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Sample records for alternative cooling assessment

  1. Boosted Fast Flux Loop Alternative Cooling Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glen R. Longhurst; Donna Post Guillen; James R. Parry; Douglas L. Porter; Bruce W. Wallace

    2007-08-01

    The Gas Test Loop (GTL) Project was instituted to develop the means for conducting fast neutron irradiation tests in a domestic radiation facility. It made use of booster fuel to achieve the high neutron flux, a hafnium thermal neutron absorber to attain the high fast-to-thermal flux ratio, a mixed gas temperature control system for maintaining experiment temperatures, and a compressed gas cooling system to remove heat from the experiment capsules and the hafnium thermal neutron absorber. This GTL system was determined to provide a fast (E > 0.1 MeV) flux greater than 1.0E+15 n/cm2-s with a fast-to-thermal flux ratio in the vicinity of 40. However, the estimated system acquisition cost from earlier studies was deemed to be high. That cost was strongly influenced by the compressed gas cooling system for experiment heat removal. Designers were challenged to find a less expensive way to achieve the required cooling. This report documents the results of the investigation leading to an alternatively cooled configuration, referred to now as the Boosted Fast Flux Loop (BFFL). This configuration relies on a composite material comprised of hafnium aluminide (Al3Hf) in an aluminum matrix to transfer heat from the experiment to pressurized water cooling channels while at the same time providing absorption of thermal neutrons. Investigations into the performance this configuration might achieve showed that it should perform at least as well as its gas-cooled predecessor. Physics calculations indicated that the fast neutron flux averaged over the central 40 cm (16 inches) relative to ATR core mid-plane in irradiation spaces would be about 1.04E+15 n/cm2-s. The fast-to-thermal flux ratio would be in excess of 40. Further, the particular configuration of cooling channels was relatively unimportant compared with the total amount of water in the apparatus in determining performance. Thermal analyses conducted on a candidate configuration showed the design of the water coolant and

  2. Alternative Room Cooling System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Fazle Rabbi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The rapidly growing population results in an increasing demand for much more residential and commercial buildings, which leads to vertical growth of the buildings and needs proper ventilation of those buildings. Natural air ventilation system is not sufficient for conventional building structures. Hence fans and air-conditioners are must to meet the requirement of proper ventilation as well as space conditioning. Globally building sector consumes largest energy in heating, cooling, ventilation and space conditioning. This load can be minimized by the application of solar chimney and modification in building structure for heating, cooling, ventilation and space conditioning. Passive solar cooling is a subject of interest to provide cooling by using the sun, a powerful energy source. This is done for ensuring human comfort in hot climates. ASHRAE (American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Engineers defines Comfort as ‘that state of mind which expresses satisfaction with the thermal environment.’ The present paper describes the development of a solar passive cooling system, which can provide thermal cooling throughout the summer season in hot and humid climates. The constructed passive system works on natural convection mode of air. Such system reduces the inside temperature of up to 5°C from the atmospheric temperature. Temperature can further be reduced by the judicious use of night ventilation.

  3. Analysis of climatic conditions and preliminary assessment of alternative cooling strategies for houses in California transition climate zones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Y.J.; Zhang, H.

    1995-07-01

    This is a preliminary scoping study done as part of the {open_quotes}Alternatives to Compressive Cooling in California Transition Climates{close_quotes} project, which has the goal of demonstrating that houses in the transitional areas between the coast and the Central Valley of California do not require air-conditioning if they are properly designed and operated. The first part of this report analyzes the climate conditions within the transitional areas, with emphasis on design rather than seasonal conditions. Transitional climates are found to be milder but more variable than those further inland. The design temperatures under the most stringent design criteria, e.g. 0.1 % annual, are similar to those in the Valley, but significantly lower under more relaxed design criteria, e.g., 2% annual frequency. Transition climates also have large day-night temperature swings, indicating significant potential for night cooling, and wet-bulb depressions in excess of 25 F, indicating good potential for evaporative cooling. The second part of the report is a preliminary assessment using DOE-2 computer simulations of the effectiveness of alternative cooling and control strategies in improving indoor comfort conditions in two conventional Title-24 houses modeled in various transition climate locations. The cooling measures studied include increased insulation, light colors, low-emissivity glazing, window overhangs, and exposed floor slab. The control strategies studied include natural and mechanical ventilation, and direct and two-stage evaporative cooling. The results indicate the cooling strategies all have limited effectiveness, and need to be combined to produce significant improvements in indoor comfort. Natural and forced ventilation provide similar improvements in indoor conditions, but during peak cooling periods, these will still be above the comfort zone. Two-stage evaporative coolers can maintain indoor comfort at all hours, but not so direct evaporative coolers.

  4. Alternative Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dulce Porto Rodrigues

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available O ensino/aprendizagem tem mudado nas últimas três décadas e também a avaliação que não deve ser vista apenas como uma forma de testar os alunos e promovê-los, mas ajudá-los a se envolver no processo de aprendizagem, e que forneça ao professor informações para o planejamento de instrução e práticas pedagógicas. É um diagnóstico dos pontos fortes e fracos do aluno que direciona a sala de aula para a avaliação através de atividades reunidas em portfólio, incluindo todas as ações do processo ensino/ aprendizagem, visando atender às necessidades dos domínios cognitivos, afetivos e psicomotores do aluno, definir objetivos, planejamento e instrução, o envolvimento do aprendiz em sua aprendizagem e a avaliação, desconstruindo, construindo e reconstruindo o seu conhecimento.The teaching/learning has changed over the past three decades and assessment musn´t be seen as just a means of testing learners´ achievement and promotion. This type of evaluation helps students get more involved in their learning and provides teachers with useful information as the basis for instructional plans and pedagogical practices. It is a way of diagnosing the students´ strengths and weaknesses so that class procedures are directed to include activities in which students measurable outcomes are collected in a portfolio that include all types of learning/assessment procedures aiming to match the students´ cognitive, affective and psychomotor domains, to define objectives, planning, instruction and active participation in the process, deconstructing, constructing and reconstructing knowledge.

  5. Psychrometric Bin Analysis for Alternative Cooling Strategies in Data Centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metzger, I.; VanGeet, O.; Rockenbaugh, C.; Dean, J.; Kurnik, C.

    2011-01-01

    Data centers are significant energy users and require continuous cooling to maintain high levels of computing performance. The majority of data centers have direct-expansion cooling which typically accounts for approximately 50% of the energy usage of data centers. However, using typical meteorological year 3 (TMY3) weather data and a simple psychometric bin analysis, alternative cooling strategies using a combination of economizer, evaporative, and supplemental DX cooling have been shown to be applicable in all climate zones in the United States. Average data center cooling energy savings across the U.S. was approximately 80%. Analysis of cooling energy savings is presented for various ASHRAE climate zones. The psychometric bin analysis is conducted for the ASHRAE recommended and allowable operating environment zones, as well as, a modified allowable operating environment. Control strategies are discussed. Finally, examples of energy efficient data centers using alternative cooling strategies are presented.

  6. Traditional Assessment versus Alternative Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belle, Dana

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether a teacher can use one type of assessment to evaluate students' abilities fairly. The question is whether or not alternative assessment strategies are necessary to meet students' individual needs. The research, conducted with 28 fifth-grade students, compared their traditional and alternative…

  7. Assessment of spent fuel cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibarra, J.G.; Jones, W.R.; Lanik, G.F. [and others

    1997-02-01

    The paper presents the methodology, the findings, and the conclusions of a study that was done by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) on loss of spent fuel pool cooling. The study involved an examination of spent fuel pool designs, operating experience, operating practices, and procedures. AEOD`s work was augmented in the area of statistics and probabilistic risk assessment by experts from the Idaho Nuclear Engineering Laboratory. Operating experience was integrated into a probabilistic risk assessment to gain insight on the risks from spent fuel pools.

  8. Alternative energies. Keeping cool in Helsinki, Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatermann, R.

    2009-09-15

    For more than fifty years the combination of power generation with district heating has been the norm in Helsinki, Finland. A few years ago Helsinki Energy decided to integrate district cooling into the system, with great success. It showed that Helsinki is an excellent example of how the efficient use of fossil fuels can be environmentally friendly.

  9. Alternative technique for laser cooling with superradiance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemova, Galina; Kashyap, Raman

    2011-01-01

    We present a theoretical scheme for laser cooling of rare-earth-doped solids with optical superradiance (SR), which is the coherent, sharply directed spontaneous emission of photons by a system of laser-excited rare-earth ions in the solid-state host (glass or crystal). We consider an Yb+-doped ZnF4-BaF2-LaF3-AlF3-NaF (ZBLAN) sample pumped at a wavelength 1015 nm, with a rectangular pulsed source with a power of ˜433 W and a duration of 10 ns. The intensity of the SR is proportional to the square of the number of excited ions. This unique feature of SR permits an increase in the rate of the cooling process in comparison with the traditional laser cooling of the rare-earth-doped solids with anti-Stokes spontaneous incoherent radiation (fluorescence). This scheme overcomes the limitation of using only low phonon energy glasses for laser cooling.

  10. The Prospects of Alternatives to Vapor Compression Technology for Space Cooling and Food Refrigeration Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Daryl R.; Dirks, James A.; Fernandez, Nicholas; Stout, Tyson E.

    2010-03-31

    Five alternatives to vapor compression technology were qualitatively evaluated to determine their prospects for being better than vapor compression for space cooling and food refrigeration applications. The results of the assessment are summarized in the report. Overall, thermoacoustic and magnetic technologies were judged to have the best prospects for competing with vapor compression technology, with thermotunneling, thermoelectric, and thermionic technologies trailing behind in that order.

  11. Assessment of alternative disposal concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Autio, J.; Saanio, T.; Tolppanen, P. [Saanio and Riekkola Consulting Engineers, Helsinki (Finland); Raiko, H.; Vieno, T. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland); Salo, J.P. [Posiva Oy, Helsinki (Finland)

    1996-12-01

    Four alternative repository designs for the disposal of spent nuclear in the Finnish crystalline bedrock were assessed in the study. The alternatives were: (1) the basic KBS-3 design in which copper canisters are emplaced in vertical deposition holes bored in the floors of horizontal tunnels, (2) the KBS-3-2C design with two canisters in a deposition hole, (3) Short Horizontal Holes (SHH) in the side walls of the tunnels, and (4) the Medium Long Holes (MLH) concept in which approximately 25 canisters are emplaced in a horizontal deposition hole about 200 metres in length bored between central and side tunnels. In all the alternatives considered, the thickness of the layer of compacted bentonite between copper canister and bedrock is 35 cm. Two different copper canister designs were also assessed. Technical feasibility and flexibility, post-closure safety and repository cost were assessed for each of the alternative canister and repository designs. On the basis of this assessment it is recommended that further development and studies should focus on the vacuum- or inert gas-filled cast insert type copper canister and the basic KBS-3 type repository design with a single canister in a vertical deposition hole. The KBS-3 design is robust and flexible and provides excellent post-closure safety. The transfer, emplacement and sealing operations are technically uncomplicated. The alternative options assessed do not offer any significant benefits in safety or cost over the basic design, but they are technically more complex and also in some respects more vulnerable to malfunction during the emplacement of canisters and buffer, as well as common mode failures. (60 refs.).

  12. An assessment of desiccant cooling and dehumidification technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mei, V.C.; Chen, F.C. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Lavan, Z. (Illinois Inst. of Tech., Chicago, IL (United States)); Collier, R.K. Jr. (Collier Engineering Services, Merritt Island, FL (United States)); Meckler, G. (Gershon Meckler Associates, P.C., Herndon, VA (United States))

    1992-07-01

    Desiccant systems are heat-actuated cooling and dehumidification technology. With the recent advances in this technology, desiccant systems can now achieve a primary energy coefficient of performance (COP) between 1.3 and 1.5, with potential to go to 1.7 and higher. It is becoming one of the most promising alternatives to conventional cooling systems. Two important and well-known advantages of desiccant cooling systems are that they are CFC free and they can reduce the electricity peak load. Another important but lesser-known advantage of desiccant technology is its potential for energy conservation. The energy impact study in this report indicated that a possible 13% energy saving in residential cooling and 8% in commercial cooling is possible. Great energy saving potential also exists in the industrial sector if industrial waste heat can be used for desiccant regeneration. The latest study on desiccant-integrated building heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems indicated that the initial cost for the conventional cooling equipment was greatly reduced by using desiccant technology because of downsized compressors, fans, and ductworks. This cost reduction was more than enough to offset the cost of desiccant equipment. Besides, the system operation cost was also reduced. All these indicate that desiccant systems are also cost effective. This study provides an updated state-of-the-art assessment forsiccant technology in the field of desiccant materials, systems, computer models, and theoretical analyses. From this information the technology options were derived and the future research and development needs were identified. Because desiccant technology has already been applied in the commercial building sector with very encouraging results, it is expected that future market breakthroughs will probably start in this sector. A market analysis for the commercial building application is therefore included.

  13. Risk Analyses of Charging Pump Control Improvements for Alternative RCP Seal Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun-Chan [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co. Ltd. Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    There are two events that significantly affect the plant risk during a TLOCCW event. One is an event in which the seal assembly of a reactor coolant pump (RCP) fails due to heating stress from the loss of cooling water; the other is an event in which the operators fail to conduct alternative cooling for the RCP seal during the accident. KHNP reviewed the replacement of the RCP seal with a qualified shutdown seal in order to remove the risk due to RCP seal failure during a TLOCCW. As an optional measure, a design improvement in the alternative cooling method for the RCP seal is being considered. This analysis presents the alternative RCP seal cooling improvement and its safety effect. K2 is a nuclear power plant with a Westinghouse design, and it has a relatively high CDF during TLOCCW events because it has a different CCW system design and difficulty in preparing alternative cooling water sources. This analysis confirmed that an operator action providing cold water to the RWST as RCP seal injection water during a TLOCCW event is very important in K2. The control circuit improvement plan for the auxiliary charging pump was established in order to reduce the failure probability of this operator action. This analysis modeled the improvement as a fault tree and evaluated the resulting CDF change. The consequence demonstrated that the RCP seal injection failure probability was reduced by 89%, and the CDF decreased by 28%.

  14. Assessment of Alternative Financial Theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Sarah

    This publication presents an assessment of various methods applicable for measurement of lender profitability with particular emphasis on net present value (NPV) in order to determine whether the Department of Education's current method for determining lender profitability within the Stafford Student Loan program is the best. The introduction…

  15. On the influence of the alternation of two different cooling systems on dairy cow daily activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona M.C. Porto

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Among the causes that influence cow welfare, heat stress induced by microclimatic conditions is one of the most relevant and many studies have investigated the efficacy of different cooling systems on animal health status. Nevertheless, the direct influence of the cooling systems on possible modifications of dairy cow behaviour has been addressed in a few studies and the related results were affected by the presence of a paddock, which gave a refuge from hot temperature. Since an alteration of the daily time budget spent by dairy cows in their usual activities can be associated with changes in their health status, this study investigated the effects of the alternation of two different cooling systems on lying, standing, and feeding behaviour of a group of dairy cows bred in a free-stall dairy house where animals had no access to a paddock. The barn was equipped with a fogging system associated with forced ventilation installed in the resting area and a sprinkler system associated with forced ventilation installed in the feeding area. The two systems were activated alternately. The results demonstrated that the management of the two cooling systems affected the analysed behaviours. Though the activation of the cooling system installed in the resting area encouraged the decubitus of animals in the stalls, the activation of that one of the feeding alley could not be able to influence the standing behaviour and had only a moderate positive influence on the feeding activity.

  16. Feasibility assessment of vacuum cooling followed by immersion vacuum cooling on water-cooked pork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiaoguang; Chen, Hui; Liu, Yi; Dai, Ruitong; Li, Xingmin

    2012-01-01

    Vacuum cooling followed by immersion vacuum cooling was designed to cool water-cooked pork (1.5±0.05 kg) compared with air blast cooling (4±0.5°C, 2 m/s), vacuum cooling (10 mbar) and immersion vacuum cooling. This combined cooling method was: vacuum cooling to an intermediate temperature of 25°C and then immersion vacuum cooling with water of 10°C to the final temperature of 10°C. It was found that the cooling loss of this combined cooling method was significantly lower (Pvacuum cooling. This combined cooling was faster (Pvacuum cooling in terms of cooling rate. Moreover, the pork cooled by combined cooling method had significant differences (P<0.05) in water content, color and shear force. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Desiccant cooling: State-of-the-art assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesaran, A.A.; Penney, T.R.; Czanderna, A.W.

    1992-10-01

    The objectives of this document are to present an overview of the work accomplished to date on desiccant cooling to provide assessment of the state of the art of desiccant cooling technology in the field of desiccant material dehumidifier components, desiccant systems, and models. The report also discusses the factors that affect the widespread acceptance of desiccant cooling technology. This report is organized as follows. First, a basic description and historical overview of desiccant cooling technology is provided. Then, the recent research and development (R&D) program history (focusing on DOE`s funded efforts) is discussed. The status of the technology elements (materials, components, systems) is discussed in detail and a preliminary study on the energy impact of desiccant technology is presented. R&D needs for advancing the technology in the market are identified. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory`s unique desiccant test facilities and their typical outputs are described briefly. Finally, the results of a comprehensive literature search on desiccant cooling are presented in a bibliography. The bibliography contains approximately 900 citations on desiccant cooling.

  18. Desiccant cooling: State-of-the-art assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesaran, A.A.; Penney, T.R.; Czanderna, A.W.

    1992-10-01

    The objectives of this document are to present an overview of the work accomplished to date on desiccant cooling to provide assessment of the state of the art of desiccant cooling technology in the field of desiccant material dehumidifier components, desiccant systems, and models. The report also discusses the factors that affect the widespread acceptance of desiccant cooling technology. This report is organized as follows. First, a basic description and historical overview of desiccant cooling technology is provided. Then, the recent research and development (R D) program history (focusing on DOE's funded efforts) is discussed. The status of the technology elements (materials, components, systems) is discussed in detail and a preliminary study on the energy impact of desiccant technology is presented. R D needs for advancing the technology in the market are identified. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's unique desiccant test facilities and their typical outputs are described briefly. Finally, the results of a comprehensive literature search on desiccant cooling are presented in a bibliography. The bibliography contains approximately 900 citations on desiccant cooling.

  19. Army Gas-Cooled Reactor Systems program: alternator final design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1964-06-01

    The development and testing of a demonstration brushless alternator for the ML-1 mobile nuclear power plant is described. The brushless concept was selected after it became apparent that a conventional power generator could not satisfy the ML-1 weight and size requirements. The demonstration alternator fabricated and tested under this program did not meet all performance specifications; the efficiency was low and the unit could not be operated for significant periods of time without overheating. However, a large body of useful data was accumulated during the extensive development program. Of special interest are data on the rotor and stator design, the cooling requirements and on the distribution of eddy current losses. Analysis of the data indicates that a brushless alternator, only slightly larger and heavier than was specified for the ML-1, could be developed with a modest additional effort.

  20. Exploring alternative assessment strategies in science classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michèle Stears

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge children bring to the classroom or construct in the classroom may find expression in a variety of activities and is often not measurable with the traditional assessment instruments used in science classrooms. Different approaches to assessment are required to accommodate the various ways in which learners construct knowledge in social settings. In our research we attempted to determine the types of outcomes achieved in a Grade 6 classroom where alternative strategies such as interactive assessments were implemented. Analyses of these outcomes show that the learners learned much more than the tests indicate, although what they learnt was not necessarily science. The implications for assessment are clear: strategies that assess knowledge of science concepts, as well as assessment of outcomes other than science outcomes, are required if we wish to gain a holistic understanding of the learning that occurs in science classrooms.

  1. Pulse Detonation Assessment for Alternative Fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Hanafi Azami

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The higher thermodynamic efficiency inherent in a detonation combustion based engine has already led to considerable interest in the development of wave rotor, pulse detonation, and rotating detonation engine configurations as alternative technologies offering improved performance for the next generation of aerospace propulsion systems, but it is now important to consider their emissions also. To assess both performance and emissions, this paper focuses on the feasibility of using alternative fuels in detonation combustion. Thus, the standard aviation fuels Jet-A, Acetylene, Jatropha Bio-synthetic Paraffinic Kerosene, Camelina Bio-synthetic Paraffinic Kerosene, Algal Biofuel, and Microalgae Biofuel are all asessed under detonation combustion conditions. An analytical model accounting for the Rankine-Hugoniot Equation, Rayleigh Line Equation, and Zel’dovich–von Neumann–Doering model, and taking into account single step chemistry and thermophysical properties for a stoichiometric mixture, is applied to a simple detonation tube test case configuration. The computed pressure rise and detonation velocity are shown to be in good agreement with published literature. Additional computations examine the effects of initial pressure, temperature, and mass flux on the physical properties of the flow. The results indicate that alternative fuels require higher initial mass flux and temperature to detonate. The benefits of alternative fuels appear significant.

  2. Spent Nuclear Fuel Alternative Technology Risk Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perella, V.F.

    1999-11-29

    A Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Task Team (RRTT) was chartered by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Spent Fuel Management with the responsibility to recommend a course of action leading to a final technology selection for the interim management and ultimate disposition of the foreign and domestic aluminum-based research reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) under DOE''s jurisdiction. The RRTT evaluated eleven potential SNF management technologies and recommended that two technologies, direct co-disposal and an isotopic dilution alternative, either press and dilute or melt and dilute, be developed in parallel. Based upon that recommendation, the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) organized the SNF Alternative Technology Program to further develop the direct co-disposal and melt and dilute technologies and provide a WSRC recommendation to DOE for a preferred SNF alternative management technology. A technology risk assessment was conducted as a first step in this recommendation process to determine if either, or both, of the technologies posed significant risks that would make them unsuitable for further development. This report provides the results of that technology risk assessment.

  3. Seismic hazard assessment: Issues and alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z.

    2011-01-01

    Seismic hazard and risk are two very important concepts in engineering design and other policy considerations. Although seismic hazard and risk have often been used inter-changeably, they are fundamentally different. Furthermore, seismic risk is more important in engineering design and other policy considerations. Seismic hazard assessment is an effort by earth scientists to quantify seismic hazard and its associated uncertainty in time and space and to provide seismic hazard estimates for seismic risk assessment and other applications. Although seismic hazard assessment is more a scientific issue, it deserves special attention because of its significant implication to society. Two approaches, probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) and deterministic seismic hazard analysis (DSHA), are commonly used for seismic hazard assessment. Although PSHA has been pro-claimed as the best approach for seismic hazard assessment, it is scientifically flawed (i.e., the physics and mathematics that PSHA is based on are not valid). Use of PSHA could lead to either unsafe or overly conservative engineering design or public policy, each of which has dire consequences to society. On the other hand, DSHA is a viable approach for seismic hazard assessment even though it has been labeled as unreliable. The biggest drawback of DSHA is that the temporal characteristics (i.e., earthquake frequency of occurrence and the associated uncertainty) are often neglected. An alternative, seismic hazard analysis (SHA), utilizes earthquake science and statistics directly and provides a seismic hazard estimate that can be readily used for seismic risk assessment and other applications. ?? 2010 Springer Basel AG.

  4. Self-assessment: an alternative method of assessing speaking skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterini Chalkia

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study focuses on self-assessment as an alternative method of assessing the speaking skills of a group of sixth graders of a Greek State Primary School. The paper consists of two parts. In the first part, traditional and alternative assessment approaches are compared and a literature review on self-assessment is presented. In the second part the methodology and the findings of the study are presented. The study was carried out by means of a questionnaire and observation notes. This was done in order to draw conclusions on the benefits of self-assessment, the difficulties students faced while carrying out self-assessment as well as to reveal the extent to which students improved their speaking skills after being involved in self-assessment. The findings revealed that the students were positive towards self-assessment. Although self-assessment was of limited duration, it turned out to be a worthwhile activity as it fostered motivation and sensitized the students to take a more active role in the learning process. It also enabled them to notice their strengths and weaknesses and improve their speaking skills. The study also revealed the practical difficulties the students faced in carrying out their self-assessment. Finally, the study concludes with recommendations for further research into this specific assessment method.

  5. Aviation turbine fuels: An assessment of alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    The general outlook for aviation turbine fuels, the effect that broadening permissible aviation turbine fuel properties could have on the overall availability of such fuels, the fuel properties most likely to be affected by use of lower grade petroleum crudes, and the research and technology required to ensure that aviation turbine fuels and engines can function satisfactorily with fuels having a range of fuel properties differing from those of current specification fuel are assessed. Views of industry representatives on alternative aviation turbine fuels are presented.

  6. The power of alternative assessments (AAs)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张千茜

    2013-01-01

    This article starts by discussing the potential disadvantages of traditional assessment towards young English as a Second Language (ESL) learners within the American public school education system. In response to such disadvantages, researchers ’call for the implementation of alternative assessments (AAs) is therefore introduced along with the various benefits of AAs. However, the current mainstream education policy in the US, namely No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Policy, is still largely based on the tra-ditional ways of testing, making policy-oriented implementation of AAs on large scales remarkably difficult. After careful analysis, the author points out several implications concerning how, under such an existing policy of NCLB, can practitioners effectively accommodate young ESL learners by applying the power of AAs.

  7. Implicit spiritual assessment: an alternative approach for assessing client spirituality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, David R

    2013-07-01

    To provide optimal services, a spiritual assessment is often administered to understand the intersection between clients' spirituality and service provision. Traditional assessment approaches, however, may be ineffective with clients who are uncomfortable with spiritual language or who are otherwise hesitant to discuss spirituality overtly. This article orients readers to an implicit spiritual assessment, an alternative approach that may be more valid with such clients. The process of administering an implicit assessment is discussed, sample questions are provided to help operationalize this approach, and suggestions are offered to integrate an implicit assessment with more traditional assessment approaches. By using terminology that is implicitly spiritual in nature, an implicit assessment enables practitioners to identify and operationalize dimensions of clients' experience that may be critical to effective service provision but would otherwise be overlooked.

  8. Corrosion control when using secondary treated municipal wastewater as alternative makeup water for cooling tower systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Ming-Kai; Li, Heng; Chien, Shih-Hsiang; Monnell, Jason D; Chowdhury, Indranil; Dzombak, David A; Vidic, Radisav D

    2010-12-01

    Secondary treated municipal wastewater is a promising alternative to fresh water as power plant cooling water system makeup water, especially in arid regions. Laboratory and field testing was conducted in this study to evaluate the corrosiveness of secondary treated municipal wastewater for various metals and metal alloys in cooling systems. Different corrosion control strategies were evaluated based on varied chemical treatment. Orthophosphate, which is abundant in secondary treated municipal wastewater, contributed to more than 80% precipitative removal of phosphorous-based corrosion inhibitors. Tolyltriazole worked effectively to reduce corrosion of copper (greater than 95% inhibition effectiveness). The corrosion rate of mild steel in the presence of free chlorine 1 mg/L (as Cl2) was approximately 50% higher than in the presence of monochloramine 1 mg/L (as Cl2), indicating that monochloramine is a less corrosive biocide than free chlorine. The scaling layers observed on the metal alloys contributed to corrosion inhibition, which could be seen by comparing the mild steel 21-day average corrosion rate with the last 5-day average corrosion rate, the latter being approximately 50% lower than the former.

  9. Assessment of atmospheric moisture harvesting by direct cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gido, Ben; Friedler, Eran; Broday, David M.

    2016-12-01

    The enormous amount of water vapor present in the atmosphere may serve as a potential water resource. An index is proposed for assessing the feasibility and energy requirements of atmospheric moisture harvesting by a direct cooling process. A climate-based analysis of different locations reveals the global potential of this process. We demonstrate that the Moisture Harvesting Index (MHI) can be used for assessing the energy requirements of atmospheric moisture harvesting. The efficiency of atmospheric moisture harvesting is highly weather and climate dependent, with the smallest estimated energy requirement found at the tropical regions of the Philippines (0.23 kW/L). Less favorable locations have much higher energy demands for the operation of an atmospheric moisture harvesting device. In such locations, using the MHI to select the optimal operation time periods (during the day and the year) can reduce the specific energy requirements of the process dramatically. Still, using current technology the energy requirement of atmospheric moisture harvesting by a direct air cooling process is significantly higher than of desalination by reverse osmosis.

  10. LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF ELECTRICITY GENERATION ALTERNATIVES

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation summarizes various electricity and electricity/steam cogeneration alternatives. Among these alternatives, are fossil fuel and biomass power generation plants. These plants have different designs due to the need in fossil fuel (coal) plants to include process u...

  11. Feasibility report on alternative methods for cooling cavern oils at the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levin, Bruce L.; Lord, David L.; Hadgu, Teklu

    2005-06-01

    Oil caverns at the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) are subjected to geothermal heating from the surrounding domal salt. This process raises the temperature of the crude oil from around 75 F upon delivery to SPR to as high as 130 F after decades of storage. While this temperature regime is adequate for long-term storage, it poses challenges for offsite delivery, with warm oil evolving gases that pose handling and safety problems. SPR installed high-capacity oil coolers in the mid-1990's to mitigate the emissions problem by lowering the oil delivery temperature. These heat exchanger units use incoming raw water as the cooling fluid, and operate only during a drawdown event where incoming water displaces the outgoing oil. The design criteria for the heat exchangers are to deliver oil at 100 F or less under all drawdown conditions. Increasing crude oil vapor pressures due in part to methane intrusion in the caverns is threatening to produce sufficient emissions at or near 100 F to cause the cooled oil to violate delivery requirements. This impending problem has initiated discussion and analysis of alternative cooling methods to bring the oil temperature even lower than the original design basis of 100 F. For the study described in this report, two alternative cooling methods were explored: (1) cooling during a limited drawdown, and (2) cooling during a degas operation. Both methods employ the heat exchangers currently in place, and do not require extra equipment. An analysis was run using two heat transfer models, HEATEX, and CaveMan, both developed at Sandia National Laboratories. For cooling during a limited drawdown, the cooling water flowrate through the coolers was varied from 1:1 water:oil to about 3:1, with an increased cooling capacity of about 3-7 F for the test cavern Bryan Mound 108 depending upon seasonal temperature effects. For cooling in conjunction with a degas operation in the winter, cavern oil temperatures for the test cavern Big Hill 102

  12. Using Alternative Assessments in Business and Foreign Language Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Deborah; Lucas, Diane

    2013-01-01

    The present study will be divided in three parts: (1) a discussion of authentic alternative assessments vs. traditional assessments in language and business classes; (2) an explanation on how to create authentic alternative assessments using technology-based and non-technology-based materials; and (3) tools to evaluate these authentic assessments.…

  13. Using Alternative Assessments in Business and Foreign Language Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Deborah; Lucas, Diane

    2013-01-01

    The present study will be divided in three parts: (1) a discussion of authentic alternative assessments vs. traditional assessments in language and business classes; (2) an explanation on how to create authentic alternative assessments using technology-based and non-technology-based materials; and (3) tools to evaluate these authentic assessments.…

  14. BWR Steam Dryer Alternating Stress Assessment Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morante, R. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hambric, S. A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ziada, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-12-01

    This report presents an overview of Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) steam dryer design; the fatigue cracking failures that occurred at the Quad Cities (QC) plants and their root causes; a history of BWR Extended Power Uprates (EPUs) in the USA; and a discussion of steam dryer modifications/replacements, alternating stress mechanisms on steam dryers, and structural integrity evaluations (static and alternating stress).

  15. Solar energy as an alternate energy source to mixed oxide fuels in light-water cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertini, H.W.

    1977-06-30

    Supplemental information pertaining to the generic environmental impact statement on the Pu recycling process for mixed oxide light-water cooled reactors (GESMO) was requested from several sources. In particular, the role of alternate sources of energy was to be explored and the implications of these alternate sources to the question of Pu recycle in LWRs were to be investigated. In this vein, solar energy as an alternate source is the main subject of this report, along with other information related to solar energy. The general conclusion is that solar energy should have little effect on the decisions concerning GESMO.

  16. Innovative and Alternative Technology Assessment Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-02-01

    This four chapter, six appendix manual presents the procedures and methodology as well as the baseline costs and energy information necessary for the analysis and evaluation of innovative and alternative technology applications submitted for federal grant assistance under the innovative and alternative technology provisions of the Clean Water Act of 1977. The manual clarifies and interprets the intent of Congress and the Environmental Protection Agency in carrying out the mandates of the innovative and alternative provisions of the Clean Water Act of 1977. [DJE 2005

  17. Optimum cooling of data centers application of risk assessment and mitigation techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Dai, Jun; Das, Diganta; Pecht, Michael G

    2014-01-01

    This book provides data center designers and operators with methods by which to assess and mitigate the risks associated with utilization of optimum cooling solutions. The goal is to provide readers with sufficient knowledge to implement measures such as free air cooling or direct liquid immersion cooling properly, or combination of existing and emerging cooling technologies in data centers, base stations, and server farms. This book also: Discusses various telecommunication infrastructures, with an emphasis on data centers and base stations Covers the most commonly known energy and power management techniques, as well as emerging cooling solutions for data centers Describes the risks to the electronic equipment fitted in these installations and the methods of risk mitigation Devotes  a particular focus to an up-to-date review of the emerging cooling methods (such as free air cooling and direct liquid immersion cooling) and tools and best practices for designers, technology developers, installation operators...

  18. Preliminary Assessment of a Debris Bed Cooling Performance for Demonstration Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Chung Ho; Park, Chang Gyu; Song, Hoon; Kim, Young Gyun; Jeong, Hae Yong; Chang, Jin Wook [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    In the case of the sodium-cooled fast reactor such as KALIMER-600, Hypothetical Core Disruptive Accident (HCDA) attributed from mass nuclear fuel melting is unlikely to occur due to defense in depth concepts to meet requirements of redundancy and diversity. Multiple faults such as loss of flow, loss of heat sink, or transient overpower without scram are to lead rising the power level until cladding failure as reactivity increasing. The fact that metallic fuel melts at a lower temperature than the cladding allows significant in-pin- fuel motion to occur prior to cladding failure. Also, the combination of Doppler and axial expansion feedback and negative feedback associated with the in-pin fuel relocation prevents the reactivity from reaching prompt critical. Finally, the resulting reactivity and power reductions help prevent fuel temperatures from rising more than the fuel melting temperature. It is more difficult to occur HCDA in a metallic fueled core because reactor power and heat removal capability is maintained in balance by inherent safety characteristics However, for the future design of sodium-cooled fast reactor, the evaluation of the safety performance and the determination of containment requirements may be worth considering due to the triple-fault accident sequences of extremely low probability of occurrence that leads to core melting. For any postulated accident sequence which leads to core melting, in-vessel retention of the core debris will be required as a design requirement for the future design of sodium cooled fast reactor. Also, proof of the capacity of the debris bed cooling is an essential condition to solve the problem of in-vessel retention of the core debris. Accordingly, evaluation of a packed debris bed cooling performance with single phase flow for demonstration sodium-cooled fast reactor was carried out for proof of the in-vessel retention of the core debris

  19. How Teachers Understand and Use Power in Alternative Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelvin H. K. Tan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available “Alternative assessment” is an increasingly common and popular discourse in education. The potential benefit of alternative assessment practices is premised on significant changes in assessment practices. However, assessment practices embody power relations between institutions, teachers and students, and these power relationships determine the possibility and the extent of actual changes in assessment practices. Labelling a practice as “alternative assessment does not guarantee meaningful departure from existing practice. Recent research has warned that assessment practices in education cannot be presumed to empower students in ways that enhance their learning. This is partly due to a tendency to speak of power in assessment in undefined terms. Hence, it would be useful to identify the types of power present in assessment practices and the contexts which give rise to them. This paper seeks to examine power in the context of different ways that alternative assessment is practiced and understood by teachers. Research on teachers’ conceptions of alternative assessment is presented, and each of the conceptions is then analysed for insights into teachers’ meanings and practices of power. In particular, instances of sovereign, epistemological and disciplinary power in alternative assessment are identified to illuminate new ways of understanding and using alternative assessment.

  20. Thermal Aspects of Using Alternative Nuclear Fuels in Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande, Lisa Christine

    A SuperCritical Water-cooled Nuclear Reactor (SCWR) is a Generation IV concept currently being developed worldwide. Unique to this reactor type is the use of light-water coolant above its critical point. The current research presents a thermal-hydraulic analysis of a single fuel channel within a Pressure Tube (PT)-type SCWR with a single-reheat cycle. Since this reactor is in its early design phase many fuel-channel components are being investigated in various combinations. Analysis inputs are: steam cycle, Axial Heat Flux Profile (AHFP), fuel-bundle geometry, and thermophysical properties of reactor coolant, fuel sheath and fuel. Uniform and non-uniform AHFPs for average channel power were applied to a variety of alternative fuels (mixed oxide, thorium dioxide, uranium dicarbide, uranium nitride and uranium carbide) enclosed in an Inconel-600 43-element bundle. The results depict bulk-fluid, outer-sheath and fuel-centreline temperature profiles together with the Heat Transfer Coefficient (HTC) profiles along the heated length of fuel channel. The objective is to identify the best options in terms of fuel, sheath material and AHFPS in which the outer-sheath and fuel-centreline temperatures will be below the accepted temperature limits of 850°C and 1850°C respectively. The 43-element Inconel-600 fuel bundle is suitable for SCWR use as the sheath-temperature design limit of 850°C was maintained for all analyzed cases at average channel power. Thoria, UC2, UN and UC fuels for all AHFPs are acceptable since the maximum fuel-centreline temperature does not exceed the industry accepted limit of 1850°C. Conversely, the fuel-centreline temperature limit was exceeded for MOX at all AHFPs, and UO2 for both cosine and downstream-skewed cosine AHFPs. Therefore, fuel-bundle modifications are required for UO2 and MOX to be feasible nuclear fuels for SCWRs.

  1. The applicability of chemical alternatives assessment for engineered nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Rune; Hansen, Steffen Foss; Jacobs, Molly;

    2017-01-01

    The use of alternatives assessment to substitute hazardous chemicals with inherently safer options is gaining momentum worldwide as a legislative and corporate strategy to minimize consumer, occupational, and environmental risks. Engineered nanomaterials represent an interesting case for alternat......The use of alternatives assessment to substitute hazardous chemicals with inherently safer options is gaining momentum worldwide as a legislative and corporate strategy to minimize consumer, occupational, and environmental risks. Engineered nanomaterials represent an interesting case...... for alternatives assessment approaches as they can be considered both emerging “chemicals” of concern, as well as potentially safer alternatives to hazardous chemicals. However, comparing the hazards of nanomaterials to traditional chemicals or to other nanomaterials is challenging and critical elements...... in chemical hazard and exposure assessment may have to be fundamentally altered to sufficiently address nanomaterials. The aim of this paper is to assess the overall applicability of alternatives assessment methods for nanomaterials and outline recommendations to enhance their use in this context. This paper...

  2. Hydronic radiant cooling: Overview and preliminary performance assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feustel, H.E.

    1993-05-01

    A significant amount of electrical energy used to cool non-residential buildings is drawn by the fans used to transport the cool air through the thermal distribution system. Hydronic systems reduce the amount of air transported through the building by separating ventilation and thermal conditioning. Due to the physical properties of water, hydronic distribution systems can transport a given amount of thermal energy using less than 5% of the otherwise necessary fan energy. This savings alone significantly reduces the energy consumption and especially the peak power requirement This survey clearly shows advantages for radiant cooling in combination with hydronic thermal distribution systems in comparison with the All-Air Systems commonly used in California. The report describes a literature survey on the system`s development, thermal comfort issues, and cooling performance. The cooling power potential and the cooling power requirement are investigated for several California climates. Peak-power requirement is compared for hydronic radiant cooling and conventional All-Air-Systems.

  3. Hydronic radiant cooling: Overview and preliminary performance assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feustel, H.E.

    1993-05-01

    A significant amount of electrical energy used to cool non-residential buildings is drawn by the fans used to transport the cool air through the thermal distribution system. Hydronic systems reduce the amount of air transported through the building by separating ventilation and thermal conditioning. Due to the physical properties of water, hydronic distribution systems can transport a given amount of thermal energy using less than 5% of the otherwise necessary fan energy. This savings alone significantly reduces the energy consumption and especially the peak power requirement This survey clearly shows advantages for radiant cooling in combination with hydronic thermal distribution systems in comparison with the All-Air Systems commonly used in California. The report describes a literature survey on the system's development, thermal comfort issues, and cooling performance. The cooling power potential and the cooling power requirement are investigated for several California climates. Peak-power requirement is compared for hydronic radiant cooling and conventional All-Air-Systems.

  4. The phenomenon of evaporative cooling from a humid surface as an alternative method for air-conditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Velasco Gomez, F.C. Rey Martinez, A. Tejero Gonzalez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of evaporative cooling is a common process in nature, whose applications for cooling air are being used since the ancient years. In fact, it meets this objective with a low energy consumption, being compared to the primary energy consumption of other alternatives for cooling, as it is simply based in the phenomenon of reducing the air temperature by evaporating water on it. This process can be an interesting alternative to conventional systems in these applications where no very low temperatures are needed, like the case of air-conditioning during the summer. However, the risk of contamination by legionnaire’s disease, commonly related to evaporative cooling systems, has led in recent years to the substitution of these devices in the industry by less-efficient systems, like the case of cooling towers or evaporative condensers substituted by air-condensing refrigerating processes. Therefore, these systems based in the evaporative cooling are rarely used for cooling buildings. To reduce this risk, evaporative cooling is produced from humid surfaces, in such a way that water evaporates due to the difference of vapor pressure between the surface and the air, and thus minimizing the generation of aerosols, responsible for the spread of legionnaire disease. Aerosols are nevertheless produced in conventional systems where water is sprayed or directly in contact with the stream of air; and the problem worsens if the water, which is recirculated, has been still in any moment or its temperature is adequate for the bacteria proliferation. This paper aims to introduce the thermodynamic basis in which the process is based, as well as the commercial evaporative systems and the problem associated to legionnaire’s disease in this kind of systems. Furthermore, three different experimental devices based in evaporative cooling are described, which have been designed and manufactured in the Thermal Engineering Research Group of the University of

  5. Alternative forms of continuous assessment in mathematics

    OpenAIRE

    Carr, Michael; Ní Fhloinn, Eabhnat

    2007-01-01

    In Dublin Institute of Technology, there has been a recent move to semesterisation, with an increased emphasis on continuous assessment. In mathematics, this would traditionally mean that students would sit a number of short, written assessments during the course of each semester, in conjunction with an end-of-module exam. However, it was decided to combine these usual assessments with presentations on mathematics for certain cohorts this semester. As part of their continuous assessment ma...

  6. Young Adult Literature and Alternative Assessment Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comer, Melissa

    2011-01-01

    The principal purpose of assessment, regardless of teaching level, should be to guide instruction. Unlike evaluation, the goal of assessment is not to arrive at a grade for students. Rather, it is to inform the educator as to what needs to be addressed in the classroom. Assessment in a young adult literature (YAL) curriculum is no different. Its…

  7. Promoting Motivational Goals through Alternative or Traditional Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslovaty, Nava; Kuzi, Esther

    2002-01-01

    Studied the relationship between classroom assessment and motivational goals in diverse class climates in two Israeli elementary schools those that mainly apply traditional assessment and two that mainly apply alternative assessment. Results for 261 sixth-grade students show distinct differences in student perceptions of assessment and perception…

  8. Desiccant dehumidification and cooling systems assessment and analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collier, R.K. Jr. [Collier Engineering, Reno, NV (United States)

    1997-09-01

    The objective of this report is to provide a preliminary analysis of the principles, sensitivities, and potential for national energy savings of desiccant cooling and dehumidification systems. The report is divided into four sections. Section I deals with the maximum theoretical performance of ideal desiccant cooling systems. Section II looks at the performance effects of non-ideal behavior of system components. Section III examines the effects of outdoor air properties on desiccant cooling system performance. Section IV analyzes the applicability of desiccant cooling systems to reduce primary energy requirements for providing space conditioning in buildings. A basic desiccation process performs no useful work (cooling). That is, a desiccant material drying air is close to an isenthalpic process. Latent energy is merely converted to sensible energy. Only when heat exchange is applied to the desiccated air is any cooling accomplished. This characteristic is generic to all desiccant cycles and critical to understanding their operation. The analyses of Section I show that desiccant cooling cycles can theoretically achieve extremely high thermal CoP`s (>2). The general conclusion from Section II is that ventilation air processing is the most viable application for the solid desiccant equipment analyzed. The results from the seasonal simulations performed in Section III indicate that, generally, the seasonal performance of the desiccant system does not change significantly from that predicted for outdoor conditions. Results from Section IV show that all of the candidate desiccant systems can save energy relative to standard vapor-compression systems. The largest energy savings are achieved by the enthalpy exchange devise.

  9. The applicability of chemical alternatives assessment for engineered nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjorth, Rune; Hansen, Steffen Foss; Jacobs, Molly; Tickner, Joel; Ellenbecker, Michael; Baun, Anders

    2017-01-01

    The use of alternatives assessment to substitute hazardous chemicals with inherently safer options is gaining momentum worldwide as a legislative and corporate strategy to minimize consumer, occupational, and environmental risks. Engineered nanomaterials represent an interesting case for alternatives assessment approaches, because they can be considered both emerging "chemicals" of concern, as well as potentially safer alternatives to hazardous chemicals. However, comparing the hazards of nanomaterials to traditional chemicals or to other nanomaterials is challenging, and critical elements in chemical hazard and exposure assessment may have to be fundamentally altered to sufficiently address nanomaterials. The aim of this paper is to assess the overall applicability of alternatives assessment methods for nanomaterials and to outline recommendations to enhance their use in this context. The present paper focuses on the adaptability of existing hazard and exposure assessment approaches to engineered nanomaterials as well as strategies to design inherently safer nanomaterials. We argue that alternatives assessment for nanomaterials is complicated by the sheer number of nanomaterials possible. As a result, the inclusion of new data tools that can efficiently and effectively evaluate nanomaterials as substitutes is needed to strengthen the alternatives assessment process. However, we conclude that with additional tools to enhance traditional hazard and exposure assessment modules of alternatives assessment, such as the use of mechanistic toxicity screens and control banding tools, alternatives assessment can be adapted to evaluate engineered nanomaterials as potential substitutes for chemicals of concern and to ensure safer nanomaterials are incorporated in the design of new products. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2017;13:177-187. © 2016 SETAC.

  10. OUTCOMES OF ALTERNATIVE ASSESSMENT IN ADULT LANGUAGE TRAINING

    OpenAIRE

    Brândușa Elena Octavia ȚEICAN

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to highlight the switch from traditional assessment to alternative, formative assessment, in other words assessment for learning, in adult language training. We focused on two aspects of formative assessment: self-assessment and peer-assessment, methods that can be used as teaching tools in communicative language teaching in adult English classes. Reportedly, these methods lead to improved results in language learning and production, as well as in motivation and...

  11. Alternative Interpretations of Alternative Assessments: Some Validity Issues in Educational Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachman, Lyle F.

    2002-01-01

    Describes an approach to addressing issues of validity of inferences and the extrapolation of inferences to target domains beyond the assessment for alternative assessments. Makes the case that in both language testing and educational assessment the roles of language and content knowledge must be considered, and that the design and development of…

  12. alternative assessment methods: implications for environmental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    integrated approach to education and training may be achieved and social ... Outcomes-based instruction and learning requires a paradigm shift .... school subjects that they have chosen. The ..... assessment is complex in nature. The use of.

  13. The applicability of chemical alternatives assessment for engineered nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Rune; Hansen, Steffen Foss; Jacobs, Molly

    2017-01-01

    The use of alternatives assessment to substitute hazardous chemicals with inherently safer options is gaining momentum worldwide as a legislative and corporate strategy to minimize consumer, occupational, and environmental risks. Engineered nanomaterials represent an interesting case for alternat......The use of alternatives assessment to substitute hazardous chemicals with inherently safer options is gaining momentum worldwide as a legislative and corporate strategy to minimize consumer, occupational, and environmental risks. Engineered nanomaterials represent an interesting case......, the inclusion of new data tools that can efficiently and effectively evaluate nanomaterials as substitutes are needed to strengthen the alternatives assessment process. However, we conclude that with additional tools to enhance traditional hazard and exposure assessment modules of alternatives assessment...

  14. Non-thermal X-ray Emission An Alternative to Cluster Cooling Flows?

    CERN Document Server

    McCarthy, I G; Welch, G A; Carthy, Ian G. Mc; West, Michael J.; Welch, Gary A.

    2002-01-01

    We report the results of experiments aimed at reducing the major problem with cooling flow models of rich cluster X-ray sources: the fact that most of the cooled gas or its products have not been found. Here we show that much of the X-ray emission usually attributed to cooling flows can, in fact, be modeled by a power-law component which is indicative of a source(s) other than thermal bremsstrahlung from the intracluster medium. We find that adequate simultaneous fits to ROSAT PSPCB and ASCA GIS/SIS spectra of the central regions of ten clusters are obtained for two-component models that include a thermal plasma component that is attributable to hot intracluster gas and a power-law component that is likely generated by compact sources and/or extended non-thermal emission. For five of the clusters that purportedly have massive cooling flows, the best-fit models have power-law components that contribute $\\sim$ 30 % of the total flux (0.14 - 10.0 keV) within the central 3 arcminutes. Because cooling flow mass de...

  15. Alternative Muon Cooling Options based on Particle-Matter-Interaction for a Neutrino Factory

    CERN Document Server

    Stratakis, D; Alekou, A; Pasternak, J

    2013-01-01

    An ionization cooling channel is a tightly spaced lattice containing absorbers for reducing the momentum of the muon beam, rf cavities for restoring the momentum and strong solenoids for focusing the beam. Such a lattice is an essential feature of most designs for Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders. Here, we explore three different approaches for designing ionization cooling channels based on periodic solenoidal focusing. Key parameters such as the engineering constraints arising from the length and separation between the solenoidal coils are systematically examined. In addition, we propose novel approaches for reducing the peak magnetic field inside the rf cavities, for example, by using bucked coils for focusing. Our lattice designs are numerically examined against two independent codes: The ICOOL and G4BL code. The performance of our proposed cooling channels is examined by implementing those to the front-end of a Neutrino Factory.

  16. Alternative weighting structures for multidimensional poverty assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cavapozzi, Danilo; Han, Wei; Miniaci, Raffaele

    2013-01-01

    A multidimensional poverty assessment requires a weighting scheme to aggregate the well-being dimensions considered. We use Alkire and Foster’s (2011a) framework to discuss the channels through which a change of the weighting structure affects the outcomes of the analysis in terms of overall poverty

  17. Assessment of Peruvian biofuel resources and alternatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harper, J.P.; Smith, W.; Mariani, E.

    1979-08-01

    Comprehensive assessment of the biofuel potential of Peru is based on: determination of current biofuel utilization practices, evauation of Peruvian biomass productivity, identification of Peruvian agricultural and forestry resources, assessment of resource development and management concerns, identification of market considerations, description of biofuel technological options, and identification of regional biofuel technology applications. Discussion of current biofuel utilization centers on a qualitative description of the main conversion approaches currently being practiced in Peru. Biomass productivity evaluations consider the terrain and soil, and climatic conditions found in Peru. The potential energy from Peruvian agricultural and forestry resources is described quantitatively. Potental regional production of agricultural residues and forest resources that could supply energy are identified. Assessment of resource development and management concerns focuses on harvesting, reforestation, training, and environmental consequences of utilization of forest resources. Market factors assessed include: importation, internal market development, external market development, energy policy and pricing, and transportation. Nine biofuel technology options for Peru are identified: (1) small-to-medium-scale gasification, (2) a wood waste inventory, (3) stationary and mobile charcoal production systems, (4) wood distillation, (5) forest resource development and management, (6) electrical cogeneration, (7) anaerobic digestion technology, (8) development of ethanol production capabilities, and (9) agricultural strategies for fuel production. Applications of these biofuel options are identified for each of the three major regions - nine applications for the Costa Region, eight for the Sierra Region, and ten for the Selva Region.

  18. Alternative weighting structures for multidimensional poverty assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cavapozzi, Danilo; Han, Wei; Miniaci, Raffaele

    2013-01-01

    A multidimensional poverty assessment requires a weighting scheme to aggregate the well-being dimensions considered. We use Alkire and Foster’s (2011a) framework to discuss the channels through which a change of the weighting structure affects the outcomes of the analysis in terms of overall poverty

  19. Development of Self-Efficacy towards Using Alternative Assessment Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buldur, Serkan; Tatar, Nilgun

    2011-01-01

    Determining the candidate teachers' opinions regarding self-efficacy towards alternative assessment will be beneficial in that this will improve their competencies while using these approaches in their applications within the classroom. In this article, the development and validation of the "Self-efficacy towards Using Alternative Assessment…

  20. Economic assessment of alternative energy policies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groncki, P J; Goettle, IV, R J; Hudson, E A

    1980-04-01

    Current US energy policy includes many programs directed toward the restructuring of the energy system so as to decrease US dependence on foreign supplies and to increase our reliance on plentiful and environmentally benign energy forms. However, recent events have led to renewed concern over the direction of current energy policy. This study describes three possible energy strategies and analyzes each in terms of its economic, environmental, and national security benefits and costs. Each strategy is represented by a specific policy. The first strategy is to initiate no additional programs or policies beyond those currently in effect or announced. The second is to direct policy toward reducing the growth in energy demand, i.e., energy conservation. The third is to promote increased supply through accelerated development of synthetic and unconventional fuels. The analysis focuses on the evaluation and comparison of these strategy alternatives with respect to their energy, economic, and environmental consequences. The analysis indicates that conservation can substantially reduce import dependence and slow the growth of energy demand, with only a small macroeconomic cost and with substantial environmental benefits; the synfuels policy reduces imports by a smaller amount, does not reduce the growth in energy demand, and involves substantial environmental costs and impacts on economic performance. However, these relationships could be different if the energy savings per unit cost for conservation turned out to be less than anticipated; therefore, both conservation and R, D, and D support for synfuels should be included in future energy policy.

  1. Alternative method for assessing coking coal plasticity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzuy Nguyen; Susan Woodhouse; Merrick Mahoney [University of Adelaide (Australia). BHP Billiton Newcastle Technology Centre

    2008-07-15

    Traditional plasticity measurements for coal have a number of limitations associated with the reproducibility of the tests and their use in predicting coking behaviour. This report reviews alternative rheological methods for characterising the plastic behaviour of coking coals. It reviews the application of more fundamental rheological measurements to the coal system as well as reviewing applications of rheology to other physical systems. These systems may act as potential models for the application of fundamental rheological measurements to cokemaking. The systems considered were polymer melts, coal ash melts, lava, bread making and ice cream. These systems were chosen because they exhibit some physically equivalent processes to the processes occurring during cokemaking, eg, the generation of bubbles within a softened system that then resolidifies. A number of recommendations were made; the steady and oscillatory shear squeeze flow techniques be further investigated to determine if the measured rheology characteristics are related to transformations within the coke oven and the characteristics of resultant coke; modification of Gieseler plastometers for more fundamental rheology measurements not be attempted.

  2. Analytical Assessment of Environmental Impact for APR1400DC UHS Cooling Tower

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jaiho [KHNP-Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Hot process water is pumped from the plant process to the cooling towers. Heat is rejected through evaporation of the process water, interacting with ambient air blown upward by fans.. Plumes generated from exit ports of the cooling tower may have adverse effects on the environment, such as deposition of cooling tower drift release, fogging, icing, shadowing, and ground-level temperature and humidity increase. These kinds of environmental impact of the cooling tower are linked closely with the dispersion of the cooling tower plumes. In this respect, predicting the behavior of the plumes has become one of the most important issues in the environmental assessments of the cooling towers. The SACTI (seasonal/annual cooling tower impact) model is an analytical tool to predict the environmental effect of cooling tower, which was developed by Argonne National Laboratory and University of Illinois with support from EPRI (electric power research institute). The initial version of SACTI has been widely used to assess the environmental effect of cooling towers in many industrial fields such as steam power plants and NPPs. Guo et. al. investigated impact of heat rejection and cooling tower height on plume dispersion using the SACTI model, for the purpose of the future construction of inland NPPs. They found that increasing cooling tower height decreases the plume length and height frequencies. Their simulation results showed that the increase in heat rejection increases the plum radius frequency. The APR1400DC is an advanced light water reactor developed for the purpose of NRC-DC (design certification). The cooling towers for APR1400DC UHS consist of two linear mechanical draft cooling towers (LMDCTs). The LMDCT for APR1400DC UHS is conceptually designed because the plant site has not been decided yet. In the present study, the dependency of plume dispersion on the number of cooling towers is investigated using SACTI-2-beta, for predicting annual environmental effect of APR

  3. An alternative solution for heavy liquid metal cooled reactors fuel assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitale Di Maio, Damiano, E-mail: damiano.vitaledimaio@uniroma1.it [“SAPIENZA” University of Rome – DIAEE, Corso Vittorio Emanuele II, 244, 00186 Rome (Italy); Cretara, Luca; Giannetti, Fabio [“SAPIENZA” University of Rome – DIAEE, Corso Vittorio Emanuele II, 244, 00186 Rome (Italy); Peluso, Vincenzo [“ENEA”, Via Martiri di Monte Sole 4, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Gandini, Augusto [“SAPIENZA” University of Rome – DIAEE, Corso Vittorio Emanuele II, 244, 00186 Rome (Italy); Manni, Fabio [“SRS Engineering Design S.r.l.”, Vicolo delle Palle 25-25/b, 00186 Rome (Italy); Caruso, Gianfranco [“SAPIENZA” University of Rome – DIAEE, Corso Vittorio Emanuele II, 244, 00186 Rome (Italy)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • A new fuel assembly locking system for heavy metal cooled reactor is proposed. • Neutronic, mechanical and thermal-hydraulic evaluations of the system behavior have been performed. • A comparison with other solutions has been presented. - Abstract: In the coming future, the electric energy production from nuclear power plants will be provided by both thermal reactors and fast reactors. In order to have a sustainable energy production through fission reactors, fast reactors should provide an increasing contribution to the total electricity production from nuclear power plants. Fast reactors have to achieve economic and technical targets of Generation IV. Among these reactors, Sodium cooled Fast Reactors (SFRs) and Lead cooled Fast Reactors (LFRs) have the greatest possibility to be developed as industrial power plants within few decades. Both SFRs and LFRs require a great R and D effort to overcome some open issues which affect the present designs (e.g. sodium-water reaction for the SFRs, erosion/corrosion for LFRs, etc.). The present paper is mainly focused on LFR fuel assembly (FA) design: issues linked with the high coolant density of lead or lead–bismuth eutectic cooled reactors have been investigated and an innovative solution for the core mechanical design is here proposed and analyzed. The solution, which foresees cylindrical fuel assemblies and exploits the buoyancy force due to the lead high density, allows to simplify the FAs locking system, to reduce their length and could lead to a more uniform neutron flux distribution.

  4. Life Cycle Inventory & Assessment Report: Cooling of Manure, Applied to Fattening Pigs Slurry, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wesnæs, Marianne; Hamelin, Lorie; Wenzel, Henrik

    the “manure management chain” from in-house storage, outdoor storage and to application of the manure to field in combination with the environmental impacts from the energy production for the manure cooling, by use of consequential Life Cycle Assessment (LCA). This report on Manure Cooling was prepared...... as part of Work Package 5 on Assessing Sustainability of Manure Technology Chains in the project Baltic Manure....

  5. Systematic comprehensive techno-economic assessment of solar cooling technologies using location-specific climate data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokhtar, Marwan; Ali, Muhammad Tauha; Sgouridis, Sgouris; Armstrong, Peter; Chiesa, Matteo [Masdar Institute of Science and Technology, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Braeuniger, Simon; Afshari, Afshin [Masdar, Abu Dhabi Future Energy Company, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)

    2010-12-15

    A methodology for assessing solar cooling technologies is proposed. The method takes into account location specific boundary conditions such as the cooling demand time series, solar resource availability, climatic conditions, component cost and component performance characteristics. This methodology evaluates the techno-economic performance of the solar collector/chiller system. We demonstrate the method by systematic evaluation of 25 feasible combinations of solar energy collection and cooling technologies. The comparison includes solar thermal and solar electric cooling options and is extended to solar cooling through concentrated solar power plants. Solar cooling technologies are compared on an economic and overall system efficiency perspective. This analysis has implication for the importance of solar load fraction and storage size in the design of solar cooling systems. We also stress the importance of studying the relation between cooling demand and solar resource availability, it was found that overlooking this relation might lead to overestimations of the potential of a solar cooling system in the range of 22% to over 100% of the actual potential. (author)

  6. Technology-Based Classroom Assessments: Alternatives to Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salend, Spencer J.

    2009-01-01

    Although many teachers are using new technologies to differentiate instruction and administer tests, educators are also employing a range of technology-based resources and strategies to implement a variety of classroom assessments as alternatives to standardized and teacher-made testing. Technology-based classroom assessments focus on the use of…

  7. Technology-Based Classroom Assessments: Alternatives to Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salend, Spencer J.

    2009-01-01

    Although many teachers are using new technologies to differentiate instruction and administer tests, educators are also employing a range of technology-based resources and strategies to implement a variety of classroom assessments as alternatives to standardized and teacher-made testing. Technology-based classroom assessments focus on the use of…

  8. Assessment of alternatives to correct inventory difference statistical treatment deficiencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byers, K.R.; Johnston, J.W.; Bennett, C.A.; Brouns, R.J.; Mullen, M.F.; Roberts, F.P.

    1983-11-01

    This document presents an analysis of alternatives to correct deficiencies in the statistical treatment of inventory differences in the NRC guidance documents and licensee practice. Pacific Northwest Laboratory's objective for this study was to assess alternatives developed by the NRC and a panel of safeguards statistical experts. Criteria were developed for the evaluation and the assessment was made considering the criteria. The results of this assessment are PNL recommendations, which are intended to provide NRC decision makers with a logical and statistically sound basis for correcting the deficiencies.

  9. Assessment of solar-powered cooling of buildings. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curran, H.M.

    1975-04-01

    Three solar-powered cooling concepts are analyzed and evaluated. These are: (1) the solar Rankine concept in which a Rankine cycle driven by solar energy is used to drive a vapor compression refrigeration machine, (2) the solar-assisted Rankine concept in which a Rankine cycle driven by both solar energy and fuel combustion is used to drive a vapor compression refrigeration machine, and (3) the solar absorption concept in which solar energy is used to drive an absorption refrigeration machine. These concepts are compared on the bases of coefficient of performance, requirements for primary fuel input, and economic considerations. Conclusions and recommendations are presented. (WHK)

  10. Assessing and controlling corrosion in air-cooled condensers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooley, R. Barry [Structural Integrity Associates, Inc., Charlotte, NC (United States); Preez, Francois du [Eskom (South Africa); Aspden, J. Denis; Howell, Andrew G.

    2009-05-15

    An increasing number of air-cooled condensers (ACC) are being installed and operated on conventional and combined cycle plants worldwide. Unless understood and corrected, the corrosion associated with the ACC ducts and tube entries can become a major problem for operators of plant. Up to just a few years ago very little was known about the corrosion/ flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC) process. This paper starts to rectify the situation with a description of the corrosion/FAC process, a corrosion index and a relationship between the operating pH and the level of iron at the condensate pump discharge. (orig.)

  11. Assessment of an active liquid cooling garment intended for use in a hot environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartkowiak, Grazyna; Dabrowska, Anna; Marszalek, Anna

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses the construction of a designed active liquid cooling garment (LCG) that has been developed in order to reduce thermal discomfort of persons working in hot environments. It consists of clothing with a tube system distributing a cooling liquid, a sensor measuring the microclimate under the clothing, and a portable cooling unit with a module controlling the temperature of the cooling liquid depending on the microclimate temperature under the clothing. The LCG was validated through tests on volunteers in a climatic chamber at 30 °C, a relative humidity of 40%, and an air movement rate of 0.4 m/s. The obtained test results confirmed the beneficial effects of the cooling system used on mean weighted skin temperature, the physical parameters of the microclimate under the clothing, and the participants' subjective assessments, as well as confirmed that the functioning of the control system regulating liquid temperature in the LCG was correct.

  12. Alternative Liquid Fuel Effects on Cooled Silicon Nitride Marine Gas Turbine Airfoils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holowczak, J.

    2002-03-01

    With prior support from the Office of Naval Research, DARPA, and U.S. Department of Energy, United Technologies is developing and engine environment testing what we believe to be the first internally cooled silicon nitride ceramic turbine vane in the United States. The vanes are being developed for the FT8, an aeroderivative stationary/marine gas turbine. The current effort resulted in further manufacturing and development and prototyping by two U.S. based gas turbine grade silicon nitride component manufacturers, preliminary development of both alumina, and YTRIA based environmental barrier coatings (EBC's) and testing or ceramic vanes with an EBC coating.

  13. Performance Assessment of a Desiccant Cooling System in a CHP Application with an IC Engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jalalzadeh-Azar, A. A.; Slayzak, S.; Judkoff, R.; Schaffhauser, T.; DeBlasio, R.

    2005-04-01

    Performance of a desiccant cooling system was evaluated in the context of combined heat and power (CHP). The baseline system incorporated a desiccant dehumidifier, a heat exchanger, an indirect evaporative cooler, and a direct evaporative cooler. The desiccant unit was regenerated through heat recovery from a gas-fired reciprocating internal combustion engine. The system offered sufficient sensible and latent cooling capacities for a wide range of climatic conditions, while allowing influx of outside air in excess of what is typically required for commercial buildings. Energy and water efficiencies of the desiccant cooling system were also evaluated and compared with those of a conventional system. The results of parametric assessments revealed the importance of using a heat exchanger for concurrent desiccant post cooling and regeneration air preheating. These functions resulted in enhancement of both the cooling performance and the thermal efficiency, which are essential for fuel utilization improvement. Two approaches for mixing of the return air and outside air were examined, and their impact on the system cooling performance and thermal efficiency was demonstrated. The scope of the parametric analyses also encompassed the impact of improving the indirect evaporative cooling effectiveness on the overall cooling system performance.

  14. Alternative assessment in physical education: a review of international literature

    OpenAIRE

    L??pez-Pastor, V??ctor Manuel; Kirk,David; Lorente-Catal??n, Eloisa; Macphail,Ann; Macdonald, Doune

    2013-01-01

    peer-reviewed Assessment is one of the most fraught and troublesome issues physical educators have had to deal with over the past 40 years or so. In light of the challenges this situation presents, in this paper we provide an overview of the international literature on assessment in school physical education. We give an account of both traditional and alternative forms of assessment, focusing in particular on recent approaches that may be considered belong to the latter category of assessm...

  15. Assessment of a satellite power system and six alternative technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolsko, T.; Whitfield, R.; Samsa, M.; Habegger, L.S.; Levine, E.; Tanzman, E.

    1981-04-01

    The satellite power system is assessed in comparison to six alternative technologies. The alternatives are: central-station terrestrial photovoltaic systems, conventional coal-fired power plants, coal-gasification/combined-cycle power plants, light water reactor power plants, liquid-metal fast-breeder reactors, and fusion. The comparison is made regarding issues of cost and performance, health and safety, environmental effects, resources, socio-economic factors, and insitutional issues. The criteria for selecting the issues and the alternative technologies are given, and the methodology of the comparison is discussed. Brief descriptions of each of the technologies considered are included. (LEW)

  16. Alternative energy sources for the heating and cooling of a building

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Strydom, JFS

    1979-11-27

    Full Text Available The objective of two of the studies was to choose the most economical source of heating energy, taking cognizance of the building owner’s particular circumstances; in both cases a suitable alternative to light petroleum oil, which had been used...

  17. Usefulness of alternative integrative assessment methodologies in public decision making

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erickson, L. E.; Litchfield, J. W.; Currie, J. W.; McDonald, C. L.; Adams, R. C.

    1978-07-01

    Many diverse social, economic, and environmental effects are associated with each of the available energy development alternatives. The assessment of the costs, risks, and benefits of these energy development options is an important function of the U. S. Department of Energy. This task is more difficult when no single alternative is better than the others in all respects. This paper compares benefit-cost and multi-attribute utility analysis as decision aids for these more difficult and more common assessment cases. PNL has developed expertise in making these assessments through its involvement since the Calvert Cliffs decision in both the preparation of Environmental Impact Statements and the development of methods to make these statements more thorough and responsive to the spirit of the National Environmental Protection Act (NEPA). Since 1973 PNL has had continuing efforts to quantify, value, and compare all of the major factors which influence the overall impacts of energy development options. An important part of this work has been the measurement and incorporation of the relative values which community groups place on these conflicting factors. Such difficult assessment problems could be approached in many ways including the use of benefit-cost or multi-attribute utility analysis. This paper addresses the following questions: (1) Should an integrative assessment methodology be used for the overall assessment of these costs, risks, and benefits. (2) If an integrative assessment methodology is to be used, what alternative methods are available and what should be the basis for selecting a method. (3) Is it possible to use one of the available alternatives for one portion of the assessment and another for another portion of the assessment. The answers to these questions presented in this report are applicable to most public decision problems.

  18. Integrating exposure into chemical alternatives assessment using a qualitative approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greggs, Bill; Arnold, Scott; Burns, Thomas J.;

    2016-01-01

    could trigger a higher-tiered, more quantitative exposure assessment on the alternatives being considered. This talk will demonstrate an approach for including chemical- and product-related exposure information in a qualitative AA comparison. Starting from existing hazard AAs, a series of four chemical...... Sustainable Chemical Alternatives Technical Committee, which consists of scientists from academia, industry, government, and NGOs, has developed a qualitative comparative exposure approach. Conducting such a comparison can screen for alternatives that are expected to have a higher exposure potential, which......-product application scenarios were examined to test the concept, to understand the effort required, and to determine the value of exposure data in AA decision-making. The group has developed a classification approach for ingredient and product parameters to support comparisons between alternatives as well...

  19. Alternative Assessment: Implications for Social Studies. ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickell, Pat

    Alternative forms of evaluating student progress are changing testing or assessment in U.S. schools. From the teacher-made to the standardized test, the familiar over-emphasis on multiple-choice items is giving way to expanded generative formats in which students are called upon to demonstrate mastery through applications in which they use complex…

  20. Monitoring of damage on water–cooled cables installed in the Large Hadron Collider (CERN) and research on possible alternatives.

    CERN Document Server

    Wollmann, Alexander; Guillaume, J C; Ricci, D

    To supply the superconducting magnets in the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, several thousand metres of water–cooled cables were installed. These cables consist of a flexible copper core surrounded by a reinforced rubber hose. Although the hose material has been selected carefully, on many cables the rubber hose has suffered from damage. After giving a general overview on common rubber materials and known reasons for their ageing, the technology of water–cooled cables and their special requirements will be introduced. Then, the aim of this thesis is to present the monitoring of the damage on the rubber hoses. This includes an introduction to the monitoring technique used, followed by an analysis and discussion of the results obtained. As a different way of investigating the damage, a pressure test for the rubber hose will be proposed and specified; and the possibility of using alternative conductors for the current supply of the LHC main magnets will be examined. Finally, a series of radiation tests on pot...

  1. Novel concepts and geometries as alternatives to conventional circular pin fins for gas turbine blade cooling applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzol, Oguz

    Short cylindrical pin fins with circular cross-sections are one of the most common types of cooling devices used in turbine blades. However it is by no means clear that the circular shape is the most efficient geometry in terms of heat transfer enhancement and pressure loss minimization. Therefore, novel pin fin concepts and geometries are developed and introduced as alternatives to conventional circular pin fins. The idea of using fluidic oscillators as turbulent heat transfer enhancement devices led to the novel concept of "oscillator fin". Also the idea of using more elliptical fin shapes resulted in the development of the SEF (Standard Elliptical Fin), the N fin (Derived from NACA four-digit series of airfoils) and the Egg fin (A hybrid circular-elliptical fin). Detailed experimental and computational investigations are performed in order to determine the heat transfer and pressure loss characteristics of these new concepts and the results are compared to the characteristics of conventional circular pin fins. The experimental analysis included endwall convective heat transfer coefficient measurements, wake total pressure surveys and wake flow field measurements and visualizations using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The isolated single fin measurements revealed that the oscillator fin concept is not working as expected and does not provide any advantage over circular fins. The SEFs and the N fins were found to be the most effective cooling devices in terms of both heat transfer enhancement and pressure loss minimization. The characteristics of the SEF and N fins are also determined for a 2 row staggered array configuration. It is observed that the endwall heat transfer enhancement capability of the SEFs and the N fins is about 25% less than the circular fins. However these elliptical fins caused tremendous reduction in loss levels from 100% to 200%. The main reason of this high levels of pressure loss in circular fin arrays is determined to be the huge low

  2. OUTCOMES OF ALTERNATIVE ASSESSMENT IN ADULT LANGUAGE TRAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brândușa Elena Octavia ȚEICAN

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to highlight the switch from traditional assessment to alternative, formative assessment, in other words assessment for learning, in adult language training. We focused on two aspects of formative assessment: self-assessment and peer-assessment, methods that can be used as teaching tools in communicative language teaching in adult English classes. Reportedly, these methods lead to improved results in language learning and production, as well as in motivation and self-esteem. Based on previous studies, our aim is to present how frequent employment of formative feedback based on adult opinions and perceptions – obtained via informal interviews – and tailored to their needs, result in improved learner outcome.

  3. Health assessment of cooling fan bearings using wavelet-based filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Qiang; Tang, Chao; Liang, Wei; Pecht, Michael

    2012-12-24

    As commonly used forced convection air cooling devices in electronics, cooling fans are crucial for guaranteeing the reliability of electronic systems. In a cooling fan assembly, fan bearing failure is a major failure mode that causes excessive vibration, noise, reduction in rotation speed, locked rotor, failure to start, and other problems; therefore, it is necessary to conduct research on the health assessment of cooling fan bearings. This paper presents a vibration-based fan bearing health evaluation method using comblet filtering and exponentially weighted moving average. A new health condition indicator (HCI) for fan bearing degradation assessment is proposed. In order to collect the vibration data for validation of the proposed method, a cooling fan accelerated life test was conducted to simulate the lubricant starvation of fan bearings. A comparison between the proposed method and methods in previous studies (i.e., root mean square, kurtosis, and fault growth parameter) was carried out to assess the performance of the HCI. The analysis results suggest that the HCI can identify incipient fan bearing failures and describe the bearing degradation process. Overall, the work presented in this paper provides a promising method for fan bearing health evaluation and prognosis.

  4. Health Assessment of Cooling Fan Bearings Using Wavelet-Based Filtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Miao

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available As commonly used forced convection air cooling devices in electronics, cooling fans are crucial for guaranteeing the reliability of electronic systems. In a cooling fan assembly, fan bearing failure is a major failure mode that causes excessive vibration, noise, reduction in rotation speed, locked rotor, failure to start, and other problems; therefore, it is necessary to conduct research on the health assessment of cooling fan bearings. This paper presents a vibration-based fan bearing health evaluation method using comblet filtering and exponentially weighted moving average. A new health condition indicator (HCI for fan bearing degradation assessment is proposed. In order to collect the vibration data for validation of the proposed method, a cooling fan accelerated life test was conducted to simulate the lubricant starvation of fan bearings. A comparison between the proposed method and methods in previous studies (i.e., root mean square, kurtosis, and fault growth parameter was carried out to assess the performance of the HCI. The analysis results suggest that the HCI can identify incipient fan bearing failures and describe the bearing degradation process. Overall, the work presented in this paper provides a promising method for fan bearing health evaluation and prognosis.

  5. Chlorine dioxide as an alternative antifouling biocide for cooling water systems: Toxicity to larval barnacle Amphibalanus reticulatus (Utinomi).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatnarayanan, Srinivas; Sriyutha Murthy, P; Kirubagaran, Ramalingam; Venugopalan, Vayalam P

    2017-01-19

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is seen as an effective alternative to chlorine, which is widely used as an antifouling biocide. However, data on its efficacy against marine macrofoulants is scanty. In this study, acute toxicity of ClO2 to larval forms of the fouling barnacle Amphibalanus reticulatus was investigated. ClO2 treatment at 0.1mg/L for 20min elicited 45-63% reduction in naupliar metamorphosis, 70% inhibition of cyprid settlement and 80% inhibition of metamorphosis to juveniles. Increase in concentration to 0.2mg/L did not result in any significant difference in the settlement inhibition or metamorphosis. Treatment with 0.2mg/L of ClO2 elicited substantial reduction in the settlement of barnacle larvae compared to control. The study indicates the possibility of using ClO2 as an alternative antifouling biocide in power plant cooling water systems. However, more work needs to be done on the environmental effects of such switchover, which we are currently undertaking.

  6. Integrating exposure into chemical alternatives assessment using a qualitative approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greggs, Bill; Arnold, Scott; Burns, T. E.

    2016-01-01

    Sustainable Chemical Alternatives Technical Committee, which consists of scientists from academia, industry, government, and NGOs, has developed a qualitative comparative exposure approach. Conducting such a comparison can screen for alternatives that are expected to have a higher human or environmental...... in a qualitative AA comparison. Starting from existing hazard AAs, a series of three chemical-product application scenarios were examined to test the concept, to understand the effort required, and to determine the value of exposure data in AA decision- making. The group has developed a classification approach...... exposure potential, which could trigger a higher-tiered, more quantitative exposure assessment on the alternatives being considered, minimizing the likelihood of regrettable substitution. This talk will demonstrate an approach for including chemical- and product-related exposure information...

  7. Assessment of alternative power sources for mobile mining machinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairelli, J. E.; Tomazic, W. A.; Evans, D. G.; Klann, J. L.

    1981-12-01

    Alternative mobile power sources for mining applications were assessed. A wide variety of heat engines and energy systems was examined as potential alternatives to presently used power systems. The present mobile power systems are electrical trailing cable, electrical battery, and diesel - with diesel being largely limited in the United States to noncoal mines. Each candidate power source was evaluated for the following requirements: (1) ability to achieve the duty cycle; (2) ability to meet Government regulations; (3) availability (production readiness); (4) market availability; and (5) packaging capability. Screening reduced the list of candidates to the following power sources: diesel, stirling, gas turbine, rankine (steam), advanced electric (batteries), mechanical energy storage (flywheel), and use of hydrogen evolved from metal hydrides. This list of candidates is divided into two classes of alternative power sources for mining applications, heat engines and energy storage systems.

  8. National Environmental Policy Act Hazards Assessment for the TREAT Alternative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyd D. Christensen; Annette L. Schafer

    2013-11-01

    This document provides an assessment of hazards as required by the National Environmental Policy Act for the alternative of restarting the reactor at the Transient Reactor Test (TREAT) facility by the Resumption of Transient Testing Program. Potential hazards have been identified and screening level calculations have been conducted to provide estimates of unmitigated dose consequences that could be incurred through this alternative. Consequences considered include those related to use of the TREAT Reactor, experiment assembly handling, and combined events involving both the reactor and experiments. In addition, potential safety structures, systems, and components for processes associated with operating TREAT and onsite handling of nuclear fuels and experiments are listed. If this alternative is selected, a safety basis will be prepared in accordance with 10 CFR 830, “Nuclear Safety Management,” Subpart B, “Safety Basis Requirements.”

  9. National Environmental Policy Act Hazards Assessment for the TREAT Alternative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyd D. Christensen; Annette L. Schafer

    2014-02-01

    This document provides an assessment of hazards as required by the National Environmental Policy Act for the alternative of restarting the reactor at the Transient Reactor Test (TREAT) facility by the Resumption of Transient Testing Program. Potential hazards have been identified and screening level calculations have been conducted to provide estimates of unmitigated dose consequences that could be incurred through this alternative. Consequences considered include those related to use of the TREAT Reactor, experiment assembly handling, and combined events involving both the reactor and experiments. In addition, potential safety structures, systems, and components for processes associated with operating TREAT and onsite handling of nuclear fuels and experiments are listed. If this alternative is selected, a safety basis will be prepared in accordance with 10 CFR 830, “Nuclear Safety Management,” Subpart B, “Safety Basis Requirements.”

  10. Infrared Thermographic Assessment of Cooling Effectiveness in Selected Dental Implant Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karol Kirstein

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The excessive temperature fluctuations during dental implant site preparation may affect the process of bone-implant osseointegration. In the presented studies, we aimed to assess the quality of cooling during the use of 3 different dental implant systems (BEGO®, NEO BIOTECH®, and BIOMET 3i®. The swine rib was chosen as a study model. The preparation of dental implant site was performed with the use of 3 different speeds of rotation (800, 1,200, and 1,500 rpm and three types of cooling: with saline solution at room temperature, with saline solution cooled down to 3°C, and without cooling. A statistically significant difference in temperature fluctuations was observed between BEGO and NEO BIOTECH dental systems when cooling with saline solution at 3°C was used (22.3°C versus 21.8°C. In case of all three evaluated dental implant systems, the highest temperature fluctuations occurred when pilot drills were used for implant site preparation. The critical temperature, defined in the available literature, was exceeded only in case of pilot drills (of all 3 systems used at rotation speed of 1,500 rpm without cooling.

  11. Analysis of Alternatives for Risk Assessment Methodologies and Tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nachtigal, Noel M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). System Analytics; Fruetel, Julia A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Systems Research and Analysis; Gleason, Nathaniel J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Systems Research and Analysis; Helms, Jovana [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Systems Research and Analysis; Imbro, Dennis Raymond [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Systems Research and Analysis; Sumner, Matthew C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Systems Research and Analysis

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide a basic overview and understanding of risk assessment methodologies and tools from the literature and to assess the suitability of these methodologies and tools for cyber risk assessment. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) performed this review in support of risk modeling activities performed for the Stakeholder Engagement and Cyber Infrastructure Resilience (SECIR) division of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Office of Cybersecurity and Communications (CS&C). The set of methodologies and tools covered in this document is not intended to be exhaustive; instead, it focuses on those that are commonly used in the risk assessment community. The classification of methodologies and tools was performed by a group of analysts with experience in risk analysis and cybersecurity, and the resulting analysis of alternatives has been tailored to address the needs of a cyber risk assessment.

  12. Alternative future scenarios for the SPS comparative assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayres, R.U.; Ridker, R.G.; Watson, W.D. Jr.; Arnold, J.; Tayi, G.

    1980-08-01

    The objective of the comparative assessment is to develop an initial understanding of the SPS with respect to a limited set of energy alternatives. A comparative methodology report describes the multi-step process in the comparative assessment. The first step is the selection and characterization of alternative energy systems. Terrestrial alternatives are selected, and their cost, performance, and environmental and social attributes are specified for use in the comparison with the SPS in the post-2000 era. Data on alternative technologies were sought from previous research and from other comparisons. The object of this study is to provide a futures framework for evaluating SPS (i.e., factor prices, primary energy prices, and energy demands for the US from 1980 to 2030). The economic/energy interactions are discussed, and a number of specific modelling schemes that have been used for long-range forecasting purposes are described. This discussion provides the rationale for the choice of a specific model and methodology, which is described. Long-range cost assumptions used in the forecast are detailed, and the basis for the selection of specific scenarios follows. Results of the analysis are detailed. (WHK)

  13. Application of Method of Multicriteria Alternatives for Land Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel V. Grigorev

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the use of the multicriteria alternatives method for the assessment of a real estate object taking into account the concept of a system of standards, rules and requirements in the field of valuation activities, considering international standards for valuation. The main means for work and costs associated with allotment and development of the built-up area are indicated. In the work, the assessment of four sites is carried out taking into account three parameters: the distance from the construction site to the center by car; cost of 1 ha of land of each of the plots; deterioration of the centralized heat supply networks. The results show that the method of multicriteria alternatives is objective and optimal when comparing land sites on the criteria with different units of measurements. The advantage of this method is the possibility to apply it to evaluation in different areas of the economy.

  14. Cold assessment criteria and prediction of cooling risk in humans: the Russian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afanasieva, Rallema; Bobrov, Alexandr; Sokolov, Sergey

    2009-07-01

    Protection of humans working in open areas during a cold period is of great importance. Cold influences human heat state, health and functional capacity. The assessment criteria for optimal permissible heat state during work time and maximum permissible heat state demanding regulation of cold exposure time are described. They form the basis for estimation and forecast of cold risk. Classification of cooling risk is made on the basis of factors such as mean skin temperature, heat deficit, strain of thermo regulative reactions, thermal sensation, and occupational conditions. Cooling risk is also dependent on human factors such as metabolic rate and clothing thermal insulation and ambient conditions such as air temperature, wind velocity, and exposure time. For evaluation of the cooling risk a regression equation is presented for determination of the integral index of cooling conditions (IICC). On basis of the IICC value, presented in a nomogram it is possible to predict the probability of cooling risk of various rates. In consideration of the shifting climate conditions of Russia, requirements for thermal insulation of protective clothing for four major climate regions of the country are presented.

  15. The California Multimedia Risk Assessment Protocol for Alternative Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, T.; Ginn, T. R.; McKone, T. E.; Rice, D. W.

    2013-12-01

    Any new fuel in California requires approval by the state agencies overseeing human and environmental health. In order to provide a systematic evaluation of new fuel impacts, California now requires a multimedia risk assessment (MMRA) for fuel approval. The fuel MMRA involves all relevant state agencies including: the California Air Resources Board (CARB), the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB), the Office of Environmental Health Hazards Assessment (OEHHA), and the Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC) overseen by the California Environmental Protection Agency (CalEPA). The lead agency for MMRAs is the CARB. The original law requiring a multimedia assessment is California Health and Safety Code 43830.8. In addition, the low carbon fuel standard (LCFS), the Global Warming Solutions Act (AB32), and the Verified Diesel Emission Control Strategy (VDECS) have provisions that can require a multimedia assessment. In this presentation, I give an overview of the California multimedia risk assessment (MMRA) for new fuels that has been recently developed and applied to several alternative fuels. The objective of the California MMRA is to assess risk of potential impacts of new fuels to multiple environmental media including: air, water, and soil. Attainment of this objective involves many challenges, including varying levels of uncertainty, relative comparison of incommensurate risk factors, and differing levels of priority assigned to risk factors. The MMRA is based on a strategy of relative risk assessment and flexible accommodation of distinct and diverse fuel formulations. The approach is tiered by design, in order to allow for sequentially more sophisticated investigations as knowledge gaps are identified and re-prioritized by the ongoing research. The assessment also involves peer review in order to provide coupling between risk assessment and stakeholder investment, as well as constructive or confrontational feedback. The multimedia assessment

  16. Life cycle assessment of a parabolic trough concentrating solar power plant and the impacts of key design alternatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, John J; Heath, Garvin A; Turchi, Craig S

    2011-03-15

    Climate change and water scarcity are important issues for today's power sector. To inform capacity expansion decisions, hybrid life cycle assessment is used to evaluate a reference design of a parabolic trough concentrating solar power (CSP) facility located in Daggett, CA, along four sustainability metrics: life cycle (LC) greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, water consumption, cumulative energy demand (CED), and energy payback time (EPBT). This wet-cooled, 103 MW plant utilizes mined nitrates salts in its two-tank, thermal energy storage (TES) system. Design alternatives of dry-cooling, a thermocline TES, and synthetically derived nitrate salt are evaluated. During its LC, the reference CSP plant is estimated to emit 26 g of CO(2eq) per kWh, consume 4.7 L/kWh of water, and demand 0.40 MJ(eq)/kWh of energy, resulting in an EPBT of approximately 1 year. The dry-cooled alternative is estimated to reduce LC water consumption by 77% but increase LC GHG emissions and CED by 8%. Synthetic nitrate salts may increase LC GHG emissions by 52% compared to mined. Switching from two-tank to thermocline TES configuration reduces LC GHG emissions, most significantly for plants using synthetically derived nitrate salts. CSP can significantly reduce GHG emissions compared to fossil-fueled generation; however, dry-cooling may be required in many locations to minimize water consumption.

  17. Life Cycle Assessment of a Parabolic Trough Concentrating Solar Power Plant and Impacts of Key Design Alternatives: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heath, G. A.; Burkhardt, J. J.; Turchi, C. S.

    2011-09-01

    Climate change and water scarcity are important issues for today's power sector. To inform capacity expansion decisions, hybrid life cycle assessment is used to evaluate a reference design of a parabolic trough concentrating solar power (CSP) facility located in Daggett, California, along four sustainability metrics: life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, water consumption, cumulative energy demand (CED), and energy payback time (EPBT). This wet-cooled, 103 MW plant utilizes mined nitrate salts in its two-tank, thermal energy storage (TES) system. Design alternatives of dry-cooling, a thermocline TES, and synthetically-derived nitrate salt are evaluated. During its life cycle, the reference CSP plant is estimated to emit 26 g CO2eq per kWh, consume 4.7 L/kWh of water, and demand 0.40 MJeq/kWh of energy, resulting in an EPBT of approximately 1 year. The dry-cooled alternative is estimated to reduce life cycle water consumption by 77% but increase life cycle GHG emissions and CED by 8%. Synthetic nitrate salts may increase life cycle GHG emissions by 52% compared to mined. Switching from two-tank to thermocline TES configuration reduces life cycle GHG emissions, most significantly for plants using synthetically-derived nitrate salts. CSP can significantly reduce GHG emissions compared to fossil-fueled generation; however, dry-cooling may be required in many locations to minimize water consumption.

  18. Cooling of chiller condensers by district cooling in supermarkets; Kylning av kylmaskiners kondensorer med fjaerrkyla i livsmedelsbutiker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haglund Stignor, Caroline [Swedish National Testing and Research Inst., Boraas (Sweden)

    2003-07-01

    Cooling of the chiller condensers in supermarkets can be performed in different ways. To start with, the condensers can be cooled by use of outdoor air in dry coolers, but the ventilation air can also perform the cooling, totally or partially. In such a way the total or a part of the heating demand of the supermarket might be covered. A third alternative for condenser cooling is use of district cooling. However, in such a case the possibility to heat the supermarket by heat recovery is lost. The purpose of this study is to outline when district cooling offers the most advantageous alternative for condenser cooling in comparison to the other alternatives. This assessment is to be performed taking costs, electricity use and environmental impact into consideration separately. The results from calculations for a case supermarket show that the price for district cooling is generally to high for making it profitable for a supermarket to cool the condensers by district cooling. However, cooling the condensers by district cooling might lead to savings for the supermarket, both in terms of investments and use of electricity. This leads to the fact that cooling the condensers by district cooling could offer a profitable alternative for the supermarket, if the prices are adapted to this type of costumer. Hopefully, such a business could be profitable for the producers of district cooling as well. In addition, there are other advantages associated with condenser cooling by district cooling, which are hard to evaluate in economic terms. When it comes to the comparison of electricity use, it is shown that condenser cooling by district cooling is the alternative that uses least electricity in a national point of view, if the district cooling is produced by a deep-water source. In this comparison, the electricity used for production of district cooling and district heating is included as well. If district cooling is co-produced with district heating in heat pumps, the result is

  19. Alternative Assessment for Immersion Students: The Student Oral Proficiency Assessment (SOPA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Nancy C.

    An alternative assessment instrument developed to assess oral language skills of students in Spanish immersion programs in the United States is described. Originally developed by the Center for Applied Linguistic to evaluate 6-year-old immersion students' speaking and listening skills in a school in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, the Student Oral…

  20. Solar cooling - Economical assessment and CO{sub 2} balance; Solar Cooling. Oekonomische Bewertung und CO{sub 2} Bilanzierung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gantenbein, P.; Machein, T.; Frank, E.

    2010-07-01

    This short, illustrated final report discusses how thermally-driven sorption chiller systems can help meet future cooling needs in houses and workplaces. Increasing global temperatures are commented on and their influence on space heating and cooling is discussed. The modelling of a single-family home, an office building and an industrial building is described. Three cooling systems are taken into consideration: a single-stage LiBr-H{sub 2}O absorber machine using solar energy from vacuum-pipe collectors, a compressor refrigeration system with a heating function powered by photovoltaics and a compressor system run on mains electricity. The simulations were carried out for locations in three different climate zones, in Lugano, Switzerland, Athens, Greece and Dubai, United Arab Emirates. The results are commented on.

  1. Energy Performance Assessment of Radiant Cooling System through Modeling and Calibration at Component Level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Yasin [Malaviya National Institute of Technology (MNIT), Jaipur, India; Mathur, Jyotirmay [Malaviya National Institute of Technology (MNIT), Jaipur, India; Bhandari, Mahabir S [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    The paper describes a case study of an information technology office building with a radiant cooling system and a conventional variable air volume (VAV) system installed side by side so that performancecan be compared. First, a 3D model of the building involving architecture, occupancy, and HVAC operation was developed in EnergyPlus, a simulation tool. Second, a different calibration methodology was applied to develop the base case for assessing the energy saving potential. This paper details the calibration of the whole building energy model to the component level, including lighting, equipment, and HVAC components such as chillers, pumps, cooling towers, fans, etc. Also a new methodology for the systematic selection of influence parameter has been developed for the calibration of a simulated model which requires large time for the execution. The error at the whole building level [measured in mean bias error (MBE)] is 0.2%, and the coefficient of variation of root mean square error (CvRMSE) is 3.2%. The total errors in HVAC at the hourly are MBE = 8.7% and CvRMSE = 23.9%, which meet the criteria of ASHRAE 14 (2002) for hourly calibration. Different suggestions have been pointed out to generalize the energy saving of radiant cooling system through the existing building system. So a base case model was developed by using the calibrated model for quantifying the energy saving potential of the radiant cooling system. It was found that a base case radiant cooling system integrated with DOAS can save 28% energy compared with the conventional VAV system.

  2. Transforming Teaching and Learning in Urban Schools through Alternative Assessment. Urban Monograph Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winking, Deborah L.; Bond, Linda Ann

    This paper looks at alternative assessment and explores its place in educational reform. It gives a snapshot of alternative assessment in practice, guidelines for establishing it as part of the urban school culture, and resources for additional information. Alternative assessments differ from traditional tests in that they require students to…

  3. From incremental to fundamental substitution in chemical alternatives assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fantke, Peter; Weber, Roland; Scheringer, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Several chemicals in consumer products are subject to binding or voluntary phase-out agreements that are based on international treaties such as the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants or on regulatory frameworks such as the European Union's Registration, Evaluation, Authorization...... and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH). To facilitate a phase-out process, alternatives assessment is commonly applied as an emerging approach to identifying chemicals (or materials, processes, and behavior changes) serving as substitutes. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), long-chain poly- and perfluorinated...... Chemistry aspects in industrial processes design constitute additional challenges. We illustrate the various challenges in the process of phasing out and successfully substituting hazardous chemicals in consumer products and provide guiding principles for addressing these challenges. We propose...

  4. Assessment of 25 kW free-piston Stirling technology alternatives for solar applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbeznik, Raymond M.; White, Maurice A.; Penswick, L. B.; Neely, Ronald E.; Ritter, Darren C.; Wallace, David A.

    The final design, construction, and testing of a 25-kW free-piston advanced Stirling conversion system (ASCS) are examined. The final design of the free-piston hydraulic ASCS consists of five subsystems: heat transport subsystem (solar receiver and pool boiler), free-piston hydraulic Stirling engine, hydraulic subsystem, cooling subsystem, and electrical and control subsystem. Advantages and disadvantages are identified for each technology alternative. Technology alternatives considered are gas bearings vs flexure bearings, stationary magnet linear alternator vs moving magnetic linear alternator, and seven different control options. Component designs are generated using available in-house procedures to meet the requirements of the free-piston Stirling convertor configurations.

  5. Methodology for assessing alternative water-acquisition-and-use strategies for energy facilities in the American West

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, J.J.; Adams, E.E.; Harleman, D.R.F.; Marks, D.H.

    1981-12-01

    A method for assessing alternative strategies for acquiring and using water at western energy plants was developed. The method was tested in a case study of cooling-water use for a hypothetical steam-electric power plant on the Crazy Woman Creek, an unregulated stream in Wyoming. The results from the case study suggest a careful analysis of reservoir design and water-right purchase strategies can reduce the cost of acquiring and using water at an energy facility. The method uses simulation models to assess the capital and operating costs and expected monthly water-consumption rates for different cooling-system designs. The method also uses reservoir operating algorithms to select, for a fixed cooling-system design, the optimal tradeoff between building a make-up water reservoir and purchasing water rights. These tradeoffs can be used to derive the firm's true demand curve for different sources of water. The analysis also reveals the implicit cost of selecting strategies that minimize conflicts with other water users. Results indicate that: (1) cooling ponds are as good as or preferred to wet towers because their costs already include provisions for storing water for use during the normally dry summer months and during occasional drought years; (2) the energy firm's demand for overall water consumption in the cooling system was found to be inversely proportional to both the cost of installing make-up water reservoirs, and the size of the energy facility; and (3) the firm's willingness to pay for existing rights is proportional to both the cost of installing reservoirs, and the size of the energy facility.

  6. Indoor Air Quality Assessment in a Radiantly Cooled Tropical Building: a Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Jie KWONG

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Many studies have been conducted to assess the indoor air quality (IAQ of buildings throughout the world because it is closely related to comfort, safety and work productivity of occupants. However, there is still lack of available literature about IAQ in tropical buildings that apply radiant cooling systems in conditioning the indoor air.Methods: This paper reports the results obtained from an IAQ audit that was conducted in a new radiantly cooled building in Malaysia, by focusing on the IAQ and thermal comfort parameters.Results: It was identified that the measured concentration levels for the five indoor air contaminants (CO, CO2, TVOC, formaldehyde and respirable particulates were within the threshold limit values (TLVs specified in the IAQ guidelines. Besides, no significant difference was found between the contaminant levels in each floor of the studied building, and a majority of the respondents did not encounter any form of physical discomfort. There is a risk of condensation problem, judging from the measured RH level.Conclusion: An increase of airflow rate and more dehumidification work in the studied building can be made to improve IAQ and prevention of condensation problem. Nevertheless, these schemes should be implemented carefully to avoid occupants’ discomfort. Relocation of workstations was suggested, especially for the lower floors, which had higher occupancy levels. Keywords: Indoor air quality (IAQ, Radiant cooling systems, IAQ audit, Indoor air contaminants, Condensation 

  7. Qualification of Simulation Software for Safety Assessment of Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors. Requirements and Recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Nicholas R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Pointer, William David [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sieger, Matt [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Flanagan, George F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Moe, Wayne [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); HolbrookINL, Mark [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The goal of this review is to enable application of codes or software packages for safety assessment of advanced sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) designs. To address near-term programmatic needs, the authors have focused on two objectives. First, the authors have focused on identification of requirements for software QA that must be satisfied to enable the application of software to future safety analyses. Second, the authors have collected best practices applied by other code development teams to minimize cost and time of initial code qualification activities and to recommend a path to the stated goal.

  8. Use of an alternative light source to assess strangulation victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, Debra S; Jackson, M Christine

    2013-01-01

    Alternative light sources (ALSs) are commonly used at crime scenes and in forensic laboratories to collect evidence such as latent fingerprints, body fluids, hair, and fibers. This article describes the use of this technology to reveal soft tissue injuries that are not visible to the naked or unaided eye in patients who report strangulation. The value of this information to the medical, nursing, and judicial systems is discussed. The records of the 172 strangulation patients seen in our forensic nurse examiner program between 2009 and 2010 were reviewed. The SPEX Crimescope (SPEX Forensics, Edison, New Jersey) was used during the assessment of all of them. Ninety-three percent of the patients had no visible evidence of external injuries on physical examination. The ALS revealed positive findings of intradermal injuries in 98% of that group. Information obtained with ALS devices helps medical and nursing practitioners understand the gravity of patients' injuries, influences medical treatment decisions and follow-up care, and supports the prosecution of the perpetrators of crimes of violence. Educational programs about the application of ALS and the interpretation of its findings are valuable for medical, nursing, and other forensic disciplines.

  9. Comparison of alternate personality models in psychopathology assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floros, Georgios D; Stogiannidou, Ariadni; Giouzepas, Ioannis; Garyfallos, Georgios D

    2014-10-01

    This study assessed the results from the parallel application of two alternate personality models, the Zuckerman-Kuhlman trait model and Bond's Defense Styles, in a sample of 268 Greek medical students (172 women, M age = 22.0 yr., SD = 1.1; 95 men, M age = 22.3 yr., SD = 1.2) in relation to psychopathological symptoms, so as to clarify whether this practice yielded accurate results while avoiding shared variance. Data from both models are cross-checked with canonical correlation analysis to validate whether there was significant conceptual overlap between them that would mean that their parallel use is an ineffective research practice. Following this analysis, factors from both models are utilized to predict variance in sample psychopathology, so as to compare their relative usefulness. Results indicated that the two models did not share a significant amount of variance, while a combination of personality aspects from both models, including Impulsive Sensation-Seeking, Neuroticism-Anxiety, Aggression-Hostility, and Sociability traits and Maladaptive Action, Image Distorting, and Adaptive Action defense styles, predicted high variance in psychopathology symptoms.

  10. A methodology for assessing the market benefits of alternative motor fuels: The Alternative Fuels Trade Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leiby, P.N.

    1993-09-01

    This report describes a modeling methodology for examining the prospective economic benefits of displacing motor gasoline use by alternative fuels. The approach is based on the Alternative Fuels Trade Model (AFTM). AFTM development was undertaken by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of a longer term study of alternative fuels issues. The AFTM is intended to assist with evaluating how alternative fuels may be promoted effectively, and what the consequences of substantial alternative fuels use might be. Such an evaluation of policies and consequences of an alternative fuels program is being undertaken by DOE as required by Section 502(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. Interest in alternative fuels is based on the prospective economic, environmental and energy security benefits from the substitution of these fuels for conventional transportation fuels. The transportation sector is heavily dependent on oil. Increased oil use implies increased petroleum imports, with much of the increase coming from OPEC countries. Conversely, displacement of gasoline has the potential to reduce US petroleum imports, thereby reducing reliance on OPEC oil and possibly weakening OPEC`s ability to extract monopoly profits. The magnitude of US petroleum import reduction, the attendant fuel price changes, and the resulting US benefits, depend upon the nature of oil-gas substitution and the supply and demand behavior of other world regions. The methodology applies an integrated model of fuel market interactions to characterize these effects.

  11. Gas-cooled fast reactor fuel-cost assessment. Final report, October 1978-September 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, M.L.

    1979-01-01

    This program, contracted to provide a Gas Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) fuel assembly fabrication cost assessment, comprised the following basic activities: establish agreement on the ground rules for cost assessment, prepare a fuel factory flow sheet, and prepare a cost assessment for fuel assembly fabrication. Two factory sizes, 250 and 25 MTHM/year, were considered for fuel assembly fabrication cost assessment. The work on this program involved utilizing GE LMFBR cost assessment and fuel factory studies experience to provide a cost assessment of GCFR fuel assembly fabrication. The recent impact of highly sensitive safety and safeguards environment policies on fuel factory containment, safety, quality assurance and safeguards costs are significantly higher than might have been expected just a few years ago. Fuel assembly fabrication costs are significant because they represent an estimated 30 to 60% of the total fuel cycle costs. In light of the relative high cost of fabrication, changes in the core and assembly design may be necessary in order to enhance the overall fuel cycle economics. Fabrication costs are based on similar operations and experience used in other fuel cycle studies. Because of extrapolation of present technology (e.g., remote fuel fabrication versus present contact fabrication) and regulatory requirements, conservative cost estimates were made.

  12. Assessing the Psychometric Properties of Alternative Items for Certification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krogh, Mary Anne; Muckle, Timothy

    Alternative items were added as scored items to the National Certification Examination for Nurse Anesthetists (NCE) in 2010. A common concern related to the new items has been their measurement attributes. This study was undertaken to evaluate the psychometric impact of adding these items to the examination. Candidates had a significantly higher ability estimate in alternative items than in multiple choice questions and 6.7 percent of test candidates performed significantly differently in alternative item formats. The ability estimates of multiple choice questions correlated at r = .58. The alternative items took significantly longer time to answer than standard multiple choice questions and discriminated to a higher degree than MCQs. The alternative items exhibited unidimensionality to the same degree as MCQs and the BIC confirmed the Rasch model as acceptable for scoring. The new item types were found to have acceptable attributes for inclusion in the certification program.

  13. An alternative method for assessing early mortality in contemporary populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, A S; Pike, I L

    1998-11-01

    Biological anthropologists are interested in a population's early mortality rates for a variety of reasons. Early mortality (infant or juvenile) is of obvious importance to those interested in demography, but early mortality statistics are useful for life history analysis, paleodemography, and human adaptability studies, among others. In general, the form of mortality statistics is derived from demography, where chronological age is the gold standard for statistical calculation and comparison. However, there are numerous problems associated with the collection, analysis, and interpretation of early mortality statistics based on age, particularly for anthropological research, which is often conducted in small or non-calendrical-age numerate populations. The infant mortality rate (IMR), for example, is notoriously difficult to determine in populations where accurate accounting of age is not routine, and yet it is widely used in demography, public health, medicine, and social science research. Here we offer an alternative to age-based early mortality statistics that makes use of human biologists' interest in, and skill at, assessing human growth and development. Our proposal is to use developmental stages of juveniles instead of relying exclusively on age as the basis for mortality statistics. Death or survival according to a developmental stage (such as crawling or weaning) may provide more accurate data that are also more closely related to the cause of death. Developmental stages have the added advantage of putting infants and children back at the center of the discussion of early mortality by focusing on their activities in relation to their environment. A case study from the Turkana population of Kenya illustrates the use of developmental stages in describing early mortality.

  14. Guia Practica para una Evaluacion Alternativa (Practical Guide to Alternative Assessment).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Joan L.; Aschbacher, Pamela R.; Winters, Lynn

    Guidance is offered in Spanish on the creation and use of alternative assessment, and a process model is presented that links assessment with curriculum and instruction, based on contemporary theories of learning and cognition. The introductory chapter provides background on the purposes of assessment and the need for new alternatives, with an…

  15. Preliminary ecotoxicity assessment of new generation alternative fuels in seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Gunther; Dolecal, Renee E; Colvin, Marienne A; George, Robert D

    2014-06-01

    The United States Navy (USN) is currently demonstrating the viability of environmentally sustainable alternative fuels to power its fleet comprised of aircraft and ships. As with any fuel used in a maritime setting, there is potential for introduction into the environment through transport, storage, and spills. However, while alternative fuels are often presumed to be eco-friendly relative to conventional petroleum-based fuels, their environmental fate and effects on marine environments are essentially unknown. Here, standard laboratory-based toxicity experiments were conducted for two alternative fuels, jet fuel derived from Camelina sativa (wild flax) seeds (HRJ5) and diesel fuel derived from algae (HRD76), and two conventional counterparts, jet fuel (JP5) and ship diesel (F76). Initial toxicity tests performed on water-accommodated fractions (WAF) from neat fuels partitioned into seawater, using four standard marine species in acute and chronic/sublethal tests, indicate that the alternative fuels are significantly less toxic to marine organisms.

  16. Assessment of modification level of hypoeutectic Al-Si alloys by pattern recognition of cooling curves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xiang; GENG Hui-yuan; LI Yan-xiang

    2005-01-01

    Most evaluations of modification level are done according to a specific scale based on an American Foundry Society (AFS) standard wall chart as qualitative analysis in Al-Si casting production currently. This method is quite dependent on human experience when making comparisons of the microstructure with the standard chart. And the structures depicted in the AFS chart do not always resemble those seen in actual Al-Si castings. Therefore, this qualitative analysis procedure is subjective and can introduce human-caused errors into comparative metallographic analyses. A quantization parameter of the modification level was introduced by setting up the relationship between mean area weighted shape factor of eutectic silicon phase and the modification level using image analysis technology. In order to evaluate the modification level, a new method called "intelligent evaluating of melt quality by pattern recognition of thermal analysis cooling curves" has also been introduced. The results show that silicon modification level can be precisely assessed by comparison of the cooling curve of the melt to be evaluated with the one most similar to it in a database.

  17. An Assessment of Physics Research Opportunities Available from Rapid Heating and Cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-04-07

    material properties such as amorphous structures, metastable crystalline structures , enhanced solid solubility, reduced chenical segregation, refined...and metastable crystalline structures by rapid cooling suggests that special metastable structures might be formed by rapid cooling techniques. There

  18. Modeling and Assessment of Alternative Cooling Methods of the Combat Operation Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    LEFT BLANK 61 LIST OF REFERENCES Aziz, M. H., Nie, O. C., Yam, J. C. M., & Wei, L. C. (2003). TCO reduction. Retrieved from IEEE Xplore website...content&Itemid=345 Kochut, A. (2009, September 21–23). Power and performance modeling of virtualized desktop systems. Retrieved from IEEE Xplore ...August 1–3). Does low-power design imply energy efficiency for data centers? Retrieved from IEEE Xplore website: http

  19. Alternative cooling water flow path for RHR heat exchanger and its effect on containment response during extended station blackout for Chinshan BWR-4 plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuann, Yng-Ruey, E-mail: ryyuann@iner.gov.tw

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Motivating alternative RHR heat exchanger tube-side flow path and determining required capacity. • Calculate NSSS and containment response during 24-h SBO for Chinshan BWR-4 plant. • RETRAN and GOTHIC models are developed for NSSS and containment, respectively. • Safety relief valve blowdown flow and energy to drywell are generated by RETRAN. • Analyses are performed with and without reactor depressurization, respectively. - Abstract: The extended Station Blackout (SBO) of 24 h has been analyzed with respect to the containment response, in particular the suppression pool temperature response, for the Chinshan BWR-4 plant of MARK-I containment. The Chinshan plant, owned by Taiwan Power Company, has twin units with rated core thermal power of 1840 MW each. The analysis is aimed at determining the required alternative cooling water flow capacity for the residual heat removal (RHR) heat exchanger when its tube-side sea water cooling flow path is blocked, due to some reason such as earthquake or tsunami, and is switched to the alternative raw water source. Energy will be dissipated to the suppression pool through safety relief valves (SRVs) of the main steam lines during SBO. The RETRAN model is used to calculate the Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) response and generate the SRV blowdown conditions, including SRV pressure, enthalpy, and mass flow rate. These conditions are then used as the time-dependent boundary conditions for the GOTHIC code to calculate the containment pressure and temperature response. The shaft seals of the two recirculation pumps are conservatively assumed to fail due to loss of seal cooling and a total leakage flow rate of 36 gpm to the drywell is included in the GOTHIC model. Based on the given SRV blowdown conditions, the GOTHIC containment calculation is performed several times, through the adjustment of the heat transfer rate of the RHR heat exchanger, until the criterion that the maximum suppression pool temperature

  20. Integrated energy, economic, and environmental assessment for the optimal solar absorption cooling and heating system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hang, Yin

    Buildings in the United States are responsible for 41% of the primary energy use and 30% of carbon dioxide emissions. Due to mounting concerns about climate change and resource depletion, meeting building heating and cooling demand with renewable energy has attracted increasing attention in the energy system design of green buildings. One of these approaches, the solar absorption cooling and heating (SACH) technology can be a key solution to addressing the energy and environmental challenges. SACH system is an integration of solar thermal heating system and solar thermal driven absorption cooling system. So far, SACH systems still remain at the demonstration and testing stage due to not only its high cost but also complicated system characteristics. This research aims to develop a methodology to evaluate the life cycle energy, economic and environmental performance of SACH systems by high-fidelity simulations validated by experimental data. The developed methodology can be used to assist the system design. In order to achieve this goal, the study includes four objectives as follows: * Objective 1: Develop the evaluation model for the SACH system. The model includes three aspects: energy, economy, and environment from a life cycle point of view. * Objective 2: Validate the energy system model by solar experiments performance data. * Objective 3: Develop a fast and effective multi-objective optimization methodology to find the optimal system configuration which achieves the maximum system benefits on energy, economy and environment. Statistic techniques are explored to reveal the relations between the system key parameters and the three evaluation targets. The Pareto front is generated by solving this multi-objective optimization problem. * Objective 4: Apply the developed assessment methodology to different building types and locations. Furthermore, this study considered the influence of the input uncertainties on the overall system performance. The sensitivity

  1. Air cooled heat pumps with mono-screw compressors. A good alternative; Luchtgekoelde warmtepompen met mono-schroefcompressoren. Een goed alternatief

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meijer, W. [Daikin Airconditioning Netherlands, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2010-09-15

    Heat pumps are becoming increasingly popular. Often water/water heat pumps are used that are linked to heat/cold storage systems or another source system. The air-cooled alternatives are advancing in house construction and are also applied in small-scale utility and schools sometimes. In the larger utility projects and the industry, however, the air-cooled heat pump has not quite yet found its way, while it can be a good alternative for the heat/cold storage systems that are much more expensive to purchase. This is due to new compressor techniques. [Dutch] Warmtepompen worden steeds populairder. Veelal wordt gebruikgemaakt van water/water-warmtepompen, die gekoppeld worden aan een koude/warmte-opslagsysteem (KWO) of ander bronsysteem. De luchtgekoelde alternatieven zijn in de woningbouw in opmars en worden soms ook in kleinschalige utiliteit en scholen toegepast. In de grotere utiliteitsprojecten en industrie heeft de luchtgekoelde warmtepomp echter zijn weg nog niet echt gevonden, terwijl het een goed alternatief kan zijn voor de in aanschaf veel duurdere KWO-systemen. Dit mede dankzij nieuwe compressortechnieken.

  2. Assessment of stress-corrosion cracking in a water-cooled ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, R.H.; Bruemmer, S.M.

    1989-04-01

    Water-cooled, near-term reactors will operate under conditions at which SCC is possible; however, control of material purity and processing and coolant chemistry can either eliminate or greatly reduce the probability of this type of structural failure. This evaluation has focused on an assessment of water impurity effects on SCC of austenitic stainless steel at temperatures below 100{degree}C and on the conditions controlling sensitization in the fusion heat of Type 316 SS and the fusion materials heat of modified Type 316 SS designated as PCA. This assessment identifies the dominant effect of small concentrations of impurities in high-purity water on SCC such that crack growth rates at 25--75{degree}C in water with as little as 5--15 ppM Cl{sup {minus}} are equal to the crack growth rates at 200--300{degree}C in high-purity water. These effects are primarily for sensitized Type 304 SS, so analysis of sensitization behavior of fusion austenitic alloys was also undertaken. An SSDOS model developed at PNL was used to make these assessments, and correlation to experimental results for Type 316 SS was very good. Both the fusion heat of Type 316 SS and PCA can be severely sensitized but with proper thermal treatment it should be possible to avoid sensitization. 14 refs., 8 figs.

  3. Assessment of alternative water management options for irrigated agriculture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jhorar, R.K.; Smit, A.A.M.F.R.; Roest, C.W.J.

    2009-01-01

    A simulation study on alternative water management strategies was carried out for Sirsa Irrigation Circle in Haryana, covering an area of about 4800 km(2). Results showed that crop evapotranspiration and soil salinity development under reduction in canal water supply and increase in groundwater use,

  4. Intelligence Assessment: Gardner Multiple Intelligence Theory as an Alternative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Leandro S.; Prieto, Maria Dolores; Ferreira, Aristides I.; Bermejo, Maria Rosario; Ferrando, Mercedes; Ferrandiz, Carmen

    2010-01-01

    In the multiple intelligence framework, newer and more contextualized cognitive tasks are suggested as alternative to more traditional psychometric tests. The purpose of this article is to examine whether or not these two types of instruments converge into a general factor of cognitive performance. Thus, the Battery of General and Differential…

  5. Economic assessment of alternatives for glyphosate application in arable farming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kehlenbeck, Hella

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Application and sales of herbicides with glyphosate have strongly increased in Germany during the past 10 years. This has raised a number of questions and discussions concerning glyphosate use. Therefore, this paper identifies and evaluates alternatives with an efficacy almost equivalent to glyphosate for different treatmentareas in terms of economic consequences for farms in comparison to glyphosate use by way of example. With the help of exemplary crop rotations uses in arable farming for winter wheat, winter oilseed rape, winter barley, maize and summer barley were analyzed. Within a “worst case scenario” a complete abandonment of glyphosate applications was assumed. Different tillage systems (plough, no-plough were considered. The only alternatives with an efficacy almost equivalent to glyphosate were mechanical measures. For the analyzed treatment-areas (desiccation, pre-sowing, stubble no approved and efficient chemical alternative could be identified. The economic advantages and disadvantages of substituting glyphosate by mechanical alternatives were strongly depending on the treatment-area, the efficacy concerning yield expectations (in comparison to glyphosate use, the tillage system, the necessity of grain drying as well as further operational factors such as the availability of sufficient field work days and mechanical equipment.

  6. The Impact of Alternate Assessment on Teaching and Learning for Students with Significant Cognitive Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roden, Melinda Reed

    2011-01-01

    Federal legislation mandates all students, including those with significant cognitive disabilities, participate in standards based education and in state assessments linked to those standards. To address this issue, this study used a multiple case study design in order to determine the impact alternate assessments based on alternate achievement…

  7. Performance Measurement and Accommodation: Students with Visual Impairments on Pennsylvania's Alternate Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebehazy, Kim T.; Zigmond, Naomi; Zimmerman, George J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: This study investigated the use of accommodations and the performance of students with visual impairments and severe cognitive disabilities on the Pennsylvania Alternate System of Assessment (PASA)yCoan alternate performance-based assessment. Methods: Differences in test scores on the most basic level (level A) of the PASA of 286…

  8. A Meta-Analysis of the Effectiveness of Alternative Assessment Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozuyesil, Eda; Tanriseven, Isil

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Recent trends have encouraged the use of alternative assessment tools in class in line with the recommendations made by the updated curricula. It is of great importance to understand how alternative assessment affects students' academic outcomes and which techniques are most effective in which contexts. This study aims to examine the…

  9. Properties of ultra-cool dwarfs with Gaia. An assessment of the accuracy for the temperature determination

    CERN Document Server

    Sarro, Luis M; Carrion, Cesar; Barrado, David; Cruz, Patricia; Isasi, Yago

    2012-01-01

    We aimed to assess the accuracy of the Gaia teff and logg estimates as derived with current models and observations. We assessed the validity of several inference techniques for deriving the physical parameters of ultra-cool dwarf stars. We used synthetic spectra derived from ultra-cool dwarf models to construct (train) the regression models. We derived the intrinsic uncertainties of the best inference models and assessed their validity by comparing the estimated parameters with the values derived in the bibliography for a sample of ultra-cool dwarf stars observed from the ground. We estimated the total number of ultra-cool dwarfs per spectral subtype, and obtained values that can be summarised (in orders of magnitude) as 400000 objects in the M5-L0 range, 600 objects between L0 and L5, 30 objects between L5 and T0, and 10 objects between T0 and T8. A bright ultra-cool dwarf (with teff=2500 K and \\logg=3.5 will be detected by Gaia out to approximately 220 pc, while for teff=1500 K (spectral type L5) and the s...

  10. Modeling Alternative Assessment for Pre-Service Middle Level Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegenfuss, Robert G.

    2011-01-01

    College assessment models for our future middle school teachers must be varied, on-going, engaging, equitable and empowering. Traditional assessments do not often model the critical components of what makes assessment appropriate for middle level students. To provide the appropriate model for future middle level teachers, the establishment of…

  11. Hydrogen storage alternatives - a technological and economic assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettersson, Joakim; Hjortsberg, Ove [Volvo Teknisk Utveckling AB, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    1999-12-01

    This study reviews state-of-the-art of hydrogen storage alternatives for vehicles. We will also discuss the prospects and estimated cost for industrial production. The study is based on published literature and interviews with active researchers. Among the alternatives commercially available today, we suggest using a moderate-pressure chamber for seasonal stationary energy storage; metal hydride vessels for small stationary units; a roof of high-pressure cylinders for buses, trucks and ferries; cryogenic high-pressure vessels or methanol reformers for cars and tractors; and cryogenic moderate-pressure vessels for aeroplanes. Initial fuel dispensing systems should be designed to offer hydrogen in pressurised form for good fuel economy, but also as cryogenic liquid for occasional needs of extended driving range and as methanol for reformer-equipped vehicles. It is probable that hydrogen can be stored efficiently in adsorbents for use in recyclable hydrogen fuel containers or rechargeable hydrogen vessels operating at ambient temperature and possibly ambient pressure by year 2004, and at reasonable or even low cost by 2010. The most promising alternatives involve various forms of activated graphite nanostructures. Recommendations for further research and standardisation activities are given.

  12. Trail resource impacts and an examination of alternative assessment techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, J.L.; Leung, Y.-F.

    2001-01-01

    Trails are a primary recreation resource facility on which recreation activities are performed. They provide safe access to non-roaded areas, support recreational opportunities such as hiking, biking, and wildlife observation, and protect natural resources by concentrating visitor traffic on resistant treads. However, increasing recreational use, coupled with poorly designed and/or maintained trails, has led to a variety of resource impacts. Trail managers require objective information on trails and their conditions to monitor trends, direct trail maintenance efforts, and evaluate the need for visitor management and resource protection actions. This paper reviews trail impacts and different types of trail assessments, including inventory, maintenance, and condition assessment approaches. Two assessment methods, point sampling and problem assessment, are compared empirically from separate assessments of a 15-mile segment of the Appalachian Trail in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Results indicate that point sampling and problem assessment methods yield distinctly different types of quantitative information. The point sampling method provides more accurate and precise measures of trail characteristics that are continuous or frequent (e.g., tread width or exposed soil). The problem assessment method is a preferred approach for monitoring trail characteristics that can be easily predefined or are infrequent (e.g., excessive width or secondary treads), particularly when information on the location of specific trail impact problems is needed. The advantages and limitations of these two assessment methods are examined in relation to various management and research information needs. The choice and utility of these assessment methods are also discussed.

  13. Virginia Alternative Assessment Program: Implementation Manual (Revised 2002).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virginia State Dept. of Education, Richmond.

    The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act requires state programs to adopt standards for all children, including those with disabilities, in state and district-wide assessments with the provision of appropriate and necessary accommodations. For students who cannot participate in state and district-wide assessments, the law requires that…

  14. Concept Maps: An Alternative Methodology to Assess Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atiles, Julia T.; Dominique-Maikell, Nikole; McKean, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    The authors investigated the utility and efficacy of using concepts maps as a research tool to assess young children. Pre- and post- concept maps have been used as an assessment and evaluation tool with teachers and with older students, typically children who can read and write; this article summarizes an investigation into the utility of using…

  15. Principles of sustainability science to assess alternative energy technologies

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Brent, AC

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available , adaptive capacity, and complexity of social-ecological systems to assess the potential of such technologies for increasing the carrying capacity and improving the resilience of social-ecological systems, or to assess the resilience of the technological...

  16. Questioning Needs Assessment: Some Limitations and Positive Alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannum, Wallace

    2013-01-01

    This article raises questions about the use of needs assessment by those seeking to improve the performance of organizations and individuals. While the discrepancy model of needs assessment has enjoyed a long history and is widely accepted, the author states that it has several undesirable consequences in terms of its impact. This article offers…

  17. Experimental assessment of film cooling performance of short cylindrical holes on a flat surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kuldeep; Premachandran, B.; Ravi, M. R.

    2016-12-01

    The present study is an experimental investigation of film-cooling over a flat surface from the short cylindrical holes. The film cooling holes used in the combustion chamber and the afterburner liner of an aero engine has length-to-diameter (L/D) typically in the range 1-2, while the cooling holes used in turbine blades has L/D > 3. Based on the classification given in the literature, cooling holes with L/D ≤ 3 are named as short holes and cooling holes with L/D > 3 are named as long holes. Short film cooling holes cause jetting of the secondary fluid whereas the secondary fluid emerging from long holes has characteristics similar to fully developed turbulent flow in pipe. In order to understand the difference in the film cooling performance of long and short cooling holes, experimental study is carried out for five values of L/D in the range 1-5, five injection angles, α = 15°-90° and five mainstream Reynolds number 1.25 × 105-6.25 × 105 and two blowing ratios, M = 0.5-1.0. The surface temperature of the test plate is monitored using infrared thermography. The results obtained from the present study showed that the film-cooling effectiveness is higher for the longest holes (L/D = 5) investigated in the present work in comparison to that for the shorter holes. Short holes are found to give better effectiveness at the lowest investigated injection angle i.e. α = 15° in the near cooling hole region, whereas film cooling effectiveness obtained at injection angle, α = 45° is found to be better than other injection angles for longest investigated holes, i.e. L/D = 5.

  18. Experimental assessment of film cooling performance of short cylindrical holes on a flat surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kuldeep; Premachandran, B.; Ravi, M. R.

    2016-03-01

    The present study is an experimental investigation of film-cooling over a flat surface from the short cylindrical holes. The film cooling holes used in the combustion chamber and the afterburner liner of an aero engine has length-to-diameter (L/D) typically in the range 1-2, while the cooling holes used in turbine blades has L/D > 3. Based on the classification given in the literature, cooling holes with L/D ≤ 3 are named as short holes and cooling holes with L/D > 3 are named as long holes. Short film cooling holes cause jetting of the secondary fluid whereas the secondary fluid emerging from long holes has characteristics similar to fully developed turbulent flow in pipe. In order to understand the difference in the film cooling performance of long and short cooling holes, experimental study is carried out for five values of L/D in the range 1-5, five injection angles, α = 15°-90° and five mainstream Reynolds number 1.25 × 105-6.25 × 105 and two blowing ratios, M = 0.5-1.0. The surface temperature of the test plate is monitored using infrared thermography. The results obtained from the present study showed that the film-cooling effectiveness is higher for the longest holes (L/D = 5) investigated in the present work in comparison to that for the shorter holes. Short holes are found to give better effectiveness at the lowest investigated injection angle i.e. α = 15° in the near cooling hole region, whereas film cooling effectiveness obtained at injection angle, α = 45° is found to be better than other injection angles for longest investigated holes, i.e. L/D = 5.

  19. Assessing the performance of Clostridium perfringens cooling models for cooked, uncured meat and poultry products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heat-resistant spores of C. perfringens may germinate and multiply in cooked meat and poultry products if the rate and extent of cooling does not occur in a timely manner. Therefore, six cooling models (PMP 7.0 broth model; PMIP Uncured Beef, Chicken, and Pork Models; Smith-Schaffner (version 3); a...

  20. Review and assessment of engineering economic studies of dry cooled electrical generating plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fryer, B.C.

    1976-03-01

    The major U.S. studies conducted between 1970 and 1975 on the economics of dry cooled electrical generating plants are reviewed. This review was undertaken to collect, compare, and summarize the approaches, assumptions, and results of several major studies on dry cooling engineering economics, and to evaluate the computer codes associated with these economic studies. From this review it was concluded that adequate detailed evaluation of state-of-the-art dry cooling systems has not been conducted and that comprehensive computer programs capable of such evaluations are not publicly available. Therefore, it is recommended that: a method for determining power production costs of dry cooled plants should be developed which reflects the actual way a utility would interface a dry cooled plant with a utility system to minimize power production costs; a comprehensive detailed evaluation of metal finned tube state-of-the-art dry cooling systems should be conducted to determine if, and where, the costs of dry cooling can be reduced; and advanced dry cooling concepts should be evaluated for potential savings in power production costs. (LCL)

  1. ADVANTAGE OR DISADVANTAGE ASSESSMENT BASED ON ALTERNATIVE VALUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DANIEL GOAGĂRĂ

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available International Valuation Standards Committee (IVSC wants to avoid the emergence of international disputes and/or the formation of misconceptions in some countries, regarding the use and application of market valuation bases unsubstantiated. Evaluators responsible for applying these standards must ensure that there have been selected the appropriate measurement bases using all means to increase the understanding of evaluation beneficiaries, avoiding circumstances that might mislead the public and objectively reporting estimates made. The International Valuation Standard 2 (IVS 2 comes to saturate an alternative situation, having two goals, namely: identify and explain the other evaluation bases than the market value and, at the same time, to establish the standards for their implementation; to show the difference between these bases and the market value. This are the main goals of this paper.

  2. Assessment of Alternative Funding Mechanisms for the IAEA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toomey, Christopher; Wyse, Evan T.; Kurzrok, Andrew J.; Ford, Benjamin E.

    2012-06-15

    While the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has enjoyed substantial success and prestige in the international community, there is growing concern that global demographic trends, advances in technology and the trend towards austerity in Member State budgets will stretch the Agency’s resources to a point where it may no longer be possible to execute its multifaceted mission in its entirety. As part of an ongoing effort by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative to evaluate the IAEA’s long-term budgetary concerns , this paper proposes a series of alternate funding mechanisms that have the potential to sustain the IAEA in the long-term, including endowment, charity, and fee-for-service funding models.

  3. Towards Life Cycle Sustainability Assessment of Alternative Passenger Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuri Cihat Onat

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable transportation and mobility are key components and central to sustainable development. This research aims to reveal the macro-level social, economic, and environmental impacts of alternative vehicle technologies in the U.S. The studied vehicle technologies are conventional gasoline, hybrid, plug-in hybrid with four different all-electric ranges, and full battery electric vehicles (BEV. In total, 19 macro level sustainability indicators are quantified for a scenario in which electric vehicles are charged through the existing U.S. power grid with no additional infrastructure, and an extreme scenario in which electric vehicles are fully charged with solar charging stations. The analysis covers all life cycle phases from the material extraction, processing, manufacturing, and operation phases to the end-of-life phases of vehicles and batteries. Results of this analysis revealed that the manufacturing phase is the most influential phase in terms of socio-economic impacts compared to other life cycle phases, whereas operation phase is the most dominant phase in the terms of environmental impacts and some of the socio-economic impacts such as human health and economic cost of emissions. Electric vehicles have less air pollution cost and human health impacts compared to conventional gasoline vehicles. The economic cost of emissions and human health impact reduction potential can be up to 45% and 35%, respectively, if electric vehicles are charged through solar charging stations. Electric vehicles have potential to generate income for low and medium skilled workers in the U.S. In addition to quantified sustainability indicators, some sustainability metrics were developed to compare relative sustainability performance alternative passenger vehicles. BEV has the lowest greenhouse gas emissions and ecological land footprint per $ of its contribution to the U.S. GDP, and has the lowest ecological footprint per unit of its energy consumption. The

  4. Evaluation of the NightCool Nocturnal Radiation Cooling Concept: Annual Performance Assessment in Scale Test Buildings Stage Gate 1B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, Danny S. [Florida Solar Energy Center, Cocoa, FL (United States); Sherwin, John R. [Florida Solar Energy Center, Cocoa, FL (United States)

    2008-03-01

    In this report, data is presented on the long-term comparative with all of NightCool system fully operational, with circulating fans when attic conditions are favorable for nocturnal cooling and with conventional air conditioning at other times. Data is included for a full year of the cooling season in Central Florida, which stretches from April to November of 2007.

  5. Impact of alternate fuels on industrial refractories and refractory insulation applications. An Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, G.C.; Tennery, V.J.

    1976-09-01

    The effects of use of alternate fuels such as distillate oils, residual oils, coal, producer gas, and electricity on refractory insulation are evaluated. Sections are included on alternate fuels for 1976 to 1980, assessment by industry of fuel conversion impact on industrial refractories in the period 1976 to 1980, interactions of alternate fuel combustion products with refractories and refractory insulation, and analysis of degradation mechanisms in refractories and refractory materials. (JRD)

  6. Computer Applications for Alternative Assessment: An Instructional and Organization Dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Ed; Brown, John A.

    1997-01-01

    Describes the possibilities and problems that computer-generated portfolios will soon present to instructors across America. Highlights include the history of portfolio assessment, logistical problems of handling portfolios in the traditional three-ring binder format, use of the zip drive for storage, and software/hardware compatibility problems.…

  7. Alternatives and implication in process of environmental impact assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tauš Peter

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available EIA is an interactive, rule-based expert system for the environmental impact assessment. It is designed for a screening level assessment of development projects at a pre-feasibility stage. Typical problems for the evaluation include: resettlement; watershed degradation; encroachment upon precious ecosystems; encroachment on historical/cultural values; watershed erosion; reservoir siltation; impairment of navigation; changes in groundwater hydrology, waterlogging; seepage and evaporation losses; migration of valuable fish species; inundation of mineral resources/forests; other inundation losses and adverse effects. It is important to prevent environmental pollution when carrying out large-scale development projects, such as artificial change of landscapes and building of certain structures that may cause a tremendous impact on the environment. In accordance with Cities Environmental Impact Assessment Departments it is necessary to provide project organisers with a necessary advice and instructions concerning the environmental impact assessment a survey to predict and evaluate environmental impact to be conducted by project organisers. Prior to offering the advice and instructions, cities need to hear the opinions of residents of the areas concerned, mayors of related municipalities and other opinion leaders, including specialists, to reflect their views in the environmental preservation. The first aspect in any quality assessment is to determine the representativeness of data both in terms of physical siting and data collected. It must be recognised the environment is a dynamic fluid; quality therefore varies over space and time. There will be locations in any community that experience poorer quality than recorded at a monitoring station. Likewise other sites will have a better quality. Most communities have only a single monitoring site. Therefore, the air quality monitors are sited to provide a representative estimate of the community exposure

  8. Application of the Fuzzy Comprehensive Assessment Technique to Optimal Selection of Pipeline Design Alternative

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ChuFeixue; ChuYanfan; LiuXiumin

    2005-01-01

    Regarding the influencing factors in an optimal selection of pipeline design alternative as fuzzy variables with different weights, a fuzzy comprehensive assessment was applied to an optimal selection of the design alternative. Giving the Lanzhou-Chengdu pipeline as an example to explain the process, the result shows that this method is acceptable.

  9. Interpreting Definitions of Public Relations: Self Assessment and a Symbolic Interactionism-Based Alternative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Joye C.

    1997-01-01

    Reviews several popular definitions of public relations; explicates the shared elements and assumptions inherent in these definitions. Presents an alternative conceptualization of public relations based upon Herbert Blumer's symbolic interactionism. Looks to stimulate questioning and self assessment and to introduce alternative goals, ideas, and…

  10. An Alternative Grading Tool for Enhancing Assessment Practice and Quality Assurance in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grainger, Peter; Weir, Katie

    2016-01-01

    Assessing student learning in university courses is commonly done using a rubric that arranges the assessment criteria and standards descriptors in a matrix style or grid format. This paper introduces an alternative style of grading tool known as the continua model of a guide to making judgements, which arranges assessment criteria based on a…

  11. An Alternative Grading Tool for Enhancing Assessment Practice and Quality Assurance in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grainger, Peter; Weir, Katie

    2016-01-01

    Assessing student learning in university courses is commonly done using a rubric that arranges the assessment criteria and standards descriptors in a matrix style or grid format. This paper introduces an alternative style of grading tool known as the continua model of a guide to making judgements, which arranges assessment criteria based on a…

  12. Assessing Partnership Alternatives in an IT Network Employing Analytical Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Reza Salamat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the main critical success factors for the companies is their ability to build and maintain an effective collaborative network. This is more critical in the IT industry where the development of sustainable competitive advantage requires an integration of various resources, platforms, and capabilities provided by various actors. Employing such a collaborative network will dramatically change the operations management and promote flexibility and agility. Despite its importance, there is a lack of an analytical tool on collaborative network building process. In this paper, we propose an optimization model employing AHP and multiobjective programming for collaborative network building process based on two interorganizational relationships’ theories, namely, (i transaction cost theory and (ii resource-based view, which are representative of short-term and long-term considerations. The five different methods were employed to solve the formulation and their performances were compared. The model is implemented in an IT company who was in process of developing a large-scale enterprise resource planning (ERP system. The results show that the collaborative network formed through this selection process was more efficient in terms of cost, time, and development speed. The framework offers novel theoretical underpinning and analytical solutions and can be used as an effective tool in selecting network alternatives.

  13. Neutronic assessment of liquid-metal cooled fast reactors using thorium fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilarski, Stevan [Electricite de France R et D, 1 Avenue du General de Gaulle, 92141 Clamart (France); Institut de Physique Nucleaire d' Orsay, 15 rue Georges Clemenceau 91406 Orsay (France)

    2009-06-15

    The long-term sustainability of atomic fission energy will require the development of new types of reactors, able to exceed the limits of the existing ones in terms of optimal use of natural resources, which clearly necessitates breeding of fissile material. In this context, fast reactors using uranium-plutonium fuel are the most mature solution from an industrial viewpoint. In addition to the obvious interest in terms of fuel resources, there is a major incentive to consider the use of the {sup 232}Th- {sup 233}U fuel cycle as an alternative to the traditional {sup 238}U-{sup 239}Pu cycle for fast reactors: it is an effective way of addressing the safety issue of the highly positive void reactivity effect, which is a well-known problem for liquid-metal cooled fast reactors of commercial size [1]. This work investigates the performance of liquid-metal cooled fast reactors in {sup 232}Th-{sup 233}U fuel cycle and draws a comparison with the traditional {sup 238}U-{sup 239}Pu cycle. Four coolants have been considered: Na, Pb, Mg(17%at.)-Pb and Li(17%at.)-Pb; a simulation of their use in cores ranging from 700 MWth to 3600 MWth has been performed in two-dimensional diffusion theory using the European system of codes ERANOS [2,3] developed at CEA. The performance parameters such as the breeding ratio have been computed for each concept, alongside safety-related parameters: the delayed neutron fraction, the cycle reactivity swing, the Doppler constant and other thermal feedbacks. More specifically, the issue of void reactivity is studied in detail using perturbation theory. These calculations are performed at equilibrium fuel composition and are complemented by the study of the initial fuel loading at start-up which is a mixture of {sup 232}Th-{sup 239}Pu. The isotopic composition of the fissile corresponds to the plutonium available from French reactors in 2035. The conclusions of this work are that near-zero to large negative void reactivity effects can be achieved in

  14. Environmental Assessment of Alternatives for Management of Grasslands on the Anahuac National Wildlife Refuge Complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This environmental assessment is prepared to evaluate alternatives for managing grasslands to provide high quality habitat for wintering waterfowl, other migratory...

  15. Multi-model assessment of global hydropower and cooling water discharge potential under climate change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vliet, M. T H; van Beek, L. P H; Eisner, S.; Flörke, M.; Wada, Y.; Bierkens, M. F P

    2016-01-01

    Worldwide, 98% of total electricity is currently produced by thermoelectric power and hydropower. Climate change is expected to directly impact electricity supply, in terms of both water availability for hydropower generation and cooling water usage for thermoelectric power. Improved understanding

  16. Environmental assessment of urban wastewater reuse: treatment alternatives and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneses, Montse; Pasqualino, Jorgelina C; Castells, Francesc

    2010-09-01

    The main function of a Wastewater Treatment Plant is to minimize the environmental impact of discharging untreated water into natural water systems. Also a Wastewater Treatment Plant may get a resource from wastewater carrying out a tertiary treatment on the treated wastewater which can be reused in non-potable applications. Water reuse strategies are intended to address the problem of water scarcity without aggravating other environmental problems, thus reflecting the need of their environmental assessment. In this paper we used Life Cycle Assessment to evaluate different disinfection treatments (chlorination plus ultraviolet treatment, ozonation and ozonation plus hydrogen peroxide) and to assess the environmental advantages and drawbacks of urban wastewater reuse in non-potable applications. To do so, we compared the environmental impacts of producing 1m(3) of water for non-potable uses from reclaimed water, potable water and desalinated water sources. The calculation has used current operating data from a Wastewater Treatment Plant located in the Mediterranean area, although the results can be applied to any other plant with similar technology. The ozonation and ozonation plus hydrogen peroxide disinfection treatment technologies have similar environmental profiles. However most of the indicators are about 50% higher than the ultraviolet disinfection except for the acidification (100% higher) and photochemical oxidation (less than 5%). Non-potable uses (both agricultural and urban uses) of reclaimed water have environmental and economical advantages. Reuse of treated wastewater is particularly beneficial when it can replace desalinated water. Consequently, reclaimed water should be promoted for non-potable uses, when there is scarcity of freshwater.

  17. Alternatives of Strategic Environmental Assessment for Road Traffic Development Planning-Case of Changchun City, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Chong; XU Ye; SHANG Jincheng; Gordon HUANG

    2009-01-01

    On analyzing the achievement of the goal in the modern urban road traffic development planning, the alternative of Strategic Environmental Assessment for urban traffic planning should include the basic scheme, the extended scheme and the environmental protection scheme. This study from different perspectives designed the alternatives for Changchun's county-level road and urban road system planning, and used the method of System Dynamics to simulate, optimize and analyze those alternatives. Thereafter, some methods including the correlation function method were used to comprehensively assess and rank those alternatives for recommending two best alternatives with the consideration to the indicators, such as the total emission amount of CO, the total emission amount of nitrogen oxides, the noise value, the road construction cost, the fossil oil consumption and the traffic capacity. The result showed that the study would provide substantial supports for decision-makers to make more scientific decisions and promote the sustainable urban traffic in Changchun City.

  18. Testing and assessment strategies, including alternative and new approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Otto A.

    2003-01-01

    The object of toxicological testing is to predict possible adverse effect in humans when exposed to chemicals whether used as industrial chemicals, pharmaceuticals or pesticides. Animal models are predominantly used in identifying potential hazards of chemicals. The use of laboratory animals raises...... ethical concern. However, irrespective of animal welfare it is an important aspect of the discipline of toxicology that the primary object is human health. The ideal testing and assessment strategy is simple to use all the available test methods and preferably more in laboratory animal species from which...... we get as many data as possible in order to obtain the most extensive database for the toxicological evaluation of a chemical. Consequently, the society has decided that certain group of chemicals should be tested accordingly. However, realising that, this idea is not obtainable in practice because...

  19. HL-LHC alternatives

    CERN Document Server

    Tomás, R; White, S

    2014-01-01

    The HL-LHC parameters assume unexplored regimes for hadron colliders in various aspects of accelerator beam dynamics and technology. This paper reviews three alternatives that could potentially improve the LHC performance: (i) the alternative filling scheme 8b+4e, (ii) the use of a 200 MHz RF system in the LHC and (iii) the use of proton cooling methods to reduce the beam emittance (at top energy and at injection). The alternatives are assessed in terms of feasibility, pros and cons, risks versus benefits and the impact on beam availability.

  20. The use of skimmed dried milk as an alternative diluent for the cooling step during the boar sêmen freezing procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyane Bandeira Barros

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the critical points in the cryopreservation process is the use of a proper diluent while lowering the temperature following the resuspension and thawing processes. Here, we tested an alternative diluent for the process of freezing boar semen. We used skimmed dried milk (SDM during the cooling and post-thawed resuspension steps. To do so, we collected semen from 15 Dalland boars using the glovedhand technique, and incubated each ejaculate sample at 30 °C. We then removed two semen aliquots from a pre-dilution. We diluted one of the aliquots in Beltsville thawing solution (BTS - control, and the remaining sample was diluted in SDM. Both aliquots were subsequently held at 30º C for 45 min (1st period of stabilization. At the end of this period, we analysed vigor and motility to determine sperm metabolic activity. We then held the diluted semen at 25° C for 30 min (2nd period of stabilization and at 17° C for 2 h (3rd period stabilization. We centrifuged the semen at 800 × g and 1600 × g at 5º C for 15 min, discarded the supernatant, and resuspended the sperm pellet in 2 mL of the cooling diluent at 5° C for 1h. We again diluted the samples in 2 mL of the freezing diluent, poured them into straws, and cooled and plunged them into liquid N2. The sêmen samples were thawed in a 39º C water bath, and were resuspended in their respective diluents at the same temperature. We determined the following sperm features: vigor, motility, vitality, acrosomal integrity and membrane functionality. During the first phase of temperature cooling (30º C, semen diluted in SDM exhibited a higher vigor (3.4 ± 0.6 and motility (78.6 ± 13.0 than those diluted BTS (vigor: 3.1 ± 0.7; motility: 69.4±14.3. However, after the thawing procedure, the inverse was observed in that: BTS samples exhibited a higher vigor (2.1 ± 0.6 and motility (35.5 ± 21.0 than SDM samples (vigor: 1.7 ± 0.9; motility: 22.8 ± 18.1. Regarding membrane functionality and

  1. Assessing ELT Pre-Service Teachers via Web 2.0 Tools: Perceptions toward Traditional, Online and Alternative Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirit, Nazli Ceren

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the perceptions of the ELT pre-service teachers toward the traditional, alternative, and online assessment methods and examine whether the participants' attitudes change toward the types of assessment after the tasks via Web 2.0 tools are implemented. In the light of these aims, the study was conducted…

  2. Assessment of Silicon Carbide Composites for Advanced Salt-Cooled Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL; Forsberg, Charles W [ORNL

    2007-09-01

    The Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is a new reactor concept that uses a liquid fluoride salt coolant and a solid high-temperature fuel. Several alternative fuel types are being considered for this reactor. One set of fuel options is the use of pin-type fuel assemblies with silicon carbide (SiC) cladding. This report provides (1) an initial viability assessment of using SiC as fuel cladding and other in-core components of the AHTR, (2) the current status of SiC technology, and (3) recommendations on the path forward. Based on the analysis of requirements, continuous SiC fiber-reinforced, chemically vapor-infiltrated SiC matrix (CVI SiC/SiC) composites are recommended as the primary option for further study on AHTR fuel cladding among various industrially available forms of SiC. Critical feasibility issues for the SiC-based AHTR fuel cladding are identified to be (1) corrosion of SiC in the candidate liquid salts, (2) high dose neutron radiation effects, (3) static fatigue failure of SiC/SiC, (4) long-term radiation effects including irradiation creep and radiation-enhanced static fatigue, and (5) fabrication technology of hermetic wall and sealing end caps. Considering the results of the issues analysis and the prospects of ongoing SiC research and development in other nuclear programs, recommendations on the path forward is provided in the order or priority as: (1) thermodynamic analysis and experimental examination of SiC corrosion in the candidate liquid salts, (2) assessment of long-term mechanical integrity issues using prototypical component sections, and (3) assessment of high dose radiation effects relevant to the anticipated operating condition.

  3. Performance Assessment of 239 Series Sub-cooling Heat Exchangers for the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Riddone, G; Roussel, P; Moracchioli, R; Tavian, L

    2006-01-01

    Helium sub-cooling heat exchangers of the counter-flow type are used to minimize the vapor fraction produced in the final expansion of the 1.9 K distributed cooling loops used for cooling the superconducting magnets of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). These components are of compact design, featuring low-pressure drop and handling very low pressure vapor at low temperature. Following a qualification phase of prototypes, a contract has been placed in European industry for the supply of 239 heat exchanger units. Different levels of extracted heat load require three different variants of heat exchangers. This paper will describe the manufacturing phase with emphasis on the main difficulties encountered to keep the production quality after a brief recall of the prototype phase. Finally, the acceptance tests performed at room temperature and at the nominal cryogenic condition at the factory and at CEA-Grenoble will be presented.

  4. Assessing Life Skills in Young Working Adults--Part 1: The Development of an Alternative Instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wal, Rachel Jacoba; van der Wal, Ruurd

    2003-01-01

    A collage with pictorial and verbal stimuli to assess life skills of young workers was developed using a framework for alternative assessment and stimuli instruments. The instrument was evaluated using Bloom's taxonomy for the cognitive domain and Krathwohl et al.'s taxonomy for the affective domain. (Contains 16 references.) (SK)

  5. Alternative Assessment in Engineering Language Education: The case of the Technical University of Madrid

    OpenAIRE

    Pierce Mcmahon, Joana; Durán Escribano, María del Pilar; Ubeda Mansilla, Paloma

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a research project involving students from nine different engineering degrees at the Technical university of Madrid. The purpose of the project was to analyze the use of peer and self assessment and the students? attitudes toward alternative assessment procedures.

  6. Integrating Alternative Learning and Assessment in a Course of English for Law Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burksaitiene, Nijole; Tereseviciene, Margarita

    2008-01-01

    Alternative approaches to learning and assessment have become common practice in higher education today. While these approaches have several learning, instructional and assessment advantages for students and teachers, a need exists for a better understanding of their consequential evidence. The purpose of this study was to examine students'…

  7. Alternative Assessment Options for Students with Disabilities Who Are Culturally and Linguistically Diverse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, L. Elena

    2008-01-01

    This review of the literature addresses the issue of assessing students with disabilities who are culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD). An examination of data showing disproportionate representation of students with disabilities who are CLD establishes a case for using alternative forms of assessment. Problems with some forms of traditional…

  8. Curriculum-Based Measurement: An Emerging Alternative to Traditional Assessment for African American Children and Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fore, Cecil, III; Burke, Mack D.; Martin, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide readers with an overview of Curriculum-Based Measurement (CBM). Special education is often used for meeting the needs of African American children and youth. Assessment reform is needed that emphasizes reliable and valid alternative assessment, linkages to the curriculum, and progress monitoring. CBM may…

  9. Record-keeping as an Alternative Method οf Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Androniki Kouvdou

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The basic topic of this chapter is the description of an alternative method of assessment which supplements traditional objective techniques (i.e. testing, while counterbalancing their limitations. This alternative method, known as ‘record-keeping’, involves the systematic collection and recording of information about learner progress and aims at providing a more complete and valid formative assessment of their developmental abilities in specified areas. More particularly, this chapter presents a small-scale case study, which was carried out in the sixth grade of a primary school and lasted three months. The subjects of this case study were four twelve-year-old learners and its purpose was to investigate the potential of ‘record-keeping’ as an alternative method of assessing oracy skills in the foreign language. The data that derived from the case study reinforce the usefulness and validity of the particular method of assessment. The goals of the experimental assessment design, which entailed the recording and gradual development of learner oracy skills as well as the enhancement of motivation and awareness of their relevant sub-skills, were accomplished to a considerable degree. Additionally, the learners responded positively to the implemented assessment project, while being actively involved in it, which further substantiates its effectiveness. Alternative assessment, however, is a large area, whose full potential of implementation calls for further investigation.

  10. Multi-model assessment of global hydropower and cooling water discharge potential under climate change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vliet, M. T H; van Beek, L. P H; Eisner, S.; Flörke, M.; Wada, Y.; Bierkens, M. F P

    2016-01-01

    Worldwide, 98% of total electricity is currently produced by thermoelectric power and hydropower. Climate change is expected to directly impact electricity supply, in terms of both water availability for hydropower generation and cooling water usage for thermoelectric power. Improved understanding o

  11. Multi-model assessment of global hydropower and cooling water discharge potential under climate change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, van M.T.H.; Beek, van L.P.H.; Eisner, S.; Flörke, M.; Wada, Y.; Bierkens, M.F.P.

    2016-01-01

    Worldwide, 98% of total electricity is currently produced by thermoelectric power and hydropower. Climate change is expected to directly impact electricity supply, in terms of both water availability for hydropower generation and cooling water usage for thermoelectric power. Improved

  12. Implementation of creep-fatigue model into finite-element code to assess cooled turbine blade.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dedekind, MO

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Turbine blades which are designed with airfoil cooling are subject to thermo-mechanical fatigue as well as creep damage. These problems arise due to thermal cycling and high operating temperatures in service. An implementation of fatigue and creep...

  13. Multi-model assessment of global hydropower and cooling water discharge potential under climate change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, van M.T.H.; Beek, van L.P.H.; Eisner, S.; Flörke, M.; Wada, Y.; Bierkens, M.F.P.

    2016-01-01

    Worldwide, 98% of total electricity is currently produced by thermoelectric power and hydropower. Climate change is expected to directly impact electricity supply, in terms of both water availability for hydropower generation and cooling water usage for thermoelectric power. Improved understandin

  14. Identifying Leader Talent: Alternative Predictors for U.S. Air Force Junior Officer Selection and Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    alternative standardized tests of GMA and other cognitive attributes (e.g., ASVAB, GRE, LSAT, GMAT ), which represent the most potentially feasible...the AFOQT-AA subtests. Generally speaking, with the exception of the ASVAB, all of the other alternatives (GRE, LSAT, GMAT ) assess higher-level...geared towards specialized educational (or academic) training, such as the LSAT (law school) or GMAT (business school). Having said that, and as

  15. The viability of alternative assessment methods in the Greek upper secondary school: the oral portfolio

    OpenAIRE

    Angeliki Daphni

    2012-01-01

    Τhe final examination of the English language subject, in the context of the Greek state upper secondary education, is a traditional paper-and-pencil test which does not include any assessment of oracy skills. This article explores the viability of the oral portfolio as an alternative assessment and pedagogic method that can facilitate the assessment of speaking and listening skills and create a more motivating learning environment. To this effect, three methodological tools were designed, na...

  16. Independent Assessment of the Savannah River Site High-Level Waste Salt Disposition Alternatives Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. T. Case (DOE-ID); M. L. Renfro (INEEL)

    1998-12-01

    This report presents the results of the Independent Project Evaluation (IPE) Team assessment of the Westinghouse Savannah River Company High-Level Waste Salt Disposition Systems Engineering (SE) Team's deliberations, evaluations, and selections. The Westinghouse Savannah River Company concluded in early 1998 that production goals and safety requirements for processing SRS HLW salt to remove Cs-137 could not be met in the existing In-Tank Precipitation Facility as currently configured for precipitation of cesium tetraphenylborate. The SE Team was chartered to evaluate and recommend an alternative(s) for processing the existing HLW salt to remove Cs-137. To replace the In-Tank Precipitation process, the Savannah River Site HLW Salt Disposition SE Team downselected (October 1998) 140 candidate separation technologies to two alternatives: Small-Tank Tetraphenylborate (TPB) Precipitation (primary alternative) and Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) Nonelutable Ion Exchange (backup alternative). The IPE Team, commissioned by the Department of Energy, concurs that both alternatives are technically feasible and should meet all salt disposition requirements. But the IPE Team judges that the SE Team's qualitative criteria and judgments used in their downselection to a primary and a backup alternative do not clearly discriminate between the two alternatives. To properly choose between Small-Tank TPB and CST Ion Exchange for the primary alternative, the IPE Team suggests the following path forward: Complete all essential R and D activities for both alternatives and formulate an appropriate set of quantitative decision criteria that will be rigorously applied at the end of the R and D activities. Concurrent conceptual design activities should be limited to common elements of the alternatives.

  17. Solar absorption cooling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, D.-S.

    2007-01-01

    As the world concerns more and more on global climate changes and depleting energy resources, solar cooling technology receives increasing interests from the public as an environment-friendly and sustainable alternative. However, making a competitive solar cooling machine for the market still

  18. Solar absorption cooling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, D.-S.

    2007-01-01

    As the world concerns more and more on global climate changes and depleting energy resources, solar cooling technology receives increasing interests from the public as an environment-friendly and sustainable alternative. However, making a competitive solar cooling machine for the market still remain

  19. A European perspective on alternatives to animal testing for environmental hazard identification and risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Stefan; Sela, Erika; Blaha, Ludek; Braunbeck, Thomas; Galay-Burgos, Malyka; García-Franco, Mauricio; Guinea, Joaquin; Klüver, Nils; Schirmer, Kristin; Tanneberger, Katrin; Tobor-Kapłon, Marysia; Witters, Hilda; Belanger, Scott; Benfenati, Emilio; Creton, Stuart; Cronin, Mark T D; Eggen, Rik I L; Embry, Michelle; Ekman, Drew; Gourmelon, Anne; Halder, Marlies; Hardy, Barry; Hartung, Thomas; Hubesch, Bruno; Jungmann, Dirk; Lampi, Mark A; Lee, Lucy; Léonard, Marc; Küster, Eberhard; Lillicrap, Adam; Luckenbach, Till; Murk, Albertinka J; Navas, José M; Peijnenburg, Willie; Repetto, Guillermo; Salinas, Edward; Schüürmann, Gerrit; Spielmann, Horst; Tollefsen, Knut Erik; Walter-Rohde, Susanne; Whale, Graham; Wheeler, James R; Winter, Matthew J

    2013-12-01

    Tests with vertebrates are an integral part of environmental hazard identification and risk assessment of chemicals, plant protection products, pharmaceuticals, biocides, feed additives and effluents. These tests raise ethical and economic concerns and are considered as inappropriate for assessing all of the substances and effluents that require regulatory testing. Hence, there is a strong demand for replacement, reduction and refinement strategies and methods. However, until now alternative approaches have only rarely been used in regulatory settings. This review provides an overview on current regulations of chemicals and the requirements for animal tests in environmental hazard and risk assessment. It aims to highlight the potential areas for alternative approaches in environmental hazard identification and risk assessment. Perspectives and limitations of alternative approaches to animal tests using vertebrates in environmental toxicology, i.e. mainly fish and amphibians, are discussed. Free access to existing (proprietary) animal test data, availability of validated alternative methods and a practical implementation of conceptual approaches such as the Adverse Outcome Pathways and Integrated Testing Strategies were identified as major requirements towards the successful development and implementation of alternative approaches. Although this article focusses on European regulations, its considerations and conclusions are of global relevance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Assessment of bovine spermatozoa viability using different cooling protocols prior to cryopreservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo B.D. Gonçalves

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to evaluate the effect of different cooling rates on the post-thawing quality of bovine spermatozoa. Ejaculated semen from a 24-month-old Jersey bull was collected using an artificial vagina and diluted in a commercial extender to evaluate spermatozoan concentration and motility subjectively before cooling and freezing and after thawing. Straws were allocated to four cooling curves: rapid (RD, semi-rapid (SRD, semi-slow (SSLW and slow (SLW. The temperature was decreased from 25ºC to 4ºC in 10, 50, 110 and 135 min, which represents a cooling rate of 2.06, 0.40, 0.18 and 0.15ºC/min, respectively. Then straws were frozen and stored at -196ºC. After thawing, one aliquot of each straw was used for evaluation. Spermatozoan integrity and mitochondrial function were evaluated using a combination of fluorescent probes containing 100 mg/mL FITC-PSA, 0.5 μg/mL PI and 153 μM JC-1. At the end of cooling, spermatozoan motility did not differ among RD (63.3%, SRD (66.7%, SSLW (66.7% and SLW (80.0%. However, normal spermatozoan morphology was lower in SRD (84.8% compared to RD (91.7%, SSLW (91.7% and SLW (90.3% (P<0.05. In thawed semen, spermatozoan motility and normal morphology did not differ among RD (40.0%; 88.8%, SRD (43.3%; 82.5%, SSLW (40.0%; 87.2% and SLW (36.7%; 88.0%. The percentage of damaged spermatozoa, including plasma and acrosome membrane damage and low mitochondrial potential, was higher in RD compared to the others (P<0.05. In conclusion, a rapid cooling curve is detrimental to the spermatozoa and affects the post-thaw spermatozoan integrity of bovine frozen semen.

  1. How strategic dynamics complicate the framing of alternatives in strategic environmental assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyhne, Ivar

    2012-01-01

    of the Danish Natural Gas Security of Supply Plan. Special emphasis is given to the framing of alternatives in the SEA process, since alternatives are directly related to the contextual developments. Based on a participative approach, strategic dynamics are mapped and the reactions and concerns in the SEA team......Unpredictable and complex developments challenge the application of strategic environmental assessment (SEA), e.g. in terms of timing, prediction, and relevance of assessments. Especially multi-actor and unstructured strategic level decision-making processes often seem to be characterised...... are outlined. The contribution of the article is enhanced empirical understanding of strategic dynamics and how it challenges SEA application....

  2. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power: report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume IX. Reactor and fuel cycle descriptions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    The Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP) has characterized and assessed various reactor/fuel-cycle systems. Volume IX provides, in summary form, the technical descriptions of the reactor/fuel-cycle systems studied. This includes the status of the system technology, as well as a discussion of the safety, environmental, and licensing needs from a technical perspective. This information was then used in developing the research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) program, including its cost and time frame, to advance the existing technology to the level needed for commercial use. Wherever possible, the cost data are given as ranges to reflect the uncertainties in the estimates. Volume IX is divided into three sections: Chapter 1, Reactor Systems; Chapter 2, Fuel-Cycle Systems; and the Appendixes. Chapter 1 contains the characterizations of the following 12 reactor types: light-water reactor; heavy-water reactor; water-cooled breeder reactor; high-temperature gas-cooled reactor; gas-cooled fast reactor; liquid-metal fast breeder reactor; spectral-shift-controlled reactor; accelerator-driven reactor; molten-salt reactor; gaseous-core reactor; tokamak fusion-fisson hybrid reactor; and fast mixed-spectrum reactor. Chapter 2 contains similar information developed for fuel-cycle facilities in the following categories: mining and milling; conversion and enrichment; fuel fabrication; spent fuel reprocessing; waste handling and disposal; and transportation of nuclear materials.

  3. Central magnetic cooling and refrigeration machines (chiller) and their assessment. A feasibility study - Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egolf, P. W.; Gonin, C. [University of Applied Sciences of Western Switzerland, HEIG-VD, Yverdon-les Bains (Switzerland); Kitanovski, A. [University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2010-03-15

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the results of a feasibility study made concerning magnetic cooling and refrigeration machines. This report presents a comprehensive thermodynamic and economic analysis of applications of rotary magnetic chillers. The study deals with magnetic chillers based on permanent magnets and superconducting magnets, respectively. The numerical design of permanent magnet assemblies with different magnetic flux densities is discussed. The authors note that superconducting magnetic chillers are feasible only in large-scale applications with over 1 MW of cooling power. This report describes new ideas for magnetic refrigeration technologies, which go beyond the state of the art. They show potential for a substantial reduction of costs and further improvements in efficiency. Rotary magnetic liquid chillers with 'wavy' structures and using micro tubes are discussed, as are superconducting magnetic chillers and future magneto-caloric technologies.

  4. Solar Heating And Cooling (SHAC) simulation programs: Assessment and evaluation. Volume 1: Summary report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merriam, R. L.

    1981-05-01

    Solar heating and cooling system simulation programs available to use by electric utilities was evaluated. A comprehensive reference manual describing the characteristics of computer programs and manual methods was developed. An analysis of the intended capabilities of 11 programs is carried out. The programs are described and ranked by application. Four programs (AXCESS, DEROB, EMPSS, TRNSYS) for three building types (residential, light commercial, and heavy commercial) and three heating and cooling system classes (conventional, active solar, passive solar are tested. The results are compared and related to the program analytical bases. The user experience encountered during the program testing is highlighted and the user related factors for the four programs are compared. The applicability of the 11 programs to utilities is explored. DOE

  5. Assessment of the Use of Nitrogen Trifluoride for Purifying Coolant and Heat Transfer Salts in the Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheele, Randall D.; Casella, Andrew M.

    2010-09-28

    This report provides an assessment of the use of nitrogen trifluoride for removing oxide and water-caused contaminants in the fluoride salts that will be used as coolants in a molten salt cooled reactor.

  6. Scientific-technical cooperation with Russia. Transient analyses for alternative types of water-cooled reactors. Final report; WTZ mit Russland. Transientenanalysen fuer wassergekuehlte Kernreaktoren. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohde, Ulrich [Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany). Inst. fuer Sicherheitsforschung; Kozmenkov, Yaroslav [Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany). Inst. fuer Sicherheitsforschung; Institute of Physics and Power Engineering, Obninsk (Russian Federation); Pivovarov, Valeri; Matveev, Yurij [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    2010-12-15

    The recently developed multi-group version DYN3D-MG of the reactor dynamics code DYN3D has been qualified for applications to water-cooled reactor concepts different from industrial PWR and BWR. An extended DYN3D version was applied to the graphite-moderated pressure tube reactor EGP-6 (NPP Bilibino) and conceptual design studies of an advanced Boiling Water Reactor with reduced moderation (RMWR) as well as the RUTA-70 reactor for low temperature heat supply. Concerning the RUTA reactor, safe heat removal by natural circulation of the coolant at low pressure has to be shown. For the corresponding validation of thermo-hydraulic system codes like ATHLET and RELAP5, experiments on flashing-induced natural circulation instabilities performed at the CIRCUS test facility at the TU Delft were simulated using the RELAP5 code. For the application to alternative water-cooled reactors, DYN3D model extensions and modifications were implemented, in particular adaptations of heat conduction and heat transfer models. Performing code-to-code comparisons with the Russian fine-mesh neutron diffusion code ACADEM contributed to the verification of DYN3D-MG. Validation has been performed by calculating reactor dynamics experiments at the NPP Bilibino. For the reactors EGP-6, RMWR and RUTA, analyses of various protected and unprotected control rod withdrawal and ejection transients were performed. The beyond design basis accident (BDBA) scenario ''Coast-down of all main coolant pumps at nominal power without scram'' for the RUTA reactor was analyzed using the code complexes DYN3D/ATHLET and DYN3D/RELAP5. It was shown, that the reactor passes over to a save asymptotic state at reduced power with coolant natural circulation. Analyzing the BDBA ''Unprotected withdrawal of a control rod group'' for the RMWR, the safety against Departure from Nucleate Boiling (DNB) could not be shown with the necessary confidence. Finally, conclusions have been drawn

  7. An Assessment of NASA Glenn's Aeroacoustic Experimental and Predictive Capabilities for Installed Cooling Fans. Part 1; Aerodynamic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanZante, Dale E.; Koch, L. Danielle; Wernet, Mark P.; Podboy, Gary G.

    2006-01-01

    Driven by the need for low production costs, electronics cooling fans have evolved differently than the bladed components of gas turbine engines which incorporate multiple technologies to enhance performance and durability while reducing noise emissions. Drawing upon NASA Glenn's experience in the measurement and prediction of gas turbine engine aeroacoustic performance, tests have been conducted to determine if these tools and techniques can be extended for application to the aerodynamics and acoustics of electronics cooling fans. An automated fan plenum installed in NASA Glenn's Acoustical Testing Laboratory was used to map the overall aerodynamic and acoustic performance of a spaceflight qualified 80 mm diameter axial cooling fan. In order to more accurately identify noise sources, diagnose performance limiting aerodynamic deficiencies, and validate noise prediction codes, additional aerodynamic measurements were recorded for two operating points: free delivery and a mild stall condition. Non-uniformities in the fan s inlet and exhaust regions captured by Particle Image Velocimetry measurements, and rotor blade wakes characterized by hot wire anemometry measurements provide some assessment of the fan aerodynamic performance. The data can be used to identify fan installation/design changes which could enlarge the stable operating region for the fan and improve its aerodynamic performance and reduce noise emissions.

  8. Assessing Jatropha Crop Production Alternatives in Abandoned Agricultural Arid Soils Using MCA and GIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serafin Corral

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the assessment of various biofuel crop production alternatives on the island of Fuerteventura using Jatropha crops. It adopts an integrated approach by carrying out a multi-criteria assessment with the support of participatory techniques and geographical information systems. Sixteen production alternatives were analyzed for growing Jatropha, and the results suggest that the best alternative involves using typical torrifluvent soils irrigated with recycled urban wastewater using surface drip irrigation covering 100% evapotranspiration. It was also determined that a potential area of 2546 ha could be used for cultivation within a radius of 10 km from a wastewater treatment plant. This level of production would supply 27.56% of the biofuel needs of Fuerteventura, thereby contributing to the 2020 target of the European Commission regarding biofuels for land transport.

  9. A Qualitative Case Study of Strategies for Choosing and Evaluating Alternative Assessments in Online Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streff, Robert James

    2016-01-01

    Studies have shown that not all students are assessed effectively using standard testing formats. However, it is unclear what alternative methodology would be useful to determine whether students have acquired the skills necessary for today's global market. This research study's purpose was to understand the processes instructors use when choosing…

  10. Life Cycle Assessment of Miscanthus as a Fuel Alternative in District Heat Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parajuli, Ranjan; Dalgaard, Tommy; Nguyen, T Lan T

    2013-01-01

    ) plant. Alternatively, we have simulated the combustion process of Miscanthus in a boiler, where only heat is produced. For NG similar scenarios are examined. Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) in relation to 1 MJ of heat production with Miscanthus fired in a CHP would lead to a Global Warming Potential (GWP...

  11. Testing Alternative Assessment Strategies-the Ups and the Downs for Science-Teaching Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscovici, Hedy; Gilmer, Penny J.

    1996-01-01

    Outlines the different alternative assessment strategies used by different biology instructors at Florida State University, each teaching a section of a new biology course for prospective elementary and early childhood teachers. Provides suggestions for similar relatively small classes as well as for large college classes. (JRH)

  12. Modified Multiple-Choice Items for Alternate Assessments: Reliability, Difficulty, and Differential Boost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettler, Ryan J.; Rodriguez, Michael C.; Bolt, Daniel M.; Elliott, Stephen N.; Beddow, Peter A.; Kurz, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Federal policy on alternate assessment based on modified academic achievement standards (AA-MAS) inspired this research. Specifically, an experimental study was conducted to determine whether tests composed of modified items would have the same level of reliability as tests composed of original items, and whether these modified items helped reduce…

  13. Incorporating Student Input in Developing Alternate Assessments Based on Modified Academic Achievement Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Andrew T.; Beddow, Peter A.; Kurz, Alexander; Kettler, Ryan J.; Elliott, Stephen N.

    2010-01-01

    In developing alternate assessments based on modified academic achievement standards (AA-MAS), several states have modified existing test items with the aim of enhancing accessibility and reducing difficulty for students with disabilities. Using Grade 8 multiple-choice test items in unmodified and modified forms, two studies examined student…

  14. Comments on James D. Brown and Thom Hudson's "The Alternatives in Language Assessment."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruton, Anthony; Brown, James Dean; Hudson, Thom

    1999-01-01

    Anthony Bruton comments on Brown and Hudson's article "The Alternatives in Language Assessment," (v32 n4 Win 1998). Raises questions about some of their definitions and categories and suggests additional items that need to be considered by test takers. Brown and Hudson reply with clarifications of terms and definition of the scope of their paper.…

  15. Incorporating Student Input in Developing Alternate Assessments Based on Modified Academic Achievement Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Andrew T.; Beddow, Peter A.; Kurz, Alexander; Kettler, Ryan J.; Elliott, Stephen N.

    2010-01-01

    In developing alternate assessments based on modified academic achievement standards (AA-MAS), several states have modified existing test items with the aim of enhancing accessibility and reducing difficulty for students with disabilities. Using Grade 8 multiple-choice test items in unmodified and modified forms, two studies examined student…

  16. Testing Alternative Assessment Strategies-the Ups and the Downs for Science-Teaching Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscovici, Hedy; Gilmer, Penny J.

    1996-01-01

    Outlines the different alternative assessment strategies used by different biology instructors at Florida State University, each teaching a section of a new biology course for prospective elementary and early childhood teachers. Provides suggestions for similar relatively small classes as well as for large college classes. (JRH)

  17. Assessing Tuition and Student Aid Strategies: Using Price-Response Measures to Simulate Pricing Alternatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. John, Edward P.

    1994-01-01

    A study used price-response measures from recent national studies to assess college and university pricing (tuition and student aid) alternatives in diverse institutional settings. It is concluded that such analyses are feasible. Analysis indicated limits to "Robin Hood" pricing patterns are predominant in private colleges. Consideration…

  18. Effect of evaporative surface cooling on thermographic assessment of burn depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmo, V. J.; Zawacki, B. E.

    1977-01-01

    Differences in surface temperature between evaporating and nonevaporating, partial- and full-thickness burn injuries were studied in 20 male, white guinea pigs. Evaporative cooling can disguise the temperature differential of the partial-thickness injury and lead to a false full-thickness diagnosis. A full-thickness burn with blister intact may retain enough heat to result in a false partial-thickness diagnosis. By the fourth postburn day, formation of a dry eschar may allow a surface temperature measurement without the complication of differential evaporation. For earlier use of thermographic information, evaporation effects must be accounted for or eliminated.

  19. Multi-Model Assessment of Global Hydropower and Cooling Water Discharge Potential Under Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vliet, M. T. H.; van Beek, L. P. H.; Eisener, S.; Wada, Y.; Bierkens, M. F. P.

    2016-01-01

    Worldwide, 98% of total electricity is currently produced by thermoelectric power and hydropower. Climate change is expected to directly impact electricity supply, in terms of both water availability for hydropower generation and cooling water usage for thermoelectric power. Improved understanding of how climate change may impact the availability and temperature of water resources is therefore of major importance. Here we use a multi-model ensemble to show the potential impacts of climate change on global hydropower and cooling water discharge potential. For the first time, combined projections of streamflow and water temperature were produced with three global hydrological models (GHMs) to account for uncertainties in the structure and parametrization of these GHMs in both water availability and water temperature. The GHMs were forced with bias-corrected output of five general circulation models (GCMs) for both the lowest and highest representative concentration pathways (RCP2.6 and RCP8.5). The ensemble projections of streamflow and water temperature were then used to quantify impacts on gross hydropower potential and cooling water discharge capacity of rivers worldwide. We show that global gross hydropower potential is expected to increase between +2.4% (GCM-GHM ensemble mean for RCP 2.6) and +6.3% (RCP 8.5) for the 2080s compared to 1971-2000. The strongest increases in hydropower potential are expected for Central Africa, India, central Asia and the northern high-latitudes, with 18-33% of the world population living in these areas by the 2080s. Global mean cooling water discharge capacity is projected to decrease by 4.5-15% (2080s). The largest reductions are found for the United States, Europe, eastern Asia, and southern parts of South America, Africa and Australia, where strong water temperature increases are projected combined with reductions in mean annual streamflow. These regions are expected to affect 11-14% (for RCP2.6 and the shared socioeconomic

  20. Assessment of thermal performance for the design of a passively-cooled plutonium storage vault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Joseph Conway

    A passively-cooled plutonium storage vault, rather than one with a safety-qualified, forced-flow cooling system, could save as much as 100 million over the project lifetime. Either configuration must maintain the temperature of the stored plutonium metal, with its significant internal heat generation, below 239 sp circF. Alpha-phase metal, if allowed to exceed this temperature, will transition to beta-phase metal and undergo a volumetric expansion which could rupture the storage container system. An investigation was performed to determine whether a passively-cooled vault is feasible. Significant temperature drops occurred in two regions, both were gas-filled vertical annuli with heat flux boundary conditions on the inner surfaces and fixed temperature boundary conditions on the outer surfaces. The thermal resistance method was employed to evaluate radial heat transfer across each annulus, coupling natural convection, radiation, and conduction. Correlations from Thomas et al and Kulacki et al were used to evaluate the degree of natural convective enhancement. For the helium-filled region between the plutonium metal rod and the container with a characteristic length of 3.9 centimeters and an aspect ratio of 5.6, the Rayleigh number was 800 when the effect of radiation was removed. This resulted in a Nusselt number of 1.8. For the air-filled region between twelve vertically arranged containers and the storage tube with a characteristic length of 5.8 centimeters and an aspect ratio of 78, the Rayleigh number was 5times10sp5. This resulted in a Nusselt number of approximately 4.5, neglecting the effect of radiation. FIDAP 7.62\\copyright$ (Fluid Dynamics Analysis Package) was used to perform multi-dimensional finite element analyses of these regions employing both buoyant and radiative effects. Both simplified and more geometrically complex models were employed, all of which compared favorably to the results using the thermal resistance method. The results of the

  1. Multi-Model Assessment of Global Hydropower and Cooling Water Discharge Potential Under Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vliet, M. T. H.; van Beek, L. P. H.; Eisener, S.; Wada, Y.; Bierkens, M. F. P.

    2016-01-01

    Worldwide, 98% of total electricity is currently produced by thermoelectric power and hydropower. Climate change is expected to directly impact electricity supply, in terms of both water availability for hydropower generation and cooling water usage for thermoelectric power. Improved understanding of how climate change may impact the availability and temperature of water resources is therefore of major importance. Here we use a multi-model ensemble to show the potential impacts of climate change on global hydropower and cooling water discharge potential. For the first time, combined projections of streamflow and water temperature were produced with three global hydrological models (GHMs) to account for uncertainties in the structure and parametrization of these GHMs in both water availability and water temperature. The GHMs were forced with bias-corrected output of five general circulation models (GCMs) for both the lowest and highest representative concentration pathways (RCP2.6 and RCP8.5). The ensemble projections of streamflow and water temperature were then used to quantify impacts on gross hydropower potential and cooling water discharge capacity of rivers worldwide. We show that global gross hydropower potential is expected to increase between +2.4% (GCM-GHM ensemble mean for RCP 2.6) and +6.3% (RCP 8.5) for the 2080s compared to 1971-2000. The strongest increases in hydropower potential are expected for Central Africa, India, central Asia and the northern high-latitudes, with 18-33% of the world population living in these areas by the 2080s. Global mean cooling water discharge capacity is projected to decrease by 4.5-15% (2080s). The largest reductions are found for the United States, Europe, eastern Asia, and southern parts of South America, Africa and Australia, where strong water temperature increases are projected combined with reductions in mean annual streamflow. These regions are expected to affect 11-14% (for RCP2.6 and the shared socioeconomic

  2. Assessment of the reduced ore cooling process at the Ernesto Che Guevara Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ever Góngora-Leyva

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of the investigations related to evaluations on the process of reduced ore cooling in rotating horizontal cylinders on an industrial scale indicated that there are only water temperature measurements on one end of pit and showed no experiments where the variables of water and ore flowrates were evaluated nor the relation with the temperature of the ore at the cooler outlet. Based on this precedent, six thermocouples were installed to calculate the cooling water temperature in three locations on both sides of the pit connected to the data input system in place in the enterprise. The design of the experiment was developed from analyzing a population of data from a 6/month period. The results showed that the variable of greater impact on the ore temperature at the cot oler outlet is the water flowrate. For lower water flowrates (15m3/h heat transfer by water evaporation to the air is predominant and for higher water flowrates (25m3/h heat transfer by convection is predominant. Also, it was possible to know that the cooler heat output reaches the highest values (86% with the lowest ore and water flowrates (15m3/h and 29t/h, respectively.

  3. An evaluation of alternative household solid waste treatment practices using life cycle inventory assessment mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanh, Nguyen Phuc; Matsui, Yasuhiro

    2012-06-01

    Waste disposal is an important part of the life cycle of a product and is associated with environmental burdens like any other life-cycle stages. In this study, an integrated assessment for solid waste treatment practices, especially household solid waste, was undertaken to evaluate the impact contribution of household solid waste treatment alternatives towards the sustainable development by using Life Cycle Inventory Assessment method. A case study has been investigated under various possible scenarios, such as (1) landfill without landfill gas recovery, (2) landfill with landfill gas recovery and flaring, (3) landfill with landfill gas recovery and electric generation, (4) composting, and (5) incineration. The evaluation utilized the Life Cycle Inventory Assessment method for multiple assessments based on various aspects, such as greenhouse gas emission/reduction, energy generation/consumption, economic benefit, investment and operating cost, and land use burden. The results showed that incineration was the most efficient alternative for greenhouse gas emission reduction, economic benefit, energy recovery, and land use reduction, although it was identified as the most expensive for investment and operating cost, while composting scenario was also an efficient alternative with quite economic benefit, low investment and operating cost, and high reduction of land use, although it was identified as existing greenhouse gas emission and no energy generation. Furthermore, the aim of this study was also to establish localized assessment methods that waste management agencies, environmental engineers, and environmental policy decision makers can use to quantify and compare the contribution to the impacts from different waste treatment options.

  4. An Assessment Of The Life Cycle Costs And GHG Emissions For Alternative Generation Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donnelly, C. Richard; Carias, Anibal; Ali, Mohammad; Wood, Nicholas; Morgenroth, Michael; Bridgeman, Andrew

    2010-09-15

    The best choices for supplying energy in a manner that can reduce emissions at a reasonable cost while still ensuring grid stability and reliability of supply is a matter of some debate. In this paper, a first principles analysis is performed to look at life-cycle costs and emissions as well as the amount of energy that is provided to the system from various low-emission alternatives, including wind, water, solar and nuclear power. These low-emission sources are then benchmarked against coal-fired energy production to establish a normalized assessment of the clean energy alternatives currently available.

  5. Life cycle assessment of a power tower concentrating solar plant and the impacts of key design alternatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Michael B; Heath, Garvin A; Burkhardt, John J; Turchi, Craig S

    2013-06-04

    A hybrid life cycle assessment (LCA) is used to evaluate four sustainability metrics over the life cycle of a power tower concentrating solar power (CSP) facility: greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, water consumption, cumulative energy demand (CED), and energy payback time (EPBT). The reference design is for a dry-cooled, 106 MW(net) power tower facility located near Tucson, AZ that uses a mixture of mined nitrate salts as the heat transfer fluid and storage medium, a two-tank thermal energy storage system designed for six hours of full load-equivalent storage, and receives auxiliary power from the local electric grid. A thermocline-based storage system, synthetically derived salts, and natural gas auxiliary power are evaluated as design alternatives. Over its life cycle, the reference plant is estimated to have GHG emissions of 37 g CO2eq/kWh, consume 1.4 L/kWh of water and 0.49 MJ/kWh of energy, and have an EPBT of 15 months. Using synthetic salts is estimated to increase GHG emissions by 12%, CED by 7%, and water consumption by 4% compared to mined salts. Natural gas auxiliary power results in greater than 10% decreases in GHG emissions, water consumption, and CED. The thermocline design is most advantageous when coupled with the use of synthetic salts.

  6. Assessment of Energy Efficiency Project Financing Alternatives for Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, W. D.; Hail, John C.; Sullivan, Gregory P.

    2000-02-14

    This document provides findings and recommendations that resulted from an assessment of the Brookhaven National Laboratory by a team from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to assess the site's potential for various alternative financing options as a means to implement energy-efficiency improvements. The assessment looked for life-cycle cost-effective energy-efficiency improvement opportunities, and through a series of staff interviews, evaluated the various methods by which these opportunities may be financed, while considering availability of funds, staff, and available financing options. This report summarizes the findings of the visit and the resulting recommendations.

  7. Alternative model for administration and analysis of research-based assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Bethany R.; Zwickl, Benjamin M.; Hobbs, Robert D.; Aiken, John M.; Welch, Nathan M.; Lewandowski, H. J.

    2016-06-01

    Research-based assessments represent a valuable tool for both instructors and researchers interested in improving undergraduate physics education. However, the historical model for disseminating and propagating conceptual and attitudinal assessments developed by the physics education research (PER) community has not resulted in widespread adoption of these assessments within the broader community of physics instructors. Within this historical model, assessment developers create high quality, validated assessments, make them available for a wide range of instructors to use, and provide minimal (if any) support to assist with administration or analysis of the results. Here, we present and discuss an alternative model for assessment dissemination, which is characterized by centralized data collection and analysis. This model provides a greater degree of support for both researchers and instructors in order to more explicitly support adoption of research-based assessments. Specifically, we describe our experiences developing a centralized, automated system for an attitudinal assessment we previously created to examine students' epistemologies and expectations about experimental physics. This system provides a proof of concept that we use to discuss the advantages associated with centralized administration and data collection for research-based assessments in PER. We also discuss the challenges that we encountered while developing, maintaining, and automating this system. Ultimately, we argue that centralized administration and data collection for standardized assessments is a viable and potentially advantageous alternative to the default model characterized by decentralized administration and analysis. Moreover, with the help of online administration and automation, this model can support the long-term sustainability of centralized assessment systems.

  8. Alternative model for assessment administration and analysis: An example from the E-CLASS

    CERN Document Server

    Wilcox, Bethany R; Hobbs, Robert D; Aiken, John M; Welch, Nathan M; Lewandowski, H J

    2016-01-01

    The primary model for dissemination of conceptual and attitudinal assessments that has been used within the physics education research (PER) community is to create a high quality, validated assessment, make it available for a wide range of instructors to use, and provide minimal (if any) support to assist with administration or analysis of the results. Here, we present and discuss an alternative model for assessment dissemination, which is characterized by centralized data collection and analysis. This model also provides a greater degree of support for both researchers and instructors. Specifically, we describe our experiences developing a centralized, automated system for an attitudinal assessment we previously created to examine students' epistemologies and expectations about experimental physics. This system provides a proof-of-concept that we use to discuss the advantages associated with centralized administration and data collection for research-based assessments in PER. We also discuss the challenges t...

  9. Psychological Assessment with the DSM-5 Alternative Model for Personality Disorders: Tradition and Innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waugh, Mark H; Hopwood, Christopher J; Krueger, Robert F; Morey, Leslie C; Pincus, Aaron L; Wright, Aidan G C

    2017-04-01

    The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders Fifth Edition (DSM-5) Section III Alternative Model for Personality Disorders (AMPD; APA, 2013) represents an innovative system for simultaneous psychiatric classification and psychological assessment of personality disorders (PD). The AMPD combines major paradigms of personality assessment and provides an original, heuristic, flexible, and practical framework that enriches clinical thinking and practice. Origins, emerging research, and clinical application of the AMPD for diagnosis and psychological assessment are reviewed. The AMPD integrates assessment and research traditions, facilitates case conceptualization, is easy to learn and use, and assists in providing patient feedback. New as well as existing tests and psychometric methods may be used to operationalize the AMPD for clinical assessments.

  10. Cost benefit and risk assessment for selected tank waste process testing alternatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasper, K.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-05-22

    The US Department of Energy has established the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) program to safely manage wastes currently stored in underground tank at the Hanford Site. A TWRS testing and development strategy was recently developed to define long-range TWRS testing plans. The testing and development strategy considered four alternatives. The primary variable in the alternatives is the level of pilot-scale testing involving actual waste. This study evaluates the cost benefit and risks associated with the four alternatives. Four types of risk were evaluated: programmatic schedule risk, process mishap risk, worker risk, and public health risk. The structure of this report is as follows: Section 1 introduces the report subject; Section 2 describes the test strategy alternative evaluation; Section 3 describes the approach used in this study to assess risk and cost benefit; Section 4 describes the assessment methodologies for costs and risks; Section 5 describes the bases and assumptions used to estimate the costs and risks; Section 6 presents the detailed costs and risks; and Section 7 describes the results of the cost benefit analysis and presents conclusions.

  11. Alternative BSE risk assessment methodology for beef and beef offal imported into Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Yasuhiro; Horiuchi, Motohiro; Ishiguro, Naotaka; Kadohira, Mutsuyo; Kai, Satoshi; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Nagata, Chisato; Onodera, Takashi; Sata, Tetsutaro; Tsutsui, Toshiyuki; Yamada, Masahito; Yamamoto, Shigeki

    2012-08-01

    The Food Safety Commission (FSC) of Japan, established in July 2003, has its own initiative to conduct risk assessments on food stuffs known as "self-tasking assessment". Within this framework, the FSC decided to conduct a risk assessment of beef and beef offal imported into Japan from countries with no previous BSE reports; thus, a methodology was formed to suit to this purpose. This methodology was partly based on the previous assessments of Japanese domestic beef and beef imported from U.S.A./Canada, but some modifications were made. Other organizations' assessment methods, such as those used for BSE status assessment in live cattle by the OIE and EFSA's GBR, were also consulted. In this review, the authors introduce this alternative methodology, which reflects (1) the risk of live cattle in the assessed country including temporal risks of BSE invasion and domestic propagation, with the assessment results verified by surveillance data, and (2) the risk of beef and beef offal consisting of cumulative BSE risk by types of slaughtering and meat production processes implemented and the status of mechanically recovered meat production. Other possible influencing factors such as atypical BSE cases were also reviewed. The key characteristic of the current assessment is a combination of the time-sequential risk level of live cattle and qualitative risk level of meat production at present in an assessed country.

  12. Assessment With Children Who Need Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC): Clinical Decisions of AAC Specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Shelley K; Quach, Wendy; Weissling, Kristy; McKelvey, Miechelle; Dietz, Aimee

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore how speech-language pathologists (SLPs) who are augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) specialists approach the assessment process for 2 case studies, 1 child with cerebral palsy and 1 with autism spectrum disorder. The aim of the study was to answer the following questions: (a) How do clinicians with expertise approach the AAC assessment process for children with developmental disabilities? (b) Can any initial hypothesis be drawn about how SLPs approach the assessment of children with motor versus social interactive deficits? This study used a phenomenological qualitative design. The researchers conducted 2 in-depth, semistructured interviews with 8 SLPs who specialized in AAC and self-identified as primarily working with children. Four major themes emerged from the data: area of assessment, method of assessment, evaluation preparation, and parent education. Each major theme contained multiple subthemes and categories within those subthemes. Participants discussed similar areas of assessment for both cases, indicating that some aspects of AAC assessment are universal. However, the specific aspects of what they were assessing and how they went about assessing them differed between the 2 cases. The results of the current study provide an outline of an assessment protocol for children with complex communication needs.

  13. Beach nourishment alternative assessment to constrain cross-shore and longshore sediment transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasu, Servet; Work, Paul; Uzlu, Ergun; Kankal, Murat; Yuksek, Omer

    2016-01-01

    A combined field and laboratory investigation was conducted to assess five options for creation of a recreational beach on a steep, armored shoreline on the eastern Black Sea coast. All designs incorporated a beach nourishment project placed between two existing, shore-normal, rubble-mound groins. Alternatives included the placement of a nearshore berm, longshore extensions added to the existing groins, and shore-parallel breakwaters. Several alternatives are reviewed for quantifying the performance of each design, including assessment of the change in shoreline position and project volume retained between the groins. Dimensionless benefits and benefit-cost ratios are quantified, and recommendations made on how to select the best outcome from a benefit-to-cost standpoint when options including hard structures are incorporated into a beach nourishment project design.

  14. Elastocaloric cooling: Stretch to actively cool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossmer, Hinnerk; Kohl, Manfred

    2016-10-01

    The elastocaloric effect can be exploited in solid-state cooling technologies as an alternative to conventional vapour compression. Now, an elastocaloric device based on the concept of active regeneration achieves a temperature lift of 15.3 K and efficiencies competitive with other caloric-based approaches.

  15. Measuring the coolness of interactive products: the COOL questionnaire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Anders; Raptis, Dimitrios; Kjeldskov, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    characteristics. These were used to create an initial pool of question items and 2236 participants were asked to assess 16 mobile devices. By performing exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses, we identified three factors that can measure the perceived inner coolness of interactive products: desirability...... is the COOL questionnaire. We based the creation of the questionnaire on literature suggesting that perceived coolness is decomposed to outer cool (the style of a product) and inner cool (the personality characteristics assigned to it). In this paper, we focused on inner cool, and we identified 11 inner cool...

  16. Electron cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshkov, I.; Sidorin, A.

    2004-10-01

    The brief review of the most significant and interesting achievements in electron cooling method, which took place during last two years, is presented. The description of the electron cooling facilities-storage rings and traps being in operation or under development-is given. The applications of the electron cooling method are considered. The following modern fields of the method development are discussed: crystalline beam formation, expansion into middle and high energy electron cooling (the Fermilab Recycler Electron Cooler, the BNL cooler-recuperator, cooling with circulating electron beam, the GSI project), electron cooling in traps, antihydrogen generation, electron cooling of positrons (the LEPTA project).

  17. Assessing fishery and ecological consequences of alternate management options for multispecies fisheries

    OpenAIRE

    Thorpe, Robert; Dolder, Paul; Reeves, Stuart; Robinson, Peter; Jennings, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Demands for management advice on mixed and multispecies fisheries pose many challenges, further complicated by corresponding requests for advice on the environmental impacts of alternate management options. Here, we develop, and apply to North Sea fisheries, a method for collectively assessing the effects of, and interplay between, technical interactions, multispecies interactions, and the environmental effects of fishing. Ecological interactions involving 21 species are characterized with an...

  18. Stochastic Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaskiewicz, M.

    2011-01-01

    Stochastic Cooling was invented by Simon van der Meer and was demonstrated at the CERN ISR and ICE (Initial Cooling Experiment). Operational systems were developed at Fermilab and CERN. A complete theory of cooling of unbunched beams was developed, and was applied at CERN and Fermilab. Several new and existing rings employ coasting beam cooling. Bunched beam cooling was demonstrated in ICE and has been observed in several rings designed for coasting beam cooling. High energy bunched beams have proven more difficult. Signal suppression was achieved in the Tevatron, though operational cooling was not pursued at Fermilab. Longitudinal cooling was achieved in the RHIC collider. More recently a vertical cooling system in RHIC cooled both transverse dimensions via betatron coupling.

  19. Comprehensive Assessment of the Potential for Efficient District Heating and Cooling and for High-Efficient Cogeneration in Austria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Büchele

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In accordance with the EU Energy Efficiency Directive all Member States have to develop a comprehensive assessment of the potential for high-efficient CHP and efficient district heating and cooling by the end of 2015. This paper describes the approach and methodology used to determine the district heating potentials for Austria. In a first step actual and future heating and cooling demand in the building sector is evaluated using the techno-economic bottom-up model Invert/EE-Lab. Relevant infrastructure probably existing in 2025 is investigated and included into the analysis. Technical potentials for efficient technologies are calculated. After a classification of relevant regions into main and secondary regions a country-level cost-benefit-analysis is performed. The results indicate that there is a reasonable additional potential for district heating by the year 2025 under our central scenario assumptions and within sensitivity scenarios. Only in scenarios with high CO2-price or low gas price, CHP is an economically efficient solution to supply district heat.

  20. Implementation of alternative test strategies for the safety assessment of engineered nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nel, A E

    2013-12-01

    Nanotechnology introduces a new field that requires novel approaches and methods for hazard and risk assessment. For an appropriate scientific platform for safety assessment, nanoscale properties and functions of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs), including how the physicochemical properties of the materials relate to mechanisms of injury at the nano-bio interface, must be considered. Moreover, this rapidly advancing new field requires novel test strategies that allow multiple toxicants to be screened in robust, mechanism-based assays in which the bulk of the investigation can be carried out at the cellular and biomolecular level whilst maintaining limited animal use and is based on the contribution of toxicological pathways to the pathophysiology of disease. First, a predictive toxicological approach for the safety assessment of ENMs will be discussed against the background of a '21st-century vision' for using alternative test strategies (ATSs) to perform toxicological assessment of large numbers of untested chemicals, thereby reducing a backlog that could otherwise become a problem for nanotechnology. An ATS is defined here as an alternative to animal experiments or refinement/reduction alternative to traditional animal testing. Secondly, the approach of selecting pathways of toxicity to screen for the pulmonary hazard potential of carbon nanotubes and metal oxides will be discussed, as well as how to use these pathways to perform high-content or high-throughput testing and how the data can be used for hazard ranking, risk assessment, regulatory decision-making and 'safer-by-design' strategies. Finally, the utility and disadvantages of this predictive toxicological approach to ENM safety assessment, and how it can assist the 21st-century vision, will be addressed.

  1. Comparative Experiments to Assess the Effects of Accumulator Nitrogen Injection on Passive Core Cooling During Small Break LOCA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yuquan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The accumulator is a passive safety injection device for emergency core cooling systems. As an important safety feature for providing a high-speed injection flow to the core by compressed nitrogen gas pressure during a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA, the accumulator injects its precharged nitrogen into the system after its coolant has been emptied. Attention has been drawn to the possible negative effects caused by such a nitrogen injection in passive safety nuclear power plants. Although some experimental work on the nitrogen injection has been done, there have been no comparative tests in which the effects on the system responses and the core safety have been clearly assessed. In this study, a new thermal hydraulic integral test facility—the advanced core-cooling mechanism experiment (ACME—was designed and constructed to support the CAP1400 safety review. The ACME test facility was used to study the nitrogen injection effects on the system responses to the small break loss-of-coolant accident LOCA (SBLOCA transient. Two comparison test groups—a 2-inch cold leg break and a double-ended direct-vessel-injection (DEDVI line break—were conducted. Each group consists of a nitrogen injection test and a nitrogen isolation comparison test with the same break conditions. To assess the nitrogen injection effects, the experimental data that are representative of the system responses and the core safety were compared and analyzed. The results of the comparison show that the effects of nitrogen injection on system responses and core safety are significantly different between the 2-inch and DEDVI breaks. The mechanisms of the different effects on the transient were also investigated. The amount of nitrogen injected, along with its heat absorption, was likewise evaluated in order to assess its effect on the system depressurization process. The results of the comparison and analyses in this study are important for recognizing and understanding the

  2. Air exchange rates and alternative vapor entry pathways to inform vapor intrusion exposure risk assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichman, Rivka; Roghani, Mohammadyousef; Willett, Evan J; Shirazi, Elham; Pennell, Kelly G

    2016-11-12

    Vapor intrusion (VI) is a term used to describe indoor air (IA) contamination that occurs due to the migration of chemical vapors in the soil and groundwater. The overall vapor transport process depends on several factors such as contaminant source characteristics, subsurface conditions, building characteristics, and general site conditions. However, the classic VI conceptual model does not adequately account for the physics of airflow around and inside a building and does not account for chemical emissions from alternative "preferential" pathways (e.g. sewers and other utility connections) into IA spaces. This mini-review provides information about recent research related to building air exchange rates (AERs) and alternative pathways to improve the accuracy of VI exposure risk assessment practices. First, results from a recently published AER study for residential homes across the United States (US) are presented and compared to AERs recommended by the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). The comparison shows considerable differences in AERs when season, location, building age, and other factors are considered. These differences could directly impact VI assessments by influencing IA concentration measurements. Second, a conceptual model for sewer gas entry into buildings is presented and a summary of published field studies is reported. The results of the field studies suggest that alternative pathways for vapors to enter indoor spaces warrant consideration. Ultimately, the information presented in this mini-review can be incorporated into a multiple-lines-of-evidence approach for assessing site-specific VI exposure risks.

  3. The life cycle assessment of alternative fuel chains for urban buses and trolleybuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliucininkas, L; Matulevicius, J; Martuzevicius, D

    2012-05-30

    This paper describes a comparative analysis of public transport alternatives in the city of Kaunas, Lithuania. An LCA (Life Cycle Assessment) inventory analysis of fuel chains was undertaken using the midi urban bus and a similar type of trolleybus. The inventory analysis of fuel chains followed the guidelines provided by the ISO 14040 and ISO 14044 standards. The ReCiPe Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA) methodology was used to quantify weighted damage originating from five alternative fuel chains. The compressed biogas fuel chain had the lowest weighted damage value, namely 45.7 mPt/km, whereas weighted damage values of the fuel chains based on electricity generation for trolleybuses were 60.6 mPt/km (for natural gas) and 78.9 mPt/km (for heavy fuel oil). The diesel and compressed natural gas fuel chains exhibited considerably higher damage values of 114.2 mPt/km and 132.6 mPt/km, respectively. The comparative life cycle assessment of fuel chains suggested that biogas-powered buses and electric trolleybuses can be considered as the best alternatives to use when modernizing the public transport fleet in Kaunas.

  4. Development of Procedures of Leak Before Break Assessment for Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S. Y.; Koo, G. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Bae, K. D.; Kim, Y. J. [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Double-Ended-Guillotine-Break(DEGB) in pipes can be prevented by detecting a leakage that occurs at the through-wall stage of a crack opening under those conditions. A consideration of these LBB characteristics can enlarge the degree of design freedom with respect to the materials, piping layouts, and safety measures against a leakage, thus leading to improved plant reliability and economy. For the LBB assessment of SFR pipes, creep crack growth could be considered, because SFRs are operated above 500 .deg. C. But the LBB assessment procedure for high temperature has not been established yet. In this study, we analyze RCC-MR A16 and propose procedure for the LBB assessment based on RCC-MR A16. For verification of this procedure, we conduct an example of LBB assessment. And we found partial procedure, equation and constant that has not been provided in RCC-MR A16. In this study, LBB assessment procedure has been proposed for SFRs design based on RCC-MR A16. Also, proposed procedure was verified by conducting an example assessment. As a result of those draw two conclusions as follow: · The LBB assessment of SFRs can be conducted by proposed procedure based on RCC-MR A16. · However, it is needed to develop determination of critical crack length methodology.

  5. Life cycle assessment of the use of alternative fuels in cement kilns: A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiopoulou, Martha; Lyberatos, Gerasimos

    2017-07-14

    The benefits of using alternative fuels (AFs) in the cement industry include reduction of the use of non-renewable fossil fuels and lower emissions of greenhouse gases, since fossil fuels are replaced with materials that would otherwise be degraded or incinerated with corresponding emissions and final residues. Furthermore, the use of alternative fuels maximizes the recovery of energy. Seven different scenaria were developed for the production of 1 ton of clinker in a rotary cement kiln. Each of these scenaria includes the use of alternative fuels such as RDF (Refuse derived fuel), TDF (Tire derived fuel) and BS (Biological sludge) or a mixture of them, in partial replacement of conventional fuels such as coal and pet coke. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the environmental impacts of the use of alternative fuels in relation to conventional fuels in the kiln operation. The Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) methodology is used to quantify the potential environmental impacts in each scenario. The interpretation of the results provides the conclusion that the most environmentally friendly prospect is the scenario based on RDF while the less preferable scenario is the scenario based on BS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Proposal for an alternative operative method for determination of polarisation resistance for the quantitative evaluation of corrosion of reinforcing steel in concrete cooling towers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitzithra, M.E., E-mail: me.mitzithra@gmail.com [EDF R& D, 6 quai Watier, 78401 Chatou Cedex (France); Université de Toulouse, UPS, INSA, LMDC, 135, Avenue de Rangueil, 31077 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Deby, F.; Balayssac, J.P. [Université de Toulouse, UPS, INSA, LMDC, 135, Avenue de Rangueil, 31077 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Salin, J. [EDF R& D, 6 quai Watier, 78401 Chatou Cedex (France)

    2015-07-15

    This paper summarises the results obtained from numerical simulations of an operational measurement mode of polarisation resistance adapted for evaluating corrosion of reinforcing steel in concrete on cooling towers. A simple operational measurement mode of R{sub p} is proposed, adapted for cooling towers prone to corrosion due to carbonation. By means of numerical experimentations, calculation diagrams and semi-empirical equations are built involving the different influencing parameters: concrete cover to steel reinforcement, concrete resistivity and current intensity injected from the counter electrode. Finally, a first application of the proposed procedure for calculating the real value of R{sub p} in laboratory conditions is presented.

  7. A comparative assessment of alternatives to the full-leg radiograph for determining knee joint alignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navali Amir M

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to assess the concurrent validity of alternative measures of frontal plane knee alignment, namely the radiographic anatomic axis and two clinical measures in patients complaining of knee malalignment as compared with the mechanical axis on full-length radiograph of lower limbs. Methods The knee-alignment angle was measured in 100 knees of 50 subjects with the chief complaint of frontal knee malalignment according to the following methods: lower-limb mechanical axis on radiograph, lower-limb anatomic axis on radiograph, distance between medial femoral condyles or medial malleoli using a calliper and lower-limb alignment using a goniometer. Data were analyzed using Pearson’s correlation coefficient and simple linear regression. Results The anatomic axis best correlated with the mechanical axis (r = 0.93, P Conclusions The anatomic axis on radiograph, the calliper method and to a lesser extent the goniometer measurement appear to be valid alternatives to the mechanical axis on full-leg radiograph for determining frontal plane knee alignment. These alternative measures have the potential to provide useful information regarding knee alignment and may increase the assessment of this parameter by clinicians and researchers.

  8. Use of Alternate Assessment Results in Reporting and Accountability Systems: Conditions for Use Based on Research and Practice. Synthesis Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quenemoen, Rachel; Rigney, Susan; Thurlow, Martha

    State assessment systems must address both technical and policy issues as assessments and accountability practices are developed and implemented. These technical and policy issues have been expanded from traditional large-scale assessment to new alternative assessment approaches required by law and developed in every state. The primary purpose of…

  9. Methodology for sodium fire vulnerability assessment of sodium cooled fast reactor based on the Monte-Carlo principle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Wei [Nuclear and Radiation Safety Center, P. O. Box 8088, Beijing (China); Wu, Yuanyu [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, 13115 Saint-Paul-lès-Durance (France); Hu, Wenjun [China Institute of Atomic Energy, P. O. Box 275(34), Beijing (China); Zuo, Jiaxu, E-mail: zuojiaxu@chinansc.cn [Nuclear and Radiation Safety Center, P. O. Box 8088, Beijing (China)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Monte-Carlo principle coupling with fire dynamic code is adopted to perform sodium fire vulnerability assessment. • The method can be used to calculate the failure probability of sodium fire scenarios. • A calculation example and results are given to illustrate the feasibility of the methodology. • Some critical parameters and experience are shared. - Abstract: Sodium fire is a typical and distinctive hazard in sodium cooled fast reactors, which is significant for nuclear safety. In this paper, a method of sodium fire vulnerability assessment based on the Monte-Carlo principle was introduced, which could be used to calculate the probabilities of every failure mode in sodium fire scenarios. After that, the sodium fire scenario vulnerability assessment of primary cold trap room of China Experimental Fast Reactor was performed to illustrate the feasibility of the methodology. The calculation result of the example shows that the conditional failure probability of key cable is 23.6% in the sodium fire scenario which is caused by continuous sodium leakage because of the isolation device failure, but the wall temperature, the room pressure and the aerosol discharge mass are all lower than the safety limits.

  10. HESI pilot project: Testing a qualitative approach for incorporating exposure into alternatives assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greggs, Bill; Arnold, Scott; Burns, Thomas J.;

    Committee, which consists of scientists from academia, industry, government, and NGOs, has developed a qualitative comparative exposure approach. Conducting such a comparison can screen for alternatives that are expected to have a higher exposure potential, which could trigger a higher-tiered, more-quantitative...... exposure assessment on the alternatives being considered. This talk will demonstrate an approach for including chemical and product exposure information in a qualitative AA comparison. Starting from existing hazard AAs, a series of four exposure examples were examined to test the concept, to understand...... the effort required, and to determine the value of exposure data in AA decision-making. The group has developed ingredient and product parameter categorization to support comparisons between chemicals and methodology to address data quality. The ingredient parameters include a range of physicochemical...

  11. Alaska Regional Energy Resources Planning Project, Phase 2: coal, hydroelectric, and energy alternatives. Volume III. Alaska's alternative energies and regional assessment inventory update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    The Alaska Regional Energy Resources Planning Project is presented in three volumes. This volume, Vol. III, considers alternative energies and the regional assessment inventory update. The introductory chapter, Chapter 12, examines the historical background, current technological status, environmental impact, applicability to Alaska, and siting considerations for a number of alternative systems. All of the systems considered use or could use renewable energy resources. The chapters that follow are entitled: Very Small Hydropower (about 12 kW or less for rural and remote villages); Low-Temperature Geothermal Space Heating; Wind; Fuel Cells; Siting Criteria and Preliminary Screening of Communities for Alternate Energy Use; Wood Residues; Waste Heat; and Regional Assessment Invntory Update. (MCW)

  12. Cost and Efficacy Assessment of an Alternative Medication Compliance Urine Drug Testing Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Kelly; Strathmann, Frederick G

    2017-02-01

    This study investigates the frequency at which quantitative results provide additional clinical benefit compared to qualitative results alone. A comparison between alternative urine drug screens and conventional screens including the assessment of cost-to-payer differences, accuracy of prescription compliance or polypharmacy/substance abuse was also included. In a reference laboratory evaluation of urine specimens from across the United States, 213 urine specimens with provided prescription medication information (302 prescriptions) were analyzed by two testing algorithms: 1) conventional immunoassay screen with subsequent reflexive testing of positive results by quantitative mass spectrometry; and 2) a combined immunoassay/qualitative mass-spectrometry screen that substantially reduced the need for subsequent testing. The qualitative screen was superior to immunoassay with reflex to mass spectrometry in confirming compliance per prescription (226/302 vs 205/302), and identifying non-prescription abuse (97 vs 71). Pharmaceutical impurities and inconsistent drug metabolite patterns were detected in only 3.8% of specimens, suggesting that quantitative results have limited benefit. The percentage difference between the conventional testing algorithm and the alternative screen was projected to be 55%, and a 2-year evaluation of test utilization as a measure of test order volume follows an exponential trend for alternative screen test orders over conventional immunoassay screens that require subsequent confirmation testing. Alternative, qualitative urine drug screens provide a less expensive, faster, and more comprehensive evaluation of patient medication compliance and drug abuse. The vast majority of results were interpretable with qualitative results alone indicating a reduced need to automatically reflex to quantitation or provide quantitation for the majority of patients. This strategy highlights a successful approach using an alternative strategy for both the

  13. An assessment of alternative agricultural management practice impacts on soil carbon in the corn belt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnwell, T.O. Jr.; Jackson, R.B.; Mulkey, L.A. [Environmental Research Laboratory, Athens, GA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    This impact of alternative management practices on agricultural soil C is estimated by a soil C mass balance modeling study that incorporates policy considerations in the analysis. A literature review of soil C modeling and impacts of management practices has been completed. The models selected for use and/or modification to meet the needs of representing soil C cycles in agroecosystems and impacts of management practices are CENTURY and DNDC. These models share a common ability to examine the impacts of alternative management practices on soil organic C, and are readily accessible. An important aspect of this effort is the development of the modeling framework and methodology that define the agricultural production systems and scenarios (i.e., crop-soil-climate combinations) to be assessed in terms of national policy, the integration of the model needs with available databases, and the operational mechanics of evaluating C sequestration potential with the integrated model/database system. We are working closely with EPA`s Office of Policy and Program Evaluation to define a reasonable set of policy alternatives for this assessment focusing on policy that might be affected through a revised Farm Bill, such as incentives to selectively promote conservation tillage, crop rotations, and/or good stewardship of the conservation reserve. Policy alternatives are translated into basic data for use in soil C models through economic models. These data, including such elements as agricultural practices, fertilization rates, and production levels are used in the soil C models to produce net carbon changes on a per unit area basis. The unit-area emissions are combined with areal-extent data in a GIS to produce an estimate of total carbon and nitrogen changes and thus estimate greenhouse benefits.

  14. Using Checklists to Assess Your Transition to Alternative Fuels: A Technical Reference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Risch, C. E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Santini, D. J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Johnson, L. R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-12-01

    The Checklist for Transition to New Alternative Fuel(s) was published in September 2011 by Chuck Risch and Dan Santini. Many improvements, described below, have been incorporated into this current document, Checklists for Assessing the Transitions to New Highway Fuels.2 Further, the original authors and Larry Johnson, co-author of the current report, identified a need for a succinct version of the full report and prepared a brochure based on it to aid busy decisionmakers: Check It Out: Using Checklists to Assess Your Transition to Alternative Fuels.2 These checklists are tools for those stakeholders charged with determining a feasible alternative fuel or fuels for highway transportation systems of the future. The original had four major players whose needs had to be satisfied for a successful transition. The term “activist,” intended to encompass environmental and other special interests, was included in the “customers” category. Activists are customers of the government in the sense that they organize citizens to exert political pressure to regulate the design of vehicles, fuel infrastructure, and roadway networks. Many who evaluate alternative fuels view activists, particularly environmental activists, as a separate category. Further, “activist” has become a pejorative term to many people. Therefore, we have used the word “advocate” or “activist/advocate” instead. Thus, in this update we recognize that environmental and other activists/advocates have been--and will continue to be--a powerful force promoting change in the nature of the fuels that are used in transportation.

  15. An integrated method for assessing climate-related risks and adaptation alternatives in urban areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Andersson-Sköld

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The urban environment is a complex structure with interlinked social, ecological and technical structures. Global warming is expected to have a broad variety of impacts, which will add to the complexity. Climate changes will force adaptation, to reduce climate-related risks. Adaptation measures can address one aspect at the time, or aim for a holistic approach to avoid maladaptation. This paper presents a systematic, integrated approach for assessing alternatives for reducing the risks of heat waves, flooding and air pollution in urban settings, with the aim of reducing the risk of maladaptation. The study includes strategies covering different spatial scales, and both the current climate situation and the climate predicted under climate change scenarios. The adaptation strategies investigated included increasing vegetation; selecting density, height and colour of buildings; and retreat or resist (defend against sea-level rise. Their effectiveness was assessed with regard to not only flooding, heat stress and air quality but also with regard to resource use, emissions to air (incl. GHG, soil and water, and people’s perceptions and vulnerability. The effectiveness of the strategies were ranked on a common scale (from −3 to 3 in an integrated assessment. Integrated assessments are recommended, as they help identify the most sustainable solutions, but to reduce the risk of maladaptation they require experts from a variety of disciplines. The most generally applicable recommendation, derived from the integrated assessment here, taking into account both expertise from different municipal departments, literature surveys, life cycle assessments and publics perceptions, is to increase the urban greenery, as it contributes to several positive aspects such as heat stress mitigation, air quality improvement, effective storm-water and flood-risk management, and it has several positive social impacts. The most favourable alternative was compact, mid

  16. CHP and District Cooling: An Assessment of Market and Policy Potential in India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    This report contains an assessment of India's CHP/DC status and recommendations for addressing barriers to allow India to meet its energy efficiency targets. Such barriers include a lack of governmental emphasis on CHP, the absence of a clear methodology for calculating CO2 emission reductions from CHP/DHC, and a tax and duty structure for CHP capital equipment that is not as attractive as for other renewable energy technologies.

  17. Acute medical assessment units: an efficient alternative to in-hospital acute medical care.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Watts, M

    2011-02-01

    Acute Medical Assessment Units (AMAUs) are being proposed as an alternative to congested Emergency Departments (EDs for the assessment of patients with a range of acute medical problems. We retrospectively reviewed the discharge destination of patients referred to a newly established AMAU during a six-month period. During the same period we contrasted activity in the ED for a similar group of patients. 1,562 patients were assessed in the AMAU. 196 (12.5%) were admitted to an in-patient bed and 1,148 (73.5%) were entered into specific diagnosis-driven out-patient pathways. 1,465 patients attended the ED and 635 (43.3%) were admitted. Out-patient alternatives to expensive in-patient care need to be provided at the \\'coal face" of acute referral. The AMAU provides this, and as a consequence admission rates are relatively low. This is achieved by directly communicating with GPs, accessing senior clinical decision makers, and providing immediate access to diagnostically driven outpatient pathways.

  18. The Role of Alternative Testing Strategies in Environmental Risk Assessment of Engineered Nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Rune; Holden, Patricia; Hansen, Steffen Foss

    2017-01-01

    Within toxicology there is a pressure to find new test systems and organisms to replace, reduce and refine animal testing. In nanoecotoxicology the need for alternative testing strategies (ATS) is further emphasized as the validity of tests and risk assessment practices developed for dissolved......) workshop in Washington, D.C. and serves as the point of depature for this paper. Here we present the main outcomes by describing and defining the use of ATS for ENMs as well as discussing its future role in environmental risk science. We conclude that diversity in testing should be encouraged to avoid...

  19. Reliability Assessment of 2400 MWth Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor Natural Circulation Decay Heat Removal in Pressurized Situations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Bassi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available As the 2400 MWth gas-cooled fast reactor concept makes use of passive safety features in combination with active safety systems, the question of natural circulation decay heat removal (NCDHR reliability and performance assessment into the ongoing probabilistic safety assessment in support to the reactor design, named “probabilistic engineering assessment” (PEA, constitutes a challenge. Within the 5th Framework Program for Research and Development (FPRD of the European Community, a methodology has been developed to evaluate the reliability of passive systems characterized by a moving fluid and whose operation is based on physical principles, such as the natural circulation. This reliability method for passive systems (RMPSs is based on uncertainties propagation into thermal-hydraulic (T-H calculations. The aim of this exercise is finally to determine the performance reliability of the DHR system operating in a “passive” mode, taking into account the uncertainties of parameters retained for thermal-hydraulical calculations performed with the CATHARE 2 code. According to the PEA preliminary results, exhibiting the weight of pressurized scenarios (i.e., with intact primary circuit boundary for the core damage frequency (CDF, the RMPS exercise is first focusing on the NCDHR performance at these T-H conditions.

  20. Opportunities for an alternative integrating testing strategy for carcinogen hazard assessment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doktorova, Tatyana Y; Pauwels, Marleen; Vinken, Mathieu; Vanhaecke, Tamara; Rogiers, Vera

    2012-02-01

    The 2-year rodent carcinogenicity bioassay evolved more than 40 years ago, and although it is complex, long lasting, expensive, and animal consuming, it is still the only generally accepted test for assessing the carcinogenicity of chemicals. Over time, different alternative approaches have been developed with the final goal to replace the bioassay. Unfortunately, at present, none of these strategies alone provides sufficient assurance of accurate prediction. In this review paper, we discuss the major advantages and pitfalls of the existing alternative methodologies to the carcinogenicity bioassay. Finally, based on the available scientific data in the public domain, we propose what we would like to call a "feasible integrated testing strategy" which incorporates some promising alternatives, providing at the same time information on the mechanism of action and the toxic nature of the compounds tested. It is, however, clear that the adoption of whatever "new" testing scheme should be considered with caution and its effectiveness should be experimentally demonstrated in advance by addressing a reasonable number of chemical carcinogens and non-carcinogens from a variety of structural and functional classes.

  1. Assessment of wastewater treatment alternatives for small communities: An analytic network process approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinos-Senante, María; Gómez, Trinidad; Caballero, Rafael; Hernández-Sancho, Francesc; Sala-Garrido, Ramón

    2015-11-01

    The selection of the most appropriate wastewater treatment (WWT) technology is a complex problem since many alternatives are available and many criteria are involved in the decision-making process. To deal with this challenge, the analytic network process (ANP) is applied for the first time to rank a set of seven WWT technology set-ups for secondary treatment in small communities. A major advantage of ANP is that it incorporates interdependent relationships between elements. Results illustrated that extensive technologies, constructed wetlands and pond systems are the most preferred alternatives by WWT experts. The sensitivity analysis performed verified that the ranking of WWT alternatives is very stable since constructed wetlands are almost always placed in the first position. This paper showed that ANP analysis is suitable to deal with complex decision-making problems, such as the selection of the most appropriate WWT system contributing to better understand the multiple interdependences among elements involved in the assessment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Assessment of costs and benefits of flexible and alternative fuel use in the US transportation sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-01

    The DOE is conducting a comprehensive technical analysis of a flexible-fuel transportation system in the United States -- that is, a system that could easily switch between petroleum and another fuel, depending on price and availability. The DOE Alternative Fuels Assessment is aimed directly at questions of energy security and fuel availability, but covers a wide range of issues. This report examines environmental, health, and safety concerns associated with a switch to alternative- and flexible-fuel vehicles. Three potential alternatives to oil-based fuels in the transportation sector are considered: methanol, compressed natural gas (CNG), and electricity. The objective is to describe and discuss qualitatively potential environmental, health, and safety issues that would accompany widespread use of these three fuels. This report presents the results of exhaustive literature reviews; discussions with specialists in the vehicular and fuel-production industries and with Federal, State, and local officials; and recent information from in-use fleet tests. Each chapter deals with the end-use and process emissions of air pollutants, presenting an overview of the potential air pollution contribution of the fuel --relative to that of gasoline and diesel fuel -- in various applications. Carbon monoxide, particulate matter, ozone precursors, and carbon dioxide are emphasized. 67 refs., 6 figs. , 8 tabs.

  3. A research needs assessment: Energy efficient alternatives to chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). Final reprot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-06-01

    An assessment of the state of the art in refrigeration and insulation technologies is carried out to evaluate the potential for efficient substitutes for CFCs and HCFCs to facilitate the transition to a CFC-free environment. Opportunities for improved efficiency in domestic refrigeration, building chillers, commercial refrigeration and industrial refrigeration are evaluated. Needs for alternate refrigerants, improved components, and/or alternate cycles are identified. A summary of on-going research is presented in each area, and the potential roles of industry and government are considered. The most promising approaches for refrigeration technology fall into these categories: (1) improved vapor compressor cycles with alternate fluids, (2) Stirling cycle development and (3) advances in absorption technology. A summary of on-going research into advanced insulation, focused on vacuum -- based insulation technology refrigeration is developed. Insulation applications considered include appliances, transport refrigeration, and buildings. Specific recommendations for a long-term R&D agenda are present. The potential benefits, research, general approach, and probability of success are addressed.

  4. Simulated performance of CIEE's 'Alternatives to Compressive Cooling' prototype house under design conditions in various California climates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yu Joe

    1999-12-01

    To support the design development of a compressorless house that does not rely on mechanical air-conditioning, the author carried out detailed computer analysis of a prototypical house design to determine the indoor thermal conditions during peak cooling periods for over 170 California locations. The peak cooling periods are five-day sequences at 2{percent} frequency determined through statistical analysis of long-term historical weather data. The DOE-2 program was used to simulate the indoor temperatures of the house under four operating options: windows closed, with mechanical ventilation, evaporatively-cooled mechanical ventilation, or a conventional 1 1/2-ton air conditioner. The study found that with a 1500 CFM mechanical ventilation system, the house design would maintain comfort under peak conditions in the San Francisco Bay Area out to Walnut Creek, but not beyond. In southern California, the same system and house design would maintain adequate comfort only along the coast. With the evaporatively-cooled ventilation system, the applicability of the house design can be extended to Fairfield and Livermore in northern California, but in southern California a larger 3000 CFM system would be needed to maintain comfort conditions over half of the greater Los Angeles area, the southern half of the Inland Empire, and most of San Diego county. With the 1 1/2-ton air conditioner, the proposed house design would perform satisfactorily through most of the state, except in the upper areas of the Central Valley and the hot desert areas in southern California. In terms of energy savings, the simulations showed that the prototypical house design would save from 0.20 to 0.43 in northern California, 0.20 to 0.53 in southern California, and 0.16 to 0.35 in the Central Valley, the energy used by the same house design built to Title-24 requirements.

  5. Economic and Environmental Analysis of Cool Thermal Energy Storage as an Alternative to Batteries for the Integration of Intermittent Renewable Energy Sources

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Matthew John

    2015-01-01

    The balance of the supply of renewable energy sources with electricity demand will become increasingly difficult with further penetration of renewable energy sources. Traditionally, large stationary batteries have been used to store renewable energy in excess of electricity demand and dispatch the stored energy to meet future electricity demand. Cool thermal energy storage is a feasible renewable energy balancing solution that has economic and environmental advantages over utility scale stati...

  6. The viability of alternative assessment methods in the Greek upper secondary school: the oral portfolio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angeliki Daphni

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Τhe final examination of the English language subject, in the context of the Greek state upper secondary education, is a traditional paper-and-pencil test which does not include any assessment of oracy skills. This article explores the viability of the oral portfolio as an alternative assessment and pedagogic method that can facilitate the assessment of speaking and listening skills and create a more motivating learning environment. To this effect, three methodological tools were designed, namely, a questionnaire addressing upper secondary English teachers in Greek state schools, a case study involving an oral portfolio implementation and finally, a questionnaire for students to record their experience. The study demonstrates that implementation of the portfolio contributed to a successful assessment of oracy skills and that it was a stimulating experience for students. The results of the study also showed that the pedagogical value of the portfolio counterbalanced its practical constraints. The paper concludes by putting forward recommendations for the future application of this assessment technique in state school education.

  7. Measurement Properties of Questionnaires Assessing Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use in Pediatrics: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toupin April, Karine; Moher, David; Stinson, Jennifer; Byrne, Ani; White, Meghan; Boon, Heather; Duffy, Ciarán M.; Rader, Tamara; Vohra, Sunita; Tugwell, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Objective Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is commonly used by children, but estimates of that use vary widely partly due to the range of questionnaires used to assess CAM use. However, no studies have attempted to appraise measurement properties of these questionnaires. The aim of this systematic review was to critically appraise and summarize measurement properties of questionnaires of CAM use in pediatrics. Study design A search strategy was implemented in major electronic databases in March 2011 and conference websites, scientific journals and experts were consulted. Studies were included if they mentioned a questionnaire assessing the prevalence of CAM use in pediatrics. Members of the team independently rated the methodological quality of the studies (using the COSMIN checklist) and measurement properties of the questionnaires (using the Terwee and Cohen criteria). Results A total of 96 CAM questionnaires were found in 104 publications. The COSMIN checklist showed that no studies reported adequate methodological quality. The Terwee criteria showed that all included CAM questionnaires had indeterminate measurement properties. According to the Cohen score, none were considered to be a well-established assessment, two approached the level of a well-established assessment, seven were promising assessments and the remainder (n = 87) did not reach the score’s minimum standards. Conclusion None of the identified CAM questionnaires have been thoroughly validated. This systematic review highlights the need for proper validation of CAM questionnaires in pediatrics, which may in turn lead to improved research and knowledge translation about CAM in clinical practice. PMID:22768098

  8. Integrating knowledge exchange and the assessment of dryland management alternatives - A learning-centered participatory approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista, Susana; Llovet, Joan; Ocampo-Melgar, Anahí; Vilagrosa, Alberto; Mayor, Ángeles G; Murias, Cristina; Vallejo, V Ramón; Orr, Barron J

    2017-06-15

    The adoption of sustainable land management strategies and practices that respond to current climate and human pressures requires both assessment tools that can lead to better informed decision-making and effective knowledge-exchange mechanisms that facilitate new learning and behavior change. We propose a learning-centered participatory approach that links land management assessment and knowledge exchange and integrates science-based data and stakeholder perspectives on both biophysical and socio-economic attributes. We outline a structured procedure for a transparent assessment of land management alternatives, tailored to dryland management, that is based on (1) principles of constructivism and social learning, (2) the participation of stakeholders throughout the whole assessment process, from design to implementation, and (3) the combination of site-specific indicators, identified by local stakeholders as relevant to their particular objectives and context conditions, and science-based indicators that represent ecosystem services of drylands worldwide. The proposed procedure follows a pattern of eliciting, challenging, and self-reviewing stakeholder perspectives that aims to facilitate learning. The difference between the initial baseline perspectives and the final self-reviewed stakeholder perspectives is used as a proxy of learning. We illustrate the potential of this methodology by its application to the assessment of land uses in a Mediterranean fire-prone area in East Spain. The approach may be applied to a variety of socio-ecological systems and decision-making and governance scales. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Gasification/combined-cycle power generation: environmental assessment of alternative systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-11-01

    This report provides a basis for the comparative assessment of the potential performance capability, technological development, and economic and environmental impact associated with the operation of integrated low-Btu coal-gasification/combined-cycle power systems. Characterization of the integrated power system in terms of fuel processing, power production, and auxiliary systems is followed up with comparisons of alternative integrated-plant-design/fuel combinations with reference to the conventional coal-fired power plant, taking into account both economic and environmental factors. The report includes an assessment of the effects of recent regulatory changes on the prospects for integrated power systems and establishes a timetable for the probable commercial development of such systems by the utilities.

  10. The Writing Portfolio: an alternative assessment tool with young learners of English

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melpomeni Barabouti

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the implementation of a portfolio for assessment purposes, with a group of primary school learners of English, aged 11-12. The focus of the portfolio is specific, concentrating on a purposeful and systematic collection of samples of students’ written language. The paper explores theories on portfolios as an alternative method of assessment and the benefits deriving from their use in the classroom. Moreover, it analyses all the stages of the organization of the learner portfolios from beginning to end. The findings shed light not only on positive outcomes but also possible problems. The paper discusses the implications of the study for classroom practice and provides suggestions for further experimentation.

  11. Multi-criteria assessment tool for sustainability appraisal of remediation alternatives for a contaminated site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Gitte Lemming; Binning, Philip John; Bondgård, Morten

    2017-01-01

    the sustainability of remediation alternatives by integrating environmental, societal, and economic criteria in the assessment. Materials and methods: The MCA includes five main decision criteria: remedial effect, remediation cost, remediation time, environmental impacts, and societal impacts. The main criteria...... found to be the most sustainable option. This was especially due to the fact that this option obtained a high score in the main categories Effect and Social impacts, which were weighted highest by the stakeholders. Conclusions: The developed MCA method is structured with five main criteria. Effect...... and time are included in addition to the three pillars of sustainability (environment, society, and economy). The remedial effect of remediation is therefore assessed and weighted separately from the main criteria environment. This structure makes interpretation of criteria scores more transparent...

  12. Automatic and Objective Assessment of Alternating Tapping Performance in Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mevludin Memedi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the development and evaluation of a method for enabling quantitative and automatic scoring of alternating tapping performance of patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD. Ten healthy elderly subjects and 95 patients in different clinical stages of PD have utilized a touch-pad handheld computer to perform alternate tapping tests in their home environments. First, a neurologist used a web-based system to visually assess impairments in four tapping dimensions (‘speed’, ‘accuracy’, ‘fatigue’ and ‘arrhythmia’ and a global tapping severity (GTS. Second, tapping signals were processed with time series analysis and statistical methods to derive 24 quantitative parameters. Third, principal component analysis was used to reduce the dimensions of these parameters and to obtain scores for the four dimensions. Finally, a logistic regression classifier was trained using a 10-fold stratified cross-validation to map the reduced parameters to the corresponding visually assessed GTS scores. Results showed that the computed scores correlated well to visually assessed scores and were significantly different across Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale scores of upper limb motor performance. In addition, they had good internal consistency, had good ability to discriminate between healthy elderly and patients in different disease stages, had good sensitivity to treatment interventions and could reflect the natural disease progression over time. In conclusion, the automatic method can be useful to objectively assess the tapping performance of PD patients and can be included in telemedicine tools for remote monitoring of tapping.

  13. Alternate forms of prose passages for the assessment of auditory-verbal memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Karen

    2005-08-01

    Logical memory (LM) is the most frequently administered subtest from the Wechsler Memory Scale; however, the lack of alternate equivalent forms for this subtest may limit its clinical utility. Six new paragraphs modelled on LM stories were developed. Stories were matched on attributes such as number of words and readability. Passage attributes for the six stories were compared with those of standard LM stories (WMS-R and WMS-III versions) to examine story equivalence. The psychometric properties of new passages were also calculated to assess task difficulty and interrater reliability. Results from these analyses suggest a high degree of overlap between the attributes of the new stories and some interesting discrepancies between passage attributes of WMS-R and WMS-III LM stories. In addition, interrater reliability of new passages was found to be excellent (at least .97), and when combined into three sets of passage-pairs, these pairs were found have equivalent difficulty. To reduce the potential for practice effects by use of alternate forms, these new logical memory-style passages may facilitate repeat assessment of auditory-verbal memory.

  14. Visitor assessment of the mandatory alternative transportation system at Zion National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mace, Britton L; Marquit, Joshua D; Bates, Scott C

    2013-11-01

    Transportation infrastructure in national parks has historically been designed for the automobile. With more vehicles in the parks, visitors found themselves in circumstances more reminiscent of a city than a park. Traffic jams, overcrowding, illegal parking, horn honking, and idling vehicles became common, creating stress and contributing to air and noise pollution, the very things visitors were hoping to get away from. Park managers began searching for alternatives, including shuttle systems. Many national parks have implemented optional shuttle systems, but relatively few have completely closed roads to vehicles, transporting visitors on mandatory shuttles. Zion National Park instituted a mandatory shuttle system in May 2000 to relieve crowding and congestion in the main canyon and to protect natural resources. Taking a longitudinal approach, attributes of the shuttle (e.g., crowding, accessibility, freedom, efficiency, preference, and success) were assessed with experiential park factors (e.g., scenic beauty, naturalness, solitude, tranquility, air quality, and soundscape) in 2000, 2003, and 2010 by surveying shuttle-riding park visitors. While visitors initially reported a few reservations about the shuttle system, by 2003, the majority rated the system successful. Ratings of all shuttle-related variables, except crowding, improved over the decade. Improvements were greatest for freedom, accessibility, and efficiency. Multiple regression found overall shuttle success to be mediated by preference, freedom, accessibility, efficiency, and comfort. Experiential variables assessing park conditions followed a similar pattern, with improved ratings as the decade progressed. Results provide important insights into the visitor experience with mandatory alternative shuttle systems in national parks.

  15. Planning Support Systems (PSS-Based Spatial Plan Alternatives and Environmental Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee-Sun Choi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Spatial planning is at the core of national land and urban development. Many countries and cities seek sustainable development through various means such as coordinated environmental planning, environmental assessment, and internalization of environmental analysis and planning. A Planning Support System (PSS is a GIS (Geographic Information System-based, spatial decision-making support system that incorporates a variety of theories and pertinent models. This study adopted the “What if?” model to design an alternative spatial plan that includes generation of predictive scenarios and is relatively easy to use. In the cities studied, we identified a total of six scenarios based on the main drivers of development—namely, population and spatial policies. Subsequently, we assessed the alternatives for their environmental impact, preparing sensitivity maps for each major environmental issue in the target area (natural ecosystem, air and microclimate, natural disasters. One projected advantage of the “What if?” model is that its digital visualization of proposed plans may improve public awareness and involvement. Furthermore, the tool is expected to be highly useful in ensuring the objectivity of quantitative analyses. However, it is necessary to develop a PSS that is both standardized and tailored to the particular needs of each area. Finally, the development of an e-governance system will be beneficial in ensuring public access to the decision making process.

  16. Visitor Assessment of the Mandatory Alternative Transportation System at Zion National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mace, Britton L.; Marquit, Joshua D.; Bates, Scott C.

    2013-11-01

    Transportation infrastructure in national parks has historically been designed for the automobile. With more vehicles in the parks, visitors found themselves in circumstances more reminiscent of a city than a park. Traffic jams, overcrowding, illegal parking, horn honking, and idling vehicles became common, creating stress and contributing to air and noise pollution, the very things visitors were hoping to get away from. Park managers began searching for alternatives, including shuttle systems. Many national parks have implemented optional shuttle systems, but relatively few have completely closed roads to vehicles, transporting visitors on mandatory shuttles. Zion National Park instituted a mandatory shuttle system in May 2000 to relieve crowding and congestion in the main canyon and to protect natural resources. Taking a longitudinal approach, attributes of the shuttle (e.g., crowding, accessibility, freedom, efficiency, preference, and success) were assessed with experiential park factors (e.g., scenic beauty, naturalness, solitude, tranquility, air quality, and soundscape) in 2000, 2003, and 2010 by surveying shuttle-riding park visitors. While visitors initially reported a few reservations about the shuttle system, by 2003, the majority rated the system successful. Ratings of all shuttle-related variables, except crowding, improved over the decade. Improvements were greatest for freedom, accessibility, and efficiency. Multiple regression found overall shuttle success to be mediated by preference, freedom, accessibility, efficiency, and comfort. Experiential variables assessing park conditions followed a similar pattern, with improved ratings as the decade progressed. Results provide important insights into the visitor experience with mandatory alternative shuttle systems in national parks.

  17. Indoor propagation and assessment of blast waves from weapons using the alternative image theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, B.; Lee, K.; Lee, S.; Jung, S.; Song, K. H.

    2016-03-01

    Blast waves generated from the muzzles of various weapons might have significant effects on the human body, and these effects are recognized as being more severe when weapons are fired indoors. The risk can be assessed by various criteria, such as waveform, exposed energy, and model-based types. This study introduces a prediction model of blast wave propagation for estimating waveform parameters related to damage risk assessment. To simulate indoor multiple reflections in a simple way, the model is based on the alternative image theory and discrete wavefront method. The alternative theory is a kind of modified image theory, but it uses the image space concept from a receiver's perspective, so that it shows improved efficiency for indoor problems. Further, the discrete wavefront method interprets wave propagation as the forward movement of a finite number of wavefronts. Even though the predicted results show slight differences from the measured data, the locations of significant shock waves indicate a high degree of correlation between them. Since the disagreement results not from the proposed techniques but from the assumptions used, it is concluded that the model is appropriate for analysis of blast wave propagation in interior spaces.

  18. Development and Alternate Form Reliability of the Complex Task Performance Assessment (CTPA) for People With Mild Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saa, Juan Pablo; Doherty, Meghan; Young, Alexis; Spiers, Meredith; Leary, Emily; Wolf, Timothy J

    Cognitive impairment is a common consequence of mild stroke. Current performance-based assessments for mild stroke can detect mild impairments in executive function but lack alternate forms to be used as outcome measures. This study aimed to develop an alternate form of the Complex Task Performance Assessment (CTPA-Alt), a performance-based assessment of executive function, and to establish the alternate form reliability of the CTPA-Alt. A repeated-measures study was conducted with 26 community participants. Participants were screened for eligibility and administered both forms of the CTPA; administration order was alternated. Overall performance was significantly correlated (rs = .44, p = .03), but pattern of scoring differed by CTPA form and order of administration. Our results indicate that the CTPA forms were similar but that the specific tasks in each form were different. The CTPA may be used as an ecologically valid outcome assessment with further considerations. Copyright © 2017 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  19. Energy resource alternatives competition. Progress report for the period February 1, 1975--December 31, 1975. [Space heating and cooling, hot water, and electricity for homes, farms, and light industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matzke, D.J.; Osowski, D.M.; Radtke, M.L.

    1976-01-01

    This progress report describes the objectives and results of the intercollegiate Energy Resource Alternatives competition. The one-year program concluded in August 1975, with a final testing program of forty student-built alternative energy projects at the Sandia Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The goal of the competition was to design and build prototype hardware which could provide space heating and cooling, hot water, and electricity at a level appropriate to the needs of homes, farms, and light industry. The hardware projects were powered by such nonconventional energy sources as solar energy, wind, biologically produced gas, coal, and ocean waves. The competition rules emphasized design innovation, economic feasibility, practicality, and marketability. (auth)

  20. Assessing inflow rates in atomic cooling haloes: implications for direct collapse black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latif, M. A.; Volonteri, M.

    2015-09-01

    Supermassive black holes are not only common in the present-day galaxies, but billion solar masses black holes also powered z ≥ 6 quasars. One efficient way to form such black holes is the collapse of a massive primordial gas cloud into a so-called direct collapse black hole. The main requirement for this scenario is the presence of large accretion rates of ≥ 0.1 M⊙ yr- 1 to form a supermassive star. It is not yet clear how and under what conditions such accretion rates can be obtained. The prime aim of this work is to determine the mass accretion rates under non-isothermal collapse conditions. We perform high-resolution cosmological simulations for three primordial haloes of a few times 107 M⊙ illuminated by an external UV flux, J21 = 100-1000. We find that a rotationally supported structure of about parsec size is assembled, with an aspect ratio between 0.25 and 1 depending upon the thermodynamical properties. Rotational support, however, does not halt collapse, and mass inflow rates of ˜ 0.1 M⊙ yr- 1 can be obtained in the presence of even a moderate UV background flux of strength J21 ≥ 100. To assess whether such large accretion rates can be maintained over longer time-scales, we employed sink particles, confirming the persistence of accretion rates of ˜ 0.1 M⊙ yr- 1. We propose that complete isothermal collapse and molecular hydrogen suppression may not always be necessary to form supermassive stars, precursors of black hole seeds. Sufficiently high inflow rates can be obtained for UV flux J21 = 500-1000, at least for some cases. This value brings the estimate of the abundance of direct collapse black hole seeds closer to that high-redshift quasars.

  1. Experimental assessment of on-chip liquid cooling through microchannels with de-ionized water and diluted ethylene glycol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Yonghyun; Kim, Sungdong; Eunkyung Kim, Sarah

    2016-06-01

    Recent progress in Si IC devices, which results in an increase in power density and decrease in device size, poses various thermal challenges owing to high heat dissipation. Therefore, conventional cooling techniques become ineffective and produce a thermal bottleneck. In this study, an on-chip liquid cooling module with microchannels and through Si via (TSV) was fabricated, and cooling characteristics were evaluated by IR measurements. Both the microchannels and TSVs were fabricated in a Si wafer by deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) and the wafer was bonded with a glass wafer by a anodic bonding. The fabricated liquid cooling sample was evaluated using two different coolants (de-ionized water and 70 wt % diluted ethylene glycol), and the effect of coolants on cooling characteristics was investigated.

  2. Calculation and comparison between alternate and continuous controlled cooling technology for X65 pipeline steel plate%X65管线钢板交替与连续控冷工艺的计算与比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张德丰; 陆建生; 吕建国; 宋鹏; 杜重麟

    2012-01-01

    为减小X65管线钢板控制冷却后的残余应力和翘曲,通过开发线性混合热膨胀模型、拓展Avrami相变动力学模型和应用Leblond的相变诱发塑性(TRIP)模型建立了热力耦合有限元模型,考虑了控冷时的弹塑性变形、热膨胀、相变潜热、相变膨胀、TRIP等所有物理效应.用该模型研究了2种控制冷却工艺下X65管线钢板的温度、残余应力、残余应变及翘曲.结果表明:与连续控冷相比,交替控冷使板的温度进一步降低7℃;上表面一侧的残余拉应力峰值进一步减小44 MPa;下表面一侧的残余总压应变峰值进一步增加0.001;翘曲由0.54×10-3减至0.09×10-3;故交替控冷可降低板内的残余应力,并减小翘曲.%To decrease the residual stress and warping of X65 pipeline steel plate after controlled cooling, a thermo-mechanical coupled FEM model was established according to linear mixture thermal expansion model, modified Avrami transformation dynamics model and Leblond transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) model. All relevant physical effects of elastoplastic deformation, thermal expansion, latent heat, transformation dilatation and TRIP effect were considered in the FEM model. Temperature, residual stress, residual strain and warping of X65 pipeline steel plate were analyzed by the proposed model under two controlled cooling technologies. The results show that the temperature of plate under alternate controlled cooling is 7 ℃ less than that under continuous controlled cooling. The residual tensile stress peak value near top surface is decreased by 44 Mpa with enhanced residual compressive strain peak value of 0.001 near bottom surface, while the warping is reduced from 0. 54 × 10-3 to 0. 09 × 10-3. Alternate controlled cooling can reduce residual stress and warping of plate.

  3. Regulatory Forum commentary: alternative mouse models for future cancer risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Daniel; Sistare, Frank D; Nambiar, Prashant R; Turner, Oliver C; Radi, Zaher; Bower, Nancy

    2014-07-01

    International regulatory and pharmaceutical industry scientists are discussing revision of the International Conference on Harmonisation of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH) S1 guidance on rodent carcinogenicity assessment of small molecule pharmaceuticals. A weight-of-evidence approach is proposed to determine the need for rodent carcinogenicity studies. For compounds with high human cancer risk, the product may be labeled appropriately without conducting rodent carcinogenicity studies. For compounds with minimal cancer risk, only a 6-month transgenic mouse study (rasH2 mouse or p53+/- mouse) or a 2-year mouse study would be needed. If rodent carcinogenicity testing may add significant value to cancer risk assessment, a 2-year rat study and either a 6-month transgenic mouse or a 2-year mouse study is appropriate. In many cases, therefore, one rodent carcinogenicity study could be sufficient. The rasH2 model predicts neoplastic findings relevant to human cancer risk assessment as well as 2-year rodent models, produces fewer irrelevant neoplastic outcomes, and often will be preferable to a 2-year rodent study. Before revising ICH S1 guidance, a prospective evaluation will be conducted to test the proposed weight-of-evidence approach. This evaluation offers an opportunity for a secondary analysis comparing the value of alternative mouse models and 2-year rodent studies in the proposed ICH S1 weight-of-evidence approach for human cancer risk assessment.

  4. A long-term, integrated impact assessment of alternative building energy code scenarios in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Sha; Eom, Jiyong; Evans, Meredydd; Clarke, Leon E.

    2014-04-01

    China is the second largest building energy user in the world, ranking first and third in residential and commercial energy consumption. Beginning in the early 1980s, the Chinese government has developed a variety of building energy codes to improve building energy efficiency and reduce total energy demand. This paper studies the impact of building energy codes on energy use and CO2 emissions by using a detailed building energy model that represents four distinct climate zones each with three building types, nested in a long-term integrated assessment framework GCAM. An advanced building stock module, coupled with the building energy model, is developed to reflect the characteristics of future building stock and its interaction with the development of building energy codes in China. This paper also evaluates the impacts of building codes on building energy demand in the presence of economy-wide carbon policy. We find that building energy codes would reduce Chinese building energy use by 13% - 22% depending on building code scenarios, with a similar effect preserved even under the carbon policy. The impact of building energy codes shows regional and sectoral variation due to regionally differentiated responses of heating and cooling services to shell efficiency improvement.

  5. SR 97 - Alternative models project. Discrete fracture network modelling for performance assessment of Aberg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dershowitz, B.; Eiben, T. [Golder Associates Inc., Seattle (United States); Follin, S.; Andersson, Johan [Golder Grundteknik KB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1999-08-01

    As part of studies into the siting of a deep repository for nuclear waste, Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) has commissioned the Alternative Models Project (AMP). The AMP is a comparison of three alternative modeling approaches for geosphere performance assessment for a single hypothetical site. The hypothetical site, arbitrarily named Aberg is based on parameters from the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory in southern Sweden. The Aberg model domain, boundary conditions and canister locations are defined as a common reference case to facilitate comparisons between approaches. This report presents the results of a discrete fracture pathways analysis of the Aberg site, within the context of the SR 97 performance assessment exercise. The Aberg discrete fracture network (DFN) site model is based on consensus Aberg parameters related to the Aespoe HRL site. Discrete fracture pathways are identified from canister locations in a prototype repository design to the surface of the island or to the sea bottom. The discrete fracture pathways analysis presented in this report is used to provide the following parameters for SKB's performance assessment transport codes FARF31 and COMP23: * F-factor: Flow wetted surface normalized with regards to flow rate (yields an appreciation of the contact area available for diffusion and sorption processes) [TL{sup -1}]. * Travel Time: Advective transport time from a canister location to the environmental discharge [T]. * Canister Flux: Darcy flux (flow rate per unit area) past a representative canister location [LT{sup -1}]. In addition to the above, the discrete fracture pathways analysis in this report also provides information about: additional pathway parameters such as pathway length, pathway width, transport aperture, reactive surface area and transmissivity, percentage of canister locations with pathways to the surface discharge, spatial pattern of pathways and pathway discharges, visualization of pathways, and

  6. Using Writing Portfolios as an Alternative Assessment Method in the Greek Primary School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angeliki Panou

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to present and analyze the use of writing portfolios as an alternative method of assessing the writing skill in a group of young learners who attend the 6th grade of a Greek State Primary School. In order for this research to be carried out successfully and to provide enlightening results, a systematic and purposeful collection and observation of these learners’ writing samples was conducted over a period of 4 months and further data was basically collected by means of questionnaires before, during and after the completion of the study. There are two major parts in this paper: the theoretical and the practical one. In the first one the following issues are considered: contrasts between traditional testing and alternative assessment and reasons for the selection of the latter as more preferable concerning the positive and very promising outcomes it provides to learners; current portfolio pedagogy and the benefits deriving in relation to the most profound theories underpinning young learners’ cognitive and linguistic development; and the process-writing approach in combination with the use of writing portfolios. The second part presents the actual implementation of the research, analyzing the whole process of the portfolio stages followed from the very beginning of the ‘journey’ to the end. Τhe outcomes and results of this research are discussed and evaluated, whether positive or even negative, and the implications of the present classroom-based study are outlined. Finally, the study concludes with suggestions for further research in order for possible revisions and/or improvements to the specific assessment method to be looked into in future.

  7. An Assessment of Fission Product Scrubbing in Sodium Pools Following a Core Damage Event in a Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucknor, M.; Farmer, M.; Grabaskas, D.

    2017-06-26

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has stated that mechanistic source term (MST) calculations are expected to be required as part of the advanced reactor licensing process. A recent study by Argonne National Laboratory has concluded that fission product scrubbing in sodium pools is an important aspect of an MST calculation for a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR). To model the phenomena associated with sodium pool scrubbing, a computational tool, developed as part of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) program, was utilized in an MST trial calculation. This tool was developed by applying classical theories of aerosol scrubbing to the decontamination of gases produced as a result of postulated fuel pin failures during an SFR accident scenario. The model currently considers aerosol capture by Brownian diffusion, inertial deposition, and gravitational sedimentation. The effects of sodium vapour condensation on aerosol scrubbing are also treated. This paper provides details of the individual scrubbing mechanisms utilized in the IFR code as well as results from a trial mechanistic source term assessment led by Argonne National Laboratory in 2016.

  8. Cooling of Dense Gas by H2O Line Emission and an Assessment of its Effects in Chondrule-Forming Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Morris, M A; Ciesla, F J

    2008-01-01

    We consider gas at densities appropriate to protoplanetary disks and calculate its ability to cool due to line radiation emitted by H2O molecules within the gas. Our work follows that of Neufeld & Kaufman (1993; ApJ, 418, 263), expanding on their work in several key aspects, including use of a much expanded line database, an improved escape probability formulism, and the inclusion of dust grains, which can absorb line photons. Although the escape probabilities formally depend on a complicated combination of optical depth in the lines and in the dust grains, we show that the cooling rate including dust is well approximated by the dust-free cooling rate multiplied by a simple function of the dust optical depth. We apply the resultant cooling rate of a dust-gas mixture to the case of a solar nebula shock pertinent to the formation of chondrules, millimeter-sized melt droplets found in meteorites. Our aim is to assess whether line cooling can be neglected in chondrule-forming shocks or if it must be included....

  9. Environmental assessment of waste incineration and alternatives; Miljoevurdering af affaldsforbraending og alternativer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, J.; Fruergaard, T.; Riber, C.; Astrup, T.; Hoejlund Christensen, T.

    2008-06-15

    Life cycle environmental assessment of waste combustion and alternatives were made using the LCA model EASEWASTE. Possible environmental effects for nine effect categories and the resource consumption of fossil fuels through treating 1 ton combustible waste were defined for several waste systems, including waste-only incineration, co-combustion in a fossil-fueled cogeneration plant, and combined biogas and compost production from household waste. The main conclusions of the analyses are: 1) with an optimum location, i.e. in the vicinity to a coal-fueled cogeneration plant, waste-only incineration, co-combustion , and combined biogas and compost production are all equal environmentally viable alternatives . 2) Regarding potential toxic impacts in the area of a coal-fueled cogeneration plant, waste-only incineration and combined biogas and compost production will result in slightly less net emissions compared to co-combustion because of better flue gas cleaning of heavy metals in incinerators than in power plants. 3) Siting the incinerator in a decentralized natural gas cogeneration area, co-combustion in a cogeneration plant is a better solution. 4) Combined biogas and compost production and waste-only combustion are environmentally equal treatments in all power plant areas. (ln)

  10. Assessing the quality of reports of randomized trials in pediatric complementary and alternative medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lepage Leah

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To evaluate the quality of reports of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM randomized controlled trials (RCTs in the pediatric population. We also examined whether there was a change in the quality of reporting over time. Methods We used a systematic sample of 251 reports of RCTs that used a CAM intervention. The quality of each report was assessed using the number of CONSORT checklist items included, the frequency of unclear allocation concealment, and a 5-point quality assessment instrument. Results Nearly half (40% of the CONSORT checklist items were included in the reports, with an increase in the number of items included. The majority (81.3% of RCTs reported unclear allocation concealment with no significant change over time. The quality of reports achieved approximately 40% of their maximum possible total score as assessed with the Jadad scale with no change over time. Information regarding adverse events was reported in less than one quarter of the RCTs (22% and information regarding costs was mentioned in only a minority of reports (4%. Conclusions RCTs are an important tool for evidence based health care decisions. If these studies are to be relevant in the evaluation of CAM interventions it is important that they are conducted and reported with the highest possible standards. There is a need to redouble efforts to ensure that children and their families are participating in RCTs that are conducted and reported with minimal bias. Such studies will increase their usefulness to a board spectrum of interested stakeholders.

  11. Local Alternative for Energy Supply: Performance Assessment of Integrated Community Energy Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binod Prasad Koirala

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Integrated community energy systems (ICESs are emerging as a modern development to re-organize local energy systems allowing simultaneous integration of distributed energy resources (DERs and engagement of local communities. Although local energy initiatives, such as ICESs are rapidly emerging due to community objectives, such as cost and emission reductions as well as resiliency, assessment and evaluation are still lacking on the value that these systems can provide both to the local communities as well as to the whole energy system. In this paper, we present a model-based framework to assess the value of ICESs for the local communities. The distributed energy resources-consumer adoption model (DER-CAM based ICES model is used to assess the value of an ICES in the Netherlands. For the considered community size and local conditions, grid-connected ICESs are already beneficial to the alternative of solely being supplied from the grid both in terms of total energy costs and CO2 emissions, whereas grid-defected systems, although performing very well in terms of CO2 emission reduction, are still rather expensive.

  12. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE NPDES STORM WATER COMPLIANCE ALTERNATIVES AT THE SRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shedrow, C

    2006-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) prepared this environmental assessment (EA) to evaluate the potential environmental impacts associated with proposed and alternative actions to achieve water quality permit compliance at 38 storm water outfalls located at the Savannah River Site (SRS) (Figure 1-1). Effluent monitoring data indicates that some of these outfalls may not presently comply with new National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Storm Water General Permit effluent standards that became effective July 1, 2005 (SCR000000). The NPDES permit requires that best management practices (BMPs) be implemented and maintained, as necessary, to ensure that storm water discharges at SRS do not cause or contribute to the contravention of applicable state water quality standards (WQS).

  13. Microstructure Assessment of Metakaolin Based-Geopolymers Produced with Alternative Silica Sources Exposed to High Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villaquirán-Caicedo Mónica Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic materials more environment friendly and with similar or even better performance than traditional ones can be produced by alkali activation of natural minerals, wastes or industrial by-products. The present study assesses the effect of exposure at 600° and 1200°C of a MK-based geopolymers. Rice husk ash (RHA and silica fume were modified chemically in order to obtain an alternative alkali activator. Exposure to elevated temperatures leads to dehydration of the reaction products and structural reorganization associated with the crystallization of the gel to leucite (KAlSi2O6 and kalsilite (KAlSiO4. The structural changes associated with the thermal treatment also promote a densification and reduction of porosity. The unreacted MK particles embedded into the geopolymeric gel lead to the formation of mullite (2Al2O3 × SiO2 after the thermal treatment at 1200°C.

  14. Pre-Service Mathematics Teachers' Views on the Use of Portfolios in Their Education as an Alternative Assessment Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birgin, Osman

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain the views of pre-service mathematics (PSM) teachers on the use of portfolios as an alternative assessment method. This study was conducted with 146 Turkish PSM teachers participating in a semester-long portfolio assessment application. Data were collected with a questionnaire comprising 34 items on a…

  15. Danish Cool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Anne Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Danish Cool. Keld Helmer-Petersen, Photography and the Photobook Handout exhibition text in English and Chinese by Anne Elisabeth Toft, Curator The exhibition Danish Cool. Keld Helmer-Petersen, Photography and the Photobook presents the ground-breaking work of late Danish photographer Keld Helmer...

  16. New Approaches to Final Cooling

    CERN Document Server

    Neuffer, David

    2015-01-01

    A high-energy muon collider scenario requires a "final cooling" system that reduces transverse emittance by a factor of ~10 while allowing longitudinal emittance increase. The baseline approach has low-energy transverse cooling within high-field solenoids, with strong longitudinal heating. This approach and its recent simulation are discussed. Alternative approaches which more explicitly include emittance exchange are also presented. Round-to-flat beam transform, transverse slicing, and longitudinal bunch coalescence are possible components of the alternative approach. A more explicit understanding of solenoidal cooling beam dynamics is introduced.

  17. Initial assessment of environmental effects on SiC/SiC composites in helium-cooled nuclear systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL

    2013-09-01

    This report summarized the information available in the literature on the chemical reactivity of SiC/SiC composites and of their components in contact with the helium coolant used in HTGR, VHTR and GFR designs. In normal operation conditions, ultra-high purity helium will have chemically controlled impurities (water, oxygen, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methane, hydrogen) that will create a slightly oxidizing gas environment. Little is known from direct experiments on the reactivity of third generation (nuclear grade) SiC/SiC composites in contact with low concentrations of water or oxygen in inert gas, at high temperature. However, there is ample information about the oxidation in dry and moist air of SiC/SiC composites at high temperatures. This information is reviewed first in the next chapters. The emphasis is places on the improvement in material oxidation, thermal, and mechanical properties during three stages of development of SiC fibers and at least two stages of development of the fiber/matrix interphase. The chemical stability of SiC/SiC composites in contact with oxygen or steam at temperatures that may develop in off-normal reactor conditions supports the conclusion that most advanced composites (also known as nuclear grade SiC/SiC composites) have the chemical resistance that would allow them maintain mechanical properties at temperatures up to 1200 1300 oC in the extreme conditions of an air or water ingress accident scenario. Further research is needed to assess the long-term stability of advanced SiC/SiC composites in inert gas (helium) in presence of very low concentrations (traces) of water and oxygen at the temperatures of normal operation of helium-cooled reactors. Another aspect that needs to be investigated is the effect of fast neutron irradiation on the oxidation stability of advanced SiC/SiC composites in normal operation conditions.

  18. Examination of submental space as an alternative method of airway assessment (submental sign).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javid, Mihan J

    2011-06-29

    Difficult airway especially failed intubation has been associated with a high incidence of mortality and morbidity. Most of mortalities occur when an anaesthesiologist encounters an unanticipated difficult airway. In 1999, a 23 yr. old, 65 kg weight and 170 cm height female patient had been scheduled for arthroscopy. Despite totally normal airway assessment (thyromental distance, mouth opening, jaw and neck movement ...) I was astonished by encountering a grade IV Cormack - Lehane laryngoscopic view. Tracheal intubation was impossible and ventilation was very difficult.On attempt to attain a better laryngoscopic view, while manipulating submandibular region I encountered a bulky noncompliant submental space (Submental Sign). This event made me more alert regarding this finding. Thereafter I noted for this sign throughout the past years and I found it very helpful.These findings encouraged me to write this report, and suggest a routine examination of submental space in order to keep the safety of the patient at the heart of the care we provide. Evaluation of the submental space is suggested as an alternative predictor of difficult airway and routine examination of the submental space is of value in airway assessment.

  19. Examination of Submental Space as an Alternative Method of Airway Assessment (Submental Sign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javid Mihan J

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Difficult airway especially failed intubation has been associated with a high incidence of mortality and morbidity. Most of mortalities occur when an anaesthesiologist encounters an unanticipated difficult airway. Findings In 1999, a 23 yr. old, 65 kg weight and 170 cm height female patient had been scheduled for arthroscopy. Despite totally normal airway assessment (thyromental distance, mouth opening, jaw and neck movement ... I was astonished by encountering a grade IV Cormack - Lehane laryngoscopic view. Tracheal intubation was impossible and ventilation was very difficult. On attempt to attain a better laryngoscopic view, while manipulating submandibular region I encountered a bulky noncompliant submental space (Submental Sign. This event made me more alert regarding this finding. Thereafter I noted for this sign throughout the past years and I found it very helpful. These findings encouraged me to write this report, and suggest a routine examination of submental space in order to keep the safety of the patient at the heart of the care we provide. Conclusion Evaluation of the submental space is suggested as an alternative predictor of difficult airway and routine examination of the submental space is of value in airway assessment.

  20. Gas cooled fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1972-06-01

    Although most of the development work on fast breeder reactors has been devoted to the use of liquid metal cooling, interest has been expressed for a number of years in alternative breeder concepts using other coolants. One of a number of concepts in which interest has been retained is the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR). As presently envisioned, it would operate on the uranium-plutonium mixed oxide fuel cycle, similar to that used in the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR), and would use helium gas as the coolant.

  1. Environmental assessment of alternative municipal solid waste management strategies. A Spanish case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovea, M D; Ibáñez-Forés, V; Gallardo, A; Colomer-Mendoza, F J

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study is to compare, from an environmental point of view, different alternatives for the management of municipal solid waste generated in the town of Castellón de la Plana (Spain). This town currently produces 207 ton of waste per day and the waste management system employed today involves the collection of paper/cardboard, glass and light packaging from materials banks and of rest waste at street-side containers. The proposed alternative scenarios were based on a combination of the following elements: selective collection targets to be accomplished by the year 2015 as specified in the Spanish National Waste Plan (assuming they are reached to an extent of 50% and 100%), different collection models implemented nationally, and diverse treatments of both the separated biodegradable fraction and the rest waste to be disposed of on landfills. This resulted in 24 scenarios, whose environmental behaviour was studied by applying the life cycle assessment methodology. In accordance with the ISO 14040-44 (2006) standard, an inventory model was developed for the following stages of the waste management life cycle: pre-collection (bags and containers), collection, transport, pre-treatment (waste separation) and treatment/disposal (recycling, composting, biogasification+composting, landfill with/without energy recovery). Environmental indicators were obtained for different impact categories, which made it possible to identify the key variables in the waste management system and the scenario that offers the best environmental behaviour. Finally, a sensitivity analysis was used to test some of the assumptions made in the initial life cycle inventory model.

  2. Probabilistic fracture mechanics applied for DHC assessment in the cool-down transients for CANDU pressure tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radu, Vasile, E-mail: vasile.radu@nuclear.ro [Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti, 1st Campului Street, 115400 Mioveni, Arges, P.O. Box 78, Mioveni (Romania); Roth, Maria [Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti, 1st Campului Street, 115400 Mioveni, Arges, P.O. Box 78, Mioveni (Romania)

    2012-12-15

    For CANDU pressure tubes made from Zr-2.5%Nb alloy, the mechanism called delayed hydride cracking (DHC) is widely recognized as main mechanism responsible for crack initiation and propagation in the pipe wall. Generation of some blunt flaws at the inner pressure tube surface during refueling by fuel bundle bearing pad or by debris fretting, combined with hydrogen/deuterium up-take (20-40 ppm) from normal corrosion process with coolant, may lead to crack initiation and growth. The process is governed by hydrogen hysteresis of terminal solid solubility limits in Zirconium and the diffusion of hydrogen atoms in the stress gradient near to a stress spot (flaw). Creep and irradiation growth under normal operating conditions promote the specific mechanisms for Zirconium alloys, which result in circumferential expansion, accompanied by wall thinning and length increasing. These complicate damage mechanisms in the case of CANDU pressure tubes that are also are affected by irradiation environment in the reactor core. The structural integrity assessment of CANDU fuel channels is based on the technical requirements and methodology stated in the Canadian Standard N285.8. Usually it works with fracture mechanics principles in a deterministic manner. However, there are inherent uncertainties from the in-service inspection, which are associated with those from material properties determination; therefore a necessary conservatism in deterministic evaluation should be used. Probabilistic approach, based on fracture mechanics principle and appropriate limit state functions defined as fracture criteria, appears as a promising complementary way to evaluate structural integrity of CANDU pressure tubes. To perform this, one has to account for the uncertainties that are associated with the main parameters for pressure tube assessment, such as: flaws distribution and sizing, initial hydrogen concentration, fracture toughness, DHC rate and dimensional changes induced by long term

  3. A multi-stakeholder perspective on the use of alternative test strategies for nanomaterial safety assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nel, Andre E; Nasser, Elina; Godwin, Hilary; Avery, David; Bahadori, Tina; Bergeson, Lynn; Beryt, Elizabeth; Bonner, James C; Boverhof, Darrell; Carter, Janet; Castranova, Vince; Deshazo, J R; Hussain, Saber M; Kane, Agnes B; Klaessig, Frederick; Kuempel, Eileen; Lafranconi, Mark; Landsiedel, Robert; Malloy, Timothy; Miller, Mary Beth; Morris, Jeffery; Moss, Kenneth; Oberdorster, Gunter; Pinkerton, Kent; Pleus, Richard C; Shatkin, Jo Anne; Thomas, Russell; Tolaymat, Thabet; Wang, Amy; Wong, Jeffrey

    2013-08-27

    There has been a conceptual shift in toxicological studies from describing what happens to explaining how the adverse outcome occurs, thereby enabling a deeper and improved understanding of how biomolecular and mechanistic profiling can inform hazard identification and improve risk assessment. Compared to traditional toxicology methods, which have a heavy reliance on animals, new approaches to generate toxicological data are becoming available for the safety assessment of chemicals, including high-throughput and high-content screening (HTS, HCS). With the emergence of nanotechnology, the exponential increase in the total number of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in research, development, and commercialization requires a robust scientific approach to screen ENM safety in humans and the environment rapidly and efficiently. Spurred by the developments in chemical testing, a promising new toxicological paradigm for ENMs is to use alternative test strategies (ATS), which reduce reliance on animal testing through the use of in vitro and in silico methods such as HTS, HCS, and computational modeling. Furthermore, this allows for the comparative analysis of large numbers of ENMs simultaneously and for hazard assessment at various stages of the product development process and overall life cycle. Using carbon nanotubes as a case study, a workshop bringing together national and international leaders from government, industry, and academia was convened at the University of California, Los Angeles, to discuss the utility of ATS for decision-making analyses of ENMs. After lively discussions, a short list of generally shared viewpoints on this topic was generated, including a general view that ATS approaches for ENMs can significantly benefit chemical safety analysis.

  4. A Multi-Stakeholder Perspective on the Use of Alternative Test Strategies for Nanomaterial Safety Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nel, Andre E.; Nasser, Elina; Godwin, Hilary; Avery, David; Bahadori, Tina; Bergeson, Lynn; Beryt, Elizabeth; Bonner, James C.; Boverhof, Darrell; Carter, Janet; Castranova, Vince; DeShazo, J. R.; Hussain, Saber M.; Kane, Agnes B.; Klaessig, Fred; Kuempel, Eileen; Lafranconi, Mark; Landsiedel, Robert; Malloy, Timothy; Miller, Mary Beth; Morris, Jeffery; Moss, Kenneth; Oberdorster, Gunter; Pinkerton, Kent; Pleus, Richard C.; Shatkin, Jo Anne; Thomas, Rusty; Tolaymat, Thabet; Wang, Amy; Wong, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    There has been a conceptual shift in toxicological studies from describing what happens to explaining how the adverse outcome occurs, thereby enabling a deeper and improved understanding of how biomolecular and mechanistic profiling can inform hazard identification and improve risk assessment. Compared to traditional toxicology methods, which have a heavy reliance on animals, new approaches to generate toxicological data are becoming available for the safety assessment of chemicals, including high-throughput and high-content screening (HTS, HCS). With the emergence of nanotechnology, the exponential increase in the total number of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in research, development, and commercialization requires a robust scientific approach to screen ENM safety in humans and the environment rapidly and efficiently. Spurred by the developments in chemical testing, a promising new toxicological paradigm for ENMs is to use alternative test strategies (ATS), which reduce reliance on animal testing through the use of in vitro and in silico methods such as HTS, HCS, and computational modeling. Furthermore, this allows for the comparative analysis of large numbers of ENMs simultaneously and for hazard assessment at various stages of the product development process and overall life cycle. Using carbon nanotubes as a case study, a workshop bringing together national and international leaders from government, industry, and academia was convened at the University of California, Los Angeles to discuss the utility of ATS for decision-making analyses of ENMs. After lively discussions, a short list of generally shared viewpoints on this topic was generated, including a general view that ATS approaches for ENMs can significantly benefit chemical safety analysis. PMID:23924032

  5. Alternative Metrics ("Altmetrics") for Assessing Article Impact in Popular General Radiology Journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Ayoola, Abimbola; Singh, Kush; Duszak, Richard

    2017-07-01

    Emerging alternative metrics leverage social media and other online platforms to provide immediate measures of biomedical articles' reach among diverse public audiences. We aimed to compare traditional citation and alternative impact metrics for articles in popular general radiology journals. All 892 original investigations published in 2013 issues of Academic Radiology, American Journal of Roentgenology, Journal of the American College of Radiology, and Radiology were included. Each article's content was classified as imaging vs nonimaging. Traditional journal citations to articles were obtained from Web of Science. Each article's Altmetric Attention Score (Altmetric), representing weighted mentions across a variety of online platforms, was obtained from Altmetric.com. Statistical assessment included the McNemar test, the Mann-Whitney test, and the Pearson correlation. Mean and median traditional citation counts were 10.7 ± 15.4 and 5 vs 3.3 ± 13.3 and 0 for Altmetric. Among all articles, 96.4% had ≥1 traditional citation vs 41.8% for Altmetric (P Mendeley (42.8%), Twitter (34.2%), Facebook (10.7%), and news outlets (8.4%). Citations and Altmetric were weakly correlated (r = 0.20), with only a 25.0% overlap in terms of articles within their top 10th percentiles. Traditional citations were higher for articles with imaging vs nonimaging content (11.5 ± 16.2 vs 6.9 ± 9.8, P < 0.001), but Altmetric scores were higher in articles with nonimaging content (5.1 ± 11.1 vs 2.8 ± 13.7, P = 0.006). Although overall online attention to radiology journal content was low, alternative metrics exhibited unique trends, particularly for nonclinical articles, and may provide a complementary measure of radiology research impact compared to traditional citation counts. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Use of spray-cooling technology for development of microencapsulated capsicum oleoresin for the growing pig as an alternative to in-feed antibiotics: a study of release using in vitro models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, J-P; Cardot, J-M; Manzanilla, E G; Wysshaar, M; Alric, M

    2007-10-01

    The aim of this study was to develop sustained release microspheres of capsicum oleoresin as an alternative to in-feed additives. Two spray-cooling technologies, a fluidized air bed using a spray nozzle system and a vibrating nozzle system placed on top of a cooling tower, were used to microencapsulate 20% of capsicum oleoresin in a hydrogenated, rapeseed oil matrix. Microencapsulation was intended to reduce the irritating effect of capsicum oleoresin and to control its release kinetics during consumption by the animal. Particles produced by the fluidized air bed process (batch F1) ranged from 180 to 1,000 microm in size. The impact of particle size on release of capsaicin, the main active compound of capsicum oleoresin, was studied after sieving batch F1 to obtain 4 formulations: F1a (180 to 250 microm), F1b (250 to 500 microm), F1c (500 to 710 microm), and F1d (710 to 1,000 microm). The vibrating nozzle system can produce a monodispersive particle size distribution. In this study, particles of 500 to 710 microm were made (batch F2). The release kinetics of the formulations was estimated in a flow-through cell dissolution apparatus (CFC). The time to achieve a 90% dissolution value (T90%) of capsaicin for subbatches of F1 increased with the increase in particle size (P granulated vs. 32.4 +/- 1.4% when feed had not been granulated, which suggests that the feed granulation process could lead to a partial degradation of the microspheres and to a limitation of the sustained release effect. This study demonstrates the potential and the limitations of spray-cooling technology to encapsulate feed additives.

  7. Characterization of alternative electric generation technologies for the SPS comparative assessment: volume 2, central-station technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-08-01

    The SPS Concept Development and Evaluation Program includes a comparative assessment. An early first step in the assessment process is the selection and characterization of alternative technologies. This document describes the cost and performance (i.e., technical and environmental) characteristics of six central station energy alternatives: (1) conventional coal-fired powerplant; (2) conventional light water reactor (LWR); (3) combined cycle powerplant with low-Btu gasifiers; (4) liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR); (5) photovoltaic system without storage; and (6) fusion reactor.

  8. Hair breakage index: an alternative tool for damage assessment of human hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhaskar, Sudhakar; Kalghatgi, Bhargavi; Chavan, Madhavi; Rout, Suryamani; Gode, Vaishali

    2011-01-01

    Improper hair care, mechanical abrasion, sun damage and chemical treatment changes the physical and morphological characteristics of hair. Several methods involving microscopic techniques, protein loss and assessment of tensile properties of the hair are generally used to evaluate the extent of damage caused. These are also used to determine the protective effect of hair care products. In the present investigation, the hair breakage index (HBI) was used as an alternative tool to determine the change in the properties of hair on weathering. HBI is a measure of the diameter of hair in a given cross sectional area of a marked region of hair on the scalp. The hair diameter changes as we progress towards the tip of the hair due to breakage. The ratio of the diameter of hair bundle in the distal region to the diameter of hair bundle in the proximal region from the scalp is used as an indicator of hair breakage. Higher HBI value is an indicator of hair damage.A study was conducted for duration of 16 weeks to assess the effect of weathering due to grooming practices on HBI values. The HBI and break stress for a group of 30 subjects were measured at baseline and at the end of 16 weeks (NU). Since Coconut oil (CNO) is known to have a positive benefit on tensile properties of hair, another matched group of 30 subjects who oiled their hair daily with CNO was used as a positive control (CNO). The HBI and break stress for this group were also measured at the baseline and after 16 weeks. It was observed that the HBI significantly increased in the NU group versus the CNO user group. The break stress also significantly decreased in the NU group suggesting its correlation with the HBI data. This study demonstrates the usefulness of HBI as a simple and effective tool for determining hair damage and its protection by different hair care products.

  9. Complementary and alternative medicine use in Portugal: development of an assessment tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Carvalho

    Full Text Available Objective: Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM usage is increasing in developing countries. However, little is known about its use in Portugal. This report describes the prevalence of CAM use in a sample of Portuguese adults from Lisbon area. Method: One hundred and seventy four individuals (62% females and 37% males with ages ranging from 20 to 80 years were inquired with a questionnaire designed to assess the use of a variety of mostly self-help CAM practices. Results: Seventy six percent of the individuals used CAM at least once in their lifetime, although 77% of participants reported having free or inexpensive access to a General Practitioner. The most commonly used CAM are natural products, massages, relaxation techniques and naturopathy, all above 20% of prevalence use. Consistent with the literature, CAM use was more prevalent among women, adults aged 30–69, higher educational levels, and monthly income between 1000€ and 1500€. Conclusion: The study provides some insight about the use of CAM in Portuguese adults and suggests the importance of further study in a larger sample of CAM usage in Portugal. The questionnaire should include a broader variety of CAM practices, as well as other health-related variables that literature suggests are related to CAM usage.

  10. REFLECTIVE TEACHING AS ALTERNATIVE ASSESSMENT IN TEACHER EDUCATION: A CASE STUDY OF PRE-SERVICE TEACHERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GUSTI ASTIKA

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Critical reflective teaching has been a goal of English teacher preparation program. Although many English educators have promoted and carried out reflective teaching in their methodology courses, success of such practice has been limited, not sufficiently reflecting what has been desired. Questions have been raised whether reflective teaching within pre-service English teacher education is a realistic aim. One argument for this has been: reflective teaching can only be learned by beginning teachers working in schools with experienced teachers who value critical reflection. This article examines 40 journals of teaching reflection produced by 40 pre-service English teachers after they completed teaching practicum in schools over a period of three months. The journals were analyzed using a theoretical model developed by Smith (2011 which encompasses different purposes with different forms of reflection: personal, interpersonal, contextual, and critical. The analysis shows that the teaching journals contained more reflection on the personal and contextual domains of teaching, indicating that the pre-service teachers were more concerned with the contextual aspects of teaching which influenced their practices in the classroom. It is recommended that a more balanced reflection be created as an alternative form of assessment in English teacher education involving personal as well as social aspects of teaching.

  11. Eye tracking research to answer questions about augmentative and alternative communication assessment and intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Krista M; Mitchell, Teresa

    2014-06-01

    Recently, eye tracking technologies (i.e., technologies that automatically track the point of an individual's gaze while that person views or interacts with a visual image) have become available for research purposes. Based on the sampling of the orientation of the individual's eyes, researchers can quantify which locations within the visual image were fixated (viewed), for how long, and how many times. These automated eye tracking research technologies open up a wealth of avenues for investigating how individuals with developmental or acquired communication disabilities may respond to aided augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems. In this paper, we introduce basic terminology and explore some of the special challenges of conducting eye tracking research with populations with disabilities who might use AAC, including challenges of inferring attention from the presence of fixation and challenges related to calibration that may result from participant characteristics, behavioral idiosyncracies, and/or the number of calibration points. We also examine how the technology can be applied to ask well-structured experimental questions that have direct clinical relevance, with a focus on the unique contributions that eye tracking research can provide by (a) allowing evaluation of skills in individuals who are difficult to assess via traditional methods, and (b) facilitating access to information on underlying visual cognitive processes that is not accessible via traditional behavioral measures.

  12. Assessment of Performance for Alternative Cover Systems on a Waste Rock Storage Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argunhan, C.; Yazicigil, H.

    2015-12-01

    A cover is usually applied to the top of the mining wastes to prevent exposure of sulphide minerals in the waste to water and oxygen ingress in order to mitigate the unwanted consequences such as acid rock drainage. Hence, the selection and design of the appropriate cover system by considering the climatic conditions, local unsaturated and saturated properties and the availability of the cover materials become an important issue. This study aims to investigate the performance of various cover systems and designs for the North Waste Rock Storage Area in Kışladağ Gold Mine located in Uşak in Western Turkey. SEEP/W and VADOSE/W softwares are used to model the flow in unsaturated and saturated zones and to assess the performance of various cover systems. The soil water characteristics and parameters used in the model for saturated and unsaturated conditions were taken from field tests and literature. Accuracy of input data is checked during calibration for steady state conditions with SEEP/W. Then, bedrock, waste rock and cover alternatives are modeled under transient conditions for 20 years using daily climatic data. The effectiveness of the various cover systems for minimizing the ingress of water and air that cause acid rock drainage is evaluated and recommendations are made so that the impacts to groundwater from the waste rock storage areas during closure period are minimized.

  13. Objective assessment of biomagnetic devices and alternative clinical therapies using infrared thermal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockley, Graham J.

    2001-03-01

    The overwhelming introduction of magnetic devices and other alternative therapies into the health care market prompts the need for objective evaluation of these techniques through the use of infrared thermal imaging. Many of these therapies are reported to promote the stimulation of blood flow or the relief of pain conditions. Infrared imaging is an efficient tool to assess such changes in the physiological state. Therefore, a thermal imager can help document and substantiate whether these therapies are in fact providing an effective change to the local circulation. Thermal images may also indicate whether the change is temporary or sustained. As a specific case example, preliminary findings will be presented concerning the use of magnets and the effect they have on peripheral circulation. This will include a discussion of the recommended protocols for this type of infrared testing. This test model can be applied to the evaluation of other devices and therapeutic procedures which are reputed to affect circulation such as electro acupuncture, orthopedic footwear and topical ointments designed to relieve pain or inflammation.

  14. Alternative future analysis for assessing the potential impact of climate change on urban landscape dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chunyang; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Huang, Qingxu; Zhang, Qiaofeng; Zhang, Da

    2015-11-01

    Assessing the impact of climate change on urban landscape dynamics (ULD) is the foundation for adapting to climate change and maintaining urban landscape sustainability. This paper demonstrates an alternative future analysis by coupling a system dynamics (SD) and a cellular automata (CA) model. The potential impact of different climate change scenarios on ULD from 2009 to 2030 was simulated and evaluated in the Beijing-Tianjin-Tangshan megalopolis cluster area (BTT-MCA). The results suggested that the integrated model, which combines the advantages of the SD and CA model, has the strengths of spatial quantification and flexibility. Meanwhile, the results showed that the influence of climate change would become more severe over time. In 2030, the potential urban area affected by climate change will be 343.60-1260.66 km(2) (5.55 -20.37 % of the total urban area, projected by the no-climate-change-effect scenario). Therefore, the effects of climate change should not be neglected when designing and managing urban landscape.

  15. Assessing the Distribution of Urban Green Spaces and its Anisotropic Cooling Distance on Urban Heat Island Pattern in Baotou, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tongliga Bao

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available An essential part of urban natural systems, urban green spaces play a crucial role in mitigating the urban heat island effect (UHI. The UHI effect refers to the phenomenon where the temperature within a city is higher than that of the surrounding rural areas. The effects of the spatial composition and configuration of urban green spaces on urban land surface temperature (LST have recently been documented. However, few studies have examined the effects of the directionality and distribution of green spaces on LST. In this study, we used a landscape index to describe the change in pattern of heat island intensity for the city of Baotou, China. We then used a semi-variable function and nearest neighbor algorithm to analyze the cooling effects of green spaces. We found that: (1 the cooling distance of an urban green space was not only influenced by its size, vegetation cover, and shape, but also showed anisotropy. In general, the larger the area of the urban green space and the higher the value of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI; a measure of plant photosynthetic activity, the larger the cooling distance within a certain threshold. Green spaces with more regular shapes displayed higher LST mitigation; however, the cooling distance was directional, and cooling effects depended on the semi-major axis and semi-minor axis of the green space. (2 The distribution of the urban green space within the landscape played a key role in mitigating the UHI effect. Within a certain area, the cooling effect of green spaces that are evenly distributed was greater than that which was associated with either green spaces that were large in area or where greens spaces were aggregated in the landscape. Therefore, within urban areas, where space is limited, urban planning should account for green spaces that are relatively scattered and evenly distributed to maximize cooling effects. The results of this study have key implications for sustainable urban

  16. Evaluation of Alternate Materials for Coated Particle Fuels for the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2006 Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul A. Demkowicz; Karen Wright; Jian Gan; David Petti; Todd Allen; Jake Blanchard

    2006-09-01

    Candidate ceramic materials were studied to determine their suitability as Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor particle fuel coatings. The ceramics examined in this work were: TiC, TiN, ZrC, ZrN, AlN, and SiC. The studies focused on (i) chemical reactivity of the ceramics with fission products palladium and rhodium, (ii) the thermomechanical stresses that develop in the fuel coatings from a variety of causes during burnup, and (iii) the radiation resiliency of the materials. The chemical reactivity of TiC, TiN, ZrC, and ZrN with Pd and Rh were all found to be much lower than that of SiC. A number of important chemical behaviors were observed at the ceramic-metal interfaces, including the formation of specific intermetallic phases and a variation in reaction rates for the different ceramics investigated. Based on the data collected in this work, the nitride ceramics (TiN and ZrN) exhibit chemical behavior that is characterized by lower reaction rates with Pd and Rh than the carbides TiC and ZrC. The thermomechanical stresses in spherical fuel particle ceramic coatings were modeled using finite element analysis, and included contributions from differential thermal expansion, fission gas pressure, fuel kernel swelling, and thermal creep. In general the tangential stresses in the coatings during full reactor operation are tensile, with ZrC showing the lowest values among TiC, ZrC, and SiC (TiN and ZrN were excluded from the comprehensive calculations due to a lack of available materials data). The work has highlighted the fact that thermal creep plays a critical role in the development of the stress state of the coatings by relaxing many of the stresses at high temperatures. To perform ion irradiations of sample materials, an irradiation beamline and high-temperature sample irradiation stage was constructed at the University of Wisconsin’s 1.7MV Tandem Accelerator Facility. This facility is now capable of irradiating of materials to high dose while controlling sample temperature

  17. SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT PHASE 1 SLUDGE STORAGE OPTIONS ASSESSMENT OF T PLANT VERSUS ALTERNATE STORAGE FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RUTHERFORD WW; GEUTHER WJ; STRANKMAN MR; CONRAD EA; RHOADARMER DD; BLACK DM; POTTMEYER JA

    2009-04-29

    The CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) has recommended to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) a two phase approach for removal and storage (Phase 1) and treatment and packaging for offsite shipment (Phase 2) of the sludge currently stored within the 105-K West Basin. This two phased strategy enables early removal of sludge from the 105-K West Basin by 2015, allowing remediation of historical unplanned releases of waste and closure of the 100-K Area. In Phase 1, the sludge currently stored in the Engineered Containers and Settler Tanks within the 105-K West Basin will be transferred into sludge transport and storage containers (STSCs). The STSCs will be transported to an interim storage facility. In Phase 2, sludge will be processed (treated) to meet shipping and disposal requirements and the sludge will be packaged for final disposal at a geologic repository. The purpose of this study is to evaluate two alternatives for interim Phase 1 storage of K Basin sludge. The cost, schedule, and risks for sludge storage at a newly-constructed Alternate Storage Facility (ASF) are compared to those at T Plant, which has been used previously for sludge storage. Based on the results of the assessment, T Plant is recommended for Phase 1 interim storage of sludge. Key elements that support this recommendation are the following: (1) T Plant has a proven process for storing sludge; (2) T Plant storage can be implemented at a lower incremental cost than the ASF; and (3) T Plant storage has a more favorable schedule profile, which provides more float, than the ASF. Underpinning the recommendation of T Plant for sludge storage is the assumption that T Plant has a durable, extended mission independent of the K Basin sludge interim storage mission. If this assumption cannot be validated and the operating costs of T Plant are borne by the Sludge Treatment Project, the conclusions and recommendations of this study would change. The following decision-making strategy, which is

  18. What Do We Know about School Discipline Reform? Assessing the Alternatives to Suspensions and Expulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Matthew P.; Lacoe, Johanna

    2017-01-01

    What evidence supports the call for discipline reform? How might alternative strategies affect students and schools? In this article, the authors describe the critiques of exclusionary discipline and then examine the research base on which discipline policy reform rests. They also describe the alternative approaches that are gaining traction in…

  19. Technology assessment of alternative fuels for the transportation sector; Teknologivurdering af altgernative drivmidler til transportsektoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-05-15

    The report documents an analysis, which aims at evaluating technologies in connection with alternative fuels for the transportation sector. During the analysis process a method has been developed for consistent evaluation of the alternative transportation fuels with the largest technological and economic potential. (BA)

  20. Participation and Performance Reporting for the Alternate Assessment Based on Modified Achievement Standards (AA-MAS). Technical Report 58

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albus, Deb; Thurlow, Martha L.; Lazarus, Sheryl S.

    2011-01-01

    This report examines publicly reported participation and performance data for the alternate assessment based on modified achievement standards (AA-MAS). The authors' analysis of these data included all states publicly reporting AA-MAS data, regardless of whether they had received approval to use the results for Title I accountability calculations.…

  1. Selfie@ssessment as an Alternative Form of Self-Assessment at Undergraduate Level in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulgar, Aysegül Takkaç

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to get ideas formed by undergraduate foreign language students about the applicability, advantages and disadvantages of "selfie@ssessment", which can be regarded as an alternative form of self-assessment utilizing modern mobile phone technologies and the available Internet facilities. Underpinning this study of…

  2. From nationwide standardized testing to school-based alternative embedded assessment in Israel: Students' performance in the matriculation 2000 project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dori, Yehudit J.

    2003-01-01

    Matriculation 2000 was a 5-year project aimed at moving from the nationwide traditional examination system in Israel to a school-based alternative embedded assessment. Encompassing 22 high schools from various communities in the country, the Project aimed at fostering deep understanding, higher-order thinking skills, and students' engagement in learning through alternative teaching and embedded assessment methods. This article describes research conducted during the fifth year of the Project at 2 experimental and 2 control schools. The research objective was to investigate students' learning outcomes in chemistry and biology in the Matriculation 2000 Project. The assumption was that alternative embedded assessment has some effect on students' performance. The experimental students scored significantly higher than their control group peers on low-level assignments and more so on assignments that required higher-order thinking skills. The findings indicate that given adequate support and teachers' consent and collaboration, schools can transfer from nationwide or statewide standardized testing to school-based alter-native embedded assessment.

  3. An assessment of alternatives and technologies for replacing ozone- depleting substances at DOE facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purcell, C.W.; Miller, K.B.; Friedman, J.R.; Rapoport, R.D.; Conover, D.R.; Hendrickson, P.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Koss, T.C. [USDOE Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Environmental Guidance

    1992-10-01

    Title VI of the Clean Air Act, as amended, mandates a production phase-out for ozone-depleting substances (ODSs). These requirements will have a significant impact on US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Currently, DOE uses ODSs in three major activities: fire suppression (halon), refrigeration and cooling (chlorofluorocarbons [CFCs]), and cleaning that requires solvents (CFCs, methyl chloroform, and carbon tetrachloride). This report provides basic information on methods and strategies to phase out use of ODSs at DOE facilities.

  4. A quantitative screening-level approach to incorporate chemical exposure and risk/safety into alternative assessment evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Scott M; Greggs, Bill; Goyak, Katy O; Landenberger, Bryce D; Mason, Ann M; Howard, Brett; Zaleski, Rosemary; Howard, Brett; Zaleski, Rosemary T

    2017-03-10

    As the general public and retailers ask for disclosure of chemical ingredients in the marketplace, a number of hazard screening tools were developed to evaluate the so called "greenness" of individual chemical ingredients and/or formulations. The majority of these tools focus only on hazard, often using chemical lists, ignoring the other part of the risk equation: exposure. Using a hazard-only focus can result in regrettable substitutions, changing one chemical ingredient for another that turns out to be more hazardous or shifts the toxicity burden to others. To minimize the incidents of regrettable substitutions, BizNGO describes 'Common Principles' to frame a process for informed substitution. Two of the six principles state reduce hazard and minimize exposure. A number of frameworks have emerged to evaluate and assess alternatives. One framework developed by leading experts under the auspices of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences recommended that hazard and exposure be specifically addressed in the same step when assessing candidate alternatives. For the alternative assessment community, this paper serves as an informational resource for considering exposure in an alternatives assessment using elements of problem formulation; product identity, use, and composition; hazard analysis; exposure analysis; and risk characterization. These conceptual elements build upon practices from government, academia, and industry and are exemplified through two hypothetical case studies demonstrating the questions asked and decisions faced in new product development. These two case studies - inhalation exposure to a generic paint product and environmental exposure to a shampoo rinsed down the drain - demonstrate the criteria, considerations, and methods required to combine exposure models addressing human health and environmental impacts to provide a screening level hazard/exposure (risk) analysis. This paper informs practices for these elements within a comparative risk

  5. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power: report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume VII. International perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-12-01

    The purpose of this volume is to assess the proliferation vulnerabilities of the present deployment of civilian nuclear-power systems within the current nonproliferation regime and, in light of their prospective deployment, to consider technical and institutional measures and alternatives which may contribute to an improved regime in which nuclear power could play a significant part. An assessment of these measures must include consideration of their nonproliferation effectiveness as well as their bearing upon energy security, and their operational, economic, and political implications. The nature of these considerations can provide some measure of their likely acceptability to various nations. While any final assessment of such measures and alternatives would have to examine the circumstances particular to each nation, it is hoped that the more generic assessments conducted here will be useful in suggesting guidelines for developing an improved nonproliferation regime which also helps to meet nuclear-energy needs. One chapter outlines the existing nonproliferation regime, including the Treaty for the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT), International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards, bilateral and multilateral requirements for agreements of cooperation and transfers of technology, and existing provisons for sanctions for violation of nonproliferation commitments. The chapter then proceeds to an assessment of various alternatives for providing assurance of fuel supply in light of this current regime. Another chapter examines a set of technical and institutional measures and alternatives for various components of once-through and closed fuel cycles. The components of the once-through fuel cycle assessed are enrichment services and spent-fuel management; the components of closed fuel cycles assessed are reprocessing and plutonium management and fast-breeder reactor (FBR) deployment.

  6. Alcohol-fueled vehicles: An alternative fuels vehicle, emissions, and refueling infrastructure technology assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCoy, G.A.; Kerstetter, J.; Lyons, J.K. [and others

    1993-06-01

    Interest in alternative motor vehicle fuels has grown tremendously over the last few years. The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, the National Energy Policy Act of 1992 and the California Clean Air Act are primarily responsible for this resurgence and have spurred both the motor fuels and vehicle manufacturing industries into action. For the first time, all three U.S. auto manufacturers are offering alternative fuel vehicles to the motoring public. At the same time, a small but growing alternative fuels refueling infrastructure is beginning to develop across the country. Although the recent growth in alternative motor fuels use is impressive, their market niche is still being defined. Environmental regulations, a key driver behind alternative fuel use, is forcing both car makers and the petroleum industry to clean up their products. As a result, alternative fuels no longer have a lock on the clean air market and will have to compete with conventional vehicles in meeting stringent future vehicle emission standards. The development of cleaner burning gasoline powered vehicles has signaled a shift in the marketing of alternative fuels. While they will continue to play a major part in the clean vehicle market, alternative fuels are increasingly recognized as a means to reduce oil imports. This new role is clearly defined in the National Energy Policy Act of 1992. The Act identifies alternative fuels as a key strategy for reducing imports of foreign oil and mandates their use for federal and state fleets, while reserving the right to require private and municipal fleet use as well.

  7. Ventilative Cooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per Kvols; Kolokotroni, Maria

    This report, by venticool, summarises the outcome of the work of the initial working phase of IEA ECB Annex 62 Ventilative Cooling and is based on the findings in the participating countries. It presents a summary of the first official Annex 62 report that describes the state-of-the-art of ventil......This report, by venticool, summarises the outcome of the work of the initial working phase of IEA ECB Annex 62 Ventilative Cooling and is based on the findings in the participating countries. It presents a summary of the first official Annex 62 report that describes the state...

  8. The Development of Alternative Assessment Instrument in Web-Based Scientific Communication Skill in Science Education Seminar Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. D. Hardianti

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Science Education Seminar course aims to develop the communication skill of students. The materials and assignments are given to train how to communicate effectively both written and orally. The tasks consist of the scientific papers analysis, conceptual article draft, and other assignments. It took longer time to assess those assignments with only pencil and paper methods therefore a web-based alternative assessment was designed to assess the assignments. Web-based alternative assessment (e-assessment can facilitate students and lecturer in the process of collecting and assessing tasks. The validation score by the assessment expert of the four aspects resulted 94,64%, 92,86%, 91,07%, and 92,86% meanwhile the score of expert information systems was 90, 63%. Thus the product can be said as valid in very feasible category with the average score of 81.5%. The percentage of positive responses of students was 84,43% that indicates the product is effective to help students and lecturers in the assessing students’ assignment and performance. Therefore, it can be said that the research has met the indicator of feasibility to result a valid and effective product.

  9. Evaluation of alternative age-based methods for estimating relative abundance from survey data in relation to assessment models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Casper Willestofte; Nielsen, Anders; Kristensen, Kasper

    2014-01-01

    Indices of abundance from fishery-independent trawl surveys constitute an important source of information for many fish stock assessments. Indices are often calculated using area stratified sample means on age-disaggregated data, and finally treated in stock assessment models as independent...... observations. We evaluate a series of alternative methods for calculating indices of abundance from trawl survey data (delta-lognormal, delta-gamma, and Tweedie using Generalized Additive Models) as well as different error structures for these indices when used as input in an age-based stock assessment model...... the different indices produced. The stratified mean method is found much more imprecise than the alternatives based on GAMs, which are found to be similar. Having time-varying index variances is found to be of minor importance, whereas the independence assumption is not only violated but has significant impact...

  10. Preliminary comparative assessment of land use for the Satellite Power System (SPS) and alternative electric energy technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newsom, D. E.; Wolsko, T.

    1980-01-01

    A preliminary comparative assessment of land use for the satellite power system (SPS), other solar technologies, and alternative electric energy technologies was conducted. The alternative technologies are coal gasification/combined-cycle, coal fluidized-bed combustion (FBC), light water reactor (LWR), liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR), terrestrial photovoltaics (TPV), solar thermal electric (STE), and ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC). The major issues of a land use assessment are the quantity, purpose, duration, location, and costs of the required land use. The phased methodology described treats the first four issues, but not the costs. Several past efforts are comparative or single technology assessment are reviewed briefly. The current state of knowledge about land use is described for each technology. Conclusions are drawn regarding deficiencies in the data on comparative land use and needs for further research.

  11. Radiation dose assessment for the biota of terrestrial ecosystems in the shoreline zone of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant cooling pond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskolkov, Boris Ya; Bondarkov, Mikhail D; Gaschak, Sergey P; Maksimenko, Andrey M; Hinton, Thomas G; Coughlin, Daniel; Jannik, G Timothy; Farfán, Eduardo B

    2011-10-01

    Radiation exposure of the biota in the shoreline area of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Cooling Pond was assessed to evaluate radiological consequences from the decommissioning of the Cooling Pond. This paper addresses studies of radioactive contamination of the terrestrial faunal complex and radionuclide concentration ratios in bodies of small birds, small mammals, amphibians, and reptiles living in the area. The data were used to calculate doses to biota using the ERICA Tool software. Doses from 90Sr and 137Cs were calculated using the default parameters of the ERICA Tool and were shown to be consistent with biota doses calculated from the field data. However, the ERICA dose calculations for plutonium isotopes were much higher (2-5 times for small mammals and 10-14 times for birds) than the doses calculated using the experimental data. Currently, the total doses for the terrestrial biota do not exceed maximum recommended levels. However, if the Cooling Pond is allowed to draw down naturally and the contaminants of the bottom sediments are exposed and enter the biological cycle, the calculated doses to biota may exceed the maximum recommended values. The study is important in establishing the current exposure conditions such that a baseline exists from which changes can be documented following the lowering of the reservoir water. Additionally, the study provided useful radioecological data on biota concentration ratios for some species that are poorly represented in the literature.

  12. RADIATION DOSE ASSESSMENT FOR THE BIOTA OF TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS IN THE SHORELINE ZONE OF THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT COOLING POND

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.

    2011-10-01

    Radiation exposure of the biota in the shoreline area of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Cooling Pond was assessed to evaluate radiological consequences from the decommissioning of the Cooling Pond. The article addresses studies of radioactive contamination of the terrestrial faunal complex and radionuclide concentration ratios in bodies of small birds, small mammals, amphibians, and reptiles living in the area. The data were used to calculate doses to biota using the ERICA Tool software. Doses from {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs were calculated using the default parameters of the ERICA Tool and were shown to be consistent with biota doses calculated from the field data. However, the ERICA dose calculations for plutonium isotopes were much higher (2-5 times for small mammals and 10-14 times for birds) than the doses calculated using the experimental data. Currently, the total doses for the terrestrial biota do not exceed maximum recommended levels. However, if the Cooling Pond is allowed to drawdown naturally and the contaminants of the bottom sediments are exposed and enter the biological cycle, the calculated doses to biota may exceed the maximum recommended values. The study is important in establishing the current exposure conditions such that a baseline exists from which changes can be documented following the lowering of the reservoir water. Additionally, the study provided useful radioecological data on biota concentration ratios for some species that are poorly represented in the literature.

  13. Assessment on the sustainable use of alternative construction materials as a substitute to natural aggregates

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    George, Theresa B

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available , and identifies potential construction materials such as glass, slags and recycled asphalt pavement (RAP) that are locally available as alternative aggregate materials to virgin aggregates. An economic cost analysis conducted indicated that it is more cost...

  14. An assessment of alternatives for management of upland habitats at the Quivira National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is an environmental impact statement (EIS) to evaluate the alternatives for management of upland habitat at Quivira National Wildlife Refuge. This EIS...

  15. State university preparatory class EFL instructors' attitudes towards assessment methods used at their institutions and portfolios as a method of alternative assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Oğuz, Şebnem

    2003-01-01

    Cataloged from PDF version of article. The purpose of this study was to investigate preparatory class instructors’ attitudes towards the methods of assessment they are currently using at their institutions, and their knowledge about and attitudes towards portfolios as an alternative method of assessment. The study was conducted with 386 English instructors from the preparatory class programs of 14 Turkish state universities. Data were collected through a fourpart questio...

  16. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume IV. Commercial potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-01

    This volume of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP) report provides time and cost estimates for positioning new nuclear power systems for commercial deployment. The assessment also estimates the rates at which the new systems might penetrate the domestic market, assuming the continuing viability of the massive light-water reactor network that now exists worldwide. This assessment does not recommend specific, detailed program plans and budgets for individual systems; however, it is clear from this analysis that any of the systems investigated could be deployed if dictated by national interest.

  17. Radiative cooling for thermophotovoltaic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhiguang; Sun, Xingshu; Bermel, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Radiative cooling has recently garnered a great deal of attention for its potential as an alternative method for photovoltaic thermal management. Here, we will consider the limits of radiative cooling for thermal management of electronics broadly, as well as a specific application to thermal power generation. We show that radiative cooling power can increase rapidly with temperature, and is particularly beneficial in systems lacking standard convective cooling. This finding indicates that systems previously operating at elevated temperatures (e.g., 80°C) can be passively cooled close to ambient under appropriate conditions with a reasonable cooling area. To examine these general principles for a previously unexplored application, we consider the problem of thermophotovoltaic (TPV) conversion of heat to electricity via thermal radiation illuminating a photovoltaic diode. Since TPV systems generally operate in vacuum, convective cooling is sharply limited, but radiative cooling can be implemented with proper choice of materials and structures. In this work, realistic simulations of system performance are performed using the rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA) techniques to capture thermal emitter radiation, PV diode absorption, and radiative cooling. We subsequently optimize the structural geometry within realistic design constraints to find the best configurations to minimize operating temperature. It is found that low-iron soda-lime glass can potentially cool the PV diode by a substantial amount, even to below ambient temperatures. The cooling effect can be further improved by adding 2D-periodic photonic crystal structures. We find that the improvement of efficiency can be as much as an 18% relative increase, relative to the non-radiatively cooled baseline, as well as a potentially significant improvement in PV diode lifetime.

  18. Cool snacks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunert, Klaus G; Brock, Steen; Brunsø, Karen

    2016-01-01

    such a product requires an interdisciplinary effort where researchers with backgrounds in psychology, anthropology, media science, philosophy, sensory science and food science join forces. We present the COOL SNACKS project, where such a blend of competences was used first to obtain thorough insight into young...

  19. Stochastic cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisognano, J.; Leemann, C.

    1982-03-01

    Stochastic cooling is the damping of betatron oscillations and momentum spread of a particle beam by a feedback system. In its simplest form, a pickup electrode detects the transverse positions or momenta of particles in a storage ring, and the signal produced is amplified and applied downstream to a kicker. The time delay of the cable and electronics is designed to match the transit time of particles along the arc of the storage ring between the pickup and kicker so that an individual particle receives the amplified version of the signal it produced at the pick-up. If there were only a single particle in the ring, it is obvious that betatron oscillations and momentum offset could be damped. However, in addition to its own signal, a particle receives signals from other beam particles. In the limit of an infinite number of particles, no damping could be achieved; we have Liouville's theorem with constant density of the phase space fluid. For a finite, albeit large number of particles, there remains a residue of the single particle damping which is of practical use in accumulating low phase space density beams of particles such as antiprotons. It was the realization of this fact that led to the invention of stochastic cooling by S. van der Meer in 1968. Since its conception, stochastic cooling has been the subject of much theoretical and experimental work. The earliest experiments were performed at the ISR in 1974, with the subsequent ICE studies firmly establishing the stochastic cooling technique. This work directly led to the design and construction of the Antiproton Accumulator at CERN and the beginnings of p anti p colliding beam physics at the SPS. Experiments in stochastic cooling have been performed at Fermilab in collaboration with LBL, and a design is currently under development for a anti p accumulator for the Tevatron.

  20. A TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT AND FEASIBILITY EVALUATION OF NATURAL GAS ENERGY FLOW MEASUREMENT ALTERNATIVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kendricks A. Behring II; Eric Kelner; Ali Minachi; Cecil R. Sparks; Thomas B. Morrow; Steven J. Svedeman

    1999-01-01

    Deregulation and open access in the natural gas pipeline industry has changed the gas business environment towards greater reliance on local energy flow rate measurement. What was once a large, stable, and well-defined source of natural gas is now a composite from many small suppliers with greatly varying gas compositions. Unfortunately, the traditional approach to energy flow measurement [using a gas chromatograph (GC) for composition assay in conjunction with a flow meter] is only cost effective for large capacity supplies (typically greater than 1 to 30 million scfd). A less costly approach will encourage more widespread use of energy measurement technology. In turn, the US will benefit from tighter gas inventory control, more efficient pipeline and industrial plant operations, and ultimately lower costs to the consumer. An assessment of the state and direction of technology for natural gas energy flow rate measurement is presented. The alternative technologies were ranked according to their potential to dramatically reduce capital and operating and maintenance (O and M) costs, while improving reliability and accuracy. The top-ranked technologies take an unconventional inference approach to the energy measurement problem. Because of that approach, they will not satisfy the fundamental need for composition assay, but have great potential to reduce industry reliance on the GC. Technological feasibility of the inference approach was demonstrated through the successful development of data correlations that relate energy measurement properties (molecular weight, mass-based heating value, standard density, molar ideal gross heating value, standard volumetric heating value, density, and volume-based heating value) to three inferential properties: standard sound speed, carbon dioxide concentration, and nitrogen concentration (temperature and pressure are also required for the last two). The key advantage of this approach is that inexpensive on-line sensors may be used

  1. A TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT AND FEASIBILITY EVALUATION OF NATURAL GAS ENERGY FLOW MEASUREMENT ALTERNATIVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kendricks A. Behring II; Eric Kelner; Ali Minachi; Cecil R. Sparks; Thomas B. Morrow; Steven J. Svedeman

    1999-01-01

    Deregulation and open access in the natural gas pipeline industry has changed the gas business environment towards greater reliance on local energy flow rate measurement. What was once a large, stable, and well-defined source of natural gas is now a composite from many small suppliers with greatly varying gas compositions. Unfortunately, the traditional approach to energy flow measurement [using a gas chromatograph (GC) for composition assay in conjunction with a flow meter] is only cost effective for large capacity supplies (typically greater than 1 to 30 million scfd). A less costly approach will encourage more widespread use of energy measurement technology. In turn, the US will benefit from tighter gas inventory control, more efficient pipeline and industrial plant operations, and ultimately lower costs to the consumer. An assessment of the state and direction of technology for natural gas energy flow rate measurement is presented. The alternative technologies were ranked according to their potential to dramatically reduce capital and operating and maintenance (O and M) costs, while improving reliability and accuracy. The top-ranked technologies take an unconventional inference approach to the energy measurement problem. Because of that approach, they will not satisfy the fundamental need for composition assay, but have great potential to reduce industry reliance on the GC. Technological feasibility of the inference approach was demonstrated through the successful development of data correlations that relate energy measurement properties (molecular weight, mass-based heating value, standard density, molar ideal gross heating value, standard volumetric heating value, density, and volume-based heating value) to three inferential properties: standard sound speed, carbon dioxide concentration, and nitrogen concentration (temperature and pressure are also required for the last two). The key advantage of this approach is that inexpensive on-line sensors may be used

  2. Dialogues in the COOL Project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stalpers, S.I.P.; Kroeze, C.

    2013-01-01

    The Climate Options for the Long-term (COOL) Project is a participatory integrated assessment (PIA) comprising extensive dialogues at three levels: national, European and global. The objective of the COOL Project was to ‘develop strategic notions on how to achieve drastic reductions of greenhouse ga

  3. Economic and Social Impact Assessment of the Alternatives to DDT Usage for Antifouling Paint Production in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Yi; Xiao Yali; Lu Yongsen

    2008-01-01

    China is the only nation that uses DDT in antifouling pain at present, approximately 5% of DDT is applied as the additive of the antifouling paint production. Therefore, actions shall be taken urgently for banning the use of DDT and substituting with non-POPs alternatives in antifouling paints. The paper researches the social and economic backgrounds of DDT booster antifouling paint production and usage, analyzes the social and economic impact assessment of the alternatives to DDT usage for antifouiing paint. The implementation of the project of alternatives will completely eliminate the adverse impact of DDT booster antifouling paint on terrestrial, marine ecosystem and human health. The broad use of alkali silicate and pepper alkali as substitutes will be feasible if appropriate measures will be taken to encourage their development, and the social and economic risk will be reduced to accepted levels.

  4. Technology assessment of alternative fuels for the transportation sector. Fact sheets on technology elements and system calculations for technology tracks; Teknologivurdering af alternative drivmidler til transportsektoren. Fakta-ark for teknologi-elementer og systemberegninger for teknologi-spor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-05-15

    The report documents an analysis, which aims at evaluating technologies in connection with alternative fuels for the transportation sector. During the analysis process a method has been developed for consistent evaluation of alternative transportation fuels with the largest technological and economic potential. This appendix presents key fact sheets which substantiate the analysis presented in the report 'Technology assessment of alternative fuels for the transportation sector'. (BA)

  5. Development of computational methods for the safety assessment of gas-cooled high-temperature and supercritical light-water reactors. Final report; Rechenmethoden zur Bewertung der Sicherheit von gasgekuehlten Hochtemperaturreaktoren und superkritischen Leichtwasserreaktoren. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchholz, S.; Cron, D. von der; Hristov, H.; Lerchl, G.; Papukchiev, A.; Seubert, A.; Sureda, A.; Weis, J.; Weyermann, F.

    2012-12-15

    This report documents developments and results in the frame of the project RS1191 ''Development of computational methods for the safety assessment of gas-cooled high temperature and supercritical light-water reactors''. The report is structured according to the five work packages: 1. Reactor physics modeling of gas-cooled high temperature reactors; 2. Coupling of reactor physics and 3-D thermal hydraulics for the core barrel; 3. Extension of ATHLET models for application to supercritical reactors (HPLWR); 4. Further development of ATHLET for application to HTR; 5. Further development and validation of ANSYS CFX for application to alternative reactor concepts. Chapter 4 describes the extensions made in TORT-TD related to the simulation of pebble-bed HTR, e.g. spectral zone buckling, Iodine-Xenon dynamics, nuclear decay heat calculation and extension of the cross section interpolation algorithms to higher dimensions. For fast running scoping calculations, a time-dependent 3-D diffusion solver has been implemented in TORT-TD. For the PBMR-268 and PBMR-400 as well as for the HTR-10 reactor, appropriate TORT-TD models have been developed. Few-group nuclear cross sections have been generated using the spectral codes MICROX- 2 and DRAGON4. For verification and validation of nuclear cross sections and deterministic reactor models, MCNP models of reactor core and control rod of the HTR-10 have been developed. Comparisons with experimental data have been performed for the HTR-10 first criticality and control rod worth. The development of the coupled 3-D neutron kinetics and thermal hydraulics code system TORT-TD/ATTICA3D is documented in chapter 5. Similar to the couplings with ATHLET and COBRA-TF, the ''internal'' coupling approach has been implemented. Regarding the review of experiments and benchmarks relevant to HTR for validation of the coupled code system, the PBMR-400 benchmarks and the HTR-10 test reactor have been selected

  6. MELTER OFF-GAS FLAMMABILITY ASSESSMENT FOR DWPF ALTERNATE REDUCTANT FLOWSHEET OPTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, A.

    2011-07-08

    Glycolic acid and sugar are being considered as potential candidates to substitute for much of the formic acid currently being added to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter feed as a reductant. A series of small-scale melter tests were conducted at the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) in January 2011 to collect necessary data for the assessment of the impact of these alternate reductants on the melter off-gas flammability. The DM10 melter with a 0.021 m{sup 2} melt surface area was run with three different feeds which were prepared at SRNL based on; (1) the baseline formic/nitric acid flowsheet, (2) glycolic/formic/nitric acid flowsheet, and (3) sugar/formic/nitric acid flowsheet - these feeds will be called the baseline, glycolic, and sugar flowsheet feeds, respectively, hereafter. The actual addition of sugar to the sugar flowsheet feed was made at VSL before it was fed to the melter. For each feed, the DM10 was run under both bubbled (with argon) and non-bubbled conditions at varying melter vapor space temperatures. The goal was to lower its vapor space temperature from nominal 500 C to less than 300 C at 50 C increments and maintain steady state at each temperature at least for one hour, preferentially for two hours, while collecting off-gas data including CO, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2} concentrations. Just a few hours into the first test with the baseline feed, it was discovered that the DM10 vapor space temperature would not readily fall below 350 C simply by ramping up the feed rate as the test plan called for. To overcome this, ambient air was introduced directly into the vapor space through a dilution air damper in addition to the natural air inleakage occurring at the operating melter pressure of -1 inch H{sub 2}O. A detailed description of the DM10 run along with all the data taken is given in the report issued by VSL. The SRNL personnel have analyzed the DM10 data and identified 25 steady state periods lasting from 32 to 92 minutes for all

  7. SOLPLAN report: An assessment of barriers and incentives to conservation and alternative-energy use in the residential sector in Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulenwider, C. K.; Weiss, L. S.; Pfefferkorn, C.; Wiener, D. E.; Feldmam, S. L.

    1981-03-01

    The Alternative Energy Policy Project of the Wisconsin Center for Public Policy focused upon two principle objectives: gathering and analyzing data on energy conservation and alternative energy commercialization; and building consensus around alternative energy policy to develop guidelines for alternative energy policy for the state. Particular attention was paid to public involvement in the policy process and to assessing barriers and incentives from as many key sectors of the energy field as possible. Data were gathered from the general public, alternative energy users, the heating industry generally, the alternative-energy industry specifically, and key decision makers.

  8. Alternate assessment use with students who are deaf or hard of hearing: an exploratory mixed-methods analysis of portfolio, checklists, and out-of-level test formats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawthon, Stephanie W; Wurtz, Keith A

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present findings on alternate assessments for students who are deaf or hard of hearing (SDHH). Drawn from the results of the "Second National Survey of Assessments and Accommodations for Students Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing," this study investigated three alternate assessment formats: portfolio, checklists, and out-of-level testing. Analysis includes descriptive data of alternate assessment use across all three formats, qualitative analyses of teacher perspectives, and an exploratory logistic regression analysis on predictors of alternate assessment use. This exploratory analysis looks at predictors such as state policy, educational setting, grades served, language of instruction, and participant perspectives. Results indicate that predictors at the student, teacher, and system level may influence alternate assessment use for SDHH.

  9. A very cool cooling system

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2015-01-01

    The NA62 Gigatracker is a jewel of technology: its sensor, which delivers the time of the crossing particles with a precision of less than 200 picoseconds (better than similar LHC detectors), has a cooling system that might become the precursor to a completely new detector technique.   The 115 metre long vacuum tank of the NA62 experiment. The NA62 Gigatracker (GTK) is composed of a set of three innovative silicon pixel detectors, whose job is to measure the arrival time and the position of the incoming beam particles. Installed in the heart of the NA62 detector, the silicon sensors are cooled down (to about -20 degrees Celsius) by a microfluidic silicon device. “The cooling system is needed to remove the heat produced by the readout chips the silicon sensor is bonded to,” explains Alessandro Mapelli, microsystems engineer working in the Physics department. “For the NA62 Gigatracker we have designed a cooling plate on top of which both the silicon sensor and the...

  10. New Approaches to Final Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuffer, David [Fermilab

    2014-11-10

    A high-energy muon collider scenario require a “final cooling” system that reduces transverse emittances by a factor of ~10 while allowing longitudinal emittance increase. The baseline approach has low-energy transverse cooling within high-field solenoids, with strong longitudinal heating. This approach and its recent simulation are discussed. Alternative approaches which more explicitly include emittance exchange are also presented. Round-to-flat beam transform, transverse slicing, and longitudinal bunch coalescence are possible components of the alternative approach. A more explicit understanding of solenoidal cooling beam dynamics is introduced.

  11. Assessment of Energy, Environmental and Economic Performance of a Solar Desiccant Cooling System with Different Collector Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Angrisani

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Desiccant-based air handling units can achieve reductions in greenhouse gas emissions and energy savings with respect to conventional air conditioning systems. Benefits are maximized when they interact with renewable energy technologies, such as solar collectors. In this work, experimental tests and data derived from scientific and technical literature are used to implement a model of a solar desiccant cooling system, considering three different collector technologies (air, flat-plate and evacuated collectors. Simulations were then performed to compare the energy, environmental and economic performance of the system with those of a desiccant-based unit where regeneration thermal energy is supplied by a natural gas boiler, and with those of a conventional air-handling unit. The only solution that allows achieving the economic feasibility of the solar desiccant cooling unit consists of 16 m2 of evacuated solar collectors. This is able to obtain, with respect to the reference system, a reduction of primary energy consumption and of the equivalent CO2 emissions of 50.2% and 49.8%, respectively, but with a payback time of 20 years.

  12. Making sense of ballistic missile defense: an assessment of concepts and systems for U.S. boost-phase missile defense in comparison to other alternatives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences; National Research Council; Naval Studies Board

    2012-01-01

    "The Committee on an Assessment of Concepts and Systems for U.S. Boost-Phase Missile Defense in Comparison to Other Alternatives set forth to provide an assessment of the feasibility, practicality, and affordability of U.S...

  13. Assessing the feasibility of a high-temperature, helium-cooled vacuum vessel and first wall for the Vulcan tokamak conceptual design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnard, H.S., E-mail: hbar@mit.edu [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Hartwig, Z.S.; Olynyk, G.M.; Payne, J.E. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2012-03-15

    The Vulcan conceptual design (R = 1.2 m, a = 0.3 m, B{sub 0} = 7 T), a compact, steady-state tokamak for plasma-material interaction (PMI) science, must incorporate a vacuum vessel capable of operating at 1000 K in order to replicate the temperature-dependent physical chemistry that will govern PMI in a reactor. In addition, the Vulcan divertor must be capable of handling steady-state heat fluxes up to 10 MW m{sup -2} so that integrated materials testing can be performed under reactor-relevant conditions. A conceptual design scoping study has been performed to assess the challenges involved in achieving such a configuration. The Vulcan vacuum system comprises an inner, primary vacuum vessel that is thermally and mechanically isolated from the outer, secondary vacuum vessel by a 10 cm vacuum gap. The thermal isolation minimizes heat conduction between the high-temperature helium-cooled primary vessel and the water-cooled secondary vessel. The mechanical isolation allows for thermal expansion and enables vertical removal of the primary vessel for maintenance or replacement. Access to the primary vessel for diagnostics, lower hybrid waveguides, and helium coolant is achieved through {approx}1 m long intra-vessel pipes to minimize temperature gradients and is shown to be commensurate with the available port space in Vulcan. The isolated primary vacuum vessel is shown to be mechanically feasible and robust to plasma disruptions with analytic calculations and finite element analyses. Heat removal in the first wall and divertor, coupled with the ability to perform in situ maintenance and replacement of divertor components for scientific purposes, is achieved by combining existing helium-cooled techniques with innovative mechanical attachments of plasma facing components, either in plate-type helium-cooled modules or independently bolted, helium-jet impingement-cooled tiles. The vacuum vessel and first wall design enables a wide range of potential PFC materials and

  14. Cooling technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salamon, Todd R; Vyas, Brijesh; Kota, Krishna; Simon, Elina

    2017-01-31

    An apparatus and a method are provided. Use is made of a wick structure configured to receive a liquid and generate vapor in when such wick structure is heated by heat transferred from heat sources to be cooled off. A vapor channel is provided configured to receive the vapor generated and direct said vapor away from the wick structure. In some embodiments, heat conductors are used to transfer the heat from the heat sources to the liquid in the wick structure.

  15. Generating alternative alignments in terrain suitability studies for environmental impact assessments of linear developments

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Deventer, Heidi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available wide variety of specialist in a TSS could ensure a well informed choice of alternatives for the EIA and a choice of optimum corridors, could result in cost savings. This may in turn avoid delays during the EIA process if routes were rejected completely...

  16. Assessment of the use of cassava as alternative energy feedstuff in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ayoade adetoye

    IJAAAR 11 (1&2): 67-76, 2015 International Journal of Applied Agricultural and ... 1Institute of Food Security, Environmental Resources and Agricultural Research, Federal University of ... three states of southwest Nigeria on the use of cassava as alternative energy feedstuff in ... food and soft drink industries (Iheke, 2008).

  17. A tiered approach to the use of alternatives to animal testing for the safety assessment of cosmetics: skin irritation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macfarlane, Martin; Jones, Penny; Goebel, Carsten; Dufour, Eric; Rowland, Joanna; Araki, Daisuke; Costabel-Farkas, Margit; Hewitt, Nicola J; Hibatallah, Jalila; Kirst, Annette; McNamee, Pauline; Schellauf, Florian; Scheel, Julia

    2009-07-01

    Evaluation of the skin irritancy and corrosivity potential of an ingredient is a necessity in the safety assessment of cosmetic ingredients. To date, there are two formally validated alternatives to the rabbit Draize test for skin corrosivity in place, namely the rat skin transcutaneous electrical resistance (TER) assay and the Human Skin Model Test using EpiSkin, EpiDerm and SkinEthic reconstructed human epidermal equivalents. For skin irritation, EpiSkin, EpiDerm and SkinEthic are validated as stand-alone test replacements for the rabbit Draize test. Data from these tests are rarely considered in isolation and are evaluated in combination with other factors to establish the overall irritating or corrosive potential of an ingredient. In light of the deadlines established in the Cosmetics Directive for cessation of animal testing for cosmetic ingredients, a COLIPA scientific meeting was held in Brussels on 30th January, 2008 to review the use of alternative approaches and to set up a decision tree approach for their integration into tiered testing strategies for hazard and safety assessment of cosmetic ingredients and their use in products. In conclusion, the safety assessments for skin irritation/corrosion of new chemicals for use in cosmetics can be confidently accomplished using exclusively alternative methods.

  18. A European perspective on alternatives to animal testing for environmental hazard identification and risk assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholz, S.; Sela, E.; Blaha, L.; Braunbeck, T.; Galay-Burgos, M.; Garcia-Franco, M.; Guinea, J.; Kluver, N.; Schirmer, K.; Tanneberger, K.; Tobor-Kaplon, M.; Witters, H.; Belanger, S.; Benfenati, E.; Creton, S.; Cronin, M.T.D.; Eggen, R.I.L.; Embry, M.; Ekman, D.; Gourmelon, A.; Halder, M.; Hardy, B.; Hartung, T.; Hubesch, B.; Jungmann, D.; Lampi, M.A.; Lee, van L.; Leonard, M.; Kuster, E.; Lillicrap, A.; Luckenbach, T.; Murk, A.J.; Navas, J.M.; Peijnenburg, W.; Repetto, G.; Salinas, E.; Schuurmann, G.; Spielmann, H.; Tollefsen, K.E.; Walter-Rohde, S.; Whale, G.; Wheeler, J.R.; Winter, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Tests with vertebrates are an integral part of environmental hazard identification and risk assessment of chemicals, plant protection products, pharmaceuticals, biocides, feed additives and effluents. These tests raise ethical and economic concerns and are considered as inappropriate for assessing

  19. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume VII. International perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-01

    The purpose of this volume is to assess the proliferation vulnerabilities of the present deployment of civilian nuclear-power systems within the current nonproliferation regime and, in light of their prospective deployment, to consider technical and institutional measures and alternatives which may contribute to an improved regime in which nuclear power could play a significant part. An assessment of these measures must include consideration of their nonproliferation effectiveness as well as their bearing upon energy security, and their operational, economic, and political implications. The nature of these considerations can provide some measure of their likely acceptability to various nations.

  20. A Multi-Center Controlled Study of the Acute and Chronic Effects of Cooling Therapy for MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Bernadette; Schwid, Steven W.; Cutter, Gary; Murray, Ronald; Bowen, James; Pellegrino, Richard; Guisado, Raul; Webbon, Bruce W.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    To determine the acute and chronic effects of cooling therapy on patients with MS using objective functional performance measures and self-assessed measures of fatigue. Cooling demyelinated nerves can reduce conduction block, potentially improving symptoms of MS. Significant acute and chronic effects of cooling have not been demonstrated in a multi-center, controlled, blinded study using objective measures of neurologic function. Patients (N=84) with definite MS, mild to moderate disability (EDSS less than 6.0), and self-reported heat sensitivity were enrolled at 5 study sites. Acute effects of cooling were assessed by randomly assigning subjects to high-dose or low-dose cooling for one hour using an active cooling vest and cap (Life Enhancement Technologies, Santa Clara, CA). Settings were individualized to maintain the cooling garments at 55 F for the high-dose treatment and 70 F for the low-dose treatment. Both patients and examining investigators were blinded to treatment assignments. The MSFC and visual acuity/contrast sensitivity were assessed before and 30 minutes after treatment. The following week, subjects had an identical visit with the alternate cooling treatment. Chronic effects of cooling were assessed by randomly assigning the same subjects to unblinded daily home cooling or observation for 4 weeks. All subjects completed the Rochester Fatigue Diary (RFD) twice weekly and subjective measures of strength, cognition, and energy level daily. At the end of the period, subjects completed the Modified Fatigue Impact Scale (MFIS) and underwent another high-dose cooling session with assessment of the MSFC and vision. After a one-week washout period, subjects crossed over to the alternate 4-week treatment. Oral temperatures were reduced with both acute treatments (0.8 +/- .06 F, high and 0.5 +/- .06 F, low). While mean MSFC did not change significantly during individual cooling sessions, post hoc analysis pooling the 3 high-dose cooling sessions revealed an

  1. Assessment of Alphamagnetic Spectrometer (AMS) Upper Experiment Structural Configuration Shielding Effectiveness Associated with Change from Cryo-Cooled Magnet to Permanent Magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Robert

    2012-01-01

    In the spring of 2010, the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer 2 (AMS-02) underwent a series of system level electromagnetic interference control measurements, followed by thermal vacuum testing. Shortly after completion of the thermal vacuum testing, the project decided to remove the cryogenically cooled superconducting magnet, and replace it with the original permanent magnet design employed in the earlier AMS- 01 assembly. Doing so necessitated several structural changes, as well as removal or modification of numerous electronic and thermal control devices and systems. At this stage, the project was rapidly approaching key milestone dates for hardware completion and delivery for launch, and had little time for additional testing or assessment of any impact to the electromagnetic signature of the AMS-02. Therefore, an analytical assessment of the radiated emissions behavioural changes associated with the system changes was requested.

  2. Safety assessment for electricity generation failure accident of gas cooled nuclear power plant using system dynamics (SD) method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Tae Ho [Seoul National Univ. (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    2013-04-15

    The power production failure happens in the loss of coolant of the nuclear power plants (NPPs). The air ingress is a serious accident in gas cooled NPPs. The quantification of the study performed by the system dynamics (SD) method which is processed by the feedback algorithms. The Vensim software package is used for the simulation, which is performed by the Monte-Carlo method. Two kinds of considerations as the economic and safety properties are important in NPPs. The result shows the stability of the operation when the power can be decided. The maximum value of risk is the 11.77 in 43rd and the minimum value is 0.0 in several years. So, the success of the circulation of coolant is simulated by the dynamical values. (orig.)

  3. Assessment of alternative management practices and policies affecting soil carbon in agroecosystems of the central United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donigian, A.S.; Barnwell, T.O.; Jackson, R.B.; Patwardhan, A.S.; Weinrich, K.B.

    1994-04-01

    The goal of the U.S. EPA BIOME Agroecosystems Assessment Project is to evaluate the degree to which agroecosystems can be technically managed, on a sustainable basis, to conserve and sequester carbon, reduce the accumulation of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, and provide reference datasets and methodologies for agricultural assessment. The report provides preliminary estimates of carbon sequestration potential for the central United States including the Corn Belt, the Great Lakes, and portions of the Great Plains. This study region comprises 44% of the land area and 60% to 70% of the agricultural cropland of the conterminous United States. The assessment methodology includes the integration of the RAMS economic model, the Century soil carbon model, meteorologic and soils data bases, and GIS display and analysis capabilities in order to assess the impacts on soil carbon of current agricultural trends and conditions, alternative tillage practices, use of cover crops, and Conservation Reserve Program policy.

  4. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power: report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume 1. Program summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    This report summarizes the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP): its background, its studies, and its results. This introductory chapter traces the growth of the issue of nuclear weapons proliferation and the organization and objectives of NASAP. Chapter 2 summarizes the program's assessments, findings and recommendations. Each of Volumes II-VII reports on an individual assessment (Volume II: Proliferation Resistance; Volume III: Resources and Fuel Cycle Facilities; Volume IV: Commercial Potential; Volume V: Economics and Systems Analysis; Volume VI: Safety and Environmental Considerations for Licensing; Volume VII: International Perspectives). Volume VIII (Advanced Concepts) presents a combined assessment of several less fully developed concepts, and Volume IX (Reactor and Fuel Cycle Descriptions) provides detailed descriptions of the reactor and fuel-cycle systems studied by NASAP.

  5. Solar-driven high temperature radiant cooling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG ZhaoPei; WANG RuZhu; ZHAI XiaoQiang

    2009-01-01

    Solar energy is widely used as one of the most important renewable energy. In addition to the growing applications of solar PV and solar water heater, solar cooling is also considered very valuable and the related researches are developing fast because of the synchronism between solar irradiance and building cooling load. Current studies mainly focus on the high temperature solar collector technique and heat-driven cooling technique, while little concern has been paid to the transport process of cooling power. In this paper, the high temperature radiant cooling is studied as an alternative way for transporting cooling power, and the performance of the combination of radiant ceiling and solar cooling is also studied. From simulation and theoretical analysis results, high temperature radiant cooling terminal shows better cooling power transportation ability against conventional air-conditioning terminal, and its thermal comfort is improved. Experiment results indicate that radiant cooling can enhance the chiller's COP (Coefficient of Performance) by 17% and cooling power regeneration by 50%.According to analysis in this paper, high temperature radiant cooling is proved to be suitable for solar cooling system, and out work can serve as a reference for later system design and promotion.

  6. Methodology for assessing the impacts of alternative rate designs on industrial energy use. Draft report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-01-11

    A task was undertaken to develop a method for analyzing industrial user responses to alternative rate designs. The method described considers the fuel switching and conservation responses of industrial users and the impact to a hypothetical utility regarding revenue stability, annual gas demand, and seasonal fluctuations. Twenty-seven hypothetical industrial plant types have been specified. For each combustor in the plant, the fuel consumption by season, initial fuel type, fuel switching costs, conservation costs, and amount of fuel conservable is provided. The decision making takes place at the plant level and is aggregated to determine the impact to the utility. Section 2 discusses the factors affecting an industrial user's response to alternative rate designs. Section 3 describes the methodology, includes an overview of the model and an example industrial user's response to a set of fuel prices. The data describing the 27 hypothetical firms is in an appendix.

  7. Analysis and Assessment of Impacts on Biodiversity: Investigating Alternative Futures for the California Mojave Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-07-01

    development. That probability surface is the mechanism for creating alternative futures. In brief, the research team needed to “populate” the California...McKenzie, N. L., L. Belbin , C. R. Margules and G. J. Keighery. 1989. Selecting representative reserve systems in remote areas: A case study in the...Process consultation: its role in organization development. Addison- Wesley Publishing Company, Reading, Massachusetts, USA. Scott, J. M., B. Csuti

  8. Environmental Assessment: Construction and Operation of an Alternate Drone Launch System at Tyndall Air Force Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-01

    mission functions at Tyndall AFB. SECTION 1 – PURPOSE AND NEED FOR THE PROPOSED ACTION DRONEFINALEA_MAY08.DOC 1-2 1.3 Location of the Proposed Action...Environmental Planning Function when the alternative selected is located in jurisdictional wetlands/surface waters or floodplains. Regulations relevant to the... milkweed Asclepias viridula ce T Wet prairie Southern red lily Lilium catesbaei T Wet prairie Spoon-leafed sundew Drosera intermedia T Wet prairie

  9. An alternative low-loss stack topology for vanadium redox flow battery: Comparative assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro, Federico; Trovò, Andrea; Bortolin, Stefano; Del, Davide, , Col; Guarnieri, Massimo

    2017-02-01

    Two vanadium redox flow battery topologies have been compared. In the conventional series stack, bipolar plates connect cells electrically in series and hydraulically in parallel. The alternative topology consists of cells connected in parallel inside stacks by means of monopolar plates in order to reduce shunt currents along channels and manifolds. Channelled and flat current collectors interposed between cells were considered in both topologies. In order to compute the stack losses, an equivalent circuit model of a VRFB cell was built from a 2D FEM multiphysics numerical model based on Comsol®, accounting for coupled electrical, electrochemical, and charge and mass transport phenomena. Shunt currents were computed inside the cells with 3D FEM models and in the piping and manifolds by means of equivalent circuits solved with Matlab®. Hydraulic losses were computed with analytical models in piping and manifolds and with 3D numerical analyses based on ANSYS Fluent® in the cell porous electrodes. Total losses in the alternative topology resulted one order of magnitude lower than in an equivalent conventional battery. The alternative topology with channelled current collectors exhibits the lowest shunt currents and hydraulic losses, with round-trip efficiency higher by about 10%, as compared to the conventional topology.

  10. Sequential cooling insert for turbine stator vane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Russel B

    2017-04-04

    A sequential flow cooling insert for a turbine stator vane of a small gas turbine engine, where the impingement cooling insert is formed as a single piece from a metal additive manufacturing process such as 3D metal printing, and where the insert includes a plurality of rows of radial extending impingement cooling air holes alternating with rows of radial extending return air holes on a pressure side wall, and where the insert includes a plurality of rows of chordwise extending second impingement cooling air holes on a suction side wall. The insert includes alternating rows of radial extending cooling air supply channels and return air channels that form a series of impingement cooling on the pressure side followed by the suction side of the insert.

  11. The fish embryo toxicity test as an animal alternative method in hazard and risk assessment and scientific research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Embry, Michelle R., E-mail: membry@ilsi.org [ILSI Health and Environmental Sciences Institute, 1156 15th Street, NW, Suite 200, Washington, DC 20005 (United States); Belanger, Scott E., E-mail: belanger.se@pg.com [Procter and Gamble, Central Product Safety, PO Box 538707, Miami Valley Innovation Center, Cincinnati, OH 45253-8707 (United States); Braunbeck, Thomas A., E-mail: braunbeck@zoo.uni-heidelberg.de [University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 230, Heidelberg D -69120 (Germany); Galay-Burgos, Malyka, E-mail: malyka.galay-burgos@ecetoc.org [European Centre for Ecotoxicology and Toxicology of Chemicals (ECETOC), 4 Avenue E. Van Nieuwenhuyse B-1160, Brussels (Belgium); Halder, Marlies, E-mail: marlies.halder@jrc.ec.europa.eu [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, In-Vitro Methods Unit TP-580 Ispra 21027 (Italy); Hinton, David E., E-mail: dhinton@duke.edu [Duke University, Nicholas School of the Environment, PO Box 90328, Durham, NC 27708, Unites States (United States); Leonard, Marc A., E-mail: mleonard@rd.loreal.com [L' Oreal Recherche Avancee, Unite d' Ecotoxicologie, 1 av. E. Schueller, 93601 Aulnay sous bois (France); Lillicrap, Adam, E-mail: Adam.lillicrap@niva.no [AstraZeneca, Freshwater Quarry, Brixham TQ5 8BA (United Kingdom); Norberg-King, Teresa, E-mail: norberg-king.teresa@epa.gov [U.S. EPA, Mid-Continent Ecology Division, 6201 Congdon Boulevard, Duluth, MN 55804-1636 (United States); Whale, Graham, E-mail: graham.whale@shell.com [Shell Global Solutions, Analytical Technology, P.O. Box 1, Chester CH1 3SH (United Kingdom)

    2010-04-15

    Animal alternatives research has historically focused on human safety assessments and has only recently been extended to environmental testing. This is particularly for those assays that involve the use of fish. A number of alternatives are being pursued by the scientific community including the fish embryo toxicity (FET) test, a proposed replacement alternative to the acute fish test. Discussion of the FET methodology and its application in environmental assessments on a global level was needed. With this emerging issue in mind, the ILSI Health and Environmental Sciences Institute (HESI) and the European Centre for Ecotoxicology and Toxicology of Chemicals (ECETOC) held an International Workshop on the Application of the Fish Embryo Test as an Animal Alternative Method in Hazard and Risk Assessment and Scientific Research in March, 2008. The workshop included approximately 40 scientists and regulators representing government, industry, academia, and non-governmental organizations from North America, Europe, and Asia. The goal was to review the state of the science regarding the investigation of fish embryonic tests, pain and distress in fish, emerging approaches utilizing fish embryos, and the use of fish embryo toxicity test data in various types of environmental assessments (e.g., hazard, risk, effluent, and classification and labeling of chemicals). Some specific key outcomes included agreement that risk assessors need fish data for decision-making, that extending the FET to include eluethereombryos was desirable, that relevant endpoints are being used, and that additional endpoints could facilitate additional uses beyond acute toxicity testing. The FET was, however, not yet considered validated sensu OECD. An important action step will be to provide guidance on how all fish tests can be used to assess chemical hazard and to harmonize the diverse terminology used in test guidelines adopted over the past decades. Use of the FET in context of effluent assessments

  12. The fish embryo toxicity test as an animal alternative method in hazard and risk assessment and scientific research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embry, Michelle R; Belanger, Scott E; Braunbeck, Thomas A; Galay-Burgos, Malyka; Halder, Marlies; Hinton, David E; Léonard, Marc A; Lillicrap, Adam; Norberg-King, Teresa; Whale, Graham

    2010-04-15

    Animal alternatives research has historically focused on human safety assessments and has only recently been extended to environmental testing. This is particularly for those assays that involve the use of fish. A number of alternatives are being pursued by the scientific community including the fish embryo toxicity (FET) test, a proposed replacement alternative to the acute fish test. Discussion of the FET methodology and its application in environmental assessments on a global level was needed. With this emerging issue in mind, the ILSI Health and Environmental Sciences Institute (HESI) and the European Centre for Ecotoxicology and Toxicology of Chemicals (ECETOC) held an International Workshop on the Application of the Fish Embryo Test as an Animal Alternative Method in Hazard and Risk Assessment and Scientific Research in March, 2008. The workshop included approximately 40 scientists and regulators representing government, industry, academia, and non-governmental organizations from North America, Europe, and Asia. The goal was to review the state of the science regarding the investigation of fish embryonic tests, pain and distress in fish, emerging approaches utilizing fish embryos, and the use of fish embryo toxicity test data in various types of environmental assessments (e.g., hazard, risk, effluent, and classification and labeling of chemicals). Some specific key outcomes included agreement that risk assessors need fish data for decision-making, that extending the FET to include eluethereombryos was desirable, that relevant endpoints are being used, and that additional endpoints could facilitate additional uses beyond acute toxicity testing. The FET was, however, not yet considered validated sensu OECD. An important action step will be to provide guidance on how all fish tests can be used to assess chemical hazard and to harmonize the diverse terminology used in test guidelines adopted over the past decades. Use of the FET in context of effluent assessments

  13. ATLAS - Liquid Cooling Systems

    CERN Multimedia

    Bonneau, P.

    1998-01-01

    Photo 1 - Cooling Unit - Side View Photo 2 - Cooling Unit - Detail Manifolds Photo 3 - Cooling Unit - Rear View Photo 4 - Cooling Unit - Detail Pump, Heater and Exchanger Photo 5 - Cooling Unit - Detail Pump and Fridge Photo 6 - Cooling Unit - Front View

  14. Secondary Analysis of Large-Scale Assessment Data: An Alternative to Variable-Centred Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Kui Foon; Kennedy, Kerry John

    2014-01-01

    International large-scale assessments are now part of the educational landscape in many countries and often feed into major policy decisions. Yet, such assessments also provide data sets for secondary analysis that can address key issues of concern to educators and policymakers alike. Traditionally, such secondary analyses have been based on a…

  15. Nonproliferation and arms control assessment of weapons-usable fissile material storage and excess plutonium disposition alternatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    This report has been prepared by the Department of Energy`s Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation (DOE-NN) with support from the Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (DOE-MD). Its purpose is to analyze the nonproliferation and arms reduction implications of the alternatives for storage of plutonium and HEU, and disposition of excess plutonium, to aid policymakers and the public in making final decisions. While this assessment describes the benefits and risks associated with each option, it does not attempt to rank order the options or choose which ones are best. It does, however, identify steps which could maximize the benefits and mitigate any vulnerabilities of the various alternatives under consideration.

  16. The Osteoporosis Self-Assessment Tool versus alternative tests for selecting postmenopausal women for bone mineral density assessment: a comparative systematic review of accuracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rud, B; Hilden, J; Hyldstrup, L

    2008-01-01

    We performed a systematic review of studies comparing the Osteoporosis Self-Assessment Tool (OST) and other tests used to select women for bone mineral density (BMD) assessment. In comparative meta-analyses, we found that the accuracy of OST was similar to other tests that are based on information...... postmenopausal women for bone mineral density (BMD) assessment by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Previous studies suggest that OST, based on age and weight only, may be as accurate as more complex triage tests. We systematically compare the accuracy of OST and alternative triage tests in postmenopausal women....... RESULTS: Summary estimates of DOR for OST and the clinical decision rules Simple Calculated Osteoporosis Risk Estimation (SCORE) and Osteoporosis Risk Assessment Instrument (ORAI) did not differ significantly in white women (relative sDOR: 0.57-1.17, all p >/= 0.11). By contrast, sDOR was higher...

  17. Environmental assessment of gasification technology for biomass conversion to energy in comparison with other alternatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, T Lan T; Hermansen, John Erik; Nielsen, Rasmus Glar

    2013-01-01

    on gasification technology appears to be more environmentally friendly than straw direct combustion in all impact categories considered. The comparison with coal results in the same conclusion as that reached in the comparison with straw direct combustion. The comparison with natural gas shows that using straw...... gas as an alternative energy source reduces global warming, non-renewable energy use and eutrophication but increases acidification and respiratory inorganics. The relative performance of straw gasification versus direct combustion and fossil fuel references does not change with varying assumptions...

  18. Assessment of an alternative postdeployment reintegration strategy with soldiers returning from Iraq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipos, Maurice L; Foran, Heather M; Wood, Michael D; Wright, Kathleen M; Barnhart, Vincent J; Riviere, Lyndon A; Adler, Amy B

    2014-05-01

    The present study examined behavioral health outcomes, risk behaviors, aggression, alcohol misuse, marital satisfaction, and attitudes toward reintegration associated with an alternative, front-loaded reintegration strategy compared with a more standardized reintegration process in soldiers returning from combat deployments. The type of reintegration strategy used did not predict differences in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, alcohol misuse, aggression, and marital satisfaction, although slightly higher reports of risk behaviors were found in the unit using the standard reintegration approach even after controlling for demographic covariates and combat exposure. These findings may help guide leadership when making decisions regarding reintegration approaches in the future.

  19. Environmental Assessment of Alternate Training Area Jack Pine Flats Idaho Department of Lands Near Coolin, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    Permit/Lease Area for SERE School Alternate Training Jack Pine Flats SERE School Permit Area - ·llo<mdNy IBJ Hon Spoc [:::::J ~1’.1 --~ N W+E s...Requisite to Protect Public Health and Welfare with an Adequate Margin of Safety, EPA/ONAC 550/9-74-004, March 1974. Available online : http://www...Preservation Office. Available online : http://www.idahohistory.net/SHPO. IDFG 2005. Idaho Department ofFish and Game Special Use Permit- Game Take

  20. Assessment of phonology in preschool African American Vernacular English speakers using an alternate response mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laing, Sandra P

    2003-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether an adapted stimulus elicitation format would reduce the amount of final consonant absence in African American Vernacular English (AAVE) speakers and to determine the extent to which the adapted and standard response formats would differ in their predictions of membership in a delayed and a typical group. Findings revealed that the alternate response mode resulted in statistically significant decreases in the use of final consonant absence and that it was less likely than the standard response mode to penalize the AAVE speaker to a degree that was clinically significant.

  1. The development of a realistic source term for sodium-cooled fast reactors : assessment of current status and future needs.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Phillips, Jesse; Parma, Edward J., Jr.; Olivier, Tara Jean; Middleton, Bobby D.

    2011-06-01

    Sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFRs) continue to be proposed and designed throughout the United States and the world. Although the number of SFRs actually operating has declined substantially since the 1980s, a significant interest in advancing these types of reactor systems remains. Of the many issues associated with the development and deployment of SFRs, one of high regulatory importance is the source term to be used in the siting of the reactor. A substantial amount of modeling and experimental work has been performed over the past four decades on accident analysis, sodium coolant behavior, and radionuclide release for SFRs. The objective of this report is to aid in determining the gaps and issues related to the development of a realistic, mechanistically derived source term for SFRs. This report will allow the reader to become familiar with the severe accident source term concept and gain a broad understanding of the current status of the models and experimental work. Further, this report will allow insight into future work, in terms of both model development and experimental validation, which is necessary in order to develop a realistic source term for SFRs.

  2. Analysis and Assessments of Combined Cooling, Heating and Power Systems in Various Operation Modes for a Building in China, Dalian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huanan Li

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Combined Cooling, Heating and Power (CCHP systems have been widely used in different kinds of buildings to make better use of fuels because of their high overall efficiency. This paper presents a mathematical analysis of a CCHP system in comparison to a Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC system. The operation strategies following electric load (FEL, thermal load (FTL and a hybrid electric-thermal load (FHL are proposed and investigated in this study. Criteria, namely primary energy saving (PES, exergy efficiency (ηexergy, and CO2 emission reduction (CER are defined to evaluate the performances of CCHP systems for a hypothetical building located in Dalian (China. The results indicate that: (1 a new mathematical foundation is established to find whether the recovered thermal energy and the amount of electricity generated by the power generation unit (PGU are enough to provide the energy required; (2 the CCHP system does not always perform better than a HVAC system from an instantaneous perspective, especially in FTL mode; (3 the CCHP system in FEL operation mode can be seen as a suitable energy system in Dalian from the annual performance perspective. Furthermore, a sensitivity analysis is presented in order to show how the performances vary due to the changes of various technical variables.

  3. Evaluation of different end-of-life management alternatives for used natural cork stoppers through life cycle assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demertzi, Martha; Dias, Ana Cláudia; Matos, Arlindo; Arroja, Luís Manuel

    2015-12-01

    An important aspect of sustainable development is the implementation of effective and sustainable waste management strategies. The present study focuses on a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) approach to different waste management strategies for natural cork stoppers, namely incineration at a municipal solid waste incinerator, landfilling in a sanitary landfill, and recycling. In the literature, there are no LCA studies analyzing in detail the end-of-life stage of natural cork stoppers as well as other cork products. In addition, cork is usually treated as wood at the end-of-life stage. Thus, the outcome of this study can provide an important insight into this matter. The results showed that different management alternatives, namely incineration and recycling, could be chosen depending on the impact category considered. The former alternative presented the best environmental results in the impact categories of climate change, ozone depletion and acidification, while the latter for photochemical ozone formation and mineral and fossil resource depletion. The landfilling alternative did not present the best environmental performance in any of the impact categories. However, when the biogenic carbon dioxide emission was assessed for the climate change category, the landfilling alternative was found to be the most effective since most of the biogenic carbon would be permanently stored in the cork products and not emitted into the atmosphere. A sensitivity analysis was performed and the results showed that there are various parameters that can significantly influence the results (e.g., carbon content in cork and decay rate of cork in the landfill). Thus, LCA studies should include a detailed description concerning their assumptions when the end-of-life stage is included in the boundaries since they can influence the results, and furthermore, to facilitate the comparison of different end-of-life scenarios. The present study and the obtained results could be useful for the

  4. Assessment of Alternative Scenarios for CO2 Reduction Potential in the Residential Building Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Sun Jeong

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The South Korean government announced its goals of reducing the country’s CO2 emissions by up to 30% below the business as usual (BAU projections by 2020 in 2009 and 37% below BAU projections by 2030 in 2015. This paper explores the potential energy savings and reduction in CO2 emissions offered by residential building energy efficiency policies and plans in South Korea. The current and future energy consumption and CO2 emissions in the residential building were estimated using an energy–environment model from 2010 to 2030. The business as usual scenario is based on the energy consumption characteristic of residential buildings using the trends related to socio-economic prospects and the number of dwellings. The alternative scenarios took into account energy efficiency for new residential buildings (scenario I, refurbishment of existing residential buildings (scenario II, use of highly efficient boilers (scenario III, and use of a solar thermal energy system (scenario IV. The results show that energy consumption in the residential building sector will increase by 33% between 2007 and 2030 in the BAU scenario. Maximum reduction in CO2 emissions in the residential building sector of South Korea was observed by 2030 in scenario I. In each alternative scenario analysis, CO2 emissions were 12.9% lower than in the business as usual scenario by the year 2030.

  5. Assessment Alternative Energy for Organic Rankine Cycle Power Plant in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nattaporn Chaiyat

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the possibility of power generation by using alternative energy in Thailand which are geothermal energy, solar energy and waste energy based on the energy and economy indicators. An Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC is used to generate electricity from heat sources of hot springs, solar water heating system and RDF-5, respectively. In this study, a 20 kW ORC system with using R-245fa as working fluid was tested and evaluated the system efficiency. It could be found that the efficiency of ORC system was around 8%, when hot water temperature was higher than 100 ºC. The values of levelized electricity costs (LEC of geothermal energy, solar energy and waste energy were 0.148, 0.547 and 0.442 USD/kWh, respectively. The suitable alternative energy for generating electricity was the geothermal energy which was beneficial than the solar and waste energy power plants in terms of energy and economy results.

  6. Final environmental assessment of habitat management alternatives on Arapaho National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This environmental assessment describes the history of the refuge and how the management strategies affect the refuge. Topics covered include a purpose and need for...

  7. Life cycle approach to sustainability assessment: a case study of remanufactured alternators

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schau, Erwin M; Traverso, Marzia; Finkbeiner, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    .... For the environmental dimension, life cycle assessment (LCA) has been practiced for nearly 40 years and is the only one standardised by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) (14040 and 14044...

  8. OLYMPIAD IN THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE AS A FORM OF ALTERNATIVE LANGUAGE ASSESSMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Bolshakova, E.

    2015-01-01

    Although a variety of the English language written olympiads (language competitions) exist, fairly little is known about how they are different from traditional forms of language assessment. In Russia, olympiads in the English language are now gaining currency because they provide an opportunity to reveal creative thinking and intellectual abilities of pupils. The present study examined major differences between language olympiads and traditional forms of language assessment. A comparison of ...

  9. CoolSim: using industrial modeling techniques to examine the impact of selective head cooling in a model of perinatal regionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, James; Geva, Alon; Zheng, Zheng; Zupancic, John A F

    2008-01-01

    A selective head-cooling device for the treatment of moderate to severe hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for use in the United States. To reflect the complexity of health care delivery at the systems level, we used the industrial modeling technique of discrete event simulation to analyze the impact of various deployment strategies for selective head cooling and its partner technology, amplitude-integrated electroencephalography. We modeled the course through the perinatal system of all births in Massachusetts over a 1-year period. Cohort and care characteristics were drawn from existing databases. Results of a recently published trial were used to estimate the effects of selective head cooling. One thousand cohort replications were conducted to assess uncertainty. Several policy alternatives were examined, including no use of selective head cooling and scenarios that altered the number and placement of selective head-cooling and amplitude-integrated electroencephalography units throughout the state. Patient-level outcome and cost data were assessed. For all scenarios tested, the use of amplitude-integrated electroencephalography/selective head cooling resulted in better outcomes at lower cost. However, substantial differences in transfer rates, failure-to-cool rates, and total costs were seen across scenarios. Optimal decision-making regarding the number and placement of devices led to a 16% improvement in cost savings and a 10-fold decrease in failure-to-cool rates, compared with other deployment scenarios. These results were insensitive to significant changes in model inputs. On the basis of currently available data, the package of amplitude-integrated electroencephalography and selective head cooling seems to be an economically desirable intervention. Quantifiable techniques to assess system-wide technology performance provide a powerful approach to informing decisions regarding the structure and function of

  10. Targeted Health Assessment for Wastes Contained at the Niagara Falls Storage Site to Guide Planning for Remedial Action Alternatives - 13428

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busse, John; Keil, Karen; Staten, Jane; Miller, Neil; Barker, Michelle [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Buffalo District, 1776 Niagara Street, Buffalo, NY (United States); MacDonell, Margaret; Peterson, John; Chang, Young-Soo; Durham, Lisa [Argonne National Laboratory, Environmental Science Division, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is evaluating potential remedial alternatives at the 191-acre Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) in Lewiston, New York, under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) brought radioactive wastes to the site during the 1940's and 1950's, and the U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE) consolidated these wastes into a 10-acre interim waste containment structure (IWCS) in the southwest portion of the site during the 1980's. The USACE is evaluating remedial alternatives for radioactive waste contained within the IWCS at the NFSS under the Feasibility Study phase of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) process. A preliminary evaluation of the IWCS has been conducted to assess potential airborne releases associated with uncovered wastes, particularly during waste excavation, as well as direct exposures to uncovered wastes. Key technical issues for this assessment include: (1) limitations in waste characterization data; (2) representative receptors and exposure routes; (3) estimates of contaminant emissions at an early stage of the evaluation process; (4) consideration of candidate meteorological data and air dispersion modeling approaches; and (5) estimates of health effects from potential exposures to both radionuclides and chemicals that account for recent updates of exposure and toxicity factors. Results of this preliminary health risk assessment indicate if the wastes were uncovered and someone stayed at the IWCS for a number of days to weeks, substantial doses and serious health effects could be incurred. Current controls prevent such exposures, and the controls that would be applied to protect onsite workers during remedial action at the IWCS would also effectively protect the public nearby. This evaluation provides framing context for the upcoming development and detailed

  11. Cool visitors

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Pictured, from left to right: Tim Izo (saxophone, flute, guitar), Bobby Grant (tour manager), George Pajon (guitar). What do the LHC and a world-famous hip-hop group have in common? They are cool! On Saturday, 1st July, before their appearance at the Montreux Jazz Festival, three members of the 'Black Eyed Peas' came on a surprise visit to CERN, inspired by Dan Brown's Angels and Demons. At short notice, Connie Potter (Head of the ATLAS secretariat) organized a guided tour of ATLAS and the AD 'antimatter factory'. Still curious, lead vocalist Will.I.Am met CERN physicist Rolf Landua after the concert to ask many more questions on particles, CERN, and the origin of the Universe.

  12. Alternative biomarkers for assessing glycemic control in diabetes: fructosamine, glycated albumin, and 1,5-anhydroglucitol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Eun

    2015-06-01

    The growing attention to alternative glycemic biomarkers including fructosamine, glycated albumin (GA), 1,5-anhydroglucitol (1,5-AG), is attributable to the limitations of the glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) assay. It is important to recognize the conditions in which HbA1c levels may be difficult to interpret. Serum fructosamine and GA have been proposed useful tools for monitoring of short-term glycemic control. These biomarkers not only reflect well glycemic control in hematologic disorder, but also represent postprandial glucose fluctuation. Serum 1,5-AG may be useful for estimating within-day glucose variation. Use of these nontraditional tests can be more helpful in the management of diabetes as complement traditional measures. Further larger cohort studies are warranted to determine whether nontraditional biomarkers have potential utility for early diagnosis, management of diabetes, and prevention of diabetic complications.

  13. Human-in-the-Loop Assessment of Alternative Clearances in Interval Management Arrival Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxley, Brian T.; Wilson, Sara R.; Swieringa, Kurt A.; Johnson, William C.; Roper, Roy D.; Hubbs, Clay E.; Goess, Paul A.; Shay, Richard F.

    2016-01-01

    Interval Management Alternative Clearances (IMAC) was a human-in-the-loop simulation experiment conducted to explore the Air Traffic Management (ATM) Technology Demonstration (ATD-1) Concept of Operations (ConOps), which combines advanced arrival scheduling, controller decision support tools, and aircraft avionics to enable multiple time deconflicted, efficient arrival streams into a high-density terminal airspace. Interval Management (IM) is designed to support the ATD-1 concept by having an "Ownship" (IM-capable) aircraft achieve or maintain a specific time or distance behind a "Target" (preceding) aircraft. The IM software uses IM clearance information and the Ownship data (route of flight, current location, and wind) entered by the flight crew, and the Target aircraft's Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast state data, to calculate the airspeed necessary for the IM-equipped aircraft to achieve or maintain the assigned spacing goal.

  14. Assessment of Etest as an alternative to agar dilution for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hsi; Taylor, Thomas H; Pettus, Kevin; Trees, David

    2014-05-01

    We studied whether the Etest can be used as an alternative to agar dilution to determine antimicrobial susceptibilities of ceftriaxone, cefixime, and cefpodoxime in Neisseria gonorrhoeae surveillance. One hundred fifteen clinical and laboratory isolates of N. gonorrhoeae were tested following the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA)-approved CLSI standard agar dilution method and, separately, by the Etest according to the manufacturer's recommendations. The MICs were determined and compared. Ten laboratory-generated mutants were used to simulate substantially nonsusceptible specimens. The Etest and agar dilution methods were well correlated. Statistical tests produced regression R2 values of 88%, 82%, and 85% and Pearson correlation coefficients of 92%, 91%, and 92% for ceftriaxone, cefixime, and cefpodoxime, respectively. When paired comparisons were made, the two tests were 88.7%, 80%, and 87% within 1 log2 dilution from each other for ceftriaxone, cefixime, and cefpodoxime, respectively. The within-2-log2 agreements were 99.1%, 98.3%, and 94.8% for ceftriaxone, cefixime, and cefpodoxime, respectively. Notwithstanding the good correlations and the within-2-log2 general agreement, the Etest results produced slightly lower MICs than the agar dilution results. In conclusion, we found that the Etest can be effectively used as an alternative to agar dilution testing to determine the susceptibility of N. gonorrhoeae to ceftriaxone, cefixime, and cefpodoxime, although we recommend further research into extremely resistant isolates. For isolates within the typical range of clinical MICs, reexamination of the Etest interpretation of susceptible and nonsusceptible categories would likely allow for successful transition from agar dilution to the Etest.

  15. Assessment of Proliferation Resistance of Closed Nuclear Fuel Cycle System with Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors Using INPRO Evaluation Methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young In; Hahn, Do Hee; Won, Byung Chool; Lee, Dong Uk

    2007-11-15

    Using the INPRO methodology, the proliferation resistance of an innovative nuclear energy system(INS) defined as a closed nuclear fuel cycle system consisting of KALIMER and pyroprocessing, has been assessed. Considering a very early development stage of the INS concept, the PR assessment is carried out based on intrinsic features, if required information and data are not available. The PR assessment of KALIMER and JSFR using the INPRO methodology affirmed that an adequate proliferation resistance has been achieved in both INSs CNFC-SFR, considering the assessor's progress and maturity of design development. KALIMER and JSFR are developed or being developed conforming to the targets and criteria defined for developing Gen IV nuclear reactor system. Based on these assessment results, proliferation resistance and physical protection(PR and PP) of KALIMER and JSFR are evaluated from the viewpoint of requirements for future nuclear fuel cycle system. The envisioned INSs CNFC-SFR rely on active plutonium management based on a closed fuel cycle, in which a fissile material is recycled in an integrated fuel cycle facility within proper safeguards. There is no isolated plutonium in the closed fuel cycle. The material remains continuously in a sequence of highly radioactive matrices within inaccessible facilities. The proliferation resistance assessment should be an ongoing analysis that keeps up with the progress and maturity of the design of Gen IV SFR.

  16. Assessment outcome is weakly correlated with lecture attendance: influence of learning style and use of alternative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Dane M; Wiederman, Steven D; Saint, David A

    2012-06-01

    The relation between lecture attendance and learning is surprisingly weak, and the role of learning styles in this is poorly understood. We hypothesized that 1) academic performance is related to lecture attendance and 2) learning style influences lecture attendance and, consequently, affects performance. We also speculated that the availability of alternative resources would affect this relationship. Second-year Bachelor of Science physiology students (n = 120) self-reported their lecture attendance in a block of 21 lectures (attendance not compulsory) and use of alternative resources. Overall self-reported lecture attendance was 73 ± 2%. Female students (n = 71) attended more lectures (16.4 ± 0.6) than male students (14.3 ± 0.08, n = 49) and achieved a higher composite mark in all assessments (73.6% vs. 69.3%, P lecture attendance (r = 0.29, n = 49, P lectures) reported significantly more use of lecture recordings (37 ± 8%, n = 15, vs. 10 ± 1%, n = 85, P Lecture attendance was not correlated with measured learning style. We concluded that lecture attendance is only weakly correlated with academic performance and is not related to learning style. The substitution of alternative materials for lecture attendance appears to have a greater role than learning style in determining academic outcomes.

  17. Marginal costs of water savings from cooling system retrofits: a case study for Texas power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loew, Aviva; Jaramillo, Paulina; Zhai, Haibo

    2016-10-01

    The water demands of power plant cooling systems may strain water supply and make power generation vulnerable to water scarcity. Cooling systems range in their rates of water use, capital investment, and annual costs. Using Texas as a case study, we examined the cost of retrofitting existing coal and natural gas combined-cycle (NGCC) power plants with alternative cooling systems, either wet recirculating towers or air-cooled condensers for dry cooling. We applied a power plant assessment tool to model existing power plants in terms of their key plant attributes and site-specific meteorological conditions and then estimated operation characteristics of retrofitted plants and retrofit costs. We determined the anticipated annual reductions in water withdrawals and the cost-per-gallon of water saved by retrofits in both deterministic and probabilistic forms. The results demonstrate that replacing once-through cooling at coal-fired power plants with wet recirculating towers has the lowest cost per reduced water withdrawals, on average. The average marginal cost of water withdrawal savings for dry-cooling retrofits at coal-fired plants is approximately 0.68 cents per gallon, while the marginal recirculating retrofit cost is 0.008 cents per gallon. For NGCC plants, the average marginal costs of water withdrawal savings for dry-cooling and recirculating towers are 1.78 and 0.037 cents per gallon, respectively.

  18. Alternative Methods for Assessing Mediation in Multilevel Data: The Advantages of Multilevel SEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preacher, Kristopher J.; Zhang, Zhen; Zyphur, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Multilevel modeling (MLM) is a popular way of assessing mediation effects with clustered data. Two important limitations of this approach have been identified in prior research and a theoretical rationale has been provided for why multilevel structural equation modeling (MSEM) should be preferred. However, to date, no empirical evidence of MSEM's…

  19. Positron range in PET imaging: an alternative approach for assessing and correcting the blurring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jødal, Lars; Le Loirec, Cindy; Champion, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    of positron emission is relevant for assessing statistical noise. Aims: The paper aims to determine positron range distribution relevant for blurring for seven medically relevant PET isotopes, 18F, 11C, 13N, 15O, 68Ga, 62Cu, and 82Rb, and derive empirical formulas for the distributions. The paper focuses...

  20. Assessing Training Priorities in Developing Countries: Current Practice and Possible Alternatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psacharopoulos, George

    1984-01-01

    This essay deals with a series of methodological issues involved in assessing training priorities in developing countries. It is argued that the present methods of arriving at these priorities leave much to be desired, and a number of suggestions are made that might lead to more informed policy decisions on education and training. (CT)

  1. The Role of Responsive Choreography in Alternative Assessment: Sequencing Writing Tasks To Support Concept Assimilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, Kathryn A.

    In an attempt to understand, holistically, how teachers make sense of their classrooms and how they use assessment to facilitate learning, this paper explores the use of a metaphor, "responsive choreography," to examine instruction in one classroom. "Responsive choreography" describes the subtle interplay or "dance" between the learner and the…

  2. Virtual shopping: A viable alternative to direct assessment of real life function?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Kathryn E; Morris, Robin; Smith, Vanessa; Jones, Anna-Marie; Pearman, Douglas; Wykes, Til

    2016-04-01

    Real-life function is markedly impaired in schizophrenia and is an important outcome for interventions, but direct assessment is time consuming and resource intensive. Virtual reality (VR) enables assessment using simulation, akin to real life (RL), but allowing greater experimental control, reliability, and a more timely assessment. This study explores whether VR simulation predicts RL performance in supermarket shopping and how both relate to underlying cognitive abilities. Forty three people with DSM-IV schizophrenia were included in the study. Participants were required to shop for items using a self-directed search in both RL and VR. In each task, accuracy (number of correct items) and efficiency (time taken and number of aisles entered) were measured. IQ, executive function, working memory, spatial memory and social cognition were also assessed. Specific correlations were found between RL accuracy and VR accuracy, and between RL and VR efficiency measures. Multiple regression analyses indicated that VR efficiency measures contributed significant unique variance to RL efficiency outcomes, in addition to that explained by background cognitive measures, with a final model predicting 58% of variance in RL efficiency. VR functional shopping measures may enhance predictions of real life performance, over and above existing cognitive test procedures, and provide a more time-efficient method for evaluating real life outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Alternative considerations for environmental oversight training: Results from a needs assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, C.; Hensley, J.

    1995-11-01

    For staff to perform their jobs effectively and efficiently, they must be adequately trained. Well-trained staff are also more likely to be satisfied with their jobs and to remain with a given organization. In addition to hiring staff with relevant backgrounds and skills, critical steps in maintaining adequately trained staff are to analyze skill levels needed for the various tasks that personnel are required to perform and to provide training to improve staff s skill base. This first analysis is commonly referred to as a training needs assessment. Training needs are usually determined by defining the tasks required for a particular job and the associated knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary to adequately accomplish these tasks. The Office of Northwestern Area Programs of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Environmental Management (EM) oversees environmental remediation activities in the Chicago, Idaho, Oakland, and Richland Operations Offices. For this organization to effectively carry out its mission, its staff need to be as proficient as possible in the appropriate knowledge and skills. Therefore, a training needs assessment was conducted to determine staff`s level of knowledge and proficiency in various skills. The purpose of the assessment was to: (1) Examine the types of activities or tasks in which staff are involved, (2) Determine the skills needed to perform relevant tasks, and (3) Assess gaps in knowledge and skills for the tasks performed in order to suggest opportunities for skill development.

  4. Comparison of analytic hierarchy process and conjoint analysis methods in assessing treatment alternatives in stroke rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IJzerman, Maarten Joost; Bridges, J.F.; van Til, Janine Astrid

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: There has been increasing interest novel HTA methods that will incorporate patient preferences in a more transparent and scientifi cally valid way. The fundamental problem of the assessment of benefi ts in HTA is the identifi cation, ranking and valuation of multiple health care outcomes

  5. Iranian University Students' Experiences of and Attitudes Towards Alternatives in Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Karim; Abolfazli Khonbi, Zainab

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of assessment type (self vs. peer vs. teacher) on university students' academic achievement and students' attitudes toward them. In the main study, 82 undergraduate English-as-a-Foreign-Language students in four classes at three universities in Iran were randomly assigned into one of self-, peer- and…

  6. Bayesian Comparison of Alternative Graded Response Models for Performance Assessment Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaowen; Stone, Clement A.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the relative effectiveness of Bayesian model comparison methods in selecting an appropriate graded response (GR) model for performance assessment applications. Three popular methods were considered: deviance information criterion (DIC), conditional predictive ordinate (CPO), and posterior predictive model checking (PPMC). Using…

  7. Assessing alternative production options for eco-efficient food supply chains using multi-objective optimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banasik, Aleksander; Kanellopoulos, Argyris; Claassen, G.D.H.; Bloemhof-Ruwaard, Jacqueline M.; Vorst, van der Jack G.A.J.

    2017-01-01

    Due to tremendous losses of resources in modern food supply chains, higher priority should be given to reducing food waste and environmental impacts of food production. In practice, multiple production options are available, but must be quantitatively assessed with respect to economic and

  8. Conservation without Conversation? An Alternative, Non-Verbal Paradigm for Assessing Conservation of Liquid Quantity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheldall, Kevin; Poborca, Barbara

    1980-01-01

    A nonverbal paradigm for assessing conservation based on an operant discrimination learning procedure is described. Initial results suggest that young children who could not conserve within the traditional verbal procedure were more likely to demonstrate conservation within the nonverbal paradigm and that traditional Piagetian tasks are verbally…

  9. Sustainability impact assessment of forest management alternatives in Europe: an introductory background and framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carnus, J.M.; Hengeveld, G.M.; Mason, B.

    2012-01-01

    Adaptation of forest management practices in the context of rapid climatic and socioeconomic changes is a global concern. Stakeholders in the forest-based sector as well as policy makers need improved methods and tools to assess potential impacts of changes in management on sustainability

  10. Open-ended questions: An alternative mode to assess the students' performance in concept development and use of scientific vocabulary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agairre-Ortiz, Maria

    1998-10-01

    Important reform movements across the nation recognize that improved science performance, language development, and alternative assessment are national priorities. This study examined the effect of two modes of alternative assessment on students' performance in in-depth concept development (IDC) and use of scientific vocabulary (VOC). The research questions asked for significant differences in students' performance in IDC and VOC across time regarding: (1) mode of assessment, (2) science achievement level, and classes. The study also investigated what are the: (1) students' opinions and feelings about the assessment modes (2) similarities and differences between OE-W and OE-D groups regarding the quality of IDC and VOC used. The sample of convenience included one hundred and four fifth grade LEP students randomly assigned to two groups. Students in both groups were asked to answer the same open-ended question at three assessment times during the study of a chapter on electricity and magnetism. Students in group one were asked to answer the question by writing paragraphs and students in group two answered the same question by making drawings. Results from a four-way repeated measures analysis showed that students in the OE-D mode, especially above-average performed better in in-depth concept development than those in the writing mode across time. The non-significant four-way interaction suggests that the differences in assessment mode across time are not influenced by science achievement level and the classes. The results suggest that although the OE-D mode in general yielded better scores, both modes of assessment could be used to assess Spanish-dominant LEP students' conceptual development and scientific vocabulary use. In general, students expressed preference for OE-D because they felt more confident and comfortable answering questions by drawing. Most of the statistical results were supported by the qualitative analysis for both dependent variables. Small size

  11. Embodied Energy Assessment and Comparisons for a Residential Building Using Conventional and Alternative Materials in Indian Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naveen Kishore, K.; Chouhan, J. S.

    2014-06-01

    Building sector is responsible for 40 % of the primary energy use and 24 % of carbon dioxide emissions in India. The main source of green house gas emissions from buildings is due to energy consumption. This paper aims to assess the embodied energy index and environmental impact of a two storied residential building. The study proposes various alternative materials which can be used in day to day construction in order to mitigate the environmental impact and climate change due to construction activity in India. Two types of construction techniques have been considered for the study, namely load bearing and reinforced concrete framed construction. Embodied energy and carbon dioxide emissions of walling and roofing components using conventional and alternative materials has also been analyzed and compared. The comparison is done based on two parameters namely, embodied energy/m2 and CO2 emissions per unit of floor area. The study shows that bricks, cement and steel are the three major contributors to the energy cost of constructing a building by conventional methods. A conventional two storied load bearing structure is 22 % more energy efficient when compared to a reinforced concrete structure. It has also been observed from the study that use of alternative material in the building envelope gives embodied energy savings between 50 and 60 % for a two storey load bearing structure and 30-42 % for a two storey reinforced concrete structure. Hence a load bearing construction is certainly a better alternative to RC framed construction for up to two storied structures in terms of embodied energy and environmental impacts.

  12. Deterioration of bioplastic carrier bags in the environment and assessment of a new recycling alternative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accinelli, Cesare; Saccà, Maria Ludovica; Mencarelli, Mariangela; Vicari, Alberto

    2012-09-01

    Increasing environmental concerns and the introduction of technologies based on renewable resources have stimulated the replacement of persistent petroleum-derived plastics with biodegradable plastics from biopolymers. As a consequence, a variety of products are currently manufactured from bioplastic, including carrier bags. This series of studies investigated the deterioration of carrier bags made with Mater-Bi (MB), a starch-based bioplastic, in soil, compost and two aquatic ecosystems, a littoral marsh and seawater. Results from the laboratory study indicated that bioplastic carrier bags were rapidly deteriorated in soil and compost. After three months of incubation, weight loss of specimens was of 37% and 43% in soil and compost, respectively. Conversely, little deterioration was observed in specimens buried in soil under field conditions or exposed to water of a littoral marsh and of the Adriatic Sea. These findings were consistent with the greater number of bacteria and especially fungi capable of degrading MB that were recovered from soil and compost with respect to the two aquatic ecosystems. Considering that a variety of microbial isolates are capable of using MB as a source of carbon, a new alternative to recycle these MB-based carrier bags was explored. More specifically, starchy residues from bags were fermented by the fungus Rhizopus oryzae to produce up to 35 mg of lactic acid per g of bag residues.

  13. Towards a systemic assessment of environmental impact (SAEI regarding alternative hydrosedimentological management practice in the Canal del Dique, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonel Vega Mora

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The Canal del Dique, located on the Colombian Caribbean Coast, can be seen as an "artificial" branch of the River Magdalena. Since its inception in 1650, it has undergone a series of interventions aimed at optimising river navigation between Cartagena and the interior of the country, little consideration having been paid to institutional, economic, social and environmental impacts.This paper presents a systemic assessment of environmental impact (SAEI methodology, based on systemic parameterisation of the environment, proposed by Vega [2011], for the strategic environmental assessment of policy, plans, programmes or large-scale projects, considering a case study of the Canal del Dique environmental rehabilitation as proposed by the Colombian government.Information arising from the framework of an inter-administrative agreement between the Universidad Nacional de Colombia and the Regional Autonomous Corporation for the Rio Grande de la Magdalena (CORMAGDALENA was used for studying the environmental restoration of and navigation in the Canal del Dique [UN-LEH, 2008]. The authors developed and summarised SAEI regarding six alternatives for hydrosedimentological management in the canal to obtain results concerning environmental impairment or improvement regarding each factor considered, and the degree of aggressiveness or betterment involved in each alternative.Alternative 4, an enhanced version of current condition (ECC would have produced the greatest environmental benefit (i.e. limited dredging plus optimising channel-wetland interconnection requiring the narrowing of three straight reaches along the canal and the construction of a sluice-gate system in the Strait of Paracuica (near the town of El Recreo.

  14. Energy conservation with alternative `silent` (passive) cooling systems in office buildings and energetic evaluation of cold generation for `silent cooling`. German contribution to the IEA Programme ECBS Annex 28, low energy cooling. Final report; Energieeinsparung durch den Einsatz von alternativen Systemen der `stillen` (passiven) Kuehlung in Buerogebaeuden und energetische Bewertung der Kaelteerzeugung fuer die `stille Kuehlung`. Deutsche Beteiligung an dem IEA-Programm ECBS Annex 28, low energy cooling. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laabs, K.D.; Wolkenhauer, H. [STULZ GmbH, Hamburg (Germany); Heinrich, G.; Franzke, U.; Seifert, C. [Institut fuer Luft- und Kaeltetechnik GmbH, Dresden (Germany); Steimle, F.; Mengede, B. [Essen Univ. (Gesamthochschule) (Germany). Inst. fuer Angewandte Thermodynamik und Klimatechnik

    1997-06-01

    In July 1993 a 3 years lasting research and development projekt, which deals with silent cooling systems (cold ceilings and cold beams), was started by the BMBF. During this projekt different tools, which allow the design of silent cooling systems, were developed in cooperation of the company STULZ GmbH Klimatechnik (coordination), the University of Essen and the ILK in Dresden. During this projekt different silent cooling systems were investigated in cooperation of the three organizations. These investigations were correlated with existing and available results form theoretical and practical investigations and publications. Main element of the investigated systems are cold surfaces and/or heat exchangers, which are installed in standard offices with different arrangements and forms. The heat transfer at the surfaces bases on free convection, which depends on the difference between the surfaces temperature and the air temperature inside the offices. By using water instead of air as heat distribution medium inside the building, it is possible to reduce the energy consumption in comparison to conventional air conditioning systems. Different variants of these systems were investigated under various operation parameters, so that a design tool could be developed by using the results form the investigations. (orig.) [Deutsch] Unter dem Thema: Einsatz von Systemen der `Stillen (passiven) Kuehlung` wurde im Juli 1993 ein Forschungsvorhaben mit einer Laufzeit von 3 Jahren vom BMBF gestartet. Im Rahmen dieses Forschungsvorhabens werden unter Fuehrung der Fa. STULZ GmbH Klimatechnik und in Kooperation mit der UNI Essen und des ILK Dresden verschiedene TOOLS zur Auslegung von Deckenkuehlsystemen erarbeitet. Auf der Grundlage bekannter und vorliegender theoretischer wissenschaftlicher Erkenntnisse der gebaeudebezogenen Klimatechnik sowie Veroeffentlichungen bundesdeutscher Forschungseinrichtungen und Hochschulinstitute relevanter Arbeitsbereiche wurde gemeinsam mit technischen

  15. Why Current Doppler Ultrasound Methodology Is Inaccurate in Assessing Cerebral Venous Return: The Alternative of the Ultrasonic Jugular Venous Pulse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Zamboni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of cerebral venous return is growing interest for potential application in clinical practice. Doppler ultrasound (DUS was used as a screening tool. However, three meta-analyses of qualitative DUS protocol demonstrate a big heterogeneity among studies. In an attempt to improve accuracy, several authors alternatively measured the flow rate, based on the product of the time average velocity with the cross-sectional area (CSA. However, also the quantification protocols lacked of the necessary accuracy. The reasons are as follows: (a automatic measurement of the CSA assimilates the jugular to a circle, while it is elliptical; (b the use of just a single CSA value in a pulsatile vessel is inaccurate; (c time average velocity assessment can be applied only in laminar flow. Finally, the tutorial describes alternative ultrasound calculation of flow based on the Womersley method, which takes into account the variation of the jugular CSA overtime. In the near future, it will be possible to synchronize the electrocardiogram with the brain inflow (carotid distension wave and with the outflow (jugular venous pulse in order to nicely have a noninvasive ultrasound picture of the brain-heart axis. US jugular venous pulse may have potential use in neurovascular, neurocognitive, neurosensorial, and neurodegenerative disorders.

  16. Why Current Doppler Ultrasound Methodology Is Inaccurate in Assessing Cerebral Venous Return: The Alternative of the Ultrasonic Jugular Venous Pulse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamboni, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of cerebral venous return is growing interest for potential application in clinical practice. Doppler ultrasound (DUS) was used as a screening tool. However, three meta-analyses of qualitative DUS protocol demonstrate a big heterogeneity among studies. In an attempt to improve accuracy, several authors alternatively measured the flow rate, based on the product of the time average velocity with the cross-sectional area (CSA). However, also the quantification protocols lacked of the necessary accuracy. The reasons are as follows: (a) automatic measurement of the CSA assimilates the jugular to a circle, while it is elliptical; (b) the use of just a single CSA value in a pulsatile vessel is inaccurate; (c) time average velocity assessment can be applied only in laminar flow. Finally, the tutorial describes alternative ultrasound calculation of flow based on the Womersley method, which takes into account the variation of the jugular CSA overtime. In the near future, it will be possible to synchronize the electrocardiogram with the brain inflow (carotid distension wave) and with the outflow (jugular venous pulse) in order to nicely have a noninvasive ultrasound picture of the brain-heart axis. US jugular venous pulse may have potential use in neurovascular, neurocognitive, neurosensorial, and neurodegenerative disorders.

  17. Solid-state fermentation and composting as alternatives to treat hair waste: A life-cycle assessment comparative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalán, Eva; Komilis, Dimitrios; Sánchez, Antoni

    2017-07-01

    One of the wastes associated with leather production in tannery industries is the hair residue generated during the dehairing process. Hair wastes are mainly dumped or managed through composting but recent studies propose the treatment of hair wastes through solid-state fermentation (SSF) to obtain proteases and compost. These enzymes are suitable for its use in an enzymatic dehairing process, as an alternative to the current chemical dehairing process. In the present work, two different scenarios for the valorization of the hair waste are proposed and assessed by means of life-cycle assessment: composting and SSF for protease production. Detailed data on hair waste composting and on SSF protease production are gathered from previous studies performed by our research group and from a literature survey. Background inventory data are mainly based on Ecoinvent version 3 from software SimaPro® 8. The main aim of this study was to identify which process results in the highest environmental impact. The SSF process was found to have lower environmental impacts than composting, due to the fact that the enzyme use in the dehairing process prevents the use of chemicals traditionally used in the dehairing process. This permits to reformulate an industrial process from the classical approach of waste management to a novel alternative based on circular economy.

  18. A Road Network for Freight Transport in Flanders: Multi-Actor Multi-Criteria Assessment of Alternative Ring Ways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathy Macharis

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Even though road transport is an essential part of freight distribution, there is a lack of customized routing networks to convey freight over the road. The present paper addresses this deficit by proposing general principles to elaborate a regional freight route network in Flanders. However, assigning regional freight traffic to a particular road network involves complex trade-offs between multiple interests, such as corporate accessibility, communal livability, additional network links and available space. The paper recommends the multi-actor multi-criteria assessment tool (MAMCA to incorporate stakeholder objectives in the evaluation of possible freight network scenarios. The tool is applied for the specific case of Anzegem, a road village amid regional freight attraction poles that suffers particularly from heavy freight flows. The impact of four alternative ring ways is assessed according to the interests of the involved parties and compared to the reference scenario. Results show that transport companies advocate supra-local accessibility, while governmental and citizen stakeholders value traffic safety and livability. Since the reference scenario does not comply with these critical stakeholder objectives, an alternate scenario is proposed. As such, MAMCA applications assist policy-makers in building consensus among multiple actors in the realization of transportation projects.

  19. Assessment of Energy Storage Alternatives in the Puget Sound Energy System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balducci, Patrick J.; Jin, Chunlian; Wu, Di; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Leslie, Patrick; Daitch, Charles

    2013-12-12

    As part of an ongoing study co-funded by the Bonneville Power Administration, under its Technology Innovation Grant Program, and the U.S. Department of Energy, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has developed an approach and modeling tool for assessing the net benefits of using energy storage located close to the customer in the distribution grid to manage demand. PNNL in collaboration with PSE and Primus Power has evaluated the net benefits of placing a zinc bromide battery system at two locations in the PSE system (Baker River / Rockport and Bainbridge Island). Energy storage can provide a number of benefits to the utility through the increased flexibility it provides to the grid system. Applications evaluated in the assessment include capacity value, balancing services, arbitrage, distribution deferral and outage mitigation. This report outlines the methodology developed for this study and Phase I results.

  20. An alternative approach to assessing feasibility of flushing sediment from reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elfimov Valeriy Ivanovich

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Effective parameters on feasibility of sediment flushing through reservoirs include hydrological, hydraulic, and topographic properties of the reservoirs. In this study, the performances of the Decision tree forest (DTF and Group method of data handling (GMDH for assessing feasibility of flushing sediment from reservoirs, were investigated. In this way, Decision tree Forest, that combines multiple Decision tree, used to evaluate the relative importance of factors affecting flushing sediment. At the second step, GMDH deployed to predict the feasibility of flushing sediment from reservoirs. Results indicate that these models, as an efficient novel approach with an acceptable range of error, can be used successfully for assessing feasibility of flushing sediment from reservoirs.

  1. Rheoencephalography (REG) as a Non-Invasive Monitoring Alternative for the Assessment of Brain Blood Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-09-01

    bioimpedance (rheoencephalography - REG) measurement as a non-invasive, continuous method for assessing the status of cerebral blood flow (CBF) in combat...Dunster KR, Colditz PB, Ward LC. Noninvasive measurement of cerebral bioimpedance for detection of cerebral edema in the neonatal piglet. Brain Res...REG measurements and DC impedance (Ro) were recorded simultaneously on a portable IBM compatible computer using CODAS (DATAQ, Inc., Akron, OH) data

  2. Comparative Environmental Life Cycle Assessment of Alternative Uses of Wastewater Carbon Content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kroghsbo, Nena; Nicolaisen, Janna; Wenzel, Henrik

    the environmental priorities between biogas and PHA formation from the carbon content of the sludge. Further, the elimination of the primary settling with the aim of using the carbon content of the wastewater for enhanced nitrogen removal in the activated sludge process was studied. This comparison allows...... for assessing the environmental priorities between using the carbon for nutrient removal through denitrification and energy production/recovery through biogas or PHA. The preliminary results and conclusions of the study will be presented....

  3. Impact of alternative metrics on estimates of extent of occurrence for extinction risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joppa, Lucas N; Butchart, Stuart H M; Hoffmann, Michael; Bachman, Steve P; Akçakaya, H Resit; Moat, Justin F; Böhm, Monika; Holland, Robert A; Newton, Adrian; Polidoro, Beth; Hughes, Adrian

    2016-04-01

    In International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List assessments, extent of occurrence (EOO) is a key measure of extinction risk. However, the way assessors estimate EOO from maps of species' distributions is inconsistent among assessments of different species and among major taxonomic groups. Assessors often estimate EOO from the area of mapped distribution, but these maps often exclude areas that are not habitat in idiosyncratic ways and are not created at the same spatial resolutions. We assessed the impact on extinction risk categories of applying different methods (minimum convex polygon, alpha hull) for estimating EOO for 21,763 species of mammals, birds, and amphibians. Overall, the percentage of threatened species requiring down listing to a lower category of threat (taking into account other Red List criteria under which they qualified) spanned 11-13% for all species combined (14-15% for mammals, 7-8% for birds, and 12-15% for amphibians). These down listings resulted from larger estimates of EOO and depended on the EOO calculation method. Using birds as an example, we found that 14% of threatened and near threatened species could require down listing based on the minimum convex polygon (MCP) approach, an approach that is now recommended by IUCN. Other metrics (such as alpha hull) had marginally smaller impacts. Our results suggest that uniformly applying the MCP approach may lead to a one-time down listing of hundreds of species but ultimately ensure consistency across assessments and realign the calculation of EOO with the theoretical basis on which the metric was founded. © 2015 Society for Conservation Biology.

  4. Oral Presentations Reinvigorated : An Alternative Way to Conduct and Assess Student Presentations

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Ian; Diem, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Traditionally class presentations involve the teacher assessing one student’s presentation in front of the entire class. In large groups this method of evaluation can be very time consuming, and as a result, valuable class time that could be better spent on teaching and learning activities is reduced. This is especially problematic when a presentation component is inserted, sometimes haphazardly, into a larger curriculum where time constraints already exist. To make matters worse, the traditi...

  5. Magnetocaloric materials for energy efficient cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyubina, Julia

    2017-02-01

    Solid-state magnetic cooling near room temperature has recently gained a prominent position among alternative cooling technologies that are deemed to have higher energy efficiency compared to vapour compression. This prospect has surged a rapid growth of the area of magnetocaloric materials. Although several breakthroughs were achieved, the extensive study revealed a number of challenges in the effective deployment of the magnetic refrigerants. This review focuses on fundamentally and technologically relevant aspects of the cooling with magnetocaloric materials. A critical evaluation of magnetic refrigerants and progress made in improvement of their performance is provided. Future development trends in the field of materials for the solid state cooling are highlighted.

  6. Alternative Assessment Strategy and Its Impact on Student Comprehension in an Undergraduate Microbiology Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry J. Margulies

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Medical Microbiology is a content-intensive course that requires a large time commitment from the students. Students are typically biology or prenursing majors, including students headed for professional schools, such as medical school and pharmacy school. This group is somewhat diverse in terms of background science coursework, so it can be difficult to teach in a way that benefits all the students. Numerous changes have been implemented in our microbiology curriculum to address the different abilities of our students by altering assessment and teaching strategies. It was hypothesized that changing the assessment strategy from the traditional scheme of two or three exams and one final to a new model of seven or eight shorter exams would have a positive impact on student comprehension and retention. The quantity of material taught or expected of the students to learn did not change, but there was definitely an impact on them. Although 30.0% of students routinely did not pass microbiology in previous semesters, the new method of assessment resulted in only 9.63% not completing the semester successfully, as determined by earning a grade of C or better. There is some evidence from conversations and interviews with students that indicates a positive impact of this methodology on student attitude. Implementation of these changes in other courses and their current effectiveness will be examined in the future, with an eye towards more broadly applicable successful teaching techniques in the sciences, especially for nonmajors.

  7. Elusive Critical Elements of Transformative Risk Assessment Practice and Interpretation: Is Alternatives Analysis the Next Step?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Royce A

    2015-11-01

    This article argues that "game-changing" approaches to risk analysis must focus on "democratizing" risk analysis in the same way that information technologies have democratized access to, and production of, knowledge. This argument is motivated by the author's reading of Goble and Bier's analysis, "Risk Assessment Can Be a Game-Changing Information Technology-But Too Often It Isn't" (Risk Analysis, 2013; 33: 1942-1951), in which living risk assessments are shown to be "game changing" in probabilistic risk analysis. In this author's opinion, Goble and Bier's article focuses on living risk assessment's potential for transforming risk analysis from the perspective of risk professionals-yet, the game-changing nature of information technologies has typically achieved a much broader reach. Specifically, information technologies change who has access to, and who can produce, information. From this perspective, the author argues that risk assessment is not a game-changing technology in the same way as the printing press or the Internet because transformative information technologies reduce the cost of production of, and access to, privileged knowledge bases. The author argues that risk analysis does not reduce these costs. The author applies Goble and Bier's metaphor to the chemical risk analysis context, and in doing so proposes key features that transformative risk analysis technology should possess. The author also discusses the challenges and opportunities facing risk analysis in this context. These key features include: clarity in information structure and problem representation, economical information dissemination, increased transparency to nonspecialists, democratized manufacture and transmission of knowledge, and democratic ownership, control, and interpretation of knowledge. The chemical safety decision-making context illustrates the impact of changing the way information is produced and accessed in the risk context. Ultimately, the author concludes that although

  8. Ponce de Leon Inlet, FL: An Integrated Hydrodynamic and Morphologic Assessment of Design Alternatives using the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Coastal Modeling System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    Ponce de Leon Inlet, FL: An Integrated Hydrodynamic and Morphologic Assessment of Design Alternatives using the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers...DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Ponce de Leon Inlet, FL: An Integrated Hydrodynamic and Morphologic Assessment of Design Alternatives...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Shoaling and channel migration at Ponce de Leon Inlet, FL, have caused persistently hazardous navigation conditions

  9. Preliminary assessment of radiological doses in alternative waste management systems without an MRS facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, K.J.; Pelto, P.J.; Daling, P.M.; Lavender, J.C.; Fecht, B.A.

    1986-06-01

    This report presents generic analyses of radiological dose impacts of nine hypothetical changes in the operation of a waste management system without a monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facility. The waste management activities examined in this study include those for handling commercial spent fuel at nuclear power reactors and at the surface facilities of a deep geologic repository, and the transportation of spent fuel by rail and truck between the reactors and the repository. In the reference study system, the radiological doses to the public and to the occupational workers are low, about 170 person-rem/1000 metric ton of uranium (MTU) handled with 70% of the fuel transported by rail and 30% by truck. The radiological doses to the public are almost entirely from transportation, whereas the doses to the occupational workers are highest at the reactors and the repository. Operating alternatives examined included using larger transportation casks, marshaling rail cars into multicar dedicated trains, consolidating spent fuel at the reactors, and wet or dry transfer options of spent fuel from dry storage casks. The largest contribution to radiological doses per unit of spent fuel for both the public and occupational workers would result from use of truck transportation casks, which are smaller than rail casks. Thus, reducing the number of shipments by increasing cask sizes and capacities (which also would reduce the number of casks to be handled at the terminals) would reduce the radiological doses in all cases. Consolidating spent fuel at the reactors would reduce the radiological doses to the public but would increase the doses to the occupational workers at the reactors.

  10. Sleep bruxism and sleep arousal: an experimental challenge to assess the role of cyclic alternating pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carra, M C; Rompré, P H; Kato, T; Parrino, L; Terzano, M G; Lavigne, G J; Macaluso, G M

    2011-09-01

    Rhythmic masticatory muscle activity (RMMA) is the characteristic electromyographic pattern of sleep bruxism (SB), a sleep-related motor disorder associated with sleep arousal. Sleep arousals are generally organised in a clustered mode known as the cyclic alternating pattern (CAP). CAP is the expression of sleep instability between sleep maintaining processes (phase A1) and stronger arousal processes (phases A2 and A3). This study aimed to investigate the role of sleep instability on RMMA/SB occurrence by analysing CAP and electroencephalographic (EEG) activities. The analysis was performed on the sleep recordings of 8 SB subjects and 8 controls who received sensory stimulations during sleep. Baseline and experimental nights were compared for sleep variables, CAP, and EEG spectral analyses using repeated measure ANOVAs. Overall, no differences in sleep variables and EEG spectra were found between SB subjects and controls. However, SB subjects had higher sleep instability (more phase A3) than controls (P= 0·05). The frequency of phase A3 was higher in the pre-REM sleep periods (P < 0·001), where peaks in RMMA/SB activity were also observed (P = 0·05). When sleep instability was experimentally increased by sensory stimuli, both groups showed an enhancement in EEG theta and alpha power (P = 0·04 and 0·02, respectively) and significant increases in sleep arousal and all CAP variables. No change in RMMA/SB index was found within either groups (RMMA/SB occurred in all SB subjects and only one control during the experimental night). These findings suggest that CAP phase A3 may act as a permissive window rather than a generator of RMMA/SB activity in predisposed individuals.

  11. USING COMPUTER-BASED TESTING AS ALTERNATIVE ASSESSMENT METHOD OF STUDENT LEARNING IN DISTANCE EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amalia SAPRIATI

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the use of computer-based testing in distance education, based on the experience of Universitas Terbuka (UT, Indonesia. Computer-based testing has been developed at UT for reasons of meeting the specific needs of distance students as the following: Ø students’ inability to sit for the scheduled test, Ø conflicting test schedules, and Ø students’ flexibility to take examination to improve their grades. In 2004, UT initiated a pilot project in the development of system and program for computer-based testing method. Then in 2005 and 2006 tryouts in the use of computer-based testing methods were conducted in 7 Regional Offices that were considered as having sufficient supporting recourses. The results of the tryouts revealed that students were enthusiastic in taking computer-based tests and they expected that the test method would be provided by UT as alternative to the traditional paper and pencil test method. UT then implemented computer-based testing method in 6 and 12 Regional Offices in 2007 and 2008 respectively. The computer-based testing was administered in the city of the designated Regional Office and was supervised by the Regional Office staff. The development of the computer-based testing was initiated with conducting tests using computers in networked configuration. The system has been continually improved, and it currently uses devices linked to the internet or the World Wide Web. The construction of the test involves the generation and selection of the test items from the item bank collection of the UT Examination Center. Thus the combination of the selected items compromises the test specification. Currently UT has offered 250 courses involving the use of computer-based testing. Students expect that more courses are offered with computer-based testing in Regional Offices within easy access by students.

  12. Sustainability assessment of electrokinetic bioremediation compared with alternative remediation options for a petroleum release site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, R T; Thornton, S F; Harbottle, M J; Smith, J W N

    2016-12-15

    Sustainable management practices can be applied to the remediation of contaminated land to maximise the economic, environmental and social benefits of the process. The Sustainable Remediation Forum UK (SuRF-UK) have developed a framework to support the implementation of sustainable practices within contaminated land management and decision making. This study applies the framework, including qualitative (Tier 1) and semi-quantitative (Tier 2) sustainability assessments, to a complex site where the principal contaminant source is unleaded gasoline, giving rise to a dissolved phase BTEX and MTBE plume. The pathway is groundwater migration through a chalk aquifer and the receptor is a water supply borehole. A hydraulic containment system (HCS) has been installed to manage the MTBE plume migration. The options considered to remediate the MTBE source include monitored natural attenuation (MNA), air sparging/soil vapour extraction (AS/SVE), pump and treat (PT) and electrokinetic-enhanced bioremediation (EK-BIO). A sustainability indictor set from the SuRF-UK framework, including priority indicator categories selected during a stakeholder engagement workshop, was used to frame the assessments. At Tier 1 the options are ranked based on qualitative supporting information, whereas in Tier 2 a multi-criteria analysis is applied. Furthermore, the multi-criteria analysis was refined for scenarios where photovoltaics (PVs) are included and amendments are excluded from the EK-BIO option. Overall, the analysis identified AS/SVE and EK-BIO as more sustainable remediation options at this site than either PT or MNA. The wider implications of this study include: (1) an appraisal of the management decision from each Tier of the assessment with the aim to highlight areas for time and cost savings for similar assessments in the future; (2) the observation that EK-BIO performed well against key indicator categories compared to the other intensive treatments; and (3) introducing methods to

  13. Field perturbation experiments, an alternate approach to the assessment of human effects in terrestrial ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suter, II, G W

    1980-01-01

    The National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) was initially interpreted as requiring full disclosure of the environmental impacts of a federal action. Because of the limitations of time, money, and manpower, this requirement that all impacts be considered has led to superficial analysis of many important impacts. Data collection has largely been limited to the enumeration of species because this information can be applied to the analysis of any problem. The President's Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) has provided a solution to this problem by reinterpreting NEPA as requiring analysis of those impacts which have significant bearing on decision making. Because assessment resources can now be concentrated on a few critical issues, it should be possible to perform field perturbation experiments to provide direct evidence of the effects of a specific mixture of pollutants or physical disturbances on the specific mixture of pollutants or physical disturbances on the specific receiving ecosystem. Techniques are described for field simulation of gaseous and particulate air pollution, soil pollutants, disturbance of the earth's surface, and disturbance of wildlife. These techniques are discussed in terms of their realism, cost, and the restrictions which they place on the measurement of ecological parameters. Development and use of these field perturbation techniques should greatly improve the accuracy of predictive assessments and further our understanding of ecosystem processes.

  14. Alternative "global warming" metrics in life cycle assessment: a case study with existing transportation data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Glen P; Aamaas, Borgar; T Lund, Marianne; Solli, Christian; Fuglestvedt, Jan S

    2011-10-15

    The Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) impact category "global warming" compares emissions of long-lived greenhouse gases (LLGHGs) using Global Warming Potential (GWP) with a 100-year time-horizon as specified in the Kyoto Protocol. Two weaknesses of this approach are (1) the exclusion of short-lived climate forcers (SLCFs) and biophysical factors despite their established importance, and (2) the use of a particular emission metric (GWP) with a choice of specific time-horizons (20, 100, and 500 years). The GWP and the three time-horizons were based on an illustrative example with value judgments and vague interpretations. Here we illustrate, using LCA data of the transportation sector, the importance of SLCFs relative to LLGHGs, different emission metrics, and different treatments of time. We find that both the inclusion of SLCFs and the choice of emission metric can alter results and thereby change mitigation priorities. The explicit inclusion of time, both for emissions and impacts, can remove value-laden assumptions and provide additional information for impact assessments. We believe that our results show that a debate is needed in the LCA community on the impact category "global warming" covering which emissions to include, the emission metric(s) to use, and the treatment of time.

  15. Environmental impacts of remediation of a trichloroethene-contaminated site: life cycle assessment of remediation alternatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemming, Gitte; Hauschild, Michael Z; Chambon, Julie; Binning, Philip J; Bulle, Cécile; Margni, Manuele; Bjerg, Poul L

    2010-12-01

    The environmental impacts of remediation of a chloroethene-contaminated site were evaluated using life cycle assessment (LCA). The compared remediation options are (i) in situ bioremediation by enhanced reductive dechlorination (ERD), (ii) in situ thermal desorption (ISTD), and (iii) excavation of the contaminated soil followed by off-site treatment and disposal. The results showed that choosing the ERD option will reduce the life-cycle impacts of remediation remarkably compared to choosing either ISTD or excavation, which are more energy-demanding. In addition to the secondary impacts of remediation, this study includes assessment of local toxic impacts (the primary impact) related to the on-site contaminant leaching to groundwater and subsequent human exposure via drinking water. The primary human toxic impacts were high for ERD due to the formation and leaching of chlorinated degradation products, especially vinyl chloride during remediation. However, the secondary human toxic impacts of ISTD and excavation are likely to be even higher, particularly due to upstream impacts from steel production. The newly launched model, USEtox, was applied for characterization of primary and secondary toxic impacts and combined with a site-dependent fate model of the leaching of chlorinated ethenes from the fractured clay till site.

  16. Technical assessment of discarded tires gasification as alternative technology for electricity generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machin, Einara Blanco; Pedroso, Daniel Travieso; de Carvalho, João Andrade

    2017-10-01

    Concern about contamination associated with the disposal of tires has led to the search for technologies to reuse discarded tires, which include the use of Tire Derived Fuel (TDF) as fuel in advanced thermal-conversion processes, this allows the energy use of these wastes at affordable costs and reduces the environmental impact on scrap tires disposal. A theoretical assessment of the technical viability of TDF gasification for electric and thermal power generation, from the producer gas combustion in an internal combustion engine and in a gas turbine, was performed. The combustion of producer gas derived from the gasification of TDF in an internal combustion engine driving a generator (ICE-G) appears as the more efficient route for electricity generation when compared with the efficiency obtained with the use of gas turbine (GT-G). A higher global efficiency, considering the electric and thermal generation efficiency can be expected with the use of TDF producer gas in GT-G, where is expected an overall efficiency of 77.49%. The assessment shows that is possible produces up to 7.67MJ and 10.62MJ of electric and thermal energy per kilogram of TDF gasified using an ICE-G and up to 6.06MJ and 13.03MJ of electric and thermal energy respectively per kilogram of gasified TDF using a GT-G. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A participatory assessment of post-fire management alternatives in eastern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llovet, Joan

    2015-04-01

    Transformational socio-economic changes during the last decades of the 20th century led to the abandonment of mountainous areas in western Mediterranean countries (Puigdefábregas and Mendizábal, 1998). This process was accelerated in the Ayora Valley (inland Valencia province, E Spain) by a major forest fire in 1979. Restoration and management actions were implemented through the 1990's to promote the recovery of the area affected by this fire. In 2010 these past actions were assessed using an integrated and participatory evaluation protocol (IAPro). The selected actions were shrubland regenerated after the fire (no-action); pine plantation over the shrubland; pine forest regenerated after the fire (no-action); and thinning of densely regenerated pines. The assessment involved the identification and engagement of a comprehensive and representative set of local and regional stakeholders who provided a baseline assessment, identified and prioritized essential indicators, considered data collected against those indicators, and participated in re-assessment of actions after an outranking multi-criteria decision aiding integration (MCDA) conducted by the expert team (Roy and Bertier, 1973). This process facilitated a collaborative integration of biophysical indicators (i.e. carbon sequestration, water and soil conservation, soil quality, biodiversity, fire risk and forest health) and socio-economic indicators (i.e. productive, recreational and touristic, aesthetic, and cultural values, cost of the actions, and impact on family finances). It was completed with activities for exchanging experiences and sharing knowledge with the platform of stakeholders. Stakeholder platform suggested that fire risk was the most important indicator, followed by water conservation and soil conservation. Least important indicators were cost of actions, aesthetic value, and recreational and touristic value. Data collected on each action showed the thinned pine forest action with the lowest

  18. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP-strings: an alternative method for assessing genetic associations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas S Goodin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS identify disease-associations for single-nucleotide-polymorphisms (SNPs from scattered genomic-locations. However, SNPs frequently reside on several different SNP-haplotypes, only some of which may be disease-associated. This circumstance lowers the observed odds-ratio for disease-association. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we develop a method to identify the two SNP-haplotypes, which combine to produce each person's SNP-genotype over specified chromosomal segments. Two multiple sclerosis (MS-associated genetic regions were modeled; DRB1 (a Class II molecule of the major histocompatibility complex and MMEL1 (an endopeptidase that degrades both neuropeptides and β-amyloid. For each locus, we considered sets of eleven adjacent SNPs, surrounding the putative disease-associated gene and spanning ∼200 kb of DNA. The SNP-information was converted into an ordered-set of eleven-numbers (subject-vectors based on whether a person had zero, one, or two copies of particular SNP-variant at each sequential SNP-location. SNP-strings were defined as those ordered-combinations of eleven-numbers (0 or 1, representing a haplotype, two of which combined to form the observed subject-vector. Subject-vectors were resolved using probabilistic methods. In both regions, only a small number of SNP-strings were present. We compared our method to the SHAPEIT-2 phasing-algorithm. When the SNP-information spanning 200 kb was used, SHAPEIT-2 was inaccurate. When the SHAPEIT-2 window was increased to 2,000 kb, the concordance between the two methods, in both of these eleven-SNP regions, was over 99%, suggesting that, in these regions, both methods were quite accurate. Nevertheless, correspondence was not uniformly high over the entire DNA-span but, rather, was characterized by alternating peaks and valleys of concordance. Moreover, in the valleys of poor-correspondence, SHAPEIT-2 was also inconsistent with itself

  19. SU-E-J-35: Using CBCT as the Alternative Method of Assessing ITV Volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Y; Turian, J; Templeton, A; Redler, G; Chu, J [Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose To study the accuracy of Internal Target Volumes (ITVs) created on cone beam CT (CBCT) by comparing the visible target volume on CBCT to volumes (GTV, ITV, and PTV) outlined on free breathing (FB) CT and 4DCT. Methods A Quasar Cylindrical Motion Phantom with a 3cm diameter ball (14.14 cc) embedded within a cork insert was set up to simulate respiratory motion with a period of 4 seconds and amplitude of 2cm superioinferiorly and 1cm anterioposteriorly. FBCT and 4DCT images were acquired. A PTV-4D was created on the 4DCT by applying a uniform margin of 5mm to the ITV-CT. PTV-FB was created by applying a margin of the motion range plus 5mm, i.e. total of 1.5cm laterally and 2.5cm superioinferiorly to the GTV outlined on the FBCT. A dynamic conformal arc was planned to treat the PTV-FB with 1mm margin. A CBCT was acquired before the treatment, on which the target was delineated. During the treatment, the position of the target was monitored using the EPID in cine mode. Results ITV-CBCT and ITV-CT were measured to be 56.6 and 62.7cc, respectively, with a Dice Coefficient (DC) of 0.94 and disagreement in center of mass (COM) of 0.59 mm. On the other hand, GTV-FB was 11.47cc, 19% less than the known volume of the ball. PTV-FB and PTV-4D were 149 and 116 cc, with a DC of 0.71. Part of the ITV-CT was not enclosed by the PTV-FB despite the large margin. The cine EPID images have confirmed geometrical misses of the target. Similar under-coverage was observed in one clinical case and captured by the CBCT, where the implanted fiducials moved outside PTV-FB. Conclusion ITV-CBCT is in good agreement with ITV-CT. When 4DCT was not available, CBCT can be an effective alternative in determining and verifying the PTV margin.

  20. Home composting as an alternative treatment option for organic household waste in Denmark: An environmental assessment using life cycle assessment-modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, J.K.; Boldrin, Alessio; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2012-01-01

    An environmental assessment of the management of organic household waste (OHW) was performed from a life cycle perspective by means of the waste-life cycle assessment (LCA) model EASEWASTE. The focus was on home composting of OHW in Denmark and six different home composting units (with different....... The GHG emissions were, on the other hand, dependent on the management of the composting units. The frequently mixed composting units had the highest GHG emissions. The environmental profiles of the home composting scenarios were in the order of −2 to 16 milli person equivalents (mPE) Mg−1 wet waste (ww...... input and different mixing frequencies) were modelled. In addition, incineration and landfilling was modelled as alternatives to home composting. The most important processes contributing to the environmental impact of home composting were identified as greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (load...

  1. Moving virtuality into reality: A comparison study of the effectiveness of traditional and alternative assessments of learning in a multisensory, fully immersive physics program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamor, Keysha Ingram

    This paper contains a research study that investigated the relative efficacy of using both a traditional paper-and-pencil assessment instrument and an alternative, virtual reality (VR) assessment instrument to assist educators and/or instructional designers in measuring learning in a virtual reality learning environment. To this end, this research study investigated assessment in VR, with the goal of analyzing aspects of student learning in VR that are feasible to access or capture by traditional assessments and alternative assessments. The researcher also examined what additional types of learning alternative assessments may offer. More specifically, this study compared the effectiveness of a traditional method with an alternative (performance-based) method of assessment that was used to examine the ability of the tools to accurately evidence the levels of students' understanding and learning. The domain area was electrostatics, a complex, abstract multidimensional concept, with which students often experience difficulty. Outcomes of the study suggest that, in the evaluation of learning in an immersive VR learning environment, assessments would most accurately manifest student learning if the assessment measure matched the learning environment itself. In this study, learning and assessing in the VR environment yielded higher final test scores than learning in VR and testing with traditional paper-and-pencil. Being able to transfer knowledge from a VR environment to other situations is critical in demonstrating the overall level of understanding of a concept. For this reason, the researcher recommends a combination of testing measures to enhance understanding of complex, abstract concepts.

  2. Health and safety: Preliminary comparative assessment of the Satellite Power System (SPS) and other energy alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habegger, L. J.; Gasper, J. R.; Brown, C.

    1980-01-01

    Data readily available from the literature were used to make an initial comparison of the health and safety risks of a fission power system with fuel reprocessing; a combined-cycle coal power system with a low-Btu gasifier and open-cycle gas turbine; a central-station, terrestrial, solar photovoltaic power system; the satellite power system; and a first-generation fusion system. The assessment approach consists of the identification of health and safety issues in each phase of the energy cycle from raw material extraction through electrical generation, waste disposal, and system deactivation; quantitative or qualitative evaluation of impact severity; and the rating of each issue with regard to known or potential impact level and level of uncertainty.

  3. Assessing the Liquidity of Firms: Robust Neural Network Regression as an Alternative to the Current Ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Andrés, Javier; Landajo, Manuel; Lorca, Pedro; Labra, Jose; Ordóñez, Patricia

    Artificial neural networks have proven to be useful tools for solving financial analysis problems such as financial distress prediction and audit risk assessment. In this paper we focus on the performance of robust (least absolute deviation-based) neural networks on measuring liquidity of firms. The problem of learning the bivariate relationship between the components (namely, current liabilities and current assets) of the so-called current ratio is analyzed, and the predictive performance of several modelling paradigms (namely, linear and log-linear regressions, classical ratios and neural networks) is compared. An empirical analysis is conducted on a representative data base from the Spanish economy. Results indicate that classical ratio models are largely inadequate as a realistic description of the studied relationship, especially when used for predictive purposes. In a number of cases, especially when the analyzed firms are microenterprises, the linear specification is improved by considering the flexible non-linear structures provided by neural networks.

  4. Alternative Mixed Assessment Project (ALT.A.: The Mexican E-Learning Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica A. López-Campos

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present an experiment of mixed evaluation (summative/formative of questions formulated by students in a distance-education environment carried out in the Total Quality Management course in the B.S. degree in Industrial Engineering offered by Mexican public universities. Questions generated by students were evaluated using a specially-designed quantitative tool: Matrix Observation of four criteria with binary scoring. The experiment showed: (1 how is it possible to enrich the evaluation process, and formalize students' skills hardly recognizable with traditional forms of assessment; and (2 how the teacher-student interaction can be increased significantly by the technique mixed evaluation of questions in reverse, i.e. by the students.

  5. Assessment of alternative management techniques of tank bottom petroleum sludge in Oman

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Futaisi, Ahmed [Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering, Sultan Qaboos University, P.O. Box 33, Al-Khoud 123 (Oman)]. E-mail: futaisi@squ.edu.om; Jamrah, Ahmad [Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering, Sultan Qaboos University, P.O. Box 33, Al-Khoud 123 (Oman); Yaghi, Basma [Department of Petroleum and Chemical Engineering, Sultan Qaboos University, P.O. Box 33, Al-Khoud 123 (Oman); Taha, Ramzi [Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering, Sultan Qaboos University, P.O. Box 33, Al-Khoud 123 (Oman)

    2007-03-22

    This paper investigated several options for environmentally acceptable management techniques of tank bottom oily sludge. In particular, we tested the applicability of managing the sludge by three options: (1) as a fuel supplement; (2) in solidification; (3) as a road material. Environmental testing included determination of heavy metals concentration; toxic organics concentration and radiological properties. The assessment of tank bottom sludge as a fuel supplement included various properties such as proximate analysis, ultimate analysis and energy content. Solidified sludge mixtures and road application sludge mixtures were subjected to leaching using the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP). Tank bottom sludge was characterized as having higher concentrations of lead, zinc, and mercury, but lower concentrations of nickel, copper and chromium in comparison with values reported in the literature. Natural occurring radioactive minerals (NORM) activity values obtained on different sludge samples were very low or negligible compared to a NORM standard value of 100 Bq/g. The fuel assessment results indicate that the heating values, the carbon content and the ash content of the sludge samples are comparable with bituminous coal, sewage sludge, meat and bone meal and petroleum coke/coal mixture, but lower than those in car tyres and petroleum coke. The nitrogen content is lower than those fuels mentioned above, while the sulfur content seems comparable with bituminous coal, petroleum coke and a petroleum coke/coal mixture. The apparent lack of leachability of metals from solidification and road material sludge applications suggests that toxic metals and organics introduced to these applications are not readily attacked by weak acid solutions and would not be expected to migrate or dissolved into the water. Thus, in-terms of trace metals and organics, the suggested sludge applications would not be considered hazardous as defined by the TCLP leaching procedure.

  6. Alternative methodology for assessing part-through-wall cracks in carbon steel bends removed from Point Lepreau Generating Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan Xinjian, E-mail: duanx@aecl.c [Senior Engineer, Reactor Engineering Department, Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Mississauga, ON (Canada); Kozluk, Michael J., E-mail: kozlukm@aecl.c [Independent Consultant, Oakville, ON (Canada); Gendron, Tracy [Manager-HTS Materials Integrity, Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada); Slade, John [Senior Technical Advisor, Point Lepreau Generating Station, Lepreau, NB (Canada)

    2011-03-15

    In 2008 April Point Lepreau Generating Station entered an extended refurbishment outage that will involve the replacement of key reactor components (fuel channels and connecting feeder pipes). Prior to the refurbishment outage, New Brunswick Power Nuclear had been successfully managing intergranular, axial cracking of carbon steel feeder piping, that were also experiencing thinning, in the Point Lepreau Generating Station, primarily by an aggressive program of inspection, repair and testing of ex-service material. For the previous three maintenance outages, a probabilistic safety evaluation (PSE) had been used to demonstrate that annual inspection of the highest risk locations maintains the nuclear safety risk from cracking at an acceptably low level. The PSE makes use of the Failure Assessment Diagram (FAD) model to predict the failure of part-through-wall cracks. Burst-pressure testing of two ex-service feeder pipe sections with part-through-wall cracks showed that this FAD model significantly under predicts the failure pressure measured in the component tests. Use of this FAD model introduces undesirable conservatism into PSE assessments that are used to optimize feeder piping inspection and maintenance plans. This paper describes an alternative finite element approach, which could be used to provide more representative structural models for use in PSE assessments. This alternative approach employs the elasto-plastic large strain finite element formulation; uses representative material properties; considers the spatial microstructural distribution; accounts for the effect of work hardening rate; models all deformation processes, i.e., uniform deformation, localized necking, and failure imitation and propagation. Excellent pre-test prediction was shown for the burst-pressure test performed in 2006. Although cold-worked feeder bends have reduced fracture toughness compared to the parent straight pipe, post-test metallurgical examinations showed that failure at the

  7. Assessing socioeconomic health care utilization inequity in Israel: impact of alternative approaches to morbidity adjustment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balicer Ran D

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Background The ability to accurately detect differential resource use between persons of different socioeconomic status relies on the accuracy of health-needs adjustment measures. This study tests different approaches to morbidity adjustment in explanation of health care utilization inequity. Methods A representative sample was selected of 10 percent (~270,000 adult enrolees of Clalit Health Services, Israel's largest health care organization. The Johns-Hopkins University Adjusted Clinical Groups® were used to assess each person's overall morbidity burden based on one year's (2009 diagnostic information. The odds of above average health care resource use (primary care visits, specialty visits, diagnostic tests, or hospitalizations were tested using multivariate logistic regression models, separately adjusting for levels of health-need using data on age and gender, comorbidity (using the Charlson Comorbidity Index, or morbidity burden (using the Adjusted Clinical Groups. Model fit was assessed using tests of the Area Under the Receiver Operating Characteristics Curve and the Akaike Information Criteria. Results Low socioeconomic status was associated with higher morbidity burden (1.5-fold difference. Adjusting for health needs using age and gender or the Charlson index, persons of low socioeconomic status had greater odds of above average resource use for all types of services examined (primary care and specialist visits, diagnostic tests, or hospitalizations. In contrast, after adjustment for overall morbidity burden (using Adjusted Clinical Groups, low socioeconomic status was no longer associated with greater odds of specialty care or diagnostic tests (OR: 0.95, CI: 0.94-0.99; and OR: 0.91, CI: 0.86-0.96, for specialty visits and diagnostic respectively. Tests of model fit showed that adjustment using the comprehensive morbidity burden measure provided a better fit than age and gender or the Charlson Index. Conclusions Identification of

  8. Uncertainty and Sensitivity of Alternative Rn-222 Flux Density Models Used in Performance Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greg J. Shott, Vefa Yucel, Lloyd Desotell

    2007-06-01

    Performance assessments for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site on the Nevada Test Site have used three different mathematical models to estimate Rn-222 flux density. This study describes the performance, uncertainty, and sensitivity of the three models which include the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide 3.64 analytical method and two numerical methods. The uncertainty of each model was determined by Monte Carlo simulation using Latin hypercube sampling. The global sensitivity was investigated using Morris one-at-time screening method, sample-based correlation and regression methods, the variance-based extended Fourier amplitude sensitivity test, and Sobol's sensitivity indices. The models were found to produce similar estimates of the mean and median flux density, but to have different uncertainties and sensitivities. When the Rn-222 effective diffusion coefficient was estimated using five different published predictive models, the radon flux density models were found to be most sensitive to the effective diffusion coefficient model selected, the emanation coefficient, and the radionuclide inventory. Using a site-specific measured effective diffusion coefficient significantly reduced the output uncertainty. When a site-specific effective-diffusion coefficient was used, the models were most sensitive to the emanation coefficient and the radionuclide inventory.

  9. Standardized Clinical Assessment And Management Plans (SCAMPs) Provide A Better Alternative To Clinical Practice Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farias, Michael; Jenkins, Kathy; Lock, James; Rathod, Rahul; Newburger, Jane; Bates, David W.; Safran, Dana G.; Friedman, Kevin; Greenberg, Josh

    2014-01-01

    Variability in medical practice in the United States leads to higher costs without achieving better patient outcomes. Clinical practice guidelines, which are intended to reduce variation and improve care, have several drawbacks that limit the extent of buy-in by clinicians. In contrast, standardized clinical assessment and management plans (SCAMPs) offer a clinician-designed approach to promoting care standardization that accommodates patients’ individual differences, respects providers’ clinical acumen, and keeps pace with the rapid growth of medical knowledge. Since early 2009 more than 12,000 patients have been enrolled in forty-nine SCAMPs in nine states and Washington, D.C. In one example, a SCAMP was credited with increasing clinicians’ rate of compliance with a recommended specialist referral for children from 19.6 percent to 75 percent. In another example, SCAMPs were associated with an 11–51 percent decrease in total medical expenses for six conditions when compared with a historical cohort. Innovative tools such as SCAMPs should be carefully examined by policy makers searching for methods to promote the delivery of high-quality, cost-effective care. PMID:23650325

  10. Assessing mouse alternatives to access to computer: a case study of a user with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pousada, Thais; Pareira, Javier; Groba, Betania; Nieto, Laura; Pazos, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the process of assessment of three assistive devices to meet the needs of a woman with cerebral palsy (CP) in order to provide her with computer access and use. The user has quadriplegic CP, with anarthria, using a syllabic keyboard. Devices were evaluated through a three-step approach: (a) use of a questionnaire to preselect potential assistive technologies, (b) use of an eTAO tool to determine the effectiveness of each devised, and (c) a conducting semi-structured interview to obtain qualitative data. Touch screen, joystick, and trackball were the preselected devices. The best device that met the user's needs and priorities was joystick. The finding was corroborated by both the eTAO tool and the semi-structured interview. Computers are a basic form of social participation. It is important to consider the special needs and priorities of users and to try different devices when undertaking a device-selection process. Environmental and personal factors have to be considered, as well. This leads to a need to evaluate new tools in order to provide the appropriate support. The eTAO could be a suitable instrument for this purpose. Additional research is also needed to understand how to better match devices with different user populations and how to comprehensively evaluate emerging technologies relative to users with disabilities.

  11. [Dental materials. A critical assessment from the viewpoint of alternative medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weilenmann, Urs

    2009-01-01

    Practical experience with unconventional treatments suggests that the paradigm used by conventional medical science to assess the impact of dental materials must be broadened. First, several diagnostic methods commonly employed to evaluate allergies and toxicological burdens are described and subjected to a critical analysis. These diagnostics include test methods used in the field of complementary medicine in addition to the traditional epicutaneous tests, the Lymphocyte Transformation Test and quantitative analysis of blood and urine. Finally, the fundamentals of toxicology in the low-dose range are discussed; in this context special attention is paid to possible factors enhancing the effect of various substance groups. The impact of dental materials is also viewed from the perspective of environmental toxicology. In addition, the authors discuss various paradigms for obtaining evidence of multifactorial causes and show why nonuniform results are obtained with dental materials. Reference is also made to new theories broadening our understanding of biological processes such as the Biphoton Theory, which has been the subject of increased discussion among quantum physicists in recent years. It becomes evident in this context that there are to date no evidence-based methods for demonstrating the absolute non-toxicity of dental materials. Finally, it is shown - on the basis of various reports provided by a practitioner of complementary medicine in private practice - that, in patients with chronic diseases, unconventional therapies integrating these insights may by the only effective therapeutic options to succeed.

  12. Assessing Fit of Alternative Unidimensional Polytomous IRT Models Using Posterior Predictive Model Checking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tongyun; Xie, Chao; Jiao, Hong

    2016-05-30

    This article explored the application of the posterior predictive model checking (PPMC) method in assessing fit for unidimensional polytomous item response theory (IRT) models, specifically the divide-by-total models (e.g., the generalized partial credit model). Previous research has primarily focused on using PPMC in model checking for unidimensional and multidimensional IRT models for dichotomous data, and has paid little attention to polytomous models. A Monte Carlo simulation was conducted to investigate the performance of PPMC in detecting different sources of misfit for the partial credit model family. Results showed that the PPMC method, in combination with appropriate discrepancy measures, had adequate power in detecting different sources of misfit for the partial credit model family. Global odds ratio and item total correlation exhibited specific patterns in detecting the absence of the slope parameter, whereas Yen's Q1 was found to be promising in the detection of misfit caused by the constant category intersection parameter constraint across items. (PsycINFO Database Record

  13. Phase Angle, an Alternative Physiological Tool to Assess Wound Treatment in Chronic Nonhealing Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Michael F.; Dobson, Nanci; Castelllino, Lisa; Kapp, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Background This exploratory study was conducted in an effort to demonstrate that bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) phase angle measurement is a novel tool for monitoring the effectiveness of a wound care regimen at a regional level and is valuable in comparing that status with the overall metabolic health of the patient. Isolating and measuring the extent to which nutritional supplementation contributes to the healing process is difficult and confounded by the many treatment modalities patients undergo. Objective The authors conducted a limited exploratory study to determine whether regional phase angle measurements accurately reflected the status of chronic nonhealing wounds. This information would potentially provide the ability to quantitatively evaluate of the role of nutritional supplementation in wounds of varying etiologies by comparing regional BIA phase angle measurement with overall BIA phase angle measurement. Methods Eleven patients with wounds of varying etiologies were selected to participate. Each patient underwent a treatment regimen specific to his or her condition, and all patients were given JUVEN® nutritional supplement. Results and Conclusion In all patients, the BIA phase angle measurement mirrored the health of the wound and provided an accurate tool for assessing the regional tissue health, a valuable insight in measuring the effectiveness of a systemic treatment. PMID:24527159

  14. Institutional constraints on alternative water for energy: a guidebook for regional assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-11-01

    Basic information is presented about the legal, political, and social constraints faced by energy developers in the acquisition of water from underground, irrigation return flow, municipal waste, and saline sources. It is a guide to those institutional constraints which are general and pronounced enough to be important for regional assessments. First, attention was focused on the acquisition phase of the water use cycle. Second, constraints were analyzed primarily from a regional, rather than state-by-state, perspective. Emphasis was placed generally on the West - particularly the synfuel-rich Rocky Mountain states, the East, and Mid-West, in that order. Alaska and Hawaii were not surveyed. Third, the study focuses on the constraints associated with groundwater, municipal waste, irrigation return flow, and sea water, in that order. The phrase, institutional constraints, as used in the study, means legal, social, economic, and political restrictions, requirements, circumstances, or conditions that must be anticipated or responded to in order to acquire water for energy development. The study focuses primarily on legal constraints and secondarily on political constraints, because they tend to encompass or reflect other forms of institutional constraints.

  15. Bioremediation assessment of diesel-biodiesel-contaminated soil using an alternative bioaugmentation strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colla, Tatiana Simonetto; Andreazza, Robson; Bücker, Francielle; de Souza, Marcela Moreira; Tramontini, Letícia; Prado, Gerônimo Rodrigues; Frazzon, Ana Paula Guedes; Camargo, Flávio Anastácio de Oliveira; Bento, Fátima Menezes

    2014-02-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of successive bioaugmentation, conventional bioaugmentation, and biostimulation of biodegradation of B10 in soil. In addition, the structure of the soil microbial community was assessed by polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. The consortium was inoculated on the initial and the 11th day of incubation for successive bioaugmentation and only on the initial day for bioaugmentation and conventional bioaugmentation. The experiment was conducted for 32 days. The microbial consortium was identified based on sequencing of 16S rRNA gene and consisted as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Achromobacter xylosoxidans, and Ochrobactrum intermedium. Nutrient introduction (biostimulation) promoted a positive effect on microbial populations. The results indicate that the edaphic community structure and dynamics were different according to the treatments employed. CO2 evolution demonstrated no significant difference in soil microbial activity between biostimulation and bioaugmentation treatments. The total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) analysis indicated a biodegradation level of 35.7 and 32.2 % for the biostimulation and successive bioaugmentation treatments, respectively. Successive bioaugmentation displayed positive effects on biodegradation, with a substantial reduction in TPH levels.

  16. VIGOR TESTS ASSOCIATION AS AN ALTERNATIVE FOR PRECISE AND EFFICIENT ASSESSMENT OF MAIZE SEED QUALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARCOS ALTOMANI NEVES DIAS

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to associate two concepts of seed vigor testing, the aging and seedling growth using image analysis, providing a feasible and time-saving way to evaluate maize seed vigor in large scale. For this purpose, five seed lots with different vigor levels from two single hybrids were used. The seeds were characterized by moisture content, germination, seedling emergence, seedling emergence speed index, accelerated aging and cold tests. The treatments were composed by varying the accelerated aging periods (0, 24, 48, 72 and 96h and seedling growth periods (48 and 72h, before submitting the seedlings to image analysis for seedling root length measurement. Considering the results obtained, the adaptation of accelerated aging test by reducing the aging duration from 96h to 48h, and the replacement of the germination test by seedling root length measurement using image analysis could be considered a potential tool for maize seed vigor assessment. The treatments composed of 48h of seed aging followed by seedlings root length measurements using image analysis provided reliable data, compared to traditional vigor tests and it could be considered an efficient and timesaving approach, associating two different concepts of seed vigor analysis.

  17. Sustainability Impact Assessment of Forest Management Alternatives in Europe: an Introductory Background and Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Michel Carnus

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Adaptation of forest management practices in the context of rapid climatic and socioeconomic changes is a global concern. Stakeholders in the forest-based sector as well as policy makers need improved methods and tools to assess potential impacts of changes in management on sustainability indicators. In this special feature, we introduce a methodological framework for classification of forest management approaches in European forestry and explore how changes in forest management might affect the delivery of various ecosystem goods and services and appropriate sustainability indicators over time and space from local to continental scales. The complementary papers in this special feature explore different aspects of sustainability and risks in representative European forest systems as affected by forest management. We show how a common framework plus supporting growth models and indicators can be used to examine the effects of management on ecosystem services and so provide a first step toward the development of a more integrated approach for strategic forest planning and sustainable use of forest ecosystems.

  18. The embryonic stem cell test combined with toxicogenomics as an alternative testing model for the assessment of developmental toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dartel, Dorien A M; Piersma, Aldert H

    2011-09-01

    One of the most studied in vitro alternative testing methods for identification of developmental toxicity is the embryonic stem cell test (EST). Although the EST has been formally validated, the applicability domain as well as the predictability of the model needs further study to allow successful implementation of the EST as an alternative testing method in regulatory toxicity testing. Genomics technologies have already provided a proof of principle of their value in identification of toxicants such as carcinogenic compounds. Also within the EST, gene expression profiling has shown its value in the identification of developmental toxicity and in the evaluation of factors critical for risk assessment, such as dose and time responses. It is expected that the implementation of genomics into the EST will provide a more detailed end point evaluation as compared to the classical morphological scoring of differentiation cultures. Therefore, genomics may contribute to improvement of the EST, both in terms of definition of its applicability domain as well as its predictive capacity. In the present review, we present the progress that has been made with regard to the prediction of developmental toxicity using the EST combined with transcriptomics. Furthermore, we discuss the developments of additional aspects required for further optimization of the EST, including kinetics, the use of human embryonic stem cells (ESC) and computational toxicology. Finally, the current and future use of the EST model for prediction of developmental toxicity in testing strategies and in regulatory toxicity evaluations is discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Energy efficient school buildings in central-western Argentina: an assessment of alternative typologies for the classroom tier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Rosa, C.; Basso, M.; Fernandez, J.C. [Laboratorio de Ambiente Humano y Vivienda, Mendoza (AR)] [and others

    2000-07-01

    Four energy-efficient demonstration school buildings were built in the western province of Mendoza, Argentina, in 1999, as part of a massive building program required to implement the new Federal Education Plan. The buildings should make medium use of bioclimatic strategies and daylighting. The aspects of typology of the classroom tiers became immediately apparent as one of the main conditioners of the overall scheme. Three different alternative schemes were designed and built. A deeper analysis of these and other possible alternatives were thought essential for future constructions of the type. Four typologies of the classroom tier, using the same, locally available technology, are being comparatively assessed in the aspects of energy efficiently, thermal and luminous comfort, construction and operation costs and environmental impact (LCA). The paper presents the provisional results of the two first items only: energy efficiency and thermal comfort. While all four schemes evaluated are believed to be ''workable'', differences will tend to favour some the other according to context situations. Volumetric Loss Coeff. range from 1.09 to 1.24 W/Km{sup 3}. Solar savings fractions for the school operation hours vary between: 82.83 and 91.58%. Work is being continued to cover all the analysis items in a combined way. (author)

  20. The impact of alternative incentive schemes on completion of health risk assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haisley, Emily; Volpp, Kevin G; Pellathy, Thomas; Loewenstein, George

    2012-01-01

    The biggest challenge for corporate wellness initiatives is low rates of employee participation. We test whether a behavioral economic approach to incentive design (i.e., a lottery) is more effective than a direct economic payment of equivalent monetary value (i.e., a grocery gift certificate) in encouraging employees to complete health risk assessments (HRAs). Employees were assigned to one of three arms. Assignment to a treatment arm versus the nontreatment arm was determined by management. Assignment to an arm among those eligible for treatment was randomized by office. A large health care management and information technology consulting company. A total of 1299 employees across 14 offices participated. All employees were eligible to receive $25 for completing the HRA. Those in the lottery condition were assigned to teams of four to eight people and, conditional on HRA completion, were entered into a lottery with a prize of $100 (expected value, $25) and a bonus value of an additional $25 if 80% of team members participated. Those in the grocery gift certificate condition who completed an HRA received a $25 grocery gift certificate. Those in the comparison condition received no additional incentive. HRA completion rates. Logistic regression analysis. HRA completion rates were significantly higher among participations in the lottery incentive condition (64%) than in both the grocery gift certificate condition (44%) and the comparison condition (40%). Effects were larger for lower-income employees, as indicated by a significant interaction between income and the lottery incentive. Lottery incentives that incorporate regret aversion and social pressure can provide higher impact for the same amount of money as simple economic incentives.

  1. Alternative Quantitative Tools in the Assessment of Diabetic Peripheral and Autonomic Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinik, A I; Casellini, C; Névoret, M-L

    2016-01-01

    Here we review some seldom-discussed presentations of diabetic neuropathy, including large fiber dysfunction and peripheral autonomic dysfunction, emphasizing the impact of sympathetic/parasympathetic imbalance. Diabetic neuropathy is the most common complication of diabetes and contributes additional risks in the aging adult. Loss of sensory perception, loss of muscle strength, and ataxia or incoordination lead to a risk of falling that is 17-fold greater in the older diabetic compared to their young nondiabetic counterparts. A fall is accompanied by lacerations, tears, fractures, and worst of all, traumatic brain injury, from which more than 60% do not recover. Autonomic neuropathy has been hailed as the "Prophet of Doom" for good reason. It is conducive to increased risk of myocardial infarction and sudden death. An imbalance in the autonomic nervous system occurs early in the evolution of diabetes, at a stage when active intervention can abrogate the otherwise relentless progression. In addition to hypotension, many newly recognized syndromes can be attributed to cardiac autonomic neuropathy such as orthostatic tachycardia and bradycardia. Ultimately, this constellation of features of neuropathy conspire to impede activities of daily living, especially in the patient with pain, anxiety, depression, and sleep disorders. The resulting reduction in quality of life may worsen prognosis and should be routinely evaluated and addressed. Early neuropathy detection can only be achieved by assessment of both large and small- nerve fibers. New noninvasive sudomotor function technologies may play an increasing role in identifying early peripheral and autonomic neuropathy, allowing rapid intervention and potentially reversal of small-fiber loss.

  2. Positron range in PET imaging: an alternative approach for assessing and correcting the blurring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jødal, L.; Le Loirec, C.; Champion, C.

    2012-06-01

    Positron range impairs resolution in PET imaging, especially for high-energy emitters and for small-animal PET. De-blurring in image reconstruction is possible if the blurring distribution is known. Furthermore, the percentage of annihilation events within a given distance from the point of positron emission is relevant for assessing statistical noise. This paper aims to determine the positron range distribution relevant for blurring for seven medically relevant PET isotopes, 18F, 11C, 13N, 15O, 68Ga, 62Cu and 82Rb, and derive empirical formulas for the distributions. This paper focuses on allowed-decay isotopes. It is argued that blurring at the detection level should not be described by the positron range r, but instead the 2D projected distance δ (equal to the closest distance between decay and line of response). To determine these 2D distributions, results from a dedicated positron track-structure Monte Carlo code, Electron and POsitron TRANsport (EPOTRAN), were used. Materials other than water were studied with PENELOPE. The radial cumulative probability distribution G2D(δ) and the radial probability density distribution g2D(δ) were determined. G2D(δ) could be approximated by the empirical function 1 - exp(-Aδ2 - Bδ), where A = 0.0266 (Emean)-1.716 and B = 0.1119 (Emean)-1.934, with Emean being the mean positron energy in MeV and δ in mm. The radial density distribution g2D(δ) could be approximated by differentiation of G2D(δ). Distributions in other media were very similar to water. The positron range is important for improved resolution in PET imaging. Relevant distributions for the positron range have been derived for seven isotopes. Distributions for other allowed-decay isotopes may be estimated with the above formulas.

  3. A Techno-Economic Assessment of Hybrid Cooling Systems for Coal- and Natural-Gas-Fired Power Plants with and without Carbon Capture and Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Haibo; Rubin, Edward S

    2016-04-05

    Advanced cooling systems can be deployed to enhance the resilience of thermoelectric power generation systems. This study developed and applied a new power plant modeling option for a hybrid cooling system at coal- or natural-gas-fired power plants with and without amine-based carbon capture and storage (CCS) systems. The results of the plant-level analyses show that the performance and cost of hybrid cooling systems are affected by a range of environmental, technical, and economic parameters. In general, when hot periods last the entire summer, the wet unit of a hybrid cooling system needs to share about 30% of the total plant cooling load in order to minimize the overall system cost. CCS deployment can lead to a significant increase in the water use of hybrid cooling systems, depending on the level of CO2 capture. Compared to wet cooling systems, widespread applications of hybrid cooling systems can substantially reduce water use in the electric power sector with only a moderate increase in the plant-level cost of electricity generation.

  4. Residual flood-risk: assessing the effectiveness of alternative large-scale mitigation strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carisi, Francesca; Domeneghetti, Alessio; Castellarin, Attilio

    2016-04-01

    The EU Flood Directive (2007/60/CE) requires institutions and public bodies, in order to formulate robust flood-risk management strategies for large European rivers, to address several fundamental tasks. For instance, they have to address the problem of flood-risk mitigation from a global perspective (i.e., entire middle-lower river reaches) by identifying critical reaches, inundation areas and corresponding overflow volumes. To this aim, we focus on the identification of large-scale flood risk mitigation strategies for the middle-lower reach of the Po river, the longest Italian river and the largest in terms of streamflow. We refer to the so-called residual flood-risk and in particular to its portion referring to the possibility to experience events associated with larger return periods than the reference one (e.g. ~200 years in our case). In particular, being a further levee heightening not technically viable nor economically conceivable for the case study, the study develops and tests the applicability of a quasi-2D hydraulic model for the identification of large-scale flood-risk mitigation strategies relative to a 500-year flood event. In particular, we consider and model in the study different geometrical configurations of the main embankment system for a ~400km reach stretching from Isola S.Antonio to the Po river delta in the Adriatic Sea: overtopping without levee breaching, overtopping and natural levee breaching, overtopping and forced levee breaching. The simulations enable the assessment of the overflowed volumes and water depths on flooded areas. Expected damages are estimated using simplified graphical tools, which we termed "Vulnerability Hypsometric Curves" (HVCs) and report the extent of the area for a given land use category that is located below a certain elevation. The analysis aims at finding the optimal configuration that minimizes the expected damages in the areas prone to flood. The outcomes of our study indicate that coupling a large

  5. Industrial stator vane with sequential impingement cooling inserts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Russell B; Fedock, John A; Goebel, Gloria E; Krueger, Judson J; Rawlings, Christopher K; Memmen, Robert L

    2013-08-06

    A turbine stator vane for an industrial engine, the vane having two impingement cooling inserts that produce a series of impingement cooling from the pressure side to the suction side of the vane walls. Each insert includes a spar with a row of alternating impingement cooling channels and return air channels extending in a radial direction. Impingement cooling plates cover the two sides of the insert and having rows of impingement cooling holes aligned with the impingement cooling channels and return air openings aligned with the return air channel.

  6. When Stories Don't Make Sense: Alternative Ways to Assess Young Children's Narratives in Social Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, MinJeong; Covino, Katharine

    2015-01-01

    Assessing children's narratives through the lens of intertexual process makes visible children's funds of knowledge. The authors describe two interrelated alternative assessments that teachers can use to make sense of young children's narratives in classroom settings. Implications for promoting an intertextually-rich environment…

  7. The Changing Landscape of Alternate Assessments Based on Modified Academic Achievement Standards: An Analysis of Early Adopters of AA-MASs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, Sheryl S.; Thurlow, Martha L.

    2009-01-01

    Several states had an assessment that they considered to be an alternate assessment based on modified academic achievement standards (AA-MAS) in place, or in development, when the April 2007 federal regulations on modified achievement standards were finalized. This article uses publicly available information collected by the National Center on…

  8. A Tutorial for Analysing the Cost-effectiveness of Alternative Methods for Assessing Chemical Toxicology: The Case of Acute Oral Toxicity Prediction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Norlen, H.; Worth, A.P.; Gabbert, S.G.M.

    2014-01-01

    Compared with traditional animal methods for toxicity testing, in vitro and in silico methods are widely considered to permit a more cost-effective assessment of chemicals. However, how to assess the cost-effectiveness of alternative methods has remained unclear. This paper offers a user-oriented tu

  9. Alternative methods for dispoal of low-level radioactive wastes. Task 1. Description of methods and assessment of criteria. [Alternative methods are belowground vaults, aboveground vaults; earth mounded concrete bunkers, mined cavities, augered holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, R.D.; Miller, W.O.; Warriner, J.B.; Malone, P.G.; McAneny, C.C.

    1984-04-01

    The study reported herein contains the results of Task 1 of a four-task study entitled Criteria for Evaluating Engineered Facilities. The overall objective of this study is to ensure that the criteria needed to evaluate five alternative low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal methods are available to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Agreement States. The alternative methods considered are belowground vaults, aboveground vaults, earth mounded concrete bunkers, mined cavities, and augered holes. Each of these alternatives is either being used by other countries for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal or is being considered by other countries or US agencies. In this report the performance requirements are listed, each alternative is described, the experience gained with its use is discussed, and the performance capabilities of each method are addressed. Next, the existing 10 CFR Part 61 Subpart D criteria with respect to paragraphs 61.50 through 61.53, pertaining to site suitability, design, operations and closure, and monitoring are assessed for applicability to evaluation of each alternative. Preliminary conclusions and recommendations are offered on each method's suitability as an LLW disposal alternative, the applicability of the criteria, and the need for supplemental or modified criteria.

  10. SOLPLAN Report: An Assessment of Barriers and Incentives to Conservation and Alternative-Energy Use in the Residential Sector in Wisconsin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fulenwider, Claire K.; Weiss, Lonnie S.; Pfefferkorn, Carol; Wiener, Don E.; Feldman, Stephen L.

    1981-03-01

    The Alternative Energy Policy Project of the Wisconsin Center for Public Policy focused upon two principle objectives: (1) gathering and analyzing new and previously unavailable data on barriers and incentives to greater energy conservation and alternative energy commercialization in the state of Wisconsin; and (2) building consensus around alternative energy policy to develop guidelines for alternative energy policy for the state. Particular attention was paid to public involvement in the policy process and to assessing barriers and incentives from as many key sectors of the energy field as possible. Thus, data were gathered from the general public, alternative energy users, the heating industry generally, the alternative-energy industry specifically, and key decision makers. The report is divided into four principal sections. The first looks at findings and analyses dealing with barriers to greater conservation and alternative energy use. Incentives for accelerating the extent of residential conservation and alternative energy use are discussed in the second section. The decision-making process itself in energy policy has been little analyzed and seldom documented. The role of consensus-building in the alternative-energy field and analysis of the decision-making process are discussed in Section III. Appendices in Section IV provide survey instruments and descriptions, a compendium of energy-related legislation developed within the project, and various reports. The total report reflects the interactive decision-making model as it was applied in SOLPLAN. (MCW)

  11. SOLPLAN report: an assessment of barriers and incentives to conservation and alternative-energy use in the residential sector in Wisconsin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fulenwider, C.K.; Weiss, L.S.; Pfefferkorn, C.; Wiener, D.E.; Feldman, S.L.

    1981-03-01

    The Alternative Energy Policy Project of the Wisconsin Center for Public Policy focused upon two principle objectives: (1) gathering and analyzing new and previously unavailable data on barriers and incentives to greater energy conservation and alternative energy commercialization in the state of Wisconsin; and (2) building consensus around alternative energy policy to develop guidelines for alternative energy policy for the state. Particular attention was paid to public involvement in the policy process and to assessing barriers and incentives from as many key sectors of the energy field as possible. Thus, data were gathered from the general public, alternative energy users, the heating industry generally, the alternative-energy industry specifically, and key decision makers. The report is divided into four principal sections. The first looks at findings and analyses dealing with barriers to greater conservation and alternative energy use. Incentives for accelerating the extent of residential conservation and alternative energy use are discussed in the second section. The decision-making process itself in energy policy has been little analyzed and seldom documented. The role of consensus-building in the alternative-energy field and analysis of the decision-making process are discussed in Section III. Appendices in Section IV provide survey instruments and descriptions, a compendium of energy-related legislation developed within the project, and various reports. The total report reflects the interactive decision-making model as it was applied in SOLPLAN. (MCW)

  12. Floor cooling and air-cooling, the effects on thermal comfort or different cooling systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sijpheer, N.C.; Bakker, E.J.; Ligthart, F.A.T.M.; Opstelten, I.J. [ECN Energie in de Gebouwde Omgeving en Netten, Petten (Netherlands)

    2007-09-15

    One of the research areas of the Energy research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) concerns the built environment. Several facilities to conduct research activities are at ECN's disposal. One of these facilities, are five research dwellings located on the premises of ECN. Measured data from these facilities together with weather data and computer models are used to evaluate innovative energy concepts and components in energy systems. Experiments with different cooling systems in ECN's research dwellings are executed to evaluate their effective influence on both energy use and thermal comfort. Influence of inhabitants' behaviour is taken into account in these experiments. The thermal comfort is indicated by the Predicted Mean Vote (PMV) as defined by P.O. Fanger. For this paper, the results of measurements with a floor cooling and air cooling system are assessed. Effects on the PMV measured during experiments with the two different cooling systems will be presented.

  13. A three-dimensional methodology for the assessment of neutron damage and nuclear energy deposition in graphite components of advanced gas-cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, D.O.; Robinson, A.T.; Allen, D.A.; Picton, D.J.; Thornton, D.A. [TCS, Serco, Rutherford House, Olympus Park, Quedgeley, Gloucester, Gloucestershire GL2 4NF (United Kingdom); Shaw, S.E. [EDF Energy, Barnet Way, Barnwood, Gloucester GL4 3RS (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-01

    This paper describes the development of a three-dimensional methodology for the assessment of neutron damage and nuclear energy deposition (or nuclear heating) throughout the graphite cores of the UK's Advanced Gas-cooled Reactors. Advances in the development of the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCBEND have enabled the efficient production of detailed fully three-dimensional models that utilise three-dimensional source distributions obtained from Core Follow data supplied by the reactor physics code PANTHER. The calculational approach can be simplified to reduce both the requisite number of intensive radiation transport calculations, as well as the quantity of data output. These simplifications have been qualified by comparison with explicit calculations and they have been shown not to introduce significant systematic uncertainties. Simple calculational approaches are described that allow users of the data to address the effects on neutron damage and nuclear energy deposition predictions of the feedback resulting from the mutual dependencies of graphite weight loss and nuclear energy deposition. (authors)

  14. Avaliação de materiais alternativos utilizados na confecção de placas porosas para sistemas de resfriamento adiabático evaporativo Evaluation of alternative materials used for pad making in the evaporative cooling system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilda de F. F. Tinôco

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se, com este trabalho, a comparação entre a eficiência de alguns materiais porosos alternativos encontrados no Brasil: cinasita (argila expandida, serragem, fibra vegetal e carvão, para o Sistema de Resfriamento Adiabático Evaporativo (SRAE. O experimento se deu em condições de verão, em estufas situadas na Universidade Federal de Viçosa, Minas Gerais. O conforto térmico ambiente foi avaliado através do Índice de Temperatura de Globo Negro e Umidade (ITGU e Umidade Relativa do ar (UR, medidos diariamente, a cada duas horas, das 8 às 18 h. Os resultados obtidos foram interpretados através da análise de variância. Com base neste estudo, é possível inferir que a confecção de placas porosas para resfriadores evaporativos, utilizando-se os materiais cinasita e carvão vegetal, indica vantagens sobre os demais materiais estudados (serragem e fibra de madeira. No entanto, como não houve diferença estatística significativa em todos os horários, para os materiais testados e com base nos resultados de umidade relativa do ar e ITGU, sugere-se a condução de novas pesquisas, no sentido de se determinar a espessura correta da placa porosa, tendo em vista a obtenção correta da pressão estática do sistema, sendo este um fator determinante, no que se refere à sua eficiência.This study aimed to compare the efficiency of some alternative pad materials found in Brazil, such as the "cinasita" (an expanded clay, the sawdust, the vegetable fiber and coal. The experiment conducted in summer conditions, in greenhouses located in the Federal University of Viçosa, Minas Gerais. The comfort thermal atmosphere was evaluated through the Black Globe Humidity Index (BGHI and Relative Humidity (RH, measured daily, every two hours, between 8 to 18 h. The obtained results were interpreted through the variance analysis. On the basis of this study, it is possible to infer that the making of pad for evaporative cooling systems, using the

  15. Objective assessment of skin tightening in Asians using a water-filtered near-infrared (1,000–1,800 nm device with contact-cooling and freezer-stored gel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanaka Y

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Yohei Tanaka,1–3 Yuichiro Tsunemi,2 Makoto Kawashima,2 Naoto Tatewaki,3 Hiroshi Nishida31Clinica Tanaka Plastic, Reconstructive Surgery and Anti-aging Center, Nagano, 2Department of Dermatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University, Tokyo, 3Department of Applied Life Sciences, Niigata University of Pharmacy and Applied Life Sciences, Niigata, JapanBackground: Near-infrared has been shown to penetrate deeper than optical light sources independent of skin color, allowing safer treatment for the Asian skin type. Many studies have indicated the efficacy of various types of devices, but have not included a sufficiently objective evaluation. In this study, we used three-dimensional imaging for objective evaluation of facial skin tightening using a water-filtered near-infrared device.Methods: Twenty Japanese patients were treated with the water-filtered near-infrared (1,000–1,800 nm device using a contact-cooling and nonfreezing gel stored in a freezer. Three-dimensional imaging was performed, and quantitative volume measurements were taken to evaluate the change in post-treatment volume. The patients then provided their subjective assessments.Results: Objective assessments of the treated cheek volume evaluated by a three-dimensional color schematic representation with quantitative volume measurements showed significant improvement 3 months after treatment. The mean volume reduction at the last post-treatment visit was 2.554 ± 0.999 mL. The post-treatment volume was significantly reduced compared with the pretreatment volume in all patients (P < 0.0001. Eighty-five percent of patients reported satisfaction with the improvement of skin laxity, and 80% of patients reported satisfaction with improvement of rhytids, such as the nasolabial folds. Side effects, such as epidermal burns and scar formation, were not observed throughout the study.Conclusion: The advantages of this water-filtered near-infrared treatment are its high efficacy for skin tightening

  16. Hybrid radiator cooling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, David M.; Smith, David S.; Yu, Wenhua; Routbort, Jules L.

    2016-03-15

    A method and hybrid radiator-cooling apparatus for implementing enhanced radiator-cooling are provided. The hybrid radiator-cooling apparatus includes an air-side finned surface for air cooling; an elongated vertically extending surface extending outwardly from the air-side finned surface on a downstream air-side of the hybrid radiator; and a water supply for selectively providing evaporative cooling with water flow by gravity on the elongated vertically extending surface.

  17. Assessment of the impacts of spent fuel disassembly alternatives on the Nuclear Waste Isolation System. [Preparing and packaging spent fuel assemblies for geologic disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-07-01

    The objective of this report was to evaluate four possible alternative methods of preparing and packaging spent fuel assemblies for geologic disposal against the Reference Process of unmodified spent fuel. The four alternative processes were: (1) End fitting removal, (2) Fission gas venting and resealing, (3) Fuel bundle disassembly and close packing of fuel pins, and (4) Fuel shearing and immobilization. Systems analysis was used to develop a basis of comparison of the alternatives. Conceptual processes and facility layouts were devised for each of the alternatives, based on technology deemed feasible for the purpose. Assessments were made of 15 principal attributes from the technical, operational, safety/risk, and economic considerations related to each of the alternatives, including both the surface packaging and underground repository operations. Specific attributes of the alternative processes were evaluated by assigning a number for each that expressed its merit relative to the corresponding attribute of the Reference Process. Each alternative process was then ranked by summing the numbers for attributes in each of the four assessment areas and collectively. Fuel bundle disassembly and close packing of fuel pins was ranked the preferred method of disposal of spent fuel. 63 references, 46 figures, 46 tables.

  18. TUGAI: An integrated simulation tool for ecological assessment of alternative water management strategies in a degraded river delta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlüter, Maja; Rüger, Nadja; Savitsky, Andre G; Novikova, Nina M; Matthies, Michael; Lieth, Helmut

    2006-10-01

    The development of ecologically sound water allocation strategies that account for the needs of riverine ecosystems is a pressing issue, especially in semiarid river basins. In the Aral Sea Basin, a search for strategies to mitigate ecological and socioeconomic deterioration has been in process since the early 1990s. The Geographic Information System-based simulation tool TUGAI has been developed to support the policy determination process by providing a simple, problem-oriented method to assess ecological effects of alternative water management strategies for the Amudarya River. It combines a multiobjective water allocation model with simple, spatially explicit statistical and rule-based models of landscape dynamics. Changes in environmental conditions are evaluated by a fuzzy habitat suitability index for Populus euphratica, which is the dominant species of the characteristic riverine Tugai forests. Water management scenarios can be developed by altering spatiotemporal water distribution in the delta area or the amount of water inflow into the delta. Outcomes of scenario analysis are qualitative comparisons of the ecological effects of different options for a time period of up to 28 years. The given approach utilizes different types of knowledge, from quantitative hydrological data to qualitative local expert knowledge. The main purpose of the tool is to integrate the knowledge in a comprehensive way to make it available for discussions on alternative policies in moderated workshops with stakeholders. In this article, the modules of the tool, their integration, and three hypothetical scenarios are presented. Based on the experience gained when developing the TUGAI tool, we propose that the general framework can be transferred to other areas where tradeoffs in water allocation between the environment and other water users are of major concern. The potential for a simulation tool to structure and inform a complex resource management situation by involving local

  19. Performance, emission and economic assessment of clove stem oil-diesel blended fuels as alternative fuels for diesel engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mbarawa, Makame [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tshwane University of Technology, Private Bag X680, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa)

    2008-05-15

    In this study the performance, emission and economic evaluation of using the clove stem oil (CSO)-diesel blended fuels as alternative fuels for diesel engine have been carried out. Experiments were performed to evaluate the impact of the CSO-diesel blended fuels on the engine performance and emissions. The societal life cycle cost (LCC) was chosen as an important indicator for comparing alternative fuel operating modes. The LCC using the pure diesel fuel, 25% CSO and 50% CSO-diesel blended fuels in diesel engine are analysed. These costs include the vehicle first cost, fuel cost and exhaust emissions cost. A complete macroeconomic assessment of the effect of introducing the CSO-diesel blended fuels to the diesel engine is not included in the study. Engine tests show that performance parameters of the CSO-diesel blended fuels do not differ greatly from those of the pure diesel fuel. Slight power losses, combined with an increase in fuel consumption, were experienced with the CSO-diesel blended fuels. This is due to the low heating value of the CSO-diesel blended fuels. Emissions of CO and HC are low for the CSO-diesel blended fuels. NO{sub x} emissions were increased remarkably when the engine was fuelled with the 50% CSO-diesel blended fuel operation mode. A remarkable reduction in the exhaust smoke emissions can be achieved when operating on the CSO-diesel blended fuels. Based on the LCC analysis, the CSO-diesel blended fuels would not be competitive with the pure diesel fuel, even though the environmental impact of emission is valued monetarily. This is due to the high price of the CSO. (author)

  20. Cooling lubricants; Kuehlschmierstoffe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeiffer, W. [Berufsgenossenschaftliches Inst. fuer Arbeitssicherheit, St. Augustin (Germany); Breuer, D. [Berufsgenossenschaftliches Inst. fuer Arbeitssicherheit, St. Augustin (Germany); Blome, H. [Berufsgenossenschaftliches Inst. fuer Arbeitssicherheit, St. Augustin (Germany); Deininger, C. [Berufsgenossenschaftliches Inst. fuer Arbeitssicherheit, St. Augustin (Germany); Hahn, J.U. [Berufsgenossenschaftliches Inst. fuer Arbeitssicherheit, St. Augustin (Germany); Kleine, H. [Berufsgenossenschaftliches Inst. fuer Arbeitssicherheit, St. Augustin (Germany); Nies, E. [Berufsgenossenschaftliches Inst. fuer Arbeitssicherheit, St. Augustin (Germany); Pflaumbaum, W. [Berufsgenossenschaftliches Inst. fuer Arbeitssicherheit, St. Augustin (Germany); Stockmann, R. [Berufsgenossenschaftliches Inst. fuer Arbeitssicherheit, St. Augustin (Germany); Willert, G. [Berufsgenossenschaftliches Inst. fuer Arbeitssicherheit, St. Augustin (Germany); Sonnenschein, G. [Maschinenbau- und Metall-Berufsgenossenschaft, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    1996-08-01

    As a rule, the base substances used are certain liquid hydrocarbons from mineral oils as well as from native and synthetic oils. Through the addition of further substances the cooling lubricant takes on the particular qualities required for the use in question. Employees working with cooling lubricants are exposed to various hazards. The assessment of the concentrations at the work station is carried out on the basis of existing technical rules for contact with hazardous substances. However, the application/implementation of compulsory investigation and supervision in accordance with these rules is made difficult by the fact that cooling lubricants are, as a rule, made up of complicated compound mixtures. In addition to protecting employees from exposure to mists and vapours from the cooling lubricants, protection for the skin is also of particular importance. Cooling lubricants should not, if at all possible, be brought into contact with the skin. Cleansing the skin and skin care is just as important as changing working clothes regularly, and hygiene and cleanliness at the workplace. Unavoidable emissions are to be immediately collected at the point where they arise or are released and safely disposed of. This means taking into account all sources of emissions. The programme presented in this report therefore gives a very detailed account of the individual protective measures and provides recommendations for the design of technical protection facilities. (orig./MG) [Deutsch] Als Basisstoffe dienen in der Regel bestimmte fluessige Kohlenwasserstoffverbindungen aus Mineraloelen sowie aus nativen oder synthetischen Oelen. Durch die Zugabe von weiteren Stoffen erlangt der Kuehlschmierstoff seine fuer den jeweiligen Anwendungsabfall geforderten Eigenschaften. Beschaeftigte, die mit Kuehlschmierstoffen umgehen, sind unterschiedliche Gefahren ausgesetzt. Die Beurteilung der Kuehlschmierstoffkonzentrationen in der Luft am Arbeitsplatz erfolgt auf der Grundlage bestehender

  1. Online versus in-person comparison of Microscale Audit of Pedestrian Streetscapes (MAPS) assessments: reliability of alternate methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Christine B; Engelberg, Jessa K; Geremia, Carrie M; Zhu, Wenfei; Kurka, Jonathan M; Cain, Kelli L; Sallis, James F; Conway, Terry L; Adams, Marc A

    2017-08-04

    An online version of the Microscale Audit of Pedestrian Streetscapes (Abbreviated) tool was adapted to virtually audit built environment features supportive of physical activity. The current study assessed inter-rater reliability of MAPS Online between in-person raters and online raters unfamiliar with the regions. In-person and online audits were conducted for a total of 120 quarter-mile routes (60 per site) in Phoenix, AZ and San Diego, CA. Routes in each city included 40 residential origins stratified by walkability and SES, and 20 commercial centers. In-person audits were conducted by raters residing in their region. Online audits were conducted by raters in the alternate location using Google Maps (Aerial and Street View) images. The MAPS Abbreviated Online tool consisted of four sections: overall route, street segments, crossings and cul-de-sacs. Items within each section were grouped into subscales, and inter-rater reliability (ICCs) was assessed for subscales at multiple levels of aggregation. Online and in-person audits showed excellent agreement for overall positive microscale (ICC = 0.86, 95% CI [0.80, 0.90]) and grand scores (ICC = 0.93, 95% CI [0.89, 0.95]). Substantial to near-perfect agreement was found for 21 of 30 (70%) subscales, valence, and subsection scores, with ICCs ranging from 0.62, 95% CI [0.50, 0.72] to 0.95, 95% CI [0.93, 0.97]. Lowest agreement was found for the aesthetics and social characteristics scores, with ICCs ranging from 0.07, 95% CI [-0.12, 0.24] to 0.27, 95% CI [0.10, 0.43]. Results support use of the MAPS Abbreviated Online tool to reliably assess microscale neighborhood features that support physical activity and may be used by raters residing in different geographic regions and unfamiliar with the audit areas.

  2. Draft of the EU regulation for the infrastructure for alternate fuels. Impact assessment for the Netherlands; Concept EU Richtlijn Uitrol Infrastructuur voor Alternatieve Brandstoffen. Impact Assessment voor NL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weeda, M. [ECN Beleidsstudies, Petten (Netherlands)

    2013-08-15

    On 24 January 2013, the European Commission approved a proposal for a directive on the rollout of infrastructure for alternative fuels for transport. The directive mostly covers the charging infrastructure for electric vehicles; CNG, LNG and hydrogen refuelling stations for road traffic, and LNG bunker facilities for shipping. On assignment of the Dutch Ministry of Infrastructure and the Environment, ECN conducted an impact assessment of the proposal for the directive for the Dutch situation. The overall conclusion is that the estimates for the Netherlands in the framework of the directive with regard to the required infrastructure for alternative fuels and the investment amount reasonably concur with the government's objectives and the expectations of market parties. Given all uncertainties about numbers and exact costs, the conclusion is drawn that, until the end of 2020, an amount of about Meuro 400 will be needed for investments in the infrastructure for alternative fuels. However, this covers only a part of the investments related to the directive. To realise the objectives, applications for alternative fuels will need to be stimulated and the financial gap in exploiting infrastructures also needs to be financed. As it is difficult to determine beforehand which costs are involved, it is important to maintain flexibility in objectives for volume and realisation pace of the infrastructure for alternative fuels. In this respect, a result obligation to realise a certain volume of infrastructure before a set date, as envisaged by the directive, is not beneficial [Dutch] Op 24 januari 2013 heeft de Europese Commissie een voorstel voor een richtlijn goedgekeurd betreffende de uitrol van infrastructuur voor alternatieve brandstoffen voor transport. De richtlijn heeft vooral betrekking op oplaadinfrastructuur voor elektrische auto's; CNG, LNG en waterstoftankstations voor wegverkeer, en LNG bunkerfaciliteiten voor de scheepvaart. ECN heeft in opdracht van het

  3. Sustainable and reliable groundwater cooling Manitoba Hydro Dorsey converter station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinclair, R.D. [KGS Group, Winnipeg, MB (Canada); Jhinger, H. [Manitoba Hydro, Winnipeg, MB (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    Three high voltage direct current (HVDC) converter stations are operated by Manitoba Hydro in conjunction with the northern generating stations on the Nelson River near Gillam, Manitoba. The Dorsey Converter Station, located approximately 900 kilometres (km) south of Gillam and 13 km northwest of Winnipeg, is an integral and critical component of Manitoba's HVDC system. The Dorsey Converter Station represents the southern terminus, where the power originating from Gillam is converted back to alternating current (AC) from DC for further distribution in southern Manitoba and for export. The current space cooling requirements for the converter station buildings are based on chiller systems scheduled to be replaced. There have been some success stories near Winnipeg with groundwater cooling, and field testing confirmed that the high permeability of the aquifer would be an asset for groundwater based cooling. The system which has been selected for installation, includes 5 pumping wells and 10 recharge wells to handle the total cooling load. Thermal interference between wells is expected to be such that winter thermal balancing would be required for sustainability, as demonstrated in digital simulations of aquifer heat transport. The assessment program and the major design considerations for this system were presented in this paper. 10 refs., 1 tab., 10 figs.

  4. Innovation and presentation of RALSPI model: a new method for evaluating alternatives and assessment of development level of settlements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Taghvaei

    2013-01-01

    Multiple Criteria Decision Making (MCDM approach, i.e., Ranking Alternatives by Limiting Substitution Possibilities of Indicators (RALSPI, for solving multiple criteria problems. In fact, RALSPI is a new, simple, and straightforward evaluating system with a coherent methodological basis, and resolves significant shortcomings of other current related methods; so, this method is proposed to evaluating alternatives and assessing development level of settlements. Keywords: Evaluating alternatives, Assessment of development level, Multiple Criteria Decision Making, RALSPI model, Iran.ReferenceAkbari, Nematollah and Zahedi Keyvan, Mahdi (2008, Application of ranking and Multi-criteria decision making methods, imo, Tehran. Asgharpoor, Mohammad Javad (2008, Multi-criteria decision makings, Tehran University. Badri, Seyyed Ali and Akbarian Ronizi, Saeedreza (2006, Comparative study of application of the methods of assessment development level in regional studies, Geography and development, No. 4, pp. 5-22.Badri, Seyyed Ali et al. (2006, Determining development level of rural areas of Kamyaran sub-province, Geographical Researches, No. 82, pp. 116-130.Bakhtiari, Sadegh; Dehaghanizadeh, Majid and Hoseynpoor, Seyyed Mojtaba (2006, Investigation of provinces of Iran from the point of view of Human Development Index, Knowledge and Development, No. 19, pp. 11-39. Chu, M-T; J. Shyu and G-H Tzeng (2006, Comparison among three analytical methods for knowledge communities group-decision analysis, Expert Systems with Applications, doi,10.1016/j.eswa.2006.08.026.Czira´ky, D.; J. Sambt; J. Rovan and J. Puljiz (2006, Regional development assessment, A structural equation approach, European Journal of Operational Research, No. 174, pp. 427-442.Emes, Joel and Tony Hahn (2001, Measuring Development: an Index of Human Progress, »Public Policy Sources«, No. 36, Fraser Institute, Vancouver, Canada.Hadder, R. 2000, Development Geography, Routledge, London.Hamidi, Naser (2003, Application of

  5. Assessment of external heat transfer coefficient during oocyte vitrification in liquid and slush nitrogen using numerical simulations to determine cooling rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, M V; Sansinena, M; Zaritzky, N; Chirife, J

    2012-01-01

    In oocyte vitrification, plunging directly into liquid nitrogen favor film boiling and strong nitrogen vaporization. A survey of literature values of heat transfer coefficients (h) for film boiling of small metal objects with different geometries plunged in liquid nitrogen revealed values between 125 to 1000 W per per square m per K. These h values were used in a numerical simulation of cooling rates of two oocyte vitrification devices (open-pulled straw and Cryotop), plunged in liquid and slush nitrogen conditions. Heat conduction equation with convective boundary condition was considered a linear mathematical problem and was solved using the finite element method applying the variational formulation. COMSOL Multiphysics was used to simulate the cooling process of the systems. Predicted cooling rates for OPS and Cryotop when cooled at -196 degree C (liquid nitrogen) or -207 degree C (average for slush nitrogen) for heat transfer coefficients estimated to be representative of film boiling, indicated lowering the cooling temperature produces only a maximum 10 percent increase in cooling rates; confirming the main benefit of plunging in slush over liquid nitrogen does not arise from their temperature difference. Numerical simulations also demonstrated that a hypothetical four-fold increase in the cooling rate of vitrification devices when plunging in slush nitrogen would be explained by an increase in heat transfer coefficient. This improvement in heat transfer (i.e., high cooling rates) in slush nitrogen is attributed to less or null film boiling when a sample is placed in slush (mixture of liquid and solid nitrogen) because it first melts the solid nitrogen before causing the liquid to boil and form a film.

  6. Final Cooling for a Muon Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acosta Castillo, John Gabriel [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States)

    2017-05-01

    To explore the new energy frontier, a new generation of particle accelerators is needed. Muon colliders are a promising alternative, if muon cooling can be made to work. Muons are 200 times heavier than electrons, so they produce less synchrotron radiation, and they behave like point particles. However, they have a short lifetime of 2.2 $\\mathrm{\\mu s}$ and the beam is more difficult to cool than an electron beam. The Muon Accelerator Program (MAP) was created to develop concepts and technologies required by a muon collider. An important effort has been made in the program to design and optimize a muon beam cooling system. The goal is to achieve the small beam emittance required by a muon collider. This work explores a final ionization cooling system using magnetic quadrupole lattices with a low enough $\\beta^{\\star} $ region to cool the beam to the required limit with available low Z absorbers.

  7. Transverse cooling in the muon collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernow, R.C.; Gallardo, J.C.; Kirk, H.G.; Palmer, R.B.

    1998-07-01

    Ionization cooling is the preferred method for reducing the emittance of muon beams in a muon collider. The method described here uses passive liquid hydrogen absorbers and rf acceleration in an alternating lattice of solenoids. The authors consider the basic principles of ionization cooling, indicating the reasons for selecting various parameters. Tracking simulations are used to make detailed examinations of effects on the beam, such as transmission losses, transverse cooling, bunch lengthening, and introduction of energy spread. The system reduces the overall 6-dimensional emittance to 44% of its initial value.

  8. Sequential cooling insert for turbine stator vane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Russell B; Krueger, Judson J; Plank, William L

    2014-04-01

    A sequential impingement cooling insert for a turbine stator vane that forms a double impingement for the pressure and suction sides of the vane or a triple impingement. The insert is formed from a sheet metal formed in a zigzag shape that forms a series of alternating impingement cooling channels with return air channels, where pressure side and suction side impingement cooling plates are secured over the zigzag shaped main piece. Another embodiment includes the insert formed from one or two blocks of material in which the impingement channels and return air channels are machined into each block.

  9. IC50-based approaches as an alternative method for assessment of time-dependent inhibition of CYP3A4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Howard J; Galetin, Aleksandra; Houston, J Brian

    2010-05-01

    The predictive utility of two in vitro methods (empirical IC(50)-based and mechanistic k(inact)/K(I)) for the assessment of time-dependent cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) inhibition has been compared. IC(50) values were determined at multiple pre-incubation time points over 30 min for five CYP3A4 time-dependent inhibitors (verapamil, diltiazem, erythromycin, clarithromycin, and azithromycin). The ability of IC(50) data obtained following pre-incubation to predict k(inact)/K(I) parameters was investigated and its utility was assessed relative to the conventional k(inact)/K(I) model using 50 reported clinical drug-drug interactions (DDIs). Models with either hepatic or hepatic with intestinal components were explored. For low/medium potency time-dependent inhibitors, 81% of the predicted k(inact)/K(I(unbound)) from IC(50) data were within an order of magnitude of the actual values, in contrast to 50% of potent inhibitors. An underprediction trend and > 50% of false-negatives were observed when IC(50) data were used in the DDI hepatic prediction model; incorporation of the intestine improved the prediction accuracy. On the contrary, 86% of the DDI studies were predicted within twofold using k(inact)/K(I) mechanistic approach and the combined hepatic and intestinal model. Use of the empirical IC(50) approach as an alternative to the mechanistic k(inact)/K(I) model for in vivo DDI prediction is limited and is best restricted to preliminary investigations.

  10. Assessment of alternative land management practices using hydrological simulation and a decision support tool: Arborea agricultural region, Sardinia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cau, P.; Paniconi, C.

    2007-11-01

    Quantifying the impact of land use on water supply and quality is a primary focus of environmental management. In this work we apply a semidistributed hydrological model (SWAT) to predict the impact of different land management practices on water and agricultural chemical yield over a long period of time for a study site situated in the Arborea region of central Sardinia, Italy. The physical processes associated with water movement, crop growth, and nutrient cycling are directly modeled by SWAT. The model simulations are used to identify indicators that reflect critical processes related to the integrity and sustainability of the ecosystem. Specifically we focus on stream quality and quantity indicators associated with anthropogenic and natural sources of pollution. A multicriteria decision support system is then used to develop the analysis matrix where water quality and quantity indicators for the rivers, lagoons, and soil are combined with socio-economic variables. The DSS is used to assess four options involving alternative watersheds designated for intensive agriculture and dairy farming and the use or not of treated wastewater for irrigation. Our analysis suggests that of the four options, the most widely acceptable consists in the transfer of intensive agricultural practices to the larger watershed, which is less vulnerable, in tandem with wastewater reuse, which rates highly due to water scarcity in this region of the Mediterranean. More generally, the work demonstrates how both qualitative and quantitative methods and information can assist decision making in complex settings.

  11. Assessment of Control Tissue for Gene and Protein Expression Studies: A Comparison of Three Alternative Lung Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret R. Passmore

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of an appropriate control group in human research is essential in investigating the level of a pathological disorder. This study aimed to compare three alternative sources of control lung tissue and to determine their suitability for gene and protein expression studies. Gene and protein expression levels of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and gelatinase families and their receptors were measured using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. The gene expression levels of VEGFA, placental growth factor (PGF, and their receptors, fms-related tyrosine kinase 1 (FLT1, and kinase insert domain receptor (KDR as well as matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2 and the inhibitors, tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 were significantly higher in lung cancer resections. The gene expression level of MMP-9 was significantly lower in the corresponding samples. Altered protein expression was also detected, depending on the area assessed. The results of this study show that none of the three control groups studied are completely suitable for gene and protein studies associated with the VEGF and gelatinase families, highlighting the need for researchers to be selective in which controls they opt for.

  12. Assessment of alternative land management practices using hydrological simulation and a decision support tool: Arborea agricultural region, Sardinia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Cau

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Quantifying the impact of land use on water supply and quality is a primary focus of environmental management. In this work we apply a semidistributed hydrological model (SWAT to predict the impact of different land management practices on water and agricultural chemical yield over a long period of time for a study site situated in the Arborea region of central Sardinia, Italy. The physical processes associated with water movement, crop growth, and nutrient cycling are directly modeled by SWAT. The model simulations are used to identify indicators that reflect critical processes related to the integrity and sustainability of the ecosystem. Specifically we focus on stream quality and quantity indicators associated with anthropogenic and natural sources of pollution. A multicriteria decision support system is then used to develop the analysis matrix where water quality and quantity indicators for the rivers, lagoons, and soil are combined with socio-economic variables. The DSS is used to assess four options involving alternative watersheds designated for intensive agriculture and dairy farming and the use or not of treated wastewater for irrigation. Our analysis suggests that of the four options, the most widely acceptable consists in the transfer of intensive agricultural practices to the larger watershed, which is less vulnerable, in tandem with wastewater reuse, which rates highly due to water scarcity in this region of the Mediterranean. More generally, the work demonstrates how both qualitative and quantitative methods and information can assist decision making in complex settings.

  13. Assessment of the quality and toxicity of the discharges of a wastewater treatment plant and alternatives to improve its operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles-Vargas, Daniel; Montoya-Castillo, Sandra Margarita; Avelar-González, Francisco Javier; Jauregui-Rincón, Juan; Rodríguez-Valadez, Francisco Javier; Rico-Martínez, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Wastewater discharges into freshwater bodies represent a serious ecological problem worldwide. In underdeveloped and developing countries wastewater treatment plants (WTP) only count with basic treatment, leading to the pollution of important aquatic reservoirs causing critical situations. In the present work, a one year evaluation of toxicity and main physical and chemical parameters of one of the major WTP of the state of Aguascalientes was conducted fortnightly, and to assess treatment alternatives for this WTP we tested: a) three white rot fungi (WRF), b) a photo-electrochemical process, c) ion-exchangers resins and activated carbon. The 3 WRF exhibited high COD removal from influents (72 - 95 %) but only Phanerochaete chrysosporium reached significant toxicity removals (70 and 55 %, for an influent and an effluent, respectively). Treatments with electrochemical advanced oxidation processes resulted with the highest toxicity and COD removals (96 % for both parameters) in comparison to biological and physicochemical treatments. Adsorption with activated carbon, zeolite and chelex ion-exchange resins removed 60 - 90 % of COD and 60 - 99 % toxicity. These results could be used to improve operation of the Industrial Park WTP and to plan future modifications to the plant.

  14. An assessment of potential degradation products in the gas-phase reactions of alternative fluorocarbons in the troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niki, Hiromi

    1990-01-01

    Tropospheric chemical transformations of alternative hydrofluorocarbons (HCF's) and hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFC's) are governed by hydroxyl radical initiated oxidation processes, which are likely to be analogous to those known for alkanes and chloroalkanes. A schematic diagram is used to illustrate plausible reaction mechanisms for their atmospheric degradation, where R, R', and R'' denote the F- and/or Cl-substituted alkyl groups derived from HCF's and HCFC's subsequent th the initial H atom abstraction by HO radicals. At present, virtually no kinetic data exist for the majority of these reactions, particularly for those involving RO. Potential degradation intermediates and final products include a large variety of fluorine- and/or chlorine-containing carbonyls, acids, peroxy acids, alcohols, hydrogen peroxides, nitrates and peroxy nitrates, as summarized in the attached table. Probably atmospheric lifetimes of these compounds were also estimated. For some carbonyl and nitrate products shown in this table, there seem to be no significant gas-phase removal mechanisms. Further chemical kinetics and photochemical data are needed to quantitatively assess the atmospheric fate of HCF's and HCFC's, and of the degradation products postulated in this report.

  15. ECOHEATCOOL Work Package 5. Possibilities with more district cooling in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalin, Paer; Rubenhag, Anders [Capital Cooling Europe AB, Stockholm (SE)] (and others)

    2006-07-01

    The main idea of district cooling is to use local sources that otherwise would be wasted or not used, in order to offer for the local market a competitive and high-efficient alternative to the traditional cooling solutions. The centralisation of cooling production is a prerequisite to reach a high efficiency insofar as it makes possible to use 'free cooling' or waste heat sources. A district cooling system can reach an efficiency rate typically 5 or even 10 times higher than traditional local electricity-driven equipments. The benefits of District cooling are addressing the society, property owners and utilities. For society: environment protection: reduction of CO{sub 2} emission and environmental hazardous refrigerants, enhanced aesthetics and an improved local environment by reducing the noise; security of supply: avoid investments in summer electricity peak capacities, enhance the reliability of the electricity supply competitiveness: development of a new energy service which should compete freely with the conventional alternatives. For property owners/customers: more economical way of cooling; corporate social responsibility (CSR) policy; Improved value for the cooled building. For utilities: competitive product that gives long term stable business; An innovative energy service to attract new and existing customers; Fits perfectly into Corporate Social Responsibility. Is a 25 % market share of District Cooling, of the total cooling market in Europe 32-165 TWh/year a possibility for 2020? There are some arguments in favour of such development but also barriers to be overcome: Strong driving force from property owners; Potential for cooling sources is larger than 500TWh: Natural cooling (free cooling including the possibility for seasonal storage): over 260TWh; Residual cooling (especially from LNG): over 30TWh; Industrial cooling (CHP, waste incineration, industrial residual); over 260 TWh. Legitimate - naturally integrated in the local energy policy

  16. 美国德克萨斯州替代性评估探析%Texas Alternative Assessment and Its Enlightenment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李莉; 江琴娣

    2015-01-01

    替代性评估是美国专门为认知障碍的学生设置的一种学业评估方式。自从1997年的《残疾人个别教育法修正案》首次确定了替代性评估的概念之后,美国各州相继形成了适合本州的替代性评估,其中德克萨斯州是美国最先采用基于调整成就标准后的替代性评估方式的州,具有较强的代表性。文章首先对德州替代性评估方式的发展历程、参与评估对象的资格、评估程序以及调整策略进行介绍,然后基于德州的替代性评估的启示对我国特殊教育评价体系的构建提出了几点建议。%Alternative assessment is a kind of assessment specialized for cognitive disorder students in America. Since the concept of alternative assessment was first addressed in The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act Amendment of 1997, the states have formed an appropriate alternative assessment based on their local characteristics. Texas has been the first state to use the alternative assessment based on the modified achievement standard and has extensive representation. The development process of Texas alternative assessment, the qualifications of participates and the procedure of it and its modified strategies were first introduced, and then give some suggestions in building our special education assessment system in our country based on enlightenment of Texas SDAAⅡ.

  17. Multicriteria cost–benefit assessment of tannery production: The need for breakthrough process alternatives beyond conventional technology optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giannetti, Biagio F. [Paulista University (UNIP) (Brazil); Agostinho, Feni, E-mail: feni@unip.br [Paulista University (UNIP) (Brazil); Moraes, Luciano C.; Almeida, Cecília M.V.B. [Paulista University (UNIP) (Brazil); Ulgiati, Sergio, E-mail: sergio.ulgiati@uniparthenope.it [Università degli studi di Napoli, Parthenope (Italy)

    2015-09-15

    The worldwide use of chromium-based processes in tanneries generates increased concerns about their related environmental burdens. Cleaner production alternatives for leather production are being proposed, based on the optimization of specific aspects or criteria, for instance, reducing demand for specific materials and energy, or reducing local toxicological emissions. While improvement on individual characteristics of the process is certainly to be favored, a more comprehensive evaluation of alternatives is also needed to prevent the risk of shifting the burden to increase global load while addressing one specific critical factor of production. This work aims to discuss the importance of a multicriteria, multiscale approach to address cleaner production strategy costs and benefits. For this, materials balance, an economic approach, and emergy (with an “m”) accounting methods are applied to selected unhairing/liming, pickling/tanning and wastewater treatment steps in a tannery process, which was chosen as a case study. Results show that the assessed recycling cleaner production strategies assessed allow the manufacturer to reduce by one half the amount of water used and the demand for chemicals up to 4% with respect to the business-as-usual process, at the expense of increasing electricity demand by 10%. Economic cost-to-benefit ratio was 25$ benefits per 1$ invested, as well as an emergy-based cost-to-benefit of 33Em$ per 1Em$ invested, of course these improvements were limited to the three investigated process steps. The improvement in cost/benefit ratios indicates that converting scenario #0 into #1 is favorable under economic and emergy views. However, when the two scenarios are investigated from the point of view of the imbalance in local and renewable resource use versus imported and nonrenewable use, the emergy method shows a small overall increase in renewability (from 3.51% to 3.85%), a low, but expected, emergy yield ratio equal to 1, and a high

  18. 中药冷热交替漩涡浴对脑卒中后肩手综合征患者的疗效观察%Clinical efficacy of traditional Chinese medicine combined with alterna-ting cooling and heating whirlpool bath on patients with shoulder-hand syndrome after stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晓东

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical efficacy of traditional Chinese medicine combined with alternating cooling and heating whirlpool bath on patients with shoulder-hand syndrome (SHS)after stroke.Methods 70 cases of SHS in stage I after stroke in the Chinese Medicine Hospital of Fengrun District of Tangshan City from December,2012 to December,2014 were randomly divided into control group (n =35)and treatment group (n =35).The control group received comprehensive rehabilitation training including exercise therapy,and the treatment group received traditional Chinese medicine com-bined with alternating cooling (12 ℃)and heating (40 ℃)whirlpool bath treatment 30 minutes every time in addition,twice a day for 4 weeks.The total effective rates,Visual Analogue Scale (VAS),Fugl-Meyer assessment,Barthel index (BI),modified Ashworth Scale (MAS),passive flexion range of the interphalangeal joint in close section of the middle finger and Stroke-Specific Quality of Life (SS-QOL) were compared.Results The total effective rate of treatment group was significantly higher than control group (P 0.05).Conclusion Traditional Chinese medicine combined with alternating cooling and heating whirl-pool bath for patients with SHS in stage I after stroke has significant clinical effect.It can effectively at-tenuate pain and improve motor function and range of finger joint activity,as well as the ability and quali-ty of daily life.%目的:观察中药冷热交替漩涡浴结合康复训练治疗脑卒中后肩手综合征(SHS)的临床疗效。方法选取2012年12月—2014年12月唐山市丰润区中医医院收治的 SHS I 期的脑卒中患者70例,随机分为对照组和治疗组,每组35例。对照组接受常规治疗并给予康复训练,治疗组同时给予温度分别为40℃与12℃的中药泡洗液交替漩涡浸泡患手,2次/d,30 min /次,共4周,比较2组患者的总体疗效、视觉模拟评分(VAS)、Fugl-Meyer 量表评分、Barthel

  19. Inductive cooling in quantum magnetomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Sanchez, Erick; Twamley, Jason; Bowen, Warwick P.; Vanner, Michael R.

    Coupling to light or microwave fields allows quantum control of the motion of a mechanical oscillator, and offers prospects for precision sensing, quantum information systems, and tests of fundamental physics. In cavity electromechanics ground state cooling has been achieved using resolved sideband cooling. Here we present an alternative approach based on a magnetomechanical system that inductively couples an LC resonator to a mechanical oscillator. The experimental setup consists of a micro cantilever with a pyramidal magnetic tip attached at the end of the beam. The sharp end of the magnetic tip is positioned close to the planar microfabricated inductor of the LC resonator. The displacement in the position of the end of the cantilever generates a change in flux through the coil inducing an electromotive force in the circuit. The current in the LC resonator generates a magnetic field, and then a force between the tip and the coil. When they are strongly coupled and the mechanical resonance frequency ωm exceeds the electrical decay rate of the resonator γe, resolved sideband cooling can be used to cool the mechanics. We present estimations for the coupling rates and the experimental parameters required for these experiments. E. Romero acknowledges to CONACyT.

  20. Local cooling reduces skin ischemia under surface pressure in rats: an assessment by wavelet analysis of laser Doppler blood flow oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Yih-Kuen; Lee, Bernard; Liao, Fuyuan; Foreman, Robert D

    2012-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the effects of local cooling on skin blood flow response to prolonged surface pressure and to identify associated physiological controls mediating these responses using the wavelet analysis of blood flow oscillations in rats. Twelve Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to three protocols, including pressure with local cooling (Δt = -10 °C), pressure with local heating (Δt = 10 °C) and pressure without temperature changes. Pressure of 700 mmHg was applied to the right trochanter area of rats for 3 h. Skin blood flow was measured using laser Doppler flowmetry. The 3 h loading period was divided into non-overlapping 30 min epochs for the analysis of the changes of skin blood flow oscillations using wavelet spectral analysis. The wavelet amplitudes and powers of three frequencies (metabolic, neurogenic and myogenic) of skin blood flow oscillations were calculated. The results showed that after an initial loading period of 30 min, skin blood flow continually decreased under the conditions of pressure with heating and of pressure without temperature changes, but maintained stable under the condition of pressure with cooling. Wavelet analysis revealed that stable skin blood flow under pressure with cooling was attributed to changes in the metabolic and myogenic frequencies. This study demonstrates that local cooling may be useful for reducing ischemia of weight-bearing soft tissues that prevents pressure ulcers.

  1. A combined capillary cooling system for cooling fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Ana Paula; Pelizza, Pablo Rodrigo; Galante, Renan Manozzo; Bazzo, Edson [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (LabCET/UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica. Lab. de Combustao e Engenharia de Sistemas Termicos], Emails: ana@labcet.ufsc.br, pablo@labcet.ufsc.br, renan@labcet.ufsc.br, ebazzo@emc.ufsc.br

    2010-07-01

    The operation temperature control has an important influence over the PEMFC (Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell) performance. A two-phase heat transfer system is proposed as an alternative for cooling and thermal control of PEMFC. The proposed system consists of a CPL (Capillary Pumped Loop) connected to a set of constant conductance heat pipes. In this work ceramic wick and stainless mesh wicks have been used as capillary structure of the CPL and heat pipes, respectively. Acetone has been used as the working fluid for CPL and deionized water for the heat pipes. Experimental results of three 1/4 inch stainless steel outlet diameter heats pipes and one CPL have been carried out and presented in this paper. Further experiments are planned coupling the proposed cooling system to a module which simulates the fuel cell. (author)

  2. Liquid-Cooled Garment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    A liquid-cooled bra, offshoot of Apollo moon suit technology, aids the cancer-detection technique known as infrared thermography. Water flowing through tubes in the bra cools the skin surface to improve resolution of thermograph image.

  3. ALTERNATIVE REFRIGERANT R-134A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasim KARABACAK

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available Because of the big damages on the ozone layer given by the refrigerants cloroflorocarbons that has been used up to now, new alternative gases should be developped and product at once. In this study, some informations about alternative to presently used CFCs, R-134A refrigerant's characteristics and its suitability to cooling systems is given. As it would be understood from these informations there is no objection on using alternative R-134A refrigerant

  4. Current progress in laser cooling of antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Luschevskaya, E V

    2014-01-01

    We talk about laser cooling methods of $\\bar{H} (H)$ and experimental achievements in this area. The Lyman-$\\alpha$ transition $1S\\rightarrow 2P$ is the most suitable one for this purpose due to small lifetime of $2P$ state and insignificant ionization losses at this wavelength. However the pulsed and continuous laser sources of Lyman-$\\alpha$ wavelength do not have enough power for fast cooling. The absence of powefull sources of Lyman-$\\alpha$ irradiation is a technical problem associated with the complexity of four-wave mixing scheme used for irradiation generation. Another problem of $\\bar{H} (H)$ laser cooling is large recoil energy which prevents cooling to submiliKelvin range by simple methods. The alternative way could be in use of other spectral transitions in (anti)hydrogen, new laser cooling methods or even other cooling schemes such as boofer or sympathetic cooling. In this paper we also discuss the applicability of sympathetic cooling for the antihydrogen case. The exploration of antihydrogen and...

  5. Data center cooling system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chainer, Timothy J; Dang, Hien P; Parida, Pritish R; Schultz, Mark D; Sharma, Arun

    2015-03-17

    A data center cooling system may include heat transfer equipment to cool a liquid coolant without vapor compression refrigeration, and the liquid coolant is used on a liquid cooled information technology equipment rack housed in the data center. The system may also include a controller-apparatus to regulate the liquid coolant flow to the liquid cooled information technology equipment rack through a range of liquid coolant flow values based upon information technology equipment temperature thresholds.

  6. Evaluation of research activities and research needs to increase the impact and applicability of alternative testing strategies in risk assessment practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Punt, A.; Schiffelers, M.J.W.A.; Jean Horbach, G.; Sandt, J.J.M. van de; Groothuis, G.M.M.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Blaauboer, B.J.

    2011-01-01

    The present paper aims at identifying strategies to increase the impact and applicability of alternative testing strategies in risk assessment. To this end, a quantitative and qualitative literature evaluation was performed on (a) current research efforts in the development of in vitro methods

  7. Who Are the Students Who May Qualify for an Alternate Assessment Based on Modified Academic Achievement Standards (AA-MAS)?: Focus Group Results. Synthesis Report 79

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, Sandra; Ebben, Barbara; Kubinski, Eva; Sim, Grant; Liu, Kristin; Lazarus, Sheryl; Thurlow, Martha; Christian, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Beginning in 2007, federal regulations to two major education laws gave state departments of education the option to develop an alternate assessment based on modified achievement standards (AA-MAS) for some students with disabilities. The regulations stated that the AA-MAS was intended for students who were being instructed in the grade-level…

  8. Ability or Access-Ability: Differential Item Functioning of Items on Alternate Performance-Based Assessment Tests for Students with Visual Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebehazy, Kim T.; Zigmond, Naomi; Zimmerman, George J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: This study investigated differential item functioning (DIF) of test items on Pennsylvania's Alternate System of Assessment (PASA) for students with visual impairments and severe cognitive disabilities and what the reasons for the differences may be. Methods: The Wilcoxon signed ranks test was used to analyze differences in the scores…

  9. NASAP: a computer code for the evaluation of the Non-proliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program concepts. Final report in support of Task 2. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maul, B.A.

    1979-09-01

    The Non-Proliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP) computer code was developed to calculate the LWR and NASAP choice reactor cost through an arbitrary year T/sub N/. The final cost is arrived at by calculation of cost contributory factors for both LWR and NASAP choice reactors.

  10. Assessing the Impact of Pilot School Snack Programs on Milk and Alternatives Intake in 2 Remote First Nation Communities in Northern Ontario, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Michelle; Hanning, Rhona M.; Gates, Allison; McCarthy, Daniel D.; Tsuji, Leonard J. S.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Canadian Aboriginal youth have poorer diet quality and higher rates of overweight and obesity than the general population. This research aimed to assess the impact of simple food provision programs on the intakes of milk and alternatives among youth in Kashechewan and Attawapiskat First Nations (FNs), Ontario, Canada. Methods: A pilot…

  11. Thermal study of the structure of an internal combustion engine and assessment of cooling system efficiency by a numerical tridimensional simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagasse, J.P.; Rossi, F.N. (Regie Nationale des Usines Renault 92 - Boulogne (FR))

    1989-01-01

    This paper proposes a calculation tool to evaluate the thermal field of the structure of an internal combustion engine. For this purpose a calculation procedure has been devised to take into account the thermal exchanges with the cooling fluid, the gases taking part to the combustion, the exchanges with the environment under the hood, the lubrificating liquid. The particularity of our study is to model with precision the action of the cooling fluid by solving the tridimensional thermo-hydraulic problem. This enables to evaluate quantitatively the efficiency of the cooling system and the influence of some geometrical modifications. We discuss the case of the housing of a car diesel-engine in using simultaneously an industrial thermo-hydraulic finite elements software (developed by C.E.A.) and a combustion specific one-dimensional software.

  12. Stochastic cooling in RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brennan,J.M.; Blaskiewicz, M. M.; Severino, F.

    2009-05-04

    After the success of longitudinal stochastic cooling of bunched heavy ion beam in RHIC, transverse stochastic cooling in the vertical plane of Yellow ring was installed and is being commissioned with proton beam. This report presents the status of the effort and gives an estimate, based on simulation, of the RHIC luminosity with stochastic cooling in all planes.

  13. Application of sensitivity analysis for assessment of de-desertification alternatives in the central Iran by using Triantaphyllou method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi Ravesh, Mohammad Hassan; Ahmadi, Hassan; Zehtabian, Gholamreza

    2011-08-01

    Desertification, land degradation in arid, semi-arid, and dry sub-humid regions, is a global environmental problem. With respect to increasing importance of desertification and its complexity, the necessity of attention to the optimal de-desertification alternatives is essential. Therefore, this work presents an analytic hierarchy process (AHP) method to objectively select the optimal de-desertification alternatives based on the results of interviews with experts in Khezr Abad region, central Iran as the case study. This model was used in Yazd Khezr Abad region to evaluate the efficiency in presentation of better alternatives related to personal and environmental situations. Obtained results indicate that the criterion "proportion and adaptation to the environment" with the weighted average of 33.6% is the most important criterion from experts viewpoints. While prevention alternatives of land usage unsuitable of reveres and conversion with 22.88% mean weight and vegetation cover development and reclamation with 21.9% mean weight are recognized ordinarily as the most important de-desertification alternatives in region. Finally, sensitivity analysis is performed in detail by varying the objective factor decision weight, the priority weight of subjective factors, and the gain factors. After the fulfillment of sensitivity analysis and determination of the most sensitive criteria and alternatives, the former classification and ranking of alternatives does not change so much, and it was observed that unsuitable land use alternative with the preference degree of 22.7% was still in the first order of priority. The final priority of livestock grazing control alternative was replaced with the alternative of modification of ground water harvesting.

  14. Local cooling reduces skin ischemia under surface pressure in rats: an assessment by wavelet analysis of laser Doppler blood flow oscillations

    OpenAIRE

    Jan, Yih-Kuen; Lee, Bernard; Liao, Fuyuan; Foreman, Robert D.

    2012-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the effects of local cooling on skin blood flow response to prolonged surface pressure and to identify associated physiological controls mediating these responses using wavelet analysis of blood flow oscillations in rats. Twelve Sprague Dawley rats were randomly assigned into three protocols, including pressure with local cooling (Δt= −10°C), pressure with local heating (Δt= 10°C), and pressure without temperature changes. Pressure of 700 mmHg ...

  15. Artificial cooling as an alternative to increase productivity and welfare of steers under heat stress Resfriamento artificial como alternativa para aumentar o bem-estar de novilhos sob estresse térmico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Correa-Calderón

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The effects of a cooling system on productive efficiency and welfare of Holstein steers were evaluated during the summer. Sixty steers in the finishing phase were randomly allotted to one of two treatment-groups. Animals of control group were only provided with shade (non-cooled group and a group of animals under a cooling system were installed in the shaded area (cooled group, which were operated daily from 09am to 6pm during the 69d of the study. The averages of environmental temperature and relative humidity were 35.4°C and 35.3%, respectively, with a temperature-humidity index average of 81.4 during the study. Individual body weight was recorded every two weeks, while body surface temperature and respiratory frequency were recorded three times per week. Blood samples were biweekly taken from coccygeal vein for determination of T3 and T4. The average daily gain in the cooled group gain (1.46kg/d was similar (P=0.21 to non-cooled group (1.37kg/d. Body surface temperature (35.9ºC vs 38.7ºC and respiratory frequency per minute (77 vs 104 were lower (PAvaliou-se um sistema de resfriamento para aumentar a eficiência produtiva e o bem-estar de novilhos durante o verão. Utilizaram-se 60 animais em fase de acabamento, distribuídos aleatoriamente em dois grupos: os do grupo-controle permaneceram somente sob sombra (grupo não resfriado e os do grupo sob sistema de resfriamento, sob área sombreada, diariamente, das 9 às 18h, durante 69 dias de estudo. As médias registradas de temperatura ambiente e umidade relativa foram 35,4°C e 35,3°C, respectivamente, com índice de temperatura-umidade de 81,4 durante o período de estudo. O peso individual foi anotado a cada duas semanas, e a temperatura da superfície corporal e a frequência respiratória foram registrados três vezes por semana. Amostras de sangue foram tomadas da veia coccígea duas vezes por semana para determinação de T3 e T4. O ganho médio diário no grupo sob resfriamento (1

  16. Life Cycle Assessment of Residential Heating and Cooling Systems in Minnesota A comprehensive analysis on life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and cost-effectiveness of ground source heat pump (GSHP) systems compared to the conventional gas furnace and air conditioner system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mo

    Ground Source Heat Pump (GSHP) technologies for residential heating and cooling are often suggested as an effective means to curb energy consumption, reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and lower homeowners' heating and cooling costs. As such, numerous federal, state and utility-based incentives, most often in the forms of financial incentives, installation rebates, and loan programs, have been made available for these technologies. While GSHP technology for space heating and cooling is well understood, with widespread implementation across the U.S., research specific to the environmental and economic performance of these systems in cold climates, such as Minnesota, is limited. In this study, a comparative environmental life cycle assessment (LCA) is conducted of typical residential HVAC (Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning) systems in Minnesota to investigate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for delivering 20 years of residential heating and cooling—maintaining indoor temperatures of 68°F (20°C) and 75°F (24°C) in Minnesota-specific heating and cooling seasons, respectively. Eight residential GSHP design scenarios (i.e. horizontal loop field, vertical loop field, high coefficient of performance, low coefficient of performance, hybrid natural gas heat back-up) and one conventional natural gas furnace and air conditioner system are assessed for GHG and life cycle economic costs. Life cycle GHG emissions were found to range between 1.09 × 105 kg CO2 eq. and 1.86 × 10 5 kg CO2 eq. Six of the eight GSHP technology scenarios had fewer carbon impacts than the conventional system. Only in cases of horizontal low-efficiency GSHP and hybrid, do results suggest increased GHGs. Life cycle costs and present value analyses suggest GSHP technologies can be cost competitive over their 20-year life, but that policy incentives may be required to reduce the high up-front capital costs of GSHPs and relatively long payback periods of more than 20 years. In addition

  17. Laser cooling of solids

    OpenAIRE

    Nemova, Galina

    2009-01-01

    Parallel to advances in laser cooling of atoms and ions in dilute gas phase, which has progressed immensely, resulting in physics Nobel prizes in 1997 and 2001, major progress has recently been made in laser cooling of solids. I compare the physical nature of the laser cooling of atoms and ions with that of the laser cooling of solids. I point out all advantages of this new and very promising area of laser physics. Laser cooling of solids (optical refrigeration) at the present time can be lar...

  18. Techno-economic assessment of boiler feed water production by membrane distillation with reuse of thermal waste energy from cooling water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, N.J.M.; Leerdam, R.C. van; Medevoort, J. van; Tongeren, W.G.J.M. van; Verhasselt, B.; Verelst, L.; Vermeersch, M.; Corbisier, D.

    2015-01-01

    The European KIC-Climate project Water and Energy for Climate Change (WE4CC) aims at the technical demonstration, business case evaluation and implementation of new value chains for the production of high-quality water using low-grade thermal waste energy from cooling water. A typical large-scale wa

  19. Market assessment for active solar heating and cooling products. Category B: A survey of decision makers in the HVAC market place. Survey instruments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilien, G. L.; Johnston, P. E.

    1980-09-01

    Telephone screener questionnaires and mail-out questionnaires for marketing surveys for solar heating and cooling equipment are presented. Questionnaires are included for the residential segment, industrial segment, HVAC professionals segment, builder/developer segment, and the commercial segment. No results are reported. (WHK)

  20. Techno-economic assessment of boiler feed water production by membrane distillation with reuse of thermal waste energy from cooling water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, N.J.M.; Leerdam, R.C. van; Medevoort, J. van; Tongeren, W.G.J.M. van; Verhasselt, B.; Verelst, L.; Vermeersch, M.; Corbisier, D.

    2015-01-01

    The European KIC-Climate project Water and Energy for Climate Change (WE4CC) aims at the technical demonstration, business case evaluation and implementation of new value chains for the production of high-quality water using low-grade thermal waste energy from cooling water. A typical large-scale