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Sample records for alternative macrophage activation

  1. The Many Alternative Faces of Macrophage Activation.

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    David A. Hume

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Monocytes and macrophages provide the first line of defense against pathogens. They also initiate acquired immunity by processing and presenting antigens and provide the downstream effector functions. In large gene expression datasets from multiple cells and tissues, it is possible to identify sets of genes that are co-regulated with the transcription factors that regulate them. In macrophages, they include lineage-specific genes, interferon-responsive genes, early inflammatory genes, and those associated with endocytosis. Macrophages enter tissues and alter their function to deal with a wide range of challenges related to development and organogenesis, tissue injury, malignancy, sterile or pathogenic inflammatory stimuli. These stimuli alter gene expression to produce activated macrophages that are better equipped to eliminate the cause of their influx, and to restore homeostasis. Activation or polarization states of macrophages have been classified as classical and alternative or M1 and M2. These proposed states of cells are not supported by large-scale transcriptomic data, including macrophage-associated signatures from large cancer tissue datasets, where the supposed markers do not correlate with other. Individual macrophage cells differ markedly from each other, and change their functions in response to doses and combinations of agonists and time. The most studied macrophage activation response is the transcriptional cascade initiated by the TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS. This response is reviewed herein. The network architecture is conserved across species, but many of the target genes evolve rapidly and differ between mouse and human. There is also considerable divergence in the sets of target genes between mouse strains, between individuals and in other species such as pigs. The data and publication deluge related to macrophage activation requires the development of new analytical tools, and ways of presenting information in an

  2. The Many Alternative Faces of Macrophage Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Monocytes and macrophages provide the first line of defense against pathogens. They also initiate acquired immunity by processing and presenting antigens and provide the downstream effector functions. Analysis of large gene expression datasets from multiple cells and tissues reveals sets of genes that are co-regulated with the transcription factors that regulate them. In macrophages, the gene clusters include lineage-specific genes, interferon-responsive genes, early inflammatory genes, and genes required for endocytosis and lysosome function. Macrophages enter tissues and alter their function to deal with a wide range of challenges related to development and organogenesis, tissue injury, malignancy, sterile, or pathogenic inflammatory stimuli. These stimuli alter the gene expression to produce “activated macrophages” that are better equipped to eliminate the cause of their influx and to restore homeostasis. Activation or polarization states of macrophages have been classified as “classical” and “alternative” or M1 and M2. These proposed states of cells are not supported by large-scale transcriptomic data, including macrophage-associated signatures from large cancer tissue datasets, where the supposed markers do not correlate with other. Individual macrophage cells differ markedly from each other, and change their functions in response to doses and combinations of agonists and time. The most studied macrophage activation response is the transcriptional cascade initiated by the TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide. This response is reviewed herein. The network topology is conserved across species, but genes within the transcriptional network evolve rapidly and differ between mouse and human. There is also considerable divergence in the sets of target genes between mouse strains, between individuals, and in other species such as pigs. The deluge of complex information related to macrophage activation can be accessed with new analytical tools and new databases

  3. Expression of the Inhibitory CD200 Receptor Is Associated with Alternative Macrophage Activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Koning; M. van Eijk; W. Pouwels; M.S.M. Brouwer; D. Voehringer; I. Huitinga; R.M. Hoek; G. Raes; J. Hamann

    2010-01-01

    Classical macrophage activation is inhibited by the CD200 receptor (CD200R). Here, we show that CD200R expression was specifically induced on human in vitro polarized macrophages of the alternatively activated M2a subtype, generated by incubation with IL-4 or IL-13. In mice, peritoneal M2 macrophage

  4. ROS play a critical role in the differentiation of alternatively activated macrophages and the occurrence of tumor-associated macrophages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Zhang; Swati Choksi; Kun Chen; Yelena Pobezinskaya; Ilona Linnoila; Zheng-Gang Liu

    2013-01-01

    Differentiation to different types of macrophages determines their distinct functions.Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) promote tumorigenesis owing to their proangiogenic and immune-suppressive functions similar to those of alternatively activated (M2) macrophages.We report that reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is critical for macrophage differentiation and that inhibition of superoxide (O2-) production specifically blocks the differentiation of M2 macrophages.We found that when monocytes are triggered to differentiate,O2-is generated and is needed for the biphasic ERK activation,which is critical for macrophage differentiation.We demonstrated that ROS elimination by butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and other ROS inhibitors blocks macrophage differentiation.However,the inhibitory effect of ROS elimination on macrophage differentiation is overcome when cells are polarized to classically activated (M1),but not M2,macrophages.More importantly,the continuous administration of the ROS inhibitor BHA efficiently blocked the occurrence of TAMs and markedly suppressed tumorigenesis in mouse cancer models.Targeting TAMs by blocking ROS can be a potentially effective method for cancer treatment.

  5. Co-existence of classical and alternative activation programs in macrophages responding to Toxoplasma gondii

    OpenAIRE

    Patil, Veerupaxagouda; Zhao, Yanlin; Shah, Suhagi; Fox, Barbara A.; Rommereim, Leah M.; Bzik, David J.; Yap, George S.

    2013-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages are critical for defense against intracellular pathogens while alternatively-activated M2 macrophages mediate tissue homeostasis and repair. Whether these distinct activation programs are mutually exclusive or can co-exist within the same cell is unclear. Here, we report the co-existence of these programs in Toxoplasma gondii-elicited inflammatory macrophages. This is independent of parasite expression of the virulence factor ROP16 and host cell expression of s...

  6. Chitohexaose activates macrophages by alternate pathway through TLR4 and blocks endotoxemia.

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    Santosh K Panda

    Full Text Available Sepsis is a consequence of systemic bacterial infections leading to hyper activation of immune cells by bacterial products resulting in enhanced release of mediators of inflammation. Endotoxin (LPS is a major component of the outer membrane of Gram negative bacteria and a critical factor in pathogenesis of sepsis. Development of antagonists that inhibit the storm of inflammatory molecules by blocking Toll like receptors (TLR has been the main stay of research efforts. We report here that a filarial glycoprotein binds to murine macrophages and human monocytes through TLR4 and activates them through alternate pathway and in the process inhibits LPS mediated classical activation which leads to inflammation associated with endotoxemia. The active component of the nematode glycoprotein mediating alternate activation of macrophages was found to be a carbohydrate residue, Chitohexaose. Murine macrophages and human monocytes up regulated Arginase-1 and released high levels of IL-10 when incubated with chitohexaose. Macrophages of C3H/HeJ mice (non-responsive to LPS failed to get activated by chitohexaose suggesting that a functional TLR4 is critical for alternate activation of macrophages also. Chitohexaose inhibited LPS induced production of inflammatory molecules TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 by macropahges in vitro and in vivo in mice. Intraperitoneal injection of chitohexaose completely protected mice against endotoxemia when challenged with a lethal dose of LPS. Furthermore, Chitohexaose was found to reverse LPS induced endotoxemia in mice even 6/24/48 hrs after its onset. Monocytes of subjects with active filarial infection displayed characteristic alternate activation markers and were refractory to LPS mediated inflammatory activation suggesting an interesting possibility of subjects with filarial infections being less prone to develop of endotoxemia. These observations that innate activation of alternate pathway of macrophages by chtx through TLR4 has

  7. Co-existence of classical and alternative activation programs in macrophages responding to Toxoplasma gondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Veerupaxagouda; Zhao, Yanlin; Shah, Suhagi; Fox, Barbara A; Rommereim, Leah M; Bzik, David J; Yap, George S

    2014-02-01

    Pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages are critical for defense against intracellular pathogens while alternatively-activated M2 macrophages mediate tissue homeostasis and repair. Whether these distinct activation programs are mutually exclusive or can co-exist within the same cell is unclear. Here, we report the co-existence of these programs in Toxoplasma gondii-elicited inflammatory macrophages. This is independent of parasite expression of the virulence factor ROP16 and host cell expression of signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6). Furthermore, this observation was recapitulated by IFN-γ and IL-4 treated bone marrow-derived macrophages in vitro. These results highlight the multi-functionality of macrophages as they respond to diverse microbial and endogenous stimuli. PMID:24083945

  8. Rapid host defense against Aspergillus fumigatus involves alveolar macrophages with a predominance of alternatively activated phenotype.

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    Shikha Bhatia

    Full Text Available The ubiquitous fungus Aspergillus fumigatus is associated with chronic diseases such as invasive pulmonary aspergillosis in immunosuppressed patients and allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA in patients with cystic fibrosis or severe asthma. Because of constant exposure to this fungus, it is critical for the host to exercise an immediate and decisive immune response to clear fungal spores to ward off disease. In this study, we observed that rapidly after infection by A. fumigatus, alveolar macrophages predominantly express Arginase 1 (Arg1, a key marker of alternatively activated macrophages (AAMs. The macrophages were also found to express Ym1 and CD206 that are also expressed by AAMs but not NOS2, which is expressed by classically activated macrophages. The expression of Arg1 was reduced in the absence of the known signaling axis, IL-4Rα/STAT6, for AAM development. While both Dectin-1 and TLR expressed on the cell surface have been shown to sense A. fumigatus, fungus-induced Arg1 expression in CD11c(+ alveolar macrophages was not dependent on either Dectin-1 or the adaptor MyD88 that mediates intracellular signaling by most TLRs. Alveolar macrophages from WT mice efficiently phagocytosed fungal conidia, but those from mice deficient in Dectin-1 showed impaired fungal uptake. Depletion of macrophages with clodronate-filled liposomes increased fungal burden in infected mice. Collectively, our studies suggest that alveolar macrophages, which predominantly acquire an AAM phenotype following A. fumigatus infection, have a protective role in defense against this fungus.

  9. Ameloginins promote an alternatively activated macrophage phenotype in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almqvist, S; Werthen, M; Lyngstadas, SP;

    2011-01-01

    Amelogenins are extracellular matrix proteins used for the topical treatment of chronically inflamed tissues. The influence of amelogenins on human monocyte-derived macrophages was studied by measuring the concentrations of cytokines in culture supernatants. The interactions of cells and protein...

  10. Identification of Caspase-6 as a New Regulator of Alternatively Activated Macrophages.

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    Yao, Yongfang; Shi, Qian; Chen, Bing; Wang, Qingsong; Li, Xinda; Li, Long; Huang, Yahong; Ji, Jianguo; Shen, Pingping

    2016-08-12

    Alternatively activated macrophages (AAMs) play essential roles in the promotion of tissue remodeling, vasculogenesis, and tumor progression; however, the detailed mechanisms underlying the activation of AAMs remain largely unknown. Here, by using quantitative proteomic analysis, we identified 62 proteins that were up-regulated in IL-4-induced macrophages. Among these, Caspase-6 was increased significantly. Caspase-6 is important in the apoptotic signaling pathway; however, its role in non-apoptosis is also reported. Here, we first examined the non-apoptotic role of Caspase-6 in the alternative activation of macrophages after administration of IL-4, 4T1 tumor conditional medium, or co-culture with 4T1 cells. Both treatments promoted alternative activation of RAW264.7 cells and primary macrophages, whereas disruption of caspase-6 expression and activity could markedly suppress the biomarker levels of AAMs. Overexpression of Caspase-6 could significantly promote the activation of AAMs. Importantly, we further present evidence that caspase-6 could regulate breast cancer cell invasion by modulating MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression in 4T1 tumor-associated macrophages, as ablation of protein levels or activity of caspase-6 suppressed tumor cell invasion in vitro In conclusion, the observed results markedly expanded our views of the dynamic changes in protein composition during alternative activation of macrophages, and they revealed a critical new role of caspase-6 in regulating this cellular biological process, which suggested that caspase-6 might be a key nod molecule to regulate immunological steady-state and be a therapeutic candidate for tumor immunotherapy. PMID:27325699

  11. METEORIN-LIKE is a cytokine associated with barrier tissues and alternatively activated macrophages

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    Ushach, Irina; Burkhardt, Amanda M.; Martinez, Cynthia; Hevezi, Peter A.; Gerber, Peter Arne; Buhren, Bettina Alexandra; Schrumpf, Holger; Valle-Rios, Ricardo; Vazquez, Monica I.; Homey, Bernhard; Zlotnik, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Cytokines are involved in many functions of the immune system including initiating, amplifying and resolving immune responses. Through bioinformatics analyses of a comprehensive database of gene expression (BIGE: Body Index of Gene Expression) we observed that a small secreted protein encoded by a poorly characterized gene called meteorin-like (METRNL), is highly expressed in mucosal tissues, skin and activated macrophages. Further studies indicate that Metrnl is produced by Alternatively Activated Macrophages (AAM) and M-CSF cultured bone marrow macrophages (M2-like macrophages). In the skin, METRNL is expressed by resting fibroblasts and IFNγ-treated keratinocytes. A screen of human skin-associated diseases showed significant over-expression of METRNL in psoriasis, prurigo nodularis, actinic keratosis and atopic dermatitis. METRNL is also up-regulated in synovial membranes of human rheumatoid arthritis. Taken together, these results indicate that Metrnl represents a novel cytokine, which is likely involved in both innate and acquired immune responses. PMID:25486603

  12. Transcriptomic analysis of human polarized macrophages: more than one role of alternative activation?

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    Eleonora Derlindati

    Full Text Available Macrophages are a heterogeneous cell population which in response to the cytokine milieu polarize in either classically activated macrophages (M1 or alternatively activated macrophages (M2. This plasticity makes macrophages essential in regulating inflammation, immune response and tissue remodeling and a novel therapeutic target in inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis. The aim of the study was to describe the transcriptomic profiles of differently polarized human macrophages to generate new hypotheses on the biological function of the different macrophage subtypes.Polarization of circulating monocytes/macrophages of blood donors was induced in vitro by IFN-γ and LPS (M1, by IL-4 (M2a, and by IL-10 (M2c. Unstimulated cells (RM served as time controls. Gene expression profile of M1, M2a, M2c and RM was assessed at 6, 12 and 24h after polarization with Whole Human Genome Agilent Microarray technique. When compared to RM, M1 significantly upregulated pathways involved in immunity and inflammation, whereas M2a did the opposite. Conversely, decreased and increased expression of mitochondrial metabolism, consistent with insulin resistant and insulin sensitive patterns, was seen in M1 and M2a, respectively. The time sequence in the expression of some pathways appeared to have some specific bearing on M1 function. Finally, canonical and non-canonical Wnt genes and gene groups, promoting inflammation and tissue remodeling, were upregulated in M2a compared to RM.Our data in in vitro polarized human macrophages: 1. confirm and extend known inflammatory and anti-inflammatory gene expression patterns; 2. demonstrate changes in mitochondrial metabolism associated to insulin resistance and insulin sensitivity in M1 and M2a, respectively; 3. highlight the potential relevance of gene expression timing in M1 function; 4. unveil enhanced expression of Wnt pathways in M2a suggesting a potential dual (pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory role of M2a in

  13. Redefining the transcriptional regulatory dynamics of classically and alternatively activated macrophages by deepCAGE transcriptomics

    KAUST Repository

    Roy, S.

    2015-06-27

    Classically or alternatively activated macrophages (M1 and M2, respectively) play distinct and important roles for microbiocidal activity, regulation of inflammation and tissue homeostasis. Despite this, their transcriptional regulatory dynamics are poorly understood. Using promoter-level expression profiling by non-biased deepCAGE we have studied the transcriptional dynamics of classically and alternatively activated macrophages. Transcription factor (TF) binding motif activity analysis revealed four motifs, NFKB1_REL_RELA, IRF1,2, IRF7 and TBP that are commonly activated but have distinct activity dynamics in M1 and M2 activation. We observe matching changes in the expression profiles of the corresponding TFs and show that only a restricted set of TFs change expression. There is an overall drastic and transient up-regulation in M1 and a weaker and more sustainable up-regulation in M2. Novel TFs, such as Thap6, Maff, (M1) and Hivep1, Nfil3, Prdm1, (M2) among others, were suggested to be involved in the activation processes. Additionally, 52 (M1) and 67 (M2) novel differentially expressed genes and, for the first time, several differentially expressed long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) transcriptome markers were identified. In conclusion, the finding of novel motifs, TFs and protein-coding and lncRNA genes is an important step forward to fully understand the transcriptional machinery of macrophage activation.

  14. Classically and alternatively activated bone marrow derived macrophages differ in cytoskeletal functions and migration towards specific CNS cell types

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    Dijkstra Christine D

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Macrophages play an important role in neuroinflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS and spinal cord injury (SCI, being involved in both damage and repair. The divergent effects of macrophages might be explained by their different activation status: classically activated (CA/M1, pro-inflammatory, macrophages and alternatively activated (AA/M2, growth promoting, macrophages. Little is known about the effect of macrophages with these phenotypes in the central nervous system (CNS and how they influence pathogenesis. The aim of this study was therefore to determine the characteristics of these phenotypically different macrophages in the context of the CNS in an in vitro setting. Results Here we show that bone marrow derived CA and AA macrophages have a distinct migratory capacity towards medium conditioned by various cell types of the CNS. AA macrophages were preferentially attracted by the low weight ( Conclusion In conclusion, since AA macrophages are more motile and are attracted by NCM, they are prone to migrate towards neurons in the CNS. CA macrophages have a lower motility and a stronger adhesion to ECM. In neuroinflammatory diseases the restricted migration and motility of CA macrophages might limit lesion size due to bystander damage.

  15. The pro-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-6, enhances the polarization of alternatively activated macrophages.

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    Maria Ruweka Fernando

    Full Text Available Macrophages are important innate immune cells that are associated with two distinct phenotypes: a pro-inflammatory (or classically activated subset with prototypic macrophage functions such as inflammatory cytokine production and bactericidal activity, and an anti-inflammatory (or alternatively activated (AAM subset linked with wound healing and tissue repair processes. In this study, we examined the effect of interlukein-6 on human and murine macrophage polarization. The results indicate that despite being commonly associated with pro-inflammatory functions and being implicated in the pathogenesis/pathophysiology of numerous inflammatory diseases, interleukin-6 can enhance the polarization of AAMs, based on increased expression of hallmark markers: arginase-1, Ym1 and CD206; this effect required the AAM differentiating cytokines, IL-4 and IL-13. Co-treatment of AAMs with IL-6 resulted in spontaneous release of IL-10, suppressed LPS-induced nitric oxide production and inhibited cytokine production by activated CD4+ T cells - immunoregulatory features not observed in the 'parent' IL-4+IL-13-induced AAM. The effect of IL-6 required signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT-3, was partially dependent on up-regulation of the IL4Rα chain, and was independent of autocrine IL-10. In the presence of IFNγ, IL-6 promoted the production of IL-1β and TNFα suggesting that this cytokine can enhance the phenotype to which a macrophage has committed. This finding may explain the pleiotrophic nature of IL-6, where it is associated with the perpetuation and enhancement of disease in inflammatory situations, but is also necessary for resolution of inflammation and adequate wound healing to occur in others. Thus, the potential benefit of IL-6 in promoting an AAM, with its' anti-inflammatory and wound healing ability, may need to be considered in immunotherapies aimed at in vivo modulation or inhibition of IL-6.

  16. The pro-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-6, enhances the polarization of alternatively activated macrophages.

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    Fernando, Maria Ruweka; Reyes, Jose Luis; Iannuzzi, Jordan; Leung, Gabriella; McKay, Derek Mark

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are important innate immune cells that are associated with two distinct phenotypes: a pro-inflammatory (or classically activated) subset with prototypic macrophage functions such as inflammatory cytokine production and bactericidal activity, and an anti-inflammatory (or alternatively activated (AAM)) subset linked with wound healing and tissue repair processes. In this study, we examined the effect of interlukein-6 on human and murine macrophage polarization. The results indicate that despite being commonly associated with pro-inflammatory functions and being implicated in the pathogenesis/pathophysiology of numerous inflammatory diseases, interleukin-6 can enhance the polarization of AAMs, based on increased expression of hallmark markers: arginase-1, Ym1 and CD206; this effect required the AAM differentiating cytokines, IL-4 and IL-13. Co-treatment of AAMs with IL-6 resulted in spontaneous release of IL-10, suppressed LPS-induced nitric oxide production and inhibited cytokine production by activated CD4+ T cells - immunoregulatory features not observed in the 'parent' IL-4+IL-13-induced AAM. The effect of IL-6 required signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-3, was partially dependent on up-regulation of the IL4Rα chain, and was independent of autocrine IL-10. In the presence of IFNγ, IL-6 promoted the production of IL-1β and TNFα suggesting that this cytokine can enhance the phenotype to which a macrophage has committed. This finding may explain the pleiotrophic nature of IL-6, where it is associated with the perpetuation and enhancement of disease in inflammatory situations, but is also necessary for resolution of inflammation and adequate wound healing to occur in others. Thus, the potential benefit of IL-6 in promoting an AAM, with its' anti-inflammatory and wound healing ability, may need to be considered in immunotherapies aimed at in vivo modulation or inhibition of IL-6.

  17. Adipogenic role of alternatively activated macrophages in β-adrenergic remodeling of white adipose tissue.

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    Lee, Yun-Hee; Kim, Sang-Nam; Kwon, Hyun-Jung; Maddipati, Krishna Rao; Granneman, James G

    2016-01-01

    De novo brown adipogenesis involves the proliferation and differentiation of progenitors, yet the mechanisms that guide these events in vivo are poorly understood. We previously demonstrated that treatment with a β3-adrenergic receptor (ADRB3) agonist triggers brown/beige adipogenesis in gonadal white adipose tissue following adipocyte death and clearance by tissue macrophages. The close physical relationship between adipocyte progenitors and tissue macrophages suggested that the macrophages that clear dying adipocytes might generate proadipogenic factors. Flow cytometric analysis of macrophages from mice treated with CL 316,243 identified a subpopulation that contained elevated lipid and expressed CD44. Lipidomic analysis of fluorescence-activated cell sorting-isolated macrophages demonstrated that CD44+ macrophages contained four- to five-fold higher levels of the endogenous peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) ligands 9-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (HODE), and 13-HODE compared with CD44- macrophages. Gene expression profiling and immunohistochemistry demonstrated that ADRB3 agonist treatment upregulated expression of ALOX15, the lipoxygenase responsible for generating 9-HODE and 13-HODE. Using an in vitro model of adipocyte efferocytosis, we found that IL-4-primed tissue macrophages accumulated lipid from dying fat cells and upregulated expression of Alox15. Furthermore, treatment of differentiating adipocytes with 9-HODE and 13-HODE potentiated brown/beige adipogenesis. Collectively, these data indicate that noninflammatory removal of adipocyte remnants and coordinated generation of PPARγ ligands by M2 macrophages provides localized adipogenic signals to support de novo brown/beige adipogenesis.

  18. Adipogenic role of alternatively activated macrophages in β-adrenergic remodeling of white adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yun-Hee; Kim, Sang-Nam; Kwon, Hyun-Jung; Maddipati, Krishna Rao; Granneman, James G

    2016-01-01

    De novo brown adipogenesis involves the proliferation and differentiation of progenitors, yet the mechanisms that guide these events in vivo are poorly understood. We previously demonstrated that treatment with a β3-adrenergic receptor (ADRB3) agonist triggers brown/beige adipogenesis in gonadal white adipose tissue following adipocyte death and clearance by tissue macrophages. The close physical relationship between adipocyte progenitors and tissue macrophages suggested that the macrophages that clear dying adipocytes might generate proadipogenic factors. Flow cytometric analysis of macrophages from mice treated with CL 316,243 identified a subpopulation that contained elevated lipid and expressed CD44. Lipidomic analysis of fluorescence-activated cell sorting-isolated macrophages demonstrated that CD44+ macrophages contained four- to five-fold higher levels of the endogenous peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) ligands 9-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (HODE), and 13-HODE compared with CD44- macrophages. Gene expression profiling and immunohistochemistry demonstrated that ADRB3 agonist treatment upregulated expression of ALOX15, the lipoxygenase responsible for generating 9-HODE and 13-HODE. Using an in vitro model of adipocyte efferocytosis, we found that IL-4-primed tissue macrophages accumulated lipid from dying fat cells and upregulated expression of Alox15. Furthermore, treatment of differentiating adipocytes with 9-HODE and 13-HODE potentiated brown/beige adipogenesis. Collectively, these data indicate that noninflammatory removal of adipocyte remnants and coordinated generation of PPARγ ligands by M2 macrophages provides localized adipogenic signals to support de novo brown/beige adipogenesis. PMID:26538237

  19. Extensive macrophage accumulation in young and old Niemann-Pick C1 model mice involves the alternative, M2, activation pathway and inhibition of macrophage apoptosis.

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    Deutsch, Gail; Muralidhar, Akshay; Le, Ellen; Borbon, Ivan A; Erickson, Robert P

    2016-03-10

    We have studied the pathophysiology of lung disease which occurs in two mouse models of Niemann-Pick C1 disease. We utilized Npc1(-/-) mice transgenic for normal gene expression in glia or neurons and glia at ages several fold the usual and a mouse model of the juvenile form of NPC1, a point mutation, at one age to confirm some findings. Lung weights, as per cent of body weight, increase much more than liver and spleen weights. Although pulmonary function parameters only vary for hysteresis between young and older Npc1(-/-) mice, they are markedly different than those found in normal control mice. Cholesterol accumulation continued in the older mice but sphingosine-1-phosphate was not increased. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) showed a massive increase (26×) in the number of macrophages. Histologic examination from the older, transgenic Npc1(-/-) mice showed small foci of alveolar proteinosis and evidence of hemorrhage, as well as dense macrophage accumulation. A large subset of macrophages was immunopositive for Fizz1 or arginase-1, markers of the alternative activation pathway, while no Fizz1 or arginase-1 positive macrophages were found in wild-type mice. The percentage of marker positive macrophages was relatively stable at 5-10% at various ages and within the 2 transgenic models. Phosphohistone H3 and Ki67 showed low levels of proliferation of these macrophages. Apoptosis was prominent within lung capillary endothelial cells, but limited within macrophages. Thus, activation of the alternative pathway is involved in Niemann-Pick C1 associated pulmonary macrophage accumulation, with low proliferation of these cells balanced by low levels of apoptosis. PMID:26707209

  20. The predominance of alternatively activated macrophages following challenge with cell wall peptide-polysaccharide after prior infection with Sporothrix schenckii.

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    Alegranci, Pamela; de Abreu Ribeiro, Livia Carolina; Ferreira, Lucas Souza; Negrini, Thais de Cássia; Maia, Danielle Cardoso Geraldo; Tansini, Aline; Gonçalves, Amanda Costa; Placeres, Marisa Campos Polesi; Carlos, Iracilda Zeppone

    2013-08-01

    Sporotrichosis is a subcutaneous mycosis that is caused by the dimorphic fungus Sporothrix schenckii. This disease generally occurs within the skin and subcutaneous tissues, causing lesions that can spread through adjacent lymphatic vessels and sometimes leading to systemic diseases in immunocompromised patients. Macrophages are crucial for proper immune responses against a variety of pathogens. Furthermore, macrophages can play different roles in response to different microorganisms and forms of activation, and they can be divided into "classic" or "alternatively" activated populations, as also known as M1 and M2 macrophages. M1 cells can lead to tissue injury and contribute to pathogenesis, whereas M2 cells promote angiogenesis, tissue remodeling, and repair. The aim of this study was to investigate the roles of M1 and M2 macrophages in a sporotrichosis model. Toward this end, we performed phenotyping of peritoneal exudate cells and evaluated the concomitant production of several immunomediators, including IL-12, IL-10, TGF-β, nitric oxide, and arginase-I activity, which were stimulated ex vivo with cell wall peptide-polysaccharide. Our results showed the predominance of the M2 macrophage population, indicated by peaks of arginase-I activity as well as IL-10 and TGF-β production during the 6th and 8th weeks after infection. These results were consistent with cellular phenotyping that revealed increases in CD206-positive cells over this period. This is the first report of the participation of M2 macrophages in sporotrichosis infections.

  1. Interleukin-4 ameliorates the functional recovery of intracerebral hemorrhage through the alternative activation of microglia/macrophage

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    Jianjing eYang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Neuro-inflammation plays an important role in the recovery of brain injury after stroke. Microglia/macrophage is the major executor in the neuro-inflammation, which can be polarized into two distinct phenotypes: injurious/toxic classical activation (M1 phenotype and protective alternative activation (M2 phenotype. Here, we investigated whether intracerebral administration of interleukin-4 (IL-4 at an early stage could affect the activation of microglia/macrophage and the corresponding outcome after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH. The neuro-behavior was recorded between different groups in the rat ICH model. The M1 and M2 markers were then determined by qRT-PCR, western blotting, ELISA and immunofluorescence, respectively. We observed aberrant activation of microglia/macrophage after ICH. After intracerebral injection of IL-4, M1 activation was greatly inhibited while M2 activation was enhanced, along with improving neurobehavioral recovery from deficits after ICH. Our study showed that early intracerebral injection of IL-4 potentially promotes neuro-functional recovery, probably through enhancing the alternative activation of microglia/macrophage.

  2. Classical and alternative macrophage activation in the lung following ozone-induced oxidative stress

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    Sunil, Vasanthi R., E-mail: sunilva@pharmacy.rutgers.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Patel-Vayas, Kinal; Shen, Jianliang [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Laskin, Jeffrey D. [Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Debra L. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Ozone is a pulmonary irritant known to cause oxidative stress, inflammation and tissue injury. Evidence suggests that macrophages play a role in the pathogenic response; however, their contribution depends on the mediators they encounter in the lung which dictate their function. In these studies we analyzed the effects of ozone-induced oxidative stress on the phenotype of alveolar macrophages (AM). Exposure of rats to ozone (2 ppm, 3 h) resulted in increased expression of 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), as well as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in AM. Whereas 8-OHdG was maximum at 24 h, expression of HO-1 was biphasic increasing after 3 h and 48–72 h. Cleaved caspase-9 and beclin-1, markers of apoptosis and autophagy, were also induced in AM 24 h post-ozone. This was associated with increased bronchoalveolar lavage protein and cells, as well as matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9, demonstrating alveolar epithelial injury. Ozone intoxication resulted in biphasic activation of the transcription factor, NFκB. This correlated with expression of monocyte chemotactic protein‐1, inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase‐2, markers of proinflammatory macrophages. Increases in arginase-1, Ym1 and galectin-3 positive anti-inflammatory/wound repair macrophages were also observed in the lung after ozone inhalation, beginning at 24 h (arginase-1, Ym1), and persisting for 72 h (galectin-3). This was associated with increased expression of pro-surfactant protein-C, a marker of Type II cell proliferation and activation, important steps in wound repair. These data suggest that both proinflammatory/cytotoxic and anti-inflammatory/wound repair macrophages are activated early in the response to ozone-induced oxidative stress and tissue injury. -- Highlights: ► Lung macrophages are highly sensitive to ozone induced oxidative stress. ► Ozone induces autophagy and apoptosis in lung macrophages. ► Proinflammatory and wound repair macrophages are activated

  3. Classical and alternative macrophage activation in the lung following ozone-induced oxidative stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozone is a pulmonary irritant known to cause oxidative stress, inflammation and tissue injury. Evidence suggests that macrophages play a role in the pathogenic response; however, their contribution depends on the mediators they encounter in the lung which dictate their function. In these studies we analyzed the effects of ozone-induced oxidative stress on the phenotype of alveolar macrophages (AM). Exposure of rats to ozone (2 ppm, 3 h) resulted in increased expression of 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), as well as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in AM. Whereas 8-OHdG was maximum at 24 h, expression of HO-1 was biphasic increasing after 3 h and 48–72 h. Cleaved caspase-9 and beclin-1, markers of apoptosis and autophagy, were also induced in AM 24 h post-ozone. This was associated with increased bronchoalveolar lavage protein and cells, as well as matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9, demonstrating alveolar epithelial injury. Ozone intoxication resulted in biphasic activation of the transcription factor, NFκB. This correlated with expression of monocyte chemotactic protein‐1, inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase‐2, markers of proinflammatory macrophages. Increases in arginase-1, Ym1 and galectin-3 positive anti-inflammatory/wound repair macrophages were also observed in the lung after ozone inhalation, beginning at 24 h (arginase-1, Ym1), and persisting for 72 h (galectin-3). This was associated with increased expression of pro-surfactant protein-C, a marker of Type II cell proliferation and activation, important steps in wound repair. These data suggest that both proinflammatory/cytotoxic and anti-inflammatory/wound repair macrophages are activated early in the response to ozone-induced oxidative stress and tissue injury. -- Highlights: ► Lung macrophages are highly sensitive to ozone induced oxidative stress. ► Ozone induces autophagy and apoptosis in lung macrophages. ► Proinflammatory and wound repair macrophages are activated

  4. Regulation of alternative macrophage activation in the liver following acetaminophen intoxication by stem cell-derived tyrosine kinase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, Carol R., E-mail: cgardner@pharmacy.rutgers.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Hankey, Pamela [Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Science, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Mishin, Vladimir; Francis, Mary [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Yu, Shan [Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Science, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Laskin, Jeffrey D. [Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Laskin, Debra L. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Stem cell-derived tyrosine kinase (STK) is a transmembrane receptor reported to play a role in macrophage switching from a classically activated/proinflammatory phenotype to an alternatively activated/wound repair phenotype. In the present studies, STK{sup −/−} mice were used to assess the role of STK in acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity as evidence suggests that the pathogenic process involves both of these macrophage subpopulations. In wild type mice, centrilobular hepatic necrosis and increases in serum transaminase levels were observed within 6 h of acetaminophen administration (300 mg/kg, i.p.). Loss of STK resulted in a significant increase in sensitivity of mice to the hepatotoxic effects of acetaminophen and increased mortality, effects independent of its metabolism. This was associated with reduced levels of hepatic glutathione, rapid upregulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase, and prolonged induction of heme oxygenase-1, suggesting excessive oxidative stress in STK{sup −/−} mice. F4/80, a marker of mature macrophages, was highly expressed on subpopulations of Kupffer cells in livers of wild type, but not STK{sup −/−} mice. Whereas F4/80{sup +} macrophages rapidly declined in the livers of wild type mice following acetaminophen intoxication, they increased in STK{sup −/−} mice. In wild type mice hepatic expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-12, products of classically activated macrophages, increased after acetaminophen administration. Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and its receptor, CCR2, as well as IL-10, mediators involved in recruiting and activating anti-inflammatory/wound repair macrophages, also increased in wild type mice after acetaminophen. Loss of STK blunted the effects of acetaminophen on expression of TNFα, IL-1β, IL-12, MCP-1 and CCR2, while expression of IL-10 increased. Hepatic expression of CX3CL1, and its receptor, CX3CR1 also increased in STK{sup −/−} mice

  5. Enhanced allergic responsiveness after early childhood infection with respiratory viruses: Are long-lived alternatively activated macrophages the missing link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, Achsah D; Shirey, Kari Ann; Bagdure, Dayanand; Blanco, Jorge; Viscardi, Rose M; Vogel, Stefanie N

    2016-07-01

    Early childhood infection with respiratory viruses, including human rhinovirus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and influenza, is associated with an increased risk of allergic asthma and severe exacerbation of ongoing disease. Despite the long recognition of this relationship, the mechanism linking viral infection and later susceptibility to allergic lung inflammation is still poorly understood. We discuss the literature and provide new evidence demonstrating that these viruses induce the alternative activation of macrophages. Alternatively activated macrophages (AAM) induced by RSV or influenza infection persisted in the lungs of mice up to 90 days after initial viral infection. Several studies suggest that AAM contribute to allergic inflammatory responses, although their mechanism of action is unclear. In this commentary, we propose that virus-induced AAM provide a link between viral infection and enhanced responses to inhaled allergens. PMID:27178560

  6. Alternative activation of macrophages and induction of arginase are not components of pathogenesis mediated by Francisella species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda J Griffin

    Full Text Available Virulent Francisella tularensis ssp tularensis is an intracellular, Gram negative bacterium that causes acute lethal disease following inhalation of fewer than 15 organisms. Pathogenicity of Francisella infections is tied to its unique ability to evade and suppress inflammatory responses in host cells. It has been proposed that induction of alternative activation of infected macrophages is a mechanism by which attenuated Francisella species modulate host responses. In this report we reveal that neither attenuated F. tularensis Live Vaccine Strain (LVS nor virulent F. tularensis strain SchuS4 induce alternative activation of macrophages in vitro or in vivo. LVS, but not SchuS4, provoked production of arginase1 independent of alternative activation in vitro and in vivo. However, absence of arginase1 did not significantly impact intracellular replication of LVS or SchuS4. Together our data establish that neither induction of alternative activation nor expression of arginase1 are critical features of disease mediated by attenuated or virulent Francisella species.

  7. Classically and alternatively activated bone marrow derived macrophages differ in cytoskeletal functions and migration towards specific CNS cell types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vereyken, Elly J. F.; Heijnen, Priscilla D. A. M.; Baron, Wia; de Vries, Elga H. E.; Dijkstra, Christine D.; Teunissen, Charlotte E.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Macrophages play an important role in neuroinflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS) and spinal cord injury (SCI), being involved in both damage and repair. The divergent effects of macrophages might be explained by their different activation status: classically activated (CA

  8. Unlike PPAR{gamma}, PPAR{alpha} or PPAR{beta}/{delta} activation does not promote human monocyte differentiation toward alternative macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouhlel, Mohamed Amine [Univ Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Inserm U545, F-59000 Lille (France); UDSL, F-59000 Lille (France); Institut Pasteur de Lille, F-59019 Lille (France); Brozek, John [Genfit, Loos (France); Derudas, Bruno [Univ Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Inserm U545, F-59000 Lille (France); UDSL, F-59000 Lille (France); Institut Pasteur de Lille, F-59019 Lille (France); Zawadzki, Christophe; Jude, Brigitte [Inserm ERI-9 and Equipe d' Accueil 2693, IFR114, Universite de Lille, Lille (France); Staels, Bart, E-mail: bart.staels@pasteur-lille.fr [Univ Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Inserm U545, F-59000 Lille (France); UDSL, F-59000 Lille (France); Institut Pasteur de Lille, F-59019 Lille (France); Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia [Univ Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Inserm U545, F-59000 Lille (France); UDSL, F-59000 Lille (France); Institut Pasteur de Lille, F-59019 Lille (France)

    2009-08-28

    Macrophages adapt their response to micro-environmental signals. While Th1 cytokines promote pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages, Th2 cytokines promote an 'alternative' anti-inflammatory M2 macrophage phenotype. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors expressed in macrophages where they control the inflammatory response. It has been shown that PPAR{gamma} promotes the differentiation of monocytes into anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages in humans and mice, while a role for PPAR{beta}/{delta} in this process has been reported only in mice and no data are available for PPAR{alpha}. Here, we show that in contrast to PPAR{gamma}, expression of PPAR{alpha} and PPAR{beta}/{delta} overall does not correlate with the expression of M2 markers in human atherosclerotic lesions, whereas a positive correlation with genes of lipid metabolism exists. Moreover, unlike PPAR{gamma}, PPAR{alpha} or PPAR{beta}/{delta} activation does not influence human monocyte differentiation into M2 macrophages in vitro. Thus, PPAR{alpha} and PPAR{beta}/{delta} do not appear to modulate the alternative differentiation of human macrophages.

  9. Genetic programs expressed in resting and IL-4 alternatively activated mouse and human macrophages : similarities and differences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinez, Fernando O.; Helming, Laura; Milde, Ronny; Varin, Audrey; Melgert, Barbro N.; Draijer, Christina; Thomas, Benjamin; Fabbri, Marco; Crawshaw, Anjali; Ho, Ling Pei; Ten Hacken, Nick H.; Jimenez, Viviana Cobos; Kootstra, Neeltje A.; Hamann, Jorg; Greaves, David R.; Locati, Massimo; Mantovani, Alberto; Gordon, Siamon

    2013-01-01

    The molecular repertoire of macrophages in health and disease can provide novel biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment. Th2-IL-4-activated macrophages (M2) have been associated with important diseases in mice, yet no specific markers are available for their detection in human tissues. Al

  10. Immune polarization by hookworms: taking cues from T helper type 2, type 2 innate lymphoid cells and alternatively activated macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Meera G; Herbert, De'Broski R

    2016-06-01

    Cellular and molecular investigation of parasitic helminth infections has greatly accelerated the understanding of type 2 immune responses. However, there remains considerable debate regarding the specific leucocytes that kill parasites and whether these mechanisms are distinct from those responsible for tissue repair. Herein, we chronicle discoveries over the past decade highlighting current paradigms in type 2 immunity with a particular emphasis upon how CD4(+) T helper type 2 cells, type 2 innate lymphoid cells and alternatively activated macrophages coordinately control helminth-induced parasitism. Primarily, this review will draw from studies of the murine nematode parasite Nippostrongylus brasiliensis, which bears important similarities to the human hookworms Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus. Given that one or more hookworm species currently infect millions of individuals across the globe, we propose that vaccine and/or pharmaceutical-based cure strategies targeting these affected human populations should incorporate the conceptual advances outlined herein. PMID:26928141

  11. Activation of Alveolar Macrophages via the Alternative Pathway in Herpesvirus-Induced Lung Fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Mora, Ana L.; Torres-González, Edilson; Rojas, Mauricio; Corredor, Claudia; Ritzenthaler, Jeffrey; Xu, Jianguo; Roman, Jesse; Brigham, Kenneth; Stecenko, Arlene

    2006-01-01

    The etiology of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is unknown. Because viral pathogenesis of IPF has been suggested, we have established a murine model of progressive pulmonary fibrosis by infecting IFN-γR–deficient mice (IFN-γR−/−) with the murine γ-herpesvirus 68. Because alveolar macrophages in humans with IPF have been implicated in driving the profibrotic response, we studied their role in our model. Chronic herpesvirus infection of the lung was associated with recruitment of alveolar m...

  12. The novel biomarker of alternative macrophage activation, soluble mannose receptor (sMR/sCD206): Implications in multiple myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Morten N; Andersen, Niels F; Rødgaard-Hansen, Sidsel;

    2015-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) play an important role in the pathophysiology of human malignancies. They support growth of cancer cells by promoting angiogenesis, and by inhibiting tumour cell apoptosis and anti-tumor immune reactions. Several membrane proteins are well-described markers...... of human TAMs, including the haemoglobin scavenger receptor CD163 and the macrophage mannose receptor (MR/CD206). Interestingly, both CD163 and MR exist as soluble serum proteins (sCD163 and sMR) that may reflect the activation state of tissue macrophages, including TAMs. Here, we report the first data...

  13. Acute cysticercosis favours rapid and more severe lesions caused by Leishmania major and Leishmania mexicana infection, a role for alternatively activated macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Sosa, Miriam; Rivera-Montoya, Irma; Espinoza, Arlett; Romero-Grijalva, Miriam; López-Flores, Roberto; González, Jorge; Terrazas, Luis I

    2006-08-01

    Parasitic helminths have developed complex mechanisms to modulate host immunity. In the present study we found that previous infection of mice with the cestode Taenia crassiceps favours parasitemia and induces larger cutaneous lesions during both Leishmania major and Leishmania mexicana co-infections. Analysis of cytokine responses into draining lymph nodes indicated that co-infection of T. crassiceps-Leishmania did not inhibit IFN-gamma production in response to Leishmania antigens, but significantly increased IL-4 production. Additionally, anti-Leishmania-specific IgG1 antibodies and total IgE increased in co-infected mice, whereas, IgG2a titers remained similar. Macrophages from Taenia-infected mice displayed increased mRNA transcripts of arginase-1, Ym1, and Mannose Receptor, as well as greater production of urea (all markers for an alternate activation state) compared to macrophages from Leishmania-infected mice. In contrast, lower mRNA transcripts for IL-12p35, IL-12p40, IL-23p19, and iNOS were detected in macrophages obtained from cestode-infected mice compared to uninfected and Leishmania-infected mice after LPS stimulation. The presence of cestode also generated impaired macrophage anti-leishmanicidal activity in vitro, as evidenced by the inability of these macrophages to prevent Leishmania growth compared to macrophages from uninfected mice. This was observed despite the fact that both groups of cells were exposed to IFN-gamma. Flow cytometry showed high IFN-gammaR expression on Taenia-induced macrophages. Thus, lack of response to IFN-gamma is not associated with the absence of its receptor. Our data suggest that cestode infection may favour Leishmania installation by inducing alternatively activated macrophages rather than inhibiting Th1-type responses.

  14. Butyrate enhances antibacterial effects while suppressing other features of alternative activation in IL-4-induced macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Maria R; Saxena, Alpana; Reyes, José-Luis; McKay, Derek M

    2016-05-15

    The short-chain fatty acid butyrate is produced by fermentation of dietary fiber by the intestinal microbiota; butyrate is the primary energy source of colonocytes and has immunomodulatory effects. Having shown that macrophages differentiated with IL-4 [M(IL-4)s] can suppress colitis, we hypothesized that butyrate would reinforce an M(IL-4) phenotype. Here, we show that in the presence of butyrate M(IL-4)s display reduced expression of their hallmark markers Arg1 and Ym1 and significantly suppressed LPS-induced nitric oxide, IL-12p40, and IL-10 production. Butyrate treatment likely altered the M(IL-4) phenotype via inhibition of histone deacetylation. Functionally, M(IL-4)s treated with butyrate showed increased phagocytosis and killing of bacteria, compared with M(IL-4) and this was not accompanied by enhanced proinflammatory cytokine production. Culture of regulatory T cells with M(IL-4)s and M(IL-4 + butyrate)s revealed that both macrophage subsets suppressed expression of the regulatory T-cell marker Foxp3. However, Tregs cocultured with M(IL-4 + butyrate) produced less IL-17A than Tregs cocultured with M(IL-4). These data illustrate the importance of butyrate, a microbial-derived metabolite, in the regulation of gut immunity: the demonstration that butyrate promotes phagocytosis in M(IL-4)s that can limit T-cell production of IL-17A reveals novel aspects of bacterial-host interaction in the regulation of intestinal homeostasis.

  15. [Molecular mechanisms regulating the activity of macrophages].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onoprienko, L V

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews modern concepts of the most common types of macrophage activation: classical, alternative, and type II. Molecular mechanisms of induction and regulation of these three types of activation are discussed. Any population of macrophages was shown to change its properties depending on its microenvironment and concrete biological situation (the "functional plasticity of macrophages"). Many intermediate states of macrophages were described along with the most pronounced and well-known activation types (classical activation, alternative activation, and type II activation). These intermediate states are characterized by a variety of combinations of their biological properties, including elements of the three afore mentioned types of activation. Macrophage activity is regulated by a complex network of interrelated cascade mechanisms.

  16. Kupffer cells ameliorate hepatic insulin resistance induced by high-fat diet rich in monounsaturated fatty acids: the evidence for the involvement of alternatively activated macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papackova Zuzana

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Resident macrophages (Kupffer cells, KCs in the liver can undergo both pro- or anti-inflammatory activation pathway and exert either beneficiary or detrimental effects on liver metabolism. Until now, their role in the metabolically dysfunctional state of steatosis remains enigmatic. Aim of our study was to characterize the role of KCs in relation to the onset of hepatic insulin resistance induced by a high-fat (HF diet rich in monounsaturated fatty acids. Methods Male Wistar rats were fed either standard (SD or high-fat (HF diet for 4 weeks. Half of the animals were subjected to the acute GdCl3 treatment 24 and 72 hrs prior to the end of the experiment in order to induce the reduction of KCs population. We determined the effect of HF diet on activation status of liver macrophages and on the changes in hepatic insulin sensitivity and triacylglycerol metabolism imposed by acute KCs depletion by GdCl3. Results We found that a HF diet rich in MUFA itself triggers an alternative but not the classical activation program in KCs. In a steatotic, but not in normal liver, a reduction of the KCs population was associated with a decrease of alternative activation and with a shift towards the expression of pro-inflammatory activation markers, with the increased autophagy, elevated lysosomal lipolysis, increased formation of DAG, PKCε activation and marked exacerbation of HF diet-induced hepatic insulin resistance. Conclusions We propose that in the presence of a high MUFA content the population of alternatively activated resident liver macrophages may mediate beneficial effects on liver insulin sensitivity and alleviate the metabolic disturbances imposed by HF diet feeding and steatosis. Our data indicate that macrophage polarization towards an alternative state might be a useful strategy for treating type 2 diabetes.

  17. Enforced Expression of Hoxa3 Inhibits Classical and Promotes Alternative Activation of Macrophages In Vitro and In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Sadoun, Hadeel; Burgess, Matthew; Hentges, Kathryn E.

    2016-01-01

    The regulated differentiation of macrophages (mφs) and their subsequent activation into proinflammatory or prohealing subtypes is critical for efficient wound healing. Chronic wounds such as diabetic (db) ulcers are associated with dysregulation of macrophage function. Whereas non-db mφs polarize to an M2-like, prohealing phenotype during the late stages of healing, db-derived mφs continue to display an M1-like, proinflammatory, or a mixed M1-like/M2-like phenotype. We have previously shown that sustained expression of Hoxa3 reduces the excessive number of leukocytes within the db wound; however, the effect of Hoxa3 on mφ polarization was unknown. In this study, we show that Hoxa3 protein transduction of mφs in vitro enhances macrophage maturation, inhibits M1 polarization, and promotes M2 polarization, in part via regulation of Pu.1/Spi1 and Stat6. Sustained expression of Hoxa3 in vivo in db wounds reduces the number of Nos2+ (M1-like) mφs, increases the number of Arg1+ and VEGF+ (M2-like) mφs, and accelerates healing in a DNA-binding independent manner. Our findings suggest a role for Hox protein activity in promoting M1-to-M2-like phenotypic switching via interactions with myeloid transcription factors and provide insight into mechanisms regulating this process in db wound healing. PMID:27342843

  18. Thalidomide inhibits alternative activation of macrophages in vivo and in vitro: a potential mechanism of anti-asthmatic effect of thalidomide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Seung Lee

    Full Text Available Thalidomide is known to have anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory actions. However, the effect and the anti-asthmatic mechanism of thalidomide in the pathogenesis of asthmatic airways are not fully understood.This study is designed to determine the effect and the potential mechanism of thalidomide in the pathogenesis of asthmatic airways using animal model of allergic asthma.Six-week-old female BALB/C mice were sensitized with alum plus ovalbumin (OVA and were exposed to OVA via intranasal route for 3 days for challenge. Thalidomide 200 mg/kg was given via gavage twice a day from a day before the challenge and airway hyperresponsivenss (AHR, airway inflammatory cells, and cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALF were evaluated. The expression levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and other mediators were evaluated using ELISA, real time (RT-qPCR, and flow cytometry. CRL-2456, alveolar macrophage cell line, was used to test the direct effect of thalidomide on the activation of macrophages in vitro.The mice with thalidomide treatment showed significantly reduced levels of allergen-induced BALF and lung inflammation, AHR, and the expression of a number of pro-inflammatory cytokines and mediators including Th2 related, IL-17 cytokines, and altered levels of allergen-specific IgG1/IgG2a. Of interesting note, thalidomide treatment significantly reduced expression levels of allergen- or Th2 cytokine-stimulated alternative activation of macrophages in vivo and in vitro.These studies highlight a potential use of thalidomide in the treatment of allergic diseases including asthma. This study further identified a novel inhibitory effect of thalidomide on alternative activation of macrophages as a potential mechanism of anti-asthmatic effect of thalidomide.

  19. The absence of MyD88 has no effect on the induction of alternatively activated macrophage during Fasciola hepatica infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luo HongLin

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alternatively activated macrophages (AAMϕ play important roles in allergies and responses to parasitic infections. However, whether signaling through toll-like receptors (TLRs plays any role in AAMϕ induction when young Fasciola hepatica penetrates the liver capsule and migrates through the liver tissue is still unclear. Results The data show that the lack of myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88 has no effect on the AAMϕ derived from the bone marrow (BMMϕ in vitro and does not impair the mRNA expression of arginase-1, resistin-like molecule (RELMα, and Ym1 in BMMϕs. The Th2 cytokine production bias in splenocytes was not significantly altered in F. hepatica-infected mice in the absence of MyD88 in vitro and in the pleural cavity lavage in vivo. In addition, MyD88-deficiency has no effect on the arginase production of the F. hepatica elicited macrophages (Fe Mϕs, production of RELMα and Ym1 proteins and mRNA expression of Ym1 and RELMα of macrophages in the peritoneal cavity 6 weeks post F. hepatica infection. Conclusions The absence of MyD88 has no effect on presence of AAMϕ 6 weeks post F. hepatica infection.

  20. Crocodylus siamensis serum and macrophage phagocytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aree, Kalaya; Siruntawineti, Jindawan; Chaeychomsri, Win

    2011-12-01

    Antimicrobial activity of sera from many crocodilian species has been recognized. This activity was proposed to be mediated, at least in part, by complement. Due to the fact that complement proteins have different functions in the immune system, they may be involved in phagocytic process of phagocytes. In the present study, the effects of Siamese crocodile serum on phagocytic activity of macrophages as well as the possible involvement of complement in this process were examined. The results showed increases in the phagocytosis of both Escherichia coli and to a lesser extent, Staphylococcus aureus upon incubation of murine macrophage cell line with fresh crocodile serum (FS). Similar to FS, other crocodile blood products, including freeze dried serum (DS) and freeze dried whole blood (DWB) exhibited phagocytosis-enhancing property. However the ability of DWB to enhance phagocytosis was less efficient than that of FS and DS, suggesting that serum factors were involved in this process. Treatment of FS with heat at 56 degrees C for 30 min deteriorated the effect of FS on bacterial uptake of macrophages, suggesting that complement proteins play a role in the modulation of the phagocytic process. Collectively, the results of the present study suggested that crocodile serum enhances the macrophage phagocytic activity through complement activity and, therefore, may be taken as an alternative medicine for supporting the human immune responses. PMID:22619919

  1. Extraintestinal Helminth Infection Limits Pathology and Proinflammatory Cytokine Expression during DSS-Induced Ulcerative Colitis: A Role for Alternatively Activated Macrophages and Prostaglandins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma-Soto, Yadira; Callejas, Blanca E; Terrazas, César A; Reyes, Jose L; Espinoza-Jiménez, Arlett; González, Marisol I; León-Cabrera, Sonia; Morales, Rosario; Olguín, Jonadab E; Saavedra, Rafael; Oghumu, Steve; Satoskar, Abhay R; Terrazas, Luis I

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammation of the intestinal mucosa is characteristic of inflammatory bowel diseases such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. Helminth parasites have developed immunomodulatory strategies that may impact the outcome of several inflammatory diseases. Therefore, we investigated whether Taenia crassiceps infection is able to decrease the inflammatory effects of dextran sulfate sodium- (DSS-) induced ulcerative colitis in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. Preinfection significantly reduced the manifestations of DSS-induced colitis, as weight loss and shortened colon length, and decreased the disease activity index independently of the genetic background of the mice. Taenia infection decreased systemic levels of proinflammatory cytokines while increasing levels of IL-4 and IL-10, and the inflammatory infiltrate into the colon was also markedly reduced. RT-PCR assays from colon showed that T. crassiceps-infected mice displayed increased expression of Arginase-1 but decreased expression of iNOS compared to DSS-treated uninfected mice. The percentages of T regulatory cells were not increased. The adoptive transfer of alternatively activated macrophages (AAMФs) from infected mice into mice with DSS-induced colitis reduced the severity of colon inflammation. Administration of indomethacin abrogated the anticolitic effect of Taenia. Thus, T. crassiceps infection limits the pathology of ulcerative colitis by suppressing inflammatory responses mechanistically associated with AAMФs and prostaglandins.

  2. Classical and alternative activation and metalloproteinase expression occurs in foam cell macrophages in male and female ApoE null mice in the absence of T- and B-lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Mo Hayes

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rupture of advanced atherosclerotic plaques accounts for most life-threatening myocardial infarctions. Classical (M1 and alternative (M2 macrophage activation could promote atherosclerotic plaque progression and rupture by increasing production of proteases, including matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs. Lymphocyte-derived cytokines may be essential for generating M1 and M2 phenotypes in plaques, although this has not been rigorously tested until now.Methods and Results: We validated the expression of M1 markers (iNOS and COX-2 and M2 markers (arginase-1, Ym-1 and CD206 and then measured MMP mRNA levels in mouse macrophages during classical and alternative activation in vitro. We then compared mRNA expression of these genes ex vivo in foam cells from subcutaneous granulomas in fat-fed immune-competent ApoE knockout and immune-compromised ApoE/Rag-1 double knockout mice, which lack all T and B cells. Furthermore, we performed immunohistochemistry in subcutaneous granulomas and in aortic root and brachiocephalic artery atherosclerotic plaques to measure the extent of M1/M2 marker and MMP protein expression in vivo. Classical activation of mouse macrophages with bacterial lipopolysaccharide in vitro increased MMPs-13, -14 and -25 but decreased MMP-19 and TIMP-2 mRNA expressions. Alternative activation with IL-4 increased MMP-19 expression. Foam cells in subcutaneous granulomas expressed all M1/M2 markers and MMPs at ex vivo mRNA and in vivo protein levels, irrespective of Rag-1 genotype. There were also similar percentages of foam cell macrophages carrying M1/M2 markers and MMPs in atherosclerotic plaques from ApoE knockout and ApoE/Rag-1 double knockout mice. Conclusions: Classical and alternative activation leads to distinct MMP expression patterns in mouse macrophages in vitro. M1 and M2 polarization in vivo occurs in the absence of T and B lymphocytes in either granuloma or plaque foam cell macrophages.

  3. Lung Collagens Perpetuate Pulmonary Fibrosis via CD204 and M2 Macrophage Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Stahl, Mirjam; Schupp, Jonas; Jäger, Benedikt; Schmid, Michael; Zissel, Gernot; Müller-Quernheim, Joachim; Prasse, Antje

    2013-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is characterized by abundant collagen production and accumulation of alternatively activated macrophages (M2) in the lower respiratory tract. Mechanisms as to how alveolar macrophages are activated by collagen breakdown products are unknown. Alveolar macrophages were obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage from 30 patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and 37 healthy donors (HD). Alveolar macrophages were cultured in the presence of collagen type I, III, IV...

  4. Ginger extract inhibits LPS induced macrophage activation and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruch David

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Macrophages play a dual role in host defence. They act as the first line of defence by mounting an inflammatory response to antigen exposure and also act as antigen presenting cells and initiate the adaptive immune response. They are also the primary infiltrating cells at the site of inflammation. Inhibition of macrophage activation is one of the possible approaches towards modulating inflammation. Both conventional and alternative approaches are being studied in this regard. Ginger, an herbal product with broad anti inflammatory actions, is used as an alternative medicine in a number of inflammatory conditions like rheumatic disorders. In the present study we examined the effect of ginger extract on macrophage activation in the presence of LPS stimulation. Methods Murine peritoneal macrophages were stimulated by LPS in presence or absence of ginger extract and production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines were observed. We also studied the effect of ginger extract on the LPS induced expression of MHC II, B7.1, B7.2 and CD40 molecules. We also studied the antigen presenting function of ginger extract treated macrophages by primary mixed lymphocyte reaction. Results We observed that ginger extract inhibited IL-12, TNF-α, IL-1β (pro inflammatory cytokines and RANTES, MCP-1 (pro inflammatory chemokines production in LPS stimulated macrophages. Ginger extract also down regulated the expression of B7.1, B7.2 and MHC class II molecules. In addition ginger extract negatively affected the antigen presenting function of macrophages and we observed a significant reduction in T cell proliferation in response to allostimulation, when ginger extract treated macrophages were used as APCs. A significant decrease in IFN-γ and IL-2 production by T cells in response to allostimulation was also observed. Conclusion In conclusion ginger extract inhibits macrophage activation and APC function and indirectly inhibits T cell activation.

  5. Macrophages Are Alternatively Activated in Patients with Endometriosis and Required for Growth and Vascularization of Lesions in a Mouse Model of Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Bacci, Monica; Capobianco, Annalisa; Monno, Antonella; Cottone, Lucia; Di Puppo, Francesca; Camisa, Barbara; Mariani, Margherita; Brignole, Chiara; Ponzoni, Mirco; Ferrari, Stefano; Panina-Bordignon, Paola; Manfredi, Angelo A.; Rovere-Querini, Patrizia

    2009-01-01

    The mechanisms that sustain endometrial tissues at ectopic sites in patients with endometriosis are poorly understood. Various leukocytes, including macrophages, infiltrate endometriotic lesions. In this study, we depleted mouse macrophages by means of either clodronate liposomes or monoclonal antibodies before the injection of syngeneic endometrial tissue. In the absence of macrophages, tissue fragments adhered and implanted into the peritoneal wall, but endometriotic lesions failed to organ...

  6. DMPD: Macrophage-stimulating protein and RON receptor tyrosine kinase: potentialregulators of macrophage inflammatory activities. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 12472665 Macrophage-stimulating protein and RON receptor tyrosine kinase: potential...:545-53. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Macrophage-stimulating protein and RON receptor tyrosine kinase:... potentialregulators of macrophage inflammatory activities. PubmedID 12472665 Title Macro

  7. DMPD: Macrophage activation by endogenous danger signals. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18161744 Macrophage activation by endogenous danger signals. Zhang X, Mosser DM. J ...Pathol. 2008 Jan;214(2):161-78. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Macrophage activation by endogenous dange...r signals. PubmedID 18161744 Title Macrophage activation by endogenous danger signals. Authors Zhang X, Moss

  8. DMPD: Receptor tyrosine kinases and the regulation of macrophage activation. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 14726496 Receptor tyrosine kinases and the regulation of macrophage activation. Cor...(.csml) Show Receptor tyrosine kinases and the regulation of macrophage activation. PubmedID 14726496 Title ...Receptor tyrosine kinases and the regulation of macrophage activation. Authors Co

  9. Macrophage Activation by Ursolic and Oleanolic Acids during Mycobacterial Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia López-García

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Oleanolic (OA and ursolic acids (UA are triterpenes that are abundant in vegetables, fruits and medicinal plants. They have been described as active moieties in medicinal plants used for the treatment of tuberculosis. In this study, we analyzed the effects of these triterpenes on macrophages infected in vitro with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB. We evaluated production of nitric oxide (NO, reactive oxygen species (ROS, and cytokines (TNF-α and TGF-β as well as expression of cell membrane receptors (TGR5 and CD36 in MTB-infected macrophages following treatment with OA and UA. Triterpenes caused reduced MTB growth in macrophages, stimulated production of NO and ROS in the early phase, stimulated TNF-α, suppressed TGF-β and caused over-expression of CD36and TGR5 receptors. Thus, our data suggest immunomodulatory properties of OA and UA on MTB infected macrophages. In conclusion, antimycobacterial effects induced by these triterpenes may be attributable to the conversion of macrophages from stage M2 (alternatively activated to M1 (classically activated.

  10. Experimental Trichinellosis in rats: Peritoneal macrophage activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gruden-Movsesijan Alisa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of Trichinella spiralis infection on macrophage activity in rats during the first 28 days of infection was examined by measuring the production of NO and IL-6, as well as the expression of mannose receptor on the surface of peritoneal macrophages. During the course of a dynamic shift in the 3 life-cycle stages of the parasite, intermittent variations in NO production were observed but ended with increased values that coincided with the highest values for IL-6 release in the final, muscle phase of infection. No change in mannose receptor expression was observed during the course of infection. These results confirm that the Trichinella spiralis infection provokes changes in macrophage activity that could influence not only the course of the parasitic disease but also the overall immune status of the host.

  11. Absence of a Classically Activated Macrophage Cytokine Signature in Peripheral Spondylarthritis, Including Psoriatic Arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Vandooren; T. Noordenbos; C. Ambarus; S. Krausz; T. Cantaert; N. Yeremenko; M. Boumans; R. Lutter; P.P. Tak; D. Baeten

    2009-01-01

    Objective. Peripheral spondylarthritis (SpA) is characterized by macrophages that express CD163, a marker of alternative activation (M2). The purpose of this study was to assess whether this differential infiltration with macrophage subsets was associated with a different local inflammatory milieu i

  12. Macrophage activation and polarization: nomenclature and experimental guidelines

    OpenAIRE

    Murray, Peter J.; Allen, Judith E.; Biswas, Subhra K.; Fisher, Edward A.; Gilroy, Derek W.; Goerdt, Sergij; Gordon, Siamon; Hamilton, John A.; Ivashkiv, Lionel B.; Lawrence, Toby; Locati, Massimo; Mantovani, Alberto; Martinez, Fernando O.; Mege, Jean-Louis; Mosser, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Description of macrophage activation is currently contentious and confusing. Like the biblical Tower of Babel, macrophage activation encompasses a panoply of descriptors used in different ways. The lack of consensus on how to define macrophage activation in experiments in vitro and in vivo impedes progress in multiple ways, including the fact that many researchers still consider there to be only the two types of activated macrophages often termed M1 and M2. Here we describe a set of standards...

  13. The transcription factor PU.1 promotes alternative macrophage polarization and asthmatic airway inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Feng; Deng, Jing; Lee, Yong Gyu; Zhu, Jimmy; Karpurapu, Manjula; Chung, Sangwoon; Zheng, Jun-Nian; Xiao, Lei; Park, Gye Young; Christman, John W

    2015-12-01

    The transcription factor PU.1 is involved in regulation of macrophage differentiation and maturation. However, the role of PU.1 in alternatively activated macrophage (AAM) and asthmatic inflammation has yet been investigated. Here we report that PU.1 serves as a critical regulator of AAM polarization and promotes the pathological progress of asthmatic airway inflammation. In response to the challenge of DRA (dust mite, ragweed, and Aspergillus) allergens, conditional PU.1-deficient (PU/ER(T)(+/-)) mice displayed attenuated allergic airway inflammation, including decreased alveolar eosinophil infiltration and reduced production of IgE, which were associated with decreased mucous glands and goblet cell hyperplasia. The reduced asthmatic inflammation in PU/ER(T)(+/-) mice was restored by adoptive transfer of IL-4-induced wild-type (WT) macrophages. Moreover, after treating PU/ER(T)(+/-) mice with tamoxifen to rescue PU.1 function, the allergic asthmatic inflammation was significantly restored. In vitro studies demonstrate that treatment of PU.1-deficient macrophages with IL-4 attenuated the expression of chitinase 3-like 3 (Ym-1) and resistin-like molecule alpha 1 (Fizz-1), two specific markers of AAM polarization. In addition, PU.1 expression in macrophages was inducible in response to IL-4 challenge, which was associated with phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6). Furthermore, DRA challenge in sensitized mice almost abrogated gene expression of Ym-1 and Fizz-1 in lung tissues of PU/ER(T)(+/-) mice compared with WT mice. These data, all together, indicate that PU.1 plays a critical role in AAM polarization and asthmatic inflammation.

  14. Cholesteryl ester hydrolase activity is abolished in HSL-/- macrophages but unchanged in macrophages lacking KIAA1363.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchebner, Marlene; Pfeifer, Thomas; Rathke, Nora; Chandak, Prakash G; Lass, Achim; Schreiber, Renate; Kratzer, Adelheid; Zimmermann, Robert; Sattler, Wolfgang; Koefeler, Harald; Fröhlich, Eleonore; Kostner, Gerhard M; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth; Chiang, Kyle P; Haemmerle, Guenter; Zechner, Rudolf; Levak-Frank, Sanja; Cravatt, Benjamin; Kratky, Dagmar

    2010-10-01

    Cholesteryl ester (CE) accumulation in macrophages represents a crucial event during foam cell formation, a hallmark of atherogenesis. Here we investigated the role of two previously described CE hydrolases, hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) and KIAA1363, in macrophage CE hydrolysis. HSL and KIAA1363 exhibited marked differences in their abilities to hydrolyze CE, triacylglycerol (TG), diacylglycerol (DG), and 2-acetyl monoalkylglycerol ether (AcMAGE), a precursor for biosynthesis of platelet-activating factor (PAF). HSL efficiently cleaved all four substrates, whereas KIAA1363 hydrolyzed only AcMAGE. This contradicts previous studies suggesting that KIAA1363 is a neutral CE hydrolase. Macrophages of KIAA1363(-/-) and wild-type mice exhibited identical neutral CE hydrolase activity, which was almost abolished in tissues and macrophages of HSL(-/-) mice. Conversely, AcMAGE hydrolase activity was diminished in macrophages and some tissues of KIAA1363(-/-) but unchanged in HSL(-/-) mice. CE turnover was unaffected in macrophages lacking KIAA1363 and HSL, whereas cAMP-dependent cholesterol efflux was influenced by HSL but not by KIAA1363. Despite decreased CE hydrolase activities, HSL(-/-) macrophages exhibited CE accumulation similar to wild-type (WT) macrophages. We conclude that additional enzymes must exist that cooperate with HSL to regulate CE levels in macrophages. KIAA1363 affects AcMAGE hydrolase activity but is of minor importance as a direct CE hydrolase in macrophages.

  15. Macrophage activation syndrome in autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deane, Sean; Selmi, Carlo; Teuber, Suzanne S; Gershwin, M Eric

    2010-01-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is a phenomenon characterized by cytopenia, organ dysfunction, and coagulopathy associated with an inappropriate activation of macrophages. Current diagnostic criteria are imprecise, but the syndrome is now recognized as a form of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis that is characteristically associated with autoimmune diatheses. The diagnosis of incipient MAS in patients with autoimmune disease requires a high index of suspicion, as several characteristics of the disorder may be present in the underlying condition or infectious complications associated with the treatment thereof. Proposed treatment regimens include aggressive approaches that require validation in future controlled studies. This review discusses the major aspects of the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of MAS with a focus on the association with autoimmune disease. PMID:20407267

  16. Macrophage activation and polarization: nomenclature and experimental guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Peter J; Allen, Judith E; Biswas, Subhra K; Fisher, Edward A; Gilroy, Derek W; Goerdt, Sergij; Gordon, Siamon; Hamilton, John A; Ivashkiv, Lionel B; Lawrence, Toby; Locati, Massimo; Mantovani, Alberto; Martinez, Fernando O; Mege, Jean-Louis; Mosser, David M; Natoli, Gioacchino; Saeij, Jeroen P; Schultze, Joachim L; Shirey, Kari Ann; Sica, Antonio; Suttles, Jill; Udalova, Irina; van Ginderachter, Jo A; Vogel, Stefanie N; Wynn, Thomas A

    2014-07-17

    Description of macrophage activation is currently contentious and confusing. Like the biblical Tower of Babel, macrophage activation encompasses a panoply of descriptors used in different ways. The lack of consensus on how to define macrophage activation in experiments in vitro and in vivo impedes progress in multiple ways, including the fact that many researchers still consider there to be only two types of activated macrophages, often termed M1 and M2. Here, we describe a set of standards encompassing three principles-the source of macrophages, definition of the activators, and a consensus collection of markers to describe macrophage activation-with the goal of unifying experimental standards for diverse experimental scenarios. Collectively, we propose a common framework for macrophage-activation nomenclature. PMID:25035950

  17. High salt reduces the activation of IL-4- and IL-13-stimulated macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binger, Katrina J; Gebhardt, Matthias; Heinig, Matthias; Rintisch, Carola; Schroeder, Agnes; Neuhofer, Wolfgang; Hilgers, Karl; Manzel, Arndt; Schwartz, Christian; Kleinewietfeld, Markus; Voelkl, Jakob; Schatz, Valentin; Linker, Ralf A; Lang, Florian; Voehringer, David; Wright, Mark D; Hubner, Norbert; Dechend, Ralf; Jantsch, Jonathan; Titze, Jens; Müller, Dominik N

    2015-11-01

    A high intake of dietary salt (NaCl) has been implicated in the development of hypertension, chronic inflammation, and autoimmune diseases. We have recently shown that salt has a proinflammatory effect and boosts the activation of Th17 cells and the activation of classical, LPS-induced macrophages (M1). Here, we examined how the activation of alternative (M2) macrophages is affected by salt. In stark contrast to Th17 cells and M1 macrophages, high salt blunted the alternative activation of BM-derived mouse macrophages stimulated with IL-4 and IL-13, M(IL-4+IL-13) macrophages. Salt-induced reduction of M(IL-4+IL-13) activation was not associated with increased polarization toward a proinflammatory M1 phenotype. In vitro, high salt decreased the ability of M(IL-4+IL-13) macrophages to suppress effector T cell proliferation. Moreover, mice fed a high salt diet exhibited reduced M2 activation following chitin injection and delayed wound healing compared with control animals. We further identified a high salt-induced reduction in glycolysis and mitochondrial metabolic output, coupled with blunted AKT and mTOR signaling, which indicates a mechanism by which NaCl inhibits full M2 macrophage activation. Collectively, this study provides evidence that high salt reduces noninflammatory innate immune cell activation and may thus lead to an overall imbalance in immune homeostasis.

  18. Myelin alters the inflammatory phenotype of macrophages by activating PPARs

    OpenAIRE

    Bogie, Jeroen; Jorissen, Winde; Mailleux, Jo; Vanmierlo, Tim; van Horssen, Jack; Hellings, Niels; Stinissen, Piet; Hendriks, J. J. A.; Nijland, Philip G.; Zelcer, Noam

    2013-01-01

    Background Foamy macrophages, containing myelin degradation products, are abundantly found in active multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions. Recent studies have described an altered phenotype of macrophages after myelin internalization. However, mechanisms by which myelin affects the phenotype of macrophages and how this phenotype influences lesion progression remain unclear. Results We demonstrate that myelin as well as phosphatidylserine (PS), a phospholipid found in myelin, reduce nitri...

  19. Differential inhibition of macrophage microbicidal activity by liposomes.

    OpenAIRE

    Gilbreath, M J; Swartz, G M; Alving, C R; Nacy, C A; Hoover, D L; Meltzer, M S

    1985-01-01

    In vitro culture of murine resident peritoneal macrophages with lymphokine (LK)-rich leukocyte culture fluids induces enhanced microbicidal activity against amastigotes of the protozoan parasite Leishmania tropica. Macrophages infected with Leishmania and treated with LKs after infection acquire the capacity to kill the intracellular parasite within 72 h. When compared with control macrophage cultures treated with medium lacking LKs, 80 to 90% fewer macrophages treated with LKs contained amas...

  20. Direct imaging of macrophage activation during PDT treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Sheng; Zhou, Feifan; Chen, Wei R.; Xing, Da

    2012-03-01

    Mounting evidence describes a more complex progress of macrophage activation during photodynamic therapy (PDT), which performing distinct immunological functions and different physiologies on surrounding cells and tissues. Macrophage-targeted PDT has been applied in the selective killing of cells involved in inflammation and tumor. We have previously shown that PDT-mediated tumor cells apoptosis can induce a higher level immune response than necrosis, and enhance the macrophage activation. However, the molecular mechanism of macrophage activation during PDT-induced apoptotic cells (AC) still unclear. Here, we use confocal microscopy to image the phagocytosis of tumor cells by macrophages. We also observed that PDT-treated AC can activate Toll-like receptors (TLRs) which are present on macrophages surface. Besides, the increase in nitric oxide (NO) formation in macrophages was detected in real time by a laser scanning microscopy. This study provided more details for understanding the molecular mechanism of the immune response induced by PDT-treated AC.

  1. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma agonist rosiglitazone attenuates postincisional pain by regulating macrophage polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa-Moriyama, Maiko, E-mail: hase-mai@m3.kufm.kagoshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan); Ohnou, Tetsuya; Godai, Kohei; Kurimoto, Tae; Nakama, Mayo; Kanmura, Yuichi [Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan)

    2012-09-14

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rosiglitazone attenuated postincisional pain. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rosiglitazone alters macrophage polarization to F4/80{sup +}CD206{sup +} M2 macrophages at the incisional sites. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transplantation of rosiglitazone-treated macrophages produced analgesic effects. -- Abstract: Acute inflammation triggered by macrophage infiltration to injured tissue promotes wound repair and may induce pain hypersensitivity. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR){gamma} signaling is known to regulate heterogeneity of macrophages, which are often referred to as classically activated (M1) and alternatively activated (M2) macrophages. M1 macrophages have considerable antimicrobial activity and produce a wide variety of proinflammatory cytokines. In contrast, M2 macrophages are involved in anti-inflammatory and homeostatic functions linked to wound healing and tissue repair. Although it has been suggested that PPAR{gamma} agonists attenuate pain hypersensitivity, the molecular mechanism of macrophage-mediated effects of PPAR{gamma} signaling on pain development has not been explored. In this study, we investigated the link between the phenotype switching of macrophage polarization induced by PPAR{gamma} signaling and the development of acute pain hypersensitivity. Local administration of rosiglitazone significantly ameliorated hypersensitivity to heat and mechanical stimuli, and paw swelling. Consistent with the down-regulation of nuclear factor {kappa}B (NF{kappa}B) phosphorylation by rosiglitazone at the incisional sites, the number of F4/80{sup +}iNOS{sup +} M1 macrophages was decreased whereas numbers of F4/80{sup +}CD206{sup +} M2 macrophages were increased in rosiglitazone-treated incisional sites 24 h after the procedure. In addition, gene induction of anti-inflammatory M2-macrophage-associated markers such as arginase1, FIZZ1 and interleukin (IL)-10 were significantly increased, whereas

  2. Similarity and Diversity in Macrophage Activation by Nematodes, Trematodes, and Cestodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen J. Jenkins

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes current knowledge of macrophages in helminth infections, with a focus not only on delineating the striking similarities in macrophage phenotype between diverse infections but also on highlighting the differences. Findings from many different labs illustrate that macrophages in helminth infection can act as anti-parasite effectors but can also act as powerful immune suppressors. The specific role for their alternative (Th2-mediated activation in helminth killing or expulsion versus immune regulation remains to be determined. Meanwhile, the rapid growth in knowledge of alternatively activated macrophages will require an even more expansive view of their potential functions to include repair of host tissue and regulation of host metabolism.

  3. Functional modifications of macrophage activity after sublethal irradiation. [Toxoplasma gondii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swartz, R.P.

    1982-01-01

    The modifications of macrophage activity following sublethal irradiation, both in vivo and in vitro, were studied using spreading and C3b-receptor-mediated ingestion assays. Nonelicited peritoneal washout cells were examined for changes in activity and selected population characteristics. The cells from irradiated mice were from a resident peritoneal population and not immigrating cells. The macrophage population showed enhanced activity early with a refractory period (24-48) when the macrophages were unresponsive to stimulation by irradiated lymphocytes. The enhanced activity was inversely dose dependent on macrophage. The lymphocytes showed a regulatory function(s) on the time post irradiation at which they were examined. Early lymphocytes exhibited the ability to enhance the activity of normal macrophages while lymphocytes removed 24 hours post irradiation could suppress the activity of already activated macrophages. The effect(s) of the various lymphocyte populations were reproduced with cell-free supernatants which was indicative of the production of lymphokines. Separation on nylon wool columns indicated that the activity resided primarily in the T-cell population of lymphocytes. In vitro irradiation indicated that stimulation of the lymphocytes is macrophage dependent. Additional work indicated that sublethally irradiated macrophages did not inhibit replication of the coccidian protozoon Toxoplasma gondii although they did show increased phagocytosis. Examination of the serum from whole body irradiated mice showed the presence of a postirradiation substance which enhanced the phagocytosis of normal macrophages. It was not present in the serum of normal mice and was not endotoxin.

  4. Macrophage activation state determines the response to rhinovirus infection in a mouse model of allergic asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Jun Young; Chung, Yutein; Steenrod, Jessica; Chen, Qiang; Lei, Jing; Comstock, Adam T.; Goldsmith, Adam M.; Bentley, J. Kelley; Sajjan, Uma S.; Hershenson, Marc B.

    2014-01-01

    Background The mechanisms by which viruses cause asthma exacerbations are not precisely known. Previously, we showed that, in ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized and -challenged mice with allergic airway inflammation, rhinovirus (RV) infection increases type 2 cytokine production from alternatively-activated (M2) airway macrophages, enhancing eosinophilic inflammation and airways hyperresponsiveness. In this paper, we tested the hypothesis that IL-4 signaling determines the state of macrophage activat...

  5. Myeloid Angiogenic Cells Act as Alternative M2 Macrophages and Modulate Angiogenesis through Interleukin-8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Reinhold J; O’Neill, Christina L; O’Doherty, T Michelle; Knott, Henry; Guduric-Fuchs, Jasenka; Gardiner, Tom A; Stitt, Alan W

    2011-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) promote angiogenesis, and clinical trials have shown such cell therapy to be feasible for treating ischemic disease. However, clinical outcomes have been contradictory owing to the diverse range of EPC types used. We recently characterized two EPC subtypes, and identified outgrowth endothelial cells as the only EPC type with true progenitor and endothelial characteristics. By contrast, myeloid angiogenic cells (MACs) were shown to be monocytic cells without endothelial characteristics despite being widely described as “EPCs.” In the current study we demonstrated that although MACs do not become endothelial cells or directly incorporate into a microvascular network, they can significantly induce endothelial tube formation in vitro and vascular repair in vivo. MAC-derived interleukin-8 (IL-8) was identified as a key paracrine factor, and blockade of IL-8 but not vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) prevented MAC-induced angiogenesis. Extracellular IL-8 transactivates VEGFR2 and induces phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases. Further transcriptomic and immunophenotypic analysis indicates that MACs represent alternative activated M2 macrophages. Our findings demonstrate an unequivocal role for MACs in angiogenesis, which is linked to paracrine release of cytokines such as IL-8. We also show, for the first time, the true identity of these cells as alternative M2 macrophages with proangiogenic, antiinflammatory and pro–tissue-repair properties. PMID:21670847

  6. DMPD: Molecular mechanisms of macrophage activation and deactivation bylipopolysaccharide: roles of the receptor complex. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 14609719 Molecular mechanisms of macrophage activation and deactivation bylipopolysaccharide: role...ivation and deactivation bylipopolysaccharide: roles of the receptor complex. Pub...medID 14609719 Title Molecular mechanisms of macrophage activation and deactivation bylipopolysaccharide: role

  7. The relationship between LDL oxidation and macrophage myeloperoxidase activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武军驻; 刘艳红; 李小明; 陈丽达; 夏腊菊; 洪嘉玲

    2003-01-01

    Objective To explore low density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation by macrophage myeloperoxidase (MPO) at molecular level.Methods Using a mouse macrophage model, we examined the relationship between LDL oxidation and macrophage MPO by measuring macrophage MPO activity, LDL oxidation products, MPO gene expression and cellular orientation of LDL oxidation. Results MPO gene expression increased to its maximum gradually when the concentration of LDL was increased, and then maintained at that level. NaN3 inhibied the elevation of MPO activity and LDL oxidation, which was LDL concentration-dependent. After the composition of macrophage membrane was roughly analyzed, it was determined that the contents of MPO and LDL in 5% sucrose were 7.667 and 21 times higher than those in 10% sucrose, respectively. Conclusion LDL is attached to the "microdomain" of the macrophage membrane in which LDL is oxidized by MPO.

  8. Resident macrophages influence stem cell activity in the mammary gland

    OpenAIRE

    Gyorki, D.E.; Asselin-Labat, M.L.; Rooijen, van, J.; Lindeman, G J; Visvader, J E

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Macrophages in the mammary gland are essential for morphogenesis of the ductal epithelial tree and have been implicated in promoting breast tumor metastasis. Although it is well established that macrophages influence normal mammopoiesis, the mammary cell types that these accessory cells influence have not been determined. Here we have explored a role for macrophages in regulating mammary stem cell (MaSC) activity, by assessing the ability of MaSCs to reconstitute a mammary gland ...

  9. DMPD: Genetic regulation of macrophage priming/activation: the Lsh gene story. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1757110 Genetic regulation of macrophage priming/activation: the Lsh gene story. Bl... (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Genetic regulation of macrophage priming/activation: the Lsh gene story. Pubmed...ID 1757110 Title Genetic regulation of macrophage priming/activation: the Lsh gen

  10. DMPD: Toll receptors, CD14, and macrophage activation and deactivation by LPS. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 12106783 Toll receptors, CD14, and macrophage activation and deactivation by LPS. D...ceptors, CD14, and macrophage activation and deactivation by LPS. PubmedID 12106783 Title Toll receptors, CD14, and macrophage activa...tion and deactivation by LPS. Authors Dobrovolskaia MA,

  11. CCL2 Mediates Neuron-Macrophage Interactions to Drive Proregenerative Macrophage Activation Following Preconditioning Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Min Jung; Shin, Hae Young; Cui, Yuexian; Kim, Hyosil; Thi, Anh Hong Le; Choi, Jun Young; Kim, Eun Young; Hwang, Dong Hoon; Kim, Byung Gon

    2015-12-01

    CNS neurons in adult mammals do not spontaneously regenerate axons after spinal cord injury. Preconditioning peripheral nerve injury allows the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) sensory axons to regenerate beyond the injury site by promoting expression of regeneration-associated genes. We have previously shown that peripheral nerve injury increases the number of macrophages in the DRGs and that the activated macrophages are critical to the enhancement of intrinsic regeneration capacity. The present study identifies a novel chemokine signal mediated by CCL2 that links regenerating neurons with proregenerative macrophage activation. Neutralization of CCL2 abolished the neurite outgrowth activity of conditioned medium obtained from neuron-macrophage cocultures treated with cAMP. The neuron-macrophage interactions that produced outgrowth-promoting conditioned medium required CCL2 in neurons and CCR2/CCR4 in macrophages. The conditioning effects were abolished in CCL2-deficient mice at 3 and 7 d after sciatic nerve injury, but CCL2 was dispensable for the initial growth response and upregulation of GAP-43 at the 1 d time point. Intraganglionic injection of CCL2 mimicked conditioning injury by mobilizing M2-like macrophages. Finally, overexpression of CCL2 in DRGs promoted sensory axon regeneration in a rat spinal cord injury model without harmful side effects. Our data suggest that CCL2-mediated neuron-macrophage interaction plays a critical role for amplification and maintenance of enhanced regenerative capacity by preconditioning peripheral nerve injury. Manipulation of chemokine signaling mediating neuron-macrophage interactions may represent a novel therapeutic approach to promote axon regeneration after CNS injury.

  12. Exopolysaccharide from Trichoderma pseudokoningii induces macrophage activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guodong; Zhu, Lei; Yu, Bo; Chen, Ke; Liu, Bo; Liu, Jun; Qin, Guozheng; Liu, Chunyan; Liu, Huixia; Chen, Kaoshan

    2016-09-20

    In this study, we evaluated the immunomodulatory activity of an exopolysaccharide (EPS) derived from Trichoderma pseudokoningii and investigated the molecular mechanism of EPS-mediated activation of macrophages. Results revealed that EPS could significantly induce the production of nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-1β and enhance phagocytic activity in RAW 264.7 cells. Immunofluorescence staining indicated that EPS promoted the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB p65 subunit. Western blot analysis showed that EPS increased the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) protein, the degradation of IκB-α and the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Furthermore, pretreatment of RAW 264.7 cells with specific inhibitors of NF-κB and MAPKs significantly attenuated EPS-induced TNF-α and IL-1β production. EPS also induced the inhibition of cytokine secretion by special antibodies against Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) and Dectin-1. These data suggest that EPS from Trichoderma pseudokoningii activates RAW 264.7 cells through NF-κB and MAPKs signaling pathways via TLR4 and Dectin-1. PMID:27261736

  13. Model-Based Characterization of Inflammatory Gene Expression Patterns of Activated Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlting, Christian; Thomas, Maria; Zanger, Ulrich M.; Sawodny, Oliver; Häussinger, Dieter; Bode, Johannes G.

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are cells with remarkable plasticity. They integrate signals from their microenvironment leading to context-dependent polarization into classically (M1) or alternatively (M2) activated macrophages, representing two extremes of a broad spectrum of divergent phenotypes. Thereby, macrophages deliver protective and pro-regenerative signals towards injured tissue but, depending on the eliciting damage, may also be responsible for the generation and aggravation of tissue injury. Although incompletely understood, there is emerging evidence that macrophage polarization is critical for these antagonistic roles. To identify activation-specific expression patterns of chemokines and cytokines that may confer these distinct effects a systems biology approach was applied. A comprehensive literature-based Boolean model was developed to describe the M1 (LPS-activated) and M2 (IL-4/13-activated) polarization types. The model was validated using high-throughput transcript expression data from murine bone marrow derived macrophages. By dynamic modeling of gene expression, the chronology of pathway activation and autocrine signaling was estimated. Our results provide a deepened understanding of the physiological balance leading to M1/M2 activation, indicating the relevance of co-regulatory signals at the level of Akt1 or Akt2 that may be important for directing macrophage polarization. PMID:27464342

  14. Effect of lectins on mouse peritoneal macrophage phagocytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, G; Porras, F; Fernández, L; Vázquez, L; Zenteno, E

    1994-11-01

    We studied the in vitro ability of lectin-treated murine peritoneal macrophages to attach and phagocytize particulate antigens. Glucose and mannose specific lectins such as Con-A and lentil lectin, as well as complex lactosamine residues specific lectins, such as Phaseolus vulgaris var. cacahuate and Phaseolus coccineus var. alubia, increased the macrophage phagocytic activity towards heterologous erythrocytes, whereas peanut agglutinin, a galactose-specific lectin, diminished the macrophage phagocytic activity. These results suggest that a galactose-N-acetyl-D galactosamine-containing structure could participate as negative modulator of the phagocytic activity. PMID:7851961

  15. Effects of lipopolysaccharide on the catabolic activity of macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ability of macrophages to degrade and catabolize antigens is of relevance both as a means to process complex antigens prior to presentation to T cells, as well as a way to down regulate immune responses by destroying the antigenicity of polypeptides. With these considerations, the authors have investigated the regulation of macrophage catabolic activity by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Catabolic activity was quantitated by following the distribution and molecular form of 125-I labelled surface components of heat-killed Listeria monocytogenes (HKLM) subsequent to their uptake by macrophages. They have compared the catabolic activity of macrophages from peritoneal exudates of mice injected i.p. with saline or LPS and have found that LPS-elicited macrophages display a greatly enhanced (3 fold) rate of catabolism. This increase in catabolic activity peaks 3 days after LPS injection and steadily declines thereafter, approaching a baseline level after 3 weeks. The enhancement of catabolic activity is under LPS gene control. LPS-elicited macrophages rapidly destroy the antigenicity of bacterial antigens and function poorly as antigen presenting cells in vitro. These results suggest that LPS elicits a macrophage population specialized for antigen degradation functions with negative regulatory effects on the induction of specific immune responses

  16. Antiorthostatic suspension stimulates profiles of macrophage activation in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, E. S.; Bates, R. A.; Koebel, D. A.; Sonnenfeld, G.

    1999-01-01

    The antiorthostatic suspension model simulates certain physiological effects of spaceflight. We have previously reported BDF1 mice suspended by the tail in the antiorthostatic orientation for 4 days express high levels of resistance to virulent Listeria monocytogenesinfection. In the present study, we examined whether the increased resistance to this organism correlates with profiles of macrophage activation, given the role of the macrophage in killing this pathogen in vivo. We infected BDF1 mice with a lethal dose of virulent L. monocytogenes on day 4 of antiorthostatic suspension and 24 h later constructed profiles of macrophage activation. Viable listeria could not be detected in mice suspended in the antiorthostatic orientation 24 h after infection. Flow cytometric analysis revealed the numbers of granulocytes and mononuclear phagocytes in the spleen of infected mice were not significantly altered as a result of antiorthostatic suspension. Splenocytes from antiorthostatically suspended infected mice produced increased titers of IL-1. Serum levels of neopterin, a nucleotide metabolite secreted by activated macrophages, were enhanced in mice infected during antiorthostatic suspension, but not in antiorthostatically suspended naive mice. Splenic macrophages from mice infected on day 4 of suspension produced enhanced levels of lysozyme. In contrast to the results from antiorthostatically suspended infected mice, macrophages from antiorthostatically suspended uninfected mice did not express enhanced bactericidal activities. The collective results indicate that antiorthostatic suspension can stimulate profiles of macrophage activation which correlate with increased resistance to infection by certain classes of pathogenic bacteria.

  17. Toxoplasma gondii Chitinase Induces Macrophage Activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fausto Almeida

    Full Text Available Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite found worldwide that is able to chronically infect almost all vertebrate species, especially birds and mammalians. Chitinases are essential to various biological processes, and some pathogens rely on chitinases for successful parasitization. Here, we purified and characterized a chitinase from T. gondii. The enzyme, provisionally named Tg_chitinase, has a molecular mass of 13.7 kDa and exhibits a Km of 0.34 mM and a Vmax of 2.64. The optimal environmental conditions for enzymatic function were at pH 4.0 and 50 °C. Tg_chitinase was immunolocalized in the cytoplasm of highly virulent T. gondii RH strain tachyzoites, mainly at the apical extremity. Tg_chitinase induced macrophage activation as manifested by the production of high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, a pathogenic hallmark of T. gondii infection. In conclusion, to our knowledge, we describe for the first time a chitinase of T. gondii tachyzoites and provide evidence that this enzyme might influence the pathogenesis of T. gondii infection.

  18. Jacalin-Activated Macrophages Exhibit an Antitumor Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danella Polli, Cláudia; Pereira Ruas, Luciana; Chain Veronez, Luciana; Herrero Geraldino, Thais; Rossetto de Morais, Fabiana; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina; Pereira-da-Silva, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) have an ambiguous and complex role in the carcinogenic process, since these cells can be polarized into different phenotypes (proinflammatory, antitumor cells or anti-inflammatory, protumor cells) by the tumor microenvironment. Given that the interactions between tumor cells and TAMs involve several players, a better understanding of the function and regulation of TAMs is crucial to interfere with their differentiation in attempts to skew TAM polarization into cells with a proinflammatory antitumor phenotype. In this study, we investigated the modulation of macrophage tumoricidal activities by the lectin jacalin. Jacalin bound to macrophage surface and induced the expression and/or release of mainly proinflammatory cytokines via NF-κB signaling, as well as increased iNOS mRNA expression, suggesting that the lectin polarizes macrophages toward the antitumor phenotype. Therefore, tumoricidal activities of jacalin-stimulated macrophages were evaluated. High rates of tumor cell (human colon, HT-29, and breast, MCF-7, cells) apoptosis were observed upon incubation with supernatants from jacalin-stimulated macrophages. Taken together, these results indicate that jacalin, by exerting a proinflammatory activity, can direct macrophages to an antitumor phenotype. Deep knowledge of the regulation of TAM functions is essential for the development of innovative anticancer strategies. PMID:27119077

  19. Macrophage Activation Syndrome-Associated Markers in Severe Dengue

    OpenAIRE

    Ab-Rahman, Hasliana Azrah; Rahim, Hafiz; AbuBakar, Sazaly; Wong, Pooi-Fong

    2016-01-01

    Hemophagocytosis, a phenomenon of which activated macrophages phagocytosed hematopoietic elements was reportedly observed in severe dengue patients. In the present study, we investigated whether markers of macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) can be used as differential diagnostic markers of severe dengue. Two hundred and eight confirmed dengue patients were recruited for the study. Sandwich ELISA was used to determine serum ferritin, soluble CD163 (sCD163), and soluble CD25 (sCD25) levels. T...

  20. Immunomodulatory activity of andrographolide on macrophage activation and specific antibody response

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Wei; Jing WANG; Dong, Sheng-Fu; Liu, Chun-Hong; Italiani, Paola; Sun, Shu-Hui; Xu, Jing; Boraschi, Diana; Ma, Shi-ping; Qu, Di

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the immunomodulatory effects of andrographolide on both innate and adaptive immune responses. Methods: Andrographolide (10 μg/mL in vitro or 1 mg/kg in vivo) was used to modulate LPS-induced classical activated (M1) or IL-4-induced alternative activated (M2) macrophages in vitro and humor immune response to HBsAg in vivo. Cytokine gene expression profile (M1 vs M2) was measured by real-time PCR, IL-12/IL-10 level was detected by ELISA, and surface antigen expression was ev...

  1. Gene expression in IFN-g-activated murine macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira C.A.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are critical for natural immunity and play a central role in specific acquired immunity. The IFN-gamma activation of macrophages derived from A/J or BALB/c mice yielded two different patterns of antiviral state in murine hepatitis virus 3 infection, which were related to a down-regulation of the main virus receptor. Using cDNA hybridization to evaluate mRNA accumulation in the cells, we were able to identify several genes that are differently up- or down-regulated by IFN-gamma in A/J (267 and 266 genes, respectively, up- and down-regulated or BALB/c (297 and 58 genes, respectively, up- and down-regulated mouse macrophages. Macrophages from mice with different genetic backgrounds behave differently at the molecular level and comparison of the patterns of non-activated and IFN-gamma-activated A/J or BALB/c mouse macrophages revealed, for instance, an up-regulation and a down-regulation of genes coding for biological functions such as enzymatic reactions, nucleic acid synthesis and transport, protein synthesis, transport and metabolism, cytoskeleton arrangement and extracellular matrix, phagocytosis, resistance and susceptibility to infection and tumors, inflammation, and cell differentiation or activation. The present data are reported in order to facilitate future correlation of proteomic/transcriptomic findings as well as of results obtained from a classical approach for the understanding of biological phenomena. The possible implication of the role of some of the gene products relevant to macrophage biology can now be further scrutinized. In this respect, a down-regulation of the main murine hepatitis virus 3 receptor gene was detected only in IFN-gamma-activated macrophages of resistant mice.

  2. An alternative strategy to generate coding sequence of macrophage migration inhibitory factor-2 of Wuchereria bancrofti

    OpenAIRE

    Nikhil Chauhan; Hoti, S.L.

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Different developmental stages of Wuchereria bancrofti, the major causal organism of lymphatic filariasis (LF), are difficult to obtain. Beside this limitation, to obtain complete coding sequence (CDS) of a gene one has to isolate mRNA and perform subsequent cDNA synthesis which is laborious and not successful at times. In this study, an alternative strategy employing polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was optimized and validated, to generate CDS of Macrophage migration ...

  3. An inducible transgene reports activation of macrophages in live zebrafish larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Leslie E; Chien, An-Tzu; Astin, Jonathan W; Crosier, Kathryn E; Crosier, Philip S; Hall, Christopher J

    2015-11-01

    Macrophages are the most functionally heterogenous cells of the hematopoietic system. Given many diseases are underpinned by inappropriate macrophage activation, macrophages have emerged as a therapeutic target to treat disease. A thorough understanding of what controls macrophage activation will likely reveal new pathways that can be manipulated for therapeutic benefit. Live imaging fluorescent macrophages within transgenic zebrafish larvae has provided a valuable window to investigate macrophage behavior in vivo. Here we describe the first transgenic zebrafish line that reports macrophage activation, as evidenced by induced expression of an immunoresponsive gene 1(irg1):EGFP transgene. When combined with existing reporter lines that constitutively mark macrophages, we reveal this unique transgenic line can be used to live image macrophage activation in response to the bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide and xenografted human cancer cells. We anticipate the Tg(irg1:EGFP) line will provide a valuable tool to explore macrophage activation and plasticity in the context of different disease models.

  4. DMPD: Macrophage activation through CCR5- and CXCR4-mediated gp120-elicited signalingpathways. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 12960231 Macrophage activation through CCR5- and CXCR4-mediated gp120-elicited sign...82. Epub 2003 Jul 22. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Macrophage activation through CCR5- and CXCR4-media...on through CCR5- and CXCR4-mediated gp120-elicited signalingpathways. Authors Lee C, Liu QH, Tomkowicz B, Yi

  5. Lung collagens perpetuate pulmonary fibrosis via CD204 and M2 macrophage activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjam Stahl

    Full Text Available Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is characterized by abundant collagen production and accumulation of alternatively activated macrophages (M2 in the lower respiratory tract. Mechanisms as to how alveolar macrophages are activated by collagen breakdown products are unknown. Alveolar macrophages were obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage from 30 patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF and 37 healthy donors (HD. Alveolar macrophages were cultured in the presence of collagen type I, III, IV and V monomers w/wo a neutralizing antibody against scavenger receptor I class A (CD204. Culture supernatants were assayed for the M2 markers CCL18, CCL2, and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra by ELISA. Furthermore, expression of phospho-Akt was measured using ELISA and expression of CD204 by RT-PCR and flow cytometry. Stimulation with collagen type I and III monomers significantly up-regulated CCL18, IL-1ra production of alveolar macrophages. Furthermore, expression of CCL2 and CD204 were up-regulated by collagen type I exposure. In addition, collagen type I stimulation increased pospho-Akt expression. Collagen type I effects were abrogated by neutralizing antiCD204 and a non-selective Phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase inhibitor (LY294002. Spontaneous CD204 expression of alveolar macrophages was significantly increased in patients with IPF. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that monomeric collagen type I via CD204 induces phospho-Akt expression shifting alveolar macrophages to the profibrotic M2 type. Innate immune responses induced by collagen monomers might perpetuate pulmonary fibrosis.

  6. Serum markers of macrophage activation in pre-eclampsia: no predictive value of soluble CD163 and neopterin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronborg, Camilla S; Knudsen, Ulla Breth; Moestrup, Søren K;

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Alternatively activated macrophages expressing the CD163 and CD206 surface receptors are the dominant immune-cell type found in the placenta. The placental number and distribution of macrophages is altered in pre-eclampsia, and the generalised inflammatory reaction associated with pre......-eclampsia group (r=0.32, p=0.011). C-reactive protein was higher in pre-eclampsia than in healthy pregnancies by week 38 (159 versus 91 nmol/l, p=0.0189). CONCLUSIONS: The macrophage serum-markers sCD163 and neopterin are not pre-symptomatic nor prognostic markers for pre-eclampsia...

  7. Proteomic Analysis of Macrophages: A Potential Way to Identify Novel Proteins Associated with Activation of Macrophages for Tumor Cell Killing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lingbing Zhang; Haoxuan Zhu; Yanni Lun; Dongmei Yan; Leyang Yu; Bairong Du; Xun Zhu

    2007-01-01

    One major mechanism through which macrophages effectively kill tumor cells requires cell to cell contact,indicating that certain molecules expressed on cell surface of activated macrophages may mediate the tumoricidal capability. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and nitric oxide (NO) are the two classical mediators of tumor cell death.However, evidence of discrepancy is accumulating indicating these known mediators do not appear to account for the broad and potent tumoricidal activity of macrophages. To obtain a full repertoire of tumoricidal activationassociated membrane proteins, we combined one-dimensional SDS-PAGE with capillary liquid chromatographytandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Using this technique, we identified 454 activated macrophage specifically expressed proteins with extremely high confidence, including most known activation markers of macrophages,such as NO synthase (iNOS), Ym1, cyclooxygenase, etc. Membrane bound TNF-α was also identified on activated macrophages. However, it was also detected on thioglycolate elicited macrophages, indicating this molecule may not play a key role in conjugation-dependent tumor cell killing. In contrast, although NO has not been assigned as an effector molecule of conjugation-dependent tumoricidal pathway, iNOS was identified from membrane fraction of activated macrophages, suggesting NO may be involved in conjugation-dependent tumoricidal mechanism,because iNOS association with plasma membrane is ideally suited to deliver NO directly into the contacted tumor cells. This research provides not only new insights into macrophage conjugation-dependent tumoricidal mechanisms, but also a valuable data set of macrophage activation associated membrane proteins, thus providing better understanding of the functional mechanisms of macrophages in anti-tumor and other biological processes.

  8. Dysregulation of Macrophage Activation Profiles by Engineered Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kodali, Vamsi; Littke, Matthew H.; Tilton, Susan C.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Shi, Liang; Frevert, Charles W.; Wang, Wei; Pounds, Joel G.; Thrall, Brian D.

    2013-08-27

    Although the potential human health impacts from exposure to engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) are uncertain, past epidemiological studies have established correlations between exposure to ambient air pollution particulates and the incidence of pneumonia and lung infections. Using amorphous silica and superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) as model high production volume ENPs, we examined how macrophage activation by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or the lung pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae is altered by ENP pretreatment. Neither silica nor SPIO treatment elicited direct cytotoxic or pro-inflammatory effects in bone marrow-derived macrophages. However, pretreatment of macrophages with SPIO caused extensive reprogramming of nearly 500 genes regulated in response to LPS challenge, hallmarked by exaggerated activation of oxidative stress response pathways and suppressed activation of both pro- and anti-inflammatory pathways. Silica pretreatment altered regulation of only 67 genes, but there was strong correlation with gene sets affected by SPIO. Macrophages exposed to SPIO displayed a phenotype suggesting an impaired ability to transition from an M1 to M2-like activation state, characterized by suppressed IL-10 induction, enhanced TNFα production, and diminished phagocytic activity toward S. pneumoniae. Studies in macrophages deficient in scavenger receptor A (SR-A) showed SR-A participates in cell uptake of both the ENPs and S. pneumonia and co-regulates the anti-inflammatory IL-10 pathway. Thus, mechanisms for dysregulation of innate immunity exist by virtue that common receptor recognition pathways are used by some ENPs and pathogenic bacteria, although the extent of transcriptional reprogramming of macrophage function depends on the physicochemical properties of the ENP after internalization. Our results also illustrate that biological effects of ENPs may be indirectly manifested only after challenging normal cell function. Finally, nanotoxicology screening

  9. Activation of murine macrophages and lymphocytes by Ureaplasma diversum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelmonska-Soyta, A; Miller, R B; Ruhnke, L; Rosendal, S

    1994-01-01

    Ureaplasma diversum is a pathogen in the bovine reproductive tract. The objective of the research was to study interactions with macrophages and lymphocytes which might elucidate aspects of pathogenetic mechanisms of this organism. We studied the activation of murine macrophages of C3H/HeN (LPS-responder) and C3H/HeJ (LPS-low-responder) genotype for TNF-alpha, IL-6, IL-1 and nitric oxide production and blastogenic response of C3H/HeJ splenocytes after Ureaplasma diversum stimulation. Live and heat-killed U. diversum induced TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IL-1 in peritoneal macrophage cultures of both C3H/HeN and C3H/HeJ mice in a dose dependent manner. Interferon-gamma modulated the cytokine production, by increasing the production of TNF-alpha, IL-6 and nitric oxide, but IL-1 secretion was only enhanced in C3H/HeJ macrophages stimulated by live ureaplasmas. Supernatant of U. diversum sonicate was mitogenic for murine spleen lymphocytes. The blastogenic response was dose dependent, and stimulation with both U. diversum and Concanavalin A seemed to have an additive effect. These results suggest that U. diversum, similar to other mycoplasmas, activates murine macrophages and lymphoid cells. The studies should be repeated with bovine cells in order to elucidate pathogenetic aspects of inflammation in cattle caused by U. diversum. PMID:7889459

  10. Bifidobacteria DNA Induces Murine Macrophages Activation in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yalin Li; Xun Qu; Hua Yang; Li Kang; Yingping Xu; Bo Bai; Wengang Song

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that oligodeoxynucleotides containing unmethylated CpG motifs were used as adjuvants for immunoregulation and immune response. This study was to explore the activation effects of Bifidobacteria DNA containing unmethylated CpG motifs (CpG DNA) on murine macrophage J774A.1 cells. The genomic DNA of Bifidobacteria was extracted and purified, and the methylation degree of CpG motifs was tested.The phagocytic ability of the macrophages was detected by flow cytometry. The cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12p40 and TNF-α) levels in the culture supernatants of Bifidobacteria DNA treated J774A.1 cells were assayed by ELISA. The content of nitric oxide (NO) was detected by Griess reagent. After treated with Bifidobacteria DNA for 24h,Nile Red stain increased in J774A.1 macrophage, which suggested that the lipid metabolism increased in the macrophages. The phagocytic ability and levels of NO and cytokines of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12p40 and TNF-α were significantly higher than PBS group and CT DNA group. The results indicated that Bifidobacteria DNA could activate murine macrophages J774A.1, which could provide scientific basis for the research and application of microorganism DNA preparation.

  11. Dopamine receptor activation increases HIV entry into primary human macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J Gaskill

    Full Text Available Macrophages are the primary cell type infected with HIV in the central nervous system, and infection of these cells is a major component in the development of neuropathogenesis and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Within the brains of drug abusers, macrophages are exposed to increased levels of dopamine, a neurotransmitter that mediates the addictive and reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse such as cocaine and methamphetamine. In this study we examined the effects of dopamine on HIV entry into primary human macrophages. Exposure to dopamine during infection increased the entry of R5 tropic HIV into macrophages, irrespective of the concentration of the viral inoculum. The entry pathway affected was CCR5 dependent, as antagonizing CCR5 with the small molecule inhibitor TAK779 completely blocked entry. The effect was dose-dependent and had a steep threshold, only occurring above 108 M dopamine. The dopamine-mediated increase in entry required dopamine receptor activation, as it was abrogated by the pan-dopamine receptor antagonist flupenthixol, and could be mediated through both subtypes of dopamine receptors. These findings indicate that the effects of dopamine on macrophages may have a significant impact on HIV pathogenesis. They also suggest that drug-induced increases in CNS dopamine may be a common mechanism by which drugs of abuse with distinct modes of action exacerbate neuroinflammation and contribute to HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders in infected drug abusers.

  12. Carbon nanohorns allow acceleration of osteoblast differentiation via macrophage activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Eri; Miyako, Eijiro; Hanagata, Nobutaka; Ushijima, Natsumi; Sakaguchi, Norihito; Russier, Julie; Yudasaka, Masako; Iijima, Sumio; Bianco, Alberto; Yokoyama, Atsuro

    2016-07-01

    Carbon nanohorns (CNHs), formed by a rolled graphene structure and terminating in a cone, are promising nanomaterials for the development of a variety of biological applications. Here we demonstrate that alkaline phosphatase activity is dramatically increased by coculture of human monocyte derived macrophages (hMDMs) and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) in the presence of CNHs. CNHs were mainly localized in the lysosome of macrophages more than in hMSCs during coculturing. At the same time, the amount of Oncostatin M (OSM) in the supernatant was also increased during incubation with CNHs. Oncostatin M (OSM) from activated macrophage has been reported to induce osteoblast differentiation and matrix mineralization through STAT3. These results suggest that the macrophages engulfed CNHs and accelerated the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into the osteoblast via OSM release. We expect that the proof-of-concept on the osteoblast differentiation capacity by CNHs will allow future studies focused on CNHs as ideal therapeutic materials for bone regeneration.Carbon nanohorns (CNHs), formed by a rolled graphene structure and terminating in a cone, are promising nanomaterials for the development of a variety of biological applications. Here we demonstrate that alkaline phosphatase activity is dramatically increased by coculture of human monocyte derived macrophages (hMDMs) and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) in the presence of CNHs. CNHs were mainly localized in the lysosome of macrophages more than in hMSCs during coculturing. At the same time, the amount of Oncostatin M (OSM) in the supernatant was also increased during incubation with CNHs. Oncostatin M (OSM) from activated macrophage has been reported to induce osteoblast differentiation and matrix mineralization through STAT3. These results suggest that the macrophages engulfed CNHs and accelerated the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into the osteoblast via OSM release. We expect that the

  13. Diet Modifies the Neuroimmune System by Influencing Macrophage Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherry, Christina Lynn

    2009-01-01

    It has long been appreciated that adequate nutrition is required for proper immune function and it is now recognized that dietary components contribute to modulation of immune cells, subsequently impacting the whole body's response during an immune challenge. Macrophage activation plays a critical role in the immune system and directs the…

  14. The phosphoproteome of toll-like receptor-activated macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weintz, Gabriele; Olsen, Jesper Velgaard; Frühauf, Katja;

    2010-01-01

    of primary macrophages using stable isotope labelling with amino acids in cell culture, phosphopeptide enrichment and high-resolution mass spectrometry. In parallel, nascent RNA was profiled to link transcription factor (TF) phosphorylation to TLR4-induced transcriptional activation. We reproducibly...

  15. Proteomic analysis of macrophage activated with salmonella lipopolysaccharide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macrophages play pivotal role in immunity. They are activated by many pathogen derived molecules such as lipopolysaccharides (LPS) which trigger the production of various proteins and peptides that drive and resolve inflammation. There are numerous studies on the effect of LPS at the genome level bu...

  16. Interplay Between Amphioxus Complement with Sea Bass Macrophages: Opsonic Activity of Amphioxus Humoral Fluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Junli; LIU Min; ZHANG Shicui

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have shown the existence of a complement system in the amphioxus Branchiostoma japonicum.However,whether it has an opsonic activity similar to that of vertebrates remains unknown.We demonstrated that the humoral fluid (HF)of amphioxus promoted the phagocytosis of yeast cells with sea bass (Lateolabraxjaponicus) macrophages,whereas the C3-depleted and heated HF significantly lost the phagocytosis-promoting capacity.In addition,the precipitation of factor B (Bf) led to a marked loss of opsonic activity.Moreover,C3 fragments in the HF were found to bind to yeast cell surfaces.The results indicate that the amphioxus complement system is an important element involved in the opsonic activity,which promotes the sea bass macrophage phagocytosis by tagging yeast cells with C3 fragments via the activation of alternative complement pathway.

  17.  The biological activity of macrophages in health and disease

    OpenAIRE

    Katarzyna Nazimek; Krzysztof Bryniarski

    2012-01-01

     Macrophages are involved in immune response as phagocytes, antigen presenting cells and as effector cells of delayed-type hypersensitivity. Moreover, the activity of macrophages is associated with modulation of many biological processes during the whole life and depends on the actual macrophage phenotype induced under the influence of various microenvironmental stimuli.In pregnancy, placental macrophages induce the development of maternal tolerance to fetal antigens, while fetal macrophages ...

  18. Paclitaxel-induced activation of murine peritoneal macrophage in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Zhongxiang; Wang Fufeng; Qiao Yuhuan

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the effects of paclitaxel on macrophage activation. Methods:Mouse macrophages were isolated by peritoneal lavage and cultured in RPMI 1640 medium according to the following groups: paclitaxel (5μmol/L) group, IFN-γ (5U/L) group, paclitaxel (5μmol/L) and IFN-γ (5U/L) combination group, and control group(without paclitaxel and IFNγ) .24 hours later, supematants were collected for nitric oxide(NO) assessment using the Griess reagent, and ttanor necrosis factor-α(TNF-α) assessment using the enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity(ADCC) of the macrophages was assessed using the method of hemoglobin-enzyme release assay (Hb-ERA). Results: Paclitaxel induced the production of higher levels of NO(8.86 ± 1.16μmol/L) and TNF-α(120.2 ± 10.2pg/ml) ,and enhanced the ADCC of macrophages[ (20.61 + 1.13)% ]. The differences were significant compared with the control group[no NO and TNF-α detected,ADCC (15.37 + 1.93)% ](P < 0.01). Paclitaxel and IFN-γ in combination induced the production of higher levels of NO(22.85 ± 0.91μmol/L) and TNF-α(358.6 ± 27 .5pg/ml), and enhanced the ADCC of macrophages[ (42.49 + 3.09) % ]. The differences were significant compared with paclitaxel or IFN-γ[NO 8.09 ± 1.13μmol/L, TNF-α1 24.8 + 9.6pg/ml, ADCC(23.32 ± 2.63) % ] alone (P<0.01). Conclusion: These findings indicate that paclitaxel can promote NO and TNF-α production,enhance ADCC of macrophages, and induce macrophage activation. The active effects are more significant with paclitaxel and IFN-γcombination.

  19. Quercetin-3-O-glucuronide induces ABCA1 expression by LXRα activation in murine macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •The major circulating quercetin metabolite (Q3GA) activated LXRα. •Q3GA induced ABCA1 via LXRα activation in macrophages. •Nelumbo nucifera leaf extracts contained quercetin glycosides. •N. nucifera leaf extract feeding elevated HDLC in mice. -- Abstract: Reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) removes excess cholesterol from macrophages to prevent atherosclerosis. ATP-binding cassette, subfamily A, member 1 (ABCA1) is a crucial cholesterol transporter involved in RCT to produce high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDLC), and is transcriptionally regulated by liver X receptor alpha (LXRα), a nuclear receptor. Quercetin is a widely distributed flavonoid in edible plants which prevented atherosclerosis in an animal model. We found that quercetin-3-O-glucuronide (Q3GA), a major quercetin metabolite after absorption from the digestive tract, enhanced ABCA1 expression, in vitro, via LXRα in macrophages. In addition, leaf extracts of a traditional Asian edible plant, Nelumbo nucifera (NNE), which contained abundant amounts of quercetin glycosides, significantly elevated plasma HDLC in mice. We are the first to present experimental evidence that Q3GA induced ABCA1 in macrophages, and to provide an alternative explanation to previous studies on arteriosclerosis prevention by quercetin

  20. Quercetin-3-O-glucuronide induces ABCA1 expression by LXRα activation in murine macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohara, Kazuaki, E-mail: Kazuaki_Ohara@kirin.co.jp [Research Laboratories for Health Science and Food Technologies, Kirin Company Limited, 1-13-5 Fukuura, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama 236-0004 (Japan); Wakabayashi, Hideyuki [Laboratory for New Product Development, Kirin Beverage Company Limited, 1-17-1 Namamugi, Tsurumi-ku, Yokohama 230-8628 (Japan); Taniguchi, Yoshimasa [Research Laboratories for Health Science and Food Technologies, Kirin Company Limited, 1-13-5 Fukuura, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama 236-0004 (Japan); Shindo, Kazutoshi [Department of Food and Nutrition, Japan Women’s University, 2-8-1 Mejirodai, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 112-8681 (Japan); Yajima, Hiroaki [Research Laboratories for Health Science and Food Technologies, Kirin Company Limited, 1-13-5 Fukuura, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama 236-0004 (Japan); Yoshida, Aruto [Central Laboratories for Key Technologies, Kirin Company Limited, 1-13-5 Fukuura, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama 236-0004 (Japan)

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •The major circulating quercetin metabolite (Q3GA) activated LXRα. •Q3GA induced ABCA1 via LXRα activation in macrophages. •Nelumbo nucifera leaf extracts contained quercetin glycosides. •N. nucifera leaf extract feeding elevated HDLC in mice. -- Abstract: Reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) removes excess cholesterol from macrophages to prevent atherosclerosis. ATP-binding cassette, subfamily A, member 1 (ABCA1) is a crucial cholesterol transporter involved in RCT to produce high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDLC), and is transcriptionally regulated by liver X receptor alpha (LXRα), a nuclear receptor. Quercetin is a widely distributed flavonoid in edible plants which prevented atherosclerosis in an animal model. We found that quercetin-3-O-glucuronide (Q3GA), a major quercetin metabolite after absorption from the digestive tract, enhanced ABCA1 expression, in vitro, via LXRα in macrophages. In addition, leaf extracts of a traditional Asian edible plant, Nelumbo nucifera (NNE), which contained abundant amounts of quercetin glycosides, significantly elevated plasma HDLC in mice. We are the first to present experimental evidence that Q3GA induced ABCA1 in macrophages, and to provide an alternative explanation to previous studies on arteriosclerosis prevention by quercetin.

  1. Stimulation of lymphocyte anti-melanoma activity by co-cultured macrophages activated by complex homeopathic medication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melanoma is the most aggressive form of skin cancer, and the most rapidly expanding cancer in terms of worldwide incidence. Chemotherapeutic approaches to treat melanoma have been uniformly disappointing. A Brazilian complex homeopathic medication (CHM), used as an immune modulator, has been recommended for patients with depressed immune systems. Previous studies in mice have demonstrated that the CHM activates macrophages, induces an increase in the number of leukocytes and improves the murine response against Sarcoma-180. Here we studied the interaction of mouse lymph node lymphocytes, co-cultured in vitro with macrophages in the presence or absence of the CHM, with B16F10 melanoma cells. Lymphocytes co-cultured with macrophages in the presence of the CHM had greater anti-melanoma activity, reducing melanoma cell density and increasing the number of lysed tumor cells. There was also a higher proportion of activated (CD25+) lymphocytes with increased viability. Overall, lymphocytes activated by treatment destroyed growing cancer cells more effectively than control lymphocytes. Co-culture of macrophages with lymphocytes in the presence of the CHM enhanced the anti-cancer performance of lymphocytes against a very aggressive lineage of melanoma cells. These results suggest that non-toxic therapies using CHMs are a promising alternative approach to the treatment of melanomas. In addition, they are attractive combination-therapy candidates, which may enhance the efficacy of conventional medicines by improving the immune response against tumor cells

  2. Dectin-1 Activation by a Natural Product β-Glucan Converts Immunosuppressive Macrophages into an M1-like Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Min; Luo, Fengling; Ding, Chuanlin; Albeituni, Sabrin; Hu, Xiaoling; Ma, Yunfeng; Cai, Yihua; McNally, Lacey; Sanders, Mary Ann; Jain, Dharamvir; Kloecker, Goetz; Bousamra, Michael; Zhang, Huang-ge; Higashi, Richard M; Lane, Andrew N; Fan, Teresa W-M; Yan, Jun

    2015-11-15

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) with an alternatively activated phenotype have been linked to tumor-elicited inflammation, immunosuppression, and resistance to chemotherapies in cancer, thus representing an attractive target for an effective cancer immunotherapy. In this study, we demonstrate that particulate yeast-derived β-glucan, a natural polysaccharide compound, converts polarized alternatively activated macrophages or immunosuppressive TAM into a classically activated phenotype with potent immunostimulating activity. This process is associated with macrophage metabolic reprograming with enhanced glycolysis, Krebs cycle, and glutamine utilization. In addition, particulate β-glucan converts immunosuppressive TAM via the C-type lectin receptor dectin-1-induced spleen tyrosine kinase-Card9-Erk pathway. Further in vivo studies show that oral particulate β-glucan treatment significantly delays tumor growth, which is associated with in vivo TAM phenotype conversion and enhanced effector T cell activation. Mice injected with particulate β-glucan-treated TAM mixed with tumor cells have significantly reduced tumor burden with less blood vascular vessels compared with those with TAM plus tumor cell injection. In addition, macrophage depletion significantly reduced the therapeutic efficacy of particulate β-glucan in tumor-bearing mice. These findings have established a new paradigm for macrophage polarization and immunosuppressive TAM conversion and shed light on the action mode of β-glucan treatment in cancer. PMID:26453753

  3. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Suppress Inflammatory Activation of Rheumatoid Arthritis Patient Synovial Macrophages and Tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Grabiec; S. Krausz; W. de Jager; T. Burakowski; D. de Groot; M.E. Sanders; B.J. Prakken; W. Maslinski; E. Eldering; P.P. Tak; K.A. Reedquist

    2010-01-01

    Macrophages contribute significantly to the pathology of many chronic inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), asthma, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Macrophage activation and survival are tightly regulated by reversible acetylation and deacetylation of histones, trans

  4. Phagocytosis stimulates alternative glycosylation of macrosialin (mouse CD68), a macrophage-specific endosomal protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, R P; Gordon, S

    1999-03-15

    Macrosialin (mouse CD68), a macrophage-specific member of the lysosomal-associated membrane protein family, displays N-linked glycosylation and a heavily sialylated, mucin-like domain. We show that phagocytosis of zymosan by inflammatory peritoneal macrophages potently alters glycan processing of macrosialin in vitro. The phagocytic glycoform is not induced by other forms of endocytosis and depends on particle internalization. Zymosan uptake does not influence macrosialin protein synthesis, but increases the specific incorporation of D-[2-3H]mannose, D-[6-3H]galactose, N-acetyl-D-[1-3H]glucosamine and L-[5,6-3H]fucose by 2-15-fold. The phagocytic glycoform displays increased binding of agglutinins from peanut, Amaranthus caudatus and Galanthus nivalis, whereas binding of the sialic-acid-specific Maakia amurensis agglutinin is slightly reduced. Digestion by N-Glycanase abolishes the incorporation of [3H]mannose label and Galanthus nivalis agglutinin binding activity, but preserves the incorporation of galactose and N-acetylglucosamine and specific lectin binding. We also show that phagocytosis increases the complexity and length of O-linked chains. The data presented highlight the importance of differential glycosylation in the biology of macrosialin, phagosomes and macrophages in general.

  5. A Systematic Approach to Identify Markers of Distinctly Activated Human Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayan eSudan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Polarization has been a useful concept for describing activated macrophage phenotypes and gene expression profiles. However, macrophage activation status within tumors and other settings are often inferred based on only a few markers. Complicating matters for relevance to human biology, many of the best studied macrophage activation markers have been best characterized in mice and sometimes are not similarly regulated in human macrophages. To identify novel markers of activated human macrophages, gene expression profiles for human macrophages of a single donor subjected to 33 distinct activating conditions were obtained and a set of putative activation markers were subsequently evaluated in macrophages from multiple donors using integrated fluidic circuit (IFC-based RT-PCR. Using unsupervised hierarchical clustering of the microarray screen, highly-altered transcripts (>4-fold change in expression sorted the macrophage transcription profiles into two major and 13 minor clusters. Among the 1874 highly-altered transcripts, over 100 were uniquely altered in one major or two related minor clusters. IFC PCR-derived data confirmed the microarray results and to show the kinetics of expression of potential macrophage activation markers. Transcripts encoding chemokines, cytokines, and cell surface were prominent in our analyses. The activation markers identified by this study could be used to better characterize tumor-associated macrophages from biopsies as well as other macrophage populations collected from human clinical samples.

  6. DMPD: The role of macrophages in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal activation inresponse to endotoxin (LPS). [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1315450 The role of macrophages in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal activation in...png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show The role of macrophages in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal activation in...response to endotoxin (LPS). PubmedID 1315450 Title The role of macrophages in th

  7. Anti-inflammatory activity of lupine (Lupinus angustifolius L.) protein hydrolysates in THP-1-derived macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Millán-Linares, María del Carmen; Bermúdez, Beatriz; Yust, María del Mar; Millán, Francisco; Pedroche, Justo

    2014-01-01

    The effect of two different lupine protein hydrolysates (LPHs) on in vitro macrophage activation in a THP-1-derived macrophage model was investigated. THP-1-derived macrophages were exposed to RPMI medium containing two LPHs obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis using two different proteases: Izyme AL and Alcalase 2.4 L. Cytokine's expression was measured by quantitative PCR. THP-1-derived macrophages exhibited attenuated expression of proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor (TNF), IL-6, ...

  8. Characterization of the Placental Macrophage Secretome: Implications for Antiviral Activity

    OpenAIRE

    García, K.; García, V.; Laspiur, J.Pérez; F. Duan; Meléndez, L.M.

    2008-01-01

    It is well documented that placental macrophages show lower levels of HIV-1 infection than monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM). We used proteomic methods to test the hypothesis that placental macrophages secrete different proteins as compared to MDM that may contribute to decreased HIV-1 replication. Placental macrophages and MDM were cultured for 12 days and supernatant was collected. To characterize supernatants, the protein profiles of placental macrophages and MDM were compared using the p...

  9. Lectin coated MgO nanoparticle: its toxicity, antileishmanial activity, and macrophage activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jebali, Ali; Hekmatimoghaddam, Seyedhossein; Kazemi, Bahram; Allaveisie, Azra; Masoudi, Alireza; Daliri, Karim; Sedighi, Najme; Ranjbari, Javad

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate toxicity of uncoated magnesium oxide nanoparticles (MgO NPs), MgO NPs coated with Peanut agglutinin (PNA) lectin, and PNA alone on the promastigotes of Leishmania major (L. major) and macrophages of BALB/c mice. On the other hand, antileishmanial property of uncoated MgO NPs, lectin coated MgO NPs, and PNA lectin alone was evaluated, and also macrophage activation was investigated after treatment with these materials by measurement of nitrite, H2O2, and some interleukins. This study showed that PNA lectin and lectin coated MgO NPs had approximately no toxicity on L. major and macrophages, but some toxic effects were observed for uncoated MgO NPs, especially at concentration of 500 µg/mL. Interestingly, lectin coated MgO NPs had the highest antileishmanial activity and macrophage activation, compared with uncoated MgO NPs and PNA lectin.

  10. Effects of Activin A on the Activities of the Mouse Peritoneal Macrophages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XuejunZhang; YangLi; GuixiangTai; GuiyueXu; PengyuZhang; YuYang; FengxueLao; ZhonghuiLiu

    2005-01-01

    Activin A is a kind of pre-inflammatory factor that belongs to the transforming growth factor-β(TGF-β) superfamily. To investigate the effect and mechanism of activin A on the activities of mouse macrophages, the secretion of NO in the supernatant of cultured mouse peritoneal macrophages was examined by NO assay kit, and the expression of iNOS, ActRIIA and ARIP2 mRNA in mouse peritoneal macrophages was analyzed by RT-PCR. The results showed that activin A stimulated the secretion of NO and the expression of iNOS mRNA in non-activated mouse macrophages in a time- and dose-dependent manner. In contrast, activin A in the same concentration inhibited the secretion of NO in LPS-activated mouse macrophages in a dose-dependent manner. ActRIIA was highly expressed on macrophages, and activin A upregulated the ActRIIA mRNA expression in macrophages. Anti-ActRIIA antibody can block the secretion of NO from the macrophages stimulated by activin A. Furthermore, RT-PCR analysis revealed that activin A enhanced the ARIP2 mRNA expression in macrophages. These results indicated that Activin A may be a weak activator compared with LPS to mouse macrophages, and activin A may modulate the secretion of NO through ActRIIA-ARIP2 signal pathway in mouse macrophages. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2005;2(1):63-67.

  11. Effects of Activin A on the Activities of the Mouse Peritoneal Macrophages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuejun Zhang; Yang Li; Guixiang Tai; Guiyue Xu; Pengyu Zhang; Yu Yang; Fengxue Lao; Zhonghui Liu

    2005-01-01

    Activin A is a kind of pre-inflammatory factor that belongs to the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily. To investigate the effect and mechanism of activin A on the activities of mouse macrophages, the secretion of NO in the supernatant of cultured mouse peritoneal macrophages was examined by NO assay kit, and the expression of iNOS, ActRIIA and ARIP2 mRNA in mouse peritoneal macrophages was analyzed by RT-PCR.The results showed that activin A stimulated the secretion of NO and the expression of iNOS mRNA in non-activated mouse macrophages in a time- and dose-dependent manner. In contrast, activin A in the same concentration inhibited the secretion of NO in LPS-activated mouse macrophages in a dose-dependent manner.ActRIIA was highly expressed on macrophages, and activin A upregulated the ActRIIA mRNA expression in macrophages. Anti-ActRIIA antibody can block the secretion of NO from the macrophages stimulated by activin A.Furthermore, RT-PCR analysis revealed that activin A enhanced the ARIP2 mRNA expression in macrophages.These results indicated that Activin A may be a weak activator compared with LPS to mouse macrophages, and activin A may modulate the secretion of NO through ActRIIA-ARIP2 signal pathway in mouse macrophages.

  12.  The biological activity of macrophages in health and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Nazimek

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available  Macrophages are involved in immune response as phagocytes, antigen presenting cells and as effector cells of delayed-type hypersensitivity. Moreover, the activity of macrophages is associated with modulation of many biological processes during the whole life and depends on the actual macrophage phenotype induced under the influence of various microenvironmental stimuli.In pregnancy, placental macrophages induce the development of maternal tolerance to fetal antigens, while fetal macrophages are responsible for proper formation of tissues and organs.Residual macrophages play a very important role in tissue homeostasis, apoptotic cell clearance to prevent autoimmunization and first defense in infections. The inflammatory response of macrophages may be modulated by pathogens. Their suppressive activity is observed in immunologically privileged organs such as testes.In pathologies, macrophages are responsible for tissue damage in a case of nonspecific activation followed by overproduction of proinflammatory factors. Suppression of a specific immune response against tumors is mainly the effect of tumor associated macrophage (TAM action. On the other hand, presentation of allergens or self-antigens by macrophages and their nonspecific activation by necrotic adipocytes leads to the induction of a chronic inflammatory response and impairment of immunity. Therefore, modulation of macrophage functions may be the key for improvement of therapy of cancer and allergic, autoimmune, metabolic, cardiovascular and Alzheimer’s diseases.

  13. Successful therapy of macrophage activation syndrome with dexamethasone palmitate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagishi, Yasuo; Shimizu, Masaki; Kasai, Kazuko; Miyoshi, Mari; Yachie, Akihiro

    2016-07-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is a severe and potential life-threatening complication of childhood systemic inflammatory disorders. Corticosteroids are commonly used as the first-line therapy for MAS. We report four patients with MAS who were successfully treated with dexamethasone palmitate (DexP), a liposome-incorporated dexamethasone, much more efficient than free corticosteroids. DexP effectively inhibited inflammation in MAS patients in whom the response to pulse methylprednisolone was not sufficient to manage their diseases. DexP was also effective as the first-line therapy for MAS. Based on these findings, DexP is an effective therapy in treating MAS patients. PMID:24754272

  14. Effect of low-level laser therapy on the modulation of the mitochondrial activity of macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadhia H. C. Souza

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Macrophages play a major role among the inflammatory cells that invade muscle tissue following an injury. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT has long been used in clinical practice to accelerate the muscle repair process. However, little is known regarding its effect on macrophages. OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the effect of LLLT on the mitochondrial activity (MA of macrophages. METHOD: J774 macrophages were treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS and interferon - gamma (IFN-γ (activation for 24 h to simulate an inflammatory process, then irradiated with LLLT using two sets of parameters (780 nm; 70 mW; 3 J/cm2 and 660 nm; 15 mW; 7.5 J/cm2. Non-activated/non-irradiated cells composed the control group. MA was evaluated by the cell mitochondrial activity (MTT assay (after 1, 3 and 5 days in three independent experiments. The data were analyzed statistically. RESULTS: After 1 day of culture, activated and 780 nm irradiated macrophages showed lower MA than activated macrophages, but activated and 660 nm irradiated macrophages showed MA similar to activated cells. After 3 days, activated and irradiated (660 nm and 780 nm macrophages showed greater MA than activated macrophages, and after 5 days, the activated and irradiated (660 nm and 780 nm macrophages showed similar MA to the activated macrophages. CONCLUSIONS: These results show that 660 nm and 780 nm LLLT can modulate the cellular activation status of macrophages in inflammation, highlighting the importance of this resource and of the correct determination of its parameters in the repair process of skeletal muscle.

  15. Effect of low-level laser therapy on the modulation of the mitochondrial activity of macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Nadhia H. C.; Ferrari, Raquel A. M.; Silva, Daniela F. T.; Nunes, Fabio D.; Bussadori, Sandra K.; Fernandes, Kristianne P. S.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Macrophages play a major role among the inflammatory cells that invade muscle tissue following an injury. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has long been used in clinical practice to accelerate the muscle repair process. However, little is known regarding its effect on macrophages. OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the effect of LLLT on the mitochondrial activity (MA) of macrophages. METHOD: J774 macrophages were treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon - gamma (IFN-γ) (activation) for 24 h to simulate an inflammatory process, then irradiated with LLLT using two sets of parameters (780 nm; 70 mW; 3 J/cm2 and 660 nm; 15 mW; 7.5 J/cm2). Non-activated/non-irradiated cells composed the control group. MA was evaluated by the cell mitochondrial activity (MTT) assay (after 1, 3 and 5 days) in three independent experiments. The data were analyzed statistically. RESULTS: After 1 day of culture, activated and 780 nm irradiated macrophages showed lower MA than activated macrophages, but activated and 660 nm irradiated macrophages showed MA similar to activated cells. After 3 days, activated and irradiated (660 nm and 780 nm) macrophages showed greater MA than activated macrophages, and after 5 days, the activated and irradiated (660 nm and 780 nm) macrophages showed similar MA to the activated macrophages. CONCLUSIONS: These results show that 660 nm and 780 nm LLLT can modulate the cellular activation status of macrophages in inflammation, highlighting the importance of this resource and of the correct determination of its parameters in the repair process of skeletal muscle. PMID:25076002

  16. Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I Induces Arginase Activity in Leishmania amazonensis Amastigote-Infected Macrophages through a Cytokine-Independent Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celia Maria Vieira Vendrame

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania (Leishmania amazonensis exhibits peculiarities in its interactions with hosts. Because amastigotes are the primary form associated with the progression of infection, we studied the effect of insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I on interactions between L. (L. amazonensis amastigotes and macrophages. Upon stimulation of infected macrophages with IGF-I, we observed decreased nitric oxide production but increased arginase expression and activity, which lead to increased parasitism. However, stimulation of amastigote-infected macrophages with IGF-I did not result in altered cytokine levels compared to unstimulated controls. Because IGF-I is present in tissue fluids and also within macrophages, we examined the possible effect of this factor on phosphatidylserine (PS exposure on amastigotes, seen previously in tissue-derived amastigotes leading to increased parasitism. Stimulation with IGF-I induced PS exposure on amastigotes but not on promastigotes. Using a PS-liposome instead of amastigotes, we observed that the PS-liposome but not the control phosphatidylcholine-liposome led to increased arginase activity in macrophages, and this process was not blocked by anti-TGF-β antibodies. Our results suggest that in L. (L. amazonensis amastigote-infected macrophages, IGF-I induces arginase activity directly in amastigotes and in macrophages through the induction of PS exposure on amastigotes in the latter, which could lead to the alternative activation of macrophages through cytokine-independent mechanisms.

  17. LPS-inducible factor(s) from activated macrophages mediates cytolysis of Naegleria fowleri amoebae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cleary, S.F.; Marciano-Cabral, F.

    1986-03-01

    Soluble cytolytic factors of macrophage origin have previously been described with respect to their tumoricidal activity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanism and possible factor(s) responsible for cytolysis of the amoeba Naegleria fowleri by activated peritoneal macrophages from B6C3F1 mice. Macrophages or conditioned medium (CM) from macrophage cultures were incubated with /sup 3/H-Uridine labeled amoebae. Percent specific release of label served as an index of cytolysis. Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) and Corynebacterium parvum macrophages demonstrated significant cytolysis of amoebae at 24 h with an effector to target ratio of 10:1. Treatment of macrophages with inhibitors of RNA or protein synthesis blocked amoebicidal activity. Interposition of a 1 ..mu..m pore membrane between macrophages and amoebae inhibited killing. Inhibition in the presence of the membrane was overcome by stimulating the macrophages with LPS. CM from SPS-stimulated, but not unstimulated, cultures of activated macrophages was cytotoxic for amoebae. The activity was heat sensitive and was recovered from ammonium sulfate precipitation of the CM. Results indicate that amoebicidal activity is mediated by a protein(s) of macrophage origin induced by target cell contact or stimulation with LPS.

  18. Genome-wide analysis of antiviral signature genes in porcine macrophages at different activation statuses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongming Sang

    Full Text Available Macrophages (MФs can be polarized to various activation statuses, including classical (M1, alternative (M2, and antiviral states. To study the antiviral activation status of porcine MФs during porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV infection, we used RNA Sequencing (RNA-Seq for transcriptomic analysis of differentially expressed genes (DEGs. Sequencing assessment and quality evaluation showed that our RNA-Seq data met the criteria for genome-wide transcriptomic analysis. Comparisons of any two activation statuses revealed more than 20,000 DEGs that were normalized to filter out 153-5,303 significant DEGs [false discovery rate (FDR ≤0.001, fold change ≥2] in each comparison. The highest 5,303 significant DEGs were found between lipopolysaccharide- (LPS and interferon (IFNγ-stimulated M1 cells, whereas only 153 significant DEGs were detected between interleukin (IL-10-polarized M2 cells and control mock-activated cells. To identify signature genes for antiviral regulation pertaining to each activation status, we identified a set of DEGs that showed significant up-regulation in only one activation state. In addition, pathway analyses defined the top 20-50 significantly regulated pathways at each activation status, and we further analyzed DEGs pertinent to pathways mediated by AMP kinase (AMPK and epigenetic mechanisms. For the first time in porcine macrophages, our transcriptomic analyses not only compared family-wide differential expression of most known immune genes at different activation statuses, but also revealed transcription evidence of multiple gene families. These findings show that using RNA-Seq transcriptomic analyses in virus-infected and status-synchronized macrophages effectively profiled signature genes and gene response pathways for antiviral regulation, which may provide a framework for optimizing antiviral immunity and immune homeostasis.

  19. cAMP Modulates Macrophage Development by Suppressing M-CSF-Induced MAPKs Activation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning Zhu; Jian Cui; Chunxia Qiao; Yan Li; Yuanfang Ma; Jiyan Zhang; Beifen Shen

    2008-01-01

    M-CSF is a key cytokine in macrophage development by inducing MAPKs activation, and cAMP can inhibit MAPKs activation induced by inflammatory stimuli. To explore the effects of cAMP on M-CSF-induced MAPKs activation and on macrophage development, the model of bone marrow-derived murine macrophages (BMMs) was used. The effects of cAMP on M-CSF-induced MAPKs activation were analyzed by Western blotting assay, and the effects of cAMP on CD14 and F4/80 expression during macrophage development were examined by FACS analysis.Macrophage morphology showed the successful establishment of the model of macrophage development. Western blotting assay revealed that M-CSF activated ERK, JNK and p38 in both mature and immature macrophages, and cAMP inhibited M-CSF-induced ERK, JNK and p38 activation in a time-dependent manner. FACS analysis revealed that macrophage development was impaired with cAMP pretreatment. In conclusion, cAMP modulates macrophage development by suppressing M-CSF-induced MAPKs activation.

  20. Activation of macrophages by lymphokines: enhancement of phagosome-lysosome fusion and killing of Coccidioides immitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Beaman, L; Benjamini, E; Pappagianis, D

    1983-01-01

    Previously, it was shown that arthroconidia of Coccidioides immitis appear to inhibit phagosome-lysosome fusion and survive within normal mouse peritoneal macrophages. However, when these macrophages are exposed to antigen-stimulated T lymphocytes from immune mice, activation occurs, leading to enhanced phagosome-lysosome fusion and killing of C. immitis. Results indicate that the activation of macrophages can be effected after incubation with soluble lymphocyte product(s) (lymphokines). The ...

  1. Tumoricidal activation of murine resident peritoneal macrophages on pancreatic carcinoma by interleukin-2 and monoclonal antibodies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi Kui Chen; Shi Zhen Yuan; Zhi Yong Zeng; Zhi Qing Huang

    2000-01-01

    @@INTRODUCTION Macrophages play an important role in tumor lysis and growth inhibition. They can be activated to a tumoricidal state by a variety of agents such as IFNr, TNFa or IL2. The killing machanisms of activated macrophages have been extensively investigated[1,2]. Recently, it has been proved that antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) is one of the potent arms to lyse tumor cells resistant to cytotoxic macrophages,and that the antitumorous effect of a macrophage activator is significantly augmented by the combined use of mAbs capable of inducing ADCC to tumor cells[3].

  2. Phenotypic diversity and emerging new tools to study macrophage activation in bacterial infectious diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Louis eMege

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Macrophage polarization is a concept that has been useful to describe the different features of macrophage activation related to specific functions. Macrophage polarization is responsible for a dichotomic approach (killing versus repair of the host response to bacteria: M1-type conditions are protective, whereas M2-type conditions are associated with bacterial persistence. The use of the polarization concept to classify the features of macrophage activation in infected patients using transcriptional and/or molecular data and to provide biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis has most often been unsuccessful. The confrontation of polarization with different clinical situations in which monocytes/macrophages encounter bacteria obliged us to reappraise this concept. With the exception of M2-type infectious diseases such as leprosy and Whipple’s disease, most acute (sepsis or chronic (Q fever, tuberculosis infectious diseases do not exhibit polarized monocytes/macrophages. This is also the case for commensals that shape the immune response and for probiotics that alter the immune response independent of macrophage polarization. We propose that the type of myeloid cells (monocytes vs. macrophages and the kinetics of the immune response (early vs. late responses are critical variables for understanding macrophage activation in human infectious diseases. Explorating the role of these new markers will provide important tools to better understand complex macrophage physiology.

  3. Macrophage-oriented cytotoxic activity of novel triterpene saponins extracted from roots of Securidaca inappendiculata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yui, S; Ubukata, K; Hodono, K; Kitahara, M; Mimaki, Y; Kuroda, M; Sashida, Y; Yamazaki, M

    2001-10-01

    It is recognized that macrophages in peripheral tissues often proliferate under pathological conditions such as tumors, inflammation and atherosclerosis. Because the growth state of macrophages is believed to be a factor regulating the pathological process of the diseases, substances that regulate macrophage growth or survival may be useful for disease control. In this paper, we identified the activity inhibiting macrophage growth in a hot water extract of roots of Securidaca inappendiculata. The extract markedly inhibited macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF/CSF-1)-induced growth of macrophages, whereas it exerted a less potent effect on growth of Concanavalin A (Con A)-stimulated thymocytes or M-CSF-stimulated bone marrow cells. The inhibition of macrophage growth was caused by a cytotoxic effect rather than a cytostatic effect. Cell death was due to the induction of apoptosis, as judged by staining with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated d-UTP nick end labelling (TUNEL). The cytotoxic activity seemed to be specific to peripheral macrophages; it showed a weak effect on the growth and survival of tumor cell lines including a macrophage-like cell line, J-774.1. Moreover, the saponin fraction induced apoptotic cell death of macrophages only when they were stimulated by M-CSF; it did not affect the viability of macrophages cultured without M-CSF or with granulocyte/macrophage-CSF. We determined the structures of the two active triterpene saponin compounds in the fraction, named securioside A and securioside B having a 3,4-dimethoxycinnamic group which is essential for the cell death-inducing activity. They are believed to be the primary compounds of new drugs for the treatment of pathological states in which macrophage proliferation occurs. PMID:11606030

  4. Phagocyte respiratory burst activates macrophage erythropoietin signalling to promote acute inflammation resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Bangwei; Wang, Jinsong; Liu, Zongwei; Shen, Zigang; Shi, Rongchen; Liu, Yu-Qi; Liu, Yu; Jiang, Man; Wu, Yuzhang; Zhang, Zhiren

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation resolution is an active process, the failure of which causes uncontrolled inflammation which underlies many chronic diseases. Therefore, endogenous pathways that regulate inflammation resolution are fundamental and of wide interest. Here, we demonstrate that phagocyte respiratory burst-induced hypoxia activates macrophage erythropoietin signalling to promote acute inflammation resolution. This signalling is activated following acute but not chronic inflammation. Pharmacological or genetical inhibition of the respiratory burst suppresses hypoxia and macrophage erythropoietin signalling. Macrophage-specific erythropoietin receptor-deficient mice and chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) mice, which lack the capacity for respiratory burst, display impaired inflammation resolution, and exogenous erythropoietin enhances this resolution in WT and CGD mice. Mechanistically, erythropoietin increases macrophage engulfment of apoptotic neutrophils via PPARγ, promotes macrophage removal of debris and enhances macrophage migration to draining lymph nodes. Together, our results provide evidences of an endogenous pathway that regulates inflammation resolution, with important implications for treating inflammatory conditions. PMID:27397585

  5. Inhibition of herpes simplex virus multiplication by activated macrophages: a role for arginase?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildy, P; Gell, P G; Rhodes, J; Newton, A

    1982-01-01

    Proteose-peptone-activated mouse macrophages can prevent productive infection by herpes simplex virus in neighboring cells in vitro whether or not those cells belong to the same animal species. The effect does not require contact between the macrophages and the infected cells, may be prevented by adding extra arginine to the medium, and may be reversed when extra arginine is added 24 h after the macrophages. Arginase activity was found both intracellularly and released from the macrophages. The extracellular enzyme is quite stable; 64% activity was found after 48 h of incubation at 37 degrees C in tissue culture medium. No evidence was found that the inefficiency of virus replication in macrophages was due to self-starvation by arginase. As might be predicted macrophages can, by the same mechanism, limit productive infection by vaccinia virus. PMID:6286497

  6. Phagocyte respiratory burst activates macrophage erythropoietin signalling to promote acute inflammation resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Bangwei; Wang, Jinsong; Liu, Zongwei; Shen, Zigang; Shi, Rongchen; Liu, Yu-Qi; Liu, Yu; Jiang, Man; Wu, Yuzhang; Zhang, Zhiren

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation resolution is an active process, the failure of which causes uncontrolled inflammation which underlies many chronic diseases. Therefore, endogenous pathways that regulate inflammation resolution are fundamental and of wide interest. Here, we demonstrate that phagocyte respiratory burst-induced hypoxia activates macrophage erythropoietin signalling to promote acute inflammation resolution. This signalling is activated following acute but not chronic inflammation. Pharmacological or genetical inhibition of the respiratory burst suppresses hypoxia and macrophage erythropoietin signalling. Macrophage-specific erythropoietin receptor-deficient mice and chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) mice, which lack the capacity for respiratory burst, display impaired inflammation resolution, and exogenous erythropoietin enhances this resolution in WT and CGD mice. Mechanistically, erythropoietin increases macrophage engulfment of apoptotic neutrophils via PPARγ, promotes macrophage removal of debris and enhances macrophage migration to draining lymph nodes. Together, our results provide evidences of an endogenous pathway that regulates inflammation resolution, with important implications for treating inflammatory conditions. PMID:27397585

  7. A transient reversal of miRNA-mediated repression controls macrophage activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumder, Anup; Bose, Mainak; Chakraborty, Abhijit; Chakrabarti, Saikat; Bhattacharyya, Suvendra N

    2013-11-01

    In mammalian macrophages, the expression of a number of cytokines is regulated by miRNAs. Upon macrophage activation, proinflammatory cytokine mRNAs are translated, although the expression of miRNAs targeting these mRNAs remains largely unaltered. We show that there is a transient reversal of miRNA-mediated repression during the early phase of the inflammatory response in macrophages, which leads to the protection of cytokine mRNAs from miRNA-mediated repression. This derepression occurs through Ago2 phosphorylation, which results in its impaired binding to miRNAs and to the corresponding target mRNAs. Macrophages expressing a mutant, non-phosphorylatable AGO2--which remains bound to miRNAs during macrophage activation--have a weakened inflammatory response and fail to prevent parasite invasion. These findings highlight the relevance of the transient relief of miRNA repression for macrophage function.

  8. Liver X Receptor (LXR) activation negatively regulates visfatin expression in macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayi, Therese Hervee; Rigamonti, Elena [Univ Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); INSERM UR1011, F-59000 Lille (France); UDSL, F-59000 Lille (France); Institut Pasteur de Lille, F-59019 Lille (France); Pattou, Francois [Univ Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Department of Endocrine Surgery, University Hospital, Lille (France); U859 Biotherapies for Diabetes, INSERM, Lille (France); Staels, Bart, E-mail: bart.staels@pasteur-lille.fr [Univ Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); INSERM UR1011, F-59000 Lille (France); UDSL, F-59000 Lille (France); Institut Pasteur de Lille, F-59019 Lille (France); Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia [Univ Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); INSERM UR1011, F-59000 Lille (France); UDSL, F-59000 Lille (France); Institut Pasteur de Lille, F-59019 Lille (France)

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Synthetic LXR ligands decreased visfatin expression in human macrophages. {yields} LXR activation leads to a modest and transient decrease of NAD{sup +} concentration. {yields} LXR activation decreased PPAR{gamma}-induced visfatin in human macrophages. -- Abstract: Adipose tissue macrophages (ATM) are the major source of visfatin, a visceral fat adipokine upregulated during obesity. Also known to play a role in B cell differentiation (pre-B cell colony-enhancing factor (PBEF)) and NAD biosynthesis (nicotinamide phosphoribosyl transferase (NAMPT)), visfatin has been suggested to play a role in inflammation. Liver X Receptor (LXR) and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor (PPAR){gamma} are nuclear receptors expressed in macrophages controlling the inflammatory response. Recently, we reported visfatin as a PPAR{gamma} target gene in human macrophages. In this study, we examined whether LXR regulates macrophage visfatin expression. Synthetic LXR ligands decreased visfatin gene expression in a LXR-dependent manner in human and murine macrophages. The decrease of visfatin mRNA was paralleled by a decrease of protein secretion. Consequently, a modest and transient decrease of NAD{sup +} concentration was observed. Interestingly, LXR activation decreased the PPAR{gamma}-induced visfatin gene and protein secretion in human macrophages. Our results identify visfatin as a gene oppositely regulated by the LXR and PPAR{gamma} pathways in human macrophages.

  9. Influence of exogenous DNA on macrophage functional activity in experimental radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was made of peritoneal macrophage functional activity in C57BL/6 mice witb transplantable Lewis carcinoma during administration of exogenous DNA and use of local radiotherapy. The results show that the use of exogenous DNA in radiotherapy incroases peritoneal macrophage functional activity in mice with transplantable tumors

  10. Soybean-derived Bowman-Birk inhibitor inhibits neurotoxicity of LPS-activated macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Persidsky Yuri

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lipopolysaccharide (LPS, the major component of the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria, can activate immune cells including macrophages. Activation of macrophages in the central nervous system (CNS contributes to neuronal injury. Bowman-Birk inhibitor (BBI, a soybean-derived protease inhibitor, has anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we examined whether BBI has the ability to inhibit LPS-mediated macrophage activation, reducing the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and subsequent neurotoxicity in primary cortical neural cultures. Methods Mixed cortical neural cultures from rat were used as target cells for testing neurotoxicity induced by LPS-treated macrophage supernatant. Neuronal survival was measured using a cell-based ELISA method for expression of the neuronal marker MAP-2. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS production in macrophages was measured via 2', 7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFH2DA oxidation. Cytokine expression was determined by quantitative real-time PCR. Results LPS treatment of macrophages induced expression of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α and of ROS. In contrast, BBI pretreatment (1-100 μg/ml of macrophages significantly inhibited LPS-mediated induction of these cytokines and ROS. Further, supernatant from BBI-pretreated and LPS-activated macrophage cultures was found to be less cytotoxic to neurons than that from non-BBI-pretreated and LPS-activated macrophage cultures. BBI, when directly added to the neuronal cultures (1-100 μg/ml, had no protective effect on neurons with or without LPS-activated macrophage supernatant treatment. In addition, BBI (100 μg/ml had no effect on N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA-mediated neurotoxicity. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that BBI, through its anti-inflammatory properties, protects neurons from neurotoxicity mediated by activated macrophages.

  11. Macrophage activation in acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Christian Schupp

    Full Text Available Acute exacerbation (AE of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF is a common cause of disease acceleration in IPF and has a major impact on mortality. The role of macrophage activation in AE of IPF has never been addressed before.We evaluated BAL cell cytokine profiles and BAL differential cell counts in 71 IPF patients w/wo AE and in 20 healthy volunteers. Twelve patients suffered from AE at initial diagnosis while sixteen patients developed AE in the 24 months of follow-up. The levels of IL-1ra, CCL2, CCL17, CCL18, CCL22, TNF-α, IL-1β, CXCL1 and IL-8 spontaneously produced by BAL-cells were analysed by ELISA.In patients with AE, the percentage of BAL neutrophils was significantly increased compared to stable patients. We found an increase in the production rate of the pro-inflammatory cytokines CXCL1 and IL-8 combined with an increase in all tested M2 cytokines by BAL-cells. An increase in CCL18 levels and neutrophil counts during AE was observed in BAL cells from patients from whom serial lavages were obtained. Furthermore, high baseline levels of CCL18 production by BAL cells were significantly predictive for the development of future AE.BAL cell cytokine production levels at acute exacerbation show up-regulation of pro-inflammatory as well as anti-inflammatory/ M2 cytokines. Our data suggest that AE in IPF is not an incidental event but rather driven by cellular mechanisms including M2 macrophage activation.

  12. Activation effect of Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides liposomes on murine peritoneal macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhenguang; Xing, Jie; Huang, Yee; Bo, Ruonan; Zheng, Sisi; Luo, Li; Niu, Yale; Zhang, Yan; Hu, Yuanliang; Liu, Jiaguo; Wu, Yi; Wang, Deyun

    2016-01-01

    The activation of murine peritoneal macrophages by Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides liposomes (GLPL) was investigated in vitro. After treatment with GLPL, the changes of the nitric oxide (NO) secretion and iNOS (inducible nitric oxide synthase) activity were evaluated. The results showed that NO production and iNOS activity of macrophages were enhanced compared to GLP and BL group. In addition, both the phagocytic activity and levels of cytokines IL-1β, TNF-α and IFN-γ were enhanced in the peritoneal macrophages of mice by stimulation of GLPL. The expression of the major histocompatibility complex class II molecule (MHC II) on the surface of peritoneal macrophages significantly increased. These indicated that GLPL could enhance the activation of peritoneal macrophages and their potential for use as a delivery system of GLP.

  13. Activation effect of Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides liposomes on murine peritoneal macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhenguang; Xing, Jie; Huang, Yee; Bo, Ruonan; Zheng, Sisi; Luo, Li; Niu, Yale; Zhang, Yan; Hu, Yuanliang; Liu, Jiaguo; Wu, Yi; Wang, Deyun

    2016-01-01

    The activation of murine peritoneal macrophages by Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides liposomes (GLPL) was investigated in vitro. After treatment with GLPL, the changes of the nitric oxide (NO) secretion and iNOS (inducible nitric oxide synthase) activity were evaluated. The results showed that NO production and iNOS activity of macrophages were enhanced compared to GLP and BL group. In addition, both the phagocytic activity and levels of cytokines IL-1β, TNF-α and IFN-γ were enhanced in the peritoneal macrophages of mice by stimulation of GLPL. The expression of the major histocompatibility complex class II molecule (MHC II) on the surface of peritoneal macrophages significantly increased. These indicated that GLPL could enhance the activation of peritoneal macrophages and their potential for use as a delivery system of GLP. PMID:26529190

  14. TLR activation of tumor-associated macrophages from ovarian cancer patients triggers cytolytic activity of NK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellora, Francesca; Castriconi, Roberta; Dondero, Alessandra; Pessino, Anna; Nencioni, Alessio; Liggieri, Giovanni; Moretta, Lorenzo; Mantovani, Alberto; Moretta, Alessandro; Bottino, Cristina

    2014-06-01

    We analyzed the functional outcome of the interaction between tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) and natural killer (NK) cells. TAMs from ascites of ovarian cancer patients displayed an alternatively activated functional phenotype (M2) characterized by a remarkably high frequency and surface density of membrane-bound IL-18. Upon TLR engagement, TAMs acquired a classically activated functional phenotype (M1), released immunostimulatory cytokines (IL-12, soluble IL-18), and efficiently triggered the cytolytic activity of NK cells. TAMs also induced the release of IFN-γ from NK cells, which however was significantly lower compared with that induced by in vitro-polarized M2 cells. Most tumor-associated NK cells displayed a CD56(bright) , CD16(neg) or CD56(bright) , CD16(dim) phenotype, and very poor cytolytic activities, despite an increased expression of the activation marker CD69. They also showed downregulation of DNAM-1, 2B4, and NTB-A activating receptors, and an altered chemokine receptor repertoire. Importantly however, when appropriately stimulated, NK cells from the patients, including those cells isolated from ascites, efficiently killed autologous TAMs that expressed low, "nonprotective" levels of HLA class I molecules. Overall, our data show the existence of a complex tumor microenvironment in which poorly cytolytic/immature NK cells deal with immunosuppressive tumor-educated macrophages.

  15. Modulation of pulmonary macrophage superoxide release and tumoricidal activity following activation by biological response modifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drath, D B

    1986-10-01

    Following immunologic activation, pulmonary macrophages may prevent or cause regression of lung metastases by mechanisms which remain largely unknown. The studies described here were designed to determine if enhanced oxygen metabolite release was related to postactivation tumoricidal activity. We have shown that in vitro activation of Fischer 344 rat pulmonary macrophages by either free or liposome-encapsulated muramyl dipeptide leads to both enhanced release of superoxide anions and marked tumoricidal activity against syngenic (Fischer 13762), allogeneic (Schmidt-Ruppin RR 1022) and xenogeneic (Fibrosarcoma MCA-F) 125I-deoxyuridine-labeled target cells. This immune modulator did not, however, metabolically activate pulmonary macrophages as effectively as liposome-encapsulated lipopolysaccharide. A 24-h in vitro incubation with either 150 U or 300 U of interferon-gamma (3 X 10(6) U/mg) or 30 U, 150 U or 300 U of interferon-alpha (6 X 10(5) U/mg) caused a significant elevation in superoxide release above controls, whereas short-term exposure (2 or 4 h) had little or no effect. Free or encapsulated 6-O-stearoyl muramyl dipeptide, on the other hand, did increase superoxide levels at all 3 time periods. When either interferon-gamma or free or encapsulated muramyl dipeptide derivative were administered to intact rats by either i.v. injection, intratracheal instillation or osmotic minipump infusion, pulmonary macrophage tumoricidal activity was observed 96 h after cell harvesting. Zymosan-stimulated superoxide release, however, was not consistently elevated above control or empty liposome treatment following this course of in vivo activation. The data collectively suggest that in vivo pulmonary macrophage activation to a tumoricidal state and metabolic activation resulting in enhanced superoxide may be separable events. PMID:3021650

  16. Resident macrophages influence stem cell activity in the mammary gland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gyorki, D.E.; Asselin-Labat, M.L.; Rooijen, van N.; Lindeman, G.J.; Visvader, J.E.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Macrophages in the mammary gland are essential for morphogenesis of the ductal epithelial tree and have been implicated in promoting breast tumor metastasis. Although it is well established that macrophages influence normal mammopoiesis, the mammary cell types that these accessory cells

  17. Peroxidatic activity distinct from myeloperoxidase in human monocytes cultured in vitro and in alveolar macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breton-Gorius, J; Vildé, J L; Guichard, J; Vainchenker, W; Basset, F

    1982-01-01

    Human monocytes develop a peroxidatic activity (PA) in rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) after adherence or after culture in semi-solid medium. This enzyme activity disappears after three days of culture in the majority of macrophages derived from adult monocytes but persists for one week in macrophages derived from neonatal monocytes. The PA is due to an enzyme distinct from myeloperoxidase (MPO), since monocytes from a patient with MPO deficiency develop the same PA as that of normal monocytes after adherence. By its localization and other characteristics, PA of adherent monocytes resembles that of rodent macrophages. We therefore investigated whether human alveolar macrophages exhibit PA, using a sensitive cytochemical method which prevents inhibition by aldehyde in adherent monocytes. In various pathological cases, four types of macrophages could be identified: the majority were peroxidase-negative, a small percentage was of exudate type exhibiting a PA in granules as blood monocytes, while few macrophages were intermediate, possessing only PA in RER i.e. of type resident and a smaller proportion had PA in RER and in granules i.e. exudate-resident macrophages. These findings demonstrate that human macrophages and adherent monocytes may exhibit PA in RER as has been reported for rodent macrophages. The true nature and function of the enzyme responsible for this PA, which is distinct from MPO, remains unknown, but some arguments seem to suggest its role in prostaglandin synthesis. PMID:6283838

  18. Hybrid-Actuating Macrophage-Based Microrobots for Active Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jiwon; Zhen, Jin; Du Nguyen, Van; Go, Gwangjun; Choi, Youngjin; Ko, Seong Young; Park, Jong-Oh; Park, Sukho

    2016-01-01

    Using macrophage recruitment in tumors, we develop active, transportable, cancer theragnostic macrophage-based microrobots as vector to deliver therapeutic agents to tumor regions. The macrophage-based microrobots contain docetaxel (DTX)-loaded poly-lactic-co-glycolic-acid (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) for chemotherapy and Fe3O4 magnetic NPs (MNPs) for active targeting using an electromagnetic actuation (EMA) system. And, the macrophage-based microrobots are synthesized through the phagocytosis of the drug NPs and MNPs in the macrophages. The anticancer effects of the microrobots on tumor cell lines (CT-26 and 4T1) are evaluated in vitro by cytotoxic assay. In addition, the active tumor targeting by the EMA system and macrophage recruitment, and the chemotherapeutic effect of the microrobots are evaluated using three-dimensional (3D) tumor spheroids. The microrobots exhibited clear cytotoxicity toward tumor cells, with a low survivability rate (<50%). The 3D tumor spheroid assay showed that the microrobots demonstrated hybrid actuation through active tumor targeting by the EMA system and infiltration into the tumor spheroid by macrophage recruitment, resulting in tumor cell death caused by the delivered antitumor drug. Thus, the active, transportable, macrophage-based theragnostic microrobots can be considered to be biocompatible vectors for cancer therapy. PMID:27346486

  19. Intracellular glutathione status regulates mouse bone marrow monocyte-derived macrophage differentiation and phagocytic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although a redox shift can regulate the development of cells, including proliferation, differentiation, and survival, the role of the glutathione (GSH) redox status in macrophage differentiation remains unclear. In order to elucidate the role of a redox shift, macrophage-like cells were differentiated from the bone marrow-derived monocytes that were treated with a macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF or CSF-1) for 3 days. The macrophagic cells were characterized by a time-dependent increase in three major symptoms: the number of phagocytic cells, the number of adherent cells, and the mRNA expression of c-fms, a M-CSF receptor that is one of the macrophage-specific markers and mediates development signals. Upon M-CSF-driven macrophage differentiation, the GSH/GSSG ratio was significantly lower on day 1 than that observed on day 0 but was constant on days 1-3. To assess the effect of the GSH-depleted and -repleted status on the differentiation and phagocytosis of the macrophages, GSH depletion by BSO, a specific inhibitor of the de novo GSH synthesis, inhibited the formation of the adherent macrophagic cells by the down-regulation of c-fms, but did not affect the phagocytic activity of the macrophages. To the contrary, GSH repletion by the addition of NAC, which is a GSH precursor, or reduced GSH in media had no effect on macrophage differentiation, and led to a decrease in the phagocytic activity. Furthermore, we observed that there is checkpoint that is capable of releasing from the inhibition of the formation of the adherent macrophagic cells according to GSH depletion by BSO. Summarizing, these results indicate that the intracellular GSH status plays an important role in the differentiation and phagocytosis of macrophages

  20. Cervical Cancer Cell Supernatants Induce a Phenotypic Switch from U937-Derived Macrophage-Activated M1 State into M2-Like Suppressor Phenotype with Change in Toll-Like Receptor Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Reyes, Karina; Bravo-Cuellar, Alejandro; Hernández-Flores, Georgina; Lerma-Díaz, José Manuel; Jave-Suárez, Luis Felipe; Gómez-Lomelí, Paulina; de Celis, Ruth; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana; Domínguez-Rodríguez, Jorge Ramiro; Ortiz-Lazareno, Pablo Cesar

    2014-01-01

    Cervical cancer (CC) is the second most common cancer among women worldwide. Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is the main risk factor for developing CC. Macrophages are important immune effector cells; they can be differentiated into two phenotypes, identified as M1 (classically activated) and M2 (alternatively activated). Macrophage polarization exerts profound effects on the Toll-like receptor (TLR) profile. In this study, we evaluated whether the supernatant of human CC cells HeLa, SiHa, and C-33A induces a shift of M1 macrophage toward M2 macrophage in U937-derived macrophages. Results. The results showed that soluble factors secreted by CC cells induce a change in the immunophenotype of macrophages from macrophage M1 into macrophage M2. U937-derived macrophages M1 released proinflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide; however, when these cells were treated with the supernatant of CC cell lines, we observed a turnover of M1 toward M2. These cells increased CD163 and IL-10 expression. The expression of TLR-3, -7, and -9 is increased when the macrophages were treated with the supernatant of CC cells. Conclusions. Our result strongly suggests that CC cells may, through the secretion of soluble factors, induce a change of immunophenotype M1 into M2 macrophages. PMID:25309919

  1. Cervical Cancer Cell Supernatants Induce a Phenotypic Switch from U937-Derived Macrophage-Activated M1 State into M2-Like Suppressor Phenotype with Change in Toll-Like Receptor Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Sánchez-Reyes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer (CC is the second most common cancer among women worldwide. Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV is the main risk factor for developing CC. Macrophages are important immune effector cells; they can be differentiated into two phenotypes, identified as M1 (classically activated and M2 (alternatively activated. Macrophage polarization exerts profound effects on the Toll-like receptor (TLR profile. In this study, we evaluated whether the supernatant of human CC cells HeLa, SiHa, and C-33A induces a shift of M1 macrophage toward M2 macrophage in U937-derived macrophages. Results. The results showed that soluble factors secreted by CC cells induce a change in the immunophenotype of macrophages from macrophage M1 into macrophage M2. U937-derived macrophages M1 released proinflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide; however, when these cells were treated with the supernatant of CC cell lines, we observed a turnover of M1 toward M2. These cells increased CD163 and IL-10 expression. The expression of TLR-3, -7, and -9 is increased when the macrophages were treated with the supernatant of CC cells. Conclusions. Our result strongly suggests that CC cells may, through the secretion of soluble factors, induce a change of immunophenotype M1 into M2 macrophages.

  2. Transcriptional and Linkage Analyses Identify Loci that Mediate the Differential Macrophage Response to Inflammatory Stimuli and Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassan, Musa A.; Jensen, Kirk D.; Butty, Vincent; Hu, K.; Boedec, E.; Prins, J.C.P.; Saeij, J.P.J.

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages display flexible activation states that range between pro-inflammatory (classical activation) and anti-inflammatory (alternative activation). These macrophage polarization states contribute to a variety of organismal phenotypes such as tissue remodeling and susceptibility to infectious a

  3. A macrophage activation switch (MAcS)-index for assessment of monocyte/macrophage activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maniecki, Maciej Bogdan; Lauridsen, Mette; Knudsen, Troels Bygum;

    2008-01-01

    of inflammatory markers (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF-α) was determined by RT-qPCR. Normalized values of sCD163 and mCD163 were calculated by dividing each value by the median value of the healthy population. The MAcS-index was then calculated as the ratio between normalized sCD163 and normalized mCD163....... A MAcS-index > 1 indicates relative increase in sCD163 as compared to mCD163, suggested to reflect a predominant M1 activation.   RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: The MAcS-index of healthy individuals clustered around 1 (2.5-97.5 percentile: 0.28-3.11), whereas the MAcS-index of the patients varied from 0.......06 to 5139, with 4% below the 2.5 % limit of healthy individuals, and 60% above the 97.5 upper limit of healthy individuals.  The MAcS-index in infected patients (with assumed M1 activation) was clearly elevated. The index was significantly higher in patients with clinical signs of infection (median: 9...

  4. Mechanistic study of macrophage activation by LPS stimulation using fluorescence imaging techinques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Cuixia; Zhou, Feifan; Chen, Wei R.; Xing, Da

    2012-03-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a structural component of the outer membrane of gram negative bacteria, has been suggested that stimulates macrophages secrete a wide variety of inflammatory mediators, such as nitric oxide (NO). However, the cellular mechanisms of NO generation in macrophage by LPS stimulation are not well known. In this study, LPS stimulated NO generation in macrophage was determined by measuring fluorescence changes with a NO specific probe DAF-FM DA. Using the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) techniques, we found an increase of protein kinase C (PKC) activation was dynamically monitored in macrophages treated with LPS. Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) translocated from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in macrophage was measured by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Moreover, the PKC inhibitor GÖ6983 inhibited LPS-stimulated NF-κB activation and NO production. These results indicated that LPS stimulated NF-κB mediated NO production by activating PKC.

  5. Macrophage activation marker soluble CD163 may predict disease progression in hepatocellular carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazankov, Konstantin; Rode, Anthony; Simonsen, Kira;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tumor associated macrophages are present in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and associated with a poor prognosis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the levels and dynamics of soluble (s)CD163, a specific macrophage activation marker, in patients with HCC. METHODS...

  6. Plutonium behavior after pulmonary administration according to solubility properties, and consequences on alveolar macrophage activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Meeren, Anne; Gremy, Olivier; Renault, Daniel; Miroux, Amandine; Bruel, Sylvie; Griffiths, Nina; Tourdes, Françoise

    2012-01-01

    The physico-chemical form in which plutonium enters the body influences the lung distribution and the transfer rate from lungs to blood. In the present study, we evaluated the early lung damage and macrophage activation after pulmonary contamination of plutonium of various preparation modes which produce different solubility and distribution patterns. Whatever the solubility properties of the contaminant, macrophages represent a major retention compartment in lungs, with 42 to 67% of the activity from broncho-alveolar lavages being associated with macrophages 14 days post-contamination. Lung changes were observed 2 and 6 weeks post-contamination, showing inflammatory lesions and accumulation of activated macrophages (CD68 positive) in plutonium-contaminated rats, although no increased proliferation of pneumocytes II (TTF-1 positive cells) was found. In addition, acid phosphatase activity in macrophages from contaminated rats was enhanced 2 weeks post-contamination as compared to sham groups, as well as inflammatory mediator levels (TNF-α, MCP-1, MIP-2 and CINC-1) in macrophage culture supernatants. Correlating with the decrease in activity remaining in macrophages after plutonium contamination, inflammatory mediator production returned to basal levels 6 weeks post-exposure. The production of chemokines by macrophages was evaluated after contamination with Pu of increasing solubility. No correlation was found between the solubility properties of Pu and the activation level of macrophages. In summary, our data indicate that, despite the higher solubility of plutonium citrate or nitrate as compared to preformed colloids or oxides, macrophages remain the main lung target after plutonium contamination and may participate in the early pulmonary damage.

  7. Substrate Stiffness Regulates Proinflammatory Mediator Production through TLR4 Activity in Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previtera, Michelle L.; Sengupta, Amitabha

    2015-01-01

    Clinical data show that disease adversely affects tissue elasticity or stiffness. While macrophage activity plays a critical role in driving disease pathology, there are limited data available on the effects of tissue stiffness on macrophage activity. In this study, the effects of substrate stiffness on inflammatory mediator production by macrophages were investigated. Bone marrow–derived macrophages were grown on polyacrylamide gels that mimicked the stiffness of a variety of soft biological tissues. Overall, macrophages grown on soft substrates produced less proinflammatory mediators than macrophages grown on stiff substrates when the endotoxin LPS was added to media. In addition, the pathways involved in stiffness–regulated proinflammation were investigated. The TLR4 signaling pathway was examined by evaluating TLR4, p–NF–κB p65, MyD88, and p–IκBα expression as well as p–NF–κB p65 translocation. Expression and translocation of the various signaling molecules were higher in macrophages grown on stiff substrates than on soft substrates. Furthermore, TLR4 knockout experiments showed that TLR4 activity enhanced proinflammation on stiff substrates. In conclusion, these results suggest that proinflammatory mediator production initiated by TLR4 is mechanically regulated in macrophages. PMID:26710072

  8. MicroRNAs Control Macrophage Formation and Activation: The Inflammatory Link between Obesity and Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Cheng-An Chang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Activation and recruitment of resident macrophages in tissues in response to physiological stress are crucial regulatory processes in promoting the development of obesity-associated metabolic disorders and cardiovascular diseases. Recent studies have provided compelling evidence that microRNAs play important roles in modulating monocyte formation, macrophage maturation, infiltration into tissues and activation. Macrophage-dependent systemic physiological and tissue-specific responses also involve cell-cell interactions between macrophages and host tissue niche cell components, including other tissue-resident immune cell lineages, adipocytes, vascular smooth muscle and others. In this review, we highlight the roles of microRNAs in regulating the development and function of macrophages in the context of obesity, which could provide insights into the pathogenesis of obesity-related metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular diseases.

  9. Regulation of antioxidant enzyme activities in male and female rat macrophages by sex steroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azevedo R.B.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Human and animal immune functions present sex dimorphism that seems to be mainly regulated by sex hormones. In the present study, the activities of the antioxidant enzymes total superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px were measured in intraperitoneal resident macrophages from adult male and female rats. In addition to comparing males and females, we also examined the regulation of these enzyme activities in macrophages by sex steroids. GSH-Px activity did not differ between male and female macrophages. However, both total SOD and CAT activities were markedly higher in females than in males (83 and 180%. Removal of the gonads in both males and females (comparison between castrated groups increased the difference in SOD activity from 83 to 138% and reduced the difference in CAT activity from 180 to 86%. Castration and testosterone administration did not significantly modify the activities of the antioxidant enzymes in male macrophages. Ovariectomy did not affect SOD or GSH-Px activity but markedly reduced (48% CAT activity. This latter change was fully reversed by estrogen administration, whereas progesterone had a smaller effect. These results led us to conclude that differences in the SOD and CAT activities may partially explain some of the differences in immune function reported for males and females. Also, estrogen is a potent regulator of CAT in macrophages and therefore this enzyme activity in macrophages may vary considerably during the menstrual cycle.

  10. Molecular imaging of macrophage enzyme activity in cardiac inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Muhammad; Pulli, Benjamin; Chen, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular imaging is highly advantageous as various insidious inflammatory events can be imaged in a serial and quantitative fashion. Combined with the conventional imaging modalities like computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR) and nuclear imaging, it helps us resolve the extent of ongoing pathology, quantify inflammation and predict outcome. Macrophages are increasingly gaining importance as an imaging biomarker in inflammatory cardiovascular diseases. Macrophages, recruited to th...

  11. Augmentation of macrophage complement receptor function in vitro. IV. The lymphokine that activates macrophage C3 receptors for phagocytosis binds to a fucose-bearing glycoprotein on the macrophage plasma membrane

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    Macrophage receptors for the third component of complement (C3) are normally immobilized and unable to diffuse within the cell's plasma membrane and, even though they promote avid particle binding, are unable to promote phagocytosis of C3-coated particles. We have previously identified a lymphokine that activates macrophage C3 receptors for phagocytosis and have found that it acts by freeing the receptors so that they can diffuse within the macrophage plasma membrane. It seemed likely to us t...

  12. Glucocorticoid-induced impairment of macrophage antimicrobial activity: mechanisms and dependence on the state of activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffner, A; Schaffner, T

    1987-01-01

    Experimental observations indicate that tissue macrophages deployed in great numbers at critical anatomic sites such as the liver, spleen, and lung are major targets for glucocorticoids compromising natural resistance of the host. Therapeutic concentrations of glucocorticoids appear to prevent destruction of microorganisms ingested by macrophages without interfering with phagocytosis, phagolysosomal fusion, and/or secretion of reactive oxygen intermediates. These findings indicate that at the cellular level the glucocorticoid target should be sought for in the nonoxidative armature of the phagocyte and that nonoxidative killing systems of resident tissue macrophages play an important role in natural resistance to opportunistic pathogens. Glucocorticoids do not prevent lymphokine-induced activation of oxidative killing systems. Thus, lymphokines such as interferon-gamma can restore the microbicidal activity of macrophages functionally impaired by glucocorticoids. Counterbalance of the suppressive effect of glucocorticoids by lymphokines might only be possible, however, for pathogens susceptible to oxidative killing and not for microorganisms that are more resistant to reactive oxygen intermediates such as Aspergillus spores and Nocardia, opportunists that appear to be particularly associated with hypercortisolism.

  13. The presence of tumor associated macrophages in tumor stroma as a prognostic marker for breast cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Medrek Catharina; Pontén Fredrik; Jirström Karin; Leandersson Karin

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) are alternatively activated macrophages that enhance tumor progression by promoting tumor cell invasion, migration and angiogenesis. TAMs have an anti-inflammatory function resembling M2 macrophages. CD163 is regarded as a highly specific monocyte/macrophage marker for M2 macrophages. In this study we evaluated the specificity of using the M2 macrophage marker CD163 as a TAM marker and compared its prognostic value with the more frequent...

  14. Distinctive role of activated tumor-associated macrophages in photosensitizer accumulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korbelik, Mladen; Krosl, Gorazd

    1995-05-01

    Cells dissociated from tumors (carcinomas and sarcomas) growing subcutaneously in mice that have been administered Photofrin or other photosensitizers were analyzed by flow cytometry. Monoclonal antibodies were used for identification of major cellular populations contained in these tumors. The results demonstrate that a subpopulation of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) is unique among tumor cell populations in that it excels in the accumulation of very high levels of photosensitizers. These macrophages showed an increased expression of interleukin 2 receptor, which is indicative of their activated state. since macrophages were reported to concentrate in the periphery of human neoplasms, it is suggested that activates TAMs are the determinants of tumor-localized photosensitizer fluorescence.

  15. Hyperuricemia-induced NLRP3 activation of macrophages contributes to the progression of diabetic nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Su-Mi; Lee, Sang-Ho; Kim, Yang-Gyun; Kim, Se-Yun; Seo, Jung-Woo; Choi, Young-Wook; Kim, Dong-Jin; Jeong, Kyung-Hwan; Lee, Tae-Won; Ihm, Chun-Gyoo; Won, Kyu-Yeoun; Moon, Ju-Young

    2015-05-01

    IL-1β-secreting nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasomes play a pivotal role in triggering innate immune responses in metabolic disease. We investigated the role of soluble uric acid in NLRP3 inflammasome activation in macrophages to demonstrate the effect of systemic hyperuricemia on progressive kidney damage in type 2 diabetes. THP-1 cells, human acute monocytic leukemia cells, were cultured to obtain macrophages, and HK-2 cells, human renal proximal tubule cells, were cultured and stimulated with uric acid. In vivo, we designed four rat groups as follows: 1) Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO); 2) Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF); 3) OLETF+high-fructose diet (HFD) for 16 wk; and 4) OLETF+HFD+allopurinol (10 mg/dl administered in the drinking water). Soluble uric acid stimulated NLRP3 inflammasomes to produce IL-1β in macrophages. Uric acid-induced MitoSOX mediates NLRP3 activation and IL-1β secretion. IL-1β from macrophages activates NF-κB in cocultured proximal tubular cells. In vivo, intrarenal IL-1β expression and macrophage infiltration increased in HFD-fed OLETF rats. Lowering the serum uric acid level resulted in improving the albuminuria, tubular injury, macrophage infiltration, and renal IL-1β (60% of HFD-fed OLETF) independently of glycemic control. Direct activation of proximal tubular cells by uric acid resulted in (C-X-C motif) ligand 12 and high mobility group box-1 release and accelerated macrophage recruitment and the M1 phenotype. Taken together, these data support direct roles of hyperuricemia in activating NLRP3 inflammasomes in macrophages, promoting chemokine signaling in the proximal tubule and contributing to the progression of diabetic nephropathy through cross talk between macrophages and proximal tubular cells. PMID:25651569

  16. Macrophage activation induced by Brucella DNA suppresses bacterial intracellular replication via enhancing NO production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning; Wang, Lin; Sun, Changjiang; Yang, Li; Tang, Bin; Sun, Wanchun; Peng, Qisheng

    2015-12-01

    Brucella DNA can be sensed by TLR9 on endosomal membrane and by cytosolic AIM2-inflammasome to induce proinflammatory cytokine production that contributes to partially activate innate immunity. Additionally, Brucella DNA has been identified to be able to act as a major bacterial component to induce type I IFN. However, the role of Brucella DNA in Brucella intracellular growth remains unknown. Here, we showed that stimulation with Brucella DNA promote macrophage activation in TLR9-dependent manner. Activated macrophages can suppresses wild type Brucella intracellular replication at early stage of infection via enhancing NO production. We also reported that activated macrophage promotes bactericidal function of macrophages infected with VirB-deficient Brucella at the early or late stage of infection. This study uncovers a novel function of Brucella DNA, which can help us further elucidate the mechanism of Brucella intracellular survival.

  17. 姜黄素促进 RAW264.7源性 M1巨噬细胞向替代激活 M2表型极化%Curcumin induces M1 phenotype derived from murine RAW264.7 macrophages polarization to alternatively activated M2 phenotype

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈方圆; 袁祖贻; 周娟; 王欢; 薛丽; 郭宁

    2015-01-01

    1 phenotype macro-phages derived from RAW264.7 macrophages to become M2 phenotype through activating PPARγ.

  18. Study on Inhibitors of PI3K/MEK Prevent Alternatively Activated Macrophages from Promoting Breast Cancer Cell Invasion and Migration%PI3K和MEK抑制剂抑制选择性激活的巨噬细胞促乳腺癌细胞浸润迁移的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈静琦; 曾波航; 朱必胜; 侯开连

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨选择性激活的巨噬细胞(M2)促进乳腺癌浸润迁移的分子机制,为治疗乳腺癌提供新的分子靶点.方法 用密度梯度离心法,从健康成人外周血中分离单个核细胞,体外诱导选择性激活巨噬细胞(M2).用Western blot的方法检测M2对乳腺癌信号分子的激活;用浸润迁移实验和划痕实验检测PI3K和ERK抑制剂对M2促乳腺癌迁移的抑制作用.结果 模拟乳腺癌微环境,把M2与乳腺癌MDA MB 231细胞共培养,证明PI3K抑制剂LY294002和MEK抑制剂U0126作用于乳腺癌细胞,可以在6、12h抑制M2对乳腺癌PI3K/ERK的激活;两种抑制剂可以抑制M2促进乳腺癌浸润迁移的作用.结论 PI3K和MEK抑制剂可以抑制M2促进乳腺癌浸润迁移,PI3K/ERK可以成为抑制M2作用的新靶点.%Objective To interpret new molecular targets for breast cancer therapy and investigated the molecular mechanism of alternatively activaed macrophages (M2)'s promotion in breast cancer invasion and migration. Methods Mononuclear cells were isolated from peripheral blood of normal adults by den-sity gradient centnfugation.and alternatively activated M2 in vitro. Activation of M2 to breast cancer signal molecules was detected by Western blot. The inhibition function of PI3K/ERK inhibitors to (M2) s promotion in breast cancer migration was evaluated by invasion assay and wound assay. Results To simulate breast cancer microenvironment, we co-cultured M2 and breast cancer MDAMB-231 cells. In the co-cultur system,the inhibitors, LY294002 of PI3K,U()126 of MEK, inhibiting (M2)'s activation to breast cancer PI3K/ERK in 6,12 h. The two inhibitors can prevent (M2) from promoting breast cancer invasion and migration. Conclusion The inhibitors of PI3K/MEK prevent M2 from promoting breast cancer invasion and migration. They can be new targets of breast cancer therapy.

  19. Paeoniflorin inhibits macrophage-mediated lung cancer metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qi; Chen, Gang-Ling; Li, Ya-Juan; Chen, Yang; Lin, Fang-Zhen

    2015-12-01

    Alternatively activated macrophages are more frequently involved in tumor growth, angiogenesis, and immunosuppression. A previous study showed that paeoniflorin, the major active constituent of Paeonia lactiflora Pallas, can inhibit tumor growth and lung metastases of Lewis lung tumor-bearing mice. This study tried to investigate whether paeoniflorin inhibited lung cancer metastasis by inhibiting the alternative activation of macrophages (M2 macrophage). Using a viability assay, the cytotoxicity of paeoniflorin on Lewis lung cancer cells and peritoneal macrophages were investigated. In vitro scratch wound and in vivo lung metastasis experiments were used to test the ability to inhibit the migration of paeoniflorin and the function of M2 macrophages. Flow cytometry was performed to test the cell cycle of Lewis lung cancer cells, and to test the M2 macrophages in peritoneal macrophages and subcutaneous transplantable tumor. It was found that paeoniflorin showed no inhibitory effect on the growth of Lewis lung cancer cells and peritoneal macrophages of mouse in vitro. Paeoniflorin could attenuate the migration of LLC stimulated by alternatively activated macrophages (stimulated for 24 h and 48 h, paeoniflorin 1, 3, 10, 30, 100 μmol·L(-1), P lung cancer cells (paeoniflorin 100 μmol·L(-1), P lung metastasis of Lewis lung cancer cells xenograft and decrease the numbers of M2 macrophages in subcutaneous xenograft tumour in vivo (paeoniflorin 20, 40 mg·kg(-1), P lung metastasis of Lewis lung cancer cells xenograft partly through inhibiting the alternative activation of macrophages.

  20. Avirulent strains of Toxoplasma gondii infect macrophages by active invasion from the phagosome

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Yanlin; Marple, Andrew H.; Ferguson, David J. P.; Bzik, David J.; Yap, George S.

    2014-01-01

    The classical active penetration model for Toxoplasma invasion was established in studies of infection of nonphagocytic host cells by virulent strains of the parasite. Here, we show that avirulent Toxoplasma parasites use a noncanonical invasion pathway when infecting macrophages. Instead of active penetration at cell surface, avirulent Toxoplasma parasites are initially phagocytosed by macrophages and, subsequently, form a parasite vacuole from a phagosomal compartment. This phagosome to vac...

  1. Coculture with intraocular lens material-activated macrophages induces an inflammatory phenotype in lens epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintwala, Robert; Postnikoff, Cameron; Molladavoodi, Sara; Gorbet, Maud

    2015-03-01

    Cataracts are the leading cause of blindness worldwide, requiring surgical implantation of an intraocular lens. Despite evidence of leukocyte ingress into the postoperative lens, few studies have investigated the leukocyte response to intraocular lens materials. A novel coculture model was developed to examine macrophage activation by hydrophilic acrylic (poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate)) and hydrophobic acrylic (polymethylmethacrylate) commercial intraocular lens. The human monocytic cell line THP-1 was differentiated into macrophages and cocultured with human lens epithelial cell line (HLE-B3) with or without an intraocular lens for one, two, four, or six days. Using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy, expression of the macrophage activation marker CD54 (intercellular adhesion molecule-1) and production of reactive oxygen species via the fluorogenic probe 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate were examined in macrophages. α-Smooth muscle actin, a transdifferentiation marker, was characterized in lens epithelial cells. The poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) intraocular lens prevented adhesion but induced significant macrophage activation (p intraocular lens), while the polymethylmethacrylate intraocular lens enabled adhesion and multinucleated fusion, but induced no significant activation. Coculture with either intraocular lens increased reactive oxygen species production in macrophages after one day (p intraocular lens, with hydrophilic surfaces inducing higher activation than hydrophobic surfaces. These findings provide a new method of inquiry into uveal biocompatibility, specifically through the quantification of cell-surface markers of leukocyte activation.

  2. Human lung tissue macrophages, but not alveolar macrophages, express matrix metalloproteinases after direct contact with activated T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari-Lacraz, S; Nicod, L P; Chicheportiche, R; Welgus, H G; Dayer, J M

    2001-04-01

    Human alveolar macrophages (AM) and lung tissue macrophages (LTM) have a distinct localization in the cellular environment. We studied their response to direct contact with activated T lymphocytes in terms of the production of interstitial collagenase (MMP-1), 92-kD gelatinase (MMP-9), and of TIMP-1, one of the counter-regulatory tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases. Either AM obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage or LTM obtained by mincing and digestion of lung tissue were exposed for 48 h to plasma membranes of T lymphocytes previously activated with phorbol myristate acetate and phytohemagglutinin for 24 h. Membranes of activated T cells strongly induced the production of MMP-1, MMP-9, and TIMP-1 exclusively in LTM but not in AM, whereas membranes from unstimulated T cells failed to induce the release of MMPs. Both populations of mononuclear phagocytes spontaneously released only small amounts of MMPs and TIMP-1. Similar results were obtained when MMP and TIMP-1 expression was analyzed at pretranslational and biosynthetic levels, respectively. Blockade experiments with cytokine antagonists revealed the involvement of T-cell membrane-associated interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha in MMP production by LTM upon contact with T cells. These data suggest that the ability of lung macrophages to produce MMPs after direct contact with activated T cells is related to the difference in phenotype of mononuclear phagocytes and cell localization. In addition, these observations indicate that cell-cell contact represents an important biological mechanism in potentiating the inflammatory response of mononuclear phagocytes in the lungs. PMID:11306438

  3. Polysaccharide-rich fraction of Agaricus brasiliensis enhances the candidacidal activity of murine macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Raquel Martins

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available A polysaccharide-rich fraction (ATF of medicinal mushroom Agaricus brasiliensis was evaluated on the candidacidal activity, H2O2 and nitric oxide (NO production, and expression of mannose receptors by murine peritoneal macrophages. Mice received three intraperitoneal (i.p. injections of ATF and after 48 h their peritoneal resident macrophages were assayed against Candida albicans yeast forms. The treatment increased fungicidal activity and it was associated with higher levels of H2O2, whereas NO production was not affected. We also found that the treatment enhances mannose receptor expression by peritoneal macrophages, which are involved in the attachment and phagocytosis of non-opsonized microorganisms. Treatment of animals with ATF was able to enhance the clearance of C. albicans during the first 6 h after the experimental i.p. infection. Our results suggest that this extract can increase host resistance against some infectious agents through the stimulation of microbicidal activity of macrophages.

  4. Enhancement of Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Curcumin Using Phosphatidylserine-Containing Nanoparticles in Cultured Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Wang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are one kind of innate immune cells, and produce a variety of inflammatory cytokines in response to various stimuli, such as oxidized low density lipoprotein found in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. In this study, the effect of phosphatidylserine on anti-inflammatory activity of curcumin-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers was investigated using macrophage cultures. Different amounts of phosphatidylserine were used in the preparation of curcumin nanoparticles, their physicochemical properties and biocompatibilities were then compared. Cellular uptake of the nanoparticles was investigated using a confocal laser scanning microscope and flow cytometry analysis in order to determine the optimal phosphatidylserine concentration. In vitro anti-inflammatory activities were evaluated in macrophages to test whether curcumin and phosphatidylserine have interactive effects on macrophage lipid uptake behavior and anti-inflammatory responses. Here, we showed that macrophage uptake of phosphatidylserine-containing nanostructured lipid carriers increased with increasing amount of phosphatidylserine in the range of 0%–8%, and decreased when the phosphatidylserine molar ratio reached over 12%. curcumin-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers significantly inhibited lipid accumulation and pro-inflammatory factor production in cultured macrophages, and evidently promoted release of anti-inflammatory cytokines, when compared with curcumin or phosphatidylserine alone. These results suggest that the delivery system using PS-based nanoparticles has great potential for efficient delivery of drugs such as curcumin, specifically targeting macrophages and modulation of their anti-inflammatory functions.

  5. Activation of TLR3/interferon signaling pathway by bluetongue virus results in HIV inhibition in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ming; Wang, Xu; Li, Jie-Liang; Zhou, Yu; Sang, Ming; Liu, Jin-Biao; Wu, Jian-Guo; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2015-12-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV), a nonenveloped double-stranded RNA virus, is a potent inducer of type Ι interferons in multiple cell systems. In this study, we report that BTV16 treatment of primary human macrophages induced both type I and III IFN expression, resulting in the production of multiple antiviral factors, including myxovirus resistance protein A, 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase, and the IFN-stimulated gene 56. Additionally, BTV-treated macrophages expressed increased HIV restriction factors (apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide 3 G/F/H) and CC chemokines (macrophage inflammatory protein 1-α, macrophage inflammatory protein 1-β, regulated on activation of normal T cell expressed and secreted), the ligands for HIV entry coreceptor CC chemokine receptor type 5. BTV16 also induced the expression of tetherin, which restricts HIV release from infected cells. Furthermore, TLR3 signaling of macrophages by BTV16 resulted in the induction of several anti-HIV microRNAs (miRNA-28, -29a, -125b, -150, -223, and -382). More importantly, the induction of antiviral responses by BTV resulted in significant suppression of HIV in macrophages. These findings demonstrate the potential of BTV-mediated TLR3 activation in macrophage innate immunity against HIV.

  6. Tumor cell-activated CARD9 signaling contributes to metastasis-associated macrophage polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, M; Shao, J-H; Miao, Y-J; Cui, W; Qi, Y-F; Han, J-H; Lin, X; Du, J

    2014-08-01

    Macrophages are critical immune effector cells of the tumor microenvironment that promote seeding, extravasation and persistent growth of tumor cells in primary tumors and metastatic sites. Tumor progression and metastasis are affected by dynamic changes in the specific phenotypes of macrophage subpopulations; however, the mechanisms by which tumor cells modulate macrophage polarization remain incompletely understood. Caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 9 (CARD9) is a central adaptor protein of innate immune responses to extracellular pathogens. We report that increased CARD9 expression is primarily localized in infiltrated macrophages and significantly associated with advanced histopathologic stage and the presence of metastasis. Using CARD9-deficient (CARD9(-/-)) mice, we show that bone marrow-derived CARD9 promotes liver metastasis of colon carcinoma cells. Mechanistic studies reveal that CARD9 contributes to tumor metastasis by promoting metastasis-associated macrophage polarization through activation of the nuclear factor-kappa B signaling pathway. We further demonstrate that tumor cell-secreted vascular endothelial growth factor facilitates spleen tyrosine kinase activation in macrophages, which is necessary for formation of the CARD9-B-cell lymphoma/leukemia 10-mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation protein 1 complex. Taken together, our results indicating that CARD9 is a regulator of metastasis-associated macrophages will lead to new insights into evolution of the microenvironments supporting tumor metastasis, thereby providing targets for anticancer therapies. PMID:24722209

  7. The Impact of Membrane Lipid Composition on Macrophage Activation in the Immune Defense against Rhodococcus equi and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Julia Schumann; Herbert Fuhrmann; Stephanie Adolph; Axel Schoeniger

    2011-01-01

    Nutritional fatty acids are known to have an impact on membrane lipid composition of body cells, including cells of the immune system, thus providing a link between dietary fatty acid uptake, inflammation and immunity. In this study we reveal the significance of macrophage membrane lipid composition on gene expression and cytokine synthesis thereby highlighting signal transduction processes, macrophage activation as well as macrophage defense mechanisms. Using RAW264.7 macrophages as a model ...

  8. Functional activity of monocytes and macrophages in HTLV-1 infected subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila F Amorim

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Human T lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1 infects predominantly T cells, inducing proliferation and lymphocyte activation. Additionally, HTLV-1 infected subjects are more susceptible to other infections caused by other intracellular agents. Monocytes/macrophages are important cells in the defense against intracellular pathogens. Our aims were to determine the frequency of monocytes subsets, expression of co-stimulatory molecules in these cells and to evaluate microbicidal ability and cytokine and chemokine production by macrophages from HTLV-1 infected subjects. Participants were 23 HTLV-1 carriers (HC, 22 HAM/TSP patients and 22 healthy subjects (HS not infected with HTLV-1. The frequencies of monocyte subsets and expression of co-stimulatory molecules were determined by flow cytometry. Macrophages were infected with L. braziliensis or stimulated with LPS. Microbicidal activity of macrophages was determined by optic microscopy. Cytokines/chemokines from macrophage supernatants were measured by ELISA. HAM/TSP patients showed an increase frequency of intermediate monocytes, but expression of co-stimulatory molecules was similar between the groups. Macrophages from HTLV-1 infected individuals were infected with L. braziliensis at the same ratio than macrophages from HS, and all the groups had the same ability to kill Leishmania parasites. However, macrophages from HTLV-1 infected subjects produced more CXCL9 and CCL5, and less IL-10 than cells from HS. While there was no correlation between IFN-γ and cytokine/chemokine production by macrophages, there was a correlation between proviral load and TNF and CXCL10. These data showed a dissociation between the inflammatory response and microbicidal ability of macrophages from HTLV-1 infected subjects. While macrophages ability to kill an intracellular pathogen did not differ among HTLV-1 infected subjects, these cells secreted high amount of chemokines even in unstimulated cultures. Moreover the

  9. Improved control of tuberculosis and activation of macrophages in mice lacking protein kinase R.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kangyun Wu

    Full Text Available Host factors that microbial pathogens exploit for their propagation are potential targets for therapeuic countermeasures. No host enzyme has been identified whose genetic absence benefits the intact mammalian host in vivo during infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, the leading cause of death from bacterial infection. Here, we report that the dsRNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR is such an enzyme. PKR-deficient mice contained fewer viable Mtb and showed less pulmonary pathology than wild type mice. We identified two potential mechanisms for the protective effect of PKR deficiency: increased apoptosis of macrophages in response to Mtb and enhanced activation of macrophages in response to IFN-gamma. The restraining effect of PKR on macrophage activation was explained by its mediation of a previously unrecognized ability of IFN-gamma to induce low levels of the macrophage deactivating factor interleukin 10 (IL10. These observations suggest that PKR inhibitors may prove useful as an adjunctive treatment for tuberculosis.

  10. Effect of Polypeptide CH50 on Macrophage Activation in vivo and Antitumor Function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The main features of CH50, a recombinant polypeptide of human fibronectin, activating macrophages in vivo and its anti-tumor function were investigated. After injection of CH50 and(or) transfection of IFN-γ gene in vivo, several kinds of factors produced by macrophages were determined and the growth of tumor in vivo was measured. CH50 could enhance the production of such factors as NO, TNF and IL-1 by macrophages, but the activation of macrophages was relatively slow when CH50 was used in vivo alone. CH50 and IFN-γ could synergistically activate macrophages rapidly in vivo no matter whether the injection of CH50 or the transfection of IFN-γ gene was performed first. Injection of CH50 alone inhibited the formation of tumor nodes in a dose-dependent manner. Low dose of CH50 could strongly inhibit the formation of tumor nodes less than 1 mm, while high dose of CH50 could inhibit those more than 1 mm. A stronger inhibition on the growth of tumor in vivo was obtained by the synergistic effect of CH50 and IFN-γ. CH50 and IFN-γ, as double-signal factors for activation of macrophages, will be potentially useful in tumortherapy.

  11. Inhibition of 5-Lipoxygenase Pathway Attenuates Acute Liver Failure by Inhibiting Macrophage Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the role of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO in acute liver failure (ALF and changes in macrophage activation by blocking it. ALF was induced in rats by administration of D-galactosamine (D-GalN/lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Rats were injected intraperitoneally with AA-861 (a specific 5-LO inhibitor, 24 hr before D-GalN/LPS administration. After D-GalN/LPS injection, the liver tissue was collected for assessment of histology, macrophage microstructure, macrophage counts, 5-LO mRNA formation, protein expression, and concentration of leukotrienes. Serum was collected for detecting alanine aminotransferase (ALT, aspartate transaminase (AST, total bilirubin (Tbil, and tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-α. Twenty-four hours after injection, compared with controls, ALF rats were characterized by widespread hepatocyte necrosis and elevated ALT, AST, and Tbil, and 5-LO protein expression reached a peak. Liver leukotriene B4 was also significantly elevated. However, 5-LO mRNA reached a peak 8 hr after D-GalN/LPS injection. Simultaneously, the microstructure of macrophages was changed most significantly and macrophages counts were increased significantly. Moreover, serum TNF-α was also elevated. By contrast, AA-861 pretreatment significantly decreased liver necrosis as well as all of the parameters compared with the rats without pretreatment. Macrophages, via the 5-LO pathway, play a critical role in ALF, and 5-LO inhibitor significantly alleviates ALF, possibly related to macrophage inhibition.

  12. Bioelectric modulation of macrophage polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunmei; Levin, Michael; Kaplan, David L.

    2016-02-01

    Macrophages play a critical role in regulating wound healing and tissue regeneration by changing their polarization state in response to local microenvironmental stimuli. The native roles of polarized macrophages encompass biomaterials and tissue remodeling needs, yet harnessing or directing the polarization response has been largely absent as a potential strategy to exploit in regenerative medicine to date. Recent data have revealed that specific alteration of cells’ resting potential (Vmem) is a powerful tool to direct proliferation and differentiation in a number of complex tissues, such as limb regeneration, craniofacial patterning and tumorigenesis. In this study, we explored the bioelectric modulation of macrophage polarization by targeting ATP sensitive potassium channels (KATP). Glibenclamide (KATP blocker) and pinacidil (KATP opener) treatment not only affect macrophage polarization, but also influence the phenotype of prepolarized macrophages. Furthermore, modulation of cell membrane electrical properties can fine-tune macrophage plasticity. Glibenclamide decreased the secretion and gene expression of selected M1 markers, while pinacidil augmented M1 markers. More interestingly, glibencalmide promoted macrophage alternative activation by enhancing certain M2 markers during M2 polarization. These findings suggest that control of bioelectric properties of macrophages could offer a promising approach to regulate macrophage phenotype as a useful tool in regenerative medicine.

  13. Hypoxia Potentiates Palmitate-induced Pro-inflammatory Activation of Primary Human Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snodgrass, Ryan G; Boß, Marcel; Zezina, Ekaterina; Weigert, Andreas; Dehne, Nathalie; Fleming, Ingrid; Brüne, Bernhard; Namgaladze, Dmitry

    2016-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines secreted by adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs) contribute to chronic low-grade inflammation and obesity-induced insulin resistance. Recent studies have shown that adipose tissue hypoxia promotes an inflammatory phenotype in ATMs. However, our understanding of how hypoxia modulates the response of ATMs to free fatty acids within obese adipose tissue is limited. We examined the effects of hypoxia (1% O2) on the pro-inflammatory responses of human monocyte-derived macrophages to the saturated fatty acid palmitate. Compared with normoxia, hypoxia significantly increased palmitate-induced mRNA expression and protein secretion of IL-6 and IL-1β. Although palmitate-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and nuclear factor κB pathway activation were not enhanced by hypoxia, hypoxia increased the activation of JNK and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling in palmitate-treated cells. Inhibition of JNK blocked the hypoxic induction of pro-inflammatory cytokine expression, whereas knockdown of hypoxia-induced transcription factors HIF-1α and HIF-2α alone or in combination failed to reduce IL-6 and only modestly reduced IL-1β gene expression in palmitate-treated hypoxic macrophages. Enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokine production and JNK activity under hypoxia were prevented by inhibiting reactive oxygen species generation. In addition, silencing of dual-specificity phosphatase 16 increased normoxic levels of IL-6 and IL-1β and reduced the hypoxic potentiation in palmitate-treated macrophages. The secretome of hypoxic palmitate-treated macrophages promoted IL-6 and macrophage chemoattractant protein 1 expression in primary human adipocytes, which was sensitive to macrophage JNK inhibition. Our results reveal that the coexistence of hypoxia along with free fatty acids exacerbates macrophage-mediated inflammation. PMID:26578520

  14. Effect of Tityus serrulatus venom on cytokine production and the activity of murine macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Vera L. Petricevich

    2002-01-01

    THE purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of Tityus serrulatus venom (TSV) on murine peritoneal macrophages evaluated in terms of activation. The effects of crude TSV were analysed by detection of cytokines, oxygen intermediate metabolites (H2O2) and nitric oxide (NO) in supernatants of peritoneal macrophages. Several functional bioassays were employed including an in vitro model for envenomating: cytotoxicity of TSV was assessed using the lyses percentage. Tumor necrosis facto...

  15. Activated alveolar macrophages in subclinical pulmonary inflammation in collagen vascular diseases.

    OpenAIRE

    Wallaert, B; Bart, F.; Aerts, C.; Ouaissi, A.; Hatron, P Y; Tonnel, A. B.; C. Voisin

    1988-01-01

    A study was initiated to determine whether alveolar macrophages from patients with collagen vascular diseases but free of pulmonary symptoms were spontaneously activated and whether they released various mediators related to the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. Alveolar macrophages obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage from 32 patients with proved collagen vascular disease but no evidence of lung disease were compared with those from 10 patients with collagen vascular disease with interstitia...

  16. Regulation of murine macrophage Ia-antigen expression by products of activated spleen cells

    OpenAIRE

    1980-01-01

    This investigation examined the effects of mediators derived form activated spleen cells on macrophage Ia-antigen expression and function. Incubation of adherent thioglycollate-induced murine peritoneal macrophages(> 90% Ia-) with concanavalin A (Con A)- stimulated spleen cell supernate (Con A sup) resulted in a dose- dependent increase in the percentage of Ia-containing (Ia+) phagocytic cells, as detected by antiserum-and-complement-mediated cytotoxicity. The Ia-antigen expression of macroph...

  17. The biological activities of glycodelin-A on human monocytes and macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Lam, Yi-Fu, Eve.; 林薏芙.

    2011-01-01

    The fetal-maternal interface is an immunologically privileged site where the semi-allogeneic fetus is protected from the maternal immune system. Macrophage represents the second major type (20-30%) of the decidual leukocyte. It functions as important regulator of pregnancy processes such as fetal tolerance, placental development and onset of labor. Changes in macrophage number and activity have been associated with fetal loss and pregnancy complications, including intrauterine growth restric...

  18. IKKalpha limits macrophage NF-kappaB activation and contributes to the resolution of inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Toby; Bebien, Magali; Liu, George Y; Nizet, Victor; Karin, Michael

    2005-04-28

    Inflammation and innate immunity involve signalling pathways leading to the production of inflammatory mediators. Usually such responses are self-limiting, but aberrant resolution of inflammation results in chronic diseases. Much attention has focused on pro-inflammatory signalling but little is known about the mechanisms that resolve inflammation. The IkappaB kinase (IKK) complex contains two catalytic subunits, IKKalpha and IKKbeta, and controls the activation of NF-kappaB transcription factors, which play a pivotal role in inflammation. Ample evidence indicates that IKKbeta mediates NF-kappaB activation in response to pro-inflammatory cytokines and microbial products. IKKalpha regulates an alternative pathway important for lymphoid organogenesis, but the role of IKKalpha in inflammation is unknown. Here we describe a new role for IKKalpha in the negative regulation of macrophage activation and inflammation. IKKalpha contributes to suppression of NF-kappaB activity by accelerating both the turnover of the NF-kappaB subunits RelA and c-Rel, and their removal from pro-inflammatory gene promoters. Inactivation of IKKalpha in mice enhances inflammation and bacterial clearance. Hence, the two IKK catalytic subunits have evolved opposing but complimentary roles needed for the intricate control of inflammation and innate immunity. PMID:15858576

  19. Progranulin promotes activation of microglia/macrophage after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shanshan; Tai, Chao; Petkau, Terri L; Zhang, Si; Liao, Chengyong; Dong, Zhifang; Wen, Wendy; Chang, Qing; Tian Wang, Yu; MacVicar, Brian A; Leavitt, Blair R; Jia, William; Cynader, Max S

    2013-09-12

    Progranulin (PGRN) haploinsufficiency accounts for up to 10% of frontotemporal lobe dementia. PGRN has also been implicated in neuroinflammation in acute and chronic neurological disorders. Here we report that both protein and mRNA levels of cortical and hippocampal PGRN are significantly enhanced following pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus. We also identify intense PGRN immunoreactivity that colocalizes with CD11b in seizure-induced animals, suggesting that PGRN elevation occurs primarily in activated microglia and macrophages. To test the role of PGRN in activation of microglia/macrophages, we apply recombinant PGRN protein directly into the hippocampal formation, and observe no change in the number of CD11b(+) microglia/macrophages in the dentate gyrus. However, with pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus, PGRN application significantly increases the number of CD11b(+) microglia/macrophages in the dentate gyrus, without affecting the extent of hilar cell death. In addition, the number of CD11b(+) microglia/macrophages induced by status epilepticus is not significantly different between PGRN knockout mice and wildtype. Our findings suggest that status epilepticus induces PGRN expression, and that PGRN potentiates but is not required for seizure-induced microglia/macrophage activation.

  20. Effect of influenza infection on the phagocytic and bactericidal activities of pulmonary macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of mouse-adapted influenza A/PR/8/34 virus on pulmonary macrophage function was evaluated by using an in vitro system which allowed direct virus interaction with macrophages and then separate analysis of the steps required for bacterial clearance by macrophages. Infection of macrophages with this virus resulted in the appearance of a hemagglutinating activity on the macrophage surface; expression of this activity was inhibited by amantadine, 2-deoxyglucose, and cycloheximide and by pretreatment of the virus inoculum with with ultraviolet light and specific antiserum. After influenza infection, net ingestion of viable Staphylococcus aureus by macrophage monolayers was unaltered and there was no change in the fraction of the monolayer which ingested cocci over a wide range of bacterial inputs. Influenza-infected microphages also inactivated intracellular S. aureus at a rate indistinguishable from controls. Therefore, these in vitro studies do not support the hypothesis that the defect in pulmonary antibacterial mechanisms associated with influenza infections results from a direct effect of virus infection on either the phagocytic or bactericidal activity of resistant pulmonary macarophages

  1. Direct Effects of Activin A on the Activation of Mouse Macrophage RAW264.7 Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingyan Ge; Yinan Wang; Ye Feng; Haiyan Liu; Xueling Cui; Fangfang Chen; Guixiang Tai; Zhonghui Liu

    2009-01-01

    Macrophages play critical roles in innate immune and acquired immune via secreting pro-inflammatory mediators, phagocytosing microorganisms and presenting antigens. Activin A, a member of transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) superfamily, is produced by macrophages and microglia cells. In this study, we reported a direct effect of activin A as a pro-inflammatory factor on mouse macrophage cell line RAW264.7 cells. Our data revealed that activin A could not only increase IL-1v and IL-6 production from RAW264.7 cells, but also promote pinocytic and phagocytic activities of RAW264.7 cells. In addition, activin A obviously up-regulated MHC Ⅱ expression on the surface of RAW264.7 cells, whereas did not influence MHC I expression. Activin A also enhanced CD80 expression, which is a marker of activated macrophages, but did not influence RAW264.7 cell proliferation. These data suggest that activin A may regulate primary macrophage-mediated innate and acquired immune response via promoting the activation of rest macrophages. Cellular & Molecular Immunology.

  2. Effect of Tityus serrulatus venom on cytokine production and the activity of murine macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera L. Petricevich

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of Tityus serrulatus venom (TSV on murine peritoneal macrophages evaluated in terms of activation. The effects of crude TSV were analysed by detection of cytokines, oxygen intermediate metabolites (H2O2 and nitric oxide (NO in supernatants of peritoneal macrophages. Several functional bioassays were employed including an in vitro model for envenomating: cytotoxicity of TSV was assessed using the lyses percentage. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF activity was assayed by measuring its cytotoxic activity on L-929 cells, and interleukin-6 (IL-6 and interferon-γ (IFN-γ were assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, whereas NO levels were detected by Griess colorimetric reactions in culture supernatant of macrophages incubated with TSV and subsequently exposed to either lipopolysaccharide or IFN-γ. Incubation of macrophages with TSV increased production of IL-6 and IFN-γ in a dose-dependent manner. TNF production was not detected in supernatants treated with TSV at any concentration. The increase in IL-6 secretion was not associated with concentration-dependent cytoxicity of TSV on these cells. These data suggest that the cytotoxicity does not appear to be the main cause of an increased cytokine production by these cells. Although NO is an important effector molecule in macrophage microbicidal activity, the inducing potential of the test compounds for its release was found to be very moderate, ranging from 125 to 800 mM. Interestingly, NO levels of peritoneal macrophages were increased after IFN-γ. Moreover, NO production had an apparent effect on macrophage activity. The results obtained here also shown that the TSV induces an important elevation in H2O2 release. These results combined with NO production suggest that TSV possesses significant immunomodulatory activities capable of stimulating immune functions in vitro.

  3. MiR-16 regulates mouse peritoneal macrophage polarization and affects T-cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xiaoqin; Li, Xiaomin; Shen, Yating; Miao, Junjun; Liu, Hao; Li, Guoli; Wang, Zhengbing

    2016-10-01

    MiR-16 is a tumour suppressor that is down-regulated in certain human cancers. However, little is known on its activity in other cell types. In this study, we examined the biological significance and underlying mechanisms of miR-16 on macrophage polarization and subsequent T-cell activation. Mouse peritoneal macrophages were isolated and induced to undergo either M1 polarization with 100 ng/ml of interferon-γ and 20 ng/ml of lipopolysaccharide, or M2 polarization with 20 ng/ml of interleukin (IL)-4. The identity of polarized macrophages was determined by profiling cell-surface markers by flow cytometry and cytokine production by ELISA. Macrophages were infected with lentivirus-expressing miR-16 to assess the effects of miR-16. Effects on macrophage-T cell interactions were analysed by co-culturing purified CD4(+) T cells with miR-16-expressing peritoneal macrophages, and measuring activation marker CD69 by flow cytometry and cytokine secretion by ELISA. Bioinformatics analysis was applied to search for potential miR-16 targets and understand its underlying mechanisms. MiR-16-induced M1 differentiation of mouse peritoneal macrophages from either the basal M0- or M2-polarized state is indicated by the significant up-regulation of M1 marker CD16/32, repression of M2 marker CD206 and Dectin-1, and increased secretion of M1 cytokine IL-12 and nitric oxide. Consistently, miR-16-expressing macrophages stimulate the activation of purified CD4(+) T cells. Mechanistically, miR-16 significantly down-regulates the expression of PD-L1, a critical immune suppressor that controls macrophage-T cell interaction and T-cell activation. MiR-16 plays an important role in shifting macrophage polarization from M2 to M1 status, and functionally activating CD4(+) T cells. This effect is potentially mediated through the down-regulation of immune suppressor PD-L1.

  4. Inhibition of nuclear factor-kappa B activation decreases survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in human macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiyuan Bai

    Full Text Available Nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB is a ubiquitous transcription factor that mediates pro-inflammatory responses required for host control of many microbial pathogens; on the other hand, NFκB has been implicated in the pathogenesis of other inflammatory and infectious diseases. Mice with genetic disruption of the p50 subunit of NFκB are more likely to succumb to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB. However, the role of NFκB in host defense in humans is not fully understood. We sought to examine the role of NFκB activation in the immune response of human macrophages to MTB. Targeted pharmacologic inhibition of NFκB activation using BAY 11-7082 (BAY, an inhibitor of IκBα kinase or an adenovirus construct with a dominant-negative IκBα significantly decreased the number of viable intracellular mycobacteria recovered from THP-1 macrophages four and eight days after infection. The results with BAY were confirmed in primary human monocyte-derived macrophages and alveolar macrophages. NFκB inhibition was associated with increased macrophage apoptosis and autophagy, which are well-established killing mechanisms of intracellular MTB. Inhibition of the executioner protease caspase-3 or of the autophagic pathway significantly abrogated the effects of BAY. We conclude that NFκB inhibition decreases viability of intracellular MTB in human macrophages via induction of apoptosis and autophagy.

  5. IMMUNOBIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY OF REGULATORY PEPTIDE FRACTIONS SYNTHESIZED BY NEUTROPHILS, AS TESTED IN A MACROPHAGE MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. I. Vasilieva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents experimental data on regulatory effect of neutrophilokine helper fractions on the macrophage (Mph functional activity in the course of antiplague immunity formation. It has revealed that these fractions content biologically active, low-molecular weight peptides. They stimulate Mph killing activity by increasing phagosome-lysosome fusion, thus boosting transformation of monocytes to Mph, and causing redistribution of macrophage subpopulations in the total cellular pool. The helper effect of neutrophilokine fractions upon functional activity of MPh is more pronounced during secondary immune response.

  6. Dihydro-CDDO-trifluoroethyl amide suppresses inflammatory responses in macrophages via activation of Nrf2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Bin [Shandong University Qilu Hospital Research Center for Cell Therapy, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Abdalrahman, Akram; Lai, Yimu; Janicki, Joseph S. [Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Ward, Keith W.; Meyer, Colin J. [Department of Pharmacology, Reata Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Irving, TX 75063 (United States); Wang, Xing Li [Shandong University Qilu Hospital Research Center for Cell Therapy, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Tang, Dongqi, E-mail: Dongqi.Tang@uscmed.sc.edu [Shandong University Qilu Hospital Research Center for Cell Therapy, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Cui, Taixing, E-mail: taixing.cui@uscmed.sc.edu [Shandong University Qilu Hospital Research Center for Cell Therapy, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States)

    2014-02-21

    Highlights: • Dh404 suppresses the expression of a selected set of pro-inflammatory cytokines in inflamed macrophages via activating Nrf2. • Dh404 activates Nrf2 while keeping Keap1 function intact in macrophages. • Dh404 minimally regulates NF-κB pathway in macrophages. - Abstract: Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2) is the major regulator of cellular defenses against various pathological stresses in a variety of organ systems, thus Nrf2 has evolved to be an attractive drug target for the treatment and/or prevention of human disease. Several synthetic oleanolic triterpenoids including dihydro-CDDO-trifluoroethyl amide (dh404) appear to be potent activators of Nrf2 and exhibit chemopreventive promises in multiple disease models. While the pharmacological efficacy of Nrf2 activators may be dependent on the nature of Nrf2 activation in specific cell types of target organs, the precise role of Nrf2 in mediating biological effects of Nrf2 activating compounds in various cell types remains to be further explored. Herein we report a unique and Nrf2-dependent anti-inflammatory profile of dh404 in inflamed macrophages. In lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-inflamed RAW264.7 macrophages, dh404 dramatically suppressed the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines including inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), and macrophage inflammatory protein-1 beta (MIP-1β), while minimally regulating the expression of interleulin-6 (IL-6), IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα). Dh404 potently activated Nrf2 signaling; however, it did not affect LPS-induced NF-κB activity. Dh404 did not interrupt the interaction of Nrf2 with its endogenous inhibitor Kelch-like ECH associating protein 1 (Keap1) in macrophages. Moreover, knockout of Nrf2 blocked the dh404-induced anti-inflammatory responses in LPS-inflamed macrophages. These results demonstrated that dh404 suppresses pro-inflammatory responses in macrophages via an activation

  7. Activation of a distinct subpopulation of pulmonary macrophages following exposure to biological response modifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drath, D B; Do, C; Burd, T; Hong, L L

    1994-03-01

    A distinct subpopulation of tissue-associated pulmonary macrophages (TAPM) displayed tumoricidal activity towards syngeneic and xenogeneic targets following in vitro incubation with N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutamine (MDP). This subpopulation, as well as, the predominant population of freely lavagable alveolar macrophages destroyed allogeneic targets following a similar incubation with either 6-0-stearoyl MDP (S-MDP) or recombinant interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). IFN-gamma-induced in vivo tumoricidal activation of both populations of pulmonary macrophage was most effective when delivered either intravenously or via osmotic minipump infusion and least effective when administered by direct intratracheal instillation. The separate populations also displayed in vivo activation in response to liposome-encapsulated i.v. administered S-MDP. Under comparable conditions, IFN-alpha was not nearly as effective. Metabolic activation of TAPM, assessed by the release of increased levels of superoxide free radicals during phagocytosis, occurred following 24 hr exposure to S-MDP or lipopolysaccharide. Incorporation of these agents into multilamellar vesicle liposomes further augmented the release of superoxide observed at 24 hrs. Our results collectively demonstrated that a subpopulation of lung macrophage, a tissue-associated pulmonary macrophage, may be activated to a tumoricidal state and to release pronounced levels of oxygen free radicals following either in vitro or in situ treatment with several biological response modifiers. PMID:8194852

  8. Schisandra polysaccharide evokes immunomodulatory activity through TLR 4-mediated activation of macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ting; Feng, Yun; Li, Jing; Mao, Riwen; Zou, Ye; Feng, Weiwei; Zheng, Daheng; Wang, Wei; Chen, Yao; Yang, Liuqing; Wu, Xiangyang

    2014-04-01

    Schisandra chinensis (Turcz.) Baill has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for centuries. Previous studies have shown that Schisandra polysaccharide (SCPP11) has robust antitumor activity in vivo. In this study, the immunomodulatory activity and mechanisms of action of SCPP11 were investigated further to reveal its mechanism of action against tumors. Results showed that SCPP11 increased the thymus and spleen indices, pinocytic activity of peritoneal macrophages, and hemolysin formation in CTX-induced immunosuppressed mice. Moreover, SCPP11 significantly increased immunoglobulin levels, cytokines levels in vivo and induced RAW264.7 cells to secrete cytokines in vitro. RAW264.7 cells pretreated with SCPP11 significantly inhibited the proliferation of HepG-2 cells. In addition, SCPP11 promoted both the expression of iNOS protein and of iNOS and TNF-α mRNA. TLR-4 is a possible receptor for SCPP11-mediated macrophage activation. Therefore, the data suggest that SCPP11 exerted its antitumor activity by improving immune system functions through TLR-4-mediated up-regulation of NO and TNF-α.

  9. Immunocytochemical localization of latent transforming growth factor-beta1 activation by stimulated macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, H.; Vodovotz, Y.; Cox, G. W.; Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta) is secreted in a latent form consisting of mature TGF-beta noncovalently associated with its amino-terminal propeptide, which is called latency associated peptide (LAP). Biological activity depends upon the release of TGF-beta from the latent complex following extracellular activation, which appears to be the key regulatory mechanism controlling TGF-beta action. We have identified two events associated with latent TGF-beta (LTGF-beta) activation in vivo: increased immunoreactivity of certain antibodies that specifically detect TGF-beta concomitant with decreased immunoreactivity of antibodies to LAP. Macrophages stimulated in vitro with interferon-gamma and lipopolysaccharide reportedly activate LTGF-beta via cell membrane-bound protease activity. We show through dual immunostaining of paraformaldehyde-fixed macrophages that such physiological TGF-beta activation is accompanied by a loss of LAP immunoreactivity with concomitant revelation of TGF-beta epitopes. The induction of TGF-beta immunoreactivity colocalized with immunoreactive betaglycan/RIII in activated macrophages, suggesting that LTGF-beta activation occurs on the cell surface. Confocal microscopy of metabolically active macrophages incubated with antibodies to TGF-beta and betaglycan/RIII prior to fixation supported the localization of activation to the cell surface. The ability to specifically detect and localize LTGF-beta activation provides an important tool for studies of its regulation.

  10. Macrophages infected with cytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus release a factor(s) capable of priming uninfected macrophages for activation-induced apoptosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Adler, B; Adler, H; Pfister, H; Jungi, T. W.; Peterhans, E

    1997-01-01

    Bovine bone marrow-derived macrophages infected with the cytopathic biotype of bovine viral diarrhea virus released an antiviral activity into the supernatant which was tentatively characterized as type I interferon because of its physicochemical properties. Such supernatants primed both infected and uninfected macrophages for decreased nitric oxide production and apoptosis in response to lipopolysaccharide. This finding strongly suggests a role of this pathway in the pathogenesis of mucosal ...

  11. Polyoxygenated Cholesterol Ester Hydroperoxide Activates TLR4 and SYK Dependent Signaling in Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Soo-Ho; Yin, Huiyong; Ravandi, Amir; Armando, Aaron; Dumlao, Darren; Kim, Jungsu; Almazan, Felicidad; Taylor, Angela M.; McNamara, Coleen A.; Tsimikas, Sotirios; Dennis, Edward A.; Witztum, Joseph L.; Miller, Yury I.

    2013-01-01

    Oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is one of the major causative mechanisms in the development of atherosclerosis. In previous studies, we showed that minimally oxidized LDL (mmLDL) induced inflammatory responses in macrophages, macropinocytosis and intracellular lipid accumulation and that oxidized cholesterol esters (OxCEs) were biologically active components of mmLDL. Here we identified a specific OxCE molecule responsible for the biological activity of mmLDL and characterized signaling pathways in macrophages in response to this OxCE. Using liquid chromatography – tandem mass spectrometry and biological assays, we identified an oxidized cholesteryl arachidonate with bicyclic endoperoxide and hydroperoxide groups (BEP-CE) as a specific OxCE that activates macrophages in a TLR4/MD-2-dependent manner. BEP-CE induced TLR4/MD-2 binding and TLR4 dimerization, phosphorylation of SYK, ERK1/2, JNK and c-Jun, cell spreading and uptake of dextran and native LDL by macrophages. The enhanced macropinocytosis resulted in intracellular lipid accumulation and macrophage foam cell formation. Bone marrow-derived macrophages isolated from TLR4 and SYK knockout mice did not respond to BEP-CE. The presence of BEP-CE was demonstrated in human plasma and in the human plaque material captured in distal protection devices during percutaneous intervention. Our results suggest that BEP-CE is an endogenous ligand that activates the TLR4/SYK signaling pathway. Because BEP-CE is present in human plasma and human atherosclerotic lesions, BEP-CE-induced and TLR4/SYK-mediated macrophage responses may contribute to chronic inflammation in human atherosclerosis. PMID:24376657

  12. Scavenger receptor B1 facilitates macrophage uptake of silver nanoparticles and cellular activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldossari, Abdullah A.; Shannahan, Jonathan H. [The University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences (United States); Podila, Ramakrishna [Clemson University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (United States); Brown, Jared M., E-mail: jared.brown@ucdenver.edu [The University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Due to increased use of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) for their antimicrobial activity, concerns have risen regarding potential adverse human health effects. Scavenger receptor B1 (SR-B1), a major receptor for high-density lipoprotein (HDL), is expressed by macrophages and has also been reported to play a role in recognition of negatively charged particles. We, therefore, hypothesized that SR-B1 mediates macrophage uptake of AgNPs and inflammatory activation. To test this hypothesis, we exposed a mouse macrophage cell line RAW264.7 (RAW) and bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) to 20 nm citrate-suspended AgNPs. To verify the role of the SR-B1 receptor, we utilized a SR-B1 inhibitor (Blt2). In vitro studies demonstrated uptake of AgNPs and HDL-coated AgNPs by macrophages which were significantly reduced following pretreatment with Blt2. Inflammatory cytokine arrays revealed that macrophages exposed to AgNPs up-regulated expression of Tnf-α, Oncostatin m (OSM), Ccl4, Il17f, Ccl7, and Ccl2, whereas Il16 was found to be down-regulated. Macrophage activation was observed following AgNP and HDL-coated AgNP exposure as measured by OSM protein production and increased surface expression of CD86. These markers of activation were reduced with Blt2 pretreatment. The in vitro findings were confirmed in vivo through pulmonary instillation of AgNPs in mice. Pulmonary instillation of AgNPs resulted in a recruitment of inflammatory cells that were reduced in SR-B1-deficient mice or following Blt2 pretreatment. This study suggests that SR-B1 plays a major role in cellular recognition of AgNPs and the induction of cell responses that could contribute to inflammation caused by AgNP exposure.

  13. Scavenger receptor B1 facilitates macrophage uptake of silver nanoparticles and cellular activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to increased use of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) for their antimicrobial activity, concerns have risen regarding potential adverse human health effects. Scavenger receptor B1 (SR-B1), a major receptor for high-density lipoprotein (HDL), is expressed by macrophages and has also been reported to play a role in recognition of negatively charged particles. We, therefore, hypothesized that SR-B1 mediates macrophage uptake of AgNPs and inflammatory activation. To test this hypothesis, we exposed a mouse macrophage cell line RAW264.7 (RAW) and bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) to 20 nm citrate-suspended AgNPs. To verify the role of the SR-B1 receptor, we utilized a SR-B1 inhibitor (Blt2). In vitro studies demonstrated uptake of AgNPs and HDL-coated AgNPs by macrophages which were significantly reduced following pretreatment with Blt2. Inflammatory cytokine arrays revealed that macrophages exposed to AgNPs up-regulated expression of Tnf-α, Oncostatin m (OSM), Ccl4, Il17f, Ccl7, and Ccl2, whereas Il16 was found to be down-regulated. Macrophage activation was observed following AgNP and HDL-coated AgNP exposure as measured by OSM protein production and increased surface expression of CD86. These markers of activation were reduced with Blt2 pretreatment. The in vitro findings were confirmed in vivo through pulmonary instillation of AgNPs in mice. Pulmonary instillation of AgNPs resulted in a recruitment of inflammatory cells that were reduced in SR-B1-deficient mice or following Blt2 pretreatment. This study suggests that SR-B1 plays a major role in cellular recognition of AgNPs and the induction of cell responses that could contribute to inflammation caused by AgNP exposure

  14. Modulation of microglial/macrophage activation by macrophage inhibitory factor (TKP or tuftsin (TKPR attenuates the disease course of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsirka Stella E

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein (MOG-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE is the most commonly used mouse model for multiple sclerosis (MS. During the of progression of EAE, microglia, the immunocompetent cells of the brain, become activated and accumulate around demyelinated lesions. Microglial activation is mediated by the extracellular protease tissue Plasminogen Activator (tPA, and mice lacking tPA display altered EAE progression. In this study, we have used pharmacological inhibitors and stimulators of microglial/macrophage activation to examine the temporal requirement for microglial activation in EAE progression and to determine whether such approaches might potentially be of therapeutic value. Results Intervention using the tripeptide macrophage/microglia inhibitory factor MIF (TKP and the tetrapeptide macrophage/microglial stimulator tuftsin (TKPR attenuated EAE symptoms and revealed that the timing of macrophage/microglial activation is critical for the clinical outcome of EAE. We show that the disease progression can potentially be manipulated favorably at early stages by altering the timing of microglial activation, which in turn alters the systemic immune response to favor upregulation of T helper cell 2 genes that promote recovery from EAE. Conclusion Preventative and therapeutic modulation of macrophage/microglial activity significantly alters the outcome of EAE at symptomatic stages. Specific molecular targets have been identified that represent potential avenues of exploration for the treatment and prevention of MS.

  15. Enhancement of phagocytotic activity by prion protein in PrP-deficient macrophage cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uraki, Ryuta; Sakudo, Akikazu; Ando, Saeko; Kitani, Hiroshi; Onodera, Takashi

    2010-10-01

    Macrophages, especially follicular dendritic cells, contribute to the pathogenesis of prion diseases by accumulating an abnormal isoform of prion protein (PrPSc), which is converted from the cellular isoform of prion protein (PrPC). As information on the function of PrPC in macrophages is limited, we have established a prion protein (PrP) gene (Prnp)-deficient macrophage cell line from the bone marrow of ZrchI Prnp-/- mice. These cells expressed macrophage specific proteins (F4/80 and MOMA-2) and displayed phagocytotic properties. The Prnp-/- macrophage cell line (MplZ) showed shorter pseudopodium extension and less phagocytotic activity than a Prnp+/+ macrophage cell line (MWF). In addition, the MplZ cells were more sensitive to serum deprivation than the MWF cells and underwent apoptotic cell death in these conditions. These findings suggest that PrPC enhances the incorporation of materials possibly including PrPSc and decreases the sensitivity of cells to oxidative stress, which may be induced by PrPSc accumulation. PMID:20818492

  16. Inhibition of ecto-ATPase activities impairs HIV-1 infection of macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schachter, Julieta; Delgado, Kelly Valcárcel; Barreto-de-Souza, Victor; Bou-Habib, Dumith Chequer; Persechini, Pedro Muanis; Meyer-Fernandes, José Roberto

    2015-05-01

    Nucleotides and nucleosides are secreted into extracellular media at different concentrations as a consequence of different physiologic and pathological conditions. Ecto-nucleotidases, enzymes present on the surface of most cells, hydrolyze these extracellular nucleotides and reduce the concentration of them, thus affecting the activation of different nucleotide and nucleoside receptors. Also, ecto-nucleotidases are present in a number of microorganisms and play important roles in host-pathogen interactions. Here, we characterized the ecto-ATPase activities present on the surface of HIV-1 particle and human macrophages as well. We found that the kinetic properties of HIV-1 and macrophage ecto-ATPases are similar, suggesting that the enzyme is the same. This ecto-ATPase activity was increased in macrophages infected in vitro with HIV-1. Using three different non-related ecto-ATPase inhibitors-POM-1, ARL67156 and BG0-we showed that the inhibition of these macrophage and viral ecto-ATPase activities impairs HIV-1 infection. In addition, we also found that elevated extracellular concentrations of ATP inhibit HIV-1 production by infected macrophages.

  17. Cathepsin L maturation and activity is impaired in macrophages harboring M. avium and M. tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepal, Rajeev M; Mampe, Stephanie; Shaffer, Brian; Erickson, Ann H; Bryant, Paula

    2006-06-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected macrophages demonstrate diminished capacity to present antigens via class II MHC molecules. Since successful class II MHC-restricted antigen presentation relies on the actions of endocytic proteases, we asked whether the activities of cathepsins (Cat) B, S and L-three major lysosomal cysteine proteases-are modulated in macrophages infected with pathogenic Mycobacterium spp. Infection of murine bone marrow-derived macrophages with either Mycobacterium avium or M. tuberculosis had no obvious effect on Cat B or Cat S activity. In contrast, the activity of Cat L was altered in infected cells. Specifically, whereas the 24-kDa two-chain mature form of active Cat L predominated in uninfected cells, we observed an increase in the steady-state activity of the precursor single-chain (30 kDa) and 25-kDa two-chain forms of the enzyme in cells infected with either M. avium or M. tuberculosis. Pulse-chase analyses revealed that maturation of nascent, single-chain Cat L into the 25-kDa two-chain form was impaired in infected macrophages, and that maturation into the 24-kDa two-chain form did not occur. Consistent with these data, M. avium infection inhibited the IFNgamma-induced secretion of active two-chain Cat L by macrophages. Viable bacilli were not required to disrupt Cat L maturation, suggesting that a constitutively expressed mycobacterial component was responsible. The absence of the major active form of lysosomal Cat L in M. avium- and M. tuberculosis-infected macrophages may influence the types of T cell epitopes generated in these antigen-presenting cells, and/or the rate of class II MHC peptide loading. PMID:16636015

  18. Aging Enhances the Production of Reactive Oxygen Species and Bactericidal Activity in Peritoneal Macrophages by Upregulating Classical Activation Pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smallwood, Heather S.; López-Ferrer, Daniel; Squier, Thomas C.

    2011-10-07

    Maintenance of macrophages in their basal state and their rapid activation in response to pathogen detection are central to the innate immune system, acting to limit nonspecific oxidative damage and promote pathogen killing following infection. To identify possible age-related alterations in macrophage function, we have assayed the function of peritoneal macrophages from young (3–4 months) and aged (14–15 months) Balb/c mice. In agreement with prior suggestions, we observe age-dependent increases in the extent of recruitment of macrophages into the peritoneum, as well as ex vivo functional changes involving enhanced nitric oxide production under resting conditions that contribute to a reduction in the time needed for full activation of senescent macrophages following exposure to lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Further, we observe enhanced bactericidal activity following Salmonella uptake by macrophages isolated from aged Balb/c mice in comparison with those isolated from young animals. Pathways responsible for observed phenotypic changes were interrogated using tandem mass spectrometry, which identified age-dependent increases in levels of proteins linked to immune cell pathways under basal conditions and following LPS activation. Immune pathways upregulated in macrophages isolated from aged mice include proteins critical to the formation of the immunoproteasome. Detection of these latter proteins is dramatically enhanced following LPS exposure for macrophages isolated from aged animals; in comparison, the identification of immunoproteasome subunits is insensitive to LPS exposure for macrophages isolated from young animals. Consistent with observed global changes in the proteome, quantitative proteomic measurements indicate that there are age-dependent abundance changes involving specific proteins linked to immune cell function under basal conditions. LPS exposure selectively increases the levels of many proteins involved in immune cell function in aged Balb/c mice

  19. Pathogenic Mycobacterium bovis strains differ in their ability to modulate the proinflammatory activation phenotype of macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrade Marcelle RM

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis or Mycobacterium bovis, remains one of the leading infectious diseases worldwide. The ability of mycobacteria to rapidly grow in host macrophages is a factor contributing to enhanced virulence of the bacteria and disease progression. Bactericidal functions of phagocytes are strictly dependent on activation status of these cells, regulated by the infecting agent and cytokines. Pathogenic mycobacteria can survive the hostile environment of the phagosome through interference with activation of bactericidal responses. To study the mechanisms employed by highly virulent mycobacteria to promote their intracellular survival, we investigated modulating effects of two pathogenic M. bovis isolates and a reference M. tuberculosis H37Rv strain, differing in their ability to multiply in macrophages, on activation phenotypes of the cells primed with major cytokines regulating proinflammatory macrophage activity. Results Bone marrow- derived macrophages obtained from C57BL/6 mice were infected by mycobacteria after a period of cell incubation with or without treatment with IFN-γ, inducing proinflammatory type-1 macrophages (M1, or IL-10, inducing anti-inflammatory type-2 cells (M2. Phenotypic profiling of M1 and M2 was then evaluated. The M. bovis strain MP287/03 was able to grow more efficiently in the untreated macrophages, compared with the strains B2 or H37Rv. This strain induced weaker secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, coinciding with higher expression of M2 cell markers, mannose receptor (MR and arginase-1 (Arg-1. Treatment of macrophages with IFN-γ and infection by the strains B2 and H37Rv synergistically induced M1 polarization, leading to high levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS expression, and reduced expression of the Arg-1. In contrast, the cells infected with the strain MP287/03 expressed high levels of Arg-1 which competed with iNOS for the common substrate

  20. Activation of Alveolar Macrophages after Plutonium Oxide Inhalation in Rats: Involvement in the Early Inflammatory Response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alveolar macrophages play an important role in the distribution, clearance and inflammatory reactions after particle inhalation, which may influence long-term events such as fibrosis and tumorigenesis. The objectives of the present study were to investigate the early inflammatory events after plutonium oxide inhalation in rats and involvement of alveolar macrophages. Lung changes were studied from 3 days to 3 months after inhalation of PuO2 or different isotopic compositions (70% or 97% 239Pu) and initial lung deposits (range 2.1 to 43.4 kBq/rat). Analyses of bronchoalveolar lavages showed early increases in the numbers of granulocytes, lymphocytes and multi-nucleated macrophages. The activation of macrophages was evaluated ex vivo by measurement of inflammatory mediator levels in culture supernatants. TNF-alpha and chemokine MCP-1, MIP-2 and CINC-1 production was elevated from 7 days after inhalation and remained so up to 3 months. In contrast, IL-1 beta, IL-6 and IL-10 production was unchanged. At 6 weeks, pulmonary macrophage numbers and activation state were increased as observed from an immunohistochemistry study of lung sections with anti-ED1. Similarly, histological analyses of lung sections also showed evidence of inflammatory responses. In conclusion, our results indicate early inflammatory changes in the lungs of PuO2-contaminated animals and the involvement of macrophages in this process. A dose-effect relationship was observed between the amount of radionuclide inhaled or retained at the time of analysis and inflammatory mediator production by alveolar macrophages 14 days after exposure. For similar initial lung deposits, the inflammatory manifestation appears higher for 97% 239Pu than for 70% 239Pu. (authors)

  1. Activation of Alveolar Macrophages after Plutonium Oxide Inhalation in Rats: Involvement in the Early Inflammatory Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Meeren, A.; Tourdes, F.; Gremy, O.; Grillon, G.; Abram, M.C.; Poncy, J.L.; Griffiths, N. [CEA, DSV, DRR, SRCA, Centre DAM Ile de France, F-91297 Bruyeres Le Chatel, Arpajon (France)

    2008-07-01

    Alveolar macrophages play an important role in the distribution, clearance and inflammatory reactions after particle inhalation, which may influence long-term events such as fibrosis and tumorigenesis. The objectives of the present study were to investigate the early inflammatory events after plutonium oxide inhalation in rats and involvement of alveolar macrophages. Lung changes were studied from 3 days to 3 months after inhalation of PuO{sub 2} or different isotopic compositions (70% or 97% {sup 239}Pu) and initial lung deposits (range 2.1 to 43.4 kBq/rat). Analyses of bronchoalveolar lavages showed early increases in the numbers of granulocytes, lymphocytes and multi-nucleated macrophages. The activation of macrophages was evaluated ex vivo by measurement of inflammatory mediator levels in culture supernatants. TNF-alpha and chemokine MCP-1, MIP-2 and CINC-1 production was elevated from 7 days after inhalation and remained so up to 3 months. In contrast, IL-1 beta, IL-6 and IL-10 production was unchanged. At 6 weeks, pulmonary macrophage numbers and activation state were increased as observed from an immunohistochemistry study of lung sections with anti-ED1. Similarly, histological analyses of lung sections also showed evidence of inflammatory responses. In conclusion, our results indicate early inflammatory changes in the lungs of PuO{sub 2}-contaminated animals and the involvement of macrophages in this process. A dose-effect relationship was observed between the amount of radionuclide inhaled or retained at the time of analysis and inflammatory mediator production by alveolar macrophages 14 days after exposure. For similar initial lung deposits, the inflammatory manifestation appears higher for 97% {sup 239}Pu than for 70% {sup 239}Pu. (authors)

  2. Macrophage activity assessed by soluble CD163 in early rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greisen, Stinne Ravn; Møller, Holger Jon; Stengaard-Pedersen, Kristian;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disease where TNF-α is a central mediator of inflammation, and is cleaved from the cell surface by TACE/ADAM17. This metalloproteinase is also responsible for the release of soluble (s) CD163. Soluble CD163 reflects macrophage activation...... in macrophage activity as evidenced by increasing levels following anti-TNF withdrawal, despite maintenance of a stable clinical condition achieved by conventional remedies. It remains to be determined whether sCD163 is an early predictor of disease flare....

  3. Muscle cells challenged with saturated fatty acids mount an autonomous inflammatory response that activates macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pillon Nicolas J

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Obesity is associated with chronic low-grade inflammation. Within adipose tissue of mice fed a high fat diet, resident and infiltrating macrophages assume a pro-inflammatory phenotype characterized by the production of cytokines which in turn impact on the surrounding tissue. However, inflammation is not restricted to adipose tissue and high fat-feeding is responsible for a significant increase in pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in muscle. Although skeletal muscle is the major disposer of dietary glucose and a major determinant of glycemia, the origin and consequence of muscle inflammation in the development of insulin resistance are poorly understood. We used a cell culture approach to investigate the vectorial crosstalk between muscle cells and macrophages upon exposure to physiological, low levels of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids. Inflammatory pathway activation and cytokine expression were analyzed in L6 muscle cells expressing myc-tagged GLUT4 (L6GLUT4myc exposed to 0.2 mM palmitate or palmitoleate. Conditioned media thereof, free of fatty acids, were then tested for their ability to activate RAW264.7 macrophages. Palmitate -but not palmitoleate- induced IL-6, TNFα and CCL2 expression in muscle cells, through activation of the NF-κB pathway. Palmitate (0.2 mM alone did not induce insulin resistance in muscle cells, yet conditioned media from palmitate-challenged muscle cells selectively activated macrophages towards a pro-inflammatory phenotype. These results demonstrate that low concentrations of palmitate activate autonomous inflammation in muscle cells to release factors that turn macrophages pro-inflammatory. We hypothesize that saturated fat-induced, low-grade muscle cell inflammation may trigger resident skeletal muscle macrophage polarization, possibly contributing to insulin resistance in vivo.

  4. TFEB and TFE3 cooperate in the regulation of the innate immune response in activated macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastore, Nunzia; Brady, Owen A; Diab, Heba I; Martina, José A; Sun, Lu; Huynh, Tuong; Lim, Jeong-A; Zare, Hossein; Raben, Nina; Ballabio, Andrea; Puertollano, Rosa

    2016-08-01

    The activation of transcription factors is critical to ensure an effective defense against pathogens. In this study we identify a critical and complementary role of the transcription factors TFEB and TFE3 in innate immune response. By using a combination of chromatin immunoprecipitation, CRISPR-Cas9-mediated genome-editing technology, and in vivo models, we determined that TFEB and TFE3 collaborate with each other in activated macrophages and microglia to promote efficient autophagy induction, increased lysosomal biogenesis, and transcriptional upregulation of numerous proinflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, secretion of key mediators of the inflammatory response (CSF2, IL1B, IL2, and IL27), macrophage differentiation (CSF1), and macrophage infiltration and migration to sites of inflammation (CCL2) was significantly reduced in TFEB and TFE3 deficient cells. These new insights provide us with a deeper understanding of the transcriptional regulation of the innate immune response. PMID:27171064

  5. The Interaction of Adrenomedullin and Macrophages Induces Ovarian Cancer Cell Migration via Activation of RhoA Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyan Pang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs are correlated with poor prognosis in many human cancers; however, the mechanism by which TAMs facilitate ovarian cancer cell migration and invasion remains unknown. This study was aimed to examine the function of adrenomedullin (ADM in macrophage polarization and their further effects on the migration of ovarian cancer cells. Exogenous ADM antagonist and small interfering RNA (siRNA specific for ADM expression were treated to macrophages and EOC cell line HO8910, respectively. Then macrophages were cocultured with HO8910 cells without direct contact. Flow cytometry, Western blot and real-time PCR were used to detect macrophage phenotype and cytokine production. The migration ability and cytoskeleton rearrangement of ovarian cancer cells were determined by Transwell migration assay and phalloidin staining. Western blot was performed to evaluate the activity status of signaling molecules in the process of ovarian cancer cell migration. The results showed that ADM induced macrophage phenotype and cytokine production similar to TAMs. Macrophages polarized by ADM promoted the migration and cytoskeleton rearrangement of HO8910 cells. The expression of RhoA and its downstream effector, cofilin, were upregulated in macrophage-induced migration of HO8910 cells. In conclusion, ADM could polarize macrophages similar to TAMs, and then polarized macrophages promote the migration of ovarian cancer cells via activation of RhoA signaling pathway in vitro.

  6. Biochemical and functional studies of the activation of tumoricidal properties in macrophages by muramyl peptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The systemic injection of muramyl dipeptides (MDP) encapsulated within phospholipid vesicles (liposomes, MLV) leads to the activation of tumoricidal properties in mononuclear phagocytes and the eradication of established lymph node and pulmonary metastases. These studies were undertaken to elucidate the mechanism(s) by which MDP activates macrophages in vitro and in vivo, and to understand its potential for the therapy of disseminated cancer. The pharmacokinetics and metabolism of intravenously administered free (unencapsulated) and MLV-encapsulated [3H]nor-MDP and its [3H]-labeled lipophilic derivative, muramyl tripeptide phosphatidylethanolamine (MTP-PE) in mice demonstrated unique patterns of circulatory clearance, organ distribution, metabolism, and excretion. The in vitro activation of tumoricial properties in normal and gamma-interferon primed, noncytotoxic human blood monocytes by nor-MDP could be enhanced by its lipophilic derivatization (MTP-PE) or encapsulation within MLV. Studies using [3H]nor-MDP and [3H]MTP-PE revealed that the activation of monocytes by muramyl peptides could not be described as resulting from an interaction with MDP cell surface receptors nor from a nonspecific consequence of glycopeptide internalization but rather from a specific intracellular event. Efficient delivery of MDP to macrophages in vivo can be obtained via encapsulation in liposomes, MDP activated macrophages destroy tumor cells without apparent selectivity, and the systemic activation of macrophages by MDP has great potential for enhancing host defense against cancer

  7. Comparative activation states of tumor-associated and peritoneal macrophages from mice bearing an induced fibrosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, J C; de Alderete, N; Meson, O E; Sirena, A; Perdigon, G

    1990-11-01

    Balb/c mice bearing a methylcholanthrene-induced fibrosarcoma were used to compare the activation levels of tumor-associated and peritoneal macrophages. Two stages of tumor growth were examined, namely "small" and "large" tumors, with average diameters of 10 and 30 mm, respectively. The activation state, determined by measurement of both phagocytic index and beta-glucuronidase content, was found to be markedly higher in tumor-associated macrophages than in their peritoneal counterparts and it was, in addition, independent of tumor progression. The percentage of tumor-associated macrophages, which were detected on the basis of Fc receptor expression, remained constant in the growing neoplasm, at approximately 23% of total cell population. None of these parameters were affected by inoculation with an immunopotentiating dose of heat-killed Candida albicans which, on the other hand, seemed not to alter the course of the tumor. These data suggest that within the tumor microenvironment macrophages would somehow be maintained at a constant proportion and at a highly activated state, while outside the tumor they would be at a lower activation level. Our results also suggest that TAM would not possess antitumor activity in vivo, although we have found this activity in vitro.

  8. Immunomodulatory action of monosulfated triterpene glycosides from the sea cucumber Cucumaria okhotensis: stimulation of activity of mouse peritoneal macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminin, Dmitry L; Silchenko, Alexandra S; Avilov, Sergey A; Stepanov, Vadim G; Kalinin, Vladimir I

    2010-12-01

    Six monosulfated triterpene glycosides, frondoside A1 (1), okhotoside B1 (2), okhotoside A1-1 (3), frondoside A (4), okhotoside A2-1 (5) and cucumarioside A2-5 (6), isolated from Cucumaria okhotensis Levin et Stepanov, stimulate spreading and lysosomal activity of mouse macrophages and ROS-formation in the macrophages. The highest macrophage spreading and stimulation of their lysosomal activity was induced by glycosides 1, 4 and 6. All glycosides similarly stimulate ROS formation in macrophages, but glycoside 2 caused minimal stimulation. PMID:21299111

  9. Moringa oleifera Flower Extract Suppresses the Activation of Inflammatory Mediators in Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated RAW 264.7 Macrophages via NF-κB Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Woan Sean Tan; Palanisamy Arulselvan; Govindarajan Karthivashan; Sharida Fakurazi

    2015-01-01

    Aim of Study. Moringa oleifera Lam. (M. oleifera) possess highest concentration of antioxidant bioactive compounds and is anticipated to be used as an alternative medicine for inflammation. In the present study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory activity of 80% hydroethanolic extract of M. oleifera flower on proinflammatory mediators and cytokines produced in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced RAW 264.7 macrophages. Materials and Methods. Cell cytotoxicity was conducted by 3-(4,5-dimethyl...

  10. G protein-coupled receptor160 regulates mycobacteria entry into macrophages by activating ERK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hua; Liu, Haipeng; Chen, Hao; Mo, Haiping; Chen, Jianxia; Huang, Xiaocheng; Zheng, Ruijuan; Liu, Zhonghua; Feng, Yonghong; Liu, Feng; Ge, Baoxue

    2016-09-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the causative agent of tuberculosis, invades and replicates within susceptible hosts by disturbing host antimicrobial mechanisms. Although G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are involved in most physiological and pathological activities of mammalian cells, the roles of GPCRs in Mtb invasion into host cell remain elusive. Here, we report that GPR160 expression is elevated at both mRNA and protein level in macrophages in response to BCG infection. Both the PiggyBac (PB) transposon-mediated mutation of gpr160 gene in mouse primary macrophages and siRNA-mediated knockdown of GPR160 in the human macrophage cell line THP-1 markedly reduced the entry of green fluorescent protein (GFP) expressing BCG (BCG-GFP), also operative in vivo. BCG infection-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 was significantly reduced in gpr160 mutated (gpr160(-/-)) macrophages relative to levels observed in wild type macrophages, while inhibition of ERK by specific inhibitor or knockdown ERK1/2 by specific siRNA markedly reduced entry of BCG. Finally, lower bacteria burdens and attenuated pathological impairments were observed in the lungs of BCG-infected gpr160(-/-) mice. Furthermore, gpr160(-/-) macrophages also exhibits reduced uptake of Escherichia coli and Francisella tularensis. Taken together, these findings suggest an important role of GPR160 in regulating the entry of BCG into macrophages by targeting the ERK signaling pathway. As GPCRs have proven to be successful drug targets in pharmaceutical industry, it's tempting to speculate that compounds targeting GPR160, a G protein-coupled receptor, could intervene in Mtb infection. PMID:27259691

  11. Autophagy deficiency in macrophages enhances NLRP3 inflammasome activity and chronic lung disease following silica exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessop, Forrest; Hamilton, Raymond F; Rhoderick, Joseph F; Shaw, Pamela K; Holian, Andrij

    2016-10-15

    Autophagy is an important metabolic mechanism that can promote cellular survival following injury. The specific contribution of autophagy to silica-induced inflammation and disease is not known. The objective of these studies was to determine the effects of silica exposure on the autophagic pathway in macrophages, as well as the general contribution of autophagy in macrophages to inflammation and disease. Silica exposure enhanced autophagic activity in vitro in Bone Marrow derived Macrophages and in vivo in Alveolar Macrophages isolated from silica-exposed mice. Impairment of autophagy in myeloid cells in vivo using Atg5(fl/fl)LysM-Cre(+) mice resulted in enhanced cytotoxicity and inflammation after silica exposure compared to littermate controls, including elevated IL-18 and the alarmin HMGB1 in the whole lavage fluid. Autophagy deficiency caused some spontaneous inflammation and disease. Greater silica-induced acute inflammation in Atg5(fl/fl)LysM-Cre(+) mice correlated with increased fibrosis and chronic lung disease. These studies demonstrate a critical role for autophagy in suppressing silica-induced cytotoxicity and inflammation in disease development. Furthermore, this data highlights the importance of basal autophagy in macrophages and other myeloid cells in maintaining lung homeostasis.

  12. [Corticosterone reception by alveolar macrophages when their functional activity has changed].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishkina, L N; Maianskiĭ, D N; Shutko, G V; Sergeev, P V

    1985-01-01

    The binding of 3H-corticosterone by rat alveolar macrophages was studied before and after stimulation with zymosan in vivo. Thirty min after incubation of the macrophagal monolayer from intact animals with 3H-corticosterone accumulation of the hormone by the cells came to an end. As the concentration of 3H-corticosterone in the incubation medium was raised, the binding of the hormone with the saturated (receptor) system of alveolar macrophages terminated upon absorption of 10.6 fmol per 10(6) cells. Further raising of the level of the bound hormone was effected by the unsaturated (lipid) system. Stimulation with zymosan led not only to an increase in the number of the cells of the bronchoalveolar tract but also to an elevation of the intensity of 3H-corticosterone engulfment by alveolar macrophages. The number of binding sites per cell in the zymosan-activated macrophages increased 1.5-fold. This may be an important moment determining the development and liquidation of mononuclear infiltrations in the lung. PMID:3967077

  13. Modulation of peritoneal macrophage activity by the saturation state of the fatty acid moiety of phosphatidylcholine

    OpenAIRE

    F.C.C. Grando; C.A. Felício; A. Twardowschy; Paula, F. M.; V.G. Batista; L.C. Fernandes; Curi, R.; Nishiyama, A

    2009-01-01

    To determine the effects of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids in phosphatidylcholine (PC) on macrophage activity, peritoneal lavage cells were cultured in the presence of phosphatidylcholine rich in saturated or unsaturated fatty acids (sat PC and unsat PC, respectively), both used at concentrations of 32 and 64 µM. The treatment of peritoneal macrophages with 64 µM unsat PC increased the production of hydrogen peroxide by 48.3% compared to control (148.3 ± 16.3 vs 100.0 ± 1.8%, N = 15), ...

  14. Autocrine IL-10 activation of the STAT3 pathway is required for pathological macrophage differentiation in polycystic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peda, Jacqueline D.; Salah, Sally M.; Wallace, Darren P.; Fields, Patrick E.; Grantham, Connor J.; Fields, Timothy A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is characterized by slow expansion of fluid-filled cysts derived from tubules within the kidney. Cystic expansion results in injury to surrounding parenchyma and leads to inflammation, scarring and ultimately loss of renal function. Macrophages are a key element in this process, promoting cyst epithelial cell proliferation, cyst expansion and disease progression. Previously, we have shown that the microenvironment established by cystic epithelial cells can ‘program’ macrophages, inducing M2-like macrophage polarization that is characterized by expression of markers that include Arg1 and Il10. Here, we functionally characterize these macrophages, demonstrating that their differentiation enhances their ability to promote cyst cell proliferation. This observation indicates a model of reciprocal pathological interactions between cysts and the innate immune system: cyst epithelial cells promote macrophage polarization to a phenotype that, in turn, is especially efficient in promoting cyst cell proliferation and cyst growth. To better understand the genesis of this macrophage phenotype, we examined the role of IL-10, a regulatory cytokine shown to be important for macrophage-stimulated tissue repair in other settings. Herein, we show that the acquisition of the pathological macrophage phenotype requires IL-10 secretion by the macrophages. Further, we demonstrate a requirement for IL-10-dependent autocrine activation of the STAT3 pathway. These data suggest that the IL-10 pathway in macrophages plays an essential role in the pathological relationship between cysts and the innate immune system in PKD, and thus could be a potential therapeutic target. PMID:27491076

  15. Exploring the activated adipogenic niche: interactions of macrophages and adipocyte progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yun-Hee; Thacker, Robert I; Hall, Brian Eric; Kong, Raymond; Granneman, James G

    2014-01-01

    Adult adipose tissue contains a large supply of progenitors that can renew fat cells for homeostatic tissue maintenance and adaptive growth or regeneration in response to external challenges. However, the in vivo mechanisms that control adipocyte progenitor behavior are poorly characterized. We recently demonstrated that recruitment of adipocyte progenitors by macrophages is a central feature of adipose tissue remodeling under various adipogenic conditions. Catabolic remodeling of white adipose tissue by β3-adrenergic receptor stimulation requires anti-inflammatory M2-polarized macrophages to clear dying adipocytes and to recruit new brown adipocytes from progenitors. In this Extra Views article, we discuss in greater detail the cellular elements of adipogenic niches and report a strategy to isolate and characterize the subpopulations of macrophages and adipocyte progenitors that actively participate in adrenergic tissue remodeling. Further characterization of these subpopulations may facilitate identification of new cellular targets to improve metabolic and immune function of adipose tissue.

  16. Pathway data concerning differentiation and activation of macrophage - DMPD | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available fferentiation and activation of macrophage extracted from the literature list in ...h URL - Data acquisition method Pathways are extracted from each paper in the above literature... list in the CSML format, which is an XML format. Data analysis method The curator reads the literature

  17. Differentially activated macrophages orchestrate myogenic precursor cell fate during human skeletal muscle regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saclier, Marielle; Yacoub-Youssef, Houda; Mackey, Abigail;

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages (MPs) exert either beneficial or deleterious effects on tissue repair, depending on their activation/polarization state. They are crucial for adult skeletal muscle repair, notably by acting on myogenic precursor cells. However, these interactions have not been fully characterized. Here...

  18. Model-driven multi-omic data analysis elucidates metabolic immunomodulators of macrophage activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordbar, Aarash; Mo, Monica L.; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Rutledge, Alexandra C.; Kim, Young-Mo; Metz, Thomas O.; Jones, Marcus B.; Frank, Bryan C.; Smith, Richard D.; Peterson, Scott N.; Hyduke, Daniel R.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Palsson, Bernhard O.

    2012-06-26

    Macrophages are central players in the immune response, manifesting divergent phenotypes to control inflammation and innate immunity through the release of cytokines and other regulatory factor-dependent signaling pathways. In recent years, the focus on metabolism has been reemphasized as critical signaling and regulatory pathways of human pathophysiology, ranging from cancer to aging, often converge on metabolic responses. Here, we used genome-scale modeling and multi-omics (transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics) analysis to assess metabolic features critical for macrophage functions. We constructed a genome-scale metabolic network for the RAW 264.7 cell line to determine metabolic modulators of macrophage activation. Metabolites well-known to be associated with immunoactivation (e.g., glucose and arginine) and immunosuppression (e.g., tryptophan and vitamin D3) were amongst the most critical effectors. Intracellular metabolic mechanisms linked to critical suppressive effectors were then assessed, identifying a suppressive role for de novo nucleotide synthesis. Finally, the underlying metabolic mechanisms of macrophage activation are identified by analyzing multi-omic data obtained from LPS-stimulated RAW cells in the context of our flux-based predictions. Our study demonstrates metabolism's role in regulating activation may be greater than previously anticipated and elucidates underlying metabolic connections between activation and metabolic effectors.

  19. Macrophage activity assessed by soluble CD163 in early rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greisen, Stinne Ravn; Møller, Holger Jon; Stengaard-Pedersen, Kristian;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disease where TNF-α is a central mediator of inflammation, and is cleaved from the cell surface by TACE/ADAM17. This metalloproteinase is also responsible for the release of soluble (s) CD163. Soluble CD163 reflects macrophage activation...

  20. Protease activated receptor-1 regulates macrophage-mediated cellular senescence : a risk for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, Cong; Rezaee, Farhad; Waasdorp, Maaike; Shi, Kun; van der Poll, Tom; Borensztajn, Keren; Spek, C. Arnold

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a destructive disease in part resulting from premature or mature cellular aging. Protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) recently emerged as a critical component in the context of fibrotic lung diseases. Therefore, we aimed to study the role of macrophages in PAR

  1. Macrophage Activation in Pediatric Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD Correlates with Hepatic Progenitor Cell Response via Wnt3a Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Carpino

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is one of the most important causes of liver-related morbidity in children. In non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, the activation of liver resident macrophage pool is a central event in the progression of liver injury. The aims of the present study were to evaluate the polarization of liver macrophages and the possible role of Wnt3a production by macrophages in hepatic progenitor cell response in the progression of pediatric non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. 32 children with biopsy-proven non-alcoholic fatty liver disease were included. 20 out of 32 patients were treated with docosahexaenoic acid for 18 months and biopsies at the baseline and after 18 months were included. Hepatic progenitor cell activation, macrophage subsets and Wnt/β-catenin pathway were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. Our results indicated that in pediatric non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, pro-inflammatory macrophages were the predominant subset. Macrophage polarization was correlated with Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease Activity Score, ductular reaction, and portal fibrosis; docosahexaenoic acid treatment determined a macrophage polarization towards an anti-inflammatory phenotype in correlation with the reduction of serum inflammatory cytokines, with increased macrophage apoptosis, and with the up-regulation of macrophage Wnt3a expression; macrophage Wnt3a expression was correlated with β-catenin phosphorylation in hepatic progenitor cells and signs of commitment towards hepatocyte fate. In conclusion, macrophage polarization seems to have a key role in the progression of pediatric non-alcoholic fatty liver disease; the modulation of macrophage polarization could drive hepatic progenitor cell response by Wnt3a production.

  2. Macrophage Activation in Pediatric Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) Correlates with Hepatic Progenitor Cell Response via Wnt3a Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renzi, Anastasia; De Stefanis, Cristiano; Stronati, Laura; Franchitto, Antonio; Alisi, Anna; Onori, Paolo; De Vito, Rita; Alpini, Gianfranco; Gaudio, Eugenio

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is one of the most important causes of liver-related morbidity in children. In non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, the activation of liver resident macrophage pool is a central event in the progression of liver injury. The aims of the present study were to evaluate the polarization of liver macrophages and the possible role of Wnt3a production by macrophages in hepatic progenitor cell response in the progression of pediatric non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. 32 children with biopsy-proven non-alcoholic fatty liver disease were included. 20 out of 32 patients were treated with docosahexaenoic acid for 18 months and biopsies at the baseline and after 18 months were included. Hepatic progenitor cell activation, macrophage subsets and Wnt/β-catenin pathway were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. Our results indicated that in pediatric non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, pro-inflammatory macrophages were the predominant subset. Macrophage polarization was correlated with Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease Activity Score, ductular reaction, and portal fibrosis; docosahexaenoic acid treatment determined a macrophage polarization towards an anti-inflammatory phenotype in correlation with the reduction of serum inflammatory cytokines, with increased macrophage apoptosis, and with the up-regulation of macrophage Wnt3a expression; macrophage Wnt3a expression was correlated with β-catenin phosphorylation in hepatic progenitor cells and signs of commitment towards hepatocyte fate. In conclusion, macrophage polarization seems to have a key role in the progression of pediatric non-alcoholic fatty liver disease; the modulation of macrophage polarization could drive hepatic progenitor cell response by Wnt3a production. PMID:27310371

  3. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated macrophage activation: the role of calcium in the generation of tumoricidal activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drysdale, B.E.; Shin, H.S.

    1986-03-01

    As the authors reported, calcium ionophore, A23187, activates macrophages (M theta) for tumor cell killing and the activated M theta produce a soluble cytotoxic factor (M theta-CF) that is similar if not identical to tumor necrosis factor. Based on these observations they have investigated whether calcium is involved in the activation mediated by another potent M theta activator, LPS. The authors have shown that A23187 caused uptake of extracellular /sup 45/Ca/sup + +/ but LPS did not. They have examined the effect of depleting extracellular calcium by using medium containing no added calcium containing 1.0 mM EGTA. In no case did depletion result in decreased M theta-CF production by the M theta activated with LPS. Measurements using the fluorescent, intracellular calcium indicator, Quin 2 have also been performed. While ionomycin, caused a rapid change in the Quin-2 signal, LPS at a concentration even in excess of that required to activate the M theta caused no change in the signal. When high doses of Quin 2 or another intracellular chelator, 8-(diethylaminol-octyl-3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoate, were used to treat M theta, M theta-CF production decreased and cytotoxic activity was impaired. These data indicate that one or more of the processes involved in M theta-CF production does require calcium, but that activation mediated by LPS occurs without the influx of extracellular calcium or redistribution of intracellular calcium.

  4. A Novel Polysaccharide in Insects Activates the Innate Immune System in Mouse Macrophage RAW264 Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Takashi Ohta; Atsushi Ido; Kie Kusano; Chiemi Miura; Takeshi Miura

    2014-01-01

    A novel water-soluble polysaccharide was identified in the pupae of the melon fly (Bactrocera cucurbitae) as a molecule that activates the mammalian innate immune response. We attempted to purify this innate immune activator using nitric oxide (NO) production in mouse RAW264 macrophages as an indicator of immunostimulatory activity. A novel acidic polysaccharide was identified, which we named "dipterose", with a molecular weight of 1.01 × 10(6) and comprising nine monosaccharides. Dipterose w...

  5. Surface modification of nanoparticles enables selective evasion of phagocytic clearance by distinct macrophage phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qie, Yaqing; Yuan, Hengfeng; von Roemeling, Christina A.; Chen, Yuanxin; Liu, Xiujie; Shih, Kevin D.; Knight, Joshua A.; Tun, Han W.; Wharen, Robert E.; Jiang, Wen; Kim, Betty Y. S.

    2016-05-01

    Nanomedicine is a burgeoning industry but an understanding of the interaction of nanomaterials with the immune system is critical for clinical translation. Macrophages play a fundamental role in the immune system by engulfing foreign particulates such as nanoparticles. When activated, macrophages form distinct phenotypic populations with unique immune functions, however the mechanism by which these polarized macrophages react to nanoparticles is unclear. Furthermore, strategies to selectively evade activated macrophage subpopulations are lacking. Here we demonstrate that stimulated macrophages possess higher phagocytic activities and that classically activated (M1) macrophages exhibit greater phagocytic capacity than alternatively activated (M2) macrophages. We show that modification of nanoparticles with polyethylene-glycol results in decreased clearance by all macrophage phenotypes, but importantly, coating nanoparticles with CD47 preferentially lowers phagocytic activity by the M1 phenotype. These results suggest that bio-inspired nanoparticle surface design may enable evasion of specific components of the immune system and provide a rational approach for developing immune tolerant nanomedicines.

  6. miR-155 targets Caspase-3 mRNA in activated macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Santis, Rebecca; Liepelt, Anke; Mossanen, Jana C; Dueck, Anne; Simons, Nadine; Mohs, Antje; Trautwein, Christian; Meister, Gunter; Marx, Gernot; Ostareck-Lederer, Antje; Ostareck, Dirk H

    2016-01-01

    To secure the functionality of activated macrophages in the innate immune response, efficient life span control is required. Recognition of bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) by toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) induces downstream signaling pathways, which merge to induce the expression of cytokine genes and anti-apoptotic genes. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as important inflammatory response modulators, but information about their functional impact on apoptosis is scarce. To identify miRNAs differentially expressed in response to LPS, cDNA libraries from untreated and LPS-activated murine macrophages were analyzed by deep sequencing and regulated miRNA expression was verified by Northern blotting and qPCR. Employing TargetScan(TM) we identified CASPASE-3 (CASP-3) mRNA that encodes a key player in apoptosis as potential target of LPS-induced miR-155. LPS-dependent primary macrophage activation revealed TLR4-mediated enhancement of miR-155 expression and CASP-3 mRNA reduction. Endogenous CASP-3 and cleaved CASP-3 protein declined in LPS-activated macrophages. Accumulation of miR-155 and CASP-3 mRNA in miRNA-induced silencing complexes (miRISC) was demonstrated by ARGONAUTE 2 (AGO2) immunoprecipitation. Importantly, specific antagomir transfection effectively reduced mature miR-155 and resulted in significantly elevated CASP-3 mRNA levels in activated macrophages. In vitro translation assays demonstrated that the target site in the CASP-3 mRNA 3'UTR mediates miR-155-dependent Luciferase reporter mRNA destabilization. Strikingly, Annexin V staining of macrophages transfected with antagomir-155 and stimulated with LPS prior to staurosporine (SSP) treatment implied that LPS-induced miR-155 prevents apoptosis through CASP-3 mRNA down-regulation. In conclusion, we report that miR-155-mediated CASP-3 mRNA destabilization in LPS-activated RAW 264.7 macrophages suppresses apoptosis, as a prerequisite to maintain their crucial function in inflammation. PMID:26574931

  7. Activation of Proteinkinase ERK Mediates Induction of Macrophage MMP-12 by OxLDL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Chun-yan; Zhou Xin; Li Xiao-ming; Yu Hong; Hong Jia-ling

    2004-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) on the expression of macrophage matrix metalloproteinase-12 (MMP-12), and the possible mechanisms. Activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) was detected by Western blot analysis. Enzymatic activity of MMP-12 was determined by β-casein zymogra-phy. RT-PCR analysis was used to measure the mRNA expression level of MMP-12. OxLDL-stimulated macrophages produced increased casein-degrading activities and oxLDL also significantly increased the mRNA level of MMP-12 in a dose-dependent manner. OxLDL stimulated the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 in macrophages. The use of the specific inhibitor indicated that the ERK1/2 signaling pathway was required for the induction of MMP-12. These data demonstrated that oxLDL induced MMP-12 expression in macrophages through an ERK1/2-dependent pathway.

  8. Effects of chlorogenic acid,an active compound activating calcineurin,purified from Flos Lonicerae on macrophage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He-zhen WU; Jing LUO; Yan-xia YIN; Qun WEI

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the activation of chlorogenic acid (CHA) purified from Flos Lonicerae to calcineurin and its effects on macrophage functions in vivo and in vitro. METHODS: According to the screening results that Flos Lonicerae could activate calcineurin, the active component which could activate calcineurin was purified from Flos Lonicerae by column chromatography on silica gel and identified as CHA. The activation of CHA on calcineurin had been validated with both p-NPP and 32p-labeled RII peptide as the substrates. The clearance of charcoal particles in normal mice and the cytotoxicity of U937 to MCF-7 were used together to determine the effects of CHA on macrophage functions. RESULTS: CHA could activate calcineurin, and the concentration of CHA on maximal activating calcineurin was 282.5μmol/L. CHA administration (10 mg/kg,ig×7 d) significantly enhanced the macrophage functions in normal mice. CHA (70.6, 141.2, and 282.5μmol/L) obviously increased the cytotoxicity of U937 to MCF-7. CONCLUSION: CHA could activate calcineurin and enhance the macrophage functions in vivo and in vitro, and its functions in vivo may be realized via the signal pathways of calcineurin.

  9. Modulation of peritoneal macrophage activity by the saturation state of the fatty acid moiety of phosphatidylcholine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.C.C. Grando

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available To determine the effects of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids in phosphatidylcholine (PC on macrophage activity, peritoneal lavage cells were cultured in the presence of phosphatidylcholine rich in saturated or unsaturated fatty acids (sat PC and unsat PC, respectively, both used at concentrations of 32 and 64 µM. The treatment of peritoneal macrophages with 64 µM unsat PC increased the production of hydrogen peroxide by 48.3% compared to control (148.3 ± 16.3 vs 100.0 ± 1.8%, N = 15, and both doses of unsat PC increased adhesion capacity by nearly 50%. Moreover, 64 µM unsat PC decreased neutral red uptake by lysosomes by 32.5% compared to the untreated group (67.5 ± 6.8 vs 100.0 ± 5.5%, N = 15, while both 32 and 64 µM unsat PC decreased the production of lipopolysaccharide-elicited nitric oxide by 30.4% (13.5 ± 2.6 vs 19.4 ± 2.5 µM and 46.4% (10.4 ± 3.1 vs 19.4 ± 2.5 µM, respectively. Unsat PC did not affect anion production in non-stimulated cells or phagocytosis of unopsonized zymosan particles. A different result pattern was obtained for macrophages treated with sat PC. Phorbol 12-miristate 13-acetate-elicited superoxide production and neutral red uptake were decreased by nearly 25% by 32 and 64 µM sat PC, respectively. Sat PC did not affect nitric oxide or hydrogen peroxide production, adhesion capacity or zymosan phagocytosis. Thus, PC modifies macrophage activity, but this effect depends on cell activation state, fatty acid saturation and esterification to PC molecule and PC concentration. Taken together, these results indicate that the fatty acid moiety of PC modulates macrophage activity and, consequently, is likely to affect immune system regulation in vivo.

  10. Effect of Propyl Gallate on Activity of Cyclooxygenase 1 and 2 in Mice's Peritoneal Macrophages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    殷惠军; 蒋跃绒; 吴晓华; 陈晓红; 陈可冀

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of Red Peony 801 (propyl gallate,PrG) on cyclooxygenase (COX) activity in murine peritoneal macrophages. Methods: A screening model for COX inhibitors in vitro based on murine peritoneal macrophages was used. COX-1 activity was reflected by the level of 6-ketoprostaglandin F1α (6-keto-PGF1α) in supernatants of cultured macrophages which were stimulated with calcium ionophore A23187 for a short-term, while COX-2 activity was reflected by the level of prostaglandin E2(PGE2) in supernatants of cultured macrophages which were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) for a long-term. Results: PrG did not affect A23187-induced, COX-1-derived 6-keto-PGF1α synthesis at the concentrations of 1 × 10-5, 5 × 10 6 mol/L (P>0.05), but enhanced 6-keto-PGF1α synthesis at the concentrations of 1×10-6, 5×10-7, 1×10-7 mol/L (P<0.01) in vitro, and showed a good dose-dependent manner. It inhibited LPS-induced, COX-2-derived PGE2 synthesis at the concentrations of 1 × 10-5 , 1 × 10-6 mol/L ( P<0.05). Conclusion: Within the range of 1 × 10-5 to 1 × 10-7 mol/L, PrG activated COX-1 at lower concentrations and inhibited COX-2 at higher concentrations in murine peritoneal macrophages.

  11. Immunotherapy for Prostate Cancer with Gc Protein-Derived Macrophage-Activating Factor, GcMAF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Nobuto; Suyama, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki

    2008-07-01

    Serum Gc protein (known as vitamin D(3)-binding protein) is the precursor for the principal macrophage-activating factor (MAF). The MAF precursor activity of serum Gc protein of prostate cancer patients was lost or reduced because Gc protein was deglycosylated by serum alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (Nagalase) secreted from cancerous cells. Therefore, macrophages of prostate cancer patients having deglycosylated Gc protein cannot be activated, leading to immunosuppression. Stepwise treatment of purified Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase generated the most potent MAF (termed GcMAF) ever discovered, which produces no adverse effect in humans. Macrophages activated by GcMAF develop a considerable variation of receptors that recognize the abnormality in malignant cell surface and are highly tumoricidal. Sixteen nonanemic prostate cancer patients received weekly administration of 100 ng of GcMAF. As the MAF precursor activity increased, their serum Nagalase activity decreased. Because serum Nagalase activity is proportional to tumor burden, the entire time course analysis for GcMAF therapy was monitored by measuring the serum Nagalase activity. After 14 to 25 weekly administrations of GcMAF (100 ng/week), all 16 patients had very low serum Nagalase levels equivalent to those of healthy control values, indicating that these patients are tumor-free. No recurrence occurred for 7 years. PMID:18633461

  12. Triamcinolone acetonide activates an anti-inflammatory and folate receptor-positive macrophage that prevents osteophytosis in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siebelt, Michiel; Korthagen, Nicoline; Wei, Wu; Groen, Harald; Bastiaansen-Jenniskens, Yvonne; Müller, Christina; Waarsing, Jan Hendrik; de Jong, Marion; Weinans, Harrie

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Triamcinolone acetonide (TA) is used for osteoarthritis management to reduce pain, and pre-clinical studies have shown that TA limits osteophyte formation. Osteophyte formation is known to be facilitated by synovial macrophage activation. TA injections might influence macrophage activa

  13. Enhanced superoxide release and tumoricidal activity by a postlavage, in situ pulmonary macrophage population in response to activation by Mycobacterium bovis BCG exposure.

    OpenAIRE

    Drath, D B

    1985-01-01

    The monocytic phagocyte population of rat lungs is heterogeneous. In addition to the freely lavagable alveolar macrophages, there is a fixed in situ tissue-associated subpopulation of pulmonary macrophages. The response of this subpopulation to classical macrophage activation by Mycobacterium bovis BCG exposure was monitored. Results indicate that this population can be activated both metabolically and functionally, as evidenced by enhanced release of superoxide anions and demonstrable tumori...

  14. Nf1+/- monocytes/macrophages induce neointima formation via CCR2 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessler, Waylan K; Kim, Grace; Hudson, Farlyn Z; Mund, Julie A; Mali, Raghuveer; Menon, Keshav; Kapur, Reuben; Clapp, D Wade; Ingram, David A; Stansfield, Brian K

    2016-03-15

    Persons with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) have a predisposition for premature and severe arterial stenosis. Mutations in the NF1 gene result in decreased expression of neurofibromin, a negative regulator of p21(Ras), and increases Ras signaling. Heterozygous Nf1 (Nf1(+/-)) mice develop a marked arterial stenosis characterized by proliferating smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and a predominance of infiltrating macrophages, which closely resembles arterial lesions from NF1 patients. Interestingly, lineage-restricted inactivation of a single Nf1 allele in monocytes/macrophages is sufficient to recapitulate the phenotype observed in Nf1(+/-) mice and to mobilize proinflammatory CCR2+ monocytes into the peripheral blood. Therefore, we hypothesized that CCR2 receptor activation by its primary ligand monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) is critical for monocyte infiltration into the arterial wall and neointima formation in Nf1(+/-) mice. MCP-1 induces a dose-responsive increase in Nf1(+/-) macrophage migration and proliferation that corresponds with activation of multiple Ras kinases. In addition, Nf1(+/-) SMCs, which express CCR2, demonstrate an enhanced proliferative response to MCP-1 when compared with WT SMCs. To interrogate the role of CCR2 activation on Nf1(+/-) neointima formation, we induced neointima formation by carotid artery ligation in Nf1(+/-) and WT mice with genetic deletion of either MCP1 or CCR2. Loss of MCP-1 or CCR2 expression effectively inhibited Nf1(+/-) neointima formation and reduced macrophage content in the arterial wall. Finally, administration of a CCR2 antagonist significantly reduced Nf1(+/-) neointima formation. These studies identify MCP-1 as a potent chemokine for Nf1(+/-) monocytes/macrophages and CCR2 as a viable therapeutic target for NF1 arterial stenosis. PMID:26740548

  15. SYK regulates macrophage MHC-II expression via activation of autophagy in response to oxidized LDL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Soo-Ho; Gonen, Ayelet; Diehl, Cody J; Kim, Jungsu; Almazan, Felicidad; Witztum, Joseph L; Miller, Yury I

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive immunity, which plays an important role in the development of atherosclerosis, is mediated by major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-dependent antigen presentation. In atherosclerotic lesions, macrophages constitute an important class of antigen-presenting cells that activate adaptive immune responses to oxidized low-density lipoprotein (OxLDL). It has been reported that autophagy regulates adaptive immune responses by enhancing antigen presentation to MHC class II (MHC-II). In a previous study, we have demonstrated that SYK (spleen tyrosine kinase) regulates generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activation of MAPK8/JNK1 in macrophages. Because ROS and MAPK8 are known to regulate autophagy, in this study we investigated the role of SYK in autophagy, MHC-II expression and adaptive immune response to OxLDL. We demonstrate that OxLDL induces autophagosome formation, MHC-II expression, and phosphorylation of SYK in macrophages. Gene knockout and pharmacological inhibitors of NOX2 and MAPK8 reduced OxLDL-induced autophagy. Using bone marrow-derived macrophages isolated from wild-type and myeloid-specific SYK knockout mice, we demonstrate that SYK regulates OxLDL-induced ROS generation, MAPK8 activation, BECN1-BCL2 dissociation, autophagosome formation and presentation of OxLDL-derived antigens to CD4+ T cells. ldlr−/− syk−/− mice fed a high-fat diet produced lower levels of IgG to malondialdehyde (MDA)-LDL, malondialdehyde-acetaldehyde (MAA)-LDL, and OxLDL compared to ldlr−/− mice. These results provide new insights into the mechanisms by which SYK regulates MHC-II expression via autophagy in macrophages and may contribute to regulation of adaptive immune responses in atherosclerosis. PMID:25946330

  16. SYK regulates macrophage MHC-II expression via activation of autophagy in response to oxidized LDL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Soo-Ho; Gonen, Ayelet; Diehl, Cody J; Kim, Jungsu; Almazan, Felicidad; Witztum, Joseph L; Miller, Yury I

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive immunity, which plays an important role in the development of atherosclerosis, is mediated by major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-dependent antigen presentation. In atherosclerotic lesions, macrophages constitute an important class of antigen-presenting cells that activate adaptive immune responses to oxidized low-density lipoprotein (OxLDL). It has been reported that autophagy regulates adaptive immune responses by enhancing antigen presentation to MHC class II (MHC-II). In a previous study, we have demonstrated that SYK (spleen tyrosine kinase) regulates generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activation of MAPK8/JNK1 in macrophages. Because ROS and MAPK8 are known to regulate autophagy, in this study we investigated the role of SYK in autophagy, MHC-II expression and adaptive immune response to OxLDL. We demonstrate that OxLDL induces autophagosome formation, MHC-II expression, and phosphorylation of SYK in macrophages. Gene knockout and pharmacological inhibitors of NOX2 and MAPK8 reduced OxLDL-induced autophagy. Using bone marrow-derived macrophages isolated from wild-type and myeloid-specific SYK knockout mice, we demonstrate that SYK regulates OxLDL-induced ROS generation, MAPK8 activation, BECN1-BCL2 dissociation, autophagosome formation and presentation of OxLDL-derived antigens to CD4(+) T cells. ldlr(-/-) syk(-/-) mice fed a high-fat diet produced lower levels of IgG to malondialdehyde (MDA)-LDL, malondialdehyde-acetaldehyde (MAA)-LDL, and OxLDL compared to ldlr(-/-) mice. These results provide new insights into the mechanisms by which SYK regulates MHC-II expression via autophagy in macrophages and may contribute to regulation of adaptive immune responses in atherosclerosis.

  17. Sustained Inflammasome Activity in Macrophages Impairs Wound Healing in Type 2 Diabetic Humans and Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Rita E Mirza; Fang, Milie M.; Eileen M Weinheimer-Haus; Ennis, William J.; Koh, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    The hypothesis of this study was that sustained activity of the Nod-like receptor protein (NLRP)-3 inflammasome in wounds of diabetic humans and mice contributes to the persistent inflammatory response and impaired healing characteristic of these wounds. Macrophages (Mp) isolated from wounds on diabetic humans and db/db mice exhibited sustained inflammasome activity associated with low level of expression of endogenous inflammasome inhibitors. Soluble factors in the biochemical milieu of thes...

  18. Immunostimulatory Activity of Protein Hydrolysate from Oviductus Ranae on Macrophage In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Oviductus Ranae is the dry oviduct of Rana chensinensis, which is also called R. chensinensis oil. Oviductus Ranae is a valuable Chinese crude drug and is recorded in the Pharmacopoeia of the People's Republic of China. The aim of this study was to investigate the immunostimulatory activity of protein hydrolysate of Oviductus Ranae (ORPH) and to assess its possible mechanism. Immunomodulatory activity of ORPH was examined in murine macrophage RAW 264.7 cells. The effect of ORPH on the phagocy...

  19. Hyper-inflammation and skin destruction mediated by rosiglitazone activation of macrophages in IL-6 deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Das, Lopa M; Rosenjack, Julie; Au, Liemin;

    2015-01-01

    -antibodies against IL-6, mimicking IL-6 deficiency in human diseases. IL-6 deficiency when combined with Rosi-mediated upregulation of suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 leads to an altered ratio of nuclear signal transducer and activator of transcription 3/NF-κB that allows hyper-induction of inducible nitric oxide...... mediating hyper-inflammatory macrophage activation significant for diseases associated with IL-6 deficiency....

  20. Paclitaxel-induced macrophage activities in the tumor-bearing host: immunologic implications and therapeutic applications

    OpenAIRE

    Mullins, David Warren

    1998-01-01

    Tumors induce immune dysfunction through the production of soluble factors that subvert macrophage (Mf) function to favor tumor growth. Previous studies suggested that tumor-induced immune cell dysfunction may be reversible through regimens that disrupt tumor cell suppressor mechanisms and concurrently promote tumoricidal activities. Because the antineoplastic agent paclitaxel (TAXOL) activates Mf function, we studied mechanisms of paclitaxel-mediated cytotoxic and immunostimulatory respons...

  1. Dectin-1–Dependent LC3 Recruitment to Phagosomes Enhances Fungicidal Activity in Macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Tam, Jenny M.; Mansour, Michael K.; Khan, Nida S.; Seward, Michael; Puranam, Sravanthi; Tanne, Antoine; Sokolovska, Anna; Becker, Christine E.; Acharya, Mridu; Baird, Michelle A.; Augustine M K Choi; Davidson, Michael W.; Segal, Brahm H; Lacy-Hulbert, Adam; Stuart, Lynda M.

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy has been postulated to play role in mammalian host defense against fungal pathogens, although the molecular details remain unclear. Here, we show that primary macrophages deficient in the autophagic factor LC3 demonstrate diminished fungicidal activity but increased cytokine production in response to Candida albicans stimulation. LC3 recruitment to fungal phagosomes requires activation of the fungal pattern receptor dectin-1. LC3 recruitment to the phagosome also requires Syk signal...

  2. Tumor cell alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase activity and its involvement in GcMAF-related macrophage activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad, Saharuddin B; Nagasawa, Hideko; Uto, Yoshihiro; Hori, Hitoshi

    2002-05-01

    Alpha-N-acetyl galactosaminidase (alpha-NaGalase) has been reported to accumulate in serum of cancer patients and be responsible for deglycosylation of Gc protein, which is a precursor of GcMAF-mediated macrophage activation cascade, finally leading to immunosuppression in advanced cancer patients. We studied the biochemical characterization of alpha-NaGalase from several human tumor cell lines. We also examined its effect on the potency of GcMAF to activate mouse peritoneal macrophage to produce superoxide in GcMAF-mediated macrophage activation cascade. The specific activity of alpha-NaGalases from human colon tumor cell line HCT116, human hepatoma cell line HepG2, and normal human liver cells (Chang liver cell line) were evaluated using two types of substrates; GalNAc-alpha-PNP (exo-type substrate) and Gal-beta-GalNAc-alpha-PNP (endo-type substrate). Tumor-derived alpha-NaGalase having higher activity than normal alpha-NaGalase, had higher substrate specificity to the exo-type substrate than to the endo-type substrate, and still maintained its activity at pH 7. GcMAF enhance superoxide production in mouse macrophage, and pre-treatment of GcMAF with tumor cell lysate reduce the activity. We conclude that tumor-derived alpha-NaGalase is different in biochemical characterization compared to normal alpha-NaGalase from normal Chang liver cells. In addition, tumor cell-derived alpha-NaGalase decreases the potency of GcMAF on macrophage activation. PMID:12062184

  3. Dectin-1-dependent LC3 recruitment to phagosomes enhances fungicidal activity in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Jenny M; Mansour, Michael K; Khan, Nida S; Seward, Michael; Puranam, Sravanthi; Tanne, Antoine; Sokolovska, Anna; Becker, Christine E; Acharya, Mridu; Baird, Michelle A; Choi, Augustine M K; Davidson, Michael W; Segal, Brahm H; Lacy-Hulbert, Adam; Stuart, Lynda M; Xavier, Ramnik J; Vyas, Jatin M

    2014-12-01

    Autophagy has been postulated to play role in mammalian host defense against fungal pathogens, although the molecular details remain unclear. Here, we show that primary macrophages deficient in the autophagic factor LC3 demonstrate diminished fungicidal activity but increased cytokine production in response to Candida albicans stimulation. LC3 recruitment to fungal phagosomes requires activation of the fungal pattern receptor dectin-1. LC3 recruitment to the phagosome also requires Syk signaling but is independent of all activity by Toll-like receptors and does not require the presence of the adaptor protein Card9. We further demonstrate that reactive oxygen species generation by NADPH oxidase is required for LC3 recruitment to the fungal phagosome. These observations directly link LC3 to the inflammatory pathway against C. albicans in macrophages. PMID:24842831

  4. Immunomodulatory Activity of Vetiveria zizanioides Extract on Peritonial Macrophages of Albino Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunitha VS

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Vetiveria zizanioides L. (Poaceae is a medicinal plant which is used as a thirst quencher in southern part of India especially in Kerala. The present study was conducted to scientifically evaluate the effects of extracts of V. zizanioides on phagocytic function of macrophages. In vivo effect of aqueous, ethanol and hexane extract of the plant at two doses (10mg/kg body weight and 25mg/kg b.w. were evaluated by oral administration of the extracts on Swiss albino male mice. In vitro immunomodulatory potential of the above extracts at different concentrations (10μg/ml, 25μg/ml, 50 μg/ml and 100μg/ml was studied using peritoneal macrophages from Swiss albino mice. All extracts gave phagocytic modulation in vivo. The aqueous extract of vetiveria zizanoides at a dose of 25mg/kg b.w. showed significant (p<0.05 increase in phagocytic activity in comparison with the control. An increased phagocytic response was shown by murine peritoneal macrophages after treatment with the extracts in vitro. A dose dependent response was observed in all cases. The results of the present study indicate the immunomodulatory effect of V. zizanioides extracts on murine peritoneal macrophages, as evidenced by its effect on phagocytosis which is a nonspecific immune mechanism.

  5. Involvement of Toso in activation of monocytes, macrophages, and granulocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Karl S Lang; Lang, Philipp A.; Meryk, Andreas; Pandyra, Aleksandra A; Boucher, Louis-Martin; Pozdeev, Vitaly I.; Tusche, Michael W.; Göthert, Joachim R.; Haight, Jillian; Wakeham, Andrew; You-Ten, Annick J.; McIlwain, David R.; Merches, Katja; Khairnar, Vishal; Recher, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Rapid activation of immune responses is necessary for antibacterial defense, but excessive immune activation can result in life-threatening septic shock. Understanding how these processes are balanced may provide novel therapeutic potential in treating inflammatory disease. Fc receptors are crucial for innate immune activation. However, the role of the putative Fc receptor for IgM, known as Toso/Faim3, has to this point been unclear. In this study, we generated Toso-deficient mice and used th...

  6. Integrated electric alternators/active filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towliat Abolhassani, Mehdi

    In response to energy crisis and power quality concerns, three different methodologies to integrate the concept of active filtering into the alternators are proposed. Wind energy, due to its free availability and its clean and renewable character, ranks as the most promising renewable energy resource that could play a key role in solving the worldwide energy crisis. An Integrated Doubly-fed Electric Alternator/Active filter (IDEA) for wind energy conversion systems is proposed. The proposed IDEA is capable of simultaneously capturing maximum power of wind energy and improving power quality, which are achieved by canceling the most significant and troublesome harmonics of the utility grid and power factor correction and reactive power compensation in the grid. The back-to-back current regulated power converters are employed to excite the rotor of IDEA. The control strategy of rotor-side power converter is based on position sensorless field oriented control method with higher power density. Analysis and experimental results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed IDEA. In the next step, an integrated synchronous machine/active filter is discussed. The proposed technology is essentially a rotating synchronous machine with suitable modification to its field excitation circuit to allow dc and ac excitations. It is shown that by controlling the ac excitation, the 5 th and 7th harmonics currents of the utility are compensated. The proposed method is cost effective because it can be applied to existing standby generators in commercial and industrial plants with minimal modification to the excitation circuits. To boost the gain of harmonic compensatory, an advanced electric machine is proposed. An Asymmetric Airgap Concentrated Winding Synchronous Machine (AACWSM) with ac and dc excitation was designed and employed. It is shown that the AACWSM with its unique design, in addition to power generation capability, could be used to compensate the most

  7. THE ROLE OF VCAM-1/VLA-4 IN THE ACTIVATION OF ALLOGENIC T CELLS BY MURINE MACROPHAGES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Long; Cao Xuetao; Zhang Weiping; Chen Guoyou; Zhu Xuejun; Yu Yizhi

    1998-01-01

    Vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) is a member of immunoglobulin superfamily. The principal ligand for VCAM-1 is integrin α4β1/VLA-4 (very late antigen 4). It was reported that VCAM-1 was expressed on macrophages and dendritic cells, but little is known about its function on these professional antigen presenting cells (APC). The present study was performed to investigate the expression of VCAM-1 on macrophages and the role of VCAM-1/VLA-4 in the activation of allogenic T cells by murine macrophages. We analyzed VCAM-1 expression on peritoneal macrophages and macrophage cell line J774A.1 by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Using neutralizing antibodies, we further analyzed the role of VCAM-1/VLA-4 interaction in macrophage and allogenic T cell mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). We found that VCAM-1 was constitutively expressed on macrophages and its expression level was upregulated by soluble tumor associated antigen (freeze-thaw lysates of FBL-3 leukemia cells) and TNF-α.In MLR assays, we observed that blocking VCAM-1/VLA-4 interaction with anti-VCAM-1 or anti-VLA-4mAbs caused significant inhibition of the proliferative response and IL-2 production. These results suggest that VCAM-1on macrophages not only facilitates the cell-tocell contact through adhesive interaction but also plays a role in the costimulation of T cells via its interaction with VLA-4 on the T cells.

  8. Alternating Current Influences Anaerobic Electroactive Biofilm Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Zhou, Lean; Lu, Lu; Lobo, Fernanda Leite; Li, Nan; Wang, Heming; Park, Jaedo; Ren, Zhiyong Jason

    2016-09-01

    Alternating current (AC) is known to inactivate microbial growth in suspension, but how AC influences anaerobic biofilm activities has not been systematically investigated. Using a Geobacter dominated anaerobic biofilm growing on the electrodes of microbial electrochemical reactors, we found that high frequency AC ranging from 1 MHz to 1 kHz (amplitude of 5 V, 30 min) showed only temporary inhibition to the biofilm activity. However, lower frequency (100 Hz, 1.2 or 5 V) treatment led to 47 ± 19% permanent decrease in limiting current on the same biofilm, which is attributed to the action of electrohydrodynamic force that caused biofilm damage and loss of intercellular electron transfer network. Confocal microscopy images show such inactivation mainly occurred at the interface between the biofilm and the electrode. Reducing the frequency further to 1 Hz led to water electrolysis, which generated gas bubbles that flushed all attached cells out of the electrode. These findings provide new references on understanding and regulating biofilm growth, which has broader implications in biofouling control, anaerobic waste treatment, energy and product recovery, and general understanding of microbial ecology and physiology. PMID:27485403

  9. ELECTROSTATIC CHARGE ON NANO-PARTICLES ACTIVATES CNS MACROPHAGES (MICROGLIA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanometer size particles carry free radical activity on their surface and can produce oxidative stress (OS)-mediated damage upon impact to target cells. The initiating event of phage cell activation (i.e., the oxidative burst) is unknown, although many proximal events have been i...

  10. Extracellular polysaccharides produced by Ganoderma formosanum stimulate macrophage activation via multiple pattern-recognition receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Cheng-Li

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The fungus of Ganoderma is a traditional medicine in Asia with a variety of pharmacological functions including anti-cancer activities. We have purified an extracellular heteropolysaccharide fraction, PS-F2, from the submerged mycelia culture of G. formosanum and shown that PS-F2 exhibits immunostimulatory activities. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms of immunostimulation by PS-F2. Results PS-F2-stimulated TNF-α production in macrophages was significantly reduced in the presence of blocking antibodies for Dectin-1 and complement receptor 3 (CR3, laminarin, or piceatannol (a spleen tyrosine kinase inhibitor, suggesting that PS-F2 recognition by macrophages is mediated by Dectin-1 and CR3 receptors. In addition, the stimulatory effect of PS-F2 was attenuated in the bone marrow-derived macrophages from C3H/HeJ mice which lack functional Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4. PS-F2 stimulation triggered the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases JNK, p38, and ERK, as well as the nuclear translocation of NF-κB, which all played essential roles in activating TNF-α expression. Conclusions Our results indicate that the extracellular polysaccharides produced by G. formosanum stimulate macrophages via the engagement of multiple pattern-recognition receptors including Dectin-1, CR3 and TLR4, resulting in the activation of Syk, JNK, p38, ERK, and NK-κB and the production of TNF-α.

  11. Mechanism for macrophage activation against Corynebacterium parvum--participation of T cells and its lymphokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, H; Mihara, M; Uesugi, Y; Nagai, H; Koda, A

    1994-01-01

    It is well known that Corynebacterium parvum activates macrophages to produce tumor necrosis factor (TNF). It is suspected that the activation of macrophages by C. parvum requires T-cell participation. The purpose of this study was to confirm that T cells participate in the activation of macrophages by C. parvum. TNF production in vitro from the spleen cells of BALB/c(-)+/+ mice was abrogated completely by the pre-treatment of spleen cells with anti-Ia antiserum and complement, indicating that Ia+ cells are the source of TNF. TNF production was not elicited at all in BALB/c-nu/nu mice. However, there was an increase in the number of Ia+ cells as well as an increase in the weight of spleen and liver. Supernatant from a culture of spleen cells stimulated with phytohemagglutinin-P (a PHA-induced lymphokine) made it possible for BALB/c-nu/nu mice to produce TNF, associated with an induction of Lyt-1+ cells and Lyt-2+ cells. However, treatment with the lymphokine did not augment the increases of Ia+ cells or liver and spleen weights. These results suggest that increasing the number of Ia+ cells is not sufficient to bring about TNF production; Ia+ cells must also be stimulated by T cells or T-cell lymphokines in order to produce TNF. These results suggest that T cells play an essential role in the activation of Ia+ cells against C. parvum. PMID:7723692

  12. Expression of a aoluble form of CTLA4 on macrophage and its biological activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAOYUEHUA; KUNIAKITAKAGI

    1999-01-01

    Interaction between cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen-4(CTLA4,CD152) and B7 molecules (B7-1 and B7-2) is of importance in the cellular events of lymphocyte,including antigen-specific T-cell activation and induction of autoreactive T-cell.We describe haere the first introduction of a murine soluble CTLA4 gene,CTLA4Ig,to Mm1 cells,a macrophagic cell line.CTLA4Ig was successfully expressed on Mm1 cells and the expressed CTLA4Ig was found to be functionally active in their binding to B7 molecules by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence studies.The biological activity of CTLA4Ig from the transfected Mm1 cells was studied and showed inhibitory activity on mixed lymphocyte culture.A high CTLA4Ig producing macrophagic cell line was obtained.As Mm1 cells were regarded as difficult for gene transfection and there has so far been no report on expression of CTLA4Ig gene on Mm1 cells,these results suggested that the CELA4Ig expressing Mm1 cells could be useful for analysis of CTLA4 and B8 molecule interaction in both macrophage and T-cell.

  13. Avirulent strains of Toxoplasma gondii infect macrophages by active invasion from the phagosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanlin; Marple, Andrew H; Ferguson, David J P; Bzik, David J; Yap, George S

    2014-04-29

    Unlike most intracellular pathogens that gain access into host cells through endocytic pathways, Toxoplasma gondii initiates infection at the cell surface by active penetration through a moving junction and subsequent formation of a parasitophorous vacuole. Here, we describe a noncanonical pathway for T. gondii infection of macrophages, in which parasites are initially internalized through phagocytosis, and then actively invade from within a phagosomal compartment to form a parasitophorous vacuole. This phagosome to vacuole invasion (PTVI) pathway may represent an intermediary link between the endocytic and the penetrative routes for host cell entry by intracellular pathogens. The PTVI pathway is preferentially used by avirulent strains of T. gondii and confers an infectious advantage over virulent strains for macrophage tropism. PMID:24733931

  14. [Plasmapheresis for macrophage activation syndrome and multiorgan failure as first presentation of juvenile dermatomyositis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustos B, R; Carrasco A, C; Toledo R, C

    2012-07-01

    The use of extracorporeal techniques for the treatment of paediatric diseases has expanded dramatically in the past decade. Plasmapheresis, a technique for exchanging plasma components with albumin or plasma, has been used in some rheumatologic conditions. We report the clinical course of a 7 years old boy with clinical and biological features of macrophage activation syndrome and multiorgan failure, at the time of presentation of severe juvenile dermatomyositis, and non responsive to corticosteroids, cyclosporine and immunoglobulin. After 4 days in the paediatric intensive care unit, plasmapheresis was used as rescue therapy. Repeated therapeutic plasmapheresis was effective for improving the multiorgan failure and laboratory abnormalities. The patient was discharged on the 21st hospital day with good functional condition. Plasmapheresis should be considered as rescue treatment in patients with life threatening macrophage activation syndrome and systemic onset of juvenile dermatomyositis. PMID:22342516

  15. Macrophage activation syndrome induced by A/H1N1 influenza in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casciaro, Rosaria; Cresta, Federico; Favilli, Federica; Naselli, Aldo; De Alessandri, Alessandra; Minicucci, Laura

    2014-02-01

    Bacterial respiratory infections have an important impact on the development and progression of pulmonary disease in cystic fibrosis (CF). Viral infections are possible triggers of acute deterioration in the clinical status of CF patients. Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is a life-threatening complication of rheumatic disease characterized by pancytopenia, hepatitis, hyperferritinemia, coagulopathy, and neurologic symptoms. This syndrome is thought to be caused by the activation and uncontrolled proliferation of T lymphocytes and well-differentiated macrophages, leading to widespread hemophagocytosis and cytokine overproduction. Here, we report the case of a boy affected by CF who developed MAS triggered by pandemic H1N1 influenza; good clinical response was obtained through high dose prednisone treatment. PMID:23401277

  16. HIV-1 infection induces changes in expression of cellular splicing factors that regulate alternative viral splicing and virus production in macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purcell Damian FJ

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Macrophages are important targets and long-lived reservoirs of HIV-1, which are not cleared of infection by currently available treatments. In the primary monocyte-derived macrophage model of infection, replication is initially productive followed by a decline in virion output over ensuing weeks, coincident with a decrease in the levels of the essential viral transactivator protein Tat. We investigated two possible mechanisms in macrophages for regulation of viral replication, which appears to be primarily regulated at the level of tat mRNA: 1 differential mRNA stability, used by cells and some viruses for the rapid regulation of gene expression and 2 control of HIV-1 alternative splicing, which is essential for optimal viral replication. Results Following termination of transcription at increasing times after infection in macrophages, we found that tat mRNA did indeed decay more rapidly than rev or nef mRNA, but with similar kinetics throughout infection. In addition, tat mRNA decayed at least as rapidly in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Expression of cellular splicing factors in uninfected and infected macrophage cultures from the same donor showed an inverse pattern over time between enhancing factors (members of the SR family of RNA binding proteins and inhibitory factors (members of the hnRNP family. While levels of the SR protein SC35 were greatly up-regulated in the first week or two after infection, hnRNPs of the A/B and H groups were down-regulated. Around the peak of virus production in each culture, SC35 expression declined to levels in uninfected cells or lower, while the hnRNPs increased to control levels or above. We also found evidence for increased cytoplasmic expression of SC35 following long-term infection. Conclusion While no evidence of differential regulation of tat mRNA decay was found in macrophages following HIV-1 infection, changes in the balance of cellular splicing factors which regulate alternative

  17. Pathogenic Mycobacterium bovis strains differ in their ability to modulate the proinflammatory activation phenotype of macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Andrade Marcelle RM; Amaral Eduardo P; Ribeiro Simone CM; Almeida Fabricio M; Peres Tanara V; Lanes Verônica; D’Império-Lima Maria; Lasunskaia Elena B

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis or Mycobacterium bovis, remains one of the leading infectious diseases worldwide. The ability of mycobacteria to rapidly grow in host macrophages is a factor contributing to enhanced virulence of the bacteria and disease progression. Bactericidal functions of phagocytes are strictly dependent on activation status of these cells, regulated by the infecting agent and cytokines. Pathogenic mycobacteria can survive the hostile...

  18. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Lactobacillus Rahmnosus and Bifidobacterium Breve on Cigarette Smoke Activated Human Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmaeil Mortaz

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a major global health problem with cigarette smoke (CS as the main risk factor for its development. Airway inflammation in COPD involves the increased expression of inflammatory mediators such as CXCL-8 and IL-1β which are important mediators for neutrophil recruitment. Macrophages are an important source of these mediators in COPD. Lactobacillus rhamnosus (L. rhamnosus and Befidobacterium breve (B. breve attenuate the development of 'allergic asthma' in animals but their effects in COPD are unknown.To determine the anti-inflammatory effects of L. rhamnosus and B. breve on CS and Toll-like receptor (TLR activation.We stimulated the human macrophage cell line THP-1 with CS extract in the presence and absence of L. rhamnosus and B. breve and measured the expression and release of inflammatory mediators by RT-qPCR and ELISA respectively. An activity assay and Western blotting were used to examine NF-κB activation.Both L. rhamnosus and B. breve were efficiently phagocytized by human macrophages. L. rhamnosus and B. breve significantly suppressed the ability of CS to induce the expression of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, IL-23, TNFα, CXCL-8 and HMGB1 release (all p<0.05 in human THP-1 macrophages. Similar suppression of TLR4- and TLR9-induced CXCL8 expression was also observed (p<0.05. The effect of L. rhamnosus and B. breve on inflammatory mediator release was associated with the suppression of CS-induced NF-κB activation (p<0.05.This data indicate that these probiotics may be useful anti-inflammatory agents in CS-associated disease such as COPD.

  19. Pleural macrophage recruitment and activation in asbestos-induced pleural injury.

    OpenAIRE

    Choe, N; Tanaka, S.; Xia, W; Hemenway, D R; Roggli, V L; Kagan, E

    1997-01-01

    The pathogenesis of asbestos-induced pleural fibrosis is poorly understood. Moreover, there has been a long-standing controversy regarding the relative potential of different commercial types of asbestos to cause pleural disease. We postulated that inhaled asbestos fibers translocate to the pleural space where they stimulate the recruitment and activation of pleural macrophages. To test this hypothesis, and to determine whether there are differences between inhaled amphibole and serpentine as...

  20. Benzo(a)pyrene activation and detoxification by human pulmonary alveolar macrophages and lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comparisons of pulmonary alveolar macrophages and circulating lymphocytes from five smokers and five nonsmokers for their ability to metabolize benzo(a)pyrene as determined by high pressure liquid chromatography were carried out. Utilizing this approach, further investigation of activation and detoxification by several human cell types could provide the basis for more precise and comprehensive studies of carcinogen and drug metabolism in the human lung, and for a better assessment of cancer risk in selected populations

  1. Screening assays for primary haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis in children presenting with suspected macrophage activation syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Cruikshank, M; Anoop, P; Nikolajeva, O.; Rao, A; Rao, K.; Gilmour, K.; Eleftheriou, D; Brogan, P. A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Primary haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) screening assays are increasingly being performed in patients presenting with macrophage activation syndrome (MAS). The objective of this study was to describe their diagnostic and prognostic relevance in children who had presented to paediatric rheumatology and had undergone investigative work up for MAS. Methods Data was obtained retrospectively from an existing protein screening assay database and patient records. Assays included...

  2. A Novel Accessory Molecule Trim59 Involved in Cytotoxicity of BCG-Activated Macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Xiangfeng; Liu, Qihui; Du, Baiqiu; Li, Peng; Cui, Qu; Han, Xiao; Du, Bairong; Yan, Dongmei; Zhu, Xun

    2012-01-01

    BCG-activated macrophages (BAM) could kill the tumor cells through cell-cell contact. In this process membrane proteins play an important role. However, up to date, few membrane proteins were revealed. In this study, we selected a surface molecule named Trim59, which was specifically expressed on BAM membrane (compared with the negative control). We cloned and prokaryoticly expressed the extracellular domain of Trim59, purified the recombinant protein and generated polyclonal antibodies. Immu...

  3. Label-free identification of macrophage phenotype by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonso-García, Alba; Smith, Tim D.; Datta, Rupsa; Luu, Thuy U.; Gratton, Enrico; Potma, Eric O.; Liu, Wendy F.

    2016-04-01

    Macrophages adopt a variety of phenotypes that are a reflection of the many functions they perform as part of the immune system. In particular, metabolism is a phenotypic trait that differs between classically activated, proinflammatory macrophages, and alternatively activated, prohealing macrophages. Inflammatory macrophages have a metabolism based on glycolysis while alternatively activated macrophages generally rely on oxidative phosphorylation to generate chemical energy. We employ this shift in metabolism as an endogenous marker to identify the phenotype of individual macrophages via live-cell fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). We demonstrate that polarized macrophages can be readily discriminated with the aid of a phasor approach to FLIM, which provides a fast and model-free method for analyzing fluorescence lifetime images.

  4. Normal autophagic activity in macrophages from mice lacking Gαi3, AGS3, or RGS19.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Vural

    Full Text Available In macrophages autophagy assists antigen presentation, affects cytokine release, and promotes intracellular pathogen elimination. In some cells autophagy is modulated by a signaling pathway that employs Gαi3, Activator of G-protein Signaling-3 (AGS3/GPSM1, and Regulator of G-protein Signaling 19 (RGS19. As macrophages express each of these proteins, we tested their importance in regulating macrophage autophagy. We assessed LC3 processing and the formation of LC3 puncta in bone marrow derived macrophages prepared from wild type, Gnai3(-/-, Gpsm1(-/-, or Rgs19(-/- mice following amino acid starvation or Nigericin treatment. In addition, we evaluated rapamycin-induced autophagic proteolysis rates by long-lived protein degradation assays and anti-autophagic action after rapamycin induction in wild type, Gnai3(-/-, and Gpsm1(-/- macrophages. In similar assays we compared macrophages treated or not with pertussis toxin, an inhibitor of GPCR (G-protein couple receptor triggered Gαi nucleotide exchange. Despite previous findings, the level of basal autophagy, autophagic induction, autophagic flux, autophagic degradation and the anti-autophagic action in macrophages that lacked Gαi3, AGS3, or RGS19; or had been treated with pertussis toxin, were similar to controls. These results indicate that while Gαi signaling may impact autophagy in some cell types it does not in macrophages.

  5. Involvement of Toso in activation of monocytes, macrophages, and granulocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Karl S; Lang, Philipp A; Meryk, Andreas; Pandyra, Aleksandra A; Boucher, Louis-Martin; Pozdeev, Vitaly I; Tusche, Michael W; Göthert, Joachim R; Haight, Jillian; Wakeham, Andrew; You-Ten, Annick J; McIlwain, David R; Merches, Katja; Khairnar, Vishal; Recher, Mike; Nolan, Garry P; Hitoshi, Yasumichi; Funkner, Pauline; Navarini, Alexander A; Verschoor, Admar; Shaabani, Namir; Honke, Nadine; Penn, Linda Z; Ohashi, Pamela S; Häussinger, Dieter; Lee, Kyeong-Hee; Mak, Tak W

    2013-02-12

    Rapid activation of immune responses is necessary for antibacterial defense, but excessive immune activation can result in life-threatening septic shock. Understanding how these processes are balanced may provide novel therapeutic potential in treating inflammatory disease. Fc receptors are crucial for innate immune activation. However, the role of the putative Fc receptor for IgM, known as Toso/Faim3, has to this point been unclear. In this study, we generated Toso-deficient mice and used them to uncover a critical regulatory function of Toso in innate immune activation. Development of innate immune cells was intact in the absence of Toso, but Toso-deficient neutrophils exhibited more reactive oxygen species production and reduced phagocytosis of pathogens compared with controls. Cytokine production was also decreased in Toso(-/-) mice compared with WT animals, rendering them resistant to septic shock induced by lipopolysaccharide. However, Toso(-/-) mice also displayed limited cytokine production after infection with the bacterium Listeria monocytogenes that was correlated with elevated presence of Listeria throughout the body. Accordingly, Toso(-/-) mice succumbed to infections of L. monocytogenes, whereas WT mice successfully eliminated the infection. Taken together, our data reveal Toso to be a unique regulator of innate immune responses during bacterial infection and septic shock. PMID:23359703

  6. Macrophage Polarization in Health and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Cassetta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are terminally differentiated cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system that also encompasses dendritic cells, circulating blood monocytes, and committed myeloid progenitor cells in the bone marrow. Both macrophages and their monocytic precursors can change their functional state in response to microenvironmental cues exhibiting a marked heterogeneity. However, there are still uncertainties regarding distinct expression patterns of surface markers that clearly define macrophage subsets, particularly in the case of human macrophages. In addition to their tissue distribution, macrophages can be functionally polarized into M1 (proinflammatory and M2 (alternatively activated as well as regulatory cells in response to both exogenous infections and solid tumors as well as by systems biology approaches.

  7. Enhanced superoxide release and tumoricidal activity by a postlavage, in situ pulmonary macrophage population in response to activation by Mycobacterium bovis BCG exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drath, D B

    1985-07-01

    The monocytic phagocyte population of rat lungs is heterogeneous. In addition to the freely lavagable alveolar macrophages, there is a fixed in situ tissue-associated subpopulation of pulmonary macrophages. The response of this subpopulation to classical macrophage activation by Mycobacterium bovis BCG exposure was monitored. Results indicate that this population can be activated both metabolically and functionally, as evidenced by enhanced release of superoxide anions and demonstrable tumoricidal activity against syngeneic and xenogeneic target cells. The pattern of metabolic activation of in situ tissue-associated macrophages differed somewhat from that of alveolar macrophages and was observed only after subsequent exposure of the cells to either zymosan particles or phorbol myristate acetate. Upon such exposure, the activated zymosan-treated tissue macrophages released approximately twice as much superoxide as the nonactivated cells and amounts comparable to the amounts released by activated alveolar macrophages. The tissue macrophages also displayed greater levels of cytotoxicity toward xenogenic targets than the alveolar cells and may have an important role in preventing microbial or tumor cell colonization of respiratory systems. PMID:2989181

  8. Identification of a Denitrase Activity Against Calmodulin in Activated Macrophages Using High-Field Liquid Chromatography - FTICR Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smallwood, Heather S.; Lourette, Natacha M.; Boschek, Curt B.; Bigelow, Diana J.; Smith, Richard D.; Pasa-Tolic, Liljiana; Squier, Thomas C.

    2007-09-18

    We have identified a denitrase activity in macrophages that is upregulated following macrophage activation, which is shown by mass spectrometry to recognize nitrotyrosines in the calcium signaling protein calmodulin (CaM) and convert them to their native tyrosine structure without the formation of any aminotyrosine. Comparable extents of methionine sulfoxide reduction are also observed that are catalyzed by endogenous methionine sulfoxide reductases. Competing with repair processes, oxidized CaM is a substrate for a peptidase activity that results in the selective cleavage of the C-terminus lysine (i.e., Lys148) that is expected to diminish CaM function. Thus, competing repair and peptidase activities define the abundances and functionality of CaM to modulate cellular metabolism in response to oxidative stress, where the presence of the truncated CaM species provides a useful biomarker for the transient appearance of oxidized CaM.

  9. Insulin-induced NADPH oxidase activation promotes proliferation and matrix metalloproteinase activation in monocytes/macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    San-Jose, G. (Gorka); Bidegain, J. (J.); Robador, P.A. (Pablo A.); J. Diez; Fortuño, A. (Ana); Zalba, G. (Guillermo)

    2009-01-01

    Insulin stimulates superoxide (O(2)(-)) production in monocytes and macrophages. However, the mechanisms through which insulin induces O(2)(-) production are not completely understood. In this study, we (a) characterized the enzyme and the pathways involved in insulin-stimulated O(2)(-) production in human monocytes and murine macrophages, and (b) analyzed the consequences of insulin-stimulated O(2)(-) production on the cellular phenotype in these cells. We showed that insulin stimulated O(2)...

  10. Modulation of macrophage activation state protects tissue from necrosis during critical limb ischemia in thrombospondin-1-deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Bréchot

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Macrophages, key regulators of healing/regeneration processes, strongly infiltrate ischemic tissues from patients suffering from critical limb ischemia (CLI. However pro-inflammatory markers correlate with disease progression and risk of amputation, suggesting that modulating macrophage activation state might be beneficial. We previously reported that thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1 is highly expressed in ischemic tissues during CLI in humans. TSP-1 is a matricellular protein that displays well-known angiostatic properties in cancer, and regulates inflammation in vivo and macrophages properties in vitro. We therefore sought to investigate its function in a mouse model of CLI. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Using a genetic model of tsp-1(-/- mice subjected to femoral artery excision, we report that tsp-1(-/- mice were clinically and histologically protected from necrosis compared to controls. Tissue protection was associated with increased postischemic angiogenesis and muscle regeneration. We next showed that macrophages present in ischemic tissues exhibited distinct phenotypes in tsp-1(-/- and wt mice. A strong reduction of necrotic myofibers phagocytosis was observed in tsp-1(-/- mice. We next demonstrated that phagocytosis of muscle cell debris is a potent pro-inflammatory signal for macrophages in vitro. Consistently with these findings, macrophages that infiltrated ischemic tissues exhibited a reduced postischemic pro-inflammatory activation state in tsp-1(-/- mice, characterized by a reduced Ly-6C expression and a less pro-inflammatory cytokine expression profile. Finally, we showed that monocyte depletion reversed clinical and histological protection from necrosis observed in tsp-1(-/- mice, thereby demonstrating that macrophages mediated tissue protection in these mice. CONCLUSION: This study defines targeting postischemic macrophage activation state as a new potential therapeutic approach to protect tissues from necrosis and promote tissue

  11. Soluble macrophage-derived CD163 is a marker of disease activity and progression in early rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greisen, Stinne Ravn; Moller, H J; Stengaard-Pedersen, Kristian;

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the expression of the soluble form of the resident macrophage marker CD163 (sCD163) and its association with core parameters for disease activity, including radiographic progression in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA).......To investigate the expression of the soluble form of the resident macrophage marker CD163 (sCD163) and its association with core parameters for disease activity, including radiographic progression in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA)....

  12. Effect of Surface Modification and Macrophage Phenotype on Particle Internalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Daniel [Iowa State University; Phan, Ngoc [Iowa State University; Isely, Christopher [Iowa State University; Bruene, Lucas [Iowa State University; Bratlie, Kaitlin M [Ames Laboratory

    2014-11-10

    Material properties play a key role in the cellular internalization of polymeric particles. In the present study, we have investigated the effects of material characteristics such as water contact angle, zeta potential, melting temperature, and alternative activation of complement on particle internalization for pro-inflammatory, pro-angiogenic, and naïve macrophages by using biopolymers (~600 nm), functionalized with 13 different molecules. Understanding how material parameters influence particle internalization for different macrophage phenotypes is important for targeted delivery to specific cell populations. Here, we demonstrate that material parameters affect the alternative pathway of complement activation as well as particle internalization for different macrophage phenotypes. Here, we show that the quantitative structure–activity relationship method (QSAR) previously used to predict physiochemical properties of materials can be applied to targeting different macrophage phenotypes. These findings demonstrated that targeted drug delivery to macrophages could be achieved by exploiting material parameters.

  13. Virgin Coconut Oil Meningkatkan Aktivitas Fagositosis Makrofag Ayam Pedaging Pascavaksinasi Flu Burung (VIRGIN COCONUT OIL INCREASES THE PHAGOCYTOSIS ACTIVITY OF MACROPHAGE OF BROILER CHICKEN FOLLOWING AVIAN INFLUENZA VACCINATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enny Yusuf Wachidah Yuniwarti

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The research objective was to find an alternative avian influenza prevention in broilers by increasinganimal’s antibody titer and macrophages phagocytic  activity.  Virgin coconut oil (VCO is a food supplementthat is proven safe for human consumption therefore it is assumed to be safe for the animal’s (chickens.Factorial design  2 vaccinated: unvaccinated x 4 (dose of VCO: 0, 5, 10 and 15 mL/kg feed were applied inthis study.  A total of 40 day day old chick were allocated in the eight treatments groups.  Feed and drinkingwater were available  ad libitum.  Antibody titers of the animals were detected using ELISA, whereasphagocytic activity of the macrophages were detected from spleen.  The result showed that the highestphagocytic activity and antibody titers were seen in chickens which were given VCO at 10 mL/kg feed.  It isconcluded that the VCO could increased the phagocytic activity of macrophages.

  14. Modulation of macrophage activities in proliferation, lysosome, and phagosome by the nonspecific immunostimulator, mica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Myunghwan; Shin, Min-Kyoung; Jung, Yeon-Kwon; Yoo, Han Sang

    2015-01-01

    It was reported that the aluminosilicate material mica activated macrophages and showed its immunostimulating effects. However, the mechanisms by which it exerts these effects are unclear. To address this, we evaluated the effects of mica fine particles (MFP, 804.1 ± 0.02 nm) on the murine macrophage cell line, RAW 264.7. Specifically, RAW 264.7 cells were treated with 100 and 500 μg/mL MFP and their proliferative response was determined using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Changes in global gene expression upon MFP treatment for 12 and 48 h were also determined using microarrays. Following the MFP treatment, RAW 264.7 cells showed a low level of proliferation compared to nontreated cells (p mica is in part derived from up-regulation of these pathways.

  15. Nitric oxide production by chicken macrophages activated by Acemannan, a complex carbohydrate extracted from Aloe vera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaca, K; Sharma, J M; Nordgren, R

    1995-03-01

    Cultures of normal chicken spleen cells and HD11 line cells produce nitric oxide (NO) in response to Acemannan, a complex carbohydrate derived from the Aloe vera plant. Neither cell type produced detectable amounts of NO in response to similar concentrations of yeast mannan, another complex carbohydrate. Nitric oxide production was dose dependent and inhibitable by the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor NG-methyl-L-arginine. In addition, the production of NO was inhibited by preincubation of ACM with concanavalin A in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that ACM-induced NO synthesis may be mediated through macrophage mannose receptors, and macrophage activation may be accountable for some of the immunomodulatory effects of ACM in chickens.

  16. The activation pattern of macrophages in giant cell (temporal) arteritis and primary angiitis of the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihm, Bernhard; Bergmann, Markus; Brück, Wolfgang; Probst-Cousin, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    To determine if the pattern of macrophage activation reflects differences in the pathogenesis and clinical presentation of giant cell arteritis and primary angiitis of the central nervous system, specimens of 10 patients with giant cell arteritis and five with primary angiitis of the central nervous system were immunohistochemically studied and the expression of the macrophage activation markers 27E10, MRP14, MRP8 and 25F9 was determined in the vasculitic infiltrates. Thus, a partly different expression pattern of macrophage activation markers in giant cell arteritis and primary angiitis of the central nervous system was observed. The group comparison revealed that giant cell arteritis cases had significantly higher numbers of acute activated MRP14-positive macrophages, whereas primary angiitis of the central nervous system is characterized by a tendency toward more MRP8-positive intermediate/late activated macrophages. Furthermore, in giant cell arteritis comparably fewer CD8-positive lymphocytes were observed. These observations suggest, that despite their histopathological similarities, giant cell arteritis and primary angiitis of the central nervous system appear to represent either distinct entities within the spectrum of granulomatous vasculitides or different stages of similar disease processes. Their discrete clinical presentation is reflected by different activation patterns of macrophages, which may characterize giant cell arteritis as a more acute process and primary angiitis of the central nervous system as a more advanced inflammatory process.

  17. Nicotine attenuates activation of tissue resident macrophages in the mouse stomach through the β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Nemethova

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway is an endogenous mechanism by which the autonomic nervous system attenuates macrophage activation via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR. This concept has however not been demonstrated at a cellular level in intact tissue. To this end, we have studied the effect of nicotine on the activation of resident macrophages in a mouse stomach preparation by means of calcium imaging. METHODS: Calcium transients ([Ca(2+]i in resident macrophages were recorded in a mouse stomach preparation containing myenteric plexus and muscle layers by Fluo-4. Activation of macrophages was achieved by focal puff administration of ATP. The effects of nicotine on activation of macrophages were evaluated and the nAChR involved was pharmacologically characterized. The proximity of cholinergic nerves to macrophages was quantified by confocal microscopy. Expression of β2 and α7 nAChR was evaluated by β2 immunohistochemistry and fluorophore-tagged α-bungarotoxin. RESULTS: In 83% of macrophages cholinergic varicose nerve fibers were detected at distances <900 nm. The ATP induced [Ca(2+]i increase was significantly inhibited in 65% or 55% of macrophages by 100 µM or 10 µM nicotine, respectively. This inhibitory effect was reversed by the β2 nAChR preferring antagonist dihydro-β-eryhtroidine but not by hexamethonium (non-selective nAChR-antagonist, mecamylamine (α3β4 nAChR-preferring antagonist, α-bungarotoxin or methyllycaconitine (both α7 nAChR-preferring antagonist. Macrophages in the stomach express β2 but not α7 nAChR at protein level, while those in the intestine express both receptor subunits. CONCLUSION: This study is the first in situ demonstration of an inhibition of macrophage activation by nicotine suggesting functional signaling between cholinergic neurons and macrophages in the stomach. The data suggest that the β2 subunit of the nAChR is critically involved in the nicotine-induced inhibition

  18. Macrophage Polarization in Metabolism and Metabolic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Meiliana

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obesity is now recognized as the main cause of the worldwide epidemic of type 2 diabetes. Obesity-associated chronic inflammation is a contributing key factor for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Numbers of studies have clearly demonstrated that the immune system and metabolism are highly integrated. CONTENT: Macrophages are an essential component of innate immunity and play a central role in inflammation and host defense. Moreover, these cells have homeostatic functions beyond defense, including tissue remodeling in ontogenesis and orchestration of metabolic functions. Diversity and plasticity are hallmarks of cells of the monocyte-macrophage lineage. In response to interferons (IFNs, toll-like receptor (TLR, or interleukin (IL-4/IL-13 signals, macrophages undergo M1 (classical or M2 (alternative activation. Progress has now been made in defining the signaling pathways, transcriptional networks, and epigenetic mechanisms underlying M1, M2 or M2-like polarized activation. SUMMARY: In response to various signals, macrophages may undergo classical M1 activation (stimulated by TLR ligands and IFN-γ or alternative M2 activation (stimulated by IL-4/IL-13; these states mirror the T helper (Th1–Th2 polarization of T cells. Pathology is frequently associated with dynamic changes in macrophage activation, with classically activated M1 cells implicate in initiating and sustaining inflammation, meanwhile M2 or M2-like activated cells associated with resolution or smoldering chronic inflammation. Identification of the mechanisms and molecules that are associated with macrophage plasticity and polarized activation provides a basis for macrophage centered diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. KEYWORDS: obesity, adipose tissue, inflammation, macrophage polarization.

  19. MicroRNAs Constitute a Negative Feedback Loop in Streptococcus pneumoniae-Induced Macrophage Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griss, Kathrin; Bertrams, Wilhelm; Sittka-Stark, Alexandra; Seidel, Kerstin; Stielow, Christina; Hippenstiel, Stefan; Suttorp, Norbert; Eberhardt, Martin; Wilhelm, Jochen; Vera, Julio; Schmeck, Bernd

    2016-07-15

    Streptococcus pneumoniae causes high mortality as a major pneumonia-inducing pathogen. In pneumonia, control of innate immunity is necessary to prevent organ damage. We assessed the role of microRNAs (miRNAs) as regulators in pneumococcal infection of human macrophages. Exposure of primary blood-derived human macrophages with pneumococci resulted in transcriptional changes in several gene clusters and a significant deregulation of 10 microRNAs. Computational network analysis retrieved miRNA-146a as one putatively important regulator of pneumococci-induced host cell activation. Its induction depended on bacterial structural integrity and was completely inhibited by blocking Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR-2) or depleting its mediator MyD88. Furthermore, induction of miRNA-146a release did not require the autocrine feedback of interleukin 1β and tumor necrosis factor α released from infected macrophages, and it repressed the TLR-2 downstream mediators IRAK-1 and TRAF-6, as well as the inflammatory factors cyclooxygenase 2 and interleukin 1β. In summary, pneumococci recognition induces a negative feedback loop, preventing excessive inflammation via miR-146a and potentially other miRNAs. PMID:26984146

  20. Lipase Activity of Guinea Pig Peritoneal Macrophages and Mycobacterial Lipase Inhibitor

    OpenAIRE

    Kiyotani, Katsuhiro; Tasaka, Hiromichi; Tsukiyama, Fumiaki; Matsuo, Yoshiyasu

    1983-01-01

    The interaction of mycobacterial lipase inhibitor (MLI), isolated from culture supernatant fluid of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain H37Rv, and lipase from guinea pig peritoneal macrophages (GP-PMφs) was investigated fluorimetrically by the modified lipase assay system which had previously been proposed. Two peaks of lipase activity were observed in the enzyme preparation from GPPMφs. The activity of MLI against lipase from GP-PMφs was significantly high at acidic pH less than 5.0, and t...

  1. SESN2/sestrin2 suppresses sepsis by inducing mitophagy and inhibiting NLRP3 activation in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Ji; Bae, Soo Han; Ryu, Jae-Chan; Kwon, Younghee; Oh, Ji-Hwan; Kwon, Jeongho; Moon, Jong-Seok; Kim, Kyubo; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Lee, Min Goo; Shin, Jaekyoon; Kim, Young Sam; Kim, Chang-Hoon; Ryter, Stefan W; Choi, Augustine M K; Rhee, Sue Goo; Ryu, Ji-Hwan; Yoon, Joo-Heon

    2016-08-01

    Proper regulation of mitophagy for mitochondrial homeostasis is important in various inflammatory diseases. However, the precise mechanisms by which mitophagy is activated to regulate inflammatory responses remain largely unknown. The NLRP3 (NLR family, pyrin domain containing 3) inflammasome serves as a platform that triggers the activation of CASP1 (caspase 1) and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. Here, we demonstrate that SESN2 (sestrin 2), known as stress-inducible protein, suppresses prolonged NLRP3 inflammasome activation by clearance of damaged mitochondria through inducing mitophagy in macrophages. SESN2 plays a dual role in inducing mitophagy in response to inflammasome activation. First, SESN2 induces "mitochondrial priming" by marking mitochondria for recognition by the autophagic machinery. For mitochondrial preparing, SESN2 facilitates the perinuclear-clustering of mitochondria by mediating aggregation of SQSTM1 (sequestosome 1) and its binding to lysine 63 (Lys63)-linked ubiquitins on the mitochondrial surface. Second, SESN2 activates the specific autophagic machinery for degradation of primed mitochondria via an increase of ULK1 (unc-51 like kinase 1) protein levels. Moreover, increased SESN2 expression by extended LPS (lipopolysaccharide) stimulation is mediated by NOS2 (nitric oxide synthase 2, inducible)-mediated NO (nitric oxide) in macrophages. Thus, Sesn2-deficient mice displayed defective mitophagy, which resulted in hyperactivation of inflammasomes and increased mortality in 2 different sepsis models. Our findings define a unique regulatory mechanism of mitophagy activation for immunological homeostasis that protects the host from sepsis. PMID:27337507

  2. Gambogic acid covalently modifies IκB-kinase-β subunit to mediate suppression of lipopolysaccharide-induced activation of NF-κB in macrophages*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palempalli, Umamaheshwari D.; Gandhi, Ujjawal; Kalantari, Parisa; Vunta, Hema; Arner, Ryan J.; Narayan, Vivek; Ravindran, Anand; Prabhu, K. Sandeep

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis Gambogic acid (GA) is a polyprenylated xanthone abundant in the resin of Garcinia morella and G. hanburyi with a long history of use as a complementary and alternative medicine. The anti-tumor activity of GA has been well demonstrated and is thought to arise partly from the associated anti-inflammatory activity. Recent studies have indicated that the anti-tumor activity of GA is mediated by its ligation of the transferrin receptor TfR1. Since the cellular expression of TfR1 is down-regulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), we hypothesized that an alternative pathway exists in immune cells, such as macrophages, where GA could mitigate the expression of pro-inflammatory genes. Here we demonstrate that GA inhibits the LPS-dependent expression of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) target pro-inflammatory genes in macrophages. Western immunoblot, NF-κB luciferase reporter, and gel shift analyses revealed that GA strongly blocked the activation of NF-κB induced by LPS; while 9,10-dihydroGA that lacks the reactive α,β-unsaturated carbonyl group was ineffective. Moreover, GA was able to decrease nuclear p65 levels in RAW264.7 macrophages, where the expression of TfR1 was down-regulated by RNA interference. In-vitro kinase assays coupled with interaction studies using biotinylated GA as well as proteomic analysis demonstrated that IKKβ, a key kinase of the NF-κB signaling axis, was covalently modified by GA at Cys179 causing significant inhibition of its kinase activity. Taken together, these data demonstrate the potent anti-inflammatory activity of GA. PMID:19140805

  3. Gambogic acid covalently modifies IkappaB kinase-beta subunit to mediate suppression of lipopolysaccharide-induced activation of NF-kappaB in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palempalli, Umamaheshwari D; Gandhi, Ujjawal; Kalantari, Parisa; Vunta, Hema; Arner, Ryan J; Narayan, Vivek; Ravindran, Anand; Prabhu, K Sandeep

    2009-04-15

    GA (gambogic acid) is a polyprenylated xanthone abundant in the resin of Garcinia morella and Garcinia hanburyi with a long history of use as a complementary and alternative medicine. The antitumour activity of GA has been well demonstrated and is thought to arise partly from the associated anti-inflammatory activity. Recent studies have indicated that the antitumour activity of GA is mediated by its ligation of TfR1 (transferrin receptor-1). Since the cellular expression of TfR1 is down-regulated by LPS (lipopolysaccharide), we hypothesized that an alternative pathway exists in immune cells, such as macrophages, where GA could mitigate the expression of pro-inflammatory genes. Here we demonstrate that GA inhibits the LPS-dependent expression of NF-kappaB (nuclear factor kappaB) target pro-inflammatory genes in macrophages. Western immunoblot, NF-kappaB-luciferase reporter and gel-shift analyses revealed that GA strongly blocked the activation of NF-kappaB induced by LPS, whereas 9,10-dihydro-GA, which lacks the reactive alpha,beta-unsaturated carbonyl group, was ineffective. Moreover, GA was able to decrease nuclear p65 levels in RAW264.7 macrophages, where the expression of TfR1 was down-regulated by RNA interference. in vitro kinase assays coupled with interaction studies using biotinylated GA as well as proteomic analysis demonstrated that IKKbeta [IkappaB (inhibitory kappaB) kinase-beta], a key kinase of the NF-kappaB signalling axis, was covalently modified by GA at Cys-179, causing significant inhibition of its kinase activity. Taken together, these results demonstrate the potent anti-inflammatory activity of GA. PMID:19140805

  4. Mesenchymal stem cells ameliorate rhabdomyolysis-induced acute kidney injury via the activation of M2 macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Geng, Yanqiu; ZHANG Li; Fu, Bo; Zhang, Jianrong; Hong, Quan; Hu, Jie; Li, Diangeng; Luo, Congjuan; Cui, Shaoyuan; Zhu, Fei; Chen, Xiangmei

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The mortality of rhabdomyolysis-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) is still high, as there is no effective therapy. It has been shown that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can induce M2 macrophages, which mediate MSC protection in other experimental inflammation-related organ injury. This study was designed to investigate the protective effects of macrophage activation in MSC therapy of rhabdomyolysis-induced AKI. Methods MSCs were injected into glycerol-induced r...

  5. Bone marrow-derived macrophages exclusively expressed caveolin-2: The role of inflammatory activators and hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maceckova, Michaela; Martiskova, Hana; Koudelka, Adolf; Kubala, Lukas; Lojek, Antonin; Pekarova, Michaela

    2015-11-01

    Caveolins are specific proteins involved in regulation of signal transduction to intracellular space. Still, their contribution to immune functions has not been completely clarified. Thus, we decided to characterize the expression of caveolins in bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) under resting and inflammatory conditions. The effect of classical activators (lipopolysaccharide, LPS; interferon-gamma, IFN-γ) was further potentiated with hypoxic (5% O2) conditions. The activation of p44/42-extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and expression of caveolin-1, -2, and -3, hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α), as well as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was monitored using the Western blot technique. The production of nitric oxide (NO) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) was analyzed by Griess method or ELISA, respectively. BMDMs were also transfected with siRNA against caveolin-2. Importantly, our study showed for the first time that BMDMs expressed only caveolin-2, and its level decreased after activation of macrophages with LPS, IFN-γ, and/or hypoxia. The expression of caveolin-2 negatively correlates with the iNOS and HIF-1α protein levels, as well as with the LPS/IFN-γ- and hypoxia-induced activation of ERK1/2. We concluded that caveolin-2 is most probably involved in regulation of pro-inflammatory responses of BMDMs, triggered via activation of ERK1/2. PMID:26215374

  6. Quercus infectoria galls possess antioxidant activity and abrogates oxidative stress-induced functional alterations in murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Athar, Mohammad; Alam, M Sarwar

    2008-02-15

    The present study reports the antioxidant activity of ethanolic extract of Quercus infectoria galls. The antioxidant potency of galls was investigated employing several established in vitro model systems. Their protective efficacy on oxidative modulation of murine macrophages was also explored. Gall extract was found to contain a large amount of polyphenols and possess a potent reducing power. HPTLC analysis of the extract suggested it to contain 19.925% tannic acid (TA) and 8.75% gallic acid (GA). The extract potently scavenged free radicals including DPPH (IC(50)~0.5 microg/ml), ABTS (IC(50)~1 microg/ml), hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) (IC(50)~2.6 microg/ml) and hydroxyl (*OH) radicals (IC(50)~6 microg/ml). Gall extract also chelated metal ions and inhibited Fe(3+) -ascorbate-induced oxidation of protein and peroxidation of lipids. Exposure of rat peritoneal macrophages to tertiary butyl hydroperoxide (tBOOH) induced oxidative stress in them and altered their phagocytic functions. These macrophages showed elevated secretion of lysosomal hydrolases, and attenuated phagocytosis and respiratory burst. Activity of macrophage mannose receptor (MR) also diminished following oxidant exposure. Pretreatment of macrophages with gall extract preserved antioxidant armory near to control values and significantly protected against all the investigated functional mutilations. MTT assay revealed gall extract to enhance percent survival of tBOOH exposed macrophages. These results indicate that Q. infectoria galls possess potent antioxidant activity, when tested both in chemical as well as biological models. PMID:18076871

  7. Phosphorylation of CRTC3 by the salt-inducible kinases controls the interconversion of classically activated and regulatory macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Kristopher; MacKenzie, Kirsty F; Petkevicius, Kasparas; Kristariyanto, Yosua; Zhang, Jiazhen; Choi, Hwan Geun; Peggie, Mark; Plater, Lorna; Pedrioli, Patrick G A; McIver, Ed; Gray, Nathanael S; Arthur, J Simon C; Cohen, Philip

    2012-10-16

    Macrophages acquire strikingly different properties that enable them to play key roles during the initiation, propagation, and resolution of inflammation. Classically activated (M1) macrophages produce proinflammatory mediators to combat invading pathogens and respond to tissue damage in the host, whereas regulatory macrophages (M2b) produce high levels of anti-inflammatory molecules, such as IL-10, and low levels of proinflammatory cytokines, like IL-12, and are important for the resolution of inflammatory responses. A central problem in this area is to understand how the formation of regulatory macrophages can be promoted at sites of inflammation to prevent and/or alleviate chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Here, we demonstrate that the salt-inducible kinases (SIKs) restrict the formation of regulatory macrophages and that their inhibition induces striking increases in many of the characteristic markers of regulatory macrophages, greatly stimulating the production of IL-10 and other anti-inflammatory molecules. We show that SIK inhibitors elevate IL-10 production by inducing the dephosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB)-regulated transcriptional coactivator (CRTC) 3, its dissociation from 14-3-3 proteins and its translocation to the nucleus where it enhances a gene transcription program controlled by CREB. Importantly, the effects of SIK inhibitors on IL-10 production are lost in macrophages that express a drug-resistant mutant of SIK2. These findings identify SIKs as a key molecular switch whose inhibition reprograms macrophages to an anti-inflammatory phenotype. The remarkable effects of SIK inhibitors on macrophage function suggest that drugs that target these protein kinases may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases.

  8. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein contributes to atherogenesis via co-activation of macrophages and mast cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Chen

    Full Text Available Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (OxLDL is a risk factor for atherosclerosis, due to its role in endothelial dysfunction and foam cell formation. Tissue-resident cells such as macrophages and mast cells release inflammatory mediators upon activation that in turn cause endothelial activation and monocyte adhesion. Two of these mediators are tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α, produced by macrophages, and histamine, produced by mast cells. Static and microfluidic flow experiments were conducted to determine the number of adherent monocytes on vascular endothelium activated by supernatants of oxLDL-treated macrophages and mast cells or directly by oxLDL. The expression of adhesion molecules on activated endothelial cells and the concentration of TNF-α and histamine in the supernatants were measured by flow cytometry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. A low dose of oxLDL (8 μg/ml, below the threshold for the clinical presentation of coronary artery disease, was sufficient to activate both macrophages and mast cells and synergistically increase monocyte-endothelium adhesion via released TNF-α and histamine. The direct exposure of endothelial cells to a much higher dose of oxLDL (80 μg/ml had less effect on monocyte adhesion than the indirect activation via oxLDL-treated macrophages and mast cells. The results of this work indicate that the co-activation of macrophages and mast cells by oxLDL is an important mechanism for the endothelial dysfunction and atherogenesis. The observed synergistic effect suggests that both macrophages and mast cells play a significant role in early stages of atherosclerosis. Allergic patients with a lipid-rich diet may be at high risk for cardiovascular events due to high concentration of low-density lipoprotein and histamine in arterial vessel walls.

  9. Ovarian ascites-derived Hospicells promote angiogenesis via activation of macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castells, Magali; Thibault, Benoît; Mery, Eliane; Golzio, Muriel; Pasquet, Marlene; Hennebelle, Isabelle; Bourin, Philippe; Mirshahi, Massoud; Delord, Jean Pierre; Querleu, Denis; Couderc, Bettina

    2012-12-29

    Within the microenvironment, Carcinoma-associated mesenchymal stem cells (Hospicells) are able to influence ovarian tumor development via, among others, the facilitation of angiogenesis in the tumor site allowing an accelerated tumor growth. We demonstrate the presence of a chemotactism between endothelial cells and Hospicells, and a cell line specific increased secretion of pro-angiogenic cytokines such as IL-6, IL-8 and VEGF from ovarian adenocarcinoma cells. Hospicells are also able to attract and activate macrophages to a M2 phenotype and allow them to secrete a huge quantity of pro-angiogenic cytokines, favorable to tumor progression of all the associated ovarian adenocarcinoma cells tested.

  10. Intracellular survival and persistence of Chlamydia muridarum is determined by macrophage polarization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Gracey

    Full Text Available Macrophages can display a number of distinct phenotypes, known collectively as polarized macrophages. The best defined of these phenotypes are the classically-activated, interferon gamma (IFNγ/LPS induced (M1 and alternatively-activated, IL-4 induced (M2 macrophages. The goal of this study is to characterize macrophage-Chlamydia interactions in the context of macrophage polarization. Here we use Chlamydia muridarum and murine bone-marrow derived macrophages to show Chlamydia does not induce M2 polarization in macrophages as a survival strategy. Unexpectedly, the infection of macrophages was silent with no upregulation of M1 macrophage-associated genes. We further demonstrate that macrophages polarized prior to infection have a differential capacity to control Chlamydia. M1 macrophages harbor up to 40-fold lower inclusion forming units (IFU than non-polarized or M2 polarized macrophages. Gene expression analysis showed an increase in 16sRNA in M2 macrophages with no change in M1 macrophages. Suppressed Chlamydia growth in M1 macrophages correlated with the induction of a bacterial gene expression profile typical of persistence as evident by increased Euo expression and decreased Omp1 and Tal expression. Observations of permissive Chlamydia growth in non-polarized and M2 macrophages and persistence in M1 macrophages were supported through electron microscopy. This work supports the importance of IFNγ in the innate immune response to Chlamydia. However, demonstration that the M1 macrophages, despite an antimicrobial signature, fail to eliminate intracellular Chlamydia supports the notion that host-pathogen co-evolution has yielded a pathogen that can evade cellular defenses against this pathogen, and persist for prolonged periods of time in the host.

  11. The FGL2/fibroleukin prothrombinase is involved in alveolar macrophage activation in COPD through the MAPK pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fibrinogen-like protein 2 (FGL2)/fibroleukin has been reported to play a vital role in the pathogenesis of some critical inflammatory diseases by possessing immunomodulatory activity through the mediation of 'immune coagulation' and the regulation of maturation and proliferation of immune cells. We observed upregulated FGL2 expression in alveolar macrophages from peripheral lungs of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients and found a correlation between FGL2 expression and increased macrophage activation markers (CD11b and CD14). The role of FGL2 in the activation of macrophages was confirmed by the detection of significantly decreased macrophage activation marker (CD11b, CD11c, and CD71) expression as well as the inhibition of cell migration and inflammatory cytokine (IL-8 and MMP-9) production in an LPS-induced FGL2 knockdown human monocytic leukemia cell line (THP-1). Increased FGL2 expression co-localized with upregulated phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38-MAPK) in the lung tissues from COPD patients. Moreover, FGL2 knockdown in THP-1 cells significantly downregulated LPS-induced phosphorylation of p38-MAPK while upregulating phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Thus, we demonstrate that FGL2 plays an important role in macrophage activation in the lungs of COPD patients through MAPK pathway modulation.

  12. Interleukin-33 Drives Activation of Alveolar Macrophages and Airway Inflammation in a Mouse Model of Acute Exacerbation of Chronic Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa M. Bunting

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the role of interleukin-33 (IL-33 in airway inflammation in an experimental model of an acute exacerbation of chronic asthma, which reproduces many of the features of the human disease. Systemically sensitized female BALB/c mice were challenged with a low mass concentration of aerosolized ovalbumin for 4 weeks to induce chronic asthmatic inflammation and then received a single moderate-level challenge to trigger acute airway inflammation simulating an asthmatic exacerbation. The inflammatory response and expression of cytokines and activation markers by alveolar macrophages (AM were assessed, as was the effect of pretreatment with a neutralizing antibody to IL-33. Compared to chronically challenged mice, AM from an acute exacerbation exhibited significantly enhanced expression of markers of alternative activation, together with enhanced expression of proinflammatory cytokines and of cell surface proteins associated with antigen presentation. In parallel, there was markedly increased expression of both mRNA and immunoreactivity for IL-33 in the airways. Neutralization of IL-33 significantly decreased both airway inflammation and the expression of proinflammatory cytokines by AM. Collectively, these data indicate that in this model of an acute exacerbation of chronic asthma, IL-33 drives activation of AM and has an important role in the pathogenesis of airway inflammation.

  13. The interaction between different types of activated RAW 264.7 cells and macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two major ways of macrophage (MΦ) activation can occur in radiation-induced pulmonary injury (RPI): classical and alternativeactivation, which play important roles in the pathogenesis of RPI. MΦ can produce chemokine MΦ inflammatory protein-1α (MIP-1α), while MIP-1α can recruit MΦ. The difference in the chemotactic ability of MIP-1α toward distinct activated MΦ is unclear. We speculated that there has been important interaction of MIP-1α with different activated MΦ, which might contribute to the pathogenesis of RPI. Classically and alternatively activated MΦ were produced by stimulating murine MΦ cell line RAW 264.7 cells with three different stimuli (LPS, IL-4 and IL-13); Then we used recombinant MIP-1α to attract two types of activated MΦ. In addition, we measured the ability of two types of activated MΦ to produce MIP-1α at the protein or mRNA level. Chemotactic ability of recombinant MIP-1α toward IL-13-treated MΦ was the strongest, was moderate for IL-4-treated MΦ, and was weakest for LPS-stimulated MΦ (p < 0.01). The ability of LPS-stimulated MΦ to secrete MIP-1α was significantly stronger than that of IL-4-treated or IL-13-treated MΦ (p < 0.01). The ability of LPS-stimulated MΦ to express MIP-1α mRNA also was stronger than that of IL-4- or IL-13-stimulated MΦ (p < 0.01). The chemotactic ability of MIP-1α toward alternatively activated MΦ (M2) was significantly greater than that for classically activated MΦ (M1). Meanwhile, both at the mRNA and protein level, the capacity of M1 to produce MIP-1α is better than that of M2. Thus, chemokine MIP-1α may play an important role in modulating the transition from radiation pneumonitis to pulmonary fibrosis in vivo, through the different chemotactic affinity for M1 and M2

  14. IL-10-Mediated Tristetraprolin Induction is part of a feedback loop that controls Macrophage STAT3 activation and cytokine production1

    OpenAIRE

    Gaba, Anthony; Grivennikov, Sergei I; Do, Mahn Vu; Stumpo, Deborah J.; Blackshear, Perry J.; Karin, Michael

    2012-01-01

    In activated macrophages, the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 inhibits expression of molecules that propagate inflammation in a manner that depends on transcription factor STAT3. Expression of IL-10 is regulated post-transcriptionally by the RNA-binding protein tristetraprolin (TTP), which destabilizes IL-10 mRNA in activated macrophages. Using LPS-activated bone marrow-derived murine macrophages, we demonstrate that TTP is a negative regulator of the IL-10/STAT3 anti-inflammatory response. ...

  15. Nitroxyl (HNO) reduces endothelial and monocyte activation and promotes M2 macrophage polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Karen L; Sampson, Amanda K; Irvine, Jennifer C; Shihata, Waled A; Michell, Danielle L; Lumsden, Natalie G; Lim, Chloe; Huet, Olivier; Drummond, Grant R; Kemp-Harper, Barbara K; Chin-Dusting, Jaye P F

    2016-09-01

    Nitroxyl anion (HNO) donors are currently being assessed for their therapeutic utility in several cardiovascular disorders including heart failure. Here, we examine their effect on factors that precede atherosclerosis including endothelial cell and monocyte activation, leucocyte adhesion to the endothelium and macrophage polarization. Similar to the NO donor glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), the HNO donors Angeli's salt (AS) and isopropylamine NONOate (IPA/NO) decreased leucocyte adhesion to activated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and mouse isolated aorta. This reduction in adhesion was accompanied by a reduction in intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and the cytokines monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) which was inhibitor of nuclear factor κB (NFκB) α (IκBα)- and subsequently NFκB-dependent. Intriguingly, the effects of AS on leucocyte adhesion, like those on vasodilation, were found to not be susceptible to pharmacological tolerance, unlike those observed with GTN. As well, HNO reduces monocyte activation and promotes polarization of M2 macrophages. Taken together, our data demonstrate that HNO donors can reduce factors that are associated with and which precede atherosclerosis and may thus be useful therapeutically. Furthermore, since the effects of the HNO donors were not subject to tolerance, this confers an additional advantage over NO donors. PMID:27231254

  16. Smoke exposure of human macrophages reduces HDAC3 activity, resulting in enhanced inflammatory cytokine production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Aaron R; Nocka, Karl N; Williams, Cara M M

    2012-08-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a debilitating condition resulting from exposure to pollutants such as cigarette smoke. Pulmonary macrophages secrete a plethora of inflammatory mediators that are increased in the lungs of COPD patients, but whether this phenotype results directly from smoke exposure remains unknown. Using an in vitro model for alveolar macrophages (AM) derived from human peripheral blood monocytes with granulocyte-macrophage stimulating factor (GM-MØ), we analyzed the mechanistic connection between cigarette smoke exposure and histone deacetylase (HDAC) regulation, hypothesized to be a contributing factor in COPD pathophysiology. Here we show that acute smoke exposure inhibits HDAC enzymatic activity in GM-MØ. Analysis of mRNA and total cellular proteins for expression of class I (1, 2, 3 and 8), class II (4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10), and class IV (11) HDAC revealed no effect of smoke exposure, whereas nuclear HDAC3 protein content was reduced. To better understand the physiological significance of reduced HDAC3 activity, we utilized siRNA to knockdown HDAC1, 2 and 3 individually. Interestingly, siRNA-mediated reduction of HDAC3 resulted in increased production of IL8 and IL1β in response to LPS stimulation, while HDAC2 knockdown had no effect on either cytokine. Lower nuclear content of HDAC3 in the context of equivalent total HDAC protein levels following smoke exposure may reflect increased nuclear export of HDAC3, allowing increased nuclear factor kappa b (NF-κB ) driven cytokine expression that can contribute to inflammation. PMID:22613758

  17. Different cell death modes of pancreatic acinar cells on macrophage activation in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Tao; LIU Tie-fu; XUE Dong-bo; SUN Bei; SHI Li-jun

    2008-01-01

    Background The pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis is complex and largely unclear. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between modes of cell death in pancreatic acinar cells, the release of cell contents and the inflammatory response of macrophagas.Methods Our experiment included four groups: group A (the control group), group B (AR42J cells overstimulated by caerulein), group C (AR42J cells treated with lipopolysaccharide and caerulein), and group D (AR42J cells treated with octreotide and caerulein). Apoptosis and oncosis, and the release of amylase and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) from AR42J cells were detected. Rat macrophages were stimulated by 1 ml supematant of culture medium of AR42J cells.Finally, NF-кB activation and TNF-α and IL-1β secretion by macrophages were detected.Results Oncotlc cells in group C increased while apoptctic cells decreased (P <0.05); cells in group D had the inverse reaction. The release of amylase and LDH changed directly with the occurrence of oncosis. The transcription factor NF-кB was activated and secretion of TNF-α and IL-1β were significantly higher in group C than in group B (P <0.05); in group D, these actions were significantly lower than in group B (P<0.05). This trend was in line with changes in amylase and LDH production.Conclusion There is a close relationship between modes of pancreatic acinar cell death, the release of cell contents and the inflammatory reaction of macrophages.

  18. Effect of cyhalothrin on Ehrlich tumor growth and macrophage activity in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.M. Quinteiro-Filho

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Cyhalothrin, a pyrethroid insecticide, induces stress-like symptoms, increases c-fos immunoreactivity in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, and decreases innate immune responses in laboratory animals. Macrophages are key elements in cellular immune responses and operate at the tumor-host interface. This study investigated the relationship among cyhalothrin effects on Ehrlich tumor growth, serum corticosterone levels and peritoneal macrophage activity in mice. Three experiments were done with 10 experimental (single gavage administration of 3.0 mg/kg cyhalothrin daily for 7 days and 10 control (single gavage administration of 1.0 mL/kg vehicle of cyhalothrin preparation daily for 7 days isogenic BALB/c mice in each experiment. Cyhalothrin i increased Ehrlich ascitic tumor growth after ip administration of 5.0 x 106 tumor cells, i.e., ascitic fluid volume (control = 1.97 ± 0.39 mL and experimental = 2.71 ± 0.92 mL; P < 0.05, concentration of tumor cells/mL in the ascitic fluid (control = 111.95 ± 16.73 x 106 and experimental = 144.60 ± 33.18 x 106; P < 0.05, and total number of tumor cells in the ascitic fluid (control = 226.91 ± 43.22 x 106 and experimental = 349.40 ± 106.38 x 106; P < 0.05; ii increased serum corticosterone levels (control = 200.0 ± 48.3 ng/mL and experimental = 420.0 ± 75.5 ng/mL; P < 0.05, and iii decreased the intensity of macrophage phagocytosis (control = 132.3 ± 19.7 and experimental = 116.2 ± 4.6; P < 0.05 and oxidative burst (control = 173.7 ± 40.8 and experimental= 99.58 ± 41.7; P < 0.05 in vitro in the presence of Staphylococcus aureus. These data provide evidence that cyhalothrin simultaneously alters host resistance to Ehrlich tumor growth, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA axis function, and peritoneal macrophage activity. The results are discussed in terms of data suggesting a link between stress, HPA axis activation and resistance to tumor growth.

  19. Activation of macrophages by an exopolysaccharide isolated from Antarctic Psychrobacter sp. B-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Leiye; Sun, Guojie; Wei, Jingfang; Wang, Yingze; Du, Chao; Li, Jiang

    2016-09-01

    An exopolysaccharide (EPS) was isolated and purified from an Antarctic psychrophilic bacterium B-3, identified as Psychrobacter sp., and the activation of RAW264.7 cells by B-3 EPS was investigated. The results show that B-3 EPS, over a certain concentration range, promoted cell viability, nitric oxide production, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α secretion, and phagocytic ability. Furthermore, TAK-242, an inhibitor of the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) significantly reduced nitric oxide production by these cells after stimulation with B-3 EPS. Moreover, B-3 EPS induced p65 phosphorylation and IκBα degradation in these cells. In conclusion, B-3 EPS might have activated RAW264.7 cells by combining with TLR4 on cell surface and triggering activation of NF-κB signaling pathways, implying that this EPS could activate macrophages and regulate initial immune response.

  20. Macrophages enhance the radiosensitizing activity of lipid A: A novel role for immune cells in tumor cell radioresponse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This study examines whether activated macrophages may radiosensitize tumor cells through the release of proinflammatory mediators. Methods and materials: RAW 264.7 macrophages were activated by lipid A, and the conditioned medium (CM) was analyzed for the secretion of cytokines and the production of nitric oxide (NO) through inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). EMT-6 tumor cells were exposed to CM and analyzed for hypoxic cell radiosensitivity. The role of nuclear factor (NF)-κB in the transcriptional activation of iNOS was examined by luciferase reporter gene assay. Results: Clinical immunomodulator lipid A, at a plasma-relevant concentration of 3 μg/mL, stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages to release NO, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and other cytokines. This in turn activated iNOS-mediated NO production in EMT-6 tumor cells and drastically enhanced their radiosensitivity. Radiosensitization was abrogated by the iNOS inhibitor aminoguanidine but not by a neutralizing anti-TNF-α antibody. The mechanism of iNOS induction was linked to NF-κB but not to JAK/STAT signaling. Interferon-γ further increased the NO production by macrophages to a level that caused radiosensitization of EMT-6 cells through the bystanding effect of diffused NO. Conclusions: We demonstrate for the first time that activated macrophages may radiosensitize tumor cells through the induction of NO synthesis, which occurs in both tumor and immune cells

  1. Macrophage activation syndrome as the initial manifestation of severe juvenile onset systemic lupus erythematosus. Favorable response to cyclophosphamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres Jiménez, Alfonso; Solís Vallejo, Eunice; Zeferino Cruz, Maritza; Céspedes Cruz, Adriana; Sánchez Jara, Berenice

    2014-01-01

    The macrophage activation syndrome is a rare but potentially fatal complication of patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases. This is a clinicopathological entity characterized by activation of histiocytes with prominent hemophagocytosis in the bone marrow and other reticuloendothelial systems. In patients with lupus it may mimic an exacerbation of the disease or infection. We report the case of a 7-year-old girl in whom the diagnosis of lupus erythematosus and macrophage activation syndrome was simultaneously made with response to the use of cyclophosphamide.

  2. Nrf2 regulates PU.1 expression and activity in the alveolar macrophage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staitieh, Bashar S; Fan, Xian; Neveu, Wendy; Guidot, David M

    2015-05-15

    Alveolar macrophage (AM) immune function depends on the activation of the transcription factor PU.1 by granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor. We have determined that chronic alcohol ingestion dampens PU.1 signaling via an unknown zinc-dependent mechanism; specifically, although PU.1 is not known to be a zinc-dependent transcription factor, zinc treatment reversed alcohol-mediated dampening of PU.1 signaling. Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), a zinc-dependent basic leucine zipper protein essential for antioxidant defenses, is also impaired by chronic alcohol ingestion and enhanced by zinc treatment. We hypothesized that the response of PU.1 to zinc treatment may result from the action of Nrf2 on PU.1. We first performed Nrf2/PU.1 protein coimmunoprecipitation on a rat AM cell line (NR8383) and found no evidence of protein-protein interactions. We then found evidence of increased Nrf2 binding to the PU.1 promoter region by chromatin immunoprecipitation. We next activated Nrf2 using either sulforaphane or an overexpression vector and inhibited Nrf2 with silencing RNA to determine whether Nrf2 could actively regulate PU.1. Nrf2 activation increased protein expression of both factors as well as gene expression of their respective downstream effectors, NAD(P)H dehydrogenase[quinone] 1 (NQO1) and cluster of differentiation antigen-14 (CD14). In contrast, Nrf2 silencing decreased the expression of both proteins, as well as gene expression of their effectors. Activating and inhibiting Nrf2 in primary rat AMs resulted in similar effects. Taken together, these findings suggest that Nrf2 regulates the expression and activity of PU.1 and that antioxidant response and immune activation are coordinately regulated within the AM.

  3. Kruppel-Like Factor 2-Mediated Suppression of MicroRNA-155 Reduces the Proinflammatory Activation of Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaolin He

    Full Text Available Recent evidence indicates that significant interactions exist between Kruppel-like factor 2 (KLF2 and microRNAs (miRNAs in endothelial cells. Because KLF2 is known to exert anti-inflammatory effects and inhibit the pro-inflammatory activation of monocytes, we sought to identify how inflammation-associated miR-155 is regulated by KLF2 in macrophages.Peritoneal macrophages from wild-type (WT C57Bl/6 mice were transfected with either recombinant adenovirus vector expressing KLF2 (Ad-KLF2 or siRNA targeting KLF2 (KLF2-siRNA for 24 h-48 h, then stimulated with oxidized low-density lipoproteins (ox-LDL, 50 μg/mL for 24 h. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction showed that KLF2 markedly reduced the expression of miR-155 in quiescent/ox-LDL-stimulated macrophages. We also found that the increased expression of miR-155, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1 and interleukin (IL-6 and the decreased expression of the suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS-1 and IL-10 in ox-LDL-treated macrophages were significantly suppressed by KLF2. Most importantly, over-expression of miR-155 could partly reverse the suppressive effects of KLF2 on the inflammatory response of macrophages. Conversely, the suppression of miR-155 in KLF2 knockdown macrophages significantly overcame the pro-inflammatory properties associated with KLF2 knockdown. Finally, Ad-KLF2 significantly attenuated the diet-induced formation of atherosclerotic lesions in apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE(-/- mice, which was associated with a significantly reduced expression of miR-155 and its relative inflammatory cytokine genes in the aortic arch and in macrophages.KLF2-mediated suppression of miR-155 reduced the inflammatory response of macrophages.

  4. Influence of cucumariosides upon intracellular [Ca2+]i and lysosomal activity of macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agafonova, Irina G; Aminin, Dmitry L; Avilov, Sergey A; Stonik, Valentin A

    2003-11-19

    Biological effects of the triterpene glycosides, cucumariosides A(2)-2 and A(7)-1 from the edible sea cucumber Cucumaria japonica and their aglycones were investigated using embryos of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus nudus and the BALB/C line mouse peritoneal macrophages. Cucumariosides were highly cytotoxic in a sea urchin embryo development test with EC(50) values of 0.3 and 1.98 microg/mL, respectively. The aglycone was completely lacking in cytotoxicity. In subtoxic concentrations (0.001-0.1 microg/mL), cucumarioside A(2)-2 showed more then 2-fold stimulation of lysosomal activity and induced a rapid short-term increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) content in mouse macrophages. The maximal stimulatory effect was detected after 1-2 h of cultivation of cells with this glycoside. Cucumarioside A(7)-1 demonstrated more weak effects and even slightly inhibited lysosomal activity, while the aglycone was completely ineffective. At the toxic concentration (1 microg/mL), cucumarioside A(2)-2 induced the sharp irreversable increase of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. We suggested that cucumariosides, especially A(2)-2, may act as Ca(2+) agonists due to their membranolytic properties. PMID:14611158

  5. In vivo macrophage activation in chickens with Acemannan, a complex carbohydrate extracted from Aloe vera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djeraba, A; Quere, P

    2000-05-01

    Acemannan (ACM 1), a beta-(1,4) -acetylated mannan isolated from Aloe vera, can be used as an effective adjuvant in vaccination against some avian viral diseases. Our results demonstrate a quick and lasting in vivo priming effect of ACM 1 on macrophage response after intramuscular inoculation in chickens (500 microg per 2-month-old bird). In response to IFN-gamma in vitro, monocytes from ACM 1-treated chickens exhibited a strong enhancement of NO production from 3 to 9 days p.i., but a weaker effect on MHC II cell surface antigen expression on day 3 p.i. A stimulating effect of ACM 1 treatment was also observed on spontaneous and inducible NO production for splenocytes only on day 3 p.i. By that time, splenocytes exhibited a strong higher capacity to proliferate in response to the T cell-mitogen PHA. At the same time, the in vivo capacity to produce NO, measured by the (NO(-)(2)+NO(-)(3)) serum level after intravenous LPS injection, increased greatly from 3 to 9 days p.i. In conclusion, ACM 1 was able efficiently and durably to increase the activation capacity of macrophages from the systemic immune compartment (in particular from the blood and spleen after an intramuscular injection) in chickens, especially for NO production. These findings provide a better understanding of the adjuvant activity of ACM 1 for viral and tumoral diseases.

  6. Is Synovial Macrophage Activation the Inflammatory Link Between Obesity and Osteoarthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Antonia RuJia; Friis, Thor; Sekar, Sunderajhan; Crawford, Ross; Xiao, Yin; Prasadam, Indira

    2016-09-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common musculoskeletal disease, affecting nearly 25 % of the world population (WHO reports), leading to pain and disability. There are as yet no clinically proven therapies to halt OA onset or progression; the development of such therapies is, therefore, a national as well as international research priority. Obesity-related metabolic syndrome has been identified as the most significant, but also an entirely preventable risk factor for OA; however, the mechanisms underlying this link remain unclear. We have examined the available literature linking OA and metabolic syndrome. The two conditions have a shared pathogenesis in which chronic low-grade inflammation of affected tissues is recognized as a major factor that is associated with systemic inflammation. In addition, the occurrence of metabolic syndrome appears to alter systemic and local pro-inflammatory cytokines that are also related to the development of OA-like pathologies. Recent findings highlight the importance not only of the elevated number of macrophage in inflamed synovium but also the activation and amplification of the inflammatory state and other pathological changes. The role of local inflammation on the synovium is now considered to be a pharmacological target against which to aim disease-modifying drugs. In this review, we evaluate evidence linking OA, synovitis and metabolic syndrome and discuss the merits of targeting macrophage activation as a valid treatment option for OA. PMID:27422277

  7. Macrophage activation syndrome in a patient with systemic onset of the juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Deepak; Aggarwal, Hari K; Rao, Avinash; Mittal, Anshul; Jain, Promil

    2016-01-01

    Systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA) is defined as arthritis affecting one or more joint usually in the juvenile age group (< 16 years of age) with or preceded by fever of at least 2 weeks duration that is documented to be daily ("quotidian") for at least 3 days which may be associated with evanescent (non-fixed) erythematous rash or generalized lymph node enlargement or hepatomegaly/splenomegaly/both or serositis. Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is a life-threatening complication of sJIA marked by sudden onset of non-remitting high fever, profound depression in all three blood cell lines (i.e. leukopenia, anemia, and thrombocytopenia), hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, and elevated serum liver enzyme levels. In children with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis, the clinical picture may mimic sepsis or an exacerbation of the underlying disease. We report a case of a 16-year-old female patient presenting with high grade fever with joint pains and generalized weakness which proved to be systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis with macrophage activation syndrome after ruling out all other differential diagnoses and responded well to intravenous steroids.

  8. Evaluation of macrophage activation syndrome associated with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis: single center experience over a one-year period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barut, Kenan; Yücel, Gözde; Sinoplu, Ada Bulut; Şahin, Sezgin; Adroviç, Amra; Kasapçopur, Özgür

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study aimed to evaluate the demographic, clinical, laboratory properties of patients with macrophage activation syndrome and treatment outcomes. Material and Methods: The data of the patients who were diagnosed with macrophage activation syndrome secondary to systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis between June 2013–May 2014 were evaluated by screening patient records. Results: Ten patients with macrophage activation syndrome were followed up in one year. The mean age at the time of diagnosis was found to be 7.6±4.5 years. The most common clinical finding at presentation (80%) was increased body temperature. Hepatosplenomegaly was found in half of the patients. The most common hematological finding (90%) was anemia. The mean erythrocyte sedimentation rate was found to be 71.8±36.2 mm/h, whereas it was measured to be lower (31.2±25.2 mm/h) at the time of the diagnosis of macrophage activation syndrome. Increased ferritin level was found in all of our patients (the mean ferritin level was found to be 23 957±15 525 ng/mL). Hypertriglyceridemia was found in nine patients (90%). The mean triglyceride level was found to be 397±332 mg/dL. Systemic steroid treatment was administered to all patients. Cyclosporine A was given to eight patients (80%), canakinumab was given to four patients (40%) and anakinra was given to five patients (50%). Plasmapheresis was performed in two patients. Improvement was found in all patients except for one patient. The patient in whom no improvement was observed showed a chronic course. Conclusions: The diagnosis of macrophage activation syndrome should be considered in presence of sudden disturbance in general condition, resistant high fever and systemic inflammation findings in children with active rheumatic disease. Complete recovery can be provided with early and efficient treatment in macrophage activation syndrome which develops secondary to systemic juvenil idiopathic arthritis. PMID:26884689

  9. Lymphotoxin β receptor activation on macrophages induces cross-tolerance to TLR4 and TLR9 ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimmer, Nadin; Huber, Barbara; Barabas, Nicola; Röhrl, Johann; Pfeffer, Klaus; Hehlgans, Thomas

    2012-04-01

    Our previous studies indicated that lymphotoxin β receptor (LTβR) activation controls and downregulates inflammatory reactions. In this study, we report that LTβR activation on primary mouse macrophages results in induction of tripartite motif containing (TRIM) 30α, which negatively regulates NF-κB activation induced by TLR signaling. LTβR activation results in a downregulation of proinflammatory cytokine and mediator expression upon TLR restimulation, demonstrating that LTβR signaling is involved in the induction of TLR cross-tolerance. Specific knockdown experiments using TRIM30α-specific small interfering RNA abolished the LTβR-dependent induction of TRIM30α and LTβR-mediated TLR cross-tolerance. Concordantly, LTβR activation on bone marrow-derived macrophages induced cross-tolerance to TLR4 and TLR9 ligands in vitro. Furthermore, we have generated cell type-specific LTβR-deficient mice with ablation of LTβR expression on macrophages/neutrophils (LTβR(flox/flox) × LysM-Cre). In bone marrow-derived macrophages derived from these mice LTβR-induced cross-tolerance to TLR4 and TLR9 ligands was impaired. Additionally, mice with a conditional ablation of LTβR expression on macrophages (LTβR(flox/flox) × LysM-Cre) are resistant to LTβR-induced TLR4 tolerance in vivo. Collectively, our data indicate that LTβR activation on macrophages by T cell-derived lymphotoxin α(1)β(2) controls proinflammatory responses by activation of a TRIM30α-controlled, counterregulatory signaling pathway to protect against exacerbating inflammatory reactions. PMID:22357629

  10. Antitumor effect of vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage activating factor on Ehrlich ascites tumor-bearing mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Y; Naraparaju, V R; Yamamoto, N

    1999-01-01

    Cancerous cells secrete alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (NaGalase) into the blood stream, resulting in deglycosylation of serum vitamin D3-binding protein (known as Gc protein), which is a precursor for macrophage activating factor (MAF). Incubation of Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase generates the most potent macrophage activating factor (designated GcMAF). Administration of GcMAF to cancer-bearing hosts can bypass the inactivated MAF precursor and act directly on macrophages for efficient activation. Therapeutic effects of GcMAF on Ehrlich ascites tumor-bearing mice were assessed by survival time and serum NaGalase activity, because serum NaGalase activity was proportional to tumor burden. A single administration of GcMAF (100 pg/mouse) to eight mice on the same day after transplantation of the tumor (5 x 10(5) cells) showed a mean survival time of 21 +/- 3 days for seven mice, with one mouse surviving more than 60 days, whereas tumor-bearing controls had a mean survival time of 13 +/- 2 days. Six of the eight mice that received two GcMAF administrations, at Day 0 and Day 4 after transplantation, survived up to 31 +/- 4 days whereas, the remaining two mice survived for more than 60 days. Further, six of the eight mice that received three GcMAF administrations with 4-day intervals showed an extended survival of at least 60 days, and serum NaGalase levels were as low as those of control mice throughout the survival period. The cure with subthreshold GcMAF-treatments (administered once or twice) of tumor-bearing mice appeared to be a consequence of sustained macrophage activation by inflammation resulting from the macrophage-mediated tumoricidal process. Therefore, a protracted macrophage activation induced by a few administrations of minute amounts of GcMAF eradicated the murine ascites tumor. PMID:9893164

  11. Immunomodulated signaling in macrophages: Studies on activation of Raf-1, MAPK, cPLA2 and secretion of IL-12

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张宗梁; 宋秋宝; 林明群; 丁跃梅; 康小伟; 姚錱

    1997-01-01

    Little is known about the mechanism and signal transduction by LPS-mediated immunomodulation of murine peritoneal macrophages. It is found that the signal molecules of the down-stream of Ras, Raf-1, MAPK p44, and MAPK p42 are phosphorylated, and cPLA2 is activated with a significant increase of the release of [ H3 ] AA by macrophages in response to LPS and PMA. Compared with the very recent finding that LPS and PMA trigger the activation and translocation of PKC-α and PKC-ε, these findings suggest that there is a connection between PKC signaling pathway and the Raf-1/MAPK pathway and that the activation of these main signaling events may be closely related to the secretion of IL-12 during LPS-induced modulation of macrophages.

  12. A very rare cause of dyspnea with a unique presentation on a computed tomography scan of the chest: macrophage activation syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandao-Neto, Rodrigo Antonio [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Clinical Emergency Dept.; Santana, Alfredo Nicodemos Cruz; Danilovic, Debora Lucia Seguro; Mendonca, Berenice Bilharinho de [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina]. E-mail: alfredonicodemos@hotmail.com; Bernardi, Fabiola Del Carlo [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Dept. of Pathology; Barbas, Carmen Silvia Valente [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Dept. of Pulmonology

    2008-02-15

    Macrophage activation syndrome is a rare and potentially life-threatening disease. It occurs due to immune dysregulation manifested as excessive macrophage proliferation, typically causing hepatosplenomegaly, pancytopenia and hepatic dysfunction. Here, we report an unusual case of macrophage activation syndrome presenting as dyspnea, as well as (reported here for the first time) high resolution computed tomography findings of an excavated nodule, diffuse ground glass opacities and consolidations (mimicking severe pneumonia or alveolar hemorrhage). The patient was successfully treated with human immunoglobulin. We recommend that macrophage activation syndrome be considered in the differential diagnosis of respiratory failure. Rapid diagnosis and treatment are essential to achieving favorable outcomes in patients with this syndrome. (author)

  13. Macrophage TCF-4 co-activates p65 to potentiate chronic inflammation and insulin resistance in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Xia; Hou, Along; Wang, Rui; Liu, Da; Xiang, Wei; Xie, Qingyun; Zhang, Bo; Gan, Lixia; Zheng, Wei; Miao, Hongming

    2016-07-01

    Transcription factor 4 (TCF-4) was recently identified as a candidate gene for the cause of type 2 diabetes, although the mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. In the present study, we demonstrated that the TCF-4 transgene in macrophages aggravated high-fat diet (HFD)-induced insulin resistance and chronic inflammation, characterized by the elevation of proinflammatory cytokines in the blood, liver and white adipose tissue, as well as a proinflammatory profile of immune cells in visceral fats in mice. Mechanistically, TCF-4 functioned as a co-activator of p65 to amplify the saturated free fatty acid (FFA)-stimulated promoter activity, mRNA transcription and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines in primary macrophages. Blockage of p65 with a specific interfering RNA or inhibitor could prevent TCF-4-enhanced expression of proinflammatory cytokines in FFA/lipopolysaccharide-treated primary macrophages. The p65 inhibitor could abolish macrophage TCF-4 transgene-aggravated systemic inflammation, glucose intolerance and insulin resistance in HFD-treated mice. In addition, we demonstrated that the mRNA expression of TCF-4 in the peripheral blood monocytes from humans was positively correlated to the levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, tumour necrosis factor α, IL-6 and fasting plasma glucose. In summary, we identified TCF-4 as a co-activator of p65 in the potentiation of proinflammatory cytokine production in macrophages and aggravation of HFD-induced chronic inflammation and insulin resistance in mice. PMID:27129186

  14. Macrophage activation and differentiation signals regulate schlafen-4 gene expression: evidence for Schlafen-4 as a modulator of myelopoiesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy J van Zuylen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The ten mouse and six human members of the Schlafen (Slfn gene family all contain an AAA domain. Little is known of their function, but previous studies suggest roles in immune cell development. In this report, we assessed Slfn regulation and function in macrophages, which are key cellular regulators of innate immunity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Multiple members of the Slfn family were up-regulated in mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMM by the Toll-like Receptor (TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS, the TLR3 agonist Poly(I∶C, and in disease-affected joints in the collagen-induced model of rheumatoid arthritis. Of these, the most inducible was Slfn4. TLR agonists that signal exclusively through the MyD88 adaptor protein had more modest effects on Slfn4 mRNA levels, thus implicating MyD88-independent signalling and autocrine interferon (IFN-β in inducible expression. This was supported by the substantial reduction in basal and LPS-induced Slfn4 mRNA expression in IFNAR-1⁻/⁻ BMM. LPS causes growth arrest in macrophages, and other Slfn family genes have been implicated in growth control. Slfn4 mRNA levels were repressed during macrophage colony-stimulating factor (CSF-1-mediated differentiation of bone marrow progenitors into BMM. To determine the role of Slfn4 in vivo, we over-expressed the gene specifically in macrophages in mice using a csf1r promoter-driven binary expression system. Transgenic over-expression of Slfn4 in myeloid cells did not alter macrophage colony formation or proliferation in vitro. Monocyte numbers, as well as inflammatory macrophages recruited to the peritoneal cavity, were reduced in transgenic mice that specifically over-expressed Slfn4, while macrophage numbers and hematopoietic activity were increased in the livers and spleens. CONCLUSIONS: Slfn4 mRNA levels were up-regulated during macrophage activation but down-regulated during differentiation. Constitutive Slfn4 expression in the

  15. Monarch-1 Activation in Murine Macrophage Cell Line (J774 A.1 Infected with Iranian Strain of Leishmania Major

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Fata

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Leishmania major is an intracellular parasite transmitted through the bite of the female phlebotomine sand flies. Leishmania major is able to escape the host immune defense and survive within macrophages. Modulation of the NF-κB (Nuclear Factor-Kappa B activation and suppression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines by L. major are the main evasion mechanisms that remain to be explored. This study aims to examine the expression level of the Monarch-1 in L. major-infected macrophages, as a negative regulator of the NF-κB activation.Methods: Murine macrophage cell line (J774 A.1 was infected by metacyclic form of Leishmania promasti­gotes at macrophage/parasite ratio of 1:10. After harvesting infected cells at different times, total RNA was extracted and converted to cDNA. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR was performed for Monarch-1 by specific primers. Hypoxanthine Phospho-Ribosyl Transferase (HPRT was used as an internal control to adjust the amount of mRNA in each sample.Results: Semiquantitive analysis of Monarch-1 mRNA expression level showed a significant expres­sion increase within 6 to 30 hours after L. major infection of macrophages when compared to the con­trol macrophages.Conclusion: Monarch-1 expression level reveals a significant increase in the early phase of macro­phage infection with L. major, which in turn may suppress IL-12 production in Leishmania infected macrophages and deeply influence the relationship between host and parasite.

  16. Effect of silica and gold nanoparticles on macrophage proliferation, activation markers, cytokine production, and phagocytosis in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancos, Simona; Stevens, David L; Tyner, Katherine M

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation of durable nanoparticles (NPs) in macrophages following systemic administration is well described. The ultimate biological impact of this accumulation on macrophage function, however, is not fully understood. In this study, nontoxic doses of two durable NPs, SiO2 and Au, at particle sizes of ~10 nm and 300 nm were used to evaluate the effect of bioaccumulation on macrophage function in vitro using RAW 264.7 mouse macrophage-like cells as a model system. Cell proliferation, cell cycle, cytokine production, surface marker activation, and phagocytosis responses were evaluated through a panel of assays using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. The most dramatic change in RAW 264.7 cell function was a reduction in phagocytosis as monitored by the uptake of Escherichia coli. Cells exposed to both 10 nm Au NPs and 10 nm SiO2 NPs showed ~50% decrease in phagocytosis, while the larger NPs caused a less dramatic reduction. In addition to modifying phagocytosis profiles, 10 nm SiO2 NPs caused changes in proliferation, cell cycle, and cell morphology. Au NPs had no effect on cell cycle, cytokine production, or surface markers and caused interference in phagocytosis in the form of quenching when the assay was performed via flow cytometry. Confocal microscopy analysis was used to minimize this interference and demonstrated that both sizes of Au NPs decreased the phagocytosis of E. coli. Overall, our results demonstrate that Au and SiO2 NP uptake by macrophages can influence macrophage phagocytosis in vitro without altering surface markers and cytokine production in vitro. While the biological impact of these findings remains unclear, our results indicate that bioaccumulation of durable NPs within the macrophages may lead to a suppression of bacterial uptake and possibly impair bactericidal activity.

  17. GADD34 suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced sepsis and tissue injury through the regulation of macrophage activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, S; Tanaka, Y; Oshino, R; Okado, S; Hori, M; Isobe, K-I

    2016-01-01

    Growth arrest and DNA damage inducible protein 34 (GADD34) is induced by various cellular stresses, such as DNA damage, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and amino-acid deprivation. Although the major roles of GADD34 are regulating ER stress responses and apoptosis, a recent study suggested that GADD34 is linked to innate immune responses. In this report, we investigated the roles of GADD34 in inflammatory responses against bacterial infection. To explore the effects of GADD34 on systemic inflammation in vivo, we employed a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced murine sepsis model and assessed the lethality, serum cytokine levels, and tissue injury in the presence or absence of GADD34. We found that GADD34 deficiency increased the lethality and serum cytokine levels in LPS-induced sepsis. Moreover, GADD34 deficiency enhanced tissue destruction, cell death, and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in LPS-induced acute liver injury. Pro-inflammatory cytokine production after LPS stimulation is regulated by the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-mediated NF-κB signaling pathway. In vitro experiments revealed that GADD34 suppressed pro-inflammatory cytokine production by macrophages through dephosphorylation of IKKβ. In conclusion, GADD34 attenuates LPS-induced sepsis and acute tissue injury through suppressing macrophage activation. Targeting this anti-inflammatory role of GADD34 may be a promising area for the development of therapeutic agents to regulate inflammatory disorders. PMID:27171261

  18. [A study on the activity of nitric oxide in alveolar macrophages from patients with lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, C; Li, G; Wu, E

    1998-01-01

    Nitrite and nitrate (NO2-/NO2-) in the bronchus alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and the supernatants of incubated alveolar macrophages (AMs) from patients with primary lung cancer were measured by copper-coated cadmium reduction and Griess method. Mrna expression of AM induced nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were analyzed by RT-PCR. There was NO2-/NO2- in BALF either from lung cancer patients or from control subjects. When compared with control group and the nontumor-bearing lung, the level of NO2-/NO2-was lower in BALF from the tumor-bearing lung [5.18+/-1.1 vs 2.47+/-0.67nmol x mg protein-1 (P65+/- 2.46 vs 2.47+/- 0.67nmol x mg protein-1(Pcancer patients than from control and nontumor-bearing lung [95.03+/- 21.76 vs 63.37+/- 17.58nmol (Pcancer patients (69%) and that of control subjects (91%). After the AMs were stimulated with granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), the level of NO2-/NO2- in the supernatants was significantly increased (Pcancer resulted in an increase of 16.85+/- 7.58% vs 33.38+/- 8.21% of control group (P< 0.05). These observation suggest that some defects of antitumor function occur in the AMs at the tumor region. GM-CSF can stimulate AMs and thus potentiate their NO activity.

  19. Rabbit M1 and M2 macrophages can be induced by human recombinant GM-CSF and M-CSF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamane, Kazuyoshi; Leung, Kai-Poon

    2016-09-01

    Macrophages can change their phenotype in response to environmental cues. Polarized macrophages are broadly classified into two groups: classical activated M1 and alternative activated M2. Characterization of human macrophages has been widely studied, but polarized macrophages in rabbits have not been characterized. We characterized rabbit macrophages that were polarized using human recombinant GM-CSF and M-CSF. GM-CSF-treated macrophages had higher mRNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines (M1 phenotype) than did the M-CSF-treated counterpart. By contrast, high levels of TGF-β and IL-10 expression (M2 phenotype) were found in M-CSF-treated macrophages. The present study may be useful to understand roles of polarized macrophages in rabbit disease models. PMID:27642558

  20. Rapid Recruitment and Activation of Macrophages by Anti-Gal/α-Gal Liposome Interaction Accelerates Wound Healing

    OpenAIRE

    Wigglesworth, Kim M.; Racki, Waldemar J.; Mishra, Rabinarayan; Szomolanyi-Tsuda, Eva; Dale L Greiner; Galili, Uri

    2011-01-01

    Macrophages are pivotal in promoting wound healing. We hypothesized that topical application of liposomes with glycolipids that carry Gala1-3Galb1-4GlcNAc-R epitopes (α-gal liposomes) on wounds may accelerate the healing process by rapid recruitment and activation of macrophages in wounds. Immune complexes of the natural anti-Gal Ab (constituting ~1% of Ig in humans) bound to its ligand, the α-gal epitope on α-gal liposomes would induce local activation of complement and generation of complem...

  1. Complement binding to erythrocytes is associated with macrophage activation and reduced haemoglobin in Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goka, B Q; Kwarko, H; Kurtzhals, J A;

    2001-01-01

    We have examined IgG and complement factor C3d deposition on erythrocytes by means of the direct Coombs' test (DAT) and looked for an association with the anaemia seen in falciparum malaria in children living in an area of hyperendemic malaria transmission (in Ghana). In one study (in 1997), 53 out...... parameters were significantly higher in DAT-positive than in DAT-negative patients (P complement binding to erythrocytes was associated with macrophage activation. Plasma levels of haptoglobin, interleukin-10 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha did not vary between the groups....... The studies support the role of complement activation and erythrophagocytosis in the pathogenesis of anaemia in falciparum malaria in African children....

  2. Extracurricular Activities, an Alternative for Interdisciplinary Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Maria CHISIU

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Extracurricular activities include multiple measures of education and training. They are characterized by a greater variety and flexibility, providing better options for folding the particular skills and interests of students, satisfying the greater needs of children and young people, having at the same time a strong band. As extracurricular activities are not unequivocally associated to content, they may be an opportunity for interdisciplinary learning, which is much closer to learning to life than learning school subjects, which is strictly divided. Interdisciplinarity as a way of organizing learning content, with implications for the entire design strategies curriculum provides a consistent view of phenomena and processes proposed for study and facilitates contextualization and application of school knowledge in different life situations. Interdisciplinary approach to learning leads to the achievement of learning objectives of a high complexity. Children learn to make decisions, to think critically, to solve problems. Learning is achieved mainly through cooperation, teacher and students become partners in learning. The student is asked to solve various tasks and make an active contribution to his own development. The assessment focuses on the qualitative elements and targets the learning progress. In this paper we propose a way to achieve the design of an extracurricular activity – the trip in an interdisciplinary manner, in terms of Bloom’s taxonomy and of the theory of multiple intelligences – HowardGardner. The tasks approach the interdisciplinary learning, differentiated, based on the eight types of intelligences: linguistic, logical -mathematical, visual-spatial, musicalrhythmical, kinesthetical, interpersonal, intrapersonal, naturalistic, following step by step the six levels of Bloom’ s taxonomy: knowledge, comprehension, application, analysis, synthesis and evaluation. Classification-JEL: A23

  3. Short Horizon Control Strategies for an Alternating Activated Sludge Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isaacs, Steven Howard

    1996-01-01

    Three control strategies allowing improved operational flexibility of an alternating type activated sludge process are presented in a unified model based framework. The control handles employed are the addition rate of an external carbon source to denitrification, the cycle length...

  4. Human lung-resident macrophages express CB1 and CB2 receptors whose activation inhibits the release of angiogenic and lymphangiogenic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staiano, Rosaria I; Loffredo, Stefania; Borriello, Francesco; Iannotti, Fabio Arturo; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Orlando, Pierangelo; Secondo, Agnese; Granata, Francescopaolo; Lepore, Maria Teresa; Fiorelli, Alfonso; Varricchi, Gilda; Santini, Mario; Triggiani, Massimo; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Marone, Gianni

    2016-04-01

    Macrophages are pivotal effector cells in immune responses and tissue remodeling by producing a wide spectrum of mediators, including angiogenic and lymphangiogenic factors. Activation of cannabinoid receptor types 1 and 2 has been suggested as a new strategy to modulate angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. We investigated whether human lung-resident macrophages express a complete endocannabinoid system by assessing their production of endocannabinoids and expression of cannabinoid receptors. Unstimulated human lung macrophage produce 2-arachidonoylglycerol,N-arachidonoyl-ethanolamine,N-palmitoyl-ethanolamine, andN-oleoyl-ethanolamine. On LPS stimulation, human lung macrophages selectively synthesize 2-arachidonoylglycerol in a calcium-dependent manner. Human lung macrophages express cannabinoid receptor types 1 and 2, and their activation induces ERK1/2 phosphorylation and reactive oxygen species generation. Cannabinoid receptor activation by the specific synthetic agonists ACEA and JWH-133 (but not the endogenous agonist 2-arachidonoylglycerol) markedly inhibits LPS-induced production of vascular endothelial growth factor-A, vascular endothelial growth factor-C, and angiopoietins and modestly affects IL-6 secretion. No significant modulation of TNF-α or IL-8/CXCL8 release was observed. The production of vascular endothelial growth factor-A by human monocyte-derived macrophages is not modulated by activation of cannabinoid receptor types 1 and 2. Given the prominent role of macrophage-assisted vascular remodeling in many tumors, we identified the expression of cannabinoid receptors in lung cancer-associated macrophages. Our results demonstrate that cannabinoid receptor activation selectively inhibits the release of angiogenic and lymphangiogenic factors from human lung macrophage but not from monocyte-derived macrophages. Activation of cannabinoid receptors on tissue-resident macrophages might be a novel strategy to modulate macrophage-assisted vascular remodeling

  5. The Impact of Membrane Lipid Composition on Macrophage Activation in the Immune Defense against Rhodococcus equi and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Schumann

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Nutritional fatty acids are known to have an impact on membrane lipid composition of body cells, including cells of the immune system, thus providing a link between dietary fatty acid uptake, inflammation and immunity. In this study we reveal the significance of macrophage membrane lipid composition on gene expression and cytokine synthesis thereby highlighting signal transduction processes, macrophage activation as well as macrophage defense mechanisms. Using RAW264.7 macrophages as a model system, we identified polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA of both the n-3 and the n-6 family to down-regulate the synthesis of: (i the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α; (ii the co-stimulatory molecule CD86; as well as (iii the antimicrobial polypeptide lysozyme. The action of the fatty acids partially depended on the activation status of the macrophages. It is particularly important to note that the anti-inflammatory action of the PUFA could also be seen in case of infection of RAW264.7 with viable microorganisms of the genera R. equi and P. aeruginosa. In summary, our data provide strong evidence that PUFA from both the n-3 and the n-6 family down-regulate inflammation processes in context of chronic infections caused by persistent pathogens.

  6. Minocycline Transiently Reduces Microglia/Macrophage Activation but Exacerbates Cognitive Deficits Following Repetitive Traumatic Brain Injury in the Neonatal Rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanlon, Lauren A; Huh, Jimmy W; Raghupathi, Ramesh

    2016-03-01

    Elevated microglial/macrophage-associated biomarkers in the cerebrospinal fluid of infant victims of abusive head trauma (AHT) suggest that these cells play a role in the pathophysiology of the injury. In a model of AHT in 11-day-old rats, 3 impacts (24 hours apart) resulted in spatial learning and memory deficits and increased brain microglial/macrophage reactivity, traumatic axonal injury, neuronal degeneration, and cortical and white-matter atrophy. The antibiotic minocycline has been effective in decreasing injury-induced microglial/macrophage activation while simultaneously attenuating cellular and functional deficits in models of neonatal hypoxic ischemia, but the potential for this compound to rescue deficits after impact-based trauma to the immature brain remains unexplored. Acute minocycline administration in this model of AHT decreased microglial/macrophage reactivity in the corpus callosum of brain-injured animals at 3 days postinjury, but this effect was lost by 7 days postinjury. Additionally, minocycline treatment had no effect on traumatic axonal injury, neurodegeneration, tissue atrophy, or spatial learning deficits. Interestingly, minocycline-treated animals demonstrated exacerbated injury-induced spatial memory deficits. These results contrast with previous findings in other models of brain injury and suggest that minocycline is ineffective in reducing microglial/macrophage activation and ameliorating injury-induced deficits following repetitive neonatal traumatic brain injury. PMID:26825312

  7. STAT3 and STAT6 Signaling Pathways Synergize to Promote Cathepsin Secretion from Macrophages via IRE1α Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Dongyao; Wang, Hao-Wei; Bowman, Robert L; Joyce, Johanna A

    2016-09-13

    Tumor-associated macrophages play critical roles during tumor progression by promoting angiogenesis, cancer cell proliferation, invasion, and metastasis. Cysteine cathepsin proteases, produced by macrophages and cancer cells, modulate these processes, but it remains unclear how these typically lysosomal enzymes are regulated and secreted within the tumor microenvironment. Here, we identify a STAT3 and STAT6 synergy that potently upregulates cathepsin secretion by macrophages via engagement of an unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway. Whole-genome expression analyses revealed that the TH2 cytokine interleukin (IL)-4 synergizes with IL-6 or IL-10 to activate UPR via STAT6 and STAT3. Pharmacological inhibition of the UPR sensor IRE1α blocks cathepsin secretion and blunts macrophage-mediated cancer cell invasion. Similarly, genetic deletion of STAT3 and STAT6 signaling components impairs tumor development and invasion in vivo. Together, these findings demonstrate that cytokine-activated STAT3 and STAT6 cooperate in macrophages to promote a secretory phenotype that enhances tumor progression in a cathepsin-dependent manner. PMID:27626662

  8. Proteinase activated receptor 1 mediated fibrosis in a mouse model of liver injury: a role for bone marrow derived macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiannis N Kallis

    Full Text Available Liver fibrosis results from the co-ordinated actions of myofibroblasts and macrophages, a proportion of which are of bone marrow origin. The functional effect of such bone marrow-derived cells on liver fibrosis is unclear. We examine whether changing bone marrow genotype can down-regulate the liver's fibrotic response to injury and investigate mechanisms involved. Proteinase activated receptor 1 (PAR1 is up-regulated in fibrotic liver disease in humans, and deficiency of PAR1 is associated with reduced liver fibrosis in rodent models. In this study, recipient mice received bone marrow transplantation from PAR1-deficient or wild-type donors prior to carbon tetrachloride-induced liver fibrosis. Bone marrow transplantation alone from PAR1-deficient mice was able to confer significant reductions in hepatic collagen content and activated myofibroblast expansion on wild-type recipients. This effect was associated with a decrease in hepatic scar-associated macrophages and a reduction in macrophage recruitment from the bone marrow. In vitro, PAR1 signalling on bone marrow-derived macrophages directly induced their chemotaxis but did not stimulate proliferation. These data suggest that the bone marrow can modulate the fibrotic response of the liver to recurrent injury. PAR1 signalling can contribute to this response by mechanisms that include the regulation of macrophage recruitment.

  9. Immunotherapy of metastatic colorectal cancer with vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage-activating factor, GcMAF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Nobuto; Suyama, Hirofumi; Nakazato, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki; Koga, Yoshihiko

    2008-07-01

    Serum vitamin D binding protein (Gc protein) is the precursor for the principal macrophage-activating factor (MAF). The MAF precursor activity of serum Gc protein of colorectal cancer patients was lost or reduced because Gc protein is deglycosylated by serum alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (Nagalase) secreted from cancerous cells. Deglycosylated Gc protein cannot be converted to MAF, leading to immunosuppression. Stepwise treatment of purified Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase generated the most potent macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) ever discovered, but it produces no side effect in humans. Macrophages treated with GcMAF (100 microg/ml) develop an enormous variation of receptors and are highly tumoricidal to a variety of cancers indiscriminately. Administration of 100 nanogram (ng)/ human maximally activates systemic macrophages that can kill cancerous cells. Since the half-life of the activated macrophages is approximately 6 days, 100 ng GcMAF was administered weekly to eight nonanemic colorectal cancer patients who had previously received tumor-resection but still carried significant amounts of metastatic tumor cells. As GcMAF therapy progressed, the MAF precursor activities of all patients increased and conversely their serum Nagalase activities decreased. Since serum Nagalase is proportional to tumor burden, serum Nagalase activity was used as a prognostic index for time course analysis of GcMAF therapy. After 32-50 weekly administrations of 100 ng GcMAF, all colorectal cancer patients exhibited healthy control levels of the serum Nagalase activity, indicating eradication of metastatic tumor cells. During 7 years after the completion of GcMAF therapy, their serum Nagalase activity did not increase, indicating no recurrence of cancer, which was also supported by the annual CT scans of these patients. PMID:18058096

  10. Immunotherapy of HIV-infected patients with Gc protein-derived macrophage activating factor (GcMAF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Nobuto; Ushijima, Naofumi; Koga, Yoshihiko

    2009-01-01

    Serum Gc protein (known as vitamin D3-binding protein) is the precursor for the principal macrophage activating factor (MAF). The MAF precursor activity of serum Gc protein of HIV-infected patients was lost or reduced because Gc protein is deglycosylated by alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (Nagalase) secreted from HIV-infected cells. Therefore, macrophages of HIV-infected patients having deglycosylated Gc protein cannot be activated, leading to immunosuppression. Since Nagalase is the intrinsic component of the envelope protein gp120, serum Nagalase activity is the sum of enzyme activities carried by both HIV virions and envelope proteins. These Nagalase carriers were already complexed with anti-HIV immunoglobulin G (IgG) but retained Nagalase activity that is required for infectivity. Stepwise treatment of purified Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase generated the most potent macrophage activating factor (termed GcMAF), which produces no side effects in humans. Macrophages activated by administration of 100 ng GcMAF develop a large amount of Fc-receptors as well as an enormous variation of receptors that recognize IgG-bound and unbound HIV virions. Since latently HIV-infected cells are unstable and constantly release HIV virions, the activated macrophages rapidly intercept the released HIV virions to prevent reinfection resulting in exhaustion of infected cells. After less than 18 weekly administrations of 100 ng GcMAF for nonanemic patients, they exhibited low serum Nagalase activities equivalent to healthy controls, indicating eradication of HIV-infection, which was also confirmed by no infectious center formation by provirus inducing agent-treated patient PBMCs. No recurrence occurred and their healthy CD + cell counts were maintained for 7 years. PMID:19031451

  11. Activation of J77A.1 Macrophages by Three Phospholipases A2 Isolated from Bothrops atrox Snake Venom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana L. Furtado

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we investigated the in vitro effects of two basic myotoxic phospholipases A2 (PLA2, BaTX-I, a catalytically inactive Lys-49 variant, and BaTX-II, a catalytically active Asp-49, and of one acidic myotoxic PLA2, BaPLA2, a catalytically active Asp-49, isolated from Bothrops atrox snake venom, on the activation of J774A.1 macrophages. At noncytotoxic concentrations, the toxins did not affect the adhesion of the macrophages, nor their ability to detach. The data obtained showed that only BaTX-I stimulated complement receptor-mediated phagocytosis. However, BaTX-I, BaTX-II, and BaPLA2 induced the release of the superoxide anion by J774A.1 macrophages. Additionally, only BaTX-I raised the lysosomal volume of macrophages after 15 min of incubation. After 30 min, all the phospholipases increased this parameter, which was not observed within 60 min. Moreover, BaTX-I, BaTX-II, and BaPLA2 increased the number of lipid bodies on macrophages submitted to phagocytosis and not submitted to phagocytosis. However, BaTX-II and BaPLA2 induced the release of TNF-α by J774A.1 macrophages. Taken together, the data show that, despite differences in enzymatic activity, the three toxins induced inflammatory events and whether the enzyme is acidic or basic does not seem to contribute to these effects.

  12. Activation of J77A.1 macrophages by three phospholipases A2 isolated from Bothrops atrox snake venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtado, Juliana L; Oliveira, George A; Pontes, Adriana S; Setúbal, Sulamita da S; Xavier, Caroline V; Lacouth-Silva, Fabianne; Lima, Beatriz F; Zaqueo, Kayena D; Kayano, Anderson M; Calderon, Leonardo A; Stábeli, Rodrigo G; Soares, Andreimar M; Zuliani, Juliana P

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the in vitro effects of two basic myotoxic phospholipases A2 (PLA2), BaTX-I, a catalytically inactive Lys-49 variant, and BaTX-II, a catalytically active Asp-49, and of one acidic myotoxic PLA2, BaPLA2, a catalytically active Asp-49, isolated from Bothrops atrox snake venom, on the activation of J774A.1 macrophages. At noncytotoxic concentrations, the toxins did not affect the adhesion of the macrophages, nor their ability to detach. The data obtained showed that only BaTX-I stimulated complement receptor-mediated phagocytosis. However, BaTX-I, BaTX-II, and BaPLA2 induced the release of the superoxide anion by J774A.1 macrophages. Additionally, only BaTX-I raised the lysosomal volume of macrophages after 15 min of incubation. After 30 min, all the phospholipases increased this parameter, which was not observed within 60 min. Moreover, BaTX-I, BaTX-II, and BaPLA2 increased the number of lipid bodies on macrophages submitted to phagocytosis and not submitted to phagocytosis. However, BaTX-II and BaPLA2 induced the release of TNF-α by J774A.1 macrophages. Taken together, the data show that, despite differences in enzymatic activity, the three toxins induced inflammatory events and whether the enzyme is acidic or basic does not seem to contribute to these effects. PMID:24592395

  13. The inhibition of macrophage foam cell formation by 9-cis β-carotene is driven by BCMO1 activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noa Zolberg Relevy

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developed societies, and begins when activated endothelial cells recruit monocytes and T-cells from the bloodstream into the arterial wall. Macrophages that accumulate cholesterol and other fatty materials are transformed into foam cells. Several epidemiological studies have demonstrated that a diet rich in carotenoids is associated with a reduced risk of heart disease; while previous work in our laboratory has shown that the 9-cis β-carotene rich alga Dunaliella inhibits atherogenesis in mice. The effect of 9-cis β-carotene on macrophage foam cell formation has not yet been investigated. In the present work, we sought to study whether the 9-cis β-carotene isomer, isolated from the alga Dunaliella, can inhibit macrophage foam cell formation upon its conversion to retinoids. The 9-cis β-carotene and Dunaliella lipid extract inhibited foam cell formation in the RAW264.7 cell line, similar to 9-cis retinoic acid. Furthermore, dietary enrichment with the algal powder in mice resulted in carotenoid accumulation in the peritoneal macrophages and in the inhibition of foam cell formation ex-vivo and in-vivo. We also found that the β-carotene cleavage enzyme β-carotene 15,15'-monooxygenase (BCMO1 is expressed and active in macrophages. Finally, 9-cis β-carotene, as well as the Dunaliella extract, activated the nuclear receptor RXR in hepa1-6 cells. These results indicate that dietary carotenoids, such as 9-cis β-carotene, accumulate in macrophages and can be locally cleaved by endogenous BCMO1 to form 9-cis retinoic acid and other retinoids. Subsequently, these retinoids activate the nuclear receptor RXR that, along with additional nuclear receptors, can affect various metabolic pathways, including those involved in foam cell formation and atherosclerosis.

  14. The Inhibition of Macrophage Foam Cell Formation by 9-Cis β-Carotene Is Driven by BCMO1 Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolberg Relevy, Noa; Bechor, Sapir; Harari, Ayelet; Ben-Amotz, Ami; Kamari, Yehuda; Harats, Dror; Shaish, Aviv

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developed societies, and begins when activated endothelial cells recruit monocytes and T-cells from the bloodstream into the arterial wall. Macrophages that accumulate cholesterol and other fatty materials are transformed into foam cells. Several epidemiological studies have demonstrated that a diet rich in carotenoids is associated with a reduced risk of heart disease; while previous work in our laboratory has shown that the 9-cis β-carotene rich alga Dunaliella inhibits atherogenesis in mice. The effect of 9-cis β-carotene on macrophage foam cell formation has not yet been investigated. In the present work, we sought to study whether the 9-cis β-carotene isomer, isolated from the alga Dunaliella, can inhibit macrophage foam cell formation upon its conversion to retinoids. The 9-cis β-carotene and Dunaliella lipid extract inhibited foam cell formation in the RAW264.7 cell line, similar to 9-cis retinoic acid. Furthermore, dietary enrichment with the algal powder in mice resulted in carotenoid accumulation in the peritoneal macrophages and in the inhibition of foam cell formation ex-vivo and in-vivo. We also found that the β-carotene cleavage enzyme β-carotene 15,15’-monooxygenase (BCMO1) is expressed and active in macrophages. Finally, 9-cis β-carotene, as well as the Dunaliella extract, activated the nuclear receptor RXR in hepa1-6 cells. These results indicate that dietary carotenoids, such as 9-cis β-carotene, accumulate in macrophages and can be locally cleaved by endogenous BCMO1 to form 9-cis retinoic acid and other retinoids. Subsequently, these retinoids activate the nuclear receptor RXR that, along with additional nuclear receptors, can affect various metabolic pathways, including those involved in foam cell formation and atherosclerosis. PMID:25629601

  15. Activation of Cannabinoid Receptor 2 Ameliorates DSS-Induced Colitis through Inhibiting NLRP3 Inflammasome in Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Ping; Shao, Bo-Zong; Xu, Zhe-Qi; Wei, Wei; Han, Bin-Ze; Chen, Xiong-Wen; Su, Ding-Feng; Liu, Chong

    2016-01-01

    Activation of cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2R) ameliorates inflammation, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In the present study, we examined whether activation of CB2R could suppress the nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome. In peritoneal macrophages isolated from C57BL/6 mice, LPS/DSS challenge for 24 h increased the expression of the components of NLRP3 inflammasome NLRP3, Casp-1 p20/Casp-1 p45 ratio, proIL-1β and IL-1β and also enhanced autophagy (LC3-II/LC3-I ratio, Beclin-1 and SQSTM1). Pretreatment of peritoneal macrophages with HU 308, a selective CB2R agonist, attenuated LPS/DSS-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation, but further enhanced autophagy. In comparison with wild-type (WT) control, peritoneal macrophages from CB2R knockout (KO) mice had more robust NLRP3 inflammasome activation and attenuated autophagy upon LPS/DSS challenge. Knockdown autophagy-related gene 5 (Atg5) with a siRNA in peritoneal macrophages attenuated the inhibitory effects of HU 308 on LPS/DSS-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation in vitro. In vivo, HU308 treatment attenuated DSS-induced colitis mice associated with reduced colon inflammation and inhibited NLRP3 inflammasome activation in wild-type mice. In CB2R KO mice, DSS-induced inflammation and NLRP3 inflammasome activation were more pronounced than those in WT control. Finally, we demonstrated that AMPK-mTOR-P70S6K signaling pathway was involved in this CB2R-mediated process. We conclude that activation of CB2R ameliorates DSS-induced colitis through enhancing autophagy that may inhibit NLRP3 inflammasome activation in macrophages.

  16. Uranium induces TNFα secretion and MAPK activation in a rat alveolar macrophage cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium is a toxic heavy metal found mainly in the nuclear industry, but it is also used in the manufacturing of military munitions. Inhalation studies using animal models have demonstrated that long-term exposure to uranium can lead to the development of neoplasia and fibrosis at the pulmonary level. Because it has been demonstrated that such effects are often associated with inflammation, the effect of uranium on TNFα, IL-1β, and IL-10 synthesis by macrophages was assessed in vitro using the NR8383 cell line. Our results show that a significant TNFα secretion was induced by uranium but not by other metals such as gadolinium. However, IL-1β and IL-10 secretions were unaffected by uranium treatment. TNFα secretion was detectable since 50 μM of uranium and was maximal after 24 h of exposure. Determination of the mechanisms of uranium-induced TNFα production was assessed through the evaluation of protein kinases activation. Our results showed that uranium treatment induced c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) activation. The use of pharmacological inhibitors suggested that both p38 MAPK and protein kinase C (PKC) participate in the signal transduction of uranium-induced TNFα secretion. The regulation of TNFα secretion involves TNFα mRNA accumulation at least through the stabilization of TNFα mRNA, but p38 MAPK did not appear to be involved in this stabilization. However, this observation does not exclude regulation of TNFα synthesis at the transcriptional level, which remains to be demonstrated. Taking together, these results suggest that uranium can induce TNFα secretion by macrophages, thus contributing to a better understanding of the pathological effect of uranium on the lung

  17. Airway mucus obstruction triggers macrophage activation and matrix metalloproteinase 12-dependent emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trojanek, Joanna B; Cobos-Correa, Amanda; Diemer, Stefanie; Kormann, Michael; Schubert, Susanne C; Zhou-Suckow, Zhe; Agrawal, Raman; Duerr, Julia; Wagner, Claudius J; Schatterny, Jolanthe; Hirtz, Stephanie; Sommerburg, Olaf; Hartl, Dominik; Schultz, Carsten; Mall, Marcus A

    2014-11-01

    Whereas cigarette smoking remains the main risk factor for emphysema, recent studies in β-epithelial Na(+) channel-transgenic (βENaC-Tg) mice demonstrated that airway surface dehydration, a key pathophysiological mechanism in cystic fibrosis (CF), caused emphysema in the absence of cigarette smoke exposure. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. The aim of this study was to elucidate mechanisms of emphysema formation triggered by airway surface dehydration. We therefore used expression profiling, genetic and pharmacological inhibition, Foerster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based activity assays, and genetic association studies to identify and validate emphysema candidate genes in βENaC-Tg mice and patients with CF. We identified matrix metalloproteinase 12 (Mmp12) as a highly up-regulated gene in lungs from βENaC-Tg mice, and demonstrate that elevated Mmp12 expression was associated with progressive emphysema formation, which was reduced by genetic deletion and pharmacological inhibition of MMP12 in vivo. By using FRET reporters, we show that MMP12 activity was elevated on the surface of airway macrophages in bronchoalveolar lavage from βENaC-Tg mice and patients with CF. Furthermore, we demonstrate that a functional polymorphism in MMP12 (rs2276109) was associated with severity of lung disease in CF. Our results suggest that MMP12 released by macrophages activated on dehydrated airway surfaces may play an important role in emphysema formation in the absence of cigarette smoke exposure, and may serve as a therapeutic target in CF and potentially other chronic lung diseases associated with airway mucus dehydration and obstruction. PMID:24828142

  18. Asian Dust Particles Induce Macrophage Inflammatory Responses via Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Activation and Reactive Oxygen Species Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuma Higashisaka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Asian dust is a springtime meteorological phenomenon that originates in the deserts of China and Mongolia. The dust is carried by prevailing winds across East Asia where it causes serious health problems. Most of the information available on the impact of Asian dust on human health is based on epidemiological investigations, so from a biological standpoint little is known of its effects. To clarify the effects of Asian dust on human health, it is essential to assess inflammatory responses to the dust and to evaluate the involvement of these responses in the pathogenesis or aggravation of disease. Here, we investigated the induction of inflammatory responses by Asian dust particles in macrophages. Treatment with Asian dust particles induced greater production of inflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α compared with treatment with soil dust. Furthermore, a soil dust sample containing only particles ≤10 μm in diameter provoked a greater inflammatory response than soil dust samples containing particles >10 μm. In addition, Asian dust particles-induced TNF-α production was dependent on endocytosis, the production of reactive oxygen species, and the activation of nuclear factor-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinases. Together, these results suggest that Asian dust particles induce inflammatory disease through the activation of macrophages.

  19. Omega-3 free fatty acids suppress macrophage inflammasome activation by inhibiting NF-κB activation and enhancing autophagy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Williams-Bey

    Full Text Available The omega-3 (ω3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA can suppress inflammation, specifically IL-1β production through poorly understood molecular mechanisms. Here, we show that DHA reduces macrophage IL-1β production by limiting inflammasome activation. Exposure to DHA reduced IL-1β production by ligands that stimulate the NLRP3, AIM2, and NAIP5/NLRC4 inflammasomes. The inhibition required Free Fatty Acid Receptor (FFAR 4 (also known as GPR120, a G-protein coupled receptor (GPR known to bind DHA. The exposure of cells to DHA recruited the adapter protein β-arrestin1/2 to FFAR4, but not to a related lipid receptor. DHA treatment reduced the initial inflammasome priming step by suppressing the nuclear translocation of NF-κB. DHA also reduced IL-1β levels by enhancing autophagy in the cells. As a consequence macrophages derived from mice lacking the essential autophagy protein ATG7 were partially resistant to suppressive effects of DHA. Thus, DHA suppresses inflammasome activation by two distinct mechanisms, inhibiting the initial priming step and by augmenting autophagy, which limits inflammasome activity.

  20. Macrophages - silent enemies in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Świdrowska-Jaros, Joanna; Orczyk, Krzysztof; Smolewska, Elżbieta

    2016-07-06

    The inflammatory response by secretion of cytokines and other mediators is postulated as one of the most significant factors in the pathophysiology of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). The effect of macrophage action depends on the type of their activation. Classically activated macrophages (M1) are responsible for release of molecules crucial for joint inflammation. Alternatively activated macrophages (M2) may recognize self antigens by scavenger receptors and induce the immunological reaction leading to autoimmune diseases such as JIA. Molecules essential for JIA pathophysiology include: TNF-α, the production of which precedes synovial inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis; IL-1 as a key mediator of synovial damage; chemotactic factors for macrophages IL-8 and MCP-1; IL6, the level of which correlates with the radiological joint damage; MIF, promoting the secretion of TNF-α and IL-6; CCL20 and HIF, significant for the hypoxic synovial environment in JIA; GM-CSF, stimulating the production of macrophages; and IL-18, crucial for NK cell functions. Recognition of the role of macrophages creates the potential for a new therapeutic approach.

  1. Overexpression of IL-10 in C2D macrophages promotes a macrophage phenotypic switch in adipose tissue environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Linglin; Fu, Qiang; Ortega, Teresa M; Zhou, Lun; Rasmussen, Dane; O'Keefe, Jacy; Zhang, Ke K; Chapes, Stephen K

    2014-01-01

    Adipose tissue macrophages are a heterogeneous collection of classically activated (M1) and alternatively activated (M2) macrophages. Interleukin 10 (IL-10) is an anti-inflammatory cytokine, secreted by a variety of cell types including M2 macrophages. We generated a macrophage cell line stably overexpressing IL-10 (C2D-IL10) and analyzed the C2D-IL10 cells for several macrophage markers after exposure to adipocytes compared to C2D cells transfected with an empty vector (C2D-vector). C2D-IL10 macrophage cells expressed more CD206 when co-cultured with adipocytes than C2D-vector cells; while the co-cultured cell mixture also expressed higher levels of Il4, Il10, Il1β and Tnf. Since regular C2D cells traffic to adipose tissue after adoptive transfer, we explored the impact of constitutive IL-10 expression on C2D-IL10 macrophages in adipose tissue in vivo. Adipose tissue-isolated C2D-IL10 cells increased the percentage of CD206(+), CD301(+), CD11c(-)CD206(+) (M2) and CD11c(+)CD206(+) (M1b) on their cell surface, compared to isolated C2D-vector cells. These data suggest that the expression of IL-10 remains stable, alters the C2D-IL10 macrophage cell surface phenotype and may play a role in regulating macrophage interactions with the adipose tissue.

  2. Circulating macrophage activation markers, CD163 and CD206, are associated with disease severity and treatment response in patients with autoimmune hepatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbæk, Henning; Kazankov, Konstantin; Jessen, Niels;

    Circulating macrophage activation markers, CD163 and CD206, are associated with disease severity and treatment response in patients with autoimmune hepatitis......Circulating macrophage activation markers, CD163 and CD206, are associated with disease severity and treatment response in patients with autoimmune hepatitis...

  3. Tumor cell-activated CARD9 signaling contributes to metastasis-associated macrophage polarization

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, M; Shao, J-H; Miao, Y-J; Cui, W.; Qi, Y-F; Han, J-H; Lin, X.; J. Du

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are critical immune effector cells of the tumor microenvironment that promote seeding, extravasation and persistent growth of tumor cells in primary tumors and metastatic sites. Tumor progression and metastasis are affected by dynamic changes in the specific phenotypes of macrophage subpopulations; however, the mechanisms by which tumor cells modulate macrophage polarization remain incompletely understood. Caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 9 (CARD9) is a central adapto...

  4. Curcumin ameliorates macrophage infiltration by inhibiting NF-κB activation and proinflammatory cytokines in streptozotocin induced-diabetic nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzuki Kenji

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic inflammation plays an important role in the progression of diabetic nephropathy (DN and that the infiltration of macrophages in glomerulus has been implicated in the development of glomerular injury. We hypothesized that the plant polyphenolic compound curcumin, which is known to exert potent anti-inflammatory effect, would ameliorate macrophage infiltration in streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetic rats. Methods Diabetes was induced with STZ (55 mg/kg by intraperitoneal injection in rats. Three weeks after STZ injection, rats were divided into three groups, namely, control, diabetic, and diabetic treated with curcumin at 100 mg/kg/day, p.o., for 8 weeks. The rats were sacrificed 11 weeks after induction of diabetes. The excised kidney was used to assess macrophage infiltration and expression of various inflammatory markers. Results At 11 weeks after STZ injection, diabetic rats exhibited renal dysfunction, as evidenced by reduced creatinine clearance, increased blood glucose, blood urea nitrogen and proteinuria, along with marked reduction in the body weight. All of these abnormalities were significantly reversed by curcumin. Hyperglycemia induced the degradation of IκBα and NF-κB activation and as a result increased infiltration of macrophages (52% as well as increased proinflammatory cytokines: TNF-α and IL-1β. Curcumin treatment significantly reduced macrophage infiltration in the kidneys of diabetic rats, suppressed the expression of above proinflammatory cytokines and degradation of IκBα. In addition, curcumin treatment also markedly decreased ICAM-1, MCP-1 and TGF-β1 protein expression. Moreover, at nuclear level curcumin inhibited the NF-κB activity. Conclusion Our results suggested that curcumin treatment protect against the development of DN in rats by reducing macrophage infiltration through the inhibition of NF-κB activation in STZ-induced diabetic rats.

  5. Beta-defensins activate macrophages and synergize in pro-inflammatory cytokine expression induced by TLR ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barabas, Nicola; Röhrl, Johann; Holler, Ernst; Hehlgans, Thomas

    2013-07-01

    Our previous studies indicated that mouse beta defensin 14 (mBD14, Defb14), a newly identified member of the beta-defensin super family, interacts with the chemokine receptors CCR2 and CCR6. In this study we report that pre-stimulation of primary mouse macrophages with mBD14 results in a synergistic, enhanced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines induced by TLR ligand re-stimulation. Experiments using specific inhibitors of G(i)-protein-coupled receptor signaling provide evidence that this effect seems to be mediated by a G(i)-protein-coupled receptor expressed on bone marrow derived macrophages. However, using primary macrophages derived from CCR6- and CCR2-deficient mice clearly demonstrated that the enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine expression is independent of the chemokine receptors CCR6 and CCR2. Additionally, signaling pathway analysis indicated that mBD14 is capable of inducing MAPK ERK1/2 phosphorylation and the induction of CD86 and F4/80 expression in bone marrow-derived macrophages after mBD14 stimulation. Collectively, our data indicate that β-defensins activate primary macrophages and enhance pro-inflammatory responses by using G(i)PCRs in order to support inflammatory reactions induced by TLR ligands. PMID:23332217

  6. Change in Performance of BALB/c Mouse Pulmonary Macrophage Surface Receptor after Exercise and its Influence on Phagocytic Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Zhang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of exercise on phagocytosis by pulmonary bronchoalveolar macrophages (BAMs. Methods: A total of 120 seven- to nine-week-old male BALB/c mice were randomly assigned into the following groups based on exercise intensity on a treadmill: control exercise (CE group, acute moderate exercise (ME group, and strenuous exercise group. Lung lavage was conducted to collect BAMs from the mice. Phagocytic behavior and surface receptor expression on BALB/c mouse BAMs were analyzed through fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Results: In the SE group, expression levels of macrophage scavenger receptors (surface receptor [SR-A] type I/II and macrophage receptor [MARCO], complement receptor3 (CR3, and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1 were upregulated; by contrast, expression level of extensive G-type immune globulin receptor (Fc Rs was not upregulated. The promoting percentage of phagocytosis in the CE group was 100%; the highest promoting percentage of phagocytosis was 161% observed in MARCO, followed by 116% detected in CR3; the promoting percentage of phagocytosis found in SR-A type I/II and ICAM-1 increased by approximately 65%. Indeed, these scavenger receptors were involved in phagocytosis induced by macrophages. MARCO was also necessary to elicit a stimulatory effect on macrophage phagocytic activity. Conclusions: The phagocytosis of unopsonized particles was possibly mediated by MARCO expression.

  7. Assessing Anti-fungal Activity of Isolated Alveolar Macrophages by Confocal Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Melissa J.; D'Auria, Anthony C.; Segal, Brahm H.

    2014-01-01

    The lung is an interface where host cells are routinely exposed to microbes and microbial products. Alveolar macrophages are the first-line phagocytic cells that encounter inhaled fungi and other microbes. Macrophages and other immune cells recognize Aspergillus motifs by pathogen recognition receptors and initiate downstream inflammatory responses. The phagocyte NADPH oxidase generates reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs) and is critical for host defense. Although NADPH oxidase is critical for neutrophil-mediated host defense1-3, the importance of NADPH oxidase in macrophages is not well defined. The goal of this study was to delineate the specific role of NADPH oxidase in macrophages in mediating host defense against A. fumigatus. We found that NADPH oxidase in alveolar macrophages controls the growth of phagocytosed A. fumigatus spores4. Here, we describe a method for assessing the ability of mouse alveolar macrophages (AMs) to control the growth of phagocytosed Aspergillus spores (conidia). Alveolar macrophages are stained in vivo and ten days later isolated from mice by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). Macrophages are plated onto glass coverslips, then seeded with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing A. fumigatus spores. At specified times, cells are fixed and the number of intact macrophages with phagocytosed spores is assessed by confocal microscopy. PMID:25045941

  8. Kruppel-Like Factor 2-Mediated Suppression of MicroRNA-155 Reduces the Proinflammatory Activation of Macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    He, Shaolin; Yang, LiYuan; Li, Dazhu; LI Ming

    2015-01-01

    Objective Recent evidence indicates that significant interactions exist between Kruppel-like factor 2 (KLF2) and microRNAs (miRNAs) in endothelial cells. Because KLF2 is known to exert anti-inflammatory effects and inhibit the pro-inflammatory activation of monocytes, we sought to identify how inflammation-associated miR-155 is regulated by KLF2 in macrophages. Approach and Results Peritoneal macrophages from wild-type (WT) C57Bl/6 mice were transfected with either recombinant adenovirus vect...

  9. Securiosides A and B, novel acylated triterpene bisdesmosides with selective cytotoxic activity against M-CSF-stimulated macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, M; Mimaki, Y; Sashida, Y; Kitahara, M; Yamazaki, M; Yui, S

    2001-02-12

    We report the discovery of securiosides A (1) and B (2), novel acylated triterpene bisdesmosides, isolated from the roots of Securidaca inappendiculata. Securiosides A and B showed potent selective cytotoxic activity against M-CSF-stimulated macrophages and were suggested to have potential as new agents for the treatment of inflammatory diseases such as RA and atherosclerosis. PMID:11212113

  10. Expert consensus on dynamics of laboratory tests for diagnosis of macrophage activation syndrome complicating systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ravelli, Angelo; Minoia, Francesca; Davì, Sergio; Horne, AnnaCarin; Bovis, Francesca; Pistorio, Angela; Aricò, Maurizio; Avcin, Tadej; Behrens, Edward M; De Benedetti, Fabrizio; Filipovic, Alexandra; Grom, Alexei A; Henter, Jan-Inge; Ilowite, Norman T; Jordan, Michael B; Khubchandani, Raju; Kitoh, Toshiyuki; Lehmberg, Kai; Lovell, Daniel J; Miettunen, Paivi; Nichols, Kim E; Ozen, Seza; Pachlopnik Schmid, Jana; Ramanan, Athimalaipet V; Russo, Ricardo; Schneider, Rayfel; Sterba, Gary; Uziel, Yosef; Wallace, Carol; Wouters, Carine; Wulffraat, Nico; Demirkaya, Erkan; Brunner, Hermine I; Martini, Alberto; Ruperto, Nicolino; Cron, Randy Q

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify which laboratory tests that change over time are most valuable for the timely diagnosis of macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) complicating systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA). METHODS: A multistep process, based on a combination of expert consensus and analysis of

  11. Trehalose diester glycolipids are superior to the monoesters in binding to Mincle, activation of macrophages in vitro and adjuvant activity in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Alexandra; Kallerup, Rie S; Korsholm, Karen S; Franzyk, Henrik; Lepenies, Bernd; Christensen, Dennis; Foged, Camilla; Lang, Roland

    2016-08-01

    The T-cell adjuvanticity of mycobacterial cord factor trehalose 6,6'-dimycolate (TDM) is well established. The identification of the C-type lectin Mincle on innate immune cells as the receptor for TDM and its synthetic analogue trehalose 6,6'-dibehenate (TDB) has raised interest in development of synthetic Mincle ligands as novel adjuvants. Trehalose mono- (TMXs) and diesters (TDXs) with symmetrically shortened acyl chains [denoted by X: arachidate (A), stearate (S), palmitate (P), and myristate (M)] were tested. Upon stimulation of murine macrophages, G-CSF secretion and NO production were strongly augmented by all TDXs tested, in a wide concentration range. In contrast, the TMXs triggered macrophage activation only at high concentrations. Macrophage activation by all TDXs required Mincle, but was independent of MyD88. The superior capacity of TDXs for activating macrophages was paralleled by direct binding of TDXs, but not of TMXs, to a Mincle-Fc fusion protein. Insertion of a short polyethylene glycol between the sugar and acyl chain in TDS reduced Mincle-binding and macrophage activation. Immunization of mice with cationic liposomes containing the analogues demonstrated the superior adjuvant activity of trehalose diesters. Overall, immune activation in vitro and in vivo by trehalose esters of simple fatty acids requires two acyl chains of length and involves Mincle. PMID:27252171

  12. Structural and Kinetic Analyses of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Active Site Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crichlow, G.; Lubetsky, J; Leng, L; Bucala, R; Lolis, E

    2009-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a secreted protein expressed in numerous cell types that counters the antiinflammatory effects of glucocorticoids and has been implicated in sepsis, cancer, and certain autoimmune diseases. Interestingly, the structure of MIF contains a catalytic site resembling the tautomerase/isomerase sites of microbial enzymes. While bona fide physiological substrates remain unknown, model substrates have been identified. Selected compounds that bind in the tautomerase active site also inhibit biological functions of MIF. It had previously been shown that the acetaminophen metabolite, N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI), covalently binds to the active site of MIF. In this study, kinetic data indicate that NAPQI inhibits MIF both covalently and noncovalently. The structure of MIF cocrystallized with NAPQI reveals that the NAPQI has undergone a chemical alteration forming an acetaminophen dimer (bi-APAP) and binds noncovalently to MIF at the mouth of the active site. We also find that the commonly used protease inhibitor, phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), forms a covalent complex with MIF and inhibits the tautomerase activity. Crystallographic analysis reveals the formation of a stable, novel covalent bond for PMSF between the catalytic nitrogen of the N-terminal proline and the sulfur of PMSF with complete, well-defined electron density in all three active sites of the MIF homotrimer. Conclusions are drawn from the structures of these two MIF-inhibitor complexes regarding the design of novel compounds that may provide more potent reversible and irreversible inhibition of MIF.

  13. Nitro-oleic acid modulates classical and regulatory activation of macrophages and their involvement in pro-fibrotic responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrozova, Gabriela; Martiskova, Hana; Koudelka, Adolf; Ravekes, Thorben; Rudolph, Tanja K; Klinke, Anna; Rudolph, Volker; Freeman, Bruce A; Woodcock, Steven R; Kubala, Lukas; Pekarova, Michaela

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is an immune response triggered by microbial invasion and/or tissue injury. While acute inflammation is directed toward invading pathogens and injured cells, thus enabling tissue regeneration, chronic inflammation can lead to severe pathologies and tissue dysfunction. These processes are linked with macrophage polarization into specific inflammatory "M1-like" or regulatory "M2-like" subsets. Nitro-fatty acids (NO2-FAs), produced endogenously as byproducts of metabolism and oxidative inflammatory conditions, may be useful for treating diseases associated with dysregulated immune homeostasis. The goal of this study was to characterize the role of nitro-oleic acid (OA-NO2) in regulating the functional specialization of macrophages induced by bacterial lipopolysaccharide or interleukin-4, and to reveal specific signaling mechanisms which can account for OA-NO2-dependent modulation of inflammation and fibrotic responses. Our results show that OA-NO2 inhibits lipopolysaccharide-stimulated production of both pro-inflammatory and immunoregulatory cytokines (including transforming growth factor-β) and inhibits nitric oxide and superoxide anion production. OA-NO2 also decreases interleukin-4-induced macrophage responses by inhibiting arginase-I expression and transforming growth factor-β production. These effects are mediated via downregulation of signal transducers and activators of transcription, mitogen-activated protein kinase and nuclear factor-кB signaling responses. Finally, OA-NO2 inhibits fibrotic processes in an in vivo model of angiotensin II-induced myocardial fibrosis by attenuating expression of α-smooth muscle actin, systemic transforming growth factor-β levels and infiltration of both "M1-" and "M2-like" macrophage subsets into afflicted tissue. Overall, the electrophilic fatty acid derivative OA-NO2 modulates a broad range of "M1-" and "M2-like" macrophage functions and represents a potential therapeutic approach to target diseases

  14. Enhancement of macrophage candidacidal activity by interferon-gamma. Increased phagocytosis, killing, and calcium signal mediated by a decreased number of mannose receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maródi, L; Schreiber, S; Anderson, D C; MacDermott, R P; Korchak, H M; Johnston, R B

    1993-01-01

    In contrast to its macrophage-activating capacity, IFN-gamma downregulates expression of the macrophage mannose receptor (MMR), which mediates uptake of Candida and other microorganisms. We found that IFN-gamma induced a concentration-dependent increase in the capacity of human monocyte-derived macrophages to ingest and kill both opsonized and unopsonized Candida albicans and to release superoxide anion upon stimulation with Candida. Mannan or mannosylated albumin inhibited this activated uptake of unopsonized Candida, but glucan did not. Addition of mAb to complement receptor (CR) 3 did not inhibit ingestion; macrophages that lacked CR3 (leukocyte adhesion defect) showed normal upregulation of ingestion by IFN-gamma. The increased candidacidal activity of IFN-gamma-activated macrophages was associated with reduced expression of MMR by a mean of 79% and decreased pinocytic uptake of 125I-mannosylated BSA by 73%; K(uptake) of pinocytosis was not changed. Exposure of resident macrophages to unopsonized Candida did not elicit a transient increase in intracellular free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i); macrophages activated by IFN-gamma expressed a brisk increase in [Ca2+]i on exposure to Candida. These data suggest that macrophage activation by IFN-gamma can enhance resistance to C. albicans infection in spite of downregulation of the MMR, perhaps through enhanced coupling of the MMR to microbicidal functions. PMID:8390485

  15. Secretion of Endoplasmic Reticulum Aminopeptidase 1 Is Involved in the Activation of Macrophages Induced by Lipopolysaccharide and Interferon-γ*

    OpenAIRE

    Goto, Yoshikuni; Ogawa, Kenji; Hattori, Akira; Tsujimoto, Masafumi

    2011-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 (ERAP1) is a multifunctional enzyme with an important role in processing antigenic peptides presented to class I major histocompatibility complex in the endoplasmic reticulum. In this study, we found that endoplasmic reticulum-retained ERAP1 was secreted from macrophages in response to activation by treatment with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon (IFN)-γ and enhanced their phagocytic activity. Enhancement of the phagocytic activity of murine macro...

  16. Soluble CD163, a product of monocyte/macrophage activation, is inversely associated with haemoglobin levels in placental malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Lin Lin Chua

    Full Text Available In Plasmodium falciparum malaria, activation of monocytes and macrophages (monocytes/macrophages can result in the production of various inflammatory mediators that contribute to immunopathology. Soluble CD163 (sCD163 is a specific marker of monocyte/macrophage activation typically found at increased levels during various inflammatory conditions and can be associated with poor clinical outcomes. To better understand the relationships between levels of sCD163 and clinical parameters in women with placental malaria, we measured plasma sCD163 levels in maternal peripheral and placental blood compartments at delivery and determined their correlations with birth weight and maternal haemoglobin concentrations. sCD163 levels were negatively correlated with birth weight only in the placental compartment (r = -0.145, p = 0.03 and were inversely correlated with maternal haemoglobin concentrations, both in peripheral blood (r = -0.238, p = 0.0004 and in placental blood (r = -0.259, p = 0.0001. These inverse relationships suggest a potential role for monocyte/macrophage activation in the pathogenesis of malaria in pregnancy, particularly in relation to malaria-associated anaemia.

  17. Interaction with extracellular matrix proteins influences Lsh/Ity/Bcg (candidate Nramp) gene regulation of macrophage priming/activation for tumour necrosis factor-alpha and nitrite release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formica, S; Roach, T I; Blackwell, J M

    1994-05-01

    The murine resistance gene Lsh/Ity/Bcg regulates activation of macrophages for tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)-dependent production of nitric oxide mediating antimicrobial activity against Leishmania, Salmonella and Mycobacterium. As Lsh is differentially expressed in macrophages from different tissue sites, experiments were performed to determine whether interaction with extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins would influence the macrophage TNF-alpha response. Plating of bone marrow-derived macrophages onto purified fibrinogen or fibronectin-rich L929 cell-derived matrices, but not onto mannan, was itself sufficient to stimulate TNF-alpha release, with significantly higher levels released from congenic B10.L-Lshr compared to C57BL/10ScSn (Lshs) macrophages. Only macrophages plated onto fibrinogen also released measurable levels of nitrites, again higher in Lshr compared to Lshs macrophages. Addition of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), but not bacterial lipopolysaccharide or mycobacterial lipoarabinomannan, as a second signal enhanced the TNF-alpha and nitrite responses of macrophages plated onto fibrinogen, particularly in the Lshr macrophages. Interaction with fibrinogen and fibronectin also primed macrophages for an enhanced TNF-alpha response to leishmanial parasites, but this was only translated into enhanced nitrite responses in the presence of IFN-gamma. In these experiments, Lshr macrophages remained superior in their TNF-alpha responses throughout, but to a degree which reflected the magnitude of the difference observed on ECM alone. Hence, the specificity for the enhanced TNF-alpha responses of Lshr macrophages lay in their interaction with fibrinogen and fibronectin ECM, while a differential nitrite response was only observed with fibrinogen and/or IFN-gamma. The results are discussed in relation to the possible function of the recently cloned candidate gene Nramp, which has structural identity to eukaryote transporters and an N-terminal cytoplasmic

  18. Immunotherapy for Prostate Cancer with Gc Protein-Derived Macrophage-Activating Factor, GcMAF1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Nobuto; Suyama, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki

    2008-01-01

    Serum Gc protein (known as vitamin D3-binding protein) is the precursor for the principal macrophage-activating factor (MAF). The MAF precursor activity of serum Gc protein of prostate cancer patients was lost or reduced because Gc protein was deglycosylated by serum α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (Nagalase) secreted from cancerous cells. Therefore, macrophages of prostate cancer patients having deglycosylated Gc protein cannot be activated, leading to immunosuppression. Stepwise treatment of purified Gc protein with immobilized β-galactosidase and sialidase generated the most potent MAF (termed GcMAF) ever discovered, which produces no adverse effect in humans. Macrophages activated by GcMAF develop a considerable variation of receptors that recognize the abnormality in malignant cell surface and are highly tumoricidal. Sixteen nonanemic prostate cancer patients received weekly administration of 100 ng of GcMAF. As the MAF precursor activity increased, their serum Nagalase activity decreased. Because serum Nagalase activity is proportional to tumor burden, the entire time course analysis for GcMAF therapy was monitored by measuring the serum Nagalase activity. After 14 to 25 weekly administrations of GcMAF (100 ng/week), all 16 patients had very low serum Nagalase levels equivalent to those of healthy control values, indicating that these patients are tumor-free. No recurrence occurred for 7 years. PMID:18633461

  19. Chemical Composition and Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Ethanolic Extract of Brazilian Green Propolis on Activated J774A.1 Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewelina Szliszka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the chemical composition and anti-inflammatory effect of ethanolic extract of Brazilian green propolis (EEP-B on LPS + IFN-γ or PMA stimulated J774A.1 macrophages. The identification and quantification of phenolic compounds in green propolis extract were performed using HPLC-DAD and UPLC-Q-TOF-MS methods. The cell viability was evaluated by MTT and LDH assays. The radical scavenging ability was determined using DPPH• and ABTS•+. ROS and RNS generation was analyzed by chemiluminescence. NO concentration was detected by the Griess reaction. The release of various cytokines by activated J774A.1 cells was measured in the culture supernatants using a multiplex bead array system based on xMAP technology. Artepillin C, kaempferide, and their derivatives were the main phenolics found in green propolis. At the tested concentrations, the EEP-B did not decrease the cell viability and did not cause the cytotoxicity. EEP-B exerted strong antioxidant activity and significantly inhibited the production of ROS, RNS, NO, cytokine IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6, IL-12p40, IL-13, TNF-α, G-CSF, GM-CSF, MCP-1, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, and RANTES in stimulated J774A.1 macrophages. Our findings provide new insights for understanding the anti-inflammatory mechanism of action of Brazilian green propolis extract and support its application in complementary and alternative medicine.

  20. Mitofusin 2 decreases intracellular lipids in macrophages by regulating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chun; Ge, Beihai [Department of Cardiology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1095 Jiefang Avenue, Wuhan 430030 (China); He, Chao [Department of Cardiology, China Three Gorges University, Yichang 433000 (China); Zhang, Yi; Liu, Xiaowen [Department of Cardiology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1095 Jiefang Avenue, Wuhan 430030 (China); Liu, Kejian [Department of Cardiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Medical College, Shihezi University (China); Qian, Cuiping; Zhang, Yu; Peng, Wenzhong [Department of Cardiology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1095 Jiefang Avenue, Wuhan 430030 (China); Guo, Xiaomei, E-mail: xmguo@tjh.tjmu.edu.cn [Department of Cardiology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1095 Jiefang Avenue, Wuhan 430030 (China)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Mfn2 decreases cellular lipid accumulation by activating cholesterol transporters. • PPARγ is involved in the Mfn2-mediated increase of cholesterol transporter expressions. • Inactivation of ERK1/2 and p38 is involved in Mfn2-induced PPARγ expression. - Abstract: Mitofusin 2 (Mfn2) inhibits atherosclerotic plaque formation, but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. This study aims to reveal how Mfn2 functions in the atherosclerosis. Mfn2 expression was found to be significantly reduced in arterial atherosclerotic lesions of both mice and human compared with healthy counterparts. Here, we observed that Mfn2 increased cellular cholesterol transporter expression in macrophages by upregulating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ, an effect achieved at least partially by inhibiting extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) pathway. These findings provide insights into potential mechanisms of Mfn2-mediated alterations in cholesterol transporter expression, which may have significant implications for the treatment of atherosclerotic heart disease.

  1. Unsaturated fatty acids prevent activation of NLRP3 inflammasome in human monocytes/macrophages[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'homme, Laurent; Esser, Nathalie; Riva, Laura; Scheen, André; Paquot, Nicolas; Piette, Jacques; Legrand-Poels, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    The NLRP3 inflammasome is involved in many obesity-associated diseases, such as type 2 diabetes, atherosclerosis, and gouty arthritis, through its ability to induce interleukin (IL)-1β release. The molecular link between obesity and inflammasome activation is still unclear, but free fatty acids have been proposed as one triggering event. Here we reported opposite effects of saturated fatty acids (SFAs) compared with unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs) on NLRP3 inflammasome in human monocytes/macrophages. Palmitate and stearate, both SFAs, triggered IL-1β secretion in a caspase-1/ASC/NLRP3-dependent pathway. Unlike SFAs, the UFAs oleate and linoleate did not lead to IL-1β secretion. In addition, they totally prevented the IL-1β release induced by SFAs and, with less efficiency, by a broad range of NLRP3 inducers, including nigericin, alum, and monosodium urate. UFAs did not affect the transcriptional effect of SFAs, suggesting a specific effect on the NLRP3 activation. These results provide a new anti-inflammatory mechanism of UFAs by preventing the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and, therefore, IL-1β processing. By this way, UFAs might play a protective role in NLRP3-associated diseases. PMID:24006511

  2. Mycobacterium avium serovars 2 and 8 infections elicit unique activation of the host macrophage immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebula, B R; Rocco, J M; Maslow, J N; Irani, V R

    2012-12-01

    Mycobacterium avium is an opportunistic pathogen whose pathogenesis is attributed to its serovar-specific glycopeptidolipid (ssGPL), which varies among its 31 serovars. To determine if the presence and type of ssGPLs contribute to M. avium pathogenesis, we infected murine macrophages (mφs) with two M. avium wild type (wt) serovars (2 and 8) and their serovar-null strains. We examined the influence of ssGPL (presence and type) on cytokine production in non-activated (-IFN-γ) and activated (+IFN-γ) mφs, and the bacterial intra-mφ survival over a 6-day infection process. Serovar-2 infections activated TNF-α production that increased over the 6 day period and was capable of controlling the intra-mφ serovar-2 null strain. In contrast, the serovar-8 infection stimulated a strong pro-inflammatory response, but was incapable of removing the invading pathogen, maybe through IL-10 production. It was clear that the intracellular growth of serovar-null in contrast to the wt M. avium strains was easily controlled. Based on our findings and the undisputed fact that M. avium ssGPL is key to its pathogenesis, we conclude that it is not appropriate to dissect the pathogenesis of one M. avium serovar and apply those findings to other serovars. PMID:22991047

  3. Salvianic acid A inhibits induction of inflammatory mediators by blocking Nuclear Factor-kB activation in macrophages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Jun; YAO Ji-hong; ZHOU Qin

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the anti-inflammation effect and possible mechanism of Salvianic acid A (SAA) in mouse peritoneal macrophages. Methods Peritoneal macrophages were obtained from BALB/c mice. LPS induced nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in supernatant, protein expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kB) in the extract were measured. Results SAA strongly inhibited the excessive production of NO, TNF-α and IL-6 in LPS-induced peritoneal macrophages in a concentration-dependent manner and blocked the expression of iNOS and MMP-9. Treatment with LPS alone increased the translocation of NF-kB (1065) from cytosol to the nucleus, but the SAA inhibited the translocation of NF-kB (p65). Conclusions The results showed that SAA had strong anti-inflammatory effects in LPS-stimulated peritoneal macrophages. The important mechanism is due to its inhibition of NF-kB activation.

  4. The polysaccharide isolated from Pleurotus nebrodensis (PN-S) shows immune-stimulating activity in RAW264.7 macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Hai-Yan; Wang, Chang-Lu; Wang, Yu-Rong; Li, Zhen-Jing; Zhang, Ya-Nan

    2015-05-01

    A novel Pleurotus nebrodensis polysaccharide (PN-S) was purified and characterized, and its immune-stimulating activity was evaluated in RAW264.7 macrophages. PN-S induced the proliferation of RAW264.7 cells in a dose-dependent manner, as determined by the MTT assay. After exposure to PN-S, the phagocytosis of the macrophages was significantly improved, with remarkable changes in morphology being observed. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that PN-S promoted RAW264.7 cells to progress through S and G2/M phases. PN-S treatment enhanced the productions of interleukin-6 (IL-6), nitric oxide (NO), interferon gamma (INF-γ), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in the macrophages, with up-regulation of mRNA expressions of interleukin-6 (IL-6), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), interferon gamma(INF-γ) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) being observed in a dose-dependent manner, as measured by qRT-PCR. In conclusion, these results suggest that the purified PN-S can improve immunity by activating macrophages.

  5. Immunotherapy of metastatic breast cancer patients with vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage activating factor (GcMAF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Nobuto; Suyama, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki; Ushijima, Naofumi

    2008-01-15

    Serum vitamin D3-binding protein (Gc protein) is the precursor for the principal macrophage activating factor (MAF). The MAF precursor activity of serum Gc protein of breast cancer patients was lost or reduced because Gc protein was deglycosylated by serum alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (Nagalase) secreted from cancerous cells. Patient serum Nagalase activity is proportional to tumor burden. The deglycosylated Gc protein cannot be converted to MAF, resulting in no macrophage activation and immunosuppression. Stepwise incubation of purified Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase generated probably the most potent macrophage activating factor (termed GcMAF) ever discovered, which produces no adverse effect in humans. Macrophages treated in vitro with GcMAF (100 pg/ml) are highly tumoricidal to mammary adenocarcinomas. Efficacy of GcMAF for treatment of metastatic breast cancer was investigated with 16 nonanemic patients who received weekly administration of GcMAF (100 ng). As GcMAF therapy progresses, the MAF precursor activity of patient Gc protein increased with a concomitant decrease in serum Nagalase. Because of proportionality of serum Nagalase activity to tumor burden, the time course progress of GcMAF therapy was assessed by serum Nagalase activity as a prognostic index. These patients had the initial Nagalase activities ranging from 2.32 to 6.28 nmole/min/mg protein. After about 16-22 administrations (approximately 3.5-5 months) of GcMAF, these patients had insignificantly low serum enzyme levels equivalent to healthy control enzyme levels, ranging from 0.38 to 0.63 nmole/min/mg protein, indicating eradication of the tumors. This therapeutic procedure resulted in no recurrence for more than 4 years. PMID:17935130

  6. Unique proteomic signatures distinguish macrophages and dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lev Becker

    Full Text Available Monocytes differentiate into heterogeneous populations of tissue macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs that regulate inflammation and immunity. Identifying specific populations of myeloid cells in vivo is problematic, however, because only a limited number of proteins have been used to assign cellular phenotype. Using mass spectrometry and bone marrow-derived cells, we provided a global view of the proteomes of M-CSF-derived macrophages, classically and alternatively activated macrophages, and GM-CSF-derived DCs. Remarkably, the expression levels of half the plasma membrane proteins differed significantly in the various populations of cells derived in vitro. Moreover, the membrane proteomes of macrophages and DCs were more distinct than those of classically and alternatively activated macrophages. Hierarchical cluster and dual statistical analyses demonstrated that each cell type exhibited a robust proteomic signature that was unique. To interrogate the phenotype of myeloid cells in vivo, we subjected elicited peritoneal macrophages harvested from wild-type and GM-CSF-deficient mice to mass spectrometric and functional analysis. Unexpectedly, we found that peritoneal macrophages exhibited many features of the DCs generated in vitro. These findings demonstrate that global analysis of the membrane proteome can help define immune cell phenotypes in vivo.

  7. Antiosteoclastogenesis activity of a CO2 laser antagonizing receptor activator for nuclear factor kappaB ligand-induced osteoclast differentiation of murine macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chun-Liang; Kao, Chia-Tze; Fang, Hsin-Yuan; Huang, Tsui-Hsien; Chen, Yi-Wen; Shie, Ming-You

    2015-03-01

    Macrophage cells are the important effector cells in the immune reaction which are indispensable for osteoclastogenesis; their heterogeneity and plasticity renders macrophages a primer target for immune system modulation. In recent years, there have been very few studies about the effects of macrophage cells on laser treatment-regulated osteoclastogenesis. In this study, RAW 264.7 macrophage cells were treated with RANKL to regulate osteoclastogenesis. We used a CO2 laser as a model biostimulation to investigate the role of osteoclastogenic. We also evaluated cell viability, cell death and cathepsin K expression. The CO2 laser inhibited a receptor activator of the NF-ĸB ligand (RANKL)-induced formation of osteoclasts during the osteoclast differentiation process. It was also found that irradiation for two times reduced RANKL-enhanced TRAP activity in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, CO2 laser-treatment diminished the expression and secretion of cathepsin K elevated by RANKL and was concurrent with the inhibition of TRAF6 induction and NF-ĸB activation. The current report demonstrates that CO2 laser abrogated RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis by retarding osteoclast differentiation. The CO2 laser can modulate every cell through dose-dependent in vitro RANKL-mediated osteoclastogenesis, such as the proliferation and fusion of preosteoclasts and the maturation of osteoclasts. Therefore, the current results serve as an improved explanation of the cellular roles of macrophage cell populations in osteoclastogenesis as well as in alveolar bone remodeling by CO2 laser-treatment.

  8. Study of possible changes brought about by plutonium oxide in the acid phosphatase activity of alveolar macrophages of the rabbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the various techniques used for determining the acid phosphatase activity of alveolar rabbit macrophages after inhalation of radioactive plutonium oxide particles, exposure of the animals, removal and sampling of the alveolar cells, and technical dosage. The results obtained are presented; they do not make it possible, in this particular case, to affirm that an important change in the enzymatic activity studied occurs. (author)

  9. Suppression by Apoptotic Cells Defines Tumor Necrosis Factor-Mediated Induction of Glomerular Mesangial Cell Apoptosis by Activated Macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Duffield, Jeremy S.; Ware, Carl F.; Ryffel, Bernhardt; Savill, John

    2001-01-01

    Activated macrophages (Mφ) isolated from inflamed glomeruli or generated by interferon-γ and lipopolysaccharide treatment in vitro induce glomerular mesangial cell apoptosis by hitherto incompletely understood mechanisms. In this report we demonstrate that nitric oxide-independent killing of co-cultured mesangial cells by interferon-γ/lipopolysaccharide-activated Mφ is suppressed by binding/ingestion of apoptotic cells and is mediated by tumor necrosis factor (TNF). Thus, soluble TNF receptor...

  10. Role of HDL in cholesteryl ester metabolism of lipopolysaccharide-activated P388D1 macrophages[S

    OpenAIRE

    Uda, Sabrina; Spolitu, Stefano; Angius, Fabrizio; Collu, Maria; Accossu, Simonetta; Banni, Sebastiano; Murru, Elisabetta; Sanna, Francesca; Batetta, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Infections share with atherosclerosis similar lipid alterations, with accumulation of cholesteryl esters (CEs) in activated macrophages and concomitant decrease of cholesterol-HDL (C-HDL). Yet the precise role of HDL during microbial infection has not been fully elucidated. Activation of P388D1 by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) triggered an increase of CEs and neutral lipid contents, along with a remarkable enhancement in 1,1′-dioctadecyl-3,3,3′,3′-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate-HDL uptake...

  11. UV-B Radiation Induces Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor–Mediated Melanogenesis through Activation of Protease-Activated Receptor-2 and Stem Cell Factor in Keratinocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Enomoto, Akiko; Yoshihisa, Yoko; Yamakoshi, Takako; Ur Rehman, Mati; Norisugi, Osamu; HARA Hiroshi; Matsunaga, Kenji; Makino, Teruhiko; Nishihira, Jun; Shimizu, Tadamichi

    2011-01-01

    UV radiation indirectly regulates melanogenesis in melanocytes through a paracrine regulatory mechanism involving keratinocytes. Protease-activated receptor (PAR)-2 activation induces melanosome transfer by increasing phagocytosis of melanosomes by keratinocytes. This study demonstrated that macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) stimulated PAR-2 expression in human keratinocytes. In addition, we showed that MIF stimulated stem cell factor (SCF) release in keratinocytes; however, MIF ha...

  12. Lung epithelial cell-derived extracellular vesicles activate macrophage-mediated inflammatory responses via ROCK1 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, H-G; Cao, Y; Yang, J; Lee, J H; Choi, H S; Jin, Y

    2015-01-01

    Despite decades of research, the pathogenesis of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) remains poorly understood, thus impeding the development of effective treatment. Diffuse alveolar damage (DAD) and lung epithelial cell death are prominent features of ARDS. Lung epithelial cells are the first line of defense after inhaled stimuli, such as in the case of hyperoxia. We hypothesized that lung epithelial cells release 'messenger' or signaling molecules to adjacent or distant macrophages, thereby initiating or propagating inflammatory responses after noxious insult. We found that, after hyperoxia, a large amount of extracellular vesicles (EVs) were generated and released into bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). These hyperoxia-induced EVs were mainly derived from live lung epithelial cells as the result of hyperoxia-associated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. These EVs were remarkably different from epithelial 'apoptotic bodies', as reflected by the significantly smaller size and differentially expressed protein markers. These EVs fall mainly in the size range of the exosomes and smaller microvesicles (MVs) (50-120 nm). The commonly featured protein markers of apoptotic bodies were not found in these EVs. Treating alveolar macrophages with hyperoxia-induced, epithelial cell-derived EVs led to an increased secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2). Robustly increased macrophage and neutrophil influx was found in the lung tissue of the mice intranasally treated with hyperoxia-induced EVs. It was determined that EV-encapsulated caspase-3 was largely responsible for the alveolar macrophage activation via the ROCK1 pathway. Caspase-3-deficient EVs induced less cytokine/MIP-2 release, reduced cell counts in BALF, less neutrophil infiltration and less inflammation in lung parenchyma, both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the serum circulating EVs were increased and mainly derived from lung epithelial cells after

  13. An essential regulatory role for macrophage migration inhibitory factor in T-cell activation.

    OpenAIRE

    Bacher, M; Metz, C N; Calandra, T; Mayer, K.; Chesney, J.; Lohoff, M.; Gemsa, D.; Donnelly, T.; Bucala, R

    1996-01-01

    The protein known as macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) was one of the first cytokines to be discovered and was described 30 years ago to be a T-cell-derived factor that inhibited the random migration of macrophages in vitro. A much broader role for MIF has emerged recently as a result of studies that have demonstrated it to be released from the anterior pituitary gland in vivo. MIF also is the first protein that has been identified to be secreted from monocytes/macrophages upon glu...

  14. Classical and Alternative Activation of Cyanobacterium Oscillatoria sp. Lipopolysaccharide-Treated Rat Microglia in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Alejandro M S; Murphy, Joseph; MacAdam, David; Osterbauer, Christopher; Baseer, Imaan; Hall, Mary L; Feher, Domonkos; Williams, Phillip

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to test the hypothesis that an in vitro exposure to cyanobacterium Oscillatoria sp. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) might result in classical and alternative activation of rat neonatal microglia. Using Escherichia coli LPS-primed microglia as a positive control, this study revealed that treatment of rat microglia with Oscillatoria sp. LPS for 17 h in vitro resulted in both classical and alternative activation as well as concomitant pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory mediator release, in a concentration-dependent manner: (1) treatment with 0.1-10 000 ng/ml Oscillatoria sp. LPS resulted in minimal lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) release, induced concentration-dependent and statistically significant O2 (-) generation, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) release, generation of the cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), and the chemokines macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2/CXCL2), interferon γ-induced protein 10 kDa (IP-10/CXCL-10), (MIP-1α/CCL3), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2), regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES/CCL5), and the alternative activation cytokine IL-10; (3) in contrast, treatment with 100 000 ng/ml Oscillatoria sp. LPS appeared to damage the microglia cell membrane, because it resulted in minimal O2 (-) generation, statistically significant LDH release, and a decrease in the generation of all the cytokines and chemokines investigated, with the exception of IL-1α and cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant 1 (CINC-1/CXCL1) generation, which was increased. Thus, our results provide experimental support for our working hypothesis, namely that Oscillatoria sp. LPS induces classical and alternative activation of rat brain microglia in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner, namely 0.1-10 000 ng/ml Oscillatoria sp. LPS, when microglia cells were shown to be viable. Furthermore, should cyanobacterium Oscillatoria sp. LPS gain

  15. LPS inhibits caspase 3-dependent apoptosis in RAW264.7 macrophages induced by the AMPK activator AICAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russe, Otto Quintus, E-mail: quintus@russe.eu; Möser, Christine V., E-mail: chmoeser@hotmail.com; Kynast, Katharina L., E-mail: katharina.kynast@googlemail.com; King, Tanya S., E-mail: tanya.sarah.king@googlemail.com; Olbrich, Katrin, E-mail: Katrin.olbrich@gmx.net; Grösch, Sabine, E-mail: groesch@em.uni-frankfurt.de; Geisslinger, Gerd, E-mail: geisslinger@em.uni-frankfurt.de; Niederberger, Ellen, E-mail: e.niederberger@em.uni-frankfurt.de

    2014-05-09

    Highlights: • AMPK-activation induces caspase 3-dependent apoptosis in macrophages. • Apoptosis is associated with decreased mTOR and increased p21 levels. • All effects can be significantly inhibited by the TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide. - Abstract: AMP-activated kinase is a cellular energy sensor which is activated in stages of increased ATP consumption. Its activation has been associated with a number of beneficial effects such as decreasing inflammatory processes and the disease progress of diabetes and obesity, respectively. Furthermore, AMPK activation has been linked with induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in cancer and vascular cells, indicating that it might have a therapeutic impact for the treatment of cancer and atherosclerosis. However, the impact of AMPK on the proliferation of macrophages, which also play a key role in the formation of atherosclerotic plaques and in inflammatory processes, has not been focused so far. We have assessed the influence of AICAR- and metformin-induced AMPK activation on cell viability of macrophages with and without inflammatory stimulation, respectively. In cells without inflammatory stimulation, we found a strong induction of caspase 3-dependent apoptosis associated with decreased mTOR levels and increased expression of p21. Interestingly, these effects could be inhibited by co-stimulation with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) but not by other proinflammatory cytokines suggesting that AICAR induces apoptosis via AMPK in a TLR4-pathway dependent manner. In conclusion, our results revealed that AMPK activation is not only associated with positive effects but might also contribute to risk factors by disturbing important features of macrophages. The fact that LPS is able to restore AMPK-associated apoptosis might indicate an important role of TLR4 agonists in preventing unfavorable cell death of immune cells.

  16. Critical role of macrophages and their activation via MyD88-NFκB signaling in lung innate immunity to Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Feng Lai

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma pneumoniae (Mp, a common cause of pneumonia, is associated with asthma; however, the mechanisms underlying this association remain unclear. We investigated the cellular immune response to Mp in mice. Intranasal inoculation with Mp elicited infiltration of the lungs with neutrophils, monocytes and macrophages. Systemic depletion of macrophages, but not neutrophils, resulted in impaired clearance of Mp from the lungs. Accumulation and activation of macrophages were decreased in the lungs of MyD88(-/- mice and clearance of Mp was impaired, indicating that MyD88 is a key signaling protein in the anti-Mp response. MyD88-dependent signaling was also required for the Mp-induced activation of NFκB, which was essential for macrophages to eliminate the microbe in vitro. Thus, MyD88-NFκB signaling in macrophages is essential for clearance of Mp from the lungs.

  17. Macrophage derived chemokine (CCL22, thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (CCL17, and CCR4 in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamaguchi Kazuhiro

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF is a chronically progressive interstitial lung disease of unknown etiology. Previously, we have demonstrated the selective upregulation of the macrophage-derived chemokine CCL22 and the thymus activation-regulated chemokine CCL17 among chemokines, in a rat model of radiation pneumonitis/pulmonary fibrosis and preliminarily observed an increase in bronchoalveolar (BAL fluid CCL22 levels of IPF patients. Methods We examined the expression of CCR4, a specific receptor for CCL22 and CCL17, in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid cells, as well as the levels of CCL22 and CCL17, to elucidate their pathophysiological roles in pulmonary fibrosis. We also studied their immunohistochemical localization. Results BAL fluid CCL22 and CCL17 levels were significantly higher in patients with IPF than those with collagen vascular diseases and healthy volunteers, and there was a significant correlation between the levels of CCL22 and CCL17 in patients with IPF. CCL22 levels in the BAL fluid did not correlate with the total cell numbers, alveolar lymphocytes, or macrophages in BAL fluid. However, the CCL22 levels significantly correlated with the numbers of CCR4-expressing alveolar macrophages. By immunohistochemical and immunofluorescence analysis, localization of CCL22 and CCR4 to CD68-positive alveolar macrophages as well as that of CCL17 to hyperplastic epithelial cells were shown. Clinically, CCL22 BAL fluid levels inversely correlated with DLco/VA values in IPF patients. Conclusion We speculated that locally overexpressed CCL22 may induce lung dysfunction through recruitment and activation of CCR4-positive alveolar macrophages.

  18. Optimized operation and design of alternating activated sludge processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lukasse, L.J.S.; Keesman, K.J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a simulation study with the scope to optimise the plant design and operation strategy of 2-reactors alternating activated sludge processes with only flow schedule and aeration on/off as control inputs. The methodology is to simulate the application of receding horizon optimal con

  19. Regulation of the expression of nitric oxide synthase and leishmanicidal activity by glycoconjugates of Leishmania lipophosphoglycan in murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proudfoot, L; Nikolaev, A V; Feng, G J; Wei, W Q; Ferguson, M A; Brimacombe, J S; Liew, F Y

    1996-10-01

    Lipophosphoglycan (LPG) glycoconjugates from promastigotes of Leishmania were not able to induce the expression of the cytokine-inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) by the murine macrophage cell line, J774. However, they synergize with interferon gamma to stimulate the macrophages to express high levels of iNOS. This synergistic effect was critically time-dependent. Preincubation of J774 cells with the LPG glycans 4-18 h before stimulation with interferon gamma resulted in a significant reduction in the expression of iNOS mRNA and of NO synthesis, compared with cells preincubated with culture medium alone. The regulatory effect on the induction of iNOS by LPG is located in the LPG phosphoglycan disaccharide backbone. Synthetic fragments of this backbone had a similar regulatory effect on NO synthesis. Further, the production of NO by activated macrophages in the present system was correlated directly with the leishmanicidal capacity of the cells. These data therefore demonstrate that LPG glycoconjugates have a profound effect on the survival of Leishmania parasites through their ability to regulate the expression of iNOS by macrophages. PMID:8855295

  20. Effect of salivary gland adenocarcinoma cell-derived alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase on the bioactivity of macrophage activating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Takashi; Uematsu, Takashi; Yamaoka, Minoru; Furusawa, Kiyofumi

    2004-03-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the effects of alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (alpha-NaGalase) produced by human salivary gland adenocarcinoma (SGA) cells on the bioactivity of macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF). High exo-alpha-NaGalase activity was detected in the SGA cell line HSG. HSG alpha-NaGalase had both exo- and endo-enzyme activities, cleaving the Gal-GalNAc and GalNAc residues linked to Thr/Ser but not releasing the [NeuAc2-6]GalNac residue. Furthermore, GcMAF enzymatically prepared from the Gc protein enhanced the superoxide-generation capacity and phagocytic activity of monocytes/macrophages. However, GcMAF treated with purified alpha-NaGalase did not exhibit these effects. Thus, HSG possesses the capacity to produce larger quantities of alpha-NaGalase, which inactivates GcMAF produced from Gc protein, resulting in reduced phagocytic activity and superoxide-generation capacity of monocytes/macrophages. The present data strongly suggest that HSG alpha-NaGalase acts as an immunodeficiency factor in cancer patients. PMID:14767536

  1. Lysis of herpesvirus-infected cells by macrophages activated with free or liposome-encapsulated lymphokine produced by a murine T cell hybridoma.

    OpenAIRE

    Koff, W C; Showalter, S D; Seniff, D A; Hampar, B

    1983-01-01

    Thioglycolate-induced mouse peritoneal macrophages were activated in vitro by the lymphokine designated macrophage-activating factor (MAF) produced by a murine T cell hybridoma to lyse herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2)-infected murine target cells. Comparison of uninfected BALB/c 10E2 cells with HSV-2-infected 10E2 cells showed that macrophages activated with MAF selectively destroyed HSV-2-infected cells and left uninfected cells unharmed, as measured by an 18-h 51Cr-release assay. In cont...

  2. Glutamine Modulates Macrophage Lipotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li He

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and diabetes are associated with excessive inflammation and impaired wound healing. Increasing evidence suggests that macrophage dysfunction is responsible for these inflammatory defects. In the setting of excess nutrients, particularly dietary saturated fatty acids (SFAs, activated macrophages develop lysosome dysfunction, which triggers activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and cell death. The molecular pathways that connect lipid stress to lysosome pathology are not well understood, but may represent a viable target for therapy. Glutamine uptake is increased in activated macrophages leading us to hypothesize that in the context of excess lipids glutamine metabolism could overwhelm the mitochondria and promote the accumulation of toxic metabolites. To investigate this question we assessed macrophage lipotoxicity in the absence of glutamine using LPS-activated peritoneal macrophages exposed to the SFA palmitate. We found that glutamine deficiency reduced lipid induced lysosome dysfunction, inflammasome activation, and cell death. Under glutamine deficient conditions mTOR activation was decreased and autophagy was enhanced; however, autophagy was dispensable for the rescue phenotype. Rather, glutamine deficiency prevented the suppressive effect of the SFA palmitate on mitochondrial respiration and this phenotype was associated with protection from macrophage cell death. Together, these findings reveal that crosstalk between activation-induced metabolic reprogramming and the nutrient microenvironment can dramatically alter macrophage responses to inflammatory stimuli.

  3. Macrophage Activation Syndrome Associated with Adult-Onset Still’s Disease Successfully Treated with Anakinra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aswini Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS is a potentially fatal complication of Adult-Onset Still’s disease (Still’s disease. Whereas an increasing body of evidence supports interleukin-1 (IL-1 blockade as a promising treatment for Still’s disease, whether it is therapeutic for MAS associated with Still’s disease remains unclear. We report a 34-year-old Caucasian man with one-decade history of TNF-blockade-responsive seronegative arthritis who presented with abrupt onset of fever, serositis, bicytopenia, splenomegaly, hepatitis, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. Striking hyperferritinemia was noted without evidence of infection, malignancy, or hemophagocytosis on bone marrow biopsy. NK cells were undetectable in the peripheral blood, whereas soluble IL-2 receptor was elevated. His multiorgan disease resolved in association with methylprednisolone pulse therapy, Anakinra, and a tapering course of prednisone. This case reinforces the notion that Still’s disease is inherently poised to manifest MAS as one of the clinical phenotypes by shedding light on the role of IL-1 underlying both Still’s disease and related MAS.

  4. The SARS coronavirus spike glycoprotein is selectively recognized by lung surfactant protein D and activates macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth-Larsen, Rikke; Zhong, Fei; Chow, Vincent T K;

    2007-01-01

    The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) infects host cells with its surface glycosylated spike-protein (S-protein). Here we expressed the SARS-CoV S-protein to investigate its interactions with innate immune mechanisms in the lung. The purified S-protein was detected as a 210 k......Da glycosylated protein. It was not secreted in the presence of tunicamycin and was detected as a 130 kDa protein in the cell lysate. The purified S-protein bound to Vero but not 293T cells and was itself recognized by lung surfactant protein D (SP-D), a collectin found in the lung alveoli. The binding required...... Ca(2+) and was inhibited by maltose. The serum collectin, mannan-binding lectin (MBL), exhibited no detectable binding to the purified S-protein. S-protein binds and activates macrophages but not dendritic cells (DCs). It suggests that SARS-CoV interacts with innate immune mechanisms in the lung...

  5. p62 regulates CD40-mediated NFκB activation in macrophages through interaction with TRAF6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seibold, Kristina; Ehrenschwender, Martin, E-mail: martin.ehrenschwender@ukr.de

    2015-08-14

    CD40 is a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor family. Activation-induced recruitment of adapter proteins, so-called TNF-receptor-associated factors (TRAFs) to the cytoplasmic tail of CD40 triggers signaling cascades important in the immune system, but has also been associated with excessive inflammation in diseases such as atherosclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis. Especially, pro-inflammatory nuclear factor κB (NFκB) signaling emanating from CD40-associated TRAF6 appears to be a key pathogenic driving force. Consequently, targeting the CD40-TRAF6 interaction is emerging as a promising therapeutic strategy, but the underlying molecular machinery of this signaling axis is to date poorly understood. Here, we identified the multifunctional adaptor protein p62 as a critical regulator in CD40-mediated NFκB signaling via TRAF6. CD40 activation triggered formation of a TRAF6-p62 complex. Disturbing this interaction tremendously reduced CD40-mediated NFκB signaling in macrophages, while TRAF6-independent signaling pathways remained unaffected. This highlights p62 as a potential target in hyper-inflammatory, CD40-associated pathologies. - Highlights: • CD40 activation triggers interaction of the adapter protein TRAF6 with p62. • TRAF6-p62 interaction regulates CD40-mediated NFκB signaling in macrophages. • Defective TRAF6-p62 interaction reduces CD40-mediated NFκB activation in macrophages.

  6. Activated human mast cells induce LOX-1-specific scavenger receptor expression in human monocyte-derived macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mervi Alanne-Kinnunen

    Full Text Available Activated mast cells in atherosclerotic lesions degranulate and release bioactive compounds capable of regulating atherogenesis. Here we examined the ability of activated human primary mast cells to regulate the expression of the major scavenger receptors in cultured human primary monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDMs.Components released by immunologically activated human primary mast cells induced a transient expression of lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor (LOX-1 mRNA in HMDMs, while the expression of two other scavenger receptors, MSR1 and CD36, remained unaffected. The LOX-1-inducing secretory components were identified as histamine, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β1, which exhibited a synergistic effect on LOX-1 mRNA expression. Histamine induced a transient expression of LOX-1 protein. Mast cell -induced increase in LOX-1 expression was not associated with increased uptake of oxidized LDL by the macrophages.Mast cell-derived histamine, TNF-α, and TGF-β1 act in concert to induce a transient increase in LOX-1 expression in human primary monocyte-derived macrophages. The LOX-1-inducing activity potentially endows mast cells a hitherto unrecognized role in the regulation of innate immune reactions in atherogenesis.

  7. Isorhamnetin attenuates atherosclerosis by inhibiting macrophage apoptosis via PI3K/AKT activation and HO-1 induction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Luo

    Full Text Available Isorhamnetin (Iso is a flavonoid compound extracted from the Chinese herb Hippophae rhamnoides L. Previous studies have revealed its anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, and anti-oxidant activities. This study investigated the ability of Iso to inhibit oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL-induced cell apoptosis in THP-1-derived macrophages. The effects of Iso on atherosclerosis in vivo were also evaluated in apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE-/- mice fed a high fat diet.Iso showed significant inhibitory effects on ox-LDL-induced THP-1-derived macrophage injuries via decreasing reactive oxygen species levels, lipid deposition, and caspase-3 activation, restoring mitochondrial membrane potential, reducing the number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL-positive cells, and regulating apoptosis-related proteins. We also determined the protective effects of Iso by PI3K/AKT activation and HO-1 induction. Iso reduced the atherosclerotic plaque size in vivo in ApoE-/- mice as assessed by oil red O, Sudan IV staining, and CD68-positive cells, and reduced macrophage apoptosis as assessed by caspase-3 and TUNEL assays in lesions.In conclusion, our results show that Iso inhibited atherosclerotic plaque development in ApoE-/- mice by PI3K/AKT activation and HO-1 induction.

  8. DMPD: Distinct functions of IRF-3 and IRF-7 in IFN-alpha gene regulation and controlof anti-tumor activity in primary macrophages. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16846591 Distinct functions of IRF-3 and IRF-7 in IFN-alpha gene regulation and controlof anti-tumor activit...Distinct functions of IRF-3 and IRF-7 in IFN-alpha gene regulation and controlof anti-tumor activity... IFN-alpha gene regulation and controlof anti-tumor activity in primary macrophages. Authors Solis M, Goubau

  9. Deficiency of Nuclear Receptor Nur77 Aggravates Mouse Experimental Colitis by Increased NFκB Activity in Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anouk A J Hamers

    Full Text Available Nuclear receptor Nur77, also referred to as NR4A1 or TR3, plays an important role in innate and adaptive immunity. Nur77 is crucial in regulating the T helper 1/regulatory T-cell balance, is expressed in macrophages and drives M2 macrophage polarization. In this study we aimed to define the function of Nur77 in inflammatory bowel disease. In wild-type and Nur77-/- mice, colitis development was studied in dextran sodium sulphate (DSS- and 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS-induced models. To understand the underlying mechanism, Nur77 was overexpressed in macrophages and gut epithelial cells. Nur77 protein is expressed in colon tissues from Crohn's disease and Ulcerative colitis patients and colons from colitic mice in inflammatory cells and epithelium. In both mouse colitis models inflammation was increased in Nur77-/- mice. A higher neutrophil influx and enhanced IL-6, MCP-1 and KC production was observed in Nur77-deficient colons after DSS-treatment. TNBS-induced influx of T-cells and inflammatory monocytes into the colon was higher in Nur77-/- mice, along with increased expression of MCP-1, TNFα and IL-6, and decreased Foxp3 RNA expression, compared to wild-type mice. Overexpression of Nur77 in lipopolysaccharide activated RAW macrophages resulted in up-regulated IL-10 and downregulated TNFα, MIF-1 and MCP-1 mRNA expression through NFκB repression. Nur77 also strongly decreased expression of MCP-1, CXCL1, IL-8, MIP-1α and TNFα in gut epithelial Caco-2 cells. Nur77 overexpression suppresses the inflammatory status of both macrophages and gut epithelial cells and together with the in vivo mouse data this supports that Nur77 has a protective function in experimental colitis. These findings may have implications for development of novel targeted treatment strategies regarding inflammatory bowel disease and other inflammatory diseases.

  10. Macrophage activation marker soluble CD163 and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in morbidly obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazankov, Konstantin; Tordjman, Joan; Møller, Holger Jon;

    2015-01-01

    ). METHODS: Demographic, clinical, and biochemical data, and plasma sCD163 measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, of 196 patients were collected preoperatively and 3, 6, and 12 months after BS leading to significant weight loss. Peroperative liver biopsies were assessed for the NAFLD Activity Score......BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Macrophages play an important role in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Soluble CD163 (sCD163) is a specific marker of macrophage activation. We aimed to measure sCD163 in morbidly obese patients with varying degrees of NAFLD before and after bariatric surgery (BS...... (NAS), Kleiner fibrosis score, and the fatty liver inhibition of progression (FLIP) algorithm. In a subset, CD163 immunohistochemistry and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction for CD163 mRNA were performed. RESULTS: sCD163 was higher in patients with NAS ≥ 5 compared with those with NAS 

  11. Anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory effects of Tagetes minuta essential oil in activated macrophages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Parastoo Karimian; Gholamreza Kavoosi; Zahra Amirghofran

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of Tagetes minuta (T. minuta) essential oil. Methods:In the present study T. minuta essential oil was obtained from leaves of T. minuta via hydro-distillation and then was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The anti-oxidant capacity of T. minuta essential oil was examined by measuring reactive oxygen, reactive nitrogen species and hydrogen peroxide scavenging. The anti-inflammatory activity of T. minuta essential oil was determined through measuring NADH oxidase, inducible nitric oxide synthase and TNF-αmRNA expression in lipopolysacharide-stimulated murine macrophages using real-time PCR. Results:Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis indicated that the main components in the T. minuta essential oil were dihydrotagetone (33.86%), E-ocimene (19.92%), tagetone (16.15%), cis-β-ocimene (7.94%), Z-ocimene (5.27%), limonene (3.1%) and epoxyocimene (2.03%). The T. minuta essential oil had the ability to scavenge all reactive oxygen/reactive nitrogen species radicals with IC50 12-15 μg/mL, which indicated a potent radical scavenging activity. In addition, T. minuta essential oil significantly reduced NADH oxidase, inducible nitric oxide synthaseand TNF-αmRNA expression in the cells at concentrations of 50 μg/mL, indicating a capacity of this product to potentially modulate/diminish immune responses. Conclusions:T. minuta essential oil has radical scavenging and anti-inflammatory activities and could potentially be used as a safe effective source of natural anti-oxidants in therapy against oxidative damage and stress associated with some inflammatory conditions.

  12. Glycan structure of Gc Protein-derived Macrophage Activating Factor as revealed by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Chad R; Rehder, Douglas S

    2016-09-15

    Disagreement exists regarding the O-glycan structure attached to human vitamin D binding protein (DBP). Previously reported evidence indicated that the O-glycan of the Gc1S allele product is the linear core 1 NeuNAc-Gal-GalNAc-Thr trisaccharide. Here, glycan structural evidence is provided from glycan linkage analysis and over 30 serial glycosidase-digestion experiments which were followed by analysis of the intact protein by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Results demonstrate that the O-glycan from the Gc1F protein is the same linear trisaccharide found on the Gc1S protein and that the hexose residue is galactose. In addition, the putative anti-cancer derivative of DBP known as Gc Protein-derived Macrophage Activating Factor (GcMAF, which is formed by the combined action of β-galactosidase and neuraminidase upon DBP) was analyzed intact by ESI-MS, revealing that the activating E. coli β-galactosidase cleaves nothing from the protein-leaving the glycan structure of active GcMAF as a Gal-GalNAc-Thr disaccharide, regardless of the order in which β-galactosidase and neuraminidase are applied. Moreover, glycosidase digestion results show that α-N-Acetylgalactosamindase (nagalase) lacks endoglycosidic function and only cleaves the DBP O-glycan once it has been trimmed down to a GalNAc-Thr monosaccharide-precluding the possibility of this enzyme removing the O-glycan trisaccharide from cancer-patient DBP in vivo.

  13. Glycan structure of Gc Protein-derived Macrophage Activating Factor as revealed by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Chad R; Rehder, Douglas S

    2016-09-15

    Disagreement exists regarding the O-glycan structure attached to human vitamin D binding protein (DBP). Previously reported evidence indicated that the O-glycan of the Gc1S allele product is the linear core 1 NeuNAc-Gal-GalNAc-Thr trisaccharide. Here, glycan structural evidence is provided from glycan linkage analysis and over 30 serial glycosidase-digestion experiments which were followed by analysis of the intact protein by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Results demonstrate that the O-glycan from the Gc1F protein is the same linear trisaccharide found on the Gc1S protein and that the hexose residue is galactose. In addition, the putative anti-cancer derivative of DBP known as Gc Protein-derived Macrophage Activating Factor (GcMAF, which is formed by the combined action of β-galactosidase and neuraminidase upon DBP) was analyzed intact by ESI-MS, revealing that the activating E. coli β-galactosidase cleaves nothing from the protein-leaving the glycan structure of active GcMAF as a Gal-GalNAc-Thr disaccharide, regardless of the order in which β-galactosidase and neuraminidase are applied. Moreover, glycosidase digestion results show that α-N-Acetylgalactosamindase (nagalase) lacks endoglycosidic function and only cleaves the DBP O-glycan once it has been trimmed down to a GalNAc-Thr monosaccharide-precluding the possibility of this enzyme removing the O-glycan trisaccharide from cancer-patient DBP in vivo. PMID:27503803

  14. Eradication of spontaneous metastases and activation of alveolar macrophages by intravenous injection of liposomes containing muramyl dipeptide.

    OpenAIRE

    Fidler, I. J.; Sone, S.; Fogler, W. E.; Barnes, Z L

    1981-01-01

    The multiple systemic administration of multilamellar liposomes composed of phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylcholine (molar ratio 3:7) that contained water-soluble muramyl dipeptide (MDP) activated alveolar macrophages to become tumoricidal and eradicated established spontaneous pulmonary and lymph node metastases. Spontaneously metastasizing melanoma cells were injected into the footpads of mice. After 4-5 weeks, the tumors were resected by a midfemoral amputation; 3 days later, twice-week...

  15. Inhibition of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis by nordihydroguaiaretic acid. The role of alveolar macrophage activation and mediator production.

    OpenAIRE

    Phan, S. H.; Kunkel, S L

    1986-01-01

    The role of alveolar macrophage activation and release of mediators remains unclear. In this study, this role is examined with respect to the effects of relatively selective inhibitors of arachidonate metabolism on the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. CBA/J mice were administered bleomycin (0.037 units) endotracheally to induce pulmonary fibrosis. Daily intraperitoneal injections of a lipoxygenase inhibitor, nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) inhibited pulmonary fibrosis in a dose-dependent ...

  16. Activation of macrophage nuclear factor-κB and induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase by LPS

    OpenAIRE

    Yan Zhong-Qun; Li Ying-Hua; Brauner Annelie; Tullus Kjell

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Background Chronic lung disease (CLD) of prematurity is a major problem of neonatal care. Bacterial infection and inflammatory response have been thought to play an important role in the development of CLD and steroids have been given, with some benefit, to neonates with this disease. In the present study, we assessed the ability of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to stimulate rat alveolar macrophages to produce nitric oxide (NO), express inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and activate ...

  17. Protocatechuic Acid Prevents oxLDL-Induced Apoptosis by Activating JNK/Nrf2 Survival Signals in Macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Rosaria Varì; Beatrice Scazzocchio; Carmela Santangelo; Carmelina Filesi; Fabio Galvano; Massimo D’Archivio; Roberta Masella; Claudio Giovannini

    2015-01-01

    Protocatechuic acid (PCA), one of the main metabolites of complex polyphenols, exerts numerous biological activities including antiapoptotic, anti-inflammatory, and antiatherosclerotic effects. Oxidised LDL have atherogenic properties by damaging arterial wall cells and inducing p53-dependent apoptosis in macrophages. This study was aimed at defining the molecular mechanism responsible for the protective effects of PCA against oxidative and proapoptotic damage exerted by oxLDL in J774 A.1 mac...

  18. Active vitamin D prevents podocyte injury via regulation of macrophage M1 and M2 phenotype in diabetic nephropathy rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭银凤

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of active vitamin D(VD)on macrophage M1 and M2 phenotype and its role in protecting podocyte impairment in diabetic nephropathy(DN).Methods Diabetes mellitus rats were established by intraperitoneal injection with streptozocin.Rats were randomly divided into four groups:normal-1(NC-1,n=8),normal-2(NC-2,n=8,normal rats treated with calcitriol 0.1μg·kg-1·d-1by gavages),

  19. Literature list concerning differentiation and activation of macrophage and pathways found in the literature - DMPD | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DMPD Literature list concerning differentiation and activation of macrophage and pathways found in the liter...ature Data detail Data name Literature list concerning differentiation and activation of macrophage and path...rch URL http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/dynamic_macrophage_pathway_csm...converts the contents into a pathway in the CSML format by using the Cell Illustrator Online (CIO). Number o...icle Title Article title Authors Article author(s) Publication Journal published the article Pathway Diagram of the path

  20. Induction of Macrophage Function in Human THP-1 Cells is Associated with MAPK Signaling and Activation of MAP3K7 (TAK1 Protein Kinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik eRichter

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages represent the primary human host response to pathogen infection and link the immediate defense to the adaptive immune system. Mature tissue macrophages convert from circulating monocyte precursor cells by terminal differentiation in a process that is not fully understood. Here, we analyzed the protein kinases of the human monocytic cell line THP-1 before and after induction of macrophage differentiation by using kinomics and phosphoproteomics. When comparing the macrophage-like state with the monocytic precursor, 50% of the kinome was altered in expression and even 71% of covered kinase phosphorylation sites were affected. Kinome rearrangements are for example characterized by a shift of overrepresented cycline-dependent kinases associated with cell cycle control in monocytes to calmodulin-dependent kinases and kinases involved in proinflammatory signaling. Eventually, we show that monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation is associated with major rewiring of mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling networks and demonstrate that protein kinase MAP3K7 (TAK1 acts as the key signaling hub in bacterial killing, chemokine production and differentiation. Our study proves the fundamental role of protein kinases and cellular signaling as major drivers of macrophage differentiation and function. The finding that MAP3K7 is central to macrophage function suggests MAP3K7 and its networking partners as promising targets in host-directed therapy for macrophage-associated disease.

  1. Activation of PPARγ by a Natural Flavonoid Modulator, Apigenin Ameliorates Obesity-Related Inflammation Via Regulation of Macrophage Polarization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiujing Feng

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available PPARγ has emerged as a master regulator of macrophage polarization and is the molecular target of the thiazolidinedione drugs. Here we show that apigenin binds and activates PPARγ by acting as a modulator. Activation of PPARγ by apigenin blocks p65 translocation into nuclei through inhibition of p65/PPARγ complex translocation into nuclei, thereby decreasing NF-κB activation and favoringM2 macrophage polarization. In HFD and ob/ob mice, apigenin significantly reverses M1 macrophage into M2 and reduces the infiltration of inflammatory cells in liver and adipose tissues, as well as decreases the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, thereby alleviating inflammation. Strikingly, apigenin reduces liver and muscular steatosis, decreases the levels of ALT, AST, TC and TG, improving glucose resistance obviously. Unlike rosiglitazone, apigenin does not cause significant weight gain, osteoporosis et al. Our findings identify apigenin as a modulator of PPARγ and a potential lead compound for treatment of metabolic disorders.

  2. A 25 kDa polypeptide is the ligand for p185neu and is secreted by activated macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarakhovsky, A; Zaichuk, T; Prassolov, V; Butenko, Z A

    1991-12-01

    Medium conditioned by mouse peritoneal macrophages, activated by muramyl dipeptide (MDP), was used as a possible source of p185neu-specific ligand. MDP-activated macrophage-conditioned medium (MDP-CM) was shown to induce p185neu down-regulation in NEU-expressing NIH3T3 cells in a dose-dependent and temperature-sensitive manner. To exclude the possibility of an indirect action of proteins/metabolites present in MDP-CM on p185neu turnover, a ligand-trapping approach was used. Secreted NEU protein possessing only the extracellular domain but lacking transmembrane and protein kinase domains was expressed in HeLa cells and then purified from conditioned medium, using affinity chromatography on WGA-Sepharose. Co-incubation of the truncated, soluble NEU protein preparation with MDP-CM abolished MDP-CM-induced p185neu down-regulation and reduced self-phosphorylation. It is concluded that a putative p185neu-specific ligand is produced by macrophages activated by MDP. Using MDP-CM, the presence of a 25 kDa polypeptide distinct from EGF, PDGF, FGF, IGF, TGF-alpha and TGF-beta and TNF-alpha, could be demonstrated by decorating a Western blot with soluble NEU and anti-NEU antibodies. Thus, a 25 kDa (non-reduced) p185neu ligand has been described.

  3. Molecular mechanisms that regulate the macrophage M1/M2 polarization balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan eWang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available As an essential component of innate immunity, macrophages have multiple functions in both inhibiting or promoting cell proliferation and tissue repair. Diversity and plasticity are hallmarks of macrophages. Classical M1 and alternative M2 activation of macrophages, mirroring the Th1–Th2 polarization of T cells, represent two extremes of a dynamic changing state of macrophage activation. M1-type macrophages release cytokines that inhibit the proliferation of surrounding cells and damage contiguous tissue, and M2-type macrophages release cytokines that promote the proliferation of contiguous cells and tissue repair. M1-M2 polarization of macrophage is a tightly controlled process entailing a set of signaling pathways, transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulatory networks. An imbalance of macrophage M1-M2 polarization is often associated with various diseases or inflammatory conditions. Therefore identification of the molecules associated with the dynamic changes of macrophage polarization and understanding their interactions is crucial for elucidating the molecular basis of disease progression and designing novel macrophage-mediated therapeutic strategies.

  4. Free cholesterol-induced macrophage apoptosis is mediated by inositol-requiring enzyme 1 alpha-regulated activation of Jun N-terminal kinase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fangming Li; Yi Guo; Shenggang Sun; Xin Jiang; Bingshan Tang; Qizhang Wang; Ling Wang

    2008-01-01

    Macrophage death in advanced atherosclerotic lesions leads to iesional necrosis, possible plaque rupture, and acute vascular occlusion. A likely cause of macrophage death is the accumulation of free cholesterol (FC) leading to activation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced apoptosis.Inositol-requiring enzyme 1 alpha (IRE1α) is an integral membrane protein of the ER that is a key signaling step in cholesterol-induced apoptosis in macrophages, activated by stress in the ER. However, the role of IRE1α in the regulation of ER stress-induced macrophage death and the mechanism for this process are largely unclear.In this study,a cell culture model was used to explore the mechanisms involved in the ER stress pathway of FC-induced macrophage death.The results herein showed that FC loading of macrophages leads to an apoptotic response that is partially dependent on initiation by activation of IRE1α.Taken together,these results showed that the IRE1-apoptosis-signaling kinase 1-c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase cascade pathway was required in this process.Moreover,the data suggested a novel cellular mechanism for cholesterol-induced macrophage death in advanced atherosclerotic lesions.The critical function of this signaling cascade is indicated by prevention of ER stress-induced apoptosis after inhibition of IRE1α,or c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase.

  5. Human Amniotic Epithelial Cell Transplantation Induces Markers of Alternative Macrophage Activation and Reduces Established Hepatic Fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Ursula Manuelpillai; Dinushka Lourensz; Vijesh Vaghjiani; Jorge Tchongue; Derek Lacey; Jing-Yang Tee; Padma Murthi; James Chan; Alexander Hodge; William Sievert

    2012-01-01

    Chronic hepatic inflammation from multiple etiologies leads to a fibrogenic response that can progress to cirrhosis and liver failure. Transplantation of human amniotic epithelial cells (hAEC) from term delivered placenta has been shown to decrease mild to moderate hepatic fibrosis in a murine model. To model advanced human liver disease and assess the efficacy of hAEC therapy, we transplanted hAEC in mice with advanced hepatic fibrosis. Immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice were administered carbon t...

  6. Immunity to Schistosoma mansoni in guinea-pigs vaccinated with radiation-attenuated cercariae. T-cell activation of macrophages for larval killing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, J.R.; McLaren, D.J.

    1988-02-01

    This study addresses macrophage activation in guinea-pigs vaccinated with radiation-attenuated cercariae of Schistosom mansoni. Peritoneal exudate macrophages elicited in vaccinated animals by mineral oil injection were activated to kill larval schistosomes in vitro. Killing efficiency is dependent upon the cell:target ratio employed and is enhanced by, but is not strictly dependent on, the presence of specific antibodies. Macrophages co-cultured with parasites release superoxide radicals and hydrogen peroxide, but the use of inhibitors has shown that neither of these reactive oxygen intermediates are the causal agents of cellular cytotoxicity in this system. Oil-elicited macrophages from naive guinea-pigs do not show comparable activation; they can, however, be activated in vitro by incubation with culture supernatant fluids from schistosome antigen-stimulated spleen, or lymph node cells harvested from vaccinated guinea-pigs. Naive macrophages activated in this way kill schistosomula in vitro and release the activation markers IL-l and superoxide anion. The macrophage-activating factor (MAF) present in spleen cell culture supernatant fluids has a MW of 35,000-55,000, but does not have the chemical characteristics of gamma-interferon.

  7. The in vitro fungicidal activity of human macrophages against Penicillium marneffei is suppressed by dexamethasone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Tuan; Chen, Renqiong; Li, Xiqing; Lu, Changming; Xi, Liyan

    2015-09-01

    Penicillium marneffei (P. marneffei) is a pathogenic fungus that can persist in macrophages and cause a life-threatening systemic mycosis in immunocompromised hosts. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying this opportunistic fungal infection, we established the co-culture system of P. marneffei conidia and human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) for investigating the interactions between them. And, we impaired the immune state of MDM by the addition of dexamethasone (DEX). Compared with immunocompetent MDM without DEX treatment in response to P. marneffei, DEX could damage MDM function in initiating the innate immune response through decreasing TNF-α production and the proportion of P. marneffei conidia in mature phagolysosomes, while the red pigment secretion by P. marneffei conidia was promoted by DEX following MDM lysis. Our data provide the evidence that DEX-treated MDM have a low fungicidal activity against P. marneffei that causes penicilliosis in immunocompromised hosts.

  8. Amniotic membrane induces apoptosis of interferon-γ activated macrophages in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Wei; He, Hua; Kawakita, Tetsuya; Espana, Edgar M.; Tseng, Scheffer C. G.

    2005-01-01

    Amniotic membrane (AM) used as a temporary or permanent graft for ocular surface reconstruction has a potent anti-inflammatory effect. We would like to investigate the mechanism whereby AM induces macrophage apoptosis in vitro. Mouse macrophages, Raw 264.7 cells, were cultured on plastic, type I collagen, corneal stromal slice or AM stromal matrix in serum-free medium with or without interferon-γ (IFN-γ). Cells were stained by LIVE/DEAD assay, Hoechst-33342, and TUNEL assay for cell death and...

  9. Analysis of alternatives for immobilized low activity waste disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burbank, D.A.

    1997-10-28

    This report presents a study of alternative disposal system architectures and implementation strategies to provide onsite near-surface disposal capacity to receive the immobilized low-activity waste produced by the private vendors. The analysis shows that a flexible unit strategy that provides a suite of design solutions tailored to the characteristics of the immobilized low-activity waste will provide a disposal system that best meets the program goals of reducing the environmental, health, and safety impacts; meeting the schedule milestones; and minimizing the life-cycle cost of the program.

  10. Analysis of alternatives for immobilized low-activity waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents a study of alternative disposal system architectures and implementation strategies to provide onsite near-surface disposal capacity to receive the immobilized low-activity waste produced by the private vendors. The analysis shows that a flexible unit strategy that provides a suite of design solutions tailored to the characteristics of the immobilized low-activity waste will provide a disposal system that best meets the program goals of reducing the environmental, health, and safety impacts; meeting the schedule milestones; and minimizing the life-cycle cost of the program

  11. 巨噬细胞活化综合征%Macrophage Activation Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾华松; 熊小燕

    2007-01-01

    臣噬细胞活化综合征(macrophage activation syndrome,MAS)是由T细胞和巨噬细胞的过度活化及增殖引起的,以发热,肝脾、淋巴结肿大,全血细胞减少,轻至重度肝功能损害,DIC及神经系统受累等为特征的综合征,又被认为继发性或反应性噬血细胞性淋巴组织细胞增多症(hemophagoeytic lymohohistiocytosis,HLH)。MAS是慢性风湿类疾病,尤其是全身型幼年型特发性关节炎(systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis,SJIA)患者中的严重的、潜在危及生命的并发症。SJIA仅占幼年型特发性关节炎(JIA)的10%-20%,然而在JIA的病死患者中却有2/3为SJIA患儿,而MAS又是SJIA的一个主要的病死原因,故正确认识,早期发现,早期治疗MAS,对于降低JIA病死率有着关键性意义。目前国内把MAS作为SJIA的并发症尚未得到足够重视。由于MAS患儿病情重,病死率高,故提高儿科临床医生对MAS的认识已成为当务之急。

  12. Fibroblast Activation Protein Expression by Stromal Cells and Tumor-Associated Macrophages in Human Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julia, Tchou; Zhang Paul, J; Yingtao, Bi; Celine, Satija; Rajrupa, Marjumdar; Stephen, TL; Lo, A; Haiying, Chen; Carolyn, Mies; June, Carl H; Jose, Conejo-Garcia; Ellen, Puré

    2013-01-01

    Summary Fibroblast activation protein (FAP) has long been known to be expressed in the stroma of breast cancer. However, very little is known if the magnitude of FAP expression within the stroma may have prognostic value and reflect the heterogeneous biology of the tumor cell. An earlier study had suggested that stromal FAP expression in breast cancer was inversely proportional to prognosis. We, therefore, hypothesized that stromal FAP expression may correlate with clinicopathologic variables and may serve as an adjunct prognostic factor in breast cancer. We evaluated the expression of FAP in a panel of breast cancer tissues (n=52) using a combination of immunostain analyses at the tissue and single cell level using freshly frozen or freshly digested human breast tumor samples respectively. Our results showed that FAP expression was abundantly expressed in the stroma across all breast cancer subtypes without significant correlation with clinicopathologic factors. We further identified a subset of FAP positive or FAP+ stromal cells that also expressed CD45, a pan-leukocyte marker. Using freshly dissociated human breast tumor specimens (n=5), we demonstrated that some of these FAP+ CD45+ cells were CD11b+CD14+MHC-II+ indicating that they were likely tumor associated macrophages (TAMs). Although FAP+CD45+ cells have been demonstrated in the mouse tumor stroma, our results demonstrating that human breast TAMs expressed FAP was novel and suggested that existing and future FAP directed therapy may have dual therapeutic benefits targeting both stromal mesenchymal cells and immune cells such as TAMs. More work is needed to explore the role of FAP as a potential targetable molecule in breast cancer treatment. PMID:24074532

  13. Macrophages: Regulators of Sex Differences in Asthma?

    OpenAIRE

    Melgert, Barbro N.; Oriss, Timothy B.; Qi, Zengbiao; Dixon-McCarthy, Barbara; Geerlings, Marie; Hylkema, Machteld N.; Ray, Anuradha

    2009-01-01

    Females are more susceptible to development of asthma than are males. In a mouse model of ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation, with aggravated disease in females compared with males, we studied interactions between immune and resident lung cells during asthma development to elucidate which processes are affected by sex. We studied numbers of regulatory T cells (Tregs), effector T cells, myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs), and alternatively activated macrophages (AAMΦ), and their functional capa...

  14. Human monocytes undergo excessive apoptosis following temozolomide activating the ATM/ATR pathway while dendritic cells and macrophages are resistant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Bauer

    Full Text Available Immunodeficiency is a severe therapy-limiting side effect of anticancer chemotherapy resulting from sensitivity of immunocompetent cells to DNA damaging agents. A central role in the immune system is played by monocytes that differentiate into macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs. In this study we compared human monocytes isolated from peripheral blood and cytokine matured macrophages and DCs derived from them and assessed the mechanism of toxicity of the DNA methylating anticancer drug temozolomide (TMZ in these cell populations. We observed that monocytes, but not DCs and macrophages, were highly sensitive to the killing effect of TMZ. Studies on DNA damage and repair revealed that the initial DNA incision was efficient in monocytes while the re-ligation step of base excision repair (BER can not be accomplished, resulting in an accumulation of DNA single-strand breaks (SSBs. Furthermore, monocytes accumulated DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs following TMZ treatment, while DCs and macrophages were able to repair DSBs. Monocytes lack the DNA repair proteins XRCC1, ligase IIIα and PARP-1 whose expression is restored during differentiation into macrophages and DCs following treatment with GM-CSF and GM-CSF plus IL-4, respectively. These proteins play a key role both in BER and DSB repair by B-NHEJ, which explains the accumulation of DNA breaks in monocytes following TMZ treatment. Although TMZ provoked an upregulation of XRCC1 and ligase IIIα, BER was not enhanced likely because PARP-1 was not upregulated. Accordingly, inhibition of PARP-1 did not sensitize monocytes, but monocyte-derived DCs in which strong PARP activation was observed. TMZ induced in monocytes the DNA damage response pathways ATM-Chk2 and ATR-Chk1 resulting in p53 activation. Finally, upon activation of the Fas-receptor and the mitochondrial pathway apoptosis was executed in a caspase-dependent manner. The downregulation of DNA repair in monocytes, resulting in their selective

  15. In Lysinuric Protein Intolerance system y+L activity is defective in monocytes and in GM-CSF-differentiated macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariani Francesca

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the recessive aminoaciduria Lysinuric Protein Intolerance (LPI, mutations of SLC7A7/y+LAT1 impair system y+L transport activity for cationic amino acids. A severe complication of LPI is a form of Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis (PAP, in which alveolar spaces are filled with lipoproteinaceous material because of the impaired surfactant clearance by resident macrophages. The pathogenesis of LPI-associated PAP remains still obscure. The present study investigates for the first time the expression and function of y+LAT1 in monocytes and macrophages isolated from a patient affected by LPI-associated PAP. A comparison with mesenchymal cells from the same subject has been also performed. Methods Monocytes from peripheral blood were isolated from a 21-year-old patient with LPI. Alveolar macrophages and fibroblastic-like mesenchymal cells were obtained from a whole lung lavage (WLL performed on the same patient. System y+L activity was determined measuring the 1-min uptake of [3H]-arginine under discriminating conditions. Gene expression was evaluated through qRT-PCR. Results We have found that: 1 system y+L activity is markedly lowered in monocytes and alveolar macrophages from the LPI patient, because of the prevailing expression of SLC7A7/y+LAT1 in these cells; 2 on the contrary, fibroblasts isolated from the same patient do not display the transport defect due to compensation by the SLC7A6/y+LAT2 isoform; 3 in both normal and LPI monocytes, GM-CSF induces the expression of SLC7A7, suggesting that the gene is a target of the cytokine; 4 GM-CSF-induced differentiation of LPI monocytes is comparable to that of normal cells, demonstrating that GM-CSF signalling is unaltered; 5 general and respiratory conditions of the patient, along with PAP-associated parameters, markedly improved after GM-CSF therapy through aerosolization. Conclusions Monocytes and macrophages, but not fibroblasts, derived from a LPI patient clearly display the

  16. Innate Immune Memory: Activation of Macrophage Killing Ability by Developmental Duties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, David; Tate, Ann Thomas

    2016-06-20

    Innate immune systems in many taxa exhibit hallmarks of memory in response to previous microbial exposure. A new study demonstrates that innate immune memory in Drosophila embryonic macrophages can also be induced by the successful engulfment of apoptotic cells, highlighting the importance of early exposure events for developing responsive immune systems.

  17. Comparison of Two Mice Strains, A/J and C57BL/6, in Caspase-1 Activity and IL-1β Secretion of Macrophage to Mycobacterium leprae Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Jin Kang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A/J mice were found to have amino acid differences in Naip5, one of the NOD-like receptors (NLRs involved in the cytosolic recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns and one of the adaptor proteins for caspase-1 activation. This defect was associated with a susceptibility to Legionella infection, suggesting an important role for Naip5 in the immune response also to other intracellular pathogens, such as Mycobacterium leprae. In this study, the immune responses of macrophages from A/J mice against M. leprae were compared to those of macrophages from C57BL/6 mice. Infection with M. leprae induced high levels of TNF-α production and NF-κB activation in A/J and C57BL/6 macrophages. Caspase-1 activation and IL-1β secretion were also induced in both macrophages. However, macrophages from A/J mice exhibited reduced caspase-1 activation and IL-1β secretion compared to C57BL/6 macrophages. These results suggest that NLR family proteins may have a role in the innate immune response to M. leprae.

  18. Effect of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α on Acyl Coenzyme A: Cholesteryl Acyltransferase Activity and ACAT1 Gene Expression in THP-1 Macrophages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Ping; CHENG Bei; WANG Yi; WANG Hongxing

    2007-01-01

    In order to explore the effect and mechanisms of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) on the activity of the acyl coenzyme A: cholesteryl acyltransferase (ACAT), THP-1 monocytes were cultured and induced to differentiate into macrophages with phorbol ester. TNF-α (60 ng/mL) was added at different time points into the macrophage-containing medium and the ACAT enzyme activity was measured by quantifying the incorporation of [1-14C] oleoyl CoA into cholesteryl esters. The expression of ACAT-1 protein and mRNA was respectively detected by Western blotting and RT-PCR in THP-1 macrophages 24 h after treatment with TNF-α (60 ng/mL). The results indicated that ACAT activity in THP-1 macrophages treated with TNF-α was increased in a time-dependent manner. The expression levels of ACAT-1 protein and mRNA were significantly increased in THP-1 macrophages after treatment with TNF-α (P<0.05). It was suggested that TNF-α could increase the activity of ACAT in THP-1 macrophages by up-regulating the expression of ACAT-1 gene.

  19. In vivo inhibition of c-MYC in myeloid cells impairs tumor-associated macrophage maturation and pro-tumoral activities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar M Pello

    Full Text Available Although tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs are involved in tumor growth and metastasis, the mechanisms controlling their pro-tumoral activities remain largely unknown. The transcription factor c-MYC has been recently shown to regulate in vitro human macrophage polarization and be expressed in macrophages infiltrating human tumors. In this study, we exploited the predominant expression of LysM in myeloid cells to generate c-Myc(fl/fl LysM(cre/+ mice, which lack c-Myc in macrophages, to investigate the role of macrophage c-MYC expression in cancer. Under steady-state conditions, immune system parameters in c-Myc(fl/fl LysM(cre/+ mice appeared normal, including the abundance of different subsets of bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells, precursors and circulating cells, macrophage density, and immune organ structure. In a model of melanoma, however, TAMs lacking c-Myc displayed a delay in maturation and showed an attenuation of pro-tumoral functions (e.g., reduced expression of VEGF, MMP9, and HIF1α that was associated with impaired tissue remodeling and angiogenesis and limited tumor growth in c-Myc(fl/fl LysM(cre/+ mice. Macrophage c-Myc deletion also diminished fibrosarcoma growth. These data identify c-Myc as a positive regulator of the pro-tumoral program of TAMs and suggest c-Myc inactivation as an attractive target for anti-cancer therapy.

  20. Diagnostic value of macrophage activity MRI in rat model of multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the value of macrophage activity imaging (MAI) in the diagnosis of brain and spinal cord lesions in rat model of multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods: Twenty LEW rats were divided into 15 model rats and 5 control rats. MS animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) was induced by the injection of peptide 35-55 of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG35-55), MRI was performed on the third day of the acute stage of disease. The brain and spinal cord of' rats were scanned by 3.0 T MR scanner (Siemens Trio Tim) with quadrature wrist joint coil. The T2W and T1W images, Gadolinium enhanced T1W images in 3D volume were obtained respectively. The MAI were obtained at 24 hours after intravenous injection of ultra small superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) as contrast medium on T2WI. The workstation with special software was used for the reconstruction images of brain and spinal cord of rat in multiple orientations. Results: Fifteen MOG3555-EAE rats model of' MS were successfully induced. The great majority lesions of central nervous system in acute stage were located in the brain (58/63) and less in the spinal cord (5/63). The main manifestation of EAE lesions presented was hyperintensity on T2WI and hypointensity on T1WI, and some lesions had enhancement after Gd-DTPA injection. The EAE lesions presented as hypointensity on MAI images, but some of them were found to be isointensity on T2WI. The enhancement pattern was discrepant between USPIO and Gd-DTPA. The sensitivity of depicting lesions of MOG35-55-EAE rat at acute stage were higher on T2WI (14/15) and MAI (13/15), and the detection rate was 100% (15/15) if they were combined. Gd-DTPA enhanced T1WI had a lower sensitivity (7/15). All the MAI findings were negative in the control rats. Conclusions: MAI can complement the drawback of conventional MRI techniques by continuously monitoring the inflammatory activity of EAE lesions, and it could raise the detection rate of EAE

  1. Increased expression of the interleukin-8 gene by alveolar macrophages in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. A potential mechanism for the recruitment and activation of neutrophils in lung fibrosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Carré, P C; Mortenson, R L; King, T. E.; Noble, P W; Sable, C L; Riches, D W

    1991-01-01

    Neutrophil migration into the airspaces of the lung is thought to contribute to the alveolar damage and subsequent fibrosis in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Interleukin 8 (IL-8), a monocyte- and macrophage-derived cytokine, displays potent chemotactic and activating properties towards neutrophils and thus may contribute to the pathogenesis of IPF. The objective of this investigation was to quantify the spontaneous expression of IL-8 transcripts by alveolar macrophages from normal healt...

  2. Exosomes Derived from M. Bovis BCG Infected Macrophages Activate Antigen-Specific CD4+ and CD8+ T Cells In Vitro and In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Giri, Pramod K.; Schorey, Jeffrey S.

    2008-01-01

    Activation of both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells is required for an effective immune response to an M. tuberculosis infection. However, infected macrophages are poor antigen presenting cells and may be spatially separated from recruited T cells, thus limiting antigen presentation within a granuloma. Our previous studies showed that infected macrophages release from cells small membrane-bound vesicles called exosomes which contain mycobacterial lipid components and showed that these exosomes could...

  3. Attenuated Leishmania induce pro-inflammatory mediators and influence leishmanicidal activity by p38 MAPK dependent phagosome maturation in Leishmania donovani co-infected macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Somenath Banerjee; Dipayan Bose; Nabanita Chatterjee; Subhadip Das; Sreeparna Chakraborty; Tanya Das; Krishna Das Saha

    2016-01-01

    Promastigote form of Leishmania, an intracellular pathogen, delays phagosome maturation and resides inside macrophages. But till date limited study has been done to manipulate the phagosomal machinery of macrophages to restrict Leishmania growth. Attenuated Leishmania strain exposed RAW 264.7 cells showed a respiratory burst and enhanced production of pro-inflammatory mediators. The augmentation of pro-inflammatory activity is mostly attributed to p38 MAPK and p44/42 MAPK. In our study, these...

  4. Alternative interpretation for the active zones of Cuba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Mario Octavio Cotilla

    2014-11-01

    An alternative explanation to the seismoactivity of Cuban faults is presented. The model is a consequence of the interaction between Caribbean and North American plates. It is made with 12 geodynamic cells form by a set of 13 active faults and their 14 areas of intersection. These cells are recognized morpho-structural blocks. The area between Eastern Matanzas and Western Cauto-Nipe is excluded because of the low level of seismic information. Cuba has two types of seismogenetic structures: faults and intersection of faults.

  5. Enzyme activities in agricultural soils fumigated with methyl bromide alternatives

    OpenAIRE

    Klose, Susanne; Ajwa, H A

    2004-01-01

    Pre-plant fumigation of agricultural soils with a combination of methyl bromide (MeBr) and chloropicrin (CP) to control nematodes, soil-borne pathogens and weeds has been a common practice in strawberry (Fragaria X ananassa Duchesne) production since the 1960s. MeBr will be phased out by 2005, but little is known about the impacts of alternative fumigants on soil microbial processes. We investigated the response of microbial biomass and enzyme activities in soils fumigated over two years with...

  6. Novel keto-phospholipids are generated by monocytes and macrophages, detected in cystic fibrosis, and activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Victoria J; Morgan, Alwena H; Lauder, Sarah; Thomas, Christopher P; Brown, Sarah; Freeman, Bruce A; Lloyd, Clare M; Davies, Jane; Bush, Andrew; Levonen, Anna-Liisa; Kansanen, Emilia; Villacorta, Luis; Chen, Y Eugene; Porter, Ned; Garcia-Diaz, Yoel M; Schopfer, Francisco J; O'Donnell, Valerie B

    2012-12-01

    12/15-Lipoxygenases (LOXs) in monocytes and macrophages generate novel phospholipid-esterified eicosanoids. Here, we report the generation of two additional families of related lipids comprising 15-ketoeicosatetraenoic acid (KETE) attached to four phosphatidylethanolamines (PEs). The lipids are generated basally by 15-LOX in IL-4-stimulated monocytes, are elevated on calcium mobilization, and are detected at increased levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from cystic fibrosis patients (3.6 ng/ml of lavage). Murine peritoneal macrophages generate 12-KETE-PEs, which are absent in 12/15-LOX-deficient mice. Inhibition of 15-prostaglandin dehydrogenase prevents their formation from exogenous 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid-PE in human monocytes. Both human and murine cells also generated analogous hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid-PEs. The electrophilic reactivity of KETE-PEs is shown by their Michael addition to glutathione and cysteine. Lastly, both 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid-PE and 15-KETE-PE activated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ reporter activity in macrophages in a dose-dependent manner. In summary, we demonstrate novel peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ-activating oxidized phospholipids generated enzymatically by LOX and 15-prostaglandin dehydrogenase in primary monocytic cells and in a human Th2-related lung disease. The lipids are a new family of bioactive mediators from the 12/15-LOX pathway that may contribute to its known anti-inflammatory actions in vivo. PMID:23060450

  7. High density lipoprotein suppresses lipoprotein associated phospholipase A2 in human monocytes-derived macrophages through peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Guan-ping; REN Jing-yi; QIN Li; SONG Jun-xian; WANG Lan; CHEN Hong

    2012-01-01

    Background Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) is mainly secreted by macrophages,serving as a specific marker of atherosclerotic plaque and exerting pro-atherogenic effects.It is known that high-density lipoprotein (HDL) plays an important role against atherosclerosis by inhibiting pro-inflammatory factors,however,the relationship between HDL and Lp-PLA2 remains elusive.Methods In this study,reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR),Western blotting,and a platelet-activating factor (PAF) acetylhydrolase assay were performed to determine the Lp-PLA2 mRNA level,protein expression and activity in human monocyte-derived macrophages upon HDL treatment of different concentrations and durations.To investigate the underlying mechanism of HDL-induced Lp-PLA2 action,pioglitazone,a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-y (PPARy) ligand,was introduced to human monocyte-derived macrophages and mRNA and protein levels of Lp-PLA2,as well as its activity,were determined.Results Lp-PLA2 mRNA levels,protein expression and activity were significantly inhibited in response to HDL treatment in a dose and time dependent manner in human monocyte-derived macrophages.Pioglitazone treatment (1-10 ng/ml) upregulated the Lp-PLA2 mRNA level,protein expression and activity in human monocyte-derived macrophages,while the effects were markedly reversed by HDL.In addition,pioglitazone resulted in a significant increase in PPARY phosphorylation in human monocyte-derived macrophages,which could be inhibited by HDL.Conclusion These findings indicate that HDL suppresses the expression and activity of Lp-PLA2 in human monocyte-derived macrophages,and the underlying mechanisms may be mediated through the PPARY pathway.

  8. Thromboxane A2 receptor antagonist SQ29548 reduces ischemic stroke-induced microglia/macrophages activation and enrichment, and ameliorates brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Aijuan; Zhang, Tingting; Yang, Xiao; Shao, Jiaxiang; Fu, Ningzhen; Shen, Fanxia; Fu, Yi; Xia, Weiliang

    2016-01-01

    Thromboxane A2 receptor (TXA2R) activation is thought to be involved in thrombosis/hemostasis and inflammation responses. We have previously shown that TXA2R antagonist SQ29548 attenuates BV2 microglia activation by suppression of ERK pathway, but its effect is not tested in vivo. The present study aims to explore the role of TXA2R on microglia/macrophages activation after ischemia/reperfusion brain injury in mice. Adult male ICR mice underwent 90-min transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO). Immediately and 24 h after reperfusion, SQ29548 was administered twice to the ipsilateral ventricle (10 μl, 2.6 μmol/ml, per dose). Cerebral infarction volume, inflammatory cytokines release and microglia/macrophages activation were measured using the cresyl violet method, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), and immunofluorescence double staining, respectively. Expression of TXA2R was significantly increased in the ipsilateral brain tissue after ischemia/reperfusion, which was also found to co-localize with activated microglia/macrophages in the infarct area. Administration of SQ29548 inhibited microglia/macrophages activation and enrichment, including both M1 and M2 phenotypes, and attenuated ischemia-induced IL-1ß, IL-6, and TNF-α up-regulation and iNOS release. TXA2R antagonist SQ29548 inhibited ischemia-induced inflammatory response and furthermore reduced microglia/macrophages activation and ischemic/reperfusion brain injury. PMID:27775054

  9. Pancreatic Acinar Cells Employ miRNAs as Mediators of Intercellular Communication to Participate in the Regulation of Pancreatitis-Associated Macrophage Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yong; Wang, Hao; Lu, Ming; Qiao, Xin; Sun, Bei; Zhang, Weihui; Xue, Dongbo

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage activation plays an important role in the inflammatory response in acute pancreatitis. In the present study, the activation of AR42J pancreatic acinar cells was induced by taurolithocholate treatment. The results showed that the culture medium from the activated AR42J cells significantly enhanced NFκB activation in the macrophages compared to that without taurolithocholate treatment. Additionally, the precipitates obtained from ultracentrifugation of the culture media that were rich in exosomes were markedly more potent in activating macrophages compared with the supernatant fraction lacking exosomes. The results indicated that the mediators carried by the exosomes played important roles in macrophage activation. Exosomal miRNAs were extracted and examined using microarrays. A total of 115 differentially expressed miRNAs were identified, and 30 showed upregulated expression, while 85 displayed downregulated expression. Target genes of the differentially expressed miRNAs were predicted using TargetScan, MiRanda, and PicTar software programs. The putative target genes were subjected to KEGG functional analysis. The functions of the target genes were primarily enriched in MAPK pathways. Specifically, the target genes regulated macrophage activation through the TRAF6-TAB2-TAK1-NIK/IKK-NFκB pathway. As the mediators of signal transduction, miRNAs and their predicted target mRNAs regulate every step in the MAPK pathway. PMID:27546996

  10. Verçenik Plateau Alternative Tourism and Recreational Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İzzet İSLAMOĞLU

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In the last century working life become easier and result of this increased people free time, after that interest of tourism activities wide spread all over. Plateau tourism or highland places are not first choices of the tourism activities but plateau rec reation will give an application for potential activity place. Turkey have unmatched nature and rich environmental resources will able to give any kind of tourism activities. In that context city of Rize took place in Black Sea region with different capabi lities, one of the source areas that make up tourism and recreational activities. This research intended for Vercenik Plateau take place 60 km away from Camlihemsin district center and will determine potential tourism and recreational application. Research is based on field observation and studies. This information obtained as a result ofthis evaluationbeing associated toliterature data and that information determined which exercise can be done in the field. Vercenik Plateau; with pristine environment and ru ral locations, the fresh water supplies, unique flora for city of Rize has high recreational capacities.As a result of study; Vercenik Plateau has natural features with the great potential of the alternative tourism as it is suitable for areas but not asse ss enough potential tourism and recreational activities without prior review has been observed.

  11. Complement alternative pathway activation in human nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip M Segers

    Full Text Available The innate immune system plays a major role in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH. Recently we reported complement activation in human NASH. However, it remained unclear whether the alternative pathway of complement, which amplifies C3 activation and which is frequently associated with pathological complement activation leading to disease, was involved. Here, alternative pathway components were investigated in liver biopsies of obese subjects with healthy livers (n = 10 or with NASH (n = 12 using quantitative PCR, Western blotting, and immunofluorescence staining. Properdin accumulated in areas where neutrophils surrounded steatotic hepatocytes, and colocalized with the C3 activation product C3c. C3 activation status as expressed by the C3c/native C3 ratio was 2.6-fold higher (p<0.01 in subjects with NASH despite reduced native C3 concentrations (0.94±0.12 vs. 0.57±0.09; p<0.01. Hepatic properdin levels positively correlated with levels of C3c (rs = 0.69; p<0.05 and C3c/C3 activation ratio (rs = 0.59; p<0.05. C3c, C3 activation status (C3c/C3 ratio and properdin levels increased with higher lobular inflammation scores as determined according to the Kleiner classification (C3c: p<0.01, C3c/C3 ratio: p<0.05, properdin: p<0.05. Hepatic mRNA expression of factor B and factor D did not differ between subjects with healthy livers and subjects with NASH (factor B: 1.00±0.19 vs. 0.71±0.07, p = 0.26; factor D: 1.00±0.21 vs. 0.66±0.14, p = 0.29;. Hepatic mRNA and protein levels of Decay Accelerating Factor tended to be increased in subjects with NASH (mRNA: 1.00±0.14 vs. 2.37±0.72; p = 0.22; protein: 0.51±0.11 vs. 1.97±0.67; p = 0.28. In contrast, factor H mRNA was downregulated in patients with NASH (1.00±0.09 vs. 0.71±0.06; p<0.05 and a similar trend was observed with hepatic protein levels (1.12±0.16 vs. 0.78±0.07; p = 0.08. Collectively, these data suggest a role for alternative

  12. The Orosomucoid 1 protein is involved in the vitamin D – mediated macrophage de-activation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gemelli, Claudia, E-mail: claudia.gemelli@unimore.it [Department of Life Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Via Campi 287, 41125 Modena (Italy); Center for Regenerative Medicine, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Via Gottardi 100, 41125 Modena (Italy); Martello, Andrea; Montanari, Monica; Zanocco Marani, Tommaso; Salsi, Valentina; Zappavigna, Vincenzo; Parenti, Sandra; Vignudelli, Tatiana; Selmi, Tommaso; Ferrari, Sergio; Grande, Alexis [Department of Life Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Via Campi 287, 41125 Modena (Italy)

    2013-12-10

    Orosomucoid 1 (ORM1), also named Alpha 1 acid glycoprotein A (AGP-A), is an abundant plasma protein characterized by anti-inflammatory and immune-modulating properties. The present study was designed to identify a possible correlation between ORM1 and Vitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3), a hormone exerting a widespread effect on cell proliferation, differentiation and regulation of the immune system. In particular, the data described here indicated that ORM1 is a 1,25(OH)2D3 primary response gene, characterized by the presence of a VDRE element inside the 1 kb sequence of its proximal promoter region. This finding was demonstrated with gene expression studies, Chromatin Immunoprecipitation and luciferase transactivation experiments and confirmed by VDR full length and dominant negative over-expression. In addition, several experiments carried out in human normal monocytes demonstrated that the 1,25(OH)2D3 – VDR – ORM1 pathway plays a functional role inside the macrophage de-activation process and that ORM1 may be considered as a signaling molecule involved in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis and remodeling. - Highlights: • ORM1 is a Vitamin D primary response gene. • VD and its receptor VDR are involved in the de-activation process mediated by human resident macrophages. • The signaling pathway VD-VDR-ORM1 plays an important role in the control of macrophage de-activation process. • ORM1 may be defined as a signaling molecule implicated in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis and remodeling.

  13. The Orosomucoid 1 protein is involved in the vitamin D – mediated macrophage de-activation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orosomucoid 1 (ORM1), also named Alpha 1 acid glycoprotein A (AGP-A), is an abundant plasma protein characterized by anti-inflammatory and immune-modulating properties. The present study was designed to identify a possible correlation between ORM1 and Vitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3), a hormone exerting a widespread effect on cell proliferation, differentiation and regulation of the immune system. In particular, the data described here indicated that ORM1 is a 1,25(OH)2D3 primary response gene, characterized by the presence of a VDRE element inside the 1 kb sequence of its proximal promoter region. This finding was demonstrated with gene expression studies, Chromatin Immunoprecipitation and luciferase transactivation experiments and confirmed by VDR full length and dominant negative over-expression. In addition, several experiments carried out in human normal monocytes demonstrated that the 1,25(OH)2D3 – VDR – ORM1 pathway plays a functional role inside the macrophage de-activation process and that ORM1 may be considered as a signaling molecule involved in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis and remodeling. - Highlights: • ORM1 is a Vitamin D primary response gene. • VD and its receptor VDR are involved in the de-activation process mediated by human resident macrophages. • The signaling pathway VD-VDR-ORM1 plays an important role in the control of macrophage de-activation process. • ORM1 may be defined as a signaling molecule implicated in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis and remodeling

  14. Importance of sulfate groups for the macrophage-stimulating activities of ascophyllan isolated from the brown alga Ascophyllum nodosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zedong; Ueno, Mikinori; Nishiguchi, Tomoki; Abu, Ryogo; Isaka, Shogo; Okimura, Takasi; Yamaguchi, Kenichi; Oda, Tatsuya

    2013-10-18

    To investigate the role of sulfate groups on the macrophage-stimulating activities of ascophyllan, we prepared desulfated ascophyllan, and its effects on RAW264.7 cells were compared with native ascophyllan. The chemical structural analysis revealed that nearly 21% of sulfate groups of ascophyllan were removed by desulfation reaction, while no significant changes in the molecular mass and monosaccharide composition occurred after desulfation. NO- and cytokine- (TNF-α and G-CSF) inducing activities of the desulfated ascophyllan on RAW264.7 cells were significantly decreased as compared to native ascophyllan. Furthermore, the activity of desulfated ascophyllan to induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation from RAW264.7 cells decreased to almost negligible level. Our results suggest that the level of sulfate groups of ascophyllan is an important structural element responsible for the macrophage-stimulating activities. Probably, even the limited removal of sulfate residues sensitive to desulfation reaction may result in significant decrease in the bioactivities of ascophyllan. PMID:24025707

  15. Dehydrodiisoeugenol, an isoeugenol dimer, inhibits lipopolysaccharide-stimulated nuclear factor kappa B activation and cyclooxygenase-2 expression in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Yukio; Shoji, Masao; Hirata, Atsushi; Tanaka, Shoji; Yokoe, Ichiro; Fujisawa, Seiichiro

    2005-02-15

    o-Methoxyphenols such as eugenol and isoeugenol exhibit anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities, but at higher concentrations act as oxidants and potent allergens. We recently demonstrated the eugenol dimer bis-eugenol to be an efficient inhibitor of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory cytokine expression in macrophages without cytotoxicity. This result suggested that dimer compound of o-methoxyphenols may possess anti-inflammatory activity. Thus, we further synthesized dehydrodiisoeugenol and alpha-diisoeugenol from isoeugenols, and investigated whether these dimers could inhibit LPS-stimulated nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) activation and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 gene expression, both of which are closely involved in inflammation and mutagenesis. The expression of the COX-2 gene was strongly inhibited by dehydrodiisoeugenol in RAW264.7 murine macrophages stimulated with LPS. In contrast, isoeugenol and alpha-diisoeugenol did not inhibit it. Dehydrodiisoeugenol also significantly inhibited LPS-stimulated phosphorylation-dependent proteolysis of inhibitor kappaB-alpha and transcriptional activity of NF-kappaB in the cells. These findings suggest that dehydrodiisoeugenol acts as a potent anti-inflammatory agent.

  16. Protocatechuic Acid Prevents oxLDL-Induced Apoptosis by Activating JNK/Nrf2 Survival Signals in Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varì, Rosaria; Scazzocchio, Beatrice; Santangelo, Carmela; Filesi, Carmelina; Galvano, Fabio; D'Archivio, Massimo; Masella, Roberta; Giovannini, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Protocatechuic acid (PCA), one of the main metabolites of complex polyphenols, exerts numerous biological activities including antiapoptotic, anti-inflammatory, and antiatherosclerotic effects. Oxidised LDL have atherogenic properties by damaging arterial wall cells and inducing p53-dependent apoptosis in macrophages. This study was aimed at defining the molecular mechanism responsible for the protective effects of PCA against oxidative and proapoptotic damage exerted by oxLDL in J774 A.1 macrophages. We found that the presence of PCA in cells treated with oxLDL completely inhibited the p53-dependent apoptosis induced by oxLDL. PCA decreased oxLDL-induced ROS overproduction and in particular prevented the early increase of ROS. This decrease seemed to be the main signal responsible for maintaining the intracellular redox homeostasis hindering the activation of p53 induced by ROS, p38MAPK, and PKCδ. Consequently the overexpression of the proapoptotic p53-target genes such as p66Shc protein did not occur. Finally, we demonstrated that PCA induced the activation of JNK, which, in turn, determined the increase of nuclear Nrf2, leading to inhibition of the early ROS overproduction. We concluded that the antiapoptotic mechanism of PCA was most likely related to the activation of the JNK-mediated survival signals that strengthen the cellular antioxidant defences rather than to the PCA antioxidant power. PMID:26180584

  17. Protocatechuic Acid Prevents oxLDL-Induced Apoptosis by Activating JNK/Nrf2 Survival Signals in Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosaria Varì

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Protocatechuic acid (PCA, one of the main metabolites of complex polyphenols, exerts numerous biological activities including antiapoptotic, anti-inflammatory, and antiatherosclerotic effects. Oxidised LDL have atherogenic properties by damaging arterial wall cells and inducing p53-dependent apoptosis in macrophages. This study was aimed at defining the molecular mechanism responsible for the protective effects of PCA against oxidative and proapoptotic damage exerted by oxLDL in J774 A.1 macrophages. We found that the presence of PCA in cells treated with oxLDL completely inhibited the p53-dependent apoptosis induced by oxLDL. PCA decreased oxLDL-induced ROS overproduction and in particular prevented the early increase of ROS. This decrease seemed to be the main signal responsible for maintaining the intracellular redox homeostasis hindering the activation of p53 induced by ROS, p38MAPK, and PKCδ. Consequently the overexpression of the proapoptotic p53-target genes such as p66Shc protein did not occur. Finally, we demonstrated that PCA induced the activation of JNK, which, in turn, determined the increase of nuclear Nrf2, leading to inhibition of the early ROS overproduction. We concluded that the antiapoptotic mechanism of PCA was most likely related to the activation of the JNK-mediated survival signals that strengthen the cellular antioxidant defences rather than to the PCA antioxidant power.

  18. Anti-inflammatory effects of five commercially available mushroom species determined in lipopolysaccharide and interferon-γ activated murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawardena, Dhanushka; Bennett, Louise; Shanmugam, Kirubakaran; King, Kerryn; Williams, Roderick; Zabaras, Dimitrios; Head, Richard; Ooi, Lezanne; Gyengesi, Erika; Münch, Gerald

    2014-04-01

    Inflammation is a well-known contributing factor to many age-related chronic diseases. One of the possible strategies to suppress inflammation is the employment of functional foods with anti-inflammatory properties. Edible mushrooms are attracting more and more attention as functional foods since they are rich in bioactive compounds, but their anti-inflammatory properties and the effect of food processing steps on this activity has not been systematically investigated. In the present study, White Button and Honey Brown (both Agaricus bisporus), Shiitake (Lentinus edodes), Enoki (Flammulina velutipes) and Oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus) preparations were tested for their anti-inflammatory activity in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) activated murine RAW 264.7 macrophages. Potent anti-inflammatory activity (IC₅₀portion of the anti-inflammatory activity was lost suggesting that the anti-inflammatory compounds might be susceptible to heating or prone to evaporation. PMID:24262531

  19. Activation of AMPA receptor promotes TNF-α release via the ROS-cSrc-NFκB signaling cascade in RAW264.7 macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relationship between glutamate signaling and inflammation has not been well defined. This study aimed to investigate the role of AMPA receptor (AMPAR) in the expression and release of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) from macrophages and the underlying mechanisms. A series of approaches, including confocal microscopy, immunofluorescency, flow cytometry, ELISA and Western blotting, were used to estimate the expression of AMPAR and downstream signaling molecules, TNF-α release and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in the macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells. The results demonstrated that AMPAR was expressed in RAW264.7 cells. AMPA significantly enhanced TNF-α release from RAW264.7 cells, and this effect was abolished by CNQX (AMPAR antagonist). AMPA also induced elevation of ROS production, phosphorylation of c-Src and activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB in RAW264.7 cells. Blocking c-Src by PP2, scavenging ROS by glutathione (GSH) or inhibiting NF-κB activation by pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) decreased TNF-α production from RAW264.7 cells. We concluded that AMPA promotes TNF-α release in RAW264.7 macrophages likely through the following signaling cascade: AMPAR activation → ROS generation → c-Src phosphorylation → NF-κB activation → TNF-α elevation. The study suggests that AMPAR may participate in macrophage activation and inflammation. - Highlights: • AMPAR is expressed in RAW264.7 macrophages and is upregulated by AMPA stimulation. • Activation of AMPAR stimulates TNF-α release in macrophages through the ROS-cSrc-NFκB signaling cascade. • Macrophage AMPAR signaling may play an important role in inflammation

  20. Activation of AMPA receptor promotes TNF-α release via the ROS-cSrc-NFκB signaling cascade in RAW264.7 macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Xiu-Li [Department of Physiology, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, School of Basic Medicine, Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Ding, Fan [Office of Scientific R& D, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Li, Hui; Tan, Xiao-Qiu [Department of Physiology, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, School of Basic Medicine, Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Liu, Xiao [Department of Pathophysiology, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, School of Basic Medicine, Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Cao, Ji-Min, E-mail: caojimin@126.com [Department of Physiology, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, School of Basic Medicine, Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Gao, Xue, E-mail: longlongnose@163.com [Department of Pathophysiology, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, School of Basic Medicine, Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China)

    2015-05-29

    The relationship between glutamate signaling and inflammation has not been well defined. This study aimed to investigate the role of AMPA receptor (AMPAR) in the expression and release of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) from macrophages and the underlying mechanisms. A series of approaches, including confocal microscopy, immunofluorescency, flow cytometry, ELISA and Western blotting, were used to estimate the expression of AMPAR and downstream signaling molecules, TNF-α release and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in the macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells. The results demonstrated that AMPAR was expressed in RAW264.7 cells. AMPA significantly enhanced TNF-α release from RAW264.7 cells, and this effect was abolished by CNQX (AMPAR antagonist). AMPA also induced elevation of ROS production, phosphorylation of c-Src and activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB in RAW264.7 cells. Blocking c-Src by PP2, scavenging ROS by glutathione (GSH) or inhibiting NF-κB activation by pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) decreased TNF-α production from RAW264.7 cells. We concluded that AMPA promotes TNF-α release in RAW264.7 macrophages likely through the following signaling cascade: AMPAR activation → ROS generation → c-Src phosphorylation → NF-κB activation → TNF-α elevation. The study suggests that AMPAR may participate in macrophage activation and inflammation. - Highlights: • AMPAR is expressed in RAW264.7 macrophages and is upregulated by AMPA stimulation. • Activation of AMPAR stimulates TNF-α release in macrophages through the ROS-cSrc-NFκB signaling cascade. • Macrophage AMPAR signaling may play an important role in inflammation.

  1. Short Communication: Activating Stimuli Enhance Immunotoxin-Mediated Killing of HIV-Infected Macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Marsden, Matthew D.; Xu, Jie; Hamer, Dean; Zack, Jerome A.

    2008-01-01

    Strategies for purging persistent reservoirs in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals may be enhanced by including agents that specifically kill virus-expressing cells. Anti-HIV envelope immunotoxins (ITs) represent one class of candidate molecules that could fulfill this function. We have previously utilized an anti-gp120 IT in conjunction with various stimulants to kill latently infected T cells ex vivo. Here we show that primary macrophages expressing HIV Env are relative...

  2. Cellular Accumulation and Activity of Quinolones in Ciprofloxacin-Resistant J774 Macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Michot, Jean-Michel; Heremans, Marie F.; Caceres, Nancy E; Mingeot-Leclercq, Marie-Paule; Tulkens, Paul M.; Van Bambeke, Françoise

    2006-01-01

    Ciprofloxacin is the substrate for a multidrug resistance-related protein (MRP)-like multidrug transporter in J774 mouse macrophages, which also modestly affects levofloxacin but only marginally affects garenoxacin and moxifloxacin (J.-M. Michot et al., Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 49:2429-2437, 2005). Two clones of ciprofloxacin-resistant cells were obtained by a stepwise increase in drug concentration (from 34 to 51 to 68 mg/liter) in the culture fluid. Compared to wild-type cells, ciprofl...

  3. Active efflux of ciprofloxacin from J774 macrophages through an MRP-like transporter

    OpenAIRE

    Michot, Jean-Michel; Van Bambeke, Françoise; Mingeot-Leclercq, Marie-Paule; Tulkens, Paul M.

    2004-01-01

    The accumulation and efflux kinetics of ciprofloxacin have been examined by using murine J774 macrophages. Accumulation (at equilibrium) was increased (three- to fourfold) (i) when cells were incubated with high extracellular drug concentrations (typically 200 mg/liter) as opposed to clinically meaningful concentrations (10 mg/liter or lower), (ii) during ATP- depletion and at acid pH, and (iii) during coincubation with probenecid, gemfibrozil and the preferential multidrug resistance-related...

  4. Neotuberostemonine attenuates bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis by suppressing the recruitment and activation of macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Juan; Cheng, Si; Feng, Tianlong; Wu, Yan; Xie, Weina; Zhang, Mian; Xu, Xianghong; Zhang, Chaofeng

    2016-07-01

    Neotuberostemonine (NTS) is one of the main antitussive alkaloids in the root of Stemona tuberosa Lour. This study aimed to investigate the effects of NTS on bleomycin (BLM)-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice and the underlying mechanism. After BLM administration, NTS were orally administered to mice at 20 and 40mg/kg per day from days 8 to 21, with nintedanib as a positive control. The effect of NTS on BLM-induced mice was assessed via histopathological examination by HE and Masson's trichrome staining, TGF-β1 level and macrophage recruitment by immunohistochemical staining, expression of profibrotic media and M1/M2 polarization by western blot. RAW 264.7 cells were used to evaluate whether NTS (1, 10, 100μM) directly affected macrophages. The results revealed that NTS treatment significantly ameliorated lung histopathological changes and decreased inflammatory cell counts in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. The over-expression of collagen, α-SMA and TGF-β1 was reduced by NTS. Furthermore, NTS markedly lowered the expression of MMP-2 and TIMP-1 while raised the expression of MMP-9. A further analysis showed that NTS was able to decrease the recruitment of macrophages and to inhibit the M2 polarization in mice lung tissues. The experiment in vitro showed that NTS significantly reduced the arginase-1 (marker for M2) expression in a dose-dependent manner but down-regulated the iNOS (marker for M1) expression only at 100μM. In conclusion, our study demonstrated for the first time that NTS has a significant protective effect on BLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis through suppressing the recruitment and M2 polarization of macrophages. PMID:27144994

  5. Neotuberostemonine attenuates bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis by suppressing the recruitment and activation of macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Juan; Cheng, Si; Feng, Tianlong; Wu, Yan; Xie, Weina; Zhang, Mian; Xu, Xianghong; Zhang, Chaofeng

    2016-07-01

    Neotuberostemonine (NTS) is one of the main antitussive alkaloids in the root of Stemona tuberosa Lour. This study aimed to investigate the effects of NTS on bleomycin (BLM)-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice and the underlying mechanism. After BLM administration, NTS were orally administered to mice at 20 and 40mg/kg per day from days 8 to 21, with nintedanib as a positive control. The effect of NTS on BLM-induced mice was assessed via histopathological examination by HE and Masson's trichrome staining, TGF-β1 level and macrophage recruitment by immunohistochemical staining, expression of profibrotic media and M1/M2 polarization by western blot. RAW 264.7 cells were used to evaluate whether NTS (1, 10, 100μM) directly affected macrophages. The results revealed that NTS treatment significantly ameliorated lung histopathological changes and decreased inflammatory cell counts in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. The over-expression of collagen, α-SMA and TGF-β1 was reduced by NTS. Furthermore, NTS markedly lowered the expression of MMP-2 and TIMP-1 while raised the expression of MMP-9. A further analysis showed that NTS was able to decrease the recruitment of macrophages and to inhibit the M2 polarization in mice lung tissues. The experiment in vitro showed that NTS significantly reduced the arginase-1 (marker for M2) expression in a dose-dependent manner but down-regulated the iNOS (marker for M1) expression only at 100μM. In conclusion, our study demonstrated for the first time that NTS has a significant protective effect on BLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis through suppressing the recruitment and M2 polarization of macrophages.

  6. Soluble surface proteins from Helicobacter pylori activate monocytes/macrophages by lipopolysaccharide-independent mechanism.

    OpenAIRE

    Mai, U E; Perez-Perez, G I; Wahl, L. M.; Wahl, S M; Blaser, M J; Smith, P. D.

    1991-01-01

    The inflammatory lesions associated with Helicobacter pylori gastritis and duodenitis contain large numbers of mononuclear cells. The close proximity of H. pylori to gastric mucosa suggests that the organism interacts with mononuclear cells, thereby modulating the inflammatory response. To investigate the role of monocytes/macrophages in this response, we examined the effect of whole H. pylori bacteria, H. pylori surface proteins, and H. pylori lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on purified human monoc...

  7. Roles of Cytoplasmic Phospholipase in Expression of the Antimicrobial Activity of Host Macrophages against Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    OpenAIRE

    佐野, 千晶; Yasumoto, Ko; 多田納, 豊; 清水, 利朗; 山部, 清子; 富岡, 治明

    2010-01-01

    We studied roles of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) isozymes, including type IIA secretory PLA2 (sPLA2-IIA), type IV cytosolic, Ca2+-dependent PLA2 (cPLA2) , type V secretory PLA2 (sPLA2-V) , and type VI cytosolic, Ca2+-independent PLA2 (iPLA2) , in macrophage ( Mφ) antimicrobial activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) H37Ra (avirulent) strain and Mφ mRNA expression of these PLA2 isotypes in response to infection with the microorganisms. First, a cPLA2 inhibitor arachidonyl trifluorometh...

  8. Folic Acid Conjugated Chitosan for Targeted Delivery of siRNA to Activated Macrophages in vitro and in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Chuanxu; Gao, Shan; Kjems, Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    was conjugated to chitosan (FA–CS) and used to formulate siRNA into nanoparticles capable of cell specific delivery. The physiochemical properties of the nanoparticles, including size, zeta-potential and encapsulation efficiency, were characterized and the intracellular uptake and gene silencing efficiency were...... studied in vitro. The results showed that folic acid conjugation enhanced cellular uptake and silencing effect in activated macrophages. An in vivo biodistribution analysis, performed in a subcutaneous inflammation model, confirmed targeting of FA–CS/siRNA to inflamed tissue. The results indicate that FA...

  9. Using recombinant CD74 protein to inhibit the activity of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-xinSHAN; Xi-yongYU; Qiu-xiongLIN; Yong-hengFU

    2005-01-01

    AIM Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine involved in the pathogenesis of a variety of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, including arthritis, glomerulonephritis, Gram-positive and Gram-negative sepsis, and atherogenesis. Recent studies showed that CD74(antigen-associated invariant chain Ⅱ) is a high-affinity membrane-binding protein for MIF. The purpose of the present study was to express the recombinant human CD74 in E. coli and inhibit the activity of MIF by using recombinant CD74 in vitro.

  10. Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315 escapes to the cytosol and actively subverts autophagy in human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khodor, Souhaila; Marshall-Batty, Kimberly; Nair, Vinod; Ding, Li; Greenberg, David E; Fraser, Iain D C

    2014-03-01

    Selective autophagy functions to specifically degrade cellular cargo tagged by ubiquitination, including bacteria. Strains of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) are opportunistic pathogens that cause life-threatening infections in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic granulomatous disease (CGD). While there is evidence that defective macrophage autophagy in a mouse model of CF can influence B. cenocepacia susceptibility, there have been no comprehensive studies on how this bacterium is sensed and targeted by the host autophagy response in human macrophages. Here, we describe the intracellular life cycle of B. cenocepacia J2315 and its interaction with the autophagy pathway in human cells. Electron and confocal microscopy analyses demonstrate that the invading bacteria interact transiently with the endocytic pathway before escaping to the cytosol. This escape triggers theselective autophagy pathway, and the recruitment of ubiquitin, the ubiquitin-binding adaptors p62 and NDP52 and the autophagosome membrane-associated protein LC3B, to the bacterial vicinity. However, despite recruitment of these key autophagy pathway effectors, B. cenocepacia blocks autophagosome completion and replicates in the host cytosol. We find that a pre-infection increase in cellular autophagy flux can significantly inhibit B. cenocepacia replication and that lower autophagy flux in macrophages from immunocompromised CGD patients could contribute to increased B. cenocepacia susceptibility, identifying autophagy manipulation as a potential therapeutic approach to reduce bacterial burden in B. cenocepacia infections. PMID:24119232

  11. Exosomes derived from M. Bovis BCG infected macrophages activate antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramod K Giri

    Full Text Available Activation of both CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells is required for an effective immune response to an M. tuberculosis infection. However, infected macrophages are poor antigen presenting cells and may be spatially separated from recruited T cells, thus limiting antigen presentation within a granuloma. Our previous studies showed that infected macrophages release from cells small membrane-bound vesicles called exosomes which contain mycobacterial lipid components and showed that these exosomes could stimulate a pro-inflammatory response in naïve macrophages. In the present study we demonstrate that exosomes stimulate both CD4(+ and CD8(+ splenic T cells isolated from mycobacteria-sensitized mice. Although the exosomes contain MHC I and II as well as costimulatory molecules, maximum stimulation of T cells required prior incubation of exosomes with antigen presenting cells. Exosomes isolated from M. bovis and M. tuberculosis infected macrophages also stimulated activation and maturation of mouse bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. Interestingly, intranasal administration of mice with exosomes isolated from M. bovis BCG infected macrophages induce the generation of memory CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells. The isolated T cells also produced IFN-gamma upon restimulation with BCG antigens. The release of exosomes from infected macrophages may overcome some of the defects in antigen presentation associated with mycobacterial infections and we suggest that exosomes may be a promising M. tuberculosis vaccine candidate.

  12. Soluble and particulate Co-Cr-Mo alloy implant metals activate the inflammasome danger signaling pathway in human macrophages: a novel mechanism for implant debris reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caicedo, Marco S; Desai, Ronak; McAllister, Kyron; Reddy, Anand; Jacobs, Joshua J; Hallab, Nadim J

    2009-07-01

    Immune reactivity to soluble and particulate implant debris remains the primary cause of aseptic inflammation and implant loosening. However, the intracellular mechanisms that trigger immune cells to sense and respond to exogenous nonbiological agents such as metal particles or metal ions released from orthopedic implants remain unknown. Recent studies in immunology have outlined the importance of the intracellular inflammasome complex of proteins in sensing danger/stress signals triggered by nonbiological agents in the cytosol of macrophages. We hypothesized that metal implant debris can activate the inflammasome pathway in macrophages that causes caspase-1-induced cleavage of intracellular pro-IL-1beta into its mature form, resulting in IL-1beta secretion and induction of a broader proinflammatory response. We tested this hypothesis by examining whether soluble cobalt, chromium, molybdenum, and nickel ions and Co-Cr-Mo alloy particles induce inflammasome- mediated macrophage reactivity. Our results demonstrate that these agents stimulate IL-1beta secretion in human macrophages that is inflammasome mediated (i.e., NADPH-, caspase-1-, Nalp3-, and ASC-dependent). Thus, metal ion- and particle-induced activation of the inflammasome in human macrophages provides evidence of a novel pathway of implant debris-induced inflammation, where contact with implant debris is sensed and transduced by macrophages into a proinflammatory response.

  13. IRF5 and IRF5 Disease-Risk Variants Increase Glycolysis and Human M1 Macrophage Polarization by Regulating Proximal Signaling and Akt2 Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matija Hedl

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5 regulates inflammatory M1 macrophage polarization, and disease-associated IRF5 genetic variants regulate pattern-recognition-receptor (PRR-induced cytokines. PRR-stimulated macrophages and M1 macrophages exhibit enhanced glycolysis, a central mediator of inflammation. We find that IRF5 is needed for PRR-enhanced glycolysis in human macrophages and in mice in vivo. Upon stimulation of the PRR nucleotide binding oligomerization domain containing 2 (NOD2 in human macrophages, IRF5 binds RIP2, IRAK1, and TRAF6. IRF5, in turn, is required for optimal Akt2 activation, which increases expression of glycolytic pathway genes and HIF1A as well as pro-inflammatory cytokines and M1 polarization. Furthermore, pro-inflammatory cytokines and glycolytic pathways co-regulate each other. Rs2004640/rs2280714 TT/TT IRF5 disease-risk-carrier cells demonstrate increased IRF5 expression and increased PRR-induced Akt2 activation, glycolysis, pro-inflammatory cytokines, and M1 polarization relative to GG/CC carrier macrophages. Our findings identify that IRF5 disease-associated polymorphisms regulate diverse immunological and metabolic outcomes and provide further insight into mechanisms contributing to the increasingly recognized important role for glycolysis in inflammation.

  14. Moringa oleifera Flower Extract Suppresses the Activation of Inflammatory Mediators in Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated RAW 264.7 Macrophages via NF-κB Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woan Sean Tan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of Study. Moringa oleifera Lam. (M. oleifera possess highest concentration of antioxidant bioactive compounds and is anticipated to be used as an alternative medicine for inflammation. In the present study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory activity of 80% hydroethanolic extract of M. oleifera flower on proinflammatory mediators and cytokines produced in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- induced RAW 264.7 macrophages. Materials and Methods. Cell cytotoxicity was conducted by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. Nitric oxide (NO production was quantified through Griess reaction while proinflammatory cytokines and other key inflammatory markers were assessed through enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and immunoblotting. Results. Hydroethanolic extract of M. oleifera flower significantly suppressed the secretion and expression of NO, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, interleukin- (IL- 6, IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α, nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB, inducible NO synthase (iNOS, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2. However, it significantly increased the production of IL-10 and IκB-α (inhibitor of κB in a concentration dependent manner (100 μg/mL and 200 μg/mL. Conclusion. These results suggest that 80% hydroethanolic extract of M. oleifera flower has anti-inflammatory action related to its inhibition of NO, PGE2, proinflammatory cytokines, and inflammatory mediator’s production in LPS-stimulated macrophages through preventing degradation of IκB-α in NF-κB signaling pathway.

  15. Moringa oleifera Flower Extract Suppresses the Activation of Inflammatory Mediators in Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated RAW 264.7 Macrophages via NF-κB Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Woan Sean; Arulselvan, Palanisamy; Karthivashan, Govindarajan; Fakurazi, Sharida

    2015-01-01

    Aim of Study. Moringa oleifera Lam. (M. oleifera) possess highest concentration of antioxidant bioactive compounds and is anticipated to be used as an alternative medicine for inflammation. In the present study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory activity of 80% hydroethanolic extract of M. oleifera flower on proinflammatory mediators and cytokines produced in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced RAW 264.7 macrophages. Materials and Methods. Cell cytotoxicity was conducted by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Nitric oxide (NO) production was quantified through Griess reaction while proinflammatory cytokines and other key inflammatory markers were assessed through enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunoblotting. Results. Hydroethanolic extract of M. oleifera flower significantly suppressed the secretion and expression of NO, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), interleukin- (IL-) 6, IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), inducible NO synthase (iNOS), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). However, it significantly increased the production of IL-10 and IκB-α (inhibitor of κB) in a concentration dependent manner (100 μg/mL and 200 μg/mL). Conclusion. These results suggest that 80% hydroethanolic extract of M. oleifera flower has anti-inflammatory action related to its inhibition of NO, PGE2, proinflammatory cytokines, and inflammatory mediator's production in LPS-stimulated macrophages through preventing degradation of IκB-α in NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:26609199

  16. MEK1 dependent and independent ERK activation regulates IL-10 and IL-12 production in bone marrow derived macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhamdan, Mohamad; Bauerfeld, Christian; Talreja, Jaya; Beuret, Laurent; Charron, Jean; Samavati, Lobelia

    2015-10-01

    The mitogen activated protein kinases ERK1/2 play an important role in response to toll like receptor (TLR) activation and cytokine production, including IL-10 and IL-12. Here, we examined the role of MEK1 in ERK1/2 activation in response to TLR4 agonist by using bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) from wild type (WT) and Mek1(d/d)Sox2(Cre) mice. Our data demonstrates that MEK1 is essential for ERK1/2 activation in response to LPS. Furthermore, stimulation of the TLR4 receptor of BMDMs derived from Mek1(d/d)Sox2(Cre) mice showed enhanced STAT4 phosphorylation and increased IL-12 secretion, but exhibited a significantly lower IL-10 production as compared to WT macrophages. Most interestingly, TLR ligation in the presence of recombinant IL-10 (rIL-10) or retinoic acid (RA) led to ERK1/2 activation independent of MEK1 in BMDMs derived from Mek1(d/d)Sox2(Cre) mice and led to inhibition of STAT4 and decreased IL-12 levels. Collectively, these data suggest that MEK1 is required for TLR4 mediated ERK activation and in turn regulates the production of IL-10 and IL-12. It also indicates that ERK1/2 can be activated independent of MEK1 in the presence of IL-10 and RA and this activation negatively regulates IL-12, but positively regulates IL-10 production. These findings may have significant implications for the development of drugs that modulate MEK1 activity in the treatment of inflammatory, autoimmune and proliferative diseases such as cancer. PMID:26208884

  17. EFFECTS OF GC-MACROPHAGE ACTIVATING FACTOR IN HUMAN NEURONS; IMPLICATIONS FOR TREATMENT OF CHRONIC FATIGUE SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodney Smith

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS is a debilitating disease of multifactorial aetiology characterized by immune system dysfunction, widespread inflammation, multisystemic neuropathology and persistent pain. Given the central role of the immune system in the pathogenesis of the syndrome, we studied the effects of a potent modulator of the immune system in in vitro and in vivo models that could help clarifying its role and indications in ME/CFS treatment. To this end, we studied the effects of vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage activating factor (also designated as Gc-Macrophage Activating Factor or (GcMAF on human neuronal cells (SH-SY5Y and on the persistent pain induced by osteoarticular damage in rats. GcMAF at pM concentration increased neuronal cell viability and metabolism through increased mitochondrial enzyme activity. These effects were accompanied by cAMP formation and by morphological changes that were representative of neuronal differentiation. We hypothesize that these effects are to be ascribed to the interconnection between the GcMAF and Vitamin D Receptor (VDR signalling pathways. The results presented here confirm at the experimental level the therapeutic effects of GcMAF in ME/CFS and elucidate the mechanisms of action through which GcMAF might be responsible for such therapeutic effects.

  18. A xenograft model of macrophage activation syndrome amenable to anti-CD33 and anti–IL-6R treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunderlich, Mark; Devarajan, Mahima; Ravishankar, Navin; Sexton, Christina; Kumar, Ashish R.; Mizukawa, Benjamin; Mulloy, James C.

    2016-01-01

    Transgenic expression of key myelosupportive human cytokines in immune-deficient mice corrects for the lack of cross-species activities of stem cell factor (SCF), IL-3, and GM-CSF. When engrafted with human umbilical cord blood (UCB), these triple-transgenic mice produce BM and spleen grafts with much higher myeloid composition, relative to nontransgenic controls. Shortly after engraftment with UCB, these mice develop a severe, fatal macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) characterized by a progressive drop in rbc numbers, increased reticulocyte counts, decreased rbc half-life, progressive cytopenias, and evidence of chronic inflammation, including elevated human IL-6. The BM becomes strikingly hypocellular, and spleens are significantly enlarged with evidence of extramedullary hematopoiesis and activated macrophages engaged in hemophagocytosis. This manifestation of MAS does not respond to lymphocyte-suppressive therapies such as steroids, i.v. immunoglobulin, or antibody-mediated ablation of human B and T cells, demonstrating a lymphocyte-independent mechanism of action. In contrast, elimination of human myeloid cells using gemtuzumab ozogamicin (anti-CD33) completely reversed the disease. Additionally, the IL-6R antibody tocilizumab delayed progression and prolonged lifespan. This new model of MAS provides an opportunity for investigation of the mechanisms driving this disease and for the testing of directed therapies in a humanized mouse. PMID:27699249

  19. Cytotoxic macrophage-released tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) as a killing mechanism for cancer cell death after cold plasma activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Nagendra Kumar; Kaushik, Neha; Min, Booki; Choi, Ki Hong; Hong, Young June; Miller, Vandana; Fridman, Alexander; Choi, Eun Ha

    2016-03-01

    The present study aims at studying the anticancer role of cold plasma-activated immune cells. The direct anti-cancer activity of plasma-activated immune cells against human solid cancers has not been described so far. Hence, we assessed the effect of plasma-treated RAW264.7 macrophages on cancer cell growth after co-culture. In particular, flow cytometer analysis revealed that plasma did not induce any cell death in RAW264.7 macrophages. Interestingly, immunofluorescence and western blot analysis confirmed that TNF-α released from plasma-activated macrophages acts as a tumour cell death inducer. In support of these findings, activated macrophages down-regulated the cell growth in solid cancer cell lines and induced cell death in vitro. Together our findings suggest plasma-induced reactive species recruit cytotoxic macrophages to release TNF-α, which blocks cancer cell growth and can have the potential to contribute to reducing tumour growth in vivo in the near future.

  20. Cytotoxic macrophage-released tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) as a killing mechanism for cancer cell death after cold plasma activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study aims at studying the anticancer role of cold plasma-activated immune cells. The direct anti-cancer activity of plasma-activated immune cells against human solid cancers has not been described so far. Hence, we assessed the effect of plasma-treated RAW264.7 macrophages on cancer cell growth after co-culture. In particular, flow cytometer analysis revealed that plasma did not induce any cell death in RAW264.7 macrophages. Interestingly, immunofluorescence and western blot analysis confirmed that TNF-α released from plasma-activated macrophages acts as a tumour cell death inducer. In support of these findings, activated macrophages down-regulated the cell growth in solid cancer cell lines and induced cell death in vitro. Together our findings suggest plasma-induced reactive species recruit cytotoxic macrophages to release TNF-α, which blocks cancer cell growth and can have the potential to contribute to reducing tumour growth in vivo in the near future. (paper)

  1. Changing University Students’ Alternative Conceptions of Optics by Active Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zalkida Hadžibegović

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Active learning is individual and group participation in effective activities such as in-class observing, writing, experimenting, discussion, solving problems, and talking about to-be-learned topics. Some instructors believe that active learning is impossible, or at least extremely difficult to achieve in large lecture sessions. Nevertheless, the truly impressive implementation results of theSCALE-UP learning environment suggest that such beliefs are false (Beichner et al., 2000. In this study, we present a design of an active learning environment with positive effect on students. The design is based on the following elements: (1 helping students to learn from interactive lecture experiment; (2 guiding students to use justified explanation and prediction after observing and exploring a phenomenon; (3 developing a conceptual question sequencedesigned for use in an interactive lecture with students answering questions in worksheets by writing and drawing; (4 evaluating students’ conceptual change and gains by questions related to light reflection, refraction, and image formation in an exam held a week after the active learning session. Data were collected from 95 science freshmen with different secondary school backgrounds. They participated in geometrical optics classes organized for collecting research results during and after only one active learning session.The results have showed that around 60% of the students changed their initial alternative conceptions of vision and of image formation. It was also found that a large group of university students is likely to be engaged in active learning, shifting from a passive role they usually play during teacher’s lectures.

  2. Injury-Induced GR-1+ Macrophage Expansion and Activation Occurs Independent of CD4 T Cell Influence

    OpenAIRE

    O’Leary, Fionnuala M.; Tajima, Goro; Delisle, Adam J.; Ikeda, Kimiko; Dolan, Sinead M.; Hanschen, Marc; Mannick, John A.; Lederer, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Burn injury initiates an enhanced inflammatory condition referred to as the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) or the two-hit response phenotype. Prior reports indicated that macrophages respond to injury and demonstrate a heightened reactivity to Toll-like receptor (TLR) stimulation. Since we and others observed a significant increase in splenic GR-1+F4/80+CD11b+ macrophages in burn-injured mice, we wished to test if these macrophages might be the primary macrophage subset that s...

  3. Novel Role of Endogenous Catalase in Macrophage Polarization in Adipose Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Seul Park

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are important components of adipose tissue inflammation, which results in metabolic diseases such as insulin resistance. Notably, obesity induces a proinflammatory phenotypic switch in adipose tissue macrophages, and oxidative stress facilitates this switch. Thus, we examined the role of endogenous catalase, a key regulator of oxidative stress, in the activity of adipose tissue macrophages in obese mice. Catalase knockout (CKO exacerbated insulin resistance, amplified oxidative stress, and accelerated macrophage infiltration into epididymal white adipose tissue in mice on normal or high-fat diet. Interestingly, catalase deficiency also enhanced classical macrophage activation (M1 and inflammation but suppressed alternative activation (M2 regardless of diet. Similarly, pharmacological inhibition of catalase activity using 3-aminotriazole induced the same phenotypic switch and inflammatory response in RAW264.7 macrophages. Finally, the same phenotypic switch and inflammatory responses were observed in primary bone marrow-derived macrophages from CKO mice. Taken together, the data indicate that endogenous catalase regulates the polarization of adipose tissue macrophages and thereby inhibits inflammation and insulin resistance.

  4. Flow Cytometric Investigation of Classical and Alternative Platelet Activation Markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debreceni, Ildikó Beke; Kappelmayer, János

    2013-01-01

    Platelets show a substantial role in the maintenance of vascular integrity when these cells after a rapid activation adhere to the vessel wall lesion, aggregate with other platelets and leukocytes resulting in an arterial thrombosis. Analysis of in vivo platelet activation at an early time point is crucial in the detection of developing thrombotic events. In addition, the forecast of future complications as well as the evaluation of the efficacy of anti- platelet medication are also essential in a large group of patients. Changes in the levels of platelet receptors or alteration in other surface properties due to intra- and extracellular responses to a stimulus can be measurable primarily by flow cytometry with specific antibodies via the assessment of classical and alternative platelet activation markers. Some of these biomarkers have been already used in routine laboratory settings in many cases, while others still stand in the phase of research applications. Deficiency in platelet receptors is also accessible with this technique for the diagnosis of certain bleeding disorders. We here describe the most important types of platelet activation markers, and give an overview how the levels of these markers are altered in different diseases.

  5. Macrophages generate reactive oxygen species in response to minimally oxidized LDL: TLR4- and Syk-dependent activation of Nox2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Yun Soo; Lee, Jee Hyun; Choi, Soo Ho; Kim, Sunah; Almazan, Felicidad; Witztum, Joseph L.; Miller, Yury I.

    2009-01-01

    Oxidative modification of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) plays a causative role in the development of atherosclerosis. In this study, we demonstrate that minimally oxidized LDL (mmLDL) stimulates intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in macrophages through NADPH oxidase 2 (gp91phox/Nox2), which in turn induces production of RANTES and migration of smooth muscle cells. Peritoneal macrophages from gp91phox/Nox2−/− mice or J774 macrophages in which Nox2 was knocked down by siRNA failed to generate ROS in response to mmLDL. Because mmLDL-induced cytoskeletal changes were dependent on TLR4, we analyzed ROS generation in peritoneal macrophages from wild type, TLR4−/−, or MyD88−/− mice and found that mmLDL-mediated ROS was generated in a TLR4-dependent, but MyD88-independent manner. Furthermore, we found that ROS generation required the recruitment and activation of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) and that mmLDL also induced PLCγ1 phosphorylation and PKC membrane translocation. Importantly, the PLCγ1 phosphorylation was reduced in J774 cells expressing Syk-specific shRNA. Nox2 modulated mmLDL activation of macrophages by regulating the expression of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6 and RANTES. We showed that purified RANTES was able to stimulate migration of mouse aortic smooth muscle cells (MASMC) and addition of neutralizing antibody against RANTES abolished the migration of MASMC stimulated by mmLDL-stimulated macrophages. These results suggest that mmLDL induces generation of ROS through sequential activation of TLR4, Syk, PLCγ1, PKC, and gp91phox/Nox2 and thereby stimulates expression of proinflammatory cytokines. These data help explain mechanisms by which endogenous ligands, such as mmLDL, can induce TLR4-dependent, proatherogenic activation of macrophages. PMID:19096031

  6. Commensal Bacteria-Induced Inflammasome Activation in Mouse and Human Macrophages Is Dependent on Potassium Efflux but Does Not Require Phagocytosis or Bacterial Viability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kejie; Shanmugam, Nanda Kumar N.; Pazos, Michael A.; Hurley, Bryan P.; Cherayil, Bobby J.

    2016-01-01

    Gut commensal bacteria contribute to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease, in part by activating the inflammasome and inducing secretion of interleukin-1ß (IL-1ß). Although much has been learned about inflammasome activation by bacterial pathogens, little is known about how commensals carry out this process. Accordingly, we investigated the mechanism of inflammasome activation by representative commensal bacteria, the Gram-positive Bifidobacterium longum subspecies infantis and the Gram-negative Bacteroides fragilis. B. infantis and B. fragilis induced IL-1ß secretion by primary mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages after overnight incubation. IL-1ß secretion also occurred in response to heat-killed bacteria and was only partly reduced when phagocytosis was inhibited with cytochalasin D. Similar results were obtained with a wild-type immortalized mouse macrophage cell line but neither B. infantis nor B. fragilis induced IL-1ß secretion in a mouse macrophage line lacking the nucleotide-binding/leucine-rich repeat pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome. IL-1ß secretion in response to B. infantis and B. fragilis was significantly reduced when the wild-type macrophage line was treated with inhibitors of potassium efflux, either increased extracellular potassium concentrations or the channel blocker ruthenium red. Both live and heat-killed B. infantis and B. fragilis also induced IL-1ß secretion by human macrophages (differentiated THP-1 cells or primary monocyte-derived macrophages) after 4 hours of infection, and the secretion was inhibited by raised extracellular potassium and ruthenium red but not by cytochalasin D. Taken together, our findings indicate that the commensal bacteria B. infantis and B. fragilis activate the NLRP3 inflammasome in both mouse and human macrophages by a mechanism that involves potassium efflux and that does not require bacterial viability or phagocytosis. PMID:27505062

  7. PAFR activation of NF-κB p65 or p105 precursor dictates pro- and anti-inflammatory responses during TLR activation in murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizuka, Edson K; Filgueiras, Luciano Ribeiro; Rios, Francisco J; Serezani, Carlos H; Jancar, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR) is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) implicated in many diseases. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a critical role in shaping innate and adaptive immune responses. In this study, we investigated whether PAFR signaling changes the macrophages responsiveness to agonists of TLR2 (Pam3Cys), TLR4 (LPS), and TLR3 agonist Poly(I:C). Exogenous PAF inhibited the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-12p40, IL-6, and TNF-α) and increased anti-inflammatory IL-10 in macrophages challenged with Pam3Cys and LPS, but not with Poly (I:C). PAF did not affect mRNA expression of MyD88, suggesting that PAF acts downstream the adaptor. PAF inhibited LPS-induced phosphorylation of NF-κB p65 and increased NF-κB p105 phosphorylation, which is processed in the proteasome to generate p50 subunit. The PAF potentiation of IL-10 production was dependent on proteasome processing but independent of NF-κB transactivation domain. Inhibition of p50 abolished the PAF-induced IL-10 production. These findings indicate that the impaired transcriptional activity of the p65 subunit and the enhanced p105 phosphorylation induced by PAF are responsible for down regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and up regulation of IL-10, respectively, in LPS-challenged macrophages. Together, our data unveil a heretofore unrecognized role for PAFR in modulating activation of NF-κB in macrophages. PMID:27554194

  8. Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) Polarizes Both M-CSF- and GM-CSF-Differentiated Macrophages Toward an M1-Like Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seif, Michelle; Philippi, Anja; Breinig, Frank; Kiemer, Alexandra K; Hoppstädter, Jessica

    2016-10-01

    Macrophages are a heterogeneous and plastic cell population with two main phenotypes: pro-inflammatory classically activated macrophages (M1) and anti-inflammatory alternatively activated macrophages (M2). Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a promising vehicle for the delivery of vaccines. It is well established that S. cerevisiae is taken up by professional phagocytic cells. However, the response of human macrophages to S. cerevisiae is ill-defined. In this study, we characterized the interaction between S. cerevisiae and M1- or M2-like macrophages. M1-like macrophages had a higher yeast uptake capacity than M2-like macrophages, but both cell types internalized opsonized yeast to the same extent. The M1 surface markers HLAII and CD86 were upregulated after yeast uptake in M1- and M2-like macrophages. Moreover, mRNA expression levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α, IL-12, and IL-6, increased, whereas the expression of anti-inflammatory mediators did not change. These results demonstrate that S. cerevisiae can target both M1 and M2 macrophages, paralleled by skewing toward an M1 phenotype. Thus, the use of yeast-based delivery systems might be a promising approach for the treatment of pathologic conditions that would benefit from the presence of M1-polarized macrophages, such as cancer.

  9. The Reactive Oxygen Species in Macrophage Polarization: Reflecting Its Dual Role in Progression and Treatment of Human Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hor-Yue Tan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High heterogeneity of macrophage is associated with its functions in polarization to different functional phenotypes depending on environmental cues. Macrophages remain in balanced state in healthy subject and thus macrophage polarization may be crucial in determining the tissue fate. The two distinct populations, classically M1 and alternatively M2 activated, representing the opposing ends of the full activation spectrum, have been extensively studied for their associations with several disease progressions. Accumulating evidences have postulated that the redox signalling has implication in macrophage polarization and the key roles of M1 and M2 macrophages in tissue environment have provided the clue for the reasons of ROS abundance in certain phenotype. M1 macrophages majorly clearing the pathogens and ROS may be crucial for the regulation of M1 phenotype, whereas M2 macrophages resolve inflammation which favours oxidative metabolism. Therefore how ROS play its role in maintaining the homeostatic functions of macrophage and in particular macrophage polarization will be reviewed here. We also review the biology of macrophage polarization and the disturbance of M1/M2 balance in human diseases. The potential therapeutic opportunities targeting ROS will also be discussed, hoping to provide insights for development of target-specific delivery system or immunomodulatory antioxidant for the treatment of ROS-related diseases.

  10. Activity of Liposomal Amphotericin B with Prolonged Circulation in Blood versus Those of AmBisome and Fungizone against Intracellular Candida albicans in Murine Peritoneal Macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    van Etten, Els W. M.; Vianen, Wim; Hak, Janneke; Bakker-Woudenberg, Irma A. J. M.

    1998-01-01

    Activity against intracellular Candida albicans was assessed in C. albicans-infected murine peritoneal macrophages exposed to long-circulating pegylated amphotericin B liposomes (PEG-AMB-LIP), AmBisome, or Fungizone. The level of antifungal activity of Fungizone is much higher than that of AmBisome or PEG-AMB-LIP, while PEG-AMB-LIP and AmBisome show equivalent activity levels. Previous exposure of uninfected macrophages to PEG-AMB-LIP or AmBisome is advantageous for intracellular antifungal a...

  11. IL-17A and serum amyloid A are elevated in a cigarette smoke cessation model associated with the persistence of pigmented macrophages, neutrophils and activated NK cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle J Hansen

    Full Text Available While global success in cessation advocacy has seen smoking rates fall in many developed countries, persistent lung inflammation in ex-smokers is an increasingly important clinical problem whose mechanistic basis remains poorly understood. In this study, candidate effector mechanisms were assessed in mice exposed to cigarette smoke (CS for 4 months following cessation from long term CS exposure. BALF neutrophils, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and lung innate NK cells remained significantly elevated following smoking cessation. Analysis of neutrophil mobilization markers showed a transition from acute mediators (MIP-2α, KC and G-CSF to sustained drivers of neutrophil and macrophage recruitment and activation (IL-17A and Serum Amyoid A (SAA. Follicle-like lymphoid aggregates formed with CS exposure and persisted with cessation, where they were in close anatomical proximity to pigmented macrophages, whose number actually increased 3-fold following CS cessation. This was associated with the elastolytic protease, MMP-12 (macrophage metallo-elastase which remained significantly elevated post-cessation. Both GM-CSF and CSF-1 were significantly increased in the CS cessation group relative to the control group. In conclusion, we show that smoking cessation mediates a transition to accumulation of pigmented macrophages, which may contribute to the expanded macrophage population observed in COPD. These macrophages together with IL-17A, SAA and innate NK cells are identified here as candidate persistence determinants and, we suggest, may represent specific targets for therapies directed towards the amelioration of chronic airway inflammation.

  12. Trimellitic anhydride-conjugated serum albumin activates rat alveolar macrophages in vitro

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    Bloksma Nanne

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Occupational exposure to airborne low molecular weight chemicals, like trimellitic anhydride (TMA, can result in occupational asthma. Alveolar macrophages (AMs are among the first cells to encounter these inhaled compounds and were previously shown to influence TMA-induced asthma-like symptoms in the Brown Norway rat. TMA is a hapten that will bind to endogenous proteins upon entrance of the body. Therefore, in the present study we determined if TMA and TMA conjugated to serum albumin induced the production of the macrophage mediators nitric oxide (NO, tumour necrosis factor (TNF, and interleukin 6 (IL-6 in vitro using the rat AM cell line NR8383 and primary AMs derived from TMA-sensitized and naïve Brown Norway rats. Methods Cells were incubated with different concentrations of TMA, TMA conjugated to bovine serum albumin (BSA, and BSA as a control for 24 h and the culture supernatant was analyzed for mediator content. Results TMA alone was not able to induce the production of mediators by NR8383 cells and primary AMs from sensitized and sham-treated rats. TMA-BSA, on the contrary, dose-dependently stimulated the production of NO, TNF, and IL-6 by NR8383 cells and of NO and TNF, but not IL-6, by primary AMs independent of sensitization. Conclusion Results suggest that although TMA is a highly reactive compound, conjugation to a suitable protein is necessary to induce mediator production by AMs. Furthermore, the observation that effects of TMA-BSA were independent of sensitization suggests involvement of an immunologically non-specific receptor. In the discussion it is argued that a macrophage scavenger receptor is a likely candidate.

  13. Macrophage activation and histopathological findings in Calomys callosus and Swiss mice infected with several strains of Trypanosoma cruzi

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    Monamaris Marques Borges

    1992-12-01

    Full Text Available Peritoneal macrophage activation as measured by H2O2 release and histopathology was compared between Swiss mice and Calomys callosus, a wild rodent, reservoir of Trypanosoma cruzi, during the course of infection with four strains of this parasite. In mice F and Y strain infections result in high parasitemia and mortality while with silvatic strains Costalimai and M226 parasitemia is sub-patent, with very low mortality. H2O2 release peaked at 33,6 and 59 nM/2 x 10(elevado a sexta potência cells for strains Y and F, respectively, 48 and 50 nM/2 x 10 (elevado a sexta potência for strains Costalimai and M226, at different days after infection. Histopathological findings of myositis, myocarditis, necrotizing artheritis and abscence of macrophage parasitism were foud for strains F and Costalimai. Y strain infection presented moderate myocarditis and myositis, with parasites multiplying within macrophages. In C. callosus all four strains resulted in patent parasitemia wich was eventually overcome, with scarce mortality. H2O2 release for strains Y or F was comparable to that of mice-peaks of 27 and 53 nM/2 x 10 (elevado a sexta potência cells, with lower values for strains Costalimai and M226 - 16.5 and 4.6 nM/2 x 10(elevado a sexta potênciacells, respectively. Histopathological lesions with Y and F strain injected animals were comparable to those of mice at the onset of infections; they subsided completely at the later stages with Y strain and partially with F strain infected C. callosus. In Costalimai infected C. callosus practically no histopathological alterations were observed.

  14. Implication of lipoprotein associated phospholipase A2 activity in oxLDL uptake by macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Markakis, Konstantinos P.; Koropouli, Maria K.; Grammenou-Savvoglou, Stavroula; van Winden, Ewoud C.; Dimitriou, Andromaxi A.; Demopoulos, Constantinos A.; Tselepis, Alexandros D; Kotsifaki, Eleni E.

    2010-01-01

    Recognition and uptake of oxidized LDL (oxLDL) by scavenger receptors of macrophages and foam cell formation are mediated by the oxidatively modified apolipoprotein B (ApoB) and lipid moiety of oxLDL. A great amount of oxidized phosphatidylcholine (oxPC) of oxLDL is hydrolyzed at the sn-2 position by lipoprotein associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) to lysophosphatidylcholine and small oxidation products. This study examines the involvement of Lp-PLA2 in the uptake of oxLDL by mouse peritonea...

  15. Autophagy in pulmonary macrophages mediates lung inflammatory injury via NLRP3 inflammasome activation during mechanical ventilation

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yang; Liu, Gongjian; Dull, Randal O; Schwartz, David E; Hu, Guochang

    2014-01-01

    The inflammatory response is a primary mechanism in the pathogenesis of ventilator-induced lung injury. Autophagy is an essential, homeostatic process by which cells break down their own components. We explored the role of autophagy in the mechanisms of mechanical ventilation-induced lung inflammatory injury. Mice were subjected to low (7 ml/kg) or high (28 ml/kg) tidal volume ventilation for 2 h. Bone marrow-derived macrophages transfected with a scrambled or autophagy-related protein 5 smal...

  16. Inhibition of Inflammatory Response by Artepillin C in Activated RAW264.7 Macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Ewelina Szliszka; Anna Mertas; Zenon P. Czuba; Wojciech Król

    2013-01-01

    Artepillin C (3,5-diprenyl-4-hydroxycinnamic acid) is the main bioactive component of Brazilian green propolis. The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory effect of artepillin C on LPS + IFN- γ - or PMA-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages. The cell viability was evaluated by MTT and LDH assays. The radical scavenging ability was determined using DPPH• and ABTS•+. ROS and RNS generation was analyzed by chemiluminescence. NO concentration was detected by the Griess reaction. The...

  17. Molecular hydrogen inhibits lipopolysaccharide-triggered NLRP3 inflammasome activation in macrophages by targeting the mitochondrial reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jian-Dong; Wu, Xiao-Bo; Jiang, Rui; Hao, Da-Peng; Liu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    The NLRP3 inflammasome, an intracellular multi-protein complex controlling the maturation of cytokine interleukin-1β, plays an important role in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory cascades. Recently, the production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) in macrophages stimulated with LPS has been suggested to act as a trigger during the process of NLRP3 inflammasome activation that can be blocked by some mitochondria-targeted antioxidants. Known as a ROS scavenger, molecular hydrogen (H2) has been shown to possess therapeutic benefit on LPS-induced inflammatory damage in many animal experiments. Due to the unique molecular structure, H2 can easily target the mitochondria, suggesting that H2 is a potential antagonist of mtROS-dependent NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Here we have showed that, in mouse macrophages, H2 exhibited substantial inhibitory activity against LPS-initiated NLRP3 inflammasome activation by scavenging mtROS. Moreover, the elimination of mtROS by H2 resultantly inhibited mtROS-mediated NLRP3 deubiquitination, a non-transcriptional priming signal of NLRP3 in response to the stimulation of LPS. Additionally, the removal of mtROS by H2 reduced the generation of oxidized mitochondrial DNA and consequently decreased its binding to NLRP3, thereby inhibiting the NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Our findings have, for the first time, revealed the novel mechanism underlying the inhibitory effect of molecular hydrogen on LPS-caused NLRP3 inflammasome activation, highlighting the promising application of this new antioxidant in the treatment of LPS-associated inflammatory pathological damage.

  18. Protocatechuic acid induces antioxidant/detoxifying enzyme expression through JNK-mediated Nrf2 activation in murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varì, Rosaria; D'Archivio, Massimo; Filesi, Carmelina; Carotenuto, Simona; Scazzocchio, Beatrice; Santangelo, Carmela; Giovannini, Claudio; Masella, Roberta

    2011-05-01

    Protocatechuic acid (PCA) is a main metabolite of anthocyanins, whose daily intake is much higher than that of other polyphenols. PCA has biological effects, e.g., it induces the antioxidant/detoxifying enzyme gene expression. This study was aimed at defining the molecular mechanism responsible for PCA-induced over-expression of glutathione (GSH) peroxidase (GPx) and GSH reductase (GR) in J774 A.1 macrophages. New evidence is provided that PCA increases GPx and GR expression by inducing C-JUN NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK)-mediated phosphorylation of Nuclear factor erythroid 2 (NF-E2)-related factor 2 (Nrf2). RNA and proteins were extracted from cells treated with PCA (25 μM) for different time points. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting analyses showed a rapid increase in mRNA (>60%) and protein (>50%) for both the enzymes. This was preceded by the up-regulation of Nrf2, in terms of mRNA and protein, and by its significant activation as assessed by increased Nrf2 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation (+60%). By using specific kinase inhibitors and detecting the activated form, we showed that JNK was the main upstream kinase responsible for Nrf2 activation. Convincing evidence is provided of a causal link between PCA-induced Nrf2 activation and increased enzyme expression. By silencing Nrf2 and using a JNK inhibitor, enzyme enhancement was counteracted. Finally, with the ChIP assay, we demonstrated that PCA-activated Nrf2 specifically bound ARE sequences in enzyme gene promoters. Our study demonstrates for the first time that PCA improves the macrophage endogenous antioxidant potential by a mechanism in which JNK-mediated Nrf2 activation plays an essential role. This knowledge could contribute to novel diet-based approaches aimed at counteracting oxidative injury by reinforcing endogenous defences. PMID:20621462

  19. Association of CD163+ macrophages and local production of soluble CD163 with decreased lymphocyte activation in spondylarthropathy synovitis