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Sample records for altering root system

  1. Phosphate availability alters architecture and causes changes in hormone sensitivity in the Arabidopsis root system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Bucio, José; Hernández-Abreu, Esmeralda; Sánchez-Calderón, Lenin; Nieto-Jacobo, María Fernanda; Simpson, June; Herrera-Estrella, Luis

    2002-05-01

    The postembryonic developmental program of the plant root system is plastic and allows changes in root architecture to adapt to environmental conditions such as water and nutrient availability. Among essential nutrients, phosphorus (P) often limits plant productivity because of its low mobility in soil. Therefore, the architecture of the root system may determine the capacity of the plant to acquire this nutrient. We studied the effect of P availability on the development of the root system in Arabidopsis. We found that at P-limiting conditions (increase in auxin sensitivity in the roots of P-deprived Arabidopsis seedlings. It was also found that the axr1-3, axr2-1, and axr4-1 Arabidopsis mutants have normal responses to low P availability conditions, whereas the iaa28-1 mutant shows resistance to the stimulatory effects of low P on root hair and lateral root formation. Analysis of ethylene signaling mutants and treatments with 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid showed that ethylene does not promote lateral root formation under P deprivation. These results suggest that in Arabidopsis, auxin sensitivity may play a fundamental role in the modifications of root architecture by P availability. PMID:12011355

  2. Mycorrhiza alters the profile of root hairs in trifoliate orange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qiang-Sheng; Liu, Chun-Yan; Zhang, De-Jian; Zou, Ying-Ning; He, Xin-Hua; Wu, Qing-Hua

    2016-04-01

    Root hairs and arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) coexist in root systems for nutrient and water absorption, but the relation between AM and root hairs is poorly known. A pot study was performed to evaluate the effects of four different AM fungi (AMF), namely, Claroideoglomus etunicatum, Diversispora versiformis, Funneliformis mosseae, and Rhizophagus intraradices on root hair development in trifoliate orange (Poncirus trifoliata) seedlings grown in sand. Mycorrhizal seedlings showed significantly higher root hair density than non-mycorrhizal seedlings, irrespective of AMF species. AMF inoculation generally significantly decreased root hair length in the first- and second-order lateral roots but increased it in the third- and fourth-order lateral roots. AMF colonization induced diverse responses in root hair diameter of different order lateral roots. Considerably greater concentrations of phosphorus (P), nitric oxide (NO), glucose, sucrose, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), and methyl jasmonate (MeJA) were found in roots of AM seedlings than in non-AM seedlings. Levels of P, NO, carbohydrates, IAA, and MeJA in roots were correlated with AM formation and root hair development. These results suggest that AMF could alter the profile of root hairs in trifoliate orange through modulation of physiological activities. F. mosseae, which had the greatest positive effects, could represent an efficient AM fungus for increasing fruit yields or decreasing fertilizer inputs in citrus production.

  3. 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol alters plant root development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazelton, Jessica N; Pfeufer, Emily E; Sweat, Teresa A; Gardener, Brian B McSpadden; Coenen, Catharina

    2008-10-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens isolates containing the phlD gene can protect crops from root pathogens, at least in part through production of the antibiotic 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAPG). However, the action mechanisms of DAPG are not fully understood, and effects of this antibiotic on host root systems have not been characterized in detail. DAPG inhibited primary root growth and stimulated lateral root production in tomato seedlings. Roots of the auxin-resistant diageotropica mutant of tomato demonstrated reduced DAPG sensitivity with regards to inhibition of primary root growth and induction of root branching. Additionally, applications of exogenous DAPG, at concentrations previously found in the rhizosphere of plants inoculated with DAPG-producing pseudomonads, inhibited the activation of an auxin-inducible GH3 promoter::luciferase reporter gene construct in transgenic tobacco hypocotyls. In this model system, supernatants of 17 phlD+ P. fluorescens isolates had inhibitory effects on luciferase activity similar to synthetic DAPG. In addition, a phlD() mutant strain, unable to produce DAPG, demonstrated delayed inhibitory effects compared with the parent wild-type strain. These results indicate that DAPG can alter crop root architecture by interacting with an auxin-dependent signaling pathway. PMID:18785830

  4. The presence of nodules on legume root systems can alter phenotypic plasticity in response to internal nitrogen independent of nitrogen fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Chooi-Hua; Nicotra, Adrienne B; Mathesius, Ulrike

    2016-04-01

    All higher plants show developmental plasticity in response to the availability of nitrogen (N) in the soil. In legumes, N starvation causes the formation of root nodules, where symbiotic rhizobacteria fix atmospheric N2 for the host in exchange for fixed carbon (C) from the shoot. Here, we tested whether plastic responses to internal [N] of legumes are altered by their symbionts. Glasshouse experiments compared root phenotypes of three legumes, Medicago truncatula, Medicago sativa and Trifolium subterraneum, inoculated with their compatible symbiont partners and grown under four nitrate levels. In addition, six strains of rhizobia, differing in their ability to fix N2 in M. truncatula, were compared to test if plastic responses to internal [N] were dependent on the rhizobia or N2 -fixing capability of the nodules. We found that the presence of rhizobia affected phenotypic plasticity of the legumes to internal [N], particularly in root length and root mass ratio (RMR), in a plant species-dependent way. While root length responses of M. truncatula to internal [N] were dependent on the ability of rhizobial symbionts to fix N2 , RMR response to internal [N] was dependent only on initiation of nodules, irrespective of N2 -fixing ability of the rhizobia strains.

  5. Graviresponsiveness of surgically altered primary roots of Zea mays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maimon, E.; Moore, R.

    1991-01-01

    We examined the gravitropic responses of surgically altered primary roots of Zea mays to determine the route by which gravitropic inhibitors move from the root tip to the elongating zone. Horizontally oriented roots, from which a 1-mm-wide girdle of epidermis plus 2-10 layers of cortex were removed from the apex of the elongating zone, curve downward. However, curvature occurred only apical to the girdle. Filling the girdle with mucilage-like material transmits curvature beyond the girdle. Vertically oriented roots with a half-girdle' (i.e. the epidermis and 2-10 layers of the cortex removed from half of the circumference of the apex of the elongating zone) curve away from the girdle. Inserting the half-girdle at the base of the elongating zone induces curvature towards the girdle. Filling the half-circumference girdles with mucilage-like material reduced curvature significantly. Stripping the epidermis and outer 2-5 layers of cortex from the terminal 1.5 cm of one side of a primary root induces curvature towards the cut, irrespective of the root's orientation to gravity. This effect is not due to desiccation since treated roots submerged in water also curved towards their cut surface. Coating a root's cut surface with a mucilage-like substance minimizes curvature. These results suggest that the outer cell-layers of the root, especially the epidermis, play an important role in root gravicurvature, and the gravitropic signals emanating from the root tip can move apoplastically through mucilage.

  6. Phosphate Availability Alters Lateral Root Anatomy and Root Architecture of Fraxinus mandshurica Rupr. Seedlings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chu WU; Xing WEI; Hai-Long SUN; Zheng-Quan WANG

    2005-01-01

    Plants have evolved some mechanisms to maximize the efficiency of phosphorus acquisition.Changes in root architecture are one such mechanism. When Fraxinus mandshurica Rupr. seedlings were grown under conditions of low phosphorus availability, the length of cells in the meristem zone of the lateral roots was longer, but the length of cells in the elongation and mature zones of the lateral roots was shorter,compared with seedlings grown under conditions of high phosphorus availability. The elongation rates of primary roots increased as phosphorus availability increased, but the elongation rates of the branched zones of the primary roots decreased. The number of lateral root primordia and the length of the lateral roots decreased as phosphorus availability increased. The topological index (altitude slope) decreased as phosphorus availability increased, suggesting that root architecture tended to be herringbone-like when seedlings were grown under conditions of low phosphate availability. Herringbone-like root systems exploit nutrients more efficiently, but they have higher construction costs than root systems with a branching pattern.

  7. Evaluation of the anatomical alterations of lower molars mesial root?s apical third

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FRÖNER Izabel Cristina

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The anatomical apex of the mesial root of the lower molars presents a morphological complexity related to the number and shape of the root canals as well as of the apical foramen and isthmus presence. The knowledge of the complexity of the endodontic system of the molar root area is essencial to select more carefully the best instrumentation and obturation technique, to obtain a more successful endodontic therapy.

  8. Proteomic alterations in root tips of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings under altered gravity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, H. Q.; Wang, H.

    Gravity has a profound influence on plant growth and development Removed the influence of gravitational acceleration by spaceflight caused a wide range of cellular changes in plant Whole seedling that germinated and grown on clinostats showed the absent of gravitropism At the cellular level clinostat treatment has specific effects on plant cells such as induce alterations in cell wall composition increase production of heat-soluble proteins impact on the cellular energy metabolism facilitate a uniform distribution of plastids amyloplasts and increase number and volume of nucleoli A number of recent studies have shown that the exposure of Arabidopsis seedlings and callus cells to gravity stimulation hyper g-forces or clinostat rotation induces alterations in gene expression In our previous study the proteome of the Arabidopsis thaliana callus cells were separated by high resolution two-dimensional electrophoresis 2-DE Image analysis revealed that 80 protein spots showed quantitative and qualitative variations after exposure to clinostat rotation treatment We report here a systematic proteomic approach to investigate the altered gravity responsive proteins in root tip of Arabidopsis thaliana cv Landsberg erecta Three-day-old seedlings were exposed for 12h to a horizontal clinostat rotation H simulated weightlessness altered g-forces by centrifugation 7g hypergravity a vertical clinostat rotation V clinostat control or a stationary control grown conditions Total proteins of roots were extracted

  9. D-Root: a system for cultivating plants with the roots in darkness or under different light conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Navas, Javier; Moreno-Risueno, Miguel A; Manzano, Concepción; Pallero-Baena, Mercedes; Navarro-Neila, Sara; Téllez-Robledo, Bárbara; Garcia-Mina, Jose M; Baigorri, Roberto; Gallego, Francisco Javier; del Pozo, Juan C

    2015-10-01

    In nature roots grow in the dark and away from light (negative phototropism). However, most current research in root biology has been carried out with the root system grown in the presence of light. Here, we have engineered a device, called Dark-Root (D-Root), to grow plants in vitro with the aerial part exposed to the normal light/dark photoperiod while the roots are in the dark or exposed to specific wavelengths or light intensities. D-Root provides an efficient system for cultivating a large number of seedlings and easily characterizing root architecture in the dark. At the morphological level, root illumination shortens root length and promotes early emergence of lateral roots, therefore inducing expansion of the root system. Surprisingly, root illumination also affects shoot development, including flowering time. Our analyses also show that root illumination alters the proper response to hormones or abiotic stress (e.g. salt or osmotic stress) and nutrient starvation, enhancing inhibition of root growth. In conclusion, D-Root provides a growing system closer to the natural one for assaying Arabidopsis plants, and therefore its use will contribute to a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in root development, hormonal signaling and stress responses.

  10. Maximal rank root subsystems of hyperbolic root systems

    OpenAIRE

    Tumarkin, P.

    2003-01-01

    A Kac-Moody algebra is called hyperbolic if it corresponds to a generalized Cartan matrix of hyperbolic type. We study root subsystems of root systems of hyperbolic algebras. In this paper, we classify maximal rank regular hyperbolic subalgebras of hyperbolic Kac-Moody algebras.

  11. Compensatory Root Water Uptake of Overlapping Root Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agee, E.; Ivanov, V. Y.; He, L.; Bisht, G.; Shahbaz, P.; Fatichi, S.; Gough, C. M.; Couvreur, V.; Matheny, A. M.; Bohrer, G.

    2015-12-01

    Land-surface models use simplified representations of root water uptake based on biomass distributions and empirical functions that constrain water uptake during unfavorable soil moisture conditions. These models fail to capture the observed hydraulic plasticity that allows plants to regulate root hydraulic conductivity and zones of active uptake based on local gradients. Recent developments in root water uptake modeling have sought to increase its mechanistic representation by bridging the gap between physically based microscopic models and computationally feasible macroscopic approaches. It remains to be demonstrated whether bulk parameterization of microscale characteristics (e.g., root system morphology and root conductivity) can improve process representation at the ecosystem scale. We employ the Couvreur method of microscopic uptake to yield macroscopic representation in a coupled soil-root model. Using a modified version of the PFLOTRAN model, which represents the 3-D physics of variably saturated soil, we model a one-hectare temperate forest stand under natural and synthetic climatic forcing. Our results show that as shallow soil layers dry, uptake at the tree and stand level shift to deeper soil layers, allowing the transpiration stream demanded by the atmosphere. We assess the potential capacity of the model to capture compensatory root water uptake. Further, the hydraulic plasticity of the root system is demonstrated by the quick response of uptake to rainfall pulses. These initial results indicate a promising direction for land surface models in which significant three-dimensional information from large root systems can be feasibly integrated into the forest scale simulations of root water uptake.

  12. X-ray computed tomography uncovers root-root interactions: quantifying spatial relationships between interacting root systems in three dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Martin Paya

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Research in the field of plant biology has recently demonstrated that inter- and intra-specific interactions belowground can dramatically alter root growth. Our aim was to answer questions related to the effect of inter- vs. intra-specific interactions on the growth and utilization of undisturbed space by fine roots within three dimensions (3D using micro X-ray computed tomography. To achieve this, Populus tremuloides (quaking aspen and Picea mariana (black spruce seedlings were planted into containers as either solitary individuals, or inter-/intra-specific pairs, allowed to grow for two months, and 3D metrics developed in order to quantify their use of belowground space. In both aspen and spruce, inter-specific root interactions produced a shift in the vertical distribution of the root system volume, and deepened the average position of root tips when compared to intra-specifically growing seedlings. Inter-specific interactions also increased the minimum distance between root tips belonging to the same root system. There was no effect of belowground interactions on the radial distribution of roots, or the directionality of lateral root growth for either species. In conclusion, we found that significant differences were observed more often when comparing controls (solitary individuals and paired seedlings (inter- or intra-specific, than when comparing inter- and intra-specifically growing seedlings. This would indicate that competition between neighboring seedlings was more responsible for shifting fine root growth in both species than was neighbor identity. However, significant inter- vs. intra-specific differences were observed, which further emphasizes the importance of biological interactions in competition studies.

  13. On rigidity of abstract root systems of Coxeter systems

    OpenAIRE

    Dyer, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    We introduce and study a combinatorially defined notion of root basis of a (real) root system of a possibly infinite Coxeter group. Known results on conjugacy up to sign of root bases of certain irreducible finite rank real root systems are extended to abstract root bases, to a larger class of real root systems, and, with a short list of (genuine) exceptions, to infinite rank irreducible Coxeter systems.

  14. Root pruning reduces root competition in living mulch cropping systems

    OpenAIRE

    Båth, B.; Kristensen, Hanne Lakkenborg; Thorup-Kristensen, Kristian

    2009-01-01

    In intercropping systems with a cash crop and a living mulch intercrop, competition between the cash crop and the intercrop (the living mulch) often reduces the yield of the cash crop. This project investigated (1) the influence of root pruning of living mulches on aboveground biomass of white cabbage. Below-ground growth and competition were examined by measuring (2) root distribution in minirhizotrons and (3) uptake of 15N placed at different soil depths. Two field experiments were carried ...

  15. The Influence of Plant Root Systems on Subsurface Flow: Implications for Slope Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although research has explained how plant roots mechanically stabilize soils, in this article we explore how root systems create networks of preferential flow and thus influence water pressures in soils to trigger landslides. Root systems may alter subsurface flow: Hydrological m...

  16. Root exudate-induced alterations in Bacillus cereus cell wall contribute to root colonization and plant growth promotion.

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    Swarnalee Dutta

    Full Text Available The outcome of an interaction between plant growth promoting rhizobacteria and plants may depend on the chemical composition of root exudates (REs. We report the colonization of tobacco, and not groundnut, roots by a non-rhizospheric Bacillus cereus (MTCC 430. There was a differential alteration in the cell wall components of B. cereus in response to the REs from tobacco and groundnut. Attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy revealed a split in amide I region of B. cereus cells exposed to tobacco-root exudates (TRE, compared to those exposed to groundnut-root exudates (GRE. In addition, changes in exopolysaccharides and lipid-packing were observed in B. cereus grown in TRE-amended minimal media that were not detectable in GRE-amended media. Cell-wall proteome analyses revealed upregulation of oxidative stress-related alkyl hydroperoxide reductase, and DNA-protecting protein chain (Dlp-2, in response to GRE and TRE, respectively. Metabolism-related enzymes like 2-amino-3-ketobutyrate coenzyme A ligase and 2-methylcitrate dehydratase and a 60 kDa chaperonin were up-regulated in response to TRE and GRE. In response to B. cereus, the plant roots altered their exudate-chemodiversity with respect to carbohydrates, organic acids, alkanes, and polyols. TRE-induced changes in surface components of B. cereus may contribute to successful root colonization and subsequent plant growth promotion.

  17. A statistical approach to root system classification.

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    Gernot eBodner

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Plant root systems have a key role in ecology and agronomy. In spite of fast increase in root studies, still there is no classification that allows distinguishing among distinctive characteristics within the diversity of rooting strategies. Our hypothesis is that a multivariate approach for plant functional type identification in ecology can be applied to the classification of root systems. We demonstrate that combining principal component and cluster analysis yields a meaningful classification of rooting types based on morphological traits. The classification method presented is based on a data-defined statistical procedure without a priori decision on the classifiers. Biplot inspection is used to determine key traits and to ensure stability in cluster based grouping. The classification method is exemplified with simulated root architectures and morphological field data. Simulated root architectures showed that morphological attributes with spatial distribution parameters capture most distinctive features within root system diversity. While developmental type (tap vs. shoot-borne systems is a strong, but coarse classifier, topological traits provide the most detailed differentiation among distinctive groups. Adequacy of commonly available morphologic traits for classification is supported by field data. Three rooting types emerged from measured data, distinguished by diameter/weight, density and spatial distribution respectively. Similarity of root systems within distinctive groups was the joint result of phylogenetic relation and environmental as well as human selection pressure. We concluded that the data-define classification is appropriate for integration of knowledge obtained with different root measurement methods and at various scales. Currently root morphology is the most promising basis for classification due to widely used common measurement protocols. To capture details of root diversity efforts in architectural measurement

  18. Systems approaches to study root architecture dynamics

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    Candela eCuesta

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The plant root system is essential for providing anchorage to the soil, supplying minerals and water, and synthesizing metabolites. It is a dynamic organ modulated by external cues such as environmental signals, water and nutrients availability, salinity and others. Lateral roots are initiated from the primary root post-embryonically, after which they progress through discrete developmental stages which can be independently controlled, providing a high level of plasticity during root system formation.Within this review, main contributions are presented, from the classical forward genetic screens to the more recent high-throughput approaches, combined with computer model predictions, dissecting how lateral roots and thereby root system architecture is established and developed.

  19. Rapid phenotyping of alfalfa root system architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root system architecture (RSA) influences the capacity of an alfalfa plant for symbiotic nitrogen fixation, nutrient uptake and water use efficiency, resistance to frost heaving, winterhardiness, and some pest and pathogen resistance. However, we currently lack a basic understanding of root system d...

  20. Can we manipulate root system architecture to control soil erosion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ola, A.; Dodd, I. C.; Quinton, J. N.

    2015-09-01

    Soil erosion is a major threat to soil functioning. The use of vegetation to control erosion has long been a topic for research. Much of this research has focused on the above-ground properties of plants, demonstrating the important role that canopy structure and cover plays in the reduction of water erosion processes. Less attention has been paid to plant roots. Plant roots are a crucial yet under-researched factor for reducing water erosion through their ability to alter soil properties, such as aggregate stability, hydraulic function and shear strength. However, there have been few attempts to specifically manipulate plant root system properties to reduce soil erosion. Therefore, this review aims to explore the effects that plant roots have on soil erosion and hydrological processes, and how plant root architecture might be manipulated to enhance its erosion control properties. We demonstrate the importance of root system architecture for the control of soil erosion. We also show that some plant species respond to nutrient-enriched patches by increasing lateral root proliferation. The erosional response to root proliferation will depend upon its location: at the soil surface dense mats of roots may reduce soil erodibility but block soil pores thereby limiting infiltration, enhancing runoff. Additionally, in nutrient-deprived regions, root hair development may be stimulated and larger amounts of root exudates released, thereby improving aggregate stability and decreasing erodibility. Utilizing nutrient placement at specific depths may represent a potentially new, easily implemented, management strategy on nutrient-poor agricultural land or constructed slopes to control erosion, and further research in this area is needed.

  1. Species-specific fine root biomass distribution alters competition in mixed forests under climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyer, Christopher; Gutsch, Martin; Lasch, Petra; Suckow, Felicitas; Sterck, Frank; Mohren, Frits

    2010-05-01

    The importance of mixed forests in European silviculture has increased due to forest conversion policies and multifunctional forest management. Concurrently, evidences for substantial impacts of climate change on forest ecosystems accumulate. Projected drier and warmer conditions alter the water relations of tree species, their growth and ultimately their inter-specific competition in mixed stands. Process-based models are scientific tools to study the impact of climate change on and to deepen the understanding of the functioning of these systems based on ecological mechanisms. They allow for long-term, stand-level studies of forest dynamics which could only be addressed with great difficulty in an experimental or empirical setup. We used the process-based forest model 4C to simulate inter-specific competition in mixed stands of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and Common beech (Fagus sylvatica) as well as Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) and Sessile / Pedunculate oak (Quercus petraea and Quercus robur) under a) historical climate for model verification and b) under climate change scenario realizations of the climate model STAR 2.0 in Brandenburg, Germany. Some of the climate change scenario realizations feature a substantially drier and warmer summer climate which decreases the climatic water balance during the growing season. We assumed species-specific fine root biomass distributions which feature broadleaved fine roots in deeper soil layers and coniferous fine roots in upper soil layers according to several root excavation studies from mixed stands. The stands themselves were constructed from yield tables of the contributing species. The model verification provided good results for the basal area predictions under the historical climate. Under climate change, the number of days when the tree water demand exceeded the soil water supply was higher for the coniferous species than for broadleaved species. Furthermore, after 45 simulation years the basal area

  2. Seasonal changes of whole root system conductance by a drought-tolerant grape root system

    OpenAIRE

    Alsina, Maria Mar; Smart, David R.; Bauerle, Taryn; de Herralde, Felicidad; Biel, Carme; Stockert, Christine; Negron, Claudia; Save, Robert

    2010-01-01

    The role of root systems in drought tolerance is a subject of very limited information compared with above-ground responses. Adjustments to the ability of roots to supply water relative to shoot transpiration demand is proposed as a major means for woody perennial plants to tolerate drought, and is often expressed as changes in the ratios of leaf to root area (A L:A R). Seasonal root proliferation in a directed manner could increase the water supply function of roots independent of total root...

  3. Advances in experimental methods for root system architecture and root development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun-bang Wang; Xiu-juan Zhang; Chu Wu

    2015-01-01

    Plant roots play important roles in acquisition of water and nutrients, storage, anchoring, transport, and symbiosis with soil microorganisms, thus quantitative researches on root developmental processes are essential to understand root functions and root turnover in ecosystems, and at the same time such researches are the most difficult because roots are hidden underground. Therefore, how to investigate efficiently root functions and root dynamics is the core aspect in underground ecology. In this article, we reviewed some experimental methods used in root resear-ches on root development and root system architecture, and summarized the advantages and shortages of these meth-ods. Based on the analyses, we proposed three new ways to more understand root processes: (1) new experimental materials for root development; (2) a new observatory system comprised of multiple components, including many observatory windows installed in field, analysis software, and automatic data transport devices; (3) new techniques used to analyze quantitatively functional roots.

  4. Alterações morfológicas no sistema radicular do milho induzidas por fungos micorrízicos e fósforo Morphological alterations on root system of maize induced by mycorrhizal fungi and phosphorus

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    Wellington Bressan

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho, conduzido em casa de vegetação, foi avaliar os efeitos da inoculação de fungos micorrízicos arbusculares (Glomus etunicatum e Glomus clarum e da adição de níveis de P (0, 50, 100 e 200 mg/kg de solo sobre a morfologia do sistema radicular do milho (Zea mays L., cultivar BR 201, e a concentração de P na planta, em duas épocas de colheita (18 e 104 dias após semeadura em solo Latossolo Vermelho-Escuro distrófico desinfestado com Bromex. O experimento foi realizado na Embrapa-Centro Nacional de Pesquisa de Milho e Sorgo, Sete Lagoas, MG. A inoculação de fungos micorrízicos aumentou o peso das raízes secas, o número de raízes laterais primárias e secundárias, e o teor de P na planta, porém reduziu a relação peso das raízes secas/peso da parte aérea seca e o número de pêlos radiculares. Esses efeitos foram dependentes das doses de P aplicadas ao solo e da espécie de fungo micorrízico. O peso das raízes secas das plantas micorrizadas mostrou correlação significativa (PThe objective of this research, carried out under greenhouse conditions was to evaluate the effect of mycorrhizal fungi (Glomus etunicatum and Glomus clarum inoculation and P levels (0, 50, 100 e 200 mg/kg of soil on maize (Zea mays L. root system morphology, cultivar BR 201, and P plant concentration in two harvest period (18 and 104 days after sowing in disinfested dystrophic Dark-Red Latosol. The experiment was carried out under greenhouse conditions at Embrapa-Centro Nacional de Pesquisa de Milho e Sorgo, in Sete Lagoas, Minas Gerais, Brazil. Inoculation with mycorrhizal fungi increased root dry weight, number of first and second order lateral roots and P concentration in the plant, but decreased root/shoot dry weight ratio and number of root hairs. These effects were affected by P concentration in the soil and by mycorrhizal fungi species. Root dry weight of inoculated plants showed significative (P<=0.05 correlation to

  5. Altered cell wall properties are responsible for ammonium-reduced aluminium accumulation in rice roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Zhao, Xue Qiang; Chen, Rong Fu; Dong, Xiao Ying; Lan, Ping; Ma, Jian Feng; Shen, Ren Fang

    2015-07-01

    The phytotoxicity of aluminium (Al) ions can be alleviated by ammonium (NH4(+)) in rice and this effect has been attributed to the decreased Al accumulation in the roots. Here, the effects of different nitrogen forms on cell wall properties were compared in two rice cultivars differing in Al tolerance. An in vitro Al-binding assay revealed that neither NH4(+) nor NO3(-) altered the Al-binding capacity of cell walls, which were extracted from plants not previously exposed to N sources. However, cell walls extracted from NH4(+)-supplied roots displayed lower Al-binding capacity than those from NO3(-)-supplied roots when grown in non-buffered solutions. Fourier-transform infrared microspectroscopy analysis revealed that, compared with NO3(-)-supplied roots, NH4(+)-supplied roots possessed fewer Al-binding groups (-OH and COO-) and lower contents of pectin and hemicellulose. However, when grown in pH-buffered solutions, these differences in the cell wall properties were not observed. Further analysis showed that the Al-binding capacity and properties of cell walls were also altered by pHs alone. Taken together, our results indicate that the NH4(+)-reduced Al accumulation was attributed to the altered cell wall properties triggered by pH decrease due to NH4(+) uptake rather than direct competition for the cell wall binding sites between Al(3+) and NH4(+).

  6. Altered microRNA expression following sciatic nerve resection in dorsal root ganglia of rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin Yu; Songlin Zhou; Tianmei Qian; Yongjun Wang; Fei Ding; Xiaosong Gu

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small,non-coding RNAs (~22 nucleotides) that negatively regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally,either through translational inhibition or degradation of target mRNAs.We uncovered a previously unknown alteration in the expression of miRNAs in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) at 1,4,7,and 14 days after resection of the sciatic nerve in rats using microarray analysis.Thirty-two significantly upregulated and 18 downregulated miRNAs were identified in the DRG at four time points following sciatic nerve injury.The expression of four consecutively deregulated miRNAs,analyzed by real-time Taqman polymerase chain reaction,was in agreement with the microarray data (upregulated: miR-21,miR-221; downregulated:miR-500,miR-551b),The potential targets for these miRNAs,altered after sciatic nerve resection,are involved mainly in nervous system development,multi-cellular organismal development,and the regulation of cellular processes.This study demonstrated a different involvement of miRNAs in the DRG after resection of the sciatic nerve in a rat model,and it may also contribute in illustrating the molecular mechanisms responsible for nerve regeneration.

  7. Modelling water uptake efficiency of root systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, Daniel; Tron, Stefania; Schröder, Natalie; Bodner, Gernot; Javaux, Mathieu; Vanderborght, Jan; Vereecken, Harry; Schnepf, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Water uptake is crucial for plant productivity. Trait based breeding for more water efficient crops will enable a sustainable agricultural management under specific pedoclimatic conditions, and can increase drought resistance of plants. Mathematical modelling can be used to find suitable root system traits for better water uptake efficiency defined as amount of water taken up per unit of root biomass. This approach requires large simulation times and large number of simulation runs, since we test different root systems under different pedoclimatic conditions. In this work, we model water movement by the 1-dimensional Richards equation with the soil hydraulic properties described according to the van Genuchten model. Climatic conditions serve as the upper boundary condition. The root system grows during the simulation period and water uptake is calculated via a sink term (after Tron et al. 2015). The goal of this work is to compare different free software tools based on different numerical schemes to solve the model. We compare implementations using DUMUX (based on finite volumes), Hydrus 1D (based on finite elements), and a Matlab implementation of Van Dam, J. C., & Feddes 2000 (based on finite differences). We analyse the methods for accuracy, speed and flexibility. Using this model case study, we can clearly show the impact of various root system traits on water uptake efficiency. Furthermore, we can quantify frequent simplifications that are introduced in the modelling step like considering a static root system instead of a growing one, or considering a sink term based on root density instead of considering the full root hydraulic model (Javaux et al. 2008). References Tron, S., Bodner, G., Laio, F., Ridolfi, L., & Leitner, D. (2015). Can diversity in root architecture explain plant water use efficiency? A modeling study. Ecological modelling, 312, 200-210. Van Dam, J. C., & Feddes, R. A. (2000). Numerical simulation of infiltration, evaporation and shallow

  8. Arabidopsis: an adequate model for dicot root systems?

    OpenAIRE

    Zobel, Richard W.

    2016-01-01

    The Arabidopsis root system is frequently considered to have only three classes of root: primary, lateral, and adventitious. Research with other plant species has suggested up to 8 different developmental/functional classes of root for a given plant root system. If Arabidopsis has only three classes of root, it may not be an adequate model for eudicot plant root systems. Recent research, however, can be interpreted to suggest that pre-flowering Arabidopsis does have at least five (5) of th...

  9. Arabidopsis: An Adequate Model for Dicot Root Systems?

    OpenAIRE

    Zobel, Richard W.

    2016-01-01

    The Arabidopsis root system is frequently considered to have only three classes of root: primary, lateral, and adventitious. Research with other plant species has suggested up to eight different developmental/functional classes of root for a given plant root system. If Arabidopsis has only three classes of root, it may not be an adequate model for eudicot plant root systems. Recent research, however, can be interpreted to suggest that pre-flowering Arabidopsis does have at least five (5) of t...

  10. Experimental geobiology links evolutionary intensification of rooting systems and weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirk, Joe; Beerling, David; Leake, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    The evolution of mycorrhizal fungi in partnership with early land plants over 440 million years ago led to the greening of the continents by plants of increasing biomass, rooting depth, nutrient demand and capacity to alter soil minerals, culminating in modern forested ecosystems. The later co-evolution of trees and rooting systems with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, together driving the biogeochemical cycling of elements and weathering of minerals in soil to meet subsequent increased phosphorus demands is thought to constitute one the most important biotic feedbacks on the geochemical carbon cycle to emerge during the Phanerozoic, and fundamentally rests on the intensifying effect of trees and their root-associating mycorrhizal fungal partners on mineral weathering. Here I present experimental and field evidence linking these evolutionary events to a mechanistic framework whereby: (1) as plants evolved in stature, biomass, and rooting depth, their mycorrhizal fungal partnerships received increasing amounts of plant photosynthate; (2) this enabled intensification of plant-driven fungal weathering of rocks to release growth-limiting nutrients; (3) in turn, this increased land-to-ocean export of Ca and P and enhanced ocean carbonate precipitation impacting the global carbon cycle and biosphere-geosphere-ocean-atmosphere interactions over the past 410 Ma. Our findings support an over-arching hypothesis that evolution has selected plant and mycorrhizal partnerships that have intensified mineral weathering and altered global biogeochemical cycles.

  11. Improvement of Root System Architecture in Peach (Prunus persica Seedlings by Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi, Related to Allocation of Glucose/Sucrose to Root

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang-Sheng WU

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Root system architecture (RSA is used to describe the spatial configuration of a root system in the soil, which substantially determines the capacity of a plant to take up nutrients and water. The present study was to assess if arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF, Glomus mosseae, G. versiforme, and Paraglomus occultum would alter RSA of peach (Prunus persica L. Batsch seedlings, and the alteration due to mycorrhization was related to allocation of glucose/sucrose to root (Aglucose/sucrose. Inoculation with G. mosseae and G. versiforme significantly increased leaf, stem, root and total fresh weights, compared with non-AMF treatment. Mycorrhizal alterations of RSA in peach plants were dependent on AMF species, because only G. mosseae and G. versiforme but not P. occultum markedly increased root length, root projected area, root surface area and root volume. For the distribution of root length classes, AMF mainly increased 0-1 and 3-4 cm root length classes, which is AMF species dependent. Inoculated seedlings with Glomus species recorded significantly higher root sucrose and leaf and root glucose concentrations and lower root sucrose concentrations than un-inoculated control. Compared with the non-AMF treatment, G. mosseae and G. versiforme generally increased the Aglucose and Asucrose, but P. occultum significantly decreased the Aglucose and Asucrose. Asucrose or Aglucose was significantly positive correlated with root length, root projected area and root surface area. The results suggest that AMF modified variables of RSA in peach, which is AMF species dependent and related to Aglucose and Asucrose.

  12. Cytoskeletal components of Beta vulgaris root hairs in altered gravity fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevchenko, G. V.

    Root hairs of Beta vulgaris are protrusions from rhizodermal cells and are characterised by plagiotropic growth. The roles of the cytoskeleton and of gravity in this growth process are being studied with the help of a clinostat. Through the use of immunocytochemical and fluorescent staining methods which reveal microtubules (MTs) and microfilaments (MFs), it was found that these cytoskeletal components of the root hairs of 4-day-old seedlings of B. vulgaris were affected by clinorotation at 2 r.p.m. In control conditions, MTs were found to be distributed evenly throughout the root hair, and an intense fluorescence due to MFs was observed at the tip of the hairs. With clinorotation, however, MTs became distributed at random, though no redistribution of MFs was observed. The latter finding conforms to the idea that MFs are responsible for tip growth. That MTs are more sensitive to altered gravity conditions is presently being tested.

  13. Del Pezzo Moduli via Root Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colombo, E.; van Geemen, B.; Looijenga, E.J.N.

    2010-01-01

    Coble defined in his 1929 treatise invariants for cubic surfaces and quartic curves. We reinterpret these in terms of the root systems of type E6 and E7 that are naturally associated to these varieties, thereby giving some of his results a more intrinsic treatment. Our discussion is uniform for all

  14. Exogenous gibberellin altered morphology, anatomic and transcriptional regulatory networks of hormones in carrot root and shoot

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Guang-Long; Que, Feng; Xu, Zhi-Sheng; Wang, Feng; Xiong, Ai-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Background Gibberellins stimulate cell elongation and expansion during plant growth and development. Carrot is a root plant with great value and undergoes obvious alteration in organ size over the period of plant growth. However, the roles of gibberellins in carrot remain unclear. Results To investigate the effects of gibberelliins on the growth of carrot, we treated carrot plants with gibberellic acid 3 (GA3) or paclobutrazol (a gibberellin inhibitor). The results found that GA3 dramatically...

  15. Seasonal changes of whole root system conductance by a drought-tolerant grape root system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsina, Maria Mar; Smart, David R.; Bauerle, Taryn; de Herralde, Felicidad; Biel, Carme; Stockert, Christine; Negron, Claudia; Save, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The role of root systems in drought tolerance is a subject of very limited information compared with above-ground responses. Adjustments to the ability of roots to supply water relative to shoot transpiration demand is proposed as a major means for woody perennial plants to tolerate drought, and is often expressed as changes in the ratios of leaf to root area (AL:AR). Seasonal root proliferation in a directed manner could increase the water supply function of roots independent of total root area (AR) and represents a mechanism whereby water supply to demand could be increased. To address this issue, seasonal root proliferation, stomatal conductance (gs) and whole root system hydraulic conductance (kr) were investigated for a drought-tolerant grape root system (Vitis berlandieri×V. rupestris cv. 1103P) and a non-drought-tolerant root system (Vitis riparia×V. rupestris cv. 101-14Mgt), upon which had been grafted the same drought-sensitive clone of Vitis vinifera cv. Merlot. Leaf water potentials (ψL) for Merlot grafted onto the 1103P root system (–0.91±0.02 MPa) were +0.15 MPa higher than Merlot on 101-14Mgt (–1.06±0.03 MPa) during spring, but dropped by approximately –0.4 MPa from spring to autumn, and were significantly lower by –0.15 MPa (–1.43±0.02 MPa) than for Merlot on 101-14Mgt (at –1.28±0.02 MPa). Surprisingly, gs of Merlot on the drought-tolerant root system (1103P) was less down-regulated and canopies maintained evaporative fluxes ranging from 35–20 mmol vine−1 s−1 during the diurnal peak from spring to autumn, respectively, three times greater than those measured for Merlot on the drought-sensitive rootstock 101-14Mgt. The drought-tolerant root system grew more roots at depth during the warm summer dry period, and the whole root system conductance (kr) increased from 0.004 to 0.009 kg MPa−1 s−1 during that same time period. The changes in kr could not be explained by xylem anatomy or conductivity changes of individual root

  16. Bessel functions for root systems via the trigonometric setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørsted, Bent; Said, S.B.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we study generalized Bessel functions related to root systems and give explicit formulas in several cases.......In this paper, we study generalized Bessel functions related to root systems and give explicit formulas in several cases....

  17. Overexpression of Laccaria bicolor aquaporin JQ585595 alters root water transport properties in ectomycorrhizal white spruce (Picea glauca) seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hao; Kemppainen, Minna; El Kayal, Walid; Lee, Seong Hee; Pardo, Alejandro G; Cooke, Janice E K; Zwiazek, Janusz J

    2015-01-01

    The contribution of hyphae to water transport in ectomycorrhizal (ECM) white spruce (Picea glauca) seedlings was examined by altering expression of a major water-transporting aquaporin in Laccaria bicolor. Picea glauca was inoculated with wild-type (WT), mock transgenic or L. bicolor aquaporin JQ585595-overexpressing (OE) strains and exposed to root temperatures ranging from 5 to 20°C to examine the root water transport properties, physiological responses and plasma membrane intrinsic protein (PIP) expression in colonized plants. Mycorrhization increased shoot water potential, transpiration, net photosynthetic rates, root hydraulic conductivity and root cortical cell hydraulic conductivity in seedlings. At 20°C, OE plants had higher root hydraulic conductivity compared with WT plants and the increases were accompanied by higher expression of P. glauca PIP GQ03401_M18.1 in roots. In contrast to WT L. bicolor, the effects of OE fungi on root and root cortical cell hydraulic conductivities were abolished at 10 and 5°C in the absence of major changes in the examined transcript levels of P. glauca root PIPs. The results provide evidence for the importance of fungal aquaporins in root water transport of mycorrhizal plants. They also demonstrate links between hyphal water transport, root aquaporin expression and root water transport in ECM plants. PMID:25323307

  18. Evaluation of the morphological alteration of the root surface radiated with a diode laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diode laser has been studied for periodontal therapy, as much for removal of calculus as for microbial reduction of periodontal pockets, as well as the visible analgesic effects and biomodulation capacity. For this reason the purpose of this study was to evaluate the morphological alteration of the root surface after radiation with the diode laser, 808 nm through analysis by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Besides this, to verify the temperature variations caused during the radiation, a thermometer put into the dentinal wall of the root canal was used. In all, 18 teeth were used, 15 of which for the SEM study, and the other 3 were used to temperature variation analysis. The 25 samples were scraped on the root surface and planed with manual instruments. The other 5 were not subjected to any type of treatment. This, 6 groups of 5 samples each were formed. Control Group C whose samples had not received any treatment; Control Group C 1 was only scraped and polished conventionally with Hu-Friedy Gracey curettes 5 and 6; the other samples groups L1, L2, L3, L4 were radiated by diode laser using parameters of power 1,0 W; 1,2 W; 1,4 W; and 1,6 W respectively, 2 times for 10 seconds with 20 seconds intervals between each radiation in continuous mode. The results with relation to the increase of temperature in the interior of the root canal demonstrated that there was an increase of more than 5 degree Celsius. The results of the scanning electron microscope analysis of Control Group C demonstrated great irregularity and ridges on the root surface, with the presence of a dentine layer. Control Group C1 presented a similar aspect to Group L 1's, smoother and more homogeneous surface. Groups L2, L3, and L4 presented scratches alternating with smoother areas showing that fiber contacted the surface of the sample. The results reconfirmed the necessity of further studies using diode laser, with a beam of light emitted in an interrupted mode to improve the control of the

  19. Tannins Alter Soil Organic Matter Extraction, Solubility of Metals, and Root Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannins are common plant-derived polyphenolic compounds that precipitate proteins and react with other biomolecules but knowledge of their effects on soil organic matter, the solubility of metals, and root physiology is incomplete. Soil from forest and pasture systems was treated with tannic acid (...

  20. A residue calculus for root systems

    OpenAIRE

    Ban, E. P. van den; Schlichtkrull, H.

    2001-01-01

    Let V be a nite dimensional real vector space on which a root system is given. Consider a meromorphic function ' on VC = V +iV , the singular locus of which is a locally nite union of hyperplanes of the form f 2 VC j h; i = sg, 2 , s 2 R. Assume ' is of suitable decay in the imaginary directions, so that integrals of the form R +iV '() d make sense for generic 2 V . A residue calculus is developed that allows shifting . This residue calculus can be used to obtain Plancherel and Paley{Wiener t...

  1. A Physiological and Behavioral Mechanism for Leaf Herbivore-Induced Systemic Root Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erb, Matthias; Robert, Christelle A M; Marti, Guillaume; Lu, Jing; Doyen, Gwladys R; Villard, Neil; Barrière, Yves; French, B Wade; Wolfender, Jean-Luc; Turlings, Ted C J; Gershenzon, Jonathan

    2015-12-01

    Indirect plant-mediated interactions between herbivores are important drivers of community composition in terrestrial ecosystems. Among the most striking examples are the strong indirect interactions between spatially separated leaf- and root-feeding insects sharing a host plant. Although leaf feeders generally reduce the performance of root herbivores, little is known about the underlying systemic changes in root physiology and the associated behavioral responses of the root feeders. We investigated the consequences of maize (Zea mays) leaf infestation by Spodoptera littoralis caterpillars for the root-feeding larvae of the beetle Diabrotica virgifera virgifera, a major pest of maize. D. virgifera strongly avoided leaf-infested plants by recognizing systemic changes in soluble root components. The avoidance response occurred within 12 h and was induced by real and mimicked herbivory, but not wounding alone. Roots of leaf-infested plants showed altered patterns in soluble free and soluble conjugated phenolic acids. Biochemical inhibition and genetic manipulation of phenolic acid biosynthesis led to a complete disappearance of the avoidance response of D. virgifera. Furthermore, bioactivity-guided fractionation revealed a direct link between the avoidance response of D. virgifera and changes in soluble conjugated phenolic acids in the roots of leaf-attacked plants. Our study provides a physiological mechanism for a behavioral pattern that explains the negative effect of leaf attack on a root-feeding insect. Furthermore, it opens up the possibility to control D. virgifera in the field by genetically mimicking leaf herbivore-induced changes in root phenylpropanoid patterns.

  2. Tree root systems and nutrient mobilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyle, Jim; Rob, Harrison; Raulund-Rasmussen, Karsten;

    of nutrient elements essential for forest growth and resilience. Research and techniques have signifi cantly advanced since Olof Tamm’s 1934 base mineral index for Swedish forest soils, and basic nutrient budget estimates for whole-tree harvesting systems of the 1970s. Recent research in areas that include...... of potential sustainability of nutrient supplies for biomass harvesting and other intensive forest management systems will advance understanding of these important ecosystem properties, processes, and services....... some of the world’s most productive intensively managed forests, including Brazil and the Southeast and Pacifi c Northwest regions of the United States, have shown that root systems are often several meters in depth, and often extend deeper than soil is sampled. Large amounts of carbon are also...

  3. An L-system model for root system mycorrhization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnepf, Andrea; Schweiger, Peter; Jansa, Jan; Leitner, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    Mineral phosphate fertilisers are a non-renewable resource; rock phosphate reserves are estimated to be depleted in 50 to 100 years. In order to prevent a severe phosphate crisis in the 21st century, there is a need to decrease agricultural inputs such as P fertilisers by making use of plant mechanisms that increase P acquisition efficiency. Most plants establish mycorrhizal symbiosis as an adaptation to increase/economize their P acquisition from the soil. However, there is a great functional diversity in P acquisition mechanisms among different fungal species that colonize the roots (Thonar et al. 2011), and the composition of mycorrhizal community is known to depend strongly on agricultural management practices. Thus, the agroecosystem management may substantially affect the mycorrhizal functioning and also the use of P fertilizers. To date, it is still difficult to quantify the potential input savings for the agricultural crops through manipulation of their symbiotic microbiome, mainly due to lack of mechanistic understanding of P uptake dynamics by the fungal hyphae. In a first attempt, Schnepf et al. (2008b) have used mathematical modelling to show on the single root scale how different fungal growth pattern influence root P uptake. However, their approach was limited by the fact that it was restricted to the scale of a single root. The goal of this work is to advance the dynamic, three-dimensional root architecture model of Leitner et al. (2010) to include root system infection with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and growth of external mycelium. The root system infection model assumes that there is an average probability of infection (primary infection), that the probability of infection of a new root segment immediately adjacent to an existing infection is much higher than the average (secondary infection), that infected root segments have entry points that are the link between internal and external mycelium, that only uninfected root segments are susceptible

  4. Photosynthate Regulation of the Root System Architecture Mediated by the Heterotrimeric G Protein Complex in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudgil, Yashwanti; Karve, Abhijit; Teixeira, Paulo J P L; Jiang, Kun; Tunc-Ozdemir, Meral; Jones, Alan M

    2016-01-01

    Assimilate partitioning to the root system is a desirable developmental trait to control but little is known of the signaling pathway underlying partitioning. A null mutation in the gene encoding the Gβ subunit of the heterotrimeric G protein complex, a nexus for a variety of signaling pathways, confers altered sugar partitioning in roots. While fixed carbon rapidly reached the roots of wild type and agb1-2 mutant seedlings, agb1 roots had more of this fixed carbon in the form of glucose, fructose, and sucrose which manifested as a higher lateral root density. Upon glucose treatment, the agb1-2 mutant had abnormal gene expression in the root tip validated by transcriptome analysis. In addition, PIN2 membrane localization was altered in the agb1-2 mutant. The heterotrimeric G protein complex integrates photosynthesis-derived sugar signaling incorporating both membrane-and transcriptional-based mechanisms. The time constants for these signaling mechanisms are in the same range as photosynthate delivery to the root, raising the possibility that root cells are able to use changes in carbon fixation in real time to adjust growth behavior. PMID:27610112

  5. The tomato res mutant which accumulates JA in roots in non-stressed conditions restores cell structure alterations under salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Abellan, José O; Fernandez-Garcia, Nieves; Lopez-Berenguer, Carmen; Egea, Isabel; Flores, Francisco B; Angosto, Trinidad; Capel, Juan; Lozano, Rafael; Pineda, Benito; Moreno, Vicente; Olmos, Enrique; Bolarin, Maria C

    2015-11-01

    Jasmonic acid (JA) regulates a wide spectrum of plant biological processes, from plant development to stress defense responses. The role of JA in plant response to salt stress is scarcely known, and even less known is the specific response in root, the main plant organ responsible for ionic uptake and transport to the shoot. Here we report the characterization of the first tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) mutant, named res (restored cell structure by salinity), that accumulates JA in roots prior to exposure to stress. The res tomato mutant presented remarkable growth inhibition and displayed important morphological alterations and cellular disorganization in roots and leaves under control conditions, while these alterations disappeared when the res mutant plants were grown under salt stress. Reciprocal grafting between res and wild type (WT) (tomato cv. Moneymaker) indicated that the main organ responsible for the development of alterations was the root. The JA-signaling pathway is activated in res roots prior to stress, with transcripts levels being even higher in control condition than in salinity. Future studies on this mutant will provide significant advances in the knowledge of JA role in root in salt-stress tolerance response, as well as in the energy trade-off between plant growth and response to stress.

  6. Chromosomal and Nuclear Alterations in Root Tip Cells of Allium Cepa L. Induced by Alprazolam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nefic, Hilada; Musanovic, Jasmin; Metovic, Azra; Kurteshi, Kemajl

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Alprazolam is a triazolobenzodiazepine used in panic disorders and other anxiety states. Target organ of Alprazolam is CNS, causing depression of respiration and consciousness. Aim: This study aimed to estimate the genotoxic potential of Alprazolam using Allium cepa test. Methods: Allium cepa is one of the most suitable plants for detecting different types of xenobiotics. The test enables the assessment of different genetic endpoints making possible damage to the DNA of humans to be predicted. Results: Alprazolam induced chromosomal (anaphase bridges, breaks, lagging and stickiness, abnormal spiralisation, multipolarity and polyploidy) and cytological aberrations, especially nuclear alterations (nuclear buds, fragmented nucleus and apoptotic bodies, cells without nucleus, binucleated and micronucleated cells), morphological alterations in shape and size of cells, spindle disturbance and polar deviation in root tip meristem cells of Allium cepa at all tested concentrations. Alprazolam also caused significant inhibition of mitotic index in these cells. Conclusion: These changes in cells are indicators of genotoxic potential of Alprazolam suggesting a need for further in vitro studies on animal and human lymphocytes as well as in vivo studies. PMID:25568504

  7. Root system markup language: toward a unified root architecture description language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobet, Guillaume; Pound, Michael P; Diener, Julien; Pradal, Christophe; Draye, Xavier; Godin, Christophe; Javaux, Mathieu; Leitner, Daniel; Meunier, Félicien; Nacry, Philippe; Pridmore, Tony P; Schnepf, Andrea

    2015-03-01

    The number of image analysis tools supporting the extraction of architectural features of root systems has increased in recent years. These tools offer a handy set of complementary facilities, yet it is widely accepted that none of these software tools is able to extract in an efficient way the growing array of static and dynamic features for different types of images and species. We describe the Root System Markup Language (RSML), which has been designed to overcome two major challenges: (1) to enable portability of root architecture data between different software tools in an easy and interoperable manner, allowing seamless collaborative work; and (2) to provide a standard format upon which to base central repositories that will soon arise following the expanding worldwide root phenotyping effort. RSML follows the XML standard to store two- or three-dimensional image metadata, plant and root properties and geometries, continuous functions along individual root paths, and a suite of annotations at the image, plant, or root scale at one or several time points. Plant ontologies are used to describe botanical entities that are relevant at the scale of root system architecture. An XML schema describes the features and constraints of RSML, and open-source packages have been developed in several languages (R, Excel, Java, Python, and C#) to enable researchers to integrate RSML files into popular research workflow.

  8. Altered susceptibility to infection by Sinorhizobium meliloti and Nectria haematococca in alfalfa roots with altered cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, H-H; Hirsch, A M; Hawes, M C

    2004-07-01

    Most infections of plant roots are initiated in the region of elongation; the mechanism for this tissue-specific localization pattern is unknown. In alfalfa expressing PsUGT1 antisense mRNA under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter, the cell cycle in roots is completed in 48 h instead of 24 h, and border cell number is decreased by more than 99%. These plants were found to exhibit increased root-tip infection by a fungal pathogen and reduced nodule formation by a bacterial symbiont. Thus, the frequency of infection in the region of elongation by Nectria haematocca was unaffected, but infection of the root tip was increased by more than 90%; early stages of Sinorhizobium meliloti infection and nodule morphology were normal, but the frequency of nodulation was fourfold lower than in wild-type roots. PMID:15042410

  9. Altered susceptibility to infection by Sinorhizobium meliloti and Nectria haematococca in alfalfa roots with altered cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, H-H; Hirsch, A M; Hawes, M C

    2004-07-01

    Most infections of plant roots are initiated in the region of elongation; the mechanism for this tissue-specific localization pattern is unknown. In alfalfa expressing PsUGT1 antisense mRNA under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter, the cell cycle in roots is completed in 48 h instead of 24 h, and border cell number is decreased by more than 99%. These plants were found to exhibit increased root-tip infection by a fungal pathogen and reduced nodule formation by a bacterial symbiont. Thus, the frequency of infection in the region of elongation by Nectria haematocca was unaffected, but infection of the root tip was increased by more than 90%; early stages of Sinorhizobium meliloti infection and nodule morphology were normal, but the frequency of nodulation was fourfold lower than in wild-type roots.

  10. Inflammation and Immune System Alterations in Frailty

    OpenAIRE

    Yao, Xu; Li, Huifen; Leng, Sean X.

    2011-01-01

    Frailty is an important geriatric syndrome characterized by multi-system dysregulation. Substantial evidence suggests heightened inflammatory state and significant immune system alterations in frailty. A heightened inflammatory state is marked by increases in levels of inflammatory molecules (IL-6 and CRP) and counts of white blood cell and its subpopulations, which may play an important role in the pathogenesis of frailty, directly or through its detrimental influence to other physiologic sy...

  11. Drought and root herbivory interact to alter the response of above-ground parasitoids to aphid infested plants and associated plant volatile signals

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Tariq; Wright, Denis J.; Bruce, Toby J. A.; Staley, Joanna T.

    2013-01-01

    Multitrophic interactions are likely to be altered by climate change but there is little empirical evidence relating the responses of herbivores and parasitoids to abiotic factors. Here we investigated the effects of drought on an above/below-ground system comprising a generalist and a specialist aphid species (foliar herbivores), their parasitoids, and a dipteran species (root herbivore).We tested the hypotheses that: (1) high levels of drought stress and below-ground herbivory interact to r...

  12. Drought and root herbivory interact to alter the response of above-ground parasitoids to aphid infested plants and associated plant volatile signals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Tariq

    Full Text Available Multitrophic interactions are likely to be altered by climate change but there is little empirical evidence relating the responses of herbivores and parasitoids to abiotic factors. Here we investigated the effects of drought on an above/below-ground system comprising a generalist and a specialist aphid species (foliar herbivores, their parasitoids, and a dipteran species (root herbivore.We tested the hypotheses that: (1 high levels of drought stress and below-ground herbivory interact to reduce the performance of parasitoids developing in aphids; (2 drought stress and root herbivory change the profile of volatile organic chemicals (VOCs emitted by the host plant; (3 parasitoids avoid ovipositing in aphids feeding on plants under drought stress and root herbivory. We examined the effect of drought, with and without root herbivory, on the olfactory response of parasitoids (preference, plant volatile emissions, parasitism success (performance, and the effect of drought on root herbivory. Under drought, percentage parasitism of aphids was reduced by about 40-55% compared with well watered plants. There was a significant interaction between drought and root herbivory on the efficacy of the two parasitoid species, drought stress partially reversing the negative effect of root herbivory on percent parasitism. In the absence of drought, root herbivory significantly reduced the performance (e.g. fecundity of both parasitoid species developing in foliar herbivores. Plant emissions of VOCs were reduced by drought and root herbivores, and in olfactometer experiments parasitoids preferred the odour from well-watered plants compared with other treatments. The present work demonstrates that drought stress can change the outcome of interactions between herbivores feeding above- and below-ground and their parasitoids, mediated by changes in the chemical signals from plants to parasitoids. This provides a new insight into how the structure of terrestrial

  13. Drought and root herbivory interact to alter the response of above-ground parasitoids to aphid infested plants and associated plant volatile signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tariq, Muhammad; Wright, Denis J; Bruce, Toby J A; Staley, Joanna T

    2013-01-01

    Multitrophic interactions are likely to be altered by climate change but there is little empirical evidence relating the responses of herbivores and parasitoids to abiotic factors. Here we investigated the effects of drought on an above/below-ground system comprising a generalist and a specialist aphid species (foliar herbivores), their parasitoids, and a dipteran species (root herbivore).We tested the hypotheses that: (1) high levels of drought stress and below-ground herbivory interact to reduce the performance of parasitoids developing in aphids; (2) drought stress and root herbivory change the profile of volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) emitted by the host plant; (3) parasitoids avoid ovipositing in aphids feeding on plants under drought stress and root herbivory. We examined the effect of drought, with and without root herbivory, on the olfactory response of parasitoids (preference), plant volatile emissions, parasitism success (performance), and the effect of drought on root herbivory. Under drought, percentage parasitism of aphids was reduced by about 40-55% compared with well watered plants. There was a significant interaction between drought and root herbivory on the efficacy of the two parasitoid species, drought stress partially reversing the negative effect of root herbivory on percent parasitism. In the absence of drought, root herbivory significantly reduced the performance (e.g. fecundity) of both parasitoid species developing in foliar herbivores. Plant emissions of VOCs were reduced by drought and root herbivores, and in olfactometer experiments parasitoids preferred the odour from well-watered plants compared with other treatments. The present work demonstrates that drought stress can change the outcome of interactions between herbivores feeding above- and below-ground and their parasitoids, mediated by changes in the chemical signals from plants to parasitoids. This provides a new insight into how the structure of terrestrial communities may be

  14. Copper-induced alteration in sucrose partitioning and its relationship to the root growth of two Elsholtzia haichowensis Sun populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min-Jing; Xiong, Zhi-Ting; Liu, Hui; Kuo, Yi-Ming; Tong, Lei

    2016-10-01

    Hydroponic culture was used to comparatively investigate the copper (Cu)-induced alteration to sucrose metabolism and biomass allocation in two Elsholtzia haichowensis Sun populations with one from a Cu-contaminated site (CS) and the other from a non-contaminated site (NCS). Experimental results revealed that biomass allocation preferred roots over shoots in CS population, and shoots over roots in NCS population under Cu exposure. The difference in biomass allocation was correlated with the difference in sucrose partitioning between the two populations. Cu treatment (45 μM) significantly decreased leaf sucrose content and increased root sucrose content in CS population as a result of the increased activities of leaf sucrose synthesis enzymes (sucrose phosphate synthetase and sucrose synthase) and root sucrose cleavage enzyme (vacuolar invertase), which led to increased sucrose transport from leaves to roots. In contrast, higher Cu treatment increased sucrose content in leaves and decreased sucrose content in roots in NCS population as a result of the decreased activities of root sucrose cleavage enzymes (vacuolar and cell wall invertases) that led to less sucrose transport from leaves to roots. These results provide important insights into carbon resource partitioning and biomass allocation strategies in metallophytes and are beneficial for the implementation of phytoremediation techniques. PMID:27153457

  15. Root System Markup Language: toward an unified root architecture description language

    OpenAIRE

    Lobet, Guillaume; Pound, Michael; Diener, Julien; Pradal, Christophe; Draye, Xavier; Godin, Christophe; Javaux, Mathieu; Leitner, Daniel; Meunier, Felicien; Nacry, Philippe; Pridmore, Tony; Schnepf, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    International audience The number of image analysis tools supporting the extraction of architectural features of root systems has increased over the last years. These tools offer a handy set of complementary facilities, yet it is widely accepted that none of these software tool is able to extract in an efficient way growing array of static and dynamic features for different types of images and species. . We describe the Root System Markup Language (RSML) that has been designed to overcome ...

  16. Tree root systems competing for soil moisture in a 3D soil-plant model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoli, Gabriele; Bonetti, Sara; Domec, Jean-Christophe; Putti, Mario; Katul, Gabriel; Marani, Marco

    2014-04-01

    Competition for water among multiple tree rooting systems is investigated using a soil-plant model that accounts for soil moisture dynamics and root water uptake (RWU), whole plant transpiration, and leaf-level photosynthesis. The model is based on a numerical solution to the 3D Richards equation modified to account for a 3D RWU, trunk xylem, and stomatal conductances. The stomatal conductance is determined by combining a conventional biochemical demand formulation for photosynthesis with an optimization hypothesis that selects stomatal aperture so as to maximize carbon gain for a given water loss. Model results compare well with measurements of soil moisture throughout the rooting zone, of total sap flow in the trunk xylem, as well as of leaf water potential collected in a Loblolly pine forest. The model is then used to diagnose plant responses to water stress in the presence of competing rooting systems. Unsurprisingly, the overlap between rooting zones is shown to enhance soil drying. However, the 3D spatial model yielded transpiration-bulk root-zone soil moisture relations that do not deviate appreciably from their proto-typical form commonly assumed in lumped eco-hydrological models. The increased overlap among rooting systems primarily alters the timing at which the point of incipient soil moisture stress is reached by the entire soil-plant system.

  17. Roots Withstanding their Environment: Exploiting Root System Architecture Responses to Abiotic Stress to Improve Crop Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koevoets, Iko T; Venema, Jan Henk; Elzenga, J Theo M; Testerink, Christa

    2016-01-01

    To face future challenges in crop production dictated by global climate changes, breeders and plant researchers collaborate to develop productive crops that are able to withstand a wide range of biotic and abiotic stresses. However, crop selection is often focused on shoot performance alone, as observation of root properties is more complex and asks for artificial and extensive phenotyping platforms. In addition, most root research focuses on development, while a direct link to the functionality of plasticity in root development for tolerance is often lacking. In this paper we review the currently known root system architecture (RSA) responses in Arabidopsis and a number of crop species to a range of abiotic stresses, including nutrient limitation, drought, salinity, flooding, and extreme temperatures. For each of these stresses, the key molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the RSA response are highlighted. To explore the relevance for crop selection, we especially review and discuss studies linking root architectural responses to stress tolerance. This will provide a first step toward understanding the relevance of adaptive root development for a plant's response to its environment. We suggest that functional evidence on the role of root plasticity will support breeders in their efforts to include root properties in their current selection pipeline for abiotic stress tolerance, aimed to improve the robustness of crops. PMID:27630659

  18. Roots Withstanding their Environment: Exploiting Root System Architecture Responses to Abiotic Stress to Improve Crop Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koevoets, Iko T.; Venema, Jan Henk; Elzenga, J. Theo. M.; Testerink, Christa

    2016-01-01

    To face future challenges in crop production dictated by global climate changes, breeders and plant researchers collaborate to develop productive crops that are able to withstand a wide range of biotic and abiotic stresses. However, crop selection is often focused on shoot performance alone, as observation of root properties is more complex and asks for artificial and extensive phenotyping platforms. In addition, most root research focuses on development, while a direct link to the functionality of plasticity in root development for tolerance is often lacking. In this paper we review the currently known root system architecture (RSA) responses in Arabidopsis and a number of crop species to a range of abiotic stresses, including nutrient limitation, drought, salinity, flooding, and extreme temperatures. For each of these stresses, the key molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the RSA response are highlighted. To explore the relevance for crop selection, we especially review and discuss studies linking root architectural responses to stress tolerance. This will provide a first step toward understanding the relevance of adaptive root development for a plant’s response to its environment. We suggest that functional evidence on the role of root plasticity will support breeders in their efforts to include root properties in their current selection pipeline for abiotic stress tolerance, aimed to improve the robustness of crops. PMID:27630659

  19. On Split Lie Algebras with Symmetric Root Systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Antonio J Calderón Martín

    2008-08-01

    We develop techniques of connections of roots for split Lie algebras with symmetric root systems. We show that any of such algebras is of the form $L=\\mathcal{U}+\\sum_j I_j$ with $\\mathcal{U}$ a subspace of the abelian Lie algebra and any $I_j$ a well described ideal of , satisfying $[I_j,I_k]=0$ if $j≠ k$. Under certain conditions, the simplicity of is characterized and it is shown that is the direct sum of the family of its minimal ideals, each one being a simple split Lie algebra with a symmetric root system and having all its nonzero roots connected.

  20. Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria and root system functioning

    OpenAIRE

    Vacheron, Jordan; Desbrosses, Guilhem; Bouffaud, Marie-Lara; Touraine, Bruno; Moënne-Loccoz, Yvan; Muller, Daniel; Legendre, Laurent; Wisniewski-Dyé, Florence; Prigent-Combaret, Claire

    2013-01-01

    The rhizosphere supports the development and activity of a huge and diversified microbial community, including microorganisms capable to promote plant growth. Among the latter, plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) colonize roots of monocots and dicots, and enhance plant growth by direct and indirect mechanisms. Modification of root system architecture by PGPR implicates the production of phytohormones and other signals that lead, mostly, to enhanced lateral root branching and developme...

  1. Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria and root system functioning

    OpenAIRE

    Jordan eVacheron; Guilhem eDesbrosses; Marie-Lara eBouffaud; Bruno eTouraine; Yvan eMoënne-Loccoz; Daniel eMuller; Laurent eLegendre; Florence eWisniewski-Dyé; Claire ePrigent-Combaret

    2013-01-01

    The rhizosphere supports the development and activity of a huge and diversified microbial community, including microorganisms capable to promote plant growth. Among the latter, Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR) colonize roots of monocots and dicots, and enhance plant growth by direct and indirect mechanisms. Modification of root system architecture by PGPR implicates the production of phytohormones and other signals that lead, mostly, to enhanced lateral root branching and developme...

  2. Properties of Plasma Membrane from Pea Root Seedlings under Altered Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klymchuk, D.; Baranenko, V.; Vorobyova, T. V.; Kurylenko, I.; Chyzhykova, O.; Dubovoy, V.

    In this study, the properties of pea (Pisum sativum L.) plasma membrane were examined to determine how the membrane structure and functions are regulated in response to clinorotation (2 rev/min) conditions. Membrane preparations enriched by plasma membrane vesicles were obtained by aqueous two-phase partitioning from 6-day seedling roots. The specific characteristics of H^+-ATPase, lípid composition and peroxidation intensity as well as fluidity of lipid bilayer were analysed. ATP hydrolytic activity was inhibited by ortovanadate and was insensitive to aside and nitrate in sealed plasma membrane vesicles isolated from both clinorotated and control seedlings. Plasma membrane vesicles from clinorotated seedlings in comparison to controls were characterised by increase in the total lipid/protein ratio, ATP hydrolytic activity and intensifying of lipid peroxidation. Sitosterol and campesterol were the predominant free sterol species. Clinorotated seedlings contained a slightly higher level of unsaturated fatty acid than controls. Plasma membrane vesicles were labelled with pyrene and fluorescence originating from monomeric (I_M) molecules and excimeric (I_E) aggregates were measured. The calculated I_E/I_M values were higher in clinorotated seedlings compared with controls reflecting the reduction in membrane microviscosity. The involvement of the changes in plasma membrane lipid content and composition, fluidity and H^+-ATPase activity in response of pea seedlings to altered gravity is discussed.

  3. Immune system alterations in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovden, H; Frederiksen, J L; Pedersen, S W

    2013-01-01

    cells working together are necessary for the pathogenesis of the disease. Observed immune system alterations could indicate an active participation in this mechanism. Damaged motor neurons are able to activate microglia, astrocytes and the complement system, which further can influence each other...... give more insight into the disease. Markers from the classical complement pathway are elevated where its initiator C1q appears to derive primarily from motor neurons. Activated microglia and astrocytes are found in close proximity to dying motor neurons. Their activation status and proliferation...... and present a hypothesis to direct the way for further studies....

  4. Phosphate-dependent root system architecture responses to salt stress

    KAUST Repository

    Kawa, Dorota

    2016-05-20

    Nutrient availability and salinity of the soil affect growth and development of plant roots. Here, we describe how phosphate availability affects root system architecture (RSA) of Arabidopsis and how phosphate levels modulate responses of the root to salt stress. Phosphate (Pi) starvation reduced main root length and increased the number of lateral roots of Arabidopsis Col-0 seedlings. In combination with salt, low Pi dampened the inhibiting effect of mild salt stress (75mM) on all measured RSA components. At higher NaCl concentrations, the Pi deprivation response prevailed over the salt stress only for lateral root elongation. The Pi deprivation response of lateral roots appeared to be oppositely affected by abscisic acid (ABA) signaling compared to the salt stress response. Natural variation in the response to the combination treatment of salt and Pi starvation within 330 Arabidopsis accessions could be grouped into four response patterns. When exposed to double stress, in general lateral roots prioritized responses to salt, while the effect on main root traits was additive. Interestingly, these patterns were not identical for all accessions studied and multiple strategies to integrate the signals from Pi deprivation and salinity were identified. By Genome Wide Association Mapping (GWAS) 13 genomic loci were identified as putative factors integrating responses to salt stress and Pi starvation. From our experiments, we conclude that Pi starvation interferes with salt responses mainly at the level of lateral roots and that large natural variation exists in the available genetic repertoire of accessions to handle the combination of stresses.

  5. Sap flow measurements of lateral tree roots in agroforestry systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lott, J. E.; Khan, A. A. H.; Ong, C. K.; Black, C. R.

    1996-01-01

    Successful extension of agroforestry to areas of the semi-arid tropics where deep reserves of water exist requires that the tree species be complementary to the associated crops in their use of water within the crop rooting zone. However, it is difficult to identify trees suitable for dryland agroforestry because most existing techniques for determining water uptake by roots cannot distinguish between absorption by tree and crop roots. We describe a method for measuring sap flow through lateral roots using constant temperature heat balance gauges, and the application of this method in a study of complementarity of water use in agroforestry systems containing Grevillea robusta A. Cunn. Sap flow gauges were attached to the trunks and roots of Grevillea with minimum disturbance to the soil. Thermal energy emanating from the soil adversely affected the accuracy of sap flow gauges attached to the roots, with the result that the uncorrected values were up to eightfold greater than the true water uptake determined gravimetrically. This overestimation was eliminated by using a calibration method in which nonconducting excised root segments, with sap flow gauges attached, were placed adjacent to the live roots. The power consumption and temperature differentials of the excised roots were used to correct for external sources and internal losses of heat within the paired live root. The fraction of the total sap flow through individual trees supplied by the lateral roots varied greatly between trees of similar canopy size. Excision of all lateral roots, except for one to which a heat balance gauge was attached, did not significantly increase sap flow through the intact root, suggesting that it was functioning at near maximum capacity.

  6. Organic fertilization alters the community composition of root associated fungi in Pisum sativum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, L.; Nicolaisen, M.; Ravnskov, S.;

    2013-01-01

    Organic fertilization is well known to affect individual functional groups of root associated fungi such as arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and root pathogens, but limited information is available on the effect of organic fertilization at the fungal community composition level. The main objecti......, the organic fertilizer Protamylasse clearly affects communities of root associated fungi, which seems to be linked to the life strategy of the different functional groups of root associated fungi. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------......Organic fertilization is well known to affect individual functional groups of root associated fungi such as arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and root pathogens, but limited information is available on the effect of organic fertilization at the fungal community composition level. The main objective...... of the present study was to examine the response of communities of root associated fungi in Pisum sativum to Protamylasse, an organic fertilizer used in pea production. Plants were grown in pots with field soil amended with four different levels of Protamylasse. 454 pyrosequencing was employed to examine...

  7. Characterization of alfalfa populations contrasting for root system architecture (RSA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The root system architecture affects the capacity for nutrient and water uptake thus impacting biomass yield production and may contribute to the persistence of perennial plants. The objectives of this study were to phenotype the roots of three alfalfa populations and identify differences between di...

  8. Accounting Carbon Storage in Decaying Root Systems of Harvested Forests

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, G. Geoff; Van Lear, David H.; Hu, Huifeng; Kapeluck, Peter R.

    2011-01-01

    Decaying root systems of harvested trees can be a significant component of belowground carbon storage, especially in intensively managed forests where harvest occurs repeatedly in relatively short rotations. Based on destructive sampling of root systems of harvested loblolly pine trees, we estimated that root systems contained about 32% (17.2 Mg ha−1) at the time of harvest, and about 13% (6.1 Mg ha−1) of the soil organic carbon 10 years later. Based on the published roundwood output data, we...

  9. Abscisic Acid: Hidden Architect of Root System Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanne M. Harris

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Plants modulate root growth in response to changes in the local environment, guided by intrinsic developmental genetic programs. The hormone Abscisic Acid (ABA mediates responses to different environmental factors, such as the presence of nitrate in the soil, water stress and salt, shaping the structure of the root system by regulating the production of lateral roots as well as controlling root elongation by modulating cell division and elongation. Curiously, ABA controls different aspects of root architecture in different plant species, perhaps providing some insight into the great diversity of root architecture in different plants, both from different taxa and from different environments. ABA is an ancient signaling pathway, acquired well before the diversification of land plants. Nonetheless, how this ancient signaling module is implemented or interacts within a larger signaling network appears to vary in different species. This review will examine the role of ABA in the control of root architecture, focusing on the regulation of lateral root formation in three plant species, Arabidopsis thaliana, Medicago truncatula and Oryza sativa. We will consider how the implementation of the ABA signaling module might be a target of natural selection, to help contribute to the diversity of root architecture in nature.

  10. Artificial Root Exudate System (ARES): a field approach to simulate tree root exudation in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Sangil, Luis; Estradera-Gumbau, Eduard; George, Charles; Sayer, Emma

    2016-04-01

    The exudation of labile solutes by fine roots represents an important strategy for plants to promote soil nutrient availability in terrestrial ecosystems. Compounds exuded by roots (mainly sugars, carboxylic and amino acids) provide energy to soil microbes, thus priming the mineralization of soil organic matter (SOM) and the consequent release of inorganic nutrients into the rhizosphere. Studies in several forest ecosystems suggest that tree root exudates represent 1 to 10% of the total photoassimilated C, with exudation rates increasing markedly under elevated CO2 scenarios. Despite their importance in ecosystem functioning, we know little about how tree root exudation affect soil carbon dynamics in situ. This is mainly because there has been no viable method to experimentally control inputs of root exudates at field scale. Here, I present a method to apply artificial root exudates below the soil surface in small field plots. The artificial root exudate system (ARES) consists of a water container with a mixture of labile carbon solutes (mimicking tree root exudate rates and composition), which feeds a system of drip-tips covering an area of 1 m2. The tips are evenly distributed every 20 cm and inserted 4-cm into the soil with minimal disturbance. The system is regulated by a mechanical timer, such that artificial root exudate solution can be applied at frequent, regular daily intervals. We tested ARES from April to September 2015 (growing season) within a leaf-litter manipulation experiment ongoing in temperate deciduous woodland in the UK. Soil respiration was measured monthly, and soil samples were taken at the end of the growing season for PLFA, enzymatic activity and nutrient analyses. First results show a very rapid mineralization of the root exudate compounds and, interestingly, long-term increases in SOM respiration, with negligible effects on soil moisture levels. Large positive priming effects (2.5-fold increase in soil respiration during the growing

  11. Does the Presence of Detached Root Border Cells of Zea mays Alter the Activity of the Pathogenic Nematode Meloidogyne incognita?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodger, S; Bengough, A G; Griffiths, B S; Stubbs, V; Young, I M

    2003-09-01

    ABSTRACT The root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita is a major pathogen of a range of important crops. Currently, control is typically achieved by the use of nematicides. However, recent work suggests that manipulating the ability of roots to slough off border cells, which then act as a decoy to the nematode, can significantly decrease damage to the roots. We investigated the attractiveness of border cells to M. incognita and the response of the nematode to border cells in close proximity. We found very limited attraction, in that nematodes did not preferentially alter direction to move toward the border cells, but a large and significant increase in nematode speed was observed once they were in the immediate vicinity of border cells. We discuss the results in the context of physical and biological mechanisms in relation to the control of pathogenic nematodes.

  12. Optimising root system hydraulic architectures for water uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, Félicien; Couvreur, Valentin; Draye, Xavier; Javaux, Mathieu

    2015-04-01

    In this study we started from local hydraulic analysis of idealized root systems to develop a mathematical framework necessary for the understanding of global root systems behaviors. The underlying assumption of this study was that the plant is naturally optimised for the water uptake. The root system is thus a pipe network dedicated to the capture and transport of water. The main objective of the present research is to explain the fitness of major types of root architectures to their environment. In a first step, we developed links between local hydraulic properties and macroscopic parameters of (un)branched roots. The outcome of such an approach were functions of apparent conductance of entire root system and uptake distribution along the roots. We compared our development with some allometric scaling laws for the root water uptake: under the same simplifying assumptions we were able to obtain the same results and even to expand them to more physiological cases. Using empirical data of measured root conductance, we were also able to fit extremely well the data-set with this model. In a second stage we used generic architecture parameters and an existent root growth model to generate various types of root systems (from fibrous to tap). We combined both sides (hydraulic and architecture) then to maximize under a volume constraint either apparent conductance of root systems or the soil volume explored by active roots during the plant growth period. This approach has led to the sensitive parameters of the macroscopic parameters (conductance and location of the water uptake) of each single plant selected for this study. Scientific questions such as: "What is the optimal sowing density of a given hydraulic architecture ?" or "Which plant traits can we change to better explore the soil domain ?" can be also addressed with this approach: some potential applications are illustrated. The next (and ultimate phase) will be to validate our conclusions with real architectures

  13. Effect of localized nitrogen availability to soybean half-root systems on photosynthate partitioning to roots and nodules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr. cv Davis) was grown in a split-root growth system designed to maintain control of the root atmosphere. Two experiments were conducted to examine how 80% Ar:20%, O2 (Ar:O2) and air (Air) atmospheres affected N assimilation (NH4NO3 and N2 fixation) and the partitioning of photosynthate to roots and nodules. Application of NH4NO3 to nonnodulated half-root systems enhanced root growth and root respiration at the site of application. A second experiment applied Ar:O2 or air to the two sides of nodulated soybean half-root systems for 11 days in the following combinations: (a) Air to both sides (Air/Air); (b) Air to one side, Ar:O2 to the other (Air/Ar:O2), and (c) Ar:O2 to both sides (Ar:O2/Ar:O2). Results indicated that dry matter and current photosynthate (14C) were selectively partitioned to nodules and roots where N2 was available. Both root and nodule growth on the Air side of Air/Ar:O2 plants was significantly greater than the Ar:O2 side. The relative partitioning of carbon and current photosynthate between roots and nodules on a half-root system was also affected by N2 availability. The Ar:O2 sides partitioned relatively more current photosynthate to roots (57%) than nodules (43%), while N2-fixing root systems partitioned 36 and 64% of the carbon to roots and nodules, respectively. The Ar:O2 atmosphere decreased root and nodule respiration by 80% and nitrogenase activity by 85% compared to half-root systems in Air while specific nitrogenase activity in Ar:O2 was 50% of nodules supplied Air. Results indicated that nitrogen assimilation, whether from N2 fixation or inorganic sources, had a localized effect on root development

  14. Morphological and Physiological Alteration of Maize Root Architectures on Drought Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drought tolerance is a complex agronomic trait and root characteristics logically play an important role in determining the response of plants to drought stress. Research experiments were conducted to investigate genotypic variations in morphological and physiological responses of roots to drought s...

  15. Morphological and biological alteration of maize root architectures on drought stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drought tolerance is a complex agronomic trait and root characteristics logically play an important role in determining the response of plants to drought stress. Studies were conducted to investigate genotypic variations in morphological and physiological responses of roots to drought stress in corn...

  16. KATP channel subunits in rat dorsal root ganglia: alterations by painful axotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemes Geza

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP channels in neurons mediate neuroprotection, they regulate membrane excitability, and they control neurotransmitter release. Because loss of DRG neuronal KATP currents is involved in the pathophysiology of pain after peripheral nerve injury, we characterized the distribution of the KATP channel subunits in rat DRG, and determined their alterations by painful axotomy using RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. Results PCR demonstrated Kir6.1, Kir6.2, SUR1 and SUR2 transcripts in control DRG neurons. Protein expression for all but Kir6.1 was confirmed by Western blots and immunohistochemistry. Immunostaining of these subunits was identified by fluorescent and confocal microscopy in plasmalemmal and nuclear membranes, in the cytosol, along the peripheral fibers, and in satellite glial cells. Kir6.2 co-localized with SUR1 subunits. Kir6.2, SUR1, and SUR2 subunits were identified in neuronal subpopulations, categorized by positive or negative NF200 or CGRP staining. KATP current recorded in excised patches was blocked by glybenclamide, but preincubation with antibody against SUR1 abolished this blocking effect of glybenclamide, confirming that the antibody targets the SUR1 protein in the neuronal plasmalemmal membrane. In the myelinated nerve fibers we observed anti-SUR1 immunostaining in regularly spaced funneled-shaped structures. These structures were identified by electron microscopy as Schmidt-Lanterman incisures (SLI formed by the Schwann cells. Immunostaining against SUR1 and Kir6.2 colocalized with anti-Caspr at paranodal sites. DRG excised from rats made hyperalgesic by spinal nerve ligation exhibited similar staining against Kir6.2, SUR1 or SUR2 as DRG from controls, but showed decreased prevalence of SUR1 immunofluorescent NF200 positive neurons. In DRG and dorsal roots proximal to axotomy SLI were smaller and showed decreased SUR1 immunofluorescence. Conclusions We

  17. Aqueous root extract ofLecaniodiscus cupanioides restores the alterations in testicular parameters of sexually impaired male rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Quadri O Nurudeen; Taofeek O Ajiboye

    2012-01-01

    Objective:This study aimed to investigate the effects of aqueous root extract ofLecaniodiscus cupanioides (L.cupanioides)on the alterations in the testicular parameters of paroxetine-treated rats.Methods:Group A rats which is the control received distilled water orally for 5 d. Groups B, C, D, E and F consisted of paroxetine-induced sexual dysfunction rats. In addition, Groups C, D, E and F rats were orally treated with 25, 50 and 100 mg/kg body weight of the extract and 7.14 mg/kg body weight of PowMax once daily for 5 d respectively.Results:Paroxetine-induced sexual dysfunction resulted into significant (P<0.05) reduction in the levels of testicular protein, sialic acid, glycogen and cholesterols. These decrease were dose dependently reversed by aqueous root extract ofL. cupanioides. The decrease in the specific activities of acid and alkaline phosphatases, lactate dehydrogenase and gamma-glutamyl transferase in the testes of paroxetine-treated rats were significantly (P<0.05) reversed. Testicular testosterone level decreased significantly (P<0.05) in sexually impaired rats. This decrease was significantly prevented by aqueous root extract ofL. cupanioides. All these alterations brought about by the administration of the extract (25 and 50 mg/kg body weight) compared significantly (P<0.05) with the reference drug, while the 100 mg/kg body weight of the extract compared significantly (P<0.05) with the control.Conclusions:The results of this study showed that aqueous root extract ofL. cupanioidesrestored the alterations in the testicular function parameters of sexually impaired rats. Thus supporting the use of the plants in the management of sexual dysfunction in the folkloric medicine of Nigeria.

  18. Moth outbreaks alter root-associated fungal communities in subarctic mountain birch forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravesi, Karita; Aikio, Sami; Wäli, Piippa R; Ruotsalainen, Anna Liisa; Kaukonen, Maarit; Huusko, Karoliina; Suokas, Marko; Brown, Shawn P; Jumpponen, Ari; Tuomi, Juha; Markkola, Annamari

    2015-05-01

    Climate change has important implications on the abundance and range of insect pests in forest ecosystems. We studied responses of root-associated fungal communities to defoliation of mountain birch hosts by a massive geometrid moth outbreak through 454 pyrosequencing of tagged amplicons of the ITS2 rDNA region. We compared fungal diversity and community composition at three levels of moth defoliation (intact control, full defoliation in one season, full defoliation in two or more seasons), replicated in three localities. Defoliation caused dramatic shifts in functional and taxonomic community composition of root-associated fungi. Differentially defoliated mountain birch roots harbored distinct fungal communities, which correlated with increasing soil nutrients and decreasing amount of host trees with green foliar mass. Ectomycorrhizal fungi (EMF) abundance and richness declined by 70-80 % with increasing defoliation intensity, while saprotrophic and endophytic fungi seemed to benefit from defoliation. Moth herbivory also reduced dominance of Basidiomycota in the roots due to loss of basidiomycete EMF and increases in functionally unknown Ascomycota. Our results demonstrate the top-down control of belowground fungal communities by aboveground herbivory and suggest a marked reduction in the carbon flow from plants to soil fungi following defoliation. These results are among the first to provide evidence on cascading effects of natural herbivory on tree root-associated fungi at an ecosystem scale. PMID:25687127

  19. Moth outbreaks alter root-associated fungal communities in subarctic mountain birch forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravesi, Karita; Aikio, Sami; Wäli, Piippa R; Ruotsalainen, Anna Liisa; Kaukonen, Maarit; Huusko, Karoliina; Suokas, Marko; Brown, Shawn P; Jumpponen, Ari; Tuomi, Juha; Markkola, Annamari

    2015-05-01

    Climate change has important implications on the abundance and range of insect pests in forest ecosystems. We studied responses of root-associated fungal communities to defoliation of mountain birch hosts by a massive geometrid moth outbreak through 454 pyrosequencing of tagged amplicons of the ITS2 rDNA region. We compared fungal diversity and community composition at three levels of moth defoliation (intact control, full defoliation in one season, full defoliation in two or more seasons), replicated in three localities. Defoliation caused dramatic shifts in functional and taxonomic community composition of root-associated fungi. Differentially defoliated mountain birch roots harbored distinct fungal communities, which correlated with increasing soil nutrients and decreasing amount of host trees with green foliar mass. Ectomycorrhizal fungi (EMF) abundance and richness declined by 70-80 % with increasing defoliation intensity, while saprotrophic and endophytic fungi seemed to benefit from defoliation. Moth herbivory also reduced dominance of Basidiomycota in the roots due to loss of basidiomycete EMF and increases in functionally unknown Ascomycota. Our results demonstrate the top-down control of belowground fungal communities by aboveground herbivory and suggest a marked reduction in the carbon flow from plants to soil fungi following defoliation. These results are among the first to provide evidence on cascading effects of natural herbivory on tree root-associated fungi at an ecosystem scale.

  20. Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria and root system functioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan eVacheron

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The rhizosphere supports the development and activity of a huge and diversified microbial community, including microorganisms capable to promote plant growth. Among the latter, Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR colonize roots of monocots and dicots, and enhance plant growth by direct and indirect mechanisms. Modification of root system architecture by PGPR implicates the production of phytohormones and other signals that lead, mostly, to enhanced lateral root branching and development of root hairs. PGPR also modify root functioning, improve plant nutrition and influence the physiology of the whole plant. Recent results provided first clues as to how PGPR signals could trigger these plant responses. Whether local and/or systemic, the plant molecular pathways involved remain often unknown. From an ecological point of view, it emerged that PGPR form coherent functional groups, whose rhizosphere ecology is influenced by a myriad of abiotic and biotic factors in natural and agricultural soils, and these factors can in turn modulate PGPR effects on roots. In this paper, we address novel knowledge and gaps on PGPR modes of action and signals, and highlight recent progress on the links between plant morphological and physiological effects induced by PGPR. We also show the importance of taking into account the size, diversity and gene expression patterns of PGPR assemblages in the rhizosphere to better understand their impact on plant growth and functioning. Integrating mechanistic and ecological knowledge on PGPR populations in soil will be a prerequisite to develop novel management strategies for sustainable agriculture.

  1. Cadmium-induced functional and ultrastructural alterations in roots of two transgenic cotton cultivars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daud, M.K.; Sun, Yuqiang; Dawood, M. [Department of Agronomy, College of Agriculture and Biotechnology, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China); Hayat, Y. [Institute of Bioinformatics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China); Variath, M.T.; Wu Yuxiang [Department of Agronomy, College of Agriculture and Biotechnology, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China); Raziuddin [Department of Agronomy, College of Agriculture and Biotechnology, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China); Plant Breeding and Genetics Department, NWFP Agricultural University Peshawar, Peshawar (Pakistan); Mishkat, Ullah [Zoological Sciences Division, Pakistan Museum of Natural History, Garden Avenue, Shakarparian, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Salahuddin [District Agriculture Extension Offices, Bannu Road, Dera Ismail Khan (NWFP) (Pakistan); Najeeb, Ullah [Department of Agronomy, College of Agriculture and Biotechnology, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China); Zhu, Shuijin [Department of Agronomy, College of Agriculture and Biotechnology, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China)], E-mail: shjzhu@zju.edu.cn

    2009-01-15

    The toxic effect of cadmium (Cd) at increasing concentrations was studied with special attention being given to the root morphological and ultrastructural changes in two transgenic cotton cultivars viz. BR001 and GK30 and their wild relative viz. Coker 312. In comparison to their respective controls, low concentration (10 and 100 {mu}M) of Cd greatly stimulated seed germination, while it was inhibited by highest concentration of Cd (1000 {mu}M) in case of two transgenic cultivars. However, in Coker 312 the seed germination percentage progressively decreased over the control at all Cd levels. Various physiological and morphological parameters of the root and whole plant in both transgenic cotton cultivars and their relative wild cotton genotype respond differently towards the Cd toxicity. Bioavailability of Cd was concentration-dependent where seedling root captured more Cd as compared to shoot. BR001 accumulated more Cd followed by GK30, while Coker 312 was less Cd accumulator. The ultrastructural modifications in the root tip cells of both the transgenic cotton cultivars and their wild relative were also dose-dependent. With the increase in Cd levels, the fine structures of their root cells also invariably changed. Increase in plasmolysis of the plasma membrane, greater number of nucleoli and vacuoles and enlarged vacuoles could be observed in both transgenic cotton cultivars. In comparison to them, Coker 312 showed relatively well developed ultrastructures of the root tips except enlarged vacuoles and greater number of mitochondria. Moreover, the accumulation of Cd in the form of electron dense granules and crystals both in vacuoles and attached to cell walls were visible in both transgenic cotton cultivars and their wild relative. These results suggest that both transgenic cotton cultivars and their wild relative cotton genotype responded positively towards Cd stress at seedling stage, the internal Cd-detoxification might be through apoplastic and symplastic

  2. Cadmium-induced functional and ultrastructural alterations in roots of two transgenic cotton cultivars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The toxic effect of cadmium (Cd) at increasing concentrations was studied with special attention being given to the root morphological and ultrastructural changes in two transgenic cotton cultivars viz. BR001 and GK30 and their wild relative viz. Coker 312. In comparison to their respective controls, low concentration (10 and 100 μM) of Cd greatly stimulated seed germination, while it was inhibited by highest concentration of Cd (1000 μM) in case of two transgenic cultivars. However, in Coker 312 the seed germination percentage progressively decreased over the control at all Cd levels. Various physiological and morphological parameters of the root and whole plant in both transgenic cotton cultivars and their relative wild cotton genotype respond differently towards the Cd toxicity. Bioavailability of Cd was concentration-dependent where seedling root captured more Cd as compared to shoot. BR001 accumulated more Cd followed by GK30, while Coker 312 was less Cd accumulator. The ultrastructural modifications in the root tip cells of both the transgenic cotton cultivars and their wild relative were also dose-dependent. With the increase in Cd levels, the fine structures of their root cells also invariably changed. Increase in plasmolysis of the plasma membrane, greater number of nucleoli and vacuoles and enlarged vacuoles could be observed in both transgenic cotton cultivars. In comparison to them, Coker 312 showed relatively well developed ultrastructures of the root tips except enlarged vacuoles and greater number of mitochondria. Moreover, the accumulation of Cd in the form of electron dense granules and crystals both in vacuoles and attached to cell walls were visible in both transgenic cotton cultivars and their wild relative. These results suggest that both transgenic cotton cultivars and their wild relative cotton genotype responded positively towards Cd stress at seedling stage, the internal Cd-detoxification might be through apoplastic and symplastic binding

  3. The Building of Grass-roots Agricultural Technology Extension System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen; YANG; Jian; HUANG

    2013-01-01

    Based on the survey of 154 farmers in Guiyang City, we analyze the basic situation of building of grass-roots agricultural technology extension system in Guiyang City. Then we point out some problems in the building of grass-roots agricultural technology extension system in Guiyang City: the function of grass-roots agricultural technology extension center weakens; the content of agricultural technology extension is difficult to adapt to farmers’ needs for technology; the extension mode of agricultural technology departments does not adapt to the needs of modern agriculture. In order to perfect the building of grass-roots agricultural technology extension system, the countermeasures and recommendations are put forth as follows: strengthening the input of funds, and ensuring that the basic work of public welfare agricultural technology extension is smoothly carried out; innovating upon the system, and improving the function of grass-roots agricultural technology extension center; implementing management on agricultural technology extension personnel’s performance, and promoting the extension efficiency; strengthening the building of extension team in rural areas, and cultivating high-quality agricultural technology extension personnel; exploring the advanced service mode to meet farmers’ needs.

  4. PLASMA-MEMBRANE LIPID ALTERATIONS INDUCED BY NACL IN WINTER-WHEAT ROOTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MANSOUR, MMF; VANHASSELT, PR; KUIPER, PJC

    1994-01-01

    A highly enriched plasma membrane fraction was isolated by two phase partitioning from wheat roots (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Vivant) grown with and without 100 mM NaCl. The lipids of the plasma membrane fraction were extracted and characterized. Phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine were

  5. Cadmium-induced Functional and Ultrastructural Alterations in Roots of Two Transgenic Cotton Cultivars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAUD M K; SUN Yu-qiang; ZHU Shui-jin

    2008-01-01

    @@ The toxic effect of cadmium (Cd) at increasing concentrations has been studied with special attention being given to root morphological and ultrastructural changes in two transgenic cotton cultivars viz.BR001 and GK30 and their wild relative cotton genotype viz.Coker 312.In comparison to their respective controls,low concentration (10 and 100 M) of Cd greatly stimulated seed germination,while it was inhibited by highest concentration of Cd (1000 M) in case of two transgenic cultivars.

  6. Cerebroside C increases tolerance to chilling injury and alters lipid composition in wheat roots.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Xia Li

    Full Text Available Chilling tolerance was increased in seed germination and root growth of wheat seedlings grown in media containing 20 µg/mL cerebroside C (CC, isolated from the endophytic Phyllosticta sp. TG78. Seeds treated with 20 µg/mL CC at 4 °C expressed the higher germination rate (77.78%, potential (23.46%, index (3.44 and the shorter germination time (6.19 d; root growth was also significantly improved by 13.76% in length, 13.44% in fresh weight and 6.88% in dry mass compared to controls. During the cultivation process at 4 °C for three days and the followed 24 h at 25 °C, lipid peroxidation, expressed by malondialdehyde (MDA content and relative membrane permeability (RMP was significantly reduced in CC-treated roots; activities of lipoxygenase (LOX, phospholipid C (PLC and phospholipid D (PLD were inhibited by 13.62-62.26%, 13.54-63.93% and 13.90-61.17%, respectively; unsaturation degree of fatty acids was enhanced through detecting the contents of CC-induced linoleic acid, linolenic acid, palmitic acid and stearic acid using GC-MS; capacities of superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px were individually increased by 7.69-46.06%, 3.37-37.96%, and -7.00-178.07%. These results suggest that increased chilling tolerance may be due, in part, to the reduction of lipid peroxidation and alternation of lipid composition of roots in the presence of CC.

  7. Fracture resistance of roots obturated with novel hydrophilic obturation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Vibha; Arora, Shashank

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Comparative assessment of fracture resistance of roots obturated with three hydrophilic systems — novel CPoint system, Resilon/Epiphany system, and EndoSequence BC sealer; and one hydrophobic gold standard gutta-percha/AHPlus system. Materials and Methods: Ninety freshly extracted, human, single-rooted mandibular premolars were selected. The specimens were decoronated and standardized to a working length of 13 mm. The teeth were randomly divided into six groups (n = 15). In Group A, teeth were left unprepared and unfilled (negative control). Rest of the groups were prepared by using ProTaper system up to a master apical file F3; followed by which Group B was left unobturated (positive control); Group C, novel CPoint System; group D, Resilon/Epiphany system, Group E EndoSequence BC sealer, and Group F gutta-percha and AH Plus. Specimens were stored for 2 weeks at 100% humidity. Each group was then subjected to fracture testing by using a universal testing machine. The force required to fracture each specimen was recorded and the data was analyzed statistically using analysis of variance (ANOVA) test and Tukey's post-hoc test. Results: The hydrophilic obturation systems have shown to exhibit significantly higher fracture resistance as shown by the values in Groups C, D, and E (P 0.05). Conclusion: In contrast to hydrophobic systems, hydrophilic systems showed higher fracture resistance in a single-rooted premolar. PMID:26069417

  8. Colonization of Greek olive cultivars' root system by arbuscular mycorrhiza fungus: root morphology, growth, and mineral nutrition of olive plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theocharis Chatzistathis

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Rooted leafy cuttings of three Greek olive (Olea europaea L. cultivars (Koroneiki, Kothreiki and Chondrolia Chalkidikis were grown for six months in three soil types, in an experimental greenhouse, in order to investigate: i if their root system was colonized by arbuscular mycorrhiza fungus (AMF genus and, ii if genotypic differences concerning growth and mineral nutrition of olive plants existed. Gigaspora sp. colonized the root system of the three cultivars studied, while Glomus sp. colonized only the root system of 'Koroneiki'. Furthermore, in most cases root colonization by AMF differed among cultivars and soil types. The maximum root colonization, in all soils, was found in 'Chondrolia Chalkidikis'. In the three soils studied, the ratio shoot dry weight (SDW/ root dry weight (RDW was higher in 'Chondrolia Chalkidikis' than in the other two cultivars. Furthermore, root system morphology of the three olive cultivars was completely different, irrespectively of soil type. Leaf Mn, Fe, Zn, Ca, Mg, K and P concentrations, as well as total per plant nutrient content and nutrient use efficiency, differed among cultivars under the same soil conditions. These differences concerning root morphology, SDW/RDW, as well as nutrient uptake and use efficiency, could be possibly ascribed to the differential AMF colonization by Glomus sp. and Gigaspora sp.

  9. Computer Algebra Systems and Theorems on Real Roots of Polynomials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aidoo, Anthony Y.; Manthey, Joseph L.; Ward, Kim Y.

    2010-01-01

    A computer algebra system is used to derive a theorem on the existence of roots of a quadratic equation on any bounded real interval. This is extended to a cubic polynomial. We discuss how students could be led to derive and prove these theorems. (Contains 1 figure.)

  10. TGeoCad: an Interface between ROOT and CAD Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the simulation of High Energy Physics experiment a very high precision in the description of the detector geometry is essential to achieve the required performances. The physicists in charge of Monte Carlo Simulation of the detector need to collaborate efficiently with the engineers working at the mechanical design of the detector. Often, this collaboration is made hard by the usage of different and incompatible software. ROOT is an object-oriented C++ framework used by physicists for storing, analyzing and simulating data produced by the high-energy physics experiments while CAD (Computer-Aided Design) software is used for mechanical design in the engineering field. The necessity to improve the level of communication between physicists and engineers led to the implementation of an interface between the ROOT geometrical modeler used by the virtual Monte Carlo simulation software and the CAD systems. In this paper we describe the design and implementation of the TGeoCad Interface that has been developed to enable the use of ROOT geometrical models in several CAD systems. To achieve this goal, the ROOT geometry description is converted into STEP file format (ISO 10303), which can be imported and used by many CAD systems

  11. Study on Constitutive Model for Root System of Korshinsk peashrub in Axial Tension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-jian Feng

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Constitutive model for root system of Korshinsk peashrub (Caragana korshinskii Kom. in axial tension is an important tool for analyzing the mechanism of soil reinforcement of root system. This model enables a mechanical analysis on strength and deformation of root system and root-soil complex. We carried out axial tension test of root system of Korshinsk peashrub in this paper and discussed the stress-strain relation. Based on the experimental results, the constitutive model for root system of Korshinsk peashrub in axial tension was established. Results showed that: (1 When the strain was smaller than 4%, the stress-strain relation was linear for single root, corresponding to linear elastic deformation; when the strain was larger than 4%, the single root underwent plastic deformation; (2 Elastic modulus of the root system was related to root diameter by a power function. The smaller the root diameter, the higher the elastic modulus was; (3 Root diameter was related to the ultimate tensile strength of root also by a power function. The smaller the root diameter, the higher the ultimate tensile strength of root was; (4 The tensile stress-strain curve of the root system divided into ascending segment and descending segment, which was fitted by parabola and curvilinear model, respectively.

  12. Traffic Root Modelling and Assignment with Intelligent Transport System

    OpenAIRE

    Kunicina, Nadezhda; Galkina, Alina; Zabasta, Anatolijs; Patlins, Antons; Kondratjevs, Kaspars

    2014-01-01

    The integration of emergency and specialized transport rooting tools in the usual traffic control paradigms is one of the opportunities offered by modern intelligent traffic control systems. The research is connected with improvement of on – line traffic control and adaptation of special traffic lighting alternatives by ITS The task can be solved with the help of modern technical methods and equipment as well as applying control paradigms of the distributed systems. The problem is solved with...

  13. Alterations of physiology and gene expression due to long-term magnesium-deficiency differ between leaves and roots of Citrus reticulata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiao-Lin; Ma, Cui-Lan; Yang, Lin-Tong; Chen, Li-Song

    2016-07-01

    Seedlings of Ponkan (Citrus reticulata) were irrigated with nutrient solution containing 0 (Mg-deficiency) or 1mM MgSO4 (control) every two day for 16 weeks. Thereafter, we examined magnesium (Mg)-deficiency-induced changes in leaf and root gas exchange, total soluble proteins and gene expression. Mg-deficiency lowered leaf CO2 assimilation, and increased leaf dark respiration. However, Mg-deficient roots had lower respiration. Total soluble protein level was not significantly altered by Mg-deficiency in roots, but was lower in Mg-deficient leaves than in controls. Using cDNA-AFLP, we obtained 70 and 71 differentially expressed genes from leaves and roots. These genes mainly functioned in signal transduction, stress response, carbohydrate and energy metabolism, cell transport, cell wall and cytoskeleton metabolism, nucleic acid, and protein metabolisms. Lipid metabolism (Ca(2+) signals)-related Mg-deficiency-responsive genes were isolated only from roots (leaves). Although little difference existed in the number of Mg-deficiency-responsive genes between them both, most of these genes only presented in Mg-deficient leaves or roots, and only four genes were shared by them both. Our data clearly demonstrated that Mg-deficiency-induced alterations of physiology and gene expression greatly differed between leaves and roots. In addition, we focused our discussion on the causes for photosynthetic decline in Mg-deficient leaves and the responses of roots to Mg-deficiency. PMID:27163764

  14. Integration of root phenes revealed by intensive phenotyping of root system architecture, anatomy, and physiology in cereals

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, Larry

    2015-04-01

    Food insecurity is among the greatest challenges humanity will face in the 21st century. Agricultural production in much of the world is constrained by the natural infertility of soil which restrains crops from reaching their yield potential. In developed nations, fertilizer inputs pollute air and water and contribute to climate change and environmental degradation. In poor nations low soil fertility is a primary constraint to food security and economic development. Water is almost always limiting crop growth in any system. Increasing the acquisition efficiency of soil resources is one method by which crop yields could be increased without the use of more fertilizers or irrigation. Cereals are the most widely grown crops, both in terms of land area and in yield, so optimizing uptake efficiency of cereals is an important goal. Roots are the primary interface between plant and soil and are responsible for the uptake of soil resources. The deployment of roots in space and time comprises root system architecture (RSA). Cereal RSA is a complex phenotype that aggregates many elemental phenes (elemental units of phenotype). Integration of root phenes will be determined by interactions through their effects on soil foraging and plant metabolism. Many architectural, metabolic, and physiological root phenes have been identified in maize, including: nodal root number, nodal root growth angle, lateral root density, lateral root length, aerenchyma, cortical cell size and number, and nitrate uptake kinetics. The utility of these phenes needs confirmation in maize and in other cereals. The maize root system is composed of an embryonic root system and nodal roots that emerge in successive whorls as the plant develops, and is similar to other cereals. Current phenotyping platforms often ignore the inner whorls and instead focus on the most visible outer whorls after excavating a maize root crown from soil. Here, an intensive phenotyping platform evaluating phenes of all nodal root

  15. Composite potato plants with transgenic roots on non-transgenic shoots: a model system for studying gene silencing in roots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Patricia; Santala, Johanna; Nielsen, Steen Lykke;

    2014-01-01

    Composite plants, with transgenic roots on a non-transgenic shoot, can be obtained by shoot explant transformation with Agrobacterium rhizogenes. The aim of this study was to generate composite potato plants (Solanum tuberosum) to be used as a model system in future studies on root...... of composite potato plants expressed significantly higher amounts of β-glucuronidase (GUS) than the roots of a GUS-transgenic potato line event. Silencing of the uidA transgene (GUS) was tested by inducing roots on the GUS-transgenic cv. Albatros event with strains of A. rhizogenes over-expressing either......-mediated silencing (co-suppression) was not functional in roots. The results suggest that composite plants offer a useful experimental system for potato research, which has gained little previous attention....

  16. Segregation and Alteration of Phenolic and Aliphatic Components of Root and Leaf Litter by Detritivores and Microbes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filley, T. R.; Altmann, J.; Szlavecz, K. A.; Kalbitz, K.; Gamblin, D.; Nierop, K.

    2012-12-01

    The physical and microbial transformation of plant detritus in the litter layer and soil is accompanied by chemical separation of progressively soluble fractions and their movement into the rhizosphere driving subsequent soil processes. We investigated the combined action of specific detritivores, microbial decay, and leaching on the chemical separation of plant aromatic and aliphatic components from root, wood, and leaf tissue using 13C-TMAH thermochemolysis. This method enabled the simultaneous analysis of hydrolyzable tannin and lignin fragments, substituted fatty acids, and condensed tannin composition and revealed process-specific chemical transformations to plant secondary compounds. Long-term incubation and field sampling demonstrated how plant residues are progressively leached of the water soluble, oxidized fragments generated through decay. The residues appeared only slightly altered, in the case of brown rot wood, or enriched in aliphatic fragments, in the case of leaf and root tissue. Water extractable fractions were always selectively dominated by polyphenolics, either as demethylated lignin or tannins, and nearly devoid of aliphatic materials, despite high concentrations in the starting materials. Additionally, for plant materials with high tannin contents, such as pine needles, consumption and passage through some arthropod guts revealed what appeared to be microbially-mediated methylation of phenols, and a loss of tannins in leachates. These findings are indications for an in-situ phenol detoxification mechanism. This research provides important information regarding the links between biochemical decay and the chemical nature of organic matter removed and remaining in the soil profile.

  17. The transparent testa4 mutation prevents flavonoid synthesis and alters auxin transport and the response of Arabidopsis roots to gravity and light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buer, Charles S; Muday, Gloria K

    2004-05-01

    We examined whether flavonoids act as endogenous auxin transport regulators during gravity vector and light intensity changes in Arabidopsis thaliana roots. Flavonoid deficient transparent testa4 [tt4(2YY6)] seedlings had elevated root basipetal auxin transport compared with the wild type, consistent with the absence of a negative auxin transport regulator. The tt4(2YY6) roots had delayed gravitropism that was chemically complemented with a flavonoid intermediate. Flavonoid accumulation was found in wild-type columella cells, the site of gravity perception, and in epidermal and cortical cells, the site of differential growth, but flavonoid accumulation was absent in tt4(2YY6) roots. Flavonoid accumulation was higher in gravity-stimulated root tips as compared with vertical controls, with maximum differences coinciding with the timing of gravitropic bending, and was located in epidermal cells. Exogenous indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) also elevated flavonoid accumulation, suggesting that flavonoid changes in response to gravity might be partly as a result of changing IAA distribution. Acropetal IAA transport was also elevated in roots of tt4(2YY6). Flavonoid synthesis was repressed in the dark, as were differences in root acropetal transport in tt4(2YY6). These results are consistent with light- and gravity-induced flavonoid stimulation that alters auxin transport in roots and dependent physiological processes, including gravitropic bending and root development.

  18. Solving polynomial systems using no-root elimination blending schemes

    KAUST Repository

    Barton, Michael

    2011-12-01

    Searching for the roots of (piecewise) polynomial systems of equations is a crucial problem in computer-aided design (CAD), and an efficient solution is in strong demand. Subdivision solvers are frequently used to achieve this goal; however, the subdivision process is expensive, and a vast number of subdivisions is to be expected, especially for higher-dimensional systems. Two blending schemes that efficiently reveal domains that cannot contribute by any root, and therefore significantly reduce the number of subdivisions, are proposed. Using a simple linear blend of functions of the given polynomial system, a function is sought after to be no-root contributing, with all control points of its BernsteinBézier representation of the same sign. If such a function exists, the domain is purged away from the subdivision process. The applicability is demonstrated on several CAD benchmark problems, namely surfacesurfacesurface intersection (SSSI) and surfacecurve intersection (SCI) problems, computation of the Hausdorff distance of two planar curves, or some kinematic-inspired tasks. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Square root voting system, optimal threshold and \\pi

    CERN Document Server

    Zyczkowski, Karol

    2011-01-01

    The problem of designing an optimal weighted voting system for the two-tier voting, applicable in the case of the Council of Ministers of the European Union (EU), is investigated. Various arguments in favour of the square root voting system, where the voting weights of member states are proportional to the square root of their population are discussed and a link between this solution and the random walk in the one-dimensional lattice is established. It is known that the voting power of every member state is approximately equal to its voting weight, if the threshold q for the qualified majority in the voting body is optimally chosen. We analyze the square root voting system for a generic 'union' of M states and derive in this case an explicit approximate formula for the level of the optimal threshold: $q \\simeq 1/2+1/\\sqrt{{\\pi} M}$. The prefactor $1/\\sqrt{{\\pi}}$ appears here as a result of averaging over the ensemble of unions with random populations.

  20. Root Zone Respiration on Hydroponically Grown Wheat Plant Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler-Crespo, R. A.; Monje, O. A.

    2010-01-01

    Root respiration is a biological phenomenon that controls plant growth and physiological development during a plant's lifespan. This process is dependent on the availability of oxygen in the system where the plant is located. In hydroponic systems, where plants are submerged in a solution containing vital nutrients but no type of soil, the availability of oxygen arises from the dissolved oxygen concentration in the solution. This oxygen concentration is dependent on the , gas-liquid interface formed on the upper surface of the liquid, as given by Henry's Law, depending on pressure and temperature conditions. Respiration rates of the plants rise as biomass and root zone increase with age. The respiration rate of Apogee wheat plants (Triticum aestivum) was measured as a function of light intensity (catalytic for photosynthesis) and CO2 concentration to determine their effect on respiration rates. To determine their effects on respiration rate and plant growth microbial communities were introduced into the system, by Innoculum. Surfactants were introduced, simulating gray-water usage in space, as another factor to determine their effect on chemical oxygen demand of microbials and on respiration rates of the plants. It is expected to see small effects from changes in CO2 concentration or light levels, and to see root respiration decrease in an exponential manner with plant age and microbial activity.

  1. Comparison of Three Methods for Determination of Root Hydraulic Conductivity of Maize (Zea mays L.) Root System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Qing-ming; LIU Bin-bin

    2010-01-01

    Three techniques of root pressure probe,pressure chamber and high pressure flow meter were used to measure the hydraulic conduetivities (Lp,) of whole root systems of young maize (Zea mays L.) seedlings grown hydroponically under either drought or normal water conditions.Compared to normal water conditions,drought stress simulated by polyethylene glycol 6 000 (osmotic potential=-0.2 MPa) reduced Lp,in the root system by over 50%.It indicated that water permeability in the roots decreased significantly when plants suffered from water shortages.Moreover,there was no significant difference (P<0.05) on the Lpr values in the root systems developed under a given water stress regime among the three techniques used.Therefore,all three methods are acceptable to study the hydraulic conductivity of maize seedling root systems.We have also highlighted some of the technical limitations of each method.It can be inferred that the root pressure probe is preferable for young maize seedlings because it is subtle and has the additional ability to determine solute transport properties,but the method is time consuming.Other advantages and disadvantages of each technique are discussed in order to acquaint researchers with basic information that could contribute to their choice of an appropriate technique for future studies.

  2. Understanding plant root system influences on soil strength and stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengough, A. Glyn; Brown, Jennifer L.; Loades, Kenneth W.; Knappett, Jonathan A.; Meijer, Gertjan; Nicoll, Bruce

    2016-04-01

    Keywords: root growth, soil reinforcement, tensile strength Plant roots modify and reinforce the soil matrix, stabilising it against erosion and shallow landslides. Roots mechanically bind the soil particles together and modify the soil hydrology via water uptake, creation of biopores, and modification of the soil water-release characteristic. Key to understanding the mechanical reinforcement of soil by roots is the relation between root strength and root diameter measured for roots in any given soil horizon. Thin roots have frequently been measured to have a greater tensile strength than thick roots, but their strength is also often much more variable. We consider the factors influencing this strength-diameter relationship, considering relations between root tensile strength and root dry density, root water content, root age, and root turnover in several woody and non-woody species. The role of possible experimental artefacts and measurement techniques will be considered. Tensile strength increased generally with root age and decreased with thermal time after excision as a result of root decomposition. Single factors alone do not appear to explain the strength-diameter relationship, and both strength/stiffness and dry density may vary between different layers of tissue within a single root. Results will be discussed to consider how we can achieve a more comprehensive understanding of the variation in root biomechanical properties, and its consequences for soil reinforcement. Acknowledgements: The James Hutton Institute receives funding from the Scottish Government. AGB and JAK acknowledge part funding from EPSRC (EP/M020355/1).

  3. Altered anterior visual system development following early monocular enucleation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krista R. Kelly

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: The novel finding of an asymmetry in morphology of the anterior visual system following long-term survival from early monocular enucleation indicates altered postnatal visual development. Possible mechanisms behind this altered development include recruitment of deafferented cells by crossing nasal fibres and/or geniculate cell retention via feedback from primary visual cortex. These data highlight the importance of balanced binocular input during postnatal maturation for typical anterior visual system morphology.

  4. Statistical modeling of nitrogen-dependent modulation of root system architecture in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Takao Araya; Takuya Kubo; Nicolaus von Wiren; Hideki Takahashi

    2016-01-01

    Plant root development is strongly affected by nutrient availability. Despite the importance of structure and function of roots in nutrient acquisition, statistical modeling approaches to evaluate dynamic and temporal modulations of root system architecture in response to nutrient availability have remained as widely open and exploratory areas in root biology. In this study, we developed a statistical modeling approach to investigate modulations of root system archi-tecture in response to nitrogen availability. Mathematical models were designed for quantitative assessment of root growth and root branching phenotypes and their dynamic relationships based on hierarchical configuration of primary and lateral roots formulating the fishbone-shaped root system architecture in Arabidopsis thaliana. Time-series datasets reporting dynamic changes in root developmental traits on different nitrate or ammonium concentrations were gener-ated for statistical analyses. Regression analyses unraveled key parameters associated with:(i) inhibition of primary root growth under nitrogen limitation or on ammonium;(i ) rapid progression of lateral root emergence in response to ammonium; and (i i) inhibition of lateral root elongation in the presence of excess nitrate or ammonium. This study provides a statistical framework for interpreting dynamic modulation of root system architecture, supported by meta-analysis of datasets displaying morphological responses of roots to diverse nitrogen supplies.

  5. Comparative ultrastructure of the root system in rhizocephalan barnacles (Crustacea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bresciani, J; Høeg, Jens Thorvald

    2001-01-01

    Rhizocephalan barnacles are parasites of Crustacea. They lack even the rudiments of an alimentary canal, but infiltrate their hosts with a nutrient-absorbing system of rootlets. We review the ultrastructure of the rootlets using light microscopy, SEM, and TEM in nine species from five families...... the rootlets towards the external reproductive body. In C. delagei the single, bladder-shaped rootlet lacks both the apical projections in the epidermis, the electron-dense cuticle layer, and the microcuticular projections. We review previous studies on the rhizocephalan root system and discuss functional...

  6. Development of root observation method by image analysis system

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Giyoung

    1995-01-01

    Knowledge of plant roots is important for determining plant-soil relationships, managing soil effectively, studying nutrient and water extraction, and creating a soil quality index. Plant root research is limited by the large amount of time and labor required to wash the roots from the soil and measure the viable roots. A root measurement method based on image analysis was proposed to reduce the time and labor requirement. A thinning algorithm-based image analysis method was us...

  7. Alteration of P2X3 expression in dorsal root ganglia after sciatic nerve ligation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guoxing Zhou; Lesi Xie; Qiben Wang; Qingping Yu; Xiaofu Liu; Qiumei Liu; Wei Peng; Zhicheng Zeng

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The expressions of P2X3 receptor in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) after different peripheral nerve injuries are diverse. It indicates the different roles of P2X3 in different models-caused neuropathologic pains.OBJECTIVE: To observe the expressions of P2X3 in corresponding DRG after sciatic nerve ligation in rats.DESIGN: Controlled observation experiment.SETTING: Department of Morphology, Hunan Traditional Chinese Medical College; Department of Human Anatomy and Neurobiology, Xiangya Medical College, Central South University.MATERIALS: Thirty-five healthy adult SD rats of clean grade an d either gender, weighing (200±20) g,were involved. According to the random digits table, the involved rats were randomized into 3 groups:normal group (n =5), sham-operated group (n =5) and experimental group (n =25). The experimental group were subdivided into 3, 7, 14, 21, 28 days groups according to different surviving time after operation, 5 rats at each time point. Polyclonal rabbit anti-P2X3 antibody (ABCAM company); biotinylated goat anti-rabbit IgG (Zhongshanjingqiao Biotechnical Co., Ltd., Beijing); Motic fluorescence microscope (Motic, Germany).METHODS: The experiments were carried out in the Department of Human Anatomy and Neurobiology,Xiangya Medical College, Central South University from June to December 2006. ① Rats of experimental group were created into models by ligation of right sciatic nerve according to the method of Seltzer et al. Left sciatic nerve was used as self-control. As for rats in the sham-operated group, ligation of sciatic nerve was omitted, but other procedures were the same as those in the experimental group. Rats of normal group were untouched. ② Rats of the normal group and sham-operated group survived for 14 days separately, and those of experimental group survived for corresponding time. After being deeply anesthetized by intraperitoneal injection of over-dose sodium pentobarbital, the rats of experimental group were transcardially

  8. Tree Root System Characterization and Volume Estimation by Terrestrial Laser Scanning and Quantitative Structure Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron Smith

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The accurate characterization of three-dimensional (3D root architecture, volume, and biomass is important for a wide variety of applications in forest ecology and to better understand tree and soil stability. Technological advancements have led to increasingly more digitized and automated procedures, which have been used to more accurately and quickly describe the 3D structure of root systems. Terrestrial laser scanners (TLS have successfully been used to describe aboveground structures of individual trees and stand structure, but have only recently been applied to the 3D characterization of whole root systems. In this study, 13 recently harvested Norway spruce root systems were mechanically pulled from the soil, cleaned, and their volumes were measured by displacement. The root systems were suspended, scanned with TLS from three different angles, and the root surfaces from the co-registered point clouds were modeled with the 3D Quantitative Structure Model to determine root architecture and volume. The modeling procedure facilitated the rapid derivation of root volume, diameters, break point diameters, linear root length, cumulative percentages, and root fraction counts. The modeled root systems underestimated root system volume by 4.4%. The modeling procedure is widely applicable and easily adapted to derive other important topological and volumetric root variables.

  9. Adaptive growth of tree root systems in response to wind action and site conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoll, Bruce C.; Ray, Duncan

    1996-01-01

    Soil-root plate dimensions and structural root architecture were examined on 46-year-old Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carr.) trees that had been mechanically uprooted. Rooting depth was restricted by a water table, and root system morphology had adapted to resist the wind movement associated with shallow rooting. The spread of the root system and the ratio of root mass to shoot mass (root/shoot ratio) were both negatively related to soil-root plate depth. Root systems had more structural root mass on the leeward side than the windward side of the tree relative to the prevailing wind direction. Cross sections of structural roots were obtained at distances of 0.5, 0.75, 1.0, and 1.25 m from the tree center. Buttressed parts of roots had greater lateral and vertical secondary thickening above rather than below the biological center. This uneven growth, which produced a shape similar in cross section to a T-beam, was greater on the leeward side of the tree, and was greatest at 0.5 m from the tree center of shallow rooted trees. Further from the tree, particularly on the windward side, many roots developed eccentric cross-sectional shapes comparable to I-beams, which would efficiently resist vertical flexing. Roots became more ovoid in shape with increasing distance from the tree, especially on deep rooted trees where lateral roots tapered rapidly to a small diameter. We conclude that these forms of adaptive growth in response to wind movement improve the rigidity of the soil-root plate and counteract the increasing vulnerability to windthrow as the tree grows.

  10. Non-Gatherable Triples for Non-Affine Root Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Cherednik

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper contains a complete description of minimal non-gatherable triangle triples in the lambda-sequences for the classical root systems, $F_4$ and $E_6$. Such sequences are associated with reduced decompositions (words in affine and non-affine Weyl groups. The existence of the non-gatherable triples is a combinatorial obstacle for using the technique of intertwiners for an explicit description of the irreducible representations of the (double affine Hecke algebras, complementary to their algebraic-geometric theory.

  11. Free Fermionic Heterotic Model Building and Root Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Robinson, M; Hunziker, M

    2008-01-01

    We consider an alternative derivation of the GSO Projection in the free fermionic construction of the weakly coupled heterotic string in terms of root systems, as well as the interpretation of the GSO Projection in this picture. We then present an algorithm to systematically and efficiently generate input sets (i.e. basis vectors) in order to study Landscape statistics with minimal computational cost. For example, the improvement at order 6 is approximately 10^{-13} over a traditional brute force approach, and improvement increases with order. We then consider an example of statistics on a relatively simple class of models.

  12. Altered acetylcholinesterase levels in the spinal cord anterior horn and dorsal root ganglion following sciatic nerve ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhenjun Yang; Pei Wang; Songhe Yang; Jingfeng Xue

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Peripheral nerve ischemia has been shown to result in ischemic fiber degeneration and axoplasmic transport disturbance. However, the effect on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) expression in relevant cells following sciatic nerve ischemia remains unclear. OBJECTIVE: To observe AChE concentration changes following peripheral nerve ischemia. DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: The present comparative observation, neuroanatomical experiment was performed at the Central Laboratory Animal of Chengde Medical College between 2006 and 2007. MATERIALS: A total of 20 healthy, adult, Wistar rats were randomized into two groups (n = 10): 8-day ischemia and 14-day ischemia. METHODS: Ischemia injury was induced in the unilateral sciatic nerve (experimental side) through ligation of the common iliac artery. The contralateral side received no intervention, and served as the control side. Rats in the 8-day ischemia and 14-day ischemia groups were allowed to survive for 8 and 14 days, respectively. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The L5 lumbar spinal cord and the L5 dorsal root ganglion were removed from both sides and sectioned utilizing a Leica vibrating slicer. AChE cellular expression was detected using Karnovsky-Root, and the number of AChE-positive cells and average gray value were analyzed using a MiVnt image analysis system. RESULTS: In the 8-day ischemia group, AChE-positive cell numbers were significantly less in the dorsal root ganglion and spinal cord anterior horn of the experimental side, but the average gray value was significantly greater, compared with the control side (P < 0.05). These changes were more significant in the 14-day ischemia group than in the 8-day ischemia group (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: Peripheral nerve ischemia leads to decreased AChE expression in the associated cells in a time-dependent manner.

  13. Root carbon input in organic and inorganic fertilizer-based systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chirinda, Ngoni; Olesen, Jørgen E; Porter, John

    2012-01-01

    C input to remain scant. This study aimed at determining macro-root C input and topsoil root related respiration in response to nutrient management and soil fertility building measures. Methods We sampled roots and shoots of cereals and catch crops in inorganic and organic fertilizer-based arable...... cropping systems in a long-term experiment in 2 years, 2008 and 2010. Sampled shoots and macro-roots of catch crop mixtures and cereals were characterized for dry matter (DM) biomass (C was estimated as 45 % of DM biomass). We also measured topsoil root-related soil respiration throughout the growing...... season of winter wheat by subtracting soil respiration from soil with and without exclusion of roots. Results Catch crop roots accounted for more than 40 % of total plant C. For spring barley in 2008 and spring wheat in 2010, root C was higher in the organic than in the inorganic fertilizer-based systems...

  14. Hairy Root as a Model System for Undergraduate Laboratory Curriculum and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Carol A.; Subramanian, Senthil; Yu, Oliver

    2009-01-01

    Hairy root transformation has been widely adapted in plant laboratories to rapidly generate transgenic roots for biochemical and molecular analysis. We present hairy root transformations as a versatile and adaptable model system for a wide variety of undergraduate laboratory courses and research. This technique is easy, efficient, and fast making…

  15. Estimation of runoff mitigation by morphologically different cover crop root systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yang; Loiskandl, Willibald; Kaul, Hans-Peter; Himmelbauer, Margarita; Wei, Wei; Chen, Liding; Bodner, Gernot

    2016-07-01

    Hydrology is a major driver of biogeochemical processes underlying the distinct productivity of different biomes, including agricultural plantations. Understanding factors governing water fluxes in soil is therefore a key target for hydrological management. Our aim was to investigate changes in soil hydraulic conductivity driven by morphologically different root systems of cover crops and their impact on surface runoff. Root systems of twelve cover crop species were characterized and the corresponding hydraulic conductivity was measured by tension infiltrometry. Relations of root traits to Gardner's hydraulic conductivity function were determined and the impact on surface runoff was estimated using HYDRUS 2D. The species differed in both rooting density and root axes thickness, with legumes distinguished by coarser axes. Soil hydraulic conductivity was changed particularly in the plant row where roots are concentrated. Specific root length and median root radius were the best predictors for hydraulic conductivity changes. For an intensive rainfall simulation scenario up to 17% less rainfall was lost by surface runoff in case of the coarsely rooted legumes Melilotus officinalis and Lathyrus sativus, and the densely rooted Linum usitatissimum. Cover crops with coarse root axes and high rooting density enhance soil hydraulic conductivity and effectively reduce surface runoff. An appropriate functional root description can contribute to targeted cover crop selection for efficient runoff mitigation.

  16. Mephedrone alters basal ganglia and limbic dynorphin systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    German, Christopher L; Alburges, Mario E; Hoonakker, Amanda J; Fleckenstein, Annette E; Hanson, Glen R

    2014-08-25

    Mephedrone (4-methymethcathinone) is a synthetic cathinone designer drug that disrupts central nervous system (CNS) dopamine (DA) signaling. Numerous central neuropeptide systems reciprocally interact with dopaminergic neurons to provide regulatory counterbalance, and are altered by aberrant DA activity associated with stimulant exposure. Endogenous opioid neuropeptides are highly concentrated within dopaminergic CNS regions and facilitate many rewarding and aversive properties associated with drug use. Dynorphin, an opioid neuropeptide and kappa receptor agonist, causes dysphoria and aversion to drug consumption through signaling within the basal ganglia and limbic systems, which is affected by stimulants. This study evaluated how mephedrone alters basal ganglia and limbic system dynorphin content, and the role of DA signaling in these changes. Repeated mephedrone administrations (4 × 25 mg/kg/injection, 2-h intervals) selectively increased dynorphin content throughout the dorsal striatum and globus pallidus, decreased dynorphin content within the frontal cortex, and did not alter dynorphin content within most limbic system structures. Pretreatment with D1 -like (SCH-23380) or D2 -like (eticlopride) antagonists blocked mephedrone-induced changes in dynorphin content in most regions examined, indicating altered dynorphin activity is a consequence of excessive DA signaling. Synapse, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Root system traits of Norway spruce, Scots pine, and silver birch in mixed boreal forests: an analysis of root architecture, morphology, and anatomy

    OpenAIRE

    Kalliokoski, Tuomo

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to unravel the functional-structural characteristics of root systems of Betula pendula Roth., Picea abies (L.) Karst., and Pinus sylvestris L. in mixed boreal forest stands differing in their developmental stage and site fertility. The root systems of these species had similar structural regularities: horizontally-oriented shallow roots defined the horizontal area of influence, and within this area, each species placed fine roots in the uppermost soil layers, w...

  18. Root system architecture: insights from Arabidopsis and cereal crops

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Stephanie; De Smet, Ive

    2012-01-01

    Roots are important to plants for a wide variety of processes, including nutrient and water uptake, anchoring and mechanical support, storage functions, and as the major interface between the plant and various biotic and abiotic factors in the soil environment. Understanding the development and architecture of roots holds potential for the exploitation and manipulation of root characteristics to both increase food plant yield and optimize agricultural land use. This theme issue highlights the...

  19. Recovering root system traits using image analysis exemplified by two-dimensional neutron radiography images of lupine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, Daniel; Felderer, Bernd; Vontobel, Peter; Schnepf, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Root system traits are important in view of current challenges such as sustainable crop production with reduced fertilizer input or in resource-limited environments. We present a novel approach for recovering root architectural parameters based on image-analysis techniques. It is based on a graph representation of the segmented and skeletonized image of the root system, where individual roots are tracked in a fully automated way. Using a dynamic root architecture model for deciding whether a specific path in the graph is likely to represent a root helps to distinguish root overlaps from branches and favors the analysis of root development over a sequence of images. After the root tracking step, global traits such as topological characteristics as well as root architectural parameters are computed. Analysis of neutron radiographic root system images of lupine (Lupinus albus) grown in mesocosms filled with sandy soil results in a set of root architectural parameters. They are used to simulate the dynamic development of the root system and to compute the corresponding root length densities in the mesocosm. The graph representation of the root system provides global information about connectivity inside the graph. The underlying root growth model helps to determine which path inside the graph is most likely for a given root. This facilitates the systematic investigation of root architectural traits, in particular with respect to the parameterization of dynamic root architecture models. PMID:24218493

  20. Recovering root system traits using image analysis exemplified by two-dimensional neutron radiography images of lupine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, Daniel; Felderer, Bernd; Vontobel, Peter; Schnepf, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Root system traits are important in view of current challenges such as sustainable crop production with reduced fertilizer input or in resource-limited environments. We present a novel approach for recovering root architectural parameters based on image-analysis techniques. It is based on a graph representation of the segmented and skeletonized image of the root system, where individual roots are tracked in a fully automated way. Using a dynamic root architecture model for deciding whether a specific path in the graph is likely to represent a root helps to distinguish root overlaps from branches and favors the analysis of root development over a sequence of images. After the root tracking step, global traits such as topological characteristics as well as root architectural parameters are computed. Analysis of neutron radiographic root system images of lupine (Lupinus albus) grown in mesocosms filled with sandy soil results in a set of root architectural parameters. They are used to simulate the dynamic development of the root system and to compute the corresponding root length densities in the mesocosm. The graph representation of the root system provides global information about connectivity inside the graph. The underlying root growth model helps to determine which path inside the graph is most likely for a given root. This facilitates the systematic investigation of root architectural traits, in particular with respect to the parameterization of dynamic root architecture models.

  1. Physiological superiority of root system of inter-subspecific hybrid rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@Physiology of root system, especially root system activity,is a very important physiological trait of rice, which directly affects rice growth and development of the aerial parts and yield. Inter-subspecific hybrid rice IIyou 2070and Ilyou 419, as well as their restorer lines 2070 and Zhong419, were used to study physiological traits of rice root system. Three years research indicated that in ter-subspecific hybrid rice had root systems of physiological superiority. Results were briefly showed as the follows:

  2. Auxins differentially regulate root system architecture and cell cycle protein levels in maize seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-de la Cruz, Enrique; García-Ramírez, Elpidio; Vázquez-Ramos, Jorge M; Reyes de la Cruz, Homero; López-Bucio, José

    2015-03-15

    Maize (Zea mays) root system architecture has a complex organization, with adventitious and lateral roots determining its overall absorptive capacity. To generate basic information about the earlier stages of root development, we compared the post-embryonic growth of maize seedlings germinated in water-embedded cotton beds with that of plants obtained from embryonic axes cultivated in liquid medium. In addition, the effect of four different auxins, namely indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), 1-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA), indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) on root architecture and levels of the heat shock protein HSP101 and the cell cycle proteins CKS1, CYCA1 and CDKA1 were analyzed. Our data show that during the first days after germination, maize seedlings develop several root types with a simultaneous and/or continuous growth. The post-embryonic root development started with the formation of the primary root (PR) and seminal scutellar roots (SSR) and then continued with the formation of adventitious crown roots (CR), brace roots (BR) and lateral roots (LR). Auxins affected root architecture in a dose-response fashion; whereas NAA and IBA mostly stimulated crown root formation, 2,4-D showed a strong repressing effect on growth. The levels of HSP101, CKS1, CYCA1 and CDKA in root and leaf tissues were differentially affected by auxins and interestingly, HSP101 registered an auxin-inducible and root specific expression pattern. Taken together, our results show the timing of early branching patterns of maize and indicate that auxins regulate root development likely through modulation of the HSP101 and cell cycle proteins. PMID:25615607

  3. Ectopic expression of a stress-inducible glycosyltransferase from saffron enhances salt and oxidative stress tolerance in Arabidopsis while alters anchor root formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrazem, Oussama; Rubio-Moraga, Angela; Trapero-Mozos, Almudena; Climent, María Fernanda López; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio; Gómez-Gómez, Lourdes

    2015-05-01

    Glycosyltransferases play diverse roles in cellular metabolism by modifying the activities of regulatory metabolites. Three stress-regulated UDP-glucosyltransferase-encoding genes have been isolated from the stigmas of saffron, UGT85U1, UGT85U2 and UGT85V1, which belong to the UGT85 family that includes members associated with stress responses and cell cycle regulation. Arabidopsis constitutively expressing UGT85U1 exhibited and increased anchor root development. No differences were observed in the timing of root emergence, in leaf, stem and flower morphology or flowering time. However, salt and oxidative stress tolerance was enhanced in these plants. Levels of glycosylated compounds were measured in these plants and showed changes in the composition of several indole-derivatives. Moreover, auxin levels in the roots were higher compared to wild type. The expression of several key genes related to root development and auxin homeostasis, including CDKB2.1, CDKB2.2, PIN2, 3 and 4; TIR1, SHR, and CYCD6, were differentially regulated with an increase of expression level of SHR, CYCD6, CDKB2.1 and PIN2. The obtained results showed that UGT85U1 takes part in root growth regulation via auxin signal alteration and the modified expression of cell cycle-related genes, resulting in significantly improved survival during oxidative and salt stress treatments.

  4. Systemic allergic dermatitis caused by Apiaceae root vegetables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Evy; Petersen, Thomas H; Fretté, Xavier C;

    2014-01-01

    Immediate hypersensitivity reactions to root vegetables of the Umbelliferae plant family (Apiaceae) is well known. Delayed-type hypersensitivity is rarely reported.......Immediate hypersensitivity reactions to root vegetables of the Umbelliferae plant family (Apiaceae) is well known. Delayed-type hypersensitivity is rarely reported....

  5. Evolving technologies for growing, imaging and analyzing 3D root system architecture of crop plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miguel A Pineros; Pierre-Luc Pradier; Nathanael M Shaw; Ithipong Assaranurak; Susan R McCouch; Craig Sturrock; Malcolm Bennett; Leon V Kochian; Brandon G Larson; Jon E Shaff; David J Schneider; Alexandre Xavier Falcao; Lixing Yuan; Randy T Clark; Eric J Craft; Tyler W Davis

    2016-01-01

    A plant’s ability to maintain or improve its yield under limiting conditions, such as nutrient deficiency or drought, can be strongly influenced by root system architec-ture (RSA), the three-dimensional distribution of the different root types in the soil. The ability to image, track and quantify these root system attributes in a dynamic fashion is a useful tool in assessing desirable genetic and physiological root traits. Recent advances in imaging technology and phenotyp-ing software have resulted in substantive progress in describing and quantifying RSA. We have designed a hydroponic growth system which retains the three-dimen-sional RSA of the plant root system, while allowing for aeration, solution replenishment and the imposition of nutrient treatments, as well as high-quality imaging of the root system. The simplicity and flexibility of the system allows for modifications tailored to the RSA of different crop species and improved throughput. This paper details the recent improvements and innovations in our root growth and imaging system which allows for greater image sensitivity (detection of fine roots and other root details), higher efficiency, and a broad array of growing conditions for plants that more closely mimic those found under field conditions.

  6. Evolving technologies for growing, imaging and analyzing 3D root system architecture of crop plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñeros, Miguel A; Larson, Brandon G; Shaff, Jon E; Schneider, David J; Falcão, Alexandre Xavier; Yuan, Lixing; Clark, Randy T; Craft, Eric J; Davis, Tyler W; Pradier, Pierre-Luc; Shaw, Nathanael M; Assaranurak, Ithipong; McCouch, Susan R; Sturrock, Craig; Bennett, Malcolm; Kochian, Leon V

    2016-03-01

    A plant's ability to maintain or improve its yield under limiting conditions, such as nutrient deficiency or drought, can be strongly influenced by root system architecture (RSA), the three-dimensional distribution of the different root types in the soil. The ability to image, track and quantify these root system attributes in a dynamic fashion is a useful tool in assessing desirable genetic and physiological root traits. Recent advances in imaging technology and phenotyping software have resulted in substantive progress in describing and quantifying RSA. We have designed a hydroponic growth system which retains the three-dimensional RSA of the plant root system, while allowing for aeration, solution replenishment and the imposition of nutrient treatments, as well as high-quality imaging of the root system. The simplicity and flexibility of the system allows for modifications tailored to the RSA of different crop species and improved throughput. This paper details the recent improvements and innovations in our root growth and imaging system which allows for greater image sensitivity (detection of fine roots and other root details), higher efficiency, and a broad array of growing conditions for plants that more closely mimic those found under field conditions. PMID:26683583

  7. Phylloxera (Daktulosphaira vitifoliae Fitch) alters the carbohydrate metabolism in root galls to allowing the compatible interaction with grapevine (Vitis ssp.) roots

    OpenAIRE

    Griesser, Michaela; Lawo, Nora Caroline; Crespo-Martinez, Sara; Schoedl-Hummel, Katharina; Wieczorek, Krzysztof; Gorecka, Miroslawa; Liebner, Falk; Zweckmair, Thomas; Stralis Pavese, Nancy; Kreil, David; Forneck, Astrid

    2015-01-01

    Gall forming phylloxera may compete for nutrients with meristematic tissues and develop heterotrophic structures that act as carbon sinks. In this work, we studied the underlying starch metabolism, sink-source translocation of soluble sugars towards and within root galls. We demonstrated that nodosities store carbohydrates by starch accumulation and monitored the expression of genes involved in the starch metabolic. Thereby we proved that the nodosity is symplastically connected to the source...

  8. Change of water use efficiency and its relation with root system growth in wheat evolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Raising crop water use efficiency (WUE) is the physiological basis to implement crop high efficiently using water. The present soil column and field experiments are designed to investigate the change of wheat WUE (Triticum aestivum L.) at whole plant level and root system growth in evolution and the relationship between WUE and its root system growth using 10 wheat evolution genotypes with different ploidy chromosomes sets. Results show that in wheat evolution from 2n→6n, WUE at whole plant level increases with the increase of ploidy chromosomes, and root system growth (root weight, root length) and root/shoot ratio of wheat decrease with the increase of ploidy chromosomes under dry and irrigated conditions. WUE is negatively correlated with root weight and root/shoot ratio of wheat in evolution, significantly. Root system growth has an adverse redundancy for WUE in wheat evolution, and the root redundancy reduces with the increase of ploidy chromosomes, which result in the increase of wheat WUE at whole plant level.

  9. Altered Phenylpropanoid Metabolism in the Maize Lc-Expressed Sweet Potato (Ipomoea batatas) Affects Storage Root Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongxia; Yang, Jun; Zhang, Min; Fan, Weijuan; Firon, Nurit; Pattanaik, Sitakanta; Yuan, Ling; Zhang, Peng

    2016-01-01

    There is no direct evidence of the effect of lignin metabolism on early storage root development in sweet potato. In this study, we found that heterologous expression of the maize leaf color (Lc) gene in sweet potato increased anthocyanin pigment accumulation in the whole plant and resulted in reduced size with an increased length/width ratio, low yield and less starch content in the early storage roots. RT-PCR analysis revealed dramatic up-regulation of the genes involved in the lignin biosynthesis pathway in developing storage roots, leading to greater lignin content in the Lc transgenic lines, compared to the wild type. This was also evidenced by the enhanced lignification of vascular cells in the early storage roots. Furthermore, increased expression of the β-amylase gene in leaves and storage roots also accelerated starch degradation and increased the sugar use efficiency, providing more energy and carbohydrate sources for lignin biosynthesis in the Lc transgenic sweet potato. Lesser starch accumulation was observed in the developing storage roots at the initiation stage in the Lc plants. Our study provides experimental evidence of the basic carbohydrate metabolism underlying the development of storage roots, which is the transformation of lignin biosynthesis to starch biosynthesis. PMID:26727353

  10. Optical methods for creating delivery systems of chemical compounds to plant roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, Pavel E.; Rogacheva, Svetlana M.; Arefeva, Oksana A.; Minin, Dmitryi V.; Tolmachev, Sergey A.; Kupadze, Machammad S.

    2004-08-01

    Spectrophotometric and fluorescence methods have been used for creation and investigation of various systems of target delivery of chemical compounds to roots of plants. The possibility of using liposomes, incrusted by polysaccharides of the external surface of nitrogen-fixing rizospheric bacteria Azospirillum brasilense SP 245, and nanoparticles incrusted by polysaccharides of wheat roots, as the named systems has been shown. The important role of polysaccharide-polysaccharide interaction in the adsorption processes of bacteria on wheat roots has been demonstrated.

  11. Ecological adaptation of Reaumuria soongorica root system architecture to arid environments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiShan Shan; Yi Li; DongMei Geng; QiuLian Dong

    2014-01-01

    The architectural parameters of Reaumuria soongorica root system in different habitats of Gansu Province, China were analyzed to examine its ecological adaptability to arid environments. Results show that:(1) Topological indices of R. Soongorica root sys-tem are small in all habitats, and root branching pattern tends to be dichotomous. Also, the indices gradually increase in the Min-qin windblown sand region and the Zhangye Gobi region in Hexi Corridor, which indicates that drought tends to produce her-ringbone-like root branching patterns. (2) Fractal dimension values of R. Soongorica root system are small and not obvious in the Minqin windblown sand region and the Zhangye Gobi region in Hexi Corridor, with values of 1.1778 and 1.1169, respectively. Fractal dimension values are relatively large in Jiuzhoutai semi-arid hilly and gully region of the Loess Plateau, which indicates that the R. Soongorica root system has better fractal characteristics in this region than in the other regions. (3) Total branching ra-tios of the R. Soongorica root system in arid regions of Hexi Corridor are smaller than that in the Jiuzhoutai semi-arid hilly and gully region of the Loess Plateau. This shows that root branching ability in the semi-arid region is stronger, and it decreases to some degree with increased drought. (4) The root connection lengths of R. soongorica root system are long in all habitats, but there are significant length differences between the different habitats. The root connection length at the Minqin windblown sand region is the longest. It is concluded that R. soongorica adapts to arid environments by decreasing root branching, decreasing root overlap and increasing root connection length, which makes its root branching pattern tend to be herringbone-like to reduce com-petition in root internal environment for nutrients and to enhance root absorption rate of nutrients, and ensure effective nutrition space. Thus the roots can absorb enough water and nutrients

  12. Radiodiagnosis of pulmonary alterations in systemic lupus erythematosus patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray examination was carried out in 170 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Certain parameters of specific immunity were studied in 60 of them, while X-ray data were compared with morphological findings on autopsy in 20 cases. A tendency toward escalation of specific cell and humoral parameters was discovered in pulmonary lesion, predetermined by vasculitis and perivasculitis, as well as inflammatory and fibrotic alterations in the interstitial tissue

  13. Phenotypic plasticity of the maize root system in response to heterogeneous nitrogen availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Peng; White, Philip J; Hochholdinger, Frank; Li, Chunjian

    2014-10-01

    Mineral nutrients are distributed in a non-uniform manner in the soil. Plasticity in root responses to the availability of mineral nutrients is believed to be important for optimizing nutrient acquisition. The response of root architecture to heterogeneous nutrient availability has been documented in various plant species, and the molecular mechanisms coordinating these responses have been investigated particularly in Arabidopsis, a model dicotyledonous plant. Recently, progress has been made in describing the phenotypic plasticity of root architecture in maize, a monocotyledonous crop. This article reviews aspects of phenotypic plasticity of maize root system architecture, with special emphasis on describing (1) the development of its complex root system; (2) phenotypic responses in root system architecture to heterogeneous N availability; (3) the importance of phenotypic plasticity for N acquisition; (4) different regulation of root growth and nutrients uptake by shoot; and (5) root traits in maize breeding. This knowledge will inform breeding strategies for root traits enabling more efficient acquisition of soil resources and synchronizing crop growth demand, root resource acquisition and fertilizer application during crop growing season, thereby maximizing crop yields and nutrient-use efficiency and minimizing environmental pollution. PMID:25143250

  14. Controlled release of 6-aminonicotinamide from aligned, electrospun fibers alters astrocyte metabolism and dorsal root ganglia neurite outgrowth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaub, Nicholas J.; Gilbert, Ryan J.

    2011-08-01

    Following central nervous system (CNS) injury, activated astrocytes form a glial scar that inhibits the migration of axons ultimately leading to regeneration failure. Biomaterials developed for CNS repair can provide local delivery of therapeutics and/or guidance mechanisms to encourage cell migration into damaged regions of the brain or spinal cord. Electrospun fibers are a promising type of biomaterial for CNS injury since these fibers can direct cellular and axonal migration while slowly delivering therapy to the injury site. In this study, it was hypothesized that inclusion of an anti-metabolite, 6-aminonicotinamide (6AN), within poly-l-lactic acid electrospun fibers could attenuate astrocyte metabolic activity while still directing axonal outgrowth. Electrospinning parameters were varied to produce highly aligned electrospun fibers that contained 10% or 20% (w/w) 6AN. 6AN release from the fiber substrates occurred continuously over 2 weeks. Astrocytes placed onto drug-releasing fibers were less active than those cultured on scaffolds without 6AN. Dorsal root ganglia placed onto control and drug-releasing scaffolds were able to direct neurites along the aligned fibers. However, neurite outgrowth was stunted by fibers that contained 20% 6AN. These results show that 6AN release from aligned, electrospun fibers can decrease astrocyte activity while still directing axonal outgrowth.

  15. Toxicity of canavanine in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) roots is due to alterations in RNS, ROS and auxin levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasuska, Urszula; Andrzejczak, Olga; Staszek, Paweł; Borucki, Wojciech; Gniazdowska, Agnieszka

    2016-06-01

    Canavanine (CAN) is non-proteinogenic aminoacid and a structural analog of arginine (Arg). Naturally, CAN occurs in legumes e.g. jack bean and is considered as a strong allelochemical. As a selective inhibitor of inducible nitric oxide synthase in mammalians, it could act as a modifier of nitric oxide (NO) concentration in plants. Modifications in the content of endogenous reactive nitrogen species (RNS) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) influence root structure and architecture, being also under hormonal control. The aim of the work was to investigate regulation of root growth in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. cv. Malinowy Ożarowski) seedling by application of CAN at concentration (10 and 50 μM) leading to 50% or 100% restriction of root elongation. CAN at higher concentration led to slight DNA fragmentation, increased total RNA and protein level. Decline in total respiration rate after CAN supplementation was not associated with enhanced membrane permeability. Malformations in root morphology (shorter and thicker roots, limited number of lateral roots) were accompanied by modification in NO and ONOO(-) localization; determined mainly in peridermal cells and some border cells. Although, CAN resulted in low RNS production, addition of exogenous NO by usage of NO donors did not reverse its negative effect, nor recovery effect was detected after roots imbibition in Arg. To build up a comprehensive view on mode of action of CAN as root growth inhibitor, it was shown an elevated level of auxin. To summarize, we demonstrated several secondary mode of action of CAN, indicating its toxicity in plants linked to restriction in RNS formation accompanied by simultaneous overaccumulation of ROS.

  16. Toxicity of canavanine in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) roots is due to alterations in RNS, ROS and auxin levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasuska, Urszula; Andrzejczak, Olga; Staszek, Paweł; Borucki, Wojciech; Gniazdowska, Agnieszka

    2016-06-01

    Canavanine (CAN) is non-proteinogenic aminoacid and a structural analog of arginine (Arg). Naturally, CAN occurs in legumes e.g. jack bean and is considered as a strong allelochemical. As a selective inhibitor of inducible nitric oxide synthase in mammalians, it could act as a modifier of nitric oxide (NO) concentration in plants. Modifications in the content of endogenous reactive nitrogen species (RNS) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) influence root structure and architecture, being also under hormonal control. The aim of the work was to investigate regulation of root growth in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. cv. Malinowy Ożarowski) seedling by application of CAN at concentration (10 and 50 μM) leading to 50% or 100% restriction of root elongation. CAN at higher concentration led to slight DNA fragmentation, increased total RNA and protein level. Decline in total respiration rate after CAN supplementation was not associated with enhanced membrane permeability. Malformations in root morphology (shorter and thicker roots, limited number of lateral roots) were accompanied by modification in NO and ONOO(-) localization; determined mainly in peridermal cells and some border cells. Although, CAN resulted in low RNS production, addition of exogenous NO by usage of NO donors did not reverse its negative effect, nor recovery effect was detected after roots imbibition in Arg. To build up a comprehensive view on mode of action of CAN as root growth inhibitor, it was shown an elevated level of auxin. To summarize, we demonstrated several secondary mode of action of CAN, indicating its toxicity in plants linked to restriction in RNS formation accompanied by simultaneous overaccumulation of ROS. PMID:26986929

  17. Alterations in cytosol free calcium in horseradish roots simultaneously exposed to lanthanum(III) and acid rain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuanbo; Wang, Lihong; Zhou, Anhua; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2016-04-01

    The extensive use of rare earth elements (REEs) has increased their environmental levels. REE pollution concomitant with acid rain in many agricultural regions can affect crop growth. Cytosol free calcium ions (Ca(2+)) play an important role in almost all cellular activities. However, no data have been reported regarding the role of cytosol free Ca(2+) in plant roots simultaneously exposed to REE and acid rain. In this study, the effects of exposures to lanthanum(III) and acid rain, independently and in combination, on cytosol free Ca(2+) levels, root activity, metal contents, biomass, cytosol pH and La contents in horseradish roots were investigated. The simultaneous exposures to La(III) and acid rain increased or decreased the cytosol free Ca(2+) levels, depending on the concentration of La(III), and these effects were more evident than independent exposure to La(III) or acid rain. In combined exposures, cytosol free Ca(2+) played an important role in the regulation of root activity, metal contents and biomass. These roles were closely related to La(III) dose, acid rain strength and treatment mode (independent exposure or simultaneous exposure). A low concentration of La(III) (20 mg L(-1)) could alleviate the adverse effects on the roots caused by acid rain, and the combined exposures at higher concentrations of La(III) and acid rain had synergic effects on the roots. PMID:26720810

  18. Parameterising root system growth models using 2D neutron radiography images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnepf, Andrea; Felderer, Bernd; Vontobel, Peter; Leitner, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    Root architecture is a key factor for plant acquisition of water and nutrients from soil. In particular in view of a second green revolution where the below ground parts of agricultural crops are important, it is essential to characterise and quantify root architecture and its effect on plant resource acquisition. Mathematical models can help to understand the processes occurring in the soil-plant system, they can be used to quantify the effect of root and rhizosphere traits on resource acquisition and the response to environmental conditions. In order to do so, root architectural models are coupled with a model of water and solute transport in soil. However, dynamic root architectural models are difficult to parameterise. Novel imaging techniques such as x-ray computed tomography, neutron radiography and magnetic resonance imaging enable the in situ visualisation of plant root systems. Therefore, these images facilitate the parameterisation of dynamic root architecture models. These imaging techniques are capable of producing 3D or 2D images. Moreover, 2D images are also available in the form of hand drawings or from images of standard cameras. While full 3D imaging tools are still limited in resolutions, 2D techniques are a more accurate and less expensive option for observing roots in their environment. However, analysis of 2D images has additional difficulties compared to the 3D case, because of overlapping roots. We present a novel algorithm for the parameterisation of root system growth models based on 2D images of root system. The algorithm analyses dynamic image data. These are a series of 2D images of the root system at different points in time. Image data has already been adjusted for missing links and artefacts and segmentation was performed by applying a matched filter response. From this time series of binary 2D images, we parameterise the dynamic root architecture model in the following way: First, a morphological skeleton is derived from the binary

  19. Consequences of insect herbivory on grape fine root systems with different growth rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauerle, T L; Eissenstat, D M; Granett, J; Gardner, D M; Smart, D R

    2007-07-01

    Herbivory tolerance has been linked to plant growth rate where plants with fast growth rates are hypothesized to be more tolerant of herbivory than slower-growing plants. Evidence supporting this theory has been taken primarily from observations of aboveground organs but rarely from roots. Grapevines differing in overall rates of new root production, were studied in Napa Valley, California over two growing seasons in an established vineyard infested with the sucking insect, grape phylloxera (Daktulosphaira vitifoliae Fitch). The experimental vineyard allowed for the comparison of two root systems that differed in rates of new root tip production (a 'fast grower', Vitis berlandieri x Vitis rupestris cv. 1103P, and a slower-growing stock, Vitis riparia x Vitis rupestris cv. 101-14 Mgt). Each root system was grafted with a genetically identical shoot system (Vitis vinifera cv. Merlot). Using minirhizotrons, we did not observe any evidence of spatial or temporal avoidance of insect populations by root growth. Insect infestations were abundant throughout the soil profile, and seasonal peaks in phylloxera populations generally closely followed peaks in new root production. Our data supported the hypothesis that insect infestation was proportional to the number of growing tips, as indicated by similar per cent infestation in spite of a threefold difference in root tip production. In addition, infested roots of the fast-growing rootstock exhibited somewhat shorter median lifespans (60 d) than the slower-growing rootstock (85 d). Lifespans of uninfested roots were similar for the two rootstocks (200 d). As a consequence of greater root mortality of younger roots, infested root populations in the fast-growing rootstock had an older age structure. While there does not seem to be a trade-off between potential growth rate and relative rate of root infestation in these cultivars, our study indicates that a fast-growing root system may more readily shed infested roots that are

  20. Root system topology and diameter distribution of species from habitats differing in inundation frequency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, T.J.; Nielsen, K.F.; Van Hal, J.; Koutstaal, B.P.

    2001-01-01

    1. We compared the root systems of seven halophytic species that occur at different elevations on a salt marsh, in order to (i) test the hypothesis that variations in root system architecture reflect adaptation to inundation frequency or nitrogen limitation, and (ii) verify the theoretically predict

  1. Long-Term Boron-Excess-Induced Alterations of Gene Profiles in Roots of Two Citrus Species Differing in Boron-Tolerance Revealed by cDNA-AFLP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Peng; Qi, Yi-Ping; Yang, Lin-Tong; Ye, Xin; Huang, Jing-Hao; Chen, Li-Song

    2016-01-01

    Boron (B) toxicity is observed in some citrus orchards in China. However, limited data are available on the molecular mechanisms of citrus B-toxicity and B-tolerance. Using cDNA-AFLP, we identified 20 up- and 52 down-regulated genes, and 44 up- and 66 down-regulated genes from excess B-treated Citrus sinensis and Citrus grandis roots, respectively, thereby demonstrating that gene expression profiles were more affected in the latter. In addition, phosphorus and total soluble protein concentrations were lowered only in excess B-treated C. grandis roots. Apparently, C. sinensis had higher B-tolerance than C. grandis. Our results suggested that the following several aspects were responsible for the difference in the B-tolerance between the two citrus species including: (a) B-excess induced Root Hair Defective 3 expression in C. sinensis roots, and repressed villin4 expression in C. grandis roots; accordingly, root growth was less inhibited by B-excess in the former; (b) antioxidant systems were impaired in excess B-treated C. grandis roots, hence accelerating root senescence; (c) genes related to Ca2+ signals were inhibited (induced) by B-excess in C. grandis (C. sinensis) roots. B-excess-responsive genes related to energy (i.e., alternative oxidase and cytochrome P450), lipid (i.e., Glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase 9 and citrus dioxygenase), and nucleic acid (i.e., HDA19, histone 4, and ribonucleotide reductase RNR1 like protein) metabolisms also possibly accounted for the difference in the B-tolerance between the two citrus species. These data increased our understanding of the mechanisms on citrus B-toxicity and B-tolerance at transcriptional level. PMID:27446128

  2. Light-induced transpiration alters cell water relations in figleaf gourd (Cucurbita ficifolia) seedlings exposed to low root temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seong Hee; Zwiazek, Janusz J; Chung, Gap Chae

    2008-06-01

    Water relation parameters including elastic modulus (epsilon), half-times of water exchange (T(w)(1/2)), hydraulic conductivity and turgor pressure (P) were measured in individual root cortical and cotyledon midrib cells in intact figleaf gourd (Cucurbita ficifolia) seedlings, using a cell pressure probe. Transpiration rates (E) of cotyledons were also measured using a steady-state porometer. The seedlings were exposed to low ambient (approximately 10 micromol m(-2) s(-1)) or high supplemental irradiance (approximately 300 micromol m(-2) s(-1) PPF density) at low (8 degrees C) or warm (22 degrees C) root temperatures. When exposed to low irradiance, all the water relation parameters of cortical cells remained similar at both root temperatures. The exposure of cotyledons to supplemental light at warm root temperatures, however, resulted in a two- to three-fold increase in T(w)(1/2) values accompanied with the reduced hydraulic conductivity in both root cortical (Lp) and cotyledon midrib cells (Lp(c)). Low root temperature (LRT) further reduced Lp(c) and E, whether it was measured under low or high irradiance levels. The reductions of Lp as the result of respective light and LRT treatments were prevented by the application of 1 microM ABA. Midrib cells required higher concentrations of ABA (2 microM) in order to prevent the reduction in Lp(c). When the exposure of cotyledons to light was accompanied by LRT, however, ABA proved ineffective in reversing the inhibition of Lp. LRT combined with high irradiance triggered a drastic 10-fold reduction in water permeability of cortical and midrib cells and increased epsilon and T(w)(1/2) values. Measurement of E indicated that the increased water demand by the transpiring plants was fulfilled by an increase in the apoplastic pathway as principal water flow route. The importance of water transport regulation by transpiration affecting the hydraulic conductivity of the roots is discussed. PMID:18346079

  3. Locally Finite Root Supersystems

    OpenAIRE

    YOUSOFZADEH, Malihe

    2013-01-01

    We introduce the notion of locally finite root supersystems as a generalization of both locally finite root systems and generalized root systems. We classify irreducible locally finite root supersystems.

  4. “Rhizoponics”: a novel hydroponic rhizotron for root system analyses on mature Arabidopsis thaliana plants

    OpenAIRE

    Mathieu, Laura; Lobet, Guillaume; Tocquin, Pierre; Périlleux, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Background Well-developed and functional roots are critical to support plant life and reach high crop yields. Their study however, is hampered by their underground growth and characterizing complex root system architecture (RSA) therefore remains a challenge. In the last few years, several phenotyping methods, including rhizotrons and x-ray computed tomography, have been developed for relatively thick roots. But in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, in vitro culture remains the easiest and...

  5. Root system stabilization of sugarcane fertigated by subsurface drip using a minirhizotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yukitaka Pessinatti Ohashi, Augusto; Célia de Matos Pires, Regina; Barros de Oliveira Silva, Andre Luiz; Vasconcelos Ribeiro, Rafael

    2013-04-01

    To improve the efficiency of water use in irrigation practices and to provide information for modeling the knowledge of plants root system becomes necessary. The use of subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) in sugarcane cultivation is an interesting cultural practice to improve production and allow cultivation in marginal lands due to water deficits conditions. The SDI provides better water use efficiency, due to the water and nutrients application in root zone plants. However, despite of the agronomic importance, few studies about the root system of sugarcane were performed. The use of root scanner is an alternative to the evaluation of the root system, which enables the continuous study of the roots throughout the cycle and for many years, but data about the use of this method for sugarcane are still scarce. The aim of this study was to determine the time required for stabilization of the root system growth of sugarcane cultivar IACSP-5000 around the access tube in which images were captured. The field experiment was carried out in Campinas, São Paulo State, Brazil. The fertigation was applied by a subsurface drip system.. The soil moisture was monitored by capacitance probes. The pH and electrical conductivity of the soil solution were monitored through solution extractor. Two access tubes with 1.05 m length were used, with 7 days difference between installations. The images were captured at 110, 128, 136, 143 and 151 days after harvest cane-plant, in the second cycle (1st cane ratoon), with the Root Scanner CI-600 ™ and were analyzed the number of roots and root length in each layer in different depths in the soil profile by software RootSnap! ™. The results show that the highest rates of increase in the number and length of roots were observed in the first 27 days. Absolute growth rates of up to 81 mm day-1 and 38 mm day-1 were presented in 0-20 and 20-40 cm layer respectively. The number of roots stabilized from 27 days after installation of the tube, while

  6. Cadmium Toxicity Induced Alterations in the Root Proteome of Green Gram in Contrasting Response towards Iron Supplement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sowbiya Muneer

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cadmium signifies a severe threat to crop productivity and green gram is a notably iron sensitive plant which shows considerable variation towards cadmium stress. A gel-based proteomics analysis was performed with the roots of green gram exposed to iron and cadmium combined treatments. The resulting data show that twenty three proteins were down-regulated in iron-deprived roots either in the absence (−Fe/−Cd or presence (−Fe/+Cd of cadmium. These down-regulated proteins were however well expressed in roots under iron sufficient conditions, even in the presence of cadmium (+Fe/+Cd. The functional classification of these proteins determined that 21% of the proteins are associated with nutrient metabolism. The other proteins in higher quantities are involved in either transcription or translation regulation, and the rest are involved in biosynthesis metabolism, antioxidant pathways, molecular chaperones and stress response. On the other hand, several protein spots were also absent in roots in response to iron deprivation either in absence (−Fe/−Cd or presence (−Fe/+Cd of cadmium but were well expressed in the presence of iron (+Fe/+Cd. Results suggest that green gram plants exposed to cadmium stress are able to change the nutrient metabolic balance in roots, but in the mean time regulate cadmium toxicity through iron supplements.

  7. Improvement of Growth and Periplocin Yield of Periploca sepium Adventitious Root Cultures by Altering Nitrogen Source Supply

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jian; GAO Wen-yuan; WANG Juan; LI Xing-lin; XIAO Pei-gen

    2011-01-01

    Objective To increase the ultimate yield of periplocin in Periploca sepium adventitious root cultures by a two-stage culture based on nitrogen source.Methods Firstly,the effects of nitrogen source(NH-NO-)at different ratios and different total initial nitrogen amounts on the accumulation of biomass and secondary metabolites in adventitious root cultures of P sepium were investigated,and growth and production media for the two-stage culture based on the above results were established.Results The highest biomass and periplocin content were obtained in the culture medium of 15 mmol/L total nitrogen amount with NH-NO(1:2)and 30 mmol/L total nitrogen amount with nitrate as the sole nitrogen source.By adopting a fed-batch cultivation strategy,the dry weight adventitious root,periplocin content and yield were increased by 136%,108%,and 389%,respectively when compared with those of the control,reaching up to 8.13 g/L,157.15 μg/g,and 1277.63 μg/L,respectively.Furthermore,it was found that in the process of two-stage culture,the adventitious roots grew thicker significantly after they were transferred into production medium directly.Conclusion The ultimate yield of periplocin in P.sepium adventitious root cultures could be significantly increased by a two-stage culture based on nitrogen source.

  8. Salinity altered root distribution and increased diversity of bacterial communities in the rhizosphere soil of Jerusalem artichoke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui; Hu, Jinxiang; Long, Xiaohua; Liu, Zhaopu; Rengel, Zed

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between roots and bacterial communities in halophytic species is poorly understood. Here, we used Jerusalem artichoke cultivar Nanyu 1 (NY-1) to characterise root distribution patterns and determine diversity and abundance of bacteria in the rhizosphere soil under variable salinity. Root growth was not inhibited within the salinity range 1.2 to 1.9 g salt/kg, but roots were mainly confined to 0-20 cm soil layer vertically and 0-30 cm horizontally from the plant centre. Root concentrations of K(+), Na(+), Mg(2+) and particularly Ca(2+) were relatively high under salinity stress. High salinity stress decreased soil invertase and catalase activity. Using a next-generation, Illumina-based sequencing approach, we determined higher diversity of bacteria in the rhizosphere soil at high than low salinity. More than 15,500 valid reads were obtained, and Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria predominated in all samples, accounting for >80% of the reads. On a genus level, 636 genera were common to the low and high salinity treatments at 0-5 cm and 5-10 cm depth. The abundance of Steroidobacter and Sphingomonas was significantly decreased by increasing salinity. Higher Shannon and Chao 1 indices with increasing severity of salt stress indicated that high salt stress increased diversity in the bacterial communities. PMID:26852800

  9. A Study of Tensile Strength Tests of Arborous Species Root System in Forest Engineering Technique of Shallow Landslide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Yonghong; LIU Shuzhen; WANG Chenghua; TANG Chuan

    2006-01-01

    One experiment was conducted, through tensile tests of Albazzia and Eucalypt roots culled from the fields. The other experiment was conducted, by testing anti-drawing strength of these root systems in the Albazzia and Eucalypt lands. These two experiments had an aim to give insights into the maximum tensile strength and anti-drawing strength of the root systems. Results indicated that the maximum tensile strength of root system is in an exponential relation with the diameter of root system while the maximum tensile strength is positively correlative with the diameter of root system. Anti-drawing force of root system together with root diameter, length, and soil bulk density are folded into a regression equation in an attempt to figure out the static friction coefficient between root system and its ambient soil.

  10. Altered Phenylpropanoid Metabolism in the Maize Lc-Expressed Sweet Potato (Ipomoea batatas) Affects Storage Root Development

    OpenAIRE

    Hongxia Wang; Jun Yang; Min Zhang; Weijuan Fan; Nurit Firon; Sitakanta Pattanaik; Ling Yuan; Peng Zhang

    2016-01-01

    There is no direct evidence of the effect of lignin metabolism on early storage root development in sweet potato. In this study, we found that heterologous expression of the maize leaf color (Lc) gene in sweet potato increased anthocyanin pigment accumulation in the whole plant and resulted in reduced size with an increased length/width ratio, low yield and less starch content in the early storage roots. RT-PCR analysis revealed dramatic up-regulation of the genes involved in the lignin biosy...

  11. Canavanine Alters ROS/RNS Level and Leads to Post-translational Modification of Proteins in Roots of Tomato Seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasuska, Urszula; Andrzejczak, Olga; Staszek, Paweł; Bogatek, Renata; Gniazdowska, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Canavanine (CAN), a structural analog of arginine (Arg), is used as a selective inhibitor of inducible NOS in mammals. CAN is incorporated into proteins’ structure in the place of Arg, leading to the formation of aberrant compounds. This non-protein amino acid is found in legumes, e.g., Canavalia ensiformis (L.) DC. or Sutherlandia frutescens (L.) R.Br. and acts as a strong toxin against herbivores or plants. Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) seedlings were treated for 24–72 h with CAN (10 or 50 μM) inhibiting root growth by 50 or 100%, without lethal effect. We determined ROS level/production in root extracts, fluorescence of DAF-FM and APF derivatives corresponding to RNS level in roots of tomato seedlings and linked CAN-induced restriction of root growth to the post-translational modifications (PTMs) of proteins: carbonylation and nitration. Both PTMs are stable markers of nitro-oxidative stress, regarded as the plant’s secondary response to phytotoxins. CAN enhanced H2O2 content and superoxide radicals generation in extracts of tomato roots and stimulated formation of protein carbonyl groups. An elevated level of carbonylated proteins was characteristic for the plants after 72 h of the culture, mainly for the roots exposed to 10 μM CAN. The proteolytic activity was stimulated by tested non-protein amino acid. CAN treatment led to decline of fluorescence of DAF-FM derivatives, and transiently stimulated fluorescence of APF derivatives. Short-term exposure of tomato seedlings to CAN lowered the protein nitration level. Activity of peroxidase, polyamine oxidase and NADPH oxidase, enzymes acting as modulators of H2O2 concentration and governing root architecture and growth were determined. Activities of all enzymes were stimulated by CAN, but no strict CAN concentration dependence was observed. We conclude, that although CAN treatment led to a decline in the nitric oxide level, PTMs observed in roots of plants exposed to CAN are linked rather to the

  12. Canavanine Alters ROS/RNS Level and Leads to Post-translational Modification of Proteins in Roots of Tomato Seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasuska, Urszula; Andrzejczak, Olga; Staszek, Paweł; Bogatek, Renata; Gniazdowska, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Canavanine (CAN), a structural analog of arginine (Arg), is used as a selective inhibitor of inducible NOS in mammals. CAN is incorporated into proteins' structure in the place of Arg, leading to the formation of aberrant compounds. This non-protein amino acid is found in legumes, e.g., Canavalia ensiformis (L.) DC. or Sutherlandia frutescens (L.) R.Br. and acts as a strong toxin against herbivores or plants. Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) seedlings were treated for 24-72 h with CAN (10 or 50 μM) inhibiting root growth by 50 or 100%, without lethal effect. We determined ROS level/production in root extracts, fluorescence of DAF-FM and APF derivatives corresponding to RNS level in roots of tomato seedlings and linked CAN-induced restriction of root growth to the post-translational modifications (PTMs) of proteins: carbonylation and nitration. Both PTMs are stable markers of nitro-oxidative stress, regarded as the plant's secondary response to phytotoxins. CAN enhanced H2O2 content and superoxide radicals generation in extracts of tomato roots and stimulated formation of protein carbonyl groups. An elevated level of carbonylated proteins was characteristic for the plants after 72 h of the culture, mainly for the roots exposed to 10 μM CAN. The proteolytic activity was stimulated by tested non-protein amino acid. CAN treatment led to decline of fluorescence of DAF-FM derivatives, and transiently stimulated fluorescence of APF derivatives. Short-term exposure of tomato seedlings to CAN lowered the protein nitration level. Activity of peroxidase, polyamine oxidase and NADPH oxidase, enzymes acting as modulators of H2O2 concentration and governing root architecture and growth were determined. Activities of all enzymes were stimulated by CAN, but no strict CAN concentration dependence was observed. We conclude, that although CAN treatment led to a decline in the nitric oxide level, PTMs observed in roots of plants exposed to CAN are linked rather to the formation of

  13. Ecology of the microbiome of the infected root canal system: a comparison between apical and coronal root segments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özok, A.R.; Persoon, I.F.; Huse, S.M.; Keijser, B.J.F.; Wesselink, P.R.; Crielaard, W.; Zaura, E.

    2016-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the microbial ecology of the coronal and apical segments of infected root canal systems using a complete sampling technique and next-generation sequencing. Methodology The roots of 23 extracted teeth with apical periodontitis were sectioned in half, horizontally, and cryo-pulverized. Bacterial communities were profiled using tagged 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rDNA hypervariable V5–V6 region. Results The sequences were classified into 606 taxa (species or higher taxon), representing 24 bacterial phyla or candidate divisions and one archaeal phylum. Proteobacteria were more abundant in the apical samples (proots compared to their coronal counterparts. Conclusions Endodontic infections are more complex than reported previously. The apical part of the root canal system drives the selection of a more diverse and more anaerobe community than the coronal part. The presence of a distinct ecological niche in the apical region explains the difficulty of eradication of the infection, and emphasizes the need that new treatment approaches should be developed. PMID:22251411

  14. How can we harness quantitative genetic variation in crop root systems for agricultural improvement?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christopher N. Topp; Adam L. Bray

    2016-01-01

    Root systems are a black box obscuring a comprehensive understanding of plant function, from the ecosystem scale down to the individual. In particular, a lack of knowledge about the genetic mechanisms and environmental effects that condition root system growth hinders our ability to develop the next generation of crop plants for improved agricultural productivity and sustainability. We discuss how the methods and metrics we use to quantify root systems can affect our ability to understand them, how we can bridge knowledge gaps and accelerate the derivation of structure-function relationships for roots, and why a detailed mecha-nistic understanding of root growth and function will be important for future agricultural gains.

  15. Can root-feeders alter the composition of AMF communities? Experimental evidence from the dune grass Ammophila arenaria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez-Echeverria, S.; Peña, de la E.; Moens, M.; Freitas, H.; Putten, van der W.H.

    2009-01-01

    Root herbivores and plant mutualists, such as arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), have a significant effect on the structure and dynamic of plant communities. Nevertheless, the interactions between the two groups of organisms in natural ecosystems are far from understood. We carried out an inoculati

  16. Advances and considerations in technologies for growing, imaging, and analyzing 3-D root system architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ability of a plant to mine the soil for nutrients and water is determined by how, where, and when roots are arranged in the soil matrix. The capacity of plant to maintain or improve its yield under limiting conditions, such as nutrient deficiency or drought, is affected by root system architectu...

  17. Exposition on affine and elliptic root systems and elliptic Lie algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Azam, Saeid; Yousofzadeh, Malihe

    2009-01-01

    This is an exposition in order to give an explicit way to understand (1) a non-topological proof for an existence of a base of an affine root system, (2) a Serre-type definition of an elliptic Lie algebra with rank =>2, and (3) the isotropic root multiplicities of those elliptic Lie algebras.

  18. Transposon-mediated alteration of TaMATE1B expression in wheat confers constitutive citrate efflux from root apices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovkach, Andriy; Ryan, Peter R; Richardson, Alan E; Lewis, David C; Rathjen, Tina M; Ramesh, Sunita; Tyerman, Stephen D; Delhaize, Emmanuel

    2013-02-01

    The TaMATE1B gene (for multidrug and toxic compound extrusion) from wheat (Triticum aestivum) was isolated and shown to encode a citrate transporter that is located on the plasma membrane. TaMATE1B expression in roots was induced by iron deficiency but not by phosphorus deficiency or aluminum treatment. The coding region of TaMATE1B was identical in a genotype showing citrate efflux from root apices (cv Carazinho) to one that lacked citrate efflux (cv Egret). However, sequence upstream of the coding region differed between these two genotypes in two ways. The first difference was a single-nucleotide polymorphism located approximately 2 kb upstream from the start codon in cv Egret. The second difference was an 11.1-kb transposon-like element located 25 bp upstream of the start codon in cv Carazinho that was absent from cv Egret. The influence of these polymorphisms on TaMATE1B expression was investigated using fusions to green fluorescent protein expressed in transgenic lines of rice (Oryza sativa). Fluorescence measurements in roots of rice indicated that 1.5- and 2.3-kb regions upstream of TaMATE1B in cv Carazinho (which incorporated 3' regions of the transposon-like element) generated 20-fold greater expression in the apical 1 mm of root compared with the native promoter in cv Egret. By contrast, fluorescence in more mature tissues was similar in both cultivars. The presence of the single-nucleotide polymorphism alone consistently generated 2-fold greater fluorescence than the cv Egret promoter. We conclude that the transposon-like element in cv Carazinho extends TaMATE1B expression to the root apex, where it confers citrate efflux and enhanced aluminum tolerance.

  19. Farming system context drives the value of deep wheat roots in semi-arid environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilley, Julianne M; Kirkegaard, John A

    2016-06-01

    The capture of subsoil water by wheat roots can make a valuable contribution to grain yield on deep soils. More extensive root systems can capture more water, but leave the soil in a drier state, potentially limiting water availability to subsequent crops. To evaluate the importance of these legacy effects, a long-term simulation analysis at eight sites in the semi-arid environment of Australia compared the yield of standard wheat cultivars with cultivars that were (i) modified to have root systems which extract more water at depth and/or (ii) sown earlier to increase the duration of the vegetative period and hence rooting depth. We compared simulations with and without annual resetting of soil water to investigate the legacy effects of drier subsoils related to modified root systems. Simulated mean yield benefits from modified root systems declined from 0.1-0.6 t ha(-1) when annually reset, to 0-0.2 t ha(-1) in the continuous simulation due to a legacy of drier soils (mean 0-32mm) at subsequent crop sowing. For continuous simulations, predicted yield benefits of >0.2 t ha(-1) from more extensive root systems were rare (3-10% of years) at sites with shallow soils (extensively has implications for the farming system productivity, and the crop sequence must be managed tactically to optimize overall system benefits.

  20. Phylloxera (Daktulosphaira vitifoliae Fitch) alters the carbohydrate metabolism in root galls to allowing the compatible interaction with grapevine (Vitis ssp.) roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesser, Michaela; Lawo, Nora Caroline; Crespo-Martinez, Sara; Schoedl-Hummel, Katharina; Wieczorek, Krzysztof; Gorecka, Miroslawa; Liebner, Falk; Zweckmair, Thomas; Stralis Pavese, Nancy; Kreil, David; Forneck, Astrid

    2015-05-01

    Gall forming phylloxera may compete for nutrients with meristematic tissues and develop heterotrophic structures that act as carbon sinks. In this work, we studied the underlying starch metabolism, sink-source translocation of soluble sugars towards and within root galls. We demonstrated that nodosities store carbohydrates by starch accumulation and monitored the expression of genes involved in the starch metabolic. Thereby we proved that the nodosity is symplastically connected to the source tissues through its development and that the starch metabolism is significantly affected to synthesize and degrade starch within the gall. Genes required for starch biosynthesis and degradation are up-regulated. Among the carbohydrate transporters the expression of a glucose-6-phosphate translocater, one sucrose transporter and two SWEET proteins were increases, whereas hexose transporters, tonoplast monosaccharide transporter and Erd6-like sugar transporters were decreased. We found general evidence for plant response to osmotic stress in the nodosity as previously suggested for gall induction processes. We conclude that nodosities are heterogenous plant organs that accumulate starch to serve as temporary storage structure that is gradually withdrawn by phylloxera. Phylloxera transcriptionally reprograms gall tissues beyond primary metabolism and included downstream secondary processes, including response to osmotic stress. PMID:25804808

  1. Phylloxera (Daktulosphaira vitifoliae Fitch) alters the carbohydrate metabolism in root galls to allowing the compatible interaction with grapevine (Vitis ssp.) roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesser, Michaela; Lawo, Nora Caroline; Crespo-Martinez, Sara; Schoedl-Hummel, Katharina; Wieczorek, Krzysztof; Gorecka, Miroslawa; Liebner, Falk; Zweckmair, Thomas; Stralis Pavese, Nancy; Kreil, David; Forneck, Astrid

    2015-05-01

    Gall forming phylloxera may compete for nutrients with meristematic tissues and develop heterotrophic structures that act as carbon sinks. In this work, we studied the underlying starch metabolism, sink-source translocation of soluble sugars towards and within root galls. We demonstrated that nodosities store carbohydrates by starch accumulation and monitored the expression of genes involved in the starch metabolic. Thereby we proved that the nodosity is symplastically connected to the source tissues through its development and that the starch metabolism is significantly affected to synthesize and degrade starch within the gall. Genes required for starch biosynthesis and degradation are up-regulated. Among the carbohydrate transporters the expression of a glucose-6-phosphate translocater, one sucrose transporter and two SWEET proteins were increases, whereas hexose transporters, tonoplast monosaccharide transporter and Erd6-like sugar transporters were decreased. We found general evidence for plant response to osmotic stress in the nodosity as previously suggested for gall induction processes. We conclude that nodosities are heterogenous plant organs that accumulate starch to serve as temporary storage structure that is gradually withdrawn by phylloxera. Phylloxera transcriptionally reprograms gall tissues beyond primary metabolism and included downstream secondary processes, including response to osmotic stress.

  2. Integrated approaches to root disease management in organic farming systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggen, van A.H.C.; Termorshuizen, A.J.

    2003-01-01

    Conventional agriculture has had major environmental impacts, in particular with respect to soil degradation. Soil structure, fertility, microbial and faunal biodiversity have declined, and root diseases are common unless genetic resistance, soil fumigation and/or seed treatments are used. Primarily

  3. A portable fluorescence spectroscopy imaging system for automated root phenotyping in soil cores in the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasson, Anton; Bischof, Leanne; Zwart, Alec; Watt, Michelle

    2016-02-01

    Root architecture traits are a target for pre-breeders. Incorporation of root architecture traits into new cultivars requires phenotyping. It is attractive to rapidly and directly phenotype root architecture in the field, avoiding laboratory studies that may not translate to the field. A combination of soil coring with a hydraulic push press and manual core-break counting can directly phenotype root architecture traits of depth and distribution in the field through to grain development, but large teams of people are required and labour costs are high with this method. We developed a portable fluorescence imaging system (BlueBox) to automate root counting in soil cores with image analysis software directly in the field. The lighting system was optimized to produce high-contrast images of roots emerging from soil cores. The correlation of the measurements with the root length density of the soil cores exceeded the correlation achieved by human operator measurements (R (2)=0.68 versus 0.57, respectively). A BlueBox-equipped team processed 4.3 cores/hour/person, compared with 3.7 cores/hour/person for the manual method. The portable, automated in-field root architecture phenotyping system was 16% more labour efficient, 19% more accurate, and 12% cheaper than manual conventional coring, and presents an opportunity to directly phenotype root architecture in the field as part of pre-breeding programs. The platform has wide possibilities to capture more information about root health and other root traits in the field. PMID:26826219

  4. A portable fluorescence spectroscopy imaging system for automated root phenotyping in soil cores in the field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasson, Anton; Bischof, Leanne; Zwart, Alec; Watt, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Root architecture traits are a target for pre-breeders. Incorporation of root architecture traits into new cultivars requires phenotyping. It is attractive to rapidly and directly phenotype root architecture in the field, avoiding laboratory studies that may not translate to the field. A combination of soil coring with a hydraulic push press and manual core-break counting can directly phenotype root architecture traits of depth and distribution in the field through to grain development, but large teams of people are required and labour costs are high with this method. We developed a portable fluorescence imaging system (BlueBox) to automate root counting in soil cores with image analysis software directly in the field. The lighting system was optimized to produce high-contrast images of roots emerging from soil cores. The correlation of the measurements with the root length density of the soil cores exceeded the correlation achieved by human operator measurements (R 2=0.68 versus 0.57, respectively). A BlueBox-equipped team processed 4.3 cores/hour/person, compared with 3.7 cores/hour/person for the manual method. The portable, automated in-field root architecture phenotyping system was 16% more labour efficient, 19% more accurate, and 12% cheaper than manual conventional coring, and presents an opportunity to directly phenotype root architecture in the field as part of pre-breeding programs. The platform has wide possibilities to capture more information about root health and other root traits in the field. PMID:26826219

  5. The incidence of root microcracks caused by 3 different single-file systems versus the protaper system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Liu; B.X. Hou; P.R. Wesselink; M.K. Wu; H. Shemesh

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to compare the incidence of root cracks observed at the apical root surface and/or in the canal wall after canal instrumentation with 3 single-file systems and the ProTaper system (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland). Methods One hundred mandibular inc

  6. Altered balance in the autonomic nervous system in schizophrenic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, B M; Mehlsen, J; Behnke, K

    1988-01-01

    .05). Heart-rate response to inspiration was greater in non-medicated schizophrenics compared to normal subjects (P less than 0.05), whereas no difference was found between medicated and non-medicated schizophrenics. The results show that the balance in the autonomic nervous system is altered in schizophrenic...... patients with a hyperexcitability in both the sympathetic and the parasympathetic division. Our study has thus indicated a dysfunction in the autonomic nervous system per se and the previous interpretations of attentional orienting responses in schizophrenia is questioned. Medication with neuroleptics......The aim of the present study was to evaluate the autonomic nervous function in schizophrenic patients. Twenty-eight patients (29 +/- 6 years) diagnosed as schizophrenics and in stable medication were included, together with ten schizophrenic patients (25 +/- 5 years) who were unmedicated. Eleven...

  7. Evaluation of the morphological alteration of the root surface radiated with a diode laser; Avaliacao da alteracao morfologica da superficie cimentaria irradiada com laser de diodo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulin, Mauricio

    2003-07-01

    The diode laser has been studied for periodontal therapy, as much for removal of calculus as for microbial reduction of periodontal pockets, as well as the visible analgesic effects and biomodulation capacity. For this reason the purpose of this study was to evaluate the morphological alteration of the root surface after radiation with the diode laser, 808 nm through analysis by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Besides this, to verify the temperature variations caused during the radiation, a thermometer put into the dentinal wall of the root canal was used. In all, 18 teeth were used, 15 of which for the SEM study, and the other 3 were used to temperature variation analysis. The 25 samples were scraped on the root surface and planed with manual instruments. The other 5 were not subjected to any type of treatment. This, 6 groups of 5 samples each were formed. Control Group C whose samples had not received any treatment; Control Group C 1 was only scraped and polished conventionally with Hu-Friedy Gracey curettes 5 and 6; the other samples groups L1, L2, L3, L4 were radiated by diode laser using parameters of power 1,0 W; 1,2 W; 1,4 W; and 1,6 W respectively, 2 times for 10 seconds with 20 seconds intervals between each radiation in continuous mode. The results with relation to the increase of temperature in the interior of the root canal demonstrated that there was an increase of more than 5 degree Celsius. The results of the scanning electron microscope analysis of Control Group C demonstrated great irregularity and ridges on the root surface, with the presence of a dentine layer. Control Group C1 presented a similar aspect to Group L 1's, smoother and more homogeneous surface. Groups L2, L3, and L4 presented scratches alternating with smoother areas showing that fiber contacted the surface of the sample. The results reconfirmed the necessity of further studies using diode laser, with a beam of light emitted in an interrupted mode to improve the control of

  8. Unleashing the potential of the root hair cell as a single plant cell type model in root systems biology

    OpenAIRE

    Zhenzhen eQiao; Marc eLibault

    2013-01-01

    Plant root is an organ composed of multiple cell types with different functions. This multicellular complexity limits our understanding of root biology because –omics studies performed at the level of the entire root reflect the average responses of all cells composing the organ. To overcome this difficulty and allow a more comprehensive understanding of root cell biology, an approach is needed that would focus on one single cell type in the plant root. Because of its biological functions (i....

  9. 32 CFR Appendix B to Part 323 - Criteria for New and Altered Record Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... alterations. b. Increases in numbers of individuals due to normal growth are not considered alterations unless... enlisted personnel to include all of DLA enlisted personnel would be considered an alteration). d. A... a new or altered system to DLA Support Services (DSS-CA) before collecting information and for...

  10. Response of Arabidopsis thaliana Roots with Altered Lipid Transfer Protein (LTP) Gene Expression to the Clubroot Disease and Salt Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Sabine Jülke; Jutta Ludwig-Müller

    2015-01-01

    The clubroot disease of Brassicaceae is caused by the obligate biotrophic protist Plasmodiophora brassicae. The disease is characterized by abnormal tumorous swellings of infected roots that result in reduced drought resistance and insufficient distribution of nutrients, leading to reduced crop yield. It is one of the most damaging diseases among cruciferous crops worldwide. The acquisition of nutrients by the protist is not well understood. Gene expression profiles in Arabidopsis thaliana cl...

  11. Pb-induced cellular defense system in the root meristematic cells of Allium sativum L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Donghua

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electron microscopy (EM techniques enable identification of the main accumulations of lead (Pb in cells and cellular organelles and observations of changes in cell ultrastructure. Although there is extensive literature relating to studies on the influence of heavy metals on plants, Pb tolerance strategies of plants have not yet been fully explained. Allium sativum L. is a potential plant for absorption and accumulation of heavy metals. In previous investigations the effects of different concentrations (10-5 to 10-3 M of Pb were investigated in A. sativum, indicating a significant inhibitory effect on shoot and root growth at 10-3 to 10-4 M Pb. In the present study, we used EM and cytochemistry to investigate ultrastructural alterations, identify the synthesis and distribution of cysteine-rich proteins induced by Pb and explain the possible mechanisms of the Pb-induced cellular defense system in A. sativum. Results After 1 h of Pb treatment, dictyosomes were accompanied by numerous vesicles within cytoplasm. The endoplasm reticulum (ER with swollen cisternae was arranged along the cell wall after 2 h. Some flattened cisternae were broken up into small closed vesicles and the nuclear envelope was generally more dilated after 4 h. During 24-36 h, phenomena appeared such as high vacuolization of cytoplasm and electron-dense granules in cell walls, vacuoles, cytoplasm and mitochondrial membranes. Other changes included mitochondrial swelling and loss of cristae, and vacuolization of ER and dictyosomes during 48-72 h. In the Pb-treatment groups, silver grains were observed in cell walls and in cytoplasm, suggesting the Gomori-Swift reaction can indirectly evaluate the Pb effects on plant cells. Conclusions Cell walls can immobilize some Pb ions. Cysteine-rich proteins in cell walls were confirmed by the Gomori-Swift reaction. The morphological alterations in plasma membrane, dictyosomes and ER reflect the features of detoxification

  12. Response of Arabidopsis thaliana Roots with Altered Lipid Transfer Protein (LTP) Gene Expression to the Clubroot Disease and Salt Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jülke, Sabine; Ludwig-Müller, Jutta

    2015-01-01

    The clubroot disease of Brassicaceae is caused by the obligate biotrophic protist Plasmodiophora brassicae. The disease is characterized by abnormal tumorous swellings of infected roots that result in reduced drought resistance and insufficient distribution of nutrients, leading to reduced crop yield. It is one of the most damaging diseases among cruciferous crops worldwide. The acquisition of nutrients by the protist is not well understood. Gene expression profiles in Arabidopsis thaliana clubroots indicate that lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) could be involved in disease development or at least in adaptation to the disease symptoms. Therefore, the aim of the study was to examine the role of some, of the still enigmatic LTPs during clubroot development. For a functional approach, we have generated transgenic plants that overexpress LTP genes in a root specific manner or show reduced LTP gene expression. Our results showed that overexpression of some of the LTP genes resulted in reduced disease severity whereas the lipid content in clubs of LTP mutants seems to be unaffected. Additional studies indicate a role for some LTPs during salt stress conditions in roots of A. thaliana. PMID:27135222

  13. Response of Arabidopsis thaliana Roots with Altered Lipid Transfer Protein (LTP Gene Expression to the Clubroot Disease and Salt Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Jülke

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The clubroot disease of Brassicaceae is caused by the obligate biotrophic protist Plasmodiophora brassicae. The disease is characterized by abnormal tumorous swellings of infected roots that result in reduced drought resistance and insufficient distribution of nutrients, leading to reduced crop yield. It is one of the most damaging diseases among cruciferous crops worldwide. The acquisition of nutrients by the protist is not well understood. Gene expression profiles in Arabidopsis thaliana clubroots indicate that lipid transfer proteins (LTPs could be involved in disease development or at least in adaptation to the disease symptoms. Therefore, the aim of the study was to examine the role of some, of the still enigmatic LTPs during clubroot development. For a functional approach, we have generated transgenic plants that overexpress LTP genes in a root specific manner or show reduced LTP gene expression. Our results showed that overexpression of some of the LTP genes resulted in reduced disease severity whereas the lipid content in clubs of LTP mutants seems to be unaffected. Additional studies indicate a role for some LTPs during salt stress conditions in roots of A. thaliana.

  14. Mephedrone alters basal ganglia and limbic neurotensin systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    German, Christopher L; Hoonakker, Amanda H; Fleckenstein, Annette E; Hanson, Glen R

    2014-08-01

    Mephedrone (4-methylmethcathinone) is a synthetic cathinone designer drug that alters pre-synaptic dopamine (DA) activity like many psychostimulants. However, little is known about the post-synaptic dopaminergic impacts of mephedrone. The neuropeptide neurotensin (NT) provides inhibitory feedback for basal ganglia and limbic DA pathways, and post-synaptic D1 -like and D2 -like receptor activity affects NT tissue levels. This study evaluated how mephedrone alters basal ganglia and limbic system NT content and the role of NT receptor activation in drug consumption behavior. Four 25 mg/kg injections of mephedrone increased NT content in basal ganglia (striatum, substantia nigra and globus pallidus) and the limbic regions (nucleus accumbens core), while a lower dosage (5 mg/kg/injection) only increased striatal NT content. Mephedrone-induced increases in basal ganglia NT levels were mediated by D1 -like receptors in the striatum and the substantia nigra by both D1 -like and D2 -like receptors in the globus pallidus. Mephedrone increased substance P content, another neuropeptide, in the globus pallidus, but not in the dorsal striatum or substantia nigra. Finally, the NT receptor agonist PD149163 blocked mephedrone self-administration, suggesting reduced NT release, as indicated by increased tissue levels, likely contributing to patterns of mephedrone consumption.

  15. Hydrotropism in pea roots in a porous-tube water delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, H; Brown, C S; Dreschel, T W; Scott, T K

    1992-05-01

    Orientation of root growth on earth and under microgravity conditions can possibly be controlled by hydrotropism--growth toward a moisture source in the absence of or reduced gravitropism. A porous-tube water delivery system being used for plant growth studies is appropriate for testing this hypothesis since roots can be grown aeroponically in this system. When the roots of the agravitropic mutant pea ageotropum (Pisum sativum L.) were placed vertically in air of 91% relative humidity and 2 to 3 mm from the water-saturated porous tube placed horizontally, the roots responded hydrotropically and grew in a continuous arch along the circular surface of the tube. By contrast, normal gravitropic roots of Alaska' pea initially showed a slight transient curvature toward the tube and then resumed vertical downward growth due to gravitropism. Thus, in microgravity, normal gravitropic roots could respond to a moisture gradient as strongly as the agravitropic roots used in this study. Hydrotropism should be considered a significant factor responsible for orientation of root growth in microgravity. PMID:11537612

  16. Alterations of reproduction system in a polyploidized cassava interspecific hybrid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassar, Nagib M A; Graciano-Ribeiro, Dalva; Gomes, Paula F; Hashimoto, Danielle Y C

    2010-04-01

    The objective of this research was to examine how much polyploidy may affect seed and root formation in cassava interspecific hybrids Manihot esculenta Crantz xM. oligantha Pax. A polyploid type was induced by colchicine treatment to lateral buds followed by propagating vegetatively arising stems. Cytogenetic and anatomical analyses were made on both polyploid and diploid types. The polyploid type showed extensive chromosome pairing and pollen viability. Multiembryonic ovule frequency increased in polyploid plants. Stalks became woody and propagation through roots difficult, the edible roots increased, however, in size. PMID:20536543

  17. Farming system context drives the value of deep wheat roots in semi-arid environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilley, Julianne M; Kirkegaard, John A

    2016-06-01

    The capture of subsoil water by wheat roots can make a valuable contribution to grain yield on deep soils. More extensive root systems can capture more water, but leave the soil in a drier state, potentially limiting water availability to subsequent crops. To evaluate the importance of these legacy effects, a long-term simulation analysis at eight sites in the semi-arid environment of Australia compared the yield of standard wheat cultivars with cultivars that were (i) modified to have root systems which extract more water at depth and/or (ii) sown earlier to increase the duration of the vegetative period and hence rooting depth. We compared simulations with and without annual resetting of soil water to investigate the legacy effects of drier subsoils related to modified root systems. Simulated mean yield benefits from modified root systems declined from 0.1-0.6 t ha(-1) when annually reset, to 0-0.2 t ha(-1) in the continuous simulation due to a legacy of drier soils (mean 0-32mm) at subsequent crop sowing. For continuous simulations, predicted yield benefits of >0.2 t ha(-1) from more extensive root systems were rare (3-10% of years) at sites with shallow soils (soils (1.6-2.5 m). Earlier sowing had a larger impact than modified root systems on water uptake (14-31 vs 2-17mm) and mean yield increase (up to 0.7 vs 0-0.2 t ha(-1)) and the benefits occurred on deep and shallow soils and in more years (9-79 vs 3-44%). Increasing the proportion of crops in the sequence which dry the subsoil extensively has implications for the farming system productivity, and the crop sequence must be managed tactically to optimize overall system benefits. PMID:26976814

  18. Root endophyte Piriformospora indica DSM 11827 alters plant morphology, enhances biomass and antioxidant activity of medicinal plant Bacopa monniera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Ram; Kamal, Shwet; Sharma, Pradeep K; Oelmüller, Ralf; Varma, Ajit

    2013-12-01

    Unorganized collections and over exploitation of naturally occurring medicinal plant Bacopa monniera is leading to rapid depletion of germplasm and is posing a great threat to its survival in natural habitats. The species has already been listed in the list of highly threatened plants of India. This calls for micropropagation based multiplication of potential accessions and understanding of their mycorrhizal associations for obtaining plants with enhanced secondary metabolite contents. The co-cultivation of B. monniera with axenically cultivated root endophyte Piriformospora indica resulted in growth promotion, increase in bacoside content, antioxidant activity and nuclear hypertrophy of this medicinal plant.

  19. Altered dendritic arborization of amygdala neurons in young adult rats orally intubated with Clitorea ternatea aqueous root extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Kiranmai S; Murthy, K Dilip; Rao, Muddanna S; Karanth, K Sudhakar

    2005-07-01

    Young adult (60 day old) Wistar rats of either sex were orally intubated with 50 mg/kg body weight and 100 mg/kg body weight of aqueous root extract of Clitoria ternatea (CTR) for 30 days, along with age-matched saline controls. These rats were then subjected to passive avoidance tests and the results from these studies showed a significant increase in passive avoidance learning and retention. Subsequent to the passive avoidance tests, these rats were killed by decapitation. The amygdala was processed for Golgi staining and the stained neurons were traced using a camera lucida and analysed. The results showed a significant increase in dendritic intersections, branching points and dendritic processes arising from the soma of amygdaloid neurons in CTR treated rats especially in the 100 mg/kg group of rats, compared with age-matched saline controls. This improved dendritic arborization of amygdaloid neurons correlates with the increased passive avoidance learning and memory in the CTR treated rats as reported earlier. The results suggest that Clitoria ternatea aqueous root extract enhances memory by increasing the functional growth of neurons of the amygdala. PMID:16161034

  20. Thermodynamics of Organic Compound Alteration in Hydrothermal Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shock, E. L.

    2005-12-01

    Organic compounds enter hydrothermal systems through infiltrating surface waters, zones of microbial productivity in the subsurface, extracts of organic matter in surrounding host rocks, and abiotic synthesis. Owing to variations in pH, oxidation state, composition, temperature, and pressure throughout the changing pathways of fluid migration over the duration of the system, organic compounds from all of these sources are introduced to conditions where their relative stabilities and reactivities can be dramatically transformed. If those transformations were predictable, then the extent to which organic alteration reactions have occurred could be used to reveal flowpaths and histories of hydrothermal systems. Speciation and mass transfer calculations permit some insight into the underlying thermodynamic driving forces that result in organic compound alteration. As an example, the speciation of many geochemist's canonical organic matter: CH2O depends strongly on oxidation state, temperature, and total concentration of dissolved organic matter. Calculations show that at oxidation states buffered by iron-bearing mineral assemblages, organic acids dominate the speciation of CH2O throughout hydrothermal systems, with acetic acid (itself equivalent to 2 CH2O by bulk composition) and propanoic acid generally the most abundant compounds. However, at more reduced conditions, which may prevail in organic-rich iron-poor sediments, the drive is to form ketones and especially alcohols at the expense of organic acids. The distribution of organic carbon among the various members of these compound classes is strongly dependent on the total concentration of dissolved organic matter. As an example, at a bulk concentration equivalent to average dissolved organic matter in seawater (45μm), the dominant alcohols at 100°C are small compounds like ethanol and 1-propanol. In contrast, at a higher bulk concentration of 500μm, there is a drive to shift large percentages of dissolved

  1. On Continued Fraction Expansion of Real Roots of Polynomial Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mantzaflaris, Angelos; Mourrain, Bernard; Tsigaridas, Elias

    2011-01-01

    polynomials. A partial extension of Vincent’s Theorem for multivariate polynomials is presented, which allows us to prove the termination of the algorithm. Bounding functions, projection and preconditioning are employed to speed up the scheme. The resulting isolation boxes have optimized rational coordinates......, corresponding to the first terms of the continued fraction expansion of the real roots. Finally, we present new complexity bounds for a simplified version of the algorithm in the bit complexity model, and also bounds in the real RAM model for a family of subdivision algorithms in terms of the real condition...

  2. Root restriction: A tool for improving volume utilization efficiency in bioregenerative life-support systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Thomas; Wheeler, Raymond

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate root restriction as a tool to increase volume utilization efficiency in spaceflight crop production systems. Bell pepper plants (Capsicum annuum cv. California Wonder) were grown under restricted rooting volume conditions in controlled environment chambers. The rooting volume was restricted to 500 ml and 60 ml in a preliminary trial, and 1500 ml (large), 500 ml (medium), and 250 ml (small) for a full fruiting trial. To reduce the possible confounding effects of water and nutrient restrictions, care was taken to ensure an even and consistent soil moisture throughout the study, with plants being watered/fertilized several times daily with a low concentration soluble fertilizer solution. Root restriction resulted in a general reduction in biomass production, height, leaf area, and transpiration rate; however, the fruit production was not significantly reduced in the root restricted plants under the employed environmental and horticultural conditions. There was a 21% reduction in total height and a 23% reduction in overall crown diameter between the large and small pot size in the fruiting study. Data from the fruiting trial were used to estimate potential volume utilization efficiency improvements for edible biomass in a fixed production volume. For fixed lighting and rooting hardware situations, the majority of improvement from root restriction was in the reduction of canopy area per plant, while height reductions could also improve volume utilization efficiency in high stacked or vertical agricultural systems.

  3. Deep phenotyping of coarse root architecture in R. pseudoacacia reveals that tree root system plasticity is confined within its architectural model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danjon, Frédéric; Khuder, Hayfa; Stokes, Alexia

    2013-01-01

    This study aims at assessing the influence of slope angle and multi-directional flexing and their interaction on the root architecture of Robinia pseudoacacia seedlings, with a particular focus on architectural model and trait plasticity. 36 trees were grown from seed in containers inclined at 0° (control) or 45° (slope) in a glasshouse. The shoots of half the plants were gently flexed for 5 minutes a day. After 6 months, root systems were excavated and digitized in 3D, and biomass measured. Over 100 root architectural traits were determined. Both slope and flexing increased significantly plant size. Non-flexed trees on 45° slopes developed shallow roots which were largely aligned perpendicular to the slope. Compared to the controls, flexed trees on 0° slopes possessed a shorter and thicker taproot held in place by regularly distributed long and thin lateral roots. Flexed trees on the 45° slope also developed a thick vertically aligned taproot, with more volume allocated to upslope surface lateral roots, due to the greater soil volume uphill. We show that there is an inherent root system architectural model, but that a certain number of traits are highly plastic. This plasticity will permit root architectural design to be modified depending on external mechanical signals perceived by young trees.

  4. Deep phenotyping of coarse root architecture in R. pseudoacacia reveals that tree root system plasticity is confined within its architectural model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Danjon

    Full Text Available This study aims at assessing the influence of slope angle and multi-directional flexing and their interaction on the root architecture of Robinia pseudoacacia seedlings, with a particular focus on architectural model and trait plasticity. 36 trees were grown from seed in containers inclined at 0° (control or 45° (slope in a glasshouse. The shoots of half the plants were gently flexed for 5 minutes a day. After 6 months, root systems were excavated and digitized in 3D, and biomass measured. Over 100 root architectural traits were determined. Both slope and flexing increased significantly plant size. Non-flexed trees on 45° slopes developed shallow roots which were largely aligned perpendicular to the slope. Compared to the controls, flexed trees on 0° slopes possessed a shorter and thicker taproot held in place by regularly distributed long and thin lateral roots. Flexed trees on the 45° slope also developed a thick vertically aligned taproot, with more volume allocated to upslope surface lateral roots, due to the greater soil volume uphill. We show that there is an inherent root system architectural model, but that a certain number of traits are highly plastic. This plasticity will permit root architectural design to be modified depending on external mechanical signals perceived by young trees.

  5. Altered signaling in systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaubas, Claudia; Wong, Elizabeth; Zhang, Yujuan; Nguyen, Khoa D; Lee, Justin; Milojevic, Diana; Shenoi, Susan; Stevens, Anne M; Ilowite, Norman; Saper, Vivian; Lee, Tzielan; Mellins, Elizabeth D

    2016-02-01

    Systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA) is characterized by systemic inflammation and arthritis. Monocytes are implicated in sJIA pathogenesis, but their role in disease is unclear. The response of sJIA monocytes to IFN may be dysregulated. We examined intracellular signaling in response to IFN type I (IFNα) and type II (IFNγ) in monocytes during sJIA activity and quiescence, in 2 patient groups. Independent of disease activity, monocytes from Group 1 (collected between 2002 and 2009) showed defective STAT1 phosphorylation downstream of IFNs, and expressed higher transcript levels of SOCS1, an inhibitor of IFN signaling. In the Group 2 (collected between 2011 and 2014), monocytes of patients with recent disease onset were IFNγ hyporesponsive, but in treated, quiescent subjects, monocytes were hyperresponsive to IFNγ. Recent changes in medication in sJIA may alter the IFN hyporesponsiveness. Impaired IFN/pSTAT1 signaling is consistent with skewing of sJIA monocytes away from an M1 phenotype and may contribute to disease pathology.

  6. Altered neurotransmission in the mesolimbic reward system of Girk mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Devinder; Haluk, Desirae M; Kourrich, Saïd; Pravetoni, Marco; Fernández-Alacid, Laura; Nicolau, Joel C; Luján, Rafael; Wickman, Kevin

    2010-09-01

    Mice lacking the Girk2 subunit of G protein-gated inwardly rectifying K+ (Girk) channels exhibit dopamine-dependent hyperactivity and elevated responses to drugs that stimulate dopamine neurotransmission. The dopamine-dependent phenotypes seen in Girk2(-/-) mice could reflect increased intrinsic excitability of or diminished inhibitory feedback to midbrain dopamine neurons, or secondary adaptations triggered by Girk2 ablation. We addressed these possibilities by evaluating Girk(-/-) mice in behavioral, electrophysiological, and cell biological assays centered on the mesolimbic dopamine system. Despite differences in the contribution of Girk1 and Girk2 subunits to Girk signaling in midbrain dopamine neurons, Girk1(-/-) and Girk2(-/-) mice exhibited comparable baseline hyperactivities and enhanced responses to cocaine. Girk ablation also correlated with altered afferent input to dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area. Dopamine neurons from Girk1(-/-) and Girk2(-/-) mice exhibited elevated glutamatergic neurotransmission, paralleled by increased synaptic levels of alpha-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate glutamate receptors. In addition, synapse density, alpha-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate receptor levels, and glutamatergic neurotransmission were elevated in medium spiny neurons of the nucleus accumbens from Girk1(-/-) and Girk2(-/-) mice. We conclude that dopamine-dependent phenotypes in Girk2(-/-) mice are not solely attributable to a loss of Girk signaling in dopamine neurons, and likely involve secondary adaptations facilitating glutamatergic signaling in the mesolimbic reward system. PMID:20557431

  7. Maternal bisphenol A alters fetal endocrine system: Thyroid adipokine dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, R G

    2016-09-01

    Because bisphenol A (BPA) has been detected in animals, the aim of this study was to investigate the possible effects of maternal BPA exposure on the fetal endocrine system (thyroid-adipokine axis). BPA (20 or 40 μg/kg body weight) was orally administered to pregnant rats from gestation day (GD) 1-20. In both treated groups, the dams and their fetuses had lower serum thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) levels, and higher thyrotropin (TSH) level than control dams and fetuses at GD 20. Some histopathological changes in fetal thyroid glands were observed in both maternal BPA groups at embryonic day (ED) 20, including fibroblast proliferation, hyperplasia, luminal obliteration, oedema, and degeneration. These disorders resulted in the suppression of fetal serum growth hormone (GH), insulin growth factor-1 (IGF1) and adiponectin (ADP) levels, and the elevation of fetal serum leptin, insulin and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) levels in both treated groups with respect to control. The depraved effects of both treated groups were associated with reduced maternal and fetal body weight compared to the control group. These alterations were dose dependent. Thus, BPA might penetrate the placental barrier and perturb the fetal thyroid adipokine axis to influence fat metabolism and the endocrine system.

  8. Maternal bisphenol A alters fetal endocrine system: Thyroid adipokine dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, R G

    2016-09-01

    Because bisphenol A (BPA) has been detected in animals, the aim of this study was to investigate the possible effects of maternal BPA exposure on the fetal endocrine system (thyroid-adipokine axis). BPA (20 or 40 μg/kg body weight) was orally administered to pregnant rats from gestation day (GD) 1-20. In both treated groups, the dams and their fetuses had lower serum thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) levels, and higher thyrotropin (TSH) level than control dams and fetuses at GD 20. Some histopathological changes in fetal thyroid glands were observed in both maternal BPA groups at embryonic day (ED) 20, including fibroblast proliferation, hyperplasia, luminal obliteration, oedema, and degeneration. These disorders resulted in the suppression of fetal serum growth hormone (GH), insulin growth factor-1 (IGF1) and adiponectin (ADP) levels, and the elevation of fetal serum leptin, insulin and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) levels in both treated groups with respect to control. The depraved effects of both treated groups were associated with reduced maternal and fetal body weight compared to the control group. These alterations were dose dependent. Thus, BPA might penetrate the placental barrier and perturb the fetal thyroid adipokine axis to influence fat metabolism and the endocrine system. PMID:27326465

  9. Computational Hemodynamic Simulation of Human Circulatory System under Altered Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim. Chang Sung; Kiris, Cetin; Kwak, Dochan

    2003-01-01

    A computational hemodynamics approach is presented to simulate the blood flow through the human circulatory system under altered gravity conditions. Numerical techniques relevant to hemodynamics issues are introduced to non-Newtonian modeling for flow characteristics governed by red blood cells, distensible wall motion due to the heart pulse, and capillary bed modeling for outflow boundary conditions. Gravitational body force terms are added to the Navier-Stokes equations to study the effects of gravity on internal flows. Six-type gravity benchmark problems are originally presented to provide the fundamental understanding of gravitational effects on the human circulatory system. For code validation, computed results are compared with steady and unsteady experimental data for non-Newtonian flows in a carotid bifurcation model and a curved circular tube, respectively. This computational approach is then applied to the blood circulation in the human brain as a target problem. A three-dimensional, idealized Circle of Willis configuration is developed with minor arteries truncated based on anatomical data. Demonstrated is not only the mechanism of the collateral circulation but also the effects of gravity on the distensible wall motion and resultant flow patterns.

  10. Management of C-shaped root canal configuration with three different obturation systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deenadayalan Elumalai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Unusual root canal anatomy always poses a diagnostic and treatment challenge. Identification of such variation is important for the success of the root canal treatment outcome. The C-shaped root canal configuration is one of the aberrant morphology of molar teeth, commonly the mandibular second molar. In this configuration, the canals are connected by slit or web. The presence of fin, slit and web makes through debridement obstacle for the clinician. This case reports present successful management of C-shaped mandibular molars with three different obturation systems.

  11. System analysis of microRNAs in the development and aluminium stress responses of the maize root system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiangpei; Zhang, Maolin; Xu, Xiangbo; Li, Xiaoming; Li, Cuiling; Ding, Zhaojun

    2014-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of regulatory small RNAs (sRNAs) that down-regulate target genes through mRNA cleavage or translational inhibition. miRNA is known to play an important role in the root development and environmental responses in both the Arabidopsis and rice. However, little information is available to form a complete view of miRNAs in the development of the maize root system and Al stress responses in maize. Four sRNA libraries were generated and sequenced from the early developmental stage of primary roots (PRY), the later developmental stage of maize primary roots (PRO), seminal roots (SR) and crown roots (CR). Through integrative analysis, we identified 278 miRNAs (246 conserved and 32 novel ones) and found that the expression patterns of miRNAs differed dramatically in different maize roots. The potential targets of the identified conserved and novel miRNAs were also predicted. In addition, our data showed that CR is more resistant to Al stress compared with PR and SR, and the differentially expressed miRNAs are likely to play significant roles in different roots in response to environmental stress such as Al stress. Here, we demonstrate that the expression patterns of miRNAs are highly diversified in different maize roots. The differentially expressed miRNAs are correlated with both the development and environmental responses in the maize root. This study not only improves our knowledge about the roles of miRNAs in maize root development but also reveals the potential role of miRNAs in the environmental responses of different maize roots.

  12. Salicylic acid prevents Trichoderma harzianum from entering the vascular system of roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Ramírez, Ana; Poveda, Jorge; Martín, Ignacio; Hermosa, Rosa; Monte, Enrique; Nicolás, Carlos

    2014-10-01

    Trichoderma is a soil-borne fungal genus that includes species with a significant impact on agriculture and industrial processes. Some Trichoderma strains exert beneficial effects in plants through root colonization, although little is known about how this interaction takes place. To better understand this process, the root colonization of wild-type Arabidopsis and the salicylic acid (SA)-impaired mutant sid2 by a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-marked Trichoderma harzianum strain was followed under confocal microscopy. Trichoderma harzianum GFP22 was able to penetrate the vascular tissue of the sid2 mutant because of the absence of callose deposition in the cell wall of root cells. In addition, a higher colonization of sid2 roots by GFP22 compared with that in Arabidopsis wild-type roots was detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction. These results, together with differences in the expression levels of plant defence genes in the roots of both interactions, support a key role for SA in Trichoderma early root colonization stages. We observed that, without the support of SA, plants were unable to prevent the arrival of the fungus in the vascular system and its spread into aerial parts, leading to later collapse.

  13. Root system distribution and yield of 'Conilon' coffee propagated by seeds or cuttings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Luiz Partelli

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the root system distribution and the yield of 'Conilon' coffee (Coffea canephora propagated by seeds or cuttings. The experiment was carried out with 2x1 m spacing, in an Oxisol with sandy clay loam texture. A randomized complete block design was used, following a 2x9x6 factorial arrangement, with two propagation methods (seeds and cuttings, nine sampling spacings (0.15, 0.30, 0.45, 0.60, 0.75, and 0.90 m between rows, and 0.15, 0.30, and 0.45 between plants within rows, six soil depths (0.10-0.20, 0.20-0.30, 0.30-0.40, 0.40-0.50, and 0.50-0.60 m, and six replicates. Soil cores (27 cm3 with roots were taken from 12 experimental units, 146 months after planting. The surface area of the root system and root diameter, length, and volume were assessed for 13 years and, then, correlated with grain yield. The highest fine root concentration occurred at the superficial soil layers. The variables used to characterize the root system did not differ between propagation methods. Moreover, no differences were observed for net photosynthetic CO2 assimilation rate, stomatal conductance, internal CO2 concentrations, and instantaneous water-use efficiency in the leaves. Cutting-propagated plants were more productive than seed-propagated ones.

  14. crinkle, a novel symbiotic mutant that affects the infection thread growth and alters the root hair, trichome, and seed development in Lotus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansengco, Myra L; Hayashi, Makoto; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi; Imaizumi-Anraku, Haruko; Murooka, Yoshikatsu

    2003-03-01

    To elucidate the mechanisms involved in Rhizobium-legume symbiosis, we examined a novel symbiotic mutant, crinkle (Ljsym79), from the model legume Lotus japonicus. On nitrogen-starved medium, crinkle mutants inoculated with the symbiont bacterium Mesorhizobium loti MAFF 303099 showed severe nitrogen deficiency symptoms. This mutant was characterized by the production of many bumps and small, white, uninfected nodule-like structures. Few nodules were pale-pink and irregularly shaped with nitrogen-fixing bacteroids and expressing leghemoglobin mRNA. Morphological analysis of infected roots showed that nodulation in crinkle mutants is blocked at the stage of the infection process. Confocal microscopy and histological examination of crinkle nodules revealed that infection threads were arrested upon penetrating the epidermal cells. Starch accumulation in uninfected cells and undeveloped vascular bundles were also noted in crinkle nodules. Results suggest that the Crinkle gene controls the infection process that is crucial during the early stage of nodule organogenesis. Aside from the symbiotic phenotypes, crinkle mutants also developed morphological alterations, such as crinkly or wavy trichomes, short seedpods with aborted embryos, and swollen root hairs. crinkle is therefore required for symbiotic nodule development and for other aspects of plant development.

  15. Altered B cell receptor signaling in human systemic lupus erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenks, Scott A.; Sanz, Iñaki

    2009-01-01

    Regulation of B cell receptor signaling is essential for the development of specific immunity while retaining tolerance to self. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is characterized by a loss of B cell tolerance and the production of anti-self antibodies. Accompanying this break down in tolerance are alterations in B cell receptor signal transduction including elevated induced calcium responses and increased protein phosphorylation. Specific pathways that negatively regulate B cell signaling have been shown to be impaired in some SLE patients. These patients have reduced levels of the kinase Lyn in lipid raft microdomains and this reduction is inversely correlated with increased CD45 in lipid rafts. Function and expression of the inhibitory immunoglobulin receptor FcγRIIB is also reduced in Lupus IgM- CD27+ memory cells. Because the relative contribution of different memory and transitional B cell subsets can be abnormal in SLE patients, we believe studies targeted to well defined B cell subsets will be necessary to further our understanding of signaling abnormalities in SLE. Intracellular flow cytometric analysis of signaling is a useful approach to accomplish this goal. PMID:18723129

  16. Effect of cropping system and mineral fertilizer on root yield of cassava

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of cropping system and fertilizer on the root yield of three introduced high yielding cassava varieties (Afisiafi, Abasafitaa and Tekbankye) and two local varieties (Tuakentenma and Akosuatumtum). Two cropping systems (sole cassava and cassava-maize intercrop and five fertilizer regimes (0-0-0, 30-30-30, 60-60-60, 90-90-90 and 120-120-120 kg ha-I N-P2O5-K2O) were studied in 2000 and 2001. A split-split plot design with four replications was used in the first study and a split-plot design for the second. Cassava-maize intercrop significantly reduced root yield at Mampong (2000) and Asuansi (2001) but not at Wenchi (2001). Afisiafi and Abasafitaa performed better than the local varieties or Tekbankye. At Asuansi and Kpeve, Afisiafi gave significantly greater root yield than Abasafitaa. Root yields of Afisiafi and Abasafita were, however, similar at Mampong and Wenchi in 2000. At Wenchi (2001), Abasafitaa gave significantly greater root yield than Atisiafi. At Mampong (2000) and Wenchi (2001), Afisiafi produced significantly more roots per stand than the local varieties and Abasafitaa gave significantly greater root yield per stand than the local variety. At all the four sites mineral fertilizer resulted in significantly greater root yield over control. At Asuansi (2001), Kpeve (2001) and Mampong (2000), 60-60-60 kg ha-1 N-P2O3-K2O gave significantly greater root yield than the 30-30-30 kg N-P2O5-K2O ha-1 but similar to the 90-90-90 and 120-120-120 kg ha-1 N-P2O5-K2O. At Wenchi (2001) all the rates gave similar root yield. Across locations, Afisiafi and Abasafitaa produced greater root yield than the local varieties and Tekbankye. Mineral fertilizer at 60-60-60 kg ha-1 N-P2O5-K2O was the optimum level for root yields. (au)

  17. R7T7 glass alteration mechanism in an aqueous closed system: understanding and modelling the long term alteration kinetic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The long term alteration rate of the French R7T7 nuclear glass has been investigated since many years because it will define the overall resistance of the radionuclide containment matrix. Recent studies have shown that the final rate remains constant or is slightly decreasing with time. It never reaches zero. Though this residual rate is very low, only 5 nm per year at 50 C, it would be the dominant alteration phenomenon in a geological repository. Two mechanisms are suggested for explaining such behaviour: diffusion in solution of elements from glass through an amorphous altered layer and precipitation of neo-formed phases. The diffusion processes are in agreement with a solid state diffusion mechanism and can lead to secondary phase precipitation due to solution concentration increases. Observed phases are mainly phyllosilicates and zeolites, in specific conditions. Phyllosilicates are expected to maintain the residual kinetic rate whereas alteration resumption could be observed in presence of zeolites at very high pH or temperature (10.5 at 90 C or temperature above 150 C). Both diffusion and neo-formed phase precipitation have been investigated in order to better understand their impact on the residual alteration rate and have then been modelled by a calculation code, coupling chemistry and transport, in order to be able to better anticipate the long term behaviour of the glass R7T7 in an aqueous closed system. (author)

  18. [Effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on root system morphology and sucrose and glucose contents of Poncirus trifoliata].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Ying-Ning; Wu, Qiang-Sheng; Li, Yan; Huang, Yong-Ming

    2014-04-01

    The effects of inoculation with Glomus mosseae, G. versiforme, and their mixture on plant growth, root system morphology, and sucrose and glucose contents of trifoliate orange (Poncirus trifoliata L.) were studied by pot culture. The results showed that all the inoculated treatments significantly increased the plant height, stem diameter, leaf number, and shoot and root biomass. In addition, the mycorrhizal treatments significantly increased the number of 1st, 2nd, and 3rd lateral roots. Inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi significantly increased the root projected area, surface area, volume, and total root length (mainly 0-1 cm root length), but decreased the root average diameter. Meanwhile, G. versiforme showed the best effects. Mycorrhizal inoculation significantly increased the leaf sucrose and root glucose contents, but decreased the leaf glucose and root sucrose contents. Owing to the 'mycorrhizal carbon pool' in roots, inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi resulted in high glucose content and low sucrose content of roots, which would facilitate the root growth and development, thereby the establishment of better root system morphology of host plants.

  19. A drought resistance-promoting microbiome is selected by root system under desert farming.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramona Marasco

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Traditional agro-systems in arid areas are a bulwark for preserving soil stability and fertility, in the sight of "reverse desertification". Nevertheless, the impact of desert farming practices on the diversity and abundance of the plant associated microbiome is poorly characterized, including its functional role in supporting plant development under drought stress. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We assessed the structure of the microbiome associated to the drought-sensitive pepper plant (Capsicum annuum L. cultivated in a traditional Egyptian farm, focusing on microbe contribution to a crucial ecosystem service, i.e. plant growth under water deficit. The root system was dissected by sampling root/soil with a different degree of association to the plant: the endosphere, the rhizosphere and the root surrounding soil that were compared to the uncultivated soil. Bacterial community structure and diversity, determined by using Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis, differed according to the microhabitat, indicating a selective pressure determined by the plant activity. Similarly, culturable bacteria genera showed different distribution in the three root system fractions. Bacillus spp. (68% of the isolates were mainly recovered from the endosphere, while rhizosphere and the root surrounding soil fractions were dominated by Klebsiella spp. (61% and 44% respectively. Most of the isolates (95% presented in vitro multiple plant growth promoting (PGP activities and stress resistance capabilities, but their distribution was different among the root system fractions analyzed, with enhanced abilities for Bacillus and the rhizobacteria strains. We show that the C. annuum rhizosphere under desert farming enriched populations of PGP bacteria capable of enhancing plant photosynthetic activity and biomass synthesis (up to 40% under drought stress. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Crop cultivation provides critical ecosystem services in arid lands with the

  20. A Drought Resistance-Promoting Microbiome Is Selected by Root System under Desert Farming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marasco, Ramona; Rolli, Eleonora; Ettoumi, Besma; Vigani, Gianpiero; Mapelli, Francesca; Borin, Sara; Abou-Hadid, Ayman F.; El-Behairy, Usama A.; Sorlini, Claudia; Cherif, Ameur; Zocchi, Graziano; Daffonchio, Daniele

    2012-01-01

    Background Traditional agro-systems in arid areas are a bulwark for preserving soil stability and fertility, in the sight of “reverse desertification”. Nevertheless, the impact of desert farming practices on the diversity and abundance of the plant associated microbiome is poorly characterized, including its functional role in supporting plant development under drought stress. Methodology/Principal Findings We assessed the structure of the microbiome associated to the drought-sensitive pepper plant (Capsicum annuum L.) cultivated in a traditional Egyptian farm, focusing on microbe contribution to a crucial ecosystem service, i.e. plant growth under water deficit. The root system was dissected by sampling root/soil with a different degree of association to the plant: the endosphere, the rhizosphere and the root surrounding soil that were compared to the uncultivated soil. Bacterial community structure and diversity, determined by using Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis, differed according to the microhabitat, indicating a selective pressure determined by the plant activity. Similarly, culturable bacteria genera showed different distribution in the three root system fractions. Bacillus spp. (68% of the isolates) were mainly recovered from the endosphere, while rhizosphere and the root surrounding soil fractions were dominated by Klebsiella spp. (61% and 44% respectively). Most of the isolates (95%) presented in vitro multiple plant growth promoting (PGP) activities and stress resistance capabilities, but their distribution was different among the root system fractions analyzed, with enhanced abilities for Bacillus and the rhizobacteria strains. We show that the C. annuum rhizosphere under desert farming enriched populations of PGP bacteria capable of enhancing plant photosynthetic activity and biomass synthesis (up to 40%) under drought stress. Conclusions/Significance Crop cultivation provides critical ecosystem services in arid lands with the plant root

  1. Toward a Low-Cost System for High-Throughput Image-Based Phenotyping of Root System Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, T. W.; Schneider, D. J.; Cheng, H.; Shaw, N.; Kochian, L. V.; Shaff, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    Root system architecture is being studied more closely for improved nutrient acquisition, stress tolerance and carbon sequestration by relating the genetic material that corresponds to preferential physical features. This information can help direct plant breeders in addressing the growing concerns regarding the global demand on crops and fossil fuels. To help support this incentive comes a need to make high-throughput image-based phenotyping of plant roots, at the individual plant scale, simpler and more affordable. Our goal is to create an affordable and portable product for simple image collection, processing and management that will extend root phenotyping to institutions with limited funding (e.g., in developing countries). Thus, a new integrated system has been developed using the Raspberry Pi single-board computer. Similar to other 3D-based imaging platforms, the system utilizes a stationary camera to photograph a rotating crop root system (e.g., rice, maize or sorghum) that is suspended either in a gel or on a mesh (for hydroponics). In contrast, the new design takes advantage of powerful open-source hardware and software to reduce the system costs, simplify the imaging process, and manage the large datasets produced by the high-resolution photographs. A newly designed graphical user interface (GUI) unifies the system controls (e.g., adjusting camera and motor settings and orchestrating the motor motion with image capture), making it easier to accommodate a variety of experiments. During each imaging session, integral metadata necessary for reproducing experiment results are collected (e.g., plant type and age, growing conditions and treatments, camera settings) using hierarchical data format files. These metadata are searchable within the GUI and can be selected and extracted for further analysis. The GUI also supports an image previewer that performs limited image processing (e.g., thresholding and cropping). Root skeletonization, 3D reconstruction and

  2. Developmental Alterations in Heart Biomechanics and Skeletal Muscle Function in Desmin Mutants Suggest an Early Pathological Root for Desminopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Ramspacher

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Desminopathies belong to a family of muscle disorders called myofibrillar myopathies that are caused by Desmin mutations and lead to protein aggregates in muscle fibers. To date, the initial pathological steps of desminopathies and the impact of desmin aggregates in the genesis of the disease are unclear. Using live, high-resolution microscopy, we show that Desmin loss of function and Desmin aggregates promote skeletal muscle defects and alter heart biomechanics. In addition, we show that the calcium dynamics associated with heart contraction are impaired and are associated with sarcoplasmic reticulum dilatation as well as abnormal subcellular distribution of Ryanodine receptors. Our results demonstrate that desminopathies are associated with perturbed excitation-contraction coupling machinery and that aggregates are more detrimental than Desmin loss of function. Additionally, we show that pharmacological inhibition of aggregate formation and Desmin knockdown revert these phenotypes. Our data suggest alternative therapeutic approaches and further our understanding of the molecular determinants modulating Desmin aggregate formation.

  3. Root cause analysis of pump valve failures of three membrane pump systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijs, L.J.; Eijk, A.; Hooft, L. van

    2014-01-01

    This paper will present the root cause analysis and the solution of fatigue failures of the pump valves of three membrane pump systems installed on a chemical plant of Momentive in Pernis, the Netherlands. The membrane pumps were installed approximately 30 years ago. Each system has encountered fati

  4. Uptake and localisation of lead in the root system of Brassica juncea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The uptake and distribution of Pb sequestered by hydroponically grown (14 days growth) Brassica juncea (3 days exposure; Pb activities 3.2, 32 and 217 μM) was investigated. Lead uptake was restricted largely to root tissue. Examination using scanning transmission electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy revealed substantial and predominantly intracellular uptake at the root tip. Endocytosis of Pb at the plasma membrane was not observed. A membrane transport protein may therefore be involved. In contrast, endocytosis of Pb into a subset of vacuoles was observed, resulting in the formation of dense Pb aggregates. Sparse and predominantly extracellular uptake occurred at some distance from the root tip. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed that the Pb concentration was greater in root tips. Heavy metal rhizofiltration using B. juncea might therefore be improved by breeding plants with profusely branching roots. Uptake enhancement using genetic engineering techniques would benefit from investigation of plasma membrane transport mechanisms. - The sites of Pb sequestration within the root system of hydroponically grown Brassica juncea were identified

  5. Deciphering Phosphate Deficiency-Mediated Temporal Effects on Different Root Traits in Rice Grown in a Modified Hydroponic System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negi, Manisha; Sanagala, Raghavendrarao; Rai, Vandna; Jain, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    Phosphate (Pi), an essential macronutrient for growth and development of plant, is often limiting in soils. Plants have evolved an array of adaptive strategies including modulation of root system architecture (RSA) for optimal acquisition of Pi. In rice, a major staple food, RSA is complex and comprises embryonically developed primary and seminal roots and post-embryonically developed adventitious and lateral roots. Earlier studies have used variant hydroponic systems for documenting the effects of Pi deficiency largely on primary root growth. Here, we report the temporal effects of Pi deficiency in rice genotype MI48 on 15 ontogenetically distinct root traits by using easy-to-assemble and economically viable modified hydroponic system. Effects of Pi deprivation became evident after 4 days- and 7 days-treatments on two and eight different root traits, respectively. The effects of Pi deprivation for 7 days were also evident on different root traits of rice genotype Nagina 22 (N22). There were genotypic differences in the responses of primary root growth along with lateral roots on it and the number and length of seminal and adventitious roots. Notably though, there were attenuating effects of Pi deficiency on the lateral roots on seminal and adventitious roots and total root length in both these genotypes. The study thus revealed both differential and comparable effects of Pi deficiency on different root traits in these genotypes. Pi deficiency also triggered reduction in Pi content and induction of several Pi starvation-responsive (PSR) genes in roots of MI48. Together, the analyses validated the fidelity of this modified hydroponic system for documenting Pi deficiency-mediated effects not only on different traits of RSA but also on physiological and molecular responses.

  6. Deciphering Phosphate Deficiency-Mediated Temporal Effects on Different Root Traits in Rice Grown in a Modified Hydroponic System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negi, Manisha; Sanagala, Raghavendrarao; Rai, Vandna; Jain, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    Phosphate (Pi), an essential macronutrient for growth and development of plant, is often limiting in soils. Plants have evolved an array of adaptive strategies including modulation of root system architecture (RSA) for optimal acquisition of Pi. In rice, a major staple food, RSA is complex and comprises embryonically developed primary and seminal roots and post-embryonically developed adventitious and lateral roots. Earlier studies have used variant hydroponic systems for documenting the effects of Pi deficiency largely on primary root growth. Here, we report the temporal effects of Pi deficiency in rice genotype MI48 on 15 ontogenetically distinct root traits by using easy-to-assemble and economically viable modified hydroponic system. Effects of Pi deprivation became evident after 4 days- and 7 days-treatments on two and eight different root traits, respectively. The effects of Pi deprivation for 7 days were also evident on different root traits of rice genotype Nagina 22 (N22). There were genotypic differences in the responses of primary root growth along with lateral roots on it and the number and length of seminal and adventitious roots. Notably though, there were attenuating effects of Pi deficiency on the lateral roots on seminal and adventitious roots and total root length in both these genotypes. The study thus revealed both differential and comparable effects of Pi deficiency on different root traits in these genotypes. Pi deficiency also triggered reduction in Pi content and induction of several Pi starvation-responsive (PSR) genes in roots of MI48. Together, the analyses validated the fidelity of this modified hydroponic system for documenting Pi deficiency-mediated effects not only on different traits of RSA but also on physiological and molecular responses. PMID:27200025

  7. Deciphering Phosphate Deficiency-Mediated Temporal Effects on Different Root Traits in Rice Grown in a Modified Hydroponic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negi, Manisha; Sanagala, Raghavendrarao; Rai, Vandna; Jain, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    Phosphate (Pi), an essential macronutrient for growth and development of plant, is often limiting in soils. Plants have evolved an array of adaptive strategies including modulation of root system architecture (RSA) for optimal acquisition of Pi. In rice, a major staple food, RSA is complex and comprises embryonically developed primary and seminal roots and post-embryonically developed adventitious and lateral roots. Earlier studies have used variant hydroponic systems for documenting the effects of Pi deficiency largely on primary root growth. Here, we report the temporal effects of Pi deficiency in rice genotype MI48 on 15 ontogenetically distinct root traits by using easy-to-assemble and economically viable modified hydroponic system. Effects of Pi deprivation became evident after 4 days- and 7 days-treatments on two and eight different root traits, respectively. The effects of Pi deprivation for 7 days were also evident on different root traits of rice genotype Nagina 22 (N22). There were genotypic differences in the responses of primary root growth along with lateral roots on it and the number and length of seminal and adventitious roots. Notably though, there were attenuating effects of Pi deficiency on the lateral roots on seminal and adventitious roots and total root length in both these genotypes. The study thus revealed both differential and comparable effects of Pi deficiency on different root traits in these genotypes. Pi deficiency also triggered reduction in Pi content and induction of several Pi starvation-responsive (PSR) genes in roots of MI48. Together, the analyses validated the fidelity of this modified hydroponic system for documenting Pi deficiency-mediated effects not only on different traits of RSA but also on physiological and molecular responses. PMID:27200025

  8. Detection of 3D tree root systems using high resolution ground penetration radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altdorff, D.; Honds, M.; Botschek, J.; Van Der Kruk, J.

    2014-12-01

    Knowledge of root systems and its distribution are important for biomass estimation as well as for the prevention of subsurface distribution network damages. Ground penetration radar (GPR) is a promising technique that enables a non-invasive imaging of tree roots. Due to the polarisation-dependent reflection coefficients and complicated three-dimensional root structure, accurate measurements with perpendicularly polarized antennas are needed. In this study, we show GPR data from two planes and one chestnut at two locations with different soil conditions. Perpendicular 10 x 10 cm grid measurements were made with a shielded 250 MHz antenna in combination with a high precision self-tracking laser theodolite that provides geo-referenced traces with a spatial resolution of ~ 2 cm. After selecting potential root hyperbolas within the perpendicular GPR profiles, the corresponding three-dimensional coordinates were extracted and visualized in planar view to reveal any linear structure that indicates a possible tree root. The coordinates of the selected linear structures were projected back to the surface by means of the laser-theodolite to indicate the locations for groundtruthing. Additionally, we interpolated the measured data into a 3D cube where time slices confirmed the locations of linear reflection events. We validated the indicated predictions by excavation of the soil with a suction dredge. Subsequent georeferencing of the true root distribution and comparison with the selected linear events showed that the approach was able to identify the precise position of roots with a diameter between 3 and 10 cm and a depth of up to 70 cm. However, not all linear events were roots; also mouse channels were found in these depths, since they also generate GPR hyperbolas aligned in linear structures. Roots at a second location at depths of 1 to 1.20 m did not generate identifiable hyperboles, which was probably due to an increased electrical conductivity below 86 cm depth. The

  9. Root patterning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheres, Ben; Laskowski, Marta

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms that pattern lateral root primordial are essential for the elaboration of root system architecture, a trait of key importance for future crop breeding. But which are most important: periodic or local cues? In this issue of Journal of Experimental Botany (pages 1411-1420), Kircher a

  10. Studying Gestures: The Iconic Roots of Human Communication Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Ioannou, Charis

    2011-01-01

    This paper tests the hypothesis that the iconicity inherent in human gestures can be a key element in the creation and evolution of communication systems. An interactive experiment based on playing charades was conducted modelling a situation where a multimodal (gesture + sound) and semiotically mixed (non‐arbitrary + arbitrary) communication system evolves through social collaboration. The experimental design was based on Garrod and colleagues’ (2007) modelling of iconic graphical signals...

  11. Investigation of plant water relations with divided root systems of soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, B E; Elsharkawi, H M

    1970-11-01

    Soybean (Glycine max) was grown with root systems divided between adjacent cartons containing nutrient solution or soil. By adding polyethylene glycol (Carbowax 6000) to reduce solute potential or withholding water to reduce soil matric potential until water absorption from that side stopped, the root xylem water potential could be ascertained. Carbowax appeared to increase root resistance. An imbalance technique is described with which soil moisture contents of adjacent containers were followed individually. The patterns of water absorption obtained following repeated additions of water or addition of CaCl(2) solutions to one side indicated soil hydraulic conductivity became limiting at a soil water potential of -2 bars. A high concentration of CaCl(2) added to one side greatly reduced transpiration and produced severe plant injury. With part of the root system developing in nutrient solution, growth of roots into and water absorption from soil were slow; however, reduction of solute potential in the solution side greatly increased water absorption from the soil side. PMID:16657537

  12. Fruit yield and root system distribution of 'Tommy Atkins' mango under different irrigation regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo R. dos Santos

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the fruit yield and the distribution of 'Tommy Atkins' mango root system under different irrigation regimes in the semiarid region of Bahia. The experimental design was completely randomized with five treatments and three replicates: 1 - Irrigation supplying 100% of ETc in phases I, II and III; 2 - Regulated deficit irrigation (RDI supplying 50% of ETc in phase I (beginning of flowering to early fruit growth; 3 - RDI supplying 50% ETc in phase II (start of expansion until the beginning of physiological maturity; 4 - RDI supplying 50% ETc in phase III (physiological mature fruits; 5 - No irrigation during all three phases. The regulated deficit irrigation supplying 50% of the ETc during phase I and II provided larger root length density of 'Tommy Atkins' mango. Regardless of management strategy, the roots were developed in all evaluated soil volume and the highest density is concentrated from 0.50 to 1.50 m distance from the trunk and in 0.20 to 0.90 m depth in the soil, that suggests this region to be the best place for fertilizer application as well for soil water sensor placement. The application of RDI during fruit set does not influence either root distribution or production. Root system and crop production is significantly reduced under no irrigation conditions.

  13. Ideotype root architecture for efficient nitrogen acquisition by maize in intensive cropping systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The use of nitrogen(N) fertilizers has contributed to the production of a food supply sufficient for both animals and humans despite some negative environmental impact.Sustaining food production by increasing N use efficiency in intensive cropping systems has become a major concern for scientists,environmental groups,and agricultural policymakers worldwide.In high-yielding maize systems the major method of N loss is nitrate leaching.In this review paper,the characteristic of nitrate movement in the soil,N uptake by maize as well as the regulation of root growth by soil N availability are discussed.We suggest that an ideotype root architecture for efficient N acquisition in maize should include(i) deeper roots with high activity that are able to uptake nitrate before it moves downward into deep soil;(ii) vigorous lateral root growth under high N input conditions so as to increase spatial N availability in the soil;and(iii) strong response of lateral root growth to localized nitrogen supply so as to utilize unevenly distributed nitrate especially under limited N conditions.

  14. Ideotype root architecture for efficient nitrogen acquisition by maize in intensive cropping systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Guohua; Chen, Fanjun; Wu, Qiuping; Lai, Ningwei; Yuan, Lixing; Zhang, Fusuo

    2010-12-01

    The use of nitrogen (N) fertilizers has contributed to the production of a food supply sufficient for both animals and humans despite some negative environmental impact. Sustaining food production by increasing N use efficiency in intensive cropping systems has become a major concern for scientists, environmental groups, and agricultural policymakers worldwide. In high-yielding maize systems the major method of N loss is nitrate leaching. In this review paper, the characteristic of nitrate movement in the soil, N uptake by maize as well as the regulation of root growth by soil N availability are discussed. We suggest that an ideotype root architecture for efficient N acquisition in maize should include (i) deeper roots with high activity that are able to uptake nitrate before it moves downward into deep soil; (ii) vigorous lateral root growth under high N input conditions so as to increase spatial N availability in the soil; and (iii) strong response of lateral root growth to localized nitrogen supply so as to utilize unevenly distributed nitrate especially under limited N conditions. PMID:21181338

  15. Modeling water uptake by a root system growing in a fixed soil volume

    CERN Document Server

    Albrieu, J L Blengino; Tarzia, D A

    2015-01-01

    The water uptake by roots of plants is examined for an ideal situation, with an approximation that resembles plants growing in pots, meaning that the total soil volume is fixed. We propose a coupled water uptake-root growth model. A one-dimensional model for water flux and water uptake by a root system growing uniformly distributed in the soil is presented, and the Van Genuchten model for the transport of water in soil is used. The governing equations are represented by a moving boundary model for which the root length, as a function of time, is prescribed. The solution of the model is obtained by front-fixing and finite element methods. Model predictions for water uptake by a same plant growing in loam, silt and clay soils are obtained and compared. A sensitivity analysis to determine relative effects on water uptake when system parameters are changed is also presented and shows that the model and numerical method proposed are more sensitive to the root growth rate than to the rest of the parameters. This se...

  16. Microgravity effects on water supply and substrate properties in porous matrix root support systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, G. E.; Jones, S. B.; Or, D.; Podolski, I. G.; Levinskikh, M. A.; Sytchov, V. N.; Ivanova, T.; Kostov, P.; Sapunova, S.; Dandolov, I.; Bubenheim, D. B.; Jahns, G.; Campbell, W. F. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    The control of water content and water movement in granular substrate-based plant root systems in microgravity is a complex problem. Improper water and oxygen delivery to plant roots has delayed studies of the effects of microgravity on plant development and the use of plants in physical and mental life support systems. Our international effort (USA, Russia and Bulgaria) has upgraded the plant growth facilities on the Mir Orbital Station (OS) and used them to study the full life cycle of plants. The Bulgarian-Russian-developed Svet Space Greenhouse (SG) system was upgraded on the Mir OS in 1996. The US developed Gas Exchange Measurement System (GEMS) greatly extends the range of environmental parameters monitored. The Svet-GEMS complex was used to grow a fully developed wheat crop during 1996. The growth rate and development of these plants compared well with earth grown plants indicating that the root zone water and oxygen stresses that have limited plant development in previous long-duration experiments have been overcome. However, management of the root environment during this experiment involved several significant changes in control settings as the relationship between the water delivery system, water status sensors, and the substrate changed during the growth cycles. c 2001 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Coarctation induces alterations in basement membranes in the cardiovascular system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lipke, D W; McCarthy, K J; Elton, T S;

    1993-01-01

    ventricular hypertrophy was maximal within 5 days. In immunohistochemical studies, fibronectin and laminin were increased and the basement membrane chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan decreased in both the subendothelial space and smooth muscle cell basement membranes of the aorta above the clip compared...... membrane components in the heart and vasculature peaked before maximal cardiac hypertrophy (5 days). These studies indicate that alterations in basement membrane component deposition in the hypertrophied vasculature occur at both transcriptional and translational levels and suggest that the cell attachment...

  18. Deciphering Phosphate Deficiency-Mediated Temporal Effects on Different Root Traits in Rice Grown in a Modified Hydroponic System

    OpenAIRE

    Negi, Manisha; Sanagala, Raghavendrarao; Rai, Vandna; Jain, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    Phosphate (Pi), an essential macronutrient for growth and development of plant, is often limiting in soils. Plants have evolved an array of adaptive strategies including modulation of root system architecture (RSA) for optimal acquisition of Pi. In rice, a major staple food, RSA is complex and comprises embryonically developed primary and seminal roots and post-embryonically developed adventitious and lateral roots. Earlier studies have used variant hydroponic systems for documenting the effe...

  19. Reflection subgroups and sub-root systems of the imprimitive complex reflection groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Based on a graph-theoretic analysis,we determine all the irreducible reflection subgroups of the imprimitive complex reflection groups G(m,p,n),and describe the irreducible subsystems of all possible types in the root system R(m,p,n) of G(m,p,n).

  20. Lentil root protoplasts: a transient expression system suitable for coelectroporation of monoclonal antibodies and plasmid molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Maccarrone, M.; Veldink, G.A.; Finazzi Agrò, A.

    1995-01-01

    Protoplasts were isolated from lentil (Lens culinaris) roots and their suitability as a transient expression system was investigated. After transfecting the protoplasts with the -glucuronidase (GUS) gene by either electroporation or polyethylene glycol (PEG), the specific activity of the reporter en

  1. Effects of linuron on a rooted aquatic macrophyte in sediment-dosed test systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buresova, H.; Crum, S.J.H.; Belgers, J.D.M.; Adriaanse, P.I.; Arts, G.H.P.

    2013-01-01

    Effects of linuron on the sediment-rooted aquatic macrophyte Myriophyllum spicatum L. were studied in sediment-dosed test systems following a proposed guideline with extended test duration. Sediment, pore water, overlying water and macrophyte shoots were sampled weekly for chemical analyses. Linuron

  2. Prevention of root diseases in closed soilless growing systems by microbial optimisation and slow sand filtration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Os, van E.A.; Postma, J.

    2000-01-01

    Closed hydroponic systems are good alternatives for soil grown crops using methyl bromide in protected cultivation. Root-infecting pathogens may be dispersed over the nursery by the circulating nutrient solution, which was reason to disinfect the nutrient solution. The natural microflora in the nutr

  3. Can Crops with Greater Rooting Systems Improve Nitrogen Retention and Mitigate Emissions of Nitrous Oxide?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decock, Charlotte; Lee, Juhwan; Barthel, Matti; Mikita, Chris; Wilde, Benjamin; Verhoeven, Elizabeth; Hund, Andreas; Abiven, Samuel; Friedli, Cordula; Conen, Franz; Mohn, Joachim; Wolf, Benjamin; Six, Johan

    2016-04-01

    It has been suggested that crops with deeper root systems could improve agricultural sustainability, because scavenging of nitrogen (N) in the subsoil would increase overall N retention and use efficiency in the system. However, the effect of plant root depth and root architecture on N-leaching and emissions of the potent greenhouse N2O remains largely unknown. We aimed to assess the effect of plant rooting depth on N-cycling and N2O production and reduction within the plant-soil system and throughout the soil profile. We hypothesized that greater root depth and root biomass will (1) increase N use efficiency and decrease N losses in the form of N leaching and N2O emissions; (2) increase N retention by shifting the fate of NH4+ from more nitrification toward more plant uptake and microbial immobilization; and (3) increase the depth of maximum N2O production and decrease the ratio of N2O:(N2O+N2) in denitrification end-products. To test these hypotheses, 4 winter wheat cultivars were grown in lysimeters (1.5 m tall, 0.5 m diameter, 3 replications per cultivar) under greenhouse conditions. Each lysimeter was equipped with an automated flux chamber for the determination of N2O surface fluxes. At 7.5, 30, 60, 90 and 120 cm depth, sampling ports were installed for the determination of soil moisture contents, as well as the collection of soil pore air and soil pore water samples. We selected two older and two newer varieties from the Swiss winter wheat breeding program, spanning a 100-year breeding history. The selection was based on previous experiments indicating that the older varieties have deeper rooting systems than the newer varieties under well watered conditions. N2O fluxes were determined twice per day on a quantum cascade laser absorption spectrometer interfaced with the automated flux chambers. Once per week, we determined concentrations of mineral N in pore water and of CO2 and N2O in the pore air. For mineral N and N2O, also natural abundance isotope deltas

  4. Healthiness and fungus composition of barley roots under organic, integrated and conventional farming systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Baturo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The researched material was healthiness of roots and fungus composition of spring barley cultivated under organic, integrated and conventional farming systems. The studies were carried out in 1998-2001 on experimental fields in Osiny near Puławy, south-eastern Poland. In the emergence stage the roots health status was the lowest in organic system however in the end of vegetation season, in dough maturity stage the most disease symptoms were stated in conventional system. The mycological analyses revealed the occurrence of two important pathogens: Bipolaris sorokiniana and Fusarium spp. Despite of root healthiness macroscopic analyses showed their lower health status in organic system only in emergence stage and the most quantity of plants with disease symptoms in dough maturity stage were observed in conventional system, but pathogens like Bipolaris sorokiniana and Fusarium spp. were mostly isolated in organic system in both phases. It can suggest that disease symptoms in conventional system can be caused by different than fungus factors. The lowest percent of mentioned pathogens was stated in integrated system. It is worth to notice that organic conditions could be favourable to Gliocladium roseum. Because of growing interest in ecology, giving up of using pesticides and more and more popular biological disease control, these fungi of Gliocladium genus be used in this system due to their antagonistic properties.

  5. Soil CO2 Efflux and Root Productivity in a Switchgrass and Loblolly Pine Intercropping System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paliza Shrestha

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Switchgrass intercropped with loblolly pine plantations can provide valuable feedstock for bioenergy production while providing ancillary benefits like controlling competing vegetation and enhancing soil C. Better understanding of the impact of intercropping on pine and switchgrass productivity is required for evaluating the long-term sustainability of this agroforestry system, along with the impacts on soil C dynamics (soil CO2 efflux; RS. RS is the result of root respiration (RA and heterotrophic respiration (RH, which are used to estimate net C ecosystem exchange. We measured RS in intercropped and monoculture stands of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L. and switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.. The root exclusion core technique was used to estimate RA and RH. The results showed pure switchgrass had significantly higher RS rates (July, August and September, root biomass and length relative to intercropped switchgrass, while there were no significant changes in RS and roots between intercropped and monoculture loblolly pine stands. A significant decrease in switchgrass root productivity in the intercropped stands versus monoculture stands could account for differences in the observed RS. The proportions of RS attributed to RA in the intercropped stand were 31% and 22% in the summer and fall respectively, indicating that the majority of the RS was heterotrophic-driven. Ancillary benefits provided by planting switchgrass between unutilized pine rows can be considered unless the goal is to increase switchgrass production.

  6. Soil chemical properties, organic reserves and root system of a degraded pasture associated introduction of legume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Santos Fabrice

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to study the recovery of degraded pasture with the introduction of Stylosanthes macrocephala e capitata cv. Campo Grande on Brachiaria decumbens cv. Basilisk evaluating the levels N-total in roots, biomass, area, and length, diameter and root levels of macro and micronutrients in the soil. The experiment was conducted in the municipality of Andradina, São Paulo State, Brazil. The experimental design was a randomized block design in a split-plot (with and without phosphorus, with four replicates, forming the following treatments: control Brachiaria decumbens (CB, partial desiccation with 1.5 L ha-1 of glyphosate (DP, total desiccation with 3.0 L ha-1 of glyphosate (TD; tillage (T, soil scarification (S; harrowing rome (H and plowing + disking (PD. Treatments H and PD were sown by broadcasting and the other in the form of direct seeding. Recovery strategies of grazing signal grass showed significant differences between treatments only for the content of N-total, there were no differences in geometric characteristics of roots and root biomass. The contents of macro and micronutrients in the soil showed no significant differences between the strategies of recovery. Fertilization had a significant effect for P. The introduction of estilosantes Campo Grande accompanied by techniques such as drying and plowing + disking contributed to increases in the N-total levels in the root system. Forms of introduction of legumes did not change the soil chemical properties.

  7. Effects of Local Nitrogen Supply on Water Uptake of Bean Plants in a Split Root System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shiwei Guo; Qirong Shen; Holger Brueck

    2007-01-01

    To study the effects of local nitrogen supply on water and nutrient absorption, French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)plants were grown in a split root system. Five treatments supplied with different nitrogen forms were compared:homogeneous nitrate (NN) and homogenous ammonium (AA) supply, spatially separated supply of nitrate and ammonium (NA), half of the root system supplied with N-free nutrient solution, the other half with either nitrate (NO) or ammonium (AO). The results showed that 10 d after onset of treatments, root dry matter (DM) in the nitratesupplied vessels treated with NA was more than two times higher than that in the ammonium-supplied vessels.Water uptake from the nitrate-supplied vessels treated with NA was 281% higher than under ammonium supply. In treatments NO and AO, the local supply of N resulted in clearly higher root DM, and water uptake from the nitratesupplied vessels was 82% higher than in the -N vessels. However, in AO plants, water uptake from the -N nutrient solution was 129% higher than from the ammonium-supplied vessels. This indicates a compensatory effect, which resulted in almost identical rates of total water uptake of treatments AA and AO, which had comparable shoot DM and leaf area. Ammonium supply reduced potassium and magnesium absorption. Water uptake was positively correlated with N, Mg and K uptake.

  8. Migration law of heavy metal cadmium in soil-root interface systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-Xiang YANG; Ming-Xu ZHANG; Xiao-Long LI; Liang-Min GAO; Duo-Xi YAO

    2013-01-01

    The distribution characteristics of heavy metals in soil-root systems have great significance for the research into soil pollution risk assessment and the phytoremediation effect.This paper takes ligustrum lucidum as an example,based on the characteristics of adsorption of heavy metals in soil by woody plants,lays out sampling points,and using software Sufer for the Kiging interpolation analysis,and the horizontal migration law of heavy metal cadmium in the soil-root interface system is simulated.Through multi-model statistical regression trend analysis,the horizontal migration mechanism of cadmium in different sections is discussed.The results show that:① under horizontal migration law:the migration ability of Cd is weaker near the Ligustrum lucidum root (0-30 cm); with the root extension,the migration ability of Cd gradually is strengthened,and the main range of the migration ability is 60 90 cm.In addition,its migration law follows the cubic curve mode.② under longitudinal migration law:based on the Kriging method,migration models Z(hi) of heavy metal Cd in any depth of hi are constructed and fit the correlation coefficient R2>0.95.

  9. Effect of partial soil wetting on transpiration, vegetative growth and root system of young orange trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Melo Vellame

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The wetted area fraction is a factor critical to the success of drip irrigation. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of partial soil wetting on transpiration, vegetative growth and root system of young orange trees. The experiment was carried out in a greenhouse where plants were grown in 0.5 m3boxes internally divided into compartments. The wetting of 12 % of soil area was tested on two types of soil cultivated with ‘Valencia’ orange trees grafted onto Rangpur lime and ‘Swingle’ citrumelo rootstocks. Transpiration was determined in 40 plants. Water extraction and root density were evaluated in the compartments. Transpiration is reduced by restriction in wetted soil area, and such reduction is influenced by the number of days after the beginning of partial irrigation, atmospheric evaporative demand and plant phenological stage. Mean transpiration of plants with partial irrigation was equivalent to 84 % of the mean transpiration of plants with 100 % of wetted soil area in the period studied. However, after 156 days of imposing partial irrigation there was no difference in transpiration between treatments. Plant acclimation was caused by an increase in root concentration in the irrigated area. After a period of acclimation, if the entire root system is wetted, soil water extraction becomes proportional to the percentage of wetted area after a short period of time. Despite the reduction in transpiration, there was no difference between treatments with 12 % and 100 % of wetted soil area in terms of vegetative growth.

  10. K+ uptake in plant roots. The systems involved, their regulation and parallels in other organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieves-Cordones, Manuel; Alemán, Fernando; Martínez, Vicente; Rubio, Francisco

    2014-05-15

    Potassium (K(+)) is an essential macronutrient for plants. It is taken into the plant by the transport systems present in the plasma membranes of root epidermal and cortical cells. The identity of these systems and their regulation is beginning to be understood and the systems of K(+) transport in the model species Arabidopsis thaliana remain far better characterized than in any other plant species. Roots can activate different K(+) uptake systems to adapt to their environment, important to a sessile organism that needs to cope with a highly variable environment. The mechanisms of K(+) acquisition in the model species A. thaliana are the best characterized at the molecular level so far. According to the current model, non-selective channels are probably the main pathways for K(+) uptake at high concentrations (>10mM), while at intermediate concentrations (1mM), the inward rectifying channel AKT1 dominates K(+) uptake. Under lower concentrations of external K(+) (100μM), AKT1 channels, together with the high-affinity K(+) uptake system HAK5 contribute to K(+) acquisition, and at extremely low concentrations (root K(+) uptake are shared by other organisms, whilst others are specific to plants. This indicates that some crucial properties of the ancestral of K(+) transport systems have been conserved through evolution while others have diverged among different kingdoms.

  11. Tree growth and management in Ugandan agroforestry systems: effects of root pruning on tree growth and crop yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wajja-Musukwe, Tellie-Nelson; Wilson, Julia; Sprent, Janet I; Ong, Chin K; Deans, J Douglas; Okorio, John

    2008-02-01

    Tree root pruning is a potential tool for managing belowground competition when trees and crops are grown together in agroforestry systems. We investigated the effects of tree root pruning on shoot growth and root distribution of Alnus acuminata (H.B. & K.), Casuarina equisetifolia L., Grevillea robusta A. Cunn. ex R. Br., Maesopsis eminii Engl. and Markhamia lutea (Benth.) K. Schum. and on yield of adjacent crops in sub-humid Uganda. The trees were 3 years old at the commencement of the study, and most species were competing strongly with crops. Tree roots were pruned 41 months after planting by cutting and back-filling a trench to a depth of 0.3 m, at a distance of 0.3 m from the trees, on one side of the tree row. The trench was reopened and roots recut at 50 and 62 months after planting. We assessed the effects on tree growth and root distribution over a 3 year period, and crop yield after the third root pruning at 62 months. Overall, root pruning had only a slight effect on aboveground tree growth: height growth was unaffected and diameter growth was reduced by only 4%. A substantial amount of root regrowth was observed by 11 months after pruning. Tree species varied in the number and distribution of roots, and C. equisetifolia and M. lutea had considerably more roots per unit of trunk volume than the other species, especially in the surface soil layers. Casuarina equisetifolia and M. eminii were the tree species most competitive with crops and G. robusta and M. lutea the least competitive. Crop yield data provided strong evidence of the redistribution of root activity following root pruning, with competition increasing on the unpruned side of tree rows. Thus, one-sided root pruning will be useful in only a few circumstances.

  12. Tree growth and management in Ugandan agroforestry systems: effects of root pruning on tree growth and crop yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wajja-Musukwe, Tellie-Nelson; Wilson, Julia; Sprent, Janet I; Ong, Chin K; Deans, J Douglas; Okorio, John

    2008-02-01

    Tree root pruning is a potential tool for managing belowground competition when trees and crops are grown together in agroforestry systems. We investigated the effects of tree root pruning on shoot growth and root distribution of Alnus acuminata (H.B. & K.), Casuarina equisetifolia L., Grevillea robusta A. Cunn. ex R. Br., Maesopsis eminii Engl. and Markhamia lutea (Benth.) K. Schum. and on yield of adjacent crops in sub-humid Uganda. The trees were 3 years old at the commencement of the study, and most species were competing strongly with crops. Tree roots were pruned 41 months after planting by cutting and back-filling a trench to a depth of 0.3 m, at a distance of 0.3 m from the trees, on one side of the tree row. The trench was reopened and roots recut at 50 and 62 months after planting. We assessed the effects on tree growth and root distribution over a 3 year period, and crop yield after the third root pruning at 62 months. Overall, root pruning had only a slight effect on aboveground tree growth: height growth was unaffected and diameter growth was reduced by only 4%. A substantial amount of root regrowth was observed by 11 months after pruning. Tree species varied in the number and distribution of roots, and C. equisetifolia and M. lutea had considerably more roots per unit of trunk volume than the other species, especially in the surface soil layers. Casuarina equisetifolia and M. eminii were the tree species most competitive with crops and G. robusta and M. lutea the least competitive. Crop yield data provided strong evidence of the redistribution of root activity following root pruning, with competition increasing on the unpruned side of tree rows. Thus, one-sided root pruning will be useful in only a few circumstances. PMID:18055434

  13. Root distribution analyses as a means of improving sensor-based deficit irrigation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloss, Sebastian; Werisch, Martin; Schütze, Niels

    2014-05-01

    The limited and seasonally variable availability of water and its efficient distribution when growing crops is still an unsolved problem in agriculture. Sensor-based deficit irrigation (DI), where a sensor is used to detect the soil water status and irrigation is provided according to certain threshold values, is one strategy to address that issue. Threshold values are needed that ensure high water productivity and high reliability. A stochastic approach of simulation and optimization in combination with irrigation experiments of drip irrigated maize for model parameterization was used to derive reliable soil water tension threshold values for irrigation control. A weakness of the applied model was the unknown parameterization of the plant root, which had to be included into the optimization besides parameters for the soil only, thus increasing the complexity of the problem. In a follow-up irrigation experiment with the same DI system parameters, focus was put on the investigation of the plant's root distribution in order to improve the validity of the model when determining optimal soil water tension threshold values in sensor-based deficit irrigation systems. Soil samples for a fully and a deficiently irrigated treatment during different stages of plant development were taken and the root density at different depths was determined. The difference in root growth for both treatments are shown and reliable soil water tension threshold values for varying values of irrigation parameters recalculated in a Monte Carlo simulation, after incorporating the new root parameterization into the model. This further improves the significance of derived threshold values and helps to assess possibilities and limitations of this approach when used for investigating the potentials of sensor-based DI systems.

  14. Primitive Liquid Water of the Solar System in an Aqueous Altered Carbonaceous Chondrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiyama, A.; Miyake, A.; Kitayama, A.; Matsuno, J.; Takeuchi, A.; Uesugi, K.; Suzuki, Y.; Nakano, T.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2016-01-01

    Non-destructive 3D observations of the aqueous altered CM chondrite Sutter's Mill using scanning imaging x-ray microscopy (SIXM) showed that some of calcite and enstatite grains contain two-phase inclusion, which is most probably composed of liquid water and bubbles. This water should be primitive water responsible for aqueous alteration in an asteroid in the early solar system.

  15. Root cause analysis of accidents on large-scale complex systems using Dual Vee Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Root cause analyses of system failures are important from a viewpoint of prevention of recurrence of the failures and occurrence of similar failures. Five-why Analysis and Fault Tree Analysis are most popular however these analysis results depend on the skill of the analysts strongly because these use brain-storming method. The authors have proposed a root cause analysis method using Dual Vee Model, which has given a guidance in space systems applications to analyze and therefore the result less depends on the skill of the analyst. This paper demonstrates the results of the application of the method of failures of Nuclear Power Plants. This paper also proposes a chart to identify systems to which the method can be applied. (author)

  16. A New Adaptive Square-Root Unscented Kalman Filter for Nonlinear Systems with Additive Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Kalman filter (KF, extended KF, and unscented KF all lack a self-adaptive capacity to deal with system noise. This paper describes a new adaptive filtering approach for nonlinear systems with additive noise. Based on the square-root unscented KF (SRUKF, traditional Maybeck’s estimator is modified and extended to nonlinear systems. The square root of the process noise covariance matrix Q or that of the measurement noise covariance matrix R is estimated straightforwardly. Because positive semidefiniteness of Q or R is guaranteed, several shortcomings of traditional Maybeck’s algorithm are overcome. Thus, the stability and accuracy of the filter are greatly improved. In addition, based on three different nonlinear systems, a new adaptive filtering technique is described in detail. Specifically, simulation results are presented, where the new filter was applied to a highly nonlinear model (i.e., the univariate nonstationary growth model (UNGM. The UNGM is compared with the standard SRUKF to demonstrate its superior filtering performance. The adaptive SRUKF (ASRUKF algorithm can complete direct recursion and calculate the square roots of the variance matrixes of the system state and noise, which ensures the symmetry and nonnegative definiteness of the matrixes and greatly improves the accuracy, stability, and self-adaptability of the filter.

  17. Concept for Sustained Plant Production on ISS Using VEGGIE Capillary Mat Rooting System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutte, Gary W.; Newsham, Gerard; Morrow, Robert M.; Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2011-01-01

    Plant growth in microgravity presents unique challenges associated with maintaining appropriate conditions for seed germination, seedling establishment, maturation and harvest. They include maintaining appropriate soil moisture content, nutrient balance, atmospheric mixing and containment. Sustained production imposes additional challenges of harvesting, replanting, and safety. The VEGGIE is a deployable (collapsible) plant growth chamber developed as part of a NASA SBIR Phase II by Orbitec, Madison, WI. The intent of VEGGIE is to provide a low-resource system to produce fresh vegetables for the crew on long duration missions. The VEGGIE uses and LED array for lighting, an expandable bellows for containment, and a capillary matting system for nutrient and water delivery. The project evaluated a number of approaches to achieve sustained production, and repeated plantings, using the capillary rooting system. A number of different root media, seed containment, and nutrient delivery systems were evaluated and effects on seed germination and growth were evaluated. A number of issues limiting sustained production, such as accumulation of nutrients, uniform water, elevated vapor pressure deficit, and media containment were identified. A concept using pre-planted rooting packs shown to effectively address a number of those issues and is a promising approach for future development as a planting system for microgravity conditions.

  18. 78 FR 64196 - Privacy Act Altered System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-28

    ..., Biographical Files (78 FR 171). In that notice, the Department announced its intent to amend that system of..., Biographical Files. The notice of proposed amendment to this system of records was published in the Federal..., Biographical Files and Social Networks. The amendment serves to modify the system of records by...

  19. Recent Advances in Understanding the Molecular Mechanisms Regulating the Root System Response to Phosphate Deficiency in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouain, Nadia; Doumas, Patrick; Rouached, Hatem

    2016-08-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential macronutrient for plant growth and development. Inorganic phosphate (Pi) is the major form of P taken up from the soil by plant roots. It is well established that under Pi deficiency condition, plant roots undergo striking morphological changes; mainly a reduction in primary root length while increase in lateral root length as well as root hair length and density. This typical phenotypic change reflects complex interactions with other nutrients such as iron, and involves the activity of a large spectrum of plant hormones. Although, several key proteins involved in the regulation of root growth under Pi-deficiency have been identified in Arabidopsis, how plants adapt roots system architecture in response to Pi availability remains an open question. In the current post-genomic era, state of the art technologies like high-throughput phenotyping and sequencing platforms,"omics" methods, together with the widespread use of system biology and genome-wide association studies will help to elucidate the genetic architectures of root growth on different Pi regimes. It is clear that the large-scale characterization of molecular systems will improve our understanding of nutrient stress phenotype and biology. Herein, we summarize the recent advances and future directions towards a better understanding of Arabidopsis root developmental programs functional under Pi deficiency. Such a progress is necessary to devise strategies to improve the Pi use efficiency in plants that is an important issue for agriculture. PMID:27499680

  20. Impact of treated wastewater on growth, respiration and hydraulic conductivity of citrus root systems in light and heavy soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudel, Indira; Cohen, Shabtai; Shaviv, Avi; Bar-Tal, Asher; Bernstein, Nirit; Heuer, Bruria; Ephrath, Jhonathan

    2016-06-01

    Roots interact with soil properties and irrigation water quality leading to changes in root growth, structure and function. We studied these interactions in an orchard and in lysimeters with clay and sandy loam soils. Minirhizotron imaging and manual sampling showed that root growth was three times lower in the clay relative to sandy loam soil. Treated wastewater (TWW) led to a large reduction in root growth with clay (45-55%) but not with sandy loam soil (hydraulic conductivity was severely reduced in clay soil. Treated wastewater increased respiration rate and reduced hydraulic conductivity of all root orders in clay but only of the lower root orders in sandy loam soil. Loss of hydraulic conductivity increased with root order in clay and clay irrigated with TWW. Respiration and hydraulic properties of all root orders were significantly affected by sodium-amended TWW in sandy loam soil. These changes in root order morphology, anatomy, physiology and hydraulic properties indicate rapid and major modifications of root systems in response to differences in soil type and water quality.

  1. Impact of treated wastewater on growth, respiration and hydraulic conductivity of citrus root systems in light and heavy soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudel, Indira; Cohen, Shabtai; Shaviv, Avi; Bar-Tal, Asher; Bernstein, Nirit; Heuer, Bruria; Ephrath, Jhonathan

    2016-06-01

    Roots interact with soil properties and irrigation water quality leading to changes in root growth, structure and function. We studied these interactions in an orchard and in lysimeters with clay and sandy loam soils. Minirhizotron imaging and manual sampling showed that root growth was three times lower in the clay relative to sandy loam soil. Treated wastewater (TWW) led to a large reduction in root growth with clay (45-55%) but not with sandy loam soil (hydraulic conductivity was severely reduced in clay soil. Treated wastewater increased respiration rate and reduced hydraulic conductivity of all root orders in clay but only of the lower root orders in sandy loam soil. Loss of hydraulic conductivity increased with root order in clay and clay irrigated with TWW. Respiration and hydraulic properties of all root orders were significantly affected by sodium-amended TWW in sandy loam soil. These changes in root order morphology, anatomy, physiology and hydraulic properties indicate rapid and major modifications of root systems in response to differences in soil type and water quality. PMID:27022106

  2. X-Ray Computed Tomography Reveals the Response of Root System Architecture to Soil Texture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Eric D; Monaenkova, Daria; Mijar, Medhavinee; Nori, Apoorva; Goldman, Daniel I; Benfey, Philip N

    2016-07-01

    Root system architecture (RSA) impacts plant fitness and crop yield by facilitating efficient nutrient and water uptake from the soil. A better understanding of the effects of soil on RSA could improve crop productivity by matching roots to their soil environment. We used x-ray computed tomography to perform a detailed three-dimensional quantification of changes in rice (Oryza sativa) RSA in response to the physical properties of a granular substrate. We characterized the RSA of eight rice cultivars in five different growth substrates and determined that RSA is the result of interactions between genotype and growth environment. We identified cultivar-specific changes in RSA in response to changing growth substrate texture. The cultivar Azucena exhibited low RSA plasticity in all growth substrates, whereas cultivar Bala root depth was a function of soil hardness. Our imaging techniques provide a framework to study RSA in different growth environments, the results of which can be used to improve root traits with agronomic potential. PMID:27208237

  3. Systemic distribution of sup 14 C-labeled formaldehyde applied in the root canal following pulpectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hata, G.I.; Nishikawa, I.; Kawazoe, S.; Toda, T.

    1989-11-01

    The systemic distribution of {sup 14}C-labeled formaldehyde which had been placed in the root canals of the canines of cats following pulpectomies was studied using liquid scintillation counting and whole-body autoradiographic technique. Radioactive {sup 14}C which had been placed in the canals was found in the plasma 30 min after the root canal procedure. The recovery of systemic {sup 14}C radioactivity increased with time. In addition, it seemed that approximately 3% of the dose placed in the teeth was excreted in the urine within 36 h. Whole-body autoradiograms indicated extensive concentration of {sup 14}C radioactivity in tissues other than those analyzed with the liquid scintillation technique.

  4. Characterization of the bacterial flora associated with root systems of Pinus contorta var. latifolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangerfield, J A; Westlake, D W; Cook, F D

    1978-12-01

    Root systems of young and mature lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl. var. latifolia Englem.) were removed from forest stands and the associated aerobic bacterial flora isolated. Characterization of rhizoplane and control soil isolates from these tree root systems demonstrated differences from that reported for agricultural crops. Ammonifying, proteolytic, and amylolytic organisms were proportionately reduced within the rhizoplane. The rhizoplane organisms grew more slowly than the control soil isolates, although they responded in greater numbers to the addition of an amino acid supplement to the growth media. The rhizoplane organisms also showed an increased ability to solubilize phosphate. The chitinolytic organisms were suppressed within the rhizoplane of the mature tree but were stimulated by the young trees. With this exception, the rhizoplane microflora of older and younger trees were similar. PMID:747813

  5. Adjustment of Forest Ecosystem Root Respiration as Temperature Warms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrew J. Burton; Jerry M. Melillo; Serita D. Frey

    2008-01-01

    Adjustment of ecosystem root respiration to warmer climatic conditions can alter the autotrophic portion of soil respiration and influence the amount of carbon available for biomass production. We examined 44 published values of annual forest root respiration and found an increase in ecosystem root respiration with increasing mean annual temperature (MAT),but the rate of this cross-ecosystem increase (Q10 = 1.6) is less than published values for short-term responses of root respiration to temperature within ecosystems (Q10 = 2-3). When specific root respiration rates and root biomass values were examined, there was a clear trend for decreasing root metabolic capacity (respiration rate at a standard temperature) with increasing MAT. There also were tradeoffs between root metabolic capacity and root system biomass, such that there were no instances of high growing season respiration rates and high root biomass occurring together. We also examined specific root respiration rates at three soil warming experiments at Harvard Forest, USA, and found decreases in metabolic capacity for roots from the heated plots. This decline could be due to either physiological acclimation or to the effects of co-occurring drier soils on the measurement date. Regardless of the cause, these findings clearly suggest that modeling efforts that allow root respiration to increase exponentially with temperature, with Qt0 values of 2 or more, may over-predict root contributions to ecosystem CO2 efflux for future climates and underestimate the amount of C available for other uses,including net primary productivity.

  6. Characterization of the soil fertility and root system of restinga forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Martins Bonilha

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The Restinga vegetation consists of a mosaic of plant communities, which are defined by the characteristics of the substrates, resulting from the type and age of the depositional processes. This mosaic complex of vegetation types comprises restinga forest in advanced (high restinga and medium regeneration stages (low restinga, each with particular differentiating vegetation characteristics. The climate along the coast is tropical (Köppen. Of all ecosystems of the Atlantic Forest, Restinga is the most fragile and susceptible to anthropic disturbances. Plants respond to soil characteristics with physiological and morphological modifications, resulting in changes in the architecture (spatial configuration of the root system. The purpose of this study was to characterize the soil fertility of high and low restinga forests, by chemical and physical parameters, and its relation to the root system distribution in the soil profile. Four locations were studied: (1 Ilha Anchieta State Park, Ubatuba; (2 two Ecological Stations of Jureia-Itatins and of Chauás, in the municipality of Iguape; (3 Vila de Pedrinhas in the municipality of Ilha Comprida; and (4 Ilha do Cardoso State Park, Cananeia. The soil fertility (chemical and physical properties was analyzed in the layers 0-5, 0-10, 0-20, 20-40 and 40-60 cm. In addition, the distribution of the root system in the soil profile was evaluated, using digital images and the Spring program. It was concluded that the root system of all vegetation types studied is restricted to the surface layers, 0-10 and 10-20 cm, but occupies mainly the 0-10 cm layer (70 %; that soil fertility is low in all environments studied, with base saturation values below 16 %, since most exchange sites are occupied by aluminum; and that restinga vegetation is edaphic.

  7. TEMPERATURE-RESPIRATION RELATIONSHIPS DIFFER IN MYCORRHIZAL AND NON-MYCORRHIZAL ROOT SYSTEMS OF PICEA ABIES (L.) KARST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root respiration has been shown to increase with temperature, but less is known about how this relation ship is affected by the fungal partner in mycorrhizal root systems. In order to test respiratory temperature dependence, in particular Q10 of mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal r...

  8. On stochastic modelling of groundwater uptake in semi-arid water-limited systems: root density and seasonality effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vervoort, R.W.; Zee, van der S.E.A.T.M.

    2012-01-01

    In recent ecohydrological modelling, a common basis has been found in methodology and axiomas, such as the minimalist, systems analysis approach and a piecewise linear root zone water loss function. In this paper, we consider the loss function for root zones in contact with ground water through capi

  9. The distribution of phosphorus in the root systems of the Proteaceae and the identification of their rhizosphere and rhizoplane fungi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The soil mycoflora of an acidic sandy soil at Pella in S.W. Cape, South Africa, was determined by the soil plate technique. The fungal populations of the rhizosphere and rhizoplane of root systems of Hakea sericea and Leucospermum parile, members of the Proteaceae growing in the soil were isolated by the serial root washing technique. The root systems of H. sericea and L. parile supported a more varied mycoflora than the non-rhizosphere soil. Members of the Ascomycotina were restricted to the rhizosphere and rhizoplane region and were absent from the non-rhizosphere soil. Different forms of phosphorus (P) containing compounds were extracted and fractionated from proteoid and non-proteoid roots of H. sericea seedlings grown in P amended Clovelly sand. The main P fractions of both proteoid and non-proteoid roots were lipid-P and orthophosphate. The phosphorus 32 uptake of the roots were also investigated. An acid labile trichloracetic acid soluble BaCl2 precipitate was present. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and paper chromatography of the phenol detergent extracts of the root systems of H. sericea and Leucadendron laureolum (Proteaceae) failed to detect polyphosphate. It is concluded that the acid labile trichloracetic acid soluble BaCl2 precipitate fraction extracted from the root systems of the Proteaceae is non-nucleotide ester-P

  10. Photoactivated disinfection (PAD) of dental root canal system – An ex-vivo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Dennis; Maruthingal, Sunith; Indira, Rajamani; Divakar, Darshan Devang; Al Kheraif, Abdulaziz Abdullah; Ramakrishnaiah, Ravikumar; Durgesh, B.H.; Basavarajappa, Santhosh; John, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Aim To investigate the efficacy of photo activated disinfection (PAD) in reducing colony-forming unit (CFU) counts of Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) in infected dental root canals. The study compared the efficacy of PAD with conventional endodontic treatment (CET) and also a combination of CET along with PAD. Material and Methods 53 maxillary incisors were taken for the study. Teeth were divided into 3 groups, CET (Group I) (n = 11), PAD (Group II) (n = 21), and a combination of CET and PAD (Group III) which consisted of (n = 21) samples, Group II and Group III were further divided into 2 subgroups, Group IIa, IIb and Group IIIa, IIIb. Strains of E. faecalis were inoculated in all the root canals. CET group samples were treated by chemo-mechanical preparation (CMP) alone, PAD samples were treated with laser alone at 2 different exposure time (4 min and 2 min). In the combination treatment, samples were treated initially by CET and then by PAD for a time period of 4 min and 2 min. Contents of the root canal were aspirated, diluted and plated in Tryptone Soya Broth (TSB) and plates were incubated for 24 h to observe the bacterial regrowth. Results Showed PAD used along with CMP reduced the bacterial load of E. faecalis by 99.5% at 4 min and 98.89% at 2 min. Conclusion PAD may be an adjunctive procedure to kill residual bacteria in the dental root canal systems after standard endodontic root canal preparation. PMID:26858548

  11. [Photoelastic stress analysis of root dentin with different composite resin post and core systems and crowns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takei, Hidenori

    2010-03-01

    Much research has been reported about post and core systems with composite resin, but the influence of the different types of prefabricated posts on the distribution of stress in the root has not yet been elucidated. It is necessary to clarify the influence of the relationship between core and crown materials to obtain combined restorations. The aim of this study is to analyze the influence of the combination of various post and core systems and different kinds of crown material on the stress distribution in the root. Six 2-dimensional photoelastic premolar models were designed. Three types of post and core systems (composite resin post and core, composite resin core with the fiber post, and composite resin core with a prefabricated stainless steel post) and two kinds of crown materials (metal and hybrid-type hard composite resin) were fabricated and cemented to each model. In these models, we applied a load of 200 N at an angle of 45 degrees to the tooth axis and analyzed the fringe order using a transmission polariscope. As a result, it has been clarified that the combination of the post and core and the crown plays an important role in preventing stress concentration within root Stress concentration can be prevented using a crown fabricated with a high-elastic modulus for the post and core with a high-elastic modulus, and a crown fabricated with a low-elastic modulus for the post and core with a low-elastic modulus.

  12. New calorimetric system and some results of water phase transition research in plant roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakradze, N; Kiziria, E; Sokhadze, V; Gogichaishvili, Sh; Vardidze, E

    2007-01-01

    The principle of operation and main parameters of the recently created scanning differential reverse microcalorimeter of the new generation are presented. The microcalorimeter is destined for studying water crystallization and ice melting processes in heterogeneous systems, including plant and animal cells and tissues in the temperature range of 20 to -55 degrees C. In order to obtain maximum information from the experimental results respective algorithms and applied software package were developed. The results of studies of water crystallization and ice melting processes in different parts of common plantain (Plantago major L.) root, as a certain model system, can give us information on the peculiarities of the studied processes in complex, heterogeneous systems.

  13. Centering and transportation: in vitro evaluation of continuous and reciprocating systems in curved root canals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navós, Beatriz Vilas; Hoppe, Carolina Bender; Mestieri, Leticia Boldrin; Böttcher, Daiana Elizabeth; Só, Marcus Vinicius Reis; Grecca, Fabiana Soares

    2016-01-01

    Context: One of the goals of endodontic therapy is the shaping and cleaning of the root canal system. In recent years, there has been multiple systems instrumentation, and changes in their dynamics are central to maintain the original shape of the canal after preparation. Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate centering and transportation in curved root canals after using ProTaper® and MTwo® in continuous rotation, Reciproc® in reciprocating motion, and a step-down manual instrumentation technique. Settings and Design: Mesiobuccal roots of human extracted the first and second maxillary molars were selected and the canals (n = 60) were divided into four groups according to the preparation techniques: PT-ProTaper®; MT-MTwo®; RE-Reciproc®; MI-manual instrumentation. Subjects and Methods: The final apical diameter was standardized to a size 25. Centering and transportation were evaluated by cone-beam computed tomography and Adobe Photoshop 8.0 software. Statistical Analysis Used: The data were statistically analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey post hoc. Results: Results of transportation showed no statistical differences (P > 0.05) between groups, and significantly, difference (P < 0.05) between ProTaper® and Reciproc® was found when evaluating centering ability in the apical third. Conclusions: We concluded that there were no differences in transportation between the evaluated systems for the preparation of curved root canals with an apical instrumentation diameter of #25. For centering ability, in the apical third, ProTaper® presented worst behavior when compared to Reciproc®. PMID:27656071

  14. Overexpression of wheat gene TaMOR improves root system architecture and grain yield in Oryza sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Liu, Dan; Li, Qiaoru; Mao, Xinguo; Li, Ang; Wang, Jingyi; Chang, Xiaoping; Jing, Ruilian

    2016-07-01

    Improved root architecture is an effective strategy to increase crop yield. We demonstrate that overexpression of transcription factor gene MORE ROOT (TaMOR) from wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) results in more roots and higher grain yield in rice (Oryza sativa). TaMOR, encoding a plant-specific transcription factor belonging to the ASYMMETRIC LEAVES2/LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES (AS2/LOB) protein family, is highly conserved in wheat and its wild relatives. In this study, tissue expression patterns indicated that TaMOR mainly localizes to root initiation sites. The consistent gene expression pattern suggests that TaMOR is involved in root initiation. Exogenous auxin treatment induced TaMOR expression without de novo protein biosynthesis. Both in vivo and in vitro experiments demonstrated that TaMOR interacts with TaMOR-related protein TaMRRP, which contains a four-tandem-pentatricopeptide repeat motif. Overexpression of TaMOR led to more lateral roots in Arabidopsis thaliana, and TaMOR-overexpressing rice plants had more crown roots, a longer main panicle, a higher number of primary branches on the main panicle, a higher grain number per plant, and higher yield per plant than the plants of wild type. In general, TaMOR-D-overexpressing lines had larger root systems in Arabidopsis and rice, and produce a higher grain yield per plant. TaMOR therefore offers an opportunity to improve root architecture and increase yield in crop plants. PMID:27229732

  15. Endodontic treatment of mandibular molar with root dilaceration using Reciproc single-file system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meireles, Daniely Amorin; Bastos, Mariana Mena Barreto; Marques, André Augusto Franco; Garcia, Lucas da Fonseca Roberti; Sponchiado, Emílio Carlos

    2013-08-01

    Biomechanical preparation of root canals with accentuated curvature is challenging. New rotatory systems, such as Reciproc, require a shorter period of time to prepare curved canals, and became a viable alternative for endodontic treatment of teeth with root dilaceration. Thus, this study aimed to report a clinical case of endodontic therapy of root with accentuated dilaceration using Reciproc single-file system. Mandibular right second molar was diagnosed as asymptomatic irreversible pulpitis. Pulp chamber access was performed, and glide path was created with #10 K-file (Dentsply Maillefer) and PathFile #13, #16 and #19 (Dentsply Maillefer) up to the temporary working length. The working length measured corresponded to 20 mm in the mesio-buccal and mesio-lingual canals, and 22 mm in the distal canal. The R25 file (VDW GmbH) was used in all the canals for instrumentation and final preparation, followed by filling with Reciproc gutta-percha cones (VDW GmbH) and AH Plus sealer (Dentsply Maillefer), using thermal compaction technique. The case has been receiving follow-up for 6 mon and no painful symptomatology or periapical lesions have been found. Despite the difficulties, the treatment could be performed in a shorter period of time than the conventional methods.

  16. Genetic association among root morphology, root quality and root yield in ashwagandha (Withania somnifera)

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar Ramesh R.; Reddy Anjaneya Prasanna L.; Subbaiah Chinna J.; Kumar Niranjana A.; Prasad Nagendra H.N.; Bhukya Balakishan

    2011-01-01

    Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) is a dryland medicinal crop and roots are used as valuable drug in traditional systems of medicine. Morphological variants (morphotypes) and the parental populations were evaluated for root - morphometric, quality and yield traits to study genetic association among them. Root morphometric traits (root length, root diameter, number of secondary roots/ plant) and crude fiber content exhibited strong association among them and ...

  17. LSODAR, Ordinary Differential Equation Solver for Stiff or Non-Stiff System with root-finding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1 - Description of program or function: LSODAR, written jointly with L. R. Petzold, is a variant of LSODA with a root-finding capability added. Thus it solves problems dy/dt = f with dense or banded Jacobian and automatic method selection, and at the same time, it finds the roots of any of a set of given functions of the form g(t,y). This is often useful for finding stop conditions, or for finding points at which a switch is to be made in the function f. The LSODAR source is commented extensively to facilitate modification. Both a single-precision version and a double-precision version are available. 2 - Methods: It is assumed that the ODEs are given explicitly, so that the system can be written in the form dy/dt = f(t,y), where y is the vector of dependent variables, and t is the independent variable

  18. Concepts and analyses in the CT scanning of root systems and leaf canopies: A timely summary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan A Lafond

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Non-medical applications of computed tomography (CT scanning have flourished in recent years, including in Plant Science. This Perspective article on CT scanning of root systems and leaf canopies is intended to be of interest to three categories of readers: those who have not yet tried plant CT scanning, and should find inspiration for new research objectives; readers who are on the learning curve with applications – here is helpful advice for them; and researchers with greater experience – the field is evolving quickly and it is easy to miss aspects. Our conclusion is that CT scanning of roots and canopies is highly demanding in terms of technology, multidisciplinarity and big-data analysis, to name a few areas of expertise, but eventually, the reward for researchers is directly proportional!

  19. Enhancing cytokinin synthesis by overexpressing ipt alleviated drought inhibition of root growth through activating ROS-scavenging systems in Agrostis stolonifera

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Yi; Burgess, Patrick; Zhang, Xunzhong; Huang, Bingru

    2016-01-01

    Drought stress limits root growth and inhibits cytokinin (CK) production. Increases in CK production through overexpression of isopentenyltransferase (ipt) alleviate drought damages to promote root growth. The objective of this study was to investigate whether CK-regulated root growth was involved in the alteration of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and ROS scavenging capacity under drought stress. Wild-type (WT) creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L. ‘Penncross’) and a transgen...

  20. Alteration of Proteasome System in Aging and Aging-Associated Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qunxing Ding

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The proteasome system is crucial in protein metabolism involving in physiological and pathological developments, especially in aging and agingrelated disorders. Here we discussed the relationship of proteasome with other metabolic systems such as lysosome and ribosome as well as the alteration of proteasome system under oxidative stress, aging and other pathological conditions

  1. 75 FR 5604 - Privacy Act of 1974; Report of an Altered System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-03

    ... to alter a system of records for Disability Claims of the Nursing Student Loan Program in the Bureau...). This system includes information on applicants for cancellation of health professions and nursing... this system of records: ``Disability Claims in the Nursing Student Loan Program, HHS/HRSA/BHPr''...

  2. Effects of Exogenous Putrescine on Mycorrhiza, Root System Architecture, and Physiological Traits of Glomus mosseae-Colonized Trifoliate Orange Seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang-Sheng WU

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Putresince (Put as one of the important polyamines (PAs has been identified to regulate mycorrhizal development of citrus plants. The present study was to screen an efficient concentration of Put application at the range of 0.05-1 mM on the trifoliate orange (Poncirus trifoliata seedlings colonized by Glomus mosseae, in terms of growth, root system architecture, and chlorophyll and carbohydrate contents. Compared to the non-Put treatment, all the Put treatments, especially 0.05 mM Put, significantly increased mycorrhizal colonization of tap root in addition to first, second, and third order lateral roots. The mycorrhizal seedlings treated by 0.05, 0.1, and 1 mM Put showed greater growth (stem diameter, height, leaf number, and fresh mass and root morphological properties ( tap root length, projected and surface areas, and volume and higher numbers of first, second, and third order lateral roots. Bio-molecules like chlorophyll a, total chlorophyll, and carotenoid contents of the seedlings were significantly increased by the Put treatments at 0.05-1 mM. All exogenous Put application at the range of 0.05-1 mM significantly decreased sucrose contents but increased glucose contents of leaves and roots. This study suggests that exogenous Put can significantly improve growth performance and root system architecture, besides changes in physiological traits of AMF seedlings. The 0.05 mM concentration of Put showed the best effects.

  3. Optimizing Culture System of Ri T-DNA Transformed Roots for Citrus grandis cv. Changshou Shatian You

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xiao-hong; SUN Zhong-hai; TONG Rui-jian

    2006-01-01

    Genetic transformation experiments of the different explants from Citrus grandis cv. Changshou Shatian You infected with Agrobacterium rhizogenes were carried out in darkness or in light. The optimizing culture system of Ri T-DNA transformed roots for C. grandis cv. Changshou Shatian You was constructed as follows: After the ventral wounded striations on the single activation cotyledon were inoculated by A. rhizogenes A4 (logarithmic period), they were cocultured at (25 ± 2)℃ in darkness for 25-30 days; some transformed roots were generated from wounded striations of most cotyledons. The genetically transformed ratio is (83 ± 11)%. Axenic Ri T-DNA transformed roots (hairy roots) were harvested after five subcultures. Explants were activated on MT medium. The MS medium was used for subculture of transformed roots. Mass Ri T-DNA transformed roots in which the hormone was produced independently were harvested from this optimizing culture system. White, fresh Ri T-DNA transformed roots were (1.14 ± 0.07) cm long, (0.73 ± 0.04) mm wide, and the growth direction of transformed roots was negative geotropism.

  4. Vascular Alterations and Sexual Function in Systemic Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Julie Impens

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Sexual dysfunction is common in systemic sclerosis (SSc. Male erectile dysfunction (MED has been reported in around 80% of subjects and more than half of female patients fulfill criteria for diagnosis as female sexual arousal Disorder (FSAD. While some evidence supports a role for cavernosal fibrosis, abundant data suggest that MED is yet another clinical feature of SSc related to vasculopathy. The contribution of vasculopathy to the more complex issues of female sexual dysfunction is less clear. Inhibitors of Type V phosphodiesterase are effective in men with MED secondary to SSc. Limited study in women suggests inconsistent effects on behavior (frequency but not on measures related to perfusion. Sexual activity is an important component of quality of life and an important domain for the caregiver to address; it is not clear that it warrants primary consideration as a consistent measure of scleroderma-related vasculopathy.

  5. Primary melanoma tumor inhibits metastasis through alterations in systemic hemostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirstein, Jennifer M; Hague, M Nicole; McGowan, Patricia M; Tuck, Alan B; Chambers, Ann F

    2016-08-01

    Progression from a primary tumor to distant metastases requires extensive interactions between tumor cells and their microenvironment. The primary tumor is not only the source of metastatic cells but also can also modulate host responses to these cells, leading to an enhancement or inhibition of metastasis. Tumor-mediated stimulation of bone marrow can result in pre-metastatic niche formation and increased metastasis. However, a primary tumor can also inhibit metastasis through concomitant tumor resistance-inhibition of metastatic growth by existing tumor mass. Here, we report that the presence of a B16F10 primary tumor significantly restricted numbers and sizes of experimental lung metastases through reduction of circulating platelets and reduced formation of metastatic tumor cell-associated thrombi. Tumor-bearing mice displayed splenomegaly, correlated with primary tumor size and platelet count. Reduction in platelet numbers in tumor-bearing animals was responsible for metastatic inhibition, as restoration of platelet numbers using isolated platelets re-established both tumor cell-associated thrombus formation and experimental metastasis. Consumption of platelets due to a B16F10 primary tumor is a form of concomitant tumor resistance and demonstrates the systemic impact of a growing tumor. Understanding the interplay between primary tumors and metastases is essential, as clarification of concomitant tumor resistance mechanisms may allow inhibition of metastatic growth following tumor resection. Key messages Mice with a primary B16F10 tumor had reduced metastasis vs. mice without a primary tumor. Tumor-bearing mice had splenomegaly and fewer platelets and tumor-associated thrombi. Restoring platelets restored tumor-associated thrombi and increased metastasis. This work shows the impact that a primary tumor can have on systemic metastasis. Understanding these interactions may lead to improved ways to inhibit metastasis. PMID:27048169

  6. General Anesthesia and Altered States of Arousal: A Systems Neuroscience Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Emery N Brown; Purdon, Patrick L.; Van Dort, Christa J.

    2011-01-01

    Placing a patient in a state of general anesthesia is crucial for safely and humanely performing most surgical and many nonsurgical procedures. How anesthetic drugs create the state of general anesthesia is considered a major mystery of modern medicine. Unconsciousness, induced by altered arousal and/or cognition, is perhaps the most fascinating behavioral state of general anesthesia. We perform a systems neuroscience analysis of the altered arousal states induced by five classes of intraveno...

  7. Root production, distribution, and turnover in conventional and organic northern highbush blueberry systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northern highbush blueberry is a shallow-rooted crop with very fine, fibrous roots. Recently, we installed minirhizotrons (root observation tubes) in a conventional and an organic blueberry planting in western Oregon. We wanted to know exactly when and where new roots were being produced and determi...

  8. Computed tomography evaluation of rotary systems on the root canal transportation and centering ability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagliosa, Andre; Raucci-Neto, Walter; Silva-Souza, Yara Teresinha Correa; Alfredo, Edson, E-mail: ysousa@unaerp.br [Universidade de Ribeirao Preto (UNAERP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Odontologia; Sousa-Neto, Manoel Damiao; Versiani, Marco Aurelio [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Odoentologia

    2015-03-01

    The endodontic preparation of curved and narrow root canals is challenging, with a tendency for the prepared canal to deviate away from its natural axis. The aim of this study was to evaluate, by cone-beam computed tomography, the transportation and centering ability of curved mesiobuccal canals in maxillary molars after biomechanical preparation with different nickel-titanium (NiTi) rotary systems. Forty teeth with angles of curvature ranging from 20° to 40° and radii between 5.0 mm and 10.0 mm were selected and assigned into four groups (n = 10), according to the biomechanical preparative system used: Hero 642 (HR), Liberator (LB), ProTaper (PT), and Twisted File (TF). The specimens were inserted into an acrylic device and scanned with computed tomography prior to, and following, instrumentation at 3, 6 and 9 mm from the root apex. The canal degree of transportation and centering ability were calculated and analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s tests (α = 0.05). The results demonstrated no significant difference (p > 0.05) in shaping ability among the rotary systems. The mean canal transportation was: -0.049 ± 0.083 mm (HR); -0.004 ± 0.044 mm (LB); -0.003 ± 0.064 mm (PT); -0.021 ± 0.064 mm (TF). The mean canal centering ability was: -0.093 ± 0.147 mm (HR); -0.001 ± 0.100 mm (LB); -0.002 ± 0.134 mm (PT); -0.033 ± 0.133 mm (TF). Also, there was no significant difference among the root segments (p > 0.05). It was concluded that the Hero 642, Liberator, ProTaper, and Twisted File rotary systems could be safely used in curved canal instrumentation, resulting in satisfactory preservation of the original canal shape. (author)

  9. Computed tomography evaluation of rotary systems on the root canal transportation and centering ability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The endodontic preparation of curved and narrow root canals is challenging, with a tendency for the prepared canal to deviate away from its natural axis. The aim of this study was to evaluate, by cone-beam computed tomography, the transportation and centering ability of curved mesiobuccal canals in maxillary molars after biomechanical preparation with different nickel-titanium (NiTi) rotary systems. Forty teeth with angles of curvature ranging from 20° to 40° and radii between 5.0 mm and 10.0 mm were selected and assigned into four groups (n = 10), according to the biomechanical preparative system used: Hero 642 (HR), Liberator (LB), ProTaper (PT), and Twisted File (TF). The specimens were inserted into an acrylic device and scanned with computed tomography prior to, and following, instrumentation at 3, 6 and 9 mm from the root apex. The canal degree of transportation and centering ability were calculated and analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s tests (α = 0.05). The results demonstrated no significant difference (p > 0.05) in shaping ability among the rotary systems. The mean canal transportation was: -0.049 ± 0.083 mm (HR); -0.004 ± 0.044 mm (LB); -0.003 ± 0.064 mm (PT); -0.021 ± 0.064 mm (TF). The mean canal centering ability was: -0.093 ± 0.147 mm (HR); -0.001 ± 0.100 mm (LB); -0.002 ± 0.134 mm (PT); -0.033 ± 0.133 mm (TF). Also, there was no significant difference among the root segments (p > 0.05). It was concluded that the Hero 642, Liberator, ProTaper, and Twisted File rotary systems could be safely used in curved canal instrumentation, resulting in satisfactory preservation of the original canal shape. (author)

  10. Effect of plumbagin free alcohol extract ofPlumbago zeylanica Linn. root on reproductive system of female Wistar rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gupta Sandeep; Ahirwar Dheeraj; Sharma Neeraj Kumar; Jhade Deenanath; Ahirwar Bharti

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To assess the effect of plumbagin-free alcohol extract (PFAE) ofPlumbago zeylanica Linn. (Plumbaginaceae) (P. zeylanica) root, on female reproductive system and fertility of adult female wistar rats.Methods: After the oral acute toxicity study, thePFAE was administered at two dose levels to perform the estrous cycle study, anti-implantation and abortifacient activity and hormonal analysis. However, the estrogenic/antiestrogenic activity was evaluated at only one most effective dose.Results:LD50cut-off was5 000 mg/kg body weight. The extract exhibited significant anti-implantation and abortifacient activity at the tested dose levels (300 and500 mg/kg,p.o.) (P<0.01). The extract dose-dependently decreased the levels of serum progesterone, follicle stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone, while a dose-dependent increase was observed in the concentration of serum prolactin. The extract did not show any significant changes in structure and function of uterus when given alone, but when given along with ethinyl estradiol, it exhibited significant antiestrogenic activity in immature overiectomized female rats(P<0.001). Biochemical parameters in the serum/blood and haematological parameters did not show appreciable changes throughout and after the course of investigation. However, all the altered parameters returned to normalcy within30 days following withdrawal of treatment. Conclusions: All findings suggest that the antifertility activity of extract could possibly be through the changes in the implantation site, altered hormonal levels, prolonged estrous cycle and anti-estrogenic activity. Hence, the extract possesses reversible antifertility activity without adverse toxicity in female rats.

  11. Combined Effects of Lanthanum (III) and Acid Rain on Antioxidant Enzyme System in Soybean Roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuanbo; Du, Yuping; Wang, Lihong; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua; Sun, Zhaoguo

    2015-01-01

    Rare earth element pollution (REEs) and acid rain (AR) pollution simultaneously occur in many regions, which resulted in a new environmental issue, the combined pollution of REEs and AR. The effects of the combined pollution on the antioxidant enzyme system of plant roots have not been reported. Here, the combined effects of lanthanum ion (La3+), one type of REE, and AR on the antioxidant enzyme system of soybean roots were investigated. In the combined treatment of La3+ (0.08 mM) and AR, the cell membrane permeability and the peroxidation of cell membrane lipid of soybean roots increased, and the superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxidase and reduced ascorbic acid served as scavengers of reactive oxygen species. In other combined treatments of La3+ (0.40 mM, 1.20 mM) and AR, the membrane permeability, malonyldialdehyde content, superoxide dismutase activity, peroxidase activity and reduced ascorbic acid content increased, while the catalase activity decreased. The increased superoxide dismutase activity, peroxidase activity and reduced ascorbic acid content were inadequate to scavenge the excess hydrogen peroxide and superoxide, leading to the damage of the cell membrane, which was aggravated with the increase in the concentration of La3+ and the level of AR. The deleterious effects of the combined treatment of La3+ and AR were stronger than those of the single treatment of La3+ or AR. Moreover, the activity of antioxidant enzyme system in the combined treatment group was affected directly and indirectly by mineral element content in soybean plants. PMID:26230263

  12. Combined Effects of Lanthanum (III and Acid Rain on Antioxidant Enzyme System in Soybean Roots.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuanbo Zhang

    Full Text Available Rare earth element pollution (REEs and acid rain (AR pollution simultaneously occur in many regions, which resulted in a new environmental issue, the combined pollution of REEs and AR. The effects of the combined pollution on the antioxidant enzyme system of plant roots have not been reported. Here, the combined effects of lanthanum ion (La3+, one type of REE, and AR on the antioxidant enzyme system of soybean roots were investigated. In the combined treatment of La3+ (0.08 mM and AR, the cell membrane permeability and the peroxidation of cell membrane lipid of soybean roots increased, and the superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxidase and reduced ascorbic acid served as scavengers of reactive oxygen species. In other combined treatments of La3+ (0.40 mM, 1.20 mM and AR, the membrane permeability, malonyldialdehyde content, superoxide dismutase activity, peroxidase activity and reduced ascorbic acid content increased, while the catalase activity decreased. The increased superoxide dismutase activity, peroxidase activity and reduced ascorbic acid content were inadequate to scavenge the excess hydrogen peroxide and superoxide, leading to the damage of the cell membrane, which was aggravated with the increase in the concentration of La3+ and the level of AR. The deleterious effects of the combined treatment of La3+ and AR were stronger than those of the single treatment of La3+ or AR. Moreover, the activity of antioxidant enzyme system in the combined treatment group was affected directly and indirectly by mineral element content in soybean plants.

  13. Advanced nutrient root-feeding system for conveyor-type cylindrical plant growth facilities for microgravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkovich, Yu A; Krivobok, N M; Krivobok, A S; Smolyanina, S O

    2016-02-01

    A compact and reliable automatic method for plant nutrition supply is needed to monitor and control space-based plant production systems. The authors of this study have designed a nutrient root-feeding system that minimizes and regulates nutrient and water supply without loss of crop yields in a space greenhouse. The system involves an ion-exchange fibrous artificial soil (AS) BIONA-V3(TM) as the root-inhabited medium; a pack with slow-release fertilizer as the main source of nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium; and a cartridge with granular mineral-rich ionite (GMRI) as a source of calcium, magnesium, sulfur, and iron. A controller equipped with an electrical conductivity meter controls the solution flow and concentration of the solution in the mixing tank at specified values. Experiments showed that the fibrous AS-stabilized pH of the substrate solution within the range of 6.0-6.6 is favorable to the majority of crops. The experimental data confirmed that this technique allowed solution preparation for crops in space greenhouses by means of pumping water through the cartridge and minimization of the AS stock onboard the space vehicle. PMID:26948009

  14. Advanced nutrient root-feeding system for conveyor-type cylindrical plant growth facilities for microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkovich, Yu. A.; Krivobok, N. M.; Krivobok, A. S.; Smolyanina, S. O.

    2016-02-01

    A compact and reliable automatic method for plant nutrition supply is needed to monitor and control space-based plant production systems. The authors of this study have designed a nutrient root-feeding system that minimizes and regulates nutrient and water supply without loss of crop yields in a space greenhouse. The system involves an ion-exchange fibrous artificial soil (AS) BIONA-V3TM as the root-inhabited medium; a pack with slow-release fertilizer as the main source of nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium; and a cartridge with granular mineral-rich ionite (GMRI) as a source of calcium, magnesium, sulfur, and iron. A controller equipped with an electrical conductivity meter controls the solution flow and concentration of the solution in the mixing tank at specified values. Experiments showed that the fibrous AS-stabilized pH of the substrate solution within the range of 6.0-6.6 is favorable to the majority of crops. The experimental data confirmed that this technique allowed solution preparation for crops in space greenhouses by means of pumping water through the cartridge and minimization of the AS stock onboard the space vehicle.

  15. Establishment of Aquilaria malaccensis Callus, cell suspension and adventitious root systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aquilaria malaccensis is a tropical forest tree from the family Thymelaeaceae, an endangered forest species and was listed in CITES since 1995. Locally known as Pokok Karas, this tree produces agar wood or gaharu, a highly valuable, resinous and fragrant forest product. Karas has been highly recognized for its vast medicinal values and gaharu has been widely use for perfumery, incense and religious purposes. The phyto chemical studies of agar wood showed that Sesqui terpenoid and Phenyl ethy chromone derivatives are the principal compounds that have anti allergic and anti microbe activities. Cell and organ culture systems provide large scale production of biomass and offers feasibilities for the production of secondary metabolites. This paper describes the work done for establishing reproducible systems for callus initiation and production of cell suspension cultures as well as production of adventitious roots that will later be amenable for the production of secondary metabolites of A. malaccensis. Hence, further manipulation with Methyl Jasmonate, a chemical elicitor could be done to induce secondary metabolites using callus, cell suspension and adventitious roots systems. (author)

  16. Flexible Microsensor Array for the Root Zone Monitoring of Porous Tube Plant Growth System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyan, Sandeep; Kim, Chang-Soo; Porterfield, D. Marshall; Nagle, H. Troy; Brown, Christopher S.

    2004-01-01

    Control of oxygen and water in the root zone is vital to support plant growth in the microgravity environment. The ability to control these sometimes opposing parameters in the root zone is dependent upon the availability of sensors to detect these elements and provide feedback for control systems. In the present study we demonstrate the feasibility of using microsensor arrays on a flexible substrate for dissolved oxygen detection, and a 4-point impedance microprobe for surface wetness detection on the surface of a porous tube (PT) nutrient delivery system. The oxygen microsensor reported surface oxygen concentrations that correlated with the oxygen concentrations of the solution inside the PT when operated at positive pressures. At negative pressures the microsensor shows convergence to zero saturation (2.2 micro mol/L) values due to inadequate water film formation on porous tube surface. The 4-point microprobe is useful as a wetness detector as it provides a clear differentiation between dry and wet surfaces. The unique features of the dissolved oxygen microsensor array and 4-point microprobe include small and simple design, flexibility and multipoint sensing. The demonstrated technology is anticipated to provide low cost, and highly reliable sensor feedback monitoring plant growth nutrient delivery system in both terrestrial and microgravity environments.

  17. Endodontic management of a mandibular first molar with six root canal systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Dilip; Reddy, Smitha; Venigalla, Bhuvan Shome; Kamishetty, Shekhar

    2015-01-01

    Internal anatomy of pulp is complex. The first mandibular molars typically have two roots, one mesial with two root canals and another distal root, which contains one or two canals. A 20-year-old female patient reported with intermittent pain and incomplete root canal treatment in left lower back region since 1-week. Refined access cavity revealed initially two canals in mesial and two canals in the distal root. With operating microscope and cone beam computerized tomography, two additional canals (L-mesio-buccal and B-mesio-lingual) were identified in mesial root. One-year follow-up showed patient was asymptomatic and complete healing of periapical radiolucency. PMID:26430309

  18. Tree growth and management in Ugandan agroforestry systems: effects of root pruning on tree growth and crop yield

    OpenAIRE

    Wajja-Musukwe, Tellie-Nelson; Wilson, Julia; Sprent, Janet I.; Ong, Chin K.; Deans, J. Douglas; Okorio, John

    2008-01-01

    Tree root pruning is a potential tool for managing below-ground competition when trees and crops are grown together in agroforestry systems. This study investigates its effects on growth and root distribution of Alnus acuminata (HB & K), Casuarina equisetifolia (L), Grevillea robusta (A. Cunn. ex R. Br), Maesopsis eminii (Engl.), and Markhamia lutea (Benth.) K. Schum. and on yield of adjacent crops in sub-humid Uganda. The trees were 3 years old at the commencement of the study, and most spec...

  19. A Palaeoproterozoic multi-stage hydrothermal alteration system at Nalunaq gold deposit, South Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Robin-Marie; Kolb, Jochen; Waight, Tod Earle; Bagas, Leon; Thomsen, Tonny B.

    2016-07-01

    Nalunaq is an orogenic, high gold grade deposit situated on the Nanortalik Peninsula, South Greenland. Mineralisation is hosted in shear zone-controlled quartz veins, located in fine- and medium-grained amphibolite. The deposit was the site of Greenland's only operating metalliferous mine until its closure in 2014, having produced 10.67 t of gold. This study uses a combination of field investigation, petrography and U/Pb zircon and titanite geochronology to define a multi-stage hydrothermal alteration system at Nalunaq. A clinopyroxene-plagioclase-garnet(-sulphide) alteration zone (CPGZ) developed in the Nanortalik Peninsula, close to regional peak metamorphism and prior to gold-quartz vein formation. The ca. 1783-1762-Ma gold-quartz veins are hosted in reactivated shear zones with a hydrothermal alteration halo of biotite-arsenopyrite-sericite-actinolite-pyrrhotite(-chlorite-plagioclase-löllingite-tourmaline-titanite), which is best developed in areas of exceptionally high gold grades. Aplite dykes dated to ca. 1762 Ma cross-cut the gold-quartz veins, providing a minimum age for mineralisation. A hydrothermal calcite-titanite alteration assemblage is dated to ca. 1766 Ma; however, this alteration is highly isolated, and as a result, its field relationships are poorly constrained. The hydrothermal alteration and mineralisation is cut by several generations of ca. 1745-Ma biotite granodiorite accompanied by brittle deformation. A ca. 1745-Ma lower greenschist facies hydrothermal epidote-calcite-zoisite alteration assemblage with numerous accessory minerals forms halos surrounding the late-stage fractures. The contrasting hydrothermal alteration styles at Nalunaq indicate a complex history of exhumation from amphibolite facies conditions to lower greenschist facies conditions in an orogenic belt which resembles modern Phanerozoic orogens.

  20. Split-root systems applied to the study of the legume-rhizobial symbiosis:What have we learned?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Estbaliz Larrainzar; Erena Gil-Quintana; Cesar Arrese-Igor; Esther M Gonzlez; Daniel Marino

    2014-01-01

    Split‐root system (SRS) approaches al ow the differential treatment of separate and independent root systems, while sharing a common aerial part. As such, SRS is a useful tool for the discrimination of systemic (shoot origin) versus local (root/nodule origin) regulation mechanisms. This type of approach is particularly useful when studying the complex regulatory mechanisms governing the symbiosis established between legumes and Rhizobium bacteria. The current work provides an overview of the main insights gained from the application of SRS approaches to understand how nodule number (nodulation autoregulation) and nitrogen fixation are control ed both under non‐stressful conditions and in response to a variety of stresses. Nodule number appears to be mainly control ed at the systemic level through a signal which is produced by nodule/root tissue, translocated to the shoot, and transmitted back to the root system, involving shoot Leu‐rich repeat receptor‐like kinases. In contrast, both local and systemic mechanisms have been shown to operate for the regulation of nitrogenase activity in nodules. Under drought and heavy metal stress, the regulation is mostly local, whereas the application of exogenous nitrogen seems to exert a regulation of nitrogen fixation both at the local and systemic levels.

  1. Analysis techniques for multivariate root loci. [a tool in linear control systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, P. M.; Stein, G.; Laub, A. J.

    1980-01-01

    Analysis and techniques are developed for the multivariable root locus and the multivariable optimal root locus. The generalized eigenvalue problem is used to compute angles and sensitivities for both types of loci, and an algorithm is presented that determines the asymptotic properties of the optimal root locus.

  2. The Accuracy of the Digital imaging system and the frequency dependent type apex locator in root canal length measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to achieve a successful endodontic treatment, root canals must be obturated three-dimensionally without causing any damage to apical tissues. Accurate length determination of the root canal is critical in this case. For this reason, I've used the conventional periapical radiography, Digora (digital imaging system) and Root ZX (the frequency dependent type apex locator) to measure the length of the canal and compare it with the true length obtained by cutting the tooth in half and measuring the length between the occlusal surface and the apical foramen. From the information obtained by these measurements, I was able to evaluate the accuracy and clinical usefulness of each systems, whether the thickness of files used in endodontic therapy has any effect on the measuring systems was also evaluated in an effort to simplify the treatment planning phase of endodontic treatment. 29 canals of 29 sound premolars were measured with no 15, no 20, no 25 files by 3 different dentists each using the periapical radiography, Digora and Root ZX. The measurements were then compared with the true length. The results were as follows ; 1. In comparing mean discrepancies between measurements obtained by using periapical radiography (mean error : -0.449 ± 0.444 mm), Digora (mean error : -0.417 ± 0.415 mm) and Root ZX (mean error : 0.123 ± 0.458 mm) with true length, periapical radiography and Digora system had statistically significant differences (p0.05). 2. By subtracting values obtained by using periapical radiography, Digora and Root ZX from the true length and making a distribution table of their absolute values, the following analysis was possible. In the case of periapical film, 140 out of 261 (53.6%) were clinically acceptable satisfying the margin of error of less than 0.5 mm, 151 out of 261 (53,6%) were acceptable in the Digora system while Root ZX had 197 out of 261 (75.5%) within the limits of 0.5 mm margin of error. 3. In determining whether the thickness of

  3. Rhizo-lysimetry: facilities for the simultaneous study of root behaviour and resource use by agricultural crop and pasture systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eberbach Philip L

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rhizo-lysimeters offer unique advantages for the study of plants and their interactions with soils. In this paper, an existing facility at Charles Sturt University in Wagga Wagga Australia is described in detail and its potential to conduct both ecophysiological and ecohydrological research in the study of root interactions of agricultural crops and pastures is quantitatively assessed. This is of significance to future crop research efforts in southern Australia, in light of recent significant long-term drought events, as well as potential impacts of climate change as predicted for the region. The rhizo-lysimeter root research facility has recently been expanded to accommodate larger research projects over multiple years and cropping rotations. Results Lucerne, a widely-grown perennial pasture in southern Australia, developed an expansive root system to a depth of 0.9 m over a twelve month period. Its deeper roots particularly at 2.05 m continued to expand for the duration of the experiment. In succeeding experiments, canola, a commonly grown annual crop, developed a more extensive (approximately 300% root system than wheat, but exhibited a slower rate of root elongation at rates of 7.47 x 10–3 m day–1 for canola and 1.04 x10–2 m day–1 for wheat. A time domain reflectometry (TDR network was designed to accurately assess changes in soil water content, and could assess water content change to within 5% of the amount of water applied. Conclusions The rhizo-lysimetry system provided robust estimates of root growth and soil water change under conditions representative of a field setting. This is currently one of a very limited number of global research facilities able to perform experimentation under field conditions and is the largest root research experimental laboratory in the southern hemisphere.

  4. Bacteria with Phosphate Solubilizing Capacity Alter Mycorrhizal Fungal Growth Both Inside and Outside the Root and in the Presence of Native Microbial Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordoñez, Yuli Marcela; Fernandez, Belen Rocio; Lara, Lidia Susana; Rodriguez, Alia; Uribe-Vélez, Daniel; Sanders, Ian R

    2016-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and phosphate solubilizing Pseudomonas bacteria (PSB) could potentially interact synergistically because PSB solubilize phosphate into a form that AMF can absorb and transport to the plant. However, very little is known about the interactions between these two groups of microorganisms and how they influence the growth of each other. We tested whether different strains of bacteria, that have the capacity to solubilize phosphate, are able to grow along AMF hyphae and differentially influence the growth of AMF both outside the roots of carrot in in vitro conditions and inside the roots of potato in the presence of a microbial community. We found strong effects of AMF on the growth of the different bacterial strains. Different bacterial strains also had very strong effects on the growth of AMF extraradical hyphae outside the roots of carrot and on colonization of potato roots by AMF. The differential effects on colonization occurred in the presence of a microbial community. Our results show that these two important groups of rhizosphere microorganisms indeed interact with each other. Such interactions could potentially lead to synergistic effects between the two groups but this could depend on whether the bacteria truly solubilize phosphate in the rhizosphere in the presence of microbial communities. PMID:27253975

  5. Bacteria with Phosphate Solubilizing Capacity Alter Mycorrhizal Fungal Growth Both Inside and Outside the Root and in the Presence of Native Microbial Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, Lidia Susana; Rodriguez, Alia; Uribe-Vélez, Daniel; Sanders, Ian R.

    2016-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and phosphate solubilizing Pseudomonas bacteria (PSB) could potentially interact synergistically because PSB solubilize phosphate into a form that AMF can absorb and transport to the plant. However, very little is known about the interactions between these two groups of microorganisms and how they influence the growth of each other. We tested whether different strains of bacteria, that have the capacity to solubilize phosphate, are able to grow along AMF hyphae and differentially influence the growth of AMF both outside the roots of carrot in in vitro conditions and inside the roots of potato in the presence of a microbial community. We found strong effects of AMF on the growth of the different bacterial strains. Different bacterial strains also had very strong effects on the growth of AMF extraradical hyphae outside the roots of carrot and on colonization of potato roots by AMF. The differential effects on colonization occurred in the presence of a microbial community. Our results show that these two important groups of rhizosphere microorganisms indeed interact with each other. Such interactions could potentially lead to synergistic effects between the two groups but this could depend on whether the bacteria truly solubilize phosphate in the rhizosphere in the presence of microbial communities. PMID:27253975

  6. Bacillus simplex—A Little Known PGPB with Anti-Fungal Activity—Alters Pea Legume Root Architecture and Nodule Morphology When Coinoculated with Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann M. Hirsch

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Two strains, 30N-5 and 30VD-1, identified as Bacillus simplex and B. subtilis, were isolated from the rhizospheres of two different plants, a Podocarpus and a palm, respectively, growing in the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA Mildred E. Mathias Botanical Garden. B. subtilis is a well-known plant-growth promoting bacterial species, but B. simplex is not. B. simplex 30N-5 was initially isolated on a nitrogen-free medium, but no evidence for nitrogen fixation was found. Nevertheless, pea plants inoculated with B. simplex showed a change in root architecture due to the emergence of more lateral roots. When Pisum sativum carrying a DR5::GUSA construct, an indicator for auxin response, was inoculated with either B. simplex 30N-5 or its symbiont Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae 128C53, GUS expression in the roots was increased over the uninoculated controls. Moreover, when pea roots were coinoculated with either B. simplex 30N-5 or B. subtilis 30VD-1 and R. leguminosarum bv. viciae 128C53, the nodules were larger, clustered, and developed more highly branched vascular bundles. Besides producing siderophores and solubilizing phosphate, the two Bacillus spp., especially strain 30VD-1, exhibited anti-fungal activity towards Fusarium. Our data show that combining nodulating, nitrogen-fixing rhizobia with growth-promoting bacteria enhances plant development and strongly supports a coinoculation strategy to improve nitrogen fixation, increase biomass, and establish greater resistance to fungal disease.

  7. Bacteria with Phosphate Solubilizing Capacity Alter Mycorrhizal Fungal Growth Both Inside and Outside the Root and in the Presence of Native Microbial Communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuli Marcela Ordoñez

    Full Text Available Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF and phosphate solubilizing Pseudomonas bacteria (PSB could potentially interact synergistically because PSB solubilize phosphate into a form that AMF can absorb and transport to the plant. However, very little is known about the interactions between these two groups of microorganisms and how they influence the growth of each other. We tested whether different strains of bacteria, that have the capacity to solubilize phosphate, are able to grow along AMF hyphae and differentially influence the growth of AMF both outside the roots of carrot in in vitro conditions and inside the roots of potato in the presence of a microbial community. We found strong effects of AMF on the growth of the different bacterial strains. Different bacterial strains also had very strong effects on the growth of AMF extraradical hyphae outside the roots of carrot and on colonization of potato roots by AMF. The differential effects on colonization occurred in the presence of a microbial community. Our results show that these two important groups of rhizosphere microorganisms indeed interact with each other. Such interactions could potentially lead to synergistic effects between the two groups but this could depend on whether the bacteria truly solubilize phosphate in the rhizosphere in the presence of microbial communities.

  8. 75 FR 34755 - Privacy Act; Proposed Alteration to Existing Systems of Records, Single Family Mortgage Asset...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-18

    ... Mortgage Asset Recovery Technology (SMART/A80H) AGENCY: Office of the Chief Information Officer, HUD... amended, notice is given of an alteration to the Department's Office of Housing records system, SMART, HUD... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING...

  9. 75 FR 60763 - Privacy Act of 1974; Report of an Altered System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... a notice to alter the system of records for the National Practitioner Data Bank for Adverse... Practitioner Data Bank (NPDB) to collect and release certain information relating to the professional... as amended by the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1990 (OBRA), expands reporting to the NPDB...

  10. Microbial community changes in biological phosphate-removal systems on altering sludge phosphorus content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, WT; Linning, KD; Nakamura, K; Mino, T; Matsuo, T; Forney, LJ

    2000-01-01

    Biomarkers (respiratory quinones and cellular fatty acids) and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes were used to characterize the microbial community structure of lab-scale enhanced biological phosphate-removal (EBPR) systems in response to altering sludge p

  11. 76 FR 4454 - Privacy Act of 1974; Report of Modified or Altered System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-25

    ..., ``Medical and Test Record Results of Individuals Involved in NIOSH Laboratory Studies, HHS/CDC/NIOSH.'' HHS...: NIOSH proposes to alter System of Records, No. 09-20-0117, ``Medical and Test Record Results of... composite data summaries to support the development of criteria for occupational safety and health...

  12. Phytoremediation of TNT: C. roseus hairy roots as a model system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauritzen, J.R.; Hughes, J.B.; Shanks, J.V. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Widespread contamination by 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) of Soil exists at former munitions production and handling facilities. Phytoremediation may be an effective alternative to existing methods of TNT remediation: incineration is highly expensive and recalcitrant reduction products are formed in composting. Recently, the intrinsic ability of plants to transform TNT has been demonstrated using hairy root cultures of Catharanthus roseus as a model system. Kinetic studies were performed at concentrations of 30 and 50 mg/L TNT in growth medium. The pseudo-first order rate constants for disappearance ranged from 0.0103 to 0.0161 (L/g-day); TNT disappears completely within seven to ten days of exposure. The fate of the TNT molecule in plants is also currently under study, mass balance studies were performed with 1-{sup 14}C TNT. After a seven day exposure period, 72% of the label was associated with the roots and 30% was associated with the medium. However, HPLC analysis shows that less than 5% (wt%) of the TNT added is recoverable from both the plants and the media in the form of reduction products. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Photodynamic Antimicrobial Chemotherapy for Root Canal System Asepsis: A Narrative Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Diogo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of this comprehensive literature review was to address the question: Does photodynamic therapy (PDT improve root canal disinfection through significant bacterial reduction in the root canal system? Methodology. A comprehensive narrative literature review was performed to compare PDT effect with sodium hypochlorite as the comparative classical irrigant. Two reviewers independently conducted literature searches using a combination of medical subject heading terms and key words to identify relevant studies comparing information found in 7 electronic databases from January 2000 to May 2015. A manual search was performed on bibliography of articles collected on electronic databases. Authors were contacted to ask for references of more research not detected on the prior electronic and manual searches. Results. The literature search provided 62 titles and abstracts, from which 29 studies were related directly to the search theme. Considering all publications, 14 (48% showed PDT to be more efficient in antimicrobial outcome than NaOCl (0.5–6% concentration used alone and 2 (7% revealed similar effects between them. Toluidine blue and methylene blue are the most used photosensitizers and most commonly laser has 660 nm of wavelength with a 400 nm diameter of intracanal fiber. Conclusions. PDT has been used without a well-defined protocol and still remains at an experimental stage waiting for further optimization. The level of evidence available in clinical studies to answer this question is low and at high risk of bias.

  14. Photodynamic Antimicrobial Chemotherapy for Root Canal System Asepsis: A Narrative Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diogo, P; Gonçalves, T; Palma, P; Santos, J M

    2015-01-01

    Aim. The aim of this comprehensive literature review was to address the question: Does photodynamic therapy (PDT) improve root canal disinfection through significant bacterial reduction in the root canal system? Methodology. A comprehensive narrative literature review was performed to compare PDT effect with sodium hypochlorite as the comparative classical irrigant. Two reviewers independently conducted literature searches using a combination of medical subject heading terms and key words to identify relevant studies comparing information found in 7 electronic databases from January 2000 to May 2015. A manual search was performed on bibliography of articles collected on electronic databases. Authors were contacted to ask for references of more research not detected on the prior electronic and manual searches. Results. The literature search provided 62 titles and abstracts, from which 29 studies were related directly to the search theme. Considering all publications, 14 (48%) showed PDT to be more efficient in antimicrobial outcome than NaOCl (0.5-6% concentration) used alone and 2 (7%) revealed similar effects between them. Toluidine blue and methylene blue are the most used photosensitizers and most commonly laser has 660 nm of wavelength with a 400 nm diameter of intracanal fiber. Conclusions. PDT has been used without a well-defined protocol and still remains at an experimental stage waiting for further optimization. The level of evidence available in clinical studies to answer this question is low and at high risk of bias.

  15. Root interactions in a maize/soybean intercropping system control soybean soil-borne disease, red crown rot.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Gao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Within-field multiple crop species intercropping is well documented and used for disease control, but the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. As roots are the primary organ for perceiving signals in the soil from neighboring plants, root behavior may play an important role in soil-borne disease control. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In two years of field experiments, maize/soybean intercropping suppressed the occurrence of soybean red crown rot, a severe soil-borne disease caused by Cylindrocladium parasiticum (C. parasiticum. The suppressive effects decreased with increasing distance between intercropped plants under both low P and high P supply, suggesting that root interactions play a significant role independent of nutrient status. Further detailed quantitative studies revealed that the diversity and intensity of root interactions altered the expression of important soybean PR genes, as well as, the activity of corresponding enzymes in both P treatments. Furthermore, 5 phenolic acids were detected in root exudates of maize/soybean intercropped plants. Among these phenolic acids, cinnamic acid was released in significantly greater concentrations when intercropped maize with soybean compared to either crop grown in monoculture, and this spike in cinnamic acid was found dramatically constrain C. parasiticum growth in vitro. CONCLUSIONS: To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first report to demonstrate that intercropping with maize can promote resistance in soybean to red crown rot in a root-dependent manner. This supports the point that intercropping may be an efficient ecological strategy to control soil-borne plant disease and should be incorporated in sustainable agricultural management practices.

  16. The role of maize root size in phosphorus uptake and productivity of maize/faba bean and maize/wheat intercropping systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yikai; Chen, Fanjun; Li, Long; Chen, Yanhua; Liu, Bingran; Zhou, Yuling; Yuan, Lixing; Zhang, Fusuo; Mi, Guohua

    2012-11-01

    Interspecific root/rhizosphere interactions affect phosphorus (P) uptake and the productivity of maize/faba bean and maize/wheat intercropping systems. The aim of these experiments was to determine whether manipulation of maize root growth could improve the productivity of the two intercropping systems. Two near isogenic maize hybrids (the larger-rooted T149 and smaller-rooted T222) were intercropped with faba bean and wheat, under conditions of high- and low-P availability. The larger-rooted T149 showed greater competitive ability than the smaller-rooted T222 in both maize/faba bean and maize/wheat intercropping systems. The higher competitive ability of T149 improved the productivity of the maize/faba bean intercropping system in P-sufficient conditions. In maize/wheat intercropping systems, root growth, shoot biomass, and P uptake of maize were inhibited by wheat, regardless of the P-supply. Compared with T222, the larger-rooted T149 suffered less in the intercropping systems. The total biomass of the maize/wheat intercropping system was higher for wheat/T149 than for wheat/T222 under low-P conditions. These data suggested that genetic improvement of maize root size could enhance maize growth and its ability to compete for P resources in maize/faba bean and maize/wheat intercropping systems. In addition, depending on the P availability, larger maize roots could increase the productivity of intercropping systems.

  17. A Palaeoproterozoic multi-stage hydrothermal alteration system at Nalunaq gold deposit, South Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bell, Robin-Marie; Kolb, Jochen; Waight, Tod Earle;

    2016-01-01

    Nalunaq is an orogenic, high gold grade deposit situated on the Nanortalik Peninsula, South Greenland. Mineralisation is hosted in shear zone-controlled quartz veins, located in fine- and medium-grained amphibolite. The deposit was the site of Greenland’s only operating metalliferous mine until its...... closure in 2014, having produced 10.67 t of gold. This study uses a combination of field investigation, petrography and U/Pb zircon and titanite geochronology to define a multistage hydrothermal alteration system at Nalunaq. A clinopyroxene-plagioclase-garnet(-sulphide) alteration zone (CPGZ) developed in...... the Nanortalik Peninsula, close to regional peak metamorphism and prior to gold-quartz vein formation. The ca. 1783–1762-Ma gold-quartz veins are hosted in reactivated shear zones with a hydrothermal alteration halo of biotite...

  18. The distribution and growth of roots for four sugarcane cultivars irrigated by a subsurface drip irrigation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yukitaka Pessinatti Ohashi, Augusto; Barros de Oliveira Silva, André Luiz; Célia de Matos Pires, Regina; Vasconcelos Ribeiro, Rafael

    2013-04-01

    The use of subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) in sugarcane cultivation is an interesting cultural practice to improve production and allow cultivation in marginal lands due to water deficit conditions or to reach high yield and to increase longevity of plants. The SDI allows improving the water use efficiency, due to the application of water and nutrients in the root zone plants. It is necessary knowledge of soil and plant parameters, such as root system to improve irrigation system use efficiency. However, despite of the agronomic importance, few studies of sugarcane roots have been performed. The use of root scanner is an alternative to the evaluation of the root system. The mentioned equipment enables the continuous study of the roots throughout the cycle and for many years, but data about the use of this method for sugarcane are scarce. The aim of this study was to determine the distribution and growth of roots for four sugarcane cultivars root system. The field experiment was carried out in Campinas SP Brazil, with IACSP95-5000, IACSP94-2094, IACSP94-2101 and SP79-1011 cultivars. The irrigation was performed by subsurface drip system and the soil moisture was monitored by capacitance probes. Three access tubes with 1.05 m-length were used for each cultivar. The images were caught with Root Scanner CI-600™ in two dates, 38 and 58 days after harvest (DAH) of cane-plant, in the second cycle (1st cane ratoon) in five depths and were analyzed by the software RootSnap! ™. The results show that, except for cultivar IACSP94-2094, more than 80% of root length was found in the first 0.40 m of soil profile. Until 38 DAH the root growth of cultivar IACSP94-2101 were approximately fourfold higher than other three ones in the 0 to 0.20 m layer, sevenfold higher to 0.20 to 0.40 m layer and threefold to 0.40 to 0.60 m soil profile layer. However, between 38 and 58 DAH the cultivar SP79-1011 presented higher growth taxes, being almost twofold higher than IACSP94-2101 at 0 to

  19. Effects of chemical alteration on fracture mechanical properties in hydrothermal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, O. A.; Eichhubl, P.; Olson, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    Fault and fracture networks often control the distribution of fluids and heat in hydrothermal and epithermal systems, and in related geothermal and mineral resources. Additional chemical influences on conduit evolution are well documented, with dissolution and precipitation of mineral species potentially changing the permeability of fault-facture networks. Less well understood are the impacts of chemical alteration on the mechanical properties governing fracture growth and fracture network geometry. We use double-torsion (DT) load relaxation tests under ambient air conditions to measure the mode-I fracture toughness (KIC) and subcritical fracture growth index (SCI) of variably altered rock samples obtained from outcrop in Dixie Valley, NV. Samples from southern Dixie Valley include 1) weakly altered granite, characterized by minor sericite in plagioclase, albitization and vacuolization of feldspars, and incomplete replacement of biotite with chlorite, and 2) granite from an area of locally intense propylitic alteration with chlorite-calcite-hematite-epidote assemblages. We also evaluated samples of completely silicified gabbro obtained from the Dixie Comstock epithermal gold deposit. In the weakly altered granite KIC and SCI are 1.3 ±0.2 MPam1/2 (n=8) and 59 ±25 (n=29), respectively. In the propylitic assemblage KIC is reduced to 0.6 ±0.1 MPam1/2 (n=11), and the SCI increased to 75 ±36 (n = 33). In both cases, the altered materials have lower fracture toughness and higher SCI than is reported for common geomechanical standards such as Westerly Granite (KIC ~1.7 MPam1/2; SCI ~48). Preliminary analysis of the silicified gabbro shows a significant increase in fracture toughness, 3.6 ±0.4 MPam1/2 (n=2), and SCI, 102 ±45 (n=19), compared to published values for gabbro (2.9 MPam1/2 and SCI = 32). These results suggest that mineralogical and textural changes associated with different alteration assemblages may result in spatially variable rates of fracture

  20. 75 FR 25904 - Privacy Act of 1974; as Amended; Proposed Alteration to an Existing Privacy Act System of Records...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-10

    ... THE SYSTEM: This system covers persons who allegedly fail to meet our qualifications to serve as a... ADMINISTRATION Privacy Act of 1974; as Amended; Proposed Alteration to an Existing Privacy Act System of Records, Housekeeping Changes, and New Routine Uses AGENCY: Social Security Administration (SSA). ACTION: Altered...

  1. Advanced nutrient root feeding system for conveyer-type cylindrical plant growth facilities developed for microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkovich, Yuliy A.; Smolyanina, Svetlana O.; Krivobok, Anna; Krivobok, Nikolay

    A new brand of cylindrical conveyer-type space plant growth facilities (PGF) has been created to improve of cosmonauts’ diet in the microgravity conditions. Up to date several ground prototypes of the space PGF have been made and tested: “Phytocycle”, “Vitacycle”, “Phytocycle-LED”, “Phytoconveyer”; now the space PGF “Vitacycle-T” for the Russian segment of the ISS is under developing. In the PGFs the ion-exchange salt-saturated fibrous artificial soil (AS) is used as a root medium. We have proposed the system for enrichment of irrigation water by nutrients to decrease of the AS store required for PGF working during the long space mission. The system includes root modules filled in fibrous ion-exchange AS, the enrichment column with crumble salt-saturation ion-exchange resin and the cassette with slow releasing fertilizer (SRF). Both substrates (ion-exchange resin and SRF) are necessary because of the SRF contains mostly N, P and K but another three essential elements S, Ca, Mg are provided by the ion-exchange resin. In the system water goes throw the enrichment column with ion-exchange resin fertilizing by the nutrients and comes into the mixer cell fertilize equipped with the electrical conductivity sensor. When the signal of the conductivity sensor is coming to the controller it turns on the pump directed the water flow throw the cassette with SRF until the electric conductivity of the solution in the mixer cell will reach the setpoint. The nutrient root feeding system was tested during 88 days when Chinese cabbage grew in PGF “Phytocycle-LED”. The crop has been continuously illuminated by red and blue LEDs in the PPF ratio 7 to 1; an integral PPF level has been (240 ± 10) µmol/(m2×s). There was no renewal of the used fibrous AS during the experiment. The PGF total electric power consumption was of 0,45 kW. The average fresh biomass productivity of the PGF during steady state working mode was equal 135×g/day per m2 of the illuminated

  2. Effects of Lanthanum Chloride on Activity of Redox System in Plasma Membrane of Rice Seedling Roots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑海雷; 张春光; 赵中秋; 马建华; 黄仙君

    2002-01-01

    The plasma membrane was isolated and purified by using the method of aqueous two-phase partitioning from rice (Oryza sativa) seedling roots. The effect of LaCl3 on the activity of redox system of plasma membrane has been studied. The reduction rate of Fe(CN)3-6 and the oxidation rate of NADH in plasma membrane are stimulated below the concentration of 40 μmolL-1, but depressed in pace with the increasing of LaCl3 over the concentration of 40 μmol*L-1. The possible effect of LaCl3 on the uptake of Fe element by rice seedling was also discussed.

  3. System approaches to study root hairs as a single cell plant model: current status and future perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Shakhawat eHossain

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Our current understanding of plant functional genomics derives primarily from measurements of gene, protein and/or metabolite levels averaged over the whole plant or multicellular tissues. These approaches risk diluting the response of specific cells that might respond strongly to the treatment but whose signal is diluted by the larger proportion of non-responding cells. For example, if a gene is expressed at a low level, does this mean that it is indeed lowly expressed or is it highly expressed, but only in a few cells? In order to avoid these issues, we adopted the soybean root hair cell, derived from a single, differentiated root epidermal cell, as a single-cell model for functional genomics. Root hair cells are intrinsically interesting since they are major conduits for root water and nutrient uptake and are also the preferred site of infection by nitrogen-fixing rhizobium bacteria. Although a variety of other approaches have been used to study single plant cells or single cell types, the root hair system is perhaps unique in allowing application of the full repertoire of functional genomic and biochemical approaches. In this mini review, we summarize our published work and place this within the broader context of root biology, with a significant focus on understanding the initial events in the soybean-rhizobium interaction.

  4. Impact of DNA mismatch repair system alterations on human fertility and related treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Min-hao; Liu, Shu-yuan; Wang, Ning; Wu, Yan; Jin, Fan

    2016-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) is one of the biological pathways, which plays a critical role in DNA homeostasis, primarily by repairing base-pair mismatches and insertion/deletion loops that occur during DNA replication. MMR also takes part in other metabolic pathways and regulates cell cycle arrest. Defects in MMR are associated with genomic instability, predisposition to certain types of cancers and resistance to certain therapeutic drugs. Moreover, genetic and epigenetic alterations in the MMR system demonstrate a significant relationship with human fertility and related treatments, which helps us to understand the etiology and susceptibility of human infertility. Alterations in the MMR system may also influence the health of offspring conceived by assisted reproductive technology in humans. However, further studies are needed to explore the specific mechanisms by which the MMR system may affect human infertility. This review addresses the physiological mechanisms of the MMR system and associations between alterations of the MMR system and human fertility and related treatments, and potential effects on the next generation.

  5. Functional Heart Valve Scaffolds Obtained by Complete Decellularization of Porcine Aortic Roots in a Novel Differential Pressure Gradient Perfusion System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierad, Leslie Neil; Shaw, Eliza Laine; Bina, Alexander; Brazile, Bryn; Rierson, Nicholas; Patnaik, Sourav S; Kennamer, Allison; Odum, Rebekah; Cotoi, Ovidiu; Terezia, Preda; Branzaniuc, Klara; Smallwood, Harrison; Deac, Radu; Egyed, Imre; Pavai, Zoltan; Szanto, Annamaria; Harceaga, Lucian; Suciu, Horatiu; Raicea, Victor; Olah, Peter; Simionescu, Agneta; Liao, Jun; Movileanu, Ionela; Harpa, Marius; Simionescu, Dan Teodor

    2015-12-01

    There is a great need for living valve replacements for patients of all ages. Such constructs could be built by tissue engineering, with perspective of the unique structure and biology of the aortic root. The aortic valve root is composed of several different tissues, and careful structural and functional consideration has to be given to each segment and component. Previous work has shown that immersion techniques are inadequate for whole-root decellularization, with the aortic wall segment being particularly resistant to decellularization. The aim of this study was to develop a differential pressure gradient perfusion system capable of being rigorous enough to decellularize the aortic root wall while gentle enough to preserve the integrity of the cusps. Fresh porcine aortic roots have been subjected to various regimens of perfusion decellularization using detergents and enzymes and results compared to immersion decellularized roots. Success criteria for evaluation of each root segment (cusp, muscle, sinus, wall) for decellularization completeness, tissue integrity, and valve functionality were defined using complementary methods of cell analysis (histology with nuclear and matrix stains and DNA analysis), biomechanics (biaxial and bending tests), and physiologic heart valve bioreactor testing (with advanced image analysis of open-close cycles and geometric orifice area measurement). Fully acellular porcine roots treated with the optimized method exhibited preserved macroscopic structures and microscopic matrix components, which translated into conserved anisotropic mechanical properties, including bending and excellent valve functionality when tested in aortic flow and pressure conditions. This study highlighted the importance of (1) adapting decellularization methods to specific target tissues, (2) combining several methods of cell analysis compared to relying solely on histology, (3) developing relevant valve-specific mechanical tests, and (4) in vitro testing

  6. Experimental alteration of molybdenite: evaluation of the Re-Os system, infrared spectroscopic profile and polytype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Katsuhiko; Kagi, Hiroyuki; Nara, Masayuki; Takano, Bokuichiro; Nozaki, Yoshiyuki

    2000-01-01

    Experiments have been carried out to clarify the effect of alteration on Re-Os system, near infrared (NIR)-infrared (IR) spectroscopic characteristics and polytype of a natural molybdenite mineral (MoS 2). The molybdenite sample was placed in H 2O and various media of 0.1 mol/L NaCl, NaHCO 3, CaCl 2, and AlCl 3 solutions, and heated in a sealed quartz tube at a temperature of 180°C for 20 d. The unaltered and altered samples were subsequently used for analysis of Re and Os, NIR microscopic observation, and NIR-IR spectroscopy, and microfocus X-ray diffraction (XRD). Molybdenites subjected to NaCl and NaHCO 3 solutions give younger Re-Os ages than that of the original unaltered molybdenite. No significant changes in d spacing and width of micro-XRD patterns can be found in these altered molybdenite, indicating the possibility of Re-Os fractionation without significant structural conversion of molybdenite mineral. These results strongly suggest that the Re-Os system in molybdenite would be frequently disturbed if it has experienced alteration, because alteration by the low salinity (<1%), low temperature (˜180°C) hydrothermal solution containing NaCl and/or CO 2 is commonly found in the natural environment. We maintain, therefore, that one set of analyses of Re and Os in a sample is not enough to determine whether the obtained Re-Os age has been affected by postdepositional alteration, but systematic replicate analyses are indispensable. Additionally, pulverizing all the collected molybdenite in a sample might give misleading results because portions, which have been altered and experienced Re-Os fractionation, may possibly mix into the undisturbed sample and be homogenized. The molybdenite used for the experiment was originally opaque under NIR light. Infrared microscopic and spectroscopic profiles show that some parts of the molybdenite subjected to CaCl 2 and AlCl 3 solutions become transparent to NIR. Increased NIR transmittance is possibly attributed to the

  7. Development of A Modular Plant Imaging PET System and Its Use In Evaluating Corn Plant Root Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowell, Alexander; Cumberbatch, Laurie; Fallin, Brent; Howell, Calvin; Reid, Chantal; Bonito, Greg; Topp, Chris; Weisenberger, Andrew; Lee, Seung Joon; McKisson, Jack; Zorn, Carl; Smith, Mark

    2014-03-01

    A modular high-resolution positron emission tomography (PET) system has been developed at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility to study physiological processes that influence the biodistribution of various substances in plants. This system is used to investigate sugar transport under varying environmental conditions using 11C-tagged sugars. The positron-emitting radiotracer 11C is produced in the tandem laboratory at TUNL. Initial evaluation of the PhytoPET system to image differences in the biodistribution of 11C-tagged sugars in corn plants due to fungal-root interactions is underway at Duke and preliminary results are presented. This work was supported in part by USDOE Grant No. DE-FG02-97-ER41033 and DE-SC0005057.

  8. Endodontic management of a mandibular first molar with six root canal systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilip Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Internal anatomy of pulp is complex. The first mandibular molars typically have two roots, one mesial with two root canals and another distal root, which contains one or two canals. A 20-year-old female patient reported with intermittent pain and incomplete root canal treatment in left lower back region since 1-week. Refined access cavity revealed initially two canals in mesial and two canals in the distal root. With operating microscope and cone beam computerized tomography, two additional canals (L-mesio-buccal and B-mesio-lingual were identified in mesial root. One-year follow-up showed patient was asymptomatic and complete healing of periapical radiolucency.

  9. The health and health system of South Africa: historical roots of current public health challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coovadia, Hoosen; Jewkes, Rachel; Barron, Peter; Sanders, David; McIntyre, Diane

    2009-09-01

    The roots of a dysfunctional health system and the collision of the epidemics of communicable and non-communicable diseases in South Africa can be found in policies from periods of the country's history, from colonial subjugation, apartheid dispossession, to the post-apartheid period. Racial and gender discrimination, the migrant labour system, the destruction of family life, vast income inequalities, and extreme violence have all formed part of South Africa's troubled past, and all have inexorably affected health and health services. In 1994, when apartheid ended, the health system faced massive challenges, many of which still persist. Macroeconomic policies, fostering growth rather than redistribution, contributed to the persistence of economic disparities between races despite a large expansion in social grants. The public health system has been transformed into an integrated, comprehensive national service, but failures in leadership and stewardship and weak management have led to inadequate implementation of what are often good policies. Pivotal facets of primary health care are not in place and there is a substantial human resources crisis facing the health sector. The HIV epidemic has contributed to and accelerated these challenges. All of these factors need to be addressed by the new government if health is to be improved and the Millennium Development Goals achieved in South Africa.

  10. Soybean root growth and crop yield in reponse to liming at the beginning of a no-tillage system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson Campanhola Bortoluzzi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Analyzing the soil near crop roots may reveal limitations to growth and yield even in a no-tillage system. The purpose of the present study was to relate the chemical and physical properties of soil under a no-tillage system to soybean root growth and plant yield after five years of use of different types of limestone and forms of application. A clayey Oxisol received application of dolomitic and calcitic limestones and their 1:1 combination in two forms: surface application, maintained on the soil surface; and incorporated, applied on the surface and incorporated mechanically. Soil physical properties (resistance to mechanical penetration, soil bulk density and soil aggregation, soil chemical properties (pH, exchangeable cations, H+Al, and cation exchange capacity and plant parameters (root growth system, soybean grain yield, and oat dry matter production were evaluated five years after setting up the experiment. Incorporation of lime neutralized exchangeable Al up to a depth of 20 cm without affecting the soil physical properties. The soybean root system reached depths of 40 cm or more with incorporated limestone, increasing grain yield an average of 31 % in relation to surface application, which limited the effect of lime up to a depth of 5 cm and root growth up to 20 cm. It was concluded that incorporation of limestone at the beginning of a no-tillage system ensures a favorable environment for root growth and soybean yield, while this intervention does not show long-term effects on soil physical properties under no-tillage. This suggests that there is resilience in the physical properties evaluated.

  11. Simultaneous monitoring of electrical capacitance and water uptake activity of plant root system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cseresnyés, Imre; Takács, Tünde; Füzy, Anna; Rajkai, Kálmán

    2014-10-01

    Pot experiments were designed to test the applicability of root electrical capacitance measurement for in situ monitoring of root water uptake activity by growing cucumber and bean cultivars in a growth chamber. Half of the plants were inoculated with Funneliformis mosseae arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, while the other half served as non-infected controls. Root electrical capacitance and daily transpiration were monitored during the whole plant ontogeny. Phenology-dependent changes of daily transpiration (related to root water uptake) and root electrical capacitance proved to be similar as they showed upward trends from seedling emergence to the beginning of flowering stage, and thereafter decreased continuously during fruit setting. A few days after arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi-colonization, daily transpiration and root electrical capacitance of infected plants became significantly higher than those of non-infected counterparts, and the relative increment of the measured parameters was greater for the more highly mycorrhizal-dependent bean cultivar compared to that of cucumber. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi colonization caused 29 and 69% relative increment in shoot dry mass for cucumbers and beans, respectively. Mycorrhization resulted in 37% increase in root dry mass for beans, but no significant difference was observed for cucumbers. Results indicate the potential of root electrical capacitance measurements for monitoring the changes and differences of root water uptake rate.

  12. Impact of salt stress on the features and activities of root system for three desert halophyte species in their seedling stage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YI LiangPeng; MA Jian; LI Yan

    2007-01-01

    Linkage between belowground and aboveground sections of ecological system is mainly depending on root system. But root system is the parts of plant that people less understand. The absorption function of root system is closely related to their morphology and activity. Moreover root system can interact with the environmental stress under the adverse situation, and adjust its system to take adaptation responses in morphology and physiology to strengthen its survival chance. This research is focused on three desert halophyte species of H. ammodendron (C.A.Mey.) Bge., S. physophora Pall., and S.nitraria Pall. under solution culture, to study the differences of their root system morphology and activity in the seedling stage under varying salt concentration conditions. The study results show that: A certain salt concentration can promote development of these three halophytes; but rather high salt concentration will restrain their growth, in particular inhibit the root system development. Under the same salt concentration condition, S. nitraria Pall. grows fast and accumulates the largest amount of biomass. Under relatively low salt concentration, the length of axial root and the total length of root system of these three halophyte species are all increased; and compared to the checking samples, S.physophora Pall. occupies the top place of root system growth, but the high salt concentration will restrain the increase of total root length; among them, the impact intensity on S. physophora Pall. is lighter than to H. ammodendron (C.A.Mey.) Bge. and S. nitraria Pall. is lighter; the salinity does not bring distinct influence on the average diameter of root system of these three plant species, but trends to reducing the size; under the solution culture conditions, the middle and lower parts of the axial root of H. ammodendron (C.A.Mey.) Bge. and S. physophora Pall. are rather equally distributed, but the central zone of S. nitraria Pall. root system is more significantly

  13. Ambient ultraviolet radiation in the Arctic reduces root biomass and alters microbial community composition but has no effects on microbial biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rinnan, R.; Keinänen, M.M.; Kasurinen, A.;

    2005-01-01

    that microbial community composition was altered by UV reduction. Although the UV responses were slight considering the large dose difference between the treatments (from near-ambient to up to 90% UV-B reduction), we cannot rule out the possibility that the recovery of ozone layer would change the below...

  14. Impaired sense of smell and altered olfactory system in RAG-1-/- immunodeficient mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenza eRattazzi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Immune deficiencies are often associated with a number of physical manifestations including loss of sense of smell and an increased level of anxiety. We have previously shown that T and B cell-deficient recombinase activating gene (RAG-1-/- knockout mice have an increased level of anxiety-like behavior and altered gene expression involved in olfaction. In this study, we expanded these findings by testing the structure and functional development of the olfactory system in RAG-1-/- mice. Our results show that these mice have a reduced engagement in different types of odors and this phenotype is associated with disorganized architecture of glomerular tissue and atrophy of the main olfactory epithelium. Most intriguingly this defect manifests specifically in adult age and is not due to impairment in the patterning of the olfactory neuron staining at the embryo stage. Together these findings provide a formerly unreported biological evidence for an altered function of the olfactory system in RAG-1-/- mice.

  15. Impaired sense of smell and altered olfactory system in RAG-1(-∕-) immunodeficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattazzi, Lorenza; Cariboni, Anna; Poojara, Ridhika; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; D'Acquisto, Fulvio

    2015-01-01

    Immune deficiencies are often associated with a number of physical manifestations including loss of sense of smell and an increased level of anxiety. We have previously shown that T and B cell-deficient recombinase activating gene (RAG-1)(-∕-) knockout mice have an increased level of anxiety-like behavior and altered gene expression involved in olfaction. In this study, we expanded these findings by testing the structure and functional development of the olfactory system in RAG-1 (-∕-) mice. Our results show that these mice have a reduced engagement in different types of odors and this phenotype is associated with disorganized architecture of glomerular tissue and atrophy of the main olfactory epithelium. Most intriguingly this defect manifests specifically in adult age and is not due to impairment in the patterning of the olfactory neuron staining at the embryo stage. Together these findings provide a formerly unreported biological evidence for an altered function of the olfactory system in RAG-1 (-∕-) mice.

  16. Local and systemic biochemical alterations induced by Bothrops atrox snake venom in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Carlos At; Kayano, Anderson M; Setúbal, Sulamita S; Pontes, Adriana S; Furtado, Juliana L; Kwasniewski, Fábio H; Zaqueo, Kayena D; Soares, Andreimar M; Stábeli, Rodrigo G; Zuliani, Juliana P

    2012-01-01

    The local and systemic alterations induced by Bothrops atrox snake venom (BaV) injection in mice were studied. BaV induced superoxide production by migrated neutrophils, mast cell degranulation and phagocytosis by macrophages. Moreover, BaV caused hemorrhage in dorsum of mice after 2hr post- injection. Three hours post-injection in gastrocnemius muscle, we also observed myonecrosis, which was assessed by the determination of serum and tissue CK besides the release of urea, but not creatinine and uric acid, indicating kidney alterations. BaV also induced the release of LDH and transaminases (ALT and AST) indicating tissue and liver abnormalities. In conclusion, the data indicate that BaV induces events of local and systemic importance. PMID:23487552

  17. Enhancement of anti-inflammatory activity of Aloe vera adventitious root extracts through the alteration of primary and secondary metabolites via salicylic acid elicitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yun Sun; Ju, Hyun Kyoung; Kim, Yeon Jeong; Lim, Tae-Gyu; Uddin, Md Romij; Kim, Yeon Bok; Baek, Jin Hong; Kwon, Sung Won; Lee, Ki Won; Seo, Hak Soo; Park, Sang Un; Yang, Tae-Jin

    2013-01-01

    Aloe vera (Asphodeloideae) is a medicinal plant in which useful secondary metabolites are plentiful. Among the representative secondary metabolites of Aloe vera are the anthraquinones including aloe emodin and chrysophanol, which are tricyclic aromatic quinones synthesized via a plant-specific type III polyketide biosynthesis pathway. However, it is not yet clear which cellular responses can induce the pathway, leading to production of tricyclic aromatic quinones. In this study, we examined the effect of endogenous elicitors on the type III polyketide biosynthesis pathway and identified the metabolic changes induced in elicitor-treated Aloe vera adventitious roots. Salicylic acid, methyl jasmonate, and ethephon were used to treat Aloe vera adventitious roots cultured on MS liquid media with 0.3 mg/L IBA for 35 days. Aloe emodin and chrysophanol were remarkably increased by the SA treatment, more than 10-11 and 5-13 fold as compared with untreated control, respectively. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry analysis identified a total of 37 SA-induced compounds, including aloe emodin and chrysophanol, and 3 of the compounds were tentatively identified as tricyclic aromatic quinones. Transcript accumulation analysis of polyketide synthase genes and gas chromatography mass spectrometry showed that these secondary metabolic changes resulted from increased expression of octaketide synthase genes and decreases in malonyl-CoA, which is the precursor for the tricyclic aromatic quinone biosynthesis pathway. In addition, anti-inflammatory activity was enhanced in extracts of SA-treated adventitious roots. Our results suggest that SA has an important role in activation of the plant specific-type III polyketide biosynthetic pathway, and therefore that the efficacy of Aloe vera as medicinal agent can be improved through SA treatment.

  18. Enhancement of anti-inflammatory activity of Aloe vera adventitious root extracts through the alteration of primary and secondary metabolites via salicylic acid elicitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Sun Lee

    Full Text Available Aloe vera (Asphodeloideae is a medicinal plant in which useful secondary metabolites are plentiful. Among the representative secondary metabolites of Aloe vera are the anthraquinones including aloe emodin and chrysophanol, which are tricyclic aromatic quinones synthesized via a plant-specific type III polyketide biosynthesis pathway. However, it is not yet clear which cellular responses can induce the pathway, leading to production of tricyclic aromatic quinones. In this study, we examined the effect of endogenous elicitors on the type III polyketide biosynthesis pathway and identified the metabolic changes induced in elicitor-treated Aloe vera adventitious roots. Salicylic acid, methyl jasmonate, and ethephon were used to treat Aloe vera adventitious roots cultured on MS liquid media with 0.3 mg/L IBA for 35 days. Aloe emodin and chrysophanol were remarkably increased by the SA treatment, more than 10-11 and 5-13 fold as compared with untreated control, respectively. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry analysis identified a total of 37 SA-induced compounds, including aloe emodin and chrysophanol, and 3 of the compounds were tentatively identified as tricyclic aromatic quinones. Transcript accumulation analysis of polyketide synthase genes and gas chromatography mass spectrometry showed that these secondary metabolic changes resulted from increased expression of octaketide synthase genes and decreases in malonyl-CoA, which is the precursor for the tricyclic aromatic quinone biosynthesis pathway. In addition, anti-inflammatory activity was enhanced in extracts of SA-treated adventitious roots. Our results suggest that SA has an important role in activation of the plant specific-type III polyketide biosynthetic pathway, and therefore that the efficacy of Aloe vera as medicinal agent can be improved through SA treatment.

  19. Roots Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Barnabas

    1998-01-01

    Offers historical information about square roots. Presents three different methods--Hero's method, visual method, and remainder method--which can be used to teach the finding of square roots and one method for determining cube roots. (ASK)

  20. Hydrothermal alteration geochemistry of Nugget gold vein system, Shotover valley, northwest Otago, New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ankeritic alteration zones are associated with gold mineralisation in the Nugget vein system, Shotover valley, northwest Otago. These zones consist of sheared and brecciated schist in Miocene normal faults. The zones are also extensively silicified. Mineralisation resulted from passage of low-salinity, low-CO2 water at 200-250 degrees C within a few kilometres of the surface. Alteration has involved replacement and veining of host pelitic schist in the mineralised zone. Most elements have been diluted by quartz and carbonate, with insignificant gains or losses. Ba has been leached as it became more soluble with decreasing fluid temperature. Considerable addition of Sr has occurred, as the fluid had higher Sr/Ca than most Otago mineralising fluids. Enrichment in Sr may be a distinctive feature of the Shotover style of mineralisation. Metallic mineralisation is due to addition of S, As, and Au during alteration. In contrast to many Otago gold vein systems, there has been no scheelite mineralisation. Carbonates have δ18O = +15.4 to +18.6, and δ13C = -8.2 to +0.5 per thousand. The oxygen isotopic signature is similar to other Otago gold veins. Carbon isotopes in aqueous CO2 which deposited Nugget ankerites are generally heavier (by 2-4 per thousand) than those in other Otago gold vein systems. This is caused by changes in dissolved carbonate species at the lower temperature, and fluid/rock interaction during ankerite mineralisation. (author). 29 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  1. Automatic measurement of water uptake and weeping sap excretion by root system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Czerski

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available An apparatus is described which allows continuous recording of water uptake by a plant. The elements of this apparatus serve at the same time for measurement of root pressure. The size of the recorded portion of uptaken water and of weeping sap excreted by the plant root can be regulated.

  2. LSODKR, Stiff Ordinary Differential Equations (ODE) System Solver with Krylov Iteration with Root-finding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1 - Description of program or function: LSODKR is a new initial value ODE solver for stiff and non-stiff systems. It is a variant of the LSODPK and LSODE solvers, intended mainly for large stiff systems. The main differences between LSODKR and LSODE are the following: a) for stiff systems, LSODKR uses a corrector iteration composed of Newton iteration and one of four preconditioned Krylov subspace iteration methods. The user must supply routines for the preconditioning operations, b) within the corrector iteration, LSODKR does automatic switching between functional (fix point) iteration and modified Newton iteration, The nonlinear iteration method-switching differs from the method-switching in LSODA and LSODAR, but provides similar savings by using the cheaper method in the non-stiff regions of the problem. c) LSODKR includes the ability to find roots of given functions of the solution during the integration. d) LSODKR also improves on the Krylov methods in LSODPK by offering the option to save and reuse the approximate Jacobian data underlying the pre-conditioner. The LSODKR source is commented extensively to facilitate modification. Both a single-precision version and a double-precision version are available. 2 - Methods: It is assumed that the ODEs are given explicitly, so that the system can be written in the form dy/dt = f(t,y), where y is the vector of dependent variables, and t is the independent variable. Integration is by Adams or BDF (Backward Differentiation Formula) methods, at user option. Corrector iteration is by Newton or fix point iteration, determined dynamically. Linear system solution is by a preconditioned Krylov iteration, selected by user from Incomplete Orthogonalization Method, Generalized Minimum Residual Method, and two variants of Preconditioned Conjugate Gradient Method. Preconditioning is to be supplied by the user

  3. Accounting for sap flow from different parts of the root system improves the prediction of xylem ABA concentration in plants grown with heterogeneous soil moisture

    OpenAIRE

    Dodd, Ian C; Egea, Gregorio; Davies, William J.

    2008-01-01

    When soil moisture is heterogeneous, sap flow from, and ABA status of, different parts of the root system impact on leaf xylem ABA concentration ([X-ABA]leaf). The robustness of a model for predicting [X-ABA]leaf was assessed. ‘Two root-one shoot’ grafted sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) plants received either deficit irrigation (DI, each root system received the same irrigation volumes) or partial rootzone drying (PRD, only one root system was watered and the other dried the soil). Irrespect...

  4. Conformity of the time and root characteristics received at modeling of linear systems in the environment of MATLAB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitaliy Borodenko

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The author analyses conformity of the time and root characteristics received at modeling of linear systems in the environment of MATLAB, to each other and to the standard approach. The author studies conditions of reception of false or inexact results at the analysis of regulation quality on the transition characteristic.

  5. Nitrogen dynamics in the soil-plant system under deficit and partial root-zone drying irrigation strategies in potatoes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shahnazari, Ali; Ahmadi, Seyed Hamid; Lærke, Poul Erik;

    2008-01-01

    Experiments were conducted in lysimeters with sandy soil under an automatic rain-out shelter to study the effects of subsurface drip irrigation treatments, full irrigation (FI), deficit irrigation (DI) and partial root-zone drying (PRD), on nitrogen (N) dynamics in the soil-plant system of potatoes...

  6. How changing root system architecture can help tackle a reduction in soil phosphate (P) levels for better plant P acquisition

    KAUST Repository

    HEPPELL, J.

    2014-06-24

    © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd. The readily available global rock phosphate (P) reserves may run out within the next 50-130 years, causing soils to have a reduced P concentration which will affect plant P uptake. Using a combination of mathematical modelling and experimental data, we investigated potential plant-based options for optimizing crop P uptake in reduced soil P environments. By varying the P concentration within a well-mixed agricultural soil, for high and low P (35.5-12.5mgL-1 respectively using Olsen\\'s P index), we investigated branching distributions within a wheat root system that maximize P uptake. Changing the root branching distribution from linear (evenly spaced branches) to strongly exponential (a greater number of branches at the top of the soil) improves P uptake by 142% for low-P soils when root mass is kept constant between simulations. This causes the roots to emerge earlier and mimics topsoil foraging. Manipulating root branching patterns, to maximize P uptake, is not enough on its own to overcome the drop in soil P from high to low P. Further mechanisms have to be considered to fully understand the impact of P reduction on plant development.

  7. Robust fault diagnosis for non-Gaussian stochastic systems based on the rational square-root approximation model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO LiNa; WANG Hong

    2008-01-01

    The task of robust fault detection and diagnosis of stochastic distribution control (SDC) systems with uncertainties is to use the measured input and the system output PDFs to still obtain possible faults information of the system. Using the ra-tional square-root B-spline model to represent the dynamics between the output PDF and the input, in this paper, a robust nonlinear adaptive observer-based fault diagnosis algorithm is presented to diagnose the fault in the dynamic part of such systems with model uncertainties. When certain conditions are satisfied, the weight vector of the rational square-root B-spline model proves to be bounded. Conver-gency analysis is performed for the error dynamic system raised from robust fault detection and fault diagnosis phase. Computer simulations are given to demon-strate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  8. Genetic association among root morphology, root quality and root yield in ashwagandha (Withania somnifera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Ramesh R.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera is a dryland medicinal crop and roots are used as valuable drug in traditional systems of medicine. Morphological variants (morphotypes and the parental populations were evaluated for root - morphometric, quality and yield traits to study genetic association among them. Root morphometric traits (root length, root diameter, number of secondary roots/ plant and crude fiber content exhibited strong association among them and showed significant positive genotypic correlation with yield. Starch-fiber ratio (SFR, determinant of brittle root texture showed strong negative association with root yield. The total alkaloid content had positive genotypic correlation with root yield. So genetic upgradation should aim at optimum balance between two divergent groups of traits i.e. root yield traits (root morphometric traits and crude fiber content and root textural quality traits (starch content and SFR to develop superior genotypes with better yield and quality.

  9. Expression pattern of drought stress marker genes in soybean roots under two water deficit systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Cristina Neves-Borges

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of tolerance mechanisms for drought stress in soybean is fundamental to the understanding and development of tolerant varieties. Using in silico analysis, four marker genes involved in the classical ABA-dependent and ABA-independent pathways of drought response were identified in the Glycine max genome in the present work. The expression profiles of the marker genes ERD1-like, GmaxRD20A-like, GmaxRD22-like and GmaxRD29B-like were investigated by qPCR in root samples of drought sensitive and tolerant soybean cultivars (BR 16 and Embrapa 48, respectively, submitted to water deficit conditions in hydroponic and pot-based systems. Among the four putative soybean homologs to Arabidopsis genes investigated herein, only GmaxRD29B-like was not regulated by water deficit stress. Distinct expression profiles and different induction levels were observed among the genes, as well as between the two drought-inducing systems. Our results showed contrasting gene expression responses for the GmaxRD20A-like and GmaxRD22-like genes. GmaxRD20A-like was highly induced by continuous drought acclimating conditions, whereas GmaxRD22-like responses decreased after abrupt water deprivation. GmaxERD1-like showed a different expression profile for the cultivars in each system. Conversely, GmaxRD20A-like and GmaxRD22-like genes exhibited similar expression levels in tolerant plants in both systems.

  10. Reversal of neurochemical alterations in the spinal dorsal horn and dorsal root ganglia by Mas-related gene (Mrg) receptors in a rat model of spinal nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongmei; Xue, Yaping; Yan, Yanhua; Lin, Minjie; Yang, Jiajia; Huang, Jianzhong; Hong, Yanguo

    2016-07-01

    The rodent Mas-related gene (Mrg) receptor subtype C has been demonstrated to inhibit pathological pain. This study investigated the mechanisms underlying the reversal of pain hypersensitivity by the selective MrgC receptor agonist bovine adrenal medulla 8-22 (BAM8-22) in a rat model of L5 spinal nerve ligation (SNL). Intrathecal (i.t.) administration of BAM8-22 (0.1-10nmol) attenuated mechanical allodynia in a dose-dependent manner on day 10 after SNL. The antiallodynia effect of BAM8-22 was abolished by MrgC receptor antibody, but not by naloxone. I.t. BAM8-22 (10nmol) inhibited SNL-induced upregulation of neuronal nitric oxide synthesis (nNOS) and phosphorylation of cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (p-CREB) in the spinal dorsal horn. The BAM8-22 treatment reversed the SNL-induced astrocyte activation, increase of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) expression and phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK) in the spinal cord. BAM8-22 also reversed the upregulation of fractalkine and IL-1β in small- and medium-sized dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Furthermore, the BAM8-22 exposure suppressed the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced increase of nNOS and IL-1β in the DRG explant cultures and the BAM8-22-induced suppression disappeared in the presence of MrgC receptor antibody. The present study provides evidence that activation of MrgC receptors inhibits nerve injury-induced increase of pronociceptive molecules in DRG neurons, suppressing astrocyte activation, the upregulation of excitatory mediators and phosphorylation of transcription factors in the spinal dorsal horn. As MrgC receptors are unequally expressed in the dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia, this study suggests that targeting MrgC receptors could be a new therapy for neuropathic pain with limited unwanted effects. PMID:27018398

  11. Root development under drought stress

    OpenAIRE

    Franco Leemhuis, José Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Serving as interfaces between plant and the soil, roots are much more exposed to drought stress than the upper plant parts. Therefore, the root system can be as affected, or even more affected, than the aerial parts of the plant for drought stress (Franco et al., 2011). Nevertheless, the influence of this stress on root activity and development has been much less studied. Undoubtedly, this is due to limitations on accessibility for root observations; being studies on root system dynamics espe...

  12. Biological soil crust as a bio-mediator alters hydrological processes in stabilized dune system of the Tengger Desert, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinrong

    2016-04-01

    Biological soil crust (BSC) is a vital component in the stabilized sand dunes with a living cover up to more than 70% of the total, which has been considered as a bio-mediator that directly influences and regulates the sand dune ecosystem processes. However, its influences on soil hydrological processes have been long neglected in Chinese deserts. In this study, BSCs of different successional stages were chose to test their influence on the hydrological processes of stabilized dune, where the groundwater deep exceeds 30m, further to explore why occur the sand-binding vegetation replacement between shrubs and herbs. Our long-term observation (60 years) shows that cyanobacteria crust has been colonized and developed after 3 years since the sand-binding vegetation has been established and dune fixation using planted xerophytic shrubs and made sand barrier (straw-checkerboard) on shifting dune surface, lichen and moss crust occurred after 20 years, and the cover of moss dominated crust could reach 70 % after 50 years. The colonization and development of BSC altered the initial soil water balance of revegetated areas by influencing rainfall infiltration, soil evaporation and dew water entrapment. The results show that BSC obviously reduced the infiltration that occurred during most rainfall events (80%), when rainfall was greater than 5 mm or less than 20 mm. The presence of BSC reduced evaporation of topsoil after small rainfall (facilitated topsoil evaporation when rainfall reached 10 mm. The amount of dew entrapment increases with the succession of BSC. Moreover, the effect of the later successional BSC to dew entrapment, rainfall infiltration and evaporation was more obvious than the early successional BSC on stabilized dunes. In general, BSC reduced the amount of rainfall water that reached deeper soil (0.4-3m), which is where the roots of shrubs are primarily distributed. These changes in the soil moisture pattern induced shifting of sand-binding vegetation from

  13. Biological soil crust as a bio-mediator alters hydrological processes in stabilized dune system of the Tengger Desert, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinrong

    2016-04-01

    Biological soil crust (BSC) is a vital component in the stabilized sand dunes with a living cover up to more than 70% of the total, which has been considered as a bio-mediator that directly influences and regulates the sand dune ecosystem processes. However, its influences on soil hydrological processes have been long neglected in Chinese deserts. In this study, BSCs of different successional stages were chose to test their influence on the hydrological processes of stabilized dune, where the groundwater deep exceeds 30m, further to explore why occur the sand-binding vegetation replacement between shrubs and herbs. Our long-term observation (60 years) shows that cyanobacteria crust has been colonized and developed after 3 years since the sand-binding vegetation has been established and dune fixation using planted xerophytic shrubs and made sand barrier (straw-checkerboard) on shifting dune surface, lichen and moss crust occurred after 20 years, and the cover of moss dominated crust could reach 70 % after 50 years. The colonization and development of BSC altered the initial soil water balance of revegetated areas by influencing rainfall infiltration, soil evaporation and dew water entrapment. The results show that BSC obviously reduced the infiltration that occurred during most rainfall events (80%), when rainfall was greater than 5 mm or less than 20 mm. The presence of BSC reduced evaporation of topsoil after small rainfall (BSC. Moreover, the effect of the later successional BSC to dew entrapment, rainfall infiltration and evaporation was more obvious than the early successional BSC on stabilized dunes. In general, BSC reduced the amount of rainfall water that reached deeper soil (0.4-3m), which is where the roots of shrubs are primarily distributed. These changes in the soil moisture pattern induced shifting of sand-binding vegetation from initial planted xerophytic shrub communities with higher coverage (35%) to complex communities dominated by shallow-rooted

  14. Accounting for sap flow from different parts of the root system improves the prediction of xylem ABA concentration in plants grown with heterogeneous soil moisture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Ian C; Egea, Gregorio; Davies, William J

    2008-01-01

    When soil moisture is heterogeneous, sap flow from, and ABA status of, different parts of the root system impact on leaf xylem ABA concentration ([X-ABA]leaf). The robustness of a model for predicting [X-ABA]leaf was assessed. 'Two root-one shoot' grafted sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) plants received either deficit irrigation (DI, each root system received the same irrigation volumes) or partial rootzone drying (PRD, only one root system was watered and the other dried the soil). Irrespective of whether relative sap flow was assessed using sap flow sensors in vivo or by pressurization of de-topped roots, each root system contributed similarly to total sap flow during DI, while sap flow from roots in drying soil declined linearly with soil water potential (Psisoil) during PRD. Although Psisoil of the irrigated pot determined the threshold Psisoil at which sap flow from roots in drying soil decreased, the slope of this decrease was independent of the wet pot Psisoil. Irrespective of whether sap was collected from the wet or dry root system of PRD plants, or a DI plant, root xylem ABA concentration increased as Psisoil declined. The model, which weighted ABA contributions of each root system according to the sap flow from each, almost perfectly explained [X-ABA] immediately above the graft union. That the model overestimated measured [X-ABA]leaf may result from changes in [X-ABA] along the transport pathway or an artefact of collecting xylem sap from detached leaves. The implications of declining sap flow through partially dry roots during PRD for the control of stomatal behaviour and irrigation scheduling are discussed.

  15. Induced systemic resistance against Botrytis cinerea by Micromonospora strains isolated from root nodules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar eMartínez-Hidalgo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Micromonospora is a Gram positive bacterium that can be isolated from nitrogen fixing nodules from healthy leguminous plants, where they could be beneficial to the plant. Their plant growth promoting activity in legume and non-legume plants has been previously demonstrated. The present study explores the ability of Micromonospora strains to control fungal pathogens and to stimulate plant immunity. Micromonospora strains isolated from surface sterilized nodules of alfalfa showed in vitro antifungal activity against several pathogenic fungi. Moreover, root inoculation of tomato plants with these Micromonospora strains effectively reduced leaf infection by the fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea, despite spatial separation between both microorganisms. This induced systemic resistance, confirmed in different tomato cultivars, is long lasting. Gene expression analyses evidenced that Micromonospora stimulates the plant capacity to activate defense mechanisms upon pathogen attack. The defensive response of tomato plants inoculated with Micromonospora spp. differs from that of non-inoculated plants, showing a stronger induction of jasmonate-regulated defenses when the plant is challenged with a pathogen. The hypothesis of jasmonates playing a key role in this defense priming effect was confirmed using defense-impaired tomato mutants, since the JA-deficient line def1 was unable to display a long term induced resistance upon Micromonospora spp. inoculation.In conclusion, nodule isolated Micromonospora strains should be considered excellent candidates as biocontrol agents as they combine both direct antifungal activity against plant pathogens and the ability to prime plant immunity.

  16. Induced systemic resistance against Botrytis cinerea by Micromonospora strains isolated from root nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Hidalgo, Pilar; García, Juan M; Pozo, María J

    2015-01-01

    Micromonospora is a Gram positive bacterium that can be isolated from nitrogen fixing nodules from healthy leguminous plants, where they could be beneficial to the plant. Their plant growth promoting activity in legume and non-legume plants has been previously demonstrated. The present study explores the ability of Micromonospora strains to control fungal pathogens and to stimulate plant immunity. Micromonospora strains isolated from surface sterilized nodules of alfalfa showed in vitro antifungal activity against several pathogenic fungi. Moreover, root inoculation of tomato plants with these Micromonospora strains effectively reduced leaf infection by the fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea, despite spatial separation between both microorganisms. This induced systemic resistance, confirmed in different tomato cultivars, is long lasting. Gene expression analyses evidenced that Micromonospora stimulates the plant capacity to activate defense mechanisms upon pathogen attack. The defensive response of tomato plants inoculated with Micromonospora spp. differs from that of non-inoculated plants, showing a stronger induction of jasmonate-regulated defenses when the plant is challenged with a pathogen. The hypothesis of jasmonates playing a key role in this defense priming effect was confirmed using defense-impaired tomato mutants, since the JA-deficient line def1 was unable to display a long term induced resistance upon Micromonospora spp. inoculation. In conclusion, nodule isolated Micromonospora strains should be considered excellent candidates as biocontrol agents as they combine both direct antifungal activity against plant pathogens and the ability to prime plant immunity. PMID:26388861

  17. Nitrogen economics of root foraging: Transitive closure of the nitrate–cytokinin relay and distinct systemic signaling for N supply vs. demand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffel, Sandrine; Krouk, Gabriel; Ristova, Daniela; Shasha, Dennis; Birnbaum, Kenneth D.; Coruzzi, Gloria M.

    2011-01-01

    As sessile organisms, root plasticity enables plants to forage for and acquire nutrients in a fluctuating underground environment. Here, we use genetic and genomic approaches in a “split-root” framework—in which physically isolated root systems of the same plant are challenged with different nitrogen (N) environments—to investigate how systemic signaling affects genome-wide reprogramming and root development. The integration of transcriptome and root phenotypes enables us to identify distinct mechanisms underlying “N economy” (i.e., N supply and demand) of plants as a system. Under nitrate-limited conditions, plant roots adopt an “active-foraging strategy”, characterized by lateral root outgrowth and a shared pattern of transcriptome reprogramming, in response to either local or distal nitrate deprivation. By contrast, in nitrate-replete conditions, plant roots adopt a “dormant strategy”, characterized by a repression of lateral root outgrowth and a shared pattern of transcriptome reprogramming, in response to either local or distal nitrate supply. Sentinel genes responding to systemic N signaling identified by genome-wide comparisons of heterogeneous vs. homogeneous split-root N treatments were used to probe systemic N responses in Arabidopsis mutants impaired in nitrate reduction and hormone synthesis and also in decapitated plants. This combined analysis identified genetically distinct systemic signaling underlying plant N economy: (i) N supply, corresponding to a long-distance systemic signaling triggered by nitrate sensing; and (ii) N demand, experimental support for the transitive closure of a previously inferred nitrate–cytokinin shoot–root relay system that reports the nitrate demand of the whole plant, promoting a compensatory root growth in nitrate-rich patches of heterogeneous soil. PMID:22025711

  18. Alternative rooting induction of semi-hardwood olive cuttings by several auxin-producing bacteria for organic agriculture systems

    OpenAIRE

    M. C. Montero-Calasanz; Santamaría, C.; M. Albareda; Daza, A; Duan, J.; Glick, B.R.; Camacho, M.

    2013-01-01

    Southern Spain is the largest olive oil producer region in the world. In recent years organic agriculture systems have grown exponentially so that new alternative systems to produce organic olive cuttings are needed. Several bacterial isolates, namely Pantoea sp. AG9, Chryseobacterium sp. AG13, Chryseobacterium sp. CT348, Pseudomonas sp. CT364 and Azospirillum brasilense Cd (ATCC 29729), have been used to induce rooting in olive semi-hardwood cuttings of Arbequina, Hojiblanca and Picual culti...

  19. Renal Oxidative Stress Induced by Long-Term Hyperuricemia Alters Mitochondrial Function and Maintains Systemic Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Cristóbal-García

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We addressed if oxidative stress in the renal cortex plays a role in the induction of hypertension and mitochondrial alterations in hyperuricemia. A second objective was to evaluate whether the long-term treatment with the antioxidant Tempol prevents renal oxidative stress, mitochondrial alterations, and systemic hypertension in this model. Long-term (11-12 weeks and short-term (3 weeks effects of oxonic acid induced hyperuricemia were studied in rats (OA, 750 mg/kg BW, OA+Allopurinol (AP, 150 mg/L drinking water, OA+Tempol (T, 15 mg/kg BW, or vehicle. Systolic blood pressure, renal blood flow, and vascular resistance were measured. Tubular damage (urine N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase and oxidative stress markers (lipid and protein oxidation along with ATP levels were determined in kidney tissue. Oxygen consumption, aconitase activity, and uric acid were evaluated in isolated mitochondria from renal cortex. Short-term hyperuricemia resulted in hypertension without demonstrable renal oxidative stress or mitochondrial dysfunction. Long-term hyperuricemia induced hypertension, renal vasoconstriction, tubular damage, renal cortex oxidative stress, and mitochondrial dysfunction and decreased ATP levels. Treatments with Tempol and allopurinol prevented these alterations. Renal oxidative stress induced by hyperuricemia promoted mitochondrial functional disturbances and decreased ATP content, which represent an additional pathogenic mechanism induced by chronic hyperuricemia. Hyperuricemia-related hypertension occurs before these changes are evident.

  20. Soil chemical properties, organic reserves and root system of a degraded pasture associated introduction of legume

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Eduardo Santos Fabrice; Cecílio Viega Soares Filho; Marcos Franke Pinto; Silvia Helena Venturoli Perri; Ulysses Cecato; Gustavo Pavan Mateus

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to study the recovery of degraded pasture with the introduction of Stylosanthes macrocephala e capitata cv. Campo Grande on Brachiaria decumbens cv. Basilisk evaluating the levels N-total in roots, biomass, area, and length, diameter and root levels of macro and micronutrients in the soil. The experiment was conducted in the municipality of Andradina, São Paulo State, Brazil. The experimental design was a randomized block design in a split-plot (with and without phosphorus), with ...

  1. The Effect of Three Irrigants on the Coronal Leakage of the Root Canals System Irrigants

    OpenAIRE

    Zare Jahromi, Maryam; Barekatain, Mehrdad; Ebrahimi, Maziar; Askari, Bahare

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The production of smear layer during canal instrumentation is thought to increase coronal microleakage even after canal obturation. Previous studies have shown that the type of irrigant does not necessarily affect the seal of the obturation. Our study aimed to evaluate the effect of three irrigation solutions (MTAD, citric acid and EDTA/NaOCl) on the coronal microleakage of root canals. MATERIALS AND METHODS Fifty five intact single rooted teeth were instrumented and randomly div...

  2. Root-microbe systems: the effect and mode of interaction of Stress Protecting Agent (SPA Stenotrophomonas rhizophila DSM14405T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peyman eAlavi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Stenotrophomonas rhizophila has great potential for applications in biotechnology and biological control due to its ability to both promote plant growth and protect roots against biotic and a-biotic stresses, yet little is known about the mode of interactions in the root-environment system. We studied mechanisms associated with osmotic stress using transcriptomic and microscopic approaches. In response to salt and root extracts, the transcriptome of S. rhizophila DSM14405T changed drastically. We found a notably similar response for several functional gene groups responsible for general stress protection, energy production, and cell motility. However, unique changes in the transcriptome were also observed: the negative regulation of flagella-coding genes together with the up-regulation of the genes responsible for biofilm formation and alginate biosynthesis were identified as a single mechanism of S. rhizophila DSM14405T against salt shock. However, production and excretion of glucosylglycerol (GG were found as a remarkable mechanism for the stress protection of this Stenotrophomonas strain. For S. rhizophila treated with root exudates, the shift from the planktonic lifestyle to a sessile one was measured as expressed in the down-regulation of flagellar-driven motility. These findings fit well with the observed positive regulation of host colonization genes and microscopic images that show different colonization patterns of oilseed rape roots. Spermidine, described as a plant growth regulator, was also newly identified as a protector against stress. Overall, we identified mechanisms of Stenotrophomonas to protect roots against osmotic stress in the environment. In addition to both the changes in life style and energy metabolism, phytohormons and osmoprotectants were also found to play a key role in stress protection.

  3. Social isolation impairs adult neurogenesis in the limbic system and alters behaviors in female prairie voles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberwirth, Claudia; Liu, Yan; Jia, Xixi; Wang, Zuoxin

    2012-09-01

    Disruptions in the social environment, such as social isolation, are distressing and can induce various behavioral and neural changes in the distressed animal. We conducted a series of experiments to test the hypothesis that long-term social isolation affects brain plasticity and alters behavior in the highly social prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster). In Experiment 1, adult female prairie voles were injected with a cell division marker, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU), and then same-sex pair-housed (control) or single-housed (isolation) for 6 weeks. Social isolation reduced cell proliferation, survival, and neuronal differentiation and altered cell death in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and the amygdala. In addition, social isolation reduced cell proliferation in the medial preoptic area and cell survival in the ventromedial hypothalamus. These data suggest that long-term social isolation affects distinct stages of adult neurogenesis in specific limbic brain regions. In Experiment 2, isolated females displayed higher levels of anxiety-like behaviors in both the open field and elevated plus maze tests and higher levels of depression-like behavior in the forced swim test than controls. Further, isolated females showed a higher level of affiliative behavior than controls, but the two groups did not differ in social recognition memory. Together, our data suggest that social isolation not only impairs cell proliferation, survival, and neuronal differentiation in limbic brain areas, but also alters anxiety-like, depression-like, and affiliative behaviors in adult female prairie voles. These data warrant further investigation of a possible link between altered neurogenesis within the limbic system and behavioral changes.

  4. Gray value differences to dentin of root posts radiographed with digital intraoral systems and conventional X-ray films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicht, S; Pfeiffer, P; Rother, U; Nergiz, I; Schmage, P

    2011-01-01

    This study compared the gray value differences to dentin of titanium and FRC root posts in anterior and posterior teeth radiographed with digital intraoral systems and conventional x-ray film. Radiographic images (n=5) of titanium or fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) root posts placed in extracted teeth were taken with six digital intraoral radiographic devices and conventional x-ray film (control group). Gray value differences were evaluated between the root posts and root dentin. Statistical analyses of the results were performed with three-way and one-way ANOVA with Bonferroni-Dunn's multiple comparisons post-hoc analyses (α=0.05). Significantly higher gray value differences of titanium and FRC posts were found in anterior teeth but not in molars for XIOS, Sidexis and Visualix digital intraoral systems, but not for RVG, DenOptix and VistaScan (FRC posts). Except for DenOptix with incisors and molars and VistaScan with molars, conventional x-ray films showed significantly lower gray value differences of titanium posts in incisors and molars compared to the corresponding digital radiographs.

  5. 丛枝菌根真菌对限根栽培枳生长和根系构型的影响%Effects of Mycorrhizal Fungi on Growth and Root System Architecture of Trifoliate Orange under Root Restriction Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张艺灿; 赵思; 邹英宁; 吴强盛

    2014-01-01

    The effects of mycorrhizal fungi including Glomus mosseae and Paraglomus occultum on growth and root system ar-chitecture of trifoliate orange under root restriction conditions were studied. Results showed that the two arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi significantly increased plant height, stem diameter, leaf number, the number of 1st, 2nd, and 3rd lateral roots, root sur-face area, root projected area, root volume, and root total length (mainly 0~3 cm size length). G. mosseae exhibited better ef-fects than P. occultum did.%在限根栽培条件下,研究丛枝菌根真菌摩西球囊霉(Glomus mosseae)和隐类球囊霉(Paraglomus occultum)对枳(Poncirus trifoliata)生长和根系构型的影响。结果表明,2种菌根真菌在限根栽培下均显著提高了枳株高、茎粗、叶片数,以及一级、二级和三级侧根数,也增加了根系投影面积、表面积、体积和总长(主要是0~3 cm 的根长),且 G.mosseae 的促进效果优于 P.occultum。

  6. A comparative evaluation of the increase in root canal surface area and canal transportation in curved root canals by three rotary systems: A cone-beam computed tomographic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasanthi, Nalam NVD; Rambabu, Tanikonda; Sajjan, Girija S; Varma, K Madhu; Satish, R Kalyan; Padmaja, M

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to measure the increase in root canal surface area and canal transportation after biomechanical preparation at 1, 3, and 5 mm short of the apex with three different rotary systems in both continuous rotary and reciprocating rotary motions. Materials and Methods: Sixty freshly extracted human mandibular molars with mesial root canal curvatures between 20° and 30° were included in the study. Teeth were randomly distributed into three groups (n = 20). Biomechanical preparations were done in all the mesial canals. In Group 1, instrumentation was done with ProTaper universal rotary files, Group 2, with K3XF rotary files, and Group 3, with LSX rotary files. Each group was further subdivided into subgroups A and B (n = 10) where instrumentation was done by continuous rotary and reciprocating rotary techniques, respectively. Increase in root canal surface area and canal transportation was measured using the preoperative and postoperative cone-beam computed tomography scans. Statistical Analysis: The data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey pairwise multiple comparison tests. Results: Increase in root canal surface area was significantly more (P 0.05) in increase of root canal surface area and canal transportation between continuous rotary and reciprocating rotary techniques for ProTaper Universal, K3XF and LSX groups. Conclusion: LSX rotary system showed minimal increase of root canal surface area and minimal canal transportation when compared to ProTaper and K3XF rotary systems. PMID:27656062

  7. Alterations in Co2 fixation enzymes, Phosphatase Activity and Endogenous Phytohormones in P-deficient Callus induced from phloem of carrot (Daccus Carota) Roots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A carrot callus liquid medium culture experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of P-deficiency on cellular responses separate from the whole plant response. Carrot (Daccus carota L.) callus was induced from the secondary phloem of the tap root. When explants were supplied with one-tenth the amount of Pi supplied to control explants (40 ppm), the concentration of P in callus was reduced by about 68% in a period of three weeks. This reduction in callus P was correlated with 48% reduction in callus fresh and dry weights. This effect was mediated through a reduction in cell number/callus by 48%. Meanwhile, the cell number/mg f.wt. of callus tissue was not affected in P-deficient treatment comparing to P-sufficient one, which might refer to a direct role of P-deficiency on the reduction of cell division. Although total N and soluble protein concentrations were not affected in P-deficient callus, chlorophyll concentration was reduced. In addition higher activity of acid phosphatase was obtained in P-deficient tissue reaching about 41% over its activity in P-sufficient callus which in turn could increase recycling process of P to spare available P for the newly formed cells. This was supported by the higher value of P utilization efficiency (d.wt. produced per unit P taken up) obtained from P-deficient callus

  8. Alterations of the Danger Zone after Preparation of Curved Root Canals Using WaveOne with Reverse Rotation or Reciprocation Movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shantiaee, Yazdan; Dianat, Omid; Paymanpour, Payam; Nahvi, Golnaz; Ketabi, Mohammad Ali; Kolahi Ahari, Golbarg

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to compare the changes that occur in the danger zone (DZ) after preparation of curved mesiobuccal (MB) canals of mandibular first molars with WaveOne instruments in two different movements [reciprocation (RCP) and counter-clockwise rotation (CCWR)] by means of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods and Materials: MB canals of 30 mandibular molars were randomly divided into 2 groups (n=15); WaveOne/RCP and WaveOne/CCWR. Pre- and post-instrumentation CBCT images were assessed for changes in the dentin thickness in DZ (2 and 4 mm below the highest point of the root furcation) in both groups. Data was analyzed using the repeated measures ANOVA test. Results: There was no statistically significant difference between two experimental groups in terms of remaining dentin thickness at 2 and 4 mm levels below the highest point of the furcation (P>0.05). Conclusion: The efficacy of WaveOne instrument on changes of the dentin thickness in the DZ was not affected by different file movements. PMID:26213536

  9. Root anatomical phenes predict root penetration ability and biomechanical properties in maize (Zea Mays)

    OpenAIRE

    Chimungu, Joseph G.; Loades, Kenneth W.; Lynch, Jonathan P.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of roots to penetrate hard soil is important for crop productivity but specific root phenes contributing to this ability are poorly understood. Root penetrability and biomechanical properties are likely to vary in the root system dependent on anatomical structure. No information is available to date on the influence of root anatomical phenes on root penetrability and biomechanics. Root penetration ability was evaluated using a wax layer system. Root tensile and bending strength we...

  10. Tank waste remediation system optimized processing strategy with an altered treatment scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides an alternative strategy evolved from the current Hanford Site Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) programmatic baseline for accomplishing the treatment and disposal of the Hanford Site tank wastes. This optimized processing strategy with an altered treatment scheme performs the major elements of the TWRS Program, but modifies the deployment of selected treatment technologies to reduce the program cost. The present program for development of waste retrieval, pretreatment, and vitrification technologies continues, but the optimized processing strategy reuses a single facility to accomplish the separations/low-activity waste (LAW) vitrification and the high-level waste (HLW) vitrification processes sequentially, thereby eliminating the need for a separate HLW vitrification facility

  11. Tank waste remediation system optimized processing strategy with an altered treatment scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slaathaug, E.J.

    1996-03-01

    This report provides an alternative strategy evolved from the current Hanford Site Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) programmatic baseline for accomplishing the treatment and disposal of the Hanford Site tank wastes. This optimized processing strategy with an altered treatment scheme performs the major elements of the TWRS Program, but modifies the deployment of selected treatment technologies to reduce the program cost. The present program for development of waste retrieval, pretreatment, and vitrification technologies continues, but the optimized processing strategy reuses a single facility to accomplish the separations/low-activity waste (LAW) vitrification and the high-level waste (HLW) vitrification processes sequentially, thereby eliminating the need for a separate HLW vitrification facility.

  12. Quantitative measurements of root water uptake and root hydraulic conductivities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarebanadkouki, Mohsen; Javaux, Mathieu; Meunier, Felicien; Couvreur, Valentin; Carminati, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    How is root water uptake distributed along the root system and what root properties control this distribution? Here we present a method to: 1) measure root water uptake and 2) inversely estimate the root hydraulic conductivities. The experimental method consists in using neutron radiography to trace deuterated water (D2O) in soil and roots. The method was applied to lupines grown aluminium containers filled with a sandy soil. When the lupines were 4 weeks old, D2O was locally injected in a selected soil regions and its transport was monitored in soil and roots using time-series neutron radiography. By image processing, we quantified the concentration of D2O in soil and roots. We simulated the transport of D2O into roots using a diffusion-convection numerical model. The diffusivity of the roots tissue was inversely estimated by simulating the transport of D2O into the roots during night. The convective fluxes (i.e. root water uptake) were inversely estimating by fitting the experiments during day, when plants were transpiring, and assuming that root diffusivity did not change. The results showed that root water uptake was not uniform along the roots. Water uptake was higher at the proximal parts of the lateral roots and it decreased by a factor of 10 towards the distal parts. We used the data of water fluxes to inversely estimate the profile of hydraulic conductivities along the roots of transpiring plants growing in soil. The water fluxes in the lupine roots were simulated using the Hydraulic Tree Model by Doussan et al. (1998). The fitting parameters to be adjusted were the radial and axial hydraulic conductivities of the roots. The results showed that by using the root architectural model of Doussan et al. (1998) and detailed information of water fluxes into different root segments we could estimate the profile of hydraulic conductivities along the roots. We also found that: 1) in a tap-rooted plant like lupine water is mostly taken up by lateral roots; (2) water

  13. Investigations of the Effects of Altered Vestibular System Function on Hindlimb Anti-Gravity Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, Mary Sue

    1998-01-01

    Exposure to different gravitational environments, both the microgravity of spaceflight and the hypergravity of centrifugation, result in altered vestibulo-spinal function which can be reversed by reacclimation to earth gravity (2). Control of orientation, posture, and locomotion are functions of the vestibular system which are altered by changes in gravitational environment. Not only is the vestibular system involved with coordination and proprioception, but the gravity sensing portion of the vestibular system also plays a major role in maintaining muscle tone through projections to spinal cord motoneurons that control anti-gravity muscles. I have been involved with investigations of several aspects of the link between vestibular inputs and muscle morphology and function during my work with Dr. Nancy Daunton this summer and the previous summer. We have prepared a manuscript for submission (4) to Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine based on work that I performed last summer in Dr. Daunton's lab. Techniques developed for that project will be utilized in subsequent experiments begun in the summer of 1998. I have been involved with the development of a pilot project to test the effects of vestibular galvanic stimulation (VGS) on anti-gravity muscles and in another project testing the effects of the ototoxic drug streptomycin on the otolith-spinal reflex and anti-gravity muscle morphology.

  14. Techniques for Fault Detection and Visualization of Telemetry Dependence Relationships for Root Cause Fault Analysis in Complex Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, Nathaniel

    This thesis explores new ways of looking at telemetry data, from a time-correlative perspective, in order to see patterns within the data that may suggest root causes of system faults. It was thought initially that visualizing an animated Pearson Correlation Coefficient (PCC) matrix for telemetry channels would be sufficient to give new understanding; however, testing showed that the high dimensionality and inability to easily look at change over time in this approach impeded understanding. Different correlative techniques, combined with the time curve visualization proposed by Bach et al (2015), were adapted to visualize both raw telemetry and telemetry data correlations. Review revealed that these new techniques give insights into the data, and an intuitive grasp of data families, which show the effectiveness of this approach for enhancing system understanding and assisting with root cause analysis for complex aerospace systems.

  15. Cone-beam computed tomography analysis of the apical third of curved roots after mechanical preparation with different automated systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Cesar Augusto Pereira; Pascoalato, Cristina [University of Southern Santa Catarina (UNISUL), Tubarao, SC (Brazil); Meurer, Maria Ines [Federal University of Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Silva, Silvio Rocha Correa, E-mail: silvio@foar.unesp.b [Sao Paulo State University (UNESP), Araraquara, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The present study evaluated by cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) the apical canal transportation and centralizing ability of different automated systems after root canal preparation. The mesiobuccal canals of maxillary first molars (n=10 per group) were prepared with: GI - reciprocating system with K-Flexofile; GII - reciprocating system with NiTiFlex files; GIII - rotary system with K3 instruments; GIV - rotary system with RaCe instruments. CBCT scans were taken before and after biomechanical preparation up to a 40.02 diameter. Canal transportation was determined by measuring the smallest distance between the inner canal walls and the mesial and distal sides of the root. The centralization ability corresponded to the difference between the measurements from transportation evaluation, using the linear voxel to voxel method of analysis. The mean transportation was 0.06 +- 0.14 mm, with a tendency to deviate to the mesial side of the root (n=22), with no statistically significant difference among the groups (p=0.4153). The mean centralization index was 0.15 +- 0.65 also without statistically significant difference among the groups (p=0.0881). It may be concluded that apical canal transportation and centralization ability were not influenced by the type of mechanical movement and instruments used. (author)

  16. Soil transfers from valley oak (Quercus lobata Nee) stands increase ectomycorrhizal diversity and alter root and shoot growth on valley oak seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, J T; Bledsoe, C S

    1998-02-01

    Soils from valley oak (Quercus lobata Nee) riparian areas of the Cosumnes River Nature Conservancy Preserve near Sacramento, California were added to growth medium of valley oak seedlings grown in a greenhouse or in agricultural fields at Cosumnes which probably once supported valley oak trees and are now replanted with native riparian vegetation or allowed to revegetate naturally. Agricultural field soil from the Cosumnes River Preserve was presumed to be low or lacking in ectomycorrhizal inoculum. The study was designed to (1) determine whether valley oak stand soil transfer could cause mycorrhizal infection on valley oak seedlings in an agricultural field and in a greenhouse, (2) describe ectomycorrhizal morphological types formed on valley oak seedlings, and (3) determine whether seedling growth is enhanced more by transfer of natural valley oak stand soil than agricultural field soil. In the field study, transfer of forest soil increased average ectomycorrhizal diversity (2.4 types) more than transfer of agricultural field soil (1.2 types). Valley oak seedlings were responsive to ectomycorrhizal infection in the field study. With increase in mycorrhizal infection there was an increase in shoot growth at the expense of root growth. In the greenhouse study, both percent mycorrhizal infection and mycorrhizal diversity were increased more by transfer of oak forest and woodland soils than agricultural field soil. Eight morphotypes occurred on seedlings in forest and woodland soils but only three morphotypes in agricultural soil. This result strongly suggests that the agricultural field also harbors ectomycorrhizal propagules but forest and woodland soils support a more abundant and diverse ectomycorrhizal flora. PMID:24578047

  17. The biocontrol endophytic bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens PICF7 induces systemic defense responses in aerial tissues upon colonization of olive roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen eGómez-Lama Cabanás

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas fluorescens PICF7, a native olive root endophyte and effective biocontrol agent (BCA against Verticillium wilt of olive, is able to trigger a broad range of defense responses in root tissues of this woody plant. In order to elucidate whether strain PICF7 also induces systemic defense responses in above-ground organs, aerial tissues of olive plants grown under non-gnotobiotic conditions were collected at different time points after root bacterization with this endophytic BCA. A suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH cDNA library, enriched in up-regulated genes, was generated. This strategy enabled the identification of 376 ESTs (99 contigs and 277 singlets, many of them related to response to different stresses. Five ESTs, involved in defense responses, were selected to carry out time-course quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR experiments aiming to: (i validate the induction of these genes, and (ii shed light on their expression pattern along time (from 1 to 15 days. Induction of olive genes potentially coding for lypoxigenase 2, catalase, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase and phenylananine ammonia-lyase was thus confirmed at some time points. Computational analysis also revealed that different transcription factors were up-regulated in olive aerial tissues (i.e. jerf, bHLH, WRKYs, as previously reported for roots. Results confirmed that root colonization by this endophytic bacterium does not only trigger defense responses in this organ but also mount a wide array of systemic defense responses in distant tissues (stems, leaves. This sheds light on how olive plants respond to the ‘non-hostile’ colonization by a bacterial endophyte and how induced defense response can contribute to the biocontrol activity of strain PICF7.

  18. Assessing the role of deep rooted vegetation in the climate system with model simulations: mechanism, comparison to observations and implications for Amazonian deforestation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleidon, A.; Heimann, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Meteorologie, Hamburg (Germany)

    2000-02-01

    Deep rooted vegetation (of up to 68 m) has been found in many parts of the tropics. However, models of the general atmospheric circulation (GCMs) typically use rooting depths of less than 2 m in their land surface parametrizations. How does the incorporation of deep roots into such a model affect the simulated climate? We assess this question by using a GCM and find that deeper roots lead to a pronounced seasonal response. During the dry season, evapotranspiration and the associated latent heat flux are considerably increased over large regions leading to a cooling of up to 8 K. The enhanced atmospheric moisture is transported towards the main convection areas in the inner tropical convergence zone where it supplies more energy to convection thus intensifying the tropical circulation patterns. Comparison to different kinds of data reveals that the simulation with deeper roots is much closer to observations. The inclusion of deep roots also leads to a general increased climatic sensitivity to rooting depth change. We investigate this aspect in the context of the climatic effects of large-scale deforestation in Amazonia. Most of the regional and remote changes can be attributed to the removal of deep roots. We conclude that deep rooted vegetation is an important part of the tropical climate system. Without the consideration of deep roots, the present-day surface climate cannot adequately be simulated. (orig.)

  19. Huanglongbing, a systemic disease, restructures the bacterial community associated with citrus roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Pankaj; Duan, Yongping; Wang, Nian

    2010-06-01

    To examine the effect of pathogens on the diversity and structure of plant-associated bacterial communities, we carried out a molecular analysis using citrus and huanglongbing as a host-disease model. 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis of citrus roots revealed shifts in microbial diversity in response to pathogen infection. The clone library of the uninfected root samples has a majority of phylotypes showing similarity to well-known plant growth-promoting bacteria, including Caulobacter, Burkholderia, Lysobacter, Pantoea, Pseudomonas, Stenotrophomonas, Bacillus, and Paenibacillus. Infection by "Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus" restructured the native microbial community associated with citrus roots and led to the loss of detection of most phylotypes while promoting the growth of bacteria such as Methylobacterium and Sphingobacterium. In pairwise comparisons, the clone library from uninfected roots contained significantly higher 16S rRNA gene diversity, as reflected in the higher Chao 1 richness estimation (P citrus by "Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus" has a profound effect on the structure and composition of the bacterial community associated with citrus roots.

  20. Proteomic profiling analysis reveals that glutathione system plays important roles responding to osmotic stress in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jianhui; Dong, Wen; Zhang, Daijing; Gao, Xiaolong; Jiang, Lina; Shao, Yun; Tong, Doudou; Li, Chunxi

    2016-01-01

    Wheat is one of the most important crops in the world, and osmotic stress has become one of the main factors affecting wheat production. Understanding the mechanism of the response of wheat to osmotic stress would be greatly significant. In the present study, isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) was used to analyze the changes of protein expression in the wheat roots exposed to different osmotic stresses. A total of 2,228 expressed proteins, including 81 differentially expressed proteins, between osmotic stress and control, were found. The comprehensive analysis of these differentially expressed proteins revealed that osmotic stress increased the variety of expressed proteins and suppressed the quantity of expressed proteins in wheat roots. Furthermore, the proteins for detoxifying and reactive oxygen species scavenging, especially the glutathione system, played important roles in maintaining organism balance in response to osmotic stress in wheat roots. Thus, the present study comprehensively describes the protein expression changes in wheat roots in response to osmotic stress, providing firmer foundation to further study the mechanism of osmotic resistance in wheat. PMID:27602297

  1. Root controls on water redistribution and carbon uptake in the soil-plant system under current and future climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, V.; Marani, M.; Albertson, J. D.; Katul, G.

    2013-10-01

    Understanding photosynthesis and plant water management as a coupled process remains an open scientific problem. Current eco-hydrologic models characteristically describe plant photosynthetic and hydraulic processes through ad hoc empirical parameterizations with no explicit accounting for the main pathways over which carbon and water uptake interact. Here, a soil-plant-atmosphere continuum model is proposed that mechanistically couples photosynthesis and transpiration rates, including the main leaf physiological controls exerted by stomata. The proposed approach links the soil-to-leaf hydraulic transport to stomatal regulation, and closes the coupled photosynthesis-transpiration problem by maximizing leaf carbon gain subject to a water loss constraint. The approach is evaluated against field data from a grass site and is shown to reproduce the main features of soil moisture dynamics and hydraulic redistribution. In particular, it is shown that the differential soil drying produced by diurnal root water uptake drives a significant upward redistribution of moisture both through a conventional Darcian flow and through the root system, consistent with observations. In a numerical soil drying experiment, it is demonstrated that more than 50% of diurnal transpiration is supplied by nocturnal upward water redistribution, and some 12% is provided directly through root hydraulic redistribution. For a prescribed leaf area density, the model is then used to diagnose how elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration and increased air temperature jointly impact soil moisture, transpiration, photosynthesis, and whole-plant water use efficiency, along with compensatory mechanisms such as hydraulic lift using several canonical forms of root-density distribution.

  2. Oral drug delivery systems comprising altered geometric configurations for controlled drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moodley, Kovanya; Pillay, Viness; Choonara, Yahya E; du Toit, Lisa C; Ndesendo, Valence M K; Kumar, Pradeep; Cooppan, Shivaan; Bawa, Priya

    2012-01-01

    Recent pharmaceutical research has focused on controlled drug delivery having an advantage over conventional methods. Adequate controlled plasma drug levels, reduced side effects as well as improved patient compliance are some of the benefits that these systems may offer. Controlled delivery systems that can provide zero-order drug delivery have the potential for maximizing efficacy while minimizing dose frequency and toxicity. Thus, zero-order drug release is ideal in a large area of drug delivery which has therefore led to the development of various technologies with such drug release patterns. Systems such as multilayered tablets and other geometrically altered devices have been created to perform this function. One of the principles of multilayered tablets involves creating a constant surface area for release. Polymeric materials play an important role in the functioning of these systems. Technologies developed to date include among others: Geomatrix(®) multilayered tablets, which utilizes specific polymers that may act as barriers to control drug release; Procise(®), which has a core with an aperture that can be modified to achieve various types of drug release; core-in-cup tablets, where the core matrix is coated on one surface while the circumference forms a cup around it; donut-shaped devices, which possess a centrally-placed aperture hole and Dome Matrix(®) as well as "release modules assemblage", which can offer alternating drug release patterns. This review discusses the novel altered geometric system technologies that have been developed to provide controlled drug release, also focusing on polymers that have been employed in such developments. PMID:22312236

  3. Alterations in Central Nervous System Serotonergic and Dopaminergic Synaptic Activity in Adulthood after Prenatal or Neonatal Chlorpyrifos Exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Aldridge, Justin E; Meyer, Armando; Seidler, Frederic J; Slotkin, Theodore A.

    2005-01-01

    Exposure to chlorpyrifos (CPF) alters neuronal development of serotonin (5HT) and dopamine systems, and we recently found long-term alterations in behaviors related to 5HT function. To characterize the synaptic mechanisms underlying these effects, we exposed developing rats to CPF regimens below the threshold for systemic toxicity, in three treatment windows: gestational days (GD) 17–20, postnatal days (PN) 1–4, or PN11–14. In early adulthood (PN60), we assessed basal neurotransmitter content...

  4. Effects of 24-Epibrassinolide on Antioxidant System in Cucumber Seedling Roots Under Hypoxia Stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KANG Yun-yan; GUO Shi-rong; LI Juan; DUAN Jiu-ju

    2007-01-01

    This article aims to study the effects of exogenous 24-epibrassinolide (EBR) on the changes in ROS, activities of antioxidative enzymes and antioxidants in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) seedling roots under hypoxia stress. Seedlings of a hypoxianormoxic or hypoxic nutrient solutions that were added or not added with 10-3 mg L-1 EBR. Under hypoxia stress, the ROS levels and the lipid peroxidation were significantly increased in the roots upon exposure to hypoxia stress, which were inhibited by EBR application. The EBR treatment significantly increased the seedlings growth and SOD, APX, GR activities, and contents of AsA and GSH under hypoxia stress. From the results obtained in this study, it can be concluded that oxidative damage on seedling roots by hypoxia stress can be considerably alleviated and the tolerance of plants was elevated.

  5. [Low-cost simple anchorage systems in the removable hybrid prosthesis. Locator Root Attachment and Würzburg post].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teubner, Eckart; Galindo, Martha L; Arnold, Dario; Marinello, Carlo P

    2009-01-01

    For a simple and provisional retention of a removable prosthesis, less expensive direct retainers are an option compared to indirect cast gold copings with attachment. The Dalbo-Rotex-retainer and the Ticap-system are clinically established. The Locator Root attachment and the Würzburger Stift were recently introduced. The Locator Root attachment uses a massive profiled cylindrical post as a radicular anchorage. The Würzburger Stift has a small endodontic part which is retained by four spreadable lamellae in a convergent cavity. They further differ in the design of the male and female part. Depending on the clinical situation these characteristics can offer benefits and disadvantages. Both systems are documented and their indication, advantages and restrictions are discussed with clinical relevance. PMID:20112639

  6. [Low-cost simple anchorage systems in the removable hybrid prosthesis. Locator Root Attachment and Würzburg post].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teubner, Eckart; Galindo, Martha L; Arnold, Dario; Marinello, Carlo P

    2009-01-01

    For a simple and provisional retention of a removable prosthesis, less expensive direct retainers are an option compared to indirect cast gold copings with attachment. The Dalbo-Rotex-retainer and the Ticap-system are clinically established. The Locator Root attachment and the Würzburger Stift were recently introduced. The Locator Root attachment uses a massive profiled cylindrical post as a radicular anchorage. The Würzburger Stift has a small endodontic part which is retained by four spreadable lamellae in a convergent cavity. They further differ in the design of the male and female part. Depending on the clinical situation these characteristics can offer benefits and disadvantages. Both systems are documented and their indication, advantages and restrictions are discussed with clinical relevance.

  7. [Comparative assessment of inductive effects of Azospirillum lectins with different antigenic properties on the signal systems of wheat seedling roots].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alen'kina, S A; Petrova, L P; Sokolova, M K; Chernyshova, M P; Trutneva, K A; Bogatyrev, V A; Nikitina, V E

    2014-01-01

    The lectins of associative nitrogen-fixing bacteria Azospirillum brasilense Sp7 and its mutant A. brasilense Sp7.2.3 were shown to have different effects on the components of the wheat seedling root signal system, namely to regulate the levels of cAMP, nitric oxide, diacylglycerol, and salicylic acid, as well as to induce the activities of superoxide dismutase and lipoxygenase. Our results make it possible to consider azospirilla lectins as inducers of the signal systems in wheat seedling roots, since they cause development of several flows of primary signals. These data are of general biological importance, since lectins are present in all living organisms and most ot the functions of lectins remain insufficiently understood.

  8. Coconut irrigation water saving as a function of areas of the concentration of the root system and soil cover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Lucia Antunes de Lima

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The Brazilian production of coconut has not been sufficient to attend the internal market demand which has resulted in great importations of dry and semi industrialized coconut (IBGE, 2006. The northeast of Brazil has the greatest coconut production and is, at the same time, characterized for its high evapotranspiration demand and the lowest precipitation, therefore, it is necessary to optimize the irrigation water used. During the development phase of the coconut tree, most of the root system concentrates around 1m of radius, and in the adult phase, in larger part, to a radius up to 2m. The traditional procedure of calculation of the water volume to be applied through irrigation, normally considers the area given by the crop planting spacing and a canopy cover coefficient. This results in great volumes of water applied unnecessarily. To save water, this study investigates the calculation of the volume of irrigation water considering the areas where larger concentration of the root system occurs. For the first year of development of the coconut tree, four areas of irrigation delimited by rings of zinc with diameters of 0.7 m, 0.8, 0.9 and 1.0 m were used to irrigate the portion with the larger concentration of the root system, and two conditions of soil covering (covered and bare soil, plus a control (4 x 2 + 1, resulting in nine treatments with three repetitions, totaling 27 plots. The procedure proposed in this research for the calculation of the water volume to be applied in the coconut crop, based on areas of larger concentration of the root system, promoted considerable economy of water, in relation to the procedure traditionally used. The isolation of the soil surface in order to avoid the evaporation contributed to a substantial reduction of the applied volume of water as well.

  9. Minimal Apical Enlargement for Penetration of Irrigants to the Apical Third of Root Canal System: A Scanning Electron Microscope Study

    OpenAIRE

    P. Srikanth; Krishna, Amaravadi Gopi; Srinivas, Siva; Reddy, E Sujayeendranatha; Battu, Someshwar; Aravelli, Swathi

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to determine minimal apical enlargement for irrigant penetration into apical third of root canal system using scanning electron microscope (SEM). Materials and Methods: Distobuccal canals of 40 freshly extracted human maxillary first molar teeth were instrumented using crown-down technique. The teeth were divided into four test groups according to size of their master apical file (MAF) (#20, #25, #30, #35 0.06% taper), and two control groups. After final ...

  10. Trypanosoma cruzi disrupts thymic homeostasis by altering intrathymic and systemic stress-related endocrine circuitries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ailin Lepletier

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that experimental infection caused by Trypanosoma cruzi is associated with changes in the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis. Increased glucocorticoid (GC levels are believed to be protective against the effects of acute stress during infection but result in depletion of CD4(+CD8(+ thymocytes by apoptosis, driving to thymic atrophy. However, very few data are available concerning prolactin (PRL, another stress-related hormone, which seems to be decreased during T. cruzi infection. Considering the immunomodulatory role of PRL upon the effects caused by GC, we investigated if intrathymic cross-talk between GC and PRL receptors (GR and PRLR, respectively might influence T. cruzi-induced thymic atrophy. Using an acute experimental model, we observed changes in GR/PRLR cross-activation related with the survival of CD4(+CD8(+ thymocytes during infection. These alterations were closely related with systemic changes, characterized by a stress hormone imbalance, with progressive GC augmentation simultaneously to PRL reduction. The intrathymic hormone circuitry exhibited an inverse modulation that seemed to counteract the GC-related systemic deleterious effects. During infection, adrenalectomy protected the thymus from the increase in apoptosis ratio without changing PRL levels, whereas an additional inhibition of circulating PRL accelerated the thymic atrophy and led to an increase in corticosterone systemic levels. These results demonstrate that the PRL impairment during infection is not caused by the increase of corticosterone levels, but the opposite seems to occur. Accordingly, metoclopramide (MET-induced enhancement of PRL secretion protected thymic atrophy in acutely infected animals as well as the abnormal export of immature and potentially autoreactive CD4(+CD8(+ thymocytes to the periphery. In conclusion, our findings clearly show that Trypanosoma cruzi subverts mouse thymus homeostasis by altering intrathymic and

  11. Capturing Arabidopsis Root Architecture Dynamics with root-fit Reveals Diversity in Responses to Salinity1[W][OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julkowska, Magdalena M.; Hoefsloot, Huub C.J.; Mol, Selena; Feron, Richard; de Boer, Gert-Jan; Haring, Michel A.; Testerink, Christa

    2014-01-01

    The plant root is the first organ to encounter salinity stress, but the effect of salinity on root system architecture (RSA) remains elusive. Both the reduction in main root (MR) elongation and the redistribution of the root mass between MRs and lateral roots (LRs) are likely to play crucial roles in water extraction efficiency and ion exclusion. To establish which RSA parameters are responsive to salt stress, we performed a detailed time course experiment in which Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings were grown on agar plates under different salt stress conditions. We captured RSA dynamics with quadratic growth functions (root-fit) and summarized the salt-induced differences in RSA dynamics in three growth parameters: MR elongation, average LR elongation, and increase in number of LRs. In the ecotype Columbia-0 accession of Arabidopsis, salt stress affected MR elongation more severely than LR elongation and an increase in LRs, leading to a significantly altered RSA. By quantifying RSA dynamics of 31 different Arabidopsis accessions in control and mild salt stress conditions, different strategies for regulation of MR and LR meristems and root branching were revealed. Different RSA strategies partially correlated with natural variation in abscisic acid sensitivity and different Na+/K+ ratios in shoots of seedlings grown under mild salt stress. Applying root-fit to describe the dynamics of RSA allowed us to uncover the natural diversity in root morphology and cluster it into four response types that otherwise would have been overlooked. PMID:25271266

  12. Clifford algebra is the natural framework for root systems and Coxeter groups. Group theory: Coxeter, conformal and modular groups

    CERN Document Server

    Dechant, Pierre-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we make the case that Clifford algebra is the natural framework for root systems and reflection groups, as well as related groups such as the conformal and modular groups: The metric that exists on these spaces can always be used to construct the corresponding Clifford algebra. Via the Cartan-Dieudonn\\'e theorem all the transformations of interest can be written as products of reflections and thus via `sandwiching' with Clifford algebra multivectors. These multivector groups can be used to perform concrete calculations in different groups, e.g. the various types of polyhedral groups, and we treat the example of the tetrahedral group $A_3$ in detail. As an aside, this gives a constructive result that induces from every 3D root system a root system in dimension four, which hinges on the facts that the group of spinors provides a double cover of the rotations, the space of 3D spinors has a 4D euclidean inner product, and with respect to this inner product the group of spinors can be shown to be cl...

  13. Root fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Christensen, Søren Steno Ahrensburg; Tsilingaridis, Georgios

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze tooth loss after root fractures and to assess the influence of the type of healing and the location of the root fracture. Furthermore, the actual cause of tooth loss was analyzed.......The purpose of this study was to analyze tooth loss after root fractures and to assess the influence of the type of healing and the location of the root fracture. Furthermore, the actual cause of tooth loss was analyzed....

  14. Square Root +

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederiksen, John G.

    1969-01-01

    A rational presentation of the so-called long division method for extracting the square root of a number. Diagrams are used to show relationship of this technique to the binomial theorem. Presentation exposes student to many facets of mathematics in addition to the mechanics of funding square root and cube root. Geometry, algebraic statements,…

  15. Genetic analysis of the gravitropic set-point angle in lateral roots of arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, J. L.; Hangarter, R. P.

    2003-05-01

    Research on gravity responses in plants has mostly focused on primary roots and shoots, which typically orient to a vertical orientation. However, the distribution of lateral organs and their characteristically non-vertical growth orientation are critical for the determination of plant form. For example, in Arabidopsis, when lateral roots emerge from the primary root, they grow at a nearly horizontal orientation. As they elongate, the roots slowly curve until they eventually reach a vertical orientation. The regulation of this lateral root orientation is an important component affecting overall root system architecture. We found that this change in orientation is not simply due to the onset of gravitropic competence, as non-vertical lateral roots are capable of both positive and negative gravitropism. Thus, the horizontal growth of new lateral roots appears to be determined by what is called the gravitropic set-point angle (GSA). This developmental control of the GSA of lateral roots in Arabidopsis provides a useful system for investigating the components involved in regulating gravitropic responses. Using this system, we have identified several Arabidopsis mutants that have altered lateral root orientations but maintain normal primary root orientation.

  16. Computer-Based Instruction: Roots, Origins, Applications, Benefits, Features, Systems, Trends and Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, Fred T.

    Dealing exclusively with instructional computing, this paper describes how computers are delivering instruction in a wide variety of subjects to students of all ages and explains why computer-based education is currently having a profound impact on education. After a discussion of roots and origins, computer applications are described for…

  17. Systems analysis of transcriptome data provides new hypotheses about Arabidopsis root response to nitrate treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier eCanales

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen (N is an essential macronutrient for plant growth and development. Plants adapt to changes in N availability partly by changes in global gene expression. We integrated publicly available root microarray data under contrasting nitrate conditions to identify new genes and functions important for adaptive nitrate responses in Arabidopsis thaliana roots. Overall, more than two thousand genes exhibited changes in expression in response to nitrate treatments in Arabidopsis thaliana root organs. Global regulation of gene expression by nitrate depends largely on the experimental context. However, despite significant differences from experiment to experiment in the identity of regulated genes, there is a robust nitrate response of specific biological functions. Integrative gene network analysis uncovered relationships between nitrate-responsive genes and eleven highly co-expressed gene clusters (modules. Four of these gene network modules have robust nitrate responsive functions such as transport, signaling and metabolism. Network analysis hypothesized G2-like transcription factors are key regulatory factors controlling transport and signaling functions. Our meta-analysis highlights the role of biological processes not studied before in the context of the nitrate response such as root hair development and provides testable hypothesis to advance our understanding of nitrate responses in plants.

  18. Echium acanthocarpum hairy root cultures, a suitable system for polyunsaturated fatty acid studies and production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravelo Ángel G

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The therapeutic and health promoting role of highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFAs from fish, i.e. eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3 and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3 are well known. These same benefits may however be shared by some of their precursors, the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs, such as stearidonic acid (SDA, 18:4 n-3. In order to obtain alternative sources for the large-scale production of PUFAs, new searches are being conducted focusing on higher plants oils which can contain these n-3 and n-6 C18 precursors, i.e. SDA and GLA (18:3n-6, γ-linolenic acid. Results The establishment of the novel Echium acanthocarpum hairy root cultures represents a powerful tool in order to research the accumulation and metabolism of fatty acids (FAs in a plant particularly rich in GLA and SDA. Furthermore, this study constitutes the first example of a Boraginaceae species hairy root induction and establishment for FA studies and production. The dominant PUFAs, 18:2n-6 (LA, linoleic acid and 18:3n-6 (GLA, accounted for about 50% of total FAs obtained, while the n-3 PUFAs, 18:3n-3 (ALA, α-linolenic acid and 18:4n-3 (SDA, represented approximately 5% of the total. Production of FAs did not parallel hairy root growth, and the optimal productivity was always associated with the highest biomass density during the culture period. Assuming a compromise between FA production and hairy root biomass, it was determined that sampling times 4 and 5 gave the most useful FA yields. Total lipid amounts were in general comparable between the different hairy root lines (29.75 and 60.95 mg/g DW, with the major lipid classes being triacylglycerols. The FAs were chiefly stored in the hairy roots with very minute amounts being released into the liquid nutrient medium. Conclusions The novel results presented here show the utility and high potential of E. acanthocarpum hairy roots. They are capable of biosynthesizing and accumulating a large

  19. Effects of PEG-Induced Water Deficit in Solanum nigrum on Zn and Ni Uptake and Translocation in Split Root Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urs Feller

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Drought strongly influences root activities in crop plants and weeds. This paper is focused on the performance of the heavy metal accumulator Solanum nigrum, a plant which might be helpful for phytoremediation. The water potential in a split root system was decreased by the addition of polyethylene glycol (PEG 6000. Rubidium, strontium and radionuclides of heavy metals were used as markers to investigate the uptake into roots, the release to the shoot via the xylem, and finally the basipetal transport via the phloem to unlabeled roots. The uptake into the roots (total contents in the plant was for most makers more severely decreased than the transport to the shoot or the export from the shoot to the unlabeled roots via the phloem. Regardless of the water potential in the labeling solution, 63Ni and 65Zn were selectively redistributed within the plant. From autoradiographs, it became evident that 65Zn accumulated in root tips, in the apical shoot meristem and in axillary buds, while 63Ni accumulated in young expanded leaves and roots but not in the meristems. Since both radionuclides are mobile in the phloem and are, therefore, well redistributed within the plant, the unequal transfer to shoot and root apical meristems is most likely caused by differences in the cell-to-cell transport in differentiation zones without functional phloem (immature sieve tubes.

  20. ANATOMO-MORPHOLOGICAL FEUTURES OF THE ROOT CANAL SYSTEM IN GEORGIAN POPULATION - CONE-BEAM COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY STUDY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beshkenadze, E; Chipashvili, N

    2015-10-01

    Incomplete and superficial knowledge of morphological types and anatomical variations of the root canal system will become the reason leading to the failure of endodontic treatment. cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) - it is a technologically more sophisticated, interesting, reliable, non-invasive imaging technique with high degree of visualization, considered as a particularly important and useful tool to study complexity and variability of canal system. 2753 teeth of 228 patients have been studied by CT. Ages of the patients varied within 25-55 years. Among them 122 men and 106 women. Maxillary teeth - 1394 and mandibular - 1359, respectively. The aim of our study was investigation and evaluation of: tooth length, number of roots and canals, type of configuration, root canal curvature and degree of curvature in Georgian population. The results of the study revealed interesting data and anatomical characteristics, those replicating the racial signs and differs from the data recorded by the other researchers, became evident. In studying of dental form variations were interested anatomists (description and comparison) anthropologists, biologists, palaeontologists and stomatologists. The field of human dental anatomy has not been completely explored so, the modern human teeth still remain a matter of continual curiosity and research. The knowledge of anatomical characteristics of dental root canals will help clinicians to optimize the algorithm of endodontic treatment. Thus, statistic data are not the universal criterias, however, basing on these indicators anthropometrical data of roots and canals vary according to the geographic zones and nationalities. The study of variations in tooth form has interested anatomists (description and comparison), anthropologists, biologists, palaeontologists and dentists. The field of human dental anatomy has not been completely explored and the dentition of modern man still remains a matter of continual curiosity and research

  1. Production Performance of Root Systems of Four Forage Legume Species and Their Development Characteristics in Loess Plateau,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang; Jianquan; Zhang; Jiyu; Wang; Yanrong; Xie; Wengang; Li; Juncheng

    2014-01-01

    Production performance of four forage legumes species of Medicago sativa,Onobrychis viciifolia,Lotus corniculatus and Galega officinalis were determined,including plant height,above-ground biomass per unit area,tillers per unit area,fertile tillers per unit area,shoot /leaf ratio and fresh /dry matter weight ratio,and the distribution characteristics of their root systems in 0- 100 cm soil layers with 10 cm interval were studied. Results showed that the average aboveground fresh biomass(4 a and 5 a) of four forage legumes species successively were L. corniculatus > M. sativa > O. viciifolia > G. officinalis. The average plant heights in two years successively were O. viciifolia > M. sativa > G. officinalis > L. corniculatus. Tillers per unit area of four forage legume species in two years successively were M. sativa > L. corniculatus > O. viciifolia > G. officinalis. Fertile tillers per unit area in two years were O. viciifolia > M. sativa > L. corniculatus > G. officinalis. Average shoot /leaf ratio in two years were G. officinalis > M. sativa > O. viciifolia > L. corniculatus. Average moisture contents of four forage legume species in two years successively were G. officinalis > L. corniculatus > M. sativa = O. viciifolia. The distribution characteristics of root systems of four forage legumes species in 0- 100 cm soil layers were as follows: the root weights of M. sativa in 0- 40 cm soil layers accounted for about 98. 3% of total root weight,that of O. viciifolia in 0- 30 cm soil layers was 85. 8%,that of L. corniculatus in 0- 10 cm soil layers was 80%,and that of G. officinalis in 0- 40 cm soil layers was 81. 4%. The results suggested that L. corniculatus was suited to plant in slighter degraded pasture to control water and soil erosion in early stage,G. officinalis with strong lateral roots was adapted to degraded grassland in the Loess Plateau where soil nutrient was poor,while O. viciifolia and M. sativa with potentially strong main root were fit for water

  2. Lodo de esgoto e sistema radicular da pupunheira Sewage sludge doses and the root system of peach palm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Vinicio Armas Vega

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Os efeitos do lodo de esgoto sobre o sistema radicular da pupunheira foram estudados em experimento em campo, em blocos casualizados, instalado em Ubatuba (SP, em julho 2001, na densidade de 5.000 plantas ha-1. As doses de lodo de esgoto fresco (79,7 % de umidade utilizadas foram de 0, 38, 76 e 152 t ha-1, equivalentes a 0, 100, 200 e 400 kg ha-1 de N. Os tratamentos foram aplicados no sulco de plantio, adicionando-se 15 g por planta de KCl como fonte de K. A análise do sistema radicular foi efetuada doze meses após, por meio de trado e de trincheiras e com o auxílio de fotos digitais. Detectou-se que o sistema radicular de pupunheiras com um ano de campo estava concentrado nas camadas superficiais (acima de 75 % nos primeiros 20 cm, assim como em distâncias de até 0,5 m da base da planta. O lodo de esgoto modificou positivamente a densidade do solo, alterando também favoravelmente a densidade das raízes. Houve aumento na biomassa radicular proporcional às doses de lodo de esgoto, existindo uma relação direta daquela com a fitomassa aérea. Doses de lodo equivalentes a 200 e 400 kg de N contribuíram para aprofundar o sistema radicular e proporcionaram maior quantidade relativa de raízes finas.The effects of sewage sludge doses on the root system of peach palm were studied in a field experiment, in randomized complete blocks, carried out in Ubatuba, state of São Paulo, Brazil. The trial was set up in July 2001, with a density of 5,000 plants ha-1. The sewage sludge doses (79.7 % water content were 0, 38, 76, and 152 t ha-1, which were equivalent to doses of 0, 100, 200, and 400 kg ha-1 of N. The treatments were applied in the planting furrow, and every plant was provided with K by a dose of 15 g potassium chloride. The root system was analyzed one year after planting using soil auger and digging of trenches and with the help of digital images. It was concluded that the root system of one-year old peach palm was concentrated in the

  3. Minimization of the root of a quadratic functional under a system of affine equality constraints with application to portfolio management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landsman, Zinoviy

    2008-10-01

    We present an explicit closed form solution of the problem of minimizing the root of a quadratic functional subject to a system of affine constraints. The result generalizes Z. Landsman, Minimization of the root of a quadratic functional under an affine equality constraint, J. Comput. Appl. Math. 2007, to appear, see http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/03770427>, articles in press, where the optimization problem was solved under only one linear constraint. This is of interest for solving significant problems pertaining to financial economics as well as some classes of feasibility and optimization problems which frequently occur in tomography and other fields. The results are illustrated in the problem of optimal portfolio selection and the particular case when the expected return of finance portfolio is certain is discussed.

  4. Alterations of the Brain Reward System in Antipsychotic Naïve Schizophrenia Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Ødegaard; Rostrup, Egill; Wulff, Sanne;

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Various schizophrenic symptoms are suggested to be linked to a dysfunction of the brain reward system. Several studies have found alterations in the reward processing in patients with schizophrenia; however, most previous findings might be confounded by medication effects. METHODS...... arousing events) into behavioral salience (events where a predicted reward requires performance) and valence anticipation (the anticipation of a monetarily significant outcome). Furthermore, the evaluation of monetary gain and loss was assessed. RESULTS: During reward anticipation, patients had a...... and nonsignificant for value anticipation. Furthermore, patients showed a changed activation pattern during outcome evaluation in right prefrontal cortex. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that changes during reward anticipation in schizophrenia are present from the beginning of the disease. This...

  5. Android System Root Access and Detection%Android系统 Root权限获取与检测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢晓燕; 金洪颖; 田敏

    2013-01-01

    Android is an operating system based on the Linux kernel and designed primarily for touchscreen mobile devices such as smartphones .In computer security, a sandbox is a security mechanism for separating running programs. It is often used to execute untested code, or untrusted programs from unveriifed third-parties, suppliers, untrusted users. As Android derives from the Linux kernel, rooting an Android device is similar to accessing administrative permissions on Linux. Rooting is required for more advanced and potentially dangerous operations including modifying or deleting system ifles, removing carrier-or manufacturer-installed applications, and low-level access to the hardware itself. This paper introduces the common process of Rooting and the method of Rooting detection.%Android是一个基于Linux多用户多进程操作系统,在这个系统中,应用程序(或者系统的部分)会在自己的进程中运行。系统和应用之间的安全性通过Linux的Sandbox(沙盒机制)在进程级别来强制实现的,比如会给应用程序分配user ID和Group ID。在Android系统中Root拥有最高权限,如果成为Root用户就可以实现破解。本文介绍了Android的安全机制和常用的Android获取Root权限的方法,以及如何检测Android是否被Root。

  6. Light as stress factor to plant roots - case of root halotropism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokawa, Ken; Fasano, Rossella; Kagenishi, Tomoko; Baluška, František

    2014-01-01

    Despite growing underground, largely in darkness, roots emerge to be very sensitive to light. Recently, several important papers have been published which reveal that plant roots not only express all known light receptors but also that their growth, physiology and adaptive stress responses are light-sensitive. In Arabidopsis, illumination of roots speeds-up root growth via reactive oxygen species-mediated and F-actin dependent process. On the other hand, keeping Arabidopsis roots in darkness alters F-actin distribution, polar localization of PIN proteins as well as polar transport of auxin. Several signaling components activated by phytohormones are overlapping with light-related signaling cascade. We demonstrated that the sensitivity of roots to salinity is altered in the light-grown Arabidopsis roots. Particularly, light-exposed roots are less effective in their salt-avoidance behavior known as root halotropism. Here we discuss these new aspects of light-mediated root behavior from cellular, physiological and evolutionary perspectives.

  7. Evaluation of Biomass Yield and Water Treatment in Two Aquaponic Systems Using the Dynamic Root Floating Technique (DRF)

    OpenAIRE

    Laura Silva; Eucario Gasca-Leyva; Edgardo Escalante; Kevin M Fitzsimmons; David Valdés Lozano

    2015-01-01

    The experiment evaluates the food production and water treatment of TAN, NO2−–N, NO3−–N, and PO43− in two aquaponics systems using the dynamic root floating technique (DRF). A separate recirculation aquaculture system (RAS) was used as a control. The fish cultured was Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). The hydroponic culture in one treatment (PAK) was pak choy (Brassica chinensis,) and in the other (COR) coriander (Coriandrum sativum). Initial and final weights were determined for the fis...

  8. Regulation of the High-Affinity Nitrate Transport System in Wheat Roots by Exogenous Abscisic Acid and Glutamine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao Cai; Xue-Qiang Zhao; Yong-Guan Zhu; Bin Li; Yi-Ping Tong; Zhen-Sheng Li

    2007-01-01

    Nitrate is a major nitrogen (N) source for most crops.Nitrate uptake by root cells is a key step of nitrogen metabolism and has been widely studied at the physiological and molecular levels.Understanding how nitrate uptake is regulated will help us engineer crops with improved nitrate uptake efficiency.The present study investigated the regulation of the high-affinity nitrate transport system (HATS) by exogenous abscisic acid (ABA) and glutamine (Gin) in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) roots.Wheat seedlings grown in nutrient solution containing 2 mmollL nitrate as the only nitrogen source for 2 weeks were deprived of N for 4d and were then transferred to nutrient solution containing 50 μmol/L ABA, and 1 mmol/L Gin in the presence or absence of 2 mmol/L nitrate for 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, and 8 h.Treated wheat plants were then divided into two groups.One group of plants was used to investigate the mRNA levels of the HATS components NRT2 and NAR2 genes in roots through semi-quantitative RT-PCR approach, and the other set of plants were used to measure high-affinity nitrate influx rates in a nutrient solution containing 0.2 mmol/L 15 N-labeled nitrate.The results showed that exogenous ABA induced the expression of the TaNRT2.1, TaNRT2.2, TaNRT2.3, TaNAR2.1, and TaNAR2.2 genes in roots when nitrate was not present in the nutrient solution, but did not further enhance the induction of these genes by nitrate.Glutamine, which has been shown to inhibit the expression of NRT2 genes when nitrate is present in the growth media, did not inhibit this induction.When Gin was supplied to a nitrate-free nutrient solution, the expression of these five genes in roots was induced.These results imply that the inhibition by Gin of NRT2 expression occurs only when nitrate is present in the growth media.Although exogenous ABA and Gin induced HATS genes in the roots of wheat, they did not induce nitrate influx.

  9. Mechanisms of alteration of the immune system by ionizing radiations: a basis for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows: Alterations of the immune system appear in relationship with exposure to ionizing radiation (IR) in different situations, e.g., accidents, radiation therapy of cancer, prenatal irradiation, some human diseases with hypersensitivity to IR and aging. Thus, the comprehension of the mechanisms of the alterations of the immune system by IR is necessary to elaborate strategies of protection and to pave the way for future possible therapies. At least 9 mechanisms of alterations can be identified: 1- Apoptosis. Apoptosis is a key mechanism of the natural regulation of the immune system and plays also a key role in the response to IR: lymphocytes die rapidly by apoptosis after exposure. Different pathways of induction of apoptosis have been identified, and include p53 dependent and mitochondria mediated pathways, as well as CD95 and ROS initiation; 2- TCR mutations. The T cell antigen receptor is responsible to discriminate between self and non self. Mutations of the TCR may result from exposure to IR; 3- Modification of the Th1-Th2 balance. T helper cells may express 2 distinct secretion patterns: Th1 cytokines promote cell-mediated immunity while Th2 cytokines favor humoral immunity. Although the effects of IR on the Th1/Th2 balance remains controversial, an imbalance towards a Th2 profile is likely and patients with cancer and systemic auto-immune disease often present a switch from Th1 to Th2; 4- Bystander effects and genetic instability. Stimulatory effect or genomic instability have been observed in haematopoietic cells exposed to IR and related to a bystander mechanism. 5- Shift toward an inflammatory profile. Ionizing radiation may induce a persistent inflammatory profile as a result of dis-regulation of cytokine production; such a status of persistent inflammation has been observed in Hiroshima and Nagasaki survivors. 6- Modification of antigen presentation. Antigen presentation by dendritic cells is an essential function preceding

  10. Adrenalectomy alters the sensitivity of the central nervous system melanocortin system

    OpenAIRE

    Drazen, DL; Wortman, MD; Schwartz, MW; Clegg, DJ; Van Dijk, G.; Woods, SC; Seeley, RJ; Drazen, Deborah L.; Wortman, Matthew D.; Schwartz, Michael W.; Woods, Stephen C.; Seeley, Randy J.

    2003-01-01

    Removal of adrenal steroids by adrenalectomy (ADX) reduces food intake and body weight in rodents and prevents excessive weight gain in many genetic and dietary models of obesity. Thus, glucocorticoids appear to play a key role to promote positive energy balance in normal and pathological conditions. By comparison, central nervous system melanocortin signaling provides critical inhibitory tone to regulate energy balance. The present experiments sought to test whether glucocorticoids influence...

  11. Systemic Sclerosis Patients Present Alterations in the Expression of Molecules Involved in B-Cell Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Lilian; Ferrier, Ashley; Aravena, Octavio; Fonseca, Elianet; Berendsen, Jorge; Biere, Andrea; Bueno, Daniel; Ramos, Verónica; Aguillón, Juan Carlos; Catalán, Diego

    2015-01-01

    The activation threshold of B cells is tightly regulated by an array of inhibitory and activator receptors in such a way that disturbances in their expression can lead to the appearance of autoimmunity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of activating and inhibitory molecules involved in the modulation of B cell functions in transitional, naive, and memory B-cell subpopulations from systemic sclerosis patients. To achieve this, blood samples were drawn from 31 systemic sclerosis patients and 53 healthy individuals. Surface expression of CD86, MHC II, CD19, CD21, CD40, CD22, Siglec 10, CD35, and FcγRIIB was determined by flow cytometry. IL-10 production was evaluated by intracellular flow cytometry from isolated B cells. Soluble IL-6 and IL-10 levels were measured by ELISA from supernatants of stimulated B cells. Systemic sclerosis patients exhibit an increased frequency of transitional and naive B cells related to memory B cells compared with healthy controls. Transitional and naive B cells from patients express higher levels of CD86 and FcγRIIB than healthy donors. Also, B cells from patients show high expression of CD19 and CD40, whereas memory cells from systemic sclerosis patients show reduced expression of CD35. CD19 and CD35 expression levels associate with different autoantibody profiles. IL-10+ B cells and secreted levels of IL-10 were markedly reduced in patients. In conclusion, systemic sclerosis patients show alterations in the expression of molecules involved in B-cell regulation. These abnormalities may be determinant in the B-cell hyperactivation observed in systemic sclerosis. PMID:26483788

  12. Alteration in male reproductive system in experimental cholestasis: roles for opioids and nitric oxide overproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiani, Samira; Valizadeh, Behzad; Hormazdi, Bahram; Samadi, Hoda; Najafi, Tahereh; Samini, Morteza; Dehpour, Ahmad R

    2009-08-01

    Cirrhosis is associated with impairment of the male reproductive system, hypogonadism and feminization. It is important to rule out whether the impairment in the reproductive system exists earlier in the course of cholestatic liver disease to target effective therapies at the best time point. In this study we investigated the role of endogenous opioid and nitric oxide system in alterations of the reproductive system in male rats. We performed sham or bile duct ligation surgery on male Sprague-Dawley rats and treated the animals for seven days with saline, naltrexone, an opioid receptor blocker (20 mg/kg) and N (G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor (10 mg/kg). We then evaluated the plasma level of testosterone, luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), sperm count and motility as well as biomarkers of cholestasis and nitric oxide productions. The results showed that following cholestasis, total testosterone level decrease and LH level increase in plasma of cholestatic rats and treatment with L-NAME and naltrexone could improve the plasma level of testosterone. Naltrexone could decrease the elevated level of LH in cholestatic animals. In addition, the weight of seminal vesicles and prostate significantly decreased in cholestasis as compared to the control group and treatment with L-NAME and naltrexone could improve the weights of the two organs in cholestasis. Our results demonstrate for the first time that the male reproductive system is impaired early in cholestasis and that endogenous opioid and nitric oxide system contribute to these impairments in the early course of the disease. PMID:19445924

  13. Does Acupuncture Alter Pain-related Functional Connectivity of the Central Nervous System? A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal Santiago, María; Tumilty, Steve; Mącznik, Aleksandra; Mani, Ramakrishnan

    2016-08-01

    Acupuncture has been studied for several decades to establish evidence-based clinical practice. This systematic review aims to evaluate evidence for the effectiveness of acupuncture in influencing the functional connectivity of the central nervous system in patients with musculoskeletal pain. A systematic search of the literature was conducted to identify studies in which the central response of acupuncture in patients with musculoskeletal pain was evaluated by neuroimaging techniques. Databases searched were AMED, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, MEDLINE, PEDro, Pubmed, SCOPUS, SPORTDiscuss, and Web of Science. Included studies were assessed by two independent reviewers for their methodological quality by using the Downs and Black questionnaire and for their levels of completeness and transparency in reporting acupuncture interventions by using Standards for Reporting Interventions in Clinical Trials of Acupuncture (STRICTA) criteria. Seven studies met the inclusion criteria. Three studies were randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and four studies were nonrandomized controlled trials (NRCTs). The neuroimaging techniques used were functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and positron emission tomography (PET). Positive effects on the functional connectivity of the central nervous system more consistently occurred during long-term acupuncture treatment. The results were heterogeneous from a descriptive perspective; however, the key findings support acupuncture's ability to alter pain-related functional connectivity in the central nervous system in patients with musculoskeletal pain. PMID:27555221

  14. Does Acupuncture Alter Pain-related Functional Connectivity of the Central Nervous System? A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal Santiago, María; Tumilty, Steve; Mącznik, Aleksandra; Mani, Ramakrishnan

    2016-08-01

    Acupuncture has been studied for several decades to establish evidence-based clinical practice. This systematic review aims to evaluate evidence for the effectiveness of acupuncture in influencing the functional connectivity of the central nervous system in patients with musculoskeletal pain. A systematic search of the literature was conducted to identify studies in which the central response of acupuncture in patients with musculoskeletal pain was evaluated by neuroimaging techniques. Databases searched were AMED, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, MEDLINE, PEDro, Pubmed, SCOPUS, SPORTDiscuss, and Web of Science. Included studies were assessed by two independent reviewers for their methodological quality by using the Downs and Black questionnaire and for their levels of completeness and transparency in reporting acupuncture interventions by using Standards for Reporting Interventions in Clinical Trials of Acupuncture (STRICTA) criteria. Seven studies met the inclusion criteria. Three studies were randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and four studies were nonrandomized controlled trials (NRCTs). The neuroimaging techniques used were functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and positron emission tomography (PET). Positive effects on the functional connectivity of the central nervous system more consistently occurred during long-term acupuncture treatment. The results were heterogeneous from a descriptive perspective; however, the key findings support acupuncture's ability to alter pain-related functional connectivity in the central nervous system in patients with musculoskeletal pain.

  15. Effect of parameter choice in root water uptake models – the arrangement of root hydraulic properties within the root architecture affects dynamics and efficiency of root water uptake

    OpenAIRE

    Bechmann, M.; Schneider, C; Carminati, A.; Vetterlein, D.; Attinger, S.; Hildebrandt, A

    2014-01-01

    Detailed three-dimensional models of root water uptake have become increasingly popular for investigating the process of root water uptake. However, they suffer from a lack of information on important parameters, particularly on the spatial distribution of root axial and radial conductivities, which vary greatly along a root system. In this paper we explore how the arrangement of those root hydraulic properties and branching within the root system affects modelled uptake dynamics, xylem water...

  16. Altered time structure of neuro-endocrine-immune system function in lung cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carughi Stefano

    2010-06-01

    TcS1 was decreased in cancer patients. The melatonin/cortisol mean nocturnal level ratio was decreased in cancer patients. Conclusion The altered secretion and loss of circadian rhythmicity of many studied factors observed in the subjects suffering from neoplastic disease may be expression of gradual alteration of the integrated function of the neuro-immune-endocrine system

  17. Alterações na qualidade de raízes de mandioca(Manihot esculenta Crantz minimamente processadas Quality alterations in cassava roots (Manihot esculenta Crantz minimally processed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreia Alves

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available A conservação pós-colheita das raízes de mandioca tem sido uma preocupação das indústrias e produtores, devido ao curto tempo de estocagem e a alta perecibilidade das raízes. Dois fenômenos são apontados como responsáveis pela deterioração das raízes, um de ordem fisiológica, provocando a perda inicial da qualidade por meio do desenvolvimento da descoloração vascular do tecido parenquimatoso, e o outro, de ordem microbiana, que se segue à fisiologia, responsável pela decomposição do produto. Dessa forma, com o presente trabalho, objetivou-se estudar a conservação das raízes de mandioca (Manihot esculenta Crantz, submetidas à higienização em água clorada e armazenadas em três tipos de embalagens, bandeja de isopor envolta em filme de policloreto de vinila (PVC, embalagem multicamada (poliéster Saram-13,5µ/polietileno-100µ com e sem vácuo e resfriadas (5 ± 0,5°C, mediante análises físico-químicas, microbiológicas, fisiológicas e sensoriais. A conservação de mandioca minimamente processada sob refrigeração para os tratamentos realizados, é possível diferenciando-se o período de armazenamento, sendo que para as amostras armazenadas em bandeja, o período de armazenamento foi de 7 dias, no selado e a vácuo foi de aproximadamente 24 dias, respectivamente.Post harvest of cassava roots has been a great concern in food industries and producers due to the short shelf life and high perishability. Several phenomena have been pointed out as responsible for root deterioration. Among them there are physiological aspects, that lead to losses in initial quality through vascular discoloration of parenchymatous tissue. On the other hand, phenomena from microbial origin, which follow the physiological alterations, are responsible for product decomposition. In this context, this work was aimed at investigating the conservation of cassava roots (Manihot esculenta Crantz submitted to chlorinated water, and stored using

  18. Difficulty assessment system of root canal treatment and research status of root canal filling materials%根管治疗难度评估系统及根管充填材料的研究现状

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周艳勤; 钟晓波

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The choice of root canal filling materials can affect the quality of root canal filling. The quality of root canal filling is an important key factor that affects the long-term results of root canal treatment. OBJECTIVE: To review the difficulty assessment of root canal treatment and research status of root canal filling materials at home and abroad in recent years. METHODS: PubMed and VIP databases (1990/2011) were searched by the first author for papers concerning the risk factors for the difficulty of root canal treatment and the effect of root canal filling materials on the quality of root canal treatment. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Root canal treatment is the most effective method for pulpal and periapical diseases, but its effectiveness is affected by many factors. Therefore, it is necessary to have a difficulty assessment of root canal treatment before treatment. During the treatment, difficult root canal treatment requires advanced therapeutic instruments to lay a good foundation for root canal filling technology. Root canal filling is a key step of the treatment, and the filling result directly influences the effectiveness and the prognosis of root canal treatment. The imprecision of filling can cause microleakage, which can result in the treatment failure due to the root canal reinfection. Therefore, the success or failure of root canal treatment largely depends on the tight filling or not. At present, there is not a kind of root canal material that can completely seal the root canal system. It is needed to further improve the difficulty assessment system of root canal treatment and to study the ideal root canal filling materials in future research.%背景:根管充填材料的选择影响根管充填的质量,根管充填质量是影响根管治疗远期疗效的重要因素.目的:综述目前国内外根管治疗难度评估和根管材料的研究现状.方法:由第一作者检索1990/2011 PubMed 数据及维普中文科技期刊数据库

  19. Analysis of effects of a new environmental pollutant, bisphenol A, on antioxidant systems in soybean roots at different growth stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiazhi; Li, Xingyi; Zhou, Li; Wang, Lihong; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2016-03-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an important industrial raw material. Because of its widespread use and increasing release into environment, BPA has become a new environmental pollutant. Previous studies about BPA’s effects in plants focus on a certain growth stage. However, the plant’s response to pollutants varies at different growth stages. Therefore, in this work, BPA’s effects in soybean roots at different growth stages were investigated by determining the reactive oxygen species levels, membrane lipid fatty acid composition, membrane lipid peroxidation, and antioxidant systems. The results showed that low-dose BPA exposure slightly caused membrane lipid peroxidation but didn’t activate antioxidant systems at the seedling stage, and this exposure did not affect above process at other growth stages; high-dose BPA increased reactive oxygen species levels and then caused membrane lipid peroxidation at all growth stages although it activated antioxidant systems, and these effects were weaker with prolonging the growth stages. The recovery degree after withdrawal of BPA exposure was negatively related to BPA dose, but was positively related to growth stage. Taken together, the effects of BPA on antioxidant systems in soybean roots were associated with BPA exposure dose and soybean growth stage.

  20. Comparative evaluation of apically extruded debris during root canal preparation using ProTaper™, Hyflex™ and Waveone™ rotary systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayaprada Reddy Surakanti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Extrusion of any debris during endodontic treatment may potentially cause post-operative complications such as flare-ups. The purpose of this in vitro study was to assess the amount of apically extruded debris during the root canal preparation using rotary and reciprocating nickel-titanium instrumentation systems. Materials and Methods: In this study, 60 human mandibular first premolars were randomly assigned to 3 groups (n = 20 teeth/group. The root canals were instrumented according to the manufacturers′ instructions using the Reciprocating single-file system WaveOne™ (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland and full-sequence rotary Hyflex CM™ (Coltene Whaledent, Allstetten, Switzerland and ProTaper™ (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland instruments. The canals were then irrigated using bidistilled water. The debris that was extruded apically was collected in preweighed eppendorf tubes and assessed with an electronic balance and compared. Statistical Analysis Used: The debris extrusion was compared and statistically analyzed using analysis of variance and the post hoc Student-Newman-Keuls test. Results: The WaveOne™ and ProTaper™ rotary instruments produced significantly more debris compared with Hyflex CM™ rotary instruments (P < 0.05. Conclusions: Under the conditions of this study, all systems that were used resulted in extrusion of apical debris. Full-sequence rotary instrumentation was associated with less debris extrusion compared with the use of reciprocating single-file systems.

  1. Microgravity-induced alterations in signal transduction in cells of the immune system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, Katrin; Thiel, Cora; Timm, Johanna; Schmidt, Peter M.; Huber, Kathrin; Tauber, Svantje; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Seibt, Dieter; Kroll, Hartmut; Grote, Karl-Heinrich; Zipp, Frauke; Schneider-Stock, Regine; Cogoli, Augusto; Hilliger, Andre; Engelmann, Frank; Ullrich, Oliver

    2010-11-01

    Since decades it is known that the activity of cells of the immune system is severely dysregulated in microgravity, however, the underlying molecular aspects have not been elucidated yet. The identification of gravity-sensitive molecular mechanisms in cells of the immune system is an important and indispensable prerequisite for the development of counteractive measures to prevent or treat disturbed immune cell function of astronauts during long-term space missions. Moreover, their sensitivity to altered gravity renders immune cells an ideal model system to understand if and how gravity on Earth is required for normal mammalian cell function and signal transduction. We investigated the effect of simulated weightlessness (2D clinostat) and of real microgravity (parabolic flights) on key signal pathways in a human monocytic and a T lymphocyte cell line. We found that cellular responses to microgravity strongly depend on the cell-type and the conditions in which the cells are subjected to microgravity. In Jurkat T cells, enhanced phosphorylation of the MAP kinases ERK-1/2, MEK and p38 and inhibition of nuclear translocation of NF-kB were the predominant responses to simulated weightlessness, in either stimulated or non-stimulated cells. In contrast, non-stimulated monocytic U937 cells responded to simulated weightlessness with enhanced overall tyrosine-phosphorylation and activation of c-jun, whereas PMA-stimulated U937 cells responded the opposite way with reduced tyrosine-phosphorylation and reduced activation of c-jun, compared with PMA-stimulated 1 g controls. P53 protein was phosphorylated rapidly in microgravity. The identification of gravi-sensitive mechanisms in cells of the immune system will not only enable us to understand and prevent the negative effects of long time exposure to microgravity on Astronauts, but could also lead to novel therapeutic targets in general.

  2. A multi-tiered data structure and process management system based on ROOT and CouchDB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A multi-tiered data structure, analysis toolkit and data processing management system has been constructed using ROOT and CouchDB. This system is well suited for experiments that acquire many computer files of raw data over the course of months or years, that are distributed to different computing centers and further reduced in size by several steps of data processing. Data handling for experiments searching for rare events extracted from digitized pulse traces typically fit this description. An implementation of this system has been constructed for the EDELWEISS-III experiment and is described here in some detail. This solution may also serve as a prototype system for the proposed EURECA experiment.

  3. Comparative dynamics of tea (Camellia sinensis L.) roots under organic and conventional management systems with special reference to water use

    OpenAIRE

    Mohotti, Dr (Mrs) A. J; Damayanthi, Mrs N; Anandacoomaraswamy, Dr A; Mohotti, Dr K. M

    2008-01-01

    Comparative measurements were carried out in the on-going, long-term organic and conventional comparison “TRI OR-CON” trial at the Tea Research Institute of Sri Lanka. The tea was grown organically using tea waste (TW), neem oil cake (NOC), compost (COM) as soil amendments using IFOAM guidelines, which were compared with tea grown conventionally (CONV) with recommended synthetic inputs. Responses of the tea yield, root system and mass volume sap flow were studied. The tea bushes showed com...

  4. Negative phototropism of rice root

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@It is often believed that the stem of higher plants has characteristics of positive phototropism, and the root shows no phototropism or no sensitivity to light though the root of Arabdopsis was reported possessing characteristics of negative phototropism. In this study, a distinct negative phototropism of the root system of rice seedlings was observed.

  5. Root morphology and mycorrhizal symbioses together shape nutrient foraging strategies of temperate trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weile; Koide, Roger T; Adams, Thomas S; DeForest, Jared L; Cheng, Lei; Eissenstat, David M

    2016-08-01

    Photosynthesis by leaves and acquisition of water and minerals by roots are required for plant growth, which is a key component of many ecosystem functions. Although the role of leaf functional traits in photosynthesis is generally well understood, the relationship of root functional traits to nutrient uptake is not. In particular, predictions of nutrient acquisition strategies from specific root traits are often vague. Roots of nearly all plants cooperate with mycorrhizal fungi in nutrient acquisition. Most tree species form symbioses with either arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) or ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi. Nutrients are distributed heterogeneously in the soil, and nutrient-rich "hotspots" can be a key source for plants. Thus, predicting the foraging strategies that enable mycorrhizal root systems to exploit these hotspots can be critical to the understanding of plant nutrition and ecosystem carbon and nutrient cycling. Here, we show that in 13 sympatric temperate tree species, when nutrient availability is patchy, thinner root species alter their foraging to exploit patches, whereas thicker root species do not. Moreover, there appear to be two distinct pathways by which thinner root tree species enhance foraging in nutrient-rich patches: AM trees produce more roots, whereas EM trees produce more mycorrhizal fungal hyphae. Our results indicate that strategies of nutrient foraging are complementary among tree species with contrasting mycorrhiza types and root morphologies, and that predictable relationships between below-ground traits and nutrient acquisition emerge only when both roots and mycorrhizal fungi are considered together.

  6. In vitro comparison rate of dental root canal transportation using two single file systems on the simulated resin blocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Javad Etesami

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Cleaning and shaping is one of the most important stages in endodontic treatment. Single-file systems save time and reduce the risk of transmission of pathogens. This in vitro study was aimed to compare the rate of canal transportation after the preparation of the stimulated resin root canal with two single-file systems, namely Waveone and Reciproc. Materials and Methods: Thirty stimulated resin root canal blocks with size 8/0. 02 K file were randomly divided into two study groups. The preparation in Group A and Group B was performed using Reciproc and Waveone files, respectively. Pre and post- preparation photographs were taken and the images were superimposed to evaluate the inner and outer wall’s curvature tendency at three points (apical, middle and coronal using AutoCad pragram. Data were analyzed using T-test. Results: Based on the results, the degree of transportation in the inner and outer walls of the canal was less at the level of 3 millimeters (P0.05. Conclusion: Waveone showed better performance in the middle third of canal and this system maybe recommended.

  7. C-shaped mandibular primary first molar diagnosed with cone beam computed tomography: A novel case report and literature review of primary molars' root canal systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Gozde; Sekerci, Ahmet Ercan; Kocoglu, Fatma

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the different anatomical variations in root canal system of dedicious dentition will improve the practice of the pediatric dentists. The teeth with C-shaped root canal configurations are definitely a problem in endodontic treatment. Dentists who are specialists of endodontics must have adequate knowledge about various root canal morphologies of primary tooth that have a tendency for rapid progression of dental caries to achieve a technically satisfactory outcome. This report presents an extraordinary case of unusual tooth morphology involving the mandibular first primary molar with a C-shaped configuration which has not yet been reported. PMID:27681406

  8. Alternative rooting induction of semi-hardwood olive cuttings by several auxin-producing bacteria for organic agriculture systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Montero-Calasanz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Southern Spain is the largest olive oil producer region in the world. In recent years organic agriculture systems have grown exponentially so that new alternative systems to produce organic olive cuttings are needed. Several bacterial isolates, namely Pantoea sp. AG9, Chryseobacterium sp. AG13, Chryseobacterium sp. CT348, Pseudomonas sp. CT364 and Azospirillum brasilense Cd (ATCC 29729, have been used to induce rooting in olive semi-hardwood cuttings of Arbequina, Hojiblanca and Picual cultivars of olive (Olea europea L. The first four strains were previously selected as auxin-producing bacteria and by their ability to promote rooting in model plants. They have been classified on the basis of their 16S rDNA gene sequence. The known auxin producer A. brasilense Cd strain has been used as a reference. The inoculation of olive cuttings was performed in two different ways: (i by dipping cuttings in a liquid bacterial culture or (ii by immersing them in a paste made of solid bacterial inoculant and sterile water. Under nursery conditions all of the tested bacterial strains were able to induce the rooting of olive cuttings to a similar or greater extent than the control cuttings treated with indole-3-butyric acid (IBA. The olive cultivars responded differently depending on the bacterial strain and the inoculation method. The strain that consistently gave the best results was Pantoea sp. AG9, the only one of the tested bacterial strains to express the enzyme 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC deaminase. The results are also discussed in terms of potential commercial interest and nursery feasibility performance of these strains.

  9. Sustained Exposure to the Widely Used Herbicide Atrazine: Altered Function and Loss of Neurons in Brain Monoamine Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez, Veronica M.; Thiruchelvam, Mona; Cory-Slechta, Deborah A.

    2005-01-01

    The widespread use of atrazine (ATR) and its persistence in the environment have resulted in documented human exposure. Alterations in hypothalamic catecholamines have been suggested as the mechanistic basis of the toxicity of ATR to hormonal systems in females and the reproductive tract in males. Because multiple catecholamine systems are present in the brain, however, ATR could have far broader effects than are currently understood. Catecholaminergic systems such as the two major long-lengt...

  10. Automatic non-destructive three-dimensional acoustic coring system for in situ detection of aquatic plant root under the water bottom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsunori Mizuno

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Digging is necessary to detect plant roots under the water bottom. However, such detection is affected by the transparency of water and the working skills of divers, usually requires considerable time for high-resolution sampling, and always damages the survey site. We developed a new automatic non-destructive acoustic measurement system that visualizes the space under the water bottom, and tested the system in the in situ detection of natural plant roots. The system mainly comprises a two-dimensional waterproof stage controlling unit and acoustic measurement unit. The stage unit was electrically controlled through a notebook personal computer, and the space under the water bottom was scanned in a two-dimensional plane with the stage unit moving in steps of 0.01 m (±0.0001 m. We confirmed a natural plant root with diameter of 0.025–0.030 m in the reconstructed three-dimensional acoustic image. The plant root was at a depth of about 0.54 m and the propagation speed of the wave between the bottom surface and plant root was estimated to be 1574 m/s. This measurement system for plant root detection will be useful for the non-destructive assessment of the status of the space under the water bottom.

  11. Water Velocity and Bioturbation Alter Sediment Resuspension and Biogeochemistry in an Experimental Freshwater Mesocosm System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivak, A.; Vanni, M. J.

    2010-12-01

    Processes such as bioturbation and resuspension can affect organic matter decomposition by altering sediment redox conditions. Increased oxygen availability may, in turn, affect remineralization rates and larger scale processes such as benthic-pelagic coupling. However, relatively few studies have explicitly tested the simultaneous effects of bioturbation and water velocity on benthic biogeochemistry and sediment resuspension. Using a mesocosm system we conducted two experiments testing the effects of bioturbator identity on particulate and dissolved nutrient dynamics before and after a resuspension event (i.e. water velocity held constant at 0.12 m s-1 for 2 hr; Expt. 1) and rates of sediment resuspension with increasing water velocity (0.00 - 0.20 m s-1; Expt. 2). We manipulated bioturbator identity across four levels as sediments were undisturbed (control), manually punctured (2% of surface area), or disturbed by one of two fish species, either bluegill or catfish. For Expt. 1, the bioturbation treatments were applied for several days and measurements were made before and after the resuspension event. Initially, water column chlorophyll and total suspended sediment (TSS) concentrations were highest in the catfish treatments. Bioturbator identity did not affect the stoichiometry of TSS as strongly; C:N was unaffected by our treatments while N:P was lowest in the disturbed treatments. After the resuspension event, there was no difference in TSS concentrations or stoichiometric ratios across the bioturbation treatments. Dissolved nutrient flux rates were insensitive to the bioturbation treatments and were more strongly influenced by the resuspension event. For instance, sediment NO3- fluxes were negative (i.e. net flux into sediments) until after the resuspension event when they became positive. In Expt. 2, we gradually increased water velocity from 0.00 - 0.20 m s-1 and measured TSS concentrations only. TSS was initially highest in catfish treatments and lowest in

  12. Physicochemical and biological properties of a novel injectable polyurethane system for root canal filling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang J

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Jian Wang,1 Yi Zuo,1 Minghui Zhao,1 Jiaxing Jiang,1 Yi Man,2 Jun Wu,3 Yunjiu Hu,3 Changlei Liu,4 Yubao Li,1 Jidong Li11Research Center for Nano-Biomaterials, Analytical and Testing Center, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, People’s Republic of China; 2College of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Orthopedics, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, People’s Republic of China; 4College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, People’s Republic of ChinaAbstract: A root canal sealer with antibacterial activity can be efficacious in preventing reinfection that results from residual microorganisms and/or the leakage of microorganisms. In the present study, a series of injectable, self-curing polyurethane (PU-based antibacterial sealers with different concentrations of silver phosphate (Ag3PO4 were fabricated. Subsequently, their physicochemical properties, antibacterial abilities, and preliminary cytocompatibilities were evaluated. The results indicated that the fabricated PU-based sealers can achieve a high conversion rate in a short amount of time. More than 95% of the isocyanate group of PU sealers with 3 wt% (PU3 and 5 wt% (PU5 concentrations of Ag3PO4 were included in the curing reaction after 7 hours. With the exception of those for film thickness for PU5, the results of setting time, film thickness, and solubility were able to meet the requirements of the International Organization for Standardization. The antibacterial tests showed that PU3 and PU5 exhibit stronger antimicrobial effects than that achieved with 1 wt% Ag3PO4 (PU1 and AH Plus (positive control against Streptococcus mutans. The cytocompatibility evaluation revealed that the PU1 and PU3 sealers possess good cytocompatibility and low cytotoxicity. These results demonstrate that the PU3 sealer offers good physicochemical and antimicrobial properties along with cytocompatibility, which may hold great

  13. Numerical Models of Human Circulatory System under Altered Gravity: Brain Circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang Sung; Kiris, Cetin; Kwak, Dochan; David, Tim

    2003-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach is presented to model the blood flow through the human circulatory system under altered gravity conditions. Models required for CFD simulation relevant to major hemodynamic issues are introduced such as non-Newtonian flow models governed by red blood cells, a model for arterial wall motion due to fluid-wall interactions, a vascular bed model for outflow boundary conditions, and a model for auto-regulation mechanism. The three-dimensional unsteady incompressible Navier-Stokes equations coupled with these models are solved iteratively using the pseudocompressibility method and dual time stepping. Moving wall boundary conditions from the first-order fluid-wall interaction model are used to study the influence of arterial wall distensibility on flow patterns and wall shear stresses during the heart pulse. A vascular bed modeling utilizing the analogy with electric circuits is coupled with an auto-regulation algorithm for multiple outflow boundaries. For the treatment of complex geometry, a chimera overset grid technique is adopted to obtain connectivity between arterial branches. For code validation, computed results are compared with experimental data for steady and unsteady non-Newtonian flows. Good agreement is obtained for both cases. In sin-type Gravity Benchmark Problems, gravity source terms are added to the Navier-Stokes equations to study the effect of gravitational variation on the human circulatory system. This computational approach is then applied to localized blood flows through a realistic carotid bifurcation and two Circle of Willis models, one using an idealized geometry and the other model using an anatomical data set. A three- dimensional anatomical Circle of Willis configuration is reconstructed from human-specific magnetic resonance images using an image segmentation method. The blood flow through these Circle of Willis models is simulated to provide means for studying gravitational effects on the brain

  14. Wfs1-deficient mice display altered function of serotonergic system and increased behavioural response to antidepressants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanel eVisnapuu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that mutations in the WFS1 gene make humans more susceptible to mood disorders. Besides that, mood disorders are associated with alterations in the activity of serotonergic and noradrenergic systems. Therefore, in this study, the effects of imipramine, an inhibitor of serotonin (5-HT and noradrenaline (NA reuptake, and paroxetine, a selective inhibitor of 5-HT reuptake, were studied in tests of behavioural despair. The tail suspension test (TST and forced swimming test (FST were performed in Wfs1-deficient mice. Simultaneously, gene expression and monoamine metabolism studies were conducted to evaluate changes in 5-HT- and NA-ergic systems of Wfs1-deficient mice. The basal immobility time of Wfs1-deficient mice in TST and FST did not differ from that of their wild-type littermates. However, a significant reduction of immobility time in response to lower doses of imipramine and paroxetine was observed in homozygous Wfs1-deficient mice, but not in their wild-type littermates. In gene expression studies, the levels of 5-HT transporter (SERT were significantly reduced in the pons of homozygous animals. Monoamine metabolism was assayed separately in the dorsal and ventral striatum of naive mice and mice exposed for 30 minutes tobrightly lit motility boxes. We found that this aversive challenge caused a significant increase in the levels of 5-HT and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA, a metabolite of 5-HT, in the ventral and dorsal striatum of wild-type mice, but not in their homozygous littermates. Taken together, the blunted 5-HT metabolism and reduced levels of SERT are a likely reason for the elevated sensitivity of these mice to the action of imipramine and paroxetine. These changes in the pharmacological and neurochemical phenotype of Wfs1-deficient mice may help to explain the increased susceptibility of Wolfram syndrome patients to depressive states.

  15. Investigation of Lab Fire Prevention Management System of Combining Root Cause Analysis and Analytic Hierarchy Process with Event Tree Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Chan Shih

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposed a new approach, combining root cause analysis (RCA, analytic hierarchy process (AHP, and event tree analysis (ETA in a loop to systematically evaluate various laboratory safety prevention strategies. First, 139 fire accidents were reviewed to identify the root causes and draw out prevention strategies. Most fires were caused due to runaway reactions, operation error and equipment failure, and flammable material release. These mostly occurred in working places of no prompt fire protection. We also used AHP to evaluate the priority of these strategies and found that chemical fire prevention strategy is the most important control element, and strengthening maintenance and safety inspection intensity is the most important action. Also together with our surveys results, we proposed that equipment design is also critical for fire prevention. Therefore a technical improvement was propounded: installing fire detector, automatic sprinkler, and manual extinguisher in the lab hood as proactive fire protections. ETA was then used as a tool to evaluate laboratory fire risks. The results indicated that the total risk of a fire occurring decreases from 0.0351 to 0.0042 without/with equipment taking actions. Establishing such system can make Environment, Health and Safety (EH&S office not only analyze and prioritize fire prevention policies more practically, but also demonstrate how effective protective equipment improvement can achieve and the probabilities of the initiating event developing into a serious accident or controlled by the existing safety system.

  16. Root systems from Toric Calabi-Yau Geometry. Towards new algebraic structures and symmetries in physics?

    CERN Document Server

    Torrente-Lujan, E

    2004-01-01

    The algebraic approach to the construction of the reflexive polyhedra that yield Calabi-Yau spaces in three or more complex dimensions with K3 fibres reveals graphs that include and generalize the Dynkin diagrams associated with gauge symmetries. In this work we continue to study the structure of graphs obtained from $CY_3$ reflexive polyhedra. We show how some particularly defined integral matrices can be assigned to these diagrams. This family of matrices and its associated graphs may be obtained by relaxing the restrictions on the individual entries of the generalized Cartan matrices associated with the Dynkin diagrams that characterize Cartan-Lie and affine Kac-Moody algebras. These graphs keep however the affine structure, as it was in Kac-Moody Dynkin diagrams. We presented a possible root structure for some simple cases. We conjecture that these generalized graphs and associated link matrices may characterize generalizations of these algebras.

  17. Effect of nutrient spray interval and light quality in root zone on growth characteristics of Anthurium andreanum L. in aeroponic system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kafi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to determine the most appropriate nutrient solution spraying interval and effects of light quality in the root zone on anthurium in aeroponic system, a split plot experiment, with completely randomized design, was carried out in a greenhouse located in the city of Karaj, Iran. In this study, time between the sprays was the main plot and consisted of two levels (2 minutes spray and 30 minutes without spray, and 2 minutes spray and 45 minutes without spray and color of the containers was the sub plot at three levels (black, blue and red. Results showed that 2 minutes spay and 45 minutes without spay increased number of leaves and shoot fresh weight much higher than 2 minutes spray and 30 minutes without spray. Study of light quality in the root zone showed that black color of the containers, by increasing total leaf area and shoot dry and fresh weight, was the best color treatment. Blue color in the root zone had the most influence on final root length; but was not able to increase root dry and fresh weight, because of higher number of roots in other color treatments. In general, spraying nutrient solution for two minutes, and 45 minutes without spray, along with black color containers in the root zone was the best treatment for most growth characteristics of the anthurium plant.

  18. Systemic control of cell division and endoreduplication by NAA and BAP by modulating CDKs in root tip cells of Allium cepa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tank, Jigna G; Thaker, Vrinda S

    2014-01-01

    Molecular mechanism regulated by auxin and cytokinin during endoreduplication, cell division, and elongation process is studied by using Allium cepa roots as a model system. The activity of CDK genes modulated by auxin and cytokinin during cell division, elongation, and endoreduplication process is explained in this research work. To study the significance of auxin and cytokinin in the management of cell division and endoreduplication process in plant meristematic cells at molecular level endoreduplication was developed in root tips of Allium cepa by giving colchicine treatment. There were inhibition of vegetative growth, formation of c-tumor at root tip, and development of endoreduplicated cells after colchicine treatment. This c-tumor was further treated with NAA and BAP to reinitiate vegetative growth in roots. BAP gave positive response in reinitiation of vegetative growth of roots from center of c-tumor. However, NAA gave negative response in reinitiation of vegetative growth of roots from c-tumor. Further, CDKs gene expression analysis from normal, endoreduplicated, and phytohormone (NAA or BAP) treated root tip was done and remarkable changes in transcription level of CDK genes in normal, endoreduplicated, and phytohormones treated cells were observed.

  19. Systemic Control of Cell Division and Endoreduplication by NAA and BAP by Modulating CDKs in Root Tip Cells of Allium cepa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jigna G. Tank

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular mechanism regulated by auxin and cytokinin during endoreduplication, cell division, and elongation process is studied by using Allium cepa roots as a model system. The activity of CDK genes modulated by auxin and cytokinin during cell division, elongation, and endoreduplication process is explained in this research work. To study the significance of auxin and cytokinin in the management of cell division and endoreduplication process in plant meristematic cells at molecular level endoreduplication was developed in root tips of Allium cepa by giving colchicine treatment. There were inhibition of vegetative growth, formation of c-tumor at root tip, and development of endoreduplicated cells after colchicine treatment. This c-tumor was further treated with NAA and BAP to reinitiate vegetative growth in roots. BAP gave positive response in reinitiation of vegetative growth of roots from center of c-tumor. However, NAA gave negative response in reinitiation of vegetative growth of roots from c-tumor. Further, CDKs gene expression analysis from normal, endoreduplicated, and phytohormone (NAA or BAP treated root tip was done and remarkable changes in transcription level of CDK genes in normal, endoreduplicated, and phytohormones treated cells were observed.

  20. Study on the system development for evaluating long-term alteration of hydraulic field in near field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the high performance evaluation of reliability of TRU waste repository, the system development for evaluating long-term alteration in consideration of the changes action of barrier materials of hydraulic field in Near Field is required. In this research, system development for evaluating long-term alteration of hydraulic field in Near Field was examined. Examination of the basic specification of chemical/dynamic alteration action analysis system used as the composition element of this system and a whole system were performed. The research result of this year is shown below. 1) The system by which the chemical changes happened by Near Field as influence of the exudation liquid from cement material are evaluated was examined. In this year, document investigation about the various processes about chemical alteration and extraction of a choice, presentation of the uncertainty about a model or data, preliminary modeling, a simple analysis tool creation and sensitivity analysis, extraction of the process which should be taken into consideration in a system valuation modeling and a phenomenon analysis model, and a corresponding mathematics model, optimization of the software composition for development of a system valuation modeling, the exercise by the preliminary system analysis model, the experiment plan for the corroboration of a model were shown. 2) In consideration of change of the physical characteristic accompanying chemical alteration of bentonite material and cement material, the system by which dynamic changes action of repository is evaluated was examined. In this year, arrangement of the dynamics action of repository for long-term were shown. Extraction of a phenomenon made applicable to evaluation was shown. And the dynamic models were investigated and the prototype of the dynamics model that can take into consideration the characteristic of bentonite material was shown. And the basic composition of a dynamic changes action analysis system was shown. 3

  1. Sistema radicular do fórmio, sisal e bambu imperial Root systems of new zealand flax, sisal, and imperial bamboo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlio César Medina

    1963-01-01

    Full Text Available Os autores apresentam e discutem os resultados de estudos preliminares sôbre o sistema radicular do fórmio (Phormium tenax Forster, sisal (Agave sisalana Perrine e bambu .imperial (Bambusa vulgaris Schrad. var. vittata A. ,& C, Riv.. Concluem, que o sistema radicular do fórmio é relativamente raso, o do sisal bastante superficial é o do bambu imperial se limitada às primeiras carnadas do solo.Results of preliminary studies on root-systems of New Zealand flax (Phormium tenax Forster, sisal (Agave sisalana Perrine, and imperial bamboo (Bambusa vulgaris Schrad. var. vittata A. & C. Riv. plants by the method of soil block, are apresented and discussed by the authors. According to local soil conditions, it is concluded that the root-system of New Zealand flax is relatively superficial, with the main concentration of roots in the 12 in. soil top layer. In sisal, the root-systems of the three plants investigated were found to occur in the soil surface layer, with more of 90% of the roots in the top 6 in. Finally, in the imperial bamboo clump atudied, the main concentration of roots was found in the layer 6-12 in. deep.

  2. Clinical evaluation of demineralization and remineralization of intact root surface lesions in the clinic by a quantitative light-induced fluorescence system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durmusoglu, Oykü; Tağtekin, Dilek Arslantunali; Yanikoğlu, Funda

    2012-03-01

    Detection of demineralization of root surface caries is an important issue since preventive approaches prolong tooth life. Quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF) has been shown to be useful for the laboratory assessment of demineralization of root surfaces. The aim of this study was to determine the demineralization and remineralization of root surface intact and cavitated caries lesions using a QLF system as a nondestructive in vivo method. Noncavitated and demineralized root surface lesions were detected and scored using the QLF system. Oral hygiene education was given and periodontal cleaning was completed before the remineralization treatment. After obtaining baseline QLF data, the patients were informed about the remineralization treatment. Fluoride varnish was applied to the carious lesions at the baseline visit, and the patients were then reviewed after 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks, with QLF assessment and fluoride varnish application repeated at each review. Repeated-measures ANOVA (α = 0.05) showed significant differences between ΔQ values at each visit (p Bifluoride 12 varnish improved mineral levels as shown by the QLF system. The treatment response to chemicals of intact noncavitated root surface carious lesions could be followed nondestructively in the clinic using QLF to quantify remineralization at recall visits. Teeth with root surface caries can be kept by controlling their remineralization.

  3. High conversion self-curing sealer based on a novel injectable polyurethane system for root canal filling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Bin [Research Center for Nano-Biomaterials, Analytical and Testing Center, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Zuo, Yi, E-mail: zoae@scu.edu.cn [Research Center for Nano-Biomaterials, Analytical and Testing Center, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Li, Jidong; Wang, Li [Research Center for Nano-Biomaterials, Analytical and Testing Center, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Tang, Kuangyun [The State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases and Orthognathic Surgery, Sichuan University West China College of Stomatology, Chengdu 610064 (China); Huang, Di; Du, Jingjing; Luo, Peipei; Li, Yubao [Research Center for Nano-Biomaterials, Analytical and Testing Center, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China)

    2013-08-01

    Low monomer–polymer conversion is the key factor leading to cytotoxicity for resin-containing restorative materials. This paper provides a new root canal filling system based on self-curing injectable polyurethane which can achieve high conversion in a short time. Traced FTIR spectra show more than 90% NCO group participated in the curing reaction after 4 h, and only about 5% remained after 24 h. The calculated data also testified the curing process supports a third-order reaction, and this efficient and sufficient reaction is postulated to weaken the toxic stimulation. By culturing with L929 murine fibroblasts, the PU sealer is shown to be favorable for cell attachment and proliferation. Then physicochemical properties of the injectable PU-based sealer were evaluated according to the Standard [ISO 6876:2001 (E)] for clinical application. A series of physicochemical properties of PU sealer have been tested comparing with AH Plus and Apexit Plus. And the results present that the self-curing PU sealer could not only match the clinic requirements, but even has better properties than the other two commercial sealers. We expect the high conversion PU sealer has a tremendous potential in the field of root canal filling after further biological evaluation. - Highlights: • A new root canal sealer based on self-curing injectable polyurethane was provided. • More than 90% NCO group reacted after 4h, and only about 5% remained after 24 h. • By culturing with L929 murine fibroblasts, the PU sealer showed perfect cytocompatibility. • Volumetric dilatancy after curing will make the sealer achieve a tight seal.

  4. Capturing Arabidopsis Root Architecture Dynamics with root-fit Reveals Diversity in Responses to Salinity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M. Julkowska; H.C.J. Hoefsloot; S. Mol; R. Feron; G.J. de Boer; M.A. Haring; C. Testerink

    2014-01-01

    The plant root is the first organ to encounter salinity stress, but the effect of salinity on root system architecture (RSA) remains elusive. Both the reduction in main root (MR) elongation and the redistribution of the root mass between MRs and lateral roots (LRs) are likely to play crucial roles i

  5. Nod Factor Effects on Root Hair-Specific Transcriptome of Medicago truncatula: Focus on Plasma Membrane Transport Systems and Reactive Oxygen Species Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiani, Isabelle; Drain, Alice; Guichard, Marjorie; Balzergue, Sandrine; Boscari, Alexandre; Boyer, Jean-Christophe; Brunaud, Véronique; Cottaz, Sylvain; Rancurel, Corinne; Da Rocha, Martine; Fizames, Cécile; Fort, Sébastien; Gaillard, Isabelle; Maillol, Vincent; Danchin, Etienne G J; Rouached, Hatem; Samain, Eric; Su, Yan-Hua; Thouin, Julien; Touraine, Bruno; Puppo, Alain; Frachisse, Jean-Marie; Pauly, Nicolas; Sentenac, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    Root hairs are involved in water and nutrient uptake, and thereby in plant autotrophy. In legumes, they also play a crucial role in establishment of rhizobial symbiosis. To obtain a holistic view of Medicago truncatula genes expressed in root hairs and of their regulation during the first hours of the engagement in rhizobial symbiotic interaction, a high throughput RNA sequencing on isolated root hairs from roots challenged or not with lipochitooligosaccharides Nod factors (NF) for 4 or 20 h was carried out. This provided a repertoire of genes displaying expression in root hairs, responding or not to NF, and specific or not to legumes. In analyzing the transcriptome dataset, special attention was paid to pumps, transporters, or channels active at the plasma membrane, to other proteins likely to play a role in nutrient ion uptake, NF electrical and calcium signaling, control of the redox status or the dynamic reprogramming of root hair transcriptome induced by NF treatment, and to the identification of papilionoid legume-specific genes expressed in root hairs. About 10% of the root hair expressed genes were significantly up- or down-regulated by NF treatment, suggesting their involvement in remodeling plant functions to allow establishment of the symbiotic relationship. For instance, NF-induced changes in expression of genes encoding plasma membrane transport systems or disease response proteins indicate that root hairs reduce their involvement in nutrient ion absorption and adapt their immune system in order to engage in the symbiotic interaction. It also appears that the redox status of root hair cells is tuned in response to NF perception. In addition, 1176 genes that could be considered as "papilionoid legume-specific" were identified in the M. truncatula root hair transcriptome, from which 141 were found to possess an ortholog in every of the six legume genomes that we considered, suggesting their involvement in essential functions specific to legumes. This

  6. Nod factor effects on root hair-specific transcriptome of Medicago truncatula: focus on plasma membrane transport systems and reactive oxygen species networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle eDAMIANI

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Root hairs are involved in water and nutrient uptake, and thereby in plant autotrophy. In legumes, they also play a crucial role in establishment of rhizobial symbiosis. To obtain a holistic view of Medicago truncatula genes expressed in root hairs and of their regulation during the first hours of the engagement in rhizobial symbiotic interaction, a high throughput RNA sequencing on isolated root hairs from roots challenged or not with lipochitooligosaccharides Nod factors (NF for 4 h or 20 h was carried out. This provided a repertoire of genes displaying expression in root hairs, responding or not to NF and specific or not to legumes. In analyzing the transcriptome dataset, special attention was paid to pumps, transporters or channels active at the plasma membrane, to other proteins likely to play a role in nutrient ion uptake, NF electrical and calcium signaling, control of the redox status or the dynamic reprogramming of root hair transcriptome induced by NF treatment, and to the identification of papilionoid legume-specific genes expressed in root hairs. About 10 percent of the root hair expressed genes were significantly up- or down-regulated by NF treatment, suggesting their involvement in remodeling plant functions to allow establishment of the symbiotic relationship. For instance, NF-induced changes in expression of genes encoding plasma membrane transport systems or disease response proteins indicate that root hairs reduce their involvement in nutrient ion absorption and adapt their immune system in order to engage in the symbiotic interaction. It also appears that the redox status of root hair cells is tuned in response to NF perception. In addition, 1,176 genes that could be considered as papilionoid legume-specific were identified in the M. truncatula root hair transcriptome, from which 141 were found to possess an orthologue in every of the 6 legume genomes that we considered, suggesting their involvement in essential functions

  7. Computed tomography scanning can monitor the effects of soil medium on root system development: an example of salt stress in corn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Sowmyalakshmi; Han, Liwen; Dutilleul, Pierre; Smith, Donald L

    2015-01-01

    Seeds and young seedlings often encounter high soluble salt levels in the upmost soil layers, impeding vigorous growth by affecting root establishment. Computed tomography (CT) scanning used at low X-ray doses can help study root development in such conditions non-destructively, because plants are allowed to grow throughout the experiment. Using a high-resolution Toshiba XVision CT scanner, we studied corn (Zea mays L.) root growth under optimal and salt-stressed conditions in 3D and on a weekly basis over 3 weeks. Two groups of three corn plants were grown in the controlled environment of a growth chamber, in mid-sized plastic pots filled with sieved and autoclaved sand. Seedlings were subjected to first CT scanning 1 week after seed planting. Our main research objectives concerning root systems were: (i) to quantify structural complexity from fractal dimensions estimated on skeletal 3-D images built from CT scanning data; (ii) to measure growth from volumes and lengths and the derived relative rates and increments, after isolating primary and secondary roots from the soil medium in CT scanning data; and (iii) to assess differences in complexity and growth per week and over Weeks 1-3 for groups of corn plants. Differences between groups were present from Week 1; starting in Week 2 secondary roots were present and could be isolated, which refined the complexity and growth analyses of root systems. Besides expected Week main effects (P medium of crop plants such as corn and the assessment of salt stress effects on developing root systems, in complexity, volume, and length. PMID:25972876

  8. Sexual differentiation of the brain: a model for drug-induced alterations of the reproductive system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process of the sexual differentiation of the brain represents a valuable model system for the study of the chemical modification of the mammalian brain. Although there are numerous functional and structural sex differences in the adult brain, these are imposed on an essentially feminine or bipotential brain by testicular hormones during a critical phase of perinatal development in the rat. It is suggested that a relatively marked structural sex difference in the rat brain, the sexually dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area (SDN-POA), is a morphological signature of the permanent or organizational action of estradiol derived from the aromatization of testicular testosterone. The SDN-POA of the male rat is severalfold larger in volume and is composed of more neurons than that of the female. The observation that the mitotic formation of the neurons of the SDN-POA is specifically prolonged has enabled us to identify the time course and pathway of neuronal migration into the nucleus. Study of the development of the SDN-POA suggests that estradiol in the male increases the number of neurons which survive a phase of neuronal death by exerting a neurite growth promoting action and/or a direct neuronotrophic action. Finally, although it is clear that gonadal hormones have dramatic permanent effects on the brain during perinatal development, even after puberty and in adulthood gonadal steroids can alter neuronal structure and, perhaps as a corollary to this, have permanent effects on reproductive function. Although the brain may be most sensitive to gonadal hormones or exogenous chemical factors during perinatal development, such as sensitivity does not appear limited to this period

  9. Root canal retained restorations: 3. Root-face attachments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dummer, P M; Edmunds, D H; Gidden, J R

    1990-10-01

    It has been common practice for many years to use retained roots to provide support and stability for partial or full dentures. The retention of such overdentures is greatly enhanced if the remaining roots are modified and restored with posts and root-face attachments. The final article in this series on root canal retained restorations classifies and describes some of the root-face attachments currently available, and also describes a number of prefabricated post systems with integral overdenture attachments. Guidelines for clinical and laboratory procedures are given. PMID:2097234

  10. Root resorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Inger

    2014-01-01

    -an ectodermal tissue layer (Malassez′s epithelium), a middle layer-composed by the collagen-mesodermal tissue layer, and an innermost root-close innervation layer. Abnormalities in one of these tissue layers are thought to cause inflammatory processes in the periodontal membrane comparable to inflammatory...... formerly been demonstrated how demyelinization of the myelin sheaths in the peripheral nerves close to the root provoke resorption. Accordingly, conditions affecting these tissue layers can be associated not only with different morphologies but also with general symptoms and diseases (e.g., ectodermal...... orthodontic treatment. The Hypothesis: The hypothesis in this paper is that three different tissue layers covering the root in the so-called periroot sheet can explain signs and symptoms of importance for avoiding root resorption during orthodontic treatment. These different tissue layers are; outermost...

  11. Metabolic system alterations in pancreatic cancer patient serum: potential for early detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The prognosis of pancreatic cancer (PC) is one of the poorest among all cancers, due largely to the lack of methods for screening and early detection. New biomarkers for identifying high-risk or early-stage subjects could significantly impact PC mortality. The goal of this study was to find metabolic biomarkers associated with PC by using a comprehensive metabolomics technology to compare serum profiles of PC patients to healthy control subjects. A non-targeted metabolomics approach based on high-resolution, flow-injection Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FI-FTICR-MS) was used to generate comprehensive metabolomic profiles containing 2478 accurate mass measurements from the serum of Japanese PC patients (n=40) and disease-free subjects (n=50). Targeted flow-injection tandem mass spectrometry (FI-MS/MS) assays for specific metabolic systems were developed and used to validate the FI-FTICR-MS results. A FI-MS/MS assay for the most discriminating metabolite discovered by FI-FTICR-MS (PC-594) was further validated in two USA Caucasian populations; one comprised 14 PCs, six intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasims (IPMN) and 40 controls, and a second comprised 1000 reference subjects aged 30 to 80, which was used to create a distribution of PC-594 levels among the general population. FI-FTICR-MS metabolomic analysis showed significant reductions in the serum levels of metabolites belonging to five systems in PC patients compared to controls (all p<0.000025). The metabolic systems included 36-carbon ultra long-chain fatty acids, multiple choline-related systems including phosphatidylcholines, lysophosphatidylcholines and sphingomyelins, as well as vinyl ether-containing plasmalogen ethanolamines. ROC-AUCs based on FI-MS/MS of selected markers from each system ranged between 0.93 ±0.03 and 0.97 ±0.02. No significant correlations between any of the systems and disease-stage, gender, or treatment were observed. Biomarker PC-594 (an ultra long

  12. PLANT MICROBIOME. Salicylic acid modulates colonization of the root microbiome by specific bacterial taxa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebeis, Sarah L; Paredes, Sur Herrera; Lundberg, Derek S; Breakfield, Natalie; Gehring, Jase; McDonald, Meredith; Malfatti, Stephanie; Glavina del Rio, Tijana; Jones, Corbin D; Tringe, Susannah G; Dangl, Jeffery L

    2015-08-21

    Immune systems distinguish "self" from "nonself" to maintain homeostasis and must differentially gate access to allow colonization by potentially beneficial, nonpathogenic microbes. Plant roots grow within extremely diverse soil microbial communities but assemble a taxonomically limited root-associated microbiome. We grew isogenic Arabidopsis thaliana mutants with altered immune systems in a wild soil and also in recolonization experiments with a synthetic bacterial community. We established that biosynthesis of, and signaling dependent on, the foliar defense phytohormone salicylic acid is required to assemble a normal root microbiome. Salicylic acid modulates colonization of the root by specific bacterial families. Thus, plant immune signaling drives selection from the available microbial communities to sculpt the root microbiome.

  13. Root Raised Cosine (RRC) Filters and Pulse Shaping in Communication Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubukcu, Erkin

    2012-01-01

    This presentation briefly discusses application of the Root Raised Cosine (RRC) pulse shaping in the space telecommunication. Use of the RRC filtering (i.e., pulse shaping) is adopted in commercial communications, such as cellular technology, and used extensively. However, its use in space communication is still relatively new. This will possibly change as the crowding of the frequency spectrum used in the space communication becomes a problem. The two conflicting requirements in telecommunication are the demand for high data rates per channel (or user) and need for more channels, i.e., more users. Theoretically as the channel bandwidth is increased to provide higher data rates the number of channels allocated in a fixed spectrum must be reduced. Tackling these two conflicting requirements at the same time led to the development of the RRC filters. More channels with wider bandwidth might be tightly packed in the frequency spectrum achieving the desired goals. A link model with the RRC filters has been developed and simulated. Using 90% power Bandwidth (BW) measurement definition showed that the RRC filtering might improve spectrum efficiency by more than 75%. Furthermore using the matching RRC filters both in the transmitter and receiver provides the improved Bit Error Rate (BER) performance. In this presentation the theory of three related concepts, namely pulse shaping, Inter Symbol Interference (ISI), and Bandwidth (BW) will be touched upon. Additionally the concept of the RRC filtering and some facts about the RRC filters will be presented

  14. Catalan Solids Derived From 3D-Root Systems and Quaternions

    CERN Document Server

    Koca, Mehmet; Koc, Ramazan

    2009-01-01

    Catalan Solids are the duals of the Archimedean solids, vertices of which can be obtained from the Coxeter-Dynkin diagrams A3, B3 and H3 whose simple roots can be represented by quaternions. The respective Weyl groups W(A3), W(B3) and W(H3) acting on the highest weights generate the orbits corresponding to the solids possessing these symmetries. Vertices of the Platonic and Archimedean solids result as the orbits derived from fundamental weights. The Platonic solids are dual to each others however duals of the Archimedean solids are the Catalan solids whose vertices can be written as the union of the orbits, up to some scale factors, obtained by applying the above Weyl groups on the fundamental highest weights (100), (010), (001) for each diagram. The faces are represented by the orbits derived from the weights (010), (110), (101), (011) and (111) which correspond to the vertices of the Archimedean solids. Representations of the Weyl groups W(A3), W(B3) and W(H3) by the quaternions simplify the calculations w...

  15. Descendant root volume varies as a function of root type: estimation of root biomass lost during uprooting in Pinus pinaster

    OpenAIRE

    Danjon, Frédéric; Caplan, Joshua S.; Fortin, Mathieu; Meredieu, Céline

    2013-01-01

    Root systems of woody plants generally display a strong relationship between the cross-sectional area or cross-sectional diameter (CSD) of a root and the dry weight of biomass (DWd) or root volume (Vd) that has grown (i.e., is descendent) from a point. Specification of this relationship allows one to quantify root architectural patterns and estimate the amount of material lost when root systems are extracted from the soil. However, specifications of this relationship generally do not account ...

  16. Fungal pathogens and antagonists in root-soil zone in organic and integrated systems of potato production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenc Leszek

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Occurrence of culturable Fungi and Oomycota in root-soil habitat of potato cv. Owacja in organic and integrated production systems at Osiny (northern Poland was compared in 2008-2010. The densities of both pathogens were significantly greater in the organic system. The eudominant fungal taxa (with frequency > 10% in at least one habitat included species of Fusarium + Gibberella + Haematonectria, Penicillium, Phoma and Trichoderma. The dominant taxa (with frequency 5-10% included species from 13 genera. In the rhizoplane, rhizosphere and non-rhizosphere soil, the total density of potential pathogens was greater in the integrated system, and of potential antagonists in the organic system. Among eudominant and dominant pathogens, Fusarium oxysporum and Gibellulopsis nigrescens occurred at greater density in the integrated system and Haematonectria haematococca and Phoma spp. in the organic system. Among eudominant antagonists, Trichoderma species occurred at greater density in the organic system. The organic system provided more disease suppressive habitat than the integrated system. The occurrence of brown leaf spot and potato blight was however similar in both systems. The mean yield of organic potatoes (24.9 t · ha-1 was higher than the mean organic potato yield in Poland (21.0 t · ha-1 and similar to the mean in other European countries (Germany 25.1 t · ha-1, Great Britain 25.0 t · ha-1. The organic system, based on a 5-year rotation, with narrow-leafed lupin, white mustard and buckwheat as a cover crop, inorganic fertilization based on ground rock phosphate + potassium sulphate, and biological and chemical control of insects and diseases (Bacillus thuringiensis ssp. tenebrionis + copper hydroxide + copper oxychloride, may be recommended for use in central Europe.

  17. Effects of a dwarfing compound, CCC, on the production and export of gibberellin-like substances by root systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, D M; Carr, D J

    1967-03-01

    (2-Chloroethyl)trimethylammonium chloride (Cycocel or CCC), an inhibitor of gibberellin biosynthesis, when repeatedly supplied to the root systems of balsam (Impatiens glandulifera Royle) plants reduces growth in height and the level of gibberellin-like substances in the bleeding sap that exudes from the stumps of detopped plants. Within twelve hours after a single application of the inhibitor to decapitated field peas (Pisum arvense), there are quantitative and qualitative changes in the gibberellins of the sap compared with those in sap collected over the same period of time from untreated plants. These changes are interpreted in terms of the possible blockage by CCC of normal gibberellin production and diversion of precursors into synthesis of "abnormal" gibberellins. PMID:24554364

  18. Dietary bovine lactoferrin alters mucosal and systemic immune cell responses in neonatal piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comstock, Sarah S; Reznikov, Elizabeth A; Contractor, Nikhat; Donovan, Sharon M

    2014-04-01

    Lactoferrin (LF) is a multifunctional immune protein found at high concentrations in human milk. Herein, the effect of dietary bovine LF (bLF) on mucosal and systemic immune development was investigated. Colostrum-deprived piglets were fed formula containing 130 [control (Ctrl)], 367 (LF1), or 1300 (LF3) mg of bLF/(kg body weight · d). To provide passive immunity, sow serum was provided orally during the first 36 h of life. Blood, spleen, mesenteric lymph node (MLN), and ascending colon (Asc) contents were collected on day 7 (n = 10-14/group) and day 14 (n = 10-12/group). Immune cell populations were quantified by flow cytometry and immunoglobulins (Igs) were measured by ELISA. Additionally, immune cells were isolated from spleen and MLNs (n = 7/group) on day 7 and stimulated ex vivo with phytohemagglutinin or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) ± LF for 72 h. Secreted cytokine concentrations were quantified by multiplex assay. Lymphocyte populations [cluster determinant (CD)4, CD8, and natural killer cells] developed normally and were unaffected by dietary bLF. LF3 piglets tended to have 1.4 to 2 times more serum IgG than Ctrl piglets (P = 0.07) or LF1 piglets (P = 0.03), but IgA in Asc contents was unaffected by bLF. Asc IgA was 4 times higher on day 14 than day 7. Spleen cells from LF3 piglets produced 2 times more interleukin (IL)-10 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α ex vivo than those from Ctrl or LF1 piglets. MLN cells from LF1 and LF3 piglets produced 40% more IL-10 and tended to produce 40% more IL-6 (P = 0.05) than those from Ctrl piglets. However, ex vivo bLF did not affect the cytokine response of spleen or MLN cells to LPS. In summary, dietary bLF alters the capacity of MLN and spleen immune cells to respond to stimulation, supporting a role for LF in the initiation of protective immune responses in these immunologically challenged neonates. PMID:24553692

  19. Response of root system growth to low-light stress in indica rice%水稻根系生长对弱光胁迫的响应

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王丽; 邓飞; 郑军; 赵柳; 任万军; 杨文钰

    2012-01-01

    通过盆栽控光试验,研究不同生育阶段遮荫对冈优906根系生长的影响以及不同品种对弱光胁迫的响应.结果表明:抽穗前遮荫处理,随遮荫程度加重,冈优906根系体积、总吸收面积和活跃吸收面积均有所降低,根系生长受到抑制;始穗后轻度遮荫处理(遮53%光强),其根系体积、总吸收面积、活跃吸收面积和根冠比增加,根系生长得以促进,衰老延迟;始穗后重度遮荫(遮73%光强)则不利于其根系正常生长,根系体积、总吸收面积、活跃吸收面积和根系α-萘胺氧化力降低.不同品种根系生长对弱光的反应不同:冈优906耐荫性较强,有较高的根系a-萘胺氧化力和活跃吸收面积;耐荫性较弱的Ⅱ优498则表现为根系α-萘胺氧化力和活跃吸收面积的较大幅度减少.灰色关联度分析表明,根系α-萘胺氧化力和活跃吸收面积可以作为耐荫性敏感鉴定的有效指标.%Rice (Oryza sativa L.) as a photophilous crop, often encounters low-light environment during the growth stage in rice-producing areas particularly in Sichuan. Low-light stress seriously affects the morphology, physiology, grain yield and quality of rice. However, the response of rice root system to low-light stress is not so far clear. Therefore, we seeks to examine the responses of five rice varieties to low-light stress at different growth stages through pot experiments under artificially-controlled shading condition using white cotton yarn screen. By a completely randomized design, the pot experiments were carried out on the experimental farm of Sichuan Agricultural University in 2009. In experiment 1, one-layer and two-layer white cotton yarn screens, which shaded about 53 % and 73 % of the full light intensity respectively, were covered on the top of rice canopy of Gangyou 906 at tillering-elongation stage, elongation-booting stage, booting-heading stage, and heading-maturing stage respectively. In experiment 2

  20. Altered systemic bioavailability and organ distribution of azathioprine in methotrexate-induced intestinal mucositis in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadaf A Karbelkar

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Study outcome has thrown light on altered fate of AZA when administered to individuals with mucositis which suggests modified drug therapy. These findings can further be investigated in different drug classes which might be administered concomitantly in mucositis and study outcome can be further confirmed in mucositis patients in clinical practice also.

  1. 78 FR 47322 - Privacy Act of 1974; Report of an Altered System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-05

    ... support the NPDB must attend security training, sign a Non-Disclosure Agreement, and sign the Rules of... deleted. The NPDB SORN was last published March 30, 2012 (77 FR 19295). The proposed alterations to the...), Monday through Friday. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Director, Division of Practitioner Data...

  2. Response of the photosynthetic system to altered protein composition and changes in environmental conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tóth, T.

    2014-01-01

    The photosynthetic thylakoid membrane has a hierarchically ordered structure containing pigment-protein complexes that capture solar radiation and convert it into chemical energy. Its highly dynamic structure is capable to continuously respond to the altered environmental conditions, e.g., light qua

  3. Water uptake patterns and root system architecture of Zea mays in a natural soil under influence of drought stress monitored by MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merz, Steffen; Pohlmeier, Andreas; Seidler, Christina; van Dusschoten, Dagmar; Vereecken, Harry

    2012-04-01

    The interface between roots and soil plays a key role in water transport in the Soil-Plant-Atmosphere-Continuum (SPAC). The transport which changes with the degree of dehydration is influenced by both the hydraulic conductivity of roots and the soil. One important factor in plant growth is the amount of available water in the soil, which correlates directly with soil texture. Water uptake of plant roots and water uptake patterns in soil can be monitored using non-invasive 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). In a preceding study the effect of root water uptake and uniform desiccation patterns under drought conditions were observed for Ricinus communis grown in a model medium (Pohlmeier et al. 2008). Continuing these studies, the new aspect is the determination of water uptake patterns and root system architecture in a natural soil. The general challenge of MRI in soils are the inherent fast relaxation times T2* and T2 of the soil matrix. With the use of conventional sequences only water in macropores can be determined. The loss of sensitivity can be overcome by MRI sequences with sufficiently short detection times. In this work we employed and assessed two methods: SPI (Single Point Imaging) detects the T2* relaxation with a dead time of Ricinus Root Uptake Monitored by Magnetic Resonance Imaging" Vadose Zone J. 7: 1010-1017.

  4. Nitrate Starvation Induced Changes in Root System Architecture, Carbon:Nitrogen Metabolism, and miRNA Expression in Nitrogen-Responsive Wheat Genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Subodh Kumar; Rani, Manju; Bansal, Niketa; Gayatri; Venkatesh, K; Mandal, P K

    2015-11-01

    Improvement of nutrient use efficiency in cereal crops is highly essential not only to reduce the cost of cultivation but also to save the environmental pollution, reduce energy consumption for production of these chemical fertilizers, improve soil health, and ultimately help in mitigating climate change. In the present investigation, we have studied the morphological (with special emphasis on root system architecture) and biochemical responses (in terms of assay of the key enzymes involved in N assimilation) of two N-responsive wheat genotypes, at the seedling stage, under nitrate-optimum and nitrate-starved conditions grown in hydroponics. Expression profile of a few known wheat micro RNAs (miRNAs) was also studied in the root tissue. Total root size, primary root length, and first- and second-order lateral root numbers responded significantly under nitrate-starved condition. Morphological parameters in terms of root and shoot length and fresh and dry weight of roots and shoots have also been observed to be significant between N-optimum and N-starved condition for each genotypes. Nitrate reductase (NR), glutamine synthatase (GS), and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) activity significantly decreased under N-starved condition. Glutamine oxoglutarate amino transferase (GOGAT) and pyruvate kinase (PK) activity was found to be genotype dependent. Most of the selected miRNAs were expressed in root tissues, and some of them showed their differential N-responsive expression. Our studies indicate that one of the N-responsive genotype (NP-890) did not get affected significantly under nitrogen starvation at seedling stage. PMID:26315134

  5. A comparative evaluation of root canal area increase using three different nickel-titanium rotary systems: An ex vivo cone-beam computed tomographic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrija Deka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: The present study was undertaken to compare and evaluate the area increase of root canals with ProTaper, iRaCe and Revo-S systems using cone beam computed tomography for analysis. Materials and Methodology: Forty five extracted human mandibular premolars having single canal and straight root were collected. Teeth were randomly assigned to three groups (n=15. Samples were decoronized by maintaining root length at 14 mm. Pre-instrumentation cone beam computed tomography scan was done after stabilizing the samples on wax blocks. The working length was determined at 1 mm short from the apical foramen by using a ISO 15 K-file tip protruding at apical foramen. Preparation was carried out according to the manufacturer′s instructions. Finally, canals were instrumented upto 30/.06 apically for each group. After each instrumentation, root canals were irrigated with 2ml of 3% sodium hypochlorite solution followed by 2 ml of 17% EDTA solution. Final irrigation was done with 5ml of saline. Post instrumentation cone beam computed tomography scans of all samples in the 3 groups were acquired. Results: Mean percentage of area increase in different thirds of the canal was highest for ProTaper followed by i-RaCe and Revo-s system which was statistically significant. Interpretation and Conclusion: Root canal area increase was highest for ProTaper followed by i-Race and Revo-S systems.

  6. Long term alteration of glass/iron systems in anoxic conditions: contribution of archaeological analogues to the study of mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The knowledge of glass alteration mechanisms arouses a great interest over the last decades, particularly in the nuclear field, since vitrification is used to stabilize high-level radioactive wastes in many countries. In the French concept, these nuclear glasses would be stored in geological repositories. This multi-barrier system (glass matrix, stainless steel container, low carbon steel over-container, geological barrier) must ensure the durable confinement of radionuclides. But laboratory experiments do not permit to predict directly the behaviour of these materials over typically a million-year timescale and the extrapolation of short-term laboratory data to long time periods remains problematic. Part of the validation of the predictive models relies on natural and archaeological analogues. Here, the analogues considered are vitreous slags produced as wastes by a blast furnace working during the 16. century in the iron making site of Glinet (Normandy, France). The choice of these specific artefacts is due to the presence of particular interface between corrosion products and glass matrix inside the blocks. Thus, they can help us to understand the influence of iron corrosion products from the steel containers on the glass alteration mechanisms and kinetics. A first part of this work concerns the characterization of the archaeological artefacts especially the interfacial area between glass and corrosion products inside cracks using micro and nano-beam techniques ( Raman spectroscopy, FEG-SEM, TEM, STXM...). This study has enabled to suggest an alteration process with different geochemical steps that leads to alteration profile observed. One of these steps is the precipitation of an iron silicate phase. In a second time, leaching experiments were set up on a synthetic glass of similar composition than the archaeological one to understand the first stages of alteration with and without iron. Two phenomena can be observed: silicon sorption and precipitation of iron

  7. Long-lasting alterations in the immune system of Chernobyl accident victims: manifestations, nature and possible consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hypothesis is formulated, which explains genesis of long-lasting disturbances in the immune system of the persons affected by factors of Chernobyl disaster. Immunological alterations which are displayed at the late time after action of radiation in doses 0.5 Gy or lower are not a result of direct damage of the cells of immune system by irradiation. Their development is more probably a result of appearance of some systemic conditions and factors in affected organism - such as hormonal disbalance and especially autoantibodies of different specificities, including those reactive with thymic epithelial cells. Refs. 60, refs. 5

  8. The Astronomical Roots of Sapling Learning: Building a Comprehensive Online Homework System for Astro 101

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, A.

    2014-07-01

    I discuss the method of creating a library of questions for Astro 101 within the Sapling Learning homework system, as well as the philosophy behind the types of homework questions (and feedback) that are being written. The system's features were built around meeting five basic goals: flexibility, engaging content, peer instruction, immediate instructional feedback, and exploration.

  9. Evolution of Root Characters of Soybean Varieties Developed in Different Years

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xiu-hong; WU Zong-pu; ZHANG Guo-dong

    2002-01-01

    It was studied that the evolution of root characteristics among 42 soybean varieties developed in Heilongjiang and Jilin Province in different years. The results showed that there were differences on the root characteristics among soybean varieties. From 1950s to 1990s, root fresh weight, root volume, root surface, root dry weight, lateral root length of main root characters tendedly increased with the variable development years. The root system of the varieties in 1990s was relatively well developed compared with that in the other years. The evolutionary trend of the root system of soybean varieties was increasing in root weight, root volume, root surface and length of lateral root.

  10. Touch and gravitropic set-point angle interact to modulate gravitropic growth in roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massa, G. D.; Gilroy, S.

    2003-01-01

    Plant roots must sense and respond to a variety of environmental stimuli as they grow through the soil. Touch and gravity represent two of the mechanical signals that roots must integrate to elicit the appropriate root growth patterns and root system architecture. Obstacles such as rocks will impede the general downwardly directed gravitropic growth of the root system and so these soil features must be sensed and this information processed for an appropriate alteration in gravitropic growth to allow the root to avoid the obstruction. We show that primary and lateral roots of Arabidopsis do appear to sense and respond to mechanical barriers placed in their path of growth in a qualitatively similar fashion. Both types of roots exhibited a differential growth response upon contacting the obstacle that directed the main axis of elongation parallel to the barrier. This growth habit was maintained until the obstacle was circumvented, at which point normal gravitropic growth was resumed. Thus, the gravitational set-point angle of the primary and lateral roots prior to encountering the barrier were 95 degrees and 136 degrees respectively and after growing off the end of the obstacle identical set-point angles were reinstated. However, whilst tracking across the barrier, quantitative differences in response were observed between these two classes of roots. The root tip of the primary root maintained an angle of 136 degrees to the horizontal as it traversed the barrier whereas the lateral roots adopted an angle of 154 degrees. Thus, this root tip angle appeared dependent on the gravitropic set-point angle of the root type with the difference in tracking angle quantitatively reflecting differences in initial set-point angle. Concave and convex barriers were also used to analyze the response of the root to tracking along a continuously varying surface. The roots maintained the a fairly fixed angle to gravity on the curved surface implying a constant resetting of this tip angle

  11. Computed tomography scanning can monitor the effects of soil medium on root system development: An example of salt stress in corn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sowmyalakshmi eSubramanian

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Seeds and young seedlings often encounter high soluble salt levels in the upmost soil layers, impeding vigorous growth by affecting root establishment. Computed tomography (CT scanning used at low X-ray doses can help study root development in such conditions non-destructively, because plants are allowed to grow throughout the experiment. Using a high-resolution Toshiba XVision CT scanner, we studied corn (Zea mays L. root growth under optimal and salt-stressed conditions in 3D and on a weekly basis over 3 weeks. Two groups of 3 corn plants were grown in the controlled environment of a growth chamber, in mid-sized plastic pots filled with sieved and autoclaved sand. Seedlings were subjected to first CT scanning one week after seed planting. Our main research objectives concerning root systems were: (i to quantify structural complexity from fractal dimensions estimated on skeletal 3-D images built from CT scanning data; (ii to measure growth from volumes and derived relative rates, after isolating primary and secondary roots from the soil medium in CT scanning data; and (iii to assess differences in complexity and growth per week and over Weeks 1–3 for groups of corn plants. Differences between groups were present from Week 1; starting in Week 2 secondary roots were present and could be isolated, which refined the complexity and growth analyses of root systems. Besides expected Week main effects (P < 0.01 or 0.05, Week x Group interaction (P < 0.05 or 0.10 and Group main effects were observed, which is remarkable given the small sample sizes. Graphical, quantitative and statistical analyses of CT scanning data were thus completed at an unprecedented level, and provided new and important insights regarding root system development. Repeated CT scanning is the key to a better understanding of the establishment in the soil medium of crop plants such as corn and the assessment of salt stress effects on developing root systems, in complexity and

  12. Evaluating root zone water quality impacts associated with various biomass production systems across landscape positions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, W.; Zhou, X.; Helmers, M. J.; Schulte Moore, L.; Isenhart, T.; Kolka, R.

    2011-12-01

    Evaluating the water quality impacts of biomass production systems is essential to assessing biomass production systems' environmental impacts. The objective of this study is to determine potential water quality impacts of various production systems across different landscape positions. Five production systems are being evaluated: (1) continuous corn, (2) corn-soy/triticale-soy, (3) switchgrass, (4) triticale/sorghum, and (5) triticale/trees, at five landscape locations: (1) summit, (2) shoulder, (3) backslope, (4) toeslope, and (5) floodplain. Each production system is randomly assigned within three replicates at each landscape location. Soil water samples are taken monthly during the growing season from two suction lysimeters per plot at a depth of 60cm. Initial results indicate significant differences between the production systems and a likely association between fertilizer input and NO3-N concentrations with corn plots having the highest concentration and the tree plots having the lowest. Relatively high concentrations in the corn and sorghum plots following fertilization were observed the first year and similar results are being observed early in the second year of observations. A significant landscape effect was observed late in the growing season during the first year of this study. Quantifying the environmental impacts of biomass production systems will aid in optimizing deployment as producers gear up to meet biomass production demand.

  13. Cell Cycle Control and Adhesion Molecule Expression in Cells of the Immune System are Sensitive to Altered Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich, O.; Paulsen, K.; Thiel, C.; Herrmann, K.; Sang, C.; Han, G.; Hemmersbach, R.; von der Wiesche, M.; Kroll, H.; Zhuang, F.; Grote, K. H.; Cogoli, A.; Zipp, F.; Engelmann, F.

    2008-06-01

    Life on earth developed in the presence and under the constant influence of gravity. Thus, it is a fundamental biological question, whether gravity is required for cellular functions and signal transduction in mammalian cells. Since the first Spacelab-Mission 20 years ago, it is known that activation and function of T lymphocytes is severely suppressed in microgravity, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are not elucidated. Experiments have been performed using ground-based facilities such as fast-rotating clinostat and hyper-g-centrifuges, and real microgravity provided by parabolic flights. We found that 1.) cells of the immune system responded cell type specifically to altered gravity, 2.) microgravity induced a multitude of initial alterations in signal transduction, whereas 3.) hypergravity of 1.8g did not induce any changes of the pathways tested, and that 4.) most of the initially altered pathways in microgravity adapted to "normal" levels within 15min. However, some pathways remained altered and could explain cell cycle arrest of T lymphocytes as observed in several long-term space experiments.

  14. 一种构建嵌入式Linux根文件系统的方法%A method of building embedded Linux root file system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘二钢

    2016-01-01

    根文件系统是构建嵌入式Linux系统的非常重要的组成部分。文中主要以制作Yaffs2根文件系统为例,研究如何使用BusyBox构建嵌入式Linux的根文件系统,包括BusyBox的配置、编译和安装,以及在嵌入式Linux环境下生成根文件系统映像文件的方法。文中所介绍的方法能够成功地在ARM开发板中移植和运行,为嵌入式系统的开发提出了一种简单易行的研究思路。%The root file system is a very important part of building the embedded Linux system. This paper mainly makes Yaffs2 root file system as an example of studying how to use the BusyBox to build embedded Linux root file system, including the BusyBox configuration, compilation and installation, and generates the system image files of root file in the embedded Linux environment. The method introduced in the paper is able to transplant and run successfully in the ARM development board, and puts forward a kind of feasible research ideas for the development of embedded system.

  15. Environmental and molecular characterization of systems which affect genome alteration in pseudomonas aeruginosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is used as a model organism to study genome alteration in freshwater microbial populations and horizontal gene transmission by both transduction and conjugation has been demonstrated. The studies have also provided data which suggest that intracellular genome instability may be increased in the aquatic environment as a result of stresses encountered by the cell in this habitat. The role of the P. aeruginosa recA analog in regulating genome instability is also addressed

  16. Pathogenesis of Bone Alterations in Gaucher Disease: The Role of Immune System

    OpenAIRE

    Juan Marcos Mucci; Paula Rozenfeld

    2015-01-01

    Gaucher, the most prevalent lysosomal disorder, is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder due to a deficiency of glucocerebrosidase. Glucocerebrosidase deficiency leads to the accumulation of glucosylceramide primarily in cells of mononuclear-macrophage lineage. Clinical alterations are visceral, hematological, and skeletal. Bone disorder in Gaucher disease produces defects on bone metabolism and structure and patients suffer from bone pain and crisis. Skeletal problems include osteopenia,...

  17. REVIEW OF SQUARE ROOTING AND TONE INJECTION METHOD FOR PAPR REDUCTION IN OFDM SYSTEM

    OpenAIRE

    Prof. Ananta S. Chavan*, Prof. Kailash V. Karad

    2016-01-01

    The best multi-carrier system for wireless communication is an OFDM system for which PAPR is one of the major critical problems. Previously, various solutions have been proposed to reduce the PAPR. In this paper, we are reviewing these solutions on basis of PAPR, bit error rate (BER), complimentary cumulative distribution function (CCDF), in band and out of band radiation. Later section investigates the simulation results and conclusion based on the above parameters.

  18. Physarum Polycephalum Syllogistic L-Systems and Judaic Roots of Unconventional Computing

    OpenAIRE

    Schumann Andrew

    2016-01-01

    We show that in Kabbalah, the esoteric teaching of Judaism, there were developed ideas of unconventional automata in which operations over characters of the Hebrew alphabet can simulate all real processes producing appropriate strings in accordance with some algorithms. These ideas may be used now in a syllogistic extension of Lindenmayer systems (L-systems), where we deal also with strings in the Kabbalistic-Leibnizean meaning. This extension is illustrated by the behavior of Physarum polyce...

  19. Fibrous-Root-Inspired Design and Lithium Storage Applications of a Co-Zn Binary Synergistic Nanoarray System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jia; Chen, Shimou; Hao, Wenjun; Zhang, Suojiang

    2016-02-23

    Developing lithium ion batteries (LIBs) with fast charging/discharging capability and high capacity is a significant issue for future technical requirements. Transition-metal oxide (TMO) materials are widely studied as the next-generation LIB anode to satisfy this requirement due to their specific capacity, nearly three times than that of conventional graphite anode, and low cost. Meanwhile, they also suffer from slow lithium diffusion and limited electrochemical and structural stability, especially at high charging/discharging rate. The structure design of TMO is an effective strategy to obtain desirable LIB performance. Herein, inspired by natural fibrous roots consisting of functional and supporting units that can enhance substances and energy exchange efficiently, fibrous-root-like Zn(x)Co(3-x)O4@Zn(1-y)Co(y)O binary TMO nanoarrays are designed and synthesized on Cu substrates through a facile one-pot, successive-deposition process for use as an integrated LIB anode. In a multilevel array ordered by orientation, ultrafine Zn(x)Co(3-x)O4 nanowire functional units and stable Zn(1-y)Co(y)O nanorod supporting units synergize, resulting in superior rate performance. At a high current density of 500 mAg(-1), they could maintain a discharge capacity as high as 804 mAh g(-1) after 100 cycles, working much higher than unary cobalt-based and zinc-based nanoarrays. This binary synergistic nanoarray system identifies an optimized electrode design strategy for advanced battery materials. PMID:26841220

  20. Effect of titanium and stainless steel posts in detection of vertical root fractures using NEWTOM VG cone beam computed tomography system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadpour, Mahdis [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bakhshalian, Neema [Dept. of Advanced Periodontology, Ostrow School of Dentistry, University of Southern California, Los Angeles (United States); Shahab, Shahriar [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Shahed University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadeghi, Shaya; Ataee, Mona [Radmehr Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology Clinic, Ghazvin (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sarikhani, Soodeh [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, University of Golestan, Gorgan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    Vertical root fracture (VRF) is a common complication in endodontically treated teeth. Considering the poor prognosis of VRF, a reliable and valid detection method is necessary. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been reported to be a reliable tool for the detection of VRF; however, the presence of metallic intracanal posts can decrease the diagnostic values of CBCT systems. This study evaluated and compared the effects of intracanal stainless steel or titanium posts on the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of VRF detection using a NewTom VG CBCT system. Eighty extracted single-rooted teeth were selected and sectioned at the cemento-enamel junction. The roots were divided into two groups of 40. Root fracture was induced in the test group by using an Instron machine, while the control group was kept intact. Roots were randomly embedded in acrylic blocks and radiographed with the NewTom VG, both with titanium and stainless steel posts and also without posts. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy values were calculated as compared to the gold standard. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of VRF diagnosis were significantly lower in teeth with stainless steel and titanium posts than in those without posts. Interobserver agreement was the highest in teeth without posts, followed by stainless steel posts, and then titanium posts. Intracanal posts significantly decreased the VRF diagnostic values of CBCT. The stainless steel posts decreased the diagnostic values more than the titanium posts.

  1. 苹果根系构型及其调控研究进展%Advances in Research of Apple Root System Architecture and It's Regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨洪强; 范伟国

    2012-01-01

    Root is the core of orchard-floor management and the foundation of the pomiculture. It was reviewed that advances in the research of the choice of material in apple root study, the types of apple root system architecture, and the effect of environmem nutrition, soil condition, planting container and growth regulator on the shape and architecture of apple roots. It was pointed out that further research content in apple root system architecture.%根系是果树栽培管理的基础和中心,重点介绍了苹果根系研究试材的选择、苹果根系构型的类型以及环境营养、土壤条件、栽培容器和生长调节剂等对苹果根系形态构型的影响和调控等方面的研究进展,并提出了进一步研究的内容。

  2. Effect of titanium and stainless steel posts in detection of vertical root fractures using NEWTOM VG cone beam computed tomography system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vertical root fracture (VRF) is a common complication in endodontically treated teeth. Considering the poor prognosis of VRF, a reliable and valid detection method is necessary. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been reported to be a reliable tool for the detection of VRF; however, the presence of metallic intracanal posts can decrease the diagnostic values of CBCT systems. This study evaluated and compared the effects of intracanal stainless steel or titanium posts on the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of VRF detection using a NewTom VG CBCT system. Eighty extracted single-rooted teeth were selected and sectioned at the cemento-enamel junction. The roots were divided into two groups of 40. Root fracture was induced in the test group by using an Instron machine, while the control group was kept intact. Roots were randomly embedded in acrylic blocks and radiographed with the NewTom VG, both with titanium and stainless steel posts and also without posts. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy values were calculated as compared to the gold standard. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of VRF diagnosis were significantly lower in teeth with stainless steel and titanium posts than in those without posts. Interobserver agreement was the highest in teeth without posts, followed by stainless steel posts, and then titanium posts. Intracanal posts significantly decreased the VRF diagnostic values of CBCT. The stainless steel posts decreased the diagnostic values more than the titanium posts.

  3. ROOT TEMPERATURE EFFECT ON ROOT HYDRAULIC RESISTANCE IN CUCUMBER (CUCUMIS SATIVUS L.) AND FIGLEAF GOURD (CUCURBITA FICIFOLIA B.) PLANTS

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshida, Satoshi; Eguchi, Hiromi

    1990-01-01

    The effect of root temperature on total root resistance (hydraulic resistance in a whole root system) was examined in detached whole root systems of cucumber and figleaf gourd plants by applying the suction of 80kPa in root temperature region of 8 to 32℃. The total root resistances in both species became higher at lower root temperatures. From the fact that radial root resistance is about 80% of total root resistance, it could be conceivable that the temperature effect on the total root resis...

  4. Root canal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endodontic therapy ... the root of a tooth. Generally, there is pain and swelling in the area. The infection can ... You may have some pain or soreness after the procedure. An over-the-counter anti-inflammatory drug, such as ibuprofen or naproxen, can help relieve ...

  5. Voting in the European Union: The square root system of Penrose and a critical point

    OpenAIRE

    Zyczkowski, Karol; Slomczynski, Wojciech

    2004-01-01

    The notion of the voting power is illustrated by examples of the systems of voting in the European Council according to the Treaty of Nice and the more recent proposition of the European Convent. We show that both systems are not representative, in a sense that citizens of different countries have not the same influence for the decision taken by the Council. We present a compromise solution based on the law of Penrose, which states that the weights for each country should be proportional to t...

  6. Physarum Polycephalum Syllogistic L-Systems and Judaic Roots of Unconventional Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schumann Andrew

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We show that in Kabbalah, the esoteric teaching of Judaism, there were developed ideas of unconventional automata in which operations over characters of the Hebrew alphabet can simulate all real processes producing appropriate strings in accordance with some algorithms. These ideas may be used now in a syllogistic extension of Lindenmayer systems (L-systems, where we deal also with strings in the Kabbalistic-Leibnizean meaning. This extension is illustrated by the behavior of Physarum polycephalum plasmodia which can implement, first, the Aristotelian syllogistic and, second, a Talmudic syllogistic by qal wa-homer.

  7. Contribution of the root system of vetiver grass towards slope stabilization of the São Francisco River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Machado

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The control of soil erosion along the banks of the São Francisco River requires the use of efficient and economically viable strategies. Soil bioengineering techniques may be an alternative to the conventional methods as they provide good soil stabilization by mechanical reinforcement promoted by the roots. The objective of this study was to evaluate the contribution of the root cohesion of vetiver grass (Chrysopogon zizanioides (L. Roberty on slope stabilization in erosion control along the right margin of the São Francisco river. Seedlings of vetiver grass were planted in the riverbank of the Lower São Francisco located in Sergipe State, northeast Brazil, and plants were sampled after two years of growth to evaluate the effect of grass on the shear strength of the soil. The monolith and cylinder method was used to collect roots for the evaluation of Root Density (RL, Root Length Density (RLD, Root Area Ratio (RAR, Root Tensile Strength (TR, and Root Cohesion (CR. Data were submitted to analysis of variance (p < 0.05, with polynomial regression analysis. The results show that for RL, RLD, and RAR, the layers of soil at depths of 0-0.10 m had the highest values of 4.84 kg m-3, 12.45 km m-3, 1.66%, respectively. The mean TR was 83 MPa and CR was 528 kPa. Vetiver increases shear strength of the soil and slope stabilization.

  8. Fate of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in plant-soil systems: Plant responses to a chemical stress in the root zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoylman, A.M. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Ecology; Walton, B.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Under laboratory conditions selected to maximize root uptake, plant tissue distribution of PAH-derived {sup 14}C was largely limited to root tissue of Malilotus alba. These results suggest that plant uptake of PAHs from contaminated soil via roots, and translocation to aboveground plant tissues (stems and leaves), is a limited mechanism for transport into terrestrial food chains. However, these data also indicate that root surface sorption of PAHs may be important for plants grown in soils containing elevated concentration PAHs. Root surface sorption of PAHs may be an important route of exposure for plants in soils containing elevated concentrations of PAHS. Consequently, the root-soil interface may be the site of plant-microbial interactions in response to a chemical stress. In this study, evidence of a shift in carbon allocation to the root zone of plants exposed to phenanthrene and corresponding increases in soil respiration and heterotrophic plate counts provide evidence of a plant-microbial response to a chemical stress. The results of this study establish the importance of the root-soil interface for plants growing in PAH contaminated soil and indicate the existence of plant-microbial interactions in response to a chemical stress. These results may provide new avenues of inquiry for studies of plant toxicology, plant-microbial interactions in the rhizosphere, and environmental fates of soil contaminants. In addition, the utilization of plants to enhance the biodegradation of soil contaminants may require evaluation of plant physiological changes and plant shifts in resource allocation.

  9. Retaining rooted operations capabilities in footloose supply networks – the system cluster configuration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søberg, Peder Veng; Wæhrens, Brian Vejrum

    2014-01-01

    Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) customers feel a need to realize the benefits of outsourcing, while maintaining the development force, which can easily be lost, if too much is outsourced. The paper illustrates the innovative value chain configuration “system cluster”, in which suppliers...

  10. Nutrient Enrichment Effects on Roots, Rhizomes, and Peat in a System Dominated by Sediment Depositional Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    We examined belowground structure in coastal marshes of the North Inlet Winyah Bay system, a National Estuarine Research Reserve (NERR) in South Carolina, USA. In this observational study we included the Debidue Creek (located approximately 1 km south of a 40 year old residential...

  11. Diverse evolutionary roots and mechanistic variations of the CRISPR-Cas systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohanraju, Prarthana; Makarova, Kira S.; Zetsche, Bernd; Zhang, Feng; Koonin, Eugene V.; Oost, van der John

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive immunity had been long thought of as an exclusive feature of animals. However, the discovery of the CRISPR-Cas defense system, present in almost half of prokaryotic genomes, proves otherwise. Because of the everlasting parasite-host arms race, CRISPR-Cas has rapidly evolved through horiz

  12. Integrating roots into a whole plant network of flowering time genes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouché, Frédéric; D'Aloia, Maria; Tocquin, Pierre; Lobet, Guillaume; Detry, Nathalie; Périlleux, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Molecular data concerning the involvement of roots in the genetic pathways regulating floral transition are lacking. In this study, we performed global analyses of the root transcriptome in Arabidopsis in order to identify flowering time genes that are expressed in the roots and genes that are differentially expressed in the roots during the induction of flowering. Data mining of public microarray experiments uncovered that about 200 genes whose mutations are reported to alter flowering time are expressed in the roots (i.e. were detected in more than 50% of the microarrays). However, only a few flowering integrator genes passed the analysis cutoff. Comparison of root transcriptome in short days and during synchronized induction of flowering by a single 22-h long day revealed that 595 genes were differentially expressed. Enrichment analyses of differentially expressed genes in root tissues, gene ontology categories, and cis-regulatory elements converged towards sugar signaling. We concluded that roots are integrated in systemic signaling, whereby carbon supply coordinates growth at the whole plant level during the induction of flowering. This coordination could involve the root circadian clock and cytokinin biosynthesis as a feed forward loop towards the shoot. PMID:27352932

  13. Hormonal response and root architecture in Arabidopsis thaliana subjected to heavy metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Vitti

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work, specific concentrations of cadmium, copper and zinc in double combination, were supplied for 12 days to growing seedlings of the model species Arabidopsis thaliana. Metal accumulation was measured in roots and shoots. Microscopic analyses revealed that root morphology was affected by metals, and that the root and shoot levels of indole-3-acetic acid, trans-zeatin riboside and dihydrozeatin riboside varied accordingly. Minor modifications in gibberellic acid levels occurred in the Zinc treatments, whereas abscisic acid level did not change after the exposition to metals. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis of some genes involved in auxin and cytokinin synthesis (AtAAO, AtNIT and AtIPT revealed that their expression were not affected by metal treatments. The root morphological alterations that resulted in an increased surface area, due to the formation of root hairs and lateral roots, could be signs of the response to metal stress in terms of a functionally-addressed reorientation of root growth. The root system plasticity observed could be important for better understanding the manner in which the root architecture is shaped by environmental and hormonal stimuli.

  14. Pathogenic LRRK2 mutations do not alter gene expression in cell model systems or human brain tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Devine

    Full Text Available Point mutations in LRRK2 cause autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease. Despite extensive efforts to determine the mechanism of cell death in patients with LRRK2 mutations, the aetiology of LRRK2 PD is not well understood. To examine possible alterations in gene expression linked to the presence of LRRK2 mutations, we carried out a case versus control analysis of global gene expression in three systems: fibroblasts isolated from LRRK2 mutation carriers and healthy, non-mutation carrying controls; brain tissue from G2019S mutation carriers and controls; and HEK293 inducible LRRK2 wild type and mutant cell lines. No significant alteration in gene expression was found in these systems following correction for multiple testing. These data suggest that any alterations in basal gene expression in fibroblasts or cell lines containing mutations in LRRK2 are likely to be quantitatively small. This work suggests that LRRK2 is unlikely to play a direct role in modulation of gene expression, although it remains possible that this protein can influence mRNA expression under pathogenic cicumstances.

  15. Space Shuttle Operations and Infrastructure: A Systems Analysis of Design Root Causes and Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCleskey, Carey M.

    2005-01-01

    This NASA Technical Publication explores and documents the nature of Space Shuttle operations and its supporting infrastructure and addresses fundamental questions often asked of the Space Shuttle program why does it take so long to turnaround the Space Shuttle for flight and why does it cost so much? Further, the report provides an overview of the cause-and effect relationships between generic flight and ground system design characteristics and resulting operations by using actual cumulative maintenance task times as a relative measure of direct work content. In addition, this NASA TP provides an overview of how the Space Shuttle program's operational infrastructure extends and accumulates from these design characteristics. Finally, and most important, the report derives a set of generic needs from which designers can revolutionize space travel from the inside out by developing and maturing more operable and supportable systems.

  16. Diverse evolutionary roots and mechanistic variations of the CRISPR-Cas systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanraju, Prarthana; Makarova, Kira S; Zetsche, Bernd; Zhang, Feng; Koonin, Eugene V; van der Oost, John

    2016-08-01

    Adaptive immunity had been long thought of as an exclusive feature of animals. However, the discovery of the CRISPR-Cas defense system, present in almost half of prokaryotic genomes, proves otherwise. Because of the everlasting parasite-host arms race, CRISPR-Cas has rapidly evolved through horizontal transfer of complete loci or individual modules, resulting in extreme structural and functional diversity. CRISPR-Cas systems are divided into two distinct classes that each consist of three types and multiple subtypes. We discuss recent advances in CRISPR-Cas research that reveal elaborate molecular mechanisms and provide for a plausible scenario of CRISPR-Cas evolution. We also briefly describe the latest developments of a wide range of CRISPR-based applications. PMID:27493190

  17. Comparative efficiency of final endodontic cleansing procedures in removing a radioactive albumin from root canal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fifty-six teeth were initially instrumented, with the use of seven irrigants or irrigant combinations, and filled with radioactive albumin. The study then showed the relative ability of three final endodontic procedures (copious reirrigation with saline solution, drying with paper points, and reassuring patency of the canal with the final instrument) to remove the albumin. Even after copious irrigation, each additional procedure removed statistically significant amounts of albumin. Alternating an organic solvent and an inorganic solvent did appear to leave the canal system in the optimal condition for final cleansing procedures. The study then correlated the relative efficiency of irrigation alone versus instrumentation plus irrigation in removing the remaining albumin from the canal systems. Reinstrumentation plus copious irrigation removed significantly more albumin than copious irrigation alone

  18. A Drought Resistance-Promoting Microbiome Is Selected by Root System under Desert Farming

    OpenAIRE

    Ramona Marasco; Eleonora Rolli; Besma Ettoumi; Gianpiero Vigani; Francesca Mapelli; Sara Borin; Abou-Hadid, Ayman F.; El-Behairy, Usama A.; Claudia Sorlini; Ameur Cherif; Graziano Zocchi; Daniele Daffonchio

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Traditional agro-systems in arid areas are a bulwark for preserving soil stability and fertility, in the sight of "reverse desertification". Nevertheless, the impact of desert farming practices on the diversity and abundance of the plant associated microbiome is poorly characterized, including its functional role in supporting plant development under drought stress. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We assessed the structure of the microbiome associated to the drought-sensitive pepp...

  19. Iron Deficiency-induced Increase of Root Branching Contributes to the Enhanced Root Ferric Chelate Reductase Activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chong-Wei Jin; Wei-Wei Chen; Zhi-Bin Meng; Shao-Jian Zheng

    2008-01-01

    In various plant species, Fe deficiency increases lateral root branching. However, whether this morphological alteration contributes to the Fe deficiency-induced physiological responses still remains to be demonstrated. In the present research, we demonstrated that the lateral root development of red clover (Trifolium pretense L.) was significantly enhanced by Fe deficient treatment, and the total lateral root number correlated well with the Fe deficiency-induced ferric chelate reductase (FCR) activity. By analyzing the results from Dasgan et al. (2002), we also found that although the two tomato genotypes line227/1 (P1) and Roza (P2) and their reciprocal F1 hybrid lines ("P1 × P2" and "P2 × P1 ") were cultured under two different lower Fe conditions (10-6 and 10-7 M FeEDDHA), their FCR activities are significantly correlated with the lateral root number. More interestingly, the -Fe chlorosis tolerant ability of these four tomato lines displays similar trends with the lateral root density. Taking these results together, it was proposed that the Fe deficiency-induced increases of the lateral root should play an important role in resistance to Fe deficiency, which may act as harnesses of a useful trait for the selection and breeding of more Fe-efficiant crops among the genotypes that have evolved a Fe deficiency-induced Fe uptake system.

  20. Rhizobacterial volatiles and photosynthesis-related signals coordinate MYB72 in Arabidopsis roots during onset of induced systemic resistance and iron deficiency responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zamioudis, C.; Korteland, J.; Van Pelt, J.A.; Van Hamersveld, M.; Dombrowski, N.; Bai, Y.; Hanson, J.; Van Verk, M.C.; Ling, H.-Q.; Schulze-Lefert, P.; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    2015-01-01

    In Arabidopsis roots, the transcription factor MYB72 plays a dual role in the onset of rhizobacteria-induced systemic resistance (ISR) and plant survival under conditions of limited iron availability. Previously, it was shown that MYB72 coordinates the expression of a gene module that promotes synth

  1. A digital photography and analysis system for estimation of root and shoot development in rice weed suppression studies in the field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice germplasm with an inherent ability to suppress weeds can potentially improve the economics and sustainability of weed control in rice. We devised a simple, rapid, and inexpensive digital imaging system to quantify several shoot and root growth characteristics in field-grown rice plants that ha...

  2. Rhizoctonia Crown and Root Rot Resistance of Beta Plant Introductions from the USDA, Agricultural Research Service's National Plant Germplasm System, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirty wild beet (Beta vulgaris subsp. maritima (L.) Arcang) plant introduction (PI) accessions from the Beta collection of the USDA-ARS National Plant Germplasm System were screened for resistance to Rhizoctonia root and crown rot, at the USDA-ARS Fort Collins, CO Research Farm. The Rhizoctonia sc...

  3. Evaluation of Biomass Yield and Water Treatment in Two Aquaponic Systems Using the Dynamic Root Floating Technique (DRF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Silva

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The experiment evaluates the food production and water treatment of TAN, NO2−–N, NO3−–N, and PO43− in two aquaponics systems using the dynamic root floating technique (DRF. A separate recirculation aquaculture system (RAS was used as a control. The fish cultured was Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus. The hydroponic culture in one treatment (PAK was pak choy (Brassica chinensis, and in the other (COR coriander (Coriandrum sativum. Initial and final weights were determined for the fish culture. Final edible fresh weight was determined for the hydroponic plant culture. TAN, NO2−–N, NO3−–N, and PO43− were measured in fish culture and hydroponic culture once a week at two times, morning (9:00 a.m. and afternoon (3:00 p.m.. The fish biomass production was not different in any treatment (p > 0.05 and the total plant yield was greater (p < 0.05 in PAK than in COR. For the hydroponic culture in the a.m., the PO43− was lower (p < 0.05 in the PAK treatment than in COR, and in the p.m. NO3−–N and PO43− were lower (p < 0.05 in PAK than in COR. The PAK treatment demonstrated higher food production and water treatment efficiency than the other two treatments.

  4. Regulation of Sucrose and Zinc on Root System Growth in Rice%蔗糖和锌对水稻根系生长的调节

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张承仁; 徐小利; 冯永永; 刘乐雨; 冯婷婷; 陈振华; 蔡凤香; 赵凤云

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] The aim was to study the relationship between urcrose, zinc and the root system growth in rice. [Method] Changes of root system growth, ROS generation and root system proton export ability were analyzed in rice (Oryza sativa L. cv Zhonghua No.11) treated with different concentrations of Zn (NO3)3 sucrose, com- bined sucrose and Zn (NO3)3 mannitol as well as mannitol plus Zn (NO3)2. [Result] The results showed that treatment with 1-3 mM Zn(NO3)2 resulted in significant increases in total root length /number and in accumulation of H202 and 02- but decreases in root system proton export ability. With the exception of shoot length, the length of primary, adventitious, and lateral roots, and the number of adventitious, and lateral roots on primary /adventitious roots were all influenced by different concentrations of sucrose. High concentrations of sucrose caused increases in H202 and O2-, starva- tion or high concentrations of sucrose reduced root system proton export ability after treating with or without Zn. However, at the same concentration of sucrose, different changes of these indicators were observed between Zn and non-Zn treatments. The regulation of root system growth induced by sucrose was marked different from that of mannitol at the same concentration of 5%, suggesting that these effects were caused by sugar signal but not by osmotic potential. [Conclusion] This study indicat- ed that both sucrose and Zn play important roles in the regulation of rice root system growth.%【目的】研究锌和蔗糖与水稻根系生长发育的关系。【方法]以水稻中花11号为试验材料,分析了不同浓度的锌、蔗糖、甘露醇、锌+蔗糖和锌+甘露醇处理条件下水稻根系生长、活性氧产生和根系质子分泌的变化。[结果]在1~3mmol/L范围内随着锌浓度的增加,水稻根系总长度、数量及活性氧的产生均增加,但质子分泌水平降低。除了株高外,初生根

  5. Genetic dissection of maize seedling root system architecture traits using an ultra-high density bin-map and a recombinant inbred line population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weibin Song; Baobao Wang; Andrew L Hauck; Xiaomei Dong; Jieping Li; Jinsheng Lai

    2016-01-01

    Maize (Zea mays) root system architecture (RSA) mediates the key functions of plant anchorage and acquisition of nutrients and water. In this study, a set of 204 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) was derived from the widely adapted Chinese hybrid ZD958(Zheng58 ? Chang7-2), genotyped by sequencing (GBS) and evaluated as seedlings for 24 RSA related traits divided into primary, seminal and total root classes. Significant differences between the means of the parental phenotypes were detected for 18 traits, and extensive transgressive segregation in the RIL population was observed for all traits. Moderate to strong relationships among the traits were discovered. A total of 62 quantitative trait loci (QTL) were identified that individually explained from 1.6% to 11.6% (total root dry weight/total seedling shoot dry weight) of the phenotypic variation. Eighteen, 24 and 20 QTL were identified for primary, seminal and total root classes of traits, respectively. We found hotspots of 5, 3, 4 and 12 QTL in maize chromosome bins 2.06, 3.02-03, 9.02-04, and 9.05-06, respectively, implicating the presence of root gene clusters or pleiotropic effects. These results characterized the phenotypic variation and genetic architecture of seedling RSA in a population derived from a successful maize hybrid.

  6. A Novel Ex Ovo Banding Technique to Alter Intracardiac Hemodynamics in an Embryonic Chicken System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Vinal; Junor, Lorain; Balhaj, Marwa; Eberth, John F; Potts, Jay D

    2016-01-01

    The new model presented here can be used to understand the influence of hemodynamics on specific cardiac developmental processes, at the cellular and molecular level. To alter intracardiac hemodynamics, fertilized chicken eggs are incubated in a humidified chamber to obtain embryos of the desired stage (HH17). Once this developmental stage is achieved, the embryo is maintained ex ovo and hemodynamics in the embryonic heart are altered by partially constricting the outflow tract (OFT) with a surgical suture at the junction of the OFT and ventricle (OVJ). Control embryos are also cultured ex ovo but are not subjected to the surgical intervention. Banded and control embryos are then incubated in a humidified incubator for the desired period of time, after which 2D ultrasound is employed to analyze the change in blood flow velocity at the OVJ as a result of OFT banding. Once embryos are maintained ex ovo, it is important to ensure adequate hydration in the incubation chamber so as to prevent drying and eventually embryo death. Using this new banded model, it is now possible to perform analyses of changes in the expression of key players involved in valve development and to understand the role of hemodynamics on cellular responses in vivo, which could not be achieved previously. PMID:27213265

  7. The Root Hair Specific SYP123 Regulates the Localization of Cell Wall Components and Contributes to Rizhobacterial Priming of Induced Systemic Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Furlán, Cecilia; Salinas-Grenet, Hernán; Sandoval, Omar; Recabarren, Camilo; Arraño-Salinas, Paulina; Soto-Alvear, Sylvana; Orellana, Ariel; Blanco-Herrera, Francisca

    2016-01-01

    Root hairs are important for nutrient and water uptake and are also critically involved the interaction with soil inhabiting microbiota. Root hairs are tubular-shaped outgrowths that emerge from trichoblasts. This polarized elongation is maintained and regulated by a robust mechanism involving the endomembrane secretory and endocytic system. Members of the syntaxin family of SNAREs (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) in plants (SYP), have been implicated in regulation of the fusion of vesicles with the target membranes in both exocytic and endocytic pathways. One member of this family, SYP123, is expressed specifically in the root hairs and accumulated in the growing tip region. This study shows evidence of the SYP123 role in polarized trafficking using knockout insertional mutant plants. We were able to observe defects in the deposition of cell wall proline rich protein PRP3 and cell wall polysaccharides. In a complementary strategy, similar results were obtained using a plant expressing a dominant negative soluble version of SYP123 (SP2 fragment) lacking the transmembrane domain. The evidence presented indicates that SYP123 is also regulating PRP3 protein distribution by recycling by endocytosis. We also present evidence that indicates that SYP123 is necessary for the response of roots to plant growth promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) in order to trigger trigger induced systemic response (ISR). Plants with a defective SYP123 function were unable to mount a systemic acquired resistance in response to bacterial pathogen infection and ISR upon interaction with rhizobacteria. These results indicated that SYP123 was involved in the polarized localization of protein and polysaccharides in growing root hairs and that this activity also contributed to the establishment of effective plant defense responses. Root hairs represent very plastic structures were many biotic and abiotic factors can affect the number, anatomy and physiology of

  8. A More Efficient Paper Pouch System for Root Architecture Research%一种更有效的根构型研究纸培系统

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵静; 严小龙; 廖红

    2012-01-01

    Based on the original paper pouch system, the author changed the method of phosphorus (P) supply, and studied the regulation of soybean root architecture by P spatial availability and its genotypic variations on specially designed paper pouch system. The results showed that: 1) Improved stratified-P treatment could represent the distribution of P in the agricultural soil, and more efficiently regulated root architecture changed. Stratified-P treatment, namely upper part was in high P conditions and lower part was in low P conditions, led to longer total root length, more root surface areas and increased the distribution of roots in upper high P part, root system became sallow, finally increased plant P uptake and bio-mass. 2) For the regulation of root architecture by stratified-P treatment, there was a significant genotypic difference between soybean genotypes with different P efficiency. P-efficient genotype, HN89, could respond to P spatial availability faster than P-inefficient genotype, HN112, and changed considerably on root architecture parameters, finally had higher P uptake and biomass.%在原有营养袋纸培系统的基础上,改进了磷供应方式,研究了介质磷空间有效性对大豆根构型的调控及基因型差异.结果表明:1)改进后的分层磷处理导致的介质磷空间有效模拟了农业生产系统中有效磷的分布,能够更高效地调控大豆根构型.在上层高磷下层低磷的分层磷处理中,大豆总根长和总根表面积增加、平均基根生长角度变小、根系分布变浅、植株磷吸收和生物量提高.2)改进后的分层磷处理导致的介质磷空间有效性对大豆根构型的调控基因型间差异显著.磷高效大豆基因型HN89比磷低效基因型HN112对磷空间有效性变化的反应更快,总根长和总根表面积的变幅更大,磷含量和生物量更高.

  9. The Root Hair Specific SYP123 Regulates the Localization of Cell Wall Components and Contributes to Rizhobacterial Priming of Induced Systemic Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Furlán, Cecilia; Salinas-Grenet, Hernán; Sandoval, Omar; Recabarren, Camilo; Arraño-Salinas, Paulina; Soto-Alvear, Sylvana; Orellana, Ariel; Blanco-Herrera, Francisca

    2016-01-01

    Root hairs are important for nutrient and water uptake and are also critically involved the interaction with soil inhabiting microbiota. Root hairs are tubular-shaped outgrowths that emerge from trichoblasts. This polarized elongation is maintained and regulated by a robust mechanism involving the endomembrane secretory and endocytic system. Members of the syntaxin family of SNAREs (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) in plants (SYP), have been implicated in regulation of the fusion of vesicles with the target membranes in both exocytic and endocytic pathways. One member of this family, SYP123, is expressed specifically in the root hairs and accumulated in the growing tip region. This study shows evidence of the SYP123 role in polarized trafficking using knockout insertional mutant plants. We were able to observe defects in the deposition of cell wall proline rich protein PRP3 and cell wall polysaccharides. In a complementary strategy, similar results were obtained using a plant expressing a dominant negative soluble version of SYP123 (SP2 fragment) lacking the transmembrane domain. The evidence presented indicates that SYP123 is also regulating PRP3 protein distribution by recycling by endocytosis. We also present evidence that indicates that SYP123 is necessary for the response of roots to plant growth promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) in order to trigger trigger induced systemic response (ISR). Plants with a defective SYP123 function were unable to mount a systemic acquired resistance in response to bacterial pathogen infection and ISR upon interaction with rhizobacteria. These results indicated that SYP123 was involved in the polarized localization of protein and polysaccharides in growing root hairs and that this activity also contributed to the establishment of effective plant defense responses. Root hairs represent very plastic structures were many biotic and abiotic factors can affect the number, anatomy and physiology of

  10. 根系对土壤机械压力影响的模拟试验%Simulation experiment of roots system effects on soil mechanical pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋自影; 王飞; 胡林; 穆兴民; 康绍忠

    2011-01-01

    为了研究根系对土壤机械压力的大小、分布和影响因素以及各个因素与其相互关系,该研究采用自制的压力测量装置,测定并分析了不同模拟根系对不同体积质量土壤产生的机械压力及其影响因素.试验结果表明:模拟根系对土壤机械压力与根系直径呈极显著(p<0.01)幂函数关系,随着直径增加,根系对土壤的机械压力增加;随着土壤体积质量增加和土层深度增加,根系对土壤机械压力增加;当植株受到风力作用时,随着风力变大,根系对土壤机械压力呈递增变化.模拟研究表明,根系生长可以对土壤产生机械压力,地表风力等扰动力量也可以传递到根系并引起这种机械压力的变化,这种压力可能会对土壤结构和物理行为产生影响,需要进一步深入研究.尽管该文是通过模拟根系进行模拟生长试验,仍