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Sample records for alternate storage facility

  1. SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT PHASE 1 SLUDGE STORAGE OPTIONS ASSESSMENT OF T PLANT VERSUS ALTERNATE STORAGE FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RUTHERFORD WW; GEUTHER WJ; STRANKMAN MR; CONRAD EA; RHOADARMER DD; BLACK DM; POTTMEYER JA

    2009-04-29

    The CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) has recommended to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) a two phase approach for removal and storage (Phase 1) and treatment and packaging for offsite shipment (Phase 2) of the sludge currently stored within the 105-K West Basin. This two phased strategy enables early removal of sludge from the 105-K West Basin by 2015, allowing remediation of historical unplanned releases of waste and closure of the 100-K Area. In Phase 1, the sludge currently stored in the Engineered Containers and Settler Tanks within the 105-K West Basin will be transferred into sludge transport and storage containers (STSCs). The STSCs will be transported to an interim storage facility. In Phase 2, sludge will be processed (treated) to meet shipping and disposal requirements and the sludge will be packaged for final disposal at a geologic repository. The purpose of this study is to evaluate two alternatives for interim Phase 1 storage of K Basin sludge. The cost, schedule, and risks for sludge storage at a newly-constructed Alternate Storage Facility (ASF) are compared to those at T Plant, which has been used previously for sludge storage. Based on the results of the assessment, T Plant is recommended for Phase 1 interim storage of sludge. Key elements that support this recommendation are the following: (1) T Plant has a proven process for storing sludge; (2) T Plant storage can be implemented at a lower incremental cost than the ASF; and (3) T Plant storage has a more favorable schedule profile, which provides more float, than the ASF. Underpinning the recommendation of T Plant for sludge storage is the assumption that T Plant has a durable, extended mission independent of the K Basin sludge interim storage mission. If this assumption cannot be validated and the operating costs of T Plant are borne by the Sludge Treatment Project, the conclusions and recommendations of this study would change. The following decision-making strategy, which is

  2. SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT PHASE 1 SLUDGE STORAGE OPTIONS. ASSESSMENT OF T PLANT VERSUS ALTERNATE STORAGE FACILITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) has recommended to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) a two phase approach for removal and storage (Phase 1) and treatment and packaging for offsite shipment (Phase 2) of the sludge currently stored within the 105-K West Basin. This two phased strategy enables early removal of sludge from the 105-K West Basin by 2015, allowing remediation of historical unplanned releases of waste and closure of the 100-K Area. In Phase 1, the sludge currently stored in the Engineered Containers and Settler Tanks within the 105-K West Basin will be transferred into sludge transport and storage containers (STSCs). The STSCs will be transported to an interim storage facility. In Phase 2, sludge will be processed (treated) to meet shipping and disposal requirements and the sludge will be packaged for final disposal at a geologic repository. The purpose of this study is to evaluate two alternatives for interim Phase 1 storage of K Basin sludge. The cost, schedule, and risks for sludge storage at a newly-constructed Alternate Storage Facility (ASF) are compared to those at T Plant, which has been used previously for sludge storage. Based on the results of the assessment, T Plant is recommended for Phase 1 interim storage of sludge. Key elements that support this recommendation are the following: (1) T Plant has a proven process for storing sludge; (2) T Plant storage can be implemented at a lower incremental cost than the ASF; and (3) T Plant storage has a more favorable schedule profile, which provides more float, than the ASF. Underpinning the recommendation of T Plant for sludge storage is the assumption that T Plant has a durable, extended mission independent of the K Basin sludge interim storage mission. If this assumption cannot be validated and the operating costs of T Plant are borne by the Sludge Treatment Project, the conclusions and recommendations of this study would change. The following decision-making strategy, which is

  3. Spent unreprocessed fuel (SURF) facility evaluation plan of the alternative storage concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concepts were evaluated for the storage of unreprocessed spent fuel in a retrievable surface storage facility. This document provides a systematic format for making a concept selection from the seven alternative concepts presented in RHO-LD-2. Results of the evaluation was that the Drywell concept was rated highest with the Water Basin Concept and the Sealed Storage Cask concept with multiple canisters of SURF coming in a close second and third

  4. Conceptual design report: Nuclear materials storage facility renovation. Part 6, Alternatives study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was a Fiscal Year (FY) 1984 line-item project completed in 1987 that has never been operated because of major design and construction deficiencies. This renovation project, which will correct those deficiencies and allow operation of the facility, is proposed as an FY 97 line item. The mission of the project is to provide centralized intermediate and long-term storage of special nuclear materials (SNM) associated with defined LANL programmatic missions and to establish a centralized SNM shipping and receiving location for Technical Area (TA)-55 at LANL. Based on current projections, existing storage space for SNM at other locations at LANL will be loaded to capacity by approximately 2002. This will adversely affect LANUs ability to meet its mission requirements in the future. The affected missions include LANL's weapons research, development, and testing (WRD ampersand T) program; special materials recovery; stockpile survelliance/evaluation; advanced fuels and heat sources development and production; and safe, secure storage of existing nuclear materials inventories. The problem is further exacerbated by LANL's inability to ship any materials offsite because of the lack of receiver sites for material and regulatory issues. Correction of the current deficiencies and enhancement of the facility will provide centralized storage close to a nuclear materials processing facility. The project will enable long-term, cost-effective storage in a secure environment with reduced radiation exposure to workers, and eliminate potential exposures to the public. This report is organized according to the sections and subsections outlined by Attachment 111-2 of DOE Document AL 4700.1, Project Management System. It is organized into seven parts. This document, Part VI - Alternatives Study, presents a study of the different storage/containment options considered for NMSF

  5. Oil Storage Facilities - Storage Tank Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — A Storage Tank Location is a DEP primary facility type, and its sole sub-facility is the storage tank itself. Storage tanks are aboveground or underground, and are...

  6. Spent-fuel-storage alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Spent Fuel Storage Alternatives meeting was a technical forum in which 37 experts from 12 states discussed storage alternatives that are available or are under development. The subject matter was divided into the following five areas: techniques for increasing fuel storage density; dry storage of spent fuel; fuel characterization and conditioning; fuel storage operating experience; and storage and transport economics. Nineteen of the 21 papers which were presented at this meeting are included in this Proceedings. These have been abstracted and indexed

  7. Multipurpose dry storage facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SGN has gained considerable experience in the design and construction of interim storage facilities for spent fuel and various nuclear waste, and can therefore propose single product and multiproduct facilities capable of accommodating all types of waste in a single structure. The pooling of certain functions (transport cask reception, radiation protection), the choice of optimized technologies to meet the specific needs of the clients (automatic transfer by shielded cask or nuclearized crane) and the use of the same type of well to cool the heat releasing packages (glass canisters, fuel elements) make it possible to propose industrially proven and cost effective solutions. The studies conducted by SGN on behalf of the Dutch company COVRA (Centrale Organisatie Voor Radioactif Afval), offer an example of the application of this new concept. This paper first presents the SGN experience through a short description of reference storage facilities for various types of products (MLW, HLW and Spent Fuel). It goes on with a typical application to show how these proven technologies are combined to obtain single product or multiproduct facilities tailored to the client's specific requirements. (author)

  8. Spent-fuel-storage alternatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    The Spent Fuel Storage Alternatives meeting was a technical forum in which 37 experts from 12 states discussed storage alternatives that are available or are under development. The subject matter was divided into the following five areas: techniques for increasing fuel storage density; dry storage of spent fuel; fuel characterization and conditioning; fuel storage operating experience; and storage and transport economics. Nineteen of the 21 papers which were presented at this meeting are included in this Proceedings. These have been abstracted and indexed. (ATT)

  9. High-level waste inventory, characteristics, generation, and facility assessment for treatment, storage, and disposal alternatives considered in the US Department of Energy eenvironmental management programmatic environmental impact statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides data and information needed to support the risk and impact assessments of high-level waste (HLW) management alternatives in the U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management (WM) Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). Available data on the physical form, chemical and isotopic composition, storage locations, and other waste characteristics of interest are presented. High-level waste management follows six implementation phases: current storage, retrieval, pretreatment, treatment, interim canister storage, and geologic repository disposal; pretreatment, treatment, and repository disposal are outside the scope of the WM PEIS. Brief descriptions of current and planned HLW management facilities are provided, including information on the type of waste managed in the facility, costs, product form, resource requirements, emissions, and current and future status. Data sources and technical and regulatory assumptions are identified. The range of HLW management alternatives (including decentralized, regionalized, and centralized approaches) is described. The required waste management facilities include expanded interim storage facilities under the various alternatives. Resource requirements for construction (e.g., land and materials) and operation (e.g., energy and process chemicals), work force, costs, effluents, design capacities, and emissions are presented for each alternative

  10. High-level waste inventory, characteristics, generation, and facility assessment for treatment, storage, and disposal alternatives considered in the U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides data and information needed to support the risk and impact assessments of high-level waste (HLW) management alternatives in the US Department of Energy Waste Management (WM) Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). Available data on the physical form, chemical and isotopic composition, storage locations, and other waste characteristics of interest are presented. High-level waste management follows six implementation phases: current storage, retrieval, pretreatment, treatment, interim canister storage, and geologic repository disposal; pretreatment, treatment, and repository disposal are outside the scope of the WM PEIS. Brief descriptions of current and planned HLW management facilities are provided, including information on the type of waste managed in the facility, costs, product form, resource requirements, emissions, and current and future status. Data sources and technical and regulatory assumptions are identified. The range of HLW management alternatives (including decentralized, regionalized, and centralized approaches) is described. The required waste management facilities include expanded interim storage facilities under the various alternatives. Resource requirements for construction (e.g., land and materials) and operation (e.g., energy and process chemicals), work force, costs, effluents, design capacities, and emissions are presented for each alternative

  11. High-level waste inventory, characteristics, generation, and facility assessment for treatment, storage, and disposal alternatives considered in the US Department of Energy eenvironmental management programmatic environmental impact statement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Folga, S.M.; Conzelmann, G.; Gillette, J.L.; Kier, P.H.; Poch, L.A.

    1996-12-01

    This report provides data and information needed to support the risk and impact assessments of high-level waste (HLW) management alternatives in the U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management (WM) Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). Available data on the physical form, chemical and isotopic composition, storage locations, and other waste characteristics of interest are presented. High-level waste management follows six implementation phases: current storage, retrieval, pretreatment, treatment, interim canister storage, and geologic repository disposal; pretreatment, treatment, and repository disposal are outside the scope of the WM PEIS. Brief descriptions of current and planned HLW management facilities are provided, including information on the type of waste managed in the facility, costs, product form, resource requirements, emissions, and current and future status. Data sources and technical and regulatory assumptions are identified. The range of HLW management alternatives (including decentralized, regionalized, and centralized approaches) is described. The required waste management facilities include expanded interim storage facilities under the various alternatives. Resource requirements for construction (e.g., land and materials) and operation (e.g., energy and process chemicals), work force, costs, effluents, design capacities, and emissions are presented for each alternative.

  12. An alternative storage method for entomopathogenic nematodes

    OpenAIRE

    GÜLCÜ, Barış; HAZIR, Selçuk

    2012-01-01

    Tetra Pak containers were evaluated as an alternative to tissue culture flasks for nematode storage. Our data showed that Tetra Pak containers were an excellent alternative to tissue culture flasks for storage of H. bacteriophora and will more than likely be useful for other entomopathogenic nematode species.

  13. Hazardous waste inventory, characteristics, generation, and facility assessment for treatment, storage, and disposal alternatives considered in the U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report focuses on the generation of hazardous waste (HW) and the treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) of HW being generated by routine US Department of Energy (DOE) facility operations. The wastes to be considered are managed by the DOE Waste Management (WM) Division (WM HW). The waste streams are to be sent to WM operations throughout the DOE complex under four management alternatives: No Action, Decentralization, Regionalized 1, and Regionalized 2. On-site and off-site capabilities for TSD are examined for each alternative. This report (1) summarizes the HW inventories and generated amounts resulting from WM activities, focusing on the largest DOE HW generators; (2) presents estimates of the annual amounts shipped off-site, as well as the amounts treated by various treatment technology groups; (3) describes the existing and planned treatment and storage capabilities of the largest HW-generating DOE installations, as well as the use of commercial TSD facilities by DOE sites; (4) presents applicable technologies (destruction of organics, deactivation/neutralization of waste, removal/recovery of organics, and aqueous liquid treatment); and (5) describes the four alternatives for consideration for future HW management, and for each alternative provides the HW loads and the approach used to estimate the source term for routine TSD operations. In addition, potential air emissions, liquid effluents, and solid residuals associated with each alternative are presented. Furthermore, this report is supplemented with an addendum that includes detailed information related to HW inventory, characteristics, generation, and facility assessment for the TSD alternatives. The addendum also presents source terms, emission rates, and throughput totals by alternative and treatment installation

  14. Bidding strategy for an energy storage facility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nasrolahpour, Ehsan; Zareipour, Hamidreza; Rosehart, William D.;

    2016-01-01

    to maximize its profit, while the market operator aims at maximizing the social welfare. In this case, the storage facility adapts its strategic behavior to take advantage of market conditions. To model the imperfectly competitive market, a bi-level optimization model is implemented to present......This paper studies operation decisions of energy storage facilities in perfectly and imperfectly competitive markets. In a perfectly competitive market, the storage facility is operated to maximize the social welfare. However, in a imperfectly competitive market, the storage facility operates...

  15. Alternatives for water basin spent fuel storage using pin storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The densest tolerable form for storing spent nuclear fuel is storage of only the fuel rods. This eliminates the space between the fuel rods and frees the hardware to be treated as non-fuel waste. The storage density can be as much as 1.07 MTU/ft2 when racks are used that just satisfy the criticality and thermal limitations. One of the major advantages of pin storage is that it is compatible with existing racks; however, this reduces the storage density to 0.69 MTU/ft2. Even this is a substantial increase over the 0.39 MTU/ft2 that is achievable with current high capacity stainless steel racks which have been selected as the bases for comparison. Disassembly requires extensive operation on the fuel assembly to remove the upper end fitting and to extract the fuel rods from the assembly skeleton. These operations will be performed with the aid of an elevator to raise the assembly where each fuel rod is grappled. Lowering the elevator will free the fuel rod for transfer to the storage canister. A storage savings of $1510 per MTU can be realized if the pin storage concept is incorporated at a new away-from-reactor facility. The storage cost ranges from $3340 to $7820 per MTU of fuel stored with the lower cost applying to storage at an existing away-from-reactor storage facility and the higher cost applying to at-reactor storage

  16. Mixed oxide conversion facility alternative conceptual designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allied-General Nuclear Services recently performed studies to evaluate alternative proliferation-resistant flowsheets of the uranium-based LWR fuel cycle. The alternatives evaluated consist of coprocessing schemes with either a gamma or a heat spike added. A literature search and evaluation were performed to select a process technology for mixed oxide coconversion. The COPRECAL process was chosen as the most suitable conversion process technology. Three alternative mixed oxide conversion facility design concepts were prepared based on the COPRECAL technology. These alternative concepts are compared to a pure plutonium conversion facility. Facility designs, relative proliferation resistance, and cost estimates are discussed

  17. Dry Well Storage Facility conceptual design study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Dry Well Storage Facility described is assumed to be located adjacent to or near a Spent Fuel Receiving and Packaging Facility and/or a Packaged Fuel Transfer Facility. Performance requirements, quality levels and codes and standards, schedule and methods of performance, special requirements, quality assurance program, and cost estimate are discussed. Appendices on major mechanical equipment and electric power requirements are included

  18. Design of spent fuel storage facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Guide is for interim spent fuel storage facilities that are not integral part of an operating nuclear power plant. Following the introduction, Section 2 describes the general safety requirements applicable to the design of both wet and dry spent fuel storage facilities; Section 3 deals with the design requirements specific to either wet or dry storage. Recommendations for the auxiliary systems of any storage facility are contained in Section 4; these are necessary to ensure the safety of the system and its safe operation. Section 5 provides recommendations for establishing the quality assurance system for a storage facility. Section 6 discusses the requirements for inspection and maintenance that must be considered during the design. Finally, Section 7 provides guidance on design features to be considered to facilitate eventual decommissioning. 18 refs

  19. Preliminary assessment of alternative dry storage methods for the storage of commercial spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of an assessment of the (1) state of technology, (2) licensability, (3) implementation schedule, and (4) costs of alternative dry methods for storage of spent fuel at a reactor location when used to supplement reactor pool storage facilities. The methods of storage that were considered included storage in casks, drywells, concrete silos and air-cooled vaults. The impact of disassembly of spent fuel and storage of consolidated fuel rods was also determined. The economic assessments were made based on the current projected storage requirements of Virginia Electric and Power Company's Surry Station for the period 1985 to 2009, which has two operating pressurized water reactors (824 MWe each). It was estimated that the unit cost for storage of spent fuel in casks would amount to $117/kgU and that such costs for storage in drywells would amount to $137/kgU. However, based on the overall assessment it was concluded both storage methods were equal in merit. Modular methods of storage were generally found to be more economic than those requiring all or most of the facilities to be constructed prior to commencement of storage operations

  20. Regional spent fuel storage facility (RSFSF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper gives an overview of the meetings held on the technology and safety aspects of regional spent fuel storage facilities. The questions of technique, economy and key public and political issues will be covered as well as the aspects to be considered for implementation of a regional facility. (author)

  1. Interim storage facility for spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spent fuel generated from the operation of a nuclear power plant is to be treated in the reprocessing plant in Rokkasho, Aomori. At present, spent fuel is stored in the nuclear power plant until it is reprocessed. However the amount of spent fuel generated exceeds the capacity of the reprocessing plant. Hence an additional spent fuel storage facility is needed for the nuclear fuel cycle. The spent fuel interim storage facility is the first institution in Japan that stores spent fuel outside of the nuclear power plant site. Our company has received an order for internal equipment for this facility. This paper introduces an overview of the interim storage facility for spent fuel. (author)

  2. Operation of spent fuel storage facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Guide was prepared as part of the IAEA's programme on safety of spent fuel storage. This is for interim spent fuel storage facilities that are not integral part of an operating nuclear power plant. Following the introduction, Section 2 describes key activities in the operation of spent fuel storage facilities. Section 3 lists the basic safety considerations for storage facility operation, the fundamental safety objectives being subcriticality, heat removal and radiation protection. Recommendations for organizing the management of a facility are contained in Section 4. Section 5 deals with aspects of training and qualification; Section 6 describes the phases of the commissioning of a spent fuel storage facility. Section 7 describes operational limits and conditions, while Section 8 deals with operating procedures and instructions. Section 9 deals with maintenance, testing, examination and inspection. Section 10 presents recommendations for radiation and environmental protection. Recommendations for the quality assurance (QA) system are presented in Section 11. Section 12 describes the aspects of safeguards and physical protection to be taken into account during operations; Section 13 gives guidance for decommissioning. 15 refs, 5 tabs

  3. 303-K Storage Facility closure plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recyclable scrap uranium with zircaloy-2 and copper silicon alloy, uranium-titanium alloy, beryllium/zircaloy-2 alloy, and zircaloy-2 chips and fines were secured in concrete billets (7.5-gallon containers) in the 303-K Storage Facility, located in the 300 Area. The beryllium/zircaloy-2 alloy and zircaloy-2 chips and fines are designated as mixed waste with the characteristic of ignitability. The concretion process reduced the ignitability of the fines and chips for safe storage and shipment. This process has been discontinued and the 303-K Storage Facility is now undergoing closure as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 and the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Dangerous Waste Regulations, WAC 173-303-040. This closure plan presents a description of the 303-K Storage Facility, the history of materials and waste managed, and the procedures that will be followed to close the 303-K Storage Facility. The 303-K Storage Facility is located within the 300-FF-3 (source) and 300-FF-5 (groundwater) operable units, as designated in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) (Ecology et al. 1992). Contamination in the operable units 300-FF-3 and 300-FF-5 is scheduled to be addressed through the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980 remedial action process. Therefore, all soil remedial action at the 304 Facility will be conducted as part of the CERCLA remedial action of operable units 300-FF-3 and 300-FF-5

  4. Calcined solids storage facility closure study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The disposal of radioactive wastes now stored at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory is currently mandated under a open-quotes Settlement Agreementclose quotes (or open-quotes Batt Agreementclose quotes) between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. Under this agreement, all high-level waste must be treated as necessary to meet the disposal criteria and disposed of or made road ready to ship from the INEEL by 2035. In order to comply with this agreement, all calcined waste produced in the New Waste Calcining Facility and stored in the Calcined Solids Facility must be treated and disposed of by 2035. Several treatment options for the calcined waste have been studied in support of the High-Level Waste Environmental Impact Statement. Two treatment methods studied, referred to as the TRU Waste Separations Options, involve the separation of the high-level waste (calcine) into TRU waste and low-level waste (Class A or Class C). Following treatment, the TRU waste would be sent to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for final storage. It has been proposed that the low-level waste be disposed of in the Tank Farm Facility and/or the Calcined Solids Storage Facility following Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure. In order to use the seven Bin Sets making up the Calcined Solids Storage Facility as a low-level waste landfill, the facility must first be closed to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) standards. This study identifies and discusses two basic methods available to close the Calcined Solids Storage Facility under the RCRA - Risk-Based Clean Closure and Closure to Landfill Standards. In addition to the closure methods, the regulatory requirements and issues associated with turning the Calcined Solids Storage Facility into an NRC low-level waste landfill or filling the bin voids with clean grout are discussed

  5. Idaho Waste Vitrification Facilities Project Vitrified Waste Interim Storage Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnema, Bruce Edward

    2001-09-01

    This feasibility study report presents a draft design of the Vitrified Waste Interim Storage Facility (VWISF), which is one of three subprojects of the Idaho Waste Vitrification Facilities (IWVF) project. The primary goal of the IWVF project is to design and construct a treatment process system that will vitrify the sodium-bearing waste (SBW) to a final waste form. The project will consist of three subprojects that include the Waste Collection Tanks Facility, the Waste Vitrification Facility (WVF), and the VWISF. The Waste Collection Tanks Facility will provide for waste collection, feed mixing, and surge storage for SBW and newly generated liquid waste from ongoing operations at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. The WVF will contain the vitrification process that will mix the waste with glass-forming chemicals or frit and turn the waste into glass. The VWISF will provide a shielded storage facility for the glass until the waste can be disposed at either the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant as mixed transuranic waste or at the future national geological repository as high-level waste glass, pending the outcome of a Waste Incidental to Reprocessing determination, which is currently in progress. A secondary goal is to provide a facility that can be easily modified later to accommodate storage of the vitrified high-level waste calcine. The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of the VWISF, which would be constructed in compliance with applicable federal, state, and local laws. This project supports the Department of Energy’s Environmental Management missions of safely storing and treating radioactive wastes as well as meeting Federal Facility Compliance commitments made to the State of Idaho.

  6. The cascad spent fuel dry storage facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    France has a wide variety of experimental spent fuels different from LWR spent fuel discharged from commercial reactors. Reprocessing such fuels would thus require the development and construction of special facilities. The French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) has consequently opted for long-term interim storage of these spent fuels over a period of 50 years. Comparative studies of different storage concepts have been conducted on the basis of safety (mainly containment barriers and cooling), economic, modular design and operating flexibility criteria. These studies have shown that dry storage in a concrete vault cooled by natural convection is the best solution. A research and development program including theoretical investigations and mock-up tests confirmed the feasibility of cooling by natural convection and the validity of design rules applied for fuel storage. A facility called CASCAD was built at the CEA's Cadarache Nuclear Research Center, where it has been operational since mid-1990. This paper describes the CASCAD facility and indicates how its concept can be applied to storage of LWR fuel assemblies

  7. Monitored retrievable storage facility site screening and evaluation report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1985-05-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 directs the Department of Energy to complete a detailed study of the need for and feasibility of, and to submit to the Congress a proposal for, the construction of one or more monitored retrievable storage facilities for high level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel.'' The Act directs that the proposal includes site specific designs. Further, the proposal is to include, for the first such facility, at least three alternative sites and at least five alternative combinations of such proposed site and facility designs...'' as well as a recommendation of the combination among the alternatives that the Secretary deems preferable.'' An MRS Site Screening Task Force has been formed to help identify and evaluated potential MRS facility sites within a preferred region and with the application of a siting process and criteria developed by the DOE. The activities of the task force presented in this report includes: site screening (Sections 3, 4, and 5), the MRS facilities which are to be sited are described; the criteria, process and outcome of the screening process is presented; and descriptions of the candidate MRS facility sites are given, and site evaluations (Sections 6 through 9) where the rational for the site evaluations are presented, along with each evaluation and findings of the Task Force.

  8. Monitored retrievable storage facility site screening and evaluation report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 directs the Department of Energy to ''complete a detailed study of the need for and feasibility of, and to submit to the Congress a proposal for, the construction of one or more monitored retrievable storage facilities for high level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel.'' The Act directs that the proposal includes site specific designs. Further, the proposal is to include, ''for the first such facility, at least three alternative sites and at least five alternative combinations of such proposed site and facility designs...'' as well as a recommendation of ''the combination among the alternatives that the Secretary deems preferable.'' An MRS Site Screening Task Force has been formed to help identify and evaluated potential MRS facility sites within a preferred region and with the application of a siting process and criteria developed by the DOE. The activities of the task force presented in this report includes: site screening (Sections 3, 4, and 5), the MRS facilities which are to be sited are described; the criteria, process and outcome of the screening process is presented; and descriptions of the candidate MRS facility sites are given, and site evaluations (Sections 6 through 9) where the rational for the site evaluations are presented, along with each evaluation and findings of the Task Force

  9. Concepts for Waste Retrieval and Alternate Storage of Radioactive Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary purpose of this technical report is to present concepts for retrieval operations, equipment to be used, scenarios under which waste retrieval operations will take place, methods for responding to potential retrieval problems, and compliance with the preclosure performance objectives of 10 CFR 63.111(a) and (b) [DIRS 156605] during the retrieval of waste packages from the subsurface repository. If a decision for retrieval is made for any or all of the waste, the waste to be retrieved would be dispositioned in accordance with the regulations applicable at the time. The secondary purpose is to present concepts for the design, construction, and operation of an alternate storage facility. The alternate storage facility would temporarily house the retrieved waste until final disposition is established. The concept presented is consistent with current practices and regulations for the protection of public health and safety and the environment, it demonstrates the feasibility of such a facility, if required, and it is based on the consideration for keeping radiation exposure as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA)

  10. Continuous inventory in SNM storage facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Instrumentation and data processing techniques that provide inexpensive verification of material in storage were investigated. Transfers of special nuclear materials (SNM) into the storage area are accompanied by an automated verification of the container identity, weight, and the radiation signature of the contents. This information is computer-processed and stored for comparison at subsequent transfers and also provides the data base for record purposes. Physical movement of containers across the boundary of the storage area is presently accomplished by operating personnel in order to minimize expensive modifications to existing storage facilities. Personnel entering and leaving the storage area are uniquely identified and also through portal monitors capable of detecting small quantities of SNM. Once material is placed on the storage shelves, simple, low-cost container tagging and radiation sensors are activated. A portion of the prescribed gamma signature, obtained by duplicate shelf monitors during the transfer verification, is thus continuously checked against the stored identification data. Radiation detector design is severely constrained by the need to discriminate individual signatures in a high background area and the need for low unit costs. In operation any unauthorized change in signal is analyzed along with auxiliary data from surveillance sensors to activate the appropriate alarms. (auth))

  11. Safety assessment for spent fuel storage facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Practice has been prepared as part of the IAEA's programme on the safety assessment of interim spent fuel storage facilities which are not an integral part of an operating nuclear power plant. This report provides general guidance on the safety assessment process, discussing both deterministic and probabilistic assessment methods. It describes the safety assessment process for normal operation and anticipated operational occurrences and also related to accident conditions. 10 refs, 2 tabs

  12. Environmental assessment for the construction and operation of waste storage facilities at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DOE is proposing to construct and operate 3 waste storage facilities (one 42,000 ft2 waste storage facility for RCRA waste, one 42,000 ft2 waste storage facility for toxic waste (TSCA), and one 200,000 ft2 mixed (hazardous/radioactive) waste storage facility) at Paducah. This environmental assessment compares impacts of this proposed action with those of continuing present practices aof of using alternative locations. It is found that the construction, operation, and ultimate closure of the proposed waste storage facilities would not significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA; therefore an environmental impact statement is not required

  13. Monitored Retrievable Storage facility site screening and evaluation report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 directs the Department of Energy to ''complete a detailed study of the need for and feasibility of, and to submit to the Congress a proposal for, the construction of one or more monitored retrievable storage facilities for high level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel.'' The Act directs that the proposal includes site specific designs. Further, the proposal is to include, ''for the first such facility, at least three alternative sites and at least five alternative combinations of such proposed sites and facility designs hor-ellipsis'' as well as a recommendation of ''the combination among the alternatives that the Secretary deems preferable.'' An MRS Site Screening Task Force has been formed to help identify and evaluate potential MRS facility sites within a preferred region and with the application of a siting process and criteria developed by the DOE. The activities of the Task Force presented in this report, all site evaluations (sections 13 through 16) where the rationale for the site evaluations are presented, along with each evaluation and findings of the Task Force. This is Volume 3 of a three volume document. References are also included in this volume

  14. Monitored Retrievable Storage facility site screening and evaluation report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1985-05-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 directs the Department of Energy to complete a detailed study of the need for and feasibility of, and to submit to the Congress a proposal for, the construction of one or more monitored retrievable storage facilities for high level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel.'' The Act directs that the proposal includes site specific designs. Further, the proposal is to include, for the first such facility, at least three alternative sites and at least five alternative combinations of such proposed sites and facility designs {hor ellipsis}'' as well as a recommendation of the combination among the alternatives that the Secretary deems preferable.'' An MRS Site Screening Task Force has been formed to help identify and evaluate potential MRS facility sites within a preferred region and with the application of a siting process and criteria developed by the DOE. The activities of the Task Force presented in this report, all site evaluations (sections 13 through 16) where the rationale for the site evaluations are presented, along with each evaluation and findings of the Task Force. This is Volume 3 of a three volume document. References are also included in this volume.

  15. Monitored retrievable storage facility site screening and evaluation report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 directs the Department of Energy to ''complete a detailed study of the need for and feasibility of, and to submit to the Congress a proposal for, the construction of one or more monitored retrievable storage facilities for high level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel.'' The Act directs that the proposal includes site specific designs. Further, the proposal is to include, ''for the first such facility, at least three alternative sites and at least five alternative combinations of such proposed sites and facility designs hor-ellipsis'' as well as a recommendation of ''the combination among the alternatives that the Secretary deems preferable.'' An MRS Site Screening Task Force has been formed to help identify and evaluate potential MRS facility sites within a preferred region and with the application of a siting process and criteria developed by the DOE. The activities of the Task Force presented in this report include: site evaluations (sections 10 through 12) where the rationale for the site evaluations are presented, along with each evaluation and findings of the Task Force. This in Volume 2 of a three volume document

  16. Monitored retrievable storage facility site screening and evaluation report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1985-05-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 directs the Department of Energy to complete a detailed study of the need for and feasibility of, and to submit to the Congress a proposal for, the construction of one or more monitored retrievable storage facilities for high level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel.'' The Act directs that the proposal includes site specific designs. Further, the proposal is to include, for the first such facility, at least three alternative sites and at least five alternative combinations of such proposed sites and facility designs{hor ellipsis}'' as well as a recommendation of the combination among the alternatives that the Secretary deems preferable.'' An MRS Site Screening Task Force has been formed to help identify and evaluate potential MRS facility sites within a preferred region and with the application of a siting process and criteria developed by the DOE. The activities of the Task Force presented in this report include: site evaluations (sections 10 through 12) where the rationale for the site evaluations are presented, along with each evaluation and findings of the Task Force. This in Volume 2 of a three volume document.

  17. Occupational dose estimates for a monitored retrievable storage facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Occupational doses were estimated for radiation workers at the monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facility. This study provides an estimate of the occupational dose based on the current MRS facility design, examines the extent that various design parameters and assumptions affect the dose estimates, and identifies the areas and activities where exposures can be reduced most effectively. Occupational doses were estimated for both the primary storage concept and the alternate storage concept. The dose estimates indicate the annual dose to all radiation workers will be below the 5 rem/yr federal dose equivalent limit. However, the estimated dose to most of the receiving and storage crew (the workers responsible for the receipt, storage, and surveillance of the spent fuel and its subsequent retrieval), to the crane maintenance technicians, and to the cold and remote maintenance technicians is above the design objective of 1 rem/yr. The highest annual dose is received by the riggers (4.7 rem) in the receiving and storage crew. An indication of the extent to which various design parameters and assumptions affect the dose estimates was obtained by changing various design-based assumptions such as work procedures, background dose rates in radiation zones, and the amount of fuel received and stored annually. The study indicated that a combination of remote operations, increased shielding, and additional personnel (for specific jobs) or changes in operating procedures will be necessary to reduce worker doses below 1.0 rem/yr. Operations that could be made at least partially remote include the removal and replacement of the tiedowns, impact limiters, and personnel barriers from the shipping casks and the removal or installation of the inner closure bolts. Reductions of the background dose rates in the receiving/shipping and the transfer/discharge areas may be accomplished with additional shielding

  18. Immobilized High Level Waste (HLW) Interim Storage Alternative Generation and analysis and Decision Report 2nd Generation Implementing Architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CALMUS, R.B.

    2000-09-14

    Two alternative approaches were previously identified to provide second-generation interim storage of Immobilized High-Level Waste (IHLW). One approach was retrofit modification of the Fuel and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF) to accommodate IHLW. The results of the evaluation of the FMEF as the second-generation IHLW interim storage facility and subsequent decision process are provided in this document.

  19. Status of siting the Monitored Retrievable Storage facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is authorized to site, construct, and operate a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility for temporary above ground storage of spent nuclear fuel from commercial reactors. The Nuclear Waste Policy Act (the Act) established two paths for obtaining a site. One, the DOE directed siting approach, is not being implemented at this time. Currently, DOE has decided to follow the second alternative, voluntary siting. The Act, as amended, also established the Office of the Nuclear Waste Negotiator (ONWN) to interact with potential volunteers who would host the MRS. The voluntary process has resulted in 21 applications for financial grants to study the possibility of hosting the facility. The siting process, regardless of the siting approach, must consider both statutory and regulatory requirements for the site. Preliminary site requirements and attributes can be used to assess the technical qualifications and regulatory compliance features of a potential MRS site. The site assessment process will determine whether a site meets the preliminary site requirements and attributes can be used to assess the technical qualifications and regulatory compliance features of a potential MRS site. The site assessment process will determine whether a site meets the preliminary site requirements and would identify the favorable and potentially unfavorable characteristics of a particular site. The purpose of these requirement and attributes is to permit a reasonable determination, on the basis of available information, that a site is potentially suitable for a MRS facility

  20. Status of siting the Monitored Retrievable Storage facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, J.; Williams, J.; Smith, L. (Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States))

    1993-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is authorized to site, construct, and operate a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility for temporary above ground storage of spent nuclear fuel from commercial reactors. The Nuclear Waste Policy Act (the Act) established two paths for obtaining a site. One, the DOE directed siting approach, is not being implemented at this time. Currently, DOE has decided to follow the second alternative, voluntary siting. The Act, as amended, also established the Office of the Nuclear Waste Negotiator (ONWN) to interact with potential volunteers who would host the MRS. The voluntary process has resulted in 21 applications for financial grants to study the possibility of hosting the facility. The siting process, regardless of the siting approach, must consider both statutory and regulatory requirements for the site. Preliminary site requirements and attributes can be used to assess the technical qualifications and regulatory compliance features of a potential MRS site. The site assessment process will determine whether a site meets the preliminary site requirements and attributes can be used to assess the technical qualifications and regulatory compliance features of a potential MRS site. The site assessment process will determine whether a site meets the preliminary site requirements and would identify the favorable and potentially unfavorable characteristics of a particular site. The purpose of these requirement and attributes is to permit a reasonable determination, on the basis of available information, that a site is potentially suitable for a MRS facility.

  1. Managing Ageing in Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent fuel pools (SFP) that are outside containment system without redundancy whose failure could release radioactive material that exceed allowable limit. If SFP have to continue to operate for long term after power plant shutdown it is essential to develop an ageing management program within the general life management program of the nuclear power plant. This work refers to the Atucha I nuclear power plant (NPP) SFPs. The fuel assembly (FA) of Atucha NPPs is 6 meter long and encompasses 36 Zircaloy-4 cladded fuel rods. For these spent fuel assemblies (SFA) there are two storage buildings located adjacent to the reactor building. One of the alternatives considered at the end of Atucha I operation is to transfer all SFAs to dry storage, another one is to continue the operation of the SFPs and to transfer to dry storage just a selected amount of SFAs. For the selection of the dry technology it should be kept in mind the characteristics of the Aturcha SFA, in particular, its length and burnup which differs according to the discharge date because of the use of natural uranium (NU) or slightly enriched uranium (SEU). Therefore, the fundamental point here is to keep in mind that it is the effect of ageing due to time and use that cause net changes in the characteristics of a System, Structure and Component (SSC). We employ formal processes to systematically identify and evaluate the Critical Systems, Structures and Components (CSSCs) in the facilities. A Technology Watch Programme is being established to ensure that degradation mechanisms, which could impact on facilities life, are promptly investigated so that mitigating programmes can be designed. With this methodology we analyse the following components of the pools, concrete wall stability, integrity of concrete structure, pool lining, and integrity of metal structure, pipe failures, degradation in storage racks and SFA degradation. (author)

  2. Integral Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) Facility conceptual design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document, Volume 6 Book 2, contains design studies for a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) Facility. Topics discussed include: materials handling; processing; support systems; support utilities; spent fuel; high-level radioactive wastes and storage; field drywell storage; ALARA consideration; safety considerations; and design approach

  3. 303-K Radioactive mixed-waste storage facility closure plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hanford Site, houses reactors, chemical-separation systems, and related facilities used for the production of special nuclear materials. The 303-K Radioactive Mixed-Waste Storage Facility (303-K Facility) has been used since 1943 to store various radioactive and dangerous process materials and wastes generated by the fuel manufacturing processes in the 300 Area. The 303-K Radioactive Mixed-Waste Storage Facility is used for the storage of mixed wastes. The north end of the building was used for containers of liquid waste and the outside storage areas were used for containers of solid waste. From 1977 to 1982, the north room was used to cure concreted billets of recyclable scrap uranium with Zircaloy-2 and copper silicon alloy chips and fines. The concretion process was discontinued in 1982, and these materials are now calcinated in the 303-M Oxide Facility. Other drummed materials have been stored on outside storage areas near the 303-K Facility on concrete, asphalt, and gravel pads. The 303-K Facility will be closed as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA). This closure plan presents a description of the facility, the history of materials and wastes managed, and the procedures that will be followed to close the 303-K Facility as a greater that 90-day storage facility. Clean closure of the 303-K Building and associated storage areas is the proposed method for final closure of the facility. After this facility is clean closed, it will be used for the storage of radioactive mixed waste for less than 90 days. 15 refs., 14 figs., 4 tabs

  4. Technical Safety Requirements for the Waste Storage Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, H L

    2007-09-07

    This document contains Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) for the Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES, which include Area 612 (A612) and the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) Storage Area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The TSRs constitute requirements regarding the safe operation of the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. These TSRs are derived from the Documented Safety Analysis for the Waste Storage Facilities (DSA) (LLNL 2006). The analysis presented therein determined that the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are low-chemical hazard, Hazard Category 2 non-reactor nuclear facilities. The TSRs consist primarily of inventory limits and controls to preserve the underlying assumptions in the hazard and accident analyses. Further, appropriate commitments to safety programs are presented in the administrative controls sections of the TSRs. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are used by RHWM to handle and store hazardous waste, TRANSURANIC (TRU) WASTE, LOW-LEVEL WASTE (LLW), mixed waste, California combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste generated at LLNL as well as small amounts from other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, as described in the DSA. In addition, several minor treatments (e.g., drum crushing, size reduction, and decontamination) are carried out in these facilities. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are located in two portions of the LLNL main site. A612 is located in the southeast quadrant of LLNL. The A612 fenceline is approximately 220 m west of Greenville Road. The DWTF Storage Area, which includes Building 693 (B693), Building 696 Radioactive Waste Storage Area (B696R), and associated yard areas and storage areas within the yard, is located in the northeast quadrant of LLNL in the DWTF complex. The DWTF Storage Area fenceline is approximately 90 m west of Greenville Road. A612 and the DWTF Storage Area are subdivided into various facilities and storage

  5. Hanford facility dangerous waste permit application, 616 Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Storage Facility. Revision 2A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This permit application for the 616 Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Storage Facility consists for 15 chapters. Topics of discussion include the following: facility description and general provisions; waste characteristics; process information; personnel training; reporting and record keeping; and certification

  6. Conceptual design report, Sodium Storage Facility, Fast Flux Test Facility, Project F-031

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Sodium Storage Facility Conceptual Design Report provides conceptual design for construction of a new facility for storage of the 260,000 gallons of sodium presently in the FFTF plant. The facility will accept the molten sodium transferred from the FFTF sodium systems, and store the sodium in a solid state under an inert cover gas until such time as a Sodium Reaction Facility is available for final disposal of the sodium

  7. 303-K Storage Facility report on FY98 closure activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adler, J.G.

    1998-07-17

    This report summarizes and evaluates the decontamination activities, sampling activities, and sample analysis performed in support of the closure of the 303-K Storage Facility. The evaluation is based on the validated data included in the data validation package (98-EAP-346) for the 303-K Storage Facility. The results of this evaluation will be used for assessing contamination for the purpose of closing the 303-K Storage Facility as described in the 303-K Storage Facility Closure Plan, DOE/RL-90-04. The closure strategy for the 303-K Storage Facility is to decontaminate the interior of the north half of the 303-K Building to remove known or suspected dangerous waste contamination, to sample the interior concrete and exterior soils for the constituents of concern, and then to perform data analysis, with an evaluation to determine if the closure activities and data meet the closure criteria. The closure criteria for the 303-K Storage Facility is that the concentrations of constituents of concern are not present above the cleanup levels. Based on the evaluation of the decontamination activities, sampling activities, and sample data, determination has been made that the soils at the 303-K Storage Facility meet the cleanup performance standards (WMH 1997) and can be clean closed. The evaluation determined that the 303-K Building cannot be clean closed without additional closure activities. An additional evaluation will be needed to determine the specific activities required to clean close the 303-K Storage Facility. The radiological contamination at the 303-K Storage Facility is not addressed by the closure strategy.

  8. Structural Integrity Program for INTEC Calcined Solids Storage Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey Bryant

    2008-08-30

    This report documents the activities of the structural integrity program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center relevant to the high-level waste Calcined Solids Storage Facilities and associated equipment, as required by DOE M 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management Manual'. Based on the evaluation documented in this report, the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities are not leaking and are structurally sound for continued service. Recommendations are provided for continued monitoring of the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities.

  9. Technical Safety Requirements for the Waste Storage Facilities May 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laycak, D. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-04-16

    This document contains the Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) for the Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES, which include Area 625 (A625) and the Building 693 (B693) Yard Area of the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) at LLNL. The TSRs constitute requirements for safe operation of the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. These TSRs are derived from the Documented Safety Analyses for the Waste Storage Facilities (DSA) (LLNL 2011). The analysis presented therein concluded that the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are low-chemical hazard, Hazard Category 2 non-reactor nuclear facilities. The TSRs consist primarily of inventory limits and controls to preserve the underlying assumptions in the hazard and accident analyses. Further, appropriate commitments to safety programs are presented in the administrative controls sections of the TSRs. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are used by RHWM to handle and store hazardous waste, TRANSURANIC (TRU) WASTE, LOW-LEVEL WASTE (LLW), mixed waste, California combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste generated at LLNL as well as small amounts of waste from other DOE facilities, as described in the DSA. In addition, several minor treatments (e.g., size reduction and decontamination) are carried out in these facilities.

  10. Technical Safety Requirements for the Waste Storage Facilities May 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document contains the Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) for the Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES, which include Area 625 (A625) and the Building 693 (B693) Yard Area of the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) at LLNL. The TSRs constitute requirements for safe operation of the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. These TSRs are derived from the Documented Safety Analyses for the Waste Storage Facilities (DSA) (LLNL 2011). The analysis presented therein concluded that the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are low-chemical hazard, Hazard Category 2 non-reactor nuclear facilities. The TSRs consist primarily of inventory limits and controls to preserve the underlying assumptions in the hazard and accident analyses. Further, appropriate commitments to safety programs are presented in the administrative controls sections of the TSRs. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are used by RHWM to handle and store hazardous waste, TRANSURANIC (TRU) WASTE, LOW-LEVEL WASTE (LLW), mixed waste, California combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste generated at LLNL as well as small amounts of waste from other DOE facilities, as described in the DSA. In addition, several minor treatments (e.g., size reduction and decontamination) are carried out in these facilities.

  11. Technical Safety Requirements for the Waste Storage Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laycak, D T

    2010-03-05

    This document contains Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) for the Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES, which include Area 625 (A625) and the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) Storage Area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The TSRs constitute requirements regarding the safe operation of the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. These TSRs are derived from the Documented Safety Analysis for the Waste Storage Facilities (DSA) (LLNL 2009). The analysis presented therein determined that the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are low-chemical hazard, Hazard Category 2 non-reactor nuclear facilities. The TSRs consist primarily of inventory limits and controls to preserve the underlying assumptions in the hazard and accident analyses. Further, appropriate commitments to safety programs are presented in the administrative controls sections of the TSRs. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are used by RHWM to handle and store hazardous waste, TRANSURANIC (TRU) WASTE, LOW-LEVEL WASTE (LLW), mixed waste, California combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste generated at LLNL as well as small amounts from other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, as described in the DSA. In addition, several minor treatments (e.g., size reduction and decontamination) are carried out in these facilities. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are located in two portions of the LLNL main site. A625 is located in the southeast quadrant of LLNL. The A625 fenceline is approximately 225 m west of Greenville Road. The DWTF Storage Area, which includes Building 693 (B693), Building 696 Radioactive Waste Storage Area (B696R), and associated yard areas and storage areas within the yard, is located in the northeast quadrant of LLNL in the DWTF complex. The DWTF Storage Area fenceline is approximately 90 m west of Greenville Road. A625 and the DWTF Storage Area are subdivided into various facilities and storage areas, consisting

  12. Technical Safety Requirements for the Waste Storage Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laycak, D T

    2008-06-16

    This document contains Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) for the Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES, which include Area 625 (A625) and the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) Storage Area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The TSRs constitute requirements regarding the safe operation of the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. These TSRs are derived from the 'Documented Safety Analysis for the Waste Storage Facilities' (DSA) (LLNL 2008). The analysis presented therein determined that the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are low-chemical hazard, Hazard Category 2 non-reactor nuclear facilities. The TSRs consist primarily of inventory limits and controls to preserve the underlying assumptions in the hazard and accident analyses. Further, appropriate commitments to safety programs are presented in the administrative controls sections of the TSRs. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are used by RHWM to handle and store hazardous waste, TRANSURANIC (TRU) WASTE, LOW-LEVEL WASTE (LLW), mixed waste, California combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste generated at LLNL as well as small amounts from other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, as described in the DSA. In addition, several minor treatments (e.g., size reduction and decontamination) are carried out in these facilities. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are located in two portions of the LLNL main site. A625 is located in the southeast quadrant of LLNL. The A625 fenceline is approximately 225 m west of Greenville Road. The DWTF Storage Area, which includes Building 693 (B693), Building 696 Radioactive Waste Storage Area (B696R), and associated yard areas and storage areas within the yard, is located in the northeast quadrant of LLNL in the DWTF complex. The DWTF Storage Area fenceline is approximately 90 m west of Greenville Road. A625 and the DWTF Storage Area are subdivided into various facilities and storage areas

  13. Wet spent fuel interim storage facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article deals with the Spent Fuel Complementary Storage Unit, which was designed for the Almirante Alvaro Alberto Nuclear Power Station situated near Rio de Janeiro. The aim of the article is to present the technical solution of complementary storage. The design deals with different reactor technologies made by Areva and Westinghouse. The article also deals with the technically interesting solution of the storage tank heat removal and its dimensioning. (author)

  14. The interim storage facility with dry storage casks and its safeguards activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recyclable-Fuel Storage Company (RFS) is constructing an interim storage facility of spent fuel at Recyclable-Fuel Storage Center (RFSC) in Aomori Prefecture. Metallic dry casks are employed to contain the spent fuel from nuclear power plants and to serve for about 50 years in RFSC. Metallic dry casks have already been used for dry cask storage facility at Tokai No.2 power station of Japan Atomic Power Company. But, RFSC is not exactly the same as the dry cask storage facility at Tokai No.2 power station, for example, cask transportation between facilities and no hot cells. Therefore, additional safeguards activities are necessary. The outline of the design and handling of metallic dry casks at RFSC and the currently developing status of safeguards activity such as containment and surveillance for the cask receipt and storage at RFSC, etc are described. (author)

  15. Safety analysis report for the Waste Storage Facility. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bengston, S.J.

    1994-05-01

    This safety analysis report outlines the safety concerns associated with the Waste Storage Facility located in the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The three main objectives of the report are: define and document a safety basis for the Waste Storage Facility activities; demonstrate how the activities will be carried out to adequately protect the workers, public, and environment; and provide a basis for review and acceptance of the identified risk that the managers, operators, and owners will assume.

  16. 190-C Facility <90 Day Storage Pad inspection plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document provides the inspection plan for the 190-C Facility <90 Day Storage Pad. The 190-C Facility <90 Day Storage Pad stores waste oils contaminated with lead generated while draining oil from equipment within 290-C. The 190-C pumphouse originally pumped water to the C Reactor after the water was treated/filtered in an adjacent building. Characteristic waste oil is removed from the facility equipment, packaged and stored in fifty-five-gallon drums. Included in this plan are the details concerning necessary security equipment, inspection for proper sign posting and other factors that may affect the integrity of the facility. The 190-C Facility <90 Day Storage Pad shall be inspected at lease once each calendar week

  17. Documented Safety Analysis for the Waste Storage Facilities March 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laycak, D T

    2010-03-05

    This Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) for the Waste Storage Facilities was developed in accordance with 10 CFR 830, Subpart B, 'Safety Basis Requirements,' and utilizes the methodology outlined in DOE-STD-3009-94, Change Notice 3. The Waste Storage Facilities consist of Area 625 (A625) and the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) Storage Area portion of the DWTF complex. These two areas are combined into a single DSA, as their functions as storage for radioactive and hazardous waste are essentially identical. The B695 Segment of DWTF is addressed under a separate DSA. This DSA provides a description of the Waste Storage Facilities and the operations conducted therein; identification of hazards; analyses of the hazards, including inventories, bounding releases, consequences, and conclusions; and programmatic elements that describe the current capacity for safe operations. The mission of the Waste Storage Facilities is to safely handle, store, and treat hazardous waste, transuranic (TRU) waste, low-level waste (LLW), mixed waste, combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste generated at LLNL (as well as small amounts from other DOE facilities).

  18. Documented Safety Analysis for the Waste Storage Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laycak, D

    2008-06-16

    This documented safety analysis (DSA) for the Waste Storage Facilities was developed in accordance with 10 CFR 830, Subpart B, 'Safety Basis Requirements', and utilizes the methodology outlined in DOE-STD-3009-94, Change Notice 3. The Waste Storage Facilities consist of Area 625 (A625) and the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) Storage Area portion of the DWTF complex. These two areas are combined into a single DSA, as their functions as storage for radioactive and hazardous waste are essentially identical. The B695 Segment of DWTF is addressed under a separate DSA. This DSA provides a description of the Waste Storage Facilities and the operations conducted therein; identification of hazards; analyses of the hazards, including inventories, bounding releases, consequences, and conclusions; and programmatic elements that describe the current capacity for safe operations. The mission of the Waste Storage Facilities is to safely handle, store, and treat hazardous waste, transuranic (TRU) waste, low-level waste (LLW), mixed waste, combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste generated at LLNL (as well as small amounts from other DOE facilities).

  19. Staging and storage facility feasibility study. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was performed to investigate the feasibility of adapting the design of the HWVP Canister Storage Building (CSB) to meet the needs of the WHC Spent Nuclear Fuel Project for Staging and Storage Facility (SSF), and to develop Rough Order of Magnitude (ROM) cost and schedule estimates

  20. Staging and storage facility feasibility study. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swenson, C.E. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-02-01

    This study was performed to investigate the feasibility of adapting the design of the HWVP Canister Storage Building (CSB) to meet the needs of the WHC Spent Nuclear Fuel Project for Staging and Storage Facility (SSF), and to develop Rough Order of Magnitude (ROM) cost and schedule estimates.

  1. On-site intermediate storage facilities in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In 2002 German utilities and the federal government agreed on the future of nuclear power in Germany. Part of this 'consensus' are site specific phase out periods, termination of reprocessing and the erection of on-site storage facilities. Shipment of spent fuel to reprocessing plants is only allowed until 2005, shipments to the German joint storage facilities of Ahaus and Gorleben have to be minimized. Each nuclear power plant has to create its own spent fuel storage with appropriate capacity. The necessary storage capacity is about 20 to 40 t/a and per plant, corresponding to 40 to 80 PWR- and 140 to 180 BWR-fuel bundles, depending on plant power and discharge burnup. Wet storage capacity inside the reactor building of most German NPPs was increased (compact storage) when shipments of spent fuel were ceased, following discussions about surface contaminations on casks. To avoid shut-down some plants even built short term storage facilities. Whereas short-term storage is to guarantee undisturbed operation of plants on an intermediate time scale, long term storage - until final nuclear waste disposal after 2030 is available - is also driven by economical considerations. Of the existing storage techniques wet and dry storage were analyzed with respect to costs and time for design, licensing and construction. Both techniques fulfill the safety requirements, but wet storage turns out to be more costly because of the necessary heat removing devices and operating expense. Total costs for construction, operation and decommissioning of a wet storage facility - as it was built in Obrigheim in 1998 on a smaller scale - rank from 80 to 250 million Euro, 1,4 million Euro annually and 45 million Euro for decommissioning (price index of 2003), respectively. Compared to that, dry storage needs about 26 million Euro for construction, annually 0,3 million Euro plus 2 - 3 casks (e.g. of the CASTOR type) with around 1,2 million Euro per flask and about 12 million Euro for

  2. MRI device – alternative for electrical energy storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molokáč, Š.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known, that the electrical energy storage in the large scale is basically difficult process. Such a process is marked by the energy losses, as the conversion of electrical energy into another form, is most frequently for example mechanical, and then back to the primary electrical form. Though, the superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES technology offers the energy storage in an unchanged form, which is advantageous primarily in the achieved efficiency. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI devices, commonly used in the medical facilities are based on the application of superconducting magnet. After its rejection from operation, there is possibility of using such devices for energy storage purposes. Additionally, such a technology of storage is also ecological.

  3. Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) Hazards Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    COVEY, L.I.

    2000-11-28

    This report documents the hazards assessment for the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) located on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. This hazards assessment was conducted to provide the emergency planning technical basis for WESF. DOE Orders require an emergency planning hazards assessment for each facility that has the potential to reach or exceed the lowest level emergency classification.

  4. Environmental assessment for the construction and operation of waste storage facilities at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-06-01

    DOE is proposing to construct and operate 3 waste storage facilities (one 42,000 ft{sup 2} waste storage facility for RCRA waste, one 42,000 ft{sup 2} waste storage facility for toxic waste (TSCA), and one 200,000 ft{sup 2} mixed (hazardous/radioactive) waste storage facility) at Paducah. This environmental assessment compares impacts of this proposed action with those of continuing present practices aof of using alternative locations. It is found that the construction, operation, and ultimate closure of the proposed waste storage facilities would not significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA; therefore an environmental impact statement is not required.

  5. Test facility of thermal storage equipment for space power generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, T.; Nakagawa, M.; Mochida, Y.; Ohtomo, F.; Shimizu, K.; Tanaka, K.; Abe, Y.; Nomura, O.; Kamimoto, M.

    A thermal storage equipment test facility has been built in connection with developing solar dynamic power systems (SDPSs). The test facility consists of a recuperative closed Brayton cycle system (CBC), with a mixture of helium and xenon with a molecular weight of 39.9 serving as the working fluid. CBC has been shown to be the most attractive power generation system among several types of SDPSs because of its ability to meet the required high power demand and its thermal efficiency, about 30 percent. The authors present a description of this test facility and give results of the preliminary test and the first-stage test with heat storage equipment.

  6. 303-K Storage Facility closure plan. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-15

    Recyclable scrap uranium with zircaloy-2 and copper silicon alloy, uranium-titanium alloy, beryllium/zircaloy-2 alloy, and zircaloy-2 chips and fines were secured in concrete billets (7.5-gallon containers) in the 303-K Storage Facility, located in the 300 Area. The beryllium/zircaloy-2 alloy and zircaloy-2 chips and fines are designated as mixed waste with the characteristic of ignitability. The concretion process reduced the ignitability of the fines and chips for safe storage and shipment. This process has been discontinued and the 303-K Storage Facility is now undergoing closure as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 and the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Dangerous Waste Regulations, WAC 173-303-040. This closure plan presents a description of the 303-K Storage Facility, the history of materials and waste managed, and the procedures that will be followed to close the 303-K Storage Facility. The 303-K Storage Facility is located within the 300-FF-3 (source) and 300-FF-5 (groundwater) operable units, as designated in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) (Ecology et al. 1992). Contamination in the operable units 300-FF-3 and 300-FF-5 is scheduled to be addressed through the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980 remedial action process. Therefore, all soil remedial action at the 304 Facility will be conducted as part of the CERCLA remedial action of operable units 300-FF-3 and 300-FF-5.

  7. 303-K Storage facility sampling and analysis plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adler, J.G.

    1997-07-01

    This document describes the cleanup, sampling, and analysis activities associated with the closure of the 303-K Storage Facility under the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610, ``Dangerous Waste Regulations.`` this document is a supplement to the 303-K Storage Facility Closure Plan (DOE-RL 1995a) (Closure Plan). The objective of these activities is to support clean closure of the 303 K Storage Facility. This document defines the information and activities needed to meet this objective, including: constituents of concern, cleanup performance standards, cleanup activities, sampling locations and methods, field screening locations and methods, field quality control requirements, laboratory analytical methods, and data validation methodology. This document supersedes the Closure Plan if the two conflict

  8. Hanford facility dangerous waste permit application, PUREX storage tunnels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haas, C. R.

    1997-09-08

    The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application is considered to be a single application organized into a General Information Portion (document number DOE/RL-91-28) and a Unit-Specific Portion. The scope of the Unit-Specific Portion is limited to Part B permit application documentation submitted for individual, `operating` treatment, storage, and/or disposal units, such as the PUREX Storage Tunnels (this document, DOE/RL-90-24).

  9. Fuel Storage Facility Final Safety Analysis Report. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linderoth, C.E.

    1984-03-01

    The Fuel Storage Facility (FSF) is an integral part of the Fast Flux Test Facility. Its purpose is to provide long-term storage (20-year design life) for spent fuel core elements used to provide the fast flux environment in FFTF, and for test fuel pins, components and subassemblies that have been irradiated in the fast flux environment. This Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) and its supporting documentation provides a complete description and safety evaluation of the site, the plant design, operations, and potential accidents.

  10. Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility mission analysis report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report defines the mission for the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF). It contains summary information regarding the mission analysis which was performed by holding workshops attended by relevant persons involved in the WESF operations. The scope of the WESF mission is to provide storage of Cesium (Cs) and Strontium (Sr) capsules, previously produced at WESF, until every capsule has been removed from the facility either to another storage location, for disposal or for beneficial use by public or private enterprises. Since the disposition of the capsules has not yet been determined, they may be stored at WESF for many years, even decades. The current condition of the WESF facility must be upgraded and maintained to provide for storage which is safe, cost effective, and fully compliant with DOE direction as well as federal, state, and local laws and regulations. The Cs capsules produced at WESF were originally released to private enterprises for uses such as the sterilization of medical equipment; but because of the leakage of one capsule, all are being returned. The systems, subsystems, and equipment not required for the storage mission will be available for use by other projects or private enterprises. Beyond the storage of the Cs and Sr capsules, no future mission for the WESF has been identified

  11. Safety and Licensing of Spent Fuel Storage Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    All operating nuclear power reactors in the United States (U.S.) are storing spent fuel on-site in spent fuel pools licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Spent fuel pools at U.S. reactors were not designed to store the full amount of spent fuel generated during the lifetime of plant operation. Consequently, most utilities expanded their storage capacity by the use of high-density storage racks. Even with the high density racks, most utilities will need additional storage capacity. When it became apparent that nuclear power plants were going to need additional spent fuel storage space, the NRC amended its regulations in 1980 to provide nuclear power plants with alternate spent fuel storage in an independent spent fuel storage installation (ISFSI). NRC provides for a 20-year specific license with the option to renew the license for additional 20-year terms. In 1990, the NRC implemented the General License option to ease the burden on nuclear power plants that have a license to either operate or possess fuel. The general license for each storage cask terminates 20 years after the storage cask is first used by the licensee. The first storage cask using a general license was loaded in 1994. This paper discusses NRC experiences and its knowledge gained in licensing over the past 30 years and renewing the licenses for three ISFSIs and how this knowledge has driven the NRC to revise its guidance and thought processes for dry storage. (author)

  12. Cooler storage ring accomplished at heavy ion facility in Lanzhou

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ The Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou-Cooler Storage Ring (HIRFLCSR),a flagship facility of basic research in China,passed the acceptance check under auspices of the State Development and Reform Commission on 30 July in Lanzhou,capital of Gansu Province.The event was jointly presided over by the Commission's Vice Minister ZHANG Xiaoqian and CAS Executive Vice President BAI Chunli.

  13. Conceptual design study of a concrete canister spent-fuel storage facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents a conceptual design study for the interim storage of CANDU spent fuel in concrete canisters. The canisters will be concrete flasks, which contain fuel prepackaged in double steel containment, and will be cooled by natural air convection. This is one of the methods proposed as a potential alternative to water pool storage. A preliminary study of this concept was done by CAFS (Committee Assessing Fuel Storage), and WNRE (Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment) is currently conducting a development and demonstration program. This study of a central facility for the storage of all Canadian spent fuel arisings to the year 2000 was completed in 1975. A brief description of the facilities required and the operations involved, a summary of costs, a survey of the monitoring requirements and a prediction of the personnel exposures associated with this method of storing spent fuel are reported here. The estimated total cost of interim storage in cylindrical canisters at a central site is $6.02/kg U (1975 dollars). Approximately half of this cost is incurred in the shipment of fuel from the reactors to the storage facility. (author)

  14. 3718-F Alkali Metal Treatment and Storage Facility Closure Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hanford Site, located northwest of the city of Richland, Washington, houses reactors, chemical-separation systems, and related facilities used for the production of special nuclear materials, as well as for activities associated with nuclear energy development. The 300 Area of the Hanford Site contains reactor fuel manufacturing facilities and several research and development laboratories. The 3718-F Alkali Metal Treatment and Storage Facility (3718-F Facility), located in the 300 Area, was used to store and treat alkali metal wastes. Therefore, it is subject to the regulatory requirements for the storage and treatment of dangerous wastes. Closure will be conducted pursuant to the requirements of the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 (Ecology 1989) and 40 CFR 270.1. Closure also will satisfy the thermal treatment facility closure requirements of 40 CFR 265.381. This closure plan presents a description of the 3718-F Facility, the history of wastes managed, and the approach that will be followed to close the facility. Only hazardous constituents derived from 3718-F Facility operations will be addressed

  15. Dry storage facility at Kozloduy Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botzem, Werner; Graham, Andrew [NUKEM Technologies GmbH, Alzenau (Germany); Kuehne, Bernhard; Schulte, Matthias [GNS Gesellschaft fuer Nuklear-Service mbH, Essen (Germany)

    2011-04-15

    The Kozloduy Nuclear Power Plant (KNPP) is located in the north-west of Bulgaria beside the River Danube. There are 6 reactors, all of Russian design, that were commissioned between 1974 and 1991. The first 4 VVER-440 units were finally shut down by the end of 2006 and are now being decommissioned. The 2 later VVER-1000 reactors are still operating. The construction of a dry spent fuel storage facility (DSF) was a necessary measure required to comply with the national strategy for spent fuel and radioactive waste management, approved by the Bulgarian Government. This facility should be designed to receive spent irradiated nuclear fuel from the 6 reactor units at KNPP. Such a facility allows sufficient time to decide whether spent fuel should be reprocessed or destined for direct disposal. In May 2004 the KNPP awarded a contract to a Consortium comprising the 2 German companies NUKEM Technologies GmbH and GNS Gesellschaft fuer Nuklear-Service mbH for the design and erection of a dry spent fuel storage facility. The storage facility was finished and accepted by the Client in March 2011. The operation of the facility will start after reception of the respective license granted by the Competent Authorities. (orig.)

  16. Dry storage facility at Kozloduy Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Kozloduy Nuclear Power Plant (KNPP) is located in the north-west of Bulgaria beside the River Danube. There are 6 reactors, all of Russian design, that were commissioned between 1974 and 1991. The first 4 VVER-440 units were finally shut down by the end of 2006 and are now being decommissioned. The 2 later VVER-1000 reactors are still operating. The construction of a dry spent fuel storage facility (DSF) was a necessary measure required to comply with the national strategy for spent fuel and radioactive waste management, approved by the Bulgarian Government. This facility should be designed to receive spent irradiated nuclear fuel from the 6 reactor units at KNPP. Such a facility allows sufficient time to decide whether spent fuel should be reprocessed or destined for direct disposal. In May 2004 the KNPP awarded a contract to a Consortium comprising the 2 German companies NUKEM Technologies GmbH and GNS Gesellschaft fuer Nuklear-Service mbH for the design and erection of a dry spent fuel storage facility. The storage facility was finished and accepted by the Client in March 2011. The operation of the facility will start after reception of the respective license granted by the Competent Authorities. (orig.)

  17. INEEL special case waste storage and disposal alternatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, L.A.; Bishop, C.W.; Bhatt, R.N.

    1997-07-01

    Special case waste is historically defined as radioactive waste that does not have a path forward or fit into current Department of Energy management plans for final treatment or disposal. The objectives of this report, relative to special case waste at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, are to (a) identify its current storage locations, conditions, and configuration; (b) review and verify the currently reported inventory; (c) segregate the inventory into manageable categories; (d) identify the portion that has a path forward or is managed under other major programs/projects; (e) identify options for reconfiguring and separating the disposable portions; (f) determine if the special case waste needs to be consolidated into a single storage location; and (g) identify a preferred facility for storage. This report also provides an inventory of stored sealed sources that are potentially greater than Class C or special case waste based on Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Site-Specific Waste Acceptance Criteria.

  18. Summary engineering description of underwater fuel storage facility for foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlke, H.J.; Johnson, D.A.; Rawlins, J.K.; Searle, D.K.; Wachs, G.W.

    1994-10-01

    This document is a summary description for an Underwater Fuel Storage Facility (UFSF) for foreign research reactor (FRR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF). A FRR SNF environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is being prepared and will include both wet and dry storage facilities as storage alternatives. For the UFSF presented in this document, a specific site is not chosen. This facility can be sited at any one of the five locations under consideration in the EIS. These locations are the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Hanford, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Nevada Test Site. Generic facility environmental impacts and emissions are provided in this report. A baseline fuel element is defined in Section 2.2, and the results of a fission product analysis are presented. Requirements for a storage facility have been researched and are summarized in Section 3. Section 4 describes three facility options: (1) the Centralized-UFSF, which would store the entire fuel element quantity in a single facility at a single location, (2) the Regionalized Large-UFSF, which would store 75% of the fuel element quantity in some region of the country, and (3) the Regionalized Small-UFSF, which would store 25% of the fuel element quantity, with the possibility of a number of these facilities in various regions throughout the country. The operational philosophy is presented in Section 5, and Section 6 contains a description of the equipment. Section 7 defines the utilities required for the facility. Cost estimates are discussed in Section 8, and detailed cost estimates are included. Impacts to worker safety, public safety, and the environment are discussed in Section 9. Accidental releases are presented in Section 10. Standard Environmental Impact Forms are included in Section 11.

  19. Storage of LWR spent fuel in air: Volume 1: Design and operation of a spent fuel oxidation test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornhill, C.K.; Campbell, T.K.; Thornhill, R.E.

    1988-12-01

    This report describes the design and operation and technical accomplishments of a spent-fuel oxidation test facility at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The objective of the experiments conducted in this facility was to develop a data base for determining spent-fuel dry storage temperature limits by characterizing the oxidation behavior of light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuels in air. These data are needed to support licensing of dry storage in air as an alternative to spent-fuel storage in water pools. They are to be used to develop and validate predictive models of spent-fuel behavior during dry air storage in an Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI). The present licensed alternative to pool storage of spent fuel is dry storage in an inert gas environment, which is called inerted dry storage (IDS). Licensed air storage, however, would not require monitoring for maintenance of an inert-gas environment (which IDS requires) but does require the development of allowable temperature limits below which UO/sub 2/ oxidation in breached fuel rods would not become a problem. Scoping tests at PNL with nonirradiated UO/sub 2/ pellets and spent-fuel fragment specimens identified the need for a statistically designed test matrix with test temperatures bounding anticipated maximum acceptable air-storage temperatures. This facility was designed and operated to satisfy that need. 7 refs.

  20. Financing strategic healthcare facilities: the growing attraction of alternative capital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zismer, Daniel K; Fox, James; Torgerson, Paul

    2013-05-01

    Community health system leaders often dismiss use of alternative capital to finance strategic facilities as being too expensive and less strategically useful, preferring to follow historical precedent and use tax-exempt bonding to finance such facilities. Proposed changes in accounting rules should cause third-party-financed facility lease arrangements to be treated similarly to tax-exempt debt financings with respect to the income statement and balance sheet, increasing their appeal to community health systems. An in-depth comparison of the total costs associated with each financing approach can help inform the choice of financing approaches by illuminating their respective advantages and disadvantages.

  1. Operations and Maintenance Concept Plan for the Immobilized High-Level Waste (IHLW) Interim Storage Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This OandM Concept looks at the future operations and maintenance of the IHLW/CSB interim storage facility. It defines the overall strategy, objectives, and functional requirements for the portion of the building to be utilized by Project W-464. The concept supports the tasks of safety basis planning, risk mitigation, alternative analysis, decision making, etc. and will be updated as required to support the evolving design

  2. The GreenLab Research Facility: A Micro-Grid Integrating Production, Consumption and Storage of Clean Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell Bomani, Bilal Mark; Elbuluk, Malik; Fain, Henry; Kankam, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    There is a large gap between the production and demand for energy from alternative fuel and alternative renewable energy sources. The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has initiated a laboratory-pilot study that concentrates on using biofuels as viable alternative fuel resources for the field of aviation, as well as, utilizing wind and solar technologies as alternative renewable energy resources, and in addition, the use of pumped water for storage of energy that can be retrieved through hydroelectric generation. This paper describes the GreenLab Research Facility and its power and energy sources with .recommendations for worldwide expansion and adoption of the concept of such a facility

  3. Commercial experience with facility deactivation to safe storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sype, T.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Fischer, S.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Lee, J.H. Jr.; Sanchez, L.C.; Ottinger, C.A.; Pirtle, G.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has shutdown many production reactors; the Department has begun a major effort to also shutdown a wide variety of other nuclear facilities. Because so many facilities are being closed, it is necessary to place many of them into a safe- storage status, i.e., deactivation, before conducting decommissioning- for perhaps as long as 20 years. The challenge is to achieve this safe-storage condition in a cost-effective manner while remaining in compliance with applicable regulations. The DOE Office of Environmental Management, Office of Transition and Management, commissioned a lessons-learned study of commercial experience with safe storage and decommissioning. Although the majority of the commercial experience has been with reactors, many of the lessons learned presented in this document can provide insight into transitioning challenges that Will be faced by the DOE weapons complex.

  4. Commercial experience with facility deactivation to safe storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has shutdown many production reactors; the Department has begun a major effort to also shutdown a wide variety of other nuclear facilities. Because so many facilities are being closed, it is necessary to place many of them into a safe- storage status, i.e., deactivation, before conducting decommissioning- for perhaps as long as 20 years. The challenge is to achieve this safe-storage condition in a cost-effective manner while remaining in compliance with applicable regulations. The DOE Office of Environmental Management, Office of Transition and Management, commissioned a lessons-learned study of commercial experience with safe storage and decommissioning. Although the majority of the commercial experience has been with reactors, many of the lessons learned presented in this document can provide insight into transitioning challenges that Will be faced by the DOE weapons complex

  5. Characteristics of the Inchukalsky underground gas storage facility. [USSR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garbuzova, I.D.

    1977-12-01

    The U.S.S.R.'s VNIIGaz is planning to expand the Inchukalsky underground gas storage facility in the Baltic region, which comprises a mid-Cambrian, water-bearing sand stratum with a closed structural contour measuring 160 ft (50 m). The average porosity of the layer is 22%, its initial pressure 1050 psi (71.5 kg/sq cm). The number of operating wells will be increased from the present 12 wells up to 47. Gas from the Valdag-Pskov-Riga pipeline is now compressed to 1470 psi (100 kg/sq cm) and injected into the underground storage. In the future facility, the injection pressure will be increased to 1570 psi (107 kg/sq cm). Experiments on gas drying with diethylene glycol have shown that the gas stored in the Inchukalsky underground facilities contains a high amount of bed water. The ciurrent phase of expansion of the Inchukalsky underground gas stoarge facilities will have an investment payback period of 4.7 yr, which is much lower than for other U.S.S.R. underground gas storage facilities located in aquiferous strata.

  6. Performance assessment of the proposed Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacific Northwest laboratory (PNL) has completed a performance evaluation of the proposed monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facility. This study was undertaken as part of the Department of Energy MRS Program at PNL. The objective of the performance evaluation was to determine whether the conceptual MRS facility would be able to process spent fuel at the specified design rate of 3600 metric tons of uranium (MTU) per year. The performance of the proposed facility was assessed using the computer model COMPACT (Computer Optimization of Processing and Cask Transport) to simulate facility operations. The COMPACT model consisted of three application models each of which addressed a different aspect of the facility's operation: MRS/waste transportation interface; cask handling capability; and disassembly/consolidation (hot cell) operations. Our conclusions, based on the assessment of design criteria for the proposed facility, are as follows: Facilities and equipment throughout the facility have capability beyond the 3600 MTU/y design requirement. This added capability provides a reserve to compensate for unexpected perturbations in shipping or handling of the spent fuel. Calculations indicate that the facility's maximum maintainable processing capability is approximately 4800 MTU/y

  7. Safeguards for spent nuclear fuel in transfer from wet storage to dry storage in on-site interim storage facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Germany initially planned to store spent nuclear fuel in the two away-from-reactor interim storage facilities built at Ahaus and Gorleben. The current approach for spent fuel management is on-site interim storage in transport and storage casks as part of a political agreement between the German government and the nuclear operators on the future use of nuclear energy. A reason for this is to avoid near term transportation of spent fuel determined for direct final disposal via public road or rail systems to away-from-reactor storage facilities. Recent legislation has triggered the construction of 12 on-site dry storage facilities at nuclear power plants. Currently, such facilities are being taken into operation on a step-by-step basis. There is a strong need to develop acceptable safeguards concepts for both transfer and dry storage of spent fuel, ideally, a standard safeguards concept that would match all German nuclear power plant sites without ignoring technical and organisational differences. The paper will address the relevant issues and give an overview of the status of safeguards implementation. (author)

  8. Inventory extension considerations for long-term storage at the nuclear materials storage facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is in the process of modifying its nuclear materials storage facility to a long-term storage configuration. In support of this effort, we examined technical and administrative means to extend periods between physical inventories. Both the frequency and sample size during a physical inventory could significantly impact required sizing of the non-destructive assay (NDA) laboratory as well as material handling capabilities. Several options are being considered, including (1) treating each storage location as a separate vault, (2) minimizing the number of items returned for quantitative analysis by optimizing the use of in situ confirmatory measurements, and (3) utilizing advanced monitoring technologies. Careful consideration of these parameters should allow us to achieve and demonstrate safe and secure storage while minimizing the impact on facility operations and without having to increase the size of the NDA laboratory beyond that required for anticipated shipping and receiving activities

  9. Minimum criticality dose evaluation for the Irradiated Fuel Storage Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S.S. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab., ID (United States)

    1999-09-01

    The Irradiated Fuel Storage Facility (IFSF) is a government-owned, contractor-operated facility located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory within the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. The mission of the facility is to provide safe dry storage for various types of irradiated fuels. Included are fuel elements such as irradiated ATR, EBR, MTR, Fort St. Vrain, TRIGA, and ROVER Parka fuels. Fuels requiring dry storage are received at the IFSF in fuel-shipping casks. At the facility receiving dock, the casks are removed from the transport vehicle, positioned in a cask transport car, and moved into the fuel-handling cave. Several functions are performed in the fuel-handling cave, including transferring fuel from shipping casks to storage canisters, preparing fuel elements for storage and processing. The minimum postulated criticality dose calculations were performed for the cask-receiving and fuel-handling areas to place criticality alarm system (CAS) detectors. The number of fissions for the minimum accident of concern is based on a dose of 20-rad air at 2 m in 1 min. The eigenvalue calculations were first performed to determine the size of the critical source. Then, two sets of fixed-source calculations were followed to calculate contributions from neutron and capture gamma rays and from prompt gamma rays. Two sets of MCNP calculations involved point and spherical critical sources. Validity of the Monte Carlo results was tested against ANISN deterministic calculations. The flux-to-dose conversion factors are based on ANSI/ANS-6.1.1-1977. All of the MCNP runs used continuous-energy ENDF/B-V cross sections. The BUGLE-80 cross-section library was used for the ANISN calculations.

  10. Modular Energy Storage System for Alternative Energy Vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Janice [Magna Electronics Inc., Auburn Hills, MI (United States); Ervin, Frank [Magna Electronics Inc., Auburn Hills, MI (United States)

    2012-05-15

    An electrical vehicle environment was established to promote research and technology development in the area of high power energy management. The project incorporates a topology that permits parallel development of an alternative energy delivery system and an energy storage system. The objective of the project is to develop technologies, specifically power electronics, energy storage electronics and controls that provide efficient and effective energy management between electrically powered devices in alternative energy vehicles plugin electric vehicles, hybrid vehicles, range extended vehicles, and hydrogen-based fuel cell vehicles. In order to meet the project objectives, the Vehicle Energy Management System (VEMS) was defined and subsystem requirements were obtained. Afterwards, power electronics, energy storage electronics and controls were designed. Finally, these subsystems were built, tested individually, and integrated into an electric vehicle system to evaluate and optimize the subsystems performance. Phase 1 of the program established the fundamental test bed to support development of an electrical environment ideal for fuel cell application and the mitigation of many shortcomings of current fuel cell technology. Phase 2, continued development from Phase 1, focusing on implementing subsystem requirements, design and construction of the energy management subsystem, and the integration of this subsystem into the surrogate electric vehicle. Phase 2 also required the development of an Alternative Energy System (AES) capable of emulating electrical characteristics of fuel cells, battery, gen set, etc. Under the scope of the project, a boost converter that couples the alternate energy delivery system to the energy storage system was developed, constructed and tested. Modeling tools were utilized during the design process to optimize both component and system design. This model driven design process enabled an iterative process to track and evaluate the impact

  11. Strategic sizing of energy storage facilities in electricity markets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nasrolahpour, Ehsan; Kazempour, Seyyedjalal; Zareipour, Hamidreza;

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a model to determine the optimasize of an energy storage facility from a strategic investor’s perspective. This investor seeks to maximize its profit through making strategic planning, i.e., storage sizing, and strategic operational, i.e., offering and bidding, decisions. We...... consider the uncertainties associated with rival generators’ offering strategies and future load levels in the proposed model. The strategic investment decisions include the sizes of charging device, discharging device and energy reservoir. The proposed model is a stochastic bi-level optimization problem...

  12. Low-level waste inventory, characteristics, generation, and facility assessment for treatment, storage, and disposal alternatives considered in the US Department of Energy waste management programmatic environmental impact statement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goyette, M.L.; Dolak, D.A.

    1996-12-01

    This report provides technical support information for use in analyzing environmental impacts associated with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) low-level radioactive waste (LLW) management alternatives in the Waste-Management (WM) Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). Waste loads treated and disposed of for each of the LLW alternatives considered in the DOE WM PEIS are presented. Waste loads are presented for DOE Waste Management (WM) wastes, which are generated from routine operations. Radioactivity concentrations and waste quantities for treatment and disposal under the different LLW alternatives are described for WM waste. 76 refs., 14 figs., 42 tabs.

  13. Low-level waste inventory, characteristics, generation, and facility assessment for treatment, storage, and disposal alternatives considered in the US Department of Energy waste management programmatic environmental impact statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides technical support information for use in analyzing environmental impacts associated with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) low-level radioactive waste (LLW) management alternatives in the Waste-Management (WM) Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). Waste loads treated and disposed of for each of the LLW alternatives considered in the DOE WM PEIS are presented. Waste loads are presented for DOE Waste Management (WM) wastes, which are generated from routine operations. Radioactivity concentrations and waste quantities for treatment and disposal under the different LLW alternatives are described for WM waste. 76 refs., 14 figs., 42 tabs

  14. Hydrogen storage alternatives - a technological and economic assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettersson, Joakim; Hjortsberg, Ove [Volvo Teknisk Utveckling AB, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    1999-12-01

    This study reviews state-of-the-art of hydrogen storage alternatives for vehicles. We will also discuss the prospects and estimated cost for industrial production. The study is based on published literature and interviews with active researchers. Among the alternatives commercially available today, we suggest using a moderate-pressure chamber for seasonal stationary energy storage; metal hydride vessels for small stationary units; a roof of high-pressure cylinders for buses, trucks and ferries; cryogenic high-pressure vessels or methanol reformers for cars and tractors; and cryogenic moderate-pressure vessels for aeroplanes. Initial fuel dispensing systems should be designed to offer hydrogen in pressurised form for good fuel economy, but also as cryogenic liquid for occasional needs of extended driving range and as methanol for reformer-equipped vehicles. It is probable that hydrogen can be stored efficiently in adsorbents for use in recyclable hydrogen fuel containers or rechargeable hydrogen vessels operating at ambient temperature and possibly ambient pressure by year 2004, and at reasonable or even low cost by 2010. The most promising alternatives involve various forms of activated graphite nanostructures. Recommendations for further research and standardisation activities are given.

  15. The dry storage cask in interim storage facility and safeguards activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Japan Atomic Power Company (JAPC) is preparing for interim storage of spent fuel at Recyclable-Fuel Storage Center (RFSC) in Aomori Prefecture. Metallic dry casks are employed to contain the spent fuel and to serve for about 50 years in RFSC. Metallic dry casks have already been used for spent fuel dry storage at Tokai No.2 power station. But, RFSC is not exactly the same as the dry storage facility in Tokai No.2 power station, for example, casks are transported out side of the reactor site and RFSC has no fuel handling system. Therefore, additional implementation of safeguards is necessary. This report introduces the design and handling of metallic dry casks for RFSC and the currently developing status of the safeguards activity such as containment and surveillance for the fuel loading at the power station, the cask receipt and storage at RFSC, etc. (author)

  16. Greenfield Alternative Study LEU-Mo Fuel Fabrication Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington Division of URS

    2008-07-01

    This report provides the initial “first look” of the design of the Greenfield Alternative of the Fuel Fabrication Capability (FFC); a facility to be built at a Greenfield DOE National Laboratory site. The FFC is designed to fabricate LEU-Mo monolithic fuel for the 5 US High Performance Research Reactors (HPRRs). This report provides a pre-conceptual design of the site, facility, process and equipment systems of the FFC; along with a preliminary hazards evaluation, risk assessment as well as the ROM cost and schedule estimate.

  17. 190-C Facility <90 Day Storage Pad training plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the Environmental Restoration Contractor (ERC) team training plan for the 190-C Facility <90 Day Storage Pad of Hazardous Waste. It is intended to meet the requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-330 and the Hanford Dangerous Waste Permit. Training unrelated to compliance with WAC 173-303-330 is not addressed in this training plan. WAC 173-303-330(1)(d)(ii, v, vi) requires that personnel be familiarized, where applicable, with waste feed cut-off systems, response to ground-water contamination incidents, and shutdown of operations. These are not applicable to 190-C Facility <90 Day Storage Pad, and are therefore not covered in this training plan

  18. INEL storage facility for sealed sources from the commercial sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Commercially owned sealed radiation sources determine by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to be a public health or safety hazard are accepted by the US Department of Energy, under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as material for reuse of recycle. To implement this policy, the sealed sources must be stored until proper disposition is determined. This report documents the investigation and selection process undertaken to locate a suitable storage facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

  19. Solid waste transuranic storage and assay facility indoor air sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pingel, L.A., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-20

    The purpose of the study is to collect and analyze samples of the indoor air at the Transuranic Storage and Assay Facility (TRUSAF), Westinghouse Hanford. A modified US EPA TO-14 methodology, using gas chromatography/mass spectrography, may be used for the collection and analysis of the samples. The information obtained will be used to estimate the total release of volatile organic compounds from TRUSAF to determine the need for air emmission permits.

  20. Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility interim operational safety requirements

    CERN Document Server

    Covey, L I

    2000-01-01

    The Interim Operational Safety Requirements (IOSRs) for the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) define acceptable conditions, safe boundaries, bases thereof, and management or administrative controls required to ensure safe operation during receipt and inspection of cesium and strontium capsules from private irradiators; decontamination of the capsules and equipment; surveillance of the stored capsules; and maintenance activities. Controls required for public safety, significant defense-in-depth, significant worker safety, and for maintaining radiological consequences below risk evaluation guidelines (EGs) are included.

  1. 40 CFR 280.220 - Ownership of an underground storage tank or underground storage tank system or facility or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ownership of an underground storage tank or underground storage tank system or facility or property on which an underground storage tank or underground storage tank system is located. 280.220 Section 280.220 Protection of Environment...

  2. Methods for expanding the capacity of spent fuel storage facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the beginning of 1989 more than 55,000 metric tonnes of heavy metal (MTHM) of spent Light Water Reactor (LWR) and Heavy Water Reactor (HWR) fuel had been discharged worldwide from nuclear power plants. Only a small fraction of this fuel has been reprocessed. The majority of the spent fuel assemblies are currently held at-reactor (AR) or away-from-reactor (AFR) in storage awaiting either chemical processing or final disposal depending on the fuel concept chosen by individual countries. Studies made by NEA and IAEA have projected that annual spent fuel arising will reach about 10,000 t HM in the year 2000 and cumulative arising will be more than 200,000 t HM. Taking into account the large quantity of spent fuel discharged from NPP and that the first demonstrations of the direct disposal of spent fuel or HLW are expected only after the year 2020, long-term storage will be the primary option for management of spent fuel until well into the next century. There are several options to expand storage capacity: (1) to construct new away-from-reactor storage facilities, (2) to transport spent fuel from a full at-reactor pool to another site for storage in a pool that has sufficient space to accommodate it, (3) to expand the capacity of existing AR pools by using compact racks, double-tierce, rod consolidation and by increasing the dimensions of existing pools. The purpose of the meeting was: to exchange new information on the international level on the subject connected with the expansion of storage capacities for spent fuel; to elaborate the state-of-the-art of this problem; to define the most important areas for future activity; on the basis of the above information to give recommendations to potential users for selection and application of the most suitable methods for expanding spent fuel facilities taking into account the relevant country's conditions. Refs, figs and tabs

  3. Hanford facility dangerous waste permit application, PUREX storage tunnels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, S.M.

    1997-09-08

    The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application is considered to be a single application organized into a General Information Portion (document number DOE/RL-91-28) and a Unit-Specific Portion. The scope of the Unit-Specific Portion is limited to Part B permit application documentation submitted for individual, operating treatment, storage, and/or disposal units, such as the PUREX Storage Tunnels (this document, DOE/RL-90-24). Both the General Information and Unit-Specific portions of the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application address the content of the Part B permit application guidance prepared by the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology 1996) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (40 Code of Federal Regulations 270), with additional information needs defined by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments and revisions of Washington Administrative Code 173-303. For ease of reference, the Washington State Department of Ecology alpha-numeric section identifiers from the permit application guidance documentation (Ecology 1996) follow, in brackets, the chapter headings and subheadings. A checklist indicating where information is contained in the PUREX Storage Tunnels permit application documentation, in relation to the Washington State Department of Ecology guidance, is located in the Contents Section. Documentation contained in the General Information Portion is broader in nature and could be used by multiple treatment, storage, and/or disposal units (e.g., the glossary provided in the General Information Portion). Wherever appropriate, the PUREX Storage Tunnels permit application documentation makes cross-reference to the General Information Portion, rather than duplicating text. Information provided in this PUREX Storage Tunnels permit application documentation is current as of April 1997.

  4. Hanford facility dangerous waste permit application, PUREX storage tunnels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application is considered to be a single application organized into a General Information Portion (document number DOE/RL-91-28) and a Unit-Specific Portion. The scope of the Unit-Specific Portion is limited to Part B permit application documentation submitted for individual, operating treatment, storage, and/or disposal units, such as the PUREX Storage Tunnels (this document, DOE/RL-90-24). Both the General Information and Unit-Specific portions of the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application address the content of the Part B permit application guidance prepared by the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology 1996) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (40 Code of Federal Regulations 270), with additional information needs defined by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments and revisions of Washington Administrative Code 173-303. For ease of reference, the Washington State Department of Ecology alpha-numeric section identifiers from the permit application guidance documentation (Ecology 1996) follow, in brackets, the chapter headings and subheadings. A checklist indicating where information is contained in the PUREX Storage Tunnels permit application documentation, in relation to the Washington State Department of Ecology guidance, is located in the Contents Section. Documentation contained in the General Information Portion is broader in nature and could be used by multiple treatment, storage, and/or disposal units (e.g., the glossary provided in the General Information Portion). Wherever appropriate, the PUREX Storage Tunnels permit application documentation makes cross-reference to the General Information Portion, rather than duplicating text. Information provided in this PUREX Storage Tunnels permit application documentation is current as of April 1997

  5. Regulators experiences in licensing and inspection of dry cask storage facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: All operating nuclear power reactors in the United States (US) are storing spent fuel in NRC licensed on-site spent fuel pools (SFPs). Most reactors were not designed to store, in these pools, the full amount of spent fuel generated during the life of plant operation. Utilities originally planned for spent fuel to remain in the SFPs for a few years after discharge from the reactor core and then to be sent to a reprocessing facility. However, the US Government declared a moratorium on reprocessing in 1977. Although the ban was later lifted, reprocessing has not been pursued as a feasible option. Consequently, utilities expanded the storage capacity of SFPs by the use of high-density storage racks. Eventually, utilities needed additional storage capacity. In response to these needs, NRC provided a regulatory alternative for interim spent fuel storage in dry cask storage systems. For spent fuel management, both pool storage and dry storage are safe methods, but there are significant differences. Pool storage requires a greater operational vigilance on the part of the nuclear power plant to maintain the performance of electrical and mechanical systems using pumps, piping and instrumentation. Dry storage technology uses passive cooling systems with robust cask designs requiring minimal operational vigilance. The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), through the combination of a rigorous licensing and inspection program, ensures the safety and security of dry cask storage. NRC authorizes the storage of spent fuel at an independent spent fuel storage installation (ISFSI) under two licensing options: site-specific licensing and general licensing. In July 1986, the NRC issued the first site-specific license to the Surry Nuclear Power Plant in Virginia, authorizing the interim storage of spent fuel in a dry storage cask configuration. Today, there are over 30 ISFSIs currently licensed by the NRC with over 700 loaded dry casks. Current projections

  6. The CASCAD system: An SGN spent fuel dry storage facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper will present SGN's dry vault spent storage system. This concept is based on the CASCAD facility, designed and built by SGN for the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) at Cadarache, France. Cascade has been in operation since 1990 since which time SGN has customized its storage system. Because of its extensive experience in both spent fuel assembly and dry storage of high level waste, SGN is able to design solutions fully customized to fit customers' storage requirements using proven technology. Its modular approach allows for staggered investment over a period of several years for maximum flexibility. The Cascad system meets site-specific constraints and safety requirements and is able to receive a wide range of fuels and shipping casks. Since spent fuel assemblies are stored in passive cooled pits, the system is entirely passive and therefore inherently safe. Moreover, the Cascad system allows total retrievability of spent fuel after a 50-year storage period even if the reactor building no longer exists

  7. Radon exposure at a radioactive waste storage facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manocchi, F H; Campos, M P; Dellamano, J C; Silva, G M

    2014-06-01

    The Waste Management Department of Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN) is responsible for the safety management of the waste generated at all internal research centers and that of other waste producers such as industry, medical facilities, and universities in Brazil. These waste materials, after treatment, are placed in an interim storage facility. Among them are (226)Ra needles used in radiotherapy, siliceous cake arising from conversion processes, and several other classes of waste from the nuclear fuel cycle, which contain Ra-226 producing (222)Rn gas daughter.In order to estimate the effective dose for workers due to radon inhalation, the radon concentration at the storage facility has been assessed within this study. Radon measurements have been carried out through the passive method with solid-state nuclear track detectors (CR-39) over a period of nine months, changing detectors every month in order to determine the long-term average levels of indoor radon concentrations. The radon concentration results, covering the period from June 2012 to March 2013, varied from 0.55 ± 0.05 to 5.19 ± 0.45 kBq m(-3). The effective dose due to (222)Rn inhalation was further assessed following ICRP Publication 65.

  8. Radon exposure at a radioactive waste storage facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Waste Management Department of Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN) is responsible for the safety management of the waste generated at all internal research centers and that of other waste producers such as industry, medical facilities, and universities in Brazil. These waste materials, after treatment, are placed in an interim storage facility. Among them are 226Ra needles used in radiotherapy, siliceous cake arising from conversion processes, and several other classes of waste from the nuclear fuel cycle, which contain Ra-226 producing 222Rn gas daughter. In order to estimate the effective dose for workers due to radon inhalation, the radon concentration at the storage facility has been assessed within this study. Radon measurements have been carried out through the passive method with solid-state nuclear track detectors (CR-39) over a period of nine months, changing detectors every month in order to determine the long-term average levels of indoor radon concentrations. The radon concentration results, covering the period from June 2012 to March 2013, varied from 0.55 ± 0.05 to 5.19 ± 0.45 kBq m−3. The effective dose due to 222Rn inhalation was further assessed following ICRP Publication 65. (paper)

  9. Storage facilities of spent nuclear fuel in dry for Mexican nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this article the relevant aspects of the spent fuel storage and the questions that should be taken in consideration for the possible future facilities of this type in the country are approached. A brief description is proposed about the characteristics of the storage systems in dry, the incorporate regulations to the present Nuclear Regulator Standard, the planning process of an installation, besides the approaches considered once resolved the use of these systems; as the modifications to the system, the authorization periods for the storage, the type of materials to store and the consequent environmental impact to their installation. At the present time the Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias (CNSNS) considers the possible generation of two authorization types for these facilities: Specific, directed to establish a new nuclear installation with the authorization of receiving, to transfer and to possess spent fuel and other materials for their storage; and General, focused to those holders that have an operation license of a reactor that allows them the storage of the nuclear fuel and other materials that they possess. Both authorizations should be valued according to the necessities that are presented. In general, this installation type represents a viable solution for the administration of the spent fuel and other materials that require of a temporary solution previous to its final disposal. Its use in the nuclear industry has been increased in the last years demonstrating to be appropriate and feasible without having a significant impact to the health, public safety and the environment. Mexico has two main nuclear facilities, the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde of the Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE) and the facilities of the TRIGA Reactor of the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ) that will require in a future to use this type of disposition installation of the spent fuel and generated wastes. (Author)

  10. Viability of Existing INL Facilities for Dry Storage Cask Handling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohachek, Randy; Wallace, Bruce; Winston, Phil; Marschman, Steve

    2013-04-30

    This report evaluates existing capabilities at the INL to determine if a practical and cost effective method could be developed for opening and handling full-sized dry storage casks. The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) CPP-603, Irradiated Spent Fuel Storage Facility, provides the infrastructure to support handling and examining casks and their contents. Based on a reasonable set of assumptions, it is possible to receive, open, inspect, remove samples, close, and reseal large bolted-lid dry storage casks at the INL. The capability can also be used to open and inspect casks that were last examined at the TAN Hot Shop over ten years ago. The Castor V/21 and REA-2023 casks can provide additional confirmatory information regarding the extended performance of low-burnup (<45 GWD/MTU) used nuclear fuel. Once a dry storage cask is opened inside CPP-603, used fuel retrieved from the cask can be packaged in a shipping cask, and sent to a laboratory for testing. Testing at the INL’s Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) can occur starting with shipment of samples from CPP-603 over an on-site road, avoiding the need to use public highways. This reduces cost and reduces the risk to the public. The full suite of characterization methods needed to establish the condition of the fuel exists and MFC. Many other testing capabilities also exist at MFC, but when those capabilities are not adequate, samples can be prepared and shipped to other laboratories for testing. This report discusses how the casks would be handled, what work needs to be done to ready the facilities/capabilities, and what the work will cost.

  11. Viability of Existing INL Facilities for Dry Storage Cask Handling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randy Bohachek; Charles Park; Bruce Wallace; Phil Winston; Steve Marschman

    2013-04-01

    This report evaluates existing capabilities at the INL to determine if a practical and cost effective method could be developed for opening and handling full-sized dry storage casks. The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) CPP-603, Irradiated Spent Fuel Storage Facility, provides the infrastructure to support handling and examining casks and their contents. Based on a reasonable set of assumptions, it is possible to receive, open, inspect, remove samples, close, and reseal large bolted-lid dry storage casks at the INL. The capability can also be used to open and inspect casks that were last examined at the TAN Hot Shop over ten years ago. The Castor V/21 and REA-2023 casks can provide additional confirmatory information regarding the extended performance of low-burnup (<45 GWD/MTU) used nuclear fuel. Once a dry storage cask is opened inside CPP-603, used fuel retrieved from the cask can be packaged in a shipping cask, and sent to a laboratory for testing. Testing at the INL’s Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) can occur starting with shipment of samples from CPP-603 over an on-site road, avoiding the need to use public highways. This reduces cost and reduces the risk to the public. The full suite of characterization methods needed to establish the condition of the fuel exists and MFC. Many other testing capabilities also exist at MFC, but when those capabilities are not adequate, samples can be prepared and shipped to other laboratories for testing. This report discusses how the casks would be handled, what work needs to be done to ready the facilities/capabilities, and what the work will cost.

  12. Reorganizing Nigeria's Vaccine Supply Chain Reduces Need For Additional Storage Facilities, But More Storage Is Required.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shittu, Ekundayo; Harnly, Melissa; Whitaker, Shanta; Miller, Roger

    2016-02-01

    One of the major problems facing Nigeria's vaccine supply chain is the lack of adequate vaccine storage facilities. Despite the introduction of solar-powered refrigerators and the use of new tools to monitor supply levels, this problem persists. Using data on vaccine supply for 2011-14 from Nigeria's National Primary Health Care Development Agency, we created a simulation model to explore the effects of variance in supply and demand on storage capacity requirements. We focused on the segment of the supply chain that moves vaccines inside Nigeria. Our findings suggest that 55 percent more vaccine storage capacity is needed than is currently available. We found that reorganizing the supply chain as proposed by the National Primary Health Care Development Agency could reduce that need to 30 percent more storage. Storage requirements varied by region of the country and vaccine type. The Nigerian government may want to consider the differences in storage requirements by region and vaccine type in its proposed reorganization efforts.

  13. Integral Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) Facility conceptual design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1985-09-01

    In April 1985, the Department of Energy (DOE) selected the Clinch River site as its preferred site for the construction and operation of the monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facility (USDOE, 1985). In support of the DOE MRS conceptual design activity, available data describing the site have been gathered and analyzed. A composite geotechnical description of the Clinch River site has been developed and is presented herein. This report presents Clinch River site description data in the following sections: general site description, surface hydrologic characteristics, groundwater characteristics, geologic characteristics, vibratory ground motion, surface faulting, stability of subsurface materials, slope stability, and references. 48 refs., 35 figs., 6 tabs.

  14. Field Survey of Cactus Crater Storage Facility (Runit Dome)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas Miller, Terence Holland

    2008-10-31

    The US Department of Energy, Office of Health and Safety (DOE/HS-10), requested that National Security Technologies, LLC, Environmental Management directorate (NSTec/EM) perform a field survey of the Cactus Crater Storage Facility (Runit Dome), similar to past surveys conducted at their request. This field survey was conducted in conjunction with a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) mission on Runit Island in the Enewetak Atoll in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI). The survey was strictly a visual survey, backed up by digital photos and a written description of the current condition.

  15. 3718-F Alkali Metal Treatment and Storage Facility Closure Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1987, Westinghouse Hanford Company has been a major contractor to the U.S. Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office and has served as co-operator of the 3718-F Alkali Metal Treatment and Storage Facility, the waste management unit addressed in this closure plan. The closure plan consists of a Part A Dangerous waste Permit Application and a RCRA Closure Plan. An explanation of the Part A Revision (Revision 1) submitted with this document is provided at the beginning of the Part A section. The closure plan consists of 9 chapters and 5 appendices. The chapters cover: introduction; facility description; process information; waste characteristics; groundwater; closure strategy and performance standards; closure activities; postclosure; and references

  16. 3718-F Alkali Metal Treatment and Storage Facility Closure Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1991-12-01

    Since 1987, Westinghouse Hanford Company has been a major contractor to the U.S. Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office and has served as co-operator of the 3718-F Alkali Metal Treatment and Storage Facility, the waste management unit addressed in this closure plan. The closure plan consists of a Part A Dangerous waste Permit Application and a RCRA Closure Plan. An explanation of the Part A Revision (Revision 1) submitted with this document is provided at the beginning of the Part A section. The closure plan consists of 9 chapters and 5 appendices. The chapters cover: introduction; facility description; process information; waste characteristics; groundwater; closure strategy and performance standards; closure activities; postclosure; and references.

  17. Consolidated Storage Facilities: Camel's Nose or Shared Burden? - 13112

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Blue Ribbon Commission (BRC) made a strong argument why the reformulated nuclear waste program should make prompt efforts to develop one or more consolidated storage facilities (CSFs), and recommended the amendment of NWPA Section 145(b) 2 (linking 'monitored retrievable storage' to repository development) as an essential means to that end. However, other than recommending that the siting of CSFs should be 'consent-based' and that spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at stranded sites should be first-in-line for removal, the Commission made few recommendations regarding how CSF development should proceed. Working with three other key Senators, Jeff Bingaman attempted in the 112. Congress to craft legislation (S. 3469) to put the BRC recommendations into legislative language. The key reason why the Nuclear Waste Administration Act of 2012 did not proceed was the inability of the four senators to agree on whether and how to amend NWPA Section 145(b). A brief review of efforts to site consolidated storage since the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987 suggests a strong and consistent motivation to shift the burden to someone (anyone) else. This paper argues that modification of NWPA Section 145(b) should be accompanied by guidelines for regional development and operation of CSFs. After review of the BRC recommendations regarding CSFs, and the 'camel's nose' prospects if implementation is not accompanied by further guidelines, the paper outlines a proposal for implementation of CSFs on a regional basis, including priorities for removal from reactor sites and subsequently from CSFs to repositories. Rather than allowing repository siting to be prejudiced by the location of a single remote CSF, the regional approach limits transport for off-site acceptance and storage, increases the efficiency of removal operations, provides a useful basis for compensation to states and communities that accept CSFs, and gives states with shared circumstances a shared stake in storage and

  18. Simulation of mass storage systems operating in a large data processing facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, R.

    1972-01-01

    A mass storage simulation program was written to aid system designers in the design of a data processing facility. It acts as a tool for measuring the overall effect on the facility of on-line mass storage systems, and it provides the means of measuring and comparing the performance of competing mass storage systems. The performance of the simulation program is demonstrated.

  19. Integral Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) Facility conceptual design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents a summary design description of the Conceptual Design for an Integral Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) Facility, as prepared by The Ralph M. Parsons Company under an A-E services contract with the Richland Operations Office of the Department of Energy. More detailed design requirements and design data are set forth in the Basis for Design and Design Report, bound under separate cover and available for reference by those desiring such information. The design data provided in this Design Report Executive Summary, the Basis for Design, and the Design Report include contributions by the Waste Technology Services Division of Westinghouse Electric Corporation (WEC), which was responsible for the development of the waste receiving, packaging, and storage systems, and Golder Associates Incorporated (GAI), which supported the design development with program studies. The MRS Facility design requirements, which formed the basis for the design effort, were prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, in the form of a Functional Design Criteria (FDC) document, Rev. 4, August 1985. 9 figs., 6 tabs

  20. Recommendations on the proposed Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-10-01

    Following the Department of Energy`s announcement in April 1985 that three Tennessee sites were to be considered for the Monitored Retrievable Storage facility, Governor Lamar Alexander initiated a review of the proposal to be coordinated by his Safe Growth Team. Roane County and the City of Oak Ridge, the local governments sharing jurisdiction over DOE`s primary and secondary sites, were invited to participate in the state`s review of the MRS proposal. Many issues related to the proposed MRS are being considered by the Governor`s Safe Growth Team. The primary objective of the Clinch River MRS Task Force has been to determine whether the proposed Monitored Retrievable Storage facility should be accepted by the local governments, and if so, under what conditions. The Clinch River MRS Task Force is organized into an Executive Committee cochaired by the Roane County Executive and Mayor of Oak Ridge and three Study Groups focusing on environmental (including health and safety), socioeconomic, and transportation issues.

  1. Recommendations on the proposed Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-10-01

    Following the Department of Energy's announcement in April 1985 that three Tennessee sites were to be considered for the Monitored Retrievable Storage facility, Governor Lamar Alexander initiated a review of the proposal to be coordinated by his Safe Growth Team. Roane County and the City of Oak Ridge, the local governments sharing jurisdiction over DOE's primary and secondary sites, were invited to participate in the state's review of the MRS proposal. Many issues related to the proposed MRS are being considered by the Governor's Safe Growth Team. The primary objective of the Clinch River MRS Task Force has been to determine whether the proposed Monitored Retrievable Storage facility should be accepted by the local governments, and if so, under what conditions. The Clinch River MRS Task Force is organized into an Executive Committee cochaired by the Roane County Executive and Mayor of Oak Ridge and three Study Groups focusing on environmental (including health and safety), socioeconomic, and transportation issues.

  2. Interface Between the Storage of Spent Fuels at Japan’s Interim Storage Facility and the Transport There of after Storage in Japan. Annex VII

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Recyclable-Fuel Storage Company (RFS) plans to construct Japan’s first interim storage facility for spent fuels of light water reactors. This facility is designed to have no equipment to refill spent fuels. It stores transported casks as they are. After storage, casks are carried out from the facility without opening their lids and transported to a reprocessing facility and others. Spent fuels are planned to be stored for 50 years. In other words, as spent fuels are transported after storage in the same state as they are carried into the interim storage facility, it is necessary to consider the transportation 50 years later in designing the cask. Here, we examined the points to be taken into account for storage in consideration of transportation 50 years later

  3. Monitored retrievable storage submission to Congress: Volume 2, Environmental assessment for a monitored retrievable storage facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) supports the DOE proposal to Congress to construct and operate a facility for monitored retrievable storage (MRS) of spent fuel at a site on the Clinch River in the Roane County portion of Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The first part of this document is an assessment of the value of, need for, and feasibility of an MRS facility as an integral component of the waste management system. The second part is an assessment and comparison of the potential environmental impacts projected for each of six site-design combinations. The MRS facility would be centrally located with respect to existing reactors, and would receive and canister spent fuel in preparation for shipment to and disposal in a geologic repository. 207 refs., 57 figs., 132 tabs

  4. Hazard Evaluation for Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Sludge at the Solid Waste Treatment Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Solid Waste Treatment Facility, referred to throughout this document as T Plant, has been identified as the location where sludge from the K Basin fuel storage facilities will be stored until final disposition of the material occurs

  5. Interface Issues Arising in Interim Storage Facilities Using Storage/Transport Dual Purpose Dry Metal Casks in Japan. Annex VIII

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The annual amount of spent fuels (SFs) discharged by the operation of commercial reactors nowadays is estimated to be around 10 000 tU level worldwide. While the amount of SFs already reprocessed account about one-third, the rest are currently stored in storage facilities, typically, in wet pools attached to nuclear power plants (NPPs). Cumulative amount of SFs stored is estimated to be about 250 000 tU by 2010 (I. Hanaki, Japan). While wet pool system is dominant in storage facility designs, new design concepts for storage facilities have been continuously developed. One of these new designs is that using dual purpose dry metal casks. “Dual” here means that the casks are not only designed as storage containers, but also designed as transport containers that will satisfy relevant regulatory requirements for transport of radioactive materials such as TS-R-1. Advantage of adopting such “dual” design in storage facilities lies in that this could contribute to reduce the burden associated with handling operations, because, under such designs, SFs once loaded into casks can easily be “transported” to storage facilities, and after storage of several decades, they can again be “transported” to their destinations, regardless they are reprocessing facilities or final disposal sites. Other than these, adopting this kind of design can reduce the amount of radioactive wastes discharged through storage operation, thus can reduce operation costs while maintaining safety level. In Japan, where 53 commercial NPPs are now in operation and with the annual amount of SFs produced sums up to about 1000 tU, keen needs are perceived among SFs producers (namely, utilities) to secure adequate SFs storage capacity. Therefore, a new application for constructing storage facility of 3000 tU scale in Mutsu city, located in northern part of Aomori prefecture, has been submitted in March 2007 by a subsidiary company of utilities named RFS (Recyclable Fuel Storage Company), using

  6. Development of Accident Scenario for Interim Spent Fuel Storage Facility Based on Fukushima Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    700 MTU of spent nuclear fuel is discharged from nuclear fleet every year and spent fuel storage is currently 70.9% full. The on-site wet type spent fuel storage pool of each NPP(nuclear power plants) in Korea will shortly exceed its storage limit. Backdrop, the Korean government has rolled out a plan to construct an interim spent fuel storage facility by 2024. However, the type of interim spent fuel storage facility has not been decided yet in detail. The Fukushima accident has resulted in more stringent requirements for nuclear facilities in case of beyond design basis accidents. Therefore, there has been growing demand for developing scenario on interim storage facility to prepare for beyond design basis accidents and conducting dose assessment based on the scenario to verify the safety of each type of storage

  7. Retrievable surface storage facility conceptual system design description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-03-01

    The studies evaluated several potentially attractive methods for processing and retrievably storing high-level radioactive waste after delivery to the Federal repository. These studies indicated that several systems could be engineered to safely store the waste, but that the simplest and most attractive concept from a technical standpoint would be to store the waste in a sealed stainless steel canister enclosed in a 2 in. thick carbon steel cask which in turn would be inserted into a reinforced concrete gamma-neutron shield, which would also provide the necessary air-cooling through an air annulus between the cask and the shield. This concept best satisfies the requirements for safety, long-term exposure to natural phenomena, low capital and operating costs, retrievability, amenability to incremental development, and acceptably small environmental impact. This document assumes that the reference site would be on ERDA's Hanford reservation. This document is a Conceptual System Design Description of the facilities which could satisfy all of the functional requirements within the established basic design criteria. The Retrievable Surface Storage Facility (RSSF) is planned with the capacity to process and store the waste received in either a calcine or glass/ceramic form. The RSSF planning is based on a modular development program in which the modular increments are constructed at rates matching projected waste receipts.

  8. 190-C Facility <90 Day Storage Pad supplemental information to the Hanford facility contingency plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 190-C Facility <90 Day Storage Pad stores waste oils primarily contaminated with lead generated while draining equipment within the building of residual lubricating oils. Waste oils are packaged and stored in fifty-five gallon drums, or other containers permitted by the Site Specific Waste Management Instruction. Bechtel Hanford, Inc. (BHI) manual BHI-EE-02, Environmental Requirements Procedures, references this document. This document is to be used to demonstrate compliance with the contingency plan requirements in Washington Administrative Code, Chapter 173-303, Dangerous Waste Regulations, for certain Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) waste management units (units). Refer to BHI-EE-02, for additional information

  9. Alternate airborne release fraction determination for hazardous waste management storage repository hazard categorization at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazardous Waste Management (HWM) facilities are used in the handling and processing of solid and liquid radioactive, hazardous, mixed, and medical wastes generated at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Waste may be treated or stored in one of the HWM facility units prior to shipment off site for treatment or disposal. Planned facilities such as the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) and the Building 280 Container Storage Unit are expected to handle similar waste streams. A hazard classification was preformed in each facility safety analysis report (SAR) according to the DOE Standard 1027-92 'Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports.' The general methodology practiced by HWM to determine alternate airborne release fractions (ARFs) in those SARs was based upon a beyond evaluation basis earthquake accident scenario characterized by the release of the largest amount of respirable, airborne radioactive material. The alternate ARF was calculated using a three-factor formula consisting of the fraction of failed waste containers, fraction of material released from failed waste containers,and the fraction of material entrained to the environment. Recently, in deliberation with DOE-Oakland representatives, HWM decided to modify this methodology. In place of the current detailed analysis, a more straightforward process was proposed based upon material form, credible accident environments, and empirical data. This paper will discuss the methodology and derivation of ARFs specific to HWM treatment and storage facilities that are alternative to those presented in DOE-STD-1027-92

  10. Groundwater Impact Assessment of Tailings Storage Facility, Western Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peksezer-Sayit, A.; Yazicigil, H.

    2015-12-01

    A tailings storage facility (TSF) is a fundamental part of the mining process and should be carefully designed and managed to prevent any adverse environmental effects. TSF is site-specific and its design criteria are determined by regulations. The new mine waste regulation for the deposition of hazardous waste in a tailings storage facility in Turkey enforces, from bottom to top, 0.5 m thick compacted clay layer with K less than or equal to 1X10-9 m/s , 2 mm thick HDPE geomembrane, and a protective natural material or geotextile. Although these criteria seem to be enough to prevent leakage from the base, in practice, manufacturing and application errors may cause leakage and subsequent contamination of groundwater. The purpose of this study is to assess potential impacts of leakage from the base of TSF on groundwater quality both in operational and post-closure period of a mine site in western Turkey. For this purpose, analytical and 2-D and 3-D numerical models are used together. The potential leakage rate of sulphate-bearing solution from the base of TSF is determined from analytical model. 2-D finite element models (SEEP/W and CTRAN/W) are used to simulate unsaturated flow conditions and advective-dispersive contaminant transport below the TSF under steady-state and transient conditions for the operating period. The long-term impacts of leakage from the base of TSF on groundwater resources are evaluated by 3-D numerical groundwater flow (MODFLOW) and contaminant transport models (MT3DMS). The model results suggest that sulphate-bearing solution leaking from the base of TSF can reach water table in about 290 years. Hence, during the operational period (i.e. 21 years), no interaction is expected between the solution and groundwater. Moreover, long-term simulation results show that about 500 years later, the sulphate concentration in groundwater will be below the maximum allowable limits (i.e. 250 mg/L).

  11. REVIEW OF FAST FLUX TEST FACILITY (FFTF) FUEL EXPERIMENTS FOR STORAGE IN INTERIM STORAGE CASKS (ISC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CHASTAIN, S.A.

    2005-10-24

    Appendix H, Section H.3.3.10.11 of the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR), provides the limits to be observed for fueled components authorized for storage in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) spent fuel storage system. Currently, the authorization basis allows standard driver fuel assemblies (DFA), as described in the FSAR Chapter 17, Section 17.5.3.1, to be stored provided decay power per assembly is {le} 250 watts, post-irradiation time is four years minimum, average assembly burn-up is 150,000 MWD/MTHM maximum and the pre-irradiation enrichment is 29.3% maximum (per H.3.3.10.11). In addition, driver evaluation (DE), core characterizer assemblies (CCA), and run-to-cladding-breach (RTCB) assemblies are included based on their similarities to a standard DFA. Ident-69 pin containers with fuel pins from these DFAs can also be stored. Section H.3.3.10.11 states that fuel types outside the specification criteria above will be addressed on a case-by-case basis. There are many different types of fuel and blanket experiments that were irradiated in the FFTF which now require offload to the spent fuel storage system. Two reviews were completed for a portion of these special type fuel components to determine if placement into the Core Component Container (CCC)/Interim Storage Cask (ISC) would require any special considerations or changes to the authorization basis. Project mission priorities coupled with availability of resources and analysts prevented these evaluations from being completed as a single effort. Areas of review have included radiological accident release consequences, radiological shielding adequacy, criticality safety, thermal limits, confinement, and stress. The results of these reviews are available in WHC-SD-FF-RPT-005, Rev. 0 and 1, ''Review of FFTF Fuel Experiments for Storage at ISA'', (Reference I), which subsequently allowed a large portion of these components to be included in the authorization basis (Table H.3.3-21). The

  12. Feasibility study: Assess the feasibility of siting a monitored retrievable storage facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of phase one of this study are: To understand the waste management system and a monitored retrievable storage facility; and to determine whether the applicant has real interest in pursuing the feasibility assessment process. Contents of this report are: Generating electric power; facts about exposure to radiation; handling storage, and transportation techniques; description of a proposed monitored retrievable storage facility; and benefits to be received by host jurisdiction

  13. Feasibility study: Assess the feasibility of siting a monitored retrievable storage facility. Phase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, J.W.

    1993-08-01

    The purpose of phase one of this study are: To understand the waste management system and a monitored retrievable storage facility; and to determine whether the applicant has real interest in pursuing the feasibility assessment process. Contents of this report are: Generating electric power; facts about exposure to radiation; handling storage, and transportation techniques; description of a proposed monitored retrievable storage facility; and benefits to be received by host jurisdiction.

  14. Indian Experience In Commissioning, Operation and Safety of Wet Type Spent Fuel Storage Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Indian Nuclear Power Programme is heavily based on PHWR. The spent fuels generated in Indian PHWRs are stored in water pools At Reactor and Fuel storage Facilities for interim periods before reprocessing. The technology of design, construction, commissioning and operation of these fuel storage facilities has been mastered by BARC. Some of the innovative features and operating experience of these facilities are described in this paper. (author)

  15. Development of a novel interim bulk fuel storage facility for the PBMR / W.F. Fuls

    OpenAIRE

    Fuls, Wilhelm Franz

    2004-01-01

    The PBMR is the first High Temperature Reactor being designed for commercial power generation in South Africa. It makes use of spherical fuel elements, containing coated uranium oxide particles encapsulated in a graphite matrix. The spent fuel generated from the reactor is stored in a storage system before final disposal. Such storage systems are called interim storage facilities, and normally make use of small transportable containers. The PBMR design makes use of bulk storage containers...

  16. Engineering evaluation of alternatives for the disposition of Niagara Falls Storage Site, its residues and wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The final disposition scenarios selected by DOE for assessment in this document are consistent with those stated in the Notice of Intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) (DOE, 1983d) and the modifications to the alternatives resulting from the public scoping process. The scenarios are: take no action beyond interim remedial measures other than maintenance and surveillance of the NFSS; retain and manage the NFSS as a long-term waste management facility for the wastes and residues on the site; decontaminate, certify, and release the NFSS for other use, with long-term management of the wastes and residues at other DOE sites; and partially decontaminate the NFSS by removal and transport off site of only the more radioactive residues, and upgrade containment of the remaining wastes and residues on site. The objective of this document is to present to DOE the conceptual engineering, occupational radiation exposure, construction schedule, maintenance and surveillance requirements, and cost information relevant to design and implementation of each of the four scenarios. The specific alternatives within each scenario used as the basis for discussion in this document were evaluated on the bases of engineering considerations, technical feasibility, and regulatory requirements. Selected alternatives determined to be acceptable for each of the four final disposition scenarios for the NFSS were approved by DOE to be assessed and costed in this document. These alternatives are also the subject of the EIS for the NFSS currently being prepared by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). 40 figures, 38 tables

  17. Evaluation of alternatives for the future of facilities at the Western New York Nuclear Service Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regulatory considerations are discussed. Alternatives for the continued operation or decommissioning of the state-licensed burial area, the low-level waste treatment facilities, and the NRC licensed burial area are evaluated. Radiological impact analyses were also performed for alternatives on other facilities

  18. Immobilized high-level waste interim storage alternatives generation and analysis and decision report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CALMUS, R.B.

    1999-05-18

    This report presents a study of alternative system architectures to provide onsite interim storage for the immobilized high-level waste produced by the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) privatization vendor. It examines the contract and program changes that have occurred and evaluates their impacts on the baseline immobilized high-level waste (IHLW) interim storage strategy. In addition, this report documents the recommended initial interim storage architecture and implementation path forward.

  19. Unsaturated zone investigation at the radioactive waste storage facility site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skuratovic, Zana; Mazeika, Jonas; Petrosius, Rimantas; Jakimaviciute-Maseliene, Vaidote [Nature Research Centre, Akademijos St. 2, LT-08412, Vilnius (Lithuania); Klizas, Petras; Mokrik, Robert [Vilnius University, M.K. Ciurlionio St. 21/27, LT-03101 Vilnius (Lithuania)

    2014-07-01

    Unsaturated zone is an important part of water circulation cycle and an integral part of many hydrological and hydrogeological factors and processes. The soils of unsaturated zone are regarded as the first natural barrier to a large extent able to limit the spread of contaminants. Nuclear waste disposal site (Maisiagala radioactive waste storage facility site) was analysed in terms of the moisture movement through the unsaturated zone. Extensive data sets of the hydraulic properties, water content and isotope composition have been collected and summarized. The main experimental and observational tasks included the collection of soil samples; determination of the physical properties and the hydraulic conductivity values of soil samples, moisture extraction from the soil sample for isotopic studies; observation of the groundwater dynamics at the Maisiagala piezometer; groundwater sampling for isotopic analysis ({sup 3}H, {sup 18}O/{sup 16}O, {sup 2}H/{sup 1}H ); and monthly precipitation isotopic analysis. Distribution features of globally widespread radionuclide tritium ({sup 3}H) and the water molecule tracer isotopes in precipitation, unsaturated zone soil moisture profiles and groundwater were determined. It was used the well-known unsaturated flow and transport model of HYDRUS-1D (Simunek et al., 2008). In this study, van Genuchten equations for the retention and conductivity estimations have been used. The retention characteristics and van Genuchten model parameters were estimated internally by HYDRUS based on the empirical equations involved in the program. Basic inputs of the tritium transport simulation are the tritium input function and meteorological variables (precipitation and potential evapotranspiration). In order to validate the representativeness of the hydraulic parameters, the model has been used to estimate the tritium distribution in the unsaturated zone, which properly represents the dynamics of the unsaturated zone. The uniformity of the daily

  20. 42 CFR 124.516 - Charitable facility compliance alternative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... facility may qualify for a provisional certification under this section if it provides an assurance that... certification will be sought, the facility must submit to the Secretary an assurance, together with such... paragraph (f)(1)(i) of this section; or (B) Submit an independent certified audit, conducted in...

  1. Hazardous Material Storage Facilities and Sites - Commercial Hazardous Waste Operations

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — A Commercial Hazardous Waste Operation is a DEP primary facility type related to the Waste Management Hazardous Waste Program. The sub-facility types related to...

  2. Cooperative Optimal Operation of Wind-Storage Facilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farashbashi-Astaneh, Seyed-Mostafa; Hu, Weihao; Chen, Zhe

    2014-01-01

    investment cost. We suggest benefitting the storage unit as a regulation service provider beside its normal operation for mitigating wind power imbalances. This idea comes from the fact that storage units have a fast ramping capability which is necessary to meet close to real-time regulation needs....... In this paper a framework is proposed to formulate the optimal design of storage unit’s operation under different scenarios. These scenarios include whether the wind farm is actually generating more or less than the scheduled level submitted to day-ahead market. The results emphasize that the deployment...... of storage units brings additional profit to the owner....

  3. Alternative Data Storage Solution for Mobile Messaging Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C. C. Ong

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, mobile devices have become relatively more powerful with additional features which have the capability to provide multimedia streaming. Better, faster and more reliable data storage solutions in the mobile messaging platform have become more essential with these additional improvements. The existing mobile messaging infrastructure, in particular the data storage platform has become less proficient in coping with the increased demand for its services. This demand especially in the mobile messaging area (i.e. SMS – Short Messaging Service, MMS – Multimedia Messaging Service, which may well exceeded 250,000 requests per second, means that the need to evaluate competing data management systems has become not only necessary but essential. This paper presents an evaluation of SMS and MMS platforms using different database management systems – DBMS and recommends the best data management strategies for these platforms.

  4. Safety analysis report for the mixed waste storage facility and portable storage units at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Mixed Waste Storage Facility (MWSF) including the Portable Storage Units (PSUs) is a government-owned contractor-operated facility located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company (LMITCO) is the current operating contractor and facility Architect/Engineer as of September 1996. The operating contractor is referred to as open-quotes the Companyclose quotes or open-quotes Companyclose quotes throughout this document. Oversight of MWSF is provided by the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID). The MWSF is located in the Power Burst Facility (PBF) Waste Reduction Operations Complex (WROC) Area, approximately 10.6 km (6.6 mi) from the southern INEL boundary and 4 km (2.5 mi) from U.S. Highway 20

  5. Design Verification Report Neutron Radiography Facility (NRF) TRIGA Fuel Storage Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report outlines the methods, procedures, and outputs developed during the Neutron Radiography Facility (NRF) Training, Research and Isotope Production, General Atomics (TRIGA) fuel storage system design and fabrication

  6. Proceedings of the Topical Meeting on the safety of nuclear fuel cycle intermediate storage facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CSNI Working Group on Fuel Cycle Safety held an International Topical Meeting on safety aspects of Intermediate Storage Facilities in Newby Bridge, England, from 28 to 30 October 1997. The main purpose of the meeting was to provide a forum for the exchange of information on the technical issues on the safety of nuclear fuel cycle facilities (intermediate storage). Titles of the papers are: An international view on the safety challenges to interim storage of spent fuel. Interim storage of intermediate and high-level waste in Belgium: a description and safety aspects. Encapsulated intermediate level waste product stores at Sellafield. Safety of interim storage facilities of spent fuel: the international dimension and the IAEA's activities. Reprocessing of irradiated fuel and radwaste conditioning at Belgoprocess site: an overview. Retrieval of wastes from interim storage silos at Sellafield. Outline of the fire and explosion of the bituminization facility and the activities of the investigation committee (STAIJAERI). The fire and explosion incident of the bituminization facility and the lessons learned from the incident. Study on the scenario of the fire incident and related analysis. Study on the scenario of the explosion incident and related analysis. Accident investigation board report on the May 14, 1997 chemical explosion at the plutonium reclamation facility, Hanford site, Richland, Washington. Dry interim storage of spent nuclear fuel elements in Germany. Safe and effective system for the bulk receipt and storage of light water reactor fuel prior to reprocessing. Receiving and storage of glass canisters at vitrified waste storage center of Japan Nuclear Fuel Ltd. Design and operational experience of dry cask storage systems. Sellafield MOX plant; Plant safety design (BNFL). The assessment of fault studies for intermediate term waste storage facilities within the UK nuclear regulatory regime. Non-active and active commissioning of the thermal oxide

  7. Impact evaluation of sea salt aerosol given to nuclear spent fuel intermediate storage facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear spent fuel intermediate storage facility is planned to be located in the Sea of Japan coast area for the reasons of nuclear spent fuel transportation. Therefore, there is the risk of structure corrosion by an environmental pollution factor e.g. sea salt aerosol. This study is the corrosion risk evaluation of nuclear spent fuel storage facility by measuring the amount of sea salt aerosol coming. This study develops the new method to improve of the conventional JIS method. (author)

  8. A Study on Applicability of Distributed Energy Generation, Storage and Consumption within Small Scale Facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Rodríguez-Molina

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Distributed generation and storage of energy, conceived as one of the prominent applications of the Smart Grid, has become one of the most popular ways for generation and usage of electricity. Not only does it offer environmental advantages and a more decentralized way to produce energy, but it also enables former consumers to become producers (thus turning them into prosumers. Alternatively, regular power production and consumption is still widely used in most of the world. Unfortunately, accurate business models representations and descriptive use cases for small scale facilitates, either involved in distributed energy or not, have not been provided in a descriptive enough manner. What is more, the possibilities that electricity trade and its storage and consumption activities offer for small users to obtain profits are yet to be addressed and offered to the research community in a thorough manner, so that small consumers will use them to their advantage. This paper puts forward a study on four different business models for small scale facilities and offers an economical study on how they can be deployed as a way to offer profitability for end users and new companies, while at the same time showing the required technological background to have them implemented.

  9. A passive air-cooled dry storage facility for vitrified high-level wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A conceptual design of air-cooled dry storage vault facility for vitrified high-level waste (HLW) canisters is developed for a site in northern Japan. The facility is designed for the reception and unloading of shielded seagoing transportation casks of vitrified HLW canisters, for the inspection of these canisters, and for their temporary storage for a period of up to 50 years. The waste is to be at least 9 years old when received, and the facility will be capable of storing up to 2,500 canisters. This paper provides a conceptual design to identify construction requirements, materials, and space requirements that are unique to the vitrified HLW storage facility. It also identifies the types of special systems and equipment needed in such a facility

  10. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility: Documentation of impact analysis for design alternatives presented in the Draft Environmental Impact Statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is proposing to construct and operate a new Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF). The proposed DWTF would replace the existing Hazardous Waste Management (HWM) facilities at LLNL. The US Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing a Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) to assess the environmental consequences of the proposed DWTF and its alternatives. This report presents the assumptions, methodologies, and analyses used to estimate the waste flows, air emissions, ambient air quality impacts, and public health risks that are presented in the DEIS. Two DWTF design alternatives (Level I and Level II) have been designated as reasonable design alternatives considering available technologies, environmental regulations, and current and future LLNL waste generation. Both design alternatives would include new, separate radioactive and nonradioactive liquid waste treatment systems, a solidification unit, a new decontamination facility, storage and treatment facilities for reactive materials, a radioactive waste storage area, receiving and classification areas, and a uranium burn pan. The Level I design alternative would include a controlled-air incinerator system, while the Level II design alternative would include a rotary kiln incinerator system. 43 refs., 4 figs., 24 tabs

  11. Risk-oriented approach for assessing the environmental safety of radioactive waste storage facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article discusses the risk-oriented approach for assessing the ecological security of radioactive waste storage facilities. On the basis of probability indicators the condition of ecological safety is found to be met at Odessa State Multiregional Facility on the normative criteria of deaths

  12. Overview of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage Facilities at the Savannah River Site. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provides an overview of activities related to fuel receipt and storage in both the Receiving Basin for Off-site Fuels and L-Basin facilities. This paper provides a useful reference to foreign facilities, cask owners and shipping contractors on the cask and fuel handling capabilities of the Savannah River Site

  13. GNS Experience on the Long-Term Storage at Dry Interim Storage Facilities Especially in Ahaus and Gorleben

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This presentation provides a general overview on the operation experience of the dry interim storage facilities in Ahaus and Gorleben (later referred to as TBL-A and TBL-G). GNS is solely in charge of the operation and maintenance of both facilities licensed for a dry storage period of 40 years. The amount of different cask types stored to date which are loaded with spent fuel and reprocessing waste and the cask specific information such as heat capacity, heat flow and dose rate are shown. A presentation of the transport and storage operation experience (e. g. statistics of the monitoring system) follows as well as an outlook on future activities. The associated licensing procedures are outlined in view of pre-existing licenses together with present or future licensing activities. This includes cask approval procedures according to the international safety requirements for transport and licensing procedures as laid down in the German Atomic Act. Both facilities have been operated, to a large extent, independently of nuclear power plants. Different casks have been stored there for more than ten years. In terms of best practices the vast operational experience gathered at these interim storage facilities is shown on practical examples i.e. the 10-year cask inspection, the pilot process for the periodical safety review as well as the ageing management demonstrating the robustness of the dry cask storage concept. The key aspects of the GNS expertise and a summary of the GNS position as well as perspectives for the long-term dry storage complete the presentation. (authors)

  14. Thermal Energy Storage in Molten Salts: Overview of Novel Concepts and the DLR Test Facility (TESIS)

    OpenAIRE

    Breidenbach, Nils; Martin, Claudia; Jockenhöfer, Henning; Bauer, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    At present, two-tank molten salt storage systems are the established commercially available concept for solar thermal power plants. Due to their very low vapour pressure and comparatively high thermal stability, molten salts are preferred as the heat transfer fluid and storage medium. Therefore, the development of alternative, more cost-effective concepts is an important step in making thermal energy storage more competitive for industrial processes and solar thermal applications. The pape...

  15. Safety research activities for Japanese regulations of spent fuel interim storage facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization (JNES) carries out (a) preparation of technical documents, (b) technical evaluations of standards (prepared by academic societies), etc. and (c) other R and D activities, to support Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency (NISA: which prepares necessary regulations for Spent Fuel Interim Storage Facilities). In 2010 fiscal year, JNES completed technical evaluation of the standard (prepared by Atomic Energy Society of Japan) used for the storage facility (dual purpose cask system) being constructed in Mutsu-City and R and D for UT test of welded canister lids which is required for concrete cask storage facilities. And also, JNES is preparing dynamic test of spent fuel to examine the integrity of spent fuel at cask drop accidents and PWR spent fuel storage test to prove long term integrity of spent fuel and cask itself. The results of these tests will be reported in 2011 and 2012 fiscal year. (author)

  16. Selection of away-from-reactor facilities for spent fuel storage. A guidebook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication aims to provide information on the approaches and criteria that would have to be considered for the selection of away-from-reactor (AFR) type spent fuel storage facilities, needs for which have been growing in an increasing number of Member States producing nuclear power. The AFR facilities can be defined as a storage system functionally independent of the reactor operation providing the role of storage until a further destination such as a disposal) becomes available. Initially developed to provide additional storage space for spent fuel, some AFR storage options are now providing additional spaces for extended storage of spent fuel with a prospect for long term storage, which is becoming a progressive reality in an increasing number of Member States due to the continuing debate on issues associated with the endpoints for spent fuel management and consequent delays in the implementation of final steps, such as disposal. The importance of AFR facilities for storage of spent fuel has been recognized for several decades and addressed in various IAEA publications in the area of spent fuel management. The Guidebook on Spent Fuel Storage (Technical Reports Series No. 240 published in 1984 and revised in 1991) discusses factors to be considered in the evaluation of spent fuel storage options. A technical committee meeting (TCM) on Selection of Dry Spent Fuel Storage Technologies held in Tokyo in 1995 also deliberated on this issue. However, there has not been any stand-alone publication focusing on the topic of selection of AFR storage facilities. The selection of AFR storage facilities is in fact a critical step for the successful implementation of spent fuel management programmes, due to the long operational periods required for storage and fuel handling involved with the additional implication of subsequent penalties in reversing decisions or changing the option mid-stream especially after the construction of the facility. In such a context, the long

  17. 36 CFR 1234.30 - How does an agency request authority to establish or relocate records storage facilities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... authority to establish or relocate records storage facilities? 1234.30 Section 1234.30 Parks, Forests, and... RECORDS STORAGE FACILITIES Facility Approval and Inspection Requirements § 1234.30 How does an agency...” excludes NARA-owned and operated records centers. For purposes of this section and § 1234.34, the...

  18. 36 CFR 1234.12 - What are the fire safety requirements that apply to records storage facilities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements that apply to records storage facilities? 1234.12 Section 1234.12 Parks, Forests, and Public... STORAGE FACILITIES Facility Standards § 1234.12 What are the fire safety requirements that apply to... reference, see § 1234.3). (e) The fire resistive rating of the roof must be a minimum of 1/2 hour for...

  19. Lessons learned from the Siting Process of an Interim Storage Facility in Spain - 12024

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamolla, Meritxell Martell [MERIENCE Strategic Thinking, 08734 Olerdola, Barcelona (Spain)

    2012-07-01

    On 29 December 2009, the Spanish government launched a site selection process to host a centralised interim storage facility for spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste. It was an unprecedented call for voluntarism among Spanish municipalities to site a controversial facility. Two nuclear municipalities, amongst a total of thirteen municipalities from five different regions, presented their candidatures to host the facility in their territories. For two years the government did not make a decision. Only in November 30, 2011, the new government elected on 20 November 2011 officially selected a non-nuclear municipality, Villar de Canas, for hosting this facility. This paper focuses on analysing the factors facilitating and hindering the siting of controversial facilities, in particular the interim storage facility in Spain. It demonstrates that involving all stakeholders in the decision-making process should not be underestimated. In the case of Spain, all regional governments where there were candidate municipalities willing to host the centralised interim storage facility, publicly opposed to the siting of the facility. (author)

  20. The Study on Regulations of Interim Spent Fuel Storage Facility in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The expansion of nuclear power generation inevitably result in the increase of spent nuclear fuel generation. Every year ∼700t of spent nuclear fuels are accumulated and total of 10,761t of spent nuclear fuels generated from 20 reactors are stored within the reactor sites by the end of 2009. If this trend is maintained, it is expected that Korea will have ∼30,000t of spent nuclear fuel by 2030. The capacity of pools in reactor sites is expected to be reached from 2016 and Korea need to prepare measures including the introduction of interim storage facility urgently. Considering the domestic situation described so far, it is be very necessary to survey and analyze the regulations of interim storage facilities of advanced countries. This report excerpts and analyzes the report of Japanese Nuclear Energy Safety Organization (JNES) on the regulations of interim storage facilities which was issues before the construction of the Mutz Interim Storage Facility. This report will be effectively used for the preparation of interim storage facility of Korea

  1. Long term Integrity of Spent Fuel and Construction Materials and Behaviour of Components for Dry Storage Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Japan, two dry storage facilities at TEPCO and JAPCO sites have been in operation since 1995 and 2002 respectively. The TEPCO dry storage facility was damaged by a Tsunami attack on 11th March 2011. The casks stored in the facility have since been moved to an onsite temporary cask custody area; after confirmation of the integrity of casks. On the other hand, the Tsunami did not attack the dry storage facility at the JAPCO site. The integrity of the storage building and the casks were maintained. In addition, an off-site centralized dry storage facility has been constructed at Mutsu City. Operation of the storage facility is pending a safety re-examination against new safety regulations. Its final storage capacity will be 5000 t(U) and the storage period is up to 50 years. To support storage operations, it is therefore necessary to obtain and evaluate data on the integrity of spent fuels and cask construction materials during long term dry storage. Objectives: Construction materials for dry storage facilities: • To evaluate long-term reliability of welded stainless steel canisters under stress corrosion cracking (SCC) environment, including the critical salt density deposited on the canister to initiate SCC, monitoring, prevention, and the mitigation method of SCC; • To detect and analyze the cover gas leak from canisters; • To evaluate integrity of sealability of metal gasket under long term storage; • To evaluate influence of the vibration on sealing performance of the ageing gasket

  2. Conceptual design of interim storage facility for CNAI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reduced storage capacity available in the two spent fuel pools of argentine PHWR Atucha-1 power plant, the current plans for extending the reactor operation beyond its design lifetime, and the government decision on Atucha-2 NPP construction ending, have motivated the evaluation of a dry storage option for the interim management of spent fuel assemblies. Two different designs are presently being analyzed by an expert working group, from both technical and economical points of views. Authors are proposing a modular system consisting of an arrangement of reinforced concrete structures into which welded metallic canisters loaded with 37 spent fuel assemblies each stored in horizontal position. The reinforced concrete module is designed to provide the necessary physical protection and biological shielding to the loaded canisters during long-term storage, as well as passive means to remove the spent fuel decay heat by a combination of radiation, conduction and natural air convection. In this works are presented advances in the conceptual designs for a spent nuclear fuel system to Atucha I nuclear power plant. (author)

  3. Groundwater Remediation and Alternate Energy at White Sands Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Holger

    2008-01-01

    White Sands Test Facility Core Capabilities: a) Remote Hazardous Testing of Reactive, Explosive, and Toxic Materials and Fluids; b) Hypergolic Fluids Materials and Systems Testing; c) Oxygen Materials and System Testing; d) Hypervelocity Impact Testing; e)Flight Hardware Processing; and e) Propulsion Testing. There is no impact to any drinking water well. Includes public wells and the NASA supply well. There is no public exposure. Groundwater is several hundred feet below ground. No air or surface water exposure. Plume is moving very slowly to the west. Plume Front Treatment system will stop this westward movement. NASA performs on-going monitoring. More than 200 wells and zones are routinely sampled. Approx. 850 samples are obtained monthly and analyzed for over 300 different hazardous chemicals.

  4. The INFN-CNAF Tier-1 GEMSS Mass Storage System and database facility activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Pier Paolo; Cavalli, Alessandro; Dell'Agnello, Luca; Favaro, Matteo; Gregori, Daniele; Prosperini, Andrea; Pezzi, Michele; Sapunenko, Vladimir; Zizzi, Giovanni; Vagnoni, Vincenzo

    2015-05-01

    The consolidation of Mass Storage services at the INFN-CNAF Tier1 Storage department that has occurred during the last 5 years, resulted in a reliable, high performance and moderately easy-to-manage facility that provides data access, archive, backup and database services to several different use cases. At present, the GEMSS Mass Storage System, developed and installed at CNAF and based upon an integration between the IBM GPFS parallel filesystem and the Tivoli Storage Manager (TSM) tape management software, is one of the largest hierarchical storage sites in Europe. It provides storage resources for about 12% of LHC data, as well as for data of other non-LHC experiments. Files are accessed using standard SRM Grid services provided by the Storage Resource Manager (StoRM), also developed at CNAF. Data access is also provided by XRootD and HTTP/WebDaV endpoints. Besides these services, an Oracle database facility is in production characterized by an effective level of parallelism, redundancy and availability. This facility is running databases for storing and accessing relational data objects and for providing database services to the currently active use cases. It takes advantage of several Oracle technologies, like Real Application Cluster (RAC), Automatic Storage Manager (ASM) and Enterprise Manager centralized management tools, together with other technologies for performance optimization, ease of management and downtime reduction. The aim of the present paper is to illustrate the state-of-the-art of the INFN-CNAF Tier1 Storage department infrastructures and software services, and to give a brief outlook to forthcoming projects. A description of the administrative, monitoring and problem-tracking tools that play a primary role in managing the whole storage framework is also given.

  5. Studies and research concerning BNFP: converting reprocessing plant's fuel receiving and storage area to an away-from-reactor (AFR) storage facility. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cottrell, Jim E.; Shallo, Frank A.; Musselwhite, E Larry; Wiedemann, George F.; Young, Moylen

    1979-09-01

    Converting a reprocessing plant's fuel receiving and storage station into an Away-From-Reactor storage facility is evaluated in this report. An engineering analysis is developed which includes (1) equipment modifications to the facility including the physical protection system, (2) planning schedules for licensing-related activities, and (3) cost estimates for implementing such a facility conversion. Storage capacities are evaluated using the presently available pools of the existing Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant-Fuel Receiving and Storage Station (BNFP-FRSS) as a model.

  6. Studies and research concerning BNFP: converting reprocessing plant's fuel receiving and storage area to an away-from-reactor (AFR) storage facility. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Converting a reprocessing plant's fuel receiving and storage station into an Away-From-Reactor storage facility is evaluated in this report. An engineering analysis is developed which includes (1) equipment modifications to the facility including the physical protection system, (2) planning schedules for licensing-related activities, and (3) cost estimates for implementing such a facility conversion. Storage capacities are evaluated using the presently available pools of the existing Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant-Fuel Receiving and Storage Station (BNFP-FRSS) as a model

  7. Interim nuclear spent fuel storage facility - From complete refusal to public acceptance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: As usual in P.R., there was a complicated, politically sensitive situation we had to face at the beginning and it wasn't easy to create the right P.R. programme with the right targets: CEZ needed a new storage facility for the nuclear spent fuel from its two NPPs - Dukovany and Temelin. Firstly, CEZ preferred to build an on-site facility for the Dukovany NPP to last until the year 2004; secondly, a facility for the Temelin NPP several years later. But the Czech Government decided to limit Dukovany's storage capacity during a public discussion in 1992. Therefore, at the end of 1993, CEZ started the site selection process for a central storage facility targeted at ten regions in the country. In P.R. we decided on two main goals: 1. To gain public acceptance of a central storage facility at least at one site, and hopefully at more. 2. To change public opinion (especially around the Dukovany NPP) in order to create the proper atmosphere for changing the government's decision to limit storage capacity. We wanted to prove that we could choose the fight technical and economical solution without political limits. This obviously presented a challenge as it would be problematic for CEZ to be very visible in the campaign: We wanted people to know that the government had made a bad decision, but we also had to make it clear that our objections were based not on questions of momentary corporate advantage but instead on solid technical grounds. Most would only see self interest. We wanted to show them the facts. Of course, some times it wasn't easy to hit both targets at the same time. There was a lot of hard work in the middle. We gained new experience and we learned a lot trying to get public confidence in nuclear safety, in our company's reliability and in some local profits for a storage site: Firstly none of those regions was excited by the idea o a storage facility in its backyard. Most of them were very strongly and actively against it and did not want to

  8. Storage of KNK nuclear fuel in the interim storage facility north (ZLN); Aufbewahrung von KNK-Kernbrennstoffen im Zwischenlager Nord (ZLN)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brauer, D. [EWN Energiewerke Nord GmbH, Rubenow (Germany); Graffunder, I. [WAK GmbH, Karlsruhe (Germany); Dominke-Bendix, C. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany); Vallentin, R. [WTI Wissenschaftlich-Technische Ingenieurberatung GmbH, Juelich (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The spent fuel elements of KNK II (highly enriched U/Pu mixed oxide) and nuclear fuel form the nuclear ship Otto Hahn being stored in Cadarache in France will be transferred into transport and storage casks type CASTOR {sup registered} KNK and transported to the interim storage facility north (ZLN). The licensing procedure for the casks and storage facility including the manipulation of the cask CASTOR {sup registered} KNK and safety aspects are described.

  9. Monitoring plan for routine organic air emissions at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex Waste Storage Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This monitoring plan provides the information necessary to perform routine organic air emissions monitoring at the Waste Storage Facilities located at the Transuranic Storage Area of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The Waste Storage Facilities include both the Type I and II Waste Storage Modules. The plan implements a dual method approach where two dissimilar analytical methodologies, Open-Path Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (OP-FTIR) and ancillary SUMMA reg-sign canister sampling, following the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) analytical method TO-14, will be used to provide qualitative and quantitative volatile organic concentration data. The Open-Path Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy will provide in situ, real time monitoring of volatile organic compound concentrations in the ambient air of the Waste Storage Facilities. To supplement the OP-FTIR data, air samples will be collected using SUMMA reg-sign, passivated, stainless steel canisters, following the EPA Method TO-14. These samples will be analyzed for volatile organic compounds with gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry analysis. The sampling strategy, procedures, and schedules are included in this monitoring plan. The development of this monitoring plan is driven by regulatory compliance to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, State of Idaho Toxic Air Pollutant increments, Occupational Safety and Health Administration. The various state and federal regulations address the characterization of the volatile organic compounds and the resultant ambient air emissions that may originate from facilities involved in industrial production and/or waste management activities

  10. Czech interim spent fuel storage facility: operation experience, inspections and future plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper describes the situation in the spent fuel management in the Czech Republic. The interim Spent Fuel Storage Facility (ISFSF) at Dukovany, which was commissioned in January 1997 and is using dual transport and storage CASTOR - 440/84 casks, is briefly described. The authors deal with their experience in operating and inspecting the ISFSF Dukovany. The structure of the basic safety document 'Limits and Conditions of Normal Operation' is also mentioned, including the experience of the performance. The inspection activities focused on permanent checking of the leak tightness of the CASTOR 440/84 casks, the maximum cask temperature and inspections monitoring both the neutron and gamma dose rate as well as the surface contamination. The results of the inspections are mentioned in the presentation as well. The operator's experience with re-opening partly loaded and already dried CASTOR-440/84 cask, after its transport from NPP Jaslovske Bohunice to the NPP Dukovany is also described. The paper introduces briefly the concept of future spent fuel storage both from the NPP Dukovany and the NPP Temelin, as prepared by the CEZ. The preparatory work for the Central Interim Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage Facility (CISFSF) in the Czech Republic and the information concerning the planned storage technology for this facility is discussed in the paper as well. The authors describe the site selection process and the preparatory steps concerning new spent fuel facility construction including the Environmental Impact Assessment studies. (author)

  11. COMPLETION OF THE FIRST INTEGRATED SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL TRANSSHIPMENT/INTERIM STORAGE FACILITY IN NW RUSSIA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Northwest and Far East Russia contain large quantities of unsecured spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from decommissioned submarines that potentially threaten the fragile environments of the surrounding Arctic and North Pacific regions. The majority of the SNF from the Russian Navy, including that from decommissioned nuclear submarines, is currently stored in on-shore and floating storage facilities. Some of the SNF is damaged and stored in an unstable condition. Existing Russian transport infrastructure and reprocessing facilities cannot meet the requirements for moving and reprocessing this amount of fuel. Additional interim storage capacity is required. Most of the existing storage facilities being used in Northwest Russia do not meet health and safety, and physical security requirements. The United States and Norway are currently providing assistance to the Russian Federation (RF) in developing systems for managing these wastes. If these wastes are not properly managed, they could release significant concentrations of radioactivity to these sensitive environments and could become serious global environmental and physical security issues. There are currently three closely-linked trilateral cooperative projects: development of a prototype dual-purpose transport and storage cask for SNF, a cask transshipment interim storage facility, and a fuel drying and cask de-watering system. The prototype cask has been fabricated, successfully tested, and certified. Serial production is now underway in Russia. In addition, the U.S. and Russia are working together to improve the management strategy for nuclear submarine reactor compartments after SNF removal

  12. Safety report for Central Interim Storage facility for radioactive waste from small producers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1999 the Agency for Radwaste Management took over the management of the Central Interim Storage (CIS) in Brinje, intended only for radioactive waste from industrial, medical and research applications. With the transfer of the responsibilities for the storage operation, ARAO, the new operator of the facility, received also the request from the Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration for refurbishment and reconstruction of the storage and for preparation of the safety report for the storage with the operational conditions and limitations. In order to fulfill these requirements ARAO first thoroughly reviewed the existing documentation on the facility, the facility itself and the stored inventory. Based on the findings of this review ARAO prepared several basic documents for improvement of the current conditions in the storage facility. In October 2000 the Plan for refurbishment and modernization of the CIS was prepared, providing an integral approach towards remediation and refurbishment of the facility, optimization of the inventory arrangement and modernization of the storage and storing utilization. In October 2001 project documentation for renewal of electric installations, water supply and sewage system, ventilation system, the improvements of the fire protection and remediation of minor defects discovered in building were completed according to the Act on Construction. In July 2003 the safety report was prepared, based on the facility status after the completion of the reconstruction works. It takes into account all improvements and changes introduced by the refurbishment and reconstruction of the facility according to project documentation. Besides the basic characteristics of the location and its surrounding, it also gives the technical description of the facility together with proposed solutions for the renewal of electric installations, renovation of water supply and sewage system, refurbishment of the ventilation system, the improvement of fire

  13. Hazard Evaluation for Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Sludge at the Solid Waste Treatment Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document describes the hazards and operability (HAZOP) analysis performed for the activities associated with the storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) sludge at the T Plant. The safety authorization basis for the T Plant for SNF sludge storage is defined as those aspects of facility design and operational requirements relied upon by DOE to authorize operations. The safety authorization basis for the current T Plant activities is described in HNF-SD-WM-ISB-006, Rev 2, ''Interim Safety Basis for Solid Waste Facilities (T Plant) (ISB)'' and associated amendments and engineering change notices. In addition the authorization basis includes other document as summarized in Section 1.3

  14. [Alternative treatment in psychiatric and psychotherapy facilities in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andritzky, W

    1996-01-01

    Questionnaires were sent to 545 clinics with at least partial psychotherapeutic or psychiatric activities to find out the spectrum of therapeutic techniques and methods used, as well as the spectrum of therapists' qualifications. From the 314 responding clinics, 127 different methods were named with an average of 4.0 each. The proportion of physicians and psychologists to patients becomes worse the bigger the clinics are: e.g., in the class of less than 50 beds, one psychologist cares for 7 patients; in the class 51-300 beds, the relation is one to 48. The six most frequently used methods are: music therapy (36.9%), imagery (25.2%), dance therapy (23.2%), autogenous training (22.6%), body therapies (21.7%), and psychodrama (18.2%). Apart from physicians and psychologists, 38 other professional groups were named. Comparing the answers concerning the methods with the performing professional group, an apparent trend towards a professional diversification was found, e.g. only 62% of music therapy is performed by music therapists, the rest by other professional groups. Finally, analysis of special remarks on the questionnaires resulted in four groups: discussions concerning the term alternative methods, recommendations to use unconventional methods after the clinical phase, conceptual changes of a clinic, and broader theoretical backgrounds integrating various methods, e.g. the psychoanalytic concept. PMID:8851128

  15. Long term integrity of spent fuel and construction materials for dry storage facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Japan, two dry storage facilities at reactor sites have already been operating since 1995 and 2002, respectively. Additionally, a large scale dry storage facility away from reactor sites is under safety examination for license near the coast and desired to start its operation in 2010. Its final storage capacity is 5,000tU. It is therefore necessary to obtain and evaluate the related data on integrity of spent fuels loaded into and construction materials of casks during long term dry storage. The objectives are: - Spent fuel rod: To evaluate hydrogen migration along axial fuel direction on irradiated claddings stored for twenty years in air; To evaluate pellet oxidation behaviour for high burn-up UO2 fuels; - Construction materials for dry storage facilities: To evaluate long term reliability of welded stainless steel canister under stress corrosion cracking (SCC) environment; To evaluate long term integrity of concrete cask under carbonation and salt attack environment; To evaluate integrity of sealability of metal gasket under long term storage and short term accidental impact force.

  16. Decontamination of transport casks and of spent fuel storage facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present document provides an analysis of the technical papers presented at the meeting as well as a summary of the panel discussion. Conclusions and Recommendations: The meeting agreed that the primary source of contamination of transport casks is the production of radioactive isotopes in nuclear fuel and activation products of fuel components in nuclear reactors. The type, amount of mechanism for the release of these isotopes depend on the reactor type and fuel handling process. The widespread use of pools for the storage and handling of fuel provides an easy path for the transfer of contamination. Control of pool water conditions is essential for limiting the spread of contamination. For plants where casks are immersed in pools for loading, the immersion times should be minimised. Casks should be designed for ease of decontamination. The meeting discussed the use of stainless steel and suitable paints for coating casks. Designers should consider the appropriate coating for specific applications. The use of pressurized water for decontamination is recommended whenever possible. A number of commercially available reagents exist for decontaminating cask external surfaces. More work, however, is needed to cope with Pressurized Water Reactor crud within casks. Leaking fuel should be identified and isolated before storage in pools. Basic studies of the uptake and release of contamination from cask surfaces should be initiated. Standardization of methods of contamination measurement and instrumentation should be instituted. Refs, figs and tabs

  17. Monitored retrievable storage submission to Congress: Volume 2, Environmental assessment for a monitored retrievable storage facility. [Contains glossary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1986-02-01

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) supports the DOE proposal to Congress to construct and operate a facility for monitored retrievable storage (MRS) of spent fuel at a site on the Clinch River in the Roane County portion of Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The first part of this document is an assessment of the value of, need for, and feasibility of an MRS facility as an integral component of the waste management system. The second part is an assessment and comparison of the potential environmental impacts projected for each of six site-design combinations. The MRS facility would be centrally located with respect to existing reactors, and would receive and canister spent fuel in preparation for shipment to and disposal in a geologic repository. 207 refs., 57 figs., 132 tabs.

  18. Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ROBINSON, P.A.

    2000-04-17

    This Quality Assurance Plan describes how the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) implements the quality assurance (QA) requirements of the Quality Assurance Program Description (QAPD) (HNF-Mp-599) for Project Hanford activities and products. This QAPP also describes the organizational structure necessary to successfully implement the program. The QAPP provides a road map of applicable Project Hanford Management System Procedures, and facility specific procedures, that may be utilized by WESF to implement the requirements of the QAPD.

  19. Technology Potential of Thermal Energy Storage (TES) Systems in Federal Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chvala, William D.

    2001-07-31

    This document presents the findings of a technology market assessment for thermal energy storage (TES) in space cooling applications. The potential impact of TES in Federal facilities is modeled using the Federal building inventory with the appropriate climatic and energy cost data. In addition, this assessment identified acceptance issues and major obstacles through interviews with energy services companies (ESCOs), TES manufacturers, and Federal facility staff.

  20. Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) Dangerous Waste Training Plan (DWTP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Waste Encapsulation Storage Facility (WESF) Dangerous Waste Training Plan (DWTP) applies to personnel who perform work at, or in support of WESF. The plan, along with the names of personnel, may be given to a regulatory agency inspector upon request. General workers, subcontractors, or visiting personnel who have not been trained in the management of dangerous wastes must be accompanied by an individual who meets the requirements of this training plan. Dangerous waste management includes handling, treatment, storage, and/or disposal of dangerous and/or mixed waste. Dangerous waste management units covered by this plan include: less-than-90-day accumulation area(s); pool cells 1-8 and 12 storage units; and process cells A-G storage units. This training plan describes general requirements, worker categories, and provides course descriptions for operation of the WESF permitted miscellaneous storage units and the Less-than-90-Day Accumulation Areas

  1. Engineering program in order to increase the irradiated fuel storage capacity in pool facilities of Juragua

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1993, a technical program in the spent fuel storage area of Nuclear Plant Juragua was launched. Such a program tries to carry out an engineering assessment of the possibility of increasing the spent fuel storage capacity in pool storage facilities by using high density racks (re-racking) instead of the original (non-compact) ones. The purpose of the above-mentioned program is to evaluate possible solutions that can be applied to the construction works prior to plant operation. The first stage of the program for the 1994-95 period is an ongoing Engineering-Economic Feasibility Study (EEFS), which endeavors to examine the capabilities of the reloading pool in Unit-1 Reactor building and long-term storage pool in auxiliary building in high density storage conditions. Technical details of the EEFS and reached results and difficulties are described. (author). 5 refs., 2 figs

  2. Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) Dangerous Waste Training Plan (DWTP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SIMMONS, F.M.

    2000-03-29

    This Waste Encapsulation Storage Facility (WESF) Dangerous Waste Training Plan (DWTP) applies to personnel who perform work at, or in support of WESF. The plan, along with the names of personnel, may be given to a regulatory agency inspector upon request. General workers, subcontractors, or visiting personnel who have not been trained in the management of dangerous wastes must be accompanied by an individual who meets the requirements of this training plan. Dangerous waste management includes handling, treatment, storage, and/or disposal of dangerous and/or mixed waste. Dangerous waste management units covered by this plan include: less-than-90-day accumulation area(s); pool cells 1-8 and 12 storage units; and process cells A-G storage units. This training plan describes general requirements, worker categories, and provides course descriptions for operation of the WESF permitted miscellaneous storage units and the Less-than-90-Day Accumulation Areas.

  3. 3718-F Alkali Metal Treatment and Storage Facility Closure Plan. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1992-11-01

    The Hanford Site, located northwest of the city of Richland, Washington, houses reactors, chemical-separation systems, and related facilities used for the production of special nuclear materials, as well as for activities associated with nuclear energy development. The 300 Area of the Hanford Site contains reactor fuel manufacturing facilities and several research and development laboratories. The 3718-F Alkali Metal Treatment and Storage Facility (3718-F Facility), located in the 300 Area, was used to store and treat alkali metal wastes. Therefore, it is subject to the regulatory requirements for the storage and treatment of dangerous wastes. Closure will be conducted pursuant to the requirements of the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 (Ecology 1989) and 40 CFR 270.1. Closure also will satisfy the thermal treatment facility closure requirements of 40 CFR 265.381. This closure plan presents a description of the 3718-F Facility, the history of wastes managed, and the approach that will be followed to close the facility. Only hazardous constituents derived from 3718-F Facility operations will be addressed.

  4. 36 CFR 1234.10 - What are the facility requirements for all records storage facilities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... environmental risks. The IPM program emphasizes three fundamental elements: (1) Prevention. IPM is a preventive... facility as defined in the Department of Justice, U. S. Marshals Service report Vulnerability Assessment of... under specific environmental conditions, the facility must have an Integrated Pest Management program...

  5. Retrieval of fluidizable radioactive wastes from storage facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides guidance for strategic planning and implementation of resuspension and retrieval of stored fluid or fluidizable radioactive wastes. The potential risks associated with preparation and realization of these processes are included in the report, and lessons learned from previous applications are highlighted. Technological procedures and equipment used in various countries for resuspension and remobilization of stored fluidizable radioactive wastes are described in the attached annexes as potential options. Waste retrieval is a maturing technology of major importance now that Member States are moving forward in the responsible management of wastes by removal to safe interim storage or disposal. Retrieval of fluidizable wastes is a four-phase operation: (1) access to the waste, (2) mobilize the waste, (3) remove the waste; and (4) transfer the waste.This report divides successful retrieval of radioactive waste into two areas. The first area applies the concept of the waste retrieval as being the final component of a systematic process of old waste management. It also encompasses characterization as it applies to waste retrieval and downstream processes, including acceptance of wastes for treatment, conditioning, storage or disposal. It should be in conformity with national policy, as well as complying with international safety standards and environmental agreements. The second area of the report focuses on implementation of waste retrieval in a wide range of scenarios and using a wide range of retrieval approaches, equipment and technologies. Technical processes are further explained as part of the experience gained in advanced countries on the subject. A set of detailed retrieval technology descriptions by country is included as Annexes to this report. Thirteen experts from seven Member States that previously implemented, or have planned for the near future, significant resuspension and remobilization operations were involved in the preparation of

  6. Norwegian work on establishing a combined storage and disposal facility for low and intermediate level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IAEA has, through its Waste Management Assessment and Technical Review Programme (WATRP), evaluated policies and facilities related to management of radioactive waste in Norway. It is concluded that the Himdalen site, in combination with the chosen engineering concept, can be suitable for the storage and disposal of the relatively small amounts of Norwegian low and intermediate level waste

  7. 30 CFR 57.4160 - Underground electric substations and liquid storage facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Underground electric substations and liquid..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL... Underground electric substations and liquid storage facilities. The requirements of this standard apply...

  8. A PROBABILISTIC INVENTORY MODEL FOR CONDITIONAL CREDIT PERIOD AND LEAD TIME WITH MULTIPLE STORAGE FACILITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Mishra

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A probabilistic inventory model for conditional credit period with exponential demand, non-zero lead time and multiple storage facility has been developed. The behaviour of total expected cost (TEC has been examined and the use and application of the model is demonstrated with the help of a numerical example.

  9. 36 CFR 1234.14 - What are the requirements for environmental controls for records storage facilities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., unscheduled and sample/select records. Paper-based permanent, unscheduled, and sample/select records must be... sample/select records must meet the requirement in this paragraph (c) beginning on September 28, 2005. Existing storage facilities that store paper-based permanent, unscheduled, and/or sample/select...

  10. 30 CFR 75.1912 - Fire suppression systems for permanent underground diesel fuel storage facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... underground diesel fuel storage facilities. 75.1912 Section 75.1912 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES... suppression system shall provide automatic fire detection and automatic fire suppression for all areas...

  11. Neutron spectrometry at the interim storage facility for spent nuclear fuel

    CERN Document Server

    Králik, M; Studeny, J

    2002-01-01

    Dosimetric characteristics of neutron and photon components of mixed fields around casks for spent nuclear fuel have been determined at various places at the dry interim storage facility. The results obtained with metrological grade instruments were compared with data provided by usual survey meters for both neutrons and photons.

  12. Safety research activities for Japanese regulations of spent fuel interim storage facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization (JNES) carries out (a) preparation of technical documents, (b) technical evaluations of standards (prepared by academic societies), etc. and (c) other R and D activities, to support Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency (NISA: which prepares necessary regulations for Spent Fuel Interim Storage Facilities). In 2011 fiscal year, JNES carried out R and D for UT test of welded canister lids which is required for concrete cask storage facilities. And also, JNES carried out dynamic test of spent fuel to examine the integrity of spent fuel at cask drop accidents and PWR spent fuel storage test to prove long term integrity of spent fuel and cask itself. Some of these tests will be carried out in 2012 fiscal year and after. (author)

  13. Development of technical design for waste processing and storage facilities for Novi Han repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Empresarion Agrupados Internacional S.A. (Spain) and ENPRO Consult Ltd. (Bulgaria) were awarded a contract by the Central Finance and Contracts Unit to develop the technical design of the waste processing and storage facilities at the Novi Han repository. At present conceptual design phase is finished. This conceptual design covers the definition of the basic design requirements to be applied to the installations defined above, following both European and Bulgarian legislation. In this paper the following items are considered: 1) Basic criteria for the layout and sizing of buildings; 2) Processing of radioactive waste, including: treatment and conditioning of disused sealed sources; treatment of liquid radioactive wastes; treatment of solid radioactive waste; conditioning of liquid and solid radioactive waste; 3) Control of waste packages and 4) Storage of radioactive waste, including storage facility and waste packages. An analysis of inventories of stored and estimated future wastes and its subsequent processes is also presented and the waste streams are illustrated

  14. Development of a variable climate controlled portable storage facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmins, Mitchel; Yadav, Kamal; Iroanusi, Kennedy; Tickle, Andrew J.

    2012-10-01

    This paper focuses on the development of a portable variable climate controlled system that can be tailored to the requirements of the item to be stored by manipulating the temperature, humidity and light levels within the controlled area. This could be used to store anything from bio-chemical samples (to preserve them from field work) to cooled electronics (prior to deployment in a given situation) to foodstuffs (such as wine and other alcohols). In this situation however, to provide a relatively simplistic example, the environment will be used to store wine. The system is adaptive in that anything can be stored within it, assuming the storage parameters are known in order to correctly configure the environment. In this paper a microcontroller (PICF4520) is connected to a fridge with various sensors attached to monitor and manipulate the environment and adjust it accordingly. For the chosen item to be stored, a temperature of 13- 14oC is required, a high humidity level and a non-Ultraviolent (UV) light source. This work thus allows for a small handheld unit that could be used to control the climate within without the need for the traditional 12 - 16 foot size portable units traditionally used. The unit could be left in the field and run off a solar cell to assist in longer term studies. This paper presents how the microcontroller is connected to the fridge and its sensors, how it manipulates the environment and the process by which the temperature and other factors can be changed without having to edit and recompile the C code, this allows for a much more friendly device interface.

  15. Draft environmental impact statement on a proposed nuclear weapons nonproliferation policy concerning foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel: Volume 2, Appendix F, Description and impacts of storage technology alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This appendix presents a description and evaluation of currently available spent nuclear fuel storage technologies, and their applicability to foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel. These technologies represent the range of alternatives dW would be available to implement the proposed action. Some of these technologies are currently in use at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Several dry storage cask and/or building designs have been licensed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and are operational with commercial nuclear power plant spent fuel at several locations. This appendix also discusses potential storage sites and impacts of foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel storage at these locations

  16. 36 CFR 1232.12 - Under what conditions may Federal records be stored in records storage facilities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... meets the provisions of 36 CFR part 1234. (b) Unscheduled records (1) Any storage facility that meets the provisions of 36 CFR part 1234. (2) Also requires prior notification to NARA (see § 1232.14(b... provisions of 36 CFR part 1234. (d) Vital records Storage facility must meet the provisions of 36 CFR...

  17. Conceptual design report: Nuclear materials storage facility renovation. Part 3, Supplemental information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was a Fiscal Year (FY) 1984 line-item project completed in 1987 that has never been operated because of major design and construction deficiencies. This renovation project, which will correct those deficiencies and allow operation of the facility, is proposed as an FY 97 line item. The mission of the project is to provide centralized intermediate and long-term storage of special nuclear materials (SNM) associated with defined LANL programmatic missions and to establish a centralized SNM shipping and receiving location for Technical Area (TA)-55 at LANL. Based on current projections, existing storage space for SNM at other locations at LANL will be loaded to capacity by approximately 2002. This will adversely affect LANUs ability to meet its mission requirements in the future. The affected missions include LANL's weapons research, development, and testing (WRD ampersand T) program; special materials recovery; stockpile survelliance/evaluation; advanced fuels and heat sources development and production; and safe, secure storage of existing nuclear materials inventories. The problem is further exacerbated by LANL's inability to ship any materials offsite because of the lack of receiver sites for mate rial and regulatory issues. Correction of the current deficiencies and enhancement of the facility will provide centralized storage close to a nuclear materials processing facility. The project will enable long-term, cost-effective storage in a secure environment with reduced radiation exposure to workers, and eliminate potential exposures to the public. It is organized into seven parts. Part I - Design Concept describes the selected solution. Part III - Supplemental Information contains calculations for the various disciplines as well as other supporting information and analyses

  18. Conceptual design report: Nuclear materials storage facility renovation. Part 7, Estimate data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-14

    The Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was a Fiscal Year (FY) 1984 line-item project completed in 1987 that has never been operated because of major design and construction deficiencies. This renovation project, which will correct those deficiencies and allow operation of the facility, is proposed as an FY 97 line item. The mission of the project is to provide centralized intermediate and long-term storage of special nuclear materials (SNM) associated with defined LANL programmatic missions and to establish a centralized SNM shipping and receiving location for Technical Area (TA)-55 at LANL. Based on current projections, existing storage space for SNM at other locations at LANL will be loaded to capacity by approximately 2002. This will adversely affect LANUs ability to meet its mission requirements in the future. The affected missions include LANL`s weapons research, development, and testing (WRD&T) program; special materials recovery; stockpile survelliance/evaluation; advanced fuels and heat sources development and production; and safe, secure storage of existing nuclear materials inventories. The problem is further exacerbated by LANL`s inability to ship any materials offsite because of the lack of receiver sites for mate rial and regulatory issues. Correction of the current deficiencies and enhancement of the facility will provide centralized storage close to a nuclear materials processing facility. The project will enable long-term, cost-effective storage in a secure environment with reduced radiation exposure to workers, and eliminate potential exposures to the public. This report is organized according to the sections and subsections outlined by Attachment III-2 of DOE Document AL 4700.1, Project Management System. It is organized into seven parts. This document, Part VII - Estimate Data, contains the project cost estimate information.

  19. Conceptual design report: Nuclear materials storage facility renovation. Part 1, Design concept. Part 2, Project management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was a Fiscal Year (FY) 1984 line-item project completed in 1987 that has never been operated because of major design and construction deficiencies. This renovation project, which will correct those deficiencies and allow operation of the facility, is proposed as an FY 97 line item. The mission of the project is to provide centralized intermediate and long-term storage of special nuclear materials (SNM) associated with defined LANL programmatic missions and to establish a centralized SNM shipping and receiving location for Technical Area (TA)-55 at LANL. Based on current projections, existing storage space for SNM at other locations at LANL will be loaded to capacity by approximately 2002. This will adversely affect LANUs ability to meet its mission requirements in the future. The affected missions include LANL's weapons research, development, and testing (WRD ampersand T) program; special materials recovery; stockpile survelliance/evaluation; advanced fuels and heat sources development and production; and safe, secure storage of existing nuclear materials inventories. The problem is further exacerbated by LANL's inability to ship any materials offsite because of the lack of receiver sites for mate rial and regulatory issues. Correction of the current deficiencies and enhancement of the facility will provide centralized storage close to a nuclear materials processing facility. The project will enable long-term, cost-effective storage in a secure environment with reduced radiation exposure to workers, and eliminate potential exposures to the public. This document provides Part I - Design Concept which describes the selected solution, and Part II - Project Management which describes the management system organization, the elements that make up the system, and the control and reporting system

  20. Conceptual design report: Nuclear materials storage facility renovation. Part 1, Design concept. Part 2, Project management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-14

    The Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was a Fiscal Year (FY) 1984 line-item project completed in 1987 that has never been operated because of major design and construction deficiencies. This renovation project, which will correct those deficiencies and allow operation of the facility, is proposed as an FY 97 line item. The mission of the project is to provide centralized intermediate and long-term storage of special nuclear materials (SNM) associated with defined LANL programmatic missions and to establish a centralized SNM shipping and receiving location for Technical Area (TA)-55 at LANL. Based on current projections, existing storage space for SNM at other locations at LANL will be loaded to capacity by approximately 2002. This will adversely affect LANUs ability to meet its mission requirements in the future. The affected missions include LANL`s weapons research, development, and testing (WRD&T) program; special materials recovery; stockpile survelliance/evaluation; advanced fuels and heat sources development and production; and safe, secure storage of existing nuclear materials inventories. The problem is further exacerbated by LANL`s inability to ship any materials offsite because of the lack of receiver sites for mate rial and regulatory issues. Correction of the current deficiencies and enhancement of the facility will provide centralized storage close to a nuclear materials processing facility. The project will enable long-term, cost-effective storage in a secure environment with reduced radiation exposure to workers, and eliminate potential exposures to the public. This document provides Part I - Design Concept which describes the selected solution, and Part II - Project Management which describes the management system organization, the elements that make up the system, and the control and reporting system.

  1. Conceptual design report: Nuclear materials storage facility renovation. Part 3, Supplemental information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-14

    The Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was a Fiscal Year (FY) 1984 line-item project completed in 1987 that has never been operated because of major design and construction deficiencies. This renovation project, which will correct those deficiencies and allow operation of the facility, is proposed as an FY 97 line item. The mission of the project is to provide centralized intermediate and long-term storage of special nuclear materials (SNM) associated with defined LANL programmatic missions and to establish a centralized SNM shipping and receiving location for Technical Area (TA)-55 at LANL. Based on current projections, existing storage space for SNM at other locations at LANL will be loaded to capacity by approximately 2002. This will adversely affect LANUs ability to meet its mission requirements in the future. The affected missions include LANL`s weapons research, development, and testing (WRD&T) program; special materials recovery; stockpile survelliance/evaluation; advanced fuels and heat sources development and production; and safe, secure storage of existing nuclear materials inventories. The problem is further exacerbated by LANL`s inability to ship any materials offsite because of the lack of receiver sites for mate rial and regulatory issues. Correction of the current deficiencies and enhancement of the facility will provide centralized storage close to a nuclear materials processing facility. The project will enable long-term, cost-effective storage in a secure environment with reduced radiation exposure to workers, and eliminate potential exposures to the public. It is organized into seven parts. Part I - Design Concept describes the selected solution. Part III - Supplemental Information contains calculations for the various disciplines as well as other supporting information and analyses.

  2. Issues at Stake When Considering Long Term Storage of HLW a Comprehensive Approach to Designing the Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CEA has been conducting a comprehensive R and D program to identify and study key HLW storage design criteria to possibly meet the lifetime goal of a century and beyond. A novel approach is being used since such installations must be understood as a global system comprised of various materials and hardware components, canisters, concrete and steel structures and specific procedures covering engineering steps from construction to operation including monitoring, care and maintenance as well as licensing. The challenge set by such a lifetime design goal made the R and D people focus on issues at stake and relevant to long term HLW storage in particular heat management, the effect of time on materials and the sustainability of care and maintenance. This opened up the R and D field from fundamental research areas to more conventional and technical aspects. Two major guiding principles have been devised as key design goals for the storage concepts under consideration. One is the paramount function of retrievability, which must allow the safe retrieval of any HLW package from the facility at any given time. Next is the passive containment philosophy requiring that a dual-barrier system be considered. In the case of spent fuel, CEA's early assessment of the long-term behavior of cladding shows that it may not qualify as a reliable barrier over a long period of time. Therefore, the overriding strategy of preventing corrosion and material degradation to achieve canister protection, and therefore containment of radioactive material throughout the time of period envisaged, is at the heart of the R and D program and several design alternatives are being studied to meet that objective. For instance available thermal power from SF is used to establish dry corrosion conditions within the storage facility. The paper reviews all of these different R and D and engineering aspects

  3. Immobilized low-activity waste interim storage facility, Project W-465 conceptual design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickett, W.W.

    1997-12-30

    This report outlines the design and Total Estimated Cost to modify the four unused grout vaults for the remote handling and interim storage of immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW). The grout vault facilities in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site were constructed in the 1980s to support Tank Waste disposal activities. The facilities were to serve project B-714 which was intended to store grouted low-activity waste. The existing 4 unused grout vaults, with modifications for remote handling capability, will provide sufficient capacity for approximately three years of immobilized low activity waste (ILAW) production from the Tank Waste Remediation System-Privatization Vendors (TWRS-PV). These retrofit modifications to the grout vaults will result in an ILAW interim storage facility (Project W465) that will comply with applicable DOE directives, and state and federal regulations.

  4. Immobilized low-activity waste interim storage facility, Project W-465 conceptual design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report outlines the design and Total Estimated Cost to modify the four unused grout vaults for the remote handling and interim storage of immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW). The grout vault facilities in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site were constructed in the 1980s to support Tank Waste disposal activities. The facilities were to serve project B-714 which was intended to store grouted low-activity waste. The existing 4 unused grout vaults, with modifications for remote handling capability, will provide sufficient capacity for approximately three years of immobilized low activity waste (ILAW) production from the Tank Waste Remediation System-Privatization Vendors (TWRS-PV). These retrofit modifications to the grout vaults will result in an ILAW interim storage facility (Project W465) that will comply with applicable DOE directives, and state and federal regulations

  5. 9975 SHIPPING PACKAGE PERFORMANCE OF ALTERNATE MATERIALS FOR LONG-TERM STORAGE APPLICATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skidmore, E.; Hoffman, E.; Daugherty, W.

    2010-02-24

    The Model 9975 shipping package specifies the materials of construction for its various components. With the loss of availability of material for two components (cane fiberboard overpack and Viton{reg_sign} GLT O-rings), alternate materials of construction were identified and approved for use for transport (softwood fiberboard and Viton{reg_sign} GLT-S O-rings). As these shipping packages are part of a long-term storage configuration at the Savannah River Site, additional testing is in progress to verify satisfactory long-term performance of the alternate materials under storage conditions. The test results to date can be compared to comparable results on the original materials of construction to draw preliminary conclusions on the performance of the replacement materials.

  6. Modification and expansion of X-7725A Waste Accountability Facility for storage of polychlorinated biphenyl wastes at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) must manage wastes containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in accordance with Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) requirements and as prescribed in a Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement (FFCA) between DOE and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). PCB-containing wastes are currently stored in the PORTS process buildings where they are generated. DOE proposes to modify and expand the Waste Accountability facility (X-7725A) at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), Piketon, Ohio, to provide a central storage location for these wastes. The proposed action is needed to eliminate the fire and safety hazards presented by the wastes. In this EA, DOE considers four alternatives: (1) no action, which requires storing wastes in limited storage areas in existing facilities; (2) modifying and expanding the X-7725A waste accountability facility; (3) constructing a new PCB waste storage building; and (4) shipping PCB wastes to the K-25 TSCA incinerator. If no action is taken, PCB-contaminated would continue to be stored in Bldgs X-326, X-330, and X-333. As TSCA cleanup activities continue, the quantity of stored waste would increase, which would subsequently cause congestion in the three process buildings and increase fire and safety hazards. The preferred alternative is to modify and expand Bldg. X-7725A to store wastes generated by TSCA compliance activities. Construction, which could begin as early as April 1996, would last approximately five to seven months, with a total peak work force of 70

  7. Modification and expansion of X-7725A Waste Accountability Facility for storage of polychlorinated biphenyl wastes at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) must manage wastes containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in accordance with Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) requirements and as prescribed in a Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement (FFCA) between DOE and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). PCB-containing wastes are currently stored in the PORTS process buildings where they are generated. DOE proposes to modify and expand the Waste Accountability facility (X-7725A) at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), Piketon, Ohio, to provide a central storage location for these wastes. The proposed action is needed to eliminate the fire and safety hazards presented by the wastes. In this EA, DOE considers four alternatives: (1) no action, which requires storing wastes in limited storage areas in existing facilities; (2) modifying and expanding the X-7725A waste accountability facility; (3) constructing a new PCB waste storage building; and (4) shipping PCB wastes to the K-25 TSCA incinerator. If no action is taken, PCB-contaminated would continue to be stored in Bldgs X-326, X-330, and X-333. As TSCA cleanup activities continue, the quantity of stored waste would increase, which would subsequently cause congestion in the three process buildings and increase fire and safety hazards. The preferred alternative is to modify and expand Bldg. X-7725A to store wastes generated by TSCA compliance activities. Construction, which could begin as early as April 1996, would last approximately five to seven months, with a total peak work force of 70.

  8. Two energy storage alternatives for a solar-powered sustainable single floor desert home

    KAUST Repository

    Serag-Eldin, M. A.

    2010-09-30

    This paper is concerned with the thermodynamic analysis of a totally solarpowered desert home. The home is air-conditioned and provides all modern comforts and facilities. It features closely spaced, roof mounted photovoltaic modules, which collect the solar energy driving the whole energy system. During the day time, the modules form an elevated horizontal surface above the roof, shielding it from direct solar radiation. After sunset, the photovoltaic modules are flipped vertically upwards to expose the roof to the sky, thus enhancing night-time cooling. Two methods of energy storage are proposed and compared, one using solely battery storage of electrical output, and the other employing a combination of cold water storage and battery storage. The analysis is based on detailed dynamic heat transfer calculations for the entire building envelope, coupled with a solar radiation model, and followed by energy balances. The results reveal that indeed it is feasible to employ solar energy as the only source of energy to power the home, and that each storage system has its own merits and shortcomings. © 2010 WIT Press.

  9. Technical, economic and institutional aspects of regional spent fuel storage facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A particular challenge facing countries with small nuclear programmes is the preparation for extended interim storage and then disposal of their spent nuclear fuel. The costs and complications of providing for away-from-reactor storage facilities and/or geological repositories for relatively small amounts of spent fuel may be prohibitively high, motivating interest in regional solutions. This publication addresses the technical, economic and institutional aspects of regional spent fuel storage facilities (RSFSF) and is based on the results of a series of meetings on this topic with participants from IAEA Member States. Topics discussed include safety criteria and standards, safeguards and physical protection, fuel acceptance criteria, long term stability of systems and stored fuel, selection of site, infrastructure aspects, storage technology, licensing, operations, transport, decommissioning, as well as research and development. Furthermore the publication comprises economic, financial and institutional considerations including organizations and legal aspects followed by political and public acceptance and ethical considerations. Approaches and processes for implementation are discussed, as well as the overall benefits and risks of implementing a regional facility. It is illustrated that implementing a RSFSF facility would involve simultaneously addressing a wide range of diverse challenges. The appendix to this report tabulates the numerous issues that have been touched upon in the study. It appears, however, from the discussions that the challenges can in principle be met; the RSFSF concept is technically feasible and potentially economically viable. The technical committees producing this report did not identify any obvious institutional deficiencies that would prevent completion of such a project. Storing spent fuel in a few safe, reliable, secure facilities could enhance safeguards, physical protection and non-proliferation benefits. The committee also

  10. 76 FR 4244 - Regulation and Enforcement; Renewable Energy Alternate Uses of Existing Facilities on the Outer...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-25

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management 30 CFR Part 285 RIN 1010-AD71 Regulation and Enforcement; Renewable Energy Alternate Uses of Existing Facilities on the Outer Continental Shelf--Acquire a Lease... renewable energy regulatory provisions that pertain to noncompetitive acquisition of leases, published...

  11. Concepts for pumped hydro storage facilities in former opencast mining facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, Detlef; Jordan, Michael [Helmut-Schmidt-Univ. Hamburg (Germany). Electrical Power Systems

    2010-07-01

    Storage of high energy amounts as needed in the electrical power system is limited to only some technologies. One of these, the pumped storage hydro power plants (PSHPP), requires special geological conditions and a costly permission procedure for conventional installations. Also the influence of PSHPP on the environment during the building phase and later in operation is a point of strong discussion. This paper proposes the installation of new PSHPP in opencast mining areas, which remain from coal mining or similar processes. Therefore the idea and the technical application of the proposed technology are introduced. The realization of the concept can bring big advantages compared to a conventional installation. Technical, organizational and financial advantages are explained in detail. (orig.)

  12. Safety research activities for Japanese regulations of spent fuel interim storage facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization (JNES) carries out (a) preparation of technical documents, (b) technical evaluations of standards (prepared by academic societies), etc. and (c) other R and D activities, to support Nuclear Regulation Authority (NRA: which controls the regulations for Spent Fuel Interim Storage Facilities). In 2012 fiscal year, JNES carried out dynamic test of spent fuel to examine the integrity of spent fuel under cask drop accidents, and preparation for PWR spent fuel storage test to prove long term integrity of spent fuel and cask itself. Some of these tests will be also carried out in 2013 fiscal year and after. (author)

  13. Audits of hazardous waste TSDFs let generators sleep easy. [Hazardous waste treatment, storage and disposal facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, F.H.

    1990-02-01

    Because of the increasingly strict enforcement of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), generators of hazardous waste are compelled to investigate the hazardous waste treatment, storage and disposal facility (TSDF) they use. This investigation must include an environmental and a financial audit. Simple audits may be performed by the hazardous waste generator, while more thorough ones such as those performed for groups of generators are more likely to be conducted by environmental consultants familiar with treatment, storage, and disposal techniques and the regulatory framework that guides them.

  14. Criticality safety evaluation report for spent nuclear fuelprocessing and storage facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwinkendorf, K.N., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-24

    This criticality evaluation is for Spent N Reactor fuel unloaded from the existing canisters in both KE and KW Basins, and loaded into multiple canister overpack (MCO) containers with specially- built baskets containing either 54 Mark IV or 48 Mark IA fuel assemblies. The criticality evaluations include loading baskets into the MCO/Cask, operations at the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF), and storage in the Canister Storage Building (CSB). Many conservatisms have been built into this analysis, the primary one being the selection of the k{sub eff} @ 0.95 criticality safety limit.

  15. High Purity Germanium Gamma-PHA Assay of Uranium Storage Pigs for 321-M Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewberry, R.A.

    2001-09-18

    The Analytical Development Section of SRTC was requested by the Facilities Disposition Division (FDD) to determine the holdup of enriched uranium in the 321-M facility as part of an overall deactivation project of the facility. The 321-M facility was used to fabricate enriched uranium fuel assemblies, lithium-aluminum target tubes, neptunium assemblies, and miscellaneous components for the production reactors. The facility also includes the 324-M storage building and the passageway connecting it to 321-M. The results of the holdup assays are essential for determining compliance with the Solid Waste's Waste Acceptance Criteria, Material Control and Accountability, and to meet criticality safety controls. This report describes and documents the use of a portable HPGe detector and EG and G Dart system that contains a high voltage power supply, signal processing electronics, a personal computer with Gamma-Vision software, and space to store and manipulate multiple 4096-channel g-ray spectra to assay for 235U content in 268 uranium shipping and storage pigs. This report includes a description of three efficiency calibration configurations and also the results of the assay. A description of the quality control checks is included as well.

  16. Interface Issues Arising Between Storage and Transport for Storage Facilities Using Storage/Transport Dual Purpose Dry Metal Casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dual purpose dry metal casks were developed as a low cost and reliable design to handle spent fuel safely, not only in relation to storage, but also transportation. One of its main advantages is to enhance worker protection against radiation while reducing possible direct manipulation of the spent fuel. In order to define regulation and the use of this type of casks, a traditional approach can be used, based on the study of every individual aspect. However a new type of approach is possible, called the “holistic approach”, taking into account the different aspects as a whole. (author)

  17. Emergency preparedness hazards assessment for the Concentrate, Storage and Transfer Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents this facility Emergency Preparedness Hazards Assessment (EPHA) for the Concentrate, Storage and Transfer Facility (CSTF) located on the Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS). The CSTF encompasses the F-Area and the H-Area Tank Farms including the Replacement High Level Waste Evaporator (RHLWE) (3H evaporator) as a segment of the H-Area Tank Farm. This EPHA is intended to identify and analyze those hazards that are significant enough to warrant consideration in the tank farm operational emergency management programs

  18. Impacts of ramping inflexibility of conventional generators on strategic operation of energy storage facilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nasrolahpour, Ehsan; Kazempour, Jalal; Zareipour, Hamidreza;

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes an approach to assist a pricemaker merchant energy storage facility in making its optimal operation decisions. The facility operates in a pool-based electricity market, where the ramping capability of other resources is limited. Also, wind power resources exist in the system...... be recast as a Mixed-integer Linear Programming (MILP) problem. Different case studies are presented and discussed using a six-bus illustrative example and the IEEE one-area reliability test system to evaluate the performance of the proposed approach....

  19. New method of calculating technological parameters of underground gas storage facilities in aquiferous strata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gritsenko, A.I.; Maksimov, V.M.; Filinov, M.V.

    1981-03-01

    A method developed for designing underground gas-storage facilities by accounting for the basic filtration processes that occur in aquifers permits calculating the volumes of both the cushion and the working gas. The standard calculation used for finding these quantities usually overestimates the working gas and underestimates the cushion gas. From differential and integral equations for calculating gas saturation and pressure distributions in the surrounding strata, analysts determined the volumes of cushion and working gas for various facilities in the USSR; the predicted volumes correlated well with the actual volumes.

  20. Demand management of city gas per season and study of estimating proper size of LNG storage facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Y.H.; Kim, S.D. [Korea Energy Economics Institute, Euiwang (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-09-01

    LNG storage facilities are indispensable to satisfy demand throughout the year by saturating the time difference of supply and demand that appears due to seasonal factors. The necessity of storage facilities is more important in a country like Korea where LNG is not produced at all and imports are relied upon. The problem of deciding how much storage facilities to keep and in what pattern to import LNG is a question to solve in order to minimize the costs related to the construction of LNG storage facilities while not causing any problem in the supply and demand of LNG. This study analyzes how the import of LNG and the consumption pattern of LNG for power generation affect the decision on the size of storage facilities. How the shipping control, and how LNG demand for power generation affect the decision of requirement of storage facilities, and why the possibility of shipping control should be investigated in the aspect of costs is investigated. As a result of this study, I presented necessary basic data for drafting a policy by assessing the minimum requirements of storage facilities needed for balancing the supply and demand with the various shipping control and LNG consumption patterns through simulation up to the year 2010. 10 refs., 33 figs., 66 tabs.

  1. Hydrologic, soil and vegetation interactions on a tailings sand storage facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgers, T. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    Oil sand companies are committed to the reclamation of lands disturbed by oil sands mining processes. In 1995, Syncrude Canada Ltd. started the progressive reclamation of its South West Sand Storage facility in order to meets the final goal of establishing a self-sustaining forest ecosystem. Initial measures included the placement of reclamation topsoil and vegetation on the lower benches. Further revegetation has been delayed in order to address concerns with salinity and moisture content which is having an adverse effect on vegetation. This reclamation effort will provide valuable technical information and practical applications for industries to successfully revegetate similar sites, including tailings and storage facilities. It contributes to the development of viable reclamation strategies for contaminated sites by determining the effects of soil and hydrologic characteristics on plant community development to better comprehend volumetric soil moisture and soil salinity effects on species distribution and composition.

  2. Storage for the Fast Flux Test Facility unirradiated fuel in the Plutonium Finishing Plant Complex, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Environmental Assessment evaluates the proposed action to relocate and store unirradiated Fast Flux Test Facility fuel in the Plutonium Finishing Plant Complex on the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. The US Department of Energy has decided to cease fuel fabrication activities in the 308 Building in the 300 Area. This decision was based on a safety concern over the ability of the fuel fabrication portion of the 308 Building to withstand a seismic event. The proposed action to relocate and store the fuel is based on the savings that could be realized by consolidating security costs associated with storage of the fuel. While the 308 Building belowgrade fuel storage areas are not at jeopardy by a seismic event, the US Department of Energy is proposing to cease storage operations along with the related fabrication operations. The US Department of Energy proposes to remove the unirradiated fuel pins and fuel assemblies from the 308 Building and store them in Room 192A, within the 234-5Z Building, a part of the Plutonium Finishing Plant Complex, located in the 200 West Area. Minor modifications to Room 192A would be required to accommodate placement of the fuel. The US Department of Energy estimates that removing all of the fuel from the 308 Building would save $6.5 million annually in security expenditures for the Fast Flux Test Facility. Environmental impacts of construction, relocation, and operation of the proposed action and alternatives were evaluated. This evaluation concluded that the proposed action would have no significant impacts on the human environment

  3. TSD-DOSE: A radiological dose assessment model for treatment, storage, and disposal facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfingston, M.; Arnish, J.; LePoire, D.; Chen, S.-Y.

    1998-10-14

    Past practices at US Department of Energy (DOE) field facilities resulted in the presence of trace amounts of radioactive materials in some hazardous chemical wastes shipped from these facilities. In May 1991, the DOE Office of Waste Operations issued a nationwide moratorium on shipping all hazardous waste until procedures could be established to ensure that only nonradioactive hazardous waste would be shipped from DOE facilities to commercial treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facilities. To aid in assessing the potential impacts of shipments of mixed radioactive and chemically hazardous wastes, a radiological assessment computer model (or code) was developed on the basis of detailed assessments of potential radiological exposures and doses for eight commercial hazardous waste TSD facilities. The model, called TSD-DOSE, is designed to incorporate waste-specific and site-specific data to estimate potential radiological doses to on-site workers and the off-site public from waste-handling operations at a TSD facility. The code is intended to provide both DOE and commercial TSD facilities with a rapid and cost-effective method for assessing potential human radiation exposures from the processing of chemical wastes contaminated with trace amounts of radionuclides.

  4. Characterization and reclamation assessment for the central shops diesel storage facility at Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fliermans, C.B.; Hazen, T.C.; Bledsoe, H.W.

    1994-12-31

    The contamination of subsurface terrestrial environments by organic contaminants is a global phenomenon. The remediation of such environments requires innovative assessment techniques and strategies for successful cleanups. Using innovative approaches, the central Shops Diesel Storage Facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS) was characterized to determine the extent of subsurface diesel fuel contamination. Effective bioremediation techniques for cleaning up of the contaminant plume were established.

  5. Hanford environment as related to radioactive waste burial grounds and transuranium waste storage facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, D.J.; Isaacson, R.E.

    1977-06-01

    A detailed characterization of the existing environment at Hanford was provided by the U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) in the Final Environmental Statement, Waste Management Operations, Hanford Reservation, Richland, Washington, December 1975. Abbreviated discussions from that document are presented together with current data, as they pertain to radioactive waste burial grounds and interim transuranic (TRU) waste storage facilities. The discussions and data are presented in sections on geology, hydrology, ecology, and natural phenomena. (JRD)

  6. Waste encapsulation storage facility (WESF) standards/requirements identification document (S/RIDS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maddox, B.S., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-29

    This Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID) sets forth the Environmental Safety and Health (ES{ampersand}H) standards/requirements for the Waste Encapsulation Storage Facility (WESF). This S/RID is applicable to the appropriate life cycle phases of design, construction, operation, and preparation for decommissioning. These standards/requirements are adequate to ensure the protection of the health and safety of workers, the public, and the environment.

  7. A Facile Route to Metal Oxides/Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Macrofilm Nanocomposites for Energy Storage

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Zeyuan; Wei, Bingqing

    2015-01-01

    Nanocomposites consisting of transition-metal oxides and carbon nanomaterials with a desired size and structure are highly demanded for high-performance energy storage devices. Here, a facile two-step and cost-efficient approach relying on directly thermal treatment of chemical vapor deposition products is developed as a general synthetic method to prepare a family of metal oxides [MxOy (M = Fe, Co, Ni)]/single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) macrofilm nanocomposites. The MxOy nanoparticles obt...

  8. Pilot scale facility to determine gaseous emissions from livestock slurry during storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Søren O; Skov, Morten; Drøscher, Per;

    2009-01-01

    emission from pig slurry was identified by GC-MS analysis of odor collected on adsorption tubes. Ammonia emissions between 0 and 166 mg N m-2 h-1 were observed during storage of pig slurry with and without surface crust and cover. A comparison of pooled and averaged time point measurements of CO2, CH4......) or a syringe (time point samples). Complete recovery of CH4 independent of ventilation rate was demonstrated. Vertical profiles of CO2 and CH4 above the slurry surface with and without ventilation and mixing of the headspace indicated methane oxidation activity in the surface crust. p-Cresol and 4-ethyl phenol...... storage facility for livestock slurry consisting of eight 6.5-m3 cylindrical units. The stores may be equipped with airtight covers and ventilated during storage or during measurement only. Each store has eight air inlets (160 mm diameter) and a single outlet in the cover connected to a main ventilation...

  9. An alternative format for Category I fuel cycle facility physical protection plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document provides an alternative format for physical protection plans designed to meet the requirements of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Sections 73.20, 73.45, and 73.46. These requirements apply to licensees who operate Category I fuel cycle facilities. Such licensees are authorized to use or possess a formula quantity of strategic special nuclear material. The format described is an alternative to that found under Regulatory Guide 5.52, Rev. 2 ''Standard Format and Content of a Licensee Physical Protection Plan for Strategic Special Nuclear Material at Fixed Sites (Other than Nuclear Power Plants).''

  10. Safe and cost-effective pipe storage facility in Bocholt (Germany); Sichere und wirtschaftliche Erdgas-Optimierungsleitung in Bocholt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuehn, Ulrich [TUEV SUED Industrie Service GmbH, Stuttgart (Germany). Abt. Fernleitungen

    2008-11-15

    The deregulation of natural gas markets in Europe and the growing share of natural gas on the energy supply market have made pipe storage facilities increasingly important for energy distributors. Flexible gas supply realised with the help of underground pipe storage facilities smooths out the volatility of peak prices and supports independent pricing. On behalf of Bocholter Energie- und Wasserversorgung GmbH, TUEV SUED Industrie Service accompanied the construction of the energy distributor's gas pipe storage facility from design to implementation. (orig.)

  11. Design, construction and commissioning of the new solid waste management and storage facilities of Ignalina NPP, Lithuania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goehring, R.; Wenninger, K. [RWE NUKEM GmbH, Alzenau (Germany)

    2006-04-15

    The contract for the design, construction and commissioning (turn-key) of the New Solid Waste Management and Storage Facilities (SWMSF) has been awarded to RWE NUKEM GmbH. The contract was signed on the 30.11.2005. The New Solid Waste Management and Storage Facilities (SWMSF) are financed by the Ignalina Decommissioning Support Fund which is managed by European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD). The new facilities are required on the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant (INPP) in order to support ongoing decomissioning work, including removal of waste from existing waste storage buildings. (orig.)

  12. Zwilag intermediate storage facility Wuerenlingen AG (CH). 25 years existence of the company, 15 years operational experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wastes with high toxicity from chemistry, pharmaceutics, process engineering, automotive and electrical engineering that comply with the requirements of an underground disposal facility (UTD) can directly be delivered to the UTD for final disposal. Radioactive wastes may not be brought into the UTD for final disposal. Compared to chemical wastes the radioactive wastes lose their toxicity faster but the after-heat generation could damage the surrounding host rock. Therefore it is required that high-level radioactive wastes are stored in a so called intermediate storage facility. The article describes the intermediate storage and conditioning of radioactive wastes using the example of the Swiss Zwilag intermediate storage facility Wuerenlingen AG.

  13. Investigation of Storage Options for Scientific Computing on Grid and Cloud Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, several new storage technologies, such as Lustre, Hadoop, OrangeFS, and BlueArc, have emerged. While several groups have run benchmarks to characterize them under a variety of configurations, more work is needed to evaluate these technologies for the use cases of scientific computing on Grid clusters and Cloud facilities. This paper discusses our evaluation of the technologies as deployed on a test bed at FermiCloud, one of the Fermilab infrastructure-as-a-service Cloud facilities. The test bed consists of 4 server-class nodes with 40 TB of disk space and up to 50 virtual machine clients, some running on the storage server nodes themselves. With this configuration, the evaluation compares the performance of some of these technologies when deployed on virtual machines and on “bare metal” nodes. In addition to running standard benchmarks such as IOZone to check the sanity of our installation, we have run I/O intensive tests using physics-analysis applications. This paper presents how the storage solutions perform in a variety of realistic use cases of scientific computing. One interesting difference among the storage systems tested is found in a decrease in total read throughput with increasing number of client processes, which occurs in some implementations but not others.

  14. The role of interim storage facilities in the nuclear waste management policy of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article discusses the role of interim storage of spent fuel elements in the current nuclear waste management policy in Germany, and possible demand for additional interim storage facilities in the future, as a consequence of the shift in the radioactive waste disposal concept and the nuclear power opt-out policy of the Federal Government. Success or failure of the consensus on the nuclear power phase-out strategy, agreed between the Federal Government and the nuclear power industry on 14 June 2000, hinges not only but essentially on the availability of sufficient interim storage facilities for spent fuel elements accrued over the negotiated remaining operating periods of nuclear power plants. The NPP operators say the present radioactive waste management concept has to be put on a different basis and needs amending in response to the change in energy policy. For the electric utilities, the crucial test is whether the Federal Government will be able to fulfill their promise made during the consensus negotiations, namely that there will be no premature shutdowns of nuclear power plants because of a bottleneck in spent fuel storage capacity. (orig./CB)

  15. Hazardous Material Storage Facilities and Sites, Hazardous Waste Material Storage Sites at Maryland Transit Administrations Washington Boulevard Facility e.g. Crusher, Universal Waste Battery, Published in 2008, 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, Maryland Transit Administration.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Hazardous Material Storage Facilities and Sites dataset, published at 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Field Observation information...

  16. Waste management facility accident analysis (WASTE ACC) system: software for analysis of waste management alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the Waste Management Facility Accident Analysis (WASTEunderscoreACC) software, which was developed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to support the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Waste Management (WM) Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). WASTEunderscoreACC is a decision support and database system that is compatible with Microsoft reg-sign Windows trademark. It assesses potential atmospheric releases from accidents at waste management facilities. The software provides the user with an easy-to-use tool to determine the risk-dominant accident sequences for the many possible combinations of process technologies, waste and facility types, and alternative cases described in the WM PEIS. In addition, its structure will allow additional alternative cases and assumptions to be tested as part of the future DOE programmatic decision-making process. The WASTEunderscoreACC system demonstrates one approach to performing a generic, systemwide evaluation of accident risks at waste management facilities. The advantages of WASTEunderscoreACC are threefold. First, the software gets waste volume and radiological profile data that were used to perform other WM PEIS-related analyses directly from the WASTEunderscoreMGMT system. Second, the system allows for a consistent analysis across all sites and waste streams, which enables decision makers to understand more fully the trade-offs among various policy options and scenarios. Third, the system is easy to operate; even complex scenario runs are completed within minutes

  17. Storage fee analysis for a nuclear waste terminal storage facility. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-09-01

    A model was developed for determining a pricing schedule designed to recover federal government costs incurred in the development, design, construction, operation, decommissioning, and surveillance of a federal repository for high-level waste generated by the commercial nuclear power industry. As currently constructed, the model computes current dollar prices on a yearly basis for a single unit charge or a split fee based upon two user-provided quantity flows. Over the period of facility operation, the computed-cost schedule shows variability on a year-to-year basis only within specified ranges. The model uses as basic input data: cost schedule for the federal repository; quantity flow schedule for each factor to be charged; schedule for escalation rate, discount rate, and interest rate; and fraction of costs to be recovered on each quantity flow if the split-fee option is used. The model allows testing of these variables in order to determine the relative significance of each component with regard to cost to, and impact on, the nuclear power industry. Another feature of the model is its versatility. Not only is the user able to specify the percent of total costs to be covered by each method of fee assessment listed above but also the user can specify a revenue-cost ratio, an option that would prove useful in trying to assess the general uncertainty involved when dealing in the future. In addition, the model accepts either current-dollar or constant-dollar cost measures, and in the case of the latter escalates the costs with user-provided assumptions.

  18. SNL Storage Facility Fire Environment Experiment Data for Model Validation and Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of validated numerical tools to predict the thermal hazard posed by a fuel fire that results from an aircraft or ground transportation accident is a goal of the Fuel Fire Technology Base Program. These validated tools support Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) probabilistic Weapon System Safety Assessments (WSSA). Two types of tools are being developed to support this type of activity: (1) tools that model the detailed physics of the problem (e.g., fire field models); and (2) tools that model the dominant phenomena (e.g., the risk assessment compatible fire models (RACFMs)). RACFMs are tailored to be compatible with the methodology of a probabilistic WSSA. A large-scale fire testing program has been established to obtain experimental data to (1) develop and calibrate RACFMs, (2) validate and further develop fire field models, (3) assess the fire threat to actual systems of interest and, (4) provide archival data for future assessments. This report describes nine full-scale enclosure pool fire experiments (JP8 fueled) that were conducted at the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Lurance Canyon Burn Site in the Building 9830 'Igloo' Facility. Experiment and hardware requirements, the test facility, instrumentation, and a complete description of each experiment are provided herein. The primary purpose of the test series was to furnish experimental data for validating compartment fire models that are being developed to predict the abnormal thermal environment in a storage facility/aircraft accident situation. Fires of interest in the storage and maintenance facilities are primarily hydrocarbon pool fires that could occur as a result of an aircraft engine penetrating the facility during an accident. The models, in turn, are to be used to assess the thermal hazard posed to stored weapons within the facility. (author)

  19. Risk assessment of CST-7 proposed waste treatment and storage facilities Volume I: Limited-scope probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) of proposed CST-7 waste treatment & storage facilities. Volume II: Preliminary hazards analysis of proposed CST-7 waste storage & treatment facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasser, K.

    1994-06-01

    In FY 1993, the Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Management Group [CST-7 (formerly EM-7)] requested the Probabilistic Risk and Hazards Analysis Group [TSA-11 (formerly N-6)] to conduct a study of the hazards associated with several CST-7 facilities. Among these facilities are the Hazardous Waste Treatment Facility (HWTF), the HWTF Drum Storage Building (DSB), and the Mixed Waste Receiving and Storage Facility (MWRSF), which are proposed for construction beginning in 1996. These facilities are needed to upgrade the Laboratory`s storage capability for hazardous and mixed wastes and to provide treatment capabilities for wastes in cases where offsite treatment is not available or desirable. These facilities will assist Los Alamos in complying with federal and state requlations.

  20. Risk assessment of CST-7 proposed waste treatment and storage facilities Volume I: Limited-scope probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) of proposed CST-7 waste treatment ampersand storage facilities. Volume II: Preliminary hazards analysis of proposed CST-7 waste storage ampersand treatment facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In FY 1993, the Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Management Group [CST-7 (formerly EM-7)] requested the Probabilistic Risk and Hazards Analysis Group [TSA-11 (formerly N-6)] to conduct a study of the hazards associated with several CST-7 facilities. Among these facilities are the Hazardous Waste Treatment Facility (HWTF), the HWTF Drum Storage Building (DSB), and the Mixed Waste Receiving and Storage Facility (MWRSF), which are proposed for construction beginning in 1996. These facilities are needed to upgrade the Laboratory's storage capability for hazardous and mixed wastes and to provide treatment capabilities for wastes in cases where offsite treatment is not available or desirable. These facilities will assist Los Alamos in complying with federal and state requlations

  1. Effect of process-dependent parameters of the handling-and-storage facility operation on the cargo handling cost

    OpenAIRE

    Шраменко, Наталя Юріївна

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of the handling-and-storage facility operation revealed the disadvantages of the technology that is related to the non-consideration of incoming cargo traffic variations in the planning and organization of industrial activity.The criterion of the handling-and-storage facility operation that presents unit costs for cargo handling has been formalized. The criterion makes it possible to take into account the cargo owner's costs associated with downtime of vehicles waiting for service an...

  2. Sampling and analysis of radioactive liquid wastes and sludges in the Melton Valley and evaporator facility storage tanks at ORNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sears, M.B.; Botts, J.L.; Ceo, R.N.; Ferrada, J.J.; Griest, W.H.; Keller, J.M.; Schenley, R.L.

    1990-09-01

    The sampling and analysis of the radioactive liquid wastes and sludges in the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVSTs), as well as two of the evaporator service facility storage tanks at ORNL, are described. Aqueous samples of the supernatant liquid and composite samples of the sludges were analyzed for major constituents, radionuclides, total organic carbon, and metals listed as hazardous under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Liquid samples from five tanks and sludge samples from three tanks were analyzed for organic compounds on the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Target Compound List. Estimates were made of the inventory of liquid and sludge phases in the tanks. Descriptions of the sampling and analytical activities and tabulations of the results are included. The report provides data in support of the design of the proposed Waste Handling and Packaging Plant, the Liquid Low-Level Waste Solidification Project, and research and development activities (R D) activities in developing waste management alternatives. 7 refs., 8 figs., 16 tabs.

  3. Dose reduction through automation of nuclear weapons dismantlement and storage procedures at the Department of Energy's Pantex Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the end of the Cold War and the subsequent break up of the Soviet Union, the number of weapons in the nuclear stockpile now greatly exceeds any foreseeable future need. To compensate for this excess an estimated 20,000 nuclear warheads have been earmarked for dismantlement and storage at the Department of Energy's Pantex Plant near Amarillo, Texas. It is anticipated that the majority of these warheads will arrive at the Pantex facility by the year 2000. At that time, it is estimated that current dismantlement and inventory procedures will not be adequate to control worker radiation exposure within administrative and federal dose limits. To control these exposures alternate approaches to dismantlement and inventory must be developed. One attractive approach is to automate as many activities as possible, thus reducing worker exposure. To facilitate automation of dismantlement and storage procedures, current procedures were investigated in terms of collective dose to workers, time to completion, ease of completion, and cost of automation for each task. A cost-benefit comparison was then performed in order to determine which procedures would be most cost-effective to automate

  4. Effects of temperature on concrete cask in a dry storage facility for spent nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the dry storage of spent nuclear fuels,concrete cask serves both as a shielding and a structural containment. The concrete in the storage facility is expected to endure the decay heat of the spent nuclear fuel during its service life. Thus, effects of the sustaining high temperature on concrete material need be evaluated for safety of the dry storage facility. In this paper, we report an experimental program aimed at investigating possible high temperature effects on properties of concrete, with emphasis on the mechanical stability, porosity,and crack-resisting ability of concrete mixes prepared using various amounts of Portland cement, fly ash, and blast furnace slag. The experimental results obtained from concrete specimens exposed to a temperature of 94 degree C for 90 days indicate that: (1) compressive strength of the concrete remains practically unchanged; (2) the ultrasonic pulse velocity, and dynamic modulus of elasticity of the concrete decrease in early stage of the high-temperature exposure,and gradually become stable with continuing exposure; (3) shrinkage of concrete mixes exhibits an increase in early stage of the exposure and does not decrease further with time; (4) concrete mixes containing pozzolanic materials,including fly ash and blast furnace slag, show better temperature-resisting characteristics than those using only Portland cement. (authors)

  5. CPP-603 Underwater Fuel Storage Facility Site Integrated Stabilization Management Plan (SISMP), Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denney, R.D.

    1995-10-01

    The CPP-603 Underwater Fuel Storage Facility (UFSF) Site Integrated Stabilization Management Plan (SISMP) has been constructed to describe the activities required for the relocation of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from the CPP-603 facility. These activities are the only Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) actions identified in the Implementation Plan developed to meet the requirements of the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 94-1 to the Secretary of Energy regarding an improved schedule for remediation in the Defense Nuclear Facilities Complex. As described in the DNFSB Recommendation 94-1 Implementation Plan, issued February 28, 1995, an INEL Spent Nuclear Fuel Management Plan is currently under development to direct the placement of SNF currently in existing INEL facilities into interim storage, and to address the coordination of intrasite SNF movements with new receipts and intersite transfers that were identified in the DOE SNF Programmatic and INEL Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement Record, of Decision. This SISMP will be a subset of the INEL Spent Nuclear Fuel Management Plan and the activities described are being coordinated with other INEL SNF management activities. The CPP-603 relocation activities have been assigned a high priority so that established milestones will be meet, but there will be some cases where other activities will take precedence in utilization of available resources. The Draft INEL Site Integrated Stabilization Management Plan (SISMP), INEL-94/0279, Draft Rev. 2, dated March 10, 1995, is being superseded by the INEL Spent Nuclear Fuel Management Plan and this CPP-603 specific SISMP.

  6. Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) Basis for Interim Operation (BIO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) is located in the 200 East Area adjacent to B Plant on the Hanford Site north of Richland, Washington. The current WESF mission is to receive and store the cesium and strontium capsules that were manufactured at WESF in a safe manner and in compliance with all applicable rules and regulations. The scope of WESF operations is currently limited to receipt, inspection, decontamination, storage, and surveillance of capsules in addition to facility maintenance activities. The capsules are expected to be stored at WESF until the year 2017, at which time they will have been transferred for ultimate disposition. The WESF facility was designed and constructed to process, encapsulate, and store the extracted long-lived radionuclides, 90Sr and 137Cs, from wastes generated during the chemical processing of defense fuel on the Hanford Site thus ensuring isolation of hazardous radioisotopes from the environment. The construction of WESF started in 1971 and was completed in 1973. Some of the 137Cs capsules were leased by private irradiators or transferred to other programs. All leased capsules have been returned to WESF. Capsules transferred to other programs will not be returned except for the seven powder and pellet Type W overpacks already stored at WESF

  7. Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) Basis for Interim Operation (BIO)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    COVEY, L.I.

    2000-11-28

    The Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) is located in the 200 East Area adjacent to B Plant on the Hanford Site north of Richland, Washington. The current WESF mission is to receive and store the cesium and strontium capsules that were manufactured at WESF in a safe manner and in compliance with all applicable rules and regulations. The scope of WESF operations is currently limited to receipt, inspection, decontamination, storage, and surveillance of capsules in addition to facility maintenance activities. The capsules are expected to be stored at WESF until the year 2017, at which time they will have been transferred for ultimate disposition. The WESF facility was designed and constructed to process, encapsulate, and store the extracted long-lived radionuclides, {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs, from wastes generated during the chemical processing of defense fuel on the Hanford Site thus ensuring isolation of hazardous radioisotopes from the environment. The construction of WESF started in 1971 and was completed in 1973. Some of the {sup 137}Cs capsules were leased by private irradiators or transferred to other programs. All leased capsules have been returned to WESF. Capsules transferred to other programs will not be returned except for the seven powder and pellet Type W overpacks already stored at WESF.

  8. Social assessment of siting a low-level radioactive waste storage facility in Michigan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoffle, R.W.; Traugott, M.J.; Stone, J.V.; McIntyre, P.D.; Davidson, C.C.; Jensen, F.V.; Coover, G.E. (Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States))

    1990-01-01

    This report presents findings from a social assessment of siting a low-level radioactive waste storage facility in Michigan. Social assessments derive from direct interaction between researchers and study participants. The report is organized into five chapters. Chapter One, Summary of Findings, focuses on key findings from the statewide telephone surveys and the in-depth ethnographic study conducted by the SNR/ISR study team. These and additional findings are discussed in greater detail in the three subsequent chapters. Chapter Two, Statewide Telephone Survey Findings, presents the knowledge, attitudes and beliefs statewide residents have regarding the LLRW project. Chapter Three, Statewide Demographic Findings, presents a detailed examination of differences among various demographic groups and includes regional analysis. Chapter Four, Hillsdale-area Ethnographic Study Findings, discusses perceived impacts of the proposed LLRW storage facility on local residents who mistakenly came to believe that their area had been specially selected as the location for the facility. Specifically, the chapter presents the development, spread, shape and persistence of what is termed a risk perception shadow in the greater Hillsdale area. Possible causes of the shadow also are discussed, and comparisons are made between statewide and Hillsdale-area survey populations. Chapter Five, Research Methods, presents a discussion of the social assessment research methods used to derive these findings.

  9. Hazard Evaluation for Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Sludge at the Solid Waste Treatment Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SCHULTZ, M.V.

    2000-08-22

    As part of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) storage basin clean-up project, sludge that has accumulated in the K Basins due to corrosion of damaged irradiated N Reactor will be loaded into containers and placed in interim storage. The Hanford Site Treatment Complex (T Plant) has been identified as the location where the sludge will be stored until final disposition of the material occurs. Long term storage of sludge from the K Basin fuel storage facilities requires identification and analysis of potential accidents involving sludge storage in T Plant. This report is prepared as the initial step in the safety assurance process described in DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports and HNF-PRO-704, Hazards and Accident Analysis Process. This report documents the evaluation of potential hazards and off-normal events associated with sludge storage activities. This information will be used in subsequent safety analyses, design, and operations procedure development to ensure safe storage. The hazards evaluation for the storage of SNF sludge in T-Plant used the Hazards and Operability Analysis (HazOp) method. The hazard evaluation identified 42 potential hazardous conditions. No hazardous conditions involving hazardous/toxic chemical concerns were identified. Of the 42 items identified in the HazOp study, eight were determined to have potential for onsite worker consequences. No items with potential offsite consequences were identified in the HazOp study. Hazardous conditions with potential onsite worker or offsite consequences are candidates for quantitative consequence analysis. The hazardous conditions with potential onsite worker consequences were grouped into two event categories, Container failure due to overpressure - internal to T Plant, and Spill of multiple containers. The two event categories will be developed into accident scenarios that will be quantitatively analyzed to determine release consequences. A third category, Container failure due to

  10. Long-term storage facility for reactor compartments in Sayda Bay - German support for utilization of nuclear submarines in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The German-Russian project that is part of the G8 initiative on Global Partnership Against the Spread of Weapons and Materials of Mass Destruction focuses on the speedy construction of a land-based interim storage facility for nuclear submarine reactor compartments at Sayda Bay near Murmansk. This project includes the required infrastructure facilities for long-term storage of about 150 reactor compartments for a period of about 70 years. The interim storage facility is a precondition for effective activities of decommissioning and dismantlement of almost all nuclear-powered submarines of the Russian Northern Fleet. The project also includes the establishment of a computer-assisted waste monitoring system. In addition, the project involves clearing Sayda Bay of other shipwrecks of the Russian navy. On the German side the project is carried out by the Energiewerke Nord GmbH (EWN) on behalf of the Federal Ministry of Economics and Labour (BMWi). On the Russian side the Kurchatov Institute holds the project management of the long-term interim storage facility in Sayda Bay, whilst the Nerpa Shipyard, which is about 25 km away from the storage facility, is dismantling the submarines and preparing the reactor compartments for long-term interim storage. The technical monitoring of the German part of this project, being implemented by BMWi, is the responsibility of the Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM). This paper gives an overview of the German-Russian project and a brief description of solutions for nuclear submarine disposal in other countries. At Nerpa shipyard, being refurbished with logistic and technical support from Germany, the reactor compartments are sealed by welding, provided with biological shielding, subjected to surface treatment and conservation measures. Using floating docks, a tugboat tows the reactor compartments from Nerpa shipyard to the interim storage facility at Sayda Bay where they will be left on the on-shore concrete

  11. Spatial distribution of stored grain insects in a rice storage and processing facility in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Lazzari, F. N.; Lazzari, F. A.; Lazzari, S. M. N.; Ceruti, F. C.

    2010-01-01

    This study describes the spatial distribution of stored product insects captured biweekly using foodbaited cage traps in a large rice storage and processing facility, in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Monitoring started in August 2009 and will be carried out for 1 year, the first 5 months of sampling being presented in this study. From end of August 2009 until the end of December 2009, a total of 9893 insects were captured in the 99 cage traps. The most abundant species were: Carpop...

  12. An automatically controlled system for waste transport in low level nuclear waste storage facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobe Steel has developed and manufactured a fully automatic remote-controlled system for the storage of up to 42 000 waste drum packages discharged from nuclear reprocessing facilities. The system includes two forklifts and an elevator both of which are controlled via a remote control center. The forklifts can transport up to 4 ton waste packages. The elevator can transport a forklift carrying a maximum weight package. The system also includes a rescue vehicle that can be manually operated at a distance from a remote station using ITV cameras. (author)

  13. Improvement of numerical simulation methods on safety assessment of the spent fuel storage facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Improvement of numerical simulation methods on safety assessment of the spent fuel storage facility is one of main objectives of JNES activities. For the thermal and structural analyses, the radiative heat transfer analysis code S-FOKS has been developed to reduce computing time and to avoid using large memory area. In order to simulate the specular reflection, a new model (called 'model-2') is planned to install to S-FOKS code. The theoretical values with the specular reflection in simple geometry were lead to verify S-FOKS model-2. (author)

  14. An information management system for a spent nuclear fuel interim storage facility.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finch, Robert J.; Chiu, Hsien-Lang (Taiwan Power Co., Taipei, 10016 Taiwan); Giles, Todd; Horak, Karl Emanuel; Jow, Hong-Nian (Jow International, Kirkland, WA)

    2010-12-01

    We describe an integrated information management system for an independent spent fuel dry-storage installation (ISFSI) that can provide for (1) secure and authenticated data collection, (2) data analysis, (3) dissemination of information to appropriate stakeholders via a secure network, and (4) increased public confidence and support of the facility licensing and operation through increased transparency. This information management system is part of a collaborative project between Sandia National Laboratories, Taiwan Power Co., and the Fuel Cycle Materials Administration of Taiwan's Atomic Energy Council, which is investigating how to implement this concept.

  15. Characterization of two WESF [Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility] capsules after five years of service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) 137Cs capsules have been analyzed destructively after five years of service in the Sandia Irradiator for Dried Sewage Solids (SIDSS). The program concentrated on studies of the inner capsule, inner capsule weld areas, and analysis of the CsCl salt. No measurable corrosion was observed on the capsule wall or welds after the five years in the SIDSS Facility. The operating temperatures of the inner capsule wall were calculated to be between 140 and 180/degree/C. Radiochemistry and isotopic analyses provided data for specific activity calculations. There was good correlation between the measured calorimetry of the capsules before sectioning, 53 and 55 kCi, and the activity calculations, 54 and 59 kCi, respectively. 21 refs., 43 figs., 18 tabs

  16. Retrieval and conditioning of high level radioactive solid waste from pit-type storage facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A city radioactive waste temporary storage facility was operated for many years and aged seriously. In the 1970s, some high level radioactive solid waste (HLW) was stored in this facility because of bad management, which threatens the environment safety and should be retrieved and conditioned as soon as possible. According to the real condition in site, a retrieval technical process for HLW utilizing 'robot-airproof work cell' was employed the Department of Radioactive Waste Management, CIAE. The HLW was located in the No. 17 pit through contaminated level and detected hot-spot. After the mock-up test, the retrieval technical process was optimized. Finally, the HLW was successfully retrieved and conditioned in remote control way. (authors)

  17. Hazardous waste: Siting of storage facility at Kelly Air Force Base, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    This report provides information on whether the hazardous waste storage facility at Kelly Air Force Base meets Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, state, and Air Force siting requirements; on whether the Air Force or the Defense Reutilization and Marketing Office selected the best site available to protect the public and to preserve good public relations with the community; on whether the Air Force, Kelly Air Force Base, or the Defense Logistics Agency adjusted siting standards as a result of the adverse publicity the hazardous waste facility has generated; and on whether Kelly Air Force Base is revising its hazardous waste management organization so that it is similar to the organizations at Tinker and McClellan Air Force Bases.

  18. An Evaluation Model for Tailings Storage Facilities Using Improved Neural Networks and Fuzzy Mathematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Tian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development of mine industry, tailings storage facility (TSF, as the important facility of mining, has attracted increasing attention for its safety problems. However, the problems of low accuracy and slow operation rate often occur in current TSF safety evaluation models. This paper establishes a reasonable TSF safety evaluation index system and puts forward a new TSF safety evaluation model by combining the theories for the analytic hierarchy process (AHP and improved back-propagation (BP neural network algorithm. The varying proportions of cross validation were calculated, demonstrating that this method has better evaluation performance with higher learning efficiency and faster convergence speed and avoids the oscillation in the training process in traditional BP neural network method and other primary neural network methods. The entire analysis shows the combination of the two methods increases the accuracy and reliability of the safety evaluation, and it can be well applied in the TSF safety evaluation.

  19. Containers for short-term storage of nuclear materials at the Los Alamos plutonium facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Los Alamos Plutonium Facility for the past 18 yr has stored nuclear samples for archiving and in support of nuclear materials research and processing programs. In the past several years, a small number of storage containers have been found in a deteriorated condition. A failed plutonium container can cause personnel contamination exposure and expensive physical area decontamination. Containers are stored in a physically secure radiation area vault, making close inspection costly in the form of personnel radiation exposure and work time. A moderate number of these containers are used in support of plutonium processing and must withstand daily handling abuse. A 2-yr evaluation of failed containers and those that have shown no deterioration has been conducted. Based on that study, a program was established to formalize our packing methods and materials and standardize the size and shape of containers that are used for short-term use. A standardized set of containers was designed, evaluated, tested, and procured for use in the facility. This paper reviews our vault storage problems, shows some failed containers, and presents our planned solutions to provide safe and secure containment of nuclear materials

  20. Commissioning of the DESIREE storage rings – a new facility for cold ion-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the ongoing commissioning of the Double ElectroStatic Ion Ring ExpEriment, DESIREE, at Stockholm University. Beams of atomic carbon anions (C−) and smaller carbon anion molecules (C−2, C−3, C−4 etc.) have been produced in a sputter ion source, accelerated to 10 keV or 20 keV, and stored successfully in the two electrostatic rings. The rings are enclosed in a common vacuum chamber cooled to below 13 Kelvin. The DESIREE facility allows for studies of internally relaxed single isolated atomic, molecular and cluster ions and for collision experiments between cat- and anions down to very low center-of-mass collision energies (meV scale). The total thermal load of the vacuum chamber at this temperature is measured to be 32 W. The decay rates of stored ion beams have two components: a non-exponential component caused by the space charge of the beam itself which dominates at early times and an exponential term from the neutralization of the beam in collisions with residual gas at later times. The residual gas limited storage lifetime of carbon anions in the symmetric ring is over seven minutes while the 1/e lifetime in the asymmetric ring is measured to be about 30 seconds. Although we aim to improve the storage in the second ring, the number of stored ions are now sufficient for many merged beams experiments with positive and negative ions requiring milliseconds to seconds ion storage

  1. Facile synthesis of porous NiO hollow microspheres and its electrochemical lithium-storage performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Porous NiO hollow microspheres are fabricated. ► Each microsphere consists of many nanoparticles of 30–80 nm. ► The synthesis involves an ultrasound-assisted route followed by thermal annealing. ► The microspheres show enhanced lithium-storage performance due to porous architecture. -- Abstract: Novel porous NiO hollow microspheres are fabricated by a facile two-step method involving the ultrasound-assisted synthesis of nickel oxalate precursors and subsequent thermal annealing in air. The as-prepared NiO microspheres are composed of loosely packed nanoparticles with diameters around 30–80 nm, and have a main pore distribution from 3 to 20 nm with a mean pore size of 5.7 nm. When evaluated as anode material for lithium ion battery, the porous NiO hollow microspheres showed enhanced electrochemical performance with high lithium storage capacity, satisfactory cyclability and rate capacity. The reversible capacity of the NiO microspheres retained 380 mAh g−1 after 30 cycles at 200 mA g−1. Even when cycled at various rate for more than 60 cycles, the capacity could recover to 520 mAh g−1 for the current of 100 mA g−1. The good lithium-storage performance can be attributed to the unique porous architecture, which provides the structural flexibility for volume change and the routes for fast Li+ diffusion

  2. HEU to LEU conversion and blending facility: Metal blending alternative to produce LEU oxide for disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    US DOE is examining options for disposing of surplus weapons-usable fissile materials and storage of all weapons-usable fissile materials. The nuclear material is converted to a form more proliferation- resistant than the original form. Blending HEU (highly enriched uranium) with less-enriched uranium to form LEU has been proposed as a disposition option. Five technologies are being assessed for blending HEU. This document provides data to be used in environmental impact analysis for the HEU-LEU disposition option that uses metal blending with an oxide waste product. It is divided into: mission and assumptions, conversion and blending facility descriptions, process descriptions and requirements, resource needs, employment needs, waste and emissions from plant, hazards discussion, and intersite transportation

  3. Asphyxiation Incidents by Hydrogen Sulfide at Manure Storage Facilities of Swine Livestock Farms in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jihoon; Kang, Taesun; Jin, Suhyun; Heo, Yong; Kim, Kyungran; Lee, Kyungsuk; Tsai, Perngjy; Yoon, Chungsik

    2016-01-01

    Livestock workers are involved in a variety of tasks, such as caring for animals, maintaining the breeding facilities, cleaning, and manure handling, and are exposed to health and safety risks. Hydrogen sulfide is considered the most toxic by-product of the manure handling process at livestock facilities. Except for several reports in developed countries, the statistics and cause of asphyxiation incidents in farms have not been collected and reported systematically, although the number of these incidents is expected to increase in developing and underdeveloped countries. In this study, the authors compiled the cases of work-related asphyxiation incidents at livestock manure storage facilities and analyzed the main causes. In this survey, a total of 17 incidents were identified through newspapers or online searches and public reports. Thirty workers died and eight were injured due to work-related tasks and rescue attempts from 1998 to 2013 in Korea. Of the 30 fatalities, 18 occurred during manure handling/maintenance tasks and 12 during rescue attempts. All incidents except for one case occurred during the warm season from the late spring (April) to early autumn (September) when manure is likely to decompose rapidly. It is important to train employees involved in the operation of the facilities (i.e., owners, managers, employees) regarding the appropriate prevention strategies for confined space management, such as hazard identification before entry, periodical facility inspection, restriction of unnecessary access, proper ventilation, and health and safety. Sharing information or case reports on previous incidents could also help prevent similar cases from occurring and reduce the number of fatalities and injuries. PMID:26765950

  4. Experience gained with nuclear material accounting and control in storage facility for plutonium dioxide of SChK radiochemical plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The task for the computerized accounting of containers at the storage with barcoding equipment for inventory taking has been performed at achieve the pre-commissioning phase. This gave the following upgrade: decrease of the time spent by the personnel in storage compartments with plutonium dioxide during inventory taking, this diminishing the dose for personnel; changeover from traditional record book to computerized accounting of nuclear materials at the storage, which will make it possible to include the local workstation of the storage into computer network for nuclear material (NM) accounting at the Radiochemical plant; test and improve technique for the use of barcoding equipment for further introduction at plants and storage facilities of the SChK. Works are underway for further improvement of the NM accounting at the storage for plutonium dioxide

  5. Pilot scale facility to determine gaseous emissions from livestock slurry during storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Søren O; Skov, Morten; Drøscher, Per; Adamsen, Anders P S

    2009-01-01

    Livestock production is a growing source of air pollution, locally and to the wider environment. Improved livestock manure management has the potential to reduce environmental impacts, but there is a need for methodologies to precisely quantify emissions. This paper describes and evaluates a novel storage facility for livestock slurry consisting of eight 6.5-m(3) cylindrical units. The stores may be equipped with airtight covers and ventilated during storage or during measurement only. Each store has eight air inlets (160 mm diameter) and a single outlet in the cover connected to a main ventilation duct. The stores can also be used as static enclosures. Ventilation can be regulated within the range of 50 to 250 m(3) h(-1). A gas sampling line enables sampling of odorants using automatic thermal desorption tubes, ammonia using acid traps, and greenhouse gases using gas sampling bags (pooled samples) or a syringe (time point samples). Complete recovery of CH(4) independent of ventilation rate was demonstrated. Vertical profiles of CO(2) and CH(4) above the slurry surface with and without ventilation and mixing of the headspace indicated methane oxidation activity in the surface crust. p-Cresol and 4-ethyl phenol emission from pig slurry was identified by GC-MS analysis of odor collected on adsorption tubes. Ammonia emissions between 0 and 166 mg N m(-2) h(-1) were observed during storage of pig slurry with and without surface crust and cover. A comparison of pooled and averaged time point measurements of CO(2), CH(4), and N(2)O indicated that pooled samples account for the diurnal variations under realistic storage conditions. PMID:19549932

  6. Partial Closure Report for the Area 514 Treatment and Storage Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abri, M

    2005-05-02

    The purpose of this partial closure report is to inform the Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC) of the status of final closure of the Area 514 Treatment and Storage Facility (Area 514) and fulfill the DTSC requirements to proceed with the implementation of the interim action. Area 514 is located at the Livermore main site of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). LLNL is owned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and operated jointly by DOE and the University of California. LLNL received its permit to operate hazardous waste facilities from DTSC in 1997. The hazardous waste treatment and storage operations of Area 514 were transferred to a newly constructed complex, the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF), in 2003. Once the DWTF was operational, the final closure of Area 514 began in accordance with the DTSC-approved closure plan in June 2004. Abri Environmental Engineering, Inc., was retained by LLNL to observe the A514 closure process and prepare this partial closure report and certification. Prior to closure, the configuration of the Area 514 Treatment and Storage Facility consisted of Building 514, the Area 514-1 Container Storage and Treatment unit, the Area 514-2 Container Storage Unit (CSU), the Area 514-3 CSU, Building 513, the Wastewater Treatment Tank Farm unit, and the associated Area 514 yard area. The fenced area of Area 514 included approximately 27,350 ft2 on the LLNL Livermore site. To date, except for the 514-3 CSU, all of the other Area 514 structures have been demolished; and sampling and analysis have taken place. The non-hazardous wastes have been disposed of. At the time of writing this report, the hazardous, mixed, and low-level radioactive wastes are in the process of profiling for final disposition. Once the disposition of all wastes has been finalized, the implementation of the approved closure plan will be completed. As a part of the closure process, LLNL is required to submit a closure report and a

  7. Dispersion modeling to compare alternative technologies for odor remediation at swine facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffman, Susan S; Graham, Brevick G; Williams, C Mike

    2008-09-01

    The effectiveness of 18 alternative technologies for reducing odor dispersion at and beyond the boundary of swine facilities was assessed in conjunction with an initiative sponsored through agreements between the Attorney General of North Carolina and Smithfield Foods, Premium Standard Farms, and Frontline Farmers. The trajectory and spatial distribution of odor emitted at each facility were modeled at 200 and 400 m downwind from each site under two meteorological conditions (daytime and nighttime) using a Eulerian-Lagrangian model. To predict the dispersion of odor downwind, the geographical area containing the odorant sources at each facility was partitioned into 10-m2 grids on the basis of satellite photographs and architectural drawings. Relative odorant concentrations were assigned to each grid point on the basis of intensity measurements made by the trained odor panel at each facility using a 9-point rating scale. The results of the modeling indicated that odor did not extend significantly beyond 400 m downwind of any of the test sites during the daytime when the layer of air above the earth's surface is usually turbulent. However, modeling indicated that odor from all full-scale farms extended beyond 400 m onto neighboring property in the evenings when deep surface cooling through long-wave radiation to space produces a stable (nocturnal) boundary layer. The results also indicated that swine housing, independent of waste management type, plays a significant role in odor downwind, as do odor sources of moderate to moderately high intensity that emanate from a large surface area such as a lagoon. Human odor assessments were utilized for modeling rather than instrument measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), hydrogen sulfide, ammonia, or particulates less than 10 microm in diameter (PM10) because these physical measurements obtained simultaneously with human panel ratings were not found to accurately predict human odor intensity in the field.

  8. Accident safety analysis for 300 Area N Reactor Fuel Fabrication and Storage Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D.J.; Brehm, J.R.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of the accident safety analysis is to identify and analyze a range of credible events, their cause and consequences, and to provide technical justification for the conclusion that uranium billets, fuel assemblies, uranium scrap, and chips and fines drums can be safely stored in the 300 Area N Reactor Fuel Fabrication and Storage Facility, the contaminated equipment, High-Efficiency Air Particulate filters, ductwork, stacks, sewers and sumps can be cleaned (decontaminated) and/or removed, the new concretion process in the 304 Building will be able to operate, without undue risk to the public, employees, or the environment, and limited fuel handling and packaging associated with removal of stored uranium is acceptable.

  9. Accident safety analysis for 300 Area N Reactor Fuel Fabrication and Storage Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the accident safety analysis is to identify and analyze a range of credible events, their cause and consequences, and to provide technical justification for the conclusion that uranium billets, fuel assemblies, uranium scrap, and chips and fines drums can be safely stored in the 300 Area N Reactor Fuel Fabrication and Storage Facility, the contaminated equipment, High-Efficiency Air Particulate filters, ductwork, stacks, sewers and sumps can be cleaned (decontaminated) and/or removed, the new concretion process in the 304 Building will be able to operate, without undue risk to the public, employees, or the environment, and limited fuel handling and packaging associated with removal of stored uranium is acceptable

  10. Management Programme for Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage and Interim Storage Facilities at Nuclear Research Institute Rez Plc, Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LVR-15 is a research reactor that operates in NRI Rez plc, Czech Republic since 1957. From the first criticality of the reactor until 2007, more than 600 fuel assemblies have been used in the reactor core, resulting in a large quantity of spent fuel. This paper describes the management of Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel (RRSNF) storage at NRI Rez plc. Characteristics of fuel types used (EK-10, IRT-2M 80% enriched and IRT-2M 36% enriched), and characteristics of interim storage facilities and infrastructure available are described. The paper emphasizes the experience gained during the preparatory works for the SNF shipment (facility and equipment modification, cask licenses) and the preparation of the SNF for transport, in particular its checking, repackaging in a hot cell, loading into the VPVR/M casks, drying, manipulation, completion of the transport documentation, etc. including its transport to the High Level Waste Storage facility before its transportation to the Russian Federation. Future Russian Federation options for the spent fuel management at NRI Rez plc, including possibility of additional shipments to the Russian Federation, or interim storage in SKODA VPVR/M cask systems at NRI Rez is also discussed. (author)

  11. Development of a methodology to accelerate a spontaneous grass colonization in a tailings storage facility under semiarid mediterranean climate type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginocchio, Rosanna; Arellano, Eduardo; Morales-Ladron de Guevara, Arturo

    2016-04-01

    Phytostabilization of massive mine tailings (>400 he) under semiarid environments is challenging, particularly when no organic amendments are locally available and no irrigation is possible. Increasing tendency for reprocessing old tailings to recover valued metals further pioneer the need for simple but effective plant covers. The choice of plant species and form of management are thus very important. CODELCO-Chile chose the Cauquenes post-operational tailings storage facility (TFS; 700 ha), that will be reprocessed for copper and other elements in the near future, to evaluate efficacy of the phytostabilization technology under semiarid conditions in central Chile. Surface application of a polymer (Soiltac TM) has been used for wind control of tailings but phytostabilization is considered as a best cost-effective alternative. A field study was performed to define a management program to improve the establishment and cover of an annual native grass (Vulpia myuros var. megalura), a spontaneous colonizer of the TSF. Considered management factors were control of macro herbivores (with and without fence), macronutrient improvement (with and without application of N-rich foliar fertilizer), and improvement of seed retention in the substrate (with and without small-scale rugosity; with and without lived wind-breakers; with and without mechanical wind-breakers). Each treatment was replicated three times and established in 2 m x 2 m quadrats. Plant response variables were monitored after 1 and 2 grass growing seasons. Application of N-rich foliar fertilizer and any wind control mechanism for seed retention in the substrate were effective for significantly improving both grass cover and biomass production in time, irrespective of macro-herbivore control. Seed production was significantly improved when macro herbivores were excluded and was positively and significantly correlated to vegetative biomass production. When applying this management program for tailings

  12. Final report on the public involvement process phase 1, Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, L.; Shanteau, C.

    1992-12-01

    This report summarizes the pubic involvement component of Phase 1 of the Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility (NM) Feasibility Study in San Juan County, Utah. Part of this summary includes background information on the federal effort to locate a voluntary site for temporary storage of nuclear waste, how San Juan County came to be involved, and a profile of the county. The heart of the report, however, summarizes the activities within the public involvement process, and the issues raised in those various forums. The authors have made every effort to reflect accurately and thoroughly all the concerns and suggestions expressed to us during the five month process. We hope that this report itself is a successful model of partnership with the citizens of the county -- the same kind of partnership the county is seeking to develop with its constituents. Finally, this report offers some suggestions to both county officials and residents alike. These suggestions concern how decision-making about the county's future can be done by a partnership of informed citizens and listening decision-makers. In the Appendix are materials relating to the public involvement process in San Juan County.

  13. Final report on the public involvement process phase 1, Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, L.; Shanteau, C.

    1992-12-01

    This report summarizes the pubic involvement component of Phase 1 of the Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility (NM) Feasibility Study in San Juan County, Utah. Part of this summary includes background information on the federal effort to locate a voluntary site for temporary storage of nuclear waste, how San Juan County came to be involved, and a profile of the county. The heart of the report, however, summarizes the activities within the public involvement process, and the issues raised in those various forums. The authors have made every effort to reflect accurately and thoroughly all the concerns and suggestions expressed to us during the five month process. We hope that this report itself is a successful model of partnership with the citizens of the county -- the same kind of partnership the county is seeking to develop with its constituents. Finally, this report offers some suggestions to both county officials and residents alike. These suggestions concern how decision-making about the county`s future can be done by a partnership of informed citizens and listening decision-makers. In the Appendix are materials relating to the public involvement process in San Juan County.

  14. A Facile Route to Metal Oxides/Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Macrofilm Nanocomposites for Energy Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeyuan eCao

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Nanocomposites consisting of transition-metal oxides and carbon nanomaterials with a desired size and structure are highly demanded for high performance energy storage devices. Here, a facile two-step and cost-efficient approach relying on directly thermal treatment of chemical-vapor-deposition products is developed as a general synthetic method to prepare a family of metal oxides (MxOy (M=Fe, Co, Ni/single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT macrofilm nanocomposites. The MxOy nanoparticles obtained are of 3-17 nm in diameter and homogeneously anchor on the free-standing SWNT macrofilms. NiO/SWNT also exhibits a high specific capacitance of 400 F g-1 and fast charge-transfer Faradaic redox reactions to achieve asymmetric supercapacitors with a high power and energy density. All MxOy/SWNT nanocomposites could deliver a high capacity beyond 1000 mAh g-1 and show excellent cycling stability for lithium-ion batteries. The impressive results demonstrate the promise for energy storage devices and the general approach may pave the way to synthesize other functional nanocomposites.

  15. Final report on the public involvement process phase 1, Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility Feasibility Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the pubic involvement component of Phase 1 of the Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility (NM) Feasibility Study in San Juan County, Utah. Part of this summary includes background information on the federal effort to locate a voluntary site for temporary storage of nuclear waste, how San Juan County came to be involved, and a profile of the county. The heart of the report, however, summarizes the activities within the public involvement process, and the issues raised in those various forums. The authors have made every effort to reflect accurately and thoroughly all the concerns and suggestions expressed to us during the five month process. We hope that this report itself is a successful model of partnership with the citizens of the county -- the same kind of partnership the county is seeking to develop with its constituents. Finally, this report offers some suggestions to both county officials and residents alike. These suggestions concern how decision-making about the county's future can be done by a partnership of informed citizens and listening decision-makers. In the Appendix are materials relating to the public involvement process in San Juan County

  16. Vibro Replacement, Dynamic Compaction, and Vibro Compaction case histories for petroleum storage tank facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaton, N; Scott, J. [Geopac West Ltd., Richmond, BC (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This paper discussed approaches to tank farm ground improvement via 3 Canadian ground improvement case histories in order to set forth the advantages of ground improvement for foundation support at petroleum storage tank facilities. Each case study featured a particular set of site conditions, performance criteria, and ground improvement techniques selected to attain the desired foundation performance. The first case study involved a Vibro Replacement stone column to meet strict seismicity requirements, the second employed Dynamic Compaction to mitigate deep variable fill within a former gravel pit, and the last encompassed Vibro Compaction applied to a site with a sand fill soil profile. The site conditions, the design requirements, the ground improvement solution, the execution, and the quality control techniques and results were presented for each case history. Soil reinforcement and ground improvement to treat loose and soft soils below heavy storage tanks can be an economical solution to foundation design challenges. However, it is important to select proper methods and tailor the densification programs to the specific subsoil conditions and design requirements. In each application, the selected ground improvement technique exceeded the specified in-situ testing requirements. 3 refs., 9 figs.

  17. PU/SS Eutectic Assessment In 9975 Packagings In A Storage Facility During Extended Fire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a radioactive material (RAM) packaging, the formation of eutectic at the Pu/SS (plutonium/stainless steel) interface is a serious concern and must be avoided to prevent of leakage of fissile material to the environment. The eutectic temperature for the Pu/SS is rather low (410 C) and could seriously impact the structural integrity of the containment vessel under accident conditions involving fire. The 9975 packaging is used for long term storage of Pu bearing materials in the DOE complex where the Pu comes in contact with the stainless steel containment vessel. Due to the serious consequences of the containment breach at the eutectic site, the Pu/SS interface temperature is kept well below the eutectic formation temperature of 410 C. This paper discusses the thermal models and the results for the extended fire conditions (1500 F for 86 minutes) that exist in a long term storage facility and concludes that the 9975 packaging Pu/SS interface temperature is well below the eutectic temperature.

  18. Safety issues in construction of facilities for long-term storage of radioactive waste at vector site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Ukraine, it is planned to create a number of near-surface facilities for disposal of short-lived RW and long-term (up to 100 years) storage of long-lived RW at the Vector site in the Chernobyl exclusion zone. The expected streams of long-lived RW are analyzed in the paper. According to the analysis of RW streams, in particular, issues are considered on development of RW acceptance criteria, admissible radiological impacts during preparation of RW for long-term storage, reliability of barriers (RW packages, modules and structures, etc.) during long-term storage of RW. (orig.)

  19. Impact of Nitrification on the Formation of N-Nitrosamines and Halogenated Disinfection Byproducts within Distribution System Storage Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Teng; Mitch, William A

    2016-03-15

    Distribution system storage facilities are a critical, yet often overlooked, component of the urban water infrastructure. This study showed elevated concentrations of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), total N-nitrosamines (TONO), regulated trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs), 1,1-dichloropropanone (1,1-DCP), trichloroacetaldehyde (TCAL), haloacetonitriles (HANs), and haloacetamides (HAMs) in waters with ongoing nitrification as compared to non-nitrifying waters in storage facilities within five different chloraminated drinking water distribution systems. The concentrations of NDMA, TONO, HANs, and HAMs in the nitrifying waters further increased upon application of simulated distribution system chloramination. The addition of a nitrifying biofilm sample collected from a nitrifying facility to its non-nitrifying influent water led to increases in N-nitrosamine and halogenated DBP formation, suggesting the release of precursors from nitrifying biofilms. Periodic treatment of two nitrifying facilities with breakpoint chlorination (BPC) temporarily suppressed nitrification and reduced precursor levels for N-nitrosamines, HANs, and HAMs, as reflected by lower concentrations of these DBPs measured after re-establishment of a chloramine residual within the facilities than prior to the BPC treatment. However, BPC promoted the formation of halogenated DBPs while a free chlorine residual was maintained. Strategies that minimize application of free chlorine while preventing nitrification are needed to control DBP precursor release in storage facilities.

  20. ISABELLE: A Proposal for Construction of a Proton--Proton Storage Accelerator Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1976-05-01

    The construction of an Intersecting Storage Accelerator Facility (ISA or ISABELLE) at Brookhaven National Laboratory is proposed. ISABELLE will permit the exploration of proton-proton collisions at center-of-mass energies continuously variable from 60 to 400 GeV and with luminosities of 1032 to 1033 cm-2 sec-1 over the entire range. An overview of the physics potential of this machine is given, covering the production of charged and neutral intermediate vector bosons, the hadron production at high transverse momentum, searches for new, massive particles, and the energy dependence of the strong interactions. The facility consists of two interlaced rings of superconducting magnets in a common tunnel about 3 km in circumference. The proton beams will collide at eight intersection regions where particle detectors will be arranged for studying the collision processes. Protons of approximately 30 GeV from the AGS will be accumulated to obtain the design current of 10A prior to acceleration to final energy. The design and performance of existing full-size superconducting dipoles and quadrupoles is described. The conceptual design of the accelerator systems and the conventional structures and buildings is presented. A preliminary cost estimate and construction schedule are given. Possible future options such as proton-antiproton, proton-deuteron and electron-proton collisions are discussed.

  1. Storage facilities of spent nuclear fuel in dry for Mexican nuclear facilities; Instalaciones de almacenamiento de combustible nuclear gastado en seco para instalaciones nucleares mexicanas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salmeron V, J. A.; Camargo C, R.; Nunez C, A.; Mendoza F, J. E.; Sanchez J, J., E-mail: juan.salmeron@cnsns.gob.mx [Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias, Dr. Jose Ma. Barragan No. 779, Col. Narvarte, 03020 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    In this article the relevant aspects of the spent fuel storage and the questions that should be taken in consideration for the possible future facilities of this type in the country are approached. A brief description is proposed about the characteristics of the storage systems in dry, the incorporate regulations to the present Nuclear Regulator Standard, the planning process of an installation, besides the approaches considered once resolved the use of these systems; as the modifications to the system, the authorization periods for the storage, the type of materials to store and the consequent environmental impact to their installation. At the present time the Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias (CNSNS) considers the possible generation of two authorization types for these facilities: Specific, directed to establish a new nuclear installation with the authorization of receiving, to transfer and to possess spent fuel and other materials for their storage; and General, focused to those holders that have an operation license of a reactor that allows them the storage of the nuclear fuel and other materials that they possess. Both authorizations should be valued according to the necessities that are presented. In general, this installation type represents a viable solution for the administration of the spent fuel and other materials that require of a temporary solution previous to its final disposal. Its use in the nuclear industry has been increased in the last years demonstrating to be appropriate and feasible without having a significant impact to the health, public safety and the environment. Mexico has two main nuclear facilities, the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde of the Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE) and the facilities of the TRIGA Reactor of the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ) that will require in a future to use this type of disposition installation of the spent fuel and generated wastes. (Author)

  2. Conceptual design for an intermediate dry storage facility for Argentinean Atucha spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The CNEA (Argentina National Atomic Energy Commission) is planning a new facility for the spent fuel of Atucha I according with the national policy to fulfill the requirement of the National Plan of Radioactive waste management with the lowest cost, having the flexibility to evaluate the fuel back end strategy in a wait and see approach. Spent fuel elements can be stored in concrete for many decades economically and safety as intermediate step, thereby providing adequate time to develop an integrated fuel disposal system, this provides flexibility from the fuel to decay, thus facilitating final disposal with decrease of the decay heat. A centralized storage for the NPP fuel elements (Embalse and Atucha I) with two very different fuel element and different enrichment was not considered, in order to minimize the radioactive waste movement. Nowadays the total life Atucha I spent fuels are in two wet pools, having fuel elements with 28 years old. For Embalse fuel elements type dry vertical concrete silos were successfully implemented for intermediate strategy. An intermediate storage for Atucha I was designed taking into account the following criteria: Assurance the fuel elements integrity for 30 years; Modular build-up to avoid over dimension systems; Low cost radiation shield (concrete and ground); Leak monitoring system for the containment integrity; Possibility to take out the failed containment; Enable the re-encapsulation and the reentry for the fuel containment; Minimize the auxiliary systems with high maintenance cost (passive); Compatible with the national regulatory commission (ARN) regulation with monitoring systems, similar with those implemented in our dry silos at Embalse; Transfer systems and hot cell facility near the pool storage to use its water treatment systems; Minimize secondary waste during wet pool to the intermediate storage. The Atucha I fuel element has 37 fuel rod in circular cluster geometry with an active length of 5,5 meters

  3. Optimal use of the Gaz de France underground gas storage facilities; Utilisation optimale des stockages souterrains de Gaz de France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Favret, F.; Rouyer, E.; Bayen, D.; Corgier, B. [Gaz de France (GDF), 75 - Paris (France)

    2000-07-01

    This paper describes the tools developed by Gaz de France to optimize the use of its whole set of underground gas storage facilities. After a short introduction about the context and the purposes, the methodology and the models are detailed. The operational results obtained during the last three years are presented, and some conclusions and perspectives are given. (authors)

  4. Studies and research concerning BNFP: life of project operating expenses for away-from-reactor (AFR) spent fuel storage facility. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Life of Project operating expenses for a licensed Away-From-Reactor (AFR) Spent Fuel Storage Facility are developed in this report. A comprehensive business management structure is established and the functions and responsibilities for the facility organization are described. Contractual provisions for spent fuel storage services are evaluated

  5. Studies and research concerning BNFP: life of project operating expenses for away-from-reactor (AFR) spent fuel storage facility. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shallo, F. A.

    1979-09-01

    Life of Project operating expenses for a licensed Away-From-Reactor (AFR) Spent Fuel Storage Facility are developed in this report. A comprehensive business management structure is established and the functions and responsibilities for the facility organization are described. Contractual provisions for spent fuel storage services are evaluated.

  6. Water-storage change measured with high-precision gravimetry at a groundwater recharge facility in Tucson, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creutzfeldt, B.; Kennedy, J.; Ferre, P. A.

    2012-12-01

    Groundwater depletion is a serious problem in many regions around the world. Artificial groundwater recharge is used for the short- and long-term storage of water in subsurface and can be an effective tool to prevent aquifer over-draft. Effective design and management of recharge facilities benefits from knowledge of the subsurface conditions and water-storage properties. In this study we combine different types of gravimeters and coupled hydrogeophysical inverse techniques to monitor subsurface water storage and to estimate subsurface hydraulic properties at the field scale. Water storage dynamics are continuously monitored with two iGrav™ superconducting gravimeters and three gPhones at three infiltration basins of the Tucson Water Southern Avra Valley Storage and Recovery Project facility. These continuous gravity observations are supported by time-lapse monitoring with absolute and spring gravimeters to map spatial gravity variations. Water level is monitored at 16 wells in the vicinity. The results of the first 6-month drying-wetting-drying cycle of the infiltration basins, during which 4,240,500 cubic meters (3,440 acre-feet) infiltrated over 53 days, are presented in this study. Gravity variations up to 170 μGal were observed. Collocated measurements show an overall good agreement of the different gravimeters. Distinct spatial variations of gravity change indicate variable water storage dynamics caused by subsurface heterogeneity at the field scale. Multiple gravimeter types combined with coupled inversion allows accurate tracking of subsurface water storage, which can improve the predictions of subsurface conditions and the water resources management of artificial recharge facilities.

  7. Nanotubes within transition metal silicate hollow spheres: Facile preparation and superior lithium storage performances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Fan; An, Yongling; Zhai, Wei; Gao, Xueping [Key Laboratory for Liquid–Solid Structural Evolution & Processing of Materials (Ministry of Education), Jinan 250100 (China); Feng, Jinkui, E-mail: jinkui@sdu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Liquid–Solid Structural Evolution & Processing of Materials (Ministry of Education), Jinan 250100 (China); Ci, Lijie [Key Laboratory for Liquid–Solid Structural Evolution & Processing of Materials (Ministry of Education), Jinan 250100 (China); Xiong, Shenglin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • The hollow Co{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}, MnSiO{sub 3} and CuSiO{sub 3} were successfully prepared by a facile hydrothermal method using SiO{sub 2} nanosphere. • The hollow Co{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}, MnSiO{sub 3} and CuSiO{sub 3} were tested as anode materials for lithium batteries. • The hollow Co{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}, MnSiO{sub 3} and CuSiO{sub 3} delivered superior electrochemical performance. • The lithium storage mechanism is probe via cyclic voltammetry and XPS. - Abstract: A series of transition metal silicate hollow spheres, including cobalt silicate (Co{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}), manganese silicate (MnSiO{sub 3}) and copper silicate (CuSiO{sub 3}.2H{sub 2}O, CuSiO{sub 3} as abbreviation in the text) were prepared via a simple and economic hydrothermal method by using silica spheres as chemical template. Time-dependent experiments confirmed that the resultants formed a novel type of hierarchical structure, hollow spheres assembled by numerous one-dimensional (1D) nanotubes building blocks. For the first time, the transition metal silicate hollow spheres were characterized as novel anode materials of Li-ion battery, which presented superior lithium storage capacities, cycle performance and rate performance. The 1D nanotubes assembly and hollow interior endow this kind of material facilitate fast lithium ion and electron transport and accommodate the big volume change during the conversion reactions. Our study shows that low-cost transition metal silicate with rationally designed nanostructures can be promising anode materials for high capacity lithium-ion battery.

  8. Facility for the storage of spent, heat-emitting and container-enclosed nuclear reactor fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patent for facility for the storage of spent, heat-emitting and container-enclosed nuclear reactor fuel assemblies, which are arranged within a building in a horizontal position and are cooled by a gas stream, whereby the building has a storage and a loading zone, characterized by the fact that pallet trucks arranged one above the other in a row and such that an interspace is left for the receiving positions for the containers, the the pallet trucks can be moved along rails that extend between two side walls arranged opposite to one another in the storage zone, that the storage zone can be loaded and unloaded by opening located in these two side walls, and that the gas stream only circulates within the building

  9. Circular letter from January 22, 2004 to the presidents of companies having the status of chartered storage facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This circular letter is intended for owners of storage facilities for petroleum products benefiting from the obligation of strategic storage according to the article 2 of law no 92-1443 from December 31, 1992. The attached document recalls the reasons and content of this obligation, the prevailing strategic storage rules in France (reference texts, products in concern, operators, stockpiles localization, product substitution possibilities..), the monthly declarations, the controls and sanctions, the annual plan of stocks localization, the obligation of information, the loss of chartered status or the renouncement. A schematic synthesis of the system of stockpiles constitution is presented in appendix, for France and for the French overseas departements. The other appendixes concern: the list of petroleum products concerned by the legal obligation of strategic storage, the relations between the professional committee of strategic stockpiles (CPSSP) and the anonymous society of security stocks management (SAGESS), and some examples of monthly and annual declaration forms. (J.S.)

  10. Aquifer thermal energy storage at Mid-Island postal facility: Phase 1 final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marseille, T.J.; Armstrong, P.R.; Brown, D.R.; Vail, L.W.; Kannberg, L.D.

    1993-05-01

    The successful widespread commercialization of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) in the United States will depend on how experiences gained from early full-scale projects are used as guides in the design, installation, and operation of future projects. One early system, built in the mid-1980s, is the US Postal Service (USPS) Mid-Island Mail Processing Facility (MPF), in Melville, New York. The heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) of the MPF's workroom is provided by an ATES system, which is operated year-round to provide a source for both heating and cooling, in combination with a triethylene glycol (TEG) liquid-desiccant system for humidity control. Because the facility affords a unique opportunity to study this innovative system, the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) entered into agreements with the USPS, the US Geological Survey (USGS), and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (the Energy Authority) to assess the operation and performance of the system. Two essentially independent questions were to be addressed by the project. The first question was: How does the MPF ATES/TEG technology compare to conventional technologies '' The second was: What can be done to make operation of the USPS MPF more economical '' Modelling of the MPF ATES/TEG HVAC system and its loads helped to address both of these questions by showing how much energy is used by the different system components. This report is divided into six sections. Section 1 is an introduction. Section 2 provides system background. Section 3 describes PNL's technical performance assessment of the system. Section 4 discusses the life-cycle cost assessment. An operational assessment of the liquid-desiccant system is discussed in Section 5. Section 6 contains conclusions of this study.

  11. Aquifer thermal energy storage at Mid-Island postal facility: Phase 1 final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marseille, T.J.; Armstrong, P.R.; Brown, D.R.; Vail, L.W.; Kannberg, L.D.

    1993-05-01

    The successful widespread commercialization of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) in the United States will depend on how experiences gained from early full-scale projects are used as guides in the design, installation, and operation of future projects. One early system, built in the mid-1980s, is the US Postal Service (USPS) Mid-Island Mail Processing Facility (MPF), in Melville, New York. The heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) of the MPF`s workroom is provided by an ATES system, which is operated year-round to provide a source for both heating and cooling, in combination with a triethylene glycol (TEG) liquid-desiccant system for humidity control. Because the facility affords a unique opportunity to study this innovative system, the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) entered into agreements with the USPS, the US Geological Survey (USGS), and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (the Energy Authority) to assess the operation and performance of the system. Two essentially independent questions were to be addressed by the project. The first question was: ``How does the MPF ATES/TEG technology compare to conventional technologies?`` The second was: ``What can be done to make operation of the USPS MPF more economical?`` Modelling of the MPF ATES/TEG HVAC system and its loads helped to address both of these questions by showing how much energy is used by the different system components. This report is divided into six sections. Section 1 is an introduction. Section 2 provides system background. Section 3 describes PNL`s technical performance assessment of the system. Section 4 discusses the life-cycle cost assessment. An operational assessment of the liquid-desiccant system is discussed in Section 5. Section 6 contains conclusions of this study.

  12. Referenced-site environmental document for a Monitored Retrievable Storage facility: backup waste management option for handling 1800 MTU per year

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silviera, D.J.; Aaberg, R.L.; Cushing, C.E.; Marshall, A.; Scott, M.J.; Sewart, G.H.; Strenge, D.L.

    1985-06-01

    This environmental document includes a discussion of the purpose of a monitored retrievable storage facility, a description of two facility design concepts (sealed storage cask and field drywell), a description of three reference sites (arid, warm-wet, and cold-wet), and a discussion and comparison of the impacts associated with each of the six site/concept combinations. This analysis is based on a 15,000-MTU storage capacity and a throughput rate of up to 1800 MTU per year.

  13. Referenced-site environmental document for a Monitored Retrievable Storage facility: backup waste management option for handling 1800 MTU per year

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This environmental document includes a discussion of the purpose of a monitored retrievable storage facility, a description of two facility design concepts (sealed storage cask and field drywell), a description of three reference sites (arid, warm-wet, and cold-wet), and a discussion and comparison of the impacts associated with each of the six site/concept combinations. This analysis is based on a 15,000-MTU storage capacity and a throughput rate of up to 1800 MTU per year

  14. ICPP calcined solids storage facility closure study. Volume III: Engineering design files

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    The following information was calculated to support cost estimates and radiation exposure calculations for closure activities at the Calcined Solids Storage Facility (CSSF). Within the estimate, volumes were calculated to determine the required amount of grout to be used during closure activities. The remaining calcine on the bin walls, supports, piping, and floor was also calculated to approximate the remaining residual calcine volumes at different stages of the removal process. The estimates for remaining calcine and vault void volume are higher than what would actually be experienced in the field, but are necessary for bounding purposes. The residual calcine in the bins may be higher than was is experienced in the field as it was assumed that the entire bin volume is full of calcine before removal activities commence. The vault void volumes are higher as the vault roof beam volumes were neglected. The estimations that follow should be considered rough order of magnitude, due to the time constraints as dictated by the project`s scope of work. Should more accurate numbers be required, a new analysis would be necessary.

  15. Methane Emissions from Leak and Loss Audits of Natural Gas Compressor Stations and Storage Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Derek R; Covington, April N; Clark, Nigel N

    2015-07-01

    As part of the Environmental Defense Fund's Barnett Coordinated Campaign, researchers completed leak and loss audits for methane emissions at three natural gas compressor stations and two natural gas storage facilities. Researchers employed microdilution high-volume sampling systems in conjunction with in situ methane analyzers, bag samples, and Fourier transform infrared analyzers for emissions rate quantification. All sites had a combined total methane emissions rate of 94.2 kg/h, yet only 12% of the emissions total resulted from leaks. Methane slip from exhausts represented 44% of the total emissions. Remaining methane emissions were attributed to losses from pneumatic actuators and controls, engine crankcases, compressor packing vents, wet seal vents, and slop tanks. Measured values were compared with those reported in literature. Exhaust methane emissions were lower than emissions factor estimates for engine exhausts, but when combined with crankcase emissions, measured values were 11.4% lower than predicted by AP-42 as applicable to emissions factors for four-stroke, lean-burn engines. Average measured wet seal emissions were 3.5 times higher than GRI values but 14 times lower than those reported by Allen et al. Reciprocating compressor packing vent emissions were 39 times higher than values reported by GRI, but about half of values reported by Allen et al. Though the data set was small, researchers have suggested a method to estimate site-wide emissions factors for those powered by four-stroke, lean-burn engines based on fuel consumption and site throughput.

  16. Methane Emissions from Leak and Loss Audits of Natural Gas Compressor Stations and Storage Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Derek R; Covington, April N; Clark, Nigel N

    2015-07-01

    As part of the Environmental Defense Fund's Barnett Coordinated Campaign, researchers completed leak and loss audits for methane emissions at three natural gas compressor stations and two natural gas storage facilities. Researchers employed microdilution high-volume sampling systems in conjunction with in situ methane analyzers, bag samples, and Fourier transform infrared analyzers for emissions rate quantification. All sites had a combined total methane emissions rate of 94.2 kg/h, yet only 12% of the emissions total resulted from leaks. Methane slip from exhausts represented 44% of the total emissions. Remaining methane emissions were attributed to losses from pneumatic actuators and controls, engine crankcases, compressor packing vents, wet seal vents, and slop tanks. Measured values were compared with those reported in literature. Exhaust methane emissions were lower than emissions factor estimates for engine exhausts, but when combined with crankcase emissions, measured values were 11.4% lower than predicted by AP-42 as applicable to emissions factors for four-stroke, lean-burn engines. Average measured wet seal emissions were 3.5 times higher than GRI values but 14 times lower than those reported by Allen et al. Reciprocating compressor packing vent emissions were 39 times higher than values reported by GRI, but about half of values reported by Allen et al. Though the data set was small, researchers have suggested a method to estimate site-wide emissions factors for those powered by four-stroke, lean-burn engines based on fuel consumption and site throughput. PMID:26148551

  17. ICPP calcined solids storage facility closure study. Volume III: Engineering design files

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following information was calculated to support cost estimates and radiation exposure calculations for closure activities at the Calcined Solids Storage Facility (CSSF). Within the estimate, volumes were calculated to determine the required amount of grout to be used during closure activities. The remaining calcine on the bin walls, supports, piping, and floor was also calculated to approximate the remaining residual calcine volumes at different stages of the removal process. The estimates for remaining calcine and vault void volume are higher than what would actually be experienced in the field, but are necessary for bounding purposes. The residual calcine in the bins may be higher than was is experienced in the field as it was assumed that the entire bin volume is full of calcine before removal activities commence. The vault void volumes are higher as the vault roof beam volumes were neglected. The estimations that follow should be considered rough order of magnitude, due to the time constraints as dictated by the project's scope of work. Should more accurate numbers be required, a new analysis would be necessary

  18. CHARACTERIZING DOE HANFORD SITE WASTE ENCAPSULATION STORAGE FACILITY CELLS USING RADBALL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farfan, E.; Coleman, R.

    2011-03-31

    RadBall{trademark} is a novel technology that can locate and quantify unknown radioactive hazards within contaminated areas, hot cells, and gloveboxes. The device consists of a colander-like outer tungsten collimator that houses a radiation-sensitive polymer semi-sphere. The collimator has a number of small holes with tungsten inserts; as a result, specific areas of the polymer are exposed to radiation becoming increasingly more opaque in proportion to the absorbed dose. The polymer semi-sphere is imaged in an optical computed tomography scanner that produces a high resolution 3D map of optical attenuation coefficients. A subsequent analysis of the optical attenuation data using a reverse ray tracing or backprojection technique provides information on the spatial distribution of gamma-ray sources in a given area forming a 3D characterization of the area of interest. RadBall{trademark} was originally designed for dry deployments and several tests, completed at Savannah River National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, substantiate its modeled capabilities. This study involves the investigation of the RadBall{trademark} technology during four submerged deployments in two water filled cells at the DOE Hanford Site's Waste Encapsulation Storage Facility.

  19. Lining of the return water dam at the Onverwacht tailings storage facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Addis, Philip [Golder Associates Ltd (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    This paper deals with design and construction of a new tailings storage facility (TSF) at the Onverwacht site located on the south of the Nkomati mine in northeast South Africa. This TSF included a return water dam (RWD). The paper discusses the lining of the RWD at the Onverwacht TSF. The RWD was designed and constructed in agreement with the South African department of water affairs and forestry's dam safety office. A comprehensive leakage detection system was installed along with a 1.5mm HDPE geomembrane lining inside the dam. Constant monitoring of the flow rate in the leakage detection system was conducted during the construction and commissioning of the RWD. The multiple outlets for the leakage detection system revealed a leak in the dam's primary liner. The steps taken to repair the leak are mentioned. From the study, it can be concluded that full time site supervision is required even for a relatively simple single liner system.

  20. Current situation with the centralized storage facilities for non-power radioactive wastes in Latin American countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Several Latin American (LA) countries have been firmly committed to the peaceful applications of ionizing radiations in medicine, industry, agriculture and research in order to achieve socioeconomic development in diverse sectors. Consequently the use of radioactive materials and radiation sources as well as the production of radioisotopes and labeled compounds may always produce radioactive wastes which require adequate management and, in the end, disposal. However, there are countries in the Latin American region whose radioactive waste volumes do not easily justify a national repository. Moreover, such facilities are extremely expensive to develop. It is unlikely that such an option will become available in the foreseeable future for most of these countries, which do not have nuclear industries. Storage has long been incorporated as a step in the management of radioactive wastes. In the recent years, there have been developments that have led some countries to consider whether the roles of storage might be expanded to provide longer-term care of long-live radioactive wastes The aim of this paper is to discuss the current situation with the storage facilities/conditions for the radioactive wastes and disused sealed radioactive sources in Latin-American countries. In some cases a brief description of the existing facilities for certain countries are provided. In other cases, when no centralized facility exists, general information on the radioactive inventories and disused sealed sources is given. (author)

  1. Neutronic characterization and decay heat calculations in the in-vessel fuel storage facilities for MYRRHA/FASTEF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Monte Carlo design of reactor facilities. ► Neutron coupling assessment between critical core and fresh fuel in the storage vessels. ► Power contribution by induced fission from neutrons leaving the core, spontaneous fission and (α, n) sources. ► Power decay heat estimation for different reactor fuel cycles scenarios. ► Material damage assessment in the storage vessels. - Abstract: The main objective of the Central Design Team (CDT) project is to establish an engineering design of a Fast Spectrum Transmutation Experimental Facility (FASTEF) that is the pilot plant of an experimental-scale of both an Accelerator Driven System (ADS) and a Lead Fast Reactor (LFR), based on the MYRRHA reactor concept, planned to be built during the next decade. The MYRRHA reactor concept is devoted to be a multi-purpose irradiation facility aimed at demonstrating the efficient transmutation of long-lived and high radiotoxicity minor actinides, fission products and the associated technology. An important issue regarding the reactor design of the MYRRHA/FASTEF experiment is the In-Vessel Fuel Storage Facilities (IVFSFs), both for fresh and spent fuel, as it might have an impact on the criticality of the overall system that must be quantified. In this work, the neutronic analysis of the in-vessel fuel storage facility and its coupling with the critical core was performed, using the state of the art Monte Carlo program MCNPX 2.6.0 and ORIGEN 2.2 computer code system for calculating the buildup and decay heat of spent fuel. Several parameters were analyzed, like the criticality behavior (namely the Keff), the neutron fluxes and their variations, the fission power production and the radiation damage (the displacements per atom). Finally, also the heat power generated by the fission products decay in the spent fuel was assessed.

  2. Friction stir welding - an alternative method for sealing nuclear waste storage canisters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, R.E. [TWI Ltd, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2004-12-01

    When welding 50 mm thick copper a very high heat input is required to combat the high thermal diffusivity and only the Electron Beam Welding (EBW) process had this capability when this copper canister concept was conceived. Despite the encouraging results achieved using EBW with thick section copper, SKB felt that it would be prudent to assess other joining methods. This assessment concluded that friction welding, could also provide very high quality welds to satisfy the service life requirements of the SKB canister design. A friction welding variant called Friction Stir Welding (FSW) was shown to have the capability of welding 3 mm thick copper sheet with excellent integrity and reproducibility. This later provided sufficient encouragement for SKB to consider the potential of FSW as a method for joining thick section copper, using relatively simple machine tool based technology. It was thought that FSW might provide an alternative or complementary method for welding lids, or bases to canisters. In 1997 an FSW development programme started at TWI, focussed on the feasibility of welding 10 mm thick copper plate. Once this task was successfully completed, work continued to demonstrate that progressively thicker plate, up to 50 mm thick, could be joined. At this stage, with process viability established, a full size experimental FSW canister machine was designed and built. Work with this machine finished in January 2003, when it had been shown that FSW could definitely be used to weld lids to full size canisters. This report summarises the TWI development of FSW for SKB from 1997 to January 2003. It also highlights the important aspects of the process and the project milestones that will help to ensure that SKB has a welding technology that can be used with confidence for production fabrication of copper waste storage canisters in the future. The overall conclusion to this FSW development is that there is no doubt that the FSW process could be used to produce full

  3. Explosion protection in coal or alternative fuel storage silos; Explosionsschutz in Siloanlagen fuer Kohle und alternative Brennstoffe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Robert [robecco GmbH, Horhausen (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    The adjustment of the oxygen and carbon monoxide limit concentrations in relation to the process temperature is necessary. The evaluation of the measured values and an alignment with typical trial processes are guaranteed. This makes operating reactions possible, e.g. sealing of leakages or prevention of a further entry of oxygen into silos and aggregates. A safe switching over of the silo plant from ''automatic mode'' to ''manual mode'' during process conditions, like test run, maintenance, revision to avoid accidents must be guaranteed. Controls must be able to take over self-sufficient system functions in case of failure situations of master systems: The monitoring of all system-relevant functions of the sensor system and the inerting plant with dosing station is necessary. An accurate inert gas dosing regarding effectiveness and environment must be considered. Maintaining the existing inert gas stock and the future procurement of storage must be considered. The functionality of the components has to be supervised, relevant errors or failures must be signalled to alarms. The automatic determination of the maintenance intervals, the maintenance dates and maintenance work of individual components in dependence the actual working time and operating frequency guarantees operability and with this a safe and productive process.

  4. Pilot-benchmarking of the WENRA safety reference levels for the spent fuel intermediate storage facility Ahaus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Western European Nuclear Regulator's Association (WENRA) has 2007 issued the draft of the 'Waste and Spent Fuel Storage Safety Reference Levels'. The objective of WENRA is to strive for a harmonized safety level of nuclear facilities within the European Community and these Reference Levels are a benchmark method to demonstrate the achieved level for the regulatory system and the implementation as well. Safety Reference Levels exist at the moment for Reactor Safety, Waste Storage and Decommissioning in different stages of development. ENISS, the European Nuclear Installations Safety Standards Initiative, a FORATOM based special organisation of nuclear operators, has discussed these Safety Reference Levels very intensively with WENRA and the agreement was to make a implementation benchmark-exercise for the storage facilities before the authorities finally agree on the Reference Levels. This benchmark was scheduled for the year 2008. Because of the special situation in Germany where a large number of storage facilities is in operation the German authorities felt that it would be useful to initiate a Pilot-Benchmark to get first results on the feasibility of the Reference Levels and the burden imposed to authorities and operators by these benchmark-exercises. GNS, a subsidiary company of the utilities, agreed to step into this process on a voluntary basis with its storage facility for spent fuel in Ahaus. The exercise was done in a very efficient way and in good co-operation between the authorities, local and federal, and the operator. The results in terms of safety assessments have been very satisfactory showing the high degree of safety. Although the facility was for the first time licensed already in 1987 the compliance with nearly all Reference Levels from 2007 could be demonstrated. It became also clear that newer facilities would fulfil the desired safety standard too. Nevertheless, in spite of the good results the exercise revealed some weak

  5. Assessment of the Proposed Design of a New Spent Sealed Radioactive Sources Storage Facility at Novi Han

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The NOVI HAN radioactive waste repository (NHRWR) in Bulgaria, built according to a Soviet design, was commissioned in 1964. The State Committee on the Use of Atomic Energy for Peaceful Purposes (CUAEPP) temporarily stopped operations at the repository from October 1994 until measures for improvement of the facility are undertaken. Since 1994, the Spent Sealed Radioactive Sources (SSRS) have been temporarily stored at the facilities at IRT-2000 research reactor of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences (BAS) in Sofia. In view of the importance of the radiological risks associated with the present management of the SSRS in Bulgaria, the present study contract has been launched to critically review the proposal to provide a new interim storage facility for SSRS at NHRWR. A comprehensive critical review was performed of the feasibility study for the construction of a new SSRS facility at Novi Han, carried out by the local consultant engineering company (EQE), and detailed recommendations were made concerning the proposed new development at the site. The authors think that new concepts and procedures in the management of all categories of SSRS including smoke detectors have to be introduced, taking into account the regulatory framework and the inventories of existing and anticipated SSRS. This should be the basis for the technical specification of the new facilities for conditioning and storage of spent sealed radioactive sources (not only SHARS). (author)

  6. Economic and Environmental Evaluation of Flexible Integrated Gasification Polygeneration Facilities Equipped with Carbon Capture and Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken, M.; Yelverton, W. H.; Dodder, R. S.; Loughlin, D. H.

    2014-12-01

    Among the diverse menu of technologies for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, one option involves pairing carbon capture and storage (CCS) with the generation of synthetic fuels and electricity from co-processed coal and biomass. In this scheme, the feedstocks are first converted to syngas, from which a Fischer-Tropsch (FT) process reactor and combined cycle turbine produce liquid fuels and electricity, respectively. With low concentrations of sulfur and other contaminants, the synthetic fuels are expected to be cleaner than conventional crude oil products. And with CO2 as an inherent byproduct of the FT process, most of the GHG emissions can be eliminated by simply compressing the CO2 output stream for pipeline transport. In fact, the incorporation of CCS at such facilities can result in very low—or perhaps even negative—net GHG emissions, depending on the fraction of biomass as input and its CO2 signature. To examine the potential market penetration and environmental impact of coal and biomass to liquids and electricity (CBtLE), which encompasses various possible combinations of input and output parameters within the overall energy landscape, a system-wide analysis is performed using the MARKet ALlocation (MARKAL) model. With resource supplies, energy conversion technologies, end-use demands, costs, and pollutant emissions as user-defined inputs, MARKAL calculates—using linear programming techniques—the least-cost set of technologies that satisfy the specified demands subject to environmental and policy constraints. In this framework, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has developed both national and regional databases to characterize assorted technologies in the industrial, commercial, residential, transportation, and generation sectors of the U.S. energy system. Here, the EPA MARKAL database is updated to include the costs and emission characteristics of CBtLE using figures from the literature. Nested sensitivity analysis is then

  7. Assessment of plutonium storage safety issues at Department of Energy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy (DOE) mission for utilization and storage of nuclear materials has recently changed as a result of the end of the ''Cold War'' era. Past and current plutonium storage practices largely reflect a temporary, in-process, or in-use storage condition which must now be changed to accommodate longer-term storage. This report summarizes information concerning current plutonium metal and oxide storage practices which was presented at the Office of Defense programs (DP) workshop in Albuquerque, New Mexico on May 26-27, 1993 and contained in responses to questions by DP-62 from the field organizations

  8. Assessment of plutonium storage safety issues at Department of Energy facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) mission for utilization and storage of nuclear materials has recently changed as a result of the end of the ``Cold War`` era. Past and current plutonium storage practices largely reflect a temporary, in-process, or in-use storage condition which must now be changed to accommodate longer-term storage. This report summarizes information concerning current plutonium metal and oxide storage practices which was presented at the Office of Defense programs (DP) workshop in Albuquerque, New Mexico on May 26-27, 1993 and contained in responses to questions by DP-62 from the field organizations.

  9. Regulators Experiences in Licensing and Inspection of Dry Cask Storage Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), through the combination of a rigorous licensing and inspection program, ensures the safety and security of dry cask storage. NRC authorizes the storage of spent fuel at an independent spent fuel storage installation (ISFSI) under two licensing options: site-specific licensing and general licensing. In July 1986, the NRC issued the first site-specific license to the Surry Nuclear Power Plant in Virginia authorizing the interim storage of spent fuel in a dry storage cask configuration. Today, there are over 30 ISFSIs currently licensed by the NRC with over 700 loaded dry casks. Current projections identify over 50 ISFSIs by the year 2010. No releases of spent fuel dry storage cask contents or other significant safety problems from the storage systems in use today have been reported. This paper discusses the NRC licensing and inspection experiences. (authors)

  10. Regulatory body experiences in licensing and inspection of dry cask storage facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), through a rigorous licensing and inspection programme, ensures the safety and security of dry cask storage. The NRC authorizes the storage of spent fuel at an independent spent fuel storage installation (ISFSI) under two licensing options: site specific licensing and general licensing. In July 1986, the NRC issued the first site specific licence to the Surry Nuclear Power Plant in Virginia, authorizing the interim storage of spent fuel in a dry storage cask configuration. Presently, there are over 40 ISFSIs licensed by the NRC, with over 800 loaded dry casks. Current projections indicate that there will be over 50 ISFSIs by the year 2010. No releases of spent fuel dry storage cask contents or other significant safety problems from the storage systems in use today have been reported. The paper discusses the NRC's licensing and inspection experiences. (author)

  11. Regulators experiences in licensing and inspection of dry cask storage facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), through the combination of a rigorous licensing and inspection program, ensures the safety and security of dry cask storage. NRC authorizes the storage of spent fuel at an independent spent fuel storage installation (ISFSI) under two licensing options: site-specific licensing and general licensing. In July 1986, the NRC issued the first site specific license to the Surry Nuclear Power Plant in Virginia authorizing the interim storage of spent fuel in a dry storage cask configuration. Today, there are over 30 ISFSIs currently licensed by the NRC with over 700 loaded dry casks. Current projections identify over 50 ISFSIs by the year 2010. No releases of spent fuel dry storage cask contents or other significant safety problems from the storage systems in use today have been reported. This paper discusses the NRC licensing and inspection experiences. (author)

  12. Performance Evaluation of Lower-Energy Energy Storage Alternatives for Full-Hybrid Vehicles; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonder, J.; Cosgrove, J.; Pesaran, A.

    2014-02-11

    Automakers have been mass producing hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) for well over a decade, and the technology has proven to be very effective at reducing per-vehicle fuel use. However, the incremental cost of HEVs such as the Toyota Prius or Ford Fusion Hybrid remains several thousand dollars higher than the cost of comparable conventional vehicles, which has limited HEV market penetration. The b b b b battery energy storage device is typically the component with the greatest contribution toward this cost increment, so significant cost reductions/performance improvements to the energy storage system (ESS) can correspondingly improve the vehicle-level cost/benefit relationship. Such an improvement would in turn lead to larger HEV market penetration and greater aggregate fuel savings. The United States Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Storage Program managers asked the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to collaborate with a USABC Workgroup and analyze the trade-offs between vehicle fuel economy and reducing the decade-old minimum energy requirement for power-assist HEVs. NREL’s analysis showed that significant fuel savings could still be delivered from an ESS with much lower energy storage than the previous targets, which prompted USABC to issue a new set of lower-energy ESS (LEESS) targets that could be satisfied by a variety of technologies. With support from DOE, NREL has developed an HEV test platform for in-vehicle performance and fuel economy validation testing of the hybrid system using such LEESS devices. This presentation describes development of the vehicle test platform, and laboratory as well as in-vehicle evaluation results with alternate energy storage configurations as compared to the production battery system. The alternate energy storage technologies considered include lithium-ion capacitors -- i.e., asymmetric electrochemical energy storage devices possessing one electrode with battery

  13. Coordination Between Wind Power, Hydro Storage Facility and Conventional Generating Units According to the Annual Growth Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrokh Shojaeean

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Considering the growing trend of the consumption of the electric power and the global tendency to substitute new renewable sources of energy, this paper proposes a Monte Carlo based method to determine an optimal level of this change. Considering the limitation of the wind farms in continuous supply of electric power, hydrostatic power storage facilities are used beside wind farms so that the electric power could be stored and fed in a continuous flow into power systems. Due to the gradual exclusion of conventional generators and 5 percent annual load increments, LOLE index was used in order to calculate the amount of the wind power and the capacity of the necessary power storage facility. To this end, LOLE index was calculated for the first year as the reference index for the estimation of the amount of wind power and the capacity of the storage facility in consequent years. For the upcoming years, calculations have been made to account for the gradual exclusion of conventional generators in proportion to load increments. The proposed method has been implemented and simulated on IEEE-RTS test system.

  14. Zwilag intermediate storage facility Wuerenlingen AG (CH). 25 years existence of the company, 15 years operational experience; Zwilag Zwischenlager Wuerenlingen AG (CH). 25 Jahre Firmenbestand, 15 Jahre Betriebserfahrung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasemeyer, Uwe [Zwilag Zwischenlager Wuerenlingen AG, Wuerenlingen (Switzerland)

    2015-07-01

    Wastes with high toxicity from chemistry, pharmaceutics, process engineering, automotive and electrical engineering that comply with the requirements of an underground disposal facility (UTD) can directly be delivered to the UTD for final disposal. Radioactive wastes may not be brought into the UTD for final disposal. Compared to chemical wastes the radioactive wastes lose their toxicity faster but the after-heat generation could damage the surrounding host rock. Therefore it is required that high-level radioactive wastes are stored in a so called intermediate storage facility. The article describes the intermediate storage and conditioning of radioactive wastes using the example of the Swiss Zwilag intermediate storage facility Wuerenlingen AG.

  15. Effects of an alternative management of water storage on aridisol at the Bolivian Altiplane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present study, we deal with a test as a base to recommend the preparation of soil for cultures different from the usual method. On a 5 year old fellow land, a parcel was ploughed before and another after the wet season. Differences on the water storage appear in both horizons of the studied aridisol, because of a structural improvement on the ploughed ground. During the five months of the rainy season, November through March, the values of water storage were between 5 and 12% higher in the ploughed soil

  16. The planning, construction, and operation of a radioactive waste storage facility for an Australian state radiation regulatory authority

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, J.D.; Kleinschmidt, R.; Veevers, P. [Radiation Health, Queensland (Australia)

    1995-12-31

    Radiation regulatory authorities have a responsibility for the management of radioactive waste. This, more often than not, includes the collection and safe storage of radioactive sources in disused radiation devices and devices seized by the regulatory authority following an accident, abandonment or unauthorised use. The public aversion to all things radioactive, regardless of the safety controls, together with the Not In My Back Yard (NIMBY) syndrome combine to make the establishment of a radioactive materials store a near impossible task, despite the fact that such a facility is a fundamental tool for regulatory authorities to provide for the radiation safety of the public. In Queensland the successful completion and operational use of such a storage facility has taken a total of 8 years of concerted effort by the staff of the regulatory authority, the expenditure of over $2 million (AUS) not including regulatory staff costs and the cost of construction of an earlier separate facility. This paper is a summary of the major developments in the planning, construction and eventual operation of the facility including technical and administrative details, together with the lessons learned from the perspective of the overall project.

  17. Zoom on the long life storage facilities; Zoom sur des entrepots au long cours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marano, D

    1999-03-01

    The law of december 1991 on the radioactive wastes management, imposes to propose for 2006 radioactive waste storage systems. This paper takes stock on the research programs concerning the spent fuel, at the Cea, especially the Precci program. Technical aspects of the underground storage are also included: the heat dissipation of the wastes and material behaviour facing the heat. The radioactive wastes storage requires a strict survey to ensure safety site. Propositions are discussed. (A.L.B.)

  18. Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) Dangerous Waste Training Plan (DWTP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This training plan describes general requirements, worker categories, and provides course descriptions for operation of the WESF permitted miscellaneous storage units, and the < 90 day accumulation areas

  19. Cleaning residual NaK in the fast flux test facility fuel storage cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), located on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Reservation, is a liquid metal-cooled test reactor. The FFTF was constructed to support the U.S. Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program. The bulk of the alkali metal (sodium and NaK) has been drained and will be stored onsite prior to final disposition. Residual NaK needed to be removed from the pipes, pumps, heat exchangers, tanks, and vessels in the Fuel Storage Facility (FSF) cooling system. The cooling system was drained in 2004 leaving residual NaK in the pipes and equipment. The estimated residual NaK volume was 76 liters in the storage tank, 1.9 liters in the expansion tank, and 19-39 liters in the heat transfer loop. The residual NaK volume in the remainder of the system was expected to be very small, consisting of films, droplets, and very small pools. The NaK in the FSF Cooling System was not radiologically contaminated. The portions of the cooling system to be cleaned were divided into four groups: 1. The storage tank, filter, pump, and associated piping; 2. The heat exchanger, expansion tank, and associated piping; 3. Argon supply piping; 4. In-vessel heat transfer loop. The cleaning was contracted to Creative Engineers, Inc. (CEI) and they used their superheated steam process to clean the cooling system. It has been concluded that during the modification activities (prior to CEI coming onsite) to prepare the NaK Cooling System for cleaning, tank T-914 was pressurized relative to the In-Vessel NaK Cooler and NaK was pushed from the tank back into the Cooler and that on November 6, 2005, when the gas purge through the In-Vessel NaK Cooler was increased from 141.6 slm to 283.2 slm, NaK was forced from the In-Vessel NaK Cooler and it contacted water in the vent line and/or scrubber. The gases from the reaction then traveled back through the vent line coating the internal surface of the vent line with NaK and NaK reaction products. The hot gases also exited the

  20. Evaluation of alternative phase change materials for energy storage in solar dynamic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, R. A.; Dustin, M. O.

    1988-01-01

    The performance of fluoride salt and metallic thermal energy storage materials are compared in terms of basic performance as applied to solar dynamic power generation. Specific performance considerations include uniformity of cycle inlet temperature, peak cavity temperature, TES utilization, and system weights. Also investigated were means of enhancing the thermal conductivity of the salts and its effect on the system performance.

  1. License procedure for spent fuel storage facilities in the Czech Republic from the competent authority point of view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Policy, approved by the Czech Government on 15 May 2002 (Government Resolution No. 487/2002), is the fundamental document defining a strategy of the State and its agencies in spent fuel and radioactive waste management through 2025. The main principles of the Policy for the spent fuel management are: - Spent fuel management is provided by nuclear power plants (NPPs) authorized for operation in the Czech Republic. Spent fuel shall be stored in dry storage facilities at the NPPs, in storage only casks or in transport and storage casks. -Possibilities for spent fuel reprocessing are monitored and assessed, as well as the use of new technologies leading to the reduction of spent fuel volume and toxicity. A deep repository shall be put into operation in 2065. -The costs of activities associated with disposal of spent fuel are paid from the nuclear account, a financial source created by generators of spent fuel in agreement with the Atomic Act and established government Order. The Ministry of Finance manages the nuclear account, as a part of the state financial assets and liabilities. This assures that the costs of disposition for wastes generated now will not be transferred to future generations. - The general public is kept informed about the Policy and about its fulfillment. The license procedure for spent fuel storage facilities is governed by three acts: - Act No. 100/2001 Coll., on assessment of impacts on the environment, - Construction Act (No. 50/1976 Coll.), and - Act No. 18/1997 Coll. (Atomic Act) The procedure consists in practice of four stages: - Assessment of impacts of the planned construction on the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) process, - Siting decision, - Construction permit, and - Operations permit. Interim spent fuel storage facility at Dukovany (ISFSF). The first preparatory works started in May 1991. In October 1992, a public hearing took place to discuss the environmental impact of the ISFSF based on an EIA study. In

  2. Nonproliferation and arms control assessment of weapons-usable fissile material storage and excess plutonium disposition alternatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    This report has been prepared by the Department of Energy`s Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation (DOE-NN) with support from the Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (DOE-MD). Its purpose is to analyze the nonproliferation and arms reduction implications of the alternatives for storage of plutonium and HEU, and disposition of excess plutonium, to aid policymakers and the public in making final decisions. While this assessment describes the benefits and risks associated with each option, it does not attempt to rank order the options or choose which ones are best. It does, however, identify steps which could maximize the benefits and mitigate any vulnerabilities of the various alternatives under consideration.

  3. Neutron Absorbing Ability Variation in Neutron Absorbing Material Caused by the Neutron Irradiation in Spent Fuel Storage Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In spent fuel storage facility like high density spent fuel storage racks and dry storage casks, spent fuels are stored with neutron absorbing materials installed as a part of those facilities, and they are used for absorbing neutrons emitted from spent fuels. Usually structural material with neutron absorbing material of racks and casks are located around spent fuels, so it is irradiated by neutrons for long time. Neutron absorbing ability could be changed by the variation of nuclide composition in neutron absorbing material caused by the irradiation of neutrons. So, neutron absorbing materials are continuously faced with spent fuels with boric acid solution or inert gas environment. Major nuclides in neutron absorbing material are Al27, C12, B11, B10 and they are changed to numerous other ones as radioactive decay or neutron absorption reaction. The B10 content in neutron absorbing material dominates the neutron absorbing ability, so, the variation of nuclide composition including the decrease of B10 content is the critical factor on neutron absorbing ability. In this study, neutron flux in spent fuel, the activation of neutron absorbing material and the variation of nuclide composition are calculated. And, the minimum neutron flux causing the decrease of B10 content is calculated in spent fuel storage facility. Finally, the variation of neutron multiplication factor is identified according to the one of B10 content in neutron absorbing material. The minimum neutron flux to impact the neutron absorbing ability is 1010 order, however, usual neutron flux from spent fuel is 108 order. Therefore, even though neutron absorbing material is irradiated for over 40 years, B10 content is little decreased, so, initial neutron absorbing ability could be kept continuously

  4. Hazardous Material Storage Facilities and Sites, Tier II Reporting locations, Published in 2005, 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, Iredell County GIS.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Hazardous Material Storage Facilities and Sites dataset, published at 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Field Survey/GPS information...

  5. Hazardous Material Storage Facilities and Sites, Shane Root- Root Spraying Service, Published in 2008, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Lane County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Hazardous Material Storage Facilities and Sites dataset, published at 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Not Provided information as of...

  6. Gas Storage Facilities, LP and LNG, tank farm; sparks, Published in 2006, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Washoe County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Gas Storage Facilities, LP and LNG dataset, published at 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of...

  7. Conceptual design report for immobilized high-level waste interim storage facility (Phase 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgard, K.C.

    1998-06-02

    The Hanford Site Canister Storage Building (CSB Bldg. 212H) will be utilized to interim store Phase 1 HLW products. Project W-464, Immobilized High-Level Waste Interim Storage, will procure an onsite transportation system and retrofit the CSB to accommodate the Phase 1 HLW products. The Conceptual Design Report establishes the Project W-464 technical and cost basis.

  8. Conceptual design report for immobilized high-level waste interim storage facility (Phase 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgard, K.C.

    1998-04-09

    The Hanford Site Canister Storage Building (CSB Bldg. 212H) will be utilized to interim store Phase 1 HLW products. Project W-464, Immobilized High-Level Waste Interim Storage, will procure an onsite transportation system and retrofit the CSB to accommodate the Phase 1 HLW products. The Conceptual Design Report establishes the Project W-464 technical and cost basis.

  9. Conceptual design report for immobilized high-level waste interim storage facility (Phase 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hanford Site Canister Storage Building (CSB Bldg. 212H) will be utilized to interim store Phase 1 HLW products. Project W-464, Immobilized High-Level Waste Interim Storage, will procure an onsite transportation system and retrofit the CSB to accommodate the Phase 1 HLW products. The Conceptual Design Report establishes the Project W-464 technical and cost basis

  10. Characterization of spent fuel assemblies for storage facilities using non destructive assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many non destructive assay (NDA) techniques have been developed by the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) for spent fuel characterization and management. Passive and active neutron methods as well as gamma spectrometric methods have been carried out and applied to industrial devices like PYTHONTM and NAJA. Many existing NDA methods can be successfully applied to storage, but the most promising are the neutron methods combined with on line evolution codes. For dry storage applications, active neutron measurements require further R and D to achieve accurate results. Characterization data given by NDA instruments can now be linked to automatic fuel recognition. Both information can feed the storage management software in order to meet the storage operation requirements like: fissile mass inventory, operators declaration consistency or automatic selection of proper storage conditions. (author)

  11. Hazardous waste storage facility accident scenarios for the U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the methods for developing accident categories and accident frequencies for internally initiated accidents at hazardous waste storage facilities (HWSFs) at US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. This categorization is a necessary first step in evaluating the risk of accidents to workers and the general population at each of the sites. This risk evaluation is part of the process of comparing alternative management strategies in DOE's Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). Such strategies involve regionalization, decentralization, and centralization of waste treatment, storage, and disposal activities. Potential accidents at the HWSFs at the DOE sites are divided into categories of spill alone, spill plus fire, and other event combinations including spill plus fire plus explosion, fire only, spill and explosion, and fire and explosion. One or more accidents are chosen to represent the types of accidents for FY 1992 for 12 DOE sites were studied to determine the most representative set of possible accidents at all DOE sites. Each accident scenario is given a probability of occurrence that is adjusted, depending on the throughput and waste composition that passes through the HWSF at the particular site. The justification for the probabilities chosen is presented

  12. Assessment of Energy Storage Alternatives in the Puget Sound Energy System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balducci, Patrick J.; Jin, Chunlian; Wu, Di; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Leslie, Patrick; Daitch, Charles

    2013-12-12

    As part of an ongoing study co-funded by the Bonneville Power Administration, under its Technology Innovation Grant Program, and the U.S. Department of Energy, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has developed an approach and modeling tool for assessing the net benefits of using energy storage located close to the customer in the distribution grid to manage demand. PNNL in collaboration with PSE and Primus Power has evaluated the net benefits of placing a zinc bromide battery system at two locations in the PSE system (Baker River / Rockport and Bainbridge Island). Energy storage can provide a number of benefits to the utility through the increased flexibility it provides to the grid system. Applications evaluated in the assessment include capacity value, balancing services, arbitrage, distribution deferral and outage mitigation. This report outlines the methodology developed for this study and Phase I results.

  13. Intended long term performances of cementitious engineered barriers for future storage and disposal facilities for radioactive wastes in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sociu F.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Considering the EU statements, Romania is engaged to endorse in the near future the IAEA relevant publications on geological repository (CNCANa, to update the Medium and Long Term National Strategy for Safe Management of Radioactive Waste and to approve the Road Map for Geological Repository Development. Currently, for example, spent fuel is wet stored for 6 years and after this period it is transported to dry storage in MACSTOR-200 (a concrete monolithic module where it is intended to remain at least 50 years. The present situation for radioactive waste management in Romania is reviewed in the present paper. Focus will be done on existent disposal facilities but, also, on future facilities planned for storage / disposal of radioactive wastes. Considering specific data for Romanian radioactive waste inventory, authors are reviewing the advance in the radioactive waste management in Romania considering its particularities. The team tries to highlight the expected limitations and unknown data related with cementitious engineered barriers that has to be faced in the near future incase of interim storage or for the upcoming long periods of disposal.

  14. Monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facility and salt repository integration: Engineering study report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This MRS Facility and Salt Repository Integration Study evaluates the impacts of an integrated MRS/Salt Repository Waste Management System on the Salt Repository Surface facilities' design, operations, cost, and schedule. Eight separate cases were studied ranging from a two phase repository design with no MRS facility to a design in which the repository only received package waste from the MRS facility for emplacement. The addition of the MRS facility to the Waste Management System significantly reduced the capital cost of the salt repository. All but one of the cases studied were capable of meeting the waste acceptance data. The reduction in the size and complexity of the Salt Repository waste handling building with the integration of the MRS facility reduces the design and operating staff requirements. 7 refs., 35 figs., 43 tabs

  15. Final environmental impact statement. Proton--Proton Storage Accelerator Facility (ISABELLE), Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liverman, James L.

    1978-08-01

    An Environmental Impact Statement for a proposed research facility (ISABELLE) to be built at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is presented. It was prepared by the Department of Energy (DOE) following guidelines issued for such analyses. In keeping with DOE policy, this statement presents a concise and issues-oriented analysis of the significant environmental effects associated with the proposed action. ISABELLE is a proposed physics research facility where beams of protons collide providing opportunities to study high energy interactions. The facility would provide two interlaced storage ring proton accelerators, each with an energy up to 400 GeV intersecting in six experimental areas. The rings are contained in a tunnel with a circumference of 3.8 km (2.3 mi). The facility will occupy 250 ha (625 acres) in the NW corner of the existing BNL site. A draft Environmental Impact Statement for this proposed facility was issued for public review and comment by DOE on February 21, 1978. The principal areas of concern expressed were in the areas of radiological impacts and preservation of cultural values. After consideration of these comments, appropriate actions were taken and the text of the statement has been amended to reflect the comments. The text was annotated to indicate the origin of the comment. The Appendices contain a glossary of terms and listings of metric prefixes and conversions and symbols and abbreviations.

  16. 40 CFR 63.11087 - What requirements must I meet for gasoline storage tanks if my facility is a bulk gasoline...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) If your gasoline storage tank is subject to, and complies with, the control requirements of 40 CFR... gasoline storage tanks if my facility is a bulk gasoline terminal, pipeline breakout station, or pipeline... CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Source Category:...

  17. Evaluation of Geological Risks Associated with Withdrawal and Storage of Gas: Geomechanical Modeling of a Storage Facility in Northern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guido, F.; Picotti, V.; Antonellini, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    The withdrawal and the injection of gas or others fluids from/in porous media in the subsurface involves the deformation of the reservoir by normal compaction and poroelastic perturbations. Such deformations are often accompanied by phenomena of subsidence, instability of the infrastructure, and in some cases also by induced and activated seismic activity, related to variations in the effective stress in the rocks of the reservoir, and in those of seal. In our work we use data from a 26-year leveling-monitoring of land subsidence above a reservoir, managed by Edison ®, consisting of 2 levels, approximately 10 meters thick, separated by clay layers and hydraulically separated, localized to the core of a gentle anticline at the most external structure of the Alpine front in the North East of Italy, at approximately 1400 meters depth. During about 15 years of field development, there has been a relative mean subsidence of about 10 mm, in correspondence to a drop in pore pressure of about 15 MPa in the levels of the reservoir. The reservoir has been converted to natural gas storage site since 1993, and a double monitoring in 2006 showed a relative uplift on the surface topography of about 2 mm, between the extraction phase and the gas injection. The production data, the pressure of the reservoir and the subsidence have been used to derive the variations of the pore volume of the reservoir, allowing to determine its volumetric deformation; this parameter is used as input data to perform a modeling of the deformations induced by the field development and by storage cycling, that takes advantage of the use of the method of Eshelby's inclusion for inclusions with ellipsoidal shape with elastic parameters different from those of the surrounding material (inhomogeneity problem), with a semi-analytical approach. The elastic fields are derived (stress, strain and displacement) in an infinite space in the neighborhood of the reservoir: the vertical displacement data are used

  18. Analysis of accident sequences and source terms at treatment and storage facilities for waste generated by US Department of Energy waste management operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.; Roglans-Ribas, J.; Folga, S.; Policastro, A.; Freeman, W.; Jackson, R.; Mishima, J.; Turner, S.

    1996-12-01

    This report documents the methodology, computational framework, and results of facility accident analyses performed for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The accident sequences potentially important to human health risk are specified, their frequencies assessed, and the resultant radiological and chemical source terms evaluated. A personal-computer-based computational framework and database have been developed that provide these results as input to the WM PEIS for the calculation of human health risk impacts. The WM PEIS addresses management of five waste streams in the DOE complex: low-level waste (LLW), hazardous waste (HW), high-level waste (HLW), low-level mixed waste (LLMW), and transuranic waste (TRUW). Currently projected waste generation rates, storage inventories, and treatment process throughputs have been calculated for each of the waste streams. This report summarizes the accident analyses and aggregates the key results for each of the waste streams. Source terms are estimated, and results are presented for each of the major DOE sites and facilities by WM PEIS alternative for each waste stream. Key assumptions in the development of the source terms are identified. The appendices identify the potential atmospheric release of each toxic chemical or radionuclide for each accident scenario studied. They also discuss specific accident analysis data and guidance used or consulted in this report.

  19. Spent fuel storage facility at science and technical center 'Sosny': Experience of ten years activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent fuel storage of the Academic Science and Technical Center in Minsk is in operation already more then 10 years. In the paper aspects of its design, operation practice, problems and decisions for future are discussed. (author)

  20. The Federal intermediate storage facility at the Paul Scherrer Institute (CH). Change of perspective - what does that mean?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) operates a place of collection of radioactive wastes from medicine, industry and research based on the Swiss legislation. Paragraph 87 of the Swiss radiation protection regulation says: ''The Federal place of collection is the PSI.'' and further in paragraph 87a: ''The PSI accepts the radioactive waste and cares for the stacking, conditioning and intermediate storage''. The site search for an underground final repository is difficult. Therefore the planned commissioning of a final repository is shifted to the remote future. The report covers also the operational experience of the intermediate storage facility during the last 30 years.

  1. Experimental comparison of alternative convection suppression arrangements for concentrating integral collector storage solar water heaters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smyth, M.; McGarrigle, P.; Eames, P.C. [Ulster Univ., School of the Built Environment, Newtownabbey, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Norton, B. [Dublin Inst. of Technology, Dublin (Ireland)

    2005-02-01

    An experimental investigation of an inverted absorber integrated collector storage solar water heater mounted in the tertiary cavity of a compound parabolic concentrator with a secondary cylindrical reflector has been performed under simulated solar conditions. The solar water heaters performance was determined with the aperture parallel to the simulator for a range of transparent baffles positioned at different locations within the collector cavity. Results indicate that glass baffles located at the upper portion of the exit aperture of the CPC can reduce thermal losses through convection suppression without significantly increasing optical losses. (Author)

  2. Dismantlement and removal of Old Hydrofracture Facility bulk storage bins and water tank, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    The Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF), located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), was constructed in 1963 to allow experimentation and operations with an integrated solid storage, mixing, and grout injection facility. During its operation, OHF blended liquid low-level waste with grout and used a hydrofracture process to pump the waste into a deep low-permeable shale formation. Since the OHF Facility was taken out of service in 1980, the four bulk storage bins located adjacent to Building 7852 had deteriorated to the point that they were a serious safety hazard. The ORNL Surveillance and Maintenance Program requested and received permission from the US Department of Energy to dismantle the bins as a maintenance action and send the free-released metal to an approved scrap metal vendor. A 25,000-gal stainless steel water tank located at the OHF site was included in the scope. A fixed-price subcontract was signed with Allied Technology Group, Inc., to remove the four bulk storage bins and water tank to a staging area where certified Health Physics personnel could survey, segregate, package, and send the radiologically clean scrap metal to an approved scrap metal vendor. All radiologically contaminated metal and metal that could not be surveyed was packaged and staged for later disposal. Permissible personnel exposure limits were not exceeded, no injuries were incurred, and no health and safety violations occurred throughout the duration of the project. Upon completion of the dismantlement, the project had generated 53,660 lb of clean scrap metal (see Appendix D). This resulted in $3,410 of revenue generated and a cost avoidance of an estimated $100,000 in waste disposal fees.

  3. Technical Competencies for the Safe Interim Storage and Management of 233U at U.S. Department of Energy Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, D.O.; Krichinsky, A.M.; Laughlin, S.S.; Van Essen, D.C.; Yong, L.K.

    1999-02-17

    Uranium-233 (with concomitant {sup 232}U) is a man-made fissile isotope of uranium with unique nuclear characteristics which require high-integrity alpha containment biological shielding, and remote handling. The special handling considerations and the fact that much of the {sup 233}U processing and large-scale handling was performed over a decade ago underscore the importance of identifying the people within the DOE complex who are currently working with or have worked with {sup 233}U. The availability of these key personnel is important in ensuring safe interim storage, management and ultimate disposition of {sup 233}U at DOE facilities. Significant programs are ongoing at several DOE sites with actinides. The properties of these actinide materials require many of the same types of facilities and handling expertise as does {sup 233}U.

  4. Box Energy: rental of energy-storage systems and alternative fuel technologies for vehicles; Box-energy. Rental of energy. Storage systems and alternative-fuel. Technologies for vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bautz, R.

    2004-07-01

    This report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the results of study on the rental of energy-storage systems and alternative fuel technologies for vehicles. Experience gained in the area of battery-rental is discussed. The aims of the 'Box Energy' project are described, as is its market environment. The 'Box Energy' concept is described and possible customers and partners listed. Logistics aspects are discussed. The organisation of 'Box Energy' is described and the concept's chances and weaknesses are discussed. The launching of a pilot project in Switzerland is discussed. Recommendations on further work to be done are made.

  5. The MRS [Monitored Retrievable Storage] task force: Economic and non-economic incentives for local public acceptance of a proposed nuclear waste packaging and storage facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A joint Oak Ridge - Roane County citizen task force (TF) evaluated the Department of Energy's (DOE) proposal to site a Monitored Retrievable Storage facility in Tennessee in terms of environmental, transportation, and socioeconomic impacts. The case study examines how the TF used mitigation, compensation and incentives (economic and non-economic) to address the problem of distrust of DOE and to change the net local impact balance from negative to positive. Intensive group interaction during their investigations and development of trust within the TF led to consensus decisions on safety and conditional acceptance. DOE accepted most of the TF conditions after informal negotiations. The siting process was stopped by extensive state-wide opposition resulting in legal challenge by the state and vetoes by the governor and state legislature

  6. 78 FR 13695 - Information Collection: Renewable Energy and Alternate Uses of Existing Facilities on the Outer...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-28

    ... that produce or support production, transportation, or transmission of energy from sources other than.... 658(c)(1) If after construction, 3 1 deviation notice/ 3 cable or pipeline BOEM evidence. deviate from... required, analyze 1.5 1 analysis report. 1.5 cable, P/L, or facility damage or failures to determine...

  7. 77 FR 61633 - Information Collection: Renewable Energy and Alternate Uses of Existing Facilities on the Outer...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-10

    ... occasion or annually. Description of Respondents: Companies interested in renewable energy-related uses on...; 530(b) Notify BOEM within 3 1. business days after learning of any action filed alleging respondent is... digital files as supporting information to plans. Subpart G--Facility Design, Fabrication,...

  8. Short report on an accident during sodium cleanup with ethyl carbitol in a storage tank of a research facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief description is given of an accident which happened on 8 March 1996 during cleanup of a small amount of sodium (about 3 kg) within a 500 l storage tank of an FZK research facility, using ethyl carbitol (EC) as a reactant. An unexpected rapid decomposition of the compounds into ignitable gases which were then released through a safety valve into the building caused a deflagration event and, as a consequence, some damage to the building walls and to the research facility. The personnel were evacuated from the building before the event happened, and so nobody was injured. Sodium cleanup with ethyl carbitol was a well-established method, and cleaning procedures of the research facility were carried out since 1991 for more than twenty times without any problem. The advantage of heavy alcohol is low vapour pressure, high ignition point and mild reaction with sodium. In the paper, a short description is given of the main features of the research facility, of the usual cleanup procedure, and of the accident including its conditions. An analysis of the event (which is incomplete of course) is presented with regard to pressure, temperature and chemical composition. Finally, the consequences are addressed. The most important one is that sodium decommissioning with EC as reactant should be avoided until possible runaway reactions are sufficiently understood. (author)

  9. Inspection of alleged design and construction deficiencies in the Nuclear Materials Storage Facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-16

    On June 8, 1994, the Office of Inspections, Office of Inspector General (OIG), Department of Energy (DOE), received a letter dated May 31, 1994, from a complainant concerning the Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The complainant alleged that the NMSF, completed in 1987, was so poorly designed and constructed that it was never usable and that DOE proposed to gut the entire facility and sandblast the walls. According to the complainant, ``these errors are so gross as to constitute professional malpractice in a commercial design setting.`` The complainant further stated that ``DOE proposes to renovate this facility to store large amounts of plutonium (as much as 30 metric tons, by some accounts), and it is imperative that the public receive some assurance that this waste will not recur and that the facility will be made safe.`` The purpose of our inspection was to determine if the allegations regarding the design and construction of the NMSF were accurate, and if so, to determine if the Government could recover damages from the Architect/Engineer and/or the construction contractor. We also reviewed the Department`s proposed actions to renovate the NMSF.

  10. Safety of laboratories, plants, facilities being dismantled, waste processing, interim storage and disposal facilities. Lessons learned from events reported in 2009 and 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the cross-disciplinary analysis performed by IRSN relating to significant events reported to the French Nuclear Safety Authority (ASN) during 2009 - 2010 for LUDD-type facilities (laboratories, plants, facilities being dismantled, and waste processing, interim storage and disposal facilities). It constitutes a follow-up to DSU Report 215 published in December 2009, relating to events reported to ASN during 2005 to 2008. The main developments observed since the analysis presented in that report have been underlined here, in order to highlight improvements, opportunities for progress and the main areas requiring careful attention. The present report is a continuation of DSU Report 215. Without claiming to be exhaustive, it presents lessons from IRSN's cross-disciplinary analysis of events reported to ASN during 2009 and 2010 at LUDD facilities while highlighting major changes from the previous analysis in order to underline improvements, areas where progress has been made, and main points for monitoring. The report has four sections: - the first gives a brief introduction to the various kinds of LUDD facilities and highlights changes with DSU Report 215; - the second provides a summary of major trends involving events reported to ASN during 2007-2010 as well as overall results of consequences of events reported during 2009 and 2010 for workers, the general public and the environment; - the third section gives a cross-disciplinary analysis of significant events reported during 2009 and 2010, performed from two complementary angles (analysis of main types of events grouped by type of risk and analysis of generic causes). Main changes from the analysis given in DSU Report 215 are considered in detail; - the last section describes selected significant events that occurred in 2009 and 2010 in order to illustrate the cross-disciplinary analysis with concrete examples. IRSN will publish this type of report periodically in coming years in order to

  11. Criticality analysis of PWR spent fuel storage facilities inside nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes some of the main features of the actinide plus fission product burnup credit methodology used by Siemens for criticality safety design analysis of wet PWR storage pools with soluble boron in the pool water. Application of burnup credit requires knowledge of the isotopic inventory of the irradiated fuel for which burnup credit is taken. This knowledge is gained by using depletion codes. The results of the depletion analysis are a necessary input to the criticality analysis. Siemens performs depletion calculations for PWR fuel burnup credit applications with the aid of the Siemens standard design procedure SAV90. The quality of this procedure relies on statistics on the differences between calculation and measurement extracted from in-core measurement data and chemical assay data. Siemens performs criticality safety calculations with the aid of the criticality calculation modules of the SCALE code package. These modules are verified many times with the aid of various kinds of critical experiments and configurations: Application of these modules to spent LWR fuel assembly storage pools was verified by analyzing critical experiments simulating such storage pools. Actinide plus fission product burnup credit applications of these modules were verified by analyzing PWR reactor critical configurations. The result of performing a burnup credit analysis is the determination of a burnup, credit loading curve for the spent fuel storage racks designed for burnup credit. This curve specifies the loading criterion by indicating the minimum burnup necessary for the fuel assembly with a specific initial enrichment to be placed in the storage racks designed for burnup credit. The loading of the spent fuel storage racks designed for burnup credit requires the implementation of controls to ensure that the loading curve is met. The controls include the determination of fuel assembly burnup based on reactor records. (author)

  12. Alternatives to electricity for transmission and annual-scale firming - Storage for diverse, stranded, renewable energy resources: hydrogen and ammonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leighty, William

    2010-09-15

    The world's richest renewable energy resources 'of large geographic extent and high intensity' are stranded: far from end-users with inadequate or nonexistent gathering and transmission systems to deliver energy. Output of most renewables varies greatly, at time scales of seconds-seasons: energy capture assets operate at low capacity factor; energy delivery is not 'firm'. New electric transmission systems, or fractions thereof, dedicated to renewables, suffer the same low CF: substantial stranded capital assets, increasing the cost of delivered renewable-source energy. Electricity storage cannot affordably firm large renewables at annual scale. Gaseous hydrogen and anhydrous ammonia fuels can: attractive alternatives.

  13. Opportunities for Water Conservation in Georgia: Alternative Energy Technologies in Planned Generation Facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Hatzenbuhler, Heather

    2013-01-01

    Water scarcity is a problem of increasing concern for the state of Georgia. For the last three decades the state has experienced droughts that have reached extreme conditions on many occasions. Georgia released a comprehensive water plan in 2008 that outlined historical and projected water use for various sectors of the economy. Water use for energy generation has the largest by volume consumptive use of water in the state. The report outlined plans for future energy generating facilities in ...

  14. Alternatives to relational databases in precision medicine: Comparison of NoSQL approaches for big data storage using supercomputers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez, Enrique Israel

    Improvements in medical and genomic technologies have dramatically increased the production of electronic data over the last decade. As a result, data management is rapidly becoming a major determinant, and urgent challenge, for the development of Precision Medicine. Although successful data management is achievable using Relational Database Management Systems (RDBMS), exponential data growth is a significant contributor to failure scenarios. Growing amounts of data can also be observed in other sectors, such as economics and business, which, together with the previous facts, suggests that alternate database approaches (NoSQL) may soon be required for efficient storage and management of big databases. However, this hypothesis has been difficult to test in the Precision Medicine field since alternate database architectures are complex to assess and means to integrate heterogeneous electronic health records (EHR) with dynamic genomic data are not easily available. In this dissertation, we present a novel set of experiments for identifying NoSQL database approaches that enable effective data storage and management in Precision Medicine using patients' clinical and genomic information from the cancer genome atlas (TCGA). The first experiment draws on performance and scalability from biologically meaningful queries with differing complexity and database sizes. The second experiment measures performance and scalability in database updates without schema changes. The third experiment assesses performance and scalability in database updates with schema modifications due dynamic data. We have identified two NoSQL approach, based on Cassandra and Redis, which seems to be the ideal database management systems for our precision medicine queries in terms of performance and scalability. We present NoSQL approaches and show how they can be used to manage clinical and genomic big data. Our research is relevant to the public health since we are focusing on one of the main

  15. IAEA Technical committee meeting on methods used in design of spent fuel storage facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The meeting was held in Espoo, Finland and hosted by the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT), and was arranged to report and discuss design methods, licensing practise, operational experience as well as economic aspects connectied with spent fuel storage. This report contains session summaries by the session chairmen and the papers presented at the meeting

  16. Economic and environmental evaluation of flexible integrated gasification polygeneration facilities with carbon capture and storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    One innovative option for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions involves pairing carbon capture and storage (CCS) with the production of synthetic fuels and electricity from co-processed coal and biomass. In this scheme, the feedstocks are first converted to syngas, from which ...

  17. Application of Framework for Integrating Safety, Security and Safeguards (3Ss) into the Design Of Used Nuclear Fuel Storage Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badwan, Faris M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Demuth, Scott F [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-01-06

    Department of Energy’s Office of Nuclear Energy, Fuel Cycle Research and Development develops options to the current commercial fuel cycle management strategy to enable the safe, secure, economic, and sustainable expansion of nuclear energy while minimizing proliferation risks by conducting research and development focused on used nuclear fuel recycling and waste management to meet U.S. needs. Used nuclear fuel is currently stored onsite in either wet pools or in dry storage systems, with disposal envisioned in interim storage facility and, ultimately, in a deep-mined geologic repository. The safe management and disposition of used nuclear fuel and/or nuclear waste is a fundamental aspect of any nuclear fuel cycle. Integrating safety, security, and safeguards (3Ss) fully in the early stages of the design process for a new nuclear facility has the potential to effectively minimize safety, proliferation, and security risks. The 3Ss integration framework could become the new national and international norm and the standard process for designing future nuclear facilities. The purpose of this report is to develop a framework for integrating the safety, security and safeguards concept into the design of Used Nuclear Fuel Storage Facility (UNFSF). The primary focus is on integration of safeguards and security into the UNFSF based on the existing Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approach to addressing the safety/security interface (10 CFR 73.58 and Regulatory Guide 5.73) for nuclear power plants. The methodology used for adaptation of the NRC safety/security interface will be used as the basis for development of the safeguards /security interface and later will be used as the basis for development of safety and safeguards interface. Then this will complete the integration cycle of safety, security, and safeguards. The overall methodology for integration of 3Ss will be proposed, but only the integration of safeguards and security will be applied to the design of the

  18. Fast neutron incineration in the energy amplifier as alternative to geologic storage the case of Spain

    CERN Document Server

    Rubbia, Carlo; Kadi, Y; Rubio, Juan Antonio

    1997-01-01

    In previous reports [1][2] we have presented the conceptual design of a fast neutron driven sub-critical device (Energy Amplifier) designed both for energy amplification (production) and for the incineration of unwanted ³waste² from Nuclear Light Water Reactors (LWR). The latter scheme is here applied to the specific case of Spain, where 9 large LWR¹s are presently in operation. It is shown that a cluster of 5 EA¹s is a very effective and realistic solution to the elimination (in 37 years) of the present and foreseen (till 2029) LWR-Waste stockpiles of Spain, but with major improvements over Geologic Storage, since: (1) only a Low Level Waste (LLW) surface repository of reasonable size is ultimately required; (2) the large amount of energy stored in the trans-Uranics is recovered, amounting for each of the 37 years of incineration to a saving of about 8% of the present primary energy demand of Spain (100 MTep/y); (3) the slightly enriched (1.1%) Uranium, unburned by LWR¹s, can be recovered for further us...

  19. Using Geographic Information Systems to Determine Site Suitability for a Low-Level Radioactive Waste Storage Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Charles A; Matthews, Kennith; Pulsipher, Allan; Wang, Wei-Hsung

    2016-02-01

    ) sites. Cells above 90%, 95%, and 99% suitability include respectively 404, 88, and 4 cells suitable for further analysis. With these areas identified, the next step in siting a LLW storage facility would be on-site analysis using additional requirements as specified by relevant regulatory guidelines. The GIS based method provides an easy, economic, efficient and effective means in evaluating potential sites for LLW storage facilities where sufficient GIS data exist. PMID:26710161

  20. Using Geographic Information Systems to Determine Site Suitability for a Low-Level Radioactive Waste Storage Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Charles A; Matthews, Kennith; Pulsipher, Allan; Wang, Wei-Hsung

    2016-02-01

    ) sites. Cells above 90%, 95%, and 99% suitability include respectively 404, 88, and 4 cells suitable for further analysis. With these areas identified, the next step in siting a LLW storage facility would be on-site analysis using additional requirements as specified by relevant regulatory guidelines. The GIS based method provides an easy, economic, efficient and effective means in evaluating potential sites for LLW storage facilities where sufficient GIS data exist.

  1. Feasibility study of recycle material storage facility in the flexible fuel cycle system during transition from LWR cycle to FBR cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to establish the future ideal FBR fuel cycle system from the current LWR fuel cycle, we proposed the Flexible Fuel Cycle Initiative (FFCI) as a suitable transition system. The FFCI removes about 90% of the U present in LWR spent fuel and the residual material, designated as recycle material (RM), is temporarily stored in a facility, such as the vitrified high-level waste (HLW) storage facility. Decay heat of the RM is removed with natural convection of air. In this paper, feasibility of the RM storage facility was studied from viewpoints of heat removal performance and critical safety. Maximum temperature of the RM and the containment pipe were evaluated for the variable density value which depends on the RM filling ratio. Because the heat density of the RM is larger than that of vitrified HLW, we made the diameter of the canister 15cm which is about one third the diameter of a vitrified HLW canister. To improve economy, we evaluated the safety of the storage facility in which three canisters surrounded by an outer pipe identical to the air pipe used in the HLW storage facility. Each canister is surrounded by an containment pipe and an pipe. The points of the feasibility study for the RM storage facility were summarized as follows. 1) The thermal analysis of the storage facility was done by regarding RM as a granule material and basically consisting of uranium oxide. Temperature at the center of the RM was evaluated with various thermal conductivity models in relation to RM filling ratio. 2) Temperature of the RM storage facility was also evaluated preliminarily with thermal properties of simulated oxide RM. Temperature at the center of a canister slightly exceeded a limit value of 1000degC for the RM produced in an air atmosphere. But it can be de reduced within the limit for the RM produced in a helium atmosphere. 3) Critical safety was also investigated for RM storage and it was found that sub-criticality could be achieved even in the hypothetical

  2. Alternative-fuel production facility for City of Huntsville, Alabama. Volume I. Executive summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-10-01

    The feasibility of a Municipal Solid Waste (MSW)-to-energy project in the Huntsville area was invetigated and found to be an environmentally attractive and cost effective method of MSW disposal. Of nine likely alternatives, that were developed for detailed evaluation and analysis. Alternative 1M surfaced as best for the City. It is described as follows: a MSW-To-Energy Plant, consisting of two 300 TPD Mass Burning Waterwall Furnace/Boiler Systems at Lowe Industrial Park to provide low pressure steam to industries in the park. A MSW Transfer Station at the existing landfill and MSW as well as residue transport rolling stock equipment is included to facilitate movement of the waste materials between the two locations that are some twelve miles apart.

  3. 3D Seismic Characterization of the Research Facility for Geological Storage of CO2: Hontomín (Burgos, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcalde, J.; Martí, D.; Calahorrano, A.; Marzan, I.; Ayarza, P.; Carbonell, R.; Perez-Estaun, A.

    2011-12-01

    A technological research facility dedicated to the underground geological storage of CO2 is currently being developed by the Spanish research program on Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) in Hontomin (Burgos, North of the Iberian Peninsula) This research program is being developed by the CIUDEN Foundation. CIUDEN is an initiative of 3 Spanish state departments (Science & Innovation, Environment and Industry). An extensive multidisciplinary site characterization phase has been carried out, including a multi-seismic data acquisition experiment. Within this effort a 36 km2 academic-oriented 3D seismic reflection survey was acquired in summer 2010. The aim of data acquisition effort are to provide high resolution images of the subsurface of the storage complex, constrain a baseline model for all the disciplines involved in the project. The main acquisition characteristics of this survey included: a mixed source (Vibroseis & explosive , 74% and 26% of the source points, respectively); 5000 shot points, distributed along 22 source lines (separated 250 m), 22 lines of receivers (separated 275 m); shot and receiver spacing along the source and receiver lines was of 25 m; this resulted in a nominal CDP-fold of 36 traces, with 13 m2 bins. This 3D-data was fully processed until migration. The main features within the processing sequence include static correction calculation, frequency filtering, trace amplitude equalization, rms velocity modeling, FK-domain filtering, 3D deconvolution, dip move-out corrections, residual static calculation and pre and post stack migration. The final high-resolution 3D-volume allowed to characterize the main tectonic structure of the dome complex, the fault system of the area and the feasibility of the reservoir for the storage. The target reservoir is a saline aquifer placed at 1400, approximately, within Lower Jurassic carbonates (Lias); the main seal is formed by inter-layered marls and marly limestones from Early to Middle Jurassic (Dogger

  4. Capacity Optimization of Renewable Energy Sources and Battery Storage in an Autonomous Telecommunication Facility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragicevic, Tomislav; Pandžić, Hrvoje; Škrlec, Davor;

    2014-01-01

    . The annual capacity reduction that results from these cycles is calculated for two types of battery technologies, i.e., valve-regulated lead–acid (VRLA) and lithium–ion (Li–ion), and treated as an additional cost. Finally, all associated costs are added up and the ideal configuration is proposed....... by a central energy storage system (ESS), consisting of a battery and a fuel cell. The optimization is carried out as a robust mixed-integer linear program (RMILP), and results in different optimal solutions, depending on budgets of uncertainty, each of which yields different RES and storage capacities....... These solutions are then tested against a set of possible outcomes, thus simulating the future operation of the system. Since battery cycling is inevitable in this application, an algorithm that counts the number of cycles and associated depths of discharges (DoD) is applied to the optimization results...

  5. Temporary storage area characterization report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The preferred alternative identified in the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) for the Weldon Spring Quarry Bulk Wastes is to remove the wastes from the quarry and transport them by truck to temporary storage facility at the chemical plant site. To support the RI/FS, this report provides data to characterize the temporary storage area (TSA) site and to ensure the suitability of the proposed location. 31 refs., 14 figs., 7 tabs

  6. Targeted Health Assessment for Wastes Contained at the Niagara Falls Storage Site to Guide Planning for Remedial Action Alternatives - 13428

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busse, John; Keil, Karen; Staten, Jane; Miller, Neil; Barker, Michelle [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Buffalo District, 1776 Niagara Street, Buffalo, NY (United States); MacDonell, Margaret; Peterson, John; Chang, Young-Soo; Durham, Lisa [Argonne National Laboratory, Environmental Science Division, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is evaluating potential remedial alternatives at the 191-acre Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) in Lewiston, New York, under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) brought radioactive wastes to the site during the 1940's and 1950's, and the U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE) consolidated these wastes into a 10-acre interim waste containment structure (IWCS) in the southwest portion of the site during the 1980's. The USACE is evaluating remedial alternatives for radioactive waste contained within the IWCS at the NFSS under the Feasibility Study phase of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) process. A preliminary evaluation of the IWCS has been conducted to assess potential airborne releases associated with uncovered wastes, particularly during waste excavation, as well as direct exposures to uncovered wastes. Key technical issues for this assessment include: (1) limitations in waste characterization data; (2) representative receptors and exposure routes; (3) estimates of contaminant emissions at an early stage of the evaluation process; (4) consideration of candidate meteorological data and air dispersion modeling approaches; and (5) estimates of health effects from potential exposures to both radionuclides and chemicals that account for recent updates of exposure and toxicity factors. Results of this preliminary health risk assessment indicate if the wastes were uncovered and someone stayed at the IWCS for a number of days to weeks, substantial doses and serious health effects could be incurred. Current controls prevent such exposures, and the controls that would be applied to protect onsite workers during remedial action at the IWCS would also effectively protect the public nearby. This evaluation provides framing context for the upcoming development and detailed

  7. Corrosion Testing of Monofrax K-3 Refractory in Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Alternate Reductant Feeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Jantzen, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Burket, P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-04-06

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) uses a combination of reductants and oxidants while converting high level waste (HLW) to a borosilicate waste form. A reducing flowsheet is maintained to retain radionuclides in their reduced oxidation states which promotes their incorporation into borosilicate glass. For the last 20 years of processing, the DWPF has used formic acid as the main reductant and nitric acid as the main oxidant. During reaction in the Chemical Process Cell (CPC), formate and formic acid release measurably significant H2 gas which requires monitoring of certain vessel’s vapor spaces. A switch to a nitric acid-glycolic acid (NG) flowsheet from the nitric-formic (NF) flowsheet is desired as the NG flowsheet releases considerably less H2 gas upon decomposition. This would greatly simplify DWPF processing from a safety standpoint as close monitoring of the H2 gas concentration could become less critical. In terms of the waste glass melter vapor space flammability, the switch from the NF flowsheet to the NG flowsheet showed a reduction of H2 gas production from the vitrification process as well. Due to the positive impact of the switch to glycolic acid determined on the flammability issues, evaluation of the other impacts of glycolic acid on the facility must be examined.

  8. Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application Immobilized High Level Waste (IHLW) Interim Storage Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Both the General Information and Unit-Specific portions of the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application address the content of the Part B permit application guidance prepared by the Washington State Department of Ecology and the U.S. EPA

  9. Facilities for processing, packaging and storage of intermediate level radioactive waste at the Winfrith Technology Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The UK strategy for the management of radioactive waste is the responsibility of the Secretary of State for the Environment. The implementation of that strategy is a function of Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Pollution (HMIP), a department within the Department of the Environment. Close liaison between HMIP and Her Majesty's Nuclear Installation Inspectorate (HMNII) takes place ensuring that site licenses are only granted for proposals which are consistent with the national waste management strategy. The task of developing national low level solid waste (LLSW) and intermediate level waste (ILW) disposal facilities rests with the UK Nirex, Ltd., a company formed by major national nuclear utilities with independent and government representation. This company is currently investigating the suitability of Sellafield, Cumbria and Dounreay, Caithness for a national repository. Operation of such a facility is unlikely however before the year 2005. 6 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  10. SHIPTRAP--a capture and storage facility for heavy radionuclides at GSI

    CERN Document Server

    Schoenfelder, J; Backe, H; Bollen, G; Dilling, J; Dretzke, A; Engels, O; Estermann, J; Habs, D; Hofmann, S; Hessberger, F P; Kluge, H J; Lauth, W; Ludolphs, W; Maier, M; Marx, G; Moore, R B; Quint, W; Rodríguez, D; Sewtz, M; Sikler, G; Toader, C F; Weber, C

    2002-01-01

    SHIPTRAP will be an ion-trap facility for heavy radionuclides delivered from SHIP. Ion traps are a perfect instrument for precision measurements since the ions can be cooled to an extremely small phase space and can be stored for a very long time. In addition one can achieve very high purity by removing contaminant ions. SHIPTRAP will extend the possibilities of measurements in traps to transuranium nuclides and provide cooled and isobarically pure ion bunches.

  11. Permitting mixed waste treatment, storage and disposal facilities: A mixed bag

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Federal Facility Compliance Act of 1992 (FFCAct) requires the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to make a comprehensive national inventory of its mixed wastes (i.e., wastes that contain both a hazardous component that meets the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) definition of hazardous waste and a radioactive component consisting of source, special nuclear, or byproduct material regulated under the Atomic Energy Act (AEA)), and of its mixed waste treatment technologies and facilities. It also requires each DOE facility that stores or generates mixed waste to develop a treatment plan that includes, in part, a schedule for constructing units to treat those wastes that can be treated using existing technologies. Inherent in constructing treatment units for mixed wastes is, of course, permitting. This paper identifies Federal regulatory program requirements that are likely to apply to new DOE mixed waste treatment units. The paper concentrates on showing how RCRA permitting requirements interrelate with the permitting or licensing requirements of such other laws as the Atomic Energy Act, the Clean Water Act, and the Clean Air Act. Documentation needed to support permit applications under these laws are compared with RCRA permit application documentation. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documentation requirements are also addressed, and throughout the paper, suggestions are made for managing the permitting process

  12. Licensing schedule for away-from-reactor (AFR) spent fuel storage facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, P.L.

    1981-08-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has authority to issue licenses for Away-From-Reactor (AFR) installations for the storage of spent nuclear fuel. This report presents a detailed estimate of the time required to prosecute a licensing action. The projected licensing schedule shows that the elapsed time between filing an application and issuance of a license will be about 32 months, assuming intervention. The legal procedural steps will determine the time schedule and will override considerations of technical complexity. A license could be issued in about 14 months in the absence of intervention.

  13. Final report : phase I investigation at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Savannah, Missouri.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2010-08-05

    From approximately 1949 until 1970, the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) operated a grain storage facility on federally owned property approximately 0.25 mi northwest of Savannah, Missouri (Figure 1.1). During this time, commercial grain fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were commonly used by the CCC/USDA and the private grain storage industry to preserve grain in their facilities. In November 1998, carbon tetrachloride was detected in a private well (Morgan) roughly 50 ft south of the former CCC/USDA facility, as a result of state-wide screening of private wells near former CCC/USDA facilities, conducted in Missouri by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1999). The 1998 and subsequent investigations by the EPA and the Missouri Department of Natural Resources (MoDNR) confirmed the presence of carbon tetrachloride in the Morgan well, as well as in a second well (on property currently owned and occupied by the Missouri Department of Transportation [MoDOT]), described as being approximately 400 ft east of the former CCC/USDA facility. The identified concentrations in these two wells were above the EPA maximum contaminant level (MCL) and the default target level (DTL) values of 5.0 {micro}g/L for carbon tetrachloride in water used for domestic purposes (EPA 1999; MoDNR 2000a,b, 2006). (The DTL is defined in Section 4.) Because the observed contamination in the Morgan and MoDOT wells might be linked to the past use of carbon tetrachloride-based fumigants at its former grain storage facility, the CCC/USDA is conducting an investigation to (1) characterize the source(s), extent, and factors controlling the subsurface distribution and movement of carbon tetrachloride at Savannah and (2) evaluate the potential risks to human health, public welfare, and the environment posed by the contamination. This work is being performed in accord with the Intergovernmental Agreement established between the Farm Service

  14. Routine organic air emissions at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex Waste Storage Facilities fiscal year 1995 report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the data and results of the routine organic air emissions monitoring performed in the Radioactive Waste Management Complex Waste Storage Facility, WMF-628, from January 4, 1995 to September 3, 1995. The task objectives were to systematically identify and measure volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations within WMF-628 that could be emitted into the environment. These routine measurements implemented a dual method approach using Open-Path Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (OP-FTIR) monitoring and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) analytical method TO-14, Summa reg-sign Canister sampling. The data collected from the routine monitoring of WNF-628 will assist in estimating the total VOC emissions from WMF-628

  15. An Assessment of Hydrological Safety for the Guri Underground Oil Storage Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Geon Young; Kim, Kyung Su; Koh, Yong Kwon; Bae, Dae Seok; Park, Kyung Woo; Ji, Sung Hoon; Ryu, Ji Hoon

    2009-08-15

    Hydrological and geochemical analysis of the various kinds of water including observation borehole groundwater was carried out for the assessment of the hydrological safety of the underground oil storage cavern and the potentiality of mineralogical and microbiological clogging was estimated. There was no distinct chemical difference in the various kinds of water. All kinds of water are undersaturated with the calcite which is the major clogging mineral. Most water samples have low Fe and Mn concentrations. However, they are saturated or oversaturated with the iron-oxide/hydroxide minerals and have high dissolved oxygen contents which softiies the possibility of clogging by the iron-oxide/hydroxide minerals as a long-term aspect. Statistical analysis shows the degree of mineral precipitation or dissolution is mainly controlled by pH, Eh and DO of water samples. Because the slime forming bacteria ate dominant microbe in several observation boreholes, the clogging can be caused by it as a long-term aspect. In addition, the possibility of clogging can be increased if the microbial effect is combined with the mineralogical effect such as iron oxide/hydroxide minerals for the possibility of clogging. Therefore, the systematic and long-term program for the assessment of clogging is required for the safe operation of underground oil storage cavern.

  16. A study on Japanese experience to secure the interim storage facility for nuclear spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung Min [Hannyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-12-15

    The Japanese Government selected Mutsu, Aomori Prefecture as a provisional spent-fuel repository site. This comes as a result of the prefecture's five-year campaign to host the site since 2000. Korea stores spent nuclear fuel within sites of nuclear power plants, and expects the storage capacity to reach its limit by the year 2016. This compels Korea to learn the cases of Japan. Having successfully hosted Gyeongju as a site for low-to-intermediate-level nuclear waste repository, Korea has already learned the potential process of hosting spent fuel storage site. The striking difference between the two countries in the process of hosting the site is that the Korean government had to offer the local city a large amount of subsidy for hosting through competitive citizens' referendum among candidate cities while it was the leadership of the local municipality that enabled the controversial decision in Japan. It is also a distinguishable characteristics of Japan that not a huge subsidy is provided to the local host city. I hope this study offers an idea to Korea's future effort to select a spent-fuel host site.

  17. Sulfur hexafluoride transfer and storage system of the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility: some thermodynamic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transfer of SF6 insulating gas from the 25 MV accelerator pressure vessel (volume = 80,000 ft3) into liquid storage tanks (volume = 6,000 ft3) is accomplished by means of two three-stage piston compressors operating in parallel. Gas from the first and second compression stages is passed through heat exchangers prior to injection into subsequent stages while gas from the third stage is cooled and/or liquified by a third exchanger/condenser. Tabulated thermodynamic data were used in calculating the SF6 transfer rate, stage compression ratios and heat transfer rates as a function of the fraction of the total inventory of SF6 (270,000 lbs) which has been transferred. The SF6 temperature, pressure and liquid fraction are also calculated at various points throughout the system. Operating parameters and procedures are recommended which should eliminate the possibility that liquid SF6 is injected into a compressor cylinder and prevent the generation of excessive pressure in the storage tanks

  18. Sulfur hexafluoride transfer and storage system of the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility: some thermodynamic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milner, W.T.

    1978-02-01

    The transfer of SF/sub 6/ insulating gas from the 25 MV accelerator pressure vessel (volume = 80,000 ft/sup 3/) into liquid storage tanks (volume = 6,000 ft/sup 3/) is accomplished by means of two three-stage piston compressors operating in parallel. Gas from the first and second compression stages is passed through heat exchangers prior to injection into subsequent stages while gas from the third stage is cooled and/or liquified by a third exchanger/condenser. Tabulated thermodynamic data were used in calculating the SF/sub 6/ transfer rate, stage compression ratios and heat transfer rates as a function of the fraction of the total inventory of SF/sub 6/ (270,000 lbs) which has been transferred. The SF/sub 6/ temperature, pressure and liquid fraction are also calculated at various points throughout the system. Operating parameters and procedures are recommended which should eliminate the possibility that liquid SF/sub 6/ is injected into a compressor cylinder and prevent the generation of excessive pressure in the storage tanks.

  19. Ageing management program for the Spanish low and intermediate level waste disposal and spent fuel and high-level waste centralised storage facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrade C.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The generic design of the centralised spent fuel storage facility was approved by the Spanish Safety Authority in 2006. The planned operational life is 60 years, while the design service life is 100 years. Durability studies and surveillance of the behaviour have been considered from the initial design steps, taking into account the accessibility limitations and temperatures involved. The paper presents an overview of the ageing management program set in support of the Performance Assessment and Safety Review of El Cabril low and intermediate level waste (LILW disposal facility. Based on the experience gained for LILW, ENRESA has developed a preliminary definition of the Ageing Management Plan for the Centralised Interim Storage Facility of spent Fuel and High Level Waste (HLW, which addresses the behaviour of spent fuel, its retrievability, the confinement system and the reinforced concrete structure. It includes tests plans and surveillance design considerations, based on the El Cabril LILW disposal facility.

  20. Chemo-mechanical modeling of low-pH concretes: Application to the calculation of storage facilities for radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work concerns to design a tool able to simulate the chemo-mechanical behavior of low-pH concretes used in radioactive waste storage, from early age to a long-term. This tool consists of a phenomenological hydration model and an original chemical evolution model. The first model is used for short-term. It can predict the development of hydration at early age and its consequences. But taking into account that this model has been developed for applications at a young age, it is based on a fixed stoichiometry of hydrates and does not take into account the specificities of low-pH cements (chemical evolution at the long-term by reaction of residual silica). Thus, a chemical evolution model at the long-term is proposed. This model is based on a variable stoichiometry of hydrates. For this, it uses the calcium mass balance for describing calcium exchange between the various hydrates and anhydrous. This equation includes the kinetics of exchanges which are based on the difference in the thermodynamic equilibrium, of the microstructure and temperature. Finally, a coupling with mechanical properties evolution was performed to simulate the mechanical behavior of the radioactive waste storage facility. (author)

  1. Niagara Falls Storage Site, Annual site environmental report, Lewiston, New York, Calendar year 1986: Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During 1986, the environmental monitoring program was continued at the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS), a US Department of Energy (DOE) surplus facility located in Niagara County, New York, presently used for the interim storage of radioactive residues and contaminated soils and rubble. The monitoring program is being conducted by Bechtel National, Inc. The monitoring program at the NFSS measures radon gas concentrations in air; external gamma radiation levels; and uranium and radium concentrations in surface water, groundwater, and sediment. To verify that the site is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard and to assess its potential effect on public health, the radiation dose was calculated for the maximally exposed individual. Based on the conservative scenario described in the report, this individual would receive an annual external exposure approximately equivalent to 6% of the DOE radiation protection standard of 100 mrem/yr. By comparison, the incremental dose received from living in a brick house versus a wooden house is 10 mrem/yr above background. The cumulative dose to the population within an 80-km (50-mi) radius of the NFSS that would result from radioactive materials present at the site would be indistinguishable from the dose that the same population would receive from naturally occurring radioactive sources. Results of the 1986 monitoring show that the NFSS is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard. 14 refs., 11 figs., 14 tabs

  2. Decommissioning of the Spent Fuel Storage at the RA Reactor Facility, Serbia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear research reactor RA was constructed in the second half of the 1950s. It was designed in the former Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR), where the main components were also manufactured. The reactor became the largest research nuclear facility in the former Yugoslavia, and was a multipurpose research reactor providing a relatively high neutron flux in the core. It belonged to the second generation of research reactors that gave an important contribution to nuclear technology development in the country. The RA reactor was a tank type reactor using heavy water as a primary coolant and as a moderator. The primary cooling system circulated heavy water to cool the fuel elements in the core and remove heat by upward forced circulation. Its nominal power was 6.5 MW. The facility went critical in December 1959 and was temporarily shut down in August 1984. During this period of operation, the reactor was successfully used for scientific research, but also for commercial purposes. From its first commissioning in 1960, until 1975, the reactor used low enriched uranium fuel (2% of 235U). In 1976, the original fuel was gradually replaced by a high enriched fuel (80% of 235U) that was developed and qualified in the former USSR. After temporary shutdown in 1984, followed by a set of thorough examinations of its systems and equipment, it was decided to reconstruct the reactor systems to enable safe and continuous operation in the future. The reconstruction, with financial help from the IAEA, started in 1986, but owing to international sanctions imposed upon the former Yugoslavia in 1992, the reconstruction work has never been finished. The facility was then left in an extended shutdown regime under passive care and maintenance

  3. Comparative risk assessments for the production and interim storage of glass and ceramic waste forms: defense waste processing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for immobilizing nuclear high level waste (HLW) is scheduled to be built at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). High level waste is produced when SRP reactor components are subjected to chemical separation operations. Two candidates for immobilizing this HLW are borosilicate glass and crystalline ceramic, either being contained in weld-sealed stainless steel canisters. A number of technical analyses are being conducted to support a selection between these two waste forms. The present document compares the risks associated with the manufacture and interim storage of these two forms in the DWPF. Process information used in the risk analysis was taken primarily from a DWPF processibility analysis. The DWPF environmental analysis provided much of the necessary environmental information. To perform the comparative risk assessments, consequences of the postulated accidents are calculated in terms of: (1) the maximum dose to an off-site individual; and (2) the dose to off-site population within 80 kilometers of the DWPF, both taken in terms of the 50-year inhalation dose commitment. The consequences are then multiplied by the estimated accident probabilities to obtain the risks. The analyses indicate that the maximum exposure risk to an individual resulting from the accidents postulated for both the production and interim storage of either waste form represents only an insignificant fraction of the natural background radiation of about 90 mrem per year per person in the local area. They also show that there is no disaster potential to the off-site population. Therefore, the risks from abnormal events in the production and the interim storage of the DWPF waste forms should not be considered as a dominant factor in the selection of the final waste form

  4. Commissioning the Heating and Cooling Systems on an FPSO (Floating Production Storage and Offloading facility)

    OpenAIRE

    Adolphe, Cyril

    2015-01-01

    The project under discussion is the FPSO Ichthys. The FPSO is a ship comprising the offshore production facility for an oil&gas field, financed by INPEX/Total. An oil platform extracts the product received via the flexible risers and separates it into gas and condensate. The condensate is transferred to the FPSO, which processes it, and separates it between natural gas and oil. The oil is stored in the FPSO and then exported via a tanker. The gas is transferred via a pipeline. An FPSO is ...

  5. Assessment of condition of underground collector lines situated inside the technological complexes of underground storage facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evaluation of status of underground gas pipeline systems operating for several decades becomes a decisive factor of the decision making for their further safe and reliable operation. The decision becomes crucial especially in cases when piping is installed within a facility without the cathodic protection. The evaluation and inspection of underground gas manifolds requires a specific approach tailored for the respective manifolds. In 2003 NAFTA, the company initiated an extensive plan of the underground gas manifolds diagnostics and evaluation. The results were presented within the Working Committee WOC2 at the 23rd World Gas Congress in Amsterdam. (authors)

  6. Advanced Motor Control Test Facility for NASA GRC Flywheel Energy Storage System Technology Development Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Barbara H.; Kascak, Peter E.; Hofmann, Heath; Mackin, Michael; Santiago, Walter; Jansen, Ralph

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the flywheel test facility developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center with particular emphasis on the motor drive components and control. A four-pole permanent magnet synchronous machine, suspended on magnetic bearings, is controlled with a field orientation algorithm. A discussion of the estimation of the rotor position and speed from a "once around signal" is given. The elimination of small dc currents by using a concurrent stationary frame current regulator is discussed and demonstrated. Initial experimental results are presented showing the successful operation and control of the unit at speeds up to 20,000 rpm.

  7. Status and latest improvements of the short-pulse facility at the DELTA storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The new short-pulse facility at the synchrotron light source DELTA utilizes the interaction of the electrons with an ultrashort laser pulse in an undulator (Coherent Harmonic Generation principle). Subsequent microbunching leads to coherent radiation of sub-ps pulses in the VUV regime, which will be used for time-resolved photoelectron-spectroscopy experiments. In addition, coherent, ultrashort THz pulses are generated. Improvements regarding the stability, availability and reliability are presented. Furthermore, the progress towards the emission of shorter wavelengths and towards pump-probe experiments at an existing user beamline are shown.

  8. Project on effects of gas in underground storage facilities for radioactive waste (Pegasus project)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whereas the subject of gas generation and gas release from radioactive waste repositories has gained in interest on the international scene, the Commission of the European Communities has increased its research efforts on this issue. In particular, in the fourth five-year R and D programme on management and storage of radioactive waste (1990-94), a framework has been set up in which research efforts on the subject of gas generation and migration, supported by the CEC, are brought together and coordinated. In this project, called Pegasus, about 20 organizations and research institutes are involved. The project covers theoretical and experimental studies of the processes of gas formation and possible gas release from the different waste types, LLW, ILW and HLW, under typical repository conditions in suitable geological formations such as clay, salt and granite. In this report the present status of the various research activities are described and 13 papers have been selected

  9. Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations: Exploratory Shaft Facility fluids and materials evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, K.A.

    1988-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if any fluids or materials used in the Exploratory Shaft Facility (ESF) of Yucca Mountain will make the mountain unsuitable for future construction of a nuclear waste repository. Yucca Mountain, an area on and adjacent to the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada, USA, is a candidate site for permanent disposal of high-level radioactive waste from commercial nuclear power and defense nuclear activities. To properly characterize Yucca Mountain, it will be necessary to construct an underground test facility, in which in situ site characterization tests can be conducted. The candidate repository horizon at Yucca Mountain, however, could potentially be compromised by fluids and materials used in the site characterization tests. To minimize this possibility, Los Alamos National Laboratory was directed to evaluate the kinds of fluids and materials that will be used and their potential impacts on the site. A secondary objective was to identify fluids and materials, if any, that should be prohibited from, or controlled in, the underground. 56 refs., 19 figs., 11 tabs.

  10. Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations: Exploratory Shaft Facility fluids and materials evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to determine if any fluids or materials used in the Exploratory Shaft Facility (ESF) of Yucca Mountain will make the mountain unsuitable for future construction of a nuclear waste repository. Yucca Mountain, an area on and adjacent to the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada, USA, is a candidate site for permanent disposal of high-level radioactive waste from commercial nuclear power and defense nuclear activities. To properly characterize Yucca Mountain, it will be necessary to construct an underground test facility, in which in situ site characterization tests can be conducted. The candidate repository horizon at Yucca Mountain, however, could potentially be compromised by fluids and materials used in the site characterization tests. To minimize this possibility, Los Alamos National Laboratory was directed to evaluate the kinds of fluids and materials that will be used and their potential impacts on the site. A secondary objective was to identify fluids and materials, if any, that should be prohibited from, or controlled in, the underground. 56 refs., 19 figs., 11 tabs

  11. Methodology for assessing alternative water-acquisition-and-use strategies for energy facilities in the American West

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, J.J.; Adams, E.E.; Harleman, D.R.F.; Marks, D.H.

    1981-12-01

    A method for assessing alternative strategies for acquiring and using water at western energy plants was developed. The method was tested in a case study of cooling-water use for a hypothetical steam-electric power plant on the Crazy Woman Creek, an unregulated stream in Wyoming. The results from the case study suggest a careful analysis of reservoir design and water-right purchase strategies can reduce the cost of acquiring and using water at an energy facility. The method uses simulation models to assess the capital and operating costs and expected monthly water-consumption rates for different cooling-system designs. The method also uses reservoir operating algorithms to select, for a fixed cooling-system design, the optimal tradeoff between building a make-up water reservoir and purchasing water rights. These tradeoffs can be used to derive the firm's true demand curve for different sources of water. The analysis also reveals the implicit cost of selecting strategies that minimize conflicts with other water users. Results indicate that: (1) cooling ponds are as good as or preferred to wet towers because their costs already include provisions for storing water for use during the normally dry summer months and during occasional drought years; (2) the energy firm's demand for overall water consumption in the cooling system was found to be inversely proportional to both the cost of installing make-up water reservoirs, and the size of the energy facility; and (3) the firm's willingness to pay for existing rights is proportional to both the cost of installing reservoirs, and the size of the energy facility.

  12. Conceptual design report: Nuclear materials storage facility renovation. Part 5, Structural/seismic investigation. Section A report, existing conditions calculations/supporting information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was a Fiscal Year (FY) 1984 line-item project completed in 1987 that has never been operated because of major design and construction deficiencies. This renovation project, which will correct those deficiencies and allow operation of the facility, is proposed as an FY 97 line item. The mission of the project is to provide centralized intermediate and long-term storage of special nuclear materials (SNM) associated with defined LANL programmatic missions and to establish a centralized SNM shipping and receiving location for Technical Area (TA)-55 at LANL. Based on current projections, existing storage space for SNM at other locations at LANL will be loaded to capacity by approximately 2002. This will adversely affect LANUs ability to meet its mission requirements in the future. The affected missions include LANL's weapons research, development, and testing (WRD ampersand T) program; special materials recovery; stockpile survelliance/evaluation; advanced fuels and heat sources development and production; and safe, secure storage of existing nuclear materials inventories. The problem is further exacerbated by LANL's inability to ship any materials offsite because of the lack of receiver sites for mate rial and regulatory issues. Correction of the current deficiencies and enhancement of the facility will provide centralized storage close to a nuclear materials processing facility. The project will enable long-term, cost-effective storage in a secure environment with reduced radiation exposure to workers, and eliminate potential exposures to the public. Based upon US Department of Energy (DOE) Albuquerque Operations (DOE/Al) Office and LANL projections, storage space limitations/restrictions will begin to affect LANL's ability to meet its missions between 1998 and 2002

  13. Characterization of the Hontomín Research Facility for Geological Storage of CO2: 3D Seismic Imaging Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcalde, J.; Martí, D.; Juhlin, C.; Malehmir, A.; Calahorrano, A.; Ayarza, P.; Pérez-Estaún, A.; Carbonell, R.

    2012-04-01

    A technological research facility dedicated to the underground geological storage of CO2 is currently being developed by the Spanish research program on Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) in Hontomin (Burgos). This research program is being developed by the CIUDEN Foundation, an initiative launched by 3 Spanish state departments (Science & Innovation, Environment and Industry). An extensive multidisciplinary site characterization phase has been carried out, including a multiseismic data acquisition experiment. Within this effort, a 36 km2 3D seismic reflection survey was acquired in the summer of 2010. Its aim was to provide high resolution images of the subsurface of the storage complex, as well as to provide a baseline model for all the disciplines involved in the project. The target reservoir is a saline aquifer located at 1400 m, approximately, within Lower Jurassic carbonates (Lias). The main seal is formed by inter-layered marls and marly limestones of Early to Middle Jurassic age (Dogger and Lias). The main acquisition characteristics of the survey included (1) a mixed source of vibroseis and explosives with 74% and 26% of each used, respectively, (2) 5000 source points distributed along 22 source lines (separated 250 m) and (3) 22 lines of receivers (separated 275 m). Shot and receiver spacing along the source and receiver lines was 25 m, resulting in a nominal CDP-fold of 36 for 13 m2 bins. The 3D-data have been fully processed to post stack migration. The most critical processing steps included static correction calculations, time variant frequency filtering, rms velocity analysis, F-XY deconvolution, dip move-out correction, residual statics calculations and post stack migration. The final high-resolution 3D-volume shows the shape and depth of the primary reservoir-seal system, the main faults of the area and the secondary reservoir-seal sequence. It allows us to characterize the main tectonic structure of the dome complex, the fault system of the area and

  14. Recent development of spent fuel management in the Central Storage Facility for Spent Fuel (CLAB) in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Swedish nuclear waste management programme was presented at the Advisory Group Meeting held 15-18 March 1988. As there have been very small changes since then in the main strategy this paper is focusing the ongoing work to expand the capacity of the Central Storage Facility for Spent Fuel, CLAB, from 3.000 tonnes of uranium (tU) to 5.000 tU within the existing storage pools. This expansion makes it possible to postpone the investment in new storage pools in a second rock cavern by 6-8 years which gives a considerable economic advantage. Preliminary studies of several methods to realize the expansion led to a decision to use storage canisters similar to the existing ones. The new BWR canister will be designed to hold 25 fuel assemblies instead of 16 and the new PWR canister 9 assemblies instead of 5. The main problem is to maintain a sufficient margin against criticality with the new and denser fuel pattern. Two methods to achieve this have been more closely investigated: Credit for the burnup of the fuel; Neutron absorbing material in the canisters for reactivity control. A calculational work has been performed in order to analyze the margins which must be applied in the first case. One of the more important factors proved to be the margin required to cover the influence of axial profiles of burnup and Pu-build up for BWR fuel. Together with other necessary reactivity margins the total penalty which has to be applied amounted to about 12 reactivity percent units. With the requirement of a final Keff value smaller than or equal to 0,95 this implied that a far to great proportion of the fuel arriving at CLAB would fall outside the acceptable region defined by initial enrichment and actual burnup. The method of taking full credit for fuel burnup therefore had to be abandoned in favour of the other method. A preliminary analysis has been performed involving different degrees of absorber material in the canister and the fact that burnable absorbers in the fuel

  15. Classification of the inventory of spent sealed sources at Inshas storage facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Egypt, spent sealed sources (SSSs) (decayed, damaged, misused, unwanted and orphan) are stored in prepared storage rooms in Hot-Laboratories center at Inshas site. Due to the accumulation of the spent sources in the storage rooms, the Hot-Laboratories is planned to dispose the spent sources in near surface vault structures with the solidified low and intermediate radioactive wastes. Special safety measures should be established during the different phases of SRSs management (transportation, treatment, handling and disposal) to avoid the risk of radiation hazards to workers and public. Therefore, the SSSs should be classified according to their potential hazard to cause deterministic health effects. Additionally, these measures are relative depending to the radiological risk, which can be caused by the source during each phase. Concerning the transportation, treatment, and handling phases, the SSSs stored at Inshas site and according the categorization of the IAEA these sources are ranked into five categories. On the other hand, this classification does not offer the safety requirements to protect the population during the post-closure disposal from the related radiological hazard of the sources. Therefore, the radioactive sources are reclassified based on the long-term safety disposal. This classification ranked the sources into two groups: the short-lived sources and the long-lived sources. Since some sources are long-lived radionuclide and are not met the criteria of waste acceptance for near surface disposal, intermediate deep borehole disposal is proposed as a safety design for the long-lived spent sources. For that reason, the joint project Integrated Management Program for Radioactive Sealed Sources (IMPRSS) between the government of Egypt and Sandia National Laboratories U.S., funded by the U.S, Agency for International Development and implemented through the U.S. Department of Energy have been performed. The aim of this project is to transfer the

  16. Hazardous Material Storage Facilities and Sites, DSHWPOPermittedUsedOilFacilities-Location in Utah of all Used Oil Facilities: Marketers, Porcessoors, Transfer, Transport and Off-specification Permitted by UDEQ Division of Hazardous Waste (DSHW) - Used Oil Section. Federal Fiscal Year 2006. Dataset Upda, Published in 2006, 1:100000 (1in=8333ft) scale, State of Utah Automated Geographic Reference Center.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Hazardous Material Storage Facilities and Sites dataset, published at 1:100000 (1in=8333ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Hardcopy Maps information...

  17. Expertise concerning the request by the ZWILAG Intermediate Storage Facility Wuerenlingen AG for granting of a licence for the building and operation of the Central Intermediate Storage Facility for radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On July 15, 1993, the Intermediate Storage Facility Wuerenlingen AG (ZWILAG) submitted a request to the Swiss Federal Council for granting of a license for the construction and operation of a central intermediate storage facility for radioactive wastes. The project foresees intermediate storage halls as well as conditioning and incineration installations. The Federal Agency for the Safety of Nuclear Installations (HSK) has to examine the project from the point of view of nuclear safety. The present report presents the results of this examination. Different waste types have to be treated in ZWILAG: spent fuel assemblies from Swiss nuclear power plants (KKWs); vitrified, highly radioactive wastes from reprocessing; intermediate and low-level radioactive wastes from KKWs and from reprocessing; wastes from the dismantling of nuclear installations; wastes from medicine, industry and research. The wastes are partitioned into three categories: high-level (HAA) radioactive wastes containing, amongst others, α-active nuclides, intermediate-level (MAA) radioactive wastes and low-level (SAA) radioactive wastes. The projected installation consists of three repository halls for each waste category, a hot cell, a conditioning plant and an incineration and melting installation. The HAA repository can accept 200 transport and storage containers with vitrified high-level wastes or spent fuel assemblies. The expected radioactivity amounts to 1020 Bq, including 1018 Bq of α-active nuclides. The thermal power produced by decay is released to the environment by natural circulation of air. The ventilation system is designed for a maximum power of 5.8 MW. Severe conditions are imposed to the containers as far as tightness and shielding against radiation is concerned. In the repository for MAA wastes the maximum radioactivity is 1018 Bq with 1015 Bq of α-active nuclides. The maximum thermal power of 250 kW is removed by forced air cooling. Because of the high level of radiation the

  18. Proceedings of a workshop on uses of depleted uranium in storage, transportation and repository facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    A workshop on the potential uses of depleted uranium (DU) in the repository was organized to coordinate the planning of future activities. The attendees, the original workshop objective and the agenda are provided in Appendices A, B and C. After some opening remarks and discussions, the objectives of the workshop were revised to: (1) exchange information and views on the status of the Department of Energy (DOE) activities related to repository design and planning; (2) exchange information on DU management and planning; (3) identify potential uses of DU in the storage, transportation, and disposal of high-level waste and spent fuel; and (4) define the future activities that would be needed if potential uses were to be further evaluated and developed. This summary of the workshop is intended to be an integrated resource for planning of any future work related to DU use in the repository. The synopsis of the first day`s presentations is provided in Appendix D. Copies of slides from each presenter are presented in Appendix E.

  19. First thoughts on KM3NeT on-shore data storage and distribution facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavrianakou, M.

    2009-04-01

    The KM3NeT project studies the design of an underwater neutrino telescope combined with a multidisciplinary underwater observatory in the Mediterranean. Data from the telescope will arrive on shore where they will be processed in real time at a data filter farm and subsequently stored and backed up at a central computing centre located on site. From there we propose a system whereby the data are distributed to participating institutes equipped with large computing centres for further processing, duplication and distribution to smaller centres. The data taking site hosts the central data management services, including the database servers, bookkeeping systems and file catalogue services, the data access and file transfer systems, data quality monitoring systems and transaction monitoring daemons and is equipped with fast network connection to all large computing sites. Data and service challenges in the course of the preparatory phase must be anticipated in order to test the hardware and software components in terms of robustness and performance, scalability as well as modularity and replaceability, given the rapid evolution of the market both in terms of CPU performance and storage capacity. The role of the GRID would also have to be evaluated and the appropriate implementation selected on time for an eventual test in the context of a data challenge before the start of data taking.

  20. Holographic Grid Cloud, a futurable high storage technology for the next generation astronomical facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Gallozzi, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    In the immediate future holographic technology will be available to store a very large amount of data in HVD (Holographic Versatile Disk) devices. This technology make extensive use of the WORM (Write-Once-Read-Many) paradigm: this means that such devices allow for a simultaneous and parallel reading of millions of volumetric pixels (i.e. voxels). This characteristic will make accessible wherever the acquired data from a telescope (or satellite) in a quite-simultaneous way. With the support of this new technology the aim of this paper is to identify the guidelines for the implementation of a distributed RAID system, a sort of "storage block" to distribute astronomical data over different geographical sites acting as a single remote device as an effect of a property of distributed computing, the abstraction of resources. The end user will only have to take care on connecting in a opportune and secure mode (using personal certificates) to the remote device and will have access to all (or part) of this potential...

  1. Proceedings of a workshop on uses of depleted uranium in storage, transportation and repository facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A workshop on the potential uses of depleted uranium (DU) in the repository was organized to coordinate the planning of future activities. The attendees, the original workshop objective and the agenda are provided in Appendices A, B and C. After some opening remarks and discussions, the objectives of the workshop were revised to: (1) exchange information and views on the status of the Department of Energy (DOE) activities related to repository design and planning; (2) exchange information on DU management and planning; (3) identify potential uses of DU in the storage, transportation, and disposal of high-level waste and spent fuel; and (4) define the future activities that would be needed if potential uses were to be further evaluated and developed. This summary of the workshop is intended to be an integrated resource for planning of any future work related to DU use in the repository. The synopsis of the first day's presentations is provided in Appendix D. Copies of slides from each presenter are presented in Appendix E

  2. The design of the system for the dry-storage facility of heat-producing high-level radioactive waste. Chapter 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The starting points, which are to be distinguished into limiting conditions with respect to the safety and the design, and the headlines are discussed for a design of a Dutch dry-storage facility for heat-producing high-level radioactive waste. (H.W.). 4 figs

  3. Preliminary studies of tunnel interface response modeling using test data from underground storage facilities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobolik, Steven Ronald; Bartel, Lewis Clark

    2010-11-01

    In attempting to detect and map out underground facilities, whether they be large-scale hardened deeply-buried targets (HDBT's) or small-scale tunnels for clandestine border or perimeter crossing, seismic imaging using reflections from the tunnel interface has been seen as one of the better ways to both detect and delineate tunnels from the surface. The large seismic impedance contrast at the tunnel/rock boundary should provide a strong, distinguishable seismic response, but in practice, such strong indicators are often lacking. One explanation for the lack of a good seismic reflection at such a strong contrast boundary is that the damage caused by the tunneling itself creates a zone of altered seismic properties that significantly changes the nature of this boundary. This report examines existing geomechanical data that define the extent of an excavation damage zone around underground tunnels, and the potential impact on rock properties such as P-wave and S-wave velocities. The data presented from this report are associated with sites used for the development of underground repositories for the disposal of radioactive waste; these sites have been excavated in volcanic tuff (Yucca Mountain) and granite (HRL in Sweden, URL in Canada). Using the data from Yucca Mountain, a numerical simulation effort was undertaken to evaluate the effects of the damage zone on seismic responses. Calculations were performed using the parallelized version of the time-domain finitedifference seismic wave propagation code developed in the Geophysics Department at Sandia National Laboratories. From these numerical simulations, the damage zone does not have a significant effect upon the tunnel response, either for a purely elastic case or an anelastic case. However, what was discovered is that the largest responses are not true reflections, but rather reradiated Stoneley waves generated as the air/earth interface of the tunnel. Because of this, data processed in the usual way may not

  4. Shortage of CO{sub 2} storage facilities for biomass CCS; Knappe CO{sub 2}-Speicherstaetten fuer Biomasse-CCS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartmann, Claus [Flensburg Univ. (Germany); Stadtwerke Flensburg GmbH, Flensburg (Germany); Hohmeyer, Olav [Flensburg Univ. (Germany)

    2010-01-15

    Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) poses an option for the continued combustion of fossil fuels which would permit a coal-based energy supply with reduced net CO{sub 2} emissions starting in the time between 2020 and 2030. However, there will foreseeably be a competition for storage facilities between carbon from coal and carbon removed from the atmosphere through biomass CCS. An expansion in the use of coal in conjunction with CCS would exhaust between 58% to (theoretically) 122% of Germany's reservoir capacities by the year 2100, so that these could no longer be used for the removal of carbon from the atmosphere through biomass CCS. The plan of reducing coal production as envisaged by the German Environment Ministry in its Lead Study must be rigorously pursued to ensure that sufficient storage facilities are available for biomass CSS from 2070 on.

  5. Rough order of magnitude cost estimate for immobilization of 50 MT of plutonium sharing existing facilities at Hanford with pit disassembly and conversion facility: alternative 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this Cost Estimate Report is to identify preliminary capital and operating costs for a facility to immobilize 50 metric tons (nominal) of plutonium as a ceramic in an existing facility at Hanford, the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF). The Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF), which is being costed in a separate report by LANL, will also be located in the FMEF in this co-location option

  6. Rough order of magnitude cost estimate for immobilization of 18.2 MT of plutonium sharing existing facilities at Hanford with MOX fuel fabrication facility: alternative 4B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this Cost Estimate Report is to identify preliminary capital and operating costs for a facility to immobilize 18.2 metric tons (nominal) of plutonium as a ceramic in an existing facility at Hanford, the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF). The MOX Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF), which is being costed in a separate report, will also be located in the FMEF in this co-location option

  7. Dental erosion in workers exposed to sulfuric acid in lead storage battery manufacturing facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suyama, Yuji; Takaku, Satoru; Okawa, Yoshikazu; Matsukubo, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    Dental erosion, and specifically its symptoms, has long been studied in Japan as an occupational dental disease. However, in recent years, few studies have investigated the development of this disease or labor hygiene management aimed at its prevention. As a result, interest in dental erosion is comparatively low, even among dental professionals. Our investigation at a lead storage battery factory in 1991 found that the work environmental sulfuric acid density was above the tolerable range (1.0mg/m(3)) and that longterm workers had dental erosion. Therefore, workers handling sulfuric acid were given an oral examination and rates of dental erosion by tooth type, rates of erosion by number of working years and rates of erosion by sulfuric acid density in the work environment investigated. Where dental erosion was diagnosed, degree of erosion was identified according to a diagnostic criterion. No development of dental erosion was detected in the maxillary teeth, and erosion was concentrated in the anterior mandibular teeth. Its prevalence was as high as 20%. Rates of dental erosion rose precipitously after 10 working years. The percentages of workers with dental erosion were 42.9% for 10-14 years, 57.1% for 15-19 years and 66.7% for over 20 years with 22.5% for total number of workers. The percentages of workers with dental erosion rose in proportion to work environmental sulfuric acid density: 17.9% at 0.5-1.0, 25.0% at 1.0-4.0 and 50.0% at 4.0-8.0mg/m(3). This suggests that it is necessary to evaluate not only years of exposure to sulfuric acid but also sulfuric acid density in the air in factory workers.

  8. 2727-S Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Storage Facility clean closure evaluation report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luke, S.N.

    1994-07-14

    This report presents the analytical results of 2727-S NRDWS facility closure verification soil sampling and compares these results to clean closure criteria. The results of this comparison will determine if clean closure of the unit is regulatorily achievable. This report also serves to notify regulators that concentrations of some analytes at the site exceed sitewide background threshold levels (DOE-RL 1993b) and/or the limits of quantitation (LOQ). This report also presents a Model Toxics Control Act Cleanup (MTCA) (WAC 173-340) regulation health-based closure standard under which the unit can clean close in lieu of closure to background levels or LOQ in accordance with WAC 173-303-610. The health-based clean closure standard will be closure to MTCA Method B residential cleanup levels. This report reconciles all analyte concentrations reported above background or LOQ to this health-based cleanup standard. Regulator acceptance of the findings presented in this report will qualify the TSD unit for clean closure in accordance with WAC 173-303-610 without further TSD unit soil sampling, or soil removal and/or decontamination. Nondetected analytes require no further evaluation.

  9. Melton Valley Storage Tanks Capacity Increase Project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to construct and maintain additional storage capacity at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tennessee, for liquid low-level radioactive waste (LLLW). New capacity would be provided by a facility partitioned into six individual tank vaults containing one 100,000 gallon LLLW storage tank each. The storage tanks would be located within the existing Melton Valley Storage Tank (MVST) facility. This action would require the extension of a potable water line approximately one mile from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) area to the proposed site to provide the necessary potable water for the facility including fire protection. Alternatives considered include no-action, cease generation, storage at other ORR storage facilities, source treatment, pretreatment, and storage at other DOE facilities.

  10. Melton Valley Storage Tanks Capacity Increase Project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to construct and maintain additional storage capacity at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tennessee, for liquid low-level radioactive waste (LLLW). New capacity would be provided by a facility partitioned into six individual tank vaults containing one 100,000 gallon LLLW storage tank each. The storage tanks would be located within the existing Melton Valley Storage Tank (MVST) facility. This action would require the extension of a potable water line approximately one mile from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) area to the proposed site to provide the necessary potable water for the facility including fire protection. Alternatives considered include no-action, cease generation, storage at other ORR storage facilities, source treatment, pretreatment, and storage at other DOE facilities

  11. Design and operation of high level waste vitrification and storage facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conversion of high level wastes (HLW) into solids has been studied for the past 30 years, primarily in those countries engaged in the reprocessing of nuclear fuels. Production and demonstration calcination and solidification plants have been operated by using waste solutions from fuels irradiated at various burnup rates, depending on the reactor type. Construction of more advanced solidification processes is now in progress in several countries to permit the handling of high burnup power reactor fuel wastes. The object of this report is to provide detailed information and references for those vitrification systems in advanced stages of implementation. Some less detailed information will be provided for previously developed immobilization systems. The report will examine the HLLW arising from the various locations, the features of each process as well as the stage of development, scale-up potential and flexibility of the processes. Since the publication of IAEA Technical Reports Series No. 176, Techniques for the Solidification of High-Level Wastes great progress on this subject has been made. The AVM in France has been operated successfully for 11 years and France has completed construction at La Hague of two vitrification plants that are based on the AVM rotary calciner/metallic melter process. A similar plant is under construction at Sellafield. The ceramic melter process has been chosen by several countries. Germany has successfully operated the PAMELA vitrification plant. Since 1986, Belgoprocess has continued to operate this facility. The former USSR operated the EP-500 plant from 1986 to 1988. In addition, two ceramic melter vitrification plants are nearing completion in the USA at Savannah River and West Valley and plans are being made to use this technology at Hanford as well as in Japan, Germany and India. This major progress attests to the maturity of these technologies for vitrifying HLLW to make a borosilicate glass for disposal of the waste. 67

  12. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume III. Resources and fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ability of uranium supply and the rest of the nuclear fuel cycle to meet the demand for nuclear power is an important consideration in future domestic and international planning. Accordingly, the purpose of this assessment is to evaluate the adequacy of potential supply for various nuclear resources and fuel cycle facilities in the United States and in the world outside centrally planned economy areas (WOCA). Although major emphasis was placed on uranium supply and demand, material resources (thorium and heavy water) and facility resources (separative work, spent fuel storage, and reprocessing) were also considered

  13. Assessment of environmental risk for red mud storage facility in China: a case study in Shandong Province.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Zhi-Chao; Ma, Shu-Hua; Zheng, Shi-Li; Zhang, Yi; Liang, Yan

    2016-06-01

    Red mud storage facility (RM-SF) pollution remains a serious problem in China mainly due to the RM's huge quantity, little recyclability, and high alkalinity. And, there is also a risk of dam failure because almost all RM-SFs are processed by damming. In order to address this challenge and improve the level of risk management, it is necessary to evaluate the environmental risk of RM-SFs systematically. So, this paper firstly designs a comprehensive evaluation index system with a three-level evaluation index in the terms of RM characteristics, RM-SF characteristics, ambient environment of RM-SF, the management of RM-SF, and the application aspect of RM by the analytic hierarchy process (AHP) method. Then, a case of RM-SF from a typical alumina production enterprise is studied according to this system, as is assisted by several experts from different fields when determining the weights of all indicators. The results show that the risk of selected RM-SF primarily depends on the former factors, that is, RM and RM-SF characteristics, while the contributions of the other factors are quite smaller. PMID:26920533

  14. An integrated approach to risk-based remediation of a former bulk fuel storage facility adjacent a marine environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemp, L.; Hers, I. [Golder Associates Ltd., Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    An integrated approach to risk-based remediation of a former bulk fuel storage facility adjacent to a marine environment was discussed. The presentation provided an introduction and illustration to the site location and history, located close to Skagway, Alaska and northwestern British Columbia. The site investigation and conceptual model were also presented. The remedial approach was also described with reference to a risk-based action approach, remedial objectives, soil vapour extraction (SVE)-bioventing, and air sparging-biosparging. The objectives were to minimize potential exposure to aquatic receptors by minimizing non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL) mobility and dissolved transport of petroleum hydrocarbons. Groundwater modeling to assess the attenuation rate and to determine remedial targets was also discussed. Model validation and results of groundwater modeling as well as remediation system details and performance were then provided. It was determined that significant attenuation is occurring and that effective mass removal and concentrations have been decreasing over time. It was demonstrated that risk-based remedial goals and hydrogeology can change with land use/development. tabs., figs.

  15. Airborne source-term modeling of past and future interim storage practices of Hanford Site waste treatment facilities using AIRSOURCE model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westinghouse Hanford Company functions as the operations and engineering contractor at the Hanford Site US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. A major mission of this responsibility is to process the chemical and radioactive wastes from former weapons material production and other activities into a form suitable for permanent storage or disposal. These processing activities involve waste reduction which separates solid wastes from effluents that have trace concentrations of chemical and radioactive materials. This water had been previously disposed of in soil column cribs which sometimes resulted in a local below-surface contamination. As a result of timing commitments and processing schedules, a facility that will remove and permanently store the trace contamination materials from the contaminated effluent water will not be available for several years. It is necessary to provide interim storage of the effluent water in order to keep the waste processing functions operating until these effluent treatment facilities are made available. In order to operate this interim storage facility, the State of Washington required a demonstration that atmospheric releases from the future practices interim storage would be less than those of the past practices operations involving the soil column disposal of effluents. To achieve this objective, a description of equipment items and processes in the past practices and proposed future practices interim storage was made. This description involved concentrations, flow rates, temperatures, and parameters such as surface areas, ventilation rates, and filtration efficiencies which affect the atmospheric source-term releases. Several design variables were considered and evaluated before a design was finalized. At the beginning of this project, 72 inorganic, organic, and radioactive materials were considered in the effluent stream. Provision was required for possible addition to this list. 2 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Estimation of effective dose caused by stray radiations of photons, electrons and positrons around a small storage ring for a synchrotron radiation facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takashima, Y.; Oki, S.; Sugiyama, H.; Kobayakawa, H.

    2005-10-01

    The spatial distribution of the effective dose of photons, electrons and positrons caused by beam loss around a small electron storage ring in a synchrotron radiation source is calculated. We propose a simple formula applicable to calculate the effective dose for storage rings for beam energies ranging from 200 MeV to 5 GeV. The formula is derived from Monte Carlo calculations of radiation flux using the simulation code EGS4. We apply the formula to estimate the effective dose distribution in a small synchrotron radiation facility planned by the Nagoya University.

  17. Analysis of accident sequences and source terms at waste treatment and storage facilities for waste generated by U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Operations, Volume 1: Sections 1-9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents the methodology, computational framework, and results of facility accident analyses performed for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The accident sequences potentially important to human health risk are specified, their frequencies are assessed, and the resultant radiological and chemical source terms are evaluated. A personal computer-based computational framework and database have been developed that provide these results as input to the WM PEIS for calculation of human health risk impacts. The methodology is in compliance with the most recent guidance from DOE. It considers the spectrum of accident sequences that could occur in activities covered by the WM PEIS and uses a graded approach emphasizing the risk-dominant scenarios to facilitate discrimination among the various WM PEIS alternatives. Although it allows reasonable estimates of the risk impacts associated with each alternative, the main goal of the accident analysis methodology is to allow reliable estimates of the relative risks among the alternatives. The WM PEIS addresses management of five waste streams in the DOE complex: low-level waste (LLW), hazardous waste (HW), high-level waste (HLW), low-level mixed waste (LLMW), and transuranic waste (TRUW). Currently projected waste generation rates, storage inventories, and treatment process throughputs have been calculated for each of the waste streams. This report summarizes the accident analyses and aggregates the key results for each of the waste streams. Source terms are estimated and results are presented for each of the major DOE sites and facilities by WM PEIS alternative for each waste stream. The appendices identify the potential atmospheric release of each toxic chemical or radionuclide for each accident scenario studied. They also provide discussion of specific accident analysis data and guidance used or consulted in this report

  18. Analysis of accident sequences and source terms at waste treatment and storage facilities for waste generated by U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Operations, Volume 1: Sections 1-9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.; Roglans-Ribas, J. [and others

    1995-04-01

    This report documents the methodology, computational framework, and results of facility accident analyses performed for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The accident sequences potentially important to human health risk are specified, their frequencies are assessed, and the resultant radiological and chemical source terms are evaluated. A personal computer-based computational framework and database have been developed that provide these results as input to the WM PEIS for calculation of human health risk impacts. The methodology is in compliance with the most recent guidance from DOE. It considers the spectrum of accident sequences that could occur in activities covered by the WM PEIS and uses a graded approach emphasizing the risk-dominant scenarios to facilitate discrimination among the various WM PEIS alternatives. Although it allows reasonable estimates of the risk impacts associated with each alternative, the main goal of the accident analysis methodology is to allow reliable estimates of the relative risks among the alternatives. The WM PEIS addresses management of five waste streams in the DOE complex: low-level waste (LLW), hazardous waste (HW), high-level waste (HLW), low-level mixed waste (LLMW), and transuranic waste (TRUW). Currently projected waste generation rates, storage inventories, and treatment process throughputs have been calculated for each of the waste streams. This report summarizes the accident analyses and aggregates the key results for each of the waste streams. Source terms are estimated and results are presented for each of the major DOE sites and facilities by WM PEIS alternative for each waste stream. The appendices identify the potential atmospheric release of each toxic chemical or radionuclide for each accident scenario studied. They also provide discussion of specific accident analysis data and guidance used or consulted in this report.

  19. SCFA lead lab technical assistance at Oak Ridge Y-12 nationalsecurity complex: Evaluation of treatment and characterizationalternatives of mixed waste soil and debris at disposal area remedialaction DARA solids storage facility (SSF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazen, Terry

    2002-08-26

    On July 17-18, 2002, a technical assistance team from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area (SCFA) met with the Bechtel Jacobs Company Disposal Area Remedial Action (DARA) environmental project leader to review treatment and characterization options for the baseline for the DARA Solids Storage Facility (SSF). The technical assistance request sought suggestions from SCFA's team of technical experts with experience and expertise in soil treatment and characterization to identify and evaluate (1) alternative treatment technologies for DARA soils and debris, and (2) options for analysis of organic constituents in soil with matrix interference. Based on the recommendations, the site may also require assistance in identifying and evaluating appropriate commercial vendors.

  20. Safety assessment document for spent fuel handling, packaging, and storage demonstrations at the E-MAD facility on the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives for spent fuel handling and packaging demonstration are to develop the capability to satisfactorily encapsulate typical commercial nuclear reactor spent fuel assemblies and to establish the suitability of interim dry surface and near surface storage concepts. To accomplish these objectives, spent fuel assemblies from a pressurized water reactor have been received, encapsulated in steel canisters, and emplaced in on-site storage facilities and subjected to other tests. As an essential element of these demonstrations, a thorough safety assessment of the demonstration activities conducted at the E-MAD facility has been completed. This document describes the site location and characteristics, the existing E-MAD facility, and the facility modifications and equipment additions made specifically for the demonstrations. The document also summarizes the Quality Assurance Program utilized, and specifies the principal design criteria applicable to the facility modifications, equipment additions, and process operations. Evaluations have been made of the radiological impacts of normal operations, abnormal operations, and postulated accidents. Analyses have been performed to determine the affects on nuclear criticality safety of postulated accidents and credible natural phenomena. The consequences of postulated accidents resulting in fission product gas release have also been estimated. This document identifies the engineered safety features, procedures, and site characteristics that (1) prevent the occurrence of potential accidents or (2) assure that the consequences of postulated accidents are either insignificant or adequately mitigated

  1. Analysis of accident sequences and source terms at waste treatment and storage facilities for waste generated by U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Operations, Volume 3: Appendixes C-H

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.; Roglans-Ribas, J. [and others

    1995-04-01

    This report contains the Appendices for the Analysis of Accident Sequences and Source Terms at Waste Treatment and Storage Facilities for Waste Generated by the U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Operations. The main report documents the methodology, computational framework, and results of facility accident analyses performed as a part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The accident sequences potentially important to human health risk are specified, their frequencies are assessed, and the resultant radiological and chemical source terms are evaluated. A personal computer-based computational framework and database have been developed that provide these results as input to the WM PEIS for calculation of human health risk impacts. This report summarizes the accident analyses and aggregates the key results for each of the waste streams. Source terms are estimated and results are presented for each of the major DOE sites and facilities by WM PEIS alternative for each waste stream. The appendices identify the potential atmospheric release of each toxic chemical or radionuclide for each accident scenario studied. They also provide discussion of specific accident analysis data and guidance used or consulted in this report.

  2. Analysis of accident sequences and source terms at waste treatment and storage facilities for waste generated by U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Operations, Volume 3: Appendixes C-H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains the Appendices for the Analysis of Accident Sequences and Source Terms at Waste Treatment and Storage Facilities for Waste Generated by the U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Operations. The main report documents the methodology, computational framework, and results of facility accident analyses performed as a part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The accident sequences potentially important to human health risk are specified, their frequencies are assessed, and the resultant radiological and chemical source terms are evaluated. A personal computer-based computational framework and database have been developed that provide these results as input to the WM PEIS for calculation of human health risk impacts. This report summarizes the accident analyses and aggregates the key results for each of the waste streams. Source terms are estimated and results are presented for each of the major DOE sites and facilities by WM PEIS alternative for each waste stream. The appendices identify the potential atmospheric release of each toxic chemical or radionuclide for each accident scenario studied. They also provide discussion of specific accident analysis data and guidance used or consulted in this report

  3. Decommissioning alternatives for the West Valley, New York, Fuel Reprocessing Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munson, L F; Nemec, J F; Koochi, A K

    1978-06-01

    The methodology and numerical values of NUREG-0278 were applied to four decommissioning alternatives for the West Valley Fuel Reprocessing Plant. The cost and impacts of the following four alternatives for the process building, fuel receiving and storage, waste tank farm, and auxiliary facilities were assessed: (1) layaway, (2) protective storage, (3) preparation for alternate nuclear use, and (4) dismantlement. The estimated costs are 5.7, 11, 19, and 31 million dollars, respectively. (DLC)

  4. Decommissioning alternatives for the West Valley, New York, Fuel Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The methodology and numerical values of NUREG-0278 were applied to four decommissioning alternatives for the West Valley Fuel Reprocessing Plant. The cost and impacts of the following four alternatives for the process building, fuel receiving and storage, waste tank farm, and auxiliary facilities were assessed: (1) layaway, (2) protective storage, (3) preparation for alternate nuclear use, and (4) dismantlement. The estimated costs are 5.7, 11, 19, and 31 million dollars, respectively

  5. Record of discussions in full wording: Hearing on the Ahaus storage facility for spent-fuel transport containers, June 21-29, 1983. Hearing concerning a project of the Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Wiederaufarbeitung von Kernbrennstoffen mbH, Hannover, and STEAG Kernenergie GmbH, Essen, to establish a long-term storage facility for spent-fuel transport containers in Ahaus, Landkreis Borken, Nordrhein-Westfalen. Pt. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This third part of the record of the Ahaus Hearing presents the full wording of the discussions and statements concerning the topics of radiation protection and protection of the environment during operation of the planned facility. The problems considered can be summarized under the following keynotes: Wastes, effluents, environmental monitoring, radiological protection of workers, micro-climate, accidents and their impacts on the environment, site selection, development trends, physical protection, emergency service. The final debates are concerned with the radwaste disposal and management concept of the Federal German Government, with alternative methods or techniques for waste storage, and with the transport of radwaste. The hearing was organized by the PTB in its capacity as a licensing authority under atomic energy law, and this organisation will be responsible of examining and evaluating the objections stated with a view to the requirements set by section 6 of the Atomic Energy Act. (HSCH)

  6. Ageing management program for the Spanish low and intermediate level waste disposal and spent fuel and high-level waste centralised storage facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Andrade C.; Ordoñez M.; Zuloaga P.; Castellote M.

    2011-01-01

    The generic design of the centralised spent fuel storage facility was approved by the Spanish Safety Authority in 2006. The planned operational life is 60 years, while the design service life is 100 years. Durability studies and surveillance of the behaviour have been considered from the initial design steps, taking into account the accessibility limitations and temperatures involved. The paper presents an overview of the ageing management program set in support of the Performance Assessment ...

  7. ICPP calcined solids storage facility closure study. Volume II: Cost estimates, planning schedules, yearly cost flowcharts, and life-cycle cost estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document contains Volume II of the Closure Study for the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant Calcined Solids Storage Facility. This volume contains draft information on cost estimates, planning schedules, yearly cost flowcharts, and life-cycle costs for the four options described in Volume I: (1) Risk-Based Clean Closure; NRC Class C fill, (2) Risk-Based Clean Closure; Clean fill, (3) Closure to landfill Standards; NRC Class C fill, and (4) Closure to Landfill Standards; Clean fill

  8. Environmental assessment: Solid waste retrieval complex, enhanced radioactive and mixed waste storage facility, infrastructure upgrades, and central waste support complex, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) needs to take action to: retrieve transuranic (TRU) waste because interim storage waste containers have exceeded their 20-year design life and could fail causing a radioactive release to the environment provide storage capacity for retrieved and newly generated TRU, Greater-than-Category 3 (GTC3), and mixed waste before treatment and/or shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Project (WIPP); and upgrade the infrastructure network in the 200 West Area to enhance operational efficiencies and reduce the cost of operating the Solid Waste Operations Complex. This proposed action would initiate the retrieval activities (Retrieval) from Trench 4C-T04 in the 200 West Area including the construction of support facilities necessary to carry out the retrieval operations. In addition, the proposed action includes the construction and operation of a facility (Enhanced Radioactive Mixed Waste Storage Facility) in the 200 West Area to store newly generated and the retrieved waste while it awaits shipment to a final disposal site. Also, Infrastructure Upgrades and a Central Waste Support Complex are necessary to support the Hanford Site's centralized waste management area in the 200 West Area. The proposed action also includes mitigation for the loss of priority shrub-steppe habitat resulting from construction. The estimated total cost of the proposed action is $66 million

  9. Seasonal thermal energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, R.D.; Kannberg, L.D.; Raymond, J.R.

    1984-05-01

    This report describes the following: (1) the US Department of Energy Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program, (2) aquifer thermal energy storage technology, (3) alternative STES technology, (4) foreign studies in seasonal thermal energy storage, and (5) economic assessment.

  10. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power: report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume II. Proliferation resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    Volume II assesses proliferation resistance. Chapters are devoted to: assessment of civilian nuclear systems (once-through fuel-cycle systems, closed fuel cycle systems, research reactors and critical facilities); assessment of associated sensitive materials and facilities (enrichment, problems with storage of spent fuel and plutonium content, and reprocessing and refabrication facilities); and safeguards for alternative fuel cycles.

  11. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power: report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume II. Proliferation resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volume II assesses proliferation resistance. Chapters are devoted to: assessment of civilian nuclear systems (once-through fuel-cycle systems, closed fuel cycle systems, research reactors and critical facilities); assessment of associated sensitive materials and facilities (enrichment, problems with storage of spent fuel and plutonium content, and reprocessing and refabrication facilities); and safeguards for alternative fuel cycles

  12. Hazardous Material Storage Facilities and Sites - WASTE_DISPOSAL_STORAGE_HANDLING_IDEM_IN: Waste Site Locations for Disposal, Storage and Handling of Solid Waste and Hazardous Waste in Indiana (Indiana Department of Environmental Management, Point Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — WASTE_DISPOSAL_STORAGE_HANDLING_IDEM_IN is a point shapefile that contains waste site locations for the disposal, storage, and handling of solid and hazardous waste...

  13. Assessment of Hydro-Mechanical Behavior of a Granite Rock Mass for a Pilot Underground Crude Oil Storage Facility in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhechao; Li, Shucai; Qiao, Liping

    2015-11-01

    The hydro-mechanical behavior of a pilot underground crude oil storage facility in a granite host rock in China was analyzed using the finite element method (FEM). Characterization of hydro-mechanical behavior of the rock mass was performed using laboratory test, field monitoring, back analysis of field measurements and permeability tests. FEM numerical analyses were used to assess the hydro-mechanical behavior of the granite to study several design and construction issues. The containment properties of the storage facility were investigated without and with the water curtain system. Results showed that the stored oil would leak into rock mass if a water curtain system is not provided, whereas the containment property of the facility will be maintained when a water curtain system is in place. On the influence of cavern excavation sequence, it was indicated that the excavation of the caverns from left to right is a better choice than right to left for the containment property of the facility. On the influence of permeable condition, it was found that the extent of plastic zones, horizontal convergence and crown settlement under permeable condition are lower than those under impermeable condition due to the different stress paths in the rock mass experienced during excavation.

  14. The low to intermediate activity and short living waste storage facility. For a controlled management of radioactive wastes; Le centre de stockage des dechets de faible et moyenne activite a vie courte. Pour une gestion controlee des dechets radioactifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    Sited at about 50 km of Troyes (France), the Aube facility started in 1992 and has taken over the Manche facility for the surface storage of low to intermediate and short living radioactive wastes. The Aube facility (named CSFMA) is the answer to the safe management of these wastes at the industrial scale and for 50 years onward. This brochure presents the facility specifications, the wastes stored at the center, the surface storage concept, the processing and conditioning of waste packages, and the environmental monitoring performed in the vicinity of the site. (J.S.)

  15. Hazardous Material Storage Facilities and Sites, Reno County and City of Hutchinson Hazardous Materials point and polygon layers for all reported haz mat buildings, Published in 2005, 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, City of Hutchinson.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Hazardous Material Storage Facilities and Sites dataset, published at 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Field Survey/GPS information as...

  16. Strategy for the future use and disposition of Uranium-233: History, inventories, storage facilities, and potential future uses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document provides background information on the man-made radioisotope 233U. It is one of a series of four reports that map out potential national strategies for the future use and disposition of 233U pending action under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The scope of this report is separated 233U, where separated refers to nonwaste 233U or 233U that has been separated from fission products. Information on other 233U, such as that in spent nuclear fuel (SNF), is included only to recognize that it may be separated at a later date and then fall under the scope of this report. The background information in this document includes the historical production and current inventory of 233U, the uses of 233U, and a discussion of the available facilities for storing 233U. The considerations for what fraction of the current inventory should be preserved for future use depend on several issues. First, 233U always contains a small amount of the contaminant isotope 232U. The decay products of 232U are highly radioactive and require special handling. The current inventory has a variety of qualities with regard to 232U content, ranging from 1 to about 200 ppm (on a total uranium basis). It is preferable to use 233U with the minimum amount of 232U in all applications. The second issue pertains to other isotopes of uranium mixed in with the 233U, specifically 235U and 238U. A large portion of the inventory has a high quantity of 235U associated with it. The presence of bulk amounts of 235U complicates storage because of the added volume needing safeguards and criticality controls. Isotopic dilution using DU may remove safeguards and criticality concerns, but it increases the overall mass and may limit applications that depend on the fissile nature of 233U. The third issue concerns the packaging of the material. There is no standard packaging (although one is being developed); consequently, the inventory exists in a variety of packages. For some applications, the

  17. Review Facility Design Drawings M3FT-16LA040105011 - Safeguards and Security by Design for Used Fuel Extended Storage: 1.02.04.01.05 FT – 16LA04010501

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherer, Carolynn P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rauch, Eric Benton [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-04-14

    This work package focuses on developing Best Practices for the design of security for, and domestic safeguarding (e.g. MC&A) of, a pilot-scale independent spent/used fuel storage facility consistent with conceptual design efforts in Nuclear Fuels Storage and Transportation (NFST) and Used Fuel Disposal (UFD) campaigns. This is a review of the basic design of the facility to determine a candidate list of accounting and control requirements that could be considered for safeguards and security purposes.

  18. On tentative decommissioning cost analysis with specific authentic cost calculations with the application of the Omega code on a case linked to the Intermediate storage facility for spent fuel in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasko, Marek; Daniska, Vladimir; Ondra, Frantisek; Bezak, Peter; Kristofova, Kristina; Tatransky, Peter; Zachar, Matej [DECOM Slovakia, spol. s.r.o., J. Bottu 2, SK-917 01 Trnava (Slovakia); Lindskog, Staffan [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2007-03-15

    The presented report is focused on tentative calculations of basic decommissioning parameters such as costs, manpower and exposure of personnel for activities of older nuclear facility decommissioning in Sweden represented by Intermediate storage facility for spent fuel in Studsvik, by means of calculation code OMEGA. This report continuously follows up two previous projects, which described methodology of cost estimates of decommissioning with an emphasis to derive cost functions for alpha contaminated material and implementation of the advanced decommissioning costing methodology for Intermediate Storage facility for Spent Fuel in Studsvik. The main purpose of the presented study is to demonstrate the trial application of the advanced costing methodology using OMEGA code for Intermediate Storage Facility for Spent Fuel in Studsvik. Basic work packages presented in report are as follows: 1. Analysis and validation input data on Intermediate Storage Facility for Spent Fuel and assemble a database suitable for standardised decommissioning cost calculations including radiological parameters, 2. Proposal of range of decommissioning calculations and define an extent of decommissioning activities, 3. Defining waste management scenarios for particular material waste streams from Intermediate Storage Facility for Spent Fuel, 4. Developing standardised cost calculation structure applied for Intermediate Storage Facility for Spent Fuel decommissioning calculation and 5. Performing tentative decommissioning calculations for Intermediate Storage Facility for Spent Fuel by OMEGA code. Calculated parameters of decommissioning are presented in structure according to Proposed Standardized List of Items for Costing Purposes. All parameters are documented and summed up in both table and graphic forms in text and Annexes. The presented report documents availability and applicability of methodology for evaluation of costs and other parameters of decommissioning in a form implemented

  19. Review Facility Design Drawings M3FT-16LA040105011 - Safeguards and Security by Design for Used Fuel Extended Storage: 1.02.04.01.05 FT - 16LA04010501

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work package focuses on developing Best Practices for the design of security for, and domestic safeguarding (e.g. MC&A) of, a pilot-scale independent spent/used fuel storage facility consistent with conceptual design efforts in Nuclear Fuels Storage and Transportation (NFST) and Used Fuel Disposal (UFD) campaigns. This is a review of the basic design of the facility to determine a candidate list of accounting and control requirements that could be considered for safeguards and security purposes.

  20. Preliminary report on the scientific and biodiversity value of the Macal and Raspaculo catchment, Belize : a wildlife impact assessment for the proposed Macal River Upper Storage Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minty, C.D. [Natural History Museum, London (United Kingdom); Sutton, D.A.; Rogers, A.D.F.; Bateman, R.M.; Penn, M.; Stafford, P.J.; Sanders, L.M. (eds.)

    2001-05-01

    The Natural Museum of History in London conducted a wildlife impact assessment of the proposed Macal River Upper Storage Facility (MRUSF) in Belize, Central America. The area contains a rare and discrete floral floodplain habitat (riparian shrubland) which acts as a conduit and critical habitat for resident and non-resident fauna and avifauna. In addition, the entire profile of the floodplain habitat of the watershed is important to the sustenance and population viability of a unique Scarlet Macaw subspecies, providing the last remaining habitat for a small population of about 60 to 100 individual birds. Other species have also been identified as regionally, nationally or globally significant. The proposed Chalillo Dam would be constructed on the Macal River Valley, approximately 5 km upstream from Guacamallo Bridge. If the project goes ahead, much of the area will be permanently flooded. The reservoir would flood up to an elevation of 400 m above the mean sea level. This report presented three options. The first option is not to build the Chalillo dam. This would leave the natural riparian habitat biologically rich and ecologically functional. The second option is to choose an alternative site, such as damming one or more of the many tributaries in the Mountain Pine Ridge. The third option is to proceed as planned, but it has been made clear that it will not be possible to mitigate against the long-term impacts on the biodiversity of the catchment, particularly those associated with habitat loss. The MRUSF is likely to cause 80 per cent of the riparian shrubland to be lost and numerous individual animals to die. In addition, it was predicted that the impacts of the project will be much greater in the surrounding areas, reaching much beyond the localized area of the dam and its impoundment. The most obvious option to avoid profound impacts is to not construct the dam. It was emphasized that this option should be seriously considered, particularly if costs outweigh

  1. Facile template-directed synthesis of carbon-coated SnO{sub 2} nanotubes with enhanced Li-storage capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xiaoshu; Zhu, Jingyi; Yao, Yinan; Zhou, Yiming; Tang, Yawen; Wu, Ping, E-mail: zjuwuping@njnu.edu.cn

    2015-08-01

    Herein, a novel type of carbon-coated SnO{sub 2} nanotubes has been designed and synthesized through a facile two-step hydrothermal approach by using ZnO nanorods as templates. During the synthetic route, SnO{sub 2} nanocrystals and carbon layer have been uniformly deposited on the rod-like templates in sequence, meanwhile ZnO nanorods could be in situ dissolved owing to the generated alkaline and acidic environments during hydrothermal coating of SnO{sub 2} nanocrystals and hydrothermal carbonization of glucose, respectively. When utilized as an anode material in lithium-ion batteries, the carbon-coated SnO{sub 2} nanotubes manifests markedly enhanced Li-storage capabilities in terms of specific capacity and cycling stability in comparison with bare SnO{sub 2} nanocrystals. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • C-coated SnO{sub 2} nanotubes prepared via facile ZnO-nanorod-templated hydrothermal route. • Unique morphological and structural features toward lithium storage. • Enhanced Li-storage performance in terms of specific capacity and cycling stability.

  2. Finding of no significant impact. Consolidation and interim storage of special nuclear material at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA -- 1060, for the consolidation, processing, and interim storage of Category I and II special nuclear material (SNM) in Building 371 at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (hereinafter referred to as Rocky Flats or Site), Golden, Colorado. The scope of the EA included alternatives for interim storage including the no action alternative, the construction of a new facility for interim storage at Rocky Flats, and shipment to other DOE facilities for interim storage

  3. Finding of no significant impact. Consolidation and interim storage of special nuclear material at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA -- 1060, for the consolidation, processing, and interim storage of Category I and II special nuclear material (SNM) in Building 371 at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (hereinafter referred to as Rocky Flats or Site), Golden, Colorado. The scope of the EA included alternatives for interim storage including the no action alternative, the construction of a new facility for interim storage at Rocky Flats, and shipment to other DOE facilities for interim storage.

  4. Analysis of accident sequences and source terms at treatment and storage facilities for waste generated by US Department of Energy waste management operations. Volume 1: Sections 1-9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents the methodology, computational framework, and results of facility accident analyses performed for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The accident sequences potentially important to human health risk are specified, their frequencies assessed, and the resultant radiological and chemical source terms evaluated. A personal-computer-based computational framework and database have been developed that provide these results as input to the WM PEIS for the calculation of human health risk impacts. The WM PEIS addresses management of five waste streams in the DOE complex: low-level waste (LLW), hazardous waste (HW), high-level waste (HLW), low-level mixed waste (LLMW), and transuranic waste (TRUW). Currently projected waste generation rates, storage inventories, and treatment process throughputs have been calculated for each of the waste streams. This report summarizes the accident analyses and aggregates the key results for each of the waste streams. Source terms are estimated, and results are presented for each of the major DOE sites and facilities by WM PEIS alternative for each waste stream. Key assumptions in the development of the source terms are identified. The appendices identify the potential atmospheric release of each toxic chemical or radionuclide for each accident scenario studied. They also discuss specific accident analysis data and guidance used or consulted in this report

  5. Testing Low-Energy, High-Power Energy Storage Alternatives in a Full-Hybrid Vehicle (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cosgrove, J.; Gonger, J.

    2014-01-01

    Automakers have been mass producing hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) for well over a decade, and the technology has proven to be very effective at reducing per-vehicle gasoline use. However, the battery cost in HEVs contribute to higher incremental cost of HEVs (a few thousand dollars) than the cost of comparable conventional vehicles, which has limited HEV market penetration. Significant cost reductions/performance improvements to the energy storage system (ESS) can improve the vehicle-level cost vs. benefit relationship for HEVs. Such an improvement could lead to larger HEV market penetration and greater aggregate gasoline savings. After significant analysis by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the United States Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC) and Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Storage program suggested a new set of requirements for ESS for power-assist HEVs for cost reduction without impacting performance and fuel economy significantly. With support from DOE, NREL has developed an HEV test platform for in-vehicle performance and fuel economy validation testing of the hybrid system using such LEESS devices. This poster will describe development of the LEESS HEV test platform, and LEESS laboratory as well as in-vehicle evaluation results. The first LEESS technology tested was lithium-ion capacitors (LICs) - i.e., asymmetric electrochemical energy storage devices possessing one electrode with battery-type characteristics (lithiated graphite) and one with ultracapacitor-type characteristics (carbon). We will discuss the performance and fuel saving results with LIC with comparison with original NiMH battery.

  6. Underfloor pumped storage power plants in facilities of coal mining; Unterflur-Pumpspeicherwerke in Anlagen des Steinkohlebergbaus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perau, Eugen; Schreiber, Ulrich [Duisburg-Essen Univ., Essen (Germany). Fachgebiet Geotechnik; Niemann, Andre [Duisburg-Essen Univ., Essen (Germany). Inst. fuer Wasserbau und Wasserwirtschaft; Koch, Marco K. [Bochum Univ. (Germany)

    2012-11-01

    The energy policy turnaround involves a variety of urgent issues. To date, the production of energy is dominated by conventional power plants. Previously the renewable energy only serves to supplement the energy supply from conventional power plants. The desire for an always available and sufficient energy supply requires the need for energy storage in order to avoid fluctuations in energy loss. From this perspective, the authors of the contribution under consideration report on underfloor pumped storage plants in the coal industry.

  7. Criticality analyses of the used and spent fuel storage facility of the 400 MWth PBMR plant / Anand Kaisavelu

    OpenAIRE

    Kaisavelu, Anand

    2009-01-01

    The development of the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor entails the design of numerous systems for various purposes. One such system of significant importance is the Sphere Storage System (a subsystem of the Fuel Handling and Storage system) where fuel spheres that are unloaded from the core will be stored until approximately eighty years after the power plant has been decommissioned. Over and above the normal conventional safety analyses that one expects to be performed for ...

  8. The Masdar Institute solar platform: A new research facility in the UAE for development of CSP components and thermal energy storage systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvet, Nicolas; Martins, Mathieu; Grange, Benjamin; Perez, Victor G.; Belasri, Djawed; Ali, Muhammad T.; Armstrong, Peter R.

    2016-05-01

    Masdar Institute established a new solar platform dedicated to research and development of concentrated solar power (CSP), and thermal energy storage systems. The facility includes among others, state of the art solar resource assessment apparatuses, a 100 kW beam down CSP plant that has been adapted to research activity, one independent 100 kW hot-oil loop, and new thermal energy storage systems. The objective of this platform is to develop cost efficient CSP solutions, promote and test these technologies in extreme desert conditions, and finally develop local expertise. The purpose of this paper is not to present experimental results, but more to give a general overview of the different capabilities of the Masdar Institute Solar Platform.

  9. Thermal analysis of the unloading cell of the Spanish centralized interim storage facility (CISF); Analisis termico de la celda de desarga del almacen temporal centralizado (ATC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez Dominguez, J. R.; Perez Vara, R.; Huelamo Martinez, E.

    2016-08-01

    This article deals with the thermal analysis performed for the Untoading Cell of Spain Centralized Interim Storage Facility, CISF (ATC, in Spanish). The analyses are done using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation, with the aim of obtaining the air flow required to remove the residual heat of the elements stored in the cell. Compliance with the admissible heat limits is checked with the results obtained in the various operation and accident modes. The calculation model is flexible enough to allow carrying out a number of sensitivity analyses with the different parameters involved in the process. (Author)

  10. 论油气储运设施安全的重要性%On the Importance of safety of oil & gas storage and transportation facilities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱建华

    2012-01-01

    油气储运设施是连接石油工业产、运、销各环节的纽带,其安全重要性日益凸显.介绍了油气储存和运输设施的分类依据及主要类型;从储运介质的易燃易爆和毒害性、油气储运设施易构成重大危险源两个方面论述了油气储运设施安全的重要性;通过总结近年发生的大连"7.16"爆炸事故、大型储罐火灾事故及油气管道泄漏事故的教训,指出第三方破坏是导致管道发生泄漏事故的主要原因,而打孔盗油又是其中的重要因素:提出了在工程立项、设计、施工及运行管理的各个阶段加强安全管理的具体措施.%Facilities in the field of oil & gas storage and transportation is a link to connect production, transportation and marketing of petroleum industry, and its significant has become more and more obvious. This paper introduces the classification basis and main types of oil & gas storage and transportation facilities and discusses the importance of safety in oil & gas storage and transportation facilities from two aspects, that is, flammable, explosive and poisonous for the medium stored and transported, and the dangerous source formed easily from the facilities of oil & gas storage and transportation. Lessons from research and investigation on the 7.16 Explosion of Dalian Oil tankfarm, fires of large-scale tanks and leakage of oil and gas pipelines in recent years reveal that the third-party damage is the main reason of leakage of pipelines, in which oil stealing is an important factor. Based on the results, special measures in strengthening safety management in different phases of project approval, design, construction and operation management are proposed.

  11. Expertise on the request of the Paul Scherrer Institute for a modification to the operational licence for the Federal Intermediate Storage Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Federal Intermediate Storage Facility (BZL) was built in 1987 at the site of the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). It serves as an intermediate storage facility for radioactive wastes from medicine, industry and research. At that time, PSI had only little knowledge on the future needs concerning the quantity, the activity and the type of radioactive wastes which would be produced in the following years. This is the reason why, under the current operation licence, only the storage of conditioned 200 litre casks, as well as unconditioned large components removed from the PSI's own nuclear facilities, was possible in the BZL. Moreover, the activity inventory of the wastes stored until now is only slightly below the maximal allowed limit. In order to increase the flexibility for waste treatment and to allow the optimal use of the BZL, PSI has reviewed the concept for the permitted storage of waste casks. The purpose is to increase the number of types of casks that can be stored and to eliminate the limitation on the activity levels of the wastes. With this in mind, PSI submitted a new safety report to the Federal Office of Energy and requested a new operational licence. The Federal Agency for the Safety of Nuclear Installations (HSK) reviewed the safety report in order to check the safety of the modified facility, especially for the source term, the doses to be expected after an aircraft crash, damage following an earthquake, as well as some documents concerning fire protection. HSK evaluates the probability of occurrence of a fire in the storage facility as higher than 10-4/a, such that fire-protection measures have to be taken, especially in the case of fire on a vehicle in the shipment transfer hall. The activity inventory is archived in the Information System for Radioactive Materials (ISRAM); it contains data on the activity inventory for each nuclide in every storage cask. Even if increased by a factor of 100 relative to the former BZL, the dose due to tritium

  12. ENIAK. Development of a non-motor injector coking test facility for alternative fuels; ENIAK. Entwicklung eines nichtmotorischen Injektorverkokungspruefstands fuer alternative Kraftstoffe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, Hajo; Schloss, Heide vom; Yang, Zhi; Grote, Melanie [OWI Oel-Waerme-Institut GmbH, Aachen (Germany). Gruppe Anwendungstechnik

    2013-10-01

    Poor Biodiesel quality, contamination with copper and zinc as well as undesired reactions between (several) additives and biodiesel components are known causes for nozzle fouling. Therefore, among other things, all additives have to pass a no-harm test. The standard fouling tests are two engine tests: the XUD9-test (CEC F-23-01) and the DW-10-test (CEC DF 98-08). The XUD9 is a cost efficient, fast and proven testing method. It uses, however, an obsolete indirect injection diesel engine. The newer DW10 test is complex, costly and designed for high stress. This reduces the engine life and leads to a fuel consumption of approximately 1,000 l per test, both contributing to the high costs of the test. The main goal of the project ENIAK is the development, assembly, commissioning, and evaluation of a non-engine fuel injector test. It uses four complete common rail systems. The injection takes place in four self-designed reactors instead of an engine, and the fuel is not combusted, but re-condensed and pumped in a circle. If the test method proves to be as reliable as expected, it can be used as an alternative test method for injector fouling with low requirements regarding infrastructure on the testing site and sample volume. The project is funded by the the federal ministry of consumer protection, food and agriculture via FNR (''Fachagentur Nachwachsende Rohstoffe'', Agency for Renewable Resources). (orig.)

  13. Comparison of different undulator schemes with superimposed alternating gradients for the VUV-FEL at the TESLA Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pflueger, J.; Nikitina, Y.M. [DESY/HASYLAB, Hamburg (Germany)

    1995-12-31

    For the VUV-FEL at the TESLA Test Facility an undulator with a total length of 30 m is needed. In this study three different approaches to realize an undulator with a sinusoidal plus a superimposed quadrupolar field were studied with the 3D code MAFIA.

  14. Interim Storage of RH-TRU 72B Canisters at the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes an evaluation performed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) office for potential interim storage of remote-handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) 72B waste canisters at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The evaluation included the conceptual design of a devoted canister storage facility and an assessment of the existing RHTRU waste storage facilities for storage of canisters. The concept for the devoted facility used modular concrete silos located on an above-grade storage pad. The assessment of the existing facilities considered the potential methods, facility modifications, and conceptual equipment that might be used for storage of 400 millisievert per hour (mSv/hr) canisters. The results of the evaluation indicated that the initial investment into a devoted facility was relatively high as compared to the certainty that significant storage capacity was necessary prior to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) accepting RH-TRU waste for disposal. As an alternative, the use of individual concrete overpacks provided an incremental method that could be used with the existing storage facilities and outside storage pads. For the concrete overpack concepts considered, the cylindrical design stored in a vertical orientation was determined to be the most effective

  15. Neutronic characterization and decay heat calculations in the in-vessel fuel storage facilities for MYRRHA/FASTEF

    OpenAIRE

    Di Maria, S.; Ottolini, M.; Malambu Mbala, E.; Sarotto, M.; Castelliti, D.

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of the Central Design Team (CDT) project is to establish an engineering design of a Fast Spectrum Transmutation Experimental Facility (FASTEF) that is the pilot plant of an experimental-scale of both an Accelerator Driven System (ADS) and a Lead Fast Reactor (LFR), based on the MYRRHA reactor concept, planned to be built during the next decade. The MYRRHA reactor concept is devoted to be a multi-purpose irradiation facility aimed at demonstrating the efficient transmutation...

  16. Final work plan : phase II investigation of potential contamination at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Savannah, Missouri.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2010-08-16

    From approximately 1949 until 1970, the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) operated a grain storage facility on federally owned property approximately 0.25 mi northwest of Savannah, Missouri (Figure 1.1). During this time, commercial grain fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were commonly used by the CCC/USDA and the private grain storage industry to preserve grain in their facilities. In November 1998, carbon tetrachloride was detected in a private well (Morgan) roughly 50 ft south of the former CCC/USDA facility, as a result of statewide screening of private wells near former CCC/USDA facilities, conducted in Missouri by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1999). The 1998 and subsequent investigations by the EPA and the Missouri Department of Natural Resources (MoDNR) confirmed the presence of carbon tetrachloride in the Morgan well, as well as in a second well (on property currently occupied by the Missouri Department of Transportation [MoDOT]) described as being approximately 400 ft east of the former CCC/USDA facility. The identified concentrations in these two wells were above the EPA maximum contaminant level (MCL) and the Missouri risk-based corrective action default target level (MRBCA DTL) values of 5.0 {micro}g/L for carbon tetrachloride in water used for domestic purposes (EPA 1999; MoDNR 2000a,b, 2006). Because the observed contamination in the Morgan and MoDOT wells might be linked to the past use of carbon tetrachloride-based fumigants at its former grain storage facility, the CCC/USDA is conducting an investigation to (1) characterize the source(s), extent, and factors controlling the subsurface distribution and movement of carbon tetrachloride at Savannah and (2) evaluate the potential risks to human health, public welfare, and the environment posed by the contamination. This work is being performed in accord with the Intergovernmental Agreement established between the Farm Service Agency

  17. Alternative energies; Energies alternatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonal, J.; Rossetti, P

    2007-07-01

    The earth took millions years to made the petroleum, the gas the coal and the uranium. Only a few centuries will be needed to exhaust these fossil fuels and some years to reach expensive prices. Will the wold continue on this way of energy compulsive consumption? The renewable energies and some citizen attitudes are sufficient to break this spiral. This book proposes to discuss these alternative energies. It shows that this attitude must be supported by the government. It takes stock on the more recent information concerning the renewable energies. it develops three main points: the electricity storage, the housing and the transports. (A.L.B.)

  18. Evaluation of Alternative Control for Prevention and or Mitigation of HEPA Filter Failure Accidents at Tank Farm Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study evaluates the adequacy and benefit of use of HEPA filter differential pressure limiting setpoints to initiate exhauster shut down as an alternative safety control for postulated accidents that might result in filtration failure and subsequent unfiltered release from Tank Farm primary tank ventilators

  19. Compressed air energy storage: Preliminary design and site development program in an aquifer. Task 1: Establish facility design criteria and utility benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-10-01

    Compressed air energy storage (CAES) stores mechanical energy in the form of compressed air during off-peak hours, using power supplied by a large, high efficiency baseload power plant. At times of high electrical demand, the compressed air is drawn from storage and is heated in a combustor by the burning of fuel oil, after which the air is expanded in a turbine. Essentially all of the turbine output can be applied to the generation of electricity, unlike a conventional gas turbine which expends approximately two-thirds of the turbine shaft power in driving the air compressor. The separation of the compression and generation modes in the system results in increased net generation and greater premium fuel economy. Work performed in establishing facility design criteria for a CAES system with aquifer storage includes: determination of initial design bases; preliminary analysis of the CAES system; development of data for site-specific analysis of the CAES system; detailed analysis of the CAES system for three selected heat cycles; CAES power plant design; and an economic analysis of CAES.

  20. Final work plan : Phase I investigation of potential contamination at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Savannah, Missouri.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-10-12

    From approximately 1949 until 1970, the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) operated a grain storage facility on federally owned property approximately 0.25 mi northwest of Savannah, Missouri. During this time, commercial grain fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were commonly used by the CCC/USDA and the private grain storage industry to preserve grain in their facilities. In November 1998, carbon tetrachloride was detected in a private well (Morgan) roughly 50 ft south of the former CCC/USDA facility, as a result of state-wide screening of private wells near former CCC/USDA facilities, conducted in Missouri by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1999). The 1998 and subsequent investigations by the EPA and the Missouri Department of Natural Resources (MoDNR) confirmed the presence of carbon tetrachloride in the Morgan well, as well as in a second well (on property currently occupied by the Missouri Department of Transportation [MoDOT]), approximately 400 ft east of the former CCC/USDA facility. Carbon tetrachloride concentrations in the Morgan well have ranged from the initial value of 29 {micro}g/L in 1998, up to a maximum of 61 {micro}g/L in 1999, and back down to 22 {micro}g/L in 2005. The carbon tetrachloride concentration in the MoDOT well in 2000 (the only time it was sampled) was 321 {micro}g/L. The concentrations for the two wells are above the EPA maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 5 {micro}g/L for carbon tetrachloride (EPA 1999; MoDNR 2000a,b). Because the observed contamination in the Morgan and MoDOT wells might be linked to the past use of carbon tetrachloride-based grain fumigants at its former grain storage facility, the CCC/USDA will conduct investigations to (1) characterize the source(s), extent, and factors controlling the subsurface distribution and movement of carbon tetrachloride at Savannah and (2) evaluate the health and environmental threats potentially posed by the contamination

  1. Final work plan : phase I investigation of potential contamination at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Montgomery City, Missouri.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2010-08-16

    From September 1949 until September 1966, the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) leased property at the southeastern end of Montgomery City, Missouri, for the operation of a grain storage facility. During this time, commercial grain fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were commonly used by the CCC/USDA and the private grain storage industry to preserve grain in their facilities. In January 2000, carbon tetrachloride was detected in a soil sample (220 {micro}g/kg) and two soil gas samples (58 {micro}g/m{sup 3} and 550 {micro}g/m{sup 3}) collected at the former CCC/USDA facility, as a result of a pre-CERCLIS site screening investigation (SSI) performed by TN & Associates, Inc., on behalf of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region VII (MoDNR 2001). In June 2001, the Missouri Department of Natural Resources (MoDNR) conducted further sampling of the soils and groundwater at the former CCC/USDA facility as part of a preliminary assessment/site inspection (PA/SI). The MoDNR confirmed the presence of carbon tetrachloride (at a maximum identified concentration of 2,810 {micro}g/kg) and chloroform (maximum 82 {micro}g/kg) in the soils and also detected carbon tetrachloride and chloroform (42.2 {micro}g/L and 58.4 {micro}g/L, respectively) in a groundwater sample collected at the former facility (MoDNR 2001). The carbon tetrachloride levels identified in the soils and groundwater are above the default target level (DTL) values established by the MoDNR for this contaminant in soils of all types (79.6 {micro}g/kg) and in groundwater (5.0 {micro}g/L), as outlined in Missouri Risk-Based Corrective Action (MRBCA): Departmental Technical Guidance (MoDNR 2006a). The corresponding MRBCA DTL values for chloroform are 76.6 {micro}g/kg in soils of all types and 80 {micro}g/L in groundwater. Because the observed contamination at Montgomery City might be linked to the past use of carbon tetrachloride-based fumigants at its

  2. Electric power supply 2. Energy industry and climate protection, electricity industry, deregulation, power plant technology and alternative power supply strategies, chemical energy storage. 3. rev. ed.; Elektrische Energieversorgung 2. Energiewirtschaft und Klimaschutz, Elektrizitaetswirtschaft, Liberalisierung, Kraftwerktechnik und alternative Stromversorgung, chemische Energiespeicherung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crastan, Valentin

    2012-07-01

    The third edition of this comprehensive textbook and reference manual for students and engineers of electrical energy engineering contains many enhancements and additional information, so that the former volume 2 was split up into volume 2 and 3. All three volumes combine theoretical fundamentals of electric power supply with direct practical information. They support understanding and training by means of exercises, examples, and simulations. The authors have long years of experience in energy supply and also in teaching as university professors. The third edition of volume 2 discusses energy industry and climate protection, electric power supply and deregulation aspects, power plant engineering, alternative power generation technologies, and chemical energy storage. [German] Der zweite Band dieses umfassenden Lehr- und Nachschlagewerkes fuer Studenten und Ingenieure in der elektrischen Energietechnik wurde in dieser dritten Auflage wegen der vielen Erweiterungen in zwei Teile aufgespalten, die fortan als Band 2 und 3 erscheinen. Die drei Baende der ''elektrischen Energieversorgung'' zeichnen sich durch die Synthese von theoretischer Fundierung und unmittelbarem Praxisbezug aus und unterstuetzen das Verstaendnis und den Lernerfolg mit Uebungsaufgaben, Modellbeispielen und Simulationen. Die Autoren schoepfen inhaltlich aus ihrer langjaehrigen Erfahrung auf dem Gebiet der Energieversorgung sowie didaktisch aus ihrer Lehrtaetigkeit als Professoren. Der vorliegende zweite Band behandelt in der dritten Auflage die Themen Energiewirtschaft und Klimaschutz, Elektrizitaetswirtschaft und damit verbundenen Liberalisierungsfragen, Kraftwerktechnik, alternative Stromerzeugung und chemische Energiespeicherung. (orig.)

  3. CSER-98-002: Criticality analysis for the storage of special nuclear material sources and standards in the WRAP facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GOLDBERG, H.J.

    1999-05-18

    The Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility will store uranium and transuranic (TRU) sources and standards for certification that WRAP meets the requirements of the Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). In addition, WRAP must meet internal requirements for testing and validation of measuring instruments for nondestructive assay (NDA). In order to be certified for WIPP, WRAP will participate in the NDA Performance Demonstration Program (PDP). This program is a blind test of the NDA capabilities for TRU waste. It is intended to ensure that the NDA capabilities of this facility satisfy the requirements of the quality assurance program plan for the WIPP. The PDP standards have been provided by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for this program. These standards will be used in the WRAP facility.

  4. Methods for Attribute Measurement and Alternatives to Multiplicity Counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Attribute Measurement System with Information Barrier (AMS/IB) specification is being developed in support of the Defense Threat Reduction Agency's (DTRA's) Cooperative Threat Reduction (CTR) program for the Mayak Fissile Material Storage Facility. This document discusses the technologies available for attribute measurement, and advantages and disadvantages of alternatives

  5. The University of Minnesota aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) field test facility -- system description, aquifer characterization, and results of short-term test cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walton, M.; Hoyer, M.C.; Eisenreich, S.J.; Holm, N.L.; Holm, T.R.; Kanivetsky, R.; Jirsa, M.A.; Lee, H.C.; Lauer, J.L.; Miller, R.T.; Norton, J.L.; Runke, H. (Minnesota Geological Survey, St. Paul, MN (United States))

    1991-06-01

    Phase 1 of the Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) Project at the University of Minnesota was to test the feasibility, and model, the ATES concept at temperatures above 100{degrees}C using a confined aquifer for the storage and recovery of hot water. Phase 1 included design, construction, and operation of a 5-MW thermal input/output field test facility (FTF) for four short-term ATES cycles (8 days each of heat injection, storage, and heat recover). Phase 1 was conducted from May 1980 to December 1983. This report describes the FTF, the Franconia-Ironton-Galesville (FIG) aquifer used for the test, and the four short-term ATES cycles. Heat recovery; operational experience; and thermal, chemical, hydrologic, and geologic effects are all included. The FTF consists of monitoring wells and the source and storage well doublet completed in the FIG aquifer with heat exchangers and a fixed-bed precipitator between the wells of the doublet. The FIG aquifer is highly layered and a really anisotropic. The upper Franconia and Ironton-Galesville parts of the aquifer, those parts screened, have hydraulic conductivities of {approximately}0.6 and {approximately}1.0 m/d, respectively. Primary ions in the ambient ground water are calcium and magnesium bicarbonate. Ambient temperature FIG ground water is saturated with respect to calcium/magnesium bicarbonate. Heating the ground water caused most of the dissolved calcium to precipitate out as calcium carbonate in the heat exchanger and precipitator. Silica, calcium, and magnesium were significantly higher in recovered water than in injected water, suggesting dissolution of some constituents of the aquifer during the cycles. Further work on the ground water chemistry is required to understand water-rock interactions.

  6. Intended long term performances of cementitious engineered barriers for future storage and disposal facilities for radioactive wastes in Romania

    OpenAIRE

    Sociu F.; Georgescu R.; Toma R.; Barariu Gh.; Fako R.

    2013-01-01

    Considering the EU statements, Romania is engaged to endorse in the near future the IAEA relevant publications on geological repository (CNCANa), to update the Medium and Long Term National Strategy for Safe Management of Radioactive Waste and to approve the Road Map for Geological Repository Development. Currently, for example, spent fuel is wet stored for 6 years and after this period it is transported to dry storage in MACSTOR-200 (a concrete monolithic module) where it is intended to rema...

  7. Burden of lysosomal storage disorders in India: experience of 387 affected children from a single diagnostic facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Jayesh; Mistri, Mehul; Sheth, Frenny; Shah, Raju; Bavdekar, Ashish; Godbole, Koumudi; Nanavaty, Nidhish; Datar, Chaitanya; Kamate, Mahesh; Oza, Nrupesh; Ankleshwaria, Chitra; Mehta, Sanjeev; Jackson, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) are considered to be a rare metabolic disease for the national health forum, clinicians, and scientists. This study aimed to know the prevalence of different LSDs, their geographical variation, and burden on the society. It included 1,110 children from January 2002 to December 2012, having coarse facial features, hepatomegaly or hepatosplenomegaly, skeletal dysplasia, neuroregression, leukodystrophy, developmental delay, cerebral-cerebellar atrophy, and abnormal ophthalmic findings. All subjects were screened for I-cell disease, glycolipid storage disorders (Niemann-Pick disease A/B, Gaucher), and mucopolysaccharide disorders followed by confirmatory lysosomal enzymes study from leucocytes and/or fibroblasts. Niemann-Pick disease-C (NPC) was confirmed by fibroblasts study using filipin stain. Various storage disorders were detected in 387 children (34.8 %) with highest prevalence of glycolipid storage disorders in 48 %, followed by mucopolysaccharide disorders in 22 % and defective sulfatide degradation in 14 % of the children. Less common defects were glycogen degradation defect and protein degradation defect in 5 % each, lysosomal trafficking protein defect in 4 %, and transport defect in 3 % of the patients. This study demonstrates higher incidence of Gaucher disease (16 %) followed by GM2 gangliosidosis that includes Tay-Sachs disease (10 %) and Sandhoff disease (7.8 %) and mucopolysaccharide disorders among all LSDs. Nearly 30 % of the affected children were born to consanguineous parents and this was higher (72 %) in children with Batten disease. Our study also demonstrates two common mutations c.1277_1278insTATC in 14.28 % (4/28) and c.964G>T (p.D322Y) in 10.7 % (3/28) for Tay-Sachs disease in addition to the earlier reported c.1385A>T (p.E462V) mutation in 21.42 % (6/28). PMID:23852624

  8. Integrated management of organic wastes for remediation of massive tailings storage facilities under semiarid mediterranean climate type: efficacy of organic pork residues as study case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginocchio, Rosanna; Arellano, Eduardo; España, Helena; Gardeweg, Rosario; Bas, Fernando; Gandarillas, Mónica

    2016-04-01

    Remediation of large surface areas of massive mine wastes, such as tailings storage facilities (TSFs) is challenging, particularly when no topsoils have been stored for the mine closure stage. Worldwide, it has been demonstrated that the use of organic wastes as substrate amendments for remediation of hard rock mine wastes is a useful alternative to topsoils material. In the case of semi-arid climate conditions of north-central Chile, the copper mining industry has generated massive TSF (between 400 ha and 3,000 ha) which needs now to be properly closed according to recently established mine closure regulations. However, in most of the cases, there have been no topsoils savage that facilitate the initial stage of the site remediation. Industrial organic wastes (i.e. biosolids) are found in the area, but their availability is normally below the demand needed for remediation of TSFs and salt content is normally elevated, thus posing salinization risks to the substrate and negative plant growth. We focused on a large organic waste producing industry, the pork industry, whose growth has been restricted due to the limited possibilities for using pig slurries as amendments for croplands in north-central Chile and the strong odor generated, resulting in conflicts with local communities. Incorporation of pig slurries as amendments to post-operative TSFs has been scarcely evaluated at international level (i.e. Spain) and no evaluation at all exists for the solid organic fraction generated from pig slurry treatment plants (PSTP). In the present study, we evaluated the efficacy of both pig slurries (PS) and the solid fraction of PSTP (SF-PSTP) as tailings amendment for creating good plant productivity on TSFs located under semi-arid Mediterranean climate conditions in north-central Chile. A short-term greenhouse study was developed. Copper mine tailings were mixed either with PS (0, 40, 80, and 120 m3 ha-1) or SF-PSTP (0, 25, 50 and 75 t ha-1), distributed in 3 L pots, and

  9. Non-proliferation, safeguards, and security for the fissile materials disposition program immobilization alternatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duggan, R.A.; Jaeger, C.D.; Tolk, K.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Moore, L.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The Department of Energy is analyzing long-term storage and disposition alternatives for surplus weapons-usable fissile materials. A number of different disposition alternatives are being considered. These include facilities for storage, conversion and stabilization of fissile materials, immobilization in glass or ceramic material, fabrication of fissile material into mixed oxide (MOX) fuel for reactors, use of reactor based technologies to convert material into spent fuel, and disposal of fissile material using geologic alternatives. This paper will focus on how the objectives of reducing security and proliferation risks are being considered, and the possible facility impacts. Some of the areas discussed in this paper include: (1) domestic and international safeguards requirements, (2) non-proliferation criteria and measures, (3) the threats, and (4) potential proliferation, safeguards, and security issues and impacts on the facilities. Issues applicable to all of the possible disposition alternatives will be discussed in this paper. However, particular attention is given to the plutonium immobilization alternatives.

  10. Experimental validation of control strategies for a microgrid test facility including a storage system and renewable generation sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baccino, Francesco; Marinelli, Mattia; Silvestro, Federico;

    2012-01-01

    The paper is aimed at describing and validating some control strategies in the SYSLAB experimental test facility characterized by the presence of a low voltage network with a 15 kW-190 kWh Vanadium Redox Flow battery system and a 11 kW wind turbine. The generation set is connected to the local...

  11. Enhanced electrochemical performance of mesoporous NiCo2O4 as an excellent supercapacitive alternative energy storage material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhojane, Prateek; Sen, Somaditya; Shirage, Parasharam M.

    2016-07-01

    Here we report the supercapacitive properties of mesoporous nickel cobalt oxide (NiCo2O4) synthesized by fast, inexpensive and facile chemical bath method, by avoiding high pressure, high temperature and chemical complexity. Physico-chemical characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), Raman Spectra, and nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherm analysis is performed to characterize the electrode material. Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) measurements reveal the surface area 52.86 m2 g-1 and from Barrett-Joyner-Halenda (BJH), typical pores size ranges between 10 and 50 nm, also confirms the mesoporosity. The electrochemical properties are measured by cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and galvanostatic charging/discharging. The synthesized material exhibits remarkably enhanced electrochemical performance with specific capacitance of 1130 F g-1 at 1 mV s-1 sweep rate and 1125 F g-1 at current density of 0.05 A g-1, highest without supporting base like carbon cloth, Ni-foam, Ti- foil used for direct growth (deposition) of electrode material. It is superior to those of its individual and hybrid components prepared by similar technique. Ragone plot shows high specific energy density (49.25 Wh kg-1) and corresponding specific power density (1851.31 W kg-1) even at high current density of 0.5 A g-1.

  12. Liquid Methane Conditioning Capabilities Developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center's Small Multi- Purpose Research Facility (SMiRF) for Accelerated Lunar Surface Storage Thermal Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamberger, Helmut H.; Robinson, R. Craig; Jurns, John M.; Grasl, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    Glenn Research Center s Creek Road Cryogenic Complex, Small Multi-Purpose Research Facility (SMiRF) recently completed validation / checkout testing of a new liquid methane delivery system and liquid methane (LCH4) conditioning system. Facility checkout validation was conducted in preparation for a series of passive thermal control technology tests planned at SMiRF in FY10 using a flight-like propellant tank at simulated thermal environments from 140 to 350K. These tests will validate models and provide high quality data to support consideration of LCH4/LO2 propellant combination option for a lunar or planetary ascent stage.An infrastructure has been put in place which will support testing of large amounts of liquid methane at SMiRF. Extensive modifications were made to the test facility s existing liquid hydrogen system for compatibility with liquid methane. Also, a new liquid methane fluid conditioning system will enable liquid methane to be quickly densified (sub-cooled below normal boiling point) and to be quickly reheated to saturation conditions between 92 and 140 K. Fluid temperatures can be quickly adjusted to compress the overall test duration. A detailed trade study was conducted to determine an appropriate technique to liquid conditioning with regard to the SMiRF facility s existing infrastructure. In addition, a completely new roadable dewar has been procured for transportation and temporary storage of liquid methane. A new spherical, flight-representative tank has also been fabricated for integration into the vacuum chamber at SMiRF. The addition of this system to SMiRF marks the first time a large-scale liquid methane propellant test capability has been realized at Glenn.This work supports the Cryogenic Fluid Management Project being conducted under the auspices of the Exploration Technology Development Program, providing focused cryogenic fluid management technology efforts to support NASA s future robotic or human exploration missions.

  13. Air quality modelling as a tool used in selecting technological alternatives for developing a new abrasive facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu Mihăiescu

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Production of abrasive compounds employs the use of various organic materials as adhesivesor as conditioners. During the baking process, a significant amount of air pollutant substances, includingvarious forms of organic compounds are emitted in the atmosphere. Selecting the most suitabletechnological process is a procedure that involves a cost benefit analysis as well as procedures forcomplying with BAT requirements (best available techniques. Assessing the resulting environmentquality in the vicinity of a new facility is also important, IPPC Directive clearly specifies that a new facilitymust not induce changes of the quality of the environment. This is highly dependent on localmeteorological and topographical conditions. The ISCST3 model was applied to assess the atmosphericdispersions associated with several potential technological designs, and compare their impacts on theenvironment.

  14. 硫磺成型及储运设施的腐蚀状况%Corrosion Status of Sulfur Forming and Storage Facilities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许述剑; 刘小辉; 于艳秋; 汪海波; 王亮; 张晓刚

    2014-01-01

    采用现场检查和实验室微观分析等方法,分析评价了普光高含硫天然气净化厂硫磺成型及储运设施的腐蚀状况。结果表明,硫磺成型及储运系统存在含硫工业大气环境腐蚀、湿硫磺沉积或浸泡水中形成的强酸性环境腐蚀和硫磺料仓内部特定H2 S及硫蒸汽气氛环境的腐蚀。%The corrosion status of sulfur forming and storage facilities in Puguang high sulfur natural gas purification plant were analyzed by field checking and laboratory micro analysis.The results showed that there existed the sulfur conaining industrial atmospheric corrosion,acidic corrosion formed by strong wet sulphur deposition or soak in water and the specific H2 S and S steam atmosphere corrosion in sulfur storage silo interior.

  15. Replacement of neutron absorbers in the spent fuel pool storage facility of the Tihange 3: an ALARA approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The irradiated fuel assemblies placed in the storage racks (pools) subject the Boraflex to an intense gamma flux, which causes degradation of the Boraflex arising from the radiolysis reaction and rupture and rearrangement of the chemical bonds by the gamma rays. The decision was taken to remove the Boraflex from the existing racks and reuse them with a neutron absorber, boron steel or borated stainless steel. Throughout this replacement project, the ALARA principle has been applied in developing tools and choosing methods. Each phase was then re-evaluated in terms of dosimetry cost in order to make improvements that would mean a reduction in the dosimetry of the operation. (A.L.B.)

  16. Functional and operational requirements document : building 1012, Battery and Energy Storage Device Test Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johns, William H.

    2013-11-01

    This report provides an overview of information, prior studies, and analyses relevant to the development of functional and operational requirements for electrochemical testing of batteries and energy storage devices carried out by Sandia Organization 2546, Advanced Power Sources R&D. Electrochemical operations for this group are scheduled to transition from Sandia Building 894 to a new Building located in Sandia TA-II referred to as Building 1012. This report also provides background on select design considerations and identifies the Safety Goals, Stakeholder Objectives, and Design Objectives required by the Sandia Design Team to develop the Performance Criteria necessary to the design of Building 1012. This document recognizes the Architecture-Engineering (A-E) Team as the primary design entity. Where safety considerations are identified, suggestions are provided to provide context for the corresponding operational requirement(s).

  17. ERDA/Lewis research center photovoltaic systems test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forestieri, A. F.; Johnson, J. A.; Knapp, W. D.; Rigo, H.; Stover, J.; Suhay, R.

    1977-01-01

    A national photovoltaic power systems test facility (of initial 10-kW peak power rating) is described. It consists of a solar array to generate electrical power, test-hardware for several alternate methods of power conversion, electrical energy storage systems, and an instrumentation and data acquisition system.

  18. Irradiated fuel storage program in Ontario Hydro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary objective of Ontario Hydro's irradiated fuel storage program is to manage the used fuel discharged from their existing and future nuclear generating stations in a safe and economical manner until it is ready for reprocessing or disposal. While current irradiated fuel handling and storage systems are adequate, some modifications will be required to integrate them with eventual transportation and disposal systems. A secondary objective of the storage program, therefore, is to review and modify existing facilities and to develop future facilities using a total systems approach. Alternate storage concepts are being evaluated as part of a study which looks into the feasibility of storing irradiated fuel for periods greater than 50 years. The main requirements considered for extended storage of irradiated fuel are long-term retrievability, long-lasting structures, and long-term maintainability and control. The basic criteria governing the study are: safety, responsibility, current technology, environmental impact, economics, and public and social acceptability. The extended storage concepts considered are: (1) engineered air- or water-cooled vaults aboveground, near surface, or deep underground; (2) borehole emplacement aboveground, near surface, or deep underground; and (3) concrete canisters aboveground. Technical descriptions of the concepts from which the assessments will be made are now being prepared. So-called hybrid storage systems are also being investigated. The hybrid strategies consider changing from a wet storage system to a dry storage system, relocation from at surface to underground, and/or changing from an active cooling system to a passive cooling system after an initial storage period of 100 to 200 years. The final report, with evaluations of extended storage strategies, is scheduled for completion in early 1981

  19. Assessment of alternatives for long-term management of uranium ore residues and contaminated soils located at DOE's Niagara Falls Storage Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merry-Libby, P.

    1984-11-05

    About 11,000 m/sup 3/ of uranium ore residues and 180,000 m/sup 3/ of wastes (mostly slightly contaminated soils) are consolidated within a diked containment area at the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) located about 30 km north of Buffalo, NY. The residues account for less than 6% of the total volume of contaminated materials but almost 99% of the radioactivty. The average /sup 226/Ra concentration in the residues is 67,000 pCi/g. Several alternatives for long-term management of the wastes and residues are being considered, including: improvement of the containment at NFSS, modification of the form of the residues, management of the residues separately from the wastes, management of the wastes and residues at another humid site (Oak Ridge, TN) or arid site (Hanford, WA), and dispersal of the wastes in the ocean. Potential radiological risks are expected to be smaller than the nonradiological risks of occupational and transportation-related injuries and deaths. Dispersal of the slightly contaminated wastes in the ocean is not expected to result in any significant impacts on the ocean environment or pose any significant radiological risk to humans. It will be necessary to take perpetual care of the near-surface burial sites because the residues and wastes will remain hazardous for thousands of years. If controls cease, the radioactive materials will eventually be dispersed in the environment. Predicted loss of the earthen covers over the buried materials ranges from several hundred to more than two million years, depending primarily on the use of the land surface. Groundwater will eventually be contaminated in all alternatives; however, the groundwater pathway is relatively insignificant with respect to radiological risks to the general population. A person intruding into the residues would incur an extremely high radiation dose.

  20. Assessment of alternatives for long-term management of uranium ore residues and contaminated soils located at DOE's Niagara Falls Storage Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    About 11,000 m3 of uranium ore residues and 180,000 m3 of wastes (mostly slightly contaminated soils) are consolidated within a diked containment area at the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) located about 30 km north of Buffalo, NY. The residues account for less than 6% of the total volume of contaminated materials but almost 99% of the radioactivty. The average 226Ra concentration in the residues is 67,000 pCi/g. Several alternatives for long-term management of the wastes and residues are being considered, including: improvement of the containment at NFSS, modification of the form of the residues, management of the residues separately from the wastes, management of the wastes and residues at another humid site (Oak Ridge, TN) or arid site (Hanford, WA), and dispersal of the wastes in the ocean. Potential radiological risks are expected to be smaller than the nonradiological risks of occupational and transportation-related injuries and deaths. Dispersal of the slightly contaminated wastes in the ocean is not expected to result in any significant impacts on the ocean environment or pose any significant radiological risk to humans. It will be necessary to take perpetual care of the near-surface burial sites because the residues and wastes will remain hazardous for thousands of years. If controls cease, the radioactive materials will eventually be dispersed in the environment. Predicted loss of the earthen covers over the buried materials ranges from several hundred to more than two million years, depending primarily on the use of the land surface. Groundwater will eventually be contaminated in all alternatives; however, the groundwater pathway is relatively insignificant with respect to radiological risks to the general population. A person intruding into the residues would incur an extremely high radiation dose

  1. Facile complex-coprecipitation synthesis of mesoporous Fe3O4 nanocages and their high lithium storage capacity as anode material for lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A facile complex-coprecipitation synthesis of mesoporous Fe3O4 nanocages and their high capacities and excellent cycling performance as anode material for LIBs are reported. - Highlights: • MFONs are synthesized by a facile complex-coprecipitation method. • MFONs with high surface area lead to excellent electrochemical performance. • MFONs anode retains a capacity of 573 mAh g−1 at 1 A g−1 after 300 cycles. - Abstract: In this study, high-quality mesoporous Fe3O4 nanocages (MFONs) have been synthesized by a facile complex-coprecipitation method at 100 °C with addition of triethanolamine and ethylene glycol. The as-prepared Fe3O4 nanocages possess a mesoporous structure and highly uniform dispersion. When used as an anode material for rechargeable lithium-ion batteries, MFONs anode shows high specific capacities and excellent cycling performance at high and low current rates. At a current density of 200 mA g−1, the discharge specific capacities are 876 mAh g−1 at the 2nd cycle and 830 mAh g−1 at the 100th cycle. Even at the high current density of 1000 mA g−1, MFONs anode still retains a stable capacity of 573 mAh g−1 after 300 cycles. This superior electrochemical performance is attributed to the unique mesoporous cage-like structure and high specific surface area (133 m2 g−1) of MFONs, which may offer large electrode/electrolyte contact area for the electron conduction and Li+ storage. Furthermore, the good mechanical flexibility of the mesoporous nanocages can readily buffer the massive volume expansion/shrinkage associated with the reversible electrode reaction. These results indicate that MFONs can be used as a promising high-performance anode material for lithium-ion batteries

  2. Instrumentation report 1: specification, design, calibration, and installation of instrumentation for an experimental, high-level, nuclear waste storage facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Spent Fuel Test-Climax (SFT-C) is being conducted 420 m underground at the Nevada Test Site under the auspices of the US Department of Energy. The test facility houses 11 spent fuel assemblies from an operating commercial nuclear reactor and numerous other thermal sources used to simulate the near-field effects of a large repository. We developed a large-scale instrumentation plan to ensure that a sufficient quality and quantity of data were acquired during the three- to five-year test. These data help satisfy scientific, operational, and radiation safety objectives. Over 800 data channels are being scanned to measure temperature, electrical power, radiation, air flow, dew point, stress, displacement, and equipment operation status (on/off). This document details the criteria, design, specifications, installation, calibration, and current performance of the entire instrumentation package

  3. Preliminary evaluation of 30 potential granitic rock sites for a radioactive waste storage facility in southern Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boardman, C.R.; Knutson, C.F.

    1978-02-15

    Results of preliminary study are presented which was performed under subtask 2.7 of the NTS Terminal Waste Storage Program Plan for 1978. Subtask 2.7 examines the feasibility of locating a nuclear waste repository in a granitic stock or pluton in southern Nevada near the Nevada Test Site (NTS). It is assumed for the purposes of this study that such a repository cannot be located at NTS. This assumption may or may not be correct. This preliminary report does not identify a particular site as being a suitable location for a repository. Nor does it absolutely eliminate a particular site from further consideration. It does, however, answer the basic question of probable suitability of some of the sites and present a systematic method for site evaluation. Since the findings of this initial study have been favorable, it will be followed by more exhaustive and detailed studies of the original 30 sites and perhaps others. In future studies some of the evaluation criteria used in the preliminary study may be modified or eliminated, and new criteria may be introduced.

  4. Preliminary evaluation of 30 potential granitic rock sites for a radioactive waste storage facility in southern Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of preliminary study are presented which was performed under subtask 2.7 of the NTS Terminal Waste Storage Program Plan for 1978. Subtask 2.7 examines the feasibility of locating a nuclear waste repository in a granitic stock or pluton in southern Nevada near the Nevada Test Site (NTS). It is assumed for the purposes of this study that such a repository cannot be located at NTS. This assumption may or may not be correct. This preliminary report does not identify a particular site as being a suitable location for a repository. Nor does it absolutely eliminate a particular site from further consideration. It does, however, answer the basic question of probable suitability of some of the sites and present a systematic method for site evaluation. Since the findings of this initial study have been favorable, it will be followed by more exhaustive and detailed studies of the original 30 sites and perhaps others. In future studies some of the evaluation criteria used in the preliminary study may be modified or eliminated, and new criteria may be introduced

  5. HFIR spent fuel management alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Martin Marietta Energy Systems' Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been unable to ship its spent fuel to Savannah River Site (SRS) for reprocessing since 1985. The HFIR storage pools are expected to fill up in the February 1994 to February 1995 time frame. If a management altemative to existing HFIR pool storage is not identified and implemented before the HFIR pools are full, the HFIR will be forced to shut down. This study investigated several alternatives for managing the HFIR spent fuel, attempting to identify options that could be implemented before the HFIR pools are full. The options investigated were: installing a dedicated dry cask storage facility at ORNL, increasing HFIR pool storage capacity by clearing the HFIR pools of debris and either close-packing or stacking the spent fuel elements, storing the spent fuel at another ORNL pool, storing the spent fuel in one or more hot cells at ORNL, and shipping the spent fuel offsite for reprocessing or storage elsewhere

  6. Storage for greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beitel, G.A. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering Lab.

    1991-12-31

    EG and G Idaho, Inc., at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is actively pursuing technical storage alternatives for greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) until a suitable licensed disposal facility is operating. A recently completed study projects that between 2200 and 6000 m{sup 3} of GTCC LLW will be generated by the year 2035; the base case estimate is 3250 m{sup 3}. The current plan envisions a disposal facility available as early as the year 2010. A long-term dedicated storage facility could be available in 1997. In the meantime, it is anticipated that a limited number of sealed sources that are no longer useful and have GTCC concentrations of radionuclides will require storage. Arrangements are being made to provide this interim storage at an existing DOE waste management facility. All interim stored waste will subsequently be moved to the dedicated storage facility once it is operating. Negotiations are under way to establish a host site for interim storage, which may be operational, at the earliest, by the second quarter of 1993. Two major activities toward developing a long-term dedicated storage facility are ongoing. (a) An engineering study, which explores costs for alternatives to provide environmentally safe storage and satisfy all regulations, is being prepared. Details of some of the findings of that study will be presented. (b) There is also an effort under way to seek the assistance of one or more private companies in providing dedicated storage. Alternatives and options will be discussed.

  7. Subsurface barrier design alternatives for confinement and controlled advection flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various technologies and designs are being considered to serve as subsurface barriers to confine or control contaminant migration from underground waste storage or disposal structures containing radioactive and hazardous wastes. Alternatives including direct-coupled flood and controlled advection designs are described as preconceptual examples. Prototype geotechnical equipment for testing and demonstration of these alternative designs tested at the Hanford Geotechnical Development and Test Facility and the Hanford Small-Tube Lysimeter Facility include mobile high-pressure injectors and pumps, mobile transport and pumping units, vibratory and impact pile drivers, and mobile batching systems. Preliminary laboratory testing of barrier materials and additive sequestering agents have been completed and are described

  8. Geological and Geotechnical Site Investigation for the Design of a CO2 Rich Flue Gas Direct Injection and Storage Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metz, Paul; Bolz, Patricia

    2013-03-25

    With international efforts to limit anthropogenic carbon in the atmosphere, various CO{sub 2} sequestration methods have been studied by various facilities worldwide. Basalt rock in general has been referred to as potential host material for mineral carbonation by various authors, without much regard for compositional variations due to depositional environment, subsequent metamorphism, or hydrothermal alteration. Since mineral carbonation relies on the presence of certain magnesium, calcium, or iron silicates, it is necessary to study the texture, mineralogy, petrology, and geochemistry of specific basalts before implying potential for mineral carbonation. The development of a methodology for the characterization of basalts with respect to their susceptibility for mineral carbonation is proposed to be developed as part of this research. The methodology will be developed based on whole rock data, petrography and microprobe analyses for samples from the Caledonia Mine in Michigan, which is the site for a proposed small-scale demonstration project on mineral carbonation in basalt. Samples from the Keweenaw Peninsula will be used to determine general compositional trends using whole rock data and petrography. Basalts in the Keweenaw Peninsula have been subjected to zeolite and prehnite-pumpellyite facies metamorphism with concurrent native copper deposition. Alteration was likely due to the circulation of CO{sub 2}-rich fluids at slightly elevated temperatures and pressures, which is the process that is attempted to be duplicated by mineral carbonation.

  9. Safety Assessment Of The Centralized Storage Facility For Disused Sealed Radioactive Sources In United Republic Of Tanzania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abel, Vitus [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, JaeSeong [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    SRS are no longer in use, they are declared as disused, and they are transferred to the central radioactive management facility (CRMF) belonging to Tanzania Atomic Energy Commission (regulatory body) and managed as radioactive waste. In order to reduce the risk associated with disused sealed radioactive sources (DSRS), the first priority would be to bring them to appropriate controls under the regulatory body. When DSRS are safely managed, regulatory body need to make assessment of the likelihood and potential impact of incidents, accidents and hazards for proper management plan. The paper applies Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) for assessing and allocating weights and priorities for solving the problem of mult criteria consideration for management plan. Using pairwise comparisons, the relative importance of one criterion over another can be expressed. The method allows decision makers to provide judgments about the relative importance of each criterion and to estimate radiological risk by using expert's judgments or probability of occurrence. AHP is the step by step manner where the resulting priorities are shown and the possible inconsistencies are determined. The Information provided by experts helps to rank hazards according to probability of occurrence, potential impact and mitigation cost. The strength of the AHP method lies in its ability to incorporate both qualitative and quantitative data in decision making. AHP present a powerful tool for weighting and prioritizing hazards in terms of occurrence probability. However, AHP also has some weak points. AHP requires data based on experience, knowledge and judgment which are subjective for each decision-maker.

  10. Storage of bovine isolated follicles: a new alternative way to improve the recovery rate of viable embryos from ovarian follicles of slaughtered cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlok, A; Cech, S; Kubelka, M; Lopatárová, M; Holý, L; Jindra, M

    2006-11-01

    The vitality of bovine oocytes stored in isolated follicles was examined. The aim of this work was to prolong the time of in vitro manipulation of oocytes before their maturation and develop a new alternative of oocyte "capacitation" to improve the quality of in vitro produced embryos. Follicles were dissected from the ovaries of slaughtered cows; subsequently, follicles were divided according to their diameter into three categories (2-3, 3-4 and 4-6 mm), and stored at 17-18 degrees C for 24 or 48 h in a modified tissue culture medium-199 (TCM-199) with reduced pH. After that time, the cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) were isolated, matured, fertilized, and embryos cultured in vitro for a total of 9 days. The percentage of total blastocysts, and hatched blastocysts developed from oocytes, initially kept ("capacitated") for 24h at 17-18 degrees C, within follicles of 3-6mm size categories, were significantly higher than that oocytes of the control [of control oocytes] (44.9 and 30.3% versus 36.2 and 20.4%, respectively). The oocytes of follicles stored for 48 h at 17-18 degrees C already had decreased developmental capacity. Interesting data were obtained when COCs of the 3-4 and 4-6 categories were additionally divided into two subgroups according to their presumed developmental history (originating from the supposed growing "fit" in contrast to the supposed regressing "unfit" follicles). The higher improvement in the rate of hatched blastocysts from 24h stored oocytes was observed only in the subgroup originated from "fit" COCs (15.3 versus 25.0%, and 20.0 versus 34.4%, in the 3-4 and 4-6mm categories, respectively). The transfer of 26 blastocysts (developed of follicles kept for 24h at 17-18 degrees C) to 26 recipient heifers resulted in 18 pregnancies. Storage of follicles at 17-18 degrees C in vitro resulted not only in recovery of higher numbers of blastocysts of better quality but also facilitated the safe transport of follicles for a long distance. The

  11. Experiments in support to the understanding of fuel cladding behavior in normal, accidental and storage conditions at the CEA LECI hotlab facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the experimental capabilities dedicated to the characterization of fuel cladding material behaviour in normal, accidental and storage conditions of the CEA Saclay LECI hotlab facility. The main objective of the LECI facility, that operates 45 hotcells, is to provide metallurgical, mechanical and physico-chemical data on irradiated materials (from fuel assembly, core structure, and vessel) in support to the operation of light water reactors as well as the development of future nuclear systems. Specifically, a comprehensive review of the available equipment which can be used to characterize a broad range of properties of irradiated cladding materials for Gen2 and 3 nuclear applications is presented. These data are then used to identify normal, accidental or storage conditions behaviour laws and models able to predict the in-service lifetime of the materials. The mechanical properties of irradiated zirconium alloy cladding are characterized through a complete set of mechanical testing such as tensile, creep and burst tests. Specific experiments have been developed in order to obtain the mechanical properties in axial, circumferential and biaxial conditions, or to simulate LOCA or RIA transients. Fine metrology tools give access to dimensional variations at the μm scale after various irradiation experiments performed in MTR, that address creep and growth under irradiation. State-of the-art equipment, including optical microscopy with image analysis for hydride content and distribution (HydruroTM), FEG-Scanning Electron Microscopy fitted with EDS, WDS and EBSD, Transmission Electron Microscopy, Electron Probe MicroAnalysis, hydrogen global measurement, and Nuclear Reaction Analysis, allow the characterization of key parameters to address the cladding behavior: precipitate phase evolution and nucleation and growth of irradiation defects, hydrogen precipitation and reorientation, structure and microstructure of oxide layers formed, fracture mode after

  12. Circular letter from January 22, 2004 to the presidents of companies having the status of chartered storage facility; Lettre circulaire du 22 janvier 2004 a Messieurs les presidents de societes titulaires du statut d'entrepositaire agree

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    This circular letter is intended for owners of storage facilities for petroleum products benefiting from the obligation of strategic storage according to the article 2 of law no 92-1443 from December 31, 1992. The attached document recalls the reasons and content of this obligation, the prevailing strategic storage rules in France (reference texts, products in concern, operators, stockpiles localization, product substitution possibilities..), the monthly declarations, the controls and sanctions, the annual plan of stocks localization, the obligation of information, the loss of chartered status or the renouncement. A schematic synthesis of the system of stockpiles constitution is presented in appendix, for France and for the French overseas departements. The other appendixes concern: the list of petroleum products concerned by the legal obligation of strategic storage, the relations between the professional committee of strategic stockpiles (CPSSP) and the anonymous society of security stocks management (SAGESS), and some examples of monthly and annual declaration forms. (J.S.)

  13. A decision support system for cost determination in grain storage facility operations Um sistema de apoio à decisão para determinação de tarifas em unidades armazenadoras de grãos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domingos S. M. Valente

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Many research works have being carried out on analyzing grain storage facility costs; however a few of them had taken into account the analysis of factors associated to all pre-processing and storage steps. The objective of this work was to develop a decision support system for determining the grain storage facility costs and utilization fees in grain storage facilities. The data of a CONAB storage facility located in Ponta Grossa - PR, Brazil, was used as input of the system developed to analyze its specific characteristics, such as amount of product received and stored throughout the year, hourly capacity of drying, cleaning, and receiving, and dispatch. By applying the decision support system, it was observed that the reception and expedition costs were exponentially reduced as the turnover rate of the storage increased. The cleaning and drying costs increased linearly with grain initial moisture. The storage cost increased exponentially as the occupancy rate of the storage facility decreased.Vários trabalhos de análise de custos em unidades armazenadoras de produtos agrícolas foram conduzidos; no entanto, poucos abordam as análises dos efeitos dos fatores associados a cada uma das etapas do pré-processamento e armazenagem. Desse modo, o objetivo deste trabalho foi desenvolver um sistema de apoio à decisão para determinação de custos e tarifas em unidades armazenadoras de produtos agrícolas. Uma unidade da CONAB, localizada em Ponta Grossa - PR, foi usada para geração de resultados conforme suas características específicas, tais como quantidade de produto recebido e estocado ao longo do ano, capacidade horária de secagem, limpeza, recepção e expedição. Ao empregar o sistema de apoio à decisão, foi constatado que os custos de recepção e expedição diminuem exponencialmente com o aumento do índice de rotatividade da unidade armazenadora; que os custos de limpeza e secagem foram aproximadamente lineares e crescentes com

  14. Chemical and Radiochemical Composition of Thermally Stabilized Plutonium Oxide from the Plutonium Finishing Plant Considered as Alternate Feedstock for the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tingey, Joel M.; Jones, Susan A.

    2005-07-01

    Eighteen plutonium oxide samples originating from the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) on the Hanford Site were analyzed to provide additional data on the suitability of PFP thermally stabilized plutonium oxides and Rocky Flats oxides as alternate feedstock to the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF). Radiochemical and chemical analyses were performed on fusions, acid leaches, and water leaches of these 18 samples. The results from these destructive analyses were compared with nondestructive analyses (NDA) performed at PFP and the acceptance criteria for the alternate feedstock. The plutonium oxide materials considered as alternate feedstock at Hanford originated from several different sources including Rocky Flats oxide, scrap from the Remote Mechanical C-Line (RMC) and the Plutonium Reclamation Facility (PRF), and materials from other plutonium conversion processes at Hanford. These materials were received at PFP as metals, oxides, and solutions. All of the material considered as alternate feedstock was converted to PuO2 and thermally stabilized by heating the PuO2 powder at 950 C in an oxidizing environment. The two samples from solutions were converted to PuO2 by precipitation with Mg(OH)2. The 18 plutonium oxide samples were grouped into four categories based on their origin. The Rocky Flats oxide was divided into two categories, low- and high-chloride Rocky Flats oxides. The other two categories were PRF/RMC scrap oxides, which included scrap from both process lines and oxides produced from solutions. The two solution samples came from samples that were being tested at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory because all of the plutonium oxide from solutions at PFP had already been processed and placed in 3013 containers. These samples originated at the PFP and are from plutonium nitrate product and double-pass filtrate solutions after they had been thermally stabilized. The other 16 samples originated from thermal stabilization batches before canning at

  15. Progress report and technical evaluation of the ISCR pilot test conducted at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Centralia, Kansas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2009-01-14

    In October, 2007, the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) presented the document Interim Measure Conceptual Design (Argonne 2007a) to the Kansas Department of Health and Environment, Bureau of Environmental Remediation (KDHE/BER), for a proposed non-emergency Interim Measure (IM) at the site of the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Centralia, Kansas (Figure 1.1). The IM was recommended to mitigate existing levels of carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the vadose zone soils beneath the former facility and in the groundwater beneath and in the vicinity of the former facility, as well as to moderate or decrease the potential future concentrations of carbon tetrachloride in the groundwater. The Interim Measure Conceptual Design (Argonne 2007a) was developed in accordance with the KDHE/BER Policy No.BERRS-029, Policy and Scope of Work: Interim Measures (KDHE 1996). The hydrogeologic, geochemical, and contaminant distribution characteristics of the Centralia site, as identified by the CCC/USDA, factored into the development of the nonemergency IM proposal. These characteristics were summarized in the Interim Measure Conceptual Design (Argonne 2007a) and were discussed in detail in previous Argonne reports (Argonne 2002a, 2003, 2004, 2005a,b,c, 2006a,b, 2007b). The identified remedial goals of the proposed IM were as follows: (1) To reduce the existing concentrations of carbon tetrachloride in groundwater in three 'hot spot' areas identified at the site (at SB01, SB05, and SB12-MW02; Figure 1.2) to levels acceptable to the KDHE. (2) To reduce carbon tetrachloride concentrations in the soils near the location of former soil boring SB12 and existing monitoring well MW02 (Figure 1.2) to levels below the KDHE Tier 2 Risk-Based Screening Level (RBSL) of 200 {micro}g/kg for this contaminant. To address these goals, the potential application of an in situ chemical reduction (ISCR) treatment technology

  16. TRIGA spent fuel storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storage of spent fuel elements is a step preliminary to final radioactive waste disposal operation. The spent fuel issue will have a common solution for both spent fuel from Cernavoda NPP and research TRIGA reactors currently operated in Romania. For the case of TRIGA reactor spent fuel this will be an alternative solution to the now functioning alternative of 'on site' storing solution adopted so far at INR Pitesti. For the time being the short term storage requirements for TRIGA spent fuel are adequately fulfilled by the pool of a multizonal reactor, the construction of which was definitively stopped. On the other hand the HEU - LEU conversion of the 14 MW TRIGA reactor which will be completed till May 2006, will pose not spent fuel problems as the TRIGA HEU fuel (612 elements) will be transferred in US (not later than May 2009). Consequently, the needs for intermediate storage will be associated only with the LEU spent fuel from TRIGA LEU-SSR and TRIGA LEU-ACPR reactors. In the latter case the maximum number of elements will be 167. For the stationary 14 MW (SSR) reactor but the amount of fuel elements to be stored on a intermediate term will be a function of service span of this reactor as well of the degree of request. Totally, some 1,750 SSR-LEU fuel elements will require intermediate storage. There is a preliminary agreement with 'NUCLEARELECTRICA -S.A.' Company regarding LEU TRIGA spent fuel storage at the intermediate storage facility for spent fuel of Cernavoda NPP.. A safety investigation is underway to determine the impact of LEU spent fuel upon the dry environment containing spent CANDU fuel. To fulfil the requirements imposed by CANDU storage technology the LEU spent fuel will be correspondingly conditioned. Then adequate containers will be used for transportation of fuel to Cernavoda's storage cell. Subcriticality condition in the storage cell loaded with LEU was checked by calculating the multiplication factor for an infinite lattice. The

  17. Engineering analysis report for the long-term management of depleted uranium hexafluoride : storage of depleted uranium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains an engineering analysis of long-term storage of uranium metal in boxes as an option for long-term management of depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF6). Three storage facilities are considered: buildings, vaults, and mined cavities. Three cases are considered: either all, half, or a quarter of the depleted uranium metal that would be produced from the conversion of depleted UF6 is stored at the facility. The analysis of these alternatives is based on a box design used in the Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride, report DOE/EIS-0269, published in 1999 by the US Department of Energy. This box design does not appear to effectively use space within the box. Hence, an alternative box design that allows for a reduced storage area is addressed in the appendices for long-term storage in buildings

  18. Decommissioning of nuclear facilities. Feasibility, needs and costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactor decommissioning activities generally are considered to begin after operations have ceased and the fuel has been removed from the reactor, although in some countries the activities may be started while the fuel is still at the reactor site. The three principal alternatives for decommissioning are described. The factors to be considered in selecting the decommissioning strategy, i.e. a stage or a combination of stages that comprise the total decommissioning programme, are reviewed. One presents a discussion of the feasibility of decommissioning techniques available for use on the larger reactors and fuel cycle facilities. The numbers and types of facilities to be decommissioned and the resultant waste volumes generated for disposal will then be projected. Finally, the costs of decommissioning these facilities, the effect of these costs on electricity generating costs, and alternative methods of financing decommissioning are discussed. The discussion of decommissioning draws on various countries' studies and experience in this area. Specific details about current activities and policies in NEA Member Countries are given in the short country specific Annexes. The nuclear facilities that are addressed in this study include reactors, fuel fabrication facilities, reprocessing facilities, associated radioactive waste storage facilities, enrichment facilities and other directly related fuel cycle support facilities. The present study focuses on the technical feasibility, needs, and costs of decommissioning the larger commercial facilities in the OECD member countries that are coming into service up to the year 2000. It is intended to inform the public and to assist in planning for the decommissioning of these facilities

  19. Underground Storage Tanks in Iowa

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — Underground storage tank (UST) sites which store petroleum in Iowa. Includes sites which have been reported to DNR, and have active or removed underground storage...

  20. Rough order of magnitude cost estimate for immobilization of 50 MT of plutonium using existing facilities at the Savannah River site: alternative 12B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this Cost Estimate Report is to identify preliminary capital and operating costs for a facility to immobilize 50 metric tons of plutonium using ceramic in an existing facility (221-F) at an Savannah River Site (SRS)