WorldWideScience

Sample records for alternative medicine practitioners

  1. General Practitioners Using Complementary and Alternative Medicine Differ From General Practitioners Using Conventional Medicine in Their View of the Risks of Electromagnetic Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kowall, Bernd; Breckenkamp, Jürgen; Berg-Beckhoff, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: General practitioners (GPs) play a key role in consulting patients worried about health effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF). We compared GPs using conventional medicine (COM) with GPs using complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) concerning their perception of EMF risks...

  2. Alternative medicine and general practitioners in The Netherlands: towards acceptance and integration.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, G.J.; Peters, L.

    1990-01-01

    A questionnaire on alternative medicine was sent to 600 general practitioners in the Netherlands. Most of the 360 (60%) GPs who replied expressed on interest in alternative practice; and 47% revealed that they used one or more alternative methods themselves, most often homoeopathy. However, the numb

  3. Intention to Encourage Complementary and Alternative Medicine among General Practitioners and Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Gaston; Beaulieu, Dominique; Touchette, Jean-Sebastien; Lambert, Leo-Daniel; Dodin, Sylvie

    2007-01-01

    The authors' goal was to identify factors explaining intention to encourage a patient to follow complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatment among general practitioners (GPs), fourth-year medical students, and residents in family medicine. They surveyed 500 GPs and 904 medical students via a self-administered mailed questionnaire that…

  4. Complementary and alternative medicine practitioners' standard of care: responsibilities to patients and parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmour, Joan; Harrison, Christine; Asadi, Leyla; Cohen, Michael H; Vohra, Sunita

    2011-11-01

    In this article we explain (1) the standard of care that health care providers must meet and (2) how these principles apply to complementary and alternative medicine practitioners. The scenario describes a 14-year-old boy who is experiencing back pain and whose chiropractor performed spinal manipulation but did not recognize or take steps to rule out serious underlying disease-in this case, testicular cancer--either initially or when the patient's condition continued to deteriorate despite treatment. We use chiropractic care for a patient with a sore back as an example, because back pain is such a common problem and chiropracty is a common treatment chosen by both adult and pediatric patients. The scenario illustrates the responsibilities that complementary and alternative medicine practitioners owe patients/parents, the potential for liability when deficient care harms patients, and the importance of ample formal pediatric training for practitioners who treat pediatric patients.

  5. Oral complementary medicine and alternative practitioner use varies across chronic conditions and attitudes to risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Adams

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Robert J Adams1, Sarah L Appleton1, Antonia Cole2, Tiffany K Gill3, Anne W Taylor3, Catherine L Hill11The Health Observatory, 2Rheumatology Unit, 3Population Research and Outcomes Unit, SA Health, The University of Adelaide Discipline of Medicine, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Woodville, AustraliaObjectives: To determine whether chronic conditions and patient factors, such as risk perception and decision-making preferences, are associated with complementary medicine and alternative practitioner use in a representative longitudinal population cohort.Participants and setting: Analysis of data from Stage 2 of the North West Adelaide Health Study of 3161 adults who attended a study clinic visit in 2004–2006. The main outcome measures were the medications brought by participants to the study clinic visit, chronic health conditions, attitudes to risk, levels of satisfaction with conventional medicine, and preferred decision-making style.Results: At least one oral complementary medicine was used by 27.9% of participants, and 7.3% were visiting alternative practitioners (naturopath, osteopath. Oral complementary medicine use was significantly associated with arthritis, osteoporosis, and mental health conditions, but not with other chronic conditions. Any pattern of complementary medicine use was generally significantly associated with female gender, age at least 45 years, patient-driven decision-making preferences (odds ratio [OR] 1.38, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.08–1.77, and frequent general practitioner visits (>five per year; OR 3.62, 95% CI: 2.13–6.17. Alternative practitioner visitors were younger, with higher levels of education (diploma/trade [OR 1.88, 95% CI: 1.28–2.76], bachelor’s degree [OR 1.77, 95% CI: 1.11–2.82], income > $80,000 (OR 2.28, 95% CI: 1.26–4.11, female gender (OR 3.15, 95% CI: 2.19–4.52, joint pain not diagnosed as arthritis (OR 1.68, 95% CI: 1.17–2.41, moderate to severe depressive symptoms (OR 2.15, 95% CI

  6. Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of General Practitioners toward Complementary and Alternative Medicine: a Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barikani, Ameneh; Beheshti, Akram; Javadi, Maryam; Yasi, Marzieh

    2015-08-01

    Orientation of public and physicians to the complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is one of the most prominent symbols of structural changes in the health service system. The aim of his study was a determination of knowledge, attitude, and practice of general practitioners in complementary and alternative medicine. This cross- sectional study was conducted in Qazvin, Iran in 2013. A self-administered questionnaire was used for collecting data including four information parts: population information, physicians' attitude and knowledge, methods of getting information and their function. A total of 228 physicians in Qazvin comprised the population of study according to the deputy of treatment's report of Qazvin University of Medical Sciences. A total of 150 physicians were selected randomly, and SPSS Statistical program was used to enter questionnaires' data. Results were analyzed as descriptive statistics and statistical analysis. Sixty percent of all responders were male. About sixty (59.4) percent of participating practitioners had worked less than 10 years.96.4 percent had a positive attitude towards complementary and alternative medicine. Knowledge of practitioners about traditional medicine in 11 percent was good, 36.3% and 52.7% had average and little information, respectively. 17.9% of practitioners offered their patients complementary and alternative medicine for treatment. Although there was little knowledge among practitioners about traditional medicine and complementary approaches, a significant percentage of them had attitude higher than the lower limit.

  7. 'Becoming accepted': The complementary and alternative medicine practitioners' response to the uptake and practice of traditional medicine therapies by the mainstream health sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiese, Marlene; Oster, Candice

    2010-07-01

    This Australian study sought to understand how practitioners of the traditional systems of what is now termed complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) are responding to the adoption of their traditional medicine therapies by the mainstream health care system, and the practice of these therapies by mainstream health care practitioners. A grounded theory approach was used for this study. In-depth interviews were conducted with 19 participants who were non-mainstream practitioners from five traditional systems of medicine - Traditional Chinese Medicine,Ayurveda, Naturopathy, Homeopathy and Western Herbal Medicine. Four main conceptual categories were identified: Losing Control of the CAM Occupational Domain (the participants' main concern); Personal Positioning; Professional Positioning (the core category); and Legitimacy.These categories formed the elements of the substantive theory of 'becoming accepted' as a legitimate health care provider in the mainstream health system, which explained the basic social process that the study's participants were using to resolve their main concern.

  8. Predictors for adolescent visits to practitioners of complementary and alternative medicine in a total population (the Young-HUNT Studies.

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    Aslak Steinsbekk

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the factors predicting adolescent visits to practitioners of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM. METHODS: A longitudinal cohort study conducted in an adolescent total population in Central Norway (The Nord-Trøndelag Health Studies (HUNT. In Young-HUNT 1, all inhabitants aged 13 to 19 years (N = 8944, 89% response rate were invited to participate, and the youngest group (13 to 15 year olds was surveyed again 4 years later (Young-HUNT 2, N = 2429, 82% response rate. The participants completed a comprehensive questionnaire on health and life style which included a question regarding visits to a CAM practitioner in the last 12 months. RESULTS: One in eleven (8.7%, 95%CI 7.6-9.8% had visited a CAM practitioner, an increase of 26% in 4 years (1.8% points. The final multivariable analysis predicted increased odds of an adolescent becoming a CAM visitor four years later (p<0.05 if she or he had previously visited a CAM practitioner (adjOR 3.4, had musculoskeletal pain (adjOR 1.5, had migraine (adjOR 2.3, used asthma medicines (adjOR 1.8 or suffered from another disease lasting more than three months (adjOR 2.1. Being male predicted reduced odds of visiting a CAM practitioner in the future (adjOR 0.6. CONCLUSION: We can conclude from this study that future visits to a CAM practitioner are predicted by both predisposing factors (being female, having visited a CAM practitioner previously and medical need factors (having had musculoskeletal pain, migraine, used asthma medicines or experienced another disease lasting more than three months. None of the specific variables associated with CAM visits were predictive for CAM visits four years later.

  9. Complementary therapy support in cancer survivorship: a survey of complementary and alternative medicine practitioners' provision and perception of skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, C A; Faithfull, S

    2014-03-01

    This study reviewed the confidence and perceived skills of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) practitioners in providing care and symptom management for clients post cancer. An e-survey was mailed to approximately 21, 000 CAM practitioners, targeted at those working with clients who were experiencing consequences of cancer and its treatments. Questions were asked about the main symptoms and concerns of clients, the confidence and current skill levels of practitioners and additional training requirements. Six hundred and twelve practitioners responded to the survey, 507 of whom were working with individuals experiencing the consequences of cancer and its treatments. Forty-five per cent (n = 134) had undertaken training in cancer prior to working with cancer patients, 61% (n = 182) had undertaken courses or study days relative to cancer care in the past two years. The most often treated symptoms or concerns of patients were those of a psychosocial nature, pain management and lymphoedema. CAM practitioners with limited knowledge and training are providing support to cancer survivors, particularly in services where the National Health Service has limited provision. CAM practitioners may fulfil a future role in providing long-term support for cancer survivors; however, in order to properly safeguard patients they are in need of further training and development.

  10. Perceptions of traditional, complementary and alternative medicine among conventional healthcare practitioners in Accra, Ghana:Implications for integrative healthcare

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Irene A Kretchy; Harry A Okere; Joseph Osafo; Barima Afrane; Joseph Sarkodie; Philip Debrah

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Integrative medicine refers to ongoing efforts to combine the best of conventional and evidence-based complementary therapies. While this effort for colaboration is increasing, traditional complementary and alternative medicine (TM-CAM) remains poorly integrated into the current healthcare system of Ghana. At present, it is not clear if practitioners of mainstream medicine favor integrative medicine. The present study, therefore, sought to explore the perceptions of conventional healthcare professionals on integrative medicine. METHODS: A qualitative design composed of semi-structured interviews was conducted with 23 conventional healthcare professionals comprising pharmacists, physicians, nurses and dieticians from two quasi-government hospitals in Accra, Ghana. RESULTS: Participants’ knowledge of TM-CAM was low, and although they perceived alternative medicine as important to current conventional healthcare in Ghana, they expressed anxieties about the potential negative effects of the use of TM-CAM. This paradox was found to account for the low levels of use among these professionals, as wel as the low level of recommendation to their patients. The practitioners surveyed recommended that alternative medicine could be integrated into mainstream alopathic healthcare in Ghana through improving knowledge, training as wel as addressing concerns of safety and effi cacy. These fi ndings are discussed under the themes: the knowledge gap, the paradox of TM-CAM, experience of use and prescription, and guided integration. We did not observe any differences in views among the participants. CONCLUSION:The conventional healthcare professionals were ready to accept the idea of integrative medicine based on knowledge of widespread use and the potential role of TM-CAM products and practices in improving healthcare delivery in the country. However, to achieve an institutional integration, practitioners’ understanding of TM-CAM must be improved, with specifi c

  11. Belief in the efficacy of alternative medicine among general practitioners in The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knipschild, P; Kleijnen, J; ter Riet, G

    1990-01-01

    A survey among 293 GPs in the Netherlands showed that many believe in the efficacy of common alternative procedures. High scores were especially found for manual therapy, yoga, acupuncture, hot bath therapy and homoeopathy. Other procedures, such as iridology, faith healing and many food supplements, were considered less useful.

  12. Knowledge and beliefs concerning evidence-based practice amongst complementary and alternative medicine health care practitioners and allied health care professionals: A questionnaire survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Khalid S

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence-based practice (EBP has become an important competency in many allied and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM health care practitioners' professional standards of proficiency. Methods To compliment an EBP course for allied health care professionals and CAM practitioners, we undertook a questionnaire survey to assess learning needs. We developed a questionnaire to measure allied health care professionals and CAM practitioners' basic knowledge, skills and beliefs concerning the main principles of EBP. The questionnaires were administered to all attendees of one-day EBP workshops. Results During 2004–5 we surveyed 193 allied health care professionals and CAM practitioners who attended one-day EBP courses prior to commencement of teaching. Of the respondents 121 (62.7% were allied health care professionals and 65 (33.7% practitioners stated that they work in the CAM field Our survey found that the majority of the respondents had not previously attended a literature appraisal skills workshop (87.3% or received formal training in research methods (69.9%, epidemiology (91.2% or statistics (80.8%. Furthermore, 67.1% of practitioners specified that they felt that they had not had adequate training in EBM and they identified that they needed more training and education in the principles of EBM (86.7%. Differences in knowledge and beliefs concerning EBP amongst allied and CAM practitioners were found and length of time since qualification was also found to be an important factor in practitioner's beliefs. More CAM practitioners compared to allied health professionals accessed educational literature via the Internet (95.3% v 68.1%, p = 0.008. Whilst, practitioners with more than 11 years experience felt that original research papers were far more confusing (p = 0.02 than their less experienced colleagues. Conclusion The results demonstrate that practitioner's learning needs do vary according to the type of profession

  13. Alternative medicine - pain relief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alternative medicine refers to treatments that are used instead of conventional (standard) ones. If you use an alternative ... with conventional medicine or therapy, it is considered complementary therapy. There are many forms of alternative medicine. Acupuncture ...

  14. Regulating Traditional Chinese Medicine Practitioners and Acupuncturists in Ontario, Canada

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    Glen E. Randall

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In 2006, the Ontario government passed the Traditional Chinese Medicine Act, which granted Traditional Chinese Medicine practitioners and Acupuncturists (TCM/A practitioners self-regulatory status under the Regulated Health Professions Act, 1991. The goal of the legislation was to create a new regulatory college that would set and enforce high standards of care and safety in order to enhance public protection and access to a range of traditional and alternative therapies. In April 2013, the College of Traditional Chinese Medicine Practitioners and Acupuncturists of Ontario was officially launched. Several factors account for the government’s decision to delegate self-regulatory authority to TCM/A practitioners through the creation of a regulatory college. In particular, the government’s decision seems to have been influenced by lobbying of some practitioners, greater public acceptance of alternative medicines, patient safety concerns related to acupuncture cases in the media, and the precedence of self-regulatory status being granted to these practitioners in other provinces. The degree to which the legislation has achieved its goals is difficult to determine given the short period of time the regulatory college has existed. However, the fact that the college has developed standards of practice to guide TCM/A practitioners and has a process in place to address public complaints is an early indication of movement toward achieving the policy’s goals.

  15. Use of Self-Care and Practitioner-Based Forms of Complementary and Alternative Medicine before and after a Diagnosis of Breast Cancer

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    Alissa R. Link

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We examine factors associated with self-care, use of practitioner-based complementary and alternative medicine (CAM, and their timing in a cohort of women with breast cancer. Methods. Study participants were women with breast cancer who participated in the Long Island Breast Cancer Study Project. Self-care is defined as the use of multivitamins, single vitamins, botanicals, other dietary supplements, mind-body practices, special diets, support groups, and prayer. Within each modality, study participants were categorized as continuous users (before and after diagnosis, starters (only after diagnosis, quitters (only before diagnosis, or never users. Multivariable logistic regression was used for the main analyses. Results. Of 764 women who provided complete data, 513 (67.2% initiated a new form of self-care following breast cancer diagnosis. The most popular modalities were those that are ingestible, and they were commonly used in combination. The strongest predictor of continuous use of one type of self-care was continuous use of other types of self-care. Healthy behaviors, including high fruit/vegetable intake and exercise, were more strongly associated with continuously using self-care than starting self-care after diagnosis. Conclusions. Breast cancer diagnosis was associated with subsequent behavioral changes, and the majority of women undertook new forms of self-care after diagnosis. Few women discontinued use of modalities they used prior to diagnosis.

  16. Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the practitioner to ask about the risks and benefits of treatment — the same kinds of things you'd do if you were interviewing a new doctor. You may have already used a complementary or alternative practice, like yoga or massage, and not even thought about it! ...

  17. Consultations with complementary and alternative medicine practitioners amongst wider care options for back pain: a study of a nationally representative sample of 1,310 Australian women aged 60-65 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Vijayendra; Sibbritt, David; Adams, Jon; Broom, Alex; Kirby, Emma; Refshauge, Kathryn M

    2014-02-01

    Back pain is a significant health service issue in Australia and internationally. Back pain sufferers can draw upon a range of health care providers including complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) practitioners. Women are higher users of health services than men and tend to use CAM frequently for musculoskeletal conditions. However, there remain important gaps in our understanding of women's consultation patterns with CAM practitioners for back pain. The objective of this study is to examine the prevalence of use and characteristics of women who use CAM practitioners for back pain. The method used was a survey of a nationally representative sample of women aged 60-65 years from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health. Women consulted a massage therapist (44.1 %, n = 578) and a chiropractor (37.3 %, n = 488) more than other CAM practitioners for their back pain. Consultations with a chiropractor for back pain were lower for women who consulted a General Practitioner (GP) (OR, 0.56; 95 % CI 0.41, 0.76) or a physiotherapist (OR, 0.53; 95 % CI 0.39, 0.72) than for those who did not consult a GP or a physiotherapist. CAM practitioner consultations for back pain were greater for women who visited a pharmacist (OR, 1.99; 95 % CI 1.23, 3.32) than for women who did not visit a pharmacist. There is substantial use of CAM practitioners alongside conventional practitioners amongst women for back pain, and there is a need to provide detailed examination of the communication between patients and their providers as well as across the diverse range of health professionals involved in back pain care.

  18. Are patients who use alternative medicine dissatisfied with orthodox medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, W J; Spykerboer, J E; Thong, Y H

    1985-05-13

    Approximately 45% of asthmatic families and 47% of non-asthmatic families had consulted an alternative-medicine practitioner at some time. The most popular form of alternative medicine was chiropractic (21.1% and 26.4%, respectively), followed by homoeopathy/naturopathy (18.8% and 12.7%, respectively), acupuncture (9.4% and 10.9%, respectively), and herbal medicine (4.7% and 6.4%, respectively), while the remainder (20.3% and 11.8% respectively) was distributed among iridology, osteopathy, hypnosis, faith healing and megavitamin therapy. More families were satisfied with orthodox medicine (87.1% and 93.6%, respectively) than with alternative medicine (84.2% and 75.1%, respectively). Crosstabulation analysis of pooled data both from asthma and from non-asthma groups showed that 76.4% were satisfied both with orthodox and with alternative medicine, and 16.4% were satisfied with orthodox, but not with alternative, medicine. In contrast, only 2.7% were dissatisfied with orthodox medicine and satisfied with alternative medicine (chi2 = 9.33; P less than 0.01). These findings do not support the view that patients who use alternative medicine are those who are disgruntled with orthodox medicine.

  19. Alternative Medicine and Your Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1- to 2-Year-Old Complementary and Alternative Medicine KidsHealth > For Parents > Complementary and Alternative Medicine A ... works. previous continue How CAM Differs From Traditional Medicine CAM is frequently distinguished by its holistic methods, ...

  20. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Education in United States Pharmacy Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowell, Donna M.; Kroll, David J.

    1998-01-01

    Survey of 50 pharmacy schools investigated the degree to which instruction in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) was included in the pharmacy curriculum, and use of alternative practitioners as instructors. Almost three-quarters offered coursework in herbal medicine or other areas of CAM; about half offered other alternative medicine…

  1. Regulating Traditional Chinese Medicine Practitioners and Acupuncturists in Ontario, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glen E. Randall

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In 2006, the Ontario government passed the Traditional Chinese Medicine Act, which granted Traditional Chinese Medicine practitioners and Acupuncturists (TCM/A practitioners self-regulatory status under the Regulated Health Professions Act, 1991. The goal of the legislation was to create a new regulatory college that would set and enforce high standards of care and safety in order to enhance public protection and access to a range of traditional and alternative therapies. In April 2013, the College of Traditional Chinese Medicine Practitioners and Acupuncturists of Ontario was officially launched. Several factors account for the government’s decision to delegate self-regulatory authority to TCM/A practitioners through the creation of a regulatory college. In particular, the government’s decision seems to have been influenced by lobbying of some practitioners, greater public acceptance of alternative medicines, patient safety concerns related to acupuncture cases in the media, and the precedence of self-regulatory status being granted to these practitioners in other provinces. The degree to which the legislation has achieved its goals is difficult to determine given the short period of time the regulatory college has existed. However, the fact that the college has developed standards of practice to guide TCM/A practitioners and has a process in place to address public complaints is an early indication of movement toward achieving the policy’s goals. Le gouvernement de l'Ontario a fait voter en 2006 la Loi sur les praticiens en médecine traditionnelle chinoise, qui accorde aux praticiens en médecine traditionnelle chinoise et aux acupuncteurs (praticiens en MTC/A le statut de profession autonome dans le cadre la Loi sur les professions de la santé réglementées de 1991. Le but de la Loi était de créer un ordre professionnel capable d'établir et appliquer des normes de qualité et de sécurité des soins, ceci dans le but d

  2. General practitioners' knowledge and practice of complementary/alternative medicine and its relationship with life-styles: a population-based survey in Italy

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    Da Frè Monica

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The growing popularity of CAM among the public is coupled with an ongoing debate on its effectiveness, safety, and its implications on the reimbursement system. This issue is critically important for GPs, who have a "gatekeeping" role with respect to health care expenditure. GPs must be aware of medications' uses, limitations and possible adverse effects. Our objective was to explore GPs' knowledge of CAM and patterns of recommendation and practice, as well as the relationship between such patterns and GPs' life-styles. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in Tuscany, a region of central Italy. One hundred percent female GPs (498 and a 60% random sample of male GPs (1310 practising in the region were contacted through a self-administered postal questionnaire followed by a postal reminder and telephone interview. Results Overall response rate was 82.1%. Most respondents (58% recommended CAM but a far smaller fraction (13% practised it; yet 36% of CAM practitioners had no certificated training. Being female, younger age, practising in larger communities, having had some training in CAM as well as following a vegetarian or macrobiotic diet and doing physical activity were independent predictors of CAM recommendation and practice. However, 42% of GPs did not recommend CAM to patients mostly because of the insufficient evidence of its effectiveness. Conclusion CAM knowledge among GPs is not as widespread as the public demand seems to require, and the scarce evidence of CAM effectiveness hinders its professional use among a considerable number of GPs. Sound research on CAM effectiveness is needed to guide physicians' behaviour, to safeguard patients' safety, and to assist policy-makers in planning regulations for CAM usage.

  3. Traditional and alternative therapy for mental illness in Jamaica: patients' conceptions and practitioners' attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Caryl C A B; Peltzer, Karl

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate traditional and alternative therapy for mental illness in Jamaica: patients' conceptions and practitioners' attitudes. The sample included 60 psychiatric patients selected from Ward 21 at the University of the West Indies, Kingston as well as Princess Margaret outpatient clinic, and 30 Afro-centric psychiatric nurses, psychiatrist and clinical psychologists from Kingston and St. Thomas, Jamaica. Patients were interviewed with the Short Explanatory Model Interview (SEMI) and practitioners completed a self administered questionnaire on attitudes towards traditional and alternative medicine. Results indicate that among psychiatric patients more than a third expressed the belief that the overall cause of their mental illness was as a result of supernatural factors. In general, the majority of patients felt that their perception of their problems did not concur with the western practitioner, which in turn caused distress for these patients. In case for those who also sought traditional medicine, they were more inclined to feel pleased about their interaction and the treatment they received. Results from western trained practitioners found that although they acknowledged that traditional medicine plays a major role in the treatment of mental illness among psychiatric patients the treatment was not advantageous. For the most part when all three traditional approaches were examined alternative medicine seemed more favourable than traditional healing and traditional herbal treatment. There is a need to develop models of collaboration that promote a workable relationship between the two healing systems in treating mental illness.

  4. Influence of folk medicine on the family practitioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gums, J G; Carson, D S

    1987-02-01

    The practice of folk medicine in the United States is increasing. Awareness by the family practitioner is essential in order to effectively communicate and successfully recommend medical treatment to those patients who hold belief in these traditional practices. Root medicine is particularly thriving in the southeastern United States. The influx of refugees into the southern coastal states has introduced new concepts into traditional medical practices. Interaction with patients who are involved with traditional health care providers and the modern medical community occurs more frequently than may be appreciated by the physicians. This article is intended to increase physicians' knowledge of some of the basic philosophies and practices of folk medicine, particularly root medicine, and to provide some insight into the reasons why the practitioners of folk medicine can be strongly influential in the medical and psychologic concerns of patients who believe in the power of the supernatural.

  5. Alternative medicine among college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaedeke, R M; Tootelian, D H; Holst, C

    1999-01-01

    The use of "alternative" medicine has become increasingly popular in the United States. Books devoted to alternative medicine, e.g., Spontaneous Healing and 8 Weeks to Optimum Health, have become best sellers. Nevertheless, relatively few research studies have focused on the subject. This study examined the role of alternative medicine among college students. Issues addressed included students' familiarity with, use of, and perceptions regarding unconventional health therapies. The study substantiated a phenomenon health care providers across the country are discovering: a growing number of Americans with interest and financial resources support the development of "mainstream" alternative medicine programs. Results of the study also suggest that well-respected traditional health care organizations would not suffer reputation damage if they were to offer such programs.

  6. Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... using or might want to try. As with modern medicine, CAM treatments that are effective for one problem ... All rights reserved. Images provided by The Nemours Foundation, iStock, Getty Images, Corbis, Veer, Science Photo Library, Science Source Images, Shutterstock, and Clipart.com

  7. Can scientific medicine incorporate alternative medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federspil, G; Vettor, R

    2000-06-01

    The authors examine the problem of defining alternative medicine, and after a brief analysis conclude that a satisfactory unifying definition of the different practices is not possible. Scientific knowledge is a function of scientific method. In turn the principle of falsifiability proposed by Karl Popper is used as a demarcation line between science and pseudoscience. They assert that the various alternative modalities do not represent authentic scientific disciplines, as they lack many of the minimum requirements of scientific discourse and, above all, because they violate the principle of falsifiability. Until they overcome these methodological shortcomings, alternative medical practices cannot become authentic scientific disciplines.

  8. Thyroid Disease and Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alternative Medicine (CAM) Thyroid Disease and Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) WHAT IS COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE (CAM)? Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) is defined ...

  9. [Alternative medicine: really an alternative to academic medicine?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happle, R

    2000-06-01

    Numerous courses on alternative medicine are regularly advertised in Deutsches Arzteblatt, the organ of the German Medical Association. The present German legislation likewise supports this form of medicine, and this explains why Iscador, an extract of the mistletoe, is found in the Rote Liste, a directory of commercially available medical drugs, under the heading "cytostatic and antimetastatic drugs" although such beneficial effect is unproven. To give another example, a German health insurance fund was sentenced to pay for acupuncture as a treatment for hepatic failure. This judgement is characteristic of the present German judicial system and represents a victory of "oracling irrationalism" (Popper). The astonishing popularity of alternative medicine can be explained by a revival of romanticism. An intellectually fair opposite position has been delineated by Karl Popper in the form of critical rationalism. It is important to realize, however, that our decision to adhere to rational thinking is made in the innermost depth of our heart but not on the basis of rational arguing. Rather, the decision in favor of reason has a moral dimension.

  10. Public opinion regarding alternative medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hammond

    1982-09-01

    Full Text Available Fairly widespread disillusionment in medicine since the 1950s (when many wonder drugs proved themselves either ineffective or harmful - or both, and when disease was found to be as prevalent as ever, even if in degenerative and stress-related guises, seems to have coincided with considerable public interest in alternative forms of healing. Some authors have given sympathetic attention to alternatives like homeopathy, chiropractic, herbalism and so on, but most of the literature still deals with these healers in a patronising if not blatantly biased manner. The abundance of emotive, highly critical reporting in the popular press, coupled with the relative lack of detailed, up-to-date studies and the persistence of ideas put forward by those in positions of power and status has caused a situation where most common knowledge about alternatives is nothing short of mythical.

  11. HERBAL MEDICINE AMONG COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE METHODS

    OpenAIRE

    A. Ruban; Rodioniva, T.

    2012-01-01

    Alternative medicine methods may incorporate or base themselves on traditional medicine [1], folk knowledge [2], spiritual beliefs, or newly conceived approaches to healing. The major complementary and alternative medicine systems have many common characteristics, treating the whole person, including a focus on individualizing treatments, promoting self-care and self-healing, and recognizing the spiritual nature of each individual. Complementary and alternative medicine often lacks or has onl...

  12. Five-year outcomes of western mental health training for Traditional Chinese Medicine practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai Pong Lam

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are increasing expectations for primary care practitioners to deal with mental health problems. In Hong Kong, 15 % of the general public consult Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM practitioners regularly for their primary health care needs. This study investigated the 5-year outcomes of a western mental health training course for TCM practitioners in Hong Kong. Method Structured questionnaire surveys were conducted to compare the TCM practitioners’ confidence and engagement in mental health care before and after the Course. The data collected during 2011–2015 were analyzed. Results A total of 151 TCM practitioners returned both pre- and post-Course questionnaires, with a response rate of 95.6 %. After the course, there were significant increases in the proportions of participants being confident of recognizing patients with psychological problems (62.9 % before the course vs 89.4 % after, diagnosing common mental health problems (47.7 % vs 77.5 %, and managing them (31.2 % vs 64.3 %. Overall, 66.9 % of the participants reported some increase in their confidence in recognizing patients with psychological problems, diagnosing or/and managing patients with common mental health problems. Qualitative responses illustrated the major improvements were increased awareness of mental symptoms, better understanding of classification of mental disorders and management approaches. On the other hand, barriers included difficulties in understanding medical terms in English, consultation time constraints, and a lack of formal referral system to psychiatrists. Conclusions The Course has positive impact on TCM practitioners in handling mental health patients. The findings are useful for designing similar trainings on complementary and alternative medicine practitioners in other countries.

  13. Challenges and Opportunities Faced by Biofield Practitioners in Global Health and Medicine: A White Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarneri, Erminia; King, Rauni Prittinen

    2015-11-01

    Biofield therapies (BTs) are increasingly employed in contemporary healthcare. In this white paper, we review specific challenges faced by biofield practitioners resulting from a lack of (1) a common scientific definition of BT; (2) common educational standards for BT training (including core competencies for clinical care); (3) collaborative team care education in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and in integrative health and medicine (IHM); (4) a focused agenda in BT research; and (5) standardized devices and scientifically validated mechanisms in biofield research. We present a description of BT and discuss its current status and challenges as an integrative healthcare discipline. To address the challenges cited and to enhance collaboration across disciplines, we propose (1) standardized biofield education that leads to professional licensure and (2) interprofessional education (IPE) competencies in BT training required for licensed healthcare practitioners and encouraged for other practitioners using these therapies. Lastly, we discuss opportunities for growth and a potential strategic agenda to achieve these goals. The Academy of Integrative Health and Medicine (AIHM) provides a unique forum to facilitate development of this emerging discipline, to facilitate IPE, and to further increase the availability of BT to patients.

  14. Alternative Medicine Review简介

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李霄茜; 周庆辉

    2009-01-01

    @@ Alternative Medicine Review(;ISSN:1089-5159)是由美国Thorne Research公司于1996年出版发行的一本同行评议补充替代医学杂志,旨在为预防保健从业者提供准确、及时并且与临床相关的各类原创文章、摘要及文献综述等.该杂志现已被Index Medicus/Medline、EMBASE、CINAHL、Current Contents/Clinical Medicine及Science Citation Index Expanded等多个数据库收录.最新影响因子为3.111.

  15. Alternative, complementary and traditional medicine in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talib, N

    2006-09-01

    This paper sets out the practice of traditional, alternative and/or complementary medicine in Malaysia. It gives an overview of the types of alternative medicine available, and the legal regulation, or lack of it within the current setting. The relevant policies and governmental action in this area are highlighted. Relevant case law decisions in this area are also included. The practice of spiritual healing as one form of traditional medicine, and its role within the spectrum of alternative medicine is dealt with briefly. The significant question of integration of alternative medicine within the existing allopathic system is addressed. The paper concludes that as interest in, and usage of alternative medicine is not likely to decrease, certain measures must be taken by the relevant authorities to ensure among others, the safety and efficacy of these medicines.

  16. Sport medicine and sport science practitioners' experiences of organizational change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagstaff, C R D; Gilmore, S; Thelwell, R C

    2015-10-01

    Despite the emergence of and widespread uptake of a growing range of medical and scientific professions in elite sport, such environs present a volatile professional domain characterized by change and unprecedentedly high turnover of personnel. This study explored sport medicine and science practitioners' experiences of organizational change using a longitudinal design over a 2-year period. Specifically, data were collected in three temporally defined phases via 49 semi-structured interviews with 20 sport medics and scientists employed by three organizations competing in the top tiers of English football and cricket. The findings indicated that change occurred over four distinct stages; anticipation and uncertainty, upheaval and realization, integration and experimentation, normalization and learning. Moreover, these data highlight salient emotional, behavioral, and attitudinal experiences of medics and scientists, the existence of poor employment practices, and direct and indirect implications for on-field performance following organizational change. The findings are discussed in line with advances to extant change theory and applied implications for prospective sport medics and scientists, sport organizations, and professional bodies responsible for the training and development of neophyte practitioners.

  17. Special Section: Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM):Quiz on Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Special Section CAM Quiz on Complementary and Alternative Medicine Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents For ... for low back pain. True False Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) includes: Meditation Chiropractic Use of natural products, ...

  18. Complementary and alternative therapies: use in pediatric pulmonary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Youngran; Dumont, Robert C

    2011-06-01

    With increased awareness of complementary/alternative medicine (CAM) and concern of potential adverse effects or limited effectiveness of conventional medications, patients and parents are looking to CAM approaches as either an alternative or as adjunct therapy, especially for chronic diseases such as asthma or cystic fibrosis. It is important that practitioners have adequate information so that patients and parents receive balanced and accurate information, especially regarding safety and potential efficacy. This review provides an overview of some of the more frequently used CAM therapies for children with chronic pulmonary disorders and summarizes the basic principles of each modality, along with efficacy and safety data.

  19. The role of alternative medicine in rhinology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roehm, Corrie E; Tessema, Belachew; Brown, Seth M

    2012-02-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) includes treatments from traditional Chinese medicine, homeopathy, naturopathy, herbal medicine, Ayurvedic medicine, mind-body medicine, chiropractic or osteopathic manipulations, and massage. More than 40% of patients in the United States use CAM, with 17% of CAM use related to otolaryngology diagnoses, but nearly half of CAM users do not communicate their use of these medications to their physicians. Perioperative risk of bleeding is a particular concern in surgical specialties, and knowledge of these therapies and their potential adverse effects is critical.

  20. [The teaching and application of alternative medicine in medical education programs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Han-Sun

    2014-12-01

    The history of alternative medicine is perhaps as long as the history of human medicine. The development of evidence-based medicine has not annihilated alternative medicine. On the contrary, more people turn to alternative medicine because this approach to treatment serves as an effective remedial or supportive treatment when used in conjunction with evidence-based medicine. In contemporary healthcare, alternative medicine is now an essential part of integrated medicine. In Taiwan, most professional medical practitioners have not received proper education about alternative medicine and therefore generally lack comprehensive knowledge on this subject. While alternative medicine may be effective when used with some patients, it may also impart a placebo effect, which helps restore the body and soul of the patients. Medical staff with advanced knowledge of alternative medicine may not only help patients but also improve the doctor-patient relationship. There is great diversity in alternative medicine, with some alternative therapies supported by evidence and covered by insurance. However, there also remain fraudulent medical practices that may be harmful to health. Medical staff must be properly educated so that they can provide patients and their family a proper understanding and attitude toward alternative medicine. Therefore, alternative medicine should be included in the standard medical education curriculum. Offering classes on alternative medicine in university for more than 10 years, the author shares his experiences regarding potential content, lecture subjects, group experience exercises, and in-class activities. This article is intended to provide a reference to professors in university medical education and offer a possible model for alternative medicine education in Taiwan.

  1. Office of Cancer Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is designed to help you talk with your health care provider(s) about your complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use during and after your cancer care. More… Yoga and Cancer People with cancer often suffer from ...

  2. [Complementary and alternative medicine in oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübner, J

    2013-06-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine are frequently used by cancer patients. The main benefit of complementary medicine is that it gives patients the chance to become active. Complementary therapy can reduce the side effects of conventional therapy. However, we have to give due consideration to side effects and interactions: the latter being able to reduce the effectiveness of cancer therapy and so to jeopardise the success of therapy. Therefore, complementary therapy should be managed by the oncologist. It is based on a common concept of cancerogenesis with conventional therapy. Complement therapy can be assessed in studies. Alternative medicine in contrast rejects common rules of evidence-based medicine. It starts from its own concepts of cancerogenesis, which is often in line with the thinking of lay persons. Alternative medicine is offered as either "alternative" to recommended cancer treatment or is used at the same time but without due regard for the interactions. Alternative medicine is a high risk to patients. In the following two parts of the article, the most important complementary and alternative therapies cancer patients use nowadays are presented and assessed according to published evidence.

  3. Competencies for public health and interprofessional education in accreditation standards of complementary and alternative medicine disciplines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett, Jennifer; Brimhall, Joseph; Healey, Dale; Pfeifer, Joseph; Prenguber, Marcia

    2013-01-01

    This review examines the educational accreditation standards of four licensed complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) disciplines (naturopathic medicine, chiropractic health care, acupuncture and oriental medicine, and massage therapy), and identifies public health and other competencies found in those standards that contribute to cooperation and collaboration among the health care professions. These competencies may form a foundation for interprofessional education. The agencies that accredit the educational programs for each of these disciplines are individually recognized by the United States Department (Secretary) of Education. Patients and the public are served when healthcare practitioners collaborate and cooperate. This is facilitated when those practitioners possess competencies that provide them the knowledge and skills to work with practitioners from other fields and disciplines. Educational accreditation standards provide a framework for the delivery of these competencies. Requiring these competencies through accreditation standards ensures that practitioners are trained to optimally function in integrative clinical care settings.

  4. Ethnoveterinary medicine of the Shervaroy Hills of Eastern Ghats, India as alternative medicine for animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usha, Swaminathan; Rajasekaran, Chandrasekaran; Siva, Ramamoorthy

    2016-01-01

    The Eastern Ghats of India is well known for its wealth of natural vegetation and Shervaroy is a major hill range of the Eastern Ghats of Tamil Nadu. Ethnomedicinal studies in the Eastern Ghats of Tamil Nadu or the Shervaroy Hills have been carried out by various researchers. However, there is not much information available on ethnoveterinary medicine in the Eastern Ghats of India. The aim of this study was to examine the potential use of folk plants as alternative medicine for cattle to cure various diseases in the Shervaroy Hills of the Eastern Ghats. Based on interactions with traditional medicine practitioners, it has been observed that a total of 21 medicinal plants belonging to 16 families are used to cure various diseases such as mastitis, enteritis, arthritis, stomatitis, salivation from the mouth, wounding, and conjunctivitis in animals. It has been observed that the traditional knowledge of ethnoveterinary medicine is now confined only among the surviving older people and a few practitioners in the tribal communities of the Shervaroy Hills. Unfortunately, no serious attempts have been made to document and preserve this immense treasure of traditional knowledge.

  5. [Do we need an alternative medicine?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloerfeld, H

    1992-02-01

    In recent years unconventional diagnostic and therapeutic concepts proposed by a number of doctors have increasingly been brought into the public's attention. Those involved have wanted to draw the distinction between the conventional understanding of medicine taught at universities and their concepts of "Holistic Medicine" ("Ganzheitsmedizin"), "Therapy by Experience" ("Erfahrungsheilkunde") and "Biological Medicine" ("Biologische Medizin"). The case of "Elektroakupunktur nach Dr. Voll (EAV)" will be taken as an example to show how an unconventional technique has been used for decades without its efficacy ever having been proven according to the criteria of scientifically orientated medicine. Nevertheless, the advocates of these unconventional concepts keep on supporting their views! The completely different approach to medicine and science--the cause of this divergence--will be explained. Furthermore, it will be considered if the high claims for this way of alternative medicine can be justified. However, even if no such alternative forms of medicine can be supported, some reorientation of the conventional medicine seems to be necessary.

  6. Alternative Medicine and the Ethics Of Commerce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, Chris; Gavura, Scott

    2016-02-01

    Is it ethical to market complementary and alternative medicines? Complementary and alternative medicines (CAM) are medical products and services outside the mainstream of medical practice. But they are not just medicines (or supposed medicines) offered and provided for the prevention and treatment of illness. They are also products and services - things offered for sale in the marketplace. Most discussion of the ethics of CAM has focused on bioethical issues - issues having to do with therapeutic value, and the relationship between patients and those purveyors of CAM. This article aims instead to consider CAM from the perspective of commercial ethics. That is, we consider the ethics not of prescribing or administering CAM (activities most closely associated with health professionals) but the ethics of selling CAM.

  7. Complementary and alternative medicine: what's it all about?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, B

    2001-01-01

    A number of health-related interventions--from widespread therapies such as acupuncture, herbal medicine, homeopathy and yoga, to less well-known modalities such as Feldenkrais, iridology, reflexology and reiki--have increasingly come under the general heading of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). A few, such as biofeedback, chiropractic and physical therapy, are considered conventional by some, alternative by others. Several national surveys estimate that around 40% of the US populace uses a CAM therapy in a given year. While a few people use CAM therapies instead of conventional medicine, the vast majority of CAM users continue to access the official health care system. Many, however, do not discuss their CAM use with their physician. Medical doctors, for their part, are sharply divided on their attitudes toward CAM, with strong advocates and vehement opponents writing and speaking about this issue. CAM therapists are even more diverse, spanning the spectrum from conventional-appearing registered and certified practitioners to iconoclasts promoting anomalous therapies in the place of conventional treatment. The majority, however, both respect and want to work with conventional medicine, as do their patients. Nearly everyone is calling for more and better evidence, and an ever-increasing number of randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses are now appearing in the literature. Over the past few years, a number of calls for "integrated medicine" have been made, and a few attempts at integrating CAM and conventional medicine have been launched. This article reviews these issues, citing our own interview-based work and the relevant literature. Whether the CAM phenomenon represents a short-lived social movement or the beginnings of a radical transformation of medicine has yet to be determined.

  8. Complementary and Alternative Medicine: Attitudes and Use among Health Educators in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ping; Priestley, Jennifer; Porter, Kandice Johnson; Petrillo, Jane

    2010-01-01

    Background: Interest in and use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in the United States is increasing. However, CAM remains an area of nascency for researchers and western practitioners. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine U.S. health educators' attitudes toward CAM and their use of common CAM therapies. Methods: A…

  9. A Methodological Framework for Evaluating the Evidence for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) for Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachariae, Robert; Johannessen, Helle

    2011-01-01

    In spite of lacking evidence for effects on cancer progression itself, an increasing number of cancer patients use various types of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). There is disagreement between CAM practitioners, researchers and clinical oncologists, as to how evidence concerning...

  10. Alternative Health Care Practitioners in a Chinese American Community: A Preliminary Report of Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Jessica Ching-Yi

    This paper provides a brief review of the literature on traditional Chinese medicine in both China and the United States and presents observations from a preliminary study of Chinese practitioners in the Chinatown section of Los Angeles, California. The dualistic health care system in Chinese culture is described as comprising both scholarly and…

  11. [Alternative medicines and "Evidence-Based Medicine" a possible reconciliation?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanherweghem, J-L

    2015-09-01

    The contrast between the efficiency of Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM), a scientific fact, and the popularity of Complementary and Alternative Medicines (CAM) is a paradox of the art of healing. EBM is based on the paradigm of positivism and materialism while CAM are based on those of relativism and vitalism. These paradigms are diametrically opposed and the aim of an integrative medicine is aporetic. However, EBM is today in a dead end. The objective proof of a disease according to the rules of EBM is often lacking face to the expectations of patients demanding their illness to be taken into account. EBM and CAM have thus to coexist. Lessons can be drawn from CAM : patient expectations should be given a meaning and be integrated in his or her psychosocial context.

  12. [Complementary and alternative medicine for insomnia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Hidehisa; Machino, Akihiko; Shishida, Kazuhiro; Yoshino, Atsuo; Yamawaki, Shigeto

    2015-06-01

    Frequency of insomnia is increasing with age. Benzodiazepine receptor agonist has been prescribed for insomnia in the elderly, but there are some patients who complain the effect is not sufficient. Adherence for sleeping pills is very low in elderly Japanese, because there has been strong stigma against sleeping pills. Complementary and alternative medicine for insomnia is widely used in elderly Japanese. Sedative antidepressants, novel antipsychotics, anti-histamine drugs, and supplements are used for insomnia as complementary and alternative medicine. But evidence of these drugs for insomnia is insufficient. In this paper, we outline the previous reports such as the advantages and disadvantages of these drugs for the treatment of insomnia in the elderly.

  13. Special Section: Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM): Time to Talk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with your health care providers any complementary and alternative medicines you take or are thinking about starting. Photo: ... and older use some form of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). But less than one-third who use ...

  14. Determining the Frequency of Defensive Medicine Among General Practitioners in Southeast Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Moosazadeh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Defensive medicine prompts physicians not to admit high-risk patients who need intensive care. This phenomenon not only decreases the quality of healthcare services, but also wastes scarce health resources. Defensive medicine occurs in negative and positive forms. Hence, the present study aimed to determine frequency of positive and negative defensive medicine behaviors and their underlying factors among general practitioners in Southeast Iran. Methods The present cross-sectional study was performed among general practitioners in Southeast Iran. 423 subjects participated in the study on a census basis and a questionnaire was used for data collection. Data analysis was carried out using descriptive and analytical statistics through SPSS 20. Results The majority of participants were male (58.2%. The mean age of physicians was 40 ± 8.5. The frequency of positive and negative defensive medicine among general practitioners in Southeast Iran was 99.8% and 79.2% respectively. A significant relationship was observed between working experience, being informed of law suits against their colleagues, and committing defensive medicine behavior (P< 0.001. Conclusion The present study indicated high frequency of defensive medicine behavior in the Southeast Iran. So, it calls policy-makers special attention to improve the status quo.

  15. No alternative? The regulation and professionalization of complementary and alternative medicine in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, David B; Doel, Marcus A; Segrott, Jeremy

    2004-12-01

    In conjunction with its growing popularity, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in the United Kingdom has witnessed increasing professionalization, partly prompted by the landmark Parliamentary Inquiry that reported in November 2000. Professionalization has become a significant strategy for practitioner associations and a key focus for the government, media, and patient groups. It is being driven by concern over the interests of patients and consumers, and in relation to the possible integration of certain forms of CAM into publicly funded healthcare. It is, moreover, being reconfigured in explicitly national terms. This paper draws on research into practitioner associations representing nine CAM modalities in the UK-aromatherapy, Chinese herbal medicine, chiropractic, crystal healing, feng shui, 'lay' homeopathy, medical homeopathy, osteopathy, and Radionics-, examining the recent wave of professionalization in relation to Foucault's concern with 'techniques of the self.' It highlights the contrasting experience of an association of Chinese herbalists seeking statutory self-regulation (SSR) and an association of chiropractors that was instrumental in securing SSR for chiropractic.

  16. [Pulmonary medicine 2012: news for the general practitioner].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gex, G; Petitpierre, N; Charbonnier, F; Rochat, T

    2013-01-16

    This review reports on papers published in 2012 that will most likely impact on daily medical practice in four different areas of pulmonary medicine. How should treatment of asthma with inhaled corticosteroids be adjusted on the long run? Should idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis receive treatment with immunosuppressive drugs? Is a long-term treatment with azithromycine for bronchiectasis supported by evidence, apart from patients with cystic fibrosis? And finally, can treatment of obstructive sleep apnea with continuous positive pressure (CPAP) prevent the occurrence of new, systemic hypertension?

  17. Is propolis safe as an alternative medicine?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Graça Miguel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Propolis is a resinous substance produced by honeybees as defense against intruders. It has relevant therapeutic properties that have been used since ancient times. Nowadays, propolis is of increasing importance as a therapeutic, alone or included in many medicines and homeopathic products or in cosmetics. Propolis is produced worldwide and honeybees use the flora surrounding their beehives for its production. Therefore its chemical composition may change according to the flora. The phenolic and volatile fractions of propolis have been revised in the present study, as well as some of the biological properties attributed to this natural product. An alert is given about the need to standardize this product, with quality control. This has already been initiated by some authors, mainly in the propolis from the poplar-type. Only this product can constitute a good complementary and alternative medicine under internationally acceptable quality control.

  18. Informed Consent in Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Opher Caspi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to examine complementary and alternative medicine (CAM practitioners’ (i attitudes toward informed consent and (ii to assess whether standards of practice exist with respect to informed consent, and what these standards look like. The design and setting of the study constituted face-to-face qualitative interviews with 28 non-MD, community-based providers representing 11 different CAM therapeutic modalities. It was found that there is great deal of variability with respect to the informed consent process in CAM across providers and modalities. No unique profession-based patterns were identified. The content analysis yielded five major categories related to (i general attitude towards the informed consent process, (ii type and amount of information exchange during that process, (iii disclosure of risks, (iv discussions of alternatives, and (v potential benefits. There is a widespread lack of standards with respect to the practice of informed consent across a broad range of CAM modalities. Addressing this problem requires concerted and systematic educational, ethical and judicial remedial actions. Informed consent, which is often viewed as a pervasive obligation is medicine, must be reshaped to have therapeutic value. Acknowledging current conceptions and misconception surrounding the practice of informed consent may help to bring about this change. More translational research is needed to guide this process.

  19. Determinants of public trust in complementary and alternative medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Groenewegen Peter P

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the Netherlands, public trust in conventional medicine is relatively high. There is reason to believe that public trust in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM is rated lower. The aim of this study is to gain insight into public trust in CAM and the determinants that lie at the root of it. We hypothesized that public trust in CAM is related to (perceived institutional guarantees, media information on CAM, information from people's social network, personal experiences, the role of general practitioners (GPs and trust in conventional medicine. Methods A postal questionnaire on public trust in CAM was mailed to 1358 members of the Health Care Consumer Panel. 65% of the questionnaires were returned. Data were analysed using frequencies, ANOVA, post hoc testing and linear regression analyses. Results In the total sample, the level of public trust in CAM was a 5.05 on average on a scale of 1-10. 40.7% was CAM user (current or past and displayed significantly higher levels of trust toward CAM than CAM non users. In the total sample, public trust in CAM was related to institutional guarantees, negative media information, positive and negative information reported by their social network and people's personal experiences with CAM. For non users, trust is mostly associated with institutional guarantees. For users, personal experiences are most important. For both users and non users, trust levels in CAM are affected by negative media information. Public trust in CAM is for CAM users related to positive information and for non users to negative information from their network. Conclusions In the Netherlands, CAM is trusted less than conventional medicine. The hypotheses on institutional guarantees, media information, information from the network and people's personal experiences are confirmed by our study for the total sample, CAM non users and users. The other hypotheses are rejected.

  20. The Sociology of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Nicola

    2014-06-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and traditional medicine (TM) are important social phenomena. This article reviews the sociological literature on the topic. First, it addresses the question of terminology, arguing that the naming process is a glimpse into the complexities of power and history that characterize the field. Second, focusing on the last 15 years of scholarship, it considers how sociological research on users and practitioners of TM/CAM has developed in that time. Third, it addresses two newer strands of work termed here the 'big picture' and the 'big question'. The big picture includes concepts that offer interpretation of what is happening at a societal level to constrain and enable observed patterns of social practice (pluralism, integration, hybridity and activism). The big question, 'Does it work?', is one of epistemology and focuses on two developing fields of critical enquiry - first, social critiques of medical science knowledge production and, second, attempts to explain the nature of interventions, i.e. how they work. Finally, the article examines the role of sociology moving forward.

  1. Complementary and alternative medicine in rheumatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, E

    2000-12-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has become an important subject for rheumatologists. This article is an attempt to provide an introduction to this subject. It will provide definitions of, and define the prevalence of, CAM. The emphasis of the article is on evaluating the efficacy of CAM treatment modalities. This is achieved by referring to systematic reviews of clinical trials of acupuncture for low back pain, osteo-arthritis, fibromyalgia, inflammatory rheumatoid disease and neck pain. Further areas addressed in this way are herbal remedies, fish oil and glucosamine. Moreover, massage therapy and spinal manipulation for back pain are discussed. The final sections of this review deal with the safety and cost of CAM. It is concluded that, in view of the popularity of CAM with rheumatological patients, rigorous research into CAM is the best way forward.

  2. Complementary and alternative medicine in oncology nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somani, Salima; Ali, Fauziya; Saeed Ali, Tazeen; Sulaiman Lalani, Nasreen

    Use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has increased globally, particularly among oncology patients. This study investigated the knowledge, experience and attitudes of oncology nurses towards CAM. A quantitative study was conducted in tertiary care hospitals in Karachi, Pakistan, where 132 oncology nurses were surveyed. The survey revealed that more than 50% of nurses had never heard about many of the CAM therapies used in Pakistan. Approximately 65% of the nurses had knowledge about prayer and less than 30% had experience of CAM education or training. In addition, the majority of nurses had seen patients using CAM and felt that their health status could be enhanced with the use of CAM. This study showed that oncology nurses had a positive experience of and attitude towards CAM, although they needed to enhance their knowledge of it to maximise patient satisfaction and quality of care.

  3. A pluralist challenge to "integrative medicine": Feyerabend and Popper on the cognitive value of alternative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Ian James

    2013-09-01

    This paper is a critique of 'integrative medicine' as an ideal of medical progress on the grounds that it fails to realise the cognitive value of alternative medicine. After a brief account of the cognitive value of alternative medicine, I outline the form of 'integrative medicine' defended by the late Stephen Straus, former director of the US National Centre for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. Straus' account is then considered in the light of Zuzana Parusnikova's recent criticism of 'integrative medicine' and her distinction between 'cognitive' and 'opportunistic' engagement with alternative medicine. Parusnikova warns that the medical establishment is guilty of 'dogmatism' and proposes that one can usefully invoke Karl Popper's 'critical rationalism' as an antidote. Using the example of Straus, I argue that an appeal to Popper is insufficient, on the grounds that 'integrative medicine' can class as a form of cognitively-productive, critical engagement. I suggest that Parusnikova's appeal to Popper should be augmented with Paul Feyerabend's emphasis upon the role of 'radical alternatives' in maximising criticism. 'Integrative medicine' fails to maximise criticism because it 'translates' alternative medicine into the theories and terminology of allopathic medicine and so erodes its capacity to provide cognitively-valuable 'radical alternatives'. These claims are then illustrated with a discussion of 'traditional' and 'medical' acupuncture. I conclude that 'integrative medicine' fails to exploit the cognitive value of alternative medicine and so should be rejected as an ideal of medical progress.

  4. Alternative medicine and doping in sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Benjamin; Freeman, Lynne; Zaslawski, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Athletes are high achievers who may seek creative or unconventional methods to improve performance. The literature indicates that athletes are among the heaviest users of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and thus may pioneer population trends in CAM use. Unlike non-athletes, athletes may use CAM not just for prevention, treatment or rehabilitation from illness or injuries, but also for performance enhancement. Assuming that athletes' creative use of anything unconventional is aimed at "legally" improving performance, CAM may be used because it is perceived as more "natural" and erroneously assumed as not potentially doping. This failure to recognise CAMs as pharmacological agents puts athletes at risk of inadvertent doping.The general position of the World Anti-Doping Authority (WADA) is one of strict liability, an application of the legal proposition that ignorance is no excuse and the ultimate responsibility is on the athlete to ensure at all times whatever is swallowed, injected or applied to the athlete is both safe and legal for use. This means that a violation occurs whether or not the athlete intentionally or unintentionally, knowingly or unknowingly, used a prohibited substance/method or was negligent or otherwise at fault. Athletes are therefore expected to understand not only what is prohibited, but also what might potentially cause an inadvertent doping violation. Yet, as will be discussed, athlete knowledge on doping is deficient and WADA itself sometimes changes its position on prohibited methods or substances. The situation is further confounded by the conflicting stance of anti-doping experts in the media. These highly publicised disagreements may further portray inconsistencies in anti-doping guidelines and suggest to athletes that what is considered doping is dependent on the dominant political zeitgeist. Taken together, athletes may believe that unless a specific and explicit ruling is made, guidelines are open to interpretation

  5. Alternative medicine and doping in sports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Koh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Athletes are high achievers who may seek creative or unconventional methods to improve performance. The literature indicates that athletes are among the heaviest users of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM and thus may pioneer population trends in CAM use. Unlike non-athletes, athletes may use CAM not just for prevention, treatment or rehabilitation from illness or injuries, but also for performance enhancement. Assuming that athletes’ creative use of anything unconventional is aimed at “legally” improving performance, CAM may be used because it is perceived as more “natural” and erroneously assumed as not potentially doping. This failure to recognise CAMs as pharmacological agents puts athletes at risk of inadvertent doping.The general position of the World Anti-Doping Authority (WADA is one of strict liability, an application of the legal proposition that ignorance is no excuse and the ultimate responsibility is on the athlete to ensure at all times whatever is swallowed, injected or applied to the athlete is both safe and legal for use. This means that a violation occurs whether or not the athlete intentionally or unintentionally, knowingly or unknowingly, used a prohibited substance/method or was negligent or otherwise at fault. Athletes are therefore expected to understand not only what is prohibited, but also what might potentially cause an inadvertent doping violation. Yet, as will be discussed, athlete knowledge on doping is deficient and WADA itself sometimes changes its position on prohibited methods or substances. The situation is further confounded by the conflicting stance of anti-doping experts in the media. These highly publicised disagreements may further portray inconsistencies in anti-doping guidelines and suggest to athletes that what is considered doping is dependent on the dominant political zeitgeist. Taken together, athletes may believe that unless a specific and explicit ruling is made, guidelines are

  6. Principles and practice of hyperbaric medicine: a medical practitioner's primer, part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdrizet, George A

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this monograph is to narrow the knowledge gap between current medical practice and hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Graduate medical education has not kept pace with the expanding science and practice of hyperbaric medicine. The number of hyperbaric chambers in the state of Connecticut has increased by >400% during the past five years. A brief overview of the science and practice of hyperbaric oxygen therapy is presented, with additional resources identified where more in-depth coverage can be found. The reader will find the basics of hyperbaric medical practice reviewed and be able to recognize diagnoses that are appropriate for referral to a hyperbaric medical center. The intended audience is practitioners who have had no formal exposure to hyperbaric medicine or chronic wound care.

  7. Traditional, complementary, and alternative medicine: Focusing on research into traditional Tibetan medicine in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Peipei; Xia, Jufeng; Rezeng, Caidan; Tong, Li; Tang, Wei

    2016-07-19

    As a form of traditional, complementary, and alternative medicine (TCAM), traditional Tibetan medicine has developed into a mainstay of medical care in Tibet and has spread from there to China and then to the rest of the world. Thus far, research on traditional Tibetan medicine has focused on the study of the plant and animal sources of traditional medicines, study of the histology of those plants and animals, chemical analysis of traditional medicines, pharmacological study of those medicines, and evaluation of the clinical efficacy of those medicines. A number of papers on traditional Tibetan medicines have been published, providing some evidence of the efficacy of traditional Tibetan medicine. However, many traditional Tibetan medicines have unknown active ingredients, hampering the establishment of drug quality standards, the development of new medicines, commercial production of medicines, and market availability of those medicines. Traditional Tibetan medicine must take several steps to modernize and spread to the rest of the world: the pharmacodynamics of traditional Tibetan medicines need to be determined, the clinical efficacy of those medicines needs to be verified, criteria to evaluate the efficacy of those medicines need to be established in order to guide their clinical use, and efficacious medicines need to be acknowledged by the pharmaceutical market. The components of traditional Tibetan medicine should be studied, traditional Tibetan medicines should be screened for their active ingredients, and techniques should be devised to prepare and manufacture those medicines.

  8. ALTERNATIVE SYSTEM OF MEDICINE IN INDIA: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Memon Shakeel

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Alternative Medicine is a term commonly used to include all the healing practice "that does not fall within the realm of conventional medicine". It can be defined as "a variety of therapeutic or preventive health care practices, such as homeopathy, naturopathy, chiropractic, and herbal medicine that do not follow generally accepted medical methods and may not have a scientific explanation for their effectiveness.” Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM is the term for medical products and practices that are not part of standard care. Standard care is what medical doctors, doctors of osteopathy and allied health professionals, such as registered nurses and physical therapists, practice. Alternative medicine means treatments that you use instead of standard ones. Complementary medicine means nonstandard treatments that you use along with standard ones.

  9. Application of alternative medicine in gastrointestinal cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacground/Aim. Alternative medicine is a set of therapeutic procedures which are no part of official practice. At present, the use of alternative medicine among cancer patients is significant and the purpose of this study was to get more information on the methods and products of alternative medicine. Thus, the aim of the study was to determine the frequency of the use of alternative medicine among gastrointestinal cancer patients. Methods. The research was conducted using an anonymous questionnaire in writing. We included 205 patients with the diagnosis of gastrointestinal malignancy in the study but the questionnaire was fulfilled by 193 patients and the presented data were based on their answers. The questions were about the sociodemographic characteristics of the patients, the reasons for their use of alternative medicine, and their information sources about alternative medicine. We divided existing alternative therapies into 6 categories: herbal therapy, special diets, psychotherapy, body-mind therapy, spiritual therapy, and other supplements. Results. A total of 48 (24.9% patients did not use any type of alternative therapy; 145 (75.1% patients used at least one product and 124 (64.25% patients used herbal preparations (beetroot juice was consumed by 110 [56.99%] patients; 136 (70.5% patients were informed about alternative therapies by other patients.; 145 (75.1% used alternative medicine to increase the chances for cure; 88 (45.6% of interviewed patients would like to participate in future research in this field. Conclusion. The use of alternative medicine is evidently significant among cancer patients. Further research should be conducted in order to find out interactions of these products with other drugs and potential advantages and disadvantages of this form of treatment.

  10. Practitioner decisions to engage in Chinese medicine: cultural messages under the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Linda L

    2009-01-01

    Theories of agency and decision making have been applied to processes by which patients select therapeutic interventions. Another kind of decision making occurs when individuals choose to engage in the practice of a therapeutic modality. This article draws on fieldwork and interview data with non-Chinese and immigrant Chinese practitioners of Chinese medicine in the United States, focusing on Boston, Massachusetts, and New York City, as case illustrations. I apply theories of agency and decision making to how and why these practitioners chose to engage in Chinese modalities. I build on Volker Scheid's (2002) analysis of agency, grounded in Chinese medicine theory, to propose the Chinese concept of xin ([image: see text] heart-mind) as an analytical frame, suggesting that it can fruitfully be set in tension with Pierre Bourdieu's notion of habitus and Antonio Gramsci's discussion of the "common-sense" nature of hegemony. I draw on a non-Eurocentric concept to enrich the theoretical discussion of agency and decision making.

  11. Traditional, complementary, and alternative medicine approaches to mental health care and psychological wellbeing in India and China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirthalli, Jagadisha; Zhou, Liang; Kumar, Kishore; Gao, Jie; Vaid, Henna; Liu, Huiming; Hankey, Alex; Wang, Guojun; Gangadhar, Bangalore N; Nie, Jing-Bao; Nichter, Mark

    2016-07-01

    India and China face the same challenge of having too few trained psychiatric personnel to manage effectively the substantial burden of mental illness within their population. At the same time, both countries have many practitioners of traditional, complementary, and alternative medicine who are a potential resource for delivery of mental health care. In our paper, part of The Lancet and Lancet Psychiatry's Series about the China-India Mental Health Alliance, we describe and compare types of traditional, complementary, and alternative medicine in India and China. Further, we provide a systematic overview of evidence assessing the effectiveness of these alternative approaches for mental illness and discuss challenges in research. We suggest how practitioners of traditional, complementary, and alternative medicine and mental health professionals might forge collaborative relationships to provide more accessible, affordable, and acceptable mental health care in India and China. A substantial proportion of individuals with mental illness use traditional, complementary, and alternative medicine, either exclusively or with biomedicine, for reasons ranging from faith and cultural congruence to accessibility, cost, and belief that these approaches are safe. Systematic reviews of the effectiveness of traditional, complementary, and alternative medicine find several approaches to be promising for treatment of mental illness, but most clinical trials included in these systematic reviews have methodological limitations. Contemporary methods to establish efficacy and safety-typically through randomised controlled trials-need to be complemented by other means. The community of practice built on collaborative relationships between practitioners of traditional, complementary, and alternative medicine and providers of mental health care holds promise in bridging the treatment gap in mental health care in India and China.

  12. Moral injury: A new challenge for complementary and alternative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopacz, Marek S; Connery, April L; Bishop, Todd M; Bryan, Craig J; Drescher, Kent D; Currier, Joseph M; Pigeon, Wilfred R

    2016-02-01

    Moral injury represents an emerging clinical construct recognized as a source of morbidity in current and former military personnel. Finding effective ways to support those affected by moral injury remains a challenge for both biomedical and complementary and alternative medicine. This paper introduces the concept of moral injury and suggests two complementary and alternative medicine, pastoral care and mindfulness, which may prove useful in supporting military personnel thought to be dealing with moral injury. Research strategies for developing an evidence-base for applying these, and other, complementary and alternative medicine modalities to moral injury are discussed.

  13. Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other Funding Find NCI funding for small business innovation, technology transfer, and contracts Training Cancer Training at ... Vitamin C Hydrazine Sulfate Laetrile/Amygdalin Medicinal Mushrooms Milk Thistle Mistletoe Extracts Newcastle Disease Virus PC-SPES ...

  14. Wound care with traditional, complementary and alternative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorai, Ananda A

    2012-05-01

    Wound care is constantly evolving with the advances in medicine. Search for the ideal dressing material still continues as wound care professionals are faced with several challenges. Due to the emergence of multi-resistant organisms and a decrease in newer antibiotics, wound care professionals have revisited the ancient healing methods by using traditional and alternative medicine in wound management. People's perception towards traditional medicine has also changed and is very encouraging. The concept of moist wound healing has been well accepted and traditional medicine has also incorporated this method to fasten the healing process. Several studies using herbal and traditional medicine from different continents have been documented in wound care management. Honey has been used extensively in wound care practice with excellent results. Recent scientific evidences and clinical trials conducted using traditional and alternative medicine in wound therapy holds good promise in the future.

  15. Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) Treatments and Pediatric Psychopharmacology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Joseph M.; Walter, Garry; Soh, Nerissa

    2008-01-01

    Children and adolescents often use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatments outside their indications, particularly to lose weight. Some of the herbal remedies and dietary supplements that may of relevance for psychopharmacological practice are discussed with respect to CAM treatments.

  16. 76 FR 30735 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine ] Special... Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, National Institutes of Health, 6707...

  17. 75 FR 57970 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Officer, Office of Scientific Review, National Center for Complementary, & Alternative Medicine, NIH,...

  18. 76 FR 59707 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special Emphasis...

  19. 76 FR 6806 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special..., National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, National Institutes of Health, 6707...

  20. 76 FR 35227 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Review, National Center for Complementary, and Alternative Medicine, NIH, 6707 Democracy Blvd., Suite...

  1. 75 FR 35075 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Review, National Center for Complementary, & Alternative Medicine, NIH, 6707 Democracy Blvd., Suite...

  2. 77 FR 28396 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Training in Complementary and Alternative Medicine, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: May 8,...

  3. 75 FR 26260 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Complementary and Alternative Medicine, National Institutes of Health, HHS) ] Dated: May 4, 2010....

  4. 78 FR 42528 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... & Alternative Medicine, NIH, 6707 Democracy Blvd., Suite 401, Bethesda, MD 20892, 301-594-3456,...

  5. 76 FR 12744 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Assistance Program Nos. 93.213, Research and Training in Complementary and Alternative Medicine,...

  6. 77 FR 52751 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Complementary and Alternative Medicine, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: August 23, 2012. Jennifer...

  7. 77 FR 31862 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special..., National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, NIH, 6707 Democracy Blvd., Suite 401,...

  8. 75 FR 63498 - National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Review Officer, National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, National Institutes of...

  9. 76 FR 16433 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Complementary and Alternative Medicine, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: March 17, 2011. Jennifer...

  10. 75 FR 6039 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special.... 93.213, Research and Training in Complementary and Alternative Medicine, National Institutes...

  11. 76 FR 79201 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Officer, Office of Scientific Review, National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine, NIH,...

  12. 78 FR 10184 - National Center For Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center For Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special Emphasis Panel; Clinical Studies of Complementary and Alternative Medicine. Date: March 14, 2013. Time:...

  13. 76 FR 29773 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Alternative Medicine, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: May 17, 2011. Jennifer S. Spaeth,...

  14. 78 FR 47328 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special..., National Center For Complementary and Alternative Medicine, National Institutes of Health, 6707...

  15. 76 FR 10913 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... of Scientific Review, National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine, NIH, 6707...

  16. 78 FR 66755 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special..., National Center for Complementary, & Alternative Medicine, NIH, 6707 Democracy Blvd., Suite 401,...

  17. 75 FR 1796 - National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Complementary, and Alternative Medicine, NIH, 6707 Democracy Blvd., Suite 401, Bethesda, MD 20892,...

  18. 75 FR 26780 - Request for Comment: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Announcement of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-12

    ... Comment: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Announcement of Strategic Planning White Papers ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine... for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) was established in 1998 with the mission...

  19. 76 FR 17140 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... and Training in Complementary and Alternative Medicine, National Institutes of Health, HHS)...

  20. 76 FR 27651 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Review, National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine, NIH, 6707 Democracy Blvd., Suite...

  1. 75 FR 43994 - National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine... Committee: National Advisory Council for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. Date: September 3, 2010... remarks by the Director of the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, presentation...

  2. 78 FR 37836 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Complementary and Alternative Medicine, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: June 18, 2013. Michelle...

  3. 78 FR 34664 - National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, National Institutes of Health, 6707...

  4. 77 FR 58402 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special...., Scientific Review Officer, National Center For Complementary and Alternative Medicine, National Institutes...

  5. 75 FR 65498 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Complementary and Alternative Medicine, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: October 15, 2010. Jennifer...

  6. Integrating complementary/alternative medicine into primary care: evaluating the evidence and appropriate implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainapel, Stanley F; Rand, Stephanie; Fishman, Loren M; Halstead-Kenny, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    The frequency with which patients utilize treatments encompassed by the term complementary/alternative medicine (CAM) is well documented. A number of these therapies are beginning to be integrated into contemporary medical practice. This article examines three of them: osteopathic manipulation, yoga, and acupuncture, with a focus on their physiological effects, efficacy in treating medical conditions commonly encountered by practitioners, precautions or contraindications, and ways in which they can be incorporated into clinical practice. Physicians should routinely obtain information about use of CAM as part of their patient history and should consider their role based on physiological effects and clinical research results. PMID:26673479

  7. GREEN PHARMACY: AN ALTERNATIVE AND COMPLEMENTARY MEDICINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeta Shivakumar*, Pushpa Agrawal and Praveen Kumar Gupta

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The people in India have an outstanding knowledge of medicinal plants acquired over centuries. A passion for studying medicinal plants is evident both in folk and scholarly traditions. The indigenous mode of understanding and using plants is different from the modern scientific way. It includes botanical, medical and astrological elements. This is the basis of green pharmacy. Indians obviously care for medicinal plants because they know so many of them, so much about them and have worked extensively on their application. It is a remarkable fact that the use of medicinal plants is still a living tradition in the form of a million village-based folk carriers. These traditional birth attendants, bonesetters, herbal healers and wandering monks are invisible to policy makers and therefore not taken into account as a public health resource. Apart from these specialised folk healers there are also millions of women and elders with traditional knowledge of food and nutrition and herbal home-remedies. However, the revitalisation of this vast and diverse folk tradition does not appear on the Governments agenda. Here is an attempt to introduce these traditional knowledge with an emphasis of Nevadensin that holds a promising substance to cure many of the diseases naturally.

  8. Traditional Knowledge and Formulations of Medicinal Plants Used by the Traditional Medical Practitioners of Bangladesh to Treat Schizophrenia Like Psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Nasir Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a subtle disorder of brain development and plasticity; it affects the most basic human processes of perception, emotion, and judgment. In Bangladesh the traditional medical practitioners of rural and remote areas characterized the schizophrenia as an insanity or a mental problem due to possession by ghosts or evil spirits and they have used various plant species’ to treat such symptoms. The aim of the present study was to conduct an ethnomedicinal plant survey and documentation of the formulations of different plant parts used by the traditional medical practitioners of Rangamati district of Bangladesh for the treatment of schizophrenia like psychosis. It was observed that the traditional medical practitioners used a total of 15 plant species to make 14 formulations. The plants were divided into 13 families, used for treatment of schizophrenia and accompanying symptoms like hallucination, depression, oversleeping or insomnia, deterioration of personal hygiene, forgetfulness, and fear due to evil spirits like genies or ghost. A search of the relevant scientific literatures showed that a number of plants used by the medicinal practitioners have been scientifically validated in their uses and traditional medicinal knowledge has been a means towards the discovery of many modern medicines. Moreover, the antipsychotic drug reserpine, isolated from the dried root of Rauvolfia serpentina species, revolutionized the treatment of schizophrenia. So it is very much possible that formulations of the practitioner, when examined scientifically in their entireties, can form discovery of lead compounds which can be used as safe and effective antipsychotic drug to treat schizophrenia.

  9. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Education for Medical Profession: Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Quartey, Nana K.; Ma, Polly H. X.; Vincent C H Chung; Griffiths, Sian M

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To help integrate traditional, complementary and alternative medicine (TCAM) into health systems, efforts are being made to educate biomedical doctors (BMD) and medical students on TCAM. We systematically evaluated the effect of TCAM education on BMD and medical students' attitude, knowledge, and behavior towards TCAM utilization and integration with biomedical medicine. Methods. Evaluative studies were identified from four databases. Methodological quality was assessed using the Med...

  10. Aspects of Sino-Japan Complementary and Alternative Medicine and Development on the Traditional Uighur Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Abdiryim Yusup; Nobuo Yamaguchi

    2009-01-01

    Two consecutive conferences on ‘Sino-Japan Complementary and Alternative Medicine and Development on the Traditional Uighur Medicine’ were held in Xinjiang Medical University on July 3 and Kanazawa Medical University on October 6, 2007. The Vice president Halmurat Upur presided over the meeting and gave congratulatory address on holding of the conference. In order to understand mutually and discuss the possibility of the Uighur Medicine as CAM and the situation of medicine in the global sense...

  11. Integrative medicine: a bridge between biomedicine and alternative medicine fitting the spirit of the age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J.R. Hoenders; M.T. Appelo; J.T.V.M. de Jong

    2012-01-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) are increasingly used by people in first world countries, almost always in combination with biomedicine. The combination of CAM and biomedicine is now commonly referred to as "integrative medicine" (IM). In Groningen, The Netherlands, we founded a center

  12. Natural Medicines: A Complementary and Alternative Medicines Tool Combining Natural Standard and the Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardell, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Natural Medicines is a subscription-based database of complementary and alternative medicine information, building on the information previously available within Natural Standard and the Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database. Natural Medicines offers several special features including an Interaction Checker and Effectiveness Checker, as well as tools focused on Nutrient Depletion, Pregnancy & Lactation, and Adverse Effects. This column features a sample search of Natural Medicines, along with descriptions of the special features and how they might be used in practice by health care providers and health sciences information professionals.

  13. Boundary objects in complementary and alternative medicine: acupuncture vs. Christian Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Kellie

    2015-03-01

    Nearly four in ten American use complementary or alternative medicine (CAM) each year. Even with a large number of patients, CAM practitioners face scrutiny from physicians and biomedical researchers who, in an era of evidence-based medicine, argue there is little evidence to support CAM treatments. Examining how CAM has or has not been integrated into American health care is crucial in understanding the contemporary boundaries of healthcare systems. An analytical tool from science and technology studies, boundary objects, can help scholars of medicine understand which practices become integrated into these systems. Using a comparative analysis based on archival and interview data, this paper examines the use of boundary objects in two alternative medical practices - acupuncture and Christian Science. While boundary objects alone cannot explain what health practices succeed or fail, juxtaposing the use of boundary objects by different CAM groups identifies the work boundary objects do to facilitate integration and the conditions under which they "work." I find that acupuncturists' use of sterile needles as a boundary objects assists in their effective integration into U.S. healthcare because needles are both a symbol of biomedical prowess and a potentially unsafe device requiring regulation. Christian Scientists' use of the placebo effect as a boundary object has not succeeded because they fail to acknowledge the different contextual definitions of the placebo effect in biomedical communities. This comparative analysis highlights how context affects which boundary objects "work" for CAM practices and theorizes why alternative health practices succeed or fail to become integrated into healthcare systems.

  14. Integrating complementary/alternative medicine into primary care: evaluating the evidence and appropriate implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wainapel SF

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Stanley F Wainapel,1 Stephanie Rand,1 Loren M Fishman,2 Jennifer Halstead-Kenny1 1The Arthur S Abramson Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, 2Department of Rehabilitation and Regenerative Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA Abstract: The frequency with which patients utilize treatments encompassed by the term complementary/alternative medicine (CAM is well documented. A number of these therapies are beginning to be integrated into contemporary medical practice. This article examines three of them: osteopathic manipulation, yoga, and acupuncture, with a focus on their physiological effects, efficacy in treating medical conditions commonly encountered by practitioners, precautions or contraindications, and ways in which they can be incorporated into clinical practice. Physicians should routinely obtain information about use of CAM as part of their patient history and should consider their role based on physiological effects and clinical research results. Keywords: integrative medicine, osteopathic manipulation, yoga, acupuncture therapy

  15. 78 FR 21381 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.213, Research and Training in Complementary and Alternative...

  16. 77 FR 1940 - National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special..., Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, National Center for Complementary and Alternative...

  17. 77 FR 10540 - National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Shau, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, National Center for Complementary and Alternative...

  18. 76 FR 38404 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Shau, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, National Center for Complementary and Alternative...

  19. [Developments and trends in traditional medicine and complementary and alternative medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Chiao; Lin, I-Hsin; Yeh, Mei-Ling

    2008-04-01

    With the rapid development of society, medical science and technology, although quality of life is enhanced and life expectancy is prolonged, aging, environmental changes and health problems are unavoidable. More and more people, therefore, are concerned about their health and place high demands on medical care. As modern medicine cannot meet all such demands, other medical care systems emerge. Trends in the seeking of medical care show that people are inclined towards natural approaches, so attention is being paid once again to traditional medicine, as well as complementary and alternative medicine. Under the patient-oriented concept, medical personnel have to recognize means of health care while thinking of the individualized and socioeconomic impacts. The purpose of this paper therefore is to provide medical personnel with information on the developments and trends in, knowledge and research with regard to traditional medicine as well as complementary and alternative medicine.

  20. Complementary Alternative Medicine for Children with Autism: A Physician Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golnik, Allison E.; Ireland, Marjorie

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies suggest over half of children with autism are using complementary alternative medicine (CAM). In this study, physicians responded (n = 539, 19% response rate) to a survey regarding CAM use in children with autism. Physicians encouraged multi-vitamins (49%), essential fatty acids (25%), melatonin (25%) and probiotics (19%) and…

  1. The Problem of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use Today

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    MacArtney, John; Wahlberg, Ayo

    2014-01-01

    Commentators like Goldacre, Dawkins, and Singh and Ernst are worried that the rise in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) represents a flight from science propagated by enemies of reason. We outline what kind of problem CAM use is for these commentators and find that users of CAM...

  2. Concepts of holism in orthodox and alternative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Michael

    2010-02-01

    In this essay the nature of holism in orthodox and alternative medicine will be explored and the true meaning of the words will be illustrated with a complicated case history concerning the life or death of a young pregnant mother suffering from a BRCA type breast cancer. Holism in medicine is an open-ended and exquisitely complex understanding of human biology that over time has led to spectacular improvements in the length and quality of life of patients with cancer and that this approach encourages us to consider the transcendental as much as the cell and molecular biology of the human organism. 'Alternative' versions of holism are arid and closed belief systems, locked in a time warp, incapable of making progress yet quick to deny it in the field of scientific medicine.

  3. Principles and practice of hyperbaric medicine: a medical practitioner's primer, part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdrizet, George A

    2014-08-01

    Advances in the treatment of chronic wounds* have steadily occurred over the past decade and include the specialized use of dynamic compression therapy, implementation of moist wound care techniques, chronic lymphedema therapy, negative pressure wound therapy, arterial compression therapy and application of off-loading devices. General medical practitioners should recognize when timely patient referral to a comprehensive wound care center is indicated. The clinical practice of HBOT and its scientific basis has also advanced significantly during this same time period. HBOT is a therapeutic tool with many qualities that are unique to medical care and enable difficult and otherwise untreatable conditions to be safely and effectively managed. Level 1 evidence exists for HBOT and the therapeutic indications are growing. It is the responsibility of all practitioners to become informed about the modern principles and practice of HBOT. Clinicians should take the advice of Mark Twain: "Supposing is good but finding out is better." It is the responsibility of educational institutions and medical societies to become informed and actively engaged in hyperbaric medical care, education and research. This will benefit our patients as well as our systems of medical care. There is now ample access to hyperbaric oxygen facilities and expertise with the state. There is a growing need for HBOT services due to the rising incidence of obesity and diabetes combined with an aging demographic. Appropriate networks and patterns of referral have lagged behind this demand due to a generalized lack of understanding of the true risks, benefits and indications for HBOT. This review will hopefully begin to address this problem. Hyperbaric medicine is in an early phase of development. The current and future demand for clinical services will drive development of research and educational programs. Only through continued efforts for perform high quality research and education will the full potential

  4. Aspects of sino-Japan complementary and alternative medicine and development on the traditional uighur medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusup, Abdiryim; Yamaguchi, Nobuo

    2009-06-01

    Two consecutive conferences on 'Sino-Japan Complementary and Alternative Medicine and Development on the Traditional Uighur Medicine' were held in Xinjiang Medical University on July 3 and Kanazawa Medical University on October 6, 2007. The Vice president Halmurat Upur presided over the meeting and gave congratulatory address on holding of the conference. In order to understand mutually and discuss the possibility of the Uighur Medicine as CAM and the situation of medicine in the global sense, specialist scholars of Traditional Uighur Medicine and postgraduates attended this conference. In the meeting of the CAM, the achievements on the research of Traditional Uighur Medicine were exchanged and warmly discussed. Presentations were made in the consecutive conference.

  5. "Getting the water-carrier to light the lamps": Discrepant role perceptions of traditional, complementary, and alternative medical practitioners in government health facilities in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josyula, K Lakshmi; Sheikh, Kabir; Nambiar, Devaki; Narayan, Venkatesh V; Sathyanarayana, T N; Porter, John D H

    2016-10-01

    The government of India has, over the past decade, implemented the "integration" of traditional, complementary and alternative medical (TCAM) practitioners, specifically practitioners of Ayurveda, Yoga and Naturopathy, Unani, Siddha, Sowa-rigpa, and Homoeopathy (collectively known by the acronym AYUSH), in government health services. A range of operational and ethical challenges has manifested during this process of large health system reform. We explored the practices and perceptions of health system actors, in relation to AYUSH providers' roles in government health services in three Indian states - Kerala, Meghalaya, and Delhi. Research methods included 196 in-depth interviews with a range of health policy and system actors and beneficiaries, between February and October 2012, and review of national, state, and district-level policy documents relating to AYUSH integration. The thematic 'framework' approach was applied to analyze data from the interviews, and systematic content analysis performed on policy documents. We found that the roles of AYUSH providers are frequently ambiguously stated and variably interpreted, in relation to various aspects of their practice, such as outpatient care, prescribing rights, emergency duties, obstetric services, night duties, and referrals across systems of medicine. Work sharing is variously interpreted by different health system actors as complementing allopathic practice with AYUSH practice, or allopathic practice, by AYUSH providers to supplement the work of allopathic practitioners. Interactions among AYUSH practitioners and their health system colleagues frequently take place in a context of partial information, preconceived notions, power imbalances, and mistrust. In some notable instances, collegial relationships and apt divisions of responsibilities are observed. Widespread normative ambivalence around the roles of AYUSH providers, complicated by the logistical constraints prevalent in poorly resourced systems, has the

  6. American Medical Students’ Beliefs in the Effectiveness of Alternative Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Frank

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: While the use of complementary and alternative medical therapy (CAM is common in the U.S., there have been no prior national studies of CAM-related attitudes of U.S. medical students.Methods: We surveyed the Class of 2003 at freshman orientation, entrance to wards, and senior year in a nationally representative sample of 16 U.S. medical schools. Our primary outcome of interest was students’ Likert-scaled responses to the statement “Alternative medicine can often be as effective as traditional medicine.”Results: With 4764 responses overall (a response rate of 80.3%, 9% strongly agreed, 45% agreed, 34% neither agreed nor disagreed, 11% disagreed, and 2% strongly disagreed that alternative medicine could be as effective as traditional medicine. Students became modestly more polarized in their beliefs, moving from 37% of students neither agreeing nor disagreeing with the statement at freshman year to 31% at senior year. Several variables including gender, paternal educational level, ethnicity, religion, political self-characterization, intended specialty, and prevention-orientation were associated with agreement.Conclusions: U.S. patients commonly use CAM, but newly-minted U.S. physicians’ are often skeptical about its efficacy. This disconnect may make it difficult to integrate patients’ CAM use into clinical decision-making.

  7. Themes of holism, empowerment, access, and legitimacy define complementary, alternative, and integrative medicine in relation to conventional biomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Bruce; Marchand, Lucille; Scheder, Jo; Plane, Mary Beth; Maberry, Rob; Appelbaum, Diane; Rakel, David; Rabago, David

    2003-12-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has been defined largely in relation to conventional biomedicine. CAM therapies that are used instead of conventional medicine are termed "alternative." CAM therapies used alongside conventional medicine are said to be "complementary." "Integrative medicine" results from the thoughtful incorporation of concepts, values, and practices from alternative, complementary, and conventional medicines. The evolving process of integration between CAM and conventional medicine evokes new conceptual frameworks, as well as new terminology. Interview-based qualitative research at the University of Wisconsin-Madison seeks to probe and develop this theoretical structure. Interviews with users and practitioners of CAM therapies have revealed four primary themes: holism, empowerment, access, and legitimacy (HEAL). These themes characterize CAM and contrast it with conventional medicine. CAM is said to be more holistic and empowering yet less legitimate than conventional medicine. CAM is more intuitive; conventional is more deductive. While CAM is perhaps more psychologically accessible to many patients in that it better reflects commonly held values, it is often less financially and institutionally accessible, at least for those with conventional health insurance and limited income. Substantive barriers--including economic, organizational and scientific differences, as well as an apparent widespread lack of understanding--continue to thwart attempts at integration. More and better evidence is needed if CAM therapies are to be accepted by mainstream medicine. State-of-the-art research methods developed by conventional science will be needed to test CAM therapies. Conventional medicine, however, has much to learn from CAM. By incorporating a more holistic, empowering and accessible therapeutic approach, conventional medicine could build on its present legitimacy, and thereby enhance its power to "HEAL."

  8. The CAM Education Program of the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Nancy J; Chesney, Margaret A

    2007-10-01

    The authors provide a historical context and overview of the experience of education projects at 14 health professions schools in the United States and the American Medical Students Association that were funded by the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine at the National Institutes of Health in cohorts of five per year in 2000, 2001, and 2002-2003. These 15 projects were designed to incorporate CAM information into the curricula of conventional health professions schools. A longer-term goal was to accelerate the integration of CAM and conventional medicine. The overall program started in 2000 at a time when discussions about the definition, goals, and value of integrative medicine were already well underway. The efforts specific to each project, as well as the shared challenges, accomplishments, and collaborative efforts of all 15 projects, can provide guidance for the education of conventional health care providers about CAM in an integrative medicine environment. Challenging issues that must be faced include (1) the need to develop successful strategies to incorporate information about CAM into already dense health professions school curricula, (2) the need for conventional health professionals to have authoritative resources to provide their patients information about risks and benefits of CAM practices, and (3) the need to identify appropriate roles for CAM practitioners in educating conventional health professionals about CAM therapies. The authors discuss these issues and others and present some recommendations.

  9. Complementary and alternative medicine use in a pediatric neurology clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aburahma, Samah K; Khader, Yousef S; Alzoubi, Karem; Sawalha, Noor

    2010-08-01

    To evaluate the frequency and determinants of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use in children attending a pediatric neurology clinic in North Jordan, a parent completed questionnaire survey of children attending the pediatric neurology clinic at King Abdullah University Hospital from March to July 2008 was conducted. A review of 176 completed questionnaires showed that 99 parents (56%) had used CAM for their child's specific neurological illness. The most common modalities were prayer/reciting the Quran (77%), religious healers (30%), massage with olive oil (32%), and consumption of honey products (29%). The most common reason was religious beliefs in 68%. None reported lack of trust in conventional medicine as the reason behind seeking CAM. Factors significantly associated with CAM use were speech delay, belief in its usefulness, father's age more than 30 years, and mothers with education less than high school. CAM had a supplementary role in relation to traditional western medicine use.

  10. Use of complementary/alternative medicine among paediatric patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Hanne; Andersen, Susie; Nielsen, Rasmus Gaardskaer

    2003-01-01

    Hospital during a 2 week period in the autumn of 2001 were asked to participate. In total, 622 (92%) patients participated. The data were collected in an interviewer administered questionnaire during a short structured interview with the patient and parents. CAM was divided into herbal medicine (herbal......UNLABELLED: The use of complementary/alternative medicine (CAM) is increasing. The aim was to characterise the use of CAM among patients in a paediatric department. All patients (aged 0-18 years), out-patients or hospitalised, in contact with the Department of Paediatrics, Odense University...... patients suffering from gastrointestinal diseases or hospitalised for observation. More than 50% of the users experienced positive effects and 6% had side-effects from AM. Of the CAM users, 11% or 2% of the total paediatric population used CAM instead of conventional medicines. CONCLUSION...

  11. Exclusive use of alternative medicine as a positive choice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Lasse; Pedersen, Inge Kryger; Verhoef, Marja

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A survey of members of the Danish MS Society revealed that a minority of MS patients choose to forgo all types of conventional treatment and use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) exclusively. A qualitative follow-up study was performed to elucidate the choice of exclusive CAM...... from the data through meaning condensation. RESULTS: Four themes characterized the participants' treatment assumptions: 1) conventional medicine contains chemical substances that affect the body in negative ways; 2) CAM treatments can strengthen the organism and make it more capable of resisting...... the impact of MS; 3) the patient's active participation is an important component of the healing process; 4) bodily sensations can be used to guide treatment selection. CONCLUSIONS: Exclusive use of CAM by MS patients may reflect embracing CAM rather than a rejection of conventional medicine. Health...

  12. Medicinal mushroom Phellinus linteus as an alternative cancer therapy

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Alternative cancer treatment with nutritional/dietary supplements containing a wide variety of herbal products is on the rise in Western countries. Recent epidemiological studies have suggested that mushrooms may prevent against different types of cancers. Phellinus linteus is a well-known Oriental medicinal fungus with a variety of biological activities, including immunomodulatory or direct antitumor activities. The activity of P. linteus and its extracts is associated with the presence of p...

  13. Use of complementary and alternative medicine by mid-age women with back pain: a national cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Broom Alex F

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM has increased significantly in Australia over the past decade. Back pain represents a common context for CAM use, with increasing utilisation of a wide range of therapies provided within and outside conventional medical facilities. We examine the relationship between back pain and use of CAM and conventional medicine in a national cohort of mid-aged Australian women. Methods Data is taken from a cross-sectional survey (n = 10492 of the mid-aged cohort of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health, surveyed in 2007. The main outcome measures were: incidence of back pain the previous 12 months, and frequency of use of conventional or CAM treatments in the previous 12 months. Results Back pain was experienced by 77% (n = 8063 of the cohort in the previous twelve month period. The majority of women with back pain only consulted with a conventional care provider (51.3%, 44.2% of women with back pain consulted with both a conventional care provider and a CAM practitioner. Women with more frequent back pain were more likely to consult a CAM practitioner, as well as seek conventional care. The most commonly utilised CAM practitioners were massage therapy (26.5% of those with back pain and chiropractic (16.1% of those with back pain. Only 1.7% of women with back pain consulted with a CAM practitioner exclusively. Conclusions Mid-aged women with back pain utilise a range of conventional and CAM treatments. Consultation with CAM practitioners or self-prescribed CAM was predominantly in addition to, rather than a replacement for, conventional care. It is important that health professionals are aware of potential multiple practitioner usage in the context of back pain and are prepared to discuss such behaviours and practices with their patients.

  14. [Alternative medicine, from North America to East Asia: between persistent exclusion and embodied pluralism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnais, Laurence

    2017-02-01

    At a time of growing interest in integrative approaches to health and care, this article examines, from a historical perspective, the factors underlying the global popularity of so-called complementary and alternative medicines (CAM). Focusing on the multiple and changing meanings of the concepts used with reference to CAM since the nineteenth century, it emphasizes the agency of CAM practitioners' and calls into question a linear progression from outright exclusion to gradual inclusion into mainstream health care systems. This analysis concludes that biomedicine and "other" medical systems have mutually defined each other in a process of co-production that has had a significant impact on the medicalization of contemporary societies from North America to East Asia.

  15. The relationship between marriage and family therapists and complementary and alternative medicine approaches: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becvar, Dorothy S; Caldwell, Karen L; Winek, Jon L

    2006-01-01

    In this article, we delineate the qualitative phase of a mixed-method research study focused on understanding the relationship between Clinical Members of the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (MFT) and complementary alternative medicine (CAM). Based on an analysis of the data derived from telephone interviews with 54 respondents, we describe four themes: definitional issues, depth of awareness of CAM, fit with MFT, and ethical considerations. Our discussion focuses on the findings of this phase, considerations from the quantitative phase, and reflections on the research study as a whole. While acknowledging the limitations of the study, we conclude that the growing awareness of and involvement with CAM approaches and practitioners among MFTs suggest a need for further education for both professionals and clients. We also note the importance of additional research support for the use of CAM practices.

  16. 78 FR 56238 - National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.213, Research and Training in Complementary and...

  17. 75 FR 6041 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.213, Research and Training in Complementary and...

  18. An investigation into the use of complementary and alternative medicine in an urban general practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mc Kenna, F

    2010-11-05

    Several International studies have shown the substantial growth in the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). However, no study in the Republic of Ireland to date has looked at its use among the population. A cross-sectional survey of 328 patients attending an urban general practice was conducted. A high number of respondents reported having visited a CAM practitioner within the past 12 months (89 patients; 27%). A significant positive association was found between CAM use and female gender (p = 0.006), middle-aged (p = 0.013), private health insurance (p = 0.016) and full time employment (p = 0.031). Massage was the most common modality used (35 patients; 39.8%), the most common reason for use was \\'to treat an illness for which conventional medicine was already sought\\' (31 patients; 42%), a high rate of non-disclosure to GPs was found (34 patients; 41%) and personal recommendation was the most important source of information (42 patients; 53.2%). This study demonstrates the current popularity of an alternative healthcare system.

  19. Roads Less Traveled: Finding a Path to Using Complementary and Alternative Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadurai, Vandhana; Sharf, Barbara F; Ramasubramanian, Srividya

    2016-07-01

    An increasing number of health seekers in the United States are looking outside conventional medicine to address their health needs. It is estimated that in the United States, 38% of adults use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Extant research characterizes CAM users as a unified homogeneous group, with little understanding of the differences among them in terms of attitudes toward body, wellness, disease, and pivotal aspects of their personal histories. In this article, we seek to better understand the nuances of who uses CAM and why, using the following questions: How do people communicate their life stories that explain their decision to use CAM? How do the life stories enable us to understand the similarities and differences among CAM users? Based on analysis of the narratives of 18 individuals, three clusters or types of CAM users emerged: natives, immigrants, and tourists. In an effort to push our analysis further, we theorized three dimensions that help to explain CAM users' objectives, motives, and resultant sense of empowerment. Together, these dimensions comprise The Pathfinder Model of CAM Usage. The Pathfinder Model can be useful to clarify self-understanding among CAM users themselves, as well as for conventional and alternative practitioners, as they establish a working relationship and communicate with their patients during medical encounters. Understanding the path of the health seeker can help influence the quality of the relationship and the communicative strategies providers use to educate and influence.

  20. 75 FR 13137 - National Center For Complementary and Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center For Complementary and Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Alternative Medicine, NIH, 6707 Democracy Blvd., Suite 401, Bethesda, MD 20892, (301) 451-6570,...

  1. 77 FR 73036 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... Alternative Medicine. The meeting will be open to the public as indicated below, with attendance limited to... Advisory Council for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. Date: February 1, 2013. Closed: 8:30 a.m....

  2. 75 FR 18217 - National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine... of Committee: National Advisory Council for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. Date: June 3-4... Alternative Medicine, presentation of a new research initiative, and other business of the Council....

  3. 75 FR 54161 - National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-03

    ... Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of... for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special Emphasis Panel; NCCAM Education Panel. Date... in Complementary and Alternative Medicine, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: August 30,...

  4. 77 FR 69869 - National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special Emphasis Panel, PAR 12-151: Centers of Excellence for Research on Complementary Alternative Medicine...

  5. 77 FR 52750 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... Alternative Medicine. The meeting will be open to the public as indicated below, with attendance limited to... Advisory Council for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. Date: October 12, 2012. Closed: 8:30 a.m....

  6. 76 FR 6487 - National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine; Announcement of Workshop on...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-04

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine... and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) invites the research community to participate in a Workshop on... National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) was established in 1999 with the...

  7. 76 FR 55073 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... Alternative Medicine (NACCAM) meeting. The meeting will be open to the public as indicated below, with... Alternative Medicine. Date: October 14, 2011. Closed: October 14, 2011, 8:30 to 10:30 a.m. Agenda: To...

  8. 78 FR 19498 - National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine... Alternative Medicine. The meeting will be open to the public as indicated below, with attendance limited to... Advisory Council for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. Date: June 7, 2013. Closed: 8:30 a.m. to...

  9. 78 FR 51734 - National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine... Alternative Medicine. The meeting will be open to the public as indicated below, with attendance limited to... Advisory Council for Complementary and Alternative Medicine NCCAM Advisory Council Board. Date: October...

  10. 75 FR 52357 - Request for Comment: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Draft Strategic Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-25

    ... for Comment: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Draft Strategic Plan ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) is developing its... Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) was established in 1998 with the mission...

  11. 77 FR 25185 - National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine... Alternative Medicine. The meeting will be open to the public as indicated below, with attendance limited to... Advisory Council for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. Date: June 1, 2012. Closed: 8:30 a.m. to 10...

  12. 77 FR 43099 - National Center For Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center For Complementary & Alternative Medicine... and Alternative Medicine. The meeting will be closed to the public in accordance with the provisions... Committee: National Advisory Council for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. Date: August 27, 2012....

  13. 76 FR 79202 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... Alternative Medicine. The meeting will be open to the public as indicated below, with attendance limited to... Advisory Council for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. Date: February 3, 2012. Closed: 8:30 a.m....

  14. 78 FR 76635 - National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine... Alternative Medicine. The meeting will be open to the public as indicated below, with attendance limited to... Advisory Council for Complementary and Alternative Medicine; NCCAM Advisory Council Board. Date: February...

  15. 76 FR 19379 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... Alternative Medicine. Date: June 3, 2011. Closed: June 3, 2011, 8:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Agenda: To review and... remarks by the Director of the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, presentation...

  16. 75 FR 30039 - National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine... of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine... Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special Emphasis Panel; RFA AT-01-001 ``Translational Tools For...

  17. The bioinformatics of psychosocial genomics in alternative and complementary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, E

    2003-06-01

    The bioinformatics of alternative and complementary medicine is outlined in 3 hypotheses that extend the molecular-genomic revolution initiated by Watson and Crick 50 years ago to include psychology in the new discipline of psychosocial and cultural genomics. Stress-induced changes in the alternative splicing of genes demonstrate how psychosomatic stress in humans modulates activity-dependent gene expression, protein formation, physiological function, and psychological experience. The molecular messengers generated by stress, injury, and disease can activate immediate early genes within stem cells so that they then signal the target genes required to synthesize the proteins that will transform (differentiate) stem cells into mature well-functioning tissues. Such activity-dependent gene expression and its consequent activity-dependent neurogenesis and stem cell healing is proposed as the molecular-genomic-cellular basis of rehabilitative medicine, physical, and occupational therapy as well as the many alternative and complementary approaches to mind-body healing. The therapeutic replaying of enriching life experiences that evoke the novelty-numinosum-neurogenesis effect during creative moments of art, music, dance, drama, humor, literature, poetry, and spirituality, as well as cultural rituals of life transitions (birth, puberty, marriage, illness, healing, and death) can optimize consciousness, personal relationships, and healing in a manner that has much in common with the psychogenomic foundations of naturalistic and complementary medicine. The entire history of alternative and complementary approaches to healing is consistent with this new neuroscience world view about the role of psychological arousal and fascination in modulating gene expression, neurogenesis, and healing via the psychosocial and cultural rites of human societies.

  18. How 'alternative' is CAM? Rethinking conventional dichotomies between biomedicine and complementary/alternative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Ana M

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this article is to interrogate the pervasive dichotomization of 'conventional' and 'alternative' therapies in popular, academic and medical literature. Specifically, I rethink the concepts such as holism, vitalism, spirituality, natural healing and individual responsibility for health care as taken-for-granted alternative ideologies. I explore how these ideologies are not necessarily 'alternative', but integral to the practice of clinical medicine as well as socially and culturally dominant values, norms and practices related to health and health care in Canada and elsewhere. These reflections address both theoretical and applied concerns central to the study of integration of different medical practices in western industrialized nations such as Canada. Overall, in examining homologies present in both biomedicine and complementary/alternative medicine (CAM), this article rethinks major social practices against binary oppositions by illustrating through literature review that the biomedical and CAM models may be homologous in their original inceptions and in recent cross-fertilizations towards a rigorous approach in medicine. By highlighting biomedicine and CAM as homologous symbolic systems, this article also sheds light on the potential for enhancing dialogue between diverse perspectives to facilitate an integrative health care system that meets multiple consumer needs.

  19. Pediatricians' attitudes, experience and referral patterns regarding complementary/alternative medicine: a national survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Ronald

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess pediatricians' attitudes toward & practice of Complementary/Alternative Medicine (CAM including their knowledge, experience, & referral patterns for CAM therapies. Methods An anonymous, self-report, 27-item questionnaire was mailed nationally to fellows of the American Academy of Pediatrics in July 2004. 648 of 3500 pediatricians' surveyed responded (18%. Results The median age ranged from 46–59 yrs; 52% female, 81% Caucasian, 71% generalists, & 85% trained in the US. Over 96% of pediatricians' responding believed their patients were using CAM. Discussions of CAM use were initiated by the family (70% & only 37% of pediatricians asked about CAM use as part of routine medical history. Majority (84% said more CME courses should be offered on CAM and 71% said they would consider referring patients to CAM practitioners. Medical conditions referred for CAM included; chronic problems (headaches, pain management, asthma, backaches (86%, diseases with no known cure (55.5% or failure of conventional therapies (56%, behavioral problems (49%, & psychiatric disorders (47%. American born, US medical school graduates, general pediatricians, & pediatricians who ask/talk about CAM were most likely to believe their patients used CAM (P Conclusion Pediatricians' have a positive attitude towards CAM. Majority believe that their patients are using CAM, that asking about CAM should be part of routine medical history, would consider referring to a CAM practitioner and want more education on CAM.

  20. The faulty statistics of complementary alternative medicine (CAM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandolfi, Maurizio; Carreras, Giulia

    2014-09-01

    The authors illustrate the difficulties involved in obtaining a valid statistical significance in clinical studies especially when the prior probability of the hypothesis under scrutiny is low. Since the prior probability of a research hypothesis is directly related to its scientific plausibility, the commonly used frequentist statistics, which does not take into account this probability, is particularly unsuitable for studies exploring matters in various degree disconnected from science such as complementary alternative medicine (CAM) interventions. Any statistical significance obtained in this field should be considered with great caution and may be better applied to more plausible hypotheses (like placebo effect) than that examined - which usually is the specific efficacy of the intervention. Since achieving meaningful statistical significance is an essential step in the validation of medical interventions, CAM practices, producing only outcomes inherently resistant to statistical validation, appear not to belong to modern evidence-based medicine.

  1. Mood disorders and complementary and alternative medicine: a literature review

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    Qureshi NA

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Naseem Akhtar Qureshi,1 Abdullah Mohammed Al-Bedah21General Administration for Research and Studies, Sulaimania Medical Complex, 2National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Ministry of Health, Riyadh, Saudi ArabiaAbstract: Mood disorders are a major public health problem and are associated with considerable burden of disease, suicides, physical comorbidities, high economic costs, and poor quality of life. Approximately 30%–40% of patients with major depression have only a partial response to available pharmacological and psychotherapeutic interventions. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM has been used either alone or in combination with conventional therapies in patients with mood disorders. This review of the literature examines evidence-based data on the use of CAM in mood disorders. A search of the PubMed, Medline, Google Scholar, and Quertile databases using keywords was conducted, and relevant articles published in the English language in the peer-reviewed journals over the past two decades were retrieved. Evidence-based data suggest that light therapy, St John's wort, Rhodiola rosea, omega-3 fatty acids, yoga, acupuncture, mindfulness therapies, exercise, sleep deprivation, and S-adenosylmethionine are effective in the treatment of mood disorders. Clinical trials of vitamin B complex, vitamin D, and methylfolate found that, while these were useful in physical illness, results were equivocal in patients with mood disorders. Studies support the adjunctive role of omega-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid, and docosahexaenoic acid in unipolar and bipolar depression, although manic symptoms are not affected and higher doses are required in patients with resistant bipolar depression and rapid cycling. Omega-3 fatty acids are useful in pregnant women with major depression, and have no adverse effects on the fetus. Choline, inositol, 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan, and N-acetylcysteine are effective adjuncts in bipolar

  2. Complementary and alternative drug therapy versus science-oriented medicine

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    Anlauf, Manfred

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This opinion deals critically with the so-called complementary and alternative medical (CAM therapy on the basis of current data. From the authors’ perspective, CAM prescriptions and most notably the extensive current endeavours to the “integration” of CAM into conventional patient care is problematic in several respects.Thus, several CAM measures are used, although no specific effects of medicines can be proved in clinical studies. It is extensively explained that the methods used in this regard are those of evidence-based medicine, which is one of the indispensable pillars of science-oriented medicine. This standard of proof of efficacy is fundamentally independent of the requirement of being able to explain efficacy of a therapy in a manner compatible with the insights of the natural sciences, which is also essential for medical progress. Numerous CAM treatments can however never conceivably satisfy this requirement; rather they are justified with pre-scientific or unscientific paradigms. The high attractiveness of CAM measures evidenced in patients and many doctors is based on a combination of positive expectations and experiences, among other things, which are at times unjustified, at times thoroughly justified, from a science-oriented view, but which are non-specific (context effects. With a view to the latter phenomenon, the authors consider the conscious use of CAM as unrevealed therapeutic placebos to be problematic. In addition, they advocate that academic medicine should again systematically endeavour to pay more attention to medical empathy and use context effects in the service of patients to the utmost.The subsequent opinion discusses the following after an introduction to medical history: the definition of CAM; the efficacy of most common CAM procedures; CAM utilisation and costs in Germany; characteristics of science-oriented medicine; awareness of placebo research; pro and contra arguments about the use of CAM, not least

  3. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use at a Comprehensive Cancer Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Qianlai; Asher, Gary N

    2016-05-04

    Background Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use is common among cancer patients, but the majority of CAM studies do not specify the time periods in relation to cancer diagnoses. We sought to define CAM use by cancer patients and investigate factors that might influence changes in CAM use in relation to cancer diagnoses. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey of adults diagnosed with breast, prostate, lung, or colorectal cancer between 2010 and 2012 at the Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center. Questionnaires were sent to 1794 patients. Phone calls were made to nonrespondents. Log binomial/Poisson regressions were used to investigate the association between cancer-related changes in CAM use and conversations about CAM use with oncology providers. Results We received 603 (33.6 %) completed questionnaires. The mean age (SD) was 64 (11) years; 62% were female; 79% were white; and 98% were non-Hispanic. Respondents reported the following cancer types: breast (47%), prostate (27%), colorectal (14%), lung (11%). Eighty-nine percent reported lifetime CAM use. Eighty-five percent reported CAM use during or after initial cancer treatment, with category-specific use as follows: mind-body medicine 39%, dietary supplements 73%, body-based therapies 30%, and energy medicine 49%. During treatment CAM use decreased for all categories except energy medicine. After treatment CAM use returned to pretreatment levels for most CAMs except chiropractic. Initiation of CAM use after cancer diagnosis was positively associated with a patient having a conversation about CAM use with their oncology provider, mainly driven by patient-initiated conversations. Conclusions Consistent with previous studies, CAM use was common among our study population. Conversations about CAM use with oncology providers appeared to influence cessation of mind-body medicine use after cancer diagnosis.

  4. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Personal Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine among Occupational Therapy Educators in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Michelle L

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish a baseline description of American occupational therapy educators' knowledge, attitudes, and personal use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) as a first step in exploring the larger issue of future occupational therapy practitioners' preparedness for meeting clients' occupational needs in today's evolving healthcare environment. Results of this cross-sectional survey highlighted limitations of occupational therapy educators' knowledge of common CAM concepts and therapies across all demographic variables, varying attitudes towards CAM in general and its inclusion in occupational therapy education, and personal use of common CAM therapies. Without increased occupational therapy educator knowledge about CAM and engagement in the current healthcare practices, occupational therapy practitioners are at risk for having a limited role in integrative healthcare.

  5. General medicine and surgery for dental practitioners: part 4. Infections and infection control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubovics, N; Greenwood, M; Meechan, J G

    2014-07-01

    Infection control and knowledge of common infectious agents is a cornerstone of safe dental practice. This paper summarises the measures that need to be taken to control cross infection and discusses some of the infectious agents of concern to dental practitioners.

  6. Surveys of complementary and alternative medicine: Part II. Use of alternative and complementary cancer therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparber, A; Wootton, J C

    2001-06-01

    The second part of this series on surveys of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in the United States provides a "point-of-information" summary of the studies on patients with cancer and their use of CAM therapies. Surveys of patients with cancer were the precursors of the recent wave of studies on CAM prevalence and use. Three tables summarize the findings from a total of 18 surveys categorized by Childhood Cancer, Adult Cancer, and Breast Cancer studies.

  7. Should the use of complementary and alternative medicine be restricted?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saikrishna Nadimpalli

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available There is a considerable amount of doubt about the effectiveness and safety profile of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM. This review article aimed at observing the trend of use of CAM in various countries and its acceptability. It was observed that CAM was more commonly used as a form of treatment in developing countries when compared to the developed countries which may be due to the cultural and economic aspects. The major reason for restricted use of CAM in developed countries is the lack of scientific evidence and adequate studies confirming its efficacy and safety. It involves use of several natural products and body parts of animals which might not always be beneficial and cause harm not only to individual but also the environment. However, some treatments like artemisin for malaria are considered the treatment of choice. CAM is an extensive field consisting of numerous wide ranging therapies, differing in concepts and effectiveness; hence, it is very difficult to have a generalised approach while drawing conclusions about its usage. It is important that more studies are conducted comparing CAM with western medicine for scientific input on its efficacy and safety. Proper monitoring and education about CAM like Ayurveda and yoga by qualified personnel can avoid any harm and facilitate its use as a complementary treatment to western medicine, combination of these two can form a more holistic medical model for treatment. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2016; 5(5.000: 1691-1694

  8. Therapeutic potential and outlook of alternative medicine for osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Liu, Qian; Tjhioe, William; Zhao, Jinmin; Lu, Aiping; Zhang, Ge; Tan, Renxiang; Zhou, Mengyu; Xu, Jiake; Feng, Haotian

    2017-03-21

    Osteoporosis, a bone disease resulting in loss of bone density and microstructure quality, is often associated with fragility fractures, and the latter imposes a great burden on the patient and society. Although there are several different treatments available for osteoporosis such as hormone replacement therapy, bisphosphonates, Denosumab, and parathyroid hormone some concern has been raised regarding the inherent side effects of their long term use. It would be of great relevance to search for alternative natural compounds, which could complementarily overcome the limitations of the currently available therapy. Herein, we review current literature on natural compounds that might have therapeutic values for osteoporosis. Search terms included bone resorption, bone density, osteoporosis, postmenopausal, osteoporosis or bone density conservation agents, and any of the terms related to traditional, herbal, natural therapy, natural health, diet, or phytoestrogens. All the compounds and herbs included in the review are naturally bioactive or are used in folk herbal medicine and have been reported to be capable of attenuating osteopenia or osteoporosis in vivo or in vitro, through various mechanisms - estrogen-like activity, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, or by modulating the key signaling pathways in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis. Through our assessment of the therapeutic potential and outlook of alternative medicine, we aim to provide an appealing perspective for the consideration of the application of a complementary anti-osteoporotic treatment option and prevention strategy for osteoporosis or osteolytic bone disorders.

  9. Identification and review of mobile applications for travel medicine practitioners and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seed, Sheila M; Khov, Steven L; Binguad, Faisal S; Abraham, George M; Aungst, Timothy Dy

    2016-04-01

    Advancements in technology have led to the development of medical applications (apps). Contents of 44 apps related to travel medicine were assessed demonstrating that many were updated infrequently and several developers had no medical background. There is an opportunity for healthcare professionals to develop apps in travel medicine.

  10. A positive concept of health - interviews with patients and practitioners in an integrative medicine clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Jennifer; Marshall, Jack; Corcoran, Katherine; Leeder, Stephen; Phelps, Kerryn

    2013-11-01

    Using the phenomenography method, interviews with patients and practitioners were undertaken to explore their understanding of 'health that is more than the absence of disease'. The question was challenging and stimulating for all interviewees. A few were unable to conceptualise this positive definition of health, some perceived it as an optimum end-state, whereas others saw it as an ongoing process. Many positive attributes of health and its influencers were identified. The more advanced understandings of this concept were of a holistic, multidimensional, expansive state where the all dimensions of health are interdependent and positively reinforcing. The results affirmed that wellness is more than psychological wellbeing, 'happiness' and life satisfaction. Optimum physical and cognitive capacities along with spiritual, social and occupational wellness were equally as important. 'Energy and vitality' were sufficiently emphasised by patients and some practitioners to support the inclusion of the principles of vitalism in any discussion about health.

  11. Complementary and alternative medicine in Indian Parkinson's disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Awadh Kishor; Vibha, Deepti; Srivastava, Achal Kumar; Shukla, Garima; Goyal, Vinay; Behari, Madhuri

    2016-10-01

    Use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM; bǔ chōng yǔ tì dài yī xué) in Parkinson disease (PD) ranged 40-70%. The objective of this study was to determine the frequency, types and factors associated with the use of CAM in Indian PD patients. PD patients, fulfilling UKPD-Society brain-bank diagnostic-criteria, attending Movement-disorders clinic of a tertiary-care teaching hospital in India from 1st May to 15th December 2012 were enrolled. Information on socio-demographic, clinical data and treatment along with factors (source of information, benefits, harms, reason for use and cost) associated with CAM use were recorded. Out of 233 consecutive PD patients, 106 (46%) used CAM. Mean ± SD age of CAM users was 56 ± 11.2 years. Among CAM users, 72% were males, with mean age-onset 49 ± 11.16 years (P = 0.042) and 73% receiving levodopa therapy (p = 0.006). Longer duration PD, higher education (graduates and above), urban residence, and fairly good perceived health were other factors seen among CAM users. Reasons for using CAM were 'feel good factor' (73%), 9% took CAM due to side effects from allopathic-medicines. Commonly used CAM were Ayurvedic, homeopathic medicines, and acupuncture ( zhēn jiǔ) [74/106 (70%)]. Median CAM cost in Indian Rupees (INR) was 1000/month (USD16, range: 0-400USD/month in year 2012). Almost half of PD patients use CAM. Three-quarters of Indian CAM using PD patients believe that CAM is harmless, using it at a substantial cost. CAM-users are educated, young, urban dwellers, longer duration PD and receiving levodopa. Commonly used CAM was Ayurvedic, Homeopathic medicines and acupuncture.

  12. A Survey of Medical Students' Knowledge and Attitudes Toward Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Urmia, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Mahshid; Rabiepoor, Soheila; Forough, Aida Sefidani; Jabbari, Shiva; Shahabi, Shahram

    2016-10-01

    Personal beliefs of medical students may interfere with their tendency for learning Complementary and Alternative Medicine concepts. This study aimed to investigate the knowledge and attitudes of medical students toward complementary and alternative medicine in Urmia, Iran. A structured questionnaire was used as data collection instrument. One hundred questionnaires were returned. Thirty-one percent of students reported use of alternative medicine for at least once. Iranian Traditional Medicine was the main type of alternative medicine used by medical students (93.5%). Neuromuscular disorders were the main indication of alternative medicine use among students (34.4%). Ninety percent of participants demonstrated competent knowledge about acupuncture while the lowest scores belonged to homeopathy (12%). Study results showed that 49% of medical students had positive attitudes and demonstrated a willingness to receive training on the subject. Thus, there appears a necessity to integrate complementary and alternative medicine into the medical curriculum, by taking expectations and feedbacks of medical students into consideration.

  13. American Academy of Pediatrics. The use of complementary and alternative medicine in pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Kathi J; Vohra, Sunita; Walls, Richard

    2008-12-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics is dedicated to optimizing the well-being of children and advancing family-centered health care. Related to these goals, the American Academy of Pediatrics recognizes the increasing use of complementary and alternative medicine in children and, as a result, the need to provide information and support for pediatricians. From 2000 to 2002, the American Academy of Pediatrics convened and charged the Task Force on Complementary and Alternative Medicine to address issues related to the use of complementary and alternative medicine in children and to develop resources to educate physicians, patients, and families. One of these resources is this report describing complementary and alternative medicine services, current levels of utilization and financial expenditures, and associated legal and ethical considerations. The subject of complementary and alternative medicine is large and diverse, and consequently, an in-depth discussion of each method of complementary and alternative medicine is beyond the scope of this report. Instead, this report will define terms; describe epidemiology; outline common types of complementary and alternative medicine therapies; review medicolegal, ethical, and research implications; review education and training for complementary and alternative medicine providers; provide resources for learning more about complementary and alternative medicine; and suggest communication strategies to use when discussing complementary and alternative medicine with patients and families.

  14. 75 FR 76019 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... Alternative Medicine. Date: February 4, 2011. Closed: February 4, 2011, 8:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Agenda: To.... Agenda: Opening remarks by the Director of the National Center for Complementary and Alternative...

  15. Complementary and alternative medicine for sleep disturbances in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooneratne, Nalaka S

    2008-02-01

    Complementary and alternative medicines (CAM) are frequently used for the treatment of sleep disorders, but in many cases patients do not discuss these therapies directly with their health care provider. There is a growing body of well-designed clinical trials using CAM that have shown the following: (1) Melatonin is an effective agent for the treatment of circadian phase disorders that affect sleep; however, the role of melatonin in the treatment of primary or secondary insomnia is less well established. (2) Valerian has shown a benefit in some, but not all clinical trials. (3) Several other modalities, such as Tai Chi, acupuncture, acupressure, yoga, and meditation have improved sleep parameters in a limited number of early trials. Future work examining CAM has the potential to significantly add to our treatment options for sleep disorders in older adults.

  16. The Problem of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use Today

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    MacArtney, John; Wahlberg, Ayo

    2014-01-01

    Commentators like Goldacre, Dawkins, and Singh and Ernst are worried that the rise in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) represents a flight from science propagated by enemies of reason. We outline what kind of problem CAM use is for these commentators and find that users of CAM...... are constituted as duped, ignorant, irrational, or immoral to explain CAM use. However, this form of problematization can be described as a flight from social science. We explore CAM use in light of the rigorous and robust social scientific body of knowledge. By pointing to the push and pull factors, CAM user......’s experiences of their body, and the problem of patient choice in CAM use, we summarize some of the key findings made by social scientists and show how they trouble many of the reasoned assumptions about CAM use....

  17. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Education for Medical Profession: Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nana K. Quartey

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To help integrate traditional, complementary and alternative medicine (TCAM into health systems, efforts are being made to educate biomedical doctors (BMD and medical students on TCAM. We systematically evaluated the effect of TCAM education on BMD and medical students' attitude, knowledge, and behavior towards TCAM utilization and integration with biomedical medicine. Methods. Evaluative studies were identified from four databases. Methodological quality was assessed using the Medical Education Research Study Quality Instrument (MERSQI. Study outcomes were classified using Kirkpatrick's hierarchy. Results. 3122 studies were identified and 12 studies of mediocre quality met inclusion criteria. Qualitative synthesis showed usage of diverse approaches including didactic, experiential learning, varying length, teacher background and intensity of exposure. More positive attitudes and improved knowledge after intervention were noted especially when teachers were BM trained. However, few studies assessed behavior change objectively. Finally, longer-term objective outcomes such as impact on patient care were not assessed. Conclusions. Lack of use of objective and reliable instruments preclude firm conclusion on the effect of TCAM education on study participants. However, positive changes, although mostly subjectively reported, were noted in most studies. Future evaluation should use validated or objective outcome assessments, and the value of using dual trained instructors.

  18. Complementary and alternative medicine education for medical profession: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quartey, Nana K; Ma, Polly H X; Chung, Vincent C H; Griffiths, Sian M

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To help integrate traditional, complementary and alternative medicine (TCAM) into health systems, efforts are being made to educate biomedical doctors (BMD) and medical students on TCAM. We systematically evaluated the effect of TCAM education on BMD and medical students' attitude, knowledge, and behavior towards TCAM utilization and integration with biomedical medicine. Methods. Evaluative studies were identified from four databases. Methodological quality was assessed using the Medical Education Research Study Quality Instrument (MERSQI). Study outcomes were classified using Kirkpatrick's hierarchy. Results. 3122 studies were identified and 12 studies of mediocre quality met inclusion criteria. Qualitative synthesis showed usage of diverse approaches including didactic, experiential learning, varying length, teacher background and intensity of exposure. More positive attitudes and improved knowledge after intervention were noted especially when teachers were BM trained. However, few studies assessed behavior change objectively. Finally, longer-term objective outcomes such as impact on patient care were not assessed. Conclusions. Lack of use of objective and reliable instruments preclude firm conclusion on the effect of TCAM education on study participants. However, positive changes, although mostly subjectively reported, were noted in most studies. Future evaluation should use validated or objective outcome assessments, and the value of using dual trained instructors.

  19. Comparing spatial accessibility to conventional medicine and complementary and alternative medicine in Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Stephen P

    2012-03-01

    Health care investigations rarely consider conventional medicine (CM) and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) simultaneously and spatial accessibility empirical research that incorporates both CM and CAM locations is novel. In this study, residents within municipalities of the Ontario province of Canada are compared in terms of spatial accessibility to a range of health care supplier 'destinations'. While areas with larger urban agglomerations generally exhibit superior levels of spatial accessibility to health care and diversity in medical service choice in comparison to more peripheral areas, considerable heterogeneity in accessibility occurs in both urban and rural settings. This study's identification of subtle spatial imbalances appends the literature by more precisely qualifying the typically reported 'urban-rich, rural-poor' assessment of health care service condition and also reinforces the need for policy-makers to appraise health care spatial accessibility differentials as a function of both CM and CAM endowment.

  20. Integrating Complementary and Alternative Medicine Into Conventional Health Care System in Developing Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishra, Shiva Raj; Neupane, Dinesh; Kallestrup, Per

    2015-01-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine has been a part of human life and practices since the beginning of time. The role of complementary and alternative medicine for the health of humans is undisputed particularly in light of its role in health promotion and well-being. This article discusses ways...... through which complementary and alternative medicine can be promoted and sustained as an integrated element of health care in developing countries. We specifically present the exemplary of Amchi traditional doctors of Northern Himalayas...

  1. Medicinal mushroom Phellinus linteus as an alternative cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliva, Daniel

    2010-05-01

    Alternative cancer treatment with nutritional/dietary supplements containing a wide variety of herbal products is on the rise in Western countries. Recent epidemiological studies have suggested that mushrooms may prevent against different types of cancers. Phellinus linteus is a well-known Oriental medicinal fungus with a variety of biological activities, including immunomodulatory or direct antitumor activities. The activity of P. linteus and its extracts is associated with the presence of polysaccharides, their peptide/protein complexes and other low molecular weight complexes. Polysaccharide fractions isolated from P. linteus were found to be related to the increased activity of immune cells such as the production of cytokines by macrophages and B-cells or the increased cytotoxic activity of natural killer cells. Moreover, P. linteus was found to modulate the expression or activity of various genes involved in cell proliferation, apoptosis, angiogenesis, invasive behavior and chemoprevention. Finally, P. linteus extracts demonstrated tumor regression in three independent case reports, suggesting that an extract from P. linteus or a dietary supplement based on the extract from P. linteus may have potential use for the alternative treatment of cancer.

  2. A study evaluating knowledge, attitude and practices of practitioners in the medicine department of tertiary care teaching rural hospital with respect to antihypertensives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jatin Patel

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate knowledge, attitude and practices of practitioners in the medicine department of tertiary care teaching rural hospital with respect to antihypertensives and find out the disparity between the recommended and actual practices for pharmacological management. Methods: It was survey type of study, carried out using feedback questionnaire related to use of antihypertensives. Total 25 consultants were included in the study. Results: It was found that in mild hypertension single drug and two drugs in combination were preferred by 15 and 10 practitioners respectively. In moderate hypertension single drug, two drugs in combination, and greater than two drugs were preferred by 3, 13, and 7 practitioners respectively. In severe hypertension two drugs in combination and greater than two drugs were preferred by 16 and 9 practitioners respectively; none preferred single drug. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors /angiotensin receptor blockers, beta blockers, Calcium channel blockers, diuretics were preferred as first line drug by 7, 4, 8, and 16 practitioners respectively. Most commonly preferred combination was Losartan and amlodipine by 16 practitioners. In pregnancy nifedipine was preferred as the first line drug while in elderly diuretics were preferred. In hypertensive patients with age less than 40 years all practitioners preferred ACEIs/ARBs. In diabetics ACEIs/ARBs was preferred by all practitioners. Each practitioner claimed to follow Joint National Committee (JNC 7 criteria. Cost of drug was an important consideration in all their prescribing patterns. Conclusion: The knowledge, attitudes and practices followed by the practitioners of Dhiraj hospital were satisfactory and guidelines oriented. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(3.000: 715-717

  3. Health Care Utilization Among Complementary and Alternative Medicine Users in a Large Military Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-11

    megavitamin therapy , homeopathic remedies, hypnosis, massage therapy , relaxation, and spiritual healing. For the purposes of these analyses...acupuncture, biofeedback, chiropractic care, energy healing, folk medicine, hypnosis, and massage therapy were grouped together as practitioner-assisted...any CAM therapy within the last 12 months. The frequency of the 12 CAM therapies reported for both men and women were massage therapy (24.7

  4. Virtual Alternative to the Oral Examination for Emergency Medicine Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGrath, Jillian

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The oral examination is a traditional method for assessing the developing physician’s medical knowledge, clinical reasoning and interpersonal skills. The typical oral examination is a face-to-face encounter in which examiners quiz examinees on how they would confront a patient case. The advantage of the oral exam is that the examiner can adapt questions to the examinee’s response. The disadvantage is the potential for examiner bias and intimidation. Computer-based virtual simulation technology has been widely used in the gaming industry. We wondered whether virtual simulation could serve as a practical format for delivery of an oral examination. For this project, we compared the attitudes and performance of emergency medicine (EM residents who took our traditional oral exam to those who took the exam using virtual simulation. Methods: EM residents (n=35 were randomized to a traditional oral examination format (n=17 or a simulated virtual examination format (n=18 conducted within an immersive learning environment, Second Life (SL. Proctors scored residents using the American Board of Emergency Medicine oral examination assessment instruments, which included execution of critical actions and ratings on eight competency categories (1-8 scale. Study participants were also surveyed about their oral examination experience. Results: We observed no differences between virtual and traditional groups on critical action scores or scores on eight competency categories. However, we noted moderate effect sizes favoring the Second Life group on the clinical competence score. Examinees from both groups thought that their assessment was realistic, fair, objective, and efficient. Examinees from the virtual group reported a preference for the virtual format and felt that the format was less intimidating. Conclusion: The virtual simulated oral examination was shown to be a feasible alternative to the traditional oral examination format for

  5. The 'gender puzzle' of alternative medicine and holistic spirituality: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshet, Yael; Simchai, Dalit

    2014-07-01

    Both as producers and consumers women are more likely than men to engage with complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and 'New Age' holistic spiritualities. We conducted a literature review of sociological and anthropological articles, with the aim of studying why women in particular use and practice these alternatives, and whether using them presents an opportunity to challenge the conventional gender order and unequal power relations. A systematic search of nine databases, complemented by an informal search resulted in the identification of 114 articles, of which 27 were included in the review. The search period was limited to 2000-2013. Thematic analysis of the literature indicated three major trends: women draw on traditional female resources and perceived 'feminine' characteristics; the realm of CAM and holistic spirituality challenges power relations and gender inequalities in healthcare, wellbeing, and employment, and may serve as an emancipating, empowering alternative; however, factors such as lack of political support, legitimacy, and a solid institutional base for the field of CAM and holistic spirituality, and its use by predominantly white middle- and upper-class women, work against significant change in the realm of healthcare and limit gendered social change. We suggest that the empowerment women experience is a form of feminine strength and personal empowerment that stems from power-from-within, which is not directed toward resistance. The literature review reveals some lacunae in the literature that call for future gendered research: the lack of quantitative studies, of data concerning the financial success of CAM practitioners, of studies linking CAM with a feminist-oriented analysis of the medical world, of understanding gender perceptions in the holistic milieu and CAM, and of studies conducted from an intersectionality perspective.

  6. Complementary and alternative medicine in pediatrics in Turkey

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Candan Ozturk; Hulya Karatas; Alfred Längler; Tim Schütze; Rebekka Bailey; Tycho Jan Zuzak

    2014-01-01

    Background: Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is applied both to children and adults widely throughout the world. A previous pan-European survey showed a surprisingly high CAM-use in Turkish children. This review aimed to survey information on the use of CAM in pediatrics in Turkey. Data sources: A narrative, non-systematic review was conducted by melding expert opinions with a thorough and balanced review of available evidence. An unrestricted literature search using the key words,"alternative", "complementary", "integrative","prevalence" and "pediatric" or "children" and "Turkey" was performed by internet search in March, 2012 using PubMed and Google Scholar. Results: CAM use was examined in general pediatrics, pediatric oncology, patients with asthma, and patients with diabetes. A frequency of CAM use was 87% in Turkish pediatric patients, with a mean of 60%. The primary sources of information about CAM are family and friends. Communication with patients/parents and health care professionals showed that most parents do not speak about CAM use with their physicians or nurses. Conclusions: CAM is extensively used in Turkish pediatric patients. This might be due to Turkey's status as a developing country in which a traditional medical system still dominates in comparison to developed countries. Thus, larger studies are required to prove an extensive use of CAM in Turkey, as this review article does not have the capacity for in-depth analysis. Knowledge about CAM and its related topics is essential for physicians and nurses in order to meet the patients' wish for a competent consultation concerning all aspects of a possible therapy.

  7. Analysis of Traditional Medicine in Zanzibar, Tanzania:Resource Conservation and Public Attitude towards the Traditional and Alternative Medicine Policy

    OpenAIRE

    Baylor, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Traditional medicine is used as a major source of health care in developing countries. A small island off the coast of Tanzania, Zanzibar has traditional medicine embedded in its culture. Informal interviews of community members and healers in four different villages as well as interviews with the Department of Forestry and the Traditional and Alternative Medicine Unit were conducted over a four week study. This study found that community members of four villages in Zanzibar supported the ide...

  8. Complementary and alternative medicine use in Portugal: development of an assessment tool

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    Cláudia Carvalho

    Full Text Available Objective: Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM usage is increasing in developing countries. However, little is known about its use in Portugal. This report describes the prevalence of CAM use in a sample of Portuguese adults from Lisbon area. Method: One hundred and seventy four individuals (62% females and 37% males with ages ranging from 20 to 80 years were inquired with a questionnaire designed to assess the use of a variety of mostly self-help CAM practices. Results: Seventy six percent of the individuals used CAM at least once in their lifetime, although 77% of participants reported having free or inexpensive access to a General Practitioner. The most commonly used CAM are natural products, massages, relaxation techniques and naturopathy, all above 20% of prevalence use. Consistent with the literature, CAM use was more prevalent among women, adults aged 30–69, higher educational levels, and monthly income between 1000€ and 1500€. Conclusion: The study provides some insight about the use of CAM in Portuguese adults and suggests the importance of further study in a larger sample of CAM usage in Portugal. The questionnaire should include a broader variety of CAM practices, as well as other health-related variables that literature suggests are related to CAM usage.

  9. Attitudes towards complementary and alternative medicine among medical and psychology students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditte, Darja; Schulz, Wolfgang; Ernst, Gundula; Schmid-Ott, Gerhard

    2011-03-01

    The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasing in Europe as well as in the USA, but CAM courses are infrequently integrated into medical curricula. In Europe, but also especially in the USA and in Canada, the attitudes of medical students and health science professionals in various disciplines towards CAM have been the subject of investigation. Most studies report positive attitudes. The main aim of this study was to compare the attitudes towards CAM of medical and psychology students in Germany. An additional set of questions concerned how CAM utilisation and emotional and physical condition affect CAM-related attitudes. Two hundred thirty-three medical students and 55 psychology students were questioned concerning their attitudes towards CAM using the Questionnaire on Attitudes Towards Complementary Medical Treatment (QACAM). Both medical students and psychology students were sceptical about the diagnostic and the therapeutic proficiency of doctors and practitioners of CAM. Students' attitudes towards CAM correlated neither with their experiences as CAM patients nor with their emotional and physical condition. It can be assumed that German medical and psychology students will be reluctant to use or recommend CAM in their professional careers. Further studies should examine more closely the correlation between attitudes towards CAM and the students' worldview as well as their existing knowledge of the effectiveness of CAM.

  10. Integration of complementary and alternative medicine information and advice in chronic disease management guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Team, Victoria; Canaway, Rachel; Manderson, Lenore

    2011-01-01

    The growing evidence on the benefits and risks of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and its high rate of use (69% of Australians) - particularly for chronic or recurrent conditions - means increasing attention on CAM. However, few people disclose CAM use to their GP, and health professionals tend to inadequately discuss CAM-related issues with their patients, partly due to insufficient knowledge. As clinical and non-clinical chronic condition management guidelines are a means to educate primary health care practitioners, we undertook a content analysis of guidelines relevant to two common chronic conditions - cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) - to assess their provision of CAM-related information. Ten current Australian guidelines were reviewed, revealing scant CAM content. When available, the CAM-relevant information was brief, in some cases unclear, inconclusive and lacking in direction to the GP or health care provider. Although we focus on CVD and T2DM, we argue the value of all chronic condition management guidelines integrating relevant evidence-informed information and advice on CAM risks, benefits and referrals, to increase GP awareness and knowledge of appropriate CAM therapies, and potentially to facilitate doctor-client discussion about CAM.

  11. Integrating complementary and alternative medicine into cancer care: Canadian oncology nurses′ perspectives

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    Tracy L Truant

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The integration of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM and conventional cancer care in Canada is in its nascent stages. While most patients use CAM during their cancer experience, the majority does not receive adequate support from their oncology health care professionals (HCPs to integrate CAM safely and effectively into their treatment and care. A variety of factors influence this lack of integration in Canada, such as health care professional(HCP education and attitudes about CAM; variable licensure, credentialing of CAM practitioners, and reimbursement issues across the country; an emerging CAM evidence base; and models of cancer care that privilege diseased-focused care at the expense of whole person care. Oncology nurses are optimally aligned to be leaders in the integration of CAM into cancer care in Canada. Beyond the respect afforded to oncology nurses by patients and family members that support them in broaching the topic of CAM, policies, and position statements exist that allow oncology nurses to include CAM as part of their scope. Oncology nurses have also taken on leadership roles in clinical innovation, research, education, and advocacy that are integral to the safe and informed integration of evidence-based CAM therapies into cancer care settings in Canada.

  12. A Complementary Alternative Medicine Questionnaire for Young Adults

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    Christine Patterson

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Limited information exists on how adolescents decide to use complementary/alternative medicine (CAM. There are also no instruments specific to CAM, for the young adult population, which makes it difficult to explore knowledge in this area. The purpose of this study was to develop and examine the psychometric properties of the CAM Questionnaire for Young Adults which measures young adults’ attitudes about CAM. Participants for this cross-sectional survey were selected from enrolled undergraduate students at an urban university. Factor analysis identified three subscales: 1 positive beliefs about CAM; 2 environmental influence; and 3 psychological comfort. The scale has good internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha = 0.79 and shows beginning demonstration of validity. Its use in this sample revealed that young adults who are female and have used CAM in the past for preventing or treating illness have the most positive attitude towards CAM and the greatest likelihood for continued use. The implication that prevention may play a role in young adults’ attitudes about CAM is a potential focus for future research.

  13. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Methods in Chronic Renal Failure

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    Zeynep Erdogan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite its long history, use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM methods has increased dramatically only after 1990s. Up to 57% of patients with chronic renal use CAM methods.These patienys use CAM methods to overcome hypertension, fatigue, constipation, leg edema, pain, cramps, anxiety, depression, sleep disorders, to cope with symptoms such as itching, to stop the progression of kidney disease and to improve their quality of life. Methods used are herbal products and food supplements, acupressure, acupuncture, homeopathy, exercise, aromatherapy, yoga and reflexology. Nephrotoxic effect of several CAM therapies used in patients with renal impairment could disturb hemodynamics by reducing the glomerular filtration rate. For this reason, health care providers should question patients about used of CAM, methods. Communication with patients should be clear and should not act judgmental. Health care personnel should learn more about CAM methods in order to avoid unwanted situations that could develop after the application of CAM methods. Patients should be informed correctly and scientifically about these methods to avoid harmful and unnecessary uses. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2014; 23(4.000: 770-786

  14. Complementary and alternative medicine education in dietetics programs: existent but not consistent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickery, Connie E; Cotugna, Nancy

    2006-06-01

    This descriptive survey was undertaken to determine the inclusion of complementary and alternative medicine topics into undergraduate didactic dietetics education. The response rate was 34% (n=92) of all directors (N=273) of didactic and coordinated dietetics programs. Almost all programs (n=81; 88%) include complementary and alternative medicine instruction in some form in their curricula; the majority of content is integrated into already existing nutrition courses. The nutrition courses most often containing complementary and alternative medicine were medical nutrition therapy, advance nutrition, and community nutrition. Topics addressed were varied and included herbal supplements, functional foods, Native-American healing, and quackery in medicine. Most directors indicated that complementary and alternative medicine is an important component of dietetics education, yet many indicated that students are not being adequately prepared in this area. The mean familiarity of program directors with complementary and alternative medicine competencies for dietetics practice was 6 on a scale, with 10 being the most knowledgeable. Respondents also identified whether complementary and alternative medicine and dietary supplement competencies were being addressed at all in their curricula. Lack of time seemed to be the limiting factor to incorporation of complementary and alternative medicine topics into the curricula. Evidence from this study indicates that current curricula are providing some complementary and alternative medicine content, but a core of knowledge is lacking. The complementary and alternative medicine competencies for entry-level dietetics practice anticipated by 2006 will be useful in helping educators adequately meet the needs of future professionals in the area of complementary and alternative medicine.

  15. 75 FR 12769 - National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Announcement of Workshop on Control...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine...: Notice. SUMMARY: The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) invites the... NPI work at all? Is this NPI as good as (or better than) some other intervention? Does this...

  16. 77 FR 4052 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... Council for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, February 3, 2012, 8:30 a.m. to February 3, 2012, 4...

  17. 78 FR 64963 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special Emphasis Panel, October 16, 2013, 2:00 p.m. to October 16,...

  18. 75 FR 19979 - National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Announcement of Workshop on the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine... Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) invites the public to observe at a Workshop on the Deconstruction... natural history of back pain. This information will help inform future research directions for NIH and...

  19. 75 FR 11186 - National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Announcement of Workshop on Natural...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Announcement of Workshop on Natural Products ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: As part of its strategic planning process, the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) invites the public to...

  20. COMPARISON OF THE KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDE AND PRACTICES OF ESSENTIAL MEDICINES AMONG MEDICAL PRACTITIONERS OF A MEDICAL COLLEGE VERSUS PRIVATE MEDICAL GENERAL PRACTITIONERS OF AN URBAN PLACE OF SOUTH INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidyarthi SurendraK, Nayak RoopaP, Gupta Sandeep K, Dandekar Rahul H

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: India is the third largest producer and exporter of medicinestomost of the countries. The World Medicine Situation Report 2011 states that 65% persons in India do not have access to essential medicines. While, huge unethical prescribing ofdrugs for monetary gains has been a second major cause of rural indebtedness. Aims and Objectives:The primary objective of the study was to compare the Knowledge, Attitude and Practices of Essential Medicines among Medical Practitioners of a Medical College and Private Medical General Practitioners of an urban place, e.g. Perambalur District of South India.Materials and Methods: After ethical approval, thestudy was started, in Dhanalakshmi Srinivasan Medical College and Hospital (DSMCH, Siruvachur-621113, Perambalur, Tamil Nadu. It was a questionnaire based study. The faculties of the DSMCH and Medical Private Practitioner of Perambalur district included as participants in the study. We distributed knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP based 15multiple choice questionson National Essential Medicine List, 2011 (NEML to each healthcare professionals (HCPs to attempt within 15 minutes.Results:Overall, Knowledge, attitude and practices regarding NEML 2011 were 57.06%, 38.36%; 51.16%, 51.82%; 21.73%, 28.7% to HCP from DSMCH and HCP from Perambalur district, respectively. Whereas, 42.2 % HCPs from DSMCH and 44.7 % HCPs from Perambalur district wereprescribed branded and generic drugs both. Conclusion:The result’s data shows that regular awareness programmes should be conducted to update knowledge, change attitude and practices regarding essential medicines to serve the society as best as possible.

  1. Probiotics and pharmabiotics: alternative medicine or an evidence-based alternative?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Colin

    2010-01-01

    That commensal bacteria play an important role in human health is beyond doubt, and it is now widely accepted that humans function as super organisms, whose collective metabolic potential exceeds the sum of our individual eukaryotic and prokaryotic components. However, while it is has been established that the prokaryotic component of the human superorganism is amenable to manipulation by chemotherapeutic, dietary or microbial interventions, the significance of such alterations in terms of human health or well being is less well established. Prebiotics (non- digestible food ingredients that stimulate the growth and/or activity of bacteria in the digestive system) and probiotics (live microorganisms that when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit on the host) are often bracketed among 'alternative' approaches to influencing human health, such as homeopathy, naturopathy, acupuncture and hypnotherapy. Others believe that prebiotics and probiotics have proven their effectiveness in properly conducted, clinically controlled human trials and therefore can be considered as evidence-based alternatives or adjuncts to conventional medicines. My journey from a position of total skepticism to 'reluctant convert' is the basis of this article, which should not be considered in any sense as a review of the literature but simply a personal account of this transition. While I am not bent on converting other doubters, I will recount some of the thought processes and evidence that has helped to form my current opinion.

  2. Trends in complementary/alternative medicine use by breast cancer survivors: Comparing survey data from 1998 and 2005

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    Zick Suzanna M

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM by women with breast cancer is often said to be increasing, yet few data exist to confirm this commonly held belief. The purpose of this paper is to compare overall patterns of CAM use, as well as use of specific products and therapies at two different points in time (1998 vs 2005 by women diagnosed with breast cancer. Methods Surveys were mailed to women randomly selected from the Ontario Cancer Registry (Canada in the spring of 1998 (n = 557 and again in the spring of 2005(n = 877. Results The response rates were 76.3% in 1998 and 63% in 2005. In 1998, 66.7% of women reported using either a CAM product/therapy or seeing a CAM therapist at some time in their lives as compared with 81.9% in 2005 (p = 0.0002. Increases were seen in both use of CAM products/therapies (62% in 1998 vs. 70.6% in 2005 and visits to CAM practitioners (39.4% of respondents in 1998 vs 57.4% of respondents in 2005. Women in 2005 reported that 41% used CAM for treating their breast cancer. The most commonly used products and practitioners for treating breast cancer as reported in 2005 were green tea, vitamin E, flaxseed, vitamin C, massage therapists and dietitians/nutritionists. Conclusion CAM use (both self-medication with products and visits to CAM practitioners increased significantly from 1998 to 2005. Now that more than 80% of all women with breast cancer report using CAM (41% in a specific attempt to management their breast cancer, CAM use can no longer be regarded as an "alternative" or unusual approach to managing breast cancer.

  3. Alternative medicine in Paris and Rio de Janeiro: a study on transformative health experiences

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    Elisabeth Eglem

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to explore the practice of alternative medicine as an experience capable of modifying the very perception of the body and body feeling, based in a two-field research in France (Paris and Brazil (Rio de Janeiro. In this research, the resort to alternative medicines was considered as urban practice and a possible response to emotional needs, beyond the curative specificities of these medicines. The two countries were chosen for their supposed complementarity concerning the perception of spirituality and therefore, the perception of holistic health concepts. The study relies on an inductive approach and a qualitative methodology: introspective interviews with consumers and professionals, as well as participant observations. After a review of the theoretical aspects on the subject — concepts related to health, alternative medicine, transformative experience —, empirical results are presented. They show that the experience of alternative medicine tends to modify body perception, understood as how individuals define their own body. It also tends to modify body internal feeling, literally how people feel their body. The second conclusion that can be drawn from our study is that, beyond cultural specificities, some similarities appear in the way the practice of alternative medicine impacts on body perception and individual values. In that sense, alternative medicine practices in big urban centers appear to be related to a global consumer culture. However, alternative health behaviors rely on a subjective quest of sense which can be expressed through a variety of practices related to better health, not necessarily involving consumption.

  4. A primer of complementary and alternative medicine and its relevance in the treatment of mental health problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamtani, Ravinder; Cimino, Andrea

    2002-01-01

    The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is widespread. Those with psychiatric disorders are more likely to use CAM than those with other diseases. There are both benefits and limitations to CAM. Many controlled studies have yielded promising results in the areas of chronic pain, insomnia, anxiety, and depression. There is sufficient evidence, for example, to support the use of a) acupuncture for addiction problems and chronic musculoskeletal pain, b) hypnosis for cancer pain and nausea, c) massage therapy for anxiety, and the use of d) mind-body techniques such as meditation, relaxation, and biofeedback for pain, insomnia, and anxiety. Large doses of vitamins, herbal supplements, and their interaction with conventional medications are areas of concern. Physicians must become informed practitioners so that they can provide appropriate and meaningful advice to patients concerning benefits and limitations of CAM.

  5. An exploratory study of complementary and alternative medicine in hospital midwifery: models of care and professional struggle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Jon

    2006-02-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasingly popular amongst midwives in Australia. A growing number of hospital midwives are personally integrating one or a range of CAM within their midwifery practice. Despite this trend we still know little about CAM in midwifery, particularly at a grass-roots level. This paper reports findings from one section of a larger exploratory study examining grass-root practitioners' understandings and experiences of complementary therapies in nursing and midwifery. Thirteen in-depth interviews were conducted with midwives working in New South Wales public hospitals and currently integrating CAM within their general midwifery practice. Analysis illustrates how midwives' explanations of, and affinity claims regarding, CAM feed into wider ongoing issues relating to professional autonomy and the relationship between midwifery and obstetrics.

  6. Use of traditional medicine and complementary and alternative medicine in Taiwan: a multilevel analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Mei-Ling; Lin, Kuan-Chia; Chen, Hsing-Hsia; Wang, Yu-Jen; Huang, Yu-Chiao

    2015-01-01

    As the selection of a medical modality is not completely independent, environmental and sociocultural contexts of ecological validity are desired. This study aimed to apply a multilevel analysis using the Hierarchical Linear Modeling software to examine predictors of traditional medicine (TM)/complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use in Taiwan on both individual and division levels. Individual-level data were obtained from the government database involving TM/CAM use and its impact on the population, whereas division-level data were obtained from a government annual report. A total of 2310 individuals from 22 administrative divisions of Taiwan were evaluated in the data analysis, of which 86.9% had used at least 1 TM/CAM modality in the past year. The average division of TM/CAM use was 2.86 modalities in the null model and 4.15 in the full model. Significant relationships were found between TM/CAM use and individual-level variables of gender, educational level, monthly income, perceived health status, experience with Western medical treatment, and the cost, effect, and degree of satisfaction with TM/CAM. At the division level, TM/CAM use was significantly related to aging population, employment status, and the number of medical institutions. With a simultaneous evaluation of the individual-level and division-level influences, it was found that the average division of TM/CAM use increased significantly. The place of residence is an important predictor of TM/CAM use. The age factor in predicting TM/CAM use in this study may be overestimated in the population of 26 to 60 years of age, whereas an aging population is important in the average division of TM/CAM use. Efforts to reform health insurance to completely cover the costs of TM/CAM and to better facilitate equality of access of health care in rural and remote areas are deemed necessary.

  7. Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM): Expanding Horizons of Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... body medicine focuses on ways to harness emotional, mental, social, spiritual, and behavioral factors to affect a person's health. Examples are meditation, hypnosis, and yoga. Whole medical systems are built upon complete systems ...

  8. Could the products of Indian medicinal plants be the next alternative for the treatment of infections?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Nandagopal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Indian medicinal plants are now recognized to have great potential for preparing clinically useful drugs that could even be used by allopathic physicians. Traditionally, practitioners of Indian medicine have used plant products in powder, syrup or lotion forms, without identification, quantification and dose regulation, unlike their allopathic counterparts. The present review explores the immense potential of the demonstrated effect of Indian medicinal plants on microbes, viruses and parasites. In the present context, with the available talent in the country like pharmaceutical chemists, microbiologists, biotechnologists and interested allopathic physicians, significant national effort towards identification of an "active principle" of Indian medicinal plants to treat human and animal infections should be a priority.

  9. Acupuncture: An alternative therapy in medicine and dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharad Vaidya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An introduction to the practical application of acupuncture is presented in the light of current research. Acupuncture could supplement conventional treatment modalities. Its value in the treatment of temporomandibular dysfunction syndrome and facial pain has been well-documented. Although, it may be useful in the control of post-operative pain, its use as sole analgesia for operative care is questionable. The aim of this paper is to give a broad introduction to acupuncture to the general and dental practitioner and to emphasize the scientific background for acupuncture.

  10. 76 FR 17659 - National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Announcement of Stakeholder Roundtable

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-30

    ... Announcement of Stakeholder Roundtable ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) invites the public to a Stakeholder Roundtable. Attendees will meet the NCCAM... Participation: Representatives of stakeholder organizations are invited to provide input into the...

  11. Talking about Complementary and Alternative Medicine with Health Care Provider: A Workbook and Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    A workbook to help patients and doctors talk about the use of complementary and alternative medicine(CAM) during and after cancer care. Worksheets, tips, and resources are provided for patients and doctors to help track CAM use.

  12. Talking about Complementary and Alternative Medicine with Health Care Providers: A Workbook and Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    A workbook to help patients and doctors talk about the use of complementary and alternative medicine(CAM) during and after cancer care. Worksheets, tips, and resources are provided for patients and doctors to help track CAM use.

  13. Talking about Complementary and Alternative Medicine with your Health Care Provider: A workbook and tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    A workbook to help patients and doctors talk about the use of complementary and alternative medicine(CAM) during and after cancer care. Worksheets, tips, and resources are provided for patients and doctors to help track CAM use.

  14. Complementary and alternative medicine use in Iranian patients with diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad HasheMHashempur; Mojtaba Heydari; Seyed HamdollaHMosavat; Seyyed Taghi Heydari; MesbaHShams

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:There is increasing interest in complementary and alternative medicine generaly, and especialy by those affected by chronic diseases, such as diabetes melitus. We aimed to determine the prevalence and pattern of complementary and alternative medicine use among patients suffering from diabetes melitus in Shiraz, southern Iran. Another objective was to explore associated factors for use of complementary and alternative medicine among patients with diabetes melitus. METHODS: A 19-item semi-structured questionnaire (open- and close-ended) was administered to 239 patients with diabetes melitus in this cross-sectional study. It was carried out in two outpatient diabetes clinics afifliated with the Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. RESULTS:One hundred and eighty patients (75.3%) used at least one type of complementary and alternative medicine in the last year prior to the interview. Patients with diabetes melitus who were living in a large family (≥ 5 members), not taking insulin, and believed that complementary and alternative medicine have synergistic effects with conventional medicine, were independently and signiifcantly (P values: 0.02, 0.04, and 0.01, respectively) more likely to use complementary and alternative medicine. Most of the users (97.7%) reported use of herbal preparations, and 89.4% of users did not change their medication, neither in medication schedule nor its dosage. CONCLUSION: The use of complementary and alternative medicine, especialy herbal remedies, is popular among diabetes patients in Shiraz, Iran. This use is associated with patients’ family size, type of conventional medications and their view about concomitant use of complementary and conventional medicine.

  15. [The practice guideline 'Anemia' from the Dutch College of General Practitioners; a response from the perspective of general practice medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, W.J.H.M. van den

    2003-01-01

    The practice guideline 'Anaemia' from the Dutch College of General Practitioners will certainly be a support for the Dutch general practitioner. The inclusion of an algorithm to make a more precise diagnosis is an experiment that needs to be evaluated in the near future. However, many general practi

  16. The Dutch Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) protocol: to ensure the safe and effective use of complementary and alternative medicine within Dutch mental health care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoenders, H.J.R.; Appelo, M.T.; van den Brink, E.H.; Hartogs, B.M.A.; de Jong, J.T.V.M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is subject to heated debates and prejudices. Studies show that CAM is widely used by psychiatric patients, usually without the guidance of a therapist and without the use of a solid working method, leading to potential health risks. Aim: The p

  17. Is There a Role for Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Preventive and Promotive Health? An Anthropological Assessment in the Context of U.S. Health Reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Jennifer Jo; Nichter, Mark

    2016-03-01

    Chronic conditions associated with lifestyle and modifiable behaviors are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in the United States. The implementation of the Affordable Care Act offers an historic opportunity to consider novel approaches to addressing the nation's public health concerns. We adopt an anticipatory anthropological perspective to consider lifestyle behavior change as common ground shared by practitioners of both biomedicine and common forms of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). At issue is whether CAM practitioners might play a more proactive and publicly endorsed role in delivering preventive and promotive health services to address these needs. Recognizing that this is a contentious issue, we consider two constructive roles for engaged medical anthropologists: (1) as culture brokers helping to facilitate interprofessional communities of preventive and promotive health practice and (2) in collaboration with health service researchers developing patient-near evaluations of preventive and promotive health services on patient well-being and behavior change.

  18. The arranged marriage of allopathic and alternative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniccia, M D

    1999-01-01

    The degree to which Americans are seeking and paying for alternative health care has caused some hospitals and medical groups to consider incorporating these services within the umbrella of their traditional care. The challenge is to find a standard of care that is consistent with allopathic traditions, but not so restrictive as to undercut the financial and patient satisfaction motives that prompted the interest in alternative care. By focusing on subjective complaints and chronic conditions, it may be possible to walk a path that leaves traditional medical standards intact while gaining the opportunity to attract the dollars and track the effectiveness of alternative care.

  19. REVIEW ON ALTERNATIVE THERAPY IN HEALTH AND MEDICINE

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    G. H. Shinde, T. M. Kalyankar* and M. S. Attar

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The phrase alternative therapy is used to explain a wide range of treatments which, generally, are not available from conventional doctors. It may be diverse for different diseases. The Alternative therapy focuses on the many things from diet to exercise and lifestyle. Many people suffering from disease are looking for the management of diseases with the help of alternative therapies. According to physicians, most of the alternative therapies started with clinical observation or scientific research. These therapies include yoga, aromatherapy, massage, hypnosis, biofeedback, herbal remedies and many others. The main advantage of these therapies is to treat the basic cause of disease and health related problems or to support the conventional therapies. Not only are the variety of alternative therapies measured to be safe and effective, they also deal individuals a wide variety of health therapy that simply do not exist through conventional treatment. This article focuses on different alternative therapies with their benefits in conventional therapies which can promise ultimate answers to treat the diseases.

  20. Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine among Children Diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Ellen; Kalish, Leslie A.; Bunce, Emily; Curtis, Christine; McDaniel, Samuel; Ware, Janice; Petry, Judith

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the prevalence of the use of different types of conventional, complementary and alternative therapies by children diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Of 112 families surveyed, 74% were using complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for their child with ASD. CAM use was most strongly associated with parent…

  1. Patterns of responses to alternative medicines in controlling allergic conjunctivitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batra Deepak

    1988-01-01

    Full Text Available This analysis identifies the various patterns of the responses of the medicines in controlling allergic conjunctivitis. The mean S Deviation coefficient of variation, correlation matrix and loading of factors are worked out as stated in the tables. In the present case the Eigen values greater than 1.50 are retained. The four factors retained explain 68% of the total variations of the 16 responses. The first factor shows 23.38% of variations in total responses while first two and first three factors show 42.39% and 58.64% respectively. Thus medicine affective in controlling the symptoms are given In the descending order: oxymetazoline and sodium salicylate and Sodium cromoglycate, Oxymetazoline and Disodium CCromoglycate & Sodium Salicylate and disodium Cromoglycate.

  2. A cross-sectional study on the perceptions and practices of modern and traditional health practitioners about traditional medicine in Dembia district, north western Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthuswamy Ragunathan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A cross-sectional study pertaining to the practices and perceptions of modern and traditional health practitioners on Traditional Medicine (TM was carried out from February 25 to April 4, 2008.The results of the study showed that almost all the practitioners in both systems expressed their willingness to collaborate among each other to promote the positive elements of TM. As traditional healing knowledge is still being handed over from one generation to the next, mainly through word of mouth, which will lead to distortion or a total demise of the original knowledge, this report indicates the urgency to document the same. Moreover, the report also implies the need for educating and training the practitioners of the two systems. More also has to be done to create a discussion forum for both modern and TM practitioners, to enable them to share their knowledge. Government support for promotion and development of TM should be considered as a goal to be seriously pursued. The government should also contribute by helping them financially and by arranging training and education for the improvement of the healthcare system given to the public.

  3. [The practice guideline 'Smoking cessation' from the Dutch College of General Practitioners; a response from the perspective of pulmonary medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Spiegel, P I

    2008-06-28

    The practice guideline 'Smoking cessation' from the Dutch College of General Practitioners has been published. If general practitioners are going to use the standard, this can have a great impact on smoking in the Dutch population. A decrease in smokers among the population will also have an impact on several smoking-related chronic diseases from a preventive point of view. The guideline emphasizes that smoking cessation is not a one-stop shop but that it requires a long-term effort.

  4. Traditional Chinese medicine, acupuncture, and other alternative medicines for prostate cancer: an introduction and the need for more research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyad, M A; Hathaway, S; Ni, H S

    1999-05-01

    There are several other alternative medicines apart from vitamins and minerals that the clinician should be aware of because they have grown in popularity in other fields of medicine. In time, these therapies should impact the arena of urologic oncology. Traditional Chinese Medicine, which includes acupuncture, is an area that has received some attention. The theory behind it can be quite daunting because it is so different from the theory behind Western Medical Science. In addition, exactly how acupuncture can be applied to a patient and its potential use in prostate cancer need to be addressed. Other herbal therapies for the patient experiencing symptoms related to a localized cancer diagnosis also need to be evaluated. St John's Wort for depression and Kava for anxiety are two examples of herbal alternatives that some prostate patients are inquiring about. Finally, Ginkgo biloba has received a great deal of attention in the media for erectile dysfunction, but there is a dearth of evidence in this area and the information that already exists can be misleading until further studies are conducted. Also, it is imperative that additional studies be performed in all of the above subjects as they relate to prostate cancer, but a general survey on alternative medicine use in urologic diseases is needed first before an adequate review of the most popular therapies can be published.

  5. Phytotherapy against insomnia: extravagant claims or an alternative medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Abhijit; Dey, Amrita

    2013-02-01

    Insomnia or sleeplessness is a disorder characterized by a personal incapability to falling or staying asleep for a desirable period of time. Apart from Valeriana officinalis and Ziziphus jujuba most of the ethnobotanicals used for sleep disorders have not been evaluated for pharmacological or clinical efficacy against insomnia. Chinese herbal medicines involving polyherbal formulations are yet to be characterized and long-term side effects are yet to be evaluated. Anti insomniac phytotherapy opens up an exciting aspect of research which might benefit a large number of patients suffering from different degrees of insomnia.

  6. What is involved in medicines management across care boundaries? A qualitative study of healthcare practitioners' experiences in the case of acute kidney injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Rebecca L; Blakeman, Tom; Ashcroft, Darren M

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To examine the role of individual and collective cognitive work in managing medicines for acute kidney injury (AKI), this being an example of a clinical scenario that crosses the boundaries of care organisations and specialties. Design Qualitative design, informed by a realist perspective and using semistructured interviews as the data source. The data were analysed using template analysis. Setting Primary, secondary and intermediate care in England. Participants 12 General practitioners, 10 community pharmacists, 7 hospital doctors and 7 hospital pharmacists, all with experience of involvement in preventing or treating AKI. Results We identified three main themes concerning participants' experiences of managing medicines in AKI. In the first theme, challenges arising from the clinical context, AKI is identified as a technically complex condition to identify and treat, often requiring judgements to be made about renal functioning against the context of the patient's general well-being. In the second theme, challenges arising from the organisational context, the crossing of professional and organisational boundaries is seen to introduce problems for the coordination of clinical activities, for example by disrupting information flows. In the third theme, meeting the challenges, participants identify ways in which they overcome the challenges they face in order to ensure effective medicines management, for example by adapting their work practices and tools. Conclusions These themes indicate the critical role of cognitive work on the part of healthcare practitioners, as individuals and as teams, in ensuring effective medicines management during AKI. Our findings suggest that the capabilities underlying this work, for example decision-making, communication and team coordination, should be the focus of training and work design interventions to improve medicines management for AKI or for other conditions. PMID:28100559

  7. Cancer complementary and alternative medicine research at the US National Cancer Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Libin

    2012-05-01

    The United States National Cancer Institute (NCI) supports complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) research which includes different methods and practices (such as nutrition therapies) and other medical systems (such as Chinese medicine). In recent years, NCI has spent around $120 million each year on various CAM-related research projects on cancer prevention, treatment, symptom/side effect management and epidemiology. The categories of CAM research involved include nutritional therapeutics, pharmacological and biological treatments, mind-body interventions, manipulative and body based methods, alternative medical systems, exercise therapies, spiritual therapies and energy therapies on a range of types of cancer. The NCI Office of Cancer Complementary and Alternative Medicine (OCCAM) supports various intramural and extramural cancer CAM research projects. Examples of these cancer CAM projects are presented and discussed. In addition, OCCAM also supports international research projects.

  8. Understanding support for complementary and alternative medicine in general populations: use and perceived efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoneman, Paul; Sturgis, Patrick; Allum, Nick

    2013-09-01

    Proponents of complementary and alternative medicine argue that these treatments can be used with great effect in addition to, and sometimes instead of, conventional medicine, a position which has drawn sustained opposition from those who advocate an evidence-based approach to the evaluation of treatment efficacy. Using recent survey data from the United Kingdom, this article seeks to establish a clearer understanding of the nature of the public's relationship with complementary and alternative medicine within the general population by focusing on beliefs about the perceived effectiveness of homeopathy, in addition to its reported use. Using recent data from the United Kingdom, we initially demonstrate that reported use and perceived effectiveness are far from coterminous and argue that for a proper understanding of the motivations underpinning public support of complementary and alternative medicine, consideration of both reported use and perceived effectiveness is necessary. We go on to demonstrate that although the profile of homeopathy users differs from those who support this form of medicine, neither outcome is dependent upon peoples' levels of knowledge about science. Instead, the results suggest a far greater explanatory role for need and concerns about conventional medicine.

  9. Use of complementary and alternative medicine and self-tests by coronary heart disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolly Kate

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coronary heart disease patients have to learn to manage their condition to maximise quality of life and prevent recurrence or deterioration. They may develop their own informal methods of self-management in addition to the advice they receive as part of formal cardiac rehabilitation programmes. This study aimed to explore the use of complementary and alternative medicines and therapies (CAM, self-test kits and attitudes towards health of UK patients one year after referral to cardiac rehabilitation. Method Questionnaire given to 463 patients attending an assessment clinic for 12 month follow up in four West Midlands hospitals. Results 91.1% completed a questionnaire. 29.1% of patients used CAM and/or self-test kits for self-management but few (8.9% used both methods. CAM was more often used for treating other illnesses than for CHD management. Self-test kit use (77.2%, was more common than CAM (31.7%, with BP monitors being the most prevalent (80.0%. Patients obtained self-test kits from a wide range of sources, for the most part (89.5% purchased entirely on their own initiative. Predictors of self-management were post revascularisation status and higher scores on 'holism', 'rejection of authority' and 'individual responsibility'. Predictors of self-test kit use were higher 'holism' and 'individual responsibility' scores. Conclusion Patients are independently using new technologies to monitor their cardiovascular health, a role formerly carried out only by healthcare practitioners. Post-rehabilitation patients reported using CAM for self-management less frequently than they reported using self-test kits. Reports of CAM use were less frequent than in previous surveys of similar patient groups. Automatic assumptions cannot be made by clinicians about which CHD patients are most likely to self-manage. In order to increase trust and compliance it is important for doctors to encourage all CHD patients to disclose their self

  10. Use of alternative medicine for hypertension in Buikwe and Mukono districts of Uganda: a cross sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Nuwaha, Fred; Musinguzi, Geofrey

    2013-01-01

    Background Use of alternative medicine for chronic diseases such as hypertension is common in low as well as high income countries. This study estimated the proportion of people who were aware of their hypertension that use alternative medicine and identified factors predicting the use of alternative medicine. Methods In a community based cross sectional survey among people ≥ 15 years in Buikwe and Mukono districts of Uganda 258 people aware of their hypertension were questioned about use of ...

  11. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use in an Italian cohort of pediatric headache patients: the tip of the iceberg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalla Libera, D; Colombo, B; Pavan, G; Comi, G

    2014-05-01

    The use of complementary alternative medicine (CAM) in paediatric populations is considerably increased, especially for pain and chronic conditions, as demonstrated by epidemiological surveys both in Europe and in the USA. In our study, CAM was used in 76 % patients of a cohort of 124 children affected by headache (age 4-16 years; 67 % female; 70 % migraine without aura, 12 % migraine with aura, 18 % tensive headache according to IHS criteria) consecutively recruited at a Pediatric Headache University Center. CAM was used as preventive treatment in 80 % cases. The main reasons for seeking CAM were: the wish of avoiding chronic use of drugs with their related side effects, the desire of an integrated approach, the reported inefficacy of conventional medicine, and a more suitable children disposition to CAM than to pharmacological compound. Female gender, younger age, migraine without aura, parents' higher educational status, maternal use of CAM and other associated chronic conditions, correlated with CAM use (p insomnia, muscle-scheletric disorders and dysmenorrhoea). The most assumed CAM were: herbal remedies (64 %) such as Valeriana, Ginkgo biloba, Boswellia serrata, Vitex agnus-castus, passion flower, Linden tree; vitamins/minerals supplements (40 %) with magnesium, 5-Hydroxytryptophan, vitamin B6 or B12, Multivitamin compounds; Homeopathy (47 %) with Silicea, Ignatia Amara, Pulsatilla, Aconitum, Nux Vomica, Calcarea phosphorica; physical treatment (45 %) such as Ayurvedic massage, shiatsu, osteopathy; yoga (33 %); acupuncture (11 %). CAM-often integrated with conventional care-was auto-prescribed in 30 % of the cases, suggested by non-physician in 22 %, by the General Practitioner in 24 % and by paediatrician in 24 %. Both general practitioners and neurologists were mostly unaware of their patients' CAM use. In conclusion, neurologists should inquire for CAM use and be prepared to learn about CAM therapies or to directly interact with CAM trained experts, in

  12. The role of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM in Germany – A focus group study of GPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemann Thomas

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There has been a marked increase in the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM in recent years worldwide. In Germany, apart from 'Heilpraktiker' (= state-licensed, non-medical CAM practitioners, some general practitioners (GPs provide CAM in their practices. This paper aims to explore the attitudes of GPs about the role of CAM in Germany, in relation to the healthcare system, quality of care, medical education and research. Furthermore, experiences of GPs integrating CAM in their daily practice were explored. Methods Using a qualitative methodological approach 3 focus groups with a convenience sample of 17 GPs were conducted. The discussions were transcribed verbatim and analysed using qualitative content analysis. Results The majority of the participating GPs had integrated one or more CAM therapies into their every-day practice. Four key themes were identified based on the topics covered in the focus groups: the role of CAM within the German healthcare system, quality of care, education and research. Within the theme 'role of CAM within the healthcare system' there were five categories: integration of CAM, CAM in the Statutory Health Insurance, modernisation of the Statutory Health Insurance Act, individual healthcare services and 'Heilpraktiker'. Regarding quality of care there were two broad groups of GPs: those who thought patients would benefit from standardizing CAM and those who feared that quality control would interfere with the individual approach of CAM. The main issues identified relating to research and education were the need for the development of alternative research strategies and the low quality of existing CAM education respectively. Conclusion The majority of the participating GPs considered CAM as a reasonable complementary approach within primary care. The study increased our understanding of GPs attitudes about the role of CAM within the German healthcare system and the use of

  13. Use of complementary and alternative medicine in children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höfer, Juliana; Hoffmann, Falk; Bachmann, Christian

    2016-05-25

    Despite limited evidence, complementary and alternative medicine treatments are popular in autism spectrum disorder. The aim of this review was to summarize the available evidence on complementary and alternative medicine use frequency in autism spectrum disorder. A systematic search of three electronic databases was performed. All research studies in English or German reporting data on the frequency of complementary and alternative medicine use in individuals with autism spectrum disorder were included. Two independent reviewers searched the literature, extracted information on study design and results, and assessed study quality using an established quality assessment tool. Twenty studies with a total of 9540 participants were included. The prevalence of any complementary and alternative medicine use ranged from 28% to 95% (median: 54%). Special diets or dietary supplements (including vitamins) were the most frequent complementary and alternative medicine treatments, ranking first in 75% of studies. There was some evidence for a higher prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine use in autism spectrum disorder compared to other psychiatric disorders and the general population. Approximately half of children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder use complementary and alternative medicine. Doctors should be aware of this and should discuss complementary and alternative medicine use with patients and their carers, especially as the evidence is mixed and some complementary and alternative medicine treatments are potentially harmful.

  14. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use in Modern Obstetrics: A Survey of the Central Association of Obstetricians & Gynecologists Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babbar, Shilpa; Williams, Karen B; Maulik, Dev

    2016-10-05

    The use of complementary and alternative medicine during pregnancy is currently on the rise. A validated survey was conducted at the Central Association of Obstetrician and Gynecologists annual meeting to evaluate the knowledge, attitude, and practice of general obstetricians and gynecologists and maternal-fetal medicine specialists in America. We obtained 128 responses: 73 electronically (57%) and 55 via the paper survey (43%). Forty-five percent reported personally using complementary and alternative medicine and 9% of women respondents used complementary and alternative medicine during pregnancy. Overall, 62% had advised their patients to utilize some form of complementary and alternative medicine in pregnancy. Biofeedback, massage therapy, meditation, and yoga were considered the most effective modalities in pregnancy (median [semi-interquartile range] = 2 [0.5]). Maternal-fetal medicine specialists were significantly more likely to disagree on the use of complementary and alternative medicine for risk reduction of preterm birth compared to obstetricians and gynecologists (P = .03). As the use of complementary and alternative medicine continues to rise in reproductive-age women, obstetricians will play an integral role in incorporating complementary and alternative medicine use with conventional medicine.

  15. Evidence-based complementary and alternative veterinary medicine--a contradiction in terms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlt, Sebastian; Heuwieser, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) like acupuncture, herbal medicine and homeopathy is increasingly used in the treatment of human and animal disease. On the other hand, CAM is discussed controversially, especially in the context of Evidence-Based Veterinary Medicine (EBVM). This paper provides a balanced analysis of the currently available data on CAM in human and veterinary medicine. In conclusion, little rigorous research data concerning the efficacy and safety of CAM has been published. However, acupuncture is gaining increasing acceptance in academic medicine, based on several metaanalyses that show efficacy for specific conditions. In practice, decisions concerning CAM therapies should also be based on the best available evidence provided by scientifically valid data. This implies that CAM interventions must be validated by stringent high quality research to obtain an objective and replicable overview of efficacy and safety. Nevertheless, trials should be designed according to important aspects of CAM therapies (e.g. individual treatment). In conclusion, Evidence-Based Alternative Veterinary Medicine is not a contradiction in terms.

  16. Prevalence and Predictors of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use among Lebanese College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jizi, Lama

    2016-01-01

    In Lebanon, estimates of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) use among college students are not available. CAM practices are not well regulated and some products contain unsafe substances. The purpose of this study was to estimate the prevalence and predictors of CAM use among Lebanese college students using the health belief model. A…

  17. Effects of Complementary and Alternative Medicines (CAM) on the Metabolism and Transport of Anticancer Drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooiman, K.D.

    2013-01-01

    The use of complementary and alternative medicines (CAM), such as herbs and dietary supplements, has become more popular among cancer patients. Cancer patients use these supplements for different reasons such as reduction of side effects and improvement of their quality of life. In general, the use

  18. How Should Alternative Medicine Be Taught to Medical Students and Physicians?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Donald M.

    2001-01-01

    Analyzes alleged deficiencies in medical education and concludes they are based on misrepresentations (for example, that physicians ignore mind-body interactions). Examines fundamental differences between traditional and alternative medicine and asserts that physicians need additional education in order to provide guidance to patients, but that…

  19. A Survey of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Knowledge among Health Educators in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ping; Priestley, Jennifer Lewis; Johnson, Roy D.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is popular among U.S. health care consumers, but no study has examined how much health educators know about CAM. Purpose: To examine the knowledge of basic CAM concepts and common CAM therapies among health educators in the U.S. Methods: An online survey was conducted among 1,299 health…

  20. Prevalence of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use among U.S. College Students: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Amy L. Versnik; Hale, Heidi M.

    2012-01-01

    Research shows that Americans are using increasing amounts of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and that education is a significant predictor of CAM use. The purpose of this systematic review is to summarize key research findings on CAM use rates among U.S. college students and recommend future actions for researchers and health…

  1. Social-Cognitive Predictors of College Student Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versnik Nowak, Amy L.; Dorman, Steve M.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Little research has addressed the prevalence and predictors of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use among undergraduate students. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to: (1) measure the prevalence and type of CAM use among a sample of college undergraduates, and (2) test the significance of select social-cognitive…

  2. Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) Treatments by Parents of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christon, Lillian M.; Mackintosh, Virginia H.; Myers, Barbara J.

    2010-01-01

    Parents of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) may elect to use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatments with their children in place of, or in addition to, conventional treatments. CAM treatments are controversial and understudied and, for most, the efficacy has not been established. The current study (n = 248) examined…

  3. Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Rural Communities: Current Research and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardle, Jon; Lui, Chi-Wai; Adams, Jon

    2012-01-01

    Contexts: The consumption of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in rural areas is a significant contemporary health care issue. An understanding of CAM use in rural health can provide a new perspective on health beliefs and practice as well as on some of the core service delivery issues facing rural health care generally. Purpose: This…

  4. Effect of a Chinese herb medicine formulation, as an alternative for antibiotics, on performance of broilers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guo, F.C.; Kwakkel, R.P.; Soede, J.; Williams, B.A.; Verstegen, M.W.A.

    2004-01-01

    1. A total of 720 female broiler chicks was used to test the effects of 4 dietary concentrations of a Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) formulation (0.25, 0.5, 1 and 2 g/kg), as an alternative for virginiamycin (VRG), on growth performance in broilers. 2. A total of 72 birds from non-supplemented, VRG a

  5. Use of complementary and alternative medicine at Norwegian and Danish hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salomonsen, Laila; Skovgaard, Lasse; la Cour, Søren;

    2011-01-01

    Several studies have found that a high proportion of the population in western countries use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). A one-page questionnaire was sent to all included hospitals in both countries. CAM is presently offered in about 50% of Norwegian hospitals and one...

  6. Exploring Predictors of Health Sciences Students' Attitudes towards Complementary-Alternative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersen, Sverre; Olsen, Rolf V.

    2007-01-01

    This study demonstrated that a "less scientific worldview" predicted health science (HS) students' positive attitude towards "complementary-alternative medicine" (CAM), independently of important background characteristics as gender, pre-college science immersion, age, and type of HS education of the students. A total of 473 students in their…

  7. Combination Treatment of People with Multiple Sclerosis based on Collaboration between Conventional Healthcare Providers and Alternative Practitioners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Lasse; Launsø, Laila; Pedersen, Inge Kryger;

    2011-01-01

    from combined treatments. The purpose of this article is to describe which outcomes PwMS have experienced from combination treatment based on collaboration between conventional healthcare providers and CAM practitioners. A second purpose is to identify and study aspects of the courses of treatment......’s role; b) participants’ perception of treatment function. Outcomes are shown to differ for different PwMS, and results indicate that the combined interventions have played a role in a dynamic and process-oriented interaction with the entire life situation of the individual patient. The results described...

  8. Alternative medicines for AIDS in resource-poor settings: Insights from exploratory anthropological studies in Asia and Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hardon, A.; Desclaux, A.; Egrot, M.; Simon, E.; Micollier, E.; Kyakuwa, M.

    2008-01-01

    The emergence of alternative medicines for AIDS in Asia and Africa was discussed at a satellite symposium and the parallel session on alternative and traditional treatments of the AIDSImpact meeting, held in Marseille, in July 2007. These medicines are heterogeneous, both in their presentation and i

  9. The AMS/Paterson Lecture: becoming alternative? Modern transformations of Chinese medicine in China and in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furth, Charlotte

    2011-01-01

    "Becoming Alternative" offers an overview of the transformations of Chinese medicine at home and abroad since the mid-19th century. After coming into contact with biomedicine, China's indigenous medicine was redefined in terms of national culture and history on the one hand, and a competitive alternative science on the other. Reimagined in terms of scientific syncretism in the PRC, and embraced as a counter-cultural alternative to bio-medicine in the United States, the medicine we call "Chinese" today emerges as a pluralistic system with global reach involving complex accommodations with local medical cultures and institutions both at home and abroad.

  10. The role of complementary and alternative medicine in therapy of multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kes, Vanja Basić; Cesarik, Marijan; Matovina, Lucija Zadro; Zavoreo, Iris; Corić, Lejla; Drnasin, Sara; Demarin, Vida

    2013-12-01

    The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine defines complementary and alternative medicine as a group of diverse medical and health care systems, practices and products that are not generally considered part of conventional medicine. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic disabling disease of the central nervous system that affects people during early adulthood. In spite of many approved medications, the treatment options in MS are limited. Many people with MS explore complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatments to help control their MS and treat their symptoms. Surveys suggest that up to 70% of people with MS have tried one or more CAM treatment for their MS. People with MS using CAM generally report deriving some benefit from therapies. The CAM therapies most frequently used include diet, omega-3 fatty acids and antioxidants. The therapies with highest potential among CAM therapies that warrant further investigation are low-fat diet, omega-3 fatty acids, lipoic acid, and vitamin D supplementation as potential anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective agents in both relapsing and progressive forms of MS. There are very limited researches evaluating the safety and efficacy of CAM in MS. However, in recent years, the USA National Institutes of Health and the National Multiple Sclerosis Society have been actively supporting the researches in this very important area.

  11. Is it really medicine? The traditional and alternative medicine act and informal health economy in the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee Mendoza, Roger

    2009-07-01

    This article examines one developing country's (Philippines) experience in legalizing the age-old but controversial practice and use of traditional, complementary, and alternative medicine (TCAM). The case studies in this article shed light on the problems, challenges, and opportunities offered by herbal therapies, natural products, and alternative healing methods, and the policy context in which they exist. The study finds that normative, axiological, and ethical considerations underlie the legitimacy of TCAM. These become critical when the scientific basis or validity of a therapy, product, or modality is at issue and political consensus is not readily available. The study suggests that both the objective and subjective aspects of TCAM be carefully evaluated in the process of integrating the informal and formal health care systems in developing countries. That, in turn, would require proactive regulatory and development-oriented roles on the part of their governments.

  12. The Challenge of Complementary and Alternative Medicine After Austerity: A Response to Recent Commentaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Aida Isabel

    2015-10-26

    Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) is frequently used in Portugal and it contributes to the improvement of people's health. CAM and Western Medicine (WM) are taken as complements both in the diagnosis and the treatment stage. The Portuguese health system is able to generate certified CAM professionals but the provision of CAM care and services is not included in the national health system. In times of austerity, this is not expected to change and access to CAM care continues to be out-of-pocket health expenditure. But the future for health in Portugal may well involve including CAM therapies in an integrated health system.

  13. A short guide to peer-reviewed, MEDLINE-indexed complementary and alternative medicine journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Sherry; Littman, Lynn; Palmer, Christina; Singh, Gurneet; LaRiccia, Patrick J

    2012-01-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) comprises a multitude of disciplines, for example, acupuncture, ayurvedic medicine, biofeedback, herbal medicine, and homeopathic medicine. While research on CAM interventions has increased and the CAM literature has proliferated since the mid-1990s, a number of our colleagues have expressed difficulties in deciding where to publish CAM articles. In response, we created a short guide to peer-reviewed MEDLINE-indexed journals that publish CAM articles. We examined numerous English-language sources to identify titles that met our criteria, whether specific to or overlapping CAM. A few of the resources in which we found the journal titles that we included are Alternative Medicine Foundation, American Holistic Nurses Association, CINAHL/Nursing Database, Journal Citation Reports database, MEDLINE, PubMed, and Research Council for Complementary Medicine. We organized the 69 selected titles for easy use by creating 2 user-friendly tables, one listing titles in alphabetical order and one listing them in topical categories. A few examples of the topical categories are Acupuncture, CAM (general), Chinese Medicine, Herbal/Plant/Phytotherapy, Neuroscience/Psychology, Nursing/Clinical Care. Our study is the first to list general CAM journals, specialty CAM journals, and overlapping mainstream journals that are peer reviewed, in English, and indexed in MEDLINE. Our goal was to assist both authors seeking publication and mainstream journal editors who receive an overabundance of publishable articles but must recommend that authors seek publication elsewhere due to space and priority issues. Publishing in journals indexed by and included in MEDLINE (or PubMed) ensures that citations to articles will be found easily.

  14. Alternative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vitamins and minerals important to the eye include zinc and copper, antioxidant vitamins C, E, and A ( ... positive impact on other glaucoma risk factors including diabetes and high blood pressure. In a recent study, ...

  15. How Do Parents Think about the Effect of Food and Alternative Medicine on their Epileptic Children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Mahmoud; Meysamie, Alipasha; Jahanian, Alireza

    2010-01-01

    Objective Parents of epileptic children are willing to know if specific foods precipitate or aggravate their kids' seizures. Nonetheless conclusive data are limited. Alternative medicine has become a popular approach to many diseases in the world and there are limited data about this approach to epilepsy in Iran. We tried to evaluate attitude of parents of epileptic children to food-epilepsy relationship and alternative therapeutic approach to epilepsy. Methods We carried out a cross-sectional study with analytic aspect at Children's Medical Center, Tehran, Iran in 2008, by asking the parents of epileptic children to fill out a valid and excellently reliable questionnaire. We collected parents‘ attitude and analyzed it using SPSS software. Findings One-hundred and fifty one families participated in the study. Fifty-nine of participants (39.1%) believed that foods had no effect on epilepsy. Fifty one cases (33.8%) said that foods might have negative or positive effect on epilepsy and 27.1% (41 cases) had no idea. Higher percent of parents believed in food-epilepsy relation in cases that fathers had educational levels above high school graduation. Sixteen cases (10.6%) said that alternative medicine might improve epilepsy and 55% had no idea about efficacy of this approach to epilepsy. Conclusion Compared with previous published study from Iran, parents of epileptic children believed less in food-epilepsy relation. Majority of parents either believed that foods had no effect on epilepsy or had no idea. More than half of parents had no idea about efficacy of alternative medicine to epilepsy. Only a few of them believed in ameliorating effects of alternative medicine on epilepsy. PMID:23056703

  16. Effects of a graduate-level interprofessional education program on adult nurse practitioner student and internal medicine resident physician attitudes towards interprofessional care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanyok, Laura A; Walton-Moss, Benita; Tanner, Elizabeth; Stewart, Rosalyn W; Becker, Kathleen

    2013-11-01

    This article describes the development, implementation and evaluation of a longitudinal interprofessional education (IPE) experience for adult nurse practitioner students and internal medicine residents. This experience focused on providing care for complex community based patients during clinic and home visits, preceded by didactic learning that emphasized understanding one another's professional roles and education, teamwork and conflict management. Evaluation demonstrated significant improvements in attitudes and beliefs associated with professional role, respect among health professions' disciplines and conflict management. Results with regards to attitudes towards IPE and interprofessional practice, and valuing teamwork training were mixed. In particular, the curricular intervention did not change participants'self-reported skill in communication and did not affect attitudes and beliefs towards effects of interprofessional education on patient outcomes.

  17. ALTERNATIVE MEDICINES FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF AIDS FROM NATURE A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHINMAYA KESHARI SAHOO

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS is caused by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection which leads to severe suppression of immune functions where CD4+ cell count falls below 200 cells/µl. AIDS is a real threat to the health of mankind and the search for effective therapies is still of great importance. Antiretroviral therapy for the treatment of AIDS is costly and many limitations are associated with antiretroviral therapy. Hence, herbal medicines are frequently used as alternate medicines by individuals living with HIV.Numerous plant-derived compounds have been evaluated for inhibitory effects on HIV replication and many have been found to inhibit different steps in HIV replication cycle. The aim of this review is to give an idea for herbal medicines which are used to inhibit HIV.

  18. The effects of complementary and alternative medicine on the speech of patients with depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraas, Michael; Solloway, Michele

    2004-05-01

    It is well documented that patients suffering from depression exhibit articulatory timing deficits and speech that is monotonous and lacking pitch variation. Traditional remediation of depression has left many patients with adverse side effects and ineffective outcomes. Recent studies indicate that many Americans are seeking complementary and alternative forms of medicine to supplement traditional therapy approaches. The current investigation wishes to determine the efficacy of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) on the remediation of speech deficits associated with depression. Subjects with depression and normal controls will participate in an 8-week treatment session using polarity therapy, a form of CAM. Subjects will be recorded producing a series of spontaneous and narrative speech samples. Acoustic analysis of mean fundamental frequency (F0), variation in F0 (standard deviation of F0), average rate of F0 change, and pause and utterance durations will be conducted. Differences pre- and post-CAM therapy between subjects with depression and normal controls will be discussed.

  19. The role of complementary and alternative medicine in the treatment of eating disorders: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Sarah; Smith, Caroline A; Hay, Phillipa

    2016-04-01

    This systematic review critically appraises the role of complementary and alternative medicine in the treatment of those with an eating disorder. Sixteen studies were included in the review. The results of this review show that the role of complementary and alternative medicine in the treatment of those with an eating disorder is unclear and further studies should be conducted. A potential role was found for massage and bright light therapy for depression in those with Bulimia Nervosa and a potential role for acupuncture and relaxation therapy, in the treatment of State Anxiety, for those with an eating disorder. The role of these complementary therapies in treating eating disorders should only be provided as an adjunctive treatment only.

  20. Effects of Complementary and Alternative Medicines (CAM) on the Metabolism and Transport of Anticancer Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Mooiman, K.D.

    2013-01-01

    The use of complementary and alternative medicines (CAM), such as herbs and dietary supplements, has become more popular among cancer patients. Cancer patients use these supplements for different reasons such as reduction of side effects and improvement of their quality of life. In general, the use of CAM is considered as safe. However, concomitant use of CAM and anticancer drugs could result in serious safety issues since CAM have the potential to cause pharmacokinetic interactions with conv...

  1. Patterns of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use in Children With Common Neurological Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Treat, Lauren; Liesinger, Juliette; Ziegenfuss, Jeanette Y; Humeniuk, Katherine; Prasad, Kavita; Tilburt, Jon C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Recent literature suggests that one in nine children in the United States uses some type of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Children with challenging neurological conditions such as headache, migraine, and seizures may seek CAM in their attempts at self-care. Our objective was to describe CAM use in children with these conditions. Methods: We compared use of CAM among children aged 3 to 17 years with and without common neurological conditions (headaches, migraines, s...

  2. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use in the US Adult Low Back Pain Population

    OpenAIRE

    Ghildayal, Neha; Johnson, Pamela Jo; Evans, Roni L; Kreitzer, Mary Jo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many people suffering from low back pain (LBP) have found conventional medical treatments to be ineffective for managing their LBP and are increasingly turning to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) to find pain relief. A comprehensive picture of CAM use in the LBP population, including all of the most commonly used modalities, is needed. Study Objective: To examine prevalence and perceived benefit of CAM use within the US LBP population by limiting vs nonlimiting LBP and...

  3. Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Cancer Pain: An Overview of Systematic Reviews

    OpenAIRE

    Yanju Bao; Xiangying Kong; Liping Yang; Rui Liu; Zhan Shi; Weidong Li; Baojin Hua; Wei Hou

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objective. Now with more and more published systematic reviews of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) on adult cancer pain, it is necessary to use the methods of overview of systematic review to summarize available evidence, appraise the evidence level, and give suggestions to future research and practice. Methods. A comprehensive search (the Cochrane Library, PubMed, Embase, and ISI Web of Knowledge) was conducted to identify all systematic reviews or meta-analyses of...

  4. Herbal medicine--sets the heart racing!

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGovern, E

    2010-07-01

    The potential for pharmaceuticals to produce side effects and drug interactions is well known to medical practitioners and the lay public alike. However, the potential for alternative medicines to produce such effects is less widely known. We describe a potentially dangerous interaction between a herbal medicine and concomitant selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor (SSRI) ingestion.

  5. [Dental materials. A critical assessment from the viewpoint of alternative medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weilenmann, Urs

    2009-01-01

    Practical experience with unconventional treatments suggests that the paradigm used by conventional medical science to assess the impact of dental materials must be broadened. First, several diagnostic methods commonly employed to evaluate allergies and toxicological burdens are described and subjected to a critical analysis. These diagnostics include test methods used in the field of complementary medicine in addition to the traditional epicutaneous tests, the Lymphocyte Transformation Test and quantitative analysis of blood and urine. Finally, the fundamentals of toxicology in the low-dose range are discussed; in this context special attention is paid to possible factors enhancing the effect of various substance groups. The impact of dental materials is also viewed from the perspective of environmental toxicology. In addition, the authors discuss various paradigms for obtaining evidence of multifactorial causes and show why nonuniform results are obtained with dental materials. Reference is also made to new theories broadening our understanding of biological processes such as the Biphoton Theory, which has been the subject of increased discussion among quantum physicists in recent years. It becomes evident in this context that there are to date no evidence-based methods for demonstrating the absolute non-toxicity of dental materials. Finally, it is shown - on the basis of various reports provided by a practitioner of complementary medicine in private practice - that, in patients with chronic diseases, unconventional therapies integrating these insights may by the only effective therapeutic options to succeed.

  6. Science Translational Medicine – improving human health care worldwide by providing an interdisciplinary forum for idea exchange between basic scientists and clinical research practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forsythe, Katherine

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Science Translational Medicine’s mission is to improve human health care worldwide by providing a forum for communication and interdisciplinary idea exchange between basic scientists and clinical research practitioners from all relevant established and emerging disciplines. The weekly journal debuted in October 2009 and is published by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS, the publisher of Science and Science Signaling. The journal features peer-reviewed research articles, perspectives and commentary, and is guided by an international Advisory Board, led by Chief Scientific Adviser, Elias A. Zerhouni, M.D., former Director of the National Institutes of Health, and Senior Scientific Adviser, Elazer R. Edelman, M.D., Ph.D., Thomas D. and Virginia W. Cabot Professor of Health Sciences and Technology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The Science Translational Medicine editorial team is led by Katrina L. Kelner, Ph.D., AAAS. A profound transition is required for the science of translational medicine. Despite 50 years of advances in our fundamental understanding of human biology and the emergence of powerful new technologies, the rapid transformation of this knowledge into effective health measures is not keeping pace with the challenges of global health care. Creative experimental approaches, novel technologies, and new ways of conducting scientific explorations at the interface of established and emerging disciplines are now required to an unprecedented degree if real progress is to be made. To aid in this reinvention, Science and AAAS have created a new interdisciplinary journal, Science Translational Medicine. The following interview exemplefies the pioneering content found in Science Translational Medicine. It is an excerpt from a Podcast interview with Dr. Samuel Broder, former director of the National Cancer Institute and current Chief Medical Officer at Celera. The Podcast was produced in tangent with Dr

  7. Implicit and explicit attitudes towards conventional and complementary and alternative medicine treatments: Introduction of an Implicit Association Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, James A; Hohmann, Cynthia; Lister, Kelsi; Albertyn, Riani; Bradshaw, Renee; Johnson, Christine

    2016-06-01

    This study examined associations between anticipated future health behaviour and participants' attitudes. Three Implicit Association Tests were developed to assess safety, efficacy and overall attitude. They were used to examine preference associations between conventional versus complementary and alternative medicine among 186 participants. A structural equation model suggested only a single implicit association, rather than three separate domains. However, this single implicit association predicted additional variance in anticipated future use of complementary and alternative medicine beyond explicit. Implicit measures should give further insight into motivation for complementary and alternative medicine use.

  8. CAM practitioners in the Australian health workforce: an underutilized resource

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace Sandra

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CAM practitioners are a valuable but underutilizes resource in Australian health care. Despite increasing public support for complementary and alternative medicine (CAM little is known about the CAM workforce. Apart from the registered professions of chiropractic, osteopathy and Chinese medicine, accurate information about the number of CAM practitioners in the workforce has been difficult to obtain. It appears that many non-registered CAM practitioners, although highly qualified, are not working to their full capacity. Discussion Increasing public endorsement of CAM stands in contrast to the negative attitude toward the CAM workforce by some members of the medical and other health professions and by government policy makers. The marginalisation of the CAM workforce is evident in prejudicial attitudes held by some members of the medical and other health professions and its exclusion from government policy making. Inconsistent educational standards has meant that non-registered CAM practitioners, including highly qualified and competent ones, are frequently overlooked. Legitimising their contribution to the health workforce could alleviate workforce shortages and provide opportunities for redesigned job roles and new multidisciplinary teams. Priorities for better utilisation of the CAM workforce include establishing a guaranteed minimum education standard for more CAM occupation groups through national registration, providing interprofessional education that includes CAM practitioners, developing courses to upgrade CAM practitioners' professional skills in areas of indentified need, and increasing support for CAM research. Summary Marginalisation of the CAM workforce has disadvantaged those qualified and competent CAM practitioners who practise evidence-informed medicine on the basis of many years of university training. Legitimising and expanding the important contribution of CAM practitioners could alleviate projected health

  9. Modes of Embodiment in Breast Cancer Patients Using Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salamonsen, Anita; Kruse, Tove Elisabeth; Eriksen, Sissel H.

    2012-01-01

    of bodily experiences among breast cancer patients who were using CAM as a supplement or an alternative to conventional treatment (CT). Our findings based on qualitative interviews with 13 women suggest that bodily experiences were particularly important when positioned outside conventional health care......Breast cancer patients are frequent users of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). They often have complex reasons for, and experiences from, their use of CAM. Bodily experiences are important and almost unexplored elements in CAM use. Our aim was to explore the meaning and importance...... prior to medical diagnosis and as users of CAM as alternative to CT. We introduce three central modes of embodiment related to CAM use: the right to one’s body, the body used as a gauge, and the body used as a guide. Patients’ positioning between treatment systems should be further explored from...

  10. US spending on complementary and alternative medicine during 2002-08 plateaued, suggesting role in reformed health system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Matthew A; Martin, Brook I; Coulter, Ian D; Weeks, William B

    2013-01-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine services in the United States are an approximately $9 billion market each year, equal to 3 percent of national ambulatory health care expenditures. Unlike conventional allopathic health care, complementary and alternative medicine is primarily paid for out of pocket, although some services are covered by most health insurance. Examining trends in demand for complementary and alternative medicine services in the United States reported in the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey during 2002-08, we found that use of and spending on these services, previously on the rise, have largely plateaued. The higher proportion of out-of-pocket responsibility for payment for services may explain the lack of growth. Our findings suggest that any attempt to reduce national health care spending by eliminating coverage for complementary and alternative medicine would have little impact at best. Should some forms of complementary and alternative medicine-for example, chiropractic care for back pain-be proven more efficient than allopathic and specialty medicine, the inclusion of complementary and alternative medicine providers in new delivery systems such as accountable care organizations could help slow growth in national health care spending.

  11. Systematic review: Complementary and alternative medicine in the irritable bowel syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hussain, Z

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Complementary and alternative medical therapies and practices are widely employed in the treatment of the irritable bowel syndrome. AIM: To review the usage of complementary and alternative medicine in the irritable bowel syndrome, and to assess critically the basis and evidence for its use. METHODS: A systematic review of complementary and alternative medical therapies and practices in the irritable bowel syndrome was performed based on literature obtained through a Medline search. RESULTS: A wide variety of complementary and alternative medical practices and therapies are commonly employed by irritable bowel syndrome patients both in conjunction with and in lieu of conventional therapies. As many of these therapies have not been subjected to controlled clinical trials, some, at least, of their efficacy may reflect the high-placebo response rate that is characteristic of irritable bowel syndrome. Of those that have been subjected to clinical trials most have involved small poor quality studies. There is, however, evidence to support efficacy for hypnotherapy, some forms of herbal therapy and certain probiotics in irritable bowel syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: Doctors caring for irritable bowel syndrome patients need to recognize the near ubiquity of complementary and alternative medical use among this population and the basis for its use. All complementary and alternative medicine is not the same and some, such as hypnotherapy, forms of herbal therapy, specific diets and probiotics, may well have efficacy in irritable bowel syndrome. Above all, we need more science and more controlled studies; the absence of truly randomized placebo-controlled trials for many of these therapies has limited meaningful progress in this area.

  12. [USE OF COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE AMONG FAMILY MEDICINE PATIENTS--EXAMPLE OF THE TOWN OF ČAKOVEC].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Ksenija; Munđar, Roko; Sović, Slavica; Bergman-Marković, Biserka; Janev Holcer, Nataša

    2014-12-01

    The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is widespread around the world including Croatia. The number of studies that investigate both quantitative and qualitative use of CAM in Croatia is limited. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of CAM among family medicine patients in the town of Čakovec and the rate they report it to their family doctor. This was a cross-sectional study in a sample of 300 patients that visited primary health center for any reason. We used anonymous questionnaire already employed in a previous investigation (Čižmešija et al. 2008), which describes socioeconomic characteristics, modalities of CAM use, and reasons for use. We also added questions on the type of herbs used and use of over-the-counter vitamin and mineral supplements. On data analysis we used descriptive statistics, χ2-test and Fisher's exact test, while the level of statistical significance was set at p ≤ 0.05. The response rate was 76%. Out of the total number of patients, 82% used some modality of CAM. Women, patients with secondary school education, employed and retired persons used CAM more often. Students and pupils reported least use of CAM. The most commonly used were herbs (87%), bioenergy (29%), diet therapy (28%), chiropractics (22%), and homeopathy and acupuncture (11% each). Vitamin and mineral supplements were used by 77% of study subjects. CAM was most frequently used for respiratory, urinary and musculoskeletal problems, as well as to improve overall health condition. Of the respondents that reported CAM use, 55% believed it would help them, 43% used it because they wanted to try something new, while only 2% indicated dissatisfaction with their physician as the reason for using CAM. Statistically, there were more subjects that used CAM and did not notify their family doctor about it, which could indicate poor communication between family doctors and health care users. Our results are consistent with a previous quantitative study

  13. Prevalence and Correlates of Postdiagnosis Initiation of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Among Patients at a Comprehensive Cancer Center

    OpenAIRE

    Perlman, Adam; Lontok, Oliver; Huhmann, Maureen; Parrott, J. Scott; Simmons, Leigh Ann; Patrick-Miller, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Patients with cancer increasingly use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in conjunction with conventional oncology treatments. This study looks at the prevalence and correlates of individual CAM modalities initiated after cancer diagnosis.

  14. Anti-cancer effects of traditional Korean wild vegetables in complementary and alternative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Hyun-Mok; Yu, Kwang-Won; Cho, Sung-Dae; Cheong, Sun Hee; Kwon, Ki Han

    2016-02-01

    This research study explored the anti-cancer effects of natural materials in South Korea. Although South Korea has a long history of traditional medicine, many natural materials of South Korea have not yet been introduced to the rest of the world because of language barriers and inconsistent study conditions. In the past 3 years, 56 papers introducing 56 natural materials, which have anti-cancer effects, have been published by scientists in South Korea. Further, these studies have introduced five kinds of natural materials presented in research papers that were written in Korean and are therefore virtually unknown overseas. The anti-cancer effects were confirmed by 2-3 cancer markers in the majority of the studies, with the most common targets being breast cancer cells and gastric cancer cells. These cancers have the greatest incidence in South Korea. The natural materials studied not only exhibit anti-cancer activity but also display anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative stress, and anti-diabetic activities. They have not yet been used for the direct treatment of disease but have potential as medicinal materials for alternative and complementary medicine for the treatment of many modern diseases. Many natural materials of South Korea are already known all over the world, and with this study, we hope to further future research to learn more about these natural medicines.

  15. The World Summit of Harmonization on Traditional, Alternative and Complementary Medicine (TACM) in Lima, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Gustavo F; Aguilar, José; Villar, Martha

    2010-06-01

    The World Summit of Harmonization on Traditional, Alternative and Complementary Medicine (TACM) was held in Lima, Peru, November 7-11, 2007, with almost 600 worldwide participants. This meeting was organized by Peruvian Medical College, the institution that affiliates and authorizes all physicians to practice medicine in Peru. The meeting included seven sections starting with an overview on the current status of the TACM. The second section included experiences from different countries on regulations and quality control in products and services used in the TACM. The worldwide experience of education and training in TACM was a very important part of the meeting in which speakers from Spain, Germany, Argentina, Italy, Brazil, Cuba and Peru shared their experience. The meeting included topics on homeopathy, acupuncture, mind-body medicine, neural therapy, chiropraxis, among others. Two final sessions were related to the ways of linking Traditional medicine to the national Health Systems in the Latin America countries and also the association between bio-commerce and TACM including intellectual properties and bio-piracy.

  16. Dynamical energy systems and modern physics: fostering the science and spirit of complementary and alternative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, G E; Russek, L G

    1997-05-01

    When systems theory is carefully applied to the concept of energy, some novel and far-reaching implications for modern physics and complementary medicine emerge. The heart of systems theory is dynamic interactions: systems do not simply act on systems, they interact with them in complex ways. By definition, systems at any level (e.g., physical, biological, social, ecological) are open to information, energy, and matter to varying degrees, and therefore interact with other systems to varying degrees. We first show how resonance between two tuning forks, a classic demonstration in physics, can be seen to reflect synchronized dynamic interactions over time. We then derive how the dynamic interaction of systems in mutual recurrent feedback relationships naturally create dynamic "memories" for their interactions over time. The mystery of how a photon (or electron) "knows" ahead of time whether to function as a particle or wave in the single slit/double slit quantum physics paradigm is potentially solved when energetic interactions inherent in the experimental system are recognized. The observation that energy decreases with the square of distance is shown not to be immutable when viewed from a dynamical energy systems perspective. Implications for controversial claims in complementary and alternative medicine, such as memory for molecules retained in water (homeopathy), remote diagnosis, and prayer and healing, are considered. A dynamical energy systems framework can facilitate the development of what might be termed "relationship consciousness," which has the potential to nurture both the science and spirit of complementary medicine and might help to create integrated medicine.

  17. Cultural consonance, constructions of science and co-existence: a review of the integration of traditional, complementary and alternative medicine in low- and middle-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmi, Josyula K; Nambiar, Devaki; Narayan, Venkatesh; Sathyanarayana, Tamysetty N; Porter, John; Sheikh, Kabir

    2015-10-01

    This review examined the determinants, patterns and imports of official recognition, and incorporation of different traditional, complementary and alternative systems of medicine (TCAM) in the public health establishment of low- and middle-income countries, with a particular focus on India. Public health systems in most countries have tended to establish health facilities centred on allopathy, and then to recognize or derecognize different TCAM based on evidence or judgement, to arrive at health-care configurations that include several systems of medicine with disparate levels of authority, jurisdiction and government support. The rationale for the inclusion of TCAM providers in the public health workforce ranges from the need for personnel to address the disease burden borne by the public health system, to the desirability of providing patients with a choice of therapeutic modalities, and the nurturing of local culture. Integration, mostly described as a juxtaposition of different systems of medical practice, is often implemented as a system of establishing personnel with certification in different medical systems, in predominantly allopathic health-care facilities, to practise allopathic medicine. A hierarchy of systems of medicine, often unacknowledged, is exercised in most societies, with allopathy at the top, certain TCAM systems next and local healing traditions last. The tools employed by TCAM practitioners in diagnosis, research, pharmacy, marketing and education and training, which are seen to increasingly emulate those of allopathy, are sometimes inappropriate for use in therapeutic systems with widely divergent epistemologies, which call for distinct research paradigms. The coexistence of numerous systems of medicine, while offering the population greater choice, and presumably enhancing geographical access to health care as well, is often fraught with tensions related to the coexistence of philosophically disparate, even opposed, disciplines, with

  18. Traditional complementary and alternative medicine: knowledge, attitudes and practices of health care workers in HIV and AIDS clinics in Durban hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbutho, Nozuko P; Gqaleni, Nceba; Korporaal, Charmaine M

    2012-01-01

    Traditional complementary and alternative medicine (TCAM) has been reported to be commonly used among individuals with HIV and AIDS disease. However a lack of communication between health care workers (HCWs) and patients as well as between HCWs and TCAM practitioners has been identified as one of the challenges that may adversely affect treatment of HIV and AIDS patients. With improved and sustained communication HCWs, patients and TCAM practitioners would be able to make informed decisions with regards to best treatment practices based on the knowledge of what is safe, effective and what is not. In order to establish a baseline understanding of the current status of interaction and communication between HCWs and TCAM profession in Durban, South Africa, the purpose of the study was to investigate the knowledge, attitudes and practices of HCWs in the HIV and AIDS clinics towards TCAM professions. Data was collected by means of anonymous self-administered questionnaire which was distributed to HCWs in the HIV and AIDS clinics. Out of 161 HCWs in the HIV and AIDS clinics 81 HCWs returned the questionnaires resulting in 50% response rate. The results showed that participants did not possess a basic knowledge of TCAM. Out of 81 participants 23 (28%) scored zero in a true or false knowledge assessment question.

  19. Perceptions of interprofessional education and practice within a complementary and alternative medicine institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadar, Gena E; Vosko, Andrew; Sackett, Michael; Thompson, H Garrett Rush

    2015-01-01

    A survey of the constituents of a complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) institution was conducted to identify perceptions of interprofessional education (IPE) and practice (IPP). A 22 question survey was developed and administered to: chiropractic students, acupuncture and oriental medicine students, faculty and alumni of both professions, staff and administrators. The majority of the 321 respondents demonstrated positive perceptions of IPE and IPP, however many reported a lack of understanding of the distinct roles of select healthcare professions. The study also suggested that the campus community is not homogenous in its understanding of CAM or allopathic professions, or is it homogenous in its understanding of IPE and IPP. While the overall positive attitudes toward IPE and IPP imply a willingness to improve collaboration between these groups, the lack of understanding of profession-specific roles must be addressed to support effective implementation of IPE.

  20. Biases in intuitive reasoning and belief in complementary and alternative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindeman, Marjaana

    2011-03-01

    Very little is known about the reasoning underlying beliefs in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). This study examined whether CAM beliefs can be better explained with intuitive reasoning, paranormal beliefs and ontological confusions of physical, biological and mental phenomena than with 12 variables that have typically been used to explore the popularity of CAM, namely gender, education, income, age, health, desire to control treatment, satisfaction with conventional medicine and world view (unconventional, feministic, environmentalist, exotical and natural). A representative sample of Finnish people (N = 1092) participated in the study. The results showed that intuitive thinking, paranormal beliefs and ontological confusions predicted 34% of the variation in CAM beliefs, whereas the 12 other variables increased the prediction only by 4%. The results help to explain individual, cultural and situational differences in the popularity of CAM and to differentiate between CAM statements that can be scientifically examined from those that cannot.

  1. The relationship between marriage and family therapists and complementary and alternative medicine approaches: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Karen L; Winek, Jon L; Becvar, Dorothy S

    2006-01-01

    Respondents to a mail survey of a random sample (N = 424) of Clinical Members of the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy provided information about their contexts of practice, use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), and relationships with CAM providers. Consistent with both national trends and the experience of psychologists as reported in a similar survey, the results of this survey suggest that marriage and family therapists have been affected significantly by and have a growing awareness of CAM practices. Limitations of the study and implications for the field are discussed.

  2. EU FP7 project 'CAMbrella' to build European research network for complementary and alternative medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weidenhammer, Wolfgang; Lewith, George; Falkenberg, Torkel

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The status of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) within the EU needs clarification. The definition and terminology of CAM is heterogeneous. The therapies, legal status, regulations and approaches used vary from country to country but there is widespread use by EU citizens. A...... review open access publications and a final conference, with emphasis on current and future EU policies, addressing different target audiences....... network involving centres of research excellence for collaborative projects, to develop consensus-based terminology to describe CAM interventions, to create a knowledge base that facilitates the understanding of patient demand for CAM and its prevalence, to review the current legal status and policies...

  3. Complementary and alternative medicine: herbs, phytochemicals and vitamins and their immunologic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainardi, Timothy; Kapoor, Simi; Bielory, Leonard

    2009-02-01

    Complementary and alternative medicines (CAMs) are used in more than 80% of the world's population and are becoming an increasing component of the US health care system, with more than 70% of the population using CAM at least once and annual spending reaching as much as $34 billion. Since the inception of the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, there has been an enormous increase in the number of basic science and therapy-based clinical trials exploring CAM. The subspecialty of allergy and immunology represents a particularly fertile area with a large number of CAM therapies that have been shown to affect the immune system. Recent work has uncovered potential biochemical mechanisms involved in the immunomodulatory pathway of many supplemental vitamins (A, D, and E) that appear to affect the differentiation of CD4(+) cell T(H)1 and T(H)2 subsets. Other research has shown that herbs such as resveratrol, quercetin, and magnolol may affect transcription factors such as nuclear factor-kappaB and the signal transducer and activator of transcription/Janus kinase pathways with resultant changes in cytokines and inflammatory mediators. Clinically, there have been hundreds of trials looking at the effect of CAM on asthma, allergic rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis. This article reviews the history of CAM and its use among patients, paying special attention to new research focusing on herbals, phytochemicals, and vitamins and their potential interaction with the immune system.

  4. Knowledge and attitudes towards complementary and alternative medicine among medical students in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akan Hulya

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective This study aims to examine knowledge and attitudes towards Complementary and Alternative Medicine among medical students in Turkey, and find out whether they want to be trained in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out between October and December 2010 among medical students. Data were collected from a total of seven medical schools. Findings The study included 943 medical students. The most well known methods among the students were herbal treatment (81.2 %, acupuncture (80.8 %, hypnosis (78.8 %, body-based practices including massage (77 % and meditation (65.2 %, respectively. Acupuncture, aromatherapy, herbal treatment and meditation were better known among female participants compared to males (p  Conclusions Majority of the medical students were familiar with the CAM methods widely used in Turkey, while most of them had positive attitudes towards CAM as well as willingness to receive training on the subject, and they were likely to recommend CAM methods to their patients in their future professional lives. With its gradual scientific development and increasing popularity, there appears a need for a coordinated policy in integrating CAM into the medical curriculum, by taking expectations of and feedback from medical students into consideration in setting educational standards.

  5. Utilization and practice of traditional/complementary/alternative medicine (TM/CAM) in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltzer, Karl

    2009-03-07

    The aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review of published and unpublished research investigating the prevalence of traditional, complementary and alternative medicine (TMCAM) use in the general population. Results found that use of a traditional and/or faith healer seemed to have decreased over the past 13 years (from a range of 3.6-12.7% to 0.1%). The prevalence of traditional male circumcision was found to be 24.8% generally and 31.9% among the African Black racial group. The range of use of alternative and complementary medicine was from 0% to 2.2%. Local utilization surveys of TMCAM for the last illness episode or in the past year showed a variation in use of 6.1% to 38.5%. The prevalence of conditions treated at different TMCAM out-patients settings ranged from chronic conditions, complex of supernatural or psychosocial problems, mental illness, chronic conditions, acute conditions, generalized pain, HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. TM and probably CAM is used by substantial proportions of the general population, but differences in study design and methodological limitations make it difficult to compare prevalence estimates.

  6. Complementary and Alternative Medicine in the Pediatrics with Leukemia: A Narrative Review Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Miladinia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundFor using of complementary and alternative medicine methods (CAM in the leukemia pediatrics than other types of cancer, we have two great challenges; first challenge is their safety and risks and second challenge is study gaps in this field. Regarding to these challenges, this study is a narrative review of some CAM methods in the leukemia pediatrics from the perspective of their safety, risks and study gaps.Materials and MethodsIn this narrative review study searched both international electronic databases including ISI Web of science, PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL, ISC, Embase, Scopus, Google Scholar and also, Iranian electronic databases including Magiran, Medlib and SID. Also, searches were performed separately in the specialized journals in the field of leukemia pediatrics and complementary and alternative medicine research.ResultsMusic therapy, gentle yoga movements, gentle massage types are quite safe for leukemia pediatrics. But, use of heavy yoga movements, massages with deep pressure, acupressure and acupuncture can be dangerous for leukemia pediatrics (risks of bleeding and or infection. Also, this study showed that, the number of investigations about the use of CAM in the leukemia pediatrics is very limited; especially in the field of yoga and acupuncture.ConclusionThe results of this study can be a basis both for chose of safe CAM method in these children and a basis for future studies on the basis of identified study gaps in this review study.

  7. The Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine among Lebanese Adults: Results from a National Survey

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    F. Naja

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To examine the prevalence and correlates of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM use in Lebanon. Methods. A cross-sectional survey was conducted through face to face interviews on a nationally representative sample of 1,475 Lebanese adults. The survey questionnaire explored the sociodemographic and health related characteristics as well as the types and modes of CAM use. The main outcome in this study was the use of CAM during the last 12 months. Results. Prevalence of CAM use was 29.87% with “folk herbs” being the most commonly used (75%. Two out of five CAM users indicated using it as alternative to conventional therapies and only 28.4% of users disclosed the use of CAM to their physician. CAM use was significantly associated with higher income, presence of a chronic disease, and lack of access to needed health care. Lower odds of CAM use were observed among older adults and those with a higher education level. Conclusions. This study revealed a high prevalence of CAM use in Lebanon. Health policy and decision makers need to facilitate proper regulation and integration of CAM into mainstream medicine and educate health care providers and the public alike on the safe and effective use of CAM therapies.

  8. Evidence-based practice method of integrative Chinese and Western medicine based on literature retrieval through PICO question and complementary and alternative medicine topics.

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    Yan, Xiu-feng; Ni, Qing; Wei, Jun-ping; Xu, Hao

    2010-12-01

    An evidence-based practice method according to literature retrieval through PICO (Patients, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome) questions and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) topics, which can obtain helpful evidence for guiding clinical practice, was introduced with a practical example in this paper. The knowledge of diseases and Western medicine treatment can be acquired by literature retrieval through PICO question, while searching by CAM topics may provide evidence for Chinese medicine (CM). Thus the author held that literature retrieval through both PICO question and CAM topics was an ideal evidence-based practice method for integrative Chinese and Western medicine (ICWM). However, since the standard in CM evidence hierarchy is still under study, the value of the CAM thematic retrieval method remains very limited. In the future, studies on the definition and hierarchy of CM evidences and the herb-drug interaction between Western and Chinese medicine during a combination therapy should be strengthened to improve the status of ICWM evidence-based practice.

  9. Information management and complementary alternative medicine: the anatomy of information about CAMs through PubMed.

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    Corrao, Salvatore; Argano, Christiano; Colomba, Daniela; Ippolito, Calogero; Gargano, Vincenzo; Arcoraci, Vincenzo; Licata, Giuseppe

    2013-10-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing interest about complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), and the use of CAM interventions has become more common among people. For these reasons, health professionals must be able to effectively manage information in this field of knowledge according to an evidence-based point of view. This study assessed the anatomy of the available information about CAMs using PubMed, to give practical instructions to manage information in this field. We also analyzed the anatomy of information according to each alternative medicine branch, narrow and broad search methods, subset filters for indexed-for-Medline and non-indexed citations, and different publication types including randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and meta-analyses. Our results demonstrated that the use of CAMs subset (supplied by PubMed search engine) leads to a great number of citations determining an information overload. Our data reveal that it would be more useful to search for the CAM separately, identifying specific items and study design. Moreover, we found the largest number of randomized clinical trials and meta-analyses related to herbal medicine and acupuncture, neither RCTs nor meta-analyses were available for bach and flower remedies, auriculoacupuncture, iridology, and pranotherapy. For the first time, our study gives a comprehensive view of the anatomy of information regarding CAMs and each branch of them. We suggest a methodological approach to face with searching information about this emerging issue from an evidence-based point of view. Finally, our data pointed out some "grey zones" since neither RCTs nor meta-analyses were available for some CAMs.

  10. Traditional, complementary and alternative medical systems and their contribution to personalisation, prediction and prevention in medicine-person-centred medicine.

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    Roberti di Sarsina, Paolo; Alivia, Mauro; Guadagni, Paola

    2012-11-06

    Traditional, complementary and alternative medical (TCAM) systems contribute to the foundation of person-centred medicine (PCM), an epistemological orientation for medical science which places the person as a physical, psychological and spiritual entity at the centre of health care and of the therapeutic process. PCM wishes to broaden the bio-molecular reductionistic approach of medical science towards an integration that allows people, doctors, nurses, health-care professionals and patients to become the real protagonists of the health-care scene. The doctor or caregiver needs to act out of empathy to meet the unique value of each human being, which unfolds over the course of a lifetime from conception to natural death. Knowledge of the human being should not be instrumental to economic or political interests, ideology, theories or religious dogma. Research needs to be broadened with methodological tools to investigate person-centred medical interventions. Salutogenesis is a fundamental principle of PCM, promoting health and preventing illness by strengthening the individual's self-healing abilities. TCAM systems also give tools to predict the insurgence of illness and treat it before the appearance of overt organic disease. A task of PCM is to educate people to take better care of their physical, psychological and spiritual health. Health-care education needs to be broadened to give doctors and health-care workers of the future the tools to act in innovative and highly differentiated ways, always guided by deep respect for individual autonomy, personal culture, religion and beliefs.

  11. Pharmacy students′ use, knowledge and attitudes toward complementary and alternative medicine at Riyadh region, Saudi Arabia

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    Hussain Abdulrahman Al-Omar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The survey was conducted to explore use, knowledge and attitudes toward complementary and alternative medicine (CAM among pharmacy students at the college of pharmacy, King Saud University. A total of 133 fourth- and fifth-year pharmacy students completed a questionnaire designed to explore their use, knowledge and attitudes toward CAM therapies at the college of pharmacy, King Saud University. Study lasted for 3 months from 1 st of October until 31 st of December in 2007. Nutrition and herbal medicine therapies were the most known therapies by 65% and 53% of the students, respectively. Knowledge about CAM therapies among the students was limited. Thirty-nine percent of the students reported use of some form of CAM at least once in their lifetime. CAM was used for acute, chronic and mild illness as well as nutrition. Herbal medicine, nutrition, massage, relaxation exercises, yoga and mega-dose vitamin were the most CAM used. Lectures were the chief CAM information source. More than one half of the respondents (53-70% believed that five of the 15 CAM modalities were useful, namely massage, herbal medicine, nutrition, yoga and relaxation exercises. Respondents had a positive attitude toward statements that favoured CAM. Most students strongly agreed or agreed that most CAM therapies were efficacious, whereas 52.6% of the respondents did believe that CAM therapies can be harmful to public health. The study showed that the students had positive attitude toward CAM and exhibited relatively high level of self-reported use of CAM therapies. Overall, students′ knowledge of CAM is limited. The students perceived interest in learning and training in CAM. A separate course in CAM including its various components is needed. Also, availability of a reliable CAM information sources will aid the students to increase their knowledge of CAM.

  12. Use of complementary and alternative medicine at Norwegian and Danish hospitals

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    Launsø Laila

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several studies have found that a high proportion of the population in western countries use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM. However, little is known about whether CAM is offered in hospitals. The aim of this study was to describe to what extent CAM is offered in Norwegian and Danish hospitals and investigate possible changes in Norway since 2001. Methods A one-page questionnaire was sent to all included hospitals in both countries. The questionnaire was sent to the person responsible for the clinical activity, typically the medical director. 99 hospitals in the authority (85% in Norway and 126 in Denmark (97% responded. Given contact persons were interviewed. Results CAM is presently offered in about 50% of Norwegian hospitals and one-third of Danish hospitals. In Norway CAM was offered in 50 hospitals, 40 of which involved acupuncture. 19 hospitals gave other alternative therapies like biofeedback, hypnosis, cupping, ear-acupuncture, herbal medicine, art therapy, homeopathy, reflexology, thought field therapy, gestalt therapy, aromatherapy, tai chi, acupressure, yoga, pilates and other. 9 hospitals offered more than one therapy form. In Denmark 38 hospitals offered acupuncture and one Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing Light Therapy. The most commonly reported reason for offering CAM was scientific evidence in Denmark. In Norway it was the interest of a hospital employee, except for acupuncture where the introduction is more often initiated by the leadership and is more based on scientific evidence of effect. All persons (except one responsible for the alternative treatment had a medical or allied health professional background and their education/training in CAM treatment varied substantially. Conclusions The extent of CAM being offered has increased substantially in Norway during the first decade of the 21st century. This might indicate a shift in attitude regarding CAM within the conventional

  13. Alternative medicines for AIDS in resource-poor settings: Insights from exploratory anthropological studies in Asia and Africa

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    Simon Emmanuelle

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The emergence of alternative medicines for AIDS in Asia and Africa was discussed at a satellite symposium and the parallel session on alternative and traditional treatments of the AIDSImpact meeting, held in Marseille, in July 2007. These medicines are heterogeneous, both in their presentation and in their geographic and cultural origin. The sessions focused on the role of these medications in selected resource poor settings in Africa and Asia now that access to anti-retroviral therapy is increasing. The aims of the sessions were to (1 identify the actors involved in the diffusion of these alternative medicines for HIV/AIDS, (2 explore uses and forms, and the way these medicines are given legitimacy, (3 reflect on underlying processes of globalisation and cultural differentiation, and (4 define priority questions for future research in this area. This article presents the insights generated at the meeting, illustrated with some findings from the case studies (Uganda, Senegal, Benin, Burkina Faso, China and Indonesia that were presented. These case studies reveal the wide range of actors who are involved in the marketing and supply of alternative medicines. Regulatory mechanisms are weak. The efficacy claims of alternative medicines often reinforce a biomedical paradigm for HIV/AIDS, and fit with a healthy living ideology promoted by AIDS care programs and support groups. The AIDSImpact session concluded that more interdisciplinary research is needed on the experience of people living with HIV/AIDS with these alternative medicines, and on the ways in which these products interact (or not with anti-retroviral therapy at pharmacological as well as psychosocial levels.

  14. Antifungal Activity of Essential Oils from Some Medicinal Plants of Iran against Alternaria alternate

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    I. Hadizadeh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Increasing public concern over the level of pesticide residues in food especially fresh produce has built up adequate pressure for scientists to look for less hazardous and environmentally safer compounds for controlling post harvest diseases. Essential oils as registered food grade materials have the potential to be applied as alternative anti-fungal treatments for fresh fruits and vegetables. Approach: We present in this study, the identification of the essential oils with antifungal activity from some medicinal plants of Iran (nettle (Urtica dioica L., thyme (Thymus vulgaris L., eucalyptus (Eucalyptus spp., Rue (Ruta graveolens L. and common yarrow (Achillea millefolium L., and their potential application as "generally regarded as safe" antifungal compounds against Alternaria alternate on tomato as a model pathosystem. Results: Both the nettle and the thyme oils exhibited antifungal activity against A. alternata. The thyme oil exhibited a lower degree of inhibition 68.5 and 74.8% at 1500 and 2000 ppm, respectively. Spore germination and germ tube elongation of the pathogens in potato dextrose broth was strongly reduced in the presence of 1500 ppm of the nettle oil. The same concentration of this oil reduced the percentage of decayed tomatoes. The experiments on reducing the development of natural tomato rot gave similar results. Conclusions: Application of essential oils for postharvest disease control of fresh produce, as a novel emerging alternative to hazardous anti-fungal treatments will allow a safer and environmentally more acceptable management of postharvest diseases.

  15. Use of complementary and alternative medicine by patients with hematological diseases experience at a university hospital in northeast Mexico

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    Jaime-Pérez, José Carlos; Chapa-Rodríguez, Adrián; Rodríguez-Martínez, Marisol; Colunga-Pedraza, Perla Rocío; Marfil-Rivera, Luis Javier; Gómez-Almaguer, David

    2012-01-01

    Background Complementary and alternative medicine includes a diverse group of medical and healthcare systems, practices and products not considered part of conventional medicine. Although there is information on unconventional practices in oncological diseases, specific data regarding the use of complementary and alternative medicine by hematology patients is scarce. Objective The aim of this study is to document the prevalence of this modality of unconventional therapy in patients with malignant and benign hematological diseases, particularly children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Methods An observational study of adult patients and guardians of children with malignant or benign hematological diseases was carried out by applying a structured questionnaire detailing the use and results of the most prevalent complementary and alternative medicine practices. Results One hundred and twenty patients were included; 104 had malignant and 16 had benign hematological diseases. The use of complementary and alternative medicine was greater in benign diseases but the difference was not statistically significant (64.7% versus 41.7%; p-value = 0.08). Patients and guardians with high school or college educations used these alternative practices more than patients with less schooling (60.7% versus 54.7%; p-value = 0.032). The use of folk remedies was most prevalent followed by herbal preparations and spiritual healing. Sixty-four percent of patients that used these unconventional practices reported improvement in their symptoms and increased capacity to perform daily activities. Conclusion No significant difference was documented between patients with malignant or benign hematological diseases using these alternative practices. The majority of complementary and alternative medicine users reported improvement of the disease or chemotherapy-related symptoms. PMID:23049401

  16. Traditional/Alternative Medicine: An Investigation into Identification, Knowledge and Consumption Practices of Herbal Medicine among Students with Hearing Impairment in Ibadan, South-Western Nigeria

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    Adeniyi, Samuel O.; Olufemi-Adeniyi, Olubukola A.; Erinoso, Sakiru M.

    2015-01-01

    The use of traditional medicine as alternative or complimentary therapy is gaining prominence in primary health care worldwide. This is because of the efficacy in the management of mild, chronic seemingly incurable ailments/diseases. Though the publicity is on the increase from country to country in the world, however, one cannot conclude that the…

  17. Is evaluating complementary and alternative medicine equivalent to evaluating the absurd?

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    Greasley, Pete

    2010-06-01

    Complementary and alternative therapies such as reflexology and acupuncture have been the subject of numerous evaluations, clinical trials, and systematic reviews, yet the empirical evidence in support of their efficacy remains equivocal. The empirical evaluation of a therapy would normally assume a plausible rationale regarding the mechanism of action. However, examination of the historical background and underlying principles for reflexology, iridology, acupuncture, auricular acupuncture, and some herbal medicines, reveals a rationale founded on the principle of analogical correspondences, which is a common basis for magical thinking and pseudoscientific beliefs such as astrology and chiromancy. Where this is the case, it is suggested that subjecting these therapies to empirical evaluation may be tantamount to evaluating the absurd.

  18. Updated review of complementary and alternative medicine treatments for systemic lupus erythematosus.

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    Greco, Carol M; Nakajima, Claire; Manzi, Susan

    2013-11-01

    It is estimated that over 50 % of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have utilized complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatments to reduce symptoms and manage their health. However, there are relatively few randomized controlled trials of CAM for SLE. This review describes recent studies of vitamins and supplements, acupuncture, and mind-body interventions in SLE patients. The recent trials of CAM treatments for SLE indicate that supplements such as vitamin D, omega 3 fatty acids, N-acetyl cysteine and turmeric show some promise for reducing SLE disease activity. In addition, mind-body methods such as cognitive-behavioral therapy and other counseling interventions may improve mood and quality of life in SLE.

  19. Use and sanctification of complementary and alternative medicine by parents of children with cystic fibrosis.

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    Grossoehme, Daniel H; Cotton, Sian; McPhail, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use, including spiritual modalities, is common in pediatric chronic diseases. However, few users discuss CAM treatments with their child's physician. Semi-structured interviews of 25 parents of children who have cystic fibrosis (CF) were completed. Primary themes were identified by thematic analyses. Most parents (19/25) used at least one CAM modality with their child. Only two reported discussing CAM use with their child's pulmonologist. Most reported prayer as helpful (81%) and multi-faceted, including individual and group prayer; using aromatherapy or scented candles as an adjunct for relaxation; and the child's sleeping with a blessed prayer. Parents ascribed sacred significance to natural oral supplements. CAM use is relevant to the majority of participating parents of children under age 13 with CF. Chaplains can play a significant role by reframing prayer's integration into chronic disease care, co-creating rituals with pediatric patients, and mediating conversations between parents and providers.

  20. The use of complementary and alternative medicine by individuals with features of metabolic syndrome

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    Rajadurai Akilen; Zeller Pimlott; Amalia Tsiami; Nicola Robinson

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:To compare the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), including dietary supplements, by individuals with and without features of metabolic syndrome (FeMS). METHODS:Using a cross sectional study design, information was obtained by self-administered questionnaires from 300 university individuals. FeMS was deifned as any individuals self-reporting at least one of the clinical diagnoses of diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, or obesity. Finally, two categories were created for cross tabulation, and individuals with and without FeMS were compared. RESULTS:Of the 192 individuals completing the study, 39%(n=76) were currently using or had used CAM therapies in the past 12 months. Individuals with FeMS (n=54, 28%) were more likely (P CONCLUSION: Individuals with FeMS were more likely to use CAM, particularly supplements. Doctors need to properly inquire about and understand their patients’ supplement use, especially if CAM therapies are used in conjunction with conventional medications.

  1. Complementary and alternative medicine utilization in Texas hospices: prevalence, importance, and challenges.

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    Olotu, Busuyi S; Brown, Carolyn M; Lawson, Kenneth A; Barner, Jamie C

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the prevalence, importance, and challenges of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) utilization in Texas hospices. Mail surveys were sent to 369 hospices in Texas, and 110 useful surveys were returned. Results showed that a majority (n = 62, 56.4%) of hospices offer CAM to their clients, with the most popularly offered CAMs being massage, music, and relaxation therapies. Despite the availability of CAM services in most hospices, and that the utilization of CAM has the potential to improve overall quality of life of patients, our results showed that a sizeable proportion of patients in these hospices are not utilizing the provided CAMs. Funding and personnel constraints were substantial obstacles to offering CAM.

  2. Complementary and alternative medicine use in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia: an Italian multicentric survey.

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    D'Arena, Giovanni; Laurenti, Luca; Coscia, Marta; Cortelezzi, Agostino; Chiarenza, Annalisa; Pozzato, Gabriele; Vigliotti, Maria Luigia; Nunziata, Giuseppe; Fragasso, Alberto; Villa, Maria Rosaria; Grossi, Alberto; Selleri, Carmine; Deaglio, Silvia; La Sala, Antonio; Del Poeta, Giovanni; Simeon, Vittorio; Aliberti, Luig; De Martino, Laura; Giudice, Aldo; Musto, Pellegrino; De Feo, Vincenzo

    2014-04-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is common in patients with cancer and its use is steadily increasing over time. We performed a multicenter survey in which the use of CAM in 442 Italian patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), the commonest form of leukemia in Western countries, was assessed. Data were collected by means of a face-to-face standardized questionnaire with several items. Mean age was 69 years; 258 patients (58%) were male and 184 (42%) female. Seventy-three patients (16.5%) were found to be CAM users. The most common CAM therapies were green tea, aloe formulations and high dose vitamins. Predictors of CAM use were female gender, younger age, higher education level, internet availability and newspaper reading. The reasons for CAM popularity among these patients are complex. Given the number of patients combining therapy with CAM and its possible drug interactions, doctor interest as well as patient education about CAM should be improved.

  3. Chemical Constituents and an Alternative Medicinal Veterinary Herbal Soap Made from Senna macranthera

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    Flávia Inoue Andrade

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Upon undergoing biomonitoring, the most active dichloromethane extract retrieved from Senna macranthera roots led to the isolation of three main compounds: emodine, physione, and chrysophanol. In this sequence, these compounds revealed a potential antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from animals with mastitis infections with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC values of 20, 90, and 90 μg mL−1, respectively. Therefore, an herbal soap was also produced from this same active extract. This soap was tested in vitro using gloves contaminated by animals with bovine mastitis that had been discarded after use by milkers and showed similar results to previously tested compounds. These results indicate the potential of this plant as an alternative veterinary medicine for the production of antibacterial soaps that aimed at controlling bovine mastitis infections in small Brazilian farms.

  4. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) following traumatic brain injury (TBI): Opportunities and challenges.

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    Hernández, Theresa D; Brenner, Lisa A; Walter, Kristen H; Bormann, Jill E; Johansson, Birgitta

    2016-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is highly prevalent and occurs in a variety of populations. Because of the complexity of its sequelae, treatment strategies pose a challenge. Given this complexity, TBI provides a unique target of opportunity for complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatments. The present review describes and discusses current opportunitites and challenges associated with CAM research and clinical applications in civilian, veteran and military service populations. In addition to a brief overview of CAM, the translational capacity from basic to clinical research to clinical practice will be described. Finally, a systematic approach to developing an adoptable evidence base, with proof of effectiveness based on the literature will be discussed. Inherent in this discussion will be the methodological and ethical challenges associated with CAM research in those with TBI and associated comorbidities, specifically in terms of how these challenges relate to practice and policy issues, implementation and dissemination. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:Brain injury and recovery.

  5. Complementary and alternative medicine for patients with chronic fatigue syndrome: A systematic review

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    Cao Huijuan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Throughout the world, patients with chronic diseases/illnesses use complementary and alternative medicines (CAM. The use of CAM is also substantial among patients with diseases/illnesses of unknown aetiology. Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS, also termed myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME, is no exception. Hence, a systematic review of randomised controlled trials of CAM treatments in patients with CFS/ME was undertaken to summarise the existing evidence from RCTs of CAM treatments in this patient population. Methods Seventeen data sources were searched up to 13th August 2011. All randomised controlled trials (RCTs of any type of CAM therapy used for treating CFS were included, with the exception of acupuncture and complex herbal medicines; studies were included regardless of blinding. Controlled clinical trials, uncontrolled observational studies, and case studies were excluded. Results A total of 26 RCTs, which included 3,273 participants, met our inclusion criteria. The CAM therapy from the RCTs included the following: mind-body medicine, distant healing, massage, tuina and tai chi, homeopathy, ginseng, and dietary supplementation. Studies of qigong, massage and tuina were demonstrated to have positive effects, whereas distant healing failed to do so. Compared with placebo, homeopathy also had insufficient evidence of symptom improvement in CFS. Seventeen studies tested supplements for CFS. Most of the supplements failed to show beneficial effects for CFS, with the exception of NADH and magnesium. Conclusions The results of our systematic review provide limited evidence for the effectiveness of CAM therapy in relieving symptoms of CFS. However, we are not able to draw firm conclusions concerning CAM therapy for CFS due to the limited number of RCTs for each therapy, the small sample size of each study and the high risk of bias in these trials. Further rigorous RCTs that focus on promising CAM therapies are warranted.

  6. The use of complementary and alternative medicine for patients with traumatic brain injury in Taiwan

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    Gau Bih-Shya

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM continues to increase in Taiwan. This study examined the use of CAM and beliefs about CAM as expressed by patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI in Taiwan. Methods TBI patients and their accompanying relatives were interviewed by using a structured questionnaire at an outpatient clinic in a medical center in northern Taiwan. Results A total of 101 patients with TBI participated in the study. Sixty-four (63% patients had used at least one form of CAM after sustaining TBI. CAM users had used an average of 2.72 forms of CAM after sustaining TBI. The most frequently used CAM category was traditional Chinese medicine (37; 57.8%, followed by folk and religious therapies (30; 46.9%, and dietary supplements (30; 46.9%. The majority of the patients (45; 70.3% did not report CAM use because they felt it was unnecessary to do so. Patients who used CAM had a significantly stronger positive belief in CAM than those who did not (t = −2.72; P = .008. After using CAM, most of the patients (54; 85% perceived moderate satisfaction (2.89 ± 0.44, according to a 4-point Likert scale. Conclusion Although the use of CAM is common for TBI patients receiving conventional medical health care in Taiwan, most patients did not inform health care personnel about their CAM use. TBI patients perceive combined use of CAM and conventional medicine as beneficial for their overall health.

  7. Prevalence of musculoskeletal disorder and alternative medicine therapies among dentists of North India: A descriptive study

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    Devanand Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Health professionals especially the dental professional are the frequent targets of musculoskeletal disorders (MSD. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM can be of some help in managing these MSD especially in. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of CAM therapies as a treatment modality for MSD management among dental professionals of north India. Materials and Methods: Registered dentist of North Indian origin, India (n = 3598 were included in the study. The questionnaire was sent to all the dentists which consisted of the demographic profile, MSD in the past year, CAM therapies utilization and opinion about CAM therapies. Data analysis was done using SPSS version 21 and data were presented in tabular and graphic form. Test of significance was done using chi-square statistics with P < 0.05 considered as significant. Results: A response rate of 80% (n = 2879 was obtained, and all complained of MDS in some or the other part of their life. The use of CAM was reported among 70% (n = 2015 of the dentist who suffered from MSD. Other dentists either used conventional treatment or did not use anything. Conclusion: As the name implies, alternative medical systems is a category that extends beyond a single modality and refers to an entire system of theory and practice that developed separately from conventional medicine. CAM should be subject to rigorous scientific inquiry so that interventions that work are systematically distinguished from those that do not. In addition, the use of CAM treatments should be based on evidence of effectiveness and safety as demonstrated in randomized clinical trials.

  8. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Usage in Skin Diseases and the Positive and Negative Impacts on Patients

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    Gülşen Tükenmez Demirci

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Our purpose was to compare the sosciodemographical differences between Complementary and Alternative medicine (CAM users and non users with skin diseases and to investigate the positive and negative impacts of CAM among patients. Methods: The patients with dermatological conditions attending the dermatology outpatient clinic were enrolled to the study randomly. The sociodemographical properties, diagnosis of the skin diseases, duration of the disease, CAM usage and duration of usage and the positive and negative impacts of the treatments were recorded. Results: A total of 522 (302 female, 220 male, median age 34.8±16.7 patients were enrolled in the study. Eighty-eight patients (16.8% were found to have used a CAM method. The mean age of CAM users (28.2±14.3 were statistically lower than non users (36.0±16.9 (p=0.000 <0.05. The disease duration of CAM users (4.3±5.5 year was statistically longer than non-users (2.8±5.2 year. The CAM methods were mostly preferred in acne vulgaris disease (31.8%, and the mostly used CAM method was herbal therapies (59.1%. We found that 16 (18.2% out of 88 CAM users had side effects from CAM treatment while nine patients (10.3% improved. Conclusion: Complementary and alternative medicine usage is not frequent among skin diseases. The patients with longer disease duration are more prone to use CAM. The side effects rarely occur due to CAM use and we ascertain that very rarely do patients benefit from CAM methods.

  9. Complementary and alternative medicine in fibromyalgia: a practical clinical debate of agreements and contrasts.

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    Cassisi, Gianniantonio; Ceccherelli, Francesco; Atzeni, Fabiola; Sarzi-Puttini, Piercarlo

    2013-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is currently classified as a chronic pain syndrome. Its main features are chronic widespread pain in the presence of tender points (TPs) upon physical examination, sleep disturbances and fatigue, although patients also report a variety of other complaints. Many therapies have been proposed over recent years with mixed results, including various pharmacological therapies for the treatment of symptoms; but there is still no effective drug treatment for the syndrome itself. Non-pharmacological therapies are an important part of the treatment, and there is evidence supporting a number of interventions, including aerobic exercise, strength and stretching training, cognitive-behavioural therapy, and patient education. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) techniques have not yet been fully acknowledged by scientific medicine because little is known about their mechanisms of action and usefulness. The aim of this wide-ranging review of the literature is to analyse the types of CAM techniques used to treat FM and their effectiveness, highlighting the disagreements among the authors of more specialised reviews.

  10. Prevalence and Correlates of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use among Hypertensive Patients in Gondar Town, Ethiopia

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    Daniel Asfaw Erku

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM therapies are being widely used by hypertensive patients worldwide. However, evidences regarding CAM use by hypertensive patients in Ethiopia are limited. This study aimed at assessing prevalence and correlates of CAM use among hypertensive patients attending ambulatory clinic at Gondar University Referral Hospital (GURH, Ethiopia. Methods. A cross-sectional study was employed on 423 patients visiting GURH. Descriptive statistics and bivariate and multivariate logistic regression tools were used to analyze/come up with the prevalence and correlates of CAM use. Results. The prevalence of CAM use in our study was found to be 67.8% and herbal based medicine was the most commonly utilized CAM therapies. Majority of CAM users (70.2% did not disclose CAM use for their physician. However, nearly half of CAM users (48.4% were satisfied with the result of CAM use. Conclusions. The higher prevalence of CAM use among hypertensive patients coupled with a very low disclosure rate to their health care providers can have a marked potential to cause ineffective hypertensive management and adverse effects due to CAM use. Health care providers should be open to discussing the use of CAM with their patients as it will lead to better health outcome.

  11. Factors Associated With Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use in Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Literature Review

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    Lee Usher

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS is a chronic functional bowel condition, which has substantial impact on quality of life and use of healthcare services. Patients often report using complementary and alternative medicine (CAM for symptom management despite limited evidence to support its use. Psychological factors have been shown to be important in both influencing CAM use and as avenues of intervention to assist in managing IBS symptoms. Therefore, this review assessed prevalence of and psychological factors associated with CAM use by people with IBS. Method: Five electronic databases (including AMED, EMBASE and PsychINFO were searched for studies that examined both the extent of and the reasons for CAM use. Five studies met the inclusion criteria. Results: Prevalence of CAM use ranged from 9% to 38%. CAM use was associated with psychosocial factors, including concerns about conventional medical care (i.e., the perceived harmful effects of medication, perception that conventional medicine had failed, and lack of satisfaction with conventional care and anxiety. Conclusion: These findings identify psychological factors associated with CAM use which could be targeted through psychologically oriented management strategies for those affected with IBS.

  12. Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Cancer Pain: An Overview of Systematic Reviews

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    Yanju Bao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective. Now with more and more published systematic reviews of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM on adult cancer pain, it is necessary to use the methods of overview of systematic review to summarize available evidence, appraise the evidence level, and give suggestions to future research and practice. Methods. A comprehensive search (the Cochrane Library, PubMed, Embase, and ISI Web of Knowledge was conducted to identify all systematic reviews or meta-analyses of CAM on adult cancer pain. And the evidence levels were evaluated using GRADE approach. Results. 27 systematic reviews were included. Based on available evidence, we could find that psychoeducational interventions, music interventions, acupuncture plus drug therapy, Chinese herbal medicine plus cancer therapy, compound kushen injection, reflexology, lycopene, TENS, qigong, cupping, cannabis, Reiki, homeopathy (Traumeel, and creative arts therapies might have beneficial effects on adult cancer pain. No benefits were found for acupuncture (versus drug therapy or shame acupuncture, and the results were inconsistent for massage therapy, transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS, and Viscum album L plus cancer treatment. However, the evidence levels for these interventions were low or moderate due to high risk of bias and/or small sample size of primary studies. Conclusion. CAM may be beneficial for alleviating cancer pain, but the evidence levels were found to be low or moderate. Future large and rigor randomized controlled studies are needed to confirm the benefits of CAM on adult cancer pain.

  13. Complementary and alternative medicine for cancer pain: an overview of systematic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yanju; Kong, Xiangying; Yang, Liping; Liu, Rui; Shi, Zhan; Li, Weidong; Hua, Baojin; Hou, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objective. Now with more and more published systematic reviews of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) on adult cancer pain, it is necessary to use the methods of overview of systematic review to summarize available evidence, appraise the evidence level, and give suggestions to future research and practice. Methods. A comprehensive search (the Cochrane Library, PubMed, Embase, and ISI Web of Knowledge) was conducted to identify all systematic reviews or meta-analyses of CAM on adult cancer pain. And the evidence levels were evaluated using GRADE approach. Results. 27 systematic reviews were included. Based on available evidence, we could find that psychoeducational interventions, music interventions, acupuncture plus drug therapy, Chinese herbal medicine plus cancer therapy, compound kushen injection, reflexology, lycopene, TENS, qigong, cupping, cannabis, Reiki, homeopathy (Traumeel), and creative arts therapies might have beneficial effects on adult cancer pain. No benefits were found for acupuncture (versus drug therapy or shame acupuncture), and the results were inconsistent for massage therapy, transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS), and Viscum album L plus cancer treatment. However, the evidence levels for these interventions were low or moderate due to high risk of bias and/or small sample size of primary studies. Conclusion. CAM may be beneficial for alleviating cancer pain, but the evidence levels were found to be low or moderate. Future large and rigor randomized controlled studies are needed to confirm the benefits of CAM on adult cancer pain.

  14. COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE (CAM THERAPIES FOR MANAGEMENT OF PAIN RELATED TO ENDOMETRIOSIS

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    Panda Roshni

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Endometriosis is a gynaecological disease with a complex etiology. It is associated with severe pelvic pain, sub fertility and reduced quality of life. Endometriosis has a multifactorial etiology and therefore its management is also multidimensional. The main targets of therapy are controlling of the pain symptoms and increasing fertility where it is desired. Hormonal and surgical therapies are the two major treatment modalities available currently. But they are not without their side effects. Therefore many women explore Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM forms of treatment for symptomatic relief from pain. These CAM therapies have been used as an adjuvant to conventional therapy or as an independent form of treatment. CAM therapies are purported to have lesser side effects as compared to conventional medical formulations. Ancient Chinese and Indian medicine system have laid the foundation of several of the prevalent Cam practices. The following CAM practices have been discussed in the article-Acupuncture, Herbal therapy, Meditation and Hypnotherapy, Yoga, Exercise, Dietary therapy Aromatherapy and Massage, Reiki, Magnet therapy and Chiropractice. Randomized Clinical Trials (RCT have been conducted for some of the CAM therapies in Endometriosis and Acupuncture and Herbal and Dietary therapies have been found to have some positive effect on the patients. The efficacy of CAM therapies still needs substantial evidence to be integrated into general healthcare practices.

  15. Clinically-relevant chemotherapy interactions with complementary and alternative medicines in patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Kevin Yi-Lwern; See, Cheng Shang; Chan, Alexandre

    2010-01-01

    Complementary and alternative medicines (CAMs), in particular herbal medicines, are commonly used by cancer patients in conjunction with chemotherapy treatment for their anticancer properties and supportive care. However, the effects of many of these herbs are not well-documented due to limited studies done on them. Severe herb-drug interactions (HDIs) have been recorded in some cases, and failure to recognize these harmful HDIs can lead to dire consequences in cancer patients. This study discusses clinically-relevant interactions between anticancer drugs (ACDs) and herbs classified into 7 categories: cancer treatment and prevention, immune-system-related, alopecia, nausea and vomiting, peripheral neuropathy and pain, inflammation, and fatigue. Some promising patents which contain these herbs and thus may manifest these interactions are also presented in this article. Pharmacokinetic interactions involved mainly induction or inhibition of the cytochrome P450 isozymes and p-glycoprotein, while pharmacodynamic interactions were related to increased risks of central nervous system-related effects, hepatotoxicity and bleeding, among others. Clinicians should be vigilant when treating cancer patients who take CAMs with concurrent chemotherapy since they face a high risk of HDIs. These HDIs can be minimized or avoided by selecting herb-drug pairs which are less likely to interact. Furthermore, close monitoring of pharmacological effects and plasma drug levels should be carried out to avoid toxicity and ensure adequate chemotherapeutic coverage in patients with cancer.

  16. Developing a patient-centered outcome measure for complementary and alternative medicine therapies I: defining content and format

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    Ritenbaugh Cheryl

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients receiving complementary and alternative medicine (CAM therapies often report shifts in well-being that go beyond resolution of the original presenting symptoms. We undertook a research program to develop and evaluate a patient-centered outcome measure to assess the multidimensional impacts of CAM therapies, utilizing a novel mixed methods approach that relied upon techniques from the fields of anthropology and psychometrics. This tool would have broad applicability, both for CAM practitioners to measure shifts in patients' states following treatments, and conventional clinical trial researchers needing validated outcome measures. The US Food and Drug Administration has highlighted the importance of valid and reliable measurement of patient-reported outcomes in the evaluation of conventional medical products. Here we describe Phase I of our research program, the iterative process of content identification, item development and refinement, and response format selection. Cognitive interviews and psychometric evaluation are reported separately. Methods From a database of patient interviews (n = 177 from six diverse CAM studies, 150 interviews were identified for secondary analysis in which individuals spontaneously discussed unexpected changes associated with CAM. Using ATLAS.ti, we identified common themes and language to inform questionnaire item content and wording. Respondents' language was often richly textured, but item development required a stripping down of language to extract essential meaning and minimize potential comprehension barriers across populations. Through an evocative card sort interview process, we identified those items most widely applicable and covering standard psychometric domains. We developed, pilot-tested, and refined the format, yielding a questionnaire for cognitive interviews and psychometric evaluation. Results The resulting questionnaire contained 18 items, in visual analog scale format

  17. Is complementary and alternative medicine (CAM cost-effective? a systematic review

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    Caspi Opher

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Out-of-pocket expenditures of over $34 billion per year in the US are an apparent testament to a widely held belief that complementary and alternative medicine (CAM therapies have benefits that outweigh their costs. However, regardless of public opinion, there is often little more than anecdotal evidence on the health and economic implications of CAM therapies. The objectives of this study are to present an overview of economic evaluation and to expand upon a previous review to examine the current scope and quality of CAM economic evaluations. Methods The data sources used were Medline, AMED, Alt-HealthWatch, and the Complementary and Alternative Medicine Citation Index; January 1999 to October 2004. Papers that reported original data on specific CAM therapies from any form of standard economic analysis were included. Full economic evaluations were subjected to two types of quality review. The first was a 35-item checklist for reporting quality, and the second was a set of four criteria for study quality (randomization, prospective collection of economic data, comparison to usual care, and no blinding. Results A total of 56 economic evaluations (39 full evaluations of CAM were found covering a range of therapies applied to a variety of conditions. The reporting quality of the full evaluations was poor for certain items, but was comparable to the quality found by systematic reviews of economic evaluations in conventional medicine. Regarding study quality, 14 (36% studies were found to meet all four criteria. These exemplary studies indicate CAM therapies that may be considered cost-effective compared to usual care for various conditions: acupuncture for migraine, manual therapy for neck pain, spa therapy for Parkinson's, self-administered stress management for cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy, pre- and post-operative oral nutritional supplementation for lower gastrointestinal tract surgery, biofeedback for patients with

  18. Formation flavonoid secondary metabolites in callus culture of Chrysanthemum cinerariefolium as alternative provision medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purwianingsih, Widi; Febri, Santika; Kusdianti

    2016-02-01

    Increasing need of medicine ingredients require the discovery of other methods that can be used as an alternative. One method that can be used as an alternative is tissue culture. Quercetin is a flavonoid secondary metabolites that have been known to be useful as antiviral, anti-asthma and anti-cancer potential. The purpose of this study was to produce flavonoids, especially quercetin in callus culture Chrysanthemum cinerariefolium. Pieces of leaves of plantlets C. cinerariefolium used as explants for formation of callus tissue. To grow the callus, Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium used with addition of various concentrations of growth regulators 2.4-D, and kinetin. For multiplication, callus subcultured on similar medium. Callus that had formed, especially brown callus, further analyzed using Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrum (GCMS). Before analyzed callus was extracted in 95% ethanol. The result showed that callus potentially generate secondary metabolite are brown and friable. Based on these parameters, the best callus produced from leaf explants grown on MS medium with the addition of 4 mg / L 2,4-D and 0 mg / L kinetin. The callus contain secondary metabolites such as some of the flavonoid quercetin precursors such as acetic acid and tetrahydroxychalcone, and some other secondary metabolites.

  19. Complementary and alternative medicine for the treatment and diagnosis of asthma and allergic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passalacqua, G; Compalati, E; Schiappoli, M; Senna, G

    2005-03-01

    The use of Complementary/Alternative Medicines (CAM) is largely diffused and constantly increasing, especially in the field of allergic diseases and asthma. Homeopathy, acupuncture and phytotherapy are the most frequently utilised treatments, whereas complementary diagnostic techniques are mainly used in the field of food allergy-intolerance. Looking at the literature, the majority of clinical trials with CAMS are of low methodological quality, thus difficult to interpret. There are very few studies performed in a rigorously controlled fashion, and those studies provided inconclusive results. In asthma, none of the CAM have thus far been proved more effective than placebo or equally effective as standard treatments. Some herbal products, containing active principles, have displayed some clinical effect, but the herbal remedies are usually not standardised and not quantified, thus carry the risk of toxic effects or interactions. None of the alternative diagnostic techniques (electrodermal testing, kinesiology, leukocytotoxic test, iridology, hair analysis) have been proved able to distinguish between healthy and allergic subjects or to diagnose sensitizations. Therefore these tests must not be used, since they can lead to delayed or incorrect diagnosis and therapy.

  20. Role of complementary and alternative medicine in geriatric care: A mini review

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    Mohammad Jamshed Siddiqui

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Since time immemorial homo sapiens are subjected to both health and diseases states and seek treatment for succor and assuagement in compromised health states. Since last two decades the progressive rise in the alternative form of treatment cannot be ignored and population seems to be dissatisfied with the conventional treatment modalities and therefore, resort to other forms of treatment, mainly complementary and alternative medicine (CAM. The use of CAM is predominantly more popular in older adults and therefore, numerous research studies and clinical trials have been carried out to investigate the effectiveness of CAM in the management of both communicable and non-communicable disease. In this current mini review, we attempt to encompass the use of CAM in chronic non-communicable diseases that are most likely seen in geriatrics. The current review focuses not only on the reassurance of good health practices, emphasizing on the holistic development and strengthening the body′s defense mechanisms, but also attempts to construct a pattern of self-care and patient empowerment in geriatrics. The issues of safety with CAM use cannot be sidelined and consultation with a health care professional is always advocated to the patient. Likewise, responsibility of the health care professional is to inform the patient about the safety and efficacy issues. In order to substantiate the efficacy and safety of CAMs, evidence-based studies and practices with consolidated standards should be planned and executed.

  1. Cancer-Related Stress and Complementary and Alternative Medicine: A Review

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    Kavita D. Chandwani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A cancer diagnosis elicits strong psychophysiological reactions that characterize stress. Stress is experienced by all patients but is usually not discussed during patient-healthcare professional interaction; thus underdiagnosed, very few are referred to support services. The prevalence of CAM use in patients with history of cancer is growing. The purpose of the paper is to review the aspects of cancer-related stress and interventions of commonly used complementary and alternative techniques/products for amelioration of cancer-related stress. Feasibility of intervention of several CAM techniques and products commonly used by cancer patients and survivors has been established in some cancer populations. Efficacy of some CAM techniques and products in reducing stress has been documented as well as stress-related symptoms in patients with cancer such as mindfulness-based stress reduction, yoga, Tai Chi Chuan, acupuncture, energy-based techniques, and physical activity. Much of the research limitations include small study samples and variety of intervention length and content. Efficacy and safety of many CAM techniques and some herbs and vitamin B and D supplements need to be confirmed in further studies using scientific methodology. Several complementary and alternative medicine therapies could be integrated into standard cancer care to ameliorate cancer-related stress.

  2. Cancer-related stress and complementary and alternative medicine: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandwani, Kavita D; Ryan, Julie L; Peppone, Luke J; Janelsins, Michelle M; Sprod, Lisa K; Devine, Katie; Trevino, Lara; Gewandter, Jennifer; Morrow, Gary R; Mustian, Karen M

    2012-01-01

    A cancer diagnosis elicits strong psychophysiological reactions that characterize stress. Stress is experienced by all patients but is usually not discussed during patient-healthcare professional interaction; thus underdiagnosed, very few are referred to support services. The prevalence of CAM use in patients with history of cancer is growing. The purpose of the paper is to review the aspects of cancer-related stress and interventions of commonly used complementary and alternative techniques/products for amelioration of cancer-related stress. Feasibility of intervention of several CAM techniques and products commonly used by cancer patients and survivors has been established in some cancer populations. Efficacy of some CAM techniques and products in reducing stress has been documented as well as stress-related symptoms in patients with cancer such as mindfulness-based stress reduction, yoga, Tai Chi Chuan, acupuncture, energy-based techniques, and physical activity. Much of the research limitations include small study samples and variety of intervention length and content. Efficacy and safety of many CAM techniques and some herbs and vitamin B and D supplements need to be confirmed in further studies using scientific methodology. Several complementary and alternative medicine therapies could be integrated into standard cancer care to ameliorate cancer-related stress.

  3. Alternative funding for academic medicine: experience at a Canadian Health Sciences Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Paul; Shortt, S E D; Walker, D M C

    2004-03-01

    In 1994 the School of Medicine of Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario, its clinical teachers, and the three principal teaching hospitals initiated a new approach to funding, the Alternative Funding Plan, a pragmatic response to the inability of fee-for-service billing by clinical faculty to subsidize the academic mission of the health sciences center. The center was funded to provide a package of service and academic deliverables (outputs), rather than on the basis of payment for physician clinical activity (inputs). The new plan required a new governance structure representing stakeholders and raised a number of important issues: how to reconcile the preservation of physician professional autonomy with corporate responsibilities; how to gather requisite information so as to equitably allocate resources; and how to report to the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-term Care in order to demonstrate accountability. In subsequent iterations of the agreement it was necessary to address issues of flexibility resulting from locked-in funding levels and to devise meaningful performance measures for departments and the center as a whole. The authors conclude that the Alternative Funding Plan represents a successful innovation in funding for an academic health sciences center in that it has created financial stability, as well as modest positive effects for education and research. The Ontario government hopes to replicate the model at the province's other four health sciences centers, and it may have applicability in any jurisdiction in which the costs of medical education outstrip the capacity of faculty clinical earnings.

  4. A complex systems science perspective for whole systems of complementary and alternative medicine research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koithan, Mary; Bell, Iris R; Niemeyer, Kathryn; Pincus, David

    2012-01-01

    Whole systems complementary and alternative medicine (WS-CAM) approaches share a basic worldview that embraces interconnectedness; emergent, non-linear outcomes to treatment that include both local and global changes in the human condition; a contextual view of human beings that are inseparable from and responsive to their environments; and interventions that are complex, synergistic, and interdependent. These fundamental beliefs and principles run counter to the assumptions of reductionism and conventional biomedical research methods that presuppose unidimensional simple causes and thus dismantle and individually test various interventions that comprise only single aspects of the WSCAM system. This paper will demonstrate the superior fit and practical advantages of using complex adaptive systems (CAS) and related modeling approaches to develop the scientific basis for WS-CAM. Furthermore, the details of these CAS models will be used to provide working hypotheses to explain clinical phenomena such as (a) persistence of changes for weeks to months between treatments and/or after cessation of treatment, (b) nonlocal and whole systems changes resulting from therapy, (c) Hering's law, and (d) healing crises. Finally, complex systems science will be used to offer an alternative perspective on cause, beyond the simple reductionism of mainstream mechanistic ontology and more parsimonious than the historical vitalism of WS-CAM. Rather, complex systems science provides a scientifically rigorous, yet essentially holistic ontological perspective with which to conceptualize and empirically explore the development of disease and illness experiences, as well as experiences of healing and wellness.

  5. The use of biomedicine, complementary and alternative medicine, and ethnomedicine for the treatment of epilepsy among people of South Asian origin in the UK

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    Ismail Hanif

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies have shown that a significant proportion of people with epilepsy use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM. CAM use is known to vary between different ethnic groups and cultural contexts; however, little attention has been devoted to inter-ethnic differences within the UK population. We studied the use of biomedicine, complementary and alternative medicine, and ethnomedicine in a sample of people with epilepsy of South Asian origin living in the north of England. Methods Interviews were conducted with 30 people of South Asian origin and 16 carers drawn from a sampling frame of patients over 18 years old with epilepsy, compiled from epilepsy registers and hospital databases. All interviews were tape-recorded, translated if required and transcribed. A framework approach was adopted to analyse the data. Results All those interviewed were taking conventional anti-epileptic drugs. Most had also sought help from traditional South Asian practitioners, but only two people had tried conventional CAM. Decisions to consult a traditional healer were taken by families rather than by individuals with epilepsy. Those who made the decision to consult a traditional healer were usually older family members and their motivations and perceptions of safety and efficacy often differed from those of the recipients of the treatment. No-one had discussed the use of traditional therapies with their doctor. The patterns observed in the UK mirrored those reported among people with epilepsy in India and Pakistan. Conclusion The health care-seeking behaviour of study participants, although mainly confined within the ethnomedicine sector, shared much in common with that of people who use global CAM. The appeal of traditional therapies lay in their religious and moral legitimacy within the South Asian community, especially to the older generation who were disproportionately influential in the determination of treatment choices. As a second

  6. Use of complementary alternative medicine for low back pain consulting in general practice: a cohort study

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    Baum Erika

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although back pain is considered one of the most frequent reasons why patients seek complementary and alternative medical (CAM therapies little is known on the extent patients are actually using CAM for back pain. Methods This is a post hoc analysis of a longitudinal prospective cohort study embedded in a RCT. General practitioners (GPs recruited consecutively adult patients presenting with LBP. Data on physical function, on subjective mood, and on utilization of health services was collected at the first consultation and at follow-up telephone interviews for a period of twelve months Results A total of 691 (51% respectively 928 (69% out of 1,342 patients received one form of CAM depending on the definition. Local heat, massage, and spinal manipulation were the forms of CAM most commonly offered. Using CAM was associated with specialist care, chronic LBP and treatment in a rehabilitation facility. Receiving spinal manipulation, acupuncture or TENS was associated with consulting a GP providing these services. Apart from chronicity disease related factors like functional capacity or pain only showed weak or no association with receiving CAM. Conclusion The frequent use of CAM for LBP demonstrates that CAM is popular in patients and doctors alike. The observed association with a treatment in a rehabilitation facility or with specialist consultations rather reflects professional preferences of the physicians than a clear medical indication. The observed dependence on providers and provider related services, as well as a significant proportion receiving CAM that did not meet the so far established selection criteria suggests some arbitrary use of CAM.

  7. Today's students, tomorrow's practitioners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heape, Chris

    2015-01-01

    There is an inherent dilemma that some research indicates ways and means of doing design practice, in particular how practitioners bring what this paper identifies as informal resources into play, that are seldom reflected in how and what design students are taught or learn. The question is posed...... as to whether today’s design students are in fact equipped to be tomorrow’s practitioners. This paper introduces a range of literature and empirical observations that describe a number of different appreciations of process and practice, from both design and non-design perspectives. This in order to draw up...... an alternative understanding of collaborative design practice as participatory inquiry. The paper suggests that participatory inquiry, as it more fully takes into account the learning driven and relational nature of design practice, could help inform alternative design educational strategies....

  8. Traditional herbal medicine, pharmacology and complementary alternative medicine (CAM): a preface to this special issue on herbal drugs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chiu-Yin KWAN

    2000-01-01

    @@In China, our ancient human civilization has long used plants and other natural products, and their extracts for both healing and poisoning. The understanding of interactions between drugs and living systems was acquired via generations of knowledge accumulation based on empirical observations. This form of healing, also well documented to exist in many other cultural civilizations via a long historical experimentation, has eventually evolved itself from an art form into a scientific modality, now known as pharmacology. This recognition of a formal discipline of medicine occurred only about a century ago following the declaration of Flexner Report in the North America in 1910. The report proclaimed that the practice of medicine should be based on scientific evidence rather than empiricism. The emergence of synthetic organic chemistry facilitating the discovery of new healing chemicals and the rapid development of physiological and biochemical sciences (often dependent on pharmacological tools) have further solidified pharmacology as a mainstream basic medical science. For long decades since the Flexner's report, the empirically based folk medicine has rapidly been replaced by the scientifically based medicine, which is often referred to as the mainstream medicine (and thus becomes a traditional/conventional medicine itself).

  9. Complementary and alternative medicine use among US Navy and Marine Corps personnel

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    Riddle James R

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, numerous studies have revealed an increase in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM use in US civilian populations. In contrast, few studies have examined CAM use within military populations, which have ready access to conventional medicine. Currently, the prevalence and impact of CAM use in US military populations remains unknown. Methods To investigate CAM use in US Navy and Marine Corps personnel, the authors surveyed a stratified random sample of 5,000 active duty and Reserve/National Guard members between December 2000 and July 2002. Chi-square tests and multivariable logistic regression were used to assess univariate associations and adjusted odds of CAM use in this population. Results and discussion Of 3,683 service members contacted, 1,446 (39.3% returned a questionnaire and 1,305 gave complete demographic and survey data suitable for study. Among respondents, more than 37% reported using at least one CAM therapy during the past year. Herbal therapies were among the most commonly reported (15.9%. Most respondents (69.8% reported their health as being very good or excellent. Modeling revealed that CAM use was most common among personnel who were women, white, and officers. Higher levels of recent physical pain and lower levels of satisfaction with conventional medical care were significantly associated with increased odds of reporting CAM use. Conclusion These data suggest that CAM use is prevalent in the US military and consistent with patterns in other US civilian populations. Because there is much to be learned about CAM use along with allopathic therapy, US military medical professionals should record CAM therapies when collecting medical history data.

  10. The value of complementary and alternative medicine in the treatment of climacteric symptoms : Results of a survey among German gynecologists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    von Studnitz, Friederike S. G.; Eulenburg, Christine; Mueck, Alfred O.; Buhling, Kai J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The present study aims to detect the attitude and experience towards complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in the treatment of climacteric disorders among gynecologists in Germany. Study design: A self-administered questionnaire, containing 15 questions, was sent to all gynecologi

  11. Parents' Views and Experiences about Complementary and Alternative Medicine Treatments for Their Children with Autistic Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senel, Hatice Gunayer

    2010-01-01

    Use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatments have been increasing for children with autistic spectrum disorder (ASD). In this study, 38 Turkish parents of children with ASD were surveyed related with their use of CAM treatments, experiences, and views for each treatment. They mentioned "Vitamins and minerals",…

  12. Religiosity and Utilization of Complementary and Alternative Medicine among Foreign-Born Hispanics in the United States

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    Heathcote, John D.; West, Joshua H.; Hall, P. Cougar; Trinidad, Dennis R.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the association between religiosity and utilization of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in a sample of foreign-born Hispanic adults, even when excluding prayer as a form of CAM. Data were collected using a self-report Spanish-language survey. Study participants consisted of 306 respondents between…

  13. Prevalence and Predictors of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) Use among Ivy League College Students: Implications for Student Health Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versnik Nowak, Amy L.; DeGise, Joe; Daugherty, Amanda; O'Keefe, Richard; Seward, Samuel, Jr.; Setty, Suma; Tang, Fanny

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Determine prevalence and types of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies used and test the significance of demographics and social cognitive constructs as predictors of CAM use in a college sample. Secondary purpose was to guide the integration of CAM therapies into college health services. Participants: Random,…

  14. Stepwise drying of medicinal plants as alternative to reduce time and energy processing

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    Cuervo-Andrade, S. P.; Hensel, O.

    2016-07-01

    The objective of drying medicinal plants is to extend the shelf life and conserving the fresh characteristics. This is achieved by reducing the water activity (aw) of the product to a value which will inhibit the growth and development of pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms, significantly reducing enzyme activity and the rate at which undesirable chemical reactions occur. The technical drying process requires an enormous amount of thermal and electrical energy. An improvement in the quality of the product to be dried and at the same time a decrease in the drying cost and time are achieved through the utilization of a controlled conventional drying method, which is based on a good utilization of the renewable energy or looking for other alternatives which achieve lower processing times without sacrificing the final product quality. In this work the method of stepwise drying of medicinal plants is presented as an alternative to the conventional drying that uses a constant temperature during the whole process. The objective of stepwise drying is the decrease of drying time and reduction in energy consumption. In this process, apart from observing the effects on decreases the effective drying process time and energy, the influence of the different combinations of drying phases on several characteristics of the product are considered. The tests were carried out with Melissa officinalis L. variety citronella, sowed in greenhouse. For the stepwise drying process different combinations of initial and final temperature, 40/50°C, are evaluated, with different transition points associated to different moisture contents (20, 30, 40% and 50%) of the product during the process. Final quality of dried foods is another important issue in food drying. Drying process has effect in quality attributes drying products. This study was determining the color changes and essential oil loses by reference the measurement of the color and essential oil content of the fresh product was

  15. Use of complementary and alternative medicines for children with chronic health conditions in Lagos, Nigeria

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    Senbanjo Idowu O

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM is on the increase globally with a high prevalence in children and adults with chronic illnesses. Many studies have evaluated the epidemiology of medicine use for children in developing countries but none has evaluated the use of CAM for children with chronic illnesses. The aim of this study was therefore to determine the prevalence, pattern of use, parental sources of information, perceived benefits, cost, and adverse effects of CAM in children with epilepsy, sickle cell anaemia and asthma in Lagos, Nigeria. Methods Parents of children with epilepsy (122, asthma (78 or sickle cell anaemia (118 who presented consecutively to the paediatric neurology, respiratory and haematology clinics of the Lagos State University Teaching Hospital (LASUTH, Ikeja were interviewed with a structured open- and close-ended questionnaire. The information obtained comprised the demography of both the patients and their parents; past and present treatments received by the patients; the type of CAM, if any, used by the patients; and the sources, cost, benefits and adverse effects of the CAM used. Results A total of 303 CAMs were used by the patients, either alone or in combination witother CAM. CAM was reportedly used by 99 (31% patients (epilepsy -38%, sickle cell anaemia – 36% and asthma – 25%. The majority (84% of these patients were currently using CAM. The use of CAM was stopped six months prior to the study by 16 patients (16%. Biological products were the most frequently used CAMs (58%, followed by alternative medical systems (27% and mind-body interventions (14%. Relations, friends and neighbours had a marked influence on 76% of the parents who used CAM for their children. Eighty-five (86% parents were willing to discuss the use of CAM with their doctors but were not asked. CAM use was associated with adverse reactions in 7.1% of the patients. Conclusion Parental use of CAMs to treat

  16. Genoprotective Capacity of Alternatively Cultivated Lingzhi or Reishi Medicinal Mushroom, Ganoderma lucidum (Agaricomycetes), Basidiocarps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilerdzic, Jasmina; Stajic, Mirjana; Zivkovic, Lada; Vukojevic, Jelena; Bajic, Vladan; Spremo-Potparevic, Biljana

    2016-01-01

    Ganoderma lucidum is traditionally used in Eastern medicine to preserve vitality, promote longevity, and treat disease. It possesses immunomodulatory, antitumor, antimicrobial, and antiaging activities, among others, but one of the most important is its antioxidant property, which is the basis for other effects, because free radicals trigger many diseases. The substrate commonly used for commercial cultivation of G. lucidum is not environmentally friendly nor economically justified, so there is a need to find new alternative substrates. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of substrate composition on the bioactivity of G. lucidum basidiocarps. G. lucidum was cultivated on 2 different substrates: (1) a mixture of wheat straw, grapevine branches, and wheat bran, and (2) wheat straw. Commercial fruiting bodies, cultivated on oak sawdust, were used as the control. 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging ability, total phenols, and flavonoid content were determined spectrophotometrically to define the antioxidative potential of basidiocarp extracts. The comet test was performed to detect the degree of DNA damage in the cells that were exposed to G. lucidum extracts before and after the effect of oxidants. Higher antioxidative potential was observed for the extract of G. lucidum basidiocarps cultivated on wheat straw compared with that from the mixed substrate and especially with commercial ones. The alternatively cultivated basidiocarps also showed stronger antigenotoxic potential compared with commercial ones. The study showed that fruiting bodies produced on wheat straw, one of the most accessible and cheapest crop residues, are more potent antioxidant and antigenotoxic agents than commercially cultivated ones.

  17. The clinical significance and costs of herbs and food supplements used by complementary and alternative medicine for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases and hypertension.

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    Chrysant, S G

    2016-01-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is widely used by people in the United States and other countries for the treatment of health conditions that include hypertension (HTN), cardiovascular disease (CVD), heart failure, hyperlipidemia and other condtions. The visits to CAM practitioners result in significant out-of-pocket expenses, as CAM is not covered by health insurance in the majority of cases. The reasons for this are that the products used are not closely regulated by governmental regulatory agencies and lack scientific evidence about their effectiveness and safety. The people regard these products as being 'natural' and, consequently, safe. However, there is evidence that these products can be contaminated and adulterated with other substances and could cause harm to the persons who take them. The responsibility falls on the health professionals, who should become familiar with the various CAM products, inquire their patients whether they taking any of these products and advise them accordingly. This review is based on a recent statement issued by the American Medical for the use of CAM for the treatment of HTN. For its preparation, a Medline search of the English language literature was performed between 2010 and 2014 restricted in the use of CAM for CVD and HTN, and from the 88 abstracts reviewed, 23 pertinent papers were selected. These papers together with collateral literature will be discussed in this review regarding CAM and CAM products on their effectiveness and safety for the treatment of CVD and HTN.

  18. A Survey of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use in Cancer Patients Treated with Radiotherapy in Thailand

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    Putipun Puataweepong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM in cancer patients is increasingly acceptable worldwide, but most of the studies were surveyed from developed countries. In this study, we evaluated the first and large cohort of cancer patients with CAM use in Thailand. Materials and Methods. A self-administered questionnaire was completed by 248 cancer patients attending outpatient radiotherapy unit at Ramathibodi Hospital. Results. The prevalence of CAM use was 60.9%. The most frequently used CAM were dietary/vitamin supplements (56.9%. Independent predictors of CAM use were high income (<0.001 and cancer type (=0.019. About half of the patients (51% reported positive effects from CAM use. Nevertheless, 9.4% of the patient also reported side effects. The majority of patients (58.3% did not disclose their use of CAM to their doctors because they felt that it was not necessary for doctors to know (65.9%. The average spending for CAM use was 200 USD/month (range, 10–1,000. Conclusion. Although the cost for CAM is relatively expensive, the prevalence of CAM use in cancer patients in Thailand is high particularly, in patients with higher income. Therefore, all clinical oncologists should be concerned about the use of CAM during evaluation of the cancer patients.

  19. Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine among Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease

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    Gurjeet S. Birdee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Among patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD, few studies have examined the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM and patients’ interest in learning mind-body interventions to address health issues. We surveyed 89 adult patients (response rate 84% at an outpatient hemodialysis center in Brookline, MA, USA regarding the utilization of CAM, including mind-body practices, and willingness to learn mind-body practices. Of respondents, 47% were female, 63% were black, and mean age was 62 years. 61% reported using CAM for health in their lifetime, and 36% reported using CAM within a month of the survey. The most frequent CAM modalities reported in ones’ lifetime and in the last month were mind-body practices (42% and 27%, resp.. Overall lifetime CAM use did not differ significantly by sex, race, dialysis vintage, diagnosis of ESRD, employment status, or education level. Subjects reported that mind-body interactions were very important to health with a median score of 9 on a 10-point Likert scale (ranging from 0 for not important to 10 for extremely important. Most patients (74% reported interest in learning mind-body practices during maintenance hemodialysis. In summary, CAM use, particularly mind-body practice, is frequent among patients with ESRD providing opportunities for future clinical research.

  20. Complementary and alternative medicines and childhood eczema: a US population-based study.

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    Silverberg, Jonathan I; Lee-Wong, Mary; Silverberg, Nanette B

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use in US children with eczema is unknown. Furthermore, it is unknown whether CAM use in the United States is associated with higher eczema prevalence. We sought to determine the eczema prevalence in association with CAM usage. We analyzed data from the 2007 National Health Interview Survey that included a nationally representative sample of 9417 children ages 0 to 17 years. Overall, 46.9% (95% confidence interval, 45.6%-48.2%) of children in the United States used 1 or more CAM, of which 0.99% (0.28%-1.71%) used CAM specifically to treat their eczema, including herbal therapy (0.46%), vitamins (0.33%), Ayurveda (0.28%), naturopathy (0.24%), homeopathy (0.20%), and traditional healing (0.12%). Several CAMs used for other purposes were associated with increased eczema prevalence, including herbal therapy (survey logistic regression; adjusted odds ratio [95% confidence interval], 2.07 [1.40-3.06]), vitamins (1.45 [1.21-1.74]), homeopathic therapy (2.94 [1.43-6.00]), movement techniques (3.66 [1.62-8.30]), and diet (2.24 [1.10-4.58]), particularly vegan diet (2.53 [1.17-5.51]). In conclusion, multiple CAMs are commonly used for the treatment of eczema in US children. However, some CAMs may actually be harmful to the skin and be associated with higher eczema prevalence in the United States.

  1. The Relationship between Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use and Breast Cancer Early Detection: A Critical Review

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    Laura C. Dale

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM use is prevalent. Concurrently, breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide, with early detection techniques widely available. This paper examined the overlap between participation in allopathic breast cancer early detection activities and CAM use. Methods. A systematic review examined the association between breast screening behaviors and CAM use. Searches were conducted on the PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, and NCCAM databases and gray literature between 1990 and 2011. STROBE criteria were used to assess study quality. Results. Nine studies met the search criteria. Four focused on CAM use in women at high breast cancer risk and five on average risk women. CAM use in women ranged from 22% to 82% and was high regardless of breast cancer risk. Correlations between CAM use and breast cancer early detection were not strong or consistent but significant relationships that did emerge were positive. Conclusions. Populations surveyed, and measures used to assess CAM, breast cancer screening, and correlates, varied widely. Many women who obtained allopathic screening also sought out CAM. This provides a foundation for future interventions and research to build on women’s motivation to enhance health and develop ways to increase the connections between CAM and allopathic care.

  2. Physician and patient attitudes towards complementary and alternative medicine in obstetrics and gynecology

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    Sen Ananda

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the U.S., complementary and alternative medicine (CAM use is most prevalent among reproductive age, educated women. We sought to determine general attitudes and approaches to CAM among obstetric and gynecology patients and physicians. Methods Obstetrician-gynecologist members of the American Medical Association in the state of Michigan and obstetric-gynecology patients at the University of Michigan were surveyed. Physician and patient attitudes and practices regarding CAM were characterized. Results Surveys were obtained from 401 physicians and 483 patients. Physicians appeared to have a more positive attitude towards CAM as compared to patients, and most reported routinely endorsing, providing or referring patients for at least one CAM modality. The most commonly used CAM interventions by patients were divergent from those rated highest among physicians, and most patients did not consult with a health care provider prior to starting CAM. Conclusion Although obstetrics/gynecology physicians and patients have a positive attitude towards CAM, physician and patients' view of the most effective CAM therapies were incongruent. Obstetrician/gynecologists should routinely ask their patients about their use of CAM with the goal of providing responsible, evidence-based advice to optimize patient care.

  3. Level of attitude toward complementary and alternative medicine among Iranian patients with multiple sclerosis.

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    Mohammad Hossein Harirchian

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is an unpredictable neurological disease leading to severe disability in young adults. The majority of MS patients use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM as adjunct to conventional therapies. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of CAM utilization among Iranian patients with MS and their attitude toward the CAM usage.A cross-sectional study was conducted on 119 definite MS patients referred to Tehran's Imam Khomeini and Sina hospitals. A questionnaire was used to examine the association between participants' health-related factors and usage of CAMs interventions. P value < 0.05 was considered statistically significant.Among the enrolled patients, 60% of the participants agreed with using CAM, 42% experienced the usage of these treatments; out of whom 41% believed its efficiency and 18% reported exacerbation of symptoms. The mean duration of disease diagnosis and mean time from symptoms onset were both longer in users of CAM (P = 0.001. Most socio-demographic factors had no significant effect on the type of used CAM. However, Yoga was significantly more applied in those with higher degree of education (P = 0.002.Regarding the widespread use of CAM by Iranian patients with MS, further researches about the safety and efficacy of each treatment on the special outcomes is recommended.

  4. The Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Among California Adults With and Without Cancer

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    Michael S Goldstein

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the extent and correlates of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM use among a population-based sample of California adults that is highly diverse in terms of sociodemographic characteristics and health status. As a follow-up to a state-wide health survey of 55 428 people, 9187 respondents were interviewed by phone regarding their use of 11 different types of CAM providers, special diets, dietary supplements, mind–body interventions, self-prayer and support groups. The sample included all participants in the initial survey who reported a diagnosis of cancer, all the non-white respondents, as well as a random sample of all the white respondents. The relation of CAM use to the respondents' demographic characteristics and health status is assessed. CAM use among Californians is generally high, and the demographic factors associated with high rates of CAM use are the same in California as have been found in other studies. Those reporting a diagnosis of cancer and those who report other chronic health problems indicate a similar level of visits to CAM providers. However, those with cancer are less likely to report using special diets, and more likely to report using support groups and prayer. Health status, gender, ethnicity and education have an independent impact upon CAM use among those who are healthy as well as those who report suffering from chronic health problems, although the precise relation varies by the type of CAM used.

  5. An Empirical Study on Traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medicine Usage among Malaysian Cancer Patients.

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    Nagashekhara, Molugulu; Murthy, Vasudeva; Mruthyunjaya, Anil Tumkur; Li Ann, Lim

    2015-01-01

    Usage of traditional, complementary and alternative medicine (TCAM) has gained popularity over the past few years. However, very little is known about TCAM use among Malaysian cancer patients. This study aimed to identify the determinants of TCAM usage among cancer patients with determination of relationships between demographic factors, patient satisfaction with conventional treatment, knowledge on TCAM and healthcare professional influence. Patient's perceptions towards TCAM were also determined. A simple random convenient sampling method was used to recruit 354 patients from Hospital Kuala Lumpur between February to April 2013. All were directly interviewed with a structured questionnaire. In this study, 172 respondents were TCAM users. There was no significant differences between demographic background of respondents in the usage of TCAM. Minimal correlation was found between patient satisfaction with the conventional treatment and usage of TCAM (r=0.091). A poor correlation was found between healthcare professional's influence and TCAM usage (r=-0.213) but the results suggested that increase in influence would decrease TCAM usage. Patient TCAM knowledge correlated negatively with the TCAM usage (r=-0.555) indicated that cancer patients are less likely to use TCAM when they have more TCAM knowledge. Healthcare professionals should be fully equipped with the necessary TCAM knowledge while maintaining patient satisfaction with the conventional treatment. They should also intervene on patient TCAM usage where a potential drug interaction or a harmful adverse event can occur.

  6. Using Complementary and Alternative Medicines to Target the Host Response during Severe Influenza

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    Lisa M. Alleva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available It is now accepted that an overwhelming inflammatory response is the cause of human deaths from avian H5N1 influenza infection. With this in mind we sought to examine the literature for examples of complementary and alternative medicines that reduce inflammation, and to place the results of this search in the context of our own work in a mouse model of influenza disease, using a pharmaceutical agent with anti-inflammatory properties. Two Chinese herbs, Angelica sinensis (Dang Gui and Salvia miltiorrhiza (Danshen, have been recently shown to protect mice during lethal experimental sepsis via inhibition of the novel inflammatory cytokine High Mobility Group Box 1 protein (HMGB1. Biochanin A, a ligand of the peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPAR alpha and gamma and the active isoflavone in Trifolium pratense (red clover, has anti-inflammatory properties, and thus could be used as an influenza treatment. This is of great interest since we have recently shown that gemfibrozil, a drug used to treat hyperlipidemia in humans and a synthetic ligand of PPAR alpha, significantly reduces the mortality associated with influenza infections in mice. The inflammation-modulating abilities of these natural agents should be considered in light of what is now known about the mechanisms of fatal influenza, and tested as potential candidates for influenza treatments in their own right, or as adjunct treatments to antivirals.

  7. Comparison of efficacy of alternative medicine with allopathy in treatment of oral fungal infection.

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    Maghu, Sahil; Desai, Vela D; Sharma, Rajeev

    2016-01-01

    This clinical study assessed and compared the efficacy of tea tree oil (TTO), an alternative form of medicine, with clotrimazole (i.e., allopathy) and a conservative form of management in the treatment of oral fungal infection. In this interventional, observational, and comparative study, we enrolled 36 medically fit individuals of both sexes who were aged 20-60 years old. The participants were randomly assigned to three groups. Group I was given TTO (0.25% rinse) as medicament, Group II was given clotrimazole, and Group III was managed with conservative treatment. The results were analyzed from the clinical evaluation of lesions, changes in four most common clinical parameters of lesions, and subjective symptoms on periodic follow-up. Based on the results, the percentage efficiency of the two groups were taken and compared through a bar graph on the scale of 1. No toxicity to TTO was reported. Group I (TTO) was found to be more efficient than the other two groups, as changes in four parameter indices of lesions were noted, and results for all three groups were compared on a percentage basis. The study concluded that TTO, being a natural product, is a better nontoxic modality compared to clotrimazole, in the treatment of oral fungal infection and has a promising future for its potential application in oral health products.

  8. Berry Leaves: An Alternative Source of Bioactive Natural Products of Nutritional and Medicinal Value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferlemi, Anastasia-Varvara; Lamari, Fotini N

    2016-06-01

    Berry fruits are recognized, worldwide, as "superfoods" due to the high content of bioactive natural products and the health benefits deriving from their consumption. Berry leaves are byproducts of berry cultivation; their traditional therapeutic use against several diseases, such as the common cold, inflammation, diabetes, and ocular dysfunction, has been almost forgotten nowadays. Nevertheless, the scientific interest regarding the leaf composition and beneficial properties grows, documenting that berry leaves may be considered an alternative source of bioactives. The main bioactive compounds in berry leaves are similar as in berry fruits, i.e., phenolic acids and esters, flavonols, anthocyanins, and procyanidins. The leaves are one of the richest sources of chlorogenic acid. In various studies, these secondary metabolites have demonstrated antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, cardioprotective, and neuroprotective properties. This review focuses on the phytochemical composition of the leaves of the commonest berry species, i.e., blackcurrant, blackberry, raspberry, bilberry, blueberry, cranberry, and lingonberry leaves, and presents their traditional medicinal uses and their biological activities in vitro and in vivo.

  9. Complementary and alternative medicine use in oncology: A questionnaire survey of patients and health care professionals

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    Sweeney Karl J

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We aimed to investigate the prevalence and predictors of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM use among cancer patients and non-cancer volunteers, and to assess the knowledge of and attitudes toward CAM use in oncology among health care professionals. Methods This is a cross-sectional questionnaire survey conducted in a single institution in Ireland. Survey was performed in outpatient and inpatient settings involving cancer patients and non-cancer volunteers. Clinicians and allied health care professionals were asked to complete a different questionnaire. Results In 676 participants including 219 cancer patients; 301 non-cancer volunteers and 156 health care professionals, the overall prevalence of CAM use was 32.5% (29.1%, 30.9% and 39.7% respectively in the three study cohorts. Female gender (p Conclusions This study demonstrates a similarly high prevalence of CAM use among oncology health care professionals, cancer and non cancer patients. Patients are more likely to disclose CAM usage if they are specifically asked. Health care professionals are interested to learn more about various CAM therapies and have poor evidence-based knowledge on specific oncology treatments. There is a need for further training to meet to the escalation of CAM use among patients and to raise awareness of potential benefits and risks associated with these therapies.

  10. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use and Latina Breast Cancer Survivors’ Symptoms and Functioning

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    Christina L. Rush

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM is used widely in cancer populations, particularly among women, and has shown promise for addressing symptom and functioning outcomes. Few studies to date have evaluated CAM use and associations over time with symptoms and function among Latina breast cancer survivors. We administered a baseline (N = 136 and follow-up (n = 58 telephone survey in Spanish or English assessing Latina breast cancer survivor demographics, physical function, anxiety, depression, fatigue, satisfaction with social roles, and both CAM activities and devotional and spiritual practices. About one-third of our sample (35% baseline; 36% follow-up reported using CAM (yoga, meditation, massage, or herbal/dietary supplements. We assessed devotional and spiritual practices separately from CAM (church attendance, prayer, religious groups, and reading devotional and religious texts; the majority of Latina survivors reported devotional and spiritual practices (80% baseline; 81% follow-up. At baseline, CAM demonstrated a positive association with better physical functioning and lower depression. In contrast, CAM use at the time of follow-up appeared to be related to lower levels of satisfaction with social roles and physical function. In longitudinal analyses, devotional and spiritual practices at baseline significantly predicted lower anxiety, depression, and fatigue at follow-up. Findings suggest CAM plays a complex and not always linear role in symptoms and function outcomes for Latina breast cancer survivors. These findings contribute to the literature on longitudinal CAM use and associations with symptom and functioning outcomes among Latina breast cancer survivors.

  11. The Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Supplements of Potential Concern during Breast Cancer Chemotherapy

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    Erin Sweet

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. While many Complementary and Alternative Medicines (CAM are unlikely to interact negatively with conventional oncology treatment, some ingestible CAM substances have biological activities that may reduce the effectiveness of chemotherapy or radiation. This study surveyed women with breast cancer in order to document the extent to which women with breast cancer use these CAM substances of concern concurrently with conventional treatments. Methods. A total of 398 women completed a survey describing their use of CAM at various time points in their cancer treatment. This report focuses on a subsample of 250 women receiving chemotherapy or radiation who reported using specific one or more of several chemotherapies. Results. Of those participating, 104 (43.7% of those receiving chemotherapy (n=238 and 45 (32.3% of those receiving radiation (139; 58.4% of all patients reported using one or more CAM substances that could be cause for concern when taken concurrently. Conclusion. Research is needed to understand the real risks associated with CAM and conventional polypharmacy. If risks associated with CAM conventional polypharmacy use prove to be substantial then improved systems to assure all women get advice regarding herb and supplement use during breast cancer treatment appear to be needed.

  12. Berry Leaves: An Alternative Source of Bioactive Natural Products of Nutritional and Medicinal Value

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    Anastasia-Varvara Ferlemi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Berry fruits are recognized, worldwide, as “superfoods” due to the high content of bioactive natural products and the health benefits deriving from their consumption. Berry leaves are byproducts of berry cultivation; their traditional therapeutic use against several diseases, such as the common cold, inflammation, diabetes, and ocular dysfunction, has been almost forgotten nowadays. Nevertheless, the scientific interest regarding the leaf composition and beneficial properties grows, documenting that berry leaves may be considered an alternative source of bioactives. The main bioactive compounds in berry leaves are similar as in berry fruits, i.e., phenolic acids and esters, flavonols, anthocyanins, and procyanidins. The leaves are one of the richest sources of chlorogenic acid. In various studies, these secondary metabolites have demonstrated antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, cardioprotective, and neuroprotective properties. This review focuses on the phytochemical composition of the leaves of the commonest berry species, i.e., blackcurrant, blackberry, raspberry, bilberry, blueberry, cranberry, and lingonberry leaves, and presents their traditional medicinal uses and their biological activities in vitro and in vivo.

  13. Complementary and Alternative Medicine: A Survey of Its Use in Pediatric Oncology

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    Rafiaa Valji

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM is high among children and youths with chronic illnesses, including cancer. The objective of this study was to assess prevalence and patterns of CAM use among pediatric oncology outpatients in two academic clinics in Canada. Procedure. A survey was developed to ask patients (or their parents/guardians presenting to oncology clinics at the Stollery Children’s Hospital in Edmonton and the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO in Ottawa about current or previous use of CAM products and practices. Results. Of the 137 families approached, 129 completed the survey. Overall CAM use was 60.5% and was not significantly different between the two hospitals. The most commonly reported reason for not using CAM was lack of knowledge about it. The most common CAM products ever used were multivitamins (86.5%, vitamin C (43.2%, cold remedies (28.4%, teething remedies (27.5%, and calcium (23.0%. The most common CAM practices ever used were faith healing (51.0%, massage (46.8%, chiropractic (27.7%, and relaxation (25.5%. Many patients (40.8% used CAM products at the same time as prescription drugs. Conclusion. CAM use was high among patients at two academic pediatric oncology clinics. Although most respondents felt that their CAM use was helpful, many were not discussing it with their physicians.

  14. Berry Leaves: An Alternative Source of Bioactive Natural Products of Nutritional and Medicinal Value†

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    Ferlemi, Anastasia-Varvara; Lamari, Fotini N.

    2016-01-01

    Berry fruits are recognized, worldwide, as “superfoods” due to the high content of bioactive natural products and the health benefits deriving from their consumption. Berry leaves are byproducts of berry cultivation; their traditional therapeutic use against several diseases, such as the common cold, inflammation, diabetes, and ocular dysfunction, has been almost forgotten nowadays. Nevertheless, the scientific interest regarding the leaf composition and beneficial properties grows, documenting that berry leaves may be considered an alternative source of bioactives. The main bioactive compounds in berry leaves are similar as in berry fruits, i.e., phenolic acids and esters, flavonols, anthocyanins, and procyanidins. The leaves are one of the richest sources of chlorogenic acid. In various studies, these secondary metabolites have demonstrated antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, cardioprotective, and neuroprotective properties. This review focuses on the phytochemical composition of the leaves of the commonest berry species, i.e., blackcurrant, blackberry, raspberry, bilberry, blueberry, cranberry, and lingonberry leaves, and presents their traditional medicinal uses and their biological activities in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27258314

  15. Assessing the quality of reports of randomized trials in pediatric complementary and alternative medicine

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    Lepage Leah

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To evaluate the quality of reports of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM randomized controlled trials (RCTs in the pediatric population. We also examined whether there was a change in the quality of reporting over time. Methods We used a systematic sample of 251 reports of RCTs that used a CAM intervention. The quality of each report was assessed using the number of CONSORT checklist items included, the frequency of unclear allocation concealment, and a 5-point quality assessment instrument. Results Nearly half (40% of the CONSORT checklist items were included in the reports, with an increase in the number of items included. The majority (81.3% of RCTs reported unclear allocation concealment with no significant change over time. The quality of reports achieved approximately 40% of their maximum possible total score as assessed with the Jadad scale with no change over time. Information regarding adverse events was reported in less than one quarter of the RCTs (22% and information regarding costs was mentioned in only a minority of reports (4%. Conclusions RCTs are an important tool for evidence based health care decisions. If these studies are to be relevant in the evaluation of CAM interventions it is important that they are conducted and reported with the highest possible standards. There is a need to redouble efforts to ensure that children and their families are participating in RCTs that are conducted and reported with minimal bias. Such studies will increase their usefulness to a board spectrum of interested stakeholders.

  16. Scientific basis of botanical medicine as alternative remedies for rheumatoid arthritis.

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    Yang, Cindy L H; Or, Terry C T; Ho, Marco H K; Lau, Allan S Y

    2013-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic, systemic autoimmune inflammatory disorder that causes permanent disability and mortality to approximately 1 to 100 people in the world. Patients with RA not only suffer from pain, stiffness, swelling, and loss of function in their joints, but also have a higher risk of cardiovascular disease and lymphoma. Typically prescribed medications, including pain-relieving drugs, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID), and disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, can help to relieve pain, reduce inflammation and slow the course of disease progression in RA patients. However, the general effectiveness of the drugs has been far from satisfactory. Other therapeutic modalities like TNF-alpha (TNF-α) inhibitors and interleukin-1 receptor antagonists targeting precise pathways within the immune system are expensive and may be associated with serious side effects. Recently, botanical medicines have become popular as alternative remedies as they are believed to be efficacious, safe and have over a thousand years experience in treating patients. In this review, we will summarize recent evidence for pharmacological effects of herbs including Black cohosh, Angelica sinensis, Licorice, Tripterygium wilfordii, Centella asiatica, and Urtica dioica. Scientific research has demonstrated that these herbs have strong anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic effects. A wide range of phytochemicals including phenolic acids, phenylpropanoid ester, triterpene glycosides, phthalide, flavonoids, triterpenoid saponin, diterpene and triterpene have been isolated and demonstrated to be responsible for the biological effects of the herbs. Understanding the mechanisms of action of the herbs may provide new treatment opportunities for RA patients.

  17. Randomized controlled trials in pediatric complementary and alternative medicine: Where can they be found?

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    Ajiferuke Isola

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The safety and effectiveness of CAM interventions are of great relevance to pediatric health care providers. The objective of this study is to identify sources of reported randomized controlled trials (RCTs in the field of pediatric complementary and alternative medicine (CAM. Methods Reports of RCTs were identified by searching Medline and 12 additional bibliographic databases and by reviewing the reference lists of previously identified pediatric CAM systematic reviews. Results We identified 908 reports of RCTs that included children under 18 and investigated a CAM therapy. Since 1965, there has been a steady growth in the number of these trials that are being published. The four journals that published the most reported RCTs are The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Pediatrics, Journal of Pediatrics, and Lancet. Medline, CAB Health, and Embase were the best database sources for identifying these studies; they indexed 93.2%, 58.4% and 42.2 % respectively of the journals publishing reports of pediatric CAM RCTs. Conclusions Those working or interested in the field of pediatric CAM should routinely search Medline, CAB Health and Embase for literature in the field. The four core journals identified above should be included in their collection.

  18. Epidemiology of complementary and alternative medicine use in patients with Parkinson's disease.

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    Wang, Yan; Xie, Cheng-long; Wang, Wen-Wen; Lu, Lin; Fu, Deng-lei; Wang, Xiao-tong; Zheng, Guo-qing

    2013-08-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common and debilitating neurodegenerative disorder without a known neuroprotective cure. Currently, an increasing number of patients with PD resort to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). This study aimed to determine the epidemiology of CAM use for PD worldwide. Methodological issues included the definition of CAM, running a search strategy using five databases, and citation tracking. Six studies estimated the prevalence of CAM use for PD to be between 25.7% and 76%. The response rates in these surveys varied from 81% to 100%. Frequently utilized forms of therapy were acupuncture, massage, herbs, and vitamins/health supplements, and these therapies were mainly used to improve the associated motor symptoms of PD. However, only 11% to 20% of these patients were referred to use CAM by a healthcare professional. Of the sociodemographic and disease-specific factors, CAM use was correlated with female sex, age, age at onset of PD, longer duration of PD, degree of education, higher income, rural location, comorbidity for indications, levodopa load, and severe motor symptoms. These results suggested that CAM use is widespread among patients with PD worldwide, but the largely unexamined use of CAM requires more attention. Moreover, there is a lack of communication between physicians and patients, increasing the risks associated with CAM use and the potential for adverse events.

  19. Multimodal management of dental pain with focus on alternative medicine: A novel herbal dental gel.

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    Kumarswamy, A

    2016-01-01

    Dental pain is the most common symptom associated with a wide array of dental problems and significantly impacts the oral health-related quality of life. The epidemiology and prevalence of oral diseases that could lead to dental pain are diverse and indicate regional variations. Several researchers have dwelled into the neurobiology and pathophysiology of dental pain making the pain pathways more clear and deciphering the precise targets for the management of pain. Although a number of pharmacological drugs are available in the market, a significant percentage of the population in India prefers alternative herbal medication for relief from dental pain due to the side effects and interactions of pharmacological treatment. However, there is a void in dental literature pertaining to the use, benefits, and safety of the herbal medicines. Therefore, the present assessment has been penned down, focusing on the current multimodal approaches for treating dental pain, the current unmet need, and the role of herbal medication in India for the management of dental pain, with a discussion on novel herbal dental gel.

  20. Multimodal management of dental pain with focus on alternative medicine: A novel herbal dental gel

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    A Kumarswamy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental pain is the most common symptom associated with a wide array of dental problems and significantly impacts the oral health-related quality of life. The epidemiology and prevalence of oral diseases that could lead to dental pain are diverse and indicate regional variations. Several researchers have dwelled into the neurobiology and pathophysiology of dental pain making the pain pathways more clear and deciphering the precise targets for the management of pain. Although a number of pharmacological drugs are available in the market, a significant percentage of the population in India prefers alternative herbal medication for relief from dental pain due to the side effects and interactions of pharmacological treatment. However, there is a void in dental literature pertaining to the use, benefits, and safety of the herbal medicines. Therefore, the present assessment has been penned down, focusing on the current multimodal approaches for treating dental pain, the current unmet need, and the role of herbal medication in India for the management of dental pain, with a discussion on novel herbal dental gel.

  1. Complementary and Alternative Medicine for the Management of Cervical Radiculopathy: An Overview of Systematic Reviews

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    Xu Wei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM is widely applied in the clinical practice of neck pain owing to cervical radiculopathy (CR. While many systematic reviews exist in CAM to improve CR, research is distributed across population, intervention, comparison, and setting. Objective. This overview aims to summarize the characteristics and evaluate critically the evidence from systematic reviews. Methods. A comprehensive literature search was performed in the six databases without language restrictions on February 24, 2015. We had identified relevant systematic reviews that examined the subjects with neck pain due to cervical radiculopathy undergoing CAM. Two authors independently appraised the methodological quality using the revised assessment of multiple systematic reviews instrument. Results. We had included eight systematic reviews. The effectiveness and safety of acupotomy, acupuncture, Jingfukang granule, manual therapies, and cervical spine manipulation were investigated. Based on available evidence, the systematic reviews supported various forms of CAM for CR. Nevertheless, the methodological quality for most of systematic reviews was low or moderate. In addition, adverse reactions of primary studies were infrequent. Conclusions. Current systematic reviews showed potential advantages to CAM for CR. Due to the frequently poor methodological quality of primary studies, the conclusions should be treated with caution for clinical practice.

  2. The knowledge and attitudes towards complementary and alternative medicine among dermatologists in Turkey

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    Kürşat Göker

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: This study aimed to evaluate the knowledge of dermatologists on Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM, common methods that are widely used in their daily practices and their general approach about CAM. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional and descriptive study was carried out between May 2012 and May 2013. A questionnaire comprising 14 questions was sent to dermatologists via electronic mail. The questionnaires which were returned completely and correctly were included in the study. Results: Two hundred questionnaires were taken into consideration. 25.5% of participants were working at universities, while 20% were working at training and research hospitals, 21% were working at public hospitals and the other 33% were working at private hospitals. 80.5% of participants have “little, a little and not at all”, 16 % moderate and the other 3.5% of them had only “a lot, very much” level of information about CAT. The most frequently recommended methods among the dermatologist were topical herbal treatment (59.6%, oral herbal treatment (48.1%, herbal shampoo (46.2%, and dietary supplement and thermal spring (38.5%, respectively. Conclusion: Although many of our colleagues have lack of information about CAM, a considerable number of them could use CAM in their daily practices. A substantial proportion of dermatologists would like to be better informed about CAM.

  3. Tuberculosis management practices by private practitioners in Andhra Pradesh, India.

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    Shanta Achanta

    Full Text Available SETTING: Private medical practitioners in Visakhapatnam district, Andhra Pradesh, India. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate self-reported TB diagnostic and treatment practices amongst private medical practitioners against benchmark practices articulated in the International Standards of Tuberculosis Care (ISTC, and factors associated with compliance with ISTC. DESIGN: Cross- sectional survey using semi-structured interviews. RESULTS: Of 296 randomly selected private practitioners, 201 (68% were assessed for compliance to ISTC diagnostic and treatment standards in TB management. Only 11 (6% followed a combination of 6 diagnostic standards together and only 1 followed a combination of all seven treatment standards together. There were 28 (14% private practitioners who complied with a combination of three core ISTC (cough for tuberculosis suspects, sputum smear examination and use of standardized treatment. Higher ISTC compliance was associated with caring for more than 20 TB patients annually, prior sensitization to TB control guidelines, and practice of alternate systems of medicine. CONCLUSION: Few private practitioners in Visakhapatnam, India reported TB diagnostic and treatment practices that met ISTC. Better engagement of the private sector is urgently required to improve TB management practices and to prevent diagnostic delay and drug resistance.

  4. [Martin Heidegger, beneficence, health, and evidence based medicine--contemplations regarding ethics and complementary and alternative medicine].

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    Oberbaum, Menachem; Gropp, Cornelius

    2015-03-01

    Beneficence is considered a core principle of medical ethics. Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) is used almost synonymously with beneficence and has become the gold standard of efficiency of conventional medicine. Conventional modern medicine and EBM in particular are based on what Heidegger called calculative thinking, whereas complementary medicine (CM) is often based on contemplative thinking according to Heidegger's distinction of different thinking processes. A central issue of beneficence is the striving for health and wellbeing. EBM is little concerned directly with wellbeing, though it does claim to aim at improving quality of life by correcting pathological processes and conditions like infectious diseases, ischemic heart disease but also hypertension and hyperlipidemia. On the other hand, wellbeing is central to therapeutic efforts of CM. Scientific methods to gauge results of EBM are quantitative and based on calculative thinking, while results of treatments with CM are expressed in a qualitative way and based on meditative thinking. In order to maximize beneficence it seems important and feasible to use both approaches, by combining EBM and CM in the best interest of the individual patient.

  5. Racial and Ethnic Profiles of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use Among Young Adults in the United States: Findings From the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health.

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    Upchurch, Dawn M; Wexler Rainisch, Bethany K

    2012-10-01

    This study describes complementary and alternative medicine use among a national sample of young adults, with an emphasis on characterizing racial and ethnic differences, highlighting variation across subgroups of Hispanics. The authors examined young adults ages 18 to 27 years (n = 14 128) from wave III (2001-2002) of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Prevalence estimates and logistic regression results were weighted and adjusted for complex sample design. The study examined recent complementary and alternative medicine use in the past 12 months, recent use for each of 15 specific complementary and alternative medicine modalities, and the 5 most commonly used modalities (herbs, massage, chiropractic, relaxation, and vitamins). Results showed that 29% of young adults aged 18 to 27 years recently used complementary and alternative medicine. Prevalence was highest among Cuban Americans (42%) and lowest among blacks (22%). Young adults used a diversity of complementary and alternative medicine modalities and there were substantial differences in use across racial and ethnic groups.

  6. The use of complementary and alternative medicine products in preceding two days among Finnish parents - a population survey

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    Hämeen-Anttila Katri P

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of complementary and alternative medicines (CAM has been extensively studied globally among adult and paediatric populations. Parents, as a group, had not been studied to assess their knowledge and attitude to CAM and general medicine use. This study is necessary since parents' attitude to medicine use is known to influence their child's attitude to medicine use later in life. We therefore aim to assess the extent and types of CAM use among Finnish parents, and to determine the factors that promote the CAM use. Also, we aim to determine parents' attitude to general medicine use. Methods Children less than 12 years old, as of spring 2007, were identified from the database of the Finnish Population Register Centre and were selected by random sampling. The parents of these children were identified and a questionnaire was sent to them. Only the parent who regularly takes care of the child's medicine was requested to fill the questionnaire. Cross-tabulations and Chi-square test were used to determine the associations between categorical variables. CAMs were defined as natural products that are not registered as medicines, such as homeopathic preparations, dietary food supplements, and traditional medicinal products. Results The response rate of the survey was 67% (n = 4032. The use of CAM was 31% in the preceding two days. The most commonly used CAM products were vitamins and minerals, followed by fish oils and fatty acids. Prescription and OTC medicines were used concomitantly with CAM by one-third of the parents. CAM was frequently used by parents over 30 years (33%, female parents (32%, highly educated parents (35%, and parents with high monthly net income (3000-3999 euros, 34%. The users of CAM had more negative attitudes towards medicines than non-users of CAM. Conclusions Our findings are in accordance with those of previous studies that women over 30 years of age with a high education and income typically use CAMs

  7. Pattern and predictors of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use among pediatric patients with epilepsy.

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    Doering, Jan H; Reuner, Gitta; Kadish, Navah E; Pietz, Joachim; Schubert-Bast, Susanne

    2013-10-01

    Parents of pediatric patients with chronic conditions such as epilepsy increasingly opt for complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). However, data on the pattern and reasons of CAM use in childhood epilepsy are scarce. The objectives of this study were as follows: first, to characterize CAM use among pediatric patients with epilepsy by assessing its spectrum, prevalence, costs, and frequency of use; second, to evaluate the influence of CAM use on compliance and satisfaction with conventional care as well as to explore parent-child neurologist communication concerning CAM; and third, to investigate predictors of CAM use. A postal survey was administered to all parents of pediatric outpatients with epilepsy aged 6 to 12, who have received treatment at the neuropediatric outpatient clinic of the University Children's Hospital Heidelberg between 2007 and 2009. One hundred thirty-two of the 297 distributed questionnaires were suitable for inclusion in statistical analysis (44.7%). Forty-nine participants indicated that their children used CAM during the previous year (37.1%). Thirty different types of CAM were used, with homeopathy (55.1%), osteopathy (24.5%), and kinesiology (16.3%) being the most commonly named. A mean of 86€ (0€-500€) and 3h (1 h-30 h) per month was committed to CAM treatment. Only 53% of the users informed their child neurologist of the additional CAM treatment, while 85.6% of all parents wished to discuss CAM options with their child neurologist. Seventy-five percent of users considered the CAM treatment effective. Among the participants most likely to seek CAM treatment are parents whose children show a long duration of epileptic symptoms, parents who make use of CAM treatment themselves, and parents who value a holistic and natural treatment approach. A substantial portion of pediatric patients with epilepsy receive CAM treatment. The high prevalence of use and significant level of financial and time resources spent on CAM indicate the

  8. Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Epileptic Children in Tehran: A Cross-Sectional Study (2009-2011

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    Seyed Hassan TONEKABONI

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Tonekaboni Sh, Jafari Naeini S, Khajeh A, Yaghini O, Ghazavi A, Abdollah Gorji F. Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Epileptic Children in Tehran: A Cross-Sectional Study (2009-2011. Iran J Child Neurol. 2014 Winter; 8(1:26-31.ObjectiveAlthough the use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM has been evaluated globally, there are few studies in our country on this subject. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence, pattern of use, parental sources of information, and benefits of CAM in epileptic children in Tehran.Materials & MethodsOne hundred thirty-three parents or relatives of epileptic children who were referred to outpatient clinics or admitted in neurologic ward of four major hospitals in Tehran, were interviewed by our researcher based on a structured questionnaire; from 2009 to 2010. The information obtained comprised the demographic data of patients and their parents, frequency and morphology of convulsions, the type and sources of CAM and finally, the benefits and adverseeffects of this practice.ResultsForty-four percent of the respondents had used CAM methods either alone or in combination with other methods. The most frequently used CAM was written prayers followed by oral herbs and special diets. CAM was mainly introduced to them by relatives. Only 16.7% of these parents had discussed this matter with their children’s physicians. No efficacy to control seizure was observed for most of these methods.ConclusionThis study showed that use of CAM in our study group is relatively common and may have a potentially hazardous role in the treatment process. So, it is necessary for physicians to have enough information about CAM practice in their patients. References:National Institutes of health. More than one third of US adults use complementary and alternative medicine, according to new government survey. [Serial online] 2004 (cited 2004 May 27. Available

  9. Complementary and alternative medicine use among older Australian women - a qualitative analysis

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    McLaughlin Deirdre

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of complementary and alternative medicines (CAM among older adults is an emerging health issue, however little is known about older people's experiences of using CAM and the cultural, geographical and other determinants of CAM use in this population. This study used qualitative methods to explore older women's views of CAM and reasons for their use of CAM. Participants for the project were drawn from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (ALSWH 1921-1926 birth cohort. Women who responded positively to a question about CAM use in Survey 5 (2008 of the ALSWH were invited to participate in the study. A total of 13 rural and 12 urban women aged between 83 and 88 years agreed to be interviewed. Results The women expressed a range of views on CAM which fell into three broad themes: "push" factors such as dissatisfaction with conventional health services, "pull" factors which emphasised the positive aspects of choice and self-care in health matters, and barriers to CAM use. Overall, the "push' factors did not play a major role in the decision to use CAM, rather this was driven by "pull" factors related to health care self-responsibility and being able to source positive information about types of CAM. A number of barriers were identified such as access difficulties associated with increased age, limited mobility and restricted transport options, as well as financial constraints. Conclusions CAM use among older women was unlikely to be influenced by aspects of conventional health care ("push factors", but rather was reflective of the personal beliefs of the women and members of their close social networks ("pull factors". While it was also apparent that there were differences between the rural and urban women in their use of CAM, the reasons for this were mainly due to the difficulties inherent in accessing certain types of CAM in rural areas.

  10. Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine in a Sample of Women With Breast Cancer

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    Mariana Vidal

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to examine the usage of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM on a sample of Portuguese women with history of breast cancer. A total of 107 women with history of breast cancer attending Movimento Vencer e Viver Lisboa responded to a questionnaire designed to assess the use of CAM, as well as other variables, such as satisfaction with conventional care, health perception, perceived control over cancer, and health status (body mass index [BMI], smoking and alcohol consumption, hours of sleep, and physical activity. Forty-eight percent of the participants had used some kind of CAM in the past 12 months. The perceived control over cancer was significantly associated with CAM use (odds ratio [OR] = 1.5; 95% confidence interval [CI] = [1.2, 1.9]. CAM use was more prevalent among women aged 30 to 39 years, single, with high education, and a monthly income of 2,500€ to 2,999€. The CAM used most often were natural products, along with psychotherapy, breathing exercises, and meditation. The main reason mentioned for its use was the improved sense of well-being, and it was interesting to note that 60% of the participants who used CAM did not discuss it with their physicians. The findings support previous data that suggest that the participants’ perceived control over their cancer is a significant predictor of CAM usage, and more than half of the patients did not discuss CAM usage with their physician. Further studies with larger samples of cancer patients are warranted.

  11. The knowledge and attitudes towards complementary and alternative medicine among patients admitted dermatology outpatient clinic

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    Kürşat Göker

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: This study aimed to evaluate the knowledge and general approach towards complementary and alternative medicine (CAM among patients admitted to our outpatient clinic. Materials and Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional survey was carried out between May 2012-2013. A questionnaire comprising 25 questions was prepared and filled by using face to face interview technique in our outpatient clinic. Results: A total of 1.021 patients were included. Six hundred nineteen (60.6% were male and 402 (39.4% were female. 30.5% of the participants reported CAM and 21.8% reported dermatological purpose. Women in the 30-39 age group and patients, who were college graduate and having high income levels, were using CAM more frequently. The most common conditions for CAM use were pigmentation disorders, hair diseases and inflammatory dermatoses. The most commonly used methods were herbal products, prayer and megavitamins. 61.1% of patients using CAM reported positive effects while 5.5% had side effects. Patients were using CAM because it was often recommended. 71.3% of patients reported not knowing the side effects, 59.5% of patients stated that they would inform their doctors about CAM usage, 1/3 of the patients wanted reimbursement of CAM by the Social Security Institution and would recommend CAM they used to others, 85% of patients reported that they would prefer medical treatments firstly. 12.9% of patients using CAM had a family history of CAM use. Conclusion: We found that the rate of CAM therapies was increased in the female patients, in those with high levels of income and education and who had a family history of CAM use. We observed that our participants commonly preferred herbal products. They usually used CAM on the recommendation of a friend. They did not have enough information about the side effects. The majority of participants preferred medical treatments.

  12. High prevalence but limited evidence in complementary and alternative medicine: guidelines for future research.

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    Fischer, Felix H; Lewith, George; Witt, Claudia M; Linde, Klaus; von Ammon, Klaus; Cardini, Francesco; Falkenberg, Torkel; Fønnebø, Vinjar; Johannessen, Helle; Reiter, Bettina; Uehleke, Bernhard; Weidenhammer, Wolfgang; Brinkhaus, Benno

    2014-02-06

    The use of complementary and alternative Medicine (CAM) has increased over the past two decades in Europe. Nonetheless, research investigating the evidence to support its use remains limited. The CAMbrella project funded by the European Commission aimed to develop a strategic research agenda starting by systematically evaluating the state of CAM in the EU. CAMbrella involved 9 work packages covering issues such as the definition of CAM; its legal status, provision and use in the EU; and a synthesis of international research perspectives. Based on the work package reports, we developed a strategic and methodologically robust research roadmap based on expert workshops, a systematic Delphi-based process and a final consensus conference. The CAMbrella project suggests six core areas for research to examine the potential contribution of CAM to the health care challenges faced by the EU. These areas include evaluating the prevalence of CAM use in Europe; the EU cititzens' needs and attitudes regarding CAM; the safety of CAM; the comparative effectiveness of CAM; the effects of meaning and context on CAM outcomes; and different models for integrating CAM into existing health care systems. CAM research should use methods generally accepted in the evaluation of health services, including comparative effectiveness studies and mixed-methods designs. A research strategy is urgently needed, ideally led by a European CAM coordinating research office dedicated to fostering systematic communication between EU governments, the public, charitable and industry funders, researchers and other stakeholders. A European Centre for CAM should also be established to monitor and further a coordinated research strategy with sufficient funds to commission and promote high quality, independent research focusing on the public's health needs and pan-European collaboration. There is a disparity between highly prevalent use of CAM in Europe and solid knowledge about it. A strategic approach on CAM

  13. Searching for Controlled Trials of Complementary and Alternative Medicine: A Comparison of 15 Databases

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    Elise Cogo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This project aims to assess the utility of bibliographic databases beyond the three major ones (MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane CENTRAL for finding controlled trials of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM. Fifteen databases were searched to identify controlled clinical trials (CCTs of CAM not also indexed in MEDLINE. Searches were conducted in May 2006 using the revised Cochrane highly sensitive search strategy (HSSS and the PubMed CAM Subset. Yield of CAM trials per 100 records was determined, and databases were compared over a standardized period (2005. The Acudoc2 RCT, Acubriefs, Index to Chiropractic Literature (ICL and Hom-Inform databases had the highest concentrations of non-MEDLINE records, with more than 100 non-MEDLINE records per 500. Other productive databases had ratios between 500 and 1500 records to 100 non-MEDLINE records—these were AMED, MANTIS, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Global Health and Alt HealthWatch. Five databases were found to be unproductive: AGRICOLA, CAIRSS, Datadiwan, Herb Research Foundation and IBIDS. Acudoc2 RCT yielded 100 CAM trials in the most recent 100 records screened. Acubriefs, AMED, Hom-Inform, MANTIS, PsycINFO and CINAHL had more than 25 CAM trials per 100 records screened. Global Health, ICL and Alt HealthWatch were below 25 in yield. There were 255 non-MEDLINE trials from eight databases in 2005, with only 10% indexed in more than one database. Yield varied greatly between databases; the most productive databases from both sampling methods were Acubriefs, Acudoc2 RCT, AMED and CINAHL. Low overlap between databases indicates comprehensive CAM literature searches will require multiple databases.

  14. The use of complementary and alternative medicine among people living with diabetes in Sydney

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    Manya Kiran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM is common in patients with chronic disease such as diabetes mellitus. The primary objective of the study was to determine the overall prevalence and type of CAM use in individuals with diabetes mellitus (DM in Western Sydney and to compare the prevalence and factors associated with CAM use with the literature. Methods A multicenter cross-sectional study was undertaken using a self-completed questionnaire distributed to patients with DM attending a public hospital and specialist endocrinology clinics in the region. The type of DM and pattern of CAM utilisation were analyzed. Results Sixty nine people responded to the questionnaire: age range of 18-75 years during a twelve week collection period. Overall, 32 respondents with diabetes were using some form of CAM, resulting in a utilisation rate of 46.3%. Twenty of the 32 CAM users used CAM specifically to treat their diabetes accounting for 28.9% of the respondent sample population. Multivitamins (40%, cinnamon, Co-enzyme q10 and prayer were the most frequently used CAM modalities. There was no significant difference between males and females, age range, income or diabetes complications between CAM and non-CAM users. (p values each > 0.05 The factor most significantly associated with CAM usage was being born overseas (p = 0.044. Conclusions Almost half the respondents (46.3% used CAM: 28% used CAM specifically to treat their diabetes. Individuals born overseas were significantly more likely to use CAM than those born in Australia. Other factors such as age, gender, wealth and duration of living with diabetes were not associated with higher rate of CAM usage.

  15. A qualitative insight on complementary and alternative medicines used by hypertensive patients

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    Inas Rifaat Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The self-treatment with complementary and alternative medicines (CAMs in chronic diseases is portraying an expanding trend worldwide. Yet, little is known concerning patients' motives to use CAM in the control of blood pressure. Objective: This study aims to explore the self-use of CAM in the management of hypertension and explore patients' attitudes, perceived benefits, and disclosure to the physician. Materials and Methods: A qualitative technique was adopted and face-to-face interviews, using a validated interview guide, were carried out among twenty hypertensive patients. A purposive sampling method was used to recruit patients at Al-Karama Teaching Hospital in Baghdad; the capital of Iraq; from January to April 2015. All the interviews were audio-recorded, then transcribed verbatim and examined for thematic relationships. Results: Three major themes were identified through thematic content analysis of the interviews. These encompassed patients' understanding of CAM; experience and perceived benefits; and communication with the doctors. The use of CAM was prevalent among the majority of the respondents. The most commonly used therapies were biological-based practices (herbal remedies, special diet, vitamins, and dietary supplements; traditional therapies (Al-Hijama or cupping; and to a less extent of manipulative body-based therapies (reflexology. Factors influencing the use of CAM were traditions, social relationships, religious beliefs, low-cost therapy, and safety of natural products. Conclusion: The use of CAM was common as a practice of self-treatment among hypertensive patients in Iraq. This was underpinned by the cultural effects, social relationships, religious beliefs, and the perception that natural products are effective and safe. Understanding patients' usage of CAM is of great importance as long as patient's safety and interaction with the standard prescribed treatment are major concerns.

  16. Complementary and alternative medicine use among women during pregnancy and childbearing years

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    Holden, Selma C.; Gardiner, Paula; Birdee, Gurjeet; Davis, Roger B.; Yeh, Gloria Y.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Little is known regarding complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use during pregnancy and the preconception period. Since half of all U.S. pregnancies are unintended, understanding the patterns of CAM use among women of childbearing age has implications for fetal and maternal health. Methods Descriptive statistics were generated from the 2012 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) to estimate weighted prevalence and patterns of CAM use by women of childbearing age. Comparisons were made between pregnant and non-pregnant respondents. Results In this sample of 10,002 women, 7% (n=727) were recently pregnant. Over one third of all the women used CAM during the previous year (34%/38%, pregnant/non-pregnant, respectively) and only half disclosed CAM use to conventional providers (50%/49%). In the adjusted model, taking multivitamins (OR=2.52 [2.22–2.86]) and moderate to heavy alcohol use (1.92 [1.53–2.41] were more likely associated with CAM use. The two most commonly used modalities were herbs (14%/17%) and yoga (13%/16%). The top reasons for CAM use were to improve general wellness or to prevent disease (33%/35%) and to treat back pain (16%/18%). When examining all pregnancy-related symptoms treated with CAM, no difference was found in the rates of CAM use between pregnant and non-pregnant users. Conclusions CAM use by women of childbearing age in the U.S is common, with over a third of the population using one or more therapies. However, only half disclosed their use to conventional providers despite limited evidence on safety and effectiveness. This study highlights the important need for further research in this area. PMID:26111221

  17. A qualitative insight on complementary and alternative medicines used by hypertensive patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Inas Rifaat; Hassali, Mohamed Azmi; Saleem, Fahad; Al Tukmagi, Haydar F.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The self-treatment with complementary and alternative medicines (CAMs) in chronic diseases is portraying an expanding trend worldwide. Yet, little is known concerning patients’ motives to use CAM in the control of blood pressure. Objective: This study aims to explore the self-use of CAM in the management of hypertension and explore patients’ attitudes, perceived benefits, and disclosure to the physician. Materials and Methods: A qualitative technique was adopted and face-to-face interviews, using a validated interview guide, were carried out among twenty hypertensive patients. A purposive sampling method was used to recruit patients at Al-Karama Teaching Hospital in Baghdad; the capital of Iraq; from January to April 2015. All the interviews were audio-recorded, then transcribed verbatim and examined for thematic relationships. Results: Three major themes were identified through thematic content analysis of the interviews. These encompassed patients’ understanding of CAM; experience and perceived benefits; and communication with the doctors. The use of CAM was prevalent among the majority of the respondents. The most commonly used therapies were biological-based practices (herbal remedies, special diet, vitamins, and dietary supplements); traditional therapies (Al-Hijama or cupping); and to a less extent of manipulative body-based therapies (reflexology). Factors influencing the use of CAM were traditions, social relationships, religious beliefs, low-cost therapy, and safety of natural products. Conclusion: The use of CAM was common as a practice of self-treatment among hypertensive patients in Iraq. This was underpinned by the cultural effects, social relationships, religious beliefs, and the perception that natural products are effective and safe. Understanding patients’ usage of CAM is of great importance as long as patient's safety and interaction with the standard prescribed treatment are major concerns. PMID:28216951

  18. Use of complementary and alternative medicine among Thai patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ausanee Wanchai; Duangjai Phrompayak

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:Patients with diabetes commonly use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Little is known about types and factors related to CAM use in patients with diabetes in Thailand. This study aimed to examine types and factors that were associated with CAM use in Thai diabetic patients. METHODS: A cross-sectional study of diabetic patients being treated in four primary healthcare units and two secondary hospitals in the north of Thailand was conducted. A questionnaire was used to colect data. Frequency, percentage, and Chi-square test were used to describe or analyze data. RESULTS:The three most common types of CAM used by samples were Daode Xinxi (a modifi ed version of Taichi), prayer and meditation. Women were more likely to use CAM than men (χ2=5.038, P=0.018). Patients aged between 40 and 69 years were more likely to use CAM than those aged younger than 40 or older than 69 years (χ2=11.041,P=0.026). Farmers were more likely to use CAM than those with other careers (χ2=19.248,P=0.007). Diabetes patients whose time since diagnosis was between 1 and 10 years were more likely to use CAM than those with a longer elapsed time since diagnosis (χ2= 8.407,P= 0.038). Marital status, religion, education, health insurance type and conventional treatment approaches were not associated with CAM use in diabetic patients. CONCLUSION:The most common type of CAM used by Thai patients with diabetes was mind and body practice. CAM use was signifi cantly associated with gender, age, career and duration of diabetes. However, marital status, religion, education, health insurance types and conventional regimen for diabetics were not associated with CAM use.

  19. The NAFKAM International Registry of Exceptional Courses of Disease Related to the Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fønnebø, Vinjar; Drageset, Brit J; Salamonsen, Anita

    2012-03-01

    The increasing use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) represents a continuing demand for treatment approaches in parallel with, or as an alternative to, conventional healthcare delivery.(1,2) Some patients report considerable health improvements related to their use of CAM,(3-6) and others report no effect or possibly harm.(7) Limited efforts have been made so far to systematically collect patients' personal experiences with various CAM therapies. Methods to collect "best cases" after the use of CAM in cancer patients have been initiated in the United States and Germany.(5,8,9.)

  20. Using Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) to Promote Stress Resilience in Those with Co-Occurring Mild TBI and PTSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    affects aspects of day-to-day function, such as memory , sleep, mood, psychiatric health and stress resilience. This information will help identify...health, memory and in a laboratory stress task. Veterans have been recruited since regulatory approval was obtained (August 2012) and enrolled in the...1 Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0037 TITLE: : Using Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) to Promote Stress Resilience in those with Co

  1. A Patient-defined “Best Case” of Multiple Sclerosis Related to the Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Salamonsen, Anita; Drageset, Brit Johanne; Fønnebø, Vinjar

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chronically ill people are frequent users of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Some patients experience great benefits from their use of CAM, like patient “XX” in this case report. XX was diagnosed with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis in 2004 and has reported a “best case” after the use of Dr Birgitta Brunes' unconventional treatment. The patient reports that many of her symptoms that, according to her neurologist, were irreversible are gone or have been greatly ...

  2. Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Management of Premature Ejaculation: A Systematic Review

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    Katy Cooper, PhD

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion: There is preliminary evidence for the effectiveness of acupuncture, Chinese herbal medicine, Ayurvedic herbal medicine, and topical severance secret cream in improving IELT and other outcomes. However, results are based on clinically heterogeneous studies of unclear quality. There are sparse data on adverse effects or potential for drug interactions. Further well-conducted randomized controlled trials would be valuable.

  3. A pilot study of complementary and alternative medicine use in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome

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    Wall GC

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS is a complex disorder, with primary symptoms of sleep disturbances, pain, and fatigue. FMS is one of the most common reasons for patient visits to a rheumatologist. Previous studies have suggested that complementary and alternative medicine (CAM use in patients with rheumatic diseases is common, but such data specific to FMS patients is limited. Objective: The following study sought to describe the prevalence of CAM use in a primary care practice of patients with FMS and assess whether these patients discuss CAM use with their physician, physician-extender, and/or pharmacist. Methods: A one-group cross-sectional survey design was implemented in a large, community-based, private physician practice of patients diagnosed with FMS. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed during clinic visits. It solicited information related to demographic characteristics; FMS-specific health background; whether CAM use had been discussed with a health care provider; and the “ever-use” of common types of CAM. Respondents returned the questionnaire via US mail in a postage-paid, self-addressed envelope. Results: A total of 115 surveys were distributed with 54 returned for analysis (47% completion rate. The sample was predominantly female, well educated and had a mean age of 55.6 years. All respondents were White. Most respondents (92.6% reported using some type of CAM. Exercise (92.2%, chiropractic treatment (48.1%, lifestyle and diet (45.8%, relaxation therapy (44.9%, and dietary and herbal supplements (36.5% were most commonly reported CAM therapies “ever-used” by respondents. Dietary and herbal supplements with the highest prevalence of “ever-use” were magnesium (19.2%, guaifenesin (11.5%, and methylsulfonylmethane (MSM (9.6%. Respondents most commonly discussed CAM with the clinic rheumatologist and the primary care physician (53.7% and 38.9%, respectively. Only 14.8% of respondents discussed CAM with a pharmacist

  4. Complementary and Alternative Medicine use in oncology: A questionnaire survey of patients and health care professionals

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chang, Kah Hoong

    2011-05-24

    Abstract Background We aimed to investigate the prevalence and predictors of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) use among cancer patients and non-cancer volunteers, and to assess the knowledge of and attitudes toward CAM use in oncology among health care professionals. Methods This is a cross-sectional questionnaire survey conducted in a single institution in Ireland. Survey was performed in outpatient and inpatient settings involving cancer patients and non-cancer volunteers. Clinicians and allied health care professionals were asked to complete a different questionnaire. Results In 676 participants including 219 cancer patients; 301 non-cancer volunteers and 156 health care professionals, the overall prevalence of CAM use was 32.5% (29.1%, 30.9% and 39.7% respectively in the three study cohorts). Female gender (p < 0.001), younger age (p = 0.004), higher educational background (p < 0.001), higher annual household income (p = 0.001), private health insurance (p = 0.001) and non-Christian (p < 0.001) were factors associated with more likely CAM use. Multivariate analysis identified female gender (p < 0.001), non-Christian (p = 0.001) and private health insurance (p = 0.015) as independent predictors of CAM use. Most health care professionals thought they did not have adequate knowledge (58.8%) nor were up to date with the best evidence (79.2%) on CAM use in oncology. Health care professionals who used CAM were more likely to recommend it to patients (p < 0.001). Conclusions This study demonstrates a similarly high prevalence of CAM use among oncology health care professionals, cancer and non cancer patients. Patients are more likely to disclose CAM usage if they are specifically asked. Health care professionals are interested to learn more about various CAM therapies and have poor evidence-based knowledge on specific oncology treatments. There is a need for further training to meet to the escalation of CAM use among patients and to raise awareness of

  5. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use in the US Adult Low Back Pain Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghildayal, Neha; Johnson, Pamela Jo; Evans, Roni L; Kreitzer, Mary Jo

    2016-01-01

    背景:许多有腰背痛 (Low Back Pain, LBP) 的人都发现常规药物治疗不足以管理其腰背痛,并越来越多地转向补充和替代医学 (Complementary and Alternative Medicine, CAM) 来疼痛缓解。需要全面描绘 CAM 在 LBP 人群中的使用情况,包括所有最常用的方式。研究目标:通过限制性与非限制性 LBP 考察在美国 LBP 人群中使用 CAM 的普遍性和感知利益,同时评估去年在 LBP 人群中使用 CAM 的几率。方法:数据来自于 2012 年国家健康访谈调查,替代健康补充。我们考察了美国成人 LBP 患者的全国代表性样本(N=9665,未加权)。使用多次逻辑回归估计去年使用 CAM的几率。结果:总体而言,41.2% 的 LBP 人群去年使用了 CAM,其中在限制性 LBP 患者中报告的使用率较高。LBP人群中使用最多的疗法包括草药补充剂、整脊疗法和按摩。多数 LBP人群使用了专用于治疗背痛的 CAM,在使用 CAM 治疗背痛者中,58.1% 感觉受益匪浅。结论:结果表明,CAM 正成为 LBP病患护理越来越重要的组成部分。进一步了解 CAM 在 LBP 人群中的使用方式将帮助卫生保健专业人员作出更加知情的护理决定,并指导研究者发展未来的背痛相关 CAM 研究。.

  6. Alternatives to relational databases in precision medicine: Comparison of NoSQL approaches for big data storage using supercomputers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez, Enrique Israel

    Improvements in medical and genomic technologies have dramatically increased the production of electronic data over the last decade. As a result, data management is rapidly becoming a major determinant, and urgent challenge, for the development of Precision Medicine. Although successful data management is achievable using Relational Database Management Systems (RDBMS), exponential data growth is a significant contributor to failure scenarios. Growing amounts of data can also be observed in other sectors, such as economics and business, which, together with the previous facts, suggests that alternate database approaches (NoSQL) may soon be required for efficient storage and management of big databases. However, this hypothesis has been difficult to test in the Precision Medicine field since alternate database architectures are complex to assess and means to integrate heterogeneous electronic health records (EHR) with dynamic genomic data are not easily available. In this dissertation, we present a novel set of experiments for identifying NoSQL database approaches that enable effective data storage and management in Precision Medicine using patients' clinical and genomic information from the cancer genome atlas (TCGA). The first experiment draws on performance and scalability from biologically meaningful queries with differing complexity and database sizes. The second experiment measures performance and scalability in database updates without schema changes. The third experiment assesses performance and scalability in database updates with schema modifications due dynamic data. We have identified two NoSQL approach, based on Cassandra and Redis, which seems to be the ideal database management systems for our precision medicine queries in terms of performance and scalability. We present NoSQL approaches and show how they can be used to manage clinical and genomic big data. Our research is relevant to the public health since we are focusing on one of the main

  7. New opportunities and proven approaches in complementary and alternative medicine research at the National Institutes of Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlan, W R

    2001-01-01

    This presentation describes some of the issues that arise when applying the clinical-trial approach of conventional medicine to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) modalities. Conventional medicine has been making the evolution to using an evidence base and to making recommendations only when the evidence is strong. The National Center for Complementary Medicine (NCCAM), one of twenty-five Institutes or Centers of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), is working to hold CAM to the same high standards, not by rejecting previous CAM research, but by building on that strong evidence base of what works and what is safe. The process for conventional drug and device development follows an orderly process of preclinical studies (usually on animals), phase I, phase II, and phase III studies (with the large human clinical trial phase taking place in phase III). Today, the randomized controlled trial is recognized as providing the highest level of scientific evidence. This conventional medicine approach to development is now being used to develop complementary and alternative therapies. For instance, the discovery and development of Taxol (Bristol-Meyers Squibb, New York, NY), an extract from the bark of the Pacific yew tree that is now a widely used chemotherapeutic agent, followed the conventional pathway to approval and marketing. But for most CAM products, the pathway is not so straightforward. Most CAM therapies are traditional therapies or new products that are already available to the public. Most of what is known about these therapies is of an anecdotal nature. There has been little isolation of the active principals from the crude product and there has usually been no preclinical testing. This presentation details various approaches and programs that address how to plan and conduct a rigorous clinical trial of a CAM product. And, while it takes a good deal of persistence and a strong focus on what are the critical principals in a trial, I conclude that

  8. To what extent can traditional medicine contribute a complementary or alternative solution to malaria control programmes?

    OpenAIRE

    Malebo Hamisi M; Kitua Andrew Y; Graz Bertrand

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Recent studies on traditional medicine (TM) have begun to change perspectives on TM effects and its role in the health of various populations. The safety and effectiveness of some TMs have been studied, paving the way to better collaboration between modern and traditional systems. Traditional medicines still remain a largely untapped health resource: they are not only sources of new leads for drug discoveries, but can also provide lessons and novel approaches that may have direct pub...

  9. Use of complementary and alternative medicine in children with autism and other developmental disabilities: associations with ethnicity, child comorbid symptoms, and parental stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valicenti-McDermott, Maria; Burrows, Bethany; Bernstein, Leora; Hottinger, Kathryn; Lawson, Katharine; Seijo, Rosa; Schechtman, Merryl; Shulman, Lisa; Shinnar, Shlomo

    2014-03-01

    The use of complementary and alternative medicine by children with autism and the association of its use with child comorbid symptoms and parental stress was studied in an ethnically diverse population, in a cross-sectional study with structured interviews. The sample included 50 families of children with autism and 50 families of children with other developmental disabilities, matched by age/gender. Interview included the Complementary and Alternative Medicine Questionnaire, Gastrointestinal Questionnaire, Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire, Aberrant Behavior Checklist, and Parenting Stress Index. In this ethnically diverse sample, the use of complementary and alternative medicine was significantly higher for the autism group. In the autism group, use was significantly related to child's irritability, hyperactivity, food allergies, and parental stress; in the developmental disabilities group, there was no association with child comorbid symptoms or parental stress. The results contribute information to health care providers about families of children with autism who are more likely to use complementary and alternative medicine.

  10. Use of complementary and alternative medicine by those with a chronic disease and the general population - results of a national population based survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McChesney Jane

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM is becoming more common, but population-based descriptions of its patterns of use are lacking. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of CAM use in the general population and for those with asthma, diabetes, epilepsy and migraine. Methods Data from cycles 1.1, 2.1 and 3.1 of the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS were used for the study. The CCHS is a national cross-sectional survey administered to 400,055 Canadians aged ≥12 between 2001-2005. Self-reported information about professionally diagnosed health conditions was elicited. CCHS surveys use a multistage stratified cluster design to randomly select a representative sample of Canadian household residents. Descriptive data on the utilization of CAM services was calculated and logistic regression was used to determine what sociodemographic factors predict CAM use. Results Weighted estimates show that 12.4% (95% Confidence Interval (CI: 12.2-12.5 of Canadians visited a CAM practitioner in the year they were surveyed; this rate was significantly higher for those with asthma 15.1% (95% CI: 14.5-15.7 and migraine 19.0% (95% CI: 18.4-19.6, and significantly lower for those with diabetes 8.0% (95% CI: 7.4-8.6 while the rate in those with epilepsy (10.3%, 95% CI: 8.4-12.2 was not significantly different from the general population. Conclusion A large proportion of Canadians use CAM services. Physicians should be aware that their patients may be accessing other services and should be prepared to ask and answer questions about the risks and benefits of CAM services in conjunction with standard medical care.

  11. Educational intervention to improve physician reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs in a primary care setting in complementary and alternative medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ostermann Thomas

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies have shown that adverse drug reactions (ADRs are underreported. This may be particularly true of ADRs associated with complementary and alternative medicine (CAM. Data on CAM-related ADRs, however, are sparse. Objective was to evaluate the impact of an educational intervention and monitoring programme designed to improve physician reporting of ADRs in a primary care setting. Methods A prospective multicentre study with 38 primary care practitioners specialized in CAM was conducted from January 2004 through June 2007. After 21 month all physicians received an educational intervention in terms of face-to-face training to assist them in classifying and reporting ADRs. The study centre monitored the quantity and quality of ADR reports and analysed the results. To measure changes in the ADR reporting rate, the median number of ADR reports and interquartile range (IQR were calculated before and after the educational intervention. The pre-intervention and post-intervention quality of the reports was assessed in terms of changes in the completeness of data provided for obligatory items. Interrater reliability between the physicians and the study centre was calculated using Cohen's kappa with a 95% confidence interval (CI. We used Mann Whitney U-test for testing continuous data and chi-square test was used for categorical data. The level of statistical significance was set at P Results A total of 404 ADRs were reported during the complete study period. An initial 148% increase (P = 0.001 in the number of ADR reports was observed after the educational intervention. Compared to baseline the postinterventional number of ADR reportings was statistically significant higher (P P Conclusion The results of the present study demonstrate that an educational intervention can increase physician awareness of ADRs. Participating physicians were able to incorporate the knowledge they had gained from face-to-face training into their

  12. Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP): Emergence As an Alternative Technology for Herbal Medicine Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing-Jian; Xiong, Chao; Liu, Yue; Liang, Jun-Song; Zhou, Xing-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Correct identification of medicinal plant ingredients is essential for their safe use and for the regulation of herbal drug supply chain. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is a recently developed approach to identify herbal medicine species. This novel molecular biology technique enables timely and accurate testing, especially in settings where infrastructures to support polymerase chain reaction facilities are lacking. Studies that used this method have altered our view on the extent and complexity of herbal medicine identification. In this review, we give an introduction into LAMP analysis, covers the basic principles and important aspects in the development of LAMP analysis method. Then we presented a critical review of the application of LAMP-based methods in detecting and identifying raw medicinal plant materials and their processed products. We also provide a practical standard operating procedure (SOP) for the utilization of the LAMP protocol in herbal authentication, and consider the prospects of LAMP technology in the future developments of herbal medicine identification and the challenges associated with its application.

  13. ‘A necessary evil that does not “really” cure disease’: The domestication of biomedicine by Dutch holistic general practitioners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.J. Raaphorst (Nadine); D. Houtman (Dick)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractAgainst the background of studies about the domestication of complementary and alternative medicine into biomedical settings, this article studies how biomedicine is integrated into holistic settings. Data from 19 in-depth interviews with Dutch holistic general practitioners who combine

  14. Complementary and alternative medicine in the treatment of refugees and survivors of torture: a review and proposal for action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longacre, McKenna; Silver-Highfield, Ellen; Lama, Puja; Grodin, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Survivors of torture and refugee trauma often have increased needs for mental and physical healthcare. This is due in part to the complex sequelae of trauma, including chronic pain, major depressive disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and somatization. This article reviews the scientific medical literature for the efficacy and feasibility of some complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) modalities including meditation, Ayurveda, pranayama/yogic breathing, massage/body-work, dance/movement, spirituality, yoga, music, Traditional Chinese Medicine and acupuncture, qigong, t'ai chi, chiropractic, homeopathy, aromatherapy and Reiki specifically with respect to survivors of torture and refugee trauma. We report that preliminary research suggests that the certain CAM modalities may prove effective as part of an integrated treatment plan for survivors of torture and refugee trauma. Further research is warranted.

  15. Comparison of methods for controlling dental caries in the classical medicine and alternative medical practices and future prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabbani Khorasgani Mohammad

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Dental caries is a multi-factorial disease and the most common human infection that annually are spent millions dollars to control and treat it. Several methods have been proposed so far to control it. The most important control methods it is now include : dental hygiene, proper nutrition , fluoride therapy , the use of non- cariogenic sweeteners . Also, the use of probiotics , nanomaterials , bacteriophages , antimicrobial peptides and anti- caries vaccines can be considered as new perspective of human in the dental caries control field. In addition, the use of complementary and alternative therapies , especially herbal drug therapy recently has been considered . Demonstrating the efficacy of complementary medicine against dental caries and its use in combination with conventional medicine or trial of new methods for decline of dental caries in the future would be hopeful.

  16. Professional ethics in complementary and alternative medicines in management of Parkinson’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee Jin; Jeon, Beomseok; Chung, Sun Ju

    2016-01-01

    The practice of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is not, at present, considered an integral part of conventional medicine. As the popularity of CAM grows and access to information about CAM increases through the media and internet where CAMs are often promoted, patients are at risk of exposure unvalidated information. Therefore, there is a need for physicians to examine objectively the efficacy and safety of CAM, compare it with current medications, and become actively involved in the CAM treatment with patients. In accordance with these needs, this manuscript reviews the utility, scientific evidence, safety and cost-effectiveness of CAM in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease (PD). We also address the ethical issues of CAM practices. PMID:27589539

  17. Statistical literacy for clinical practitioners

    CERN Document Server

    Holmes, William H

    2014-01-01

    This textbook on statistics is written for students in medicine, epidemiology, and public health. It builds on the important role evidence-based medicine now plays in the clinical practice of physicians, physician assistants and allied health practitioners. By bringing research design and statistics to the fore, this book can integrate these skills into the curricula of professional programs. Students, particularly practitioners-in-training, will learn statistical skills that are required of today’s clinicians. Practice problems at the end of each chapter and downloadable data sets provided by the authors ensure readers get practical experience that they can then apply to their own work.  Topics covered include:   Functions of Statistics in Clinical Research Common Study Designs Describing Distributions of Categorical and Quantitative Variables Confidence Intervals and Hypothesis Testing Documenting Relationships in Categorical and Quantitative Data Assessing Screening and Diagnostic Tests Comparing Mean...

  18. Comparative Evaluation of the Complementary and Alternative Medicine Therapy and Conventional Therapy Use for Musculoskeletal Disorders Management and Its Association with Job Satisfaction among Dentists of West India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Devanand; Batra, Renu; Mahajan, Shveta; Bhaskar, Dara John; Jain, Ankita; Shiju, Mohammed; Yadav, Ankit; Chaturvedi, Mudita; Gill, Shruti; Verma, Renuka; Dalai, Deepak Ranjan; Gupta, Rajendra Kumar

    2014-10-01

    Musculoskeletal problems have become a significant issue in the profession of dentistry. There are currently no recommended effective disease-preventing and modifying remedies. High prevalence rates for musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) among dentists have been reported in the literature. Complementary and alternative medicine can be helpful in managing and preventing the MSDs. The purpose of this study was to determine if dentists in the western part of India are using complementary and alternative medicine therapies for MSDs, and also to find if those who use complementary and alternative medicine therapies have greater job/career satisfaction compared to conventional therapy (CT) users. Dentists of western India registered under the Dental Council of India (N = 2166) were recruited for the study. Data were analyzed using univariate and bivariate analyses and logistic regression. A response rate of 73% (n = 1581) was obtained, of which 79% (n = 1249) was suffering from MSDs. The use of complementary and alternative medicine or CT was reported by 90% (n = 1124) of dentists with MSDs. Dentists using complementary and alternative medicine reported greater health (P alternative medicine therapies may improve the quality of life and enhance job satisfaction for a dentist who suffers from MSDs.

  19. An evaluation on levels of knowledge, attitude and behavior of people at 65 years and above about alternative medicine living in Ankara.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, Ozlem; Santaş, Fatih; Yıldırım, Hasan Hüseyin

    2012-01-01

    The aim was to determine the knowledge, attitude and behavioral levels of people at and above 65 years of age, living in Ankara (Turkey) about alternative medicine. The study was carried out between March - April 2010 through survey application of 200 participants by selective random sampling from the population. Data obtained as a result of the survey were analyzed by SPSS program. The study revealed that 83.5% of the participants believed in alternative therapy methods but 16.5% of them did not. It is concluded that herbal therapy methods are the most frequently used methods with a 63% rate among other alternative therapy methods. When status of the participants was analyzed it was found that it was found that 69% received the information about alternative medicines from their family while 53.5% received it from television This study revealed that alternative medicine is profoundly used by people above 65 years of age in Ankara.

  20. Integrating complementary/alternative medicine into primary care: evaluating the evidence and appropriate implementation [Corrigendum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wainapel SF

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Wainapel SF, Rand S, Fishman LM, Halstead-Kenny J. Int J Gen Med. 2015;8:361–372.On page 364, left column, line 15, Doctor of Osteopathy should have been Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine. View original article by Wainapel et al. 

  1. Use and satisfaction of complementary and alternative medicine among diabetic patients in a tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica N.

    2016-12-01

    Conclusions: Doctors should enquire diabetics regarding CAM use since the voluntary disclosure is very less. Keeping lines of communication open for any discussions regarding pros and cons of CAM. Increasing patient awareness about potential drug interactions, when CAM is practised along with conventional medicine. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2016; 5(6.000: 2521-2527

  2. To what extent can traditional medicine contribute a complementary or alternative solution to malaria control programmes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malebo Hamisi M

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent studies on traditional medicine (TM have begun to change perspectives on TM effects and its role in the health of various populations. The safety and effectiveness of some TMs have been studied, paving the way to better collaboration between modern and traditional systems. Traditional medicines still remain a largely untapped health resource: they are not only sources of new leads for drug discoveries, but can also provide lessons and novel approaches that may have direct public-health and economic impact. To optimize such impact, several interventions have been suggested, including recognition of TM's economic and medical worth at academic and health policy levels; establishing working relationships with those prescribing TM; providing evidence for safety and effectiveness of local TM through appropriate studies with malaria patients; spreading results for clinical recommendations and health policy development; implementing and evaluating results of new health policies that officially integrate TM.

  3. To what extent can traditional medicine contribute a complementary or alternative solution to malaria control programmes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graz, Bertrand; Kitua, Andrew Y; Malebo, Hamisi M

    2011-03-15

    Recent studies on traditional medicine (TM) have begun to change perspectives on TM effects and its role in the health of various populations. The safety and effectiveness of some TMs have been studied, paving the way to better collaboration between modern and traditional systems. Traditional medicines still remain a largely untapped health resource: they are not only sources of new leads for drug discoveries, but can also provide lessons and novel approaches that may have direct public-health and economic impact. To optimize such impact, several interventions have been suggested, including recognition of TM's economic and medical worth at academic and health policy levels; establishing working relationships with those prescribing TM; providing evidence for safety and effectiveness of local TM through appropriate studies with malaria patients; spreading results for clinical recommendations and health policy development; implementing and evaluating results of new health policies that officially integrate TM.

  4. Screening for alternative antibiotics: an investigation into the antimicrobial activities of medicinal food plants of Mauritius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahomoodally, M F; Gurib-Fakim, A; Subratty, A H

    2010-04-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the antimicrobial activities of 2 endemic medicinal plants; Faujasiopsis flexuosa (Asteraceae) (FF) and Pittosporum senacia (Pittosporaceae) (PS) and 2 exotic medicinal plants, Momordica charantia (Cucurbitaceae) (MC) and Ocimum tenuiflorum (Lamiaceae) (OT) that forms part of local pharmacopoeia of Mauritius and correlate any observed activity with its phytochemical profile. Aqueous and organic fractions of the leaves, fruits, and seeds of these plants were subjected to antimicrobial testing by the disc diffusion method against 8 clinical isolates of bacteria and 2 strains of fungus. It was found that MC, OT, and FF possessed antimicrobial properties against the test organisms. The MIC for MC ranged from 0.5 to 9 mg/mL and that of FF from 2 to 10 mg/mL and the lowest MIC value (0.5 mg/mL) was recorded for the unripe fruits of MC against E. coli. On the other hand, higher concentration of the unripe MC fruit extract of 9 mg/mL was needed to be effective against a resistant strain of Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The antimicrobial effect against MRSA was lost upon ripening of the fruits. The methanolic extract of both MC and FF showed highest MIC values compared to the corresponding aqueous extract, which indicates the low efficacy and the need of higher doses of the plant extract. Phytochemical screening of the plants showed the presence of at least tannins, phenols, flavonoids, and alkaloids, which are known antimicrobial phyto-compounds. In conclusion, the observed antimicrobial properties would tend to further validate the medicinal properties of these commonly used endemic medicinal and food plants of Mauritius.

  5. The paradox of non-evidence based, publicly funded complementary alternative medicine in the English National Health Service: An explanation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Maria K

    2015-10-01

    Despite the unproven effectiveness of many practices that are under the umbrella term 'complementary alternative medicine' (CAM), there is provision of CAM within the English National Health Service (NHS). Moreover, although the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence was established to promote scientifically validated medicine in the NHS, the paradox of publicly funded, non-evidence based CAM can be explained as linked with government policy of patient choice and specifically patient treatment choice. Patient choice is useful in the political and policy discourse as it is open to different interpretations and can be justified by policy-makers who rely on the traditional NHS values of equity and universality. Treatment choice finds expression in the policy of personalised healthcare linked with patient responsibilisation which finds resonance in the emphasis CAM places on self-care and self-management. More importantly, however, policy-makers also use patient choice and treatment choice as a policy initiative with the objective of encouraging destabilisation of the entrenched healthcare institutions and practices considered resistant to change. This political strategy of system reform has the unintended, paradoxical consequence of allowing for the emergence of non-evidence based, publicly funded CAM in the NHS. The political and policy discourse of patient choice thus trumps evidence based medicine, with patients that demand access to CAM becoming the unwitting beneficiaries.

  6. The current acceptance, accessibility and recognition of Chinese and Ayurvedic medicine in the United States in the public, governmental, and industrial sectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jongbae J; Beckman-Harned, Selena; Cho, Gayoung; Kim, Duckhee; Kim, Hangon

    2012-06-01

    To assess the current level of acceptance in the United States of complementary and alternative medicine, recent research into the prevalence, acceptance, accessibility, and recognition of complementary and alternative therapies were reviewed. Several signs point to an increasing acceptance of complementary and alternative medicine in the United States; the use of complementary and alternative medicine is significantly increasing, many aspects of Chinese medicine and Ayurveda are becoming mainstream, practitioners in the United States are beginning to be licensed, and insurance companies are beginning to cover some complementary and alternative therapies. Remaining challenges to true acceptance include the restrictive Western mindset, the absence of published studies, a lack of consistent manufacturing processes and quality standards, and a fear of adulteration. Although the field still faces many challenges, alternative and complementary medicine, including Chinese medicine and Ayurvedic medicine, is becoming more accepted and accessible in the United States.

  7. [Diabetes and alternative medicine: diabetic patients experiences with Ayur-Ved, "clinical ecology" and "cellular nutrition" methods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanelli, M; Chiari, G; Gugliotta, M; Capuano, C; Giacalone, T; Gruppi, L; Condò, M

    2002-04-01

    In the last two years we discovered that three of our patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (0.8%) suffered an unexpected worsening in their glycemic control due to a reduction of their insulin dosage in favour of some "alternative" diabetes treatments using herbs, vitamins, fantastic diets and trace elements prescribed by non-medical practitioners. The first patient, a 6.6 year old boy, was admitted to hospital because of a severe ketoacidosis with first degree coma as a result of his parents having reduced his insulin dosage by 77% and replacing the insulin with an ayurvedic herbal preparation (Bardana Actium Lapp). The second patient, a 10.4 year old boy, was admitted to hospital after his teachers noticed that he appeared tired, thinner and polyuric. During hospital admission for mild ketoacidosis the mother, reluctant at first, finally confessed that her son was under the care of a "clinical ecologist". Having identified several food allergies this "clinical ecologist" had placed the child on a spartan diet of bread, water and salt, and had reduced his insulin dosage by 68%. The third patient, a 21 year old male, upon transfer to the Adult Diabetic Center, reported that he had been under the care of a pranotherapist for several years. The pranotherapist had prescribed a cellular nutrition preparation (called "Madonna drops"), a meditation program and also a 50% reduction in his insulin dosage. During this period his HbAlc values had increased from 6.4% to 12%. Current orthodox diabetes treatments are considered unsatisfactory by many people and it is thus not surprising that they search for "miracle" cures. It is important, however, that hospital staff do not ridicule the patients or their parents for trying these alternative therapies. Nevertheless, it would be useful for staff to discuss in advance these "therapies" with patients, highlighting their ineffectiveness and strongly discouraging cures that call for a reduction or elimination of the insulin

  8. The influence of communication and information sources upon decision-making around complementary and alternative medicine use for back pain among Australian women aged 60-65 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Vijayendra; Adams, Jon; Broom, Alex; Kirby, Emma; Refshauge, Kathryn M; Sibbritt, David

    2017-01-01

    This study examined factors influencing decision-making on complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use for back pain and back pain sufferers' communication about CAM use. A cross-sectional postal survey was conducted in 2011/2012 as a sub-study of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (ALSWH). The sample contained 1620 women from the 1945-1951 cohort of the ALSWH, aged 60-65 years who were eligible for the sub-study, as they had experienced back pain during 12 months prior to the survey. Of these, 1310 (80.9%) returned completed questionnaires. A significant proportion of women consulted a CAM practitioner (76%, n = 1001) and/or had self-prescribed CAM treatment (75%, n = 985). Of the women who used CAM for their back pain, 20% consulted their general practitioner (GP) prior to using CAM and 34% always informed their GP following CAM use. Forty-three per cent of the women were influenced by their doctors, 39% by friends/colleagues, 36% by family/relatives, 33% by their partner, 30% by a CAM practitioner, 20% by a pharmacist, 16% by a book/magazine, 11% by mass media, 10% by an allied health worker and 6% by the Internet. Our results show that information sources used by women for their decision-making on CAM use differed according to the symptoms. While non-professional information sources (e.g. family/relatives) positively influenced women in their decision to use CAM for a range of back pain-related symptoms (e.g. headaches/migraines), doctors and allied health workers (e.g. nurses) negatively influenced women in their decision to consult a CAM practitioner for a range of back pain-related symptoms (e.g. headaches/migraines, neck pain). Women seek information from a wide range of professional and non-professional sources with regard to their decision-making around CAM use for back pain. Back pain care providers need to ensure effective communication with their back pain patients regarding safe, effective and co-ordinated back pain care

  9. Personalized medicine beyond genomics: alternative futures in big data-proteomics, environtome and the social proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdemir, Vural; Dove, Edward S; Gürsoy, Ulvi K; Şardaş, Semra; Yıldırım, Arif; Yılmaz, Şenay Görücü; Ömer Barlas, I; Güngör, Kıvanç; Mete, Alper; Srivastava, Sanjeeva

    2017-01-01

    No field in science and medicine today remains untouched by Big Data, and psychiatry is no exception. Proteomics is a Big Data technology and a next generation biomarker, supporting novel system diagnostics and therapeutics in psychiatry. Proteomics technology is, in fact, much older than genomics and dates to the 1970s, well before the launch of the international Human Genome Project. While the genome has long been framed as the master or "elite" executive molecule in cell biology, the proteome by contrast is humble. Yet the proteome is critical for life-it ensures the daily functioning of cells and whole organisms. In short, proteins are the blue-collar workers of biology, the down-to-earth molecules that we cannot live without. Since 2010, proteomics has found renewed meaning and international attention with the launch of the Human Proteome Project and the growing interest in Big Data technologies such as proteomics. This article presents an interdisciplinary technology foresight analysis and conceptualizes the terms "environtome" and "social proteome". We define "environtome" as the entire complement of elements external to the human host, from microbiome, ambient temperature and weather conditions to government innovation policies, stock market dynamics, human values, political power and social norms that collectively shape the human host spatially and temporally. The "social proteome" is the subset of the environtome that influences the transition of proteomics technology to innovative applications in society. The social proteome encompasses, for example, new reimbursement schemes and business innovation models for proteomics diagnostics that depart from the "once-a-life-time" genotypic tests and the anticipated hype attendant to context and time sensitive proteomics tests. Building on the "nesting principle" for governance of complex systems as discussed by Elinor Ostrom, we propose here a 3-tiered organizational architecture for Big Data science such as

  10. 建设以全科医生为核心的中国家庭医学服务诊所的探讨%Setup of General Practitioner-led Family Medicine Clinics in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐国平; 牛丽娟; 王家骥

    2016-01-01

    2009年国家新医改方案确定了建设中国基本医疗卫生服务制度, 最终达到全国居民人人享有基本医疗卫生服务的宏伟计划. 建设结构合理、 覆盖城乡医疗卫生服务体系的基础是建设好基层医疗卫生机构, 即农村乡镇卫生院和城市社区卫生服务中心, 完善高效规范的运行机制. 加强基层医疗卫生人才队伍建设, 特别是正规 (5+3) 全科医生的培养, 是着力提高基层医疗卫生机构服务水平和质量的重要环节. 本文根据发达国家的成熟经验结合中国目前的现实情况和将来的发展方向提出建设以全科医生为核心, 具有中国特色的规范化家庭医学服务诊所 ( Family Medicine Clinic , FMC) 的概念、 原则和方法. 认为创建合理有效的基层医疗服务运行机制和建立以高质量全科主治医生为核心团队的服务体系是成功建设中国基本医疗卫生服务制度的关键.%In 2009 Chinese government promulgated an ambitious plan to establish a primary healthcare system and to provide universal coverage for all 1.3 billion residents.The foundation for building an accessible , high quality and efficient primary health care system is to set up rural township hospitals and urban community health centers with a standardized and efficient performance mechanism.Building up a well trained primary care workforce -general practitioners (5+3) to practice in rural and urban communities is crucial for providing high quality care for all residents .This article described the concept , principles and methods for the setup of general practitioner -led family medicine clinic ( FMC ) in China by incorporating successful models from other countries into China′s current and future context in primary health care development .A dynamic , well performing family medicine clinic with attending general practitioner -led teams to provide high quality care is pivotal for the success in China′s primary health care

  11. Knowledge, awareness, and practices of complementary and alternative medicine for oral health-care management among dental students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newadkar, Ujwala Rohan; Chaudhari, Lalit; Khalekar, Yogita K

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study is to assess the awareness and practices of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for oral health-care management among dental students. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in 200 dental students of final year and internship selected by simple random sampling using a close-ended questionnaire. Results: Among the total respondents, 52% were females and 48% were males. Nearly, 14% of the students were not aware of the different categories of the CAM and 12% of them were not aware of its implication in oral health-care management. Conclusion: Majority of the students was aware of CAM, yet they do not follow the use of the same for their patient's oral health-care management. Hence, a small provision regarding the knowledge of CAM should be imposed under the undergraduate curriculum for the dental students so that it should be implemented in their practice in future.

  12. A systematic review of complementary and alternative medicine interventions for the management of cancer-related fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnegan-John, Jennifer; Molassiotis, Alex; Richardson, Alison; Ream, Emma

    2013-07-01

    Fatigue, experienced by patients during and following cancer treatment, is a significant clinical problem. It is a prevalent and distressing symptom yet pharmacological interventions are used little and confer limited benefit for patients. However, many cancer patients use some form of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), and some evidence suggests it may relieve fatigue. A systematic review was conducted to appraise the effectiveness of CAM interventions in ameliorating cancer-related fatigue. Systematic searches of biomedical, nursing, and specialist CAM databases were conducted, including Medline, Embase, and AMED. Included papers described interventions classified as CAM by the National Centre of Complementary and Alternative Medicine and evaluated through randomized controlled trial (RCT) or quasi-experimental design. Twenty studies were eligible for the review, of which 15 were RCTs. Forms of CAM interventions examined included acupuncture, massage, yoga, and relaxation training. The review identified some limited evidence suggesting hypnosis and ginseng may prevent rises in cancer-related fatigue in people undergoing treatment for cancer and acupuncture and that biofield healing may reduce cancer-related fatigue following cancer treatments. Evidence to date suggests that multivitamins are ineffective at reducing cancer-related fatigue. However, trials incorporated within the review varied greatly in quality; most were methodologically weak and at high risk of bias. Consequently, there is currently insufficient evidence to conclude with certainty the effectiveness or otherwise of CAM in reducing cancer-related fatigue. The design and methods employed in future trials of CAM should be more rigorous; increasing the strength of evidence should be a priority.

  13. Concurrent Complementary and Alternative Medicine CAM and Conventional Rehabilitation Therapy in the Management of Children with Developmental Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo Yeon Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We investigated the concurrent use of conventional rehabilitations and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM therapies for the long-term management of children with developmental disorders (DDs. Methods. The parents or caregivers of 533 children with DDs (age range, 1–19 years who visited the rehabilitation centers were surveyed using in depth face-to-face interviews. Results. Of the 533 patients enrolled, 520 completed the questionnaire (97% response rate. A total of 292 (56% children were receiving multiple therapies, more than two conventional rehabilitations and CAM, at the time of the interview. A total of 249 (48% children reported lifetime CAM use, 23% used CAM at the time of the interview, and 62% of the patients planned to use CAM therapy in the future. Conventional rehabilitation therapies used at the time of the interview included physical therapy (30%, speech therapy (28%, and occupational therapy (19%, and the CAM therapies included herbal medicine (5% and acupuncture or moxibustion (3%. The respondents indicated that in the future they planned to use acupuncture or moxibustion (57%, occupational therapy (18%, cognitive behavioral therapy (16%, speech therapy (10%, and physical therapy (8%. Conclusion. Concurrent management as conventional rehabilitations and CAM therapies is widely used by children with DDs.

  14. Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jillian L. Capodice

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available To discuss challenges concerning treatment for chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS and review complementary and alternative medical (CAM therapies being evaluated for this condition, we performed a comprehensive search of articles published from 1990–2005 using the PubMed, Medline databases. Data from the articles were abstracted and pooled by subject. Keywords cross-searched with CP/CPPS included: complementary, alternative, integrative, therapies, interventions, nutrition, antioxidants, herbs, supplements, biofeedback and acupuncture. Listed articles with no abstracts were not included. Various CAM therapies for CP/CPPS exist including biofeedback, acupuncture, hyperthermia and electrostimulation. Additionally, a variety of in vitro and in vivo studies testing herbal and nutritional supplements were found. Saw palmetto, cernilton and quercetin were the most frequently tested supplements for CP/CPP Although many CAM therapies demonstrate positive preliminary observations as prospective treatments for CP/CPPS, further exploratory studies including more randomized, controlled trials are necessary for significant validation as treatment options for this complex disorder.

  15. Methodologic considerations in the study of diet as part of complementary and alternative medicine modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zander, Mary E S; Wargovich, Michael J; Hebert, James R

    2004-01-01

    Diet is an essential component of most comprehensive health systems. Food figures prominently in the consciousness of most individuals, and the sensations of taste and smell are fundamentally important in human emotion. Complex configurations of dietary sanctions and strictures exist in virtually every human society, providing additional force to the power of diet. A wide variety of epidemiologic and laboratory-based studies have implicated a number of specific dietary factors in health and disease, with the former producing much in the way of equivocal evidence on most diet-health relationships and the latter often focusing so narrowly as to call into question the relevance of findings to human health. Assessing the role of diet as an important component of complementary and alternative medical treatment and preventive strategies will require a broad understanding of methodologic issues. Careful consideration of what is required to answer substantive questions in this intriguing and important area also will serve to advance the study of complementary and alternative modalities more generally.

  16. Resistance to Antibiotics and Antifungal Medicinal Products: Can Complementary and Alternative Medicine Help Solve the Problem in Common Infection Diseases? The Introduction of a Dutch Research Consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther T. Kok

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The increase of antibiotic resistance worldwide, rising numbers of deaths and costs associated with this, and the fact that hardly any new antimicrobial drugs have been developed during the last decade have increased the interest in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM therapeutic interventions, if proven safe and effective. Observational studies on clinical CAM practices demonstrate positive effects of treatment of infections with CAM therapies (clinical effects, patient satisfaction in combination with small percentages of antibiotics prescription. However, Cochrane reviews and other studies demonstrate that in most instances the quality of clinical trials on CAM treatment of infections is currently too low to provide sufficient evidence. Therefore a Dutch consortium on (in vitro and clinical scientific research on CAM and antibiotic resistance has been formed. The aim and objective of the consortium is to establish an enduring partnership and to develop expertise to further develop and investigate safe and effective CAM treatments for infectious diseases of humans (and animals. A first ongoing project on the development of safe and effective biobased CAM antimycotics in women with (recurrent vaginal candidiasis infection is introduced.

  17. Medical students’ knowledge, attitude, and practice of complementary and alternative medicine: a pre- and post-exposure survey in Majmaah University, Saudi Arabia

    OpenAIRE

    Qureshi, Naseem; AlMansour,Mohammed; AlBedah,Abdullah; AlRukban,Mohammed; Elsubai,Ibrahim; Mohamed,Elsadig; Ahmed,Elolemy; Khalil,Asim; Khalil, Mohamed; Alqaed,Meshari; Almudaiheem,Abdullah; Mahmoud,Waqas; Medani,Khalid

    2015-01-01

    Mohammed Abdullah Al Mansour,1 Abdullah MN Al-Bedah,2 Mohammed Othman AlRukban,3 Ibrahim S Elsubai,2 Elsadiq Yousif Mohamed,4 Ahmed Tawfik El Olemy,2 Asim AH Khalil,2 Mohamed KM Khalil,2 Meshari Saleh Alqaed,2 Abdullah Almudaiheem,2 Waqas Sami Mahmoud,4 Khalid Altohami Medani,4 Naseem Akhtar Qureshi2 1College of Medicine, Majmaah University, Al Majma’ah, 2National Center of Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Ministry of Health, 3Department of Family Medicine and Community Medic...

  18. Complementary and alternative medicine in cancer pain management: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Quality of life (QoL encompasses the physical, psychosocial, social and spiritual dimensions of life lived by a person. Cancer pain is one of the physical component has tremendous impact on the QoL of the patient. Cancer pain is multifaceted and complex to understand and managing cancer pain involves a tool box full of pharmacological and non pharmacological interventions but still there are 50-70% of cancer patients who suffer from uncontrolled pain and they fear pain more than death. Aggressive surgeries, radiotherapy and chemotherapy focus more on prolonging the survival of the patient failing to realize that the QoL lived also matters equally. This paper reviews complementary and alternative therapy approaches for cancer pain and its impact in improving the QoL of cancer patients.

  19. Review of complementary and alternative medicine and selected nutraceuticals: background for a pilot study on nutrigenomic intervention in patients with advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varker, Kimberly A; Ansel, Adam; Aukerman, Glen; Carson, William E

    2012-01-01

    As commonly defined, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is a broad category that includes biologically based practices, mind-body medicine, manipulative and bodybased practices, and energy medicine as well as complete medical systems such as naturopathy, homeopathy, Ayurvedic medicine, and traditional Chinese medicine. Several CAM methodologies show promise for the treatment of chronic conditions such as depression and pain disorders or have demonstrated effects upon the immune response in experimental studies. There is growing interest in the use of integrative medicine the combination of CAM methodologies with a conventional medical approach-for the optimization of treatment of various cancers. The Ohio State University Center for Integrative Medicine has developed a specialized nutrigenomic protocol for integrative cancer care. The center uses a comprehensive nutritional and medical evaluation, including a panel of proinflammatory molecules and physiologic parameters, to guide a program of individualized dietary interventions. Dietary supplementation is a current focus of study, including: (1) Omega-3 fatty acids and B vitamins, which are thought to play important roles in immunomodulation; (2) Magnesium oxide, which has been shown to decrease inflammation and improve insulin resistance and lipid profiles; and (3) Cinnamon extract, which reportedly decreases serum glucose levels. This article presents a brief overview of CAM and integrative medicine and a discussion of the relevant nutraceuticals.

  20. Knowledge, perceptions, and attitudes toward complementary and alternative medicines among pharmacy students of a Malaysian Public University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shazia Qasim Jamshed

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background:The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM is consistently on the rise worldwide. Consumers often consider pharmacists as a major source of information about CAM products and their safety. Due to the limitation of data, it is worth exploring the knowledge, perceptions, and attitudes of pharmacy students toward CAM. Objective: The objective of this study was to explore the knowledge, perceptions, and attitudes of pharmacy students regarding the use of CAM in Malaysia. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted for 3 months among Bachelor of Pharmacy students in a public sector University of Malaysia. A pretested, self-administered questionnaire, comprised four sections, was used to collect the data from 440 participants. Descriptive analysis was used, and Chi-square test was used to test the association between dependent and independent variables. Results: Of 440 questionnaire distributed, 287 were returned giving a response rate of (65.2%. The results showed that 38.6% participants gave correct answers when asked about the use of herbal products with digoxin. Majority of the participants were knowledgeable about supplementary therapy (25.3% while the lack of knowledge was mostly evident in traditional Chinese medicines (73.7%. Majority of the students were either neutral (49.5% or disagreed that (42.8% CAM use is unsafe. Females were more in disagreement to the statements than males (P = 0.007. Majority of students also agreed to use CAM therapies for their health and well-being (51.2%. Conclusion: The study revealed that pharmacy students did not have adequate knowledge of CAM though their attitudes and perceptions were relatively positive.

  1. Epidemiology of complementary and alternative medicine therapy use in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant survivorship patients in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Julian; Kabir, Masrura; Gilroy, Nicole; Dyer, Gemma; Brice, Lisa; Moore, John; Greenwood, Matthew; Hertzberg, Mark; Gottlieb, David; Larsen, Stephen R; Hogg, Megan; Brown, Louisa; Huang, Gillian; Tan, Jeff; Ward, Christopher; Kerridge, Ian

    2016-12-01

    In addition to prescribed conventional medicines, many allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) survivors also use complementary and alternative medical therapies (CAM), however, the frequency and types of CAMs used by allogeneic HSCT survivors remain unclear. Study participants were adults who had undergone an allogeneic HSCT between 1st January 2000 and 31st December 2012. Participants completed a 402-item questionnaire regarding the use of CAM, medical complications, specialist referrals, medications and therapies, infections, vaccinations, cancer screening, lifestyle, and occupational issues and relationship status following stem cell transplantation. A total of 1475 allogeneic HSCT were performed in the study period. Of the 669 recipients known to be alive at study sampling, 583 were contactable and were sent study packs. Of 432 participants who returned the completed survey (66% of total eligible, 76% of those contacted), 239 (54.1%) HSCT survivors used at least one form of CAM. These included dietary modification (13.6%), vitamin therapy (30%), spiritual or mind-body therapy (17.2%), herbal supplements (13.5%), manipulative and body-based therapies (26%), Chinese medicine (3.5%), reiki (3%), and homeopathy (3%). These results definitively demonstrate that a large proportion of HSCT survivors are using one or more form of CAM therapy. Given the potential benefits demonstrated by small studies of specific CAM therapies in this patient group, as well as clearly documented therapies with no benefit or even toxicity, this result shows there is a large unmet need for additional studies to ascertain efficacy and safety of CAM therapies in this growing population.

  2. Use of complementary and alternative medicine by patients with localized prostate carcinoma. Study at a single institute in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshimura, Koji; Ichioka, Kentaro; Terada, Naoki; Terai, Akito [Kurashiki Central Hospital, Okayama (Japan); Arai, Yoichi [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine

    2003-02-01

    The use of complementary/alternative medicine (CAM) has recently received considerable attention throughout the world. We evaluated the prevalence and predictors of CAM use among Japanese patients with localized prostate cancer. A total of 177 patients with localized prostate carcinoma underwent radical retropubic prostatecotomy or external beam radiation therapy between January 1994 and January 2001. Of them, 138 (78%) answered a self-administered questionnaire on CAM use and were eligible for this study. The overall prevalence, types of CAM used, and costs of CAM were assessed. The effects of age, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level, clinical stage, pretreatment Gleason score, patients' income, patients' final educational status, and general health-related quality of life at baseline and 1 year after treatment, as estimated using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Prostate Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire on the prevalence of CAM use, were evaluated. Twenty-seven patients (20%) had once used or had been using some types of CAM. Herbal medicine and vitamins were the most common types of CAM used. Preoperative Gleason score was significantly associated with CAM use, as determined by the {chi}''2 test (P0.0198), and PSA level and posttreatment physical function domain were marginally associated with CAM use, as determined by the Mann-Whitney U-test (P=0.0734 and P=0.0597, respectively). Patient age, income, and final educational status had no impact on CAM use. A relatively small proportion of Japanese patients with localized prostate cancer have tried CAM compared with the proportions of patients described in previous reports from Western countries. (author)

  3. Use of complementary and alternative medicine in Germany – a survey of patients with inflammatory bowel disease

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    Hahn Eckhart G

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have suggested an increasing use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. The aim of our study was to evaluate the use of CAM in German patients with IBD. Methods A questionnaire was offered to IBD patients participating in patient workshops which were organized by a self-help association, the German Crohn's and Colitis Association. The self-administered questionnaire included demographic and disease-related data as well as items analysing the extent of CAM use and satisfaction with CAM treatment. Seven commonly used CAM methods were predetermined on the questionnaire. Results 413 questionnaires were completed and included in the analysis (n = 153 male, n = 260 female; n = 246 Crohn's disease, n = 164 ulcerative colitis. 52 % of the patients reported CAM use in the present or past. In detail, homeopathy (55%, probiotics (43%, classical naturopathy (38%, Boswellia serrata extracts (36% and acupuncture/Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM (33% were the most frequently used CAM methods. Patients using probiotics, acupuncture and Boswellia serrata extracts (incense reported more positive therapeutic effects than others. Within the statistical analysis no significant predictors for CAM use were found. 77% of the patients felt insufficiently informed about CAM. Conclusion The use of CAM in IBD patients is very common in Germany, although a large proportion of patients felt that information about CAM is not sufficient. However, to provide an evidence-based approach more research in this field is desperately needed. Therefore, physicians should increasingly inform IBD patients about benefits and limitations of CAM treatment.

  4. Use of traditional complementary and alternative medicine for HIV patients in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

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    Ramlagan Shandir

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Traditional medicine use has been reported is common among individuals with moderate and advanced HIV disease. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to assess the use of Traditional Complementary and Alternative Medicine (TCAM for HIV patients prior to initiating antiretroviral therapy in three public hospitals in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Methods Using systematic sampling, 618 HIV-positive patients were selected from outpatient departments from three hospitals and interviewed with a questionnaire. Results TCAM was commonly used for HIV in the past six months by study participants (317, 51.3% and herbal therapies alone (183, 29.6%. The use of micronutrients (42.9% was excluded from TCAM since mostly vitamins were provided by the health facility. Herbal therapies were the most expensive, costing on average 128 Rand (US$16 per patient per month. Most participants (90% indicated that their health care provider was not aware that they were taking herbal therapies for HIV (90%. Herbal therapies were mainly used for pain relief (87.1% and spiritual practices or prayer for stress relief (77.6%. Multivariate logistic regression with use of herbs for HIV as the dependent variable identified being on a disability grant and fewer clinic visits to be associated with use of herbs, and TCAM use for HIV identified being on a disability grant, number of HIV symptoms and family members not contributing to main source of household income to be associated with TCAM use. Conclusion Traditional herbal therapies and TCAM are commonly used by HIV treatment naïve outpatients of public health facilities in South Africa. Health care providers should routinely screen patients on TCAM use when initiating ART and also during follow-up and monitoring keeping in mind that these patients may not fully disclose other therapies.

  5. Language Proficiency Testing and the Expatriate Medical Practitioner in Malawi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamwendo, Gregory H.

    2008-01-01

    According to the Medical Council of Malawi, one of the conditions for a licence to be granted to an individual who wants to practise medicine in Malawi is the practitioner's ability to speak and write English fluently. This means that the expatriate medical practitioner is not required by law to demonstrate fluency in Chichewa (the national…

  6. Traditional medicine as an alternative form of health care system: a preliminary case study of Nangabo sub-county, central Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galabuzi, Charles; Agea, Jacob Godfrey; Fungo, Bernard L; Kamoga, Regina M N

    2009-10-15

    This study was conducted in Nangabo sub-county of Wakiso district. The purpose was to document the common Traditional Medicine (TM) practices; assess the local people's preferences for TM versus western medicine (WM) and lastly to determine the awareness about the importance of TM by local people. Data were collected using semi-structured administered face-to-face with respondents. A total of 120 interviewed. Six focused group discussions (FGDs) were held to validate the questionnaire responses. Data were analyzed descriptively using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS). The findings indicated that most (43%) respondents derive their livelihoods from traditional medicine practices. Three forms of TM were reported-herbalism (67%), spiritual counseling (23%) and bone setting (10%). Although the majority (81%) of respondents were quite aware of the importance of TM in the sustenance of health care system, majority (55%) of them shunned TM in preference to WM, largely because of the belief that TM is evil-founded and devilish in nature. Only 45% of the respondents preferred TM to WM. The main reasons given for visiting TM practioners rather than western medical practitioners were that TM is sometimes more effective than WM and that in many instances it has very minimal side effects on the human body. There is, however, a need for Ugandan government to legitimize the practice of TM since it contributes a lot to health care needs in areas where western medicine is insufficiently provided. In addition, there is a need for further research into the efficacy and safety of traditional medicines if it is to be adequately integrated into western medicine.

  7. Medicina occidental y otras alternativas: ¿es posible su complementariedad? Reflexiones conceptuales Western medicine and alternative medicines: can they be complementary? Conceptual reflections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Beatriz Duarte Gómez

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available El presente documento hace parte de una serie de reflexiones sobre el abordaje intercultural de los sistemas de salud y las políticas públicas que le corresponden, provocadas por el estudio de dos hospitales mixtos (interculturales creados en áreas rurales de México. El uso cada vez más frecuente de diversas medicinas alternativas y complementarias y la existencia de un modelo médico hegemónico que las excluyen, hacen del sistema de salud occidental una respuesta que no satisface las necesidades de toda la población. Se discute el concepto de complementariedad como componente del desarrollo del sistema de salud y se proponen prioridades en el tema desde diferentes enfoques: la complementariedad como política pública, como proyecto institucional y como decisión individual del terapeuta o del paciente.The present article is part of a series of reflections from an intercultural approach to health systems and corresponding public policies, motivated by findings from a study on two intercultural hospitals in rural Mexico. The frequent utilization of complementary and alternative medicines by the local population and the hegemonic health model that excludes them make the existing health system an unsatisfactory response to people's needs. We present the concept of complementariness as a health system component and propose priorities on this issue, taking different approaches: complementariness as a public policy, as an institutional project, or as an individual decision by the therapist or patient.

  8. The effect of complementary and alternative medicines on CYP3A4-mediated metabolism of three different substrates : 7-benzyloxy-4-trifluoromethyl-coumarin, midazolam and docetaxel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooiman, Kim D; Maas-Bakker, Roel F; Hendrikx, Jeroen J M A; Bank, Paul C D; Rosing, Hilde; Beijnen, Jos H; Schellens, Jan H M; Meijerman, Irma

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Concomitant use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and anticancer drugs can affect the pharmacokinetics of anticancer drugs by inhibiting the metabolizing enzyme cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) (EC 1.14.13.157). Several in vitro studies determined whether CAM can inhibit CYP3A4,

  9. The use of complementary and alternative medicine by women transitioning through menopause in Germany : Results of a survey of women aged 45-60 years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buhling, K. J.; v Daniels, B.; v Studnitz, F. S. G.; Eulenburg, C.; Mueck, A. O.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To describe prevalence rates of complementary and alternative medicine therapies (CAM) for the relief of menopausal complaints among German women. Furthermore, to investigate the perceived effectiveness of these therapies. Design: A self-administered questionnaire was sent to 9785 random

  10. Use of complementary and alternative medicines associated with a 30% lower ongoing pregnancy/live birth rate during 12 months of fertility treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boivin, J; Schmidt, L

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND There seems to be little discussion between patient and physician about the use of complementary and alternative medicines (CAMs), perhaps because they are not perceived to have adverse effects on fertility. We therefore compared ongoing pregnancy and live birth rate in spontaneous users...

  11. Complementary and alternative medicine use of women with breast cancer : Self-help CAM attracts other women than guided CAM therapies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lo-Fo-Wong, Deborah N. N.; Ranchor, Adelita V.; de Haes, Hanneke C. J. M.; Sprangers, Mirjam A. G.; Henselmans, Inge

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Examine stability of use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) of breast cancer patients, reasons for CAM use, and sociodemographic, clinical, and psychological predictors of CAM use. Methods: CAM use was assessed after adjuvant therapy and six months later. Following the CAM He

  12. [MODERN EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY MASTERING PRACTICAL SKILLS OF GENERAL PRACTITIONERS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalchuk, L I; Prokopchuk, Y V; Naydyonova, O V

    2015-01-01

    The article presents the experience of postgraduate training of general practitioners--family medicine. Identified current trends, forms and methods of pedagogical innovations that enhance the quality of learning and mastering the practical skills of primary professionals providing care.

  13. Complementary and alternative medicine use and cost in functional bowel disorders: A six month prospective study in a large HMO

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    Drossman Douglas A

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional Bowel Disorders (FBD are chronic disorders that are difficult to treat and manage. Many patients and doctors are dissatisfied with the level of improvement in symptoms that can be achieved with standard medical care which may lead them to seek alternatives for care. There are currently no data on the types of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM used for FBDs other than Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS, or on the economic costs of CAM treatments. The aim of this study is to determine prevalence, types and costs of CAM in IBS, functional diarrhea, functional constipation, and functional abdominal pain. Methods 1012 Patients with FBD were recruited through a health care maintenance organization and followed for 6 months. Questionnaires were used to ascertain: Utilization and expenditures on CAM, symptom severity (IBS-SS, quality of life (IBS-QoL, psychological distress (BSI and perceived treatment effectiveness. Costs for conventional medical care were extracted from administrative claims. Results CAM was used by 35% of patients, at a median yearly cost of $200. The most common CAM types were ginger, massage therapy and yoga. CAM use was associated with female gender, higher education, and anxiety. Satisfaction with physician care and perceived effectiveness of prescription medication were not associated with CAM use. Physician referral to a CAM provider was uncommon but the majority of patients receiving this recommendation followed their physician's advice. Conclusion CAM is used by one-third of FBD patients. CAM use does not seem to be driven by dissatisfaction with conventional care. Physicians should discuss CAM use and effectiveness with their patients and refer patients if appropriate.

  14. Blurring the boundaries between public and private health care services as an alternative explanation for the emergence of black medicine: the Israeli case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filc, Dani; Cohen, Nissim

    2015-07-01

    Black medicine represents the most problematic configuration of informal payments for health care. According to the accepted economic explanations, we would not expect to find black medicine in a system with a developed private service. Using Israel as a case study, we suggest an alternative yet a complimentary explanation for the emergence of black medicine in public health care systems - even though citizens do have the formal option to use private channels. We claim that when regulation is weak and political culture is based on 'do it yourself' strategies, which meant to solve immediate problems, blurring the boundaries between public and private health care services may only reduce public trust and in turn, contribute to the emergence of black medicine. We used a combined quantitative and qualitative methodology to support our claim. Statistical analysis of the results suggested that the only variable significantly associated with the use of black medicine was trust in the health care system. The higher the respondents' level of trust in the health care system, the lower the rate of the use of black medicine. Qualitatively, interviewee emphasized the relation between the blurred boundaries between public and private health care and the use of black medicine.

  15. In vitro and in vivo inhibition of Streptococcus mutans biofilm by Trachyspermum ammi seeds: an approach of alternative medicine.

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    Khan, Rosina; Adil, Mohd; Danishuddin, Mohd; Verma, Praveen K; Khan, Asad U

    2012-06-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the crude and active solvent fraction of Trachyspermum ammi on S. mutans cariogenicity, effect on expression of genes involved in biofilm formation and caries development in rats. GC-MS was carried out to identify the major components present in the crude and the active fraction of T. ammi. The crude extract and the solvent fraction exhibiting least MIC were selected for further experiments. Scanning electron microscopy was carried out to observe the effect of the extracts on S. mutans biofilm. Comparative gene expression analysis was carried out for nine selected genes. 2-Isopropyl-5-methyl-phenol was found as major compound in crude and the active fraction. Binding site of this compound within the proteins involved in biofilm formation, was mapped with the help of docking studies. Real-time RT-PCR analyses revealed significant suppression of the genes involved in biofilm formation. All the test groups showed reduction in caries (smooth surface as well as sulcal surface caries) in rats. Moreover, it also provides new insight to understand the mechanism influencing biofilm formation in S. mutans. Furthermore, the data suggest the putative cariostatic properties of T. Ammi and hence can be used as an alternative medicine to prevent caries infection.

  16. Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Victims of Intimate Partner Abuse: A Systematic Review of Use and Efficacy

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    Luke Duffy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To examine: (i the extent to which victims of intimate partner abuse (IPA use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM and (ii the effects of CAM on their mental health. Methods. Medline, Scopus, and Web of Science were searched for studies measuring the extent of CAM use amongst victims of IPA and trials assessing the impact of CAM on mental health amongst this population. Risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane collaboration tool. Results. No studies measuring the level of CAM use amongst IPA victims, and only three studies assessing the effect of CAM on the mental health of this population were identified. Two studies looked at yogic breathing, while one assessed the effect of music therapy. All three studies showed some beneficial effects; however, each had a small sample, brief intervention period, and no follow-up measurement and were considered to be at high risk of bias. Conclusions. The review found little evidence for the benefits of CAM for IPA victims. Findings suggest positive effects of music therapy and yogic breathing; however, methodological limitations mean that these results should be interpreted with caution. It is important that more research into the use and effects of CAM amongst this population are undertaken.

  17. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Approaches for Pediatric Pain: A Review of the State-of-the-science

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    Jennie C. I. Tsao

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM in pediatric populations has increased considerably, especially for chronic conditions such as cancer, rheumatoid arthritis and cystic fibrosis in which pain may be a significant problem. Despite the growing popularity of CAM approaches for pediatric pain, questions regarding the efficacy of these interventions remain. This review critically evaluates the existing empirical evidence for the efficacy of CAM interventions for pain symptoms in children. CAM modalities that possess a published literature, including controlled trials and/or multiple baseline studies, that focused on either chronic or acute, procedural pain were included in this review. The efficacy of the CAM interventions was evaluated according to the framework developed by the American Psychological Association (APA Division 12 Task Force on Promotion and Dissemination of Psychological Procedures. According to these criteria, only one CAM approach reviewed herein (self-hypnosis/guided imagery/relaxation for recurrent pediatric headache qualified as an empirically supported therapy (EST, although many may be considered possibly efficacious or promising treatments for pediatric pain. Several methodological limitations of the existing literature on CAM interventions for pain problems in children are highlighted and future avenues for research are outlined.

  18. Traditional complementary and alternative medicine and antiretroviral treatment adherence among HIV patients in Kwazulu-Natal, South Africa.

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    Peltzer, Karl; Friend-du Preez, Natalie; Ramlagan, Shandir; Fomundam, Henry; Anderson, Jane

    2009-12-30

    Adherence to antiretroviral medication in the treatment of HIV is critical, both to maximize efficacy and to minimize the emergence of drug resistance. The aim of this prospective study in three public hospitals in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, is to assess the use of Traditional Complementary and Alternative Medicine (TCAM) by HIV patients and its effect on antiretroviral (ARV) adherence 6 months after initiating ARVs. 735 (29.8% male and 70.2% female) patients who consecutively attended three HIV clinics completed assessments prior to ARV initiation and 519 after six months on antiretroviral therapy (ART) Results indicate that the use of herbal therapies for HIV declined significantly from 36.6% prior to antiretroviral treatment (ART) initiation to 7.9% after being on ARVs for 6 months. Faith healing methods, including spiritual practices and prayer for HIV declined from 35.8% to 22.1% and physical/body-mind therapy (exercise and massage) declined from 5.0% to 1.9%. In contrast, the use of micronutrients (vitamins, etc.) significantly increased from 42.6% to 87.4%. In multivariate regression analyses, ARV non-adherence (dose, schedule and food) was associated with the use of herbal treatment, not taking micronutrients and the use of over-the-counter drugs. The use of TCAM declined after initiating ARVs. As herbal treatment for HIV was associated with reduced ARV adherence, patients' use of TCAM should be considered in ARV adherence management.

  19. Complementary and alternative medicine practices, traditional healing practices, and cultural competency in pediatric oncology in Hawai' i

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    Asad Ghiasuddin; Joyce Wong; Andrea M Siu

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Hawai’i is an ethnicaly diverse island state with a high rate of both traditional healing (TH) and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use. The aim of this project was to assess TH and CAM use within the pediatric oncology population in Honolulu and improve the delivery of culturaly competent care. METHODS: A 9-item survey was distributed to al pediatric oncology patients at Kapi’olani Medical Center for Women and Children for 3 months. The survey inquired about patient ethnicity, TH practices, CAM practices and perception of cultural competence of the care received. Descriptive statistics were calculated for the survey items. Qualitative analysis was done with participant comments to identify themes. RESULTS:Sixty-two surveys were completed. TH was used by 39% of the respondents in the home, and 10% in the hospital (top method was traditional foods). CAM was used by 27% of the respondents in the home, and 68% in the hospital (top method was healing touch). Ninety-seven percent of the respondents reported receiving culturaly competent care. Areas for improvement included language services and dietary choices. CONCLUSION: CAM and TH are used frequently by pediatric oncology patients in Hawai’i, and the vast majority of patients and families felt that the care they received was culturaly competent.

  20. Evaluating the prevalence, content and readability of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) web pages on the internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagaram, Smitha; Walji, Muhammad; Bernstam, Elmer

    2002-01-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use is growing rapidly. As CAM is relatively unregulated, it is important to evaluate the type and availability of CAM information. The goal of this study is to deter-mine the prevalence, content and readability of online CAM information based on searches for arthritis, diabetes and fibromyalgia using four common search engines. Fifty-eight of 599 web pages retrieved by a "condition search" (9.6%) were CAM-oriented. Of 216 CAM pages found by the "condition" and "condition + herbs" searches, 78% were authored by commercial organizations, whose pur-pose involved commerce 69% of the time and 52.3% had no references. Although 98% of the CAM information was intended for consumers, the mean read-ability was at grade level 11. We conclude that consumers searching the web for health information are likely to encounter consumer-oriented CAM advertising, which is difficult to read and is not supported by the conventional literature.

  1. A lecture program on complementary and alternative medicine for cancer patients--evaluation of the pilot phase.

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    Huebner, J; Ebel, M; Muenstedt, K; Micke, O; Prott, F J; Muecke, R; Hoppe, A

    2015-06-01

    About half of all patients with cancer use complementary or alternative medicine (CAM). In 2013, we started a lecture program for patients, followed by evidence-based recommendations on counseling on CAM. These recommendations have been published before by this working group. The aim of the program is to provide scientific facts on the most often used CAM methods in standardized presentations which help patients discuss the topic with their oncologists and support shared decision making. The article presents the evaluation of the pilot phase. Participants received a standardized questionnaire before the start of the lecture. The questionnaire comprises four parts: demographic data, data concerning experience with CAM, satisfaction with the lecture, and needs for further information on CAM. In 2013, seven lectures on CAM were given in cooperation with regional branches of the German Cancer Society in several German states. Four hundred sixty patients and relatives took part (75% females and 16% males). Forty-eight percent formerly had used CAM. Most often named sources of information on CAM were print media (48%) and the Internet (37%). Most participants rated additional written information valuable. About one third would like to have an individual consultation concerning CAM. A standardized presentation of evidence on CAM methods most often used, together with recommendations on the self-management of symptoms, is highly appreciated. The concept of a highly interactive lecture comprising is feasible and if presented in lay terminology, adequate. In order to give additional support on the topic, written information should be provided as the first step.

  2. Complementary and Alternative Medicine use Among Patients with Acne Vulgaris or Melasma in Dermatology Clinic: a Questionnaire Survey

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    Çiçek Durusoy

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To determine the prevalence rate and types of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM use among patients diagnosed with acne vulgaris (AV or melasma, and to identify the factors influencing the use of CAM.Method: This study included 73 patients who attended dermatology outpatient clinic in Alanya Başkent University and diagnosed with AV or melasma. Each patient was asked to answer a questionnaire consisting of sociodemografic information and negative impact of their disease on their psychological and physical health status and work/friendship relations, their history of using CAM methods. Results: Of the study patients, 54 were diagnosed with AV and 19 with melasma. The proportion of CAM use was 52,1%in total; 57.4 %of AV and 36,8%of melasma patients had used CAM. Females with regard to the males, those having problems in work/friendship relations with regard to those who have not, were using CAM in high proportion. All CAM users have applied phytotherapy, and 63,2 %of the patients have learned these methods from family members and/or friends.Conclusion: Our results show that CAM use is common in patients with AV and melasma. Since the CAM methods have the potential of influencing the outcomes of the disease by interacting with the medical treatment modalities, dermatologists should enquire about CAM use as it may by.

  3. From "does it work?" to "what is 'it'?": implications for voodoo, psychotherapy, pop-psychology, regular, and alternative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mommaerts, Jean-Luc; Devroey, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    In this article, a "healing method" (HM) is defined as any method intended to improve health through non-somatic means. For many healing methods, especially within the realm of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), there is mounting debate over the question "Does it work?" Indeed, this seems to be the primary question for most stakeholders. Yet in light of the well-documented effects of nonspecific factors, particularly empathy and placebo (EP), we contend that the basic question is: "What is 'it'?" Without answering this question, scientific progress is impossible, and research costs will spiral upwards without producing tangible results. Furthermore, it is impossible to characterize the potential side effects of healing methods without a full understanding of the underlying mechanisms through which they act. It is generally acknowledged that many healing methods are sociohistorical artifacts, based on underlying theoretical models that are divorced from established science. There is a need for healing method research that is accommodating of such methods' fluid nature while being congruent with accepted scientific practices. "It works" is no longer an adequate justification for any healing method, as "it" often turns out to be a combination of nonspecific factors.

  4. Understanding unexpected courses of multiple sclerosis among patients using complementary and alternative medicine: A travel from recipient to explorer

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    Anita Salamonsen

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM is frequently used by patients with multiple sclerosis (MS. Some MS patients experience unexpected improvements of symptoms, which they relate to their use of CAM. The aim of this study was to obtain knowledge and develop understandings of such self-defined unexpected improvement of MS symptoms. Two cases were constructed based on documents and 12 qualitative interviews. Our aim was not to make generalisations from the cases, but to transfer knowledge as working hypotheses. We identified four health-related change processes: the process of losing bodily competence; the process of developing responsibility; the process of taking control; and the process of choosing CAM. The patients explained unexpected improvements in their MS symptoms as results of their own efforts including their choice and use of CAM. In our theoretical interpretations, we found the patients’ redefinition of history, the concept of treatment and the importance of conventional health care to be essential, and leading to a change of patients’ position towards conventional health care from recipients to explorers. The explorers can be perceived as boundary walkers reflecting limitations within the conventional health care system and as initiators regarding what MS patients find useful in CAM.

  5. Traditional, complementary and alternative medical systems and their contribution to personalisation, prediction and prevention in medicine—person-centred medicine

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    Roberti di Sarsina Paolo

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Traditional, complementary and alternative medical (TCAM systems contribute to the foundation of person-centred medicine (PCM, an epistemological orientation for medical science which places the person as a physical, psychological and spiritual entity at the centre of health care and of the therapeutic process. PCM wishes to broaden the bio-molecular reductionistic approach of medical science towards an integration that allows people, doctors, nurses, health-care professionals and patients to become the real protagonists of the health-care scene. The doctor or caregiver needs to act out of empathy to meet the unique value of each human being, which unfolds over the course of a lifetime from conception to natural death. Knowledge of the human being should not be instrumental to economic or political interests, ideology, theories or religious dogma. Research needs to be broadened with methodological tools to investigate person-centred medical interventions. Salutogenesis is a fundamental principle of PCM, promoting health and preventing illness by strengthening the individual's self-healing abilities. TCAM systems also give tools to predict the insurgence of illness and treat it before the appearance of overt organic disease. A task of PCM is to educate people to take better care of their physical, psychological and spiritual health. Health-care education needs to be broadened to give doctors and health-care workers of the future the tools to act in innovative and highly differentiated ways, always guided by deep respect for individual autonomy, personal culture, religion and beliefs.

  6. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use by Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Are Canadian Physicians Failing with Conventional Therapy, or Not?

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    Charles N Bernstein

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Hilsden et al conducted a postal survey of members of the Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of Canada (CCFC, gathering data on the use of both conventional therapy and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM. The response rate was 76% (quite good for a mailed survey, although 9% of respondents stated that they did not actually have inflammatory bowel disease (IBD (their data were excluded from the analysis. The data regarding CAM use were difficult to follow, as there was a blending of past and current reported use of CAM, as well as of CAM use specifically for IBD as opposed to for non-IBD reasons. Current or past use of CAM for IBD was reported by 47% of respondents, and ongoing use for IBD specifically was reported by 24%. It appears that most of the CAM used by IBD patients was not for their IBD. An important finding was that approximately half of IBD patients use CAM either for their IBD or for other reasons. The main CAM used was acidophilus (19%, followed by massage (18% and flax seed (13%.

  7. Medicinas Alternativas e Complementares: uma metassíntese Complementary and Alternative Medicines: a meta-synthesis

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    Cristiane Spadacio

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available O aumento do uso de Medicinas Alternativas e Complementares (MAC motivou o crescimento do número de estudos qualitativos sobre o tema, justificando a realização de sínteses sobre esse material. Este artigo apresenta uma revisão sistemática de pesquisas qualitativas sobre MAC publicadas em periódicos internacionais. Esta revisão se orientou pela metodologia dos metaestudos. Foi realizada busca em revistas do Portal Periódicos da Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior e foram selecionados 32 artigos para análise. Os estudos revisados apresentam questões que têm como foco: o paciente, suas experiências terapêuticas e seus contextos sociais e culturais; o profissional, as relações profissionais e o processo de profissionalização das MAC; a MAC e sua relação com a biomedicina. Conclui-se que as pesquisas qualitativas sobre as MAC ensejam um olhar exploratório sobre o tema, procurando identificar as experiências de pacientes e profissionais com essas terapêuticas, assim como buscam discutir as conseqüências desse uso para a Medicina Convencional ou biomedicina.The growing use of Complementary and Alternative Medicines (CAM has led to an increase in the number of qualitative studies on the subject, thus justifying a meta-synthesis of the resulting material. The current article presents a systematic review of qualitative studies on CAM published in international journals. The review was conducted according to the meta-synthesis methodology. A search was performed in journals through the Periodicals Periodical of CAPES, the National Agency for the Evaluation of Graduate Studies, and 32 articles were selected for analysis. The reviewed studies raise questions focusing on: patients, their therapeutic experiences, and their social and cultural contexts; professionals, professional relations, and the process of professionalization of CAM; and CAM and their relationship to biomedicine. The article concludes

  8. Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 18 months. Using state-of-the-art imaging technology, NIH documented the power of the mind to ... greater decrease in total score on the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire. In addition, the tai chi group demonstrated ...

  9. Alternative Medicine for Menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a day Relaxation therapies (including massage, meditation , and yoga) May relieve stress, insomnia, and fatigue Massage may not be safe for women with certain health problems, such as advanced osteoporosis Reflexology (pressure or ...

  10. Travel and Adventure Medicine Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, Christopher A; Pottinger, Paul S

    2016-03-01

    Given the ever-changing nature of travel medicine, practitioners who provide pretravel and posttravel care are obligatorily students for the duration of their professional careers. A large variety of resources are available for medical practitioners. Providers should join at least one travel or tropical medicine professional association, attend its annual meeting, and read its journal. The largest general travel medicine association is the International Society of Travel Medicine.

  11. Recruitment and Early Retention of Women with Advanced Breast Cancer in a Complementary and Alternative Medicine Trial

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    Alla Sikorskii

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available More than 80% of women with breast cancer are now reported to be using complementary and alternative medicine (CAM therapies during conventional treatment. A randomized clinical trial (RCT of reflexology with late stage breast cancer patients serves as the data source for this article. The purposes were to investigate: (i reasons for refusal to participate in a RCT of reflexology; (ii the differences between those who completed the baseline interview and those who dropped out before baseline; and (iii the utility of the Palliative Prognostic Score (PPS as a prognostic screening tool in minimizing early attrition (before baseline from the trial. Eligible women (N = 400 approached at 12 cancer centers in the Midwest had advanced breast cancer, were on chemotherapy or hormonal therapy, and had a PPS of 11 or less. Comparisons of those who dropped out early (N = 33 to those who stayed in the trial (N = 240 were carried out using Wilcoxon rank, t-, chi-squared and Fisher's exact tests. The reasons of being “too sick” or “overwhelmed” were given by less than 12% of the women who refused to participate. There was a higher early dropout rate among black women compared to other (primarily white women (P = .01. Cancer recurrence and metastasis, age, and the PPS were not predictive of early retention of women. Specialized techniques may be needed to ensure black women remain in the trial once consented. Women with advanced disease were likely to enter and remain in the trial despite deterioration in health.

  12. What rheumatologists in the United States think of complementary and alternative medicine: results of a national survey

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    Curlin Farr A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We aimed to describe prevailing attitudes and practices of rheumatologists in the United States toward complementary and alternative medicine (CAM treatments. We wanted to determine whether rheumatologists' perceptions of the efficacy of CAM therapies and their willingness to recommend them relate to their demographic characteristics, geographic location, or clinical practices. Methods A National Institutes of Health-sponsored cross-sectional survey of internists and rheumatologists was conducted regarding CAM for treatment of chronic back pain or joint pain. In this study we analyzed responses only from rheumatologists. Response items included participant characteristics and experience with 6 common CAM categories, as defined by the National Institutes of Health. Descriptive statistics were used to describe attitudes to CAM overall and to each CAM category. Composite responses were devised for respondents designating 4 or more of the 6 CAM therapies as "very" or "moderately" beneficial or "very likely" or "somewhat likely" to recommend. Results Of 600 rheumatologists who were sent the questionnaire, 345 responded (58%; 80 (23% were women. Body work had the highest perceived benefit, with 70% of respondents indicating benefit. Acupuncture was perceived as beneficial by 54%. Most were willing to recommend most forms of CAM. Women had significantly higher composite benefit and recommend responses than men. Rheumatologists not born in North America were more likely to perceive benefit of select CAM therapies. Conclusions In this national survey of rheumatologists practicing in the United States, we found widespread favorable opinion toward many, but not all, types of CAM. Further research is required to determine to what extent CAM can or should be integrated into the practice of rheumatology in the United States.

  13. Complementary and alternative medicine use and nutrient intake among individuals with multiple sclerosis in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masullo, Laura; Papas, Mia A; Cotugna, Nancy; Baker, Sandra; Mahoney, Lauren; Trabulsi, Jillian

    2015-02-01

    Individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) often use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). However, specific CAM therapies used within this population have not been thoroughly described, particularly the use of supplements, herbal remedies, and dietary modifications. The aim of this pilot study was to determine the prevalence of specific types of CAM used by adults with MS in the United States. Participants included adults who were diagnosed with MS at least 1 year prior to study enrollment. CAM use was measured using the CAM Supplement of the National Health Interview Survey, and nutrient intake was assessed using an Automated Self-Administered 24-h Recall. This study found that a majority (77 %, n = 27) of the sample used CAM within the past 12 months, the most prevalent type being vitamins/minerals (88.9 %, n = 24), nonvitamin, nonmineral, natural products (NP) (44.4 %, n = 12), relaxation techniques (33.3 %, n = 9), and special diets (29.6 %, n = 8). Regarding diet, median percent calories from fat (37 %) and saturated fat (12 %) were higher than current recommendations, while dietary fiber intake met only 87 % of the adequate intake. Participants following the Paleo (7.4 %, n = 2) diet did not meet the Estimated Average Requirement (EAR) for vitamins D and E, while those on the Swank diet (7.4 %, n = 2) were below the EAR for vitamins C, A, E, and folate. The results support previous findings that CAM therapies are commonly used by individuals with MS. Inadequate intakes of certain vitamins and minerals by those following the Swank and Paleo diet suggest these diets may be too restrictive, thus further research is warranted.

  14. A Prospective, Multicenter Study of Complementary/Alternative Medicine (CAM) Utilization During Definitive Radiation for Breast Cancer

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    Moran, Meena S., E-mail: meena.moran@yale.edu [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Department of Radiation Therapy, William W. Backus Hospital, Norwich, Connecticut (United States); Ma Shuangge [Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Jagsi, Reshma [University of Michigan, Department of Radiation Oncology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Yang, Tzu-I Jonathan [Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Higgins, Susan A. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Department of Radiation Therapy, Shoreline Medical Center, Guilford, Connecticut (United States); Weidhaas, Joanne B. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Wilson, Lynn D. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Department of Radiation Therapy, Lawrence and Memorial Hospital, New London, Connecticut (United States); Lloyd, Shane [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Peschel, Richard [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Department of Radiation Therapy, Lawrence and Memorial Hospital, New London, Connecticut (United States); Gaudreau, Bryant [Department of Radiation Therapy, William W. Backus Hospital, Norwich, Connecticut (United States); Rockwell, Sara [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Although complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) utilization in breast cancer patients is reported to be high, there are few data on CAM practices in breast patients specifically during radiation. This prospective, multi-institutional study was conducted to define CAM utilization in breast cancer during definitive radiation. Materials/Methods: A validated CAM instrument with a self-skin assessment was administered to 360 Stage 0-III breast cancer patients from 5 centers during the last week of radiation. All data were analyzed to detect significant differences between users/nonusers. Results: CAM usage was reported in 54% of the study cohort (n=194/360). Of CAM users, 71% reported activity-based CAM (eg, Reiki, meditation), 26% topical CAM, and 45% oral CAM. Only 16% received advice/counseling from naturopathic/homeopathic/medical professionals before initiating CAM. CAM use significantly correlated with higher education level (P<.001), inversely correlated with concomitant hormone/radiation therapy use (P=.010), with a trend toward greater use in younger patients (P=.066). On multivariate analysis, level of education (OR: 6.821, 95% CI: 2.307-20.168, P<.001) and hormones/radiation therapy (OR: 0.573, 95% CI: 0.347-0.949, P=.031) independently predicted for CAM use. Significantly lower skin toxicity scores were reported in CAM users vs nonusers, respectively (mild: 34% vs 25%, severe: 17% vs 29%, P=.017). Conclusion: This is the first prospective study to assess CAM practices in breast patients during radiation, with definition of these practices as the first step for future investigation of CAM/radiation interactions. These results should alert radiation oncologists that a large percentage of breast cancer patients use CAM during radiation without disclosure or consideration for potential interactions, and should encourage increased awareness, communication, and documentation of CAM practices in patients undergoing radiation treatment for breast

  15. A preliminary survey of the practice patterns of United States Guild Certified Feldenkrais PractitionersCM

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    Buchanan Patricia A

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Feldenkrais Method® of somatic education purports to guide people of varying ages and abilities to improve function. Many people choose this method to aid with recovery from injury, manage chronic conditions, or enhance performance even though limited research supporting its safety and effectiveness exists to guide decisions about use and referral. Very little information about practitioner characteristics and practice patterns is publicly available to assist researchers in the design of appropriate safety and effectiveness studies. The purpose of this study was to obtain an initial overview of the characteristics of United States Guild Certified Feldenkrais PractitionersCM. Methods Of 1300 certified Feldenkrais® practitioners at the time of the study, there were 1193 practitioners with email accounts who were sent invitations to complete a web-based survey. The survey inquired about practice locations, additional credentials, service patterns and workloads during the previous 3 months. Response rate and descriptive statistics were calculated. Results The survey had a 32.3% (385/1193 response rate. The top states in which responders practiced were California (n = 92 and New York (n = 44. Most responders did not hold other credentials as traditional health care providers or as complementary and alternative medicine providers. Among those who did, the most common credentials were physical therapist (n = 83 and massage therapist (n = 38. Just over a third of traditional health care providers only provided Feldenkrais lessons, compared to 59.3% of complementary and alternative providers. On average, responders saw 7.6 ± 8.1 (median = 5 clients per week for individual lessons, 8.4 ± 11.5 (median = 5 clients per week for group lessons, and 2.9 ± 3.9 (median = 2 new clients per month for individual lessons. Conclusions This preliminary survey of United States Guild Certified Feldenkrais Practitioners indicated that most

  16. Current and future prospects of integrating traditional and alternative medicine in the management of diseases in Tanzania.

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    Moshi, M J

    2005-09-01

    Traditional medicine and medicinal plants, in general, continue to be a powerful source of new drugs, now contributing about 90% of the newly discovered pharmaceuticals. Traditional medicine continues to provide health coverage for over 80% of the world population, especially in the developing world. The past and the present are all full of living examples of discoveries of drugs, ranging from anticancer, antiasthma, antidiabetic, antihypertensives and many others which owe their origin to traditional medicine. The current era of HIV/AIDS is not short of contributions from traditional medicine. The recent discovery of the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI), calanolide A, is a new addition from traditional medicine. Many more such discoveries are yet to come. While this potential is much acknowledged, little has been done in African countries, to utilize the plants that are already known and proven to be safe for use by patients. A number of plants could be widely cultivated for local industrial production of medicines and herbal nutritional supplements. There is need to ensure that what is known is made use of, for financial gain, and for improvement of the health of our people. We need to establish the necessary expertise for development of traditional medicines and deliberate efforts should be made to encourage local industrial production of traditional/herbal medicines so that cultivation may become possible and hence contribute to poverty reduction.

  17. Psycho-socioeconomic factors affecting complementary and alternative medicine use among selected rural communities in Malaysia: a cross-sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurubaran Ganasegeran

    Full Text Available The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM as a source of cure has gained much spectrum worldwide, despite skeptics and advocates of evidence-based practice conceptualized such therapies as human nostrum.This study aimed to explore the factors affecting CAM use among rural communities in Malaysia.A cross-sectional study was carried out on 288 occupants across four rural villages within the District of Selama, Perak, Malaysia. A survey that consisted of socio-economic characteristics, history of CAM use and the validated Holistic Complementary and Alternative Medicine Questionnaire (HCAMQ were used.The prevalence of self-reported CAM use over the past one year was 53.1%. Multiple logistic regression analyses yielded three significant predictors of CAM use: monthly household income of less than MYR 2500, higher education level, and positive attitude towards CAM.Psycho-socioeconomic factors were significantly associated with CAM use among rural communities in Malaysia.

  18. Seeking Mind, Body and Spirit Healing—Why Some Men with Prostate Cancer Choose CAM (Complementary and Alternative Medicine) over Conventional Cancer Treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Margaret A. White; Verhoef, Marja J.; B.J. Davison; Hal Gunn; Karen Cooke

    2008-01-01

    Little is known about men with prostate cancer who decline conventional treatment and use only complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Objectives: To 1) explore why men decline conventional prostate cancer treatment and use CAM 2) understand the role of holistic healing in their care, and 3) document their recommendations for health care providers. Methods: Semi-structured interviews and follow-up focus groups. Sample: Twenty-nine men diagnosed with prostate cancer who declined all reco...

  19. Doctoring the Genitals: Towards Broadening the Meaning of Social Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shweder, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    Doctoring the genitals is compatible with a recognizable conception of social medicine. This commentary critically examines the distinction between medical and nonmedical procedures; presents an alternative account of Sohaila Bastami's personal reaction to the anonymous caller's request for referral information concerning hymen reconstruction surgery; and makes use of Yelp to simulate the caller's procedure for locating a helpful practitioner. Yelp is a very useful informational search engine that does not subject its users to a moral examination.

  20. Legislative Regulation of Traditional Medicinal Knowledge in Eritrea vis-à-vis Eritrea's Commitments under the Convention on Biological Diversity: Issues and Alternatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senai Andemariam

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available On 21 March 1996, Eritrea acceded to the Convention on Biological Diversity which, among others, obliges states to sustainably conserve and develop customary uses of biological resources. Among the many forms of traditional practices of biological resources is traditional medicinal knowledge. Research has revealed that Eritrea has abundant pool of such knowledge and a high percentage of its population, as it is true with many developing and underdeveloped countries, resorts to traditional medicine for curing numerous ailments. However, no specific policy or legislative framework has yet been developed to sift, preserve and encourage the practice. Analysis of existing Eritrean laws and policies will show that they are neither adequate nor specific enough to be used in the preservation and development of Eritrean traditional medicinal knowledge. This article will, therefore, in view of the rich, yet unregulated, traditional medicinal knowledge resource in Eritrea, highlight the need for the development of a specific legal instrument legislation for Eritrea from the perspective of international and country level experiences. It will be argued that the development of a specific legislation is preferred to the alternative of keeping traditional medicinal knowledge as a component of a legal instrument developed for a larger mass such as health or traditional knowledge.

  1. Changing academic medicine: strategies used by academic leaders of integrative medicine-a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Claudia M; Holmberg, Christine

    2012-01-01

    In Western countries, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is more and more provided by practitioners and family doctors. To base this reality of health care provision on an evidence-base, academic medicine needs to be included in the development. In the study we aimed to gain information on a structured approach to include CAM in academic health centers. We conducted a semistructured interview study with leading experts of integrative medicine to analyze strategies of existing academic institutions of integrative medicine. The study sample consisted of a purposive sample of ten leaders that have successfully integrated CAM into medical schools in the USA, Great Britain, and Germany and the Director of the National Center for Alternative and Complementary Medicine. Analysis was based on content analysis. The prerequisite to foster change in academic medicine was a strong educational and professional background in academic medicine and research methodologies. With such a skill set, the interviewees identified a series of strategies to align themselves with colleagues from conventional medicine, such as creating common goals, networking, and establishing well-functioning research teams. In addition, there must be a vision of what should be needed to be at the center of all efforts in order to implement successful change.

  2. The use of complementary and alternative medicines among patients with locally advanced breast cancer – a descriptive study

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    Rakovitch Eileen

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM use is common among cancer patients. This paper reviews the use of CAM in a series of patients with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC. Methods Women with LABC attending a specialist clinic at a single Canadian cancer centre were identified and approached. Participants completed a self-administered survey regarding CAM usage, beliefs associated with CAM usage, views of their risks of developing recurrent cancer and of dying of breast cancer. Responses were scored and compared between CAM users and non-users. Results Thirty-six patients were approached, 32 completed the questionnaire (response rate 89%. Forty-seven percent of LABC patients were identified as CAM users. CAM users were more likely to be younger, married, in a higher socioeconomic class and of Asian ethnicity than non-users. CAM users were likely to use multiple modalities simultaneously (median 4 with vitamins being the most popular (60%. Motivation for CAM therapy was described as, "assisting their body to heal" (75%, to 'boost the immune system' (56% and to "give a feeling of control with respect to their treatment" (56%. CAM therapy was used concurrently with conventional treatment in 88% of cases, however, 12% of patients felt that CAM could replace their conventional therapy. Psychological evaluation suggests CAM users perceived their risk of dying of breast cancer was similar to that of the non-Cam group (33% vs. 35%, however the CAM group had less severe anxiety and depression. Conclusion The motivation, objectives and benefits of CAM therapy in a selected population of women with LABC are similar to those reported for women diagnosed with early stage breast cancer. CAM users display less anxiety and depression and are less likely to believe they will die of their breast cancer. However the actual benefit to overall and disease free survival has yet to be demonstrated, as well as the possible interactions with

  3.  Public Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Complementary and AlternativeMedicine in Riyadh Region, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah M.N. AlBedah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available  Objectives: Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM iswell established world wide. The present work is aimed at studying the knowledge, attitude and practice of CAM by the people of Riyadh region, Saudi Arabia.Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive household survey studyof the people living in Riyadh city, as well as the surrounding governorates. A multistage random sample was taken from1st January to the end of March 2010, with a total number of 518 participants. Data were collected using a pre-designed questionnaire through direct interview. The data was collected based on socio-demography, as well as knowledge, attitude and practice of CAM.Results: Participants were nearly sex-matched, consisting of approximately 70�0Saudi and 30�0non-Saudis. About 89�0ofthe participants had some knowledge of CAM. Mass media e.g.(T.V., newspapers and radio and family, relatives and friends represented the main sources of CAM knowledge, (46.5�0and46.3�0respectively. Nearly 85�0of participants or one of their family members has used some form of CAM before, and the most common users of CAM practices were females, housewives, and illiterate subjects (or those who could just read and write, as well as participants aged 60 years and above. Medical herbs (58.89� prayer (54� honey and bee products (54� hijama (35.71�nd cauterization or medical massage therapy (22�20were thecommonly used CAM practices. Most participants agreed that there are needs for; CAM practices (93.8� regulations for CAM(94.9� health education (96.6� specialized centers (94.8�20and CAM clinics (92.7� While only 8.3�0of participants usually discussed CAM with their physicians.Conclusion: There is a high prevalence and increased public interest in CAM use in the Riyadh region. There is a positiv eattitude towards CAM, yet most participants are reluctant to share and discuss CAM information with their physicians.

  4. Medical students’ knowledge, attitude, and practice of complementary and alternative medicine: a pre- and post-exposure survey in Majmaah University, Saudi Arabia

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    Al Mansour MA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mohammed Abdullah Al Mansour,1 Abdullah MN Al-Bedah,2 Mohammed Othman AlRukban,3 Ibrahim S Elsubai,2 Elsadiq Yousif Mohamed,4 Ahmed Tawfik El Olemy,2 Asim AH Khalil,2 Mohamed KM Khalil,2 Meshari Saleh Alqaed,2 Abdullah Almudaiheem,2 Waqas Sami Mahmoud,4 Khalid Altohami Medani,4 Naseem Akhtar Qureshi2 1College of Medicine, Majmaah University, Al Majma’ah, 2National Center of Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Ministry of Health, 3Department of Family Medicine and Community Medicine, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, 4Department of Community Medicine and Public Health, College of Medicine, Majmaah University, Al Majma’ah, Saudi Arabia Background: Evidently, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM is a recognized medical practice that efficiently uses multiple treatment therapies and techniques in the prevention and management of a variety of human disorders. Many medical schools have integrated CAM curriculum in medical education system worldwide. Research in knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP of diverse health professionals exposed to CAM courses is important from many perspectives including improvement in KAP and teaching skills of faculty, together with capacity building and curriculum development.Objective and setting: This pre- and post-design cross-sectional study aimed to assess CAM-KAP of two intakes of medical students in Majmaah University, Saudi Arabia.Methods: The second-year medical students of the first (year 2012–2013 and second (year 2013–2014 intake (n=26 and 39, respectively were selected for this study. A reliable, 16-item self-administered questionnaire was distributed among all the students for answering before and after the 48-hour CAM course. The data were analyzed using appropriate statistical test of significance.Results: Medical students’ knowledge and attitude toward CAM significantly improved across some subitems of CAM questionnaire with a positive trend in the rest of its items

  5. The Concept of Wind in Traditional Chinese Medicine

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    Mehrab Dashtdar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of folk medicine has been widely embraced in many developed countries under the name of traditional, complementary and alternative medicine (TCAM and is now becoming the mainstream in the UK and the rest of Europe, as well as in North America and Australia. Diversity, easy accessibility, broad continuity, relatively low cost, base levels of technological inputs, fewer side effects, and growing economic importance are some of the positive features of folk medicine. In this framework, a critical need exists to introduce the practice of folk medicine into public healthcare if the goal of reformed access to healthcare facilities is to be achieved. The amount of information available to public health practitioners about traditional medicine concepts and the utilization of that information are inadequate and pose many problems for the delivery of primary healthcare globally. Different societies have evolved various forms of indigenous perceptions that are captured under the broad concept of folk medicine, e.g., Persian, Chinese, Grecian, and African folk medicines, which explain the lack of universally accepted definitions of terms. Thus, the exchange of information on the diverse forms of folk medicine needs to be facilitated. Various concepts of Wind are found in books on traditional medicine, and many of those go beyond the boundaries established in old manuscripts and are not easily understood. This study intends to provide information, context, and guidance for the collection of all important information on the different concepts of Wind and for their simplification. This new vision for understanding earlier Chinese medicine will benefit public health specialists, traditional and complementary medicine practitioners, and those who are interested in historical medicine by providing a theoretical basis for the traditional medicines and the acupuncture that is used to eliminate Wind in order to treat various diseases.

  6. Complementary and Integrative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medical treatments that are not part of mainstream medicine. When you are using these types of care, it may be called complementary, integrative, or alternative medicine. Complementary medicine is used together with mainstream medical ...

  7. Reflective Practitioner Account

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    干青

    2009-01-01

    This article focus on the reflective account of an English teacher learning and teaching in higher education with the British post-graduate certificate program of the Yunnan Agdculture University.As n practitioner for smny years in English learning and teaching for many years,it reflects in four fields.

  8. The Transmission of Chinese Medicine in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Garvey

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper explores some of the issues concerning the transmission of Chinese medicine in Australia, its practitioner training and the future of Chinese medicine as a distinct medical discipline in the Australian context. In China over the last century Chinese medicine was overhauled in order to align it with the biomedical perspective prevalent in the West. These changes, in turn, had important consequences for the transmission of CM in Australia and the West. But while the biomedicalisation of CM has offered the path of least resistance, it has also lead to unworkable simplifications and methodological failures. The paper thus argues for a renewed access to the tradition’s primary sources in order to ally the distinctive features and methods of traditional practice with biomedicine, as an alternative to an outright integration into biomedical practice.

  9. Use of complementary and alternative medicine for physical performance, energy, immune function, and general health among older women and men in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, Elizabeth M; Laditka, Sarah B; Laditka, James N; Nies, Mary A; Racine, Elizabeth F

    2012-01-01

    We examined use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for health and well-being by older women and men. Data were from the 2007 National Health Interview Survey, representing 89.5 million Americans ages 50+. Multivariate logistic regression accounted for the survey design. For general health, 52 million people used CAM. The numbers for immune function, physical performance, and energy were 21.6, 15.9, and 10.1 million respectively. In adjusted results, women were much more likely than men to use CAM for all four reasons, especially energy. Older adults, particularly women, could benefit from research on CAM benefits and risks.

  10. Screening for antimicrobial activity of ten medicinal plants used in Colombian folkloric medicine: A possible alternative in the treatment of non-nosocomial infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ocampo Saul A

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The antimicrobial activity and Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC of the extracts of Bidens pilosa L., Bixa orellana L., Cecropia peltata L., Cinchona officinalis L., Gliricidia sepium H.B. & K, Jacaranda mimosifolia D.Don, Justicia secunda Vahl., Piper pulchrum C.DC, P. paniculata L. and Spilanthes americana Hieron were evaluated against five bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus β hemolític, Bacillus cereus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Escherichia coli, and one yeast (Candida albicans. These plants are used in Colombian folk medicine to treat infections of microbial origin. Methods Plants were collected by farmers and traditional healers. The ethanol, hexane and water extracts were obtained by standard methods. The antimicrobial activity was found by using a modified agar well diffusion method. All microorganisms were obtained from the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC. MIC was determined in the plant extracts that showed some efficacy against the tested microorganisms. Gentamycin sulfate (1.0 μg/ml, clindamycin (0.3 μg/ml and nystatin (1.0 μg/ml were used as positive controls. Results The water extracts of Bidens pilosa L., Jacaranda mimosifolia D.Don, and Piper pulchrum C.DC showed a higher activity against Bacillus cereus and Escherichia coli than gentamycin sulfate. Similarly, the ethanol extracts of all species were active against Staphylococcus aureus except for Justicia secunda. Furthermore, Bixa orellana L, Justicia secunda Vahl. and Piper pulchrum C.DC presented the lowest MICs against Escherichia coli (0.8, 0.6 and 0.6 μg/ml, respectively compared to gentamycin sulfate (0.9 8g/ml. Likewise, Justicia secunda and Piper pulchrum C.DC showed an analogous MIC against Candida albicans (0.5 and 0.6 μg/ml, respectively compared to nystatin (0.6 μg/ml. Bixa orellana L, exhibited a better MIC against Bacillus cereus (0.2 μg/ml than gentamycin sulfate (0.5 μg/ml. Conclusion This in vitro study

  11. A systematic review on the effectiveness of complementary and alternative medicine for chronic non-specific low-back pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M. Rubinstein (Sidney); M. van Middelkoop (Marienke); T. Kuijpers (Ton); R.W.J.G. Ostelo (Raymond); A.P. Verhagen (Arianne); M.R. de Boer (Michiel Robert); B.W. Koes (Bart); M.W. van Tulder (Maurits)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe purpose of this systematic review was to assess the effects of spinal manipulative therapy (SMT), acupuncture and herbal medicine for chronic non-specific LBP. A comprehensive search was conducted by an experienced librarian from the Cochrane Back Review Group (CBRG) in multiple data

  12. Project ASPIRE: Incorporating Integrative Medicine Into Residency Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawaz, Haq; Via, Christina M; Ali, Ather; Rosenberger, Lisa D

    2015-11-01

    Griffin Hospital, a community hospital affiliated with Yale School of Public Health and Yale School of Medicine, received Health Resources and Services Administration funding to strengthen and improve its combined internal medicine and general preventive medicine residency program by incorporating an integrative medicine curriculum. The purpose of project ASPIRE (Advancing Skills of Preventive medicine residents through Integrative medicine Education, Research and Evaluation) was to create, implement, and evaluate a needs-based, innovative training curriculum in integrative medicine. Through this robust new training, the authors aimed to produce preventive medicine-trained physicians with competencies in integrative medicine to collaboratively work with other integrative medicine practitioners in interdisciplinary teams to provide holistic, patient-centered care. The multifaceted collaborative curriculum was composed of didactics, grand rounds, journal club, objective structured clinical examinations, and two new practicum rotations in integrative medicine. The new practicum rotations included block rotations at the Integrative Medicine Center at Griffin Hospital and the Yale Stress Center. Between 2012 and 2014, three cohorts participated in the curriculum; two of these cohorts included three advanced preventive medicine residents each and the fourth included four residents. Project faculty conducted 14 lectures and journal clubs, and two grand rounds. Six of the ten participating residents (60%) completed integrative medicine clinical rotations. Residents' attitudes toward integrative medicine were evaluated through self-assessment using the Complementary, Alternative, and Integrative Medicine Attitudes Questionnaire; data were analyzed in 2015. This article describes the results of this prospective observational study based on single-institution experience over the course of the 2-year project period.

  13. The Internet and the medical radiation science practitioner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanahan, Madeleine [School of Medical Science, RMIT University, Bundoora, Victoria 3083 (Australia)], E-mail: mshanahan@rmit.edu.au; Herrington, Anthony; Herrington, Jan [Faculty of Education, University of Wollongong, New South Wales (Australia)

    2009-08-15

    Purpose: The Internet is an important information source for health practitioners providing immediate access to the most current health and medical information. Factors limiting practitioner access to the Internet have been identified and the literature shows that access to the Internet varies across and within health professions. There is therefore a need for each health profession to investigate practitioner access to the Internet. There has been, however, no identified empirical research investigating medical radiation science (MRS) practitioner access to or use of the Internet. This research sought to establish the professional use of Internet-based tools by Australian MRS practitioners and issues affecting access to the Internet within MRS workplaces. Methods: Qualitative and quantitative approaches were used in this research. These included interviews with 28 MRS practitioners from the four areas of specialisation, namely nuclear medicine, radiation therapy, radiography and sonography and a survey of MRS practitioners. In 2007 a 4-page postal survey was sent to a random sample of 1142 MRS practitioners with a response rate of 32.8%. Results: The Internet is an important information source widely used by MRS practitioners. MRS practitioners search the Internet (87%), access specific web pages (86%), use email (82%) and listservs (39.4%) to update their professional knowledge. It was evident that access to the Internet within the workplace varied within the MRS profession. Whilst the majority (96.4%) of MRS practitioners had some level of access to the Internet in their workplace, factors shown to affect practitioner access were workplace setting (p = 0.000), work environment (p = 0.000), and geographic location (p = 0.025). The majority of clinical workplaces (81%) did not provide practitioners with remote access to electronic resources available in the workplace such as e-journals and databases. Conclusions: This research provides baseline data to the MRS

  14. A critical review of complementary and alternative medicine use among people with arthritis: a focus upon prevalence, cost, user profiles, motivation, decision-making, perceived benefits and communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lu; Sibbritt, David; Adams, Jon

    2017-03-01

    A critical review of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use among people with arthritis was conducted focusing upon prevalence and profile of CAM users as well as their motivation, decision-making, perceived benefits and communication with healthcare providers. A comprehensive search of peer-reviewed literature published from 2008 to 2015 was undertaken via CINAHL, Medline and AMED databases. The initial search identified 4331 articles, of which 49 articles met selection criteria. The review shows a high prevalence of CAM use (often multiple types and concurrent to conventional medical care) among those with arthritis which is not restricted to any particular geographic or social-economic status. A large proportion of arthritis sufferers using CAM consider these medicines to be somewhat or very effective but almost half do not inform their healthcare provider about their CAM use. It is suggested that rheumatologists and others providing health care for patients with arthritis should be cognizant of the high prevalence of CAM use and the challenges associated with possible concurrent use of CAM and conventional medicine among their patients.

  15. Vermittlung von Naturheilverfahren in der Veterinärmedizin mittels E-Learning [Teaching methods of alternative therapy in veterinary medicine via e-learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fidelak, Christian

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available [english] The Free University’s Veterinary Clinic of Reproduction in the Department of Veterinary Medicine, Berlin, has been offering courses on alternative and complementary veterinary medicine to its students for several years. Due to time constraints and shortages in teaching staff, it has not been possible to satisfy student demand for instruction in these areas. To provide more detailed information as well as more opportunities for discussion and practica, subject area courses were modified in two steps. Initially, blended learning was implemented to include e-learning and in-class formats of instruction. Subsequently, an entire block of courses offered were transferred to e-learning format. Students may now voluntarily register for the e-learning course entitled “Introduction of alternative and complementary veterinary medicine” via the Internet and learn the basic principles of homoeopathy, herbal medicine, acupuncture and other alternative methods in veterinary medicine. After passing this basic course, blended learning courses enable advanced students to learn more about fundamentals of methods in greater detail as well as to perform practica with animal subjects. The evaluation of these courses showed that students rated e-learning to be a reasonable addendum to in-class instruction. More than two thirds of the students recommended an increased integration of e-learning into veterinary education. [german] Die Tierklinik für Fortpflanzung in Berlin bietet den Studierenden der Veterinärmedizin seit einigen Semestern Wahlpflichtkurse zu den Naturheilverfahren an. Der enormen Nachfrage seitens der Studierenden standen personelle und zeitliche Begrenzungen des Lehrpersonals gegenüber. Um den Interessenten dennoch umfangreiche Informationen zu bieten sowie Freiräume für Diskussionen und praktische Übungen zu schaffen, wurde das Ausbildungsangebot in zwei Projektphasen ausgebaut. Zunächst wurde dabei die Methode des Blended

  16. Medicina complementar e alternativa: utilização pela comunidade de Montes Claros, Minas Gerais Complementary and alternative medicine: use in Montes Claros, Minas Gerais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joao Felício Rodrigues Neto

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Verificar a prevalência de utilização e o perfil socioeconômico do usuário de medicina complementar e alternativa pela população de Montes Claros (MG. MÉTODOS: Estudo transversal, analítico. A amostra foi probabilística, por conglomerados, sendo a unidade amostral o domicílio e os entrevistados de ambos os sexos e maiores de 18 anos. Os dados foram coletados em uma cidade de porte médio de Minas Gerais utilizando formulários semi-estruturados. RESULTADOS: Foram entrevistadas 3.090 pessoas. A prevalência de uso de medicina complementar e alternativas foi, quando consideradas somente as que envolvem custos, como homeopatia, acupuntura, quiropraxia, medicina ortomolecular, técnicas de relaxamento/meditação e massagem, de 8,93% e 70%, quando incluímos todas as terapias arguidas. As prevalências foram: oração a Deus (52%, remédios populares (30,9%, exercícios físicos (25,5%, benzedeiras (15%, dietas populares (7,1%, massagem (4,9%, relaxamento/meditação (2,8%, homeopatia (2,4%, grupos de autoajuda (1,9%, quiropraxia (1,7%, acupuntura (1,5% e medicina ortomolecular (0,2%. Mulheres, católicos, casados, melhor renda e escolaridade estiveram associados de forma positiva com a utilização das terapias que envolvem custos. CONCLUSÃO: Medicina complementar e alternativa é utilizada por número significativo da população. Gênero, religião, estado civil, renda e escolaridade estiveram associados positivamente com utilização de terapias alternativas. O acesso das pessoas de menor renda e escolaridade à medicina complementar e alternativa poderia aumentar a prevalência de utilização daquelas formas que envolvem custos.OBJECTIVE: To determine prevalence of utilization and social and economic profile of those using complementary and alternative medicine in the medium sized Brazilian city of Montes Claros, MG. METHODS: A transversal descriptive study was conducted. The sample of 3090 people was probabilistic, by

  17. A foot in both worlds: education and the transformation of Chinese medicine in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flesch, Hannah

    2013-01-01

    Although insufficiently studied, schools of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) provide substantial insight into the transformation of medicine in the United States. Scholars have suggested that the increasing acceptance of CAM is due to its alignment with biomedical models of professionalization, education, research, and practice. At West Coast University, students of acupuncture and Oriental medicine learn to straddle both Western and Eastern medical worlds through an increasingly science-oriented curriculum and the inculcation of professional values associated with West Coast University's emphasis upon integration with Western medicine as a means of achieving professional status and legitimacy vis-à-vis the dominant biomedical paradigm. The implications of integration with biomedicine for the identity of Chinese medicine are discussed: from the perspective of critical medical anthropology, integration reproduces biomedical hegemony; paving the way toward co-optation of Chinese medicine, the subordination of its practitioners, and, ultimately, the constraint of medical pluralism in the United States.

  18. Publishing scientifically sound papers in Traditional and Complementary Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isidoro, Ciro; Huang, Chia-Chi; Sheen, Lee-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Non-conventional medical practices that make use of dietary supplements, herbal extracts, physical manipulations, and other practices typically associated with folk and Traditional Medicine are increasingly becoming popular in Western Countries. These practices are commonly referred to by the generic, all-inclusive term "Complementary and Alternative Medicine." Scientists, practitioners, and medical institutions bear the responsibility of testing and proving the effectiveness of these non-conventional medical practices in the interest of patients. In this context, the number of peer-reviewed journals and published articles on this topic has greatly increased in the recent decades. In this editorial article, we illustrate the policy of the Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine for publishing solid and scientifically sound papers in the field of Traditional and Complementary Medicine.

  19. Publishing scientifically sound papers in Traditional and Complementary Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isidoro, Ciro; Huang, Chia-Chi; Sheen, Lee-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Non-conventional medical practices that make use of dietary supplements, herbal extracts, physical manipulations, and other practices typically associated with folk and Traditional Medicine are increasingly becoming popular in Western Countries. These practices are commonly referred to by the generic, all-inclusive term “Complementary and Alternative Medicine.” Scientists, practitioners, and medical institutions bear the responsibility of testing and proving the effectiveness of these non-conventional medical practices in the interest of patients. In this context, the number of peer-reviewed journals and published articles on this topic has greatly increased in the recent decades. In this editorial article, we illustrate the policy of the Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine for publishing solid and scientifically sound papers in the field of Traditional and Complementary Medicine. PMID:26933641

  20. Complementary and Alternative Medicines Use during Pregnancy: A Systematic Review of Pregnant Women and Healthcare Professional Views and Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Rouf Pallivalappila

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To undertake a systematic review of the recent (2008–2013 primary literature, describing views and experiences of CAM use during pregnancy by women and healthcare professionals. Method. Medline, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Cochrane Database of Systematic Review Library and Allied, and Complementary Medicine Database were searched. Studies reporting systemic CAM products (homeopathic preparations, herbal medicines, Vitamins and minerals, homeopathy, and special diets alone or in combination with other nonsystemic CAM modalities (e.g., acupuncture were included. Results. Database searches retrieved 2,549 citations. Removal of duplicates followed by review of titles and abstracts yielded 32 relevant studies. Twenty-two reported the perspectives of women and their CAM use during pregnancy, while 10 focused on healthcare professionals. The majority of studies had significant flaws in study design and reporting, including a lack of appropriate definitions of CAM and associated modalities, absence of detailed checklists provided to participants, the use of convenience sampling, and a general lack of scientific robustness in terms of data validity and reliability. Conclusion. To permit generalisability of study findings, there is an urgent need to expand the evidence base assessing CAMs use during pregnancy using appropriately designed studies.

  1. The clinical effectiveness of cognitive behavior therapy and an alternative medicine approach in reducing symptoms of depression in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charkhandeh, Mansoureh; Talib, Mansor Abu; Hunt, Caroline Jane

    2016-05-30

    The main aim of the study was to investigate the effectiveness of two psychotherapeutic approaches, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and a complementary medicine method Reiki, in reducing depression scores in adolescents. We recruited 188 adolescent patients who were 12-17 years old. Participants were randomly assigned to CBT, Reiki or wait-list. Depression scores were assessed before and after the 12 week interventions or wait-list. CBT showed a significantly greater decrease in Child Depression Inventory (CDI) scores across treatment than both Reiki (pReiki also showed greater decreases in CDI scores across treatment relative to the wait-list control condition (p=.031). The analyses indicated a significant interaction between gender, condition and change in CDI scores, such that male participants showed a smaller treatment effect for Reiki than did female participants. Both CBT and Reiki were effective in reducing the symptoms of depression over the treatment period, with effect for CBT greater than Reiki. These findings highlight the importance of early intervention for treatment of depression using both cognitive and complementary medicine approaches. However, research that tests complementary therapies over a follow-up period and against a placebo treatment is required.

  2. Traditional/alternative medicines and the right to health: Key elements for a convention on global health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpinga, Emmanuel Kabengele; Kandolo, Tshimungu; Verloo, Henk; Bukonda, Ngoyi K Zacharie; Kandala, Ngianga-Bakwin; Chastonay, Philippe

    2013-06-14

    Little has been done to investigate and promote the importance of non-conventional medicines (NCMs) in the realization of the right to health, yet all over the world people regularly resort to NCMs to secure healing or to prevent or mitigate the occurrence of a wide range of morbidities. This study aims to elucidate the theoretical framework of the role of NCMs in realizing the right to health, to identify the potential manifestations and causes of violations of the right to health in their practice, and to propose the practice of NCMs that could be included in a Framework Convention on Global Health. We use both the documentary analysis and the violation of rights approaches. Through a non-directive review of the literature, we have tried to clarify the concepts and uniqueness of NCMs. We have also tried to unveil the challenges facing NCMs in a context where conventional medicines assume extensive power. The human rights approach has enabled us to bring to light the potential challenges to the rights of the various stakeholders that NCMs create. We argue that NCMs can contribute to realizing the right to health through their availability, accessibility, acceptability, and relative quality. The Framework Convention on Global Health could contribute to the effective realization of this right by integrating basic principles to ensure the recognition, protection, promotion, and conservation of NCMs-at least of those NCMs that have shown evidence of efficacy-as well as catalyzing increased international cooperation in this area.

  3. The cult of saints-healers – an alternative and opposition to the official medicine in medieval Bulgaria

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    of medical services, by their inaccessibility, as well as by the widespread disappointment in learned physicians. This led to the search for alternative healing practices. different means and methods were developed for filling up the deficit of healthcare services: • Self-treatment and self-proclaimed healers, • Healing through sacred objects, • Faith in saints and their relics. Evidence of the existence of a Bulgarian tradition of healing practices can be found in the considerabl...

  4. The impaired practitioner - scope of the problem and ethical challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhai, A; Szabo, C P; McQuoid-Mason, D J

    2006-10-01

    Practitioner impairment occurs when a physical, mental or substance-related disorder interferes with his or her ability to engage in professional activities competently and safely. The Health Professions Council of South Africa makes reporting of impaired colleagues and students mandatory. The ethical dilemma faced by many colleagues on the issue of reporting an impaired practitioner is that of having to choose between protecting the privacy of the practitioner and the safety of patients. However, medicine as a profession with an acknowledged fiduciary relationship has a clear responsibility to assure the public, and all patients, that its practitioners and institutions are trustworthy. An awareness of and sensitivity to physician vulnerability and early detection and prevention of impairment is important.

  5. Characteristics of users and implications for the use of complementary and alternative medicine in Ghanaian cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy and chemotherapy: a cross- sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yarney Joel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is widespread use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM in Ghana, driven by cultural consideration and paradigm to disease causation. Whether there is concurrent use of conventional medicine and CAM in cancer patients is unknown. This study investigates the prevalence, pattern and predictors of CAM use in cancer patients. Overlapping toxicity, sources of information, and whether users inform their doctor about CAM use is examined. Method Cross-sectional study using a questionnaire administered to cancer patients, who were receiving radiotherapy and or chemotherapy or had recently completed treatment at a single institution was used. Results Ninety eight patients participated in the study with a mean age of 55.5 (18–89, made up of 51% females. Married individuals formed 56% of the respondents, whilst 49% had either secondary or tertiary education. Head and neck cancer patients were 15.3%, breast (21.4%, abdomen/pelvic cancers constituted (52%.Seventy seven (78.6% patients received radiotherapy only, 16.3% received radiation and chemotherapy and 5.3% had chemotherapy only. Ninety five patients were diagnosed of cancer within the past 24 months,73.5% were CAM users as follows; massage(66.3%, herbal(59.2%, mega vitamins(55.1%, Chinese medicine(53.1%,and prayer(42.9%. Sixty eight percent were treated with curative intent. Overlapping toxicity was reported. Majority (83.3% of users had not informed their doctor about CAM use. On univariate analysis, female (p=0.004 and palliative patients, p=0.032 were more likely to be CAM users. Multivariate analysis identified female (p Friends and Media are the main sources of information on CAM. There was increase in CAM use after the diagnosis of cancer mainly for Chinese Medicine and vitamins. Conclusion There is high CAM usage among Cancer patients, comparable to use in the general population, there is concurrent use of CAM and conventional medicine with reported

  6. Educating the Reflexive Practitioner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc J. Neveu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available “I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think.”SocratesIntroductionStudio as a model of education is distinct from many other professionaldisciplines and although it can be quite rewarding on many levels it mayalso be an extremely unconstructive endeavor.1 The amount of time spent in studio typically far outweighs that spent for other courses and often atthe expense of such other courses. The dedication that students bring tothe studio is remarkable, yet much of the time spent in studio is not alwaysproductive. Students often complain of not knowing what is expected ofthem and as a result much of the time is spent thinking about what they think the professor wants to see as opposed to working through theirprojects. In an alternate scenario, students are crushed by the workload, tasks, demands or expectations of their instructors. In either case, the work is almost invariably driven by the students’ own creativity and imagination; unlike law, medicine, business, or engineering for example, where the interpretation and inquiry into case studies and cadaversis much less based on the personal introspection than established traditions. This extremely personal nature of the architectural studio canmake reviews either a devastating or extremely empowering process. As seen from the perspective of the larger university community, the studio is simply not an efficient way of education. The faculty to student ratio, for example, is not in accordance with other undergraduate disciplines. But this ratio, as we all know can also be a real strength. The often hermeticnature of the studio offers latitude for students to develop theirwork in relatively safe surroundings. This environment, however, may also foster the cult of personality that develops around certain professorsthat harkens back to the very roots of education but can also lead to anentourage of disciples who have no incentive to inform the Emperor that he or she is no longer

  7. Medical Pluralism and Traditional/Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use Among Older People: a Cross-Sectional Study in a Rural Mountainous Village in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Yuta; Umezaki, Masahiro

    2016-03-01

    Given current concerns about the rapidly aging population in Japan, we investigated medical pluralism and health-seeking behaviors among individuals aged 50 years or older living in a rural mountain village in Japan. In total, 76 participants were interviewed about the methods they used to treat 11 common medical conditions. We found that all the respondents used at least two types of treatment for their medical conditions and nearly 90% used four or five types of treatment. The factors affecting health-seeking behaviors were age, education, car use, and the characteristics of the medical condition. Our results show that the older individuals in this community used both formal and traditional/complementary and alternative medicine (TM/CAM) treatments and did not view issues related to medical care as involving a dualistic choice between formal healthcare services and TM/CAM; however, the relationship between different types of TM/CAM and conventional healthcare varied.

  8. Dysmenorrhea Characteristics of Female Students of Health School and Affecting Factors and Their Knowledge and Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midilli, Tulay Sagkal; Yasar, Eda; Baysal, Ebru

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the menstruation and dysmenorrhea characteristics and the factors affecting dysmenorrhea of health school students, and the knowledge and use of the methods of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) on the part of those students with dysmenorrhea. This is a descriptive study. A descriptive analysis was made by calculating the number, percentage, mean, Pearson χ, and logistic regression analysis. A total of 488 female students participated in the research and 87.7% (n = 428) of all students experienced dysmenorrhea. It was detected that a family history of dysmenorrhea and regular menstrual cycles of the students were dysmenorrhea-affecting factors (P students with dysmenorrhea used CAM methods. Heat application of CAM methods for dysmenorrhea management was the most commonly used and also known by the students. The students who experienced severe pain used analgesics (P < .05) and CAM methods (P < .05).

  9. Pediatric Integrative Medicine Approaches to Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Esparham

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD is the most common neuropsychiatric disorder in children and is increasing in prevalence. There has also been a related increase in prescribing stimulant medication despite some controversy whether ADHD medication makes a lasting difference in school performance or achievement. Families who are apprehensive about side effects and with concerns for efficacy of medication pursue integrative medicine as an alternative or adjunct to pharmacologic and cognitive behavioral treatment approaches. Integrative medicine incorporates evidence-based medicine, both conventional and complementary and alternative therapies, to deliver personalized care to the patient, emphasizing diet, nutrients, gut health, and environmental influences as a means to decrease symptoms associated with chronic disorders. Pediatric integrative medicine practitioners are increasing in number throughout the United States because of improvement in patient health outcomes. However, limited funding and poor research design interfere with generalizable treatment approaches utilizing integrative medicine. The use of research designs originally intended for drugs and procedures are not suitable for many integrative medicine approaches. This article serves to highlight integrative medicine approaches in use today for children with ADHD, including dietary therapies, nutritional supplements, environmental hygiene, and neurofeedback.

  10. Complementary or alternative medicine as possible determinant of decreased persistence to aromatase inhibitor therapy among older women with non-metastatic breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laetitia Huiart

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Aromatase inhibitor therapy (AI significantly improves survival in breast cancer patients. Little is known about adherence and persistence to aromatase inhibitors and about the causes of treatment discontinuation among older women. METHODS: We constituted a cohort of women over 65 receiving a first AI therapy for breast cancer between 2006 and 2008, and followed them until June 2011. Women were selected in the population-based French National Health Insurance databases, and data was collected on the basis of pharmacy refills, medical records and face-to-face interviews. Non-persistence to treatment was defined as the first treatment discontinuation lasting more than 3 consecutive months. Time to treatment discontinuation was studied using survival analysis techniques. RESULTS: Overall among the 382 selected women, non-persistence to treatment went from 8.7% (95%CI: 6.2-12.1 at 1 year, to 15.6% (95%CI: 12.2-19.8 at 2 years, 20.8% (95%CI: 16.7-25.6 at 3 years, and 24.7% (95%CI: 19.5-31.0 at 4 years. In the multivariate analysis on a sub-sample of 233 women with available data, women using complementary or alternative medicine (CAM (HR = 3.2; 95%CI: 1.5-6.9 or suffering from comorbidities (HR = 2.2; 95%CI: 1.0-4.8 were more likely to discontinue their treatment, whereas women with polypharmacy (HR = 0.4; 95%CI: 0.2-0.91 were less likely to discontinue. In addition, 13% of the women with positive hormonal receptor status did not fill any prescription for anti-hormonal therapy. CONCLUSION: AI therapy is discontinued prematurely in a substantial portion of older patients. Some patients may use CAM not as a complementary treatment, but as an alternative to conventional medicine. Improving patient-physician communication on the use of CAM may improve hormonal therapy adherence.

  11. Development of a student-mentored research program between a complementary and alternative medicine university and a traditional, research-intensive university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Barbara M; Furner, Sylvia E; Cramer, Gregory D

    2014-09-01

    The global need to develop clinician-scientists capable of using research in clinical practice, translating research knowledge into practice, and carrying out research that affects the quality, efficacy, and efficiency of health care is well documented. The complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) professions embrace the call to develop physician-researchers to carry out translational and applied research for CAM modalities. CAM universities face unique challenges when implementing research training compared with traditional, research-intensive (TRI) universities and medical centers where the majority of medical research is carried out.The authors present the development and outcomes of a mentored research program (MRP) between a CAM and a TRI institution, the National University of Health Sciences and the University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health, between 2006 and 2012. CAM predoctoral students engaged in a full-immersion semester at the TRI, including didactic courses and active research with a TRI faculty research mentor. Half of the participating doctor of chiropractic (DC) students continued on to PhD programs, and half established integrative medicine, primary care clinical careers.Establishing rigorous criteria for mentors and mentees, communicating expectations, developing solid relationships between the mentor, mentee, and home school advisor, responding quickly to impediments, and providing adequate support from CAM and TRI investigators were key to the MRP's success. To sustain research opportunities, coordinated degree programs for the DC and master of public health and master of clinical and translational research were established.

  12. Antiretrovirals and the use of traditional, complementary and alternative medicine by HIV patients in Kwazulu-Natal, South Africa: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltzer, Karl; Preez, Natalie Friend-du; Ramlagan, Shandir; Fomundam, Henry; Anderson, Jane; Chanetsa, Lucia

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study (20 months) was to assess HIV patients' use of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medicine (TCAM) and its effect on ARV adherence at three public hospitals in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Seven hundred and thirty-five (29.8% male and 70.2% female) patients who consecutively attended three HIV clinics completed assessments prior to ARV initiation, 519 after 6 months, 557 after 12 and 499 after 20 months on antiretroviral therapy (ART). Results indicate that following initiation of ARV therapy the use of herbal therapies for HIV declined significantly from 36.6% prior to ARV therapy to 8.0% after 6 months, 4.1% after 12 months and 0.6% after 20 months on ARVs. Faith healing methods (including spiritual practices and prayer) declined from 35.8% to 22.1%, 20.8% and 15.5%, respectively. In contrast, the use of micronutrients (vitamins, etc.) significantly increased from 42.6% to 78.2%. The major herbal remedies that were used prior to ART were unnamed traditional medicine, followed by imbiza (Scilla natalensis planch), canova (immune booster), izifozonke (essential vitamins mixed with herbs), African potato (Hypoxis hemerocallidea), stametta (aloe mixed with vitamins and herbs) and ingwe (tonic). Herbal remedies were mainly used for pain relief, as immune booster and for stopping diarrhea. As herbal treatment for HIV was associated with reduced ARV adherence, patient's use of TCAM should be considered in ARV adherence management.

  13. Therapeutic manuka honey: no longer so alternative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dee A Carter

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Medicinal honey research is undergoing a substantial renaissance. From a folklore remedy largely dismissed by mainstream medicine as alternative, we now see increased interest by scientists, clinical practitioners and the general public in the therapeutic uses of honey. There are a number of drivers of this interest: first, the rise in antibiotic resistance by many bacterial pathogens has prompted interest in developing and using novel antibacterials; second, an increasing number of reliable studies and case reports have demonstrated that certain honeys are very effective wound treatments; third, therapeutic honey commands a premium price, and the honey industry is actively promoting studies that will allow it to capitalize on this; and finally, the very complex and rather unpredictable nature of honey provides an attractive challenge for laboratory scientists. In this paper we review manuka honey research, from observational studies on its antimicrobial effects through to current experimental and mechanistic work that aims to take honey into mainstream medicine. We outline current gaps and remaining controversies in our knowledge of how honey acts, and suggest new studies that could make honey a no longer alternative alternative.

  14. Managing medical treatment waste and effluent: the point of view of a nuclear medicine practitioner; Gestion des dechets et effluents issus de traitements medicaux: le point de vue d'un praticien de medecine nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karcher, G. [Chef du Service de medecine nucleaire de l' Hopital d' adultes de Brabois - CHU, 54 - Nancy (Meurthe-et-Moselle) (France)

    2011-02-15

    The nuclear medicine department of the Nancy CHU hospital is one of the largest in France: 16.000 patients are welcomed each year and 4.000 persons undergo a tomography there. 5 shielded and isolated rooms, dedicated to Iodine{sup 131} treatment, allow the care of 150 to 200 patients each year. The head of the nuclear medicine department gives his meaning about the new regulation on the management of radioactive effluents. According to him, regulations are necessary but the values of the imposed thresholds have to be scientifically justified. Another point is that a lot of money is spent on radiation protection issues while the radioactive risks are almost null, which leads to wasting money. The elaboration of the radioprotection regulations must be made not as a whole but on a specific basis according to the domain: nuclear power plants, research reactors or nuclear medicine, it applies. (A.C.)

  15. Prevalence, socio-demographic and clinical predictors of post-diagnostic utilisation of different types of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in a nationwide cohort of Danish women treated for primary breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christina Gundgaard; Christensen, Søren; Jensen, Anders Bonde;

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the prevalence and predictors of use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in a nationwide inception cohort of Danish women treated for early-stage breast cancer as well as differences in user patterns for individual types of CAM.......This study investigated the prevalence and predictors of use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in a nationwide inception cohort of Danish women treated for early-stage breast cancer as well as differences in user patterns for individual types of CAM....

  16. Alternative dentistry with medicinal plants in Chapada dos Guimarães – Mato Grosso – Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneliza Meireles BORBA

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In Mato Grosso, the use of plant species as a therapeutic alternative is passed through generations. Objective: This research aimed at a survey of the vegetal species used by the neighborhood of Santa Cruz community, Chapada dos Guimarães city, their therapeutical indications and methods of use to the oral health. Material and methods: Forty local informers were questioned through qualitative approach. The collection of 65 vegetable species was cataloged and filed for identification in the UFMT/Herbário Central. Results and conclusion: The most cited for teeth eruption was chamomile(Matricaria chamomilla L.; to stomatitis, the saffron (Crocus sativus L.; to tooth pain, the “arnica-da-serra” (Brickelia brasiliensis (Spreng.(Robinson. The leaf was the most used part of the plant, and the tea, by decoction, the most common method of use.

  17. Plasma medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Fridman, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    This comprehensive text is suitable for researchers and graduate students of a 'hot' new topic in medical physics. Written by the world's leading experts,  this book aims to present recent developments in plasma medicine, both technological and scientific, reviewed in a fashion accessible to the highly interdisciplinary audience consisting of doctors, physicists, biologists, chemists and other scientists, university students and professors, engineers and medical practitioners. The book focuses on major topics and covers the physics required to develop novel plasma discharges relevant for medic

  18. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi are an alternative to the application of chemical fertilizer in the production of the medicinal and aromatic plant Coriandrum sativum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Rui S; Ma, Ying; Rocha, Inês; Carvalho, Maria F; Vosátka, Miroslav; Freitas, Helena

    2016-01-01

    The widespread use of agrochemicals is detrimental to the environment and may exert harmful effects on human health. The consumer demand for organic food plants has been increasing. There is thus a rising need for alternatives to agrochemicals that can foster sustainable plant production. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential use of an arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus as an alternative to application of chemical fertilizer for improving growth performance of the medicinal and aromatic plant Coriandrum sativum. Plants were inoculated with the AM fungus Rhizophagus irregularis BEG163 and/or supplemented with a commercial chemical fertilizer (Plant Marvel, Nutriculture Bent Special) in agricultural soil. Plant growth, nutrition, and development of AM fungus were assessed. Plants inoculated with R. irregularis and those supplemented with chemical fertilizer displayed significantly improved growth performances when compared with controls. There were no significant differences in total fresh weight between plants inoculated with R. irregularis or those supplemented with chemical fertilizer. Leaf chlorophyll a + b (82%), shoot nitrogen (44%), phosphorus (254%), and potassium (27%) concentrations increased in plants inoculated with R. irregularis compared to controls. Application of chemical fertilizer inhibited root mycorrhizal colonization and the length of the extraradical mycelium of R. irregularis. Inoculation with R. irregularis was equally or more efficient than application of chemical fertilizer in promoting growth and nutrition of C. sativum. AM fungi may thus contribute to improve biologically based production of food plants and reduce the dependence on agrochemicals in agriculture.

  19. The prevalence, patterns of usage and people's attitude towards complementary and alternative medicine (CAM among the Indian community in Chatsworth, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raidoo Deshandra M

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to determine, among the Indian community of Chatsworth, South Africa, the prevalence and utilisation patterns of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM, attitudes associated with CAM use and communication patterns of CAM users with their primary care doctors. Methods Face-to-face structured interviews were conducted in Chatsworth, a suburb of Durban in which South Africans of Indian origin predominantly reside. Participants were 200 randomly selected adult English-speaking Indian residents. Results The prevalence of CAM usage for period 2000/2001 was 38.5% (95% confidence interval 31.7% to 45.6%. Spiritual healing and herbal/natural medicines, including vitamins were the most common types of CAM used, accounting for 42.8% and 48.1% respectively of overall CAM usage. People used CAM to treat conditions including diabetes mellitus, headaches, arthritis and joint pains, stress, skin disorders, backaches, hypertension and nasal disorders. Half of the CAM users used allopathic medicines concurrently. The cost of CAM utilization over this 1-year period, incurred by 80.5% of users for the duration of therapy for their most troublesome condition was below R500 (approximately US$50. Age, sex, marital status, religion, level of education and income were shown not to influence the use of CAM. Greater than half (51.9% of CAM users did so either upon the advice of someone they knew, or after noticing a CAM advertisement in the local press. Seventy-nine percent of CAM users indicated that they had positive outcomes with their treatments. Fifty four percent of CAM users (excluding those using spiritual healing only failed to inform their doctors that they used CAM. The main reason given by half of this group was that informing their doctors did not seem necessary. Conclusion The prevalence of CAM in Chatsworth is similar to findings in other parts of the world. Although CAM was used to treat many different

  20. Cardiovascular Protective Effects of Adjunctive Alternative Medicine (Salvia miltiorrhiza and Pueraria lobata in High-Risk Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. S. Woo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hypertension in association with diabetes (DM, renal impairment (RI, and left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH increases the risk of future cardiovascular events. We hypothesize, traditional herbal medicines Danshen and Gegen (D&G have beneficial effects on atherogenesis in these high-risk hypertensive subjects. Subjects and Methods. 90 asymptomatic hypertensive subjects associated with LVH (63.3%, DM (62.2%, or RI (30% were randomized to receive D&G herbal capsules 1 gm/day, 2 gm/day, or identical placebo capsules in double-blind and parallel fashion for 12 months. Brachial flow-mediated dilation (endothelium-dependent dilation, FMD and carotid intima-media thickness (IMT were measured by ultrasound. All data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences in Windows 16.0. Results. Their mean age was 55±8 years, and 74.4% were male. After 12 months of adjunctive therapies and compared with baseline, there were no significant changes in blood pressure, heart rate, hematological, glucose, and creatinine profiles in both placebo and D&G groups. FMD improved significantly during D&G (P=0.0001 and less so after placebo treatment (P=0.001. There was a mild but significant decrease in carotid IMT after D&G (P<0.001 but no significant changes after placebo. A trend of better improvement in FMD after higher versus lower D&G dosages was seen. D&G were well tolerated, with no significant adverse events or blood biochemistry changes. Conclusion. D&G adjunctive treatment was well tolerated and significantly improved atherogenesis in high-risk hypertensive patients, with potential in primary atherosclerosis prevention.