice between the "medicine" corner with scientific manuals for professionals and the "health" corner with all kinds of books about acupuncture, ayurveda, natural healing, homeopathy, nutrition, massage, and so on! How is it on the Net? Even a short tour will bring you a lot of "medical" information, but when you look for alternative approaches in the "health" corner you will be rather disappointe...

  10. Alternative Medicine Taking Hold Among Americans: Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159511.html Alternative Medicine Taking Hold Among Americans: Report More than $30 ... chunk of their health care dollars on alternative medicine, such as acupuncture, yoga, chiropractic care and natural ...

  11. Office of Cancer Complementary and Alternative Medicine (OCCAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Office of Cancer Complementary and Alternative Medicine (OCCAM) is an office of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in the Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis. OCCAM is responsible for NCI’s research agenda in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) as it relates to cancer prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and symptom management.

  12. Seeking Mind, Body and Spirit Healing—Why Some Men with Prostate Cancer Choose CAM (Complementary and Alternative Medicine) over Conventional Cancer Treatments

    OpenAIRE

    White, Margaret A.; Verhoef, Marja J.; Davison, B.J.; Hal Gunn; Karen Cooke

    2008-01-01

    Little is known about men with prostate cancer who decline conventional treatment and use only complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Objectives: To 1) explore why men decline conventional prostate cancer treatment and use CAM 2) understand the role of holistic healing in their care, and 3) document their recommendations for health care providers. Methods: Semi-structured interviews and follow-up focus groups. Sample: Twenty-nine men diagnosed with prostate cancer who declined all reco...

  13. Alternative medicine and doping in sports

    OpenAIRE

    Benjamin Koh; Lynne Freeman; Christopher Zaslawski3

    2012-01-01

    Athletes are high achievers who may seek creative or unconventional methods to improve performance. The literature indicates that athletes are among the heaviest users of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and thus may pioneer population trends in CAM use. Unlike non-athletes, athletes may use CAM not just for prevention, treatment or rehabilitation from illness or injuries, but also for performance enhancement. Assuming that athletes’ creative use of anything unconventional is aime...

  14. Use of selected complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatments in veterans with cancer or chronic pain: a cross-sectional survey

    OpenAIRE

    Liebschutz Jane M; McEachrane-Gross F; Berlowitz Dan

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is emerging as an important form of care in the United States. We sought to measure the prevalence of selected CAM use among veterans attending oncology and chronic pain clinics and to describe the characteristics of CAM use in this population. Methods The self-administered, mail-in survey included questions on demographics, health beliefs, medical problems and 6 common CAM treatments (herbs, dietary supplements, chiropractic ca...

  15. Special Section: Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM):Quiz on Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Special Section CAM Quiz on Complementary and Alternative Medicine Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents For ... low back pain. True False Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) includes: Meditation Chiropractic Use of natural products, ...

  16. A primer of complementary and alternative medicine and its relevance in the treatment of mental health problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamtani, Ravinder; Cimino, Andrea

    2002-01-01

    The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is widespread. Those with psychiatric disorders are more likely to use CAM than those with other diseases. There are both benefits and limitations to CAM. Many controlled studies have yielded promising results in the areas of chronic pain, insomnia, anxiety, and depression. There is sufficient evidence, for example, to support the use of a) acupuncture for addiction problems and chronic musculoskeletal pain, b) hypnosis for cancer pain and nausea, c) massage therapy for anxiety, and the use of d) mind-body techniques such as meditation, relaxation, and biofeedback for pain, insomnia, and anxiety. Large doses of vitamins, herbal supplements, and their interaction with conventional medications are areas of concern. Physicians must become informed practitioners so that they can provide appropriate and meaningful advice to patients concerning benefits and limitations of CAM. PMID:12418362

  17. Medicine Of Water Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book deals with the medicine of water handling, which includes medicine for dispersion and cohesion, zeta-potential, congelation with Shalze Hardy's law, inorganic coagulants, inorganic high molecule coagulants, aid coagulant such as fly ash and sodium hydroxide, and effect of aluminum and iron on cohesion of clay suspension, organic coagulants like history of organic coagulants, a polyelectrolyte, coagulants for cation, and organic polymer coagulant, heavy metal and cyan exfoliants, application of drugs of water treatment.

  18. Demographic Characteristics and Medical Service Use of Failed Back Surgery Syndrome Patients at an Integrated Treatment Hospital Focusing on Complementary and Alternative Medicine: A Retrospective Review of Electronic Medical Records

    OpenAIRE

    Hee Seung Choi; Eun Hya Chi; Me-riong Kim; Jaehoon Jung; Jinho Lee; Joon-Shik Shin; In-Hyuk Ha

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To report the patient demographics and nonsurgical complementary and alternative medicine treatment used at a Korean medicine hospital for low back pain (LBP) and/or sciatica after surgery. Methods. Medical records of patients who visited a spine-specialized Korean medicine hospital at 2 separate sites for continuous or recurrent LBP or sciatica following back surgery were reviewed. The demographics, MRI and/or CT scans, and treatments were assessed. Results. Of the total 707 patie...

  19. Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Osteoporosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejazi, Zahra Alsadat; Namjooyan, Forough; Khanifar, Marjan

    2016-01-01

    Background: A systemic skeletal disease is characterized by low bone mass and micro-architectural deterioration with a consequent increase in bone fragility and susceptibility to fracture. Asia has the highest increment in the elderly population; therefore, osteoporotic fracture should be a noticeable health issue. The incidence rate of hip fractures in Asia could rise to 45% by the year 2050. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is a group of various medical and health care systems, practices, and products that are not presently considered as part of formal medicine. CAMs have been described as “diagnosis, treatment, and/or prevention which complements mainstream medicine as a holistic, subjective and various natural approaches to medical problems by contributing to a common whole, satisfying claims not met by orthodoxy, or diversifying the conceptual frameworks of medicine”. Methods: Peer-reviewed publications were identified through a search in Scopus, Science Direct, Cochrane, PubMed, and Google scholar using keywords “osteopenia”, “osteoporosis”, “menopause”, “CAM”, “phytoestrogens”, “phytotherapy” and “herbal medicine”. The search was completed in July 2015 and was limited to articles published in English. Relevant articles were identified based on the expertise and clinical experience of the authors. Results: We categorized our results in different classifications including: lifestyle modifications (cigarette, alcohol, exercise and food regimen), supportive cares (intake supplements including vitamin D, C and K), treatments synthetic (routine and newer options for hormone replacement and none hormonal therapies) and natural options (different types of CAM including herbal medicines, yoga and chiropractic). Conclusion: Established osteoporosis is difficult to treat because bone density has fallen below the fracture threshold and trabecular elements may have been lost. Antiresorptive agents can be used to prevent further

  20. Thyroid Disease and Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Donate Thyroid Disease and Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) WHAT IS A THYROID NODULE? The term ... type of evaluation. WHAT IS COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE (CAM)? Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) is defined ...

  1. Application of alternative medicine in gastrointestinal cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacground/Aim. Alternative medicine is a set of therapeutic procedures which are no part of official practice. At present, the use of alternative medicine among cancer patients is significant and the purpose of this study was to get more information on the methods and products of alternative medicine. Thus, the aim of the study was to determine the frequency of the use of alternative medicine among gastrointestinal cancer patients. Methods. The research was conducted using an anonymous questionnaire in writing. We included 205 patients with the diagnosis of gastrointestinal malignancy in the study but the questionnaire was fulfilled by 193 patients and the presented data were based on their answers. The questions were about the sociodemographic characteristics of the patients, the reasons for their use of alternative medicine, and their information sources about alternative medicine. We divided existing alternative therapies into 6 categories: herbal therapy, special diets, psychotherapy, body-mind therapy, spiritual therapy, and other supplements. Results. A total of 48 (24.9% patients did not use any type of alternative therapy; 145 (75.1% patients used at least one product and 124 (64.25% patients used herbal preparations (beetroot juice was consumed by 110 [56.99%] patients; 136 (70.5% patients were informed about alternative therapies by other patients.; 145 (75.1% used alternative medicine to increase the chances for cure; 88 (45.6% of interviewed patients would like to participate in future research in this field. Conclusion. The use of alternative medicine is evidently significant among cancer patients. Further research should be conducted in order to find out interactions of these products with other drugs and potential advantages and disadvantages of this form of treatment.

  2. Complementary and alternative medicine in developmental disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kelly A; Patel, Dilip R

    2005-11-01

    Developmental disabilities (DD) are defined as a diverse group of severe chronic conditions due to mental and/or physical impairments. Individuals with developmental disabilities have difficulty with major life activities including language, mobility, and learning. Developmental disabilities can begin anytime during development--from prenatal up to 22 years of age, and the disability usually lasts throughout a person's lifetime. Autism spectrum disorders, cerebral palsy, mental retardation, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder are common conditions falling within the definition of developmental disabilities. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is becoming increasingly utilized in the general population for treatment of everything from the common cold to complex and chronic medical conditions. This article reviews the prevalence of different types of CAM used for various developmental disabilities. PMID:16391450

  3. The essence of alternative medicine. A dermatologist's view from Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happle, R

    1998-11-01

    In Germany, alternative medicine is presently very popular and is supported by the federal government. When deliberating on the essence of alternative medicine we should simultaneously reflect on the intellectual and moral basis of regular medicine. To provide an epistemological demarcation of the 2 fields, the following 12 theses are advanced: (1) alternative and regular medicine are speaking different languages; (2) alternative medicine is not unconventional medicine; (3) the paradigm of regular medicine is rational thinking; (4) the paradigm of alternative medicine is irrational thinking; (5) the present popularity of alternative medicine can be explained by romanticism; (6) some concepts of alternative medicine are falsifiable and others are not; (7) alternative medicine and evidence-based medicine are mutually exclusive; (8) the placebo effect is an important factor in regular medicine and the exclusive therapeutic principle of alternative medicine; (9) regular and alternative medicine have different aims: coming of age vs faithfulness; (10) alternative medicine is not always safe; (11) alternative medicine is not economic; and (12) alternative medicine will always exist. The fact that alternative methods are presently an integral part of medicine as taught at German universities, as well as of the physician's fee schedule, represents a collective aberration of mind that hopefully will last for only a short time. PMID:9828884

  4. Seeking Mind, Body and Spirit Healing—Why Some Men with Prostate Cancer Choose CAM (Complementary and Alternative Medicine over Conventional Cancer Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret A. White

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about men with prostate cancer who decline conventional treatment and use only complementary and alternative medicine (CAM.Objectives: To 1 explore why men decline conventional prostate cancer treatment and use CAM 2 understand the role of holistic healing in their care, and 3 document their recommendations for health care providers.Methods: Semi-structured interviews and follow-up focus groups.Sample: Twenty-nine men diagnosed with prostate cancer who declined all recommended conventional treatments and used CAM.Results: Based on strong beliefs about healing, study participants took control by researching the risks of delaying or declining conventional treatment while using CAM as a first option. Most perceived conventional treatment to have a negative impact on quality of life. Participants sought healing in a broader mind, body, spirit context, developing individualized CAM approaches consistent with their beliefs about the causes of cancer. Most made significant lifestyle changes to improve their health. Spirituality was central to healing for one-third of the sample. Participants recommended a larger role for integrated cancer care.Conclusion: Men who decline conventional prostate cancer treatment and use CAM only may benefit from a whole person approach to care where physicians support them to play an active role in healing while carefully monitoring their disease status.

  5. Detraditionalisation, gender and alternative and complementary medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sointu, Eeva

    2011-03-01

    This article is premised on the importance of locating the appeal and meaning of alternative and complementary medicines in the context of gendered identities. I argue that the discourse of wellbeing--captured in many alternative and complementary health practices--is congruent with culturally prevalent ideals of self-fulfilling, authentic, unique and self-responsible subjectivity. The discourse of wellbeing places the self at the centre, thus providing a contrast with traditional ideas of other-directed and caring femininity. As such, involvement in alternative and complementary medicines is entwined with a negotiation of shifting femininities in detraditionalising societies. Simultaneously, many alternative and complementary health practices readily tap into and reproduce traditional representations of caring femininity. It is through an emphasis on emotional honesty and intimacy that the discourse of wellbeing also captures a challenge to traditional ideas of masculinity. Expectations and experiences relating to gender add a further level of complexity to the meaningfulness and therapeutic value of alternative and complementary medicines and underlie the gender difference in the utilisation of holistic health practices. I draw on data from a qualitative study with 44, primarily white, middle-class users and practitioners of varied alternative and complementary medicines in the UK. PMID:21251021

  6. Screening for antimicrobial activity of ten medicinal plants used in Colombian folkloric medicine: A possible alternative in the treatment of non-nosocomial infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ocampo Saul A

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The antimicrobial activity and Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC of the extracts of Bidens pilosa L., Bixa orellana L., Cecropia peltata L., Cinchona officinalis L., Gliricidia sepium H.B. & K, Jacaranda mimosifolia D.Don, Justicia secunda Vahl., Piper pulchrum C.DC, P. paniculata L. and Spilanthes americana Hieron were evaluated against five bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus β hemolític, Bacillus cereus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Escherichia coli, and one yeast (Candida albicans. These plants are used in Colombian folk medicine to treat infections of microbial origin. Methods Plants were collected by farmers and traditional healers. The ethanol, hexane and water extracts were obtained by standard methods. The antimicrobial activity was found by using a modified agar well diffusion method. All microorganisms were obtained from the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC. MIC was determined in the plant extracts that showed some efficacy against the tested microorganisms. Gentamycin sulfate (1.0 μg/ml, clindamycin (0.3 μg/ml and nystatin (1.0 μg/ml were used as positive controls. Results The water extracts of Bidens pilosa L., Jacaranda mimosifolia D.Don, and Piper pulchrum C.DC showed a higher activity against Bacillus cereus and Escherichia coli than gentamycin sulfate. Similarly, the ethanol extracts of all species were active against Staphylococcus aureus except for Justicia secunda. Furthermore, Bixa orellana L, Justicia secunda Vahl. and Piper pulchrum C.DC presented the lowest MICs against Escherichia coli (0.8, 0.6 and 0.6 μg/ml, respectively compared to gentamycin sulfate (0.9 8g/ml. Likewise, Justicia secunda and Piper pulchrum C.DC showed an analogous MIC against Candida albicans (0.5 and 0.6 μg/ml, respectively compared to nystatin (0.6 μg/ml. Bixa orellana L, exhibited a better MIC against Bacillus cereus (0.2 μg/ml than gentamycin sulfate (0.5 μg/ml. Conclusion This in vitro study

  7. [Alternative medicines and "Evidence-Based Medicine" a possible reconciliation?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanherweghem, J-L

    2015-09-01

    The contrast between the efficiency of Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM), a scientific fact, and the popularity of Complementary and Alternative Medicines (CAM) is a paradox of the art of healing. EBM is based on the paradigm of positivism and materialism while CAM are based on those of relativism and vitalism. These paradigms are diametrically opposed and the aim of an integrative medicine is aporetic. However, EBM is today in a dead end. The objective proof of a disease according to the rules of EBM is often lacking face to the expectations of patients demanding their illness to be taken into account. EBM and CAM have thus to coexist. Lessons can be drawn from CAM : patient expectations should be given a meaning and be integrated in his or her psychosocial context. PMID:26591330

  8. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Therapies for Perinatal Depression

    OpenAIRE

    Deligiannidis, Kristina M.; Freeman, Marlene P.

    2013-01-01

    Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) therapies are increasingly sought out by patients with psychiatric disorders. This article provides a review of the evidence for several commonly utilized CAM therapies (i.e. omega-3 fatty acids, folate, S-adenosyl-methionine (SAMe), St. John’s Wort, bright light therapy, exercise, massage, and acupuncture) in the treatment of perinatal depression. A number of these treatments may be reasonable to consider for women during pregnancy or the postpart...

  9. The impact of complementary and alternative medicines on cancer symptoms, treatment side effects, quality of life, and survival in women with breast cancer--a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggett, S; Koczwara, B; Miller, M

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common form of cancer amongst women. Women with breast cancer frequently consult dietitians for advice, and increasingly advice on complementary alternative medicines (CAM). The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate evidence of CAM administered orally on cancer-related outcomes. Databases were searched for studies recruiting women with a history of breast cancer reporting on the use of CAM administered orally as tablets, capsules, powders, and liquids for any 1 or more of the following: alleviation of cancer-related symptoms and treatment side effects, improvement to quality of life, physical and emotional wellbeing, survival, and mortality. Twenty-two studies were identified as meeting the inclusion criteria. Ten CAM categories were established with no more than 4 articles published in each category. Although the evidence is of varying quality there is some data to support that guarana and Ganoderma lucidum may improve fatigue, whereas glutamine may also be effective in improving oral mucositis symptoms. Overall, the current available evidence is inconclusive to make definitive recommendations regarding the effectiveness for individuals' use of CAM in women with breast cancer. Further high-quality randomized controlled trials exploring safety, toxicity, and other potential adverse effects of CAM are required. PMID:25811312

  10. Alternative medicine and doping in sports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Koh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Athletes are high achievers who may seek creative or unconventional methods to improve performance. The literature indicates that athletes are among the heaviest users of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM and thus may pioneer population trends in CAM use. Unlike non-athletes, athletes may use CAM not just for prevention, treatment or rehabilitation from illness or injuries, but also for performance enhancement. Assuming that athletes’ creative use of anything unconventional is aimed at “legally” improving performance, CAM may be used because it is perceived as more “natural” and erroneously assumed as not potentially doping. This failure to recognise CAMs as pharmacological agents puts athletes at risk of inadvertent doping.The general position of the World Anti-Doping Authority (WADA is one of strict liability, an application of the legal proposition that ignorance is no excuse and the ultimate responsibility is on the athlete to ensure at all times whatever is swallowed, injected or applied to the athlete is both safe and legal for use. This means that a violation occurs whether or not the athlete intentionally or unintentionally, knowingly or unknowingly, used a prohibited substance/method or was negligent or otherwise at fault. Athletes are therefore expected to understand not only what is prohibited, but also what might potentially cause an inadvertent doping violation. Yet, as will be discussed, athlete knowledge on doping is deficient and WADA itself sometimes changes its position on prohibited methods or substances. The situation is further confounded by the conflicting stance of anti-doping experts in the media. These highly publicised disagreements may further portray inconsistencies in anti-doping guidelines and suggest to athletes that what is considered doping is dependent on the dominant political zeitgeist. Taken together, athletes may believe that unless a specific and explicit ruling is made, guidelines are

  11. Demographic Characteristics and Medical Service Use of Failed Back Surgery Syndrome Patients at an Integrated Treatment Hospital Focusing on Complementary and Alternative Medicine: A Retrospective Review of Electronic Medical Records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee Seung Choi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To report the patient demographics and nonsurgical complementary and alternative medicine treatment used at a Korean medicine hospital for low back pain (LBP and/or sciatica after surgery. Methods. Medical records of patients who visited a spine-specialized Korean medicine hospital at 2 separate sites for continuous or recurrent LBP or sciatica following back surgery were reviewed. The demographics, MRI and/or CT scans, and treatments were assessed. Results. Of the total 707 patients, 62% were male and the average age was 50.20 years. Ninety percent of patients presented with LBP and 67% with sciatica. Eighty-four percent were diagnosed with herniated nucleus pulposus at time of surgery. Of these patients, 70% had pain recurrence 6 months or later, but 19% experienced no relief or immediate aggravation of pain after surgery. Many patients selected traditional Korean medicine treatment as primary means of postsurgery care (47%. When time to pain recurrence was short or pain persisted after surgery, return of symptoms at the same disc level and side was frequent. Conclusion. An integrative treatment model focusing on Korean medicine and used in conjunction with radiological diagnostics and conventional medicine is currently used as a treatment option for patients with pain after lumbar spine surgery.

  12. Use of selected complementary and alternative medicine (CAM treatments in veterans with cancer or chronic pain: a cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liebschutz Jane M

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM is emerging as an important form of care in the United States. We sought to measure the prevalence of selected CAM use among veterans attending oncology and chronic pain clinics and to describe the characteristics of CAM use in this population. Methods The self-administered, mail-in survey included questions on demographics, health beliefs, medical problems and 6 common CAM treatments (herbs, dietary supplements, chiropractic care, massage therapy, acupuncture and homeopathy use. We used the chi-square test to examine bivariate associations between our predictor variables and CAM use. Results Seventy-two patients (27.3% reported CAM use within the past 12 months. CAM use was associated with more education (p = 0.02, higher income (p = 0.006, non-VA insurance (p = 0.003, additional care outside the VA (p = 0.01 and the belief that lifestyle contributes to illness (p = 0.015. The diagnosis of chronic pain versus cancer was not associated with differential CAM use (p = 0.15. Seventy-six percent of CAM non-users reported that they would use it if offered at the VA. Conclusion Use of 6 common CAM treatments among these veterans is lower than among the general population, but still substantial. A large majority of veterans reported interest in using CAM modalities if they were offered at the VA. A national assessment of veteran interest in CAM may assist VA leaders to respond to patients' needs.

  13. Is propolis safe as an alternative medicine?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Graça Miguel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Propolis is a resinous substance produced by honeybees as defense against intruders. It has relevant therapeutic properties that have been used since ancient times. Nowadays, propolis is of increasing importance as a therapeutic, alone or included in many medicines and homeopathic products or in cosmetics. Propolis is produced worldwide and honeybees use the flora surrounding their beehives for its production. Therefore its chemical composition may change according to the flora. The phenolic and volatile fractions of propolis have been revised in the present study, as well as some of the biological properties attributed to this natural product. An alert is given about the need to standardize this product, with quality control. This has already been initiated by some authors, mainly in the propolis from the poplar-type. Only this product can constitute a good complementary and alternative medicine under internationally acceptable quality control.

  14. Chinese herbal medicine research in eczema treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leung Ping

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Eczema is a chronic relapsing atopic dermatitis (AD associated with pruritus, sleep disturbance and poor quality of life of the patient. Treatment of eczema includes use of emollient, topical and systemic antimicrobial agents, corticosteroid or immunomodulating agents. Many patients also seek alternative treatments such as dietary avoidance, supplementation or both. This article reviews the basic pathophysiology of eczema and clinical trials involving Chinese medicine in the treatment of eczema. Research reports on Chinese herbal medicine for eczema were retrieved from PubMed and the Cochrane Database for Systematic Reviews for this review. Only a few RCTs demonstrated the efficacy (or lack of efficacy of Chinese medicinal herbs in treating atopic eczema. Further larger scale trials are warranted.

  15. Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Pakistan: Prospects and Limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Babar T; Hatcher, Juanita

    2005-06-01

    Despite all the marvelous advancements in modern medicine, traditional medicine has always been practiced. More than 70% of the developing world's population still depends on the complementary and alternative systems of medicine (CAM). Cultural beliefs and practices often lead to self-care or home remedies in rural areas and consultation with traditional healers. Evidence-based CAM therapies have shown remarkable success in healing acute as well as chronic diseases. Alternative therapies have been utilized by people in Pakistan who have faith in spiritual healers, clergymen, hakeems, homeopaths or even many quacks. These are the first choice for problems such as infertility, epilepsy, psychosomatic troubles, depression and many other ailments. The traditional medicine sector has become an important source of health care, especially in rural and tribal areas of the country. The main reasons for consulting a CAM healer is the proximity, affordable fee, availability, family pressure and the strong opinion of the community. Pakistan has a very rich tradition in the use of medicinal plants for the treatment of various ailments. It necessitates the integration of the modern and CAM systems in terms of evidence-based information sharing. The health-seeking behavior of the people especially in developing countries calls for bringing all CAM healers into the mainstream by providing them with proper training, facilities and back-up for referral. A positive interaction between the two systems has to be harnessed to work for the common goal of improving health of the people. PMID:15937553

  16. Complementary and alternative medicine: what's it all about?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, B

    2001-01-01

    A number of health-related interventions--from widespread therapies such as acupuncture, herbal medicine, homeopathy and yoga, to less well-known modalities such as Feldenkrais, iridology, reflexology and reiki--have increasingly come under the general heading of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). A few, such as biofeedback, chiropractic and physical therapy, are considered conventional by some, alternative by others. Several national surveys estimate that around 40% of the US populace uses a CAM therapy in a given year. While a few people use CAM therapies instead of conventional medicine, the vast majority of CAM users continue to access the official health care system. Many, however, do not discuss their CAM use with their physician. Medical doctors, for their part, are sharply divided on their attitudes toward CAM, with strong advocates and vehement opponents writing and speaking about this issue. CAM therapists are even more diverse, spanning the spectrum from conventional-appearing registered and certified practitioners to iconoclasts promoting anomalous therapies in the place of conventional treatment. The majority, however, both respect and want to work with conventional medicine, as do their patients. Nearly everyone is calling for more and better evidence, and an ever-increasing number of randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses are now appearing in the literature. Over the past few years, a number of calls for "integrated medicine" have been made, and a few attempts at integrating CAM and conventional medicine have been launched. This article reviews these issues, citing our own interview-based work and the relevant literature. Whether the CAM phenomenon represents a short-lived social movement or the beginnings of a radical transformation of medicine has yet to be determined. PMID:11816777

  17. Use of complementary and alternative medicines associated with a 30% lower ongoing pregnancy/live birth rate during 12 months of fertility treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boivin, J; Schmidt, L

    2009-01-01

    ongoing pregnancy and live birth rate was 31.3% lower in CAM users (42.2%) compared with non-users (61.4%). Adjusted odds of pregnancy/live birth remained lower in CAM users versus non-users, odds ratio = 0.467 (95% confidence interval 0.306-0.711) after controlling for prognostic indicators (age, parity......BACKGROUND There seems to be little discussion between patient and physician about the use of complementary and alternative medicines (CAMs), perhaps because they are not perceived to have adverse effects on fertility. We therefore compared ongoing pregnancy and live birth rate in spontaneous users...

  18. Exclusive Use of Alternative Medicine as a Positive Choice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Inge Kryger; Verhoef, Marja

    2014-01-01

    Background: A survey of members of the Danish MS Society revealed that a minority of MS patients choose to forgo all types of conventional treatment and use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) exclusively. A qualitative follow-up study was performed to elucidate the choice of exclusive CAM use by exploring treatment assumptions among a group of exclusive CAM users. Methods: The study was based on a phenomenological approach. Semistructured in-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with 17 participants, using program theory as an analytical tool, and emerging themes were extracted from the data through meaning condensation. Results: Four themes characterized the participants' treatment assumptions: 1) conventional medicine contains chemical substances that affect the body in negative ways; 2) CAM treatments can strengthen the organism and make it more capable of resisting the impact of MS; 3) the patient's active participation is an important component of the healing process; 4) bodily sensations can be used to guide treatment selection. Conclusions: Exclusive use of CAM by MS patients may reflect embracing CAM rather than a rejection of conventional medicine. Health-care practitioners, patient organizations, and health authorities within the MS field should be aware of possible changes in patients' attitudes toward both CAM and conventional treatment interventions. PMID:25337054

  19. ALTERNATIVE SYSTEM OF MEDICINE IN INDIA: A REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Memon Shakeel; Pathan Dilnawaz; Ziyaurrrahman; Kamal Safura; Bora Chanderprakash

    2011-01-01

    Alternative Medicine is a term commonly used to include all the healing practice "that does not fall within the realm of conventional medicine". It can be defined as "a variety of therapeutic or preventive health care practices, such as homeopathy, naturopathy, chiropractic, and herbal medicine that do not follow generally accepted medical methods and may not have a scientific explanation for their effectiveness.” Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is the term for medical products a...

  20. Vaginal dryness alternative treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a day. Soybeans contain plant-based substances called isoflavones. These substances have an effect on the body ... soy for vasomotor symptoms: the Herbal Alternatives for Menopause (HALT) Study. Menopause . 2008;15(1):51-58. ...

  1. A pluralist challenge to "integrative medicine": Feyerabend and Popper on the cognitive value of alternative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Ian James

    2013-09-01

    This paper is a critique of 'integrative medicine' as an ideal of medical progress on the grounds that it fails to realise the cognitive value of alternative medicine. After a brief account of the cognitive value of alternative medicine, I outline the form of 'integrative medicine' defended by the late Stephen Straus, former director of the US National Centre for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. Straus' account is then considered in the light of Zuzana Parusnikova's recent criticism of 'integrative medicine' and her distinction between 'cognitive' and 'opportunistic' engagement with alternative medicine. Parusnikova warns that the medical establishment is guilty of 'dogmatism' and proposes that one can usefully invoke Karl Popper's 'critical rationalism' as an antidote. Using the example of Straus, I argue that an appeal to Popper is insufficient, on the grounds that 'integrative medicine' can class as a form of cognitively-productive, critical engagement. I suggest that Parusnikova's appeal to Popper should be augmented with Paul Feyerabend's emphasis upon the role of 'radical alternatives' in maximising criticism. 'Integrative medicine' fails to maximise criticism because it 'translates' alternative medicine into the theories and terminology of allopathic medicine and so erodes its capacity to provide cognitively-valuable 'radical alternatives'. These claims are then illustrated with a discussion of 'traditional' and 'medical' acupuncture. I conclude that 'integrative medicine' fails to exploit the cognitive value of alternative medicine and so should be rejected as an ideal of medical progress. PMID:23859834

  2. The emergence of trust in clinics of alternative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Inge Kryger; Hansen, Vibeke Holm; Grünenberg, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    Demands for alternative medicine have increased since the 1970s in nations in which western scientific evidence has become the basis for health care. This paradox has been the impetus to examine how trust emerges in clinics of alternative medicine. Alternative practitioners are self-regulated and the clients pay out of their own pockets to attend non-authorised treatments with very limited scientific evidence of their effects. Trust is a key issue in this context. However, only a few studies have dealt with the ways in which alternative practitioners win their clients' trust. Drawing on three qualitative studies and informing the empirical findings with a sociological concept of trust, this article provides new empirical insights on how trust emerges in Danish clinics of acupuncture, reflexology and homeopathy. The analysis demonstrates how trust is situational and emerges through both clients' susceptibility and practitioners' individual skill development and strategies, as well as from objects, place and space. Trust is developed on relational and bodily as well as material grounds. It is argued that the dynamics and elements of trust identified do not only minimalise uncertainties but sometimes convert these uncertainties into productive new ways for clients to address their ailments, life circumstances and perspectives. PMID:26403077

  3. Mood disorders and complementary and alternative medicine: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qureshi NA

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Naseem Akhtar Qureshi,1 Abdullah Mohammed Al-Bedah21General Administration for Research and Studies, Sulaimania Medical Complex, 2National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Ministry of Health, Riyadh, Saudi ArabiaAbstract: Mood disorders are a major public health problem and are associated with considerable burden of disease, suicides, physical comorbidities, high economic costs, and poor quality of life. Approximately 30%–40% of patients with major depression have only a partial response to available pharmacological and psychotherapeutic interventions. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM has been used either alone or in combination with conventional therapies in patients with mood disorders. This review of the literature examines evidence-based data on the use of CAM in mood disorders. A search of the PubMed, Medline, Google Scholar, and Quertile databases using keywords was conducted, and relevant articles published in the English language in the peer-reviewed journals over the past two decades were retrieved. Evidence-based data suggest that light therapy, St John's wort, Rhodiola rosea, omega-3 fatty acids, yoga, acupuncture, mindfulness therapies, exercise, sleep deprivation, and S-adenosylmethionine are effective in the treatment of mood disorders. Clinical trials of vitamin B complex, vitamin D, and methylfolate found that, while these were useful in physical illness, results were equivocal in patients with mood disorders. Studies support the adjunctive role of omega-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid, and docosahexaenoic acid in unipolar and bipolar depression, although manic symptoms are not affected and higher doses are required in patients with resistant bipolar depression and rapid cycling. Omega-3 fatty acids are useful in pregnant women with major depression, and have no adverse effects on the fetus. Choline, inositol, 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan, and N-acetylcysteine are effective adjuncts in bipolar

  4. Risk, pregnancy and complementary and alternative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Mary

    2010-05-01

    Since the 1990's sociologists such as Giddens and Beck have highlighted the complexities of contemporary western societies in relation to risk. The "risk society" is one in which the advantages of scientific and technological developments are overshadowed with risks and dangers: leading to a world dominated by anxiety and uncertainty. Although a complex set of interrelated phenomena the risk society can be summarised under three main changes: including globalisation, scepticism about expert knowledge, Thompson: 27 and the degree of autonomy individuals have in our detraditionalised society to determine their own life choices (Beck: 13). The discourses of the "risk society" inevitably impact on women during pregnancy and the potential influence this discourse may have in relation to healthcare choices, particularly in the field of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) are explored. In this paper it is argued that the apparently growing use of CAM during pregnancy and childbirth could be interpreted as a response by women to these discourses, that decisions made with regard to CAM may signify a desire for personal fulfilment and a need for autonomy and active participation in healthcare during pregnancy and childbirth. PMID:20347843

  5. Alternative medicine and general practitioners in The Netherlands: towards acceptance and integration.

    OpenAIRE

    Visser, G.J.; Peters, L.

    1990-01-01

    A questionnaire on alternative medicine was sent to 600 general practitioners in the Netherlands. Most of the 360 (60%) GPs who replied expressed on interest in alternative practice; and 47% revealed that they used one or more alternative methods themselves, most often homoeopathy. However, the number of patients given alternative treatment by each doctor was small. Almost all (90%) of the GPs referred patients to alternative practitioners. There is no reason to assume that GPs make use of al...

  6. Medical Student Attitudes toward Complementary, Alternative and Integrative Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Ryan B; Hui, Ka-Kit; Hays, Ron D; Mandel, Jess; Goldstein, Michael; Winegarden, Babbi; Glaser, Dale; Brunton, Laurence

    2011-01-01

    While the use of complementary, alternative and integrative medicine (CAIM) is substantial, it continues to exist at the periphery of allopathic medicine. Understanding the attitudes of medical students toward CAIM will be useful in understanding future integration of CAIM and allopathic medicine. This study was conducted to develop and evaluate an instrument and assess medical students' attitudes toward CAIM. The Complementary, Alternative and Integrative Medicine Attitudes Questionnaire (CAIMAQ) was developed by a panel of experts in CAIM, allopathic medicine, medical education and survey development. A total of 1770 CAIMAQ surveys (51% of US medical schools participated) were obtained in a national sample of medical students in 2007. Factor analysis of the CAIMAQ revealed five distinct attitudinal domains: desirability of CAIM therapies, progressive patient/physician health care roles, mind-body-spirit connection, principles of allostasis and a holistic understanding of disease. The students held the most positive attitude for the "mind-body-spirit connection" and the least positive for the "desirability of CAIM therapies". This study provided initial support for the reliability of the CAIMAQ. The survey results indicated that in general students responded more positively to the principles of CAIM than to CAIM treatment. A higher quality of CAIM-related medical education and expanded research into CAIM therapies would facilitate appropriate integration of CAIM into medical curricula. The most significant limitation of this study is a low response rate, and further work is required to assess more representative populations in order to determine whether the relationships found in this study are generalizable. PMID:21826186

  7. Complementary and alternative medicine for children's asthma: satisfaction, care provider responsiveness, and networks of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freidin, Betina; Timmermans, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    We explain why some caretakers opt for alternative medicine for the treatment of children's asthma whereas others do not. In the past 15 years, asthma care has been standardized, with clinical practice guidelines centered on advanced pharmacological regimes. Clinicians argue that with proper biomedical treatment and environmental control, asthma should be a manageable chronic disease. Yet many patients forego available pharmacological treatments for alternative medicine or complement prescribed drugs with unconventional treatments. On the basis of open-ended, in-depth qualitative interviews with 50 mothers of children with asthma, we argue that the experience with biomedical treatments, social influence in mother's network of care, concerns about adverse and long-term effects, health care providers' responsiveness to such concerns, and familiarity with alternative treatments explain why some families rely on alternative medicine and others do not. PMID:18174534

  8. Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Pakistan: Prospects and Limitations

    OpenAIRE

    Juanita Hatcher; Shaikh, Babar T

    2005-01-01

    Despite all the marvelous advancements in modern medicine, traditional medicine has always been practiced. More than 70% of the developing world's population still depends on the complementary and alternative systems of medicine (CAM). Cultural beliefs and practices often lead to self-care or home remedies in rural areas and consultation with traditional healers. Evidence-based CAM therapies have shown remarkable success in healing acute as well as chronic diseases. Alternative therapies have...

  9. Traditional, complementary, and alternative medicine: Focusing on research into traditional Tibetan medicine in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Peipei; Xia, Jufeng; Rezeng, Caidan; Tong, Li; Tang, Wei

    2016-07-19

    As a form of traditional, complementary, and alternative medicine (TCAM), traditional Tibetan medicine has developed into a mainstay of medical care in Tibet and has spread from there to China and then to the rest of the world. Thus far, research on traditional Tibetan medicine has focused on the study of the plant and animal sources of traditional medicines, study of the histology of those plants and animals, chemical analysis of traditional medicines, pharmacological study of those medicines, and evaluation of the clinical efficacy of those medicines. A number of papers on traditional Tibetan medicines have been published, providing some evidence of the efficacy of traditional Tibetan medicine. However, many traditional Tibetan medicines have unknown active ingredients, hampering the establishment of drug quality standards, the development of new medicines, commercial production of medicines, and market availability of those medicines. Traditional Tibetan medicine must take several steps to modernize and spread to the rest of the world: the pharmacodynamics of traditional Tibetan medicines need to be determined, the clinical efficacy of those medicines needs to be verified, criteria to evaluate the efficacy of those medicines need to be established in order to guide their clinical use, and efficacious medicines need to be acknowledged by the pharmaceutical market. The components of traditional Tibetan medicine should be studied, traditional Tibetan medicines should be screened for their active ingredients, and techniques should be devised to prepare and manufacture those medicines. PMID:27301588

  10. GREEN PHARMACY: AN ALTERNATIVE AND COMPLEMENTARY MEDICINE

    OpenAIRE

    Neeta Shivakumar*, Pushpa Agrawal and Praveen Kumar Gupta

    2013-01-01

    The people in India have an outstanding knowledge of medicinal plants acquired over centuries. A passion for studying medicinal plants is evident both in folk and scholarly traditions. The indigenous mode of understanding and using plants is different from the modern scientific way. It includes botanical, medical and astrological elements. This is the basis of green pharmacy. Indians obviously care for medicinal plants because they know so many of them, so much about them and have worked exte...

  11. [Alternative treatment methods in ENT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friese, K H

    1997-08-01

    In this review, the most important complementary und alternative therapies are discussed, focusing particularly on their use in otorhinolaryngology. These therapies include balneology, Kneipp therapy, microbiological therapy, fasting, excretion therapy, different oxygen therapies, hydro-colon therapy, urine therapy, own-blood therapy, Bach therapy, orthomolecular therapy, order therapy, environmental medicine, phytotherapy, homeopathy, complex homeopathy, anthroposophy, neural therapy, electroaccupuncture according to Voll and similar therapies, nasal reflex therapy, reflex-zone massage, manual therapy, massage, lymph drainage, aroma therapy, thermotherapy, bioresonance, kinesiology, hopi candles, and dietetics. Some of these methods and regimens can be recommended, but others should be rejected. In universities, these methods are only represented to a minor extend, but are more accepted by otorhinolaryngologists in practice. This paper provides a guide to which alternative therapies are sensible and possible in otorhinolaryngology. The aim is to stimulate interest in these methods. It is necessary to discuss these alternative methods reasonably and credibly with patients. PMID:9378666

  12. Shock wave treatment in medicine

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S K Shrivastava; Kailash

    2005-03-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave therapy in orthopedics and traumatology is still a young therapy method. Since the last few years the development of shock wave therapy has progressed rapidly. Shock waves have changed the treatment of urolithiasis substantially. Today shock waves are the first choice to treat kidney and urethral stones. Urology has long been the only medical field for shock waves in medicine. Meanwhile shock waves have been used in orthopedics and traumatology to treat insertion tendinitis, avascular necrosis of the head of femur and other necrotic bone alterations. Another field of shock wave application is the treatment of tendons, ligaments and bones on horses in veterinary medicine. In the present paper we discuss the basic theory and application of shock waves and its history in medicine. The idea behind using shock wave therapy for orthopedic diseases is the stimulation of healing in tendons, surrounding tissue and bones. This is a completely different approach compared to urology where shock waves are used for disintegration.

  13. Complementary and alternative drug therapy versus science-oriented medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anlauf, Manfred

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This opinion deals critically with the so-called complementary and alternative medical (CAM therapy on the basis of current data. From the authors’ perspective, CAM prescriptions and most notably the extensive current endeavours to the “integration” of CAM into conventional patient care is problematic in several respects.Thus, several CAM measures are used, although no specific effects of medicines can be proved in clinical studies. It is extensively explained that the methods used in this regard are those of evidence-based medicine, which is one of the indispensable pillars of science-oriented medicine. This standard of proof of efficacy is fundamentally independent of the requirement of being able to explain efficacy of a therapy in a manner compatible with the insights of the natural sciences, which is also essential for medical progress. Numerous CAM treatments can however never conceivably satisfy this requirement; rather they are justified with pre-scientific or unscientific paradigms. The high attractiveness of CAM measures evidenced in patients and many doctors is based on a combination of positive expectations and experiences, among other things, which are at times unjustified, at times thoroughly justified, from a science-oriented view, but which are non-specific (context effects. With a view to the latter phenomenon, the authors consider the conscious use of CAM as unrevealed therapeutic placebos to be problematic. In addition, they advocate that academic medicine should again systematically endeavour to pay more attention to medical empathy and use context effects in the service of patients to the utmost.The subsequent opinion discusses the following after an introduction to medical history: the definition of CAM; the efficacy of most common CAM procedures; CAM utilisation and costs in Germany; characteristics of science-oriented medicine; awareness of placebo research; pro and contra arguments about the use of CAM, not least

  14. Complementary and alternative drug therapy versus science-oriented medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anlauf, Manfred; Hein, Lutz; Hense, Hans-Werner; Köbberling, Johannes; Lasek, Rainer; Leidl, Reiner; Schöne-Seifert, Bettina

    2015-01-01

    This opinion deals critically with the so-called complementary and alternative medical (CAM) therapy on the basis of current data. From the authors’ perspective, CAM prescriptions and most notably the extensive current endeavours to the “integration” of CAM into conventional patient care is problematic in several respects. Thus, several CAM measures are used, although no specific effects of medicines can be proved in clinical studies. It is extensively explained that the methods used in this regard are those of evidence-based medicine, which is one of the indispensable pillars of science-oriented medicine. This standard of proof of efficacy is fundamentally independent of the requirement of being able to explain efficacy of a therapy in a manner compatible with the insights of the natural sciences, which is also essential for medical progress. Numerous CAM treatments can however never conceivably satisfy this requirement; rather they are justified with pre-scientific or unscientific paradigms. The high attractiveness of CAM measures evidenced in patients and many doctors is based on a combination of positive expectations and experiences, among other things, which are at times unjustified, at times thoroughly justified, from a science-oriented view, but which are non-specific (context effects). With a view to the latter phenomenon, the authors consider the conscious use of CAM as unrevealed therapeutic placebos to be problematic. In addition, they advocate that academic medicine should again systematically endeavour to pay more attention to medical empathy and use context effects in the service of patients to the utmost. The subsequent opinion discusses the following after an introduction to medical history: the definition of CAM; the efficacy of most common CAM procedures; CAM utilisation and costs in Germany; characteristics of science-oriented medicine; awareness of placebo research; pro and contra arguments about the use of CAM, not least of all in terms

  15. Use of complementary and alternative medicine and quality of life: changes at the end of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa-Velez, Ignacio; Clavarino, Alexandra; Barnett, Adrian G; Eastwood, Heather

    2003-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the physical, psychological and social dimensions associated with quality-of-life outcomes over the last year of life, between advanced cancer users and nonusers of complementary and alternative medicine. One hundred and eleven patients were identified through Queensland Cancer Registry records, and followed up every four to six weeks until close to death using standardized protocols. Outcome measures were symptom burden, psychological distress, subjective wellbeing, satisfaction with conventional medicine and need for control over treatment decisions. At the initial interview, 36 (32%) participants had used complementary/alternative medicine the previous week; mainly vitamins, minerals and tonics and herbal remedies. Among all participants, 53 (48%) used at least one form of complementary/alternative medicine over the study period. Only six (11%) visited alternative practitioners on a regular basis. Overall, complementary/alternative medicine users reported higher levels of anxiety and pain, less satisfaction with conventional medicine and lower need for control over treatment decisions compared with nonusers. These differences tend to change as death approaches. A more rigorous assessment of complementary/alternative medicine use, psychological distress, pain and subjective wellbeing among patients with advanced cancer is needed in the clinical setting. PMID:14694921

  16. Wound care with traditional, complementary and alternative medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananda A Dorai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Wound care is constantly evolving with the advances in medicine. Search for the ideal dressing material still continues as wound care professionals are faced with several challenges. Due to the emergence of multi-resistant organisms and a decrease in newer antibiotics, wound care professionals have revisited the ancient healing methods by using traditional and alternative medicine in wound management. People′s perception towards traditional medicine has also changed and is very encouraging. The concept of moist wound healing has been well accepted and traditional medicine has also incorporated this method to fasten the healing process. Several studies using herbal and traditional medicine from different continents have been documented in wound care management. Honey has been used extensively in wound care practice with excellent results. Recent scientific evidences and clinical trials conducted using traditional and alternative medicine in wound therapy holds good promise in the future.

  17. Wound care with traditional, complementary and alternative medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Ananda A Dorai

    2012-01-01

    Wound care is constantly evolving with the advances in medicine. Search for the ideal dressing material still continues as wound care professionals are faced with several challenges. Due to the emergence of multi-resistant organisms and a decrease in newer antibiotics, wound care professionals have revisited the ancient healing methods by using traditional and alternative medicine in wound management. People's perception towards traditional medicine has also changed and is very encouraging. T...

  18. 77 FR 58402 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special...., Scientific Review Officer, National Center For Complementary and Alternative Medicine, National Institutes...

  19. 76 FR 59707 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special Emphasis...

  20. 75 FR 65498 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Complementary and Alternative Medicine, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: October 15, 2010. Jennifer...

  1. 78 FR 66755 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special..., National Center for Complementary, & Alternative Medicine, NIH, 6707 Democracy Blvd., Suite 401,...

  2. 76 FR 79201 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Officer, Office of Scientific Review, National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine, NIH,...

  3. 75 FR 57970 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Officer, Office of Scientific Review, National Center for Complementary, & Alternative Medicine, NIH,...

  4. 76 FR 16433 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Complementary and Alternative Medicine, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: March 17, 2011. Jennifer...

  5. 78 FR 37836 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Complementary and Alternative Medicine, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: June 18, 2013. Michelle...

  6. 76 FR 35227 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Review, National Center for Complementary, and Alternative Medicine, NIH, 6707 Democracy Blvd., Suite...

  7. 75 FR 6039 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special.... 93.213, Research and Training in Complementary and Alternative Medicine, National Institutes...

  8. 77 FR 24971 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... . Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special Emphasis...

  9. 78 FR 42528 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... & Alternative Medicine, NIH, 6707 Democracy Blvd., Suite 401, Bethesda, MD 20892, 301-594-3456,...

  10. 77 FR 31862 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special..., National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, NIH, 6707 Democracy Blvd., Suite 401,...

  11. 76 FR 10913 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... of Scientific Review, National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine, NIH, 6707...

  12. 78 FR 47328 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special..., National Center For Complementary and Alternative Medicine, National Institutes of Health, 6707...

  13. 76 FR 29773 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Alternative Medicine, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: May 17, 2011. Jennifer S. Spaeth,...

  14. 76 FR 27651 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Review, National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine, NIH, 6707 Democracy Blvd., Suite...

  15. Personalized Medicine: Matching Treatments to Your Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disclaimer . Subscribe Personalized Medicine Matching Treatments to Your Genes You’re one of a kind. It’s not ... personalized medicine begins with the unique set of genes you inherited from your parents. Genes are stretches ...

  16. GREEN PHARMACY: AN ALTERNATIVE AND COMPLEMENTARY MEDICINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeta Shivakumar*, Pushpa Agrawal and Praveen Kumar Gupta

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The people in India have an outstanding knowledge of medicinal plants acquired over centuries. A passion for studying medicinal plants is evident both in folk and scholarly traditions. The indigenous mode of understanding and using plants is different from the modern scientific way. It includes botanical, medical and astrological elements. This is the basis of green pharmacy. Indians obviously care for medicinal plants because they know so many of them, so much about them and have worked extensively on their application. It is a remarkable fact that the use of medicinal plants is still a living tradition in the form of a million village-based folk carriers. These traditional birth attendants, bonesetters, herbal healers and wandering monks are invisible to policy makers and therefore not taken into account as a public health resource. Apart from these specialised folk healers there are also millions of women and elders with traditional knowledge of food and nutrition and herbal home-remedies. However, the revitalisation of this vast and diverse folk tradition does not appear on the Governments agenda. Here is an attempt to introduce these traditional knowledge with an emphasis of Nevadensin that holds a promising substance to cure many of the diseases naturally.

  17. A bibliometric approach to the Alternative Medicine in chronic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ennio Cocco

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the interest of science for the Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM in the chronic pain treatment using the number of articles registered by PubMed as an indicator. On Medline system with the key words: CAM and Pain 11.671 papers are available; 2.167 with the key words: CAM and chronic pain; 192 papers deal with the topic chronic pain and dementia. The interest of science for CAM in chronic pain is increasing, but few studies deal with the epidemiological and psychosocial side of this phenomenon. Analogously, more and more studies deal with CAM utilization in dementia. More studies deal with the specific problem of chronic pain in dementia, but few include CAM referral for this topic. A different vision should be dedicated to CAM in chronic pain especially for a better understanding of patients’ (and their families’ needs.

  18. Necessary alternatives: patients’ views of asthma treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Kopnina

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Helen Kopnina1, Joke Haafkens21Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Labor Studies, University of Amsterdam; 2Department of General Practice, Academic Medical Centre of the University of Amsterdam, The NetherlandsAbstract: This article is based on semistructured interviews and focus groups conducted with 27 asthma patients in The Netherlands who chose complementary and alternative medicine (CAM for treatment of their condition. All subjects were contacted through an online forum for asthma patients hosted by the Dutch Asthma Foundation. Nineteen subjects (12 women and seven men between the ages of 29 and 65 years participated in the interviews, held between June 2009 and January 2010. All of the participating subjects had experience with conventional medications, including anti-inflammatory corticosteroids and bronchodilators. For the focus group meeting, held in February 2010, the sample included seven subjects (four women and three men between the ages of 31 and 46 years, none of whom had ever used conventional medication and all of whom were using CAM. All subjects in the sample had been diagnosed with asthma by their physician or lung specialist. The study examined the causes of patient noncompliance with the prescribed medical regime. It is argued that evidence-based rationality on the part of subjects is an overlooked dimension of their experience of asthma. This study demonstrates the role that the patients’ social network, including medical practitioners, friends, and family, and other asthmatics, plays in the process of decision-making and choices about treating asthma. It also demonstrates the role of patients’ information-searching strategies. The author concludes that patient noncompliance with commonly prescribed medication and selection of alternative medical treatment is less a matter of denial of their diagnosis or the severity of their illness, but more a matter of choice informed by evidence-based rationality.Keywords: asthma

  19. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Cancer Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Introduction Cancer CAM Clinical Trials Introduction What are clinical trials? A clinical trial is one of the final ... and effective. What are the different types of clinical trials? Treatment trials test new treatments (like a new ...

  20. Complementary and alternative medicine use by visitors to rural Japanese family medicine clinics: results from the international complementary and alternative medicine survey

    OpenAIRE

    Shumer, Gregory; Warber, Sara; Motohara, Satoko; Yajima, Ayaka; Plegue, Melissa; Bialko, Matthew; Iida, Tomoko; Sano, Kiyoshi; Amenomori, Masaki; Tsuda, Tsukasa; Fetters, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Background There is growing interest in the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) throughout the world, however previous research done in Japan has focused primarily on CAM use in major cities. The purpose of this study was to develop and distribute a Japanese version of the International Complementary and Alternative Medicine Questionnaire (I-CAM-Q) to assess the use of CAM among people who visit rural Japanese family medicine clinics. Methods Using a Japanese version of the In...

  1. Alternative medicines for AIDS in resource-poor settings: Insights from exploratory anthropological studies in Asia and Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Hardon; A. Desclaux; M. Egrot; E. Simon; E. Micollier; M. Kyakuwa

    2008-01-01

    The emergence of alternative medicines for AIDS in Asia and Africa was discussed at a satellite symposium and the parallel session on alternative and traditional treatments of the AIDSImpact meeting, held in Marseille, in July 2007. These medicines are heterogeneous, both in their presentation and i

  2. Nutritional and physicochemical profiles of some indigenous extracts used in alternative medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ojiezeh Tony Ifeanyi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Numerous drugs have entered the international market through exploration of ethnopharmacology and traditional medicine. Aim: The need to document the beliefs and practice of our traditional healers, the wholesomeness and safety of some of indigenous extracts used in alternative medicine prompted this study. Methods: Survey carried out between February 2011 and December 2011 in Ondo State and part of Oyo State on the usefulness of some local sources for alternative medicine showed that the people have strong belief in traditional medicine. A total of 200 respondents contacted filled-out the questionnaires. Result: Majority of the studied population lived in the villages and semi urban areas of the States and within age range of 30 - 60. Aloe vera, Alma millsoni, Ganoderma lucidum and Archachatina maginata were reported to be useful for treatment of various ailments including labour pain, hypertension and diabetic. Though not without pockets of complications and mode of action not understood. Freshly prepared juice is safe and nutritious based on physicochemical profile but as storage progress at room temperature, bacterial contamination could be inimical to humans. Conclusion: Therefore, careful thought must be made on the pros and coins of the effects of the local sources in alternative medicine or healthcare services. Governments at all level should encourage collaboration of western medicine and traditional medicine perhaps; there could be a way forward in treatment of problematic cases like HIV and cancer that have defiled current medical treatments. [J Intercult Ethnopharmacol 2014; 3(1.000: 29-36

  3. Thinking about Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... type Progress Annual Report to the Nation Cancer Portfolio Snapshots Milestones in Cancer Research & Discovery Stories of ... Editorial Board Integrative Therapies Editorial Board Levels of Evidence Levels of Evidence: Treatment Levels of Evidence: Supportive & ...

  4. Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of multiple sclerosis (MS). The American Academy of Neurology (AAN) is the world’s largest association of neurologists ... modifying and symptomatic treatments. ©2014 American Academy of Neurology AAN. com What is CAM therapy? How does ...

  5. Complementary and alternative medicine : facts and figures : part 2

    OpenAIRE

    Pace, Odette

    2012-01-01

    The popularity of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is evident in both developed and less developed societies. It is perceived as being more natural and having fewer side effects than conventional medicine. Claims for efficacy are often unsubstantiated. In this second article, other forms of CAM will be described including herbalism, chiropractic, osteopathy, reflexology and iridology. Proposed mechanisms of action and evidence-based research about their eff...

  6. The Sociology of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Gale, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and traditional medicine (TM) are important social phenomena. This article reviews the sociological literature on the topic. First, it addresses the question of terminology, arguing that the naming process is a glimpse into the complexities of power and history that characterize the field. Second, focusing on the last 15 years of scholarship, it considers how sociological research on users and practitioners of TM/CAM has developed in that time. Thi...

  7. The Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Patients with Migraine

    OpenAIRE

    GÖKSEL, Başak KARAKURUM

    2013-01-01

    Although many patients with migraine get positive benefits from conventional pharmacological treatments, many others do not benefit sufficiently or experience adverse effects from these treatments. For that reason, these patients usually seek complementary and/or alternative medical (CAM) treatments all over the world. In general, although CAM therapies are not recommended by neurologist in Turkey, most of migraine patients, who do not respond conventional medicine treatments, seek alternativ...

  8. 77 FR 28396 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Medicine, National Institutes of Health, 6707 Democracy Boulevard, Suite 401, Bethesda, MD 20892,...

  9. 75 FR 6041 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Medicine, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: January 27, 2010. Jennifer Spaeth, Director, Office...

  10. [Freedom to cure and alternative medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eicher, W

    1993-04-01

    The problem area of unconventional methods of treatment involves addressing a complex web of legal questions (constitutional law, criminal law, medical liability law, social insurance law, medical professional law). However, proceeding from the basis of statutory health insurance law, all individual questions can be resolved uniformly if the customary statutory or contractual "scientific-basis-clauses" intended to restrict the use of unconventional methods of treatment are understood merely as a criterion for a medical-acceptability test that respects the individual physician's discretion as regards treatment and appraisal. Methods of "outsiders" are then not generally excluded; rather, an individual weighing-up of the benefits has to be carried out in each case. PMID:8484199

  11. Cancer complementary and alternative medicine research at the US National Cancer Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Libin

    2012-05-01

    The United States National Cancer Institute (NCI) supports complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) research which includes different methods and practices (such as nutrition therapies) and other medical systems (such as Chinese medicine). In recent years, NCI has spent around $120 million each year on various CAM-related research projects on cancer prevention, treatment, symptom/side effect management and epidemiology. The categories of CAM research involved include nutritional therapeutics, pharmacological and biological treatments, mind-body interventions, manipulative and body based methods, alternative medical systems, exercise therapies, spiritual therapies and energy therapies on a range of types of cancer. The NCI Office of Cancer Complementary and Alternative Medicine (OCCAM) supports various intramural and extramural cancer CAM research projects. Examples of these cancer CAM projects are presented and discussed. In addition, OCCAM also supports international research projects. PMID:22241505

  12. CONIPLENIENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE (CANI) IN EPILEPSY

    OpenAIRE

    Aulina, Susi

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is a difficult illness to control up to 35% of patients with Epilepsy do not respond fully to science based medical treatment which ln the developed countries include at least 20 drugs. Surgery is highly effective and save for selected patients but it still underused, even in high-income countries. Many people with epilepsy may not be candidates for surgery because a single site of origin of their seizures cannot be localized or exists within eloquent regions of the corte...

  13. 76 FR 38404 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Shau, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, National Center for Complementary and Alternative...

  14. Prevalence and Correlates of Postdiagnosis Initiation of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Among Patients at a Comprehensive Cancer Center

    OpenAIRE

    Perlman, Adam; Lontok, Oliver; Huhmann, Maureen; Parrott, J. Scott; Simmons, Leigh Ann; Patrick-Miller, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Patients with cancer increasingly use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in conjunction with conventional oncology treatments. This study looks at the prevalence and correlates of individual CAM modalities initiated after cancer diagnosis.

  15. Traditional Chinese Medicine in treatments to depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ti-Fei

    2009-03-01

    Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) has a long history of more than 5,000 years and it has the earliest medicine book in the world: Yellow Emperor's Canon: Internal Medicine (Huang Ti Nei Jing), by the Yellow Emperor of China (2695-2589 BC) (Lin , 1988; Shampo and Kyle, 1989; Wang, 1999). However the combinational and systemic recipes that bring TCM high efficiency also block the promotion of TCM treatment to various diseases, including depression. In this short comment we firstly give some theoretical basis for TCM treatment to depression, then some clinical reports on efficiency; we also present some possible explanations on TCM treatments to depression. PMID:19300379

  16. Conducting systematic reviews of complementary and alternative medicine: common pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wider, Barbara; Boddy, Kate

    2009-12-01

    Systematic reviews (SRs) are considered the best tools for summarizing the evidence for or against the effectiveness of health care interventions. The principles and methods of SRs apply equally to both, mainstream and complementary/alternative medicine (CAM). Certain challenges are, however, more commonly encountered in CAM or even specific to it; this article is aimed at raising awareness of these among systematic reviewers. When searching for literature, specific issues relating to specialist databases, indexing, access, foreign language studies, and certain forms of publication bias need to be considered. Researchers also need to be aware of the difficulties of comparing CAM studies and address the variability between studies. CAM modalities are highly diversified and great variations exist in the standardization of herbal products and other dietary supplements. Individualization of treatment as well as different classifications of disease and different diagnostic methods need to be addressed. Expectation bias is high in CAM, and finding appropriate controls and blinding are often challenging. It is important that these issues are taken into account early on in the planning stages of an SR so that proper consideration can be given to the search strategies, inclusion/exclusion criteria and methods of analysis with the overall aim of reducing bias. PMID:19942632

  17. American Medical Students’ Beliefs in the Effectiveness of Alternative Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Frank

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: While the use of complementary and alternative medical therapy (CAM is common in the U.S., there have been no prior national studies of CAM-related attitudes of U.S. medical students.Methods: We surveyed the Class of 2003 at freshman orientation, entrance to wards, and senior year in a nationally representative sample of 16 U.S. medical schools. Our primary outcome of interest was students’ Likert-scaled responses to the statement “Alternative medicine can often be as effective as traditional medicine.”Results: With 4764 responses overall (a response rate of 80.3%, 9% strongly agreed, 45% agreed, 34% neither agreed nor disagreed, 11% disagreed, and 2% strongly disagreed that alternative medicine could be as effective as traditional medicine. Students became modestly more polarized in their beliefs, moving from 37% of students neither agreeing nor disagreeing with the statement at freshman year to 31% at senior year. Several variables including gender, paternal educational level, ethnicity, religion, political self-characterization, intended specialty, and prevention-orientation were associated with agreement.Conclusions: U.S. patients commonly use CAM, but newly-minted U.S. physicians’ are often skeptical about its efficacy. This disconnect may make it difficult to integrate patients’ CAM use into clinical decision-making.

  18. Homeopathy as an alternative for asthma treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Sebastian Loureiro Mendez

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by a reversible obstruction and hyperactivity of inferior aerial treat [1]. It is responsible for lifestyle modification and, considering its high frequency, it became an important issue in the budget of health services around the world. Aspects like the lack of definitive results and presence of adverse effects, observed for traditional therapy, as well as the search for better quality of life have increased patients’ interest for complementary and alternative medicines (CAM, being homeopathy one of the most cited [2]. In 2001, asthma was between the 10 diagnostics most treated by homeopaths in USA [3]. Aims: In this work, a qualitative research was made focusing the evaluation of the real contribution that homeopathy can represent for asthma patients and the role of pharmacist in this therapy. Methodology: databases such as Medline, Sciencedirect and Bireme were used to find scientific articles, applying the expressions “asthma”, “homeopathy” and “complementary and alternative medicine”. Results: At least six works demonstrate successful applications of homeopathic treatment in children or adults with asthma. The main benefits cited are the decrease of frequency and gravity of the crises, besides of some cure cases. Conclusions: Data available are still scanty about asthma homeopathic treatment. The few works found showed this kind of therapy is very adequate, mainly because of the emotional component of the disease, but also because it represents to be away from the adverse effects commonly related to the traditional therapy (e. g. corticoids. To ensure a correct therapy is being made, the pharmacist must be present and active in the patients’ identification and documentation, giving them right orientations about the use and storage of homeopathic medicines

  19. Exclusive use of alternative medicine as a positive choice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Lasse; Pedersen, Inge Kryger; Verhoef, Marja

    2014-01-01

    from the data through meaning condensation. RESULTS: Four themes characterized the participants' treatment assumptions: 1) conventional medicine contains chemical substances that affect the body in negative ways; 2) CAM treatments can strengthen the organism and make it more capable of resisting the......-care practitioners, patient organizations, and health authorities within the MS field should be aware of possible changes in patients' attitudes toward both CAM and conventional treatment interventions....

  20. Mood disorders and complementary and alternative medicine: a literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Qureshi, Naseem

    2013-01-01

    Naseem Akhtar Qureshi,1 Abdullah Mohammed Al-Bedah21General Administration for Research and Studies, Sulaimania Medical Complex, 2National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Ministry of Health, Riyadh, Saudi ArabiaAbstract: Mood disorders are a major public health problem and are associated with considerable burden of disease, suicides, physical comorbidities, high economic costs, and poor quality of life. Approximately 30%–40% of patients with major depression have ...

  1. Complementary and Alternative Medicine: Perceptions of Medical Students from Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Majeed, Kashif; Mahmud, Hussain; Khawaja, Hussain Raza; Mansoor, Saba; Masood, Sana; Khimani, Farhad

    2009-01-01

    Background: In view of the increasing popularity of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), it is imperative that medical students, the health professionals of tomorrow, possess ad­equate knowledge on the topic. Objectives: This is a descriptive study designed to assess the knowledge, attitudes and behavior of medical students about CAM and to capture their perceptions and opinions about its integration into the medical curriculum. Methods: A questionnaire-based cross-sectional survey...

  2. Paediatric Pain Management: Using Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, Subhadra; Tsao, Jennie C. I.; Zeltzer, Lonnie K

    2008-01-01

    Children undergo acute painful procedures and many also experience chronic pain.Due to their developing systems, infants and children may be at greater risk than adults for protracted pain sensitivity.There is a need to manage acute and chronic paediatric pain to reduce children's suffering and to prevent future pain problems.Consistent with a biopsychosocial perspective, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) should be considered in management of acute and chronic paediatric pain.Altho...

  3. Casimir force: an alternative treatment

    CERN Document Server

    Silva, P R

    2009-01-01

    The Casimir force between two parallel uncharged closely spaced metallic plates is evaluated in ways alternatives to those usually considered in the literature. In a first approximation we take in account the suppressed quantum numbers of a cubic box, representing a cavity which was cut in a metallic block. We combine these ideas with those of the MIT bag model of hadrons, but adapted to non-relativistic particles. In a second approximation we consider the particles occupying the energy levels of the Bohr atom, so that the Casimir force depends explicitly on the fine structure constant alpha. In both treatments, the mean energies which have explicit dependence on the particle mass and on the maximum occupied quantum number (related to the Fermi level of the system) at the beginning of the calculations, have these dependences mutually canceled at the end of them. Finally by comparing the averaged energies computed in both approximations, we are able to make an estimate of the value of the fine structure consta...

  4. 78 FR 51734 - National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine... Alternative Medicine. The meeting will be open to the public as indicated below, with attendance limited to... Advisory Council for Complementary and Alternative Medicine NCCAM Advisory Council Board. Date: October...

  5. 78 FR 19498 - National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine... Alternative Medicine. The meeting will be open to the public as indicated below, with attendance limited to... Advisory Council for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. Date: June 7, 2013. Closed: 8:30 a.m. to...

  6. 77 FR 25185 - National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine... Alternative Medicine. The meeting will be open to the public as indicated below, with attendance limited to... Advisory Council for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. Date: June 1, 2012. Closed: 8:30 a.m. to 10...

  7. 76 FR 79202 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... Alternative Medicine. The meeting will be open to the public as indicated below, with attendance limited to... Advisory Council for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. Date: February 3, 2012. Closed: 8:30 a.m....

  8. 77 FR 73036 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... Alternative Medicine. The meeting will be open to the public as indicated below, with attendance limited to... Advisory Council for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. Date: February 1, 2013. Closed: 8:30 a.m....

  9. 78 FR 76635 - National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine... Alternative Medicine. The meeting will be open to the public as indicated below, with attendance limited to... Advisory Council for Complementary and Alternative Medicine; NCCAM Advisory Council Board. Date: February...

  10. 77 FR 52750 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... Alternative Medicine. The meeting will be open to the public as indicated below, with attendance limited to... Advisory Council for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. Date: October 12, 2012. Closed: 8:30 a.m....

  11. Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... High-Dose Vitamin C Hydrazine Sulfate Laetrile/Amygdalin Milk Thistle Mistletoe Extracts Newcastle Disease Virus PC-SPES Prostate Cancer, Nutrition, and Dietary Supplements Selected Vegetables/Sun's Soup ...

  12. A Research Roadmap for Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, F.; Lewith, G.; Witt, C. M.;

    2014-01-01

    likely that they are significant. Research into different models of CAM health care integration: There are different models of CAM being integrated into conventional medicine throughout Europe, each with their respective strengths and limitations. These models should be described and concurrently...... evaluated; innovative models of CAM provision in health care systems should be one focus for CAM research. We also propose a methodological framework for CAM research. We consider that a framework of mixed methodological approaches is likely to yield the most useful information. In this model, all available......Background: The CAMbrella coordination action was funded within the Framework Programme 7. Its aim is to provide a research roadmap for clinical and epidemiological research for complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) that is appropriate for the health needs of European citizens and acceptable...

  13. Building a medicine bank for Venezuela. AIDS treatment access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    A partnership began in 1994 between United Against AIDS International (UAAI) of New York and Accion Ciudadana Contra el SIDA (ACCSI) of Venezuela has led to the development of a volunteer infrastructure including medicine and medical supply donors, airlines, truck drivers, customs officials, storage facilities, and medical personnel to bring treatment to people with AIDS (PWA) in Venezuela. Renate Koch, ACCSI director, began bringing medications home to Venezuela in early 1994, following a visit to New York City, where she met with representatives of ACT UP], the Global Network of People with AIDS, and other New York-based HIV/AIDS associations. Hugh Ward, who founded UAAI to provide HIV/AIDS drugs to PWA in Venezuela, later met with Koch and several other nongovernmental organizations in Caracas. Ward explained that most unused medicines and treatments given to people with AIDS in the US are thrown away after the patient has died or when the patient's health condition demands an alternate treatment. A network of New York-based AIDS organizations and doctors' groups now collects the medicines returned to them by PWA for donation to the medicine bank program. Once the medicines are received in Caracas, they are stored at Accion Ecumenica health clinic for distribution to PWA. While there is always a need for more medicines and supplies, the current network is able to back-stock enough quantities to ensure that patients will receive consistent and sustained treatment. Limited quantities of retrovirals and protease inhibitors are included in the medicine bank. PMID:12321757

  14. Patient decision-making about complementary and alternative medicine in cancer management: context and process

    OpenAIRE

    Balneaves, L.G.; Weeks, L.; Seely, D.

    2008-01-01

    Objective In this paper, we set out to describe the personal and social contexts of treatment decisions made by cancer patients concerning complementary and alternative medicine (cam) and also the process through which cancer patients reach cam decisions throughout the cancer trajectory. Methods We selected and reviewed a variety of cam decision-making models published in the past 10 years within the Canadian health literature. Results The cam decision-making process is influenced by a variet...

  15. Use and Sanctification of Complementary and Alternative Medicine by Parents of Children with Cystic Fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Grossoehme, Daniel H.; Cotton, Sian; McPhail, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use, including spiritual modalities, is common in pediatric chronic diseases. However, few users discuss CAM treatments with their child’s physician. Semi-structured interviews of 25 parents of children who have cystic fibrosis (CF) were completed. Primary themes were identified by thematic analyses. Most parents (19/25) used at least one CAM modality with their child. Only two reported discussing CAM use with their child’s pulmonologist. Most repo...

  16. Development and Preliminary Face and Content Validation of the “Which Health Approaches and Treatments Are You Using?” (WHAT) Questionnaires Assessing Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use in Pediatric Rheumatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toupin April, Karine; Stinson, Jennifer; Boon, Heather; Duffy, Ciarán M.; Huber, Adam M.; Gibbon, Michele; Descarreaux, Martin; Spiegel, Lynn; Vohra, Sunita; Tugwell, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objective Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is commonly used by children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), yet no validated questionnaires assess that use. The objective of this study was to develop child self- and parent proxy-report questionnaires assessing CAM use and to determine the face and content validity of the “Which Health Approaches and Treatments are you using?” (WHAT) questionnaires in pediatric rheumatology. Methods A sequential phased mixed methods approach was used to develop the questionnaires. A Delphi Survey of 126 experts followed by an interdisciplinary consensus conference of 14 stakeholders in CAM, general pediatrics and pediatric rheumatology was held to develop consensus on the content of the questionnaires using a nominal group technique. To determine face and content validity of the questionnaires, two groups, including (a) a purposive sample of 22 children with JIA 8 to 18 years and their parents from the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario and the Hospital for Sick Children, and (b) 21 Canadian pediatric rheumatology experts, participated in interviews. Participants were independently asked about the goal, understandability and comprehensiveness of the WHAT questionnaires, as well as the relevance of items. Results Consensus was reached on 17 items of the WHAT questionnaires. The domains found to be relevant were child’s CAM use, factors associated with CAM use, perceived impact of CAM use, and communication about CAM. A total of 15 items in the parent proxy-report questionnaire and 13 items in the child report questionnaire showed adequate content validity. Conclusions Consensus was reached by experts on the content of a pediatric CAM questionnaire. Face and content validity testing and modifications made to the WHAT questionnaires have helped ensure adequate preliminary validity for use in pediatric rheumatology. This constitutes the basis for further testing of these questionnaires in pediatric

  17. Casimir force: an alternative treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, P. R.

    2009-01-01

    The Casimir force between two parallel uncharged closely spaced metallic plates is evaluated in ways alternatives to those usually considered in the literature. In a first approximation we take in account the suppressed quantum numbers of a cubic box, representing a cavity which was cut in a metallic block. We combine these ideas with those of the MIT bag model of hadrons, but adapted to non-relativistic particles. In a second approximation we consider the particles occupying the energy level...

  18. Complementary and Alternative Medicine on Wikipedia: Opportunities for Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malcolm Koo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Wikipedia, a free and collaborative Internet encyclopedia, has become one of the most popular sources of free information on the Internet. However, there have been concerns over the quality of online health information, particularly that on complementary and alternative medicine (CAM. This exploratory study aimed to evaluate several page attributes of articles on CAM in the English Wikipedia. A total of 97 articles were analyzed and compared with eight articles of broad categories of therapies in conventional medicine using the Mann-Whitney U test. Based on the Wikipedia editorial assessment grading, 4% of the articles attained “good article” status, 34% required considerable editing, and 56% needed substantial improvements in their content. The median daily access of the articles over the previous 90 days was 372 (range: 7–4,214. The median word count was 1840 with a readability of grade 12.7 (range: 9.4–17.7. Medians of word count and citation density of the CAM articles were significantly lower than those in the articles of conventional medicine therapies. In conclusion, despite its limitations, the general public will continue to access health information on Wikipedia. There are opportunities for health professionals to contribute their knowledge and to improve the accuracy and completeness of the CAM articles on Wikipedia.

  19. Complementary and alternative medicine therapies for chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Brent A; Tilburt, Jon C; Sood, Amit; Li, Guang-Xi; Wang, Shi-Han

    2016-06-01

    Pain afflflicts over 50 million people in the US, with 30.7% US adults suffering with chronic pain. Despite advances in therapies, many patients will continue to deal with ongoing symptoms that are not fully addressed by the best conventional medicine has to offer them. The patients frequently turn to therapies outside the usual purview of conventional medicine (herbs, acupuncture, meditation, etc.) called complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Academic and governmental groups are also starting to incorporate CAM recommendations into chronic pain management strategies. Thus, for any physician who care for patients with chronic pain, having some familiarity with these therapies-including risks and benefits-will be key to helping guide patients in making evidence-based, well informed decisions about whether or not to use such therapies. On the other hand, if a CAM therapy has evidence of both safety and efficacy then not making it available to a patient who is suffering does not meet the need of the patient. We summarize the current evidence of a wide variety of CAM modalities that have potential for helping patients with chronic pain in this article. The triad of chronic pain symptoms, ready access to information on the internet, and growing patient empowerment suggest that CAM therapies will remain a consistent part of the healthcare of patients dealing with chronic pain. PMID:27339090

  20. Complementary and alternative medicine on wikipedia: opportunities for improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Malcolm

    2014-01-01

    Wikipedia, a free and collaborative Internet encyclopedia, has become one of the most popular sources of free information on the Internet. However, there have been concerns over the quality of online health information, particularly that on complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). This exploratory study aimed to evaluate several page attributes of articles on CAM in the English Wikipedia. A total of 97 articles were analyzed and compared with eight articles of broad categories of therapies in conventional medicine using the Mann-Whitney U test. Based on the Wikipedia editorial assessment grading, 4% of the articles attained "good article" status, 34% required considerable editing, and 56% needed substantial improvements in their content. The median daily access of the articles over the previous 90 days was 372 (range: 7-4,214). The median word count was 1840 with a readability of grade 12.7 (range: 9.4-17.7). Medians of word count and citation density of the CAM articles were significantly lower than those in the articles of conventional medicine therapies. In conclusion, despite its limitations, the general public will continue to access health information on Wikipedia. There are opportunities for health professionals to contribute their knowledge and to improve the accuracy and completeness of the CAM articles on Wikipedia. PMID:24864148

  1. Ethnoveterinary medicine of the Shervaroy Hills of Eastern Ghats, India as alternative medicine for animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usha, Swaminathan; Rajasekaran, Chandrasekaran; Siva, Ramamoorthy

    2016-01-01

    The Eastern Ghats of India is well known for its wealth of natural vegetation and Shervaroy is a major hill range of the Eastern Ghats of Tamil Nadu. Ethnomedicinal studies in the Eastern Ghats of Tamil Nadu or the Shervaroy Hills have been carried out by various researchers. However, there is not much information available on ethnoveterinary medicine in the Eastern Ghats of India. The aim of this study was to examine the potential use of folk plants as alternative medicine for cattle to cure various diseases in the Shervaroy Hills of the Eastern Ghats. Based on interactions with traditional medicine practitioners, it has been observed that a total of 21 medicinal plants belonging to 16 families are used to cure various diseases such as mastitis, enteritis, arthritis, stomatitis, salivation from the mouth, wounding, and conjunctivitis in animals. It has been observed that the traditional knowledge of ethnoveterinary medicine is now confined only among the surviving older people and a few practitioners in the tribal communities of the Shervaroy Hills. Unfortunately, no serious attempts have been made to document and preserve this immense treasure of traditional knowledge. PMID:26870689

  2. REVIEW ON ALTERNATIVE THERAPY IN HEALTH AND MEDICINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. H. Shinde, T. M. Kalyankar* and M. S. Attar

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The phrase alternative therapy is used to explain a wide range of treatments which, generally, are not available from conventional doctors. It may be diverse for different diseases. The Alternative therapy focuses on the many things from diet to exercise and lifestyle. Many people suffering from disease are looking for the management of diseases with the help of alternative therapies. According to physicians, most of the alternative therapies started with clinical observation or scientific research. These therapies include yoga, aromatherapy, massage, hypnosis, biofeedback, herbal remedies and many others. The main advantage of these therapies is to treat the basic cause of disease and health related problems or to support the conventional therapies. Not only are the variety of alternative therapies measured to be safe and effective, they also deal individuals a wide variety of health therapy that simply do not exist through conventional treatment. This article focuses on different alternative therapies with their benefits in conventional therapies which can promise ultimate answers to treat the diseases.

  3. Chinese herbal medicine for treatment of dislipidemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haiyun Wu; Jianwei Bei; Jiao Guo

    2009-01-01

    Prevalence of dislipidemia is increasing rapidly in China and there has been a growing interest in Chinese herbal medicine for the treatment of hyperlipidemia both inside and outside China. In this article, lipids regulating effects of 9 herbs or their extracts and 5 herbal formulae which have been published in English-language literature are reviewed. Although evidence from animals and humans consistently supports the therapeutic activities of these Chinese herbal medicines, few multi-center large-scale clinical trials have been conducted to confirm the efficacy and evaluate their safety.

  4. Complementary and alternative medicine use in breast cancer patients in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molassiotis, Alexander; Scott, Julia A; Kearney, Nora; Pud, Dorit; Magri, Miriam; Selvekerova, Sarka; Bruyns, Ingrid; Fernadez-Ortega, Paz; Panteli, Vassiliki; Margulies, Anita; Gudmundsdottir, Gudbjorg; Milovics, Ljiljana; Ozden, Gulten; Platin, Nurgun; Patiraki, Elisabeth

    2006-03-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has gained popularity among cancer patients in the past years. For this study, CAM includes any group of health care systems, practices or products that are not considered to be part of conventional medicine at present (National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine). The present study assessed patterns of CAM use in breast cancer patients in Europe. The study used a descriptive cross-sectional design, and data were collected through a 27-item questionnaire. The sample, which was part of a larger study, consisted of 282 breast cancer patients from 11 countries in Europe. Among participants, 44.7% used CAM since their diagnosis of cancer. The most common therapies used included herbal medicine (46.4%) and medicinal teas, relaxation techniques, spiritual therapies, homeopathy and vitamins/minerals. Younger patients with higher education and who had received combination treatments for their cancer in the past were more likely to use CAM. High levels of satisfaction were reported, with only 6.5% of the women reporting no benefits from the CAM used. Main sources of information about CAM were mostly friends/family and the media. Findings suggested that a high proportion of breast cancer patients used CAM, which may have implications for the clinical management of these patients. PMID:16143871

  5. 75 FR 18217 - National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine... Medicine (NACCAM) meeting. The meeting will be open to the public as indicated below, with attendance... of Committee: National Advisory Council for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. Date: June...

  6. 76 FR 19379 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... Medicine (NACCAM) meeting. The meeting will be open to the public as indicated below, with attendance... Alternative Medicine. Date: June 3, 2011. Closed: June 3, 2011, 8:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Agenda: To review...

  7. 75 FR 43994 - National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine... Medicine (NACCAM) meeting. The meeting will be open to the public as indicated below, with attendance... Committee: National Advisory Council for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. Date: September 3,...

  8. Modes of Embodiment in Breast Cancer Patients Using Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salamonsen, Anita; Kruse, Tove Elisabeth; Eriksen, Sissel H.

    2012-01-01

    of bodily experiences among breast cancer patients who were using CAM as a supplement or an alternative to conventional treatment (CT). Our findings based on qualitative interviews with 13 women suggest that bodily experiences were particularly important when positioned outside conventional health care......Breast cancer patients are frequent users of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). They often have complex reasons for, and experiences from, their use of CAM. Bodily experiences are important and almost unexplored elements in CAM use. Our aim was to explore the meaning and importance...... prior to medical diagnosis and as users of CAM as alternative to CT. We introduce three central modes of embodiment related to CAM use: the right to one’s body, the body used as a gauge, and the body used as a guide. Patients’ positioning between treatment systems should be further explored from...

  9. Complementary and alternative medicine for autism spectrum disorders: rationale, safety and efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehouse, Andrew J O

    2013-09-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine is widely used for children with autism spectrum disorder, despite uncertainty regarding efficacy. This review describes complementary and alternative practices commonly used among this population, the rationale for the use of each practice, as well as the side-effect profile and evidence for efficacy. The existing evidence base indicates that melatonin can be recommended as a treatment for sleeping disturbances associated with autism spectrum disorder, while secretin can be rejected as an efficacious treatment for broader autistic symptoms. There is insufficient evidence to draw conclusions on the efficacy of modified diets, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, immune therapy, and vitamin and fatty acid supplementation. There is a clear need for methodologically rigorous studies to provide evidence-based guidance to families and clinicians regarding complementary and alternative practices for individuals with autism spectrum disorders. PMID:23682728

  10. Clinical outcome research in complementary and alternative medicine: an overview of experimental design and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatchel, R J; Maddrey, A M

    1998-09-01

    This article serves as a primer for those beginning clinical research in complementary and alternative medicine. The authors provide a basic overview of important experimental design and statistical issues, of which clinical researchers in the area of complementary and alternative medicine must be aware when attempting to demonstrate the effectiveness of particular treatment modalities. As the article suggests, science is an inferential process, and experimental investigations can vary greatly in methodological integrity. Key concepts in clinical outcome research such as internal validity, statistical conclusion validity, and the appropriate measurement and operational definitions of outcomes are discussed. New scientific approaches that are evolving because of paradigm shifts in science (e.g., chaos theory) are also reviewed. Suggestions are provided to further develop an understanding of clinical outcome research methodology. PMID:9737030

  11. Obesity: Causes and Treatment Alternatives

    OpenAIRE

    Berrin Zuhal Bulucu Altunkaynak; Elvan Özbek

    2007-01-01

    Obesity is an important and chronic disease. It occurs due to more body fat accumulation than normal levels, it associates with many factor and it needs to medical treatment. Important risk factors of obesity are feeding habits, sexualty (Female), age, education, marriage, labor number and hereditary. Obesity, may be originated from hereditary factors and it progresses very fastly in developed and developing countries. More than 30 % percent of population is obese in Turkey (male %7,9 female ...

  12. Paediatric Pain Management: Using Complementary and Alternative Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Subhadra; Tsao, Jennie C I; Zeltzer, Lonnie K

    2008-09-01

    Children undergo acute painful procedures and many also experience chronic pain.Due to their developing systems, infants and children may be at greater risk than adults for protracted pain sensitivity.There is a need to manage acute and chronic paediatric pain to reduce children's suffering and to prevent future pain problems.Consistent with a biopsychosocial perspective, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) should be considered in management of acute and chronic paediatric pain.Although research is limited for paediatric pain, CAM interventions receiving the most empirical attention include hypnotherapy, acupuncture and music therapy. Evidence also exists for the therapeutic benefits of yoga, massage, humor therapy and the use of certain biological based therapies. PMID:26525515

  13. AROMATHERAPY AMONG COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE METHODS IN MEDICINE

    OpenAIRE

    Старикова, Элла; Оганисян, Г.

    2013-01-01

    Научный руководитель: старший преподаватель Определеннова О.В. Many of us take for granted the sense of smell. Yet many researches show that the human nose can distinguish over 10,000 different smells, which have various physiological and psychological effects.Aromatherapy is a form of alternative medicine that uses essential oils from plants for healing. It is useful for relieving pain, stress and tension, for improving mood and promoting relaxation. Therapies using essential oils complement...

  14. Exploring adolescent complementary/alternative medicine (CAM) use in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Chris; Arthur, Heather; Noesgaard, Charlotte; Caldwell, Patricia; Vohra, Julie; Francoeur, Chera; Swinton, Marilyn

    2008-01-01

    A qualitative study using a grounded theory approach investigated adolescents' perceptions about complementary/alternative medicine (CAM) use. Adolescents, attending a clinic at the Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine, were interviewed after receiving ethics approval. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews. The decision of adolescents to use CAM was based within the context of their world and how it shaped influencing factors. Factors that influenced adolescents' decision to use CAM were identified as certain personality traits, culture, media, social contacts and the ability of CAM providers to develop therapeutic relationships. The barriers and benefits of CAM use influenced evaluation of choices. The importance of barriers in limiting freedom of choice in health care decisions should be investigated by practitioners as they provide care to adolescents. Health care planning for integrative models of care requires determining the "right" blend of expertise by knowing interprofessional boundaries, determining mixed skill sets to provide the essential services and ensuring appropriate regulation that allows practitioners to use their full scope of practice. PMID:18202985

  15. A primer of complementary and alternative medicine commonly used by cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, E

    2001-01-15

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is frequently used by cancer patients, and many oncologists have limited knowledge of CAM. This article provides a brief, evidence-based introduction to several CAM treatments relevant in the context of cancer. "Alternative" diets, chiropractic, coffee enemas, ozone therapy, and shark cartilage seem to have little to offer cancer patients. The evidence for or against homoeopathy and spiritual healing is at present inconclusive. Acupuncture, aromatherapy, and meditation may be useful for nausea/vomiting, for mild relaxation, and for pain/anxiety, respectively. Herbal treatments offer no reasonable prospect of a cure (mistletoe), but could be useful as palliative treatments (eg, for depression [St John's wort] or anxiety [kava]). Our knowledge regarding the potential benefit and harm of CAM is insufficient. PMID:11245510

  16. Integrating Complementary and Alternative Medicine Into Conventional Health Care System in Developing Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishra, Shiva Raj; Neupane, Dinesh; Kallestrup, Per

    2015-01-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine has been a part of human life and practices since the beginning of time. The role of complementary and alternative medicine for the health of humans is undisputed particularly in light of its role in health promotion and well-being. This article discusses ways...... through which complementary and alternative medicine can be promoted and sustained as an integrated element of health care in developing countries. We specifically present the exemplary of Amchi traditional doctors of Northern Himalayas...

  17. Listening Clearly: Alternative Treatments for Adolescent Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlasson, Terry D.

    2012-01-01

    For many years now, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and anti-depressant medications have been the primary treatments for adolescent depression. However, there are many youth today with mild to moderate depressive symptoms for whom these treatments are not necessary. This article briefly summarizes several alternative therapeutic approaches for…

  18. Alternatives to Drug Treatment for Hyperactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Den Houtter, Kathryn

    1980-01-01

    Results from recent studies on the effectiveness of Ritalin for "hyperactivity" show that this treatment is dubious at best. This article presents an alternative treatment approach, placing emphasis on devising an appropriate learning situation that meets the needs of the so-called hyperactive child. (Author)

  19. Complementary and alternative treatment for neck pain: chiropractic, acupuncture, TENS, massage, yoga, Tai Chi, and Feldenkrais.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plastaras, Christopher T; Schran, Seth; Kim, Natasha; Sorosky, Susan; Darr, Deborah; Chen, Mary Susan; Lansky, Rebecca

    2011-08-01

    Of the multitude of treatment options for the management of neck pain, no obvious single treatment modality has been shown to be most efficacious. As such, the clinician should consider alternative treatment modalities if a modality is engaging, available, financially feasible, potentially efficacious, and is low risk for the patient. As evidence-based medicine for neck pain develops, the clinician is faced with the challenge of which treatments to encourage patients to pursue. Treatment modalities explored in this article, including chiropractic, acupuncture, TENS, massage, yoga, Tai Chi, and Feldenkrais, represent reasonable complementary and alternative medicine methods for patients with neck pain. PMID:21824591

  20. Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine among People with Multiple Sclerosis in the Nordic Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Skovgaard

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. The aim of the study was to describe and compare (1 the types and prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM treatments used among individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS in the Nordic countries; (2 the types of conventional treatments besides disease-modifying medicine for MS that were used in combination with CAM treatments; (3 the types of symptoms/health issues addressed by use of CAM treatments. Methods. An internet-based questionnaire was used to collect data from 6455 members of the five Nordic MS societies. The response rates varied from 50.9% in Norway to 61.5% in Iceland. Results. A large range of CAM treatments were reported to be in use in all five Nordic countries. Supplements of vitamins and minerals, supplements of oils, special diet, acupuncture, and herbal medicine were among the CAM treatment modalities most commonly used. The prevalence of the overall use of CAM treatments within the last twelve months varied from 46.0% in Sweden to 58.9% in Iceland. CAM treatments were most often used in combination with conventional treatments. The conventional treatments that were most often combined with CAM treatment were prescription medication, physical therapy, and over-the-counter (OTC medications. The proportion of CAM users who reported exclusive use of CAM (defined as use of no conventional treatments besides disease-modifying medicine for MS varied from 9.5% in Finland to 18.4% in Norway. In all five Nordic countries, CAM treatments were most commonly used for nonspecific/preventative purposes such as strengthening the body in general, improving the body’s muscle strength, and improving well-being. CAM treatments were less often used for the purpose of improving specific symptoms such as body pain, problems with balance, and fatigue/lack of energy. Conclusions. A large range of CAM treatments were used by individuals with MS in all Nordic countries. The most commonly reported rationale for CAM treatment use

  1. An analysis of news media coverage of complementary and alternative medicine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Billie Bonevski

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To examine the accuracy and adequacy of lay media news stories about complementary and alternative medicines and therapies. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A descriptive analysis of news stories about complementary and alternative medicine (CAM in the Australian media using a national medical news monitoring website, mediadoctor.org.au. Each story was rated against 10 criteria by two individuals. Consensus scores of 222 news articles reporting therapeutic claims about complementary medicines posted on mediadoctor.org.au between 1 January 2004 and 1 September 2007 were calculated. The overall rating score for 222 CAM articles was 50% (95% CI 47% to 53%. There was a statistically significant (F = 3.68, p = 0.006 difference in cumulative mean scores according to type of therapy: biologically based practices (54%, 95% CI 50% to 58%; manipulative body based practices (46%, 95% CI 39% to 54%, whole medical systems (45%, 95% CI 32% to 58%, mind body medicine (41%, 95% CI 31% to 50% and energy medicine (33%, 95% CI 11% to 55%. There was a statistically significant difference in cumulative mean scores (F = 3.72, p = 0.0001 according to the clinical outcome of interest with stories about cancer treatments (62%, 95% CI 54% to 70% scoring highest and stories about treatments for children's behavioural and mental health concerns scoring lowest (31%, 95% CI 19% to 43%. Significant differences were also found in scores between media outlets. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: There is substantial variability in news reporting practices about CAM. Overall, although they may be improving, the scores remain generally low. It appears that much of the information the public receives about CAM is inaccurate or incomplete.

  2. Integrating complementary/alternative medicine into primary care: evaluating the evidence and appropriate implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wainapel SF

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Stanley F Wainapel,1 Stephanie Rand,1 Loren M Fishman,2 Jennifer Halstead-Kenny1 1The Arthur S Abramson Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, 2Department of Rehabilitation and Regenerative Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA Abstract: The frequency with which patients utilize treatments encompassed by the term complementary/alternative medicine (CAM is well documented. A number of these therapies are beginning to be integrated into contemporary medical practice. This article examines three of them: osteopathic manipulation, yoga, and acupuncture, with a focus on their physiological effects, efficacy in treating medical conditions commonly encountered by practitioners, precautions or contraindications, and ways in which they can be incorporated into clinical practice. Physicians should routinely obtain information about use of CAM as part of their patient history and should consider their role based on physiological effects and clinical research results. Keywords: integrative medicine, osteopathic manipulation, yoga, acupuncture therapy

  3. Virtual Alternative to the Oral Examination for Emergency Medicine Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGrath, Jillian

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The oral examination is a traditional method for assessing the developing physician’s medical knowledge, clinical reasoning and interpersonal skills. The typical oral examination is a face-to-face encounter in which examiners quiz examinees on how they would confront a patient case. The advantage of the oral exam is that the examiner can adapt questions to the examinee’s response. The disadvantage is the potential for examiner bias and intimidation. Computer-based virtual simulation technology has been widely used in the gaming industry. We wondered whether virtual simulation could serve as a practical format for delivery of an oral examination. For this project, we compared the attitudes and performance of emergency medicine (EM residents who took our traditional oral exam to those who took the exam using virtual simulation. Methods: EM residents (n=35 were randomized to a traditional oral examination format (n=17 or a simulated virtual examination format (n=18 conducted within an immersive learning environment, Second Life (SL. Proctors scored residents using the American Board of Emergency Medicine oral examination assessment instruments, which included execution of critical actions and ratings on eight competency categories (1-8 scale. Study participants were also surveyed about their oral examination experience. Results: We observed no differences between virtual and traditional groups on critical action scores or scores on eight competency categories. However, we noted moderate effect sizes favoring the Second Life group on the clinical competence score. Examinees from both groups thought that their assessment was realistic, fair, objective, and efficient. Examinees from the virtual group reported a preference for the virtual format and felt that the format was less intimidating. Conclusion: The virtual simulated oral examination was shown to be a feasible alternative to the traditional oral examination format for

  4. Complementary and alternative medicine in pediatrics in Turkey

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Candan Ozturk; Hulya Karatas; Alfred Längler; Tim Schütze; Rebekka Bailey; Tycho Jan Zuzak

    2014-01-01

    Background: Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is applied both to children and adults widely throughout the world. A previous pan-European survey showed a surprisingly high CAM-use in Turkish children. This review aimed to survey information on the use of CAM in pediatrics in Turkey. Data sources: A narrative, non-systematic review was conducted by melding expert opinions with a thorough and balanced review of available evidence. An unrestricted literature search using the key words,"alternative", "complementary", "integrative","prevalence" and "pediatric" or "children" and "Turkey" was performed by internet search in March, 2012 using PubMed and Google Scholar. Results: CAM use was examined in general pediatrics, pediatric oncology, patients with asthma, and patients with diabetes. A frequency of CAM use was 87% in Turkish pediatric patients, with a mean of 60%. The primary sources of information about CAM are family and friends. Communication with patients/parents and health care professionals showed that most parents do not speak about CAM use with their physicians or nurses. Conclusions: CAM is extensively used in Turkish pediatric patients. This might be due to Turkey's status as a developing country in which a traditional medical system still dominates in comparison to developed countries. Thus, larger studies are required to prove an extensive use of CAM in Turkey, as this review article does not have the capacity for in-depth analysis. Knowledge about CAM and its related topics is essential for physicians and nurses in order to meet the patients' wish for a competent consultation concerning all aspects of a possible therapy.

  5. Efficacy of Iranian Traditional Medicine in the Treatment of Epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Mehri Abdollahi Fard; Asie Shojaii

    2013-01-01

    Epilepsy is a brain disorder which affects about 50 million people worldwide. Ineffectiveness of the drugs in some cases and the serious side effects and chronic toxicity of the antiepileptic drugs lead to use of herbal medicine as a form of complementary and alternative medicine. In this review modern evidences for the efficacy of antiepileptic medicinal plants in Traditional Iranian Medicine (TIM) will be discussed. For this purpose electronic databases including PubMed, Scopus, Sciencedire...

  6. The Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Endometriosis: A Review of Utilization and Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sai Kong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Endometriosis (EM is one of the common gynecological conditions causing menstrual and pelvic pain and affects 10%–15% of women of reproductive age. In recent years, the complementary and alternative medical (CAM treatment for EM has become popular due to the few adverse reactions reported. The CAM therapy for EM includes several different treatments such as herbs (herbal prescription, extract, and patent, acupuncture, microwave physiotherapy, and Chinese herb medicine enema (CHM enema. These CAM therapies are effective at relieving dysmenorrhoea, shrinking adnexal masses, and promoting pregnancy, with less unpleasant side effects when compared to hormonal and surgical treatments. In this review, we focus on the status quo of CAM on EM and try to identify therapeutic efficacy and mechanisms based on some clinical and experimental studies. We hope to provide some instructive suggestions for clinical treatment and experimental research in the future.

  7. Complementary alternative medicine use among patients with dengue fever in the hospital setting: a cross-sectional study in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Ching, SiewMooi; Ramachandran, Vasudevan; Gew, Lai Teck; Lim, Sazlyna Mohd Sazlly; Sulaiman, Wan Aliaa Wan; Foo, Yoke Loong; Zakaria, Zainul Amiruddin; Samsudin, Nurul Huda; Lau, Paul Chih Ming Chih; Veettil, Sajesh K; Hoo, Fankee

    2016-01-01

    Background In Malaysia, the number of reported cases of dengue fever demonstrates an increasing trend. Since dengue fever has no vaccine or antiviral treatment available, it has become a burden. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has become one of the good alternatives to treat the patients with dengue fever. There is limited study on the use of CAM among patients with dengue fever, particularly in hospital settings. This study aims to determine the prevalence, types, reasons, expen...

  8. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Methods in Chronic Renal Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep Erdogan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite its long history, use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM methods has increased dramatically only after 1990s. Up to 57% of patients with chronic renal use CAM methods.These patienys use CAM methods to overcome hypertension, fatigue, constipation, leg edema, pain, cramps, anxiety, depression, sleep disorders, to cope with symptoms such as itching, to stop the progression of kidney disease and to improve their quality of life. Methods used are herbal products and food supplements, acupressure, acupuncture, homeopathy, exercise, aromatherapy, yoga and reflexology. Nephrotoxic effect of several CAM therapies used in patients with renal impairment could disturb hemodynamics by reducing the glomerular filtration rate. For this reason, health care providers should question patients about used of CAM, methods. Communication with patients should be clear and should not act judgmental. Health care personnel should learn more about CAM methods in order to avoid unwanted situations that could develop after the application of CAM methods. Patients should be informed correctly and scientifically about these methods to avoid harmful and unnecessary uses. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2014; 23(4.000: 770-786

  9. [Complementary and alternative medicine--time for research and regulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halevy, Jonathan

    2011-08-01

    The usage of complementary and alternative medicine [CAM] is increasing in popularity in the modern world. In this issue of Harefuah, seven articles relate to various aspects of CAM: the use of various modalities of CAM in four community clinics in Northern Israel, an assessment of the needs and expectations of patients on chemotherapy from the integration of CAM in palliative oncological care, a description of a series of quality research studies relating to CAM in hemato-oncological disorders and autoimmune diseases and a discussion of ethical dilemmas and issues relating to Jewish law. Other authors review the history of clinical studies with an emphasis on mind-body connection and the placebo effect. The conclusion that may be derived about CAM from this compilation of articles is that, despite the ltack of scientific evidence to support the paradigm underlying most CAM modalities and the scarcity of evidence to support its efficacy, the increasing popularity of CAM should lead us to expand research into CAM and to teach our medical students about CAM. We should do so for the sake of proper doctor-patient relationships and to prevent improper use of CAM by the general public. The diversity of CAM modalities and the heterogeneity of training patterns among those who practice CAM call for the prompt regulation of training and licensing of all CAM practitioners. PMID:21939117

  10. Undoing gender? The case of complementary and alternative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenton, Joslyn; Elliott, Sinikka

    2014-01-01

    Despite a rich body of sociological research that examines the relationship between gender and health, scholars have paid little attention to the case of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). One recent study (Sointu 2011) posits that men and women who use CAM challenge traditional ascriptions of femininity and masculinity through the exploration of self-care and emotions, respectively. Drawing on 25 in-depth interviews with middle-class Americans who use CAM, this article instead finds that men and women interpret their CAM use in ways that reproduce traditional gendered identities. Men frame their CAM use in terms of science and rationality, while simultaneously distancing themselves from feminine-coded components of CAM, such as emotions. Women seek CAM for problems such as abusive relationships, low self-esteem, and body image concerns, and frame their CAM use as a quest for self-reinvention that largely reflects and reproduces conventional femininity. Further, the reproduction of gendered identities is shaped by the participants' embrace of neoliberal tenets, such as the cultivation of personal control. This article contributes to ongoing theoretical debates about the doing, redoing and undoing of gender, as well as the literature on health and gender. PMID:23574309

  11. A methodological framework for evaluating the evidence for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) for cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachariae, Robert; Johannesen, Helle

    2011-01-01

    In spite of lacking evidence for effects on cancer progression itself, an increasing number of cancer patients use various types of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). There is disagreement between CAM practitioners, researchers and clinical oncologists, as to how evidence concerning...... effects of CAM can and should be produced, and how the existing evidence should be interpreted. This represents a considerable challenge for oncologists; both in terms of patient needs for an informed dialogue regarding CAM, and because some types of CAM may interact with standard treatments...

  12. 78 FR 64963 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special Emphasis Panel, October 16, 2013, 2:00 p.m. to October 16,...

  13. 77 FR 4052 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... Federal Register on December 21, 2011, 76 FR 79202. This meeting has been amended so that the open session... Council for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, February 3, 2012, 8:30 a.m. to February 3, 2012, 4...

  14. The physiological basis of complementary and alternative medicines for polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja-Khan, Nazia; Stener-Victorin, Elisabet; Wu, XiaoKe; Legro, Richard S

    2011-07-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common endocrine disorder that is characterized by chronic hyperandrogenic anovulation leading to symptoms of hirsutism, acne, irregular menses, and infertility. Multiple metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors are associated with PCOS, including insulin resistance, obesity, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, inflammation, and subclinical atherosclerosis. However, current treatments for PCOS are only moderately effective at controlling symptoms and preventing complications. This article describes how the physiological effects of major complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatments could reduce the severity of PCOS and its complications. Acupuncture reduces hyperandrogenism and improves menstrual frequency in PCOS. Acupuncture's clinical effects are mediated via activation of somatic afferent nerves innervating the skin and muscle, which, via modulation of the activity in the somatic and autonomic nervous system, may modulate endocrine and metabolic functions in PCOS. Chinese herbal medicines and dietary supplements may also exert beneficial physiological effects in PCOS, but there is minimal evidence that these CAM treatments are safe and effective. Mindfulness has not been investigated in PCOS, but it has been shown to reduce psychological distress and exert positive effects on the central and autonomic nervous systems, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, and immune system, leading to reductions in blood pressure, glucose, and inflammation. In conclusion, CAM treatments may have beneficial endocrine, cardiometabolic, and reproductive effects in PCOS. However, most studies of CAM treatments for PCOS are small, nonrandomized, or uncontrolled. Future well-designed studies are needed to further evaluate the safety, effectiveness, and mechanisms of CAM treatments for PCOS. PMID:21487075

  15. Alteration of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Usage in Patients With Cancer in Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    MUTLU, HASAN; Akca, Zeki; Cihan, Yasemin Benderli; Aslan, Tuncay; Erden, Abdülsamet; Büyükçelik, Abdullah

    2013-01-01

    The complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) are commonly encountered by cancer patients. In this study, the methods of CAM used by Turkish cancer patients were documented, and its frequency and the changes in the use of CAM over time were evaluated. Totally of 559 patients were enrolled from Kayseri Training and Research Hospital. Of CAM using patients, 11.8% used alternative medicine products, 60.1% used complementary medicine, and 28% received support from both. Patients with breast ca...

  16. Alternative medicines for AIDS in resource-poor settings: insights from exploratory anthropological studies in Asia and Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardon, Anita; Desclaux, Alice; Egrot, Marc; Simon, Emmanuelle; Micollier, Evelyne; Kyakuwa, Margaret

    2008-01-01

    The emergence of alternative medicines for AIDS in Asia and Africa was discussed at a satellite symposium and the parallel session on alternative and traditional treatments of the AIDSImpact meeting, held in Marseille, in July 2007. These medicines are heterogeneous, both in their presentation and in their geographic and cultural origin. The sessions focused on the role of these medications in selected resource poor settings in Africa and Asia now that access to anti-retroviral therapy is increasing. The aims of the sessions were to (1) identify the actors involved in the diffusion of these alternative medicines for HIV/AIDS, (2) explore uses and forms, and the way these medicines are given legitimacy, (3) reflect on underlying processes of globalisation and cultural differentiation, and (4) define priority questions for future research in this area. This article presents the insights generated at the meeting, illustrated with some findings from the case studies (Uganda, Senegal, Benin, Burkina Faso, China and Indonesia) that were presented. These case studies reveal the wide range of actors who are involved in the marketing and supply of alternative medicines. Regulatory mechanisms are weak. The efficacy claims of alternative medicines often reinforce a biomedical paradigm for HIV/AIDS, and fit with a healthy living ideology promoted by AIDS care programs and support groups. The AIDSImpact session concluded that more interdisciplinary research is needed on the experience of people living with HIV/AIDS with these alternative medicines, and on the ways in which these products interact (or not) with anti-retroviral therapy at pharmacological as well as psychosocial levels. PMID:18616794

  17. Alternative medicines for AIDS in resource-poor settings: Insights from exploratory anthropological studies in Asia and Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Emmanuelle

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The emergence of alternative medicines for AIDS in Asia and Africa was discussed at a satellite symposium and the parallel session on alternative and traditional treatments of the AIDSImpact meeting, held in Marseille, in July 2007. These medicines are heterogeneous, both in their presentation and in their geographic and cultural origin. The sessions focused on the role of these medications in selected resource poor settings in Africa and Asia now that access to anti-retroviral therapy is increasing. The aims of the sessions were to (1 identify the actors involved in the diffusion of these alternative medicines for HIV/AIDS, (2 explore uses and forms, and the way these medicines are given legitimacy, (3 reflect on underlying processes of globalisation and cultural differentiation, and (4 define priority questions for future research in this area. This article presents the insights generated at the meeting, illustrated with some findings from the case studies (Uganda, Senegal, Benin, Burkina Faso, China and Indonesia that were presented. These case studies reveal the wide range of actors who are involved in the marketing and supply of alternative medicines. Regulatory mechanisms are weak. The efficacy claims of alternative medicines often reinforce a biomedical paradigm for HIV/AIDS, and fit with a healthy living ideology promoted by AIDS care programs and support groups. The AIDSImpact session concluded that more interdisciplinary research is needed on the experience of people living with HIV/AIDS with these alternative medicines, and on the ways in which these products interact (or not with anti-retroviral therapy at pharmacological as well as psychosocial levels.

  18. [Treatment of senile diseases should prescribe Chinese patent medicine scientifically].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin-Xiang

    2014-04-01

    Treatment of senile diseases by Chinese patent medicine should prescribe according to physiological and pathological specialty of the aged. It's necessary for treatment according to syndrome differentiation associating with the disease,reasonable combination of drugs avoiding adverse reactions,gentle medicine character but not fierce,small medicine quantity but not great, the use of Chinese patent medicine mild and tonic used properly but not excessively. PMID:24812911

  19. Systematic review: Complementary and alternative medicine in the irritable bowel syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hussain, Z

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Complementary and alternative medical therapies and practices are widely employed in the treatment of the irritable bowel syndrome. AIM: To review the usage of complementary and alternative medicine in the irritable bowel syndrome, and to assess critically the basis and evidence for its use. METHODS: A systematic review of complementary and alternative medical therapies and practices in the irritable bowel syndrome was performed based on literature obtained through a Medline search. RESULTS: A wide variety of complementary and alternative medical practices and therapies are commonly employed by irritable bowel syndrome patients both in conjunction with and in lieu of conventional therapies. As many of these therapies have not been subjected to controlled clinical trials, some, at least, of their efficacy may reflect the high-placebo response rate that is characteristic of irritable bowel syndrome. Of those that have been subjected to clinical trials most have involved small poor quality studies. There is, however, evidence to support efficacy for hypnotherapy, some forms of herbal therapy and certain probiotics in irritable bowel syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: Doctors caring for irritable bowel syndrome patients need to recognize the near ubiquity of complementary and alternative medical use among this population and the basis for its use. All complementary and alternative medicine is not the same and some, such as hypnotherapy, forms of herbal therapy, specific diets and probiotics, may well have efficacy in irritable bowel syndrome. Above all, we need more science and more controlled studies; the absence of truly randomized placebo-controlled trials for many of these therapies has limited meaningful progress in this area.

  20. No alternative? The regulation and professionalization of complementary and alternative medicine in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, David B; Doel, Marcus A; Segrott, Jeremy

    2004-12-01

    In conjunction with its growing popularity, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in the United Kingdom has witnessed increasing professionalization, partly prompted by the landmark Parliamentary Inquiry that reported in November 2000. Professionalization has become a significant strategy for practitioner associations and a key focus for the government, media, and patient groups. It is being driven by concern over the interests of patients and consumers, and in relation to the possible integration of certain forms of CAM into publicly funded healthcare. It is, moreover, being reconfigured in explicitly national terms. This paper draws on research into practitioner associations representing nine CAM modalities in the UK-aromatherapy, Chinese herbal medicine, chiropractic, crystal healing, feng shui, 'lay' homeopathy, medical homeopathy, osteopathy, and Radionics-, examining the recent wave of professionalization in relation to Foucault's concern with 'techniques of the self.' It highlights the contrasting experience of an association of Chinese herbalists seeking statutory self-regulation (SSR) and an association of chiropractors that was instrumental in securing SSR for chiropractic. PMID:15491893

  1. Complementary and Integrative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medical treatments that are not part of mainstream medicine. When you are using these types of care, it may be called complementary, integrative, or alternative medicine. Complementary medicine is used together with mainstream medical ...

  2. Probiotics and pharmabiotics: alternative medicine or an evidence-based alternative?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Colin

    2010-01-01

    That commensal bacteria play an important role in human health is beyond doubt, and it is now widely accepted that humans function as super organisms, whose collective metabolic potential exceeds the sum of our individual eukaryotic and prokaryotic components. However, while it is has been established that the prokaryotic component of the human superorganism is amenable to manipulation by chemotherapeutic, dietary or microbial interventions, the significance of such alterations in terms of human health or well being is less well established. Prebiotics (non- digestible food ingredients that stimulate the growth and/or activity of bacteria in the digestive system) and probiotics (live microorganisms that when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit on the host) are often bracketed among 'alternative' approaches to influencing human health, such as homeopathy, naturopathy, acupuncture and hypnotherapy. Others believe that prebiotics and probiotics have proven their effectiveness in properly conducted, clinically controlled human trials and therefore can be considered as evidence-based alternatives or adjuncts to conventional medicines. My journey from a position of total skepticism to 'reluctant convert' is the basis of this article, which should not be considered in any sense as a review of the literature but simply a personal account of this transition. While I am not bent on converting other doubters, I will recount some of the thought processes and evidence that has helped to form my current opinion. PMID:21326932

  3. Applications and Therapeutic Actions of Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Women with Genital Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenfang Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Genital infection is a common worldwide disease among females with clinical features such as bilateral lower abdominal tenderness, abnormal vaginal or cervical discharge, fever, abnormal vaginal bleeding, dyspareunia, vaginal itching, and adnexal tenderness, which can significantly impair women’s health and quality of life. Genital infection is commonly treated with antibiotics, leading to an imbalance in gut flora due to prolonged use of antibiotics. Therefore, it is necessary to discover safe and efficacious alternative treatment strategies for patients with genital infection. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM is becoming increasingly prevalent among women with genital infection. CAM has interested the western mainstream medical community because of its less invasive, safe, effective, economical, and convenient therapies. CAM focuses on the prevention and treatment of disease and has become an important force in treating chronic disease. During the last few decades, the popularity of CAM has gradually increased. To further understand the efficacy of CAM in treating genital infection, our paper will review the current progress of treating genital infection including vulvitis, vaginitis, cervicitis, and pelvic inflammatory disease (PID with CAM therapies. Several CAM strategies including traditional Chinese medicine (TCM, acupuncture, Psychology interference, and physical therapy are introduced in this review.

  4. Knowledge and attitudes towards complementary and alternative medicine among medical students in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akan Hulya

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective This study aims to examine knowledge and attitudes towards Complementary and Alternative Medicine among medical students in Turkey, and find out whether they want to be trained in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out between October and December 2010 among medical students. Data were collected from a total of seven medical schools. Findings The study included 943 medical students. The most well known methods among the students were herbal treatment (81.2 %, acupuncture (80.8 %, hypnosis (78.8 %, body-based practices including massage (77 % and meditation (65.2 %, respectively. Acupuncture, aromatherapy, herbal treatment and meditation were better known among female participants compared to males (p  Conclusions Majority of the medical students were familiar with the CAM methods widely used in Turkey, while most of them had positive attitudes towards CAM as well as willingness to receive training on the subject, and they were likely to recommend CAM methods to their patients in their future professional lives. With its gradual scientific development and increasing popularity, there appears a need for a coordinated policy in integrating CAM into the medical curriculum, by taking expectations of and feedback from medical students into consideration in setting educational standards.

  5. The importance of wellness among users of complementary and alternative medicine: findings from the 2007 National Health Interview Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Upchurch, Dawn M.; Rainisch, Bethany Wexler

    2015-01-01

    Background This study developed and tested a sociobehavioral wellness model of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) to differentiate predisposing factors, enabling resources, need, and personal health practices according to use for wellness, for combined wellness and treatment, or for treatment alone. Methods Data were from the 2007 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), a cross-sectional, nationally representative sample of 23,393 adult Americans. This analysis included people who ...

  6. Alternative medicine in Paris and Rio de Janeiro: a study on transformative health experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Eglem

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to explore the practice of alternative medicine as an experience capable of modifying the very perception of the body and body feeling, based in a two-field research in France (Paris and Brazil (Rio de Janeiro. In this research, the resort to alternative medicines was considered as urban practice and a possible response to emotional needs, beyond the curative specificities of these medicines. The two countries were chosen for their supposed complementarity concerning the perception of spirituality and therefore, the perception of holistic health concepts. The study relies on an inductive approach and a qualitative methodology: introspective interviews with consumers and professionals, as well as participant observations. After a review of the theoretical aspects on the subject — concepts related to health, alternative medicine, transformative experience —, empirical results are presented. They show that the experience of alternative medicine tends to modify body perception, understood as how individuals define their own body. It also tends to modify body internal feeling, literally how people feel their body. The second conclusion that can be drawn from our study is that, beyond cultural specificities, some similarities appear in the way the practice of alternative medicine impacts on body perception and individual values. In that sense, alternative medicine practices in big urban centers appear to be related to a global consumer culture. However, alternative health behaviors rely on a subjective quest of sense which can be expressed through a variety of practices related to better health, not necessarily involving consumption.

  7. Alternative Systemic Treatments for Vitiligo: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Brandon E; Elbuluk, Nada; Mu, Euphemia W; Orlow, Seth J

    2015-12-01

    Vitiligo is a common, acquired disorder of skin pigmentation that can significantly impact quality of life. It often represents a therapeutic challenge, which has resulted in interest in alternative treatments such as herbal and vitamin supplements. In this review, we provide an overview of the most commonly studied complementary agents, describe proposed mechanisms of action, identify potential adverse effects, and discuss the primary evidence supporting their use. Our discussion focuses on L-phenylalanine, Polypodium leucotomos, khellin, Ginkgo biloba, and vitamins and minerals, including vitamins B12, C, and E, folic acid, and zinc used as monotherapy or in combination with other treatments for the management of vitiligo. PMID:26329814

  8. Clinical Study on Treatment of Depression with Combined Acupuncture & Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Hong; WANG Qiao-chu; HAN Chou-ping

    2003-01-01

    Purpose To observe and compare the curative effects of combined acupuncture and medicine with simple herbal medicine on treatment of depression. Method Altogether 63 cases were enrolled according to the determination of internationally accepted self-evaluation depression scales (SDS), among them 33 cases were treated with combination of acupuncture and herbal medicine (acupuncture-medicine group) and the other 30 cases were in treated with herbal medicine alone (herbal medicine group) Results The total effective rate of acupuncture-medicine group was 90.9% and that of herbal group was 80.0%. And there was significant statistics difference between the curative effects of two groups (P <0.05) without obvious adverse reaction. Conclusion Combination of acupuncture and medicine has better effect in treating depression than herbal medicine group.

  9. Treatment Technology and Alternative Water Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    At this point in our settlement of the planet Earth, with over seven billion human inhabitants, there are very few unallocated sources of fresh water. We are turning slowly toward "alternatives" such as municipal and industrial wastewater, saline groundwater, the sea, irrigation return flow, and produced water that comes up with oil and gas deposits from deep beneath the surface of the earth. Slowly turning, not because of a lack in technological ability, but because it takes a large capital investment to acquire and treat these sources to a level at which they can be used. The regulatory system is not geared up for alternative sources and treatment processes. Permitting can be circular, contradictory, time consuming, and very expensive. The purpose for the water, or the value of the product obtained using the water, must be such that the capital and ongoing expense seem reasonable. There are so many technological solutions for recovering water quality that choosing the most reliable, economical, and environmentally sound technology involves unraveling the "best" weave of treatment processes from a tangled knot of alternatives. Aside from permitting issues, which are beyond the topic for this presentation, the "best" weave of processes will be composed of four strands specifically fitted to the local situation: energy, pretreatment, driving force for separation processes, and waste management. A range of treatment technologies will be examined in this presentation with a focus on how the quality of the feed water, available power sources, materials, and waste management opportunities aid in choosing the best weave of treatment technologies, and how innovative use of a wide variety of driving forces are increasing the efficiency of treatment processes.

  10. (Using) complementary and alternative medicine: the perceptions of palliative patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliott, Jaklin A; Kealey, Colin P; Olver, Ian N

    2008-01-01

    Use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasingly common within Western societies, including Australia. This parallels calls for or claims of integration of CAM into mainstream medical practice, with oncology and palliative care specifically nominated as appropriate arenas for integration. However, there is an absence of studies examining patient perceptions of both CAM and CAM users. In this study, 28 adult patients with cancer close to death were interviewed regarding treatment decisions at the end of life, including decisions about CAM. Thematic analysis of transcribed interviews found consistent differences in talk around CAM between 12 users and 16 nonusers of CAM, primarily related to the perceived value of these treatments. Drawing upon a mind-body discourse that holds individuals responsible for their health, users valued CAM for the perceived benefit to physical or psychological well-being and compatibility with a holistic approach to health care, deemed to complement or augment conventional medicine. However, some were self-critical of their failure to continue with CAM, despite practical and financial difficulties experienced. Nonusers devalued CAM as unable to cure their disease (but did not similarly devalue conventional medicine), and negatively construed CAM users as desperate, or as challenging medical wisdom. Despite increased legitimation and medicalization of CAM, patients assess CAM differently to allopathic medicine, with different (positive and negative) assessments attributable to users. The misperception by many (nonusers) that CAM are intended to cure and available negative moral and social judgments centred around CAM use may deter patient uptake of CAM in areas where they have proven efficacy in symptom control. PMID:18370894

  11. Role of complementary and alternative medicine in geriatric care: A mini review

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    Mohammad Jamshed Siddiqui

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Since time immemorial homo sapiens are subjected to both health and diseases states and seek treatment for succor and assuagement in compromised health states. Since last two decades the progressive rise in the alternative form of treatment cannot be ignored and population seems to be dissatisfied with the conventional treatment modalities and therefore, resort to other forms of treatment, mainly complementary and alternative medicine (CAM. The use of CAM is predominantly more popular in older adults and therefore, numerous research studies and clinical trials have been carried out to investigate the effectiveness of CAM in the management of both communicable and non-communicable disease. In this current mini review, we attempt to encompass the use of CAM in chronic non-communicable diseases that are most likely seen in geriatrics. The current review focuses not only on the reassurance of good health practices, emphasizing on the holistic development and strengthening the body′s defense mechanisms, but also attempts to construct a pattern of self-care and patient empowerment in geriatrics. The issues of safety with CAM use cannot be sidelined and consultation with a health care professional is always advocated to the patient. Likewise, responsibility of the health care professional is to inform the patient about the safety and efficacy issues. In order to substantiate the efficacy and safety of CAMs, evidence-based studies and practices with consolidated standards should be planned and executed.

  12. Complementary and alternative medicine in fibromyalgia: a practical clinical debate of agreements and contrasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassisi, Gianniantonio; Ceccherelli, Francesco; Atzeni, Fabiola; Sarzi-Puttini, Piercarlo

    2013-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is currently classified as a chronic pain syndrome. Its main features are chronic widespread pain in the presence of tender points (TPs) upon physical examination, sleep disturbances and fatigue, although patients also report a variety of other complaints. Many therapies have been proposed over recent years with mixed results, including various pharmacological therapies for the treatment of symptoms; but there is still no effective drug treatment for the syndrome itself. Non-pharmacological therapies are an important part of the treatment, and there is evidence supporting a number of interventions, including aerobic exercise, strength and stretching training, cognitive-behavioural therapy, and patient education. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) techniques have not yet been fully acknowledged by scientific medicine because little is known about their mechanisms of action and usefulness. The aim of this wide-ranging review of the literature is to analyse the types of CAM techniques used to treat FM and their effectiveness, highlighting the disagreements among the authors of more specialised reviews. PMID:24373372

  13. COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE (CAM THERAPIES FOR MANAGEMENT OF PAIN RELATED TO ENDOMETRIOSIS

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    Panda Roshni

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Endometriosis is a gynaecological disease with a complex etiology. It is associated with severe pelvic pain, sub fertility and reduced quality of life. Endometriosis has a multifactorial etiology and therefore its management is also multidimensional. The main targets of therapy are controlling of the pain symptoms and increasing fertility where it is desired. Hormonal and surgical therapies are the two major treatment modalities available currently. But they are not without their side effects. Therefore many women explore Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM forms of treatment for symptomatic relief from pain. These CAM therapies have been used as an adjuvant to conventional therapy or as an independent form of treatment. CAM therapies are purported to have lesser side effects as compared to conventional medical formulations. Ancient Chinese and Indian medicine system have laid the foundation of several of the prevalent Cam practices. The following CAM practices have been discussed in the article-Acupuncture, Herbal therapy, Meditation and Hypnotherapy, Yoga, Exercise, Dietary therapy Aromatherapy and Massage, Reiki, Magnet therapy and Chiropractice. Randomized Clinical Trials (RCT have been conducted for some of the CAM therapies in Endometriosis and Acupuncture and Herbal and Dietary therapies have been found to have some positive effect on the patients. The efficacy of CAM therapies still needs substantial evidence to be integrated into general healthcare practices.

  14. Antifungal Activity of Essential Oils from Some Medicinal Plants of Iran against Alternaria alternate

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    I. Hadizadeh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Increasing public concern over the level of pesticide residues in food especially fresh produce has built up adequate pressure for scientists to look for less hazardous and environmentally safer compounds for controlling post harvest diseases. Essential oils as registered food grade materials have the potential to be applied as alternative anti-fungal treatments for fresh fruits and vegetables. Approach: We present in this study, the identification of the essential oils with antifungal activity from some medicinal plants of Iran (nettle (Urtica dioica L., thyme (Thymus vulgaris L., eucalyptus (Eucalyptus spp., Rue (Ruta graveolens L. and common yarrow (Achillea millefolium L., and their potential application as "generally regarded as safe" antifungal compounds against Alternaria alternate on tomato as a model pathosystem. Results: Both the nettle and the thyme oils exhibited antifungal activity against A. alternata. The thyme oil exhibited a lower degree of inhibition 68.5 and 74.8% at 1500 and 2000 ppm, respectively. Spore germination and germ tube elongation of the pathogens in potato dextrose broth was strongly reduced in the presence of 1500 ppm of the nettle oil. The same concentration of this oil reduced the percentage of decayed tomatoes. The experiments on reducing the development of natural tomato rot gave similar results. Conclusions: Application of essential oils for postharvest disease control of fresh produce, as a novel emerging alternative to hazardous anti-fungal treatments will allow a safer and environmentally more acceptable management of postharvest diseases.

  15. Use of complementary and alternative medicine at Norwegian and Danish hospitals

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    Launsø Laila

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several studies have found that a high proportion of the population in western countries use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM. However, little is known about whether CAM is offered in hospitals. The aim of this study was to describe to what extent CAM is offered in Norwegian and Danish hospitals and investigate possible changes in Norway since 2001. Methods A one-page questionnaire was sent to all included hospitals in both countries. The questionnaire was sent to the person responsible for the clinical activity, typically the medical director. 99 hospitals in the authority (85% in Norway and 126 in Denmark (97% responded. Given contact persons were interviewed. Results CAM is presently offered in about 50% of Norwegian hospitals and one-third of Danish hospitals. In Norway CAM was offered in 50 hospitals, 40 of which involved acupuncture. 19 hospitals gave other alternative therapies like biofeedback, hypnosis, cupping, ear-acupuncture, herbal medicine, art therapy, homeopathy, reflexology, thought field therapy, gestalt therapy, aromatherapy, tai chi, acupressure, yoga, pilates and other. 9 hospitals offered more than one therapy form. In Denmark 38 hospitals offered acupuncture and one Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing Light Therapy. The most commonly reported reason for offering CAM was scientific evidence in Denmark. In Norway it was the interest of a hospital employee, except for acupuncture where the introduction is more often initiated by the leadership and is more based on scientific evidence of effect. All persons (except one responsible for the alternative treatment had a medical or allied health professional background and their education/training in CAM treatment varied substantially. Conclusions The extent of CAM being offered has increased substantially in Norway during the first decade of the 21st century. This might indicate a shift in attitude regarding CAM within the conventional

  16. Wastewater Treatment in Kathmandu : Management, Treatment and Alternative

    OpenAIRE

    Regmi, Shakil

    2013-01-01

    Main aim of this thesis was to understand the wastewater situation in Kathmandu, Nepal and its impact in natural water stream, how it is managed and treated. After understanding the scenario of wastewater treatment in Kathmandu, a suitable alternative wastewater treatment system is recommended for future use. Technical as well as managerial problem exists in Kathmandu, thus from my experience in Mikkeli, Finland I came up with the model that is handled by the municipality itself because skill...

  17. Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neurotoxicity and Complementary and Alternative Medicines: Progress and Perspective

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    Xiao-Lan eCheng

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neurotoxicity (CIPN is a severe and dose-limiting side effect of antineoplastic drugs. It can cause sensory, motor and autonomic system dysfunction, and ultimately force patients to discontinue chemotherapy. Until now, little is understood about CIPN and no consistent standard of care is available. Since CIPN is a multifactorial disease, the clinical efficacy of single pharmacological drugs is disappointing, prompting patients to seek out alternative treatment options. Complementary and alternative medicines (CAMs, especially herbal medicines, are well known for their multifaceted implications and widely used in human health care. So far, several phytochemicals, plant extracts, and herbal formulas have been evaluated for their possible therapeutic potential in preventing onset and progression of CIPN in experimental models. Clinical acupuncture has also been shown to improve CIPN symptoms. In this review, we will give an outline of our current knowledge on the research advances of CIPN, the role of CAMs in alleviating CIPN and possible lacunae in research that needs to be addressed.

  18. [USE OF COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE AMONG FAMILY MEDICINE PATIENTS--EXAMPLE OF THE TOWN OF ČAKOVEC].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Ksenija; Munđar, Roko; Sović, Slavica; Bergman-Marković, Biserka; Janev Holcer, Nataša

    2014-12-01

    The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is widespread around the world including Croatia. The number of studies that investigate both quantitative and qualitative use of CAM in Croatia is limited. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of CAM among family medicine patients in the town of Čakovec and the rate they report it to their family doctor. This was a cross-sectional study in a sample of 300 patients that visited primary health center for any reason. We used anonymous questionnaire already employed in a previous investigation (Čižmešija et al. 2008), which describes socioeconomic characteristics, modalities of CAM use, and reasons for use. We also added questions on the type of herbs used and use of over-the-counter vitamin and mineral supplements. On data analysis we used descriptive statistics, χ2-test and Fisher's exact test, while the level of statistical significance was set at p ≤ 0.05. The response rate was 76%. Out of the total number of patients, 82% used some modality of CAM. Women, patients with secondary school education, employed and retired persons used CAM more often. Students and pupils reported least use of CAM. The most commonly used were herbs (87%), bioenergy (29%), diet therapy (28%), chiropractics (22%), and homeopathy and acupuncture (11% each). Vitamin and mineral supplements were used by 77% of study subjects. CAM was most frequently used for respiratory, urinary and musculoskeletal problems, as well as to improve overall health condition. Of the respondents that reported CAM use, 55% believed it would help them, 43% used it because they wanted to try something new, while only 2% indicated dissatisfaction with their physician as the reason for using CAM. Statistically, there were more subjects that used CAM and did not notify their family doctor about it, which could indicate poor communication between family doctors and health care users. Our results are consistent with a previous quantitative study

  19. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use in Infertility: Cultural and Religious Influences in a Multicultural Canadian Setting

    OpenAIRE

    Read, Suzanne C.; Carrier, Marie-Eve; Whitley, Rob; Gold, Ian; Tulandi, Togas; Zelkowitz, Phyllis

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To explore the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for infertility in a multicultural healthcare setting and to compare Western and non-Western infertility patients' reasons for using CAM and the meanings they attribute to CAM use.

  20. 76 FR 17659 - National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Announcement of Stakeholder Roundtable

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-30

    ... Announcement of Stakeholder Roundtable ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) invites the public to a Stakeholder Roundtable. Attendees will meet the NCCAM... Participation: Representatives of stakeholder organizations are invited to provide input into the...

  1. Prevalence of musculoskeletal disorder and alternative medicine therapies among dentists of North India: A descriptive study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Devanand; Mathur, Amit; Patil, Gaurav I.; Tippanawar, Harshad K.; Jain, Ankita; Jaggi, Namita; Gupta, Rajendra Kumar; Garg, Purnima

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Health professionals especially the dental professional are the frequent targets of musculoskeletal disorders (MSD). Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) can be of some help in managing these MSD especially in. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of CAM therapies as a treatment modality for MSD management among dental professionals of north India. Materials and Methods: Registered dentist of North Indian origin, India (n = 3598) were included in the study. The questionnaire was sent to all the dentists which consisted of the demographic profile, MSD in the past year, CAM therapies utilization and opinion about CAM therapies. Data analysis was done using SPSS version 21 and data were presented in tabular and graphic form. Test of significance was done using chi-square statistics with P < 0.05 considered as significant. Results: A response rate of 80% (n = 2879) was obtained, and all complained of MDS in some or the other part of their life. The use of CAM was reported among 70% (n = 2015) of the dentist who suffered from MSD. Other dentists either used conventional treatment or did not use anything. Conclusion: As the name implies, alternative medical systems is a category that extends beyond a single modality and refers to an entire system of theory and practice that developed separately from conventional medicine. CAM should be subject to rigorous scientific inquiry so that interventions that work are systematically distinguished from those that do not. In addition, the use of CAM treatments should be based on evidence of effectiveness and safety as demonstrated in randomized clinical trials. PMID:26692749

  2. Prevalence of musculoskeletal disorder and alternative medicine therapies among dentists of North India: A descriptive study

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    Devanand Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Health professionals especially the dental professional are the frequent targets of musculoskeletal disorders (MSD. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM can be of some help in managing these MSD especially in. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of CAM therapies as a treatment modality for MSD management among dental professionals of north India. Materials and Methods: Registered dentist of North Indian origin, India (n = 3598 were included in the study. The questionnaire was sent to all the dentists which consisted of the demographic profile, MSD in the past year, CAM therapies utilization and opinion about CAM therapies. Data analysis was done using SPSS version 21 and data were presented in tabular and graphic form. Test of significance was done using chi-square statistics with P < 0.05 considered as significant. Results: A response rate of 80% (n = 2879 was obtained, and all complained of MDS in some or the other part of their life. The use of CAM was reported among 70% (n = 2015 of the dentist who suffered from MSD. Other dentists either used conventional treatment or did not use anything. Conclusion: As the name implies, alternative medical systems is a category that extends beyond a single modality and refers to an entire system of theory and practice that developed separately from conventional medicine. CAM should be subject to rigorous scientific inquiry so that interventions that work are systematically distinguished from those that do not. In addition, the use of CAM treatments should be based on evidence of effectiveness and safety as demonstrated in randomized clinical trials.

  3. Legal regulations of complementary and alternative medicines in different countries

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    Ajazuddin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional medicines that formed the basis of health care throughout the world since the earliest days of mankind are still widely used and have considerable importance in international trade. Recognition of their clinical, pharmaceutical, and economic value is still growing, although this varies widely between countries and therefore regulation of exploitation and exportation is essential, together with international cooperation and coordination for their conservation so as to ensure their availability for the future. World Health Organization and European Union issued the guidelines defined the basic criteria for the evaluation of quality, safety, and efficacy of herbal medicines with the goal of assisting national regulatory authorities, scientific organizations, and manufacturers in assessing documentation, submissions, and dossiers in respect of such products. Legislative controls in respect of medicinal plants have not evolved around a structured control model. There are different ways in which countries define medicinal plants or herbs or products derived from them. The present review highlights the status of different countries adopted various approaches to licensing, dispensing, manufacturing, and trading to ensure their safety, quality, and efficacy.

  4. Legal regulations of complementary and alternative medicines in different countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajazuddin; Saraf, Shailendra

    2012-07-01

    Traditional medicines that formed the basis of health care throughout the world since the earliest days of mankind are still widely used and have considerable importance in international trade. Recognition of their clinical, pharmaceutical, and economic value is still growing, although this varies widely between countries and therefore regulation of exploitation and exportation is essential, together with international cooperation and coordination for their conservation so as to ensure their availability for the future. World Health Organization and European Union issued the guidelines defined the basic criteria for the evaluation of quality, safety, and efficacy of herbal medicines with the goal of assisting national regulatory authorities, scientific organizations, and manufacturers in assessing documentation, submissions, and dossiers in respect of such products. Legislative controls in respect of medicinal plants have not evolved around a structured control model. There are different ways in which countries define medicinal plants or herbs or products derived from them. The present review highlights the status of different countries adopted various approaches to licensing, dispensing, manufacturing, and trading to ensure their safety, quality, and efficacy. PMID:23055642

  5. Attitudes and practices of complementary and alternative medicine among adolescents in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musaiger, Abdulrahman O; Abahussain, Nada A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the attitudes and use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) among Saudi Arabian adolescents. A multistage stratified sampling method was used to select 736 adolescents (358 males, 378 females) aged 15-19 years from secondary schools. The study was carried out in Al-Khobar city, Eastern region of Saudi Arabia. The findings revealed that the use of CAM by adolescents in their lifetime ranged from 1.6% for acupuncture to 58.6% for honey treatment, with significant differences between genders, except in the use of dietary supplements, black cumin, and acupuncture therapies. Females were more likely to use CAM for treating abdominal pains, cold and flu, and cough than males (P < 0.000). Family members and friends (67.7%) were the main source of CAM usage, followed by television (10%), and Internet (8%). Religious and medicinal herb healers were the CAM healers most commonly visited by adolescents. Nearly 21-43% of adolescents had positive attitudes toward CAM, with some significant differences between males and females. It can be concluded that CAM is widely used by Saudi adolescents, but caution should be exercised for the safe usage of some CAM treatments. CAM should not be ignored; however there is an urgent need to establish regulations for CAM usage. PMID:25560362

  6. Clinically-relevant chemotherapy interactions with complementary and alternative medicines in patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Kevin Yi-Lwern; See, Cheng Shang; Chan, Alexandre

    2010-01-01

    Complementary and alternative medicines (CAMs), in particular herbal medicines, are commonly used by cancer patients in conjunction with chemotherapy treatment for their anticancer properties and supportive care. However, the effects of many of these herbs are not well-documented due to limited studies done on them. Severe herb-drug interactions (HDIs) have been recorded in some cases, and failure to recognize these harmful HDIs can lead to dire consequences in cancer patients. This study discusses clinically-relevant interactions between anticancer drugs (ACDs) and herbs classified into 7 categories: cancer treatment and prevention, immune-system-related, alopecia, nausea and vomiting, peripheral neuropathy and pain, inflammation, and fatigue. Some promising patents which contain these herbs and thus may manifest these interactions are also presented in this article. Pharmacokinetic interactions involved mainly induction or inhibition of the cytochrome P450 isozymes and p-glycoprotein, while pharmacodynamic interactions were related to increased risks of central nervous system-related effects, hepatotoxicity and bleeding, among others. Clinicians should be vigilant when treating cancer patients who take CAMs with concurrent chemotherapy since they face a high risk of HDIs. These HDIs can be minimized or avoided by selecting herb-drug pairs which are less likely to interact. Furthermore, close monitoring of pharmacological effects and plasma drug levels should be carried out to avoid toxicity and ensure adequate chemotherapeutic coverage in patients with cancer. PMID:20653549

  7. The arranged marriage of allopathic and alternative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniccia, M D

    1999-01-01

    The degree to which Americans are seeking and paying for alternative health care has caused some hospitals and medical groups to consider incorporating these services within the umbrella of their traditional care. The challenge is to find a standard of care that is consistent with allopathic traditions, but not so restrictive as to undercut the financial and patient satisfaction motives that prompted the interest in alternative care. By focusing on subjective complaints and chronic conditions, it may be possible to walk a path that leaves traditional medical standards intact while gaining the opportunity to attract the dollars and track the effectiveness of alternative care. PMID:10662462

  8. Patterns of responses to alternative medicines in controlling allergic conjunctivitis

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    Batra Deepak

    1988-01-01

    Full Text Available This analysis identifies the various patterns of the responses of the medicines in controlling allergic conjunctivitis. The mean S Deviation coefficient of variation, correlation matrix and loading of factors are worked out as stated in the tables. In the present case the Eigen values greater than 1.50 are retained. The four factors retained explain 68% of the total variations of the 16 responses. The first factor shows 23.38% of variations in total responses while first two and first three factors show 42.39% and 58.64% respectively. Thus medicine affective in controlling the symptoms are given In the descending order: oxymetazoline and sodium salicylate and Sodium cromoglycate, Oxymetazoline and Disodium CCromoglycate & Sodium Salicylate and disodium Cromoglycate.

  9. Complementary and alternative medicine for patients with chronic fatigue syndrome: A systematic review

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    Cao Huijuan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Throughout the world, patients with chronic diseases/illnesses use complementary and alternative medicines (CAM. The use of CAM is also substantial among patients with diseases/illnesses of unknown aetiology. Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS, also termed myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME, is no exception. Hence, a systematic review of randomised controlled trials of CAM treatments in patients with CFS/ME was undertaken to summarise the existing evidence from RCTs of CAM treatments in this patient population. Methods Seventeen data sources were searched up to 13th August 2011. All randomised controlled trials (RCTs of any type of CAM therapy used for treating CFS were included, with the exception of acupuncture and complex herbal medicines; studies were included regardless of blinding. Controlled clinical trials, uncontrolled observational studies, and case studies were excluded. Results A total of 26 RCTs, which included 3,273 participants, met our inclusion criteria. The CAM therapy from the RCTs included the following: mind-body medicine, distant healing, massage, tuina and tai chi, homeopathy, ginseng, and dietary supplementation. Studies of qigong, massage and tuina were demonstrated to have positive effects, whereas distant healing failed to do so. Compared with placebo, homeopathy also had insufficient evidence of symptom improvement in CFS. Seventeen studies tested supplements for CFS. Most of the supplements failed to show beneficial effects for CFS, with the exception of NADH and magnesium. Conclusions The results of our systematic review provide limited evidence for the effectiveness of CAM therapy in relieving symptoms of CFS. However, we are not able to draw firm conclusions concerning CAM therapy for CFS due to the limited number of RCTs for each therapy, the small sample size of each study and the high risk of bias in these trials. Further rigorous RCTs that focus on promising CAM therapies are warranted.

  10. Phytotherapy Against Insomnia: Extravagant Claims or an Alternative Medicine?

    OpenAIRE

    Amrita Dey; Abhijit Dey

    2013-01-01

    Insomnia or sleeplessness is a disorder characterized by a personal incapability to falling or staying asleep for a desirable period of time. Apart from Valeriana officinalis and Ziziphus jujuba most of the ethnobotanicals used for sleep disorders have not been evaluated for pharmacological or clinical efficacy against insomnia. Chinese herbal medicines involving polyherbal formulations are yet to be characterized and long term side effects are yet to be evaluated. Anti insomniac phytotherapy...

  11. Legal regulations of complementary and alternative medicines in different countries

    OpenAIRE

    Ajazuddin,; Shailendra Saraf

    2012-01-01

    Traditional medicines that formed the basis of health care throughout the world since the earliest days of mankind are still widely used and have considerable importance in international trade. Recognition of their clinical, pharmaceutical, and economic value is still growing, although this varies widely between countries and therefore regulation of exploitation and exportation is essential, together with international cooperation and coordination for their conservation so as to ensure their ...

  12. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Usage in Skin Diseases and the Positive and Negative Impacts on Patients

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    Gülşen Tükenmez Demirci

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Our purpose was to compare the sosciodemographical differences between Complementary and Alternative medicine (CAM users and non users with skin diseases and to investigate the positive and negative impacts of CAM among patients. Methods: The patients with dermatological conditions attending the dermatology outpatient clinic were enrolled to the study randomly. The sociodemographical properties, diagnosis of the skin diseases, duration of the disease, CAM usage and duration of usage and the positive and negative impacts of the treatments were recorded. Results: A total of 522 (302 female, 220 male, median age 34.8±16.7 patients were enrolled in the study. Eighty-eight patients (16.8% were found to have used a CAM method. The mean age of CAM users (28.2±14.3 were statistically lower than non users (36.0±16.9 (p=0.000 <0.05. The disease duration of CAM users (4.3±5.5 year was statistically longer than non-users (2.8±5.2 year. The CAM methods were mostly preferred in acne vulgaris disease (31.8%, and the mostly used CAM method was herbal therapies (59.1%. We found that 16 (18.2% out of 88 CAM users had side effects from CAM treatment while nine patients (10.3% improved. Conclusion: Complementary and alternative medicine usage is not frequent among skin diseases. The patients with longer disease duration are more prone to use CAM. The side effects rarely occur due to CAM use and we ascertain that very rarely do patients benefit from CAM methods.

  13. Low protein diets in patients with chronic kidney disease: a bridge between mainstream and complementary-alternative medicines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccoli, Giorgina Barbara; Capizzi, Irene; Vigotti, Federica Neve; Leone, Filomena; D'Alessandro, Claudia; Giuffrida, Domenica; Nazha, Marta; Roggero, Simona; Colombi, Nicoletta; Mauro, Giuseppe; Castelluccia, Natascia; Cupisti, Adamasco; Avagnina, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Dietary therapy represents an important tool in the management of chronic kidney disease (CKD), mainly through a balanced reduction of protein intake aimed at giving the remnant nephrons in damaged kidneys a "functional rest". While dialysis, transplantation, and pharmacological therapies are usually seen as "high tech" medicine, non pharmacological interventions, including diets, are frequently considered lifestyle-complementary treatments. Diet is one of the oldest CKD treatments, and it is usually considered a part of "mainstream" management. In this narrative review we discuss how the lessons of complementary alternative medicines (CAMs) can be useful for the implementation and study of low-protein diets in CKD. While high tech medicine is mainly prescriptive, prescribing a "good" life-style change is usually not enough and comprehensive counselling is required; the empathic educational approach, on which CAMs are mainly, though not exclusively based, may support a successful personalized nutritional intervention.There is no gold-standard, low-protein diet for all CKD patients: from among a relatively vast choice, the best compliance is probably obtained by personalization. This approach interferes with the traditional RCT-based analyses which are grounded upon an assumption of equal preference of treatments (ideally blinded). Whole system approaches and narrative medicine, that are widely used in the study of CAMs, may offer ways to integrate EBM and personalised medicine in the search for innovative solutions respecting individualization, but gaining sound data, such as with partially-randomised patient preference trials. PMID:27391228

  14. The Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Supplements of Potential Concern during Breast Cancer Chemotherapy

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    Erin Sweet

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. While many Complementary and Alternative Medicines (CAM are unlikely to interact negatively with conventional oncology treatment, some ingestible CAM substances have biological activities that may reduce the effectiveness of chemotherapy or radiation. This study surveyed women with breast cancer in order to document the extent to which women with breast cancer use these CAM substances of concern concurrently with conventional treatments. Methods. A total of 398 women completed a survey describing their use of CAM at various time points in their cancer treatment. This report focuses on a subsample of 250 women receiving chemotherapy or radiation who reported using specific one or more of several chemotherapies. Results. Of those participating, 104 (43.7% of those receiving chemotherapy (n=238 and 45 (32.3% of those receiving radiation (139; 58.4% of all patients reported using one or more CAM substances that could be cause for concern when taken concurrently. Conclusion. Research is needed to understand the real risks associated with CAM and conventional polypharmacy. If risks associated with CAM conventional polypharmacy use prove to be substantial then improved systems to assure all women get advice regarding herb and supplement use during breast cancer treatment appear to be needed.

  15. The Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Supplements of Potential Concern during Breast Cancer Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Erin; Dowd, Fred; Zhou, May; Standish, Leanna J; Andersen, M Robyn

    2016-01-01

    Objective. While many Complementary and Alternative Medicines (CAM) are unlikely to interact negatively with conventional oncology treatment, some ingestible CAM substances have biological activities that may reduce the effectiveness of chemotherapy or radiation. This study surveyed women with breast cancer in order to document the extent to which women with breast cancer use these CAM substances of concern concurrently with conventional treatments. Methods. A total of 398 women completed a survey describing their use of CAM at various time points in their cancer treatment. This report focuses on a subsample of 250 women receiving chemotherapy or radiation who reported using specific one or more of several chemotherapies. Results. Of those participating, 104 (43.7%) of those receiving chemotherapy (n = 238) and 45 (32.3%) of those receiving radiation (139; 58.4% of all patients) reported using one or more CAM substances that could be cause for concern when taken concurrently. Conclusion. Research is needed to understand the real risks associated with CAM and conventional polypharmacy. If risks associated with CAM conventional polypharmacy use prove to be substantial then improved systems to assure all women get advice regarding herb and supplement use during breast cancer treatment appear to be needed. PMID:27528880

  16. Phytotherapy Against Insomnia: Extravagant Claims or an Alternative Medicine?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrita Dey

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Insomnia or sleeplessness is a disorder characterized by a personal incapability to falling or staying asleep for a desirable period of time. Apart from Valeriana officinalis and Ziziphus jujuba most of the ethnobotanicals used for sleep disorders have not been evaluated for pharmacological or clinical efficacy against insomnia. Chinese herbal medicines involving polyherbal formulations are yet to be characterized and long term side effects are yet to be evaluated. Anti insomniac phytotherapy opens up an exciting aspect of research which might benefit a large number of patients suffering from different degrees of insomnia.

  17. Complementary and alternative medicine for psoriasis: what the dermatologist needs to know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbott, Whitney; Duffy, Nana

    2015-06-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use is common among patients with psoriasis. CAM modalities include traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), herbal therapies, dietary supplements, climatotherapy, and mind/body interventions. In this review, evidence from clinical trials investigating the efficacy of CAM for psoriasis is reviewed. There is a large amount of evidence from controlled trials that have shown that the combination of TCM with traditional therapies for psoriasis is more efficacious than traditional therapies alone. Herbal therapies that have the most evidence for efficacy are Mahonia aquifolium and indigo naturalis, while there is a smaller amount of evidence for aloe vera, neem, and extracts of sweet whey. Dietary supplementation in patients with psoriasis demonstrates consistent evidence supporting the efficacy of fish oil supplements. Zinc supplementation has not been shown to be effective; however, some evidence is available (albeit conflicting) for vitamin D, vitamin B12, and selenium supplementation. Overwhelming evidence supports the effectiveness of Dead Sea climatotherapy. Finally, mindfulness-based stress reduction can be helpful as adjuvant treatment of psoriasis. There are potential benefits to these modalities, but also potential side issues. Concerns with CAM include, but are not limited to, contamination of TCM products with heavy metals or corticosteroids, systemic toxicity or contact dermatitis from herbal supplements, and ultraviolet light-induced carcinomas from climatotherapy. Dermatologists should be aware of these benefits and side effects to allow for informed discussions with their patients. PMID:25904522

  18. Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Cancer Pain: An Overview of Systematic Reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanju Bao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective. Now with more and more published systematic reviews of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM on adult cancer pain, it is necessary to use the methods of overview of systematic review to summarize available evidence, appraise the evidence level, and give suggestions to future research and practice. Methods. A comprehensive search (the Cochrane Library, PubMed, Embase, and ISI Web of Knowledge was conducted to identify all systematic reviews or meta-analyses of CAM on adult cancer pain. And the evidence levels were evaluated using GRADE approach. Results. 27 systematic reviews were included. Based on available evidence, we could find that psychoeducational interventions, music interventions, acupuncture plus drug therapy, Chinese herbal medicine plus cancer therapy, compound kushen injection, reflexology, lycopene, TENS, qigong, cupping, cannabis, Reiki, homeopathy (Traumeel, and creative arts therapies might have beneficial effects on adult cancer pain. No benefits were found for acupuncture (versus drug therapy or shame acupuncture, and the results were inconsistent for massage therapy, transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS, and Viscum album L plus cancer treatment. However, the evidence levels for these interventions were low or moderate due to high risk of bias and/or small sample size of primary studies. Conclusion. CAM may be beneficial for alleviating cancer pain, but the evidence levels were found to be low or moderate. Future large and rigor randomized controlled studies are needed to confirm the benefits of CAM on adult cancer pain.

  19. Complementary and alternative medicine for cancer pain: an overview of systematic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yanju; Kong, Xiangying; Yang, Liping; Liu, Rui; Shi, Zhan; Li, Weidong; Hua, Baojin; Hou, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objective. Now with more and more published systematic reviews of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) on adult cancer pain, it is necessary to use the methods of overview of systematic review to summarize available evidence, appraise the evidence level, and give suggestions to future research and practice. Methods. A comprehensive search (the Cochrane Library, PubMed, Embase, and ISI Web of Knowledge) was conducted to identify all systematic reviews or meta-analyses of CAM on adult cancer pain. And the evidence levels were evaluated using GRADE approach. Results. 27 systematic reviews were included. Based on available evidence, we could find that psychoeducational interventions, music interventions, acupuncture plus drug therapy, Chinese herbal medicine plus cancer therapy, compound kushen injection, reflexology, lycopene, TENS, qigong, cupping, cannabis, Reiki, homeopathy (Traumeel), and creative arts therapies might have beneficial effects on adult cancer pain. No benefits were found for acupuncture (versus drug therapy or shame acupuncture), and the results were inconsistent for massage therapy, transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS), and Viscum album L plus cancer treatment. However, the evidence levels for these interventions were low or moderate due to high risk of bias and/or small sample size of primary studies. Conclusion. CAM may be beneficial for alleviating cancer pain, but the evidence levels were found to be low or moderate. Future large and rigor randomized controlled studies are needed to confirm the benefits of CAM on adult cancer pain. PMID:24817897

  20. Patient's Attitudes Towards the Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Finland: an Ethnomedical Insight Based on Cancer Narratives

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    Piret Paal

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available As in many other countries, the second half of the 19th century and the first half of the 20th century marked times of modernisation in Finland. Rapid changes also took place in the health care system at this time. Until the 1920s most health concerns were addressed using the ethnomedical practices. New legislation gave the dominant position in health care to the Western (evidence based health care system. According to the official record, the majority of ethnomedical treatments were declared marginal and generally useless and the state began to support the construction of hospitals. The slow pace of development in social health care held up the treatments given by legally approved medical practitioners. All of which supported a deliberate shift towards the modernisation of the health care system leading to primary health concerns being solved in local health care centres by doctors trained according to the conventions of evidence based medicine. Unlike many other countries, where the representatives of conventional medicine also consider complementary and alternative medicine as a part of their treatment, the use of non-evidence based medicine is extremely unusual in Finland. However, patients with long-term illnesses are eager to try all available cures in their desire to become well and this leads to a situation in which complementary treatments are used in a somewhat secretive manner. The article follows the discussion concerning the use of complementary and alternative medicine in cancer narratives in order to point out its significance as a part of a self-negotiation process characteristic to the patients with long-term illnesses.

  1. Use of complementary/alternative medicine among paediatric patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Hanne; Andersen, Susie; Nielsen, Rasmus Gaardskaer; Dolmer, Birgitte Sofie; Høst, Arne; Damkier, Anette

    2003-01-01

    was out-patient or hospitalised. The users were pre-school children. HM (Bio-Strath and Echinacea) was especially used to strengthen the immune system. Among AT, reflexological treatment was the most popular treatment. The most frequent users of CAM were patients with asthma, eczema or allergy plus...

  2. Integrating complementary and alternative medicine into pediatric training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Linda; Risko, Wanessa; Nethersole, Sharl; Maypole, Jack

    2004-04-01

    The Center for Pediatric Integrative Medical Education and Boston Healing Landscape Project represent diverse approaches to integrative medicine and its practice. The relationship and collegial collaboration between the two programs illustrates the extent to which they complement one another. Both recognize the importance of curriculum geared to different levels of learners and of interventions introduced across the full curriculum. Both use case-based learning, although each focuses on different kinds of CAM and different case models. The Center for Pediatric Integrative Medical Education promotes interactive didactics with hands-on, direct experiential learning. The BHLP applies active-learning pedagogy, through experiential learning and its teaching case model. Both programs understand that, given the ongoing interaction among medical students, residents, fellows, and faculty, each group's training in CAM must reinforce the others for a larger system to change. PMID:15101232

  3. Using Complementary and Alternative Medicines to Target the Host Response during Severe Influenza

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    Lisa M. Alleva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available It is now accepted that an overwhelming inflammatory response is the cause of human deaths from avian H5N1 influenza infection. With this in mind we sought to examine the literature for examples of complementary and alternative medicines that reduce inflammation, and to place the results of this search in the context of our own work in a mouse model of influenza disease, using a pharmaceutical agent with anti-inflammatory properties. Two Chinese herbs, Angelica sinensis (Dang Gui and Salvia miltiorrhiza (Danshen, have been recently shown to protect mice during lethal experimental sepsis via inhibition of the novel inflammatory cytokine High Mobility Group Box 1 protein (HMGB1. Biochanin A, a ligand of the peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPAR alpha and gamma and the active isoflavone in Trifolium pratense (red clover, has anti-inflammatory properties, and thus could be used as an influenza treatment. This is of great interest since we have recently shown that gemfibrozil, a drug used to treat hyperlipidemia in humans and a synthetic ligand of PPAR alpha, significantly reduces the mortality associated with influenza infections in mice. The inflammation-modulating abilities of these natural agents should be considered in light of what is now known about the mechanisms of fatal influenza, and tested as potential candidates for influenza treatments in their own right, or as adjunct treatments to antivirals.

  4. How to locate and appraise qualitative research in complementary and alternative medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Franzel, Brigitte; Schwiegershausen, Martina; Heusser, Peter; Berger, Bettina

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this publication is to present a case study of how to locate and appraise qualitative studies for the conduct of a meta-ethnography in the field of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). CAM is commonly associated with individualized medicine. However, one established scientific approach to the individual, qualitative research, thus far has been explicitly used very rarely. This article demonstrates a case example of how qualitative research in the field of CAM st...

  5. The growing importance of traditional, alternative and complementary medicine in India

    OpenAIRE

    Premachandra, M. Krishnapriya

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses the importance of the Ayurveda, Yoga and Naturopathy, Unani, Siddha and Homoeopathy (AYUSH) system of medicines in India, focusing on the reasons for its adoption in India and on government support in terms of allocation of funds, insurance schemes, growth of the manufacturing sector and education reforms. The author shows the resurgence of traditional, complementary and alternative medicine and local health tradition services by people of the urban as well as the rura...

  6. Teaching methods of alternative therapy in veterinary medicine via e-learning

    OpenAIRE

    Fidelak, Christian; Heuwieser, Wolfgang; Schmidt, Sandra; Arlt, Sebastian

    2008-01-01

    [english] The Free University’s Veterinary Clinic of Reproduction in the Department of Veterinary Medicine, Berlin, has been offering courses on alternative and complementary veterinary medicine to its students for several years. Due to time constraints and shortages in teaching staff, it has not been possible to satisfy student demand for instruction in these areas. To provide more detailed information as well as more opportunities for discussion and practica, subject area courses were modi...

  7. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use among Physicians in Oriental Medicine Hospitals in Vietnam: A Hospital-Based Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duong Duc Pham

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Interest in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM is growing worldwide, even in Vietnam where traditional medicine is considered mainstream. We conducted a survey of the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of CAM therapies among physicians in oriental medicine (OM hospitals in Vietnam. A two-stage random selection process selected 337 physicians who were interviewed using a face-to-face method with a standardized structured questionnaire. Data from 312 physicians who completed the questionnaire suggested that oriental herbal medicine and acupuncture (Vietnamese OM version were the more commonly used CAM modalities compared with Vietnamese folk medicine and other forms of CAM. A broad range of CAM modalities, particularly chiropractice, diet supplements, and dietary therapy, and an excessive proportion of western medication were employed in conjunction with OM in the physicians’ daily practice. Their daily practice was influenced by the source of knowledge, education level, medical specialty, and working environment. These findings suggest that physicians in OM hospitals in Vietnam have interests in various forms of CAM therapies besides traditional modes.

  8. Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Epileptic Children in Tehran: A Cross-Sectional Study (2009-2011

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    Seyed Hassan TONEKABONI

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Tonekaboni Sh, Jafari Naeini S, Khajeh A, Yaghini O, Ghazavi A, Abdollah Gorji F. Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Epileptic Children in Tehran: A Cross-Sectional Study (2009-2011. Iran J Child Neurol. 2014 Winter; 8(1:26-31.ObjectiveAlthough the use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM has been evaluated globally, there are few studies in our country on this subject. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence, pattern of use, parental sources of information, and benefits of CAM in epileptic children in Tehran.Materials & MethodsOne hundred thirty-three parents or relatives of epileptic children who were referred to outpatient clinics or admitted in neurologic ward of four major hospitals in Tehran, were interviewed by our researcher based on a structured questionnaire; from 2009 to 2010. The information obtained comprised the demographic data of patients and their parents, frequency and morphology of convulsions, the type and sources of CAM and finally, the benefits and adverseeffects of this practice.ResultsForty-four percent of the respondents had used CAM methods either alone or in combination with other methods. The most frequently used CAM was written prayers followed by oral herbs and special diets. CAM was mainly introduced to them by relatives. Only 16.7% of these parents had discussed this matter with their children’s physicians. No efficacy to control seizure was observed for most of these methods.ConclusionThis study showed that use of CAM in our study group is relatively common and may have a potentially hazardous role in the treatment process. So, it is necessary for physicians to have enough information about CAM practice in their patients. References:National Institutes of health. More than one third of US adults use complementary and alternative medicine, according to new government survey. [Serial online] 2004 (cited 2004 May 27. Available

  9. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) following traumatic brain injury (TBI): Opportunities and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Theresa D; Brenner, Lisa A; Walter, Kristen H; Bormann, Jill E; Johansson, Birgitta

    2016-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is highly prevalent and occurs in a variety of populations. Because of the complexity of its sequelae, treatment strategies pose a challenge. Given this complexity, TBI provides a unique target of opportunity for complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatments. The present review describes and discusses current opportunitites and challenges associated with CAM research and clinical applications in civilian, veteran and military service populations. In addition to a brief overview of CAM, the translational capacity from basic to clinical research to clinical practice will be described. Finally, a systematic approach to developing an adoptable evidence base, with proof of effectiveness based on the literature will be discussed. Inherent in this discussion will be the methodological and ethical challenges associated with CAM research in those with TBI and associated comorbidities, specifically in terms of how these challenges relate to practice and policy issues, implementation and dissemination. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:Brain injury and recovery. PMID:26806403

  10. The knowledge and attitudes towards complementary and alternative medicine among dermatologists in Turkey

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    Kürşat Göker

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: This study aimed to evaluate the knowledge of dermatologists on Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM, common methods that are widely used in their daily practices and their general approach about CAM. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional and descriptive study was carried out between May 2012 and May 2013. A questionnaire comprising 14 questions was sent to dermatologists via electronic mail. The questionnaires which were returned completely and correctly were included in the study. Results: Two hundred questionnaires were taken into consideration. 25.5% of participants were working at universities, while 20% were working at training and research hospitals, 21% were working at public hospitals and the other 33% were working at private hospitals. 80.5% of participants have “little, a little and not at all”, 16 % moderate and the other 3.5% of them had only “a lot, very much” level of information about CAT. The most frequently recommended methods among the dermatologist were topical herbal treatment (59.6%, oral herbal treatment (48.1%, herbal shampoo (46.2%, and dietary supplement and thermal spring (38.5%, respectively. Conclusion: Although many of our colleagues have lack of information about CAM, a considerable number of them could use CAM in their daily practices. A substantial proportion of dermatologists would like to be better informed about CAM.

  11. Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine and Quality of Life of Cancer Patients: Turkish Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Medet; Tavsanli, Nurgul Gungor; Ozcelik, Hanife

    2016-01-01

    A large proportion of cancer patients use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) to extend their quality of life. The purpose of this study was to determine the level of CAM use by patients undergoing cancer treatment. The study was conducted in Turkey at a large state university hospital and a government hospital between March and December 2013. The research sample consisted of a total of 147 cancer patients undergoing either chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Data collection was performed using a Patient Description Form and the EUROHIS (WHOQOL-8.Tr) quality-of-life scale through face-to-face interviews. The use of CAM, green tea (28.00 ± 4.24), and garlic (29.00 ± 0.00), as well as the use of a combination of plant products such as pomegranate juice, pollen, and herbal tea (31.25 ± 5.96), not feeling the need to inform the physician of the use of CAM, regular use of CAM, finding CAM use effective, and suggesting CAM use to others were found to have a statistically significant relationship to average quality-of-life scores (P < 0.05). This study could be used to develop holistic nursing interventions and CAM use by patients undergoing cancer treatment. PMID:26752220

  12. Level of attitude toward complementary and alternative medicine among Iranian patients with multiple sclerosis.

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    Mohammad Hossein Harirchian

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is an unpredictable neurological disease leading to severe disability in young adults. The majority of MS patients use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM as adjunct to conventional therapies. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of CAM utilization among Iranian patients with MS and their attitude toward the CAM usage.A cross-sectional study was conducted on 119 definite MS patients referred to Tehran's Imam Khomeini and Sina hospitals. A questionnaire was used to examine the association between participants' health-related factors and usage of CAMs interventions. P value < 0.05 was considered statistically significant.Among the enrolled patients, 60% of the participants agreed with using CAM, 42% experienced the usage of these treatments; out of whom 41% believed its efficiency and 18% reported exacerbation of symptoms. The mean duration of disease diagnosis and mean time from symptoms onset were both longer in users of CAM (P = 0.001. Most socio-demographic factors had no significant effect on the type of used CAM. However, Yoga was significantly more applied in those with higher degree of education (P = 0.002.Regarding the widespread use of CAM by Iranian patients with MS, further researches about the safety and efficacy of each treatment on the special outcomes is recommended.

  13. Utilization and perceived effectiveness of complementary and alternative medicine in patients with dystonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junker, Judith; Oberwittler, Christoph; Jackson, Didi; Berger, Klaus

    2004-02-01

    The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasing worldwide, especially by patients with chronic diseases. To date, no data are available about utilization and perceived effectiveness of CAM in patients with dystonia. A questionnaire survey on utilization and costs of CAM was completed by 180 members of the German Dystonia Society, a patient advocate group. In total, 131 dystonia patients (73%) were current or former users of CAM, 55 patients used CAM in addition to botulinum toxin A injections, and 86 patients had experience with three or more CAM methods. The options used most widely were acupuncture (56%), relaxation techniques (44%), homeopathy (27%), and massages (26%). Among users of specific CAM methods, breathing therapy, Feldenkrais, massages, and relaxation techniques were perceived as most effective. On average, patients spent 1,513 Euro on CAM without reimbursement. There was no correlation between costs and perceived effectiveness of different methods. In line with other studies on chronically ill patients, our results show that dystonia patients frequently utilize CAM methods, often in addition to conventional treatment. There is a growing need to evaluate scientifically the effect of CAM methods on symptom severity and quality of life in dystonia, to prevent utilization of costly and ineffective CAM treatments. PMID:14978670

  14. Pragmatic medicine in solid cancer: a translational alternative to precision medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Brábek J; Rosel D; Fernandes M

    2016-01-01

    Jan Brábek,1 Daniel Rosel,1 Michael Fernandes21Department of Cell Biology, Faculty of Science, Charles University in Prague, Prague 2, Czech Republic; 2Medbase, Chapel Hill, NC, USAAbstract: The precision medicine (PM) initiative is a response to the dismal outlook in solid cancer. Despite heterogeneity, common mechanistic denominators may exist across the spectrum of solid cancer. A shift from conventional research and development (R&D) toward PM will require conceptual and struct...

  15. 75 FR 12769 - National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Announcement of Workshop on Control...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-17

    .../ comparison groups. This workshop will be divided into six sessions that will feature presentations and discussions focusing on the selection of a particular control/comparison group(s) for a given research... Scientific Coordination and Outreach, National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine,...

  16. Effects of Complementary and Alternative Medicines (CAM) on the Metabolism and Transport of Anticancer Drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooiman, K.D.

    2013-01-01

    The use of complementary and alternative medicines (CAM), such as herbs and dietary supplements, has become more popular among cancer patients. Cancer patients use these supplements for different reasons such as reduction of side effects and improvement of their quality of life. In general, the use

  17. The role of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in Germany - a focus group study of GPs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joos, S.; Musselmann, B.; Miksch, A.; Rosemann, T.J.; Szecsenyi, J.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There has been a marked increase in the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in recent years worldwide. In Germany, apart from 'Heilpraktiker' (= state-licensed, non-medical CAM practitioners), some general practitioners (GPs) provide CAM in their practices. This paper aim

  18. Treatment of Alzheimer’s Disease in Iranian Traditional Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmadian-Attari, Mohammad Mahdi; Ahmadiani, Abolhassan; Kamalinejad, Mohammad; Dargahi, Leila; SHIRZAD, Meysam; Mosaddegh, Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    Background: Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease with a high prevalence in recent years. Dramatic growth in AD prevalence has increased the importance of more researches on AD treatment. History has shown that traditional medicine can be a source of inspiration to find new therapies. Objectives: This study tried to codify the recommendations of Iranian traditional medicine (ITM) by studying the main medical manuscripts. The second purpose was to compare these fi...

  19. Traditional Chinese medicine in treatment of opiate addiction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie SHI; Yan-li LIU; Yu-xia FANG; Guo-zhu XU; Hai-fen ZHAI; Lin LU

    2006-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) includes Chinese medicine and acupuncture. Chinese medicine consists of natural products including plants, animals and minerals. TCM has been practiced in China for more than 2000 years, and for the past 200 years has been used in treatment of drug addiction. Ten Chinese medicines for the treatment of opiate addiction have been approved by the Chinese State Food and Drug Administration (SFDA), and at least 6 are in clinical trials. The general therapeutic principle of Chinese medicine developed was based on its unique theory of "reinforcing healthy Qi and resolving and removing effects of toxicity". Acupuncture, another essential part of TCM, which was developed based on the principle that "functions of the human body are controlled by the 'Jing-Luo' and 'Qi-Xue' system", has been used not only in China, but also in Europe, the USA and other countries, for controlling opiate addiction. There are some advantages in using TCM for opiate detoxification, including less harmful side effects, high safety and ideal effects in the inhibition of protracted withdrawal symptoms and relapse. Co-administration of TCM with modern medicine shows some synergistic effects in detoxification. Many TCM for detoxification also have efficacy in the rehabilitation of abnormal body functions induced by chronic drug use, including improving immune function, increasing working memory and preventing neurological disorder. Given that TCM is effective in the prevention of relapse and causes fewer side effects, it may be used widely in the treatment of opiate addiction.

  20. Efficacy of Iranian Traditional Medicine in the Treatment of Epilepsy

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    Mehri Abdollahi Fard

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a brain disorder which affects about 50 million people worldwide. Ineffectiveness of the drugs in some cases and the serious side effects and chronic toxicity of the antiepileptic drugs lead to use of herbal medicine as a form of complementary and alternative medicine. In this review modern evidences for the efficacy of antiepileptic medicinal plants in Traditional Iranian Medicine (TIM will be discussed. For this purpose electronic databases including PubMed, Scopus, Sciencedirect, and Google Scholar were searched for each of the antiepileptic plants during 1970-February 2013.Anticonvulsant effect of some of the medicinal plants mentioned in TIM like Anacyclus pyrethrum, Pimpinella anisum, Nigella sativa, and Ferula gummosa was studied with different models of seizure. Also for some of these plants like Nigella sativa or Piper longum the active constituent responsible for antiepileptic effect was isolated and studied. For some of the herbal medicine used in TIM such as Pistacia lentiscus gum (Mastaki, Bryonia alba (Fashra, Ferula persica (Sakbinaj, Ecballium elaterium (Ghesa-al Hemar, and Alpinia officinarum (Kholanjan there is no or not enough studies to confirm their effectiveness in epilepsy. It is suggested that an evaluation of the effects of these plants on different epileptic models should be performed.

  1. Efficacy of Iranian traditional medicine in the treatment of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollahi Fard, Mehri; Shojaii, Asie

    2013-01-01

    Epilepsy is a brain disorder which affects about 50 million people worldwide. Ineffectiveness of the drugs in some cases and the serious side effects and chronic toxicity of the antiepileptic drugs lead to use of herbal medicine as a form of complementary and alternative medicine. In this review modern evidences for the efficacy of antiepileptic medicinal plants in Traditional Iranian Medicine (TIM) will be discussed. For this purpose electronic databases including PubMed, Scopus, Sciencedirect, and Google Scholar were searched for each of the antiepileptic plants during 1970-February 2013.Anticonvulsant effect of some of the medicinal plants mentioned in TIM like Anacyclus pyrethrum, Pimpinella anisum, Nigella sativa, and Ferula gummosa was studied with different models of seizure. Also for some of these plants like Nigella sativa or Piper longum the active constituent responsible for antiepileptic effect was isolated and studied. For some of the herbal medicine used in TIM such as Pistacia lentiscus gum (Mastaki), Bryonia alba (Fashra), Ferula persica (Sakbinaj), Ecballium elaterium (Ghesa-al Hemar), and Alpinia officinarum (Kholanjan) there is no or not enough studies to confirm their effectiveness in epilepsy. It is suggested that an evaluation of the effects of these plants on different epileptic models should be performed. PMID:23936834

  2. Pragmatic medicine in solid cancer: a translational alternative to precision medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brábek J

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Jan Brábek,1 Daniel Rosel,1 Michael Fernandes21Department of Cell Biology, Faculty of Science, Charles University in Prague, Prague 2, Czech Republic; 2Medbase, Chapel Hill, NC, USAAbstract: The precision medicine (PM initiative is a response to the dismal outlook in solid cancer. Despite heterogeneity, common mechanistic denominators may exist across the spectrum of solid cancer. A shift from conventional research and development (R&D toward PM will require conceptual and structural change. As individuals and as a society, we welcome innovation, but question change. We ask: In solid cancer, does PM identify and address the causes of prior failures, and, if so, are the proposed solutions feasible? And, when may we expect safer, more effective and affordable drugs in the clinic? Considerations that prompt a pragmatic rethink include a failure analysis of translational R&D in solid cancer suggesting that trials and regulations need to be aligned with the natural history of the disease. In successful therapeutic interventions in chronic, complex disease, surrogate markers and endpoints should be consistent with the Prentice’s criteria. In solid cancer, drug induced tumor shrinkage, is a drug effect and not a disease response; tumor shrinkage does not reflect nor predict interruption of the disease. Overall, we support a pragmatic, multidisciplinary, and collaborative R&D, and suggest that direction be set by clinical need and utility, and by questions, not answers. PM will prove worthwhile if it could improve clinical outcomes. The lag in therapeutics relative to diagnostics is a cause for confusion. Overdiagnosis adds to fear and harm, especially in the absence of effective interventions. A revised initiative that prioritizes metastasis research could replicate the successful HIV/AIDS model in solid cancer. A pragmatic approach may further translational efforts toward meaningfully effective, generally available, and affordable solutions

  3. Complementary and alternative medicine use among the cancer patients in Northern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cancer has emerged as a major public health problem. People often turn to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM when they have a long-lasting problem. CAM is a group of diverse medical and healthcare systems, practices, and products that are not generally considered part of conventional medicine. The present study was conducted to find prevalence rate of CAM use among cancer patients undergoing allopathic treatment in a health facility and to compare the CAM usage patterns among different subgroups of patients at different stages. Further to investigate some psychosocial, cultural, and demographiccorrelates/predictors of CAM use. Materials and Methods: Present hospital-based cross sectional study was conducted among cancer patients attending Radiotherapy Outpatient Department (OPD of a Government Medical College and Hospital (GMCH. A total of 1,117 cancer patients participated in the study. Statistical methods like normal test of proportions, Chi-square (c2 test, logistic regression analysis for estimation of risk factors of CAM use were applied to carry out the data analyses using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS-16 software package. Results: The most common CAM therapy in use was found to be ayurvedic treatment reported by 187 (16.7% patients. Overall CAM use was found to be 38.7%. Sixty percent of patients who were aware of CAM were not using CAM, only 40% aware were using CAM. Low socioeconomic status contributed maximum to proportions of CAM use; wherein out of all users, 175 (40.5% patients were using CAM. Maximum degree of relief was found due to homeopathic treatment (78.4%. Reasons of using CAM therapies reported by the users were mainly on the advice of family members or friends (23.1%. Conclusions: There is an urgent need of conducting further in-depth epidemiological studies to evaluate the efficacy of various CAM therapies in use for cancer. The high utilization of CAM among cancer patients and

  4. Multimodal management of dental pain with focus on alternative medicine: A novel herbal dental gel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumarswamy, A.

    2016-01-01

    Dental pain is the most common symptom associated with a wide array of dental problems and significantly impacts the oral health-related quality of life. The epidemiology and prevalence of oral diseases that could lead to dental pain are diverse and indicate regional variations. Several researchers have dwelled into the neurobiology and pathophysiology of dental pain making the pain pathways more clear and deciphering the precise targets for the management of pain. Although a number of pharmacological drugs are available in the market, a significant percentage of the population in India prefers alternative herbal medication for relief from dental pain due to the side effects and interactions of pharmacological treatment. However, there is a void in dental literature pertaining to the use, benefits, and safety of the herbal medicines. Therefore, the present assessment has been penned down, focusing on the current multimodal approaches for treating dental pain, the current unmet need, and the role of herbal medication in India for the management of dental pain, with a discussion on novel herbal dental gel. PMID:27307656

  5. Multimodal management of dental pain with focus on alternative medicine: A novel herbal dental gel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Kumarswamy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental pain is the most common symptom associated with a wide array of dental problems and significantly impacts the oral health-related quality of life. The epidemiology and prevalence of oral diseases that could lead to dental pain are diverse and indicate regional variations. Several researchers have dwelled into the neurobiology and pathophysiology of dental pain making the pain pathways more clear and deciphering the precise targets for the management of pain. Although a number of pharmacological drugs are available in the market, a significant percentage of the population in India prefers alternative herbal medication for relief from dental pain due to the side effects and interactions of pharmacological treatment. However, there is a void in dental literature pertaining to the use, benefits, and safety of the herbal medicines. Therefore, the present assessment has been penned down, focusing on the current multimodal approaches for treating dental pain, the current unmet need, and the role of herbal medication in India for the management of dental pain, with a discussion on novel herbal dental gel.

  6. Multimodal management of dental pain with focus on alternative medicine: A novel herbal dental gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumarswamy, A

    2016-01-01

    Dental pain is the most common symptom associated with a wide array of dental problems and significantly impacts the oral health-related quality of life. The epidemiology and prevalence of oral diseases that could lead to dental pain are diverse and indicate regional variations. Several researchers have dwelled into the neurobiology and pathophysiology of dental pain making the pain pathways more clear and deciphering the precise targets for the management of pain. Although a number of pharmacological drugs are available in the market, a significant percentage of the population in India prefers alternative herbal medication for relief from dental pain due to the side effects and interactions of pharmacological treatment. However, there is a void in dental literature pertaining to the use, benefits, and safety of the herbal medicines. Therefore, the present assessment has been penned down, focusing on the current multimodal approaches for treating dental pain, the current unmet need, and the role of herbal medication in India for the management of dental pain, with a discussion on novel herbal dental gel. PMID:27307656

  7. Risk of interactions between complementary and alternative medicine and medication for comorbidities in patients with melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loquai, Carmen; Dechent, Dagmar; Garzarolli, Marlene; Kaatz, Martin; Kaehler, Katharina C; Kurschat, Peter; Meiss, Frank; Stein, Annette; Nashan, Dorothee; Micke, Oliver; Muecke, Ralph; Muenstedt, Karsten; Stoll, Christoph; Schmidtmann, Irene; Huebner, Jutta

    2016-05-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is used widely among cancer patients. Beside the risk of interaction with cancer therapies, interactions with treatment for comorbidities are an underestimated problem. The aim of this study was to assess prevalence of interactions between CAM and drugs for comorbidities from a large CAM usage survey on melanoma patients and to classify herb-drug interactions with regard to their potential to harm. Consecutive melanoma outpatients of seven skin cancer centers were asked to complete a standardized CAM questionnaire including questions to their CAM use and their taken medication for comorbidities and cancer. Each combination of conventional drugs and complementary substances was evaluated for their potential of interaction. 1089 questionnaires were eligible for evaluation. From these, 61.6 % of patients reported taking drugs regularly from which 34.4 % used biological-based CAM methods. Risk evaluation for interaction was possible for 180 CAM users who listed the names or substances they took for comorbidities. From those patients, we found 37.2 % at risk of interaction of their co-consumption of conventional and complementary drugs. Almost all patients using Chinese herbs were at risk (88.6 %). With a high rate of CAM usage at risk of interactions between CAM drugs and drugs taken for comorbidities, implementation of a regular assessment of CAM usage and drugs for comorbidities is mandatory in cancer care. PMID:27090799

  8. Canine babesiosis treatment with three different medicines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torbica G.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Canine babesiosis is a relatively frequent disease in Croatia. Elevated body temperature, anemia and haemoglobinuria are the most common signs. Diagnosis is rapidly obtained by employing blood smears, as B. canis is present in the red blood cells of affected dogs. Treatment is favourable and without consequences. Blood work was performed initialy, prior to treatment, and on the 1st and the 7th day following treatment. Following history and examination of the dogs blood and urine samples were taken. After confirmation of B. canis in the red blood cells, alltogether 226 dogs were tretated. Out of them 80 were tretaed with Berenil® (diminazen aceturate, Hoechst, 72 were tretated with Imizol® (imidocarb dipropionate, Schering-Plough-Animal-Health and 74 with Oxopirvedin® (fenamidine dizetionate, Merial. Clinical findings, haematological analysis and urine analysis are given and statistically assesed. After tretment with Berenil®, symptoms of babesiosis regressed within 24 hours. Health improved more slowly in the group treated with Oxopirvedin® in comparioson with the group treated with Berenil®. Contrary to the above, Imizol® displayed the slowest regression of the disease and reinfestation with B. canis within 30 days was not noted. That is not the case if treatment was provided by Berenil® and Oxopirvedin®. In all 226 cases of canine babesiosis side effects were not noted, except topically inflammed tissue at the site of subcutaneous application.

  9. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Holistic Treatment of Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We believe a holistic approach to problems in childhood and adolescence will benefit the child, adolescent, and the whole family. As a rule, children have far less to say in the family than their parents. Therefore, it is the parents who set the agenda and decide how things are done at home and in relation to the child. Most often, it is also the parents who have a problem when the child is not thriving. The child thus acts as the thermometer of the family. When children are not feeling well or are sick, the parents are not doing well either. Most problems arising from dysfunctional patterns are almost impossible for the parents to solve on their own, but with help and support from the holistically oriented physician, we believe that many problems can be discovered and solved. Not only can health problems be addressed, but also problems of poor thriving in the family in general. With the physician in the role of a coach, the family can be provided with relevant exercises that will change the patterns of dysfunction. Consciousness-based medicine also seems to be efficient with children and adolescents, who are much more sensitive to the psychosocial dimensions than adults. Five needs seem to be essential for the thriving and health of the child: attention, respect, love, acceptance (touch, and acknowledgment. The physician should be able to see if the child lacks fulfillment in one or more of these needs, and he can then demonstrate to the parents how these needs should be handled. This should be followed by simple instructions and exercises for the parents in the spirit of coaching. This approach is especially relevant when the child is chronically ill.

  10. Alternative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Size Small Text Medium Text Large Text Contrast Dark on Light Light on Dark Donate Search Menu Donate What is Glaucoma? Care ... Low Vision Resources Medication Guide Resources on the Web » See All Articles Help the Cause Glaucoma affects ...

  11. Medicinal Plants: Their Use in Anticancer Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Greenwell, M.; Rahman, P.K.S.M.

    2015-01-01

    Globally cancer is a disease which severely effects the human population. There is a constant demand for new therapies to treat and prevent this life-threatening disease. Scientific and research interest is drawing its attention towards naturally-derived compounds as they are considered to have less toxic side effects compared to current treatments such as chemotherapy. The Plant Kingdom produces naturally occurring secondary metabolites which are being investigated for their anticancer activ...

  12. Innovative medicines for treatment of psoriatic arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Levitan A.l.; Reshetko O.V.

    2015-01-01

    The problem of effective treatment of psoriatic arthritis has not been solved yet. The search for new therapeutic options is very active in many directions. At the stage of clinical trials are drugs that block interleukin-17-a (secukinumab, ixekizumab, brodalumab), drugs that suppress interleukin-12 and interleukin-23 (ustekinumab). To modern means to ensure psoriatic arthritis include drugs that are inhibitors of small molecules orkinase pathways (apremilast, tofacitinib).

  13. Innovative medicines for treatment of psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levitan A.l.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The problem of effective treatment of psoriatic arthritis has not been solved yet. The search for new therapeutic options is very active in many directions. At the stage of clinical trials are drugs that block interleukin-17-a (secukinumab, ixekizumab, brodalumab, drugs that suppress interleukin-12 and interleukin-23 (ustekinumab. To modern means to ensure psoriatic arthritis include drugs that are inhibitors of small molecules orkinase pathways (apremilast, tofacitinib.

  14. How Do Parents Think about the Effect of Food and Alternative Medicine on their Epileptic Children?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alipasha Meysamie

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective:Parents of epileptic children are willing to know if specific foods precipitate or aggravate their kids seizures. Nonetheless conclusive data are limited. Alternative medicine has become a popular approach to many diseases in the world and there are limited data about this approach to epilepsy in Iran. We tried to evaluate attitude of parents of epileptic children to food-epilepsy relationship and alternative therapeutic approach to epilepsy. Methods:We carried out a cross-sectional study with analytic aspect at Childrens Medical Center, Tehran, Iran in 2008, by asking the parents of epileptic children to fill out a valid and excellently reliable questionnaire. We collected parents` attitude and analyzed it using SPSS software. Findings:One-hundred and fifty one families participated in the study. Fifty-nine of participants (39.1% believed that foods had no effect on epilepsy. Fifty one cases (33.8% said that foods might have negative or positive effect on epilepsy and 27.1% (41 cases had no idea. Higher percent of parents believed in food-epilepsy relation in cases that fathers had educational levels above high school graduation. Sixteen cases (10.6% said that alternative medicine might improve epilepsy and 55% had no idea about efficacy of this approach to epilepsy. Conclusion:Compared with previous published study from Iran, parents of epileptic children believed less in food-epilepsy relation. Majority of parents either believed that foods had no effect on epilepsy or had no idea. More than half of parents had no idea about efficacy of alternative medicine to epilepsy. Only a few of them believed in ameliorating effects of alternative medicine on epilepsy.

  15. Pragmatic medicine in solid cancer: a translational alternative to precision medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brábek, Jan; Rosel, Daniel; Fernandes, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The precision medicine (PM) initiative is a response to the dismal outlook in solid cancer. Despite heterogeneity, common mechanistic denominators may exist across the spectrum of solid cancer. A shift from conventional research and development (R&D) toward PM will require conceptual and structural change. As individuals and as a society, we welcome innovation, but question change. We ask: In solid cancer, does PM identify and address the causes of prior failures, and, if so, are the proposed solutions feasible? And, when may we expect safer, more effective and affordable drugs in the clinic? Considerations that prompt a pragmatic rethink include a failure analysis of translational R&D in solid cancer suggesting that trials and regulations need to be aligned with the natural history of the disease. In successful therapeutic interventions in chronic, complex disease, surrogate markers and endpoints should be consistent with the Prentice’s criteria. In solid cancer, drug induced tumor shrinkage, is a drug effect and not a disease response; tumor shrinkage does not reflect nor predict interruption of the disease. Overall, we support a pragmatic, multidisciplinary, and collaborative R&D, and suggest that direction be set by clinical need and utility, and by questions, not answers. PM will prove worthwhile if it could improve clinical outcomes. The lag in therapeutics relative to diagnostics is a cause for confusion. Overdiagnosis adds to fear and harm, especially in the absence of effective interventions. A revised initiative that prioritizes metastasis research could replicate the successful HIV/AIDS model in solid cancer. A pragmatic approach may further translational efforts toward meaningfully effective, generally available, and affordable solutions. PMID:27103822

  16. Pragmatic medicine in solid cancer: a translational alternative to precision medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brábek, Jan; Rosel, Daniel; Fernandes, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The precision medicine (PM) initiative is a response to the dismal outlook in solid cancer. Despite heterogeneity, common mechanistic denominators may exist across the spectrum of solid cancer. A shift from conventional research and development (R&D) toward PM will require conceptual and structural change. As individuals and as a society, we welcome innovation, but question change. We ask: In solid cancer, does PM identify and address the causes of prior failures, and, if so, are the proposed solutions feasible? And, when may we expect safer, more effective and affordable drugs in the clinic? Considerations that prompt a pragmatic rethink include a failure analysis of translational R&D in solid cancer suggesting that trials and regulations need to be aligned with the natural history of the disease. In successful therapeutic interventions in chronic, complex disease, surrogate markers and endpoints should be consistent with the Prentice's criteria. In solid cancer, drug induced tumor shrinkage, is a drug effect and not a disease response; tumor shrinkage does not reflect nor predict interruption of the disease. Overall, we support a pragmatic, multidisciplinary, and collaborative R&D, and suggest that direction be set by clinical need and utility, and by questions, not answers. PM will prove worthwhile if it could improve clinical outcomes. The lag in therapeutics relative to diagnostics is a cause for confusion. Overdiagnosis adds to fear and harm, especially in the absence of effective interventions. A revised initiative that prioritizes metastasis research could replicate the successful HIV/AIDS model in solid cancer. A pragmatic approach may further translational efforts toward meaningfully effective, generally available, and affordable solutions. PMID:27103822

  17. Patterns of complementary and alternative medicine use amongst outpatients in Tokyo, Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasconcelos Joana C

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM has been increasing rapidly throughout the world during the past decade. The use of CAM in the general Japanese population has been previously reported to be as high as 76%. This study aims to investigate the patterns of CAM use, perceived effectiveness and disclosure of CAM use to orthodox medical practitioners amongst patients attending typical primary and secondary care clinics in a busy district general hospital in Tokyo, Japan. Methods The authors analysed data collected during March 2002 on patients attending general outpatient clinics held at Shiseikai Daini Hospital in Tokyo, Japan. Data was collected by use of self-completed questionnaires distributed to patients in the outpatient clinics waiting area. Statistical analysis was performed using chi-square tests of independence. Results 515 adults were approached to participate in this study and the overall response rate was 96% (n = 496. 50% of the patients were using or have used at least 1 CAM therapy within the last 12 months. The 5 most commonly used therapies were massage (n = 106, 43%, vitamins (n = 85, 35%, health foods including dietary supplements (n = 56, 23%, acupressure (n = 51, 21% and kampo (n = 46, 19%. The majority of CAM users (75%, n = 145 found their CAM treatment to be effective (95% CI = 68–81%. Patients who were more likely to use CAM were females (p = 0.003 and those with a high number of medical conditions (p = Conclusion Patterns of CAM usage in the sample surveyed was high (50%. Despite this high prevalence rate and presumed acceptance of CAM in Japan, the reporting of CAM use by patients to their physicians was low (42%. It is therefore important that physicians are aware of the possibility that their patients may be using CAM and also increase their knowledge and understanding of these treatments.

  18. Complementary and alternative medicine use in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kompoliti, Katie; Fan, Wenqin; Leurgans, Sue

    2009-10-15

    The aim of this study was to describe the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in patients with Tourette syndrome (TS) and explore associations with CAM use. In recent years CAM use has increased, but rates of CAM use in TS patients are not reported. Consecutive TS patients or their parent(s), seen in an academic movement disorder center, completed a questionnaire regarding their use of CAM. One hundred TS patients or parents completed the questionnaire, mean age 21.5 +/- 13.5, 76 males, 87 Caucasians. Sixty four patients had used at least one CAM modality. CAM treatments used were prayer (28), vitamins (21), massage (19), dietary supplements (15), chiropractic manipulations (12), meditation (10), diet alterations (nine), yoga (nine), acupuncture (eight), hypnosis (seven), homeopathy (six), and EEG biofeedback (six). Fifty six percent of patients using CAM reported some improvement. Users paid out of pocket for 47% of treatments pursued, and 19% of these payers received partial reimbursement by third party payer. Users and non-users did not differ in age, gender, race, income, educational level, general health, tic severity, medication use for TS, current satisfaction from medications or experience of side effects from medications. CAM use was associated with the presence of affective disorder (P = 0.004), but not with either ADHD or OCD. Among CAM users, 80% initiated CAM without informing their doctor. CAM is commonly used in children and adults with TS, and often without the neurologist's knowledge. Physicians should inquire about CAM to understand the spectrum of interventions that patients with TS use. PMID:19705358

  19. Endometriosis: alternative methods of medical treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Hernando, Leticia; Muñoz-Gonzalez, Jose L; Marqueta-Marques, Laura; Alvarez-Conejo, Carmen; Tejerizo-García, Álvaro; Lopez-Gonzalez, Gregorio; Villegas-Muñoz, Emilia; Martin-Jimenez, Angel; Jiménez-López, Jesús S

    2015-01-01

    Endometriosis is an inflammatory estrogen-dependent disease defined by the presence of endometrial glands and stroma at extrauterine sites. The main purpose of endometriosis management is alleviating pain associated to the disease. This can be achieved surgically or medically, although in most women a combination of both treatments is required. Long-term medical treatment is usually needed in most women. Unfortunately, in most cases, pain symptoms recur between 6 months and 12 months once treatment is stopped. The authors conducted a literature search for English original articles, related to new medical treatments of endometriosis in humans, including articles published in PubMed, Medline, and the Cochrane Library. Keywords included “endometriosis” matched with “medical treatment”, “new treatment”, “GnRH antagonists”, “Aromatase inhibitors”, “selective progesterone receptor modulators”, “anti-TNF α”, and “anti-angiogenic factors”. Hormonal treatments currently available are effective in the relief of pain associated to endometriosis. Among new hormonal drugs, association to aromatase inhibitors could be effective in the treatment of women who do not respond to conventional therapies. GnRH antagonists are expected to be as effective as GnRH agonists, but with easier administration (oral). There is a need to find effective treatments that do not block the ovarian function. For this purpose, antiangiogenic factors could be important components of endometriosis therapy in the future. Upcoming researches and controlled clinical trials should focus on these drugs. PMID:26089705

  20. Generating Treatment Plan in Medicine: A Data Mining Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad M. Razali; Shahriyah Ali

    2009-01-01

    This study reports on a research effort on generating treatment plan to handle the error and complexity of treatment process for healthcare providers. Focus has been given for outpatient and was based on data collected from various health centers throughout Malaysia. These clinical data were recorded using SOAP (Subjective, Objective, Assessment and Plan) format approach as being practiced in medicine and were recorded electronically via Percuro Clinical Information System (Percuro). Cross-In...

  1. ALTERNATIVE DISINFECTION FOR DRINKING WATER TREATMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    During a one-yr study at Jefferson Parish, La., the chemical, microbiological, and mutagenic effects os using the major drinkgin water disinfectants (chlorine, chlorine dioxide, chloramine, ozone) were evaluated. Tests were performed on samples collected from various treatment s...

  2. Prospective investigation of complementary and alternative medicine use and subsequent hospitalizations

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan Margaret AK; Smith Besa; Smith Tyler C

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background The prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use has been estimated to be as high as 65% in some populations. However, there has been little objective research into the possible risks or benefits of unmanaged CAM therapies. Methods In this prospective study of active duty US Navy and Marine Corps personnel, the association between self-reported practitioner-assisted or self-administered CAM use and future hospitalization was investigated. Cox regression m...

  3. Health Literacy and Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use Among Underserved Inpatients in a Safety Net Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Gardiner, Paula; Mitchell, Suzanne; Amanda C. Filippelli; Sadikova, Ekaterina; White, Laura F.; Paasche-Orlow, Michael K; Jack, Brian W.

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the relationship between health literacy and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use in low-income racially diverse patients. The authors conducted a secondary analysis of baseline data from 581 participants enrolled in the Re-Engineered Discharge clinical trial. The authors assessed sociodemographic characteristics, CAM use, and health literacy. They used bivariate and multivariate logistic regression to test the association of health literacy with four pattern...

  4. Use of complementary and alternative medicine in a sample of women with breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Vidal, Mariana; Carvalho, Cláudia Maria Constante Ferreira de; Bispo, Regina

    2013-01-01

    Abstract This study aims to examine the usage of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) on a sample of Portuguese women with history of breast cancer. A total of 107 women with history of breast cancer attending Movimento Vencer e Viver Lisboa responded to a questionnaire designed to assess the use of CAM, as well as other variables, such as satisfaction with conventional care, health perception, perceived control over cancer, and health status (body mass index [BMI], smokin...

  5. Complementary and Alternative Medicines in Prostate Cancer: From Bench to Bedside?

    OpenAIRE

    Klempner, Samuel J.; Bubley, Glenn

    2012-01-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use is common among adults, and recent reports suggest that 25%–50% of prostate cancer (PCa) patients use at least one CAM modality. The most common CAM modalities used by PCa patients are vitamin and herbal preparations (e.g., common antioxidants, pomegranate extract, green tea, turmeric, resveratrol, silibinin, and herbal combination preparations) with purported antitumor effects despite only modest underlying preclinical or clinical evidence of ...

  6. Complementary and alternative medicine use in adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease and juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Nousiainen, Pauliina; Merras-Salmio, Laura; Aalto, Kristiina; Kolho, Kaija-Leena

    2014-01-01

    Background The use of complementary alternative medicine (CAM) is potentially prevalent among paediatric patients with chronic diseases but with variable rates among different age groups, diseases and countries. There are no recent reports on CAM use among paediatric patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) in Europe. We hypothesized that CAM use associates with a more severe disease in paediatric IBD and JIA. Methods A cross-sectional questionnai...

  7. Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Cancer Pain: An Overview of Systematic Reviews

    OpenAIRE

    Yanju Bao; Xiangying Kong; Liping Yang; Rui Liu; Zhan Shi; Weidong Li; Baojin Hua; Wei Hou

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objective. Now with more and more published systematic reviews of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) on adult cancer pain, it is necessary to use the methods of overview of systematic review to summarize available evidence, appraise the evidence level, and give suggestions to future research and practice. Methods. A comprehensive search (the Cochrane Library, PubMed, Embase, and ISI Web of Knowledge) was conducted to identify all systematic reviews or meta-analyses of...

  8. Patterns of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use in Children With Common Neurological Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Treat, Lauren; Liesinger, Juliette; Ziegenfuss, Jeanette Y; Humeniuk, Katherine; Prasad, Kavita; Tilburt, Jon C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Recent literature suggests that one in nine children in the United States uses some type of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Children with challenging neurological conditions such as headache, migraine, and seizures may seek CAM in their attempts at self-care. Our objective was to describe CAM use in children with these conditions. Methods: We compared use of CAM among children aged 3 to 17 years with and without common neurological conditions (headaches, migraines, s...

  9. Integrative Therapies for Low Back Pain That Include Complementary and Alternative Medicine Care: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Kizhakkeveettil, Anupama; Rose, Kevin; Kadar, Gena E.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design: Systematic review of the literature. Objective: To evaluate whether an integrated approach that includes different Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) therapies combined or CAM therapies combined with conventional medical care is more effective for the management of low back pain (LBP) than single modalities alone. Summary of Background Data: LBP is one of the leading causes of disability worldwide, yet its optimal management is still unresolved. Methods: The PRISMA Sta...

  10. Use of complementary and alternative medicine among asthmatic patients in primary care clinics in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Alshagga Mustafa; Al-Dubai Sami; Muhamad Faiq Siti; Yusuf Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to determine the knowledge about asthma and the prevalence, disclosure and evaluation of the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) among asthmatic patients. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 95 patients diagnosed with asthma in a primary healthcare centre in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia using a self-administered questionnaire. Results: Ninety-five patients with a mean age of 47.06 years (±12.8) participated, the majority were fem...

  11. Endometriosis: alternative methods of medical treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muñoz-Hernando L

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Leticia Muñoz-Hernando,1 Jose L Muñoz-Gonzalez,1 Laura Marqueta-Marques,1 Carmen Alvarez-Conejo,1 Álvaro Tejerizo-García,1 Gregorio Lopez-Gonzalez,1 Emilia Villegas-Muñoz,2 Angel Martin-Jimenez,3 Jesús S Jiménez-López1 1Endometriosis Unit, Service of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hospital Universitario 12 de Octubre, Madrid, Spain; 2Endometriosis Unit, Service of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hospital Carlos Haya, Malaga, Spain; 3Endometriosis Unit, Service of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hospital Son Llatzer, Palma de Mallorca, Spain Abstract: Endometriosis is an inflammatory estrogen-dependent disease defined by the presence of endometrial glands and stroma at extrauterine sites. The main purpose of endometriosis management is alleviating pain associated to the disease. This can be achieved surgically or medically, although in most women a combination of both treatments is required. Long-term medical treatment is usually needed in most women. Unfortunately, in most cases, pain symptoms recur between 6 months and 12 months once treatment is stopped. The authors conducted a literature search for English original articles, related to new medical treatments of endometriosis in humans, including articles published in PubMed, Medline, and the Cochrane Library. Keywords included “endometriosis” matched with “medical treatment”, “new treatment”, “GnRH antagonists”, “Aromatase inhibitors”, “selective progesterone receptor modulators”, “anti-TNF α”, and “antiangiogenic factors”. Hormonal treatments currently available are effective in the relief of pain associated to endometriosis. Among new hormonal drugs, association to aromatase inhibitors could be effective in the treatment of women who do not respond to conventional therapies. GnRh antagonists are expected to be as effective as GnRH agonists, but with easier administration (oral. There is a need to find effective treatments that do not block the ovarian function

  12. Medicinal Plants for the Treatment of Hypertrophic Scars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Ye

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertrophic scar is a complication of wound healing and has a high recurrence rate which can lead to significant abnormity in aesthetics and functions. To date, no ideal treatment method has been established. Meanwhile, the underlying mechanism of hypertrophic scarring has not been clearly defined. Although a large amount of scientific research has been reported on the use of medicinal plants as a natural source of treatment for hypertrophic scarring, it is currently scattered across a wide range of publications. Therefore, a systematic summary and knowledge for future prospects are necessary to facilitate further medicinal plant research for their potential use as antihypertrophic scar agents. A bibliographic investigation was accomplished by focusing on medicinal plants which have been scientifically tested in vitro and/or in vivo and proved as potential agents for the treatment of hypertrophic scars. Although the chemical components and mechanisms of action of medicinal plants with antihypertrophic scarring potential have been investigated, many others remain unknown. More investigations and clinical trials are necessary to make use of these medical plants reasonably and phytotherapy is a promising therapeutic approach against hypertrophic scars.

  13. Irradiation as an alternative post harvest treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This current world population has significantly added to the pressures placed upon our finite resources and our resulting ability to feed ourselves. In order to cope with current and future demands, the two established lines of action, that is, reduced population growth and expansion of agricultural production, must be supplemented with the parallel activity of reducing food losses during and after harvest. For developing countries in particular, enormous post-harvest losses result from spillage, contamination, pests and physiological deterioration during storage. Studies in these countries indicate that post-harvest losses are enormous and amount to tens of millions of tons per year valued at billions of dollars. Programs to reduce post-harvest losses, if applied properly, can result in realistic yield increases between 10 and 30%, which can be directly converted into increased consumption for humans. Post-harvest losses vary greatly and are a function of the crop variety, pest combinations in the environment, climate, the system of harvesting, storage, handling, marketing, and even the social and cultural environment. Pests are among the most criticals of these factors. Because of the disastrous potential consequences of such pests, quarantine regulations prohibit the entrance of plants or products which might hide the unwanted pest from countries where it is known to exist. Quarantine treatments are can be chemical, physical or ionizing radiation treatment. Numerous investigations on the use of ionizing radiation for the disinfestation of fresh plant materials indicate that rather low dosages will control fruit-fly problems, thus making it well suited for quarantine treatment. The effectiveness of the irradiation as a broad spectrum quarantine treatment of fresh fruits and vegetables was recognized by the several plant protection organizations around the world. Currently, some 40 countries have approved one or more irradiated food items or groups of food

  14. Irradiation as an alternative post harvest treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satin, M. [Agricultural Industries and Post-harvest Management Service, FAO, Rome (Italy); Loaharanu, P. [Head, Food Preservation Section, Joint FAO/ IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture, Wagramerstr. 5, A-1400, Vienna (Austria)

    1997-12-31

    This current world population has significantly added to the pressures placed upon our finite resources and our resulting ability to feed ourselves. In order to cope with current and future demands, the two established lines of action, that is, reduced population growth and expansion of agricultural production, must be supplemented with the parallel activity of reducing food losses during and after harvest. For developing countries in particular, enormous post-harvest losses result from spillage, contamination, pests and physiological deterioration during storage. Studies in these countries indicate that post-harvest losses are enormous and amount to tens of millions of tons per year valued at billions of dollars. Programs to reduce post-harvest losses, if applied properly, can result in realistic yield increases between 10 and 30%, which can be directly converted into increased consumption for humans. Post-harvest losses vary greatly and are a function of the crop variety, pest combinations in the environment, climate, the system of harvesting, storage, handling, marketing, and even the social and cultural environment. Pests are among the most criticals of these factors. Because of the disastrous potential consequences of such pests, quarantine regulations prohibit the entrance of plants or products which might hide the unwanted pest from countries where it is known to exist. Quarantine treatments are can be chemical, physical or ionizing radiation treatment. Numerous investigations on the use of ionizing radiation for the disinfestation of fresh plant materials indicate that rather low dosages will control fruit-fly problems, thus making it well suited for quarantine treatment. The effectiveness of the irradiation as a broad spectrum quarantine treatment of fresh fruits and vegetables was recognized by the several plant protection organizations around the world. Currently, some 40 countries have approved one or more irradiated food items or groups of food

  15. Is complementary and alternative medicine effective in job satisfaction among dentists with musculoskeletal disorders? A cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devanand Gupta

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Musculoskeletal disorders have serious impact on the profession of dentistry. There is common occurrence of pain due to incorrect posture in dental professionals. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM therapies may cast a new light on preventing and intercepting musculoskeletal disorders (MSD. An epidemiological study was conducted in an effort to contribute to the prevention of musculoskeletal disorders in dentistry. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of MSD at dentists using CAM as a treatment and preventive modality for MSD and to compare job/career satisfaction between dentists who use CAM and conventional therapy (CT. Material and Methods: Dentists registered in Uttrakhand state, India, under the Dental Council of India and registered members of the Indian Dental Association, Uttrakhand branch (N = 1496 were surveyed. Statistical analysis was conducted using SPSS 17. Results: A response rate of 84% (N = 1257 was obtained, revealing that 90% (N = 1131 had the problem of MSD. Seventy three percentage (N = 826 of dentists with MSD reported the use of CAM and CT. Complementary and alternative medicine users reported greater overall health (72.7% vs. 51%, p < 0.001, job satisfaction (61.2% vs. 35%, p < 0.001 and work efficiency compared to CT users. Conclusions: Complementary and alternative medicine therapies may improve quality of life, reduce work interruption and enhance job satisfaction for dentists who suffers from MSD. Through the course of their studies, dentists should be equipped with knowledge on ergonomics and CAM therapies, such as yoga and others, to help them prevent musculoskeletal disorders more effectively. Med Pr 2014;65(3:317–323

  16. Alternatives to litigation for health care conflicts and claims: alternative dispute resolution in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauer, Edward A

    2002-12-01

    Health care has undergone radical changes, and it may be predicted that further changes are in the offing as the burdens and the benefits of the newer configurations become known. Change in any system stresses it, creating opportunities for conflict as people and organizations adjust to new realities and encounter changed expectations. The opportunities for conflict in health care (and legal conflict with it), therefore, have been and will continue to be a measurable part of health care's daily life. Many of these conflicts can be managed through one or another of the several forms of ADR. Some ADR procedures are most productive when used as alternatives to impending litigation. Others may be employed when litigation is not likely but when the persistence of conflict, such as that within a newly structured provider organization, would otherwise take its toll on the productivity of the organization and those who work within it. The challenge in using ADR for any of these problems is similar to what physicians understand as differential diagnosis. A good therapy applied to the wrong case yields a bad result. The world of ADR has matured to the point at which the salient features of both cases and procedures are well-enough understood to allow for low-risk and high-benefit applications. This is particularly true for disputes involving allegations of medical error, where the indicators of efficacy are very positive and the risks to safety are comfortably low. Mediation in particular, but mediation of the interest-based style rather than the settlement conference style, deserves fuller consideration and broader use. PMID:12512175

  17. Nitromedicine: translating alternative medicine to evidence based medicine and redefining disease (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halasa, Salaheldin; Arany, Praveen; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2016-03-01

    Nitromedicine is a new medical treatment paradigm, focused on increasing nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability and modulating redox-signaling pathways combined with phototherapy, electrotherapy and stem cell therapy. It has been known since the discovery of the biological role of NO in the 1980s, that supplying NO donors such can have many beneficial effects in different conditions by stimulating stem cells and modulating the immune response, but there also exists a substantial risk of side-effects with long-term use. Excess NO can inhibit mitochondrial metabolism by binding to cytochrome c oxidase (CCO) and can also produce reactive nitrogen species (Peroxynitrite) by interacting with reactive oxygen species (ROS). To avoid these potential damaging side-effects we propose to combine the use of NO donors with three additional components. Firstly we believe that addition of antioxidants such as hydrogen sulfide donors, polyphenols and vitamins can neutralize ROS and RNS. Secondly we believe that application of appropriate wavelengths and dosages of light (blue, red or near infrared depending on the exact condition being treated) will dissociate NO from CCO (and other storage sites) thus restoring mitochondrial ATP production and stimulating healing in many situations. Thirdly delivering electrons to the body might help to saturate the free radicals with electrons, eliminate underlying oxidative stress, stabilize mitochondria, prevent further formation of pathological free radicals and increase the nitric oxide bioavailability. This combination therapy may be applied to treat a large variety of oxidative stressed related diseases such as degenerative diseases, immunological diseases, chronic infectious diseases, cancers and a broad range of unmet medical needs involving chronic inflammation with an emphasis on pain management.

  18. [Alternative endourologic methods for treatment of urethral stricture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niesel, T; Moore, R G; Hofmann, R; Kavoussi, L R

    1998-01-01

    Advances in endoscopic instrumentation and techniques offer new alternatives for safe and effective treatment of urethral strictures. Visual internal urethrotomy, the standard treatment modality, is associated with new scar formation with stricture recurrence. This experience has led to the investigation of alternative techniques which would avoid or ameliorate this result. This article reviews the current literature and discusses these newer approaches, including balloon dilatation, laser urethrotomy, endoscopic urethroplasty, "cut to the light" and "core through" procedures, and urethral wallstent implantation. PMID:9540185

  19. Complementary and alternative medicines and childhood eczema: a US population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverberg, Jonathan I; Lee-Wong, Mary; Silverberg, Nanette B

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use in US children with eczema is unknown. Furthermore, it is unknown whether CAM use in the United States is associated with higher eczema prevalence. We sought to determine the eczema prevalence in association with CAM usage. We analyzed data from the 2007 National Health Interview Survey that included a nationally representative sample of 9417 children ages 0 to 17 years. Overall, 46.9% (95% confidence interval, 45.6%-48.2%) of children in the United States used 1 or more CAM, of which 0.99% (0.28%-1.71%) used CAM specifically to treat their eczema, including herbal therapy (0.46%), vitamins (0.33%), Ayurveda (0.28%), naturopathy (0.24%), homeopathy (0.20%), and traditional healing (0.12%). Several CAMs used for other purposes were associated with increased eczema prevalence, including herbal therapy (survey logistic regression; adjusted odds ratio [95% confidence interval], 2.07 [1.40-3.06]), vitamins (1.45 [1.21-1.74]), homeopathic therapy (2.94 [1.43-6.00]), movement techniques (3.66 [1.62-8.30]), and diet (2.24 [1.10-4.58]), particularly vegan diet (2.53 [1.17-5.51]). In conclusion, multiple CAMs are commonly used for the treatment of eczema in US children. However, some CAMs may actually be harmful to the skin and be associated with higher eczema prevalence in the United States. PMID:25207686

  20. Patient-Physician Communication About Complementary and Alternative Medicine in a Radiation Oncology Setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Despite the extensive use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) among cancer patients, patient-physician communication regarding CAM therapies remains limited. This study quantified the extent of patient-physician communication about CAM and identified factors associated with its discussion in radiation therapy (RT) settings. Methods and Materials: We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 305 RT patients at an urban academic cancer center. Patients with different cancer types were recruited in their last week of RT. Participants self-reported their demographic characteristics, health status, CAM use, patient-physician communication regarding CAM, and rationale for/against discussing CAM therapies with physicians. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify relationships between demographic/clinical variables and patients’ discussion of CAM with radiation oncologists. Results: Among the 305 participants, 133 (43.6%) reported using CAM, and only 37 (12.1%) reported discussing CAM therapies with their radiation oncologists. In multivariate analyses, female patients (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.45, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.21-0.98) and patients with full-time employment (AOR 0.32, 95% CI 0.12-0.81) were less likely to discuss CAM with their radiation oncologists. CAM users (AOR 4.28, 95% CI 1.93-9.53) were more likely to discuss CAM with their radiation oncologists than were non-CAM users. Conclusions: Despite the common use of CAM among oncology patients, discussions regarding these treatments occur rarely in the RT setting, particularly among female and full-time employed patients. Clinicians and patients should incorporate discussions of CAM to guide its appropriate use and to maximize possible benefit while minimizing potential harm.

  1. Scientific basis of botanical medicine as alternative remedies for rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cindy L H; Or, Terry C T; Ho, Marco H K; Lau, Allan S Y

    2013-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic, systemic autoimmune inflammatory disorder that causes permanent disability and mortality to approximately 1 to 100 people in the world. Patients with RA not only suffer from pain, stiffness, swelling, and loss of function in their joints, but also have a higher risk of cardiovascular disease and lymphoma. Typically prescribed medications, including pain-relieving drugs, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID), and disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, can help to relieve pain, reduce inflammation and slow the course of disease progression in RA patients. However, the general effectiveness of the drugs has been far from satisfactory. Other therapeutic modalities like TNF-alpha (TNF-α) inhibitors and interleukin-1 receptor antagonists targeting precise pathways within the immune system are expensive and may be associated with serious side effects. Recently, botanical medicines have become popular as alternative remedies as they are believed to be efficacious, safe and have over a thousand years experience in treating patients. In this review, we will summarize recent evidence for pharmacological effects of herbs including Black cohosh, Angelica sinensis, Licorice, Tripterygium wilfordii, Centella asiatica, and Urtica dioica. Scientific research has demonstrated that these herbs have strong anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic effects. A wide range of phytochemicals including phenolic acids, phenylpropanoid ester, triterpene glycosides, phthalide, flavonoids, triterpenoid saponin, diterpene and triterpene have been isolated and demonstrated to be responsible for the biological effects of the herbs. Understanding the mechanisms of action of the herbs may provide new treatment opportunities for RA patients. PMID:22700248

  2. The use of complementary and alternative medicine by women experiencing menopausal symptoms in Bologna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lombardo Flavia

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present study describes Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM use amongst Italian women transitioning through menopause. Popularity and perceived effectiveness of CAM treatments, use of pharmaceutical medications, characteristics of CAM users, the extent of communication between medical practitioners and women about their use of CAM, and variables associated with CAM use were also investigated. Methods Women, aged 45-65 years attending Family Planning and Women's Health clinics or Menopause Centres in Bologna were invited to complete a voluntary, anonymous, self administered questionnaire, which was used in a previous study in Sydney. The questionnaire was translated and adapted for use amongst Italian women. Data on general demographic and health characteristics, menopause related symptoms and the use of CAM and pharmaceutical treatments during the previous 12 months were collected. Results In total, 1,203 women completed the survey, of which 1,106 were included in the final sample. Of women who had symptoms linked with menopause and/or used remedies to alleviate symptoms, 33.5% reported to have used CAM. Among these, 23.5% had consulted one or more practitioners and 24% had used at least one CAM product. Approximately nine out of ten respondents reported medical practitioners did not seek information about their use of CAM; while one third of CAM users did not disclose the use of CAM to their physician. Nevertheless, medical practitioners were the most popular source of information. From the multivariate analysis, variables associated with CAM use were: professional employment, time since the last natural menses, use of CAM for conditions other than menopause, and presence of some severe symptoms. Conclusions The relatively high prevalence of CAM use by women transitioning through menopause should encourage research initiatives into determining which CAM treatments are the safest and effective. The increasing and

  3. Medicinal plants for the treatment of “nervios”, anxiety, and depression in Mexican Traditional Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Laura Guzmán Gutiérrez

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The term “nervios” is referred as a folk illness recognized by Mexican Traditional Medicine, and also widely reported across many countries in Latin America. “Nervios” are characterized by a “state of bodily and mental unrest”, which decreases the ability to achieve daily goals. The causes are varied; in fact, any situation that alters the emotional state or mood is interpreted as a possible triggering agent. Depression and anxiety are psychiatric disorders, which share symptoms, or can be included in the same group of disorders with “nervios”. The therapies are designed to reassure health, i.e. “calm the nerves”. For this propose, the oral administration of plants infusions is common. In this review we compile information regarding the plants used for the treatment of “nervios” in México, along with those for which reports of anxiolytic or/and antidepressive activity exist. We found 92 plant species used in folk medicine for the treatment of “nervios”, among these, sixteen have been studied experimentally. The most studied plant is Galphimia glauca Cav., Malpighiaceae, which current clinical studies have validated its efficacy in patients, and their active components, the triterpenes galphimine A, B, and C, identified. Interestingly only nine plants were found to be reported in folk medicine for the treatment of sadness or/and depression, but their antidepressant activity has not been investigated. However, among the plants used in folk medicine for treatment of “nervios”, several, as Litsea glaucescens Kunth, Lauraceae, have been proven to show antidepressant activity in experimental models, and some of their active compounds have been determined. These species could be a potential source of compounds with activity in the central nervous system.

  4. An unusual case of refractory metabolic acidosis after homeopathic medicinal treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer Saraf

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Homeopathy is one of the most frequently used and controversial systems of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM. It is based on the ′principle of similars′, whereby highly diluted preparations of substances that cause symptoms in healthy individuals are used to stimulate healing in patients who have similar symptoms when ill 1. General trends show a rise in the number of individuals utilising naturopathic and homeopathic therapeutic methods 2. The patients who seek homeopathic treatment are primarily those suffering from long-standing, chronic disease 1. Certainly, the CAM can show clinical benefits. However, some of these also involve a considerable risk of sometimes severe side-effects. We here are reporting an unusual case of refractory metabolic acidosis after homeopathic medicinal treatment.

  5. [Complementary medicine in cancer patients under treatment in Marrakech, Morocco: a prospective study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazi, I; Nafil, H; Mahmal, L; Harif, M; Khouchani, M; Saadi, Z; Belbaraka, R; Elomrani, A; Tahri, A

    2013-10-01

    Use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is very frequent in cancer patients. The aims of this study were to analyze the frequency, the reasons of use of CAM in patients with a cancer treated in a Moroccan oncology department. We included in this study 400 patients. An anonymous questionnaire was proposed to patients during treatment. Over 384 analyzable questionnaires, 71% of patients were using CAM. The most frequent method was religious therapy (60%). The second one was herbal medicine (36%). The main reason for using CAM was reducing psychic pain in 53%, and boosting the immune system in 32%. Adverse effects were reported in 2% of cases. Only 5% of patients discussed CAM with their doctors. The cost of CAM was less than 100 Euros in 88% of cases. To optimize the patient-physician relationship and to avoid a propensity to unproved treatments, accurate and adequate communication is necessary. PMID:24057644

  6. Cytotoxic activity of Thai medicinal plants for cancer treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Chawaboon Dechsukum; Pranee Ratanasuwan; Niwat Keawpradub; Chatchai Wattanapiromsakul; Arunporn Itharat; Athima Saetung

    2005-01-01

    Twelve Thai medicinal plants as the ingredients of a Southern Thai traditional formula for cancer treatment were selected to test cytotoxicity activity against two types of human cancer cell lines ; large cell lung carcinoma (CORL-23) and prostate cancer cell lines (PC3) and one type of normal human cell line, fibroblast cells (10FS). SRB assay was used to test cytotoxic activity against all the cell types. Two of the extracts (water and ethanolic extracts) procedures used were similar to tho...

  7. Recent Research Trends in Korean Medicine Treatment of Diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Jung Han-sung; Yu Jung-suk; Song Beom-yong

    2008-01-01

    Objective : The purpose of this study was to analyze the directions of Korean Medicine treatment of diabetes mellitus. Methods : We reviewed the 52 studies about diabetes mellitus which had been published from 2000 to 2007. We selected those studies from the search engine of the web site of five journals. Those were the Journal of Korean Oriental Medical Society, Korean Journal of Oriental Physiology & Pathology, the Journal of Korean Acupuncture & Moxibustion Society, Korean Journal of...

  8. An Alternative Methodological Approach for Cost-Effectiveness Analysis and Decision Making in Genomic Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragoulakis, Vasilios; Mitropoulou, Christina; van Schaik, Ron H; Maniadakis, Nikolaos; Patrinos, George P

    2016-05-01

    Genomic Medicine aims to improve therapeutic interventions and diagnostics, the quality of life of patients, but also to rationalize healthcare costs. To reach this goal, careful assessment and identification of evidence gaps for public health genomics priorities are required so that a more efficient healthcare environment is created. Here, we propose a public health genomics-driven approach to adjust the classical healthcare decision making process with an alternative methodological approach of cost-effectiveness analysis, which is particularly helpful for genomic medicine interventions. By combining classical cost-effectiveness analysis with budget constraints, social preferences, and patient ethics, we demonstrate the application of this model, the Genome Economics Model (GEM), based on a previously reported genome-guided intervention from a developing country environment. The model and the attendant rationale provide a practical guide by which all major healthcare stakeholders could ensure the sustainability of funding for genome-guided interventions, their adoption and coverage by health insurance funds, and prioritization of Genomic Medicine research, development, and innovation, given the restriction of budgets, particularly in developing countries and low-income healthcare settings in developed countries. The implications of the GEM for the policy makers interested in Genomic Medicine and new health technology and innovation assessment are also discussed. PMID:27096406

  9. Tazarotene as alternative topical treatment for onychomycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campione E

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Elena Campione,1 Evelin Jasmine Paternò,2 Gaetana Costanza,2,3 Laura Diluvio,1 Isabella Carboni,1 Daniele Marino,4 Cartesio Favalli,4 Sergio Chimenti,1 Luca Bianchi,1 Augusto Orlandi2,3 1Department of Dermatology, 2Department of Biomedicine and Prevention, 3Department of Anatomic Pathology, Policlinic Tor Vergata, 4Department of Microbiology, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy Background: Distal and lateral onychomycoses are the most frequent forms of onychomycosis, causing subungual hyperkeratosis that usually limits local penetration of antimycotic drugs. Tazarotene exerts anti-inflammatory and immune-modulating activities toward both infective agents and damaged keratinocytes. Given the well-documented efficacy of tazarotene on hyperkeratotic nail psoriasis, we investigated its therapeutic use in onychomycosis. Patients and methods: We designed a preliminary open clinical trial in patients affected by distal and lateral subungual onychomycosis of the toenails and verified the fungistatic activity of tazarotene in vitro. Fifteen patients were treated with topical tazarotene 0.1% gel once per day for 12 weeks. Mycological cultures and potassium hydroxide stains of nail samples were performed at the beginning and at the end of the study. Treatment was considered effective when clinical healing and negative mycological culture were obtained. Onycholysis, nail bed discoloration, and subungual hyperkeratosis were measured using standardized methodologies and analyzed by means of Mann–Whitney test and analysis of variance. Fungistatic activity of tazarotene was evaluated by disk diffusion assay. Results: Six patients (40% reached a mycological cure on target nail samples already after 4 weeks of treatment. Complete clinical healing and negative cultures were reached in all patients at week 12, with a significant improvement of all clinical parameters of the infected nails. Disk diffusion assay after 48 hours of incubation with

  10. Narrative medicine and the personalisation of treatment for elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cenci, C

    2016-07-01

    Healthcare organisations, medical knowledge and clinical practice are among the contexts that have most strongly felt the impact of the over 75 population. This is a population of multimorbidity and polypharmacy patients. They are often seen as a conglomeration of juxtaposed guidelines resulting in the intake of more than 10 drugs a day, with absolutely no certainty of their efficacy. The scientific community is increasingly calling into question the current disease-focused approach. Narrative medicine can provide the tools for a treatment plan which is instead more patient-centred. Narrative medicine can promote the development of a systemic, integrated and multi-disciplinary approach to elderly patients. The stories of patients and caregivers, their representations, perceptions, experiences and preferences can reduce the risk of inappropriate tests and treatments. They can promote deprescribing procedures based on a careful analysis of a specific patient's needs. Narration time is treatment time which does not necessarily create a burden on organisations and caregivers. Quite the contrary since by facilitating adherence and team work, it can significantly reduce time and costs. Given their training and the importance of their relationship with elderly patients, internists, together with geriatricians, can play a key role in promoting and coordinating a narrative medicine approach. PMID:27210901

  11. Alternative Methods for Treatment of TRISO Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current treatment technologies of spent TRISO fuel have been review. The proposed innovative technologies such as thermal shock breaching and EMS-CC processes were found to be promising. A schematic flow sheet has been constructed by using thermal shock, EMS-CC process and separation of breached fines. The heating and fracture behavior of SiC powder by RF heating was investigated. Hoop stress was calculated for breaching of coating layers by inter fission gas pressure at elevated temperature. Electrolytic molten salt cell was installed in glove box and preliminary test was performed. EMS-CC reaction was realized by using glassy carbon and CVD SiC. The morphology of the sample was observed after EMS-CC test. Cyclic voltammogram was constructed by using SiC in order to check the effect of magnesium as a reductant. Investigation of fracture behavior of TRISO coating layers by using thermal shock : 1500 .deg. C of temperature gradient was applied. Macro, microstructure and crystal structure were investigated by using XRD and SEM. Vicker hardness was measured before and after experiment. Innovative gas-solid reaction method beside RF heating and EMS-CC was proposed. This process was also evaluated as a promising to decrease secondary waste. Construction of cyclone separator and optimization : ZrO2(kernel), SiC and graphite powders as surrogate of TRISO were used for the process optimization of fluidization separator equipped with cyclone. The optimum condition was found to be 1.5cm/s of fluidization velocity and 99.9% of separation efficiency was achieved. Literature survey of FP recovery : Recovery technologies of fission products such as I, Kr/Xe, 14C and tritium which are released during the breaching process were surveyed, and its flow sheet was constructed

  12. Women's attitudes towards the use of complementary and alternative medicine products during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frawley, J; Sibbritt, D; Broom, A; Gallois, C; Steel, A; Adams, J

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse women's attitudes towards the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) products during pregnancy. The study sample was obtained via the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health or ALSWH. A response rate of 79.2% (n = 1,835) was attained. Women who use herbal medicines (34.5%, n = 588) view CAM as a preventative measure, are looking for something holistic and are concerned about evidence of clinical efficacy when considering the use of these products during pregnancy. Women who use aromatherapy (17.4%, n = 319) and homoeopathy (13.3%, n = 244) want more personal control over their body and are concerned more about their own personal experience of the efficacy of CAM than clinical evidence of efficacy. As CAM use in pregnancy appears to be increasingly commonplace, insights into women's attitudes towards CAM are valuable for maternity healthcare providers. PMID:26472482

  13. Alternative methods of conservative treatment of idiopathic scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarzycka, Maja; Rozek, Karina; Zarzycki, Michał

    2009-01-01

    Scoliosis is a deformity of the spine known since Hippocrates times. The value of certain methods of conservative treatment remains controversial. Some of them have only a psychological value both for the physician and his or her caregivers. Based on current literature and the Scoliosis Research Society Report of Alternative Methods of Treatment of Idiopathic Scoliosis, we describe the effectiveness of various alternative methods, such as exercise, Dobosiewicz technique, Karski method, SEAS 02, acupuncture, Alexander technique, aromatherapy, ayurveda, ASCO treatment, biofeedback, chiropractic, Yoga, Feldenkrais method, Pilates method, massage therapy, rolfing, magnet therapy, surface electrical stimulation, PNF, Copes system, and bracing. PMID:19920282

  14. A systematic review of complementary and alternative medicine interventions for the management of cancer-related fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnegan-John, Jennifer; Molassiotis, Alex; Richardson, Alison; Ream, Emma

    2013-07-01

    Fatigue, experienced by patients during and following cancer treatment, is a significant clinical problem. It is a prevalent and distressing symptom yet pharmacological interventions are used little and confer limited benefit for patients. However, many cancer patients use some form of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), and some evidence suggests it may relieve fatigue. A systematic review was conducted to appraise the effectiveness of CAM interventions in ameliorating cancer-related fatigue. Systematic searches of biomedical, nursing, and specialist CAM databases were conducted, including Medline, Embase, and AMED. Included papers described interventions classified as CAM by the National Centre of Complementary and Alternative Medicine and evaluated through randomized controlled trial (RCT) or quasi-experimental design. Twenty studies were eligible for the review, of which 15 were RCTs. Forms of CAM interventions examined included acupuncture, massage, yoga, and relaxation training. The review identified some limited evidence suggesting hypnosis and ginseng may prevent rises in cancer-related fatigue in people undergoing treatment for cancer and acupuncture and that biofield healing may reduce cancer-related fatigue following cancer treatments. Evidence to date suggests that multivitamins are ineffective at reducing cancer-related fatigue. However, trials incorporated within the review varied greatly in quality; most were methodologically weak and at high risk of bias. Consequently, there is currently insufficient evidence to conclude with certainty the effectiveness or otherwise of CAM in reducing cancer-related fatigue. The design and methods employed in future trials of CAM should be more rigorous; increasing the strength of evidence should be a priority. PMID:23632236

  15. Attitudes and Practices of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Among Adolescents in Saudi Arabia

    OpenAIRE

    Musaiger, Abdulrahman O.; Nada A Abahussain

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the attitudes and use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) among Saudi Arabian adolescents. A multistage stratified sampling method was used to select 736 adolescents (358 males, 378 females) aged 15–19 years from secondary schools. The study was carried out in Al-Khobar city, Eastern region of Saudi Arabia. The findings revealed that the use of CAM by adolescents in their lifetime ranged from 1.6% for acupuncture to 58.6% for honey treatmen...

  16. Treatment of Alzheimer’s Disease in Iranian Traditional Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadian-Attari, Mohammad Mahdi; Ahmadiani, Abolhassan; Kamalinejad, Mohammad; Dargahi, Leila; Shirzad, Meysam; Mosaddegh, Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    Background: Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease with a high prevalence in recent years. Dramatic growth in AD prevalence has increased the importance of more researches on AD treatment. History has shown that traditional medicine can be a source of inspiration to find new therapies. Objectives: This study tried to codify the recommendations of Iranian traditional medicine (ITM) by studying the main medical manuscripts. The second purpose was to compare these findings with new medical information. Materials and Methods: Cardinal traditional medical and pharmacological texts from 10th to 18th century were searched for traditional terms of dementia (Nesyan, Fisad-uz-Zekr, Faramooshkari) focused on treatment methods. The findings were classified into three groups: lifestyle recommendations, dietary approaches, and drug therapies. These findings were compared with new medical findings. Results: ITM has dietary recommendations for dementia such as increasing consumption of nuts, poultry and eggs, milk, and grape products (like raisin and currant). These compounds are full of unsaturated fatty acids, cholesterol, and polyphenolic compounds. New findings suggest that these substances can help in prevention and treatment of AD. ITM has some lifestyle considerations like increasing physical and mental activities, listening to music, attending musical feasts, and smelling specific perfumes. New medical findings confirm nearly all of these recommendations. Along with the aforementioned items, treatment with natural medicines is in the first line of traditional treatment of dementia. New investigations show that many of these herbs have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory factors and acetylcholine esterase inhibitory effects. A few of them also have N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) blocking activity. When these herbs are put together in traditional formulations, they can comprehensively fight against the disease. Conclusions: More ethnopharmacological

  17. Critical thinking in Norwegian upper secondary biology education: The cases of complementary-alternative-medicine and health claims in the media

    OpenAIRE

    Sverre Pettersen

    2005-01-01

    By definition, complementary alternative medicine (CAM) treatments are not scientifically proven. Scientific deficient health claiming news seems to flourish in the media. The aims of this questionnaire study was to explore: (1) attitudes towards CAM among 3rd year students of the health sciences in Norway, who either have immersed themselves in the 2nd and 3rd year upper secondary biology courses, or taken the 1st year compulsory natural science course, exclusively, and (2) these students’ s...

  18. Treatment of anxiety and depression: medicinal plants in retrospect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajemiroye, James O; da Silva, Dayane M; de Oliveira, Danillo R; Costa, Elson A

    2016-06-01

    Anxiety and depression are complex heterogeneous psychiatric disorders and leading causes of disability worldwide. This review summarizes reports on the fundamentals, prevalence, diagnosis, neurobiology, advancement in treatment of these diseases and preclinical assessment of botanicals. This review was conducted through bibliographic investigation of scientific journals, books, electronic sources, unpublished theses and electronic medium such as ScienceDirect and PubMed. A number of the first-line drugs (benzodiazepine, azapirone, antidepressant tricyclics, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, serotonin selective reuptake inhibitors, noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors, serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors, etc.) for the treatment of these psychiatric disorders are products of serendipitous discoveries. Inspite of the numerous classes of drugs that are available for the treatment of anxiety and depression, full remission has remained elusive. The emerging clinical cases have shown increasing interests among health practitioners and patients in phytomedicine. The development of anxiolytic and antidepressant drugs of plant origin takes advantage of multidisciplinary approach including but not limited to ethnopharmacological survey (careful investigation of folkloric application of medicinal plant), phytochemical and pharmacological studies. The selection of a suitable plant for a pharmacological study is a basic and very important step. Relevant clues to achieving this step include traditional use, chemical composition, toxicity, randomized selection or a combination of several criteria. Medicinal plants have been and continue to be a rich source of biomolecule with therapeutic values for the treatment of anxiety and depression. PMID:26851117

  19. Complementary and Alternative Medicine in the Context of Earlier Diagnoses of Alzheimer's Disease: Opening the Conversation to Prepare Ethical Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racine, Eric; Forlini, Cynthia; Aspler, John; Chandler, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Preclinical Alzheimer's disease (AD), a newly proposed, actively researched, and hotly debated research-only diagnostic category, raises the prospect of an ethical dilemma: whether, and possibly how, to treat a disorder with no target symptoms. This proposed category rests on the detection of a number of biomarkers thought to provide evidence of AD pathophysiology years before any behavioral symptoms manifest. Faced with limited treatment options, patients and their relatives may come to consider complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) a viable option, albeit one with minimal supporting evidence. Accordingly, the hopes and needs of some preclinical patients and their relatives could further fuel market-oriented entrepreneurship for CAM. In this ethics review, we provide background and reflect on some ethical questions related to the roles of key stakeholders arising from the potential for CAM use in the context of a possible preclinical AD diagnosis. PMID:26836152

  20. Knowledge and attitudes of healthcare professionals regarding alternative treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandros Andrikopoulos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, there seems to be an interest in complementary treatments, with the result that there is a noticeable increase in their use. Aim: The aim of the present study was to investigate knowledge and attitudes of healthcare professionals who work in a medium-sized general hospital, regarding employing alternative treatments in everyday practice. Method and material: The sample of the study comprised of 234 healthcare professionals from a General Hospital. A special, valid and anonymous questionnaire was used. Data collection took place from March to May 2013, and the SPSS 17.0 software was used for the statistical analysis (p < 0.05. Results: The majority of the participants were married (62.3% female (75.6% nurses (56.9% of higher education level (46.1%, aged 47,08 ± 9,18 years. The majority knew what alternative treatments were and how they could be applied (79.2%, n=186, while 79 persons (33.8% reported having used at least once some kind of an alternative treatment and 61.5% (n=143 of them said they were fairly/very satisfied with the results. 91% (n=211 of the participants said supervision should be necessary for the use of alternative treatments, and most of them were informed about those treatments by other healthcare professionals (38.8%, family or friends (38%, and the Internet (34,6%. Conclusions: Alternative treatments are a modern therapeutic approach that improves cooperation; healthcare professionals should acquire specialised knowledge regarding complementary treatments.

  1. Traditional, complementary and alternative medical systems and their contribution to personalisation, prediction and prevention in medicine-person-centred medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberti di Sarsina, Paolo; Alivia, Mauro; Guadagni, Paola

    2012-01-01

    Traditional, complementary and alternative medical (TCAM) systems contribute to the foundation of person-centred medicine (PCM), an epistemological orientation for medical science which places the person as a physical, psychological and spiritual entity at the centre of health care and of the therapeutic process. PCM wishes to broaden the bio-molecular reductionistic approach of medical science towards an integration that allows people, doctors, nurses, health-care professionals and patients to become the real protagonists of the health-care scene. The doctor or caregiver needs to act out of empathy to meet the unique value of each human being, which unfolds over the course of a lifetime from conception to natural death. Knowledge of the human being should not be instrumental to economic or political interests, ideology, theories or religious dogma. Research needs to be broadened with methodological tools to investigate person-centred medical interventions. Salutogenesis is a fundamental principle of PCM, promoting health and preventing illness by strengthening the individual's self-healing abilities. TCAM systems also give tools to predict the insurgence of illness and treat it before the appearance of overt organic disease. A task of PCM is to educate people to take better care of their physical, psychological and spiritual health. Health-care education needs to be broadened to give doctors and health-care workers of the future the tools to act in innovative and highly differentiated ways, always guided by deep respect for individual autonomy, personal culture, religion and beliefs. PMID:23126628

  2. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use in an Italian cohort of pediatric headache patients: the tip of the iceberg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalla Libera, D; Colombo, B; Pavan, G; Comi, G

    2014-05-01

    The use of complementary alternative medicine (CAM) in paediatric populations is considerably increased, especially for pain and chronic conditions, as demonstrated by epidemiological surveys both in Europe and in the USA. In our study, CAM was used in 76 % patients of a cohort of 124 children affected by headache (age 4-16 years; 67 % female; 70 % migraine without aura, 12 % migraine with aura, 18 % tensive headache according to IHS criteria) consecutively recruited at a Pediatric Headache University Center. CAM was used as preventive treatment in 80 % cases. The main reasons for seeking CAM were: the wish of avoiding chronic use of drugs with their related side effects, the desire of an integrated approach, the reported inefficacy of conventional medicine, and a more suitable children disposition to CAM than to pharmacological compound. Female gender, younger age, migraine without aura, parents' higher educational status, maternal use of CAM and other associated chronic conditions, correlated with CAM use (p minerals supplements (40 %) with magnesium, 5-Hydroxytryptophan, vitamin B6 or B12, Multivitamin compounds; Homeopathy (47 %) with Silicea, Ignatia Amara, Pulsatilla, Aconitum, Nux Vomica, Calcarea phosphorica; physical treatment (45 %) such as Ayurvedic massage, shiatsu, osteopathy; yoga (33 %); acupuncture (11 %). CAM-often integrated with conventional care-was auto-prescribed in 30 % of the cases, suggested by non-physician in 22 %, by the General Practitioner in 24 % and by paediatrician in 24 %. Both general practitioners and neurologists were mostly unaware of their patients' CAM use. In conclusion, neurologists should inquire for CAM use and be prepared to learn about CAM therapies or to directly interact with CAM trained experts, in order to coordinate an integrative approach to health, as especially required in paediatric headache patients and their parents. Further studies are required to investigate safety and efficacy of CAM in pediatric headache

  3. Complementary and alternative medicine use among women with breast cancer: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanchai, Ausanee; Armer, Jane M; Stewart, Bob R

    2010-08-01

    Patients with breast cancer use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) despite the fact that no studies have shown altered disease progression attributable to CAM use. The purpose of this systematic review is to summarize research as it relates to CAM use among women with breast cancer. Among the many findings of the review, biologically based practices were noted as the types of CAM most used by women with breast cancer, followed by mind-body medicine, whole medical systems, and energy medicine. Sources of information about CAM use for women with breast cancer vary widely, including family, friends, mass media, healthcare providers, CAM providers, and self-help groups. Sociodemographic factors that appear to be related to CAM use were younger age, higher education, higher income, married status, involvement in a support group, and health insurance. The reasons for CAM use reported by women with breast cancer were to help healing, to promote emotional health, and to cure cancer. Oncology nurses should learn more about CAM use among women with breast cancer. Open communication about CAM use helps ensure that safe and holistic care is provided. Additional research in this particular area is needed. PMID:20682492

  4. Bacteriocins: exploring alternatives to antibiotics in mastitis treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reneé Pieterse

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Mastitis is considered to be the most costly disease affecting the dairy industry. Management strategies involve the extensive use of antibiotics to treat and prevent this disease. Prophylactic dosages of antibiotics used in mastitis control programmes could select for strains with resistance to antibiotics. In addition, a strong drive towards reducing antibiotic residues in animal food products has lead to research in finding alternative antimicrobial agents. In this review we have focus on the pathogenesis of the mastitis in dairy cows, existing antibiotic treatments and possible alternative for application of bacteriocins from lactic acid bacteria in the treatment and prevention of this disease.

  5. Complementary and alternative medicine in reducing radiation-induced skin toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jennifer J; Cui, Tengjiao; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L; Allen, Glenn O; Li, Jie; Takita, Cristiane; Lally, Brian E

    2014-08-01

    Radiation therapy-induced acute and late effects, particularly skin toxicities, have significant impact on cancer patients' quality of life and long-term survival. To date, no effective topical agents have been routinely used in the clinical setting to prevent skin toxicity. Using SKH-hr1 hairless mice, we investigated two complementary and alternative medicine in their effects on inflammation and ionizing radiation (IR)-induced skin toxicity: Calendula officinalis (CO) and Ching Wan Hung (CWH). They were applied immediately following each IR dosing of 10 Gy/day for 4 days. Skin toxicity and inflammatory factors were evaluated at multiple time points up to 15 days post-radiation. Serum interleukin (IL)-1α, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP1), keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC), and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) were significantly induced by radiation. Both CO and CWH significantly inhibited IR-induced MCP1 (p < 0.01), KC (p < 0.05), and G-CSF (p < 0.001). IR-induced erythema and blood vessel dilation were significantly reduced by CWH (p < 0.001) but not by CO at day 10 post-IR. Both agents inhibited IR-induced IL-1α (p < 0.01), MCP1 (p < 0.05), and vascular endothelial growth factor (p < 0.05). There were continuous inhibitory effects of CWH on IR-induced skin toxicities and inflammation. In contrast, CO treatment resulted in skin reactions compared to IR alone. Our results suggest that both CO and CWH reduce IR-induced inflammation and CWH reduced IR-induced erythema. In summary, CWH showed promising effects in reducing IR-related inflammation and skin toxicities, and future proof-of-principal testing in humans will be critical in evaluating its potential application in preventing IR-induced skin toxicities. PMID:24792319

  6. A pilot study of complementary and alternative medicine use in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wall GC

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS is a complex disorder, with primary symptoms of sleep disturbances, pain, and fatigue. FMS is one of the most common reasons for patient visits to a rheumatologist. Previous studies have suggested that complementary and alternative medicine (CAM use in patients with rheumatic diseases is common, but such data specific to FMS patients is limited. Objective: The following study sought to describe the prevalence of CAM use in a primary care practice of patients with FMS and assess whether these patients discuss CAM use with their physician, physician-extender, and/or pharmacist. Methods: A one-group cross-sectional survey design was implemented in a large, community-based, private physician practice of patients diagnosed with FMS. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed during clinic visits. It solicited information related to demographic characteristics; FMS-specific health background; whether CAM use had been discussed with a health care provider; and the “ever-use” of common types of CAM. Respondents returned the questionnaire via US mail in a postage-paid, self-addressed envelope. Results: A total of 115 surveys were distributed with 54 returned for analysis (47% completion rate. The sample was predominantly female, well educated and had a mean age of 55.6 years. All respondents were White. Most respondents (92.6% reported using some type of CAM. Exercise (92.2%, chiropractic treatment (48.1%, lifestyle and diet (45.8%, relaxation therapy (44.9%, and dietary and herbal supplements (36.5% were most commonly reported CAM therapies “ever-used” by respondents. Dietary and herbal supplements with the highest prevalence of “ever-use” were magnesium (19.2%, guaifenesin (11.5%, and methylsulfonylmethane (MSM (9.6%. Respondents most commonly discussed CAM with the clinic rheumatologist and the primary care physician (53.7% and 38.9%, respectively. Only 14.8% of respondents discussed CAM with a pharmacist

  7. Complementary and Alternative Medicine use in oncology: A questionnaire survey of patients and health care professionals

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chang, Kah Hoong

    2011-05-24

    Abstract Background We aimed to investigate the prevalence and predictors of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) use among cancer patients and non-cancer volunteers, and to assess the knowledge of and attitudes toward CAM use in oncology among health care professionals. Methods This is a cross-sectional questionnaire survey conducted in a single institution in Ireland. Survey was performed in outpatient and inpatient settings involving cancer patients and non-cancer volunteers. Clinicians and allied health care professionals were asked to complete a different questionnaire. Results In 676 participants including 219 cancer patients; 301 non-cancer volunteers and 156 health care professionals, the overall prevalence of CAM use was 32.5% (29.1%, 30.9% and 39.7% respectively in the three study cohorts). Female gender (p < 0.001), younger age (p = 0.004), higher educational background (p < 0.001), higher annual household income (p = 0.001), private health insurance (p = 0.001) and non-Christian (p < 0.001) were factors associated with more likely CAM use. Multivariate analysis identified female gender (p < 0.001), non-Christian (p = 0.001) and private health insurance (p = 0.015) as independent predictors of CAM use. Most health care professionals thought they did not have adequate knowledge (58.8%) nor were up to date with the best evidence (79.2%) on CAM use in oncology. Health care professionals who used CAM were more likely to recommend it to patients (p < 0.001). Conclusions This study demonstrates a similarly high prevalence of CAM use among oncology health care professionals, cancer and non cancer patients. Patients are more likely to disclose CAM usage if they are specifically asked. Health care professionals are interested to learn more about various CAM therapies and have poor evidence-based knowledge on specific oncology treatments. There is a need for further training to meet to the escalation of CAM use among patients and to raise awareness of

  8. An investigation into the use of complementary and alternative medicine in an urban general practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mc Kenna, F

    2010-11-05

    Several International studies have shown the substantial growth in the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). However, no study in the Republic of Ireland to date has looked at its use among the population. A cross-sectional survey of 328 patients attending an urban general practice was conducted. A high number of respondents reported having visited a CAM practitioner within the past 12 months (89 patients; 27%). A significant positive association was found between CAM use and female gender (p = 0.006), middle-aged (p = 0.013), private health insurance (p = 0.016) and full time employment (p = 0.031). Massage was the most common modality used (35 patients; 39.8%), the most common reason for use was \\'to treat an illness for which conventional medicine was already sought\\' (31 patients; 42%), a high rate of non-disclosure to GPs was found (34 patients; 41%) and personal recommendation was the most important source of information (42 patients; 53.2%). This study demonstrates the current popularity of an alternative healthcare system.

  9. The use of complementary and alternative medicine by persons with HIV infection in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colebunders, R; Dreezen, C; Florence, E; Pelgrom, Y; Schrooten, W

    2003-10-01

    Between June 1996-September 1997 and December 1998-December 1999, two surveys using an anonymous questionnaire were carried out in Europe among persons living with HIV infection. The questionnaire included questions on use of antiretrovirals, complementary or alternative medicines. Vitamins/minerals were taken by 528 (58%) of the 1996-97 participants, compared to 326 (63%) of the 1998-99 participants (P =0.06). Homeopathy was taken by respectively 176 (21%) and 55 (14%) (P =0.003) participants and herbal products respectively by 213 (25%) and 77 (20%) (P =0.06). In multiple regression analysis a longer time since HIV diagnosis, having a higher education level and having a lower CD(+) lymphocyte count were associated with the use of homeopathy. A longer time since HIV diagnosis and a more advanced stage of the disease were associated with the use of herbal products. The study shows that despite the availability of highly active antiretroviral therapy many people with HIV infection still take complementary and alternative medicine. PMID:14596770

  10. Barriers, strategies, and lessons learned from complementary and alternative medicine curricular initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierpina, Victor S; Schneeweiss, Ronald; Frenkel, Moshe A; Bulik, Robert; Maypole, Jack

    2007-10-01

    Fifteen U.S. academic programs were the recipients of a National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine R25 Education Grant Program to introduce curricular changes in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in their institutions. The authors describe the lessons learned during the implementation of these CAM education initiatives. Principal investigators identified these lessons along with discovered barriers and strategies, both those traditionally related to medical and nursing education and those unique to CAM education. Many lessons, barriers, and strategies were common across multiple institutions. Most significant among the barriers were issues such as the resistance by faculty; the curriculum being perceived as too full; presenting CAM content in an evidence-based and even-handed way; providing useful, reliable resources; and developing teaching and assessment tools. Strategies included integration into existing curriculum; creating increased visibility of the curriculum; placing efforts into faculty development; cultivating and nurturing leadership at all levels in the organization, including among students, faculty, and administration; providing access to CAM-related databases through libraries; and fostering efforts to maintain sustainability of newly established CAM curricular elements through institutionalization and embedment into overall educational activities. These lessons, along with some detail on barriers and strategies, are reported and summarized here with the goal that they will be of practical use to other institutions embarking on new CAM education initiatives. PMID:17895653

  11. [Significance of precision medicine in pancreatic cancer prevention and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C F

    2016-03-23

    The morbidity and mortality of pancreatic cancer has been increasing year by year, however, the treatment progress and prevention effect were minimal. With the development of basic research, especially the advances of gene sequencing technology, it was possible to clarify the etiology and pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer, and achieve the first stage prevention. The discovery of pancreatic cancer exosomes of high sensitivity and specificity made early diagnosis of pancreatic cancer (the second stage prevention) no longer a worldwide problem. The build of pancreatic cancer genotyping with clinical applicability made the precision treatment of pancreatic cancer (the third stage prevention) possible. Thus, the precision medicine which is based on advances of gene sequencing, popularity of the Internet and the big data technology has brought a ray of hope for the prevention and treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26988819

  12. Cryosurgery as an effective alternative for treatment of oral lesions in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende, Karla Mayra; Moraes, Paulo de Camargo; Oliveira, Luciana Butini; Thomaz, Luiz Alexandre; Junqueira, José Luiz Cintra; Bönecker, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    Children can exhibit a wide variety of oral pathologies, such as oral lesions, bone lesions, tumors, cysts and cutaneous lesions. Different techniques have been described for the treatment of these lesions, but all of them are invasive. This paper presents a series of cases that demonstrate the clinical efficacy of cryosurgery as an alternative to invasive surgical treatments of the most common oral lesions in children. This technique has been well tolerated by patients due to the absence of anesthesia, rapid healing and minimal bleeding. Cryotherapy has many applications in oral medicine and is an extremely useful alternative in patients to whom surgery is contraindicated due to age or medical history. It is a simple procedure to perform, minimally invasive, low-cost and very effective in pediatric dentistry clinic. PMID:25250502

  13. Pharmacy students′ use, knowledge and attitudes toward complementary and alternative medicine at Riyadh region, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussain Abdulrahman Al-Omar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The survey was conducted to explore use, knowledge and attitudes toward complementary and alternative medicine (CAM among pharmacy students at the college of pharmacy, King Saud University. A total of 133 fourth- and fifth-year pharmacy students completed a questionnaire designed to explore their use, knowledge and attitudes toward CAM therapies at the college of pharmacy, King Saud University. Study lasted for 3 months from 1 st of October until 31 st of December in 2007. Nutrition and herbal medicine therapies were the most known therapies by 65% and 53% of the students, respectively. Knowledge about CAM therapies among the students was limited. Thirty-nine percent of the students reported use of some form of CAM at least once in their lifetime. CAM was used for acute, chronic and mild illness as well as nutrition. Herbal medicine, nutrition, massage, relaxation exercises, yoga and mega-dose vitamin were the most CAM used. Lectures were the chief CAM information source. More than one half of the respondents (53-70% believed that five of the 15 CAM modalities were useful, namely massage, herbal medicine, nutrition, yoga and relaxation exercises. Respondents had a positive attitude toward statements that favoured CAM. Most students strongly agreed or agreed that most CAM therapies were efficacious, whereas 52.6% of the respondents did believe that CAM therapies can be harmful to public health. The study showed that the students had positive attitude toward CAM and exhibited relatively high level of self-reported use of CAM therapies. Overall, students′ knowledge of CAM is limited. The students perceived interest in learning and training in CAM. A separate course in CAM including its various components is needed. Also, availability of a reliable CAM information sources will aid the students to increase their knowledge of CAM.

  14. Studies on Treatment of Psoriasis with Integrative Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦万章; 林熙然; 陈学荣; 邹铭西; 吴绍熙; 张秉正

    2002-01-01

    @@ Psoriasis is a com-mon, easy to recur, chro-nic inflammatory diseaseof the skin. The exactcause of it is still un-known, and there aremany hypotheses for it,such as heredity, infec-tion, metabolic disorder,endocrine influence, neu-ro-psychic fact6rs, immunologic disorder. Treat-ment of psoriasis by traditional Chinese medicine(TCM) is carried on in a nationwide drive andmuch work on its clinical and experimental study has been doen. The trend of study goes,of course,in the light of our own nationl conditions.

  15. Clinical Observation on Treatment of Tourette Syndrome by Integrative Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李安源; 丛珊; 吕红; 李继君; 赵林

    2009-01-01

    Objective:To explore the clinical efficacy of integrative Chinese and Western medicine in treating Tourette syndrome(TS).Methods:Ninety children with TS were randomized into two groups by randomizing digital table method:the 60 patients in the treated group were treated by Ningdong Granule(宁动颗粒,NDG) plus haloperidol,and the 30 in the control group treated by haloperidol alone.The course for both groups was 6 months.Conditions of the patients were estimated before and after treatment with Yale Global Tic ...

  16. Alternative and controversial treatments for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgaertel, A

    1999-10-01

    ADHD is a syndrome that can be treated effectively, safely, and economically with stimulant medications. There is no equal alternative to these agents in short-term treatment of ADHD symptoms. However, many families seek alternatives to stimulants and other drug treatments for a variety of reasons. Alternative approaches reflect the complexity and heterogeneity of the disorder by being equally manifold, complex, and often obscure in their modus operandi. Scientific evidence suggests that individualized dietary management may be effective in some children. Trace element supplementation also may be beneficial when specific deficiencies are present. At this point, nootropics, herbs, and homeopathy are being seriously researched regarding their role in neurologic functioning, but evidence to support their role in the specific treatment of ADHD is inconsistent or lacking. Self-regulatory techniques such as hypnotherapy and biofeedback do not alter the core symptoms of ADHD but may be helpful in controlling secondary symptoms. These methods are unique in ADHD treatment because children can become active agents of their own coping strategies. There is no scientific evidence to support the validity of vision therapy, oculovestibular treatment, or sound training (Tomatis method) as treatment modalities for ADHD. However, auditory stimulation with individualized music may help to improve situational performance in cognitive tasks. Regardless of the treatment approach, the diagnosis of ADHD and other comorbidities first must be established through a standard medical evaluation. The standard treatment options always should be presented and discussed carefully. If alternative approaches are sought, the merits of available options should be reiterated. If the primary care provider is not comfortable or knowledgeable about an acceptable method, referral to capable and responsible practitioners in the community who are experienced in these areas should be considered. The primary

  17. The role of the Therapeutic Goods Administration and the Medicine and Medical Devices Safety Authority in evaluating complementary and alternative medicines in Australia and New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currently, the regulation of complementary and alternative medicines and related health claims in Australia and New Zealand is managed in a number of ways. Complementary medicines, including herbal, minerals, nutritional/dietary supplements, aromatherapy oils and homeopathic medicines are regulated under therapeutic goods/products legislation. The Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA), a division of the Commonwealth Department of Health and Ageing is responsible for administering the provisions of the legislation in Australia. The New Zealand Medicines and Medical Devices Safety Authority (Medsafe) administers the provision of legislation in New Zealand. In December 2003 the Australian and New Zealand governments signed a Treaty to establish a single, bi-national agency to regulate therapeutic products, including medical devices prescription, over-the-counter and complementary medicines. A single agency will replace the Australian TGA and the New Zealand Medsafe. The role of the new agency will be to safeguard public health through regulation of the quality, safety and efficacy or performance of therapeutic products in both Australia and New Zealand. The major activities of the new joint Australia New Zealand therapeutic products agency are in product licensing, specifying labelling standards and setting the advertising scheme, together with determining the risk classes of medicines and creating an expanded list of ingredients permitted in Class I medicines. A new, expanded definition of complementary medicines is proposed and this definition is currently under consultation. Related Australian and New Zealand legislation is being developed to implement the joint scheme. Once this legislation is passed, the Treaty will come into force and the new joint regulatory scheme will begin. The agency is expected to commence operation no later than 1 July 2006 and will result in a single agency to regulate complementary and alternative medicines

  18. Anti-Freckles Herbal Treatment in Iranian Traditional Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakerin, Sara; Fahimi, Shirin; Rezghi, Maedeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Freckles are numerous pigmented spots of the skin, mainly confined to the face, even arms and back. Although freckles are light-brown macules, most frequently observed in individuals with red or blond hair, they are common to Asian people too. Freckles increase in number, size, and depth of pigmentation during the summer months. Histologically, freckles show increased production of melanin pigment by a normal number of melanocytes. Freckles commonly stop spreading before adolescence and last for life, but could sometimes be subtle in adulthood. Treatments are often requested for cosmetic purposes. Before the advent of lasers, treatment modalities for pigmentary disorders included surgical excision, dermabrasion, chemical bleaching, and peeling. These treatments may lead to unwanted side effects of potential scarring or undesired pigmentation changes. In Iranian traditional medicine (ITM), freckles have been known as well. “Namash” was the term used by ITM scholars to indicate freckles. There is a wide range of plants, which were prescribed by Iranian physicians for the treatment of freckles. The purpose of this study is to find the most frequent useful herbs for freckles as mentioned in ITM references. Methods: Seven ITM references were studied for anti-freckles medicines. The references were Canon of Medicine (Avicenna), Alhavi (Razes) Tuhfat ul-Momineen (Momen tonekaboni), Makhzan-ul-Adwiah (Aghili), Ikhtiyarat Badi’i (Ansari), Al-abnia An-Haghyegh el-advia (Heravi), and al-jāmi li-mufradāt al-adwiyawa al-aghdhiya (Ibn al-Baitar). Moreover, plants were ordered according to their repetition in the references. Afterwards, traditional names of the selected plants were matched with the scientific names using botanical text references. Results: This study demonstrated that Myristica fragrans Houtt, Cicer arietema L., Eruca sativa Lam., Lilium candidium L., Amygdalus communis L., Arum italicum L. were the most frequent herbs mentioned in ITM

  19. Ethnobotanical survey of medicinal plants used in the treatment of animal diarrhoea in Plateau State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gotep Jurbe G

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of medicinal plants in the treatment of diseases has generated renewed interest in recent times, as herbal preparations are increasingly being used in both human and animal healthcare systems. Diarrhoea is one of the common clinical signs of gastrointestinal disorders caused by both infectious and non-infectious agents and an important livestock debilitating condition. Plateau State is rich in savannah and forest vegetations and home to a vast collection of plants upheld in folklore as having useful medicinal applications. There is however scarcity of documented information on the medicinal plants used in the treatment of animal diarrhoea in the state, thus the need for this survey. Ten (10 out of 17 Local Government Areas (LGAs, spread across the three senatorial zones were selected. Farmers were interviewed using well structured, open-ended questionnaire and guided dialogue techniques between October and December 2010. Medicinal plants reported to be effective in diarrhoea management were collected using the guided field-walk method for identification and authentication. Results A total of 248 questionnaires were completed, out of which 207 respondents (83.47% acknowledged the use of herbs in diarrhoea management, while 41 (16.53% do not use herbs or apply other traditional methods in the treatment of diarrhoea in their animals. Medicinal plants cited as beneficial in the treatment of animal diarrhoea numbered 132, from which 57(43.18% were scientifically identified and classified into 25 plant families with the families Fabaceae (21% and Combretaceae (14.04% having the highest occurrence. The plant parts mostly used in antidiarrhoeal herbal preparations are the leaves (43.86% followed by the stem bark (29.82%. The herbal preparations are usually administered orally. Conclusion Rural communities in Plateau State are a rich source of information on medicinal plants as revealed in this survey. There is need to

  20. Traditional/Alternative Medicine: An Investigation into Identification, Knowledge and Consumption Practices of Herbal Medicine among Students with Hearing Impairment in Ibadan, South-Western Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeniyi, Samuel O.; Olufemi-Adeniyi, Olubukola A.; Erinoso, Sakiru M.

    2015-01-01

    The use of traditional medicine as alternative or complimentary therapy is gaining prominence in primary health care worldwide. This is because of the efficacy in the management of mild, chronic seemingly incurable ailments/diseases. Though the publicity is on the increase from country to country in the world, however, one cannot conclude that the…

  1. Stress-induced alternative gene splicing in mind-body medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Ernest Lawrence

    2004-01-01

    Recent research documents how psychosocial stress can alter the expression of the acetylcholinesterase gene to generate at least 3 alternative proteins that are implicated in a wide variety of normal mind-body functions, as well as pathologies. These range from early embryological development, plasticity of the brain in adulthood, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and stress-associated dysfunctions of the central nervous, endocrine, and immune systems, to age-related neuropathologies. Such stress-induced alternative gene splicing is proposed here as a major mind-body pathway of psychosocial genomics-the modulation of gene expression by creative psychological, social, and cultural processes. We explore the types of research that are now needed to investigate how stress-induced alternative splicing of the acetylcholinesterase gene may play a pivotal role in the deep psychobiology of psychotherapy, meditation, spiritual rituals, and the experiencing of positive humanistic values that have been associated with mind-body medicine, such as compassion, beneficence, serenity, forgiveness, and gratitude. PMID:15356952

  2. Treatment of Diarrhoea in Rural African Communities: An Overview of Measures to Maximise the Medicinal Potentials of Indigenous Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collise Njume

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Diarrhoea is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in rural communities in Africa, particularly in children under the age of five. This calls for the development of cost effective alternative strategies such as the use of herbal drugs in the treatment of diarrhoea in these communities. Expenses associated with the use of orthodox medicines have generated renewed interest and reliance on indigenous medicinal plants in the treatment and management of diarrhoeal infections in rural communities. The properties of many phenolic constituents of medicinal plants such as their ability to inhibit enteropooling and delay gastrointestinal transit are very useful in the control of diarrhoea, but problems such as scarcity of valuable medicinal plants, lack of standardization of methods of preparation, poor storage conditions and incertitude in some traditional health practitioners are issues that affect the efficacy and the practice of traditional medicine in rural African communities. This review appraises the current strategies used in the treatment of diarrhoea according to the Western orthodox and indigenous African health-care systems and points out major areas that could be targeted by health-promotion efforts as a means to improve management and alleviate suffering associated with diarrhoea in rural areas of the developing world. Community education and research with indigenous knowledge holders on ways to maximise the medicinal potentials in indigenous plants could improve diarrhoea management in African rural communities.

  3. Cannabinoids: novel medicines for the treatment of Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagredo, Onintza; Pazos, M Ruth; Valdeolivas, Sara; Fernandez-Ruiz, Javier

    2012-04-01

    Cannabinoid pharmacology has experienced a notable increase in the last 3 decades which is allowing the development of novel cannabinoid-based medicines for the treatment of different human pathologies, for example, Cesamet® (nabilone) or Marinol® (synthetic Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol for oral administration) that were approved in 80s for the treatment of nausea and vomiting associated with chemotherapy treatment in cancer patients and in 90s for anorexiacachexia associated with AIDS therapy. Recently, the british company GW Pharmaceuticals plc has developed an oromucosal spray called Sativex®, which is constituted by an equimolecular combination of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol- and cannabidiol- enriched botanical extracts. Sativex® has been approved for the treatment of specific symptoms (i.e. spasticity and pain) of multiple sclerosis patients in various countries (i.e. Canada, UK, Spain, New Zealand). However, this cannabis- based medicine has been also proposed to be useful in other neurological disorders given the analgesic, antitumoral, anti-inflammatory, and neuroprotective properties of their components demonstrated in preclinical models. Numerous clinical trials are presently being conducted to confirm this potential in patients. We are particularly interested in the case of Huntington's disease (HD), an autosomal-dominant inherited disorder caused by an excess of CAG repeats in the genomic allele resulting in a polyQ expansion in the encoded protein called huntingtin, and that affects primarily striatal and cortical neurons thus producing motor abnormalities (i.e. chorea) and dementia. Cannabinoids have been studied for alleviation of hyperkinetic symptoms, given their inhibitory effects on movement, and, in particular, as disease-modifying agents due to their anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective and neuroregenerative properties. This potential has been corroborated in different experimental models of HD and using different types of cannabinoid agonists

  4. Prevention and Treatment of Osteoporosis with Chinese Herbal Medicines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Xiao-ling; FENG Yu-xiong; PENG Yong

    2012-01-01

    In this paper,laboratory reports,medication rules,formulating principles,and research methods are summarized and analyzed,including single herb,compound herbs,and the problems in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis(OP)within the past decade.With widely recognized efficacy,satisfying achievements have been achieved in preventing and treating OP with Chinese herbal medicines(CHM).However,due to the complex constituents,the pharmacological activities and mechanism of CHM are not clear yet,and there is no unified standard on the diagnosis and syndrome differentiation of OP and the efficacy evaluation of CHM in the treatment.Accordingly,the research in the future should focus on the pharmacology and standardization of CHM in treating OP.

  5. Sodium-Bearing Waste Treatment Alternatives Implementation Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles M. Barnes; James B. Bosley; Clifford W. Olsen

    2004-07-01

    The purpose of this document is to discuss issues related to the implementation of each of the five down-selected INEEL/INTEC radioactive liquid waste (sodium-bearing waste - SBW) treatment alternatives and summarize information in three main areas of concern: process/technical, environmental permitting, and schedule. Major implementation options for each treatment alternative are also identified and briefly discussed. This report may touch upon, but purposely does not address in detail, issues that are programmatic in nature. Examples of these include how the SBW will be classified with respect to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA), status of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) permits and waste storage availability, available funding for implementation, stakeholder issues, and State of Idaho Settlement Agreement milestones. It is assumed in this report that the SBW would be classified as a transuranic (TRU) waste suitable for disposal at WIPP, located in New Mexico, after appropriate treatment to meet transportation requirements and waste acceptance criteria (WAC).

  6. [Development of Precision Medicine in the Surgical Treatment of Lung Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Fengwei; Li, Ning; Gao, Shugeng; He, Jie

    2016-06-20

    Precision medicine is to developing the most appropriate individualized treatment for each patient based on the macro to the micro level of individual differences. Genomic, proteomics, metabolomics data, and other big data analysis methods are the essence of precision medicine. Precision medicine brings the hope to overcome cancer. Among all kinds of tumors, lung cancer is the biggest threat to human. This paper reviewed the development of precision medicine in the surgical treatment of lung cancer. PMID:27335287

  7. Acne Etiology and Treatments in Traditional Persian Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirbeigi, Leila; Oveidzadeh, Laleh; Jafari, Zahra; Fard, Monireh Sadat Motahari

    2016-01-01

    Background: Traditional Persian medicine (TPM) is based on humors theory. Temperament or mizaj is the result of a combination of four fundamental humors called blood, phlegm, yellow bile, and black bile. Like any other diseases, acne is the result of humoral imbalance. Acne is a highly prevalent dermatological problem, which has both physical and psychological effects on patients. The aim of this study was to determine the etiology of acne formation and natural remedies from the perspective of Persian scientists. Methods: The etiology and treatment of acne were collected and analyzed from selected TPM medical textbooks. Some selected plants in these books were assessed in tabular format and their anti-acne activities were compared with modern medicine’s databases. Results: In the acne treatment, considering six essential schemes for health, diet and herbal remedies as well as manipulation are recommended. Although the mentioned herbs in acne treatment have antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant effects; however, some have special proven effects on the acne formation process. There is also a strong relationship between the digestive system and skin. This paper was rendered to show ancient Persian scholar’s viewpoints on acne and its treatment. Conclusion: Some reported remedies might be beneficial towards further studies on acne treatment. PMID:26722141

  8. Treatment of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia from Traditional Chinese Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Li Hsiao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is a cancer that immature white blood cells continuously overproduce in the bone marrow. These cells crowd out normal cells in the bone marrow bringing damage and death. Methotrexate (MTX is a drug used in the treatment of various cancer and autoimmune diseases. In particular, for the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia, it had significant effect. MTX competitively inhibits dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR, an enzyme that participates in the tetrahydrofolate synthesis so as to inhibit purine synthesis. In addition, its downstream metabolite methotrexate polyglutamates (MTX-PGs inhibit the thymidylate synthase (TS. Therefore, MTX can inhibit the synthesis of DNA. However, MTX has cytotoxicity and neurotoxin may cause multiple organ injury and is potentially lethal. Thus, the lower toxicity drugs are necessary to be developed. Recently, diseases treatments with Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM as complements are getting more and more attention. In this study, we attempted to discover the compounds with drug-like potential for ALL treatment from the components in TCM. We applied virtual screen and QSAR models based on structure-based and ligand-based studies to identify the potential TCM component compounds. Our results show that the TCM compounds adenosine triphosphate, manninotriose, raffinose, and stachyose could have potential to improve the side effects of MTX for ALL treatment.

  9. The Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine by Korean Breast Cancer Women: Is It Associated with Severity of Symptoms?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Hye Hwang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM among patients with breast cancer could be associated with severity of the cancer symptoms experienced, but there is little evidence to prove this. This study tried to investigate any difference in the severity of breast cancer symptoms between CAM users and nonusers. Methods. The study followed cross-sectional design using structured survey questionnaire. Survey participants were recruited from four different healthcare settings in Seoul, South Korea. The survey instrument comprised 39 items including questions on demographics, use of CAM, and six main symptoms associated with breast cancer and cancer treatment. Results. Out of 288 participants, 67% stated using one or more modalities of CAM. Age, education, and time duration since diagnosis of cancer were significantly associated with use of CAM. About 90% of the CAM users experienced side effects of cancer treatment. CAM users reported more severe anxiety and skin/hair changes than nonusers. Conclusions. CAM was used by those breast cancer patients who experience more severe symptoms to alleviate the conditions associated with breast cancer and cancer treatment. Our findings revealed motivation behind the CAM use, which has profound implications for clinicians to recognize patient-perceived needs.

  10. Assessment of alternatives to correct inventory difference statistical treatment deficiencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents an analysis of alternatives to correct deficiencies in the statistical treatment of inventory differences in the NRC guidance documents and licensee practice. Pacific Northwest Laboratory's objective for this study was to assess alternatives developed by the NRC and a panel of safeguards statistical experts. Criteria were developed for the evaluation and the assessment was made considering the criteria. The results of this assessment are PNL recommendations, which are intended to provide NRC decision makers with a logical and statistically sound basis for correcting the deficiencies

  11. Chemical Constituents and an Alternative Medicinal Veterinary Herbal Soap Made from Senna macranthera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue Andrade, Flávia; Purgato, Gislaine Aparecida; de Faria Maia, Thalita; Pais Siqueira, Raoni; Lima, Sâmia; Diaz, Gaspar; Diaz, Marisa Alves Nogueira

    2015-01-01

    Upon undergoing biomonitoring, the most active dichloromethane extract retrieved from Senna macranthera roots led to the isolation of three main compounds: emodine, physione, and chrysophanol. In this sequence, these compounds revealed a potential antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from animals with mastitis infections with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of 20, 90, and 90 μg mL(-1), respectively. Therefore, an herbal soap was also produced from this same active extract. This soap was tested in vitro using gloves contaminated by animals with bovine mastitis that had been discarded after use by milkers and showed similar results to previously tested compounds. These results indicate the potential of this plant as an alternative veterinary medicine for the production of antibacterial soaps that aimed at controlling bovine mastitis infections in small Brazilian farms. PMID:25821480

  12. Is evaluating complementary and alternative medicine equivalent to evaluating the absurd?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greasley, Pete

    2010-06-01

    Complementary and alternative therapies such as reflexology and acupuncture have been the subject of numerous evaluations, clinical trials, and systematic reviews, yet the empirical evidence in support of their efficacy remains equivocal. The empirical evaluation of a therapy would normally assume a plausible rationale regarding the mechanism of action. However, examination of the historical background and underlying principles for reflexology, iridology, acupuncture, auricular acupuncture, and some herbal medicines, reveals a rationale founded on the principle of analogical correspondences, which is a common basis for magical thinking and pseudoscientific beliefs such as astrology and chiromancy. Where this is the case, it is suggested that subjecting these therapies to empirical evaluation may be tantamount to evaluating the absurd. PMID:20457720

  13. Complementary and alternative medicine use in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia: an Italian multicentric survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arena, Giovanni; Laurenti, Luca; Coscia, Marta; Cortelezzi, Agostino; Chiarenza, Annalisa; Pozzato, Gabriele; Vigliotti, Maria Luigia; Nunziata, Giuseppe; Fragasso, Alberto; Villa, Maria Rosaria; Grossi, Alberto; Selleri, Carmine; Deaglio, Silvia; La Sala, Antonio; Del Poeta, Giovanni; Simeon, Vittorio; Aliberti, Luig; De Martino, Laura; Giudice, Aldo; Musto, Pellegrino; De Feo, Vincenzo

    2014-04-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is common in patients with cancer and its use is steadily increasing over time. We performed a multicenter survey in which the use of CAM in 442 Italian patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), the commonest form of leukemia in Western countries, was assessed. Data were collected by means of a face-to-face standardized questionnaire with several items. Mean age was 69 years; 258 patients (58%) were male and 184 (42%) female. Seventy-three patients (16.5%) were found to be CAM users. The most common CAM therapies were green tea, aloe formulations and high dose vitamins. Predictors of CAM use were female gender, younger age, higher education level, internet availability and newspaper reading. The reasons for CAM popularity among these patients are complex. Given the number of patients combining therapy with CAM and its possible drug interactions, doctor interest as well as patient education about CAM should be improved. PMID:23829282

  14. Rurality, mobility, identity: women's use of complementary and alternative medicine in rural Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meurk, Carla; Broom, Alex; Adams, Jon; Sibbritt, David

    2013-03-01

    This article explores why women in rural and remote areas of Australia use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) at higher rates than their counterparts in urban areas. Drawing on qualitative interviews with 60 women 60-65 years of age, currently living in rural Australia, we explore the possibility that CAM use in rural areas may be embedded in processes of spatialised identity-building and the health-creating practices of mobile, ex-urban, individuals who drive this process. We problematise previous explanations which suggest CAM use in rural areas is principally derived from a lack of biomedical service provision and enhanced community ties showing instead how and why identity and mobility are useful additional variables for understanding CAM use in rural areas. PMID:23385030

  15. The use of complementary and alternative medicine by individuals with features of metabolic syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rajadurai Akilen; Zeller Pimlott; Amalia Tsiami; Nicola Robinson

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:To compare the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), including dietary supplements, by individuals with and without features of metabolic syndrome (FeMS). METHODS:Using a cross sectional study design, information was obtained by self-administered questionnaires from 300 university individuals. FeMS was deifned as any individuals self-reporting at least one of the clinical diagnoses of diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, or obesity. Finally, two categories were created for cross tabulation, and individuals with and without FeMS were compared. RESULTS:Of the 192 individuals completing the study, 39%(n=76) were currently using or had used CAM therapies in the past 12 months. Individuals with FeMS (n=54, 28%) were more likely (P CONCLUSION: Individuals with FeMS were more likely to use CAM, particularly supplements. Doctors need to properly inquire about and understand their patients’ supplement use, especially if CAM therapies are used in conjunction with conventional medications.

  16. Chemical Constituents and an Alternative Medicinal Veterinary Herbal Soap Made from Senna macranthera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Inoue Andrade

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Upon undergoing biomonitoring, the most active dichloromethane extract retrieved from Senna macranthera roots led to the isolation of three main compounds: emodine, physione, and chrysophanol. In this sequence, these compounds revealed a potential antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from animals with mastitis infections with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC values of 20, 90, and 90 μg mL−1, respectively. Therefore, an herbal soap was also produced from this same active extract. This soap was tested in vitro using gloves contaminated by animals with bovine mastitis that had been discarded after use by milkers and showed similar results to previously tested compounds. These results indicate the potential of this plant as an alternative veterinary medicine for the production of antibacterial soaps that aimed at controlling bovine mastitis infections in small Brazilian farms.

  17. The use of complementary and alternative medicine for patients with traumatic brain injury in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gau Bih-Shya

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM continues to increase in Taiwan. This study examined the use of CAM and beliefs about CAM as expressed by patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI in Taiwan. Methods TBI patients and their accompanying relatives were interviewed by using a structured questionnaire at an outpatient clinic in a medical center in northern Taiwan. Results A total of 101 patients with TBI participated in the study. Sixty-four (63% patients had used at least one form of CAM after sustaining TBI. CAM users had used an average of 2.72 forms of CAM after sustaining TBI. The most frequently used CAM category was traditional Chinese medicine (37; 57.8%, followed by folk and religious therapies (30; 46.9%, and dietary supplements (30; 46.9%. The majority of the patients (45; 70.3% did not report CAM use because they felt it was unnecessary to do so. Patients who used CAM had a significantly stronger positive belief in CAM than those who did not (t = −2.72; P = .008. After using CAM, most of the patients (54; 85% perceived moderate satisfaction (2.89 ± 0.44, according to a 4-point Likert scale. Conclusion Although the use of CAM is common for TBI patients receiving conventional medical health care in Taiwan, most patients did not inform health care personnel about their CAM use. TBI patients perceive combined use of CAM and conventional medicine as beneficial for their overall health.

  18. Factors Associated With Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use in Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Usher

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS is a chronic functional bowel condition, which has substantial impact on quality of life and use of healthcare services. Patients often report using complementary and alternative medicine (CAM for symptom management despite limited evidence to support its use. Psychological factors have been shown to be important in both influencing CAM use and as avenues of intervention to assist in managing IBS symptoms. Therefore, this review assessed prevalence of and psychological factors associated with CAM use by people with IBS. Method: Five electronic databases (including AMED, EMBASE and PsychINFO were searched for studies that examined both the extent of and the reasons for CAM use. Five studies met the inclusion criteria. Results: Prevalence of CAM use ranged from 9% to 38%. CAM use was associated with psychosocial factors, including concerns about conventional medical care (i.e., the perceived harmful effects of medication, perception that conventional medicine had failed, and lack of satisfaction with conventional care and anxiety. Conclusion: These findings identify psychological factors associated with CAM use which could be targeted through psychologically oriented management strategies for those affected with IBS.

  19. Are Users of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Sicker than Non-Users?

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    Amir Shmueli

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Higher utilization of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM, both in cross-sections and over time, is commonly related to better socioeconomic status and to increased dissatisfaction with conventional medicine and its values. Little is known about health differences between users and non-users of CAM. The objective of the paper is to explore the difference in health measured by the SF-36 instrument between users and non-users of CAM, and to estimate the relative importance of the SF-36 health domains scales to the likelihood of consulting CAM providers. Interviews were used to collect information from a sample of 2000 persons in 1993 and 2500 persons in 2000, representing the Israeli Jewish urban population aged 45–75 in those years. Bivariate and logistic regression analyses were used to explore the above associations. The results show that while users of CAM enjoy higher socioeconomic status and younger age, they tend to report worse health than non-users on the eight SF-36 health domains scales in both years. However, controlling for personal characteristics, lower scores on the bodily pain, role-emotional and vitality scales are related to greater likelihood of CAM use in 2000. In 1993, no scale had a significant adjusted association with the use of CAM. The conclusions are that CAM users tend to report worse health. With CAM becoming a mainstream, though somewhat luxurious, medical practice, pain and affective-emotional distress are the main drivers of CAM use.

  20. Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Brazil: one concept, different meanings Medicina Alternativa e Complementar no Brasil: um conceito e diferentes significados

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson Filice de Barros; Everardo Duarte Nunes

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses the various meanings ascribed to the concept of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) in Brazil, where research on this theme has a limited tradition in terms of influences from anthropology, sociology of knowledge and epistemology, and sociology of CAM and clinical medicine. By means of the concepts identified in the literature, we elaborated a table with types of meanings. The terms Alternative Medicine and Complementary Medicine were found in more than one of ...

  1. Precision medicine for diagnosis and treatment of osteosarcoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui Wang; Freddie H Fu; Bing Wang

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is one of the most common primary malignant bone tumors, most commonly afecting chil-dren and adolescents. With a low 5-year survival rate, osteosarcoma is among the most dangerous threats to the health and life of young people. In many cases, lung micro-metastases are detected at the time of osteosarcoma diagnosis, which makes it very dificult to save patients’ lives even with very radical treat-ments such as surgical amputation to remove the primary lesion. Patients with osteosarcoma often die of lung metastatic disease. The diagnosis of osteosarcoma at an early stage is therefore very important for disease prognosis. Osteosarcoma shows a remarkable variation in its pathologic presentation between its diferent pathologic sub-types and from patient to patient. Prior to displaying any abnormalities in celular morphology, molecular and biochemical metabolic changes may occur, leading to increases in abnormaly functioning oncoproteins. New evidence from molecular biological and genomic studies provides critical information about the occurrence, development, metastasis, and prognosis of osteosarcoma. The precision medicine approach, which alows for individualized treatment, has improved the prognosis and treatment outcomes for osteosarcoma. This review aims to comprehensively summarize the recent key discoveries in osteosarcoma and to highlight optimal strategies for diagnosis and treatment.

  2. PTSD and comorbid AUD: a review of pharmacological and alternative treatment options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralevski E

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Elizabeth Ralevski, Lening A Olivera-Figueroa, Ismene Petrakis Yale University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, VA Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, CT, USA Background: Although posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD and alcohol use disorders (AUD frequently co-occur there are no specific treatments for individuals diagnosed with these comorbid conditions. The main objectives of this paper are to review the literature on pharmacological options for PTSD and comorbid AUD, and to summarize promising behavioral and alternative interventions for those with these dual diagnoses. Methods: We conducted a comprehensive search on PsycINFO and MEDLINE/PubMed databases using Medical Subject Headings terms in various combinations to identify articles that used pharmacotherapy for individuals with dual diagnoses of PTSD and AUD. Similar strategies were used to identify articles on behavioral and alternative treatments for AUD and PTSD. We identified and reviewed six studies that tested pharmacological treatments for patients with PTSD and comorbid AUD. Results: The literature on treatment with US Food and Drug Administration approved medications for patients with dual diagnosis of PTSD and AUD is very limited and inconclusive. Promising evidence indicates that topiramate and prazosin may be effective in reducing PTSD and AUD symptoms in individuals with comorbidity. Seeking safety has had mixed efficacy in clinical trials. The efficacy of other behavioral and alternative treatments (mindfulness-based, yoga, and acupuncture is more difficult to evaluate since the evidence comes from small, single studies without comparison groups. Conclusion: There is a clear need for more systematic and rigorous study of pharmacological, behavioral, and alternative treatments for patients with dual diagnoses of PTSD and AUD. Keywords: dual diagnosis, PTSD, AUD, pharmacotherapy

  3. Alternative methods for the treatment of post-menopausal troubles [Alternative Methoden zur Behandlung postmenopausaler Beschwerden

    OpenAIRE

    Wasem, Jürgen; Aidelsburger, Pamela; Schauer, Svenja; Grabein, Kristin

    2012-01-01

    Background Menopause is described as the transition from the reproductive phase of a women to the non reproductive. Changes in hormone levels might lead to complaints and health consequences especially during peri- and postmenopause. Hormone therapy has a potential damaging health risk profile and is recommended for temporal limited therapy for acute vasomotor symptoms only. Objective The present HTA-report aims to assess the effectiveness and the cost-effectiveness of alternative treatment m...

  4. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neurotoxicity and complementary and alternative medicines: progress and perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Xiao L.; Liu, Hong Q.; Wang, Qi; Huo, Jie G.; Wang, Xiao N.; Cao, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neurotoxicity (CIPN) is a severe and dose-limiting side effect of antineoplastic drugs. It can cause sensory, motor and autonomic system dysfunction, and ultimately force patients to discontinue chemotherapy. Until now, little is understood about CIPN and no consistent caring standard is available. Since CIPN is a multifactorial disease, the clinical efficacy of single pharmacological drugs is disappointing, prompting patients to seek alternative treatment opti...

  5. Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neurotoxicity and Complementary and Alternative Medicines: Progress and Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao-Lan eCheng; Hong-Quan eLiu; Jie-Ge eHuo; Xiao-Ning eWang; Peng eCao

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neurotoxicity (CIPN) is a severe and dose-limiting side effect of antineoplastic drugs. It can cause sensory, motor and autonomic system dysfunction, and ultimately force patients to discontinue chemotherapy. Until now, little is understood about CIPN and no consistent standard of care is available. Since CIPN is a multifactorial disease, the clinical efficacy of single pharmacological drugs is disappointing, prompting patients to seek out alternative treatment...

  6. Use of complementary and alternative medicine by patients with localized prostate carcinoma. Study at a single institute in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshimura, Koji; Ichioka, Kentaro; Terada, Naoki; Terai, Akito [Kurashiki Central Hospital, Okayama (Japan); Arai, Yoichi [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine

    2003-02-01

    The use of complementary/alternative medicine (CAM) has recently received considerable attention throughout the world. We evaluated the prevalence and predictors of CAM use among Japanese patients with localized prostate cancer. A total of 177 patients with localized prostate carcinoma underwent radical retropubic prostatecotomy or external beam radiation therapy between January 1994 and January 2001. Of them, 138 (78%) answered a self-administered questionnaire on CAM use and were eligible for this study. The overall prevalence, types of CAM used, and costs of CAM were assessed. The effects of age, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level, clinical stage, pretreatment Gleason score, patients' income, patients' final educational status, and general health-related quality of life at baseline and 1 year after treatment, as estimated using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Prostate Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire on the prevalence of CAM use, were evaluated. Twenty-seven patients (20%) had once used or had been using some types of CAM. Herbal medicine and vitamins were the most common types of CAM used. Preoperative Gleason score was significantly associated with CAM use, as determined by the {chi}''2 test (P0.0198), and PSA level and posttreatment physical function domain were marginally associated with CAM use, as determined by the Mann-Whitney U-test (P=0.0734 and P=0.0597, respectively). Patient age, income, and final educational status had no impact on CAM use. A relatively small proportion of Japanese patients with localized prostate cancer have tried CAM compared with the proportions of patients described in previous reports from Western countries. (author)

  7. Use of complementary and alternative medicine by patients with localized prostate carcinoma. Study at a single institute in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of complementary/alternative medicine (CAM) has recently received considerable attention throughout the world. We evaluated the prevalence and predictors of CAM use among Japanese patients with localized prostate cancer. A total of 177 patients with localized prostate carcinoma underwent radical retropubic prostatecotomy or external beam radiation therapy between January 1994 and January 2001. Of them, 138 (78%) answered a self-administered questionnaire on CAM use and were eligible for this study. The overall prevalence, types of CAM used, and costs of CAM were assessed. The effects of age, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level, clinical stage, pretreatment Gleason score, patients' income, patients' final educational status, and general health-related quality of life at baseline and 1 year after treatment, as estimated using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Prostate Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire on the prevalence of CAM use, were evaluated. Twenty-seven patients (20%) had once used or had been using some types of CAM. Herbal medicine and vitamins were the most common types of CAM used. Preoperative Gleason score was significantly associated with CAM use, as determined by the χ''2 test (P0.0198), and PSA level and posttreatment physical function domain were marginally associated with CAM use, as determined by the Mann-Whitney U-test (P=0.0734 and P=0.0597, respectively). Patient age, income, and final educational status had no impact on CAM use. A relatively small proportion of Japanese patients with localized prostate cancer have tried CAM compared with the proportions of patients described in previous reports from Western countries. (author)

  8. Use of complementary and alternative medicine in Germany – a survey of patients with inflammatory bowel disease

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    Hahn Eckhart G

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have suggested an increasing use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. The aim of our study was to evaluate the use of CAM in German patients with IBD. Methods A questionnaire was offered to IBD patients participating in patient workshops which were organized by a self-help association, the German Crohn's and Colitis Association. The self-administered questionnaire included demographic and disease-related data as well as items analysing the extent of CAM use and satisfaction with CAM treatment. Seven commonly used CAM methods were predetermined on the questionnaire. Results 413 questionnaires were completed and included in the analysis (n = 153 male, n = 260 female; n = 246 Crohn's disease, n = 164 ulcerative colitis. 52 % of the patients reported CAM use in the present or past. In detail, homeopathy (55%, probiotics (43%, classical naturopathy (38%, Boswellia serrata extracts (36% and acupuncture/Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM (33% were the most frequently used CAM methods. Patients using probiotics, acupuncture and Boswellia serrata extracts (incense reported more positive therapeutic effects than others. Within the statistical analysis no significant predictors for CAM use were found. 77% of the patients felt insufficiently informed about CAM. Conclusion The use of CAM in IBD patients is very common in Germany, although a large proportion of patients felt that information about CAM is not sufficient. However, to provide an evidence-based approach more research in this field is desperately needed. Therefore, physicians should increasingly inform IBD patients about benefits and limitations of CAM treatment.

  9. Eurycoma longifolia: Medicinal Plant in the Prevention and Treatment of Male Osteoporosis due to Androgen Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Mohd Effendy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis in elderly men is now becoming an alarming health issue due to its relation with a higher mortality rate compared to osteoporosis in women. Androgen deficiency (hypogonadism is one of the major factors of male osteoporosis and it can be treated with testosterone replacement therapy (TRT. However, one medicinal plant, Eurycoma longifolia Jack (EL, can be used as an alternative treatment to prevent and treat male osteoporosis without causing the side effects associated with TRT. EL exerts proandrogenic effects that enhance testosterone level, as well as stimulate osteoblast proliferation and osteoclast apoptosis. This will maintain bone remodelling activity and reduce bone loss. Phytochemical components of EL may also prevent osteoporosis via its antioxidative property. Hence, EL has the potential as a complementary treatment for male osteoporosis.

  10. Formation flavonoid secondary metabolites in callus culture of Chrysanthemum cinerariefolium as alternative provision medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purwianingsih, Widi; Febri, Santika; Kusdianti

    2016-02-01

    Increasing need of medicine ingredients require the discovery of other methods that can be used as an alternative. One method that can be used as an alternative is tissue culture. Quercetin is a flavonoid secondary metabolites that have been known to be useful as antiviral, anti-asthma and anti-cancer potential. The purpose of this study was to produce flavonoids, especially quercetin in callus culture Chrysanthemum cinerariefolium. Pieces of leaves of plantlets C. cinerariefolium used as explants for formation of callus tissue. To grow the callus, Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium used with addition of various concentrations of growth regulators 2.4-D, and kinetin. For multiplication, callus subcultured on similar medium. Callus that had formed, especially brown callus, further analyzed using Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrum (GCMS). Before analyzed callus was extracted in 95% ethanol. The result showed that callus potentially generate secondary metabolite are brown and friable. Based on these parameters, the best callus produced from leaf explants grown on MS medium with the addition of 4 mg / L 2,4-D and 0 mg / L kinetin. The callus contain secondary metabolites such as some of the flavonoid quercetin precursors such as acetic acid and tetrahydroxychalcone, and some other secondary metabolites.

  11. Alternative funding for academic medicine: experience at a Canadian Health Sciences Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Paul; Shortt, S E D; Walker, D M C

    2004-03-01

    In 1994 the School of Medicine of Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario, its clinical teachers, and the three principal teaching hospitals initiated a new approach to funding, the Alternative Funding Plan, a pragmatic response to the inability of fee-for-service billing by clinical faculty to subsidize the academic mission of the health sciences center. The center was funded to provide a package of service and academic deliverables (outputs), rather than on the basis of payment for physician clinical activity (inputs). The new plan required a new governance structure representing stakeholders and raised a number of important issues: how to reconcile the preservation of physician professional autonomy with corporate responsibilities; how to gather requisite information so as to equitably allocate resources; and how to report to the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-term Care in order to demonstrate accountability. In subsequent iterations of the agreement it was necessary to address issues of flexibility resulting from locked-in funding levels and to devise meaningful performance measures for departments and the center as a whole. The authors conclude that the Alternative Funding Plan represents a successful innovation in funding for an academic health sciences center in that it has created financial stability, as well as modest positive effects for education and research. The Ontario government hopes to replicate the model at the province's other four health sciences centers, and it may have applicability in any jurisdiction in which the costs of medical education outstrip the capacity of faculty clinical earnings. PMID:14985191

  12. Traditional herbal medicine, pharmacology and complementary alternative medicine (CAM): a preface to this special issue on herbal drugs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chiu-Yin KWAN

    2000-01-01

    @@In China, our ancient human civilization has long used plants and other natural products, and their extracts for both healing and poisoning. The understanding of interactions between drugs and living systems was acquired via generations of knowledge accumulation based on empirical observations. This form of healing, also well documented to exist in many other cultural civilizations via a long historical experimentation, has eventually evolved itself from an art form into a scientific modality, now known as pharmacology. This recognition of a formal discipline of medicine occurred only about a century ago following the declaration of Flexner Report in the North America in 1910. The report proclaimed that the practice of medicine should be based on scientific evidence rather than empiricism. The emergence of synthetic organic chemistry facilitating the discovery of new healing chemicals and the rapid development of physiological and biochemical sciences (often dependent on pharmacological tools) have further solidified pharmacology as a mainstream basic medical science. For long decades since the Flexner's report, the empirically based folk medicine has rapidly been replaced by the scientifically based medicine, which is often referred to as the mainstream medicine (and thus becomes a traditional/conventional medicine itself).

  13. Appraisal of medicinal plants used in alternative systems of medicines for microbial contamination, physiochemical parameters and heavy metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The safety of herbal products has become a foremost apprehension in public health with their recognition and worldwide market growth and due in part to the widespread assumption that natural implies harmless. The global market of medicinal plants has been growing at a rate of 7-10% annually; capitalizing on the growing awareness of herbal and aromatic plants globally. The present study was conducted to assess the physiochemical parameters, microbial contamination and presence of heavy metals. The 24 medicinal plants were collected from open market places of various cities of Pakistan and tested by employing WHO and AOAC guidelines. Medicinal plants were found polluted with wide variety of potentially pathogenic bacterias. Microbial count and levels of arsenic and mercury in some plants were found elevated. The percentage (%) of physiochemical parameters i.e., foreign organic matter, total ash, acid insoluble ash, alcohol soluble extract, water soluble extract and moisture count of these medicinal plants were found statistically noteworthy. The nonexistence of quality control values for medicinal plants has been one of the key lacunas. Quality assurance system and WHO's guidelines on good agricultural and collection practices be methodically enforced in the medicinal plants supply chain i.e., cultivation, collection and distribution, although it is tricky task. (author)

  14. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Holistic Treatment of Rape and Incest Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies indicate that at least 15% of the female population in western countries has experienced sexual abuse and severe sexual traumas. This paper explains how even serious sexual abuse and trauma can be healed when care and resources encourage the patient to return to the painful life events. When the physician cares and receives the trust of the patient, emotional holding and processing will follow quite naturally. Spontaneous regression seems to be an almost pain-free way of integrating the severe traumas from earlier experiences of rape and incest. This technique is a recommended alternative to classical timeline therapy using therapeutic commands. When traumatized patients distance themselves from their soul (feelings, sexuality, and existential depth, they often lose their energy and enjoyment of life. However, this does not mean that they are lost to life. Although it may seem paradoxical, a severe trauma may be a unique opportunity to regain enjoyment of life. The patient will often be richly rewarded for the extensive work of clearing and sorting out in order to experience a new depth in his or her existence and emotional life, with a new ability to understand life in general and other people in particular. So what may look like a tragedy can be transformed into a unique gift; if the patient gets sufficient support, there is the possibility of healing and learning. Consciousness-based medicine seems to provide severely traumatized patients with the quality of support and care needed for their soul to heal.

  15. Medicinal plants used by traditional medicine practitioners for the treatment of HIV/AIDS and related conditions in Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Lamorde, Mohammed; Merry, Concepta

    2010-01-01

    IN_PRESS Introduction and objectives: In Uganda, there are over 1 million people with HIV/AIDS. When advanced, this disease is characterized by life-threatening opportunistic infections. As the formal health sector struggles to confront this epidemic, new medicines from traditional sources are needed to complement control efforts. This study was conducted to document herbal medicines used in the treatment of HIV/AIDS and related opportunistic infections, and to document the existing kno...

  16. Complementary and alternative medicine use and cost in functional bowel disorders: A six month prospective study in a large HMO

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    Drossman Douglas A

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional Bowel Disorders (FBD are chronic disorders that are difficult to treat and manage. Many patients and doctors are dissatisfied with the level of improvement in symptoms that can be achieved with standard medical care which may lead them to seek alternatives for care. There are currently no data on the types of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM used for FBDs other than Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS, or on the economic costs of CAM treatments. The aim of this study is to determine prevalence, types and costs of CAM in IBS, functional diarrhea, functional constipation, and functional abdominal pain. Methods 1012 Patients with FBD were recruited through a health care maintenance organization and followed for 6 months. Questionnaires were used to ascertain: Utilization and expenditures on CAM, symptom severity (IBS-SS, quality of life (IBS-QoL, psychological distress (BSI and perceived treatment effectiveness. Costs for conventional medical care were extracted from administrative claims. Results CAM was used by 35% of patients, at a median yearly cost of $200. The most common CAM types were ginger, massage therapy and yoga. CAM use was associated with female gender, higher education, and anxiety. Satisfaction with physician care and perceived effectiveness of prescription medication were not associated with CAM use. Physician referral to a CAM provider was uncommon but the majority of patients receiving this recommendation followed their physician's advice. Conclusion CAM is used by one-third of FBD patients. CAM use does not seem to be driven by dissatisfaction with conventional care. Physicians should discuss CAM use and effectiveness with their patients and refer patients if appropriate.

  17. Herbal Medicines for the Treatment of Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis: Current Scenario and Future Prospects

    OpenAIRE

    Ravirajsinh Jadeja; Devkar, Ranjitsinh V; Srinivas Nammi

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a multifactorial disease and has close correlations with other metabolic disorders. This makes its treatment difficult using a single pharmacological drug. Use of plant extract/decoction or polyherbal formulation to treat various liver diseases is very well mentioned in various traditional systems of medicine (Ayurveda, Japanese or traditional Chinese Medicine, and Kampo medicine). Medicinal herbs are known for their multifaceted implications and thus ca...

  18. SCIENTIFIC BASED OF ACUPUNCTURE AS ALTERNATIVE TREATMENT OF DIABETES MELLITUS

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    Koosnadi Saputra

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acupuncture its traditional form is based upon the stimulation of well defined points on the body by insertion of metal needles, such needling is considered necessary influenced biological mechanism by intrinsic and extrinsic activation after acupuncture points stimulation. Many clinical report therapeutic effect acupuncture treatment of Diabetes Mellitus especially Non Insulin dependent, the effectiveness of mild or middle type of disease is better that severe one and accompanying With controlling diet and doing more exercise will contribute recovery. Methods: Modem research indicates that acupuncture treatment can control blood sugar level, mainly by adjusting insulin molecular level, enhance insulin secretion and recontrol insulin by regulating central nervous system. Of the all, the improved function of the receptor of insulin target cells is probably the most important one. Results: The basic research approach to animal laboratory (rabbit,rat and mice by electro stimulation, streptozotocin and alloxan monohydrate injection visualizing correlation 13 cell pancreas inorphofunction, insulin receptor and electrical profile of specific pancreas point in body surface. Conclusion: Relationship between biophysical, morphology and physiological study of acupuncture points in diabetic animal and diabetic patient tobase acupuncture model as alternative treatment to diabetes mellitus. Key words: acupuncture, alternative treatment, diabetes mellitus

  19. Prospective investigation of complementary and alternative medicine use and subsequent hospitalizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Margaret AK

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM use has been estimated to be as high as 65% in some populations. However, there has been little objective research into the possible risks or benefits of unmanaged CAM therapies. Methods In this prospective study of active duty US Navy and Marine Corps personnel, the association between self-reported practitioner-assisted or self-administered CAM use and future hospitalization was investigated. Cox regression models were used to examine risk of hospitalization due to any cause over the follow-up period from date of questionnaire submission, until hospitalization, separation from the military, or end of observation period (June 30, 2004, whichever occurred first. Results After adjusting for baseline health, baseline trust and satisfaction with conventional medicine, and demographic characteristics, those who reported self-administering two or more CAM therapies were significantly less likely to be hospitalized for any cause when compared with those who did not self-administer CAM (HR = 0.38; 95% CI = 0.17, 0.86. Use of multiple practitioner-assisted CAM was not associated with a significant decrease or increase of risk for future hospitalization (HR = 1.86; 95 percent confidence interval = 0.96-3.63. Conclusion While there were limitations to these analyses, this investigation utilized an objective measure of health to investigate the potential health effects of CAM therapies and found a modest reduction in the overall risk of hospitalization associated with self-administration of two or more CAM therapies. In contrast, use of practitioner-assisted CAM was not associated with a protective effect.

  20. Complementary and alternative medicine use among US Navy and Marine Corps personnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riddle James R

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, numerous studies have revealed an increase in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM use in US civilian populations. In contrast, few studies have examined CAM use within military populations, which have ready access to conventional medicine. Currently, the prevalence and impact of CAM use in US military populations remains unknown. Methods To investigate CAM use in US Navy and Marine Corps personnel, the authors surveyed a stratified random sample of 5,000 active duty and Reserve/National Guard members between December 2000 and July 2002. Chi-square tests and multivariable logistic regression were used to assess univariate associations and adjusted odds of CAM use in this population. Results and discussion Of 3,683 service members contacted, 1,446 (39.3% returned a questionnaire and 1,305 gave complete demographic and survey data suitable for study. Among respondents, more than 37% reported using at least one CAM therapy during the past year. Herbal therapies were among the most commonly reported (15.9%. Most respondents (69.8% reported their health as being very good or excellent. Modeling revealed that CAM use was most common among personnel who were women, white, and officers. Higher levels of recent physical pain and lower levels of satisfaction with conventional medical care were significantly associated with increased odds of reporting CAM use. Conclusion These data suggest that CAM use is prevalent in the US military and consistent with patterns in other US civilian populations. Because there is much to be learned about CAM use along with allopathic therapy, US military medical professionals should record CAM therapies when collecting medical history data.

  1. Rural Australian community pharmacists' views on complementary and alternative medicine: a pilot study

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    Willis Jon A

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complementary and alternative medicines (CAMs are being used increasingly across the world. In Australia, community pharmacists are a major supplier of these products but knowledge of the products and interactions with other medicines is poor. Information regarding the use of CAMs by metropolitan pharmacists has been documented by the National Prescribing Service (NPS in Australia but the views of rural/regional community pharmacists have not been explored. The aim of this pilot study was to explore the knowledge, attitudes and information seeking of a cohort of rural community pharmacists towards CAMs and to compare the findings to the larger NPS study. Methods A cross sectional self-administered postal questionnaire was mailed to all community pharmacists in one rural/regional area of Australia. Using a range of scales, data was collected regarding attitudes, knowledge, information seeking behaviour and demographics. Results Eighty eligible questionnaires were returned. Most pharmacists reported knowing that they should regularly ask consumers if they are using CAMs but many lacked the confidence to do so. Pharmacists surveyed for this study were more knowledgeable in regards to side effects and interactions of CAMs than those in the NPS survey. Over three quarters of pharmacists surveyed reported sourcing CAM information at least several times a month. The most frequently sought information was drug interactions, dose, contraindications and adverse effects. A variety of resources were used to source information, the most popular source was the internet but the most useful resource was CAM text books. Conclusions Pharmacists have varied opinions on the use of CAMs and many lack awareness of or access to good quality CAMs information. Therefore, there is a need to provide pharmacists with opportunities for further education. The data is valuable in assisting interested stakeholders with the development of initiatives to

  2. Prevalence and Predictors of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) Use among Ivy League College Students: Implications for Student Health Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versnik Nowak, Amy L.; DeGise, Joe; Daugherty, Amanda; O'Keefe, Richard; Seward, Samuel, Jr.; Setty, Suma; Tang, Fanny

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Determine prevalence and types of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies used and test the significance of demographics and social cognitive constructs as predictors of CAM use in a college sample. Secondary purpose was to guide the integration of CAM therapies into college health services. Participants: Random,…

  3. Ionizing radiation treatment of dry and dehydrated products: Case of medicinal plants intended for infusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drying and dehydration are common methods of stabilizing foodstuffs. The removal of insects or bacteria from them has hitherto been carried out by chemical treatments the effectiveness of which is not fully satisfactory and which also raise the problem of residues. Treatment with ionizing radiation does not have these drawbacks and therefore offers a very attractive alternative. The application of such treatment to dry and dehydrated products is especially appropriate because their low water content limits the possible organoleptic changes. In France, authorization has been or is soon to be granted for several intermediate products - spices, aromatics, gum arabic, dehydrated vegetables and cereal flakes for dairy products. However, the treatment is also justifiable for products sold to the public which are often of inadequate microbiological quality. This is the case with medicinal plants intended for infusion, the market for which is growing dramatically. The risks are often further increased by the consumer himself making his infusion under poor conditions. Ionization treatment, carefully performed, considerably reduces the microbial load without affecting the principal chemical characteristics of these plants at the doses used. Numerous organoleptic tests have demonstrated the absence of significant change in taste as compared with control batches. A request for authorization has therefore been submitted wherein it is proposed that ionizing radiation treatment should be used only if the total microbial load is above 104 but below 108. An overall average maximum dose of 9 kGy will then be sufficient. (author)

  4. Generating Treatment Plan in Medicine: A Data Mining Approach

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    Ahmad M. Razali

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This study reports on a research effort on generating treatment plan to handle the error and complexity of treatment process for healthcare providers. Focus has been given for outpatient and was based on data collected from various health centers throughout Malaysia. These clinical data were recorded using SOAP (Subjective, Objective, Assessment and Plan format approach as being practiced in medicine and were recorded electronically via Percuro Clinical Information System (Percuro. Cross-Industry Standard Process for Data Mining (CRISP-DM model has been utilized for the entire research. We used data mining analysis through decision trees technique with C5 algorithm. The scopes that have been set are patients complaint, gender, age, race, type of plan and detailed item given to patient. Acute upper respiratory infection disease or identified as J06.9 in International Classification of Diseases 10 by World Health Organization has been selected as it was the most common problem encountered. The model created for J06.9 disease is that type of plan recommended through giving drug to patients without the need to consider patients complaint, gender, age and race, with accuracy obtained for the model is 94.73%. Inspite of that, we also identified detailed items that have been given to J06.9 patients and the occurancy of them. This can be as a guideline for future treatment with item recommendation is less than 0.078% compared to item inventory in Percuro database. The research is expected to aid healthcare provider as well as to minimize error during treatment process while benefited from technology information to increase the health care delivery.

  5. Attitudes and perceptions of Australian pharmacy students towards Complementary and Alternative Medicine – a pilot study

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    Wallis Marianne

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the increased usage of CAM worldwide comes the demand for its integration into health professional education. However, the incorporation of CAM into health professional curricula is handled quite differently by different institutions and countries. Furthermore, the evaluation of CAM curricula is complicated because students' ability to learn about CAM may be influenced by factors such as student's prior knowledge and motivation, together with the perceptions and attitudes of clinical preceptors. The study aimed to describe the attitudes, perceptions and beliefs of second, third and fourth year pharmacy students towards complementary and alternative medicine (CAM and to explore factors that might affect attitudes such as learning, preceptors and placements. Methods Pharmacy students from a University in South East Queensland, Australia participated in the study. The study consisted of a cross-sectional survey (n = 110 and semi-structured interviews (n = 9. Results The overall response rate for the survey was 75%, namely 50% (36/72 for second year, 77.3% (34/44 for third year and 97.6% (40/41 for fourth year students. Overall, 95.5% of pharmacy students believe that pharmacists should be able to advise patients about CAM and most (93.7% have used CAM prior to course enrolment. Students' attitudes to CAM are influenced by the use of CAM by family, friends and self, CAM training, lecturers and to a lesser degree by preceptors. The majority of pharmacy students (89.2% perceive education about CAM as a core and integral part of their professional degree and favour it over an additional postgraduate degree. However, they see a greater need for education in complementary medicines (such as herbal medicines, vitamins and minerals than for education in complementary therapies (such as acupuncture, meditation and bio-magnetism. Knowledge and educational input rationalised rather than marginalised students' attitudes towards CAM

  6. Stepwise drying of medicinal plants as alternative to reduce time and energy processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuervo-Andrade, S. P.; Hensel, O.

    2016-07-01

    The objective of drying medicinal plants is to extend the shelf life and conserving the fresh characteristics. This is achieved by reducing the water activity (aw) of the product to a value which will inhibit the growth and development of pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms, significantly reducing enzyme activity and the rate at which undesirable chemical reactions occur. The technical drying process requires an enormous amount of thermal and electrical energy. An improvement in the quality of the product to be dried and at the same time a decrease in the drying cost and time are achieved through the utilization of a controlled conventional drying method, which is based on a good utilization of the renewable energy or looking for other alternatives which achieve lower processing times without sacrificing the final product quality. In this work the method of stepwise drying of medicinal plants is presented as an alternative to the conventional drying that uses a constant temperature during the whole process. The objective of stepwise drying is the decrease of drying time and reduction in energy consumption. In this process, apart from observing the effects on decreases the effective drying process time and energy, the influence of the different combinations of drying phases on several characteristics of the product are considered. The tests were carried out with Melissa officinalis L. variety citronella, sowed in greenhouse. For the stepwise drying process different combinations of initial and final temperature, 40/50°C, are evaluated, with different transition points associated to different moisture contents (20, 30, 40% and 50%) of the product during the process. Final quality of dried foods is another important issue in food drying. Drying process has effect in quality attributes drying products. This study was determining the color changes and essential oil loses by reference the measurement of the color and essential oil content of the fresh product was

  7. New Effective Treatment of Liver Fibrosis by Chinese Herbal Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张国梁

    2002-01-01

    @@ Liver fibrosis is an abnormal proliferation pathologic process of intrahepatic fibrous connective tissue that occurs after liver cells have been necrotized and stimulated by inflammatory factors. It is called fibrosis when the pathological change is mild, and liver cirrhosis when the change becomes so severe as to reconstruct the liver lobuli to form pseudolobuli and nodule(1). Liver fibrosis is an important pathological characteristic of chronic hepatopathy and the chief intermediate link to further develop of liver cirrhosis. No ideal remedy for treatment of chronic hepatitic cirrhosis has been found so far. Although some drugs, such as colchicine and penicillamine, had been reported to have the effect of fibrosis inhibition, their clinical application is still limited for the rather severe toxic-side effects. Certain progress have been made from the clinical and experimental studies on anti-fibrosis treatment by traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) carried out widely in China in recent ten years. And here is a general review of the drugs used.

  8. Traditional Japanese herbal medicines for treatment of odontopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kojiro eYamaguchi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This article highlights several refractory oral diseases, such as stomatitis, burning mouth syndrome (BMS, glossalgia, atypical facial pain (AFP, oral cancer, dry mouth, and Sjögren’s syndrome(SJS, in which use of Japanese herbal medicines, Kampo medicines(KM, on the basis of Kampo theory could exert the maximum effects on human body. 1 In acute stomatitis, heat because of agitated vital energy may affect the head, chest, and middle abdominal region. Stomatitis is also related to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. There are many antioxidants in the crude extracts of KM. Thus, we can control environmental factors (cold, heat, dampness, dryness and vital energy, blood, and fluid of the organ systemically using KM to treat stomatitis and eliminate local ROS accumulation.2 BMS, glossalgia, and AFP are multifactorial syndromes involving the interaction of biological and psychological factors. Local temperature decrease and edema often occur in chronic pain. These are local circulatory disturbances that can be resolved by improving the flow of blood and fluid. Several KM, such as Tokishakuyakusan and Kamishoyosan(KSS, are effective for enhancing peripheral circulation. Those such as Saikokaryukotuboreito, Yokukansan, KSS, and Saibokutou can reduce stress and associated pain by altering glutamatergic and monoaminergic transmission in the brain. The clinical efficacy of KM for BMS and AFP may depend on the regulation of the mesolimbic dopaminergic and descending glutamatergic pain modulation systems.3 Regarding oral cancer treatment, I introduce 4 possible applications of KM, inhibition of the proliferation of cancer cells, complementation of the main cancer therapy, reduction of side effect caused by the main anti-cancer therapy and improvement of quality of life such as the overall status and/or oral discomfort. This review explains in more details Hozai such as Hochuekkito(HET, Juzendaihoto, and Ninjinyoeito(NYT that are frequently

  9. Traditional Japanese herbal medicines for treatment of odontopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Kojiro

    2015-01-01

    This article highlights several refractory oral diseases, such as stomatitis, burning mouth syndrome (BMS), glossalgia, atypical facial pain (AFP), oral cancer, dry mouth, and Sjögren's syndrome (SJS), in which use of Japanese herbal medicines, Kampo medicines (KM), on the basis of Kampo theory could exert the maximum effects on human body. (1) In acute stomatitis, heat because of agitated vital energy may affect the head, chest, and middle abdominal region. Stomatitis is also related to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). There are many antioxidants in the crude extracts of KM. Thus, we can control environmental factors (cold, heat, dampness, dryness) and vital energy, blood, and fluid of the organ systemically using KM to treat stomatitis and eliminate local ROS accumulation. (2) BMS, glossalgia, and AFP are multifactorial syndromes involving the interaction of biological and psychological factors. Local temperature decrease and edema often occur in chronic pain. These are local circulatory disturbances that can be resolved by improving the flow of blood and fluid. Several KM, such as Tokishakuyakusan and Kamishoyosan (KSS), are effective for enhancing peripheral circulation. Those such as Saikokaryukotuboreito, Yokukansan, KSS, and Saibokutou can reduce stress and associated pain by altering glutamatergic and monoaminergic transmission in the brain. The clinical efficacy of KM for BMS and AFP may depend on the regulation of the mesolimbic dopaminergic and descending glutamatergic pain modulation systems. (3) Regarding oral cancer treatment, I introduce four possible applications of KM, inhibition of the proliferation of cancer cells, complementation of the main cancer therapy, reduction of side effect caused by the main anti-cancer therapy and improvement of quality of life such as the overall status and/or oral discomfort. This review explains in more details Hozai such as Hochuekkito (HET), Juzendaihoto, and Ninjinyoeito (NYT) that are frequently

  10. Hedyotis diffusa Combined with Scutellaria barbata Are the Core Treatment of Chinese Herbal Medicine Used for Breast Cancer Patients: A Population-Based Study

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan-Chieh Yeh; Hsing-Yu Chen; Sien-Hung Yang; Yi-Hsien Lin; Jen-Hwey Chiu; Yi-Hsuan Lin; Jiun-Liang Chen

    2014-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), which is the most common type of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) used in Taiwan, is increasingly used to treat patients with breast cancer. However, large-scale studies on the patterns of TCM prescriptions for breast cancer are still lacking. The aim of this study was to determine the core treatment of TCM prescriptions used for breast cancer recorded in the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. TCM visits made for breast cancer i...

  11. A Retrospective Analysis of 5,195 Patient Treatment Sessions in an Integrative Veterinary Medicine Service: Patient Characteristics, Presenting Complaints, and Therapeutic Interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Justin Shmalberg; Memon, Mushtaq A.

    2015-01-01

    Integrative veterinary medicine, the combination of complementary and alternative therapies with conventional care, is increasingly prevalent in veterinary practice and a focus of clinical instruction in many academic teaching institutions. However, the presenting complaints, therapeutic modalities, and patient population in an integrative medicine service have not been described. A retrospective analysis of 5,195 integrative patient treatment sessions in a veterinary academic teaching hospit...

  12. Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jillian L. Capodice

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available To discuss challenges concerning treatment for chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS and review complementary and alternative medical (CAM therapies being evaluated for this condition, we performed a comprehensive search of articles published from 1990–2005 using the PubMed, Medline databases. Data from the articles were abstracted and pooled by subject. Keywords cross-searched with CP/CPPS included: complementary, alternative, integrative, therapies, interventions, nutrition, antioxidants, herbs, supplements, biofeedback and acupuncture. Listed articles with no abstracts were not included. Various CAM therapies for CP/CPPS exist including biofeedback, acupuncture, hyperthermia and electrostimulation. Additionally, a variety of in vitro and in vivo studies testing herbal and nutritional supplements were found. Saw palmetto, cernilton and quercetin were the most frequently tested supplements for CP/CPP Although many CAM therapies demonstrate positive preliminary observations as prospective treatments for CP/CPPS, further exploratory studies including more randomized, controlled trials are necessary for significant validation as treatment options for this complex disorder.

  13. Types and sociodemographic correlates of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use among people with epilepsy in Oman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Asmi, Abdullah; Al Maniri, Abdullah; Al-Farsi, Yahya M; Burke, David T; Al Asfoor, Fatema M H; Al Busaidi, Ibrahim; Al Breiki, Mohamed H A; Lahiri, Shaon; Braidy, Nady; Essa, Musthafa M; Al-Adawi, Samir

    2013-11-01

    Nonpharmacological treatment strategies that originate from sociocultural teachings and are beyond the scope of allopathic medicine are commonly used among people with epilepsy (PWE) in many parts of the world. The present study explored the types and sociodemographic correlates of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use among PWE in Oman among attendees of a neurological unit at a tertiary care center. Data on the types of CAM were gathered from telephone interviews. The relevant demographic and clinical characteristics of the participants were obtained from electronic medical records. Of the total of 101 participants, 73.3% were CAM users. The majority of these participants have not disclosed their CAM use to their allopathic health-care providers. The most common types of CAM reported were those falling under the 'mind-body' type (incantations and fumigation) and biologically based (herbal concoctions) or a combination of them. Compared to non-CAM users, a significant and greater proportion of CAM users attributed the etiology of their illness to nonbiomedical factors such as 'evil eyes' (P=0.04). The multivariate logistic regression model indicated that the use of CAM was highly associated with age of unemployment (OR=2.04; 95% CI: 1.15, 6.39), having basic school education (OR=2.21; 95% CI: 0.83, 5.18), low family income (OR=1.52; 95% CI: 0.91, 2.11), and the presence of hypersalivation (OR=2.20; 95% CI: 1.01, 4.39). Further studies are needed to harmonize these two healing practices. On the whole, this study indicates that among attendees of tertiary care utilization, CAM is common among PWE in Oman. The most utilized type of CAM falls under the umbrella of mind-body practice. PMID:24011398

  14. Use of traditional complementary and alternative medicine for HIV patients in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramlagan Shandir

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Traditional medicine use has been reported is common among individuals with moderate and advanced HIV disease. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to assess the use of Traditional Complementary and Alternative Medicine (TCAM for HIV patients prior to initiating antiretroviral therapy in three public hospitals in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Methods Using systematic sampling, 618 HIV-positive patients were selected from outpatient departments from three hospitals and interviewed with a questionnaire. Results TCAM was commonly used for HIV in the past six months by study participants (317, 51.3% and herbal therapies alone (183, 29.6%. The use of micronutrients (42.9% was excluded from TCAM since mostly vitamins were provided by the health facility. Herbal therapies were the most expensive, costing on average 128 Rand (US$16 per patient per month. Most participants (90% indicated that their health care provider was not aware that they were taking herbal therapies for HIV (90%. Herbal therapies were mainly used for pain relief (87.1% and spiritual practices or prayer for stress relief (77.6%. Multivariate logistic regression with use of herbs for HIV as the dependent variable identified being on a disability grant and fewer clinic visits to be associated with use of herbs, and TCAM use for HIV identified being on a disability grant, number of HIV symptoms and family members not contributing to main source of household income to be associated with TCAM use. Conclusion Traditional herbal therapies and TCAM are commonly used by HIV treatment naïve outpatients of public health facilities in South Africa. Health care providers should routinely screen patients on TCAM use when initiating ART and also during follow-up and monitoring keeping in mind that these patients may not fully disclose other therapies.

  15. Treatment of 140 cerebral palsied children with a combined method based on traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and western medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Xue-juan; ZHENG Kun

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To observe and evaluate a method that is effective and practical for treatment of cerebral palsied (CP)children in China. Method: The patient's age and disease type and individual specific conditions were considered in choosing therapy methods accordingly: Chinese herbs, acupuncture, auricular seed pressure, point finger pressing, massage, orthopedic hand manipulation, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, language therapy, etc. Meanwhile we created a new CP treatment model that combines hospitalized treatment with family therapy. Results: The majority of CP patients improved greatly in motor and social adaptation capacities after treatment. Wilcoxon paired rank sum test analysis showed that there were significant differences between the data before and after treatment (P<0.01). Conclusion: This combined therapy method, based on traditional Chinese medicine and western medicine plus family supplemental therapy, is an effective and practical treatment strategy for CP children in China.

  16. Alternative pharmacological strategies for adult ADHD treatment: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buoli, Massimiliano; Serati, Marta; Cahn, Wiepke

    2016-01-01

    Adult Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a prevalent psychiatric condition associated with high disability and frequent comorbidity. Current standard pharmacotherapy (methylphenidate and atomoxetine) improves ADHD symptoms in the short-term, but poor data were published about long-term treatment. In addition a number of patients present partial or no response to methylphenidate and atomoxetine. Research into the main database sources has been conducted to obtain an overview of alternative pharmacological approaches in adult ADHD patients. Among alternative compounds, amphetamines (mixed amphetamine salts and lisdexamfetamine) have the most robust evidence of efficacy, but they may be associated with serious side effects (e.g. psychotic symptoms or hypertension). Antidepressants, particularly those acting as noradrenaline or dopamine enhancers, have evidence of efficacy, but they should be avoided in patients with comorbid bipolar disorder. Finally metadoxine and lithium may be particularly suitable in case of comorbid alcohol misuse or bipolar disorder. PMID:26693882

  17. Alternative therapies in the treatment of atrial fibrillation

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    Federico Lombardi, MD, FESC; Sebastiano Belletti, MD; Alberto Lomuscio, MD.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation (AF is the most common clinical arrhythmia and represents a major social and economic problem. The number of subjects with AF is constantly increasing as a result of aging and improved survival in several cardiac and non-cardiac diseases. Patients with AF are often symptomatic, have a reduced physical capacity and are at high risk for thromboembolic events. Moreover, AF is associated with increased mortality and independently of the management based either on rhythm or rate control strategy, whereas the safety and efficacy of most anti-arrhythmic drugs are questionable. Increasing attention has therefore been addressed to evaluate the possible therapeutic and/or preventive effects of forms of treatment coming from ancient medical traditions of Far East, like acupuncture and yoga. In traditional Chinese medicine, acupuncture has been found effective in managing patients with paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia. Recently, also in the Western literature, reports have been published supporting the clinical efficacy of acupuncture to treat arterial hypertension and to reduce chest pain. Other studies have evaluated the effects of acupuncture and other methods of Eastern Medicine, i.e., Qigong, Tai Chi Chuan and Yoga, in the treatment of cardiac illnesses associated with supraventricular arrhythmias. Two reports on the effects of acupuncture in preventing or reducing the rate of AF recurrences in patients with persistent or paroxysmal AF have been recently reported . Another ancient traditional eastern form of therapy and prevention, i.e., yoga, has been recently shown to reduce episodes of atrial fibrillation and improve the symptoms of anxiety and depression often associated with this arrhythmia. Growing evidence indicates that acupuncture and yoga are safe, without any pro-arrhythmic effect and with limited cost. All these factors should be considered when evalu­ating the efficacy of therapeutic intervention for an epi

  18. The Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Among California Adults With and Without Cancer

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    Michael S Goldstein

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the extent and correlates of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM use among a population-based sample of California adults that is highly diverse in terms of sociodemographic characteristics and health status. As a follow-up to a state-wide health survey of 55 428 people, 9187 respondents were interviewed by phone regarding their use of 11 different types of CAM providers, special diets, dietary supplements, mind–body interventions, self-prayer and support groups. The sample included all participants in the initial survey who reported a diagnosis of cancer, all the non-white respondents, as well as a random sample of all the white respondents. The relation of CAM use to the respondents' demographic characteristics and health status is assessed. CAM use among Californians is generally high, and the demographic factors associated with high rates of CAM use are the same in California as have been found in other studies. Those reporting a diagnosis of cancer and those who report other chronic health problems indicate a similar level of visits to CAM providers. However, those with cancer are less likely to report using special diets, and more likely to report using support groups and prayer. Health status, gender, ethnicity and education have an independent impact upon CAM use among those who are healthy as well as those who report suffering from chronic health problems, although the precise relation varies by the type of CAM used.

  19. Attitudes toward complementary and alternative medicine amongst oncology professionals in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamela, Siegel; Alex, Broom; Vanessa, Bowden; Jon, Adams; Nelson Filice de, Barros

    2016-08-01

    Complementary and alternative medicines (CAM) are popular amongst cancer patients in the Brazilian context, however little is known about oncology health professionals' attitudes toward the role of CAM and their perspectives on the potential for integration into oncological care. In this study, drawing on a series of interviews with oncology professionals (i.e. doctors, nurses, nutritionists, pharmacologists and psychologists), we provide insight into their views on the rise, validity, and role of CAM in cancer care. The results reveal two key dynamics in relation to CAM in cancer care in Brazil. First, that doctors, nurses and other allied professionals hold considerably different views on the value and place of CAM, and in turn ascribe it varying levels of legitimacy potentially limiting integration. Second, that while some health professionals may articulate a degree of support for CAM, this is limited by perceptions of CAM as lacking efficacy and intruding on their respective jurisdictional claims. Further research is needed in the Brazilian context to explore patient and professional perspectives on experiences on CAM in cancer care, including how oncology professionals' varying positions on CAM may influence what patients are prepared to use, or discuss, in the context of cancer care. PMID:27515873

  20. Pediatricians' attitudes, experience and referral patterns regarding complementary/alternative medicine: a national survey

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    Thomas Ronald

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess pediatricians' attitudes toward & practice of Complementary/Alternative Medicine (CAM including their knowledge, experience, & referral patterns for CAM therapies. Methods An anonymous, self-report, 27-item questionnaire was mailed nationally to fellows of the American Academy of Pediatrics in July 2004. 648 of 3500 pediatricians' surveyed responded (18%. Results The median age ranged from 46–59 yrs; 52% female, 81% Caucasian, 71% generalists, & 85% trained in the US. Over 96% of pediatricians' responding believed their patients were using CAM. Discussions of CAM use were initiated by the family (70% & only 37% of pediatricians asked about CAM use as part of routine medical history. Majority (84% said more CME courses should be offered on CAM and 71% said they would consider referring patients to CAM practitioners. Medical conditions referred for CAM included; chronic problems (headaches, pain management, asthma, backaches (86%, diseases with no known cure (55.5% or failure of conventional therapies (56%, behavioral problems (49%, & psychiatric disorders (47%. American born, US medical school graduates, general pediatricians, & pediatricians who ask/talk about CAM were most likely to believe their patients used CAM (P Conclusion Pediatricians' have a positive attitude towards CAM. Majority believe that their patients are using CAM, that asking about CAM should be part of routine medical history, would consider referring to a CAM practitioner and want more education on CAM.

  1. Berry Leaves: An Alternative Source of Bioactive Natural Products of Nutritional and Medicinal Value†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferlemi, Anastasia-Varvara; Lamari, Fotini N.

    2016-01-01

    Berry fruits are recognized, worldwide, as “superfoods” due to the high content of bioactive natural products and the health benefits deriving from their consumption. Berry leaves are byproducts of berry cultivation; their traditional therapeutic use against several diseases, such as the common cold, inflammation, diabetes, and ocular dysfunction, has been almost forgotten nowadays. Nevertheless, the scientific interest regarding the leaf composition and beneficial properties grows, documenting that berry leaves may be considered an alternative source of bioactives. The main bioactive compounds in berry leaves are similar as in berry fruits, i.e., phenolic acids and esters, flavonols, anthocyanins, and procyanidins. The leaves are one of the richest sources of chlorogenic acid. In various studies, these secondary metabolites have demonstrated antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, cardioprotective, and neuroprotective properties. This review focuses on the phytochemical composition of the leaves of the commonest berry species, i.e., blackcurrant, blackberry, raspberry, bilberry, blueberry, cranberry, and lingonberry leaves, and presents their traditional medicinal uses and their biological activities in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27258314

  2. Berry Leaves: An Alternative Source of Bioactive Natural Products of Nutritional and Medicinal Value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferlemi, Anastasia-Varvara; Lamari, Fotini N

    2016-01-01

    Berry fruits are recognized, worldwide, as "superfoods" due to the high content of bioactive natural products and the health benefits deriving from their consumption. Berry leaves are byproducts of berry cultivation; their traditional therapeutic use against several diseases, such as the common cold, inflammation, diabetes, and ocular dysfunction, has been almost forgotten nowadays. Nevertheless, the scientific interest regarding the leaf composition and beneficial properties grows, documenting that berry leaves may be considered an alternative source of bioactives. The main bioactive compounds in berry leaves are similar as in berry fruits, i.e., phenolic acids and esters, flavonols, anthocyanins, and procyanidins. The leaves are one of the richest sources of chlorogenic acid. In various studies, these secondary metabolites have demonstrated antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, cardioprotective, and neuroprotective properties. This review focuses on the phytochemical composition of the leaves of the commonest berry species, i.e., blackcurrant, blackberry, raspberry, bilberry, blueberry, cranberry, and lingonberry leaves, and presents their traditional medicinal uses and their biological activities in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27258314

  3. Berry Leaves: An Alternative Source of Bioactive Natural Products of Nutritional and Medicinal Value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia-Varvara Ferlemi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Berry fruits are recognized, worldwide, as “superfoods” due to the high content of bioactive natural products and the health benefits deriving from their consumption. Berry leaves are byproducts of berry cultivation; their traditional therapeutic use against several diseases, such as the common cold, inflammation, diabetes, and ocular dysfunction, has been almost forgotten nowadays. Nevertheless, the scientific interest regarding the leaf composition and beneficial properties grows, documenting that berry leaves may be considered an alternative source of bioactives. The main bioactive compounds in berry leaves are similar as in berry fruits, i.e., phenolic acids and esters, flavonols, anthocyanins, and procyanidins. The leaves are one of the richest sources of chlorogenic acid. In various studies, these secondary metabolites have demonstrated antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, cardioprotective, and neuroprotective properties. This review focuses on the phytochemical composition of the leaves of the commonest berry species, i.e., blackcurrant, blackberry, raspberry, bilberry, blueberry, cranberry, and lingonberry leaves, and presents their traditional medicinal uses and their biological activities in vitro and in vivo.

  4. An Active Learning Complementary and Alternative Medicine Session in a Self-Care Therapeutics Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemec, Eric C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To provide an interactive, non-supplement based complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) session in a self-care therapeutics class and to evaluate the effect of the session on pharmacy students’ perceptions and knowledge of CAM. Design. Second professional year pharmacy students enrolled in a required 3-credit course titled Self-Care Therapeutics participated in an active learning session on CAM. Students physically engaged in 5 separate active learning CAM sessions including massage therapy, Tai Chi, yoga, progressive muscle relaxation, and Reiki. Assessment. Students were assessed on both knowledge and perception of CAM. Concept mastery was assessed using a written examination and individual readiness assurance tests (iRAT) and team readiness assurance tests (tRAT). Perception of CAM was measured using both a presession and a postsession survey. Conclusion. Participating in an intensive, active learning CAM session provided an opportunity to increase students’ knowledge of CAM and an effective strategy for providing the learner with the experience to better envision incorporation into patient therapies. PMID:25258446

  5. Complementary and Alternative Medicine: A Survey of Its Use in Pediatric Oncology

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    Rafiaa Valji

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM is high among children and youths with chronic illnesses, including cancer. The objective of this study was to assess prevalence and patterns of CAM use among pediatric oncology outpatients in two academic clinics in Canada. Procedure. A survey was developed to ask patients (or their parents/guardians presenting to oncology clinics at the Stollery Children’s Hospital in Edmonton and the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO in Ottawa about current or previous use of CAM products and practices. Results. Of the 137 families approached, 129 completed the survey. Overall CAM use was 60.5% and was not significantly different between the two hospitals. The most commonly reported reason for not using CAM was lack of knowledge about it. The most common CAM products ever used were multivitamins (86.5%, vitamin C (43.2%, cold remedies (28.4%, teething remedies (27.5%, and calcium (23.0%. The most common CAM practices ever used were faith healing (51.0%, massage (46.8%, chiropractic (27.7%, and relaxation (25.5%. Many patients (40.8% used CAM products at the same time as prescription drugs. Conclusion. CAM use was high among patients at two academic pediatric oncology clinics. Although most respondents felt that their CAM use was helpful, many were not discussing it with their physicians.

  6. [Treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus oral Chinese patent medicine literature metrology analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Tong-hua; Li, Yuan-yuan

    2012-09-01

    The CBM, CNKI database 1979-2012 included oral Chinese patent medicine treatment diabetes literature, and the literature published time, periodical distribution, sources of literature and statistical analysis, to explore the treatment of type 2 diabetes medicine clinical literature distribution law and development trend, as in diabetes research related to the clinical and scientific research personnel to provide reference. PMID:23236770

  7. Use of complementary and alternative treatment methods among adults in Slovenia

    OpenAIRE

    Kersnik, Janko; Klemenc-Ketiš, Zalika; Ivetić, Vojislav; Čreslovnik, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of our research was to determine how many people use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and how the use of CAM depends on the gender, age, education, and the living environment of each individual person. We wanted to determine the level of fondness for the providers of CAM and define the most popular alternative medicinal preparations. Methods: The cross-sectional study was based on an anonymous questionnaire sent to the houses of a randomly selected sample (N=1000)...

  8. Understanding unexpected courses of multiple sclerosis among patients using complementary and alternative medicine: A travel from recipient to explorer

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    Anita Salamonsen

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM is frequently used by patients with multiple sclerosis (MS. Some MS patients experience unexpected improvements of symptoms, which they relate to their use of CAM. The aim of this study was to obtain knowledge and develop understandings of such self-defined unexpected improvement of MS symptoms. Two cases were constructed based on documents and 12 qualitative interviews. Our aim was not to make generalisations from the cases, but to transfer knowledge as working hypotheses. We identified four health-related change processes: the process of losing bodily competence; the process of developing responsibility; the process of taking control; and the process of choosing CAM. The patients explained unexpected improvements in their MS symptoms as results of their own efforts including their choice and use of CAM. In our theoretical interpretations, we found the patients’ redefinition of history, the concept of treatment and the importance of conventional health care to be essential, and leading to a change of patients’ position towards conventional health care from recipients to explorers. The explorers can be perceived as boundary walkers reflecting limitations within the conventional health care system and as initiators regarding what MS patients find useful in CAM.

  9. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Approaches for Pediatric Pain: A Review of the State-of-the-science

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    Jennie C. I. Tsao

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM in pediatric populations has increased considerably, especially for chronic conditions such as cancer, rheumatoid arthritis and cystic fibrosis in which pain may be a significant problem. Despite the growing popularity of CAM approaches for pediatric pain, questions regarding the efficacy of these interventions remain. This review critically evaluates the existing empirical evidence for the efficacy of CAM interventions for pain symptoms in children. CAM modalities that possess a published literature, including controlled trials and/or multiple baseline studies, that focused on either chronic or acute, procedural pain were included in this review. The efficacy of the CAM interventions was evaluated according to the framework developed by the American Psychological Association (APA Division 12 Task Force on Promotion and Dissemination of Psychological Procedures. According to these criteria, only one CAM approach reviewed herein (self-hypnosis/guided imagery/relaxation for recurrent pediatric headache qualified as an empirically supported therapy (EST, although many may be considered possibly efficacious or promising treatments for pediatric pain. Several methodological limitations of the existing literature on CAM interventions for pain problems in children are highlighted and future avenues for research are outlined.

  10. Complementary and Alternative Medicine use Among Patients with Acne Vulgaris or Melasma in Dermatology Clinic: a Questionnaire Survey

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    Çiçek Durusoy

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To determine the prevalence rate and types of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM use among patients diagnosed with acne vulgaris (AV or melasma, and to identify the factors influencing the use of CAM.Method: This study included 73 patients who attended dermatology outpatient clinic in Alanya Başkent University and diagnosed with AV or melasma. Each patient was asked to answer a questionnaire consisting of sociodemografic information and negative impact of their disease on their psychological and physical health status and work/friendship relations, their history of using CAM methods. Results: Of the study patients, 54 were diagnosed with AV and 19 with melasma. The proportion of CAM use was 52,1%in total; 57.4 %of AV and 36,8%of melasma patients had used CAM. Females with regard to the males, those having problems in work/friendship relations with regard to those who have not, were using CAM in high proportion. All CAM users have applied phytotherapy, and 63,2 %of the patients have learned these methods from family members and/or friends.Conclusion: Our results show that CAM use is common in patients with AV and melasma. Since the CAM methods have the potential of influencing the outcomes of the disease by interacting with the medical treatment modalities, dermatologists should enquire about CAM use as it may by.

  11. A survey of chinese medicinal herbal treatment for chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis

    OpenAIRE

    Sven Schröder; Matthias Rostock; Henry Johannes Greten; Thomas Efferth; Janine Radtke; Gesa Meyer-Hamme; Kathrin Beckmann

    2013-01-01

    Oral mucositis is one of the common side effects of chemotherapy treatment with potentially severe implications. Despite several treatment approaches by conventional and complementary western medicine, the therapeutic outcome is often not satisfactory. Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) offers empirical herbal formulas for the treatment of oral ulceration which are used in adaptation to chemotherapy-induced mucositis. While standard concepts for TCM treatment do not exist and acceptance by co...

  12. Medical students’ knowledge, attitude, and practice of complementary and alternative medicine: a pre- and post-exposure survey in Majmaah University, Saudi Arabia

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    Al Mansour MA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mohammed Abdullah Al Mansour,1 Abdullah MN Al-Bedah,2 Mohammed Othman AlRukban,3 Ibrahim S Elsubai,2 Elsadiq Yousif Mohamed,4 Ahmed Tawfik El Olemy,2 Asim AH Khalil,2 Mohamed KM Khalil,2 Meshari Saleh Alqaed,2 Abdullah Almudaiheem,2 Waqas Sami Mahmoud,4 Khalid Altohami Medani,4 Naseem Akhtar Qureshi2 1College of Medicine, Majmaah University, Al Majma’ah, 2National Center of Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Ministry of Health, 3Department of Family Medicine and Community Medicine, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, 4Department of Community Medicine and Public Health, College of Medicine, Majmaah University, Al Majma’ah, Saudi Arabia Background: Evidently, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM is a recognized medical practice that efficiently uses multiple treatment therapies and techniques in the prevention and management of a variety of human disorders. Many medical schools have integrated CAM curriculum in medical education system worldwide. Research in knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP of diverse health professionals exposed to CAM courses is important from many perspectives including improvement in KAP and teaching skills of faculty, together with capacity building and curriculum development.Objective and setting: This pre- and post-design cross-sectional study aimed to assess CAM-KAP of two intakes of medical students in Majmaah University, Saudi Arabia.Methods: The second-year medical students of the first (year 2012–2013 and second (year 2013–2014 intake (n=26 and 39, respectively were selected for this study. A reliable, 16-item self-administered questionnaire was distributed among all the students for answering before and after the 48-hour CAM course. The data were analyzed using appropriate statistical test of significance.Results: Medical students’ knowledge and attitude toward CAM significantly improved across some subitems of CAM questionnaire with a positive trend in the rest of its items

  13. Alternative endoscopic management in the treatment of urethral strictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niesel, T; Moore, R G; Alfert, H J; Kavoussi, L R

    1995-02-01

    Advances in endoscopic instrumentation and techniques have expanded our armamentarium for safe and effective treatment of urethral strictures. Endoscopic incision or dilation should remain the preferred treatment for uncomplicated primary strictures. Balloon dilation can be useful in the treatment of dense strictures. Incision using laser energy has yet to provide better results than procedures employing a cold knife. As such, it would be difficult to justify the added expense of laser urethrotomy. Endoscopic placement of free skin grafts into the bed of the urethra after transurethral resection or deep incision of the stricture is a novel approach that has shown a great deal of promise. Endourethroplasty is a reasonable alternative to open urethroplasty when treating long strictures, as more than 90% of the reported patients have had a successful outcome with no recurrence. However, larger experience with this procedure is necessary to verify its efficacy and for greater acceptance. The placement of indwelling stents is another new promising treatment option. Overall short-term success rates range from 75% to 100%, but the follow-up period is short, and little is known about the long-term risks of an indwelling foreign body in the urethra. Endoscopic incision via "cut-to-the-light" or "core-through" procedures is an excellent alternative in patients with obliterative strictures. Data from several centers reveal that the majority of patients gain relief of obstruction while maintaining continence and erectile potency. However, at least 25% of these patients will need further endoscopic management to maintain urethral patency. PMID:7780428

  14. An alternative approach for treatment of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartzendruber, D E; Retsky, M W; Wardwell, R H; Bame, P D

    1994-01-01

    Since adjuvant chemotherapy and hormonal therapy generally extend disease free survival in breast cancer rather than provide a cure, we have examined the current breast cancer paradigm. Heterogeneity is a fundamental characteristic of breast cancer tissue and a well recognized aspect of the disease. There are variations in natural history, histopathology, biochemistry and endocrinology, and molecular biology of cancer tissues and cells within the tissues. A variety of data indicate that growth kinetics are also variable, not only from tumor to tumor, but also during the natural history of an individual's tumor. To better understand kinetic heterogeneity, a stochastic numeric computer model of the natural history of breast cancer has been developed. To be consistent with inter- and intratumor kinetic heterogeneity and with late relapse, the model predicts that tumors grow in an irregular fashion with alternating periods of growth and periods of dormancy rather than the generally accepted modified exponential, or Gompertzian fasion. The prediction of irregular growth has been compared to data relevant to growth characteristics of human breast cancer. Much data support the concept of irregular kinetics and temporary dormancy rather than steady, Gompertzian growth of human breast cancer. Thus, in addition to drug resistance, kinetic heterogeneity may help explain the limited impact that traditional chemotherpeutic treatment has had on mortality from breast cancer. Although the mechanisms underlying irregular growth need to be better understood, non-Gompertzian growth kinetics indicates that there may be alternative approaches for breast cancer treatment. PMID:7865858

  15. Complementary or alternative medicine as possible determinant of decreased persistence to aromatase inhibitor therapy among older women with non-metastatic breast cancer.

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    Laetitia Huiart

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Aromatase inhibitor therapy (AI significantly improves survival in breast cancer patients. Little is known about adherence and persistence to aromatase inhibitors and about the causes of treatment discontinuation among older women. METHODS: We constituted a cohort of women over 65 receiving a first AI therapy for breast cancer between 2006 and 2008, and followed them until June 2011. Women were selected in the population-based French National Health Insurance databases, and data was collected on the basis of pharmacy refills, medical records and face-to-face interviews. Non-persistence to treatment was defined as the first treatment discontinuation lasting more than 3 consecutive months. Time to treatment discontinuation was studied using survival analysis techniques. RESULTS: Overall among the 382 selected women, non-persistence to treatment went from 8.7% (95%CI: 6.2-12.1 at 1 year, to 15.6% (95%CI: 12.2-19.8 at 2 years, 20.8% (95%CI: 16.7-25.6 at 3 years, and 24.7% (95%CI: 19.5-31.0 at 4 years. In the multivariate analysis on a sub-sample of 233 women with available data, women using complementary or alternative medicine (CAM (HR = 3.2; 95%CI: 1.5-6.9 or suffering from comorbidities (HR = 2.2; 95%CI: 1.0-4.8 were more likely to discontinue their treatment, whereas women with polypharmacy (HR = 0.4; 95%CI: 0.2-0.91 were less likely to discontinue. In addition, 13% of the women with positive hormonal receptor status did not fill any prescription for anti-hormonal therapy. CONCLUSION: AI therapy is discontinued prematurely in a substantial portion of older patients. Some patients may use CAM not as a complementary treatment, but as an alternative to conventional medicine. Improving patient-physician communication on the use of CAM may improve hormonal therapy adherence.

  16. Comparison between Complementary Dietary Treatment of Alzheimer Disease in Iranian Traditional Medicine and Modern Medicine.

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    Mohammad Mahdi Ahmadian-Attari

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Dietary notifications have been introduced recently for Alzheimer Disease (AD. In Iranian old medical manuscripts, there are some nutritional recommendations related to Nesyan (AD equivalent. The aim of this article was to compare dietary recommendations of Iranian traditional medicine (ITM with novel medical outcomes.1 Searching for dietary recommendations and abstinences described in ITM credible manuscripts; 2 Extracting fatty components of ITM diet according to the database of the Department of Agriculture of the USA; 3 Statistical analysis of fatty elements of traditionally recommended foods via Mann-Whitney Test in comparison with elements of the abstinent ones; 4 Searching for AD dietary recommendations and abstinences which currently published in medical journals; 5 Comparing traditional and new dietary suggestions with each other.1 Traditionally recommended foods are fattier than abstinent ones (P<0.001. There are meaningful differences between unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs (P<0.001, saturated fatty acids (P<0.001, and cholesterol (P<0.05 of recommended foods and abstinent ones. 2 Traditionally recommended diet is also fattier than the abstinent diet (4.5 times; UFAs of the recommended diet is 11 times more than that of the abstinent one; it is the same story for cholesterol (1.4 times; 3 Recent studies show that diets with high amounts of UFAs have positive effects on AD; a considerable number of papers emphasizes on probable positive role of cholesterol on AD; 4 Traditional recommended diet is in agreement with recent studies.ITM recommended diet which is full of unsaturated fatty acids and cholesterol can be utilized for complementary treatment of AD.

  17. Academic doctors' views of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM and its role within the NHS: an exploratory qualitative study

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    Shaw Alison

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There has been a marked increase in the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM in the UK population in recent years. Surveys of doctors' perspectives on CAM have identified a variety of views and potential information needs. While these are useful for describing the proportions of doctors who hold particular attitudes towards CAM, they are less helpful for understanding why. In addition, while the views of non-academic doctors have begun to be studied, the perspective and rationales of academic doctors remains under-researched. It seems important to investigate the views of those with a research-orientation, given the emphasis on the need for more scientific evidence in recent debates on CAM. Methods This exploratory study used qualitative methods to explore academic doctors' views of CAM and the rationales they provided for their views. A purposeful sampling strategy was used to identify doctors with a dual clinical and academic role in the Bristol area, with an anticipated variety of views on CAM. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with nine doctors. The data were analysed thematically, drawing on the Framework Approach. Results The doctors expressed a spectrum of views on CAM, falling into three broad groups: the 'enthusiasts', the 'sceptics' and the 'undecided'. Scepticism or uncertainty about the value of CAM was prominent, except among those practising a form of CAM. A variety of rationales underpinned their perspectives on CAM, a key recurring rationale being their perspective on the scientific evidence base. The main themes arising included: the role of doctors' professional experiences of conventional medicine and CAM in shaping their attitudes towards CAM, doctor-patient communication about CAM and patient disclosure, whether there is a need for training and education in CAM for doctors, a hierarchy of acceptability of CAM and the nature of evidence; and the role of CAM within the NHS. Conclusion

  18. Evaluating complementary and alternative medicine interventions: in search of appropriate patient-centered outcome measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallory Devon

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Central to the development of a sound evidence base for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM interventions is the need for valid, reliable and relevant outcome measures to assess whether the interventions work. We assessed the specific needs for a database that would cover a wide range of outcomes measures for CAM research and considered a framework for such a database. Methods The study was a survey of CAM researchers, practitioners and students. An online questionnaire was emailed to the members of the Canadian Interdisciplinary Network for CAM Research (IN-CAM and the CAM Education and Research Network of Alberta (CAMera. The majority of survey questions were open-ended and asked about outcome measures currently used, outcome measures' assessment criteria, sources of information, perceived barriers to finding outcome measures and outcome domains of importance. Descriptive quantitative analysis and qualitative content analysis were used. Results One hundred and sixty-four completed surveys were received. Of these, 62 respondents reported using outcome measures in their CAM research and identified 92 different specific outcomes. The most important barriers were the fact that, for many health concepts, outcome measures do not yet exist, as well as issues related to accessibility of instruments. Important outcome domains identified included physical, psychological, social, spiritual, quality of life and holistic measures. Participants also mentioned the importance of individualized measures that assess unique patient-centered outcomes for each research participant, and measures to assess the context of healing and the process of healing. Conclusion We have developed a preliminary framework that includes all components of health-related outcomes. The framework provides a foundation for a larger, comprehensive collection of CAM outcomes. It fits very well in a whole systems perspective, which requires an expanded set of

  19. The use of complementary and alternative medicine among people living with diabetes in Sydney

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    Manya Kiran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM is common in patients with chronic disease such as diabetes mellitus. The primary objective of the study was to determine the overall prevalence and type of CAM use in individuals with diabetes mellitus (DM in Western Sydney and to compare the prevalence and factors associated with CAM use with the literature. Methods A multicenter cross-sectional study was undertaken using a self-completed questionnaire distributed to patients with DM attending a public hospital and specialist endocrinology clinics in the region. The type of DM and pattern of CAM utilisation were analyzed. Results Sixty nine people responded to the questionnaire: age range of 18-75 years during a twelve week collection period. Overall, 32 respondents with diabetes were using some form of CAM, resulting in a utilisation rate of 46.3%. Twenty of the 32 CAM users used CAM specifically to treat their diabetes accounting for 28.9% of the respondent sample population. Multivitamins (40%, cinnamon, Co-enzyme q10 and prayer were the most frequently used CAM modalities. There was no significant difference between males and females, age range, income or diabetes complications between CAM and non-CAM users. (p values each > 0.05 The factor most significantly associated with CAM usage was being born overseas (p = 0.044. Conclusions Almost half the respondents (46.3% used CAM: 28% used CAM specifically to treat their diabetes. Individuals born overseas were significantly more likely to use CAM than those born in Australia. Other factors such as age, gender, wealth and duration of living with diabetes were not associated with higher rate of CAM usage.

  20. Complementary and alternative medicine use among older Australian women - a qualitative analysis

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    McLaughlin Deirdre

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of complementary and alternative medicines (CAM among older adults is an emerging health issue, however little is known about older people's experiences of using CAM and the cultural, geographical and other determinants of CAM use in this population. This study used qualitative methods to explore older women's views of CAM and reasons for their use of CAM. Participants for the project were drawn from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (ALSWH 1921-1926 birth cohort. Women who responded positively to a question about CAM use in Survey 5 (2008 of the ALSWH were invited to participate in the study. A total of 13 rural and 12 urban women aged between 83 and 88 years agreed to be interviewed. Results The women expressed a range of views on CAM which fell into three broad themes: "push" factors such as dissatisfaction with conventional health services, "pull" factors which emphasised the positive aspects of choice and self-care in health matters, and barriers to CAM use. Overall, the "push' factors did not play a major role in the decision to use CAM, rather this was driven by "pull" factors related to health care self-responsibility and being able to source positive information about types of CAM. A number of barriers were identified such as access difficulties associated with increased age, limited mobility and restricted transport options, as well as financial constraints. Conclusions CAM use among older women was unlikely to be influenced by aspects of conventional health care ("push factors", but rather was reflective of the personal beliefs of the women and members of their close social networks ("pull factors". While it was also apparent that there were differences between the rural and urban women in their use of CAM, the reasons for this were mainly due to the difficulties inherent in accessing certain types of CAM in rural areas.

  1. Complementary and alternative medicine use among women at increased genetic risk of breast and ovarian cancer

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    Loud Jennifer T

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM use is well documented among breast cancer patients and survivors, but little evidence is available to describe rates and patterns of use among women at increased genetic risk of breast cancer. Methods A pre-visit telephone interview was conducted to ascertain CAM use among the BRCA mutation carriers enrolled in a high-risk breast cancer screening study. Participants were asked to report on their use of thirteen therapies within the year prior to enrollment into the study. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between various factors and CAM use in this population. Results Among the 164 BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation-positive (BRCA+ women in this analysis, 78% reported CAM use, with prayer and lifestyle diet being the two most commonly reported modalities. Many subjects used multiple CAM therapies, with 34% reporting use of three or more modalities. The most commonly used modalities were mind-body therapies and biologically-based practices, 61.6% and 51.8%, respectively. High-risk women were more likely to use CAM if they were older, more educated, more worried about ovarian cancer risk, or had a previous cancer diagnosis. Conclusion This study suggests that the prevalence of CAM use is high among BRCA mutation carriers, with frequency of use comparable to that of breast cancer patients and survivors. Given the high prevalence of CAM use in our subjects, especially biologically-based therapies including herbal supplements, whose safety and efficacy in relation to cancer risk are unknown, our study suggests that future research is necessary to clarify these risks, and that it is important for providers to inquire about and to discuss the pros and cons of CAM use with their BRCA+ patients.

  2. Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine: A survey in Turkish Gastroenterology Patients

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    Kav Taylan

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The study examined complementary and alternative medicine (CAM usage by patients attending a Turkish gastroenterology outpatient clinic. Methods The survey was conducted on 216 patients presenting with gastrointestinal problems during their first visit to the clinic using a 31 item, self-report questionnaire between May and October 2005. Data included information on patient demographics and their gastrointestinal symptoms, as well as items to identify CAM use and patient satisfaction with these therapies. Results Seventy-nine patients (36.6% reported using one or more forms of CAM. The most commonly used therapy was herbal therapy, usually taken as a tea or infusion. These were used by 27 people (29% in this subgroup. Common indicators for their use were epigastric pain, constipation, bloating and dyspepsia or indigestion. CAM use among upper GI patients was marginally higher than lower GI patients (41.8% versus 41.2%, but the highest usage was amongst patients with liver disease where 53.8% reported using one or more CAM therapy. About half of the patients learned about CAM from their relatives or friends, with more women than men using the therapies (p Conclusion CAM usage in our sample of gastrointestinal patients was lower than that described in other countries and other chronic disease groups. This could be due to their low perceived efficacy, or the relatively transient duration of symptoms experienced by the sample. Healthcare professionals need however, to be aware of CAM usage in order to educate patients appropriately about possible adverse effects or drug-interactions.

  3. Use of complementary and alternative medicine among asthmatic patients in primary care clinics in Malaysia

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    Alshagga Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aimed to determine the knowledge about asthma and the prevalence, disclosure and evaluation of the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM among asthmatic patients. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 95 patients diagnosed with asthma in a primary healthcare centre in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia using a self-administered questionnaire. Results: Ninety-five patients with a mean age of 47.06 years (±12.8 participated, the majority were female (66.7%, Malay (72.6%. The prevalence of ever-CAM use was 61.1%. The non-ever-CAM users′ mean age was 51±13.9 years while the ever-CAM users′ mean age was 44.5 ±11.5 years ( P = 0.021. Sixty-three females (66.8% used CAM compared to 14 males (43.8% ( P = 0.014. Thirty-six (62.1% CAM users had not discussed use of CAM with their doctors. The main reason of non-disclosure was "the doctor never asked" (55.6%, and the main sources of information about CAM were family and relatives (46.6%. There was no significant difference between use of CAM and knowledge about asthma. The majority of asthmatic patients used rubs (39%, foods (16.9% and herbs (16.9%. About 76% of asthmatic patients perceived CAM as good for their disease management. On linear multiple regression, Malay race ( P = 0.026 and female gender ( P = 0.006 were significant predictors of CAM use. Conclusion: Use of CAM among asthmatic patients is relatively high, particularly among females. The majority of asthmatic patients valued the use of CAM. Non-disclosure was high in this study. Health education of asthmatic patients about CAM is highly recommended.

  4. Obtaining membranes for alternative treatment hydrogels of cutaneous leishmaniasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polymeric Hydrogels formed by crosslinked polymeric chains were obtained by ionizing radiation process according to Rosiak technique. In the last 40 years the use of hydrogels has been investigated for various applications as curatives. In this work hydrogel membranes were synthesized with poly (N-2-pyrrolidone) (PVP), poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA), chitosan and laponita clay for use as a vehicle for controlled glucantime release on the surface of skin tissues injured by leishmaniasis. Leishmaniasis is a disease caused by a protozoan parasite of the genus Leishmania transmitted by the bite of phlebotomies sandfly. The traditional treatment of patients infected by these parasites is done with pentavalent antimony in injectable form. However, these antimonates are highly toxic and cause side effects in these patients. In addition, patients with heart and kidney disease can not use this treatment. In treatment with drug delivery hydrogel membrane applied on the surface of leishmaniasis injured tissues the drug is released directly to the wound in a controlled manner, reducing the side effects. Membranes prepared in this study were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TG), swelling, gel fraction, infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The characterizations of cytotoxicity and drug release were made 'in vitro' and 'in vivo' with functional test according to ethical protocol of the Division of Infectious and Parasitic Diseases at the Hospital of Clinics, Sao Paulo University-School of Medicine, University. The 'in vivo' test of these membranes proved to be effective in controlled release of drugs directly into leishmaniasis damaged tissues. Results of 'in vivo' tests using PVP/PVAl / clay 1,5% and glucantime membrane showed remarkable contribution to wound reduction and cure in clinical therapy. (author)

  5. Physicians’ knowledge and communication about traditional, complementary and alternative medicine use among Latino patients at Kaiser Permanente, Oakland CA

    OpenAIRE

    Bauer, Ingrid; Guerra, Juan J.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding Latinos’ health beliefs and traditional, complementary and alternative medicine (TCAM) practices, and improving cross-cultural communication skills may improve quality of care and reduce health disparities. Although studies have examined the health beliefs and practices of Latino patients, few have examined the knowledge, attitudes, and communication skills of health care providers in regards to Latino TCAM use. This paper discusses the results from 10 physician questionnaires, ...

  6. Complementary and Alternative Medicine use Among Patients with Acne Vulgaris or Melasma in Dermatology Clinic: a Questionnaire Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Çiçek Durusoy; A. Tülin Güleç; Elif Durukan; Coşkun Bakar

    2010-01-01

    Aims: To determine the prevalence rate and types of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use among patients diagnosed with acne vulgaris (AV) or melasma, and to identify the factors influencing the use of CAM.Method: This study included 73 patients who attended dermatology outpatient clinic in Alanya Başkent University and diagnosed with AV or melasma. Each patient was asked to answer a questionnaire consisting of sociodemografic information and negative impact of their disease on the...

  7. Use of complementary and alternative medicine in patients with health complaints attributed to former dental amalgam fillings

    OpenAIRE

    Kristoffersen, Agnete Egilsdatter; Musial, Frauke; Hamre, Harald Johan; Björkman, Lars; Stub, Trine; Salamonsen, Anita; Alræk, Terje

    2016-01-01

    Background. The dental filling material amalgam is generally well tolerated. However, a small proportion of dental patients experience health complaints which they attribute to amalgam. The symptom pattern is often similar to patients with medically unexplained physical symptoms (MUPS) and the health complaints may persist after amalgam removal. Among patients with MUPS, the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) seems to be high. The aim of this survey was to describe the preval...

  8. Association of Health Literacy with Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use: A Cross-Sectional Study in Adult Primary Care Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Bains Sujeev S; Egede Leonard E

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background In the United States, it is estimated that 40% of adults utilize complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies. Recently, national surveys report that over 90 million adults have inadequate health literacy. To date, no study has assessed health literacy and its effect on CAM use. The primary objective of this study was to assess the relationship between health literacy and CAM use independent of educational attainment. Second objective was to evaluate the differen...

  9. A scoping review of research on complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and the mass media: Looking back, moving forward

    OpenAIRE

    Strudsholm Tina; Weeks Laura C

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has become more common in Western developed countries in recent years, as has media reporting on CAM and related issues. Correspondingly, media reports are a primary information source regarding decisions to use CAM. Research on CAM related media reports is becoming increasingly relevant and important; however, identifying key concepts to guide future research is problematic due to the dispersed nature of completed re...

  10. Traditional Japanese herbal medicines for treatment of odontopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Kojiro eYamaguchi

    2015-01-01

    This article highlights several refractory oral diseases, such as stomatitis, burning mouth syndrome (BMS), glossalgia, atypical facial pain (AFP), oral cancer, dry mouth, and Sjögren’s syndrome(SJS), in which use of Japanese herbal medicines, Kampo medicines(KM), on the basis of Kampo theory could exert the maximum effects on human body. 1) In acute stomatitis, heat because of agitated vital energy may affect the head, chest, and middle abdominal region. Stomatitis is also related to the gen...

  11. Traditional Japanese herbal medicines for treatment of odontopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Yamaguchi, Kojiro

    2015-01-01

    This article highlights several refractory oral diseases, such as stomatitis, burning mouth syndrome (BMS), glossalgia, atypical facial pain (AFP), oral cancer, dry mouth, and Sjögren's syndrome (SJS), in which use of Japanese herbal medicines, Kampo medicines (KM), on the basis of Kampo theory could exert the maximum effects on human body. (1) In acute stomatitis, heat because of agitated vital energy may affect the head, chest, and middle abdominal region. Stomatitis is also related to the ...

  12. A database for medicinal plants used in the treatment of diabetes and its secondary complications

    OpenAIRE

    Arulrayan, Nirmala; Rangasamy, Saradha; James, Eliza; Pitchai, Daisy

    2007-01-01

    Effective treatment of diabetes is increasingly dependent on active constituents of medicinal plants capable of controlling hyperglycemia as well as its secondary complications. Sensing the importance of documenting such medicinal plants, here we describe a web database containing information (name, literature citation, active compounds and few related full text articles) of the diabetes medicinal plants exhibiting hypoglycemic, antioxidant and antimicrobial effects. Availability http://www.a...

  13. The role of medicinal plants in the treatment of diabetes: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Kooti, Wesam; Farokhipour, Maryam; Asadzadeh, Zahra; Ashtary-Larky, Damoon; Asadi-Samani, Majid

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Diabetes is a serious metabolic disorder and plenty of medical plants are used in traditional medicines to treat diabetes. These plants have no side effects and many existing medicines are derived from the plants. The purpose of this systematic review is to study diabetes and to summarize the available treatments for this disease, focusing especially on herbal medicine. Methods Required papers about diabetes and effective plants were searched from the databases, including Science...

  14. Comparing the etiology and treatment of skin fissure in traditional and conventional medicine; a brief review

    OpenAIRE

    A. Jedkareh; Esmaeili, S.; A. Alembagheri; S.A. Mortazavi

    2016-01-01

    Dry skin is a common problem which affects wound healing, severity of other skin diseases and quality of life of people. One of its undesirable effects is fissure that is a cutaneous condition in which there is a linear loss of epidermis and dermis with sharply defined, nearly vertical walls. In the present study, we have investigated the etiology of the disease and its treatments in conventional medicine and Iranian Traditional Medicine (ITM). Two traditional medicine references, current sci...

  15. Effect of herb drug medicine Treatment for Functional Dyspepsia:Controlled Trial

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    Lee Jae-Jin

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Obejective : Functional dyspepsia is a prevalent disease. It impedes subjective quality of life. The purpose of this research is to examine the equivalent effect of herb drug medicine treatment(H-Dand Over the Counter(OTC for functional dyspepsia. Method : In this controlled study, we compared herb drug medicine(H-D with Over the Counter(OTC of functional dyspepsia. 30 volunteers who satisfied the requirements were enrolled in study. Severity of dyspepsia was measured by Nepean Dyspepsia Index(NDI-K before and after treatments. Result : The results are summarized as follows. 1. In Herb drug medicine and Over the Counter groups, total key symptoms score of after treatment were significantly decreased and improve rate of key symptoms was higher than before treatment, but there were no statistical significance between two groups. 2. In Herb drug medicine and Over the Counter groups, each symptoms score of after treatment were significantly decreased and improve rate of key symptoms was higher than before treatment, but there were no statistical significance between two groups. 3. In Herb drug medicine and Over the Counter groups, quality of life score of after treatment were significantly decreased and improve rate of key symptoms was higher than before treatment, but there were no statistical significance between two groups. Conclusion : Herb drug medicine treatment(H-D is effective to improve the symptoms and quality of life in patients with functional dyspepsia.

  16. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Treatment of Physical Health Problems Without a Known Cause, Exemplified by Hypertension and Tinnitus

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    Søren Ventegodt

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In the medical clinic, we often face health problems that have no known cause, even after a thorough examination. Biomedicine is often unable to find a cure in these situations, leaving the problem unsolved or leaving the patient on a palliative pharmaceutical cure, which is often for a lifetime. In this case, consciousness-based, holistic medicine could be an alternative. Using the theories and tools of holistic medicine wisely, the physician can often provide treatment for the patient. The toolbox of holistic medicine makes it possible to work on everybody because there is always something related to the patients quality of life that can be improved: his love, his purpose of life, and the way he uses his talents, his mind, his feelings, his body, and his sexuality. For treatment in holistic medicine, it really does not matter as much that you cannot give the patient a precise medical diagnosis, because you can always work on the patient with the intention of healing his or her whole life and existence. It is quite a paradox that many of these diseases can be understood on the level of the individual patient at the same moment that the patient is cured; many of these diseases seem to be clearly related to the repression of the individual character, as stressed already by Hippocrates. So if you simply start working with the patient to help him confront old existential pain and coach him in his personal development of his life by intensifying its meaning and purpose, the symptoms very often simply disappear. The toolbox of holistic medicine also seems relevant to even difficult, neurotic, psychosomatic, and hypochondriac patients. Believing in the treatment and not giving up on your patient, and moving forward in the treatment with the patient himself is the ultimate goal, even when you yourself do not understand the mechanism fully. This will force you to develop your own competence and is, in essence, what makes an outstanding holistic

  17. Most Common Herbal Medicines in the Treatment of Iranian Children: A Systematic Review

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    Masoumeh Ghazanfarpour

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To assess the efficacy of foeniculum Vulgar, menthe longifolia and Garlic in Iranian children. Methods and Matherials: Nine databases such as MEDLINE, Scopus and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials as well as domestic  database (Persian such as SID, Iranmedex, Magiran, Medlib, Irandoc, and Google Scholar were searched using keywords such as  “child” and “complementary treatments or alternative treatments or herbal treatments or Anthum Foeniculum or Capillaceum or Foeniculum Officinale or Foeniculum vulgare or menthe longifolia or Garlic in June 2014 Result: Five studies were included in the systematic review. Our systematic review showed beneficial effect of Foeniculum Vulgare on redacting of infant colic and also led to significant increase on prolactin levels in lactating mothers.  Base on only study, comparison between two groups (Shirafza and placebo Drops did not show any significant difference in regarding infant weight gain. Menthe longifolia combined with ORS improved frequency of defecation, Volume and consistency of stool. Also Review Systematic showed that Garlic significantly decreased fever, frequency and duration of diarrhea, leukocyte in stool.   Conclusion: herbals medicine (foeniculum Vulgar, menthe longifolia and Garlic had beneficial effect on Women's serum prolactin levels, infantile colic, frequency of defecation, Volume, consistency of stool. However, this result should be interpreted with caution which low number of sample and methodological quality.

  18. The Square Curve Paradigm for Research in Alternative, Complementary, and Holistic Medicine: A Cost-Effective, Easy, and Scientifically Valid Design for Evidence-Based Medicine and Quality Improvement

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    Soren Ventegodt

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present a new research paradigm for alternative, complementary, and holistic medicine — a low-cost, effective, and scientifically valid design for evidence-based medicine. Our aim is to find the simplest, cheapest, and most practical way to collect data of sufficient quality and validity to determine: (1 which kinds of treatment give a clinically relevant improvement to quality of life, health, and/or functionality; (2 which groups of patients can be aided by alternative, complementary, or holistic medicine; and (3 which therapists have the competence to achieve the clinically relevant improvements. Our solution to the problem is that a positive change in quality of life must be immediate to be taken as caused by an intervention. We define “immediate” as within 1 month of the intervention. If we can demonstrate a positive result with a group of chronic patients (20 or more patients who have had their disease or state of suffering for 1 year or more, who can be significantly helped within 1 month, and the situation is still improved 1 year after, we find it scientifically evidenced that this cure or intervention has helped the patients. We call this characteristic curve a “square curve”. If a global, generic, quality-of-life questionnaire like QOL5 or, even better, a QOL-Health-Ability questionnaire (a quality-of-life questionnaire combined with a self-evaluated health and ability to function questionnaire is administered to the patients before and after the intervention, it is possible to document the effect of an intervention to a cost of only a few thousand Euros/USD. A general acceptance of this new research design will solve the problem that there is not enough money in alternative, complementary, and holistic medicine to pay the normal cost of a biomedical Cochrane study. As financial problems must not hinder the vital research in nonbiomedical medicine, we ask the scientific community to accept this new research

  19. Alternative Focal Spot Geometry for More Efficient HIFU Treatment Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, Elena; Chen, Jing; Medan, Yoav; Pauly, Kim Butts

    2010-03-01

    In this work a more time efficient approach for tissue assessment with MR-ARFI is proposed. During HIFU treatments gadolinium-free assessment of treated tissue is highly desirable. MR-ARFI allows measuring tissue displacement in the focal spot. Therefore raster-scanning the ultrasound focal spot through the tissue of interest can give information about tissue stiffness in the "probed" area. To enhance efficiency of such ultrasound "probing," we replaced a conventional point focus with a line focus that allows greater area coverage during MR-ARFI acquisitions. This approach was tested in a phantom and in ex vivo bovine muscle. The results of the study showed that the line focus produces a fairly uniform line shape focal spot in both temperature and displacement maps. Using one line focus position, the displacement maps obtained in the muscle tissue well depicted the difference in displacement in the area where lesion was created. This shows great potential for line focus geometry combined with MR-ARFI as an alternative treatment assessment technique.

  20. Current Pharmaceutical Treatments and Alternative Therapies of Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jie; Cui, Yanhua; Li, Song; Le, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    Over the decades, pharmaceutical treatments, particularly dopaminergic (DAergic) drugs have been considered as the main therapy against motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). It is proposed that DAergic drugs in combination with other medications, such as monoamine oxidase type B inhibitors, catechol-O-methyl transferase inhibitors, anticholinergics and other newly developed non-DAergic drugs can make a better control of motor symptoms or alleviate levodopa-induced motor complications. Moreover, non-motor symptoms of PD, such as cognitive, neuropsychiatric, sleep, autonomic and sensory disturbances caused by intrinsic PD pathology or drug-induced side effects, are gaining increasing attention and urgently need to be taken care of due to their impact on quality of life. Currently, neuroprotective therapies have been investigated extensively in pre-clinical studies, and some of them have been subjected to clinical trials. Furthermore, non-pharmaceutical treatments, including deep brain stimulation (DBS), gene therapy, cell replacement therapy and some complementary managements, such as Tai chi, Yoga, traditional herbs and molecular targeted therapies have also been considered as effective alternative therapies to classical pharmaceutics. This review will provide us updated information regarding the current drugs and non-drugs therapies for PD. PMID:26585523

  1. Inflammatory bowel diseases: an update of current treatment alternatives.

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    Lucrecia Suárez

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD are characterized for having an unpredictable clinical course with periods of inactivity alternating with relapses, a very variable response to treatment and the constant threat of diverse complications. Management of IBD in children may be of particular complexity, added to the fact that published clinical trials are limited, and scientific evidence seems contradictory, explain in part why to current date there is no international consensus regarding treatment in this age group. A suitable therapy should aim at inducing and maintaining remission for as long as possible, encourage adequate growth and preventing potential complications from appearing. In more recent years, development of new therapeutic agents has allowed a more integrative approach which takes in consideration other aspects of the disease such as nutritional status, psychological welfare and general quality of life. One must also keep in mind that none of these therapeutic resources is exempt of side effects on short and long term basis, consequently, it is imperative to be thoughtful of individual features in order to make accurate clinical decisions and offer a tailored management plan which should be able to modify the disease evolution.

  2. The clinical effectiveness of cognitive behavior therapy and an alternative medicine approach in reducing symptoms of depression in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charkhandeh, Mansoureh; Talib, Mansor Abu; Hunt, Caroline Jane

    2016-05-30

    The main aim of the study was to investigate the effectiveness of two psychotherapeutic approaches, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and a complementary medicine method Reiki, in reducing depression scores in adolescents. We recruited 188 adolescent patients who were 12-17 years old. Participants were randomly assigned to CBT, Reiki or wait-list. Depression scores were assessed before and after the 12 week interventions or wait-list. CBT showed a significantly greater decrease in Child Depression Inventory (CDI) scores across treatment than both Reiki (pCBT and Reiki were effective in reducing the symptoms of depression over the treatment period, with effect for CBT greater than Reiki. These findings highlight the importance of early intervention for treatment of depression using both cognitive and complementary medicine approaches. However, research that tests complementary therapies over a follow-up period and against a placebo treatment is required. PMID:27058159

  3. Use of complementary and alternative medicine and self-tests by coronary heart disease patients

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    Jolly Kate

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coronary heart disease patients have to learn to manage their condition to maximise quality of life and prevent recurrence or deterioration. They may develop their own informal methods of self-management in addition to the advice they receive as part of formal cardiac rehabilitation programmes. This study aimed to explore the use of complementary and alternative medicines and therapies (CAM, self-test kits and attitudes towards health of UK patients one year after referral to cardiac rehabilitation. Method Questionnaire given to 463 patients attending an assessment clinic for 12 month follow up in four West Midlands hospitals. Results 91.1% completed a questionnaire. 29.1% of patients used CAM and/or self-test kits for self-management but few (8.9% used both methods. CAM was more often used for treating other illnesses than for CHD management. Self-test kit use (77.2%, was more common than CAM (31.7%, with BP monitors being the most prevalent (80.0%. Patients obtained self-test kits from a wide range of sources, for the most part (89.5% purchased entirely on their own initiative. Predictors of self-management were post revascularisation status and higher scores on 'holism', 'rejection of authority' and 'individual responsibility'. Predictors of self-test kit use were higher 'holism' and 'individual responsibility' scores. Conclusion Patients are independently using new technologies to monitor their cardiovascular health, a role formerly carried out only by healthcare practitioners. Post-rehabilitation patients reported using CAM for self-management less frequently than they reported using self-test kits. Reports of CAM use were less frequent than in previous surveys of similar patient groups. Automatic assumptions cannot be made by clinicians about which CHD patients are most likely to self-manage. In order to increase trust and compliance it is important for doctors to encourage all CHD patients to disclose their self

  4. Recruitment and Early Retention of Women with Advanced Breast Cancer in a Complementary and Alternative Medicine Trial

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    Alla Sikorskii

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available More than 80% of women with breast cancer are now reported to be using complementary and alternative medicine (CAM therapies during conventional treatment. A randomized clinical trial (RCT of reflexology with late stage breast cancer patients serves as the data source for this article. The purposes were to investigate: (i reasons for refusal to participate in a RCT of reflexology; (ii the differences between those who completed the baseline interview and those who dropped out before baseline; and (iii the utility of the Palliative Prognostic Score (PPS as a prognostic screening tool in minimizing early attrition (before baseline from the trial. Eligible women (N = 400 approached at 12 cancer centers in the Midwest had advanced breast cancer, were on chemotherapy or hormonal therapy, and had a PPS of 11 or less. Comparisons of those who dropped out early (N = 33 to those who stayed in the trial (N = 240 were carried out using Wilcoxon rank, t-, chi-squared and Fisher's exact tests. The reasons of being “too sick” or “overwhelmed” were given by less than 12% of the women who refused to participate. There was a higher early dropout rate among black women compared to other (primarily white women (P = .01. Cancer recurrence and metastasis, age, and the PPS were not predictive of early retention of women. Specialized techniques may be needed to ensure black women remain in the trial once consented. Women with advanced disease were likely to enter and remain in the trial despite deterioration in health.

  5. A Prospective, Multicenter Study of Complementary/Alternative Medicine (CAM) Utilization During Definitive Radiation for Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, Meena S., E-mail: meena.moran@yale.edu [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Department of Radiation Therapy, William W. Backus Hospital, Norwich, Connecticut (United States); Ma Shuangge [Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Jagsi, Reshma [University of Michigan, Department of Radiation Oncology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Yang, Tzu-I Jonathan [Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Higgins, Susan A. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Department of Radiation Therapy, Shoreline Medical Center, Guilford, Connecticut (United States); Weidhaas, Joanne B. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Wilson, Lynn D. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Department of Radiation Therapy, Lawrence and Memorial Hospital, New London, Connecticut (United States); Lloyd, Shane [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Peschel, Richard [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Department of Radiation Therapy, Lawrence and Memorial Hospital, New London, Connecticut (United States); Gaudreau, Bryant [Department of Radiation Therapy, William W. Backus Hospital, Norwich, Connecticut (United States); Rockwell, Sara [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Although complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) utilization in breast cancer patients is reported to be high, there are few data on CAM practices in breast patients specifically during radiation. This prospective, multi-institutional study was conducted to define CAM utilization in breast cancer during definitive radiation. Materials/Methods: A validated CAM instrument with a self-skin assessment was administered to 360 Stage 0-III breast cancer patients from 5 centers during the last week of radiation. All data were analyzed to detect significant differences between users/nonusers. Results: CAM usage was reported in 54% of the study cohort (n=194/360). Of CAM users, 71% reported activity-based CAM (eg, Reiki, meditation), 26% topical CAM, and 45% oral CAM. Only 16% received advice/counseling from naturopathic/homeopathic/medical professionals before initiating CAM. CAM use significantly correlated with higher education level (P<.001), inversely correlated with concomitant hormone/radiation therapy use (P=.010), with a trend toward greater use in younger patients (P=.066). On multivariate analysis, level of education (OR: 6.821, 95% CI: 2.307-20.168, P<.001) and hormones/radiation therapy (OR: 0.573, 95% CI: 0.347-0.949, P=.031) independently predicted for CAM use. Significantly lower skin toxicity scores were reported in CAM users vs nonusers, respectively (mild: 34% vs 25%, severe: 17% vs 29%, P=.017). Conclusion: This is the first prospective study to assess CAM practices in breast patients during radiation, with definition of these practices as the first step for future investigation of CAM/radiation interactions. These results should alert radiation oncologists that a large percentage of breast cancer patients use CAM during radiation without disclosure or consideration for potential interactions, and should encourage increased awareness, communication, and documentation of CAM practices in patients undergoing radiation treatment for breast

  6. A Prospective, Multicenter Study of Complementary/Alternative Medicine (CAM) Utilization During Definitive Radiation for Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Although complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) utilization in breast cancer patients is reported to be high, there are few data on CAM practices in breast patients specifically during radiation. This prospective, multi-institutional study was conducted to define CAM utilization in breast cancer during definitive radiation. Materials/Methods: A validated CAM instrument with a self-skin assessment was administered to 360 Stage 0-III breast cancer patients from 5 centers during the last week of radiation. All data were analyzed to detect significant differences between users/nonusers. Results: CAM usage was reported in 54% of the study cohort (n=194/360). Of CAM users, 71% reported activity-based CAM (eg, Reiki, meditation), 26% topical CAM, and 45% oral CAM. Only 16% received advice/counseling from naturopathic/homeopathic/medical professionals before initiating CAM. CAM use significantly correlated with higher education level (P<.001), inversely correlated with concomitant hormone/radiation therapy use (P=.010), with a trend toward greater use in younger patients (P=.066). On multivariate analysis, level of education (OR: 6.821, 95% CI: 2.307-20.168, P<.001) and hormones/radiation therapy (OR: 0.573, 95% CI: 0.347-0.949, P=.031) independently predicted for CAM use. Significantly lower skin toxicity scores were reported in CAM users vs nonusers, respectively (mild: 34% vs 25%, severe: 17% vs 29%, P=.017). Conclusion: This is the first prospective study to assess CAM practices in breast patients during radiation, with definition of these practices as the first step for future investigation of CAM/radiation interactions. These results should alert radiation oncologists that a large percentage of breast cancer patients use CAM during radiation without disclosure or consideration for potential interactions, and should encourage increased awareness, communication, and documentation of CAM practices in patients undergoing radiation treatment for breast

  7. Alternatives to relational databases in precision medicine: Comparison of NoSQL approaches for big data storage using supercomputers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez, Enrique Israel

    Improvements in medical and genomic technologies have dramatically increased the production of electronic data over the last decade. As a result, data management is rapidly becoming a major determinant, and urgent challenge, for the development of Precision Medicine. Although successful data management is achievable using Relational Database Management Systems (RDBMS), exponential data growth is a significant contributor to failure scenarios. Growing amounts of data can also be observed in other sectors, such as economics and business, which, together with the previous facts, suggests that alternate database approaches (NoSQL) may soon be required for efficient storage and management of big databases. However, this hypothesis has been difficult to test in the Precision Medicine field since alternate database architectures are complex to assess and means to integrate heterogeneous electronic health records (EHR) with dynamic genomic data are not easily available. In this dissertation, we present a novel set of experiments for identifying NoSQL database approaches that enable effective data storage and management in Precision Medicine using patients' clinical and genomic information from the cancer genome atlas (TCGA). The first experiment draws on performance and scalability from biologically meaningful queries with differing complexity and database sizes. The second experiment measures performance and scalability in database updates without schema changes. The third experiment assesses performance and scalability in database updates with schema modifications due dynamic data. We have identified two NoSQL approach, based on Cassandra and Redis, which seems to be the ideal database management systems for our precision medicine queries in terms of performance and scalability. We present NoSQL approaches and show how they can be used to manage clinical and genomic big data. Our research is relevant to the public health since we are focusing on one of the main

  8. Milk versus medicine for the treatment of iron deficiency anaemia in hospitalised infants

    OpenAIRE

    Wall, C.; Grant, C.; Taua, N; C. Wilson; Thompson, J.

    2005-01-01

    Aims: To compare iron fortified follow-on milk (iron follow-on), iron fortified partially modified cows' milk (iron milk), and iron medicine for the treatment of iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) in hospitalised infants.

  9. Do clinical prediction models improve concordance of treatment decisions in reproductive medicine?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.W. van der Steeg; P. Steures; M.J.C. Eijkemans; J.D.F. Habbema; P.M.M. Bossuyt; P.G.A. Hompes; F. van der Veen; B.W.J. Mol

    2006-01-01

    Objective To assess whether the use of clinical prediction models improves concordance between gynaecologists with respect to treatment decisions in reproductive medicine. Design We constructed 16 vignettes of subfertile couples by varying fertility history, postcoital test, sperm motility, follicle

  10. Comparison of methods for controlling dental caries in the classical medicine and alternative medical practices and future prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabbani Khorasgani Mohammad

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Dental caries is a multi-factorial disease and the most common human infection that annually are spent millions dollars to control and treat it. Several methods have been proposed so far to control it. The most important control methods it is now include : dental hygiene, proper nutrition , fluoride therapy , the use of non- cariogenic sweeteners . Also, the use of probiotics , nanomaterials , bacteriophages , antimicrobial peptides and anti- caries vaccines can be considered as new perspective of human in the dental caries control field. In addition, the use of complementary and alternative therapies , especially herbal drug therapy recently has been considered . Demonstrating the efficacy of complementary medicine against dental caries and its use in combination with conventional medicine or trial of new methods for decline of dental caries in the future would be hopeful.

  11. Pain medicine and palliative care as an alternative to euthanasia in end-of-life cancer care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdek, Michael

    2015-01-01

    There exists support for euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide (PAS) in cases of terminal cancer. One of the premises for this approach is the goal of the alleviation of suffering. Do current means of pain control in the greater overall setting of palliative care serve as a desirable alternative? A contrast comparison may be drawn between the above approaches using both theological and medical sources to show that the enlightened use of both interventional and non-interventional pain medicine approaches in an integrated palliative care setting are a theologically grounded and medically feasible alternative to euthanasia or PAS in this population. Lay summary: Patients suffering from terminal cancer often have pain. Some have advocated euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide as a potential way of alleviating this suffering. Further examination of this topic, however, shows this approach may be essentially utilitarian and fail to consider the inherent value of human life. There has been significant development in recent years in the fields of pain medicine and palliative care, which afford alternate means of addressing suffering in this patient population. PMID:25999611

  12. The use of complementary and alternative medicines among patients with locally advanced breast cancer – a descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakovitch Eileen

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM use is common among cancer patients. This paper reviews the use of CAM in a series of patients with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC. Methods Women with LABC attending a specialist clinic at a single Canadian cancer centre were identified and approached. Participants completed a self-administered survey regarding CAM usage, beliefs associated with CAM usage, views of their risks of developing recurrent cancer and of dying of breast cancer. Responses were scored and compared between CAM users and non-users. Results Thirty-six patients were approached, 32 completed the questionnaire (response rate 89%. Forty-seven percent of LABC patients were identified as CAM users. CAM users were more likely to be younger, married, in a higher socioeconomic class and of Asian ethnicity than non-users. CAM users were likely to use multiple modalities simultaneously (median 4 with vitamins being the most popular (60%. Motivation for CAM therapy was described as, "assisting their body to heal" (75%, to 'boost the immune system' (56% and to "give a feeling of control with respect to their treatment" (56%. CAM therapy was used concurrently with conventional treatment in 88% of cases, however, 12% of patients felt that CAM could replace their conventional therapy. Psychological evaluation suggests CAM users perceived their risk of dying of breast cancer was similar to that of the non-Cam group (33% vs. 35%, however the CAM group had less severe anxiety and depression. Conclusion The motivation, objectives and benefits of CAM therapy in a selected population of women with LABC are similar to those reported for women diagnosed with early stage breast cancer. CAM users display less anxiety and depression and are less likely to believe they will die of their breast cancer. However the actual benefit to overall and disease free survival has yet to be demonstrated, as well as the possible interactions with

  13. Comparing the etiology and treatment of skin fissure in traditional and conventional medicine; a brief review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Jedkareh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dry skin is a common problem which affects wound healing, severity of other skin diseases and quality of life of people. One of its undesirable effects is fissure that is a cutaneous condition in which there is a linear loss of epidermis and dermis with sharply defined, nearly vertical walls. In the present study, we have investigated the etiology of the disease and its treatments in conventional medicine and Iranian Traditional Medicine (ITM. Two traditional medicine references, current scientific data bases and medicinal texts were explored with the selected keywords such as "sheqaq-e-poosti", "skin fissure" and "dry skin" to find the etiology and treatment of skin fissure. From the view point of both conventional medicine and ITM, dry skin is the cause of skin fissure and some causes of dry skin are similar. In conventional medicine, moisturizers are mainly used for treatment of dry skin; while in ITM some herbs, oils and other natural remedies have been used. A topical dosage form which was called "qeirooti", a mixture of wax and oil, was used to treat skin fissure in ITM. It comprised of oily ingredients that acted as occlusives and also some herbal components that directly improved dry skin (similar to moisturizers. Components efficacy of traditional dosage forms for treatment of dry skin lead us to study about formulation of “qeirooti” for treatment of dry skin.

  14. Medicinal plants for the treatment of “nervios”, anxiety, and depression in Mexican Traditional Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    S. Laura Guzmán Gutiérrez; Ricardo Reyes Chilpa; Herlinda Bonilla Jaime

    2014-01-01

    The term “nervios” is referred as a folk illness recognized by Mexican Traditional Medicine, and also widely reported across many countries in Latin America. “Nervios” are characterized by a “state of bodily and mental unrest”, which decreases the ability to achieve daily goals. The causes are varied; in fact, any situation that alters the emotional state or mood is interpreted as a possible triggering agent. Depression and anxiety are psychiatric disorders, which share symptoms, or can be in...

  15. Determination of Fe in blood using portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometry: an alternative for sports medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An alternate methodology based on a portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (PXRFS) for determination of Fe in blood was evaluated. The iron concentrations was determined in whole blood of 18 male amateur athletes (runners) using this portable XRF spectrometer and compared with a control group (54 male donors at the same age but not involved with physical activities) obtained by XRF and NAA techniques. The Fe concentration in the blood of runners is an important factor in sports medicine contributing to the performance of endurance athletes as well as for proposing new protocols of clinical evaluation. (author)

  16. Integrating complementary/alternative medicine into primary care: evaluating the evidence and appropriate implementation [Corrigendum

    OpenAIRE

    Rand, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Wainapel SF, Rand S, Fishman LM, Halstead-Kenny J. Int J Gen Med. 2015;8:361–372.On page 364, left column, line 15, Doctor of Osteopathy should have been Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine. View original article by Wainapel et al. 

  17. Plant-based Complementary and alternative medicine used by breast cancer patients at the Hospital Universitario San Ignacio in Bogotá, Colombia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Mercado

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study estimates the frequency of the use of plant-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM by breast cancer patients. From June to December of 2011, a self-administered questionnaire was given to 404 breast cancer patients receiving outpatient therapy at the Javeriana Oncology Center of the Hospital Universitario San Ignacio in Bogotá. The prevalence of patient CAM use was 57%, out of which 76% was based on plants like anamú, aloe, red fruits and soursop. Sixty-five percent of the patients had a positive perception of using medicinal plants and 57% used them simultaneously with the oncologist recommended allopathic treatment. We concluded that the frequency of CAM use in breast cancer patients at the Javeriana Oncology Center is within the prevalence range reported worldwide, despite differences in CAM types and frequencies. The high rates of plant-based CAM use without physician consent, brings about the lack of assessment of the synergic or antagonistic effects of CAM therapies on the allopathic treatment of breast cancer and evaluation of the antitumor and immunomodulatory potential of the traditionally used plants.

  18. From consumerism to active dependence: Patterns of medicines use and treatment decisions among patients with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nørreslet, M; Bissell, P; Traulsen, J M

    2010-01-01

    In this article, findings from in-depth interviews with 12 people diagnosed with atopic dermatitis (AD) are described. The findings describe the range of strategies used to manage atopic dermatitis, including use of conventional medicines. A strong theme identified in informants' accounts centred on concerns about the risks of illness and long-term use of conventional medicines, which acted as a strong incentive for patients to seek alternatives to conventional treatments. However, despite their significant efforts to do so, patients were eventually forced to return to and rely on conventional medicines because of their efficacy in alleviating and treating symptoms. These findings are discussed in relation to the sociological literature on consumerism, risk and reflexivity in health. We argue that our findings exemplify how living with and managing a chronic illness may not be straightforward and the choices of treatment at hand may be limited. Consequently, this may limit the potential opportunities accruing from adopting a reflexive or consumerist approach to managing illness. PMID:20051432

  19. [Prescription rules of Chinese herbal medicines in treatment of gastric cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Wen; Zhao, Ai-guang

    2009-01-01

    Analysis of the nature, tastes, channel distributions and effects of the frequently used herbal medicines in the prescriptions involved in the clinical literatures about treatment of gastric cancer published from 1988 to 2007 was made in the paper. The literatures were categorized into three types: 1) treatment of middle- and late-stage gastric cancer; 2) prevention and treatment of the recurrence and metastasis after operation; 3) Chinese herbal medicines combined with chemotherapy for enhancing efficacy and reducing toxicity. The most frequently used herbal medicines in the three literature types were qi-invigorating herbs, such as Atractylodes, Astragalus, Codonopsis, Glycyrrhiza and Ginseng, etc. The herbal medicines for promoting urination to subside swelling such as tuckahoe and Semen Coicis, etc were used more frequently than the herbal medicines for regulating qi such as dried orange peel and putchuck, etc, as well as for clearing away heat to remove toxin such as spreading hedyotis herb, Herba Scutellariae Barbatae, yangtao actinidia root, and Rhizoma Paridis, etc. From another angle, the most frequently used herbal medicines for the treatment of gatric cancer were those cold, warm and neutral in nature, sweet, bitter and pungent in taste, and distributed to spleen and liver channels. PMID:19134451

  20. A Review of Herbal Medicine in Iranian Traditional Manuscripts for Treatment of Participatory Gastric Headache

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarpour, Mehrnaz; Yousefi, Gholamhossein; Hamedi, Azadeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Participatory gastric headache is a type of headache described in Iranian traditional medicine. It is defined as a headache not originated from the head and neck disorders; rather the pain in the head is caused by gastric dysfunction and its disorders. Treatment of this type of headache is completely reliant on the treatment of the gastric complaint. Reviewing Iranian traditional medicine (ITM) literature, a broad spectrum of herbal medicines that could be useful in the treatment of this type of headache is described. Accordingly, this review was performed to gather and discuss the therapeutic management of this disorder in ITM and evaluating related characteristics of each medicinal herb. Methods: In this study, medicinal plants prescribed for gastric headache from different ancient Iranian literature is documented. The botanical name, family name, part used, temperaments, rout of administration and dosage forms are provided in this article. Results: About 40 plants, mainly used orally, were prescribed for the treatment of participatory gastric headache. Most of them have the astringent effect, which is related to their dryness temperament. Therefore, they could strengthen the stomach and prevent ascending vapors into the brain that in turn helps to get relief from headache. In addition, they possess reinforcement effect on the brain. Conclusion: In general, herbal medicines with tonic characteristics could be effective in participatory gastric headache.

  1. Are modern health worries associated with somatosensory amplification, environmental attribution style, and commitment to complementary and alternative medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köteles, Ferenc; Bárány, Eszter; Varsányi, Péter; Bárdos, György

    2012-04-01

    Relationship among modern health worries (MHWs), somatosensory amplification (SSA), and attributional styles was investigated in a cross-sectional questionnaire study. A total of 99 university students, 104 patients visiting their General Practitioners, and 102 future alternative therapists completed questionnaires assessing MHWs, SSA, negative affect (NA), and psychological, somatic and normalizing (environmental) attribution styles. Significant correlation between SSA and MHWs was found in all three samples. MHWs and psychological attribution style were significantly associated with Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM)-orientation in the regression equation even after controlling for SSA, NA, and sociodemographic variables. MHWs were independent from any attribution styles in the student and patient samples, while significant correlations with all three styles were found in the CAM group. Previously described association between MHWs and SSA was replicated in three different samples. The connection between MHWs and CAM preference seems to be independent from SSA, NA or any particular attribution style. PMID:21883257

  2. MEDICINAL INJECTION FOR TREATMENT OF 54 CASES OF LUMBAR STRAIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhan-hui

    2006-01-01

    @@ Lumbar strain refers to the long-term accumulated mild injuries due to improper posture and overload in soft tissues, such as in lumbar sacral muscle, ligament and fascia. It happens generally at young age, is the common disorder in clinic and leads to quite inconvenience and pain in the life of patient. The author adopted medicinal injection with procaine and Vit. B1 on Tingyaoxue (挺腰穴) to treat 54 cases of lumbar strain and has achieved the remarkable effects. The report is presented as follows.

  3. Herbal Medicines for the Treatment of Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis: Current Scenario and Future Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravirajsinh Jadeja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH is a multifactorial disease and has close correlations with other metabolic disorders. This makes its treatment difficult using a single pharmacological drug. Use of plant extract/decoction or polyherbal formulation to treat various liver diseases is very well mentioned in various traditional systems of medicine (Ayurveda, Japanese or traditional Chinese Medicine, and Kampo medicine. Medicinal herbs are known for their multifaceted implications and thus can form an effective treatment schedule against NASH. Till date, several plant extracts, polyherbal formulations, and phytochemicals have been evaluated for their possible therapeutic potential in preventing onset and progression of NASH in experimental models, but clinical studies using the same are sparse. Herbal extracts with antioxidants, antidiabetic, and antihyperlipidemic properties have been shown to ameliorate symptoms of NASH. This review article is a meticulous compilation of our current knowledge on the role of natural products in alleviating NASH and possible lacunae in research that needs to be addressed.

  4. Case Study of Oriental Medicine Treatment with acupotomy Therpy of the Tarsal tunnel Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim Na-ra

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : In order to estimate clinical effects of Oriental Medicine Treatment with acupotomy therapy of Tarsal tunnel Syndrome Methods : From 5th November, 2008 to 8th November, 2008, 1 male patient diagnosed as Tarsal tunnel syndrome(clinical diagnosed was treated with general oriental medicine therapy (acupuncture, moxibustion, cupping, physical therapy, herbal medication and acupotomy. Results : The patient's Rt foot paresthesia, pain were remarkably improved. Conclusions : This study demonstrates that oriental medical treatment with acuputomy therapy has notable effect in improving symptoms of tarsal tunnel syndrome. as though we had not wide experience in this treatment, more research is needed.

  5. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Holistic Treatment of Mental Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We believe that holistic medicine can be used for patient's with mental health disorders. With holistic psychiatry, it is possible to help the mentally ill patient to heal existentially. As in holistic medicine, the methods are love or intense care, winning the trust of the patient, getting permission to give support and holding, and daring to be fully at the patient's service. Our clinical experiences have led us to believe that mental health patient's can heal if only you can make him or her feel the existential pain at its full depth, understand what the message of the suffering is, and let go of all the negative attitudes and beliefs connected with the disease. Many mentally ill young people would benefit from a few hours of existential holistic processing in order to confront the core existential pains. To help the mentally ill patient, you must understand the level of responsibility and help process the old traumas that made the patient escape responsibility for his or her own life and destiny. To guide the work, we have developed a responsibility scale going from (1 free perception over (2 emotional pain to (3 psychic death (denial of life purpose further down to (4 escape and (5 denial to (6 destruction of own perception and (7 hallucination further down to (8 coma, suicide, and unconsciousness. This scale seems to be a valuable tool to understand the state of consciousness and the nature of the process of healing that the patient must go through.

  6. Scientific Evidence on the Supportive Cancer Care with Chinese Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William CS CHO

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Complementary and alternative medicine has been increasingly utilized by cancer patients in developed countries. Among the various forms of complementary and alternative medicine, Traditional Chinese Medicine is one of the few that has a well constructed theoretical framework and established treatment approaches for diseases including cancer. Recent research has revealed growing evidence suggesting that Traditional Chinese Medicine is effective in the supportive care of cancer patients during and after major conventional cancer treatments. This paper succinctly summarizes some published clinical evidence and meta-analyses which support the usage of various Traditional Chinese Medicine treatment strategies including Chinese herbal medicine, acupuncture and Qigong in supportive cancer care.

  7. Ancient Records and Modern Research on the Mechanisms of Chinese Herbal Medicines in the Treatment of Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai-ming; Liang, Feng-xia

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decades, Chinese herbal medicines (CHM) have been extensively and intensively studied through from both clinical and experimental perspectives and CHM have been proved to be effective in the treatment of diabetes mellitus (DM). This study, by searching ancient records and modern research papers, reviewed CHM in terms of their clinical application and principal mechanism in the treatment of DM. We summarized the use of CHM mentioned in 54 famous ancient materia medica monographs and searched papers on the hypoglycemic effect of several representative CHM. Main mechanisms and limitations of CHM and further research direction for DM were discussed. On the basis of the study, we were led to conclude that TCM, as a main form of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), was well recorded in ancient literatures and has less adverse effects as shown by modern studies. The mechanisms of CHM treatment of DM are complex, multilink, and multitarget, so we should find main hypoglycemic mechanism through doing research on CHM monomer active constituents. Many CHM monomer constituents possess noteworthy hypoglycemic effects. Therefore, developing a novel natural product for DM and its complications is of much significance. It is strongly significant to pay close attention to CHM for treatment of DM and its complications. PMID:25815039

  8. Ancient Records and Modern Research on the Mechanisms of Chinese Herbal Medicines in the Treatment of Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-ming Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decades, Chinese herbal medicines (CHM have been extensively and intensively studied through from both clinical and experimental perspectives and CHM have been proved to be effective in the treatment of diabetes mellitus (DM. This study, by searching ancient records and modern research papers, reviewed CHM in terms of their clinical application and principal mechanism in the treatment of DM. We summarized the use of CHM mentioned in 54 famous ancient materia medica monographs and searched papers on the hypoglycemic effect of several representative CHM. Main mechanisms and limitations of CHM and further research direction for DM were discussed. On the basis of the study, we were led to conclude that TCM, as a main form of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM, was well recorded in ancient literatures and has less adverse effects as shown by modern studies. The mechanisms of CHM treatment of DM are complex, multilink, and multitarget, so we should find main hypoglycemic mechanism through doing research on CHM monomer active constituents. Many CHM monomer constituents possess noteworthy hypoglycemic effects. Therefore, developing a novel natural product for DM and its complications is of much significance. It is strongly significant to pay close attention to CHM for treatment of DM and its complications.

  9. A General Introduction of HIV/AIDS Treatment with Traditional Chinese Medicine in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    This paper gives a general introduction of HIV/AIDS treatment with Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) in China during the past 20 years. Although the role of TCM in treatment of HIV/AIDS is promising, there is still a long way to go.

  10. Use of complementary and alternative medicine by patients with cancer: a cross-sectional study at different points of cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortmann, J Kleine; Bremer, A; Eich, H T; Wortmann, H P Kleine; Schuster, A; Fühner, J; Büntzel, J; Muecke, R; Prott, F J; Huebner, J

    2016-07-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is widely used by cancer patients. In order to learn more on the usage of CAM, its reasons and motifs as well as sources of information along the trajectory of treatment, we decided to evaluate the prevalence and predictors for the use of CAM by cancer patients while being under active treatment with chemo- or radiotherapy or in aftercare. We distributed a standardized questionnaire among patients attending a department of radio-oncology, an ambulance for oncology and offices of general practitioners (GPs). Five hundred and six patients took part. Most attributed cancer to stress and trauma (23.7 and 16.4 %) or genes (20.8 %). Forty-four percentage reported knowing a physician with competence in CAM, and in all settings, most patients named the GP. Fifty-one percentage admitted using CAM, 35 % informed the oncologist about using CAM, 56 % informed the GP, and 26 % did not inform any physician. Most often used CAM was vitamin D (17 %) and selenium (16 %). Most important goals were to strengthen the immune system (59 %) and become active (52 %). Most patients were satisfied with the CAM methods they used. Yet, with some methods, dissatisfaction was up to 30 %. The GP has an important function concerning CAM in oncology as most patients believe the GP to have best knowledge in CAM. In order to integrate complementary medicine into evidence-based medicine, physicians should be trained on how to communicate on CAM with the patient and with each other. Explaining cancer and cancer therapies in a way lay persons are able to understand may be helpful. Physicians should actively address patients' needs of involvement not only in decision making, but also actively in the therapy. PMID:27300549

  11. Present Researching Approaches and Future Prospects for Treatment of Cardiac Diseases-Integrative Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Feng; Hao Xu; Yi-Xin Wang; Li-Ping Ma; Da-Zhuo Shi

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of cardiac diseases is very complex and involved in many gene transcription and protein expression. How to effectively treat the diseases has become the hotspot of modern medicine. Accumulating evidences over the past decades on integrative medicine have shown us hopeful future prospects. With the development of modern biomedicine, such as sketch mapping genomic sequence, functional genomics, proteomics and pharmacogenetics, more advanced techniques could be applied in elucidating the possibly complicated biological networks, or complex pathological and physiological mechanisms underlying cardiac diseases, by which integrative medicine will also bring out some new and more effective strategies in the treatment of cardiac diseases.

  12. A new horizon of nuclear medicine. Application to treatment strategy of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear medicine diagnosis, such as PET, SPECT, can image molecular and functional changes that occur prior to morphological changes. Early prognosis and treatment monitoring is considered as a new horizon of nuclear medicine, taking advantage of the technique. There is increasing interest in nuclear medicine imaging of amino acid metabolism, nucleic-acid metabolism, and hypoxia, in addition to the imaging of glucose metabolism using the glucose analog labeled with F-18 (18F-FDG), and increasing evidence indicates the usefulness of the functional imaging. (author)

  13. Progress in Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine Treatments and Nursing Care of Knee Osteoarthritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Hua Shen; Yi Cui

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews the causes of knee osteoarthritis, traditional Chinese and Western medicine therapies and nursing research progress and indicates that traditional Chinese and Western medicine have gradually recognized the cause of knee osteoarthritis. Knee osteoarthritis has been treated with various treatments and nursing care planning, and the combination of traditional Chinese and Western medicine has constantly been improved. Nurses should instruct the discharged patient to correctly treat their disease, adopt the health education, and, via the establishment of a healthy lif-estyle, insist on a functional exercise to relieve the pain, delay disease progression, and improve quality of life.

  14. Current Status and Prospect of Prevention and Treatment of Oral Diseases by Integrative Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ To carry out integrative medical prevention and treatment of oral diseases, based on the inheritance and development of traditional medicine as well as the application of modern scientific, technique and medical theory, is of great significance in oral health maintenance. Certain achievements of the integrative traditional Chinese and Western medicine (TCM-WM) have been obtained in the recent several years in clinical and experimental studies and theoretic exploration of oral diseases, which are introduced briefly as follows.

  15. Case Study of Oriental Medicine Treatment with acupotomy Therapy of the Achilles Tendinitis

    OpenAIRE

    Jang Eun-ha; Lim Na-ra; Na Won-min; Kim Sung-chul

    2008-01-01

    Purpose : In order to estimate clinical effects of Oriental Medicine Treatment with acupotomy therapy of Achilles Tendinitis Methods : From 4th August, 2008 to 14th August, 2008, 1 female patient diagnosed as Chronic Achilles Tendinitis (clinical diagnosed) was treated with general oriental medicine therapy(acupuncture, moxibustion, cupping, physical therapy, herbal medication) and acupotomy. Results : The patient's chief complaints- Lt. heel pain and stiffness, dorsi-flexion limitation...

  16. Chinese herbal medicines as adjuvant treatment during chemo- or radio-therapy for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Fanghua; Li, Anyuan; Inagaki, Yoshinori; Gao, Jianjun; Li, Jijun; Kokudo, Norihiro; Li, Xiao-Kang; Tang, Wei

    2010-12-01

    Numerous studies have indicated that in cancer treatment Chinese herbal medicines in combination with chemo- or radio-therapy can be used to enhance the efficacy of and diminish the side effects and complications caused by chemo- and radio-therapy. Therefore, an understanding of Chinese herbal medicines is needed by physicians and other health care providers. This review provides evidence for use of Chinese herbal medicines as adjuvant cancer treatment during chemo- or radio-therapy. First, Chinese herbal medicines (e.g. Astragalus, Turmeric, Ginseng, TJ-41, PHY906, Huachansu injection, and Kanglaite injection) that are commonly used by cancer patients for treating the cancer and/or reducing the toxicity induced by chemo- or radio-therapy are discussed. Preclinical and clinical studies have shown that these Chinese herbal medicines possess great advantages in terms of suppressing tumor progression, increasing the sensitivity of chemo- and radio-therapeutics, improving an organism's immune system function, and lessening the damage caused by chemo- and radio-therapeutics. Second, clinical trials of Chinese herbal medicines as adjuvant cancer treatment are reviewed. By reducing side effects and complications during chemo- and radio-therapy, these Chinese herbal medicines have a significant effect on reducing cancer-related fatigue and pain, improving respiratory tract infections and gastrointestinal side effects including diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting, protecting liver function, and even ameliorating the symptoms of cachexia. This review should contribute to an understanding of Chinese herbal medicines as adjuvant treatment for cancer and provide useful information for the development of more effective anti-cancer drugs. PMID:21248427

  17. Characteristics of users and implications for the use of complementary and alternative medicine in Ghanaian cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy and chemotherapy: a cross- sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yarney Joel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is widespread use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM in Ghana, driven by cultural consideration and paradigm to disease causation. Whether there is concurrent use of conventional medicine and CAM in cancer patients is unknown. This study investigates the prevalence, pattern and predictors of CAM use in cancer patients. Overlapping toxicity, sources of information, and whether users inform their doctor about CAM use is examined. Method Cross-sectional study using a questionnaire administered to cancer patients, who were receiving radiotherapy and or chemotherapy or had recently completed treatment at a single institution was used. Results Ninety eight patients participated in the study with a mean age of 55.5 (18–89, made up of 51% females. Married individuals formed 56% of the respondents, whilst 49% had either secondary or tertiary education. Head and neck cancer patients were 15.3%, breast (21.4%, abdomen/pelvic cancers constituted (52%.Seventy seven (78.6% patients received radiotherapy only, 16.3% received radiation and chemotherapy and 5.3% had chemotherapy only. Ninety five patients were diagnosed of cancer within the past 24 months,73.5% were CAM users as follows; massage(66.3%, herbal(59.2%, mega vitamins(55.1%, Chinese medicine(53.1%,and prayer(42.9%. Sixty eight percent were treated with curative intent. Overlapping toxicity was reported. Majority (83.3% of users had not informed their doctor about CAM use. On univariate analysis, female (p=0.004 and palliative patients, p=0.032 were more likely to be CAM users. Multivariate analysis identified female (p Friends and Media are the main sources of information on CAM. There was increase in CAM use after the diagnosis of cancer mainly for Chinese Medicine and vitamins. Conclusion There is high CAM usage among Cancer patients, comparable to use in the general population, there is concurrent use of CAM and conventional medicine with reported

  18. Developing a patient-centered outcome measure for complementary and alternative medicine therapies I: defining content and format

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritenbaugh Cheryl

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients receiving complementary and alternative medicine (CAM therapies often report shifts in well-being that go beyond resolution of the original presenting symptoms. We undertook a research program to develop and evaluate a patient-centered outcome measure to assess the multidimensional impacts of CAM therapies, utilizing a novel mixed methods approach that relied upon techniques from the fields of anthropology and psychometrics. This tool would have broad applicability, both for CAM practitioners to measure shifts in patients' states following treatments, and conventional clinical trial researchers needing validated outcome measures. The US Food and Drug Administration has highlighted the importance of valid and reliable measurement of patient-reported outcomes in the evaluation of conventional medical products. Here we describe Phase I of our research program, the iterative process of content identification, item development and refinement, and response format selection. Cognitive interviews and psychometric evaluation are reported separately. Methods From a database of patient interviews (n = 177 from six diverse CAM studies, 150 interviews were identified for secondary analysis in which individuals spontaneously discussed unexpected changes associated with CAM. Using ATLAS.ti, we identified common themes and language to inform questionnaire item content and wording. Respondents' language was often richly textured, but item development required a stripping down of language to extract essential meaning and minimize potential comprehension barriers across populations. Through an evocative card sort interview process, we identified those items most widely applicable and covering standard psychometric domains. We developed, pilot-tested, and refined the format, yielding a questionnaire for cognitive interviews and psychometric evaluation. Results The resulting questionnaire contained 18 items, in visual analog scale format

  19. Integration of alternative feedstreams for biomass treatment and utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessey, Susan Marie; Friend, Julie; Dunson, Jr., James B.; Tucker, III, Melvin P.; Elander, Richard T.; Hames, Bonnie

    2011-03-22

    The present invention provides a method for treating biomass composed of integrated feedstocks to produce fermentable sugars. One aspect of the methods described herein includes a pretreatment step wherein biomass is integrated with an alternative feedstream and the resulting integrated feedstock, at relatively high concentrations, is treated with a low concentration of ammonia relative to the dry weight of biomass. In another aspect, a high solids concentration of pretreated biomass is integrated with an alternative feedstream for saccharifiaction.

  20. Alternative methods for the treatment of post-menopausal troubles [Alternative Methoden zur Behandlung postmenopausaler Beschwerden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wasem, Jürgen

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available [english] Menopause is described as the transition from the reproductive phase of a women to the non reproductive. Changes in hormone levels might lead to complaints and health consequences especially during peri- and postmenopause. Hormone therapy has a potential damaging health risk profile and is recommended for temporal limited therapy for acute vasomotor symptoms only.The present HTA-report aims to assess the effectiveness and the cost-effectiveness of alternative treatment methods for women with postmenopausal symptoms in Germany regarding patient relevant endpoints (reduction of symptoms and frequency of adverse events and improvement of quality of life.A systematic literature search was carried out in 33 relevant databases in September 2010. Citations were selected according to pre-defined criteria and were extracted and evaluated.In the systematic research 22 studies are identified for the effectiveness evaluation, 22 primary studies and one review.High doses of isolated genistein reduce the frequency/intensity of hot flashes while low doses of genistein show no significant effect. Intake of isoflavone extract such as genistein, daidzein, glycitein in various combinations does not have an effect on improvement of cognitive function or vaginal dryness. The effect of black cohosh and hop extract for menopausal complaints cannot be determined since results are heterogenous. The combination of isoflavone, black cohosh, monk’s pepper, valerian and vitamin E has a positive effect on menopause symptoms. Ginkgo biloba shows no significant effect on menopause symptoms and cognitive improvement beside mental flexibility. Acupuncture has a significant influence on hot flashes especially in severe cases.No final statement can be drawn regarding the effectiveness of alter­ne treatment methods due to qualitative shortcomings of included studies and a general limited availability of studies in this field. Furthermore, the generalization of the

  1. Integrative Medicine: In With the New

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffany A. Mullen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Integrative medicine is not "alternative," which implies the substitution of conventional medicine with often unproven natural treatments. Rather, integrative medicine is defined as the combination of conventional biomedicine with nontraditional and holistic practices to help patients on their journey to health.

  2. Effectiveness of a Chinese herbal medicine preparation in the treatment of cough in uncomplicated upper respiratory tract infection: a randomised double-blinded placebo-control trial

    OpenAIRE

    WCW, Wong; A, Lee; AT, Lam; KT, Li; CYM, Leung; PC, Leung; ELY, Wong; JL, Tang

    2006-01-01

    Background Rigorous scientific and well-designed clinical trials to evaluate the effect of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is lacking. We, therefore, designed this study to evaluate the effectiveness of a commonly used TCM preparation in treating acute cough of uncomplicated URTI in adults and to search for a safe, effective and affordable alternative treatment for this common condition. Methods A randomised, double-blinded, placebo-control study comparing this TCM preparation with a place...

  3. Remission of Unresectable Lung Metastases from Rectal Cancer After Herbal Medicine Treatment: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyungsuk; Lee, Sanghun

    2016-01-01

    Lung metastasis is frequent in rectal cancer patients and has a poor prognosis, with an expected three-year survival rate of about 10%. Though western medicine has made great strides in the curative resection of liver metastases, resection of lung metastases has lagged far behind. Many preclinical studies have suggested that herbal treatments block metastasis, but few clinical studies have addressed this topic. We present the case of a 57-year-old Asian male with lung metastases from rectal cancer. He first underwent resection of the primary lesion (stage IIA, T3N0M0) and six cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy. Unfortunately, lung metastases were confirmed about one year later. Palliative chemotherapy was begun, but his disease continued to progress after three cycles and chemotherapy was halted. The patient was exclusively treated with herbal medicine-standardized allergen-removed Rhus verniciflua stokes extract combined with Dokhwaljihwang-tang (Sasang constitutional medicine in Korea). After seven weeks of herbal medicine treatment, the lung metastases were markedly improved. Regression of lung metastases has continued; also, the patient's rectal cancer has not returned. He has been receiving herbal medicine for over two years and very few side effects have been observed. We suggest that the herbal regimen used in our patient is a promising candidate for the treatment of lung metastases secondary to rectal cancer, and we hope that this case stimulates further investigation into the efficacy of herbal treatments for metastatic colorectal cancer patients. PMID:27198037

  4. Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care: An Alternative to Residential Treatment for High Risk Children and Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip A. Fisher

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care program (MTFC, an evidence based approach for providing psychotherapeutic treatment for very troubled children and adolescents that is an alternative to residential care. Versions of the MTFC program have been developed and validated for young children with a history of maltreatment as well as for older children and adolescents who are involved with the youth justice system. In the paper we describe the development of the MTFC program and its foundations in the social learning model that originated at the Oregon Social Learning Center in the 1960's and 70's. We present information about program elements. We then review the research that has been conducted on MTFC.

  5. Uso de medicinas alternativas e complementares por pacientes com câncer: revisão sistemática Use of complementary and alternative medicine by cancer patients: systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Spadacio

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available O interesse no tema das medicinas alternativas e complementares tem aumentado, principalmente entre pacientes oncológicos. Realizou-se uma revisão sistemática da literatura na base de dados PubMed sobre o perfil dos pacientes que optam pelo uso dessas medicinas e suas motivações. As palavras-chaves utilizadas na busca foram "cancer and complementary alternative medicine" e "oncology and complementary alternative medicine", no período 1995-2005. Os critérios de seleção foram: presença dos descritores no título dos artigos, idiomas português, inglês ou espanhol e terem sido realizados em população adulta. A partir de 43 artigos analisados, concluiu-se que a utilização de medicinas alternativas e complementares é parte do escopo social desses pacientes. Seu uso é importante na construção da identidade de pacientes com câncer, ajudando-os nas decisões em relação ao tratamento convencional.Interest in complementary and alternative medicine has increased, especially among oncology patients. A systematic literature review of the profile of patients who choose to use this type of medicine, as well as their motivations, was carried out on the PubMed database. For this search, the key words used were ?cancer and complementary alternative medicine? and ?oncology and complementary alternative medicine?, covering the period between 1995 and 2005. The selection criteria were the following: key words were present in the article title; article was written in either English, Portuguese, or Spanish; and study was performed with an adult population. From the 43 articles analyzed, it could be concluded that the use of complementary and alternative medicine is part of these patients? social scope. Moreover, its use plays an important role in the identity construction of cancer patients, helping them to make decisions related to conventional treatment.

  6. The Flexner Report of 1910 and Its Impact on Complementary and Alternative Medicine and Psychiatry in North America in the 20th Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahnisch, Frank W.; Verhoef, Marja

    2012-01-01

    America experienced a genuinely vast development of biomedical science in the early decades of the twentieth century, which in turn impacted the community of academic psychiatry and changed the way in which clinical and basic research approaches in psychiatry were conceptualized. This development was largely based on the restructuring of research universities in both of the USA and Canada following the influential report of Johns Hopkins-trained science administrator and politician Abraham Flexner (1866–1959). Flexner's report written in commission for the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching in Washington, DC, also had a major influence on complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in psychiatry throughout the 20th century. This paper explores the lasting impact of Flexner's research published on modern medicine and particularly on what he interpreted as the various forms of health care and psychiatric treatment that appeared to compete with the paradigm of biomedicine. We will particularly draw attention to the serious effects of the closing of so many CAM-oriented hospitals, colleges, and medical teaching programs following to the publication of the Flexner Report in 1910. PMID:23346209

  7. Pomegranate and Its Components as Alternative Treatment for Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Lei Wang; Manuela Martins-Green

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in men in the United States. There is a major need for less toxic but yet effective therapies to treat prostate cancer. Pomegranate fruit from the tree Punica granatum has been used for centuries for medicinal purposes and is described as “nature’s power fruit”. Recent research has shown that pomegranate juice (PJ) and/or pomegranate extracts (PE) significantly inhibit the growth of prostate cancer cells in culture. In preclinical m...

  8. Herbal Medicines In The Treatment of Psychiatric and Neurological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahin Akhondzadeh

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This review will indicate the quality of the evidence supporting the clinical effects of a number of commonly used types of herbal medicines for psychiatric and neurological disorders. Method: We conducted a review of literature to understand the biochemical and evidential bases for the use of herbs in psychiatric and neurological disorders as follow: 1 Alzheimer’s disease, 2 Depression, 3 Anxiety, 4 Insomnia, 5 Substance use disorders, 6 Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD, 7 Migraine. Results: Evidences support use of Ginkgo biloba, Huperzine A, Galantamine, Melissa officinalis,and Salvia officinalis for Alzheimer’s disease; St. John’s wort, Lavender, and Saffron for depression; Passionflower, and Kava, for anxiety disorders; Valerian, and English Lavender for sleep disorders; Hypericum for substance related disorders; Ginkgo biloba, and Passionflower for ADHD; and feverfew, and Butterbur root for migraine. The highest level of confidence derives from well-designed, randomized, double blind controlled studies. Conclusion: Herbs may have beneficial effects in variety of psychiatric and neurological disorder; however we must consider their potential side effects and drug-drug interactions.

  9. Herbal medicine as inducers of apoptosis in cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safarzadeh, Elham; Sandoghchian Shotorbani, Siamak; Baradaran, Behzad

    2014-10-01

    Cancer is uncontrolled growth of abnormal cells in the body. Nowadays, cancer is considered as a human tragedy and one of the most prevalent diseases in the wide, and its mortality resulting from cancer is being increased. It seems necessary to identify new strategies to prevent and treat such a deadly disease. Control survival and death of cancerous cell are important strategies in the management and therapy of cancer. Anticancer agents should kill the cancerous cell with the minimal side effect on normal cells that is possible through the induction of apoptosis. Apoptosis is known as programmed cell death in both normal and damaged tissues. This process includes some morphologically changes in cells such as rapid condensation and budding of the cell, formation of membrane-enclosed apoptotic bodies with well-preserved organelles. Induction of apoptosis is one of the most important markers of cytotoxic antitumor agents. Some natural compounds including plants induce apoptotic pathways that are blocked in cancer cells through various mechanisms in cancer cells. Multiple surveys reported that people with cancer commonly use herbs or herbal products. Vinca Alkaloids, Texans, podo phyllotoxin, Camptothecins have been clinically used as Plant derived anticancer agents. The present review summarizes the literature published so far regarding herbal medicine used as inducers of apoptosis in cancer. PMID:25364657

  10. Herbal Medicine as Inducers of Apoptosis in Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Safarzadeh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is uncontrolled growth of abnormal cells in the body. Nowadays, cancer is considered as a human tragedy and one of the most prevalent diseases in the wide, and its mortality resulting from cancer is being increased. It seems necessary to identify new strategies to prevent and treat such a deadly disease. Control survival and death of cancerous cell are important strategies in the management and therapy of cancer. Anticancer agents should kill the cancerous cell with the minimal side effect on normal cells that is possible through the induction of apoptosis. Apoptosis is known as programmed cell death in both normal and damaged tissues. This process includes some morphologically changes in cells such as rapid condensation and budding of the cell, formation of membrane-enclosed apoptotic bodies with well-preserved organelles. Induction of apoptosis is one of the most important markers of cytotoxic antitumor agents. Some natural compounds including plants induce apoptotic pathways that are blocked in cancer cells through various mechanisms in cancer cells. Multiple surveys reported that people with cancer commonly use herbs or herbal products. Vinca Alkaloids, Texans, podo phyllotoxin, Camptothecins have been clinically used as Plant derived anticancer agents. The present review summarizes the literature published so far regarding herbal medicine used as inducers of apoptosis in cancer.

  11. Prevention and Treatment of Flatulence From a Traditional Persian Medicine Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larijani, Bagher; Esfahani, Mohammad Medhi; Moghimi, Maryam; Shams Ardakani, Mohammad Reza; Keshavarz, Mansoor; Kordafshari, Gholamreza; Nazem, Esmaiel; Hasani Ranjbar, Shirin; Mohammadi Kenari, Hoorieh; Zargaran, Arman

    2016-01-01

    Context The feeling of abdominal fullness, bloating, and movement of gas in the abdomen is a very uncomfortable sensation termed flatulence. Since flatulence is one of the most common gastrointestinal symptoms that is bothersome to patients, it is important to identify effective methods to resolve this issue. In modern medicine, management of flatulence is often not satisfactory. On the other hand, traditional systems of medicine can be considered good potential sources to find new approaches for preventing and treating flatulence. The aim of this study is to review flatulence treatments from a traditional Persian medicine (TPM) viewpoint. Evidence Acquisition In this study, the reasons for flatulence and methods for its prevention and treatment are reviewed in traditional Persian medicine (TPM) texts and then related with evidence from modern medicine by searching in databases, including PubMed, Scopus, Google Scholar, and IranMedex. Results From a traditional Persian scholar viewpoint, one of the most important causes of flatulence is an incorrect manner of eating; valuable advice to correct bad eating habits will be illustrated. In addition, traditional practitioners describe some herbs and vegetables as well as herbal compounds that are effective food additives to relieve flatulence. The anti-flatulent effect of most of these herbs has been experimentally verified using modern medicine. Conclusions Attention to TPM can lead to the identification of new preventive and curative approaches to avoid and treat flatulence. In addition, Persian viewpoints from the medieval era regarding flatulence are historically important.

  12. Cancer-Related Stress and Complementary and Alternative Medicine: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Chandwani, Kavita D.; Ryan, Julie L.; Peppone, Luke J.; Janelsins, Michelle M.; Sprod, Lisa K.; Katie Devine; Lara Trevino; Jennifer Gewandter; Morrow, Gary R.; Mustian, Karen M.

    2012-01-01

    A cancer diagnosis elicits strong psychophysiological reactions that characterize stress. Stress is experienced by all patients but is usually not discussed during patient-healthcare professional interaction; thus underdiagnosed, very few are referred to support services. The prevalence of CAM use in patients with history of cancer is growing. The purpose of the paper is to review the aspects of cancer-related stress and interventions of commonly used complementary and alternative techniques/...

  13. TREATMENT OF PRIMARY PALPEBRAL RETRACTION WITH ACUPOINT—INJECTION AND CHINESE MEDICINAL HERBS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱新民; LiPeifang

    2000-01-01

    In the present paper,the therapeutic effect of combined therapy of acupoint-injection and Chinese medicinal herbs was observed in 59cases of primary palpebral retraction patients.These 59patients were divided into treatment group(n=38,treated with acupoint-injection and Chinese medicinal herbs)and control group(n=21,treated with Chinese medicinal herbs alone).After3 courses of treatment.of the 38cases in treatment group,25(65.8%)were cured,8(21.1%)had marked improement and5(13.2%)had improement;of the 21cases in control group,8(38.1%)were cured,9(42.9%)had marked improement,2(9.5%)had improement6 and2(9.5%)were ineffective.Statistical analysis showed a si9gnificant difference between the two groups in the therapeu-tic effect.The cure rate of experimental group was apparently higher than athat of the control group,i.e.the therapeutic effect of the combined therapy of acupoint-injection and Chinese medicinal herbs was superior to that of Chinese medicinal herbs alone.

  14. Traditional Chinese medicine valuably augments therapeutic options in the treatment of climacteric syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenhardt, Sarah; Fleckenstein, Johannes

    2016-07-01

    Climacteric syndrome refers to recurring symptoms such as hot flashes, chills, headache, irritability and depression. This is usually experienced by menopausal women and can be related to a hormonal reorganization in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. In Traditional Chinese Medicine, originating 1000s of years ago, above-mentioned symptoms can be interpreted on the basis of the philosophic diagnostic concepts, such as the imbalance of Yin and Yang, the Zang-Fu and Basic substances (e.g. Qi, Blood and Essence). These concepts postulate balance and harmonization as the principle aim of a treatment. In this context, it is not astounding that one of the most prominent ancient textbooks dating back to 500-200 BC, Huang di Neijing: The Yellow Emperor's Classic of Internal Medicine gives already first instructions for diagnosis and therapy of climacteric symptoms. For therapy, traditional Chinese medicine comprises five treatment principles: Chinese herbal medicine, TuiNa (a Chinese form of manual therapy), nutrition, activity (e.g. QiGong) and acupuncture (being the most widespread form of treatment used in Europe). This review provides an easy access to the concepts of traditional Chinese medicine particularly regarding to climacteric syndrome and also focuses on current scientific evidence. PMID:27040419

  15. Interventional recanalization combined with chinese traditional medicine in the treatment of fallopian tube obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To observe the curative effect of interventional recanalization combined with chinese traditional medicine in treatment of fallopian tube obstruction. Methods: There were 200 cases in treatment group and 120 cases in control group. In the treatment group patients were given chinese herbal medicine after the intervention. In sixth month a follow up imaging was performed assessing the patency. The follow up also included the pregnancy rate 1 year later. Results: The patency rate was 83% in treatment group, and 81.5% in control group (P>0.05). Re-conjunction rate was 7.6% in the study group and 22% in control group (P<0.01). The pregnancy rate was 67% in study group and 42% in control group (P<0.01). Conclusion: With interventional recanalization combined with chinese traditional medicine, good curative effect obtained in treatment of fallopian tube obstructive infertility. Combined with Chinese traditional medicine, the post-procedure re-conjunction rate is decreased, especially in the case of short fallopian tube obstruction

  16. Alternative Treatment Applications in Children with Respiratory Tract Infections in the West of Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Naci Topaloğlu; Şule Yıldırım; Mustafa Tekin; Ayşegül Uludağ; Kenan Özgen

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: It is known that the trend toward alternative treatments is increasing each day regardless of the differences between communities. We aimed to detect alternative treatments in our region and to determine the thoughts of families about these treatments. Materials and Methods: A total of 214 patients presenting to General Pediatrics Outpatient Clinics of Çanakkale Onsekiz Mart University Teaching and Research Hospital between October 2012 and February 2012 with fever, coughs, s...

  17. Cyborg Butterflies, Liminal Medicine: Thyroid Hormone Treatment, 1890-1970

    OpenAIRE

    Crandell, Allison S

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis, I develop a history of thyroid hormone treatment (THT) that centers on the bodies of animals and women between 1890 and 1970. This history contextualizes the current debate between two forms of THT, desiccated and synthetic. Drawing on the discourses present in biomedical journals, I trace how medical practitioners used the animals and women to demonstrate and make sense of THTâ s effectiveness over time. As such, I study what Catherine Waldby terms the â biomedical imag...

  18. Herbal medicines for urinary stone treatment. A systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Elena Monti; Alberto Trinchieri; Vittorio Magri; Anne Cleves; Gianpaolo Perletti

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the clinical evidence on the efficacy of phytotherapy in the treatment of calculi in the urinary tract. Methods: To be eligible, full-length articles should include the results of randomized controlled trials enrolling patients affected by urolithiasis, reporting any comparison between an experimental herbal agent versus placebo or any active comparator, aimed at preventing the formation or facilitating the dissolution of calculi in any portion of the urinary tract. Fift...

  19. Special Section: Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM): Low Back Pain and CAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Special Section CAM Low Back Pain and CAM Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of ... from CAM treatment for conditions such as low back pain. Photo courtesy of Glenn Scimonelli "Oh, my aching ...

  20. Laughter and humor as complementary and alternative medicines for dementia patients

    OpenAIRE

    Morihara Takashi; Tagami Shinji; Okochi Masayasu; Kudo Takashi; Hashimoto Ryota; Takeda Masatoshi; Sadick Golam; Tanaka Toshihisa

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The number of dementia patients has increased worldwide, with an estimated 13.7 million dementia patients in the Asia Pacific region alone. This number is expected to increase to 64.6 million by the year 2050. Discussion As a result of advances in research, there several pharmacological therapies available for the treatment of dementia patients. However, current treatments do not suppress the disease process and cannot prevent dementia, and it will be some time before thes...

  1. HolisticKids.org—Evolution of information resources in pediatric complementary and alternative medicine projects: from monographs to Web learning*†

    OpenAIRE

    Whelan, Julia S.; Dvorkin, Lana

    2003-01-01

    Use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is growing in the United States. Children are a part of this trend, with adolescent self-care exceeding adult use. As a result, the necessity of educating pediatricians on CAM practices has become clear. This paper describes the Pediatric Integrative Medicine Education (PIME) project with a focus on the creation of HolisticKids.org, a Website designed to educate pediatric residents. HolisticKids.org also addresses the needs and interests of ...

  2. X-ray appearance of subcutaneous gemstones as part of alternative/holistic medicine: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLemore, Jerri; Hallengren, Aaron L

    2010-01-01

    The authors present a case of a deceased man with numerous subcutaneous nodules identified as foreign bodies on radiographic films. The foreign bodies were gemstones inserted underneath the skin as a form of holistic medicine. The X-ray findings of this case and a review of the literature for similar subcutaneously implanted foreign bodies used in holistic, alternative, or folk medicine are presented. PMID:20630347

  3. Predictors for adolescent visits to practitioners of complementary and alternative medicine in a total population (the Young-HUNT Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aslak Steinsbekk

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the factors predicting adolescent visits to practitioners of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM. METHODS: A longitudinal cohort study conducted in an adolescent total population in Central Norway (The Nord-Trøndelag Health Studies (HUNT. In Young-HUNT 1, all inhabitants aged 13 to 19 years (N = 8944, 89% response rate were invited to participate, and the youngest group (13 to 15 year olds was surveyed again 4 years later (Young-HUNT 2, N = 2429, 82% response rate. The participants completed a comprehensive questionnaire on health and life style which included a question regarding visits to a CAM practitioner in the last 12 months. RESULTS: One in eleven (8.7%, 95%CI 7.6-9.8% had visited a CAM practitioner, an increase of 26% in 4 years (1.8% points. The final multivariable analysis predicted increased odds of an adolescent becoming a CAM visitor four years later (p<0.05 if she or he had previously visited a CAM practitioner (adjOR 3.4, had musculoskeletal pain (adjOR 1.5, had migraine (adjOR 2.3, used asthma medicines (adjOR 1.8 or suffered from another disease lasting more than three months (adjOR 2.1. Being male predicted reduced odds of visiting a CAM practitioner in the future (adjOR 0.6. CONCLUSION: We can conclude from this study that future visits to a CAM practitioner are predicted by both predisposing factors (being female, having visited a CAM practitioner previously and medical need factors (having had musculoskeletal pain, migraine, used asthma medicines or experienced another disease lasting more than three months. None of the specific variables associated with CAM visits were predictive for CAM visits four years later.

  4. [Are there alternative therapeutical options other than CPAP in the treatment of the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randerath, W; Bauer, M; Blau, A; Fietze, I; Galetke, W; Hein, H; Maurer, J T; Orth, M; Rasche, K; Rühle, K-H; Sanner, B; Stuck, B A; Verse, T

    2007-07-01

    Many patients with the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) look for alternative conservative or surgical therapies to avoid to be treated with continuous positive airway pressure. In view of the high prevalence and the relevant impairment of the patients lots of methods are offered which promise definitive cure or relevant improvement of OSAS. The working group "Apnea" in the German Society of Sleep Medicine and Research established a task force to evaluate the scientific literature on non-CPAP therapies in the treatment of OSAS according to the standards of evidence-based medicine. This paper summarizes the results of the task force. The data were unsatisfactorily for most of the methods. Sufficient data were available for intraoral appliances (IOA) and the maxillomandibular osteotomy (MMO). IOA's can reduce mild to moderate respiratory disturbances, MMO are efficient in the short and long term but are performed only in special situations such as craniofacial dysmorphias. Weight reduction and body positioning cannot be recommended as a single treatment of OSAS. Most surgical procedures still lack sufficient data according to the criteria of evidence based medicine. Resections of muscular tissue within the soft palate have to be strictly avoided. But even success following gentle soft palate procedures is difficult to predict and often decreases after years. Results in other anatomical regions seem to be more stable over time. Today combined surgeries in the sense of multi-level surgery concepts are of increasing interest in the secondary treatment after failure of nasal ventilation therapy although more data from prospective controlled studies are needed. There is no evidence for any other treatment options. PMID:17538860

  5. Concurrent Complementary and Alternative Medicine CAM and Conventional Rehabilitation Therapy in the Management of Children with Developmental Disorders

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    Soo Yeon Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We investigated the concurrent use of conventional rehabilitations and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM therapies for the long-term management of children with developmental disorders (DDs. Methods. The parents or caregivers of 533 children with DDs (age range, 1–19 years who visited the rehabilitation centers were surveyed using in depth face-to-face interviews. Results. Of the 533 patients enrolled, 520 completed the questionnaire (97% response rate. A total of 292 (56% children were receiving multiple therapies, more than two conventional rehabilitations and CAM, at the time of the interview. A total of 249 (48% children reported lifetime CAM use, 23% used CAM at the time of the interview, and 62% of the patients planned to use CAM therapy in the future. Conventional rehabilitation therapies used at the time of the interview included physical therapy (30%, speech therapy (28%, and occupational therapy (19%, and the CAM therapies included herbal medicine (5% and acupuncture or moxibustion (3%. The respondents indicated that in the future they planned to use acupuncture or moxibustion (57%, occupational therapy (18%, cognitive behavioral therapy (16%, speech therapy (10%, and physical therapy (8%. Conclusion. Concurrent management as conventional rehabilitations and CAM therapies is widely used by children with DDs.

  6. Knowledge and Attitudes towards Complementary and Alternative Medicine among Senior Medical Students in King Abdulaziz University, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzahrani, Sami H; Bashawri, Jamil; Salawati, Emad M; Bakarman, Marwan A

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. This study assessed the knowledge and attitudes regarding complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in medical students in Saudi Arabia. Furthermore, it evaluated their views on the incorporation of CAM in their medical syllabus. Methods. The study was conducted by selecting a cross-sectional sample of senior medical students in the Faculty of Medicine. A validated and reliable self-administered questionnaire was used to explore the knowledge, attitude, and benefits of CAM. It was distributed to a sample of 273 students. Results. The study included 242 students, making the response rate 88.6%. Only two-thirds of students (62.4%) were aware of acupuncture principles and only 17.4% recognized that chiropractic is associated with pain management. The knowledge of common herbs such as St. John's Wort, Echinacea, and Ginkgo biloba was limited among the students. Older students had a positive CAM attitude compared to younger students (p = 0.027). Conclusion. Students attitudes toward CAM learning were encouraging regardless of their limited knowledge on the subject. A high percentage of students agreed that CAM in combination with conventional therapy is beneficial in treating unusual cases, but the choice of CAM should be based on evidence. Furthermore, medical students are still reluctant to have CAM practitioners in their referral network. PMID:27066102

  7. Is biological treatment a viable alternative for micropollutant removal in drinking water treatment processes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benner, Jessica; Helbling, Damian E; Kohler, Hans-Peter E; Wittebol, Janneke; Kaiser, Elena; Prasse, Carsten; Ternes, Thomas A; Albers, Christian N; Aamand, Jens; Horemans, Benjamin; Springael, Dirk; Walravens, Eddy; Boon, Nico

    2013-10-15

    In western societies, clean and safe drinking water is often taken for granted, but there are threats to drinking water resources that should not be underestimated. Contamination of drinking water sources by anthropogenic chemicals is one threat that is particularly widespread in industrialized nations. Recently, a significant amount of attention has been given to the occurrence of micropollutants in the urban water cycle. Micropollutants are bioactive and/or persistent chemicals originating from diverse sources that are frequently detected in water resources in the pg/L to μg/L range. The aim of this review is to critically evaluate the viability of biological treatment processes as a means to remove micropollutants from drinking water resources. We first place the micropollutant problem in context by providing a comprehensive summary of the reported occurrence of micropollutants in raw water used directly for drinking water production and in finished drinking water. We then present a critical discussion on conventional and advanced drinking water treatment processes and their contribution to micropollutant removal. Finally, we propose biological treatment and bioaugmentation as a potential targeted, cost-effective, and sustainable alternative to existing processes while critically examining the technical limitations and scientific challenges that need to be addressed prior to implementation. This review will serve as a valuable source of data and literature for water utilities, water researchers, policy makers, and environmental consultants. Meanwhile this review will open the door to meaningful discussion on the feasibility and application of biological treatment and bioaugmentation in drinking water treatment processes to protect the public from exposure to micropollutants. PMID:24053940

  8. Treatment of Fibromyalgia Syndrome: Recommendations of Recent Evidence-Based Interdisciplinary Guidelines with Special Emphasis on Complementary and Alternative Therapies

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    Jacob Ablin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Current evidence indicates that there is no single ideal treatment for fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS. First choice treatment options remain debatable, especially concerning the importance of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM treatments. Methods. Three evidence-based interdisciplinary guidelines on FMS in Canada, Germany, and Israel were compared for their first choice and CAM-recommendations. Results. All three guidelines emphasized a patient-tailored approach according to the key symptoms. Aerobic exercise, cognitive behavioral therapy, and multicomponent therapy were first choice treatments. The guidelines differed in the grade of recommendation for drug treatment. Anticonvulsants (gabapentin, pregabalin and serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (duloxetine, milnacipran were strongly recommended by the Canadian and the Israeli guidelines. These drugs received only a weak recommendation by the German guideline. In consideration of CAM-treatments, acupuncture, hypnosis/guided imagery, and Tai Chi were recommended by the German and Israeli guidelines. The Canadian guidelines did not recommend any CAM therapy. Discussion. Recent evidence-based interdisciplinary guidelines concur on the importance of treatment tailored to the individual patient and further emphasize the need of self-management strategies (exercise, and psychological techniques.

  9. Evaluation for antidiabetic activity in selected medicinal plants used in Malaysian traditional medicine for the treatment of diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aqueous extracts of three medicinal plants used in Malaysian traditional medicine for the treatment of diabetes were investigated. The nuts of Areca cathecu, leaves of Lagerstroemia speciosa and Ficus deltoidea were each extracted by boiling in distilled water. The aqueous extracts were filtered and the filtrates were then spray dried. Their biological evaluation was conducted to determine their blood glucose lowering effect in normoglycaemic and alloxan-induced diabetic rats. Commercially available antidiabetic drug, glybenclamide was used as positive control. Toxicity of the extracts was carried out using the brine shrimp lethality assay and in vivo acute toxicity test in rats. Aqueous extracts of all the plants studied showed significant reduction in blood glucose level up to 50% in rats over a period of 3 to 4 weeks. The largest reduction in blood glucose levels was exhibited by the aqueous extracts of the Lagestroemia speciosa, followed by the Ficus deltoidea and Areca cathecu. There was no evidence of toxicity of the extracts against the brine shrimp (up to 4,000 μg/ml) and in rats (up to 0.2% body weight). (Author)

  10. Clinical observation of associated treatment for Graves' disease with traditional chinese medicine and 131I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the method and curative effect of associated treatment for Graves Disease (GD) with traditional Chinese medicine and 131I. 100 patients with GD were randomly divided into two groups, the patients in group A was only given 131I treatment and the patients in group B was given traditional Chinese medicine (Shimaiqing Fluid, 3 times of 20 mL per day for 40 days) after 7 days of 131I treatment. The serum FT3, FT4 and TSH were measured before and 30 and 90 days after treatment. 8 cardinal symptoms were selected and Kupperman 4-grade grading method was used to assess the remission of the disease. The Results showed that the symptoms of patients in group B were improved ahead of time, and pass through the FT3 and FT4 rebound elevation period safely after one month of 131I treatment. The symptoms of patients in group A after 30 days treatment were more serious than that of before treatment, the levels of serum FT3 and FT4 were both higher than those of before treatment. The symptoms of patients in group B after 90 days treatment were improved significantly, and the levels of serum FT3, FT4 and TSH were in normal value. The clinical symptoms of patients in group A were improved, but the levels of serum FT3 and FT4 were lower and TSH was higher than normal value. The curative effect in group B was better than that in group A, the patients passed through the high risk period safely after 30 days treatment, and the hypothyroidism rate was decreased after 90 days treatment. The Shimaiqing Fluid is a nontoxic and safe medicine, and it may be widely used in clinical treatment for patients with GD. (authors)

  11. Thermotherapy. An alternative for the treatment of American cutaneous leishmaniasis.

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    López Liliana

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pentavalent antimonials (Sb5 and miltefosine are the first-line drugs for treating cutaneous leishmaniasis in Colombia; however, toxicity and treatment duration negatively impact compliance and cost, justifying an active search for better therapeutic options. We compared the efficacy and safety of thermotherapy and meglumine antimoniate for the treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Colombia. Method An open randomized Phase III clinical trial was performed in five military health centres. located in northwestern, central and southern Colombia. Volunteers with parasitological positive diagnosis (Giemsa-stained smears of cutaneous leishmaniasis were included. A single thermotherapy session involving the application of 50°C at the center and active edge of each lesion. Meglumine antimoniate was administered intramuscularly at a dose of 20 mg Sb5/kg weight/day for 20 days. Results Both groups were comparable. The efficacy of thermotherapy was 64% (86/134 patients by protocol and 58% (86/149 by intention-to-treat. For the meglumine antimoniate group, efficacy by protocol was 85% (103/121 patients and 72% (103/143 by intention-to-treat, The efficacy between the treatments was statistically significant (p 0.01 and Leishmania species responsible for infection. The side effects of meglumine antimoniate included myalgia, arthralgia, headache and fever. Regarding thermotherapy, the only side effect was pain at the lesion area four days after the initiation of treatment. Conclusion Although the efficacy rate of meglumine antimoniate was greater than that of thermotherapy for the treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis, the side effects were also greater. Those factors, added to the increased costs, the treatment adherence problems and the progressive lack of therapeutic response, make us consider thermotherapy as a first line treatment for cutaneous leishmaniasis. Registered ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00471705

  12. Complementary and alternative medicine in cancer pain management: A systematic review

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    Priyanka Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Quality of life (QoL encompasses the physical, psychosocial, social and spiritual dimensions of life lived by a person. Cancer pain is one of the physical component has tremendous impact on the QoL of the patient. Cancer pain is multifaceted and complex to understand and managing cancer pain involves a tool box full of pharmacological and non pharmacological interventions but still there are 50-70% of cancer patients who suffer from uncontrolled pain and they fear pain more than death. Aggressive surgeries, radiotherapy and chemotherapy focus more on prolonging the survival of the patient failing to realize that the QoL lived also matters equally. This paper reviews complementary and alternative therapy approaches for cancer pain and its impact in improving the QoL of cancer patients.

  13. The physiological basis of complementary and alternative medicines for polycystic ovary syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Raja-Khan, Nazia; Stener-Victorin, Elisabet; Wu, XiaoKe; Legro, Richard S.

    2011-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common endocrine disorder that is characterized by chronic hyperandrogenic anovulation leading to symptoms of hirsutism, acne, irregular menses, and infertility. Multiple metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors are associated with PCOS, including insulin resistance, obesity, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, inflammation, and subclinical atherosclerosis. However, current treatments for PCOS are only moderately effective at controlling symptoms and preventi...

  14. Pomegranate and Its Components as Alternative Treatment for Prostate Cancer

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    Lei Wang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in men in the United States. There is a major need for less toxic but yet effective therapies to treat prostate cancer. Pomegranate fruit from the tree Punica granatum has been used for centuries for medicinal purposes and is described as “nature’s power fruit”. Recent research has shown that pomegranate juice (PJ and/or pomegranate extracts (PE significantly inhibit the growth of prostate cancer cells in culture. In preclinical murine models, PJ and/or PE inhibit growth and angiogenesis of prostate tumors. More recently, we have shown that three components of PJ, luteolin, ellagic acid and punicic acid together, have similar inhibitory effects on prostate cancer growth, angiogenesis and metastasis. Results from clinical trials are also promising. PJ and/or PE significantly prolonged the prostate specific antigen (PSA doubling time in patients with prostate cancer. In this review we discuss data on the effects of PJ and PE on prostate cancer. We also discuss the effects of specific components of the pomegranate fruit and how they have been used to study the mechanisms involved in prostate cancer progression and their potential to be used in deterring prostate cancer metastasis.

  15. [Study on pathogenesis and treatment of pre-hypertension in traditional Chinese medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Xiong, Xing-Jiang; Wang, Jie

    2013-07-01

    The forward-shift prevention and treatment strategy is the current trend of the development of clinical medicine. As hypertension is an important risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, it is curtail to pay attention to the prevention and treatment of prehypertension. Pre-hypertension refers to the blood pressure value between the normal blood pressure and high blood pressure, which easily develops into hypertension with complications. In recent years, pre-hypertension has attracted attentions both at home and abroad. The traditional Chinese medicinal theory of "preventive treatment of disease" shows its unique advantages in preventing and treating pre-hypertension and high blood pressure. With the socio-economic development and the changes in lifestyle, traditional pathogenetic theories have no longer kept pace with the occurrence regularity of modern high blood pressure and pre-hypertension. Therefore, the in-depth study on the pathogenesis of pre-hypertension is of great significance in the guidance of clinical prevention and treatment. It is believed that the etiologies of pre-hypertension are related to improper diet, sedentariness and emotional instability. In other words, stasis in six forms such as qi stagnation, dyspepsia, damp obstruction, phlegm stasis, blood stasis and fire stagnation is an crucial pathogenesis of pre-hypertension. Consequently, on the basis of the traditional Chinese medicinal theory of "preventive treatment of disease", the combination of the treatment based on syndrome differentiation and the correspondence of prescriptions and the syndromes in treating pre-hypertension is worth clinically promoting and applying. PMID:24199585

  16. Effects of integrative medicine treatment on 48 infertile patients with diminished ovarian reserve

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Jin; PAN Fang

    2008-01-01

    Objective:To observe the effect of integrative medicine treatment on infertile patients with diminished ovarian reserve(DOR).Methods:Forty-eight infertile patients with DOR were treated with integrative medicine from May 2004 to December 2006 in our center.Patients were divided into 3 groups:failed IVF-ET in 16 cases(IVF group),prema-ture ovarian failure in 9 cases(POF group)and DOR due to other causes in 23.cases(OV ↓ group).Yu's Follicle Replenishing Recipe(YFRR)was administered daily in all cases,and usually different dosages of estrogen were dia-lectically added according to the view of life network regulation.Symptoms,BBT,ovulation rate,pregnancy rate and serum sex hormones measuring on cycle Day 3(or day 3 after withdrawal bleeding)were observed before and af-ter treatment.Results:During the treatment,symptoms were gratefully relieved in all 48 patients,and the pregnancy rate was 40%.Ovulation rate significantly increased from 17%(8/48 before treatment)to 56 %(27/48 after treatment)(P0.05).Conclusion:The integrative medicine treatment not only increases ovulation rate and pregnancy rate in infertile patients with DOR,but also calms down their symptoms.

  17. Attitudes towards complementary and alternative medicine in chronic pain syndromes: a questionnaire-based comparison between primary headache and low back pain

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    Czaja Eva

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM is widely used and popular among patients with primary headache or low back pain (LBP. Aim of the study was to analyze attitudes of headache and LBP patients towards the use of CAM. Methods Two questionnaire-based surveys were applied comparing 432 primary headache and 194 LBP patients. Results In total, 84.75% of all patients reported use of CAM; with significantly more LBP patients. The most frequently-used CAM therapies in headache were acupuncture (71.4%, massages (56.4%, and thermotherapy (29.2%, in LBP thermotherapy (77.4%, massages (62.7%, and acupuncture (51.4%. The most frequent attitudes towards CAM use in headache vs. LBP: "leave nothing undone" (62.5% vs. 52.1%; p = 0.006, "take action against the disease" (56.8% vs. 43.2%; p = 0.006. Nearly all patients with previous experience with CAM currently use CAM in both conditions (93.6% in headache; 100% in LBP. However, the majority of the patients had no previous experience. Conclusion Understanding motivations for CAM treatment is important, because attitudes derive from wishes for non-pharmacological treatment, to be more involved in treatment and avoid side effects. Despite higher age and more permanent pain in LBP, both groups show high use of CAM with only little specific difference in preferred methods and attitudes towards CAM use. This may reflect deficits and unfulfilled goals in conventional treatment. Maybe CAM can decrease the gap between patients' expectations about pain therapy and treatment reality, considering that both conditions are often chronic diseases, causing high burdens for daily life.

  18. The treatment and research for posttraumatic stress disorder with Chinese medicine

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    Yong-Hua Zhang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available There is no disease called posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM. However, Huangdi's Canon of Medicine written in about 200 BC, one of the most famous TCM classics, recorded diseases with similar etiology, pathogenesis, and clinical symptoms. Moreover, contemporary TCM also attaches great importance to diseases caused by trauma. Especially after 2008, there is a mini-rush of study on PTSD as a result of Sichuan earthquake. Referring to ancient and modern literature, we summarize the TCM treatment of PTSD and wish to contribute to the further study on TCM remedy for PTSD.

  19. An alternative treatment approach in tetanus: Botulinum toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Nazlim Aktug; Sumer, Sua; Ural, Onur; Ozturk, Serefnur; Celik, Jale Bengi

    2015-01-01

    Tetanus is a preventable infectious disease caused by tetanus toxin (tetanospasmin) produced by Clostridium tetani. Tetanus is still an important health problem in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Botulinum toxin administration is a treatment approach that has been used in recent years to reduce rigidity and spasms in tetanus patients. This case report focuses on its efficacy. PMID:25234426

  20. An alternative non-invasive treatment for Peyronie's disease

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    Joaquim A. Claro

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Surgical correction of the deformity and plaque caused by Peyronie's disease has some important disadvantages and extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT emerged as a new promising therapy. We evaluated prospectively the efficacy and safety of the association of high dose vitamin E and ESWT as a non-invasive treatment for the disease. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty-five patients 42 to 68 years old (mean = 54 presenting penile deviation and sexual distress caused by Peyronie's disease were treated in a non-invasive manner. The time of penile deviation ranged from 16 to 52 months (mean = 30. All patients had previous unsuccessful treatment for Peyronie's disease. The angulation's deformity of the penis was assessed by photography at home. The patients received vitamin E (l.200 mg daily during 3 months and underwent 3 to 6 sessions (mean = 3 of ESWT (3,000 to 4,000 shockwaves at a power level of l to 2 at 1-week intervals. RESULTS: From 25 patients treated, 16 (64% reported an improvement in penile angulation, with a mean reduction of 21 degrees (10 to 40. Eight patients reported improvement in their spontaneous erections. Overall, the patients presented only minimal bruising at the site of treatment and skin hematoma. Four patients presented urethral bleeding. The mean angulation after treatment in the control group was 48.67 degrees (30 - 70 and in the study group was 24.42 degrees (0 - 70, statistically significant. CONCLUSION: Considering the common complications and the unsatisfactory outcome of the surgical correction for Peyronie's disease, the association of high dose vitamin E and ESWT represents a good option for a non-invasive, effective and safe treatment of the penile deformity.