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Sample records for alternative macrophage activation

  1. Ameloginins promote an alternatively activated macrophage phenotype in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almqvist, S; Werthen, M; Lyngstadas, SP

    2011-01-01

    aggregates were visualised by transmission electron microscopy. The amelogenin treatment of macrophages increased several pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, including alternative macrophage activation marker AMAC-1 (p

  2. Alternatively activated macrophages (M2 macrophages) in the skin of patient with localized scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi-Kuwata, Nobuyo; Makino, Takamitsu; Inoue, Yuji; Takeya, Motohiro; Ihn, Hironobu

    2009-08-01

    Localized scleroderma is a connective tissue disorder that is limited to the skin and subcutaneous tissue. Macrophages have been reported to be particularly activated in patients with skin disease including systemic sclerosis and are potentially important sources for fibrosis-inducing cytokines, such as transforming growth factor beta. To clarify the features of immunohistochemical characterization of the immune cell infiltrates in localized scleroderma focusing on macrophages, skin biopsy specimens were analysed by immunohistochemistry. The number of cells stained with monoclonal antibodies, CD68, CD163 and CD204, was calculated. An evident macrophage infiltrate and increased number of alternatively activated macrophages (M2 macrophages) in their fibrotic areas were observed along with their severity of inflammation. This study revealed that alternatively activated macrophages (M2 macrophages) may be a potential source of fibrosis-inducing cytokines in localized scleroderma, and may play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of localized scleroderma.

  3. Alternatively Activated (M2) Macrophage Phenotype Is Inducible by Endothelin-1 in Cultured Human Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldano, Stefano; Pizzorni, Carmen; Paolino, Sabrina; Trombetta, Amelia Chiara; Montagna, Paola; Brizzolara, Renata; Ruaro, Barbara; Sulli, Alberto; Cutolo, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Alternatively activated (M2) macrophages are phenotypically characterized by the expression of specific markers, mainly macrophage scavenger receptors (CD204 and CD163) and mannose receptor-1 (CD206), and participate in the fibrotic process by over-producing pro-fibrotic molecules, such as transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGFbeta1) and metalloproteinase (MMP)-9. Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is implicated in the fibrotic process, exerting its pro-fibrotic effects through the interaction with its receptors (ETA and ETB). The study investigated the possible role of ET-1 in inducing the transition from cultured human macrophages into M2 cells. Cultured human monocytes (THP-1 cell line) were activated into macrophages (M0 macrophages) with phorbol myristate acetate and subsequently maintained in growth medium (M0-controls) or treated with either ET-1 (100nM) or interleukin-4 (IL-4, 10ng/mL, M2 inducer) for 72 hours. Similarly, primary cultures of human peripheral blood monocyte (PBM)-derived macrophages obtained from healthy subjects, were maintained in growth medium (untreated cells) or treated with ET-1 or IL-4 for 6 days. Both M0 and PBM-derived macrophages were pre-treated with ET receptor antagonist (ETA/BRA, bosentan 10-5M) for 1 hour before ET-1 stimulation. Protein and gene expression of CD204, CD206, CD163, TGFbeta1 were analysed by immunocytochemistry, Western blotting and quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Gene expression of interleukin(IL)-10 and macrophage derived chemokine (CCL-22) was evaluated by qRT-PCR. MMP-9 production was investigated by gel zymography. ET-1 significantly increased the expression of M2 phenotype markers CD204, CD206, CD163, IL-10 and CCL-22, and the production of MMP-9 in both cultures of M0 and PBM-derived macrophages compared to M0-controls and untreated cells. In cultured PBM-derived macrophages, ET-1 increased TGFbeta1 protein and gene expression compared to untreated cells. The ET-1-mediated effects were

  4. Redefining the transcriptional regulatory dynamics of classically and alternatively activated macrophages by deepCAGE transcriptomics

    KAUST Repository

    Roy, S.; Schmeier, S.; Arner, E.; Alam, Tanvir; Parihar, S. P.; Ozturk, M.; Tamgue, O.; Kawaji, H.; de Hoon, M. J. L.; Itoh, M.; Lassmann, T.; Carninci, P.; Hayashizaki, Y.; Forrest, A. R. R.; Bajic, Vladimir B.; Guler, R.; Consortium, F.; Brombacher, F.; Suzuki, H.

    2015-01-01

    Classically or alternatively activated macrophages (M1 and M2, respectively) play distinct and important roles for microbiocidal activity, regulation of inflammation and tissue homeostasis. Despite this, their transcriptional regulatory dynamics

  5. Oxidized LDL Induces Alternative Macrophage Phenotype through Activation of CD36 and PAFR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. Rios

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OxLDL is recognized by macrophage scavenger receptors, including CD36; we have recently found that Platelet-Activating Factor Receptor (PAFR is also involved. Since PAFR in macrophages is associated with suppressor function, we examined the effect of oxLDL on macrophage phenotype. It was found that the presence of oxLDL during macrophage differentiation induced high mRNA levels to IL-10, mannose receptor, PPARγ and arginase-1 and low levels of IL-12 and iNOS. When human THP-1 macrophages were pre-treated with oxLDL then stimulated with LPS, the production of IL-10 and TGF-β significantly increased, whereas that of IL-6 and IL-8 decreased. In murine TG-elicited macrophages, this protocol significantly reduced NO, iNOS and COX2 expression. Thus, oxLDL induced macrophage differentiation and activation towards the alternatively activated M2-phenotype. In murine macrophages, oxLDL induced TGF-β, arginase-1 and IL-10 mRNA expression, which were significantly reduced by pre-treatment with PAFR antagonists (WEB and CV or with antibodies to CD36. The mRNA expression of IL-12, RANTES and CXCL2 were not affected. We showed that this profile of macrophage activation is dependent on the engagement of both CD36 and PAFR. We conclude that oxLDL induces alternative macrophage activation by mechanisms involving CD36 and PAFR.

  6. Critical illness induces alternative activation of M2 macrophages in adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langouche, Lies; Marques, Mirna B; Ingels, Catherine; Gunst, Jan; Derde, Sarah; Vander Perre, Sarah; D'Hoore, André; Van den Berghe, Greet

    2011-01-01

    We recently reported macrophage accumulation in adipose tissue of critically ill patients. Classically activated macrophage accumulation in adipose tissue is a known feature of obesity, where it is linked with increasing insulin resistance. However, the characteristics of adipose tissue macrophage accumulation in critical illness remain unknown. We studied macrophage markers with immunostaining and gene expression in visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue from healthy control subjects (n = 20) and non-surviving prolonged critically ill patients (n = 61). For comparison, also subcutaneous in vivo adipose tissue biopsies were studied from 15 prolonged critically ill patients. Subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue biopsies from non-surviving prolonged critically ill patients displayed a large increase in macrophage staining. This staining corresponded with elevated gene expression of "alternatively activated" M2 macrophage markers arginase-1, IL-10 and CD163 and low levels of the "classically activated" M1 macrophage markers tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS). Immunostaining for CD163 confirmed positive M2 macrophage staining in both visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue biopsies from critically ill patients. Surprisingly, circulating levels and tissue gene expression of the alternative M2 activators IL-4 and IL-13 were low and not different from controls. In contrast, adipose tissue protein levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ), a nuclear receptor required for M2 differentiation and acting downstream of IL-4, was markedly elevated in illness. In subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue biopsies from surviving critically ill patients, we could confirm positive macrophage staining with CD68 and CD163. We also could confirm elevated arginase-1 gene expression and elevated PPARγ protein levels. Unlike obesity, critical illness evokes adipose tissue accumulation of alternatively activated M2

  7. Alternative activation of macrophages and pulmonary fibrosis are modulated by scavenger receptor, macrophage receptor with collagenous structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Shubha; Larson-Casey, Jennifer L; Ryan, Alan J; He, Chao; Kobzik, Lester; Carter, A Brent

    2015-08-01

    Alternative activation of alveolar macrophages is linked to fibrosis following exposure to asbestos. The scavenger receptor, macrophage receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO), provides innate immune defense against inhaled particles and pathogens; however, a receptor for asbestos has not been identified. We hypothesized that MARCO acts as an initial signaling receptor for asbestos, polarizes macrophages to a profibrotic M2 phenotype, and is required for the development of asbestos-induced fibrosis. Compared with normal subjects, alveolar macrophages isolated from patients with asbestosis express higher amounts of MARCO and have greater profibrotic polarization. Arginase 1 (40-fold) and IL-10 (265-fold) were higher in patients. In vivo, the genetic deletion of MARCO attenuated the profibrotic environment and pulmonary fibrosis in mice exposed to chrysotile. Moreover, alveolar macrophages from MARCO(-/-) mice polarize to an M1 phenotype, whereas wild-type mice have higher Ym1 (>3.0-fold) and nearly 7-fold more active TGF-β1 in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid (BALF). Arg(432) and Arg(434) in domain V of MARCO are required for the polarization of macrophages to a profibrotic phenotype as mutation of these residues reduced FIZZ1 expression (17-fold) compared with cells expressing MARCO. These observations demonstrate that a macrophage membrane protein regulates the fibrotic response to lung injury and suggest a novel target for therapeutic intervention. © FASEB.

  8. Conditioned medium from alternatively activated macrophages induce mesangial cell apoptosis via the effect of Fas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Yuan; Luo, Fangjun; Li, Hui; Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Nong

    2013-01-01

    During inflammation in the glomerulus, the proliferation of myofiroblast-like mesangial cells is commonly associated with the pathological process. Macrophages play an important role in regulating the growth of resident mesangial cells in the glomeruli. Alternatively activated macrophage (M2 macrophage) is a subset of macrophages induced by IL-13/IL-4, which is shown to play a repair role in glomerulonephritis. Prompted by studies of development, we performed bone marrow derived macrophage and rat mesangial cell co-culture study. Conditioned medium from IL-4 primed M2 macrophages induced rat mesangial cell apoptosis. The pro-apoptotic effect of M2 macrophages was demonstrated by condensed nuclei stained with Hoechst 33258, increased apoptosis rates by flow cytometry analysis and enhanced caspase-3 activation by western blot. Fas protein was up-regulated in rat mesangial cells, and its neutralizing antibody ZB4 partly inhibited M2 macrophage-induced apoptosis. The up-regulated arginase-1 expression in M2 macrophage also contributed to this apoptotic effect. These results indicated that the process of apoptosis triggered by conditioned medium from M2 macrophages, at least is partly conducted through Fas in rat mesangial cells. Our findings provide compelling evidence that M2 macrophages control the growth of mesangial cells in renal inflammatory conditions. - Highlights: • Conditioned-medium from M2 macrophages induces rat mesangial cell (MsC) apoptosis. • M2 macrophage conditioned medium exerts its pro-apoptotic effects via Fas ligand. • Arginase-1 activity in M2 macrophages plays a role in inducing apoptosis in rat MsC

  9. Conditioned medium from alternatively activated macrophages induce mesangial cell apoptosis via the effect of Fas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yuan; Luo, Fangjun; Li, Hui; Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Nong, E-mail: nzhang@fudan.edu.cn

    2013-11-15

    During inflammation in the glomerulus, the proliferation of myofiroblast-like mesangial cells is commonly associated with the pathological process. Macrophages play an important role in regulating the growth of resident mesangial cells in the glomeruli. Alternatively activated macrophage (M2 macrophage) is a subset of macrophages induced by IL-13/IL-4, which is shown to play a repair role in glomerulonephritis. Prompted by studies of development, we performed bone marrow derived macrophage and rat mesangial cell co-culture study. Conditioned medium from IL-4 primed M2 macrophages induced rat mesangial cell apoptosis. The pro-apoptotic effect of M2 macrophages was demonstrated by condensed nuclei stained with Hoechst 33258, increased apoptosis rates by flow cytometry analysis and enhanced caspase-3 activation by western blot. Fas protein was up-regulated in rat mesangial cells, and its neutralizing antibody ZB4 partly inhibited M2 macrophage-induced apoptosis. The up-regulated arginase-1 expression in M2 macrophage also contributed to this apoptotic effect. These results indicated that the process of apoptosis triggered by conditioned medium from M2 macrophages, at least is partly conducted through Fas in rat mesangial cells. Our findings provide compelling evidence that M2 macrophages control the growth of mesangial cells in renal inflammatory conditions. - Highlights: • Conditioned-medium from M2 macrophages induces rat mesangial cell (MsC) apoptosis. • M2 macrophage conditioned medium exerts its pro-apoptotic effects via Fas ligand. • Arginase-1 activity in M2 macrophages plays a role in inducing apoptosis in rat MsC.

  10. Purinergic signaling during macrophage differentiation results in M2 alternative activated macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberà-Cremades, Maria; Baroja-Mazo, Alberto; Pelegrín, Pablo

    2016-02-01

    Macrophages represent a highly heterogenic cell population of the innate immune system, with important roles in the initiation and resolution of the inflammatory response. Purinergic signaling regulates both M1 and M2 macrophage function at different levels by controlling the secretion of cytokines, phagocytosis, and the production of reactive oxygen species. We found that extracellular nucleotides arrest macrophage differentiation from bone marrow precursors via adenosine and P2 receptors. This results in a mature macrophage with increased expression of M2, but not M1, genes. Similar to adenosine and ATP, macrophage growth arrested with LPS treatment resulted in an increase of the M2-related marker Ym1. Recombinant Ym1 was able to affect macrophage proliferation and could, potentially, be involved in the arrest of macrophage growth during hematopoiesis. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  11. CFTR-dependent defect in alternatively-activated macrophages in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarique, Abdullah A; Sly, Peter D; Holt, Patrick G; Bosco, Anthony; Ware, Robert S; Logan, Jayden; Bell, Scott C; Wainwright, Claire E; Fantino, Emmanuelle

    2017-07-01

    The role of the macrophages in cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease has been poorly studied. We hypothesized that alternatively activated M2 macrophages are abnormal in CF lung disease. Blood samples were collected from adults (n=13) children (n=27) with CF on admission for acute pulmonary exacerbation and when clinically stable. Monocytes were differentiated into macrophages and polarized into classical (M1) and alternatively-activated (M2) phenotypes, function determined ex-vivo and compared with healthy controls. In the absence of functional cystic fibrosis trans-membrane conductance regulator (CFTR), either naturally in patients with CF or induced with CFTR inhibitors, monocyte-derived macrophages do not respond to IL-13/IL-4, fail to polarize into M2s associated with a post-transcriptional failure to produce and express IL-13Rα1 on the macrophage surface Polarization to the M1 phenotype was unaffected. CFTR-dependent imbalance of macrophage phenotypes and functions could contribute to the exaggerated inflammatory response seen in CF lung disease. Copyright © 2017 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Transcriptomic analysis of human polarized macrophages: more than one role of alternative activation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Derlindati

    Full Text Available Macrophages are a heterogeneous cell population which in response to the cytokine milieu polarize in either classically activated macrophages (M1 or alternatively activated macrophages (M2. This plasticity makes macrophages essential in regulating inflammation, immune response and tissue remodeling and a novel therapeutic target in inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis. The aim of the study was to describe the transcriptomic profiles of differently polarized human macrophages to generate new hypotheses on the biological function of the different macrophage subtypes.Polarization of circulating monocytes/macrophages of blood donors was induced in vitro by IFN-γ and LPS (M1, by IL-4 (M2a, and by IL-10 (M2c. Unstimulated cells (RM served as time controls. Gene expression profile of M1, M2a, M2c and RM was assessed at 6, 12 and 24h after polarization with Whole Human Genome Agilent Microarray technique. When compared to RM, M1 significantly upregulated pathways involved in immunity and inflammation, whereas M2a did the opposite. Conversely, decreased and increased expression of mitochondrial metabolism, consistent with insulin resistant and insulin sensitive patterns, was seen in M1 and M2a, respectively. The time sequence in the expression of some pathways appeared to have some specific bearing on M1 function. Finally, canonical and non-canonical Wnt genes and gene groups, promoting inflammation and tissue remodeling, were upregulated in M2a compared to RM.Our data in in vitro polarized human macrophages: 1. confirm and extend known inflammatory and anti-inflammatory gene expression patterns; 2. demonstrate changes in mitochondrial metabolism associated to insulin resistance and insulin sensitivity in M1 and M2a, respectively; 3. highlight the potential relevance of gene expression timing in M1 function; 4. unveil enhanced expression of Wnt pathways in M2a suggesting a potential dual (pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory role of M2a in

  13. Alternate radiolabeled markers for detecting metabolic activity of Mycobacterium leprae residing in murine macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, H.K.; Hastings, R.C.

    1985-05-01

    This study demonstrated the utility of using 4% NaOH as a murine macrophage cell-solubilizing agent to discriminate between host macrophage metabolism and that of intracellular Mycobacterium leprae. A 4% concentration of NaOH had no deleterious effect on labeled mycobacteria. Thereby, alternate radiolabeled indicators of the metabolic activity of intracellular M. leprae could be experimented with. Significant incorporation of /sup 14/C-amino acid mixture, (/sup 14/C)leucine, (/sup 14/C)uridine, and carrier-free /sup 32/P was observed in cultures containing freshly extracted (''live'') strains of M. leprae as compared with control cultures containing autoclaved bacilli.

  14. Alternate radiolabeled markers for detecting metabolic activity of Mycobacterium leprae residing in murine macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, H.K.; Hastings, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    This study demonstrated the utility of using 4% NaOH as a murine macrophage cell-solubilizing agent to discriminate between host macrophage metabolism and that of intracellular Mycobacterium leprae. A 4% concentration of NaOH had no deleterious effect on labeled mycobacteria. Thereby, alternate radiolabeled indicators of the metabolic activity of intracellular M. leprae could be experimented with. Significant incorporation of 14 C-amino acid mixture, [ 14 C]leucine, [ 14 C]uridine, and carrier-free 32 P was observed in cultures containing freshly extracted (''live'') strains of M. leprae as compared with control cultures containing autoclaved bacilli

  15. Redefining the transcriptional regulatory dynamics of classically and alternatively activated macrophages by deepCAGE transcriptomics

    KAUST Repository

    Roy, S.

    2015-06-27

    Classically or alternatively activated macrophages (M1 and M2, respectively) play distinct and important roles for microbiocidal activity, regulation of inflammation and tissue homeostasis. Despite this, their transcriptional regulatory dynamics are poorly understood. Using promoter-level expression profiling by non-biased deepCAGE we have studied the transcriptional dynamics of classically and alternatively activated macrophages. Transcription factor (TF) binding motif activity analysis revealed four motifs, NFKB1_REL_RELA, IRF1,2, IRF7 and TBP that are commonly activated but have distinct activity dynamics in M1 and M2 activation. We observe matching changes in the expression profiles of the corresponding TFs and show that only a restricted set of TFs change expression. There is an overall drastic and transient up-regulation in M1 and a weaker and more sustainable up-regulation in M2. Novel TFs, such as Thap6, Maff, (M1) and Hivep1, Nfil3, Prdm1, (M2) among others, were suggested to be involved in the activation processes. Additionally, 52 (M1) and 67 (M2) novel differentially expressed genes and, for the first time, several differentially expressed long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) transcriptome markers were identified. In conclusion, the finding of novel motifs, TFs and protein-coding and lncRNA genes is an important step forward to fully understand the transcriptional machinery of macrophage activation.

  16. Classically and alternatively activated bone marrow derived macrophages differ in cytoskeletal functions and migration towards specific CNS cell types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dijkstra Christine D

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Macrophages play an important role in neuroinflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS and spinal cord injury (SCI, being involved in both damage and repair. The divergent effects of macrophages might be explained by their different activation status: classically activated (CA/M1, pro-inflammatory, macrophages and alternatively activated (AA/M2, growth promoting, macrophages. Little is known about the effect of macrophages with these phenotypes in the central nervous system (CNS and how they influence pathogenesis. The aim of this study was therefore to determine the characteristics of these phenotypically different macrophages in the context of the CNS in an in vitro setting. Results Here we show that bone marrow derived CA and AA macrophages have a distinct migratory capacity towards medium conditioned by various cell types of the CNS. AA macrophages were preferentially attracted by the low weight ( Conclusion In conclusion, since AA macrophages are more motile and are attracted by NCM, they are prone to migrate towards neurons in the CNS. CA macrophages have a lower motility and a stronger adhesion to ECM. In neuroinflammatory diseases the restricted migration and motility of CA macrophages might limit lesion size due to bystander damage.

  17. The Transcription Factor STAT6 Mediates Direct Repression of Inflammatory Enhancers and Limits Activation of Alternatively Polarized Macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Czimmerer, Zsolt; Daniel, Bence; Horvath, Attila; Rückerl, Dominik; Nagy, Gergely; Kiss, Mate; Peloquin, Matthew; Budai, Marietta M.; Cuaranta-Monroy, Ixchelt; Simandi, Zoltan; Steiner, Laszlo; Nagy, Bela; Poliska, Szilard; Banko, Csaba; Bacso, Zsolt

    2018-01-01

    Summary The molecular basis of signal-dependent transcriptional activation has been extensively studied in macrophage polarization, but our understanding remains limited regarding the molecular determinants of repression. Here we show that IL-4-activated STAT6 transcription factor is required for the direct transcriptional repression of a large number of genes during in vitro and in vivo alternative macrophage polarization. Repression results in decreased lineage-determining transcription fac...

  18. Unlike PPARγ, PPARα or PPARβ/δ activation does not promote human monocyte differentiation toward alternative macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouhlel, Mohamed Amine; Brozek, John; Derudas, Bruno; Zawadzki, Christophe; Jude, Brigitte; Staels, Bart; Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia

    2009-01-01

    Macrophages adapt their response to micro-environmental signals. While Th1 cytokines promote pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages, Th2 cytokines promote an 'alternative' anti-inflammatory M2 macrophage phenotype. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors expressed in macrophages where they control the inflammatory response. It has been shown that PPARγ promotes the differentiation of monocytes into anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages in humans and mice, while a role for PPARβ/δ in this process has been reported only in mice and no data are available for PPARα. Here, we show that in contrast to PPARγ, expression of PPARα and PPARβ/δ overall does not correlate with the expression of M2 markers in human atherosclerotic lesions, whereas a positive correlation with genes of lipid metabolism exists. Moreover, unlike PPARγ, PPARα or PPARβ/δ activation does not influence human monocyte differentiation into M2 macrophages in vitro. Thus, PPARα and PPARβ/δ do not appear to modulate the alternative differentiation of human macrophages.

  19. Taenia crassiceps Antigens Control Experimental Type 1 Diabetes by Inducing Alternatively Activated Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza-Jiménez, Arlett; De Haro, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease caused by the selective destruction of the pancreatic β-cells, causing inability to produce insulin. Proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-12, IL-17, and NO can be released by CD4 and CD8+ lymphocytes as well as by classically activated macrophages (CAMϕs), which are important in the development of T1D. Helminth infections have been shown to prevent T1D, mainly through Th2-biased responses and increased recruitment of regulatory cell populations. Previously, we have shown that Taenia crassiceps infection in mice significantly reduces hyperglycemia, insulitis, and the incidence of T1D. In this study, we determined whether T. crassiceps-derived products such as soluble (TcS) or excreted/secreted (TcES) antigens might have a beneficial influence on the development of experimental T1D. Treatment with different doses before or after induction of T1D was analyzed. Mice that were pretreated with TcS were unable to develop T1D, whereas those receiving TcES early after T1D induction displayed significantly reduced insulitis and hyperglycemia along with increased recruitment of alternatively activated macrophages (AAMϕs) and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). Finally, we examined the modulatory role of AAMϕs on T1D by depleting macrophages with clodronate-loaded liposomes, demonstrating that AAMϕs are key cells in T1D regulation. PMID:29249872

  20. Alternatively Activated Macrophages Play an Important Role in Vascular Remodeling and Hemorrhaging in Patients with Brain Arteriovenous Malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yukihiko; Sugita, Yasuo; Nakashima, Shinji; Okada, Yousuke; Yoshitomi, Munetake; Kimura, Yoshizou; Miyoshi, Hiroaki; Morioka, Motohiro; Ohshima, Koichi

    2016-03-01

    Angiogenic and immunoactive lesions in brain arteriovenous malformation (BAVM) contribute to hemorrhagic events and the growth of BAVMs. However, the detailed mechanism is unclear. Our objective is to clarify the relationship between hemorrhagic events of BAVM and alternatively activated macrophages in the perinidal dilated capillary network (PDCN). We examined microsurgical specimens of BVMs (n = 29) and focused on the PDCN area. Ten autopsied brains without intracranial disease were the controls. We performed immunostaining of the inflammatory and endothelial cell markers, macrophage markers (CD163 and CD68), and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A). We evaluated each cell's density and the vessel density in the PDCN and analyzed the relationship to hemorrhagic events of BAVM. The PDCN was involved in all the resected arteriovenous malformations, and these vessels showed a high rate of CD105 expression (72.0 ± 10.64%), indicating newly proliferating vessels. Alternatively activated macrophages were found, with a high rate (85.6%) for all macrophages (controls, 56.6%). In the hemorrhagic cases, the cell density was significantly higher than that in the nonhemorrhagic cases and controls (hemorrhagic group, 290 ± 44 cells/mm(2); nonhemorrhagic group, 180 ± 59 cells/mm(2); and control, 19 ± 8 cells/mm(2)). The cell density of alternatively activated macrophages showed a positive correlation with the vessel density of the PDCN. Double immunostaining showed that VEGF-A was secreted by alternatively activated macrophages. Our data suggest that alternatively activated macrophages may have some relationships with angiogenesis of PDCN and hemorrhagic event of BAVM. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Intermittent fasting promotes adipose thermogenesis and metabolic homeostasis via VEGF-mediated alternative activation of macrophage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung-Han; Kim, Yun Hye; Son, Joe Eun; Lee, Ju Hee; Kim, Sarah; Choe, Min Seon; Moon, Joon Ho; Zhong, Jian; Fu, Kiya; Lenglin, Florine; Yoo, Jeong-Ah; Bilan, Philip J; Klip, Amira; Nagy, Andras; Kim, Jae-Ryong; Park, Jin Gyoon; Hussein, Samer Mi; Doh, Kyung-Oh; Hui, Chi-Chung; Sung, Hoon-Ki

    2017-11-01

    Intermittent fasting (IF), a periodic energy restriction, has been shown to provide health benefits equivalent to prolonged fasting or caloric restriction. However, our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of IF-mediated metabolic benefits is limited. Here we show that isocaloric IF improves metabolic homeostasis against diet-induced obesity and metabolic dysfunction primarily through adipose thermogenesis in mice. IF-induced metabolic benefits require fasting-mediated increases of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in white adipose tissue (WAT). Furthermore, periodic adipose-VEGF overexpression could recapitulate the metabolic improvement of IF in non-fasted animals. Importantly, fasting and adipose-VEGF induce alternative activation of adipose macrophage, which is critical for thermogenesis. Human adipose gene analysis further revealed a positive correlation of adipose VEGF-M2 macrophage-WAT browning axis. The present study uncovers the molecular mechanism of IF-mediated metabolic benefit and suggests that isocaloric IF can be a preventive and therapeutic approach against obesity and metabolic disorders.

  2. Intermittent fasting promotes adipose thermogenesis and metabolic homeostasis via VEGF-mediated alternative activation of macrophage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung-Han; Kim, Yun Hye; Son, Joe Eun; Lee, Ju Hee; Kim, Sarah; Choe, Min Seon; Moon, Joon Ho; Zhong, Jian; Fu, Kiya; Lenglin, Florine; Yoo, Jeong-Ah; Bilan, Philip J; Klip, Amira; Nagy, Andras; Kim, Jae-Ryong; Park, Jin Gyoon; Hussein, Samer MI; Doh, Kyung-Oh; Hui, Chi-chung; Sung, Hoon-Ki

    2017-01-01

    Intermittent fasting (IF), a periodic energy restriction, has been shown to provide health benefits equivalent to prolonged fasting or caloric restriction. However, our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of IF-mediated metabolic benefits is limited. Here we show that isocaloric IF improves metabolic homeostasis against diet-induced obesity and metabolic dysfunction primarily through adipose thermogenesis in mice. IF-induced metabolic benefits require fasting-mediated increases of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in white adipose tissue (WAT). Furthermore, periodic adipose-VEGF overexpression could recapitulate the metabolic improvement of IF in non-fasted animals. Importantly, fasting and adipose-VEGF induce alternative activation of adipose macrophage, which is critical for thermogenesis. Human adipose gene analysis further revealed a positive correlation of adipose VEGF-M2 macrophage-WAT browning axis. The present study uncovers the molecular mechanism of IF-mediated metabolic benefit and suggests that isocaloric IF can be a preventive and therapeutic approach against obesity and metabolic disorders. PMID:29039412

  3. Interleukin-4 ameliorates the functional recovery of intracerebral hemorrhage through the alternative activation of microglia/macrophage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianjing eYang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Neuro-inflammation plays an important role in the recovery of brain injury after stroke. Microglia/macrophage is the major executor in the neuro-inflammation, which can be polarized into two distinct phenotypes: injurious/toxic classical activation (M1 phenotype and protective alternative activation (M2 phenotype. Here, we investigated whether intracerebral administration of interleukin-4 (IL-4 at an early stage could affect the activation of microglia/macrophage and the corresponding outcome after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH. The neuro-behavior was recorded between different groups in the rat ICH model. The M1 and M2 markers were then determined by qRT-PCR, western blotting, ELISA and immunofluorescence, respectively. We observed aberrant activation of microglia/macrophage after ICH. After intracerebral injection of IL-4, M1 activation was greatly inhibited while M2 activation was enhanced, along with improving neurobehavioral recovery from deficits after ICH. Our study showed that early intracerebral injection of IL-4 potentially promotes neuro-functional recovery, probably through enhancing the alternative activation of microglia/macrophage.

  4. Classical and alternative macrophage activation in the lung following ozone-induced oxidative stress

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    Sunil, Vasanthi R., E-mail: sunilva@pharmacy.rutgers.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Patel-Vayas, Kinal; Shen, Jianliang [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Laskin, Jeffrey D. [Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Debra L. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Ozone is a pulmonary irritant known to cause oxidative stress, inflammation and tissue injury. Evidence suggests that macrophages play a role in the pathogenic response; however, their contribution depends on the mediators they encounter in the lung which dictate their function. In these studies we analyzed the effects of ozone-induced oxidative stress on the phenotype of alveolar macrophages (AM). Exposure of rats to ozone (2 ppm, 3 h) resulted in increased expression of 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), as well as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in AM. Whereas 8-OHdG was maximum at 24 h, expression of HO-1 was biphasic increasing after 3 h and 48–72 h. Cleaved caspase-9 and beclin-1, markers of apoptosis and autophagy, were also induced in AM 24 h post-ozone. This was associated with increased bronchoalveolar lavage protein and cells, as well as matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9, demonstrating alveolar epithelial injury. Ozone intoxication resulted in biphasic activation of the transcription factor, NFκB. This correlated with expression of monocyte chemotactic protein‐1, inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase‐2, markers of proinflammatory macrophages. Increases in arginase-1, Ym1 and galectin-3 positive anti-inflammatory/wound repair macrophages were also observed in the lung after ozone inhalation, beginning at 24 h (arginase-1, Ym1), and persisting for 72 h (galectin-3). This was associated with increased expression of pro-surfactant protein-C, a marker of Type II cell proliferation and activation, important steps in wound repair. These data suggest that both proinflammatory/cytotoxic and anti-inflammatory/wound repair macrophages are activated early in the response to ozone-induced oxidative stress and tissue injury. -- Highlights: ► Lung macrophages are highly sensitive to ozone induced oxidative stress. ► Ozone induces autophagy and apoptosis in lung macrophages. ► Proinflammatory and wound repair macrophages are activated

  5. Regulation of alternative macrophage activation in the liver following acetaminophen intoxication by stem cell-derived tyrosine kinase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, Carol R., E-mail: cgardner@pharmacy.rutgers.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Hankey, Pamela [Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Science, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Mishin, Vladimir; Francis, Mary [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Yu, Shan [Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Science, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Laskin, Jeffrey D. [Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Laskin, Debra L. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Stem cell-derived tyrosine kinase (STK) is a transmembrane receptor reported to play a role in macrophage switching from a classically activated/proinflammatory phenotype to an alternatively activated/wound repair phenotype. In the present studies, STK{sup −/−} mice were used to assess the role of STK in acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity as evidence suggests that the pathogenic process involves both of these macrophage subpopulations. In wild type mice, centrilobular hepatic necrosis and increases in serum transaminase levels were observed within 6 h of acetaminophen administration (300 mg/kg, i.p.). Loss of STK resulted in a significant increase in sensitivity of mice to the hepatotoxic effects of acetaminophen and increased mortality, effects independent of its metabolism. This was associated with reduced levels of hepatic glutathione, rapid upregulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase, and prolonged induction of heme oxygenase-1, suggesting excessive oxidative stress in STK{sup −/−} mice. F4/80, a marker of mature macrophages, was highly expressed on subpopulations of Kupffer cells in livers of wild type, but not STK{sup −/−} mice. Whereas F4/80{sup +} macrophages rapidly declined in the livers of wild type mice following acetaminophen intoxication, they increased in STK{sup −/−} mice. In wild type mice hepatic expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-12, products of classically activated macrophages, increased after acetaminophen administration. Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and its receptor, CCR2, as well as IL-10, mediators involved in recruiting and activating anti-inflammatory/wound repair macrophages, also increased in wild type mice after acetaminophen. Loss of STK blunted the effects of acetaminophen on expression of TNFα, IL-1β, IL-12, MCP-1 and CCR2, while expression of IL-10 increased. Hepatic expression of CX3CL1, and its receptor, CX3CR1 also increased in STK{sup −/−} mice

  6. Classically and alternatively activated bone marrow derived macrophages differ in cytoskeletal functions and migration towards specific CNS cell types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vereyken, Elly J. F.; Heijnen, Priscilla D. A. M.; Baron, Wia; de Vries, Elga H. E.; Dijkstra, Christine D.; Teunissen, Charlotte E.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Macrophages play an important role in neuroinflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS) and spinal cord injury (SCI), being involved in both damage and repair. The divergent effects of macrophages might be explained by their different activation status: classically activated

  7. Genetic programs expressed in resting and IL-4 alternatively activated mouse and human macrophages : similarities and differences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinez, Fernando O.; Helming, Laura; Milde, Ronny; Varin, Audrey; Melgert, Barbro N.; Draijer, Christina; Thomas, Benjamin; Fabbri, Marco; Crawshaw, Anjali; Ho, Ling Pei; Ten Hacken, Nick H.; Jimenez, Viviana Cobos; Kootstra, Neeltje A.; Hamann, Jorg; Greaves, David R.; Locati, Massimo; Mantovani, Alberto; Gordon, Siamon

    2013-01-01

    The molecular repertoire of macrophages in health and disease can provide novel biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment. Th2-IL-4-activated macrophages (M2) have been associated with important diseases in mice, yet no specific markers are available for their detection in human tissues.

  8. Genetic programs expressed in resting and IL-4 alternatively activated mouse and human macrophages: similarities and differences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinez, Fernando O.; Helming, Laura; Milde, Ronny; Varin, Audrey; Melgert, Barbro N.; Draijer, Christina; Thomas, Benjamin; Fabbri, Marco; Crawshaw, Anjali; Ho, Ling Pei; ten Hacken, Nick H.; Cobos Jiménez, Viviana; Kootstra, Neeltje A.; Hamann, Jörg; Greaves, David R.; Locati, Massimo; Mantovani, Alberto; Gordon, Siamon

    2013-01-01

    The molecular repertoire of macrophages in health and disease can provide novel biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment. Th2-IL-4-activated macrophages (M2) have been associated with important diseases in mice, yet no specific markers are available for their detection in human tissues.

  9. CCR2 deficiency leads to increased eosinophils, alternative macrophage activation, and type 2 cytokine expression in adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolus, W Reid; Gutierrez, Dario A; Kennedy, Arion J; Anderson-Baucum, Emily K; Hasty, Alyssa H

    2015-10-01

    Adipose tissue (AT) inflammation during obesity is mediated by immune cells and closely correlates with systemic insulin resistance. In lean AT, eosinophils are present in low but significant numbers and capable of promoting alternative macrophage activation in an IL-4/IL-13-dependent manner. In WT mice, obesity causes the proportion of AT eosinophils to decline, concomitant with inflammation and classical activation of AT macrophages. In this study, we show that CCR2 deficiency leads to increased eosinophil accumulation in AT. Furthermore, in contrast to WT mice, the increase in eosinophils in CCR2(-/-) AT is sustained and even amplified during obesity. Interestingly, a significant portion of eosinophils is found in CLSs in AT of obese CCR2(-/-) mice, which is the first time eosinophils have been shown to localize to these inflammatory hot spots. CCR2(-/-) bone marrow precursors displayed increased expression of various key eosinophil genes during in vitro differentiation to eosinophils, suggesting a potentially altered eosinophil phenotype in the absence of CCR2. In addition, the proportion of eosinophils in AT positively correlated with local expression of Il5, a potent eosinophil stimulator. The increase in eosinophils in CCR2(-/-) mice was detected in all white fat pads analyzed and in the peritoneal cavity but not in bone marrow, blood, spleen, or liver. In AT of CCR2(-/-) mice, an increased eosinophil number positively correlated with M2-like macrophages, expression of the Treg marker Foxp3, and type 2 cytokines, Il4, Il5, and Il13. This is the first study to link CCR2 function with regulation of AT eosinophil accumulation. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  10. The metabolic ER stress sensor IRE1α suppresses alternative activation of macrophages and impairs energy expenditure in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Bo; Wang, Xiaoxia; Wu, Ying; Xu, Chi; Xia, Zhixiong; Dai, Jianli; Shao, Mengle; Zhao, Feng; He, Shengqi; Yang, Liu; Zhang, Mingliang; Nan, Fajun; Li, Jia; Liu, Jianmiao; Liu, Jianfeng; Jia, Weiping; Qiu, Yifu; Song, Baoliang; Han, Jing-Dong J; Rui, Liangyou; Duan, Sheng-Zhong; Liu, Yong

    2017-05-01

    Obesity is associated with metabolic inflammation and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, both of which promote metabolic disease progression. Adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs) are key players orchestrating metabolic inflammation, and ER stress enhances macrophage activation. However, whether ER stress pathways underlie ATM regulation of energy homeostasis remains unclear. Here, we identified inositol-requiring enzyme 1α (IRE1α) as a critical switch governing M1-M2 macrophage polarization and energy balance. Myeloid-specific IRE1α abrogation in Ern1 f/f ; Lyz2-Cre mice largely reversed high-fat diet (HFD)-induced M1-M2 imbalance in white adipose tissue (WAT) and blocked HFD-induced obesity, insulin resistance, hyperlipidemia and hepatic steatosis. Brown adipose tissue (BAT) activity, WAT browning and energy expenditure were significantly higher in Ern1 f/f ; Lyz2-Cre mice. Furthermore, IRE1α ablation augmented M2 polarization of macrophages in a cell-autonomous manner. Thus, IRE1α senses protein unfolding and metabolic and immunological states, and consequently guides ATM polarization. The macrophage IRE1α pathway drives obesity and metabolic syndrome through impairing BAT activity and WAT browning.

  11. The novel biomarker of alternative macrophage activation, soluble mannose receptor (sMR/sCD206): Implications in multiple myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Morten N; Andersen, Niels F; Rødgaard-Hansen, Sidsel

    2015-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) play an important role in the pathophysiology of human malignancies. They support growth of cancer cells by promoting angiogenesis, and by inhibiting tumour cell apoptosis and anti-tumor immune reactions. Several membrane proteins are well-described markers...... of human TAMs, including the haemoglobin scavenger receptor CD163 and the macrophage mannose receptor (MR/CD206). Interestingly, both CD163 and MR exist as soluble serum proteins (sCD163 and sMR) that may reflect the activation state of tissue macrophages, including TAMs. Here, we report the first data...... showed significant association with sCD163, which may indicate common origin from CD163+MR+TAMs....

  12. Expression of scavenger receptor‐AI promotes alternative activation of murine macrophages to limit hepatic inflammation and fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labonte, Adam C.; Sung, Sun‐Sang J.; Jennelle, Lucas T.; Dandekar, Aditya P.

    2016-01-01

    The liver maintains an immunologically tolerant environment as a result of continuous exposure to food and bacterial constituents from the digestive tract. Hepatotropic pathogens can take advantage of this niche and establish lifelong chronic infections causing hepatic fibrosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Macrophages (Mϕ) play a critical role in regulation of immune responses to hepatic infection and regeneration of tissue. However, the factors crucial for Mϕ in limiting hepatic inflammation or resolving liver damage have not been fully understood. In this report, we demonstrate that expression of C‐type lectin receptor scavenger receptor‐AI (SR‐AI) is crucial for promoting M2‐like Mϕ activation and polarization during hepatic inflammation. Liver Mϕ uniquely up‐regulated SR‐AI during hepatotropic viral infection and displayed increased expression of alternativeactivation markers, such as YM‐1, arginase‐1, and interleukin‐10 by activation of mer receptor tyrosine kinase associated with inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin. Expression of these molecules was reduced on Mϕ obtained from livers of infected mice deficient for the gene encoding SR‐AI (msr1). Furthermore, in vitro studies using an SR‐AI‐deficient Mϕ cell line revealed impeded M2 polarization and decreased phagocytic capacity. Direct stimulation with virus was sufficient to activate M2 gene expression in the wild‐type (WT) cell line, but not in the knockdown cell line. Importantly, tissue damage and fibrosis were exacerbated in SR‐AI–/– mice following hepatic infection and adoptive transfer of WT bone‐marrow–derived Mϕ conferred protection against fibrosis in these mice. Conclusion: SR‐AI expression on liver Mϕ promotes recovery from infection‐induced tissue damage by mediating a switch to a proresolving Mϕ polarization state. (Hepatology 2017;65:32‐43). PMID:27770558

  13. Kupffer cells ameliorate hepatic insulin resistance induced by high-fat diet rich in monounsaturated fatty acids: the evidence for the involvement of alternatively activated macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papackova Zuzana

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Resident macrophages (Kupffer cells, KCs in the liver can undergo both pro- or anti-inflammatory activation pathway and exert either beneficiary or detrimental effects on liver metabolism. Until now, their role in the metabolically dysfunctional state of steatosis remains enigmatic. Aim of our study was to characterize the role of KCs in relation to the onset of hepatic insulin resistance induced by a high-fat (HF diet rich in monounsaturated fatty acids. Methods Male Wistar rats were fed either standard (SD or high-fat (HF diet for 4 weeks. Half of the animals were subjected to the acute GdCl3 treatment 24 and 72 hrs prior to the end of the experiment in order to induce the reduction of KCs population. We determined the effect of HF diet on activation status of liver macrophages and on the changes in hepatic insulin sensitivity and triacylglycerol metabolism imposed by acute KCs depletion by GdCl3. Results We found that a HF diet rich in MUFA itself triggers an alternative but not the classical activation program in KCs. In a steatotic, but not in normal liver, a reduction of the KCs population was associated with a decrease of alternative activation and with a shift towards the expression of pro-inflammatory activation markers, with the increased autophagy, elevated lysosomal lipolysis, increased formation of DAG, PKCε activation and marked exacerbation of HF diet-induced hepatic insulin resistance. Conclusions We propose that in the presence of a high MUFA content the population of alternatively activated resident liver macrophages may mediate beneficial effects on liver insulin sensitivity and alleviate the metabolic disturbances imposed by HF diet feeding and steatosis. Our data indicate that macrophage polarization towards an alternative state might be a useful strategy for treating type 2 diabetes.

  14. Genome-wide identification of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 and -2 binding sites in hypoxic human macrophages alternatively activated by IL-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tausendschön, Michaela; Rehli, Michael; Dehne, Nathalie; Schmidl, Christian; Döring, Claudia; Hansmann, Martin-Leo; Brüne, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages (MΦ) often accumulate in hypoxic areas, where they significantly influence disease progression. Anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-10, generate alternatively activated macrophages that support tumor growth. To understand how alternative activation affects the transcriptional profile of hypoxic macrophages, we globally mapped binding sites of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α and HIF-2α in primary human monocyte-derived macrophages prestimulated with IL-10. 713 HIF-1 and 795 HIF-2 binding sites were identified under hypoxia. Pretreatment with IL-10 altered the binding pattern, with 120 new HIF-1 and 188 new HIF-2 binding sites emerging. HIF-1 binding was most prominent in promoters, while HIF-2 binding was more abundant in enhancer regions. Comparison of ChIP-seq data obtained in other cells revealed a highly cell type specific binding of HIF. In MΦ HIF binding occurred preferentially in already active enhancers or promoters. To assess the roles of HIF on gene expression, primary human macrophages were treated with siRNA against HIF-1α or HIF-2α, followed by genome-wide gene expression analysis. Comparing mRNA expression to the HIF binding profile revealed a significant enrichment of hypoxia-inducible genes previously identified by ChIP-seq. Analysis of gene expression under hypoxia alone and hypoxia/IL-10 showed the enhanced induction of a set of genes including PLOD2 and SLC2A3, while another group including KDM3A and ADM remained unaffected or was reduced by IL-10. Taken together IL-10 influences the DNA binding pattern of HIF and the level of gene induction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Progastrin represses the alternative activation of human macrophages and modulates their influence on colon cancer epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Hernández

    Full Text Available Macrophage infiltration is a negative prognostic factor for most cancers but gastrointestinal tumors seem to be an exception. The effect of macrophages on cancer progression depends on their phenotype, which may vary between M1 (pro-inflammatory, defensive to M2 (tolerogenic, pro-tumoral. Gastrointestinal cancers often become an ectopic source of gastrins and macrophages present receptors for these peptides. The aim of the present study is to analyze whether gastrins can affect the pattern of macrophage infiltration in colorectal tumors. We have evaluated the relationship between gastrin expression and the pattern of macrophage infiltration in samples from colorectal cancer and the influence of these peptides on the phenotype of macrophages differentiated from human peripheral monocytes in vitro. The total number of macrophages (CD68+ cells was similar in tumoral and normal surrounding tissue, but the number of M2 macrophages (CD206+ cells was significantly higher in the tumor. However, the number of these tumor-associated M2 macrophages correlated negatively with the immunoreactivity for gastrin peptides in tumor epithelial cells. Macrophages differentiated from human peripheral monocytes in the presence of progastrin showed lower levels of M2-markers (CD206, IL10 with normal amounts of M1-markers (CD86, IL12. Progastrin induced similar effects in mature macrophages treated with IL4 to obtain a M2-phenotype or with LPS plus IFNγ to generate M1-macrophages. Macrophages differentiated in the presence of progastrin presented a reduced expression of Wnt ligands and decreased the number and increased cell death of co-cultured colorectal cancer epithelial cells. Our results suggest that progastrin inhibits the acquisition of a M2-phenotype in human macrophages. This effect exerted on tumor associated macrophages may modulate cancer progression and should be taken into account when analyzing the therapeutic value of gastrin immunoneutralization.

  16. A macrophage activation switch (MAcS)-index for assessment of monocyte/macrophage activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maniecki, Maciej Bogdan; Lauridsen, Mette; Knudsen, Troels Bygum

    2008-01-01

    , simplified by the M1-M2 dichotomy of classically activated (M1), pro-inflammatory cells and alternatively activated (M2), anti-inflammatory cells. Macrophages, however, display a large degree of flexibility and are able to switch between activation states (1). The hemoglobin scavenger receptor CD163...... is expressed exclusively on monocytes and macrophages, and its expression is strongly induced by anti-inflammatory stimuli like IL10 and glucocorticoid, making CD163 an ideal M2 macrophage marker (2). Furthermore a soluble variant of CD163 (sCD163) is shed from the cell surface to plasma by protease mediated.......058-5139) (panti-inflammatory state.   CONCLUSION: We present a CD163-derived macrophage activation switch (MAcS)-index, which seems able to differentiate between (predominantly) pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory macrophage activation. The index needs...

  17. The promotion of mandibular defect healing by the targeting of S1P receptors and the recruitment of alternatively activated macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Anusuya; Segar, Claire E; Hughley, Brian B; Bowers, Daniel T; Botchwey, Edward A

    2013-12-01

    Endogenous signals originating at the site of injury are involved in the paracrine recruitment, proliferation, and differentiation of circulating progenitor and diverse inflammatory cell types. Here, we investigate a strategy to exploit endogenous cell recruitment mechanisms to regenerate injured bone by local targeting and activation of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptors. A mandibular defect model was selected for evaluating regeneration of bone following trauma or congenital disease. The particular challenges of mandibular reconstruction are inherent in the complex anatomy and function of the bone given that the area is highly vascularized and in close proximity to muscle. Nanofibers composed of poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLAGA) and polycaprolactone (PCL) were used to delivery FTY720, a targeted agonist of S1P receptors 1 and 3. In vitro culture of bone progenitor cells on drug-loaded constructs significantly enhanced SDF1α mediated chemotaxis of bone marrow mononuclear cells. In vivo results show that local delivery of FTY720 from composite nanofibers enhanced blood vessel ingrowth and increased recruitment of M2 alternatively activated macrophages, leading to significant osseous tissue ingrowth into critical sized defects after 12 weeks of treatment. These results demonstrate that local activation of S1P receptors is a regenerative cue resulting in recruitment of wound healing or anti-inflammatory macrophages and bone healing. Use of such small molecule therapy can provide an alternative to biological factors for the clinical treatment of critical size craniofacial defects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The absence of MyD88 has no effect on the induction of alternatively activated macrophage during Fasciola hepatica infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luo HongLin

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alternatively activated macrophages (AAMϕ play important roles in allergies and responses to parasitic infections. However, whether signaling through toll-like receptors (TLRs plays any role in AAMϕ induction when young Fasciola hepatica penetrates the liver capsule and migrates through the liver tissue is still unclear. Results The data show that the lack of myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88 has no effect on the AAMϕ derived from the bone marrow (BMMϕ in vitro and does not impair the mRNA expression of arginase-1, resistin-like molecule (RELMα, and Ym1 in BMMϕs. The Th2 cytokine production bias in splenocytes was not significantly altered in F. hepatica-infected mice in the absence of MyD88 in vitro and in the pleural cavity lavage in vivo. In addition, MyD88-deficiency has no effect on the arginase production of the F. hepatica elicited macrophages (Fe Mϕs, production of RELMα and Ym1 proteins and mRNA expression of Ym1 and RELMα of macrophages in the peritoneal cavity 6 weeks post F. hepatica infection. Conclusions The absence of MyD88 has no effect on presence of AAMϕ 6 weeks post F. hepatica infection.

  19. Classical and alternative activation and metalloproteinase expression occurs in foam cell macrophages in male and female ApoE null mice in the absence of T- and B-lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Mo Hayes

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rupture of advanced atherosclerotic plaques accounts for most life-threatening myocardial infarctions. Classical (M1 and alternative (M2 macrophage activation could promote atherosclerotic plaque progression and rupture by increasing production of proteases, including matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs. Lymphocyte-derived cytokines may be essential for generating M1 and M2 phenotypes in plaques, although this has not been rigorously tested until now.Methods and Results: We validated the expression of M1 markers (iNOS and COX-2 and M2 markers (arginase-1, Ym-1 and CD206 and then measured MMP mRNA levels in mouse macrophages during classical and alternative activation in vitro. We then compared mRNA expression of these genes ex vivo in foam cells from subcutaneous granulomas in fat-fed immune-competent ApoE knockout and immune-compromised ApoE/Rag-1 double knockout mice, which lack all T and B cells. Furthermore, we performed immunohistochemistry in subcutaneous granulomas and in aortic root and brachiocephalic artery atherosclerotic plaques to measure the extent of M1/M2 marker and MMP protein expression in vivo. Classical activation of mouse macrophages with bacterial lipopolysaccharide in vitro increased MMPs-13, -14 and -25 but decreased MMP-19 and TIMP-2 mRNA expressions. Alternative activation with IL-4 increased MMP-19 expression. Foam cells in subcutaneous granulomas expressed all M1/M2 markers and MMPs at ex vivo mRNA and in vivo protein levels, irrespective of Rag-1 genotype. There were also similar percentages of foam cell macrophages carrying M1/M2 markers and MMPs in atherosclerotic plaques from ApoE knockout and ApoE/Rag-1 double knockout mice. Conclusions: Classical and alternative activation leads to distinct MMP expression patterns in mouse macrophages in vitro. M1 and M2 polarization in vivo occurs in the absence of T and B lymphocytes in either granuloma or plaque foam cell macrophages.

  20. Ginger extract inhibits LPS induced macrophage activation and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruch David

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Macrophages play a dual role in host defence. They act as the first line of defence by mounting an inflammatory response to antigen exposure and also act as antigen presenting cells and initiate the adaptive immune response. They are also the primary infiltrating cells at the site of inflammation. Inhibition of macrophage activation is one of the possible approaches towards modulating inflammation. Both conventional and alternative approaches are being studied in this regard. Ginger, an herbal product with broad anti inflammatory actions, is used as an alternative medicine in a number of inflammatory conditions like rheumatic disorders. In the present study we examined the effect of ginger extract on macrophage activation in the presence of LPS stimulation. Methods Murine peritoneal macrophages were stimulated by LPS in presence or absence of ginger extract and production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines were observed. We also studied the effect of ginger extract on the LPS induced expression of MHC II, B7.1, B7.2 and CD40 molecules. We also studied the antigen presenting function of ginger extract treated macrophages by primary mixed lymphocyte reaction. Results We observed that ginger extract inhibited IL-12, TNF-α, IL-1β (pro inflammatory cytokines and RANTES, MCP-1 (pro inflammatory chemokines production in LPS stimulated macrophages. Ginger extract also down regulated the expression of B7.1, B7.2 and MHC class II molecules. In addition ginger extract negatively affected the antigen presenting function of macrophages and we observed a significant reduction in T cell proliferation in response to allostimulation, when ginger extract treated macrophages were used as APCs. A significant decrease in IFN-γ and IL-2 production by T cells in response to allostimulation was also observed. Conclusion In conclusion ginger extract inhibits macrophage activation and APC function and indirectly inhibits T cell activation.

  1. DMPD: Macrophage activation by endogenous danger signals. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18161744 Macrophage activation by endogenous danger signals. Zhang X, Mosser DM. J ...Pathol. 2008 Jan;214(2):161-78. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Macrophage activation by endogenous dange...r signals. PubmedID 18161744 Title Macrophage activation by endogenous danger signals. Authors Zhang X, Moss

  2. iNOS+ macrophages: potential alternate and tool for effective tumor therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prakash, Hridayesh; KIug, Felix; Jäger, Dirk; Hammerling, Gunter; Beckhove, Philipp

    2014-01-01

    Inefficient migration of immune effector cells in the tumor is a major limitation of effective therapy against solid tumors. This is due to immunosuppressive micro environment and impermissive endothelium which protects tumors from immune attack which is attributed to massive infiltration of tumors by macrophages which are known as tumor associated macrophages which are INOS low , Arginase- 1+ , Ym- 1+ , CD206 + (known as M2 or alternatively activated or tumor associated macrophages). Accumulation of M2 has been associated with the poor prognosis in the majority of cancer patients. Radiotherapy has recently been introduced as a potential strategy to improve cancer immunotherapy and tumor immune rejection. This is the only clinically advanced approach for noninvasive, site-specific intervention in cancer patients. Majority of cancer patients are routinely irradiated with therapeutic and high doses of γ-radiations which frequently manifest severe local/systemic acute. Low dose radiation (LDR) on the other hand may provide good alternatives of HDR for avoiding such toxicities. In this line, our pioneer study demonstrated that local/systemic low dose irradiation of tumors (2 Gy) effectively modified tumor micro environment and facilitated infiltration of peripheral immune effectors cells (T-cells) in neuroendocrine tumor of pancreas called insulinoma in RIP1-Tag5 (RT5) mice and primary human pancreatic carcinoma. Such tumor infiltration of T cells remained strictly dependent on iNOS + peritumoral macrophages. Our study also explicitly revealed that adoptive transfer of iNOS expressing macrophages in unirradiated RIP1-Tag5 (RT5) also offer a promising intervention to establish those populations of macrophages in the tumor tissue that enable therapeutic efficacy of cancer immunotherapy. We here demonstrate the critical role of iNOS + macrophages in joint regulation of tumor micro environment (angiogenesis) as well as effector T cell recruitment into tumor tissue and

  3. Omega-3 fatty acids promote fatty acid utilization and production of pro-resolving lipid mediators in alternatively activated adipose tissue macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rombaldova, Martina; Janovska, Petra; Kopecky, Jan; Kuda, Ondrej

    2017-08-26

    It is becoming increasingly apparent that mutual interactions between adipocytes and immune cells are key to the integrated control of adipose tissue inflammation and lipid metabolism in obesity, but little is known about the non-inflammatory functions of adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs) and how they might be impacted by neighboring adipocytes. In the current study we used metabolipidomic analysis to examine the adaptations to lipid overload of M1 or M2 polarized macrophages co-incubated with adipocytes and explored potential benefits of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). Macrophages adjust their metabolism to process excess lipids and M2 macrophages in turn modulate lipolysis and fatty acids (FA) re-esterification of adipocytes. While M1 macrophages tend to store surplus FA as triacylglycerols and cholesteryl esters in lipid droplets, M2 macrophages channel FA toward re-esterification and β-oxidation. Dietary omega-3 PUFA enhance β-oxidation in both M1 and M2. Our data document that ATMs contribute to lipid trafficking in adipose tissue and that omega-3 PUFA could modulate FA metabolism of ATMs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Metabolic-epigenetic crosstalk in macrophage activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baardman, Jeroen; Licht, Iris; de Winther, Menno P. J.; van den Bossche, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic enzymes are emerging as crucial controllers of macrophages, innate immune cells that determine the outcome of many inflammatory diseases. Recent studies demonstrate that the activity of particular chromatin-modifying enzymes is regulated by the availability of specific metabolites like

  5. Macrophage Activation Mechanisms in Human Monocytic Cell Line-derived Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumiya, Yu; Ishikawa, Mami; Inoue, Takahiro; Inui, Toshio; Kuchiike, Daisuke; Kubo, Kentaro; Uto, Yoshihiro; Nishikata, Takahito

    2015-08-01

    Although the mechanisms of macrophage activation are important for cancer immunotherapy, they are poorly understood. Recently, easy and robust assay systems for assessing the macrophage-activating factor (MAF) using monocytic cell line-derived macrophages were established. Gene-expression profiles of U937- and THP-1-derived macrophages were compared using gene expression microarray analysis and their responses against several MAFs were examined by in vitro experiments. Activated states of these macrophages could not be assigned to a specific sub-type but showed, however, different unique characteristics. The unique of monocytic cell line-derived macrophages could provide clues to understand the activation mechanism of macrophages and, therefore, help to develop effective cancer immunotherapy with MAFs. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  6. Omega-3 fatty acids promote fatty acid utilization and production of pro-resolving lipid mediators in alternatively activated adipose tissue macrophages

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rombaldová, Martina; Janovská, Petra; Kopecký, Jan; Kuda, Ondřej

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 490, č. 3 (2017), s. 1080-1085 ISSN 0006-291X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-05151S; GA MŠk(CZ) LTAUSA17173 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : adipose tissue * macrophages * omega-3 PUFA * fatty acid re-esterification * lipolysis * lipid mediators Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition OBOR OECD: Endocrinology and metabolism (including diabetes, hormones) Impact factor: 2.466, year: 2016

  7. Legumain is activated in macrophages during pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wartmann, Thomas; Fleming, Alicia K.; Gocheva, Vasilena; van der Linden, Wouter A.; Withana, Nimali P.; Verdoes, Martijn; Aurelio, Luigi; Edgington-Mitchell, Daniel; Lieu, TinaMarie; Parker, Belinda S.; Graham, Bim; Reinheckel, Thomas; Furness, John B.; Joyce, Johanna A.; Storz, Peter; Halangk, Walter; Bogyo, Matthew; Bunnett, Nigel W.

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas characterized by dysregulated activity of digestive enzymes, necrosis, immune infiltration, and pain. Repeated incidence of pancreatitis is an important risk factor for pancreatic cancer. Legumain, a lysosomal cysteine protease, has been linked to inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis, stroke, and cancer. Until now, legumain activation has not been studied during pancreatitis. We used a fluorescently quenched activity-based probe to assess legumain activation during caerulein-induced pancreatitis in mice. We detected activated legumain by ex vivo imaging, confocal microscopy, and gel electrophoresis. Compared with healthy controls, legumain activity in the pancreas of caerulein-treated mice was increased in a time-dependent manner. Legumain was localized to CD68+ macrophages and was not active in pancreatic acinar cells. Using a small-molecule inhibitor of legumain, we found that this protease is not essential for the initiation of pancreatitis. However, it may serve as a biomarker of disease, since patients with chronic pancreatitis show strongly increased legumain expression in macrophages. Moreover, the occurrence of legumain-expressing macrophages in regions of acinar-to-ductal metaplasia suggests that this protease may influence reprogramming events that lead to inflammation-induced pancreatic cancer. PMID:27514475

  8. Acute injury in the peripheral nervous system triggers an alternative macrophage response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ydens Elke

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The activation of the immune system in neurodegeneration has detrimental as well as beneficial effects. Which aspects of this immune response aggravate the neurodegenerative breakdown and which stimulate regeneration remains an open question. To unravel the neuroprotective aspects of the immune system we focused on a model of acute peripheral nerve injury, in which the immune system was shown to be protective. Methods To determine the type of immune response triggered after axotomy of the sciatic nerve, a model for Wallerian degeneration in the peripheral nervous system, we evaluated markers representing the two extremes of a type I and type II immune response (classical vs. alternative using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR, western blot, and immunohistochemistry. Results Our results showed that acute peripheral nerve injury triggers an anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive response, rather than a pro-inflammatory response. This was reflected by the complete absence of classical macrophage markers (iNOS, IFNγ, and IL12p40, and the strong up-regulation of tissue repair markers (arginase-1, Ym1, and Trem2. The signal favoring the alternative macrophage environment was induced immediately after nerve damage and appeared to be established within the nerve, well before the infiltration of macrophages. In addition, negative regulators of the innate immune response, as well as the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 were induced. The strict regulation of the immune system dampens the potential tissue damaging effects of an over-activated response. Conclusions We here demonstrate that acute peripheral nerve injury triggers an inherent protective environment by inducing the M2 phenotype of macrophages and the expression of arginase-1. We believe that the M2 phenotype, associated with a sterile inflammatory response and tissue repair, might explain their neuroprotective capacity. As such, shifting the

  9. DMPD: Receptor tyrosine kinases and the regulation of macrophage activation. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 14726496 Receptor tyrosine kinases and the regulation of macrophage activation. Cor...osine kinases and the regulation of macrophage activation. PubmedID 14726496 Title Receptor tyrosine...rell PH, Morrison AC, Lutz MA. J Leukoc Biol. 2004 May;75(5):731-7. Epub 2004 Jan 14. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Receptor tyr

  10. Macrophage activation and its role in repair and pathology after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gensel, John C; Zhang, Bei

    2015-09-04

    The injured spinal cord does not heal properly. In contrast, tissue repair and functional recovery occur after skin or muscle injuries. The reason for this dichotomy in wound repair is unclear but inflammation, and specifically macrophage activation, likely plays a key role. Macrophages have the ability to promote the repair of injured tissue by regulating transitions through different phase of the healing response. In the current review we compare and contrast the healing and inflammatory responses between spinal cord injuries and tissues that undergo complete wound resolution. Through this comparison, we identify key macrophage phenotypes that are inaptly triggered or absent after spinal cord injury and discuss spinal cord stimuli that contribute to this maladaptive response. Sequential activation of classic, pro-inflammatory, M1 macrophages and alternatively activated, M2a, M2b, and M2c macrophages occurs during normal healing and facilitates transitions through the inflammatory, proliferative, and remodeling phases of repair. In contrast, in the injured spinal cord, pro-inflammatory macrophages potentiate a prolonged inflammatory phase and remodeling is not properly initiated. The desynchronized macrophage activation after spinal cord injury is reminiscent of the inflammation present in chronic, non-healing wounds. By refining the role macrophages play in spinal cord injury repair we bring to light important areas for future neuroinflammation and neurotrauma research. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Spinal cord injury. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Macrophage activating activity of pyrrole alkaloids from Morus alba fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seon Beom; Chang, Bo Yoon; Jo, Yang Hee; Lee, Sang Hoon; Han, Sang-Bae; Hwang, Bang Yeon; Kim, Sung Yeon; Lee, Mi Kyeong

    2013-01-09

    The fruits of Morus alba have been traditionally used as a tonic to enhance immune responses. The macrophage activating constituents of Morus alba fruits were purified using various column chromatography techniques. The structures of isolated compounds were determined on the basis of spectroscopic data interpretation such as 1D and 2D NMR analysis. The macrophage activating activities of isolated compounds were evaluated by measuring the production of nitric oxide, TNF-α and IL-12 in RAW 264.7 cells. The phagocytic activity was also evaluated. Five pyrrole alkaloids, 5-(hydroxymethyl)-1H-pyrrole-2-carboxaldehyde (1), 2-formyl-1H-pyrrole-1-butanoic acid (2), 2-formyl-5-(hydroxymethyl)-1H-pyrrole-1-butanoic acid (3), 2-formyl-5-(methoxymethyl)-1H-pyrrole-1-butanoic acid (4) and Morrole A (5) were isolated from the fruits of Morus alba. Morrole A (5) is first reported in nature and other pyrrole alkaloids (1-4) are first reported from Morus species. Among the isolated compounds, compounds 3 and 4 significantly activated macrophage activity by the enhancement of nitric oxide, TNF-α and IL-12 production, and the stimulation of phagocytic activity in RAW 264.7 cells. Pyrrole alkaloids, including a new compound, were isolated from Morus alba fruits. These compounds activated macrophage activity in RAW 264.7 cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Functional modifications of macrophage activity after sublethal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swartz, R.P.

    1982-01-01

    The modifications of macrophage activity following sublethal irradiation, both in vivo and in vitro, were studied using spreading and C3b-receptor-mediated ingestion assays. Nonelicited peritoneal washout cells were examined for changes in activity and selected population characteristics. The cells from irradiated mice were from a resident peritoneal population and not immigrating cells. The macrophage population showed enhanced activity early with a refractory period (24-48) when the macrophages were unresponsive to stimulation by irradiated lymphocytes. The enhanced activity was inversely dose dependent on macrophage. The lymphocytes showed a regulatory function(s) on the time post irradiation at which they were examined. Early lymphocytes exhibited the ability to enhance the activity of normal macrophages while lymphocytes removed 24 hours post irradiation could suppress the activity of already activated macrophages. The effect(s) of the various lymphocyte populations were reproduced with cell-free supernatants which was indicative of the production of lymphokines. Separation on nylon wool columns indicated that the activity resided primarily in the T-cell population of lymphocytes. In vitro irradiation indicated that stimulation of the lymphocytes is macrophage dependent. Additional work indicated that sublethally irradiated macrophages did not inhibit replication of the coccidian protozoon Toxoplasma gondii although they did show increased phagocytosis. Examination of the serum from whole body irradiated mice showed the presence of a postirradiation substance which enhanced the phagocytosis of normal macrophages. It was not present in the serum of normal mice and was not endotoxin

  13. Immunomodulatory activity of andrographolide on macrophage activation and specific antibody response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Jing; Dong, Sheng-fu; Liu, Chun-hong; Italiani, Paola; Sun, Shu-hui; Xu, Jing; Boraschi, Diana; Ma, Shi-ping; Qu, Di

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the immunomodulatory effects of andrographolide on both innate and adaptive immune responses. Methods: Andrographolide (10 μg/mL in vitro or 1 mg/kg in vivo) was used to modulate LPS-induced classical activated (M1) or IL-4-induced alternative activated (M2) macrophages in vitro and humor immune response to HBsAg in vivo. Cytokine gene expression profile (M1 vs M2) was measured by real-time PCR, IL-12/IL-10 level was detected by ELISA, and surface antigen expression was evaluated by flow cytometry, whereas phosphorylation level of ERK 1/2 and AKT was determined by Western blot. The level of anti-HBs antibodies in HBsAg immunized mice was detected by ELISA, and the number of HBsAg specific IL-4-producing splenocyte was enumerated by ELISPOT. Results: Andrographolide treatment in vitro attenuated either LPS or IL-4 induced macrophage activation, inhibited both M1 and M2 cytokines expression and decreased IL-12/IL-10 ratio (the ratio of M1/M2 polarization). Andrographolide down-regulated the expression of mannose receptor (CD206) in IL-4 induced macrophages and major histocompability complex/costimulatory molecules (MHC I, CD40, CD80, CD86) in LPS-induced macrophages. Correspondingly, anti-HBs antibody production and the number of IL-4-producing splenocytes were reduced by in vivo administration of andrographolide. Reduced phosphorylation levels of ERK1/2 and AKT were observed in macrophages treated with andrographolide. Conclusion: Andrographolide can modulate the innate and adaptive immune responses by regulating macrophage phenotypic polarization and Ag-specific antibody production. MAPK and PI3K signaling pathways may participate in the mechanisms of andrographolide regulating macrophage activation and polarization. PMID:20139902

  14. DMPD: Genetic regulation of macrophage priming/activation: the Lsh gene story. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1757110 Genetic regulation of macrophage priming/activation: the Lsh gene story. Bl... (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Genetic regulation of macrophage priming/activation: the Lsh gene story. Pubmed...ID 1757110 Title Genetic regulation of macrophage priming/activation: the Lsh gen

  15. Crotoxin stimulates an M1 activation profile in murine macrophages during Leishmania amazonensis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farias, L H S; Rodrigues, A P D; Coêlho, E C; Santos, M F; Sampaio, S C; Silva, E O

    2017-09-01

    American tegumentary leishmaniasis is caused by different species of Leishmania. This protozoan employs several mechanisms to subvert the microbicidal activity of macrophages and, given the limited efficacy of current therapies, the development of alternative treatments is essential. Animal venoms are known to exhibit a variety of pharmacological activities, including antiparasitic effects. Crotoxin (CTX) is the main component of Crotalus durissus terrificus venom, and it has several biological effects. Nevertheless, there is no report of CTX activity during macrophage - Leishmania interactions. Thus, the main objective of this study was to evaluate whether CTX has a role in macrophage M1 polarization during Leishmania infection murine macrophages, Leishmania amazonensis promastigotes and L. amazonensis-infected macrophages were challenged with CTX. MTT [3-(4,5dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrasodium bromide] toxicity assays were performed on murine macrophages, and no damage was observed in these cells. Promastigotes, however, were affected by treatment with CTX (IC50 = 22·86 µg mL-1) as were intracellular amastigotes. Macrophages treated with CTX also demonstrated increased reactive oxygen species production. After they were infected with Leishmania, macrophages exhibited an increase in nitric oxide production that converged into an M1 activation profile, as suggested by their elevated production of the cytokines interleukin-6 and tumour necrosis factor-α and changes in their morphology. CTX was able to reverse the L. amazonensis-mediated inhibition of macrophage immune responses and is capable of polarizing macrophages to the M1 profile, which is associated with a better prognosis for cutaneous leishmaniasis treatment.

  16. DMPD: Molecular mechanisms of macrophage activation and deactivation bylipopolysaccharide: roles of the receptor complex. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 14609719 Molecular mechanisms of macrophage activation and deactivation bylipopolys...acol Ther. 2003 Nov;100(2):171-94. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Molecular mechanisms of macrophage act...medID 14609719 Title Molecular mechanisms of macrophage activation and deactivation bylipopolysaccharide: ro

  17. Understanding the Mysterious M2 Macrophage through Activation Markers and Effector Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rőszer, Tamás

    2015-01-01

    The alternatively activated or M2 macrophages are immune cells with high phenotypic heterogeneity and are governing functions at the interface of immunity, tissue homeostasis, metabolism, and endocrine signaling. Today the M2 macrophages are identified based on the expression pattern of a set of M2 markers. These markers are transmembrane glycoproteins, scavenger receptors, enzymes, growth factors, hormones, cytokines, and cytokine receptors with diverse and often yet unexplored functions. This review discusses whether these M2 markers can be reliably used to identify M2 macrophages and define their functional subdivisions. Also, it provides an update on the novel signals of the tissue environment and the neuroendocrine system which shape the M2 activation. The possible evolutionary roots of the M2 macrophage functions are also discussed. PMID:26089604

  18. Effects of lipopolysaccharide on the catabolic activity of macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cluff, C.; Ziegler, H.K.

    1986-01-01

    The ability of macrophages to degrade and catabolize antigens is of relevance both as a means to process complex antigens prior to presentation to T cells, as well as a way to down regulate immune responses by destroying the antigenicity of polypeptides. With these considerations, the authors have investigated the regulation of macrophage catabolic activity by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Catabolic activity was quantitated by following the distribution and molecular form of 125 -I labelled surface components of heat-killed Listeria monocytogenes (HKLM) subsequent to their uptake by macrophages. They have compared the catabolic activity of macrophages from peritoneal exudates of mice injected i.p. with saline or LPS and have found that LPS-elicited macrophages display a greatly enhanced (3 fold) rate of catabolism. This increase in catabolic activity peaks 3 days after LPS injection and steadily declines thereafter, approaching a baseline level after 3 weeks. The enhancement of catabolic activity is under LPS gene control. LPS-elicited macrophages rapidly destroy the antigenicity of bacterial antigens and function poorly as antigen presenting cells in vitro. These results suggest that LPS elicits a macrophage population specialized for antigen degradation functions with negative regulatory effects on the induction of specific immune responses

  19. [Macrophage activation in atherosclerosis. Message 1: Activation of macrophages normally and in atherosclerotic lesions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikiforov, N G; Kornienko, V Y; Karagodin, V P; Orekhov, A N

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages play important role in initiation and progression of inflammation in atherosclerosis. Plaque macrophages were shown to exhibit a phenotypic range that is intermediate between two extremes, M1 (proinflammatory) and M2 (anti-inflammatory). Indeed, in atherosclerosis, macrophages demonstrate phenotypic plasticity to rapidly adjust to changing microenvironmental conditions. In plaque macrophages demonstrate different phenotypes, and besides macrophage phenotypes could be changed. Phenotypes M1, M2, M4, Mhem, HA-mac, M(Hb) u Mox are described in the article. Ability of macrophages change their phenotype also considered.

  20. Therapeutic potential of carbohydrates as regulators of macrophage activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundahl, Mimmi L E; Scanlan, Eoin M; Lavelle, Ed C

    2017-12-15

    It is well established for a broad range of disease states, including cancer and Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, that pathogenesis is bolstered by polarisation of macrophages towards an anti-inflammatory phenotype, known as M2. As these innate immune cells are relatively long-lived, their re-polarisation to pro-inflammatory, phagocytic and bactericidal "classically activated" M1 macrophages is an attractive therapeutic approach. On the other hand, there are scenarios where the resolving inflammation, wound healing and tissue remodelling properties of M2 macrophages are beneficial - for example the successful introduction of biomedical implants. Although there are numerous endogenous and exogenous factors that have an impact on the macrophage polarisation spectrum, this review will focus specifically on prominent macrophage-modulating carbohydrate motifs with a view towards highlighting structure-function relationships and therapeutic potential. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Soluble ICAM-1 activates lung macrophages and enhances lung injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmal, H; Czermak, B J; Lentsch, A B

    1998-01-01

    production of TNF-alpha and the CXC chemokine, macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2). Alveolar macrophages exhibited cytokine responses to both sICAM-1 and immobilized sICAM-1, while rat PBMCs failed to demonstrate similar responses. Exposure of alveolar macrophages to sICAM-1 resulted in NFkappa......B activation (which was blocked by the presence of the aldehyde peptide inhibitor of 28S proteosome and by genistein, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor). As expected, cross-linking of CD18 on macrophages with Ab resulted in generation of TNF-alpha and MIP-2. This response was also inhibited in the presence...... of TNF-alpha and MIP-2 and increased neutrophil recruitment. Therefore, through engagement of beta2 integrins, sICAM-1 enhances alveolar macrophage production of MIP-2 and TNF-alpha, the result of which is intensified lung injury after intrapulmonary disposition of immune complexes....

  2. Glycyrrhizic Acid Promotes M1 Macrophage Polarization in Murine Bone Marrow-Derived Macrophages Associated with the Activation of JNK and NF-κB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yulong; Wang, Baikui; Xu, Xin; Du, Wei; Li, Weifen; Wang, Youming

    2015-01-01

    The roots and rhizomes of Glycyrrhiza species (licorice) have been widely used as natural sweeteners and herbal medicines. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of glycyrrhizic acid (GA) from licorice on macrophage polarization. Both phenotypic and functional activities of murine bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) treated by GA were assessed. Our results showed that GA obviously increased the cell surface expression of CD80, CD86, and MHCII molecules. Meanwhile, GA upregulated the expression of CCR7 and the production of TNF-α, IL-12, IL-6, and NO (the markers of classically activated (M1) macrophages), whereas it downregulated the expression of MR, Ym1, and Arg1 (the markers of alternatively activated (M2) macrophage). The functional tests showed that GA dramatically enhanced the uptake of FITC-dextran and E. coli K88 by BMDMs and decreased the intracellular survival of E. coli K88 and S. typhimurium. Moreover, we demonstrated that JNK and NF-κB activation are required for GA-induced NO and M1-related cytokines production, while ERK1/2 pathway exhibits a regulatory effect via induction of IL-10. Together, these findings indicated that GA promoted polarization of M1 macrophages and enhanced its phagocytosis and bactericidal capacity. The results expanded our knowledge about the role of GA in macrophage polarization.

  3. Novel phosphate-activated macrophages prevent ectopic calcification by increasing extracellular ATP and pyrophosphate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa-Bellosta, Ricardo; Hamczyk, Magda R.; Andrés, Vicente

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Phosphorus is an essential nutrient involved in many pathobiological processes. Less than 1% of phosphorus is found in extracellular fluids as inorganic phosphate ion (Pi) in solution. High serum Pi level promotes ectopic calcification in many tissues, including blood vessels. Here, we studied the effect of elevated Pi concentration on macrophage polarization and calcification. Macrophages, present in virtually all tissues, play key roles in health and disease and display remarkable plasticity, being able to change their physiology in response to environmental cues. Methods and results High-throughput transcriptomic analysis and functional studies demonstrated that Pi induces unpolarized macrophages to adopt a phenotype closely resembling that of alternatively-activated M2 macrophages, as revealed by arginine hydrolysis and energetic and antioxidant profiles. Pi-induced macrophages showed an anti-calcifying action mediated by increased availability of extracellular ATP and pyrophosphate. Conclusion We conclude that the ability of Pi-activated macrophages to prevent calcium-phosphate deposition is a compensatory mechanism protecting tissues from hyperphosphatemia-induced pathologic calcification. PMID:28362852

  4. Effect of irradiation on lysosomal enzyme activation in cultured macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, C.; Wills, E.D.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of γrays on lysosomal enzyme activity of normal and immune macrophages of DBA/2 mice cultured in vitro has been studied. A dose of 500 rad did not significantly affect lysosomal enzyme activity 3 hours after irradiation but caused the activity to increase to 1.4 times the control value 22.5 hours after irradiation. 22.5 hours after a dose of 3000 rad the enzyme activity increased to 2.5 times the control. Lysosomal enzyme activity of the macrophages was also markedly increased by immunization of the mice with D lymphoma cells, before culture in vitro, but irradiation of these cells with a dose of 500 rad caused a further increase in lysosomal enzyme activity. The results indicate that immunization and irradiation both cause stimulation of lysosomal enzyme activity in macrophages but that the mechanisms of activation are unlikely to be identical. (author)

  5. Modulation of human macrophage activity by Ascaris antigens is dependent on macrophage polarization state

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almeida, Sara; Nejsum, Peter; Williams, Andrew R.

    2018-01-01

    Parasitic worms (helminths) are known to actively modulate host immune responses and inflammation. The aim of this study was to investigate if adult body fluid (ABF) from the helminth Ascaris suum has immunomodulatory effects on different subtypes of human monocyte-derived macrophages (Mɸ) in vitro...

  6. Mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 expression in macrophages is controlled by lymphocytes during macrophage activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Chong; Yang, Xiqiang; Yao, Lan; Jiang, Liping; Liu, Wei; Li, Xin; Wang, Lijia

    2012-01-01

    The viewpoints on the control of innate immune cells by the adaptive immune system during sepsis remain controversial. Mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) is essential to the negative control of innate immunity and suppresses the activation of macrophages by inhibiting activated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). The purpose of the current study was to observe inflammatory response and macrophage activation in mice with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) with endotoxemia and to determine the role of MKP-1 in the control of macrophage activation by the adaptive immune system. Endotoxemia was induced in wild-type and SCID mice by an intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and all of the SCID mice died. SCID mice produced more inflammatory cytokines than BALB/c mice systemically and locally. TNF-α mRNA expression was higher and MKP-1 mRNA expression was lower in peritoneal macrophages (PMa) from SCID mice compared to PMa from wild-type mice after and even before LPS injection. Thioglycollate-stimulated PMa from wild-type mice were stimulated with LPS in vitro in the presence or absence of pan-T cells. The levels of TNF-α and IL-6 were higher in the supernatants from PMa cultured alone compared to PMa co-cultured with pan-T cells, and PMa MKP-1 mRNA and protein expression were higher when PMa were co-cultured with pan-T cells. Therefore, pan-T cells can up-regulate MKP-1 expression in macrophages and inhibit the secretion of inflammatory cytokines secretion by macrophages. In SCID mice, lymphocyte deficiency, especially T cell deficiency, causes insufficient MKP-1 expression in macrophages, which can be responsible for the severe inflammation and bad prognosis of septic SCID mice. MKP-1 plays an important role in the control of macrophage activation by the adaptive immune system.

  7. DMPD: Macrophage-stimulating protein and RON receptor tyrosine kinase: potentialregulators of macrophage inflammatory activities. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 12472665 Macrophage-stimulating protein and RON receptor tyrosine kinase: potential...:545-53. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Macrophage-stimulating protein and RON receptor tyrosine kinase:...le Macrophage-stimulating protein and RON receptor tyrosine kinase: potentialregulators of macrophage inflam

  8. The role of PTEN in regulation of hepatic macrophages activation and function in progression and reversal of liver fibrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Yahui; Tian, Yuanyao; Xia, Jialu; Wu, Xiaoqin; Yang, Yang; Li, Xiaofeng; Huang, Cheng; Meng, Xiaoming; Ma, Taotao; Li, Jun, E-mail: lj@ahmu.edu.cn

    2017-02-15

    Activation of Kupffer cells (KCs) plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis. The progression and reversal of CCl{sub 4}-induced mouse liver fibrosis showed a mixed induction of hepatic classical (M1) and alternative (M2) macrophage markers. Although the role of phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) in modulating myeloid cell activation has recently been identified, its function in macrophage activation during hepatic fibrosis remains to be fully appreciated. In our study, PTEN expression of KCs was remarkably decreased in CCl{sub 4}-induced mice but increased to a near-normal level in reversed mice. Moreover, PTEN was significantly decreased in IL4-induced RAW 264.7 cells in vitro and lower expression of PTEN was observed in M2 macrophages in vivo. In addition, loss- and gain-of-function studies suggested that PTEN regulates M2 macrophages polarization via activation of PI3K/Akt/STAT6 signaling, but had a limited effect on M1 macrophages polarization in vitro. Additionally, Ly294002, a chemical inhibitor of PI3K/Akt, could dramatically down-regulate the hallmarks of M2 macrophages. In conclusion, PTEN mediates macrophages activation by PI3K/Akt/STAT6 signaling pathway, which provides novel compelling evidences on the potential of PTEN in liver injury and opens new cellular target for the pharmacological therapy of liver fibrosis. - Highlights: • CCl{sub 4} treatment triggered a mixed M1/M2 macrophage phenotype in fibrosis. • Lower expression of PTEN in murine M2 macrophages in vivo and vitro. • PTEN modulates M2 macrophages activation via PI3K/Akt/STAT6 signaling. • Provide a new cellular target modulate macrophage mediated hepatic fibrosis.

  9. Microbial stasis of Leishmania enriettii in activated guinea pig macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groocock, C.M.; Soulsby, E.J.L.

    1980-01-01

    Peritoneal exudate cells (PEC) from Leishmania-sensitized guinea pigs were cultured in vitro in the presence (activated) or absence (non-activated) of leishmanial antigen for 24 or 48 hours. These were then labelled with 51 Cr and challenged with 125 I-labelled promastigotes. The changing relationship between the macrophage and the parasite was monitored by observing changes in the ratio of the cell-associated isotopes. Highly significant differences in the ratio change developed during culture. These differences were a result of the activated cultures showing a higher release of 51 Cr and a lower release of 125 I when compared with the non-activated cells, at 12 hours the percentage release of 125 I from the parasite within the activated macrophage was fourfold less than that released by parasites within non-activated cells (9.2% versus 38.3%) and tenfold less than that released from glutaraldehyde-killed organisms phagocytosed by activated macrophages (91.6%). These studies indicate that stasis rather than killing of leishmaniae occurs in the activated macrophage in vitro. Parallel experiments evaluated by the visual counting of leishmaniae within the macrophages support these data. PEC from tuberculin-sensitized guinea pigs activated in vitro by purified protein derivative showed little or no activity against leishmaniae, indicating a specific requirement for this microbial stasis by activated macrophages. As a corollary of this, peritoneal exudate lymphocytes separated from the same preparations of PEC were shown to be specifically reactive to leishmanial antigen by transformation and incorporation of 3 H-thymidine. (author)

  10. Gene expression in IFN-g-activated murine macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira C.A.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are critical for natural immunity and play a central role in specific acquired immunity. The IFN-gamma activation of macrophages derived from A/J or BALB/c mice yielded two different patterns of antiviral state in murine hepatitis virus 3 infection, which were related to a down-regulation of the main virus receptor. Using cDNA hybridization to evaluate mRNA accumulation in the cells, we were able to identify several genes that are differently up- or down-regulated by IFN-gamma in A/J (267 and 266 genes, respectively, up- and down-regulated or BALB/c (297 and 58 genes, respectively, up- and down-regulated mouse macrophages. Macrophages from mice with different genetic backgrounds behave differently at the molecular level and comparison of the patterns of non-activated and IFN-gamma-activated A/J or BALB/c mouse macrophages revealed, for instance, an up-regulation and a down-regulation of genes coding for biological functions such as enzymatic reactions, nucleic acid synthesis and transport, protein synthesis, transport and metabolism, cytoskeleton arrangement and extracellular matrix, phagocytosis, resistance and susceptibility to infection and tumors, inflammation, and cell differentiation or activation. The present data are reported in order to facilitate future correlation of proteomic/transcriptomic findings as well as of results obtained from a classical approach for the understanding of biological phenomena. The possible implication of the role of some of the gene products relevant to macrophage biology can now be further scrutinized. In this respect, a down-regulation of the main murine hepatitis virus 3 receptor gene was detected only in IFN-gamma-activated macrophages of resistant mice.

  11. Antibodies trap tissue migrating helminth larvae and prevent tissue damage by driving IL-4Rα-independent alternative differentiation of macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Esser-von Bieren

    Full Text Available Approximately one-third of the world's population suffers from chronic helminth infections with no effective vaccines currently available. Antibodies and alternatively activated macrophages (AAM form crucial components of protective immunity against challenge infections with intestinal helminths. However, the mechanisms by which antibodies target these large multi-cellular parasites remain obscure. Alternative activation of macrophages during helminth infection has been linked to signaling through the IL-4 receptor alpha chain (IL-4Rα, but the potential effects of antibodies on macrophage differentiation have not been explored. We demonstrate that helminth-specific antibodies induce the rapid trapping of tissue migrating helminth larvae and prevent tissue necrosis following challenge infection with the natural murine parasite Heligmosomoides polygyrus bakeri (Hp. Mice lacking antibodies (JH (-/- or activating Fc receptors (FcRγ(-/- harbored highly motile larvae, developed extensive tissue damage and accumulated less Arginase-1 expressing macrophages around the larvae. Moreover, Hp-specific antibodies induced FcRγ- and complement-dependent adherence of macrophages to larvae in vitro, resulting in complete larval immobilization. Antibodies together with helminth larvae reprogrammed macrophages to express wound-healing associated genes, including Arginase-1, and the Arginase-1 product L-ornithine directly impaired larval motility. Antibody-induced expression of Arginase-1 in vitro and in vivo occurred independently of IL-4Rα signaling. In summary, we present a novel IL-4Rα-independent mechanism of alternative macrophage activation that is antibody-dependent and which both mediates anti-helminth immunity and prevents tissue disruption caused by migrating larvae.

  12. DMPD: Macrophage activation through CCR5- and CXCR4-mediated gp120-elicited signalingpathways. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 12960231 Macrophage activation through CCR5- and CXCR4-mediated gp120-elicited sign...82. Epub 2003 Jul 22. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Macrophage activation through CCR5- and CXCR4-media...on through CCR5- and CXCR4-mediated gp120-elicited signalingpathways. Authors Lee C, Liu QH, Tomkowicz B, Yi

  13. Periodontitis-activated monocytes/macrophages cause aortic inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyajima, Shin-ichi; Naruse, Keiko; Kobayashi, Yasuko; Nakamura, Nobuhisa; Nishikawa, Toru; Adachi, Kei; Suzuki, Yuki; Kikuchi, Takeshi; Mitani, Akio; Mizutani, Makoto; Ohno, Norikazu; Noguchi, Toshihide; Matsubara, Tatsuaki

    2014-01-01

    A relationship between periodontal disease and atherosclerosis has been suggested by epidemiological studies. Ligature-induced experimental periodontitis is an adequate model for clinical periodontitis, which starts from plaque accumulation, followed by inflammation in the periodontal tissue. Here we have demonstrated using a ligature-induced periodontitis model that periodontitis activates monocytes/macrophages, which subsequently circulate in the blood and adhere to vascular endothelial cells without altering the serum TNF-α concentration. Adherent monocytes/macrophages induced NF-κB activation and VCAM-1 expression in the endothelium and increased the expression of the TNF-α signaling cascade in the aorta. Peripheral blood-derived mononuclear cells from rats with experimental periodontitis showed enhanced adhesion and increased NF-κB/VCAM-1 in cultured vascular endothelial cells. Our results suggest that periodontitis triggers the initial pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, inflammation of the vasculature, through activating monocytes/macrophages. PMID:24893991

  14. Dysregulation of Macrophage Activation Profiles by Engineered Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kodali, Vamsi; Littke, Matthew H.; Tilton, Susan C.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Shi, Liang; Frevert, Charles W.; Wang, Wei; Pounds, Joel G.; Thrall, Brian D.

    2013-08-27

    Although the potential human health impacts from exposure to engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) are uncertain, past epidemiological studies have established correlations between exposure to ambient air pollution particulates and the incidence of pneumonia and lung infections. Using amorphous silica and superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) as model high production volume ENPs, we examined how macrophage activation by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or the lung pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae is altered by ENP pretreatment. Neither silica nor SPIO treatment elicited direct cytotoxic or pro-inflammatory effects in bone marrow-derived macrophages. However, pretreatment of macrophages with SPIO caused extensive reprogramming of nearly 500 genes regulated in response to LPS challenge, hallmarked by exaggerated activation of oxidative stress response pathways and suppressed activation of both pro- and anti-inflammatory pathways. Silica pretreatment altered regulation of only 67 genes, but there was strong correlation with gene sets affected by SPIO. Macrophages exposed to SPIO displayed a phenotype suggesting an impaired ability to transition from an M1 to M2-like activation state, characterized by suppressed IL-10 induction, enhanced TNFα production, and diminished phagocytic activity toward S. pneumoniae. Studies in macrophages deficient in scavenger receptor A (SR-A) showed SR-A participates in cell uptake of both the ENPs and S. pneumonia and co-regulates the anti-inflammatory IL-10 pathway. Thus, mechanisms for dysregulation of innate immunity exist by virtue that common receptor recognition pathways are used by some ENPs and pathogenic bacteria, although the extent of transcriptional reprogramming of macrophage function depends on the physicochemical properties of the ENP after internalization. Our results also illustrate that biological effects of ENPs may be indirectly manifested only after challenging normal cell function. Finally, nanotoxicology screening

  15. Protein energy malnutrition increases arginase activity in monocytes and macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corware, Karina; Yardley, Vanessa; Mack, Christopher; Schuster, Steffen; Al-Hassi, Hafid; Herath, Shanthi; Bergin, Philip; Modolell, Manuel; Munder, Markus; Müller, Ingrid; Kropf, Pascale

    2014-01-01

    Protein energy malnutrition is commonly associated with immune dysfunctions and is a major factor in susceptibility to infectious diseases. In this study, we evaluated the impact of protein energy malnutrition on the capacity of monocytes and macrophages to upregulate arginase, an enzyme associated with immunosuppression and increased pathogen replication. Our results show that monocytes and macrophages are significantly increased in the bone marrow and blood of mice fed on a protein low diet. No alteration in the capacity of bone marrow derived macrophages isolated from malnourished mice to phagocytose particles, to produce the microbicidal molecule nitric oxide and to kill intracellular Leishmania parasites was detected. However, macrophages and monocytes from malnourished mice express significantly more arginase both in vitro and in vivo. Using an experimental model of visceral leishmaniasis, we show that following protein energy malnutrition, the increased parasite burden measured in the spleen of these mice coincided with increased arginase activity and that macrophages provide a more permissive environment for parasite growth. Taken together, these results identify a novel mechanism in protein energy malnutrition that might contributes to increased susceptibility to infectious diseases by upregulating arginase activity in myeloid cells.

  16. Macrophage heterogeneity and cholesterol homeostasis: classically-activated macrophages are associated with reduced cholesterol accumulation following treatment with oxidized LDL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Eugene M; Tai, Daven C; Beer, Jennifer L; Hill, John S

    2013-02-01

    Macrophages are centrally involved during atherosclerosis development and are the predominant cell type that accumulates cholesterol in the plaque. Macrophages however, are heterogeneous in nature reflecting a variety of microenvironments and different phenotypes may be more prone to contribute towards atherosclerosis progression. Using primary human monocyte-derived macrophages, we sought to evaluate one aspect of atherogenic potential of different macrophage phenotypes by determining their propensity to associate with and accumulate oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL). Classically-activated macrophages treated simultaneously with interferon γ (IFNγ) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) associated with less oxLDL and accumulated less cholesterol compared to untreated controls. The combined treatment of IFNγ and TNFα reduced the mRNA expression of CD36 and the expression of both cell surface CD36 and macrophage scavenger receptor 1 (MSR1) protein. Under oxLDL loaded conditions, IFNγ and TNFα did not reduce macrophage protein expression of the transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-actived receptor γ (PPARγ) which is known to positively regulate CD36 expression. However, macrophages treated with IFNγ attenuated the ability of the PPARγ-specific agonist rosiglitazone from upregulating cell surface CD36 protein expression. Our results demonstrate that the observed reduction of cholesterol accumulation in macrophages treated with IFNγ and TNFα following oxLDL treatment was due at least in part to reduced cell surface CD36 and MSR1 protein expression. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Dopamine receptor activation increases HIV entry into primary human macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J Gaskill

    Full Text Available Macrophages are the primary cell type infected with HIV in the central nervous system, and infection of these cells is a major component in the development of neuropathogenesis and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Within the brains of drug abusers, macrophages are exposed to increased levels of dopamine, a neurotransmitter that mediates the addictive and reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse such as cocaine and methamphetamine. In this study we examined the effects of dopamine on HIV entry into primary human macrophages. Exposure to dopamine during infection increased the entry of R5 tropic HIV into macrophages, irrespective of the concentration of the viral inoculum. The entry pathway affected was CCR5 dependent, as antagonizing CCR5 with the small molecule inhibitor TAK779 completely blocked entry. The effect was dose-dependent and had a steep threshold, only occurring above 108 M dopamine. The dopamine-mediated increase in entry required dopamine receptor activation, as it was abrogated by the pan-dopamine receptor antagonist flupenthixol, and could be mediated through both subtypes of dopamine receptors. These findings indicate that the effects of dopamine on macrophages may have a significant impact on HIV pathogenesis. They also suggest that drug-induced increases in CNS dopamine may be a common mechanism by which drugs of abuse with distinct modes of action exacerbate neuroinflammation and contribute to HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders in infected drug abusers.

  18. Dopamine Receptor Activation Increases HIV Entry into Primary Human Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskill, Peter J.; Yano, Hideaki H.; Kalpana, Ganjam V.; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Berman, Joan W.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are the primary cell type infected with HIV in the central nervous system, and infection of these cells is a major component in the development of neuropathogenesis and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Within the brains of drug abusers, macrophages are exposed to increased levels of dopamine, a neurotransmitter that mediates the addictive and reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse such as cocaine and methamphetamine. In this study we examined the effects of dopamine on HIV entry into primary human macrophages. Exposure to dopamine during infection increased the entry of R5 tropic HIV into macrophages, irrespective of the concentration of the viral inoculum. The entry pathway affected was CCR5 dependent, as antagonizing CCR5 with the small molecule inhibitor TAK779 completely blocked entry. The effect was dose-dependent and had a steep threshold, only occurring above 108 M dopamine. The dopamine-mediated increase in entry required dopamine receptor activation, as it was abrogated by the pan-dopamine receptor antagonist flupenthixol, and could be mediated through both subtypes of dopamine receptors. These findings indicate that the effects of dopamine on macrophages may have a significant impact on HIV pathogenesis. They also suggest that drug-induced increases in CNS dopamine may be a common mechanism by which drugs of abuse with distinct modes of action exacerbate neuroinflammation and contribute to HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders in infected drug abusers. PMID:25268786

  19. Diet Modifies the Neuroimmune System by Influencing Macrophage Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherry, Christina Lynn

    2009-01-01

    It has long been appreciated that adequate nutrition is required for proper immune function and it is now recognized that dietary components contribute to modulation of immune cells, subsequently impacting the whole body's response during an immune challenge. Macrophage activation plays a critical role in the immune system and directs the…

  20. Loss of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 alters macrophage polarization and reduces NFκB activation in the foreign body response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Laura Beth; Sawyer, Andrew J; Charokopos, Antonios; Skokos, Eleni A; Kyriakides, Themis R

    2015-01-01

    Implantation of biomaterials elicits a foreign body response characterized by fusion of macrophages to form foreign body giant cells and fibrotic encapsulation. Studies of the macrophage polarization involved in this response have suggested that alternative (M2) activation is associated with more favorable outcomes. Here we investigated this process in vivo by implanting mixed cellulose ester filters or polydimethylsiloxane disks in the peritoneal cavity of wild-type (WT) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) knockout mice. We analyzed classical (M1) and alternative (M2) gene expression via quantitative polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in both non-adherent cells isolated by lavage and implant-adherent cells. Our results show that macrophages undergo unique activation that displays features of both M1 and M2 polarization including induction of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF), which induces the expression and nuclear translocation of p50 and RelA determined by immunofluorescence and Western blot. Both processes were compromised in fusion-deficient MCP-1 KO macrophages in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, inclusion of BAY 11-7028, an inhibitor of NFκB activation, reduced nuclear translocation of RelA and fusion in WT macrophages. Our studies suggest that peritoneal implants elicit a unique macrophage polarization phenotype leading to induction of TNF and activation of the NFκB pathway. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. The influence of macrophage growth factors on Theiler's Murine Encephalomyelitis Virus (TMEV) infection and activation of macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Karin M; Watson, Neva B; Minchenberg, Scott B; Massa, Paul T

    2018-02-01

    Macrophages are common targets for infection and innate immune activation by many pathogenic viruses including the neurotropic Theiler's Murine Encephalomyelitis Virus (TMEV). As both infection and innate activation of macrophages are key determinants of viral pathogenesis especially in the central nervous system (CNS), an analysis of macrophage growth factors on these events was performed. C3H mouse bone-marrow cells were differentiated in culture using either recombinant macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) or granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), inoculated with TMEV (BeAn) and analyzed at various times thereafter. Cytokine RNA and protein analysis, virus titers, and flow cytometry were performed to characterize virological parameters under these culture conditions. GM-CSF-differentiated macrophages showed higher levels of TMEV viral RNA and proinflammatory molecules compared to infected M-CSF-differentiated cells. Thus, GM-CSF increases both TMEV infection and TMEV-induced activation of macrophages compared to that seen with M-CSF. Moreover, while infectious viral particles decreased from a peak at 12h to undetectable levels at 48h post infection, TMEV viral RNA remained higher in GM-CSF- compared to M-CSF-differentiated macrophages in concert with increased proinflammatory gene expression. Analysis of a possible basis for these differences determined that glycolytic rates contributed to heightened virus replication and proinflammatory cytokine secretion in GM-CSF compared to M-CSF-differentiated macrophages. In conclusion, we provide evidence implicating a role for GM-CSF in promoting virus replication and proinflammatory cytokine expression in macrophages, indicating that GM-CSF may be a key factor for TMEV infection and the induction of chronic TMEV-induced immunopathogenesis in the CNS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Pathway data concerning differentiation and activation of macrophage - DMPD | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us DMPD Pathway data concerning differentiation and activation of macrophage Data detail Data name Pathway data concern...scription of data contents Pathways concerning differentiation and activation of macrophage extracted from t...tory of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us Pathway data concerning differentiation and activation of macrophage - DMPD | LSDB Archive ...

  3. Quercetin-3-O-glucuronide induces ABCA1 expression by LXRα activation in murine macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohara, Kazuaki, E-mail: Kazuaki_Ohara@kirin.co.jp [Research Laboratories for Health Science and Food Technologies, Kirin Company Limited, 1-13-5 Fukuura, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama 236-0004 (Japan); Wakabayashi, Hideyuki [Laboratory for New Product Development, Kirin Beverage Company Limited, 1-17-1 Namamugi, Tsurumi-ku, Yokohama 230-8628 (Japan); Taniguchi, Yoshimasa [Research Laboratories for Health Science and Food Technologies, Kirin Company Limited, 1-13-5 Fukuura, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama 236-0004 (Japan); Shindo, Kazutoshi [Department of Food and Nutrition, Japan Women’s University, 2-8-1 Mejirodai, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 112-8681 (Japan); Yajima, Hiroaki [Research Laboratories for Health Science and Food Technologies, Kirin Company Limited, 1-13-5 Fukuura, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama 236-0004 (Japan); Yoshida, Aruto [Central Laboratories for Key Technologies, Kirin Company Limited, 1-13-5 Fukuura, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama 236-0004 (Japan)

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •The major circulating quercetin metabolite (Q3GA) activated LXRα. •Q3GA induced ABCA1 via LXRα activation in macrophages. •Nelumbo nucifera leaf extracts contained quercetin glycosides. •N. nucifera leaf extract feeding elevated HDLC in mice. -- Abstract: Reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) removes excess cholesterol from macrophages to prevent atherosclerosis. ATP-binding cassette, subfamily A, member 1 (ABCA1) is a crucial cholesterol transporter involved in RCT to produce high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDLC), and is transcriptionally regulated by liver X receptor alpha (LXRα), a nuclear receptor. Quercetin is a widely distributed flavonoid in edible plants which prevented atherosclerosis in an animal model. We found that quercetin-3-O-glucuronide (Q3GA), a major quercetin metabolite after absorption from the digestive tract, enhanced ABCA1 expression, in vitro, via LXRα in macrophages. In addition, leaf extracts of a traditional Asian edible plant, Nelumbo nucifera (NNE), which contained abundant amounts of quercetin glycosides, significantly elevated plasma HDLC in mice. We are the first to present experimental evidence that Q3GA induced ABCA1 in macrophages, and to provide an alternative explanation to previous studies on arteriosclerosis prevention by quercetin.

  4. Serum neopterin and soluble CD163 as markers of macrophage activation in paracetamol (acetaminophen)-induced human acute liver injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, D G; Lee, P; Pryde, E A; Hayes, P C; Simpson, K J

    2013-12-01

    Macrophage activation is implicated in the pathogenesis of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) following paracetamol (acetaminophen) overdose (POD). Neopterin is synthesised from macrophages and reflects the intensity of monocyte/macrophage activation. Soluble CD163 (sCD163) is a marker of alternatively activated M2 macrophages. To examine neopterin and sCD163 levels in a cohort of acute liver injury patients. Consecutive patients (n = 41, (18 (43.9%) male) with acute liver injury were enrolled. Neopterin and sCD163 levels were measured by ELISA. A total of 24/33 (72.7%) POD patients developed hepatic encephalopathy (HE), and therefore acute liver failure. Both neopterin and sCD163 levels were significantly higher in PODs compared with chronic liver disease (neopterin P paracetamol overdose, and reflect the degree of macrophage activation in this condition. Serum neopterin in particular may have value as an early proxy marker of macrophage activation following paracetamol overdose. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Ceramic modifications of porous titanium: effects on macrophage activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scislowska-Czarnecka, A; Menaszek, E; Szaraniec, B; Kolaczkowska, E

    2012-12-01

    Porous titanium is one of the most widely used implant materials because of its mechanical properties, however, it is also characterised by low bioactivity. To improve the above parameter we prepared three modifications of the porous (30 wt%) titanium (Ti) surface by covering it with bioactive hydroxyapatite (HA), bioglass (BG) and calcium silicate (CS). Subsequently we tested the impact of the modifications on macrophages directing the inflammatory response that might compromise the implant bioactivity. In the study we investigated the in vitro effects of the materials on murine cell line RAW 264.7 macrophage adherence, morphology and activation (production/release of metalloproteinase MMP-9 and pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines). CS Ti decreased the macrophage adherence and up-regulated the release of several pro-inflammatory mediators, including TNF-α, IL-6, IL-12. Also HA Ti reduced the cell adherence but other parameters were generally not increased, except of TNF-α. In contrast, BG Ti improved macrophage adherence and either decreased production of multiple mediators (MMP-9, TNF-α, IFN-γ, MCP-1) or did not change it in comparison to the porous titanium. We can conclude that analyzing the effects on the inflammatory response initiated by macrophages in vitro, calcium silicate did not improve the biological properties of the porous titanium. The improved bioactivity of titanium was, however, achieved by the application of the hydroxyapatite and bioglass layers. The present in vitro results suggest that these materials, HA Ti and especially BG Ti, may be suitable for in vivo application and thus justify their further investigation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Legumain is activated in macrophages during pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edgington-Mitchell, L.E.; Wartmann, T.; Fleming, A.K.; Gocheva, V.; Linden, W.A. van der; Withana, N.P.; Verdoes, M.; Aurelio, L.; Edgington-Mitchell, D.; Lieu, T.; Parker, B.S.; Graham, B.; Reinheckel, T.; Furness, J.B.; Joyce, J.A.; Storz, P.; Halangk, W.; Bogyo, M.; Bunnett, N.W.

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas characterized by dysregulated activity of digestive enzymes, necrosis, immune infiltration, and pain. Repeated incidence of pancreatitis is an important risk factor for pancreatic cancer. Legumain, a lysosomal cysteine protease, has been linked

  7. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor primes interleukin-13 production by macrophages via protease-activated receptor-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Manabu; Yamaguchi, Rui; Yamamoto, Takatoshi; Ishimaru, Yasuji; Ono, Tomomichi; Sakamoto, Arisa; Narahara, Shinji; Sugiuchi, Hiroyuki; Hirose, Eiji; Yamaguchi, Yasuo

    2015-04-01

    Chronic inflammation is often linked to the presence of type 2-polarized macrophages, which are induced by the T helper type 2 cytokines interleukin-4 and interleukin-13 (IL-13). IL-13 is a key mediator of tissue fibrosis caused by T helper type 2-based inflammation. Human neutrophil elastase (HNE) plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. This study investigated the priming effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) on IL-13 expression by macrophages stimulated with HNE. Adherent macrophages were obtained from primary cultures of human mononuclear cells. Expression of IL-13 mRNA and protein by GM-CSF-dependent macrophages was investigated after stimulation with HNE, using the polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. GM-CSF had a priming effect on IL-13 mRNA and protein expression by macrophages stimulated with HNE, while this effect was not observed for various other cytokines. GM-CSF-dependent macrophages showed a significant increase in the expression of protease activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) mRNA and protein. The response of IL-13 mRNA to HNE was significantly decreased by pretreatment with alpha1-antitrypsin, a PAR-2 antibody (SAM11), or a PAR-2 antagonist (ENMD-1068). These findings suggest that stimulation with HNE can induce IL-13 production by macrophages, especially GM-CSF-dependent macrophages. Accordingly, neutrophil elastase may have a key role in fibrosis associated with chronic inflammation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Water Extract of Deer Bones Activates Macrophages and Alleviates Neutropenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Seok Choi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracts from deer bones, called nok-gol in Korean, have long been used to invigorate Qi. While neutropenia is not well detected in normal physiological condition, it could be a cause of severe problems to develop diseases such as infectious and cancerous diseases. Thus, a prevention of neutropenia in normal physiology and pathophysiological states is important for maintaining Qi and preventing disease progress. In cell biological aspects, activated macrophages are known to prevent neutropenia. In this study, we demonstrate that water extract of deer bone (herein, NG prevents neutropenia by activating macrophages. In mouse neutropenia model system in vivo where ICR mice were treated with cyclophosphamide to immunosuppress, an oral administration of NG altered the number of blood cells including lymphocytes, neutrophils, basophils, and eosinophils. This in vivo effect of NG was relevant to that of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF that was known to improve neutropenia. Our in vitro studies further showed that NG treatment increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS and promoted macrophagic differentiation of mouse monocytic Raw264.7 cells in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, NG enhanced nitric oxide (NO synthesis and secretions of cytokines including IL-6 and TNF-α. Consistently, NG treatment induced phosphorylation of ERK, JNK, IKK, IκBα, and NF-κB in Raw264.7 cells. Thus, our data suggest that NG is helpful for alleviating neutropenia.

  9. Delineation of diverse macrophage activation programs in response to intracellular parasites and cytokines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuyi Zhang

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The ability to reside and proliferate in macrophages is characteristic of several infectious agents that are of major importance to public health, including the intracellular parasites Trypanosoma cruzi (the etiological agent of Chagas disease and Leishmania species (etiological agents of Kala-Azar and cutaneous leishmaniasis. Although recent studies have elucidated some of the ways macrophages respond to these pathogens, the relationships between activation programs elicited by these pathogens and the macrophage activation programs elicited by bacterial pathogens and cytokines have not been delineated.To provide a global perspective on the relationships between macrophage activation programs and to understand how certain pathogens circumvent them, we used transcriptional profiling by genome-wide microarray analysis to compare the responses of mouse macrophages following exposure to the intracellular parasites T. cruzi and Leishmania mexicana, the bacterial product lipopolysaccharide (LPS, and the cytokines IFNG, TNF, IFNB, IL-4, IL-10, and IL-17. We found that LPS induced a classical activation state that resembled macrophage stimulation by the Th1 cytokines IFNG and TNF. However, infection by the protozoan pathogen L. mexicana produced so few transcriptional changes that the infected macrophages were almost indistinguishable from uninfected cells. T. cruzi activated macrophages produced a transcriptional signature characterized by the induction of interferon-stimulated genes by 24 h post-infection. Despite this delayed IFN response by T. cruzi, the transcriptional response of macrophages infected by the kinetoplastid pathogens more closely resembled the transcriptional response of macrophages stimulated by the cytokines IL-4, IL-10, and IL-17 than macrophages stimulated by Th1 cytokines.This study provides global gene expression data for a diverse set of biologically significant pathogens and cytokines and identifies the relationships between

  10. Macrophages migrate in an activation-dependent manner to chemokines involved in neuroinflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogel, D.Y.S.; Heijnen, D.A.M.; Breur, M.; de Vries, H.E.; Tool, A.T.; Amor, S.; Dijkstra, C.D.

    2014-01-01

    Background: In neuroinflammatory diseases, macrophages can play a dual role in the process of tissue damage, depending on their activation status (M1 / M2). M1 macrophages are considered to exert damaging effects to neurons, whereas M2 macrophages are reported to aid regeneration and repair of

  11. Metformin affects macrophages' phenotype and improves the activity of glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, catalase and decreases malondialdehyde concentration in a partially AMPK-independent manner in LPS-stimulated human monocytes/macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bułdak, Łukasz; Łabuzek, Krzysztof; Bułdak, Rafał Jakub; Kozłowski, Michał; Machnik, Grzegorz; Liber, Sebastian; Suchy, Dariusz; Duława-Bułdak, Anna; Okopień, Bogusław

    2014-06-01

    Diabetic patients experience accelerated atherosclerosis. Metformin is a cornerstone of the current therapy of type 2 diabetes. Macrophages are the key cells associated with the development of atherosclerotic plaques. Therefore, our aim was to assess the in vitro effects of metformin on macrophages and its influence on the mechanisms involved in the development of atherosclerosis. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were obtained from the group including 16 age-matched healthy non-smoking volunteers aged 18-40 years. Monocytes were further incubated with metformin, LPS and compound C--a pharmacological inhibitor of AMPK. The impact of metformin on oxidative stress markers, antioxidative properties, inflammatory cytokines and phenotypical markers of macrophages was studied. We showed that macrophages treated with metformin expressed less reactive oxygen species (ROS), which resulted from increased antioxidative potential. Furthermore, a reduction in inflammatory cytokines was observed. We also observed a phenotypic shift toward the alternative activation of macrophages that was induced by metformin. All the aforementioned results resulted from AMPK activation, but a residual activity of metformin after AMPK blockade was still noticeable even after inhibition of AMPK by compound C. Authors believe that metformin-based therapy, a cornerstone in diabetes therapy, not only improves the prognosis of diabetics by reducing blood glucose but also by reducing oxidative stress, inflammatory cytokine production and the shift toward alternative activation of macrophages. Copyright © 2014 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  12. Macrophage Activation Syndrome as Initial Presentation of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Say-Tin Yeap

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS is known to be a severe and potentially life-threatening complication of rheumatic disorder, especially systemic juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. It is very rare for MAS to be an initial presentation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Here, we report a 14-year-old girl in whom MAS developed as an initial presentation of SLE. With early diagnosis and administration of cyclosporine A, she had a fair outcome. Further testing showed positive anti-dsDNA about 8 months later.

  13. Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I Induces Arginase Activity in Leishmania amazonensis Amastigote-Infected Macrophages through a Cytokine-Independent Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celia Maria Vieira Vendrame

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania (Leishmania amazonensis exhibits peculiarities in its interactions with hosts. Because amastigotes are the primary form associated with the progression of infection, we studied the effect of insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I on interactions between L. (L. amazonensis amastigotes and macrophages. Upon stimulation of infected macrophages with IGF-I, we observed decreased nitric oxide production but increased arginase expression and activity, which lead to increased parasitism. However, stimulation of amastigote-infected macrophages with IGF-I did not result in altered cytokine levels compared to unstimulated controls. Because IGF-I is present in tissue fluids and also within macrophages, we examined the possible effect of this factor on phosphatidylserine (PS exposure on amastigotes, seen previously in tissue-derived amastigotes leading to increased parasitism. Stimulation with IGF-I induced PS exposure on amastigotes but not on promastigotes. Using a PS-liposome instead of amastigotes, we observed that the PS-liposome but not the control phosphatidylcholine-liposome led to increased arginase activity in macrophages, and this process was not blocked by anti-TGF-β antibodies. Our results suggest that in L. (L. amazonensis amastigote-infected macrophages, IGF-I induces arginase activity directly in amastigotes and in macrophages through the induction of PS exposure on amastigotes in the latter, which could lead to the alternative activation of macrophages through cytokine-independent mechanisms.

  14. A defect in the inflammation-primed macrophage-activation cascade in osteopetrotic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, N; Lindsay, D D; Naraparaju, V R; Ireland, R A; Popoff, S N

    1994-05-15

    Macrophages were activated by administration of lysophosphatidylcholine (lyso-Pc) or dodecylglycerol (DDG) to wild-type rats but not in osteopetrotic (op) mutant rats. In vitro treatment of wild-type rat peritoneal cells with lyso-Pc or DDG efficiently activated macrophages whereas treatment of op mutant rat peritoneal cells with lyso-Pc or DDG did not activate macrophages. The inflammation-primed macrophage activation cascade in rats requires participation of B lymphocytes and vitamin D binding protein (DBP). Lyso-Pc-inducible beta-galactosidase of wild-type rat B lymphocytes can convert DBP to the macrophage-activating factor (MAF), whereas B lymphocytes of the op mutant rats were shown to be deficient in lyso-Pc-inducible beta-galactosidase. DBP is conserved among mammalian species. Treatment of human DBP (Gc1 protein) with commercial glycosidases yields an extremely high titrated MAF as assayed on mouse and rat macrophages. Because the enzymatically generated MAF (GcMAF) bypasses the role of lymphocytes in macrophage activation, the op mutant rat macrophages were efficiently activated by administration of a small quantity (100 pg/rat) of GcMAF. Likewise, in vitro treatment of op rat peritoneal cells with as little as 40 pg GcMAF/ml activated macrophages.

  15. Activation of peritoneal macrophages to cytoxicity against B16 melanoma cells by Serratia marcescens polyribosome fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoover, S.K.

    1985-01-01

    Serratia marcescens polyribosomes (SMPR) have been shown to elicit an anti-tumor response in vivo. The in-vitro effects of SMPR on macrophages as the nonspecific mediators of the anti-tumor response have not previously been examined. The first objective of this research project is to corroborate and analyze the in-vivo results by the development and application of an in-vitro cytotoxicity assay. The second objective is to examine the effect of SMPR upon previously unstimulated peritoneal macrophages as representing the mechanism of cytotoxicity. The third objective is to identify the minimal effective component of SMPR responsible for an effect on macrophages. Results revealed that SMPR preparations exert a number of effects upon macrophages. Morphologic changes included increased spreading and increased perinuclear vacuolization. Macrophages were shown to be metabolically activate by two lines of evidence. SMPR-treated macrophages exhibited increased cellular metabolism by the increased uptake of 3 H-thymidine and by the increased levels of secreted leucine aminopeptidase as compared to control macrophages. Results also showed that SMPR activates macrophages to cytotoxicity against syngeneic tumor target cells. Buoyant-density fractions were isolated and assayed for macrophage activating ability. Results showed 50S ribosomal subunits to be the smallest fraction effective for macrophage activation. Both the RNA and protein were necessary for complete effectiveness

  16. Rictor/mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 promotes macrophage activation and kidney fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jiafa; Li, Jianzhong; Feng, Ye; Shu, Bingyan; Gui, Yuan; Wei, Wei; He, Weichun; Yang, Junwei; Dai, Chunsun

    2017-08-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling controls many essential cellular functions. However, the role of Rictor/mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2) in regulating macrophage activation and kidney fibrosis remains largely unknown. We report here that Rictor/mTORC2 was activated in macrophages from the fibrotic kidneys of mice. Ablation of Rictor in macrophages reduced kidney fibrosis, inflammatory cell accumulation, macrophage proliferation and polarization after unilateral ureter obstruction or ischaemia/reperfusion injury. In bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs), deletion of Rictor or blockade of protein kinase Cα inhibited cell migration. Additionally, deletion of Rictor or blockade of Akt abolished interleukin-4-stimulated or transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1-stimulated macrophage M2 polarization. Furthermore, deletion of Rictor downregulated TGF-β1-stimulated upregulation of multiple profibrotic cytokines, including platelet-derived growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor and connective tissue growth factor, in BMMs. Conditioned medium from TGF-β1-pretreated Rictor -/- macrophages stimulated fibroblast activation less efficiently than that from TGF-β1-pretreated Rictor +/+ macrophages. These results demonstrate that Rictor/mTORC2 signalling can promote macrophage activation and kidney fibrosis. Targeting this signalling pathway in macrophages may shine light on ways to protect against kidney fibrosis in patients with chronic kidney diseases. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. M1 Macrophages but Not M2 Macrophages Are Characterized by Upregulation of CRP Expression via Activation of NFκB: a Possible Role for Ox-LDL in Macrophage Polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Marielle; Shur, Anna; Tendler, Yvgeny

    2018-04-23

    Arterial macrophages comprise a heterogeneous population: pro-inflammatory (M1) and anti-inflammatory (M2). Since C-reactive protein (CRP) is produced by macrophages in atherosclerotic lesions, understanding of CRP regulation in macrophages could be crucial to decipher inflammatory patterns in atherogenesis. We aimed to analyze CRP expression in M1/M2 macrophages and to question whether it involves NFκB signaling pathway. Furthermore, we questioned whether oxidative stress affect macrophage phenotype and modulate macrophage CRP expression. M1/M2 macrophage polarization was validated using THP-1 macrophages. CRP mRNA and protein expression were determined using real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry. Involvement of NFκB was determined by nuclear translocation of p50 subunit and the use of NFκB inhibitor. Involvement of oxidative stress in macrophage phenotypes induction was studied using oxidized-LDL (Ox-LDL) and antioxidants. M1 macrophages were characterized by elevated CRP mRNA expression (by 67%), CRP protein levels (by 108%), and upregulation of NFκB activation compared to control, but these features were not shared by M2 macrophages. Macrophages incubation with Ox-LDL led to a moderate M1 phenotype combined with a M2 phenotype, correlated with increased CRP mRNA expression. Antioxidants inhibited by up to 86% IL6 expression but did not significantly affect IL10 secretion. Antioxidants significantly inhibited CRP expression in M1 macrophages, but not in M2 macrophages. Elevated expression of CRP was characteristic of M1 macrophages rather than M2 through NFκB activation. Oxidative stress could be one of the endogenous triggers for macrophage activation to a mixed M1 and M2 phenotype, in association with increased expression of CRP.

  18. MicroRNA 21 Is a Homeostatic Regulator of Macrophage Polarization and Prevents Prostaglandin E2-Mediated M2 Generation

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Zhuo; Brandt, Stephanie; Medeiros, Alexandra; Wang, Soujuan; Wu, Hao; Dent, Alexander; Serezani, C. Henrique

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages dictate both initiation and resolution of inflammation. During acute inflammation classically activated macrophages (M1) predominate, and during the resolution phase alternative macrophages (M2) are dominant. The molecular mechanisms involved in macrophage polarization are understudied. MicroRNAs are differentially expressed in M1 and M2 macrophages that influence macrophage polarization. We identified a role of miR-21 in macrophage polarization, and found that cross-talk between ...

  19. Assessment of Antibody-based Drugs Effects on Murine Bone Marrow and Peritoneal Macrophage Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozicky, Lisa; Sly, Laura M

    2017-12-26

    Macrophages are phagocytic innate immune cells, which initiate immune responses to pathogens and contribute to healing and tissue restitution. Macrophages are equally important in turning off inflammatory responses. We have shown that macrophages stimulated with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) can produce high amounts of the anti-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin 10 (IL-10), and low levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in response to bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS). IVIg is a polyvalent antibody, primarily immunoglobulin Gs (IgGs), pooled from the plasma of more than 1,000 blood donors. It is used to supplement antibodies in patients with immune deficiencies or to suppress immune responses in patients with autoimmune or inflammatory conditions. Infliximab, a therapeutic anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) antibody, has also been shown to activate macrophages to produce IL-10 in response to inflammatory stimuli. IVIg and other antibody-based biologics can be tested to determine their effects on macrophage activation. This paper describes methods for derivation, stimulation, and assessment of murine bone marrow macrophages activated by antibodies in vitro and murine peritoneal macrophages activated with antibodies in vivo. Finally, we demonstrate the use of western blotting to determine the contribution of specific cell signaling pathways to anti-inflammatory macrophage activity. These protocols can be used with genetically modified mice, to determine the effect of a specific protein(s) on anti-inflammatory macrophage activation. These techniques can also be used to assess whether specific biologics may act by changing macrophages to an IL-10-producing anti-inflammatory activation state that reduces inflammatory responses in vivo. This can provide information on the role of macrophage activation in the efficacy of biologics during disease models in mice, and provide insight into a potential new mechanism of action in people. Conversely, this may caution

  20. Inhibition of herpes simplex virus multiplication by activated macrophages: a role for arginase?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildy, P; Gell, P G; Rhodes, J; Newton, A

    1982-07-01

    Proteose-peptone-activated mouse macrophages can prevent productive infection by herpes simplex virus in neighboring cells in vitro whether or not those cells belong to the same animal species. The effect does not require contact between the macrophages and the infected cells, may be prevented by adding extra arginine to the medium, and may be reversed when extra arginine is added 24 h after the macrophages. Arginase activity was found both intracellularly and released from the macrophages. The extracellular enzyme is quite stable; 64% activity was found after 48 h of incubation at 37 degrees C in tissue culture medium. No evidence was found that the inefficiency of virus replication in macrophages was due to self-starvation by arginase. As might be predicted macrophages can, by the same mechanism, limit productive infection by vaccinia virus.

  1. Liver X Receptor (LXR) activation negatively regulates visfatin expression in macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayi, Therese Hervee; Rigamonti, Elena [Univ Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); INSERM UR1011, F-59000 Lille (France); UDSL, F-59000 Lille (France); Institut Pasteur de Lille, F-59019 Lille (France); Pattou, Francois [Univ Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Department of Endocrine Surgery, University Hospital, Lille (France); U859 Biotherapies for Diabetes, INSERM, Lille (France); Staels, Bart, E-mail: bart.staels@pasteur-lille.fr [Univ Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); INSERM UR1011, F-59000 Lille (France); UDSL, F-59000 Lille (France); Institut Pasteur de Lille, F-59019 Lille (France); Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia [Univ Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); INSERM UR1011, F-59000 Lille (France); UDSL, F-59000 Lille (France); Institut Pasteur de Lille, F-59019 Lille (France)

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Synthetic LXR ligands decreased visfatin expression in human macrophages. {yields} LXR activation leads to a modest and transient decrease of NAD{sup +} concentration. {yields} LXR activation decreased PPAR{gamma}-induced visfatin in human macrophages. -- Abstract: Adipose tissue macrophages (ATM) are the major source of visfatin, a visceral fat adipokine upregulated during obesity. Also known to play a role in B cell differentiation (pre-B cell colony-enhancing factor (PBEF)) and NAD biosynthesis (nicotinamide phosphoribosyl transferase (NAMPT)), visfatin has been suggested to play a role in inflammation. Liver X Receptor (LXR) and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor (PPAR){gamma} are nuclear receptors expressed in macrophages controlling the inflammatory response. Recently, we reported visfatin as a PPAR{gamma} target gene in human macrophages. In this study, we examined whether LXR regulates macrophage visfatin expression. Synthetic LXR ligands decreased visfatin gene expression in a LXR-dependent manner in human and murine macrophages. The decrease of visfatin mRNA was paralleled by a decrease of protein secretion. Consequently, a modest and transient decrease of NAD{sup +} concentration was observed. Interestingly, LXR activation decreased the PPAR{gamma}-induced visfatin gene and protein secretion in human macrophages. Our results identify visfatin as a gene oppositely regulated by the LXR and PPAR{gamma} pathways in human macrophages.

  2. Hyper-inflammation and skin destruction mediated by rosiglitazone activation of macrophages in IL-6 deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Das, Lopa M; Rosenjack, Julie; Au, Liemin

    2015-01-01

    Injury initiates recruitment of macrophages to support tissue repair; however, excessive macrophage activity may exacerbate tissue damage causing further destruction and subsequent delay in wound repair. Here we show that the peroxisome proliferation-activated receptor-γ agonist, rosiglitazone (R...

  3. Macrophage Reporter Cell Assay for Screening Immunopharmacological Activity of Cell Wall-Active Antifungals

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, Russell E.; Liao, Guangling; Young, Katherine; Douglas, Cameron; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.

    2014-01-01

    Antifungal exposure can elicit immunological effects that contribute to activity in vivo, but this activity is rarely screened in vitro in a fashion analogous to MIC testing. We used RAW 264.7 murine macrophages that express a secreted embryonic alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) gene induced by transcriptional activation of NF-κB and activator protein 1 (AP-1) to develop a screen for immunopharmacological activity of cell wall-active antifungal agents. Isolates of Candida albicans and Aspergillus f...

  4. Soybean-derived Bowman-Birk inhibitor inhibits neurotoxicity of LPS-activated macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Persidsky Yuri

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lipopolysaccharide (LPS, the major component of the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria, can activate immune cells including macrophages. Activation of macrophages in the central nervous system (CNS contributes to neuronal injury. Bowman-Birk inhibitor (BBI, a soybean-derived protease inhibitor, has anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we examined whether BBI has the ability to inhibit LPS-mediated macrophage activation, reducing the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and subsequent neurotoxicity in primary cortical neural cultures. Methods Mixed cortical neural cultures from rat were used as target cells for testing neurotoxicity induced by LPS-treated macrophage supernatant. Neuronal survival was measured using a cell-based ELISA method for expression of the neuronal marker MAP-2. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS production in macrophages was measured via 2', 7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFH2DA oxidation. Cytokine expression was determined by quantitative real-time PCR. Results LPS treatment of macrophages induced expression of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α and of ROS. In contrast, BBI pretreatment (1-100 μg/ml of macrophages significantly inhibited LPS-mediated induction of these cytokines and ROS. Further, supernatant from BBI-pretreated and LPS-activated macrophage cultures was found to be less cytotoxic to neurons than that from non-BBI-pretreated and LPS-activated macrophage cultures. BBI, when directly added to the neuronal cultures (1-100 μg/ml, had no protective effect on neurons with or without LPS-activated macrophage supernatant treatment. In addition, BBI (100 μg/ml had no effect on N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA-mediated neurotoxicity. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that BBI, through its anti-inflammatory properties, protects neurons from neurotoxicity mediated by activated macrophages.

  5. Induction of different activated phenotypes of mouse peritoneal macrophages grown in different tissue culture media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Tomoya; Koike, Atsushi; Amano, Fumio

    2017-08-01

    The role of activated macrophages in the host defense against pathogens or tumor cells has been investigated extensively. Many researchers have been using various culture media in in vitro experiments using macrophages. We previously reported that J774.1/JA-4 macrophage-like cells showed great differences in their activated macrophage phenotypes, such as production of reactive oxygen, nitric oxide (NO) or cytokines depending on the culture medium used, either F-12 (Ham's F-12 nutrient mixture) or Dulbecco modified Eagle's medium (DMEM). To examine whether a difference in the culture medium would influence the functions of primary macrophages, we used BALB/c mouse peritoneal macrophages in this study. Among the activated macrophage phenotypes, the expression of inducible NO synthase in LPS- and/or IFN-γ-treated peritoneal macrophages showed the most remarkable differences between F-12 and DMEM; i.e., NO production by LPS- and/or IFN-γ-treated cells was far lower in DMEM than in F-12. Similar results were obtained with C57BL mouse peritoneal macrophages. Besides, dilution of F-12 medium with saline resulted in a slight decrease in NO production, whereas that of DMEM with saline resulted in a significant increase, suggesting the possibility that DMEM contained some inhibitory factor(s) for NO production. However, such a difference in NO production was not observed when macrophage-like cell lines were examined. These results suggest that phenotypes of primary macrophages could be changed significantly with respect to host inflammatory responses by the surrounding environment including nutritional factors and that these altered macrophage phenotypes might influence the biological host defense.

  6. Activated prostaglandin D2 receptors on macrophages enhance neutrophil recruitment into the lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandl, Katharina; Stacher, Elvira; Bálint, Zoltán; Sturm, Eva Maria; Maric, Jovana; Peinhaupt, Miriam; Luschnig, Petra; Aringer, Ida; Fauland, Alexander; Konya, Viktoria; Dahlen, Sven-Erik; Wheelock, Craig E.; Kratky, Dagmar; Olschewski, Andrea; Marsche, Gunther; Schuligoi, Rufina; Heinemann, Akos

    2016-01-01

    Background Prostaglandin (PG) D2 is an early-phase mediator in inflammation, but its action and the roles of the 2 D-type prostanoid receptors (DPs) DP1 and DP2 (also called chemoattractant receptor–homologous molecule expressed on TH2 cells) in regulating macrophages have not been elucidated to date. Objective We investigated the role of PGD2 receptors on primary human macrophages, as well as primary murine lung macrophages, and their ability to influence neutrophil action in vitro and in vivo. Methods In vitro studies, including migration, Ca2+ flux, and cytokine secretion, were conducted with primary human monocyte-derived macrophages and neutrophils and freshly isolated murine alveolar and pulmonary interstitial macrophages. In vivo pulmonary inflammation was assessed in male BALB/c mice. Results Activation of DP1, DP2, or both receptors on human macrophages induced strong intracellular Ca2+ flux, cytokine release, and migration of macrophages. In a murine model of LPS-induced pulmonary inflammation, activation of each PGD2 receptor resulted in aggravated airway neutrophilia, tissue myeloperoxidase activity, cytokine contents, and decreased lung compliance. Selective depletion of alveolar macrophages abolished the PGD2-enhanced inflammatory response. Activation of PGD2 receptors on human macrophages enhanced the migratory capacity and prolonged the survival of neutrophils in vitro. In human lung tissue specimens both DP1 and DP2 receptors were located on alveolar macrophages along with hematopoietic PGD synthase, the rate-limiting enzyme of PGD2 synthesis. Conclusion For the first time, our results show that PGD2 markedly augments disease activity through its ability to enhance the proinflammatory actions of macrophages and subsequent neutrophil activation. PMID:26792210

  7. Differential activation of Fyn kinase distinguishes saturated and unsaturated fats in mouse macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarabra, Elena; An Lee, Ting-Wen; Zammit, Victor A; Vatish, Manu; Yamada, Eijiro; Pessin, Jeffrey E; Bastie, Claire C

    2017-10-17

    Diet-induced obesity is associated with increased adipose tissue activated macrophages. Yet, how macrophages integrate fatty acid (FA) signals remains unclear. We previously demonstrated that Fyn deficiency ( fynKO ) protects against high fat diet-induced adipose tissue macrophage accumulation. Herein, we show that inflammatory markers and reactive oxygen species are not induced in fynKO bone marrow-derived macrophages exposed to the saturated FA palmitate, suggesting that Fyn regulates macrophage function in response to FA signals. Palmitate activates Fyn and re-localizes Fyn into the nucleus of RAW264.7, J774 and wild-type bone marrow-derived macrophages. Similarly, Fyn activity is increased in cells of adipose tissue stromal vascular fraction of high fat-fed control mice, with Fyn protein being located in the nucleus of these cells. We demonstrate that Fyn modulates palmitate-dependent oxidative stress in macrophages. Moreover, Fyn catalytic activity is necessary for its nuclear re-localization and downstream effects, as Fyn pharmacological inhibition abolishes palmitate-induced Fyn nuclear redistribution and palmitate-dependent increase of oxidative stress markers. Importantly, mono-or polyunsaturated FAs do not activate Fyn, and fail to re-localize Fyn to the nucleus. Together these data demonstrate that macrophages integrate nutritional FA signals via a differential activation of Fyn that distinguishes, at least partly, the effects of saturated versus unsaturated fats.

  8. Niacin and its metabolites as master regulators of macrophage activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montserrat-de la Paz, Sergio; Naranjo, M Carmen; Lopez, Sergio; Abia, Rocio; Muriana, Francisco J Garcia; Bermudez, Beatriz

    2017-01-01

    Niacin is a broad-spectrum lipid-regulating drug used for clinical therapy of chronic high-grade inflammatory diseases. However, the mechanisms by which either niacin or the byproducts of its catabolism ameliorate these inflammatory diseases are not clear yet. Human circulating monocytes and mature macrophages were used to analyze the effects of niacin and its metabolites (NAM, NUA and 2-Pyr) on oxidative stress, plasticity and inflammatory response by using biochemical, flow cytometry, quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot technologies. Niacin, NAM and 2-Pyr significantly decreased ROS, NO and NOS2 expression in LPS-treated human mature macrophages. Niacin and NAM skewed macrophage polarization toward antiinflammatory M2 macrophage whereas a trend toward proinflammatory M1 macrophage was noted following treatment with NUA. Niacin and NAM also reduced the inflammatory competence of LPS-treated human mature macrophages and promoted bias toward antiinflammatory CD14 + CD16 ++ nonclassical human primary monocytes. This study reveals for the first time that niacin and its metabolites possess antioxidant, reprogramming and antiinflammatory properties on human primary monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages. Our findings imply a new understanding of the mechanisms by which niacin and its metabolites favor a continuous and gradual plasticity process in the human monocyte/macrophage system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Intracellular glutathione status regulates mouse bone marrow monocyte-derived macrophage differentiation and phagocytic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin-Man; Kim, Hyunsoo; Kwon, Soon Bok; Lee, Soo Young; Chung, Sung-Chang; Jeong, Dae-Won; Min, Byung-Moo

    2004-01-01

    Although a redox shift can regulate the development of cells, including proliferation, differentiation, and survival, the role of the glutathione (GSH) redox status in macrophage differentiation remains unclear. In order to elucidate the role of a redox shift, macrophage-like cells were differentiated from the bone marrow-derived monocytes that were treated with a macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF or CSF-1) for 3 days. The macrophagic cells were characterized by a time-dependent increase in three major symptoms: the number of phagocytic cells, the number of adherent cells, and the mRNA expression of c-fms, a M-CSF receptor that is one of the macrophage-specific markers and mediates development signals. Upon M-CSF-driven macrophage differentiation, the GSH/GSSG ratio was significantly lower on day 1 than that observed on day 0 but was constant on days 1-3. To assess the effect of the GSH-depleted and -repleted status on the differentiation and phagocytosis of the macrophages, GSH depletion by BSO, a specific inhibitor of the de novo GSH synthesis, inhibited the formation of the adherent macrophagic cells by the down-regulation of c-fms, but did not affect the phagocytic activity of the macrophages. To the contrary, GSH repletion by the addition of NAC, which is a GSH precursor, or reduced GSH in media had no effect on macrophage differentiation, and led to a decrease in the phagocytic activity. Furthermore, we observed that there is checkpoint that is capable of releasing from the inhibition of the formation of the adherent macrophagic cells according to GSH depletion by BSO. Summarizing, these results indicate that the intracellular GSH status plays an important role in the differentiation and phagocytosis of macrophages

  10. 5-Lipoxygenase contributes to PPARγ activation in macrophages in response to apoptotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Knethen, Andreas; Sha, Lisa K; Kuchler, Laura; Heeg, Annika K; Fuhrmann, Dominik; Heide, Heinrich; Wittig, Ilka; Maier, Thorsten J; Steinhilber, Dieter; Brüne, Bernhard

    2013-12-01

    Macrophage polarization to an anti-inflammatory phenotype upon contact with apoptotic cells is a contributing hallmark to immune suppression during the late phase of sepsis. Although the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) supports this macrophage phenotype switch, it remains elusive how apoptotic cells activate PPARγ. Assuming that a molecule causing PPARγ activation in macrophages originates in the cell membrane of apoptotic cells we analyzed lipid rafts from apoptotic, necrotic, and living human Jurkat T cells which showed the presence of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) in lipid rafts of apoptotic cells only. Incubating macrophages with lipid rafts of apoptotic, but not necrotic or living cells, induced PPAR responsive element (PPRE)-driven mRuby reporter gene expression in RAW 264.7 macrophages stably transduced with a 4xPPRE containing vector. Experiments with lipid rafts of apoptotic murine EL4 T cells revealed similar results. To verify the involvement of 5-LO in activating PPARγ in macrophages, Jurkat T cells were incubated with the 5-LO inhibitor MK-866 prior to induction of apoptosis, which failed to induce mRuby expression. Similar results were obtained with lipid rafts of apoptotic EL4 T cells preexposed to the 5-LO inhibitors zileuton and CJ-13610. Interestingly, Jurkat T cells overexpressing 5-LO failed to activate PPARγ in macrophages, while their 5-LO overexpressing apoptotic counterparts did. Our results suggest that during apoptosis 5-LO gets associated with lipid rafts and synthesizes ligands that in turn stimulate PPARγ in macrophages. © 2013.

  11. Degalactosylated/desialylated human serum containing GcMAF induces macrophage phagocytic activity and in vivo antitumor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchiike, Daisuke; Uto, Yoshihiro; Mukai, Hirotaka; Ishiyama, Noriko; Abe, Chiaki; Tanaka, Daichi; Kawai, Tomohito; Kubo, Kentaro; Mette, Martin; Inui, Toshio; Endo, Yoshio; Hori, Hitoshi

    2013-07-01

    The group-specific component protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) has various biological activities, such as macrophage activation and antitumor activity. Clinical trials of GcMAF have been carried out for metastatic breast cancer, prostate cancer, and metastatic colorectal cancer. In this study, despite the complicated purification process of GcMAF, we used enzymatically-treated human serum containing GcMAF with a considerable macrophage-stimulating activity and antitumor activity. We detected GcMAF in degalactosylated/desialylated human serum by western blotting using an anti-human Gc globulin antibody, and Helix pomatia agglutinin lectin. We also found that GcMAF-containing human serum significantly enhanced the phagocytic activity of mouse peritoneal macrophages and extended the survival time of mice bearing Ehrlich ascites tumors. We demonstrated that GcMAF-containing human serum can be used as a potential macrophage activator for cancer immunotherapy.

  12. Cervical Cancer Cell Supernatants Induce a Phenotypic Switch from U937-Derived Macrophage-Activated M1 State into M2-Like Suppressor Phenotype with Change in Toll-Like Receptor Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Sánchez-Reyes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer (CC is the second most common cancer among women worldwide. Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV is the main risk factor for developing CC. Macrophages are important immune effector cells; they can be differentiated into two phenotypes, identified as M1 (classically activated and M2 (alternatively activated. Macrophage polarization exerts profound effects on the Toll-like receptor (TLR profile. In this study, we evaluated whether the supernatant of human CC cells HeLa, SiHa, and C-33A induces a shift of M1 macrophage toward M2 macrophage in U937-derived macrophages. Results. The results showed that soluble factors secreted by CC cells induce a change in the immunophenotype of macrophages from macrophage M1 into macrophage M2. U937-derived macrophages M1 released proinflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide; however, when these cells were treated with the supernatant of CC cell lines, we observed a turnover of M1 toward M2. These cells increased CD163 and IL-10 expression. The expression of TLR-3, -7, and -9 is increased when the macrophages were treated with the supernatant of CC cells. Conclusions. Our result strongly suggests that CC cells may, through the secretion of soluble factors, induce a change of immunophenotype M1 into M2 macrophages.

  13. Macrophage activation marker soluble CD163 may predict disease progression in hepatocellular carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazankov, Konstantin; Rode, Anthony; Simonsen, Kira Schreiner

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tumor associated macrophages are present in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and associated with a poor prognosis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the levels and dynamics of soluble (s)CD163, a specific macrophage activation marker, in patients with HCC. METHODS: In a co...

  14. Susceptibility of bone marrow-derived macrophages to influenza virus infection is dependent on macrophage phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Gillian M; Nicol, Marlynne Q; Dransfield, Ian; Shaw, Darren J; Nash, Anthony A; Dutia, Bernadette M

    2015-10-01

    The role of the macrophage in influenza virus infection is complex. Macrophages are critical for resolution of influenza virus infections but implicated in morbidity and mortality in severe infections. They can be infected with influenza virus and consequently macrophage infection is likely to have an impact on the host immune response. Macrophages display a range of functional phenotypes, from the prototypical pro-inflammatory classically activated cell to alternatively activated anti-inflammatory macrophages involved in immune regulation and wound healing. We were interested in how macrophages of different phenotype respond to influenza virus infection and therefore studied the infection of bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) of classical and alternative phenotype in vitro. Our results show that alternatively activated macrophages are more readily infected and killed by the virus than classically activated. Classically activated BMDMs express the pro-inflammatory markers inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and TNF-α, and TNF-α expression was further upregulated following infection. Alternatively activated macrophages express Arginase-1 and CD206; however, following infection, expression of these markers was downregulated whilst expression of iNOS and TNF-α was upregulated. Thus, infection can override the anti-inflammatory state of alternatively activated macrophages. Importantly, however, this results in lower levels of pro-inflammatory markers than those produced by classically activated cells. Our results showed that macrophage phenotype affects the inflammatory macrophage response following infection, and indicated that modulating the macrophage phenotype may provide a route to develop novel strategies to prevent and treat influenza virus infection.

  15. Mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase 1 (MKP-1) in macrophage biology and cardiovascular disease. A redox-regulated master controller of monocyte function and macrophage phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hong Seok; Asmis, Reto

    2017-08-01

    MAPK pathways play a critical role in the activation of monocytes and macrophages by pathogens, signaling molecules and environmental cues and in the regulation of macrophage function and plasticity. MAPK phosphatase 1 (MKP-1) has emerged as the main counter-regulator of MAPK signaling in monocytes and macrophages. Loss of MKP-1 in monocytes and macrophages in response to metabolic stress leads to dysregulation of monocyte adhesion and migration, and gives rise to dysfunctional, proatherogenic monocyte-derived macrophages. Here we review the properties of this redox-regulated dual-specificity MAPK phosphatase and the role of MKP-1 in monocyte and macrophage biology and cardiovascular diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Gc protein-derived macrophage activating factor (GcMAF): isoelectric focusing pattern and tumoricidal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad, Saharuddin Bin; Nagasawa, Hideko; Sasaki, Hideyuki; Uto, Yoshihiro; Nakagawa, Yoshinori; Kawashima, Ken; Hori, Hitoshi

    2003-01-01

    Gc protein is the precursor for Gc protein-derived macrophage activating factor (GcMAF), with three phenotypes: Gc1f, Gc1s and Gc2, based on its electrophoretic mobility. The difference in electrophoretic mobility is because of the difference in its posttranslational sugar moiety composition. We compared the difference between Gc protein and GcMAF electrophoretic mobility using the isoelectric focusing (IEF) method. The tumoricidal activity of GcMAF-treated macrophage was evaluated after coculture with L-929 cell. The tumoricidal mechanism was investigated using TNF bioassay and nitric oxide (NO) release. The difference in Gc protein and GcMAF electrophoretic mobility was detected. The tumoricidal activity of GcMAF-treated macrophage was detected, but no release of TNF and NO was detected. The difference of isoelectric focusing mobility in Gc protein and GcMAF would be useful to develop a GcMAF detection method. GcMAF increased macrophage tumoricidal activity but TNF and NO release were not involved in the mechanism.

  17. Neutrophil Microvesicles from Healthy Control and Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Prevent the Inflammatory Activation of Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hefin I. Rhys

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Microvesicles (MVs are emerging as a novel means to enact cell-to-cell communication in inflammation. Here, we aimed to ascertain the ability of neutrophil-derived MVs to modulate target cell behaviour, the focus being the macrophage.MVs were generated in response to tumour necrosis factor-α, from healthy control neutrophils or those from rheumatoid arthritis patients. MVs were used to stimulate human monocyte-derived macrophages in vitro, or administered intra-articularly in the K/BxN mouse model of arthritis. A macrophage/fibroblast-like synoviocyte co-culture system was used to study the effects of vesicles on the crosstalk between these cells.We demonstrate a direct role for phosphatidylserine and annexin-A1 exposed by the MVs to counteract classical activation of the macrophages, and promote the release of transforming growth factor-β, respectively. Classically-activated macrophages exposed to neutrophil MVs no longer activated fibroblast-like synoviocytes in subsequent co-culture settings. Finally, intra-articular administration of neutrophil MVs from rheumatoid arthritis patients in arthritic mice affected the phenotype of joint macrophages.Altogether these data, with the identification of specific MV determinants, open new opportunities to modulate on-going inflammation in the synovia – mainly by affecting macrophage polarization and potentially also fibroblast-like synoviocytes - through the delivery of autologous or heterologous MVs produced from neutrophils. Keywords: Neutrophils, Macrophages, Vesicles, Rheumatoid arthritis

  18. A Time- and Compartment-Specific Activation of Lung Macrophages in Hypoxic Pulmonary Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugliese, Steven C; Kumar, Sushil; Janssen, William J; Graham, Brian B; Frid, Maria G; Riddle, Suzette R; El Kasmi, Karim C; Stenmark, Kurt R

    2017-06-15

    Studies in various animal models suggest an important role for pulmonary macrophages in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension (PH). Yet, the molecular mechanisms characterizing the functional macrophage phenotype relative to time and pulmonary localization and compartmentalization remain largely unknown. In this study, we used a hypoxic murine model of PH in combination with FACS to quantify and isolate lung macrophages from two compartments over time and characterize their programing via RNA sequencing approaches. In response to hypoxia, we found an early increase in macrophage number that was restricted to the interstitial/perivascular compartment, without recruitment of macrophages to the alveolar compartment or changes in the number of resident alveolar macrophages. Principal component analysis demonstrated significant differences in overall gene expression between alveolar and interstitial macrophages (IMs) at baseline and after 4 and 14 d hypoxic exposure. Alveolar macrophages at both day 4 and 14 and IMs at day 4 shared a conserved hypoxia program characterized by mitochondrial dysfunction, proinflammatory gene activation, and mTORC1 signaling, whereas IMs at day 14 demonstrated a unique anti-inflammatory/proreparative programming state. We conclude that the pathogenesis of vascular remodeling in hypoxic PH involves an early compartment-independent activation of lung macrophages toward a conserved hypoxia program, with the development of compartment-specific programs later in the course of the disease. Thus, harnessing time- and compartment-specific differences in lung macrophage polarization needs to be considered in the therapeutic targeting of macrophages in hypoxic PH and potentially other inflammatory lung diseases. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  19. MicroRNAs Control Macrophage Formation and Activation: The Inflammatory Link between Obesity and Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Cheng-An Chang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Activation and recruitment of resident macrophages in tissues in response to physiological stress are crucial regulatory processes in promoting the development of obesity-associated metabolic disorders and cardiovascular diseases. Recent studies have provided compelling evidence that microRNAs play important roles in modulating monocyte formation, macrophage maturation, infiltration into tissues and activation. Macrophage-dependent systemic physiological and tissue-specific responses also involve cell-cell interactions between macrophages and host tissue niche cell components, including other tissue-resident immune cell lineages, adipocytes, vascular smooth muscle and others. In this review, we highlight the roles of microRNAs in regulating the development and function of macrophages in the context of obesity, which could provide insights into the pathogenesis of obesity-related metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular diseases.

  20. A novel assay system for macrophage-activating factor activity using a human U937 cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Mami; Inoue, Takahiro; Inui, Toshio; Kuchiike, Daisuke; Kubo, Kentaro; Uto, Yoshihiro; Nishikata, Takahito

    2014-08-01

    Macrophages play important roles in antitumor immunity, and immunotherapy with the group-specific component protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) has been reported to be effective in patients with various types of cancers. However, in macrophage research, it is important to properly evaluate macrophage activity. U937 macrophages were induced by 12-O-tetradecanoyl-13-phorbolacetate (TPA). The phagocytic activity of macrophages was evaluated as the internalized beads ratio. The MAF activity was assessed at 30 min after MAF addition as the activation ratio. We established a novel assay for phagocytic activities using differentiated U937 macrophages. The novel protocol was simple and rapid and was sensitive for GcMAF. This protocol should be useful not only for basic studies, such as those on molecular mechanisms underlying macrophage activation, but also for clinical studies, such as assessment of GcMAF activity prior to clinical use. Copyright© 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  1. Regulation of antioxidant enzyme activities in male and female rat macrophages by sex steroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azevedo R.B.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Human and animal immune functions present sex dimorphism that seems to be mainly regulated by sex hormones. In the present study, the activities of the antioxidant enzymes total superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px were measured in intraperitoneal resident macrophages from adult male and female rats. In addition to comparing males and females, we also examined the regulation of these enzyme activities in macrophages by sex steroids. GSH-Px activity did not differ between male and female macrophages. However, both total SOD and CAT activities were markedly higher in females than in males (83 and 180%. Removal of the gonads in both males and females (comparison between castrated groups increased the difference in SOD activity from 83 to 138% and reduced the difference in CAT activity from 180 to 86%. Castration and testosterone administration did not significantly modify the activities of the antioxidant enzymes in male macrophages. Ovariectomy did not affect SOD or GSH-Px activity but markedly reduced (48% CAT activity. This latter change was fully reversed by estrogen administration, whereas progesterone had a smaller effect. These results led us to conclude that differences in the SOD and CAT activities may partially explain some of the differences in immune function reported for males and females. Also, estrogen is a potent regulator of CAT in macrophages and therefore this enzyme activity in macrophages may vary considerably during the menstrual cycle.

  2. Triamcinolone acetonide activates an anti-inflammatory and folate receptor-positive macrophage that prevents osteophytosis in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siebelt, Michiel; Korthagen, Nicoline; Wei, Wu; Groen, Harald; Bastiaansen-Jenniskens, Yvonne; Müller, Christina; Waarsing, Jan Hendrik; de Jong, Marion; Weinans, Harrie

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Triamcinolone acetonide (TA) is used for osteoarthritis management to reduce pain, and pre-clinical studies have shown that TA limits osteophyte formation. Osteophyte formation is known to be facilitated by synovial macrophage activation. TA injections might influence macrophage

  3. Decommissioning alternatives, process and work activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    The following outlines the topics discussed under Decommissioning Alternatives, Process and Work Activities: (1) decommissioning alternatives, (2) work activities for prompt removal/dismantling, (3) work activities for entombment with delayed dismantling, and (4) work activities for mothballing with delayed dismantling

  4. Tie2 signaling cooperates with TNF to promote the pro-inflammatory activation of human macrophages independently of macrophage functional phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Samuel; Krausz, Sarah; Ambarus, Carmen A; Fernández, Beatriz Malvar; Hartkamp, Linda M; van Es, Inge E; Hamann, Jörg; Baeten, Dominique L; Tak, Paul P; Reedquist, Kris A

    2014-01-01

    Angiopoietin (Ang) -1 and -2 and their receptor Tie2 play critical roles in regulating angiogenic processes during development, homeostasis, tumorigenesis, inflammation and tissue repair. Tie2 signaling is best characterized in endothelial cells, but a subset of human and murine circulating monocytes/macrophages essential to solid tumor formation express Tie2 and display immunosuppressive properties consistent with M2 macrophage polarization. However, we have recently shown that Tie2 is strongly activated in pro-inflammatory macrophages present in rheumatoid arthritis patient synovial tissue. Here we examined the relationship between Tie2 expression and function during human macrophage polarization. Tie2 expression was observed under all polarization conditions, but was highest in IFN-γ and IL-10 -differentiated macrophages. While TNF enhanced expression of a common restricted set of genes involved in angiogenesis and inflammation in GM-CSF, IFN-γ and IL-10 -differentiated macrophages, expression of multiple chemokines and cytokines, including CXCL3, CXCL5, CXCL8, IL6, and IL12B was further augmented in the presence of Ang-1 and Ang-2, via Tie2 activation of JAK/STAT signaling. Conditioned medium from macrophages stimulated with Ang-1 or Ang-2 in combination with TNF, sustained monocyte recruitment. Our findings suggest a general role for Tie2 in cooperatively promoting the inflammatory activation of macrophages, independently of polarization conditions.

  5. Autophagy deficiency in macrophages enhances NLRP3 inflammasome activity and chronic lung disease following silica exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jessop, Forrest; Hamilton, Raymond F.; Rhoderick, Joseph F.; Shaw, Pamela K.; Holian, Andrij

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is an important metabolic mechanism that can promote cellular survival following injury. The specific contribution of autophagy to silica-induced inflammation and disease is not known. The objective of these studies was to determine the effects of silica exposure on the autophagic pathway in macrophages, as well as the general contribution of autophagy in macrophages to inflammation and disease. Silica exposure enhanced autophagic activity in vitro in Bone Marrow derived Macrophages and in vivo in Alveolar Macrophages isolated from silica-exposed mice. Impairment of autophagy in myeloid cells in vivo using Atg5 fl/fl LysM-Cre + mice resulted in enhanced cytotoxicity and inflammation after silica exposure compared to littermate controls, including elevated IL-18 and the alarmin HMGB1 in the whole lavage fluid. Autophagy deficiency caused some spontaneous inflammation and disease. Greater silica-induced acute inflammation in Atg5 fl/fl LysM-Cre + mice correlated with increased fibrosis and chronic lung disease. These studies demonstrate a critical role for autophagy in suppressing silica-induced cytotoxicity and inflammation in disease development. Furthermore, this data highlights the importance of basal autophagy in macrophages and other myeloid cells in maintaining lung homeostasis. - Highlights: • Silica exposure increases autophagy in macrophages. • Autophagy deficient mice have enhanced inflammation and silicosis. • Autophagy deficiency in macrophages results in greater silica-induced cytotoxicity. • Autophagy deficiency in macrophages increases extracellular IL-18 and HMGB1.

  6. Polysaccharide of Dendrobium huoshanense activates macrophages via toll-like receptor 4-mediated signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Song-Zi; Hao, Ran; Zha, Xue-Qiang; Pan, Li-Hua; Liu, Jian; Luo, Jian-Ping

    2016-08-01

    The present work aimed at investigating the pattern recognition receptor (PRR) and immunostimulatory mechanism of a purified Dendrobium huoshanense polysaccharide (DHP). We found that DHP could bind to the surface of macrophages and stimulate macrophages to secrete NO, TNF-α and IL-1β. To unravel the mechanism for the binding of DHP to macrophages, flow cytometry, confocal laser-scanning microscopy, affinity electrophoresis, SDS-PAGE and western blotting were employed to verify the type of PRR responsible for the recognition of DHP by RAW264.7 macrophages and peritoneal macrophages of C3H/HeN and C3H/HeJ macrophages. Results showed that toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) was an essential receptor for macrophages to directly bind DHP. Further, the phosphorylation of ERK, JNK, Akt and p38 were observed to be time-dependently promoted by DHP, as well as the nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65. These results suggest that DHP activates macrophages via its direct binding to TLR4 to trigger TLR4 signaling pathways. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Macrophage activation induced by Brucella DNA suppresses bacterial intracellular replication via enhancing NO production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning; Wang, Lin; Sun, Changjiang; Yang, Li; Tang, Bin; Sun, Wanchun; Peng, Qisheng

    2015-12-01

    Brucella DNA can be sensed by TLR9 on endosomal membrane and by cytosolic AIM2-inflammasome to induce proinflammatory cytokine production that contributes to partially activate innate immunity. Additionally, Brucella DNA has been identified to be able to act as a major bacterial component to induce type I IFN. However, the role of Brucella DNA in Brucella intracellular growth remains unknown. Here, we showed that stimulation with Brucella DNA promote macrophage activation in TLR9-dependent manner. Activated macrophages can suppresses wild type Brucella intracellular replication at early stage of infection via enhancing NO production. We also reported that activated macrophage promotes bactericidal function of macrophages infected with VirB-deficient Brucella at the early or late stage of infection. This study uncovers a novel function of Brucella DNA, which can help us further elucidate the mechanism of Brucella intracellular survival. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Complement binding to erythrocytes is associated with macrophage activation and reduced haemoglobin in Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goka, B Q; Kwarko, H; Kurtzhals, J A

    2001-01-01

    parameters were significantly higher in DAT-positive than in DAT-negative patients (P macrophage activation. Plasma levels of haptoglobin, interleukin-10 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha did not vary between the groups...

  9. Oral Colostrum Macrophage-activating Factor for Serious Infection and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Three Case Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inui, Toshio; Kubo, Kentaro; Kuchiike, Daisuke; Uto, Yoshihiro; Nishikata, Takahito; Sakamoto, Norihiro; Mette, Martin

    2015-08-01

    Gc protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) immunotherapy has been steadily advancing over the last two decades. Oral colostrum macrophage-activating factor (MAF) produced from bovine colostrum has shown high macrophage phagocytic activity. GcMAF-based immunotherapy has a wide application for use in treating many diseases via macrophage activation or for use as supportive therapy. Three case studies demonstrate that oral colostrum MAF can be used for serious infection and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) without adverse effects. We demonstrate that colostrum MAF shows promising clinical results in patients with infectious diseases and for symptoms of fatigue, which is common in many chronic diseases. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  10. Monocyte to macrophage differentiation-associated (MMD) positively regulates ERK and Akt activation and TNF-α and NO production in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiang; Zheng, Jin; Yin, Dan-Dan; Xiang, Jie; He, Fei; Wang, Yao-Chun; Liang, Liang; Qin, Hong-Yan; Liu, Li; Liang, Ying-Min; Han, Hua

    2012-05-01

    Macrophage activation is modulated by both environmental cues and endogenous programs. In the present study, we investigated the role of a PAQR family protein, monocyte to macrophage differentiation-associated (MMD), in macrophage activation and unveiled its underlying molecular mechanism. Our results showed that while MMD expression could be detected in all tissues examined, its expression level is significantly up-regulated upon monocyte differentiation. Within cells, EGFP-MMD fusion protein could be co-localized to endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, Golgi apparatus, but not lysosomes and cytoplasm. MMD expression is up-regulated in macrophages after LPS stimulation, and this might be modulated by RBP-J, the critical transcription factor of Notch signaling. Overexpression of MMD in macrophages increased the production of TNF-α and NO upon LPS stimulation. We found that MMD overexpression enhanced ERK1/2 and Akt phosphorylation in macrophages after LPS stimulation. Blocking Erk or Akt by pharmacological agent reduced TNF-α or NO production in MMD-overexpressing macrophages, respectively. These results suggested that MMD modulates TNF-α and NO production in macrophages, and this process might involves Erk or Akt.

  11. The Dipeptidyl Peptidases 4, 8, and 9 in Mouse Monocytes and Macrophages: DPP8/9 Inhibition Attenuates M1 Macrophage Activation in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waumans, Yannick; Vliegen, Gwendolyn; Maes, Lynn; Rombouts, Miche; Declerck, Ken; Van Der Veken, Pieter; Vanden Berghe, Wim; De Meyer, Guido R Y; Schrijvers, Dorien; De Meester, Ingrid

    2016-02-01

    Atherosclerosis remains the leading cause of death in Western countries. Dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP) 4 has emerged as a novel target for the prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis. Family members DPP8 and 9 are abundantly present in macrophage-rich regions of atherosclerotic plaques, and DPP9 inhibition attenuates activation of human M1 macrophages in vitro. Studying this family in a mouse model for atherosclerosis would greatly advance our knowledge regarding their potential as therapeutic targets. We found that DPP4 is downregulated during mouse monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation. DPP8 and 9 expression seems relatively low in mouse monocytes and macrophages. Viability of primary mouse macrophages is unaffected by DPP4 or DPP8/9 inhibition. Importantly, DPP8/9 inhibition attenuates macrophage activation as IL-6 secretion is significantly decreased. Mouse macrophages respond similarly to DPP inhibition, compared to human macrophages. This shows that the mouse could become a valid model species for the study of DPPs as therapeutic targets in atherosclerosis.

  12. Macrophage activation induced by the polysaccharides isolated from the roots of Sanguisorba officinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Haibin; Mao, Dirui; Zhai, Mingyue; Zhang, Zhuorui; Sun, Guangren; Jiang, Guiquan

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage, involved at all stages of immune response, is an important component of the host defense system. Polysaccharides exist almost ubiquitously in medical plants and most of them possess immunomodulation and macrophage activation properties. This study elucidates the effects on macrophage activation and molecular mechanism induced by the polysaccharides (SOPs) from the roots of Sanguisorba officinalis Linne (Rosaceae). Polysaccharides (SOPs) from the roots of S. officinalis were obtained by water extraction and ethanol precipitation. Physicochemical characterization of SOPs was analyzed by phenol-sulfuric acid, m-hydroxydiphenyl, Bradford method, and gas chromatography. Phagocytic capacity of RAW 264.7 macrophages incubated with SOPs (25 and 100 μg/ml) was determined by the aseptic neutral red method. Macrophages were incubated with SOPs (25 and 100 μg/ml), and the TNF-α and NO the secretion were measured using ELISA kit and Griess reagent, respectively. In addition, TNF-α and iNOS transcripts were evaluated by semi-quantitative RT-PCR, and NF-κB signaling activation was detected by Western blot assay. SOPs enhanced the phagocytosis capacity of macrophages to aseptic neutral red solution and increased TNF-α and NO secretion. The amounts of TNF-α and iNOS transcript were increased significantly at the mRNA level when macrophages were exposed to SOPs. Meanwhile, the stimulation of macrophages by SOPs induced phosphorylation of p65 at serine 536 and a marked decrease of IκB expression. These results suggested that SOPs exhibited significant macrophage activation properties through NF-κB signaling pathway and could be considered as a new immunopotentiator.

  13. Effect of the Gc-derived macrophage-activating factor precursor (preGcMAF) on phagocytic activation of mouse peritoneal macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uto, Yoshihiro; Yamamoto, Syota; Takeuchi, Ryota; Nakagawa, Yoshinori; Hirota, Keiji; Terada, Hiroshi; Onizuka, Shinya; Nakata, Eiji; Hori, Hitoshi

    2011-07-01

    The 1f1f subtype of the Gc protein (Gc(1f1f) protein) was converted into Gc-derived macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) by enzymatic processing in the presence of β-galactosidase of an activated B-cell and sialidase of a T-cell. We hypothesized that preGc(1f1f)MAF, the only Gc(1f1f) protein lacking galactose, can be converted to GcMAF in vivo because sialic acid is cleaved by residual sialidase. Hence, we investigated the effect of preGc(1f1f)MAF on the phagocytic activation of mouse peritoneal macrophages. We examined the sugar moiety of preGc(1f1f)MAF with a Western blot using peanut agglutinin (PNA) and Helix pomatia agglutinin (HPA) lectin. We also found that preGc(1f1f)MAF significantly enhanced phagocytic activity in mouse peritoneal macrophages but only in the presence of the mouse peritoneal fluid; the level of phagocytic activity was the same as that observed for GcMAF. PreGc(1f1f)MAF can be used as an effective macrophage activator in vivo.

  14. Classical and alternative macrophages have impaired function during acute and chronic HIV-1 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo J. Galvão-Lima

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Our therapy protocols were not effective in restoring the functional alterations induced by HIV, especially those found on macrophages. These findings indicate that we still need to develop new approaches and improve the current therapy protocols, focusing on the reestablishment of cellular functions and prevention/treatment of opportunistic infections.

  15. Toll like receptor 4 (TLR4) mediates the stimulating activities of chitosan oligosaccharide on macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pei; Liu, Weizhi; Peng, Yanfei; Han, Baoqin; Yang, Yan

    2014-11-01

    The in vivo and in vitro immunostimulating properties of chitosan oligosaccharide (COS) prepared by enzymatic hydrolysis of chitosan and the mechanisms mediating the effects were investigated. Our data showed that the highly active chitosanase isolated could hydrolyze chitosan to the polymerization degree of 3-8. The resulting COS was an efficient immunostimulator. COS markedly enhanced the proliferation and neutral red phagocytosis by RAW 264.7 macrophages. The production of nitric oxide (NO) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) by macrophages was significantly increased after incubation with COS. Oral administration of COS in mice could increase spleen index and serum immunoglobin G (IgG) contents. COS was labeled with FITC to study the pinocytosis by macrophages. Results showed that FITC-COS was phagocyted by macrophages and anti-murine TLR4 antibody completely blocked FITC-COS pinocytosis. RT-PCR indicated that COS treatment of macrophages significantly increased TLR4 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA levels. When cells were pretreated with anti-murine TLR4 antibody, the effect of COS on TLR4 and iNOS mRNA induction was decreased. COS-induced NO secretion by macrophages was also markedly decreased by anti-murine TLR4 antibody pretreatment. In conclusion, the present study revealed that COS possesses potent immune-stimulating properties by activating TLR4 on macrophages. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Enhancement of Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Curcumin Using Phosphatidylserine-Containing Nanoparticles in Cultured Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Wang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are one kind of innate immune cells, and produce a variety of inflammatory cytokines in response to various stimuli, such as oxidized low density lipoprotein found in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. In this study, the effect of phosphatidylserine on anti-inflammatory activity of curcumin-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers was investigated using macrophage cultures. Different amounts of phosphatidylserine were used in the preparation of curcumin nanoparticles, their physicochemical properties and biocompatibilities were then compared. Cellular uptake of the nanoparticles was investigated using a confocal laser scanning microscope and flow cytometry analysis in order to determine the optimal phosphatidylserine concentration. In vitro anti-inflammatory activities were evaluated in macrophages to test whether curcumin and phosphatidylserine have interactive effects on macrophage lipid uptake behavior and anti-inflammatory responses. Here, we showed that macrophage uptake of phosphatidylserine-containing nanostructured lipid carriers increased with increasing amount of phosphatidylserine in the range of 0%–8%, and decreased when the phosphatidylserine molar ratio reached over 12%. curcumin-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers significantly inhibited lipid accumulation and pro-inflammatory factor production in cultured macrophages, and evidently promoted release of anti-inflammatory cytokines, when compared with curcumin or phosphatidylserine alone. These results suggest that the delivery system using PS-based nanoparticles has great potential for efficient delivery of drugs such as curcumin, specifically targeting macrophages and modulation of their anti-inflammatory functions.

  17. Serum markers of macrophage activation in pre-eclampsia: no predictive value of soluble CD163 and neopterin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronborg, Camilla S; Knudsen, Ulla Breth; Moestrup, Søren K

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Alternatively activated macrophages expressing the CD163 and CD206 surface receptors are the dominant immune-cell type found in the placenta. The placental number and distribution of macrophages is altered in pre-eclampsia, and the generalised inflammatory reaction associated with pre-eclampsia...... might lead to shedding of soluble CD163 into the circulation. METHODS: Serum samples from 18 women with pre-eclampsia and 90 normal pregnancies were obtained from a longitudinal study of 955 pregnant women at Randers County Hospital, Denmark. sCD163 and Neopterin were measured by ELISA on samples....... Neopterin increased throughout pregnancy in both healthy (from median 5.4 to 6.7 nmol/l, ppre-eclampsia...

  18. Epigenetic mechanisms of macrophage activation in type 2 dilabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed, Mohamed; de Winther, Menno P. J.; van den Bossche, Jan

    2017-01-01

    The alarming rise of obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D) has put a tremendous strain on global healthcare systems. Over the past decade extensive research has focused on the role of macrophages as key mediators of inflammation in T2D. The inflammatory environment in the obese adipose tissue and

  19. Cardiac macrophages adopt profibrotic/M2 phenotype in infarcted hearts: Role of urokinase plasminogen activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Signe; Helterline, Deri; Asbe, Laura; Dupras, Sarah; Minami, Elina; Farris, Stephen; Stempien-Otero, April

    2017-07-01

    Macrophages (mac) that over-express urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) adopt a profibrotic M2 phenotype in the heart in association with cardiac fibrosis. We tested the hypothesis that cardiac macs are M2 polarized in infarcted mouse and human hearts and that polarization is dependent on mac-derived uPA. Studies were performed using uninjured (UI) or infarcted (MI) hearts of uPA overexpressing (SR-uPA), uPA null, or nontransgenic littermate (Ntg) mice. At 7days post-infarction, cardiac mac were isolated, RNA extracted and M2 markers Arg1, YM1, and Fizz1 measured with qrtPCR. Histologic analysis for cardiac fibrosis, mac and myofibroblasts was performed at the same time-point. Cardiac macs were also isolated from Ntg hearts and RNA collected after primary isolation or culture with vehicle, IL-4 or plasmin and M2 marker expression measured. Cardiac tissue and blood was collected from humans with ischemic heart disease. Expression of M2 marker CD206 and M1 marker TNFalpha was measured. Macs from WT mice had increased expression of Arg1 and Ym1 following MI (41.3±6.5 and 70.3±36, fold change vs UI, n=8, Padopt a M2 phenotype in association with fibrosis. Plasmin can induce an M2 phenotype in cardiac macs. However, M2 activation can occur in the heart in vivo in the absence of uPA indicating that alternative pathways to activate plasmin are present in the heart. Excess uPA promotes increased fibroblast density potentially via potentiating fibroblast migration or proliferation. Altering macrophage phenotype in the heart is a potential target to modify cardiac fibrosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Bioelectric modulation of macrophage polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunmei; Levin, Michael; Kaplan, David L.

    2016-02-01

    Macrophages play a critical role in regulating wound healing and tissue regeneration by changing their polarization state in response to local microenvironmental stimuli. The native roles of polarized macrophages encompass biomaterials and tissue remodeling needs, yet harnessing or directing the polarization response has been largely absent as a potential strategy to exploit in regenerative medicine to date. Recent data have revealed that specific alteration of cells’ resting potential (Vmem) is a powerful tool to direct proliferation and differentiation in a number of complex tissues, such as limb regeneration, craniofacial patterning and tumorigenesis. In this study, we explored the bioelectric modulation of macrophage polarization by targeting ATP sensitive potassium channels (KATP). Glibenclamide (KATP blocker) and pinacidil (KATP opener) treatment not only affect macrophage polarization, but also influence the phenotype of prepolarized macrophages. Furthermore, modulation of cell membrane electrical properties can fine-tune macrophage plasticity. Glibenclamide decreased the secretion and gene expression of selected M1 markers, while pinacidil augmented M1 markers. More interestingly, glibencalmide promoted macrophage alternative activation by enhancing certain M2 markers during M2 polarization. These findings suggest that control of bioelectric properties of macrophages could offer a promising approach to regulate macrophage phenotype as a useful tool in regenerative medicine.

  1. Inhibition of 5-Lipoxygenase Pathway Attenuates Acute Liver Failure by Inhibiting Macrophage Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the role of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO in acute liver failure (ALF and changes in macrophage activation by blocking it. ALF was induced in rats by administration of D-galactosamine (D-GalN/lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Rats were injected intraperitoneally with AA-861 (a specific 5-LO inhibitor, 24 hr before D-GalN/LPS administration. After D-GalN/LPS injection, the liver tissue was collected for assessment of histology, macrophage microstructure, macrophage counts, 5-LO mRNA formation, protein expression, and concentration of leukotrienes. Serum was collected for detecting alanine aminotransferase (ALT, aspartate transaminase (AST, total bilirubin (Tbil, and tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-α. Twenty-four hours after injection, compared with controls, ALF rats were characterized by widespread hepatocyte necrosis and elevated ALT, AST, and Tbil, and 5-LO protein expression reached a peak. Liver leukotriene B4 was also significantly elevated. However, 5-LO mRNA reached a peak 8 hr after D-GalN/LPS injection. Simultaneously, the microstructure of macrophages was changed most significantly and macrophages counts were increased significantly. Moreover, serum TNF-α was also elevated. By contrast, AA-861 pretreatment significantly decreased liver necrosis as well as all of the parameters compared with the rats without pretreatment. Macrophages, via the 5-LO pathway, play a critical role in ALF, and 5-LO inhibitor significantly alleviates ALF, possibly related to macrophage inhibition.

  2. Inhibition by AA861 of prostaglandin E2 production by activated peritoneal macrophages of rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohuchi, K; Watanabe, M; Taniguchi, J; Tsurufuji, S; Levine, L

    1983-10-01

    Prostaglandin E2 production by rat peritoneal activated macrophages was inhibited by AA861 which had been reported as a selective inhibitor of 5-lipoxygenase from guinea pig peritoneal leukocytes. At a dose of 3.06 microM, prostaglandin E2 production was decreased to 27% of control. No inhibition of the release of (3H)arachidonic acid from the prelabeled macrophages was observed at the dose.

  3. Development of ostrich thrombocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages in culture and the control of Toxoplasma gondii reproduction after macrophage activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Farlen J B; Damasceno-Sá, João Cláudio; DaMatta, Renato A

    2016-01-01

    Raising ostriches became an important economic activity after their products became commodities. The health of farm animals is of paramount importance, so assessing basic immunological responses is necessary to better understand health problems. We developed a method to obtain ostrich thrombocytes and macrophages. The thrombocytes died by apoptosis after 48 h in culture, and the macrophages expanded in size and increased the number of acidic compartments. Macrophages were activated by chicken interferon-γ, producing high levels of nitric oxide. Toxoplasma gondii was able to infect these macrophages, and activation controlled parasitic reproduction. T. gondii, however, persisted in these cells, and infection reduced the production of nitric oxide. These results are important for the future assessment of the basic cellular and immunobiology of ostriches and demonstrate T. gondii suppression of nitric oxide production. © 2016 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  4. Effect of influenza infection on the phagocytic and bactericidal activities of pulmonary macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nugent, K.M.; Pesanti, E.L.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of mouse-adapted influenza A/PR/8/34 virus on pulmonary macrophage function was evaluated by using an in vitro system which allowed direct virus interaction with macrophages and then separate analysis of the steps required for bacterial clearance by macrophages. Infection of macrophages with this virus resulted in the appearance of a hemagglutinating activity on the macrophage surface; expression of this activity was inhibited by amantadine, 2-deoxyglucose, and cycloheximide and by pretreatment of the virus inoculum with with ultraviolet light and specific antiserum. After influenza infection, net ingestion of viable Staphylococcus aureus by macrophage monolayers was unaltered and there was no change in the fraction of the monolayer which ingested cocci over a wide range of bacterial inputs. Influenza-infected microphages also inactivated intracellular S. aureus at a rate indistinguishable from controls. Therefore, these in vitro studies do not support the hypothesis that the defect in pulmonary antibacterial mechanisms associated with influenza infections results from a direct effect of virus infection on either the phagocytic or bactericidal activity of resistant pulmonary macarophages

  5. The role of medicaments, exosomes and miRNA molecules in modulation of macrophage immune activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Nazimek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages play an important role in innate immunity, in induction and orchestration of acquired immune response as well as in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. Macrophages as antigen presenting cells induce or inhibit the development of immune response and as effector cells play an important role in innate immunity to infectious agents and in delayed--type hypersensitivity as well. Thus, either up- or down-regulation of their activity leads to the impairment of different biological processes. This often results in the development of immunological diseases or inflammatory response associated with metabolic, cardiovascular or neuroendocrine disorders. Therefore, the possibility of modulation of macrophage function should allow for elaboration of new effective therapeutic strategies. Noteworthy, interaction of medicaments with macrophages may directly mediate their therapeutic activity or is an additional beneficial effect increasing efficacy of treatment. Further, macrophage differentiation is regulated by miRNA-223, while expression of miRNA-146 and miRNA-155 may modulate and/or be a result of the current cell phenotype. Present review is focused on the current knowledge about the action of medicaments, microRNA molecules, exosomes and related vesicles on macrophages leading to modulation of their biological activity.

  6. In acute experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, infiltrating macrophages are immune activated, whereas microglia remain immune suppressed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vainchtein, I D; Vinet, J; Brouwer, N; Brendecke, S; Biagini, G; Biber, K; Boddeke, H W G M; Eggen, B J L

    2014-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system (CNS) characterized by loss of myelin accompanied by infiltration of T-lymphocytes and monocytes. Although it has been shown that these infiltrates are important for the progression of MS, the role of microglia, the resident macrophages of the CNS, remains ambiguous. Therefore, we have compared the phenotypes of microglia and macrophages in a mouse model for MS, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). In order to properly discriminate between these two cell types, microglia were defined as CD11b(pos) CD45(int) Ly-6C(neg) , and infiltrated macrophages as CD11b(pos) CD45(high) Ly-6C(pos) . During clinical EAE, microglia displayed a weakly immune-activated phenotype, based on the expression of MHCII, co-stimulatory molecules (CD80, CD86, and CD40) and proinflammatory genes [interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumour necrosis factor- α (TNF-α)]. In contrast, CD11b(pos) CD45(high) Ly-6C(pos) infiltrated macrophages were strongly activated and could be divided into two populations Ly-6C(int) and Ly-6C(high) , respectively. Ly-6C(high) macrophages contained less myelin than Ly-6C(int) macrophages and expression levels of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and TNF-α were higher in Ly-6C(int) macrophages. Together, our data show that during clinical EAE, microglia are only weakly activated whereas infiltrated macrophages are highly immune reactive. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Mechanism of interleukin-13 production by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-dependent macrophages via protease-activated receptor-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Rui; Yamamoto, Takatoshi; Sakamoto, Arisa; Ishimaru, Yasuji; Narahara, Shinji; Sugiuchi, Hiroyuki; Hirose, Eiji; Yamaguchi, Yasuo

    2015-06-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) promotes classically activated M1 macrophages. GM-CSF upregulates protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) protein expression and activation of PAR-2 by human neutrophil elastase (HNE) regulates cytokine production. This study investigated the mechanism of PAR-2-mediated interleukin (IL)-13 production by GM-CSF-dependent macrophages stimulated with HNE. Adherent macrophages were obtained from primary cultures of human mononuclear cells. After stimulation with HNE to activate the mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MAPK/ERK) signaling pathway, IL-13 mRNA and protein levels were assessed by the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. PAR-2 protein was detected in GM-CSF-dependent macrophages by Western blotting. Unexpectedly, PD98059 (an ERK1 inhibitor) increased IL-13 production, even at higher concentrations. Interestingly, U0126 (an ERK1/2 inhibitor) reduced IL-13 production in a concentration-dependent manner. Neither SB203580 (a p38alpha/p38beta inhibitor) nor BIRB796 (a p38gamma/p38delta inhibitor) affected IL-13 production, while TMB-8 (a calcium chelator) diminished IL-13 production. Stimulation with HNE promoted the production of IL-13 (a Th2 cytokine) by GM-CSF-dependent M1 macrophages. PAR-2-mediated IL-13 production may be dependent on the Ca(2+)/ERK2 signaling pathway. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of Tityus serrulatus venom on cytokine production and the activity of murine macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera L. Petricevich

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of Tityus serrulatus venom (TSV on murine peritoneal macrophages evaluated in terms of activation. The effects of crude TSV were analysed by detection of cytokines, oxygen intermediate metabolites (H2O2 and nitric oxide (NO in supernatants of peritoneal macrophages. Several functional bioassays were employed including an in vitro model for envenomating: cytotoxicity of TSV was assessed using the lyses percentage. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF activity was assayed by measuring its cytotoxic activity on L-929 cells, and interleukin-6 (IL-6 and interferon-γ (IFN-γ were assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, whereas NO levels were detected by Griess colorimetric reactions in culture supernatant of macrophages incubated with TSV and subsequently exposed to either lipopolysaccharide or IFN-γ. Incubation of macrophages with TSV increased production of IL-6 and IFN-γ in a dose-dependent manner. TNF production was not detected in supernatants treated with TSV at any concentration. The increase in IL-6 secretion was not associated with concentration-dependent cytoxicity of TSV on these cells. These data suggest that the cytotoxicity does not appear to be the main cause of an increased cytokine production by these cells. Although NO is an important effector molecule in macrophage microbicidal activity, the inducing potential of the test compounds for its release was found to be very moderate, ranging from 125 to 800 mM. Interestingly, NO levels of peritoneal macrophages were increased after IFN-γ. Moreover, NO production had an apparent effect on macrophage activity. The results obtained here also shown that the TSV induces an important elevation in H2O2 release. These results combined with NO production suggest that TSV possesses significant immunomodulatory activities capable of stimulating immune functions in vitro.

  9. M2 macrophages activate WNT signaling pathway in epithelial cells: relevance in ulcerative colitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Cosín-Roger

    Full Text Available Macrophages, which exhibit great plasticity, are important components of the inflamed tissue and constitute an essential element of regenerative responses. Epithelial Wnt signalling is involved in mechanisms of proliferation and differentiation and expression of Wnt ligands by macrophages has been reported. We aim to determine whether the macrophage phenotype determines the expression of Wnt ligands, the influence of the macrophage phenotype in epithelial activation of Wnt signalling and the relevance of this pathway in ulcerative colitis. Human monocyte-derived macrophages and U937-derived macrophages were polarized towards M1 or M2 phenotypes and the expression of Wnt1 and Wnt3a was analyzed by qPCR. The effects of macrophages and the role of Wnt1 were analyzed on the expression of β-catenin, Tcf-4, c-Myc and markers of cell differentiation in a co-culture system with Caco-2 cells. Immunohistochemical staining of CD68, CD206, CD86, Wnt1, β-catenin and c-Myc were evaluated in the damaged and non-damaged mucosa of patients with UC. We also determined the mRNA expression of Lgr5 and c-Myc by qPCR and protein levels of β-catenin by western blot. Results show that M2, and no M1, activated the Wnt signaling pathway in co-culture epithelial cells through Wnt1 which impaired enterocyte differentiation. A significant increase in the number of CD206+ macrophages was observed in the damaged mucosa of chronic vs newly diagnosed patients. CD206 immunostaining co-localized with Wnt1 in the mucosa and these cells were associated with activation of canonical Wnt signalling pathway in epithelial cells and diminution of alkaline phosphatase activity. Our results show that M2 macrophages, and not M1, activate Wnt signalling pathways and decrease enterocyte differentiation in co-cultured epithelial cells. In the mucosa of UC patients, M2 macrophages increase with chronicity and are associated with activation of epithelial Wnt signalling and diminution in

  10. Solute carrier protein family 11 member 1 (Slc11a1) activation efficiently inhibits Leishmania donovani survival in host macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nisha; Gedda, Mallikarjuna Rao; Tiwari, Neeraj; Singh, Suya P; Bajpai, Surabhi; Singh, Rakesh K

    2017-09-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (kala-azar), a life threatening disease caused by L. donovani , is a latent threat to more than 147 million people living in disease endemic South East Asia region of the Indian subcontinent. The therapeutic option to control leishmanial infections are very limited, and at present comprise only two drugs, an antifungal amphotericin B and an antitumor miltefosine, which are also highly vulnerable for parasitic resistance. Therefore, identification and development of alternate control measures is an exigent requirement to control leishmanial infections. In this study, we report that functionally induced expression of solute carrier protein family 11 member 1 ( Slc11a1), a transmembrane divalent cationic transporter recruited on the surface of phagolysosomes after phagocytosis of parasites, effectively inhibits Leishmania donovani growth in host macrophages. Further, the increased Slc11a1 functionality also resulted in increased production of NOx, TNF-α and IL-12 by activated macrophages. The findings of this study signify the importance of interplay between Slc11a1 expression and macrophages activation that can be effectively used to control of Leishmania growth and survival.

  11. Inhibition of nuclear factor-kappa B activation decreases survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in human macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiyuan Bai

    Full Text Available Nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB is a ubiquitous transcription factor that mediates pro-inflammatory responses required for host control of many microbial pathogens; on the other hand, NFκB has been implicated in the pathogenesis of other inflammatory and infectious diseases. Mice with genetic disruption of the p50 subunit of NFκB are more likely to succumb to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB. However, the role of NFκB in host defense in humans is not fully understood. We sought to examine the role of NFκB activation in the immune response of human macrophages to MTB. Targeted pharmacologic inhibition of NFκB activation using BAY 11-7082 (BAY, an inhibitor of IκBα kinase or an adenovirus construct with a dominant-negative IκBα significantly decreased the number of viable intracellular mycobacteria recovered from THP-1 macrophages four and eight days after infection. The results with BAY were confirmed in primary human monocyte-derived macrophages and alveolar macrophages. NFκB inhibition was associated with increased macrophage apoptosis and autophagy, which are well-established killing mechanisms of intracellular MTB. Inhibition of the executioner protease caspase-3 or of the autophagic pathway significantly abrogated the effects of BAY. We conclude that NFκB inhibition decreases viability of intracellular MTB in human macrophages via induction of apoptosis and autophagy.

  12. Dihydro-CDDO-trifluoroethyl amide suppresses inflammatory responses in macrophages via activation of Nrf2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Bin; Abdalrahman, Akram; Lai, Yimu; Janicki, Joseph S.; Ward, Keith W.; Meyer, Colin J.; Wang, Xing Li; Tang, Dongqi; Cui, Taixing

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Dh404 suppresses the expression of a selected set of pro-inflammatory cytokines in inflamed macrophages via activating Nrf2. • Dh404 activates Nrf2 while keeping Keap1 function intact in macrophages. • Dh404 minimally regulates NF-κB pathway in macrophages. - Abstract: Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2) is the major regulator of cellular defenses against various pathological stresses in a variety of organ systems, thus Nrf2 has evolved to be an attractive drug target for the treatment and/or prevention of human disease. Several synthetic oleanolic triterpenoids including dihydro-CDDO-trifluoroethyl amide (dh404) appear to be potent activators of Nrf2 and exhibit chemopreventive promises in multiple disease models. While the pharmacological efficacy of Nrf2 activators may be dependent on the nature of Nrf2 activation in specific cell types of target organs, the precise role of Nrf2 in mediating biological effects of Nrf2 activating compounds in various cell types remains to be further explored. Herein we report a unique and Nrf2-dependent anti-inflammatory profile of dh404 in inflamed macrophages. In lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-inflamed RAW264.7 macrophages, dh404 dramatically suppressed the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines including inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), and macrophage inflammatory protein-1 beta (MIP-1β), while minimally regulating the expression of interleulin-6 (IL-6), IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα). Dh404 potently activated Nrf2 signaling; however, it did not affect LPS-induced NF-κB activity. Dh404 did not interrupt the interaction of Nrf2 with its endogenous inhibitor Kelch-like ECH associating protein 1 (Keap1) in macrophages. Moreover, knockout of Nrf2 blocked the dh404-induced anti-inflammatory responses in LPS-inflamed macrophages. These results demonstrated that dh404 suppresses pro-inflammatory responses in macrophages via an activation

  13. Dihydro-CDDO-trifluoroethyl amide suppresses inflammatory responses in macrophages via activation of Nrf2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Bin [Shandong University Qilu Hospital Research Center for Cell Therapy, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Abdalrahman, Akram; Lai, Yimu; Janicki, Joseph S. [Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Ward, Keith W.; Meyer, Colin J. [Department of Pharmacology, Reata Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Irving, TX 75063 (United States); Wang, Xing Li [Shandong University Qilu Hospital Research Center for Cell Therapy, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Tang, Dongqi, E-mail: Dongqi.Tang@uscmed.sc.edu [Shandong University Qilu Hospital Research Center for Cell Therapy, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Cui, Taixing, E-mail: taixing.cui@uscmed.sc.edu [Shandong University Qilu Hospital Research Center for Cell Therapy, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States)

    2014-02-21

    Highlights: • Dh404 suppresses the expression of a selected set of pro-inflammatory cytokines in inflamed macrophages via activating Nrf2. • Dh404 activates Nrf2 while keeping Keap1 function intact in macrophages. • Dh404 minimally regulates NF-κB pathway in macrophages. - Abstract: Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2) is the major regulator of cellular defenses against various pathological stresses in a variety of organ systems, thus Nrf2 has evolved to be an attractive drug target for the treatment and/or prevention of human disease. Several synthetic oleanolic triterpenoids including dihydro-CDDO-trifluoroethyl amide (dh404) appear to be potent activators of Nrf2 and exhibit chemopreventive promises in multiple disease models. While the pharmacological efficacy of Nrf2 activators may be dependent on the nature of Nrf2 activation in specific cell types of target organs, the precise role of Nrf2 in mediating biological effects of Nrf2 activating compounds in various cell types remains to be further explored. Herein we report a unique and Nrf2-dependent anti-inflammatory profile of dh404 in inflamed macrophages. In lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-inflamed RAW264.7 macrophages, dh404 dramatically suppressed the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines including inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), and macrophage inflammatory protein-1 beta (MIP-1β), while minimally regulating the expression of interleulin-6 (IL-6), IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα). Dh404 potently activated Nrf2 signaling; however, it did not affect LPS-induced NF-κB activity. Dh404 did not interrupt the interaction of Nrf2 with its endogenous inhibitor Kelch-like ECH associating protein 1 (Keap1) in macrophages. Moreover, knockout of Nrf2 blocked the dh404-induced anti-inflammatory responses in LPS-inflamed macrophages. These results demonstrated that dh404 suppresses pro-inflammatory responses in macrophages via an activation

  14. Haemophilus ducreyi infection induces activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome in nonpolarized but not in polarized human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Katz, Barry P; Bauer, Margaret E; Spinola, Stanley M

    2013-08-01

    Recognition of microbial infection by certain intracellular pattern recognition receptors leads to the formation of a multiprotein complex termed the inflammasome. Inflammasome assembly activates caspase-1 and leads to cleavage and secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and IL-18, which help control many bacterial pathogens. However, excessive inflammation mediated by inflammasome activation can also contribute to immunopathology. Here, we investigated whether Haemophilus ducreyi, a Gram-negative bacterium that causes the genital ulcer disease chancroid, activates inflammasomes in experimentally infected human skin and in monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM). Although H. ducreyi is predominantly extracellular during human infection, several inflammasome-related components were transcriptionally upregulated in H. ducreyi-infected skin. Infection of MDM with live, but not heat-killed, H. ducreyi induced caspase-1- and caspase-5-dependent processing and secretion of IL-1β. Blockage of H. ducreyi uptake by cytochalasin D significantly reduced the amount of secreted IL-1β. Knocking down the expression of the inflammasome components NLRP3 and ASC abolished IL-1β production. Consistent with NLRP3-dependent inflammasome activation, blocking ATP signaling, K(+) efflux, cathepsin B activity, and lysosomal acidification all inhibited IL-1β secretion. However, inhibition of the production and function of reactive oxygen species did not decrease IL-1β production. Polarization of macrophages to classically activated M1 or alternatively activated M2 cells abrogated IL-1β secretion elicited by H. ducreyi. Our study data indicate that H. ducreyi induces NLRP3 inflammasome activation via multiple mechanisms and suggest that the heterogeneity of macrophages within human lesions may modulate inflammasome activation during human infection.

  15. In vitro photodynamic effects of scavenger receptor targeted-photoactivatable nanoagents on activated macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Bong Gu; Park, Ok Kyu; Jeong, Myeong Seon; Kwon, Seung Hae; Jung, Jae In; Lee, Seongsoo; Ryoo, Sungwoo; Kim, Sung Eun; Kim, Jin Won; Moon, Won-Jin; Park, Kyeongsoon

    2017-04-01

    Scavenger receptors (SRs) expressed on the activated macrophages in inflammation sites have been considered as the most interesting and important target biomarker for targeted drug delivery, imaging and therapy. In the present study, we fabricated the scavenger receptor-A (SR-A) targeted-photoactivatable nanoagents (termed as Ce6/DS-DOCA) by entrapping chlorin e6 (Ce6) into the amphiphilic dextran sulfate-deoxycholic acid (DS-DOCA) conjugates via physically hydrophobic interactions. Insoluble Ce6 was easily encapsulated into DS-DOCA nanoparticles by a dialysis method and the loading efficiency was approximately 51.7%. The Ce6/DS-DOCA formed nano-sized self-assembled aggregates (28.8±5.6nm in diameter), confirmed by transmission electron microscope, UV/Vis and fluorescence spectrophotometer. The Ce6/DS-DOCA nanoagents could generate highly reactive singlet oxygen under laser irradiation. Also, in vitro studies showed that they were more specifically taken up by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced activated macrophages (RAW 264.7) via a SR-A-mediated endocytosis, relative to by non-activated macrophages, and notably induced cell death of activated macrophages under laser irradiation. Therefore, SR-A targetable and photoactivatable Ce6/DS-DOCA nanoagents with more selective targeting to the activated macrophages will have great potential for treatment of inflammatory diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Degalactosylated/Desialylated Bovine Colostrum Induces Macrophage Phagocytic Activity Independently of Inflammatory Cytokine Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uto, Yoshihiro; Kawai, Tomohito; Sasaki, Toshihide; Hamada, Ken; Yamada, Hisatsugu; Kuchiike, Daisuke; Kubo, Kentaro; Inui, Toshio; Mette, Martin; Tokunaga, Ken; Hayakawa, Akio; Go, Akiteru; Oosaki, Tomohiro

    2015-08-01

    Colostrum contains antibodies, such as immunoglobulin G (IgG), immunoglobulin A (IgA) and immunoglobulin M (IgM), and, therefore, has potent immunomodulating activity. In particular, IgA has an O-linked sugar chain similar to that in the group-specific component (Gc) protein, a precursor of the Gc protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF). In the present study, we investigated the macrophage-activating effects of degalactosylated/desialylated bovine colostrum. We detected the positive band in degalactosylated/ desialylated bovine colostrum by western blotting using Helix pomatia agglutinin lectin. We also found that degalactosylated/ desialylated bovine colostrum could significantly enhance the phagocytic activity of mouse peritoneal macrophages in vitro and of intestinal macrophages in vivo. Besides, degalactosylated/desialylated bovine colostrum did not mediate the production of inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β). Similar to the use of GcMAF, degalactosylated/desialylated bovine colostrum can be used as a potential macrophage activator for various immunotherapies. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  17. Telomerase Activation in Atherosclerosis and Induction of Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase Expression by Inflammatory Stimuli in Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gizard, Florence; Heywood, Elizabeth B.; Findeisen, Hannes M.; Zhao, Yue; Jones, Karrie L.; Cudejko, Cèline; Post, Ginell R.; Staels, Bart; Bruemmer, Dennis

    2010-01-01

    Objective Telomerase serves as a critical regulator of tissue renewal. Although telomerase activity is inducible in response to various environmental cues, it remains unknown whether telomerase is activated during the inflammatory remodeling underlying atherosclerosis formation. To address this question, we investigated in the present study the regulation of telomerase in macrophages and during atherosclerosis development in LDL-receptor-deficient mice. Methods and Results We demonstrate that inflammatory stimuli activate telomerase in macrophages by inducing the expression of the catalytic subunit telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT). Reporter and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays identified a previously unrecognized NF-κB response element in the TERT promoter, to which NF-κB is recruited during inflammation. Inhibition of NF-κB signaling completely abolished the induction of TERT expression, characterizing TERT as a bona fide NF-κB target gene. Furthermore, functional experiments revealed that TERT-deficiency results in a senescent cell phenotype. Finally, we demonstrate high levels of TERT expression in macrophages of human atherosclerotic lesions and establish that telomerase is activated during atherosclerosis development in LDL-receptor-deficient mice. Conclusion These results characterize TERT as a previously unrecognized NF-κB target gene in macrophages and demonstrate that telomerase is activated during atherosclerosis. This induction of TERT expression prevents macrophage senescence and may have important implications for the development of atherosclerosis. PMID:21106948

  18. Scavenger receptor B1 facilitates macrophage uptake of silver nanoparticles and cellular activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldossari, Abdullah A.; Shannahan, Jonathan H. [The University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences (United States); Podila, Ramakrishna [Clemson University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (United States); Brown, Jared M., E-mail: jared.brown@ucdenver.edu [The University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Due to increased use of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) for their antimicrobial activity, concerns have risen regarding potential adverse human health effects. Scavenger receptor B1 (SR-B1), a major receptor for high-density lipoprotein (HDL), is expressed by macrophages and has also been reported to play a role in recognition of negatively charged particles. We, therefore, hypothesized that SR-B1 mediates macrophage uptake of AgNPs and inflammatory activation. To test this hypothesis, we exposed a mouse macrophage cell line RAW264.7 (RAW) and bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) to 20 nm citrate-suspended AgNPs. To verify the role of the SR-B1 receptor, we utilized a SR-B1 inhibitor (Blt2). In vitro studies demonstrated uptake of AgNPs and HDL-coated AgNPs by macrophages which were significantly reduced following pretreatment with Blt2. Inflammatory cytokine arrays revealed that macrophages exposed to AgNPs up-regulated expression of Tnf-α, Oncostatin m (OSM), Ccl4, Il17f, Ccl7, and Ccl2, whereas Il16 was found to be down-regulated. Macrophage activation was observed following AgNP and HDL-coated AgNP exposure as measured by OSM protein production and increased surface expression of CD86. These markers of activation were reduced with Blt2 pretreatment. The in vitro findings were confirmed in vivo through pulmonary instillation of AgNPs in mice. Pulmonary instillation of AgNPs resulted in a recruitment of inflammatory cells that were reduced in SR-B1-deficient mice or following Blt2 pretreatment. This study suggests that SR-B1 plays a major role in cellular recognition of AgNPs and the induction of cell responses that could contribute to inflammation caused by AgNP exposure.

  19. Scavenger receptor B1 facilitates macrophage uptake of silver nanoparticles and cellular activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldossari, Abdullah A.; Shannahan, Jonathan H.; Podila, Ramakrishna; Brown, Jared M.

    2015-07-01

    Due to increased use of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) for their antimicrobial activity, concerns have risen regarding potential adverse human health effects. Scavenger receptor B1 (SR-B1), a major receptor for high-density lipoprotein (HDL), is expressed by macrophages and has also been reported to play a role in recognition of negatively charged particles. We, therefore, hypothesized that SR-B1 mediates macrophage uptake of AgNPs and inflammatory activation. To test this hypothesis, we exposed a mouse macrophage cell line RAW264.7 (RAW) and bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) to 20 nm citrate-suspended AgNPs. To verify the role of the SR-B1 receptor, we utilized a SR-B1 inhibitor (Blt2). In vitro studies demonstrated uptake of AgNPs and HDL-coated AgNPs by macrophages which were significantly reduced following pretreatment with Blt2. Inflammatory cytokine arrays revealed that macrophages exposed to AgNPs up-regulated expression of Tnf- α, Oncostatin m (OSM), Ccl4, Il17f, Ccl7, and Ccl2, whereas Il16 was found to be down-regulated. Macrophage activation was observed following AgNP and HDL-coated AgNP exposure as measured by OSM protein production and increased surface expression of CD86. These markers of activation were reduced with Blt2 pretreatment. The in vitro findings were confirmed in vivo through pulmonary instillation of AgNPs in mice. Pulmonary instillation of AgNPs resulted in a recruitment of inflammatory cells that were reduced in SR-B1-deficient mice or following Blt2 pretreatment. This study suggests that SR-B1 plays a major role in cellular recognition of AgNPs and the induction of cell responses that could contribute to inflammation caused by AgNP exposure.

  20. Differential macrophage polarisation during parasitic infections in common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joerink, Maaike; Forlenza, Maria; Ribeiro, Carla M. S.; de Vries, Beitske J.; Savelkoul, Huub F. J.; Wiegertjes, Geert F.

    2006-01-01

    In many parasitic infections both classically activated macrophages (caMF) and alternatively activated macrophages (aaMF) play a pivotal role. To investigate if both types of macrophages also play an important role during parasitic infections in fish, we infected carp with either Trypanoplasma

  1. Inhibition of ecto-ATPase activities impairs HIV-1 infection of macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schachter, Julieta; Delgado, Kelly Valcárcel; Barreto-de-Souza, Victor; Bou-Habib, Dumith Chequer; Persechini, Pedro Muanis; Meyer-Fernandes, José Roberto

    2015-05-01

    Nucleotides and nucleosides are secreted into extracellular media at different concentrations as a consequence of different physiologic and pathological conditions. Ecto-nucleotidases, enzymes present on the surface of most cells, hydrolyze these extracellular nucleotides and reduce the concentration of them, thus affecting the activation of different nucleotide and nucleoside receptors. Also, ecto-nucleotidases are present in a number of microorganisms and play important roles in host-pathogen interactions. Here, we characterized the ecto-ATPase activities present on the surface of HIV-1 particle and human macrophages as well. We found that the kinetic properties of HIV-1 and macrophage ecto-ATPases are similar, suggesting that the enzyme is the same. This ecto-ATPase activity was increased in macrophages infected in vitro with HIV-1. Using three different non-related ecto-ATPase inhibitors-POM-1, ARL67156 and BG0-we showed that the inhibition of these macrophage and viral ecto-ATPase activities impairs HIV-1 infection. In addition, we also found that elevated extracellular concentrations of ATP inhibit HIV-1 production by infected macrophages. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Full Spectrum of LPS Activation in Alveolar Macrophages of Healthy Volunteers by Whole Transcriptomic Profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Pinilla-Vera

    Full Text Available Despite recent advances in understanding macrophage activation, little is known regarding how human alveolar macrophages in health calibrate its transcriptional response to canonical TLR4 activation. In this study, we examined the full spectrum of LPS activation and determined whether the transcriptomic profile of human alveolar macrophages is distinguished by a TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF-dominant type I interferon signature. Bronchoalveolar lavage macrophages were obtained from healthy volunteers, stimulated in the presence or absence of ultrapure LPS in vitro, and whole transcriptomic profiling was performed by RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq. LPS induced a robust type I interferon transcriptional response and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis predicted interferon regulatory factor (IRF7 as the top upstream regulator of 89 known gene targets. Ubiquitin-specific peptidase (USP-18, a negative regulator of interferon α/β responses, was among the top up-regulated genes in addition to IL10 and USP41, a novel gene with no known biological function but with high sequence homology to USP18. We determined whether IRF-7 and USP-18 can influence downstream macrophage effector cytokine production such as IL-10. We show that IRF-7 siRNA knockdown enhanced LPS-induced IL-10 production in human monocyte-derived macrophages, and USP-18 overexpression attenuated LPS-induced production of IL-10 in RAW264.7 cells. Quantitative PCR confirmed upregulation of USP18, USP41, IL10, and IRF7. An independent cohort confirmed LPS induction of USP41 and IL10 genes. These results suggest that IRF-7 and predicted downstream target USP18, both elements of a type I interferon gene signature identified by RNA-Seq, may serve to fine-tune early cytokine response by calibrating IL-10 production in human alveolar macrophages.

  3. miR-148a-3p Mediates Notch Signaling to Promote the Differentiation and M1 Activation of Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Huang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The Notch pathway plays critical roles in the differentiation and polarized activation of macrophages; however, the downstream molecular mechanisms underlying Notch activity in macrophages remain elusive. Our previous study has identified a group of microRNAs that mediate Notch signaling to regulate macrophage activation and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs. In this study, we demonstrated that miR-148a-3p functions as a novel downstream molecule of Notch signaling to promote the differentiation of monocytes into macrophages in the presence of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF. Meanwhile, miR-148a-3p promoted M1 and inhibited M2 polarization of macrophages upon Notch activation. Macrophages overexpressing miR-148a-3p exhibited enhanced ability to engulf and kill bacteria, which was mediated by excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Further studies using reporter assay and Western blotting identified Pten as a direct target gene of miR-148a-3p in macrophages. Macrophages overexpressing miR-148a-3p increased their ROS production through the PTEN/AKT pathway, likely to defend against bacterial invasion. Moreover, miR-148a-3p also enhanced M1 macrophage polarization and pro-inflammatory responses through PTEN/AKT-mediated upregulation of NF-κB signaling. In summary, our data establish a novel molecular mechanism by which Notch signaling promotes monocyte differentiation and M1 macrophage activation through miR-148a-3p, and suggest that miR-148a-3p-modified monocytes or macrophages are potential new tools for the treatment of inflammation-related diseases.

  4. Activation of Alveolar Macrophages after Plutonium Oxide Inhalation in Rats: Involvement in the Early Inflammatory Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Meeren, A.; Tourdes, F.; Gremy, O.; Grillon, G.; Abram, M.C.; Poncy, J.L.; Griffiths, N. [CEA, DSV, DRR, SRCA, Centre DAM Ile de France, F-91297 Bruyeres Le Chatel, Arpajon (France)

    2008-07-01

    Alveolar macrophages play an important role in the distribution, clearance and inflammatory reactions after particle inhalation, which may influence long-term events such as fibrosis and tumorigenesis. The objectives of the present study were to investigate the early inflammatory events after plutonium oxide inhalation in rats and involvement of alveolar macrophages. Lung changes were studied from 3 days to 3 months after inhalation of PuO{sub 2} or different isotopic compositions (70% or 97% {sup 239}Pu) and initial lung deposits (range 2.1 to 43.4 kBq/rat). Analyses of bronchoalveolar lavages showed early increases in the numbers of granulocytes, lymphocytes and multi-nucleated macrophages. The activation of macrophages was evaluated ex vivo by measurement of inflammatory mediator levels in culture supernatants. TNF-alpha and chemokine MCP-1, MIP-2 and CINC-1 production was elevated from 7 days after inhalation and remained so up to 3 months. In contrast, IL-1 beta, IL-6 and IL-10 production was unchanged. At 6 weeks, pulmonary macrophage numbers and activation state were increased as observed from an immunohistochemistry study of lung sections with anti-ED1. Similarly, histological analyses of lung sections also showed evidence of inflammatory responses. In conclusion, our results indicate early inflammatory changes in the lungs of PuO{sub 2}-contaminated animals and the involvement of macrophages in this process. A dose-effect relationship was observed between the amount of radionuclide inhaled or retained at the time of analysis and inflammatory mediator production by alveolar macrophages 14 days after exposure. For similar initial lung deposits, the inflammatory manifestation appears higher for 97% {sup 239}Pu than for 70% {sup 239}Pu. (authors)

  5. Mesenchymal stem cells ameliorate rhabdomyolysis-induced acute kidney injury via the activation of M2 macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The mortality of rhabdomyolysis-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) is still high, as there is no effective therapy. It has been shown that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can induce M2 macrophages, which mediate MSC protection in other experimental inflammation-related organ injury. This study was designed to investigate the protective effects of macrophage activation in MSC therapy of rhabdomyolysis-induced AKI. Methods MSCs were injected into glycerol-induced rhabdomyolysis mice. Renal injury was evaluated using the serum creatinine, urea nitrogen, renal pathology and acute tubular necrosis score. The distribution of MSCs was detected using two-photon fluorescence confocal imaging. Immunofluorescence of anti-F4/80 and anti-CD206 was performed to determine macrophages and M2 macrophages in the tissues of the kidney, and M2 macrophage infiltration was also evaluated using western blotting analyses. After depletion of macrophages using clodronate liposomes at the phase of kidney repair, renal injury was re-evaluated. RAW 264.7 macrophages were incubated with lipopolysaccharide and co-cultured with MSCs and subsequently visualised using immunofluorescence staining and flow cytometry analysis. Finally, disparate phenotype macrophages, including normal macrophages (M0), lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages (M1), and MSC-co-cultured macrophages (M2), were infused into mice with AKI, which were pre-treated with liposomal clodronate. Results In vivo infusion of MSCs protected AKI mice from renal function impairment and severe tubular injury, which was accompanied by a time-dependent increase in CD206-positive M2 macrophage infiltration. In addition, depleting macrophages with clodronate delayed restoration of AKI. In vitro, macrophages co-cultured with MSCs acquired an anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype, which was characterised by an increased expression of CD206 and the secretory cytokine interleukin (IL)-10. The concentrations of IL-10, IL

  6. Macrophage activity assessed by soluble CD163 in early rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greisen, Stinne Ravn; Møller, Holger Jon; Stengaard-Pedersen, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disease where TNF-α is a central mediator of inflammation, and is cleaved from the cell surface by TACE/ADAM17. This metalloproteinase is also responsible for the release of soluble (s) CD163. Soluble CD163 reflects macrophage activation...... in macrophage activity as evidenced by increasing levels following anti-TNF withdrawal, despite maintenance of a stable clinical condition achieved by conventional remedies. It remains to be determined whether sCD163 is an early predictor of disease flare....

  7. Translocator protein as an imaging marker of macrophage and stromal activation in RA pannus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Nehal; Owen, David; Mandhair, Harpreet; Smyth, Erica; Carlucci, Francesco; Saleem, Azeem; Gunn, Roger; Rabiner, Eugenii Ilan A; Wells, Lisa; Dakin, Stephanie; Sabokbar, Afsie; Taylor, Peter

    2018-01-04

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) radioligands targeted to Translocator protein (TSPO), offer a highly sensitive and specific means of imaging joint inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Through high expression of TSPO on activated macrophages, TSPO PET has been widely reported in several studies of RA as a means of imaging synovial macrophages in vivo. However, this premise does not take into account the ubiquitous expression of TSPO. This study aimed to investigate TSPO expression in major cellular constituents of RA pannus; monocytes, macrophages, fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) and CD4+ T lymphocytes, to more accurately interpret TSPO PET signal from RA synovium. Methods: 3 RA patients and 3 healthy volunteers underwent PET both knees using the TSPO radioligand 11 C-PBR28. Through synovial tissue 3H-PBR28 autoradiography and immunostaining of 6 RA patients and 6 healthy volunteers, cellular expression of TSPO in synovial tissue was evaluated. TSPO mRNA expression and 3H-PBR28 radioligand binding was assessed using in vitro monocytes, macrophages, FLS and CD4+ T-lymphocytes. Results: 11 C-PBR28 PET signal was significantly higher in RA compared to healthy joints (average SUV 0.82± 0.12 compared to 0.03± 0.004 respectively, p<0.01). Further, 3H-PBR28 specific binding in synovial tissue was approximately 10-fold higher in RA compared to healthy controls. Immunofluorescence revealed TSPO expression on macrophages, FLS and CD4+ T cells. In vitro study demonstrated highest TSPO mRNA expression and 3H-PBR28 specific binding, in activated FLS, non-activated and activated 'M2' reparative macrophages, with least TSPO expression in activated and non-activated CD4+ T lymphocytes. Conclusion: This study is the first evaluation of cellular TSPO expression in synovium, finding highest TSPO expression and PBR28 binding on activated synovial FLS and M2 phenotype macrophages. TSPO targeted PET may therefore have unique sensitivity to detect FLS and macrophage

  8. Dynamic activation of basilar membrane macrophages in response to chronic sensory cell degeneration in aging mouse cochleae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, Mitchell D; Yang, Weiping; Zhang, Celia; Xiong, Binbin; Hu, Bo Hua

    2017-02-01

    In the sensory epithelium, macrophages have been identified on the scala tympani side of the basilar membrane. These basilar membrane macrophages are the spatially closest immune cells to sensory cells and are able to directly respond to and influence sensory cell pathogenesis. While basilar membrane macrophages have been studied in acute cochlear stresses, their behavior in response to chronic sensory cell degeneration is largely unknown. Here we report a systematic observation of the variance in phenotypes, the changes in morphology and distribution of basilar membrane tissue macrophages in different age groups of C57BL/6J mice, a mouse model of age-related sensory cell degeneration. This study reveals that mature, fully differentiated tissue macrophages, not recently infiltrated monocytes, are the major macrophage population for immune responses to chronic sensory cell death. These macrophages display dynamic changes in their numbers and morphologies as age increases, and the changes are related to the phases of sensory cell degeneration. Notably, macrophage activation precedes sensory cell pathogenesis, and strong macrophage activity is maintained until sensory cell degradation is complete. Collectively, these findings suggest that mature tissue macrophages on the basilar membrane are a dynamic group of cells that are capable of vigorous adaptation to changes in the local sensory epithelium environment influenced by sensory cell status. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. MicroRNA-223 Is Upregulated in Active Tuberculosis Patients and Inhibits Apoptosis of Macrophages by Targeting FOXO3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Xiue; Zhang, Chunxiao; Han, Wei; Zhao, Huayang; Zhang, Huiqiang; Jiao, Junhua

    2015-12-01

    Macrophage apoptosis is a host innate defense mechanism against tuberculosis (TB). In this study, we aimed to investigate the role of microRNA-223 (miR-223) in macrophage apoptosis of TB. We analyzed apoptosis in peripheral blood macrophages of active TB patients, infected human macrophages (TDMs and MDMs) with the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) strain H37Rv, and observed the expression of miR-223 to investigate the relationship between miR-223 and macrophage apoptosis induced by Mtb. The apoptosis rate of peripheral blood macrophages decreased in active TB patients compared with healthy controls, and miR-223 expression increased significantly in macrophages after H37Rv infection. Transfection of human macrophages (TDMs and MDMs) with miR-223 inhibited macrophage apoptosis. We also demonstrated that miR-223 directly suppressed forkhead box O3 (FOXO3), and FOXO3 played a critical role as a mediator of the biological effects of miR-223 in macrophage apoptosis. The overexpression of FOXO3 remarkably reversed the apoptosis inhibitory effect of miR-223. Our data provide new clues for the essential role of miR-223 in the regulation of anti-Mtb-directed immune responses, which relies on the regulation of FOXO3 expression.

  10. Anti-inflammatory activity of standardized dichloromethane extract of Salvia connivens on macrophages stimulated by LPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Chávez, Marco Martín; Ramos-Velázquez, Cinthia Saraí; Serrano-Vega, Roberto; Pérez-González, Cuauhtemoc; Sánchez-Mendoza, Ernesto; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Salud

    2017-12-01

    A previous study demonstrated that the chloroform extract of Salvia connivens Epling (Lamiaceae) has anti-inflammatory activity. Identification of the active components in the dicholorometane extract (DESC), and, standardization of the extract based in ursolic acid. DESC was prepared by percolation with dichlromethane and after washed with hot hexane, its composition was determined by CG-MS and NMR, and standardized by HPLC. The anti-inflammatory activity was tested on acute TPA-induced mouse ear oedema at doses of 2.0 mg/ear. The cell viability of macrophages was evaluated by MTT method, and pro- and anti-inflammatory interleukin levels were measured using an ELISA kit. Ursolic acid, oleanolic acid, dihydroursolic acid and eupatorin were identified in DESC, which was standardized based on the ursolic acid concentration (126 mg/g). The anti-inflammatory activities of DESC, the acid mixture, and eupatorin (2 mg/ear) were 60.55, 57.20 and 56.40% inhibition, respectively, on TPA-induced ear oedema. The IC 50 of DESC on macrophages was 149.4 μg/mL. DESC (25 μg/mL) significantly reduced TNF-α (2.0-fold), IL-1β (2.2-fold) and IL-6 (2.0-fold) in macrophages stimulated with LPS and increased the production of IL-10 (1.9-fold). Inflammation is a basic response to injuries, and macrophages are involved in triggering inflammation. Macrophage cells exhibit a response to LPS, inducing inflammatory mediators, and DESC inhibits the biosynthesis of the pro-inflammatory and promote anti-inflammatory cytokines. DESC has an anti-inflammatory effect; reduced the levels of IL-1β, Il-6 and TNF-α; and increases IL-10 in macrophages stimulated with LPS. Ursolic acid is a good phytochemical marker.

  11. Comparative activation states of tumor-associated and peritoneal macrophages from mice bearing an induced fibrosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, J C; de Alderete, N; Meson, O E; Sirena, A; Perdigon, G

    1990-11-01

    Balb/c mice bearing a methylcholanthrene-induced fibrosarcoma were used to compare the activation levels of tumor-associated and peritoneal macrophages. Two stages of tumor growth were examined, namely "small" and "large" tumors, with average diameters of 10 and 30 mm, respectively. The activation state, determined by measurement of both phagocytic index and beta-glucuronidase content, was found to be markedly higher in tumor-associated macrophages than in their peritoneal counterparts and it was, in addition, independent of tumor progression. The percentage of tumor-associated macrophages, which were detected on the basis of Fc receptor expression, remained constant in the growing neoplasm, at approximately 23% of total cell population. None of these parameters were affected by inoculation with an immunopotentiating dose of heat-killed Candida albicans which, on the other hand, seemed not to alter the course of the tumor. These data suggest that within the tumor microenvironment macrophages would somehow be maintained at a constant proportion and at a highly activated state, while outside the tumor they would be at a lower activation level. Our results also suggest that TAM would not possess antitumor activity in vivo, although we have found this activity in vitro.

  12. Synergy of anti-CD40, CpG and MPL in activation of mouse macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yongyu; Felder, Mildred A R; Sondel, Paul M; Rakhmilevich, Alexander L

    2015-08-01

    Activation of macrophages is a prerequisite for their antitumor effects. Several reagents, including agonistic anti-CD40 monoclonal antibody (anti-CD40), CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG) and monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), can stimulate activation of macrophages. Our previous studies showed synergy between anti-CD40 and CpG and between anti-CD40 and MPL in macrophage activation and antitumor efficacy in mice. In the present study, we asked whether there was synergy among these three reagents. The activation of adherent peritoneal exudate cells (PEC) obtained from mice injected with anti-CD40 and then treated with CpG and/or MPL in vitro was determined by their ability to suppress proliferation of tumor cells and to produce various cytokines and chemokines in vitro. Cell sorting and histology followed by functional testing showed that macrophages were the main cell population in PEC activated by CD40 ligation in vivo. A combination of anti-CD40, CpG or MPL activated PEC to suppress proliferation of B16 cells and produce nitric oxide far greater than the single reagents or any of the double combinations of these reagents. In addition, the combination of all three reagents activated PEC to secrete IL-12, IFN-γ and MCP-1 to a greater degree than any single reagent or any two combined reagents. These results demonstrate that macrophages can be synergistically activated by anti-CD40, CpG and MPL, suggesting that this novel combined approach might be further investigated as potential cancer therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Synergy of anti-CD40, CpG and MPL in activation of mouse macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yongyu; Felder, Mildred A.R.; Sondel, Paul M.; Rakhmilevich, Alexander L.

    2015-01-01

    Activation of macrophages is a prerequisite for their antitumor effects. Several reagents, including agonistic anti-CD40 monoclonal antibody (anti-CD40), CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG) and monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), can stimulate activation of macrophages. Our previous studies showed synergy between anti-CD40 and CpG and between anti-CD40 and MPL in macrophage activation and antitumor efficacy in mice. In the present study, we asked whether there was synergy among these three reagents. The activation of adherent peritoneal exudate cells (PEC) obtained from mice injected with anti-CD40 and then treated with CpG and/or MPL in vitro was determined by their ability to suppress proliferation of tumor cells and to produce various cytokines and chemokines in vitro. Cell sorting and histology followed by functional testing showed that macrophages were the main cell population in PEC activated by CD40 ligation in vivo. A combination of anti-CD40, CpG or MPL activated PEC to suppress proliferation of B16 cells and produce nitric oxide far greater than the single reagents or any of the double combinations of these reagents. In addition, the combination of all three reagents activated PEC to secrete IL-12, IFN-γ and MCP-1 to a greater degree than any single reagent or any two combined reagents. These results demonstrate that macrophages can be synergistically activated by anti-CD40, CpG and MPL, suggesting that this novel combined approach might be further investigated as potential cancer therapy. PMID:25829245

  14. Activation of murine macrophages by lipoprotein and lipooligosaccharide of Treponema denticola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, G; Sela, M N; Naor, R; Halabi, A; Barak, V; Shapira, L

    1999-03-01

    We have recently demonstrated that the periodontopathogenic oral spirochete Treponema denticola possesses membrane-associated lipoproteins in addition to lipooligosaccharide (LOS). The aim of the present study was to test the potential of these oral spirochetal components to induce the production of inflammatory mediators by human macrophages, which in turn may stimulate tissue breakdown as observed in periodontal diseases. An enriched lipoprotein fraction (dLPP) from T. denticola ATCC 35404 obtained upon extraction of the treponemes with Triton X-114 was found to stimulate the production of nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), and interleukin-1 (IL-1) by mouse macrophages in a dose-dependent manner. Induction of NO by dLPP was at 25% of the levels obtained by Salmonella typhosa lipopolysaccharide (LPS) at similar concentrations, while IL-1 was produced at similar levels by both inducers. dLPP-mediated macrophage activation was unaffected by amounts of polymyxin B that neutralized the induction produced by S. typhosa LPS. dLPP also induced NO and TNF-alpha secretion from macrophages isolated from endotoxin-unresponsive C3H/HeJ mice to an extent similar to the stimulation produced in endotoxin-responsive mice. Purified T. denticola LOS also produced a concentration-dependent activation of NO and TNF-alpha in LPS-responsive and -nonresponsive mouse macrophages. However, macrophage activation by LOS was inhibited by polymyxin B. These results suggest that T. denticola lipoproteins and LOS may play a role in the inflammatory processes that characterize periodontal diseases.

  15. Activation of Murine Macrophages by Lipoprotein and Lipooligosaccharide of Treponema denticola

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Graciela; Sela, Michael N.; Naor, Ronit; Halabi, Amal; Barak, Vivian; Shapira, Lior

    1999-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that the periodontopathogenic oral spirochete Treponema denticola possesses membrane-associated lipoproteins in addition to lipooligosaccharide (LOS). The aim of the present study was to test the potential of these oral spirochetal components to induce the production of inflammatory mediators by human macrophages, which in turn may stimulate tissue breakdown as observed in periodontal diseases. An enriched lipoprotein fraction (dLPP) from T. denticola ATCC 35404 obtained upon extraction of the treponemes with Triton X-114 was found to stimulate the production of nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and interleukin-1 (IL-1) by mouse macrophages in a dose-dependent manner. Induction of NO by dLPP was at 25% of the levels obtained by Salmonella typhosa lipopolysaccharide (LPS) at similar concentrations, while IL-1 was produced at similar levels by both inducers. dLPP-mediated macrophage activation was unaffected by amounts of polymyxin B that neutralized the induction produced by S. typhosa LPS. dLPP also induced NO and TNF-α secretion from macrophages isolated from endotoxin-unresponsive C3H/HeJ mice to an extent similar to the stimulation produced in endotoxin-responsive mice. Purified T. denticola LOS also produced a concentration-dependent activation of NO and TNF-α in LPS-responsive and -nonresponsive mouse macrophages. However, macrophage activation by LOS was inhibited by polymyxin B. These results suggest that T. denticola lipoproteins and LOS may play a role in the inflammatory processes that characterize periodontal diseases. PMID:10024558

  16. Macrophage recruitment, but not interleukin 1 beta activation, enhances noise-induced hearing damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizushima, Yu; Fujimoto, Chisato; Kashio, Akinori; Kondo, Kenji; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2017-11-18

    It has been suggested that macrophages or inflammatory monocytes participate in the pathology of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL), but it is unclear how extensively these cells contribute to the development of temporary and/or permanent NIHL. To address this question, we used clodronate liposomes to deplete macrophages and monocytes. After clodronate liposome injection, mice were exposed to 4-kHz octave band noise at 121 dB for 4 h. Compared to vehicle-injected controls, clodronate-treated mice exhibited significantly reduced permanent threshold shifts at 4 and 8 kHz and significantly smaller outer hair cell losses in the lower-apical cochlear turn. Following noise exposure, the stria vascularis had significantly more cells expressing the macrophage-specific protein F4/80, and this effect was significantly suppressed by clodronate treatment. These F4/80-positive cells expressed interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β), which noise exposure activated. However, IL-1β deficient mice did not exhibit significant resistance to intense noise when compared to wild-type mice. These findings suggest that macrophages that enter the cochlea after noise exposure are involved in NIHL, whereas IL-1β inhibition does not reverse this cochlear damage. Therefore, macrophages may be a promising therapeutic target in human sensorineural hearing losses such as NIHL. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Functional Roles of p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase in Macrophage-Mediated Inflammatory Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanyan Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is a natural host defensive process that is largely regulated by macrophages during the innate immune response. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs are proline-directed serine and threonine protein kinases that regulate many physiological and pathophysiological cell responses. p38 MAPKs are key MAPKs involved in the production of inflammatory mediators, including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2. p38 MAPK signaling plays an essential role in regulating cellular processes, especially inflammation. In this paper, we summarize the characteristics of p38 signaling in macrophage-mediated inflammation. In addition, we discuss the potential of using inhibitors targeting p38 expression in macrophages to treat inflammatory diseases.

  18. Macrophage activity assessed by soluble CD163 in early rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greisen, Stinne Ravn; Møller, Holger Jon; Stengaard-Pedersen, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disease where TNF-α is a central mediator of inflammation, and is cleaved from the cell surface by TACE/ADAM17. This metalloproteinase is also responsible for the release of soluble (s) CD163. Soluble CD163 reflects macrophage activation...

  19. Exosomes derived from gastric cancer cells activate NF-κB pathway in macrophages to promote cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lijun; Zhang, Xu; Zhang, Bin; Shi, Hui; Yuan, Xiao; Sun, Yaoxiang; Pan, Zhaoji; Qian, Hui; Xu, Wenrong

    2016-09-01

    Exosomes are nano-sized membrane vesicles secreted by both normal and cancer cells. Emerging evidence indicates that cancer cells derived exosomes contribute to cancer progression through the modulation of tumor microenvironment. However, the effects of exosomes derived from gastric cancer cells on macrophages are not well understood. In this study, we investigated the biological role of gastric cancer cells derived exosomes in the activation of macrophages. We demonstrated that gastric cancer cells derived exosomes activated macrophages to express increased levels of proinflammatory factors, which in turn promoted tumor cell proliferation and migration. In addition, gastric cancer cells derived exosomes remarkably upregulated the phosphorylation of NF-κB in macrophages. Inhibiting the activation of NF-κB reversed the upregulation of proinflammatory factors in macrophages and blocked their promoting effects on gastric cancer cells. Moreover, we found that gastric cancer cells derived exosomes could also activate macrophages from human peripheral blood monocytes through the activation of NF-κB. In conclusion, our results suggest that gastric cancer cells derived exosomes stimulate the activation of NF-κB pathway in macrophages to promote cancer progression, which provides a potential therapeutic approach for gastric cancer by interfering with the interaction between exosomes and macrophages in tumor microenvironment.

  20. Antitumor activity of the Korean mistletoe lectin is attributed to activation of macrophages and NK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Taek Joon; Yoo, Yung Choon; Kang, Tae Bong; Song, Seong Kyu; Lee, Kyung Bok; Her, Erk; Song, Kyung Sik; Kim, Jong Bae

    2003-10-01

    Inhibitory effect of the lectins (KML-C) isolated from Korean mistletoe (KM; Viscum album coloratum) on tumor metastases produced by murine tumor cells (B16-BL6 melanoma, colon 26-M3.1 carcinoma and L5178Y-ML25 lymphoma cells) was investigated in syngeneic mice. An intravenous (i.v.) administration of KML-C (20-50 ng/mouse) 2 days before tumor inoculation significantly inhibited lung metastases of both B16-BL6 and colon 26-M3.1 cells. The prophylactic effect of 50 ng/mouse of KML-C on lung metastasis was almost the same with that of 100 microg/mouse of KM. Treatment with KML-C 1 day after tumor inoculation induced a significant inhibition of not only the experimental lung metastasis induced by B16-BL6 and colon 26-M3.1 cells but also the liver and spleen metastasis of L5178Y-ML25 cells. Furthermore, multiple administration of KML-C given at 3 day-intervals after tumor inoculation led to a significant reduction of lung metastasis and suppression of the growth of B16-BL6 melanoma cells in a spontaneous metastasis model. In an assay for natural killer (NK) cell activity, i.v. administration of KML-C (50 ng/mouse) significantly augmented NK cytotoxicity against Yac-1 tumor cells 2 days after KML-C treatment. In addition, treatment with KML-C (50 ng/mouse) induced tumoricidal activity of peritoneal macrophages against B16-BL6 and 3LL cells. These results suggest that KML-C has an immunomodulating activity to enhance the host defense system against tumors, and that its prophylactic and therapeutic effect on tumor metastasis is associated with the activation of NK cells and macrophages.

  1. Macrophage activation syndrome associated with griscelli syndrome type 2: case report and review of literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefsafi, Zakia; Hasbaoui, Brahim El; Kili, Amina; Agadr, Aomar; Khattab, Mohammed

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is a severe and potentially fatal life-threatening condition associated with excessive activation and expansion of T cells with macrophages and a high expression of cytokines, resulting in an uncontrolled inflammatory response, with high levels of macrophage colony-stimulating factor and causing multiorgan damage. This syndrome is classified into primary (genetic/familial) or secondary forms to several etiologies, such as infections, neoplasias mainly hemopathies or autoimmune diseases. It is characterised clinically by unremitting high fever, pancytopaenia, hepatosplenomegaly, hepatic dysfunction, encephalopathy, coagulation abnormalities and sharply increased levels of ferritin. The pathognomonic feature of the syndrome is seen on bone marrow examination, which frequently, though not always, reveals numerous morphologically benign macrophages exhibiting haemophagocytic activity. Because MAS can follow a rapidly fatal course, prompt recognition of its clinical and laboratory features and immediate therapeutic intervention are essential. However, it is difficult to distinguish underlying disease flare, infectious complications or medication side effects from MAS. Although, the pathogenesis of MAS is unclear, the hallmark of the syndrome is an uncontrolled activation and proliferation of T lymphocytes and macrophages, leading to massive hypersecretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Mutations in cytolytic pathway genes are increasingly being recognised in children who develop MAS in his secondary form. We present here a case of Macrophage activation syndrome associated with Griscelli syndrome type 2 in a 3-years-old boy who had been referred due to severe sepsis with non-remitting high fever, generalized lymphoadenopathy and hepato-splenomegaly. Laboratory data revealed pancytopenia with high concentrations of triglycerides, ferritin and lactic dehydrogenase while the bone marrow revealed numerous morphologically benign

  2. Virulent Mycobacterium bovis Beijing Strain Activates the NLRP7 Inflammasome in THP-1 Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhou

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium bovis is the causative agent of tuberculosis in a wide range of mammals, including humans. Macrophages are the first line of host defense. They secrete proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β, in response to mycobacterial infection, but the underlying mechanisms by which human macrophages are activated and release IL-1β following M. bovis infection are poorly understood. Here we show that the 'nucleotide binding and oligomerization of domain-like receptor (NLR family pyrin domain containing 7 protein' (NLRP7 inflammasome is involved in IL-1β secretion and caspase-1 activation induced by M. bovis infection in THP-1 macrophages. NLRP7 inflammasome activation promotes the induction of pyroptosis as well as the expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, Chemokine (C-C motif ligand 3 (CCL3 and IL-1β mRNAs. Thus, the NLRP7 inflammasome contributes to IL-1β secretion and induction of pyroptosis in response to M. bovis infection in THP-1 macrophages.

  3. Activation of macrophage mediated host defense against Salmonella typhimurium by Morus alba L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, BoYoon; Koo, BongSeong; Lee, HyeonCheol; Oh, Joa Sub; Kim, SungYeon

    2018-01-01

    The innate immune system plays a crucial role in the initiation and subsequent direction of adaptive immune responses, as well as in the removal of pathogens that have been targeted by an adaptive immune response. Morus alba L. was reported to have immunostimulatory properties that might protect against infectious diseases. However, this possibility has not yet been explored. The present study investigated the protective and immune-enhancing ability of M. alba L. against infectious disease and the mechanisms involved. To investigate the immune-enhancing effects of M. alba L., we used a bacterial infection model. The lifespan of mice infected with a lethal dose of Salmonella typhimurium (1 × 10 7 colony forming units - CFU) was significantly extended when they were administered M. alba L. Furthermore, M. alba L. activated macrophages, monocytes, and neutrophils and induced Th1 cytokines (IL-12, IFN-γ, TNF-α) in mice infected with a sublethal dose (1 × 10 5 CFU) of S. typhimurium . M. alba L. significantly stimulated the uptake of bacteria into peritoneal macrophages as indicated by increased phagocytosis. Peritoneal macrophages derived from C3H/HeJ mice significantly inhibited M. alba L. induced NO production and TNF-α secretion compared with peritoneal macrophages derived from C3H/HeN mice. These results suggest that the innate immune activity of M. alba L. against bacterial infection in mice occurs through activation of the TLR4 signaling pathway.

  4. Histone deacetylases in monocyte/macrophage development, activation and metabolism: refining HDAC targets for inflammatory and infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das Gupta, Kaustav; Shakespear, Melanie R; Iyer, Abishek; Fairlie, David P; Sweet, Matthew J

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages have central roles in danger detection, inflammation and host defense, and consequently, these cells are intimately linked to most disease processes. Major advances in our understanding of the development and function of macrophages have recently come to light. For example, it is now clear that tissue-resident macrophages can be derived from either blood monocytes or through local proliferation of phagocytes that are originally seeded during embryonic development. Metabolic state has also emerged as a major control point for macrophage activation phenotypes. Herein, we review recent literature linking the histone deacetylase (HDAC) family of enzymes to macrophage development and activation, particularly in relation to these recent developments. There has been considerable interest in potential therapeutic applications for small molecule inhibitors of HDACs (HDACi), not only for cancer, but also for inflammatory and infectious diseases. However, the enormous range of molecular and cellular processes that are controlled by different HDAC enzymes presents a potential stumbling block to clinical development. We therefore present examples of how classical HDACs control macrophage functions, roles of specific HDACs in these processes and approaches for selective targeting of drugs, such as HDACi, to macrophages. Development of selective inhibitors of macrophage-expressed HDACs and/or selective delivery of pan HDACi to macrophages may provide avenues for enhancing efficacy of HDACi in therapeutic applications, while limiting unwanted side effects.

  5. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated macrophage activation: the role of calcium in the generation of tumoricidal activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drysdale, B.E.; Shin, H.S.

    1986-01-01

    As the authors reported, calcium ionophore, A23187, activates macrophages (M theta) for tumor cell killing and the activated M theta produce a soluble cytotoxic factor (M theta-CF) that is similar if not identical to tumor necrosis factor. Based on these observations they have investigated whether calcium is involved in the activation mediated by another potent M theta activator, LPS. The authors have shown that A23187 caused uptake of extracellular 45 Ca ++ but LPS did not. They have examined the effect of depleting extracellular calcium by using medium containing no added calcium containing 1.0 mM EGTA. In no case did depletion result in decreased M theta-CF production by the M theta activated with LPS. Measurements using the fluorescent, intracellular calcium indicator, Quin 2 have also been performed. While ionomycin, caused a rapid change in the Quin-2 signal, LPS at a concentration even in excess of that required to activate the M theta caused no change in the signal. When high doses of Quin 2 or another intracellular chelator, 8-(diethylaminol-octyl-3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoate, were used to treat M theta, M theta-CF production decreased and cytotoxic activity was impaired. These data indicate that one or more of the processes involved in M theta-CF production does require calcium, but that activation mediated by LPS occurs without the influx of extracellular calcium or redistribution of intracellular calcium

  6. Surface modification of nanoparticles enables selective evasion of phagocytic clearance by distinct macrophage phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qie, Yaqing; Yuan, Hengfeng; von Roemeling, Christina A.; Chen, Yuanxin; Liu, Xiujie; Shih, Kevin D.; Knight, Joshua A.; Tun, Han W.; Wharen, Robert E.; Jiang, Wen; Kim, Betty Y. S.

    2016-05-01

    Nanomedicine is a burgeoning industry but an understanding of the interaction of nanomaterials with the immune system is critical for clinical translation. Macrophages play a fundamental role in the immune system by engulfing foreign particulates such as nanoparticles. When activated, macrophages form distinct phenotypic populations with unique immune functions, however the mechanism by which these polarized macrophages react to nanoparticles is unclear. Furthermore, strategies to selectively evade activated macrophage subpopulations are lacking. Here we demonstrate that stimulated macrophages possess higher phagocytic activities and that classically activated (M1) macrophages exhibit greater phagocytic capacity than alternatively activated (M2) macrophages. We show that modification of nanoparticles with polyethylene-glycol results in decreased clearance by all macrophage phenotypes, but importantly, coating nanoparticles with CD47 preferentially lowers phagocytic activity by the M1 phenotype. These results suggest that bio-inspired nanoparticle surface design may enable evasion of specific components of the immune system and provide a rational approach for developing immune tolerant nanomedicines.

  7. Plexin-B2 negatively regulates macrophage motility, Rac, and Cdc42 activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly E Roney

    Full Text Available Plexins are cell surface receptors widely studied in the nervous system, where they mediate migration and morphogenesis though the Rho family of small GTPases. More recently, plexins have been implicated in immune processes including cell-cell interaction, immune activation, migration, and cytokine production. Plexin-B2 facilitates ligand induced cell guidance and migration in the nervous system, and induces cytoskeletal changes in overexpression assays through RhoGTPase. The function of Plexin-B2 in the immune system is unknown. This report shows that Plexin-B2 is highly expressed on cells of the innate immune system in the mouse, including macrophages, conventional dendritic cells, and plasmacytoid dendritic cells. However, Plexin-B2 does not appear to regulate the production of proinflammatory cytokines, phagocytosis of a variety of targets, or directional migration towards chemoattractants or extracellular matrix in mouse macrophages. Instead, Plxnb2(-/- macrophages have greater cellular motility than wild type in the unstimulated state that is accompanied by more active, GTP-bound Rac and Cdc42. Additionally, Plxnb2(-/- macrophages demonstrate faster in vitro wound closure activity. Studies have shown that a closely related family member, Plexin-B1, binds to active Rac and sequesters it from downstream signaling. The interaction of Plexin-B2 with Rac has only been previously confirmed in yeast and bacterial overexpression assays. The data presented here show that Plexin-B2 functions in mouse macrophages as a negative regulator of the GTPases Rac and Cdc42 and as a negative regulator of basal cell motility and wound healing.

  8. Vasodilator-Stimulated Phosphoprotein Activity Is Required for Coxiella burnetii Growth in Human Macrophages.

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    Punsiri M Colonne

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Coxiella burnetii is an intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes human Q fever, an acute flu-like illness that can progress to chronic endocarditis and liver and bone infections. Humans are typically infected by aerosol-mediated transmission, and C. burnetii initially targets alveolar macrophages wherein the pathogen replicates in a phagolysosome-like niche known as the parasitophorous vacuole (PV. C. burnetii manipulates host cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA signaling to promote PV formation, cell survival, and bacterial replication. In this study, we identified the actin regulatory protein vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP as a PKA substrate that is increasingly phosphorylated at S157 and S239 during C. burnetii infection. Avirulent and virulent C. burnetii triggered increased levels of phosphorylated VASP in macrophage-like THP-1 cells and primary human alveolar macrophages, and this event required the Cα subunit of PKA. VASP phosphorylation also required bacterial protein synthesis and secretion of effector proteins via a type IV secretion system, indicating the pathogen actively triggers prolonged VASP phosphorylation. Optimal PV formation and intracellular bacterial replication required VASP activity, as siRNA-mediated depletion of VASP reduced PV size and bacterial growth. Interestingly, ectopic expression of a phospho-mimetic VASP (S239E mutant protein prevented optimal PV formation, whereas VASP (S157E mutant expression had no effect. VASP (S239E expression also prevented trafficking of bead-containing phagosomes to the PV, indicating proper VASP activity is critical for heterotypic fusion events that control PV expansion in macrophages. Finally, expression of dominant negative VASP (S157A in C. burnetii-infected cells impaired PV formation, confirming importance of the protein for proper infection. This study provides the first evidence of VASP manipulation by an intravacuolar bacterial pathogen via activation of PKA

  9. Immunotherapy for Prostate Cancer with Gc Protein-Derived Macrophage-Activating Factor, GcMAF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Nobuto; Suyama, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki

    2008-07-01

    Serum Gc protein (known as vitamin D(3)-binding protein) is the precursor for the principal macrophage-activating factor (MAF). The MAF precursor activity of serum Gc protein of prostate cancer patients was lost or reduced because Gc protein was deglycosylated by serum alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (Nagalase) secreted from cancerous cells. Therefore, macrophages of prostate cancer patients having deglycosylated Gc protein cannot be activated, leading to immunosuppression. Stepwise treatment of purified Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase generated the most potent MAF (termed GcMAF) ever discovered, which produces no adverse effect in humans. Macrophages activated by GcMAF develop a considerable variation of receptors that recognize the abnormality in malignant cell surface and are highly tumoricidal. Sixteen nonanemic prostate cancer patients received weekly administration of 100 ng of GcMAF. As the MAF precursor activity increased, their serum Nagalase activity decreased. Because serum Nagalase activity is proportional to tumor burden, the entire time course analysis for GcMAF therapy was monitored by measuring the serum Nagalase activity. After 14 to 25 weekly administrations of GcMAF (100 ng/week), all 16 patients had very low serum Nagalase levels equivalent to those of healthy control values, indicating that these patients are tumor-free. No recurrence occurred for 7 years.

  10. Scutellarin Suppresses NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation in Macrophages and Protects Mice against Bacterial Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Jing, Yan-Yun; Zeng, Chen-Ying; Li, Chen-Guang; Xu, Li-Hui; Yan, Liang; Bai, Wen-Jing; Zha, Qing-Bing; Ouyang, Dong-Yun; He, Xian-Hui

    2017-01-01

    The NLRP3 inflammasome plays a critical role in mediating the innate immune defense against pathogenic infections, but aberrant activation of NLRP3 inflammasome has been linked to a variety of inflammatory diseases. Thus targeting the NLRP3 inflammasome represents a promising therapeutic for the treatment of such diseases. Scutellarin is a flavonoid isolated from Erigeron breviscapus (Vant.) Hand.-Mazz. and has been reported to exhibit potent anti-inflammatory activities, but the underlying mechanism is only partly understood. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether scutellarin could affect the activation of NLRP3 inflammasome in macrophages. The results showed that scutellarin dose-dependently reduced caspase-1 activation and decreased mature interleukin-1β (IL-1β) release in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-primed macrophages upon ATP or nigericin stimulation, indicating that scutellarin inhibited NLRP3 inflammasome activation in macrophages. Consistent with this, scutellarin also suppressed pyroptotic cell death in LPS-primed macrophages treated with ATP or nigericin. ATP or nigericin-induced ASC speck formation and its oligomerization were blocked by scutellarin pre-treatment. Intriguingly, scutellarin augmented PKA-specific phosphorylation of NLRP3 in LPS-primed macrophages, which was completely blocked by selective PKA inhibitor H89, suggesting that PKA signaling had been involved in the action of scutellarin to suppress NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Supporting this, the inhibitory effect of scutellarin on NLRP3 inflammasome activation was completely counteracted by H89 or adenyl cyclase inhibitor MDL12330A. As NLRP3-dependent release of IL-1β has a critical role in sepsis, the in vivo activity of scutellarin was assayed in a mouse model of bacterial sepsis, which was established by intraperitoneally injection of a lethal dose of viable Escherichia coli . Oral administration of scutellarin significantly improved the survival of mice with bacterial sepsis

  11. Scutellarin Suppresses NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation in Macrophages and Protects Mice against Bacterial Sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The NLRP3 inflammasome plays a critical role in mediating the innate immune defense against pathogenic infections, but aberrant activation of NLRP3 inflammasome has been linked to a variety of inflammatory diseases. Thus targeting the NLRP3 inflammasome represents a promising therapeutic for the treatment of such diseases. Scutellarin is a flavonoid isolated from Erigeron breviscapus (Vant. Hand.-Mazz. and has been reported to exhibit potent anti-inflammatory activities, but the underlying mechanism is only partly understood. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether scutellarin could affect the activation of NLRP3 inflammasome in macrophages. The results showed that scutellarin dose-dependently reduced caspase-1 activation and decreased mature interleukin-1β (IL-1β release in lipopolysaccharide (LPS-primed macrophages upon ATP or nigericin stimulation, indicating that scutellarin inhibited NLRP3 inflammasome activation in macrophages. Consistent with this, scutellarin also suppressed pyroptotic cell death in LPS-primed macrophages treated with ATP or nigericin. ATP or nigericin-induced ASC speck formation and its oligomerization were blocked by scutellarin pre-treatment. Intriguingly, scutellarin augmented PKA-specific phosphorylation of NLRP3 in LPS-primed macrophages, which was completely blocked by selective PKA inhibitor H89, suggesting that PKA signaling had been involved in the action of scutellarin to suppress NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Supporting this, the inhibitory effect of scutellarin on NLRP3 inflammasome activation was completely counteracted by H89 or adenyl cyclase inhibitor MDL12330A. As NLRP3-dependent release of IL-1β has a critical role in sepsis, the in vivo activity of scutellarin was assayed in a mouse model of bacterial sepsis, which was established by intraperitoneally injection of a lethal dose of viable Escherichia coli. Oral administration of scutellarin significantly improved the survival of mice with

  12. Decreased sialidase activity in alveolar macrophages of guinea pigs exposed to coal mine dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzidis-Trabelsi, H; Lefèvre, J P; Bignon, J; Lambré, C R

    1992-01-01

    The origin of immune dysfunctions that are observed in pneumoconiotic miners still remains unknown. There is evidence that the carbohydrate moiety of membrane glycoconjugates is of primary importance in many functions of immunocompetent cells. The glycosylation, and especially the sialylation level of membrane components of various lymphocyte and macrophage subsets, vary depending on the state of cellular differentiation and activation. Sialidases, which may regulate the amount of sialic acids exposed on the cell membrane, can thus be considered as immunoregulatory enzymes. In this report, the sialidase activity has been measured in alveolar macrophages (AM) and in cell-free bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) from guinea pigs exposed for 4 months to coal mine dust at a concentration of 300 mg/m3. The samples were collected by bronchoalveolar lavage 2 months after cessation of exposure. The sialidase activity in the cell-free fluid and in the purified alveolar macrophages showed a 10-fold decrease (p less than 0.001). Kinetic parameters of the enzyme such as Km and optimum pH did not change. This changed activity was specific for sialidase, as two other lysosomal glycosidases, beta-galactosidase and N-acetylglucosaminidase, showed unchanged activities. These results suggest the possibility that, by inducing a decreased sialidase activity, exposure to coal mine dust may lead to a modified expression of AM membrane-associated sialic acids giving rise to altered immune functions (i. e., phagocytosis, antigen processing, response to cytokines, etc.). PMID:1396442

  13. Triamcinolone acetonide activates an anti-inflammatory and folate receptor-positive macrophage that prevents osteophytosis in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebelt, Michiel; Korthagen, Nicoline; Wei, Wu; Groen, Harald; Bastiaansen-Jenniskens, Yvonne; Müller, Christina; Waarsing, Jan Hendrik; de Jong, Marion; Weinans, Harrie

    2015-12-05

    Triamcinolone acetonide (TA) is used for osteoarthritis management to reduce pain, and pre-clinical studies have shown that TA limits osteophyte formation. Osteophyte formation is known to be facilitated by synovial macrophage activation. TA injections might influence macrophage activation and subsequently reduce osteophytosis. Although widely applied in clinical care, the mechanism through which TA exerts this effect remains unknown. In this animal study, we investigated the in vivo effects of TA injections on macrophage activation, osteophyte development and joint degeneration. Furthermore, in vitro macrophage differentiation experiments were conducted to further explain working mechanisms of TA effects found in vivo. Osteoarthritis was induced in rat knees using papain injections and a running protocol. Untreated and TA-treated animals were longitudinally monitored for 12 weeks with in vivo micro-computed tomography (μCT) to measure subchondral bone changes. Synovial macrophage activation was measured in vivo using folate receptor β (FRβ)-targeted single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography. Articular cartilage was analyzed at 6 and 12 weeks with ex vivo contrast-enhanced μCT and histology. To further explain the outcomes of our in vivo study, TA on macrophages was also studied in vitro. These cultured macrophages were either M1- or M2-activated, and they were analyzed using fluorescence-activated cell sorting for CD163 and FRβ expression as well as for messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of interleukin (IL)-10. Our in vivo study showed that intra-articular injections with TA strongly enhanced FRβ(+) macrophage activation. Despite stimulated macrophage activation, osteophyte formation was fully prevented. There was no beneficial effect of TA against cartilage degradation or subchondral bone sclerosis. In vitro macrophage cultures showed that TA strongly induced monocyte differentiation towards CD163(+) and FRβ(+) macrophages. Furthermore

  14. Activating transcription factor 4 underlies the pathogenesis of arsenic trioxide-mediated impairment of macrophage innate immune functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Ritesh K.; Li, Changzhao [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Wang, Yong [Department of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Weng, Zhiping; Elmets, Craig A. [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Harrod, Kevin S. [Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Deshane, Jessy S., E-mail: treena@uab.edu [Department of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Athar, Mohammad, E-mail: mathar@uab.edu [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Chronic arsenic exposure to humans is considered immunosuppressive with augmented susceptibility to several infectious diseases. The exact molecular mechanisms, however, remain unknown. Earlier, we showed the involvement of unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling in arsenic-mediated impairment of macrophage functions. Here, we show that activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4), a UPR transcription factor, regulates arsenic trioxide (ATO)-mediated dysregulation of macrophage functions. In ATO-treated ATF4{sup +/+} wild-type mice, a significant down-regulation of CD11b expression was associated with the reduced phagocytic functions of peritoneal and lung macrophages. This severe immuno-toxicity phenotype was not observed in ATO-treated ATF4{sup +/−} heterozygous mice. To confirm these observations, we demonstrated in Raw 264.7 cells that ATF4 knock-down rescues ATO-mediated impairment of macrophage functions including cytokine production, bacterial engulfment and clearance of engulfed bacteria. Sustained activation of ATF4 by ATO in macrophages induces apoptosis, while diminution of ATF4 expression protects against ATO-induced apoptotic cell death. Raw 264.7 cells treated with ATO also manifest dysregulated Ca{sup ++} homeostasis. ATO induces Ca{sup ++}-dependent calpain-1 and caspase-12 expression which together regulated macrophage apoptosis. Additionally, apoptosis was also induced by mitochondria-regulated pathway. Restoring ATO-impaired Ca{sup ++} homeostasis in ER/mitochondria by treatments with the inhibitors of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) and voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) attenuate innate immune functions of macrophages. These studies identify a novel role for ATF4 in underlying pathogenesis of macrophage dysregulation and immuno-toxicity of arsenic. - Highlights: • ATF4 regulates arsenic-mediated impairment in macrophage functions. • Arsenic-mediated alterations in pulmonary macrophage are diminished in ATF4{sup +/−} mice

  15. Activating transcription factor 4 underlies the pathogenesis of arsenic trioxide-mediated impairment of macrophage innate immune functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, Ritesh K.; Li, Changzhao; Wang, Yong; Weng, Zhiping; Elmets, Craig A.; Harrod, Kevin S.; Deshane, Jessy S.; Athar, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Chronic arsenic exposure to humans is considered immunosuppressive with augmented susceptibility to several infectious diseases. The exact molecular mechanisms, however, remain unknown. Earlier, we showed the involvement of unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling in arsenic-mediated impairment of macrophage functions. Here, we show that activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4), a UPR transcription factor, regulates arsenic trioxide (ATO)-mediated dysregulation of macrophage functions. In ATO-treated ATF4 +/+ wild-type mice, a significant down-regulation of CD11b expression was associated with the reduced phagocytic functions of peritoneal and lung macrophages. This severe immuno-toxicity phenotype was not observed in ATO-treated ATF4 +/− heterozygous mice. To confirm these observations, we demonstrated in Raw 264.7 cells that ATF4 knock-down rescues ATO-mediated impairment of macrophage functions including cytokine production, bacterial engulfment and clearance of engulfed bacteria. Sustained activation of ATF4 by ATO in macrophages induces apoptosis, while diminution of ATF4 expression protects against ATO-induced apoptotic cell death. Raw 264.7 cells treated with ATO also manifest dysregulated Ca ++ homeostasis. ATO induces Ca ++ -dependent calpain-1 and caspase-12 expression which together regulated macrophage apoptosis. Additionally, apoptosis was also induced by mitochondria-regulated pathway. Restoring ATO-impaired Ca ++ homeostasis in ER/mitochondria by treatments with the inhibitors of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) and voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) attenuate innate immune functions of macrophages. These studies identify a novel role for ATF4 in underlying pathogenesis of macrophage dysregulation and immuno-toxicity of arsenic. - Highlights: • ATF4 regulates arsenic-mediated impairment in macrophage functions. • Arsenic-mediated alterations in pulmonary macrophage are diminished in ATF4 +/− mice. • Changes in macrophage

  16. Do chondroitin sulfates with different structures have different activities on chondrocytes and macrophages?

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha, André L; Aguiar, Jair A K; Correa da Silva, Flavio S; Michelacci, Yara M

    2017-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the activities of natural chondroitin sulfates (CS) with different structures on cultured chondrocytes and macrophages. CS were isolated from cartilages of bovine trachea (BT), porcine trachea (PT), chicken sternum (Ch) and skate (Sk). The preparations were 90-98% pure, with ∼1% proteins, nucleic acids and keratan sulfate contaminants. Structural analysis of these CS and of commercial chondroitin 4- and 6-sulfate (C4S, C6S) have shown that most of their disaccharides are monosulfated, with varying proportions of 4- and 6-sulfation, and 2-7% non-sulfated disaccharides. Sk-CS and C6S contained detectable amounts of disulfated disaccharides. All the CS were polydisperse, with modal molecular weights of 26-135kDa. These CS had anti-inflammatory activities on both chondrocytes and macrophages, but with different efficiencies. On horse and human chondrocytes, they reduced the IL-1β-induced liberation of NO and PGE 2 , and on RAW 264.7 immortalized macrophage-like cell line, C4S, C6S, Ch and Sk-CS decreased the LPS-induced liberation of TNF-α, but did not affect IL-6. In contrast, on bone marrow derived macrophages, C4S, C6S, BT and PT-CS reduced the LPS-induced liberation of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β and NO, indicating that the RAW response to CS was different from that of primary macrophages. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Tumor cell alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase activity and its involvement in GcMAF-related macrophage activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad, Saharuddin B; Nagasawa, Hideko; Uto, Yoshihiro; Hori, Hitoshi

    2002-05-01

    Alpha-N-acetyl galactosaminidase (alpha-NaGalase) has been reported to accumulate in serum of cancer patients and be responsible for deglycosylation of Gc protein, which is a precursor of GcMAF-mediated macrophage activation cascade, finally leading to immunosuppression in advanced cancer patients. We studied the biochemical characterization of alpha-NaGalase from several human tumor cell lines. We also examined its effect on the potency of GcMAF to activate mouse peritoneal macrophage to produce superoxide in GcMAF-mediated macrophage activation cascade. The specific activity of alpha-NaGalases from human colon tumor cell line HCT116, human hepatoma cell line HepG2, and normal human liver cells (Chang liver cell line) were evaluated using two types of substrates; GalNAc-alpha-PNP (exo-type substrate) and Gal-beta-GalNAc-alpha-PNP (endo-type substrate). Tumor-derived alpha-NaGalase having higher activity than normal alpha-NaGalase, had higher substrate specificity to the exo-type substrate than to the endo-type substrate, and still maintained its activity at pH 7. GcMAF enhance superoxide production in mouse macrophage, and pre-treatment of GcMAF with tumor cell lysate reduce the activity. We conclude that tumor-derived alpha-NaGalase is different in biochemical characterization compared to normal alpha-NaGalase from normal Chang liver cells. In addition, tumor cell-derived alpha-NaGalase decreases the potency of GcMAF on macrophage activation.

  18. Recognition of acidic phospholipase A2 activity in plasma membranes of resident peritoneal macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Y.; Abiko, Y.; Ohno, H.; Araki, T.; Takiguchi, H.

    1988-01-01

    Phospholipase (PLase) activities in the plasma membrane of guinea pig peritoneal macrophages were studied, as these enzymes having such activity may be candidates for the release of arachidonic acid (AA) from phosphatidylcholine (PC). An AA release system operating at acidic pH was identified in the macrophage plasma membrane and characterized. This membrane-bound acidic PLase A 2 had an optimum pH at 4.5, and enzyme activation was observed in Ca ++ -free medium; but the maximum activity was found at 0.5 mM Ca ++ concentration. The Km value for PC of acidic PLase A 2 was 4.2 μM, and a Michaelis-Menten relationship was evident. Calcium might act as a cofactor at some intermediate step during the activation of acidic PLase A 2 in light of the uncompetitive manner of Ca ++ action. Furthermore, the release of [ 3 H]-AA from preradiolabelled macrophage plasma membranes occurred with the addition of Ca ++ at pH 4.5. These data suggest that the acid PLase A 2 is a component of the plasma membrane and is not due to lysosomal contamination since membrane-bound acidic PLase A 2 properties are opposite to those found for lysosomal PLase A 2

  19. Macrophage Plasticity in Skeletal Muscle Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Rigamonti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are one of the first barriers of host defence against pathogens. Beyond their role in innate immunity, macrophages play increasingly defined roles in orchestrating the healing of various injured tissues. Perturbations of macrophage function and/or activation may result in impaired regeneration and fibrosis deposition as described in several chronic pathological diseases. Heterogeneity and plasticity have been demonstrated to be hallmarks of macrophages. In response to environmental cues they display a proinflammatory (M1 or an alternative anti-inflammatory (M2 phenotype. A lot of evidence demonstrated that after acute injury M1 macrophages infiltrate early to promote the clearance of necrotic debris, whereas M2 macrophages appear later to sustain tissue healing. Whether the sequential presence of two different macrophage populations results from a dynamic shift in macrophage polarization or from the recruitment of new circulating monocytes is a subject of ongoing debate. In this paper, we discuss the current available information about the role that different phenotypes of macrophages plays after injury and during the remodelling phase in different tissue types, with particular attention to the skeletal muscle.

  20. Lysosomal storage and impaired autophagy lead to inflammasome activation in Gaucher macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aflaki, Elma; Moaven, Nima; Borger, Daniel K; Lopez, Grisel; Westbroek, Wendy; Chae, Jae Jin; Marugan, Juan; Patnaik, Samarjit; Maniwang, Emerson; Gonzalez, Ashley N; Sidransky, Ellen

    2016-02-01

    Gaucher disease, the inherited deficiency of lysosomal glucocerebrosidase, is characterized by the presence of glucosylcer-amide macrophages, the accumulation of glucosylceramide in lysosomes and the secretion of inflammatory cytokines. However, the connection between this lysosomal storage and inflammation is not clear. Studying macrophages derived from peripheral monocytes from patients with type 1 Gaucher disease with genotype N370S/N370S, we confirmed an increased secretion of interleukins IL-1β and IL-6. In addition, we found that activation of the inflammasome, a multiprotein complex that activates caspase-1, led to the maturation of IL-1β in Gaucher macrophages. We show that inflammasome activation in these cells is the result of impaired autophagy. Treatment with the small-molecule glucocerebrosidase chaperone NCGC758 reversed these defects, inducing autophagy and reducing IL-1β secretion, confirming the role of the deficiency of lysosomal glucocerebrosidase in these processes. We found that in Gaucher macrophages elevated levels of the autophagic adaptor p62 prevented the delivery of inflammasomes to autophagosomes. This increase in p62 led to activation of p65-NF-kB in the nucleus, promoting the expression of inflammatory cytokines and the secretion of IL-1β. This newly elucidated mechanism ties lysosomal dysfunction to inflammasome activation, and may contribute to the massive organomegaly, bone involvement and increased susceptibility to certain malignancies seen in Gaucher disease. Moreover, this link between lysosomal storage, impaired autophagy, and inflammation may have implications relevant to both Parkinson disease and the aging process. Defects in these basic cellular processes may also provide new therapeutic targets. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Extracellular polysaccharides produced by Ganoderma formosanum stimulate macrophage activation via multiple pattern-recognition receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Cheng-Li

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The fungus of Ganoderma is a traditional medicine in Asia with a variety of pharmacological functions including anti-cancer activities. We have purified an extracellular heteropolysaccharide fraction, PS-F2, from the submerged mycelia culture of G. formosanum and shown that PS-F2 exhibits immunostimulatory activities. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms of immunostimulation by PS-F2. Results PS-F2-stimulated TNF-α production in macrophages was significantly reduced in the presence of blocking antibodies for Dectin-1 and complement receptor 3 (CR3, laminarin, or piceatannol (a spleen tyrosine kinase inhibitor, suggesting that PS-F2 recognition by macrophages is mediated by Dectin-1 and CR3 receptors. In addition, the stimulatory effect of PS-F2 was attenuated in the bone marrow-derived macrophages from C3H/HeJ mice which lack functional Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4. PS-F2 stimulation triggered the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases JNK, p38, and ERK, as well as the nuclear translocation of NF-κB, which all played essential roles in activating TNF-α expression. Conclusions Our results indicate that the extracellular polysaccharides produced by G. formosanum stimulate macrophages via the engagement of multiple pattern-recognition receptors including Dectin-1, CR3 and TLR4, resulting in the activation of Syk, JNK, p38, ERK, and NK-κB and the production of TNF-α.

  2. Immunotherapy for Prostate Cancer with Gc Protein-Derived Macrophage-Activating Factor, GcMAF1

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto, Nobuto; Suyama, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki

    2008-01-01

    Serum Gc protein (known as vitamin D3-binding protein) is the precursor for the principal macrophage-activating factor (MAF). The MAF precursor activity of serum Gc protein of prostate cancer patients was lost or reduced because Gc protein was deglycosylated by serum α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (Nagalase) secreted from cancerous cells. Therefore, macrophages of prostate cancer patients having deglycosylated Gc protein cannot be activated, leading to immunosuppression. Stepwise treatment of pu...

  3. Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitor Anagliptin Prevents Intracranial Aneurysm Growth by Suppressing Macrophage Infiltration and Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikedo, Taichi; Minami, Manabu; Kataoka, Hiroharu; Hayashi, Kosuke; Nagata, Manabu; Fujikawa, Risako; Higuchi, Sei; Yasui, Mika; Aoki, Tomohiro; Fukuda, Miyuki; Yokode, Masayuki; Miyamoto, Susumu

    2017-06-19

    Chronic inflammation plays a key role in the pathogenesis of intracranial aneurysms (IAs). DPP-4 (dipeptidyl peptidase-4) inhibitors have anti-inflammatory effects, including suppressing macrophage infiltration, in various inflammatory models. We examined whether a DPP-4 inhibitor, anagliptin, could suppress the growth of IAs in a rodent aneurysm model. IAs were surgically induced in 7-week-old male Sprague Dawley rats, followed by oral administration of 300 mg/kg anagliptin. We measured the morphologic parameters of aneurysms over time and their local inflammatory responses. To investigate the molecular mechanisms, we used lipopolysaccharide-treated RAW264.7 macrophages. In the anagliptin-treated group, aneurysms were significantly smaller 2 to 4 weeks after IA induction. Anagliptin inhibited the accumulation of macrophages in IAs, reduced the expression of MCP-1 (monocyte chemotactic protein 1), and suppressed the phosphorylation of p65. In lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW264.7 cells, anagliptin treatment significantly reduced the production of tumor necrosis factor α, MCP-1, and IL-6 (interleukin 6) independent of GLP-1 (glucagon-like peptide 1), the key mediator in the antidiabetic effects of DPP-4 inhibitors. Notably, anagliptin activated ERK5 (extracellular signal-regulated kinase 5), which mediates the anti-inflammatory effects of statins, in RAW264.7 macrophages. Preadministration with an ERK5 inhibitor blocked the inhibitory effect of anagliptin on MCP-1 and IL-6 expression. Accordingly, the ERK5 inhibitor also counteracted the suppression of p65 phosphorylation in vitro. A DPP-4 inhibitor, anagliptin, prevents the growth of IAs via its anti-inflammatory effects on macrophages. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  4. Immunostimulating activity of maysin isolated from corn silk in murine RAW 264.7 macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jisun; Kim, Sun-Lim; Lee, Seul; Chung, Mi Ja; Park, Yong Il

    2014-07-01

    Corn silk (CS) has long been consumed as a traditional herb in Korea. Maysin is a major flavonoid of CS. The effects of maysin on macrophage activation were evaluated, using the murine macrophage RAW 264.7 cells. Maysin was isolated from CS by methanol extraction, and preparative C18 reverse phase column chromatography. Maysin was nontoxic up to 100 μg/ml, and dose-dependently increased TNF-α secretion and iNOS production by 11.2- and 4.2-fold, respectively, compared to untreated control. The activation and subsequent nuclear translocation of NF-κB was substantially enhanced upon treatment with maysin (1-100 μg/ml). Maysin also stimulated the phosphorylation of Akt and MAPKs (ERK, JNK). These results indicated that maysin activates macrophages to secrete TNF-α and induce iNOS expression, via the activation of the Akt, NF-κB and MAPKs signaling pathways. These results suggest for the first time that maysin can be a new immunomodulator, enhancing the early innate immunity.

  5. Acrolein activates matrix metalloproteinases by increasing reactive oxygen species in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Toole, Timothy E; Zheng, Yu-Ting; Hellmann, Jason; Conklin, Daniel J; Barski, Oleg; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2009-04-15

    Acrolein is a ubiquitous component of environmental pollutants such as automobile exhaust, cigarette, wood, and coal smoke. It is also a natural constituent of several foods and is generated endogenously during inflammation or oxidation of unsaturated lipids. Because increased inflammation and episodic exposure to acrolein-rich pollutants such as traffic emissions or cigarette smoke have been linked to acute myocardial infarction, we examined the effects of acrolein on matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), which destabilize atherosclerotic plaques. Our studies show that exposure to acrolein resulted in the secretion of MMP-9 from differentiated THP-1 macrophages. Acrolein-treatment of macrophages also led to an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS), free intracellular calcium ([Ca2+](i)), and xanthine oxidase (XO) activity. ROS production was prevented by allopurinol, but not by rotenone or apocynin and by buffering changes in [Ca2+](I) with BAPTA-AM. The increase in MMP production was abolished by pre-treatment with the antioxidants Tiron and N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) or with the xanthine oxidase inhibitors allopurinol or oxypurinol. Finally, MMP activity was significantly stimulated in aortic sections from apoE-null mice containing advanced atherosclerotic lesions after exposure to acrolein ex vivo. These observations suggest that acrolein exposure results in MMP secretion from macrophages via a mechanism that involves an increase in [Ca2+](I), leading to xanthine oxidase activation and an increase in ROS production. ROS-dependent activation of MMPs by acrolein could destabilize atherosclerotic lesions during brief episodes of inflammation or pollutant exposure.

  6. Acrolein activates matrix metalloproteinases by increasing reactive oxygen species in macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Toole, Timothy E.; Zheng Yuting; Hellmann, Jason; Conklin, Daniel J.; Barski, Oleg; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2009-01-01

    Acrolein is a ubiquitous component of environmental pollutants such as automobile exhaust, cigarette, wood, and coal smoke. It is also a natural constituent of several foods and is generated endogenously during inflammation or oxidation of unsaturated lipids. Because increased inflammation and episodic exposure to acrolein-rich pollutants such as traffic emissions or cigarette smoke have been linked to acute myocardial infarction, we examined the effects of acrolein on matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), which destabilize atherosclerotic plaques. Our studies show that exposure to acrolein resulted in the secretion of MMP-9 from differentiated THP-1 macrophages. Acrolein-treatment of macrophages also led to an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS), free intracellular calcium ([Ca 2+ ] i ), and xanthine oxidase (XO) activity. ROS production was prevented by allopurinol, but not by rotenone or apocynin and by buffering changes in [Ca 2+ ] I with BAPTA-AM. The increase in MMP production was abolished by pre-treatment with the antioxidants Tiron and N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) or with the xanthine oxidase inhibitors allopurinol or oxypurinol. Finally, MMP activity was significantly stimulated in aortic sections from apoE-null mice containing advanced atherosclerotic lesions after exposure to acrolein ex vivo. These observations suggest that acrolein exposure results in MMP secretion from macrophages via a mechanism that involves an increase in [Ca 2+ ] I , leading to xanthine oxidase activation and an increase in ROS production. ROS-dependent activation of MMPs by acrolein could destabilize atherosclerotic lesions during brief episodes of inflammation or pollutant exposure.

  7. Soluble CD163 from activated macrophages predicts mortality in acute liver failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Holger Jon; Grønbaek, Henning; Schiødt, Frank V

    2007-01-01

    .2-54.0) vs. 14.6mg/l (3.5-67.2), respectively (p=0.0025). Patients that were transplanted had intermediate levels. Sensitivity and specificity at a cut-off level of 26mg/l was 62% and 81%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Activated macrophages are involved in ALF resulting in a 10-fold increase in sCD163. A high...

  8. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Lactobacillus Rahmnosus and Bifidobacterium Breve on Cigarette Smoke Activated Human Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortaz, Esmaeil; Adcock, Ian M; Ricciardolo, Fabio L M; Varahram, Mohammad; Jamaati, Hamidreza; Velayati, Ali Akbar; Folkerts, Gert; Garssen, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major global health problem with cigarette smoke (CS) as the main risk factor for its development. Airway inflammation in COPD involves the increased expression of inflammatory mediators such as CXCL-8 and IL-1β which are important mediators for neutrophil recruitment. Macrophages are an important source of these mediators in COPD. Lactobacillus rhamnosus (L. rhamnosus) and Befidobacterium breve (B. breve) attenuate the development of 'allergic asthma' in animals but their effects in COPD are unknown. To determine the anti-inflammatory effects of L. rhamnosus and B. breve on CS and Toll-like receptor (TLR) activation. We stimulated the human macrophage cell line THP-1 with CS extract in the presence and absence of L. rhamnosus and B. breve and measured the expression and release of inflammatory mediators by RT-qPCR and ELISA respectively. An activity assay and Western blotting were used to examine NF-κB activation. Both L. rhamnosus and B. breve were efficiently phagocytized by human macrophages. L. rhamnosus and B. breve significantly suppressed the ability of CS to induce the expression of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, IL-23, TNFα, CXCL-8 and HMGB1 release (all p<0.05) in human THP-1 macrophages. Similar suppression of TLR4- and TLR9-induced CXCL8 expression was also observed (p<0.05). The effect of L. rhamnosus and B. breve on inflammatory mediator release was associated with the suppression of CS-induced NF-κB activation (p<0.05). This data indicate that these probiotics may be useful anti-inflammatory agents in CS-associated disease such as COPD.

  9. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Lactobacillus Rahmnosus and Bifidobacterium Breve on Cigarette Smoke Activated Human Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmaeil Mortaz

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a major global health problem with cigarette smoke (CS as the main risk factor for its development. Airway inflammation in COPD involves the increased expression of inflammatory mediators such as CXCL-8 and IL-1β which are important mediators for neutrophil recruitment. Macrophages are an important source of these mediators in COPD. Lactobacillus rhamnosus (L. rhamnosus and Befidobacterium breve (B. breve attenuate the development of 'allergic asthma' in animals but their effects in COPD are unknown.To determine the anti-inflammatory effects of L. rhamnosus and B. breve on CS and Toll-like receptor (TLR activation.We stimulated the human macrophage cell line THP-1 with CS extract in the presence and absence of L. rhamnosus and B. breve and measured the expression and release of inflammatory mediators by RT-qPCR and ELISA respectively. An activity assay and Western blotting were used to examine NF-κB activation.Both L. rhamnosus and B. breve were efficiently phagocytized by human macrophages. L. rhamnosus and B. breve significantly suppressed the ability of CS to induce the expression of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, IL-23, TNFα, CXCL-8 and HMGB1 release (all p<0.05 in human THP-1 macrophages. Similar suppression of TLR4- and TLR9-induced CXCL8 expression was also observed (p<0.05. The effect of L. rhamnosus and B. breve on inflammatory mediator release was associated with the suppression of CS-induced NF-κB activation (p<0.05.This data indicate that these probiotics may be useful anti-inflammatory agents in CS-associated disease such as COPD.

  10. Benzo(a)pyrene activation and detoxification by human pulmonary alveolar macrophages and lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, M.V.; McLemore, T.L.; Martin, R.R.; Marshall, M.H.; Wray, N.P.; Busbee, D.L.; Cantrell, E.T.; Arnott, M.S.; Griffin, A.C.

    1980-01-01

    Comparisons of pulmonary alveolar macrophages and circulating lymphocytes from five smokers and five nonsmokers for their ability to metabolize benzo(a)pyrene as determined by high pressure liquid chromatography were carried out. Utilizing this approach, further investigation of activation and detoxification by several human cell types could provide the basis for more precise and comprehensive studies of carcinogen and drug metabolism in the human lung, and for a better assessment of cancer risk in selected populations

  11. YC-1 potentiates cAMP-induced CREB activation and nitric oxide production in alveolar macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Tsong-Long, E-mail: htl@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Natural Products, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Chinese Herbal Medicine Research Team, Healthy Aging Research Center, Chang Gung University, Kweishan, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Tang, Ming-Chi [Graduate Institute of Natural Products, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Kuo, Liang-Mou [Department of General Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Chia-Yi, Taiwan (China); Chang, Wen-De; Chung, Pei-Jen; Chang, Ya-Wen; Fang, Yao-Ching [Graduate Institute of Natural Products, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China)

    2012-04-15

    Alveolar macrophages play significant roles in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory lung diseases. Increases in exhaled nitric oxide (NO) are well documented to reflect disease severity in the airway. In this study, we investigated the effect of 3-(5′-hydroxymethyl-2′-furyl)-1-benzyl indazole (YC-1), a known activator of soluble guanylyl cyclase, on prostaglandin (PG)E{sub 1} (a stable PGE{sub 2} analogue) and forskolin (a adenylate cyclase activator) induced NO production and inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expression in rat alveolar macrophages (NR8383). YC-1 did not directly cause NO production or iNOS expression, but drastically potentiated PGE{sub 1}- or forskolin-induced NO production and iNOS expression in NR8383 alveolar macrophages. Combination treatment with YC-1 and PGE{sub 1} significantly increased phosphorylation of the cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), but not nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation. The combined effect on NO production, iNOS expression, and CREB phosphorylation was reversed by a protein kinase (PK)A inhibitor (H89), suggesting that the potentiating functions were mediated through a cAMP/PKA signaling pathway. Consistent with this, cAMP analogues, but not the cGMP analogue, caused NO release, iNOS expression, and CREB activation. YC-1 treatment induced an increase in PGE{sub 1}-induced cAMP formation, which occurred through the inhibition of cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity. Furthermore, the combination of rolipram (an inhibitor of PDE4), but not milronone (an inhibitor of PDE3), and PGE{sub 1} also triggered NO production and iNOS expression. In summary, YC-1 potentiates PGE{sub 1}-induced NO production and iNOS expression in alveolar macrophages through inhibition of cAMP PDE activity and activation of the cAMP/PKA/CREB signaling pathway. Highlights: ► YC-1 potentiated PGE1-induced iNOS expression in alveolar macrophages. ► The combination of YC-1 and PGE1 increased CREB but not NFκB activation.

  12. Normal autophagic activity in macrophages from mice lacking Gαi3, AGS3, or RGS19.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Vural

    Full Text Available In macrophages autophagy assists antigen presentation, affects cytokine release, and promotes intracellular pathogen elimination. In some cells autophagy is modulated by a signaling pathway that employs Gαi3, Activator of G-protein Signaling-3 (AGS3/GPSM1, and Regulator of G-protein Signaling 19 (RGS19. As macrophages express each of these proteins, we tested their importance in regulating macrophage autophagy. We assessed LC3 processing and the formation of LC3 puncta in bone marrow derived macrophages prepared from wild type, Gnai3(-/-, Gpsm1(-/-, or Rgs19(-/- mice following amino acid starvation or Nigericin treatment. In addition, we evaluated rapamycin-induced autophagic proteolysis rates by long-lived protein degradation assays and anti-autophagic action after rapamycin induction in wild type, Gnai3(-/-, and Gpsm1(-/- macrophages. In similar assays we compared macrophages treated or not with pertussis toxin, an inhibitor of GPCR (G-protein couple receptor triggered Gαi nucleotide exchange. Despite previous findings, the level of basal autophagy, autophagic induction, autophagic flux, autophagic degradation and the anti-autophagic action in macrophages that lacked Gαi3, AGS3, or RGS19; or had been treated with pertussis toxin, were similar to controls. These results indicate that while Gαi signaling may impact autophagy in some cell types it does not in macrophages.

  13. Modified pectin from Theobroma cacao induces potent pro-inflammatory activity in murine peritoneal macrophage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorim, Juliana C; Vriesmann, Lucia Cristina; Petkowicz, Carmen L O; Martinez, Glaucia Regina; Noleto, Guilhermina R

    2016-11-01

    In vitro effects of acetylated pectin (OP) isolated from cacao pod husks (Theobroma cacao L.), its partially deacetylated and de-esterified form (MOP), and a commercial homogalacturonan (PG) were investigated on murine peritoneal macrophages. MOP stood out among the studied pectins. After 48h of incubation, compared with the control group, it was able to promote significant macrophage morphological differentiation from resident to activated stage and also stimulated nitric oxide production, which reached a level of 85% of that of LPS stimulus. In the presence of the highest tested concentration of MOP (200μg·mL -1 ), the levels of the cytokines TNF-α (6h) and IL-12 and IL-10 (48h) increased substantially in relation to untreated cells. Our results show that the partial deacetylation and de-esterification of pectin extracted from cacao pod husks (T. cacao L.) produced a polymer with greater ability than its native form to activate macrophages to a cytotoxic phenotype. Like this, they provide the possibility of a therapeutic application to MOP, which could lead to a decreased susceptibility to microbial infection besides antitumor activity. Additionally, the present results also corroborate with the proposition of that the chemical modifications of the biopolymers can result in an improved molecule with new possibilities of application. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Mycobacterium leprae Activates Toll-Like Receptor-4 Signaling and Expression on Macrophages Depending on Previous Bacillus Calmette-Guerin Vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polycarpou, Anastasia; Holland, Martin J; Karageorgiou, Ioannis; Eddaoudi, Ayad; Walker, Stephen L; Willcocks, Sam; Lockwood, Diana N J

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR)-1 and TLR2 have been shown to be receptors for Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae), yet it is unclear whether M. leprae can signal through alternative TLRs. Other mycobacterial species possess ligands for TLR4 and genetic association studies in human populations suggest that people with TLR4 polymorphisms may be protected against leprosy. Using human embryonic kidney (HEK)-293 cells co-transfected with TLR4, we demonstrate that M. leprae activates TLR4. We used human macrophages to show that M. leprae stimulation of cytokine production is diminished if pre-treated with TLR4 neutralizing antibody. TLR4 protein expression was up-regulated on macrophages derived from non-bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccinated healthy volunteers after incubation with M. leprae, whereas it was down-regulated in macrophages derived from BCG-vaccinated donors. Finally, pre-treatment of macrophages derived from BCG-naive donors with BCG reversed the effect of M. leprae on TLR4 expression. This may be a newly described phenomenon by which BCG vaccination stimulates "non-specific" protection to the human immune system.

  15. Effect of Oxidized Dextran on Cytokine Production and Activation of IRF3 Transcription Factor in Macrophages from Mice of Opposite Strains with Different Sensitivity to Tuberculosis Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chechushkov, A V; Kozhin, P M; Zaitseva, N S; Gainutdinov, P I; Men'shchikova, E B; Troitskii, A V; Shkurupy, V A

    2018-04-16

    We studied differences in the production of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and IRF3 transcription factor by peritoneal macrophages from mice of opposite strains CBA/J and C57Bl/6 and the effect of 60-kDa oxidized dextran on these parameters. Macrophages from C57Bl/6 mice were mainly characterized by the production of proinflammatory cytokines TNFα, IL-12, and MCP-1 (markers of M1 polarization). By contrast, CBA/J mice exhibited a relatively high level of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and lower expression of proinflammatory cytokines (M2 phenotype). IRF3 content in peritoneal macrophages of CBA/J mice was higher than in C57Bl/6 mice. Oxidized dextran decreased the expression of IRF3 upon stimulation of cells from CBA/J mice with LPS, but increased this process in C57Bl/6 mice. Despite a diversity of oxidized dextran-induced changes in cytokine production, the data confirm our hypothesis that this agent can stimulate the alternative activation of macrophages.

  16. Mesenchymal Stromal Cell-Derived Microvesicles Regulate an Internal Pro-Inflammatory Program in Activated Macrophages

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    Juan S. Henao Agudelo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are multipotent cells with abilities to exert immunosuppressive response promoting tissue repair. Studies have shown that MSCs can secrete extracellular vesicles (MVs-MSCs with similar regulatory functions to the parental cells. Furthermore, strong evidence suggesting that MVs-MSCs can modulate several immune cells (i.e., Th1, Th17, and Foxp3+ T cells. However, their precise effect on macrophages (Mϕs remains unexplored. We investigated the immunoregulatory effect of MVs-MSCs on activated M1-Mϕs in vitro and in vivo using differentiated bone marrow Mϕs and an acute experimental model of thioglycollate-induced peritonitis, respectively. We observed that MVs-MSCs shared surface molecules with MSCs (CD44, CD105, CD90, CD73 and expressed classical microvesicle markers (Annexin V and CD9. The in vitro treatment with MVs-MSCs exerted a regulatory-like phenotype in M1-Mϕs, which showed higher CD206 level and reduced CCR7 expression. This was associated with decreased levels of inflammatory molecules (IL-1β, IL-6, nitric oxide and increased immunoregulatory markers (IL-10 and Arginase in M1-Mϕs. In addition, we detected that MVs-MSCs promoted the downregulation of inflammatory miRNAs (miR-155 and miR-21, as well as, upregulated its predicted target gene SOCS3 in activated M1-Mϕs. In vivo MVs-MSCs treatment reduced the Mϕs infiltrate in the peritoneal cavity inducing a M2-like regulatory phenotype in peritoneal Mϕs (higher arginase activity and reduced expression of CD86, iNOS, IFN-γ, IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-1α, and IL-6 molecules. This in vivo immunomodulatory effect of MVs-MSCs on M1-Mϕs was partially associated with the upregulation of CX3CR1 in F4/80+/Ly6C+/CCR2+ Mϕs subsets. In summary, our findings indicate that MVs-MSCs can modulate an internal program in activated Mϕs establishing an alternative regulatory-like phenotype.

  17. Label-free identification of macrophage phenotype by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonso-García, Alba; Smith, Tim D.; Datta, Rupsa; Luu, Thuy U.; Gratton, Enrico; Potma, Eric O.; Liu, Wendy F.

    2016-04-01

    Macrophages adopt a variety of phenotypes that are a reflection of the many functions they perform as part of the immune system. In particular, metabolism is a phenotypic trait that differs between classically activated, proinflammatory macrophages, and alternatively activated, prohealing macrophages. Inflammatory macrophages have a metabolism based on glycolysis while alternatively activated macrophages generally rely on oxidative phosphorylation to generate chemical energy. We employ this shift in metabolism as an endogenous marker to identify the phenotype of individual macrophages via live-cell fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). We demonstrate that polarized macrophages can be readily discriminated with the aid of a phasor approach to FLIM, which provides a fast and model-free method for analyzing fluorescence lifetime images.

  18. Macrophage Polarization in Chronic Inflammatory Diseases: Killers or Builders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baci, Denisa; Tremolati, Marco; Fanuli, Matteo; Farronato, Giampietro; Mortara, Lorenzo

    2018-01-01

    Macrophages are key cellular components of the innate immunity, acting as the main player in the first-line defence against the pathogens and modulating homeostatic and inflammatory responses. Plasticity is a major feature of macrophages resulting in extreme heterogeneity both in normal and in pathological conditions. Macrophages are not homogenous, and they are generally categorized into two broad but distinct subsets as either classically activated (M1) or alternatively activated (M2). However, macrophages represent a continuum of highly plastic effector cells, resembling a spectrum of diverse phenotype states. Induction of specific macrophage functions is closely related to the surrounding environment that acts as a relevant orchestrator of macrophage functions. This phenomenon, termed polarization, results from cell/cell, cell/molecule interaction, governing macrophage functionality within the hosting tissues. Here, we summarized relevant cellular and molecular mechanisms driving macrophage polarization in “distant” pathological conditions, such as cancer, type 2 diabetes, atherosclerosis, and periodontitis that share macrophage-driven inflammation as a key feature, playing their dual role as killers (M1-like) and/or builders (M2-like). We also dissect the physio/pathological consequences related to macrophage polarization within selected chronic inflammatory diseases, placing polarized macrophages as a relevant hallmark, putative biomarkers, and possible target for prevention/therapy. PMID:29507865

  19. Macrophage Polarization in Chronic Inflammatory Diseases: Killers or Builders?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Parisi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are key cellular components of the innate immunity, acting as the main player in the first-line defence against the pathogens and modulating homeostatic and inflammatory responses. Plasticity is a major feature of macrophages resulting in extreme heterogeneity both in normal and in pathological conditions. Macrophages are not homogenous, and they are generally categorized into two broad but distinct subsets as either classically activated (M1 or alternatively activated (M2. However, macrophages represent a continuum of highly plastic effector cells, resembling a spectrum of diverse phenotype states. Induction of specific macrophage functions is closely related to the surrounding environment that acts as a relevant orchestrator of macrophage functions. This phenomenon, termed polarization, results from cell/cell, cell/molecule interaction, governing macrophage functionality within the hosting tissues. Here, we summarized relevant cellular and molecular mechanisms driving macrophage polarization in “distant” pathological conditions, such as cancer, type 2 diabetes, atherosclerosis, and periodontitis that share macrophage-driven inflammation as a key feature, playing their dual role as killers (M1-like and/or builders (M2-like. We also dissect the physio/pathological consequences related to macrophage polarization within selected chronic inflammatory diseases, placing polarized macrophages as a relevant hallmark, putative biomarkers, and possible target for prevention/therapy.

  20. Modulation of macrophage activation state protects tissue from necrosis during critical limb ischemia in thrombospondin-1-deficient mice.

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    Nicolas Bréchot

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Macrophages, key regulators of healing/regeneration processes, strongly infiltrate ischemic tissues from patients suffering from critical limb ischemia (CLI. However pro-inflammatory markers correlate with disease progression and risk of amputation, suggesting that modulating macrophage activation state might be beneficial. We previously reported that thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1 is highly expressed in ischemic tissues during CLI in humans. TSP-1 is a matricellular protein that displays well-known angiostatic properties in cancer, and regulates inflammation in vivo and macrophages properties in vitro. We therefore sought to investigate its function in a mouse model of CLI. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Using a genetic model of tsp-1(-/- mice subjected to femoral artery excision, we report that tsp-1(-/- mice were clinically and histologically protected from necrosis compared to controls. Tissue protection was associated with increased postischemic angiogenesis and muscle regeneration. We next showed that macrophages present in ischemic tissues exhibited distinct phenotypes in tsp-1(-/- and wt mice. A strong reduction of necrotic myofibers phagocytosis was observed in tsp-1(-/- mice. We next demonstrated that phagocytosis of muscle cell debris is a potent pro-inflammatory signal for macrophages in vitro. Consistently with these findings, macrophages that infiltrated ischemic tissues exhibited a reduced postischemic pro-inflammatory activation state in tsp-1(-/- mice, characterized by a reduced Ly-6C expression and a less pro-inflammatory cytokine expression profile. Finally, we showed that monocyte depletion reversed clinical and histological protection from necrosis observed in tsp-1(-/- mice, thereby demonstrating that macrophages mediated tissue protection in these mice. CONCLUSION: This study defines targeting postischemic macrophage activation state as a new potential therapeutic approach to protect tissues from necrosis and promote tissue

  1. Anti-inflammatory activity of horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) root extracts in LPS-stimulated macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzocco, Stefania; Calabrone, Luana; Adesso, Simona; Larocca, Marilena; Franceschelli, Silvia; Autore, Giuseppina; Martelli, Giuseppe; Rossano, Rocco

    2015-12-01

    Horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) is a perennial crop belonging to the Brassicaceae family. Horseradish root is used as a condiment due to its extremely pungent flavour, deriving from the high content of glucosinolates and their breakdown products such as isothiocyanates and other sulfur compounds. Horseradish also has a long history in ethnomedicine. In this study the anti-inflammatory potential of three accessions of Armoracia rusticana on lipopolysaccharide from E. coli treated J774A.1 murine macrophages was evaluated. Our results demonstrate that Armoracia rusticana reduced nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 release and nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 expression in macrophages, acting on nuclear transcription factor NF-κB p65 activation. Moreover Armoracia rusticana reduced reactive oxygen species release and increased heme-oxygenase-1 expression, thus contributing to the cytoprotective cellular effect during inflammation.

  2. TRANSCRIPTIONAL INHIBITION OF INTERLEUKIN-12 PROMOTER ACTIVITY IN LEISHMANIA SPP.-INFECTED MACROPHAGES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, Asha; Widenmaier, Robyn; Ma, Xiaojing; McDowell, Mary Ann

    2009-01-01

    To establish and persist within a host, Leishmania spp. parasites delay the onset of cell-mediated immunity by suppressing interleukin-12 (IL-12) production from host macrophages. Although it is established that Leishmania spp.-infected macrophages have impaired IL-12 production, the mechanisms that account for this suppression remain to be completely elucidated. Using a luciferase reporter assay assessing IL-12 transcription, we report here that Leishmania major, Leishmania donovani, and Leishmania chagasi inhibit IL-12 transcription in response to interferon-gamma, lipopolysaccharide, and CD40 ligand and that Leishmania spp. lipophosphoglycan, phosphoglycans, and major surface protein are not necessary for inhibition. In addition, all the Leishmania spp. strains and life-cycle stages tested inhibited IL-12 promoter activity. Our data further reveal that autocrine-acting host factors play no role in the inhibitory response and that phagocytosis signaling is necessary for inhibition of IL-12. PMID:18372625

  3. HIV-1 infection induces changes in expression of cellular splicing factors that regulate alternative viral splicing and virus production in macrophages

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    Purcell Damian FJ

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Macrophages are important targets and long-lived reservoirs of HIV-1, which are not cleared of infection by currently available treatments. In the primary monocyte-derived macrophage model of infection, replication is initially productive followed by a decline in virion output over ensuing weeks, coincident with a decrease in the levels of the essential viral transactivator protein Tat. We investigated two possible mechanisms in macrophages for regulation of viral replication, which appears to be primarily regulated at the level of tat mRNA: 1 differential mRNA stability, used by cells and some viruses for the rapid regulation of gene expression and 2 control of HIV-1 alternative splicing, which is essential for optimal viral replication. Results Following termination of transcription at increasing times after infection in macrophages, we found that tat mRNA did indeed decay more rapidly than rev or nef mRNA, but with similar kinetics throughout infection. In addition, tat mRNA decayed at least as rapidly in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Expression of cellular splicing factors in uninfected and infected macrophage cultures from the same donor showed an inverse pattern over time between enhancing factors (members of the SR family of RNA binding proteins and inhibitory factors (members of the hnRNP family. While levels of the SR protein SC35 were greatly up-regulated in the first week or two after infection, hnRNPs of the A/B and H groups were down-regulated. Around the peak of virus production in each culture, SC35 expression declined to levels in uninfected cells or lower, while the hnRNPs increased to control levels or above. We also found evidence for increased cytoplasmic expression of SC35 following long-term infection. Conclusion While no evidence of differential regulation of tat mRNA decay was found in macrophages following HIV-1 infection, changes in the balance of cellular splicing factors which regulate alternative

  4. Activation of farnesoid X receptor downregulates monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in murine macrophage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Liangpeng; Zhang, Qian; Peng, Jiahe; Jiang, Chanjui; Zhang, Yan; Shen, Lili; Dong, Jinyu; Wang, Yongchao; Jiang, Yu, E-mail: yujiang0207@163.com

    2015-11-27

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, which plays important roles in bile acids/lipid homeostasis and inflammation. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) contributes to macrophage infiltration into body tissues during inflammation. Here we investigated whether FXR can regulate MCP-1 expression in murine macrophage. FXR activation down regulate MCP-1 mRNA and protein levels in ANA-1 and Raw264.7 cells. Luciferase reporter assay, Gel shift and Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays have revealed that the activated FXR bind to the FXR element located in −738 bp ∼  −723 bp in MCP-1 promoter. These results suggested that FXR may serve as a novel target for regulating MCP-1 levels for the inflammation related diseases therapies. - Highlights: • FXR is expressed in murine macrophage cell line. • FXR down regulates MCP-1 expression. • FXR binds to the DR4 in MCP-1 promoter.

  5. Immunological Demyelination Triggers Macrophage/Microglial Cells Activation without Inducing Astrogliosis

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    Frank Cloutier

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The glial scar formed by reactive astrocytes and axon growth inhibitors associated with myelin play important roles in the failure of axonal regeneration following central nervous system (CNS injury. Our laboratory has previously demonstrated that immunological demyelination of the CNS facilitates regeneration of severed axons following spinal cord injury. In the present study, we evaluate whether immunological demyelination is accompanied with astrogliosis. We compared the astrogliosis and macrophage/microglial cell responses 7 days after either immunological demyelination or a stab injury to the dorsal funiculus. Both lesions induced a strong activated macrophage/microglial cells response which was significantly higher within regions of immunological demyelination. However, immunological demyelination regions were not accompanied by astrogliosis compared to stab injury that induced astrogliosis which extended several millimeters above and below the lesions, evidenced by astroglial hypertrophy, formation of a glial scar, and upregulation of intermediate filaments glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP. Moreover, a stab or a hemisection lesion directly within immunological demyelination regions did not induced astrogliosis within the immunological demyelination region. These results suggest that immunological demyelination creates a unique environment in which astrocytes do not form a glial scar and provides a unique model to understand the putative interaction between astrocytes and activated macrophage/microglial cells.

  6. Vitamin D Is Required for IFN-γ–Mediated Antimicrobial Activity of Human Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabri, Mario; Stenger, Steffen; Shin, Dong-Min; Yuk, Jae-Min; Liu, Philip T.; Realegeno, Susan; Lee, Hye-Mi; Krutzik, Stephan R.; Schenk, Mirjam; Sieling, Peter A.; Teles, Rosane; Montoya, Dennis; Iyer, Shankar S.; Bruns, Heiko; Lewinsohn, David M.; Hollis, Bruce W.; Hewison, Martin; Adams, John S.; Steinmeyer, Andreas; Zügel, Ulrich; Cheng, Genhong; Jo, Eun-Kyeong; Bloom, Barry R.; Modlin, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    Control of tuberculosis worldwide depends on our understanding of human immune mechanisms, which combat the infection. Acquired T cell responses are critical for host defense against microbial pathogens, yet the mechanisms by which they act in humans remain unclear. We report that T cells, by the release of interferon-γ (IFN-γ), induce autophagy, phagosomal maturation, the production of antimicrobial peptides such as cathelicidin, and antimicrobial activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in human macrophages via a vitamin D–dependent pathway. IFN-γ induced the antimicrobial pathway in human macrophages cultured in vitamin D–sufficient sera, but not in sera from African-Americans that have lower amounts of vitamin D and who are more susceptible to tuberculosis. In vitro supplementation of vitamin D–deficient serum with 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 restored IFN-γ–induced antimicrobial peptide expression, autophagy, phagosome-lysosome fusion, and antimicrobial activity. These results suggest a mechanism in which vitamin D is required for acquired immunity to overcome the ability of intracellular pathogens to evade macrophage-mediated antimicrobial responses. The present findings underscore the importance of adequate amounts of vitamin D in all human populations for sustaining both innate and acquired immunity against infection. PMID:21998409

  7. Serum lipoproteins attenuate macrophage activation and Toll-Like Receptor stimulation by bacterial lipoproteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Richard W

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chlamydia trachomatis was previously shown to express a lipoprotein, the macrophage infectivity potentiator (Mip, exposed at the bacterial surface, and able to stimulate human primary monocytes/macrophages through Toll Like Receptor (TLR2/TLR1/TLR6, and CD14. In PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells the proinflammatory activity of Mip was significantly higher in the absence than in the presence of serum. The present study aims to investigate the ability of different serum factors to attenuate Mip proinflammatory activity in PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells and in primary human differentiated macrophages. The study was also extend to another lipoprotein, the Borrelia burgdorferi outer surface protein (OspA. The proinflammatory activity was studied through Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNF-α and Interleukin (IL-8 release. Finally, TLR1/2 human embryonic kidney-293 (HEK-293 transfected cells were used to test the ability of the serum factors to inhibit Mip and OspA proinflammatory activity. Results In the absence of any serum and in the presence of 10% delipidated FBS, production of Mip-induced TNF-α and IL-8 in PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells were similar whereas they were significantly decreased in the presence of 10% FBS suggesting an inhibiting role of lipids present in FBS. In the presence of 10% human serum, the concentrations of TNF-α and IL-8 were 2 to 5 times lower than in the presence of 10% FBS suggesting the presence of more potent inhibitor(s in human serum than in FBS. Similar results were obtained in primary human differentiated macrophages. Different lipid components of human serum were then tested (total lipoproteins, HDL, LDL, VLDL, triglyceride emulsion, apolipoprotein (apoA-I, B, E2, and E3. The most efficient inhibitors were LDL, VLDL, and apoB that reduced the mean concentration of TNF-α release in Mip-induced macrophages to 24, 20, and 2%, respectively (p Conclusions These results demonstrated the ability of

  8. Macrophages activate iNOS signaling in adventitial fibroblasts and contribute to adventitia fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guannan; Li, Xiaodong; Sheng, Chengyu; Chen, Xiaohui; Chen, Yu; Zhu, Dingliang; Gao, Pingjin

    2016-12-30

    A large amount of NO is generated through the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) pathway from the vascular adventitia in various vascular diseases. However, it is currently not fully understood how the iNOS signaling pathway is activated. In the present study, this question was addressed in the context of adventitial cellular interactions. A rat model of acute hypertension in the contralateral carotid arteries was established through transverse aortic constriction (TAC) surgery. In this model, activated macrophages were found surrounded by a large quantity of iNOS-expressing adventitial fibroblasts (AFs), suggesting a possible causal relationship between macrophages and iNOS activation of the neighboring AFs. In an in vitro model, a macrophage-like cell line RAW 264.7 was first activated by LPS treatment. The supernatant was then harvested and applied to treat primary rat AFs. iNOS in AFs was activated robustly by the supernatant treatment but not by LPS itself. Treating AFs with interleukin-1β (IL-1β) also activated iNOS signaling, suggesting that the IL-1β pathway might be a possible mediator. As a consequence of the iNOS activation, total protein nitration and S-nitrosylation significantly increased in those AFs. Additionally, increased deposition of type I and type III collagens was observed in both in vitro and in vivo models. The collagen deposition was partially restored by an iNOS inhibitor, 1400 W. These findings highlight the importance of iNOS signaling during vascular inflammation, and advance our understanding of its activation through a cellular interaction perspective. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [DNA hydroxymethylase 10-11 translocation 2 (TET2) inhibits mouse macrophage activation and polarization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bingyi; Huo, Yi; Lin, Zhifeng; Wang, Tao

    2017-09-01

    Objective To study the role of DNA hydroxymethylase 10-11 translocation 2 (TET2) in macrophage activation and polarization. Methods RAW264.7 macrophages were cultured in vitro and stimulated with 100 ng/mL LPS for 0, 1, 2, 4, 6 hours. Real-time quantitative PCR was used to detect TET2 mRNA expression. TET2 expression was knocked down with siRNA and the knock-down efficiency was evaluated by real-time quantitative PCR and Western blotting. Following siRNA transfection for 48 hours, RAW264.7 cells were stimulated by LPS for 4 hours, and then real-time quantitative PCR and ELISA were performed to detect the expressions of interleukin 6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and IL-12. The M1 polarizing markers TNF-α, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and IL-12, and M2 polarizing markers mannose receptor (MR), arginase 1 (Arg-1) and chitinase 3-like molecule 1 (Ym1) were tested after M1 or M2 induction by LPS/IFN-γ or IL-4. Results TET2 expression increased after LPS treatment in RAW264.7 cells and reached the peak at 2 hours later. The siRNA effectively reduced the expression of TET2. The expressions of IL-6, TNF-α and IL-12 mRNAs increased after TET2 knock-down and LPS stimulation. The expressions of M1 polarization markers and M2 markers were up-regulated by the corresponding stimulations after TET2 knock-down. Conclusion TET2 has the effect of inhibiting LPS-induced macrophage activation and plays an inhibitory role in macrophage M1 and M2 polarization.

  10. The activation pattern of macrophages in giant cell (temporal) arteritis and primary angiitis of the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihm, Bernhard; Bergmann, Markus; Brück, Wolfgang; Probst-Cousin, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    To determine if the pattern of macrophage activation reflects differences in the pathogenesis and clinical presentation of giant cell arteritis and primary angiitis of the central nervous system, specimens of 10 patients with giant cell arteritis and five with primary angiitis of the central nervous system were immunohistochemically studied and the expression of the macrophage activation markers 27E10, MRP14, MRP8 and 25F9 was determined in the vasculitic infiltrates. Thus, a partly different expression pattern of macrophage activation markers in giant cell arteritis and primary angiitis of the central nervous system was observed. The group comparison revealed that giant cell arteritis cases had significantly higher numbers of acute activated MRP14-positive macrophages, whereas primary angiitis of the central nervous system is characterized by a tendency toward more MRP8-positive intermediate/late activated macrophages. Furthermore, in giant cell arteritis comparably fewer CD8-positive lymphocytes were observed. These observations suggest, that despite their histopathological similarities, giant cell arteritis and primary angiitis of the central nervous system appear to represent either distinct entities within the spectrum of granulomatous vasculitides or different stages of similar disease processes. Their discrete clinical presentation is reflected by different activation patterns of macrophages, which may characterize giant cell arteritis as a more acute process and primary angiitis of the central nervous system as a more advanced inflammatory process. © 2013 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  11. Effect of Surface Modification and Macrophage Phenotype on Particle Internalization

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    Wang, Daniel [Iowa State University; Phan, Ngoc [Iowa State University; Isely, Christopher [Iowa State University; Bruene, Lucas [Iowa State University; Bratlie, Kaitlin M [Ames Laboratory

    2014-11-10

    Material properties play a key role in the cellular internalization of polymeric particles. In the present study, we have investigated the effects of material characteristics such as water contact angle, zeta potential, melting temperature, and alternative activation of complement on particle internalization for pro-inflammatory, pro-angiogenic, and naïve macrophages by using biopolymers (~600 nm), functionalized with 13 different molecules. Understanding how material parameters influence particle internalization for different macrophage phenotypes is important for targeted delivery to specific cell populations. Here, we demonstrate that material parameters affect the alternative pathway of complement activation as well as particle internalization for different macrophage phenotypes. Here, we show that the quantitative structure–activity relationship method (QSAR) previously used to predict physiochemical properties of materials can be applied to targeting different macrophage phenotypes. These findings demonstrated that targeted drug delivery to macrophages could be achieved by exploiting material parameters.

  12. Phagocytosis-induced 51Cr release from activated macrophages and blood mononuclears. Effect of colchicine and antioxidants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGee, M.P.; Hale, A.H.

    1981-01-01

    The chromium-release test was adapted to the measurement of the cellular injury induced when activated macrophages phagocytose particulates. Macrophages obtained from rabbit lungs undergoing BCG-induced chronic inflammation released more chromium when incubated in the presence of phagocytosable particles than when incubated under resting conditions. Blood mononuclear cells, 40-60% monocytes, procured from the same BCG-injected animals, were less susceptible to phagocytosis-induced injury than the macrophages obtained from the lungs. The amount of chromium released by the activated macrophages was proportional to the number of particles present during incubation. In the presence of catalase, the amounts of chromium released by phagocytosing and resting macrophages were similar; in the presence of superoxide dismutase and cytochrome c, the amount of chromium released by phagocytosing macrophages was 13-35% less than the amount of chromium released by macrophages incubated without the antioxidants. In addition, colchicine, an inhibitor of degranulation also exerted partial inhibition of the chromium release. These results suggest that oxygen radicals and lysosomal contents contribute to the cellular injury that results from phagocytosis

  13. Clonorchis sinensis antigens alter hepatic macrophage polarization in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Min; Kwak, You Shine; Yi, Myung-Hee; Kim, Ju Yeong; Sohn, Woon-Mok; Yong, Tai-Soon

    2017-05-01

    Clonorchis sinensis infection elicits hepatic inflammation, which can lead to cholangitis, periductal hepatic fibrosis, liver cirrhosis, and even cholangiocarcinoma. Hepatic macrophages are an intrinsic element of both innate and acquired immunity. This study was conducted to demonstrate the dynamics of hepatic macrophage polarization during C. sinensis infection in mice and to identify factors regulating this polarization. Treatment of hepatic macrophages isolated from normal mice with C. sinensis excretory/secretory products (ESPs) resulted in the preferential generation of classically activated hepatic macrophages (M1 macrophages) and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Additionally, cells stimulated with C. sinensis ESPs exhibited changes in cellular morphology. During the early stages of C. sinensis infection, hepatic macrophages preferentially differentiated into M1 macrophages; however, during the C. sinensis mature worm stage, when eggs are released, there were significant increases in the abundance of both M1 macrophages and alternatively activated hepatic macrophages (M2 macrophages). Moreover, there was a further increase in the M2 macrophage count during the fibrotic and cirrhotic stage of infection. Notably, this fibrotic and cirrhotic stage promoted a strong increase in the proportion of Arg-1-producing macrophages (M2 phenotype), which were associated with fibrosis and tissue repair in the liver. Our results suggest that the dynamic polarization of hepatic macrophages as C. sinensis infection progresses is related to the histological lesions present in liver tissue. Hepatic macrophages thus play an important role in local immunity during C. sinensis infection.

  14. Clonorchis sinensis antigens alter hepatic macrophage polarization in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Min Kim

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Clonorchis sinensis infection elicits hepatic inflammation, which can lead to cholangitis, periductal hepatic fibrosis, liver cirrhosis, and even cholangiocarcinoma. Hepatic macrophages are an intrinsic element of both innate and acquired immunity. This study was conducted to demonstrate the dynamics of hepatic macrophage polarization during C. sinensis infection in mice and to identify factors regulating this polarization. Treatment of hepatic macrophages isolated from normal mice with C. sinensis excretory/secretory products (ESPs resulted in the preferential generation of classically activated hepatic macrophages (M1 macrophages and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Additionally, cells stimulated with C. sinensis ESPs exhibited changes in cellular morphology. During the early stages of C. sinensis infection, hepatic macrophages preferentially differentiated into M1 macrophages; however, during the C. sinensis mature worm stage, when eggs are released, there were significant increases in the abundance of both M1 macrophages and alternatively activated hepatic macrophages (M2 macrophages. Moreover, there was a further increase in the M2 macrophage count during the fibrotic and cirrhotic stage of infection. Notably, this fibrotic and cirrhotic stage promoted a strong increase in the proportion of Arg-1-producing macrophages (M2 phenotype, which were associated with fibrosis and tissue repair in the liver. Our results suggest that the dynamic polarization of hepatic macrophages as C. sinensis infection progresses is related to the histological lesions present in liver tissue. Hepatic macrophages thus play an important role in local immunity during C. sinensis infection.

  15. Blockade of MMP14 Activity in Murine Breast Carcinomas: Implications for Macrophages, Vessels, and Radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ager, Eleanor I.; Kozin, Sergey V.; Kirkpatrick, Nathaniel D.; Seano, Giorgio; Kodack, David P.; Askoxylakis, Vasileios; Huang, Yuhui; Goel, Shom; Snuderl, Matija; Muzikansky, Alona; Finkelstein, Dianne M.; Dransfield, Daniel T.; Devy, Laetitia; Boucher, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Background: Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 14 may mediate tumor progression through vascular and immune-modulatory effects. Methods: Orthotopic murine breast tumors (4T1 and E0771 with high and low MMP14 expression, respectively; n = 5–10 per group) were treated with an anti-MMP14 inhibitory antibody (DX-2400), IgG control, fractionated radiation therapy, or their combination. We assessed primary tumor growth, transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression, macrophage phenotype, and vascular parameters. A linear mixed model with repeated observations, with Mann-Whitney or analysis of variance with Bonferroni post hoc adjustment, was used to determine statistical significance. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: DX-2400 inhibited tumor growth compared with IgG control treatment, increased macrophage numbers, and shifted the macrophage phenotype towards antitumor M1-like. These effects were associated with a reduction in active TGFβ and SMAD2/3 signaling. DX-2400 also transiently increased iNOS expression and tumor perfusion, reduced tissue hypoxia (median % area: control, 20.2%, interquartile range (IQR) = 6.4%-38.9%; DX-2400: 1.2%, IQR = 0.2%-3.2%, P = .044), and synergistically enhanced radiation therapy (days to grow to 800mm3: control, 12 days, IQR = 9–13 days; DX-2400 plus radiation, 29 days, IQR = 26–30 days, P < .001) in the 4T1 model. The selective iNOS inhibitor, 1400W, abolished the effects of DX-2400 on vessel perfusion and radiotherapy. On the other hand, DX-2400 was not capable of inducing iNOS expression or synergizing with radiation in E0771 tumors. Conclusion: MMP14 blockade decreased immunosuppressive TGFβ, polarized macrophages to an antitumor phenotype, increased iNOS, and improved tumor perfusion, resulting in reduced primary tumor growth and enhanced response to radiation therapy, especially in high MMP14-expressing tumors. PMID:25710962

  16. Preparation of Gc protein-derived macrophage activating factor (GcMAF) and its structural characterization and biological activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad, Saharuddin Bin; Nagasawa, Hideko; Uto, Yoshihiro; Hori, Hitoshi

    2002-01-01

    Gc protein has been reported to be a precursor of Gc protein-derived macrophage activation factor (GcMAF) in the inflammation-primed macrophage activation cascade. An inducible beta-galactosidase of B cells and neuraminidase of T cells convert Gc protein to GcMAF. Gc protein from human serum was purified using 25(OH)D3 affinity column chromatography and modified to GcMAF using immobilized glycosidases (beta-galactosidase and neuraminidase) The sugar moiety structure of GcMAF was characterized by lectin blotting by Helix pomatia agglutinin. The biological activities of GcMAF were evaluated by a superoxide generation assay and a phagocytosis assay. We successfully purified Gc protein from human serum. GcMAF was detected by lectin blotting and showed a high biological activity. Our results support the importance of the terminal N-acetylgalactosamine moiety in the GcMAF-mediated macrophage activation cascade, and the existence of constitutive GcMAF in human serum. These preliminary data are important for designing small molecular GcMAF mimics.

  17. Structurally well-defined macrophage activating factor derived from vitamin D3-binding protein has a potent adjuvant activity for immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, N; Naraparaju, V R

    1998-06-01

    Freund's adjuvant produced severe inflammation that augments development of antibodies. Thus, mixed administration of antigens with adjuvant was not required as long as inflammation was induced in the hosts. Since macrophage activation for phagocytosis and antigen processing is the first step of antibody development, inflammation-primed macrophage activation plays a major role in immune development. Therefore, macrophage activating factor should act as an adjuvant for immunization. The inflammation-primed macrophage activation process is the major macrophage activating cascade that requires participation of serum vitamin D3-binding protein (DBP; human DBP is known as Gc protein) and glycosidases of B and T lymphocytes. Stepwise incubation of Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase efficiently generated the most potent macrophage activating factor (designated GcMAF) we have ever encountered. Administration of GcMAF (20 or 100 pg/mouse) resulted in stimulation of the progenitor cells for extensive mitogenesis and activation of macrophages. Administration of GcMAF (100 pg/mouse) along with immunization of mice with sheep red blood cells (SRBC) produced a large number of anti-SRBC antibody secreting splenic cells in 2-4 days. Thus, GcMAF has a potent adjuvant activity for immunization. Although malignant tumours are poorly immunogenic, 4 days after GcMAF-primed immunization of mice with heat-killed Ehrlich ascites tumour cells, the ascites tumour was no longer transplantable in these mice.

  18. Essential oil from leaves of Liquidambar formosana ameliorates inflammatory response in lipopolysaccharide-activated mouse macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Kuo-Feng; Yang, Tzu-Jung; Chiu, Huan-Wen; Ho, Chen-Lung

    2014-06-01

    The essential oil from Liquidambar formosana leaves (EOLF) was demonstrated to exhibit anti-inflammatory activity in mouse macrophages. EOLF reduced nitrite oxide generation, secretion levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6, and expression levels of prointerleukin-beta, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and cyclooxygenase-2 in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated mouse macrophages. EOLF also reduced NLRP3 inflammasome-derived interleukin-1beta secretion. The underlying mechanisms for the EOLF-mediated anti-inflammatory activity were (1) reduction of LPS-induced reactive oxygen species generation; (2) reduction of LPS-induced activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, and p38 MAP kinase; (3) reduction of LPS-induced nuclear factor-kappaBeta activation. Furthermore, 25 compounds were identified in the EOLF using GC-FID and GC-MS and the major compounds were terpinen-4-ol (32.0%), beta-pinene (18.0%), gamma-terpinene (13.8%), and alpha-terpinene (9.7%). We found that LPS-induced nitrite oxide generation was inhibited significantly by terpinen-4-ol. Our results indicated that EOLF has anti-inflammatory activity and may provide a molecular rationale for future therapeutic interventions in immune modulation.

  19. The Flavonoid Quercetin Ameliorates Liver Inflammation and Fibrosis by Regulating Hepatic Macrophages Activation and Polarization in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Li

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available At present, there are no effective antifibrotic drugs for patients with chronic liver disease; hence, the development of antifibrotic therapies is urgently needed. Here, we performed an experimental and translational study to investigate the potential and underlying mechanism of quercetin treatment in liver fibrosis, mainly focusing on the impact of quercetin on macrophages activation and polarization. BALB/c mice were induced liver fibrosis by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4 for 8 weeks and concomitantly treated with quercetin (50 mg/kg or vehicle by daily gavage. Liver inflammation, fibrosis, and hepatic stellate cells (HSCs activation were examined. Moreover, massive macrophages accumulation, M1 macrophages and their related markers, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α, interleukin (IL-1β, IL-6, and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1 in livers were analyzed. In vitro, we used Raw 264.7 cells to examine the effect of quercetin on M1-polarized macrophages activation. Our results showed that quercetin dramatically ameliorated liver inflammation, fibrosis, and inhibited HSCs activation. These results were attributed to the reductive recruitment of macrophages (F4/80+ and CD68+ into the liver in quercetin-treated fibrotic mice confirmed by immunostaining and expression levels of marker molecules. Importantly, quercetin strongly inhibited M1 polarization and M1-related inflammatory cytokines in fibrotic livers when compared with vehicle-treated mice. In vitro, studies further revealed that quercetin efficiently inhibited macrophages activation and M1 polarization, as well as decreased the mRNA expression of M1 macrophage markers such as TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and nitric oxide synthase 2. Mechanistically, the inhibition of M1 macrophages by quercetin was associated with the decreased levels of Notch1 expression on macrophages both in vivo and in vitro. Taken together, our data indicated that quercetin attenuated CCl4-induced liver inflammation and

  20. Dioscorin isolated from Dioscorea alata activates TLR4-signaling pathways and induces cytokine expression in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Shu-Ling; Hsu, Ya-Hui; Lee, Pei-Yeh; Hou, Wen-Chi; Hung, Ling-Chien; Lin, Chao-Hsiung; Chen, Chiu-Ming; Huang, Yu-Jing

    2006-01-06

    The Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-signaling pathway is crucial for activating both innate and adaptive immunity. TLR4 is a promising molecular target for immune-modulating drugs, and TLR4 agonists are of therapeutic potential for treating immune diseases and cancers. Several medicinal herb-derived components have recently been reported to act via TLR4-dependent pathways, suggesting that medicinal plants are potential resources for identifying TLR4 activators. We have applied a screening procedure to systematically identify herbal constituents that activate TLR4. To exclude possible LPS contamination in these plant-derived components, a LPS inhibitor, polymyxin B, was added during screening. One of the plant components we identified from the screening was dioscorin, the glycoprotein isolated from Dioscorea alata. It induced TLR4-downstream cytokine expression in bone marrow cells isolated from TLR4-functional C3H/HeN mice but not from TLR4-defective C3H/HeJ mice. Dioscorin also stimulated multiple signaling molecules (NF-kappaB, ERK, JNK, and p38) and induced the expression of cytokines (TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and IL-6) in murine RAW 264.7 macrophages. Furthermore, the ERK, p38, JNK, and NF-kappaB-mediated pathways are all involved in dioscorin-mediated TNF-alpha production. In summary, our results demonstrate that dioscorin is a novel TLR4 activator and induces macrophage activation via typical TLR4-signaling pathways.

  1. MAPK/p38 regulation of cytoskeleton rearrangement accelerates induction of macrophage activation by TLR4, but not TLR3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Hongjun; Li, Feifei; Wang, Wenwen; Zhao, Qi; Gao, Shanshan; Ma, Jincai; Li, Xiao; Ren, Wanhua; Qin, Chengyong; Qi, Jianni

    2017-11-01

    Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) and TLR4 utilize adaptor proteins to activate mitogen‑activated protein kinase (MAPK), resulting in the acute but transient inflammatory response aimed at the clearance of pathogens. In the present study, it was demonstrated that macrophage activation by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or poly(I:C), leading to changes in cell morphology, differed significantly between the mouse macrophage cell line RAW264.7 and mouse primary peritoneal macrophages. Moreover, the expression of α- and β-tubulin was markedly decreased following LPS stimulation. By contrast, α- and β-tubulin expression were only mildly increased following poly(I:C) treatment. However, the expression of β-actin and GAPDH was not significantly affected. Furthermore, it was verified that vincristine pretreatment abrogated the cytoskeleton rearrangement and decreased the synthesis and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and migration of macrophages caused by LPS. Finally, it was observed that the MAPK/p38 signaling pathway regulating cytoskeleton rearrangement may participate in LPS‑induced macrophage cytokine production and migration. Overall, the findings of the present study indicated that MAPK/p38 regulation of the cytoskeleton, particularly tubulin proteins, plays an important role in LPS-induced inflammatory responses via alleviating the synthesis and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and inhibiting the migration of macrophages.

  2. Radiation effects on chemiluminescence of resting and immunologically activated alveolar macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benichou, G.; Dormont, D.; Herodin, F.; Pasquier, C.; Hopital Saint Antoine, 75 - Paris

    1986-01-01

    In resting cells, for low radiation doses, a transient activation of chemiluminescence was observed, maximal at 3 Gy. At 10 Gy, CL returned to the control value; greater doses (above 30 Gy) induced a progressive diminution of the response which was abolished at 100 Gy. Activated alveolar macrophages showed a 30% decrease of the chemiluminescence at 10 Gy. The respiratory burst induced by opsonized zymosan was abolished at 30 Gy. IgG anti-MHC(IgGαB 1 ) activated specifically the GP S2 alveolar macrophages by alloantibody bipolar bridging; by contrast IgG which are directed against non-specific allogeneic determinants (IgG α B 3 ) or specific F(ab') 2 (F(ab') 2 αB 1 ) are unable to stimulate the cells. For all the tested doses, irradiation had no effect on this activation mechanism. The results with the three doses tested (3 Gy, 10 Gy, 30 Gy) are comparable to those using the positive control cells. The same results are obtained with the class II antigens and their specific IgG. (UK)

  3. Activation of macrophages by a laccase-polymerized polyphenol is dependent on phosphorylation of Rac1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, Katsuya; Akanuma, Satoshi; Matsumoto-Akanuma, Akiko; Yamanaka, Daisuke; Ishibashi, Ken-Ichi; Adachi, Yoshiyuki; Ohno, Naohito

    2018-01-15

    Various physiologically active effects of polymerized polyphenols have been reported. In this study, we synthesized a polymerized polyphenol (mL2a-pCA) by polymerizing caffeic acid using mutant Agaricus brasiliensis laccase and analyzed its physiological activity and mechanism of action. We found that mL2a-pCA induced morphological changes and the production of cytokines and chemokines in C3H/HeN mouse-derived resident peritoneal macrophages in vitro. The mechanisms of action of polymerized polyphenols on in vitro mouse resident peritoneal cells have not been characterized in detail previously. Herein, we report that the mL2a-pCA-induced production of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) in C3H/HeN mouse-derived resident peritoneal cells was inhibited by treatment with the Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 trihydrochloride. In addition, we found that mL2a-pCA activated the phosphorylation Rac1. Taken together, the results show that mL2a-pCA induced macrophage activation via Rac1 phosphorylation-dependent pathways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. CX3CL1-mediated macrophage activation contributed to paclitaxel-induced DRG neuronal apoptosis and painful peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhen-Zhen; Li, Dai; Liu, Cui-Cui; Cui, Yu; Zhu, He-Quan; Zhang, Wen-Wen; Li, Yong-Yong; Xin, Wen-Jun

    2014-08-01

    Painful peripheral neuropathy is a dose-limiting side effect of paclitaxel therapy, which hampers the optimal clinical management of chemotherapy in cancer patients. Currently the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here we showed that the clinically relevant dose of paclitaxel (3×8mg/kg, cumulative dose 24mg/kg) induced significant upregulation of the chemokine CX3CL1 in the A-fiber primary sensory neurons in vivo and in vitro and infiltration of macrophages into the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in rats. Paclitaxel treatment also increased cleaved caspase-3 expression, induced the loss of primary afferent terminal fibers and decreased sciatic-evoked A-fiber responses in the spinal dorsal horn, indicating DRG neuronal apoptosis induced by paclitaxel. In addition, the paclitaxel-induced DRG neuronal apoptosis occurred exclusively in the presence of macrophage in vitro study. Intrathecal or systemic injection of CX3CL1 neutralizing antibody blocked paclitaxel-induced macrophage recruitment and neuronal apoptosis in the DRG, and also attenuated paclitaxel-induced allodynia. Furthermore, depletion of macrophage by systemic administration of clodronate inhibited paclitaxel-induced allodynia. Blocking CX3CL1 decreased activation of p38 MAPK in the macrophage, and inhibition of p38 MAPK activity blocked the neuronal apoptosis and development of mechanical allodynia induced by paclitaxel. These findings provide novel evidence that CX3CL1-recruited macrophage contributed to paclitaxel-induced DRG neuronal apoptosis and painful peripheral neuropathy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The FGL2/fibroleukin prothrombinase is involved in alveolar macrophage activation in COPD through the MAPK pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yanling; Xu, Sanpeng; Xiao, Fei; Xiong, Yan; Wang, Xiaojin; Gao, Sui; Yan, Weiming; Ning, Qin

    2010-01-01

    Fibrinogen-like protein 2 (FGL2)/fibroleukin has been reported to play a vital role in the pathogenesis of some critical inflammatory diseases by possessing immunomodulatory activity through the mediation of 'immune coagulation' and the regulation of maturation and proliferation of immune cells. We observed upregulated FGL2 expression in alveolar macrophages from peripheral lungs of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients and found a correlation between FGL2 expression and increased macrophage activation markers (CD11b and CD14). The role of FGL2 in the activation of macrophages was confirmed by the detection of significantly decreased macrophage activation marker (CD11b, CD11c, and CD71) expression as well as the inhibition of cell migration and inflammatory cytokine (IL-8 and MMP-9) production in an LPS-induced FGL2 knockdown human monocytic leukemia cell line (THP-1). Increased FGL2 expression co-localized with upregulated phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38-MAPK) in the lung tissues from COPD patients. Moreover, FGL2 knockdown in THP-1 cells significantly downregulated LPS-induced phosphorylation of p38-MAPK while upregulating phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Thus, we demonstrate that FGL2 plays an important role in macrophage activation in the lungs of COPD patients through MAPK pathway modulation.

  6. Identification and characterization of monoclonal antibodies specific for macrophages at intermediate stages in the tumoricidal activation pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulnock, D.M.; Lambert, L.E.

    1990-01-01

    Macrophage activation for tumor cell killing is a multistep pathway in which responsive macrophages interact sequentially with priming and triggering stimuli in the acquisition of full tumoricidal activity. A number of mediators have been identified which have activating capability, including in particular IFN-gamma and bacterial LPS. Although the synergistic functional response of normal macrophages to sequential incubation with these activation signals has been well-established, characterization of the intermediate stages in the activation pathway has been difficult. We have developed a model system for examination of various aspects of macrophage activation, through the use of the murine macrophage tumor cell line, RAW 264.7. These cells, like normal macrophages, exhibit a strict requirement for interaction with both IFN-gamma and LPS in the development of tumor cytolytic activity. In addition, these cells can be stably primed by the administration of gamma-radiation. In the studies reported here, we have used RAW 264.7 cells treated with IFN-gamma alone or with IFN-gamma plus LPS to stimulate the production of rat mAb probes recognizing cell surface changes occurring during the activation process. In this way we have identified three Ag associated with intermediate stages of the activation process. One Ag, TM-1, is expressed on RAW 264.7 cells primed by IFN-gamma or gamma-radiation. This surface Ag thus identifies cells at the primed cell intermediate stage of the tumoricidal activation pathway regardless of the mechanism of activation. A second Ag, TM-2, is expressed on IFN-treated RAW 264.7 cells but not on RAW 264.7 cells primed with gamma-radiation alone. Expression of this Ag can be induced by treatment of irradiated cells with IFN-gamma, but is not induced by IFN-gamma treatment of a noncytolytic cell line, WEHI-3

  7. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Latent Antigen Rv2029c from the Multistage DNA Vaccine A39 Drives TH1 Responses via TLR-mediated Macrophage Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haibo Su

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Targeting of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB latent antigens comprises a crucial strategy for the development of alternative tuberculosis (TB vaccine(s that protects against TB reactivation. Here, we generated a multistage DNA vaccine, A39, containing the early antigens Ag85A and Rv3425 as well as the latency-associated protein Rv2029c, which conferred protective immunity in a pre-exposure mouse model. Moreover, administration of the A39 vaccination after MTB exposure inhibited reactivation and resulted in significantly lower bacterial loads in the lungs and spleen of mice, compared to those in the control population. Subsequently, we investigated the effect of Rv2029c on innate immunity and characterized the molecular details of the interaction of this protein with the host via iTRAQ proteomic and biochemical assay analyses. Rv2029c activated macrophages, triggered the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and promoted toll-like receptor/mitogen-activated protein kinase (TLR/MAPK-dependent macrophage apoptosis. Furthermore, Rv2029c treatment enhanced the ability of Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG-infected macrophages to present antigens to CD4+ T cells in vitro, which correlated with an increase in MHC-II expression. Lastly, Rv2029c-treated macrophages activated T cells, effectively polarized CD4+ and CD8+ T cells to secrete IFN-γ and IL-2, and specifically expanded a population of CD44highCD62LlowCD4+/CD8+ effector/memory cells, indicating that Rv2029c, as a specific recall antigen, contributes to Th1 polarization in T cell immunity. These results suggest that Rv2029c and A39 comprise promising targets for the development of next-generation clinical TB therapeutic vaccines.

  8. Production and characterization of guinea pig recombinant gamma interferon and its effect on macrophage activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeevan, A; McFarland, C T; Yoshimura, T; Skwor, T; Cho, H; Lasco, T; McMurray, D N

    2006-01-01

    Gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) plays a critical role in the protective immune responses against mycobacteria. We previously cloned a cDNA coding for guinea pig IFN-gamma (gpIFN-gamma) and reported that BCG vaccination induced a significant increase in the IFN-gamma mRNA expression in guinea pig cells in response to living mycobacteria and that the virulent H37Rv strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis stimulated less IFN-gamma mRNA than did the attenuated H37Ra strain. In this study, we successfully expressed and characterized recombinant gpIFN-gamma with a histidine tag at the N terminus (His-tagged rgpIFN-gamma) in Escherichia coli. rgpIFN-gamma was identified as an 18-kDa band in the insoluble fraction; therefore, the protein was purified under denaturing conditions and renatured. N-terminal amino acid sequencing of the recombinant protein yielded the sequence corresponding to the N terminus of His-tagged gpIFN-gamma. The recombinant protein upregulated major histocompatibility complex class II expression in peritoneal macrophages. The antiviral activity of rgpIFN-gamma was demonstrated with a guinea pig fibroblast cell line (104C1) infected with encephalomyocarditis virus. Interestingly, peritoneal macrophages treated with rgpIFN-gamma did not produce any nitric oxide but did produce hydrogen peroxide and suppressed the intracellular growth of mycobacteria. Furthermore, rgpIFN-gamma induced morphological alterations in cultured macrophages. Thus, biologically active rgpIFN-gamma has been successfully produced and characterized in our laboratory. The study of rgpIFN-gamma will further increase our understanding of the cellular and molecular responses induced by BCG vaccination in the guinea pig model of pulmonary tuberculosis.

  9. Effect of cyhalothrin on Ehrlich tumor growth and macrophage activity in mice

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    W.M. Quinteiro-Filho

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Cyhalothrin, a pyrethroid insecticide, induces stress-like symptoms, increases c-fos immunoreactivity in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, and decreases innate immune responses in laboratory animals. Macrophages are key elements in cellular immune responses and operate at the tumor-host interface. This study investigated the relationship among cyhalothrin effects on Ehrlich tumor growth, serum corticosterone levels and peritoneal macrophage activity in mice. Three experiments were done with 10 experimental (single gavage administration of 3.0 mg/kg cyhalothrin daily for 7 days and 10 control (single gavage administration of 1.0 mL/kg vehicle of cyhalothrin preparation daily for 7 days isogenic BALB/c mice in each experiment. Cyhalothrin i increased Ehrlich ascitic tumor growth after ip administration of 5.0 x 106 tumor cells, i.e., ascitic fluid volume (control = 1.97 ± 0.39 mL and experimental = 2.71 ± 0.92 mL; P < 0.05, concentration of tumor cells/mL in the ascitic fluid (control = 111.95 ± 16.73 x 106 and experimental = 144.60 ± 33.18 x 106; P < 0.05, and total number of tumor cells in the ascitic fluid (control = 226.91 ± 43.22 x 106 and experimental = 349.40 ± 106.38 x 106; P < 0.05; ii increased serum corticosterone levels (control = 200.0 ± 48.3 ng/mL and experimental = 420.0 ± 75.5 ng/mL; P < 0.05, and iii decreased the intensity of macrophage phagocytosis (control = 132.3 ± 19.7 and experimental = 116.2 ± 4.6; P < 0.05 and oxidative burst (control = 173.7 ± 40.8 and experimental= 99.58 ± 41.7; P < 0.05 in vitro in the presence of Staphylococcus aureus. These data provide evidence that cyhalothrin simultaneously alters host resistance to Ehrlich tumor growth, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA axis function, and peritoneal macrophage activity. The results are discussed in terms of data suggesting a link between stress, HPA axis activation and resistance to tumor growth.

  10. Neuropeptide FF increases M2 activation and self-renewal of adipose tissue macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waqas, Syed F. Hassnain; Hoang, Anh Cuong; Ampem, Grace; Azegrouz, Hind; Balogh, Lajos; Thuróczy, Julianna; Gerling, Ivan C.; Nam, Sorim; Lim, Jong-Seok; Martinez-Ibañez, Juncal; Real, José T.; Paschke, Stephan; Quillet, Raphaëlle; Ayachi, Safia; Simonin, Frédéric; Schneider, E. Marion; Brinkman, Jacqueline A.; Seroogy, Christine M.

    2017-01-01

    The quantity and activation state of adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs) impact the development of obesity-induced metabolic diseases. Appetite-controlling hormones play key roles in obesity; however, our understanding of their effects on ATMs is limited. Here, we have shown that human and mouse ATMs express NPFFR2, a receptor for the appetite-reducing neuropeptide FF (NPFF), and that NPFFR2 expression is upregulated by IL-4, an M2-polarizing cytokine. Plasma levels of NPFF decreased in obese patients and high-fat diet–fed mice and increased following caloric restriction. NPFF promoted M2 activation and increased the proliferation of murine and human ATMs. Both M2 activation and increased ATM proliferation were abolished in NPFFR2-deficient ATMs. Mechanistically, the effects of NPFF involved the suppression of E3 ubiquitin ligase RNF128 expression, resulting in enhanced stability of phosphorylated STAT6 and increased transcription of the M2 macrophage–associated genes IL-4 receptor α (Il4ra), arginase 1 (Arg1), IL-10 (Il10), and alkylglycerol monooxygenase (Agmo). NPFF induced ATM proliferation concomitantly with the increase in N-Myc downstream-regulated gene 2 (Ndrg2) expression and suppressed the transcription of Ifi200 cell-cycle inhibitor family members and MAF bZIP transcription factor B (Mafb), a negative regulator of macrophage proliferation. NPFF thus plays an important role in supporting healthy adipose tissue via the maintenance of metabolically beneficial ATMs. PMID:28581443

  11. circRNA Mediates Silica-Induced Macrophage Activation Via HECTD1/ZC3H12A-Dependent Ubiquitination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zewei; Jiang, Rong; Yang, Xiyue; Guo, Huifang; Fang, Shencun; Zhang, Yingming; Cheng, Yusi; Wang, Jing; Yao, Honghong; Chao, Jie

    2018-01-01

    Rationale: Phagocytosis of silicon dioxide (SiO2) into lung cells causes an inflammatory cascade that results in fibroblast proliferation and migration, followed by fibrosis. Circular RNAs (circRNAs) are a subclass of non-coding RNAs detected within mammalian cells; however, researchers have not determined whether circRNAs are involved in the pathophysiological process of silicosis. The upstream molecular mechanisms and functional effects on cell apoptosis, proliferation and migration were investigated to elucidate the role of circRNAs in SiO2-induced inflammation in pulmonary macrophages. Methods: Primary cultures of alveolar macrophages from healthy donors and patients as well as the RAW264.7 macrophage cell line were used to explore the functions of circHECTD1 (HECT domain E3 ubiquitin protein ligase 1) in macrophage activation. Results: The results of the experiments indicated that 1) SiO2 concomitantly decreased circHECTD1 levels and increased HECTD1 protein expression; 2) circHECTD1 and HECTD1 were involved in SiO2-induced macrophage activation via ubiquitination; and 3) SiO2-activated macrophages promoted fibroblast proliferation and migration via the circHECTD1/HECTD1 pathway. Tissue samples from silicosis patients confirmed the upregulation of HECTD1. Conclusions: Our study elucidated a link between SiO2-induced macrophage activation and the circHECTD1/HECTD1 pathway, thereby providing new insight into the potential use of HECTD1 in the development of novel therapeutic strategies for treating silicosis. PMID:29290828

  12. circRNA Mediates Silica-Induced Macrophage Activation Via HECTD1/ZC3H12A-Dependent Ubiquitination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zewei; Jiang, Rong; Yang, Xiyue; Guo, Huifang; Fang, Shencun; Zhang, Yingming; Cheng, Yusi; Wang, Jing; Yao, Honghong; Chao, Jie

    2018-01-01

    Rationale: Phagocytosis of silicon dioxide (SiO 2 ) into lung cells causes an inflammatory cascade that results in fibroblast proliferation and migration, followed by fibrosis. Circular RNAs (circRNAs) are a subclass of non-coding RNAs detected within mammalian cells; however, researchers have not determined whether circRNAs are involved in the pathophysiological process of silicosis. The upstream molecular mechanisms and functional effects on cell apoptosis, proliferation and migration were investigated to elucidate the role of circRNAs in SiO 2 -induced inflammation in pulmonary macrophages. Methods: Primary cultures of alveolar macrophages from healthy donors and patients as well as the RAW264.7 macrophage cell line were used to explore the functions of circHECTD1 (HECT domain E3 ubiquitin protein ligase 1) in macrophage activation. Results: The results of the experiments indicated that 1) SiO 2 concomitantly decreased circHECTD1 levels and increased HECTD1 protein expression; 2) circHECTD1 and HECTD1 were involved in SiO 2 -induced macrophage activation via ubiquitination; and 3) SiO 2 -activated macrophages promoted fibroblast proliferation and migration via the circHECTD1/HECTD1 pathway. Tissue samples from silicosis patients confirmed the upregulation of HECTD1. Conclusions: Our study elucidated a link between SiO 2 -induced macrophage activation and the circHECTD1/HECTD1 pathway, thereby providing new insight into the potential use of HECTD1 in the development of novel therapeutic strategies for treating silicosis.

  13. IFN-γ fails to overcome inhibition of selected macrophage activation events in response to pathogenic mycobacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyamala Thirunavukkarasu

    Full Text Available According to most models of mycobacterial infection, inhibition of the pro-inflammatory macrophage immune responses contributes to the persistence of bacteria. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP is a highly successful pathogen in cattle and sheep and is also implicated as the causative agent of Crohn's disease in humans. Pathogenic mycobacteria such as MAP have developed multiple strategies to evade host defence mechanisms including interfering with the macrophages' capacity to respond to IFN-γ, a feature which might be lacking in non-pathogenic mycobacteria such as M. smegmatis. We hypothesized that pre-sensitisation of macrophages with the pro-inflammatory cytokine IFN-γ would help in overcoming the inhibitory effect of MAP or its antigens on macrophage inflammatory responses. Herein we have compared a series of macrophage activation parameters in response to MAP and M. smegmatis as well as mycobacterial antigens. While IFN-γ did overcome the inhibition in immune suppressive mechanisms in response to MAP antigen as well as M. smegmatis, we could not find a clear role for IFN-γ in overcoming the inhibition of macrophage inflammatory responses to the pathogenic mycobacterium, MAP. We demonstrate that suppression of macrophage defence mechanisms by pathogenic mycobacteria is unlikely to be overcome by prior sensitization with IFN-γ alone. This indicates that IFN-γ signaling pathway-independent mechanisms may exist for overcoming inhibition of macrophage effector functions in response to pathogenic mycobacteria. These findings have important implications in understanding the survival mechanisms of pathogenic mycobacteria directed towards finding better therapeutics and vaccination strategies.

  14. An update on renal involvement in hemophagocytic syndrome (macrophage activation syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaili, Haydarali; Mostafidi, Elmira; Mehramuz, Bahareh; Ardalan, Mohammadreza; Mohajel-Shoja, Mohammadali

    2016-01-01

    Hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS) is mainly characterized by massive infiltration of bone marrow by activated macrophages and often presents with pancytopenia. Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) is also present with thrombocytopenia and renal involvement. Both conditions could coexist with each other and complicate the condition. Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), EMBASE, Google Scholar, PubMed, EBSCO, and Web of Science with keywords relevant to; Hemophagocytic syndrome, macrophage activation syndrome, interferon-gamma and thrombotic microangiopathy, have been searched. Viral infection, rheumatologic disease and malignancies are the main underlying causes for secondary HPS. calcineurin inhibitors and viral infections are also the main underlying causes of TMA in transplant recipients. In this review, we discussed a 39-year-old male who presented with pancytopenia and renal allograft dysfunction. With the diagnosis of HPS induced TMA his renal condition and pancytopenia improved after receiving intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and plasmapheresis therapy. HPS is an increasingly recognized disorder in the realm of different medical specialties. Renal involvement complicates the clinical picture of the disease, and this condition even is more complex in renal transplant recipients. We should consider the possibility of HPS in any renal transplant recipient with pancytopenia and allograft dysfunction. The combination of HPS with TMA future increases the complexity of the situation.

  15. IL33 Promotes Colon Cancer Cell Stemness via JNK Activation and Macrophage Recruitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Min; Li, Yongkui; Huang, Kai; Qi, Shanshan; Zhang, Jian; Zgodzinski, Witold; Majewski, Marek; Wallner, Grzegorz; Gozdz, Stanislaw; Macek, Pawel; Kowalik, Artur; Pasiarski, Marcin; Grywalska, Ewelina; Vatan, Linda; Nagarsheth, Nisha; Li, Wei; Zhao, Lili; Kryczek, Ilona; Wang, Guobin; Wang, Zheng; Zou, Weiping; Wang, Lin

    2018-01-01

    The expression and biological role of IL33 in colon cancer is poorly understood. In this study, we show that IL33 is expressed by vascular endothelial cells and tumor cells in the human colon cancer microenvironment. Administration of human IL33 and overexpression of murine IL33 enhanced human and murine colon cancer cell growth in vivo, respectively. IL33 stimulated cell sphere formation and prevented chemotherapy-induced tumor apoptosis. Mechanistically, IL33 activated core stem cell genes NANOG, NOTCH3, and OCT3/4 via the ST2 signaling pathway, and induced phosphorylation of c-Jun N terminal kinase (JNK) activation and enhanced binding of c-Jun to the promoters of the core stem cell genes. Moreover, IL33 recruited macrophages into the cancer microenvironment and stimulated them to produce prostaglandin E2, which supported colon cancer stemness and tumor growth. Clinically, tumor IL33 expression associated with poor survival in patients with metastatic colon cancer. Thus, IL33 dually targets tumor cells and macrophages and endows stem-like qualities to colon cancer cells to promote carcinogenesis. Collectively, our work reveals an immune-associated mechanism that extrinsically confers cancer cell stemness properties. Targeting the IL33 signaling pathway may offer an opportunity to treat patients with metastatic cancer. PMID:28249897

  16. Differentially activated macrophages orchestrate myogenic precursor cell fate during human skeletal muscle regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saclier, Marielle; Yacoub-Youssef, Houda; Mackey, Abigail

    2013-01-01

    , we explored both in vitro and in vivo, in human, the interactions of differentially activated MPs with myogenic precursor cells (MPCs) during adult myogenesis and skeletal muscle regeneration. We showed in vitro that through the differential secretion of cytokines and growth factors, proinflammatory...... anti-inflammatory markers. These data demonstrate for the first time in human that MPs sequentially orchestrate adult myogenesis during regeneration of damaged skeletal muscle. These results support the emerging concept that inflammation, through MP activation, controls stem cell fate and coordinates......Macrophages (MPs) exert either beneficial or deleterious effects on tissue repair, depending on their activation/polarization state. They are crucial for adult skeletal muscle repair, notably by acting on myogenic precursor cells. However, these interactions have not been fully characterized. Here...

  17. Antitumor effect of vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage activating factor on Ehrlich ascites tumor-bearing mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Y; Naraparaju, V R; Yamamoto, N

    1999-01-01

    Cancerous cells secrete alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (NaGalase) into the blood stream, resulting in deglycosylation of serum vitamin D3-binding protein (known as Gc protein), which is a precursor for macrophage activating factor (MAF). Incubation of Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase generates the most potent macrophage activating factor (designated GcMAF). Administration of GcMAF to cancer-bearing hosts can bypass the inactivated MAF precursor and act directly on macrophages for efficient activation. Therapeutic effects of GcMAF on Ehrlich ascites tumor-bearing mice were assessed by survival time and serum NaGalase activity, because serum NaGalase activity was proportional to tumor burden. A single administration of GcMAF (100 pg/mouse) to eight mice on the same day after transplantation of the tumor (5 x 10(5) cells) showed a mean survival time of 21 +/- 3 days for seven mice, with one mouse surviving more than 60 days, whereas tumor-bearing controls had a mean survival time of 13 +/- 2 days. Six of the eight mice that received two GcMAF administrations, at Day 0 and Day 4 after transplantation, survived up to 31 +/- 4 days whereas, the remaining two mice survived for more than 60 days. Further, six of the eight mice that received three GcMAF administrations with 4-day intervals showed an extended survival of at least 60 days, and serum NaGalase levels were as low as those of control mice throughout the survival period. The cure with subthreshold GcMAF-treatments (administered once or twice) of tumor-bearing mice appeared to be a consequence of sustained macrophage activation by inflammation resulting from the macrophage-mediated tumoricidal process. Therefore, a protracted macrophage activation induced by a few administrations of minute amounts of GcMAF eradicated the murine ascites tumor.

  18. MCPIP1 Regulates Alveolar Macrophage Apoptosis and Pulmonary Fibroblast Activation After in vitro Exposure to Silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingang; Zhang, Yuxia; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Haijun; Zhou, Zewei; Dai, Xiaoniu; Cheng, Yusi; Fang, Shencun; Zhang, Yingming; Yao, Honghong; Chao, Jie

    2016-05-01

    Silicosis is a fatal and fibrotic pulmonary disease caused by the inhalation of silica. After arriving at the alveoli, silica is ingested by alveolar macrophages (AMOs), in which monocyte chemotactic protein-induced protein 1 (MCPIP1) plays an essential role in controlling macrophage-mediated inflammatory responses. However, the mechanism of action of MCPIP1 in silicosis is poorly understood. Primary rat AMOs were isolated and treated with SiO2 (50 µg/cm(2)). MCPIP1 and AMO activation/apoptosis markers were detected by immunoblotting. MCPIP1 was down-regulated using siRNA in AMOs. The effects of AMOs on fibroblast activation and migration were evaluated using a gel contraction assay, a scratch assay, and a nested collagen matrix migration model. After exposure to SiO2, MCPIP1 was significantly increased in rat AMOs. Activation and apoptosis markers in AMOs were up-regulated after exposure to SiO2 Following siRNA-mediated silencing of MCPIP1 mRNA, the markers of AMO activation and apoptosis were significantly decreased. Rat pulmonary fibroblasts (PFBs) cultured in conditional medium from AMOs treated with MCPIP1 siRNA and SiO2 showed significantly less activation and migration compared with those cultured in conditional medium from AMOs treated with control siRNA and SiO2 CONCLUSION: Our data suggest a vital role for MCPIP1 in AMO apoptosis and PFB activation/migration induced by SiO2. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. The Synthetic Lignan Secoisolariciresinol Diglucoside Prevents Asbestos-Induced NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation in Murine Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph A. Pietrofesa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The interaction of asbestos with macrophages drives two key processes that are linked to malignancy: (1 the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS/reactive nitrogen species (RNS and (2 the activation of an inflammation cascade that drives acute and chronic inflammation, with the NLRP3 inflammasome playing a key role. Synthetic secoisolariciresinol diglucoside (SDG, LGM2605, is a nontoxic lignan with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties and was evaluated for protection from asbestos in murine peritoneal macrophages (MF. Methods. MFs were exposed to crocidolite asbestos ± LGM2605 given 4 hours prior to exposure and evaluated at various times for NLRP3 expression, secretion of inflammasome-activated cytokines (IL-1β and IL-18, proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6, TNFα, and HMGB1, NF-κB activation, and levels of total nitrates/nitrites. Results. Asbestos induces a significant (p<0.0001 increase in the NLRP3 subunit, release of proinflammatory cytokines, NLRP3-activated cytokines, NF-κB, and levels of nitrates/nitrites. LGM2605 significantly reduced NLRP3 ranging from 40 to 81%, IL-1β by 89–96%, and TNFα by 67–78%, as well as activated NF-κB by 48-49% while decreasing levels of nitrates/nitrites by 85–93%. Conclusions. LGM2605 reduced asbestos-induced NLRP3 expression, proinflammatory cytokine release, NF-κB activation, and nitrosative stress in MFs supporting its possible use in preventing the asbestos-induced inflammatory cascade leading to malignancy.

  20. Macrophage activation and differentiation signals regulate schlafen-4 gene expression: evidence for Schlafen-4 as a modulator of myelopoiesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy J van Zuylen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The ten mouse and six human members of the Schlafen (Slfn gene family all contain an AAA domain. Little is known of their function, but previous studies suggest roles in immune cell development. In this report, we assessed Slfn regulation and function in macrophages, which are key cellular regulators of innate immunity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Multiple members of the Slfn family were up-regulated in mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMM by the Toll-like Receptor (TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS, the TLR3 agonist Poly(I∶C, and in disease-affected joints in the collagen-induced model of rheumatoid arthritis. Of these, the most inducible was Slfn4. TLR agonists that signal exclusively through the MyD88 adaptor protein had more modest effects on Slfn4 mRNA levels, thus implicating MyD88-independent signalling and autocrine interferon (IFN-β in inducible expression. This was supported by the substantial reduction in basal and LPS-induced Slfn4 mRNA expression in IFNAR-1⁻/⁻ BMM. LPS causes growth arrest in macrophages, and other Slfn family genes have been implicated in growth control. Slfn4 mRNA levels were repressed during macrophage colony-stimulating factor (CSF-1-mediated differentiation of bone marrow progenitors into BMM. To determine the role of Slfn4 in vivo, we over-expressed the gene specifically in macrophages in mice using a csf1r promoter-driven binary expression system. Transgenic over-expression of Slfn4 in myeloid cells did not alter macrophage colony formation or proliferation in vitro. Monocyte numbers, as well as inflammatory macrophages recruited to the peritoneal cavity, were reduced in transgenic mice that specifically over-expressed Slfn4, while macrophage numbers and hematopoietic activity were increased in the livers and spleens. CONCLUSIONS: Slfn4 mRNA levels were up-regulated during macrophage activation but down-regulated during differentiation. Constitutive Slfn4 expression in the

  1. Macrophage activation markers predict mortality in patients with liver cirrhosis without or with acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbæk, Henning; Rødgaard-Hansen, Sidsel; Aagaard, Niels Kristian

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Activation of liver macrophages plays a key role in liver and systemic inflammation and may be involved in development and prognosis of acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF). We therefore measured the circulating macrophage activation markers soluble sCD163 and mannose receptor......-C ACLF and CLIF-C AD scores. Addition of the macrophage markers to the clinical scores improved the prognostic efficacy: In ACLF patients sCD163 improved prediction of short-term mortality (C-index: 0.74 (0.67-0.80)) and in patients without ACLF sMR improved prediction of long-term mortality (C-index: 0.......80 (0.76-0.85)). CONCLUSIONS: The severity related increase in sCD163 and sMR and close association with mortality suggest a primary importance of inflammatory activation of liver macrophages in the emergence and course of ACLF. Accordingly, supplementation of the macrophage biomarkers to the platform...

  2. A very rare cause of dyspnea with a unique presentation on a computed tomography scan of the chest: macrophage activation syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandao-Neto, Rodrigo Antonio; Santana, Alfredo Nicodemos Cruz; Danilovic, Debora Lucia Seguro; Mendonca, Berenice Bilharinho de; Bernardi, Fabiola Del Carlo; Barbas, Carmen Silvia Valente

    2008-01-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome is a rare and potentially life-threatening disease. It occurs due to immune dysregulation manifested as excessive macrophage proliferation, typically causing hepatosplenomegaly, pancytopenia and hepatic dysfunction. Here, we report an unusual case of macrophage activation syndrome presenting as dyspnea, as well as (reported here for the first time) high resolution computed tomography findings of an excavated nodule, diffuse ground glass opacities and consolidations (mimicking severe pneumonia or alveolar hemorrhage). The patient was successfully treated with human immunoglobulin. We recommend that macrophage activation syndrome be considered in the differential diagnosis of respiratory failure. Rapid diagnosis and treatment are essential to achieving favorable outcomes in patients with this syndrome. (author)

  3. Human Properdin Opsonizes Nanoparticles and Triggers a Potent Pro-inflammatory Response by Macrophages without Involving Complement Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouser, Lubna; Paudyal, Basudev; Kaur, Anuvinder; Stenbeck, Gudrun; Jones, Lucy A.; Abozaid, Suhair M.; Stover, Cordula M.; Flahaut, Emmanuel; Sim, Robert B.; Kishore, Uday

    2018-01-01

    Development of nanoparticles as tissue-specific drug delivery platforms can be considerably influenced by the complement system because of their inherent pro-inflammatory and tumorigenic consequences. The complement activation pathways, and its recognition subcomponents, can modulate clearance of the nanoparticles and subsequent inflammatory response and thus alter the intended translational applications. Here, we report, for the first time, that human properdin, an upregulator of the complement alternative pathway, can opsonize functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) via its thrombospondin type I repeat (TSR) 4 and 5. Binding of properdin and TSR4+5 is likely to involve charge pattern/polarity recognition of the CNT surface since both carboxymethyl cellulose-coated carbon nanotubes (CMC-CNT) and oxidized (Ox-CNT) bound these proteins well. Properdin enhanced the uptake of CMC-CNTs by a macrophage cell line, THP-1, mounting a robust pro-inflammatory immune response, as revealed by qRT-PCR, multiplex cytokine array, and NF-κB nuclear translocation analyses. Properdin can be locally synthesized by immune cells in an inflammatory microenvironment, and thus, its interaction with nanoparticles is of considerable importance. In addition, recombinant TSR4+5 coated on the CMC-CNTs inhibited complement consumption by CMC-CNTs, suggesting that nanoparticle decoration with TSR4+5, can be potentially used as a complement inhibitor in a number of pathological contexts arising due to exaggerated complement activation. PMID:29483907

  4. Volcanic ash activates the NLRP3 inflammasome in murine and human macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damby, David; Horwell, Claire J.; Baxter, Peter J.; Kueppers, Ulrich; Schnurr, Max; Dingwell, Donald B.; Duewell, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Volcanic ash is a heterogeneous mineral dust that is typically composed of a mixture of amorphous (glass) and crystalline (mineral) fragments. It commonly contains an abundance of the crystalline silica (SiO2) polymorph cristobalite. Inhalation of crystalline silica can induce inflammation by stimulating the NLRP3 inflammasome, a cytosolic receptor complex that plays a critical role in driving inflammatory immune responses. Ingested material results in the assembly of NLRP3, ASC, and caspase-1 with subsequent secretion of the interleukin-1 family cytokine IL-1β. Previous toxicology work suggests that cristobalite-bearing volcanic ash is minimally reactive, calling into question the reactivity of volcanically derived crystalline silica, in general. In this study, we target the NLRP3 inflammasome as a crystalline silica responsive element to clarify volcanic cristobalite reactivity. We expose immortalized bone marrow-derived macrophages of genetically engineered mice and primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to ash from the Soufrière Hills volcano as well as representative, pure-phase samples of its primary componentry (volcanic glass, feldspar, cristobalite) and measure NLRP3 inflammasome activation. We demonstrate that respirable Soufrière Hills volcanic ash induces the activation of caspase-1 with subsequent release of mature IL-1β in a NLRP3 inflammasome-dependent manner. Macrophages deficient in NLRP3 inflammasome components are incapable of secreting IL-1β in response to volcanic ash ingestion. Cellular uptake induces lysosomal destabilization involving cysteine proteases. Furthermore, the response involves activation of mitochondrial stress pathways leading to the generation of reactive oxygen species. Considering ash componentry, cristobalite is the most reactive pure-phase with other components inducing only low-level IL-1β secretion. Inflammasome activation mediated by inhaled ash and its potential relevance in chronic pulmonary

  5. Activation of Nrf2-mediated oxidative stress response in macrophages by hypochlorous acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pi Jingbo; Zhang Qiang; Woods, Courtney G.; Wong, Victoria; Collins, Sheila; Andersen, Melvin E.

    2008-01-01

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl), a potent oxidant generated when chlorine gas reacts with water, is important in the pathogenesis of many disorders. Transcription factor Nrf2-mediated antioxidant response represents a critical cellular defense mechanism that serves to maintain intracellular redox homeostasis and limit oxidative damage. In the present study, the effect of HOCl on Nrf2 activation was investigated in macrophages, one of the target cells of chlorine gas exposure. Exposure of RAW 264.7 macrophages to HOCl resulted in increased protein levels of Nrf2 in nuclear extractions, as well as a time- and dose-dependent increase in the expression of Nrf2 target genes, including heme oxygenase-1, NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO-1), glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC), and glutathione synthetase (GS). Additionally, intracellular glutathione (GSH), which is the prime scavenger for HOCl in cells, decreased within the first hour of HOCl exposure. The decline was followed by a GSH rebound that surpassed the initial basal levels by up to 4-fold. This reversal in GSH levels closely correlated with the gene expression profile of GCLC and GS. To study the mechanisms of Nrf2 activation in response to HOCl exposure, we examined the effects of several antioxidants on Nrf2-mediated response. Pretreatment with cell-permeable catalase, N-acetyl-L-cysteine or GSH-monoethyl ester markedly reduced expression of NQO-1 and GCLC under HOCl challenge conditions, suggesting intracellular ROS-scavenging capacity affects HOCl-induced Nrf2 activation. Importantly, pre-activation of Nrf2 with low concentrations of pro-oxidants protected the cells against HOCl-induced cell damage. Taken together, we provide direct evidence that HOCl activates Nrf2-mediated antioxidant response, which protects cells from oxidative damage

  6. CEA in activated macrophages. New diagnostic possibilities for tumor markers in early colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Japink, Dennis; Leers, Mathie P G; Sosef, Meindert N; Nap, Marius

    2009-08-01

    Serum tumor markers show low sensitivity, making them unsuitable for early detection of cancer. Activated macrophages (AM) from peripheral blood can accumulate tumor marker substances and facilitate early detection in prostate cancer. Here it was investigated whether carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-containing macrophages (CEACM) can be used to detect colorectal cancer (CRC) at earlier stages than can serum CEA. Peripheral blood was collected from patients with CRC (n=48), inflammatory colorectal disease (n=5) and from healthy controls (n=18). After separating and labeling AM with CD14-APC/CD16-FITC, AM were intracellularly labeled with anti-CEA antibody and flow cytometrically analyzed. Serum CEA and C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured. The fraction-size of CEACM discriminated between controls and CRC patients, irrespective of AJCC stage (AJCC stage I-IV, pCEA values were significantly elevated in AJCC stage II, III and IV (p=0.02, 0.006 and <0.0001, respectively). Combining CEACM with CRP levels separated CRC from inflammatory colorectal disease. CEACM combined with CRP appears to have diagnostic potential in early CRC.

  7. Simvastatin induces caspase-independent apoptosis in LPS-activated RAW264.7 macrophage cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yong Chan; Song, Seok Bean; Lee, Mi Hee; Kang, Kwang Il; Lee, Hayyoung; Paik, Sang-Gi; Kim, Kyoon Eon; Kim, Young Sang

    2006-01-01

    Macrophages participate in several inflammatory pathologies such as sepsis and arthritis. We examined the effect of simvastatin on the LPS-induced proinflammatory macrophage RAW264.7 cells. Co-treatment of LPS and a non-toxic dose of simvastatin induced cell death in RAW264.7 cells. The cell death was accompanied by disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), genomic DNA fragmentation, and caspase-3 activation. Surprisingly, despite caspase-dependent apoptotic cascade being completely blocked by Z-VAD-fmk, a pan-caspase inhibitor, the cell death was only partially repressed. In the presence of Z-VAD-fmk, DNA fragmentation was blocked, but DNA condensation, disruption of MMP, and nuclear translocation of apoptosis inducing factor were obvious. The cell death by simvastatin and LPS was effectively decreased by both the FPP and GGPP treatments as well as mevalonate. Our findings indicate that simvastatin triggers the cell death of LPS-treated RAW264.7 cells through both caspase-dependent and -independent apoptotic pathways, suggesting a novel mechanism of statins for the severe inflammatory disease therapy

  8. The glycosylation and characterization of the candidate Gc macrophage activating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravnsborg, Tina; Olsen, Dorthe T; Thysen, Anna Hammerich; Christiansen, Maja; Houen, Gunnar; Højrup, Peter

    2010-04-01

    The vitamin D binding protein, Gc globulin, has in recent years received some attention for its role as precursor for the extremely potent macrophage activating factor (GcMAF). An O-linked trisaccharide has been allocated to the threonine residue at position 420 in two of the three most common isoforms of Gc globulin (Gc1s and Gc1f). A substitution for a lysine residue at position 420 in Gc2 prevents this isoform from being glycosylated at that position. It has been suggested that Gc globulin subjected sequentially to sialidase and galactosidase treatment generates GcMAF in the form of Gc globulin with only a single GalNAc attached to T420. In this study we confirm the location of a linear trisaccharide on T420. Furthermore, we provide the first structural evidence of the generation of the proposed GcMAF by use of glycosidase treatment and mass spectrometry. Additionally the generated GcMAF candidate was tested for its effect on cytokine release from macrophages in human whole blood. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Activity of novel oxazolidinones against Nocardia brasiliensis growing within THP-1 macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera-Cabrera, Lucio; Espinoza-González, Nelly A; Welsh, Oliverio; Ocampo-Candiani, Jorge; Castro-Garza, Jorge

    2009-11-01

    Nocardia are organisms that can escape the effects of both immune response and antimicrobial agents, due to their potential capacity to grow intracellularly. In previous studies, we found that experimental oxazolidinones, DA-7157 and DA-7218, are active both in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we compare the ability of linezolid, DA-7157 and DA-7218 to inhibit intracellular growth of Nocardia brasiliensis within the human monocyte cell line THP-1. The addition of oxazolidinones to the infected macrophage monolayer at concentrations 0.25x, 1x, 4x and 16x the MIC for N. brasiliensis resulted in an inhibitory effect on bacterial growth as follows DA-7157 > or = DA-7218 > linezolid. The excellent intracellular antimicrobial activity detected suggests that these compounds could be effective in the treatment of actinomycetoma. However, more studies are needed both in vitro and in vivo, including clinical trials, to confirm this issue.

  10. BAG3 promotes pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma growth by activating stromal macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosati, Alessandra; Basile, Anna; D'Auria, Raffaella; d'Avenia, Morena; De Marco, Margot; Falco, Antonia; Festa, Michelina; Guerriero, Luana; Iorio, Vittoria; Parente, Roberto; Pascale, Maria; Marzullo, Liberato; Franco, Renato; Arra, Claudio; Barbieri, Antonio; Rea, Domenica; Menichini, Giulio; Hahne, Michael; Bijlsma, Maarten; Barcaroli, Daniela; Sala, Gianluca; di Mola, Fabio Francesco; di Sebastiano, Pierluigi; Todoric, Jelena; Antonucci, Laura; Corvest, Vincent; Jawhari, Anass; Firpo, Matthew A; Tuveson, David A; Capunzo, Mario; Karin, Michael; De Laurenzi, Vincenzo; Turco, Maria Caterina

    2015-11-02

    The incidence and death rate of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) have increased in recent years, therefore the identification of novel targets for treatment is extremely important. Interactions between cancer and stromal cells are critically involved in tumour formation and development of metastasis. Here we report that PDAC cells secrete BAG3, which binds and activates macrophages, inducing their activation and the secretion of PDAC supporting factors. We also identify IFITM-2 as a BAG3 receptor and show that it signals through PI3K and the p38 MAPK pathways. Finally, we show that the use of an anti-BAG3 antibody results in reduced tumour growth and prevents metastasis formation in three different mouse models. In conclusion, we identify a paracrine loop involved in PDAC growth and metastatic spreading, and show that an anti-BAG3 antibody has therapeutic potential.

  11. Adventitial fibroblasts induce a distinct proinflammatory/profibrotic macrophage phenotype in pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Kasmi, Karim C; Pugliese, Steven C; Riddle, Suzette R; Poth, Jens M; Anderson, Aimee L; Frid, Maria G; Li, Min; Pullamsetti, Soni S; Savai, Rajkumar; Nagel, Maria A; Fini, Mehdi A; Graham, Brian B; Tuder, Rubin M; Friedman, Jacob E; Eltzschig, Holger K; Sokol, Ronald J; Stenmark, Kurt R

    2014-07-15

    Macrophage accumulation is not only a characteristic hallmark but is also a critical component of pulmonary artery remodeling associated with pulmonary hypertension (PH). However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms that drive vascular macrophage activation and their functional phenotype remain poorly defined. Using multiple levels of in vivo (bovine and rat models of hypoxia-induced PH, together with human tissue samples) and in vitro (primary mouse, rat, and bovine macrophages, human monocytes, and primary human and bovine fibroblasts) approaches, we observed that adventitial fibroblasts derived from hypertensive pulmonary arteries (bovine and human) regulate macrophage activation. These fibroblasts activate macrophages through paracrine IL-6 and STAT3, HIF1, and C/EBPβ signaling to drive expression of genes previously implicated in chronic inflammation, tissue remodeling, and PH. This distinct fibroblast-activated macrophage phenotype was independent of IL-4/IL-13-STAT6 and TLR-MyD88 signaling. We found that genetic STAT3 haplodeficiency in macrophages attenuated macrophage activation, complete STAT3 deficiency increased macrophage activation through compensatory upregulation of STAT1 signaling, and deficiency in C/EBPβ or HIF1 attenuated fibroblast-driven macrophage activation. These findings challenge the current paradigm of IL-4/IL-13-STAT6-mediated alternative macrophage activation as the sole driver of vascular remodeling in PH, and uncover a cross-talk between adventitial fibroblasts and macrophages in which paracrine IL-6-activated STAT3, HIF1α, and C/EBPβ signaling are critical for macrophage activation and polarization. Thus, targeting IL-6 signaling in macrophages by completely inhibiting C/EBPβ or HIF1α or by partially inhibiting STAT3 may hold therapeutic value for treatment of PH and other inflammatory conditions characterized by increased IL-6 and absent IL-4/IL-13 signaling. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists

  12. Adventitial Fibroblasts induce a distinct Pro-inflammatory/Pro-fibrotic Macrophage Phenotype in Pulmonary Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Kasmi, Karim C.; Pugliese, Steven C.; Riddle, Suzette R.; Poth, Jens M.; Anderson, Aimee L.; Frid, Maria G.; Li, Min; Pullamsetti, Soni S.; Savai, Rajkumar; Nagel, Maria A.; Fini, Mehdi A.; Graham, Brian B.; Tuder, Rubin M.; Friedman, Jacob E.; Eltzschig, Holger K.; Sokol, Ronald J.; Stenmark, Kurt R.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophage accumulation is not only a characteristic hallmark but also a critical component of pulmonary artery (PA) remodeling associated with pulmonary hypertension (PH). However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms that drive vascular macrophage activation and their functional phenotype remain poorly defined. Utilizing multiple levels of in vivo (bovine and rat models of hypoxia-induced PH, together with human tissue samples) and in vitro (primary mouse, rat, and bovine macrophages, human monocytes, as well as primary human and bovine fibroblasts) approaches, we observed that adventitial fibroblasts derived from hypertensive Pas (bovine and human) regulate macrophage activation. These fibroblasts activate macrophages through paracrine IL6 and STAT3, HIF1, and C/EBPβ signaling to drive expression of genes previously implicated in chronic inflammation, tissue remodeling, and PH. This distinct fibroblast-activated macrophage phenotype was independent of IL4/IL13-STAT6 and TLR-MyD88 signaling. We found that genetic STAT3 haplodeficiency in macrophages attenuated macrophage activation while complete STAT3 deficiency increased macrophage activation through compensatory upregulation of STAT1 signaling, while deficiency in C/EBPβ or HIF1 attenuated fibroblast driven macrophage activation. These findings challenge the current paradigm of IL4/IL13-STAT6 mediated alternative macrophage activation as the sole driver of vascular remodeling in PH and uncover a crosstalk between adventitial fibroblasts and macrophages in which paracrine IL6 activated STAT3, HIF1, and C/EBPβ signaling is critical for macrophage activation and polarization. Thus, targeting IL6 signaling in macrophages by completely inhibiting C/EBPβ, HIF1a or partially inhibiting STAT3 may hold therapeutic value for treatment of PH and other inflammatory conditions characterized by increased IL6 and absent IL4/IL13 signaling. PMID:24928992

  13. Differential regulation of caspase-1 activation, pyroptosis, and autophagy via Ipaf and ASC in Shigella-infected macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshihiko Suzuki

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Shigella infection, the cause of bacillary dysentery, induces caspase-1 activation and cell death in macrophages, but the precise mechanisms of this activation remain poorly understood. We demonstrate here that caspase-1 activation and IL-1beta processing induced by Shigella are mediated through Ipaf, a cytosolic pattern-recognition receptor of the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD-like receptor (NLR family, and the adaptor protein apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a C-terminal caspase recruitment domain (ASC. We also show that Ipaf was critical for pyroptosis, a specialized form of caspase-1-dependent cell death induced in macrophages by bacterial infection, whereas ASC was dispensable. Unlike that observed in Salmonella and Legionella, caspase-1 activation induced by Shigella infection was independent of flagellin. Notably, infection of macrophages with Shigella induced autophagy, which was dramatically increased by the absence of caspase-1 or Ipaf, but not ASC. Autophagy induced by Shigella required an intact bacterial type III secretion system but not VirG protein, a bacterial factor required for autophagy in epithelial-infected cells. Treatment of macrophages with 3-methyladenine, an inhibitor of autophagy, enhanced pyroptosis induced by Shigella infection, suggesting that autophagy protects infected macrophages from pyroptosis. Thus, Ipaf plays a critical role in caspase-1 activation induced by Shigella independently of flagellin. Furthermore, the absence of Ipaf or caspase-1, but not ASC, regulates pyroptosis and the induction of autophagy in Shigella-infected macrophages, providing a novel function for NLR proteins in bacterial-host interactions.

  14. Proteinase activated receptor 1 mediated fibrosis in a mouse model of liver injury: a role for bone marrow derived macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiannis N Kallis

    Full Text Available Liver fibrosis results from the co-ordinated actions of myofibroblasts and macrophages, a proportion of which are of bone marrow origin. The functional effect of such bone marrow-derived cells on liver fibrosis is unclear. We examine whether changing bone marrow genotype can down-regulate the liver's fibrotic response to injury and investigate mechanisms involved. Proteinase activated receptor 1 (PAR1 is up-regulated in fibrotic liver disease in humans, and deficiency of PAR1 is associated with reduced liver fibrosis in rodent models. In this study, recipient mice received bone marrow transplantation from PAR1-deficient or wild-type donors prior to carbon tetrachloride-induced liver fibrosis. Bone marrow transplantation alone from PAR1-deficient mice was able to confer significant reductions in hepatic collagen content and activated myofibroblast expansion on wild-type recipients. This effect was associated with a decrease in hepatic scar-associated macrophages and a reduction in macrophage recruitment from the bone marrow. In vitro, PAR1 signalling on bone marrow-derived macrophages directly induced their chemotaxis but did not stimulate proliferation. These data suggest that the bone marrow can modulate the fibrotic response of the liver to recurrent injury. PAR1 signalling can contribute to this response by mechanisms that include the regulation of macrophage recruitment.

  15. The Warburg effect in mycobacterial granulomas is dependent on the recruitment and activation of macrophages by interferon-γ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelberg, Rui; Moreira, Diana; Barreira-Silva, Palmira; Borges, Margarida; Silva, Letícia; Dinis-Oliveira, Ricardo Jorge; Resende, Mariana; Correia-Neves, Margarida; Jordan, Michael B; Ferreira, Nuno C; Abrunhosa, Antero J; Silvestre, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Granulomas are the hallmark of mycobacterial disease. Here, we demonstrate that both the cell recruitment and the increased glucose consumption in granulomatous infiltrates during Mycobacterium avium infection are highly dependent on interferon-γ (IFN-γ). Mycobacterium avium-infected mice lacking IFN-γ signalling failed to developed significant inflammatory infiltrations and lacked the characteristic uptake of the glucose analogue fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). To assess the role of macrophages in glucose uptake we infected mice with a selective impairment of IFN-γ signalling in the macrophage lineage (MIIG mice). Although only a partial reduction of the granulomatous areas was observed in infected MIIG mice, the insensitivity of macrophages to IFN-γ reduced the accumulation of FDG. In vivo, ex vivo and in vitro assays showed that macrophage activated by IFN-γ displayed increased rates of glucose uptake and in vitro studies showed also that they had increased lactate production and increased expression of key glycolytic enzymes. Overall, our results show that the activation of macrophages by IFN-γ is responsible for the Warburg effect observed in organs infected with M. avium. PMID:25807843

  16. Minocycline Transiently Reduces Microglia/Macrophage Activation but Exacerbates Cognitive Deficits Following Repetitive Traumatic Brain Injury in the Neonatal Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanlon, Lauren A.; Huh, Jimmy W.

    2016-01-01

    Elevated microglial/macrophage-associated biomarkers in the cerebrospinal fluid of infant victims of abusive head trauma (AHT) suggest that these cells play a role in the pathophysiology of the injury. In a model of AHT in 11-day-old rats, 3 impacts (24 hours apart) resulted in spatial learning and memory deficits and increased brain microglial/macrophage reactivity, traumatic axonal injury, neuronal degeneration, and cortical and white-matter atrophy. The antibiotic minocycline has been effective in decreasing injury-induced microglial/macrophage activation while simultaneously attenuating cellular and functional deficits in models of neonatal hypoxic ischemia, but the potential for this compound to rescue deficits after impact-based trauma to the immature brain remains unexplored. Acute minocycline administration in this model of AHT decreased microglial/macrophage reactivity in the corpus callosum of brain-injured animals at 3 days postinjury, but this effect was lost by 7 days postinjury. Additionally, minocycline treatment had no effect on traumatic axonal injury, neurodegeneration, tissue atrophy, or spatial learning deficits. Interestingly, minocycline-treated animals demonstrated exacerbated injury-induced spatial memory deficits. These results contrast with previous findings in other models of brain injury and suggest that minocycline is ineffective in reducing microglial/macrophage activation and ameliorating injury-induced deficits following repetitive neonatal traumatic brain injury. PMID:26825312

  17. Activation of M1 macrophages in sepsis-induced acute kidney injury in response to heparin-binding protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xing

    Full Text Available In the early stage of sepsis, M1 macrophages result in the production of inflammatory mediators and AKI. Heparin-binding protein (HBP have been shown to play important roles in sepsis-induced AKI. In this study, we investigate the association of HBP with M1 macrophages in sepsis-induced AKI.Male C57BL6 mice were subjected to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP or sham surgery. Biochemical and histological renal damage was assessed. Macrophage infiltration was assessed by immunohistochemistry. RT-PCR was used to investigate the expression of heparin-binding protein (HBP, the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and arginase 1 (Arg-1 mRNAs. Western blots were performed to assay the tissue levels of HBP, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α and interleukin-6 (IL-6.High levels of HBP were obviously detected 24 h after sepsis-induced AKI. Heparin inhibited HBP expression during sepsis-induced AKI. The suppression of HBP expression by heparin injection after the establishment of sepsis-induced AKI resulted in a reduction in renal injury severity accompanied with a significant repression of M1 macrophage activation and expression of TNF-α and IL-6.HBP plays an important role in the initial inflammatory reaction associated with sepsis-induced AKI, presumably by activating M1 macrophages and suppressing TNF-α and IL-6 secretion.

  18. Immunotherapy of metastatic colorectal cancer with vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage-activating factor, GcMAF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Nobuto; Suyama, Hirofumi; Nakazato, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki; Koga, Yoshihiko

    2008-07-01

    Serum vitamin D binding protein (Gc protein) is the precursor for the principal macrophage-activating factor (MAF). The MAF precursor activity of serum Gc protein of colorectal cancer patients was lost or reduced because Gc protein is deglycosylated by serum alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (Nagalase) secreted from cancerous cells. Deglycosylated Gc protein cannot be converted to MAF, leading to immunosuppression. Stepwise treatment of purified Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase generated the most potent macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) ever discovered, but it produces no side effect in humans. Macrophages treated with GcMAF (100 microg/ml) develop an enormous variation of receptors and are highly tumoricidal to a variety of cancers indiscriminately. Administration of 100 nanogram (ng)/ human maximally activates systemic macrophages that can kill cancerous cells. Since the half-life of the activated macrophages is approximately 6 days, 100 ng GcMAF was administered weekly to eight nonanemic colorectal cancer patients who had previously received tumor-resection but still carried significant amounts of metastatic tumor cells. As GcMAF therapy progressed, the MAF precursor activities of all patients increased and conversely their serum Nagalase activities decreased. Since serum Nagalase is proportional to tumor burden, serum Nagalase activity was used as a prognostic index for time course analysis of GcMAF therapy. After 32-50 weekly administrations of 100 ng GcMAF, all colorectal cancer patients exhibited healthy control levels of the serum Nagalase activity, indicating eradication of metastatic tumor cells. During 7 years after the completion of GcMAF therapy, their serum Nagalase activity did not increase, indicating no recurrence of cancer, which was also supported by the annual CT scans of these patients.

  19. Immunotherapy of HIV-infected patients with Gc protein-derived macrophage activating factor (GcMAF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Nobuto; Ushijima, Naofumi; Koga, Yoshihiko

    2009-01-01

    Serum Gc protein (known as vitamin D3-binding protein) is the precursor for the principal macrophage activating factor (MAF). The MAF precursor activity of serum Gc protein of HIV-infected patients was lost or reduced because Gc protein is deglycosylated by alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (Nagalase) secreted from HIV-infected cells. Therefore, macrophages of HIV-infected patients having deglycosylated Gc protein cannot be activated, leading to immunosuppression. Since Nagalase is the intrinsic component of the envelope protein gp120, serum Nagalase activity is the sum of enzyme activities carried by both HIV virions and envelope proteins. These Nagalase carriers were already complexed with anti-HIV immunoglobulin G (IgG) but retained Nagalase activity that is required for infectivity. Stepwise treatment of purified Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase generated the most potent macrophage activating factor (termed GcMAF), which produces no side effects in humans. Macrophages activated by administration of 100 ng GcMAF develop a large amount of Fc-receptors as well as an enormous variation of receptors that recognize IgG-bound and unbound HIV virions. Since latently HIV-infected cells are unstable and constantly release HIV virions, the activated macrophages rapidly intercept the released HIV virions to prevent reinfection resulting in exhaustion of infected cells. After less than 18 weekly administrations of 100 ng GcMAF for nonanemic patients, they exhibited low serum Nagalase activities equivalent to healthy controls, indicating eradication of HIV-infection, which was also confirmed by no infectious center formation by provirus inducing agent-treated patient PBMCs. No recurrence occurred and their healthy CD + cell counts were maintained for 7 years.

  20. P17, an Original Host Defense Peptide from Ant Venom, Promotes Antifungal Activities of Macrophages through the Induction of C-Type Lectin Receptors Dependent on LTB4-Mediated PPARγ Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaddouj Benmoussa

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite the growing knowledge with regard to the immunomodulatory properties of host defense peptides, their impact on macrophage differentiation and on its associated microbicidal functions is still poorly understood. Here, we demonstrated that the P17, a new cationic antimicrobial peptide from ant venom, induces an alternative phenotype of human monocyte-derived macrophages (h-MDMs. This phenotype is characterized by a C-type lectin receptors (CLRs signature composed of mannose receptor (MR and Dectin-1 expression. Concomitantly, this activation is associated to an inflammatory profile characterized by reactive oxygen species (ROS, interleukin (IL-1β, and TNF-α release. P17-activated h-MDMs exhibit an improved capacity to recognize and to engulf Candida albicans through the overexpression both of MR and Dectin-1. This upregulation requires arachidonic acid (AA mobilization and the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ nuclear receptor through the leukotriene B4 (LTB4 production. AA/LTB4/PPARγ/Dectin-1-MR signaling pathway is crucial for P17-mediated anti-fungal activity of h-MDMs, as indicated by the fact that the activation of this axis by P17 triggered ROS production and inflammasome-dependent IL-1β release. Moreover, we showed that the increased anti-fungal immune response of h-MDMs by P17 was dependent on intracellular calcium mobilization triggered by the interaction of P17 with pertussis toxin-sensitive G-protein-coupled receptors on h-MDMs. Finally, we also demonstrated that P17-treated mice infected with C. albicans develop less severe gastrointestinal infection related to a higher efficiency of their macrophages to engulf Candida, to produce ROS and IL-1β and to kill the yeasts. Altogether, these results identify P17 as an original activator of the fungicidal response of macrophages that acts upstream PPARγ/CLRs axis and offer new immunomodulatory therapeutic perspectives in the field of

  1. An incomplete TCA cycle increases survival of Salmonella Typhimurium during infection of resting and activated murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, Steven D; Ramachandran, Vinoy K; Knudsen, Gitte M; Hinton, Jay C D; Thompson, Arthur

    2010-11-08

    In comparison to the comprehensive analyses performed on virulence gene expression, regulation and action, the intracellular metabolism of Salmonella during infection is a relatively under-studied area. We investigated the role of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle in the intracellular replication of Salmonella Typhimurium in resting and activated macrophages, epithelial cells, and during infection of mice. We constructed deletion mutations of 5 TCA cycle genes in S. Typhimurium including gltA, mdh, sdhCDAB, sucAB, and sucCD. We found that the mutants exhibited increased net intracellular replication in resting and activated murine macrophages compared to the wild-type. In contrast, an epithelial cell infection model showed that the S. Typhimurium ΔsucCD and ΔgltA strains had reduced net intracellular replication compared to the wild-type. The glyoxylate shunt was not responsible for the net increased replication of the TCA cycle mutants within resting macrophages. We also confirmed that, in a murine infection model, the S. Typhimurium ΔsucAB and ΔsucCD strains are attenuated for virulence. Our results suggest that disruption of the TCA cycle increases the ability of S. Typhimurium to survive within resting and activated murine macrophages. In contrast, epithelial cells are non-phagocytic cells and unlike macrophages cannot mount an oxidative and nitrosative defence response against pathogens; our results show that in HeLa cells the S. Typhimurium TCA cycle mutant strains show reduced or no change in intracellular levels compared to the wild-type. The attenuation of the S. Typhimurium ΔsucAB and ΔsucCD mutants in mice, compared to their increased net intracellular replication in resting and activated macrophages suggest that Salmonella may encounter environments within the host where a complete TCA cycle is advantageous.

  2. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ Induces the Expression of Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor-1 (TFPI-1 in Human Macrophages

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    G. Chinetti-Gbaguidi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tissue factor (TF is the initiator of the blood coagulation cascade after interaction with the activated factor VII (FVIIa. Moreover, the TF/FVIIa complex also activates intracellular signalling pathways leading to the production of inflammatory cytokines. The TF/FVIIa complex is inhibited by the tissue factor pathway inhibitor-1 (TFPI-1. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ is a transcription factor that, together with PPARα and PPARβ/δ, controls macrophage functions. However, whether PPARγ activation modulates the expression of TFP1-1 in human macrophages is not known. Here we report that PPARγ activation increases the expression of TFPI-1 in human macrophages in vitro as well as in vivo in circulating peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The induction of TFPI-1 expression by PPARγ ligands, an effect shared by the activation of PPARα and PPARβ/δ, occurs also in proinflammatory M1 and in anti-inflammatory M2 polarized macrophages. As a functional consequence, treatment with PPARγ ligands significantly reduces the inflammatory response induced by FVIIa, as measured by variations in the IL-8, MMP-2, and MCP-1 expression. These data identify a novel role for PPARγ in the control of TF the pathway.

  3. MicroRNA-365 in macrophages regulates Mycobacterium tuberculosis-induced active pulmonary tuberculosis via interleukin-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qingzhang; Li, Hui; Shao, Hua; Li, Chunling; Lu, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    The present study is to investigate the relationship between microRNA (miR)-365 expression and the levels of interleukin (IL)-6 mRNA and protein in patients with active tuberculosis. From June 2011 to June 2014, 48 patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis induced by Mycobacterium tuberculosis were included in the study. In addition, 23 healthy subjects were enrolled as control. Macrophages were collected by pulmonary alveolus lavage. In addition, serum and mononuclear cells were isolated from peripheral blood. The levels of miR-365 and IL-6 in macrophages, mononuclear cells and serum were determined using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The protein expression of IL-6 in macrophages and mononuclear cells was measured using Western blotting, while that in serum was detected by enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay. Expression of IL-6 mRNA and protein was significantly enhanced in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis. Increase of IL-6 protein concentration in serum was probably due to the release of IL-6 protein from mononuclear cells in the blood. In addition, miR-365 levels were significantly lowered in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis. Up-regulated IL-6 expression in macrophages, mononuclear cells and serum in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis is related to the down-regulation of miR-365, suggesting that miR-365 may regulate the occurrence and immune responses of active pulmonary tuberculosis via IL-6.

  4. Extracts of Crinum latifolium inhibit the cell viability of mouse lymphoma cell line EL4 and induce activation of anti-tumour activity of macrophages in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hoang-Yen T; Vo, Bach-Hue T; Nguyen, Lac-Thuy H; Bernad, Jose; Alaeddine, Mohamad; Coste, Agnes; Reybier, Karine; Pipy, Bernard; Nepveu, Françoise

    2013-08-26

    Crinum latifolium L. (CL) leaf extracts have been traditionally used in Vietnam and are now used all over the world for the treatment of prostate cancer. However, the precise cellular mechanisms of the action of CL extracts remain unclear. To examine the effects of CL samples on the anti-tumour activity of peritoneal murine macrophages. The properties of three extracts (aqueous, flavonoid, alkaloid), one fraction (alkaloid), and one pure compound (6-hydroxycrinamidine) obtained from CL, were studied (i) for redox capacities (DPPH and bleaching beta-carotene assays), (ii) on murine peritoneal macrophages (MTT assay) and on lymphoma EL4-luc2 cells (luciferine assay) for cytotoxicity, (iii) on macrophage polarization (production of ROS and gene expression by PCR), and (iv) on the tumoricidal functions of murine peritoneal macrophages (lymphoma cytotoxicity by co-culture with syngeneic macrophages). The total flavonoid extract with a high antioxidant activity (IC50=107.36 mg/L, DPPH assay) showed an inhibitory action on cancer cells. Alkaloid extracts inhibited the proliferation of lymphoma cells either by directly acting on tumour cells or by activating of the tumoricidal functions of syngeneic macrophages. The aqueous extract induced mRNA expression of tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) indicating differentiation of macrophages into pro-inflammatory M1 polarized macrophages. The total flavonoid, alkaloid extracts and an alkaloid fraction induced the expression of the formyl peptide receptor (FPR) on the surface of the polarized macrophages that could lead to the activation of macrophages towards the M1 phenotype. Aqueous and flavonoid extracts enhanced NADPH quinine oxido-reductase 1 (NQO1) mRNA expression in polarized macrophages which could play an important role in cancer chemoprevention. All the samples studied were non-toxic to normal living cells and the pure alkaloid tested, 6-hydroxycrinamidine, was not

  5. Anti-inflammatory Potential of Petiveria alliacea on Activated RAW264.7 Murine Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Rosa Martha Perez; Hoyo-Vadillo, Carlos

    2017-07-01

    Defense and protection to multiple harmful stimuli are the inflammation, when is self-amplified and uncontrolled is the basis of the pathogenesis of a wide variety of inflammatory illness. The aim of this study was to evaluate if Petiveria alliacea could attenuate inflammation in a murine model of RAW264 macrophages the involved model and its involved mechanism. The ethanol extract from P. alliacea was precipitated with water and supernatant was used for this study (PW). The anti-inflammatory effects of PW were investigated through evaluating of the production of several cytokines, chemokines, and expression of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages. Also was determined the ability to decrease the oxidative stress in RAW264.7 cells with carboxy-2',7'-dichloro-dihydro-fluorescein diacetate. PW significantly suppress the secretion of prostaglandin E 2 , leukotriene C 4 , interleukin (IL)-1 β, IL-6, IL-10, interferon gamma nitric oxide (NO), inducible NO synthase, IL-1 β, IL-4, in RAW264.7 cells in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, PW also markedly inhibited the transcriptional activity of NF-κB. PW produced significant anti-inflammatory activity through inhibiting the production of inflammatory mediators through the NF-κB inactivation in the LPS-stimulated RAW24.7 cells. PW exerts significant antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities, and this effect can be attributed in part, to the presence of dibenzyl disulfide, dibenzyl trisulfide pinitol, coumarin, myricetin, glutamyl-S-benzyl cysteine, and petiveriins A and B. Treatment with ethanol extract from Petiveria alliacea which was previously precipitated with water and supernatant (PE) was tested in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. PE suppressed the level of oxidative stress and the induction of proinflammatory mediators, as PGE2, LTC4, IL-1 ß, IL-6, IL-10, IFN- NO, iNOS, IL-1 ß, IL-4, in RAW264.7 macrophages through NF-B inactivation. These findings

  6. Lineage-specific enhancers activate self-renewal genes in macrophages and embryonic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Soucie, E.L.; Weng, Z.; Geirsdottir, L.; Molawi, K.; Maurizio, J.; Fenouil, R.; Mossadegh-Keller, N.; Gimenez, G.; VanHille, L.; Beniazza, M.; Favret, J.; Berruyer, C.; Perrin, P.; Hacohen, N.; Andrau, J.C.

    2016-01-01

    Differentiated macrophages can self-renew in tissues and expand long-term in culture, but the gene regulatory mechanisms that accomplish self-renewal in the differentiated state have remained unknown. Here we show that in mice, the transcription factors MafB and c-Maf repress a macrophage-specific enhancer repertoire associated with a gene network controlling self-renewal. Single cell analysis revealed that, in vivo, proliferating resident macrophages can access this network by transient down...

  7. Macrophages inhibit human osteosarcoma cell growth after activation with the bacterial cell wall derivative liposomal muramyl tripeptide in combination with interferon-γ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahl, Jens H W; Kwappenberg, Kitty M C; Varypataki, Eleni M; Santos, Susy J; Kuijjer, Marieke L; Mohamed, Susan; Wijnen, Juul T; van Tol, Maarten J D; Cleton-Jansen, Anne-Marie; Egeler, R Maarten; Jiskoot, Wim; Lankester, Arjan C; Schilham, Marco W

    2014-03-10

    In osteosarcoma, the presence of tumor-infiltrating macrophages positively correlates with patient survival in contrast to the negative effect of tumor-associated macrophages in patients with other tumors. Liposome-encapsulated muramyl tripeptide (L-MTP-PE) has been introduced in the treatment of osteosarcoma patients, which may enhance the potential anti-tumor activity of macrophages. Direct anti-tumor activity of human macrophages against human osteosarcoma cells has not been described so far. Hence, we assessed osteosarcoma cell growth after co-culture with human macrophages. Monocyte-derived M1-like and M2-like macrophages were polarized with LPS + IFN-γ, L-MTP-PE +/- IFN-γ or IL-10 and incubated with osteosarcoma cells. Two days later, viable tumor cell numbers were analyzed. Antibody-dependent effects were investigated using the therapeutic anti-EGFR antibody cetuximab. M1-like macrophages inhibited osteosarcoma cell growth when activated with LPS + IFN-γ. Likewise, stimulation of M1-like macrophages with liposomal muramyl tripeptide (L-MTP-PE) inhibited tumor growth, but only when combined with IFN-γ. Addition of the tumor-reactive anti-EGFR antibody cetuximab did not further improve the anti-tumor activity of activated M1-like macrophages. The inhibition was mediated by supernatants of activated M1-like macrophages, containing TNF-α and IL-1β. However, specific blockage of these cytokines, nitric oxide or reactive oxygen species did not inhibit the anti-tumor effect, suggesting the involvement of other soluble factors released upon macrophage activation. While LPS + IFN-γ-activated M2-like macrophages had low anti-tumor activity, IL-10-polarized M2-like macrophages were able to reduce osteosarcoma cell growth in the presence of the anti-EGFR cetuximab involving antibody-dependent tumor cell phagocytosis. This study demonstrates that human macrophages can be induced to exert direct anti-tumor activity against osteosarcoma cells. Our

  8. Circulating macrophage activation markers, CD163 and CD206, are associated with disease severity and treatment response in patients with autoimmune hepatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbæk, Henning; Kazankov, Konstantin; Jessen, Niels

    Circulating macrophage activation markers, CD163 and CD206, are associated with disease severity and treatment response in patients with autoimmune hepatitis......Circulating macrophage activation markers, CD163 and CD206, are associated with disease severity and treatment response in patients with autoimmune hepatitis...

  9. Macrophage biospecific extraction and HPLC-ESI-MSn analysis for screening immunological active components in Smilacis Glabrae Rhizoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhao-Guang; Duan, Ting-Ting; He, Bao; Tang, Dan; Jia, Xiao-Bin; Wang, Ru-Shang; Zhu, Jia-Xiao; Xu, You-Hua; Zhu, Quan; Feng, Liang

    2013-04-15

    A cell-permeable membrane, as typified by Transwell insert Permeable Supports, permit accurate repeatable invasion assays, has been developed as a tool for screening immunological active components in Smilacis Glabrae Rhizoma (SGR). In this research, components in the water extract of SGR (ESGR) might conjugate with the receptors or other targets on macrophages which invaded Transwell inserts, and then the eluate which contained components biospecific binding to macrophages was identified by HPLC-ESI-MS(n) analysis. Six compounds, which could interact with macrophages, were detected and identified. Among these compounds, taxifolin (2) and astilbin (4) were identified by comparing with the chromatography of standards, while the four others including 5-O-caffeoylshikimic acid (1), neoastilbin (3), neoisoastilbin (5) and isoastilbin (6), were elucidated by their structure clearage characterizations of tandem mass spectrometry. Then compound 1 was isolated and purified from SGR, along with 2 and 4, was applied to the macrophage migration and adhesion assay in HUVEC (Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells) -macrophages co-incultured Transwell system for immunological activity assessment. The results showed that compounds 1, 2 and 4 with concentration of 5μM (H), 500nM (M) and 50nM (L) could remarkably inhibit the macrophage migration and adhesion (Vs AGEs (Advanced Glycation End Produces) group, 1-L, 2-H and 4-L groups: pgroups: pESI-MS(n) analysis is a rapid, simple and reliable method for screening immunological active components from Traditional Chinese Medicine. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Activation of MMPs in Macrophages by Mycobacterium tuberculosis via the miR-223-BMAL1 Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Jun; Wang, Yongli; Zhang, Zhimin; Qiu, Weiqiang

    2017-12-01

    An interaction between Mycobacterium tuberculosis and macrophages constitutes an essential step in tuberculosis development, as macrophages exert both positive and negative effects on M. tuberculosis-triggered organ lesions. In this study, we focused on the regulation of the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), which is responsible for lung matrix degradation and bacteria dissection, in macrophages following M. tuberculosis infection. Female BALB/c mice were intravenously injected with the M. tuberculosis strain H37Rv at 0 h zeitgeber time (ZT0) or 12 h zeitgeber time (ZT12). The expression and activity of MMP-1, -2, -3, and -9 in lungs and spleens were then evaluated. In vitro, peritoneal macrophages were harvested at ZT0 or at ZT12 and infected with 10 MOI M. tuberculosis. The expression of MMPs, microRNA-223 and BMAL1 was analyzed by qRT-PCR and/or Western blot. The binding of BMAL1 3'-UTR by miR-223 was confirmed by luciferase activity assay. Additionally, wild-type BMAL1 or NLS mut BMAL1 plasmids were transfected to evaluate the effect of BMAL1 on MMPs. The results showed a differential expression of MMPs in mice tissues infected at different times. M. tuberculosis infection caused enhanced MMP-1, -9, and miR-223 expression, with inhibited BMAL1 expression. MiR-223 modulated BMAL1 expression via the direct binding of BMAL1 3'-UTR. Furthermore, wild-type BMAL1 other than NLS mut BMAL1 attenuated MMPs expression in M. tuberculosis-infected macrophages. Overall, this study demonstrated a potential involvement of circadian rhythm in MMP activation by M. tuberculosis in macrophages. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 4804-4812, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Curcumin ameliorates macrophage infiltration by inhibiting NF-κB activation and proinflammatory cytokines in streptozotocin induced-diabetic nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzuki Kenji

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic inflammation plays an important role in the progression of diabetic nephropathy (DN and that the infiltration of macrophages in glomerulus has been implicated in the development of glomerular injury. We hypothesized that the plant polyphenolic compound curcumin, which is known to exert potent anti-inflammatory effect, would ameliorate macrophage infiltration in streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetic rats. Methods Diabetes was induced with STZ (55 mg/kg by intraperitoneal injection in rats. Three weeks after STZ injection, rats were divided into three groups, namely, control, diabetic, and diabetic treated with curcumin at 100 mg/kg/day, p.o., for 8 weeks. The rats were sacrificed 11 weeks after induction of diabetes. The excised kidney was used to assess macrophage infiltration and expression of various inflammatory markers. Results At 11 weeks after STZ injection, diabetic rats exhibited renal dysfunction, as evidenced by reduced creatinine clearance, increased blood glucose, blood urea nitrogen and proteinuria, along with marked reduction in the body weight. All of these abnormalities were significantly reversed by curcumin. Hyperglycemia induced the degradation of IκBα and NF-κB activation and as a result increased infiltration of macrophages (52% as well as increased proinflammatory cytokines: TNF-α and IL-1β. Curcumin treatment significantly reduced macrophage infiltration in the kidneys of diabetic rats, suppressed the expression of above proinflammatory cytokines and degradation of IκBα. In addition, curcumin treatment also markedly decreased ICAM-1, MCP-1 and TGF-β1 protein expression. Moreover, at nuclear level curcumin inhibited the NF-κB activity. Conclusion Our results suggested that curcumin treatment protect against the development of DN in rats by reducing macrophage infiltration through the inhibition of NF-κB activation in STZ-induced diabetic rats.

  12. Omega-3 free fatty acids suppress macrophage inflammasome activation by inhibiting NF-κB activation and enhancing autophagy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Williams-Bey

    Full Text Available The omega-3 (ω3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA can suppress inflammation, specifically IL-1β production through poorly understood molecular mechanisms. Here, we show that DHA reduces macrophage IL-1β production by limiting inflammasome activation. Exposure to DHA reduced IL-1β production by ligands that stimulate the NLRP3, AIM2, and NAIP5/NLRC4 inflammasomes. The inhibition required Free Fatty Acid Receptor (FFAR 4 (also known as GPR120, a G-protein coupled receptor (GPR known to bind DHA. The exposure of cells to DHA recruited the adapter protein β-arrestin1/2 to FFAR4, but not to a related lipid receptor. DHA treatment reduced the initial inflammasome priming step by suppressing the nuclear translocation of NF-κB. DHA also reduced IL-1β levels by enhancing autophagy in the cells. As a consequence macrophages derived from mice lacking the essential autophagy protein ATG7 were partially resistant to suppressive effects of DHA. Thus, DHA suppresses inflammasome activation by two distinct mechanisms, inhibiting the initial priming step and by augmenting autophagy, which limits inflammasome activity.

  13. Activation of macrophages for microbicidal and tumoricidal effector functions by soluble factors from EL-4, a continuous T cell line.

    OpenAIRE

    Nacy, C A; James, S L; Benjamin, W R; Farrar, J J; Hockmeyer, W T; Meltzer, M S

    1983-01-01

    Macrophages treated with culture fluids from EL-4 cells, a continuous T cell line, were activated to kill mKSA-TU-5 fibrosarcoma cells, amastigotes of Leishmania tropica, and schistosomula of Schistosoma mansoni. Active EL-4 factors eluted from Sephadex G-100 in two distinct regions: molecular weight 45,000 (activities induced killing of unrelated intracellular and extracellular targets) and molecular weight 23,000 (activities induced killing of extracellular targets only). These results conf...

  14. Identification and Biological Activity of Synthetic Macrophage Inducible C-Type Lectin Ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chriselle D. Braganza

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The macrophage inducible C-type lectin (Mincle is a pattern recognition receptor able to recognize both damage-associated and pathogen-associated molecular patterns, and in this respect, there has been much interest in determining the scope of ligands that bind Mincle and how structural modifications to these ligands influence ensuing immune responses. In this review, we will present Mincle ligands of known chemical structure, with a focus on ligands that have been synthetically prepared, such as trehalose glycolipids, glycerol-based ligands, and 6-acylated glucose and mannose derivatives. The ability of the different classes of ligands to influence the innate, and consequently, the adaptive, immune response will be described, and where appropriate, structure–activity relationships within each class of Mincle ligands will be presented.

  15. The glycosylation and characterization of the candidate Gc macrophage activating factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravnsborg, Tina; Olsen, Dorthe T; Thysen, Anna Hammerich

    2010-01-01

    The vitamin D binding protein, Gc globulin, has in recent years received some attention for its role as precursor for the extremely potent macrophage activating factor (GcMAF). An O-linked trisaccharide has been allocated to the threonine residue at position 420 in two of the three most common...... isoforms of Gc globulin (Gc1s and Gc1f). A substitution for a lysine residue at position 420 in Gc2 prevents this isoform from being glycosylated at that position. It has been suggested that Gc globulin subjected sequentially to sialidase and galactosidase treatment generates GcMAF in the form of Gc...... globulin with only a single GalNAc attached to T420. In this study we confirm the location of a linear trisaccharide on T420. Furthermore, we provide the first structural evidence of the generation of the proposed GcMAF by use of glycosidase treatment and mass spectrometry. Additionally the generated GcMAF...

  16. Mast cell granules modulate alveolar macrophage respiratory-burst activity and eicosanoid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, M J; Despot, J; Lemanske, R F

    1990-10-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AMs) and mast cells reside in the airway, and both have been demonstrated to contribute independently to allergic inflammatory responses through the generation of respiratory-burst metabolites and the release of biologically active mediators, respectively. Since mast cell granules (MCGs) contain mediators that could potentially interact with the AM respiratory burst, we investigated the effects of isolated MCGs on this important inflammatory pathway of the AM. MCGs and AMs were obtained by peritoneal and tracheoalveolar lavage, respectively, of Sprague-Dawley rats. First, the overall respiratory-burst activity was measured by luminal-enhanced chemiluminescence (CL), and second, the individual oxygen species contributing to CL (superoxide anion [O2-], hydrogen peroxide [H2O2], and hypochlorous acid) were measured. MCGs alone enhanced AM CL responses to an equivalent degree compared to zymosan-stimulated AMs. However, AMs preincubated with MCGs followed by zymosan stimulation significantly and synergistically enhanced the CL responses. This enhanced CL was not due to an increased production of O2-, H2O2, or hypochlorous acid; in fact, there were decreased measured amounts of O2- and H2O2 from zymosan-stimulated AMs in the presence of MCGs, most likely caused by the content of granules of superoxide dismutase and peroxidase, respectively. The lipoxygenase inhibitor, nordihydroguaiaretic acid, completely abolished the enhanced CL of AM preincubated with MCGs and subsequently stimulated by zymosan, but O2- production was not affected by nordihydroguaiaretic acid. Taken together, these results suggest that derivatives of arachidonic acid metabolism, most likely those of the lipoxygenase pathway, are responsible for the enhanced AM CL response observed in the presence of MCGs. Thus, mast cell-macrophage interactions may be important within the airway in enhancing the generation of mediators that contribute to tissue inflammation and bronchospasm.

  17. Role of tumor necrosis factor in macrophage leishmanicidal activity in vitro and resistance to cutaneous leishmaniasis in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodos, C M; Povinelli, L; Molina, R; Sherry, B; Titus, R G

    1991-01-01

    Recombinant human tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and purified murine TNF were both able to activate macrophages to destroy intracellular Leishmania major in vitro. In addition, parasitizing macrophages with L. major markedly increased the ability of the cells to produce TNF. Finally, when mice were vaccinated with an avirulent form of L. major, the animals produced large amounts of TNF but no gamma interferon in response to infection with virulent L. major. Treating these mice with a neutralizing anti-TNF antibody led to partial but not complete inhibition of the resistant state, which suggests that factors other than TNF and gamma interferon contribute to resistance to L. major. PMID:1906844

  18. A Yersinia effector with enhanced inhibitory activity on the NF-κB pathway activates the NLRP3/ASC/caspase-1 inflammasome in macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Zheng

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A type III secretion system (T3SS in pathogenic Yersinia species functions to translocate Yop effectors, which modulate cytokine production and regulate cell death in macrophages. Distinct pathways of T3SS-dependent cell death and caspase-1 activation occur in Yersinia-infected macrophages. One pathway of cell death and caspase-1 activation in macrophages requires the effector YopJ. YopJ is an acetyltransferase that inactivates MAPK kinases and IKKβ to cause TLR4-dependent apoptosis in naïve macrophages. A YopJ isoform in Y. pestis KIM (YopJ(KIM has two amino acid substitutions, F177L and K206E, not present in YopJ proteins of Y. pseudotuberculosis and Y. pestis CO92. As compared to other YopJ isoforms, YopJ(KIM causes increased apoptosis, caspase-1 activation, and secretion of IL-1β in Yersinia-infected macrophages. The molecular basis for increased apoptosis and activation of caspase-1 by YopJ(KIM in Yersinia-infected macrophages was studied. Site directed mutagenesis showed that the F177L and K206E substitutions in YopJ(KIM were important for enhanced apoptosis, caspase-1 activation, and IL-1β secretion. As compared to YopJ(CO92, YopJ(KIM displayed an enhanced capacity to inhibit phosphorylation of IκB-α in macrophages and to bind IKKβ in vitro. YopJ(KIM also showed a moderately increased ability to inhibit phosphorylation of MAPKs. Increased caspase-1 cleavage and IL-1β secretion occurred in IKKβ-deficient macrophages infected with Y. pestis expressing YopJ(CO92, confirming that the NF-κB pathway can negatively regulate inflammasome activation. K+ efflux, NLRP3 and ASC were important for secretion of IL-1β in response to Y. pestis KIM infection as shown using macrophages lacking inflammasome components or by the addition of exogenous KCl. These data show that caspase-1 is activated in naïve macrophages in response to infection with a pathogen that inhibits IKKβ and MAPK kinases and induces TLR4-dependent apoptosis. This pro

  19. Effect of Vibrio cholerae neuraminidase on the mitogen response of T lymphocytes. I. Enhancement of macrophage T-lymphocyte cooperation in concanavalin-A-induced lymphocyte activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knop, J

    1980-12-01

    Vibrio cholerae neuraminidase (VCN) enhances the immune response of lymphocytes in various systems, such as antigen- and mitogen-induced blastogenesis, mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) and tumor-cell response. We used macrophage-depleted and reconstituted murine lymph-node T-cells to investigate the effect of VCN on macrophage-T-lymphocyte co-operation in Con-A-induced lymphocyte activation. In unfractionated lymph-node cells VCN enhanced the Con-A-induced lymphocyte activation as measured by 3H-thymidine (3H-dThd) incorporation. Removing macrophages from the cells resulted in a significantly diminished response. In addition the enhancing effect of VCN was greatly reduced. Reconstitution of the lymphocyte cultures with macrophages in increasing numbers and from various sources rstored the lymphocyte response and the enhancing effect of VCN. VCN proved to be most efficient in cultures reconstituted with normal peritoneal macrophages. Some effect was also observed using bone-marrow-derived (BM) macrophages. However, higher numbers of normal PE macrophages in the presence of VCN inhibited lymphocyte activation, and inhibition by thioglycollate-broth-induced macrophages was considerably increased by VCN. These results suggest that VCN acts by increasing the efficiency of macrophage-T lymphocyte interaction.

  20. 64Cu-DOTATATE PET/MRI for detection of activated macrophages in carotid atherosclerotic plaques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Sune Folke; Sandholt, Benjamin Vikjær; Keller, Sune Høgild

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A feature of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques of the carotid artery is high activity and abundance of lesion macrophages. There is consensus that this is of importance for plaque vulnerability, which may lead to clinical events, such as stroke and transient ischemic attack. We used p...

  1. Triamcinolone acetonide activates an anti-inflammatory and folate receptor-positive macrophage that prevents osteophytosis in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Siebelt (Michiel); N. Korthagen (Nicoline); W. Wei (Wu); H.C. Groen (Harald); Y.M. Bastiaansen-Jenniskens (Yvonne); C. Müller (Cristina); J.H. Waarsing (Jan); M. de Jong (Marcel); H.H. Weinans (Harrie)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Triamcinolone acetonide (TA) is used for osteoarthritis management to reduce pain, and pre-clinical studies have shown that TA limits osteophyte formation. Osteophyte formation is known to be facilitated by synovial macrophage activation. TA injections might influence

  2. Endometriosis, a disease of the macrophage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa eCapobianco

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Endometriosis, a common cause of pelvic pain and female infertility, depends on the growth of vascularised endometrial tissue at ectopic sites. Endometrial fragments reach the peritoneal cavity during the fertile years: local cues decide whether they yield endometriotic lesions. Macrophages are recruited at sites of hypoxia and tissue stress, where they clear cell debris and heme-iron and generate pro-life and pro-angiogenesis signals. Macrophages are abundant in endometriotic lesions, where are recruited and undergo alternative activation. In rodents macrophages are required for lesions to establish and to grow; bone-marrow derived Tie-2 expressing macrophages specifically contribute to lesions neovasculature, possibly because they concur to the recruitment of circulating endothelial progenitors, and sustain their survival and the integrity of the vessel wall. Macrophages sense cues (hypoxia, cell death, iron overload in the lesions and react delivering signals to restore the local homeostasis: their action represents a necessary, non-redundant step in the natural history of the disease. Endometriosis may be due to a misperception of macrophages about ectopic endometrial tissue. They perceive it as a wound, they activate programs leading to ectopic cell survival and tissue vascularization. Clearing this misperception is a critical area for the development of novel medical treatments of endometriosis, an urgent and unmet medical need.

  3. Arctigenin Induces an Activation Response in Porcine Alveolar Macrophage Through TLR6-NOX2-MAPKs Signaling Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zheng; Chang, Lingling; Du, Qian; Huang, Yong; Zhang, Xiujuan; Wu, Xingchen; Zhang, Jie; Li, Ruizhen; Zhang, Zelin; Zhang, Wenlong; Zhao, Xiaomin; Tong, Dewen

    2018-01-01

    Arctigenin (ARG), one of the most active ingredients abstracted from seeds of Arctium lappa L., has been proved to exert promising biological activities such as immunomodulatory, anti-viral, and anti-cancer etc. However, the mechanism behind its immunomodulatory function still remains elusive to be further investigated. In this study, we found that ARG had no significant effects on the cell proliferation in both porcine alveolar macrophage cell line (3D4/21) and primary porcine derived alveolar macrophage. It remarkably increased the expression and secretion of the two cytokines including tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-β1) in a dose-dependent manner with the concomitant enhancement of phagocytosis, which are the indicators of macrophage activation. ARG also elevated the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by activating NOX2-based NADPH oxidase. Furthermore, inhibition of ROS generation by diphenyliodonium and apocynin significantly suppressed ARG-induced cytokine secretion and phagocytosis increase, indicating the requirement of ROS for the porcine alveolar macrophage activation. In addition, TLR6-My88 excitation, p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 phosphorylation were all involved in the process. As blocking TLR6 receptor dramatically attenuated the NOX2 oxidase activation, cytokine secretion and phagocytosis increase. Inhibiting ROS generation almost abolished p38 and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, and the cytokine secretion could also be remarkably reduced by p38 and ERK1/2 inhibitors (SB203580 and UO126). Our finding gave a new insight of understanding that ARG could improve the immune-function of porcine alveolar macrophages through TLR6-NOX2 oxidase-MAPKs signaling pathway.

  4. Arctigenin Induces an Activation Response in Porcine Alveolar Macrophage Through TLR6-NOX2-MAPKs Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Lu

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Arctigenin (ARG, one of the most active ingredients abstracted from seeds of Arctium lappa L., has been proved to exert promising biological activities such as immunomodulatory, anti-viral, and anti-cancer etc. However, the mechanism behind its immunomodulatory function still remains elusive to be further investigated. In this study, we found that ARG had no significant effects on the cell proliferation in both porcine alveolar macrophage cell line (3D4/21 and primary porcine derived alveolar macrophage. It remarkably increased the expression and secretion of the two cytokines including tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α and transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-β1 in a dose-dependent manner with the concomitant enhancement of phagocytosis, which are the indicators of macrophage activation. ARG also elevated the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS production by activating NOX2-based NADPH oxidase. Furthermore, inhibition of ROS generation by diphenyliodonium and apocynin significantly suppressed ARG-induced cytokine secretion and phagocytosis increase, indicating the requirement of ROS for the porcine alveolar macrophage activation. In addition, TLR6-My88 excitation, p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 phosphorylation were all involved in the process. As blocking TLR6 receptor dramatically attenuated the NOX2 oxidase activation, cytokine secretion and phagocytosis increase. Inhibiting ROS generation almost abolished p38 and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, and the cytokine secretion could also be remarkably reduced by p38 and ERK1/2 inhibitors (SB203580 and UO126. Our finding gave a new insight of understanding that ARG could improve the immune-function of porcine alveolar macrophages through TLR6-NOX2 oxidase-MAPKs signaling pathway.

  5. Arctigenin Induces an Activation Response in Porcine Alveolar Macrophage Through TLR6-NOX2-MAPKs Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zheng; Chang, Lingling; Du, Qian; Huang, Yong; Zhang, Xiujuan; Wu, Xingchen; Zhang, Jie; Li, Ruizhen; Zhang, Zelin; Zhang, Wenlong; Zhao, Xiaomin; Tong, Dewen

    2018-01-01

    Arctigenin (ARG), one of the most active ingredients abstracted from seeds of Arctium lappa L. , has been proved to exert promising biological activities such as immunomodulatory, anti-viral, and anti-cancer etc. However, the mechanism behind its immunomodulatory function still remains elusive to be further investigated. In this study, we found that ARG had no significant effects on the cell proliferation in both porcine alveolar macrophage cell line (3D4/21) and primary porcine derived alveolar macrophage. It remarkably increased the expression and secretion of the two cytokines including tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-β1) in a dose-dependent manner with the concomitant enhancement of phagocytosis, which are the indicators of macrophage activation. ARG also elevated the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by activating NOX2-based NADPH oxidase. Furthermore, inhibition of ROS generation by diphenyliodonium and apocynin significantly suppressed ARG-induced cytokine secretion and phagocytosis increase, indicating the requirement of ROS for the porcine alveolar macrophage activation. In addition, TLR6-My88 excitation, p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 phosphorylation were all involved in the process. As blocking TLR6 receptor dramatically attenuated the NOX2 oxidase activation, cytokine secretion and phagocytosis increase. Inhibiting ROS generation almost abolished p38 and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, and the cytokine secretion could also be remarkably reduced by p38 and ERK1/2 inhibitors (SB203580 and UO126). Our finding gave a new insight of understanding that ARG could improve the immune-function of porcine alveolar macrophages through TLR6-NOX2 oxidase-MAPKs signaling pathway.

  6. Dual role of YM1+ M2 macrophages in allergic lung inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Draijer, Christina; Robbe, Patricia; Boorsma, Carian E; Hylkema, Machteld N; Melgert, Barbro N

    2018-01-01

    Alternatively activated (M2 or YM1+) macrophages have been associated with the development of asthma but their contribution to disease initiation and progression remains unclear. To assess the therapeutic potential of modulating these M2 macrophages, we have studied inhibition of M2 polarisation

  7. Vorinostat Modulates the Imbalance of T Cell Subsets, Suppresses Macrophage Activity, and Ameliorates Experimental Autoimmune Uveoretinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Sijie; Meng, Xiangda; Zhang, Zhuhong; Wang, Yang; Liu, Yuanyuan; You, Caiyun; Yan, Hua

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory efficiency of vorinostat, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, in experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU). EAU was induced in female C57BL/6J mice immunized with interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein peptide. Vorinostat or the control treatment, phosphate-buffered saline, was administrated orally from 3 days before immunization until euthanasia at day 21 after immunization. The clinical and histopathological scores of mice were graded, and the integrity of the blood-retinal barrier was examined by Evans blue staining. T helper cell subsets were measured by flow cytometry, and the macrophage functions were evaluated with immunohistochemistry staining and immunofluorescence assays. The mRNA levels of tight junction proteins were measured by qRT-PCR. The expression levels of intraocular cytokines and transcription factors were examined by western blotting. Vorinostat relieved both clinical and histopathological manifestations of EAU in our mouse model, and the BRB integrity was maintained in vorinostat-treated mice, which had less vasculature leakage and higher mRNA and protein expressions of tight junction proteins than controls. Moreover, vorinostat repressed Th1 and Th17 cells and increased Th0 and Treg cells. Additionally, the INF-γ and IL-17A expression levels were significantly decreased, while the IL-10 level was increased by vorinostat treatment. Furthermore, due to the reduced TNF-α level, the macrophage activity was considerably inhibited in EAU mice. Finally, transcription factors, including STAT1, STAT3, and p65, were greatly suppressed by vorinostat treatment. Our data suggest that vorinostat might be a potential anti-inflammatory agent in the management of uveitis and other autoimmune inflammatory diseases.

  8. Placental Growth Factor Contributes to Liver Inflammation, Angiogenesis, Fibrosis in Mice by Promoting Hepatic Macrophage Recruitment and Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Li

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Placental growth factor (PlGF, a member of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF family, mediates wound healing and inflammatory responses, exerting an effect on liver fibrosis and angiogenesis; however, the precise mechanism remains unclear. The aims of this study are to identify the role of PlGF in liver inflammation and fibrosis induced by bile duct ligation (BDL in mice and to reveal the underlying molecular mechanism. PlGF small interfering RNA (siRNA or non-targeting control siRNA was injected by tail vein starting 2 days after BDL. Liver inflammation, fibrosis, angiogenesis, macrophage infiltration, and hepatic stellate cells (HSCs activation were examined. Our results showed that PlGF was highly expressed in fibrotic livers and mainly distributed in activated HSCs and macrophages. Furthermore, PlGF silencing strongly reduced the severity of liver inflammation and fibrosis, and inhibited the activation of HSCs. Remarkably, PlGF silencing also attenuated BDL-induced hepatic angiogenesis, as evidenced by attenuated liver endothelial cell markers CD31 and von Willebrand factor immunostaining and genes or protein expression. Interestingly, these pathological ameliorations by PlGF silencing were due to a marked reduction in the numbers of intrahepatic F4/80+, CD68+, and Ly6C+ cell populations, which were reflected by a lower expression of these macrophage marker molecules in fibrotic livers. In addition, knockdown of PlGF by siRNA inhibited macrophages activation and substantially suppressed the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in fibrotic livers. Mechanistically, evaluation of cultured RAW 264.7 cells revealed that VEGF receptor 1 (VEGFR1 mainly involved in mediating the role of PlGF in macrophages recruitment and activation, since using VEGFR1 neutralizing antibody blocking PlGF/VEGFR1 signaling axis significantly inhibited macrophages migration and inflammatory responses. Together, these findings indicate

  9. GC protein-derived macrophage-activating factor decreases ?-N-acetylgalactosaminidase levels in advanced cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Thyer, Lynda; Ward, Emma; Smith, Rodney; Branca, Jacopo JV; Morucci, Gabriele; Gulisano, Massimo; Noakes, David; Eslinger, Robert; Pacini, Stefania

    2013-01-01

    ?-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (nagalase) accumulates in the serum of cancer patients and its activity correlates with tumor burden, aggressiveness and clinical disease progression. The administration of GC protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) to cancer patients with elevated levels of nagalase has been associated with a decrease of serum nagalase activity and with significant clinical benefits. Here, we report the results of the administration of GcMAF to a heterogeneous cohort ...

  10. Soluble CD163, a product of monocyte/macrophage activation, is inversely associated with haemoglobin levels in placental malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Lin Lin Chua

    Full Text Available In Plasmodium falciparum malaria, activation of monocytes and macrophages (monocytes/macrophages can result in the production of various inflammatory mediators that contribute to immunopathology. Soluble CD163 (sCD163 is a specific marker of monocyte/macrophage activation typically found at increased levels during various inflammatory conditions and can be associated with poor clinical outcomes. To better understand the relationships between levels of sCD163 and clinical parameters in women with placental malaria, we measured plasma sCD163 levels in maternal peripheral and placental blood compartments at delivery and determined their correlations with birth weight and maternal haemoglobin concentrations. sCD163 levels were negatively correlated with birth weight only in the placental compartment (r = -0.145, p = 0.03 and were inversely correlated with maternal haemoglobin concentrations, both in peripheral blood (r = -0.238, p = 0.0004 and in placental blood (r = -0.259, p = 0.0001. These inverse relationships suggest a potential role for monocyte/macrophage activation in the pathogenesis of malaria in pregnancy, particularly in relation to malaria-associated anaemia.

  11. Krill Oil-In-Water Emulsion Protects against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Proinflammatory Activation of Macrophages In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaterra, Gabriel A; Driscoll, David; Schwarzbach, Hans; Kinscherf, Ralf

    2017-03-15

    Parenteral nutrition is often a mandatory therapeutic strategy for cases of septicemia. Likewise, therapeutic application of anti-oxidants, anti-inflammatory therapy, and endotoxin lowering, by removal or inactivation, might be beneficial to ameliorate the systemic inflammatory response during the acute phases of critical illness. Concerning anti-inflammatory properties in this setting, omega-3 fatty acids of marine origin have been frequently described. This study investigated the anti-inflammatory and LPS-inactivating properties of krill oil (KO)-in-water emulsion in human macrophages in vitro. Differentiated THP-1 macrophages were activated using specific ultrapure-LPS that binds only on the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in order to determine the inhibitory properties of the KO emulsion on the LPS-binding capacity, and the subsequent release of TNF-α. KO emulsion inhibited the macrophage binding of LPS to the TLR4 by 50% (at 12.5 µg/mL) and 75% (at 25 µg/mL), whereas, at 50 µg/mL, completely abolished the LPS binding. Moreover, KO (12.5 µg/mL, 25 µg/mL, or 50 µg/mL) also inhibited (30%, 40%, or 75%, respectively) the TNF-α release after activation with 0.01 µg/mL LPS in comparison with LPS treatment alone. KO emulsion influences the LPS-induced pro-inflammatory activation of macrophages, possibly due to inactivation of the LPS binding capacity.

  12. Interaction with extracellular matrix proteins influences Lsh/Ity/Bcg (candidate Nramp) gene regulation of macrophage priming/activation for tumour necrosis factor-alpha and nitrite release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formica, S; Roach, T I; Blackwell, J M

    1994-05-01

    The murine resistance gene Lsh/Ity/Bcg regulates activation of macrophages for tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)-dependent production of nitric oxide mediating antimicrobial activity against Leishmania, Salmonella and Mycobacterium. As Lsh is differentially expressed in macrophages from different tissue sites, experiments were performed to determine whether interaction with extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins would influence the macrophage TNF-alpha response. Plating of bone marrow-derived macrophages onto purified fibrinogen or fibronectin-rich L929 cell-derived matrices, but not onto mannan, was itself sufficient to stimulate TNF-alpha release, with significantly higher levels released from congenic B10.L-Lshr compared to C57BL/10ScSn (Lshs) macrophages. Only macrophages plated onto fibrinogen also released measurable levels of nitrites, again higher in Lshr compared to Lshs macrophages. Addition of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), but not bacterial lipopolysaccharide or mycobacterial lipoarabinomannan, as a second signal enhanced the TNF-alpha and nitrite responses of macrophages plated onto fibrinogen, particularly in the Lshr macrophages. Interaction with fibrinogen and fibronectin also primed macrophages for an enhanced TNF-alpha response to leishmanial parasites, but this was only translated into enhanced nitrite responses in the presence of IFN-gamma. In these experiments, Lshr macrophages remained superior in their TNF-alpha responses throughout, but to a degree which reflected the magnitude of the difference observed on ECM alone. Hence, the specificity for the enhanced TNF-alpha responses of Lshr macrophages lay in their interaction with fibrinogen and fibronectin ECM, while a differential nitrite response was only observed with fibrinogen and/or IFN-gamma. The results are discussed in relation to the possible function of the recently cloned candidate gene Nramp, which has structural identity to eukaryote transporters and an N-terminal cytoplasmic

  13. IL-15 protects NKT cells from inhibition by tumor-associated macrophages and enhances antimetastatic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Daofeng; Song, Liping; Wei, Jie; Courtney, Amy N.; Gao, Xiuhua; Marinova, Ekaterina; Guo, Linjie; Heczey, Andras; Asgharzadeh, Shahab; Kim, Eugene; Dotti, Gianpietro; Metelitsa, Leonid S.

    2012-01-01

    Vα24-invariant NKT cells inhibit tumor growth by targeting tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). Tumor progression therefore requires that TAMs evade NKT cell activity through yet-unknown mechanisms. Here we report that a subset of cells in neuroblastoma (NB) cell lines and primary tumors expresses membrane-bound TNF-α (mbTNF-α). These proinflammatory tumor cells induced production of the chemokine CCL20 from TAMs via activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway, an effect that was amplified in hypoxia. Flow cytometry analyses of human primary NB tumors revealed selective accumulation of CCL20 in TAMs. Neutralization of the chemokine inhibited in vitro migration of NKT cells toward tumor-conditioned hypoxic monocytes and localization of NKT cells to NB grafts in mice. We also found that hypoxia impaired NKT cell viability and function. Thus, CCL20-producing TAMs served as a hypoxic trap for tumor-infiltrating NKT cells. IL-15 protected antigen-activated NKT cells from hypoxia, and transgenic expression of IL-15 in adoptively transferred NKT cells dramatically enhanced their antimetastatic activity in mice. Thus, tumor-induced chemokine production in hypoxic TAMs and consequent chemoattraction and inhibition of NKT cells represents a mechanism of immune escape that can be reversed by adoptive immunotherapy with IL-15–transduced NKT cells. PMID:22565311

  14. IL-15 protects NKT cells from inhibition by tumor-associated macrophages and enhances antimetastatic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Daofeng; Song, Liping; Wei, Jie; Courtney, Amy N; Gao, Xiuhua; Marinova, Ekaterina; Guo, Linjie; Heczey, Andras; Asgharzadeh, Shahab; Kim, Eugene; Dotti, Gianpietro; Metelitsa, Leonid S

    2012-06-01

    Vα24-invariant NKT cells inhibit tumor growth by targeting tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). Tumor progression therefore requires that TAMs evade NKT cell activity through yet-unknown mechanisms. Here we report that a subset of cells in neuroblastoma (NB) cell lines and primary tumors expresses membrane-bound TNF-α (mbTNF-α). These proinflammatory tumor cells induced production of the chemokine CCL20 from TAMs via activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway, an effect that was amplified in hypoxia. Flow cytometry analyses of human primary NB tumors revealed selective accumulation of CCL20 in TAMs. Neutralization of the chemokine inhibited in vitro migration of NKT cells toward tumor-conditioned hypoxic monocytes and localization of NKT cells to NB grafts in mice. We also found that hypoxia impaired NKT cell viability and function. Thus, CCL20-producing TAMs served as a hypoxic trap for tumor-infiltrating NKT cells. IL-15 protected antigen-activated NKT cells from hypoxia, and transgenic expression of IL-15 in adoptively transferred NKT cells dramatically enhanced their antimetastatic activity in mice. Thus, tumor-induced chemokine production in hypoxic TAMs and consequent chemoattraction and inhibition of NKT cells represents a mechanism of immune escape that can be reversed by adoptive immunotherapy with IL-15-transduced NKT cells.

  15. Structural definition of a potent macrophage activating factor derived from vitamin D3-binding protein with adjuvant activity for antibody production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, N

    1996-10-01

    Incubation of human vitamin D3-binding protein (Gc protein), with a mixture of immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase, efficiently generated a potent macrophage activating factor, a protein with N-acetylgalactosamine as the remaining sugar. Stepwise incubation of Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase, and isolation of the intermediates with immobilized lectins, revealed that either sequence of hydrolysis of Gc glycoprotein by these glycosidases yields the macrophage-activating factor, implying that Gc protein carries a trisaccharide composed of N-acetylgalactosamine and dibranched galactose and sialic acid termini. A 3 hr incubation of mouse peritoneal macrophages with picomolar amounts of the enzymatically generated macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) resulted in a greatly enhanced phagocytic activity. Administration of a minute amount (10-50 pg/mouse) of GcMAF resulted in a seven- to nine-fold enhanced phagocytic activity of macrophages. Injection of sheep red blood cells (SRBC) along with GcMAF into mice produced a large number of anti-SRBC antibody secreting splenic cells in 2-4 days.

  16. Immunomodulatory effect of Parsley (Petroselinum crispum) essential oil on immune cells: mitogen-activated splenocytes and peritoneal macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousofi, Alireza; Daneshmandi, Saeed; Soleimani, Neda; Bagheri, Kambiz; Karimi, Mohammad Hossein

    2012-04-01

    Parsley (Petroselinum crispum) has been traditionally used for the treatment of allergy, autoimmune and chronic inflammatory disorders. The present study aims to investigate the suppressive effects of parsley essential oil on mouse splenocytes and macrophages cells. Parsley essential oil was harvested. It was treated on splenocytes and phytohemagglutinin (PHA) (5 μg/mL) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (10 μg/mL) activated splenocytes in different concentrations (0.01-100 μg/mL); then, proliferation was assayed by methyl tetrazolium (MTT) method. Treatment was also performed on the macrophages and LPS-stimulated macrophages (10 μg/ml) and the nitrite levels were measured using the diazotization method based on the Griess reaction and MTT assay for evaluation of the viability of the macrophages. Proliferation of splenocytes in all the treated groups was suppressed. In PHA-stimulated splenocytes, the suppression was seen in all the examined concentrations (0.01-100 μg/mL), while in the unstimulated and LPS-stimulated groups suppression was relatively dose dependent and in high concentration (10 and100 μg/mL).The viability of the macrophages in all groups was the same and in the unstimulated groups; NO suppression was significant in all the concentrations but in LPS-stimulated groups, it was significant in the three higher concentrations (1, 10, and100 μg/mL). The results of this study indicate that parsley essential oil may be able to suppress the cellular and humoral immune response. It can also suppress both NO production and the functions of macrophages as the main innate immune cells. These results may suggest that parsley essential oil is a proper suppressant for different applications.

  17. THP-1 monocytes but not macrophages as a potential alternative for CD34+ dendritic cells to identify chemical skin sensitizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambrechts, Nathalie; Verstraelen, Sandra; Lodewyckx, Hanne; Felicio, Ana; Hooyberghs, Jef; Witters, Hilda; Tendeloo, Viggo van; Cauwenberge, Paul van; Nelissen, Inge; Heuvel, Rosette van den; Schoeters, Greet

    2009-01-01

    Early detection of the sensitizing potential of chemicals is an emerging issue for chemical, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. In our institute, an in vitro classification model for prediction of chemical-induced skin sensitization based on gene expression signatures in human CD34 + progenitor-derived dendritic cells (DC) has been developed. This primary cell model is able to closely mimic the induction phase of sensitization by Langerhans cells in the skin, but it has drawbacks, such as the availability of cord blood. The aim of this study was to investigate whether human in vitro cultured THP-1 monocytes or macrophages display a similar expression profile for 13 predictive gene markers previously identified in DC and whether they also possess a discriminating capacity towards skin sensitizers and non-sensitizers based on these marker genes. To this end, the cell models were exposed to 5 skin sensitizers (ammonium hexachloroplatinate IV, 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, eugenol, para-phenylenediamine, and tetramethylthiuram disulfide) and 5 non-sensitizers (L-glutamic acid, methyl salicylate, sodium dodecyl sulfate, tributyltin chloride, and zinc sulfate) for 6, 10, and 24 h, and mRNA expression of the 13 genes was analyzed using real-time RT-PCR. The transcriptional response of 7 out of 13 genes in THP-1 monocytes was significantly correlated with DC, whereas only 2 out of 13 genes in THP-1 macrophages. After a cross-validation of a discriminant analysis of the gene expression profiles in the THP-1 monocytes, this cell model demonstrated to also have a capacity to distinguish skin sensitizers from non-sensitizers. However, the DC model was superior to the monocyte model for discrimination of (non-)sensitizing chemicals.

  18. NFAT5-Regulated Macrophage Polarization Supports the Proinflammatory Function of Macrophages and T Lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellechea, Mónica; Buxadé, Maria; Tejedor, Sonia; Aramburu, Jose; López-Rodríguez, Cristina

    2018-01-01

    Macrophages are exquisite sensors of tissue homeostasis that can rapidly switch between pro- and anti-inflammatory or regulatory modes to respond to perturbations in their microenvironment. This functional plasticity involves a precise orchestration of gene expression patterns whose transcriptional regulators have not been fully characterized. We had previously identified the transcription factor NFAT5 as an activator of TLR-induced responses, and in this study we explore its contribution to macrophage functions in different polarization settings. We found that both in classically and alternatively polarized macrophages, NFAT5 enhanced functions associated with a proinflammatory profile such as bactericidal capacity and the ability to promote Th1 polarization over Th2 responses. In this regard, NFAT5 upregulated the Th1-stimulatory cytokine IL-12 in classically activated macrophages, whereas in alternatively polarized ones it enhanced the expression of the pro-Th1 mediators Fizz-1 and arginase 1, indicating that it could promote proinflammatory readiness by regulating independent genes in differently polarized macrophages. Finally, adoptive transfer assays in vivo revealed a reduced antitumor capacity in NFAT5-deficient macrophages against syngeneic Lewis lung carcinoma and ID8 ovarian carcinoma cells, a defect that in the ID8 model was associated with a reduced accumulation of effector CD8 T cells at the tumor site. Altogether, detailed analysis of the effect of NFAT5 in pro- and anti-inflammatory macrophages uncovered its ability to regulate distinct genes under both polarization modes and revealed its predominant role in promoting proinflammatory macrophage functions. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  19. Immunotherapy for Prostate Cancer with Gc Protein-Derived Macrophage-Activating Factor, GcMAF1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Nobuto; Suyama, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki

    2008-01-01

    Serum Gc protein (known as vitamin D3-binding protein) is the precursor for the principal macrophage-activating factor (MAF). The MAF precursor activity of serum Gc protein of prostate cancer patients was lost or reduced because Gc protein was deglycosylated by serum α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (Nagalase) secreted from cancerous cells. Therefore, macrophages of prostate cancer patients having deglycosylated Gc protein cannot be activated, leading to immunosuppression. Stepwise treatment of purified Gc protein with immobilized β-galactosidase and sialidase generated the most potent MAF (termed GcMAF) ever discovered, which produces no adverse effect in humans. Macrophages activated by GcMAF develop a considerable variation of receptors that recognize the abnormality in malignant cell surface and are highly tumoricidal. Sixteen nonanemic prostate cancer patients received weekly administration of 100 ng of GcMAF. As the MAF precursor activity increased, their serum Nagalase activity decreased. Because serum Nagalase activity is proportional to tumor burden, the entire time course analysis for GcMAF therapy was monitored by measuring the serum Nagalase activity. After 14 to 25 weekly administrations of GcMAF (100 ng/week), all 16 patients had very low serum Nagalase levels equivalent to those of healthy control values, indicating that these patients are tumor-free. No recurrence occurred for 7 years. PMID:18633461

  20. Trehalose diester glycolipids are superior to the monoesters in binding to Mincle, activation of macrophages invitro and adjuvant activity invivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huber, Alexandra; Kallerup, Rie S.; Korsholm, Karen S.

    2016-01-01

    The T-cell adjuvanticity of mycobacterial cord factor trehalose 6,6'-dimycolate (TDM) is well established. The identification of the C-type lectin Mincle on innate immune cells as the receptor for TDM and its synthetic analogue trehalose 6,6'-dibehenate (TDB) has raised interest in development...... of synthetic Mincle ligands as novel adjuvants. Trehalose mono- (TMXs) and diesters (TDXs) with symmetrically shortened acyl chains [denoted by X: arachidate (A), stearate (S), palmitate (P), and myristate (M)] were tested. Upon stimulation of murine macrophages, G-CSF secretion and NO production were strongly...... activity of trehalose diesters. Overall, immune activation in vitro and in vivo by trehalose esters of simple fatty acids requires two acyl chains of length and involves Mincle....

  1. Inhibitory effects of andrographolide on activated macrophages and adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Swati; Mishra, Kamla Prasad; Singh, Shashi Bala; Ganju, Lilly

    2018-04-01

    Andrographolide, a diterpenoid lactone obtained from plant Andrographis paniculata, is used in South Asian countries to relieve various inflammatory symptoms. To study the effects of this agent, the impact of andrographolide on production of inflammatory mediators were delineated in mouse peritoneal macrophages (PMϕ). Inflammatory mediators like nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin-6 and related molecular mechanisms of andrographolide-mediated inhibition of enzymes/transcription factors were studied. In addition, the in vivo anti-inflammatory activity of andrographolide was evaluated in an adjuvant-induced arthritis rat model. The results indicated that andrographolide clearly inhibited the production of NO and TNF-α in lipopolysaccharide-activated PMϕ in a dose-related manner. Immunoblot analyses revealed that andrographolide suppressed activation of both inducible NO synthase and cyclo-oxygenase-2 by directly targeting nuclear transcription factor (NF)-κB. Complete Freund's Adjuvant-induced paw edema in rats was also significantly inhibited by andrographolide treatment. From the data, we concluded that andrographolide imparted anti-inflammatory effects by suppressing two key inflammatory enzymes and a signaling pathway that mediates expression of variety of inflammatory cytokines/agents in situ. It is plausible that eventually, after further toxicologic characterization, andrographolide might be useful as a drug for the clinical treatment of various inflammatory diseases like rheumatoid arthritis or diseases associated with joint pain.

  2. Mitofusin 2 decreases intracellular lipids in macrophages by regulating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chun; Ge, Beihai [Department of Cardiology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1095 Jiefang Avenue, Wuhan 430030 (China); He, Chao [Department of Cardiology, China Three Gorges University, Yichang 433000 (China); Zhang, Yi; Liu, Xiaowen [Department of Cardiology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1095 Jiefang Avenue, Wuhan 430030 (China); Liu, Kejian [Department of Cardiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Medical College, Shihezi University (China); Qian, Cuiping; Zhang, Yu; Peng, Wenzhong [Department of Cardiology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1095 Jiefang Avenue, Wuhan 430030 (China); Guo, Xiaomei, E-mail: xmguo@tjh.tjmu.edu.cn [Department of Cardiology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1095 Jiefang Avenue, Wuhan 430030 (China)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Mfn2 decreases cellular lipid accumulation by activating cholesterol transporters. • PPARγ is involved in the Mfn2-mediated increase of cholesterol transporter expressions. • Inactivation of ERK1/2 and p38 is involved in Mfn2-induced PPARγ expression. - Abstract: Mitofusin 2 (Mfn2) inhibits atherosclerotic plaque formation, but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. This study aims to reveal how Mfn2 functions in the atherosclerosis. Mfn2 expression was found to be significantly reduced in arterial atherosclerotic lesions of both mice and human compared with healthy counterparts. Here, we observed that Mfn2 increased cellular cholesterol transporter expression in macrophages by upregulating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ, an effect achieved at least partially by inhibiting extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) pathway. These findings provide insights into potential mechanisms of Mfn2-mediated alterations in cholesterol transporter expression, which may have significant implications for the treatment of atherosclerotic heart disease.

  3. Mitofusin 2 decreases intracellular lipids in macrophages by regulating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Chun; Ge, Beihai; He, Chao; Zhang, Yi; Liu, Xiaowen; Liu, Kejian; Qian, Cuiping; Zhang, Yu; Peng, Wenzhong; Guo, Xiaomei

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Mfn2 decreases cellular lipid accumulation by activating cholesterol transporters. • PPARγ is involved in the Mfn2-mediated increase of cholesterol transporter expressions. • Inactivation of ERK1/2 and p38 is involved in Mfn2-induced PPARγ expression. - Abstract: Mitofusin 2 (Mfn2) inhibits atherosclerotic plaque formation, but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. This study aims to reveal how Mfn2 functions in the atherosclerosis. Mfn2 expression was found to be significantly reduced in arterial atherosclerotic lesions of both mice and human compared with healthy counterparts. Here, we observed that Mfn2 increased cellular cholesterol transporter expression in macrophages by upregulating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ, an effect achieved at least partially by inhibiting extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) pathway. These findings provide insights into potential mechanisms of Mfn2-mediated alterations in cholesterol transporter expression, which may have significant implications for the treatment of atherosclerotic heart disease

  4. Immunotherapy of metastatic breast cancer patients with vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage activating factor (GcMAF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Nobuto; Suyama, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki; Ushijima, Naofumi

    2008-01-15

    Serum vitamin D3-binding protein (Gc protein) is the precursor for the principal macrophage activating factor (MAF). The MAF precursor activity of serum Gc protein of breast cancer patients was lost or reduced because Gc protein was deglycosylated by serum alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (Nagalase) secreted from cancerous cells. Patient serum Nagalase activity is proportional to tumor burden. The deglycosylated Gc protein cannot be converted to MAF, resulting in no macrophage activation and immunosuppression. Stepwise incubation of purified Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase generated probably the most potent macrophage activating factor (termed GcMAF) ever discovered, which produces no adverse effect in humans. Macrophages treated in vitro with GcMAF (100 pg/ml) are highly tumoricidal to mammary adenocarcinomas. Efficacy of GcMAF for treatment of metastatic breast cancer was investigated with 16 nonanemic patients who received weekly administration of GcMAF (100 ng). As GcMAF therapy progresses, the MAF precursor activity of patient Gc protein increased with a concomitant decrease in serum Nagalase. Because of proportionality of serum Nagalase activity to tumor burden, the time course progress of GcMAF therapy was assessed by serum Nagalase activity as a prognostic index. These patients had the initial Nagalase activities ranging from 2.32 to 6.28 nmole/min/mg protein. After about 16-22 administrations (approximately 3.5-5 months) of GcMAF, these patients had insignificantly low serum enzyme levels equivalent to healthy control enzyme levels, ranging from 0.38 to 0.63 nmole/min/mg protein, indicating eradication of the tumors. This therapeutic procedure resulted in no recurrence for more than 4 years. Copyright 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Activity Therapy: An Alternative Therapy for Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottman, Terry T.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the benefits of activity therapy for preteens and adolescents, where the client is engaged in nonverbal modes of relationship--games, free play, movement, drama, music, art or other activities, as the chief therapeutic media in which conflicts are resolved and intellectual and emotional energies freed. Reviews the literature, describes…

  6. Chemical Composition and Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Ethanolic Extract of Brazilian Green Propolis on Activated J774A.1 Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewelina Szliszka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the chemical composition and anti-inflammatory effect of ethanolic extract of Brazilian green propolis (EEP-B on LPS + IFN-γ or PMA stimulated J774A.1 macrophages. The identification and quantification of phenolic compounds in green propolis extract were performed using HPLC-DAD and UPLC-Q-TOF-MS methods. The cell viability was evaluated by MTT and LDH assays. The radical scavenging ability was determined using DPPH• and ABTS•+. ROS and RNS generation was analyzed by chemiluminescence. NO concentration was detected by the Griess reaction. The release of various cytokines by activated J774A.1 cells was measured in the culture supernatants using a multiplex bead array system based on xMAP technology. Artepillin C, kaempferide, and their derivatives were the main phenolics found in green propolis. At the tested concentrations, the EEP-B did not decrease the cell viability and did not cause the cytotoxicity. EEP-B exerted strong antioxidant activity and significantly inhibited the production of ROS, RNS, NO, cytokine IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6, IL-12p40, IL-13, TNF-α, G-CSF, GM-CSF, MCP-1, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, and RANTES in stimulated J774A.1 macrophages. Our findings provide new insights for understanding the anti-inflammatory mechanism of action of Brazilian green propolis extract and support its application in complementary and alternative medicine.

  7. Unique proteomic signatures distinguish macrophages and dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lev Becker

    Full Text Available Monocytes differentiate into heterogeneous populations of tissue macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs that regulate inflammation and immunity. Identifying specific populations of myeloid cells in vivo is problematic, however, because only a limited number of proteins have been used to assign cellular phenotype. Using mass spectrometry and bone marrow-derived cells, we provided a global view of the proteomes of M-CSF-derived macrophages, classically and alternatively activated macrophages, and GM-CSF-derived DCs. Remarkably, the expression levels of half the plasma membrane proteins differed significantly in the various populations of cells derived in vitro. Moreover, the membrane proteomes of macrophages and DCs were more distinct than those of classically and alternatively activated macrophages. Hierarchical cluster and dual statistical analyses demonstrated that each cell type exhibited a robust proteomic signature that was unique. To interrogate the phenotype of myeloid cells in vivo, we subjected elicited peritoneal macrophages harvested from wild-type and GM-CSF-deficient mice to mass spectrometric and functional analysis. Unexpectedly, we found that peritoneal macrophages exhibited many features of the DCs generated in vitro. These findings demonstrate that global analysis of the membrane proteome can help define immune cell phenotypes in vivo.

  8. Macrophages in synovial inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aisling eKennedy

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available AbstractSynovial macrophages are one of the resident cell types in synovial tissue and while they remain relatively quiescent in the healthy joint, they become activated in the inflamed joint and, along with infiltrating monocytes/macrophages, regulate secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and enzymes involved in driving the inflammatory response and joint destruction. Synovial macrophages are positioned throughout the sub-lining layer and lining layer at the cartilage-pannus junction and mediate articular destruction. Sub-lining macrophages are now also considered as the most reliable biomarker for disease severity and response to therapy in rheumatoid arthritis (RA. There is a growing understanding of the molecular drivers of inflammation and an appreciation that the resolution of inflammation is an active process rather than a passive return to homeostasis, and this has implications for our understanding of the role of macrophages in inflammation. Macrophage phenotype determines the cytokine secretion profile and tissue destruction capabilities of these cells. Whereas inflammatory synovial macrophages have not yet been classified into one phenotype or another it is widely known that TNFα and IL-l, characteristically released by M1 macrophages, are abundant in RA while IL-10 activity, characteristic of M2 macrophages, is somewhat diminished.Here we will briefly review our current understanding of macrophages and macrophage polarisation in RA as well as the elements implicated in controlling polarisation, such as cytokines and transcription factors like NFκB, IRFs and NR4A, and pro-resolving factors, such as LXA4 and other lipid mediators which may promote a non-inflammatory, pro-resolving phenotype and may represent a novel therapeutic paradigm.

  9. Study of possible changes brought about by plutonium oxide in the acid phosphatase activity of alveolar macrophages of the rabbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouvroy, Huguette

    1970-06-01

    This report describes the various techniques used for determining the acid phosphatase activity of alveolar rabbit macrophages after inhalation of radioactive plutonium oxide particles, exposure of the animals, removal and sampling of the alveolar cells, and technical dosage. The results obtained are presented; they do not make it possible, in this particular case, to affirm that an important change in the enzymatic activity studied occurs. (author) [fr

  10. Arctigenin Induces an Activation Response in Porcine Alveolar Macrophage Through TLR6-NOX2-MAPKs Signaling Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng Lu; Lingling Chang; Qian Du; Yong Huang; Xiujuan Zhang; Xingchen Wu; Jie Zhang; Ruizhen Li; Zelin Zhang; Wenlong Zhang; Xiaomin Zhao; Dewen Tong

    2018-01-01

    Arctigenin (ARG), one of the most active ingredients abstracted from seeds of Arctium lappa L., has been proved to exert promising biological activities such as immunomodulatory, anti-viral, and anti-cancer etc. However, the mechanism behind its immunomodulatory function still remains elusive to be further investigated. In this study, we found that ARG had no significant effects on the cell proliferation in both porcine alveolar macrophage cell line (3D4/21) and primary porcine derived alveol...

  11. Cocaine promotes oxidative stress and microglial-macrophage activation in rat cerebellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa M López-Pedrajas

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Different mechanisms have been suggested for cocaine neurotoxicity, including oxidative stress alterations. Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB, considered a sensor of oxidative stress and inflammation, is involved in drug toxicity and addiction. NF-κB is a key mediator for immune responses that induces microglial/macrophage activation under inflammatory processes and neuronal injury/degeneration. Although cerebellum is commonly associated to motor control, muscular tone and balance. Its relation with addiction is getting relevance, being associated to compulsive and perseverative behaviors. Some reports indicate that cerebellar microglial activation induced by cannabis or ethanol, promote cerebellar alterations and these alterations could be associated to addictive-related behaviors. After considering the effects of some drugs on cerebellum, the aim of the present work analyzes pro-inflammatory changes after cocaine exposure. Rats received daily 15 mg/kg cocaine i.p. for 18 days. Reduced and oxidized forms of glutathione (GSH and GSSG, glutathione peroxidase (GPx activity and glutamate were determined in cerebellar homogenates. NF-κB activity, CD68 and GFAP expression were determined.Cerebellar GPx activity and GSH/GSSG ratio are significantly decreased after cocaine exposure. A significant increase of glutamate concentration is also observed. Interestingly, increased NF-κB activity is also accompanied by an increased expression of the lysosomal mononuclear phagocytic marker ED1 without GFAP alterations.Current trends in addiction biology are focusing on the role of cerebellum on addictive behaviors. Cocaine-induced cerebellar changes described herein fit with previosus data showing cerebellar alterations on addict subjects and support the proposed role of cerebelum in addiction.

  12. Cell Elasticity Determines Macrophage Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Naimish R.; Bole, Medhavi; Chen, Cheng; Hardin, Charles C.; Kho, Alvin T.; Mih, Justin; Deng, Linhong; Butler, James; Tschumperlin, Daniel; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.; Krishnan, Ramaswamy; Koziel, Henry

    2012-01-01

    Macrophages serve to maintain organ homeostasis in response to challenges from injury, inflammation, malignancy, particulate exposure, or infection. Until now, receptor ligation has been understood as being the central mechanism that regulates macrophage function. Using macrophages of different origins and species, we report that macrophage elasticity is a major determinant of innate macrophage function. Macrophage elasticity is modulated not only by classical biologic activators such as LPS and IFN-γ, but to an equal extent by substrate rigidity and substrate stretch. Macrophage elasticity is dependent upon actin polymerization and small rhoGTPase activation, but functional effects of elasticity are not predicted by examination of gene expression profiles alone. Taken together, these data demonstrate an unanticipated role for cell elasticity as a common pathway by which mechanical and biologic factors determine macrophage function. PMID:23028423

  13. Cell elasticity determines macrophage function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naimish R Patel

    Full Text Available Macrophages serve to maintain organ homeostasis in response to challenges from injury, inflammation, malignancy, particulate exposure, or infection. Until now, receptor ligation has been understood as being the central mechanism that regulates macrophage function. Using macrophages of different origins and species, we report that macrophage elasticity is a major determinant of innate macrophage function. Macrophage elasticity is modulated not only by classical biologic activators such as LPS and IFN-γ, but to an equal extent by substrate rigidity and substrate stretch. Macrophage elasticity is dependent upon actin polymerization and small rhoGTPase activation, but functional effects of elasticity are not predicted by examination of gene expression profiles alone. Taken together, these data demonstrate an unanticipated role for cell elasticity as a common pathway by which mechanical and biologic factors determine macrophage function.

  14. Inactivation of adipose angiotensinogen reduces adipose tissue macrophages and increases metabolic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeMieux, Monique J; Ramalingam, Latha; Mynatt, Randall L; Kalupahana, Nishan S; Kim, Jung Han; Moustaïd-Moussa, Naïma

    2016-02-01

    The adipose renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has been linked to obesity-induced inflammation, though mechanisms are not completely understood. In this study, adipose-specific angiotensinogen knockout mice (Agt-KO) were generated to determine whether Agt inactivation reduces inflammation and alters the metabolic profile of the Agt-KO mice compared to wild-type (WT) littermates. Adipose tissue-specific Agt-KO mice were created using the Cre-LoxP system with both Agt-KO and WT littermates fed either a low-fat or high-fat diet to assess metabolic changes. White adipose tissue was used for gene/protein expression analyses and WAT stromal vascular cells for metabolic extracellular flux assays. No significant differences were observed in body weight or fat mass between both genotypes on either diet. However, improved glucose clearance was observed in Agt-KO compared to WT littermates, consistent with higher expression of genes involved in insulin signaling, glucose transport, and fatty acid metabolism. Furthermore, Agt inactivation reduced total macrophage infiltration in Agt-KO mice fed both diets. Lastly, stroma vascular cells from Agt-KO mice revealed higher metabolic activity compared to WT mice. These findings indicate that adipose-specific Agt inactivation leads to reduced adipose inflammation and increased glucose tolerance mediated in part via increased metabolic activity of adipose cells. © 2015 The Obesity Society.

  15. Activated alveolar macrophage and lymphocyte alveolitis in extrathoracic sarcoidosis without radiological mediastinopulmonary involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallaert, B.; Ramon, P.; Fournier, E.C.; Prin, L.; Tonnel, A.B.; Voisin, C.

    1986-01-01

    Cellular characteristics of BAL were investigated in 18 patients with proved extrathoracic sarcoidosis (that is, sarcoidosis that affected the skin, eyes, parotid glands, stomach, nose, kidneys, or meninges) without clinical or radiological mediastinopulmonary involvement. Computed tomography of the thorax was performed on five patients: four patients were normal, and one had enlarged lymph nodes (these enlargements were not detectable on the patient's chest roentgenogram). The results of pulmonary function tests were normal in all patients. The total BAL cell count did not differ significantly between controls and patients. Abnormal percentages of alveolar lymphocytes (from 18 to 87%) were noted in 15 out of 18 patients. SACE levels were normal in 15 patients. No pulmonary gallium uptake was detected. The chemiluminescence of AM's, whether spontaneous or PMA induced, was increased in five out of seven patients. The percentages of T3+ lymphocytes in sarcoidosis patients did not significantly differ from those in controls. The T4+:T8+ ratio was normal in four patients and slightly increased in one. Follow-up of patients showed that alveolar lymphocytosis is as lasting as extrathoracic involvement. Our data demonstrate increased percentages of lymphocytes and activated AM's in the BAL of patients with extrathoracic sarcoidosis. This may be due to the initial involvement of the respiratory tract in extrathoracic sarcoidosis or to the diffusion of activated macrophages and lymphocytes from an extrathoracic site into the lung

  16. Granulocyte Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor-Activated Eosinophils Promote Interleukin-23 Driven Chronic Colitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griseri, Thibault; Arnold, Isabelle C.; Pearson, Claire; Krausgruber, Thomas; Schiering, Chris; Franchini, Fanny; Schulthess, Julie; McKenzie, Brent S.; Crocker, Paul R.; Powrie, Fiona

    2015-01-01

    Summary The role of intestinal eosinophils in immune homeostasis is enigmatic and the molecular signals that drive them from protective to tissue damaging are unknown. Most commonly associated with Th2 cell-mediated diseases, we describe a role for eosinophils as crucial effectors of the interleukin-23 (IL-23)-granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) axis in colitis. Chronic intestinal inflammation was characterized by increased bone marrow eosinopoiesis and accumulation of activated intestinal eosinophils. IL-5 blockade or eosinophil depletion ameliorated colitis, implicating eosinophils in disease pathogenesis. GM-CSF was a potent activator of eosinophil effector functions and intestinal accumulation, and GM-CSF blockade inhibited chronic colitis. By contrast neutrophil accumulation was GM-CSF independent and dispensable for colitis. In addition to TNF secretion, release of eosinophil peroxidase promoted colitis identifying direct tissue-toxic mechanisms. Thus, eosinophils are key perpetrators of chronic inflammation and tissue damage in IL-23-mediated immune diseases and it suggests the GM-CSF-eosinophil axis as an attractive therapeutic target. PMID:26200014

  17. Concomitant administration of fluoxetine and amantadine modulates the activity of peritoneal macrophages of rats subjected to a forced swimming test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Adam; Rogóz, Zofia; Kubera, Marta; Nawrat, Dominika; Nalepa, Irena

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies show that administration of a non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, amantadine (AMA), potentiates the action of antidepressant drugs. Since antidepressants may modulate functioning of the immune system and activation of a pro-inflammatory response in depressive disorders is frequently reported, the aim of the present study was to examine whether a combined administration of AMA and the antidepressant, fluoxetine (FLU), to rats subsequently subjected to a forced swimming test (FST) modifies the parameters of macrophage activity, directly related to their immunomodulatory functions, i.e., arginase (ARG) activity and synthesis of nitric oxide (NO). We found that 10 mg/kg AMA and 10 mg/kg FLU, ineffective in FST for antidepressant-like activity when administered alone, increased the ARG/NO ratio in macrophages when administered concomitantly. This effect was accompanied by a decrease of cellular adherence. Concurrently, the basal metabolic activity of the cells measured with reduction of resazurin, and intracellular host defense as assessed by a synthesis of superoxide anion, were not affected by such antidepressive treatment. Our data indicate that co-administration of AMA and FLU decreases the pro-inflammatory properties of macrophages and causes a redirection of immune response toward anti-inflammatory activity, as one can anticipate in the case of an effective antidepressive treatment.

  18. LPS inhibits caspase 3-dependent apoptosis in RAW264.7 macrophages induced by the AMPK activator AICAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russe, Otto Quintus; Möser, Christine V.; Kynast, Katharina L.; King, Tanya S.; Olbrich, Katrin; Grösch, Sabine; Geisslinger, Gerd; Niederberger, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • AMPK-activation induces caspase 3-dependent apoptosis in macrophages. • Apoptosis is associated with decreased mTOR and increased p21 levels. • All effects can be significantly inhibited by the TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide. - Abstract: AMP-activated kinase is a cellular energy sensor which is activated in stages of increased ATP consumption. Its activation has been associated with a number of beneficial effects such as decreasing inflammatory processes and the disease progress of diabetes and obesity, respectively. Furthermore, AMPK activation has been linked with induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in cancer and vascular cells, indicating that it might have a therapeutic impact for the treatment of cancer and atherosclerosis. However, the impact of AMPK on the proliferation of macrophages, which also play a key role in the formation of atherosclerotic plaques and in inflammatory processes, has not been focused so far. We have assessed the influence of AICAR- and metformin-induced AMPK activation on cell viability of macrophages with and without inflammatory stimulation, respectively. In cells without inflammatory stimulation, we found a strong induction of caspase 3-dependent apoptosis associated with decreased mTOR levels and increased expression of p21. Interestingly, these effects could be inhibited by co-stimulation with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) but not by other proinflammatory cytokines suggesting that AICAR induces apoptosis via AMPK in a TLR4-pathway dependent manner. In conclusion, our results revealed that AMPK activation is not only associated with positive effects but might also contribute to risk factors by disturbing important features of macrophages. The fact that LPS is able to restore AMPK-associated apoptosis might indicate an important role of TLR4 agonists in preventing unfavorable cell death of immune cells

  19. LPS inhibits caspase 3-dependent apoptosis in RAW264.7 macrophages induced by the AMPK activator AICAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russe, Otto Quintus, E-mail: quintus@russe.eu; Möser, Christine V., E-mail: chmoeser@hotmail.com; Kynast, Katharina L., E-mail: katharina.kynast@googlemail.com; King, Tanya S., E-mail: tanya.sarah.king@googlemail.com; Olbrich, Katrin, E-mail: Katrin.olbrich@gmx.net; Grösch, Sabine, E-mail: groesch@em.uni-frankfurt.de; Geisslinger, Gerd, E-mail: geisslinger@em.uni-frankfurt.de; Niederberger, Ellen, E-mail: e.niederberger@em.uni-frankfurt.de

    2014-05-09

    Highlights: • AMPK-activation induces caspase 3-dependent apoptosis in macrophages. • Apoptosis is associated with decreased mTOR and increased p21 levels. • All effects can be significantly inhibited by the TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide. - Abstract: AMP-activated kinase is a cellular energy sensor which is activated in stages of increased ATP consumption. Its activation has been associated with a number of beneficial effects such as decreasing inflammatory processes and the disease progress of diabetes and obesity, respectively. Furthermore, AMPK activation has been linked with induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in cancer and vascular cells, indicating that it might have a therapeutic impact for the treatment of cancer and atherosclerosis. However, the impact of AMPK on the proliferation of macrophages, which also play a key role in the formation of atherosclerotic plaques and in inflammatory processes, has not been focused so far. We have assessed the influence of AICAR- and metformin-induced AMPK activation on cell viability of macrophages with and without inflammatory stimulation, respectively. In cells without inflammatory stimulation, we found a strong induction of caspase 3-dependent apoptosis associated with decreased mTOR levels and increased expression of p21. Interestingly, these effects could be inhibited by co-stimulation with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) but not by other proinflammatory cytokines suggesting that AICAR induces apoptosis via AMPK in a TLR4-pathway dependent manner. In conclusion, our results revealed that AMPK activation is not only associated with positive effects but might also contribute to risk factors by disturbing important features of macrophages. The fact that LPS is able to restore AMPK-associated apoptosis might indicate an important role of TLR4 agonists in preventing unfavorable cell death of immune cells.

  20. Critical role of macrophages and their activation via MyD88-NFκB signaling in lung innate immunity to Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Feng Lai

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma pneumoniae (Mp, a common cause of pneumonia, is associated with asthma; however, the mechanisms underlying this association remain unclear. We investigated the cellular immune response to Mp in mice. Intranasal inoculation with Mp elicited infiltration of the lungs with neutrophils, monocytes and macrophages. Systemic depletion of macrophages, but not neutrophils, resulted in impaired clearance of Mp from the lungs. Accumulation and activation of macrophages were decreased in the lungs of MyD88(-/- mice and clearance of Mp was impaired, indicating that MyD88 is a key signaling protein in the anti-Mp response. MyD88-dependent signaling was also required for the Mp-induced activation of NFκB, which was essential for macrophages to eliminate the microbe in vitro. Thus, MyD88-NFκB signaling in macrophages is essential for clearance of Mp from the lungs.

  1. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Interacts with the Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Delta to Induce Genes Affecting Fatty Acid Oxidation in Human Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Kemmerer

    Full Text Available AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK maintains energy homeostasis by suppressing cellular ATP-consuming processes and activating catabolic, ATP-producing pathways such as fatty acid oxidation (FAO. The transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ (PPARδ also affects fatty acid metabolism, stimulating the expression of genes involved in FAO. To question the interplay of AMPK and PPARδ in human macrophages we transduced primary human macrophages with lentiviral particles encoding for the constitutively active AMPKα1 catalytic subunit, followed by microarray expression analysis after treatment with the PPARδ agonist GW501516. Microarray analysis showed that co-activation of AMPK and PPARδ increased expression of FAO genes, which were validated by quantitative PCR. Induction of these FAO-associated genes was also observed upon infecting macrophages with an adenovirus coding for AMPKγ1 regulatory subunit carrying an activating R70Q mutation. The pharmacological AMPK activator A-769662 increased expression of several FAO genes in a PPARδ- and AMPK-dependent manner. Although GW501516 significantly increased FAO and reduced the triglyceride amount in very low density lipoproteins (VLDL-loaded foam cells, AMPK activation failed to potentiate this effect, suggesting that increased expression of fatty acid catabolic genes alone may be not sufficient to prevent macrophage lipid overload.

  2. Flavonoids inhibit myelin phagocytosis by macrophages; a structure-activity relationship study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, Jerome J. A.; de Vries, Helga E.; van der Pol, Susanne M. A.; van den Berg, Timo K.; van Tol, Eric A. F.; Dijkstra, Christine D.

    2003-01-01

    Demyelination is a characteristic hallmark of the neuro-inflammatory disease multiple sclerosis. During demyelination, macrophages phagocytose myelin and secrete inflammatory mediators that worsen the disease. Here, we investigated whether flavonoids, naturally occurring immunomodulating compounds,

  3. Effect of salivary gland adenocarcinoma cell-derived alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase on the bioactivity of macrophage activating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Takashi; Uematsu, Takashi; Yamaoka, Minoru; Furusawa, Kiyofumi

    2004-03-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the effects of alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (alpha-NaGalase) produced by human salivary gland adenocarcinoma (SGA) cells on the bioactivity of macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF). High exo-alpha-NaGalase activity was detected in the SGA cell line HSG. HSG alpha-NaGalase had both exo- and endo-enzyme activities, cleaving the Gal-GalNAc and GalNAc residues linked to Thr/Ser but not releasing the [NeuAc2-6]GalNac residue. Furthermore, GcMAF enzymatically prepared from the Gc protein enhanced the superoxide-generation capacity and phagocytic activity of monocytes/macrophages. However, GcMAF treated with purified alpha-NaGalase did not exhibit these effects. Thus, HSG possesses the capacity to produce larger quantities of alpha-NaGalase, which inactivates GcMAF produced from Gc protein, resulting in reduced phagocytic activity and superoxide-generation capacity of monocytes/macrophages. The present data strongly suggest that HSG alpha-NaGalase acts as an immunodeficiency factor in cancer patients.

  4. MicroR-146 blocks the activation of M1 macrophage by targeting signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 in hepatic schistosomiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing He

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis is a chronic disease caused by the parasite of the Schistosoma genus and is characterized by egg-induced hepatic granulomas and fibrosis. Macrophages play a central role in schistosomiasis with several studies highlighting their differentiation into M2 cells involved in the survival of infected mice through limitation of immunopathology. However, little is known regarding the mechanisms of regulating macrophage differentiation. Here, we showed that the early stage of infection by Schistosoma japonicum induced expression of type 1 T-helper-cell (Th1 cytokine, interferon-γ (IFN-γ, leading to increase in M1 cells. However, the presence of liver-trapped eggs induced the expression of Th2 cytokines including interleukin-4 (IL-4, IL-10, and IL-13 that upregulated the transcription of miR-146b by activating signal transducer and activator of transcription 3/6 (STAT3/6 that bind to the promoter of the pre-miR-146b gene. We found that the miR-146a/b was significantly upregulated in macrophages during the progression of hepatic schistosomiasis. The elevated miR-146a/b inhibited the IFN-γ-induced differentiation of macrophages to M1 cells through targeting STAT1. Our data indicate the protective roles of miR-146a/b in hepatic schistosomiasis through regulating the differentiation of macrophages into M2 cells.

  5. Molecular mechanisms of macrophage activation induced by the synergistic effects of low dose irradiation and adoptive T cell therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, Noemi

    2016-01-01

    The detection of cancerous cells by the immune system elicits spontaneous antitumour immune responses. Still, during their progression, tumours acquire characteristics that enable them to escape immune surveillance. Cancer immunotherapy aims to reverse tumour immune evasion by activating and directing the immune system against transformed tumour cells. However, the tumours' intrinsic resistance mechanisms limit the success of many immunotherapeutic approaches. The functionally and morphologically abnormal tumour vasculature forms a physical barrier and prevents the entry of tumour-reactive immune effector cells, while the immunosuppressive tumour microenvironment impairs their function. To block tumour immune evasion, therapeutic strategies are being developed that combine cancer immunotherapy with treatment modalities, such as radiotherapy, that reprogram the tumour microenvironment to increase treatment efficacies and improve clinical outcome. In various preclinical models radiotherapy was shown to enhance the efficacy of adoptive T cell therapy. Our group showed that in the RIP1-TAg5 mouse model of spontaneous insulinoma, the transfer of in vitro-activated tumour-specific T cells induces T cell infiltration and promotes long-term survival only in combination with neoadjuvant local low dose irradiation (LDI). These treatment effects were mediated by iNOS+ macrophages. In this thesis, we investigated the mechanisms underlying the improved T cell infiltration and prolonged survival upon combination therapy with adoptive T cell transfer and local LDI. We demonstrate that combination therapy leads to a normalization of the aberrant tumour vasculature and endothelial activation, an increase in intratumoural macrophages, a reduction of intratumoural myeloid derived suppressor cells and, most importantly, to tumour regression. These findings suggest that this treatment inhibits tumour immune suppression but also facilitates immune effector cell infiltration through the

  6. Molecular mechanisms of macrophage activation induced by the synergistic effects of low dose irradiation and adoptive T cell therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, Noemi

    2016-12-19

    The detection of cancerous cells by the immune system elicits spontaneous antitumour immune responses. Still, during their progression, tumours acquire characteristics that enable them to escape immune surveillance. Cancer immunotherapy aims to reverse tumour immune evasion by activating and directing the immune system against transformed tumour cells. However, the tumours' intrinsic resistance mechanisms limit the success of many immunotherapeutic approaches. The functionally and morphologically abnormal tumour vasculature forms a physical barrier and prevents the entry of tumour-reactive immune effector cells, while the immunosuppressive tumour microenvironment impairs their function. To block tumour immune evasion, therapeutic strategies are being developed that combine cancer immunotherapy with treatment modalities, such as radiotherapy, that reprogram the tumour microenvironment to increase treatment efficacies and improve clinical outcome. In various preclinical models radiotherapy was shown to enhance the efficacy of adoptive T cell therapy. Our group showed that in the RIP1-TAg5 mouse model of spontaneous insulinoma, the transfer of in vitro-activated tumour-specific T cells induces T cell infiltration and promotes long-term survival only in combination with neoadjuvant local low dose irradiation (LDI). These treatment effects were mediated by iNOS+ macrophages. In this thesis, we investigated the mechanisms underlying the improved T cell infiltration and prolonged survival upon combination therapy with adoptive T cell transfer and local LDI. We demonstrate that combination therapy leads to a normalization of the aberrant tumour vasculature and endothelial activation, an increase in intratumoural macrophages, a reduction of intratumoural myeloid derived suppressor cells and, most importantly, to tumour regression. These findings suggest that this treatment inhibits tumour immune suppression but also facilitates immune effector cell infiltration through

  7. Acrolein increases 5-lipoxygenase expression in murine macrophages through activation of ERK pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chae E; Lee, Seung J; Seo, Kyo W; Park, Hye M; Yun, Jung W; Bae, Jin U; Bae, Sun S; Kim, Chi D

    2010-05-15

    Episodic exposure to acrolein-rich pollutants has been linked to acute myocardial infarction, and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) is involved in the production of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), which destabilizes atherosclerotic plaques. Thus, the present study determined the effect of acrolein on 5-LO/leukotriene B(4) (LTB(4)) production in murine macrophages. Stimulation of J774A.1 cells with acrolein led to increased LTB(4) production in association with increased 5-LO expression. Acrolein-evoked 5-LO expression was blocked by pharmacological inhibition of the ERK pathway, but not by inhibitors for JNK and p38 MAPK pathways. In line with these results, acrolein exclusively increased the phosphorylation of ERK among these MAPK, suggesting a role for the ERK pathway in acrolein-induced 5-LO expression with subsequent production of LTB(4). Among the receptor tyrosine kinases including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and platelet derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR), acrolein-evoked ERK phosphorylation was attenuated by AG1478, an EGFR inhibitor, but not by AG1295, a PDGFR inhibitor. In addition, acrolein-evoked 5-LO expression was also inhibited by inhibition of EGFR pathway, but not by inhibition of PDGFR pathway. These observations suggest that acrolein has a profound effect on the 5-LO pathway via an EGFR-mediated activation of ERK pathway, leading to acute ischemic syndromes through the generation of LTB(4), subsequent MMP-9 production and plaque rupture.

  8. Acrolein increases 5-lipoxygenase expression in murine macrophages through activation of ERK pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chae E.; Lee, Seung J.; Seo, Kyo W.; Park, Hye M.; Yun, Jung W.; Bae, Jin U.; Bae, Sun S.; Kim, Chi D.

    2010-01-01

    Episodic exposure to acrolein-rich pollutants has been linked to acute myocardial infarction, and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) is involved in the production of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), which destabilizes atherosclerotic plaques. Thus, the present study determined the effect of acrolein on 5-LO/leukotriene B 4 (LTB 4 ) production in murine macrophages. Stimulation of J774A.1 cells with acrolein led to increased LTB 4 production in association with increased 5-LO expression. Acrolein-evoked 5-LO expression was blocked by pharmacological inhibition of the ERK pathway, but not by inhibitors for JNK and p38 MAPK pathways. In line with these results, acrolein exclusively increased the phosphorylation of ERK among these MAPK, suggesting a role for the ERK pathway in acrolein-induced 5-LO expression with subsequent production of LTB 4 . Among the receptor tyrosine kinases including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and platelet derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR), acrolein-evoked ERK phosphorylation was attenuated by AG1478, an EGFR inhibitor, but not by AG1295, a PDGFR inhibitor. In addition, acrolein-evoked 5-LO expression was also inhibited by inhibition of EGFR pathway, but not by inhibition of PDGFR pathway. These observations suggest that acrolein has a profound effect on the 5-LO pathway via an EGFR-mediated activation of ERK pathway, leading to acute ischemic syndromes through the generation of LTB 4 , subsequent MMP-9 production and plaque rupture.

  9. Biomimetic carbon monoxide delivery based on hemoglobin vesicles ameliorates acute pancreatitis in mice via the regulation of macrophage and neutrophil activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Kazuaki; Nagao, Saori; Maeda, Hitoshi; Yanagisawa, Hiroki; Sakai, Hiromi; Yamasaki, Keishi; Wakayama, Tomohiko; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Otagiri, Masaki; Maruyama, Toru

    2018-11-01

    Macrophages play a central role in various inflammatory disorders and are broadly divided into two subpopulations, M1 and M2 macrophage. In the healing process in acute inflammatory disorders, shifting the production of M1 macrophages to M2 macrophages is desirable, because M1 macrophages secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines, whilst the M2 variety secrete anti-inflammatory cytokines. Previous findings indicate that when macrophages are treated with carbon monoxide (CO), the secretion of anti-inflammatory cytokine is increased and the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines is inhibited, indicating that CO may have a potential to modulate the production of macrophages toward the M2-like phenotype. In this study, we examined the issue of whether CO targeting macrophages using a nanotechnology-based CO donor, namely CO-bound hemoglobin vesicles (CO-HbV), modulates their polarization and show therapeutic effects against inflammatory disorders. The results showed that the CO-HbV treatment polarized a macrophage cell line toward an M2-like phenotype. Furthermore, in an in vivo study using acute pancreatitis model mice as a model of an inflammatory disease, a CO-HbV treatment also tended to polarize macrophages toward an M2-like phenotype and inhibited neutrophil infiltration in the pancreas, resulting in a significant inflammation. In addition to the suppression of acute pancreatitis, CO-HbV diminished a subsequent pancreatitis-associated acute lung injury. This could be due to the inhibition of the systemic inflammation, neutrophil infiltration in the lungs and the production of HMGB-1. These findings suggest that CO-HbV exerts superior anti-inflammatory effects against inflammatory disorders via the regulation of macrophage and neutrophil activity.

  10. p62 regulates CD40-mediated NFκB activation in macrophages through interaction with TRAF6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seibold, Kristina; Ehrenschwender, Martin, E-mail: martin.ehrenschwender@ukr.de

    2015-08-14

    CD40 is a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor family. Activation-induced recruitment of adapter proteins, so-called TNF-receptor-associated factors (TRAFs) to the cytoplasmic tail of CD40 triggers signaling cascades important in the immune system, but has also been associated with excessive inflammation in diseases such as atherosclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis. Especially, pro-inflammatory nuclear factor κB (NFκB) signaling emanating from CD40-associated TRAF6 appears to be a key pathogenic driving force. Consequently, targeting the CD40-TRAF6 interaction is emerging as a promising therapeutic strategy, but the underlying molecular machinery of this signaling axis is to date poorly understood. Here, we identified the multifunctional adaptor protein p62 as a critical regulator in CD40-mediated NFκB signaling via TRAF6. CD40 activation triggered formation of a TRAF6-p62 complex. Disturbing this interaction tremendously reduced CD40-mediated NFκB signaling in macrophages, while TRAF6-independent signaling pathways remained unaffected. This highlights p62 as a potential target in hyper-inflammatory, CD40-associated pathologies. - Highlights: • CD40 activation triggers interaction of the adapter protein TRAF6 with p62. • TRAF6-p62 interaction regulates CD40-mediated NFκB signaling in macrophages. • Defective TRAF6-p62 interaction reduces CD40-mediated NFκB activation in macrophages.

  11. Activated human mast cells induce LOX-1-specific scavenger receptor expression in human monocyte-derived macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mervi Alanne-Kinnunen

    Full Text Available Activated mast cells in atherosclerotic lesions degranulate and release bioactive compounds capable of regulating atherogenesis. Here we examined the ability of activated human primary mast cells to regulate the expression of the major scavenger receptors in cultured human primary monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDMs.Components released by immunologically activated human primary mast cells induced a transient expression of lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor (LOX-1 mRNA in HMDMs, while the expression of two other scavenger receptors, MSR1 and CD36, remained unaffected. The LOX-1-inducing secretory components were identified as histamine, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β1, which exhibited a synergistic effect on LOX-1 mRNA expression. Histamine induced a transient expression of LOX-1 protein. Mast cell -induced increase in LOX-1 expression was not associated with increased uptake of oxidized LDL by the macrophages.Mast cell-derived histamine, TNF-α, and TGF-β1 act in concert to induce a transient increase in LOX-1 expression in human primary monocyte-derived macrophages. The LOX-1-inducing activity potentially endows mast cells a hitherto unrecognized role in the regulation of innate immune reactions in atherogenesis.

  12. Is chondroitin sulfate responsible for the biological effects attributed to the GC protein-derived Macrophage Activating Factor (GcMAF)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggiero, Marco; Reinwald, Heinz; Pacini, Stefania

    2016-09-01

    We hypothesize that a plasma glycosaminoglycan, chondroitin sulfate, may be responsible for the biological and clinical effects attributed to the Gc protein-derived Macrophage Activating Factor (GcMAF), a protein that is extracted from human blood. Thus, Gc protein binds chondroitin sulfate on the cell surface and such an interaction may occur also in blood, colostrum and milk. This interpretation would solve the inconsistencies encountered in explaining the effects of GcMAF in vitro and in vivo. According to our model, the Gc protein or the GcMAF bind to chondroitin sulfate both on the cell surface and in bodily fluids, and the resulting multimolecular complexes, under the form of oligomers trigger a transmembrane signal or, alternatively, are internalized and convey the signal directly to the nucleus thus eliciting the diverse biological effects observed for both GcMAF and chondroitin sulfate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Macrophage activation marker soluble CD163 and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in morbidly obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazankov, Konstantin; Tordjman, Joan; Møller, Holger Jon

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Macrophages play an important role in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Soluble CD163 (sCD163) is a specific marker of macrophage activation. We aimed to measure sCD163 in morbidly obese patients with varying degrees of NAFLD before and after bariatric surgery (BS...... (NAS), Kleiner fibrosis score, and the fatty liver inhibition of progression (FLIP) algorithm. In a subset, CD163 immunohistochemistry and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction for CD163 mRNA were performed. RESULTS: sCD163 was higher in patients with NAS ≥ 5 compared with those with NAS ...). METHODS: Demographic, clinical, and biochemical data, and plasma sCD163 measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, of 196 patients were collected preoperatively and 3, 6, and 12 months after BS leading to significant weight loss. Peroperative liver biopsies were assessed for the NAFLD Activity Score...

  14. Anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory effects of Tagetes minuta essential oil in activated macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimian, Parastoo; Kavoosi, Gholamreza; Amirghofran, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of Tagetes minuta (T. minuta) essential oil. Methods In the present study T. minuta essential oil was obtained from leaves of T. minuta via hydro-distillation and then was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The anti-oxidant capacity of T. minuta essential oil was examined by measuring reactive oxygen, reactive nitrogen species and hydrogen peroxide scavenging. The anti-inflammatory activity of T. minuta essential oil was determined through measuring NADH oxidase, inducible nitric oxide synthase and TNF-α mRNA expression in lipopolysacharide-stimulated murine macrophages using real-time PCR. Results Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis indicated that the main components in the T. minuta essential oil were dihydrotagetone (33.86%), E-ocimene (19.92%), tagetone (16.15%), cis-β-ocimene (7.94%), Z-ocimene (5.27%), limonene (3.1%) and epoxyocimene (2.03%). The T. minuta essential oil had the ability to scavenge all reactive oxygen/reactive nitrogen species radicals with IC50 12-15 µg/mL, which indicated a potent radical scavenging activity. In addition, T. minuta essential oil significantly reduced NADH oxidase, inducible nitric oxide synthaseand TNF-α mRNA expression in the cells at concentrations of 50 µg/mL, indicating a capacity of this product to potentially modulate/diminish immune responses. Conclusions T. minuta essential oil has radical scavenging and anti-inflammatory activities and could potentially be used as a safe effective source of natural anti-oxidants in therapy against oxidative damage and stress associated with some inflammatory conditions. PMID:25182441

  15. Glycan structure of Gc Protein-derived Macrophage Activating Factor as revealed by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Chad R; Rehder, Douglas S

    2016-09-15

    Disagreement exists regarding the O-glycan structure attached to human vitamin D binding protein (DBP). Previously reported evidence indicated that the O-glycan of the Gc1S allele product is the linear core 1 NeuNAc-Gal-GalNAc-Thr trisaccharide. Here, glycan structural evidence is provided from glycan linkage analysis and over 30 serial glycosidase-digestion experiments which were followed by analysis of the intact protein by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Results demonstrate that the O-glycan from the Gc1F protein is the same linear trisaccharide found on the Gc1S protein and that the hexose residue is galactose. In addition, the putative anti-cancer derivative of DBP known as Gc Protein-derived Macrophage Activating Factor (GcMAF, which is formed by the combined action of β-galactosidase and neuraminidase upon DBP) was analyzed intact by ESI-MS, revealing that the activating E. coli β-galactosidase cleaves nothing from the protein-leaving the glycan structure of active GcMAF as a Gal-GalNAc-Thr disaccharide, regardless of the order in which β-galactosidase and neuraminidase are applied. Moreover, glycosidase digestion results show that α-N-Acetylgalactosamindase (nagalase) lacks endoglycosidic function and only cleaves the DBP O-glycan once it has been trimmed down to a GalNAc-Thr monosaccharide-precluding the possibility of this enzyme removing the O-glycan trisaccharide from cancer-patient DBP in vivo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Total glucosides of paeony regulates JAK2/STAT3 activation and macrophage proliferation in diabetic rat kidneys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun; Wu, Yong-Gui; Su, Jing; Zhang, Jing-Jing; Zhang, Pei; Qi, Xiang-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Total glucosides of paeony (TGP) is the major active constituent of Paeonia lactiflora Pall., which has shown renoprotection in experimental diabetic nephropathy. Activation of Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription (JAK/STAT) is an important mechanism by which hyperglycemia contributes to renal damage. Macrophages also play an essential role in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. Herein, we investigated the ability of TGP to modulate JAK2/STAT3 activation and macrophage proliferation in rats with streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes. TGP (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg) was administered orally once a day for eight weeks. Levels of p-JAK2 and p-STAT3 were determined by Western blot analysis. Immunohistochemistry and double immunohistochemistry were used to identify p-STAT3, ED-1, PCNA/ED-1, and p-STAT3/ED-1-positive (+) cells. The elevated 24-h urinary albumin excretion rate was markedly attenuated by treatment with 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg TGP. Western blot analysis showed that the significantly increased levels of p-JAK2, p-STAT3 proteins in the kidneys of diabetic rats were significantly inhibited by 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg TGP treatment. The marked accumulation and proliferation of macrophages in diabetic kidneys were significantly inhibited by TGP treatment. ED-1+/p-STAT3+ cells were significantly increased in the kidneys from the model group but were significantly inhibited by TGP treatment. These results show that TGP significantly inhibited diabetic nephropathy progression and suggest that these protective effects are associated with the ability of TGP to inhibit the JAK2/STAT3 pathway and macrophage proliferation and action.

  17. Association of the macrophage activating factor (MAF) precursor activity with polymorphism in vitamin D-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasawa, Hideko; Sasaki, Hideyuki; Uto, Yoshihiro; Kubo, Shinichi; Hori, Hitoshi

    2004-01-01

    Serum vitamin D-binding protein (Gc protein or DBP) is a highly expressed polymorphic protein, which is a precursor of the inflammation-primed macrophage activating factor, GcMAF, by a cascade of carbohydrate processing reactions. In order to elucidate the relationship between Gc polymorphism and GcMAF precursor activity, we estimated the phagocytic ability of three homotypes of Gc protein, Gc1F-1F, Gc1S-1S and Gc2-2, through processing of their carbohydrate moiety. We performed Gc typing of human serum samples by isoelectric focusing (IEF). Gc protein from human serum was purified by affinity chromatography with 25-hydroxyvitamin D3-sepharose. A phagocytosis assay of Gc proteins, modified using beta-glycosidase and sialidase, was carried out. The Gc1F-1F phenotype was revealed to possess Galbeta1-4GalNAc linkage by the analysis of GcMAF precursor activity using beta1-4 linkage-specific galactosidase from jack bean. The GcMAF precursor activity of the Gc1F-1F phenotype was highest among three Gc homotypes. The Gc polymorphism and carbohydrate diversity of Gc protein are significant for its pleiotropic effects.

  18. Activation of PPARγ by a Natural Flavonoid Modulator, Apigenin Ameliorates Obesity-Related Inflammation Via Regulation of Macrophage Polarization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiujing Feng

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available PPARγ has emerged as a master regulator of macrophage polarization and is the molecular target of the thiazolidinedione drugs. Here we show that apigenin binds and activates PPARγ by acting as a modulator. Activation of PPARγ by apigenin blocks p65 translocation into nuclei through inhibition of p65/PPARγ complex translocation into nuclei, thereby decreasing NF-κB activation and favoringM2 macrophage polarization. In HFD and ob/ob mice, apigenin significantly reverses M1 macrophage into M2 and reduces the infiltration of inflammatory cells in liver and adipose tissues, as well as decreases the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, thereby alleviating inflammation. Strikingly, apigenin reduces liver and muscular steatosis, decreases the levels of ALT, AST, TC and TG, improving glucose resistance obviously. Unlike rosiglitazone, apigenin does not cause significant weight gain, osteoporosis et al. Our findings identify apigenin as a modulator of PPARγ and a potential lead compound for treatment of metabolic disorders.

  19. Effects of vitamin D(3)-binding protein-derived macrophage activating factor (GcMAF) on angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Shigeru; Mochizuki, Yasushi; Miyata, Yasuyoshi; Kanetake, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Nobuto

    2002-09-04

    The vitamin D(3)-binding protein (Gc protein)-derived macrophage activating factor (GcMAF) activates tumoricidal macrophages against a variety of cancers indiscriminately. We investigated whether GcMAF also acts as an antiangiogenic factor on endothelial cells. The effects of GcMAF on angiogenic growth factor-induced cell proliferation, chemotaxis, and tube formation were examined in vitro by using cultured endothelial cells (murine IBE cells, porcine PAE cells, and human umbilical vein endothelial cells [HUVECs]) and in vivo by using a mouse cornea micropocket assay. Blocking monoclonal antibodies to CD36, a receptor for the antiangiogenic factor thrombospondin-1, which is also a possible receptor for GcMAF, were used to investigate the mechanism of GcMAF action. GcMAF inhibited the endothelial cell proliferation, chemotaxis, and tube formation that were all stimulated by fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), vascular endothelial growth factor-A, or angiopoietin 2. FGF-2-induced neovascularization in murine cornea was also inhibited by GcMAF. Monoclonal antibodies against murine and human CD36 receptor blocked the antiangiogenic action of GcMAF on the angiogenic factor stimulation of endothelial cell chemotaxis. In addition to its ability to activate tumoricidal macrophages, GcMAF has direct antiangiogenic effects on endothelial cells independent of tissue origin. The antiangiogenic effects of GcMAF may be mediated through the CD36 receptor.

  20. Krill Oil-In-Water Emulsion Protects against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Proinflammatory Activation of Macrophages In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel A. Bonaterra

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Parenteral nutrition is often a mandatory therapeutic strategy for cases of septicemia. Likewise, therapeutic application of anti-oxidants, anti-inflammatory therapy, and endotoxin lowering, by removal or inactivation, might be beneficial to ameliorate the systemic inflammatory response during the acute phases of critical illness. Concerning anti-inflammatory properties in this setting, omega-3 fatty acids of marine origin have been frequently described. This study investigated the anti-inflammatory and LPS-inactivating properties of krill oil (KO-in-water emulsion in human macrophages in vitro. Materials and Methods: Differentiated THP-1 macrophages were activated using specific ultrapure-LPS that binds only on the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 in order to determine the inhibitory properties of the KO emulsion on the LPS-binding capacity, and the subsequent release of TNF-α. Results: KO emulsion inhibited the macrophage binding of LPS to the TLR4 by 50% (at 12.5 µg/mL and 75% (at 25 µg/mL, whereas, at 50 µg/mL, completely abolished the LPS binding. Moreover, KO (12.5 µg/mL, 25 µg/mL, or 50 µg/mL also inhibited (30%, 40%, or 75%, respectively the TNF-α release after activation with 0.01 µg/mL LPS in comparison with LPS treatment alone. Conclusion: KO emulsion influences the LPS-induced pro-inflammatory activation of macrophages, possibly due to inactivation of the LPS binding capacity.

  1. Periodontitis promotes the diabetic development of obese rat via miR-147 induced classical macrophage activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ran; Zeng, Guang; Wang, Shuyong; Tao, Hong; Ren, Le; Zhang, Zhe; Zhang, Qingna; Zhao, Jinxiu; Gao, Jing; Li, Daxu

    2016-10-01

    Emerging evidence has indicated the bad effect of periodontal inflammation on diabetes control. However, the exact regulatory mechanisms within the association between periodontitis and diabetic development remain unclear. This study aims to investigate the function of microRNAs in regulating periodontitis-induced inflammation in an obese rat model. Experimental periodontitis was introduced into OLETF and LETO rat. Intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test was performed to detect diabetic development. Serum cytokines levels and microRNAs expression were detected by ELISA and RT-PCR analysis respectively. And, macrophages were isolated for gain- and loss-of-function studies, to investigate the regulatory mechanism of miR-147 in periodontitis-induced inflammation. Periodontitis induced proinflammatory response with classical activated macrophages in both rats, but distinctively aggravated the impaired glucose tolerance of OLETF rat with spontaneous type 2 diabetes. Analysis for serum microRNAs expression showed the distinctive and synergistic upregulation of miR-147 with periodontitis-induced effects in rats, while further experiments demonstrated the positive regulatory mechanism of miR-147 on classical activated macrophages with overexpressed proinflammatory markers, showing M1 phenotype. This study provided new evidence for the positive effect of periodontal inflammation on diabetic development, while the regulatory mechanism of miR-147 on classical macrophage activation, was verified, and presumed to contribute to the impaired glucose tolerance aggravated by periodontitis in obese rats. Besides, this study indicated the application of miR-147 for therapeutic approach in the treatment of diabetes with periodontitis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Nitrated Fatty Acids Reverse Cigarette Smoke-Induced Alveolar Macrophage Activation and Inhibit Protease Activity via Electrophilic S-Alkylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Aravind T; Lakshmi, Sowmya P; Muchumarri, Ramamohan R; Reddy, Raju C

    2016-01-01

    Nitrated fatty acids (NFAs), endogenous products of nonenzymatic reactions of NO-derived reactive nitrogen species with unsaturated fatty acids, exhibit substantial anti-inflammatory activities. They are both reversible electrophiles and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) agonists, but the physiological implications of their electrophilic activity are poorly understood. We tested their effects on inflammatory and emphysema-related biomarkers in alveolar macrophages (AMs) of smoke-exposed mice. NFA (10-nitro-oleic acid or 12-nitrolinoleic acid) treatment downregulated expression and activity of the inflammatory transcription factor NF-κB while upregulating those of PPARγ. It also downregulated production of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines and of the protease cathepsin S (Cat S), a key mediator of emphysematous septal destruction. Cat S downregulation was accompanied by decreased AM elastolytic activity, a major mechanism of septal destruction. NFAs downregulated both Cat S expression and activity in AMs of wild-type mice, but only inhibited its activity in AMs of PPARγ knockout mice, pointing to a PPARγ-independent mechanism of enzyme inhibition. We hypothesized that this mechanism was electrophilic S-alkylation of target Cat S cysteines, and found that NFAs bind directly to Cat S following treatment of intact AMs and, as suggested by in silico modeling and calculation of relevant parameters, elicit S-alkylation of Cys25 when incubated with purified Cat S. These results demonstrate that NFAs' electrophilic activity, in addition to their role as PPARγ agonists, underlies their protective effects in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and support their therapeutic potential in this disease.

  3. Immunity to Schistosoma mansoni in guinea-pigs vaccinated with radiation-attenuated cercariae. T-cell activation of macrophages for larval killing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, J.R.; McLaren, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    This study addresses macrophage activation in guinea-pigs vaccinated with radiation-attenuated cercariae of Schistosom mansoni. Peritoneal exudate macrophages elicited in vaccinated animals by mineral oil injection were activated to kill larval schistosomes in vitro. Killing efficiency is dependent upon the cell:target ratio employed and is enhanced by, but is not strictly dependent on, the presence of specific antibodies. Macrophages co-cultured with parasites release superoxide radicals and hydrogen peroxide, but the use of inhibitors has shown that neither of these reactive oxygen intermediates are the causal agents of cellular cytotoxicity in this system. Oil-elicited macrophages from naive guinea-pigs do not show comparable activation; they can, however, be activated in vitro by incubation with culture supernatant fluids from schistosome antigen-stimulated spleen, or lymph node cells harvested from vaccinated guinea-pigs. Naive macrophages activated in this way kill schistosomula in vitro and release the activation markers IL-l and superoxide anion. The macrophage-activating factor (MAF) present in spleen cell culture supernatant fluids has a MW of 35,000-55,000, but does not have the chemical characteristics of gamma-interferon. (author)

  4. Lineage-specific enhancers activate self-renewal genes in macrophages and embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soucie, Erinn L; Weng, Ziming; Geirsdóttir, Laufey; Molawi, Kaaweh; Maurizio, Julien; Fenouil, Romain; Mossadegh-Keller, Noushine; Gimenez, Gregory; VanHille, Laurent; Beniazza, Meryam; Favret, Jeremy; Berruyer, Carole; Perrin, Pierre; Hacohen, Nir; Andrau, J-C; Ferrier, Pierre; Dubreuil, Patrice; Sidow, Arend; Sieweke, Michael H

    2016-02-12

    Differentiated macrophages can self-renew in tissues and expand long term in culture, but the gene regulatory mechanisms that accomplish self-renewal in the differentiated state have remained unknown. Here we show that in mice, the transcription factors MafB and c-Maf repress a macrophage-specific enhancer repertoire associated with a gene network that controls self-renewal. Single-cell analysis revealed that, in vivo, proliferating resident macrophages can access this network by transient down-regulation of Maf transcription factors. The network also controls embryonic stem cell self-renewal but is associated with distinct embryonic stem cell-specific enhancers. This indicates that distinct lineage-specific enhancer platforms regulate a shared network of genes that control self-renewal potential in both stem and mature cells. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  5. Literature list concerning differentiation and activation of macrophage and pathways found in the literature - DMPD | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us DMPD Literature list concerning differentiation and activation of macrophage and pathways fo...und in the literature Data detail Data name Literature list concerning differentiation and activation of mac...rophage and pathways found in the literature DOI 10.18908/lsdba.nbdc00558-001 Description of data contents Literature list concern...ad License Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us Literature list concerning differentiati

  6. Nanoparticles as Antituberculosis Drugs Carriers: Effect on Activity Against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Human Monocyte-Derived Macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anisimova, Y.V.; Gelperina, S.I.; Peloquin, C.A.; Heifets, L.B.

    2000-01-01

    This is the first report evaluating the nanoparticle delivery system for three antituberculosis drugs: isoniazid, rifampin, and streptomycin. The typical particle size is 250 nm. We studied accumulation of these drugs in human monocytes as well as their antimicrobial activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis residing in human monocyte-derived macrophages. Nanoparticle encapsulation increased the intracellular accumulation (cell-association) of all three tested drugs, but it enhanced the antimicrobial activity of isoniazid and streptomycin only. On the other hand, the activity of encapsulated rifampin against intracellular bacteria was not higher than that of the free drug

  7. Expression of Fgf23 in activated dendritic cells and macrophages in response to immunological stimuli in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Yuki; Ohta, Hiroya; Morita, Yumiko; Nakayama, Yoshiaki; Miyake, Ayumi; Itoh, Nobuyuki; Konishi, Morichika

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (Fgfs) are polypeptide growth factors with diverse biological activities. While several studies have revealed that Fgf23 plays important roles in the regulation of phosphate and vitamin D metabolism, the additional physiological roles of Fgf23 remain unclear. Although it is believed that osteoblasts/osteocytes are the main sources of Fgf23, we previously found that Fgf23 mRNA is also expressed in the mouse thymus, suggesting that it might be involved in the immune system. In this study we examined the potential roles of Fgf23 in immunological responses. Mouse serum Fgf23 levels were significantly increased following inoculation with Escherichia coli or Staphylococcus aureus or intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide. We also identified activated dendritic cells and macrophages that potentially contributed to increased serum Fgf23 levels. Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signaling was essential for the induction of Fgf23 expression in dendritic cells in response to immunological stimuli. Moreover, we examined the effects of recombinant Fgf23 protein on immune cells in vitro. Fgfr1c, a potential receptor for Fgf23, was abundantly expressed in macrophages, suggesting that Fgf23 might be involved in signal transduction in these cells. Our data suggest that Fgf23 potentially increases the number in macrophages and induces expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), a proinflammatory cytokine. Collectively, these data suggest that Fgf23 might be intimately involved in inflammatory processes.

  8. Increase in a distinct pulmonary macrophage subset possessing an antigen-presenting cell phenotype and in vitro APC activity following silica exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Migliaccio, Christopher T.; Hamilton, Raymond F.; Holian, Andrij

    2005-01-01

    Silica inhalation results in chronic lung inflammation and fibrosis. While the role of the alveolar macrophage (AM) is considered key to the effects of silica on lung pathology, the etiology is not completely understood. Evidence suggests an increase in antigen presenting cell (APC) activity as a contributing factor to this process, as well as potential roles for both AM and interstitial macrophages (IM) in silicosis. In order to study the effects of crystalline silica on the APC activity of pulmonary macrophages, mice were exposed intranasally and changes in pulmonary macrophage populations were assessed using flow cytometry. Following intranasal instillation of silica, a significant increase in the APC activity of AM was observed, as well as a significant increase in a subset of IM expressing classic APC markers (MHC class II, CD11c). In addition, an in vitro system using bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) was generated to assess the effects of silica on the APC activity of macrophages in vitro. Data using BMDM in the in vitro APC assay demonstrated a significant increase in APC activity following silica exposure, but not following exposure to saline or a control particle (TiO 2 ). Using a combination of in vivo and in vitro experiments, the current study describes a significant increase in an interstitial macrophage subset with an APC phenotype, as well as an increase in the APC activity of both AM and BMDM, as a direct result of exposure to crystalline silica. These studies suggest a specific mechanism, macrophage subset activation, by which crystalline silica exposure results in chronic pulmonary inflammation and, eventually, fibrosis

  9. M1 and M2 macrophages derived from THP-1 cells differentially modulate the response of cancer cells to etoposide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genin, Marie; Clement, Francois; Fattaccioli, Antoine; Raes, Martine; Michiels, Carine

    2015-01-01

    Tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) are present in high density in solid tumors. TAMs share many characteristics with alternatively activated macrophages, also called M2. They have been shown to favor tumor development and a role in chemoresistance has also been suggested. Here, we investigated the effects of M2 in comparison to M1 macrophages on cancer cell sensitivity to etoposide. We set up a model of macrophage polarization, starting from THP-1 monocytes differentiated into macrophages using PMA (Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate). Once differentiated (M0 macrophages), they were incubated with IL-4 and IL-13 in order to obtain M2 polarized macrophages or with IFN-gamma and LPS for classical macrophage activation (M1). To mimic the communication between cancer cells and TAMs, M0, M1 or M2 macrophages and HepG2 or A549 cancer cells were co-cultured during respectively 16 (HepG2) or 24 (A549) hours, before etoposide exposure for 24 (HepG2) or 16 (A549) hours. After the incubation, the impact of etoposide on macrophage polarization was studied and cancer cell apoptosis was assessed by western-blot for cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved PARP-1 protein, caspase activity assay and FACS analysis of Annexin V and PI staining. mRNA and protein expression of M1 and M2 markers confirmed the polarization of THP-1-derived macrophages, which provide a new, easy and well-characterized model of polarized human macrophages. Etoposide-induced cancer cell apoptosis was markedly reduced in the presence of THP-1 M2 macrophages, while apoptosis was increased in cells co-cultured with M1 macrophages. On the other hand, etoposide did not influence M1 or M2 polarization. These results evidence for the first time a clear protective effect of M2 on the contrary to M1 macrophages on etoposide-induced cancer cell apoptosis

  10. Features, Treatment, and Outcomes of Macrophage Activation Syndrome in Childhood-Onset Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgia, R Ezequiel; Gerstein, Maya; Levy, Deborah M; Silverman, Earl D; Hiraki, Linda T

    2018-04-01

    To describe the features and treatment of macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) in a single-center cohort of patients with childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and to compare childhood-onset SLE manifestations and outcomes between those with and those without MAS. We included all patients with childhood-onset SLE followed up at The Hospital for Sick Children from 2002 to 2012, and identified those also diagnosed as having MAS. Demographic, clinical, and laboratory features of MAS and SLE, medication use, hospital and pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) admissions, as well as damage indices and mortality data were extracted from the Lupus database. Student's t-tests and Fisher's exact tests were used to compare continuous and categorical variables, respectively. We calculated incidence rate ratios of hospital and PICU admissions comparing patients with and those without MAS, using Poisson models. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was used to examine the time to disease damage accrual. Of the 403 patients with childhood-onset SLE, 38 (9%) had MAS. The majority (68%) had concomitant MAS and SLE diagnoses. Fever was the most common MAS clinical feature. The frequency of renal and central nervous system disease, hospital admissions, the average daily dose of steroids, and time to disease damage were similar between those with and those without MAS. We observed a higher mortality rate among those with MAS (5%) than those without MAS (0.2%) (P = 0.02). MAS was most likely to develop concomitantly with childhood-onset SLE diagnosis. The majority of the MAS patients were successfully treated with corticosteroids with no MAS relapses. Although the numbers were small, there was a higher risk of death associated with MAS compared to SLE without MAS. © 2018, American College of Rheumatology.

  11. Gc-protein-derived macrophage activating factor counteracts the neuronal damage induced by oxaliplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morucci, Gabriele; Branca, Jacopo J V; Gulisano, Massimo; Ruggiero, Marco; Paternostro, Ferdinando; Pacini, Alessandra; Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo; Pacini, Stefania

    2015-02-01

    Oxaliplatin-based regimens are effective in metastasized advanced cancers. However, a major limitation to their widespread use is represented by neurotoxicity that leads to peripheral neuropathy. In this study we evaluated the roles of a proven immunotherapeutic agent [Gc-protein-derived macrophage activating factor (GcMAF)] in preventing or decreasing oxaliplatin-induced neuronal damage and in modulating microglia activation following oxaliplatin-induced damage. The effects of oxaliplatin and of a commercially available formula of GcMAF [oleic acid-GcMAF (OA-GcMAF)] were studied in human neurons (SH-SY5Y cells) and in human microglial cells (C13NJ). Cell density, morphology and viability, as well as production of cAMP and expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), markers of neuron regeneration [neuromodulin or growth associated protein-43 (Gap-43)] and markers of microglia activation [ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba1) and B7-2], were determined. OA-GcMAF reverted the damage inflicted by oxaliplatin on human neurons and preserved their viability. The neuroprotective effect was accompanied by increased intracellular cAMP production, as well as by increased expression of VEGF and neuromodulin. OA-GcMAF did not revert the effects of oxaliplatin on microglial cell viability. However, it increased microglial activation following oxaliplatin-induced damage, resulting in an increased expression of the markers Iba1 and B7-2 without any concomitant increase in cell number. When neurons and microglial cells were co-cultured, the presence of OA-GcMAF significantly counteracted the toxic effects of oxaliplatin. Our results demonstrate that OA-GcMAF, already used in the immunotherapy of advanced cancers, may significantly contribute to neutralizing the neurotoxicity induced by oxaliplatin, at the same time possibly concurring to an integrated anticancer effect. The association between these two powerful anticancer molecules would probably produce

  12. Reduced expression of IL-12 p35 by SJL/J macrophages responding to Theiler's virus infection is associated with constitutive activation of IRF-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlberg, Angela; Auble, Mark R.; Petro, Thomas M.

    2006-01-01

    Macrophages responding to viral infections may contribute to autoimmune demyelinating diseases (ADD). Macrophages from ADD-susceptible SJL/J mice responding to Theiler's Virus (TMEV) infection, the TLR7 agonist loxoribine, or the TLR4 agonist-LPS expressed less IL-12 p35 but more IL-12/23 p40 and IFN-β than macrophages from ADD-resistant B10.S mice. While expression of IRF-1 and -7 was similar between B10.S and SJL/J TMEV-infected macrophages, SJL/J but not B10.S macrophages exhibited constitutively active IRF-3. In contrast to overexpressed IRF-1, IRF-5, and IRF-7, which stimulated p35 promoter reporter activity, overexpressed IRF-3 repressed p35 promoter activity in response to TMEV infection, loxoribine, IFN-γ/LPS, but not IFN-γ alone. IRF-3 lessened but did not eliminate IRF-1-stimulated p35 promoter activity. Repression by IRF-3 required bp -172 to -122 of the p35 promoter. The data suggest that pre-activated IRF-3 is a major factor in the differences in IL-12 production between B10.S and SJL/J macrophages responding to TMEV

  13. Macrophages contribute to the cyclic activation of adult hair follicle stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castellana, Donatello; Paus, Ralf; Perez-Moreno, Mirna

    2014-01-01

    Skin epithelial stem cells operate within a complex signaling milieu that orchestrates their lifetime regenerative properties. The question of whether and how immune cells impact on these stem cells within their niche is not well understood. Here we show that skin-resident macrophages decrease in...

  14. Tissue macrophage activation: a shared sign of exposure to ionizing and non-ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrenyov, D.R.

    2012-01-01

    The features of oxidative metabolism of peritoneal macrophages were studied in rats exposed to ionizing and non-ionizing radiation. An increased RNS and ROS production reported in animals exposed to both source of radiation showing non-specific response of organism. (authors)

  15. Macrophage activity assessed by soluble CD163 in early rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greisen, Stinne Ravn; Møller, Holger Jon; Stengaard-Pedersen, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disease where TNF-α is a central mediator of inflammation, and is cleaved from the cell surface by TACE/ADAM17. This metalloproteinase is also responsible for the release of soluble (s) CD163. Soluble CD163 reflects macrophage activati...

  16. Macrophage phagocytic activity toward adhering staphylococci on cationic and patterned hydrogel coatings versus common biomaterials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Da Silva Domingues, Joana; Roest, Steven; Wang, Yi; van der Mei, Henny C.; Libera, Matthew; van Kooten, Theo G.; Busscher, Henk J.

    Biomaterial-associated-infection causes failure of biomaterial implants. Many new biomaterials have been evaluated for their ability to inhibit bacterial colonization and stimulate tissue-cell-integration, but neglect the role of immune cells. This paper compares macrophage phagocytosis of adhering

  17. Investigation into the Role of Tumor-Associated Macrophages in the Antitumor Activity of Doxil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banciu, M.; Schiffelers, R.M.; Storm, G.

    Purpose. Our recent studies show specific localization of long-circulating liposomes (LCL) within the endosomal/lysosomal compartment of tumor-associated macrophages (TAM). Based on this finding, the present study aims to investigate whether clinically applied LCL formulations such as Doxil

  18. Human monocytes undergo excessive apoptosis following temozolomide activating the ATM/ATR pathway while dendritic cells and macrophages are resistant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Bauer

    Full Text Available Immunodeficiency is a severe therapy-limiting side effect of anticancer chemotherapy resulting from sensitivity of immunocompetent cells to DNA damaging agents. A central role in the immune system is played by monocytes that differentiate into macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs. In this study we compared human monocytes isolated from peripheral blood and cytokine matured macrophages and DCs derived from them and assessed the mechanism of toxicity of the DNA methylating anticancer drug temozolomide (TMZ in these cell populations. We observed that monocytes, but not DCs and macrophages, were highly sensitive to the killing effect of TMZ. Studies on DNA damage and repair revealed that the initial DNA incision was efficient in monocytes while the re-ligation step of base excision repair (BER can not be accomplished, resulting in an accumulation of DNA single-strand breaks (SSBs. Furthermore, monocytes accumulated DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs following TMZ treatment, while DCs and macrophages were able to repair DSBs. Monocytes lack the DNA repair proteins XRCC1, ligase IIIα and PARP-1 whose expression is restored during differentiation into macrophages and DCs following treatment with GM-CSF and GM-CSF plus IL-4, respectively. These proteins play a key role both in BER and DSB repair by B-NHEJ, which explains the accumulation of DNA breaks in monocytes following TMZ treatment. Although TMZ provoked an upregulation of XRCC1 and ligase IIIα, BER was not enhanced likely because PARP-1 was not upregulated. Accordingly, inhibition of PARP-1 did not sensitize monocytes, but monocyte-derived DCs in which strong PARP activation was observed. TMZ induced in monocytes the DNA damage response pathways ATM-Chk2 and ATR-Chk1 resulting in p53 activation. Finally, upon activation of the Fas-receptor and the mitochondrial pathway apoptosis was executed in a caspase-dependent manner. The downregulation of DNA repair in monocytes, resulting in their selective

  19. Genomewide effects of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma in macrophages and dendritic cells--revealing complexity through systems biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuaranta-Monroy, Ixchelt; Kiss, Mate; Simandi, Zoltan; Nagy, Laszlo

    2015-09-01

    Systems biology approaches have become indispensable tools in biomedical and basic research. These data integrating bioinformatic methods gained prominence after high-throughput technologies became available to investigate complex cellular processes, such as transcriptional regulation and protein-protein interactions, on a scale that had not been studied before. Immunology is one of the medical fields that systems biology impacted profoundly due to the plasticity of cell types involved and the accessibility of a wide range of experimental models. In this review, we summarize the most important recent genomewide studies exploring the function of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ in macrophages and dendritic cells. PPARγ ChIP-seq experiments were performed in adipocytes derived from embryonic stem cells to complement the existing data sets and to provide comparators to macrophage data. Finally, lists of regulated genes generated from such experiments were analysed with bioinformatics and system biology approaches. We show that genomewide studies utilizing high-throughput data acquisition methods made it possible to gain deeper insights into the role of PPARγ in these immune cell types. We also demonstrate that analysis and visualization of data using network-based approaches can be used to identify novel genes and functions regulated by the receptor. The example of PPARγ in macrophages and dendritic cells highlights the crucial importance of systems biology approaches in establishing novel cellular functions for long-known signaling pathways. © 2015 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  20. Intermittent fasting promotes adipose thermogenesis and metabolic homeostasis via VEGF-mediated alternative activation of macrophage

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Kyoung-Han; Kim, Yun Hye; Son, Joe Eun; Lee, Ju Hee; Kim, Sarah; Choe, Min Seon; Moon, Joon Ho; Zhong, Jian; Fu, Kiya; Lenglin, Florine; Yoo, Jeong-Ah; Bilan, Philip J; Klip, Amira; Nagy, Andras; Kim, Jae-Ryong

    2017-01-01

    Intermittent fasting (IF), a periodic energy restriction, has been shown to provide health benefits equivalent to prolonged fasting or caloric restriction. However, our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of IF-mediated metabolic benefits is limited. Here we show that isocaloric IF improves metabolic homeostasis against diet-induced obesity and metabolic dysfunction primarily through adipose thermogenesis in mice. IF-induced metabolic benefits require fasting-mediated increases of vasc...

  1. Propolis reversed cigarette smoke-induced emphysema through macrophage alternative activation independent of Nrf2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barroso, Marina Valente; Cattani-Cavalieri, Isabella; de Brito-Gitirana, Lycia; Fautrel, Alain; Lagente, Vincent; Schmidt, Martina; Porto, Luís Cristóvão; Romana-Souza, Bruna; Valença, Samuel Santos; Lanzetti, Manuella

    2017-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an incurable and progressive disease. Emphysema is the principal manifestation of COPD, and the main cause of this condition is cigarette smoke (CS). Natural products have shown antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties that can prevent acute lung

  2. Silica-induced initiation of circular ZC3H4 RNA/ZC3H4 pathway promotes the pulmonary macrophage activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiyue; Wang, Jing; Zhou, Zewei; Jiang, Rong; Huang, Jie; Chen, Lulu; Cao, Zhouli; Chu, Han; Han, Bing; Cheng, Yusi; Chao, Jie

    2018-01-22

    Phagocytosis of silicon dioxide (SiO 2 ) into lung cells causes an inflammatory cascade that results in fibroblast proliferation and migration, followed by fibrosis. Circular RNAs (circRNAs) are a subclass of noncoding RNAs that are present within mammalian cells; however, researchers have not determined whether circRNAs are involved in the pathophysiologic process of silicosis. To elucidate the role of these RNAs in SiO 2 -induced inflammation in pulmonary macrophages, we investigated the upstream molecular mechanisms and functional effects of circRNAs on cell apoptosis, proliferation, and migration. Primary cultures of alveolar macrophages from healthy donors and from patients and the RAW264.7 macrophage cell line were used to explore the functions of circZC3H4 RNA in macrophage activation. The experimental results indicated the following: 1) SiO 2 concomitantly increased circZC3H4 RNA expression and increased ZC3H4 protein levels; 2) circular ZC3H4 (circZC3H4) RNA and ZC3H4 protein participated in SiO 2 -induced macrophage activation; and 3) SiO 2 -activated macrophages promoted fibroblast proliferation and migration via the circZC3H4 RNA/ZC3H4 pathway. The up-regulation of the ZC3H4 protein was confirmed in tissue samples from patients with silicosis. Our study elucidates a link between SiO 2 -induced macrophage activation and the circZC3H4 RNA/ZC3H4 pathway, thereby providing novel insight into the potential use of ZC3H4 to develop novel therapeutic strategies for silicosis.-Yang, X., Wang, J., Zhou, Z., Jiang, R., Huang, J., Chen, L., Cao, Z., Chu, H., Han, B., Cheng, Y., Chao, J. Silica-induced initiation of circular ZC3H4 RNA/ZC3H4 pathway promotes the pulmonary macrophage activation.

  3. Immunomodulatory Molecule IRAK-M Balances Macrophage Polarization and Determines Macrophage Responses during Renal Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiger, Stefanie; Kumar, Santhosh V; Honarpisheh, Mohsen; Lorenz, Georg; Günthner, Roman; Romoli, Simone; Gröbmayr, Regina; Susanti, Heni-Eka; Potempa, Jan; Koziel, Joanna; Lech, Maciej

    2017-08-15

    Activation of various innate immune receptors results in IL-1 receptor-associated kinase (IRAK)-1/IRAK-4-mediated signaling and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-12, IL-6, or TNF-α, all of which are implicated in tissue injury and elevated during tissue remodeling processes. IRAK-M, also known as IRAK-3, is an inhibitor of proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine expression in intrarenal macrophages. Innate immune activation contributes to both acute kidney injury and tissue remodeling that is associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Our study assessed the contribution of macrophages in CKD and the role of IRAK-M in modulating disease progression. To evaluate the effect of IRAK-M in chronic renal injury in vivo, a mouse model of unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) was employed. The expression of IRAK-M increased within 2 d after UUO in obstructed compared with unobstructed kidneys. Mice deficient in IRAK-M were protected from fibrosis and displayed a diminished number of alternatively activated macrophages. Compared to wild-type mice, IRAK-M-deficient mice showed reduced tubular injury, leukocyte infiltration, and inflammation following renal injury as determined by light microscopy, immunohistochemistry, and intrarenal mRNA expression of proinflammatory and profibrotic mediators. Taken together, these results strongly support a role for IRAK-M in renal injury and identify IRAK-M as a possible modulator in driving an alternatively activated profibrotic macrophage phenotype in UUO-induced CKD. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  4. The pancreas anatomy conditions the origin and properties of resident macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderon, Boris; Carrero, Javier A; Ferris, Stephen T; Sojka, Dorothy K; Moore, Lindsay; Epelman, Slava; Murphy, Kenneth M; Yokoyama, Wayne M; Randolph, Gwendalyn J; Unanue, Emil R

    2015-09-21

    We examine the features, origin, turnover, and gene expression of pancreatic macrophages under steady state. The data distinguish macrophages within distinct intrapancreatic microenvironments and suggest how macrophage phenotype is imprinted by the local milieu. Macrophages in islets of Langerhans and in the interacinar stroma are distinct in origin and phenotypic properties. In islets, macrophages are the only myeloid cells: they derive from definitive hematopoiesis, exchange to a minimum with blood cells, have a low level of self-replication, and depend on CSF-1. They express Il1b and Tnfa transcripts, indicating classical activation, M1, under steady state. The interacinar stroma contains two macrophage subsets. One is derived from primitive hematopoiesis, with no interchange by blood cells and alternative, M2, activation profile, whereas the second is derived from definitive hematopoiesis and exchanges with circulating myeloid cells but also shows an alternative activation profile. Complete replacement of islet and stromal macrophages by donor stem cells occurred after lethal irradiation with identical profiles as observed under steady state. The extraordinary plasticity of macrophages within the pancreatic organ and the distinct features imprinted by their anatomical localization sets the base for examining these cells in pathological conditions. © 2015 Calderon et al.

  5. Porphyromonas gulae Activates Unprimed and Gamma Interferon-Primed Macrophages via the Pattern Recognition Receptors Toll-Like Receptor 2 (TLR2), TLR4, and NOD2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, James A.; O'Brien-Simpson, Neil M.; Lenzo, Jason C.; Orth, Rebecca K. H.; Mansell, Ashley

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Porphyromonas gulae is an anaerobic, Gram-negative coccobacillus that has been associated with periodontal disease in companion animals. The aims of this study were to analyze the ligation of pattern recognition receptors by P. gulae and the subsequent activation of macrophages. Exposure of HEK cells transfected with Toll-like receptors (TLRs) or NOD-like receptors to P. gulae resulted in the ligation of TLR2, TLR4, and NOD2. The effects of this engagement of receptors were investigated by measuring the synthesis of nitric oxide (NO), CD86 expression, and inflammatory cytokine production by wild-type, TLR2−/−, and TLR4−/− macrophages. The addition of P. gulae to unprimed and gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-primed (M1 phenotype) macrophages significantly increased the surface expression of CD86, but only M1 macrophages produced nitric oxide. P. gulae-induced expression of CD86 on unprimed macrophages was dependent on both TLR2 and TLR4, but CD86 expression and NO production in M1 macrophages were only TLR2 dependent. P. gulae induced an increase in secretion of interleukin-1α (IL-1α), IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12p70, IL-13, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), and macrophage inflammatory protein 1α (MIP-1α) by M1 macrophages compared to that by unprimed controls. Among these cytokines, secretion of IL-6 and TNF-α by M1 macrophages was dependent on either TLR2 or TLR4. Our data indicate that TLR2 and TLR4 are important for P. gulae activation of unprimed macrophages and that activation and effector functions induced in M1 macrophages by P. gulae are mainly dependent on TLR2. In conclusion, P. gulae induces a strong TLR2-dependent inflammatory M1 macrophage response which may be important in establishing the chronic inflammation associated with periodontal disease in companion animals. PMID:28630066

  6. Porphyromonas gulae Activates Unprimed and Gamma Interferon-Primed Macrophages via the Pattern Recognition Receptors Toll-Like Receptor 2 (TLR2), TLR4, and NOD2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, James A; O'Brien-Simpson, Neil M; Lenzo, Jason C; Orth, Rebecca K H; Mansell, Ashley; Reynolds, Eric C

    2017-09-01

    Porphyromonas gulae is an anaerobic, Gram-negative coccobacillus that has been associated with periodontal disease in companion animals. The aims of this study were to analyze the ligation of pattern recognition receptors by P. gulae and the subsequent activation of macrophages. Exposure of HEK cells transfected with Toll-like receptors (TLRs) or NOD-like receptors to P. gulae resulted in the ligation of TLR2, TLR4, and NOD2. The effects of this engagement of receptors were investigated by measuring the synthesis of nitric oxide (NO), CD86 expression, and inflammatory cytokine production by wild-type, TLR2 -/- , and TLR4 -/- macrophages. The addition of P. gulae to unprimed and gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-primed (M1 phenotype) macrophages significantly increased the surface expression of CD86, but only M1 macrophages produced nitric oxide. P. gulae- induced expression of CD86 on unprimed macrophages was dependent on both TLR2 and TLR4, but CD86 expression and NO production in M1 macrophages were only TLR2 dependent. P. gulae induced an increase in secretion of interleukin-1α (IL-1α), IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12p70, IL-13, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), and macrophage inflammatory protein 1α (MIP-1α) by M1 macrophages compared to that by unprimed controls. Among these cytokines, secretion of IL-6 and TNF-α by M1 macrophages was dependent on either TLR2 or TLR4. Our data indicate that TLR2 and TLR4 are important for P. gulae activation of unprimed macrophages and that activation and effector functions induced in M1 macrophages by P. gulae are mainly dependent on TLR2. In conclusion, P. gulae induces a strong TLR2-dependent inflammatory M1 macrophage response which may be important in establishing the chronic inflammation associated with periodontal disease in companion animals. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  7. Exogenous oxidants activate nuclear factor kappa B through Toll-like receptor 4 stimulation to maintain inflammatory phenotype in macrophage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Igwe, Orisa J

    2018-01-01

    Disturbances in redox equilibrium in tissue can lead to inflammatory state, which is a mediatory factor in many human diseases. The mechanism(s) by which exogenous oxidants may activate an inflammatory response is not fully understood. Emerging evidence suggests that oxidant-induced Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation plays a major role in "sterile" inflammation. In the present study, we used murine macrophage RAW-Blue cells, which are chromosomally integrated with secreted embryonic alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) inducible by NF-κB. We confirmed the expression of TLR4 mRNA and protein in RAW-Blue cells by RT-PCR and Western blot, respectively. We showed that oxidants increased intracellular reactive oxygen species production and lipid peroxidation, which resulted in decreased intracellular total antioxidant capacity. Consistent with the actions of TLR4-specific agonist LPS-EK, exogenous oxidants increased transcriptional activity of NF-κB p65 with subsequent release of NF-κB reporter gene SEAP. These effects were blocked by pretreatment with TLR4 neutralizing pAb and TLR4 signaling inhibitor CLI-095. In addition, oxidants decreased the expression of IκBα with enhanced phosphorylation at the Tyr42 residue. Finally, oxidants and LPS-EK increased TNFα production, but did not affect IL-10 production, which may cause imbalance between pro- and anti-inflammatory processes, which CLI-095 inhibited. For biological relevance, we confirmed that oxidants increased release of TNFα and IL-6 in primary macrophages derived from TLR4-WT and TLR4-KO mice. Our results support the involvement of TLR4 mediated oxidant-induced inflammatory phenotype through NF-κB activation in macrophages. Thus exogenous oxidants may play a role in activating inflammatory phenotypes that propagate and maintain chronic disease states. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Activated Macrophages as a Novel Determinant of Tumor Cell Radioresponse: The Role of Nitric Oxide-Mediated Inhibition of Cellular Respiration and Oxygen Sparing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Heng; De Ridder, Mark; Verovski, Valeri N.; Sonveaux, Pierre; Jordan, Benedicte F.; Law, Kalun; Monsaert, Christinne; Van den Berge, Dirk L.; Verellen, Dirk; Feron, Olivier; Gallez, Bernard; Storme, Guy A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Nitric oxide (NO), synthesized by the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), is known to inhibit metabolic oxygen consumption because of interference with mitochondrial respiratory activity. This study examined whether activation of iNOS (a) directly in tumor cells or (b) in bystander macrophages may improve radioresponse through sparing of oxygen. Methods and Materials: EMT-6 tumor cells and RAW 264.7 macrophages were exposed to bacterial lipopolysaccharide plus interferon-γ, and examined for iNOS expression by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting and enzymatic activity. Tumor cells alone, or combined with macrophages were subjected to metabolic hypoxia and analyzed for radiosensitivity by clonogenic assay, and for oxygen consumption by electron paramagnetic resonance and a Clark-type electrode. Results: Both tumor cells and macrophages displayed a coherent picture of iNOS induction at transcriptional/translational levels and NO/nitrite production, whereas macrophages showed also co-induction of the inducible heme oxygenase-1, which is associated with carbon monoxide (CO) and bilirubin production. Activation of iNOS in tumor cells resulted in a profound oxygen sparing and a 2.3-fold radiosensitization. Bystander NO-producing, but not CO-producing, macrophages were able to block oxygen consumption by 1.9-fold and to radiosensitize tumor cells by 2.2-fold. Both effects could be neutralized by aminoguanidine, a metabolic iNOS inhibitor. An improved radioresponse was clearly observed at macrophages to tumor cells ratios ranging between 1:16 to 1:1. Conclusions: Our study is the first, as far as we are aware, to provide evidence that iNOS may induce radiosensitization through oxygen sparing, and illuminates NO-producing macrophages as a novel determinant of tumor cell radioresponse within the hypoxic tumor microenvironment.

  9. The in vitro GcMAF effects on endocannabinoid system transcriptionomics, receptor formation, and cell activity of autism-derived macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Siniscalco, Dario; Bradstreet, James Jeffrey; Cirillo, Alessandra; Antonucci, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Background Immune system dysregulation is well-recognized in autism and thought to be part of the etiology of this disorder. The endocannabinoid system is a key regulator of the immune system via the cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2R) which is highly expressed on macrophages and microglial cells. We have previously published significant differences in peripheral blood mononuclear cell CB2R gene expression in the autism population. The use of the Gc protein-derived Macrophage Activating Factor...

  10. Activation/proliferation and apoptosis of bystander goat lymphocytes induced by a macrophage-tropic chimeric caprine arthritis encephalitis virus expressing SIV Nef

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouzar, Baya Amel; Rea, Angela; Hoc-Villet, Stephanie; Garnier, Celine; Guiguen, Francois; Jin Yuhuai; Narayan, Opendra; Chebloune, Yahia

    2007-01-01

    Caprine arthritis encephalitis virus (CAEV) is the natural lentivirus of goats, well known for its tropism for macrophages and its inability to cause infection in lymphocytes. The viral genome lacks nef, tat, vpu and vpx coding sequences. To test the hypothesis that when nef is expressed by the viral genome, the virus became toxic for lymphocytes during replication in macrophages, we inserted the SIVsmm PBj14 nef coding sequences into the genome of CAEV thereby generating CAEV-nef. This recombinant virus is not infectious for lymphocytes but is fully replication competent in goat macrophages in which it constitutively expresses the SIV Nef. We found that goat lymphocytes cocultured with CAEV-nef-infected macrophages became activated, showing increased expression of the interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R). Activation correlated with increased proliferation of the cells. Interestingly, a dual effect in terms of apoptosis regulation was observed in exposed goat lymphocytes. Nef was found first to induce a protection of lymphocytes from apoptosis during the first few days following exposure to infected macrophages, but later it induced increased apoptosis in the activated lymphocytes. This new recombinant virus provides a model to study the functions of Nef in the context of infection of macrophages, but in absence of infection of T lymphocytes and brings new insights into the biological effects of Nef on lymphocytes

  11. Monocytes/macrophages support mammary tumor invasivity by co-secreting lineage-specific EGFR ligands and a STAT3 activator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlaicu, Philip; Mertins, Philipp; Mayr, Thomas; Widschwendter, Peter; Ataseven, Beyhan; Högel, Bernhard; Eiermann, Wolfgang; Knyazev, Pjotr; Ullrich, Axel

    2013-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) promote malignant progression, yet the repertoire of oncogenic factors secreted by TAM has not been clearly defined. We sought to analyze which EGFR- and STAT3-activating factors are secreted by monocytes/macrophages exposed to tumor cell-secreted factors. Following exposure of primary human monocytes and macrophages to supernatants of a variety of tumor cell lines, we have analyzed transcript and secreted protein levels of EGFR family ligands and of STAT3 activators. To validate our findings, we have analyzed TAM infiltration levels, systemic and local protein levels as well as clinical data of primary breast cancer patients. Primary human monocytes and macrophages respond to tumor cell-derived factors by secreting EGFR- and STAT3-activating ligands, thus inducing two important oncogenic pathways in carcinoma cells. Tumor cell-secreted factors trigger two stereotype secretory profiles in peripheral blood monocytes and differentiated macrophages: monocytes secrete epiregulin (EREG) and oncostatin-M (OSM), while macrophages secrete heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) and OSM. HB-EGF and OSM cooperatively induce tumor cell chemotaxis. HB-EGF and OSM are co-expressed by TAM in breast carcinoma patients, and plasma levels of both ligands correlate strongly. Elevated HB-EGF levels accompany TAM infiltration, tumor growth and dissemination in patients with invasive disease. Our work identifies systemic markers for TAM involvement in cancer progression, with the potential to be developed into molecular targets in cancer therapy

  12. Enhanced Replication of Virulent Newcastle Disease Virus in Chicken Macrophages Is due to Polarized Activation of Cells by Inhibition of TLR7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pingze; Ding, Zhuang; Liu, Xinxin; Chen, Yanyu; Li, Junjiao; Tao, Zhi; Fei, Yidong; Xue, Cong; Qian, Jing; Wang, Xueli; Li, Qingmei; Stoeger, Tobias; Chen, Jianjun; Bi, Yuhai; Yin, Renfu

    2018-01-01

    Newcastle disease (ND), caused by infections with virulent strains of Newcastle disease virus (NDV), is one of the most important infectious disease affecting wild, peridomestic, and domestic birds worldwide. Vaccines constructed from live, low-virulence (lentogenic) viruses are the most accepted prevention and control strategies for combating ND in poultry across the globe. Avian macrophages are one of the first cell lines of defense against microbial infection, responding to signals in the microenvironment. Although macrophages are considered to be one of the main target cells for NDV infection in vivo , very little is known about the ability of NDV to infect chicken macrophages, and virulence mechanisms of NDV as well as the polarized activation patterns of macrophages and correlation with viral infection and replication. In the present study, a cell culture model (chicken bone marrow macrophage cell line HD11) and three different virulence and genotypes of NDV (including class II virulent NA-1, class II lentogenic LaSota, and class I lentogenic F55) were used to solve the above underlying questions. Our data indicated that all three NDV strains had similar replication rates during the early stages of infection. Virulent NDV titers were shown to increase compared to the other lentogenic strains, and this growth was associated with a strong upregulation of both pro-inflammatory M1-like markers/cytokines and anti-inflammatory M2-like markers/cytokines in chicken macrophages. Virulent NDV was found to block toll-like receptor (TLR) 7 expression, inducing higher expression of type I interferons in chicken macrophages at the late stage of viral infection. Only virulent NDV replication can be inhibited by pretreatment with TLR7 ligand. Overall, this study demonstrated that virulent NDV activates a M1-/M2-like mixed polarized activation of chicken macrophages by inhibition of TLR7, resulting in enhanced replication compared to lentogenic viruses.

  13. Trichomonas vaginalis Induces Production of Proinflammatory Cytokines in Mouse Macrophages Through Activation of MAPK and NF-κB Pathways Partially Mediated by TLR2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ling; Li, Xin; Gong, Pengtao; Zhang, Xichen; Yang, Zhengtao; Yang, Ju; Li, Jianhua

    2018-01-01

    Trichomoniasis, caused by Trichomonas vaginalis infection, is the most prevalent sexually transmitted disease in female and male globally. However, the mechanisms by innate immunity against T. vaginalis infection have not been fully elucidated. Toll-like receptor2 (TLR2) has been shown to be involved in pathogen recognition, innate immunity activation, and inflammatory response to the pathogens. Nonetheless, the function of TLR2 against T. vaginalis remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the role of TLR2 in mouse macrophages against T. vaginalis. RT-qPCR analysis revealed that T. vaginalis stimulation increased the gene expression of TLR2 in wild-type (WT) mouse macrophages. T. vaginalis also induced the secretion of IL-6, TNF-α, and IFN-γ in WT mouse macrophages, and the expression of these cytokines significantly decreased in TLR2-/- mouse macrophages and in WT mouse macrophages pretreated with MAPK inhibitors SB203580 (p38) and PD98059 (ERK). Western blot analysis demonstrated that T. vaginalis stimulation induced the activation of p38, ERK, and p65 NF-κB signal pathways in WT mouse macrophages, and the phosphorylation of p38, ERK, and p65 NF-κB significantly decreased in TLR2-/- mouse macrophages. Taken together, our data suggested that T. vaginalis may regulates proinflammatory cytokines production by activation of p38, ERK, and NF-κB p65 signal pathways via TLR2 in mouse macrophages. TLR2 might be involved in the defense and elimination of T. vaginalis infection. PMID:29692771

  14. Bacteroides fragilis interferes with iNOS activity and leads to pore formation in macrophage surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Jessica Manya B.D.; Vallim, Deyse C.; Ferreira, Eliane O.; Seabra, Sergio H.; Vommaro, Rossiane C.; Avelar, Katia E.S.; De Souza, Wanderley; Ferreira, Maria Ca-hat ndida S.; Domingues, Regina M.C.P.

    2005-01-01

    Bacteroides fragilis is the anaerobe most commonly recoverable from clinical specimens. The wide genetic diversity of this bacterium related with virulence potential is still an open question. In this study, we analyzed the morphological aspects and microbicide action of MO during interactions with B. fragilis. A filamentous cytoplasm content release and a different actin organization colocalized with iNOS were detected. It was also possible to observe the reduction of NO production in the same conditions. The scanning electron microscopy showed the formation of pore-like structures in the surface of macrophages in the bacterial presence and by transmission electron microscopy we could observe the extrusion of cytoplasm contents as well as the condensation of chromatin in the nucleus periphery. These data suggest the existence of an inhibitory mechanism developed by B. fragilis strains for one of the macrophage microbicide actions

  15. Novel keto-phospholipids are generated by monocytes and macrophages, detected in cystic fibrosis, and activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Victoria J; Morgan, Alwena H; Lauder, Sarah; Thomas, Christopher P; Brown, Sarah; Freeman, Bruce A; Lloyd, Clare M; Davies, Jane; Bush, Andrew; Levonen, Anna-Liisa; Kansanen, Emilia; Villacorta, Luis; Chen, Y Eugene; Porter, Ned; Garcia-Diaz, Yoel M; Schopfer, Francisco J; O'Donnell, Valerie B

    2012-12-07

    12/15-Lipoxygenases (LOXs) in monocytes and macrophages generate novel phospholipid-esterified eicosanoids. Here, we report the generation of two additional families of related lipids comprising 15-ketoeicosatetraenoic acid (KETE) attached to four phosphatidylethanolamines (PEs). The lipids are generated basally by 15-LOX in IL-4-stimulated monocytes, are elevated on calcium mobilization, and are detected at increased levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from cystic fibrosis patients (3.6 ng/ml of lavage). Murine peritoneal macrophages generate 12-KETE-PEs, which are absent in 12/15-LOX-deficient mice. Inhibition of 15-prostaglandin dehydrogenase prevents their formation from exogenous 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid-PE in human monocytes. Both human and murine cells also generated analogous hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid-PEs. The electrophilic reactivity of KETE-PEs is shown by their Michael addition to glutathione and cysteine. Lastly, both 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid-PE and 15-KETE-PE activated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ reporter activity in macrophages in a dose-dependent manner. In summary, we demonstrate novel peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ-activating oxidized phospholipids generated enzymatically by LOX and 15-prostaglandin dehydrogenase in primary monocytic cells and in a human Th2-related lung disease. The lipids are a new family of bioactive mediators from the 12/15-LOX pathway that may contribute to its known anti-inflammatory actions in vivo.

  16. Short Horizon Control Strategies for an Alternating Activated Sludge Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isaacs, Steven Howard

    1996-01-01

    Three control strategies allowing improved operational flexibility of an alternating type activated sludge process are presented in a unified model based framework. The control handles employed are the addition rate of an external carbon source to denitrification, the cycle length, and the dissol...

  17. Growth hormone (GH) differentially regulates NF-kB activity in preadipocytes and macrophages: implications for GH's role in adipose tissue homeostasis in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, P Anil; Chitra, P Swathi; Lu, Chunxia; Sobhanaditya, J; Menon, Ram

    2014-06-01

    Adipose tissue remodeling in obesity involves macrophage infiltration and chronic inflammation. NF-kB-mediated chronic inflammation of the adipose tissue is directly implicated in obesity-associated insulin resistance. We have investigated the effect of growth hormone (GH) on NF-kB activity in preadipocytes (3T3-F442A) and macrophages (J774A.1). Our studies indicate that whereas GH increases NF-kB activity in preadipocytes, it decreases NF-kB activity in macrophages. This differential response of NF-kB activity to GH correlates with the GH-dependent expression of a cadre of NF-kB-activated cytokines in these two cell types. Activation of NF-kB by GH in preadipocytes heightens inflammatory response by stimulating production of multiple cytokines including TNF-α, IL-6, and MCP-1, the mediators of both local and systemic insulin resistance and chemokines that recruit macrophages. Our studies also suggest differential regulation of miR132 and SIRT1 expression as a mechanism underlying the observed variance in GH-dependent NF-kB activity and altered cytokine profile in preadipocytes and macrophages. These findings further our understanding of the complex actions of GH on adipocytes and insulin sensitivity.

  18. Activation of Murine Macrophages by Lipoprotein and Lipooligosaccharide of Treponema denticola

    OpenAIRE

    Rosen, Graciela; Sela, Michael N.; Naor, Ronit; Halabi, Amal; Barak, Vivian; Shapira, Lior

    1999-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that the periodontopathogenic oral spirochete Treponema denticola possesses membrane-associated lipoproteins in addition to lipooligosaccharide (LOS). The aim of the present study was to test the potential of these oral spirochetal components to induce the production of inflammatory mediators by human macrophages, which in turn may stimulate tissue breakdown as observed in periodontal diseases. An enriched lipoprotein fraction (dLPP) from T. denticola ATCC 35404 ...

  19. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Lactobacillus Rahmnosus and Bifidobacterium Breve on Cigarette Smoke Activated Human Macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Mortaz, E; Adcock, IM; Ricciardolo, FLM; Varahram, M; Jamaati, H; Velayati, AA; Folkerts, G; Garssen, J

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major global health problem with cigarette smoke (CS) as the main risk factor for its development. Airway inflammation in COPD involves the increased expression of inflammatory mediators such as CXCL-8 and IL-1β which are important mediators for neutrophil recruitment. Macrophages are an important source of these mediators in COPD. Lactobacillus rhamnosus (L. rhamnosus) and Befidobacterium breve (B. breve) attenuate the development...

  20. Bone marrow-derived macrophages exclusively expressed caveolin-2: The role of inflammatory activators and hypoxia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Macečková, Michaela; Martíšková, Hana; Koudelka, Adolf; Kubala, Lukáš; Lojek, Antonín; Pekarová, Michaela

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 220, č. 11 (2015), s. 1266-1274 ISSN 0171-2985 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP13-40882P; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0030 Grant - others:GAAV(CZ) M200041208 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : NF-KAPPA-B * RAT PERITONEAL-MACROPHAGES * NITRIC-OXIDE PRODUCTION Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 2.781, year: 2015

  1. Physicochemical Characterization of Polysaccharides with Macrophage Immunomodulatory Activities Isolated from Red Ginseng (Panax ginseng C. A. Meyer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Zheng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, four polysaccharide fractions designated as RGP1, RGP2, RGP3, and RGP4 were isolated from red ginseng by DEAE-52 cellulose chromatography, and their macrophage immunomodulatory activities were investigated. The results revealed that the proliferation, NO production, and neutral red phagocytosis of RAW 264.7 macrophage cells in groups treated with RGP1 and RGP2 in vitro were increased significantly compared to RGP3 and RGP4. In addition, the level of TNF-α in RAW 264.7 cells was significantly increased in RGP1 and RGP2 groups. All the results consistently indicated that polysaccharide fractions RGP1 and RGP2 had strong macrophage immunomodulatory activities. Furthermore, RGP1 and RGP2 were purified by Sephadex G-100 column and RGP2 was further fractionated into a homogeneous fraction RGP2-1, with the molecular weight of 2.16 × 104 Da. The analysis of monosaccharide composition revealed that RGP1 was composed of arabinose, glucose, and galactose with a relative molecular ratio of 0.02 : 0.88 : 0.10. RGP2-1 was composed of rhamnose, arabinose, glucose, and galactose with a relative molecular ratio of 0.02 : 0.10 : 0.77 : 0.11. These results provided evidences that the neutral polysaccharide fractions RGP1 and RGP2 possessed significant immunomodulatory activity and could be explored as a promising natural immunomodulating agent applied in functional foods or medicines.

  2. Macrophage activation marker sCD163 correlates with accelerated lipolysis following LPS exposure: a human-randomised clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaj Rittig

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Macrophage activation determined by levels of soluble sCD163 is associated with obesity, insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2 and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. This suggests that macrophage activation is involved in the pathogenesis of conditions is characterised by adaptions in the lipid metabolism. Since sCD163 is shed to serum by inflammatory signals including lipopolysaccharides (LPS, endotoxin, we investigated sCD163 and correlations with lipid metabolism following LPS exposure. Methods: Eight healthy male subjects were investigated on two separate occasions: (i following an LPS exposure and (ii following saline exposure. Each study day consisted of a four-hour non-insulin-stimulated period followed by a two-hour hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp period. A 3H-palmitate tracer was used to calculate the rate of appearance (Rapalmitate. Blood samples were consecutively obtained throughout each study day. Abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue was obtained for western blotting. Results: We observed a significant two-fold increase in plasma sCD163 levels following LPS exposure (P < 0.001, and sCD163 concentrations correlated positively with the plasma concentration of free fatty acids, Rapalmitate, lipid oxidation rates and phosphorylation of the hormone-sensitive lipase at serine 660 in adipose tissue (P < 0.05, all. Furthermore, sCD163 concentrations correlated positively with plasma concentrations of cortisol, glucagon, tumour necrosis factor (TNF-α, interleukin (IL-6 and IL-10 (P < 0.05, all. Conclusion: We observed a strong correlation between sCD163 and stimulation of lipolysis and fat oxidation following LPS exposure. These findings support preexisting theory that inflammation and macrophage activation play a significant role in lipid metabolic adaptions under conditions such as obesity, DM2 and NAFLD.

  3. The Orosomucoid 1 protein is involved in the vitamin D – mediated macrophage de-activation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gemelli, Claudia, E-mail: claudia.gemelli@unimore.it [Department of Life Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Via Campi 287, 41125 Modena (Italy); Center for Regenerative Medicine, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Via Gottardi 100, 41125 Modena (Italy); Martello, Andrea; Montanari, Monica; Zanocco Marani, Tommaso; Salsi, Valentina; Zappavigna, Vincenzo; Parenti, Sandra; Vignudelli, Tatiana; Selmi, Tommaso; Ferrari, Sergio; Grande, Alexis [Department of Life Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Via Campi 287, 41125 Modena (Italy)

    2013-12-10

    Orosomucoid 1 (ORM1), also named Alpha 1 acid glycoprotein A (AGP-A), is an abundant plasma protein characterized by anti-inflammatory and immune-modulating properties. The present study was designed to identify a possible correlation between ORM1 and Vitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3), a hormone exerting a widespread effect on cell proliferation, differentiation and regulation of the immune system. In particular, the data described here indicated that ORM1 is a 1,25(OH)2D3 primary response gene, characterized by the presence of a VDRE element inside the 1 kb sequence of its proximal promoter region. This finding was demonstrated with gene expression studies, Chromatin Immunoprecipitation and luciferase transactivation experiments and confirmed by VDR full length and dominant negative over-expression. In addition, several experiments carried out in human normal monocytes demonstrated that the 1,25(OH)2D3 – VDR – ORM1 pathway plays a functional role inside the macrophage de-activation process and that ORM1 may be considered as a signaling molecule involved in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis and remodeling. - Highlights: • ORM1 is a Vitamin D primary response gene. • VD and its receptor VDR are involved in the de-activation process mediated by human resident macrophages. • The signaling pathway VD-VDR-ORM1 plays an important role in the control of macrophage de-activation process. • ORM1 may be defined as a signaling molecule implicated in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis and remodeling.

  4. Nucleotide-oligomerizing domain-1 (NOD1) receptor activation induces pro-inflammatory responses and autophagy in human alveolar macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juárez, Esmeralda; Carranza, Claudia; Hernández-Sánchez, Fernando; Loyola, Elva; Escobedo, Dante; León-Contreras, Juan Carlos; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Torres, Martha; Sada, Eduardo

    2014-09-25

    Nucleotide-binding oligomerizing domain-1 (NOD1) is a cytoplasmic receptor involved in recognizing bacterial peptidoglycan fragments that localize to the cytosol. NOD1 activation triggers inflammation, antimicrobial mechanisms and autophagy in both epithelial cells and murine macrophages. NOD1 mediates intracellular pathogen clearance in the lungs of mice; however, little is known about NOD1's role in human alveolar macrophages (AMs) or its involvement in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection. AMs, monocytes (MNs), and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) from healthy subjects were assayed for NOD1 expression. Cells were stimulated with the NOD1 ligand Tri-DAP and cytokine production and autophagy were assessed. Cells were infected with Mtb and treated with Tri-DAP post-infection. CFUs counting determined growth control, and autophagy protein recruitment to pathogen localization sites was analyzed by immunoelectron microscopy. NOD1 was expressed in AMs, MDMs and to a lesser extent MNs. Tri-DAP stimulation induced NOD1 up-regulation and a significant production of IL1β, IL6, IL8, and TNFα in AMs and MDMs; however, the level of NOD1-dependent response in MNs was limited. Autophagy activity determined by expression of proteins Atg9, LC3, IRGM and p62 degradation was induced in a NOD1-dependent manner in AMs and MDMs but not in MNs. Infected AMs could be activated by stimulation with Tri-DAP to control the intracellular growth of Mtb. In addition, recruitment of NOD1 and the autophagy proteins IRGM and LC3 to the Mtb localization site was observed in infected AMs after treatment with Tri-DAP. NOD1 is involved in AM and MDM innate responses, which include proinflammatory cytokines and autophagy, with potential implications in the killing of Mtb in humans.

  5. The Orosomucoid 1 protein is involved in the vitamin D – mediated macrophage de-activation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gemelli, Claudia; Martello, Andrea; Montanari, Monica; Zanocco Marani, Tommaso; Salsi, Valentina; Zappavigna, Vincenzo; Parenti, Sandra; Vignudelli, Tatiana; Selmi, Tommaso; Ferrari, Sergio; Grande, Alexis

    2013-01-01

    Orosomucoid 1 (ORM1), also named Alpha 1 acid glycoprotein A (AGP-A), is an abundant plasma protein characterized by anti-inflammatory and immune-modulating properties. The present study was designed to identify a possible correlation between ORM1 and Vitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3), a hormone exerting a widespread effect on cell proliferation, differentiation and regulation of the immune system. In particular, the data described here indicated that ORM1 is a 1,25(OH)2D3 primary response gene, characterized by the presence of a VDRE element inside the 1 kb sequence of its proximal promoter region. This finding was demonstrated with gene expression studies, Chromatin Immunoprecipitation and luciferase transactivation experiments and confirmed by VDR full length and dominant negative over-expression. In addition, several experiments carried out in human normal monocytes demonstrated that the 1,25(OH)2D3 – VDR – ORM1 pathway plays a functional role inside the macrophage de-activation process and that ORM1 may be considered as a signaling molecule involved in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis and remodeling. - Highlights: • ORM1 is a Vitamin D primary response gene. • VD and its receptor VDR are involved in the de-activation process mediated by human resident macrophages. • The signaling pathway VD-VDR-ORM1 plays an important role in the control of macrophage de-activation process. • ORM1 may be defined as a signaling molecule implicated in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis and remodeling

  6. Activation of AMPA receptor promotes TNF-α release via the ROS-cSrc-NFκB signaling cascade in RAW264.7 macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Xiu-Li [Department of Physiology, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, School of Basic Medicine, Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Ding, Fan [Office of Scientific R& D, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Li, Hui; Tan, Xiao-Qiu [Department of Physiology, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, School of Basic Medicine, Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Liu, Xiao [Department of Pathophysiology, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, School of Basic Medicine, Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Cao, Ji-Min, E-mail: caojimin@126.com [Department of Physiology, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, School of Basic Medicine, Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Gao, Xue, E-mail: longlongnose@163.com [Department of Pathophysiology, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, School of Basic Medicine, Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China)

    2015-05-29

    The relationship between glutamate signaling and inflammation has not been well defined. This study aimed to investigate the role of AMPA receptor (AMPAR) in the expression and release of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) from macrophages and the underlying mechanisms. A series of approaches, including confocal microscopy, immunofluorescency, flow cytometry, ELISA and Western blotting, were used to estimate the expression of AMPAR and downstream signaling molecules, TNF-α release and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in the macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells. The results demonstrated that AMPAR was expressed in RAW264.7 cells. AMPA significantly enhanced TNF-α release from RAW264.7 cells, and this effect was abolished by CNQX (AMPAR antagonist). AMPA also induced elevation of ROS production, phosphorylation of c-Src and activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB in RAW264.7 cells. Blocking c-Src by PP2, scavenging ROS by glutathione (GSH) or inhibiting NF-κB activation by pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) decreased TNF-α production from RAW264.7 cells. We concluded that AMPA promotes TNF-α release in RAW264.7 macrophages likely through the following signaling cascade: AMPAR activation → ROS generation → c-Src phosphorylation → NF-κB activation → TNF-α elevation. The study suggests that AMPAR may participate in macrophage activation and inflammation. - Highlights: • AMPAR is expressed in RAW264.7 macrophages and is upregulated by AMPA stimulation. • Activation of AMPAR stimulates TNF-α release in macrophages through the ROS-cSrc-NFκB signaling cascade. • Macrophage AMPAR signaling may play an important role in inflammation.

  7. Liver macrophages: friend or foe during hepatitis B infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faure-Dupuy, Suzanne; Durantel, David; Lucifora, Julie

    2018-05-17

    The Hepatitis B virus chronically infects the liver of 250 million people worldwide. Over the past decades, major advances have been made in the understanding of Hepatitis B virus life cycle in hepatocytes. Beside these parenchymal cells, the liver also contains resident and infiltrating myeloid cells involved in immune responses to pathogens and much less is known about their interplay with Hepatitis B virus. In this review, we summarized and discussed the current knowledge of the role of liver macrophages (including Kupffer cells and liver monocyte-derived macrophages), in HBV infection. While it is still unclear if liver macrophages play a role in the establishment and persistence of HBV infection, several studies disclosed data suggesting that HBV would favour liver macrophage anti-inflammatory phenotypes and thereby increase liver tolerance. In addition, alternatively activated liver macrophages might also play in the long term a key role in hepatitis B associated pathogenesis, especially through the activation of hepatic stellate cells. Therapies aiming at a transient activation of pro-inflammatory liver macrophages should therefore be considered for the treatment of chronic HBV infection. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. Incorporation of cerium oxide into hydroxyapatite coating regulates osteogenic activity of mesenchymal stem cell and macrophage polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kai; Shen, Qingyi; Xie, Youtao; You, Mingyu; Huang, Liping; Zheng, Xuebin

    2017-02-01

    Biomedical coatings for orthopedic implants should facilitate osseointegration and mitigate implant-induced inflammatory reactions. Cerium oxide (CeO 2 ) ceramics possess anti-oxidative properties and can be used to decrease mediators of inflammation, which makes them attractive for biomedical applications. In our work, two kinds of CeO 2 incorporated hydroxyapatite coatings (HA-10Ce and HA-30Ce) were prepared via plasma spraying technique and the effects of CeO 2 addition on the responses of bone mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) and RAW264.7 macrophages were investigated. An increase in CeO 2 content in the HA coatings resulted in better osteogenic behaviors of BMSCs in terms of cell proliferation, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and mineralized nodule formation. RT-PCR and western blot analysis suggested that the incorporation of CeO 2 may promote the osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs through the Smad-dependent BMP signaling pathway, which activated Runx2 expression and subsequently enhanced the expression of ALP and OCN. The expression profiles of macrophages cultured on the CeO 2 modified coating revealed a tendency toward a M2 phenotype, because of an upregulation of M2 surface markers (CD163 and CD206), anti-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6) and osteoblastogenesis-related genes (BMP2 and TGF-β1) as well as a downregulation of M1 surface markers (CCR7 and CD11c), proinflammatory cytokines (IL-10 and IL-1ra) and reactive oxygen species production. The results suggested the regulation of BMSCs behaviors and macrophage-mediated responses at the coating's surface were associated with CeO 2 incorporation. The incorporation of CeO 2 in HA coatings can be a valuable strategy to promote osteogenic responses and reduce inflammatory reactions.

  9. Immunomodulatory effects and anti-Candida activity of lactobacilli in macrophages and in invertebrate model of Galleria mellonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Felipe Eduardo; Rossoni, Rodnei Dennis; de Barros, Patricia Pimentel; Begnini, Barbara Evelyn; Junqueira, Juliana Campos; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; Leão, Mariella Vieira Pereira; de Oliveira, Luciane Dias

    2017-09-01

    Due to the growing number of multi-resistant Candida spp., adjuvant treatments that may help combat these fungal pathogens are relevant and useful. This study evaluated the immunomodulation and anti-Candida activity of Lactobacillus rhamnosus (LR), Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus paracasei suspensions, either single- or multiple-strain, in mouse macrophages (RAW 264.7) and Galleria mellonella (GM). Mouse macrophages were activated by different lactobacilli suspensions and challenged with C. albicans (CA). Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-17 production and cell viability were investigated. LR was the best suspension for stimulating all evaluated cytokines and thus was used in subsequent in vivo assays. Two C. albicans clinical strains, CA21 and CA60, were then added to the GM assays to further confirm the results. LR suspension was injected into the larvae 24 h before challenging with CA. Survival curve, CFU per larva and hemocytes were counted. In the GM, the LR suspension increased the survival rate and hemocyte counts and decreased the CFU per larva counts for all groups. Lactobacilli suspensions presented strain-dependent immunomodulation; however, single suspensions showed better results. Anti-Candida activity was demonstrated by decreased Candida counts in the GM with the use of LR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Dendritic cells that phagocytose apoptotic macrophages loaded with mycobacterial antigens activate CD8 T cells via cross-presentation

    OpenAIRE

    Espinosa-Cueto, Patricia; Magallanes-Puebla, Alejandro; Castellanos, Carlos; Mancilla, Raul

    2017-01-01

    While homeostatic apoptosis is immunologically silent, macrophage apoptosis during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection can potentially induce an immune response against the mycobacteria. To examine the role of dendritic cells in this response, macrophage apoptosis was induced by incubating the macrophage with cell wall extracts of mycobacteria expressing LpqH. The apoptogenic proteins of the cell wall extracts were engulfed by the macrophage and then were translocated from the cytosol to the...

  11. Moringa oleifera Flower Extract Suppresses the Activation of Inflammatory Mediators in Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated RAW 264.7 Macrophages via NF-κB Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woan Sean Tan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of Study. Moringa oleifera Lam. (M. oleifera possess highest concentration of antioxidant bioactive compounds and is anticipated to be used as an alternative medicine for inflammation. In the present study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory activity of 80% hydroethanolic extract of M. oleifera flower on proinflammatory mediators and cytokines produced in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- induced RAW 264.7 macrophages. Materials and Methods. Cell cytotoxicity was conducted by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. Nitric oxide (NO production was quantified through Griess reaction while proinflammatory cytokines and other key inflammatory markers were assessed through enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and immunoblotting. Results. Hydroethanolic extract of M. oleifera flower significantly suppressed the secretion and expression of NO, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, interleukin- (IL- 6, IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α, nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB, inducible NO synthase (iNOS, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2. However, it significantly increased the production of IL-10 and IκB-α (inhibitor of κB in a concentration dependent manner (100 μg/mL and 200 μg/mL. Conclusion. These results suggest that 80% hydroethanolic extract of M. oleifera flower has anti-inflammatory action related to its inhibition of NO, PGE2, proinflammatory cytokines, and inflammatory mediator’s production in LPS-stimulated macrophages through preventing degradation of IκB-α in NF-κB signaling pathway.

  12. Moringa oleifera Flower Extract Suppresses the Activation of Inflammatory Mediators in Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated RAW 264.7 Macrophages via NF-κB Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Woan Sean; Arulselvan, Palanisamy; Karthivashan, Govindarajan; Fakurazi, Sharida

    2015-01-01

    Aim of Study. Moringa oleifera Lam. (M. oleifera) possess highest concentration of antioxidant bioactive compounds and is anticipated to be used as an alternative medicine for inflammation. In the present study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory activity of 80% hydroethanolic extract of M. oleifera flower on proinflammatory mediators and cytokines produced in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced RAW 264.7 macrophages. Materials and Methods. Cell cytotoxicity was conducted by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Nitric oxide (NO) production was quantified through Griess reaction while proinflammatory cytokines and other key inflammatory markers were assessed through enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunoblotting. Results. Hydroethanolic extract of M. oleifera flower significantly suppressed the secretion and expression of NO, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), interleukin- (IL-) 6, IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), inducible NO synthase (iNOS), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). However, it significantly increased the production of IL-10 and IκB-α (inhibitor of κB) in a concentration dependent manner (100 μg/mL and 200 μg/mL). Conclusion. These results suggest that 80% hydroethanolic extract of M. oleifera flower has anti-inflammatory action related to its inhibition of NO, PGE2, proinflammatory cytokines, and inflammatory mediator's production in LPS-stimulated macrophages through preventing degradation of IκB-α in NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:26609199

  13. Tumor-associated macrophages as a paradigm of macrophage plasticity, diversity, and polarization: lessons and open questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantovani, Alberto; Locati, Massimo

    2013-07-01

    Macrophages are present in all body compartments, including cancerous tissues, and their functions are profoundly affected by signals from the microenvironment under homeostatic and pathological conditions. Tumor-associated macrophages are a major cellular component of cancer-related inflammation and have served as a paradigm for the plasticity and functional polarization of mononuclear phagocytes. Tumor-associated macrophages can exert dual influence of cancer depending on the activation state, with classically activated (M1) and alternatively activated (M2) cells generally exerting antitumoral and protumoral functions, respectively. These are extremes in a continuum of polarization states in a universe of diversity. Tumor-associated macrophages affect virtually all aspects of tumor tissues, including stem cells, metabolism, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. Progress has been made in defining signaling molecules, transcription factors, epigenetic changes, and repertoire of microRNAs underlying macrophage polarization. Preclinical and early clinical data suggest that macrophages may serve as tools for the development of innovative diagnostic and therapeutic strategies in cancer and chronic nonresolving inflammatory diseases.

  14. Cytotoxic macrophage-released tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) as a killing mechanism for cancer cell death after cold plasma activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Nagendra Kumar; Kaushik, Neha; Min, Booki; Choi, Ki Hong; Hong, Young June; Miller, Vandana; Fridman, Alexander; Choi, Eun Ha

    2016-03-01

    The present study aims at studying the anticancer role of cold plasma-activated immune cells. The direct anti-cancer activity of plasma-activated immune cells against human solid cancers has not been described so far. Hence, we assessed the effect of plasma-treated RAW264.7 macrophages on cancer cell growth after co-culture. In particular, flow cytometer analysis revealed that plasma did not induce any cell death in RAW264.7 macrophages. Interestingly, immunofluorescence and western blot analysis confirmed that TNF-α released from plasma-activated macrophages acts as a tumour cell death inducer. In support of these findings, activated macrophages down-regulated the cell growth in solid cancer cell lines and induced cell death in vitro. Together our findings suggest plasma-induced reactive species recruit cytotoxic macrophages to release TNF-α, which blocks cancer cell growth and can have the potential to contribute to reducing tumour growth in vivo in the near future.

  15. Cytotoxic macrophage-released tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) as a killing mechanism for cancer cell death after cold plasma activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaushik, Nagendra Kumar; Kaushik, Neha; Min, Booki; Choi, Ki Hong; Hong, Young June; Choi, Eun Ha; Miller, Vandana; Fridman, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The present study aims at studying the anticancer role of cold plasma-activated immune cells. The direct anti-cancer activity of plasma-activated immune cells against human solid cancers has not been described so far. Hence, we assessed the effect of plasma-treated RAW264.7 macrophages on cancer cell growth after co-culture. In particular, flow cytometer analysis revealed that plasma did not induce any cell death in RAW264.7 macrophages. Interestingly, immunofluorescence and western blot analysis confirmed that TNF-α released from plasma-activated macrophages acts as a tumour cell death inducer. In support of these findings, activated macrophages down-regulated the cell growth in solid cancer cell lines and induced cell death in vitro. Together our findings suggest plasma-induced reactive species recruit cytotoxic macrophages to release TNF-α, which blocks cancer cell growth and can have the potential to contribute to reducing tumour growth in vivo in the near future. (paper)

  16. Identification of M2 macrophages in anterior pituitary glands of normal rats and rats with estrogen-induced prolactinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Ken; Yatabe, Megumi; Tofrizal, Alimuddin; Jindatip, Depicha; Yashiro, Takashi; Nagai, Ryozo

    2017-05-01

    Macrophages are present throughout the anterior pituitary gland. However, the features and function of macrophages in the gland are poorly understood. Recent studies have indicated that there are two main macrophage classes: M1 (classically activated) and M2 (alternatively activated). In this study, we examine whether both M1 and M2 macrophages are present in the anterior pituitary gland of rats. Our findings indicate that macrophages that are positive for CD68 (a pan-macrophage marker) were localized near capillaries in rat anterior pituitary gland. These macrophages were positive for iNOS or mannose receptor (MR), which are markers of M1 and M2 macrophages, respectively. To determine the morphological characteristics of M2 macrophages under pathological conditions, diethylstilbestrol (DES)-treated rats were used as an animal model of prolactinoma. After 2 weeks of DES treatment, a number of MR-immunopositive cells were present in the gland. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed that MR-immunopositive M2 macrophages had many small vesicles and moderately large vacuoles in cytoplasm. Phagosomes were sometimes present in cytoplasm. Interestingly, M2 macrophages in prolactinoma tissues did not usually exhibit distinct changes or differences during the normal, hyperplasia and adenoma stages. This study is the first to confirm that both M1 and M2 macrophages are present in the anterior pituitary gland of rats. Moreover, the number of M2 macrophages was greatly increased in rats with DES-induced prolactinoma. Future studies should attempt to characterize the functional role of M2 macrophages in the gland.

  17. Novel Role of Endogenous Catalase in Macrophage Polarization in Adipose Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ye Seul; Uddin, Md Jamal; Piao, Lingjuan; Hwang, Inah; Lee, Jung Hwa; Ha, Hunjoo

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are important components of adipose tissue inflammation, which results in metabolic diseases such as insulin resistance. Notably, obesity induces a proinflammatory phenotypic switch in adipose tissue macrophages, and oxidative stress facilitates this switch. Thus, we examined the role of endogenous catalase, a key regulator of oxidative stress, in the activity of adipose tissue macrophages in obese mice. Catalase knockout (CKO) exacerbated insulin resistance, amplified oxidative stress, and accelerated macrophage infiltration into epididymal white adipose tissue in mice on normal or high-fat diet. Interestingly, catalase deficiency also enhanced classical macrophage activation (M1) and inflammation but suppressed alternative activation (M2) regardless of diet. Similarly, pharmacological inhibition of catalase activity using 3-aminotriazole induced the same phenotypic switch and inflammatory response in RAW264.7 macrophages. Finally, the same phenotypic switch and inflammatory responses were observed in primary bone marrow-derived macrophages from CKO mice. Taken together, the data indicate that endogenous catalase regulates the polarization of adipose tissue macrophages and thereby inhibits inflammation and insulin resistance.

  18. Commensal Bacteria-Induced Inflammasome Activation in Mouse and Human Macrophages Is Dependent on Potassium Efflux but Does Not Require Phagocytosis or Bacterial Viability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kejie Chen

    Full Text Available Gut commensal bacteria contribute to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease, in part by activating the inflammasome and inducing secretion of interleukin-1ß (IL-1ß. Although much has been learned about inflammasome activation by bacterial pathogens, little is known about how commensals carry out this process. Accordingly, we investigated the mechanism of inflammasome activation by representative commensal bacteria, the Gram-positive Bifidobacterium longum subspecies infantis and the Gram-negative Bacteroides fragilis. B. infantis and B. fragilis induced IL-1ß secretion by primary mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages after overnight incubation. IL-1ß secretion also occurred in response to heat-killed bacteria and was only partly reduced when phagocytosis was inhibited with cytochalasin D. Similar results were obtained with a wild-type immortalized mouse macrophage cell line but neither B. infantis nor B. fragilis induced IL-1ß secretion in a mouse macrophage line lacking the nucleotide-binding/leucine-rich repeat pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3 inflammasome. IL-1ß secretion in response to B. infantis and B. fragilis was significantly reduced when the wild-type macrophage line was treated with inhibitors of potassium efflux, either increased extracellular potassium concentrations or the channel blocker ruthenium red. Both live and heat-killed B. infantis and B. fragilis also induced IL-1ß secretion by human macrophages (differentiated THP-1 cells or primary monocyte-derived macrophages after 4 hours of infection, and the secretion was inhibited by raised extracellular potassium and ruthenium red but not by cytochalasin D. Taken together, our findings indicate that the commensal bacteria B. infantis and B. fragilis activate the NLRP3 inflammasome in both mouse and human macrophages by a mechanism that involves potassium efflux and that does not require bacterial viability or phagocytosis.

  19. IL-17A and serum amyloid A are elevated in a cigarette smoke cessation model associated with the persistence of pigmented macrophages, neutrophils and activated NK cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle J Hansen

    Full Text Available While global success in cessation advocacy has seen smoking rates fall in many developed countries, persistent lung inflammation in ex-smokers is an increasingly important clinical problem whose mechanistic basis remains poorly understood. In this study, candidate effector mechanisms were assessed in mice exposed to cigarette smoke (CS for 4 months following cessation from long term CS exposure. BALF neutrophils, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and lung innate NK cells remained significantly elevated following smoking cessation. Analysis of neutrophil mobilization markers showed a transition from acute mediators (MIP-2α, KC and G-CSF to sustained drivers of neutrophil and macrophage recruitment and activation (IL-17A and Serum Amyoid A (SAA. Follicle-like lymphoid aggregates formed with CS exposure and persisted with cessation, where they were in close anatomical proximity to pigmented macrophages, whose number actually increased 3-fold following CS cessation. This was associated with the elastolytic protease, MMP-12 (macrophage metallo-elastase which remained significantly elevated post-cessation. Both GM-CSF and CSF-1 were significantly increased in the CS cessation group relative to the control group. In conclusion, we show that smoking cessation mediates a transition to accumulation of pigmented macrophages, which may contribute to the expanded macrophage population observed in COPD. These macrophages together with IL-17A, SAA and innate NK cells are identified here as candidate persistence determinants and, we suggest, may represent specific targets for therapies directed towards the amelioration of chronic airway inflammation.

  20. The Reactive Oxygen Species in Macrophage Polarization: Reflecting Its Dual Role in Progression and Treatment of Human Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Hor-Yue; Li, Sha; Hong, Ming; Wang, Xuanbin

    2016-01-01

    High heterogeneity of macrophage is associated with its functions in polarization to different functional phenotypes depending on environmental cues. Macrophages remain in balanced state in healthy subject and thus macrophage polarization may be crucial in determining the tissue fate. The two distinct populations, classically M1 and alternatively M2 activated, representing the opposing ends of the full activation spectrum, have been extensively studied for their associations with several disease progressions. Accumulating evidences have postulated that the redox signalling has implication in macrophage polarization and the key roles of M1 and M2 macrophages in tissue environment have provided the clue for the reasons of ROS abundance in certain phenotype. M1 macrophages majorly clearing the pathogens and ROS may be crucial for the regulation of M1 phenotype, whereas M2 macrophages resolve inflammation which favours oxidative metabolism. Therefore how ROS play its role in maintaining the homeostatic functions of macrophage and in particular macrophage polarization will be reviewed here. We also review the biology of macrophage polarization and the disturbance of M1/M2 balance in human diseases. The potential therapeutic opportunities targeting ROS will also be discussed, hoping to provide insights for development of target-specific delivery system or immunomodulatory antioxidant for the treatment of ROS-related diseases. PMID:27143992

  1. Fungal infection control by garlic extracts (Allium sativum L.) and modulation of peritoneal macrophages activity in murine model of sporotrichosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burian, J P; Sacramento, L V S; Carlos, I Z

    2017-11-01

    Garlic (Allium sativum L.) is grown all over the world as seasoning and medicinal vegetable since 3,000 BC. Allicin is the main component of garlic, being attributed to it the most of its biological activities, such as bactericidal, antifungal and antiviral actions. However, other compounds of garlic present antioxidant, hypocholesterolemic, vasodilator activities, protective action against different types of cancer, and immunomodulatory. Fungal infections are important causes of morbidity and mortality in people mainly in immunosuppressed ones. Sporothrix schenckii, the causing agent of Sporotrichosis (most common subcutaneous mycosis in Latin America), is dimorphic fungus, of saprophytic life in soil or plants, infecting people and animals mainly through skin injuries and bruises. The main of this work was to evaluate the influence of garlic consuming on immune modulation of healthy and infected Swiss mice in induced way by S. schenckii, since these animals functioning of peritoneal macrophages as well as the nitric oxide and cytokines' production (IL-1β, IL-10 and IL-12) and to evaluate the antifungal potential of garlic with S. schenckii through minimum inhibitory concentration test and colony-forming units. The results showed that garlic offers antifungal potential with S. schenckii. The oral taking of garlic extracts influences the releasing of cytokines by macrophages, regular consuming shows anti-inflammatory effect, and its acute use may take to an inflammatory response. Mice that consumed garlic responded more effectively to fight against the infection.

  2. Alendronate augments interleukin-1β release from macrophages infected with periodontal pathogenic bacteria through activation of caspase-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Xue; Tamai, Riyoko; Endo, Yasuo; Kiyoura, Yusuke

    2009-01-01

    Nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates (NBPs) are anti-bone-resorptive drugs with inflammatory side effects that include osteomyelitis and osteonecrosis of the jaw. Oral bacteria have been considered to be a trigger for these NBP-associated jaw bone diseases. The present study examined the effects of alendronate (a typical NBP) and clodronate (a non-NBP) on the production of proinflammatory cytokines by macrophages infected with Porphyromonas gingivalis and Tannerella forsythia, which are important pathogens of periodontal diseases. Pretreatment with alendronate augmented IL-1β, but not TNFα, production by macrophages infected with P. gingivalis or T. forsythia. This augmentation of IL-1β production was inhibited by clodronate. Furthermore, caspase-1, a promoter of IL-1β production, was activated by treatment with alendronate, and caspase-1 inhibitor reduced the production of IL-1β induced by alendronate and P. gingivalis. These results suggest that NBPs augment periodontal pathogenic bacteria-induced IL-1β release via caspase-1 activation, and this phenomenon may contribute to the development of NBP-associated inflammatory side effects including jaw osteomyelitis. Co-treatment with clodronate may prevent and/or reduce these inflammatory effects induced by NBPs

  3. Alendronate augments interleukin-1{beta} release from macrophages infected with periodontal pathogenic bacteria through activation of caspase-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Deng; Tamai, Riyoko [Division of Oral Bacteriology, Department of Oral Medical Science, Ohu University School of Dentistry, 31-1 Misumido, Tomitamachi, Koriyama, Fukushima 963-8611 (Japan); Endo, Yasuo [Department of Molecular Regulation, Graduate School of Dentistry, Tohoku University, 4-1 Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Kiyoura, Yusuke [Division of Oral Bacteriology, Department of Oral Medical Science, Ohu University School of Dentistry, 31-1 Misumido, Tomitamachi, Koriyama, Fukushima 963-8611 (Japan)

    2009-02-15

    Nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates (NBPs) are anti-bone-resorptive drugs with inflammatory side effects that include osteomyelitis and osteonecrosis of the jaw. Oral bacteria have been considered to be a trigger for these NBP-associated jaw bone diseases. The present study examined the effects of alendronate (a typical NBP) and clodronate (a non-NBP) on the production of proinflammatory cytokines by macrophages infected with Porphyromonas gingivalis and Tannerella forsythia, which are important pathogens of periodontal diseases. Pretreatment with alendronate augmented IL-1{beta}, but not TNF{alpha}, production by macrophages infected with P. gingivalis or T. forsythia. This augmentation of IL-1{beta} production was inhibited by clodronate. Furthermore, caspase-1, a promoter of IL-1{beta} production, was activated by treatment with alendronate, and caspase-1 inhibitor reduced the production of IL-1{beta} induced by alendronate and P. gingivalis. These results suggest that NBPs augment periodontal pathogenic bacteria-induced IL-1{beta} release via caspase-1 activation, and this phenomenon may contribute to the development of NBP-associated inflammatory side effects including jaw osteomyelitis. Co-treatment with clodronate may prevent and/or reduce these inflammatory effects induced by NBPs.

  4. Fungal infection control by garlic extracts (Allium sativum L. and modulation of peritoneal macrophages activity in murine model of sporotrichosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Burian

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Garlic (Allium sativum L. is grown all over the world as seasoning and medicinal vegetable since 3,000 BC. Allicin is the main component of garlic, being attributed to it the most of its biological activities, such as bactericidal, antifungal and antiviral actions. However, other compounds of garlic present antioxidant, hypocholesterolemic, vasodilator activities, protective action against different types of cancer, and immunomodulatory. Fungal infections are important causes of morbidity and mortality in people mainly in immunosuppressed ones. Sporothrix schenckii, the causing agent of Sporotrichosis (most common subcutaneous mycosis in Latin America, is dimorphic fungus, of saprophytic life in soil or plants, infecting people and animals mainly through skin injuries and bruises. The main of this work was to evaluate the influence of garlic consuming on immune modulation of healthy and infected Swiss mice in induced way by S. schenckii, since these animals functioning of peritoneal macrophages as well as the nitric oxide and cytokines’ production (IL-1β, IL-10 and IL-12 and to evaluate the antifungal potential of garlic with S. schenckii through minimum inhibitory concentration test and colony-forming units. The results showed that garlic offers antifungal potential with S. schenckii. The oral taking of garlic extracts influences the releasing of cytokines by macrophages, regular consuming shows anti-inflammatory effect, and its acute use may take to an inflammatory response. Mice that consumed garlic responded more effectively to fight against the infection.

  5. The effect of phosphoethanolamine intake on mortality and macrophage activity in mice with solid ehrlich tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Sueli Parreira de Arruda

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of a diet rich in synthetic PEtn on the metabolism macrophages of tumor-bearing mice. The results demonstrated that PEtn increased the animals' survival time. In addition, the treated animals released smaller amounts of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and nitric oxide (NO than the non-treated animals, particularly after day 14. From the results it could be concluded that H2O2 and NO were important in the modulation of neoplastic growth, and pointed to a promising role of PEtn in the control of human neoplasms.

  6. Effect of Massoia (Massoia aromatica Becc.) Bark on the Phagocytic Activity of Wistar Rat Macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Triana Hertiani; Agustinus Yuswanto; Sylvia Utami Tunjung Pratiwi; Harlyanti Muthma’innah Mashar

    2018-01-01

    The essential oil of Massoia (Massoia aromatica Becc., Lauraceae) bark is a potential immunomodulator in vitro. This study evaluated the potential immunomodulatory effects of Massoia bark infusion on the nonspecific immune response (phagocytosis) of Wistar rats. For the in vitro assay, macrophages were treated with the freeze-dried infusion at the concentrations of 2.5, 5, 10, 20, or 40 µg/mL media. For the in vivo assay, two-month-old male Wistar rats were divided into five groups. The...

  7. Tachykinins activate guinea-pig alveolar macrophages: involvement of NK2 and NK1 receptors.

    OpenAIRE

    Brunelleschi, S.; Vanni, L.; Ledda, F.; Giotti, A.; Maggi, C. A.; Fantozzi, R.

    1990-01-01

    1. The effects of substance P (SP), neurokinin A (NKA) and neurokinin B (NKB) were evaluated on superoxide anion (O2-.) production by guinea-pig alveolar macrophages (AM). 2. SP dose-dependently (ED50 = 0.7 nM) evoked O2-. production from guinea-pig AM; the N-terminal heptapeptide, SP(1-7), was ineffective. In the presence of thiorphan (10(-5) M), an enkephalinase inhibitor, the stimulating effects of SP were not significantly modified. NKA and NKB were both able to induce O2-. production fro...

  8. Infiltration of the synovial membrane with macrophage subsets and polymorphonuclear cells reflects global disease activity in spondyloarthropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeten, Dominique; Kruithof, Elli; De Rycke, Leen; Boots, Anemieke M; Mielants, Herman; Veys, Eric M; De Keyser, Filip

    2005-01-01

    Considering the relation between synovial inflammation and global disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and the distinct but heterogeneous histology of spondyloarthropathy (SpA) synovitis, the present study analyzed whether histopathological features of synovium reflect specific phenotypes and/or global disease activity in SpA. Synovial biopsies obtained from 99 SpA and 86 RA patients with active knee synovitis were analyzed for 15 histological and immunohistochemical markers. Correlations with swollen joint count, serum C-reactive protein concentrations, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate were analyzed using classical and multiparameter statistics. SpA synovitis was characterized by higher vascularity and infiltration with CD163+ macrophages and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and by lower values for lining-layer hyperplasia, lymphoid aggregates, CD1a+ cells, intracellular citrullinated proteins, and MHC-HC gp39 complexes than RA synovitis. Unsupervised clustering of the SpA samples based on synovial features identified two separate clusters that both contained different SpA subtypes but were significantly differentiated by concentration of C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Global disease activity in SpA correlated significantly with lining-layer hyperplasia as well as with inflammatory infiltration with macrophages, especially the CD163+ subset, and with PMNs. Accordingly, supervised clustering using these synovial parameters identified a cluster of 20 SpA patients with significantly higher disease activity, and this finding was confirmed in an independent SpA cohort. However, multiparameter models based on synovial histopathology were relatively poor predictors of disease activity in individual patients. In conclusion, these data indicate that inflammatory infiltration of the synovium with CD163+ macrophages and PMNs as well as lining-layer hyperplasia reflect global disease activity in SpA, independently of the SpA subtype

  9. Macrophage activation and histopathological findings in Calomys callosus and Swiss mice infected with several strains of Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monamaris Marques Borges

    1992-12-01

    Full Text Available Peritoneal macrophage activation as measured by H2O2 release and histopathology was compared between Swiss mice and Calomys callosus, a wild rodent, reservoir of Trypanosoma cruzi, during the course of infection with four strains of this parasite. In mice F and Y strain infections result in high parasitemia and mortality while with silvatic strains Costalimai and M226 parasitemia is sub-patent, with very low mortality. H2O2 release peaked at 33,6 and 59 nM/2 x 10(elevado a sexta potência cells for strains Y and F, respectively, 48 and 50 nM/2 x 10 (elevado a sexta potência for strains Costalimai and M226, at different days after infection. Histopathological findings of myositis, myocarditis, necrotizing artheritis and abscence of macrophage parasitism were foud for strains F and Costalimai. Y strain infection presented moderate myocarditis and myositis, with parasites multiplying within macrophages. In C. callosus all four strains resulted in patent parasitemia wich was eventually overcome, with scarce mortality. H2O2 release for strains Y or F was comparable to that of mice-peaks of 27 and 53 nM/2 x 10 (elevado a sexta potência cells, with lower values for strains Costalimai and M226 - 16.5 and 4.6 nM/2 x 10(elevado a sexta potênciacells, respectively. Histopathological lesions with Y and F strain injected animals were comparable to those of mice at the onset of infections; they subsided completely at the later stages with Y strain and partially with F strain infected C. callosus. In