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Sample records for alternaria-sensitive moderate-severe asthma

  1. Association of IL-4RA single nucleotide polymorphisms, HLA-DR and HLA-DQ in children with Alternaria-sensitive moderate-severe asthma

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    Santiago Luis A

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Asthma afflicts 6% to 8% of the United States population, and severe asthma represents approximately 10% of asthmatic patients. Several epidemiologic studies in the United States and Europe have linked Alternaria sensitivity to both persistence and severity of asthma. In order to begin to understand genetic risk factors underlying Alternaria sensitivity and asthma, in these studies we examined T cell responses to Alternaria antigens, HLA Class II restriction and HLA-DQ protection in children with severe asthma. Methods Sixty children with Alternaria-sensitive moderate-severe asthma were compared to 49 children with Alternaria-sensitive mild asthma. We examined HLA-DR and HLA-DQ frequencies in Alternaria-sensitive asthmatic by HLA typing. To determine ratios of Th1/Th2 Alternaria-specific T-cells, cultures were stimulated in media alone, Alternaria alternata extract and Alt a1. Sensitivity to IL-4 stimulation was measured by up-regulation of CD23 on B cells. Results Children with Alternaria-sensitive moderate-severe asthma trended to have increased sensitivities to Cladosporium (46% versus 35%, to Aspergillus (43% versus 28%, and significantly increased sensitivities to trees (78% versus 57% and to weeds (68% versus 48%. The IL-4RA ile75val polymorphism was significantly increased in Alternaria-sensitive moderate-severe asthmatics, 83% (0.627 allele frequency compared to Alternaria-sensitive mild asthmatics, 57% (0.388 allele frequency. This was associated with increased sensitivity to IL-4 stimulation measured by significantly increased IL-4 stimulated CD23 expression on CD19+ and CD86+CD19+ B cells of Alternaria-sensitive moderate-severe asthmatics. IL-5 and IL-13 synthesis was significantly increased in Alternaria-sensitive moderate-severe asthmatics compared to mild asthmatics to Alternaria extract and Alt a1 stimulation. The frequency of HLA-DQB1*03 allele was significantly decreased in Alternaria-sensitive moderate-severe

  2. Mild, Moderate, Severe Asthma: What Do Grades Mean?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disrupt the child’s normal activities and make it difficult to sleep. Nighttime flare-ups may occur more than once a week. In moderate persistent asthma, lung function is roughly between 60% and 80% ...

  3. The effect of various breathing exercises (pranayama in patients with bronchial asthma of mild to moderate severity

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    Saxena Tarun

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: The incidence of bronchial asthma is on increase. Chemotherapy is helpful during early course of the disease, but later on morbidity and mortality increases. The efficacy of yoga therapy though appreciated is yet to be defined and modified. Aim: To study the effect of breathing exercises ( pranayama in patients with bronchial asthma of mild to moderate severity. Materials and Methods: Fifty cases of bronchial asthma (Forced Expiratory Volume in one second (FEV1 > 70% were studied for 12 weeks. Patients were allocated to two groups: group A and group B (control group. Patients in group A were treated with breathing exercises (deep breathing, Brahmari , and Omkara , etc. for 20 minutes twice daily for a period of 12 weeks. Patients were trained to perform Omkara at high pitch (forceful with prolonged exhalation as compared to normal Omkara . Group B was treated with meditation for 20 minutes twice daily for a period of 12 weeks. Subjective assessment, FEV1%, and Peak Expiratory Flow Rate (PEFR were done in each case initially and after 12 weeks. Results: After 12 weeks, group A subjects had significant improvement in symptoms, FEV1, and PEFR as compared to group B subjects. Conclusion: Breathing exercises ( pranayama , mainly expiratory exercises, improved lung function subjectively and objectively and should be regular part of therapy.

  4. Comparison of six-minute walk test in children with moderate/severe asthma with reference values for healthy children

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    Lívia Barboza de Andrade

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE:to compare physical performance and cardiorespiratory responses in the six-minute walk test (6MWT in asthmatic children with reference values for healthy children in the same age group, and to correlate them with intervening variables.METHODS:this was a cross-sectional, prospective study that evaluated children with moderate/severe asthma, aged between 6 and 16 years, in outpatient follow-up. Demographic and spirometric test data were collected. All patients answered the pediatric asthma quality of life (QoL questionnaire (PAQLQ and level of basal physical activity. The 6MWT was performed, following the American Thoracic Society recommendations. Comparison of means was performed using Student's t-test and Pearson's correlation to analyze the 6MWT with study variables. The significance level was set at 5%.RESULTS:40 children with moderate or severe asthma were included, 52.5% males, 70% with normal weight and sedentary. Mean age was 11.3 ± 2.1 years, mean height was 1.5 ± 0.1 m, and mean weight was 40.8 ± 12.6 Kg. The mean distance walked in the 6MWT was significantly lower, corresponding to 71.9% ± 19.7% of predicted values; sedentary children had the worst values. The difference between the distance walked on the test and the predicted values showed positive correlation with age (r = 0.373, p = 0.018 and negative correlation with cardiac rate at the end of the test (r = -0.518, p < 0.001. Regarding QoL assessment, the values in the question about physical activity limitations showed the worst scores, with a negative correlation with walked distance difference (r = -0.311, p = 0.051.CONCLUSIONS:asthmatic children's performance in the 6MWT evaluated through distance walked is significantly lower than the predicted values for healthy children of the same age, and is directly influenced by sedentary life style.

  5. Asthma

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    Kim Harold

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Asthma is the most common respiratory disorder in Canada. Despite significant improvement in the diagnosis and management of this disorder, the majority of Canadians with asthma remain poorly controlled. In most patients, however, control can be achieved through the use of avoidance measures and appropriate pharmacological interventions. Inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs represent the standard of care for the majority of patients. Combination ICS/long-acting beta2-agonists (LABA inhalers are preferred for most adults who fail to achieve control with ICS therapy. Allergen-specific immunotherapy represents a potentially disease-modifying therapy for many patients with asthma, but should only be prescribed by physicians with appropriate training in allergy. Regular monitoring of asthma control, adherence to therapy and inhaler technique are also essential components of asthma management. This article provides a review of current literature and guidelines for the appropriate diagnosis and management of asthma.

  6. Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1.25 million of those individuals have severe asthma, a condition that can be difficult to control and treat. Learn more about his research by visiting the NHLBI Laboratory of Asthma and Lung Inflammation website: http://www.nhlbi.nih. ...

  7. Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Harold; Mazza, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    Asthma is the most common respiratory disorder in Canada. Despite significant improvement in the diagnosis and management of this disorder, the majority of Canadians with asthma remain poorly controlled. In most patients, however, control can be achieved through the use of avoidance measures and appropriate pharmacological interventions. Inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) represent the standard of care for the majority of patients. Combination ICS/long-acting beta2-agonists (LABA) inhalers are pr...

  8. Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Kim Harold; Mazza Jorge

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Asthma is the most common respiratory disorder in Canada. Despite significant improvement in the diagnosis and management of this disorder, the majority of Canadians with asthma remain poorly controlled. In most patients, however, control can be achieved through the use of avoidance measures and appropriate pharmacological interventions. Inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) represent the standard of care for the majority of patients. Combination ICS/long-acting beta2-agonists (LABA) inhale...

  9. The influence of the snoezelen approach on persons with moderate, severe and profound developmental disabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Likovnik Gorjup, Vesna

    2016-01-01

    The determination of effective educational-therapeutic approaches of work with persons with moderate, severe and profound developmental disabilities, especially with persons with severe and profound developmental disabilities, is of the utmost importance in order to improve their quality of life. The master’s thesis titled “The Influence Of The Snoezelen Approach On Persons With Moderate, Severe And Profound Developmental Disabilities” defines on the basis of theoretical findings snoezele...

  10. Asthma Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Asthma Basics KidsHealth > For Parents > Asthma Basics A A ... Asthma Categories en español Asma: aspectos fundamentales About Asthma Asthma is a common lung condition in kids ...

  11. Safety profile of L-arginine infusion in moderately severe falciparum malaria.

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    Tsin W Yeo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: L-arginine infusion improves endothelial function in malaria but its safety profile has not been described in detail. We assessed clinical symptoms, hemodynamic status and biochemical parameters before and after a single L-arginine infusion in adults with moderately severe malaria. METHODOLOGY AND FINDINGS: In an ascending dose study, adjunctive intravenous L-arginine hydrochloride was infused over 30 minutes in doses of 3 g, 6 g and 12 g to three separate groups of 10 adults hospitalized with moderately severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria in addition to standard quinine therapy. Symptoms, vital signs and selected biochemical measurements were assessed before, during, and for 24 hours after infusion. No new or worsening symptoms developed apart from mild discomfort at the intravenous cannula site in two patients. There was a dose-response relationship between increasing mg/kg dose and the maximum decrease in systolic (rho = 0.463; Spearman's, p = 0.02 and diastolic blood pressure (r = 0.42; Pearson's, p = 0.02, and with the maximum increment in blood potassium (r = 0.70, p<0.001 and maximum decrement in bicarbonate concentrations (r = 0.53, p = 0.003 and pH (r = 0.48, p = 0.007. At the highest dose (12 g, changes in blood pressure and electrolytes were not clinically significant, with a mean maximum decrease in mean arterial blood pressure of 6 mmHg (range: 0-11; p<0.001, mean maximal increase in potassium of 0.5 mmol/L (range 0.2-0.7 mmol/L; p<0.001, and mean maximal decrease in bicarbonate of 3 mEq/L (range 1-7; p<0.01 without a significant change in pH. There was no significant dose-response relationship with blood phosphate, lactate, anion gap and glucose concentrations. All patients had an uncomplicated clinical recovery. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Infusion of up to 12 g of intravenous L-arginine hydrochloride over 30 minutes is well tolerated in adults with moderately severe malaria, with no clinically important changes in

  12. Involvement of fractalkine and macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha in moderate-severe depression

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    Rosaria Alba Merendino

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available MODERATE-severe depression (MSD is linked to overexpression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Fractalkine (FKN and macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha (MIP-1α are, respectively, members of CX3C and C-C chemokines, and both are involved in recruiting and activating mononuclear phagocytes in the central nervous system. We analysed the presence of FKN and MIP-1α in sera of untreated MSD patients and healthy donors. High FKN levels were observed in all MSD patients as compared with values only detectable in 26% of healthy donors. MIP-1α was measurable in 20% of patients, while no healthy donors showed detectable chemokine levels. In conclusion, we describe a previously unknown involvement of FKN in the pathogenesis of MSD, suggesting that FKN may represent a target for a specific immune therapy of this disease.

  13. 11.3.Upper respiratory tract disease and bronchial asthma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1992-01-01

    920096 A clinical trial of treating asthma ofmoderate severity with beclomethason dip-ropionate aerosol.SHEN Xun (沈勋),et al.DeptPulmon Med,Zhongshan Hosp,Shanghai MedUniv,200032.Chin J Intern Med 1991; 30 (9):536-538.In order to investigate the efficacy of steroidinhalation in treating asthma of moderate sever-

  14. [Importance of laboratory findings in differentiating cranio-cerebral injuries of mild and moderate severity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgman, G P; Iurishchev, E P; Vial'tseva, I N; Ovsiannikova, R P; Smirnova, I V

    1982-01-01

    The authors discuss the results of clinical and laboratory examination of 191 patients among whom 93 had a mild and 98 a moderately severe cranio-cerebral injury. The dynamics of changes in the cerebrospinal fluid, including the changes in its cell composition, and the changes in the morphological compositions of blood during the post-traumatic period were studied. Different aspects of metabolism characterizing the functional condition of the liver, kidneys and adrenals were studied. The condition of blood coagulation was determined with due account for its rheological properties. The results of the statistical analysis of the material obtained show that in judging the depth of the pathophysiological disturbances and differentiating the mild and moderated degrees of cranio-cerebral injury severity it is advisable to use such laboratory tests as those for disorders of the composition of the cerebrospinal fluid (erythrochromia, hyperproteinochromia, pleocytosis, cytological values) and blood (leukocytosis with a shift of the neutrophils to the left, increased Krebs' index, increased ESR), tests for disorders of carbohydrate and protein metabolism (fructosuria, dysproteinemia), for the degree of intensified blood coagulation activity and tests for abnormalities in the renal function (albuminuria, microhematuria).

  15. Pediatric Asthma

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    ... Plan Asthma Epidemic Eating with Asthma Helping Your Child Cope With a Medical Condition Nasal Wash Guide Cleaning Dirty Items Impact on Families Asthma & Pets Peak Flow Meter Athletes & Asthma Helpful Tools for ...

  16. Difficult Asthma

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    Ahmet Uslu

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Difficult asthma is a distinct entity of asthma, comprising approximately %5 of asthmatic patients. There is no agreed definition of difficult asthma. It will include asthma uncontrolled by new standard therapy, steroid dependent, steroid resistant and severe asthma. In this study difficult asthma; clinical features, risk factors, pathophysiology and novel therapies are summarized by literatures.

  17. Difficult asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmet Uslu; Tülay Özdemir

    1989-01-01

    Difficult asthma is a distinct entity of asthma, comprising approximately %5 of asthmatic patients. There is no agreed definition of difficult asthma. It will include asthma uncontrolled by new standard therapy, steroid dependent, steroid resistant and severe asthma. In this study difficult asthma; clinical features, risk factors, pathophysiology and novel therapies are summarized by literatures.

  18. White matter disruption in moderate/severe pediatric traumatic brain injury: Advanced tract-based analyses

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    Emily L. Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is the leading cause of death and disability in children and can lead to a wide range of impairments. Brain imaging methods such as DTI (diffusion tensor imaging are uniquely sensitive to the white matter (WM damage that is common in TBI. However, higher-level analyses using tractography are complicated by the damage and decreased FA (fractional anisotropy characteristic of TBI, which can result in premature tract endings. We used the newly developed autoMATE (automated multi-atlas tract extraction method to identify differences in WM integrity. 63 pediatric patients aged 8–19 years with moderate/severe TBI were examined with cross sectional scanning at one or two time points after injury: a post-acute assessment 1–5 months post-injury and a chronic assessment 13–19 months post-injury. A battery of cognitive function tests was performed in the same time periods. 56 children were examined in the first phase, 28 TBI patients and 28 healthy controls. In the second phase 34 children were studied, 17 TBI patients and 17 controls (27 participants completed both post-acute and chronic phases. We did not find any significant group differences in the post-acute phase. Chronically, we found extensive group differences, mainly for mean and radial diffusivity (MD and RD. In the chronic phase, we found higher MD and RD across a wide range of WM. Additionally, we found correlations between these WM integrity measures and cognitive deficits. This suggests a distributed pattern of WM disruption that continues over the first year following a TBI in children.

  19. Efficacy of Memantine, Donepezil, or Their Association in Moderate-Severe Alzheimer’s Disease: A Review of Clinical Trials

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    Ivana Molino

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE/cholinesterase (ChE inhibitors (Is and memantine are licensed for symptomatic treatment of mild-moderate and moderate-severe forms of Alzheimer’s disease (AD, respectively. High doses of the AChE-I donepezil were licensed in the USA for moderate-severe AD, and the association AChE/ChE-Is plus memantine was proposed for AD at this stage. Objectives. This paper has reviewed evidence from clinical trials of the effectiveness of memantine, donepezil, or the two drugs in association in managing moderate-severe AD. Method. Double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized trials (RCTs using memantine or donepezil alone or in association versus placebo in moderate-severe AD were reviewed. Analysis done in January 2013 considered the years 2007–2012. Results and Conclusion. Only 83 of the 941 papers selected were considered relevant, and only 13 met the criterion of “adequacy and representativeness.” Memantine and donepezil lead to improvements in moderate-to-severe AD and the choice between the compounds should be based on their contraindications more than on disease severity. No evidence was found of advantages of the association of memantine-donepezil. The heterogeneity of conditions explored by RCTs, the relatively short time of observation (24–52 weeks, and the different cognitive assessment tools used did not allow comparing properly different trials.

  20. Treatment Evaluation with Mometasone Furoate, Alone or in Combination with Desloratadine/ Montelukast in Moderate Severe Allergic Rhinitis

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    Florincescu-Gheorghe Nona-Aura

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Allergic rhinitis is one of the most common allergic diseases, characterized by the inflammation of the nasal mucosa. Eosinophils play a predominant pro-inflammatory role in allergic inflammation. This study assesses the effect of mometasone furoate alone or in combination with desloratadine/montelukast in patients with moderate-severe allergic rhinitis.

  1. Bronchial Thermoplasty in Asthma

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    Wayne Mitzner

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this review we discuss the potential of a new procedure, termed Bronchial Thermoplasty to prevent serious consequences resulting from excessive airway narrowing. The most important factor in minimizing an asthmatic attack is limiting the degree of smooth muscle shortening. The premise that airway smooth muscle can be either inactivated or obliterated without any long-term alteration of other lung tissues, and that airway function will remain normal, albeit with reduced bronchoconstriction, has now been demonstrated in dogs, a subset of normal subjects, and mild asthmatics. Bronchial Thermoplasty may thus develop into a useful clinical procedure to effectively impair the ability for airway smooth muscle to reach the levels of pathologic narrowing that characterizes an asthma attack. It may also enable more successful treatment of asthma patients who are unresponsive to more conventional therapies. Whether this will remain stable for the lifetime of the patient still remains to be determined, but at the present time, there are no indications that the smooth muscle contractility will return. This successful preliminary experience showing that Bronchial Thermoplasty could be safely performed in patients with asthma has led to an ongoing clinical trial at a number of sites in Europe and North America designed to examine the effectiveness of this procedure in subjects with moderately severe asthma.

  2. Occupational asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Names Asthma - occupational exposure; Irritant-induced reactive airways disease Images Spirometry Respiratory system References Lemiere C, Vandenplas O. Occupational allergy and asthma. In: Adkinson NF Jr., Bochner ...

  3. Use of inhaled corticosteroids in pediatric asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, H

    1997-01-01

    Inhaled corticosteroids reduce asthma symptoms and exacerbations, improve lung function, and reduce airway inflammation and bronchial hyperreactivity more effectively than other treatments. However, inhaled corticosteroids may be unable to return lung function and bronchial hyperreactivity...... to normal when introduced for moderately severe asthma. This finding highlights the need to improve treatment strategy in pediatric asthma. The natural progression of persistent asthma may lead to loss of lung function and chronic bronchial hyperreactivity for children and adults. There is evidence...... to suggest that asthma acts via a chronic inflammatory process that causes remodeling of the airways with mucosal thickening and smooth muscle hypertrophy. An optimal treatment strategy would be one aimed at reducing the ongoing airway inflammation. Inhaled steroids ameliorate the inflammation, whereas...

  4. Effectiveness of balance training exercise in people with mild to moderate severity Alzheimer's disease: protocol for a randomised trial

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    Lautenschlager Nicola T

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Balance dysfunction and falls are common problems in later stages of dementia. Exercise is a well-established intervention to reduce falls in cognitively intact older people, although there is limited randomised trial evidence of outcomes in people with dementia. The primary objective of this study is to evaluate whether a home-based balance exercise programme improves balance performance in people with mild to moderate severity Alzheimer's disease. Methods/design Two hundred and fourteen community dwelling participants with mild to moderate severity Alzheimer's disease will be recruited for the randomised controlled trial. A series of laboratory and clinical measures will be used to evaluate balance and mobility performance at baseline. Participants will then be randomized to receive either a balance training home exercise programme (intervention group from a physiotherapist, or an education, information and support programme from an occupational therapist (control group. Both groups will have six home visits in the six months following baseline assessment, as well as phone support. All participants will be re-assessed at the completion of the programme (after six months, and again in a further six months to evaluate sustainability of outcomes. The primary outcome measures will be the Limits of Stability (a force platform measure of balance and the Step Test (a clinical measure of balance. Secondary outcomes include other balance and mobility measures, number of falls and falls risk measures, cognitive and behavioural measures, and carer burden and quality of life measures. Assessors will be blind to group allocation. Longitudinal change in balance performance will be evaluated in a sub-study, in which the first 64 participants of the control group with mild to moderate severity Alzheimer's disease, and 64 age and gender matched healthy participants will be re-assessed on all measures at initial assessment, and then at 6, 12

  5. Natural history of cytomegalovirus infection in a series of patients diagnosed with moderate-severe ulcerative colitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Valeria Criscuoli; Maria Rosa Rizzuto; Luigi Montalbano; Elena Gallo; Mario Cottone

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the natural history of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection in a series of 28 ulcerative colitis patients in whom the search for HCMV was positive.METHODS: A series of 85 patients with moderate-severe ulcerative colitis flare-up were evaluated for a HCMV search by performing a haematoxylin and eosin stain,immunohistochemical assay and nested polymerase chain reaction on rectal biopsies. Among 85 screened patients (19 of whom were steroid resistant/dependant),28 were positive for HCMV; after remission the patients were followed up clinically and histologically.RESULTS: Among the 22 patients with complete followup,in 8 (36%) patients HCMV-DNA persisted in the intestinal specimens. Among the HCMV positive patients,4 (50%) experienced at least one moderate-severe flare-up of colitis without evidence of peripheral HCMV.Among the 14 HCMV negative patients, 3 with pouches developed pouchitis and 5 out of 11 (45%) experienced a colitis flare-up.CONCLUSION: Our preliminary results suggest that HCMV may remain in the colon after an acute colitis flareup despite remission; it seems that the virus is not responsible for the disease relapse.

  6. Asthma pharmacotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Minka L

    2014-02-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airway that leads to airway obstruction via bronchoconstriction, edema, and mucus hypersecretion. The National Asthma Education and Prevention Program has outlined evidence-based guidelines to standardize asthma therapy and improve outcomes. The initial recommendation of choice for persistent asthmatic patients is an inhaled corticosteroid (ICS). Long-acting beta-2 agonists in combination with ICS, oral corticosteroids, leukotriene modifiers, and anti-IgE therapeutic options can be considered for patients with persistent or worsening symptoms. Many novel therapies are being developed, with an emphasis on anti-inflammatory mechanisms, gene expression, and cytokine modification.

  7. Exercise and Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Exercise and Asthma Page Content Article Body Almost every child (and ... of Pediatrics about asthma and exercise. What is asthma Asthma is the most common chronic medical problem ...

  8. Asthma and Hispanic Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Data > Minority Population Profiles > Hispanic/Latino > Asthma Asthma and Hispanic Americans In 2014, 2.1 million Hispanics reported that they currently have asthma. Puerto Rican Americans have almost twice the asthma ...

  9. Childhood Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education Center Fellows-in-Training Grants & Awards Program Directors Practice Resources ASTHMA IQ Consultation and Referral Guidelines Practice Financial Survey Practice Tools Running a Practice Statements and Practice Parameters About AAAAI Advocacy Allergist / Immunologists: ...

  10. Occupational Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education Center Fellows-in-Training Grants & Awards Program Directors Practice Resources ASTHMA IQ Consultation and Referral Guidelines Practice Financial Survey Practice Tools Running a Practice Statements and Practice Parameters About AAAAI Advocacy Allergist / Immunologists: ...

  11. Asthma Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education Center Fellows-in-Training Grants & Awards Program Directors Practice Resources ASTHMA IQ Consultation and Referral Guidelines Practice Financial Survey Practice Tools Running a Practice Statements and Practice Parameters About AAAAI Advocacy Allergist / Immunologists: ...

  12. Facial Emotion Recognition Deficits following Moderate-Severe Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI): Re-examining the Valence Effect and the Role of Emotion Intensity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosenberg, H.; McDonald, S.; Dethier, M.; Kessels, R.P.C.; Westbrook, R.F.

    2014-01-01

    Many individuals who sustain moderate-severe traumatic brain injuries (TBI) are poor at recognizing emotional expressions, with a greater impairment in recognizing negative (e.g., fear, disgust, sadness, and anger) than positive emotions (e.g., happiness and surprise). It has been questioned whether

  13. Comparison of Cone-Beam CT Incidental Findings between Moderate/Severe Obstructive Sleep Apnea patients and Mild/Normal patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enciso, Reyes; Shigeta, Yuko; Nguyen, Manuel; Clark, Glenn T.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To compare the incidental radiographic findings in the maxillofacial structures and the pharyngeal airway between moderate/severe Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) subjects and mild OSA/normal subjects using Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) scans. Study Design 53 moderate/severe OSA subjects (with a Respiratory Disturbance Index [RDI]≥15 events/hr) and 33 mild OSA/normal subjects, (RDI<15) based on ambulatory somnographic assessment were recruited. Supine CBCT’s were taken and sent for radiological report. The incidental findings were compared between the two groups. Results Moderate/severe subjects had larger prevalence of conchae bullosa, hypertrophic turbinates, hypertrophic tonsils, elongated or posteriorly placed soft palate, narrower airway, enlarged tongue, and focal calcifications, though no significant differences were found. Conclusions CBCT is useful in identifying maxillofacial and airway anomalies that could interfere with normal breathing. However, no significant difference was found in prevalence of incidental findings between moderate/severe OSA and mild/normal subjects. Further studies are necessary to generalize our results. PMID:22862979

  14. Recognizing asthma mimics and asthma complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amundson, Dennis; Seda, Gilbert; Daheshia, Massoud

    2011-10-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways characterized by airflow obstruction, bronchial hyperreactivity, and underlying inflammation. Two common reasons asthmatics fail standard therapy are incorrect diagnosis and failure to recognize underlying contributing factors. A correct diagnosis of asthma is of great importance to military practitioners since misdiagnosis or uncontrolled asthma affects an individual's operational readiness or determines whether one can receive a medical waiver to enlist in military service. This article presents four cases of patients with dyspnea that have conditions which mimic asthma or complicate asthma management: vocal cord dysfunction misdiagnosed as asthma, respiratory bronchiolitis interstitial lung disease mistaken as asthma, difficult-to-control asthma because of bronchiectasis and allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, and difficult and fatal asthma. Asthma is contrasted to other respiratory disorders, and an outlined approach to asthma diagnosis and management is presented using the Global Initiative for Asthma guidelines.

  15. Patterns, predictors and outcomes of asthma control and exacerbations during pregnancy: a prospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke E. Grzeskowiak

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available There exists a paucity of data for socially disadvantaged populations describing patterns and predictors of asthma control status and exacerbations during pregnancy, and their relationship to adverse perinatal outcomes. Asthmatic women (n=189 were followed prospectively during pregnancy, with visits at 12, 20, 28 and 36 weeks gestation. Data on loss of control, recurrent uncontrolled asthma and moderate/severe exacerbations were collected at each visit and their relationship to perinatal outcomes examined following stratification for fetal sex. 50% of asthmatic women experienced a loss of control or moderate/severe exacerbation during pregnancy, with 22% of women experiencing a moderate/severe exacerbation. Factors associated with an increased risk of women experiencing recurrent uncontrolled asthma during pregnancy included smoking (relative risk 2.92, 95% CI 1.53–5.58, inhaled corticosteroid use at the beginning of pregnancy (relative risk 2.40, 95% CI 1.25–4.60 and increasing maternal age (relative risk 1.06, 95% CI 1.01–1.11. No factors were associated with moderate/severe exacerbations. Asthma control rather than exacerbations during pregnancy appeared to be most strongly correlated with perinatal outcomes. Following stratification by fetal sex, the presence of recurrent uncontrolled asthma was associated with an increased risk of being small for gestational age in women pregnant with females (33.3% versus 9.5%; p=0.018. In contrast, there was a nonsignificant increased risk of preterm birth in women with recurrent uncontrolled asthma that were pregnant with males (25.0% versus 11.8%; p=0.201 These results suggest that the key to improving perinatal outcomes lies in improving asthma control as early as possible in pregnancy and monitoring throughout pregnancy, rather than focusing on preventing exacerbations alone.

  16. Bronchial asthma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008049 Activation ralated genes of memory CD+4 T cells in asthma patients. PI Weifeng(皮卫峰),et al. Dept Respir Med, Xinhua Hosp, Sch Med, Shanghai Jiaotong Univ, Shanghai 200092. Chin J Tuberc Respir Dis 2007;30(12):932-935. Objective To screen and identify the genes of activated memory CD+4 T cells in asthma. Methods Differential display polymerase chain reaction(DDPCR) was utilized to identify genes of memory CD+4 T cells after activation from asthmatic patients and normal individuals,

  17. Effect of tiotropium bromide combined with salmeterol fluticasone inhalation on airway function and airway inflammation in patients with moderate-severe stable COPD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To analyze the effect of tiotropium bromide combined with salmeterol fluticasone inhalation on airway function and airway inflammation in patients with moderate-severe stable COPD.Methods: A total of 118 patients with moderate-severe stable COPD were randomly divided into observation group and control group (n=59), control group accepted routine treatment, observation group received tiotropium bromide combined with salmeterol fluticasone inhalation treatment, and then differences in the levels of small airway function and airway wall parameters, the content of inflammatory factors and chemokines in serum and so on were compared between two groups of patients after 2 weeks of treatment.Results:After 2 weeks of treatment, small airway function parameters FEF25, FEF25-75 and FEF75 levels of observation group were significantly higher than those of control group, airway wall parameters WT, WA and T/D levels were significantly lower than those of control group, and AI level was significantly higher than that of control group; MIP-1α, PCT, NF-κB, IL-6, CRP, Eotaxin, CCL18, Lymphotactin, sFKN and MCP-1 content in serum of observation group were significantly lower than those of control group while sTNFR content was significantly higher than that of control group.Conclusions:Tiotropium bromide combined with salmeterol fluticasone inhalation therapy can optimize the overall condition in patients with moderate-severe stable COPD, which is specifically reflected on the control of the airway function and the degree of inflammation.

  18. [Severe asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Claudio D

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this work were to investigate the frequency of severe asthma (SA) according to WHO definition and to compare SA patients' characteristics with those of non-severe asthma (NSA); secondly, to investigate the level of control reached throughout a period of regular treatment. Between 1-1-2005 and 12-31-2014, 471 medical records from patients with bronchial asthma assisted in Buenos Aires City were analyzed. SA frequency was 40.1% (189/471), being significantly higher among patients from the public health system (47.7%, 108/226 vs. 33%, 81/245, p = 0.001). SA patients were older than NSA ones (51.3 ± 17.4 vs. 42.6 ± 17.1 years, p = 0.000), presented longer time since onset of the disease (median 30 vs. 20 years, p = 0.000), lower educational levels (secondary level or higher 41.7% vs. 58.1%, p = 0.000), lower frequency of rhinitis (47% vs. 60.6%, p = 0.004), more severe levels of airway obstruction (FEV% 50.2 ± 13.7 vs. 77.7 ± 12.4, p = 0.000), more frequent antecedents of Near Fatal Asthma (11.1% vs. 2.8%, p = 0.000), higher levels of serum IgE (median of 410 vs. 279 UI/l, p = 0.01) and higher demand of systemic steroids requirements and hospitalizations (68.7% vs. 50.7%, p = 0.000 and 37.5% vs. 15.9%, p = 0.000, respectively). A 30.6% of SA patients (58/189) reached a follow-up period of 12 months, 13 (22.5%) of whom reached the controlled asthma level. The frequency of SA found seems to be considerable. Multicenter studies to investigate the levels of control reached by SA patients with access to proper treatment are recommended.

  19. Allergies, asthma, and dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reactive airway disease - dust; Bronchial asthma - dust; Triggers - dust ... Things that make allergies or asthma worse are called triggers. Dust is a common trigger. When your asthma or allergies become worse due to dust, you are ...

  20. Allergies, asthma, and molds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reactive airway - mold; Bronchial asthma - mold; Triggers - mold; Allergic rhinitis - pollen ... Things that make allergies or asthma worse are called triggers. Mold is a common trigger. When your asthma or allergies become worse due to mold, you are ...

  1. Asthma: Basic Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Air Pollution & Respiratory Health Learn How to Control Asthma Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... Treated? Select a Language Español (Spanish) What Is Asthma? Asthma is a disease that affects your lungs. ...

  2. Asthma in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have asthma. Nearly 9 million of them are children. Children have smaller airways than adults, which makes asthma especially serious for them. Children with asthma may experience wheezing, coughing, chest tightness, ...

  3. Asthma triggers (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... things make your asthma worse. These are called asthma "triggers". Avoiding them is your first step toward feeling better. The most common asthma triggers are mold, pets, dust, grasses, pollen, cockroaches, odors ...

  4. Asthma essentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Greene

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is a chronic, reversible obstructive disease that when in exacerbation can present to the emergency department in a spectrum of severity. Prompt recognition of the potentially severely ill asthmatic requires a careful history and physical exam while considering alternative diagnoses for the presenting symptoms. Early administration of salbutamol and corticosteroids is indicated in almost all patients with other medications such as ipratropium and magnesium and supportive modalities like BiPAP reserved for sicker patients. The global impact of asthma is increasing, especially amongst children. While the benign clinical presentation is most common and mortality has decreased in recent decades due to improved recognition and care, the ubiquity of the condition and frequent lack of regular outpatient management contribute to the disease claiming 250,000 lives worldwide annually. The emergency physician must be prepared to assess and appropriately manage both the young child with a mild wheeze and the adult in respiratory failure.

  5. An N-terminal glycine to cysteine mutation in the collagen COL1A1 gene produces moderately severe osteogenesis imperfecta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilcox, W.; Scott, L.; Cohn, D. [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is usually due to mutations in the type I procollagen genes COL1A1 and COL1A2. Point mutations close to the N-terminus are generally milder than those near the C-terminus of the molecule (the gradient hypothesis of collagen mutations). We describe a patient with moderately severe OI due to a mutation in the N-terminal portion of the triple helical domain of the {alpha}1(I) chain. Electrophoretic analysis of collagen isolated from fibroblast cultures suggested the abnormal presence of a cysteine in the N-terminal portion of the {alpha}1(I) chain. Five overlapping DNA fragments amplified from fibroblast RNA were screened for mutations using single strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) and heteroduplex analyses. Direct DNA sequence analysis of the single positive fragment demonstrated a G to T transversion, corresponding to a glycine to cysteine substitution at position 226 of the triple helical domain of the {alpha}1(I) chain. The mutation was confirmed by restriction enzyme analysis of amplified genomic DNA. The mutation was not present in fibroblasts from either phenotypically normal parent. Combining this mutation with other reported mutations, glycine to cysteine substitutions at positions 205, 211, 223, and 226 produce a moderately severe phenotype whereas flanking mutations at positions 175 and 382 produce a mild phenotype. This data supports a regional rather than a gradient model of the relationship between the nature and location of type I collagen mutations and OI phenotype.

  6. Asthma and obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, Caroline Trunk-Black; Ali, Zarqa; Nilas, Lisbeth

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is a major health problem, and obesity is associated with a high incidence of asthma and poor asthma control. The aim of the present paper is to systematically review the current knowledge of the effect on overall asthma control of weight reduction in overweight and obese adults with asthma....

  7. Occupational asthma in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Dobashi, Kunio

    2012-01-01

    Research into occupational asthma (OA) in Japan has been led by the Japanese Society of Occupational and Environmental Allergy. The first report about allergic OA identified konjac asthma. After that, many kinds of OA have been reported. Cases of some types of OA, such as konjac asthma and sea squirt asthma, have been dramatically reduced by the efforts of medical personnel. Recently, with the development of new technologies, chemical antigen-induced asthma has increased in Japan. Due to adva...

  8. Changes in regional cerebral hemodynamics and its significance after internal carotid artery stenting in patients with moderate/severe internal carotid artery stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-chuan YAN

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the cerebral hemodynamic changes before and after carotid artery angioplasty and stenting.Methods Thirty-eight patients with moderate/severe internal carotid artery stenosis underwent carotid artery angioplasty and stenting.CT perfusion imaging was performed pre-and post-surgery to determine the cerebral blood flow(CBF,cerebral blood volume(CBV and mean transit time(MTT in the ipsilateral and contralateral cerebrum.Results Before angioplasty and stenting,the CBF and CBV decreased,and MTT increased in the ipsilateral cerebrum than in contralateral cerebrum.After intervention,the CBF and CBV increased and CTT shortened obviously in comparison with that of pre-surgery(P 0.05.Conclusion Angioplasty and stenting may improve the cerebral hemodynamics of patients with severe/moderate internal carotid artery stenosis.

  9. What's an Asthma Action Plan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to 2-Year-Old What's an Asthma Action Plan? KidsHealth > For Parents > What's an Asthma Action Plan? ... normal everyday activities without having asthma symptoms. Action Plans Are Unique Each person's experience with asthma is ...

  10. Stay away from asthma triggers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asthma triggers - stay away from; Asthma triggers - avoiding; Reactive airway disease - triggers; Bronchial asthma - triggers ... to them. Have someone who does not have asthma cut the grass, or wear a facemask if ...

  11. Obesity and Asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, Caroline Trunk-Black; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is more prevalent in obese compared with normal weight subjects. Our aim has been to review current knowledge of the impact of obesity on asthma severity, asthma control, and response to therapy.Several studies have shown that overweight and obesity is associated with more severe asthma...... and impaired quality of life compared with normal weight individuals. Furthermore, obesity is associated with poorer asthma control, as assessed by asthma control questionnaires, limitations in daily activities, breathlessness and wheezing, use of rescue medication, unscheduled doctor visits, emergency...... department visits, and hospitalizations for acute asthma. Studies of the impact of a high body mass index (BMI) on response to asthma therapy have, however, revealed conflicting results. Most studies show that overweight and obesity is associated with less favorable response to asthma therapy with regard...

  12. The Features of the Clinical Course and Treatment of Moderately Severe Graves’ Ophthalmopathy in Patients with Graves’ Disease in Response to Catamnesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E K Fattakhova

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To document the course of Graves’ ophthalmopathy (GO, following immunosuppressive therapy and the spontaneous course of the disease in patients with Graves’ disease (GD. Design. Randomized study with three-year follow-up. Patients. 150 euthyroid patients with moderately severe GO. Intervention. In group 1 (n = 52 patients received glucocorticoids (GC alone (prednisolone per os for 5 months, starting dose, 50—80 mg/d; or intravenous, 500—1000 mg/d, given during 3 days weekly; 5—6 cycles in all. Group 2 (n = 51 treated by GC in combination with orbital radiotherapy (16—20 Gy. None of 47 patients of group 3 treated with immunosuppressive therapy either due to contraindications to corticosteroids, or refusal of patients (spontaneous course of GO. Measurements: The activity of GO was scored by the method of Mourits et al., 1997, (Clinical Activity Score, CAS and confirmed by the assessment of serum sICAM-1 (soluble form of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and uGAGs (the urinary excretion of glycosaminoglycans. Results. Group 2 was characterized with the earliest establishment of the inactive GO (CAS J 2 (in 2.7 ± 1.4 months after beginning of the treatment (p < 0.05, and the lowest frequency of deteriorations (p < 0,05. In the end of observation the “burnt out” stage of GO (fibrosis was revealed in 98% of patients of group 2, that statistically differs from two other groups (p < 0.001. Group 3, in this respect, statistically did not differ from group 1 (45% vs 38%, P = 0.39, detected by comparison of CAS values, uGAGs, sICAM-1, obtained in inactive GO. Conclusions. 1 the absence of statistical verified differences of parameters, obtained in the inactive GO in groups 3 and 1 allow to use active observation at the planning of GO treatment; 2 the most effective strategy of treatment of moderately severe GO should be considered combined immunosuppressive therapy. Key words: graves’disease, ophthalmopathy, hyperthyroidism.

  13. Asthma and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulet, L-P

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence and incidence of asthma have increased among obese children and adults, particularly among women. Obesity seems to be a predisposing factor for the development of asthma, but the underlying mechanisms of its influence are still uncertain. Various hypotheses have been proposed to explain the link between obesity and asthma such as a common genetic predisposition, developmental changes, altered lung mechanics, the presence of a systemic inflammatory process, and an increased prevalence of associated comorbid conditions. Over-diagnosis of asthma does not seem to be more frequent in obese compared to non-obese subjects, but the added effects of obesity on respiratory symptoms can affect asthma control assessment. Obesity can make asthma more difficult to control and is associated with a reduced beneficial effect of asthma medications. This could be due to a change in asthma phenotype, particularly evidenced as a less eosinophilic type of airway inflammation combined to the added effects of changes in lung mechanics. Weight loss is associated with a universal improvement of asthma and should be part of asthma management in the obese patient. Additional research should be conducted to better determine how obesity influences the development and clinical expression of asthma, establish the optimal management of asthma in this population and determine how obesity affects long-term asthma outcomes in these patients.

  14. Exercise-Induced Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... management of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction: A practice parameter. Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. 2010;105:S1. Krafczyk ... up exercise on exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 2012;44:383. Asthma ...

  15. Psychopathology in difficult asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, L.C.; van Son, M.J.M.; Keimpema, A.R.; van Ranst, D; Pommer, A; Meijer, J.W.; Pop, V.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Within the asthma population, difficult asthma (DA) is a severe condition in which patients present with frequent exacerbations, hospitalizations and emergency room visits. The identification and treatment of psychopathology is included in the management of DA. Psychopathology is supposed

  16. Test Your Asthma Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... narrowing of the bronchi. This can make breathing difficult, particularly expiration (exhaling) and can cause a feeling of tightness in the chest. Answer: D. All of these can make asthma worse. But some things that make asthma worse ...

  17. Allergies, asthma, and pollen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reactive airway - pollen; Bronchial asthma - pollen; Triggers - pollen; Allergic rhinitis - pollen ... Things that make allergies or asthma worse are called triggers. It is important to know your triggers because avoiding them is your first step toward feeling better. ...

  18. Asthma - child - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pediatric asthma - discharge; Wheezing - discharge; Reactive airway disease - discharge ... Your child has asthma , which causes the airways of the lungs to swell and narrow. In the hospital, the doctors and nurses helped ...

  19. Exercise-induced asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000036.htm Exercise-induced asthma To use the sharing features on this page, ... such as running, basketball, or soccer. Use Your Asthma Medicine Before you Exercise Take your short-acting, ...

  20. Smoking and asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000504.htm Smoking and asthma To use the sharing features on ... your allergies or asthma worse are called triggers. Smoking is a trigger for many people who have ...

  1. Obesity and asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ali, Zarqa; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological data has established increasing adiposity as a risk factor for incident asthma. However, the mechanisms underlying the association between obesity and asthma are incompletely understood. In the present paper, we review current knowledge of possible mechanisms mediating the observed...

  2. Genetics of asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Simon F

    2015-01-01

    Asthma runs in families, and children of asthmatic parents are at increased risk of asthma. Prediction of disease risk is pivotal for the clinician when counselling atopic families. However, this is not always an easy task bearing in mind the vast and ever-increasing knowledge about asthma genetics...... of methods and advances in asthma genetics in an attempt to help the clinician keep track of the most important knowledge in the field....

  3. Fatal asthma or anaphylaxis?

    OpenAIRE

    Rainbow, J; Browne, G

    2002-01-01

    The incidence of anaphylaxis is under-reported. Children with asthma are frequently atopic and prone to allergic reactions. Parents and clinicians may attribute wheeze of rapid onset to acute severe asthma, rather than recognising an anaphylactic event. Two cases of fatal anaphylaxis are reported who were initially diagnosed as acute severe asthma, and responded poorly to bronchodilator treatment. Survivors of "acute asphyxic asthma" should be screened for reactions to common allergens that p...

  4. Identifying asthma triggers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Justin C; Ferguson, Berrylin J

    2014-02-01

    Asthma has many triggers including rhinosinusitis; allergy; irritants; medications (aspirin in aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease); and obesity. Paradoxic vocal fold dysfunction mimics asthma and may be present along with asthma. This article reviews each of these triggers, outlining methods of recognizing the trigger and then its management. In many patients more than one trigger may be present. Full appreciation of the complexity of these relationships and targeted therapy to the trigger is needed to best care for the patient with asthma.

  5. Asthma and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the airways of the lungs. When an asthma attack occurs, it is difficult for air to pass through the lungs which ... others have not. In these studies, it is difficult to determine whether the problems noted were due to the mother’s asthma, the medicines needed to control the asthma, or ...

  6. Severe asthma in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilbert, Theresa W; Bacharier, Leonard B; Fitzpatrick, Anne M

    2014-01-01

    Severe asthma in children is characterized by sustained symptoms despite treatment with high doses of inhaled corticosteroids or oral corticosteroids. Children with severe asthma may fall into 2 categories, difficult-to-treat asthma or severe therapy-resistant asthma. Difficult-to-treat asthma is defined as poor control due to an incorrect diagnosis or comorbidities, or poor adherence due to adverse psychological or environmental factors. In contrast, treatment resistant is defined as difficult asthma despite management of these factors. It is increasingly recognized that severe asthma is a highly heterogeneous disorder associated with a number of clinical and inflammatory phenotypes that have been described in children with severe asthma. Guideline-based drug therapy of severe childhood asthma is based primarily on extrapolated data from adult studies. The recommendation is that children with severe asthma be treated with higher-dose inhaled or oral corticosteroids combined with long-acting β-agonists and other add-on therapies, such as antileukotrienes and methylxanthines. It is important to identify and address the influences that make asthma difficult to control, including reviewing the diagnosis and removing causal or aggravating factors. Better definition of the phenotypes and better targeting of therapy based upon individual patient phenotypes is likely to improve asthma treatment in the future.

  7. School and Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What Happens in the Operating Room? School and Asthma KidsHealth > For Kids > School and Asthma A A A What's in this article? Have ... La escuela y el asma If you have asthma , you probably have a routine at home for ...

  8. Exercise-Induced Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Exercise-Induced Asthma KidsHealth > For Parents > Exercise-Induced Asthma A A ... previous continue Tips for Kids With Exercise-Induced Asthma For the most part, kids with exercise-induced ...

  9. Traveling and Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What Happens in the Operating Room? Traveling and Asthma KidsHealth > For Kids > Traveling and Asthma A A A What's in this article? Pack ... Or how about sleepover camp? If you have asthma , you'll be packing more than your clothes ...

  10. Do Allergies Cause Asthma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Happens in the Operating Room? Do Allergies Cause Asthma? KidsHealth > For Kids > Do Allergies Cause Asthma? A A A en español ¿Las alergias provocan ... kinds of allergies are more likely to have asthma. Do you have allergies that affect your nose ...

  11. Antifungals in severe asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parulekar, Amit D.; Diamant, Zuzana; Hanania, Nicola A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Despite guideline-based treatment, many patients with severe asthma continue to have uncontrolled disease. Fungal allergy is being increasingly recognized in the pathogenesis of severe asthma. Limited data exist on the approach to treatment of fungal asthma. This review summarizes

  12. Near Fatal Asthma: Clinical and Airway Biopsy Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard G. Barbers

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Inflammation and remodeling are integral parts of asthma pathophysiology. We sought to describe the clinical and pathologic features of near fatal asthma exacerbation (NFE. Methods. Bronchial biopsies were collected prospectively from NFE I subjects. Another NFE II group and a moderate severity exacerbation control group (ME II were retrospectively identified—no biopsies obtained. Results. All NFE II (=9 subjects exhibited remodeling and significant inflammation (eosinophilic, neutrophilic. NFE II group (=37 had a significant history of prior intubation and inhaled corticosteroids usage compared to ME II group (=41. They also exhibited leukocytosis, eosinophilia, and longer hospitalization days. Conclusions. Remodeling, eosinophilic, and neutrophilic inflammation were observed in NFE. NFE is associated with prior intubation and inhaled corticosteroids usage.

  13. [Cytokines and asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gani, F; Senna, G; Piglia, P; Grosso, B; Mezzelani, P; Pozzi, E

    1998-10-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory lung disease in which eosinophils are one of the most important involved cells. These cells accumulate in the lung because of cytokines, which are able to regulate cellular responses. The role of cytokines is well known in allergic asthma: IL4, IL5, IL3, GMCSF are the principally cytokine involved. IL4 regulate IgE synthesis while IL5, (and IL3) cause the activation and accumulation of eosinophils. In non allergic asthma, whilst only IL5 seemed to be important recent data, shows that also IL4 plays an important role. Therefore nowadays no relevant difference seems to exist between allergic and non allergic asthma; instead the primer is different: the allergen in allergic asthma and often an unknown factor in the non allergic asthma. Recently other cytokines have been proved to play a role in the pathogenesis of asthma. IL8 is chemotactic not only for neutrophils but also for eosinophils and might cause chronic inflammation in severe asthma. IL13 works like IL4, while RANTES seems to be a more important chemotactic agent than IL5. Finally IL10, which immunoregulates T lymphocyte responses, may reduce asthma inflammation. In conclusion cytokine made us to learn more about the pathogenesis of asthma even if we do not yet know when and how asthma inflammation develops.

  14. Obesity and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Peter G

    2013-12-01

    There is a global epidemic of asthma and obesity that is concentrated in Westernized and developed countries. A causal association in some people with asthma is suggested by observations that obesity precedes the onset of asthma and that bariatric surgery for morbid obesity can resolve asthma. The obese asthma phenotype features poor asthma control, limited response to corticosteroids, and an exaggeration of the physiological effects of obesity on lung function, which includes a reduction in expiratory reserve volume and airway closure occurring during tidal breathing. Obesity has important implications for asthma treatment. Increasing corticosteroid doses based on poor asthma control, as currently recommended in guidelines, may lead to overtreatment with corticosteroids in obese asthma. Enhanced bronchodilation, particularly of the small airways, may reduce the component of airway closure due to increased bronchomotor tone and suggests that greater emphasis should be placed on long-acting bronchodilators in obese asthma. The societal implications of this are important: with increasing obesity there will be increasing asthma from obesity, and the need to identify successful individual and societal weight-control strategies becomes a key goal.

  15. Epigenetics of asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, Andrew L; Wiegman, Coen; Adcock, Ian M

    2011-11-01

    Asthma is caused by both heritable and environmental factors. It has become clear that genetic studies do not adequately explain the heritability and susceptibility to asthma. The study of epigenetics, heritable non-coding changes to DNA may help to explain the heritable component of asthma. Additionally, epigenetic modifications can be influenced by the environment, including pollution and cigarette smoking, which are known asthma risk factors. These environmental trigger-induced epigenetic changes may be involved in skewing the immune system towards a Th2 phenotype following in utero exposure and thereby enhancing the risk of asthma. Alternatively, they may directly or indirectly modulate the immune and inflammatory processes in asthmatics via effects on treatment responsiveness. The study of epigenetics may therefore play an important role in our understanding and possible treatment of asthma and other allergic diseases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biochemistry of Asthma.

  16. Obesity and asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivapalan, Pradeesh; Diamant, Zuzana; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Obesity has significant impact on asthma incidence and manifestations. The purpose of the review is to discuss recent observations regarding the association between obesity and asthma focusing on underlying mechanisms, clinical presentation, response to therapy and effect...... of weight reduction. RECENT FINDINGS: Clinical and epidemiological studies indicate that obese patients with asthma may represent a unique phenotype, which is more difficult to control, less responsive to asthma medications and by that may have higher healthcare utilization. A number of common comorbidities...... have been linked to both obesity and asthma, and may, therefore, contribute to the obese-asthma phenotype. Furthermore, recently published studies indicate that even a modest weight reduction can improve clinical manifestations and outcome of asthma. SUMMARY: Compared with normal-weight patients, obese...

  17. Targeting phosphoinositide 3-kinase δ for allergic asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, Wendy C; Smith, Janet L; Affleck, Karen; Amour, Augustin

    2012-02-01

    Chronic inflammation in the lung has long been linked to the pathogenesis of asthma. Central to this airway inflammation is a T-cell response to allergens, with Th2 cytokines driving the differentiation, survival and function of the major inflammatory cells involved in the allergic cascade. PI3Kδ (phosphoinositide 3-kinase δ) is a lipid kinase, expressed predominantly in leucocytes, where it plays a critical role in immune receptor signalling. A selective PI3Kδ inhibitor is predicted to block T-cell activation in the lung, reducing the production of pro-inflammatory Th2 cytokines. PI3Kδ is also involved in B-cell and mast cell activation. Therefore the inhibition of PI3Kδ should dampen down the inflammatory cascade involved in the asthmatic response through a wide breadth of pharmacology. Current anti-inflammatory therapies, which are based on corticosteroids, are effective in controlling inflammation in mild asthmatics, but moderate/severe asthmatic patients remain poorly controlled, experiencing recurrent exacerbations. Corticosteroids have no effect on mast cell degranulation and do not act directly on B-cells, so, overall, a PI3Kδ inhibitor has the potential to deliver improvements in onset of action, efficacy and reduced exacerbations in moderate/severe asthmatics. Additionally, PI3Kδ inhibition is expected to block effects of Th17 cells, which are increasingly implicated in steroid-insensitive asthma.

  18. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 1 MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health Know How to Use Your Asthma ... 1 MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health File Formats Help: How do I ...

  19. Examining the association between childhood asthma and parent and grandparent asthma status: Implications for Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Valerio, Melissa A.; Andreski, Patricia M.; Schoeni, Robert F.; McGonagle, Katherine A.

    2010-01-01

    Examination of intergenerational asthma beyond maternal asthma has been limited. The association between childhood asthma and intergenerational asthma status among a national cohort of children was examined.

  20. Asthma in the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Lorenzo Urso

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Bronchial asthma is a common problem with enormous medical and economics impacts. It is an inflammatory disease of the airways associated with intermittent episodes of bronchospasm. Asthma is not uncommon in the elderly patients. Prevalence of asthma is similar in older and younger adults. Asthma in the elderly patient is underdiagnosed because of false perceptions by both patient and physician. The high incidence of comorbid conditions in the elderly patient makes the diagnosis and management more difficult. Correct diagnosis is demonstrated with spirometry. The goals of asthma treatment are to achieve and maintain control of symptoms and to prevent development of irreversible airflow limitation. Asthma drugs are preferably inhaled because this route minimizes systemic absorption and, thus, improves the ratio of the therapeutic benefit to the potential side-effects in elderly patients.

  1. Tobaksrygning og asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli; Lange, Peter

    2002-01-01

    with asthma. Substantial evidence suggests that smoking affects asthma adversely. Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke, especially maternal smoking in children, may be a significant risk factor for asthma. Such exposure in patients with established asthma is not only associated with more severe symptoms......Cigarette smoking is a well-known health hazard, probably not least for patients suffering from asthma. This review gives a short overview of the effects of passive and active smoking on the inception and outcome with of longitudinal changes in the lung function and mortality of patients......, but also with a poorer quality of life, reduced lung function, and increased utilisation of health care including hospital admissions. Active smoking does not appear to be a significant risk factor for asthma, but is associated with a worse outcome with regard to both longitudinal changes in lung function...

  2. Asthma and obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte S

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Obesity has significant negative impact on asthma control and risk of exacerbations. The purpose of this review is to discuss recent studies evaluating the effects of weight reduction on asthma control in obese adults. RECENT FINDINGS: Clinical studies have shown that weight...... reduction in obese patients is associated with improvements in symptoms, use of controller medication, and asthma-related quality of life together with a reduction in the risk for severe exacerbations. Furthermore, several studies have also revealed improvements in lung function and airway responsiveness...... reduction in obese adults with asthma leads to an overall improvement in asthma control, including airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation. Weight reduction should be a cornerstone in the management of obese patients with asthma....

  3. Asthma among mink workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøntved, Berit; Carstensen, Ole; Petersen, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    We report two cases of asthma among mink workers. The first case is about a mink farmer who had asthma that was difficult to treat. In the medical history there was no clear relation to work, and no conclusive work relation with peak flow monitoring. He had a positive histamine release test to mink...... urine. The second case is about a mink farm worker, who had an asthma attack when handling mink furs. Peak flow monitoring showed a clear relation to this work, but there were no signs of allergy. We conclude that these two cases suggest an increased risk of asthma among mink workers....

  4. Linking obesity and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, E Rand

    2014-04-01

    A growing body of literature suggests that obesity has a significant impact on asthma risk, phenotype, and prognosis. Epidemiological studies have clearly demonstrated that asthma is more likely to occur in obese patients, and health status is impaired in obese individuals with asthma, with obese asthmatics experiencing more symptoms, worse quality of life, increased healthcare use, and increased asthma severity. However, obesity has well-described effects on lung function and mechanics that can lead to symptoms of dyspnea without causing the pathophysiologic changes of asthma. Adding to the challenges of evaluating this association, some studies have failed to demonstrate a robust relationship between obesity and traditional biomarkers of airway inflammation in adult asthmatics, leading to the conclusion that obesity does not necessarily worsen airway inflammation in asthma. In this regard, emerging data suggest that nonatopic mechanisms may be relevant in obese asthmatics, and that these mechanisms may have a direct impact on the response of obese asthmatics to asthma therapies, most notably inhaled glucocorticoids. This article will review selected aspects of the contributions of obesity-related airway and systemic inflammation to asthma, with a focus on the impact of obesity as a modifier of risk, prognosis, and therapeutic response in asthma.

  5. Pharmacogenomics of pediatric asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Sarika

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Asthma is a complex disease with multiple genetic and environmental factors contributing to it. A component of this complexity is a highly variable response to pharmacological therapy. Pharmacogenomics is the study of the role of genetic determinants in the variable response to therapy. A number of examples of possible pharmacogenomic approaches that may prove of value in the management of asthma are discussed below. Evidence Acquisition: A search of PubMed, Google scholar, E-Medicine, BMJ and Mbase was done using the key words "pharmacogenomics of asthma", "pharmacogenomics of β-agonist, glucocorticoids, leukotriene modifiers, theophylline, muscarinic antagonists in asthma". Results: Presently, there are limited examples of gene polymorphism that can influence response to asthma therapy. Polymorphisms that alter response to asthma therapy include Arg16Gly, Gln27Glu, Thr164Ile for β-agonist receptor, polymorphism of glucocorticoid receptor gene, CRHR1 variants and polymorphism of LTC4S, ALOX5. Polymorphic variants of muscarinic receptors, PDE4 and CYP450 gene variants. Conclusion: It was concluded that genetic variation can improve the response to asthma therapy. However, no gene polymorphism has been associated with consistent results in different populations. Therefore, asthma pharmacogenomic studies in different populations with a large number of subjects are required to make possible tailoring the asthma therapy according to the genetic characteristic of individual patient.

  6. Asthma, sports, and death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiDario, A Geoffrey; Becker, Jack M

    2005-01-01

    The impact of asthma on the general population has been described in detail in medical literature. However, asthma also has a significant impact on the pediatric and adult athlete. This is rarely reported in either the lay press or the medical literature. In 2003, Becker and coworkers conducted a retrospective analysis of the incidence of asthma as a direct cause of death in competitive athletes across the United States between 1993 and 2000. They sought to raise awareness that severe asthma exacerbations and even death can occur during sports from asthma in athletes, while still supporting the concept of maximal participation in sporting activities. To their knowledge, this remains the only published study looking specifically at this issue. Fortunately, fatal asthma events are infrequent in either the adult or the pediatric populations. Those rare cases involving athletes are commonly highlighted in the lay press when they do occur, e.g., when the victim is a college football player such as Rashidi Wheeler. Wheeler died of a fatal asthma exacerbation on August 3, 2002, during a conditioning drill as a member of the Northwestern University football team. Although he was known to have chronic asthma with no obvious barriers to health care, he nevertheless succumbed to his condition. Here, we report a similar, although less well-known, case of an adolescent who died as a direct result of an asthma exacerbation during a high school physical education class. We also offer a brief review of the literature regarding morbidity and mortality in athletes.

  7. Influence of degree of specific allergic sensitivity on severity of rhinitis and asthma in Chinese allergic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Changqing

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The association between sensitizations and severity of allergic diseases is controversial. Objective This study was to investigate the association between severity of asthma and rhinitis and degree of specific allergic sensitization in allergic patients in China. Method A cross-sectional survey was performed in 6304 patients with asthma and/or rhinitis from 4 regions of China. Patients completed a standardized questionnaire documenting their respiratory and allergic symptoms, their impact on sleep, daily activities, school and work. They also underwent skin prick tests with 13 common aeroallergens. Among the recruited subjects, 2268 provided blood samples for serum measurement of specific IgE (sIgE against 16 common aeroallergens. Results Significantly higher percentage of patients with moderate-severe intermittent rhinitis were sensitized to outdoor allergens while percentage of patients sensitized to indoor allergens was increased with increasing severity of asthma. Moderate-severe intermittent rhinitis was associated with the skin wheal size and the level of sIgE to Artemisia vulgaris and Ambrosia artemisifolia (p Dermatophagoides (D. pteronyssinus and D. farinae (p Conclusions Artemisia vulgaris and Ambrosia artemisifolia sensitizations are associated with the severity of intermittent rhinitis and D. pteronyssinus and D. farinae sensitizations are associated with increasing severity of asthma in China. Increase in number of allergens the patients are sensitized to may also increase the severity of rhinitis and asthma.

  8. Nutrition and Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta K

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Increase in the asthma prevalence in many countries over the recent decades, highlights the need for a greater understanding of the risk factors for asthma. Be-cause asthma is the result of interaction between genetic and environmental fac-tors, increasing prevalence is certainly the result of changes in environmental fac-tors because of process of wesernization. That is the reason for higher prevalence in countries where a traditional to a westernized lifestyle occurred earlier. This increasing prevalence has affected both rural and urban communities, suggesting that local environmental factors such as exposure to allergens or industrial air pol-lutions are not the sole cause. In the last few years, nutrition has represented an important conditioning factor of many cardiovascular, gastrointestinal and chronic pulmonary diseases. So it has been hypothesized that dietary constituents influence the immune system and thus, may also be actively involved in the onset of asthma and other allergic diseases. Dietary constituents can play beneficial as well as det-rimental role in asthma. The possible role of diet in the development of asthma can be described as follows: first, a food allergen can cause asthma. Second, there is role of breast-feeding for prevention of asthma later in life. Third, a low intake of antioxidative dietary constituents might be a risk factor for asthma. Moreover, role of cations such as sodium, potassium and magnesium has been described in development of asthma. Finally, intake of fatty acids specially the role of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids play important role in cause of asthma.

  9. Disorders of cardiac hemodynamic in attack period of bronchial asthma in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kondratiev V.А.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available By dopplerechocardiography method there was studied functional state of cardiac ventricles and character of hemodynamic disorders in 48 patients aged 5-17 years in attack period of moderately-severe and severe bronchial asthma. Group of comparison included 40 healthy peers. Disorders of central and peripheral hemodynamic in attack period of bronchial asthma in children were accompanied both by systolic and diastolic dysfunction of the left and right heart ventricles, herewith right ventricle was functioning in the mode of hyperdynamic, and left one – in the mode of hypodynamic. Combined systolic-diastolic variant of dysfunction both of right and left ventricles was developing in 58,3% of patients with moderately-severe and in 91,6% of patients with severe bronchial asthma. In the attack period of bronchial asthma in children equal directionality of systolic and diastolic dysfunction of heart ventricles was developing; this was characterized by synchronization of their function. Assessment of functional interaction of the ventricles under conditions of severe asthma attack showed direct and high (r=0,67 correlative interaction between finding of Tei index of the left and right ventricles, which characterize their systolic function; this, under conditions of increased hemodynamic pre-loading testified to compensatory increase of systolic interaction of ventricles. Direct and high (r=0,69 correlative interaction between time indices of isovolumic relaxation of the left and right ventricles, characterizing their diastolic function, testified to compensatory increase of diastolic interaction of ventricles under conditions of increase of hemodynamic post-loading. Imbalance of central and peripheral link of hemodynamic in attack period of bronchial asthma in children testified to development of cardiac insufficiency, which was compensated predominantly at the expense of increase of heart contractions rate.

  10. How Is Asthma Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1.25 million of those individuals have severe asthma, a condition that can be difficult to control and treat. Learn more about his research by visiting the NHLBI Laboratory of Asthma and Lung Inflammation website: http://www.nhlbi.nih. ...

  11. Traveling and Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Emergency Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Traveling and Asthma KidsHealth > For Kids > Traveling and Asthma A A A What's in this ... t have to get in the way of travel fun. Let's find out how to be prepared ...

  12. Undiagnosed asthma in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gent, R.

    2008-01-01

    Asthma is the most prevalent chronic disease in childhood. To study the actual prevalence and impact of undiagnosed childhood asthma in daily life (i.e. quality of life, participation in physical and school activities) we performed a survey in schoolchildren (aged 7-10 years) in the southern part of

  13. Asthma in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Benedictis, Fernando Maria; Attanasi, Marina

    2016-03-01

    Several topics on childhood asthma were addressed in the Paediatric Clinical Year in Review session at the 2015 European Respiratory Society International Congress. With regard to the relationship between lower respiratory tract infections and asthma, it emerges that is the number of respiratory episodes in the first years of life, but not the particular viral trigger, to be associated with later asthma development. Understanding which characteristics of individual patients are associated with an increased risk for asthma exacerbation is a critical step to implement strategies preventing these seasonal events. Recent data suggest the possibility that exhaled volatile organic compounds may qualify as biomarkers in detecting early signs of asthma. Adding information of exhaled volatile organic compounds and expression of inflammation genes to a clinical tool significantly improves asthma prediction in preschool wheezy children. Personal communication with children and adolescents is likely more important than the tools actually used for monitoring asthma. Systemic corticosteroids do not affect the long-term prognosis in children with first viral-induced wheezing episode and should be used cautiously during acute episodes. Finally, stress and a polymorphism upstream of a specific gene are both associated with reduced bronchodilator response in children with asthma.

  14. Asthma in childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Maria de Benedictis

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Several topics on childhood asthma were addressed in the Paediatric Clinical Year in Review session at the 2015 European Respiratory Society International Congress. With regard to the relationship between lower respiratory tract infections and asthma, it emerges that is the number of respiratory episodes in the first years of life, but not the particular viral trigger, to be associated with later asthma development. Understanding which characteristics of individual patients are associated with an increased risk for asthma exacerbation is a critical step to implement strategies preventing these seasonal events. Recent data suggest the possibility that exhaled volatile organic compounds may qualify as biomarkers in detecting early signs of asthma. Adding information of exhaled volatile organic compounds and expression of inflammation genes to a clinical tool significantly improves asthma prediction in preschool wheezy children. Personal communication with children and adolescents is likely more important than the tools actually used for monitoring asthma. Systemic corticosteroids do not affect the long-term prognosis in children with first viral-induced wheezing episode and should be used cautiously during acute episodes. Finally, stress and a polymorphism upstream of a specific gene are both associated with reduced bronchodilator response in children with asthma.

  15. Reflexology and bronchial asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brygge, T; Heinig, J H; Collins, P

    2001-01-01

    Many asthma patients seek alternative or adjunctive therapies. One such modality is reflexology, whereby finger pressure is applied to certain parts of the body. The aim of the study was to examine the popular claim that reflexology treatment benefits bronchial asthma. Ten weeks of active...

  16. [Occupational asthma in Hungary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endre, László

    2015-05-10

    Occupational asthma belongs to communicable diseases, which should be reported in Hungary. During a 24-year period between January 1990 and December 2013, 180 occupational asthma cases were reported in Hungary (52 cases between 1990 and 1995, 83 cases between 1996 and 2000, 40 cases between 2001 and 2006, and 5 cases between 2007 and 2013). These data are unusual, because according to the official report of the National Korányi Pulmonology Institute in Budapest, at least 14,000 new adult asthma cases were reported in every year between 2000 and 2012 in Hungary. Also, international data indicate that at least 2% of adult patients with asthma have occupational asthma and at least 50 out of 1 million employees develop occupational asthma in each year. In 2003, 631 new occupational asthma patients were reported in the United Kingdom, but only 7 cases in Hungary. Because it is unlikely that the occupational environment in Hungary is much better than anywhere else in the world, it seems that not all new occupational asthma cases are reported in Hungary. Of the 180 reported cases in Hungary, 55 were bakers or other workers in flour mills. There were 11 metal-workers, 10 health care assistants, 9 workers dealing with textiles (tailors, dressmakers, workers in textile industry) and 9 employees worked upon leather and animal fur. According to international data, the most unsafe profession is the animal keeper in scientific laboratories, but only 4 of them were reported as having occupational asthma during the studied 24 years in Hungary. Interestingly, 3 museologists with newly-diagnosed occupational asthma were reported in 2003, but not such cases occurred before or after that year. In this paper the Hungarian literature of occupational asthma is summarized, followed by a review on the classification, pathomechanism, clinical presentation, predisposing factors, diagnostics and therapeutic aspects of the disease. Epidemiological data of adult asthma in Hungary and data from

  17. [Distinguishing asthma from COPD].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohara, Kouhei; Samukawa, Takuya; Inoue, Hiromasa

    2016-05-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are major public health burdens. Asthma is characterized by airway inflammation, airway narrowing with reversibility, and hyperresponsiveness of airways. COPD has been associated with smoking and exposure to environmental fumes, which typically characterized by persistent airflow limitation and chronic inflammation of the airways. These differences are most apparent when young non-smoker with asthma and older smokers with COPD are compared. However, it would be difficult to differentiate asthma from COPD, especially in elderly who currently smoke or have a significant history of smoking. Furthermore, some patients exhibit characteristics of both diseases, this may represent a phenotype known as asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS). Therefore, the precise understanding of these diseases is important.

  18. Asthma control in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Søren

    2016-01-01

    The goal of asthma management is to achieve disease control. Poorly controlled asthma is associated with an increased number of days lost from school, exacerbations and days in hospital. Furthermore, children with uncontrolled asthma have more frequent contacts with the health-care system. Recent...... studies have added new information about the effects of poorly controlled asthma on a range of important, but less studied outcomes, including risk of obesity, daily physical activity, cardiovascular fitness, stress, concentration and focused attention, learning disabilities and risk of depression. From...... these studies it seems that poor asthma control may have a greater impact on the child than previously thought. This may have important long-term consequences for the child such as an increased risk of life-style associated diseases and poorer school performance. The level of control seems to be the most...

  19. Fertility outcomes in asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade, Elisabeth Juul; Thomsen, Simon Francis; Lindenberg, Svend;

    2016-01-01

    Evidence is increasing of an association between asthma and aspects of female reproduction. However, current knowledge is limited and furthermore relies on questionnaire studies or small populations. In a prospective observational cohort study to investigate whether time to pregnancy, the number...... of fertility treatments, and the number of successful pregnancies differ significantly between women with unexplained infertility with and without asthma.245 women with unexplained infertility (aged 23-45 years) underwent questionnaires and asthma and allergy testing while undergoing fertility treatment. 96...... women entering the study had either a former doctor's diagnosis of asthma or were diagnosed with asthma when included. After inclusion they were followed for a minimum of 12 months in fertility treatment, until they had a successful pregnancy, stopped treatment, or the observation ended.The likelihood...

  20. Asthma control: Patient and environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijssenbeek-Nouwens, L.H.M.

    2015-01-01

    Control of asthma, the goal of asthma treatment, seems hard to obtain. However, it is largely unknown why control of asthma remains difficult in many patients in spite of available powerful medication. In this thesis we studied non-pharmacological factors influencing asthma control: patient related

  1. Factors associated with asthma control.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, M.P. de; Bemt, E.A.J.M. van den; Lince, S.; Muris, J.W.M.; Thoonen, B.P.A.; Schayck, C.P. van

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate which factors are associated with asthma control experienced by asthma patients. In a cross-sectional study patients aged 16-60 years with mild to moderate asthma were selected. The influence of the following factors on asthma control was studied in a multivaria

  2. Advances in pediatric asthma in 2013: coordinating asthma care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szefler, Stanley J

    2014-03-01

    Last year's "Advances in pediatric asthma: moving toward asthma prevention" concluded that "We are well on our way to creating a pathway around wellness in asthma care and also to utilize new tools to predict the risk for asthma and take steps to not only prevent asthma exacerbations but also to prevent the early manifestations of the disease and thus prevent its evolution to severe asthma." This year's summary will focus on recent advances in pediatric asthma on prenatal and postnatal factors altering the natural history of asthma, assessment of asthma control, and new insights regarding potential therapeutic targets for altering the course of asthma in children, as indicated in Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology publications in 2013 and early 2014. Recent reports continue to shed light on methods to understand factors that influence the course of asthma, methods to assess and communicate levels of control, and new targets for intervention, as well as new immunomodulators. It will now be important to carefully assess risk factors for the development of asthma, as well as the risk for asthma exacerbations, and to improve the way we communicate this information in the health care system. This will allow parents, primary care physicians, specialists, and provider systems to more effectively intervene in altering the course of asthma and to further reduce asthma morbidity and mortality.

  3. Tobaksrygning og asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli; Lange, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is a well-known health hazard, probably not least for patients suffering from asthma. This review gives a short overview of the effects of passive and active smoking on the inception and outcome with of longitudinal changes in the lung function and mortality of patients with ast......Cigarette smoking is a well-known health hazard, probably not least for patients suffering from asthma. This review gives a short overview of the effects of passive and active smoking on the inception and outcome with of longitudinal changes in the lung function and mortality of patients...... with asthma. Substantial evidence suggests that smoking affects asthma adversely. Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke, especially maternal smoking in children, may be a significant risk factor for asthma. Such exposure in patients with established asthma is not only associated with more severe symptoms......, but also with a poorer quality of life, reduced lung function, and increased utilisation of health care including hospital admissions. Active smoking does not appear to be a significant risk factor for asthma, but is associated with a worse outcome with regard to both longitudinal changes in lung function...

  4. Asthma in adolescent athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsen, Kai-Håkon; Hem, Erlend; Stensrud, Trine

    2011-12-01

    Athletes active in endurance sports are at an increased risk of acquiring asthma through their sports activities, especially so for cross-country skiers, biathlon skiers, swimmers and athletes of other endurance sports. Asthma may be present from early childhood or develop while in active sports. This article focuses on the physical activity and sports activities in children and adolescents. Exercise-induced asthma (EIA) is found in 8-10% of a normal child population of school age and in about 35% of children with current asthma. EIA is caused by the markedly increased ventilation during exercise, with increased heat and water loss through respiration, leading to bronchial constriction. The risk of developing asthma in the young athlete is related to the repeated daily training activity with increased epithelial damage of the airways, delayed repair due to the daily repetition of the training and increased airway mucosal inflammation. The increased environmental exposure through the sports activity to environmental agents, such as cold, dry air in skiers and chlorine compounds in swimmers, increases symptoms and signs of asthma and bronchial hyper-responsiveness, either worsening an existing asthma or leading to a novel disease in a previously healthy athlete. Several specific aspects of daily training life, environmental exposure, diagnostic procedures and aspects of treatment related to the regulations of medication use in sports need particular attention when addressing the adolescent athlete with respiratory symptoms.

  5. Eosinophilic Endotype of Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, Fernando; Lim, Hui Fang; Nair, Parameswaran

    2016-08-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous disease that can be classified into different clinical endotypes, depending on the type of airway inflammation, clinical severity, and response to treatment. This article focuses on the eosinophilic endotype of asthma, which is defined by the central role that eosinophils play in the pathophysiology of the condition. It is characterized by elevated sputum and/or blood eosinophils on at least 2 occasions and by a significant response to treatments that suppress eosinophilia. Histopathologic demonstration of eosinophils in the airways provides the most direct diagnosis of eosinophilic asthma; but it is invasive, thus, impractical in clinical practice.

  6. Pediatric asthma disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, T R; Chatburn, R L

    2000-03-01

    The prevalence of asthma in children in the United States is estimated at more than 5% of the population, and it has risen more than 40% in the previous decade. Several guidelines for the management of acute and chronic asthma exist, and they all emphasize several basic components including state-of-the-art pharmacologic treatment, trigger avoidance, and patient self-management skills. This Article highlights the necessary components for pediatric asthma disease management to insure a smooth continuum of care across all disciplines and settings.

  7. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir You can control your asthma and avoid an attack by taking ... people with asthma live healthier lives by gaining control over their asthma. Quick Links Asthma Action Plan ...

  8. TCM Differential Treatment of Cough Variant Asthma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhong-de; DENG Yi-qi; ZHANG Yu; HAN Yun; LIN Lin; CHAO En-xiang

    2010-01-01

    @@ Cough variant asthma (CVA), also called latent asthma or cough asthma, is a special type of asthma. With gradually deepened understanding of CVA in recent years, good curative effect has been achieved in TCM treatment of CVA.

  9. What's an Asthma Flare-Up?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old What's an Asthma Flare-Up? KidsHealth > For Parents > What's an Asthma ... of a straw that's being pinched. Causes of Asthma Flare-Ups People with asthma have airways that ...

  10. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Children with Current Asthma Overuse of quick-relief medication among persons with active asthma Use of long-term control medication among persons with active asthma Uncontrolled Asthma among ...

  11. Asthma Triggers: Gain Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jump to main content US EPA United States Environmental Protection Agency Search Search Asthma Share Facebook Twitter Google+ ... remove an animal from the home, it is important to thoroughly clean the floors, walls, carpets and ...

  12. Asthma Medications and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... correctly. Other Asthma Related Medication Treatment Annual influenza vaccine (flu shot) The annual flu shot is recommended for ... second or third trimester. Read more about the flu vaccine . Immunotherapy (allergy shots) Allergy shots should not be ...

  13. Asthma and Food Allergies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pediatrician Health Issues Conditions Abdominal ADHD Allergies & Asthma Autism Cancer Chest & Lungs Chronic Conditions Cleft & Craniofacial Developmental ... prepared food. Last Updated 11/21/2015 Source Nutrition: What Every Parent Needs to Know (Copyright © American ...

  14. Interleukin-16 in asthma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Jing-min; SHI Huan-zhong

    2006-01-01

    @@ Bronchial asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways that is characterized by lymphocyte, eosinophil, and mast cell infiltration of the submucosa along with mucous gland hyperplasia and subepithelial fibrosis.

  15. Zoneterapi og asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brygge, Thor; Heinig, John Hilligsøe; Collins, Philippa;

    2002-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Many patients with asthma seek alternative or adjunctive therapies. One such modality is reflexology. Our aim was to examine the popular claim that reflexology treatment benefits bronchial asthma. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Ten weeks of either active or simulated (placebo) reflexology were...... compared in an otherwise blind, controlled trial of 40 patients with asthma. RESULTS: Objective lung function tests did not change. Subjective scores and bronchial sensitivity to histamine improved on both regimens, but no differences were found in the groups receiving active or placebo reflexology....... However, a trend in favour of reflexology became significant when a supplementary analysis of symptom diaries was carried out. At the same time a significant pattern compatible with subconscious un-blinding was found. DISCUSSION: We found no evidence that reflexology has a specific effect on asthma beyond...

  16. Inhaled Asthma Medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education Center Fellows-in-Training Grants & Awards Program Directors Practice Resources ASTHMA IQ Consultation and Referral Guidelines Practice Financial Survey Practice Tools Running a Practice Statements and Practice Parameters About AAAAI Advocacy Allergist / Immunologists: ...

  17. Asthma, Allergies and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education Center Fellows-in-Training Grants & Awards Program Directors Practice Resources ASTHMA IQ Consultation and Referral Guidelines Practice Financial Survey Practice Tools Running a Practice Statements and Practice Parameters About AAAAI Advocacy Allergist / Immunologists: ...

  18. Exercise and Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education Center Fellows-in-Training Grants & Awards Program Directors Practice Resources ASTHMA IQ Consultation and Referral Guidelines Practice Financial Survey Practice Tools Running a Practice Statements and Practice Parameters About AAAAI Advocacy Allergist / Immunologists: ...

  19. Precipitating factors of asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, T H

    1992-01-01

    Asthma is characterised by bronchial hyperresponsiveness. This feature of the asthmatic diathesis predisposes patients to wheezing in response to a number of different factors. These precipitating factors include specific allergen acting via sensitised mediator cells through an IgE-dependent mechanism. There are irritants which may work through a non-specific manner, or stimuli such as exercise and hyperventilation, which probably also act through mediator release via a non-IgE-dependent manner. The mechanism whereby physical stimuli such as exercise induce bronchoconstriction is of interest, because it increases the context in which the mast cell may participate in acute asthmatic bronchoconstriction. Respiratory infections also commonly provoke asthma, especially in infants and may, indeed, precipitate the asthmatic state itself. Finally, drugs can often trigger asthma attacks and the mechanisms of asthma precipitated by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as aspirin have been the subject of recent research.

  20. Relvar Ellipta for asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    ▼Relvar Ellipta (GSK) is a dry powder inhaler that contains a corticosteroid (fluticasone furoate) and a long-acting beta2 agonist (vilanterol trifenatate). It is licensed for once-daily use as maintenance therapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma. In a previous article we considered its use in the management of COPD.1 Here we review the evidence for Relvar Ellipta in the treatment of patients with asthma.

  1. [Asthma, obesity and diet].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barranco, P; Delgado, J; Gallego, L T; Bobolea, I; Pedrosa, Ma; García de Lorenzo, A; Quirce, S

    2012-01-01

    Asthma and obesity have a considerable impact on public health and their prevalence has increased in recent years. Numerous studies have linked both disorders. Most prospective studies show that obesity is a risk factor for asthma and have found a positive correlation between baseline body mass index (BMI) and the subsequent development of asthma, although these results are not conclusive when studying the association between airway hyperresponsiveness with BMI. Furthermore, several studies suggest that whereas weight gain increases the risk of asthma, weight loss improves the course of the illness. Different factors could explain this association. Obesity is capable of reducing pulmonary compliance, lung volumes and the diameter of peripheral respiratory airways as well as affecting the volume of blood in the lungs and the ventilation-perfusion relationship. Furthermore, the increase in the normal functioning of adipose tissue in obese subjects leads to a systemic proinflammatory state, which produces a rise in the serum concentrations of several cytokines, the soluble fractions of their receptors and chemokines. Many of these mediators are synthesized and secreted by cells from adipose tissue and receive the generic name of adipokines, including IL-6, IL-10, eotaxin, TNF-α, TGF- 1, PCR, leptin y adiponectin. Finally, specific regions of the human genome which are related to both asthma and obesity have been identified. Most studies point out that obesity is capable of increasing the prevalence and incidence of asthma, although this effect appears to be modest. The treatment of obese asthmatics must include a weight control program.

  2. Role of Asthma Education in the Management of Adult Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanne Côté

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available When a patient is newly diagnosed as having asthma, he or she is often prescribed new medication without getting much information on the disease and its treatment. This article emphasizes the need to educate asthmatics. Asthma treatment should begin with a proper adjustment of the medication, allowing asthmatics to lead a normal life. All asthmatics should be shown how to use their inhalation device properly. They should he knowledgeable about the basic aspects of asthma, airway inflammation and bronchoconstriction, use or medication and early symptoms heralding an asthma attack. Environmental factors that may trigger an asthma attack should be explained. Patients should be able to self-monitor asthma using either symptom severity or a peak flow meter. Because asthma is an unpredictable disease, patients should have a self-action plan to implement when their asthma deteriorates.

  3. Pediatric asthma controller therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmo, Mark

    2011-02-01

    The treatment of children with asthma has historically relied upon expert opinion using data extrapolated from adult studies. Over the past few years, landmark studies have been completed providing healthcare professionals with evidence on which a reasonable approach can be made for children suffering from this common and serious disease. Asthmatic phenotype in children, unlike adults, tends to differ according to age, which must be taken into account as well as triggers, severity, and level of control. The care of the child with asthma is complex, but accumulating data have demonstrated that we are on the right path for optimizing control while reducing the burden of side effects. The newest Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) guidelines, as well as recent updates from the landmark CAMP (Childhood Asthma Management Program) study and information from the PACT (Pediatric Asthma Control Trial) and budesonide/formoterol controller and reliever studies, along with recent comparisons of higher dose inhaled corticosteroids (ICS), and ICS/long-acting β(2)-adrenoceptor agonist (LABA) combination and leukotriene receptor antagonist (LTRA) therapies in children have clarified a few of the big questions in pediatric asthma. For children with asthma aged 5 years and older, the CAMP trial demonstrated that regular use of ICS reduces the frequency of symptoms; however, height was adversely affected and there is no evidence for altering the natural history of asthma. In patients aged 6 years and over whose asthma is uncontrolled on ICS alone, combination therapy with ICS and a LABA has been recently compared with the use of higher dose ICS and the addition of an LTRA in pediatric patients. The addition of a LABA statistically will be of most benefit; however, some children will have optimal control with doubling the baseline dose of ICS or addition of an LTRA. Use of budesonide/formoterol as a controller and reliever therapy extends the time to first exacerbation versus

  4. The Significance of Asthma Follow-Up Consultations for Adherence to Asthma Medication, Asthma Medication Beliefs, and Asthma Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malin Axelsson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim was to investigate adherence to asthma medication treatment, medication beliefs, and asthma control in relation to asthma follow-up consultations in asthmatics in the general population. A further aim was to describe associations between adherence, medication beliefs, and asthma control. Method. In the population-based West Sweden Asthma Study, data allowing calculation of adherence for 4.5 years based on pharmacy records were obtained from 165 adult asthmatics. Additional data were collected through questionnaires and structured interviews. Results. The mean adherence value for filled prescriptions for regular asthma medication was 68% (median 55.3% but varied over the year under study. Adherence to combination inhalers with corticosteroids and long-acting beta2 agonists was higher than adherence to single inhalers with corticosteroids only. More than one-third of participants reported not having seen an asthma nurse or physician for several years. Regular asthma follow-up consultations were associated with both higher adherence and the belief that asthma medication was necessary but were not associated with asthma control. Conclusions. Adherence to asthma medication treatment was low and varied over the year under study. The current study suggests that quality improvements in asthma care are needed if adherence to asthma medication is to be improved.

  5. Genetics Home Reference: allergic asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1 link) American Academy of Allergy Asthma and Immunology: Asthma Treatment and Management General Information from MedlinePlus (5 links) Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy Genetic Counseling Palliative Care Surgery and Rehabilitation Related Information How are genetic conditions ...

  6. Allergy and Asthma Health Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Of Age Older Adults Allergy and Asthma Health Magazine Women Infant, Children and Teenagers Living With Lung ... written by Respiratory Experts Like no other health magazine, Allergy & Asthma Health Magazine is published by people ...

  7. Smoking and Asthma (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... get absorbed into upholstery, clothing, and carpeting, leaving carcinogens that can't be washed away with soap ... asthma, let friends, relatives, and caregivers know that tobacco smoke may cause an asthma flare-up. To ...

  8. Japanese Guideline for Adult Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Ohta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult bronchial asthma (hereinafter, asthma is characterized by chronic airway inflammation, reversible airway narrowing, and airway hyperresponsiveness. Long-standing asthma induces airway remodeling to cause an intractable asthma. The number of patients with asthma has increased, while the number of patients who die from asthma has decreased (1.7 per 100,000 patients in 2009. The aim of asthma treatment is to enable patients with asthma to lead a healthy life without any symptoms. A partnership between physicians and patients is indispensable for appropriate treatment. Long-term management with agents and elimination of causes and risk factors are fundamental to asthma treatment. Four steps in pharmacotherapy differentiate mild to intensive treatments; each step includes an appropriate daily dose of an inhaled corticosteroid (ICS, varying from low to high doses. Long-acting β2 agonists (LABA, leukotriene receptor antagonists, and theophylline sustained-release preparation are recommended as concomitant drugs, while anti-IgE antibody therapy is a new choice for the most severe and persistent asthma. Inhaled β2 agonists, aminophylline, corticosteroids, adrenaline, oxygen therapy, etc., are used as needed against acute exacerbations. Allergic rhinitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, aspirin induced asthma, pregnancy, and cough variant asthma are also important factors that need to be considered.

  9. Childhood asthma and physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lochte, Lene; Nielsen, Kim G; Petersen, Poul Erik

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Childhood asthma is a global problem affecting the respiratory health of children. Physical activity (PA) plays a role in the relationship between asthma and respiratory health. We hypothesized that a low level of PA would be associated with asthma in children and adolescents...

  10. Genetics of onset of asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, F. Nicole; de Jongste, Johan C.; Postma, Dirkje S.; Koppelman, Gerard H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review Most asthma starts early in life. Defining phenotypes of asthma at this age is difficult as many preschool children have asthma-like respiratory symptoms. This review discusses progress in defining early wheezing phenotypes and describes genetic factors associated with the age of o

  11. Defining asthma in genetic studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppelman, GH; Postma, DS; Meijer, G.

    1999-01-01

    Genetic studies have been hampered by the lack of a gold standard to diagnose asthma. The complex nature of asthma makes it more difficult to identify asthma genes. Therefore, approaches to define phenotypes, which have been successful in other genetically complex diseases, may be applied to define

  12. How Do Asthma Medicines Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What Happens in the Operating Room? How Do Asthma Medicines Work? KidsHealth > For Kids > How Do Asthma Medicines Work? A A A en español ¿Cómo funcionan los medicamentos para el asma? People with asthma have what is called a chronic (say: KRAH- ...

  13. Rhinitis: a complication to asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J W; Thomsen, S F; Nolte, H;

    2010-01-01

    Asthma and rhinitis often co-occur, and this potentially increases the disease severity and impacts negatively on the quality of life. We studied disease severity, airway responsiveness, atopy, quality of life and treatment in subjects with both asthma and rhinitis compared to patients with asthma...

  14. Ion channels in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valverde, Miguel A; Cantero-Recasens, Gerard; Garcia-Elias, Anna; Jung, Carole; Carreras-Sureda, Amado; Vicente, Rubén

    2011-09-23

    Ion channels are specialized transmembrane proteins that permit the passive flow of ions following their electrochemical gradients. In the airways, ion channels participate in the production of epithelium-based hydroelectrolytic secretions and in the control of intracellular Ca(2+) levels that will ultimately activate almost all lung cells, either resident or circulating. Thus, ion channels have been the center of many studies aiming to understand asthma pathophysiological mechanisms or to identify therapeutic targets for better control of the disease. In this minireview, we focus on molecular, genetic, and animal model studies associating ion channels with asthma.

  15. Difficult childhood asthma: management and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillie-Leblond, Isabelle; Deschildre, Antoine; Gosset, Philippe; de Blic, Jacques

    2012-09-01

    Diagnosis and management of severe asthma implies the definition of different entities, that is, difficult asthma and refractory severe asthma, but also the different phenotypes included in the term refractory severe asthma. A complete evaluation by a physician expert in asthma is necessary, adapted for each child. Identification of mechanisms involved in different phenotypes in refractory severe asthma may improve the therapeutic approach. The quality of care and monitoring of children with severe asthma is as important as the prescription drug, and is also crucial for differentiating between severe asthma and difficult asthma, whereby expertise is required.

  16. Allergy, asthma and the environment; Allergie, Asthma und Umwelt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ring, J. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Dermatologie und Allergologie am Biederstein, Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Gfesser, M. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Dermatologie und Allergologie am Biederstein, Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany)

    1996-10-11

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways. Asthma and other allergic diseases have increased in prevalence during the last decades in many industrialized countries. Among other hypotheses, the possible role of environmental pollutants has received much public and scientific attention. Some pollutants may modulate the different phases of allergic reactions. Inflammation is a critical feature in the pathogenesis of asthma and therefore, beside allergen avoidance, anti-inflammatory treatment is the first line therapy of asthma. Cysteinyl-leukotrienes are lipid mediators which appear to play a major role in the pathophysiology of asthma. Based on current data, it appears that leukotrience receptor antagonists have bronchodilative and anti-inflammatory effects and may therefore enrich the pharmacotherapeutic spectrum within the therapeutic concept of patient management in asthma. (orig.) [Deutsch] Asthma bronchiale ist eine entzuendliche Erkrankung der Atemwege. Epidemiologische Studien konnten eine deutliche Zunahme der Erkrankung in den letzten zwei Jahrzehnten aufzeigen. In der Entstehung von Allergien und Asthma bronchiale spielen Umwelteinfluesse eine grosse Rolle. Luftschadstoffe scheinen mit verschiedenen Allergie-Parametern bei der Sensibilisierung, Symptombildung und Chronifizierung zu interferieren. Da beim Asthma bronchiale neben der Bronchokonstriktion die Entzuendung der Bronchialschleimhaut eine besondere Rolle spielt, wird heute neben Allergenkarenz und prophylaktischen Massnahmen eine fruehzeitige antientzuendliche Asthmatherapie angestrebt. Cysteinyl-Leukotriene gehoeren zu den wirksamsten Entzuendungsmediatoren beim Asthma bronchiale. Leukotrien-Rezeptorantagonisten scheinen sowohl bronchodilatatorische als auch antientzuendliche Wirkungen zu haben und koennten so innerhalb eines Gesamtkonzeptes von antiallergischer und antiasthmatischer Therapie das pharmakotherapeutische Spektrum bereichern. (orig.)

  17. Elastin in asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reddel, Caroline J; Weiss, Anthony S; Burgess, Janette K

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular matrix is generally increased in asthma, causing thickening of the airways which may either increase or decrease airway responsiveness, depending on the mechanical requirements of the deposited matrix. However, in vitro studies have shown that the altered extracellular matrix produced

  18. Occupational Neutrophilic Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Leigh

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Occupational asthma is typically associated with an eosinophilic bronchitis. The case of a 41-year-old woman who developed symptoms of asthma after occupational exposure to metal working fluids is reported. The diagnosis of asthma was confirmed by an forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1 of 1.7 (59% predicted, with 11% reversibility after inhaled bronchodilator and a provocation concentration of methacholine to cause a fall in FEV1 of 20% (PC20 of 0.4 mg/mL. Induced sputum examination showed a marked neutrophilia. Over the next six months, serial sputum analyses confirmed the presence of a marked sterile neutrophilic bronchitis during periods of occupational exposure to metal working fluids, which resolved when the patient was away from work and recurred when she returned to work. The sputum findings were mirrored by corresponding changes in spirometry and PC20 methacholine. The findings indicate the occurrence of occupational asthma associated with an intense, sterile neutrophilic bronchitis after exposure to metal working fluids.

  19. The microbiome in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yvonne J; Boushey, Homer A

    2015-01-01

    The application of recently developed sensitive, specific, culture-independent tools for identification of microbes is transforming concepts of microbial ecology, including concepts of the relationships between the vast complex populations of microbes associated with ourselves and with states of health and disease. Although most work initially focused on the community of microbes (microbiome) in the gastrointestinal tract and its relationship to gastrointestinal disease, interest has expanded to include study of the relationships of the airway microbiome to asthma and its phenotypes and to the relationships between the gastrointestinal microbiome, development of immune function, and predisposition to allergic sensitization and asthma. Here we provide our perspective on the findings of studies of differences in the airway microbiome between asthmatic patients and healthy subjects and of studies of relationships between environmental microbiota, gut microbiota, immune function, and asthma development. In addition, we provide our perspective on how these findings suggest the broad outline of a rationale for approaches involving directed manipulation of the gut and airway microbiome for the treatment and prevention of allergic asthma.

  20. Managing Asthma at School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Julie A.

    2000-01-01

    School personnel must know which students have asthma, typical warning signs, and appropriate actions in an emergency. Administering appropriate medication and reducing environmental triggers are not enough. Policymaking in schools and workplaces and legislation to increase health care access and eliminate substandard housing and air pollution are…

  1. Stress and asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoji Nagata

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Three factors in recent medical research and treatment (advances in the field of psychoneuroimmunology, epidemiological evidence regarding important interaction between psychosocial factors and development of disease, and the recognition of the importance of patient education for self-management of asthma have led clinicians and researchers to reconsider the role of psychosocial stress in asthma. There are many reports suggesting that stressful life events, family problems and a behavior pattern that increases psychological conflict may influence the development or relapse of asthma and influence its clinical course. Depression is known as one of the risk factors of fatal asthmatic attack. In laboratory studies, about 20% of asthmatics were considered reactors who showed an airway change after exposure to emotional stress. Studies regarding the pathway of stress effect on allergy and asthma are reviewed and discussed from the standpoint of psychoneuroimmunology; for example, the enhancement of IgE production and increased susceptibility to respiratory infection by stress, conditioned anaphylaxis and nerve/mast cell interaction, the effect of stress on various bronchial responses and the inhibition of the immediate and late asthmatic response by anterior hypothalamic lesioning.

  2. Mast cell-nerve interactions in asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleij, Hanneke Paulina Maria van der

    2002-01-01

    Asthma is characterized by a chronic inflammatory reaction in the airways. Roughly, asthma can be subdivided into atopic asthma involving elevated levels of serum IgE and a less familiar form, non-atopic asthma. Non-atopic asthma is an increasing problem in the developed world. The mechanisms involv

  3. Do Written Asthma Action Plans Improve Outcomes?

    OpenAIRE

    Kelso, John M.

    2016-01-01

    With appropriate management, children with asthma should expect few symptoms, no limits on activity, rare exacerbations, and normal lung function. Appropriate education of parents and other caregivers of children with asthma has clearly been shown to help achieve these goals. Although recommended in asthma guidelines, providing written asthma action plans does not improve outcomes beyond asthma education alone.

  4. Surgical treatment of coronary heart disease with moderate-severe ischemic mitral insufficiency%冠心病合并中重度缺血性二尖瓣关闭不全的外科治疗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万里飞; 宋之明; 郝兴海; 张喆; 赵鸿; 崔仲奇; 张鲁锋; 解基严; 万峰

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the surgical treatment principles of coronary heart disease (CHD) with moderate-severe ischemic mitral insufficiency .Methods Clinical data about 61 CHD patients with moderate-severe ischemic mitral insufficiency after surgical treatment were retrospectively analyzed .Results Of the 61 patients ,45 underwent coronary artery bypass grafting and mitral valve repair (CABG+MVP) and 16 received CABG+mitral valve replacement (CABG+ MVR) , 2 died of heart failure early after operation and 59 were cured and discharged .Echocardiography showed that the LVEDD was shorter after operation than before operation while the LVEF was higher after operation than before operation [(47 .9 ± 8 .9) mm vs (52 .8 ± 11 .3) mm ,(52 ± 12)% vs (46 ± 11)% ,P<0 .01] .Conclusion Combined CABG and mitral valve procedure can achieve sat-isfactory outcomes in CHD patients with moderate-severe ischemic mitral insufficiency .%目的:探讨冠心病合并中重度缺血性二尖瓣关闭不全的外科治疗原则。方法选择冠心病合并中重度缺血性二尖瓣关闭不全的手术患者61例,并对患者的临床资料进行回顾性分析。结果45例行冠状动脉旁路移植术+二尖瓣成形术,16例行冠状动脉旁路移植术+二尖瓣置换术,其中2例患者行二尖瓣置换术,术后早期死于心力衰竭,余59例均治愈岀院。术后复查超声心动图检查显示,左心室舒张末内径从(52.8±11.3)mm降至(47.9±8.9) mm(P<0.01),LVEF从(46±11)%升至(52±12)%,差异有统计学意义(P<0.01)。结论对于冠心病合并中重度缺血性二尖瓣关闭不全的手术患者,同期处理二尖瓣后效果满意。

  5. Children with Asthma and Sports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selda Yuzer

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is one of the chronic diseases which have are widely seen among the children. The disease has recently been in the increase all over the world and affects many children. In a study conducted with International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC method, it was found out that prevalence of childhood asthma was 17.1%. Participation in sportive activities by the children with asthma, which is today considered as a part of asthma treatment program, makes contributions to their physical, mental and psychological development and increases their quality of life. The most recommended sports for the children with asthma are swimming and water sports. Sports like tennis and volleyball are too advised. Choice of sports depends on severity of asthma, child and #8217;s choice and whether or not asthma is kept under control. Nursing approaches for the children with asthma include correction of symptoms, training of children and their families, assistance with disease adaptation, continuing asthma care at home and interventions to make children lead healthy activities of daily life of children. With protective measures to be taken by families and children; children should be encourage for sportive activities. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2014; 13(3.000: 241-244

  6. Introduction to genetics and genomics in asthma: genetics of asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathias, Rasika Ann

    2014-01-01

    While asthma is a heterogeneous disease, a strong genetic basis has been firmly established. Rather than being a single disease entity, asthma consists of related, overlapping syndromes [Barnes (Proc Am Thor Soc 8:143-148, 2011)] including three general domains: variable airway obstruction, airway hyper-responsiveness, and airway inflammation with a considerable proportion, but not all, of asthma being IgE-mediated further adding to its heterogeneity. This chapter reviews the approaches to the elucidation of genetics of asthma from the early evidence of familial clustering to the current state of knowledge with genome-wide approaches. The conclusion is that research efforts have led to a tremendous repository of genetic determinants of asthma, most of which fall into the above phenotypic domains of the syndrome. We now look to future integrative approaches of genetics, genomics (Chap. 10), and epigenetics (Chap. 11) to better understand the causal mechanism through which, these genetic loci act in manifesting asthma.

  7. Efficacy and safety of a recombinant factor IX (Bax326) in previously treated patients with severe or moderately severe haemophilia B undergoing surgical or other invasive procedures: a prospective, open-label, uncontrolled, multicentre, phase III study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windyga, J; Lissitchkov, T; Stasyshyn, O; Mamonov, V; Ghandehari, H; Chapman, M; Fritsch, S; Wong, W-Y; Pavlova, B G; Abbuehl, B E

    2014-09-01

    Haemostatic management of haemophilia B patients undergoing surgery is critical to patient safety. The aim of this ongoing prospective trial was to investigate the haemostatic efficacy and safety of a recombinant factor IX (rFIX) (Bax326) in previously treated subjects (12-65 years, without history of FIX inhibitors) with severe or moderately severe haemophilia B, undergoing surgical, dental or other invasive procedures. Haemostatic efficacy was assessed according to a predefined scale. Blood loss was compared to the average and maximum blood loss predicted preoperatively. Haemostatic FIX levels were achieved peri- and postoperatively in 100% of subjects (n = 14). Haemostasis was 'excellent' intraoperatively in all patients and postoperatively in those without a drain, and 'excellent' or 'good' at the time of drain removal and day of discharge in those with a drain employed. Following the initial dose, the mean FIX activity level rose from 6.55% to 107.58% for major surgeries and from 3.60% to 81.4% for minor surgeries. Actual vs. predicted blood loss matched predicted intraoperative blood loss but was equal to or higher than (but less than 150%) the maximum predicted postoperative blood loss reflecting the severity of procedure and FIX requirements. There were no related adverse events, severe allergic reactions or thrombotic events. There was no evidence that BAX326 increased the risk of inhibitor or binding antibody development to FIX. BAX326 was safe and effective for peri-operative management of 14 subjects with severe and moderately severe haemophilia B.

  8. Can the Weather Affect My Child's Asthma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Year-Old Can the Weather Affect My Child's Asthma? KidsHealth > For Parents > Can the Weather Affect My ... empeorar el asma de mi hijo? Weather and Asthma The effect of weather on asthma symptoms isn' ...

  9. Influenza vaccination for children with asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Friedman, Bat-Chen; Goldman, Ran D.

    2010-01-01

    QUESTION Parents of children with asthma are encouraged by many health organizations to vaccinate their children against seasonal influenza viruses. Is the influenza vaccine efficient in preventing asthma exacerbation? Are current vaccinations safe to administer to children with asthma?

  10. Asthma and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Population Profiles > Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander > Asthma Asthma and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders are 70 percent more likely to have asthma as non-Hispanic whites. National data for this ...

  11. Asthma and American Indians/Alaska Natives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Minority Population Profiles > American Indian/Alaska Native > Asthma Asthma and American Indians/Alaska Natives In 2014, 218, ... Native American adults reported that they currently have asthma. American Indian/Alaska Native children are 30% more ...

  12. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brochures Facts Triggers Indoors In the Workplace Outdoors Management Asthma Action Plan Flu Shots Inhalers Data, Statistics, ... among persons with active asthma Use of long-term control medication among persons with active asthma Uncontrolled ...

  13. Implementation of spacer therapy for acute asthma in children.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Vandeleur, M

    2009-09-01

    The aim was to develop and implement an evidence based guideline for the treatment of acute asthma using a metered dose inhaler and spacer combination. Children admitted to Cork University Hospital Paediatric Department with acute asthma were identified during two identical 2 month seasonal periods before (2005) and after (2006) implementation of the new guidelines in September 2006. Pre-intervention and post-intervention audits by case note review were performed to determine the impact of and compliance with this evidence-based guideline emphasising patient assessment, spacer delivered bronchodilator and specific discharge criteria. Patients had similar characteristics during the two study periods. There was a raised threshold for admission after guideline implementation with 11\\/52 patients having mild exacerbations in 2006, compared to 21\\/36 in 2005. Duration of admission was less in the post-implementation group for equivalent exacerbation severity e.g. for moderate severity; 28 hours in 2005, 23 hours in 2006. Duration of bronchodilator therapy was shorter in 2006 and more likely to be given by spacer device earlier for equivalent levels of severity e.g. for moderate exacerbations, in 2006 the average length of salbutamol therapy was 18 hours with 12 hours by spacer device, in 2005 the average length of therapy was 25 hours with 3 hours by spacer. There was earlier initiation of oral corticosteroids; the average time to administration was 56 minutes in 2006 and 227 minutes in 2005. There was an improved documentation of asthma education in 2006 e.g. inhaler technique was reviewed in 37\\/52 in 2006, 21\\/35 in 2005 and better use of written action plans.

  14. Violence and Asthma: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeo Fujiwara

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent research shows that exposure to community violence is, directly and indirectly, associated with asthma. This article reviews the findings on the impact of violence on asthma, and the pathways for the association of violence and asthma are suggested: 1 exposure to violence is directly associated with asthma, mainly through dysregulation of sympathetic-adrenal-medullary (SAM and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis, 2 exposure to violence is associated with the change of susceptibility of outdoor air pollution on asthma, probably through the change of an immune response, and 3 behavioral change due to exposure to violence (e.g. keeping children indoors leads to more exposure to indoor pollutants. The suggested framework may be useful to develop health policy on asthma in high-violence communities.

  15. Pediatric obesity and asthma quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velsor-Friedrich, Barbara; Militello, Lisa K; Kouba, Joanne; Harrison, Patrick R; Manion, Amy; Doumit, Rita

    2013-06-01

    Widely researched as separate entities, our understanding of the comorbid effects of childhood obesity and asthma on quality of life is limited. This article discusses the effects of childhood obesity and asthma on self-reported quality of life in low-income African American teens with asthma. When controlling for the influence of symptom frequency, asthma classification, asthma self-efficacy, and asthma self-care levels, body mass index remains a most important factor in determining self-reported quality of life among teens with asthma. Although overweight and obesity did not change the effectiveness of the asthma intervention program, obesity did affect participants quality of life scores.

  16. Asthma in elite athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elers, Jimmi; Pedersen, Lars; Backer, Vibeke

    2011-01-01

    Asthma is frequently found among elite athletes performing endurance sports such as swimming, rowing and cross-country skiing. Although these athletes often report symptoms while exercising, they seldom have symptoms at rest. Moreover, compared with nonathletic asthmatic individuals, elite athletes...... have been shown to have a different distribution of airway inflammation and unequal response to bronchial provocative test. Elite athletes display signs of exercise-induced symptoms, for example, nonasthmatic inspiratory wheeze, vocal cord dysfunction and cardiac arrhythmias, which could limit...... be aware of the doping aspects. Systemic β2-agonist intake is strictly prohibited, whereas inhaled treatment is allowed in therapeutic doses when asthma is documented and dispensation has been granted when needed....

  17. Asthma in elite athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elers, Jimmi; Pedersen, Lars; Backer, Vibeke

    2011-01-01

    Asthma is frequently found among elite athletes performing endurance sports such as swimming, rowing and cross-country skiing. Although these athletes often report symptoms while exercising, they seldom have symptoms at rest. Moreover, compared with nonathletic asthmatic individuals, elite athletes...... have been shown to have a different distribution of airway inflammation and unequal response to bronchial provocative test. Elite athletes display signs of exercise-induced symptoms, for example, nonasthmatic inspiratory wheeze, vocal cord dysfunction and cardiac arrhythmias, which could limit...... be aware of the doping aspects. Systemic ß2-agonist intake is strictly prohibited, whereas inhaled treatment is allowed in therapeutic doses when asthma is documented and dispensation has been granted when needed....

  18. Future treatment for asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Charriot

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The landscape of asthma has considerably changed after 40 years of inhaled corticosteroid development and nearly 20 years since the first monoclonal antibodies (mAbs were approved. New members of pharmacological families and more effective drug-delivery devices have been designed but the proportion of uncontrolled patients, unfortunately, remains stable. The most promising treatments now rely on targeted therapies that encourage the improvement of the characterisation of our patients. These clinical (phenotype or new biological (endotype tools lead to palpable personalised medicine. This review examines not only the future of mAbs and other new ways of treating asthma but also describes futuristic views based on the paradigm shifts that are ready to occur.

  19. Steroid resistant asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhadia, S K

    2014-03-01

    Inspite of very safe and effective treatment, Bronchial asthmatics do not respond well in 5-10% of cases which are labelled as Refractory Asthma. Besides compliance, presence of psychogenic and trigger factors and comorbid illness, steroid insensitiveness or resistance may play a significant role in the poorly controlled/responding asthmatics. Type I Steroid resistance is due to lack of binding affinity of steroids to glucocorticoid receptors and may respond to higher doses of steroids while type II steroid resistance is because of reduced number of cells with glucocorticoid receptors, which is very rare and do not respond to even higher doses of systemic steroids and these cases require alternative/novel therapies. Future treatment of steroid resistant and severe refractory asthma is likely to be targeted towards cytokines and Bronchial Thermoplasty.

  20. Intravenous magnesium for acute asthma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-10-01

    Each year in the UK, around 1,500 people die from asthma. Standard treatment has been based on bronchodilators (e.g. beta 2-stimulants) and anti-inflammatory drugs (corticosteroids). The recently revised British Guideline on the Management of Asthma suggests also using a single dose of i.v. magnesium sulphate in patients with acute severe asthma, an unlicensed indication. Here we discuss the rationale for giving i.v. magnesium and whether it offers any advantage for patients with acute severe asthma.

  1. Japanese Guideline for Childhood Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Nishimuta

    2011-01-01

    JAGL differs from the Global Initiative for Asthma Guideline (GINA in that the former emphasizes long-term management of childhood asthma based on asthma severity and early diagnosis and intervention at <2 years and 2–5 years of age. However, a management method, including step-up or step-down of long-term management agents based on the status of asthma symptoms, is easy to understand and thus JAGL is suitable for routine medical treatment. JAGL also introduced treatment and management using a control test for children, recommending treatment and management aimed at complete control through avoiding exacerbation factors and appropriate use of antiinflammatory agents.

  2. Occupational allergies and asthma.

    OpenAIRE

    Tarlo, S.M.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review aspects of occupational allergies and asthma for primary care physicians recognizing, diagnosing, and managing patients with these conditions. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Studies in the medical literature mainly provide level 2 evidence, that is, from at least one well-designed clinical trial without randomization, from cohort or case-control analytical studies, from multiple time series, or from dramatic results in uncontrolled experiments. MAIN MESSAGE: Occupational allergies ...

  3. [Asthma and cyclic neutropenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar Cabrera, A N; Berrón Pérez, R; Ortega Martell, J A; Onuma Takane, E

    1996-01-01

    We report a male with history of recurrent infections (recurrent oral aphtous disease [ROAD], middle ear infections and pharyngo amigdalitis) every 3 weeks since he was 7 months old. At the age of 3 years cyclic neutropenia was diagnosed with cyclic fall in the total neutrophil count in blood smear every 21 days and prophylactic antimicrobial therapy was indicated. Episodic events every 3 weeks of acute asthma and allergic rhinitis were detected at the age of 6 years old and specific immunotherapy to Bermuda grass was given during 3 years with markedly improvement in his allergic condition but not in the ROAD. He came back until the age of 16 with episodic acute asthma and ROAD. The total neutrophil count failed to 0 every 21 days and surprisingly the total eosinophil count increased up to 2,000 at the same time, with elevation of serum IgE (412 Ul/mL). Specific immunotherapy to D.pt. and Aller.a. and therapy with timomodulin was indicated. After 3 months we observed clinical improvement in the asthmatic condition and the ROAD disappeared, but the total neutrophil count did not improve. We present this case as a rare association between 2 diseases with probably no etiological relationship but may be physiopatological that could help to understand more the pathogenesis of asthma.

  4. Acute bronchial asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Ramuscello

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is one of the main causes of morbidity worldwide. It affects some 300 million individuals and has risen over the past 20 years, especially in the paediatric population. Asthma is a chronic inflammation of the airways, subject to periodic exacerbations, characterised by coughing and progressive dyspnoea. Clinical conditions may vary greatly, ranging from moderate exacerbation with an increase in nocturnal awakening and a less than 20% reduction in the flow peak, through to severe respiratory insufficiency that requires immediate intubation of the airways. Pharmacological treatment envisages a step approach that aims to obtain and maintain control over the symptoms, taking into consideration the effectiveness of the treatment available, potential side effects and cost. β2-agonists and corticosteroids are the drugs of election for both maintenance therapy and for treating exacerbations. Other therapeutic devices may prove useful in particular cases. One fundamental key point in treatment over time is the cooperation between patient and attending doctor. The latest review of the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA guidelines was published in 2006.

  5. Asma ocupacional Occupational asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lusia Godoy Fernandes

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available A asma relacionada ao trabalho é uma das principais doenças respiratórias ocupacionais em termos de prevalência. Inúmeras substâncias químicas utilizadas nas mais diversas atividades produtivas podem desencadear ou agravar essa doença. A definição e a classificação da asma relacionada ao trabalho são descritas, bem como, suas repercussões epidemiológicas, história natural, critérios diagnósticos, evolução, prognóstico e seus aspectos legais, de forma resumida, objetivando alertar sobre essa doença e suas implicações trabalhistas.Work-related asthma is one of the principal occupational respiratory diseases in terms of prevalence. Innumerable chemical substances used in various production processes can cause or aggravate occupational asthma. This chapter contains a brief description of the definition and classification of work-related asthma, as well as the epidemiological repercussions, natural course, diagnostic criteria, progression and legal aspects of the disease, with the objective of raising an alert regarding this disease and its implications for workers.

  6. Asthma and PM10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilmour M Ian

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract PM10 (the mass of particles present in the air having a 50% cutoff for particles with an aerodynamic diameter of 10 μm is the standard measure of particulate air pollution used worldwide. Epidemiological studies suggest that asthma symptoms can be worsened by increases in the levels of PM10. Epidemiological evidence at present indicates that PM10 increases do not raise the chances of initial sensitisation and induction of disease, although further research is warranted. PM10 is a complex mixture of particle types and has many components and there is no general agreement regarding which component(s could lead to exacerbations of asthma. However pro-inflammatory effects of transition metals, hydrocarbons, ultrafine particles and endotoxin, all present to varying degrees in PM10, could be important. An understanding of the role of the different components of PM10 in exacerbating asthma is essential before proper risk assessment can be undertaken leading to advice on risk management for the many asthmatics who are exposed to air pollution particles.

  7. Occupational asthma often goes unrecognised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullinan, Paul; Cannon, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Occupational asthma is induced de novo by an airborne agent encountered in the workplace. The risk of occupational asthma is greater in those with a prior atopic history. Work-exacerbated asthma is the provocation of pre-existing, or coincidental, disease by one or more irritant exposures at work. Distinguishing occupational from work-exacerbated asthma can be difficult but it is important since the two have very different clinical, occupational and legal implications. Occupational asthma is underrecognised, the disease often develops in young people who are otherwise fit. They may not recognise their symptoms as anything out of the ordinary, or may confuse them with hay fever or a cold. It is sensible to consider occupational and work-exacerbated asthma in every working adult who has asthma or who presents with suggestive symptoms such as rhinitis. Occupational asthma almost always arises from an immediate-type hypersensitivity reaction to a respiratory sensitising agent in the workplace. The disease has a short latency with symptoms developing 6 to 36 months after employment in a new job. Rhinitis is common and in those working in an environment with airborne proteins the absence of rhinitis effectively rules out occupational asthma. In occupational asthma, symptoms (including nasal symptoms) improve away from work. Once the disease is established symptoms are provoked by even very small exposures at work and begin to be provoked by a wide variety of irritant exposures both at, and away from, work. It is good practice to enquire into the employment of every working-age adult with asthma, or rhinitis, and particularly in those presenting with new symptoms or symptoms that have become more difficult to manage. Patients should routinely be asked whether their symptoms improve when they are not at work.

  8. AsthmaVent – Effect of Ventilation on Asthma Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hogaard, Nina Viskum; Rubak, Sune Leisgaard Mørck; Halken, Susanne

    Background House dust mite (HDM) allergy is a frequent cause of allergic asthma among children. Children spend 14 hours of their time indoor everyday in aberage, where they are exposed to different components in the indoor air. These components are children with asthma and HDM allergy specially...... air quality and thereby asthma symptoms and quality of life, in children with house dust mite allergy and asthma. Materials and Methods Randomized double-blind placebo-controlled intervention study, including 80 children from 3 Danish Pediatric outpatient clinics, with: Verified asthma, requiring...... a minimum of 400 µg of inhaled steroid daily Verified HDM allergy Verified exposure to HDMallergene No pet- or birch allergy A ventilation system will be placed in to the child’s bedroom, ventilating the room with a rate of 2-3 air changes per hour for 9 months during the winter season. We monitor indoor...

  9. Predicting adult asthma in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonk, JM; Boezen, HM

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: There still is no cure for asthma. Early identification of patients at risk for disease progression may lead to better treatment opportunities and hopefully better disease outcomes in adulthood. Recent literature on childhood risk factors associated with the outcome of asthma in a

  10. Environment and asthma in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Moual, Nicole; Jacquemin, Bénédicte; Varraso, Raphaëlle; Dumas, Orianne; Kauffmann, Francine; Nadif, Rachel

    2013-09-01

    The present review addresses recent advances and especially challenging aspects regarding the role of environmental risk factors in adult-onset asthma, for which the causes are poorly established. In the first part of the review, we discuss aspects regarding some environmental risk factors for adult-onset asthma: air pollution, occupational exposures with a focus on an emerging risk represented by exposure to cleaning agents (both at home and in the workplace), and lifestyle and nutrition. The second part is focused on perspectives and challenges, regarding relevant topics on which research is needed to improve the understanding of the role of environmental factors in asthma. Aspects of exposure assessment, the complexity of multiple exposures, the interrelationships of the environment with behavioral characteristics and the importance of studying biological markers and gene-environment interactions to identify the role of the environment in asthma are discussed. We conclude that environmental and lifestyle exposures play an important role in asthma or related phenotypes. The changes in lifestyle and the environment in recent decades have modified the specific risk factors in asthma even for well-recognized risks such as occupational exposures. To better understand the role of the environment in asthma, the use of objective (quantitative measurement of exposures) or modern tools (bar code, GPS) and the development of multidisciplinary collaboration would be very promising. A better understanding of the complex interrelationships between socio-economic, nutritional, lifestyle and environmental conditions might help to study their joint and independent roles in asthma.

  11. Adult-onset eosinophilic asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, J.C.

    2017-01-01

    In the last decades, it has been recognized that asthma is not a single disease, but comprises several clinical syndromes, which all share respiratory symptoms and lung function abnormalities, associated with different types of airway inflammation. These syndromes are now known as different asthma p

  12. The management of acute asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, S

    1997-04-01

    Health professionals likely to come into contact with people experiencing an acute episode of asthma, such as school nurses, ambulance personnel and A&E staff, need clear guidelines on management. The British Thoracic Society guidelines, revised this year, advise on the categorisation of asthma, assessment and treatment.

  13. Asthma in patients with psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønnberg, A S; Skov, L; Skytthe, A;

    2015-01-01

    We read with interest the report by Fang and colleagues of the relationship between psoriasis and asthma in a large retrospective case-control study from Taiwan [1]. The study found a 1.38-fold increased risk of asthma among patients with psoriasis, and with an increasing risk according to higher...

  14. Adolescents and Exercise Induced Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Pamela; Bickanse, Shanna; Bogenreif, Mike; VanSickle, Kyle

    2008-01-01

    This article defines asthma and exercise induced asthma, and provides information on the triggers, signs, and symptoms of an attack. It also gives treatments for these conditions, along with prevention guidelines on how to handle an attack in the classroom or on the practice field. (Contains 2 tables and 1 figure.)

  15. DNA vaccine and asthma therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Huan-zhong

    2005-01-01

    @@ Allergic asthma is currently considered a chronic airway inflammatory disorder associated with the presence of activated CD4+ Th2-type lymphocytes, eosinophils, and mast cells. Interestingly, therapeutic strategies based on immune deviation and suppression have been shown to successfully attenuate the development of the asthma phenotype.

  16. Occupational asthma in maritime environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lucas, David; Loddé, Brice; Jepsen, Jørgen Riis

    2016-01-01

    In 2006 we published our first review based on the available literature on occupational asthma in maritime environments in the “International Maritime Health” journal. Since then, we have obtained a great deal of new knowledge on asthma in seafood workers and fishermen and on the impact of exposu...

  17. The Saudi Initiative for asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Moamary Mohamed

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The Saudi Initiative for Asthma (SINA provides up-to-date guidelines for healthcare workers managing patients with asthma. SINA was developed by a panel of Saudi experts with respectable academic backgrounds and long-standing experience in the field. SINA is founded on the latest available evidence, local literature, and knowledge of the current setting in Saudi Arabia. Emphasis is placed on understanding the epidemiology, pathophysiology, medications, and clinical presentation. SINA elaborates on the development of patient-doctor partnership, self-management, and control of precipitating factors. Approaches to asthma treatment in SINA are based on disease control by the utilization of Asthma Control Test for the initiation and adjustment of asthma treatment. This guideline is established for the treatment of asthma in both children and adults, with special attention to children 5 years and younger. It is expected that the implementation of these guidelines for treating asthma will lead to better asthma control and decrease patient utilization of the health care system.

  18. Smoking and Asthma (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Smoking and Asthma KidsHealth > For Teens > Smoking and Asthma A A A What's in this ... family photo albums full of pictures with people smoking at all kinds of events, from kids' birthday ...

  19. Prenatal Stress, Prematurity, and Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medsker, Brock; Forno, Erick; Simhan, Hyagriv; Celedón, Juan C

    2015-12-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic disease of childhood, affecting millions of children in the United States and worldwide. Prematurity is a risk factor for asthma, and certain ethnic or racial minorities such as Puerto Ricans and non-Hispanic blacks are disproportionately affected by both prematurity and asthma. In this review, we examine current evidence to support maternal psychosocial stress as a putative link between prematurity and asthma, while also focusing on disruption of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and immune responses as potential underlying mechanisms for stress-induced "premature asthma." Prenatal stress may cause not only abnormalities in the HPA axis but also epigenetic changes in the fetal glucocorticoid receptor gene (NR3C1), leading to impaired glucocorticoid metabolism. Moreover, maternal stress can alter fetal cytokine balance, favoring TH2 (allergic) immune responses characteristic of atopic asthma: interleukin 6 (IL-6), which has been associated with premature labor, can promote TH2 responses by stimulating production of IL-4 and IL-13. Given a link among stress, prematurity, and asthma, future research should include birth cohorts aimed at confirming and better characterizing "premature asthma." If confirmed, clinical trials of prenatal maternal stress reduction would be warranted to reduce the burden of these common comorbidities. While awaiting the results of such studies, sound policies to prevent domestic and community violence (eg, from firearms) are justified, not only by public safety but also by growing evidence of detrimental effects of violence-induced stress on psychiatric and somatic health.

  20. "Kickin' Asthma": School-Based Asthma Education in an Urban Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magzamen, Sheryl; Patel, Bina; Davis, Adam; Edelstein, Joan; Tager, Ira B.

    2008-01-01

    Background: In urban communities with high prevalence of childhood asthma, school-based educational programs may be the most appropriate approach to deliver interventions to improve asthma morbidity and asthma-related outcomes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the implementation of "Kickin' Asthma", a school-based asthma curriculum…

  1. Asthma symptoms in obese adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2016-01-01

    The association between asthma and obesity is well-described, but not straightforward, and according to current guidelines asthma control is more difficult to achieve in obese patients. The currently available studies evaluating response to pharmacological asthma therapy in obese patients show...... that these patients have an altered, in general less favorable, response to both reliever and controller medication compared to normal weight patients. However, at present, the limited available evidence precludes evidence-based recommendations. The 'obesity-related asthma' phenotype has different characteristics......, including association with atopy and type of airway inflammation, compared to 'classic' asthma. Furthermore, weight loss in patients with this phenotype leads to an improvement in symptoms, lung function, and airway responsiveness, as well as a reduction in medication utilization and hospital admissions...

  2. Infectious triggers of pediatric asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gern, James E; Lemanske, Robert F

    2003-06-01

    Respiratory infections can cause wheezing illnesses in children of all ages and also can influence the causation and disease activity of asthma. For years it has been recognized that respiratory syncytial virus infections often produce the first episode of wheezing in children who go on to develop chronic asthma. More recently, it has been proposed that repeated infections with other common childhood viral pathogens might help the immune system develop in such a way as to prevent the onset of allergic diseases and possibly asthma. In addition to the effects of viral infections, infections with certain intracellular pathogens, such as chlamydia and mycoplasma, may cause acute and chronic wheezing in some individuals, whereas common cold and acute sinus infections can trigger acute symptoms of asthma. In this article, the epidemiologic, mechanistic, and treatment implications of the association between respiratory infections and asthma are discussed.

  3. BENEFIT OF ASTHMA ACTION PLAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pagadpally

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AIM: The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of asthma action plan on asthma control, reducing unscheduled hospital visits of children with asthma. The study also was to know if the instructions regarding management are being documented in the patient notes. METHOD: It was a retrospective study. The data was collected from a random sample of 100 patients with asthma between Jan . 2012 to Dec . 2014 who were admitted as in - patients to the children’s ward in our hospital. RESULTS: Children who received asthma action plan had fewer exacerbations and fewer lost school days. Good documentation of symptoms led to better compliance and outcome in the child KEYWORDS: A sthma; A ction plan.

  4. Asthma mortality in the Danish child population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Inger Merete; Jensen, V B; Bülow, S

    2003-01-01

    Child death due to asthma is a rare and potentially preventable event. We investigated possible risk factors for death due to asthma in children and adolescents, as a step towards preventing or minimizing asthma death in this age group, and improving asthma management and care. We reviewed all 10...

  5. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Breathing Easier [PDF – 1.1 MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health Know ... Breathing Easier [PDF – 1.1 MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health File ...

  6. Exploring the obesity-asthma link

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger, R V; Gonzalez-Quintela, A; Vidal, C;

    2012-01-01

    Obesity and risk of asthma are linked. Different distributions of adiposity, such as visceral, subcutaneous or ectopic adiposity, may affect asthma risk differently.......Obesity and risk of asthma are linked. Different distributions of adiposity, such as visceral, subcutaneous or ectopic adiposity, may affect asthma risk differently....

  7. Sources of Stress in Children with Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Michelle; Ryan-Wenger, Nancy M.

    1992-01-01

    Children with asthma were studied to determine their perceptions of the frequency and severity of stressors they experienced other than asthma. Results indicated children with asthma were similar to peers regarding perceptions of stressors. Perceptions of most stressors related more strongly to gender role development than to asthma. (SM)

  8. Asma ocupacional Occupational asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Cebollero

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Asma ocupacional es aquella entidad que se desarrolla por causas o condiciones derivadas de un determinado medio laboral y no por estímulos que se encuentran fuera del trabajo. El asma ocupacional constituye hoy en día la enfermedad respiratoria ocupacional más frecuente en la mayoría de los países industrializados y se calcula que la proporción de nuevos casos de asma atribuibles a la exposición laboral se sitúa en torno al 10-15%. Puede desarrollarse tanto por un mecanismo inmunológico como no inmunológico. En su desarrollo influyen el tipo de agente al que se está expuesto, el nivel y modo de exposición y factores genéticos de susceptibilidad. En el proceso diagnóstico concurre la confirmación de que el paciente tiene asma bronquial y la confirmación de que ésta se produce por causa laboral. Como demuestra la historia natural de la enfermedad, un diagnóstico precoz y las consiguientes acciones posteriores redundan en un mejor pronóstico de la misma.Occupational asthma is an entity caused by conditions deriving from a certain work milieu and not from stimuli found outside the workplace. Nowadays, occupational asthma is the most frequent respiratory occupational disease in the majority of the industrialised countries and it is estimated that the proportion of new cases of asthma that can be attributed to exposure at work is around 10-15%. It can be developed due to an immunological mechanism or to a non-immunological mechanism. Influential in its development are the type of agent exposed to, the level and form of exposure and genetic factors of susceptibility. In the diagnostic process there is a concurrent confirmation that the patient has bronchial asthma and that this has been caused by occupational reasons. As shown by the natural history of the disease, an early diagnosis and the consequent posterior actions result in an improved prognosis.

  9. Physiopathology of severe asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Todo-Bom, Ana; Mota-Pinto, Anabela

    2006-01-01

    A história natural da asma e as condições determinantes de evolução para formas moderadas ou graves não estão completamente estabelecidas. Contudo, quer os fatores genéticos quer os fatores ambientais serão determinantes na fisiopatologia e no prognóstico da doença. Nesta revisão são apresentados os mecanismos envolvidos na fisiopatologia da asma grave The natural history of asthma and the determinant factors involved in its evolution from moderate to severe forms are not completely establ...

  10. The poorly explored impact of uncontrolled asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Byrne, Paul M; Pedersen, Søren; Schatz, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The goal of asthma management is to achieve disease control; however, despite the availability of effective and safe medications, for many patients asthma remains uncontrolled. One reason for this is the fear of long-term side effects from the regular use of inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs). Adverse...... effects of poorly controlled asthma (for example, obesity, pneumonia, and risks to the fetus) can be perceived as side effects of ICSs. Poorly controlled asthma adversely affects children's cardiovascular fitness, while children with well-controlled asthma perform at the same level as their peers...... and concentration are negatively affected in patients with untreated asthma, and patients with asthma are at greater risk for depression. Also, poorly controlled asthma increases the risks of severe asthma exacerbations following upper respiratory and pneumococcal pulmonary infections. ICSs used to improve asthma...

  11. Understanding mild persistent asthma in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Hans; Szefler, Stanley J

    2005-01-01

    Limitations in asthma prevalence studies and difficulties in diagnosing pediatric asthma lead to uncertainty over the full extent of mild persistent asthma in children and adolescents. Although recent surveys have reported that the majority of pediatric patients with asthma in the United States...... and Europe have symptoms consistent with mild disease, these surveys have limitations in design. Thus, the true prevalence of mild asthma remains unknown. It is unclear whether children with mild persistent asthma progress to more severe asthma, but the risk of severe asthma exacerbations seems...... to be unrelated to the symptom severity. Clinical studies restricted to pediatric patients with mild asthma are limited, but available data do suggest substantial morbidity of mild persistent asthma in this population and support inhaled corticosteroid intervention. There is a need for further investigation...

  12. Asthma and dualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paley, J

    2000-06-01

    The rejection of Cartesian dualism can be taken to imply that the mind is implicated in health and illness to a greater degree than conventional medicine would suggest. Surprisingly, however, there appears to be a train of thought in antidualist nursing theory which takes the opposite view. This paper looks closely at an interesting example of antidualist thinking - an article in which Benner and her colleagues comment on the ways in which people with asthma make sense of their condition - and concludes that it places unduly stringent and arbitrary limits on the mind's role. It then asks how antidualism can lead to such a dogmatic rejection of the idea that states of the body are clinically influenced by states of mind. The answer to this question is that Benner assimilates very different philosophical theories into the same 'tradition'. On this occasion, she has combined Descartes, Kant and the Platonist ascetics into a single package, misleadingly labelled 'Cartesianism', and this move accounts for her unexpected views on the relation between mind and body in asthma.

  13. Indoor Domestic environment and asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papadimitriou E.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Genesis and development of asthma are greatly affected by the indoor environmental quality. Duringrecent years, it is noted an important increase in asthma cases worldwide which is mainly caused by the effects ofpollutants in indoor environments. Purpose: In this study, there has been an effort to show the impact of indoorenvironment on asthma development. Methodology: Reviewing bibliography by information retrieval from thePubmed and TRIP Database.Conclusion: Indoor air pollution is an interdisciplinary subject. The great number ofpollutants, their variety on structure and action, the conditions under which they are developed as well as theirdifferent and disparate ways of treatment and control require knowledge from many scientific fields. By assuming newdimensions in world climate changes, increasing sensitization in allergens, using respiratory irritants, such aspesticides and compounds and chemicals of industrial origin, and at the same time the poor home indoor air qualityand the family history of asthma lead to new asthma cases worldwide. An important number of asthma cases in afamily could be avoided by implementing a better environmental policy inside our homes. Finally, by understandingbetter the link between environment and asthma as well as by explaining the involved gene action, they will bedelivered more effective prevention and treatment programs.

  14. Childhood asthma and physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lochte, Lene; Nielsen, Kim G; Petersen, Poul Erik;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Childhood asthma is a global problem affecting the respiratory health of children. Physical activity (PA) plays a role in the relationship between asthma and respiratory health. We hypothesized that a low level of PA would be associated with asthma in children and adolescents. The obj......BACKGROUND: Childhood asthma is a global problem affecting the respiratory health of children. Physical activity (PA) plays a role in the relationship between asthma and respiratory health. We hypothesized that a low level of PA would be associated with asthma in children and adolescents...... and extracted data from original articles that met the inclusion criteria. Summary odds ratios (ORs) and confidence intervals (CIs) were used to express the results of the meta-analysis (forest plot). We explored heterogeneity using funnel plots and the Graphic Appraisal Tool for Epidemiology (GATE). RESULTS......: We retrieved 1,571 titles and selected 11 articles describing three cohort and eight cross-sectional studies for inclusion. A meta-analysis of the cohort studies revealed a risk of new-onset asthma in children with low PA (OR [95 % CI] 1.32 [0.95; 1.84] [random effects] and 1.35 [1.13; 1.62] [fixed...

  15. Role of Obesity in Asthma Control, the Obesity-Asthma Phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is a disease with distinct phenotypes that have implications for both prognosis and therapy. Epidemiologic studies have demonstrated an association between asthma and obesity. Further studies have shown that obese asthmatics have poor asthma control and more severe asthma. This obese-asthma group may represent a unique phenotype. The mechanisms behind poor asthma control in obese subjects remain unclear, but recent research has focused on adipokines and their effects on the airways as ...

  16. The Chinese version of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory™ (PedsQL™ 3.0 Asthma Module: reliability and validity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Ruoqing

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health-related quality of life (HRQOL has been recognized as an important health outcome measurement for pediatric patients. One of the most promising instruments in measuring pediatric HRQOL emerged in recent years is the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL™. The PedsQL™ 3.0 Asthma Module, one of the PedsQL™disease-specific scales, was designed to measure HRQOL dimensions specifically tailored for pediatric asthma. The present study is aimed to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Chinese version of the PedsQL™ 3.0 Asthma Module. Methods The PedsQL™ 3.0 Asthma Module was translated into Chinese following the PedsQL™ Measurement Model Translation Methodology. The Chinese version scale was administered to 204 children with asthma and 337 parents of children with asthma from four Triple A hospitals. The psychometric properties were then evaluated. Results The percentage of missing value for each item of the scale ranged from 0.00% to 8.31%. All child self-report subscales and parent proxy-report subscales approached or exceeded the minimum reliability standard of 0.70 for alpha coefficient, except 3 subscales of Young Child (aged 5-7 self-report (alphas ranging from 0.59 to 0.68. Test-retest reliability was satisfactory with intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs which exceeded the recommended standard of 0.80 in all subscales. Correlation coefficients between items and their hypothesized subscales were higher than those with other subscales. The PedsQL™ 3.0 Asthma Module distinguished between outpatients and inpatients. Patients with mild asthma reported higher scores than those with moderate/severe asthma in majority of subscales. The intercorrelations among the PedsQL™ 3.0 Asthma Module subscales and the PedsQL™ 4.0 Generic Core Scales were in medium to large effect size. The child self-report scores were consistent with the parent proxy-report scores. Conclusions The Chinese version of

  17. [Epidural emphysema complicating bronchial asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouetbi, N; Ben Saad, A; Joobeur, S; Skhiri, N; Cheikh Mhamed, S; Mribah, H; El Kamel, A

    2012-12-01

    Epidural emphysema is an exceptional complication of bronchial asthma, revealed by an incidental finding in chest tomography. We report a case of a 21-year-old man admitted with asthma attack complicated by subcutaneous and mediastinal emphysema. Chest tomography confirmed the mediastinal emphysema and also revealed the epidural emphysema within the vertebral canal. Neurological examination was negative. The patient showed complete recovery 10days after the onset of symptoms. The epidural emphysema is a rare complication during asthma attacks. The benignity of this complication should not require a systematic chest tomography.

  18. Environmental factors and childhood asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipatanakul, Wanda

    2006-09-01

    Indoor allergens are potent triggers for acute and chronic pediatric asthma. Environmental control measures of these allergens should be considered first-line treatment measures. Allergen avoidance can produce changes in disease activity and symptoms that can be beneficial before any medical intervention is implemented. In addition to allergen avoidance, studies evaluating other exposures, such as endotoxin and diet, in the pathogenesis of asthma are in progress. Understanding the complex relationships between exposure and allergy/asthma development is vitally important to the development of potentially more effective primary and secondary prevention strategies.

  19. Pharmacokinetics, efficacy and safety of BAX326, a novel recombinant factor IX: a prospective, controlled, multicentre phase I/III study in previously treated patients with severe (FIX level <1%) or moderately severe (FIX level ≤2%) haemophilia B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windyga, J; Lissitchkov, T; Stasyshyn, O; Mamonov, V; Rusen, L; Lamas, J L; Oh, M-S; Chapman, M; Fritsch, S; Pavlova, B G; Wong, W-Y; Abbuehl, B E

    2014-01-01

    BAX326 is a recombinant factor IX (rFIX; nonacog gamma) manufactured without the addition of any materials of human or animal origin, and with two viral inactivation steps (solvent/detergent treatment and 15 nm nanofiltration). The aim of this prospective trial was to investigate the pharmacokinetics, haemostatic efficacy and safety of BAX326 in previously treated patients aged 12-65 years with severe or moderately severe haemophilia B. BAX326 was safe and well tolerated in all 73 treated subjects; adverse events considered related to treatment (2.7% incidence, all non-serious) were transient and mild, and no hypersensitivity reactions, inhibitor formation or thrombotic events were observed. Pharmacokinetic (PK) equivalence (n = 28) between BAX326 and a licensed rFIX was confirmed in terms of the ratio of geometric mean AUC(0-72) h per dose. Twice-weekly prophylaxis [mean duration 6.2 (±0.7) months; 1.8 (±0.1) infusions per week, 49.5 (±4.8) IU kg(-1) per infusion] was effective in preventing bleeding episodes, with a significantly lower (79%, P < 0.001) annualized bleed rate (4.2) compared to an on-demand treatment in a historical control group (20.0); 24 of 56 subjects on prophylaxis (43%) did not bleed throughout the study observation period. Of 249 total acute bleeds, 211 (84.7%) were controlled with one to two infusions of BAX326. Haemostatic efficacy at resolution of bleed was rated excellent or good in 96.0% of all treated bleeding episodes. The results of this study indicate that BAX326 is safe and efficacious in treating bleeds and routine prophylaxis in patients aged 12 years and older with haemophilia B.

  20. [Occupational asthma--the case of bakers' asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishara, Hasham; Carel, Rafael S

    2013-08-01

    Occupational asthma (OA) is the most common of all occupational lung diseases in industrialized countries and its prevalence has been rising steadily. It is estimated that occupational factors account for one out of six cases of adult asthmatic patients causing significant morbidity, disability and costs. Due to its high prevalence and substantial health and socio-economic impacts OA represents a significant public health concern. OA can be divided into allergic and non allergic asthma. Allergic OA is further divided into IgE mediated and non IgE mediated. Baker's asthma (BA), is the leading cause of IgE mediated OA caused by high molecular weight antgens in industrialized countries. Innovations in the baking industry during the last few decades have led to the introduction of new allergens inducing OA. OA is potentially preventable, through early diagnosis and exposure cessation interventions. Thus, clinicians should consider the occupational history in every adult patient presenting with newly diagnosed asthma.

  1. Predicting Asthma in Preschool Children with Asthma-Like Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education Center Fellows-in-Training Grants & Awards Program Directors Practice Resources ASTHMA IQ Consultation and Referral Guidelines Practice Financial Survey Practice Tools Running a Practice Statements and Practice Parameters About AAAAI Advocacy Allergist / Immunologists: ...

  2. Prevalence of asthma-like symptoms, asthma and its treatment in elite athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, T; Pedersen, L; Larsson, B; Backer, V

    2009-04-01

    The objective was to determine the prevalence of asthma-like symptoms and asthma and the use of asthma medication in Danish elite athletes. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey of Danish elite athletes was conducted in 2006. All elite athletes (N=418) financially supported by the national organization of elite athletes comprised the study group; 329 (79%) completed the questionnaire concerning their sport, asthma-like symptoms, asthma and use of asthma medication. Asthma-like symptoms at rest were reported by 41% of respondents; 55% reported asthma-like symptoms at rest or at exercise. Physician-diagnosed asthma was present in 16% and 14% had current asthma. Asthma medication was taken by 7% of the athletes, of whom 79% used inhaled corticosteroids and 21% used inhaled beta(2)-agonists only. Athletes participating in endurance sports had higher prevalences of current asthma (24%) and use of asthma medication (15%) than all other athletes (Pendurance sports have a higher prevalence of asthma and use of asthma medication. The frequency of asthma medication is lower than the prevalence of current asthma indicating that there is no overuse of asthma medication among Danish elite athletes.

  3. Prevalence of asthma-like symptoms, asthma and its treatment in elite athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, T; Pedersen, L; Larsson, B;

    2008-01-01

    The objective was to determine the prevalence of asthma-like symptoms and asthma and the use of asthma medication in Danish elite athletes. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey of Danish elite athletes was conducted in 2006. All elite athletes (N=418) financially supported by the national...... organization of elite athletes comprised the study group; 329 (79%) completed the questionnaire concerning their sport, asthma-like symptoms, asthma and use of asthma medication. Asthma-like symptoms at rest were reported by 41% of respondents; 55% reported asthma-like symptoms at rest or at exercise...... among Danish elite athletes....

  4. Coexistence of asthma and polycystic ovary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zierau, Louise; Gade, Elisabeth Juul; Lindenberg, Svend;

    2016-01-01

    Asthma may be associated with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), and possibly patients with PCOS have a more severe type of asthma. The purpose of this systematic literature review is to summarize evidence of a coexistense of PCOS and asthma using the available literature. The search was completed...... on 01.01.2016. English language articles were retrieved using the search terms 'Asthma' AND 'PCOS', 'Asthma' AND 'systemic inflammation', 'Asthma' AND 'metabolic syndrome', 'asthma' AND 'gynaecology', 'PCOS' AND 'systemic inflammation', 'PCOS' AND 'metabolic syndrome', 'PCOS' AND 'allergy'. Five papers...... meeting prespecified search criteria were found of which two were registry studies of relevance. The current literature supports a coexistense of PCOS and asthma and gives us an indication of the causes for the possible link between PCOS and asthma. Further research in the area must be conducted...

  5. Japanese Guideline for Adult Asthma 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Ohta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult bronchial asthma (hereinafter, asthma is characterized by chronic airway inflammation, reversible airway narrowing, and airway hyperresponsiveness. Long-standing asthma induces airway remodeling to cause intractable asthma. The number of patients with asthma has increased, and that of patients who die from asthma has decreased (1.5 per 100,000 patients in 2012. The aim of asthma treatment is to enable patients with asthma to lead a normal life without any symptoms. A good relationship between physicians and patients is indispensable for appropriate treatment. Long-term management with antiasthmatic agents and elimination of the causes and risk factors of asthma are fundamental to its treatment. Four steps in pharmacotherapy differentiate between mild and intensive treatments; each step includes an appropriate daily dose of an inhaled corticosteroid, varying from low to high. Long-acting 02-agonists, leukotriene receptor antagonists, and sustained-release theophylline are recommended as concomitant drugs, while anti-immunoglobulin E antibody therapy has been recently developed for the most severe and persistent asthma involving allergic reactions. Inhaled 02-agonists, aminophylline, corticosteroids, adrenaline, oxygen therapy, and others are used as needed in acute exacerbations by choosing treatment steps for asthma exacerbations depending on the severity of attacks. Allergic rhinitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, aspirin-induced asthma, pregnancy, asthma in athletes, and coughvariant asthma are also important issues that need to be considered.

  6. Adherence to asthma guidelines in general practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roghmann, M C; Sexton, M

    1999-06-01

    Adherence to asthma practice guidelines is low. Improved compliance could potentially improve care of patients with asthma. The purpose of this study was to determine if patients managed in a general practice with an associated asthma clinic are more likely to use asthma medications according to clinical practice guidelines than patients managed in the general surgery of the practice. A cross-sectional study of adult asthmatics, aged 18-55 years, was conducted in six British general practices. Prescription data on all asthma medication was collected for a 6-month period. Information on asthma clinic attendance, age, sex, employment status, other medical illness, and how patients used their inhaled beta2-agonist was collected through questionnaire. The prescription data for asthma medication and patient use of inhaled beta2-agonist were compared to the British Thoracic Society's (BTS) Guidelines for Management of Asthma in Adults to determine if the patient's asthma medication regimen was appropriate. There was no significant association found between appropriate asthma medication and asthma clinic attendance or other patient characteristics. Adherence to the BTS guidelines was low. Fifty-eight percent of the asthma patients used asthma medication regimens that were not consistent with the BTS guidelines published 1 year earlier. Adherence to the BTS guidelines was low regardless of patient characteristics, including asthma clinic attendance, age, sex, employment status, other medical illness, or individual practice. These findings underscore the need to document the utility of clinical practice guidelines which may improve physician compliance.

  7. Asthma in Adults Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... States: 2002-2007. Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology . 2011; 127:145-52. American Lung Association Asthma ... Oppose House-Passed REINS Act Blog: Why Lung Cancer Screening Isn’t for Never Smokers Blog: The ...

  8. The placebo effect in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutile, Stefanie; Kaptchuk, Ted J; Wechsler, Michael E

    2014-08-01

    The placebo effect is a complex phenomenon occurring across a variety of clinical conditions. While much placebo research has been conducted in diseases defined by self-report such as depression, chronic pain, and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), asthma has been proposed as a useful model because of its easily measured objective outcomes. Studies examining the placebo response in asthma have not only contributed to an understanding of the mechanisms behind the placebo response but also shed an interesting light on the current treatment and diagnosis of asthma. This paper will review current literature on placebos in general and specifically on the placebo response in asthma. It focuses on what we know about the mechanisms behind the placebo effect, whether there is a specific portion of the population who responds to placebos, which patient outcomes are influenced by the placebo effect, and whether the effect can be augmented.

  9. Teaching Your Child about Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education Center Fellows-in-Training Grants & Awards Program Directors Practice Resources ASTHMA IQ Consultation and Referral Guidelines Practice Financial Survey Practice Tools Running a Practice Statements and Practice Parameters About AAAAI Advocacy Allergist / Immunologists: ...

  10. [Macrophages in asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina Avalos, M A; Orea Solano, M

    1997-01-01

    Every time they exist more demonstrations of the paper than performs the line monocytes-macrophage in the patogenesis of the bronchial asthma. The mononuclear phagocytes cells, as the alveolar macrophages, also they can be activated during allergic methods. The monocytes macrophages are possible efficient inductors of the inflammation; this due to the fact that they can secrete inflammatory mediators, between those which are counted the pre-forming granules of peptides, metabolites of oxidation activation, activator of platelets activator and metabolites of the arachidonic acid. The identification of IL-1 in the liquidate of the bronchial ablution of sick asthmatic, as well as the identification of IL-1 in the I bronchioalveolar washing of places of allergens cutaneous prick, supports the activation concept mononuclear of phagocytic cells in allergic sufferings.

  11. Identification of asthma clusters in two independent Korean adult asthma cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Bum; Jang, An-Soo; Kwon, Hyouk-Soo; Park, Jong-Sook; Chang, Yoon-Seok; Cho, Sang-Heon; Choi, Byoung Whui; Park, Jung-Won; Nam, Dong-Ho; Yoon, Ho-Joo; Cho, Young-Joo; Moon, Hee-Bom; Cho, You Sook; Park, Choon-Sik

    2013-06-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous airway disease with various clinical phenotypes. It is crucial to clearly identify clinical phenotypes to achieve better asthma management. We used cluster analysis to classify the clinical groups of 724 asthmatic patients from the Cohort for Reality and Evolution of Adult Asthma in Korea (COREA), and in 1843 subjects from another independent Korean asthma cohort of Soonchunhyang University Asthma Genome Research Centre (SCH) (Bucheon, Republic of Korea). Hierarchical cluster analysis was performed by Ward's method, followed by κ-means cluster analysis. Cluster analysis of the COREA cohort indicated four asthma subtypes: 1) smoking asthma; 2) severe obstructive asthma; 3) early-onset atopic asthma; and 4) late-onset mild asthma. An independent cluster analysis of the SCH cohort also indicated four clusters that were similar to the COREA clusters. Our results indicate that adult Korean asthma patients can be classified into four distinct clusters.

  12. The disease management approach to controlling asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haahtela, T

    2002-02-01

    Asthma has become an important public health issue worldwide and certain groups, such as children, are at particular risk of the disease. Often asthma remains under-diagnosed and under-treated. Despite these worrying trends, the disease management approach to asthma control can help most asthma patients achieve a 'normal' way of life. The increased prevalence and greater diagnostic awareness of asthma have placed increased demands on healthcare resources, but effective asthma control can minimize the personal, social and economic burdens of asthma. Early diagnosis and immediate anti-inflammatory treatment is the first step in gaining control of symptoms. A stepwise approach is then used to classify asthma severity and treatment, with the number and frequency of medications increasing (step up) as asthma severity increases and decreasing (step down) when asthma is under control. This stepwise approach to asthma management necessitates regular review of treatment once asthma is under control. However, effective asthma management is dependent on successful patient education, adherence to prescribed medication and good doctor patient partnerships. Current treatment guidelines recommend the use of a written asthma management plan that should be agreed between the doctor and patient. These plans should cover all aspects of asthma treatment, including prevention steps for long-term control and action steps to stop attacks once a worsening in asthma has been recognized. This comprehensive approach to asthma management increases the likelihood of achieving asthma control, which in turn reduces the need for emergency visits to the hospital or clinic and reduces the limitations on physical activity previously imposed by the condition.

  13. Exacerbations of asthma during pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ali, Z; Hansen, A V; Ulrik, C S

    2016-01-01

    that asthma exacerbations during pregnancy increase the risk of pre-eclampsia, gestational diabetes, placental abruption and placenta praevia. Furthermore, these women also have higher risk for breech presentation, haemorrhage, pulmonary embolism, caesarean delivery, maternal admission to the intensive care...... unit and longer postpartum hospital stay. Asthma has been associated with increased risk of intrauterine growth retardation, small-for-gestational age, low birth weight, infant hypoglycaemia and preterm birth, but more recent prospective studies have not revealed significant associations with regard...

  14. Asthma and Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-Xian Qiao; Yi Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To get a comprehensive understanding about the relationship between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and asthma by reviewing the epidemiology,pathophysiology,and clinical manifestation and then summarizing the latest progress on diagnosis and treatment.Data Sources:Articles referred in this review were mainly collected from a comprehensive search of the PubMed published in English from 1990 to 2015 with the terms "OSA" and “asthma'" as the main keywords.Highly regarded older publications were also included.Study Selection:Information about the features of the two diseases in common,the pathophysiologic association between them and their current treatments from the literature search were identified,retrieved,and summarized.Results:Both OSA and asthma are very prevalent conditions.The incidences of them have kept on rising in recent years.Asthma is often accompanied by snoring and apnea,and OSA often combines with asthma,as well.They have many predisposing and aggravating factors in common.Possible shared direct mechanistic links between them include mechanical effects,intermittent hypoxia,nerve reflex,inflammation,leptin,etc.Indirect mechanistic links include medication,nose diseases,smoking,obesity,and gastroesophageal reflux disease.Since OSA presents many similar features with nocturnal asthma,some scholars termed them as a sole syndrome "alternative overlap syndrome,"and proved that asthma symptoms in those patients could be improved through the treatment of continuous positive airway pressure.Conclusions:OSA and asthma are closely associated in pathogenesis,symptoms,and therapies.With the growing awareness of the relationship between them,we should raise our vigilance on the coexistence of OSA in those difficult-to-control asthmatic patients.Further studies are still needed to guide the clinical works.

  15. Respiratory Reviews in Asthma 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Tae-Hyung

    2014-01-01

    From January 2012 up until March 2013, many articles with huge clinical importance in asthma were published based on large numbered clinical trials or meta-analysis. The main subjects of these studies were the new therapeutic plan based on the asthma phenotype or efficacy along with the safety issues regarding the current treatment guidelines. For efficacy and safety issues, inhaled corticosteroid tapering strategy or continued long-acting beta agonists use was the major concern. As new thera...

  16. Persistent cough: is it asthma?

    OpenAIRE

    Faniran, A; Peat, J; Woolcock, A

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if children in the community with persistent cough can be considered to have asthma. A validated questionnaire was given to the parents of 1245 randomly selected children aged 6-12 years. Atopy was measured with skin prick tests. Children with persistent cough had less morbidity and less atopy compared with children with wheeze. Although the syndrome commonly referred to as "cough variant asthma" could not be shown in this study, a sign...

  17. Asthma in Sickle Cell Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha Newaskar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, evidence has increased that asthma predisposes to complications of sickle cell disease (SCD, such as pain crises, acute chest syndrome, pulmonary hypertension, and stroke, and is associated with increased mortality. An obstructive pattern of pulmonary function, along with a higher-than-expected prevalence of airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR when compared to the general population, has led some researchers to suspect that underlying hemolysis may contribute to the development of a pulmonary disease similar to asthma in patients with SCD. While the pathophysiologic mechanism in atopic asthma involves up-regulation of Th2 cytokines, mast cell– and eosinophil-driven inflammation, plus increased activity of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and arginase in airway epithelium resulting in obstructive changes and AHR, the exact mechanisms of AHR, obstructive and restrictive lung disease in SCD is unclear. It is known that SCD is associated with a proinflammatory state and an enhanced inflammatory response is seen during vaso-occlusive events (VOE. Hemolysis-driven acute-on-chronic inflammation and dysregulated arginines–nitric oxide metabolism are potential mechanisms by which pulmonary dysfunction could occur in patients with SCD. In patients with a genetic predisposition of atopic asthma, these changes are probably more severe and result in increased susceptibility to sickle cell complications. Early recognition and aggressive management of asthma based on established National Institutes of Health asthma guidelines is recommended in order to minimize morbidity and mortality.

  18. Childhood Asthma: Diagnosis and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wim M. van Aalderen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many children suffer from recurrent coughing, wheezing and chest tightness. In preschool children one third of all children have these symptoms before the age of six, but only 40% of these wheezing preschoolers will continue to have asthma. In older school-aged children the majority of the children have asthma. Quality of life is affected by asthma control. Sleep disruption and exercised induced airflow limitation have a negative impact on participation in sports and social activities, and may influence family life. The goal of asthma therapy is to achieve asthma control, but only a limited number of patients are able to reach total control. This may be due to an incorrect diagnosis, co-morbidities or poor inhalation technique, but in the majority of cases non-adherence is the main reason for therapy failures. However, partnership with the parents and the child is important in order to set individually chosen goals of therapy and may be of help to improve control. Non-pharmacological measures aim at avoiding tobacco smoke, and when a child is sensitised, to avoid allergens. In pharmacological management international guidelines such as the GINA guideline and the British Guideline on the Management of Asthma are leading.

  19. Childhood asthma: diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Aalderen, Wim M

    2012-01-01

    Many children suffer from recurrent coughing, wheezing and chest tightness. In preschool children one third of all children have these symptoms before the age of six, but only 40% of these wheezing preschoolers will continue to have asthma. In older school-aged children the majority of the children have asthma. Quality of life is affected by asthma control. Sleep disruption and exercised induced airflow limitation have a negative impact on participation in sports and social activities, and may influence family life. The goal of asthma therapy is to achieve asthma control, but only a limited number of patients are able to reach total control. This may be due to an incorrect diagnosis, co-morbidities or poor inhalation technique, but in the majority of cases non-adherence is the main reason for therapy failures. However, partnership with the parents and the child is important in order to set individually chosen goals of therapy and may be of help to improve control. Non-pharmacological measures aim at avoiding tobacco smoke, and when a child is sensitised, to avoid allergens. In pharmacological management international guidelines such as the GINA guideline and the British Guideline on the Management of Asthma are leading.

  20. [Difficult to control severe asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnan, Antoine; Pipet, Anaïs

    2011-03-01

    Difficult to control severe asthma is characterized by the persistence of inacceptable symptoms of asthma despite a continuous treatment with at least high doses of inhaled steroids and long acting bronchodilators. The diagnosis is done after a period of observation and some investigations that will allow confirm the diagnosis of asthma, eliminate alternative diagnosis and etiological forms that would be difficult to treat intrinsically (allergic broncho-pulmonary aspergillosis, Churg and Strauss disease, chronic eosinophilic pneumonia, occupational asthma). At the end of this period devoted to diagnosis a systematic approach is set up to take care of these patients. Therapeutic education includes action plans and measures for triggering factors avoidance in order to prevent exacerbations. Comorbidities such as rhinitis, nasal polyposis, gastro-oesophageal reflux and obesity are taken into account. Lastly, the treatment must be adapted according to the patient's preferences and aims, and to the asthma severity. Ultimately in steroid-dependent asthma, the lowest efficient dose is tracked continuously. For these patients, new molecules are needed.

  1. Patient and physician asthma deterioration terminology: results from the 2009 Asthma Insight and Management survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaiss, Michael S; Nathan, Robert A; Stoloff, Stuart W; Meltzer, Eli O; Murphy, Kevin R; Doherty, Dennis E

    2012-01-01

    Long-term achievement of asthma control is dependent in part on the use of mutually understandable asthma terminology in all verbal and written patient-physician communications. Using data from the Asthma Insight and Management (AIM) survey, the objective of this analysis is to provide a contemporary depiction of asthma deterioration terminology as used by current asthma patients and physicians in the United States. As part of the 2009 AIM survey, current asthma patients (≥12 years of age; weighted n = 2499) and physicians (n = 309) were queried about their recognition, understanding, and/or use of the terms "asthma attack," "asthma flare-up," and "asthma exacerbation" in telephone interviews. Nearly all patients had heard the term "asthma attack" (97%), but relatively few had heard the term "asthma exacerbation" (24%); 71% had heard "asthma flare-up." In contrast, physicians reported using the term "asthma attack" least (65%) and the term "asthma exacerbation" most (77%) when discussing asthma with their patients; 70% reported using "asthma flare-up." Among patients familiar with "asthma flare-up" and "asthma exacerbation" (n = 502), only 38% said that the terms mean the same thing; nearly all physicians (94%) said that the terms mean the same thing. Collectively, data from the AIM survey suggest that patients and physicians use different asthma deterioration terminology and, more importantly, that they do not necessarily understand each other's terms. Standardizing asthma deterioration terminology may help optimize asthma patient-physician communication to improve patient understanding of written asthma action plans and therefore, enhance patient outcomes.

  2. Difficult asthma: assessment and management, Part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Aidan A; Fanta, Christopher H

    2012-01-01

    A minority of asthma patients have disease that proves difficult to control with usual medications and experience ongoing symptoms, poor quality of life, and limitations in activity and/or frequent asthma exacerbations. This group of patients accounts for much of the expense associated with asthma care and is the focus of national and international collaborative study groups. Distinguishing between "difficult-to-manage asthma" and truly "therapy-resistant asthma" is helpful and promotes a systematic consideration of contributory factors. Critical evaluation of factors contributing to difficult-to-manage asthma including adverse environment, comorbidities, nonadherence, and incorrect diagnosis is recommended in a systematic fashion in Part 1 of this contribution.

  3. Childhood Asthma Management and Environmental Triggers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollenbach, Jessica P; Cloutier, Michelle M

    2015-10-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic disease among children. It cannot be prevented but can be controlled. Industrialized countries experience high lifetime asthma prevalence that has increased over recent decades. Asthma has a complex interplay of genetic and environmental triggers. Studies have revealed complex interactions of lung structure and function genes with environmental exposures such as environmental tobacco smoke and vitamin D. Home environmental strategies can reduce asthma morbidity in children but should be tailored to specific allergens. Coupled with education and severity-specific asthma therapy, tailored interventions may be the most effective strategy to manage childhood asthma.

  4. 急性中重度有机磷农药中毒对认知功能的影响%Effect of Acute Moderately Severe Organophosphorus Pesticides Poisoning on Cognitive Function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨琴; 田仰华; 周姝; 李景荣; 程景林

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of acute moderately severe organophosphorus pesticides poisoning on cognitive function. Methods 29 patients with acute moderately severe organophosphorus pesticides poisoning,who had been hospitalized in Department of Emergency Internal Medicine of the Second Hospital of Anhui Medical University from November 2010 to October 2014 and met the inclusion criteria,were selected as the research group,and 29 healthy volunteers after physical examination in the same hospital during the same period were also enrolled as the control group. Patients in research group received corresponding treatment like timely gastric lavage. All patients' cognitive function were evaluated by the Montreal Cognitive Assessment(MoCA). The MoCA various dimensional score and total score of control group at the enrolling time and of research group 1 week,1 month and 6 months after treatment were compared in this study. Results The MoCA total score of 1 month and 6 months after treatment was higher than that of 1 week after treatment in the research group(P 0. 05). In the research group,the scores of naming,attention,abstraction,delayed recall and orientation of 1 month and 6 months after treatment were higher than those 1 week after treatment,and the scores of visual space and executive function and language 6 months after treatment were higher than those 1 week after treatment(P < 0. 05);the scores of visual space and executive function,attention,language,abstraction,delayed recall and orientation 6 months after treatment were higher than those 1 month after treatment(P < 0. 05). The scores of visual space and executive function,naming,attention, language,abstraction,delayed recall and orientation in the control group were higher than those in the research group 1 week after treatment(P < 0. 05);the scores of attention,language,delayed recall and orientation in the control group were higher than those in the research group 1 month after treatment(P < 0. 05

  5. Korean Asthma Guideline 2014: Summary of Major Updates to the Korean Asthma Guideline 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Deog Kyeom; Park, Yong Bum; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Jung, Ki-Suck; Yoo, Ji Hong; Yoo, Kwang-Ha; Kim, Kwan Hyung

    2016-07-01

    Asthma is a prevalent and serious health problem in Korea. Recently, the Korean Asthma Guideline has been updated by The Korean Academy of Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases (KATRD) in an effort to improve the clinical management of asthma. This guideline focuses on adult patients with asthma and aims to deliver up to date scientific evidence and recommendations to general physicians for the management of asthma. For this purpose, this guideline was updated following systematic review and meta-analysis of recent studies and adapting some points of international guidelines (Global Initiative for Asthma [GINA] report 2014, National Asthma Education and Prevention Program [NAEPP] 2007, British Thoracic Society [BTS/SIGN] asthma guideline 2012, and Canadian asthma guideline 2012). Updated issues include recommendations derived using the population, intervention, comparison, and outcomes (PICO) model, which produced 20 clinical questions on the management of asthma. It also covers a new definition of asthma, the importance of confirming various airflow limitations with spirometry, the epidemiology and the diagnostic flow of asthma in Korea, the importance and evidence for inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) and ICS/formoterol as a single maintenance and acute therapy in the stepwise management of asthma, assessment of severity of asthma and management of exacerbation, and an action plan to cope with exacerbation. This guideline includes clinical assessments, and treatment of asthma-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome, management of asthma in specific conditions including severe asthma, elderly asthma, cough variant asthma, exercise-induced bronchial contraction, etc. The revised Korean Asthma Guideline is expected to be a useful resource in the management of asthma.

  6. "Kickin' Asthma": School-Based Asthma Education in an Urban Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magzamen, Sheryl; Patel, Bina; Davis, Adam; Edelstein, Joan; Tager, Ira B.

    2008-01-01

    Background: In urban communities with high prevalence of childhood asthma, school-based educational programs may be the most appropriate approach to deliver interventions to improve asthma morbidity and asthma-related outcomes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the implementation of "Kickin' Asthma", a school-based asthma…

  7. Sleep Problems in Asthma and COPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Mini Series #5 Sleep Problems in Asthma and COPD NORMAL AIRWAY Good quality sleep is important for ... with asthma and/or Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) may have sleep issues that can lead to ...

  8. Obesity-related asthma in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Nikunj A; Lazarus, Angeline

    2016-08-01

    Obesity as a risk factor for asthma has been identified in previous studies. Additionally, a disproportionate number of patients with severe or difficult-to-control asthma are obese. Patients with obesity-related asthma tend to have worse asthma control and quality of life disproportionate to their pulmonary function tests, are less responsive to corticosteroid therapy, and are more likely to have obesity-related comorbidities such as obstructive sleep apnea and gastroesophageal disease that complicate asthma treatment. With the increasing prevalence of obesity, the prevalence of asthma is anticipated to grow proportionally. Addressing weight loss and encouraging activity is essential in the management of obesity-related asthma. This article briefly overviews the epidemiology, unique distinguishing features, potential mechanisms, and approach to management of patients with obesity-related asthma in adults.

  9. Asthma Medication Ratio Predicts Emergency Depart...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — According to findings reported in Asthma Medication Ratio Predicts Emergency Department Visits and Hospitalizations in Children with Asthma, published in Volume 3,...

  10. American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care Professionals Find an Allergist American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology Seeking Relief? Find an Allergist ... shots? View All Postings Ask the Allergist Index Allergy & Asthma News Are tree nut allergies diagnosed too ...

  11. Physician Asthma Management Practices in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Jin

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To establish national baseline information on asthma management practices of physicians, to compare the reported practices with the Canadian Consensus recommendations and to identify results potentially useful for interventions that improve physician asthma management practices.

  12. Asthma Research: The NIH–NJRC Connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section Asthma Research: The NIH–NJRC Connection Past Issues / Fall ... the many ways that NIH supports and promotes asthma research is through its strong relationship with National ...

  13. Diagnosing Asthma in Very Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Diagnosing Asthma in Babies & Toddlers Page Content Article Body One ... family with recurrent bronchitis or sinus problems. When Asthma is Not the Cause Your pediatrician will listen ...

  14. Childhood Asthma: A Chance to HEAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section Childhood Asthma: A Chance to HEAL Past Issues / Fall 2007 ... a peak flow meter. Photo courtesy of MCAN Asthma, a reality of daily life for more than ...

  15. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Territory Data AsthmaStats Asthma and Fair or Poor Health Usual Place for Medical Care among Children Number of Visits to a Health Care Provider(s) among Children Health Care Coverage among ...

  16. Asthma: New Information for the Early Interventionist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeonsson, Nancy; And Others

    1995-01-01

    This article highlights key portions of the National Institutes of Health's National Asthma Education Program. Guidelines for understanding asthma triggers and medications are provided, and approaches to controlling environmental factors are suggested. (Author/PB)

  17. Childhood Asthma May Encourage Obesity, Study Suggests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Human Services. More Health News on: Asthma in Children Obesity in Children Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Asthma in Children Obesity in Children About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer ...

  18. Suicidal ideation and suicide attempts among asthma

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Background The present study aimed to investigate the mental health status in patients with asthma and assess the effects of asthma on suicidal ideation and attempts using a representative sample from Korea. Methods Individual-level data were obtained from 228,744 participants (6372 with asthma and 222,372 without asthma) of the 2013 Korean Community Health Survey. Demographic characteristics, socioeconomic status, physical health status, and mental health status were compared between patient...

  19. Asthma care for children and adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background: Asthma is one of the most common chronic diseases among young children and adolescents. With high quality health care, most children and adolescents with asthma can live an active and normal life. Yet, many children and adolescents have uncontrolled asthma, with symptoms and exacerbations which may affect their daily life. Adolescence is a sensitive period and asthma may be difficult to treat due to poor adherence to treatment. Little is known about health care professionals’ adhe...

  20. Svær asthma bronchiale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Bülow, Anna; Backer, Vibeke; Porsbjerg, Celeste

    2015-01-01

    Severe asthma is defined by persistent symptoms and frequent exacerbations despite intensive asthma therapy. The prevalence is estimated to be 5-10% of all asthmatics. Severe asthma is responsible for a major burden of illness including low quality of life and a disproportionate use of health......-care resources. The clinical assessment of severe asthma must include verification of the correct diagnosis, adherence to medication, excluding differential diagnosis and identification and treatment of aggravating co-morbidities and trigger factors....

  1. Progress in the management of childhood asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Vichyanond, Pakit; Pensrichon, Rattana; Kurasirikul, Suruthai

    2012-01-01

    Asthma has become the most common chronic disease in childhood. Significant advances in epidemiological research as well as in therapy of pediatric asthma have been made over the past 2 decades. In this review, we look at certain aspects therapy of childhood asthma, both in the past and present. Literature review on allergen avoidance (including mites, cockroach and cat), intensive therapy with β2-agonists in acute asthma (administering via continuous nebulization and intravenous routes), a r...

  2. [Severe asthma--where are we today?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bülow, Anna; Backer, Vibeke; Porsbjerg, Celeste

    2014-01-13

    Severe asthma is defined by persistent symptoms and frequent exacerbations despite intensive asthma therapy. The prevalence is estimated to be 5-10% of all asthmatics. Severe asthma is responsible for a major burden of illness including low quality of life and a disproportionate use of health-care resources. The clinical assessment of severe asthma must include verification of the correct diagnosis, adherence to medication, excluding differential diagnosis and identification and treatment of aggravating co-morbidities and trigger factors.

  3. Association of moderate-severe chronic periodontitis with essential hypertension%中、重度慢性牙周炎与原发性高血压的相关性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    麦蕙晶

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the association of moderate-severe chronic periodontitis with essential hypertension.Methods: Included in this study were 35 healthy subjects undergone physical examination between December 2010 and January 2013(group A),32 patients with moderate or severe chron-ic periodontitis received treatment in the corresponding period(group B) and 37 patients with chronic periodontitis associated with essential hypertension (group C).The clinical data were compared regarding the plaque index,probing depth,attachment loss,gingival bleeding index and anticardiolipin anti-body IgG level among the three groups.Results:Group C had the highest periodontal indexes and anticardiolipin antibody IgG level ,and the indexes were lowest for group A(all P<0.05).The anticardiolipin antibody IgG level was positively correlated with the plaque index,probing depth,attachment loss, gingival bleeding index in the three groups.Conclusion:Essential hypertension can aggravate the condition of patients with chronic periodontitis that may lead to elevated level of anticardiolipin antibody and increased risks of atherosclerosis in such patients .%目的:探究中、重度慢性牙周炎与原发性高血压之间的相关性。方法:选取我院近年来(2010年12月~2013年1月)体检的健康人群35例(A组),同期收治中、重度慢性牙周炎患者32例(B组),慢性牙周炎伴原发性高血压患者37例(C组)为研究对象。对3组对象的菌斑指数、探诊深度、附着丧失、出血指数、抗心磷脂抗体IgG等指标进行比较研究。结果:①3组对象的各项牙周指标比较差异明显,C组指标高于A、B组,B组指标高于A组( P均<0.05);②3组对象的抗心磷脂抗体IgG指标比较差异明显,C组指标高于A、B组,B组指标高于A组(P均<0.05);③3组对象的抗心磷脂抗体IgG指标与菌斑指数、探诊深度、附着丧失、出血指数之间正显著相关。

  4. An Online Simulation in Pediatric Asthma Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, Keith B.

    2004-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) estimates that nearly 20 million Americans suffer from asthma, 6.3 million of which are children (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2004). It is not merely an annoyance disease, as is commonly believed. Asthma kills. It takes more than 5,000 American lives each year (Asthma Statistics in America,…

  5. Treating Asthma in Children under 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... inflammation makes the airways vulnerable to episodes of difficult breathing (asthma attacks). Common triggers include allergies, colds and exercise. ... asthma in children under age 5 can be difficult. In infants and young children, the ... symptoms of asthma — wheezing and coughing — may be caused by other ...

  6. How Can I Deal with My Asthma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Breakfasts Shyness How Can I Deal With My Asthma? KidsHealth > For Teens > How Can I Deal With My Asthma? A A A What's in this article? Taking ... Tips en español ¿Cómo puedo afrontar mi asma? Asthma is more common these days than it used ...

  7. Managing Asthma in the Early Childhood Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graville, Iris

    2011-01-01

    Asthma, one of the most common chronic disorders in childhood, affects more than seven million children in the United States, and is the third leading cause of hospitalization for children. Statistics like these make planning and preparing for asthma in the early childhood setting a high priority. With the high rates of asthma in the U.S. today,…

  8. Taking ACTion for better control of asthma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Yong-chang

    2007-01-01

    @@ The global prevalence of asthma ranges from 1% to 18% of the population in different countries.1 In China, while national data of asthma prevalence are still lacking, an epidemiological study in Beijing showed that the prevalence of asthma in occupational populations was 1.25%.2

  9. Jackie Joyner-Kersee: Living with Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Asthma Jackie Joyner-Kersee: Living with Asthma Past Issues / Fall 2011 Table of Contents Jackie ... the heptathlon and long-jump competitions, despite severe asthma. While she was a top student-athlete at ...

  10. Asthma: Not Just a Childhood Condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Kandra

    2002-01-01

    Asthma has grown to epidemic proportions among school-age children, and nearly 10 million U.S. adults suffer from it. This paper describes asthma and its triggers and explains how to take measures to manage asthma symptoms within the school (e.g., dusting regularly and keeping medications available). A sidebar presents tips on controlling asthma…

  11. Children with Asthma: Strategies for Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuharth-Pritchett, Stacey; Getch, Yvette Q.

    1999-01-01

    Guidelines for managing the child with asthma in educational settings address effects of asthma on academic performance, psychosocial effects, the need for collaboration with parents and medical personnel, common triggers of asthmatic episodes, symptoms, communication with parents, and resources. A sample asthma care plan is attached. (DB)

  12. Understanding Children with Asthma: Trouble and Triggers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, JungHa; Wood, Beatrice L.; Cheah, PoAnn

    2009-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most common illnesses of childhood; in the United States, nearly 9% of children have the condition (Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics, 2006). Among children with chronic illnesses, asthma is the most common cause for school absence and hospitalization (Akinbami, 2006). Asthma is a chronic disorder of the…

  13. Adult Asthma Consensus Guidelines Update 2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Lemière

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several sets of Canadian guidelines for the diagnosis and management of asthma have been published over the past 15 years. Since the last revision of the 1999 Canadian Asthma Consensus Report, important new studies have highlighted the need to incorporate new information into the asthma guidelines.

  14. Individual-level socioeconomic status is associated with worse asthma morbidity in patients with asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouchard Anne

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low socioeconomic status (SES has been linked to higher morbidity in patients with chronic diseases, but may be particularly relevant to asthma, as asthmatics of lower SES may have higher exposures to indoor (e.g., cockroaches, tobacco smoke and outdoor (e.g., urban pollution allergens, thus increasing risk for exacerbations. Methods This study assessed associations between adult SES (measured according to educational level and asthma morbidity, including asthma control; asthma-related emergency health service use; asthma self-efficacy, and asthma-related quality of life, in a Canadian cohort of 781 adult asthmatics. All patients underwent a sociodemographic and medical history interview and pulmonary function testing on the day of their asthma clinic visit, and completed a battery of questionnaires (Asthma Control Questionnaire, Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire, and Asthma Self-Efficacy Scale. General Linear Models assessed associations between SES and each morbidity measure. Results Lower SES was associated with worse asthma control (F = 11.63, p Conclusions Results suggest that lower SES (measured according to education level, is associated with several indices of worse asthma morbidity, particularly worse asthma control, in adult asthmatics independent of disease severity. Results are consistent with previous studies linking lower SES to worse asthma in children, and add asthma to the list of chronic diseases affected by individual-level SES.

  15. Allergy and asthma prevention 2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nieto, Antonio; Wahn, Ulrich; Bufe, Albrecht

    2014-01-01

    Asthma and allergic diseases have become one of the epidemics of the 21st century in developed countries. Much of the success of other areas of medicine, such as infectious diseases, lies on preventive measures. Thus, much effort is also being placed lately in the prevention of asthma and allergy....... This manuscript reviews the current evidence, divided into four areas of activity. Interventions modifying environmental exposure to allergens have provided inconsistent results, with multifaceted interventions being more effective in the prevention of asthma. Regarding nutrition, the use of hydrolyzed formulas...... in high-risk infants reduces the incidence of atopic dermatitis, while there is for now not enough evidence to recommend other dietary modifications, pre-biotics, probiotics, or other microbial products. Pharmacologic agents used until now for prevention have not proved useful, while there is hope...

  16. Sodium cromoglycate in nocturnal asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, A D; Connaughton, J J; Catterall, J R; Shapiro, C M; Douglas, N J; Flenley, D C

    1986-01-01

    To investigate whether mast cell degranulation was important in producing nocturnal asthma, the effect of a single high dose of nebulised sodium cromoglycate on overnight bronchoconstriction, oxygen saturation, and breathing patterns in eight patients with nocturnal wheeze was examined. The study took the form of a double blind placebo controlled crossover comparison. Treatment with cromoglycate did not reduce the overnight fall in FEV1 or FVC, although it was associated with improved nocturnal oxygenation. This study suggests that mast cell degranulation may not be important in the pathogenesis of nocturnal asthma. PMID:3085257

  17. Antinuclear Antibodies in Asthma Patients- A Special Asthma Phenotype?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agache Ioana

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Several studies reported the appearance of asthma and autoimmune conditions in the same patient, but the clinical significance of this association was not yet assessed. One hundred asthmatic patients were observed for one year evolution with death, severe exacerbations, intake of > 1000 micrograms of beclometasone or equivalent (high ICS and FEV1 decline >100 ml, in relation with ANA (ELISA, sputum and blood eosinophilia (EO, NSAID intolerance, BMI >25, chronic rhinosinusitis, smoking status and FEV1 After 1 year of observation, there were 5 deaths, 28 severe asthma exacerbations requiring hospitalisations, 24 cases requiring high inhaled corticosteroid intake, and 19 patients with fast FEV1 decline (>100 ml/year. Multiple regression analysis pointed out several different independent risk factors for severe asthma evolution: for death presence of ANA (P=0.037, NSAID intolerance (P100 ml ANA (P=0.006, sputum EO (P=0.037, BMI>25 (P=0.046 and NSAID intolerance (P=0.017The presence of ANA is an independent risk factor in asthma for evolution with death, severe exacerbations, high inhaled corticosteroid intake and FEV1 decline >100 ml.

  18. Childhood asthma prediction models: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Henriette A; Pinart, Mariona; Antó, Josep M; Keil, Thomas; Bousquet, Jean; Carlsen, Kai H; Moons, Karel G M; Hooft, Lotty; Carlsen, Karin C Lødrup

    2015-12-01

    Early identification of children at risk of developing asthma at school age is crucial, but the usefulness of childhood asthma prediction models in clinical practice is still unclear. We systematically reviewed all existing prediction models to identify preschool children with asthma-like symptoms at risk of developing asthma at school age. Studies were included if they developed a new prediction model or updated an existing model in children aged 4 years or younger with asthma-like symptoms, with assessment of asthma done between 6 and 12 years of age. 12 prediction models were identified in four types of cohorts of preschool children: those with health-care visits, those with parent-reported symptoms, those at high risk of asthma, or children in the general population. Four basic models included non-invasive, easy-to-obtain predictors only, notably family history, allergic disease comorbidities or precursors of asthma, and severity of early symptoms. Eight extended models included additional clinical tests, mostly specific IgE determination. Some models could better predict asthma development and other models could better rule out asthma development, but the predictive performance of no single model stood out in both aspects simultaneously. This finding suggests that there is a large proportion of preschool children with wheeze for which prediction of asthma development is difficult.

  19. Pediatric asthma: an integrative approach to care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, John David

    2009-01-01

    Asthma in children and young adults is a complex disease with many different phenotypic expressions. Diagnosis is often made based on history and lung function including measuring airway reversibility. However, in children younger than 6 years of age, the diagnosis is more difficult because many children wheeze in the first 4-6 years of life, especially with viral infections. For those children, asthma treatment is often started empirically. Those who go on to develop chronic asthma most likely have a genetic predisposition and exposure to various environmental factors resulting in chronic inflammation of the lower respiratory tract. There are established national guidelines for diagnosing and treating asthma in children and adults. For persistent asthma, it is recommended that medications be taken on a regular basis after identifying and avoiding environmental triggers. Because many factors play a role in developing asthma in children, many nonmedical approaches to asthma and asthma-like conditions have been promoted even when the diagnosis is at times uncertain. The nonmedical approaches and therapies are often referred to as complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). This review will discuss the conventional therapies recommended for children with asthma in addition to CAM therapies, some of which have supporting scientific evidence. Integrating conventional and CAM therapies can prove to be an effective way to treat pediatric asthma, a common and chronic childhood lung disorder. A case is provided to illustrate how such an integrative approach was used in the successful treatment of a child with moderate persistent asthma.

  20. Pediatric asthma self-management: current concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, L. D.

    1999-01-01

    The concept of asthma self-management began in asthma camps in the 1970s. Today all asthma camps are required to provide an educational asthma self-management program. The interaction between children and educators is brief, and if the children do not continue in an associated program after camp, the benefits may be lost. Open Airways, the first program developed specifically for minority children, has been the prototype for community asthma self-management. School-based intervention programs have incorporated asthma education into the health curriculum. Some asthma education programs include an emphasis on the environment. Another approach is to develop intervention projects with parents, as in the Head Start program. This program has been very effective in increasing early recognition of asthma and decreasing recidivism in a high-risk population. Another type of project addressed the reading ability and reading comprehension of asthmatic children. Improvement in reading skills resulted in a 47% decrease in asthma recidivism. After 18 months, there were only two hospitalizations among the enrolled participants. Asthma self-management programs that are most effective for inner-city children provide an interactive, culturally relevant form of asthma education and address issues such as literacy and continuity. PMID:12653391

  1. The Danish National Database for Asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Backer, Vibeke; Lykkegaard, Jesper; Bodtger, Uffe;

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF THE DATABASE: Asthma is the most prevalent chronic disease in children, adolescents, and young adults. In Denmark (with a population of 5.6 million citizens), >400,000 persons are prescribed antiasthmatic medication annually. However, undiagnosed cases, dubious diagnoses, and poor asthma...... management are probably common. The Danish National Database for Asthma (DNDA) was established in 2015. The aim of the DNDA was to collect the data on all patients treated for asthma in Denmark and to monitor asthma occurrence, the quality of diagnosis, and management. STUDY POPULATION: Persons above the age...... year, the inclusion criteria are a second purchase of asthma prescription medicine within a 2-year period (National Prescription Registry) or a diagnosis of asthma (National Patient Register). Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are excluded, but smokers are not excluded. DESCRIPTIVE...

  2. Obesity in asthma: approaches to treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradeepan, Shyamala; Garrison, Garth; Dixon, Anne E

    2013-10-01

    There is mounting evidence that obesity is associated with asthma, both of which are seeing a dramatic increase in prevalence. Not only is obesity a risk factor for the development of asthma but it is also associated with poor asthma control. Asthma phenotypes associated with obesity include early-onset allergic asthma and late-onset non-allergic asthma. The pathogenesis of the linkage is complex; obesity causes a variety of mechanical, metabolic, and immunological changes that can affect the airways. The treatment of asthma in obesity can be challenging, as obesity is associated with poor response to standard controller medications. A tailored approach that involves combining pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic therapies including weight loss, dietary interventions, and exercise, along with identification and treatment of obstructive sleep apnea, should therefore be considered in this population.

  3. Svær asthma bronchiale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Bülow, Anna; Backer, Vibeke; Porsbjerg, Celeste

    2015-01-01

    Severe asthma is defined by persistent symptoms and frequent exacerbations despite intensive asthma therapy. The prevalence is estimated to be 5-10% of all asthmatics. Severe asthma is responsible for a major burden of illness including low quality of life and a disproportionate use of health-car......-care resources. The clinical assessment of severe asthma must include verification of the correct diagnosis, adherence to medication, excluding differential diagnosis and identification and treatment of aggravating co-morbidities and trigger factors.......Severe asthma is defined by persistent symptoms and frequent exacerbations despite intensive asthma therapy. The prevalence is estimated to be 5-10% of all asthmatics. Severe asthma is responsible for a major burden of illness including low quality of life and a disproportionate use of health...

  4. Allergy and asthma prevention 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Antonio; Wahn, Ulrich; Bufe, Albrecht; Eigenmann, Philippe; Halken, Susanne; Hedlin, Gunilla; Høst, Arne; Hourihane, Jonathan; Just, Jocelyne; Lack, Gideon; Lau, Susanne; Matricardi, Paolo Maria; Muraro, Antonella; Papadopoulos, Nikos; Roberts, Graham; Simpson, Angela; Valovirta, Erkka; Weidinger, Stephan; Wickman, Magnus; Mazon, Angel

    2014-10-01

    Asthma and allergic diseases have become one of the epidemics of the 21st century in developed countries. Much of the success of other areas of medicine, such as infectious diseases, lies on preventive measures. Thus, much effort is also being placed lately in the prevention of asthma and allergy. This manuscript reviews the current evidence, divided into four areas of activity. Interventions modifying environmental exposure to allergens have provided inconsistent results, with multifaceted interventions being more effective in the prevention of asthma. Regarding nutrition, the use of hydrolyzed formulas in high-risk infants reduces the incidence of atopic dermatitis, while there is for now not enough evidence to recommend other dietary modifications, prebiotics, probiotics, or other microbial products. Pharmacologic agents used until now for prevention have not proved useful, while there is hope that antiviral vaccines could be useful in the future. Allergen-specific immunotherapy is effective for the treatment of allergic patients with symptoms; the study of its value for primary and secondary prevention of asthma and allergy is in its very preliminary phases. The lack of success in the prevention of these disorders lies on their complexity, which involves many genetic, epigenetic, and environmental interactions. There is a need to identify target populations, involved mechanisms and interactions, and the best interventions. These must be effective, feasible, implementable, and affordable.

  5. [Asthma mortality trends in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas Ramírez, M; Segura Méndez, N H; Martínez-Cairo Cueto, S

    1994-04-01

    The objective of this cross-sectional study was to estimate mortality and morbidity from asthma in Mexico by federative entity (state) of residence, age, and sex during the period between 1960 and 1988. Statistics published by the National Institute of Statistics, Geography, and Information Science were reviewed, as were vital statistics and information from other sources. Data were selected on mortality, hospital admissions, and outpatient visits, as well as population by federative entity, age, and sex. Mortality and morbidity rates were adjusted for age using the direct method. From 1960 to 1987, mortality decreased for both sexes. The groups with the highest asthma mortality were those under 4 years of age and those over 50. From 1960 to the present, the state with the highest mortality was Tlaxcala. Hospitalizations increased from 10 to 140 per 100,000 population for the country as a whole. When both outpatient visits and hospitalizations were considered, the morbidity rates rose from 180 to 203.4 per 100,000 between 1960 and 1970. In 1970, hospital morbidity was higher among males than females. From 1960 up to the 1990s, the highest rates of hospitalization and outpatient visits were registered among those under 4 and those over 60. The states with the highest asthma hospitalization rates were Morelos, Baja California Sur, Nuevo León, Durango, and Tamaulipas. It is concluded that asthma mortality in Mexico is showing a downward trend, while morbidity is increasing considerably, especially among adolescents.

  6. Childhood asthma and risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljuština-Pribić Radmila

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. This article summarizes the contribution of epidemiology to the understanding of childhood asthma. The first task in epidemiology is to determine prevalence and incidence of any disease. Prevalence. Epidemiological investigations are aimed at evaluating hypotheses about causes of disease by defining demographic characteristics of a certain population as well as by determining possible effects of environmental factors. In spite of some limitations, data obtained by epidemiological investigations have been valuable in confirming both the increasing incidence of asthma and the differences in prevalence in certain population groups. The observance of this phenomenon has led to much speculation and a lot of attempts to identify the reasons behind the rising prevalence. Risk factors. Epidemiological studies have identified risk factors for the development of childhood asthma and provided insight into natural history of disease and prognosis. Factors ranging from increased numbers of immunizations to increased air pollution have been suggested, but subsequent analysis has failed to provide the supporting evidence to implicate most of these possibilities. The concept known as the hygiene hypothesis has gained some support from epidemiological studies. Conclusion. The development of asthma as well as its severity are affected by numerous factors and their interactions can be explained by the heterogeneous nature of this disease.

  7. Occupational asthma caused by palladium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daenen, M.; Rochette, F.; Demedts, M.; Nemery, B. [K.U. Leuven, Pneumology (Belgium); Rogiers, P. [A.Z. St-Lucas, Brugge (Belgium); Walle, C. Van de [Siemens, Oostkamp (Belgium)

    1999-01-01

    Occupational exposure to complex platinum salts is a well-known cause of occupational asthma. Although there is evidence that platinum refinery workers may also be sensitized to other precious metals, such as palladium or rhodium, no instances of occupational asthma due to an isolated sensitization to palladium have been reported. A case is reported of occupational rhinoconjunctivitis and asthma in a previously healthy worker exposed to the fumes of an electroplating bath containing palladium. There was no exposure to platinum. Sensitization to palladium was documented by skin-prick tests. The skin-prick test was positive with Pd(NH{sub 3}){sub 4}Cl{sub 2}, but not with (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}PdCl{sub 4}. Corresponding salts of platinum were all negative. A bronchial provocation test with Pd(NH{sub 34})Cl{sub 2} (0.0001 % for a total of 315 s, followed by 0.001 % for a total of 210 s) led to an early decrease in forced expiratory volume in one second (-35%). A similar exposure (0.001 % for a total of 16 min) in an unrelated asthmatic gave no reaction. This case shows that an isolated sensitization to palladium can occur and that respiratory exposure to palladium is a novel cause of metal-induced occupational asthma. (au) 24 refs.

  8. Carboxyhemoglobin and Methemoglobin in Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naples, Robert; Laskowski, Dan; McCarthy, Kevin; Mattox, Emmea; Comhair, Suzy A. A.; Erzurum, Serpil C.

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO) are synthesized at high levels in asthmatic airways. NO can oxidize hemoglobin (Hb) to methemoglobin (MetHb). CO binds to heme to produce carboxyhemoglobin (COHb). We hypothesized that MetHb and COHb may be increased in asthma. COHb, MetHb, and Hb were measured in venous blood of healthy controls (n=32) and asthmatics (n=31). Arterial COHb and oxyhemoglobin were measured by pulse CO-oximeter. Hb, oxyhemoglobin, and deoxyhemoglobin were similar among groups, but arterial COHb was higher in asthmatics than controls (p=0.04). Venous COHb was similar among groups, and thus arteriovenous COHb (a-v COHb) concentration difference was greater in asthma compared with controls. Venous MetHb was lower in asthma compared to controls (p=0.01) and correlated to venous NO (p=0.009). The greater a-v COHb in asthma suggests CO offloading to tissues, but lower than normal MetHb suggests countermeasures to avoid adverse effects of high NO on gas transfer. PMID:25680415

  9. Gastric asthma : a pathophysiological entity?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, FTM; Kleibeuker, JH; Postma, DS

    1998-01-01

    Background: Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) is manifested by typical reflux symptoms and atypical extra-oesophageal symptoms. Important in this respect are respiratory conditions. Gastric asthma is a prominent example of these extra-oesophageal manifestations of GORD. There is, however, muc

  10. Obesity and Asthma: Physiological Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bill Brashier

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity induces some pertinent physiological changes which are conducive to either development of asthma or cause of poorly controlled asthma state. Obesity related mechanical stress forces induced by abdominal and thoracic fat generate stiffening of the lungs and diaphragmatic movements to result in reduction of resting lung volumes such as functional residual capacity (FRC. Reduced FRC is primarily an outcome of decreased expiratory reserve volume, which pushes the tidal breathing more towards smaller high resistance airways, and consequentially results in expiratory flow limitation during normal breathing in obesity. Reduced FRC also induces plastic alteration in the small collapsible airways, which may generate smooth muscle contraction resulting in increased small airway resistance, which, however, is not picked up by spirometric lung volumes. There is also a possibility that chronically reduced FRC may generate permanent adaptation in the very small airways; therefore, the airway calibres may not change despite weight reduction. Obesity may also induce bronchodilator reversibility and diurnal lung functional variability. Obesity is also associated with airway hyperresponsiveness; however, the mechanism of this is not clear. Thus, obesity has effects on lung function that can generate respiratory distress similar to asthma and may also exaggerate the effects of preexisting asthma.

  11. Asthma and Respiratory Allergic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    The pathogenesis of non-communicable diseases such as allergy is complex and poorly understood. The causes of chronic allergic diseases including asthma involve to a large extent, immunomodulation of the adaptive and particularly the innate immune systems and are markedly influen...

  12. Controlling Your Symptoms of Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a disease that affects the tubes in your lungs that carry air (oxygen). These tubes are called airways. In people with asthma, the airways can be sensitive to pollen, dust mites, animal dander, chemicals, tobacco smoke, wood Visit your doctor to talk about your health ...

  13. Children with problematic severe asthma: A biopsychosocial perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkleij, M.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis focuses on problematic severe asthma in children and its treatment from a biopsychosocial perspective. Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways. In children with problematic severe asthma, asthma is not under control despite optimal medical treatment. Asthma control is the

  14. Asthma and Adolescents: Review of Strategies to Improve Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessy-Harstad, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    One of every 10 adolescents in the United States has asthma. Adolescents who lack asthma control are at increased risk for severe asthma episodes and death. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute 2007 asthma guidelines and research studies indicated that school nurses are instrumental in assisting adolescents to monitor their asthma, learn…

  15. Asthma and obesity: does weight loss improve asthma control? a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juel CTB

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Caroline Trunk-Black Juel,1 Zarqa Ali,1 Lisbeth Nilas,2 Charlotte Suppli Ulrik11Respiratory Section, Internal Medicine Unit, 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Hvidovre Hospital and University of Copenhagen, Hvidovre, DenmarkAim and methods: Obesity is a major health problem, and obesity is associated with a high incidence of asthma and poor asthma control. The aim of the present paper is to systematically review the current knowledge of the effect on overall asthma control of weight reduction in overweight and obese adults with asthma.Results: Weight loss in obese individuals with doctor-diagnosed asthma is associated with a 48%–100% remission of asthma symptoms and use of asthma medication. Published studies, furthermore, reveal that weight loss in obese asthmatics improves asthma control, and that especially surgically induced weight loss results in significant improvements in asthma severity, use of asthma medication, dyspnoea, exercise tolerance, and acute exacerbations, including hospitalizations due to asthma. Furthermore, weight loss in obese asthmatics is associated with improvements in level of lung function and airway responsiveness to inhaled methacholine, whereas no significant improvements have been observed in exhaled nitric oxide or other markers of eosinophilic airway inflammation.Conclusion: Overweight and obese adults with asthma experience a high symptomatic remission rate and significant improvements in asthma control, including objective measures of disease activity, after weight loss. Although these positive effects of weight loss on asthma-related health outcomes seem not to be accompanied by remission or improvements in markers of eosinophilic airway inflammation, it has potentially important implications for the future burden of asthma.Keywords: asthma, weight loss, diet, bariatric surgery, asthma control

  16. The impact of food allergy on asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupama Kewalramani

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Anupama Kewalramani, Mary E BollingerDepartment of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Allergy/Pulmonology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USAAbstract: Food allergy is a potentially severe immune response to a food or food additive. Although a majority of children will outgrow their food allergies, some may have lifelong issues. Food allergies and other atopic conditions, such as asthma, are increasing in prevalence in Western countries. As such, it is not uncommon to note the co-existence of food allergy and asthma in the same patient. As part of the atopic march, many food allergic patients may develop asthma later in life. Each can adversely affect the other. Food allergic patients with asthma have a higher risk of developing life-threatening food-induced reactions. Although food allergy is not typically an etiology of asthma, an asthmatic patient with food allergy may have higher rates of morbidity and mortality associated with the asthma. Asthma is rarely a manifestation of food allergy alone, but the symptoms can be seen with allergic reactions to foods. There may be evidence to suggest that early childhood environmental factors, such as the mother’s and child’s diets, factor in the development of asthma; however, the evidence continues to be conflicting. All food allergic patients and their families should be counseled on the management of food allergy and the risk of developing co-morbid asthma.Keywords: food allergy, diagnosis, treatment, asthma

  17. Difficult asthma: assessment and management, Part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanta, Christopher H; Long, Aidan A

    2012-01-01

    Patients with severe asthma have considerable morbidity related to their asthma and are at risk for serious, life-threatening exacerbations. Their management requires an intensive and comprehensive approach, including attention to reducing exposure to environmental inciters of airway inflammation and triggers of symptoms, patient education (including an asthma action plan), and opportunity for close patient-provider communication. Approved medical options include the lipoxygenase inhibitor, zileuton; the anti-immunoglobulin E monoclonal antibody, omalizumab; and bronchial thermoplasty. Nonapproved interventions of potential benefit are ultrahigh-dose inhaled corticosteroids, anticholinergic bronchodilators (tiotropium), macrolide antibiotics, and vitamin D supplementation for the vitamin D-deficient patient. Potentially toxic, "steroid-sparing" therapies such as methotrexate, cyclosporine, and etanercept are best reserved for patients participating in clinical trials. Recognition of specific subtypes of patients with therapy-resistant asthma permits more targeted treatment approaches, such as for aspirin-sensitive asthma, persistent eosinophilic asthma, asthma complicated by allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, asthma with persistent airflow obstruction, and asthma with life-threatening (near fatal) asthmatic attacks. Novel therapies based on an improved understanding of the pathobiology of therapy-resistant asthma are greatly needed.

  18. Current asthma deaths among adults in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsugio Nakazawa

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent asthma deaths were examined from yearly reports of the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare of Japan and from reports published by the Japan Asthma Death Investigation Committee on 811 deaths over the period 1992–2000. The rate and number of recent asthma deaths in Japan have been decreasing rapidly. Most asthma deaths were of patients aged 70–90 years and there has been a marked trend for increased asthma deaths in the elderly. As for the circumstances surrounding the deaths, sudden death, unstable sudden aggravation and intermittent aggravation were mainly noted. Respiratory infections, fatigue and stress were the major courses of fatal attacks contributing to deaths due to asthma. Many of the patients who died from asthma had been diagnosed as having as moderate to severe asthma and many had non-atopic asthma. There are some reports that suggest that the recent decrease in asthma deaths in Japan is correlated with the use of inhaled cortico- steroids.

  19. Asthma in Hispanics. An 8-year update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosser, Franziska J; Forno, Erick; Cooper, Philip J; Celedón, Juan C

    2014-06-01

    This review provides an update on asthma in Hispanics, a diverse group tracing their ancestry to countries previously under Spanish rule. A marked variability in the prevalence and morbidity from asthma remains among Hispanic subgroups in the United States and Hispanic America. In the United States, Puerto Ricans and Mexican Americans have high and low burdens of asthma, respectively (the "Hispanic Paradox"). This wide divergence in asthma morbidity among Hispanic subgroups is multifactorial, likely reflecting the effects of known (secondhand tobacco smoke, air pollution, psychosocial stress, obesity, inadequate treatment) and potential (genetic variants, urbanization, vitamin D insufficiency, and eradication of parasitic infections) risk factors. Barriers to adequate asthma management in Hispanics include economic and educational disadvantages, lack of health insurance, and no access to or poor adherence with controller medications such as inhaled corticosteroids. Although considerable progress has been made in our understanding of asthma in Hispanic subgroups, many questions remain. Studies of asthma in Hispanic America should focus on environmental or lifestyle factors that are more relevant to asthma in this region (e.g., urbanization, air pollution, parasitism, and stress). In the United States, research studies should focus on risk factors that are known to or may diverge among Hispanic subgroups, including but not limited to epigenetic variation, prematurity, vitamin D level, diet, and stress. Clinical trials of culturally appropriate interventions that address multiple aspects of asthma management in Hispanic subgroups should be prioritized for funding. Ensuring high-quality healthcare for all remains a pillar of eliminating asthma disparities.

  20. 2003 Canadian Asthma Consensus Guidelines Executive Summary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Becker Allan

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of asthma have been published over the last 15 years; however, there has been little focus on issues relating to asthma in childhood. Since the last revision of the 1999 Canadian Asthma Consensus Report, important new studies, particularly in children, have highlighted the need to incorporate new information into the asthma guidelines. The objectives of this article are to review the literature on asthma published between January 2000 and June 2003 and to evaluate the influence of new evidence on the recommendations made in the 1999 Canadian Asthma Consensus Report and its 2001 update, with a major focus on pediatric issues. Methods The diagnosis of asthma in young children and prevention strategies, pharmacotherapy, inhalation devices, immunotherapy, and asthma education were selected for review by small expert resource groups. The reviews were discussed in June 2003 at a meeting under the auspices of the Canadian Network For Asthma Care and the Canadian Thoracic Society. Data published through December 2004 were subsequently reviewed by the individual expert resource groups. Results This report evaluates early-life prevention strategies and focuses on treatment of asthma in children, emphasizing the importance of early diagnosis and preventive therapy, the benefits of additional therapy, and the essential role of asthma education. Conclusion We generally support previous recommendations and focus on new issues, particularly those relevant to children and their families. This document is a guide for asthma management based on the best available published data and the opinion of health care professionals, including asthma experts and educators.

  1. School variation in asthma: compositional or contextual?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy K Richmond

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Childhood asthma prevalence and morbidity have been shown to vary by neighborhood. Less is known about between-school variation in asthma prevalence and whether it exists beyond what one might expect due to students at higher risk of asthma clustering within different schools. Our objective was to determine whether between-school variation in asthma prevalence exists and if so, if it is related to the differential distribution of individual risk factors for and correlates of asthma or to contextual influences of schools. METHODS: Cross-sectional analysis of 16,640 teens in grades 7-12 in Wave 1 (data collected in 1994-5 of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Outcome was current diagnosis of asthma as reported by respondents' parents. Two-level random effects models were used to assess the contribution of schools to the variance in asthma prevalence before and after controlling for individual attributes. RESULTS: The highest quartile schools had mean asthma prevalence of 21.9% compared to the lowest quartile schools with mean asthma prevalence of 7.1%. In our null model, the school contributed significantly to the variance in asthma (sigma(u0(2 = 0.27, CI: 0.20, 0.35. Controlling for individual, school and neighborhood attributes reduced the between-school variance modestly (sigma(u0(2 = 0.19 CI: 0.13-0.29. CONCLUSION: Significant between-school variation in current asthma prevalence exists even after controlling for the individual, school and neighborhood factors. This provides evidence for school level contextual influences on asthma. Further research is needed to determine potential mechanisms through which schools may influence asthma outcomes.

  2. Asthma in elite athletes: how do we manage asthma-like symptoms and asthma in elite athletes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Thomas Kromann

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Asthma is frequent in elite athletes and the high prevalence of asthma might be associated with specific types of sport. It has been suggested that chronic endurance training might increase the number of neutrophils in the airways, and this may reflect airway injury. The use of anti......-asthmatic medication in elite athletes is also currently under scrutiny in order to reduce the risk of under-treatment or over treatment. OBJECTIVES: Determine the use of anti-asthmatic medication and the prevalence of asthma-like symptoms and asthma in Danish elite athletes. Further, to determine whether elite...... survey of elite athletes (N = 418); and (iii) a clinical study of elite athletes. A total of 54 elite athletes (19 with physician-diagnosed asthma) participated together with two control groups: (i) 22 non-athletes with physician-diagnosed asthma (steroid naïve for 4 weeks before the examination) and (ii...

  3. Extrinsic and intrinsic asthma: influence of classification on family history of asthma and allergic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibbald, B

    1980-05-01

    The distributions of asthma, hay fever and eczema were examined in the first degree relatives of 516 asthmatics grouped according to atopic status, history of hay fever/eczema and history of asthma provoked by pollens, dust or animals. The prevalences of both asthma and eczema in relatives were strongly correlated with the presence of hay fever/eczema in probands and to a lesser extent with their atopic status. The prevalence of hay fever in relatives was strongly correlated with both the presence of hay fever/eczema and the degree of atopy in probands. In contrast, allergic provocation of asthma in probands did not influence the prevalences of asthma, hay fever or eczema. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that there is an increased risk of asthma in relatives of atopic asthmatics which may arise from the enhanced susceptibility to asthma of individuals who inherit both a predisposition to asthma and a predisposition to atopy.

  4. Perceived Stress, Severity of Asthma, and Quality of Life in Young Adults with Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoaki Kimura

    2009-01-01

    Conclusions: A major variable related to the disease-specific quality of life was perceived stress, followed by the severity of asthma. Stress management of patients with asthma may improve their quality of life.

  5. Efffect of Aeroallergen Sensitization on Asthma Control in African-American Teens with Persistent Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    In African-American adolescents with persistent asthma, allergic profile predicted the likelihood of having poorly controlled asthma despite guidelines-directed therapies. Our results suggest that tree and weed pollen sensitization are independent risk factors for poorly controll...

  6. The Prevalence of Severe Asthma and Low Asthma Control Among Danish Adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Bülow, Anna; Kriegbaum, Margit; Backer, Vibeke;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The prevalence of severe asthma is unknown. However, international expert statements estimate that severe asthma represents 5% to 10 % of the entire asthma population. OBJECTIVE: Based on register data from a nationwide population, we wanted to investigate the prevalence of severe...... asthma, the extent of asthma control, and contact with specialist care. METHODS: A descriptive cross-sectional register study was performed. By using a nationwide prescription database, we identified current patients with asthma (age, 18-44 years) in 2010. Severity was classified as severe versus mild......-moderate asthma according to the level of antiasthma treatment. We investigated prescription drug use, hospitalizations, emergency department visits, and outpatient clinic visits according to severity. RESULTS: Among a nationwide population, we identified 61,583 current patients with asthma. Based on the level...

  7. Electronic asthma action plan database: asthma action plan development using Microsoft Access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangold, Rita A; Salzman, Gary A

    2005-04-01

    We created a user-friendly database for use with asthma management consistent with the national guidelines for asthma. A database was designed by using Microsoft Access for the creation of asthma action plans that can be shared between providers caring for patients with asthma. This database and the use of "form entry" improved documentation of asthma action plans, which are increasingly being used to assess appropriateness of care. We currently have 400 asthma action plans in the database. These action plans can be queried to document compliance with accepted best practices. Asthma action plans can be created and stored in an Access database that is both user-friendly and that can be networked to provide more consistent asthma care.

  8. Are asthma-like symptoms in elite athletes associated with classical features of asthma?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, T.K.; Pedersen, L.; Anderson, S.D.;

    2009-01-01

    Background: Asthma is frequent in elite athletes and clinical studies in athletes have found increased airway inflammation. Objective: To investigate asthma-like symptoms, airway inflammation, airway reactivity (AR) to mannitol and use of asthma medication in Danish elite athletes. Methods......: The study group consisted of 54 elite athletes (19 with doctor-diagnosed asthma), 22 non-athletes with doctor-diagnosed asthma (steroid naive for 4 weeks before the examination) and 35 non-athletes without asthma; all aged 18-35 years. Examinations (1 day): questionnaires, exhaled nitric oxide (e......NO) in parts per billion, spirometry, skin prick test, AR to mannitol and blood samples. Induced sputum was done in subjects with asthma. Results: No significant difference was found in values for eNO, AR and atopy between 42 elite athletes with and 12 without asthma-like symptoms. Elite athletes with doctor...

  9. Characteristics of phenotypes of elderly patients with asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Sano

    2016-04-01

    Conclusions: Half of elderly patients with asthma are characterized by asthma-emphysema overlap. Our results showed that elderly patients with asthma who are smokers and have moderate or severe OAD are also likely to have emphysema.

  10. Imaging diagnosis of bronchial asthma and related diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, Fumikazu; Fujimura, Mikihiko; Kimura, Fumiko; Fujimura, Kaori; Hayano, Toshio; Nishii, Noriko; Machida, Haruhiko; Toda, Jo; Saito, Naoko [Tokyo Women' s Medical Coll. (Japan)

    2002-12-01

    We describe imaging features of bronchial asthma and related diseases. The practical roles of imaging diagnosis are the evaluation of severity and complications of bronchial asthma and differential diagnosis of diseases showing asthmatic symptoms other than bronchial asthma. (author)

  11. Treating Asthma in Children Ages 5 to 11

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... triggers such as cigarette smoke or seasonal allergies. Asthma emergencies Severe asthma attacks can be life-threatening ... doctor at every visit. Immunotherapy for allergy-induced asthma Allergy-desensitization shots (immunotherapy) may help if your ...

  12. Asthma and Schools | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Breathing Easier Asthma and Schools Past Issues / Fall 2013 Table of ... of America 800–727–8462 www.aafa.org Asthma and Physical Activity Exercise-induced asthma is triggered ...

  13. Evolution of Asthma Concept and Effect of Current Asthma Management Guidelines

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Concept of asthma has changed from symptom-complex or airway hypersensitivity to airway inflammation and airway remodeling. Based on this concept asthma management guidelines (JGL) has been developed in Japan. Death from asthma has decreased drastically since the publication of the guidelines, although it is still high in elderly population. Further works are expected for "zero-death" from asthma and for tighter control of airway inflammation and resultant airway remodeling.

  14. Metabolic asthma: is there a link between obesity, diabetes, and asthma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Miriam K; Piedimonte, Giovanni

    2014-11-01

    Childhood asthma and obesity have reached epidemic proportions worldwide, and the latter is also contributing to increasing rates of related metabolic disorders, such as diabetes. However, the relationship between asthma, obesity, and abnormal metabolism is not well understood nor has it been adequately explored in children. This article discusses the concept of metabolic asthma and the recent hypothesis that early derangement in lipid and glucose metabolism is independently associated with increased risk for asthma.

  15. Sleep Disorders in Patients with Bronchial Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukic, Vesna; Lovre, Vladimir; Dragisic, Dejan

    2011-01-01

    Respiratory disturbances during sleep are recognized as extremely common disorders with important clinical consequences. Breathing disorders during sleep can result in broad range of clinical manifestations, the most prevalent of which are unrefreshing sleep, daytime sleepiness and fatigue, and cognitive impairmant. There is also evidence that respiratory-related sleep disturbances can contribute to several common cardiovascular and metabolic disorders, including systemic hypertension, cardiac dysfunction, and insulin-resistance. Correlations are found between asthma-related symptoms and sleep disturbances. Difficulties inducing sleep, sleep fragmentation on polysomnography, early morning awakenings and daytime sleepiness are more common in asthmatics compared with subjects without asthma. The “morning deep” in asthma is relevant for the characterization of asthma severity, and impact drugs’ choices. Sleep and night control of asthma could be relevant to evaluate disease’s control. Appropriate asthma control recovering is guarantor for better sleep quality in these patients and less clinical consequences of respiratory disturbances during sleep. PMID:23678304

  16. Tiotropium – what role in asthma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Tiotropium solution for inhalation (Spiriva Respimat - Boehringer Ingelheim) is the first long-acting muscarinic antagonist to be marketed in the UK for the management of asthma. It is licensed as add-on maintenance bronchodilator treatment in adults with asthma who are using an inhaled corticosteroid (≥800μg budesonide/day or equivalent) and a long-acting beta2 agonist, and who have had one or more severe exacerbations in the previous year. This corresponds to use at step 4 of both the British asthma guideline and the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) strategy for the treatment of asthma in adults. Here we consider the evidence for tiotropium in the management of asthma and whether it offers any advantages over existing therapeutic options at step 4.

  17. Asthma affects time to pregnancy and fertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade, Elisabeth J; Thomsen, Simon F; Lindenberg, Svend;

    2014-01-01

    Coexistence of infertility and asthma has been observed clinically. Therefore, we investigated the association between asthma and delayed pregnancy in a nationwide population-based cohort of twins. A cohort of 15 250 twins living in Denmark (aged 12-41 years) participated in a questionnaire study...... including questions about the presence of asthma and fertility. Differences in time to pregnancy and pregnancy outcome were analysed in subjects with asthma, allergy and in healthy individuals using multiple regression analysis. Asthma was associated with an increased time to pregnancy, the percentage...... in those >30 years of age (32.2% versus 24.9%, OR (95% CI) 1.44 (1.1-1.9); p=0.04). Untreated asthmatics had a significant increased risk of prolonged time to pregnancy compared to healthy individuals (OR (95% CI) 1.79 (1.20-2.66); p=0.004), while asthmatics receiving any kind of treatment for asthma...

  18. Childhood asthma in low income countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Marianne Stubbe; Nantanda, Rebecca; Tumwine, James K

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia has hitherto been considered the key cause of the high respiratory morbidity and mortality in children under five years of age (under-5s) in low-income countries, while asthma has not been stated as a significant reason. This paper explores the definitions and concepts...... and poor treatment results using antibiotics. Moreover, children diagnosed with recurrent pneumonia in infancy were often later diagnosed with asthma. Recent studies showed a 10-15% prevalence of preschool asthma in low-income countries, although under-5s with long-term cough and difficulty breathing...... in under-5s without fever, which suggests the diagnosis of asthma/wheezing rather than bacterial pneumonia. Ultimately, underlying asthma may have contributed to malnutrition and fatal bacterial pneumonia. In conclusion, preschool asthma in low-income countries may be significantly under...

  19. The treatment of asthma in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Anne

    2012-06-01

    The world is facing an unprecedented epidemic of obesity. This epidemic has led to major changes in the epidemiology of common diseases such as asthma. Obesity is a major risk factor for new-onset asthma. This article will discuss the role of mechanical and metabolic factors, as well as obesity-related comorbidities, in both causing airway disease and also affecting response to therapy in obese asthmatics. Asthma in obese individuals probably includes a spectrum of disease with at least two distinct phenotypes: early-onset allergic disease complicated by obesity and late-onset disease developing in the setting of obesity. Both phenotypes are distinct from asthma in lean individuals. Treatment of asthma in obesity needs to consider altered response to controller therapy, and the fact that mechanical factors, metabolic inflammation and other comorbidities are probably contributing to airway disease. Future studies should focus on the development of therapies specifically tailored towards the treatment of asthma in obesity.

  20. PILL Series. The ‘problematic’ asthma patient

    OpenAIRE

    Kui, Swee Leng; How, Choon How; Koh, Jansen

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is a reversible chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways that can be effectively controlled without causing any lifestyle limitation or burden on the quality of life of the majority of asthma patients. However, persistently uncontrolled asthma can be frustrating for both the patient and the managing physician. Patients who fail to respond to high-intensity asthma treatment fall into the category of ‘problematic’ asthma, which is further subdivided into ‘difficult’ asthma and ‘sever...

  1. Asthma Education and Intervention Program: Partnership for Asthma Trigger-Free Homes (PATH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    triggers can reduce the disease symptoms and severity. Indoor asthma triggers include allergens (dust mite, cockroach, cat , dog , rodent), environmental...cockroach, cat , dog , rodent), environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), pesticides, and molds. The Project Coordinator trained participants (parents or guardians...Although asthma is a complicated multi-factorial disease with both genetic and environmental components, reducing levels of certain indoor asthma

  2. Challenges of Asthma Management for School Nurses in Districts with High Asthma Hospitalization Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberatos, Penny; Leone, Jennifer; Craig, Ann Marie; Frei, Elizabeth Mary; Fuentes, Natalie; Harris, India Marie

    2013-01-01

    Background: School nurses play a central role in assisting elementary school children in managing their asthma, especially those in higher-risk school districts that are at increased risk of uncontrolled asthma. Study purposes are to (1) identify barriers to asthma management by school nurses in higher-risk school districts; and (2) assess the…

  3. Adjusting prednisone using blood eosinophils reduces exacerbations and improves asthma control in difficult patients with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wark, Peter Ab; McDonald, Vanessa M; Gibson, Peter G

    2015-11-01

    Severe or therapy-resistant asthma represents a major problem, and despite advanced treatment, many patients require oral corticosteroids (OCS). We aimed to determine if patients with severe asthma and elevated peripheral blood eosinophils (PBE) could have treatment with OCS adjusted using an algorithm that controlled PBE (asthma symptoms with an overall lower OCS dose.

  4. Scheduled asthma management in general practice generally improve asthma control in those who attend

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Backer, Vibeke; Bornemann, Maja; Knudsen, Anja Dorte Brandt;

    2012-01-01

    Successful asthma management involves guideline-based treatment and regular follow-up. We aimed to study the level of disease control in asthmatic individuals managed by their GP and a dedicated nurse when using a systematic asthma consultation guide based on Global Initiative of Asthma guideline...

  5. Asthma Risk Profiles of Children Participating in an Asthma Education and Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Candice; Rapp, Kristi Isaac; Jack, Leonard, Jr.; Hayes, Sandra; Post, Robert; Malveaux, Floyd

    2015-01-01

    Background: Focused risk assessment is essential in the effective management of asthma. Purpose: This study identified and examined correlations among areas of pediatric asthma risk and determined associations between these risks and demographic characteristics. Methods: This exploratory study identified risk factors that affect asthma management…

  6. My Child Is Diagnosed with Asthma, Now What?: Motivating Parents to Help Their Children Control Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepney, Cesalie; Kane, Katelyn; Bruzzese, Jean-Marie

    2011-01-01

    Pediatric asthma is often undiagnosed, and therefore untreated. It negatively impacts children's functioning, including school attendance and performance, as well as quality of life. Schoolwide screening for asthma is becoming increasingly common, making identification of possible asthma particularly relevant for school nurses. Nurses may need to…

  7. Obesity and asthma: impact on severity, asthma control, and response to therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juel, Caroline Trunk-Black; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2013-05-01

    Asthma is more prevalent in obese, compared with normal weight, subjects. Our aim has been to review current knowledge of the impact of obesity on asthma severity, asthma control, and response to therapy. Several studies have shown that overweight and obesity is associated with more severe asthma and impaired quality of life, compared with normal weight individuals. Furthermore, obesity is associated with poorer asthma control, as assessed by asthma control questionnaires, limitations in daily activities, breathlessness and wheezing, use of rescue medication, unscheduled doctor visits, emergency department visits, and hospitalizations for acute asthma. Studies of the impact of a high body mass index on response to asthma therapy have, however, revealed conflicting results. Most studies show that overweight and obesity is associated with less favorable response to asthma therapy, with regard to symptoms, level of FEV1, fraction of exhaled nitric oxide, and airway responsiveness. Some studies suggest that asthma in the obese patient might be more responsive to leukotriene modifiers, orchestrated by leptin and/or adiponectin derived from adipose tissue, than to inhaled corticosteroids, possibly reflecting differences in the underlying airway inflammation in obese versus non-obese asthmatics. In conclusion, overweight and obesity is associated with poorer asthma control and, very importantly, overall poorer response to asthma therapy, compared with normal weight individuals.

  8. Poliomyelitis-like illness associated with asthma.

    OpenAIRE

    Blomquist, H K; Björkstén, B

    1980-01-01

    A 10-year-old girl with a combination of paralytic disease, resembling poliomyelitis, and asthma is described. The girl developed neurological symptoms 5 days after a severe attack of asthma. No aetiology to the flaccid paralysis could be demonstrated although Coxsackie B5 virus was isolated from a stool. A similar poliomyelitis-like illness associated with asthma has previously been reported in 13 cases from Australia and the UK.

  9. Asthma in the Navy and Marine Corps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, J P; Baez, S A

    1991-09-01

    Today, asthma is an increasing health problem in young Americans. In some cases, it can be quite difficult to diagnose. Many individuals enter military service each year with undiagnosed asthma, which subsequently limits their performance of duty. We review the patterns of asthma in children and young adults and relate this to Navy and Marine Corps personnel. We also review the current evaluation of this disease in the U.S. Navy Medical Department and suggest future improvements in this evaluation.

  10. The pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics of asthma therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Tse, Sze Man; Tantisira, Kelan; Weiss, Scott Tillman

    2011-01-01

    Despite the availability of several classes of asthma medications and their overall effectiveness, a significant portion of patients fail to respond to these therapeutic agents. Evidence suggests that genetic factors may partly mediate the heterogeneity in asthma treatment response. This review discusses important findings in asthma pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics studies conducted to date, examines limitations of these studies and finally, proposes future research directions in this fi...

  11. Creating an Asthma-Friendly School

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-11-08

    This podcast features real-life success stories of students with asthma who, thanks to their schools' implementation of asthma-friendly policies and programs, now have their asthma under control.  Created: 11/8/2007 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), Division of Adolescent and School Health (DASH).   Date Released: 5/20/2008.

  12. Bronchial asthma with ABPA presenting as PTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrika Azad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA, as a complication of asthma, is rare in children. The persistent and poorly-controlled asthma leading to cor pulmonale is not uncommon in adults but rarely described in the pediatric age group. Here, we report a case of asthma and ABPA complicated by pulmonary thrombo-embolism and cor pulmonale. To the best of our knowledge, such association has never been reported in the pediatric age group.

  13. Neutrophils in asthma--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciepiela, Olga; Ostafin, Magdalena; Demkow, Urszula

    2015-04-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease, with an array of cells involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. The role of neutrophils in the development of bronchial asthma is found to be complex, as they may trigger activation of immunocompetent cells and are a potent source of free oxygen radicals and enzymes participating in airway remodeling. The review highlights the role of neutrophils in bronchial asthma.

  14. Perceived triggers of asthma: key to symptom perception and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssens, T; Ritz, T

    2013-09-01

    Adequate asthma management depends on an accurate identification of asthma triggers. A review of the literature on trigger perception in asthma shows that individuals vary in their perception of asthma triggers and that the correlation between self-reported asthma triggers and allergy tests is only modest. In this article, we provide an overview of psychological mechanisms involved in the process of asthma triggers identification. We identify sources of errors in trigger identification and targets for behavioural interventions that aim to improve the accuracy of asthma trigger identification and thereby enhance asthma control.

  15. Interleukin 18 receptor 1 gene polymorphisms are associated with asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Guohua; Whyte, Moira K B; Vestbo, Jørgen;

    2008-01-01

    The interleukin 18 receptor (IL18R1) gene is a strong candidate gene for asthma. It has been implicated in the pathophysiology of asthma and maps to an asthma susceptibility locus on chromosome 2q12. The possibility of association between polymorphisms in IL18R1 and asthma was examined...... by genotyping seven SNPs in 294, 342 and 100 families from Denmark, United Kingdom and Norway and conducting family-based association analyses for asthma, atopic asthma and bronchial hyper-reactivity (BHR) phenotypes. Three SNPs in IL18R1 were associated with asthma (0.01131 ... in IL18R1 and asthma....

  16. Hematopoietic Processes in Eosinophilic Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, Brittany M; Sehmi, Roma

    2017-01-24

    Airway eosinophilia is a hallmark of allergic asthma and understanding mechanisms that promote increases in lung eosinophil numbers is important for effective pharmaco-therapeutic development. It has become evident that expansion of hemopoietic compartments in the bone marrow promotes differentiation and trafficking of mature eosinophils to the airways. Hematopoietic progenitor cells egress the bone marrow and home to the lungs, where in-situ differentiative processes within the tissue provide an ongoing source of pro-inflammatory cells. In addition, hematopoietic progenitor cells in the airways can respond to locally-derived alarmins, to produce a panoply of cytokines thereby themselves acting as effector pro-inflammatory cells that potentiate type 2 responses in eosinophilic asthma. In this review, we will provide evidence for these findings and discuss novel targets for modulating eosinophilopoietic processes, migration and effector function of precursor cells.

  17. Parental Perceptions and Practices toward Childhood Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amani K. Abu-Shaheen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Parental perceptions and practices are important for improving the asthma outcomes in children; indeed, evidence shows that parents of asthmatic children harbor considerable misperceptions of the disease. Objective. To investigate the perceptions and practices of parents toward asthma and its management in Saudi children. Methods. Using a self-administered questionnaire, a two-stage cross-sectional survey of parents of children aged between 3 and 15 years, was conducted from schools located in Riyadh province in central Saudi Arabia. Results. During the study interval, 2000 parents were asked to participate in the study; 1450 parents responded, of whom 600 (41.4% reported that their children had asthma, dyspnea, or chest allergy (recurrent wheezing or coughing, while 478 (32.9% of the parents reported that their children were diagnosed earlier with asthma by a physician. Therefore, the final statistical analyses were performed with 600 participants. Furthermore, 321 (53.5% respondents believed that asthma is solely a hereditary disease. Interestingly, 361 (60.3% were concerned about side effects of inhaled corticosteroids and 192 (32% about the development of dependency on asthma medications. Almost 76% of parents had previously visited a pediatric emergency department during an asthma attack. Conclusions. Parents had misperceptions regarding asthma and exhibited ineffective practices in its management. Therefore, improving asthma care and compliance requires added parental education.

  18. Perimenstrual asthma: from pathophysiology to treatment strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziottin, Alessandra; Serafini, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of asthma is about 9,7 % in women and 5,5 % in men. Asthma can deteriorate during the perimenstrual period, a phenomenon known as perimenstrual asthma (PMA), which represents a unique, highly symptomatic asthma phenotype. It is distinguished from traditional allergic asthma by aspirin sensitivity, less atopy, and lower lung capacity. PMA incidence is reported to vary between 19 and 40 % of asthmatic women. The presence of PMA has been related to increases in asthma-related emergency department visits, hospitalizations and emergency treatment including intubations. It is hypothesized that hormonal status may influence asthma in women, focusing on the role of sex hormones, and specifically on the impact of estrogens' fluctuations at ovulation and before periods. This paper will focus on the pathophysiology of hormone triggered cycle related inflammatory/allergic events and their relation with asthma. We reviewed the scientific literature on Pubmed database for studies on PMA. Key word were PMA, mastcells, estrogens, inflammation, oral contraception, hormonal replacement therapy (HRT), and hormone free interval (HFI). Special attention will be devoted to the possibility of reducing the perimenstrual worsening of asthma and associated symptoms by reducing estrogens fluctuations, with appropriate hormonal contraception and reduced HFI. This novel therapeutical approach will be finally discussed.

  19. Genetics of asthma: a molecular biologist perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghosh Balaram

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Asthma belongs to the category of classical allergic diseases which generally arise due to IgE mediated hypersensitivity to environmental triggers. Since its prevalence is very high in developed or urbanized societies it is also referred to as "disease of civilizations". Due to its increased prevalence among related individuals, it was understood quite long back that it is a genetic disorder. Well designed epidemiological studies reinforced these views. The advent of modern biological technology saw further refinements in our understanding of genetics of asthma and led to the realization that asthma is not a disorder with simple Mendelian mode of inheritance but a multifactorial disorder of the airways brought about by complex interaction between genetic and environmental factors. Current asthma research has witnessed evidences that are compelling researchers to redefine asthma altogether. Although no consensus exists among workers regarding its definition, it seems obvious that several pathologies, all affecting the airways, have been clubbed into one common category called asthma. Needless to say, genetic studies have led from the front in bringing about these transformations. Genomics, molecular biology, immunology and other interrelated disciplines have unearthed data that has changed the way we think about asthma now. In this review, we center our discussions on genetic basis of asthma; the molecular mechanisms involved in its pathogenesis. Taking cue from the existing data we would briefly ponder over the future directions that should improve our understanding of asthma pathogenesis.

  20. A double-blind, placebo-controlled comparison of sodium cromoglycate and ketotifen in the treatment of childhood asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croce, J; Negreiros, E B; Mazzei, J A; Isturiz, G

    1995-06-01

    We compared three treatments: sodium cromoglycate 5 mg aerosol and placebo syrup (39 patients), placebo aerosol and ketotifen syrup (39 patients), and placebo aerosol and syrup (36 patients). The patients (mean age 11.7 years) had mostly allergic, moderately severe asthma. Treatments were added to current therapy (mostly bronchodilators only) for 3 months. Aerosols were taken four times daily and syrups twice daily. The following results were significant at a level of 5%. At the final clinic visit, the changes from baseline in lung function favored sodium cromoglycate over the other treatments. During month 3, sodium cromoglycate was superior to ketotifen for night symptoms, morning tightness, daytime symptoms, and cough. Bronchodilator use decreased more with sodium cromoglycate than ketotifen. Patients' and clinicians' overall opinions of treatment effectiveness favored sodium cromoglycate over ketotifen and placebo. In these patients, sodium cromoglycate was both effective and superior to ketotifen.

  1. Sodium cromoglycate in nocturnal asthma.

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    To investigate whether mast cell degranulation was important in producing nocturnal asthma, the effect of a single high dose of nebulised sodium cromoglycate on overnight bronchoconstriction, oxygen saturation, and breathing patterns in eight patients with nocturnal wheeze was examined. The study took the form of a double blind placebo controlled crossover comparison. Treatment with cromoglycate did not reduce the overnight fall in FEV1 or FVC, although it was associated with improved nocturn...

  2. When to Suspect Occupational Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Lemière

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Occupational asthma (OA is a difficult diagnosis to make. The present review describes the work environments in which workers are at risk for developing OA, the characteristics of the individuals in whom OA should be suspected and the investigation that can be performed to diagnose the condition. Accurately diagnosing OA is crucial because of the major social and economic consequences of this diagnosis on the patient.

  3. Pediatric Asthma and Viral Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Garcia, M Luz; Calvo Rey, Cristina; Del Rosal Rabes, Teresa

    2016-05-01

    Respiratory viral infections, particularly respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and rhinovirus, are the most importance risk factors for the onset of wheezing in infants and small children. Bronchiolitis is the most common acute respiratory infection in children under 1year of age, and the most common cause of hospitalization in this age group. RSV accounts for approximately 70% of all these cases, followed by rhinovirus, adenovirus, metapneumovirus and bocavirus. The association between bronchiolitis caused by RSV and the development of recurrent wheezing and/or asthma was first described more than 40years ago, but it is still unclear whether bronchiolitis causes chronic respiratory symptoms, or if it is a marker for children with a genetic predisposition for developing asthma in the medium or long term. In any case, sufficient evidence is available to corroborate the existence of this association, which is particularly strong when the causative agent of bronchiolitis is rhinovirus. The pathogenic role of respiratory viruses as triggers for exacerbations in asthmatic patients has not been fully characterized. However, it is clear that respiratory viruses, and in particular rhinovirus, are the most common causes of exacerbation in children, and some type of respiratory virus has been identified in over 90% of children hospitalized for an episode of wheezing. Changes in the immune response to viral infections in genetically predisposed individuals are very likely to be the main factors involved in the association between viral infection and asthma.

  4. The Brussels Declaration: the need for change in asthma management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holgate, S.; Bisgaard, H.; Bjermer, L.

    2008-01-01

    Asthma is a highly prevalent condition across Europe and numerous guidelines have been developed to optimise management. However, asthma can be neither cured nor prevented, treatment choices are limited and many patients have poorly controlled or uncontrolled asthma. The Brussels Declaration on A...... reviews the evidence supporting the need for change in asthma management and summarises the ten key points contained in the Brussels Declaration Udgivelsesdato: 2008/12......Asthma is a highly prevalent condition across Europe and numerous guidelines have been developed to optimise management. However, asthma can be neither cured nor prevented, treatment choices are limited and many patients have poorly controlled or uncontrolled asthma. The Brussels Declaration...... on Asthma, sponsored by The Asthma, Allergy and Inflammation Research Charity, was developed to call attention to the shortfalls in asthma management and to urge European policy makers to recognise that asthma is a public health problem that should be a political priority. The Declaration urges recognition...

  5. Obese individuals experience wheezing without asthma but not asthma without wheezing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Çolak, Yunus; Shoaib, Afzal; Lange, Peter;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Observational studies suggest that obesity is associated with increased risk of asthma. However, it is unknown whether this could be explained by wheezing. We tested the hypothesis that high body mass index (BMI) observationally and genetically is associated with high risk of wheezing...... and asthma, and that the association between high BMI and asthma is explained by wheezing. METHODS: We genotyped 85 437 individuals aged 20-100 years from the Copenhagen General Population Study for FTO (rs9939609), MC4R (rs17782313), TMEM18 (rs6548238) GNPDA2 (rs10938397) and BDNF (rs10767664); 14 500...... individuals experienced wheezing and 5406 had asthma. Wheezing was self-reported, and asthma was ascertained through self-report, hospital contacts with asthma, and/or receiving medication for asthma. BMI was calculated as measured weight divided by measured height squared (kg/m(2)). RESULTS: In observational...

  6. Current asthma control predicts future risk of asthma exacerbation: a 12-month prospective cohort study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Hua-hua; ZHOU Ting; WANG Lan; ZHANG Hong-ping; FU Juan-juan; WANG Lei; JI Yu-lin; WANG Gang

    2012-01-01

    Background The performance of asthma control test (ACT) at baseline for predicting future risk of asthma exacerbation has not been previously demonstrated.This study was designed to explore the ability of the baseline ACT score to predict future risk of asthma exacerbation during a 12-month follow-up.Methods This post hoc analysis included data from a 12-month prospective cohort study in patients with asthma (n=290).The time to the first asthma exacerbation was analyzed and the association between baseline ACT scores and future risk of asthma exacerbation was calculated as adjusted odds ratio (OR) using Logistic regression models.Further,sensitivity and specificity were estimated at each cut-point of ACT scores for predicting asthma exacerbations.Results The subjects were divided into three groups,which were uncontrolled (U,n=128),partly-controlled (PC,n=111),and well controlled (C,n=51) asthma.After adjustment,the decreased ACT scores at baseline in the U and PC groups were associated with an increased probability of asthma exacerbations (OR 3.65 and OR 5.75,respectively),unplanned visits (OR 8.03 and OR 8.21,respectively) and emergency visits (OR 20.00 and OR 22.60,respectively) over a 12-month follow-up period.The time to the first asthma exacerbation was shorter in the groups with U and PC asthma (all P<0.05).The baseline ACT of 20 identified as the cut-point for screening the patients at high risk of asthma exacerbations had an increased sensitivity of over 90.0% but a lower specificity of about 30.0%.Conclusion Our findings indicate that the baseline ACT score with a high sensitivity could rule out patients at low risk of asthma exacerbations and oredict future risk of asthma exacerbations in clinical practice.

  7. Predicting asthma in preschool children with asthma symptoms: study rationale and design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafkamp-de Groen Esther

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In well-child care it is difficult to determine whether preschool children with asthma symptoms actually have or will develop asthma at school age. The PIAMA (Prevention and Incidence of Asthma and Mite Allergy Risk Score has been proposed as an instrument that predicts asthma at school age, using eight easy obtainable parameters, assessed at the time of first asthma symptoms at preschool age. The aim of this study is to present the rationale and design of a study 1 to externally validate and update the PIAMA Risk Score, 2 to develop an Asthma Risk Appraisal Tool to predict asthma at school age in (specific subgroups of preschool children with asthma symptoms and 3 to test implementation of the Asthma Risk Appraisal Tool in well-child care. Methods and design The study will be performed within the framework of Generation R, a prospective multi-ethnic cohort study. In total, consent for postnatal follow-up was obtained from 7893 children, born between 2002 and 2006. At preschool age the PIAMA Risk Score will be assessed and used to predict asthma at school age. Discrimination (C-index and calibration will be assessed for the external validation. We will study whether the predictive ability of the PIAMA Risk Score can be improved by removing or adding predictors (e.g. preterm birth. The (updated PIAMA Risk Score will be converted to the Asthma Risk Appraisal Tool- to predict asthma at school age in preschool children with asthma symptoms. Additionally, we will conduct a pilot study to test implementation of the Asthma Risk Appraisal Tool in well-child care. Discussion Application of the Asthma Risk Appraisal Tool in well-child care will help to distinguish preschool children at high- and low-risk of developing asthma at school age when asthma symptoms appear. This study will increase knowledge about the validity of the PIAMA risk score and might improve risk assessment of developing asthma at school age in (specific subgroups

  8. Mechanisms of Airway Remodeling in Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etsuko Tagaya

    2007-01-01

    To date, many studies have identified candidate mechanisms and mediators for these observed structural changes, which are thus potential targets in the treatment of asthma. In this review, we describe the recent knowledge of the mechanisms and clinical implications of airway remodeling in asthma.

  9. Asthma in children : origins and outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zomer - Kooijker, K.

    2014-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most common chronic diseases in the world. At school age, 4-7% of all children is experiencing asthmatic symptoms. Improvement of asthma control and health related quality of life (HRQOL) may lower the huge burden of this disease. This requires insight into the determinants of a

  10. Exhaled nitric oxide and asthma in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.J.P. van der Valk (Ralf)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractAsthma was first described in the medical literature of Greek antiquity. It is difficult to determine whether by referring to “asthma”, Hippocrates and his school (460-360 B.C.) meant an autonomous clinical entity or a symptom. The clinical presentation of asthma nowadays has probably ch

  11. Rhinovirus and childhood asthma: an update

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is recognized as a complex disease resulting from interactions between multiple genetic and environmental factors. Accumulating evidence suggests that respiratory viral infections in early life constitute a major environmental risk factor for the development of childhood asthma. Respiratory viral infections have also been recognized as the most common cause of asthma exacerbation. The advent of molecular diagnostics to detect respiratory viruses has provided new insights into the role of human rhinovirus (HRV) infections in the pathogenesis of asthma. However, it is still unclear whether HRV infections cause asthma or if wheezing with HRV infection is simply a predictor of childhood asthma. Recent clinical and experimental studies have identified plausible pathways by which HRV infection could cause asthma, particularly in a susceptible host, and exacerbate disease. Airway epithelial cells, the primary site of infection and replication of HRV, play a key role in these processes. Details regarding the role of genetic factors, including ORMDL3, are beginning to emerge. This review discusses recent clinical and experimental evidence for the role of HRV infection in the development and exacerbation of childhood asthma and the potential underlying mechanisms that have been proposed. PMID:27895690

  12. Regulatory T-lymphocytes in asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oosterhout, AJM; Bloksma, N

    2005-01-01

    T-helper cell type (Th)2 lymphocytes play an important role in the initiation, progression and persistence of allergic diseases, including asthma. However, little is known about immunoregulatory mechanisms that determine susceptibility to, severity of, or persistence of asthma. The concept of a dist

  13. Asthma Management in Sickle Cell Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteban Gomez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is a common comorbid factor in sickle cell disease (SCD. However, the incidence of asthma in SCD is much higher than expected compared to rates in the general population. Whether “asthma” in SCD is purely related to genetic and environmental factors or rather is the consequence of the underlying hemolytic and inflammatory state is a topic of recent debate. Regardless of the etiology, hypoxemia induced by bronchoconstriction and inflammation associated with asthma exacerbations will contribute to a cycle of sickling and subsequent complications of SCD. Recent studies confirm that asthma predisposes to complications of SCD such as pain crises, acute chest syndrome, and stroke and is associated with increased mortality. Early recognition and aggressive standard of care management of asthma may prevent serious pulmonary complications and reduce mortality. However, data regarding the management of asthma in SCD is very limited. Clinical trials are needed to evaluate the effectiveness of current asthma therapy in patients with SCD and coincident asthma, while mechanistic studies are needed to delineate the underlying pathophysiology.

  14. Nebulised ipratropium and salbutamol in asthma.

    OpenAIRE

    Storr, J; LENNEY, W.

    1986-01-01

    Treatment with nebulised salbutamol or a mixture of salbutamol and ipratropium was given to 138 children. Length of hospital stay and number of nebulised doses required did not differ. In severe asthma response was greater with salbutamol alone. In mild asthma response was greater with combined treatment.

  15. Metabolic Abnormalities in Children with Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: Childhood asthma and obesity have reached epidemic proportions worldwide, and the latter is also contributing to increasing rates of related metabolic disorders, such as diabetes. Yet, the relationship between asthma, obesity, and abnormal lipid and glucose metabolism is not well understood, nor has it been adequately explored in children.

  16. The prevalence of severe refractory asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hekking, Pieter-Paul W; Wener, Reinier R; Amelink, Marijke; Zwinderman, Aelko H; Bouvy, Marcel L; Bel, Elisabeth H

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Severe asthma is characterized by difficulty to achieve disease control despite high-intensity treatment. However, prevalence figures of severe asthma are lacking, whereas longstanding estimates vary between 5% and 10% of all asthmatic patients. Knowing the exact prevalence of severe ref

  17. Anti-inflammatory drug therapy in asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rottier, Bart L.; Duiverman, Eric J.

    2009-01-01

    Asthma is a disease with chronic inflammation of the airways and and-inflammatory treatment is a logical treatment. Inhaled corticosteroids [ICS] remain the cornerstone of anti-inflammatory therapy in recent international guidelines. Asthma cannot be cured by any medication: if the drug is discontin

  18. Creating an Asthma-Safe Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... clean the cage daily. Cockroaches are another major asthma trigger that can be difficult to avoid in multifamily dwellings, especially in urban areas. To avoid cockroaches: Have your home professionally ... can aggravate asthma). Avoid saving boxes, paper bags, or newspapers in ...

  19. How Is Asthma Treated and Controlled?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1.25 million of those individuals have severe asthma, a condition that can be difficult to control and treat. Learn more about his research by visiting the NHLBI Laboratory of Asthma and Lung Inflammation website: http://www.nhlbi.nih. ...

  20. Physicians' Preferences for Asthma Guidelines Implementation

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Patient care based on asthma guidelines is cost-effective and leads to improved treatment outcomes. However, ineffective implementation strategies interfere with the use of these recommendations in clinical practice. This study investigated physicians' preferences for asthma guidelines, including content, supporting evidence, learning strategies, format, and placement in the clinical workplace. Methods We obtained information through a questionnaire survey. The questionnaire was distr...

  1. Asthma in childhood: a complex, heterogeneous disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai Lee Chung

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Asthma in childhood is a heterogeneous disease with different phenotypes and variable clinical manifestations, which depend on the age, gender, genetic background, and environmental influences of the patients. Several longitudinal studies have been conducted to classify the phenotypes of childhood asthma, on the basis of the symptoms, triggers of wheezing illness, or pathophysiological features of the disease. These studies have provided us with important information about the different wheezing phenotypes in young children and about potential mechanisms and risk factors for the development of chronic asthma. The goal of these studies was to provide a better insight into the causes and natural course of childhood asthma. It is well-known that complicated interactions between genes and environmental factors contribute to the development of asthma. Because childhood is a period of rapid growth in both the lungs and the immune system, developmental factors should be considered in the pathogenesis of childhood asthma. The pulmonary system continues to grow and develop until linear growth is completed. Longitudinal studies have reported significant age-related immune development during postnatal early life. These observations suggest that the phenotypes of childhood asthma vary among children and also in an individual child over time. Improved classification of heterogeneous conditions of the disease will help determine novel strategies for primary and secondary prevention and for the development of individualized treatment for childhood asthma.

  2. [Asthma and allergic diseases in Sweden].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundbäck, B; Lindström, M; Forsberg, B

    1992-01-01

    Until recently the prevalence of asthma in Sweden was assessed to be 2-3 per cent. An increase in the prevalence of asthma and allergic rhinitis was noted among new conscripts undergoing health work-ups prior to military service with the most marked increase in northern Sweden, were 5 per cent of conscripts were reported to have asthma. In southern Sweden the prevalence remained about 2 per cent. More recent questionnaire studies in mid- and southern Sweden have reported similar rates of respiratory symptoms and use of anti-asthmatic drugs as in northern Sweden, suggesting that there may be no difference in asthma prevalence between the north and the south of the country. The exact prevalence of allergic diseases among Swedish adults is still not clear, but 40 per cent of adults in northern Sweden report that they often have wheezing in the chest, attacks of breathlessness, longstanding cough or sputum production. In questionnaire studies among children about 40 per cent of respondents have reported that they had asthma, allergic rhinitis or other type of hypersensitivity. The absence of generally accepted diagnostic criteria for asthma and allergic disorders in epidemiological studies makes comparison of prevalence difficult. It is thus not possible to be sure that the prevalence of asthma and allergic disorders in Sweden has recently increased. Risk factors for the development of asthma and allergic disorders are under study in Sweden. Several studies report an association in children between urban living and allergic disorders.

  3. Identifying novel genes contributing to asthma pathogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holloway, John W.; Koppelman, Gerard H.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose of review To illustrate recent examples of novel asthma genes such as those encoding G-protein-coupled receptor for asthma susceptibility, filaggrin and tenascin-C, and to describe the process that is needed to translate these findings to the clinic. Recent findings Many hundreds of studies

  4. [Delayed asthma bronchiale due to epoxy resin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Authried, Georg; Al-Asadi, Haifaa; Møller, Ulla; Sherson, David Lee

    2013-10-28

    Epoxy resin is a low molecular weight agent, which can cause both acute and delayed allergic reactions. However, it is known causing skin reactions with direct or airborne contact. Rarely it can cause airway reactions like asthma bronchiale. We describe a case of a windmill worker who developed delayed asthma bronchiale due to airborne contact with epoxy resin.

  5. Epidemiology of asthma in western Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charpin, D; Vervloet, D; Charpin, J

    1988-10-01

    Asthma deaths are uncommon, but have recently increased in some countries due to problems in the management of the disease. Morbidity rates show large variations, which can be attributed to differences in defining the disease, but also to genuine variations, with a trend towards less asthma in northern Europe. It has been suggested that allergic diseases as a whole, and asthma in particular, may exhibit an upward secular trend. Risk factors include a genetic background and environmental triggering factors. The importance of genetic factors is illustrated by family studies and by extreme prevalence rates observed in some communities. Environmental factors include rapid air pollution variations which act as a trigger for asthma attacks. However, at levels currently prevailing in western Europe, air pollutants do not induce a higher incidence of asthma. Altitude generates a gradual decrease in Dermatophagoides, thus explaining both the clinical improvement in asthmatics living in altitude and a lower prevalence of asthma in populations born and living there. Among the other aero-allergens, grass pollens plays a major role in spring, elicitating asthma attacks. Some natural allergens transformed by man (castor bean, soja) can be responsible for asthma epidemics.

  6. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Health Care Coverage among Children Asthma-related Missed School Days among Children aged 5–17 Years Asthma ... FastStats Survey Questions Resources for Health Professionals and Schools Healthcare Professionals Public Health Professionals School and Childcare ...

  7. The Danish National Database for Asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne; Hoffmann-Petersen, Benjamin; Sverrild, Asger

    2016-01-01

    in Denmark, including the National Patient Register, the National Prescription Registry, and the National Health Insurance Services register, and potentially includes all asthma patients in Denmark. The following quality indicators have been selected to monitor trends: first, conduction of annual asthma...

  8. Helicobacter pylori Seropositivity in Children With Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Yousefichaijan; Mosayebi; Sharafkhah; Kahbazi; Heydarbagi; Rafiei

    2016-01-01

    Background Some studies have reported an association between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) colonization and the occurrence of asthma or other allergies. However, data are inconsistent, and few studies have been performed in children. Objectives The current study aimed to investigate H. pylori seropositivity in children with and without asthma. Patients and Methods This cross-sect...

  9. Asthma and cystic fibrosis: A tangled web.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kent, Brian D

    2014-03-01

    Successfully diagnosing concomitant asthma in people with cystic fibrosis (CF) is a challenging proposition, and the utility of conventional diagnostic criteria of asthma in CF populations remains uncertain. Nonetheless, the accurate identification of individuals with CF and asthma allows appropriate tailoring of therapy, and should reduce the unnecessary use of asthma medication in broader CF cohorts. In this review, we discuss the diagnostic challenge posed by asthma in CF, both in terms of clinical evaluation, and of interpretation of pulmonary function testing and non-invasive markers of airway inflammation. We also examine how the role of cross-sectional thoracic imaging in CF and asthma can assist in the diagnosis of asthma in these patients. Finally, we critically appraise the evidence base behind the use of asthma medications in CF populations, with a particular focus on the use of inhaled corticosteroids and bronchodilators. As shall be discussed, the gaps in the current literature make further high-quality research in this field imperative. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2014; 49:205-213. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Cough in asthma triggered by reflux episodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Devendra; He, Zhaoping; Padman, Raj

    2014-05-01

    With combined pH and impedance monitoring, non-acid, as well as acid reflux episodes, are more commonly detected immediately prior to cough in asthma in children. Gastroesophageal reflux should be evaluated as a trigger for cough in difficult childhood asthma.

  11. Management of asthma in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Honkoop, Pieter Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is a common non-communicable respiratory disease. In this thesis we analysed three different management strategies for adult patients with asthma in primary care. In the first, we targeted the currently recommended aim of ‘Controlled asthma’, which means patients experience hardly any symptom

  12. [Underdiagnosed asthma in third-grade children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walus, I; Richard, G; Laquerrière, B; Perucca, M; Tuveri, R; Einbinder, V; Muller, B; Beydon, N

    2016-01-01

    Undiagnosed asthma has been poorly studied before adolescence since it can go unnoticed by parents and doctors. Moreover, it is unusual to look for undiagnosed asthma by directly questioning children on the presence of current respiratory symptoms. Epidemiologic studies show that more adolescents quote symptoms suggestive of asthma than the prevalence of doctor-diagnosed asthma, but respiratory symptoms compatible with asthma remain undetected by parents of younger children more frequently than doctors diagnose asthma in their children. We attempted to evaluate the relevance of a questionnaire used since 2011 by school doctors in Paris to detect asthma. In this questionnaire, the family history of atopy and asthma were completed by the parents when they met the school doctor (last year of preschool) and questions on current respiratory symptoms were answered by third-grade children seen alone by the school doctor. One hundred and thirty-one children out of 1135 children questioned had a positive questionnaire for suspected asthma. In three-quarters of the cases, questionnaires were positive based on the children's answers on their respiratory symptoms (without a positive answer on personal or family history being necessary). The outcome of 41 children screened by the questionnaire was known. Twenty (49%) children had received a final diagnosis of asthma, of whom 12 were put on asthma controllers. Among these 20 children, two children underwent lung function testing and two others underwent tests for allergy. In eight children, tests had been requested by the child's GP, but no final diagnosis was reported by the parents. None of the 13 children in whom asthma was ruled out had any test performed. It was concluded that it is possible to detect undiagnosed asthma in children as young as 8 years by directly asking them about their respiratory symptoms. The knowledge of personal and family history can improve screening for asthma in these children. A more thorough

  13. Role of leukotrienes in asthma pathophysiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, H

    2000-01-01

    Inflammation is an essential component of asthma pathophysiology. While beta(2)-agonists are often used for short-term relief of acute bronchospasm, anti-inflammatory agents are required for the long-term management of chronic inflammation in this disease. Corticosteroids have emerged as the first......-line anti-inflammatory therapy for asthma management. However, in some patients, especially children, the high doses of corticosteroids that may be required to control features of hyperresponsiveness, including exercise-induced asthma, raise safety concerns. Thus, there is a need for complementary anti......-inflammatory, steroid-sparing agents in asthma therapy. Several inflammatory mediators have been targeted in an attempt to thwart this inflammatory process, but so far with little success. The cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLT), LTC(4), LTD(4), and LTE(4), have been shown to be essential mediators in asthma, making them...

  14. An evaluation of pediatric asthma educational resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, David B; Dell, Sharon D; Fleming-Carroll, Bonnie; Selkirk, Enid K

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate newly developed educational resources for children with asthma. Children with asthma, their parents, and pediatric health care professionals were invited to review age-appropriate asthma resources. Key findings revealed: (1) the perceived usefulness of these resources, particularly for creating discussion opportunities between children and their caregivers through implemented resource use; (2) the need for health education materials to balance goals of depth of information versus child enjoyment in order to increase effective knowledge transfer and application; and (3) a renewed call for future educational resources to be both relevant and interactive in their outreach and engagement of children, potentially involving mediums of advanced technology. Clinical experience and the literature note a current lack of pediatric asthma education materials. The positive findings of this review of novel educational materials in asthma address an important gap relative to pediatric practice, resource evaluation, and knowledge translation.

  15. Assessment of problematic severe asthma in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, K. C. L.; Hedlin, G.; Bush, A.;

    2011-01-01

    Assessment of problematic severe asthma in children should be performed in a stepwise manner to ensure an optimal approach. A four-step assessment scheme is proposed. First, a full diagnostic work-up is performed to exclude other diseases which mimic asthma. Secondly, a multi-disciplinary assessm......Assessment of problematic severe asthma in children should be performed in a stepwise manner to ensure an optimal approach. A four-step assessment scheme is proposed. First, a full diagnostic work-up is performed to exclude other diseases which mimic asthma. Secondly, a multi...... in our current knowledge in all these steps are highlighted, and recommendations for current clinical practice and future research are made. The lack of good data and the heterogeneity of problematic severe asthma still limit our ability to optimise the management on an individual basis in this small...

  16. Genetic and environmental influence on asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skadhauge, L.R.; Christensen, Kaare; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm;

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the relative influence of genetic and environmental factors on the aetiology of asthma. The classic twin study design was used to analyse data on self-reported asthma obtained by a questionnaire mailed to 34,076 individuals, aged 12-41 yrs and originating from...... the Danish Twin Register. The cumulative incidence of asthma was 6.2% in the pooled sample. The data showed a decreasing cumulative incidence with age for males, but no sex or zygosity difference was observed. Substantially higher concordance rates, odds ratios and correlations for asthma were estimated...... in the monozygotic than in the dizygotic twins. Using biometric modelling, a model including additive genetic and nonshared environmental effects provided the best overall fit to the data. According to this model, 73% of the variation in liability to asthma was explained by genetic factors. No sex difference or age...

  17. [Treatment of patients with acute asthma exacerbation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostojić, Jelena; Mose, Jakov

    2009-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways. The global prevalence of asthma ranges from 1% to 18% of the population, so it remains a common problem with enormous medical and economic impacts. In majority of patients, asthma can be well controlled with simple regimens of inhaled anti-inflammatory and bronchodilating medications. However, some patients tend to suffer from poorly controlled disease in terms of chronic symptoms with episodic severe exacerbations. Major factors that may be related to the emergency department visits and hospitalisation include prior severe attacks, nonadherence to therapeutic regimens, inadequate use of inhaled corticosteroids, poor self-management skills, frequent use of inhaled short-acting beta-agonists, cigarette smoking, poor socioeconomic status and age over 40 years. Severe exacerbations of asthma are life-threatening medical emergencies and require careful brief assesment, treatment according to current GINA (Global Initiative for Asthma) guidelines with periodic reassesment of patient's response to therapy usually in an emergency department.

  18. The Danish National Database for Asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne; Hoffmann-Petersen, Benjamin; Sverrild, Asger;

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most common chronic diseases worldwide affecting more than 300 million people. Symptoms are often non-specific and include coughing, wheezing, chest tightness, and shortness of breath. Asthma may be highly variable within the same individual over time. Although asthma results...... in death only in extreme cases, the disease is associated with significant morbidity, reduced quality of life, increased absenteeism, and large costs for society. Asthma can be diagnosed based on report of characteristic symptoms and/or the use of several different diagnostic tests. However......, there is currently no gold standard for making a diagnosis, and some degree of misclassification and inter-observer variation can be expected. This may lead to local and regional differences in the treatment, monitoring, and follow-up of the patients. The Danish National Database for Asthma (DNDA) is slated...

  19. Breathing exercises for adults with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Asthma is a common long-term condition that remains poorly controlled in many people despite the availability of pharmacological interventions, evidence-based treatment guidelines and care pathways.(1) There is considerable public interest in the use of non-pharmacological approaches for the treatment of asthma.(2) A survey of people with asthma reported that many have used complementary and alternative medicine, often without the knowledge of their clinical team.(3) Such interventions include breathing techniques, herbal products, homeopathy and acupuncture. The role of breathing exercises within the management of asthma has been controversial, partly because early claims of effectiveness were exaggerated.(4) UK national guidance and international guidelines on the management of asthma have included the option of breathing exercise programmes as an adjuvant to pharmacological treatment.(5,6) Here we discuss the types of breathing exercises used and review the evidence for their effectiveness.

  20. The many faces of asthma in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sideleva, O; Dixon, A E

    2014-03-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor for the development of asthma, and causes severe, uncontrolled disease that responds poorly to therapy. The obese state alters early onset allergic asthma, and leads to the development of a novel form of late onset asthma secondary to obesity. The presentation of early onset allergic asthma is altered through effects on immune function. Factors such as mechanical loading, effects of adipokines on airways, altered diet, insulin resistance and altered metabolism of nitric oxide likely all contribute to increased airway reactivity in obesity, causing late onset asthma in obesity. Obesity also alters responses to environmental factors such as ozone and particulate matter. Focused studies to understand the importance of these factors in the pathogenesis of airway disease in obesity will be essential to develop therapies to intervene in this new epidemic of airway disease.

  1. Association of interleukin-18 and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ming-Hui; Yuan, Feng-Lai; Wang, Shu-Jing; Xu, Hui-Ying; Li, Cheng-Wan; Tong, Xiao

    2017-02-01

    Cytokine-mediated immunity plays a dominant role in the pathogenesis of various immune diseases, including asthma. The recent identification of the family interleukin (IL)-1-related cytokine IL-18 now contributes to our understanding of the fine-tuning of cellular immunity. IL-18 can act as a cofactor for Th2 cell development and IgE production and also plays an important role in the differentiation of Th1 cells. Recent work identified an IL-18 association with the pathogenesis of asthma, wherein increased IL-18 expression was found in the serum of patients. Furthermore, IL-18 polymorphisms with susceptibility to asthma were reported, suggesting that IL-18 may be therapeutically relevant to asthma. In this review, we discuss the role of IL-18 in the pathogenesis of asthma and its therapeutic potential based on current research.

  2. Gastroesophageal Reflux in Children with Refractory Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaa S. Deeb

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To investigate the association between clinical and macroscopic findings of GER and severity of refractory asthma (statistical study.Methods: A prospective study in a university-based practice of 75 children who were diagnosed with refractory asthma because they exhibited no satisfactory response for at least three months of treatment. Medical history, physical examination, spirometrical measurements and prick skin test were conducted on all patients. Endoscopic and macroscopic evaluations for esophagitis were performed on all patients regardless of the presence of GER symptoms.Results: Endoscopy was done for 75 children with refractory asthma. GER was symptomatic in 65% of all patients with no statistical significance (p>0.05 and the most frequent symptom was abdominal pain (67%. The frequency of these symptoms was 50% in mild asthma, 58% in moderate asthma and 72% in severe asthma with no statistical significance (p>0.05. The frequency of macroscopic esophagitis was 71%, distributed in three asthmatic groups as in order of 75% in mild asthma, 58.3% in moderate asthma and 76.6% in severe asthma (p>0.05. Regarding the relationship between GER and nocturnal attacks or spasmodic cough, the frequency of the latest was 66.7%. The differences have no statistical significance regarding GER symptoms (p>0.05, but they are statistically significant regarding the reflux esophagitis (p<0.05. Also endoscopic reflux was as frequent as76.3% in non allergic patients, and this result is statistically significant (p<0.05.Conclusion: In spite of the fact that there was no relationship between the severity of asthma and the symptoms of GER, or its endoscopic findings, the frequency of GER in asthmatic children was higher than its frequency in other children.

  3. Interaction between asthma and lung function growth in early life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Hans; Jensen, Signe Marie; Bønnelykke, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    The causal direction between asthma and lung function deficit is unknown, but important for the focus of preventive measures and research into the origins of asthma.......The causal direction between asthma and lung function deficit is unknown, but important for the focus of preventive measures and research into the origins of asthma....

  4. Barriers to Asthma Management for School Nurses: An Integrative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley Nadeau, Ellen; Toronto, Coleen E.

    2016-01-01

    Childhood asthma is a growing health concern. Asthma is the most common chronic illness of childhood and a leading cause of emergency room visits, hospitalizations, and school absenteeism. School nurses play a valuable role in asthma management. The purpose of this integrative review is to examine barriers to asthma management for school nurses in…

  5. Barriers to Asthma Management as Identified by School Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta, Judith E.; Spencer, Gale A.

    2016-01-01

    Asthma rates are increasing in children. School nurses have opportunities to care for children with asthma but need to overcome barriers impacting their ability to manage asthma in the school setting. This study (a) assessed barriers present in the school setting, (b) determined the impact of barriers on performance of asthma management behaviors,…

  6. Quality of life in children with undiagnosed and diagnosed asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gent, R.; van Essen, L.E.; Rovers, M.M.; Kimpen, J.L.; van der Ent, C.K.; de Meer, G.

    2007-01-01

    This study describes the impact of undiagnosed and diagnosed asthma on quality of life in schoolchildren aged 7-10 years and their caregivers in a cross-sectional community-based study. Diagnosed asthma was defined as the parents' confirmation of a physician's diagnosis of asthma. Undiagnosed asthma

  7. Asthma in elite athletes: pathogenesis, diagnosis, differential diagnoses, and treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars; Elers, Jimmi; Backer, Vibeke

    2011-01-01

    measurements, such as the eucapnic voluntary hyperpnea test or exercise test. When considering that not all respiratory symptoms are due to asthma, other diagnoses should be considered. Certain regulations apply to elite athletes who require asthma medication for asthma. Knowledge of these regulations...... athletes with asthma, anti-doping regulations, and differential diagnoses such as exercise-induced laryngomalacia are discussed....

  8. Asthma and Environment Fact Sheet for Parents and Schools. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Schools Network, Inc., 2012

    2012-01-01

    Important facts about asthma and the environment include: (1) Asthma has reached epidemic proportions in the United States, affecting about 25 million people of all ages and races, including about 7 million children; (2) Nearly one in 10 school-aged children has asthma, and the percentage of children with asthma is rising more rapidly in…

  9. Low Magnesium Concentration in Erythrocytes of Children with Acute Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Sedighi

    2006-12-01

    These results indicate that intracellular Mg level may be a more accurate method to assess Mg level in patients with asthma. Hence, determination of Mg concentration in erythrocytes may be used in evaluation of asthma pathophysiology. There are recommendations for using intravenous Mg sulfate in acute asthma, and this study supports the rational for using it in emergency departments for acute severe asthma.

  10. Variants of DENND1B associated with asthma in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sleiman, Patrick M A; Flory, James; Imielinski, Marcin;

    2010-01-01

    Asthma is a complex disease that has genetic and environmental causes. The genetic factors associated with susceptibility to asthma remain largely unknown.......Asthma is a complex disease that has genetic and environmental causes. The genetic factors associated with susceptibility to asthma remain largely unknown....

  11. Genetic influence on the age at onset of asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Simon Francis; Duffy, David Lorenzo; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm;

    2010-01-01

    Although the genetics of asthma susceptibility have been frequently explored, little is known about genetic factors that influence the age at onset of asthma.......Although the genetics of asthma susceptibility have been frequently explored, little is known about genetic factors that influence the age at onset of asthma....

  12. Posttraumatic Stress in Adolescents with Asthma and Their Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kean, Emily Millikan; Kelsay, Kimberly; Wamboldt, Frederick; Wamboldt, Marianne Z.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To assess posttraumatic stress (PTS) symptoms in adolescents with and without asthma and their parents and the relationship between PTS symptoms and asthma morbidity. Method: Three groups of adolescents (12-18 years) participated: adolescents who had experienced a life-threatening asthma episode (n = 49), asthma controls (n = 71), and…

  13. [Bronchial morphologic modification in asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldo, D; Louis, R; Godon, A; Munaut, C; Noël, A; Foidart, J M; Bartsch, P

    2000-07-01

    Asthma is an inflammatory disease of the airways clinically characterised by recurrent bronchial obstructions at least partially reversible. Recent epidemiologic data suggest that asthmatics have an increased rate of decrease of their expiratory volumes during life. This irreversible lung function impairment is associated with fundamental structural changes of the bronchial wall in terms of conjunctive tissue and smooth muscle composition. We describe these changes and explore the different mechanisms proposed to explain these structural modifications. We also review their consequences in terms of bronchial physiology and their potential influence on bronchial hyperresponsiveness.

  14. Occupational asthma caused by ethanolamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savonius, B; Keskinen, H; Tuppurainen, M; Kanerva, L

    1994-12-01

    Amino alcohols are used in various industries, often as minor constituents of compounds to modify the properties of the compound. Generally, they are considered to be safe, but they have been known to cause local skin irritation at higher concentrations in solutions. We report on three cases of occupational asthma caused by ethanolamines: two metal workers exposed to a cutting fluid containing triethanolamine, and one cleaner exposed to a detergent containing monoethanolamine. The diagnosis was based on work-related symptoms and on a chamber challenge with the suspected agent. Persistence of the symptoms after exposure ended was a common feature of the three cases.

  15. Validation of a web-based version of the asthma control test and childhood asthma control test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koolen, B.B.; Pijnenburg, M.W.; Brackel, H.J.; Landstra, A.M.; Berg, N.J. van den; Merkus, P.J.F.M.; Hop, W.C.J.; Vaessen-Verberne, A.A.

    2011-01-01

    RATIONALE: Recent guidelines focus on adjusting asthma treatment to the level of asthma control. The availability of a web-based asthma control questionnaire offers the possibility to assess asthma control without the need of outpatient clinic visits. The aim of this study was to evaluate the agreem

  16. Current Control and Future Risk in Asthma Management

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Despite international and national guidelines, poor asthma control remains an issue. Asthma exacerbations are costly to both the individual, and the healthcare provider. Improvements in our understanding of the therapeutic benefit of asthma therapies suggest that, in general, while long-acting bronchodilator therapy improves asthma symptoms, the anti-inflammatory activity of inhaled corticosteroids reduces acute asthma exacerbations. Studies have explored factors which could be predictive of ...

  17. Management of pediatric asthma at home and in school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Roeyen, Linda Sue

    2013-03-01

    The incidence of pediatric asthma in the United States creates a huge financial burden to the economy as well as a negative impact on child health. Identification and elimination of asthma triggers are helpful in reducing asthma exacerbations. The incidence of asthma is higher in African American and underserved populations. Improved management of pediatric asthma leads to improved school performance, improved mental health, and general well-being.

  18. Validity of Asthma Control Test in Chinese patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Xin; LI Jing; WANG Chang-zheng; DING Feng-ming; LIN Jiang-tao; YIN Kai-sheng; CHEN Ping; HE Quan-ying; SHEN Hua-hao; WAN Huan-ying; LIU Chun-tao

    2007-01-01

    Background So far, in China, there has been no effective or easy procedure to define the control of asthma. This study assesses the validity of Asthma Control Test in Chinese patients.Methods Three questionnaires (Asthma Control Test, Asthma Control Questionnaire and the 30 second asthma test)were administered to 305 asthma patients from 10 teaching hospitals across China. Spirometry was also used. Asthma specialists rated the control of asthma according to patients' symptoms, medications and forced expiratory volume in first second. The patients were divided into noncontrolled group and controlled group according to the specialists' rating.Reliability, empirical validity and screening accuracy were conducted for Asthma Control Test scores. Screening accuracy was compared among 3 questionnaires. The patients' self rating and the specialists' rating were also compared.Results The internal consistency reliability of the 5-item Asthma Control Test was 0.854. The correlation coefficient between Asthma Control Test and the specialists' rating was 0.729, which was higher than other instruments. Asthma Control Test scores discriminated between groups of patients differing in the percent predicted forced expiratory volume in first second (F=26.06, P<0.0001), the specialists' rating of asthma control (F=88.24, P<0.0001) and the Asthma Control Questionnaire scores (F=250.57, P<0.0001). Asthma Control Test showed no significant difference with Asthma Control Questionnaire in the percent correctly classified, while the percent correctly classified by Asthma Control Test was much higher than 30 second asthma test. The patients' self rating was the same as assessment of the specialists (t=0.65, P=0.516).Conclusion The Asthma Control Test is an effective and practicable method for assessing asthma control in China.

  19. Epidemiology of adult asthma in Asia: toward a better understanding

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Woo-Jung; Kang, Min-Gyu; Chang, Yoon-Seok; Cho, Sang-Heon

    2014-01-01

    Asia is the world's most dynamic area. Asthma is a major chronic disease in Asia, like other continents. However, unlike childhood asthma, the epidemiological burden of asthma in Asian adults has been unclear. Here we reviewed the currently available literatures on the epidemiology of adult asthma in the Asian community populations. Adult asthma prevalence was generally lower in Asian than in Europe, but the increasing trends suggested the disease burden to rise in the near future. However, f...

  20. Exercise-induced bronchospasm, asthma control, and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrom, Nancy K; Parsons, Jonathan P; Eid, Nemr S; Craig, Timothy J; Stoloff, Stuart; Hayden, Mary Lou; Colice, Gene L

    2013-01-01

    Exercise-induced bronchospasm (EIB) commonly affects patients with asthma. However, the relationship between EIB and asthma control remains unclear. Exercise limitation due to asthma might lead to reduced physical activity, but little information is available regarding obesity and EIB in asthma. A recent survey evaluated the frequency of EIB and exercise-related respiratory symptoms in a large number of patients with asthma. The survey results were reanalyzed to address any relationship between EIB and asthma control and obesity. A nationwide random sample of children aged 4-12 years (n = 250), adolescents aged 13-17 years (n = 266), and adults aged ≥18 years (n = 1001) with asthma were interviewed by telephone. Questions in the survey addressed asthma symptoms in general, medication use, and height and weight. Asthma control was categorized using established methods in the Expert Panel Report 3. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated using standard nomograms and obesity was defined as a BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2). Most children (77.6%), adolescents (71.1%), and adults (83.1%) had either "not well" or "very poorly" controlled asthma. Children with "not well" controlled asthma reported a history of EIB significantly more often than those with "well" controlled" asthma. Asthma patients of all ages who had "not well" and "very poorly" controlled asthma described multiple (four or more) exercise-related respiratory symptoms significantly more often than those with "well-controlled" asthma. Obesity was significantly more common in adolescents with "not well" and "very poorly" controlled asthma and adults with "very poorly" controlled asthma. Children, adolescents, and adults with asthma infrequently have well-controlled disease. A history of EIB and exercise-related respiratory symptoms occur more commonly in patients with not well and very poorly controlled asthma. Obesity was found more often in adolescents and adults, but not children, with asthma, which was not well and

  1. Asthma in Rhinosinusitis: A Survey from Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Bakhshaee

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The coexistence of asthma and chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS is more common than expected given their individual prevalence in the general population and may affect patient’s quality of life. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of asthma in chronic rhinosinusitis in Mashhad, Northeast Iran.  Materials and Methods: This study was performed in two university hospital from November 2012 for 12 months. In total, 153 patients with chronic rhinosinusitis were enrolled and referred to a particular pulmonologist for asthma evaluation.  Results: The mean age of participants was 40.54±13.11 years, and 41.8% were male. In total, 63.4% of patients had the polypoid form of CRS. The proportion of patients in this study with asthma was 41.8%, compared with a general asthma prevalence in this region of 13.5%.  Conclusion: There is a high prevalence of asthma among patients with CRS, but it often remains undiagnosed. Asthma in CRS patients should be diagnosed and treated in order to improve patient’s quality of life. We recommend an evaluation of the lower airways in all of these patients as well as further studies in this field.

  2. Management of critical asthma syndrome during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Andrew L; Juarez, Maya M; Gidwani, Nisha; Albertson, Timothy E

    2015-02-01

    One-third of pregnant asthmatics experience a worsening of their asthma that may progress to a critical asthma syndrome (CAS) that includes status asthmaticus (SA) and near-fatal asthma (NFA). Patients with severe asthma before pregnancy may experience more exacerbations, especially during late pregnancy. Prevention of the CAS includes excellent asthma control involving targeted early and regular medical care of the pregnant asthmatic, together with medication compliance. Spontaneous abortion risk is higher in pregnant women with uncontrolled asthma than in non-asthmatics. Should CAS occur during pregnancy, aggressive bronchodilator therapy, montelukast, and systemic corticosteroids can be used in the context of respiratory monitoring, preferably in an Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Systemic epinephrine should be avoided due to potential teratogenic side-effects and placental/uterine vasoconstriction. Non-invasive ventilation has been used in some cases. Intratracheal intubation can be hazardous and rapid-sequence intubation by an experienced physician is recommended. Mechanical ventilation parameters are adjusted based on changes to respiratory mechanics in the pregnant patient. An inhaled helium-oxygen gas admixture may promote laminar airflow and improve gas exchange. Permissive hypercapnea is controversial, but may be unavoidable. Sedation with propofol which itself has bronchodilating properties is preferred to benzodiazepines. Case reports delineating good outcomes for both mother and fetus despite intubation for SA suggest that multidisciplinary ICU care of the pregnant asthmatic with critical asthma are feasible especially if hypoxemia is avoided.

  3. National and regional asthma programmes in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olof Selroos

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This review presents seven national asthma programmes to support the European Asthma Research and Innovation Partnership in developing strategies to reduce asthma mortality and morbidity across Europe. From published data it appears that in order to influence asthma care, national/regional asthma programmes are more effective than conventional treatment guidelines. An asthma programme should start with the universal commitments of stakeholders at all levels and the programme has to be endorsed by political and governmental bodies. When the national problems have been identified, the goals of the programme have to be clearly defined with measures to evaluate progress. An action plan has to be developed, including defined re-allocation of patients and existing resources, if necessary, between primary care and specialised healthcare units or hospital centres. Patients should be involved in guided self-management education and structured follow-up in relation to disease severity. The three evaluated programmes show that, thanks to rigorous efforts, it is possible to improve patients' quality of life and reduce hospitalisation, asthma mortality, sick leave and disability pensions. The direct and indirect costs, both for the individual patient and for society, can be significantly reduced. The results can form the basis for development of further programme activities in Europe.

  4. Asthma phenotypes and IgE responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froidure, Antoine; Mouthuy, Jonathan; Durham, Stephen R; Chanez, Pascal; Sibille, Yves; Pilette, Charles

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of IgE represented a major breakthrough in allergy and asthma research, whereas the clinical interest given to IgE in asthma has been blurred until the arrival of anti-IgE biotherapy. Novel facets of the complex link between IgE and asthma have been highlighted by the effect of this treatment and by basic research. In parallel, asthma phenotyping recently evolved to the concept of endotypes, relying on identified/suspected pathobiological mechanisms to phenotype patients, but has not yet clearly positioned IgE among biomarkers of asthma.In this review, we first summarise recent knowledge about the regulation of IgE production and its main receptor, FcεRI. In addition to allergens acting as classical IgE inducers, viral infections as well as air pollution may trigger the IgE pathway, notably resetting the threshold of IgE sensitivity by regulating FcεRI expression. We then analyse the place of IgE in different asthma endo/phenotypes and discuss the potential interest of IgE among biomarkers in asthma.

  5. Cardiac arrhythmias in adult patients with asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warnier, Miriam J; Rutten, Frans H; Kors, Jan A;

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The pathogenesis of cardiac arrhythmias in asthma patients has not been fully elucidated. Adverse drug effects, particularly those of β2-mimetics, may play a role. The aim of this study was to determine whether asthma is associated with the risk of cardiac arrhythmias and electrocardio......OBJECTIVE: The pathogenesis of cardiac arrhythmias in asthma patients has not been fully elucidated. Adverse drug effects, particularly those of β2-mimetics, may play a role. The aim of this study was to determine whether asthma is associated with the risk of cardiac arrhythmias...... and electrocardiographic characteristics of arrhythmogenicity (ECG) and to explore the role of β2-mimetics. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 158 adult patients with a diagnosis of asthma and 6303 participants without asthma from the cohort of the Utrecht Health Project-an ongoing, longitudinal, primary...... or flutter). Secondary outcomes were tachycardia, bradycardia, PVC, atrial fibrillation or flutter, mean heart rate, mean corrected QT (QTc) interval length, and prolonged QTc interval. RESULTS: Tachycardia and PVCs were more prevalent in patients with asthma (3% and 4%, respectively) than those without...

  6. Asthma in pregnancy: a hit for two

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa E. Murphy

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Asthma commonly occurs in pregnant females, and recent data have outlined the risks of adverse perinatal outcomes among this population. There is an increased risk of low birth weight and small for gestational age, particularly among females with moderate-to-severe asthma and exacerbations during pregnancy. There is also an increased risk of preterm birth, especially with oral steroid use, a small but statistically significant increased risk of congenital malformations, particularly of cleft lip with or without cleft palate, and an increased risk of neonatal hospitalisation and death. Active management may reduce these risks, possibly through reductions in exacerbations. Additional reassuring data have been presented for asthma medication use, which support the benefits outweighing the risks of indicated asthma medication use in pregnancy. Viral infections are an important trigger of asthma exacerbations in pregnancy, and recent data provides possible immunological changes that may explain this. Poor medication adherence despite worsening asthma symptoms in pregnancy is a problem which continues to be demonstrated in the literature. Improving asthma control in pregnancy has the potential to improve not only the mother’s health but also that of her child.

  7. Asthma in pregnancy: a hit for two.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Vanessa E; Schatz, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Asthma commonly occurs in pregnant females, and recent data have outlined the risks of adverse perinatal outcomes among this population. There is an increased risk of low birth weight and small for gestational age, particularly among females with moderate-to-severe asthma and exacerbations during pregnancy. There is also an increased risk of preterm birth, especially with oral steroid use, a small but statistically significant increased risk of congenital malformations, particularly of cleft lip with or without cleft palate, and an increased risk of neonatal hospitalisation and death. Active management may reduce these risks, possibly through reductions in exacerbations. Additional reassuring data have been presented for asthma medication use, which support the benefits outweighing the risks of indicated asthma medication use in pregnancy. Viral infections are an important trigger of asthma exacerbations in pregnancy, and recent data provides possible immunological changes that may explain this. Poor medication adherence despite worsening asthma symptoms in pregnancy is a problem which continues to be demonstrated in the literature. Improving asthma control in pregnancy has the potential to improve not only the mother's health but also that of her child.

  8. Viral infections and atopy in asthma pathogenesis: new rationales for asthma prevention and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Patrick G; Sly, Peter D

    2012-05-04

    Prospective birth cohort studies tracking asthma initiation and consolidation in community cohorts have identified viral infections occurring against a background of allergic sensitization to aeroallergens as a uniquely potent risk factor for the expression of acute severe asthma-like symptoms and for the ensuing development of asthma that can persist through childhood and into adulthood. A combination of recent experimental and human studies have suggested that underlying this bipartite process are a series of interactions between antiviral and atopic inflammatory pathways that are mediated by local activation of myeloid cell populations in the airway mucosa and the parallel programming and recruitment of their replacements from bone marrow. Targeting key components of these pathways at the appropriate stages of asthma provides new opportunities for the treatment of established asthma but, more crucially, for primary and secondary prevention of asthma during childhood.

  9. Improving Asthma during Pregnancy with Dietary Antioxidants: The Current Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicki L. Clifton

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The complication of asthma during pregnancy is associated with a number of poor outcomes for the mother and fetus. This may be partially driven by increased oxidative stress induced by the combination of asthma and pregnancy. Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways associated with systemic inflammation and oxidative stress, which contributes to worsening asthma symptoms. Pregnancy alone also intensifies oxidative stress through the systemic generation of excess reactive oxidative species (ROS. Antioxidants combat the damaging effects of ROS; yet antioxidant defenses are reduced in asthma. Diet and nutrition have been postulated as potential factors to combat the damaging effects of asthma. In particular, dietary antioxidants may play a role in alleviating the heightened oxidative stress in asthma. Although there are some observational and interventional studies that have shown protective effects of antioxidants in asthma, assessment of antioxidants in pregnancy are limited and there are no antioxidant intervention studies in asthmatic pregnancies on asthma outcomes. The aims of this paper are to (i review the relationships between oxidative stress and dietary antioxidants in adults with asthma and asthma during pregnancy, and (ii provide the rationale for which dietary management strategies, specifically increased dietary antioxidants, might positively impact maternal asthma outcomes. Improving asthma control through a holistic antioxidant dietary approach might be valuable in reducing asthma exacerbations and improving asthma management during pregnancy, subsequently impacting perinatal health.

  10. Improving asthma during pregnancy with dietary antioxidants: the current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieger, Jessica A; Wood, Lisa G; Clifton, Vicki L

    2013-08-14

    The complication of asthma during pregnancy is associated with a number of poor outcomes for the mother and fetus. This may be partially driven by increased oxidative stress induced by the combination of asthma and pregnancy. Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways associated with systemic inflammation and oxidative stress, which contributes to worsening asthma symptoms. Pregnancy alone also intensifies oxidative stress through the systemic generation of excess reactive oxidative species (ROS). Antioxidants combat the damaging effects of ROS; yet antioxidant defenses are reduced in asthma. Diet and nutrition have been postulated as potential factors to combat the damaging effects of asthma. In particular, dietary antioxidants may play a role in alleviating the heightened oxidative stress in asthma. Although there are some observational and interventional studies that have shown protective effects of antioxidants in asthma, assessment of antioxidants in pregnancy are limited and there are no antioxidant intervention studies in asthmatic pregnancies on asthma outcomes. The aims of this paper are to (i) review the relationships between oxidative stress and dietary antioxidants in adults with asthma and asthma during pregnancy, and (ii) provide the rationale for which dietary management strategies, specifically increased dietary antioxidants, might positively impact maternal asthma outcomes. Improving asthma control through a holistic antioxidant dietary approach might be valuable in reducing asthma exacerbations and improving asthma management during pregnancy, subsequently impacting perinatal health.

  11. [Asthma clinical practice guidelines: advantages and pitfalls].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaza, Vicente; Bellido-Casado, Jesús; Alonso-Coello, Pablo; Rodrigo, Gustavo

    2009-01-01

    The Clinical Practice Guidelines on asthma have contributed towards unifying concepts and reaching a consensus on performances between different professional groups. However, they have failed in the overall improvement in the management of asthma, the final objective that they are meant to achieve. Today, almost 20 years after they appeared, the majority of asthmatic patients are still inadequately controlled, partly due to lack of follow up by doctors and the rest of health care staff who have to look after them. This lack of follow up of these recommendations is probably associated with a lack of well structured planning in their circulation and implementation. Also, although the recommendations of these guidelines agree in what is essential, they differ in other aspects, which in turn could be determining factors in clinical practice. The purpose of this article has been to establish the main differences in the recommendations that the principal clinical practice guidelines on the disease propose on the diagnosis, classification and treatment of asthma. To do this we have compared, The British Guideline on the Management of Asthma 2007, The Global Strategy for Asthma Management and Prevention/Global Initiative for Asthma 2006 (GINA), the National Prevention program for Education on Asthma (Programa Nacional de Prevención para la Educación del Asma) (NAEPP), the Spanish Guide for the Management of Asthma (Guía Española para el Manejo del Asma 2003) (GEMA) and the ALAT y SEPAR guides, Latin-America and Spain. Recommendations for the Prevention and Treatment of Asthma Exacerbation (América Latina y España. Recomendaciones para la Prevención y el Tratamiento de la Exacerbación Asmática 2008) (ALERTA).

  12. Asthma in the elderly: a different disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Battaglia

    2016-03-01

    Asthma is a chronic airway disease that affects all ages, but does this definition also include the elderly? Traditionally, asthma has been considered a disease of younger age, but epidemiological studies and clinical experience support the concept that asthma is as prevalent in older age as it is in the young. With the ever-increasing elderly population worldwide, the detection and proper management of the disease in old age may have a great impact from the public health perspective. Whether asthma in the elderly maintains the same characteristics as in young populations is an interesting matter. The diagnostic process in older individuals with suspected asthma follows the same steps, namely a detailed history supported by clinical examination and laboratory investigations; however, it should be recognised that elderly patients may partially lose reversibility of airway obstruction. The correct interpretation of spirometric curves in the elderly should take into account the physiological changes in the respiratory system. Several factors contribute to delaying the diagnosis of asthma in the elderly, including the age-related impairment in perception of breathlessness. The management of asthma in advanced age is complicated by the comorbidities and polypharmacotherapy, which advocate for a comprehensive approach with a multidimensional assessment. It should be emphasised that older age frequently represents an exclusion criterion for eligibility in clinical trials, and current asthma medications have rarely been tested in elderly asthmatics. Ageing is associated with pharmacokinetic changes of the medications. As a consequence, absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of antiasthmatic medications can be variably affected. Similarly, drug-to-drug interactions may reduce the effectiveness of inhaled medications and increase the risk of side-effects. For this reason, we propose the term “geriatric asthma” be preferred to the more generic “asthma in the

  13. Respiratory infections precede adult-onset asthma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aino Rantala

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Respiratory infections in early life are associated with an increased risk of developing asthma but there is little evidence on the role of infections for onset of asthma in adults. The objective of this study was to assess the relation of the occurrence of respiratory infections in the past 12 months to adult-onset asthma in a population-based incident case-control study of adults 21-63 years of age. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We recruited all new clinically diagnosed cases of asthma (n = 521 during a 2.5-year study period and randomly selected controls (n = 932 in a geographically defined area in South Finland. Information on respiratory infections was collected by a self-administered questionnaire. The diagnosis of asthma was based on symptoms and reversible airflow obstruction in lung function measurements. The risk of asthma onset was strongly increased in subjects who had experienced in the preceding 12 months lower respiratory tract infections (including acute bronchitis and pneumonia with an adjusted odds ratio (OR 7.18 (95% confidence interval [CI] 5.16-9.99, or upper respiratory tract infections (including common cold, sinusitis, tonsillitis, and otitis media with an adjusted OR 2.26 (95% CI 1.72-2.97. Individuals with personal atopy and/or parental atopy were more susceptible to the effects of respiratory infections on asthma onset than non-atopic persons. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study provides new evidence that recently experienced respiratory infections are a strong determinant for adult-onset asthma. Reducing such infections might prevent onset of asthma in adulthood, especially in individuals with atopy or hereditary propensity to it.

  14. Helpful Hints: Caregiver-Generated Asthma Management Strategies and Their Relation to Pediatric Asthma Symptoms and Quality of Life

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Objective This mixed-methods study examined the relation between caregiver-generated asthma management strategies and asthma severity in a sample of 200 children with persistent asthma (ages 5–12 years). Methods Caregivers were interviewed about asthma management strategies they found helpful in controlling their child's symptoms. A qualitative content analysis was used to identify household strategies. Indicators of asthma severity included lung functioning (FEV1) and functional severity (FS...

  15. Ways of coping with asthma in everyday life: validation of the Asthma Specific Coping Scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aalto, Anna-Mari; Härkäpää, Kristiina; Aro, Arja R;

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study examines the validity of the Asthma Specific Coping Scale. METHODS: Study samples were comprised of persons with drug-treated asthma (n=3464) drawn from the Drug Reimbursement Registry and asthma rehabilitation participants [brief (n=278) and comprehensive (n=316) intervention...... also showed sensitivity to change after rehabilitation. CONCLUSION: Though further longitudinal studies are needed, this scale seems to be a promising instrument to be used in surveys and outcome studies....

  16. The Danish National Register for Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Backer V

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Vibeke Backer,1 Jesper Lykkegaard,2 Uffe Bodtger,3,4 Lone Agertoft,5 Lene Korshoej,6 Elvira Vaclavik Braüner7,8 1Department of Respiratory Medicine L, Bispebjerg Frederiskberg University Hospital, Copenhagen, 2Research Unit of General Practice, Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, 3Department of Respiratory Medicine, Næstved Hospital, Næstved, 4Institute of Regional Health Research, University of Southern Denmark, 5Hans Christian Andersen Children's Hospital, Odense University Hospital, Odense, 6Competence Centre for Clinical Quality and Information Technology West (KCKS West, Aarhus, 7Research Center for Prevention and Health, Center for Health, Glostrup Hospital, Capital Region of Denmark, Glostrup, 8Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital, Capital Region of Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark Aim of the database: Asthma is the most prevalent chronic disease in children, adolescents, and young adults. In Denmark (with a population of 5.6 million citizens, >400,000 persons are prescribed antiasthmatic medication annually. However, undiagnosed cases, dubious diagnoses, and poor asthma management are probably common. The Danish National Database for Asthma (DNDA was established in 2015. The aim of the DNDA was to collect the data on all patients treated for asthma in Denmark and to monitor asthma occurrence, the quality of diagnosis, and management. Study population: Persons above the age of 6 years, with a specific focus on 6–44 years, are included. The DNDA links three existing nationwide registries of administrative records in the Danish health care system: the National Patient Register, the National Health Insurance Services Register, and the National Prescription Registry. For each year, the inclusion criteria are a second purchase of asthma prescription medicine within a 2-year period (National Prescription Registry or a diagnosis of asthma (National Patient

  17. Occupational and environmental lung disease: occupational asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenton, S C

    2010-01-01

    Occupational exposures cause 10-15% of new-onset asthma in adults, and that represents a considerable health and economic burden. Exposure to many causative agents is now well controlled but workplace practices are constantly evolving and new hazards being introduced. Overall, there is no good evidence that the incidence of occupational asthma is decreasing. Evidence-based guidelines such as those published by the British Occupational Health research Foundation and Standards of Care documents should help raise awareness of the problem and improve management. Key targets include the control of occupational exposures, a high index of suspicion in any adult with new onset asthma, and early detailed investigation.

  18. Psychosocial Factors in Severe Pediatric Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booster, Genery D; Oland, Alyssa A; Bender, Bruce G

    2016-08-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic illness among children in the United States and can impact nearly all aspects of functioning. Most research suggests that children with severe asthma display more emotional and behavioral problems than their healthy peers. These psychological difficulties are associated with increased risk for functional impairments and problematic disease course. Multidisciplinary teams that assess and treat these psychosocial factors using psychoeducational and behavioral interventions are important for children whose asthma is poorly controlled. Future research should examine the ways in which stress, emotions, and immune functions interact, so as to develop more preventative interventions.

  19. Pediatric asthma for the primary care practitioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanGarsse, Anne; Magie, Richard D; Bruhnding, Aubree

    2015-03-01

    Asthma is a complex disease, involving many different allergic, inflammatory, and environmental components. It is a disease for which patient and family education and a team-based approach are paramount for successful management. Guidelines have been put forth by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, which provide a helpful framework in which to begin to manage patients and to navigate the many medication choices available. It is only through diligent attention to control of asthma symptoms that improved quality of life and prevention of long-term sequelae are possible for the pediatric patient with asthma.

  20. Respiratory Infections Precede Adult-Onset Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Respiratory infections in early life are associated with an increased risk of developing asthma but there is little evidence on the role of infections for onset of asthma in adults. The objective of this study was to assess the relation of the occurrence of respiratory infections in the past 12 months to adult-onset asthma in a population-based incident case-control study of adults 21-63 years of age. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We recruited all new clinically diagnosed cases of a...

  1. Asthma: NIH-Sponsored Research and Clinical Trials | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Asthma Asthma: NIH-Sponsored Research and Clinical Trials Past Issues / Fall 2011 Table of Contents NIH-Sponsored Research Asthma in the Inner City: Recognizing that asthma severity ...

  2. Asthma as a disruption in iron homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over several decades, asthma has evolved from being recognized as a single disease to include a diverse group of phenotypes with dissimilar natural histories, pathophysiologies, responses to treatment, and distinctive molecular pathways. With the application of Occam’s raz...

  3. Fostering adherence to optimize therapy in asthma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIN Jian-bao; SHI Huan-zhong

    2010-01-01

    @@ Asthma is one of the most common chronic inflammatory diseases, affecting about 300 million people worldwide and is estimated to account for about one of every 250 deaths and 15 million disability-adjusted life years lost annually.

  4. Current trends in management of pediatric asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kercsmar, Carolyn M

    2003-03-01

    Though asthma cannot be cured, it can be effectively controlled with existing treatments. Management strategies for acute and chronic asthma often vary substantially within and among medical facilities and practices, often driven by physician preference and familiarity rather than by data. The use of carefully designed care paths can improve quality of care and decrease management costs of acute asthma in both the emergency department and in-patient setting. Using newer beta agonists and attention to proper inhalation delivery systems may also improve outcomes and patient satisfaction. Assessment-driven care paths can be safely and effectively administered by respiratory therapists and nurses. The major controversies in the management of chronic asthma center on what to do for the patient who fails to respond to low or moderate doses of inhaled corticosteroids. The addition of a long-acting beta agonist or a leukotriene receptor antagonist may be beneficial.

  5. Asthma in the elderly: a different disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, Salvatore; Benfante, Alida; Spatafora, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Key points Asthma in the elderly can be difficult to identify due to modifications of its clinical features and functional characteristics. Several comorbidities are associated with asthma in the elderly, and this association differs from that observed in younger patients. In clinical practice, physicians should treat comorbidities that are correlated with asthma (i.e. rhinitis or gastro-oesophageal reflux), assess comorbidities that may influence asthma outcomes (i.e. depression or cognitive impairment) and try to prevent comorbidities related to ­‘drug-associated side-effects (i.e. cataracts, arrhythmias or osteoporosis). “Geriatric asthma” should be the preferred term because it implies the comprehensive and multidimensional approach to the disease in the older populations, whereas “asthma in the elderly” is only descriptive of the occurrence of the disease in this age range. Educational aims To present critical issues in performing differential diagnosis of asthma in the elderly. To offer the instrument to implement the management of asthma in the most advanced ages. Asthma is a chronic airway disease that affects all ages, but does this definition also include the elderly? Traditionally, asthma has been considered a disease of younger age, but epidemiological studies and clinical experience support the concept that asthma is as prevalent in older age as it is in the young. With the ever-increasing elderly population worldwide, the detection and proper management of the disease in old age may have a great impact from the public health perspective. Whether asthma in the elderly maintains the same characteristics as in young populations is an interesting matter. The diagnostic process in older individuals with suspected asthma follows the same steps, namely a detailed history supported by clinical examination and laboratory investigations; however, it should be recognised that elderly patients may partially lose reversibility of airway obstruction

  6. Canadian Thoracic Society Guidelines for Occupational Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan M Tarlo

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To provide broad guidelines and principles to help primary care physicians, occupational physicians, allergists and respirologists with the recognition, diagnosis and management of patients with occupational asthma (OA.

  7. The relation between paracetamol use and asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaheen, S; Potts, J; Gnatiuc, L

    2008-01-01

    Studies from the UK and the USA suggest that frequent use of paracetamol (acetaminophen) may increase the risk of asthma, but data across Europe are lacking.As part of a multi-centre case-control study organised by the GA(2)LEN network we have examined whether frequent paracetamol use is associated...... the same population defined by age (20-45 years) and place of residence.In a random effects meta-analysis, after controlling for confounders, the adjusted odds ratio for asthma associated with weekly use of paracetamol, compared with less frequent use, was 2.87 (95% CI: 1.49 to 5.37), P=0.......002. There was no evidence for heterogeneity across centres. No association was seen between use of other analgesics and asthma.These data add to the increasing and consistent epidemiological evidence implicating frequent paracetamol use in asthma in diverse populations...

  8. Foreign body aspiration masquerading as difficult asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rai S

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available It is important to assess patients of difficult/therapy resistant asthma carefully in order to identify whether there are any correctable factors that may contribute to their poor control. It is critical to make a diagnosis of asthma and to exclude other airway diseases. A 65-years-old lady presented with repeated acute episodes of dyspnoea and wheezing. She was on regular medication for bronchial asthma for 18 years. There was no history of foreign body aspiration or loss of consciousness. Her chest radiograph was normal. She showed poor response to corticosteroids and bronchodilators. Fibreoptic bronchoscopy (FOB showed intracordal cyst of the left vocal cord and 1cm size irregular piece of betel nut in right main bronchus, which was removed endoscopically with the help of dormia basket, following which her condition improved and asthma was controlled on inhaled bronchodilators.

  9. Leukotriene modifiers in pediatric asthma management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, H

    2001-01-01

    Cysteinyl leukotrienes (Cys-LTs) are mediators released in asthma and virus-induced wheezing. Corticosteroids appear to have little or no effect on this release in vivo. Cys-LTs are both direct bronchoconstrictors and proinflammatory substances that mediate several steps in the pathophysiology...... of chronic asthma, including inflammatory cell recruitment, vascular leakage, and possibly airway remodeling. Blocking studies show that Cys-LTs are pivotal mediators in the pathophysiology of asthma. Cys-LTs are key components in the early and late allergic airway response and also contribute to bronchial...... obstruction after exercise and hyperventilation of cold, dry air in asthmatics. LT modifiers reduce airway eosinophil numbers and exhaled nitric oxide levels. Together these findings support an important role for the Cys-LTs in the asthma airway inflammation. Cys-LT receptor antagonists (Cys...

  10. Clinical characteristics of eosinophilic asthma exacerbations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Asger; Laing, Ingrid A; Backer, Vibeke;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Airway eosinophilia is associated with an increased risk of asthma exacerbations; however, the impact on the severity of exacerbations is largely unknown. We describe the sputum inflammatory phenotype during asthma exacerbation and correlate it with severity and treatment...... response. METHODS: Patients presenting to hospital with an asthma exacerbation were recruited during a 12-month period and followed up after 4 weeks. Induced sputum was collected at both visits. Patients underwent spirometry, arterial blood gas analysis, fractional exhaled nitric oxide analysis, white...... with a sensitivity of 86% and a specificity of 70%. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that eosinophilic asthma exacerbations may be clinically more severe than NEEs, supporting the identification of these higher risk patients for specific interventions....

  11. Asthma and risk of myelodysplastic syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Henrik; Farkas, Dóra Körmendiné; Horváth-Puhó, Erzsébet;

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Risk factors for the development of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) include age, exposure to ionising radiation, and cytotoxic drug treatment. Recently, asthma also has been suggested as a risk factor for MDS. METHODS: We undertook this nationwide population-based cohort study...... on patients with a first-time hospital-based asthma diagnosis during 2002-2013 and followed them for the development of MDS/chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia (CMML). RESULTS: We identified 75 995 patients with incident asthma and no previous MDS/CMML diagnosis. Seventy-eight patients subsequently developed MDS...... and nine patients developed CMML during 402 892 person-years. The cumulative risks of developing MDS/CMML among asthma patients were 0.02% (95% CI: 0.01-0.04%) and 0.07% (95% CI: 0.05-0.09%) during the first year and the first five years of follow-up, respectively. The standardised incidence ratio of MDS...

  12. HOLISTIC APPROACH TO MANAGEMENT OF ASTHMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khatry Sadhna

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is an inflammatory disease which is prevalent throughout the world. Allopathic medicines are commonly used for its treatment. Although allopathic medicines provide immediate relief to most patients but low risk, non drug strategies would provide a valuable adjunct or alternative treatment in Asthma Management. A holistic approach helps the body to come into balance naturally and can be used as a long term therapy with minimal side effects. The holistic approach includes different systems of medicine like Ayurveda, Herbal drugs, Homeopathy, Naturopathy, Siddha, Unani and other therapies. Holistic treatment can be an effective solution for treating asthma Substantial scientific evidence is not available on these therapies and further trials need to be conducted to prove their efficacy and encourage the patients to use this approach in the management of asthma.

  13. New Asthma Guidelines: What You Should Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section New Asthma Guidelines: What You Should Know Past Issues / ... and chairs the Expert Panel that established the new guidelines. The report gives health care professionals new ...

  14. The intestinal microbiota and allergic asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrieta, Marie-Claire; Finlay, Brett

    2014-11-01

    There is increasing evidence that environmental changes are involved in the sharp increase in asthma incidence, as well as with other immune-mediated diseases. This increase matches the introduction of modern life advances such as antibiotics and caesarean sections. Several epidemiological studies provide convincing evidence that a lack of exposure to microbes early in life is associated with later development of allergic asthma. In addition, animal studies have shown that early life modulation of the intestinal microbiota with antibiotics has profound effects in the immune cellular mechanisms that lead to asthma. By describing some of the most relevant human and animal studies in this field, we explore the concept that significant perturbations of the intestinal and perhaps the lung microbiota are a cause of allergic asthma.

  15. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... avoid an attack by taking your medicine exactly as your doctor or other medical professional tells you ... keep them with your Asthma Action Plan. Using a metered dose inhaler with a spacer Your browser ...

  16. American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education Center Fellows-in-Training Grants & Awards Program Directors Practice Resources ASTHMA IQ Consultation and Referral Guidelines Practice Financial Survey Practice Tools Running a Practice Statements and Practice Parameters About AAAAI Advocacy Allergist / Immunologists: ...

  17. Personalizing the Approach to Childhood Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education Center Fellows-in-Training Grants & Awards Program Directors Practice Resources ASTHMA IQ Consultation and Referral Guidelines Practice Financial Survey Practice Tools Running a Practice Statements and Practice Parameters About AAAAI Advocacy Allergist / Immunologists: ...

  18. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) (and Asthma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education Center Fellows-in-Training Grants & Awards Program Directors Practice Resources ASTHMA IQ Consultation and Referral Guidelines Practice Financial Survey Practice Tools Running a Practice Statements and Practice Parameters About AAAAI Advocacy Allergist / Immunologists: ...

  19. Prevention of Allergies and Asthma in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education Center Fellows-in-Training Grants & Awards Program Directors Practice Resources ASTHMA IQ Consultation and Referral Guidelines Practice Financial Survey Practice Tools Running a Practice Statements and Practice Parameters About AAAAI Advocacy Allergist / Immunologists: ...

  20. Asthma and COPD: Differences and Similarities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education Center Fellows-in-Training Grants & Awards Program Directors Practice Resources ASTHMA IQ Consultation and Referral Guidelines Practice Financial Survey Practice Tools Running a Practice Statements and Practice Parameters About AAAAI Advocacy Allergist / Immunologists: ...

  1. Asthma Medicines: Long-Term Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Size Email Print Share Asthma Medicines: Long-term Control Page Content Article Body Corticosteroids Synthetic versions of ... form, they are used exclusively for long-term control; they are not very effective for acute symptoms. ...

  2. Asthma, stress, and depression in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frieri, Marianne; O'Connor, Maeve; Nassef, Mervat

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of depression with asthma is very common, especially in women, and can influence behavioral factors, such as treatment compliance, self-assessment, and management of environmental triggers, that can collectively result in poor asthma management and control. This review describes the association and major clinical implications of stress, anxiety, and depression, and the associated hormonal changes frequently seen in women with poorly controlled asthma. Several validated instruments have recently been developed for screening patients for depression that can now be used and benefit patients with asthma by earlier detection of these confounding risk factors. The review also highlights the need for further delineation and characterization of specific underlying pathophysiologic and immunologic mechanisms responsible for depression in women.

  3. Lung Disease Including Asthma and Adult Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Healthcare Professionals Lung Disease including Asthma and Adult Vaccination Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... more about health insurance options. Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Heart Disease, ...

  4. Increased asthma risk and asthma-related health care complications associated with childhood obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Mary Helen; Zhou, Hui; Takayanagi, Miwa; Jacobsen, Steven J; Koebnick, Corinna

    2013-10-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic condition of childhood, yet the relationship between obesity and asthma risk and the impact of obesity on clinical asthma outcomes are not well understood. For this population-based, longitudinal study, demographic and clinical data were extracted from administrative and electronic health records of 623,358 patients aged 6-19 years who were enrolled in the Kaiser Permanente Southern California health plan in 2007-2011. Crude asthma incidence ranged from 16.9 per 1,000 person-years among normal-weight youth to 22.3 per 1,000 person-years among extremely obese youth. The adjusted risks of asthma for overweight, moderately obese, and extremely obese youth relative to those of normal weight youth were 1.16 (95% confidence interval: 1.13, 1.20), 1.23 (95% confidence interval: 1.19, 1.28), and 1.37 (95% confidence interval: 1.32, 1.42), respectively (Ptrend obesity and asthma risk was strongest in Asian/Pacific Islanders and in the youngest girls (aged 6-10 years), compared with other groups. Among youth who developed asthma, those who were moderately or extremely obese had more frequent asthma exacerbations requiring emergency department services and/or treatment with oral corticosteroids. In conclusion, obese youth are not only more likely to develop asthma, but they may be more likely to have severe asthma, resulting in a greater need for health care utilization and aggressive asthma treatment.

  5. Nocturnal asthma: Understanding chronobiology and chronotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J. Martin

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The field of chronobiology and chronotherapy in medicine is in its relative infancy. However, important knowledge has been gained so as to better understand both the pathophysiology of diseases and the corresponding therapeutic interventions. Asthma is one of the disease entities that has been studied in detail in regard to both time related alterations in pathophysiology and treatment. This article reviews the nocturnal worsening of asthma.

  6. Definition and diagnosis of occupational asthma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cartier, A. (Hopital du Sacre-Coeur, Gouin Ouest, Montreal, PQ (Canada))

    1994-01-01

    Asthma is the most frequent occupational lung disease. The diagnosis of occupational asthma, defined as variable airways narrowing, causally related to exposure in the working environment to specific airborne dusts, gases, vapour of fumes, needs to be confirmed by objective means. This article reviews the different steps of investigation which are: history, pulmonary function tests, immunological tests, monitoring of peak expiratory flows and nonallergic bronchial responsiveness and, finally, the gold standard, specific bronchial provocation. (au) (57 refs.)

  7. Asthma in childhood: a complex, heterogeneous disease

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Asthma in childhood is a heterogeneous disease with different phenotypes and variable clinical manifestations, which depend on the age, gender, genetic background, and environmental influences of the patients. Several longitudinal studies have been conducted to classify the phenotypes of childhood asthma, on the basis of the symptoms, triggers of wheezing illness, or pathophysiological features of the disease. These studies have provided us with important information about the different wheez...

  8. Cluster Analysis and Clinical Asthma Phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Dominic E.; Berry, Michael A.; Thomas, Michael; Brightling, Christopher E.; Wardlaw, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Heterogeneity in asthma expression is multidimensional, including variability in clinical, physiologic, and pathologic parameters. Classification requires consideration of these disparate domains in a unified model. Objectives To explore the application of a multivariate mathematical technique, k-means cluster analysis, for identifying distinct phenotypic groups. Methods We performed k-means cluster analysis in three independent asthma populations. Clusters of a population managed in primary care (n = 184) with predominantly mild to moderate disease, were compared with a refractory asthma population managed in secondary care (n = 187). We then compared differences in asthma outcomes (exacerbation frequency and change in corticosteroid dose at 12 mo) between clusters in a third population of 68 subjects with predominantly refractory asthma, clustered at entry into a randomized trial comparing a strategy of minimizing eosinophilic inflammation (inflammation-guided strategy) with standard care. Measurements and Main Results Two clusters (early-onset atopic and obese, noneosinophilic) were common to both asthma populations. Two clusters characterized by marked discordance between symptom expression and eosinophilic airway inflammation (early-onset symptom predominant and late-onset inflammation predominant) were specific to refractory asthma. Inflammation-guided management was superior for both discordant subgroups leading to a reduction in exacerbation frequency in the inflammation-predominant cluster (3.53 [SD, 1.18] vs. 0.38 [SD, 0.13] exacerbation/patient/yr, P = 0.002) and a dose reduction of inhaled corticosteroid in the symptom-predominant cluster (mean difference, 1,829 μg beclomethasone equivalent/d [95% confidence interval, 307–3,349 μg]; P = 0.02). Conclusions Cluster analysis offers a novel multidimensional approach for identifying asthma phenotypes that exhibit differences in clinical response to treatment algorithms. PMID:18480428

  9. Occupational Asthma in a Cable Manufacturing Company

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attarchi, Mirsaeed; Dehghan, Faezeh; Yazdanparast, Taraneh; Mohammadi, Saber; Golchin, Mahdie; Sadeghi, Zargham; Moafi, Masoud; Seyed Mehdi, Seyed Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background: During the past decade, incidence of asthma has increased, which might have been due to environmental exposures. Objectives: Considering the expansion of cable manufacturing industry in Iran, the present study was conducted to evaluate the prevalence of occupational asthma in a cable manufacturing company in Iran as well as its related factors. Patients and Methods: This study was conducted on employees of a cable manufacturing company in Yazd, Iran, in 2012. The workers were divided into two groups of exposure (to toluene diisocyanate, polyvinyl chloride, polyethylene or polypropylene) and without exposure. Diagnosis of occupational asthma was made based on the subjects’ medical history, spirometry and peak flowmetry, and its frequency was compared between the two groups. Results: The overall prevalence of occupational asthma was 9.7%. This rate was 13.8% in the exposed group. Logistic regression analysis showed that even after adjustment for confounding factors, a significant correlation existed between the frequency of occupational asthma and exposure to the produced dust particles (P < 0.05). In addition, age, work experience, body mass index, cigarette smoking and shift work had significant correlations with the prevalence of occupational asthma (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Considering the high prevalence of occupational asthma among cable manufacturing company workers in Iran, this issue needs to be addressed immediately in addition to reduction of exposure among subjects. Reduction in work shift duration, implementation of tobacco control and cessation programs for the personnel, and performing spirometry tests and respiratory examinations in shorter periods may be among effective measures for reducing the incidence of occupational asthma in this industry. PMID:25558389

  10. Helicobacter Pylori Infection and Pediatric Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Abdullah Karimi; Koroush Fakhimi Derakhshan; Farid Imanzadeh; Mohamad Rezaei; Zahra Cavoshzadeh; Saeid Maham

    2013-01-01

    Objective Childhood infectious diseases are one of the most known environmental pathogenic causes of childhood asthma. The high prevalence of both Helicobacter pylori infection and asthma in our country prompted us to assess anyprobable association between them in childhood. Methods This cross-sectional study recruited 196 children aged 6 to 12 years old comprising 98 asthmatic (case group) and 98 healthy (control group) individuals. Urea breath test was performed for all of the children and ...

  11. Natural Killer Cells in Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalil eKarimi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The worldwide prevalence, morbidity, and mortality of asthma have dramatically increased over the last few decades and there is a clear need to identify new, effective, therapeutic and prophylactic strategies. Despite high numbers of NK cells in the lung and their ability to and generate a variety of immunomodulatory mediators the potential of these cells as therapeutic targets in allergic airway disease has been largely overlooked. The fact that IgE, acting through FcγRIII can activate NK cells resulting in cytokine/chemokine production implies that NK cells may contribute to IgE-mediated allergic responses. Indeed, current evidence suggests that NK cells can promote allergic airway responses during sensitization and ongoing inflammation. In animals models increased NK cells are observed in the lung following antigen challenge, while depletion of NK cells before immunization inhibits allergic airway inflammation. Moreover, in asthmatics NK cell phenotype is altered, and may contribute to promotion of the pro-inflammatory Th2-type environment. Conversely, driving NK cells towards an IFN-γ-secreting phenotype can reduce features of the allergic airway response in animal models. However, we have limited knowledge of the signals that drive the development of distinct subsets and functional phenotypes of NK cells in the lung and thus the role and therapeutic potential of NK cells in the allergic airway remains unclear. Here we review the potentially diverse roles of NK cells in allergic airway disease, identify gaps in current knowledge and discuss the potential of modulating NK cell function as a treatment strategy in asthma

  12. [Physical exercise and bronchial asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endre, László

    2016-06-26

    An article was published in the Lancet in 1935 about the therapy of asthmatic patients, using a special breathing exercise (the authors used a control group, too). Swimming, as a complementary therapy for asthmatic children, was first recommended in 1968, by authors from the United States. In Hungary, regular swimming training for asthmatic children is in use since August, 1981. As the result of this exercise, the physical fitness of asthmatic children (using this method regularly for years) increased dramatically, and it is much better compared to that found in the non asthmatic, non swimming children of the same age group. The requirement for asthma medication decreased, and the severity of their disease significantly decreased, also. On the other hand, asthma is not a rarity even among elite athletes. It is most frequent in the endurance sports (for example in Northern Europe among cross-country skiers its prevalence is between 14-54%, among long distance runners 15-24%, and among swimmers 13-44%). The possible reason is related to the fact that elite athletes inspire 200 liter air/minute (mostly through the mouth). Air pollution and allergens can penetrate in the lower respiratory tract. The air causes cooling and drying of the mucosa of the airways and, as a consequence, mediators are liberated which produce oedema of the mucosa, and bronchoconstriction. Beta-2-receptor agonists inhalation can prevent (or decrease significantly) this phenomenon. These agents are used regularly by elite athletes, too. The non-medical possibilities for prevention include wearing a special mask, frequent ventilation of the swimming pool's air, consumption of omega-3-fatty acid, and inhalation of dry salt (very small, and very clear sodiumchloride particles).

  13. Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Respiratory infections, such as the common cold Strong emotions (stress) Tobacco smoke Substances in some workplaces can ... symptoms that need prompt medical help include: Bluish color to the lips and face Decreased level of ...

  14. Asthma.

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, P L

    1989-01-01

    Asthmatics should be encouraged to increase the quality and intensity of exercise gradually in order to allow the body to adapt to the training load. If sensible precautions are taken and if adequately controlled with medication, asthmatics can reach the top in even the most arduous of sports.

  15. Asthma and gender: the female lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignataro, F S; Bonini, M; Forgione, A; Melandri, S; Usmani, O S

    2017-02-23

    Asthma is a common chronic disease that affects over 300 million people worldwide, resulting in a considerable socio-economic burden. Literature data suggest that asthma has a higher incidence in females, particularly at certain stages of pubertal development. Moreover, women seem to experience more asthma symptom than man and to use more rescue medications, resulting in a reduced quality of life. Although several mechanisms have been proposed to explain these differences, there are not yet final data available in the literature on the role of gender in the pathogenesis of asthma and different behavior in females. Some study suggested a more prevalent hyper-responsiveness in women than in men. Nevertheless, in the literature definitive data on a possible different response to drugs used for asthma between male and female are not described. Understanding the mechanisms underlie these gender differences in clinical history of asthma patients could give inspiration to new areas of research to obtain a more specific diagnostic and therapeutic approach gender-oriented.

  16. Asthma and Its Impacts on Oral Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultan Keleş

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness and reversible airflow obstruction. Genetic factors and environmental factors may play a role in the etiology of asthma. An approximately 300 million people worldwide have been diagnosed with asthma and there may be an additional 100 million diagnosis by 2025. Studies conducted in Turkey reported a prevalence between 1.5% and 9.4%. In the literature, there are many studies investigating the impacts of the medications used for asthma, which has a tendency to increase in our country and in the world, on oral health. However, no consensus has yet been established regarding whether these medications affect oral health. It is important to have knowledge about the impacts of asthma medications on oral and dental health and to take the necessary precautions in order to maintain oral and dental health. In this review, in addition to investigation of the impact of asthma medications on oral health, possible measures that can be taken were also evaluated.

  17. Early interventions in asthma with inhaled corticosteroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laitinen, L A; Altraja, A; Karjalainen, E M; Laitinen, A

    2000-02-01

    We have earlier shown epithelial damage in the airway mucosa in patients with asthma. Later other structural changes have been recognized in asthma, such as deposition of collagen and tenascin in the subepithelial basement membrane and changes in the laminin subchain composition. These processes are modified by an inflammatory process in the airways. Both the United States National Institutes of Health and the British Thoracic Society guidelines on the management of asthma emphasize the need for early use of anti-inflammatory drugs. Many clinical studies that used airway biopsy specimens have shown a decrease in airway inflammatory cell numbers after inhaled corticosteroid therapy. However, there is very little information on the effects of asthma medication on the structural components of the airways. Both the synthesis and degradation of many extracellular matrix components may be affected by the disease process and the drugs resulting in altered remodeling and gene expression in the airways. Because there are only a few studies that try to identify early changes in asthma, it is not known whether the anti-inflammatory treatment of asthma proposed by the guidelines is started early enough.

  18. Difficult-to-treat asthma in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Alexandra; Saglani, Sejal

    2013-06-01

    Asthma continues to be one of the greatest burdens to healthcare resources throughout the developed world. In most cases, good symptom control can be achieved with low-dose inhaled corticosteroids, and can be cared for in the primary and secondary healthcare systems. However, there is a group in whom control is not achieved despite high-dose inhaled corticosteroids and maximal add-on therapies; these are children with problematic severe asthma that should be referred to a specialist team for further investigation and management. In this review we aimed to provide an evidence-based guide for pediatricians providing care for children with asthma in secondary healthcare settings. The review focuses on a proposed investigation and management strategy for children aged between 6 and 16 years with problematic severe asthma, and is supported as far as possible by evidence from the literature. We first address recent advances in nomenclature and then discuss our proposed course of investigation and management of these children. Distinction of children with true, severe, therapy-resistant asthma from those with asthma that is difficult to treat because of unaddressed underlying modifiable factors is critical and is discussed in detail.

  19. Biomarkers in the Management of Difficult Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleich, Florence; Demarche, Sophie; Louis, Renaud

    2016-01-01

    Difficult asthma is a heterogeneous disease of the airways including various types of bronchial inflammation and various degrees of airway remodeling. Therapeutic response of severe asthmatics can be predicted by the use of biomarkers of Type2-high or Type2-low inflammation. Based on sputum cell analysis, four inflammatory phenotypes have been described. As induced sputum is timeconsuming and expensive technique, surrogate biomarkers are useful in clinical practice. Eosinophilic phenotype is likely to reflect ongoing adaptive immunity in response to allergen. Several biomarkers of eosinophilic asthma are easily available in clinical practice (blood eosinophils, serum IgE, exhaled nitric oxyde, serum periostin). Neutrophilic asthma is thought to reflect innate immune system activation in response to pollutants or infectious agents while paucigranulocytic asthma is thought to be not inflammatory and characterized by smooth muscle dysfunction. We currently lack of user-friendly biomarkers of neutrophilic asthma and airway remodeling. In this review, we summarize the biomarkers available for the management of difficult asthma.

  20. Asthma exacerbation in children: a practical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Lin-Shien; Tsai, Ming-Chin

    2014-04-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic lower respiratory tract disease in childhood throughout the world. Despite advances in asthma management, acute exacerbations continue to be a major problem in patients and they result in a considerable burden on direct/indirect health care providers. A severe exacerbation occurring within 1 year is an independent risk factor. Respiratory tract viruses have emerged as the most frequent triggers of exacerbations in children. It is becoming increasingly clear that interactions may exist between viruses and other triggers, increasing the likelihood of an exacerbation. In this study, we provide an overview of current knowledge about asthma exacerbations, including its definition, impact on health care providers, and associated factors. Prevention management in intermittent asthma as well as intermittent wheeze in pre-school children and those with persistent asthma are discussed. Our review findings support the importance of controlling persistent asthma, as indicated in current guidelines. In addition, we found that early episodic intervention appeared to be crucial in preventing severe attacks and future exacerbations. Besides the use of medication, timely education after an exacerbation along with a comprehensive plan in follow up is also vitally important.

  1. Occupational Medicine Model and Asthma Military Recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Stuart M

    2015-11-01

    Medical evidence hints that asymptomatic recruits with a history of childhood asthma, quiescent since their 13th birthday, are still at risk for adverse changes in their clinical status following unfavorable environmental exposures during military deployment or combat. Asthmatic persons, claiming none or few symptoms, may still manifest airflow obstruction and display biomarkers of airway inflammation even when they are relatively asymptomatic and experience few if any respiratory complaints. The occupational medicine model offers a credible foundation for acknowledging the importance of personal susceptibility in the pathogenesis of military-associated asthma. It is appropriate to re-explore the current military standard for recruits with asymptomatic childhood asthma (≥12 months) not prescribed antiasthma medications. Raising the acceptance age for these recruits may be a consideration. Unfortunately, there is no effectual screening test that recognizes such susceptible soldiers at risk for future asthma attacks. Nevertheless, there is general support for evidence-based, scientifically valid medical screening that judges fitness for military service. Screening tests comprising asthma biomarkers and genetic indices may better verify vulnerable soldiers destined to suffer future asthma reactivation.

  2. The role of CRAC channel in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Manminder; Birrell, Mark A; Dekkak, Bilel; Reynolds, Sophie; Wong, Sissie; De Alba, Jorge; Raemdonck, Kristof; Hall, Simon; Simpson, Karen; Begg, Malcolm; Belvisi, Maria G; Singh, Dave

    2015-12-01

    Asthma is increasing globally and current treatments only manage a proportion of patients. There is an urgent need to develop new therapies. Lymphocytes are thought to play a central role in the pathophysiology of asthma through the production of inflammatory mediators. This is thought to be via the transcription factor NFAT which in turn can be activated through Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channels. The aim of this work was to investigate the role of CRAC in clinical and pre-clinical models of allergic asthma. Initial data demonstrated that the NFAT pathway is increased in stimulated lymphocytes from asthmatics. To confirm a role for the channel we showed that a selective inhibitor, Synta 66, blocked mediator production from lymphocytes. Synta 66 inhibited CD2/3/28 induced IL-2, IL-7, IL-13 & IFNΥ in a concentration-dependent manner in healthy and severe asthma donors, with over 60% inhibition observed for all cytokines. NFAT pathway was also increased in a pre-clinical asthma model. In this model we have demonstrated that CRAC played a central role in the airway inflammation and late asthmatic response (LAR). In conclusion, our data provides evidence that suggests targeting CRAC channels could be of therapeutic benefit for asthma sufferers.

  3. Mepolizumab: a new drug in asthma armamentorium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satyadeo Choubey

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Bronchial asthma is a syndrome characterized by airflow obstruction that varies markedly, both spontaneously and with treatment. The current therapy for asthma includes either inhaled corticosteroids alone or in combinations with inhaled bronchodilators with other controller options being theophyllines, leukotriene antagonists and systemic corticosteroids. In step V of Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA management guidelines Anti Ig E, Omalizumab is recommended in selected patients when everything fails. But still some unmet need is felt in the form of refractory asthma. Mepolizumab, an IL-5 antagonist has been developed in this regard and has been approved by FDA on Nov 4, 2015 followed by European commission on Dec 02, 2015 in view of good results based on clinical trials conducted by GlaxoSmithKline a multi-centre, open-label long-term safety study of 100 milligram (mg mepolizumab administered subcutaneously (SC every 4 weeks for 12 months in addition to standard of care in subjects who have severe, refractory asthma and a history of eosinophilic inflammation. This article covers the review of mepolizumab with its advantages in refractory bronchial asthma. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2016; 5(2.000: 543-545

  4. Current and future biomarkers in allergic asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zissler, U M; Esser-von Bieren, J; Jakwerth, C A; Chaker, A M; Schmidt-Weber, C B

    2016-04-01

    Diagnosis early in life, sensitization, asthma endotypes, monitoring of disease and treatment progression are key motivations for the exploration of biomarkers for allergic rhinitis and allergic asthma. The number of genes related to allergic rhinitis and allergic asthma increases steadily; however, prognostic genes have not yet entered clinical application. We hypothesize that the combination of multiple genes may generate biomarkers with prognostic potential. The current review attempts to group more than 161 different potential biomarkers involved in respiratory inflammation to pave the way for future classifiers. The potential biomarkers are categorized into either epithelial or infiltrate-derived or mixed origin, epithelial biomarkers. Furthermore, surface markers were grouped into cell-type-specific categories. The current literature provides multiple biomarkers for potential asthma endotypes that are related to T-cell phenotypes such as Th1, Th2, Th9, Th17, Th22 and Tregs and their lead cytokines. Eosinophilic and neutrophilic asthma endotypes are also classified by epithelium-derived CCL-26 and osteopontin, respectively. There are currently about 20 epithelium-derived biomarkers exclusively derived from epithelium, which are likely to innovate biomarker panels as they are easy to sample. This article systematically reviews and categorizes genes and collects current evidence that may promote these biomarkers to become part of allergic rhinitis or allergic asthma classifiers with high prognostic value.

  5. Viral infections in asthma and COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Koichiro; Inoue, Hiromasa

    2014-03-01

    Airway viral infections are associated with the pathogenesis of asthma and COPD. It has been argued that respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection in infancy is a probable causal factor in the development of pediatric asthma. RSV infections tend to induce Th2-biased immune responses in the host airways. RSV infection, atopy, and low pulmonary function in neonates may work synergistically toward the development of pediatric asthma. Human rhinovirus (HRV) is a representative virus associated with the exacerbation of asthma in both children and adults. Viral infections trigger innate immune responses including granulocytic inflammation and worsen the underlying inflammation due to asthma and COPD. The innate immune responses involve type-I and -III interferon (IFN) production, which plays an important role in anti-viral responses, and the airway epithelia of asthmatics reportedly exhibit defects in the virus-induced IFN responses, which renders these individuals more susceptible to viral infection. A similarly impaired IFN response is seen in COPD, and several investigators propose that latent adenoviral infection may be involved in COPD development. Persistent RSV infections were detected in a sub-population of patients with COPD and were associated with the accelerated decline of lung function. The virus-induced upregulation of co-inhibitory molecules in the airway epithelium partly accounts for the persistent infections. Experimental animal models for virus-asthma/COPD interactions have shed light on the underlying immune mechanisms and are expected to help develop novel approaches to treat respiratory diseases.

  6. 噻托溴铵对稳定期中、重度COPD患者肺功能和运动耐量的影响%Effect of Tiotropium Bromide on Lung Function and Exercise Tolerance of Moderately Severe COPD Patients in Steady Stage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田雨; 李杨

    2014-01-01

    Objective To observe the effect of tiotropium bromide on lung function and exercise tolerance of moderately severe COPD patients in steady stage and discuss its clinical effect. Method 67 cases of moderately severe COPD patients in steady stage were randomly divided, intervened by medication and analyzed. Observation group was treated by dry power inhalation of tiotropium bromide and control group was treated by aerosol inhalation of ipratropium bromide. The treatment course was 1 month. Lung functions and exercise tolerance changes of both groups before and after treatment were tested. Result Compared with prior treatment, lung functions and exercise tolerance of both groups improved and observation group was more significant (P<0.01). Conclusion Dry power inhalation of tiotropium bromide has a good effect for moderately severe COPD patients in steady stage, it has a more reliable function in improving lung function and exercise tolerance than aerosol inhalation of ipratropium bromide.%目的:观察噻托溴铵对稳定期中、重度COPD患者肺功能和运动耐量的影响,探讨其临床治疗稳定期中、重度COPD的疗效。方法对我院67例诊断为稳定期中、重度COPD患者进行随机分组用药干预研究,观察组采用噻托溴铵干粉吸入,对照组采用异丙托溴铵气雾剂吸入,对患者进行为期1个月的临床治疗。检测治疗前后两组患者的肺功能以及运动耐量的变化。结果与治疗前相比,两组患者的肺功能和运动耐量均有了一定的好转。观察组与对照组相比,前者肺功能和运动耐量的改善明显优于后者(P<0.01)。结论噻托溴铵干粉吸入对稳定期中、重度COPD患者有较好的临床疗效,较目前临床常用的托溴铵气雾剂有着更为可靠的改善肺功能及运动耐量的作用。

  7. Non-adherence in difficult asthma and advances in detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, John T; Heaney, Liam G

    2013-12-01

    Non-adherence to anti-inflammatory therapies is common in patients referred for specialist assessment at difficult-to-treat asthma services. In the difficult asthma setting, non-adherence to treatment is associated with poor baseline asthma control, increased frequency of exacerbations and asthma-related hospitalizations, as well as increased risk of death. Here, we present a review of the current literature surrounding the prevalence and risks of non-adherence in difficult asthma and we report on current methods of measuring treatment adherence and advances in the detection of non-adherence. We will also explore methods by which non-adherence in difficult asthma can be addressed.

  8. Prescription of asthma medications before and during pregnancy in France

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beau, Anna-Belle; Didier, Alain; Hurault-Delarue, Caroline;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Asthma affects between 3 to 8% of pregnant women. Previous studies have suggested that women's prescriptions for asthma medication change during pregnancy. The aim was to describe the prescription of asthma medications before and during pregnancy in France. METHODS: Women from the EFEM......OBJECTIVE: Asthma affects between 3 to 8% of pregnant women. Previous studies have suggested that women's prescriptions for asthma medication change during pregnancy. The aim was to describe the prescription of asthma medications before and during pregnancy in France. METHODS: Women from...

  9. [Research advances in association between pediatric obesity and bronchial asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lian; Xu, Zhi-Liang; Cheng, Yan-Yang

    2016-07-01

    This review article introduces the research advances in the pathophysiological mechanism of obesity in inducing pediatric bronchial asthma, including the role of leptin in obesity and asthma, the association of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 with obesity and asthma, the association of adiponectin and interleukins with obesity and asthma, and the influence of neurotransmitter on asthma. In particular, this article introduces the latest research on the inhibition of allergic asthma through targeting at the nociceptor of dorsal root ganglion and blocking the signaling pathway of the nociceptor.

  10. The Association between Asthma and Sleep in Urban Adolescents with Undiagnosed Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koinis Mitchell, Daphne; Kopel, Sheryl J.; Williams, Brittney; Cespedes, Amarilis; Bruzzese, Jean-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Background: We examined associations between asthma and sleep in a sample of inner-city adolescents with asthma-like symptoms who are undiagnosed, and to assess the extent to which youth's report of perceived stress moderates this association. Methods: A total of 349 adolescents (83% girls), with a mean age of 15.8 years, and their primary…

  11. Community Asthma Initiative to Improve Health Outcomes and Reduce Disparities Among Children with Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Elizabeth R; Bhaumik, Urmi; Sommer, Susan J; Chan, Elaine; Tsopelas, Lindsay; Fleegler, Eric W; Lorenzi, Margarita; Klements, Elizabeth M; Dickerson, Deborah U; Nethersole, Shari; Dulin, Rick

    2016-02-12

    Black and Hispanic children are hospitalized with complications of asthma at much higher rates than white children. The Boston Children's Hospital Community Asthma Initiative (CAI) provides asthma case management and home visits for children from low-income neighborhoods in Boston, Massachusetts, to address racial/ethnic health disparities in pediatric asthma outcomes. CAI objectives were to evaluate 1) case management data by parent/guardian report for health outcomes and 2) hospital administrative data for comparison between intervention and comparison groups. Data from parent/guardian reports indicate that CAI decreased the number of children with any (one or more) asthma-related hospitalizations (decrease of 79% at 12 months) and any asthma-related emergency department visits (decrease of 56% at 12 months) among children served, most of whom were non-Hispanic black or Hispanic. Hospital administrative data also indicate that the number of asthma-related hospitalizations per child significantly decreased among CAI participants compared with a comparison group. The CAI model has been replicated in other cities and states with adaptations to local cultural and systems variations. Health outcome and cost data have been used to contribute to a business case to educate legislators and insurers about outcomes and costs for this enhanced approach to care. Strong partnerships with public health, community, and housing agencies have allowed CAI to leverage its outcomes to expand systemic changes locally and statewide to reduce asthma morbidity.

  12. Cluster analysis of obesity and asthma phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Rand Sutherland

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Asthma is a heterogeneous disease with variability among patients in characteristics such as lung function, symptoms and control, body weight, markers of inflammation, and responsiveness to glucocorticoids (GC. Cluster analysis of well-characterized cohorts can advance understanding of disease subgroups in asthma and point to unsuspected disease mechanisms. We utilized an hypothesis-free cluster analytical approach to define the contribution of obesity and related variables to asthma phenotype. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a cohort of clinical trial participants (n = 250, minimum-variance hierarchical clustering was used to identify clinical and inflammatory biomarkers important in determining disease cluster membership in mild and moderate persistent asthmatics. In a subset of participants, GC sensitivity was assessed via expression of GC receptor alpha (GCRα and induction of MAP kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1 expression by dexamethasone. Four asthma clusters were identified, with body mass index (BMI, kg/m(2 and severity of asthma symptoms (AEQ score the most significant determinants of cluster membership (F = 57.1, p<0.0001 and F = 44.8, p<0.0001, respectively. Two clusters were composed of predominantly obese individuals; these two obese asthma clusters differed from one another with regard to age of asthma onset, measures of asthma symptoms (AEQ and control (ACQ, exhaled nitric oxide concentration (F(ENO and airway hyperresponsiveness (methacholine PC(20 but were similar with regard to measures of lung function (FEV(1 (% and FEV(1/FVC, airway eosinophilia, IgE, leptin, adiponectin and C-reactive protein (hsCRP. Members of obese clusters demonstrated evidence of reduced expression of GCRα, a finding which was correlated with a reduced induction of MKP-1 expression by dexamethasone CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: Obesity is an important determinant of asthma phenotype in adults. There is heterogeneity in

  13. President Calvin Coolidge's asthma and modern management of asthma patients in the dental setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, William James; Maloney, Maura P

    2012-03-01

    Asthma affects millions of individuals worldwide. President Calvin Coolidge was one of these individuals. Coolidge suffered from asthma since childhood. It affected his outlook toward aggressive physical activity and was a strong factor in shaping his personality and, eventually, his politics. He was devoted to the status quo in American business enterprises and was known for his reserved personality and conservative political beliefs. One can speculate as to what role his passive personality, developed as a direct and conscious result of his desire for physical self-preservation in light of his asthma, played in leading the United States to the brink of the Great Depression. Dentists encounter individuals with asthma in their private practices daily. It is imperative that all dentists be aware of the symptoms of asthma, its many orofacial manifestations and possible modifications to dental treatment.

  14. Comparison of clinically diagnosed asthma with parental assessment of children's asthma in a questionnaire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hederos, C.A.; Hasselgren, M.; Hedlin, G.;

    2007-01-01

    Epidemiological evaluations of the prevalence of asthma are usually based on written questionnaires (WQs) in combination with validation by clinical investigation. In the present investigation, we compared parental assessment of asthma among their preschool children in response to a WQ...... with the corresponding medical records in the same region. An International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC)-based WQ was answered by 75% of the parents of 6295 children aged 1-6 yr. Clinically diagnosed asthma, recorded in connection with admissions to the hospital or a visit to any of the outpatient...... clinics in the same region, were analysed in parallel. Finally, a complementary WQ was sent to the parents of children identified as asthmatic by either or both of this approaches. In response to the WQ 5.9% were claimed to suffer from asthma diagnosed by a doctor. According to the medical records...

  15. Sleep in children with asthma: results of the PIAMA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Maanen, Annette; Wijga, Alet H; Gehring, Ulrike; Postma, Dirkje S; Smit, Henriëtte A; Oort, Frans J; Rodenburg, Roos; Meijer, Anne Marie

    2013-04-01

    Children with asthma are thought to have impaired sleep quality and quantity. In this study, we investigated which of the many sleep aspects are associated with asthma. Our sample consisted of 2529 children (aged 11 years) who participated in the Prevention and Incidence of Asthma and Mite Allergy (PIAMA) birth cohort study. Parents reported about asthma symptoms (wheezing, dyspnoea, prescription of inhaled corticosteroids and asthma diagnosis) and children reported about different aspects of sleep (bedtime, rise time, sleep quality and daytime sleepiness/tiredness). Results were analysed with (logistic) regression analysis. Children with frequent asthma symptoms significantly more often reported that they felt sleepy or tired during the day (34.4% experienced daytime sleepiness/tiredness at least once a week) than children without asthma symptoms (22.2%) and children with infrequent asthma symptoms (21.9%). This association was not confounded by sex, age of the child, parental educational level or smoking inside the house; the effect was also not modified by sex. There were no associations between asthma and bedtime, time spent in bed or sleep quality. Children with frequent asthma symptoms experienced daytime sleepiness/tiredness more often than children with infrequent or no asthma symptoms. Otherwise, children with asthma did not differ much from children without asthma with regard to sleep.

  16. Spirometry use in children hospitalized with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chee Chun; McDowell, Karen M; Fenchel, Matthew; Szczesniak, Rhonda; Kercsmar, Carolyn M

    2014-05-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic disorder of childhood and continues to be a leading cause of pediatric hospital admission. The National Asthma Education and Prevention Program (NAEPP) recommends that spirometry be obtained for asthma patients upon hospital admission, after bronchodilation during the acute phase of asthma symptoms, and at least one additional time before discharge from the hospital. The objectives of this study were to describe the use of spirometry in children hospitalized with asthma and to determine association of pulmonary function with future exacerbations. A retrospective cohort study design was utilized involving review of medical records of children ≥5 years old admitted with asthma to Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center from September 1, 2009 to March 31, 2011. Hospitalization or emergency department (ED) visits were identified by the ICD-9-CM codes of having either a primary diagnosis of asthma (493) or a respiratory illness (460-496) plus a secondary diagnosis of asthma. Asthma re-exacerbation was defined as either having an ED visit or hospitalization for asthma that occurred within 3 months after the index hospitalization. All spirometries were performed in a pediatric pulmonary function laboratory. Among 1,037 admissions included in this study, 89 (8.6%) had spirometry that was recommended by a consulting asthma specialist and usually performed on the day of discharge. Spirometries for forty-five of these patients (54.9%) met all acceptability and repeatability criteria of the American Thoracic Society. Patients who performed acceptable spirometry were significantly older (12.4 ± 3.8 vs. 10.7 ± 3.0 years; P = 0.041). The average forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1 ) was 84.4 ± 19.7% predicted; forced vital capacity (FVC) was 98.1 ± 16.0% predicted; FEV1 /FVC was 74.6 ± 9.6%; forced expiratory flow at 25-75% (FEF25-75 ) was 61.2 ± 30.1% predicted. Ten patients (22%) who

  17. Oral health in children with asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marković Dejan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. It has been suggested that asthmatic patients may have a higher risk for oral diseases, both as a result of the medical condition and effects of medications. Objective. The aim of the study was to determine the oral health status of children with asthma and to evaluate the oral health parameters according to the medications and severity of the disease. Methods. The study group consisted of 158 children with asthma and 100 healthy control subjects aged 2-18 years. The diagnosis of dental caries was performed using the Decayed, Missing, and Filled Teeth (DMFT/dmft criteria. The oral hygiene, periodontal status and gingival health were assessed with the Simplified Oral Hygiene Index (Greene-Vermillion, Community Periodontal Index of Treatment Needs and Gingival Index (Löe-Silness, respectively. Results. Thirty (19% patients with asthma and 43 (43% healthy children were caries-free (p<0.001. There were no significant differences between asthmatic and control children in caries experience (for children with asthma mean DMFT=2.1±1.8, mean dmft=4.2±3.3; for healthy children mean DMFT=2.5±0.9, mean dmft=5.2±1.3. Level of asthma control did not have influence on dental health, while dose of inhaled corticosteroid had impact on primary dentition. Periodontal status and gingival health did not differ between asthmatic and control children. However, children with asthma had poorer oral hygiene (p<0.001. Conclusion. Results of the study do not show a relationship between asthma and oral diseases. However, further improvement could be made in educating children and parents on the importance of good oral hygiene and prevention of oral diseases.

  18. The asthma epidemic and our artificial habitats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maziak Wasim

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recent increase in childhood asthma has been a puzzling one. Recent views focus on the role of infection in the education of the immune system of young children. However, this so called hygiene hypothesis fails to answer some important questions about the current trends in asthma or to account for environmental influences that bear little relation to infection. Discussion The multi-factorial nature of asthma, reflecting the different ways we tend to interact with our environment, mandates that we look at the asthma epidemic from a broader perspective. Seemingly modern affluent lifestyles are placing us increasingly in static, artificial, microenvironments very different from the conditions prevailed for most part of our evolution and shaped our organisms. Changes that occurred during the second half of the 20th century in industrialized nations with the spread of central heating/conditioning, building insulation, hygiene, TV/PC/games, manufactured food, indoor entertainment, cars, medical care, and sedentary lifestyles all seem to be depriving our children from the essential inputs needed to develop normal airway function (resistance. Asthma according to this view is a manifestation of our respiratory maladaptation to modern lifestyles, or in other words to our increasingly artificial habitats. The basis of the artificial habitat notion may lie in reduced exposure of innate immunity to a variety of environmental stimuli, infectious and non-infectious, leading to reduced formulation of regulatory cells/cytokines as well as inscribed regulatory pathways. This could contribute to a faulty checking mechanism of non-functional Th2 (and likely Th1 responses, resulting in asthma and other immuno-dysregulation disorders. Summary In this piece I discuss the artificial habitat concept, its correspondence with epidemiological data of asthma and allergy, and provide possible immunological underpinning for it from an evolutionary

  19. Age-Specific Characteristics of Inpatients with Severe Asthma Exacerbation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyoshi Sekiya

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: The characteristics of inpatients with severe asthma vary depending on age. We need to establish countermeasures for asthma exacerbation according to the characteristics of patients depending on age.

  20. Ozone Air Purifiers: Can They Improve Asthma Symptoms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... daughter has asthma. Would she benefit from an ozone air purifier in her room? Answers from James ... Li, M.D., Ph.D. Despite manufacturers' claims, ozone air purifiers don't remove asthma triggers from ...

  1. Estimates of asthma heritability in a large twin sample

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, S F; van der Sluis, S; Kyvik, K O;

    2010-01-01

    Asthma is a complex disease characterized by symptoms of wheezing, shortness of breath, chest tightness, and cough.......Asthma is a complex disease characterized by symptoms of wheezing, shortness of breath, chest tightness, and cough....

  2. A Case of Severe Bronchial Asthma Controlled with Tacrolimus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirokazu Taniguchi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The control of severe bronchial asthma, such as corticosteroid-resistant asthma, is difficult. It is also possible that immunosuppressive agents would be effective for bronchial asthma. Case Summary. A 55-year-old Japanese female presented with severe bronchial asthma controlled with tacrolimus. She had been diagnosed with bronchial asthma during childhood. Her asthma worsened, and a chest radiograph showed atelectasis of the left lung. Bronchoscopy revealed the left main bronchus to be obstructed with viscous sputum consisting of 82% neutrophils and no eosinophils. The atelectasis did not improve with corticosteroid treatment, but was ameliorated by administration of tacrolimus. Discussion. This patient had severe asthma due to neutrophilic inflammation of the airways. Tacrolimus is effective for treating severe asthma, for example, in corticosteroid-resistant cases.

  3. New Biologic Drug Tackles Hard-To-Control Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... html New Biologic Drug Tackles Hard-to-Control Asthma Benralizumab significantly cuts respiratory attacks, two trials show ... drug reduces flare-ups in patients with severe asthma that is not controlled by steroid inhalers alone, ...

  4. Asthma and Health Disparities | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Breathing Easier Asthma and Health Disparities Past Issues / Fall 2013 Table ... under 18 years of age, who currently have asthma, 2010 Non-Hispanic Black Non-Hispanic White Non- ...

  5. Kids' Asthma Flareups Fall Off After No-Smoking Laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162952.html Kids' Asthma Flareups Fall Off After No-Smoking Laws Researchers ... adopted indoor smoking bans, fewer children need emergency asthma treatment, a new study finds. ER visits for ...

  6. Banishing Asthma-Inducing Mice Allergens on The Cheap

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/news/fullstory_163963.html Banishing Asthma-Inducing Mice Allergens on the Cheap Do-it-yourself approach ... in kids with a mouse allergy, researchers say. Mice are a common cause of asthma flare-ups ...

  7. Asthma and endocrine disorders: shared mechanisms and genetic pleiotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesse, Riccardina; Schieck, Maximilian; Kabesch, Michael

    2011-02-20

    Asthma is a common inflammatory disease for which the cause is not yet known. Studies of the epidemiology and natural history of childhood asthma into adulthood demonstrate a change in gender prevalence with age. Hormones and inflammation may interact in asthma pathogenesis and determine its course. The same may be true for some endocrine disorders, including diabetes and obesity. Obesity plays a major role in the development of the metabolic syndrome and has been identified as an important risk factor for chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes mellitus. The prevalence of asthma has paralleled the rise in obesity, suggesting that shared environmental factors could affect both conditions. In addition, endocrine diseases and asthma may share common genetic determinants. In the first part of this review we assess endocrine influences on asthma and overlaps between endocrine disorders and asthma while in the second part we explore the potential benefit of comparative genetic analyses between asthma and endocrine diseases.

  8. Early Virus Raises Asthma Risk in Certain Kids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160651.html Early Virus Raises Asthma Risk in Certain Kids: Study Infants ... Topics Asthma in Children Genetic Testing Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact Us ...

  9. Can Mom's Vitamin E Head Off Child's Asthma Risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163923.html Can Mom's Vitamin E Head Off Child's Asthma Risk? Association only ... Kids born to moms with low levels of vitamin E might be more likely to develop asthma, ...

  10. Consequences of asthma on job absenteeism and job retention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Carl Lysbeck; Baelum, Jesper; Skadhauge, Lars Rauff;

    2012-01-01

    Various social and economic effects are associated with asthma. This quantitative study describes the effects of current asthma on work life evaluated from the number of weeks receiving transfer incomes....

  11. Low-Income Kids More Likely to Have ADHD, Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... html Low-Income Kids More Likely to Have ADHD, Asthma Autism more often diagnosed among children in ... to make ends meet are developing asthma and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) at faster rates than kids from families ...

  12. Efficacy of the I Can Control Asthma and Nutrition Now (ICAN) Pilot Program on Health Outcomes in High School Students with Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouba, Joanne; Velsor-Friedrich, Barbarba; Militello, Lisa; Harrison, Patrick R.; Becklenberg, Amy; White, Barb; Surya, Shruti; Ahmed, Avais

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is the most prevalent chronic illness in childhood affecting 7 million youth. Many youth with asthma face another risk factor in obesity. Obesity, in turn, increases disorders such as asthma. Studies have recommended that asthma programs also address weight management in youth. Taking this into consideration, the I Can Control Asthma and…

  13. ANTIMICROBIAL PROPERTIES «LIPIN» INHALATION USE IN CHILDREN WITH ASTHMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chernusky V.G.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Problems of modern pharmacotherapy of bronchial asthma (BA in children is largely reduced to the establishment of effective dosage forms that provide the delivery of drugs in the bronchopulmonary system without affecting other organ systems. A promising area in addressing the causal treatment of asthma in children is the use of the formulation «Lipin», which is a liposome, arising by self-assembly of amphiphilic lipid complexes. Material & methods. The study of antimicrobial properties «Lipin» on microorganisms isolated from sputum in 135 children are hospitalized in the pulmonology department of GU «Children's Hospital road» Kharkiv about asthma in the period of exacerbation. Age was surveyed children from 5 to 14 years on average - 11 ± 0,12 years. The diagnosis of bronchial asthma (BA is set according to GINA guidelines. The treatment groups were representative, rondomizirovany by age, sex, severity of the disease. Patients with asthma in all forms (atopic, non-atopic, mixed and severity (mild, moderate, severe received basic asthma treatment according to the Ministry of Health of Ukraine № 4.01.12-8.1178 order dated 14.12.2009, which was supplemented by liposomal formulation «Lipin» inhalation through an ultrasonic nebulizer in age dosage. All drugs used in accordance with instructions for their use, approved by the Ministry of Health of Ukraine. Microbiological examination of sputum was performed by conventional methods: for seeding solid or liquid nutrient medium, followed by isolation and isolates microscopy, biochemical and serological identification. Identification of the isolates was performed according to the position of the Ministry of Health USSR order number 535 and respectively toksonomicheskih determination tests bacteria Burgi. The antimicrobial activity of the preparation «Lipin» was determined by the level of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC - twofold serial dilution method in medium Mueller

  14. NAC Manchester Asthma and Allergy Study (NACMAAS): risk factors for asthma and allergic disorders in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, B M; Custovic, A; Simpson, A; Hallam, C L; Walsh, D; Marolia, H; Campbell, J; Woodcock, A

    2001-03-01

    Asthma and atopic disorders are the most common chronic diseases in the developed countries. Knowledge of the risk factors for these disorders may facilitate the development of preventive strategies aimed at reducing prevalence rates. To investigate the risk factors for asthma and allergic diseases in a large number of adults who are the parents of children in the National Asthma Campaign Manchester Asthma and Allergy Study. All pregnant women and their partners attending "Booking" antenatal clinics were invited to take part in the study. Questionnaire data were collected including the history of asthma and other atopic diseases, pet ownership and smoking habits, and skin prick tests were performed. The prevalence of atopy and the risk factors for asthma and allergic disorders were investigated in all subjects who completed the questionnaire and underwent skin testing. Statistical analysis was carried out using logistic regression. Initially, risk factors were assessed by univariate analysis to see how each potential explanatory variable affected the probability of having allergic disease. Variables were then tested in a forward stepwise multivariate analysis. In 5687 adult subjects there was a very high (48.2%) prevalence of atopy, and 9.7% of subjects had a diagnosis of asthma. In a multivariate regression analysis sensitization to dust mite, cat, dog and mixed grasses were all independently associated with asthma. The odds ratios for current asthma increased with the increasing number of positive skin tests (any two allergens - OR 4.3, 95% CI 3.3-5.5; any three allergens - OR 7.0 95% CI 5.3-9.3; all four allergens - OR 10.4, 95% CI 7.7-14; P Dog ownership (OR 1.31, 95% CI 1.10-1.57; P = 0.003) and current smoking (OR 1.36, 95% CI 1.15-1.62; P = 0.0004) were significantly and directly associated with "asthma ever". Thirteen per cent of participants reported a history of eczema. In the multivariate analysis the strongest independent associate of eczema was

  15. The role of tiotropium in the management of asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Heung-Woo

    2012-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic respiratory disease characterized by reversible airway obstruction that is secondary to an allergic inflammation and excessive smooth muscle contraction. Cholinergic signals were known to contribute significantly to the pathophysiology of asthma. However, the use of anti-cholinergic agents in asthma has been justified only in acute asthma exacerbations, until tiotropium bromide, a long-acting anti-cholinergic agent was introduced. Recent reports showing a promising role of...

  16. Validation of an asthma symptom diary for interventional studies

    OpenAIRE

    Santanello, N.; Davies, G.(Imperial College, London, UK); Galant, S.; Pedinoff, A.; Sveum, R.; Seltzer, J.; Seidenberg, B.; Knorr, B.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—The Pediatric Asthma Diary was developed and validated to assess efficacy of interventions in children with asthma.
DESIGN, PATIENTS, AND SETTING—Diary validation was performed in a three week, prospective study of 106 children aged 6-14 years with asthma. Children were classified at baseline as either stable (requiring no additional asthma treatment) or new onset/worse (requiring either addition of or increase in anti-inflammatory treatment).
RESULTS—A dayti...

  17. Persistent Airflow Obstruction in Young Adult Asthma Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyoshi Sekiya

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: In this study, patients not undergoing treatment for asthma were examined. History of childhood asthma and smoking history may be the risk factors for persistent airway obstruction in the asthma patients with mild subjective symptoms. Tests on the bronchodilator change in FEV1 should be performed in patients with history of childhood asthma and smoking history, even if they have only mild subjective symptoms.

  18. Predicting asthma control: the role of psychological triggers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritz, Thomas; Bobb, Carol; Griffiths, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Asthma triggers have been linked to adverse health outcomes in asthma, but little is known about their association with asthma control. Because trigger avoidance is an integral part of successful asthma management, psychological triggers in particular may be associated with suboptimal asthma control, given the difficulty of controlling them. We examined cross-sectional and longitudinal associations of perceived asthma triggers with self-report of asthma control impairment, symptoms, and spirometric lung function (forced expiratory volume in the 1st second, [FEV1]) in 179 adult primary care asthma patients. Perceived asthma triggers explained up to 42.5% of the variance in asthma control and symptoms, but not in FEV1 alone. Allergic triggers explained up to 12.1% of the asthma control and symptom variance, three nonallergic trigger types, air pollution/irritants, physical activity, and infection, explained up to 26.2% over and above allergic triggers, and psychological triggers up to 9.5% over and above all other triggers. Psychological triggers alone explained up to 33.9% of the variance and were the only trigger class that was consistently significant in all final multiple regression models predicting control and symptoms. Psychological triggers also predicted lower asthma control 3-6 months later, although controlling for initial asthma control eliminated this association. In free reports of individually relevant triggers, only psychological triggers were associated with suboptimal asthma control. Trigger factors are important predictors of self-reported asthma control and symptoms but not actual lung function. Particular attention should be directed to psychological triggers as indicators of patients' perceptions of suboptimal asthma control.

  19. 8. Occupational asthma and allergies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardana, Emil J

    2003-02-01

    A diversity of airborne dusts, gases, fumes, and vapors can cause dose-related symptoms in individuals exposed in the workplace. More than 250 chemicals have been incriminated as a cause of occupational asthma (OA). The prevalence of OA ranges from 2% to 6% of the asthmatic population. Predisposing factors facilitating the development of OA include the work environment, climatic conditions, genetic proclivities, tobacco and recreational drug use, respiratory infection, and bronchial hyperresponsiveness. Pathogenetically, new-onset OA may be immunologic or nonimmunologic in origin. The immunologic variants are usually caused by high molecular-weight allergens such as grain dust and animal or fish protein. Symptoms ensue after a latent period of months to years. Nonimmunologic OA can be precipitated by a brief, high-level exposure to a potent irritant. Symptoms occur immediately or within a few hours of the exposure. In either instance, once the diagnosis is established, the worker should be removed from the workplace. If the diagnosis is made in a timely fashion, most workers experience improvement. Prevention is the best therapeutic intervention.

  20. Canadian Asthma Consensus Conference Summary of Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Ernst

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The Asthma Committee of the Canadian Thoracic Society invited a group of Canadian physicians with a particular interest in asthma to meet in Montebello, Quebec, March 9-12, 1995 to arrive at a consensus statement on the optimal approach to the management of asthma in the pediatric and adult ambulatory care settings. The societies and associations represented are listed in the appendix with the names of the contributors to this document. The objectives of the Montebello conference were: 1. To review the current ambulatory care management of asthma in Canada; 2. To develop guidelines with the participation of family physicians and specialists; 3. To develop guidelines which are evidence-based; 4. In creating evidence-based guidelines to focus attention on aspects of asthma management that are currently not supported by randomized controlled trials; 5. To develop strategies that allow for the implementation of rational guidelines at a local level. Recommendations were based on a critical review of the scientific literature by small groups prior to the meeting and are categorized according to the strength of the scientific evidence supporting each recommendation (Table 1.

  1. Virus Infection-Induced Bronchial Asthma Exacerbation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutsuo Yamaya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection with respiratory viruses, including rhinoviruses, influenza virus, and respiratory syncytial virus, exacerbates asthma, which is associated with processes such as airway inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness, and mucus hypersecretion. In patients with viral infections and with infection-induced asthma exacerbation, inflammatory mediators and substances, including interleukins (ILs, leukotrienes and histamine, have been identified in the airway secretions, serum, plasma, and urine. Viral infections induce an accumulation of inflammatory cells in the airway mucosa and submucosa, including neutrophils, lymphocytes and eosinophils. Viral infections also enhance the production of inflammatory mediators and substances in airway epithelial cells, mast cells, and other inflammatory cells, such as IL-1, IL-6, IL-8, GM-CSF, RANTES, histamine, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1. Viral infections affect the barrier function of the airway epithelial cells and vascular endothelial cells. Recent reports have demonstrated augmented viral production mediated by an impaired interferon response in the airway epithelial cells of asthma patients. Several drugs used for the treatment of bronchial asthma reduce viral and pro-inflammatory cytokine release from airway epithelial cells infected with viruses. Here, I review the literature on the pathogenesis of the viral infection-induced exacerbation of asthma and on the modulation of viral infection-induced airway inflammation.

  2. International Consensus On (ICON) Pediatric Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, N. G.; Arakawa, H.; Carlsen, K.-H.; Custovic, A.; Gern, J.; Lemanske, R.; Le Souef, P.; Makela, M.; Roberts, G.; Wong, G.; Zar, H.; Akdis, C. A.; Bacharier, L. B.; Baraldi, E.; van Bever, H. P.; de Blic, J.; Boner, A.; Burks, W.; Casale, T. B.; Castro-Rodriguez, J. A.; Chen, Y. Z.; El-Gamal, Y. M.; Everard, M. L.; Frischer, T.; Geller, M.; Gereda, J.; Goh, D. Y.; Guilbert, T. W.; Hedlin, G.; Heymann, P. W.; Hong, S. J.; Hossny, E. M.; Huang, J. L.; Jackson, D. J.; de Jongste, J. C.; Kalayci, O.; Khaled, N.; Kling, S.; Kuna, P.; Lau, S.; Ledford, D. K.; Lee, S. I.; Liu, A. H.; Lockey, R. F.; Lodrup-Carlsen, K.; Lotvall, J.; Morikawa, A.; Nieto, A.; Paramesh, H.; Pawankar, R.; Pohunek, P.; Pongracic, J.; Price, D.; Robertson, C.; Rosario, N.; Rossenwasser, L. J.; Sly, P. D.; Stein, R.; Stick, S.; Szefler, S.; Taussig, L. M.; Valovirta, E.; Vichyanond, P.; Wallace, D.; Weinberg, E.; Wennergren, G.; Wildhaber, J.; Zeiger, R. S.

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic lower respiratory disease in childhood throughout the world. Several guidelines and/or consensus documents are available to support medical decisions on pediatric asthma. Although there is no doubt that the use of common systematic approaches for management can considerably improve outcomes, dissemination and implementation of these are still major challenges. Consequently, the International Collaboration in Asthma, Allergy and Immunology (iCAALL), recently formed by the EAACI, AAAAI, ACAAI and WAO, has decided to propose an International Consensus on (ICON) Pediatric Asthma. The purpose of this document is to highlight the key messages that are common to many of the existing guidelines, while critically reviewing and commenting on any differences, thus providing a concise reference. The principles of pediatric asthma management are generally accepted. Overall, the treatment goal is disease control. In order to achieve this, patients and their parents should be educated to optimally manage the disease, in collaboration with health care professionals. Identification and avoidance of triggers is also of significant importance. Assessment and monitoring should be performed regularly to re-evaluate and fine-tune treatment. Pharmacotherapy is the cornerstone of treatment. The optimal use of medication can, in most cases, help patients control symptoms and reduce the risk for future morbidity. The management of exacerbations is a major consideration, independent from chronic treatment. There is a trend towards considering phenotype specific treatment choices; however this goal has not yet been achieved. PMID:22702533

  3. Not asthma, but GERD: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhonggao

    2007-02-01

    Asthma is a disorder of the lungs characterized by increased responsiveness of the airways, as manifested by episodes of wheezing and increased resistance to expiratory airflow because of varying degrees of smooth muscle contraction, edema of the mucosa, and mucus in the lumen of the bronchi and bronchioles. The stimuli vary widely and include antigens, infection, air pollutants, respiratory tract irrtants, exercise, and emotional factors. This condition is completely different from distress breathing because of laryngotracheal spasm. One of its causes is the gastric content reflux through the pharynx to the larynx because of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), in addition to the typical human avian flu that may cause immediate suffocation by laryngospasm owing to acute larygotrachitis. A patient suffered from GERD without esophageal symptoms, which was diagnosed and treated as bronchial asthma during his five emergency admissions. The admissions were because of episodic attacks of severe air hunger owing to an extreme throat tightening. The patient was being treated for as long as two years. After the correct diagnosis was made and treatment of laporascopic fundaplication was performed, the longstanding "bronchial asthma", after all, completely disappeared. The concept of "not asthma, but GERD" seems undervalued, unappreciated, even misunderstood among patients with intractable asthma. Therefore, such a case is reported in detail, similar cases are mentioned briefly as well, and a mechanism responsible for GERD-originated larryngo-or laryngotracho-spasm is proposed.

  4. International consensus on (ICON) pediatric asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, N G; Arakawa, H; Carlsen, K-H; Custovic, A; Gern, J; Lemanske, R; Le Souef, P; Mäkelä, M; Roberts, G; Wong, G; Zar, H; Akdis, C A; Bacharier, L B; Baraldi, E; van Bever, H P; de Blic, J; Boner, A; Burks, W; Casale, T B; Castro-Rodriguez, J A; Chen, Y Z; El-Gamal, Y M; Everard, M L; Frischer, T; Geller, M; Gereda, J; Goh, D Y; Guilbert, T W; Hedlin, G; Heymann, P W; Hong, S J; Hossny, E M; Huang, J L; Jackson, D J; de Jongste, J C; Kalayci, O; Aït-Khaled, N; Kling, S; Kuna, P; Lau, S; Ledford, D K; Lee, S I; Liu, A H; Lockey, R F; Lødrup-Carlsen, K; Lötvall, J; Morikawa, A; Nieto, A; Paramesh, H; Pawankar, R; Pohunek, P; Pongracic, J; Price, D; Robertson, C; Rosario, N; Rossenwasser, L J; Sly, P D; Stein, R; Stick, S; Szefler, S; Taussig, L M; Valovirta, E; Vichyanond, P; Wallace, D; Weinberg, E; Wennergren, G; Wildhaber, J; Zeiger, R S

    2012-08-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic lower respiratory disease in childhood throughout the world. Several guidelines and/or consensus documents are available to support medical decisions on pediatric asthma. Although there is no doubt that the use of common systematic approaches for management can considerably improve outcomes, dissemination and implementation of these are still major challenges. Consequently, the International Collaboration in Asthma, Allergy and Immunology (iCAALL), recently formed by the EAACI, AAAAI, ACAAI, and WAO, has decided to propose an International Consensus on (ICON) Pediatric Asthma. The purpose of this document is to highlight the key messages that are common to many of the existing guidelines, while critically reviewing and commenting on any differences, thus providing a concise reference. The principles of pediatric asthma management are generally accepted. Overall, the treatment goal is disease control. To achieve this, patients and their parents should be educated to optimally manage the disease, in collaboration with healthcare professionals. Identification and avoidance of triggers is also of significant importance. Assessment and monitoring should be performed regularly to re-evaluate and fine-tune treatment. Pharmacotherapy is the cornerstone of treatment. The optimal use of medication can, in most cases, help patients control symptoms and reduce the risk for future morbidity. The management of exacerbations is a major consideration, independent of chronic treatment. There is a trend toward considering phenotype-specific treatment choices; however, this goal has not yet been achieved.

  5. Helicobacter Pylori Infection and Pediatric Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Karimi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Childhood infectious diseases are one of the most known environmental pathogenic causesof childhood asthma. The high prevalence of both Helicobacter pylori infection and asthma in our country prompted us to assess anyprobable association between them in childhood.Methods: This cross-sectionalstudy recruited 196 children aged 6 to 12 years old comprising 98 asthmatic (case group and 98 healthy (control group individuals. Urea breath test was performed for all of the children and H. pyloriinfection was compared between the two groups according to the urea breath test results.Results:Urea breath test was positive in 18 asthmatic (18.36 and 23 (23.36 healthy subjects but was not significantly different between the case and controls(p=0.380.Furtheranalysis in the asthmatic group revealed association ofH. pyloriinfection withage (p<0.001 and duration of asthma (p=0.010. However, no significant correlation was found between sex, severity of asthma, controledasthma or abnormal pulmonary function testswith H. pyloriinfection (p= 0.804, 0.512 ,0.854 and 0.292, respectively.Conclusion:Given the results of the study, H. pylori infection was not significantly differentbetween asthmatic and healthy children.In asthmatic patients, there wasnosignificant association between H.pyloriinfection andsex,severity of disease, control status of disease andnormal or abnormal pulmonary function tests.H. Pylori infection had a significant association withincreasing age and duration of asthma.

  6. Do mast cells link obesity and asthma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sismanopoulos, N; Delivanis, D-A; Mavrommati, D; Hatziagelaki, E; Conti, P; Theoharides, T C

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the lungs. Both the number of cases and severity of asthma have been increasing without a clear explanation. Recent evidence suggests that obesity, which has also been increasing alarmingly, may worsen or precipitate asthma, but there is little evidence of how obesity may contribute to lung inflammation. We propose that mast cells are involved in both asthma and obesity by being the target and source of adipocytokines, 'alarmins' such as interleukin-9 (IL-9) and interleukin-33 (IL-33), and stress molecules including corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and neurotensin (NT), secreted in response to the metabolic burden. In particular, CRH and NT have synergistic effects on mast cell secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). IL-33 augments VEGF release induced by substance P (SP) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) release induced by NT. Both IL-9 and IL-33 also promote lung mast cell infiltration and augment allergic inflammation. These molecules are also expressed in human mast cells leading to autocrine effects. Obese patients are also less sensitive to glucocorticoids and bronchodilators. Development of effective mast cell inhibitors may be a novel approach for the management of both asthma and obesity. Certain flavonoid combinations may be a promising new treatment approach.

  7. Prevalence of childhood asthma in Istanbul, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oneş, U; Sapan, N; Somer, A; Dişçi, R; Salman, N; Güler, N; Yalçin, I

    1997-05-01

    In order to determine the asthma prevalence in 6-12-year-old schoolchildren in Istanbul, we issued 2350 questionnaires, according to ISAAC criteria, in six randomly selected city primary schools to be completed at home by parents. A total of 2232 of the questionnaires were completed, an overall response rate of 94.9%, and 2216 questionnaires were taken into consideration. The prevalence of asthma was found to be 9.8% and wheezing 15.1%. To investigate the effect of socioeconomic status on the prevalence of asthma, we evaluated the heating system at home, the place of residence, the educational levels of the mother and father, the number of people living in the house, the sharing of bedrooms, and the annual family income. In conclusion, the prevalence of childhood asthma was not affected by any of these factors. Atopic family history, food allergy, eczema, and frequent otitis media and sinusitis attacks were evaluated and found to be significant in asthma prevalence.

  8. Teachers’ knowledge of Asthma in primary schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "Movahedi M

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available A survey was carried out in 1998-99 among 20 selected primary schools in the north, south, east and west regions of Tehran to determine the level of teachers’ knowledge of asthma. 387 (96.7% of 400 questionnaires were completed and evaluated. Five items were investigated: “general knowledge”, “symptoms and triggers”, exercise”, treatment” and “individual experience”. Statistical analysis was performed by using counting statistics. For the correlation of items, Spearman correlation coefficients and willcoxon’s test were used. The teachers in primary schools showed a good basic knowledge of asthma and trigger factors of asthma; 40.6% teachers knew that asthma could not be transmitted by virus. There was no statistically significant effect of teaching experience in terms of years, level of education and contact with asthmatic child on the knowledge score. 24% of teachers felt they had the average information about asthma. We suggest that teachers at primary school receive further instructions in this regard.

  9. [Bronchial asthma pathogenesis and genetic prognosis development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmasova, I P; Sepiashvili, R I; Sepiashvili, Ia R; Malova, E S

    2014-01-01

    The review is dedicated to an actual problem--genetic prognosis of risk of bronchial asthma development that is quite a complex aspect of studies from a methodological viewpoint. Bronchial asthma--heterogeneous disease by both etiology and clinical characteristics. At the same time genetic prognosis is based on the unity of pathogenetic mechanisms of development, though in immunological reactions that are the base of this disease, alternative variants are possible. The aim of this review is carrying out parallels between modern achievements in the field of deciphering trigger mechanisms of bronchial asthma pathogenesis and object of genetic studies based on these mechanisms. Among the examined conceptions--role of epithelial tissue in trigger mechanisms of bronchial asthma, variants of key role of immune system cells, first of all, T-helpers of various types for further development of inflammatory-effector reactions with damage characteristic for this disease. Compliance of contemporary approaches of genetic studies and novel concepts of bronchial asthma pathogenesis is shown.

  10. Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bousquet, J; Schünemann, H J; Samolinski, B;

    2012-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) and asthma represent global health problems for all age groups. Asthma and rhinitis frequently coexist in the same subjects. Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) was initiated during a World Health Organization workshop in 1999 (published in 2001). ARIA has rec...

  11. Obesity and asthma: co-morbidity or causal relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Huisstede, A; Braunstahl, G J

    2010-09-01

    There is substantial evidence that obesity and asthma are related. "Obese asthma" may be a unique phenotype of asthma, characterized by decreased lung volumes, greater symptoms for a given degree of lung function impairment, destabilization or lack of asthma control, lack of eosinophilic inflammation and a different response to controller medication. Whether this relationship between obesity and asthma is causal or represents co-morbidity due to other factors is unclear. In previous reviews concerning the relationship between obesity and asthma, five hypotheses were put forth. One of these hypotheses is that a low grade systemic inflammation caused by adipokines from the fat tissue causes or enhances bronchial inflammation. In animal models, there is an increasing amount of evidence for the role of adipokines derived from fat tissue in the relationship between obesity and asthma. The data are conflicting in humans. Since obesity is a component of the metabolic syndrome and the metabolic syndrome is also a form of systemic inflammation, it is to be expected that there is a relationship between metabolic syndrome and asthma. The few data that are available show that there is no relationship between metabolic syndrome and asthma, but there is one between the metabolic syndrome and asthma-like symptoms. Further research is needed to confirm the relationship between obesity and asthma in humans, where a rigorous approach in the diagnosis of asthma is essential.

  12. An Evaluation of Asthma Interventions for Preteen Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Noreen M.; Shah, Smita; Dodge, Julia A.; Thomas, Lara J.; Andridge, Rebecca R.; Little, Roderick J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Asthma is a serious problem for low-income preteens living in disadvantaged communities. Among the chronic diseases of childhood and adolescence, asthma has the highest prevalence and related health care use. School-based asthma interventions have proven successful for older and younger students, but results have not been demonstrated…

  13. Novel Gentic Variations Contributing to Asthma Susceptability in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-13

    Collection of Clinical Data That Will be Used in This Study and Will Form a Data Bank for Asthma in Saudi Arabia; Identify Known and NOVEL Genetic Risk Factors Contributing to Asthma Susceptibility; Study the Mechanistic Roles of the Genetic Variants Within Major Asthma Susceptibility Genes

  14. Incidence and risk factors for exacerbations of asthma during pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ali, Zarqa; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most common chronic diseases among pregnant women. Acute exacerbations of asthma during pregnancy have an unfavorable impact on pregnancy outcome. This review provides an overview of current knowledge of incidence, mechanisms, and risk factors for acute exacerbations of asthma...... during pregnancy....

  15. A population analysis of prescriptions for asthma medications during pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zetstra-van der Woude, Priscilla A.; Vroegop, J. Sebastiaan; Bos, H. Jens; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje T. W.

    2013-01-01

    Background: It is important to control asthma during pregnancy. However, some studies indicate that women stop or change their asthma medications when they become pregnant. Objective: We used a population database to analyze changes in prescriptions for asthma medications to patients before, during,

  16. Determinants of asthma phenotypes in supermarket bakery workers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baatjies, R.; Lopata, A.L.; Sander, I.; Raulf-Heimsoth, M.; Bateman, E.D.; Meijster, T.; Heederik, D.J.J.; Robins, T.G.; Jeebhay, M.F.

    2009-01-01

    While baker's asthma has been well described, various asthma phenotypes in bakery workers have yet to be characterised. Our study aims to describe the asthma phenotypes in supermarket bakery workers in relation to host risk factors and self-reported exposure to flour dust. A cross-sectional study of

  17. Determinants of asthma phenotypes in supermarket bakery workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baatjies, R.; Lopata, A.L.; Sander, I.; Raulf-Heimsoth, M.; Batemane, E.D.; Meijster, T.; Heederik, D.; Robins, T.G.; Jeebhay, M.F.

    2009-01-01

    While baker's asthma has been well described, various asthma phenotypes in bakery workers have yet to be characterised. Our study aims to describe the asthma phenotypes in supermarket bakery workers in relation to host risk factors and self-reported exposure to flour dust. A cross-sectional study of

  18. Respiratory tract infections and asthma control in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zomer-Kooijker, Kim; Uiterwaal, Cuno S P M; Verschueren, Kim J C; Maitland - van der Zee, Anke-Hilse; Balemans, Walter A F; van Ewijk, Bart E; van Velzen, Maartje F; van der Ent, Cornelis K

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Asthma control is considered the major goal of asthma management, while many determinants of control are difficult to modify. We studied the association between respiratory infection episodes (RTIs) of various types and asthma control. METHODS: Cross-sectional data were used from child

  19. Asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease : Similarities and Differences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, Dirkje S.; Reddel, Helen K.; ten Hacken, Nicolaas; van den Berge, Maarten

    2014-01-01

    Asthma and CORD are both heterogeneous lung diseases including many different phenotypes. The classical asthma and CORD phenotypes are easy to discern because they reflect extremes of a phenotypical spectrum. Thus asthma in childhood and CORD in smokers have their own phenotypic expression with unde

  20. Asthma and respiratory symptoms among hairdressers in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lysdal, Susan Hovmand; Mosbech, Holger; Johansen, Jeanne Duus;

    2014-01-01

    asthma reported their asthma as an occupational disease to the authorities. In total, 27.3% were daily smokers; the smoking pattern was similar between hairdressers with and without asthma. Local exhaust ventilation was only used consistently by 63.8% for permanent waving and hair coloring procedures...