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Sample records for altering phagocyte behavior

  1. Leptospira interrogans stably infects zebrafish embryos, altering phagocyte behavior and homing to specific tissues.

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    J Muse Davis

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis is an extremely widespread zoonotic infection with outcomes ranging from subclinical infection to fatal Weil's syndrome. Despite the global impact of the disease, key aspects of its pathogenesis remain unclear. To examine in detail the earliest steps in the host response to leptospires, we used fluorescently labelled Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni to infect 30 hour post fertilization zebrafish embryos by either the caudal vein or hindbrain ventricle. These embryos have functional innate immunity but have not yet developed an adaptive immune system. Furthermore, they are optically transparent, allowing direct visualization of host-pathogen interactions from the moment of infection. We observed rapid uptake of leptospires by phagocytes, followed by persistent, intracellular infection over the first 48 hours. Phagocytosis of leptospires occasionally resulted in formation of large cellular vesicles consistent with apoptotic bodies. By 24 hours, clusters of infected phagocytes were accumulating lateral to the dorsal artery, presumably in early hematopoietic tissue. Our observations suggest that phagocytosis may be a key defense mechanism in the early stages of leptospirosis, and that phagocytic cells play roles in immunopathogenesis and likely in the dissemination of leptospires to specific target tissues.

  2. Altered release of chemokines by phagocytes from fibromyalgia patients: a pilot study.

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    García, Juan José; Carvajal-Gil, Julián; Guerrero-Bonmatty, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a syndrome characterized by widespread chronic pain and is associated with elevated systemic inflammatory biomarkers, and an elevated innate cellular response. The aim of this study was to determine if fibromyalgia patients have altered ability to release pro-inflammatory chemokines by isolated neutrophils and monocytes. The study participants were women diagnosed with FM (n = 6) and a control group of healthy women (HW) (n = 6). Supernatant concentrations of eotaxin (CCL11), human macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC) (CCL22) and growth regulated-oncogene (GRO-α) (CXCL1) released by both monocytes and neutrophils either resting or stimulated by LPS were determined by ELISA and compared between the FM and HW groups. Both resting and activated monocytes from FM patients released more eotaxin, MDC and GRO-α than those from HW. However, there were no significant differences in the release of chemokines from neutrophils of FM patients and the ones from healthy women. In conclusion, monocytes from women with FM are deregulated, releasing higher amounts of eotaxin, MDC and GRO-α than healthy individuals. This fact does not occur in neutrophils from women with FM. PMID:26341115

  3. Hypergravity-induced altered behavior in Drosophila

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    Hosamani, Ravikumar; Wan, Judy; Marcu, Oana; Bhattacharya, Sharmila

    2012-07-01

    Microgravity and mechanical stress are important factors of the spaceflight environment, and affect astronaut health and behavior. Structural, functional, and behavioral mechanisms of all cells and organisms are adapted to Earth's gravitational force, 1G, while altered gravity can pose challenges to their adaptability to this new environment. On ground, hypergravity paradigms have been used to predict and complement studies on microgravity. Even small changes that take place at a molecular and genetic level during altered gravity may result in changes in phenotypic behavior. Drosophila provides a robust and simple, yet very reliable model system to understand the complexity of hypergravity-induced altered behavior, due to availability of a plethora of genetic tools. Locomotor behavior is a sensitive parameter that reflects the array of molecular adaptive mechanisms recruited during exposure to altered gravity. Thus, understanding the genetic basis of this behavior in a hypergravity environment could potentially extend our understanding of mechanisms of adaptation in microgravity. In our laboratory we are trying to dissect out the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying hypergravity-induced oxidative stress, and its potential consequences on behavioral alterations by using Drosophila as a model system. In the present study, we employed pan-neuronal and mushroom body specific knock-down adult flies by using Gal4/UAS system to express inverted repeat transgenes (RNAi) to monitor and quantify the hypergravity-induced behavior in Drosophila. We established that acute hypergravity (3G for 60 min) causes a significant and robust decrease in the locomotor behavior in adult Drosophila, and that this change is dependent on genes related to Parkinson's disease, such as DJ-1α , DJ-1β , and parkin. In addition, we also showed that anatomically the control of this behavior is significantly processed in the mushroom body region of the fly brain. This work links a molecular

  4. Algal toxins alter copepod feeding behavior.

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    Jiarong Hong

    Full Text Available Using digital holographic cinematography, we quantify and compare the feeding behavior of free-swimming copepods, Acartia tonsa, on nutritional prey (Storeatula major to that occurring during exposure to toxic and non-toxic strains of Karenia brevis and Karlodinium veneficum. These two harmful algal species produce polyketide toxins with different modes of action and potency. We distinguish between two different beating modes of the copepod's feeding appendages-a "sampling beating" that has short durations (<100 ms and involves little fluid entrainment and a longer duration "grazing beating" that persists up to 1200 ms and generates feeding currents. The durations of both beating modes have log-normal distributions. Without prey, A. tonsa only samples the environment at low frequency. Upon introduction of non-toxic food, it increases its sampling time moderately and the grazing period substantially. On mono algal diets for either of the toxic dinoflagellates, sampling time fraction is high but the grazing is very limited. A. tonsa demonstrates aversion to both toxic algal species. In mixtures of S. major and the neurotoxin producing K. brevis, sampling and grazing diminish rapidly, presumably due to neurological effects of consuming brevetoxins while trying to feed on S. major. In contrast, on mixtures of cytotoxin producing K. veneficum, both behavioral modes persist, indicating that intake of karlotoxins does not immediately inhibit the copepod's grazing behavior. These findings add critical insight into how these algal toxins may influence the copepod's feeding behavior, and suggest how some harmful algal species may alter top-down control exerted by grazers like copepods.

  5. Algal toxins alter copepod feeding behavior.

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    Hong, Jiarong; Talapatra, Siddharth; Katz, Joseph; Tester, Patricia A; Waggett, Rebecca J; Place, Allen R

    2012-01-01

    Using digital holographic cinematography, we quantify and compare the feeding behavior of free-swimming copepods, Acartia tonsa, on nutritional prey (Storeatula major) to that occurring during exposure to toxic and non-toxic strains of Karenia brevis and Karlodinium veneficum. These two harmful algal species produce polyketide toxins with different modes of action and potency. We distinguish between two different beating modes of the copepod's feeding appendages-a "sampling beating" that has short durations (<100 ms) and involves little fluid entrainment and a longer duration "grazing beating" that persists up to 1200 ms and generates feeding currents. The durations of both beating modes have log-normal distributions. Without prey, A. tonsa only samples the environment at low frequency. Upon introduction of non-toxic food, it increases its sampling time moderately and the grazing period substantially. On mono algal diets for either of the toxic dinoflagellates, sampling time fraction is high but the grazing is very limited. A. tonsa demonstrates aversion to both toxic algal species. In mixtures of S. major and the neurotoxin producing K. brevis, sampling and grazing diminish rapidly, presumably due to neurological effects of consuming brevetoxins while trying to feed on S. major. In contrast, on mixtures of cytotoxin producing K. veneficum, both behavioral modes persist, indicating that intake of karlotoxins does not immediately inhibit the copepod's grazing behavior. These findings add critical insight into how these algal toxins may influence the copepod's feeding behavior, and suggest how some harmful algal species may alter top-down control exerted by grazers like copepods. PMID:22629336

  6. Phagocytic Clearance in Neurodegeneration

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    Sokolowski, Jennifer D.; Mandell, James W.

    2011-01-01

    The cellular and molecular mechanisms of phagocytic clearance of apoptotic cells and debris have been intensely studied in invertebrate model organisms and in the mammalian immune system. This evolutionarily conserved process serves multiple purposes. Uncleared debris from dying cells or aggregated proteins can be toxic and may trigger exaggerated inflammatory responses. Even though apoptotic cell death and debris accumulation are key features of neurodegenerative diseases, relatively little ...

  7. Phagocytic activity of peripheral blood and crevicular phagocytes in health and periodontal disease

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    Asif K

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neutrophils constitute the main phagocytic cell system in mammalian host defense against an infecting agent. Abnormalities in leukocyte number and function are associated with increased susceptibility to periodontal diseases. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the in vitro phagocytic properties of crevicular and peripheral blood neutrophils in healthy and periodontitis subjects. Patients and Methods: A total of 30 subjects, that is, 10 patients in each of the following three groups: healthy controls, chronic periodontitis (CP, and localized aggressive periodontitis (LAP, were included in the study. The neutrophils were isolated from the peripheral blood and gingival crevice and tested for phagocytosis of Candida albicans. The percentage of leukocytes with ingested C. albicans was determined by light microscopy. Results: A significant reduction in the phagocytic activity of crevicular fluid polymorphonuclear neutrophils (CF-PMN of LAP subjects (mean: 54.3±7(P< 0.001 was observed, compared to healthy controls (mean: 74.2±9 and chronic periodontitis subjects (mean: 69±9(P=0.352. The mean percentage of peripheral blood polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs with phagocytosis of opsonized C. albicans in LAP patients was significantly reduced (mean: 74.9±5(P< 0.0068 compared to the phagocytic activity of neutrophils from controls (mean:82.1±3 and chronic periodontitis subjects (mean: 82.0±5(P=0.970. There was no significant reduction in the phagocytic activity of CF PMNs (mean: 69±9 (P=0.35 and peripheral blood PMNs (mean: 82.5(P=0.97 in the chronic periodontitis group when compared to the control group. Conclusion: The phagocytic activity of both crevicular and peripheral neutrophils in subjects with periodontitis is altered, increasing the susceptibility to periodontitis. Thus individual susceptibility may be an additional and important modifying factor in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease.

  8. Prenatal corticosteroid exposure alters early developmental seizures and behavior

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    Velíšek, Libor

    2011-01-01

    In humans, corticosteroids are often administered prenatally to improve lung development in preterm neonates. Studies in exposed children as well as in children, whose mothers experienced significant stress during pregnancy indicate behavioral problems and possible increased occurrence of epileptic spasms. This study investigated whether prenatal corticosteroid exposure alters early postnatal seizure susceptibility and behaviors. On gestational day 15, pregnant rats were injected i.p. with hy...

  9. Atomic Layer Deposition Coating of Carbon Nanotubes with Aluminum Oxide Alters Pro-Fibrogenic Cytokine Expression by Human Mononuclear Phagocytes In Vitro and Reduces Lung Fibrosis in Mice In Vivo

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    Taylor, Alexia J.; McClure, Christina D.; Shipkowski, Kelly A.; Thompson, Elizabeth A.; Hussain, Salik; Garantziotis, Stavros; Parsons, Gregory N.; Bonner, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) pose a possible human health risk for lung disease as a result of inhalation exposure. Mice exposed to MWCNTs develop pulmonary fibrosis. Lung macrophages engulf MWCNTs and produce pro-fibrogenic cytokines including interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and osteopontin (OPN). Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a novel process used to enhance functional properties of MWCNTs, yet the consequence of ALD-modified MWCNTs on macrophage biology and fibrosis is unknown. Methods The purpose of this study was to determine whether ALD coating with aluminum oxide (Al2O3) would alter the fibrogenic response to MWCNTs and whether cytokine expression in human macrophage/monocytes exposed to MWCNTs in vitro would predict the severity of lung fibrosis in mice. Uncoated (U)-MWCNTs or ALD-coated (A)-MWCNTs were incubated with THP-1 macrophages or human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and cell supernatants assayed for cytokines by ELISA. C57BL6 mice were exposed to a single dose of A- or U-MWCNTs by oropharyngeal aspiration (4 mg/kg) followed by evaluation of histopathology, lung inflammatory cell counts, and cytokine levels at day 1 and 28 post-exposure. Results ALD coating of MWCNTs with Al2O3 enhanced IL-1β secretion by THP-1 and PBMC in vitro, yet reduced protein levels of IL-6, TNF-α, and OPN production by THP-1 cells. Moreover, Al2O3 nanoparticles, but not carbon black NPs, increased IL-1β but decreased OPN and IL-6 in THP-1 and PBMC. Mice exposed to U-MWCNT had increased levels of all four cytokines assayed and developed pulmonary fibrosis by 28 days, whereas ALD-coating significantly reduced fibrosis and cytokine levels at the mRNA or protein level. Conclusion These findings indicate that ALD thin film coating of MWCNTs with Al2O3 reduces fibrosis in mice and that in vitro phagocyte expression of IL-6, TNF-α, and OPN, but not IL-1β, predict MWCNT-induced fibrosis in the lungs of mice in vivo

  10. Superoxide production by phagocytic leukocytes.

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    Drath, D B; Karnovsky, M L

    1975-01-01

    Mononuclear phagocytic leukocytes, as well as polymorphonuclear leukocytes, produce and release superoxide at rest, and this is stimulated by phagocytosis. Of the mouse monocytic cells studied, alveolar macrophages released the largest amounts of superoxide during phagocytosis, followed by normal peritoneal macrophages. Casein-elicited and "activated" macrophages released smaller quantities. In the guinea pig, polymorphonuclear leukocytes and casein-elicited macrophages were shown to release superoxide during phagocytosis whereas alveolar macrophages did not. Superoxide release accounted for only a small fraction of the respiratory burst of phagocytosis in all but the normal mouse peritoneal macrophage, the guinea pig polymorphonuclear leukocyte, and probably the mouse alveolar macrophage. There are obviously considerable species differences in O2-release by various leukocytes that might reflect both the production and/or destruction (e.g. by dismutase) of that substance. PMID:804030

  11. Phagocytic defense in the lung.

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    Reynolds, H Y

    1985-01-01

    Phagocytic defense in the normal lung is shared principally by two kinds of cells - alveolar macrophages that reside on the air surface and roam the alveoli and PMNs that circulate in the intravascular space or are stored transiently in areas adjacent to the capillary-alveolar interface (marginated in capillaries) and can reach the alveolar space quickly. The nature of the stimulating microorganism or aerosol particle reaching the alveolar surface may determine which phagocytic cell ultimately responds to contain the intruder. Ingestion and containment (either intracellular killing or enzymatic degradation) are the goals, and an 'opsonin' may be necessary to enhance the efficiency of phagocytosis. In the lung this is very complex, reflecting the interdependence on immune and nonimmune opsonins. For immune mediated phagocytosis by alveolar macrophages, IgG antibody is preferable. Among the four subclasses of IgG, certain ones seem to bind preferentially to macrophages, whereas others are already adherent to the cells as cytophilic antibody. In the respiratory tract milieu of subjects with CF, the interaction of immune and nonimmune opsonins is much more complex because of proteolytic enzymes that can degrade antibodies creating various fragments. Now that we are in an era of very specific humoral replacement therapy with intravenous IgG that contains IgG subclasses and the potential for using monoclonal antibodies for very precisely directed replacement, special attention must be given to identifying the appropriate class and subclass of antibody that may be required. This may be relatively simple when forms of passive immune therapy are being considered. More difficult will be devising ways to actively immunize patients (or animals) and manipulate their antibody responses so that selective immunoglobulin subclasses are produced. To obtain such control over the humoral immune response will require much more basic work in animal models. More attention to the form of

  12. Behavioral alterations in the gray dolphin Sotalia guianensis (Gervais, 1953) caused by sea traffi

    OpenAIRE

    Francielli Cristine Cunha Melo; Anderson Luis do Valle

    2006-01-01

    Behavioral responses by Sotalia guianensis dolphins in the presence of touristic sea traffic in the bay of Curral, Pipa-RN, Brazil, were measured. The dolphins changed their behavior when boats were closer than 100 meters. The main behavioral alterations were that the dolphins remained submerged for longer and that they formed a more cohesive group as the boats came closer. Although we concluded that the approach of the boats changed the dolphins’ behavioral pattern, we do not know what aspec...

  13. Altering the function of commands presented to boys with oppositional and hyperactive behavior

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    Danforth, Jeffrey S.

    2002-01-01

    Mentalistic and behavioral analyses of noncompliance among children with hyperactive behavior are contrasted. Then, a behavioral training program for 3 boys with behavior characteristic of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and oppositional defiant disorder is described. The child-focused training was conducted in conjunction with parent training. In an effort to increase the rate of compliance, the child-training program was designed to alter the function of parent commands by teaching...

  14. Crocodylus siamensis serum and macrophage phagocytic activity.

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    Aree, Kalaya; Siruntawineti, Jindawan; Chaeychomsri, Win

    2011-12-01

    Antimicrobial activity of sera from many crocodilian species has been recognized. This activity was proposed to be mediated, at least in part, by complement. Due to the fact that complement proteins have different functions in the immune system, they may be involved in phagocytic process of phagocytes. In the present study, the effects of Siamese crocodile serum on phagocytic activity of macrophages as well as the possible involvement of complement in this process were examined. The results showed increases in the phagocytosis of both Escherichia coli and to a lesser extent, Staphylococcus aureus upon incubation of murine macrophage cell line with fresh crocodile serum (FS). Similar to FS, other crocodile blood products, including freeze dried serum (DS) and freeze dried whole blood (DWB) exhibited phagocytosis-enhancing property. However the ability of DWB to enhance phagocytosis was less efficient than that of FS and DS, suggesting that serum factors were involved in this process. Treatment of FS with heat at 56 degrees C for 30 min deteriorated the effect of FS on bacterial uptake of macrophages, suggesting that complement proteins play a role in the modulation of the phagocytic process. Collectively, the results of the present study suggested that crocodile serum enhances the macrophage phagocytic activity through complement activity and, therefore, may be taken as an alternative medicine for supporting the human immune responses. PMID:22619919

  15. Neutrophils and macrophages: The main partners of phagocyte cell systems

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    Manuel T. Silva

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Biological cellular systems are groups of cells sharing a set of characteristics, mainly key function and origin. Phagocytes are crucial in the host defense against microbial infection. The previously proposed phagocyte cell systems including the most recent and presently prevailing one, the Mononuclear Phagocyte System (MPS, grouped mononuclear cells but excluded neutrophils, creating an unacceptable situation. As neutrophils are archetypical phagocytes that must be members of comprehensive phagocyte systems, M. T. Silva recently proposed the creation of a Myeloid Phagocyte System (MYPS that adds neutrophils to the MPS. The phagocytes grouped in the MYPS include the leukocytes neutrophils, inflammatory monocytes, macrophages and immature myeloid DCs. Here the justifications behind the inclusion of neutrophils in a phagocyte system is expanded and the MYPS are further characterized as a group of dedicated phagocytic cells that function in an interacting and cooperative way in the host defense against microbial infection. Neutrophils and macrophages are considered the main arms of this system.

  16. Hericium erinaceus extracts alter behavioral rhythm in mice.

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    Furuta, Shoko; Kuwahara, Rika; Hiraki, Eri; Ohnuki, Koichiro; Yasuo, Shinobu; Shimizu, Kuniyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Hericium erinaceus (HE), an edible mushroom, has been used as a herbal medicine in several Asian countries since ancient times. HE has potential as a medicine for the treatment and prevention of dementia, a disorder closely linked with circadian rhythm. This study investigated the effects of the intake of HE extracts on behavioral rhythm, photosensitivity of the circadian clock, and clock gene mRNA expression in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), a central clock, in mice. Although the HE ethanol extract only affected the offset time of activity, the HE water extract advanced the sleep-wake cycle without affecting the free-running period, photosensitivity, or the clock gene mRNA expression in SCN. In addition, both extracts decreased wakefulness around end of active phase. The findings of the present study suggest that HE may serve as a functional food in the prevention and treatment of Alzheimer's disease and delayed sleep phase syndrome. PMID:27544998

  17. Postpartum behavioral profiles in Wistar rats following maternal separation - altered exploration and risk-assessment behavior in MS15 dams

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    Ingrid Nylander

    2010-01-01

    The rodent maternal separation (MS) model is frequently used to investigate the impact of early environmental factors on adult neurobiology and behavior. The majority of MS studies assess effects in the offspring and few address the consequences of repeated pup removal in the dam. Such studies are of interest since alterations detected in offspring subjected to MS may, at least in part, be mediated by variations in maternal behavior and the amount of maternal care provided by the dam. The aim...

  18. Brucella alters endocytic pathway in J774 macrophages.

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    Arenas, Graciela N; Grilli, Diego J; Samartino, Luis E; Magadán, Javier; Mayorga, Luis S

    2010-01-01

    Brucella is a facultative intracellular bacterium which causes chronic infections in mammals by surviving and replicating within host cells. The putative role of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in the formation of the phagosome in non-professional phagocytes is supported by several research groups, but still leaves open the question of the fate of Brucella inside professional phagocytes and its resistance mechanisms therein. Macrophages are particularly important for the survival and spreading of Brucella during infection. The intracellular transport of Brucella in these cells has not been thoroughly characterized. To study the maturation process of Brucella-containing phagosomes in phagocytes, we comparatively monitored the intracellular transport of a virulent strain (2308) with two vaccine strains (S19 and RB51) in J 774 macrophages. Then, we compared the behavior of all three strains studied through transmission electron microscopy. The results indicate that the virulent strain not only occupies two different kinds of compartments but also alters the endocytic pathway of the cell it parasitizes, unlike what has been reported for non-professional phagocytes, like HeLa cell. Besides, differences are observed in the behavior of both Brucella abortus vaccine strains. PMID:21178473

  19. Caffeine triggers behavioral and neurochemical alterations in adolescent rats.

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    Ardais, A P; Borges, M F; Rocha, A S; Sallaberry, C; Cunha, R A; Porciúncula, L O

    2014-06-13

    Caffeine is the psychostimulant most consumed worldwide but concerns arise about the growing intake of caffeine-containing drinks by adolescents since the effects of caffeine on cognitive functions and neurochemical aspects of late brain maturation during adolescence are poorly known. We now studied the behavioral impact in adolescent male rats of regular caffeine intake at low (0.1mg/mL), moderate (0.3mg/mL) and moderate/high (1.0mg/mL) doses only during their active period (from 7:00 P.M. to 7:00 A.M.). All tested doses of caffeine were devoid of effects on locomotor activity, but triggered anxiogenic effects. Caffeine (0.3 and 1mg/mL) improved the performance in the object recognition task, but the higher dose of caffeine (1.0mg/mL) decreased the habituation to an open-field arena, suggesting impaired non-associative memory. All tested doses of caffeine decreased the density of glial fibrillary acidic protein and synaptosomal-associated protein-25, but failed to modify neuron-specific nuclear protein immunoreactivity in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex. Caffeine (0.3-1mg/mL) increased the density of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and proBDNF density as well as adenosine A1 receptor density in the hippocampus, whereas the higher dose of caffeine (1mg/mL) increased the density of proBDNF and BDNF and decreased A1 receptor density in the cerebral cortex. These findings document an impact of caffeine consumption in adolescent rats with a dual impact on anxiety and recognition memory, associated with changes in BDNF levels and decreases of astrocytic and nerve terminal markers without overt neuronal damage in hippocampal and cortical regions. PMID:24726984

  20. Behavioral alterations in the gray dolphin Sotalia guianensis (Gervais, 1953 caused by sea traffi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francielli Cristine Cunha Melo

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Behavioral responses by Sotalia guianensis dolphins in the presence of touristic sea traffic in the bay of Curral, Pipa-RN, Brazil, were measured. The dolphins changed their behavior when boats were closer than 100 meters. The main behavioral alterations were that the dolphins remained submerged for longer and that they formed a more cohesive group as the boats came closer. Although we concluded that the approach of the boats changed the dolphins’ behavioral pattern, we do not know what aspects of the boats caused the avoidance. We believe that the noise of the boats is probably responsible for repelling the animals.

  1. The behavioral effects of enriched housing are not altered by serotonin depletion but enrichment alters hippocampal neurochemistry.

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    Galani, Rodrigue; Berthel, Marie-Camille; Lazarus, Christine; Majchrzak, Monique; Barbelivien, Alexandra; Kelche, Christian; Cassel, Jean-Christophe

    2007-07-01

    To assess a possible role for serotonin in the mediation of the behavioral changes induced by enriched housing conditions (EC), adult female Long-Evans rats sustaining a serotonin depletion (150 microg of 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine, icv) and sham-operated rats were housed postoperatively for 30 days in enriched (12 rats/large cage containing various objects) or standard housing conditions (2 rats/standard laboratory cage). Thereafter, anxiety responses (elevated plus-maze), locomotor activity (in the home-cage), sensori-motor capabilities (beam-walking task), and spatial memory (eight-arm radial maze) were assessed. Monoamine levels were subsequently measured in the frontoparietal cortex and the hippocampus. Overall, EC reduced anxiety-related responses, enhanced sensori-motor performance and improved the memory span in the initial stage of the spatial memory task. Despite a substantial reduction of serotonergic markers in the hippocampus (82%) and the cortex (74%), these positive effects of EC were not altered by the lesion. EC reduced the serotonin levels in the ventral hippocampus (particularly in unlesioned rats: -23%), increased serotonin turnover in the entire hippocampus (particularly in lesioned rats: +36%) and augmented the norepinephrine levels in the dorsal hippocampus (+68% in unlesioned and +49% in lesioned rats); no such alterations were found in the frontoparietal cortex. Our data suggest that an intact serotonergic system is not a prerequisite for the induction of positive behavioral effects by EC. The neurochemical changes found in the hippocampus of EC rats, however, show that the monoaminergic innervation of the hippocampus is a target of EC. PMID:17493843

  2. Statins Enhance Formation of Phagocyte Extracellular Traps

    OpenAIRE

    Chow, Ohn A.; von Köckritz-Blickwede, Maren; Bright, A. Taylor; Hensler, Mary E.; Zinkernagel, Annelies S; Cogen, Anna L.; Gallo, Richard L.; Monestier, Marc; Wang, Yanming; Glass, Christopher K.; Nizet, Victor

    2010-01-01

    Statins are inhibitors of 3-hydroxy 3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, the rate-limiting enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis. Several recent clinico-epidemiologic studies have revealed that patients receiving statin therapy have reduced mortality associated with severe bacterial infection. Here we study pharmacological effect of statins on the innate immune capacity of phagocytic cells, focusing on the leading human bacterial pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. These studies revealed...

  3. Comparative Anatomy of Phagocytic and immunological Synapses

    OpenAIRE

    Niedergang, Florence; Di Bartolo, Vincenzo; Alcover, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    The generation of phagocytic cups and immunological synapses are crucial events of the innate and adaptive immune responses, respectively. They are triggered by distinct immune receptors and performed by different cell types. However, growing experimental evidence shows that a very close series of molecular and cellular events control these two processes. Thus, the tight and dynamic interplay between receptor signaling, actin and microtubule cytoskeleton, and targeted vesicle traffic are all ...

  4. Early onset of behavioral alterations in senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8).

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    Yanai, Shuichi; Endo, Shogo

    2016-07-15

    Senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM) is inbred lines of mice originally developed from AKR/J mice. Among the six SAM prone (SAMP) substrains, 8- to 12-month-old SAMP8 have long been used as a model of age-related cognitive impairments. However, little is still known for younger SAMP8 mice. Here, we examined the phenotypical characteristics of 4-month-old SAMP8 using a battery of behavioral tests. Four-month-old SAMP8 mice failed to recognize spatially displaced object in an object recognition task and performed poorly in the probe test of the Morris water maze task compared to SAMR1, suggesting that SAMP8 have impaired spatial memory. In addition, young SAMP8 exhibited enhanced anxiety-like behavior in an open field test and showed depression-like behavior in the forced-swim test. Their circadian rhythm was also disrupted. These abnormal behaviors of young SAMP8 are similar to behavioral alterations also observed in aged mice. In summary, age-related behavioral alterations occur in SAMP8 as young as 4 months old. PMID:27093926

  5. Behavioral alterations following blood-brain barrier disruption stimulated by focused ultrasound.

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    Yang, Feng-Yi; Huang, Sheng-Fang; Cheng, Irene Han-Juo

    2016-05-10

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the behavioral alterations and histological changes of the brain after FUS-induced BBB disruption (BBBD). Rats were behaviorally tested using the open field, hole-board, and grip strength tests from day 1 through day 32 after undergoing BBBD induced by FUS with either a mild or heavy parameter. In the open field test, we found an increase in center entries on day 1 and day 9 following heavy FUS treatment and a decrease in center entries at day 18 following mild FUS treatment. With regard to memory-related alterations, rats subjected to heavy FUS treatment exhibited longer latency to start exploring and to find the first baited hole. However, rats subjected to mild FUS treatment exhibited no significant differences in terms of memory performance or grip force. The obtained data suggest that heavy FUS treatment might induce hyperactivity, spatial memory impairment, and forelimb gripping deficits. Furthermore, while mild FUS treatment may have an impact on anxiety-related behaviors, the data suggested it had no impact on locomotor activity, memory, or grip force. Thus, the behavioral alterations following FUS-induced BBBD require further investigation before clinical application. PMID:27034007

  6. The effect of altering self-descriptive behavior on self-concept and classroom behavior.

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    Lane, J; Muller, D

    1977-09-01

    This research examined the impact of operant reinforcement of positive self-descriptive behavior on the self-concepts and classroom behavior of 60 fifth-grade students. Three groups of 10 male and 10 female low self-concept students wrote a series of eight essays describing their school performance. The first group (P) received written reinforcement for positive self-descriptions of their school performance. The second group (G) received an equal number of reinforcements for general statements. The third group (C) received no reinforcement for written statements. Three areas of self-concept were measured with the Primary Self-Concept Inventory: personal-self, social-self, and intellectual-self. A frequency count was also made of nine classroom behaviors thought to be influenced by self-concept. The P group displayed increases in the frequency of positive self-descriptive statement and in intellectual self-concept but no changes in personal self-concept, social self-concept, or the nine classroom behaviors. The G and C groups showed no change in self-description, self-concept, or the nine classroom behaviors. PMID:894617

  7. Effects of Infantile Repeated Hyperglycemia on Behavioral Alterations in Adult Rats

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    Malihe Moghadami

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Anxiety symptoms have been reported to be present in many patients with diabetes mellitus. However, little is known about the effects of hyperglycemia in critical periods of the central nervous system development. We assessed locomotive, exploratory, and anxiety behaviors in adult rats that remained from infantile repeated hyperglycemia by the open field and elevated plus maze tests. Our findings showed significant hypo activity, reduced locomotive/exploratory activities, increased fear related behaviors, and anxiety state between hyperglycemic and control adult males and the same differences were observed among females. In addition, no significant behavioral alterations between male and female animals were observed. This study determined that repeated increments in daily blood sugar levels in newborns may affect neuronal functions and provide behavioral abnormalities in adults.

  8. Heat acclimation alters the sleep and behavior based thermoregulatory dynamics of rats in heat stress

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    Sinha RK

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is well understood that the high environmental heat significantly affects the brain physiology of mammals, particularly the sleep and behavior of the subjects. The objective of the present work is to quantify the effects of acclimatization to the high environmental heat on sleep and behavioral activities in heat stress conditions. Methods: The polygraphic data involved simultaneous recordings of cortical electroencephalogram (EEG, electrooculogram (EOG, and electromyogram (EMG were recorded both on chart as well as in digital format to study the sleep-wake parameters in three different age groups of freely moving rats following exposure to high environmental heat. Each age group was subdivided into four groups: the acute heat stress group, subjected to a single exposure of 4h at 38°C in the biological oxygen demand (BOD incubator; the chronic heat stress group, exposed for 21 days, for 1 h each day, at 38°C in the BOD; acute heat stress followed by 21 days of chronic heat acclimatization and the handling control group. Open field and elevated plus-maze behavior was also analyzed following different exposure setup of high environmental heat. Results: The analyses of results suggest that acclimatization to the high environmental heat significantly alters the effects of acute exposure of high environmental heat on different sleep-wake as well as behavioral parameters. Conclusion: Acclimatization to environmental heat shifts the thermoregulatory set-point and thus these altered changes in sleep and behavior have been observed. Paste Full conclusion here

  9. Cortical Structure Alterations and Social Behavior Impairment in p50-Deficient Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonini, Sara Anna; Mastinu, Andrea; Maccarinelli, Giuseppina; Mitola, Stefania; Premoli, Marika; La Rosa, Luca Rosario; Ferrari-Toninelli, Giulia; Grilli, Mariagrazia; Memo, Maurizio

    2016-06-01

    Alterations in genes that regulate neurodevelopment can lead to cortical malformations, resulting in malfunction during postnatal life. The NF-κB pathway has a key role during neurodevelopment by regulating the maintenance of the neural progenitor cell pool and inhibiting neuronal differentiation. In this study, we evaluated whether mice lacking the NF-κB p50 subunit (KO) present alterations in cortical structure and associated behavioral impairment. We found that, compared with wild type (WT), KO mice at postnatal day 2 present an increase in radial glial cells, an increase in Reelin protein expression levels, in addition to an increase of specific layer thickness. Moreover, adult KO mice display abnormal columnar organization in the somatosensory cortex, a specific decrease in somatostatin- and parvalbumin-expressing interneurons, altered neurite orientation, and a decrease in Synapsin I protein levels. Concerning behavior, KO mice, in addition to an increase in locomotor and exploratory activity, display impairment in social behaviors, with a reduction in social interaction. Finally, we found that risperidone treatment decreased hyperactivity of KO mice, but had no effect on defective social interaction. Altogether, these data add complexity to a growing body of data, suggesting a link between dysregulation of the NF-κB pathway and neurodevelopmental disorders pathogenesis. PMID:26946128

  10. Role of dopaminergic and serotonergic neurotransmitters in behavioral alterations observed in rodent model of hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanda, Saurabh; Sandhir, Rajat

    2015-06-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the role of biogenic amines in behavioral alterations observed in rat model of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) following bile duct ligation (BDL). Male Wistar rats subjected to BDL developed biliary fibrosis after four weeks which was supported by altered liver function tests, increased ammonia levels and histological staining (Sirius red). Animals were assessed for their behavioral performance in terms of cognitive, anxiety and motor functions. The levels of dopamine (DA), serotonin (5-HT), epinephrine and norepinephrine (NE) were estimated in different regions of brain viz. cortex, hippocampus, striatum and cerebellum using HPLC along with activity of monoamine oxidase (MAO). Cognitive assessment of BDL rats revealed a progressive decline in learning, memory formation, retrieval, exploration of novel environment and spontaneous locomotor activity along with decrease in 5-HT and NE levels. This was accompanied by an increase in MAO activity. Motor functions of BDL rats were also altered which were evident from decrease in the time spent on the rotating rod and higher foot faults assessed using narrow beam walk task. A global decrease was observed in the DA content along with an increase in MAO activity. Histopathological studies using hematoxylin-eosin (H&E) and cresyl violet exhibited marked neuronal degeneration, wherein neurons appeared more pyknotic, condensed and damaged. The results reveal that dopaminergic and serotonergic pathways are disturbed in chronic liver failure post-BDL which may be responsible for behavioral impairments observed in HE. PMID:25639545

  11. Postpartum behavioral profiles in Wistar rats following maternal separation - altered exploration and risk-assessment behavior in MS15 dams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loudin Daoura

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The rodent maternal separation (MS model is frequently used to investigate the impact of early environmental factors on adult neurobiology and behavior. The majority of MS studies assess effects in the offspring and few address the consequences of repeated pup removal in the dam. Such studies are of interest since alterations detected in offspring subjected to MS may, at least in part, be mediated by variations in maternal behavior and the amount of maternal care provided by the dam. The aim of this study was to investigate how daily short (15 min; MS15 and prolonged (360 min; MS360 periods of MS affects the dam by examining postpartum behavioral profiles using the multivariate concentric square field™ (MCSF test. The dams were tested on postpartum days 24-25, i.e. just after the end of the separation period and weaning. The results reveal a lower exploratory drive and lower risk-assessment behavior in MS15 dams relative to MS360 or animal facility reared dams. The present results contrast some of the previously reported findings and provide new information about early post-weaning behavioral characteristics in a multivariate setting. Plausible explanations for the results are provided including a discussion how the present results fit into the maternal mediation hypothesis.

  12. Gender and estrous cycle influences on behavioral and neurochemical alterations in adult rats neonatally administered ketamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Célia Moreira Borella, Vládia; Seeman, Mary V; Carneiro Cordeiro, Rafaela; Vieira dos Santos, Júnia; Romário Matos de Souza, Marcos; Nunes de Sousa Fernandes, Ethel; Santos Monte, Aline; Maria Mendes Vasconcelos, Silvânia; Quinn, John P; de Lucena, David F; Carvalho, André F; Macêdo, Danielle

    2016-05-01

    Neonatal N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor blockade in rodents triggers schizophrenia (SCZ)-like alterations during adult life. SCZ is influenced by gender in age of onset, premorbid functioning, and course. Estrogen, the hormone potentially driving the gender differences in SCZ, is known to present neuroprotective effects such as regulate oxidative pathways and the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Thus, the aim of this study was to verify if differences in gender and/or estrous cycle phase during adulthood would influence the development of behavioral and neurochemical alterations in animals neonatally administered ketamine. The results showed that ketamine-treated male (KT-male) and female-in-diestrus (KTF-diestrus, the low estrogen phase) presented significant deficits in prepulse inhibition of the startle reflex and spatial working memory, two behavioral SCZ endophenotypes. On the contrary, female ketamine-treated rats during proestrus (KTF-proestrus, the high estradiol phase) had no behavioral alterations. This correlated with an oxidative imbalance in the hippocampus (HC) of both male and KTF-diestrus female rats, that is, decreased levels of GSH and increased levels of lipid peroxidation and nitrite. Similarly, BDNF was decreased in the KTF-diestrus rats while no alterations were observed in KTF-proestrus and male animals. The changes in the HC were in contrast to those in the prefrontal cortex in which only increased levels of nitrite in all groups studied were observed. Thus, there is a gender difference in the adult rat HC in response to ketamine neonatal administration, which is based on the estrous cycle. This is discussed in relation to neuropsychiatric conditions and in particular SCZ. PMID:26215537

  13. Innate Immunity to Leishmania Infection: Within Phagocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Freitas Lopes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection by Leishmania takes place in the context of inflammation and tissue repair. Besides tissue resident macrophages, inflammatory macrophages and neutrophils are recruited to the infection site and serve both as host cells and as effectors against infection. Recent studies suggest additional important roles for monocytes and dendritic cells. This paper addresses recent experimental findings regarding the regulation of Leishmania major infection by these major phagocyte populations. In addition, the role of IL-4 on dendritic cells and monocytes is discussed.

  14. Acetylcholinesterase inhibition and altered locomotor behavior in the carabid beetle pterostichus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Charlotte S.; Krause-Jensen, Lone; Baatrup, Erik

    1997-01-01

    The establishment of cause–effect relationships is fundamental for the interpretation and the predictive value of biomarker responses measured at all levels of biological complexity. In the present study, the biochemical exposure biomarker acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition was related to...... locomotor behavior, representing a general effect biomarker at the organismal level. Both sexes of the carabid beetle Pterostichus cupreus were intoxicated with three doses of the organophosphorous insecticide dimethoate. Five elements of their locomotor behavior were measured for 4 h employing computer......-aided video tracking, whereupon the whole body AChE activity was measured in the individual beetle. AChE inhibition was strongly correlated with dimethoate dose in both sexes. Alterations in the locomotor behavior were directly correlated with AChE inhibition in male beetles, which responded by reducing the...

  15. Effect of lectins on mouse peritoneal macrophage phagocytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, G; Porras, F; Fernández, L; Vázquez, L; Zenteno, E

    1994-11-01

    We studied the in vitro ability of lectin-treated murine peritoneal macrophages to attach and phagocytize particulate antigens. Glucose and mannose specific lectins such as Con-A and lentil lectin, as well as complex lactosamine residues specific lectins, such as Phaseolus vulgaris var. cacahuate and Phaseolus coccineus var. alubia, increased the macrophage phagocytic activity towards heterologous erythrocytes, whereas peanut agglutinin, a galactose-specific lectin, diminished the macrophage phagocytic activity. These results suggest that a galactose-N-acetyl-D galactosamine-containing structure could participate as negative modulator of the phagocytic activity. PMID:7851961

  16. Phagocytic ability of neutrophils and monocytes in neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mantagos Stephanos

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infections by a variety of pathogens are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality during perinatal period. The susceptibility of neonates to bacterial infections has been attributed to immaturity of innate immunity. It is considered that one of the impaired mechanisms is the phagocytic function of neutrophils and monocytes. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the phagocytic ability of neonates at birth. Methods The phagocytic ability of neutrophils and monocytes of 42 neonates was determined using the Phagotest flow cytometry method, that assesses the intake of E. Coli by phagocytes, in cord blood and in peripheral blood 3 days after birth. Fifteen healthy adults were included in the study as controls. Results The phagocytic ability of neutrophils in the cord blood of neonates was significantly reduced compared to adults. The 3rd postnatal day the reduction of phagocytic ability of neutrophils was no longer significant compared to adults. The phagocytic ability of monocytes did not show any difference from that of adults either at birth or the 3rd postnatal day. Conclusions Our findings indicate that the intake of E. Coli by phagocytes is impaired at birth in both preterm and full term neonates compared to adults. This defect is transient, with the phagocytic ability in neonates reaching that of the adults 3 days after birth.

  17. Dynamical and Phase Behavior of a Phospholipid Membrane Altered by an Antimicrobial Peptide at Low Concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, V K; Mamontov, E; Tyagi, M; Qian, S; Rai, D K; Urban, V S

    2016-07-01

    The mechanism of action of antimicrobial peptides is traditionally attributed to the formation of pores in the lipid cell membranes of pathogens, which requires a substantial peptide to lipid ratio. However, using incoherent neutron scattering, we show that even at a concentration too low for pore formation, an archetypal antimicrobial peptide, melittin, disrupts the regular phase behavior of the microscopic dynamics in a phospholipid membrane, dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC). At the same time, another antimicrobial peptide, alamethicin, does not exert a similar effect on the DMPC microscopic dynamics. The melittin-altered lateral motion of DMPC at physiological temperature no longer resembles the fluid-phase behavior characteristic of functional membranes of the living cells. The disruptive effect demonstrated by melittin even at low concentrations reveals a new mechanism of antimicrobial action relevant in more realistic scenarios, when peptide concentration is not as high as would be required for pore formation, which may facilitate treatment with antimicrobial peptides. PMID:27232190

  18. Influence of parenteral lipid emulsions on the phagocytes in vitro

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lojek, Antonín; Číž, Milan; Hofmanová, Jiřina; Kozubík, Alois

    Brno, 2006. s. 17-17. [2nd European Workshop on the Analysis of the Phagocyte Functions. 15.06.2006-17.06.2006, Křtiny] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) 1QS500040507 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507 Keywords : parenteral lipid emulsions * phagocytes Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  19. Bacterial-mediated DNA delivery to tumour associated phagocytic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, W L; Murphy, C T; Cronin, M; Wirth, T; Tangney, M

    2014-12-28

    Phagocytic cells including macrophages, dendritic cells and neutrophils are now recognised as playing a negative role in many disease settings including cancer. In particular, macrophages are known to play a pathophysiological role in multiple diseases and present a valid and ubiquitous therapeutic target. The technology to target these phagocytic cells in situ, both selectively and efficiently, is required in order to translate novel therapeutic modalities into clinical reality. We present a novel delivery strategy using non-pathogenic bacteria to effect gene delivery specifically to tumour-associated phagocytic cells. Non-invasive bacteria lack the ability to actively enter host cells, except for phagocytic cells. We exploit this natural property to effect 'passive transfection' of tumour-associated phagocytic cells following direct administration of transgene-loaded bacteria to tumour regions. Using an in vitro-differentiated human monocyte cell line and two in vivo mouse models (an ovarian cancer ascites and a solid colon tumour model) proof of delivery is demonstrated with bacteria carrying reporter constructs. The results confirm that the delivery strategy is specific for phagocytic cells and that the bacterial vector itself recruits more phagocytic cells to the tumour. While proof of delivery to phagocytic cells is demonstrated in vivo for solid and ascites tumour models, this strategy may be applied to other settings, including non-cancer related disease. PMID:25466954

  20. Modulation ofTcf7l2 expression alters behavior in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Savic

    Full Text Available The comorbidity of type 2 diabetes (T2D with several psychiatric diseases is well established. While environmental factors may partially account for these co-occurrences, common genetic susceptibilities could also be implicated in the confluence of these diseases. In support of shared genetic burdens, TCF7L2, the strongest genetic determinant for T2D risk in the human population, has been recently implicated in schizophrenia (SCZ risk, suggesting that this may be one of many loci that pleiotropically influence both diseases. To investigate whether Tcf7l2 is involved in behavioral phenotypes in addition to its roles in glucose metabolism, we conducted several behavioral tests in mice with null alleles of Tcf7l2 or overexpressing Tcf7l2. We identified a role for Tcf7l2 in anxiety-like behavior and a dose-dependent effect of Tcf7l2 alleles on fear learning. None of the mutant mice showed differences in prepulse inhibition (PPI, which is a well-established endophenotype for SCZ. These results show that Tcf7l2 alters behavior in mice. Importantly, these differences are observed prior to the onset of detectable glucose metabolism abnormalities. Whether these differences are related to human anxiety-disorders or schizophrenia remains to be determined. These animal models have the potential to elucidate the molecular basis of psychiatric comorbidities in diabetes and should therefore be studied further.

  1. Alteration of the Nonsystemic Behavior of the Pesticide Ferbam on Tea Leaves by Engineered Gold Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Ruyan; Zhang, Zhiyun; Pang, Shintaro; Yang, Tianxi; Clark, John M; He, Lili

    2016-06-21

    A model system consisting of a nonsystemic pesticide (ferbam), engineered gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and a plant tissue (tea leaves) was investigated using surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). Ferbam has no ability by itself to penetrate into tea leaves. When AuNPs were placed with ferbam onto the surface of tea leaves, however, the SERS signal of the ferbam-AuNPs complex was observed inside of the tea leaves. Within 1 h, the ferbam-AuNPs complex rapidly penetrated into the leaf to a depth of approximately 190 μm, about (1)/3 to (1)/2 of the leaf's thickness. The rate of penetration was dependent on the size of AuNPs, with 30 nm AuNPs-ferbam penetrating more rapidly when compared with complexes made with the 50 and 69 nm AuNPs. These results clearly demonstrated an alteration of the nonsystemic behavior of ferbam in the combined presence with AuNPs. This finding might lead to the development of some new pesticide formulations. Conversely, new toxicity issues may arise as the behaviors and fate of pesticides are altered significantly upon interaction with engineered NPs in the pesticide formulation or environment. PMID:27254832

  2. Iron metabolism in the mononuclear phagocyte system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weina Kong; Xianglin Duan; Zhenhua Shi; Yanzhong Chang

    2008-01-01

    The maintenance of body iron homeostasis requires the coordination of multiple regulatory mechanisms of iron metabolism.The mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS,composed of monocytes,macrophages,and their precursor cells) is crucial in the maintenance of iron homeostasis.Recycling of iron is carried out by specialized macrophages via engulfment of aged erythrocytes.The iron stores of macrophages depend on the levels of recovered and exported iron.However,the molecular mechanisms underlying iron homeostasis in macrophages are poorly understood.Recent studies characterizing the function and regulation of natural resistance-associated macrophage protein 1 (Nrampl),divalent metal transporter 1 (DMTI),HLA-linked hemechromatosis gene (HFE),ferroportin 1 (FPN1),and hepcidin are rapidly expanding our knowledge on the molecular level of MPS iron handling.These studies are deepening our understanding about the molecular mechanism of iron homeostasis and iron-related diseases.

  3. Phagocyte NADPH oxidase and specific immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cachat, Julien; Deffert, Christine; Hugues, Stephanie; Krause, Karl-Heinz

    2015-05-01

    The phagocyte NADPH oxidase NOX2 produces reactive oxygen species (ROS) and is a well-known player in host defence. However, there is also increasing evidence for a regulatory role of NOX2 in adaptive immunity. Deficiency in phagocyte NADPH oxidase causes chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) in humans, a condition that can also be studied in CGD mice. Clinical observations in CGD patients suggest a higher susceptibility to autoimmune diseases, in particular lupus, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and rheumatoid arthritis. In mice, a strong correlation exists between a polymorphism in a NOX2 subunit and the development of autoimmune arthritis. NOX2 deficiency in mice also favours lupus development. Both CGD patients and CGD mice exhibit increased levels of immunoglobulins, including autoantibodies. Despite these phenotypes suggesting a role for NOX2 in specific immunity, mechanistic explanations for the typical increase of CGD in autoimmune disease and antibody levels are still preliminary. NOX2-dependent ROS generation is well documented for dendritic cells and B-lymphocytes. It is unclear whether T-lymphocytes produce ROS themselves or whether they are exposed to ROS derived from dendritic cells during the process of antigen presentation. ROS are signalling molecules in virtually any cell type, including T- and B-lymphocytes. However, knowledge about the impact of ROS-dependent signalling on T- and B-lymphocyte phenotype and response is still limited. ROS might contribute to Th1/Th2/Th17 cell fate decisions during T-lymphocyte activation and might enhance immunoglobulin production by B-lymphocytes. In dendritic cells, NOX2-derived ROS might be important for antigen processing and cell activation. PMID:25760962

  4. Behavioral performance altering effects of MK-801 in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sison, Margarette; Gerlai, Robert

    2011-07-01

    MK-801, a non-competitive NMDA-R antagonist, has been utilized in the analysis of mammalian learning and memory. The zebrafish is a novel vertebrate study species that has been proposed for the analysis of the mechanisms of learning and memory. Although learning paradigms have been developed for this species, psychopharmacological characterization of its behavioral responses is rudimentary. Before one attempts the analysis of the effects of MK-801 on learning and memory in zebrafish, one needs to know whether this drug affects motor function, perception and/or motivation, factors that may influence performance in learning tasks. Here we conduct dose response analyses investigating the effects of 0, 2, 20 and 100 μM MK-801 administered 24h or 30 min before the behavioral test, or during the test. We analyze responses in the open tank to measure motor and posture patterns, in the light dark paradigm to evaluate visual perception, and in a group preference task to attempt to quantify motivation. Our results show a significant performance alteration only in the highest (100 μM) dose groups. These fish spent more time on the bottom of their tank, showed elevated Erratic movement, increased their clockwise and counterclockwise turning frequency, and reduced the time spent near a shoal stimulus, behavioral alterations that also depended upon the timing of drug administration. Thus, using the current delivery procedures and outbred zebrafish population, the highest dose that may not lead to significant performance deficits is 20 μM, a concentration we propose to use in a future learning study in zebrafish. PMID:21333690

  5. Chemosensory cues affect amygdaloid neurogenesis and alter behaviors in the socially monogamous prairie vole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y; Lieberwirth, C; Jia, X; Curtis, J T; Meredith, M; Wang, Z X

    2014-05-01

    The current study examined the effects of pheromonal exposure on adult neurogenesis and revealed the role of the olfactory pathways on adult neurogenesis and behavior in the socially monogamous prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster). Subjects were injected with a cell proliferation marker [5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU)] and then exposed to their own soiled bedding or bedding soiled by a same- or opposite-sex conspecific. Exposure to opposite-sex bedding increased BrdU labeling in the amygdala (AMY), but not the dentate gyrus (DG), of female, but not male, voles, indicating a sex-, stimulus-, and brain region-specific effect. The removal of the main olfactory bulbs or lesioning of the vomeronasal organ (VNOX) in females reduced BrdU labeling in the AMY and DG, and inhibited the male bedding-induced BrdU labeling in the AMY, revealing the importance of an intact olfactory pathway for amygdaloid neurogenesis. VNOX increased anxiety-like behavior and altered social preference, but it did not affect social recognition memory in female voles. VNOX also reduced the percentage of BrdU-labeled cells that co-expressed the neuronal marker TuJ1 in the AMY, but not the DG. Together, our data indicate the importance of the olfactory pathway in mediating brain plasticity in the limbic system as well as its role in behavior. PMID:24641515

  6. Aniracetam does not alter cognitive and affective behavior in adult C57BL/6J mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W Elston

    Full Text Available There is a growing community of individuals who self-administer the nootropic aniracetam for its purported cognitive enhancing effects. Aniracetam is believed to be therapeutically useful for enhancing cognition, alleviating anxiety, and treating various neurodegenerative conditions. Physiologically, aniracetam enhances both glutamatergic neurotransmission and long-term potentiation. Previous studies of aniracetam have demonstrated the cognition-restoring effects of acute administration in different models of disease. No previous studies have explored the effects of aniracetam in healthy subjects. We investigated whether daily 50 mg/kg oral administration improves cognitive performance in naïve C57BL/6J mice in a variety of aspects of cognitive behavior. We measured spatial learning in the Morris water maze test; associative learning in the fear conditioning test; motor learning in the accelerating rotarod test; and odor discrimination. We also measured locomotion in the open field test, anxiety through the elevated plus maze test and by measuring time in the center of the open field test. We measured repetitive behavior through the marble burying test. We detected no significant differences between the naive, placebo, and experimental groups across all measures. Despite several studies demonstrating efficacy in impaired subjects, our findings suggest that aniracetam does not alter behavior in normal healthy mice. This study is timely in light of the growing community of healthy humans self-administering nootropic drugs.

  7. Aniracetam does not alter cognitive and affective behavior in adult C57BL/6J mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elston, Thomas W; Pandian, Ashvini; Smith, Gregory D; Holley, Andrew J; Gao, Nanjing; Lugo, Joaquin N

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing community of individuals who self-administer the nootropic aniracetam for its purported cognitive enhancing effects. Aniracetam is believed to be therapeutically useful for enhancing cognition, alleviating anxiety, and treating various neurodegenerative conditions. Physiologically, aniracetam enhances both glutamatergic neurotransmission and long-term potentiation. Previous studies of aniracetam have demonstrated the cognition-restoring effects of acute administration in different models of disease. No previous studies have explored the effects of aniracetam in healthy subjects. We investigated whether daily 50 mg/kg oral administration improves cognitive performance in naïve C57BL/6J mice in a variety of aspects of cognitive behavior. We measured spatial learning in the Morris water maze test; associative learning in the fear conditioning test; motor learning in the accelerating rotarod test; and odor discrimination. We also measured locomotion in the open field test, anxiety through the elevated plus maze test and by measuring time in the center of the open field test. We measured repetitive behavior through the marble burying test. We detected no significant differences between the naive, placebo, and experimental groups across all measures. Despite several studies demonstrating efficacy in impaired subjects, our findings suggest that aniracetam does not alter behavior in normal healthy mice. This study is timely in light of the growing community of healthy humans self-administering nootropic drugs. PMID:25099639

  8. Social Isolation Stress Induces Anxious-Depressive-Like Behavior and Alterations of Neuroplasticity-Related Genes in Adult Male Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Alessandro Ieraci; Alessandra Mallei; Maurizio Popoli

    2016-01-01

    Stress is a major risk factor in the onset of several neuropsychiatric disorders including anxiety and depression. Although several studies have shown that social isolation stress during postweaning period induces behavioral and brain molecular changes, the effects of social isolation on behavior during adulthood have been less characterized. Aim of this work was to investigate the relationship between the behavioral alterations and brain molecular changes induced by chronic social isolation ...

  9. A radiolabel release microassay for phagocytic killing of Candida albicans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chromium-51 release technique for quantifying intracellular killing of radiolabelled Candida albicans particles was exploited in a microassay in which murine and human phagocytes acted as effectors under peculiarly simple conditions. At appropriate effector: target ratios and with a 4 h incubation, up to 50% specific chromium release could be detected in the supernatant with no need for opsonization or lysis of phagocytes. This simple microassay permits easy-to-perform, simultaneous testing of a variety of different phagocytes even if only available in limited amounts, and provides an objective measurement of intracellular killing of Candida albicans. (Auth.)

  10. Altering strength and plastic deformation behavior via alloying and laminated structure in nanocrystalline metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, C. [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Material, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Wang, F., E-mail: wangfei@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Strength and Vibration of Mechanical Structures, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Huang, P., E-mail: huangping@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Material, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Lu, T.J. [State Key Laboratory for Strength and Vibration of Mechanical Structures, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); MOE Key Laboratory for Multifunctional Materials and Structures, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Xu, K.W. [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Material, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2015-07-29

    Nanoindentation and electron microscope techniques have been performed on sputtering deposited monolayered nanocrystalline CuNb and multilayered CuNb/Cu thin films. Microstructural features, hardness and surface morphologies of residual indentation have been evaluated to identify the effects of alloying and laminated structure on strength and plastic deformation behavior of nanocrystalline metals. By altering the content of Nb in CuNb alloy and adding crystalline Cu layers into CuNb alloy, the volume fraction of amorphous phase in CuNb alloy and interface structures changed dramatically, resulting in various trends that are related to hardness, indentation induced pileup and shear banding deformation. Based on the experimental results, the dominant deformation mechanisms of the CuNb and CuNb/Cu thin films with various Nb contents were proposed and extended to be discussed.

  11. Altering strength and plastic deformation behavior via alloying and laminated structure in nanocrystalline metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanoindentation and electron microscope techniques have been performed on sputtering deposited monolayered nanocrystalline CuNb and multilayered CuNb/Cu thin films. Microstructural features, hardness and surface morphologies of residual indentation have been evaluated to identify the effects of alloying and laminated structure on strength and plastic deformation behavior of nanocrystalline metals. By altering the content of Nb in CuNb alloy and adding crystalline Cu layers into CuNb alloy, the volume fraction of amorphous phase in CuNb alloy and interface structures changed dramatically, resulting in various trends that are related to hardness, indentation induced pileup and shear banding deformation. Based on the experimental results, the dominant deformation mechanisms of the CuNb and CuNb/Cu thin films with various Nb contents were proposed and extended to be discussed

  12. Do early-life events permanently alter behavioral and hormonal responses to stressors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisman, H; Zaharia, M D; Meaney, M J; Merali, Z

    1998-01-01

    Early-life stimulation (e.g., brief handling) attenuates the behavioral and neuroendocrine responses to stressors encountered in adulthood, particularly with respect to activation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) activity. In contrast, if neonates were subjected to a more severe stressor, such as protracted separation from the dam or exposure to an endotoxin, then the adult response to a stressor was exaggerated. These early-life experiences program HPA functioning, including negative feedback derived from stimulation of hippocampal glucocorticoid receptors, and corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and arginine vasopressin (AVP) coexpression in PVN neurons, to modify the response to subsequent stressor experiences. The persistent variations of HPA activity observed in handled/stimulated animals may stem from alterations in dam-pup interactions (e.g. increased arched-back feeding, licking, grooming). In addition genetic makeup is critical in determining stress reactivity. For instance, BALB/cByJ mice are more reactive to stressors than C57BL/6ByJ mice, exhibiting greater HPA hormonal alterations and behavioral disturbances. BALB/cByJ also fail to acquire a spatial learning response in a Morris water-maze paradigm, which has been shown to be correlated with hippocampal cell loss associated with aging. Early-life handling of BALB/cByJ mice prevented these performance deficits and attenuated the hypersecretion of ACTH and corticosterone elicited by stressors. The stressor reactivity may have been related to maternal and genetic factors. When BALB/cByJ mice were raised by a C57BL/6ByJ dam, the excessive stress-elicited HPA activity was reduced, as were the behavioral impairments. However, cross-fostering the more resilient C57BL/6ByJ mice to a BALB/cByJ dam failed to elicit the behavioral disturbances. It is suggested that genetic factors may influence dam-pup interactive styles and may thus proactively influence the response to subsequent stressors among

  13. Alteration by p11 of mGluR5 localization regulates depression-like behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ko-Woon; Westin, Linda; Kim, Jeongjin; Chang, Jerry C.; Oh, Yong-Seok; Amreen, Bushra; Gresack, Jodi; Flajolet, Marc; Kim, Daesoo; Aperia, Anita; Kim, Yong; Greengard, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Mood disorders and antidepressant therapy involve alterations of monoaminergic and glutamatergic transmission. The protein S100A10 (p11) was identified as a regulator of serotonin receptors, and has been implicated in the etiology of depression and in mediating the antidepressant actions of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Here we report that p11 can also regulate depression-like behaviors via regulation of a glutamatergic receptor in mice. p11 directly binds to the cytoplasmic tail of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5). p11 and mGluR5 mutually facilitate their accumulation at the plasma membranes, and p11 increases cell surface availability of the receptor. While p11 overexpression potentiates mGluR5 agonist-induced calcium responses, overexpression of mGluR5 mutant, which does not interact with p11, diminishes the calcium responses in cultured cells. Knockout of mGluR5 or p11 specifically in glutamatergic neurons in mice causes depression-like behaviors. Conversely, knockout of mGluR5 or p11 in GABAergic neurons causes antidepressant-like behaviors. Inhibition of mGluR5 with an antagonist, MPEP, induces antidepressant-like behaviors in a p11-dependent manner. Notably, the antidepressant-like action of MPEP is mediated by parvalbumin-positive GABAergic interneurons, resulting in a decrease of inhibitory neuronal firing with a resultant increase of excitatory neuronal firing. These results identify a molecular and cellular basis by which mGluR5 antagonism achieves its antidepressant-like activity. PMID:26370144

  14. The first mecp2-null zebrafish model shows altered motor behaviors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Pietri

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Rett syndrome is an X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder and one of the most common causes of mental retardation in affected girls. Other symptoms include a rapid regression of motor and cognitive skills after an apparently early normal development. Sporadic mutations in the transcription factor MECP2 has been shown to be present in more than 90% of the patients and several models of MeCP2-deficient mice have been created to understand the role of this gene. These models have pointed toward alterations in the maintenance of the central nervous system rather than its development, in line with the late onset of the disease in humans. However, the exact functions of MeCP2 remain difficult to delineate and the animal models have yielded contradictory results. Here, we present the first mecp2-null allele mutation zebrafish model. Surprisingly and in contrast to MeCP2-null mouse models, mecp2-null zebrafish are viable and fertile. They present nonetheless clear behavioral alterations during their early development, including spontaneous and sensory-evoked motor anomalies, as well as defective thigmotaxis.

  15. Clock genes and behavioral responses to light are altered in a mouse model of diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahouaoui, Hasna; Coutanson, Christine; Cooper, Howard M; Bennis, Mohamed; Dkhissi-Benyahya, Ouria

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that melanopsin-expressing ganglion cells (ipRGCs) are altered in retinal pathologies. Using a streptozotocin-induced (STZ) model of diabetes, we investigated the impact of diabetic retinopathy on non-visual functions by analyzing ipRGCs morphology and light-induced c-Fos and Period 1-2 clock genes in the central clock (SCN). The ability of STZ-diabetic mice to entrain to light was challenged by exposure animals to 1) successive light/dark (LD) cycle of decreasing or increasing light intensities during the light phase and 2) 6-h advance of the LD cycle. Our results show that diabetes induces morphological changes of ipRGCs, including soma swelling and dendritic varicosities, with no reduction in their total number, associated with decreased c-Fos and clock genes induction by light in the SCN at 12 weeks post-onset of diabetes. In addition, STZ-diabetic mice exhibited a reduction of overall locomotor activity, a decrease of circadian sensitivity to light at low intensities, and a delay in the time to re-entrain after a phase advance of the LD cycle. These novel findings demonstrate that diabetes alters clock genes and behavioral responses of the circadian timing system to light and suggest that diabetic patients may show an increased propensity for circadian disturbances, in particular when they are exposed to chronobiological challenges. PMID:25006976

  16. Structural Brain Alterations Associated with Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucetta, Soufiane; Salimi, Ali; Dadar, Mahsa; Jones, Barbara E; Collins, D Louis; Dang-Vu, Thien Thanh

    2016-01-01

    Characterized by dream-enactment motor manifestations arising from rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is frequently encountered in Parkinson's disease (PD). Yet the specific neurostructural changes associated with RBD in PD patients remain to be revealed by neuroimaging. Here we identified such neurostructural alterations by comparing large samples of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans in 69 PD patients with probable RBD, 240 patients without RBD and 138 healthy controls, using deformation-based morphometry (p medullary reticular formation, hypothalamus, thalamus, putamen, amygdala and anterior cingulate cortex. These results demonstrate that RBD is associated with a prominent loss of volume in the pontomesencephalic tegmentum, where cholinergic, GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons are located and implicated in the promotion of REM sleep and muscle atonia. It is additionally associated with more widespread atrophy in other subcortical and cortical regions whose loss also likely contributes to the altered regulation of sleep-wake states and motor activity underlying RBD in PD patients. PMID:27245317

  17. Metabolic and feeding behavior alterations provoked by prenatal exposure to aspartame.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Poser Toigo, E; Huffell, A P; Mota, C S; Bertolini, D; Pettenuzzo, L F; Dalmaz, C

    2015-04-01

    The use of artificial sweeteners has increased together with the epidemic growth of obesity. In addition to their widespread use in sodas, artificial sweeteners are added to nearly 6000 other products sold in the US, including baby foods, frozen dinners and even yogurts. It has been suggested that the use of nonnutritive sweeteners can lead to body weight gain and an altered metabolic profile. However, very few studies have evaluated the effects of maternal consumption of artificial non-caloric sweeteners on body weight, feeding behavior or the metabolism of offspring in adult life. In this study, we found that animals exposed to aspartame during the prenatal period presented a higher consumption of sweet foods during adulthood and a greater susceptibility to alterations in metabolic parameters, such as increased glucose, LDL and triglycerides. These effects were observed in both males and females, although they were more pronounced in males. Despite the preliminary nature of this study, and the need for further confirmation of these effects, our data suggest that the consumption of sweeteners during gestation may have deleterious long-term effects and should be used with caution. PMID:25543075

  18. Serotonin 2B receptor slows disease progression and prevents degeneration of spinal cord mononuclear phagocytes in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Oussini, Hajer; Bayer, Hanna; Scekic-Zahirovic, Jelena; Vercruysse, Pauline; Sinniger, Jérôme; Dirrig-Grosch, Sylvie; Dieterlé, Stéphane; Echaniz-Laguna, Andoni; Larmet, Yves; Müller, Kathrin; Weishaupt, Jochen H; Thal, Dietmar R; van Rheenen, Wouter; van Eijk, Kristel; Lawson, Roland; Monassier, Laurent; Maroteaux, Luc; Roumier, Anne; Wong, Philip C; van den Berg, Leonard H; Ludolph, Albert C; Veldink, Jan H; Witting, Anke; Dupuis, Luc

    2016-03-01

    Microglia are the resident mononuclear phagocytes of the central nervous system and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). During neurodegeneration, microglial activation is accompanied by infiltration of circulating monocytes, leading to production of multiple inflammatory mediators in the spinal cord. Degenerative alterations in mononuclear phagocytes are commonly observed during neurodegenerative diseases, yet little is known concerning the mechanisms leading to their degeneration, or the consequences on disease progression. Here we observed that the serotonin 2B receptor (5-HT2B), a serotonin receptor expressed in microglia, is upregulated in the spinal cord of three different transgenic mouse models of ALS. In mutant SOD1 mice, this upregulation was restricted to cells positive for CD11b, a marker of mononuclear phagocytes. Ablation of 5-HT2B receptor in transgenic ALS mice expressing mutant SOD1 resulted in increased degeneration of mononuclear phagocytes, as evidenced by fragmentation of Iba1-positive cellular processes. This was accompanied by decreased expression of key neuroinflammatory genes but also loss of expression of homeostatic microglial genes. Importantly, the dramatic effect of 5-HT2B receptor ablation on mononuclear phagocytes was associated with acceleration of disease progression. To determine the translational relevance of these results, we studied polymorphisms in the human HTR2B gene, which encodes the 5-HT2B receptor, in a large cohort of ALS patients. In this cohort, the C allele of SNP rs10199752 in HTR2B was associated with longer survival. Moreover, patients carrying one copy of the C allele of SNP rs10199752 showed increased 5-HT2B mRNA in spinal cord and displayed less pronounced degeneration of Iba1 positive cells than patients carrying two copies of the more common A allele. Thus, the 5-HT2B receptor limits degeneration of spinal cord mononuclear

  19. Cellular immune responses and phagocytic activity of fishes exposed to pollution of volcano mud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risjani, Yenny; Yunianta; Couteau, Jerome; Minier, Christophe

    2014-05-01

    Since May 29, 2006, a mud volcano in the Brantas Delta of the Sidoarjo district has emitted mud that has inundated nearby villages. Pollution in this area has been implicated in detrimental effects on fish health. In fishes, leukocyte and phagocytic cells play a vital role in body defenses. We report for the first time the effect of "LUSI" volcano mud on the immune systems of fish in the Brantas Delta. The aim of this study was to find biomarkers to allow the evaluation of the effects of volcanic mud and anthropogenic pollution on fish health in the Brantas Delta. The study took places at the Brantas Delta, which was polluted by volcano mud, and at reference sites in Karangkates and Pasuruan. Leukocyte numbers were determined using a Neubauer hemocytometer and a light microscope. Differential leukocyte counts were determined using blood smears stained with May Grunwald-Giemsa, providing neutrophil, lymphocyte and monocyte counts. Macrophages were taken from fish kidney, and their phagocytic activity was measured. In vitro analyses revealed that leukocyte and differential leukocyte counts (DLC) were higher in Channa striata and Chanos chanos caught from the polluted area. Macrophage numbers were higher in Oreochromis mossambicus than in the other species, indicating that this species is more sensitive to pollution. In areas close to volcanic mud eruption, all specimens had lower phagocytic activity. Our results show that immune cells were changed and phagocytic activity was reduced in the polluted area indicating cytotoxicity and alteration of the innate immune system in fishes exposed to LUSI volcano mud and anthropogenic pollution. PMID:24631200

  20. Altered functional connectivity in lesional peduncular hallucinosis with REM sleep behavior disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geddes, Maiya R; Tie, Yanmei; Gabrieli, John D E; McGinnis, Scott M; Golby, Alexandra J; Whitfield-Gabrieli, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Brainstem lesions causing peduncular hallucinosis (PH) produce vivid visual hallucinations occasionally accompanied by sleep disorders. Overlapping brainstem regions modulate visual pathways and REM sleep functions via gating of thalamocortical networks. A 66-year-old man with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation developed abrupt-onset complex visual hallucinations with preserved insight and violent dream enactment behavior. Brain MRI showed restricted diffusion in the left rostrodorsal pons suggestive of an acute ischemic stroke. REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) was diagnosed on polysomnography. We investigated the integrity of ponto-geniculate-occipital circuits with seed-based resting-state functional connectivity MRI (rs-fcMRI) in this patient compared to 46 controls. Rs-fcMRI revealed significantly reduced functional connectivity between the lesion and lateral geniculate nuclei (LGN), and between LGN and visual association cortex compared to controls. Conversely, functional connectivity between brainstem and visual association cortex, and between visual association cortex and prefrontal cortex (PFC) was significantly increased in the patient. Focal damage to the rostrodorsal pons is sufficient to cause RBD and PH in humans, suggesting an overlapping mechanism in both syndromes. This lesion produced a pattern of altered functional connectivity consistent with disrupted visual cortex connectivity via de-afferentation of thalamocortical pathways. PMID:26656284

  1. The α1 Antagonist Doxazosin Alters the Behavioral Effects of Cocaine in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin N. Haile

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Medications that target norepinephrine (NE neurotransmission alter the behavioral effects of cocaine and may be beneficial for stimulant-use disorders. We showed previously that the short-acting, α1-adrenergic antagonist, prazosin, blocked drug-induced reinstatement of cocaine-seeking in rats and doxazosin (DOX, a longer-acting α1 antagonist blocked cocaine’s subjective effects in cocaine-dependent volunteers. To further characterize DOX as a possible pharmacotherapy for cocaine dependence, we assessed its impact on the development and expression of cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization in rats. Rats (n = 6–8 were administered saline, cocaine (COC, 10 mg/kg or DOX (0.3 or 1.0 mg/kg alone or in combination for 5 consecutive days (development. Following 10-days of drug withdrawal, all rats were administered COC and locomotor activity was again assessed (expression. COC increased locomotor activity across days indicative of sensitization. The high dose (1.0 mg/kg, but not the low dose (0.3 mg/kg of DOX significantly decreased the development and expression of COC sensitization. DOX alone did not differ from saline. These results are consistent with studies showing that α1 receptors are essential for the development and expression of cocaine’s behavioral effects. Results also suggest that blockade of both the development and expression of locomotor sensitization may be important characteristics of possible pharmacotherapies for cocaine dependence in humans.

  2. Survival and function of phagocytes in blood culture media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, T K; Prag, J; Kharazmi, A

    1999-01-01

    The survival and function of human phagocytes in sterile aerobic and anaerobic blood culture media were investigated using neutrophil morphology, white blood cell count in a haemoanalyser, flow cytometry, oxidative burst response, and bactericidal effect in Colorbact and Septi-Chek blood culture...... media and Bact/Alert. When comparing agitation to stationary incubation no difference in phagocytic activity was found. The methods showed the same trends demonstrating that the phagocytes' viability and activity were prolonged by oxygen and shortened by anaerobic conditions and sodium polyethanol...... sulfonate (SPS). Best preserved activity and viability were found in the aerobic media containing less than 0.5 g/l SPS, in which significant phagocyte oxidative burst and bactericidal activity were found up to 4 days after inoculation. Considering that the majority of bacteremias are due to aerobic or...

  3. 3. Impact of altered gravity on CNS development and behavior in male and female rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajdel-Sulkowska, E. M.; Nguon, K.; Ladd, B.; Sulkowski, V. A.; Sulkowski, Z. L.; Baxter, M. G.

    The present study examined the effect of altered gravity on CNS development. Specifically, we compared neurodevelopment, behavior, cerebellar structure and protein expression in rat neonates exposed perinatally to hypergravity. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 1.5G-1.75G hypergravity on a 24-ft centrifuge starting on gestational day (G) 10, through giving birth on G22/G23, and nursing their offspring through postnatal day (P) 21. Cerebellar mass on P6 was decreased in 1.75G-exposed male pups by 27.5 percent; in 1.75G-exposed female pups it was decreased by 22.5 percent. The observed cerebellar changes were associated with alterations in neurodevelopment and motor behavior. Exposure to hypergravity impaired performance on the following neurocognitive tests: (1) righting time on P3 was more than doubled in 1.75G-exposed rats and the effect appeared more pronounced in female pups, (2) startle response on P10 was delayed in both male and female HG pups; HG pups were one-fifth as likely to respond to a clapping noise as SC pups, and (3) performance on a rotorod on P21 was decreased in HG pups; the duration of the stay on rotorod recorded for HG pups of both sexes was one tenth of the SC pups. Furthermore, Western blot analysis of selected cerebellar proteins suggested gender-specific changes in glial and neuronal proteins. On P6, GFAP expression was decreased by 59.2 percent in HG males, while no significant decrease was observed in female cerebella. Synaptophysin expression was decreased in HG male neonates by 29.9 percent and in HG female neonates by 20.7 percent as compared to its expression in SC cerebella. The results of this experiment suggest that perinatal exposure to hypergravity affects cerebellar development and behavior differently in male and female neonates. If one accepts that hypergravity is a good paradigm to study the effect of microgravity on the CNS, and since males and females were shown to respond differently to hypergravity, it can be

  4. DEPRESSIVE BEHAVIOR AND METABOLIC ALTERATIONS IN MICE ARE MUSICAL STYLE-DEPENDENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Lima

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the world population has been affected by two serious psychological disorders, anxiety and depression, but there are few discoveries for new therapies to combat them. Studies have shown that music therapy has its beneficial behavioral effects. Therefore, the aim of the present study it was to investigate the possible effects of two music styles in some lipids and carbohydrate metabolism parameters resulting from behavioral changes related to anxiety and depression. So, mice were used with 30 days of age, divided into 6 groups: G1: saline, G2: Diazepam (DZP, G3: Fluoxetine (FLX, G4: control (no treatment, G5: Rock, and G6: Mozart Sonata. The animals from groups G1, G2 and G3 received treatments by oral route (gavage for 15 days. The music therapy sessions (2x/day 4 hours/day occurred in the same period of time at a 65dB frequency for G5 and G6 groups. After being evaluated in spontaneous locomotion, elevated plus maze and forced swimming tests, the animals were euthanized. The lactate, total cholesterol and plasma glucose levels were measured from the blood. No change was observed in spontaneous locomotion test and elevated plus maze. In the forced swimming test animals exposed to Rock showed an increase in immobility time. Furthermore, it was observed an increase in glucose and a reduction in cholesterol levels in the groups exposed to Rock and Mozart, while a decrease of lactate was observed only in group Rock. It was concluded that the auditory stimulus caused by music in mice was able to encourage depressive behavior and alter some lipids and carbohydrate metabolism parameters dependently of the musical style.

  5. Phagocytic activity of neuronal progenitors regulates adult neurogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Zhenjie; Elliott, Michael R.; Chen, Yubo; Walsh, James T.; Klibanov, Alexander L.; Ravichandran, Kodi S.; Kipnis, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    Whereas thousands of new neurons are generated daily during adult life, only a fraction of them survive and become part of neural circuits; the rest die, and their corpses are presumably cleared by resident phagocytes. How the dying neurons are removed and how such clearance influences neurogenesis are not well understood. Here, we identify an unexpected phagocytic role for the doublecortin (DCX)-positive neuronal progenitor cells during adult neurogenesis. Our in vivo and ex vivo studies dem...

  6. Phagocytic activity of neuronal progenitors regulates adult neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhenjie; Elliott, Michael R; Chen, Yubo; Walsh, James T; Klibanov, Alexander L; Ravichandran, Kodi S; Kipnis, Jonathan

    2011-09-01

    Whereas thousands of new neurons are generated daily during adult life, only a fraction of them survive and become part of neural circuits; the rest die, and their corpses are presumably cleared by resident phagocytes. How the dying neurons are removed and how such clearance influences neurogenesis are not well understood. Here, we identify an unexpected phagocytic role for the doublecortin (DCX)-positive neuronal progenitor cells during adult neurogenesis. Our in vivo and ex vivo studies demonstrate that DCX(+) cells comprise a significant phagocytic population within the neurogenic zones. Intracellular engulfment protein ELMO1, which promotes Rac activation downstream of phagocytic receptors, was required for phagocytosis by DCX(+) cells. Disruption of engulfment in vivo genetically (in Elmo1-null mice) or pharmacologically (in wild-type mice) led to reduced uptake by DCX(+) cells, accumulation of apoptotic nuclei in the neurogenic niches and impaired neurogenesis. Collectively, these findings indicate a paradigm wherein DCX(+) neuronal precursors also serve as phagocytes, and that their phagocytic activity critically contributes to neurogenesis in the adult brain. PMID:21804544

  7. Prenatal chlorpyrifos exposure alters motor behavior and ultrasonic vocalization in cd-1 mouse pups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calamandrei Gemma

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chlorpyrifos (CPF is a non-persistent organophosphate (OP largely used as pesticide. Studies from animal models indicate that CPF is a developmental neurotoxicant able to target immature central nervous system at dose levels well below the threshold of systemic toxicity. So far, few data are available on the potential short- and long-term adverse effects in children deriving from low-level exposures during prenatal life and infancy. Methods Late gestational exposure [gestational day (GD 14–17] to CPF at the dose of 6 mg/kg was evaluated in CD-1 mice during early development, by assessment of somatic and sensorimotor maturation [reflex-battery on postnatal days (PNDs 3, 6, 9, 12 and 15] and ultrasound emission after isolation from the mother and siblings (PNDs 4, 7 and 10. Pups' motor skills were assessed in a spontaneous activity test on PND 12. Maternal behavior of lactating dams in the home cage and in response to presentation of a pup previously removed from the nest was scored on PND 4, to verify potential alterations in maternal care directly induced by CPF administration. Results As for the effects on the offspring, results indicated that on PND 10, CPF significantly decreased number and duration of ultrasonic calls while increasing latency to emit the first call after isolation. Prenatal CPF also reduced motor behavior on PND 12, while a tendency to hyporeflexia was observed in CPF pups by means of reflex-battery scoring. Dams administered during gestation with CPF showed baseline levels of maternal care comparable to those of controls, but higher levels of both pup-directed (licking and explorative (wall rearing responses. Conclusion Overall our results are consistent with previous epidemiological data on OP neurobehavioral toxicity, and also indicate ultrasonic vocalization as an early marker of CPF exposure during development in rodent studies, with potential translational value to human infants.

  8. Short and long term neuro-behavioral alterations in type 1diabetes mellitus pediatric population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Edna Litmanovitch; Ronny Geva; Marianna Rachmiel

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is one of the mostprevalent chronic conditions affecting individualsunder the age of 18 years, with increasing incidenceworldwide, especially among very young age groups,younger than 5. There is still no cure for the disease,and therapeutic goals and guidelines are a challenge.Currently, despite T1DM intensive management andtechnological interventions in therapy, the majorityof pediatric patients do not achieve glycemic controlgoals. This leads to a potential prognosis of longterm diabetic complications, nephrological, cardiac,ophthalmological and neurological. Unfortunately, theneurological manifestations, including neurocognitiveand behavioral complications, may present soon afterdisease onset, during childhood and adolescence.These manifestations may be prominent, but at timessubtle, thus they are often not reported by patients orphysicians as related to the diabetes. Furthermore, themetabolic mechanism for such manifestations has beeninconsistent and difficult to interpret in practical clinicalcare, as reported in several reviews on the topic ofbrain and T1DM. However, new technological methodsfor brain assessment, as well as the introduction ofcontinuous glucose monitoring, provide new insightsand information regarding brain related manifestationsand glycemic variability and control parameters, whichmay impact the clinical care of children and youth withT1DM. This paper provides a comprehensive reviewof the most recently reported behavioral, cognitivedomains, sleep related, electrophysiological, andstructural alterations in children and adolescences froma novel point of view. The review focuses on reportedimpairments based on duration of T1DM, its timeline,and modifiable disease related risk parameters. Thesefindings are not without controversy, and limitations ofdata are presented in addition to recommendations forfuture research direction.

  9. Myeloperoxidase modulates the phagocytic activity of polymorphonuclear neutrophil leukocytes. Studies with cells from a myeloperoxidase-deficient patient.

    OpenAIRE

    Stendahl, O.; Coble, B I; Dahlgren, C; Hed, J; Molin, L.

    1984-01-01

    Patients lacking the primary granulae enzyme, myeloperoxidase (MPO), do not usually show any increased susceptibility to infection or altered inflammatory response, in contrast to several other biochemical defects in polymorphonuclear neutrophils. We have now evaluated the role of MPO on phagocyte function in a patient with complete MPO deficiency suffering from generalized pustular psoriasis. We found that the MPO-deficient neutrophils showed enhanced phagocytosis (greater than 200% of norma...

  10. The Relationship between Instructor Misbehaviors and Student Antisocial Behavioral Alteration Techniques: The Roles of Instructor Attractiveness, Humor, and Relational Closeness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claus, Christopher J.; Booth-Butterfield, Melanie; Chory, Rebecca M.

    2012-01-01

    Using rhetorical/relational goal theory as a guiding frame, we examined relationships between instructor misbehaviors (i.e., indolence, incompetence, and offensiveness) and the likelihood of students communicating antisocial behavioral alteration techniques (BATs). More specifically, the study focused on whether students' perceptions of instructor…

  11. Cross-fostering does not alter the neurochemistry or behavior of spontaneously hypertensive rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell Vivienne A

    2009-06-01

    and prefrontal cortex while SD prefrontal cortex released more [3H]norepinephrine than WKY. SHR were resilient, cross-fostering did not reduce their ADHD-like behavior or change their neurochemistry. Cross-fostering of SD pups onto SHR or WKY dams increased their exploratory behavior without altering their anxiety-like behavior. Conclusion The ADHD-like behavior of SHR and their neurochemistry is genetically determined and not dependent on nurturing by SHR dams. The similarity between WKY and SD supports the continued use of WKY as a control for SHR and suggests that SD may be a useful additional reference strain for SHR. The fact that SD behaved similarly to WKY in the elevated-plus maze argues against the use of WKY as a model for anxiety-like disorders.

  12. Paradoxical sleep deprivation: neurochemical, hormonal and behavioral alterations. Evidence from 30 years of research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Tufik

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Sleep comprises approximately one-third of a person's lifetime, but its impact on health and medical conditions remains partially unrecognized. The prevalence of sleep disorders is increasing in modern societies, with significant repercussions on people's well-being. This article reviews past and current literature on the paradoxical sleep deprivation method as well as data on its consequences to animals, ranging from behavioral changes to alterations in the gene expression. More specifically, we highlight relevant experimental studies and our group's contribution over the last three decades.O sono ocupa cerca de um terço de nossas vidas, entretanto seu impacto na saúde e sua influência nas condições patológicas ainda não foi completamente elucidado. A prevalência dos distúrbios de sono é cada vez maior, sobretudo nas regiões mais industrializadas, repercutindo diretamente no bem-estar da população. Este artigo tem como objetivo sintetizar e atualizar a literatura a respeito do método de privação de sono paradoxal e seu panorama de conseqüências desde comportamentais até genéticas em animais. Ainda, destacamos a contribuição e relevância dos estudos experimentais realizados por nosso grupo nas ultimas três décadas.

  13. CRIEPI's research results (2006-2011) and clarified future issues on alteration behavior of bentonite barrier by alkaline solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In radioactive waste disposal facilities, bentonite barrier would be altered by alkaline solutions which arise by leaching of cementitious materials. Consequently suitable properties of the bentonite barrier would be degraded for a long time period. In CRIEPI, the investigation on the alteration of the bentonite under alkaline conditions was started in 2006, and several CRIEPI reports have been published. Specifically, we have investigated the kinetics of montmorillonite dissolution, the mineralogical alteration of compacted bentonite (with high- and low-dry density) and the change of permeability of the compacted bentonite (with high- and low-dry density) during alteration under the alkaline conditions. Furthermore, stability of saponite, which has similar physical properties to the bentonite, under the alkaline conditions was also examined. In this report, we show the outline of those research results, and lay out the clarified future issues extracted from our results. Ten clarified future issues were divided three categories as follows: 1) the estimation of the alteration behavior of the bentonite by alkaline solutions, 2) the elucidation of the mechanism of physical properties (e.g., permeability, swelling properties and mechanistic properties) change of the compacted bentonites during alteration, and 3) the development of the model building and simulation technology concerning the change in physical properties during alteration under alkaline conditions. (author)

  14. Dietary isoflavones alter regulatory behaviors, metabolic hormones and neuroendocrine function in Long-Evans male rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bu Lihong

    2004-12-01

    protein (UCP-1 mRNA levels in brown adipose tissue (BAT were seen in Phyto-600 fed males. However, decreased core body temperature was recorded in these same animals compared to Phyto-free fed animals. Conclusions This study demonstrates that consumption of a soy-based (isoflavone-rich diet, significantly alters several parameters involved in maintaining body homeostatic balance, energy expenditure, feeding behavior, hormonal, metabolic and neuroendocrine function in male rats.

  15. Osteoclast formation from mononuclear phagocytes : role of bone forming cells

    OpenAIRE

    Burger, E.H.; Meer, J.W.M. van der; Nijweide, P. J.

    1984-01-01

    In a previous study, using co-cultures of embryonic bone rudiments stripped of periosteum, and mononuclear phagocytes of various sources, we found that multinucleated mineral-resorbing osteoclasts developed in vitro from radiosensitive mouse bone marrow mononuclear phagocytes (BMMP). (Burger, E. H., J. W. M. van der Meer, J. S. van de Gevel, C. W. Thesingh, and R. van Furth, 1982, J. Exp. Med. 156:1604-1614). In the present study, this co-culture technique was used to analyze the influence of...

  16. Bacopa monniera (L.) Wettst ameliorates behavioral alterations and oxidative markers in sodium valproate induced autism in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhya, T; Sowjanya, J; Veeresh, B

    2012-05-01

    Early prenatal or post natal exposure to environmental insults such as valproic acid (VPA), thalidomide and ethanol could induce behavioral alterations similar to autistic symptoms. Bacopa monniera, a renowned plant in ayurvedic medicine is useful in several neurological disorders. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of B. monniera on VPA induced autism. On 12.5 day of gestation the female pregnant rats were divided into control and VPA treated groups. They were administered saline/VPA (600 mg/kg, i.p.) respectively and allowed to raise their own litters. Group I-male pups of saline treated mothers. On postnatal day (PND) 21 VPA induced autistic male pups were divided into two groups (n = 6); Group II-received saline and Group III-received B. monniera (300 mg/kg/p.o.) from PND 21-35. Behavioral tests (nociception, locomotor activity, exploratory activity, anxiety and social behavior) were performed in both adolescence (PND 30-40) and adulthood (PND 90-110) period. At the end of behavioral testing animals were sacrificed, brain was isolated for biochemical estimations (serotonin, glutathione, catalase and nitric oxide) and histopathological examination. Induction of autism significantly affected normal behavior, increased oxidative stress and serotonin level, altered histoarchitecture of cerebellum (decreased number of purkinje cells, neuronal degeneration and chromatolysis) when compared with normal control group. Treatment with B. monniera significantly (p < 0.05) improved behavioral alterations, decreased oxidative stress markers and restored histoarchitecture of cerebellum. In conclusion, the present study suggests that B. monniera ameliorates the autistic symptoms possibly due to its anti-anxiety, antioxidant and neuro-protective activity. PMID:22322665

  17. Metabolic changes and DNA hypomethylation in cerebellum are associated with behavioral alterations in mice exposed to trichloroethylene postnatally

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blossom, Sarah J., E-mail: blossomsarah@uams.edu [Department of Pediatrics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, Arkansas Children' s Hospital Research Institute, 13 Children' s Way, Little Rock, AR 72202 (United States); Cooney, Craig A. [Department of Research and Development, Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System, John L. McClellan Memorial Veterans Hospital, 4300 West 7th St., Little Rock, AR 72205-5484 (United States); Melnyk, Stepan B.; Rau, Jenny L.; Swearingen, Christopher J. [Department of Pediatrics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, Arkansas Children' s Hospital Research Institute, 13 Children' s Way, Little Rock, AR 72202 (United States); Wessinger, William D. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, 4301 West Markham St., Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States)

    2013-06-15

    Previous studies demonstrated that low-level postnatal and early life exposure to the environmental contaminant, trichloroethylene (TCE), in the drinking water of MRL +/+ mice altered glutathione redox homeostasis and increased biomarkers of oxidative stress indicating a more oxidized state. Plasma metabolites along the interrelated transmethylation pathway were also altered indicating impaired methylation capacity. Here we extend these findings to further characterize the impact of TCE exposure in mice exposed to water only or two doses of TCE in the drinking water (0, 2, and 28 mg/kg/day) postnatally from birth until 6 weeks of age on redox homeostasis and biomarkers of oxidative stress in the cerebellum. In addition, pathway intermediates involved in methyl metabolism and global DNA methylation patterns were examined in cerebellar tissue. Because the cerebellum is functionally important for coordinating motor activity, including exploratory and social approach behaviors, these parameters were evaluated in the present study. Mice exposed to 28 mg/kg/day TCE exhibited increased locomotor activity over time as compared with control mice. In the novel object exploration test, these mice were more likely to enter the zone with the novel object as compared to control mice. Similar results were obtained in a second test when an unfamiliar mouse was introduced into the testing arena. The results show for the first time that postnatal exposure to TCE causes key metabolic changes in the cerebellum that may contribute to global DNA methylation deficits and behavioral alterations in TCE-exposed mice. - Highlights: • We exposed male mice to low-level trichloroethylene from postnatal days 1 through 42. • This exposure altered redox potential and increased oxidative stress in cerebellum. • This exposure altered metabolites important in cellular methylation in cerebellum. • This exposure promoted DNA hypomethylation in cerebellum. • This exposure enhanced locomotor

  18. Metabolic changes and DNA hypomethylation in cerebellum are associated with behavioral alterations in mice exposed to trichloroethylene postnatally

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous studies demonstrated that low-level postnatal and early life exposure to the environmental contaminant, trichloroethylene (TCE), in the drinking water of MRL +/+ mice altered glutathione redox homeostasis and increased biomarkers of oxidative stress indicating a more oxidized state. Plasma metabolites along the interrelated transmethylation pathway were also altered indicating impaired methylation capacity. Here we extend these findings to further characterize the impact of TCE exposure in mice exposed to water only or two doses of TCE in the drinking water (0, 2, and 28 mg/kg/day) postnatally from birth until 6 weeks of age on redox homeostasis and biomarkers of oxidative stress in the cerebellum. In addition, pathway intermediates involved in methyl metabolism and global DNA methylation patterns were examined in cerebellar tissue. Because the cerebellum is functionally important for coordinating motor activity, including exploratory and social approach behaviors, these parameters were evaluated in the present study. Mice exposed to 28 mg/kg/day TCE exhibited increased locomotor activity over time as compared with control mice. In the novel object exploration test, these mice were more likely to enter the zone with the novel object as compared to control mice. Similar results were obtained in a second test when an unfamiliar mouse was introduced into the testing arena. The results show for the first time that postnatal exposure to TCE causes key metabolic changes in the cerebellum that may contribute to global DNA methylation deficits and behavioral alterations in TCE-exposed mice. - Highlights: • We exposed male mice to low-level trichloroethylene from postnatal days 1 through 42. • This exposure altered redox potential and increased oxidative stress in cerebellum. • This exposure altered metabolites important in cellular methylation in cerebellum. • This exposure promoted DNA hypomethylation in cerebellum. • This exposure enhanced locomotor

  19. Maternal Inflammation Contributes to Brain Overgrowth and Autism-Associated Behaviors through Altered Redox Signaling in Stem and Progenitor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janel E. Le Belle

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A period of mild brain overgrowth with an unknown etiology has been identified as one of the most common phenotypes in autism. Here, we test the hypothesis that maternal inflammation during critical periods of embryonic development can cause brain overgrowth and autism-associated behaviors as a result of altered neural stem cell function. Pregnant mice treated with low-dose lipopolysaccharide at embryonic day 9 had offspring with brain overgrowth, with a more pronounced effect in PTEN heterozygotes. Exposure to maternal inflammation also enhanced NADPH oxidase (NOX-PI3K pathway signaling, stimulated the hyperproliferation of neural stem and progenitor cells, increased forebrain microglia, and produced abnormal autism-associated behaviors in affected pups. Our evidence supports the idea that a prenatal neuroinflammatory dysregulation in neural stem cell redox signaling can act in concert with underlying genetic susceptibilities to affect cellular responses to environmentally altered cellular levels of reactive oxygen species.

  20. Change in Performance of BALB/c Mouse Pulmonary Macrophage Surface Receptor after Exercise and its Influence on Phagocytic Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Ming Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of exercise on phagocytosis by pulmonary bronchoalveolar macrophages (BAMs). Methods: A total of 120 seven- to nine-week-old male BALB/c mice were randomly assigned into the following groups based on exercise intensity on a treadmill: control exercise (CE) group, acute moderate exercise (ME) group, and strenuous exercise group. Lung lavage was conducted to collect BAMs from the mice. Phagocytic behavior and surface receptor expression on BALB/c mouse BAMs were a...

  1. Influence of polysulfone and hemophan hemodialysis membranes on phagocytes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubala, Lukáš; Číž, Milan; Soška, V.; Černý, J.; Lojek, Antonín

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 4 (2002), s. 367-380. ISSN 0231-5882 R&D Projects: GA MZd NA4796 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Keywords : hemodialysis * phagocytes * reactive oxygen species Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 0.719, year: 2002

  2. Effects of parenteral lipid emulsions on the phagocytes in vitro

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lojek, Antonín; Číž, Milan; Kubala, Lukáš; Hofmanová, Jiřina; Kozubík, Alois

    Berlin, 2008. S77. ISSN 1071-5762. [The Society for Free Radical Research European Meeting. 05.07.2008-09.07.2008, Berlin] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) 1QS500040507 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : phagocytes * parenteral lipid emulsion * chemiluminescence Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  3. Iron inhibits respiratory burst of peritoneal phagocytes in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotfryd, Kamil; Jurek, Aleksandra; Kubit, Piotr;

    2011-01-01

    Objective. This study examines the effects of iron ions Fe(3+) on the respiratory burst of phagocytes isolated from peritoneal effluents of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients, as an in vitro model of iron overload in end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Material and Methods. Res...

  4. In vivo evaluation of the antibacterial capacity of tissue phagocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The phagocytic activity of guinea pig liver to deal with bacterial infection was investigated on 14C- or 32P-labelled Brucella melitensis. Some in vitro work has been started, using immunoglobulins (IgG, IgM) with antibody activity against whole Brucella

  5. Relationship among Short and Long Term of Hypoinsulinemia-Hyperglycemia, Dermatophytosis, and Immunobiology of Mononuclear Phagocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraga-Silva, Thais F. C.; Marchetti, Camila M.; Mimura, Luiza A. N.; Locachevic, Gisele A.; Golim, Márjorie A.; Venturini, James; Arruda, Maria S. P.

    2015-01-01

    Dermatophytes are fungi responsible for causing superficial infections. In patients with diabetes mellitus (DM), dermatophytosis is usually more severe and recurrent. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the influence of short and long term hypoinsulinemia-hyperglycemia (HH) during experimental infection by Trichophyton mentagrophytes as well as alterations in the mononuclear phagocytes. Our results showed two distinct profiles of fungal outcome and immune response. Short term HH induced a discrete impaired proinflammatory response by peritoneal adherent cells (PAC) and a delayed fungal clearance. Moreover, long term HH mice showed low and persistent fungal load and a marked reduction in the production of TNF-α by PAC. Furthermore, while the inoculation of TM in non-HH mice triggered high influx of Gr1+ monocytes into the peripheral blood, long term HH mice showed low percentage of these cells. Thus, our results demonstrate that the time of exposure of HH interferes with the TM infection outcome as well as the immunobiology of mononuclear phagocytes, including fresh monocyte recruitment from bone marrow and PAC activity. PMID:26538824

  6. Onset of apoprotein E secretion during differentiation of mouse bone marrow-derived mononuclear phagocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of macrophage functions were sequentially expressed when the bone marrow precursors of mononuclear phagocytes differentiated in culture in the presence of a specific growth factor, colony-stimulating factor-1. The authors defined the expression of apoprotein E (ApoE), a major secreted protein of resident peritoneal macrophages, during maturation of adherent bone marrow-derived mononuclear phagocytes into macrophages. By 5 d the bone marrow macrophages were active secretory cells, but few cells contained intracellular immunoreactive ApoE, and little, if any, ApoE was secreted. ApoE secretion was initiated at 9 d, and this correlated with an increase in the percentage of macrophages containing intracellular ApoE. The onset of ApoE secretion was selective, and little change occurred in the other major secreted proteins detected by [35S]methionine incorporation. In parallel, the high rate of plasminogen activator secretion, which peaked at 7 d, decreased markedly. ApoE secretion was not associated with altered expression of the macrophage surface antigen, la, or with secretion of fibronectin. Virtually all cells in independent colonies of bone marrow-derived macrophages eventually expressed ApoE. The proliferating monocyte/macrophage-like cell lines P388D1, J774.2, WHEI-3, RAW 264.1, and MGI.D+ secreted little or no ApoE. These data establish that ApoE secretion is developmentally regulated

  7. Altered behavior, physiology, and metabolism in fish exposed to polystyrene nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattsson, Karin; Ekvall, Mikael T; Hansson, Lars-Anders; Linse, Sara; Malmendal, Anders; Cedervall, Tommy

    2015-01-01

    administered 24 and 27 nm polystyrene nanoparticles to fish through an aquatic food chain, from algae through Daphnia, and studied the effects on behavior and metabolism. We found severe effects on feeding and shoaling behavior as well as metabolism of the fish; hence, we conclude that polystyrene...... nanoparticles have severe effects on both behavior and metabolism in fish and that commonly used nanosized particles may have considerable effects on natural systems and ecosystem services derived from them....

  8. Adolescent social defeat alters neural, endocrine and behavioral responses to amphetamine in adult male rats

    OpenAIRE

    Burke, Andrew R.; Renner, Kenneth J.; Forster, Gina L.; Watt, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    The mesocorticolimbic dopamine system, which governs components of reward and goal-directed behaviors, undergoes final maturation during adolescence. Adolescent social stress contributes to adult behavioral dysfunction, and is linked to adult psychiatric and addiction disorders. Here, behavioral, corticosterone, and limbic dopamine responses to amphetamine were examined in adult male rats previously exposed to repeated social defeat stress during mid-adolescence. Amphetamine (2.5 mg/kg, ip) w...

  9. Genetic alteration of anxiety and stress-like behavior in mice lacking CaMKIV

    OpenAIRE

    Kaang Bong-Kiun; Lee Yong-Seok; Ko Shanelle W; Shum Fanny WF; Zhuo Min

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CaMKIV) phosphorylates the major transcription factor cyclic AMP-response element binding protein (CREB), which plays a role in emotional behavior. Here, CaMKIV knockout mice (CaMKIV-/-) were tested in a battery of stress and anxiety-related behavioral tests, to determine if CaMKIV plays a role in emotional behavior. CaMKIV-/-exhibited a decrease in anxiety-like behavior in both the elevated plus maze and dark-light emergence tests when...

  10. Altered diurnal pattern of steroid hormones in relation to various behaviors, external factors and pathologies: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collomp, K; Baillot, A; Forget, H; Coquerel, A; Rieth, N; Vibarel-Rebot, N

    2016-10-01

    The adrenal and gonadal stress steroids [i.e., cortisol, testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA)] have gathered considerable attention in the last few decades due to their very broad physiological and psychological actions. Their diurnal patterns have become a particular focus following new data implicating altered diurnal hormone patterns in various endocrine, behavioral and cardiovascular risk profiles. In this review of the current literature, we present a brief overview of the altered diurnal patterns of these hormones that may occur in relation to chronic stress, nutritional behaviors, physical exercise, drugs and sleep deprivation/shift. We also present data on the altered diurnal hormone patterns implicated in cardiometabolic and psychiatric/neurologic diseases, cancer and other complex pathologies. We consider the occasionally discrepant results of the studies, and summarize the current knowledge in this new field of interest, underlining the potential effects on both biological and psychological functioning, and assess the implications of these effects. Last, we conclude with some practical considerations and perspectives. PMID:27235338

  11. Chronic fluoxetine treatment induces anxiolytic responses and altered social behaviors in medaka, Oryzias latipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansai, Satoshi; Hosokawa, Hiroshi; Maegawa, Shingo; Kinoshita, Masato

    2016-04-15

    Medaka (Oryzias latipes) is a small freshwater teleost that is an emerging model system for neurobehavioral research and toxicological testing. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor class of antidepressants such as fluoxetine is one of the widely prescribed drugs, but little is known about the effects of these drugs on medaka behaviors. To assess the behavioral effects of fluoxetine, we chronically administrated fluoxetine to medaka adult fish and analyzed the anxiety-related and social behaviors using five behavioral paradigms (diving, open-field, light-dark transition, mirror-biting, and social interaction) with an automated behavioral testing system. Fish chronically treated with fluoxetine exhibited anxiolytic responses such as an overall increased time spent in the top area in the diving test and an increased time spent in center area in the open-field test. Analysis of socially evoked behavior showed that chronic fluoxetine administration decreased the number of mirror biting times in the mirror-biting test and increased latency to first contact in the social interaction test. Additionally, chronic fluoxetine administration reduced the horizontal locomotor activity in the open-field test but not the vertical activity in the diving test. These investigations are mostly consistent with previous reports in the other teleost species and rodent models. These results indicate that behavioral assessment in medaka adult fish will become useful for screening of effects of pharmaceutical and toxicological compounds in animal behaviors. PMID:26821288

  12. Long-term behavior of Embiez archaeological glass: Results after 1800 years of alteration in a marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An archaeological glass initially fractured and altered for 1800 years in a marine environment is now being examined by the CEA because of its strong morphological similarity to the nuclear glasses used for immobilization of long-lived radionuclides (i.e. the presence of fractures and cracks formed during cooling, which significantly increase the surface area accessible to water). The issue concerns glass alteration by water, and in particular the different behavior of the external surfaces in contact with a solution highly renewed and the internal surfaces, which constitute a much more confined medium. The preliminary results of this study are discussed. The cracks in the archaeological glass have been filled by crystallized alteration products formed jointly by elements from the glass and elements dissolved in seawater. The glass is distinctly less altered (by a factor of 10 to 100) on the internal surfaces generated by the cracks than on the external surfaces. The forward glass dissolution rate was measured at different temperatures on pristine glass samples and under conditions that allowed us to estimate the dissolution rate of the external surfaces under realistic conditions at about 200 μm in 1800 years. The implications of this study are then discussed. (author)

  13. Early Life Manipulations of the Nonapeptide System Alter Pair Maintenance Behaviors and Neural Activity in Adult Male Zebra Finches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, Nicole M; Tomaszycki, Michelle L; Adkins-Regan, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Adult zebra finches (T. guttata) form socially monogamous pair bonds characterized by proximity, vocal communication, and contact behaviors. In this experiment, we tested whether manipulations of the nonapeptide hormone arginine vasotocin (AVT, avian homolog of vasopressin) and the V1a receptor (V1aR) early in life altered species-typical pairing behavior in adult zebra finches of both sexes. Although there was no effect of treatment on the tendency to pair in either sex, males in different treatments exhibited profoundly different profiles of pair maintenance behavior. Following a brief separation, AVT-treated males were highly affiliative with their female partner but sang very little compared to Controls. In contrast, males treated with a V1aR antagonist sang significantly less than Controls, but did not differ in affiliation. These effects on behavior in males were also reflected in changes in the expression of V1aR and immediate early gene activity in three brain regions known to be involved in pairing behavior in birds: the medial amygdala, medial bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, and the lateral septum. AVT males had higher V1aR expression in the medial amygdala than both Control and antagonist-treated males and immediate early gene activity of V1aR neurons in the medial amygdala was positively correlated with affiliation. Antagonist treated males showed decreased activity in the medial amygdala. In addition, there was a negative correlation between the activity of V1aR cells in the medial bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and singing. Treatment also affected the expression of V1aR and activity in the lateral septum, but this was not correlated with any behaviors measured. These results provide evidence that AVT and V1aR play developmental roles in specific pair maintenance behaviors and the neural substrate underlying these behaviors in a bird. PMID:27065824

  14. Early Life Manipulations of the Nonapeptide System Alter Pair Maintenance Behaviors and Neural Activity in Adult Male Zebra Finches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole M. Baran

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Adult zebra finches (T. guttata form socially monogamous pair bonds characterized by proximity, vocal communication, and contact behaviors. In this experiment, we tested whether manipulations of the nonapeptide hormone arginine vasotocin (AVT, avian homologue of vasopressin and the V1a receptor (V1aR early in life altered species-typical pairing behavior in adult zebra finches of both sexes. Although there was no effect of treatment on the tendency to pair in either sex, males in different treatments exhibited profoundly different profiles of pair maintenance behavior. Following a brief separation, AVT-treated males were highly affiliative with their female partner but sang very little compared to Controls. In contrast, males treated with a V1aR antagonist sang significantly less than Controls, but did not differ in affiliation. These effects on behavior in males were also reflected in changes in the expression of V1aR and immediate early gene activity in three brain regions known to be involved in pairing behavior in birds: the medial amygdala, medial bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, and the lateral septum. AVT males had higher V1aR expression in the medial amygdala than both Control and antagonist-treated males and immediate early gene activity of V1aR neurons in the medial amygdala was positively correlated with affiliation. Antagonist treated males showed decreased activity in the medial amygdala. In addition, there was a negative correlation between the activity of V1aR cells in the medial bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and singing. Treatment also affected the expression of V1aR and activity in the lateral septum, but this was not correlated with any behaviors measured. These results provide evidence that AVT and V1aR play developmental roles in specific pair maintenance behaviors and the neural substrate underlying these behaviors in a bird.

  15. Metarhizium anisopliae infection alters feeding and trophallactic behavior in the ant Solenopsis invicta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Hua-Long; Lu, Li-Hua; Zalucki, M P; He, Yu-Rong

    2016-07-01

    In social insects, social behavior may be changed in a way that preventing the spread of pathogens. We infected workers of the ant Solenopsis invicta with an entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae and then videotaped and/or measured worker feeding and trophallactic behavior. Results showed that fungal infected S. invicta enhanced their preference for bitter alkaloid chemical quinine on 3days after inoculation, which might be self-medication of S. invicta by ingesting more alkaloid substances in response to pathogenic infection. Furthermore, infected ants devoted more time to trophallactic behavior with their nestmates on 3days post inoculation, in return receiving more food. Increased interactions between exposed ants and their naive nestmates suggest the existence of social immunity in S. invicta. Overall, our study indicates that S. invicta may use behavioral defenses such as self-medication and social immunity in response to a M. anisopliae infection. PMID:27234423

  16. Repeated neonatal handling with maternal separation permanently alters hippocampal GABAA receptors and behavioral stress responses

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu, Fu-Chun; Zhang, Guo-Jun; Raol, Yogendra Sinh H.; Valentino, Rita J.; Coulter, Douglas A.; Brooks-Kayal, Amy R.

    2003-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that postnatal events, such as handling or maternal separation, can produce long-term changes in brain function. These are often expressed as changes in the profile of endocrine or behavioral responses to stress. Changes in γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptors (GABARs), which mediate the majority of fast synaptic inhibition in adult brain, have been proposed as one potential mediator of these behavioral effects. In the current article, we use a combination of sing...

  17. Adolescent male rats exposed to social defeat exhibit altered anxiety behavior and limbic monoamines as adults

    OpenAIRE

    Watt, Michael J.; Burke, Andrew R.; Renner, Kenneth J.; Forster, Gina L.

    2009-01-01

    Social stress in adolescence is correlated with emergence of psychopathologies during early adulthood. In this study, we investigated the impact of social defeat stress during mid-adolescence on adult male brain and behavior. Adolescent male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to repeated social defeat for five days while controls were placed into a novel empty cage. When exposed to defeat-associated cues as adults, previously defeated rats showed increased risk assessment and behavioral inhibit...

  18. Long-term Ovariectomy Alters Social and Anxious Behaviors in Semi-free Ranging Japanese Macaques

    OpenAIRE

    Coleman, Kris; Robertson, Nicola D; Bethea, Cynthia L.

    2011-01-01

    Symptoms of anxiety and depression often occur in young women after complete hysterectomy and in older women during menopause. There are many variables that are hard to control in human population studies, but that are absent to a large extent in stable nonhuman primate troops. However, macaques exhibit depressive and anxious behaviors in response to similar situations as humans such as isolation, stress, instability or aggression. Therefore, we hypothesized that examination of behavior in ov...

  19. The kinetic measurement of phagocyte function in whole blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technique has been developed for the kinetic measurement on the same blood sample of a variety of functions of phagocytic cells. Adherence to glass, the clearance of a mixture of microorganisms and their subsequent solubilisation, and the secretion of granule contents from the cells were determined. The technique uses carbon-14 labelled and tritium-labelled bacteria which are injected into a perfusion chamber with glass coverslips containing anticoagulated blood. The release of soluble radioactive microboial components into the blood gives a measure of bacterial degradation. The numbers of residual viable intracellular staphylococci were measured at the completion of the study. These methods were used to investigate phagocyte function in 33 normal subjects and 6 patients with chronic granulomatous disease. (Auth.)

  20. Metabolic Reprograming of Mononuclear Phagocytes in Progressive Multiple Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Tannahill, Gillian Margaret; Iraci, Nunzio; Gaude, Edoardo; Frezza, Christian; Pluchino, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory and demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS). Accumulation of brain damage in progressive MS is partly the result of mononuclear phagocytes (MPs) attacking myelin sheaths in the CNS. Although there is no cure yet for MS, significant advances have been made in the development of disease modifying agents. Unfortunately, most of these drugs fail to reverse established neurological deficits and can have adverse effects. Recent evidence s...

  1. Fungal invasion of normally non-phagocytic host cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott G Filler

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Many fungi that cause invasive disease invade host epithelial cells during mucosal and respiratory infection, and subsequently invade endothelial cells during hematogenous infection. Most fungi invade these normally non-phagocytic host cells by inducing their own uptake. Candida albicans hyphae interact with endothelial cells in vitro by binding to N-cadherin on the endothelial cell surface. This binding induces rearrangement of endothelial cell microfilaments, which results in the endocytosis of the organism. The capsule of Cryptococcus neoformans is composed of glucuronoxylomannan, which binds specifically to brain endothelial cells, and appears to mediate both adherence and induction of endocytosis. The mechanisms by which other fungal pathogens induce their own uptake are largely unknown. Some angioinvasive fungi, such as Aspergillus species and the Zygomycetes, invade endothelial cells from the abluminal surface during the initiation of invasive disease, and subsequently invade the luminal surface of endothelial cells during hematogenous dissemination. Invasion of normally non-phagocytic host cells has different consequences, depending on the type of invading fungus. Aspergillus fumigatus blocks apoptosis of pulmonary epithelial cells, whereas Paracoccidioides brasiliensis induces apoptosis of epithelial cells. This review summarizes the mechanisms by which diverse fungal pathogens invade normally non-phagocytic host cells and discusses gaps in our knowledge that provide opportunities for future research.

  2. Geochemical behavior of rare earth elements of the hydrothermal alterations within the Tepeoba porphyry Cu-Mo-Au deposits at Balikesir, NW Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doner, Zeynep; Abdelnasser, Amr; Kiran Yildirim, Demet; Kumral, Mustafa

    2016-04-01

    This work reports the geochemical characteristics and behavior of the rare earth elements (REE) of the hydrothermal alteration of the Tepeoba porphyry Cu-Mo-Au deposit located in the Anatolian tectonic belt at Biga peninsula (Locally Balikesir province), NW Turkey. The Cu-Mo-Au mineralization at this deposit hosted in the hornfels rocks and related to the silicic to intermediate intrusion of Eybek pluton. It locally formed with brecciated zones and quartz vein stockworks, as well as the brittle fracture zones associated with intense hydrothermal alteration. Three main alteration zones with gradual boundaries formed in the mine area in the hornfels rock that represents the host rock, along that contact the Eybek pluton; potassic, propylitic and phyllic alteration zones. The potassic alteration zone that formed at the center having high amount of Cu-sulfide minerals contains biotite, muscovite, and sericite with less amount of K-feldspar and associated with tourmalinization alteration. The propylitic alteration surrounds the potassic alteration having high amount of Mo and Au and contains chlorite, albite, epidote, calcite and pyrite. The phyllic alteration zone also surrounds the potassic alteration containing quartz, sericite and pyrite minerals. Based on the REE characteristics and content and when we correlate the Alteration index (AI) with the light REEs and heavy REEs of each alteration zone, it concluded that the light REEs decrease and heavy REEs increase during the alteration processes. The relationships between K2O index with Eu/Eu* and Sr/Sr* reveals a positive correlation in the potassic and phyllic alteration zones and a negative correlation in the propylitic alteration zone. This refers to the hydrothermal solution which is responsible for the studied porphyry deposits and associated potassic and phyllic alterations has a positive Eu and Sr anomaly as well as these elements were added to the altered rock from the hydrothermal solution. Keywords: Rare

  3. Altered behavior, physiology, and metabolism in fish exposed to polystyrene nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattsson, Karin; Ekvall, Mikael T; Hansson, Lars-Anders;

    2015-01-01

    The use of nanoparticles in consumer products, for example, cosmetics, sunscreens, and electrical devices, has increased tremendously over the past decade despite insufficient knowledge about their effects on human health and ecosystem function. Moreover, the amount of plastic waste products that...... administered 24 and 27 nm polystyrene nanoparticles to fish through an aquatic food chain, from algae through Daphnia, and studied the effects on behavior and metabolism. We found severe effects on feeding and shoaling behavior as well as metabolism of the fish; hence, we conclude that polystyrene...... nanoparticles have severe effects on both behavior and metabolism in fish and that commonly used nanosized particles may have considerable effects on natural systems and ecosystem services derived from them....

  4. Conessine, an H3 receptor antagonist, alters behavioral and neurochemical effects of ethanol in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais-Silva, Gessynger; Ferreira-Santos, Mariane; Marin, Marcelo T

    2016-05-15

    Ethanol abuse potential is mainly due to its reinforcing properties, crucial in the transition from the recreational to pathological use. These properties are mediated by mesocorticolimbic and nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathways and neuroadaptations in these pathways seem to be responsible for addiction. Both pathways are modulated by other neurotransmitters systems, including neuronal histaminergic system. Among the histamine receptors, H3 receptor stands out due to its role in modulation of histamine and other neurotransmitters release. Thus, histaminergic system, through H3 receptors, may have an important role in ethanol addiction development. Aiming to understand these interactions, conessine, an H3 receptor antagonist, was given to mice subjected to the evaluation of ethanol-induced psychostimulation, ethanol CPP and quantification of norepinephrine, dopamine, serotonin and their metabolites in mesocorticolimbic and nigrostriatal pathways following acute ethanol treatment. Systemic conessine administration exacerbated ethanol effects on locomotor activity. Despite of conessine reinforcing effect on CPP, this drug did not alter acquisition of ethanol CPP. Ethanol treatment affects the serotoninergic neurotransmission in the ventral tegmental area, the dopaminergic neurotransmission in the pre-frontal cortex (PFC) and caudate-putamen nucleus (CPu) and the noradrenergic neurotransmission in the CPu. In the PFC, conessine blocked ethanol effects on dopaminergic and noradrenergic neurotransmission. The blockade of H3 receptors and ethanol seem to interact in the modulation of dopaminergic neurotransmission of nigrostriatal pathway, decreasing dopamine metabolites in substantia nigra. In conclusion, conessine was able to change psychostimulant effect of ethanol, without altering its reinforcing properties. This exacerbation of ethanol-induced psychostimulation would be related to alterations in dopaminergic neurotransmission in the nigrostriatal pathway. PMID

  5. Clock Genes and Behavioral Responses to Light Are Altered in a Mouse Model of Diabetic Retinopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Lahouaoui, Hasna; Coutanson, Christine; Cooper, Howard M.; Mohamed BENNIS; Dkhissi-Benyahya, Ouria

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that melanopsin-expressing ganglion cells (ipRGCs) are altered in retinal pathologies. Using a streptozotocin-induced (STZ) model of diabetes, we investigated the impact of diabetic retinopathy on non-visual functions by analyzing ipRGCs morphology and light-induced c-Fos and Period 1–2 clock genes in the central clock (SCN). The ability of STZ-diabetic mice to entrain to light was challenged by exposure animals to 1) successive light/dark (LD) cycle of decreasing...

  6. Female Moth Calling and Flight Behavior Are Altered Hours Following Pheromone Autodetection: Possible Implications for Practical Management with Mating Disruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukasz Stelinski

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Female moths are known to detect their own sex pheromone—a phenomenon called “autodetection”. Autodetection has various effects on female moth behavior, including altering natural circadian rhythm of calling behavior, inducing flight, and in some cases causing aggregations of conspecifics. A proposed hypothesis for the possible evolutionary benefits of autodetection is its possible role as a spacing mechanism to reduce female-female competition. Here, we explore autodetection in two species of tortricids (Grapholita molesta (Busck and Choristoneura rosaceana (Harris. We find that females of both species not only “autodetect,” but that learning (change in behavior following experience occurs, which affects behavior for at least 24 hours after pheromone pre-exposure. Specifically, female calling in both species is advanced at least 24 hours, but not 5 days, following pheromone pre-exposure. Also, the propensity of female moths to initiate flight and the duration of flights, as quantified by a laboratory flight mill, were advanced in pre-exposed females as compared with controls. Pheromone pre-exposure did not affect the proportion of mated moths when they were confined with males in small enclosures over 24 hours in laboratory assays. We discuss the possible implications of these results with respect to management of these known pest species with the use of pheromone-based mating disruption.

  7. Repeated exposure of adult rats to transient oxidative stress induces various long-lasting alterations in cognitive and behavioral functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshio Iguchi

    Full Text Available Exposure of neonates to oxidative stress may increase the risk of psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia in adulthood. However, the effects of moderate oxidative stress on the adult brain are not completely understood. To address this issue, we systemically administrated 2-cyclohexen-1-one (CHX to adult rats to transiently reduce glutathione levels. Repeated administration of CHX did not affect the acquisition or motivation of an appetitive instrumental behavior (lever pressing rewarded by a food outcome under a progressive ratio schedule. In addition, response discrimination and reversal learning were not affected. However, acute CHX administration blunted the sensitivity of the instrumental performance to outcome devaluation, and this effect was prolonged in rats with a history of repeated CHX exposure, representing pro-depression-like phenotypes. On the other hand, repeated CHX administration reduced immobility in forced swimming tests and blunted acute cocaine-induced behaviors, implicating antidepressant-like effects. Multivariate analyses segregated a characteristic group of behavioral variables influenced by repeated CHX administration. Taken together, these findings suggest that repeated administration of CHX to adult rats did not cause a specific mental disorder, but it induced long-term alterations in behavioral and cognitive functions, possibly related to specific neural correlates.

  8. Reduced Anxiety-Like Behavior and Altered Hippocampal Morphology in Female p75NTRexon IV−/− Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puschban, Zoe; Sah, Anupam; Grutsch, Isabella; Singewald, Nicolas; Dechant, Georg

    2016-01-01

    The presence of the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) in adult basal forebrain cholinergic neurons, precursor cells in the subventricular cell layer and the subgranular cell layer of the hippocampus has been linked to alterations in learning as well as anxiety- and depression- related behaviors. In contrast to previous studies performed in a p75NTRexon III−/− model still expressing the short isoform of the p75NTR, we focused on locomotor and anxiety–associated behavior in p75NTRexon IV−/− mice lacking both p75NTR isoforms. Comparing p75NTRexon IV−/− and wildtype mice for both male and female animals showed an anxiolytic-like behavior as evidenced by increased central activities in the open field paradigm and flex field activity system as well as higher numbers of open arm entries in the elevated plus maze test in female p75NTR knockout mice. Morphometrical analyses of dorsal and ventral hippocampus revealed a reduction of width of the dentate gyrus and the granular cell layer in the dorsal but not ventral hippocampus in male and female p75NTRexon IV−/− mice. We conclude that germ-line deletion of p75NTR seems to differentially affect morphometry of dorsal and ventral dentate gyrus and that p75NTR may play a role in anxiety-like behavior, specifically in female mice. PMID:27313517

  9. Alterations in affective behavior during the time course of alcohol hangover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadayian, Analía G; Busso, María J; Feleder, Carlos; Cutrera, Rodolfo A

    2013-09-15

    Alcohol hangover is a temporary state described as the unpleasant next-day effects after binge-like drinking. Hangover begins when ethanol is absent in plasma and is characterized by physical and psychological symptoms. Affective behavior is impaired during the acute phase of alcohol intoxication; however, no reports indicate if similar effects are observed during withdrawal. The aim of this work was to study the time-extension and possible fluctuations in affective behavior during a hangover episode. Male Swiss mice were injected i.p. either with saline (control group) or with ethanol (3.8g/kg BW) (hangover group). Anxiety, fear-related behavior and despair phenotype were evaluated at a basal point (ZT0) and every 2h up to 20h after blood alcohol levels were close to zero (hangover onset). Also, anhedonia signs and pain perception disabilities were studied. Mice exhibited an increase in anxiety-like behavior during 4h and 14h after hangover onset when evaluated by the elevated-plus maze and open field test respectively (phangover animals by the increase of freezing and decrease of line crossings and rearing frequency during 16h after hangover onset (phangover mice during 14h (pHangover mice showed a significant decrease in pain perception when tested by tail immersion test at the beginning of hangover (phangover affective impairments. This study shows the long lasting effects of hangover over the phase of ethanol intoxication. PMID:23850352

  10. Diet induced alterations in gastrointestinal bacterial populations affect memory and learning behavior in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ability of dietary manipulation to influence learning and behavior is well recognized. While the mechanism of action is almost exclusively interpreted as direct effects of dietary constituents on neural functioning within the central nervous system (CNS), the role of dietary modification on bact...

  11. Brief Report: Altered Social Behavior in Isolation-Reared "Fmr1" Knockout Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitzer, Andrew M.; Roth, Alexandra K.; Nawrocki, Lauren; Wrenn, Craige C.; Valdovinos, Maria G.

    2013-01-01

    Social behavior abnormalities in Fragile X syndrome (FXS) are characterized by social withdrawal, anxiety, and deficits in social cognition. To assess these deficits, a model of FXS, the "Fmr1" knockout mouse ("Fmr1" KO), has been utilized. This mouse model has a null mutation in the fragile X mental retardation 1 gene ("Fmr1") and displays…

  12. Relaxin-3-deficient mice showed slight alteration in anxiety-related behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihisa eWatanabe

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Relaxin-3 is a neuropeptide belonging to the relaxin/insulin superfamily. Studies using rodents have revealed that relaxin-3 is predominantly expressed in neurons in the nucleus incertus of the pons, the axons of which project to forebrain regions including the hypothalamus. There is evidence that relaxin-3 is involved in several functions, including food intake and stress responses. In the present study, we generated relaxin-3 gene knockout (KO mice and examined them using a range of behavioral tests of sensory/motor functions and emotion-related behaviors. The results revealed that relaxin-3 KO mice exhibited normal growth and appearance, and were generally indistinguishable from wild genotype littermates. There was no difference in bodyweight among genotypes until at least 28 weeks after birth. In addition, there were no significant differences between wild-type and KO mice in locomotor activity, social interaction, hot plate test performance, fear conditioning, depression-like behavior, and Y-maze test performance. However, in the elevated plus maze test, KO mice exhibited a robust increase in the tendency to enter open arms, although they exhibited normal performance in a light/dark transition test and showed no difference from wild-type mice in the time spent in central area in the open field test. On the other hand, a significant increase in the acoustic startle response was observed in KO mice. These results indicate that relaxin-3 is slightly involved in the anxiety-related behavior.

  13. The effect of dietary alterations during rearing on growth, productivity, and behavior in broiler breeder females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, K L H; Widowski, T; Leeson, S; Sandilands, V; Arnone, A; Torrey, S

    2014-02-01

    Parent stocks of meat birds are severely feed restricted to avoid obesity-related health and fertility problems. This restriction often leads to chronic hunger, accompanied by stereotypic behavior. Research based in the United Kingdom has shown that using diets containing fiber and appetite suppressants may relieve some of the symptoms of hunger. However, few data are available regarding North American-sourced ingredients or nondaily feeding regimens. This study investigated the effects of 2 alternative diets, in combination with 2 feeding frequencies on growth, productivity, and behavior in broiler breeders. Six dietary treatments were tested, each with 5 replicate pens of 12 or 13 birds. Control diets consisted of a commercial crumble, fed on a daily or skip-a-day (SAD) basis. Alternative diets included soybean hulls as a fiber source, and calcium propionate as an appetite suppressant of either a feed-grade or purified quality, fed on either a daily or SAD basis. Birds were weighed weekly and egg production was recorded daily. Video cameras were used to record behavior during and following the morning feeding bout every 2 wk from 11 to 28 wk. Data were analyzed with a mixed model ANOVA, with repeated measures. Diet, feeding frequency, time, or an interaction of the 3 had significant effects on all observed behavior during rearing. These differences appeared to diminish during lay, with most stereotypic behavior no longer present. Very little object pecking and aggression was observed during and immediately following feeding bouts; however, daily-fed control birds still displayed this behavior more often, especially during rearing (P = 0.015). During feeding bouts, SAD birds feather pecked (P = 0.003) and rested more (P = 0.0002) than daily-fed birds. Control birds feather pecked most often (P = 0.033) after feeding bouts. Overall, the feed-grade diet appeared most effective at reducing hunger-related behavior, and the control diet appeared the least effective

  14. High aggression in rats is associated with elevated stress, anxiety-like behavior, and altered catecholamine content in the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patki, Gaurav; Atrooz, Fatin; Alkadhi, Isam; Solanki, Naimesh; Salim, Samina

    2015-01-01

    The social defeat paradigm involves aggressive encounters between Long-Evans (LE) (resident) and Sprague-Dawley (SD) (intruder) rats. Successful application of chronic social defeat stress in SD rats is dependent upon selection of highly aggressive LE rats. Half of the LE rats screened for aggression did not meet the criterion for aggression (LE rats performing a defeat, characterized by the intruder surrendering or acquiring a supine position for at least 3 sec). The observation of the differences in the level of aggression between age and weight matched LE rats was quite compelling which led us to the present study. Herein, we measured behavioral differences between aggressor and non-aggressor LE rats. We analyzed their anxiety-like behavior using open-field and elevated plus maze tests. We also measured aggression/violence-like behavior using two tests. In one, time taken to defeat the intruder SD rat was recorded. In the second test, time taken to attack a novel object was compared between the two groups. We observed a significant increase in anxiety-like behavior in aggressor rats when compared to the non-aggressive group. Furthermore, time taken to defeat the intruder rat and to attack a novel object was significantly lower in aggressive LE rats. Biochemical data suggests that heightened anxiety-like behavior and aggression is associated with increased plasma levels of corticosterones and elevated oxidative stress. Significant alterations in dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (EPI) were observed within the hippocampus, amygdala and the prefrontal cortex, suggesting potential involvement of dopaminergic and noradrenergic systems in regulation of aggressive behaviors. PMID:25450144

  15. Chronic cocaine or ethanol exposure during adolescence alters novelty-related behaviors in adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansfield, Kirstie H; Kirstein, Cheryl L

    2007-04-01

    Adolescence is a time of high-risk behavior and increased exploration. This developmental period is marked by a greater probability to initiate drug use and is associated with an increased risk to develop addiction and adulthood dependency and drug use at this time is associated with an increased risk. Human adolescents are predisposed toward an increased likelihood of risk-taking behaviors [Zuckerman M. Sensation seeking and the endogenous deficit theory of drug abuse. NIDA Res Monogr 1986;74:59-70.], including drug use or initiation. In the present study, adolescent animals were exposed to twenty days of either saline (0.9% sodium chloride), cocaine (20 mg/kg) or ethanol (1 g/kg) i.p. followed by a fifteen-day washout period. All animals were tested as adults on several behavioral measures including locomotor activity induced by a novel environment, time spent in the center of an open field, novelty preference and novel object exploration. Animals exposed to cocaine during adolescence and tested as adults exhibited a greater locomotor response in a novel environment, spent less time in the center of the novel open field and spent less time with a novel object, results that are indicative of a stress or anxiogenic response to novelty or a novel situation. Adolescent animals chronically administered ethanol and tested as adults, unlike cocaine-exposed were not different from controls in a novel environment, indicated by locomotor activity or time spent with a novel object. However, ethanol-exposed animals approached the novel object more, suggesting that exposure to ethanol during development may result in less-inhibited behaviors during adulthood. The differences in adult behavioral responses after drug exposure during adolescence are likely due to differences in the mechanisms of action of the drugs and subsequent reward and/or stress responsivity. Future studies are needed to determine the neural substrates of these long lasting drug-induced changes. PMID

  16. Altered behavioral and neural responsiveness to counterfactual gains in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobia, Michael J; Guo, Rong; Gläscher, Jan; Schwarze, Ulrike; Brassen, Stefanie; Büchel, Christian; Obermayer, Klaus; Sommer, Tobias

    2016-06-01

    Counterfactual information processing refers to the consideration of events that did not occur in comparison to those actually experienced, in order to determine optimal actions, and can be formulated as computational learning signals, referred to as fictive prediction errors. Decision making and the neural circuitry for counterfactual processing are altered in healthy elderly adults. This experiment investigated age differences in neural systems for decision making with knowledge of counterfactual outcomes. Two groups of healthy adult participants, young (N = 30; ages 19-30 years) and elderly (N = 19; ages 65-80 years), were scanned with fMRI during 240 trials of a strategic sequential investment task in which a particular strategy of differentially weighting counterfactual gains and losses during valuation is associated with more optimal performance. Elderly participants earned significantly less than young adults, differently weighted counterfactual consequences and exploited task knowledge, and exhibited altered activity in a fronto-striatal circuit while making choices, compared to young adults. The degree to which task knowledge was exploited was positively correlated with modulation of neural activity by expected value in the vmPFC for young adults, but not in the elderly. These findings demonstrate that elderly participants' poor task performance may be related to different counterfactual processing. PMID:26864879

  17. Gestational exposure to low dose bisphenol A alters social behavior in juvenile mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer T Wolstenholme

    Full Text Available Bisphenol A (BPA is a man-made compound used to make polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins; public health concerns have been fueled by findings that BPA exposure can reduce sex differences in brain and some behaviors. We asked if a low BPA dose, within the range measured in humans, ingested during pregnancy, would affect social behaviors in prepubertal mice. We noted sex differences in social interactions whereby females spent more time sitting side-by-side, while males engaged in more exploring and sitting alone. In addition BPA increased display of nose-to-nose contacts, play solicitations and approaches in both sexes. Interactions between sex and diet were found for self grooming, social interactions while sitting side-by-side and following the other mouse. In all these cases interactions were produced by differences between control and BPA females. We examined brains from embryos during late gestation to determine if gene expression differences might be correlated with some of the sexually dimorphic or BPA affected behaviors we observed. Because BPA treatments ended at birth we took the brains during embryogenesis to increase the probability of discovering BPA mediated effects. We also selected this embryonic age (E18.5 because it coincides with the onset of sexual differentiation of the brain. Interestingly, mRNA for the glutamate transporter, Slc1a1, was enhanced by exposure to BPA in female brains. Also we noted that BPA changed the expression of two of the three DNA methyltransferase genes, Dnmt1 and Dnmt3a. We propose that BPA affects DNA methylation of Sc1a1 during neural development. Sex differences in juvenile social interactions are affected by BPA and in particular this compound modifies behavior in females.

  18. Activation of the Maternal Immune System During Pregnancy Alters Behavioral Development of Rhesus Monkey Offspring

    OpenAIRE

    Bauman, Melissa D.; Iosif, Ana-Maria; Smith, Stephen E. P.; Bregere, Catherine; Amaral, David G.; Patterson, Paul H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Maternal infection during pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of schizophrenia and autism in the offspring. Supporting this correlation, experimentally activating the maternal immune system during pregnancy in rodents produces offspring with abnormal brain and behavioral development. We have developed a nonhuman primate model to bridge the gap between clinical populations and rodent models of maternal immune activation (MIA). Methods: A modified form of the ...

  19. Behavioral performance altering effects of MK-801 in zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    OpenAIRE

    Sison, Margarette; Gerlai, Robert

    2011-01-01

    MK-801, a non-competitive NMDA-R antagonist, has been utilized in the analysis of mammalian learning and memory. The zebrafish is a novel vertebrate study species that has been proposed for the analysis of the mechanisms of learning and memory. Although learning paradigms have been developed for this species, psychopharmacological characterization of its behavioral responses is rudimentary. Before one attempts the analysis of the effects of MK-801 on learning and memory in zebrafish, one need...

  20. Dietary isoflavones alter regulatory behaviors, metabolic hormones and neuroendocrine function in Long-Evans male rats

    OpenAIRE

    Bu Lihong; Lund Trent D; Porter James P; Lephart Edwin D; Setchell Kenneth DR; Ramoz Gina; Crowley William R

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background Phytoestrogens derived from soy foods (or isoflavones) have received prevalent usage due to their 'health benefits' of decreasing: a) age-related diseases, b) hormone-dependent cancers and c) postmenopausal symptoms. However, little is known about the influence of dietary phytoestrogens on regulatory behaviors, such as food and water intake, metabolic hormones and neuroendocrine parameters. This study examined important hormonal and metabolic health issues by testing the h...

  1. Altered behavior, physiology, and metabolism in fish exposed to polystyrene nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, Karin; Ekvall, Mikael T; Hansson, Lars-Anders; Linse, Sara; Malmendal, Anders; Cedervall, Tommy

    2015-01-01

    The use of nanoparticles in consumer products, for example, cosmetics, sunscreens, and electrical devices, has increased tremendously over the past decade despite insufficient knowledge about their effects on human health and ecosystem function. Moreover, the amount of plastic waste products that enter natural ecosystems, such as oceans and lakes, is increasing, and degradation of the disposed plastics produces smaller particles toward the nano scale. Therefore, it is of utmost importance to gain knowledge about how plastic nanoparticles enter and affect living organisms. Here we have administered 24 and 27 nm polystyrene nanoparticles to fish through an aquatic food chain, from algae through Daphnia, and studied the effects on behavior and metabolism. We found severe effects on feeding and shoaling behavior as well as metabolism of the fish; hence, we conclude that polystyrene nanoparticles have severe effects on both behavior and metabolism in fish and that commonly used nanosized particles may have considerable effects on natural systems and ecosystem services derived from them. PMID:25380515

  2. Subchronic and mild social defeat stress alter mouse nest building behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otabi, Hikari; Goto, Tatsuhiko; Okayama, Tsuyoshi; Kohari, Daisuke; Toyoda, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Behavioral and physiological evaluations of animal models of depression are essential to thoroughly understand the mechanisms of depression in humans. Various models have been developed and characterized, and the socially defeated mouse has been widely used for studying depression. Here, we developed and characterized a mouse model of social aversion using a subchronic and mild social defeat stress (sCSDS) paradigm. Compared to control mice, sCSDS mice showed significantly increased body weight gain, water intake, and social aversion to dominant mice on the social interaction test. We observed nest building behavior in sCSDS mice using the pressed cotton as a nest material. Although sCSDS mice eventually successfully built nests, the onset of nest building was severely delayed compared to control mice. The underlying mechanism of this significant delay in nest building by sCSDS mice is unclear. However, our results demonstrate that nest building evaluation is a simple and useful assay for understanding behavior in socially defeated mice and screening drugs such as antidepressants. PMID:26524409

  3. Behavioral sensitization and long-term neurochemical alterations associated with the fungicide triadimefon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Ruth; Thiruchelvam, Mona; Richfield, Eric K; Cory-Slechta, Deborah A

    2003-09-01

    Triadimefon (TDF), a widely used triazole fungicide, blocks reuptake of the neurotransmitter dopamine (DA), similarly to cocaine. Preliminary studies show that intermittent intraperitoneal injections of TDF increase ambulatory and vertical activity across repeated injections [Neurotoxicology (in press)] leading to the hypothesis tested here, that exposure to TDF may influence the development and expression of behavioral sensitization, a model of psychostimulant-induced psychosis. Exposure of adult male C57BL/6 mice to 75 mg/kg i.p. TDF (TDF75) twice a week for 7 weeks increased vertical activity at each injection. Following a 2-week withdrawal period, a TDF challenge to test for expression of behavioral sensitization revealed further increases in vertical activity levels relative to all other conditions. TDF induction/expression of behavioral sensitization was associated with long-term, perhaps permanent modulation of dopaminergic function that included increases in striatal dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and DA turnover, increases in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) dopamine transporter (DAT) binding, as well as decreases in DA D1 and increases in DA D2 and DAT receptor binding that appeared to target the nucleus accumbens shell (NAs) subregion. Thus, TDF exposure may serve as an environmental risk factor for DA system dysfunctions. PMID:14592684

  4. Laurate Biosensors Image Brain Neurotransmitters In Vivo: Can an Antihypertensive Medication Alter Psychostimulant Behavior?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Murthy

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Neuromolecular Imaging (NMI with novel biosensors enables the selective detection of neurotransmitters in vivo within seconds, on line and in real time. Biosensors remain in place for continuing studies over a period of months. This biotechnological advance is based on conventional electrochemistry; the biosensors detect neurotransmitters by electron transfer. Simply stated, biosensors adsorb electrons from each neurotransmitter at specific oxidation potentials; the current derived from electron transfer is proportional to neurotransmitter concentration. Selective electron transfer properties of these biosensors permit the imaging of neurotransmitters, metabolites and precursors. The novel BRODERICK PROBE® biosensors we have developed, differ in formulation and detection capabilities from biosensors/electrodes used in conventional electrochemistry/ voltammetry. In these studies, NMI, specifically, the BRODERICK PROBE® laurate biosensor images neurotransmitter signals within mesolimbic neuronal terminals, nucleus accumbens (NAc; dopamine (DA, serotonin (5-HT, homovanillic acid (HVA and Ltryptophan (L-TP are selectively imaged. Simultaneously, we use infrared photobeams to monitor open-field movement behaviors on line with NMI in the same animal subjects. The goals are to investigate integrated neurochemical and behavioral effects of cocaine and caffeine alone and co-administered and further, to use ketanserin to decipher receptor profiles for these psychostimulants, alone and co-administered. The rationale for selecting this medication is: ketanserin (a is an antihypertensive and cocaine and caffeine produce hypertension and (b acts at 5-HT2A/2C receptors, prevalent in NAc and implicated in hypertension and cocaine addiction. Key findings are: (a the moderate dose of caffeine simultaneously potentiates cocaine's neurochemical and behavioral responses. (b ketanserin simultaneously inhibits cocaine-increased DA and 5-HT release in

  5. Developmental neurotoxicity of organophosphorous pesticides: fetal and neonatal exposure to chlorpyrifos alters sex-specific behaviors at adulthood in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricceri, Laura; Venerosi, Aldina; Capone, Francesca; Cometa, Maria Francesca; Lorenzini, Paola; Fortuna, Stefano; Calamandrei, Gemma

    2006-09-01

    Developmental exposure to the organophosphorous insecticide chlorpyrifos (CPF) induces long-term effects on brain and behavior in laboratory rodents. We evaluated in adult mice the behavioral effects of either fetal and/or neonatal CPF exposure at doses not inhibiting fetal and neonatal brain cholinesterase. CPF (3 or 6 mg/kg) was given by oral treatment to pregnant females on gestational days 15-18 and offspring were treated sc (1 or 3 mg/kg) on postnatal days (PNDs) 11-14. Serum and brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity was evaluated at birth and 24 h from termination of postnatal treatments. On PND 70, male mice were assessed for spontaneous motor activity in an open-field test and in a socioagonistic encounter with an unfamiliar conspecific. Virgin females underwent a maternal induction test following presentation of foster pups. Both sexes were subjected to a plus-maze test to evaluate exploration and anxiety levels. Gestational and postnatal CPF exposure (higher doses) affected motor activity in the open field and enhanced synergically agonistic behavior. Postnatal CPF exposure increased maternal responsiveness toward pups in females. Mice of both sexes exposed to postnatal CPF showed reduced anxiety response in the plus-maze, an effect greater in females. Altogether, developmental exposure to CPF at doses that do not cause brain AChE inhibition induces long-term alterations in sex-specific behavior patterns of the mouse species. Late neonatal exposure on PNDs 11-14 was the most effective in causing behavioral changes. These findings support the hypothesis that developmental CPF may represent a risk factor for increased vulnerability to neurodevelopmental disorders in humans. PMID:16760416

  6. Time Course of Behavioral Alteration and mRNA Levels of Neurotrophic Factor Following Stress Exposure in Mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashikawa, Naoya; Ogawa, Takumi; Sakamoto, Yusuke; Ogawa, Mami; Matsuo, Yumi; Zamami, Yoshito; Hashikawa-Hobara, Narumi

    2015-08-01

    Stress is known to affect neurotrophic factor expression, which induces depression-like behavior. However, whether there are time-dependent changes in neurotrophic factor mRNA expression following stress remains unclear. In the present study, we tested whether chronic stress exposure induces long-term changes in depression-related behavior, serum corticosterone, and hippocampal proliferation as well as neurotrophic factor family mRNA levels, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), in the mouse hippocampus. The mRNA level of neurotrophic factors (BDNF, NGF, NT-3, and CNTF) was measured using the real-time PCR. The serum corticosterone level was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and, for each subject, the hippocampal proliferation was examined by 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine immunostaining. Mice exhibited depression-like behavior in the forced-swim test (FST) and decreased BDNF mRNA and hippocampal proliferation in the middle of the stress exposure. After 15 days of stress exposure, we observed increased immobility in the FST, serum corticosterone levels, and BDNF mRNA levels and degenerated hippocampal proliferation, maintained for at least 2 weeks. Anhedonia-like behavior in the sucrose preference test and NGF mRNA levels were decreased following 15 days of stress. NGF mRNA levels were significantly higher 1 week after stress exposure. The current data demonstrate that chronic stress exposure induces prolonged BDNF and NGF mRNA changes and increases corticosterone levels and depression-like behavior in the FST, but does not alter other neurotrophic factors or performance in the sucrose preference test. PMID:25820756

  7. The amelioration of phagocytic ability in microglial cells by curcumin through the inhibition of EMF-induced pro-inflammatory responses

    OpenAIRE

    He, Gen-Lin; Liu, Yong; Min LI; Chen, Chun-Hai; Gao, Peng; Yu, Zheng-Ping; Yang, Xue-Sen

    2014-01-01

    Background Insufficient clearance by microglial cells, prevalent in several neurological conditions and diseases, is intricately intertwined with MFG-E8 expression and inflammatory responses. Electromagnetic field (EMF) exposure can elicit the pro-inflammatory activation and may also trigger an alteration of the clearance function in microglial cells. Curcumin has important roles in the anti-inflammatory and phagocytic process. Here, we evaluated the ability of curcumin to ameliorate the phag...

  8. Deletion of vanilloid receptor (TRPV1) in mice alters behavioral effects of ethanol

    OpenAIRE

    Blednov, Y.A.; Harris, R. A.

    2009-01-01

    The vanilloid receptor TRPV1 is activated by ethanol and this may be important for some of the central and peripheral actions of ethanol. To determine if this receptor has a role in ethanol-mediated behaviors, we studied null mutant mice in which the Trpv1 gene was deleted. Mice lacking this gene showed significantly higher preference for ethanol and consumed more ethanol in a two-bottle choice test as compared with wild type littermates. Null mutant mice showed shorter duration of loss of ri...

  9. Prenatal SSRI alters the hormonal and behavioral responses to stress in female mice: Possible role for glucocorticoid resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avitsur, Ronit; Grinshpahet, Rachel; Goren, Naama; Weinstein, Ido; Kirshenboim, Or; Chlebowski, Noa

    2016-08-01

    Life time prevalence of major depression disorder (MDD) is higher in women compared to men especially during the period surrounding childbirth. Women suffering from MDD during pregnancy use antidepressant medications, particularly Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRI). These drugs readily cross the placental barrier and impact the developing fetal brain. The present study assessed the effects of prenatal exposure to fluoxetine (FLX), an SSRI antidepressant drug, on corticosterone and behavioral responses to stress in female mice. In young females, prenatal FLX significantly elevated corticosterone response to continuous stress. In adults, prenatal FLX augmented corticosterone response to acute stress and suppressed the response to continuous stress. Additionally, prenatal FLX significantly augmented stress-induced increase in locomotion and reduced anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors in adult, but not young mice. The dexamethasone suppression test revealed that prenatal FLX induced a state of glucocorticoid resistance in adult females, indicating that the negative feedback control of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis response to stress was disrupted. These findings provide the first indication of altered hormonal and behavioral responses to continuous stress and suggest a role for the development of glucocorticoid resistance in these effects. According to these findings, prenatal environment may have implications for stress sensitivity and responsiveness to life challenges. Furthermore, this study may assist in understanding the limitations and precautions that should be taken in the use of SSRIs during pregnancy. PMID:27283378

  10. Changes of human leukocyte phagocytic activity after ultraviolet irradiation of blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phagocytic activity of human mono- and granulocytes increased markedly after UV blood irradiation in the apparatus ''Izolda'' used in hospitals of the USSR for medical treatment. With the rise of irradiation dose the ratio of cells ingesting latex particles increased, although the average number of particles ingested per cell decreased. The integrative phagocytic index poorly depended on the irradiation dose. In patients with a low initial level of phagocytic index, after UV blood irradiation it became more pronounced than in those with the initial elevated level. The enhancement of phagocytic activity is the result of a direct UV-stimulation of cells. This stimulation not mediated by irradiated blood plasma is known to inhibit the phagocytic activity of leucocytes. A possible mechanism of phagocytic activity stimulation is discussed discussed

  11. Time course study of microglial and behavioral alterations induced by 6-hydroxydopamine in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Thiago Pereira da; Poli, Anicleto; Hara, Daniela Balz; Takahashi, Reinaldo Naoto

    2016-05-27

    Understanding the mechanisms responsible for nonmotor manifestations of Parkinson's disease (PD) is crucial in the search for new therapeutic approaches. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the time course of behavioral, neurochemical, and microglial responses after a retrograde partial lesion of the nigrostriatal pathway induced by bilateral injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). The results showed that 6-OHDA was able to produce both anhedonic and anxiety behaviors; however, an increase of microglial density in some brain areas (substantia nigra, hippocampus and striatum) and deficits in locomotor activity was observed only one week after the lesion. Striatal levels of dopamine (DA) and dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) were reduced by approximately 60% at all times tested. Conversely, increased levels of serotonin (5-HT) and its metabolite were also noted in the striatum only at the first week. These data extend our previous findings and suggest that the retrograde and partial damage of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra can induce effects resembling premotor symptoms of PD, two and three weeks after injury. PMID:27113204

  12. Protective effect of Labisia pumila on stress-induced behavioral, biochemical, and immunological alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kour, Kiranjeet; Sharma, Neelam; Chandan, Bal Krishan; Koul, Surrinder; Sangwan, Payare Lal; Bani, Sarang

    2010-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the antistress potential of LABISIA PUMILA aqueous extract (LPPM/A003) using a battery of tests widely employed in different stressful situations. Pretreatment of experimental animals with LPPM/A003 caused an increase in the swimming endurance and hypoxia time and also showed the recovery of physical stress-induced depletion of neuromuscular coordination and scopolamine induced memory deficit. LPPM/A003 at graded doses reversed the chronic restraint stress (RST), induced depletion of CD4 (+) and CD8 (+) T lymphocytes, NK cell population, and corresponding cytokines expression besides downregulating the stress-induced increase in plasma corticosterone, a major stress hormone. In addition, LPPM/A003 reversed the chronic stress-induced increase in adrenal gland weight, serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and hepatic lipid peroxidation (LP) levels and augmented the RST induced decrease in hepatic glutathione (GSH), thymus and spleen weight. Thus, we conclude that LPPM/A003 has the ability to reverse the alterations produced by various stressful stimuli and therefore restores homeostasis. PMID:20217640

  13. Does respondent driven sampling alter the social network composition and health-seeking behaviors of illicit drug users followed prospectively?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abby E Rudolph

    Full Text Available Respondent driven sampling (RDS was originally developed to sample and provide peer education to injection drug users at risk for HIV. Based on the premise that drug users' social networks were maintained through sharing rituals, this peer-driven approach to disseminate educational information and reduce risk behaviors capitalizes and expands upon the norms that sustain these relationships. Compared with traditional outreach interventions, peer-driven interventions produce greater reductions in HIV risk behaviors and adoption of safer behaviors over time, however, control and intervention groups are not similarly recruited. As peer-recruitment may alter risk networks and individual risk behaviors over time, such comparison studies are unable to isolate the effect of a peer-delivered intervention. This analysis examines whether RDS recruitment (without an intervention is associated with changes in health-seeking behaviors and network composition over 6 months. New York City drug users (N = 618 were recruited using targeted street outreach (TSO and RDS (2006-2009. 329 non-injectors (RDS = 237; TSO = 92 completed baseline and 6-month surveys ascertaining demographic, drug use, and network characteristics. Chi-square and t-tests compared RDS- and TSO-recruited participants on changes in HIV testing and drug treatment utilization and in the proportion of drug using, sex, incarcerated and social support networks over the follow-up period. The sample was 66% male, 24% Hispanic, 69% black, 62% homeless, and the median age was 35. At baseline, the median network size was 3, 86% used crack, 70% used cocaine, 40% used heroin, and in the past 6 months 72% were tested for HIV and 46% were enrolled in drug treatment. There were no significant differences by recruitment strategy with respect to changes in health-seeking behaviors or network composition over 6 months. These findings suggest no association between RDS recruitment and changes in

  14. Increased phagocytic activity of splenectomized mice challenged with Listeria monocytogenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adult splenectomized mice exhibited increased resistance to infection with Listeria monocytogenes. Phagocytosis, by reticuloendothelial cells, of test particles (51Cr-labelled sheep erythrocytes) was the same in splenectomized and control mice. However, 24 h exposure to Listeria, which failed to influence phagocytic activity of normal mice, greatly enhanced the blood clearance and liver uptake of the test particles in splenectomized mice. The presence of a cell population and/or product in the spleen which modulates macrophage activation upon the exposure to appropriate stimuli is postulated. (author)

  15. Hacker within! Ehrlichia chaffeensis Effector Driven Phagocyte Reprogramming Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lina, Taslima T; Farris, Tierra; Luo, Tian; Mitra, Shubhajit; Zhu, Bing; McBride, Jere W

    2016-01-01

    Ehrlichia chaffeensis is a small, gram negative, obligately intracellular bacterium that preferentially infects mononuclear phagocytes. It is the etiologic agent of human monocytotropic ehrlichiosis (HME), an emerging life-threatening tick-borne zoonosis. Mechanisms by which E. chaffeensis establishes intracellular infection, and avoids host defenses are not well understood, but involve functionally relevant host-pathogen interactions associated with tandem and ankyrin repeat effector proteins. In this review, we discuss the recent advances in our understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms that underlie Ehrlichia host cellular reprogramming strategies that enable intracellular survival. PMID:27303657

  16. Hacker Within! Ehrlichia chaffeensis Effector Driven Phagocyte Reprogramming Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taslima Taher Lina

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Ehrlichia chaffeensis is a small, gram negative, obligately intracellular bacterium that preferentially infects mononuclear phagocytes. It is the etiologic agent of human monocytotropic ehrlichiosis (HME, an emerging life-threatening tick-borne zoonosis. Mechanisms by which E. chaffeensis establishes intracellular infection, and avoids host defenses are not well understood, but involve functionally relevant host-pathogen interactions associated with tandem and ankyrin repeat effector proteins. In this review, we discuss the recent advances in our understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms that underlie Ehrlichia host cellular reprogramming strategies that enable intracellular survival.

  17. Behavioral expression of opiate withdrawal is altered after prefrontocortical dopamine depletion in rats: monoaminergic correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espejo, E F; Serrano, M I; Caillé, S; Stinus, L

    2001-08-01

    The objective of this study was to establish the effects of prefrontocortical dopamine depletion on opiate withdrawal and prefrontocortical neurochemical changes elicited by morphine dependence and withdrawal. The dopaminergic content was also measured in the nucleus accumbens during withdrawal, in order to detect reactive changes induced by prefrontocortical lesion. Withdrawal was induced by naloxone in morphine-dependent rats. Monoamine levels were analyzed post-mortem by high performance liquid cromatography. The results showed that chronic morphine dependence did not modify basal levels of monoamines in sham rats, revealing neuroadaptation of prefrontocortical dopamine, noradrenaline and serotonin systems to chronic morphine. The neuroadaptive phenomenon remained after prefrontocortical lesion (> 79% dopamine depletion). On the other hand, a strong increase of dopamine, noradrenaline, and serotonin contents in the medial prefrontal cortex of sham rats was detected during opiate withdrawal. However, in lesioned rats, the increase of prefrontocortical dopamine and serotonin content, but not that of noradrenaline, was much lower. In the nucleus accumbens, prefrontocortical lesion reactively enhanced the dopaminergic tone and, although opiate withdrawal reduced dopaminergic activity in both sham and lesioned rats, this reduction was less intense in the latter group. At a behavioral level, some symptoms of physical opiate withdrawal were exacerbated in lesioned rats (writhing, mastication, teeth-chattering, global score) and exploration was reduced. The findings hence indicate that: (i) prefrontocortical monoaminergic changes play a role in the behavioral expression of opiate withdrawal; (ii) the severity of some withdrawal signs are related to the dopaminergic and serotonergic tone of the medial prefrontal cortex rather than to the noradrenergic one, and (iii) an inverse relationship between mesocortical and mesolimbic dopaminergic systems exists. PMID:11425504

  18. Meal time shift disturbs circadian rhythmicity along with metabolic and behavioral alterations in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Ae Yoon

    Full Text Available In modern society, growing numbers of people are engaged in various forms of shift works or trans-meridian travels. Such circadian misalignment is known to disturb endogenous diurnal rhythms, which may lead to harmful physiological consequences including metabolic syndrome, obesity, cancer, cardiovascular disorders, and gastric disorders as well as other physical and mental disorders. However, the precise mechanism(s underlying these changes are yet unclear. The present work, therefore examined the effects of 6 h advance or delay of usual meal time on diurnal rhythmicities in home cage activity (HCA, body temperature (BT, blood metabolic markers, glucose homeostasis, and expression of genes that are involved in cholesterol homeostasis by feeding young adult male mice in a time-restrictive manner. Delay of meal time caused locomotive hyperactivity in a significant portion (42% of subjects, while 6 h advance caused a torpor-like symptom during the late scotophase. Accordingly, daily rhythms of blood glucose and triglyceride were differentially affected by time-restrictive feeding regimen with concurrent metabolic alterations. Along with these physiological changes, time-restrictive feeding also influenced the circadian expression patterns of low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR as well as most LDLR regulatory factors. Strikingly, chronic advance of meal time induced insulin resistance, while chronic delay significantly elevated blood glucose levels. Taken together, our findings indicate that persistent shifts in usual meal time impact the diurnal rhythms of carbohydrate and lipid metabolisms in addition to HCA and BT, thereby posing critical implications for the health and diseases of shift workers.

  19. Altered Neuroinflammation and Behavior after Traumatic Brain Injury in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokiko-Cochran, Olga; Ransohoff, Lena; Veenstra, Mike; Lee, Sungho; Saber, Maha; Sikora, Matt; Teknipp, Ryan; Xu, Guixiang; Bemiller, Shane; Wilson, Gina; Crish, Samuel; Bhaskar, Kiran; Lee, Yu-Shang; Ransohoff, Richard M; Lamb, Bruce T

    2016-04-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has acute and chronic sequelae, including an increased risk for the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). TBI-associated neuroinflammation is characterized by activation of brain-resident microglia and infiltration of monocytes; however, recent studies have implicated beta-amyloid as a major manipulator of the inflammatory response. To examine neuroinflammation after TBI and development of AD-like features, these studies examined the effects of TBI in the presence and absence of beta-amyloid. The R1.40 mouse model of cerebral amyloidosis was used, with a focus on time points well before robust AD pathologies. Unexpectedly, in R1.40 mice, the acute neuroinflammatory response to TBI was strikingly muted, with reduced numbers of CNS myeloid cells acquiring a macrophage phenotype and decreased expression of inflammatory cytokines. At chronic time points, macrophage activation substantially declined in non-Tg TBI mice; however, it was relatively unchanged in R1.40 TBI mice. The persistent inflammatory response coincided with significant tissue loss between 3 and 120 days post-injury in R1.40 TBI mice, which was not observed in non-Tg TBI mice. Surprisingly, inflammatory cytokine expression was enhanced in R1.40 mice compared with non-Tg mice, regardless of injury group. Although R1.40 TBI mice demonstrated task-specific deficits in cognition, overall functional recovery was similar to non-Tg TBI mice. These findings suggest that accumulating beta-amyloid leads to an altered post-injury macrophage response at acute and chronic time points. Together, these studies emphasize the role of post-injury neuroinflammation in regulating long-term sequelae after TBI and also support recent studies implicating beta-amyloid as an immunomodulator. PMID:26414955

  20. PFOS induces behavioral alterations, including spontaneous hyperactivity that is corrected by dexamfetamine in zebrafish larvae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Spulber

    Full Text Available Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS is a widely spread environmental contaminant. It accumulates in the brain and has potential neurotoxic effects. The exposure to PFOS has been associated with higher impulsivity and increased ADHD prevalence. We investigated the effects of developmental exposure to PFOS in zebrafish larvae, focusing on the modulation of activity by the dopaminergic system. We exposed zebrafish embryos to 0.1 or 1 mg/L PFOS (0.186 or 1.858 µM, respectively and assessed swimming activity at 6 dpf. We analyzed the structure of spontaneous activity, the hyperactivity and the habituation during a brief dark period (visual motor response, and the vibrational startle response. The findings in zebrafish larvae were compared with historical data from 3 months old male mice exposed to 0.3 or 3 mg/kg/day PFOS throughout gestation. Finally, we investigated the effects of dexamfetamine on the alterations in spontaneous activity and startle response in zebrafish larvae. We found that zebrafish larvae exposed to 0.1 mg/L PFOS habituate faster than controls during a dark pulse, while the larvae exposed to 1 mg/L PFOS display a disorganized pattern of spontaneous activity and persistent hyperactivity. Similarly, mice exposed to 0.3 mg/kg/day PFOS habituated faster than controls to a new environment, while mice exposed to 3 mg/kg/day PFOS displayed more intense and disorganized spontaneous activity. Dexamfetamine partly corrected the hyperactive phenotype in zebrafish larvae. In conclusion, developmental exposure to PFOS in zebrafish induces spontaneous hyperactivity mediated by a dopaminergic deficit, which can be partially reversed by dexamfetamine in zebrafish larvae.

  1. A magnetic-dependent protein corona of tailor-made superparamagnetic iron oxides alters their biological behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ziyao; Zhan, Xiaohui; Yang, Minggang; Yang, Qi; Xu, Xianghui; Lan, Fang; Wu, Yao; Gu, Zhongwei

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, it is becoming increasingly evident that once nanoparticles come into contact with biological fluids, a protein corona surely forms and critically affects the biological behaviors of nanoparticles. Herein, we investigate whether the formation of protein corona on the surface of superparamagnetic iron oxides (SPIOs) is influenced by static magnetic field. Under static magnetic field, there is no obvious variation in the total amount of protein adsorption, but the proportion of adsorbed proteins significantly changes. Noticeably, certain proteins including apolipoproteins, complement system proteins and acute phase proteins, increase in the protein corona of SPIOs in the magnetic field. More importantly, the magnetic-dependent protein corona of SPIOs enhances the cellular uptake of SPIOs into the normal cell line (3T3 cells) and tumor cell line (HepG2 cells), due to increased adsorption of apolipoprotein. In addition, SPIOs with the magnetic-dependent protein corona cause high cytotoxicity to 3T3 cells and HepG2 cells. This work discloses that superparamagnetism as a key feature of SPIOs affects the composition of protein corona to a large extent, which further alters the biological behaviors of SPIOs.In recent years, it is becoming increasingly evident that once nanoparticles come into contact with biological fluids, a protein corona surely forms and critically affects the biological behaviors of nanoparticles. Herein, we investigate whether the formation of protein corona on the surface of superparamagnetic iron oxides (SPIOs) is influenced by static magnetic field. Under static magnetic field, there is no obvious variation in the total amount of protein adsorption, but the proportion of adsorbed proteins significantly changes. Noticeably, certain proteins including apolipoproteins, complement system proteins and acute phase proteins, increase in the protein corona of SPIOs in the magnetic field. More importantly, the magnetic-dependent protein

  2. Behavioral and molecular neuroepigenetic alterations in prenatally stressed mice: relevance for the study of chromatin remodeling properties of antipsychotic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, E; Tueting, P; Matrisciano, F; Grayson, D R; Guidotti, A

    2016-01-01

    We have recently reported that mice born from dams stressed during pregnancy (PRS mice), in adulthood, have behavioral deficits reminiscent of behaviors observed in schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar (BP) disorder patients. Furthermore, we have shown that the frontal cortex (FC) and hippocampus of adult PRS mice, like that of postmortem chronic SZ patients, are characterized by increases in DNA-methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1), ten-eleven methylcytosine dioxygenase 1 (TET1) and exhibit an enrichment of 5-methylcytosine (5MC) and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5HMC) at neocortical GABAergic and glutamatergic gene promoters. Here, we show that the behavioral deficits and the increased 5MC and 5HMC at glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (Gad1), reelin (Reln) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf) promoters and the reduced expression of the messenger RNAs (mRNAs) and proteins corresponding to these genes in FC of adult PRS mice is reversed by treatment with clozapine (5 mg kg(-1) twice a day for 5 days) but not by haloperidol (1 mg kg(-1) twice a day for 5 days). Interestingly, clozapine had no effect on either the behavior, promoter methylation or the expression of these mRNAs and proteins when administered to offspring of nonstressed pregnant mice. Clozapine, but not haloperidol, reduced the elevated levels of DNMT1 and TET1, as well as the elevated levels of DNMT1 binding to Gad1, Reln and Bdnf promoters in PRS mice suggesting that clozapine, unlike haloperidol, may limit DNA methylation by interfering with DNA methylation dynamics. We conclude that the PRS mouse model may be useful preclinically in screening for the potential efficacy of antipsychotic drugs acting on altered epigenetic mechanisms. Furthermore, PRS mice may be invaluable for understanding the etiopathogenesis of SZ and BP disorder and for predicting treatment responses at early stages of the illness allowing for early detection and remedial intervention. PMID:26756904

  3. Prenatal exposure to aflatoxin B1: developmental, behavioral, and reproductive alterations in male rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supriya, Ch.; Reddy, P. Sreenivasula

    2015-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that aflatoxin B1 (AfB1) inhibits androgen biosynthesis as a result of its ability to form a high-affinity complex with the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein. The results of the present study demonstrate the postnatal effects of in utero exposure to AfB1 in the rat. Pregnant Wistar rats were given 10, 20, or 50 μg AfB1/kg body weight daily from gestation day (GD) 12 to GD 19. At parturition, newborns were observed for clinical signs and survival. All animals were born alive and initially appeared to be active. Male pups from control and AfB1-exposed animals were weaned and maintained up to postnatal day (PD) 100. Litter size, birth weight, sex ratio, survival rate, and crown-rump length of the pups were significantly decreased in AfB1-exposed rats when compared to controls. Elapsed time (days) for testes to descend into the scrotal sac was significantly delayed in experimental pups when compared to control pups. Behavioral observations such as cliff avoidance, negative geotaxis, surface rightening activity, ascending wire mesh, open field behavior, and exploratory and locomotory activities were significantly impaired in experimental pups. Body weights and the indices of testis, cauda epididymis, prostate, seminal vesicles, and liver were significantly reduced on PD 100 in male rats exposed to AfB1 during embryonic development when compared with controls. Significant reduction in the testicular daily sperm production, epididymal sperm count, and number of viable, motile, and hypo-osmotic tail coiled sperm was observed in experimental rats. The levels of serum testosterone and activity levels of testicular hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases were significantly decreased in a dose-dependent manner with a significant increase in the serum follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone in experimental rats. Deterioration in the testicular and cauda epididymal architecture was observed in experimental rats. The results of fertility

  4. Automated Behavioral Phenotyping Reveals Presymptomatic Alterations in a SCA3 Genetrap Mouse Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jeannette Hübener; Nicolas Casadei; Peter Teismann; Mathias W. Seeliger; Maria Bj(o)rkqvist; Stephan von H(o)rsten; Olaf Riess; Huu Phuc Nguyen

    2012-01-01

    Characterization of disease models of neurodegenerative disorders requires a systematic and comprehensive phenotyping in a highly standardized manner,Therefore,automated high-resolution behavior test systems such as the homecage based LabMaster system are of particular interest.We demonstrate the power of the automated LabMaster system by discovering previously unrecognized features of a recently characterized atxn3 mutant mouse model.This model provided neurological symptoms including gait ataxia,tremor,weight loss and premature death at the age of t2 months usually detectable just 2 weeks before the mice died.Moreover,using the LabMaster system we were able to detect hypoactivity in presymptomatic mutant mice in the dark as well as light phase.Additionally,we analyzed inflammation,immunological and hematological parameters,which indicated a reduced immune defense in phenotypic mice.Here we demonstrate thai a detailed characterization even of organ systems that are usually not affected in SCA3 is important for further studies of pathogenesis and required for the preclinical therapeutic studies.

  5. Caffeine Consuming Children and Adolescents Show Altered Sleep Behavior and Deep Sleep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrina Aepli

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Caffeine is the most commonly ingested psychoactive drug worldwide with increasing consumption rates among young individuals. While caffeine leads to decreased sleep quality in adults, studies investigating how caffeine consumption affects children’s and adolescents’ sleep remain scarce. We explored the effects of regular caffeine consumption on sleep behavior and the sleep electroencephalogram (EEG in children and adolescents (10–16 years. While later habitual bedtimes (Caffeine 23:14 ± 11.4, Controls 22:17 ± 15.4 and less time in bed were found in caffeine consumers compared to the control group (Caffeine 08:10 ± 13.3, Controls 09:03 ± 16.1, morning tiredness was unaffected. Furthermore, caffeine consumers exhibited reduced sleep EEG slow-wave activity (SWA, 1–4.5 Hz at the beginning of the night compared to controls (20% ± 9% average reduction across all electrodes and subjects. Comparable reductions were found for alpha activity (8.25–9.75 Hz. These effects, however, disappeared in the morning hours. Our findings suggest that caffeine consumption in adolescents may lead to later bedtimes and reduced SWA, a well-established marker of sleep depth. Because deep sleep is involved in recovery processes during sleep, further research is needed to understand whether a caffeine-induced loss of sleep depth interacts with neuronal network refinement processes that occur during the sensitive period of adolescent development.

  6. Defects in the oxidative killing of microorganisms by phagocytic leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, D; Weening, R S

    One of the most important mechanisms of phagocytic killing of ingested microorganisms by leukocytes is the generation of toxic oxygen products. During phagocytosis, neutrophils, as well as monocytes and macrophages, display a strongly increased cell respiration. Quantitatively the most important product of this reaction is hydrogen peroxide. Superoxide is also generated in large amounts, probably as an intermediate in the formation of hydrogen peroxide. Indications exist that singlet oxygen and hydroxyl radicals are also formed in this process. Some of these oxygen products have microbicidal properties by themselves. The effect of hydrogen peroxide is greatly enhanced by the enzyme myeloperoxidase. Several dysfunctions of this sytem are known. In chronic granulomatous disease the enzyme system that produces superoxide is not operative. Thus, no superoxide or hydrogen peroxide is generated, leading to a severely decreased bacterial killing capacity. The exact molecular defects in the X-linked and the autosomal form are as yet undefined. Two variants are also known: lipochrome histiocytosis, with different clinical and histological manifestations, and a 'triggering defect' where only strongly opsonized particles trigger the respiratory burst. Myeloperoxidase deficiency leads to slightly decreased killing capacity, especially for yeasts. In glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency no oxygen radicals or hydrogen peroxide are produced because no equivalents for oxygen reduction can be generated in the hexose-monophosphate shunt. Deficiencies in the glutathione redox system also result in impaired phagocyte function, probably because the cells have to be protected against their own toxic oxygen products. PMID:225141

  7. Altered cognitive-emotional behavior in early experimental autoimmune encephalitis--cytokine and hormonal correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharjee, Shaona; Nayani, Nausheen; Tsutsui, Mio; Hill, Matthew N; Ousman, Shalina S; Pittman, Quentin J

    2013-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is often associated with co-morbid behavioural and cognitive impairments; however the presence of these symptoms does not necessarily correlate with neurological damage. This suggests that an alternate mechanism may subserve these impairments relative to motor deficits. We investigated whether these abnormalities could be studied in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of MS. In myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein peptide (MOG35-55)-induced EAE mice, no motor deficits were observed until d9 after immunization. This enabled us to carry out a series of neurobehavioral tests during the presymptomatic stage, between d6 and d8 post-immunization. EAE mice spent more time in the outer zone in an open field test and in the closed arms of an elevated plus maze and, showed decreased latency for immobility in the tail suspension and forced swim tests and reduced social interaction compared with controls. These results are indicative of anxiety- and depression- like behavior. In addition, EAE mice appeared to exhibit memory impairment compared to controls based on their reduced time spent in the target quadrant in the Morris water maze and their faster memory extinction in the fear conditioning test. No demyelination, microglial activation or astrogliosis was observed in the brain at this early stage. Transcript analysis by RT-PCR from d6 to d8 brain revealed elevated interleukin (IL)-1β and TNF-α in the hypothalamus but not in the amygdala or hippocampus of EAE mice. Lastly, plasma corticosterone levels increased in EAE mice compared to controls. In conclusion, emotional and cognitive deficits are observed in EAE prior to demyelination and are associated with elevated IL-1β and TNF-α in the hypothalamus and changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. PMID:23886782

  8. Dialectical behavior therapy alters emotion regulation and amygdala activity in patients with borderline personality disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Marianne; Carpenter, David; Tang, Cheuk Y.; Goldstein, Kim E.; Avedon, Jennifer; Fernandez, Nicolas; Mascitelli, Kathryn A.; Blair, Nicholas J.; New, Antonia S.; Triebwasser, Joseph; Siever, Larry J.; Hazlett, Erin A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Siever and Davis’ (1991) psychobiological framework of borderline personality disorder (BPD) identifies affective instability (AI) as a core dimension characterized by prolonged and intense emotional reactivity. Recently, deficient amygdala habituation, defined as a change in response to repeated relative to novel unpleasant pictures within a session, has emerged as a biological correlate of AI in BPD. Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT), an evidence-based treatment, targets AI by teaching emotion-regulation skills. This study tested the hypothesis that BPD patients would exhibit decreased amygdala activation and improved habituation, as well as improved emotion regulation with standard 12-month DBT. Methods Event-related fMRI was obtained pre- and post-12-months of standard-DBT in unmedicated BPD patients. Healthy controls (HCs) were studied as a benchmark for normal amygdala activity and change over time (n = 11 per diagnostic-group). During each scan, participants viewed an intermixed series of unpleasant, neutral and pleasant pictures presented twice (novel, repeat). Change in emotion regulation was measured with the Difficulty in Emotion Regulation (DERS) scale. Results fMRI results showed the predicted Group × Time interaction: compared with HCs, BPD patients exhibited decreased amygdala activation with treatment. This post-treatment amygdala reduction in BPD was observed for all three pictures types, but particularly marked in the left hemisphere and during repeated-emotional pictures. Emotion regulation measured with the DERS significantly improved with DBT in BPD patients. Improved amygdala habituation to repeated-unpleasant pictures in patients was associated with improved overall emotional regulation measured by the DERS (total score and emotion regulation strategy use subscale). Conclusion These findings have promising treatment implications and support the notion that DBT targets amygdala hyperactivity—part of the disturbed neural

  9. Trypanosoma brucei modifies the tsetse salivary composition, altering the fly feeding behavior that favors parasite transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Van Den Abbeele

    Full Text Available Tsetse flies are the notorious transmitters of African trypanosomiasis, a disease caused by the Trypanosoma parasite that affects humans and livestock on the African continent. Metacyclic infection rates in natural tsetse populations with Trypanosoma brucei, including the two human-pathogenic subspecies, are very low, even in epidemic situations. Therefore, the infected fly/host contact frequency is a key determinant of the transmission dynamics. As an obligate blood feeder, tsetse flies rely on their complex salivary potion to inhibit host haemostatic reactions ensuring an efficient feeding. The results of this experimental study suggest that the parasite might promote its transmission through manipulation of the tsetse feeding behavior by modifying the saliva composition. Indeed, salivary gland Trypanosoma brucei-infected flies display a significantly prolonged feeding time, thereby enhancing the likelihood of infecting multiple hosts during the process of a single blood meal cycle. Comparison of the two major anti-haemostatic activities i.e. anti-platelet aggregation and anti-coagulation activity in these flies versus non-infected tsetse flies demonstrates a significant suppression of these activities as a result of the trypanosome-infection status. This effect was mainly related to the parasite-induced reduction in salivary gland gene transcription, resulting in a strong decrease in protein content and related biological activities. Additionally, the anti-thrombin activity and inhibition of thrombin-induced coagulation was even more severely hampered as a result of the trypanosome infection. Indeed, while naive tsetse saliva strongly inhibited human thrombin activity and thrombin-induced blood coagulation, saliva from T. brucei-infected flies showed a significantly enhanced thrombinase activity resulting in a far less potent anti-coagulation activity. These data clearly provide evidence for a trypanosome-mediated modification of the tsetse

  10. Predator odor stress alters corticotropin-releasing factor-1 receptor (CRF1R)-dependent behaviors in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roltsch, Emily A; Baynes, Brittni B; Mayeux, Jacques P; Whitaker, Annie M; Baiamonte, Brandon A; Gilpin, Nicholas W

    2014-04-01

    Humans with stress-related anxiety disorders exhibit increases in arousal and alcohol drinking, as well as altered pain processing. Our lab has developed a predator odor stress model that produces reliable and lasting increases in alcohol drinking. Here, we utilize this predator odor stress model to examine stress-induced increases in arousal, nociceptive processing, and alcohol self-administration by rats, and also to determine the effects of corticotropin-releasing factor-1 receptors (CRF1Rs) in mediating these behavioral changes. In a series of separate experiments, rats were exposed to predator odor stress, then tested over subsequent days for thermal nociception in the Hargreaves test, acoustic startle reactivity, or operant alcohol self-administration. In each experiment, rats were systemically injected with R121919, a CRF1R antagonist, and/or vehicle. Predator odor stress increased thermal nociception (i.e., hyperalgesia) and acoustic startle reactivity. Systemic administration of R121919 reduced thermal nociception and hyperarousal in stressed rats but not unstressed controls, and reduced operant alcohol responding over days. Stressed rats exhibited increased sensitivity to the behavioral effects of R121919 in all three tests, suggesting up-regulation of brain CRF1Rs number and/or function in stressed rats. These results suggest that post-stress alcohol drinking may be driven by a high-nociception high-arousal state, and that brain CRF1R signaling mediates these stress effects. PMID:24269607

  11. Qualitatively Assessing the Experiences of College Students Completing AlcoholEdu: Do Participants Report Altering Behavior After Intervention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Adam E; Hobbs, Laura Ansley; Haas, Emily J; Gibson, Gregory

    2016-03-01

    To reduce college student drinking and associated alcohol-related consequences, many universities are turning to e-interventions, such as AlcoholEdu. To date, however, results of evaluations examining the impact of AlcoholEdu are mixed. Among these evaluations, few qualitative assessments have examined the experiences and perceptions of students who complete AlcoholEdu. This investigation aimed to assess whether students (a) find the program educational and engaging, (b) implemented specific strategies learned from participation, and (c) self-report altering their behavior as a result of participation. Even though respondents universally reported an increase in alcohol-related knowledge, there was an evident disconnect between this knowledge and their actual behavior. In other words, respondents reported that they did not implement what was taught in AlcoholEdu. Moreover, students highlighted several limitations associated with the program that would have influenced its overall impact, such as ignoring video segments of the program and clicking through assessments simply to complete the task. If used, college administrators and health professionals should implement e-interventions such as AlcoholEdu as one component of a multifaceted approach rather than a panacea for the current high-risk drinking practices of college students. PMID:26134110

  12. LPS alters pattern of sickness behavior but does not affect glutathione level in aged male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrotek, Sylwia; Jędrzejewski, Tomasz; Nowakowska, Anna; Kozak, Wiesław

    2016-08-01

    Behavioral symptoms of sickness, such as fever and motor activity are a coordinated set of changes that develop during infection. The aim of study was to compare the sickness behaviour (SB) in healthy old and young rats treated with pyrogenic dose of endotoxin and to check their glutathione level. Before experimentation male Wistar rats were selected according to standard body mass, motor activity, and white blood cells count. Intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from E. coli was used to provoke SB. The level of liver glutathione, interleukin (IL) -6, deep body temperature (Tb) and motor activity were measured. Glutathione level in old and young rats did not differ significantly. In both young and old rats LPS administration provoked fever (the mean value of Tb was 38.06 ± 0.01 °C in old rats, and 38.19 ± 0.06 °C in young rats). LPS injection affected night-time activity in both groups (12 h averages were 1.56 ± 0.40 counts in old LPS-treated rats vs 2.74 ± 0.53 counts in not-treated old rats and 3.44 ± 0.60 counts for young LPS-treated vs 4.28 ± 0.57 counts for young not-treated rats). The injection of LPS provoked an elevation of plasma IL-6 concentration (from values below the lowest detectable standard in not-treated groups of animals to 6322.82 ± 537.00 pg/mL in old LPS-treated rats and 7415.62 ± 451.88 pg/mL in young LPS-treated rats). Based on these data, we conclude that good health of aged rats prevents decrease in the glutathione level. Old rats are still able to develop SB in response to pyrogenic dose of LPS, although its components have changed pattern compared to young animals. PMID:26829940

  13. Selenium exposure results in reduced reproduction in an invasive ant species and altered competitive behavior for a native ant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Riva, Deborah G; Trumble, John T

    2016-06-01

    Competitive ability and numerical dominance are important factors contributing to the ability of invasive ant species to establish and expand their ranges in new habitats. However, few studies have investigated the impact of environmental contamination on competitive behavior in ants as a potential factor influencing dynamics between invasive and native ant species. Here we investigated the widespread contaminant selenium to investigate its potential influence on invasion by the exotic Argentine ant, Linepithema humile, through effects on reproduction and competitive behavior. For the fecundity experiment, treatments were provided to Argentine ant colonies via to sugar water solutions containing one of three concentrations of selenium (0, 5 and 10 μg Se mL(-1)) that fall within the range found in soil and plants growing in contaminated areas. Competition experiments included both the Argentine ant and the native Dorymyrmex bicolor to determine the impact of selenium exposure (0 or 15 μg Se mL(-1)) on exploitation- and interference-competition between ant species. The results of the fecundity experiment revealed that selenium negatively impacted queen survival and brood production of Argentine ants. Viability of the developing brood was also affected in that offspring reached adulthood only in colonies that were not given selenium, whereas those in treated colonies died in their larval stages. Selenium exposure did not alter direct competitive behaviors for either species, but selenium exposure contributed to an increased bait discovery time for D. bicolor. Our results suggest that environmental toxins may not only pose problems for native ant species, but may also serve as a potential obstacle for establishment among exotic species. PMID:27038576

  14. Prenatal stress alters the developmental pattern of behavioral indices of sexual maturation and copulation in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Arteaga, Enrique; Hernández-González, Marisela; Rentería, Mayra Liliana Ramírez-; Almanza-Sepúlveda, Mayra Linné; Guevara, Miguel Angel; Silva, Marcela Arteaga; Jaime, Herlinda Bonilla

    2016-09-01

    Gestation and pre-puberty are critical periods during which several environmental factors can drastically affect the adequate development of subjects. Considering that stress is one of the most common factors to which subjects may be exposed during gestation, the present study evaluated the effects of prenatal stress on the behavioral indices of sexual maturation in male rats, including genital grooming (GG), preputial separation (PS), and spontaneous penile erections (SPE) during puberty, and on copulatory parameters during adulthood. Stress was exerted by immobilizing the female rats once per day for 2h from days 14-21 of pregnancy. The young rats born to the dams in the stressed group (SG) later presented a delayed occurrence of PS with a delayed onset and lower frequency and duration of GG compared to a control group (CG). Less than half of the subjects in SG presented SPE, and those that did showed delayed onset and lower frequency and duration. In adulthood, fewer subjects in SG showed sexual behavior responses (intromission and ejaculation), and their mount and intromission latencies on the first day they ejaculated were longer than those of the CG rats. Findings from this study provide additional evidence that stress caused by immobilization during the third period of pregnancy exerts a negative effect in the short-term (i.e., around puberty) by altering the typical development of GG and SPE and the occurrence of PS, while also demonstrating that this effect persists in the long-term, when it affects the performance of copulatory behavior in mature male rats. PMID:27174612

  15. Removal of GABA(A receptor γ2 subunits from parvalbumin neurons causes wide-ranging behavioral alterations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elli Leppä

    Full Text Available We investigated the behavioral significance of fast synaptic inhibition by αβγ2-type GABA(A receptors on parvalbumin (Pv cells. The GABA(A receptor γ2 subunit gene was selectively inactivated in Pv-positive neurons by Cre/loxP recombination. The resulting Pv-Δγ2 mice were relatively healthy in the first postnatal weeks; but then as Cre started to be expressed, the mice progressively developed wide-ranging phenotypic alterations including low body weight, motor deficits and tremor, decreased anxiety levels, decreased pain sensitivity and deficient prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex and impaired spatial learning. Nevertheless, the deletion was not lethal, and mice did not show increased mortality even after one year. Autoradiography with t-butylbicyclophosphoro[(35S]thionate suggested an increased amount of GABA(A receptors with only α and β subunits in central nervous system regions that contained high levels of parvalbumin neurons. Using BAC-transgenesis, we reduced some of the Pv-Δγ2 phenotype by selectively re-expressing the wild-type γ2 subunit back into some Pv cells (reticular thalamic neurons and cerebellar Pv-positive neurons. This produced less severe impairments of motor skills and spatial learning compared with Pv-Δγ2 mice, but all other deficits remained. Our results reveal the widespread significance of fast GABAergic inhibition onto Pv-positive neurons for diverse behavioral modalities, such as motor coordination, sensorimotor integration, emotional behavior and nociception.

  16. CHEMOTAXIS OF PHAGOCYTES IS SIGNIFICANT IN ESTIMATION OF INDIVIDUAL DOSAGE OF DRUGS FOR CORRECTION OF LOCOMOTIVE PHAGOCYTE DISFUNCTIONS IN CHILDREN WITH TRAUMA

    OpenAIRE

    O. N. Zlakomanova; A. V. Zurochka; A. V. Chukichev

    2007-01-01

    Abstract. The article considers an original approach to individual dose selection and efficiency evaluation of immunity-targeted drugs applied for treatment of children with trauma, based on examination of phagocyte locomotive functions.

  17. Targeting CD47-SIRPα interactions for potentiating therapeutic antibody-mediated tumor cell destruction by phagocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, X.W.

    2014-01-01

    The primary aim of the studies described in this thesis was to investigate the role of CD47-SIRPα interactions in therapeutic antibody-dependent tumor cell destruction by human phagocytes and also explore the killing mechanism(s) by which human phagocytes, and in particular human neutrophils, mediate therapeutic antibody-dependent cytotoxicity towards cancer cells.

  18. Prenatal exposure to moderate levels of ethanol alters social behavior in adult rats: Relationship to structural plasticity and immediate early gene expression in frontal cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Derek A Hamilton; Akers, Katherine G.; Rice, James P.; Johnson, Travis E.; Candelaria-Cook, Felicha T.; Maes, Levi I.; Rosenberg, Martina; Valenzuela, C. Fernando; Savage, Daniel D.

    2009-01-01

    The goals of the present study were to characterize the effects of prenatal exposure to moderate levels of ethanol on adult social behavior, and to evaluate fetal-ethanol-related effects on dendritic morphology, structural plasticity and activity-related immediate early gene (IEG) expression in the agranular insular (AID) and prelimbic (Cg3) regions of frontal cortex. Baseline fetal-ethanol-related alterations in social behavior were limited to reductions in social investigation in males. Rep...

  19. Exposure to the Contraceptive Progestin, Gestodene, Alters Reproductive Behavior, Arrests Egg Deposition, and Masculinizes Development in the Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, Tyler E; Meyer, Michael T; Kolpin, Dana W; Gillis, Amanda B; Alvarez, David A; Orlando, Edward F

    2016-06-01

    Endogenous progestogens and pharmaceutical progestins enter the environment through wastewater treatment plant effluent and agricultural field runoff. Lab studies demonstrate strong, negative exposure effects of these chemicals on aquatic vertebrate reproduction. Behavior can be a sensitive, early indicator of exposure to environmental contaminants associated with altered reproduction yet is rarely examined in ecotoxicology studies. Gestodene is a human contraceptive progestin and a potent activator of fish androgen receptors. Our objective was to test the effects of gestodene on reproductive behavior and associated egg deposition in the fathead minnow. After only 1 day, males exposed to ng/L of gestodene were more aggressive and less interested in courtship and mating, and exposed females displayed less female courtship behavior. Interestingly, 25% of the gestodene tanks contained a female that drove the male out of the breeding tile and displayed male-typical courtship behaviors toward the other female. Gestodene decreased or arrested egg deposition with no observed gonadal histopathology. Together, these results suggest that effects on egg deposition are primarily due to altered reproductive behavior. The mechanisms by which gestodene disrupts behavior are unknown. Nonetheless, the rapid and profound alterations of the reproductive biology of gestodene-exposed fish suggest that wild populations could be similarly affected. PMID:27129041

  20. Contributions of altered permeability of intestinal barrier and defecation behavior to toxicity formation from graphene oxide in nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qiuli; Yin, Li; Li, Xing; Tang, Meng; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Dayong

    2013-09-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) has been extensively studied for potential biomedical applications. Meanwhile, potential GO toxicity arises in both biomedical applications and non-biomedical products where environmental exposures may occur. In the present study, we examined the potential adverse effects of GO and the underlying mechanism using nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as the assay system. We compared the in vivo effects of GO between acute exposure and prolonged exposure, and found that prolonged exposure to 0.5-100 mg L-1 of GO caused damage on functions of both primary (intestine) and secondary (neuron and reproductive organ) targeted organs. In the intestine, ROS production was significantly correlated with the formation of adverse effects on functions of both primary and secondary targeted organs. GO could be translocated into intestinal cells with loss of microvilli, and distributed to be adjacent to or surrounding mitochondria. Prolonged exposure to GO resulted in a hyper-permeable state of the intestinal barrier, an increase in mean defecation cycle length, and alteration of genes required for intestinal development and defecation behavior. Thus, our data suggest that prolonged exposure to GO may cause potential risk to environmental organisms after release into the environment. GO toxicity may be due to the combinational effects of oxidative stress in the intestinal barrier, enhanced permeability of the biological barrier, and suppressed defecation behavior in C. elegans.Graphene oxide (GO) has been extensively studied for potential biomedical applications. Meanwhile, potential GO toxicity arises in both biomedical applications and non-biomedical products where environmental exposures may occur. In the present study, we examined the potential adverse effects of GO and the underlying mechanism using nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as the assay system. We compared the in vivo effects of GO between acute exposure and prolonged exposure, and found that prolonged

  1. Altered ratio of D1 and D2 dopamine receptors in mouse striatum is associated with behavioral sensitization to cocaine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawn Thompson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Drugs of abuse elevate brain dopamine levels, and, in vivo, chronic drug use is accompanied by a selective decrease in dopamine D2 receptor (D2R availability in the brain. Such a decrease consequently alters the ratio of D1R:D2R signaling towards the D1R. Despite a plethora of behavioral studies dedicated to the understanding of the role of dopamine in addiction, a molecular mechanism responsible for the downregulation of the D2R, in vivo, in response to chronic drug use has yet to be identified. METHODS AND FINDINGS: ETHICS STATEMENT: All animal work was approved by the Gallo Center IACUC committee and was performed in our AAALAC approved facility. In this study, we used wild type (WT and G protein coupled receptor associated sorting protein-1 (GASP-1 knock out (KO mice to assess molecular changes that accompany cocaine sensitization. Here, we show that downregulation of D2Rs or upregulation of D1Rs is associated with a sensitized locomotor response to an acute injection of cocaine. Furthermore, we demonstrate that disruption of GASP-1, that targets D2Rs for degradation after endocytosis, prevents cocaine-induced downregulation of D2Rs. As a consequence, mice with a GASP-1 disruption show a reduction in the sensitized locomotor response to cocaine. CONCLUSIONS: Together, our data suggests that changes in the ratio of the D1:D2R could contribute to cocaine-induced behavioral plasticity and demonstrates a role of GASP-1 in regulating both the levels of the D2R and cocaine sensitization.

  2. Female Flinders Sensitive Line rats show estrous cycle-independent depression-like behavior and altered tryptophan metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskelund, Amanda; Budac, David P; Sanchez, Connie; Elfving, Betina; Wegener, Gregers

    2016-08-01

    Clinical studies suggest a link between depression and dysfunctional tryptophan (TRP) metabolism. Even though depression is twice as prevalent in women as men, the impact of the estrous cycle on TRP metabolism is not well-understood. Here we investigated 13 kynurenine and serotonin metabolites in female Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) rats, a genetic rat model of depression. FSL rats and controls (Flinders Resistant Line rats), 12-20weeks old, were subject to the forced swim test (FST), a commonly used measure of depression-like behavior. Open field was used to evaluate locomotor ability and agoraphobia. Subsequently, plasma and hemispheres were collected and analyzed for their content of TRP metabolites using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Vaginal saline lavages were obtained daily for ⩾2 cycles. To estimate the effects of sex and FST we included plasma from unhandled, naïve male FSL and FRL rats. Female FSL rats showed a depression-like phenotype with increased immobility in the FST, not confounded by anxiety. In the brain, 3-hydroxykynurenine was increased whereas anthranilate and 5-hydroxytryptophan were decreased. In plasma, anthranilate and quinolinate levels were lower in FSL rats compared to the control line, independent of sex and FST. The estrous cycle neither impacted behavior nor TRP metabolite levels in the FSL rat. In conclusion, the female FSL rat is an interesting preclinical model of depression with altered TRP metabolism, independent of the estrous cycle. The status of the pathway in brain was not reflected in the plasma, which may indicate that an inherent local, cerebral regulation of TRP metabolism occurs. PMID:27210075

  3. GBR 12909 administration as an animal model of bipolar mania: time course of behavioral, brain oxidative alterations and effect of mood stabilizing drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, Ana Isabelle G; de Araújo, Maíra Moraes; da Silva Araújo, Tatiane; de Souza, Greicy Coelho; Cavalcante, Lígia Menezes; de Jesus Souza Machado, Michel; de Lucena, David Freitas; Quevedo, João; Macêdo, Danielle

    2015-10-01

    Polymorphisms in the human dopamine transporter (DAT) are associated with bipolar endophenotype. Based on this, the acute inhibition of DAT using GBR12909 causes behavioral alterations that are prevented by valproate (VAL), being related to a mania-like model. Herein our first aim was to analyze behavioral and brain oxidative alterations during a 24 h period post-GBR12909 to better characterize this model. Our second aim was to determine the preventive effects of lithium (Li) or VAL 2 h post-GBR12909. For this, adult male mice received GBR12909 or saline being evaluated at 2, 4, 8, 12 or 24 h post-administration. Hyperlocomotion, levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) and lipid peroxidation in brain areas were assessed at all these time-points. GBR12909 caused hyperlocomotion at 2 and 24 h. Rearing behavior increased only at 2 h. GSH levels decreased in the hippocampus and striatum at the time points of 2, 4, 8 and 12 h. Increased lipid peroxidation was detected at the time-points of 2 and 12 h in all brain areas studied. At the time-point of 2 h post-GBR12909 Li prevented the hyperlocomotion and rearing alterations, while VAL prevented only rearing alterations. Both drugs prevented pro-oxidative changes. In conclusion, we observed that the main behavioral and oxidative alterations took place at the time-period of 2 h post-GBR12909, what points to this time-period as the best for the assessment of alterations in this model. Furthermore, the present study expands the predictive validity of the model by the determination of the preventive effects of Li. PMID:26073232

  4. DMPD: Regulation of phagocyte migration and recruitment by Src-family kinases. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18385944 Regulation of phagocyte migration and recruitment by Src-family kinases. B...how Regulation of phagocyte migration and recruitment by Src-family kinases. PubmedID 18385944 Title Regulat...ion of phagocyte migration and recruitment by Src-family kinases. Authors Baruzzi

  5. Assessment of phagocytic activity of neutrophils in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalitha Shanmugam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess the phagocytic activity of neutrophils in subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Background/Need of Study: There is a paucity of data in relation to phagocytic function in COPD. By this multidisciplinary study, a better understanding about the etiology of lung destruction among COPD patients is being sought. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted among 28 subjects with COPD and 25 controls in a private tertiary hospital in Chennai after obtaining Institutional Ethical Clearance. Known cases of COPD as proven by clinical findings and spirometry were included in the study, and subjects with any other source of infection, recent surgery, or chronic granulomatous disease were excluded. The study subjects were divided into three groups based on the severity of COPD as determined by spirometry, and healthy volunteers were taken as Group 4. After obtaining informed consent, validated respiratory health questionnaire was administered. The phagocytic function was assessed by Candida phagocytic test and Nitroblue Tetrazolium (NBT Reduction Test. Results: Significantly impaired phagocytic function as indicated by lower phagocytic, lytic indices and decreased NBT reduction of neutrophils was seen in COPD subjects compared to normal healthy controls (P <.001. Conclusion: This study showed that there is phagocytic dysfunction in COPD subjects when compared with normal subjects. This could be due to underlying inflammation in human airway. Understanding the role of neutrophils may lead to improved understanding of the pathogenesis of COPD, which in turn may pave way for implementing modified therapeutic intervention strategies.

  6. Interleukin-15 Constrains Mucosal T Helper 17 Cell Generation: Influence of Mononuclear Phagocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Huifeng; Sui, Yongjun; Wang, Yichuan; Sato, Noriko; Frey, Blake; Xia, Zheng; Waldmann, Thomas A.; Berzofsky, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-15 has multiple roles in innate and adaptive immunity, especially regarding CD8+ T cells and natural killer cells. However, the role of IL-15 in regulating differentiation of T helper cell subsets and mononuclear phagocytes (MPs) in different tissues in vivo is unknown. Here we report that IL-15 indirectly regulates Th17 but not other Th subsets in the intestinal lamina propria (LP), apparently through effects on MPs. Th17 cells in the LP were more prevalent in IL-15 KO mice than their wild-type counterparts, and less prevalent in IL-15 transgenic mice than their wild-type littermates, even co-caged. MPs from the LP of these mice were sufficient to mimic the in vivo finding in vitro by skewing of cocultured wild type OVA-specific CD4+ T cells. However, production of IL-15 or lack thereof by these MPs was not sufficient to explain the skewing, as addition or blockade of IL-15 in the cultures had no effect. Rather, a skewing of the relative proportion of CD11b+, CD103+ and double positive LP MP subsets in transgenic and KO could explain the differences in Th17 cells. Thus, IL-15 may influence MP subsets in the gut in a novel way that alters the frequency of LP Th17 cells. PMID:26600079

  7. Live Candida albicans suppresses production of reactive oxygen species in phagocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellington, Melanie; Dolan, Kristy; Krysan, Damian J

    2009-01-01

    Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is an important aspect of phagocyte-mediated host responses. Since phagocytes play a crucial role in the host response to Candida albicans, we examined the ability of Candida to modulate phagocyte ROS production. ROS production was measured in the murine macrophage cell line J774 and in primary phagocytes using luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence. J774 cells, murine polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN), human monocytes, and human PMN treated with live C. albicans produced significantly less ROS than phagocytes treated with heat-killed C. albicans. Live C. albicans also suppressed ROS production in murine bone marrow-derived macrophages from C57BL/6 mice, but not from BALB/c mice. Live C. albicans also suppressed ROS in response to external stimuli. C. albicans and Candida glabrata suppressed ROS production by phagocytes, whereas Saccharomyces cerevisiae stimulated ROS production. The cell wall is the initial point of contact between Candida and phagocytes, but isolated cell walls from both heat-killed and live C. albicans stimulated ROS production. Heat-killed C. albicans has increased surface exposure of 1,3-beta-glucan, a cell wall component that can stimulate phagocytes. To determine whether surface 1,3-beta-glucan exposure accounted for the difference in ROS production, live C. albicans cells were treated with a sublethal dose of caspofungin to increase surface 1,3-beta-glucan exposure. Caspofungin-treated C. albicans was fully able to suppress ROS production, indicating that suppression of ROS overrides stimulatory signals from 1,3-beta-glucan. These studies indicate that live C. albicans actively suppresses ROS production in phagocytes in vitro, which may represent an important immune evasion mechanism. PMID:18981256

  8. Behavior of Paramecium sp. in solutions containing Sr and Pb: Do Paramecium sp. alter chemical forms of those metals?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behavior of Paramecium sp. (Paramecium bursaria) in aqueous solutions containing Sr and Pb was investigated to determine the role of protozoa in the migration of radionuclides in the environment. Precultured living cells of P. bursaria were exposed to aqueous solutions containing 0.01 or 0.05 mM Sr or Pb at pH 7 for 24 h. For comparison, pre-killed cells were treated with the metal solutions in the same way. Two-dimensional elemental mappings of cells were obtained by micro-PIXE. Aquatic species of Sr and Pb were analyzed by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) coupled online to ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopy and inductivity coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). The amounts of Sr adsorbed or taken up by the cells surviving for 24 h and adsorbed on pre-killed cells were below the detection limit. Cells of P. bursaria adsorbed or took up a fraction of Pb. The Pb adsorbed or taken up by the cells surviving for 24 h in the Pb solution was barely detectable, while the Pb adsorbed on pre-killed cells was clearly mappable. These findings suggest that living cells of P. bursaria have functions that reduce adsorption or uptake of Pb on the cells. Quantitative and SEC-UV-ICP-MS analyses of the Sr and Pb in aqueous phases showed no clear evidences that living cells of P. bursaria alter the chemical form of Sr or Pb remaining in the aqueous phases after the cell-solution contact.

  9. Behavior of Paramecium sp. in solutions containing Sr and Pb: Do Paramecium sp. alter chemical forms of those metals?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozai, Naofumi, E-mail: kozai.naofumi@jaea.go.jp [Advanced Sciences Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Ohnuki, Toshihiko [Advanced Sciences Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Koka, Masahi; Satoh, Takahiro; Kamiya, Tomihiro [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, JAEA, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2011-10-15

    The behavior of Paramecium sp. (Paramecium bursaria) in aqueous solutions containing Sr and Pb was investigated to determine the role of protozoa in the migration of radionuclides in the environment. Precultured living cells of P. bursaria were exposed to aqueous solutions containing 0.01 or 0.05 mM Sr or Pb at pH 7 for 24 h. For comparison, pre-killed cells were treated with the metal solutions in the same way. Two-dimensional elemental mappings of cells were obtained by micro-PIXE. Aquatic species of Sr and Pb were analyzed by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) coupled online to ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopy and inductivity coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). The amounts of Sr adsorbed or taken up by the cells surviving for 24 h and adsorbed on pre-killed cells were below the detection limit. Cells of P. bursaria adsorbed or took up a fraction of Pb. The Pb adsorbed or taken up by the cells surviving for 24 h in the Pb solution was barely detectable, while the Pb adsorbed on pre-killed cells was clearly mappable. These findings suggest that living cells of P. bursaria have functions that reduce adsorption or uptake of Pb on the cells. Quantitative and SEC-UV-ICP-MS analyses of the Sr and Pb in aqueous phases showed no clear evidences that living cells of P. bursaria alter the chemical form of Sr or Pb remaining in the aqueous phases after the cell-solution contact.

  10. Change in Performance of BALB/c Mouse Pulmonary Macrophage Surface Receptor after Exercise and its Influence on Phagocytic Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Zhang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of exercise on phagocytosis by pulmonary bronchoalveolar macrophages (BAMs. Methods: A total of 120 seven- to nine-week-old male BALB/c mice were randomly assigned into the following groups based on exercise intensity on a treadmill: control exercise (CE group, acute moderate exercise (ME group, and strenuous exercise group. Lung lavage was conducted to collect BAMs from the mice. Phagocytic behavior and surface receptor expression on BALB/c mouse BAMs were analyzed through fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Results: In the SE group, expression levels of macrophage scavenger receptors (surface receptor [SR-A] type I/II and macrophage receptor [MARCO], complement receptor3 (CR3, and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1 were upregulated; by contrast, expression level of extensive G-type immune globulin receptor (Fc Rs was not upregulated. The promoting percentage of phagocytosis in the CE group was 100%; the highest promoting percentage of phagocytosis was 161% observed in MARCO, followed by 116% detected in CR3; the promoting percentage of phagocytosis found in SR-A type I/II and ICAM-1 increased by approximately 65%. Indeed, these scavenger receptors were involved in phagocytosis induced by macrophages. MARCO was also necessary to elicit a stimulatory effect on macrophage phagocytic activity. Conclusions: The phagocytosis of unopsonized particles was possibly mediated by MARCO expression.

  11. Phagocyte NADPH oxidase, chronic granulomatous disease and mycobacterial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deffert, Christine; Cachat, Julien; Krause, Karl-Heinz

    2014-08-01

    Infection of humans with Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains frequent and may still lead to death. After primary infection, the immune system is often able to control M. tuberculosis infection over a prolonged latency period, but a decrease in immune function (from HIV to immunosenescence) leads to active disease. Available vaccines against tuberculosis are restricted to BCG, a live vaccine with an attenuated strain of M. bovis. Immunodeficiency may not only be associated with an increased risk of tuberculosis, but also with local or disseminated BCG infection. Genetic deficiency in the reactive oxygen species (ROS)-producing phagocyte NADPH oxidase NOX2 is called chronic granulomatous disease (CGD). CGD is among the most common primary immune deficiencies. Here we review our knowledge on the importance of NOX2-derived ROS in mycobacterial infection. A literature review suggests that human CGD patient frequently have an increased susceptibility to BCG and to M. tuberculosis. In vitro studies and experiments with CGD mice are incomplete and yielded - at least in part - contradictory results. Thus, although observations in human CGD patients leave little doubt about the role of NOX2 in the control of mycobacteria, further studies will be necessary to unequivocally define and understand the role of ROS. PMID:24916152

  12. Hydroxyl radical formation in phagocytic cells of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drath, D B; Karnovsky, M L; Huber, G L

    1979-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and macrophages, harvested from the peritoneum and lung, release superoxide (O-.2) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) during phagocytosis. These two agents are thought to react with each other to produce a highly active oxidative substance known as hydroxyl radical (OH.). We present evidence suggesting that these radicals are generated by phagocytic cells of the rat. Our findings are based upon an assay where ethylene gas is generated from methional by the action of this radical. Ethylene generation was shown to be inhibited by superoxide dismutase, catalase, and scavengers of OH.. Of the cells examined, PMN generated the most ethylene from methional, exhibiting a fourfold increase during phagocytosis. Pulmonary and peritoneal macrophages caused smaller amounts of this gas to be formed. Regardless of cell type, an intact cell was required for ethylene generation. Zymosan appeared to be the most effective particle for all cells in ethylene formation from methional, although opsonization was critical only for PMN. Ethylene generation was dependent on cell concentration to an extent and increased with time. PMID:222719

  13. Pre- and neonatal exposure to lipopolysaccharide or the enteric metabolite, propionic acid, alters development and behavior in adolescent rats in a sexually dimorphic manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Kelly A; Ossenkopp, Klaus-Peter; Kavaliers, Martin; Macfabe, Derrick F

    2014-01-01

    Alterations in the composition of the gut microbiome and/or immune system function may have a role in the development of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The current study examined the effects of prenatal and early life administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a bacterial mimetic, and the short chain fatty acid, propionic acid (PPA), a metabolic fermentation product of enteric bacteria, on developmental milestones, locomotor activity, and anxiety-like behavior in adolescent male and female offspring. Pregnant Long-Evans rats were subcutaneously injected once a day with PPA (500 mg/kg) on gestation days G12-16, LPS (50 µg/kg) on G15-16, or vehicle control on G12-16 or G15-16. Male and female offspring were injected with PPA (500 mg/kg) or vehicle twice a day, every second day from postnatal days (P) 10-18. Physical milestones and reflexes were monitored in early life with prenatal PPA and LPS inducing delays in eye opening. Locomotor activity and anxiety were assessed in adolescence (P40-42) in the elevated plus maze (EPM) and open-field. Prenatal and postnatal treatments altered behavior in a sex-specific manner. Prenatal PPA decreased time spent in the centre of the open-field in males and females while prenatal and postnatal PPA increased anxiety behavior on the EPM in female rats. Prenatal LPS did not significantly influence those behaviors. Evidence for the double hit hypothesis was seen as females receiving a double hit of PPA (prenatal and postnatal) displayed increased repetitive behavior in the open-field. These results provide evidence for the hypothesis that by-products of enteric bacteria metabolism such as PPA may contribute to ASD, altering development and behavior in adolescent rats similar to that observed in ASD and other neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:24466331

  14. THE RELATION BETWEEN PHAGOCYTIC ACTIVITY OF THE NEUTROPHILS (PMN AND THE GLICEMIC LEVEL AT THE SPORTSMAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Cotuna

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available We tried to find a relation between the phagocytes activity of the neutrophils and the level of glicemy in athletes applying the ANOVA test, taking into account the fact that hyperglicemy reduces the phagocytes activity of the neutrophils which becomes so more spherical and burden after the contact with foreign particles. The phagocyte activity of neutrophils (PMN had been established through NBT technique and the glicemy level was determined by Hagerdon – Jansen method. From these notices processed by ANOVA test applied on the values of phagocyte activity of PMN and on glicemy level we conclude that does not exist a tendency of association of these two parameters in a relationship.

  15. Chemiluminescence of whole-body phagocytes from rats with ischemic-reperfused small intestine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dušková, Monika; Lojek, Antonín; Číž, Milan; Vondráček, Jan; Čížová, Hana; Pavlíček, V.; Černý, J.; Lilius, E. M.; Hamar, J.

    Wroclaw: Polish Academy of Sciences, 1995 - (Kochel, B.; Podbielska, H.; Strek, W.), s. 11 [International Conference: Light and Biological Systems. Wroclaw (PL), 03.07.1995-06.07.1995] Keywords : ischemia * reperfusion * intestine * rat * phagocytes * chemiluminescence

  16. Inflammasome activation in NADPH oxidase defective mononuclear phagocytes from patients with chronic granulomatous disease

    OpenAIRE

    Meissner, F; Seger, R.A.; Moshous, D.; Fischer, A; Reichenbach, J.; Zychlinsky, A

    2010-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is an inherited disorder characterized by recurrent infections and deregulated inflammatory responses. CGD is caused by mutations in subunits of the NADPH oxidase, an enzyme that generates reactive oxygen species in phagocytes. To elucidate the contribution of the proinflammatory protease caspase-1 to aberrant inflammatory reactions in CGD, we analyzed cells isolated from patients with defects in the phagocyte oxidase subunits p22phox, p47phox or gp91phox. ...

  17. The redox-sensitive cation channel TRPM2 modulates phagocyte ROS production and inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Di, Anke; Gao, Xiao-Pei; Qian, Feng; Kawamura, Takeshi; Han, Jin; Hecquet, Claudie; Ye, Richard D; Vogel, Stephen M.; Malik, Asrar B.

    2011-01-01

    The NADPH oxidase activity of phagocytes and its generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is critical for host-defense, but ROS overproduction can also lead to inflammation and tissue injury. Here we report that TRPM2, a non-selective and redox-sensitive cation channel, inhibits ROS production in phagocytic cells and prevents endotoxin-induced lung inflammation in mice. TRPM2-deficient mice challenged with endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide) showed an increased inflammatory signature and decrea...

  18. Effects of lethal and non-lethal malaria on the mononuclear phagocyte system

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Eduardo Tosta; Greta Ruiz; Nina Wedderburn

    1983-01-01

    The effects ofone non-lethal species ofmalarialparasite, Plasmodium yoelii, and one lethal species, P. berghei, on the mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS) of BALB/c mice were studied. P. yoelii caused a greater and more sustained expansion and activation of the MPS, and the two major populations of spleen phagocytic cells-red pulp and marginal zone macrophages - exhibited a greater increase in numbers in this infection. During the course of P. berghei mataria, the spleen was progressively occu...

  19. Aggregation of sea urchin phagocytes is augmented in vitro by lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majeske, Audrey J; Bayne, Christopher J; Smith, L Courtney

    2013-01-01

    Development of protocols and media for culturing immune cells from marine invertebrates has not kept pace with advancements in mammalian immune cell culture, the latter having been driven by the need to understand the causes of and develop therapies for human and animal diseases. However, expansion of the aquaculture industry and the diseases that threaten these systems creates the need to develop cell and tissue culture methods for marine invertebrates. Such methods will enable us to better understand the causes of disease outbreaks and to develop means to avoid and remedy epidemics. We report a method for the short-term culture of phagocytes from the purple sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, by modifying an approach previously used to culture cells from another sea urchin species. The viability of cultured phagocytes from the purple sea urchin decreases from 91.6% to 57% over six days and phagocyte morphology changes from single cells to aggregates leading to the formation of syncytia-like structures. This process is accelerated in the presence of lipopolysaccharide suggesting that phagocytes are capable of detecting this molecular pattern in culture conditions. Sea urchin immune response proteins, called Sp185/333, are expressed on the surface of a subset of phagocytes and have been associated with syncytia-like structures. We evaluated their expression in cultured phagocytes to determine their possible role in cell aggregation and in the formation of syncytia-like structures. Between 0 and 3 hr, syncytia-like structures were observed in cultures when only ~10% of the cells were positive for Sp185/333 proteins. At 24 hr, ~90% of the nuclei were Sp185/333-positive when all of the phagocytes had aggregated into syncytia-like structures. Consequently, we conclude that the Sp185/333 proteins do not have a major role in initiating the aggregation of cultured phagocytes, however the Sp185/333 proteins are associated with the clustered nuclei within the

  20. Approaches to the study of functional activity phagocytic link immune system (review)

    OpenAIRE

    ABDUSHUKUROV ABDURASHI; GULYAMOV NARIMAN; HIETOV ROVSHAN; SADIKOVA NIGORA

    2016-01-01

    Literature data on the role and significance of phagocytic component, in particular, neutrophils in realization of immune response of an organism to antigen are analyzed. A special attention is paid to approaches to evaluation of functional state and reactivity of phagocytes. The most informative and objective method for evaluation of functional state of neutrophils is NBT-test. NBT-test allows to evaluate a potential maximal ability of neutrophils (stimulation test), what part of maximal abi...

  1. Assessment of phagocytic activity of neutrophils in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    OpenAIRE

    Lalitha Shanmugam; Sheela S Ravinder; Priscilla Johnson; Padmavathi, R.; Rajagopalan, B.; Anupma Jyoti Kindo

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To assess the phagocytic activity of neutrophils in subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Background/Need of Study: There is a paucity of data in relation to phagocytic function in COPD. By this multidisciplinary study, a better understanding about the etiology of lung destruction among COPD patients is being sought. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted among 28 subjects with COPD and 25 controls in a private tertiary hospital in Chennai after obtaining In...

  2. Onset of apoprotein E secretion during differentiation of mouse bone marrow-derived mononuclear phagocytes

    OpenAIRE

    1983-01-01

    A number of macrophage functions were sequentially expressed when the bone marrow precursors of mononuclear phagocytes differentiated in culture in the presence of a specific growth factor, colony-stimulating factor-1. We have defined the expression of apoprotein E (ApoE), a major secreted protein of resident peritoneal macrophages, during maturation of adherent bone marrow-derived mononuclear phagocytes into macrophages. By 5 d the bone marrow macrophages were active secretory cells, but few...

  3. Alterations in ethanol-induced behaviors and consumption in knock-in mice expressing ethanol-resistant NMDA receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina R den Hartog

    Full Text Available Ethanol's action on the brain likely reflects altered function of key ion channels such as glutamatergic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs. In this study, we determined how expression of a mutant GluN1 subunit (F639A that reduces ethanol inhibition of NMDARs affects ethanol-induced behaviors in mice. Mice homozygous for the F639A allele died prematurely while heterozygous knock-in mice grew and bred normally. Ethanol (44 mM; ∼0.2 g/dl significantly inhibited NMDA-mediated EPSCs in wild-type mice but had little effect on responses in knock-in mice. Knock-in mice had normal expression of GluN1 and GluN2B protein across different brain regions and a small reduction in levels of GluN2A in medial prefrontal cortex. Ethanol (0.75-2.0 g/kg; i.p. increased locomotor activity in wild-type mice but had no effect on knock-in mice while MK-801 enhanced activity to the same extent in both groups. Ethanol (2.0 g/kg reduced rotarod performance equally in both groups but knock-in mice recovered faster following a higher dose (2.5 g/kg. In the elevated zero maze, knock-in mice had a blunted anxiolytic response to ethanol (1.25 g/kg as compared to wild-type animals. No differences were noted between wild-type and knock-in mice for ethanol-induced loss of righting reflex, sleep time, hypothermia or ethanol metabolism. Knock-in mice consumed less ethanol than wild-type mice during daily limited-access sessions but drank more in an intermittent 24 h access paradigm with no change in taste reactivity or conditioned taste aversion. Overall, these data support the hypothesis that NMDA receptors are important in regulating a specific constellation of effects following exposure to ethanol.

  4. Human and mouse mononuclear phagocyte networks: a tale of two species?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary eReynolds

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs, monocytes and macrophages are a heterogeneous population of mononuclear phagocytes that are involved in antigen processing and presentation to initiate and regulate immune responses to pathogens, vaccines, tumour and tolerance to self. In addition to their afferent sentinel function, DCs and macrophages are also critical as effectors and coordinators of inflammation and homeostasis in peripheral tissues. Harnessing DCs and macrophages for therapeutic purposes has major implications for infectious disease, vaccination, transplantation, tolerance induction, inflammation and cancer immunotherapy. There has been a paradigm shift in our understanding of the developmental origin and function of the cellular constituents of the mononuclear phagocyte system. Significant progress has been made in tandem in both human and mouse mononuclear phagocyte biology. This progress has been accelerated by comparative biology analysis between mouse and human, which has proved to be an exceptionally fruitful strategy to harmonise findings across species. Such analyses have provided unexpected insights and facilitated productive reciprocal and iterative processes to inform our understanding of human and mouse mononuclear phagocytes. In this review, we discuss the strategies, power and utility of comparative biology approaches to integrate recent advances in human and mouse mononuclear phagocyte biology and its potential to drive forward clinical translation of this knowledge. We also present a functional framework on the parallel organisation of human and mouse mononuclear phagocyte networks.

  5. Alteration of rhyolitic (volcanic) glasses in natural Bolivian salt lakes. - Natural analogue for the behavior of radioactive waste glasses in rock salt repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alteration experiments with the R7T7 glass in three salt brines, saturated respectively in MgCl2, MgCl2-CaCl2 and NaCl, showed that the solubilities of most radionuclides are controlled by the secondary phases. Nd, La, and Pr are trapped in powellite, Ce in cerianite, U in coffinite, and Sr is partially immobilized in barite. There is a good similarity between the secondary phases formed experimentally on volcanic glasses and the R7T7 glass altered in MgCl2CaCl2-saturated brine (formation of hydrotalcite and chlorite-serpentine at short-term and saponite at long-term). These results support the use of volcanic glasses alteration patterns in Mg-rich solutions (seawater, brines) to understand the long-term behavior of nuclear waste glasses and to evaluate the stability of the secondary phases. The study of the sediments of Uyuni (Bolivia) showed that the corrosion rate of the rhyolitic glass in brines at 10 C is 12 to 30 time lower than those of rhyolitic glasses altered in high dilute conditions. The neoformed phases in the sediments are: Smectite, alunite, pyrite, barite, celestite and cerianite. The low alteration rate of rhyolitic glasses in brines and the formation of secondary phases such as smectite, barite and cerianite (also formed during the experimental alteration of the R7T7 glass), permit us to expect the low alteration of nuclear waste glasses at long-term in brines and the trapping of certain radionuclides in secondary phases. (orig.)

  6. Sex differences in the adult HPA axis and affective behaviors are altered by perinatal exposure to a low dose of bisphenol A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fang; Zhou, Libin; Bai, Yinyang; Zhou, Rong; Chen, Ling

    2014-07-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA), an estrogen-mimicking endocrine disrupter, when administered perinatally can affect affective behaviors in adult rodents, however the underlying mechanisms remain largely unclear. Postnatal day (PND) 80 vehicle-injected control female rats showed more obvious depression- and anxiety-like behaviors than males, indicative of sexually dimorphic affective behaviors. When female breeders were subcutaneously injected with BPA (2µg/kg) from gestation day 10 to lactation day 7, sex difference of affective behaviors was impaired in their offspring (PND80 BPA-rats), as results that female BPA-rats showed a visible "antianxiety-like" behavior, and male BPA-rats increased depression-like behavior compared to vehicle-injected controls. Notably, basal levels of serum corticosterone and adrenocorticotropin (ACTH), and corticotropin-releasing hormone mRNA were increased in male BPA-rats, but not in female BPA-rats, in comparison with vehicle-injected controls. Following mild-stressor the elevation of corticosterone or ACTH levels was higher in male BPA-rats, whereas it was lower in female BPA-rats than vehicle-injected controls. In comparison with vehicle-injected controls, the level of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) mRNA in hippocampus or hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus was increased in female BPA-rats, while decreased in male BPA-rats. In addition, the levels of hippocampal mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) mRNA, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and phospho-cAMP response element binding protein (p-CREB) were increased in female BPA-rats, but were decreased in male BPA-rats. Furthermore, the testosterone level was reduced in male BPA-rats. The results indicate that the perinatal exposure to BPA through altering the GR and MR expression disrupts the GR-mediated feedback of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and MR-induced nNOS-CREB signaling, which alters sex difference in affective behaviors. PMID:24857958

  7. AAV-mediated overexpression of the CB1 receptor in the mPFC of adult rats alters cognitive flexibility, social behavior and emotional reactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias eKlugmann

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The endocannabinoid (ECB system is strongly involved in the regulation of cognitive processing and emotional behavior and evidence indicates that ECB signaling might affect these behavioral abilities by modulations of prefrontal cortical functions. The aim of the present study was to examine the role of the CB1 receptor in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC on cognitive flexibility and emotional behavior. Therefore, the CB1 receptor was overexpressed by adeno-associated virus (AAV vector-mediated gene transfer specifically in the mPFC of adult Wistar rats. Animals were then tested in different anxiety-related paradigms for emotional reactivity (e.g. elevated plus maze (EPM, light/dark emergence test (EMT, social interaction and the attentional set shift task (ASST - an adaptation of the human Wisconsin card sorting test - for cognitive abilities and behavioral flexibility. A subtle increase in exploratory behavior was found in CB1 receptor overexpressing animals (CB1-R compared to empty vector injected controls (Empty in the EMT and EPM, although general locomotor activity did not differ between the groups. During social interaction testing, social contact behavior towards the unknown conspecific was found to be decreased, whereas social withdrawal was increased in CB1-R animals and they showed an inadequate increase in exploratory behavior compared to control animals. In the ASST, impaired reversal learning abilities were detected in CB1-R animals compared to controls, indicating reduced behavioral flexibility. In conclusion, upregulation of the CB1 receptor specifically in the rat mPFC induces alterations in emotional reactivity, leads to inadequate social behavior and impairs cognitive flexibility. These findings might be relevant for neuropsychiatric disorders, since higher cortical CB1 receptor expression levels as well as similar behavioral impairments as observed in the present study have been described in schizophrenic patients.

  8. Early Adolescence as a Critical Window During Which Social Stress Distinctly Alters Behavior and Brain Norepinephrine Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Bingham, Brian; McFadden, Kile; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Bhatnagar, Seema; Beck, Sheryl; Valentino, Rita

    2010-01-01

    Many neural programs that shape behavior become established during adolescence. Adverse events at this age can have enduring consequences for both adolescent and adult mental health. Here we show that repeated social stress at different stages of adolescent development differentially affects rat behavior and neuronal activity. Early-adolescent (PND 28, EA), mid-adolescent (PND 42, MA), and adult (PND 63) rats were subjected to resident-intruder social stress (7 days) and behavior was examined...

  9. Neonatal exposure to benzo[a]pyrene induces oxidative stress causing altered hippocampal cytomorphometry and behavior during early adolescence period of male Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Bhupesh; Das, Saroj Kumar; Das, Swagatika; Das, Lipsa; Patri, Manorama

    2016-05-01

    Environmental neurotoxicants like benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) have been well documented regarding their potential to induce oxidative stress. However, neonatal exposure to B[a]P and its subsequent effect on anti-oxidant defence system and hippocampal cytomorphometry leading to behavioral changes have not been fully elucidated. We investigated the effect of acute exposure of B[a]P on five days old male Wistar pups administered with single dose of B[a]P (0.2 μg/kg BW) through intracisternal mode. Control group was administered with vehicle i.e., DMSO and a separate group of rats without any treatment was taken as naive group. Behavioral analysis showed anxiolytic-like behavior with significant increase in time spent in open arm in elevated plus maze. Further, significant reduction in fall off time during rotarod test showing B[a]P induced locomotor hyperactivity and impaired motor co-ordination in adolescent rats. B[a]P induced behavioral changes were further associated with altered anti-oxidant defence system involving significant reduction in the total ATPase, Na(+) K(+) ATPase, Mg(2+) ATPase, GR and GPx activity with a significant elevation in the activity of catalase and GST as compared to naive and control groups. Cytomorphometry of hippocampus showed that the number of neurons and glia in B[a]P treated group were significantly reduced as compared to naive and control. Subsequent observation showed that the area and perimeter of hippocampus, hippocampal neurons and neuronal nucleus were significantly reduced in B[a]P treated group as compared to naive and control. The findings of the present study suggest that the alteration in hippocampal cytomorphometry and neuronal population associated with impaired antioxidant signaling and mood in B[a]P treated group could be an outcome of neuromorphological alteration leading to pyknotic cell death or impaired differential migration of neurons during early postnatal brain development. PMID:26946409

  10. Fluorescent Probes Detecting the Phagocytic Phase of Apoptosis: Enzyme-Substrate Complexes of Topoisomerase and DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candace L. Minchew

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In apoptosis, the initial self-driven suicide phase generates cellular corpses which are digested in the phagolysosomes of professional and amateur phagocytes during the subsequent waste-management phase. This ensures the complete elimination of the genetic material which often contains pathological, viral or cancerous DNA sequences. Although the phagocytic phase is critical for the efficient execution of apoptosis, there are currently few methods specifically adapted for its detailed visualization in the fixed tissue section format. To resolve this we developed new fluorescent probes for in situ research. The probes selectively visualize active phagocytic cells of any lineage (professional, amateur phagocytes or surrounding tissue cells which engulf and digest apoptotic cell DNA. These fluorescent probes are the covalently-bound enzyme-DNA intermediates produced in a topoisomerase reaction with specific “starting” oligonucleotides. They detect a specific marker of DNase II cleavage activity, which occurs exclusively in phagolysosomes of the cells that engulfed apoptotic nuclei. The probes provide snap-shot images of the digestion process occurring in cellular organelles responsible for the actual execution of phagocytic degradation of apoptotic cell corpses. We applied the probes for visualization of the phagocytic reaction in tissue sections of normal thymus and in several human lymphomas. We also discuss the nature, stability and properties of DNase II-type breaks as a marker of phagocytic activity. This development provides a useful fluorescent tool for studies of pathologies where clearance of dying cells is essential, such as cancers, inflammation, infection and auto-immune disorders.

  11. Altered behavior and neural activity in conspecific cagemates co-housed with mouse models of brain disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hyunwoo; Jung, Seungmoon; Seo, Jinsoo; Khalid, Arshi; Yoo, Jung-Seok; Park, Jihyun; Kim, Soyun; Moon, Jangsup; Lee, Soon-Tae; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Chu, Kon; Lee, Sang Kun; Jeon, Daejong

    2016-09-01

    The psychosocial environment is one of the major contributors of social stress. Family members or caregivers who consistently communicate with individuals with brain disorders are considered at risk for physical and mental health deterioration, possibly leading to mental disorders. However, the underlying neural mechanisms of this phenomenon remain poorly understood. To address this, we developed a social stress paradigm in which a mouse model of epilepsy or depression was housed long-term (>4weeks) with normal conspecifics. We characterized the behavioral phenotypes and electrophysiologically investigated the neural activity of conspecific cagemate mice. The cagemates exhibited deficits in behavioral tasks assessing anxiety, locomotion, learning/memory, and depression-like behavior. Furthermore, they showed severe social impairment in social behavioral tasks involving social interaction or aggression. Strikingly, behavioral dysfunction remained in the cagemates 4weeks following co-housing cessation with the mouse models. In an electrophysiological study, the cagemates showed an increased number of spikes in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) neurons. Our results demonstrate that conspecifics co-housed with mouse models of brain disorders develop chronic behavioral dysfunctions, and suggest a possible association between abnormal mPFC neural activity and their behavioral pathogenesis. These findings contribute to the understanding of the psychosocial and psychiatric symptoms frequently present in families or caregivers of patients with brain disorders. PMID:27211331

  12. Progesterone regulates corticosterone elevation and alterations in spatial memory and exploratory behavior induced by stress in Wistar rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Diaz-Burke

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The hippocampus is sensitive to high levels of glucocorticoids during stress responses; it suffers biochemical and cellular changes that affect spatial memory and exploratory behavior, among others. We analyzed the influence of the neurosteroid progesterone (PROG on stress-induced changes in urinary corticosterone (CORT levels, spatial memory and exploratory behavior.Castrated adult male rats were implanted with PROG or vehicle (VEHI,and then exposed for ten days to chronic stress created by overcrowding or ultrasonic noise. PROG and CORT levels were assessed in urine using highperformanceliquid chromatography (HPLC. Implanted PROG inhibited the rise of stress-induced CORT, prevented spatial memory impairment in the Morris water maze, and eliminated increased exploratory behavior in the hole-board test. These results suggest a protective role of PROG, possibly mediated by its anxiolytic mechanisms, against corticosteroids elevation and the behavioral deficit generated by stressful situations.

  13. Performances of survival, feeding behavior, and gene expression in aphids reveal their different fitness to host alteration

    OpenAIRE

    Hong Lu; Pengcheng Yang; Yongyu Xu; Lan Luo; Junjie Zhu; Na Cui; Le Kang; Feng Cui

    2016-01-01

    Insect populations feeding on different plant species are under selection pressure to adapt to these differences. A study integrating elements of the ecology, behavior, and gene expression of aphids on different host plants has not yet been well-explored. The present study explores the relationship between host fitness and survival, feeding behavior, and salivary gland gene expression of a pea (Pisum sativum) host race of Acyrthosiphon pisum feeding on a common host Vicia faba and on three ge...

  14. Pre-stress performance in an instrumental training predict post-stress behavioral alterations in chronically stressed rats

    OpenAIRE

    Shigenobu Toda

    2015-01-01

    Stress is a major factor in the development of major depressive disorder (MDD), but few studies have assessed individual risk based on pre-stress traits. In this study, we employed appetitive instrumental lever pressing with a progressive ratio schedule to assess the individual pre-stress behavioral and cognitive traits in experimentally naïve Sprague–Dawley rats. Based on the behavioral data, the animals were classified into four subgroups (Low Motivation, Quick Learner, Slow Learner, and Hy...

  15. Progesterone regulates corticosterone elevation and alterations in spatial memory and exploratory behavior induced by stress in Wistar rats

    OpenAIRE

    Yolanda Diaz-Burke; Claudia Elena Gonzalez-Sandoval; Carlos Eduardo Valencia-Alfonso; Miguel Huerta; Xóchitl Trujillo; Lourdes Diaz; Joaquín García-Estrada; Sonia Luquín

    2010-01-01

    The hippocampus is sensitive to high levels of glucocorticoids during stress responses; it suffers biochemical and cellular changes that affect spatial memory and exploratory behavior, among others. We analyzed the influence of the neurosteroid progesterone (PROG) on stress-induced changes in urinary corticosterone (CORT) levels, spatial memory and exploratory behavior. Castrated adult male rats were implanted with PROG or vehicle (VEHI), and then exposed for ten days to chronic stress create...

  16. Reduced and Misexpression of 5-HT2 Receptors Alters Development, Behavior and CNS Activity in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.L. Cooper

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The misexpression as well as a knock down of the 5-HT2dro receptor produces slower body movements in larvae and altered development. When 1st instar larvae are raised with altered expression levels a high degree of death occurred. Exposure of the CNS to 5-HT in control larva increases motor unit excitability; however, when the 5-HT2dro expression is decreased the relative sensitivity to exogenously applied 5-HT is enhanced. This is likely a function of reduced basal CNS activity in this line. No change was observed for the strain with an over-expression compared to controls. Evoked sensory-CNS-motor circuits as well as spontaneous motor neuronal activity are also reduced. Like CNS activity, Heart Rate (HR in larva is sensitive to 5-HT. When the 1st instar to early 3rd instar were chronically reduced or misexpressed in the 5-HT receptor no alteration to 5-HT sensitivity on HR occurred, although the initial HR was lower in both strains as compared to wild type. Thus, a normal expression of the 5-HT2dro is required for development and CNS responsiveness to 5-HT, but this receptor subtype might not function in acute responsiveness of the heart to 5-HT, although the receptor has some effect on basal heart rate.

  17. Evaluation of potential gender-related differences in behavioral and cognitive alterations following pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus in C57BL/6 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Clarissa Vasconcelos de; Grigoletto, Jéssica; Funck, Vinícius Rafael; Ribeiro, Leandro Rodrigo; Royes, Luiz Fernando Freire; Fighera, Michele Rechia; Furian, Ana Flávia; Oliveira, Mauro Schneider

    2015-05-01

    Together with pharmacoresistant seizures, the quality of life of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients is negatively impacted by behavioral comorbidities including but not limited to depression, anxiety and cognitive deficits. The pilocarpine model of TLE has been widely used to study characteristics of human TLE, including behavioral comorbidities. Since the outcomes of pilocarpine-induced TLE might vary depending on several experimental factors, we sought to investigate potential gender-related differences regarding selected behavioral alterations in C57BL6 mice. We found that epileptic mice, independent of gender, displayed increased anxiety-like behavior in the open-field test. In the object recognition test, epileptic mice, regardless of gender, showed a decreased recognition index at 24 (but not at 4) hours after training. On the other hand, no significant differences were found regarding mice learning and memory performance in the Barnes maze paradigm. Motor coordination and balance as assessed by the beam walk and rotarod tests were not impaired in epileptic mice of both genders. However, female mice, independent of epilepsy, performed the beam walk and rotarod tasks better than their male counterparts. We also found that only male epileptic mice displayed disturbed behavior in the forced swim test, but the mice of both genders displayed anhedonia-like behavior in the taste preference test. Lastly, we found that the extent of hilar cell loss is similar in both genders. In summary, both genders can be successfully employed to study behavioral comorbidities of TLE; however, taking the potential gender differences into account may help choose the more appropriated gender for a given task, which may be of value for the minimization of the number of animals used during the experiments. PMID:25749198

  18. Avoidance Prone Individuals Self Reporting Behavioral Inhibition Exhibit Facilitated Acquisition and Altered Extinction of Conditioned Eyeblinks With Partial Reinforcement Schedules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Todd Allen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Avoidance in the face of novel situations or uncertainty is a prime feature of behavioral inhibition which has been put forth as a risk factor for the development of anxiety disorders. Recent work has found that behaviorally inhibited individuals acquire conditioned eyeblinks faster than non-inhibited individuals in omission and yoked paradigms in which the predictive relationship between the conditioned stimulus (CS and unconditional stimulus (US is less than optimal as compared to standard training with CS-US paired trials (Holloway et al., 2014. In the current study, we tested explicitly partial schedules in which half the trials were CS alone or US alone trials in addition to the standard CS-US paired trials. One hundred and forty nine college-aged undergraduates participated in the study. All participants completed the Adult Measure of Behavioral Inhibition (i.e., AMBI which was used to group participants as behaviorally inhibited and non-inhibited. Eyeblink conditioning consisted of 3 US alone trials, 60 acquisition trials, and 20 CS-alone extinction trials presented in one session. Conditioning stimuli were a 500 ms tone conditioned stimulus (CS and a 50-ms air puff unconditional stimulus (US. Behaviorally inhibited individuals receiving 50% partial reinforcement with CS alone or US alone trials produced facilitated acquisition as compared to non-inhibited individuals. A partial reinforcement extinction effect was evident with CS alone trials in behaviorally inhibited but not non-inhibited individuals. These current findings indicate that avoidance prone individuals self-reporting behavioral inhibition over-learn an association and are slow to extinguish conditioned responses when there is some level of uncertainty between paired trials and CS or US alone presentations.

  19. Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Behavioral Alterations Are Alleviated by Sodium Phenylbutyrate via Attenuation of Oxidative Stress and Neuroinflammatory Cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jangra, Ashok; Sriram, Chandra Shaker; Lahkar, Mangala

    2016-08-01

    Oxido-nitrosative stress, neuroinflammation, and reduced level of neurotrophins are implicated in the pathophysiology of anxiety and depressive illness. A few recent studies have revealed the role of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in the pathophysiology of stress and depression. The aim of the present study is to investigate the neuroprotective potential of sodium phenylbutyrate (SPB), an ER stress inhibitor against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced anxiety and depressive-like behavior in Swiss albino mice. Anxiety and depressive-like behavior was induced by LPS (0.83 mg/kg; i.p.) administration. Various behavioral tests were conducted to evaluate the anxiety and depressive-like behavior in mice. Real-time PCR was employed for the detection and expression of ER stress markers (78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78) and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein homologous protein (CHOP)). Pretreatment with SPB significantly ameliorated the LPS-induced anxiety and depressive-like behavior as revealed by behavioral paradigm results. LPS-induced oxidative stress was ameliorated by SPB pretreatment in hippocampus (HC) and prefrontal cortex (PFC) region. Neuroinflammation was significantly reduced by SPB pretreatment in LPS-treated mice as evident from reduction in proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β and TNF-α). Importantly, LPS administration significantly up-regulated the GRP78 mRNA expression level in the HC which suggests the involvement of unfolded protein response (UPR) in LPS-evoked behavioral anomalies. These results highlight the neuroprotective potential of SPB in LPS-induced anxiety and depressive illness model which may be partially due to inhibition of oxidative stress-neuroinflammatory cascade. PMID:27192986

  20. [Subpopulations and phagocytic activity of monocytes in chronic gastroduodenitis in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agafonova, E V; Malanicheva, T G; Denisova, S N

    2013-01-01

    There was conducted a study of the phagocytic activity, immunophenotype and peripheral blood monocytes by flow cytometry in children with chronic gastroduodenitis associated with Helicobacter pylori, as well as the association of Helicobacter pylori with fungi of the genus Candida and markers of secondary immune deficiency. The differential changes in the structure of circulating profile of monocytes were revealed, that indicate the pathogenetic significance of these disorders in chronic gastroduodenitis with H. pylori etiology, as well as at association of Helicobacter pylori with fungi of the genus Candida. Violations of the phagocytic activity of monocytes in chronic gastroduodenitis in children are associated with depression of different stages of phagocytosis--capture functions, mobilization, killing, intracellular biocidity. A severe depression in phagocytic activity of monocytes occurs in CGD associated with Hp and fungi of the genus Candida. PMID:24501955

  1. The redox-sensitive cation channel TRPM2 modulates phagocyte ROS production and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Anke; Gao, Xiao-Pei; Qian, Feng; Kawamura, Takeshi; Han, Jin; Hecquet, Claudie; Ye, Richard D; Vogel, Stephen M; Malik, Asrar B

    2012-01-01

    The NADPH oxidase activity of phagocytes and its generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is critical for host defense, but ROS overproduction can also lead to inflammation and tissue injury. Here we report that TRPM2, a nonselective and redox-sensitive cation channel, inhibited ROS production in phagocytic cells and prevented endotoxin-induced lung inflammation in mice. TRPM2-deficient mice challenged with endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide) had an enhanced inflammatory response and diminished survival relative to that of wild-type mice challenged with endotoxin. TRPM2 functioned by dampening NADPH oxidase-mediated ROS production through depolarization of the plasma membrane in phagocytes. As ROS also activate TRPM2, our findings establish a negative feedback mechanism for the inactivation of ROS production through inhibition of the membrane potential-sensitive NADPH oxidase. PMID:22101731

  2. The redox-sensitive cation channel TRPM2 modulates phagocyte ROS production and inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Anke; Gao, Xiao-Pei; Qian, Feng; Kawamura, Takeshi; Han, Jin; Hecquet, Claudie; Ye, Richard D.; Vogel, Stephen M.; Malik, Asrar B.

    2011-01-01

    The NADPH oxidase activity of phagocytes and its generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is critical for host-defense, but ROS overproduction can also lead to inflammation and tissue injury. Here we report that TRPM2, a non-selective and redox-sensitive cation channel, inhibits ROS production in phagocytic cells and prevents endotoxin-induced lung inflammation in mice. TRPM2-deficient mice challenged with endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide) showed an increased inflammatory signature and decreased survival compared to controls. TRPM2 functions by dampening NADPH oxidase-mediated ROS production through depolarization of the plasma membrane in phagocytes. Since ROS also activates TRPM2, our findings establish a negative feedback mechanism inactivating ROS production through inhibition of the membrane potential-sensitive NADPH oxidase. PMID:22101731

  3. In vitro phagocytosis and intracellular survival of Campylobacter jejuni with phagocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiehlbauch, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    In vitro phagocytosis and intracellular survival of Campylobacter jejuni was studied using three types of mononuclear phagocytes: a J774G8 peritoneal macrophage line, resident BABL/c peritoneal macrophages and human peripheral blood monocytes. In phagocytosis assays using CFU determinations, phagocytosis increased steadily over an 8 hr time period. Results obtained using a /sup 51/Cr assay indicated no consistent significant difference between phagocytosis of C. jejuni between the three mononuclear phagocytes or PMN's and that maximum infection occurred prior to 0.5 hr and maintained throughout the 4 hr assay. Further investigation of the mechanism of attachment and entry of C. jejuni revealed this process required the expenditure of energy by the phagocyte, but was not inhibited by inhibitors of microfilament functions. In addition, phagocytosis was enhanced by the presence of 20% FCS,

  4. Interactions of phagocytes with the Lyme disease spirochete: role of the Fc receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benach, J.L.; Fleit, H.B.; Habicht, G.S.; Coleman, J.L.; Bosler, E.M.; Lane, B.P.

    1984-10-01

    The phagocytic capacity of murine and human mononuclear and polymorphonuclear phagocytes (including peripheral blood monocytes and neutrophils), rabbit and murine peritoneal exudate cells, and the murine macrophage cell line P388D1 against the Lyme disease spirochete was studied. All of these cells were capable of phagocytosing the spirochete; phagocytosis was measured by the uptake of radiolabeled spirochetes, the appearance of immunofluorescent bodies in phagocytic cells, and electron microscopy. Both opsonized and nonopsonized organisms were phagocytosed. The uptake of opsonized organisms by neutrophils was blocked by a monoclonal antibody specific for the Fc receptor and by immune complexes; these findings suggested that most phagocytosis is mediated by the Fc receptor. Similarly, the uptake of opsonized organisms by human monocytes was inhibited by human monomeric IgG1 and by immune complexes. These results illustrate the role of immune phagocytosis of spirochetes in host defense against Lyme disease.

  5. Interactions of phagocytes with the Lyme disease spirochete: role of the Fc receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The phagocytic capacity of murine and human mononuclear and polymorphonuclear phagocytes (including peripheral blood monocytes and neutrophils), rabbit and murine peritoneal exudate cells, and the murine macrophage cell line P388D1 against the Lyme disease spirochete was studied. All of these cells were capable of phagocytosing the spirochete; phagocytosis was measured by the uptake of radiolabeled spirochetes, the appearance of immunofluorescent bodies in phagocytic cells, and electron microscopy. Both opsonized and nonopsonized organisms were phagocytosed. The uptake of opsonized organisms by neutrophils was blocked by a monoclonal antibody specific for the Fc receptor and by immune complexes; these findings suggested that most phagocytosis is mediated by the Fc receptor. Similarly, the uptake of opsonized organisms by human monocytes was inhibited by human monomeric IgG1 and by immune complexes. These results illustrate the role of immune phagocytosis of spirochetes in host defense against Lyme disease

  6. The perivascular phagocyte of the mouse pineal gland: An antigen-presenting cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Morten; Rath, Martin F; Klein, David C

    2006-01-01

    The perivascular space of the rat pineal gland is known to contain phagocytic cells that are immunoreactive for leukocyte antigens, and thus they appear to belong to the macrophage/microglial cell line. These cells also contain MHC class II proteins. We investigated this cell type in the pineal...... gland of mice. Actively phagocytosing cells with a prominent lysosomal system were found in the pericapillary spaces of the mouse pineal gland following intravenous injection of horseradish peroxidase. The cells also exhibited strong acid phosphatase activity. Perivascular cells were immunopositive for...... MHC class II protein and for CD68, a marker of monocytes/phagocytes. This study verifies that perivascular phagocytes with antigen-presenting properties are present in the mouse pineal gland....

  7. Surface modification of nanoparticles enables selective evasion of phagocytic clearance by distinct macrophage phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qie, Yaqing; Yuan, Hengfeng; von Roemeling, Christina A.; Chen, Yuanxin; Liu, Xiujie; Shih, Kevin D.; Knight, Joshua A.; Tun, Han W.; Wharen, Robert E.; Jiang, Wen; Kim, Betty Y. S.

    2016-05-01

    Nanomedicine is a burgeoning industry but an understanding of the interaction of nanomaterials with the immune system is critical for clinical translation. Macrophages play a fundamental role in the immune system by engulfing foreign particulates such as nanoparticles. When activated, macrophages form distinct phenotypic populations with unique immune functions, however the mechanism by which these polarized macrophages react to nanoparticles is unclear. Furthermore, strategies to selectively evade activated macrophage subpopulations are lacking. Here we demonstrate that stimulated macrophages possess higher phagocytic activities and that classically activated (M1) macrophages exhibit greater phagocytic capacity than alternatively activated (M2) macrophages. We show that modification of nanoparticles with polyethylene-glycol results in decreased clearance by all macrophage phenotypes, but importantly, coating nanoparticles with CD47 preferentially lowers phagocytic activity by the M1 phenotype. These results suggest that bio-inspired nanoparticle surface design may enable evasion of specific components of the immune system and provide a rational approach for developing immune tolerant nanomedicines.

  8. Radiometric method for determination of phagocytic activity of macrophages in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors describe a radiometric method for determination of phagocytic activity of macrophages, using as an object for phaging hen erythrocytes labelled with chromium 51. The basic principle consists of quantitative determination of phaged cells by means of measuring the activity, found in the phagocytes. The method is described in details and the obtained results in normal mice and such with experimental leucosis NKLy are compared with those, checked by the classi--cal methods for determining phagocytic activity in vivo and in vitro. On the basis of these data the authors indicate the advantages of the method, prepared by them, because it allows objective checking of phagocytosis on a large number of cells and thus increased the possibilities of obtaining significant results. (author)

  9. Corticosterone in ovo modifies aggressive behaviors and reproductive performances through alterations of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in the chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Abdelkareem A; Ma, Wenqiang; Ni, Yingdong; Wang, Song; Zhao, Ruqian

    2014-05-01

    Exposure to excess glucocorticoids during embryonic development affects offspring reproduction and suppresses the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis in mammals. However, whether corticosterone (CORT) causes similar effects in the chicken remains unclear. In the present study, we injected low (0.2μg) and high (1μg) doses of CORT in ovo before incubation and detected changes in aggressive behavior, tonic immobility (TI), reproductive performances, and HPG axis gene expression in posthatch chickens of different ages. High dose of CORT suppressed growth rate from 3 weeks of age, increased the frequency of aggressive behaviors, which was associated with elevated plasma CORT concentration. High-dose CORT significantly (PGnRH1), while significantly (Pchicken through alterations of HPG axis. PMID:24630043

  10. The Utility of Impulsive Bias and Altered Decision Making as Predictors of Drug Efficacy and Target Selection: Rethinking Behavioral Screening for Antidepressant Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, Gerard J; Day, Mark; Hudzik, Thomas J

    2016-03-01

    Cognitive dysfunction may be a core feature of major depressive disorder, including affective processing bias, abnormal response to negative feedback, changes in decision making, and increased impulsivity. Accordingly, a translational medicine paradigm predicts clinical action of novel antidepressants by examining drug-induced changes in affective processing bias. With some exceptions, these concepts have not been systematically applied to preclinical models to test new chemical entities. The purpose of this review is to examine whether an empirically derived behavioral screen for antidepressant drugs may screen for compounds, at least in part, by modulating an impulsive biasing of responding and altered decision making. The differential-reinforcement-of-low-rate (DRL) 72-second schedule is an operant schedule with a documented fidelity for discriminating antidepressant drugs from nonantidepressant drugs. However, a theoretical basis for this empirical relationship has been lacking. Therefore, this review will discuss whether response bias toward impulsive behavior may be a critical screening characteristic of DRL behavior requiring long inter-response times to obtain rewards. This review will compare and contrast DRL behavior with the five-choice serial reaction time task, a test specifically designed for assessing motoric impulsivity, with respect to psychopharmacological testing and the neural basis of distributed macrocircuits underlying these tasks. This comparison suggests that the existing empirical basis for the DRL 72-second schedule as a pharmacological screen for antidepressant drugs is complemented by a novel hypothesis that altering impulsive response bias for rodents trained on this operant schedule is a previously unrecognized theoretical cornerstone for this screening paradigm. PMID:26699144

  11. Gestational and early postnatal hypothyroidism alters VGluT1 and VGAT bouton distribution in the neocortex and hippocampus, and behavior in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela eNavarro

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid hormones are fundamental for the expression of genes involved in the development of the CNS and their deficiency is associated with a wide spectrum of neurological diseases including mental retardation, attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder and autism spectrum disorders. We examined in rat whether developmental and early postnatal hypothyroidism affects the distribution of vesicular glutamate transporter-1 (VGluT1; glutamatergic and vesicular inhibitory amino acid transporter (VGAT; GABAergic immunoreactive (ir boutons in the hippocampus and somatosensory cortex, and the behavior of the pups. Hypothyroidism was induced by adding 0.02% methimazole (MMI and 1% KClO4 to the drinking water starting at embryonic day 10 (E10; developmental hypothyroidism and E21 (early postnatal hypothyroidism until day of sacrifice at postnatal day 50. Behavior was studied using the acoustic prepulse inhibition (somatosensory attention and the elevated plus-maze (anxiety-like assessment tests. The distribution, density and size of VGlut1-ir and VGAT-ir boutons in the hippocampus and somatosensory cortex was abnormal in MMI pups and these changes correlate with behavioral changes, as prepulse inhibition of the startle response amplitude was reduced, and the percentage of time spent in open arms increased. In conclusion, both developmental and early postnatal hypothyroidism significantly decreases the ratio of GABAergic to glutamatergic boutons in dentate gyrus leading to an abnormal flow of information to the hippocampus and infragranular layers of the somatosensory cortex, and alter behavior in rats. Our data show cytoarchitectonic alterations in the basic excitatory hippocampal loop, and in local inhibitory circuits of the somatosensory cortex and hippocampus that might contribute to the delayed neurocognitive outcome observed in thyroid hormone deficient children born in iodine deficient areas, or suffering from congenital hypothyroidism.

  12. Orbitofrontal cortex 5-HT2A receptor mediates chronic stress-induced depressive-like behaviors and alterations of spine density and Kalirin7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chang; Ma, Xin-Ming; Chen, Hui-Bin; Zhou, Meng-He; Qiao, Hui; An, Shu-Cheng

    2016-10-01

    Neuroimaging studies show that patients with major depression have reduced volume of the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC). Although the serotonin (5-HT) 2A receptor, which is abundant in the OFC, has been implicated in depression, the underlying mechanisms in the development of stress-induced depression remain unclear. Kalirin-7 (Kal7) is an essential component of mature excitatory synapses for maintaining dendritic spines density, size and synaptic functions. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of orbitofrontal 5-HT and 5-HT2A receptors in depressive-like behaviors and their associations with Kal7 and dendritic spines using chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS), an established animal model of depression. CUMS had no effect on the levels of 5-HT or the 5-HT2A receptor in the OFC. However, CUMS or microinjection of the 5-HT2A/2C receptor agonist (±)-1-(2, 5-Dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)- 2-aminopropane hydrochloride (DOI, 5 μg/0.5 μL) into the OFC induced depressive-like behaviors, including anhedonia in the sucrose preference test and behavioral despair in the tail suspension test, a significant reduction in body weight gain and locomotor activity in the open field test, which were accompanied by decreased expression of Kal7 and PSD95 as well as decreased density of dendritic spines in the OFC. These alterations induced by CUMS were reversed by pretreatment with the 5-HT2A receptor antagonist Ketanserin (Ket, 5 μg/0.5 μL into the OFC). These results suggest that CUMS alters structural plasticity through activation of the orbital 5-HT2A receptor and is associated with decreased expression of Kal7, thereby resulting in depressive-like behaviors in rats, suggesting an important role of Kal7 in the OFC in depression. PMID:26921771

  13. Aggregation of sea urchin phagocytes is augmented in vitro by lipopolysaccharide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey J Majeske

    Full Text Available Development of protocols and media for culturing immune cells from marine invertebrates has not kept pace with advancements in mammalian immune cell culture, the latter having been driven by the need to understand the causes of and develop therapies for human and animal diseases. However, expansion of the aquaculture industry and the diseases that threaten these systems creates the need to develop cell and tissue culture methods for marine invertebrates. Such methods will enable us to better understand the causes of disease outbreaks and to develop means to avoid and remedy epidemics. We report a method for the short-term culture of phagocytes from the purple sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, by modifying an approach previously used to culture cells from another sea urchin species. The viability of cultured phagocytes from the purple sea urchin decreases from 91.6% to 57% over six days and phagocyte morphology changes from single cells to aggregates leading to the formation of syncytia-like structures. This process is accelerated in the presence of lipopolysaccharide suggesting that phagocytes are capable of detecting this molecular pattern in culture conditions. Sea urchin immune response proteins, called Sp185/333, are expressed on the surface of a subset of phagocytes and have been associated with syncytia-like structures. We evaluated their expression in cultured phagocytes to determine their possible role in cell aggregation and in the formation of syncytia-like structures. Between 0 and 3 hr, syncytia-like structures were observed in cultures when only ~10% of the cells were positive for Sp185/333 proteins. At 24 hr, ~90% of the nuclei were Sp185/333-positive when all of the phagocytes had aggregated into syncytia-like structures. Consequently, we conclude that the Sp185/333 proteins do not have a major role in initiating the aggregation of cultured phagocytes, however the Sp185/333 proteins are associated with the clustered

  14. Whole-blood phagocytic and bactericidal activities of atomic bomb survivors, Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This in vitro study evaluated the phagocytic and bactericidal activities of leukocytes in aliquots of whole blood from Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors for Staphylococcus aureus. The data were analyzed by multiple linear regression. Any significant effects of exposure to A-bomb radiation could not be detected for both phagocytic and bactericidal activities of whole blood from A-bomb survivors. In addition, there were no significant effects of age categories, sex or city, except in neutrophil counts. (J.P.N.)

  15. Ethanol during adolescence decreased the BDNF levels in the hippocampus in adult male Wistar rats, but did not alter aggressive and anxiety-like behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Scheidt

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective:To investigate the effects of ethanol exposure in adolescent rats during adulthood by assesssing aggression and anxiety-like behaviors and measuring the levels of inflammatory markers.Methods:Groups of male Wistar rats (mean weight 81.4 g, n = 36 were housed in groups of four until postnatal day (PND 60. From PNDs 30 to 46, rats received one of three treatments: 3 g/kg of ethanol (15% w/v, orally, n = 16, 1.5 g/kg of ethanol (12.5% w/v, PO, n = 12, or water (n = 12 every 48 hours. Animals were assessed for aggressive behavior (resident x intruder test and anxiety-like behaviors (elevated plus maze during adulthood.Results:Animals that received low doses of alcohol showed reduced levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in the hippocampus as compared to the control group. No significant difference was found in prefrontal cortex.Conclusions:Intermittent exposure to alcohol during adolescence is associated with lower levels of BDNF in the hippocampus, probably due the episodic administration of alcohol, but alcohol use did not alter the level agression toward a male intruder or anxiety-like behaviors during the adult phase.

  16. Altered Circulating Levels of Serotonin and Immunological Changes in Laying Hens Divergently Selected for Feather Pecking Behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buitenhuis, Albert Johannes; Kjaer, Jørgen B.; Labouriau, Rodrigo;

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in immunological parameters as well as changes with respect to plasma levels of serotonin and tryptophan in lines selected for and against feather pecking (FP) behavior [high FP (HP) line and low FP (LP) line] for 5 generations. The hens from the...

  17. Elevated copper levels during larval development cause altered locomotor behavior in the adult carabid beetle Pterostichus cupreus L. (Coleoptera: Carbidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bayley, M; Baatrup, E; Heimbach, U;

    1995-01-01

    effect the emergence weights of adults of either sex. This toxic effect on the larvae was preserved through pupation to the surviving adults, which were normal in size and appearance, but displayed a dramatically depressed locomotor behavior. Copper analysis of these adults revealed that copper levels...

  18. Pre-stress performance in an instrumental training predict post-stress behavioral alterations in chronically stressed rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshio eIguchi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Stress is a major factor in the development of major depressive disorder (MDD, but few studies have assessed individual risk based on pre-stress traits. In this study, we employed appetitive instrumental lever pressing with a progressive ratio schedule to assess the individual pre-stress behavioral and cognitive traits in experimentally naïve Sprague–Dawley rats. Based on the behavioral data, the animals were classified into four subgroups (Low Motivation, Quick Learner, Slow Learner, and Hypermotivation, and exposed to chronic unpredictable stress (CUS before monitoring their post-stress responses once each week for 4 weeks to identify early- and late-appearing CUS-induced behavioral phenotypes. The four subgroups exhibited different behavioral phenotypes after CUS. Therefore, we identified distinct relationships between pre-stress traits and the post-stress phenotypes in each subgroup. In addition, many of the CUS-induced phenotypes in rats corresponded to symptoms in human MDD or they had putative relationships with them. We concluded that the consequences of stress may be predicted before stress exposure by determining the pre-stress traits of each individual.

  19. Embryonic GABA(B receptor blockade alters cell migration, adult hypothalamic structure, and anxiety- and depression-like behaviors sex specifically in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew S Stratton

    Full Text Available Neurons of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN regulate the hypothalamic- pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis and the autonomic nervous system. Females lacking functional GABA(B receptors because of a genetic disruption of the R1 subunit have altered cellular characteristics in and around the PVN at birth. The genetic disruption precluded appropriate assessments of physiology or behavior in adulthood. The current study was conducted to test the long term impact of a temporally restricting pharmacological blockade of the GABA(B receptor to a 7-day critical period (E11-E17 during embryonic development. Experiments tested the role of GABA(B receptor signaling in fetal development of the PVN and later adult capacities for adult stress related behaviors and physiology. In organotypic slices containing fetal PVN, there was a female specific, 52% increase in cell movement speeds with GABA(B receptor antagonist treatment that was consistent with a sex-dependent lateral displacement of cells in vivo following 7 days of fetal exposure to GABA(B receptor antagonist. Anxiety-like and depression-like behaviors, open-field activity, and HPA mediated responses to restraint stress were measured in adult offspring of mothers treated with GABA(B receptor antagonist. Embryonic exposure to GABA(B receptor antagonist resulted in reduced HPA axis activation following restraint stress and reduced depression-like behaviors. There was also increased anxiety-like behavior selectively in females and hyperactivity in males. A sex dependent response to disruptions of GABA(B receptor signaling was identified for PVN formation and key aspects of physiology and behavior. These changes correspond to sex specific prevalence in similar human disorders, namely anxiety disorders and hyperactivity.

  20. Embryonic GABAB Receptor Blockade Alters Cell Migration, Adult Hypothalamic Structure, and Anxiety- and Depression-Like Behaviors Sex Specifically in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratton, Matthew S.; Staros, Michelle; Budefeld, Tomaz; Searcy, Brian T.; Nash, Connor; Eitel, Chad; Carbone, David; Handa, Robert J.; Majdic, Gregor; Tobet, Stuart A.

    2014-01-01

    Neurons of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) regulate the hypothalamic- pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the autonomic nervous system. Females lacking functional GABAB receptors because of a genetic disruption of the R1 subunit have altered cellular characteristics in and around the PVN at birth. The genetic disruption precluded appropriate assessments of physiology or behavior in adulthood. The current study was conducted to test the long term impact of a temporally restricting pharmacological blockade of the GABAB receptor to a 7-day critical period (E11–E17) during embryonic development. Experiments tested the role of GABAB receptor signaling in fetal development of the PVN and later adult capacities for adult stress related behaviors and physiology. In organotypic slices containing fetal PVN, there was a female specific, 52% increase in cell movement speeds with GABAB receptor antagonist treatment that was consistent with a sex-dependent lateral displacement of cells in vivo following 7 days of fetal exposure to GABAB receptor antagonist. Anxiety-like and depression-like behaviors, open-field activity, and HPA mediated responses to restraint stress were measured in adult offspring of mothers treated with GABAB receptor antagonist. Embryonic exposure to GABAB receptor antagonist resulted in reduced HPA axis activation following restraint stress and reduced depression-like behaviors. There was also increased anxiety-like behavior selectively in females and hyperactivity in males. A sex dependent response to disruptions of GABAB receptor signaling was identified for PVN formation and key aspects of physiology and behavior. These changes correspond to sex specific prevalence in similar human disorders, namely anxiety disorders and hyperactivity. PMID:25162235

  1. Embryonic GABA(B) receptor blockade alters cell migration, adult hypothalamic structure, and anxiety- and depression-like behaviors sex specifically in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratton, Matthew S; Staros, Michelle; Budefeld, Tomaz; Searcy, Brian T; Nash, Connor; Eitel, Chad; Carbone, David; Handa, Robert J; Majdic, Gregor; Tobet, Stuart A

    2014-01-01

    Neurons of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) regulate the hypothalamic- pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the autonomic nervous system. Females lacking functional GABA(B) receptors because of a genetic disruption of the R1 subunit have altered cellular characteristics in and around the PVN at birth. The genetic disruption precluded appropriate assessments of physiology or behavior in adulthood. The current study was conducted to test the long term impact of a temporally restricting pharmacological blockade of the GABA(B) receptor to a 7-day critical period (E11-E17) during embryonic development. Experiments tested the role of GABA(B) receptor signaling in fetal development of the PVN and later adult capacities for adult stress related behaviors and physiology. In organotypic slices containing fetal PVN, there was a female specific, 52% increase in cell movement speeds with GABA(B) receptor antagonist treatment that was consistent with a sex-dependent lateral displacement of cells in vivo following 7 days of fetal exposure to GABA(B) receptor antagonist. Anxiety-like and depression-like behaviors, open-field activity, and HPA mediated responses to restraint stress were measured in adult offspring of mothers treated with GABA(B) receptor antagonist. Embryonic exposure to GABA(B) receptor antagonist resulted in reduced HPA axis activation following restraint stress and reduced depression-like behaviors. There was also increased anxiety-like behavior selectively in females and hyperactivity in males. A sex dependent response to disruptions of GABA(B) receptor signaling was identified for PVN formation and key aspects of physiology and behavior. These changes correspond to sex specific prevalence in similar human disorders, namely anxiety disorders and hyperactivity. PMID:25162235

  2. Subchronic treatment with phencyclidine in adolescence leads to impaired exploratory behavior in adult rats without altering social interaction or N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor binding levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metaxas, A; Willems, R; Kooijman, E J M; Renjaän, V A; Klein, P J; Windhorst, A D; Donck, L Ver; Leysen, J E; Berckel, B N M van

    2014-11-01

    Although both the onset of schizophrenia and human phencyclidine (PCP) abuse typically present within the interval from adolescence to early adulthood, the majority of preclinical research employing the PCP model of schizophrenia has been conducted on neonatal or adult animals. The present study was designed to evaluate the behavioral and neurochemical sequelae of subchronic exposure to PCP in adolescence. Male 35-42-day-old Sprague Dawley rats were subcutaneously administered either saline (10 ml · kg(-1) ) or PCP hydrochloride (10 mg · kg(-1) ) once daily for a period of 14 days (n = 6/group). The animals were allowed to withdraw from treatment for 2 weeks, and their social and exploratory behaviors were subsequently assessed in adulthood by using the social interaction test. To examine the effects of adolescent PCP administration on the regulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs), quantitative autoradiography was performed on brain sections of adult, control and PCP-withdrawn rats by using 20 nM (3) H-MK-801. Prior subchronic exposure to PCP in adolescence had no enduring effects on the reciprocal contact and noncontact social behavior of adult rats. Spontaneous rearing in response to the novel testing arena and time spent investigating its walls and floor were reduced in PCP-withdrawn animals compared with control. The long-term behavioral effects of PCP occurred in the absence of persistent deficits in spontaneous locomotion or self-grooming activity and were not mediated by altered NMDAR density. Our results document differential effects of adolescent PCP administration on the social and exploratory behaviors of adult rats, suggesting that distinct neurobiological mechanisms are involved in mediating these behaviors. PMID:24953757

  3. Prenatal exposure to moderate levels of ethanol alters social behavior in adult rats: Relationship to structural plasticity and immediate early gene expression in frontal cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Derek A.; Akers, Katherine G.; Rice, James P.; Johnson, Travis E.; Candelaria-Cook, Felicha T.; Maes, Levi I.; Rosenberg, Martina; Valenzuela, C. Fernando; Savage, Daniel D.

    2009-01-01

    The goals of the present study were to characterize the effects of prenatal exposure to moderate levels of ethanol on adult social behavior, and to evaluate fetal-ethanol-related effects on dendritic morphology, structural plasticity and activity-related immediate early gene (IEG) expression in the agranular insular (AID) and prelimbic (Cg3) regions of frontal cortex. Baseline fetal-ethanol-related alterations in social behavior were limited to reductions in social investigation in males. Repeated experience with novel cage-mates resulted in comparable increases in wrestling and social investigation among saccharin- and ethanol-exposed females, whereas social behavioral effects among males were more evident in ethanol-exposed animals. Male ethanol-exposed rats also displayed profound increases in wrestling when social interaction was motivated by 24 hours of isolation. Baseline decreases in dendritic length and spine density in AID were observed in ethanol-exposed rats that were always housed with the same cage-mate. Modest experience-related decreases in dendritic length and spine density in AID were observed in saccharin-exposed rats housed with various cage-mates. In contrast, fetal-ethanol-exposed rats displayed experience-related increases in dendritic length in AID, and no experience-related changes in spine density. The only effect observed in Cg3 was a baseline increase in basilar dendritic length among male ethanol-exposed rats. Robust increases in activity-related IEG expression in AID (c-fos and Arc) and Cg3 (c-fos) were observed following social interaction in saccharin-exposed rats, however, activity-related increases in IEG expression were not observed in fetal-ethanol-exposed rats in either region. The results indicate that deficits in social behavior are among the long-lasting behavioral consequences of moderate ethanol exposure during brain development, and implicate AID, and to a lesser degree Cg3, in fetal-ethanol-related social behavior

  4. Dietary Restriction Mitigates Cocaine-Induced Alterations of Olfactory Bulb Cellular Plasticity and Gene Expression, and Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Xiangru; Mughal, Mohamed R.; Hall, F. Scott; Perona, Maria T. G.; Pistell, Paul J.; Lathia, Justin D.; Chigurupati, Srinivasulu; Becker, Kevin G.; Ladenheim, Bruce; Niklason, Laura E.; Uhl, George R; Cadet, Jean Lud; Mattson, Mark P.

    2010-01-01

    Because the olfactory system plays a major role in food consumption, and because “food addiction” and associated morbidities have reached epidemic proportions, we tested the hypothesis that dietary energy restriction can modify adverse effects of cocaine on behavior and olfactory cellular and molecular plasticity. Mice maintained on an alternate day fasting (ADF) diet exhibited increased baseline locomotion and increased cocaine-sensitized locomotion during cocaine conditioning, despite no ch...

  5. Anhedonic behavior in cryptochrome 2-deficient mice is paralleled by altered diurnal patterns of amygdala gene expression

    OpenAIRE

    Savalli, Giorgia; Diao, Weifei; Berger, Stefanie; Ronovsky, Marianne; Partonen, Timo; Pollak, Daniela D.

    2015-01-01

    Mood disorders are frequently paralleled by disturbances in circadian rhythm-related physiological and behavioral states and genetic variants of clock genes have been associated with depression. Cryptochrome 2 (Cry2) is one of the core components of the molecular circadian machinery which has been linked to depression, both, in patients suffering from the disease and animal models of the disorder. Despite this circumstantial evidence, a direct causal relationship between Cry2 expression and d...

  6. Performances of survival, feeding behavior, and gene expression in aphids reveal their different fitness to host alteration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hong; Yang, Pengcheng; Xu, Yongyu; Luo, Lan; Zhu, Junjie; Cui, Na; Kang, Le; Cui, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Insect populations feeding on different plant species are under selection pressure to adapt to these differences. A study integrating elements of the ecology, behavior, and gene expression of aphids on different host plants has not yet been well-explored. The present study explores the relationship between host fitness and survival, feeding behavior, and salivary gland gene expression of a pea (Pisum sativum) host race of Acyrthosiphon pisum feeding on a common host Vicia faba and on three genetically-related hosts (Vicia villosa, Medicago truncatula, and Medicago sativa). Life table data indicated that aphids on non-favored hosts exhibited small size, low reproduction rate, slow population increase and individual development, and long lifespan. Electrical penetration graph results showed that the aphids spent significantly less time in passive ingestion of phloem sap on all non-preferred host plants before acclimation. After a period of acclimation on M. truncatula and V. villosa, pea host race individuals showed improved feeding behavior. No individuals of the pea host race completed its life history on M. sativa. Interestingly, the number of host-specific differentially-expressed salivary gland genes was negatively correlated with the fitness of aphids on this host plant. This study provided important cues in host plant specialization in aphids. PMID:26758247

  7. Effects of enriched environment on alterations in the prefrontal cortex GFAP- and S100B-immunopositive astrocytes and behavioral deficits in MK-801-treated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahati, M; Nozari, M; Eslami, H; Shabani, M; Basiri, M

    2016-06-21

    A plethora of studies have indicated that enriched environment (EE) paradigm provokes plastic and morphological changes in astrocytes with accompanying increments of their density and positively affects the behavior of rodents. We also previously documented that EE could be employed to preclude several behavioral abnormalities, mainly cognitive deficits, attributed to postnatal N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist (MK-801) treatment, as a rodent model of schizophrenia (SCH) aspects. Given this, the current study quantitatively investigated the number of cells, presumed to be astrocytes, expressing two astroglia-associated proteins (S100B and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)) by immunohistochemistry in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), along with anxiety and passive avoidance (PA) learning behaviors by utilizing elevated plus maze (EPM) and shuttle-box tests, in MK-801-treated male wistar rats submitted to EE and non-EE rats. Following a treatment regime of sub-chronic MK-801 (1.0mg/kg i.p. daily for five consecutive days from postnatal day (P) 6), S-100B-positive cells and anxiety level were markedly increased, while the GFAP-positive cells and PA learning were notably attenuated. The trend of diminished GFAP-immunopositive cells and elevated S100B-immunostained cells in the PFC was reversed in the SCH-like rats by exposure of animals to EE, commencing from birth up to the time of experiments on P28-85. Additionally, EE exhibited an ameliorating effect on the behavioral abnormalities evoked by MK-801. Overall, present findings support that improper astrocyte functioning and behavioral changes, reminiscent of the many facets of SCH, occur consequential to repetitive administration of MK-801 and that raising rat pups in an EE mitigates these alterations. PMID:27063100

  8. Ischemia/reperfusion ů The role of phagocyte-derived reactive oxygen species in rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Papežíková, I.; Čížová, Hana; Lojek, Antonín; Číž, Milan

    Brno, 2003. s. -. [European Workshop on the Analysis of Phagocyte Functions /1./. 07.09.2003-09.09.2003, Brno] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA524/01/1219 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Keywords : ischemia/reperfusion * rat * TRAP Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  9. Myeloperoxidase-dependent lipid peroxidation promotes the oxidative modification of cytosolic proteins in phagocytic neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkie-Grantham, Rachel P; Magon, Nicholas J; Harwood, D Tim; Kettle, Anthony J; Vissers, Margreet C; Winterbourn, Christine C; Hampton, Mark B

    2015-04-10

    Phagocytic neutrophils generate reactive oxygen species to kill microbes. Oxidant generation occurs within an intracellular phagosome, but diffusible species can react with the neutrophil and surrounding tissue. To investigate the extent of oxidative modification, we assessed the carbonylation of cytosolic proteins in phagocytic neutrophils. A 4-fold increase in protein carbonylation was measured within 15 min of initiating phagocytosis. Carbonylation was dependent on NADPH oxidase and myeloperoxidase activity and was inhibited by butylated hydroxytoluene and Trolox, indicating a role for myeloperoxidase-dependent lipid peroxidation. Proteomic analysis of target proteins revealed significant carbonylation of the S100A9 subunit of calprotectin, a truncated form of Hsp70, actin, and hemoglobin from contaminating erythrocytes. The addition of the reactive aldehyde 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) caused carbonylation, and HNE-glutathione adducts were detected in the cytosol of phagocytic neutrophils. The post-translational modification of neutrophil proteins will influence the functioning and fate of these immune cells in the period following phagocytic activation, and provides a marker of neutrophil activation during infection and inflammation. PMID:25697357

  10. Pheniramines and oxidative burst of blood phagocytes during ischaemia/reperfusion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nosál, R.; Jančinová, V.; Nosálová, V.; Perečko, T.; Číž, Milan; Lojek, Antonín

    Stockholm, 2008. s. 62. [European Histamine Research Society, XXXVIIth Meeting. 07.05.2008-10.05.2008, Stockholm] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : pheniramines * phagocytes * ischemia /reperfusion Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  11. Pheniramines and oxidative burst of blood phagocytes during ischaemia/reperfusion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nosál, R.; Jančinová, V.; Nosálová, V.; Perečko, T.; Číž, Milan; Lojek, Antonín

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 1 (2009), S66-S67. ISSN 1023-3830 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : oxidative burst * phagocytes * pheniramines Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.586, year: 2009

  12. Effect of H1-antihistamines on the oxidative burst of rat phagocytes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Králová, Jana; Číž, Milan; Nosál, R.; Drábiková, K.; Lojek, Antonín

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 1 (2006), S15-S16. ISSN 1023-3830 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/04/0896 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507 Keywords : H1-antihistamines * reactive oxygen species * phagocytes Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.485, year: 2006

  13. The Effect of Bacteriophage Preparations on Intracellular Killing of Bacteria by Phagocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Jończyk-Matysiak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular killing of bacteria is one of the fundamental mechanisms against invading pathogens. Impaired intracellular killing of bacteria by phagocytes may be the reason of chronic infections and may be caused by antibiotics or substances that can be produced by some bacteria. Therefore, it was of great practical importance to examine whether phage preparations may influence the process of phagocyte intracellular killing of bacteria. It may be important especially in the case of patients qualified for experimental phage therapy (approximately half of the patients with chronic bacterial infections have their immunity impaired. Our analysis included 51 patients with chronic Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial infections treated with phage preparations at the Phage Therapy Unit in Wroclaw. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of experimental phage therapy on intracellular killing of bacteria by patients’ peripheral blood monocytes and polymorphonuclear neutrophils. We observed that phage therapy does not reduce patients’ phagocytes’ ability to kill bacteria, and it does not affect the activity of phagocytes in patients with initially reduced ability to kill bacteria intracellularly. Our results suggest that experimental phage therapy has no significant adverse effects on the bactericidal properties of phagocytes, which confirms the safety of the therapy.

  14. Evolution of phagocytic function in monocytes and neutrophils blood cells of healthy calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Camila F; Blagitz, Maiara G; Bertagnon, Heloisa G; Gomes, Renata C; Santos, Kamila R; Della Libera, Alice M M P

    2015-12-01

    The immune system of newborn calves is immature and must mature gradually. Understanding how this immunity is established may define different profiles. Twelve healthy calves were monitored during 8 time periods to assess the innate immune system during the first 90d. Blood samples were collected, and the blood phagocytes, identified by the expression of CD14 and CH138 surface molecules, were evaluated for phagocytic functionality (Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli stained with propidium iodide) and the intracellular production of reactive oxygen species (2,7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate oxidation). Functional changes in the CD14+ and CH138+ cells occurred at 40d of age, with sporadic increases in phagocytosis intensity and reactive oxygen species production, and decreased phagocytosis occurred at 60d of age. Therefore, fewer phagocytes were active from 40d of age, although those that were active performed their roles with greater efficacy. That change presumably occurred because the calf phagocytes began to support the immune response without the influence of passive immunity. The animals failed to reach the stability needed to complete the maturation of the innate immune response by 90d of age. These data are applicable for healthy calves only. PMID:26476941

  15. Mobilization of phagocytes during experimentally induced ischemia/reperfusion of rat small intestine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dušková, Monika; Lojek, Antonín; Číž, Milan; Čížová, Hana; Vondráček, Jan

    Hradec Králové: Purkyně Military Medical Academy, 1995. s. 91-96. [Experimental, Therapeutic and Toxic Manipulations of Host Defence System. 12.06.1995-15.06.1995, Hradec Králové] Keywords : phagocytes * ischemia/reperfusion * small intestine * reactive oxygen species * chemiluminescence * lipid peroxidation

  16. Dysregulation of the Axonal Trafficking of Nuclear-encoded Mitochondrial mRNA alters Neuronal Mitochondrial Activity and Mouse Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Kar, Amar N.; Sun, Ching-Yu; Reichard, Kathryn; Gervasi, Noreen M.; Pickel, James; Nakazawa, Kazu; Gioio, Anthony E.; Kaplan, Barry B.

    2013-01-01

    Local translation of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial mRNAs is essential for mitochondrial activity, yet there is little insight into the role that axonal trafficking of these transcripts play in neuronal function and behavior. Previously, we identified a 38 nucleotide stem-loop structure (zipcode) in the 3′ untranslated region of the Cytochrome C oxidase IV (COXIV) mRNA that directs the transport of a reporter mRNA to the axon of superior cervical ganglion neurons (SCG). Over-expression of a ch...

  17. 3xTgAD mice exhibit altered behavior and elevated Aβ after chronic mild social stress

    OpenAIRE

    Rothman, Sarah M.; Herdener, Nathan; Camandola, Simonetta; Texel, Sarah J.; Mughal, Mohamed R.; Cong, Wei-na; Martin, Bronwen; Mattson, Mark P.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic stress may be a risk factor for developing Alzheimer’s disease (AD), but most studies of the effects of stress in models of AD utilize acute adverse stressors of questionable clinical relevance. The goal of this work was to determine how chronic psychosocial stress affects behavioral and pathological outcomes in an animal model of AD, and to elucidate underlying mechanisms. A triple-transgenic mouse model of AD (3xTgAD mice) and nontransgenic control mice were used to test for an affe...

  18. Up-regulated expression of extracellular matrix remodeling genes in phagocytically challenged trabecular meshwork cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristine M Porter

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cells in the trabecular meshwork (TM, the tissue responsible for draining aqueous humor out of the eye, are known to be highly phagocytic. Phagocytic function in TM cells is thought to play an important role in the normal functioning of the outflow pathway. Dysfunction of phagocytosis could lead to abnormalities of outflow resistance and increased intraocular pressure (IOP. However, the molecular mechanisms triggered by phagocytosis in TM cells are completely unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Gene expression profile analysis of human TM cells phagocytically challenged to E. coli or pigment under physiological and oxidative stress environment were performed using Affymetrix U133 plus 2.0 array and analyzed with Genespring GX. Despite the differential biological response elicited by E. coli and pigment particles, a number of genes, including MMP1, MMP3, TNFSF11, DIO2, KYNU, and KCCN2 showed differential expression with both phagocytic ligands in all conditions. Data was confirmed by qPCR in both human and porcine TM cells. Metacore pathway analysis and the usage of recombinant adenovirus encoding the dominant negative mutant of IkB identified NF-κB as a transcription factor mediating the up-regulation of at least MMP1 and MMP3 in TM cells with phagocytosis. In-gel zymography demonstrated increased collagenolytic and caseinolytic activities in the culture media of TM cells challenge to E. coli. In addition, collagenolytic I activity was further confirmed using the self-quenched fluorescent substrate DQ-Collagen I. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Here we report for the first time the differential gene expression profile of TM cells phagocytically challenged with either E. coli or pigment. Our data indicate a potential role of phagocytosis in outflow pathway tissue homeostasis through the up-regulation and/or proteolytic activation of extracellular matrix remodeling genes.

  19. Value of phagocyte function screening for immunotoxicity of nanoparticles in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fröhlich E

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Eleonore Fröhlich Center for Medical Research, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria Abstract: Nanoparticles (NPs present in the environment and in consumer products can cause immunotoxic effects. The immune system is very complex, and in vivo studies are the gold standard for evaluation. Due to the increased amount of NPs that are being developed, cellular screening assays to decrease the amount of NPs that have to be tested in vivo are highly needed. Effects on the unspecific immune system, such as effects on phagocytes, might be suitable for screening for immunotoxicity because these cells mediate unspecific and specific immune responses. They are present at epithelial barriers, in the blood, and in almost all organs. This review summarizes the effects of carbon, metal, and metal oxide NPs used in consumer and medical applications (gold, silver, titanium dioxide, silica dioxide, zinc oxide, and carbon nanotubes and polystyrene NPs on the immune system. Effects in animal exposures through different routes are compared to the effects on isolated phagocytes. In addition, general problems in the testing of NPs, such as unknown exposure doses, as well as interference with assays are mentioned. NPs appear to induce a specific immunotoxic pattern consisting of the induction of inflammation in normal animals and aggravation of pathologies in disease models. The evaluation of particle action on several phagocyte functions in vitro may provide an indication on the potency of the particles to induce immunotoxicity in vivo. In combination with information on realistic exposure levels, in vitro studies on phagocytes may provide useful information on the health risks of NPs. Keywords: immunotoxicity, phagocytes, cytokines, respiratory burst, nitric oxide generation, phagocytosis

  20. Defining mononuclear phagocyte subset homology across several distant warm-blooded vertebrates through comparative transcriptomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thien eVu Manh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mononuclear phagocytes are organized in a complex system of ontogenically and functionally-distinct subsets, that has been best described in mouse and to some extent in human. Identification of homologous mononuclear phagocyte subsets in other vertebrate species of biomedical, economic and environmental interest is needed to improve our knowledge in physiologic and physio-pathologic processes, and to design intervention strategies against a variety of diseases, including zoonotic infections.We developed a streamlined approach combining refined cell sorting and integrated comparative transcriptomics analyses which revealed conservation of the mononuclear phagocyte organization across human, mouse, sheep, pigs and, in some respect, chicken. This strategy should help democratizing the use of omics analyses for the identification and study of cell types across tissues and species. Moreover we identified conserved gene signatures that enable robust identification and universal definition of these cell types. We identified new evolutionarily conserved gene candidates and gene interaction networks for the molecular regulation of the development or functions of these cell types, as well as conserved surface candidates for refined subset phenotyping throughout species. A phylogenetic analysis revealed that orthologous genes of the conserved signatures exist in teleost fishes and apparently not in Lamprey, indicating conservation of the genetic support for mononuclear phagocyte organization throughout jawed vertebrates but likely not in agnathans. Altogether this work provides molecular clues to the definition and functions of mononuclear phagocyte subsets across vertebrates which shall be useful to rigorously identify these cells and to design universal strategies to manipulate them in many target species towards the goal to reach and maintain global health.

  1. Long-term exposure to paraquat alters behavioral parameters and dopamine levels in adult zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolotto, Josiane W; Cognato, Giana P; Christoff, Raissa R; Roesler, Laura N; Leite, Carlos E; Kist, Luiza W; Bogo, Mauricio R; Vianna, Monica R; Bonan, Carla D

    2014-04-01

    Chronic exposure to paraquat (Pq), a toxic herbicide, can result in Parkinsonian symptoms. This study evaluated the effect of the systemic administration of Pq on locomotion, learning and memory, social interaction, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression, dopamine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) levels, and dopamine transporter (DAT) gene expression in zebrafish. Adult zebrafish received an i.p. injection of either 10 mg/kg (Pq10) or 20 mg/kg (Pq20) of Pq every 3 days for a total of six injections. Locomotion and distance traveled decreased at 24 h after each injection in both treatment doses. In addition, both Pq10- and Pq20-treated animals exhibited differential effects on the absolute turn angle. Nonmotor behaviors were also evaluated, and no changes were observed in anxiety-related behaviors or social interactions in Pq-treated zebrafish. However, Pq-treated animals demonstrated impaired acquisition and consolidation of spatial memory in the Y-maze task. Interestingly, dopamine levels increased while DOPAC levels decreased in the zebrafish brain after both treatments. However, DAT expression decreased in the Pq10-treated group, and there was no change in the Pq20-treated group. The amount of TH protein showed no significant difference in the treated group. Our study establishes a new model to study Parkinson-associated symptoms in zebrafish that have been chronically treated with Pq. PMID:24568596

  2. Alteration of cellular behavior and response to PI3K pathway inhibition by culture in 3D collagen gels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Fallica

    Full Text Available Most investigations into cancer cell drug response are performed with cells cultured on flat (2D tissue culture plastic. Emerging research has shown that the presence of a three-dimensional (3D extracellular matrix (ECM is critical for normal cell behavior including migration, adhesion, signaling, proliferation and apoptosis. In this study we investigate differences between cancer cell signaling in 2D culture and a 3D ECM, employing real-time, live cell tracking to directly observe U2OS human osteosarcoma and MCF7 human breast cancer cells embedded in type 1 collagen gels. The activation of the important PI3K signaling pathway under these different growth conditions is studied, and the response to inhibition of both PI3K and mTOR with PI103 investigated. Cells grown in 3D gels show reduced proliferation and migration as well as reduced PI3K pathway activation when compared to cells grown in 2D. Our results quantitatively demonstrate that a collagen ECM can protect U2OS cells from PI103. Overall, our data suggests that 3D gels may provide a better medium for investigation of anti-cancer drugs than 2D monolayers, therefore allowing better understanding of cellular response and behavior in native like environments.

  3. Female Flinders Sensitive Line rats show estrous cycle-independent depression-like behavior and altered tryptophan metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskelund, Amanda; Budac, David P; Sanchez, Connie;

    2016-01-01

    female Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) rats, a genetic rat model of depression. FSL rats and controls (Flinders Resistant Line rats), 12-20weeks old, were subject to the forced swim test (FST), a commonly used measure of depression-like behavior. Open field was used to evaluate locomotor ability and......Clinical studies suggest a link between depression and dysfunctional tryptophan (TRP) metabolism. Even though depression is twice as prevalent in women as men, the impact of the estrous cycle on TRP metabolism is not well-understood. Here we investigated 13 kynurenine and serotonin metabolites in...... male FSL and FRL rats. Female FSL rats showed a depression-like phenotype with increased immobility in the FST, not confounded by anxiety. In the brain, 3-hydroxykynurenine was increased whereas anthranilate and 5-hydroxytryptophan were decreased. In plasma, anthranilate and quinolinate levels were...

  4. Neuropeptide s alters anxiety but not depression-like behaviors in the flinders sensitive line rats, a genetic animal model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathe, A.; Wegener, Gregers; Finger, B.;

    2010-01-01

    day FST. In selected animals effect of NPS on home cage activity was explored. Finally, brains from separate groups of naive animals were harvested; hippocampi, amygdalae and PVN punched out, and mRNA transcripts measured with the real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (rt-qPCR). Results...... the effects of centrally administered NPS on depression- and anxiety-related behaviors, using a well validated animal model of depression, the Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) rats and their controls the Flinders Resistant Line (FRL). Methods: Male and female were tested. Seven days following insertion...... of cannula, 0.25 or 1.0 nmol NPS, or vehicle/5 ml were infused into the lateral ventricle. 45 min after NPS infusion animals were tested on elevated plus maze (EPM). Five days later the animals were subjected to the two-day forced swim test (FST); NPS or vehicle were injected 45 min before the second...

  5. Geochemical behavior of rare earth elements associated with hydrothermal alteration. Implication for the migration and retardation of Am and Cm in hydrothermal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rare earth element (REE) contents of hydrothermally altered dacitic and basaltic rocks in the Kuroko mining area were analyzed. It was found that geochemical features of REE (Light REE/Total REE ratio, La/Sm ratio, Eu anomaly) are related to K2O index (=K2O/(K2O+Na2O+CaO+MgO)x100) and oxygen isotopic composition (δ18O). This relation indicates that LREE (light rare earth element) did not remove from the rocks to hydrothermal solution and were probably added to the rocks from hydrothermal solution at and near the site of hydrothermal ore deposition. This geochemical behavior of LREE which are considered to be chemical analogue elements for Am and Cm suggests that Am and Cm would not remove from the high level nuclear waste glass if the hydrothermal solution ascent to the disposal site and contacted with the high level nuclear waste. (author)

  6. Altered resting-state neural activity and changes following a craving behavioral intervention for Internet gaming disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin-Tao; Yao, Yuan-Wei; Potenza, Marc N; Xia, Cui-Cui; Lan, Jing; Liu, Lu; Wang, Ling-Jiao; Liu, Ben; Ma, Shan-Shan; Fang, Xiao-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Internet gaming disorder (IGD) has become a serious mental health issue worldwide. Evaluating the benefits of interventions for IGD is of great significance. Thirty-six young adults with IGD and 19 healthy comparison (HC) subjects were recruited and underwent resting-state fMRI scanning. Twenty IGD subjects participated in a group craving behavioral intervention (CBI) and were scanned before and after the intervention. The remaining 16 IGD subjects did not receive an intervention. The results showed that IGD subjects showed decreased amplitude of low fluctuation in the orbital frontal cortex and posterior cingulate cortex, and exhibited increased resting-state functional connectivity between the posterior cingulate cortex and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, compared with HC subjects. Compared with IGD subjects who did not receive the intervention, those receiving CBI demonstrated significantly reduced resting-state functional connectivity between the: (1) orbital frontal cortex with hippocampus/parahippocampal gyrus; and, (2) posterior cingulate cortex with supplementary motor area, precentral gyrus, and postcentral gyrus. These findings suggest that IGD is associated with abnormal resting-state neural activity in reward-related, default mode and executive control networks. Thus, the CBI may exert effects by reducing interactions between regions within a reward-related network, and across the default mode and executive control networks. PMID:27381822

  7. Ultrastructural alterations in skeletal muscle fibers of rats after exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akuzawa, M.; Hataya, M.

    1982-01-01

    Ultrastructural alterations in skeletal muscle fibers were electron microscopically studied in rats forced to run on the treadmill until all-out. When they were mild and limited to relatively small areas, the reconstruction of filaments ensued within 10 days without infiltration of cells. When they were severe and extensive, phagocytes infiltrated in the lesions and removed degenerative sacroplasmic debris from muscle fibers. A little later, myoblasts appeared and regeneration was accomplished in 30 days in much the same manner as in myogenesis.

  8. Salmonella typhimurium mutants that downregulate phagocyte nitric oxide production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, S; Björkman, J; Borg, S; Syk, A; Pettersson, S; Andersson, D I; Rhen, M

    2000-06-01

    To examine the potential and strategies of the facultative intracellular pathogen Salmonella typhimurium to increase its fitness in host cells, we applied a selection that enriches for mutants with increased bacterial growth yields in murine J774-A.1 macrophage-like cells. The selection, which was based on intracellular growth competition, rapidly yielded isolates that out-competed the wild-type strain during intracellular growth. J774-A.1 cells responded to challenge with S. typhimurium by mounting an inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA and protein expression and a concomitant nitric oxide (NO) production. Inhibition of NO production with the use of the competitive inhibitor N-monomethyl-L-arginine (NMMA) resulted in a 20-fold increase in bacterial growth yield, suggesting that the NO response prevented bacterial intracellular growth. In accordance with this observation, five out of the nine growth advantage mutants isolated inhibited production of NO from J774-A.1 cells, despite an induction of iNOS mRNA and iNOS protein. Accompanying bacterial phenotypes included alterations in lipopolysaccharide structure and in the profiles of proteins secreted by invasion-competent bacteria. The results indicate that S. typhimurium has the ability to mutate in several different ways to increase its host fitness and that inhibition of iNOS activity may be a major adaptation. PMID:11207580

  9. CCR1+/CCR5+ mononuclear phagocytes accumulate in the central nervous system of patients with multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trebst, C; Sørensen, Torben Lykke; Kivisäkk, P;

    2001-01-01

    Mononuclear phagocytes (monocytes, macrophages, and microglia) are considered central to multiple sclerosis (MS) pathogenesis. Molecular cues that mediate mononuclear phagocyte accumulation and activation in the central nervous system (CNS) of MS patients may include chemokines RANTES/CCL5 and...... CNS pathology, compared to less than 20% of circulating monocytes. In active MS lesions CCR1+/CCR5+ monocytes were found in perivascular cell cuffs and at the demyelinating edges of evolving lesions. Mononuclear phagocytes in early demyelinating stages comprised CCR1+/CCR5+ hematogenous monocytes and...

  10. Oral administration of curcumin relieves behavioral alterations and oxidative stress in the frontal cortex, hippocampus, and striatum of ovariectomized Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva Morrone, Maurilio; Schnorr, Carlos Eduardo; Behr, Guilherme Antônio; Gasparotto, Juciano; Bortolin, Rafael Calixto; Moresco, Karla Suzana; Bittencourt, Leonardo; Zanotto-Filho, Alfeu; Gelain, Daniel Pens; Moreira, José Cláudio Fonseca

    2016-06-01

    Menopause occurs gradually and is characterized by increased susceptibility to developing mood disorders. Several studies have suggested treatments based on the antioxidant properties of vitamins and herbal compounds as an alternative to hormone replacement therapies, with few or none reporting toxicity. The present study was performed to explore the effects of curcumin oral supplementation on anxiety-like behavior and oxidative stress parameters in different central nervous system (CNS) areas of ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Female Wistar rats were randomly divided into either sham-operated or OVX groups. Sham-operated group (n=8) and an OVX group (n=11) were treated with vehicle, and the other two OVX groups received curcumin at 50 or 100mg/kg/day doses (n=8/group). Elevated plus maze (EPM) test was performed on the 28th day of treatment. On the 30th day, animals were killed and the dissected brain regions were removed and stored at-80°C until analysis. Ovariectomy induced deficit in the locomotor activity and increased anxiety-like behavior. Moreover, OVX rats showed increased lipid oxidized in the frontal cortex and striatum, increased hippocampal and striatal carbonylated protein level, and decreased striatal thiol content of non-protein fraction indicative of a glutathione (GSH) pool. Curcumin oral treatment for 30days reduced oxidative stress in the CNS areas as well as the behavior alterations resulting from ovariectomy. Curcumin supplementation attenuated most of these parameters to sham comparable values, suggesting that curcumin could have positive effects against anxiety-like disturbances and brain oxidative damage due to hormone deprivation. PMID:27142750

  11. [Fundamental study of memory impairment and non-cognitive behavioral alterations in APPswe/PS1dE9 mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniuchi, Nobuhiko; Niidome, Tetsuhiro; Sugimoto, Hachiro

    2015-01-01

    In addition to cognitive decline, Alzheimer's disease patients also exhibit non-cognitive symptoms commonly referred to as behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia, or BPSD. These symptoms have a serious impact on the quality of life of these patients, as well as that of their caregivers, but there are currently no effective therapies. The amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) is suspected to play a central role in the cascade leading to Alzheimer's disease, but the precise mechanisms are still incompletely known. To assess the influence of Aβ pathology on cognitive and non-cognitive behaviors, we examined locomotor activity, motor coordination, and spatial memory in male and female APPswePS1dE9 mice (Alzheimer's disease model, double transgenic mice expressing an amyloid precursor protein with Swedish mutation and a presenilin-1 with deletion of exon 9) at 5 months of age, when the mice had subtle Aβ deposits, and again at 9 months of age, when the mice had numerous Aβ deposits. Compared to wild-type mice, the male and female APPswe/PS1dE9 mice showed normal motor coordination in the rotarod test at both 5 and 9 months. In the Morris water maze test, male and female APPswe/PS1dE9 mice showed impaired spatial memory at 9 months; however, no such deficits were found at 5 months. In a locomotor activity test, male APPswe/PS1dE9 mice exhibited locomotor hyperactivity at 9 months, while females exhibited locomotor hyperactivity at both 5 and 9 months compared to the control mice. Together, these results indicate that APPswe/PS1dE9 mice developed spatial memory impairment and BPSD-like behavioral alterations resulting from Aβ accumulation. PMID:25747232

  12. WASH is required for lysosomal recycling and efficient autophagic and phagocytic digestion

    OpenAIRE

    King, Jason S.; Gueho, Aurélie; Hagedorn, Monica; Gopaldass, Navin Andréw; Leuba, Florence; Soldati, Thierry; Insall, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein and SCAR homologue (WASH) is an important regulator of vesicle trafficking. By generating actin on the surface of intracellular vesicles, WASH is able to directly regulate endosomal sorting and maturation. We report that, in Dictyostelium, WASH is also required for the lysosomal digestion of both phagocytic and autophagic cargo. Consequently, Dictyostelium cells lacking WASH are unable to grow on many bacteria or to digest their own cytoplasm to survive starva...

  13. Innate immune response during Yersinia infection: critical modulation of cell death mechanisms through phagocyte activation

    OpenAIRE

    Bergsbaken, Tessa; Cookson, Brad T.

    2009-01-01

    Yersinia pestis, the etiological agent of plague, is one of the most deadly pathogens on our planet. This organism shares important attributes with its ancestral progenitor, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, including a 70-kb virulence plasmid, lymphotropism during growth in the mammalian host, and killing of host macrophages. Infections with both organisms are biphasic, where bacterial replication occurs initially with little inflammation, followed by phagocyte influx, inflammatory cytokine produ...

  14. Phagocytic responses of peritoneal macrophages and neutrophils are different in rats following prolonged exercise

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, Clílton K O; Jonato Prestes; DONATTO, FELIPE F.; Rozangela Verlengia; NAVALTA, JAMES W.; Cláudia R. Cavaglieri

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the effects of exhausting long-duration physical exercise (swimming) sessions of different durations and intensities on the number and phagocytic capacity of macrophages and neutrophils in sedentary rats. INTRODUCTION: Exercise intensity, duration and frequency are important factors in determining immune response to physical effort. Thus, the effects of exhausting long-duration exercise are unclear. METHODS: Wistar rats were divided into two groups: an untreated group (m...

  15. The case of the “serfdom” condition of phagocytic immune cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Ottaviani

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In a modern immunological perspective, it may be asserted that the phagocytic cell should not be considered as the "serfdom", but rather the pivot of the immune system. Indeed, the invertebrate immunocyte as well as the vertebrate macrophage play a central role in immunity, inflammation and stress response. The evolutionary conserved immune-neuroendocrine effector system have remained of fundamental importance in defense against pathogens, and its efficiency increased through synergy with the new, clonotipical recognition repertoire in vertebrates.

  16. Phosphatidylserine targets single-walled carbon nanotubes to professional phagocytes in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagarjun V Konduru

    Full Text Available Broad applications of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT dictate the necessity to better understand their health effects. Poor recognition of non-functionalized SWCNT by phagocytes is prohibitive towards controlling their biological action. We report that SWCNT coating with a phospholipid "eat-me" signal, phosphatidylserine (PS, makes them recognizable in vitro by different phagocytic cells - murine RAW264.7 macrophages, primary monocyte-derived human macrophages, dendritic cells, and rat brain microglia. Macrophage uptake of PS-coated nanotubes was suppressed by the PS-binding protein, Annexin V, and endocytosis inhibitors, and changed the pattern of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine secretion. Loading of PS-coated SWCNT with pro-apoptotic cargo (cytochrome c allowed for the targeted killing of RAW264.7 macrophages. In vivo aspiration of PS-coated SWCNT stimulated their uptake by lung alveolar macrophages in mice. Thus, PS-coating can be utilized for targeted delivery of SWCNT with specified cargoes into professional phagocytes, hence for therapeutic regulation of specific populations of immune-competent cells.

  17. Phagocytosis of escherichia coli by monocyte phagocytic system organs in splenectomized rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Being the major lymphoid organ of the human body, the spleen performs critical immunological functions such as bacterial clearance from the bloodstream and early antibody production against various antigenic particles. Liver, lung and spleen account for more than 95% of phagocytic activity in humans. Design and Methods: Young and adult Wistar rats of both sexes were submitted do total splenectomy and compared to animals not submitted to any surgical manipulation to evaluate the phagocytic function of spleen. Sixteen weeks after the beginning of the experiment rats of both groups were challenged with a suspension of Escherichia coli labeled with Tc-99m and twenty minutes later they were sacrificed. Liver, lung, spleen and a blood clot sample were removed for uptake of bacteria determination. The statistical study was performed with Student t-test. Results: There were no significant differences in the percent bacterial uptake in young or adult splenectomized rats. However, splenectomized animals were associated with a higher bacterial uptake than animals of the control group (p<0.0001) due to a larger bacterial remnant in the bloodstream. Conclusion: This finding suggests that some failure in the mononuclear phagocytic system occurs in the absence of the spleen absence, demonstrating the need to develop alternative surgical techniques to total splenectomy in patients requiring spleen removal

  18. Phagocytes: A Holistic Defense and Protection Against Active P2P Worms

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Ruichuan; Crowcroft, Jon; Tang, Liyong; Chen, Zhong

    2011-01-01

    Active Peer-to-Peer (P2P) worms present serious threats to the global Internet by exploiting popular P2P applications to perform rapid topological self-propagation. Active P2P worms pose more deadly threats than normal scanning worms because they do not exhibit easily detectable anomalies, thus many existing defenses are no longer effective. We propose an immunity system with Phagocytes --- a small subset of elected P2P hosts that are immune with high probability and specialized in finding and "eating" worms in the P2P overlay. The Phagocytes will monitor their managed P2P hosts' connection patterns and traffic volume in an attempt to detect active P2P worm attacks. Once detected, local isolation, alert propagation and software patching will take place for containment. The Phagocytes further provide the access control and filtering mechanisms for communication establishment between the internal P2P overlay and the external hosts. We design a novel adaptive and interaction-based computational puzzle scheme at ...

  19. Association of dietary soy with expression of various pro-inflammatory genes in porcine phagocytes

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    Georgios Theodorou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Soybean and whey are two common protein sources used in piglet feeding; however, their effects on pro-inflammatory responses remain unclear. The present study investigated the expression of various genes implicated in the activation/deactivation of porcine phagocytes post-weaning. Eighteen piglets were divided into two groups based on the main protein source of their diet; soybean (SB or whey proteins (WP. Blood phagocytes were isolated at 72 days of age. Expression of urokinase plasminogen activator (u-PA, u-PA receptor (u-PAR, plasminogen activator inhibitors 1 and 2, intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1, inducible NO synthase (iNOS, cyclo-oxygenase-2 and interleukin-10 (IL-10 in activated monocytes and neutrophils (except IL-10 was determined by quantitative PCR. Expression of u-PAR, ICAM-1 and iNOS were lower in both cell types obtained from SB-fed piglets compared to WP-fed piglets. In conclusion, a SB-based diet, compared with a WP diet, is associated with reduced expression of crucial pro-inflammatory genes in porcine phagocytes.

  20. Fosfomycin enhances phagocyte-mediated killing of Staphylococcus aureus by extracellular traps and reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Fengge; Tang, Xudong; Cheng, Wei; Wang, Yang; Wang, Chao; Shi, Xiaochen; An, Yanan; Zhang, Qiaoli; Liu, Mingyuan; Liu, Bo; Yu, Lu

    2016-01-01

    The successful treatment of bacterial infections is the achievement of a synergy between the host's immune defences and antibiotics. Here, we examined whether fosfomycin (FOM) could improve the bactericidal effect of phagocytes, and investigated the potential mechanisms. FOM enhanced the phagocytosis and extra- or intracellular killing of S. aureus by phagocytes. And FOM enhanced the extracellular killing of S. aureus in macrophage (MФ) and in neutrophils mediated by extracellular traps (ETs). ET production was related to NADPH oxidase-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS). Additionally, FOM increased the intracellular killing of S. aureus in phagocytes, which was mediated by ROS through the oxidative burst process. Our results also showed that FOM alone induced S. aureus producing hydroxyl radicals in order to kill the bacterial cells in vitro. In a mouse peritonitis model, FOM treatment increased the bactericidal extra- and intracellular activity in vivo, and FOM strengthened ROS and ET production from peritoneal lavage fluid ex vivo. An IVIS imaging system assay further verified the observed in vivo bactericidal effect of the FOM treatment. This work may provide a deeper understanding of the role of the host's immune defences and antibiotic interactions in microbial infections. PMID:26778774

  1. Zebrafish kidney phagocytes utilize macropinocytosis and Ca+-dependent endocytic mechanisms.

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    Claudia Hohn

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The innate immune response constitutes the first line of defense against invading pathogens and consists of a variety of immune defense mechanisms including active endocytosis by macrophages and granulocytes. Endocytosis can be used as a reliable measure of selective and non-selective mechanisms of antigen uptake in the early phase of an immune response. Numerous assays have been developed to measure this response in a variety of mammalian and fish species. The small size of the zebrafish has prevented the large-scale collection of monocytes/macrophages and granulocytes for these endocytic assays. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Pooled zebrafish kidney hematopoietic tissues were used as a source of phagocytic cells for flow-cytometry based endocytic assays. FITC-Dextran, Lucifer Yellow and FITC-Edwardsiella ictaluri were used to evaluate selective and non-selective mechanisms of uptake in zebrafish phagocytes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Zebrafish kidney phagocytes characterized as monocytes/macrophages, neutrophils and lymphocytes utilize macropinocytosis and Ca(2+-dependant endocytosis mechanisms of antigen uptake. These cells do not appear to utilize a mannose receptor. Heat-killed Edwardsiella ictaluri induces cytoskeletal interactions for internalization in zebrafish kidney monocytes/macrophages and granulocytes. The proposed method is easy to implement and should prove especially useful in immunological, toxicological and epidemiological research.

  2. Phagocytic superoxide specifically damages an extracytoplasmic target to inhibit or kill Salmonella.

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    Maureen Craig

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The phagocytic oxidative burst is a primary effector of innate immunity that protects against bacterial infection. However, the mechanism by which reactive oxygen species (ROS kill or inhibit bacteria is not known. It is often assumed that DNA is a primary target of oxidative damage, consistent with known effects of endogenously produced ROS in the bacterial cytoplasm. But most studies fail to distinguish between effects of host derived ROS versus damage caused by endogenous bacterial sources. We took advantage of both the ability of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to survive in macrophages and the genetic tractability of the system to test the hypothesis that phagocytic superoxide damages cytoplasmic targets including DNA. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: SodCI is a periplasmic Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD that contributes to the survival of Salmonella Typhimurium in macrophages. Through competitive virulence assays, we asked if sodCI has a genetic interaction with various cytoplasmic systems. We found that SodCI acts independently of cytoplasmic SODs, SodA and SodB. In addition, SodCI acts independently of the base excision repair system and RuvAB, involved in DNA repair. Although sodCI did show genetic interaction with recA, this was apparently independent of recombination and is presumably due to the pleiotropic effects of a recA mutation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, these results suggest that bacterial inhibition by phagocytic superoxide is primarily the result of damage to an extracytoplasmic target.

  3. Alkalinity of neutrophil phagocytic vacuoles is modulated by HVCN1 and has consequences for myeloperoxidase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Adam P; Duchen, Michael R; de Villiers, Simon; Rich, Peter R; Segal, Anthony W

    2015-01-01

    The NADPH oxidase of neutrophils, essential for innate immunity, passes electrons across the phagocytic membrane to form superoxide in the phagocytic vacuole. Activity of the oxidase requires that charge movements across the vacuolar membrane are balanced. Using the pH indicator SNARF, we measured changes in pH in the phagocytic vacuole and cytosol of neutrophils. In human cells, the vacuolar pH rose to ~9, and the cytosol acidified slightly. By contrast, in Hvcn1 knock out mouse neutrophils, the vacuolar pH rose above 11, vacuoles swelled, and the cytosol acidified excessively, demonstrating that ordinarily this channel plays an important role in charge compensation. Proton extrusion was not diminished in Hvcn1-/- mouse neutrophils arguing against its role in maintaining pH homeostasis across the plasma membrane. Conditions in the vacuole are optimal for bacterial killing by the neutral proteases, cathepsin G and elastase, and not by myeloperoxidase, activity of which was unphysiologically low at alkaline pH. PMID:25885273

  4. APOPTOSIS INDUCTION IN THE PHAGOCYTIC CELLS BY MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSISWITH DIFFERENT VIRULENCE

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    Zubriychuk OM

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the characteristics of phagocytic cells apoptosis induced in vitro and in vivo by Mycobacterium tuberculosis with different virulence. For this aim the main feachers of apoptosis of peritoneal macrophages, neutrophyles, monocytes, induced in vitro by living and dead MBT H37Rv and BCG in intact animals, healthy subjects and patients with tuberculosis were expected, as well as features of apoptosis of neutrophils and peritoneal macrophages of animals infected with MBT H37Rv and BCG. It was found that the virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis have a powerful apoptogenic effect on phagocytic cells, and the loss of pathogen viability and virulence causes its weakening. It was demonstrated that the induction of apoptosis by Mycobacterium tuberculosis is realised both directly and indirectly, probably through their influence on the production of cell interaction mediators. It was detected that in order to limit excessive loss of phagocytes due to apoptosis, virulent mycobacteria use mechanisms that prevent infection of these cells.

  5. Alterations in local thyroid hormone signaling in the hippocampus of the SAMP8 mouse at younger ages: association with delayed myelination and behavioral abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawano, Erika; Negishi, Takayuki; Aoki, Tomoyuki; Murakami, Masami; Tashiro, Tomoko

    2013-03-01

    The senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM) strains were established through selective inbreeding of the AKR/J strain based on phenotypic variations of aging and consist of senescence-prone (SAMP) and senescence-resistant (SAMR) strains. Among them, SAMP8 is considered as a model of neurodegeneration displaying age-associated learning and memory impairment and altered emotional status. Because adult hypothyroidism is one of the common causes of cognitive impairment and various psychiatric disorders, we examined the possible involvement of thyroid hormone (TH) signaling in the pathological aging of SAMP8 using the senescence-resistant SAMR1 as control. Although plasma TH levels were similar in both strains, a significant decrease in type 2 deiodinase (D2) gene expression was observed in the SAMP8 hippocampus from 1 to 8 months of age, which led to a 35-50% reductions at the protein level and 20% reduction of its enzyme activity at 1, 3, and 5 months. D2 is responsible for local conversion of thyroxine into transcriptionally active 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3), so the results suggest a reduction in T3 level in the SAMP8 hippocampus. Attenuation of local TH signaling was confirmed by downregulation of TH-dependent genes and by immunohistochemical demonstration of delayed and reduced accumulation of myelin basic protein, the expression of which is highly dependent on TH. Furthermore, we found that hyperactivity and reduced anxiety were not age-associated but were characteristic of young SAMP8 before they start showing impairments in learning and memory. Early alterations in local TH signaling may thus underlie behavioral abnormalities as well as the pathological aging of SAMP8. PMID:23224839

  6. Relative uptake of technetium 99m stannous colloid by neutrophils and monocytes is altered by gram-negative infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gram-negative infection alters phagocytic cell function; hence, it could affect phagocytic uptake of inorganic colloids by these cells. Neutrophil and monocyte uptake of technetium 99m stannous colloid (99mTc SnC) in whole blood was measured in 10 patients with gram-negative infection (Burkholderia pseudomallei) and 7 controls. Mean uptake per individual neutrophil was reduced in infection. Uptake per monocyte was not significantly different. Blood from six normal individuals was incubated with lysed B. pseudomallei and colloid, which showed reduced neutrophil uptake, but increased monocyte uptake. These results indicate that uptake of 99mTc SnC stannous colloid can be used to measure alteration in phagocytic cell function. They suggest that infection with B. pseudomallei is associated with reduced phagocytosis by individual neutrophils, possibly through toxic effects of bacterial products. This could have immunopathogenic consequences for this gram-negative infection and may explain why it responds to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor

  7. M-CSF Mediates Host Defense during Bacterial Pneumonia by Promoting the Survival of Lung and Liver Mononuclear Phagocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettina, Alexandra; Zhang, Zhimin; Michels, Kathryn; Cagnina, R Elaine; Vincent, Isaah S; Burdick, Marie D; Kadl, Alexandra; Mehrad, Borna

    2016-06-15

    Gram-negative bacterial pneumonia is a common and dangerous infection with diminishing treatment options due to increasing antibiotic resistance among causal pathogens. The mononuclear phagocyte system is a heterogeneous group of leukocytes composed of tissue-resident macrophages, dendritic cells, and monocyte-derived cells that are critical in defense against pneumonia, but mechanisms that regulate their maintenance and function during infection are poorly defined. M-CSF has myriad effects on mononuclear phagocytes but its role in pneumonia is unknown. We therefore tested the hypothesis that M-CSF is required for mononuclear phagocyte-mediated host defenses during bacterial pneumonia in a murine model of infection. Genetic deletion or immunoneutralization of M-CSF resulted in reduced survival, increased bacterial burden, and greater lung injury. M-CSF was necessary for the expansion of lung mononuclear phagocytes during infection but did not affect the number of bone marrow or blood monocytes, proliferation of precursors, or recruitment of leukocytes to the lungs. In contrast, M-CSF was essential to survival and antimicrobial functions of both lung and liver mononuclear phagocytes during pneumonia, and its absence resulted in bacterial dissemination to the liver and hepatic necrosis. We conclude that M-CSF is critical to host defenses against bacterial pneumonia by mediating survival and antimicrobial functions of mononuclear phagocytes in the lungs and liver. PMID:27183631

  8. It takes two to tango: Phagocyte and lymphocyte numbers in a small mammalian hibernator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havenstein, Nadine; Langer, Franz; Stefanski, Volker; Fietz, Joanna

    2016-02-01

    Immunity is energetically costly and competes for resources with other physiological body functions, which may result in trade-offs that impair fitness during demanding situations. Endocrine mediators, particularly stress hormones, play a central role in these relationships and directly impact leukocyte differentials. To determine the effects of external stressors, energetic restraints and competing physiological functions on immune parameters and their relevance for fitness, we investigated leukocyte profiles during the active season of a small obligate hibernator, the edible dormouse (Glis glis), in five different study sites in south-western Germany. The highly synchronized yearly cycle of this species and the close adaptation of its life history to the irregular abundance of food resources provide a natural experiment to elucidate mechanisms underlying variations in fitness parameters. In contrast to previous studies on hibernators, that showed an immediate recovery of all leukocyte subtypes upon emergence, our study revealed that hibernation results in depleted phagocyte (neutrophils and monocytes) stores that recovered only slowly. As the phenomenon of low phagocyte counts was even more pronounced at the beginning of a low food year and primarily immature neutrophils were present in the blood upon emergence, preparatory mechanisms seem to determine the regeneration of phagocytes before hibernation is terminated. Surprisingly, the recovery of phagocytes thereafter took several weeks, presumably due to energetic restrictions. This impaired first line of defense coincides with lowest survival probabilities during the annual cycle of our study species. Reduced survival could furthermore be linked to drastic increases in the P/L ratio (phagocytes/lymphocytes), an indicator of physiological stress, during reproduction. On the other hand, moderate augmentations in the P/L ratio occurred during periods of low food availability and were associated with increased

  9. Communication of brain network core connections altered in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia but possibly preserved in early-onset Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daianu, Madelaine; Jahanshad, Neda; Mendez, Mario F.; Bartzokis, George; Jimenez, Elvira E.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2015-03-01

    Diffusion imaging and brain connectivity analyses can assess white matter deterioration in the brain, revealing the underlying patterns of how brain structure declines. Fiber tractography methods can infer neural pathways and connectivity patterns, yielding sensitive mathematical metrics of network integrity. Here, we analyzed 1.5-Tesla wholebrain diffusion-weighted images from 64 participants - 15 patients with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), 19 with early-onset Alzheimer's disease (EOAD), and 30 healthy elderly controls. Using whole-brain tractography, we reconstructed structural brain connectivity networks to map connections between cortical regions. We evaluated the brain's networks focusing on the most highly central and connected regions, also known as hubs, in each diagnostic group - specifically the "high-cost" structural backbone used in global and regional communication. The high-cost backbone of the brain, predicted by fiber density and minimally short pathways between brain regions, accounted for 81-92% of the overall brain communication metric in all diagnostic groups. Furthermore, we found that the set of pathways interconnecting high-cost and high-capacity regions of the brain's communication network are globally and regionally altered in bvFTD, compared to healthy participants; however, the overall organization of the high-cost and high-capacity networks were relatively preserved in EOAD participants, relative to controls. Disruption of the major central hubs that transfer information between brain regions may impair neural communication and functional integrity in characteristic ways typical of each subtype of dementia.

  10. Repeated, Intermittent Social Defeat across the Entire Juvenile Period Resulted in Behavioral, Physiological, Hormonal, Immunological, and Neurochemical Alterations in Young Adult Male Golden Hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wei-Chun; Liu, Ching-Yi; Lai, Wen-Sung

    2016-01-01

    , intermittent social defeats throughout entire adolescence in hamsters impact their adult responses at multiple levels. Our results also suggest that the "social threat" group may serve as an appropriate control. This study further suggest that the alterations of behavioral responses and neurobiological functions in the body and brain might provide potential markers to measure the negative consequences of chronic social defeats. PMID:27375450

  11. Re-circulating Phagocytes Loaded with CNS Debris: A Potential Marker of Neurodegeneration in Parkinsons Disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa J. White

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis and monitoring of diseases by measurement of biochemical markers has most commonly been performed on samples of peripheral blood. However, no such markers are available for clinical use in the major diseases of the central nervous system (CNS. In Parkinson's disease circulating biomarkers would find clinical utility in early diagnosis and also monitoring of disease progression. Of particular interest is early diagnosis as this would create .a window of opportunity for treatment with neuroprotective drugs. We have developed a novel strategy for monitoring disease activity in the CNS based on the recognition that tissue injuries incite inflammation and recruitment of phagocytes that engulf debris. We postulated that some of these debris laden phagocytes may return to the peripheral blood and their cargo of CNS proteins could be measured. If CNS antigens can be measured in PBMCs it may be an indicator of active neurodegeneration as the debris engulfed by phagocytes is completely degraded within days. To make this approach more specific to Parkinson's disease we probed PBMC lysates for neuromelanin as a marker of degeneration within the substancia nigra. We performed a proof of principle study in ten subjects with early PD and ten age and sex matched controls. The biomarkers neuromelanin, Tau protein, UCH-L1 and HPCAL-1 were measured in PBMC lysates from these two groups. Neuromelanin and Tau protein mean levels were elevated in PD compared with controls and was extremely statistically significant in both cases. UCH-L1 and HPCAL-1 mean levels were elevated in PD over controls and were not quite significant in both cases. These results suggest that this is a promising new approach for diagnosis and monitoring of PD and potentially other CNS diseases.

  12. Intracellular glutathione status regulates mouse bone marrow monocyte-derived macrophage differentiation and phagocytic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although a redox shift can regulate the development of cells, including proliferation, differentiation, and survival, the role of the glutathione (GSH) redox status in macrophage differentiation remains unclear. In order to elucidate the role of a redox shift, macrophage-like cells were differentiated from the bone marrow-derived monocytes that were treated with a macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF or CSF-1) for 3 days. The macrophagic cells were characterized by a time-dependent increase in three major symptoms: the number of phagocytic cells, the number of adherent cells, and the mRNA expression of c-fms, a M-CSF receptor that is one of the macrophage-specific markers and mediates development signals. Upon M-CSF-driven macrophage differentiation, the GSH/GSSG ratio was significantly lower on day 1 than that observed on day 0 but was constant on days 1-3. To assess the effect of the GSH-depleted and -repleted status on the differentiation and phagocytosis of the macrophages, GSH depletion by BSO, a specific inhibitor of the de novo GSH synthesis, inhibited the formation of the adherent macrophagic cells by the down-regulation of c-fms, but did not affect the phagocytic activity of the macrophages. To the contrary, GSH repletion by the addition of NAC, which is a GSH precursor, or reduced GSH in media had no effect on macrophage differentiation, and led to a decrease in the phagocytic activity. Furthermore, we observed that there is checkpoint that is capable of releasing from the inhibition of the formation of the adherent macrophagic cells according to GSH depletion by BSO. Summarizing, these results indicate that the intracellular GSH status plays an important role in the differentiation and phagocytosis of macrophages

  13. Enhanced alveolar monocytic phagocyte (macrophage) proliferation in tobacco and marijuana smokers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbers, R.G.; Evans, M.J.; Gong, H. Jr.; Tashkin, D.P. (Univ. of California-Los Angeles School of Medicine (USA))

    1991-05-01

    We tested the hypothesis that enhanced cell division accounted for the augmented numbers of monocytic phagocytes with characteristics attributed to alveolar macrophages (AM) found in the lungs of habitual tobacco (T) and marijuana (M) smokers. The monocytic phagocytes, that is, alveolar macrophages, were obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) from 12 nonsmoking subjects; 10 subjects who smoked T only (TS); 13 subjects who smoked M only (MS); and 6 smokers of both T and M (MTS). The replication of these cells was determined by measuring the incorporation of ({sup 3}H)thymidine into the DNA of dividing cells and visually counting 2,000 cells on autoradiographically prepared cytocentrifuge cell preparations. This study demonstrated that the number of ({sup 3}H)thymidine-labeled monocytic phagocytes with characteristics of alveolar macrophages from either TS or MS have a higher proliferative index compared to cells (macrophages) from nonsmokers, p less than 0.05 by one-way ANOVA. The total number of BAL macrophages that are in mitosis in TS (17.90 +/- 4.50 labeled AM x 10(3)/ml) or MTS (10.50 +/- 4.20 labeled AM x 10(3)/ml) are 18- and 10-fold greater, respectively, than the number obtained from nonsmokers (1.01 +/- 0.18 labeled AM x 10(3)/ml). Interestingly, the number of ({sup 3}H)thymidine-labeled macrophages from MS (2.90 +/- 0.66 labeled AM x 10(3)/ml) are also greater than the number obtained from nonsmokers, although this is not statistically significant. The stimulus augmenting alveolar macrophage replication is as yet unknown but may likely be found in the T or M smoke.

  14. Enhanced alveolar monocytic phagocyte (macrophage) proliferation in tobacco and marijuana smokers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We tested the hypothesis that enhanced cell division accounted for the augmented numbers of monocytic phagocytes with characteristics attributed to alveolar macrophages (AM) found in the lungs of habitual tobacco (T) and marijuana (M) smokers. The monocytic phagocytes, that is, alveolar macrophages, were obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) from 12 nonsmoking subjects; 10 subjects who smoked T only (TS); 13 subjects who smoked M only (MS); and 6 smokers of both T and M (MTS). The replication of these cells was determined by measuring the incorporation of [3H]thymidine into the DNA of dividing cells and visually counting 2,000 cells on autoradiographically prepared cytocentrifuge cell preparations. This study demonstrated that the number of [3H]thymidine-labeled monocytic phagocytes with characteristics of alveolar macrophages from either TS or MS have a higher proliferative index compared to cells (macrophages) from nonsmokers, p less than 0.05 by one-way ANOVA. The total number of BAL macrophages that are in mitosis in TS (17.90 +/- 4.50 labeled AM x 10(3)/ml) or MTS (10.50 +/- 4.20 labeled AM x 10(3)/ml) are 18- and 10-fold greater, respectively, than the number obtained from nonsmokers (1.01 +/- 0.18 labeled AM x 10(3)/ml). Interestingly, the number of [3H]thymidine-labeled macrophages from MS (2.90 +/- 0.66 labeled AM x 10(3)/ml) are also greater than the number obtained from nonsmokers, although this is not statistically significant. The stimulus augmenting alveolar macrophage replication is as yet unknown but may likely be found in the T or M smoke

  15. Adolescent Social Defeat Induced Alterations in Social Behavior and Cognitive Flexibility in Adult Mice: Effects of Developmental Stage and Social Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Yuan, Sanna; Shao, Feng; Wang, Weiwen

    2016-01-01

    Negative social experiences during adolescence increase the risk of psychiatric disorders in adulthood. Using “resident-intruder” stress, the present study aimed to investigate the effects of adolescent social defeat on emotional and cognitive symptoms associated with psychiatric disorders during adulthood and the effects of the developmental stage and social condition on this process. In Experiment 1, animals were exposed to social defeat or manipulation for 10 days during early adolescence (EA, postnatal days [PND] 28–37), late adolescence (LA, PND 38–47), and adulthood (ADULT, PND 70–79) and then singly housed until the behavioral tests. Behaviors, including social avoidance of the defeat context and cortically mediated cognitive flexibility in an attentional set-shifting task (AST), were assessed during the week following stress or after 6 weeks during adulthood. We determined that social defeat induced significant and continuous social avoidance across age groups at both time points. The mice that experienced social defeat during adulthood exhibited short-term impairments in reversal learning (RL) on the AST that dissipated after 6 weeks. In contrast, social defeat during EA but not LA induced a delayed deficit in extra-dimensional set-shifting (EDS) in adulthood but not during adolescence. In Experiment 2, we further examined the effects of social condition (isolation or social housing after stress) on the alterations induced by social defeat during EA in adult mice. The adult mice that had experienced stress during EA exhibited social avoidance similar to the avoidance identified in Experiment 1 regardless of the isolation or social housing after the stress. However, social housing after the stress ameliorated the cognitive flexibility deficits induced by early adolescent social defeat in the adult mice, and the social condition had no effect on cognitive function. These findings suggest that the effects of social defeat on emotion and cognitive

  16. A new method for measuring simultaneously the phagocytic and bactericidal capacity of human leukocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new technique for simultaneously measuring the phagocytic and bactericidal capacity of human leukocytes is proposed. The method uses 14C labelled bacteria and is based on the principle that only viable intra-cellular bacteria incorporate 3H-thymidine. Phagocytosis is measured by the ratio intra-cellular 14C/extra and intra-cellular 14C and the bactericidal capacity of leukocytes by the difference between the 3H-thymidine incorporation of the ingested and non-ingested bacteria. Results in normal subjects and in a case of chronic granulomatous disease show the validity of the method which is easier and quicker than the methods previously used

  17. Hemoglobin-Vesicles as Oxygen Carriers : Influence on Phagocytic Activity and Histopathological Changes in Reticuloendothelial System

    OpenAIRE

    Sakai, Hiromi; Horinouchi, Hirohisa; Tomiyama, Kenichi; IKEDA, EIJI; Takeoka, Shinji; Kobayashi, Koichi; Tsuchida, Eishun

    2001-01-01

    Hemoglobin-vesicles (HbV) have been developed for use as artificial oxygen carriers (particle diameter, 250 nm) in which a purified Hb solution is encapsulated with a phospholipid bilayer membrane. The influence of HbV on the reticuloendothelial system was studied by carbon clearance measurements and histopathological examination. The HbV suspension ([Hb] = 10 g/dl) was intravenously infused in male Wistar rats at dose rates of 10 and 20 ml/kg, and the phagocytic activity was measured by moni...

  18. Quantitation of microbicidal activity of mononuclear phagocytes: an in vitro technique.

    OpenAIRE

    Rege N; Dahanukar S

    1993-01-01

    An in vitro assay technique was set up to determine the phagocytic and microbicidal activity of a monocyte-macrophage cell line using Candida species as test organisms. The norms were determined for the activity of peritoneal macrophages of rats (24.69 +/- 2.6% phagocytosis and 35.4 +/- 5.22% ICK) and human (27.89 +/- 3.63% phagocytosis and 50.91 +/- 6.3% ICK). The assay technique was used to test the degree of activation of macrophages ...

  19. In vitro and ex vivo effects of cyclosporin A on phagocytic host defenses against Aspergillus fumigatus.

    OpenAIRE

    Roilides, E.; Robinson, T.; T Sein; Pizzo, P A; Walsh, T J

    1994-01-01

    Because cyclosporin A (CsA) is extensively used as an immunosuppressive agent, its effects on phagocytic defenses against Aspergillus fumigatus were studied in vitro and ex vivo. After incubation with 10 to 250 ng of CsA per ml at 37 degrees C for 60 min, polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) exhibited unaltered superoxide anion (O2-) production in response to phorbol myristate acetate and N-formylmethionyl leucyl phenylalanine, whereas > or = 500 ng/ml significantly suppressed it (P < 0.01). M...

  20. Alterations in body temperature, corticosterone, and behavior following the administration of 5-methoxy-diisopropyltryptamine ('foxy') to adult rats: a new drug of abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Michael T; Herring, Nicole R; Schaefer, Tori L; Skelton, Matthew R; Campbell, Nicholas G; Lipton, Jack W; McCrea, Anne E; Vorhees, Charles V

    2007-06-01

    Many drugs are used or abused in social contexts without understanding the ramifications of their use. In this study, we examined the effects of a newly popular drug, 5-methoxy-diisopropyltryptamine (5-MEO-DIPT; 'foxy' or 'foxy-methoxy'). Two experiments were performed. In the first, 5-MEO-DIPT (0, 10, or 20 mg/kg) was administered to rats four times on a single day and animals were examined 3 days later. The animals that received 5-MEO-DIPT demonstrated hypothermia during the period of drug administration and delayed mild hyperthermic rebound for at least 48 h. Corticosterone levels in plasma were elevated in a dose-dependent manner compared to saline-treated animals with minor changes in 5-HT turnover and no changes in monoamine levels. In experiment 2, rats were examined in behavioral tasks following either 0 or 20 mg/kg of 5-MEO-DIPT. The animals treated with 5-MEO-DIPT showed hypoactivity and an attenuated response to (+)-methamphetamine-induced stimulation (1 mg/kg). In a test of path integration (Cincinnati water maze), 5-MEO-DIPT-treated animals displayed deficits in performance compared to the saline-treated animals. No differences were noted in the ability of the animals to perform in the Morris water maze or on tests of novel object or place recognition. The data demonstrate that 5-MEO-DIPT alters the ability of an animal to perform certain cognitive tasks, while leaving others intact and disrupts the endocrine system. 5-MEO-DIPT may have the potential to induce untoward effects in humans. PMID:17047665

  1. Cathepsin B is up-regulated and mediates extracellular matrix degradation in trabecular meshwork cells following phagocytic challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristine Porter

    Full Text Available Cells in the trabecular meshwork (TM, a tissue responsible for draining aqueous humor out of the eye, are known to be highly phagocytic. Phagocytic activity in TM cells is thought to play an important role in outflow pathway physiology. However, the molecular mechanisms triggered by phagocytosis in TM cells are unknown. Here we investigated the effects of chronic phagocytic stress on lysosomal function using different phagocytic ligands (E. coli, carboxylated beads, collagen I-coated beads, and pigment. Lysotracker red co-localization and electron micrographs showed the maturation of E. coli- and collagen I-coated beads-containing phagosomes into phagolysosomes. Maturation of phagosomes into phagolysosomes was not observed with carboxylated beads or pigment particles. In addition, phagocytosis of E. coli and collagen I-coated beads led to increased lysosomal mass, and the specific up-regulation and activity of cathepsin B (CTSB. Higher levels of membrane-bound and secreted CTSB were also detected. Moreover, in vivo zymography showed the intralysosomal degradation of ECM components associated with active CTSB, as well as an overall increased gelatinolytic activity in phagocytically challenged TM cells. This increased gelatinolytic activity with phagocytosis was partially blocked with an intracellular CTSB inhibitor. Altogether, these results suggest a potential role of phagocytosis in outflow pathway tissue homeostasis through the up-regulation and/or proteolytic activation of extracellular matrix remodeling genes.

  2. Nanoblinker: Brownian Motion Powered Bio-Nanomachine for FRET Detection of Phagocytic Phase of Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minchew, Candace L.; Didenko, Vladimir V.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a new type of bio-nanomachine which runs on thermal noise. The machine is solely powered by the random motion of water molecules in its environment and does not ever require re-fuelling. The construct, which is made of DNA and vaccinia virus topoisomerase protein, can detect DNA damage by employing fluorescence. It uses Brownian motion as a cyclic motor to continually separate and bring together two types of fluorescent hairpins participating in FRET. This bio-molecular oscillator is a fast and specific sensor of 5′OH double-strand DNA breaks present in phagocytic phase of apoptosis. The detection takes 30 s in solution and 3 min in cell suspensions. The phagocytic phase is critical for the effective execution of apoptosis as it ensures complete degradation of the dying cells’ DNA, preventing release of pathological, viral and tumor DNA and self-immunization. The construct can be used as a smart FRET probe in studies of cell death and phagocytosis. PMID:25268504

  3. The role of STIM and ORAI proteins in phagocytic immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demaurex, Nicolas; Nunes, Paula

    2016-04-01

    Phagocytic cells, such as neutrophils, macrophages, and dendritic cells, migrate to sites of infection or damage and are integral to innate immunity through two main mechanisms. The first is to directly neutralize foreign agents and damaged or infected cells by secreting toxic substances or ingesting them through phagocytosis. The second is to alert the adaptive immune system through the secretion of cytokines and the presentation of the ingested materials as antigens, inducing T cell maturation into helper, cytotoxic, or regulatory phenotypes. While calcium signaling has been implicated in numerous phagocyte functions, including differentiation, maturation, migration, secretion, and phagocytosis, the molecular components that mediate these Ca(2+)signals have been elusive. The discovery of the STIM and ORAI proteins has allowed researchers to begin clarifying the mechanisms and physiological impact of store-operated Ca(2+)entry, the major pathway for generating calcium signals in innate immune cells. Here, we review evidence from cell lines and mouse models linking STIM and ORAI proteins to the control of specific innate immune functions of neutrophils, macrophages, and dendritic cells. PMID:26764049

  4. Quantitation of microbicidal activity of mononuclear phagocytes: an in vitro technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rege, N N; Dahanukar, S A

    1993-01-01

    An in vitro assay technique was set up to determine the phagocytic and microbicidal activity of a monocyte-macrophage cell line using Candida species as test organisms. The norms were determined for the activity of peritoneal macrophages of rats (24.69 +/- 2.6% phagocytosis and 35.4 +/- 5.22% ICK) and human (27.89 +/- 3.63% phagocytosis and 50.91 +/- 6.3% ICK). The assay technique was used to test the degree of activation of macrophages induced by metronidazole, Tinospora cordifolia and Asparaqus racemousus and to compare their effects with a standard immunomodulator muramyl-dipeptide. All the three test agents increased the phagocytic and killing capacity of macrophages in a dose dependent manner upto a certain dose, beyond which either these activities were found to have plateaued or decreased. The optimal doses for MDP, Metronidazole, Asparagus racemosus and Tinospora cordifolia were found to be 100 micrograms, 300 mg/kg, 200 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg respectively. Patients with cirrhosis were screened for defects in monocyte function. The depressed monocyte function (20.58 +/- 5% phago and 41.24 +/- 12.19% ICK; P < 0.05) was observed indicating a compromised host defense. The utility of this candidicidal assay in experimental and clinical studies is discussed. PMID:8295140

  5. Cell-Type Specific Determinants of NRAMP1 Expression in Professional Phagocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu F. M. Cellier

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Natural resistance-associated macrophage protein 1 (Nramp1 or Solute carrier 11 member 1, Slc11a1 transports divalent metals across the membrane of late endosomes and lysosomes in professional phagocytes. Nramp1 represents an ancient eukaryotic cell-autonomous defense whereas the gene duplication that yielded Nramp1 and Nramp2 predated the origin of Sarcopterygians (lobe-finned fishes and tetrapods. SLC11A1 genetic polymorphisms associated with human resistance to tuberculosis consist of potential regulatory variants. Herein, current knowledge of the regulation of SLC11A1 gene expression is reviewed and comprehensive analysis of ENCODE data available for hematopoietic cell-types suggests a hypothesis for the regulation of SLC11A1 expression during myeloid development and phagocyte functional polarization. SLC11A1 is part of a 34.6 kb CTCF-insulated locus scattered with predicted regulatory elements: a 3' enhancer, a large 5' enhancer domain and four elements spread around the transcription start site (TSS, including several C/EBP and PU.1 sites. SLC11A1 locus ends appear mobilized by ETS-related factors early during myelopoiesis; activation of both 5' and 3' enhancers in myelo-monocytic cells correlate with transcription factor binding at the TSS. Characterizing the corresponding cis/trans determinants functionally will establish the mechanisms involved and possibly reveal genetic variation that impacts susceptibility to infectious or immune diseases.

  6. Capnocytophaga canimorsus: a human pathogen feeding at the surface of epithelial cells and phagocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Mally

    Full Text Available Capnocytophaga canimorsus, a commensal bacterium of the canine oral flora, has been repeatedly isolated since 1976 from severe human infections transmitted by dog bites. Here, we show that C. canimorsus exhibits robust growth when it is in direct contact with mammalian cells, including phagocytes. This property was found to be dependent on a surface-exposed sialidase allowing C. canimorsus to utilize internal aminosugars of glycan chains from host cell glycoproteins. Although sialidase probably evolved to sustain commensalism, by releasing carbohydrates from mucosal surfaces, it also contributed to bacterial persistence in a murine infection model: the wild type, but not the sialidase-deficient mutant, grew and persisted, both when infected singly or in competition. This study reveals an example of pathogenic bacteria feeding on mammalian cells, including phagocytes by deglycosylation of host glycans, and it illustrates how the adaptation of a commensal to its ecological niche in the host, here the dog's oral cavity, contributes to being a potential pathogen.

  7. Interferon-beta signaling in retinal mononuclear phagocytes attenuates pathological neovascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lückoff, Anika; Caramoy, Albert; Scholz, Rebecca; Prinz, Marco; Kalinke, Ulrich; Langmann, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of vision loss among the elderly. AMD pathogenesis involves chronic activation of the innate immune system including complement factors and microglia/macrophage reactivity in the retina. Here, we show that lack of interferon-β signaling in the retina accelerates mononuclear phagocyte reactivity and promotes choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in the laser model of neovascular AMD Complete deletion of interferon-α/β receptor (Ifnar) using Ifnar1(-/-) mice significantly enhanced early microglia and macrophage activation in lesion areas. This triggered subsequent vascular leakage and CNV at later stages. Similar findings were obtained in laser-treated Cx3cr1(Cre) (ER):Ifnar1(fl/fl) animals that allowed the tamoxifen-induced conditional depletion of Ifnar in resident mononuclear phagocytes only. Conversely, systemic IFN-β therapy of laser-treated wild-type animals effectively attenuated microgliosis and macrophage responses in the early stage of disease and significantly reduced CNV size in the late phase. Our results reveal a protective role of Ifnar signaling in retinal immune homeostasis and highlight a potential use for IFN-β therapy in the eye to limit chronic inflammation and pathological angiogenesis in AMD. PMID:27137488

  8. Examination of in vitro epithelial cell lines as models for Francisella tularensis non-phagocytic infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Karen Yi-Shyuan; Chua, Michael Dominic; Abdulla, Salima; Law, H T; Guttman, Julian Andrew

    2013-05-01

    Francisella tularensis (F. tularensis), the causative agent of tularemia, has long been known to invade and occupy non-phagocytic epithelial cells. Many epithelial cell infection models have been developed to study this process; however, due to the lack of consensus on infection methods and precise experimental procedures to evaluate invasion and replication, selection of appropriate models to use based on the literature is challenging. To evaluate in vitro non-phagocytic cell infection models, we chose 8 epithelial cultured cell lines from published models to infect with F. tularensis subspecies novicida (F. novicida) and compared the results to a recently developed model that used the mouse hepatocyte BNL CL.2 cell line. We utilized classical gentamicin-based invasion assays to determine total intracellular bacterial loads and employed microscopic examination with staining techniques that distinguished between intracellular and extracellular bacteria to provide an accurate assessment of the proportion of invaded host cells and the degree of bacterial replication. We found that COS-7 cells exhibited the greatest invasion rates; CMT-93 cells contained the largest intracellular bacterial loads; ad HEK-293s were capable of invasion and replication rates at high levels, but required shorter infection incubation times. Although COS-7, CMT-93 and HEK-293 cell lines may be suited to study certain aspects of invasion or replication, we found that BNL CL.2 cells appeared the most appropriate to study the overall pathogenesis of F. novicida when examined in toto. PMID:23523968

  9. Quantitation of microbicidal activity of mononuclear phagocytes: an in vitro technique.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rege N

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available An in vitro assay technique was set up to determine the phagocytic and microbicidal activity of a monocyte-macrophage cell line using Candida species as test organisms. The norms were determined for the activity of peritoneal macrophages of rats (24.69 +/- 2.6% phagocytosis and 35.4 +/- 5.22% ICK and human (27.89 +/- 3.63% phagocytosis and 50.91 +/- 6.3% ICK. The assay technique was used to test the degree of activation of macrophages induced by metronidazole, Tinospora cordifolia and Asparaqus racemousus and to compare their effects with a standard immunomodulator muramyl-dipeptide. All the three test agents increased the phagocytic and killing capacity of macrophages in a dose dependent manner upto a certain dose, beyond which either these activities were found to have plateaued or decreased. The optimal doses for MDP, Metronidazole, Asparagus racemosus and Tinospora cordifolia were found to be 100 micrograms, 300 mg/kg, 200 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg respectively. Patients with cirrhosis were screened for defects in monocyte function. The depressed monocyte function (20.58 +/- 5% phago and 41.24 +/- 12.19% ICK; P < 0.05 was observed indicating a compromised host defense. The utility of this candidicidal assay in experimental and clinical studies is discussed.

  10. Phagocytic function of monocyte-derived macrophages is not affected by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nottet, H S; de Graaf, L; de Vos, N M; Bakker, L J; van Strijp, J A; Visser, M R; Verhoef, J

    1993-07-01

    The immunopathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is characterized by the failure to control opportunistic infections. Here, the direct effect of HIV on macrophage phagocytic function was studied. HIV-1-infected monocyte-derived macrophages expressed as many Fc gamma and complement receptors as did control macrophages. The function of these receptors was not affected by HIV-1 infection since binding and internalization of opsonized Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus were not impaired. Production of reactive oxygen species induced by stimulation of the HIV-1-infected macrophages with opsonized E. coli, zymosan, or PMA was intact. HIV-1-infected macrophages killed opsonized E. coli and Candida albicans as effectively as did control macrophages. These results, therefore, do not support the hypothesis that HIV-1 infection of macrophages causes phagocytic dysfunction and suggest that HIV-induced abnormalities outside the mononuclear phagocyte system may lead to the inability to control opportunistic pathogens. PMID:8390549

  11. In vitro effects of the extracellular protein of Renibacterium salmoninarum on phagocyte function in brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Densmore, C L; Smith, S A; Holladay, S D

    1998-04-30

    Renibacterium salmoninarum is a facultative intracellular pathogen often found in host phagocytes where it appears to successfully avoid the host fish's immunological defenses. The objective of this investigation was to determine if soluble extracellular protein (ECP) produced by R. salmoninarum may contribute to the immunomodulation in bacterial kidney disease (BKD) via inhibition of phagocyte respiratory burst and/or phagocytosis mechanisms. Splenic cells from adult brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) were incubated with two different concentrations of ECP (0.1 mg/ml and 1.0 mg/ml) and viable R. salmoninarum. Splenic cell cultures were evaluated for respiratory burst activity via flow cytometry with the dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCF-DA) assay and for phagocytosis via light microscopic assessment of microsphere engulfment. Respiratory burst activity was significantly inhibited in all treatment groups as compared to untreated fish, while no differences were noted in phagocytic activity. PMID:9646439

  12. Could a B-1 cell derived phagocyte "be one" of the peritoneal macrophages during LPS-driven inflammation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Flavia Popi

    Full Text Available The inflammatory response is driven by signals that recruit and elicit immune cells to areas of tissue damage or infection. The concept of a mononuclear phagocyte system postulates that monocytes circulating in the bloodstream are recruited to inflamed tissues where they give rise to macrophages. A recent publication demonstrated that the large increase in the macrophages observed during infection was the result of the multiplication of these cells rather than the recruitment of blood monocytes. We demonstrated previously that B-1 cells undergo differentiation to acquire a mononuclear phagocyte phenotype in vitro (B-1CDP, and we propose that B-1 cells could be an alternative origin for peritoneal macrophages. A number of recent studies that describe the phagocytic and microbicidal activity of B-1 cells in vitro and in vivo support this hypothesis. Based on these findings, we further investigated the differentiation of B-1 cells into phagocytes in vivo in response to LPS-induced inflammation. Therefore, we investigated the role of B-1 cells in the composition of the peritoneal macrophage population after LPS stimulation using osteopetrotic mice, BALB/Xid mice and the depletion of monocytes/macrophages by clodronate treatment. We show that peritoneal macrophages appear in op/op((-/- mice after LPS stimulation and exhibit the same Ig gene rearrangement (VH11 that is often found in B-1 cells. These results strongly suggest that op/op((-/- peritoneal "macrophages" are B-1CDP. Similarly, the LPS-induced increase in the macrophage population was observed even following monocyte/macrophage depletion by clodronate. After monocyte/macrophage depletion by clodronate, LPS-elicited macrophages were observed in BALB/Xid mice only following the transfer of B-1 cells. Based on these data, we confirmed that B-1 cell differentiation into phagocytes also occurs in vivo. In conclusion, the results strongly suggest that B-1 cell derived phagocytes are a component of

  13. Altered Anxiety-like Behavior and Long-term Potentiation in the Bed Nucleus of the Stria Terminalis in Adult Mice Exposed to Chronic Social Isolation, Unpredictable Stress and Ethanol Beginning in Adolescence

    OpenAIRE

    Conrad, Kelly L; Winder, Danny G.

    2010-01-01

    Alcohol and chronic stress exposure, especially during adolescence, can lead to an increased risk in adulthood of developing alcohol use disorders (AUDs). To date, however, no study has assessed the potential long-term effects of chronic intermittent and unpredictable ethanol (EtOH) exposure in mice chronically stressed beginning in adolescence on brain function and anxiety-like behaviors in adulthood. In particular, alterations in function of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST), a...

  14. Cytokine-producing microglia have an altered beta-amyloid load in aged APP/PS1 Tg mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babcock, Alicia A; Ilkjær, Laura; Clausen, Bettina H;

    2015-01-01

    latter cytokines was generally increased in APP/PS1 Tg mice. Microglia that phagocytosed endogenously-produced Aβ were only observed in APP/PS1 Tg mice. Differences in phagocytic index and total Aβ load were observed in microglia with specific cytokine profiles. Both phagocytic index and total Aβ load...... mice, we confirmed that the majority of neocortical CD11b(+)(CD45(+)) microglia were resident cells (GFP(-)) in APP/PS1 Tg mice, even after selectively analysing CD11b(+)CD45(high) cells, which are typically considered to be infiltrating cells. Together, our data demonstrate that cytokine expression is...... selectively correlated with age and Aβ pathology, and is associated with an altered Aβ load in phagocytic microglia from APP/PS1 Tg mice. These findings have implications for understanding the regulation of microglial cytokine production and phagocytosis of Aβ in Alzheimer's disease....

  15. DMPD: CR3 (CD11b, CD18): a phagocyte and NK cell membrane receptor with multipleligand specificities and functions. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 8485905 CR3 (CD11b, CD18): a phagocyte and NK cell membrane receptor with multipleligand specificitie...) (.html) (.csml) Show CR3 (CD11b, CD18): a phagocyte and NK cell membrane receptor with multipleligand specificitie...d NK cell membrane receptor with multipleligand specificities and functions. Authors Ross GD, Vetvicka V. Pu

  16. Phagocytic responses of peritoneal macrophages and neutrophils are different in rats following prolonged exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clílton K. O. Ferreira

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze the effects of exhausting long-duration physical exercise (swimming sessions of different durations and intensities on the number and phagocytic capacity of macrophages and neutrophils in sedentary rats. INTRODUCTION: Exercise intensity, duration and frequency are important factors in determining immune response to physical effort. Thus, the effects of exhausting long-duration exercise are unclear. METHODS: Wistar rats were divided into two groups: an untreated group (macrophage study and oyster glycogen-treated rats (neutrophil study. In each group, the animals were subdivided into five groups (10 rats per group: unexercised controls, an unadapted low-intensity exercise group, an unadapted moderate-intensity exercise group, a preadapted low-intensity exercise group and a preadapted moderate-intensity exercise group. All exercises were performed to exhaustion, and preadaptation consisted of 5, 15, 30 and 45 min sessions. RESULTS: Macrophage study: the number of peritoneal macrophages significantly decreased (9.22 ± 1.78 x 10(6 after unadapted exercise but increased (21.50 ± 0.63 x 10(6 after preadapted low-intensity exercise, with no changes in the moderate-intensity exercise group. Phagocytic capacity, however, increased by more than 80% in all exercise groups (low/moderate, unadapted/preadapted. Neutrophil study: the number of peritoneal neutrophils significantly decreased after unadapted (29.20 ± 3.34 x 10(6 and preadapted (50.00 ± 3.53 x 10(6 low-intensity exercise but increased after unadapted (127.60 ± 5.14 x 10(6 and preadapted (221.80 ± 14.85 x 10(6 moderate exercise. Neutrophil phagocytic capacity decreased by 63% after unadapted moderate exercise but increased by 90% after corresponding preadapted sessions, with no changes in the low-intensity exercise groups. CONCLUSION: Neutrophils and macrophages of sedentary rats respond differently to exercise-induced stress. Adaptation sessions reduce exercise

  17. Effect of plastic catheters on the phagocytic activity of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-López, G; Pascual, A; Perea, E J

    1990-05-01

    The effect of five kinds of plastic catheters (polyvinyl chloride, Teflon, polyurethane, Vialon and siliconized latex) on the phagocytic and bactericidal function of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes was evaluated. In the presence of the polyvinyl chloride, Teflon and siliconized latex catheters, superoxide radical production by polymorphonuclear leukocytes was significantly inhibited. The effect of the siliconized latex catheter was presumably mediated by products eluted from the catheter into the medium, since the incubation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in eluates obtained from the incubation of this catheter in buffer induced a similar inhibitory effect. This phenomenon was not observed with polyurethane or Vialon catheters. Neither the catheters evaluated nor their eluates affected the uptake of opsonized Staphylococcus aureus by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. It is concluded that the polyvinyl chloride, Teflon and siliconized latex catheters used in this study could impair the respiratory burst of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. PMID:2164932

  18. Phagocyte respiratory burst activates macrophage erythropoietin signalling to promote acute inflammation resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Bangwei; Wang, Jinsong; Liu, Zongwei; Shen, Zigang; Shi, Rongchen; Liu, Yu-Qi; Liu, Yu; Jiang, Man; Wu, Yuzhang; Zhang, Zhiren

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation resolution is an active process, the failure of which causes uncontrolled inflammation which underlies many chronic diseases. Therefore, endogenous pathways that regulate inflammation resolution are fundamental and of wide interest. Here, we demonstrate that phagocyte respiratory burst-induced hypoxia activates macrophage erythropoietin signalling to promote acute inflammation resolution. This signalling is activated following acute but not chronic inflammation. Pharmacological or genetical inhibition of the respiratory burst suppresses hypoxia and macrophage erythropoietin signalling. Macrophage-specific erythropoietin receptor-deficient mice and chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) mice, which lack the capacity for respiratory burst, display impaired inflammation resolution, and exogenous erythropoietin enhances this resolution in WT and CGD mice. Mechanistically, erythropoietin increases macrophage engulfment of apoptotic neutrophils via PPARγ, promotes macrophage removal of debris and enhances macrophage migration to draining lymph nodes. Together, our results provide evidences of an endogenous pathway that regulates inflammation resolution, with important implications for treating inflammatory conditions. PMID:27397585

  19. A specific primed immune response in Drosophila is dependent on phagocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linh N Pham

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila melanogaster, like other invertebrates, relies solely on its innate immune response to fight invading microbes; by definition, innate immunity lacks adaptive characteristics. However, we show here that priming Drosophila with a sublethal dose of Streptococcus pneumoniae protects against an otherwise-lethal second challenge of S. pneumoniae. This protective effect exhibits coarse specificity for S. pneumoniae and persists for the life of the fly. Although not all microbial challenges induced this specific primed response, we find that a similar specific protection can be elicited by Beauveria bassiana, a natural fly pathogen. To characterize this primed response, we focused on S. pneumoniae-induced protection. The mechanism underlying this protective effect requires phagocytes and the Toll pathway. However, activation of the Toll pathway is not sufficient for priming-induced protection. This work contradicts the paradigm that insect immune responses cannot adapt and will promote the search for similar responses overlooked in organisms with an adaptive immune response.

  20. Effect of free radicals released from pulmonary alveolar phagocytes on development of radiation pneumonia in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measuring the hydroxyproline (HyP) content in rat lungs and the chemiluminescence (CL) of bronchus alveolar lavage fluid cell (BALFC) at 0.5, 1 and 2 months after irradiation with 60Co γ-rays respectively, we found that the amount of BALFC and its CL stimulated by zymosan and the pulmonary HyP content were apparently increased after irradiation, and these alternations took a favourable turn when selenium was supplemented to irradiated rats, suggesting that selenium protected the rats from radiation injury of lung. In addition, we found that there were certain interrelations between the multiplication of pulmonary fibrocytes and the free radicals released from accumulated BALFC in pulmonary alveoli, indicating that the free radicals produced from alveolar phagocytes may be an important factor in development of rat radiation pneumonia

  1. Blood phagocyte free radical production and plasma cytokine levels in patients undergoing open heart surgery or heart transplantation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubala, Lukáš; Číž, Milan; Čížová, Hana; Černý, J.; Němec, P.; Studeník, P.; Lojek, Antonín

    Antalya , 2001, s. 79. [Free Radicals, Nitric Oxide, and Inflammation: Molecular, Biochemical, and Clinical Aspects. Antalya (TR), 23.09.2001-03.10.2001] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Keywords : blood phagocyte * free radical production * heart surgery Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  2. Interaction between Salmonella typhimurium and phagocytic cells in pigs - Phagocytosis, oxidative burst and killing in polymorphonuclear leukocytes and monocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riber, Ulla; Lind, Peter

    1999-01-01

    Interactions between Salmonella typhimurium and peripheral blood leucocytes from healthy, Salmonella-free pigs were investigated in vitro. Both granulocytes and monocytes phagocytized FITC-labelled heat-killed Salmonella bacteria as shown by flow cytometry. Phagocytosis in whole blood and isolate...

  3. Development of a fluorescence-based in vivo phagocytosis assay to measure mononuclear phagocyte system function in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartaro, Karrie; VanVolkenburg, Maria; Wilkie, Dean; Coskran, Timothy M; Kreeger, John M; Kawabata, Thomas T; Casinghino, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    The mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS) which provides protection against infection is made up of phagocytic cells that engulf and digest bacteria or other foreign substances. Suppression of the MPS may lead to decreased clearance of pathogenic microbes. Drug delivery systems and immunomodulatory therapeutics that target phagocytes have a potential to inhibit MPS function. Available methods to measure inhibition of MPS function use uptake of radioactively-labeled cells or labor-intensive semi-quantitative histologic techniques. The objective of this work was to develop a non-radioactive quantitative method to measure MPS function in vivo by administering heat-killed E. coli conjugated to a pH-sensitive fluorescent dye (Bioparticles(®)). Fluorescence of the Bioparticles(®) is increased at low pH when they are in phagocytic lysosomes. The amount of Bioparticles(®) phagocytosed by MPS organs in rats was determined by measuring fluorescence intensity in livers and spleens ex vivo using an IVIS(®) Spectrum Pre-clinical In Vivo Imaging System. Phagocytosis of the particles by peripheral blood neutrophils was measured by flow cytometry. To assess method sensitivity, compounds likely to suppress the MPS [clodronate-containing liposomes, carboxylate-modified latex particles, maleic vinyl ether (MVE) polymer] were administered to rats prior to injection of the Bioparticles(®). The E. coli particles consistently co-localized with macrophage markers in the liver but not in the spleen. All of the compounds tested decreased phagocytosis in the liver, but had no consistent effects on phagocytic activity in the spleen. In addition, administration of clodronate liposomes and MVE polymer increased the percentage of peripheral blood neutrophils that phagocytosed the Bioparticles(®). In conclusion, an in vivo rat model was developed that measures phagocytosis of E. coli particles in the liver and may be used to assess the impact of test compounds on MPS function. Still, the

  4. Calcium influx rescues adenylate cyclase-hemolysin from rapid cell membrane removal and enables phagocyte permeabilization by toxin pores.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radovan Fiser

    Full Text Available Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin-hemolysin (CyaA penetrates the cytoplasmic membrane of phagocytes and employs two distinct conformers to exert its multiple activities. One conformer forms cation-selective pores that permeabilize phagocyte membrane for efflux of cytosolic potassium. The other conformer conducts extracellular calcium ions across cytoplasmic membrane of cells, relocates into lipid rafts, translocates the adenylate cyclase enzyme (AC domain into cells and converts cytosolic ATP to cAMP. We show that the calcium-conducting activity of CyaA controls the path and kinetics of endocytic removal of toxin pores from phagocyte membrane. The enzymatically inactive but calcium-conducting CyaA-AC⁻ toxoid was endocytosed via a clathrin-dependent pathway. In contrast, a doubly mutated (E570K+E581P toxoid, unable to conduct Ca²⁺ into cells, was rapidly internalized by membrane macropinocytosis, unless rescued by Ca²⁺ influx promoted in trans by ionomycin or intact toxoid. Moreover, a fully pore-forming CyaA-ΔAC hemolysin failed to permeabilize phagocytes, unless endocytic removal of its pores from cell membrane was decelerated through Ca²⁺ influx promoted by molecules locked in a Ca²⁺-conducting conformation by the 3D1 antibody. Inhibition of endocytosis also enabled the native B. pertussis-produced CyaA to induce lysis of J774A.1 macrophages at concentrations starting from 100 ng/ml. Hence, by mediating calcium influx into cells, the translocating conformer of CyaA controls the removal of bystander toxin pores from phagocyte membrane. This triggers a positive feedback loop of exacerbated cell permeabilization, where the efflux of cellular potassium yields further decreased toxin pore removal from cell membrane and this further enhances cell permeabilization and potassium efflux.

  5. Phagocytic cell responses to silica-coated dithiocarbamate-functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles and mercury co-exposures in Anguilla anguilla L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Leonor; Mohmood, Iram; Trindade, Tito; Anjum, Naser A; Duarte, Armando C; Pereira, Eduarda

    2016-06-01

    Immune system responses in fish are considered as suitable and sensitive biomarkers for monitoring aquatic pollution. However, a clear knowledge gap persists in the literture on the immunotoxic potential of engineered nanoparticles toward aquatic organisms such as fish. Employing major enzymatic- (glutathione reductase, GR; glutathione peroxidase, GPX; glutathione sulfo-transferase, GST; catalase, CAT) and thiol- (non-protein thiols, NP-SH; total glutathione, TGSH)-based defense biomarkers, this study assessed the response of phagocytes isolated from peritoneum (P-phagocytes), gill (G-phagocytes), head kidney (HK-phagocytes), and spleen (S-phagocytes) of European eel (Anguilla anguilla L.) to silica-coated magnetite particles (Fe3O4@SiO2/SiDTC, hereafter called IONP; size range: 82 ± 21 to 100 ± 30 nm; 2.5 mg L(-1)) alone and IONP and mercury (Hg; 50 μg L(-1)) concomitant exposures. Responses of previous biomarkers were studied in P-phagocytes, G-phagocytes, HK-phagocytes, and S-phagocytes collected during 0, 2, 4, 8, 16, 24, 48, and 72 h of exposures. Contingent to hour of exposure to IONP, Hg, and IONP + Hg GST, GPX, CAT, NP-SH, and TGSH exhibited their differential responses in all the phagocytic cells considered. In particular, under IONP exposure, the potential occurrence of the GSH-independent antioxidant defense was indicated by the observed herein inhibition in the enzymatic- and thiol-based defense in A. anguilla phagocytes. In contrast, the response of P-, G-, HK-, and S-phagocytes to the increasing Hg exposure period reflected an increased detoxification activity. Notably, the occurrence of an antagonism between IONP and Hg was depicted during late hours (72 h) under IONP + Hg concomitant exposure, where elevations in the defense biomarkers were depicted. Overall, the P-, G-, HK-, and S-phagocytic cells exhibited a differential induction in the studied enzymes and thiols to counteract impacts of IONP, Hg, and IONP + Hg concomitant

  6. Loss of phosphoinositide 3-kinase γ decreases migration and activation of phagocytes but not T cell activation in antigen-induced arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wetzker Reinhard

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phosphoinositide 3-kinase γ (PI3Kγ has been depicted as a major regulator of inflammatory processes, including leukocyte activation and migration towards several chemokines. This study aims to explore the role of PI3Kγ in the murine model of antigen-induced arthritis (AIA. Methods Development of AIA was investigated in wildtype and PI3Kγ-deficient mice as well as in mice treated with a specific inhibitor of PI3Kγ (AS-605240 in comparison to untreated animals. Inflammatory reactions of leukocytes, including macrophage and T cell activation, and macrophage migration, were studied in vivo and in vitro. Results Genetic deletion or pharmacological inhibition of PI3Kγ induced a marked decrease of clinical symptoms in early AIA, together with a considerably diminished macrophage migration and activation (lower production of NO, IL-1β, IL-6. Also, macrophage and neutrophil infiltration into the knee joint were impaired in vivo. However, T cell functions, measured by cytokine production (TNFα, IFNγ, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-17 in vitro and DTH reaction in vivo were not altered, and accordingly, disease developed normally at later timepoints Conclusion PI3Kγ specifically affects phagocyte function in the AIA model but has no impact on T cell activation.

  7. Influência da ooforectomia e da gravidez na função fagocitária do sistema mononuclear fagocitário em modelo experimental The influence of oophorectomy and pregnancy on the phagocytic function of the phagocytic mononuclear system in experimental model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo de Souza Vasconcellos

    2005-06-01

    99mTc by liver, spleen and lung. The remnant colloid in the blood steam was verified by mears of a blood clot. The weight and radioactive level of the samples were measured and the results were compared by Student's t test, with significance for p < 0.05. Histological analyses of these organs were also performed. RESULTS: The scintigraphic values were higher in liver followed by spleen and lung. The blood clot presented only little amount of radiation. The oophorectomized rats did not registered alterations in colloids uptake when compared with the control group. Although the pregnant rats registered lower radiation in the liver and higher in the lung no histological abnormality was found in all groups. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, pregnancy interferes with the phagocytic function of PMS, however oophorectomy does not seem to modify this function.

  8. Sex and Exercise Interact to Alter the Expression of Anabolic Androgenic Steroid-Induced Anxiety-Like Behaviors in the Mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Onakomaiya, Marie M.; Porter, Donna M.; Oberlander, Joseph G.; Henderson, Leslie P.

    2014-01-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are taken by both sexes to enhance athletic performance and body image, nearly always in conjunction with an exercise regime. Although taken to improve physical attributes, chronic AAS use can promote negative behavior, including anxiety. Few studies have directly compared the impact of AAS use in males versus females or assessed the interaction of exercise and AAS. We show that AAS increase anxiety-like behaviors in female but not male mice and that volunta...

  9. Repeated social defeat increases reactive emotional coping behavior and alters functional responses in serotonergic neurons in the rat dorsal raphe nucleus

    OpenAIRE

    Paul, Evan D; Hale, Matthew W.; Lukkes, Jodi L.; Valentine, McKenzie J.; Sarchet, Derek M.; Lowry, Christopher A.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic stress is a vulnerability factor for a number of psychiatric disorders, including anxiety and affective disorders. Social defeat in rats has proven to be a useful paradigm to investigate the neural mechanisms underlying physiologic and behavioral adaptation to acute and chronic stress. Previous studies suggest that serotonergic systems may contribute to the physiologic and behavioral adaptation to chronic stress, including social defeat in rodent models. In order to test the hypothesi...

  10. Neonatal lesions of orbital frontal areas 11/13 in monkeys alter goal-directed behavior but spare fear conditioning and safety signal learning.

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    Andy M Kazama

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies in monkeys have demonstrated that damage to the lateral subfields of orbital frontal cortex (OFC areas 11/13 yields profound changes in flexible modulation of goal-directed behaviors and a lack in fear regulation. Yet, little consideration has been placed on its role in emotional and social development throughout life. The current study investigated the effects of neonatal lesions of the OFC on the flexible modulation of goal-directed behaviors and fear responses in monkeys. Infant monkeys received neonatal lesions of OFC areas 11/13 or sham-lesions during the first post-natal week. Modulation of goal-directed behaviors was measured with a devaluation task at 3-4 years and 6-7 years. Modulation of fear reactivity by safety signals was assessed with the AX+/BX- potentiated-startle paradigm at 6-7 years. Similar to adult-onset OFC lesions, selective neonatal lesions of OFC areas 11/13 yielded a failure to modulate behavioral responses guided by changes in reward value, but spared the ability to modulate fear responses in the presence of safety signals. These results suggest that these areas play a critical role in the development of behavioral adaptation during goal-directed behaviors, but not, or less so, in the development of the ability to process emotionally salient stimuli and to modulate emotional reactivity using environmental contexts, which could be supported by other OFC subfields, such as the most ventromedial subfields (i.e. areas 14/25. Given similar impaired decision-making abilities and spared modulation of fear followed both neonatal lesions of either OFC areas 11 and 13 or amygdala (Kazama et al., 2012; Kazama & Bachevalier, 2013, the present results suggest that interactions between these two neural structures play a critical role in the development of behavioral adaptation; an ability essential for the self-regulation of emotion and behavior that assures the maintenance of successful social relationships.

  11. Altered microglia morphology and higher resilience to stress-induced depression-like behavior in CX3CR1-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellwig, Sabine; Brioschi, Simone; Dieni, Sandra; Frings, Lars; Masuch, Annette; Blank, Thomas; Biber, Knut

    2016-07-01

    Microglia are suggested to be involved in several neuropsychiatric diseases. Indeed changes in microglia morphology have been reported in different mouse models of depression. A crucial regulatory system for microglia function is the well-defined CX3C axis. Thus, we aimed to clarify the role of microglia and CX3CR1 in depressive behavior by subjecting CX3CR1-deficient mice to a particular chronic despair model (CDM) paradigm known to exhibit face validity to major depressive disorder. In wild-type mice we observed the development of chronic depressive-like behavior after 5days of repetitive swim stress. 3D-reconstructions of Iba-1-labeled microglia in the dentate molecular layer revealed that behavioral effects were associated with changes in microglia morphology towards a state of hyper-ramification. Chronic treatment with the anti-depressant venlafaxine ameliorated depression-like behavior and restored microglia morphology. In contrast, CX3CR1 deficient mice showed a clear resistance to either (i) stress-induced depressive-like behavior, (ii) changes in microglia morphology and (iii) antidepressant treatment. Our data point towards a role of hyper-ramified microglia in the etiology of chronic depression. The lack of effects in CX3CR1 deficient mice suggests that microglia hyper-ramification is controlled by neuron-microglia signaling via the CX3C axis. However, it remains to be elucidated how hyper-ramified microglia contribute to depressive-like behavior. PMID:26576722

  12. Modulation of swimming behavior in the medicinal leech. IV. Serotonin-induced alteration of synaptic interactions between neurons of the swim circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangan, P S; Cometa, A K; Friesen, W O

    1994-12-01

    Serotonin enhances the expression of swimming in the medicinal leech Hirudo medicinalis. These two reports examine the physiological causes underlying this modulation. The initial paper (Mangan et al. 1994) demonstrated that serotonin enhanced the participation of inhibitory swim motor neurons (MNs) in the generation of the swimming rhythm in the isolated nerve cord. In experiments reported here, we examined whether synaptic interactions between neurons of the swim circuit are altered by serotonin. Following exposure to 50 microM serotonin, pairwise intracellular recording revealed the presence of a time-dependent synaptic decrement. Synaptic decrement was characterized by: 1) a substantial decline in synaptic inhibition (half-decay time about 0.4 s) during constant presynaptic excitation; 2) a reduced half-time of recovery from synaptic inhibition; and 3) a strong dependence on the presynaptic neuron's membrane potential. We found little alteration in the physiology of synaptic transmission involving MNs following amine depletion in leech nerve cords. We propose that alterations in synaptic interactions resulting from exposure to elevated serotonin levels, coupled with the changes in MN cellular properties described earlier, are crucial to the increased efficacy of MNs in participating in generating and expressing the leech swimming rhythm. PMID:7807416

  13. Effects of lethal and non-lethal malaria on the mononuclear phagocyte system

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    Carlos Eduardo Tosta

    1983-03-01

    Full Text Available The effects ofone non-lethal species ofmalarialparasite, Plasmodium yoelii, and one lethal species, P. berghei, on the mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS of BALB/c mice were studied. P. yoelii caused a greater and more sustained expansion and activation of the MPS, and the two major populations of spleen phagocytic cells-red pulp and marginal zone macrophages - exhibited a greater increase in numbers in this infection. During the course of P. berghei mataria, the spleen was progressively occupied by haematopoietic tissue and, at the terminal stage of infection, an extensive depletion of lymphocytes and macrophages was apparent. The possibility was suggested that the outcome of mataria may be inftuenced by the particular way the parasite interacts with the MPS.Estudou-se o efeito da infecção causada por espécie letal (Plasmodium berghei e não- letal (P. yoelii de plasmódio sobre o sistema de fagócitos mononucleares de camundongo BALB/c. O P. yoelii causou maior e mais prolongada expansão e ativação do sistema de macrófagos. As duas mais importantes populações de fagócitos esplênicos - macrófagos de polpa vermelha e da zona marginal - exibiam maior aumento do número de células nesta infecção. Durante a evolução da malária por P. berghei, o baço foi progressivamente ocupado por tecido hematopoiético e, na fase terminal da infecção, observou-se significativa depleção dos linfócitos e macrófagos esplênicos. Os dados apresentados indicam que a evolução da malária depende do tipo de interação entre o plasmódio e o sistema de fagócitos mononucleares.

  14. Knockout of the norepinephrine transporter and pharmacologically diverse antidepressants prevent behavioral and brain neurotrophin alterations in two chronic stress models of depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haenisch, Britta; Bilkei-Gorzo, Andras; Caron, Marc G.; Bönisch, Heinz

    2009-01-01

    Diverse factors such as changes in neurotrophins and brain plasticity have been proposed to be involved in the actions of antidepressant drugs (ADs). However, in mouse models of depression based on chronic stress, it is still unclear whether simultaneous changes in behavior and neurotrophin expression occur and whether these changes can be corrected or prevented comparably by chronic administration of ADs or genetic manipulations that produce antidepressant-like effects such as the knockout (KO) of the norepinephrine transporter (NET) gene. Here we show that chronic restraint or social defeat stress induce comparable effects on behavior and changes in the expression of neurotrophins in depression-related brain regions. Chronic stress caused down-regulation of BDNF, NGF and NT-3 in hippocampus and cerebral cortex and up-regulation of these targets in striatal regions. In wild-type mice, these effects could be prevented by concomitant chronic administration of five pharmacologically diverse ADs. In contrast, NETKO mice were resistant to stress-induced depressive-like changes in behavior and brain neurotrophin expression. Thus, the resistance of the NETKO mice to the stress-induced depression-associated behaviors and biochemical changes highlight the importance of noradrenergic pathways in the maintenance of mood. In addition, these mice represent a useful model to study depression-resistant behaviors, and they might help to provide deeper insights into the identification of downstream targets involved in the mechanisms of antidepressants. PMID:19694905

  15. An endocrine disruptor, bisphenol A, affects development in the protochordate Ciona intestinalis: Hatching rates and swimming behavior alter in a dose-dependent manner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is widely used industrially to produce polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins. Numerous studies document the harmful effects caused by low-dose BPA exposure especially on nervous systems and behavior in experimental animals such as mice and rats. Here, we exposed embryos of a model chordate, Ciona intestinalis, to seawater containing BPA to evaluate adverse effects on embryonic development and on the swimming behavior of subsequent larvae. Ciona is ideal because its larva develops rapidly and has few cells. The rate of larval hatching decreased in a dose-dependent manner with exposures to BPA above 3 μM; swimming behavior was also affected in larvae emerging from embryos exposed to 1 μM BPA. Adverse effects were most severe on fertilized eggs exposed to BPA within 7 h post-fertilization. Ciona shares twelve nuclear receptors with mammals, and BPA is proposed to disturb the physiological functions of one or more of these. - Highlights: ► Embryos of Ciona intestinalis were exposed to BPA to evaluate its developmental effects. ► The rate of larval hatching decreased in a dose-dependent manner. ► Swimming behavior was affected in larvae that emerge from embryos exposed to 1 μM BPA. ► Our findings will support a new strategy to analyze the developmental effects induced by BPA. - Exposure of fertilized Ciona embryos to BPA decreased their hatch rate in a dose-dependent manner and led to abnormal larval swimming behavior.

  16. Long-Term Provision of Environmental Resources Alters Behavior but not Physiology or Neuroanatomy of Male and Female BALB/c and C57BL/6 Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clipperton-Allen, Amy E; Ingrao, Joelle C; Ruggiero, Laura; Batista, Lucas; Ovari, Jelena; Hammermueller, Jutta; Armstrong, John N; Bienzle, Dorothee; Choleris, Elena; Turner, Patricia V

    2015-11-01

    Few studies have evaluated the long-term effects of providing environmental resources to mice. This consideration is important given that mice are often maintained in vivaria for months. We evaluated the effects of providing simple cage resources (wood wool, cotton nesting material, a plastic tunnel, and oat cereal) compared with standard housing (solid-bottom cage with hardwood chips) to group-housed adult male and female C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice (n = 20/sex/strain/group) over 6 mo to determine whether these resources had a lasting effect on animal physiology, anatomy, and behavior. Body weights increased in all groups over time but were proportionately higher in male and female BALB/c mice housed in resource-supplemented environments. Throughout the study, adding environmental resources had no effect on hematology and lymphocyte subsets, fecal corticoid metabolite levels, response to LPS injection, or dendritic spine length or density. Strain- or sex×environmentspecific changes occurred in dark-light activity and thermal nociceptive responses. Dominant agonistic behaviors, abnormal conspecific sexual behaviors, and social nonagonistic behaviors demonstrated sex and strain×environment interactions such that fewer maladaptive social behaviors were noted in mice that were provided with environmental resources. This association was particularly evident in male mice of both strains in resource-supplemented environments. A small but significant increase in brain weight:body weight ratios occurred in mice in resource-supplemented environments. Under the conditions evaluated here, consistent use of simple environmental resources had a positive long-term effect on the behavioral wellbeing of male and female BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice yet minimally affected other aspects of murine physiology and neuroanatomy. PMID:26632781

  17. Phagocytic and oxidative-burst activity of blood leukocytes in rats fed a protein-free diet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sawosz, Ewa; Winnicka, Anna; Chwalibog, André;

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of two weeks' protein deprivation on the cellular parameters of non-specific immunity in rats. Wistar rats (200-250 g) were divided into two groups (2x12) and were fed two isoenergetic (control and protein-free) diets. The phagocytic activity...... of neutrophils and monocytes, and the oxidative-burst activity of neutrophils of peripheral blood, were determined by flow cytometry after stimulation with E. coli and phorbol 12-mirystate 13-acetate. Feeding the protein-free diet for two weeks did not influence the phagocytic activity of neutrophils......, monocytes or blood morphology. However, the oxidative burst of stimulated neutrophils was increased indicating that two weeks' protein deprivation does not depress the oxygen-dependent killing mechanism in neutrophils, but may lead to the overproduction of reactive oxygen species....

  18. Essential role of MFG-E8 for phagocytic properties of microglial cells.

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    Yong Liu

    Full Text Available Milk fat globule factor-E8 (MFG-E8 has been regarded as a key factor involved in the phagocytosis of apoptotic cells. We induced a lentivirus into the microglial cells for the augmentation or abrogation of MFG-E8 expression in mouse microglial cells, and investigated phagocytosis of phosphatidylserine tagged human red blood cells (hRBCs in co-cultures. Increased MFG-E8 levels were associated with a significant increase in phagocytic activity compared to the controls. Conversely, phagocytosis dramitically decreased due to the abrogation of MFG-E8. In addition, the expression of the inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α and IL-1β, also increased or decreased in the microglial cells with the augmentation or abrogation of MFG-E8, respectively. Our findings indicate that the enhanced expression of MFG-E8 could increase phagocytosis of apoptotic cells; conversely, the rate of phagocytosis and the expression of inflammatory cytokines decreased when MFG-E8 expression was knocked down. Our results confirm that MFG-E8 plays an important role in phagocytosis, and possibly serves as an essential signal molecule for microglial cells.

  19. Influence of dietary nucleotide restriction on bacterial sepsis and phagocytic cell function in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, A D; Fanslow, W C; Drath, D B; Rudolph, F B; Van Buren, C T

    1986-02-01

    Although enzyme defects in purine metabolism have revealed the importance of these substrates to maintenance of a normal immune response, the role of exogenous nucleotides on the cells that mediate the host defense system has remained largely unexplored. Recent investigations have revealed that dietary nucleotides are vital to the maintenance of cell-mediated responses to antigen stimulation. To test the influence of dietary nucleotide deprivation on resistance to infection, Balb/c mice were maintained on chow, a nucleotide-free (NF) diet, or an NF diet repleted with adenine, uracil, or RNA. Mice on the NF diet suffered 100% mortality following intravenous challenge with Staphylococcus aureus, while chow-fed and RNA- or uracil-repleted mice demonstrated significantly greater resistance to this bacterial challenge. Macrophages from mice on the NF diet had decreased phagocytic activity as measured by uptake of radiolabeled bacteria compared with mice maintained on the NF diet supplemented with adenine, uracil, or RNA. No change in S aureus antibody response was noted on the various diets. Although the mechanism of this suppression of nonspecific immunity remains unclear, provision of nucleotides to defined diets appears vital to maintain host resistance to bacterial challenge. PMID:3947217

  20. The atherogenic bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis evades circulating phagocytes by adhering to erythrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belstrøm, Daniel; Holmstrup, Palle; Damgaard, Christian;

    2011-01-01

    A relationship between periodontitis and coronary heart disease has been investigated intensively. A pathogenic role for the oral bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis has been suggested for both diseases. We examined whether complement activation by P. gingivalis strain ATCC 33277 allows the bacter......A relationship between periodontitis and coronary heart disease has been investigated intensively. A pathogenic role for the oral bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis has been suggested for both diseases. We examined whether complement activation by P. gingivalis strain ATCC 33277 allows...... the bacterium to adhere to human red blood cells (RBCs) and thereby evade attack by circulating phagocytes. On incubation with normal human serum, the P. gingivalis strain efficiently fixed complement component 3 (C3). Incubation of bacteria with washed whole blood cells suspended in autologous serum resulted......) and that by monocytes after between 15 min and 30 min of incubation (by 66% and 53%, respectively). The attachment of C3b/iC3b to bacterium-bearing RBCs decreased progressively after 15 min, indicating that conversion of C3 fragments into C3dg occurred, decreasing the affinity for CR1 on RBCs. We propose that P...

  1. Mycobacterium leprae phenolglycolipid-1 expressed by engineered M. bovis BCG modulates early interaction with human phagocytes.

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    Guillaume Tabouret

    Full Text Available The species-specific phenolic glycolipid 1 (PGL-1 is suspected to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of leprosy, a chronic disease of the skin and peripheral nerves caused by Mycobacterium leprae. Based on studies using the purified compound, PGL-1 was proposed to mediate the tropism of M. leprae for the nervous system and to modulate host immune responses. However, deciphering the biological function of this glycolipid has been hampered by the inability to grow M. leprae in vitro and to genetically engineer this bacterium. Here, we identified the M. leprae genes required for the biosynthesis of the species-specific saccharidic domain of PGL-1 and reprogrammed seven enzymatic steps in M. bovis BCG to make it synthesize and display PGL-1 in the context of an M. leprae-like cell envelope. This recombinant strain provides us with a unique tool to address the key questions of the contribution of PGL-1 in the infection process and to study the underlying molecular mechanisms. We found that PGL-1 production endowed recombinant BCG with an increased capacity to exploit complement receptor 3 (CR3 for efficient invasion of human macrophages and evasion of inflammatory responses. PGL-1 production also promoted bacterial uptake by human dendritic cells and dampened their infection-induced maturation. Our results therefore suggest that M. leprae produces PGL-1 for immune-silent invasion of host phagocytic cells.

  2. Effect of influenza infection on the phagocytic and bactericidal activities of pulmonary macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of mouse-adapted influenza A/PR/8/34 virus on pulmonary macrophage function was evaluated by using an in vitro system which allowed direct virus interaction with macrophages and then separate analysis of the steps required for bacterial clearance by macrophages. Infection of macrophages with this virus resulted in the appearance of a hemagglutinating activity on the macrophage surface; expression of this activity was inhibited by amantadine, 2-deoxyglucose, and cycloheximide and by pretreatment of the virus inoculum with with ultraviolet light and specific antiserum. After influenza infection, net ingestion of viable Staphylococcus aureus by macrophage monolayers was unaltered and there was no change in the fraction of the monolayer which ingested cocci over a wide range of bacterial inputs. Influenza-infected microphages also inactivated intracellular S. aureus at a rate indistinguishable from controls. Therefore, these in vitro studies do not support the hypothesis that the defect in pulmonary antibacterial mechanisms associated with influenza infections results from a direct effect of virus infection on either the phagocytic or bactericidal activity of resistant pulmonary macarophages

  3. Effect of Clinoptilolite and Sepiolite Nanoclays on Human and Parasitic Highly Phagocytic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledano-Magaña, Yanis; Flores-Santos, Leticia; Montes de Oca, Georgina; González-Montiel, Alfonso; Laclette, Juan-Pedro; Carrero, Julio-César

    2015-01-01

    Nanoclays have potential applications in biomedicine raising the need to evaluate their toxicity in in vitro models as a first approach to its biocompatibility. In this study, in vitro toxicity of clinoptilolite and sepiolite nanoclays (NC) was analyzed in highly phagocytic cultures of amoebas and human and mice macrophages. While amebic viability was significantly affected only by sepiolite NC at concentrations higher than 0.1 mg/mL, the effect on macrophage cultures was dependent on the origin of the cells. Macrophages derived from human peripheral blood monocytes were less affected in viability (25% decrease at 48 h), followed by the RAW 264.7 cell line (40%), and finally, macrophages derived from mice bone marrow monocytes (98%). Moreover, the cell line and mice macrophages die mainly by necrosis, whereas human macrophages exhibit increased apoptosis. Cytokine expression analysis in media of sepiolite NC treated cultures showed a proinflammatory profile (INFγ, IL-1α, IL-8, and IL-6), in contrast with clinoptilolite NC that induced lees cytokines with concomitant production of IL-10. The results show that sepiolite NC is more toxic to amoebas and macrophages than clinoptilolite NC, mostly in a time and dose-dependent manner. However, the effect of sepiolite NC was comparable with talc powder suggesting that both NC have low cytotoxicity in vitro. PMID:26090385

  4. Clearance and binding of radiolabeled glycoproteins by cells of the murine mononuclear phagocyte system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The clearance and binding of radiolabeled lactoferrin and fast α2-macroglobulin were studied. Both glycoproteins cleared rapidly following intravenous injection in mice, and both bound specifically to discrete receptors on murine peritoneal macrophages. The simultaneous presence of excess, unlabeled ligands specific for receptors recognizing terminal fucose, mannose, N-acetylglucosamine or galactose residues did not inhibit the clearance or binding of either lactoferrin or fast-α2M. The clearance and binding of enzymatically defucosylated lactoferrin was indistinguishable from native lactoferrin, indicating that terminal α(1-3)-linked fucose on lactoferrin is not necessary for receptor recognition. The clearance and binding of two fast -α2M forms, α2M-trypsin and α2M-MeNH2 cross compete with each other. Saturation binding studies indicated that the total binding of mannosyl -BSA, fusocyl-BSA, and N-acetylglucosaminyl-BSA to macrophages activated by BCG was approximately 15% of the levels observed with inflammatory macrophages elicited by thioglycollate broth. Cross-competition binding studies demonstrated a common surface receptor mediated binding of all three neoglycoprotein ligands and was identical to the receptor on mononuclear phagocytes that binds mannosyl- and N-acetylglucosaminyl-terminated glycoproteins. These results suggest that difference between discrete states of macrophage function may be correlated with selective changes in levels of the surface receptor for mannose-containing glycoproteins

  5. CHARACTERISTICS OF PHAGOCYTIC CELLS IN PATIENTS WITH ACUTE LEUKEMIA WITH AN INFECTIOUS SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Plotnikova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The aim of this study was to investigate some characteristics of neutrophils and monocytes in patients with acute leukemia, depending on presence of an infectious syndrome, as based on studying of CD16, CD64, HLA-DR receptors, along with assaying myeloperoxidase (MPO and functional activity of the cells. Infectious syndrome in acute leukemia patients was accompanied by changes in antibody-dependent cytotoxicity against neutrophils (decreased CD16 and increase in CD64 expression, lower phagocytic capacity of the cells, and myeloperoxidase deficiency of neutrophils and monocytes. In patients with inflammatory manifestations of infectious syndrome (i.e., acute tonsillitis, bronchitis, pneumonia, etc., the signs of neutrophilic insussiciency were more pronounced, i.e., CD16+ neutrophils comprised 24.36±7.43%, as compared with 74.21±5.43% in controls, p < 0.001; MPO positivity was detected in 29.15±12.6% of the cells against 96.1±1.94% in controls, p < 0.01; MPO expression: 5.34±3.07 MFI, with 32.9±10.76 in controls, p < 0,05. These data suggest significant disturbances of anti-infectious elimination mechanisms.

  6. CD66 carcinoembryonic antigens mediate interactions between Opa-expressing Neisseria gonorrhoeae and human polymorphonuclear phagocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray-Owen, S D; Dehio, C; Haude, A; Grunert, F; Meyer, T F

    1997-06-16

    Colonization of urogenital tissues by the human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae is characteristically associated with purulent exudates of polymorphonuclear phagocytes (PMNs) containing apparently viable bacteria. Distinct variant forms of the phase-variable opacity-associated (Opa) outer membrane proteins mediate the non-opsonized binding and internalization of N. gonorrhoeae by human PMNs. Using overlay assays and an affinity isolation technique, we demonstrate the direct interaction between Opa52-expressing gonococci and members of the human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) family which express the CD66 epitope. Gonococci and recombinant Escherichia coli strains synthesizing Opa52 showed specific binding and internalization by transfected HeLa cell lines expressing the CD66 family members BGP (CD66a), NCA (CD66c), CGM1 (CD66d) and CEA (CD66e), but not that expressing CGM6 (CD66b). Bacterial strains expressing either no opacity protein or the epithelial cell invasion-associated Opa50 do not bind these CEA family members. Consistent with their different receptor specificities, Opa52-mediated interactions could be inhibited by polyclonal anti-CEA sera, while Opa50 binding was instead inhibited by heparin. Using confocal laser scanning microscopy, we observed a marked recruitment of CD66 antigen by Opa52-expressing gonococci on both the transfected cell lines and infected PMNs. These data indicate that members of the CEA family constitute the cellular receptors for the interaction with, and internalization of, N. gonorrhoeae. PMID:9218786

  7. Alzheimer's associated β-amyloid protein inhibits influenza A virus and modulates viral interactions with phagocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell R White

    Full Text Available Accumulation of β-Amyloid (βA is a key pathogenetic factor in Alzheimer's disease; however, the normal function of βA is unknown. Recent studies have shown that βA can inhibit growth of bacteria and fungi. In this paper we show that βA also inhibits replication of seasonal and pandemic strains of H3N2 and H1N1 influenza A virus (IAV in vitro. The 42 amino acid fragment of βA (βA42 had greater activity than the 40 amino acid fragment. Direct incubation of the virus with βA42 was needed to achieve optimal inhibition. Using quantitative PCR assays βA42 was shown to reduce viral uptake by epithelial cells after 45 minutes and to reduce supernatant virus at 24 hours post infection. βA42 caused aggregation of IAV particles as detected by light transmission assays and electron and confocal microscopy. βA42 did not stimulate neutrophil H2O2 production or extracellular trap formation on its own, but it increased both responses stimulated by IAV. In addition, βA42 increased uptake of IAV by neutrophils. βA42 reduced viral protein synthesis in monocytes and reduced IAV-induced interleukin-6 production by these cells. Hence, we demonstrate for the first time that βA has antiviral activity and modulates viral interactions with phagocytes.

  8. Smectite alteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains the proceedings of a second workshop in Washington DC December 8-9, 1983 on the alteration of smectites intended for use as buffer materials in the long-term containment of nuclear wastes. It includes extended summaries of all presentations and a transcript of the detailed scientific discussion. The discussions centered on three main questions: What is the prerequisite for and what is the precise mechanism by which smectite clays may be altered to illite. What are likly sources of potassium with respect to the KBS project. Is it likely that the conversion of smectite to illite will be of importance in the 10 5 to the 10 6 year time frame. The workshop was convened to review considerations and conclusions in connection to these questions and also to broaden the discussion to consider the use of smectite clays as buffer materials for similar applications in different geographical and geological settings. SKBF/KBS technical report 83-03 contains the proceedings from the first workshop on these matters that was held at the State University of New York, Buffalo May 26-27, 1982. (Author)

  9. Enhancing plant resistance at the seed stage: low concentrations of methyl jasmonate reduce the performance of the leaf miner Tuta absoluta but do not alter the behavior of its predator Chrysoperla externa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strapasson, Priscila; Pinto-Zevallos, Delia M; Paudel, Sulav; Rajotte, Edwin G; Felton, Gary W; Zarbin, Paulo H G

    2014-10-01

    Plants express inducible direct and indirect defenses in response to herbivory. The plant hormone jasmonic acid (JA) and related signaling compounds referred to as jasmonates play a central role in regulating defense responses to a wide range of herbivores.We assessed whether treating tomato seeds with 0.8 mM of methyl jasmonate (MeJA) affected the performance of the leaf miner Tuta absoluta, and whether possible changes in volatile profiles altered the behavior of its predator Chrysoperla externa. MeJA-treatment significantly lengthened larval development and decreased the pupal weight of T. absoluta. Herbivory alone increased the emissions of α-pinene, 6-methyl 5-hepten-2-one, β-myrcene, (E)-β-ocimene, isoterpinolene, TMTT, (Z)-3-hexenyl butyrate, and hexyl salicylate. MeJA seed treatment significantly decreased the emissions of α-cubebene from undamaged and herbivore-infested plants. In addition, the emissions of several compounds were lower in the absence of herbivory. Chrysoperla. externa preferred odors from herbivore-infested plants over those from control plants, regardless of the MeJA-treatment, and they did not show any preference for herbivore-infested plants for any of the MeJA-treatments. Our results show preliminary evidence that the treatment of tomato seeds with MeJA can reduce the performance of Tuta absoluta, and that the chemical differences observed in plant VOC profiles do not alter the behavior of the model predator. PMID:25319361

  10. Phagocyte migration and cellular stress induced in liver, lung, and intestine during sleep loss and sleep recovery

    OpenAIRE

    Everson, Carol A.; Thalacker, Christa D.; Hogg, Neil

    2008-01-01

    Sleep is understood to possess recuperative properties and, conversely, sleep loss is associated with disease and shortened life span. Despite these critical attributes, the mechanisms and functions by which sleep and sleep loss impact health still are speculative. One of the most consistent, if largely overlooked, signs of sleep loss in both humans and laboratory rats is a progressive increase in circulating phagocytic cells, mainly neutrophils. The destination, if any, of the increased circ...

  11. Mononuclear Phagocyte Differentiation, Activation, and Viral Infection Regulate Matrix Metalloproteinase Expression: Implications for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-Associated Dementia

    OpenAIRE

    Ghorpade, Anuja; Persidskaia, Raisa; Suryadevara, Radhika; Che, Myhanh; Liu, Xiao Juan; Persidsky, Yuri; Gendelman, Howard E.

    2001-01-01

    The pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-associated dementia (HAD) is mediated mainly by mononuclear phagocyte (MP) secretory products and their interactions with neural cells. Viral infection and MP immune activation may affect leukocyte entry into the brain. One factor that influences central nervous system (CNS) monocyte migration is matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). In the CNS, MMPs are synthesized by resident glial cells and affect the integrity of the neuropil ext...

  12. Staphylococci surviving intracellularly in phagocytes from patients suffering from chronic granulomatous disease are killed in vitro by antibiotics encapsulated in liposomes.

    OpenAIRE

    Roesler, J.; Hockertz, S; Vogt, B.; Lohmann-Matthes, M L

    1991-01-01

    Granulocytes and monocytes/macrophages from patients suffering from chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) are ineffective in killing specific kinds of phagocytized bacteria, e.g., Staphylococcus aureus, due to decreased or lacking ability to produce reactive oxygen intermediates. Commonly used antibiotics like flucloxacillin are of limited therapeutic value, because the staphylococci are protected against their action in the interior of phagocytes. However, encapsulation of flucloxacillin into ...

  13. Repeated, Intermittent Social Defeat across the Entire Juvenile Period Resulted in Behavioral, Physiological, Hormonal, Immunological, and Neurochemical Alterations in Young Adult Male Golden Hamsters

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Wei-Chun; Liu, Ching-Yi; Lai, Wen-Sung

    2016-01-01

    The developing brain is vulnerable to social defeat during the juvenile period. As complements of human studies, animal models of social defeat provide a straightforward approach to investigating the functional and neurobiological consequences of social defeats. Taking advantage of agonist behavior and social defeat in male golden hamster, a set of 6 experiments was conducted to investigate the consequences at multiple levels in young adulthood resulting from repeated, intermittent social def...

  14. Stress-induced Alterations in Anxiety-like Behavior and Adaptations in Plasticity in the Bed Nucleus of the Stria Terminalis

    OpenAIRE

    Conrad, Kelly L.; Louderback, Katherine M; Gessner, Caitlin P; Winder, Danny G.

    2011-01-01

    In vulnerable individuals, exposure to stressors can result in chronic disorders such as generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), major depressive disorder (MDD), and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The extended amygdala is critically implicated in mediating acute and chronic stress responsivity and anxiety-like behaviors. The bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST), a subregion of the extended amygdala, serves as a relay of corticolimbic information to the paraventricular nucleus of the...

  15. Social isolation in adolescence alters behaviors in the forced swim and sucrose preference tests in female but not in male rats

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Suzie; Flashner, Bess; Chiu, Melissa; Hoeve, Elizabeth ver; Luz, Sandra; Bhatnagar, Seema

    2011-01-01

    Social interactions in rodents are rewarding and motivating and social isolation is aversive. Accumulating evidence suggests that disruption of the social environment in adolescence has long-term effects on social interactions, on anxiety-like behavior and on stress reactivity. In previous work we showed that adolescent isolation produced increased reactivity to acute and to repeated stress in female rats, whereas lower corticosterone responses to acute stress and decreased anxiety-related be...

  16. Chronic treatment with a selective 5-HT6 receptor antagonist alters the behavioral and neurochemical effects of ethanol in young adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayarajan, Pradeep; Nirogi, Ramakrishna; Shinde, Anil; Benade, Vijay; Muddana, Nageswara Rao

    2016-04-01

    Experimental evidence indicates a potential role of 5-HT6 receptors in the regulation of addictive behavior. We studied the effects of a potent and selective 5-HT6 receptor antagonist (compound A) on voluntary ethanol intake and behavioral/neurochemical changes induced by ethanol. The pharmacokinetic interaction of compound A and ethanol was assessed. The effect of compound A on schedule-induced ethanol polydipsia was studied to determine its effect on voluntary ethanol intake. Open-field and ethanol-induced loss of righting reflex assays were carried out to determine the effect of compound A on the ataxic and sedative effects of ethanol. The effect on motor learning was evaluated using rotarod and brain microdialysis was carried out to study the effect on monoaminergic neurotransmission. No significant changes were observed in the pharmacokinetic parameters of compound A when cotreated with ethanol. Compound A significantly decreased voluntary ethanol consumption and attenuated the effects of ethanol on motor learning. Compound A also antagonized the sedative and ataxic effects of ethanol. The effect of ethanol on the dopaminergic and noradrenergic neurotransmission was blocked by compound A. The effects of compound A were evident only after chronic treatment. Compound A may have attenuated the behavioral effects of ethanol by blocking the ethanol-induced efflux of dopamine and norepinephrine in the motor cortex. PMID:25932717

  17. Depressive behavior and alterations in receptors for dopamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine in the brain of the senescence accelerated mouse (SAM)-P10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onodera, T; Watanabe, R; Tha, K K; Hayashi, Y; Murayama, T; Okuma, Y; Ono, C; Oketani, Y; Hosokawa, M; Nomura, Y

    2000-08-01

    The senescence accelerated mouse (SAM) is known as a murine model of aging. SAM consists of senescence accelerated-prone mouse (SAMP) and senescence accelerated-resistant mouse (SAMR). Previous studies reported that SAMP10 exhibits age-related learning impairments and behavioral depression in a tail suspension test after 7 months. We investigated the changes in emotional behavior in a forced swimming test and in receptors for dopamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in SAMP10. SAMP10 at 8 months showed an increase of immobility in the test compared with SAMR1. Treatment with desipramine (25 mg/kg, i.p., 3 days) in SAMP10 caused a decrease in immobility. In the cortex from SAMP10, [3H]quinpirole binding to D2/D3 dopamine receptors increased significantly compared with control SAMR1. In the hippocampus from SAMP10, [3H]8-hydroxy DPAT binding to 5-HT1A receptor increased. In midbrains from SAMP10, bindings of [3H]quinpirole and [3H]8-hydroxy DPAT increased. [3H]SCH23390 binding to D1/D5 receptors and [3H]ketanserin binding to 5-HT2 receptor in brain regions examined in SAMP10 were similar to those in SAMR1. The present findings represent the first neurochemical evidence of an increase of D2/D3 and 5-HT1A receptors in SAMP10. SAMP10 may be a useful model of aging associated depressive behavior. PMID:11001177

  18. Effects of glutamine-containing total parenteral nutrition on phagocytic activity and anabolic hormone response in rats undergoing gastrectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen-Hsien Lee; Wan-Chun Chiu; Soul-Chin Chen; Chih-Hsiung Wu; Sung-Ling Yeh

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of glutamine (Gln)-containing parenteral nutrition on phagocytic activity and to elucidate the possible roles of Gin in the secretion of anabolic hormones and nitrogen balance in rats undergoing a gastrectomy.METHODS: Rats with an internal jugular catheter were divided into 2 experimental groups and received total parenteral nutrition (TPN). The TPN solutions were isonitrogenous and identical in nutrient compositions except for differences in amino acid content. One group received conventional TPN (control), and in the other group, 25%of the total amino acid nitrogen was replaced with Gln.After receiving TPN for 3 d, one-third of the rats in each experimental group were sacrificed as the baseline group.The remaining rats underwent a partial gastrectomy and were killed 1 and 3 d, respectively, after surgery. Plasma,peritoneal lavage fluid (PLF), and urine samples were collected for further analysis.RESULTS: The Gin group had fewer nitrogen losses 1 and 2 d after surgery (d1, 16.6±242.5 vs -233.4±205.9 mg/d,d2, 31.8±238.8 vs-253.4±184.6 mg/d, P<0.05). There were no differences in plasma growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-1 levels between the 2 groups before or after surgery. The phagocytic activity of peritoneal macrophages was higher in the Gin group than in the control group 1 d after surgery (4 1185±931 vs 323±201,P<0.05). There were no differences in the phagocytic activities of blood polymorphonuclear neutrophils between the 2 groups at the baseline or on the postoperative days.No significant differences in interleukin-1β or interleukin-6concentrations in PLF were observed between the 2 groups.However, tumor necrosis factor-α level in PLF was significantly lower in the Gin group than in the control group on postoperative d 3.CONCLUSION: TPN supplemented with Gin can improve the nitrogen balance, and enhance macrophage phagocytic activity at the site of injury. However, Gin supplementation has no effect

  19. Activation-induced spatiotemporal cerebral blood flow changes and behavioral deficit after developmental mTBI in rats can be favorably altered by facilitating mitochondrial calcium uptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhuvika eMurugan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mild to moderate traumatic brain injury (mTBI leads to secondary neuronal loss via excitotoxic mechanisms, including mitochondrial Ca2+ overload. However in the surviving cellular population, mitochondrial Ca2+ influx and oxidative metabolism are diminished leading to suboptimal neuronal circuit activity and poor prognosis. Hence we tested the impact of boosting neuronal electrical activity and oxidative metabolism by facilitating mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake in a rat model of mTBI. In developing rats (P25-P26 sustaining an mTBI, we demonstrate post-traumatic changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF in the sensorimotor cortex in response to whisker stimulation compared to sham using functional Laser Doppler Imaging (fLDI at adulthood (P67-P73. Compared to sham, whisker stimulation-evoked positive CBF responses decreased while negative CBF responses increased in the mTBI animals. The spatiotemporal CBF changes representing underlying neuronal activity suggested profound changes to neurovascular activity after mTBI. Behavioral assessment of the same cohort of animals prior to fLDI showed that mTBI resulted in persistent contralateral sensorimotor behavioral deficit along with ipsilateral neuronal loss compared to sham. Treating mTBI rats with Kaempferol, a dietary flavonol compound that enhanced mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake, eliminated the inter-hemispheric asymmetry in the whisker stimulation-induced positive CBF responses and the ipsilateral negative CBF responses otherwise observed in the untreated and vehicle-treated mTBI animals in adulthood. Kaempferol also improved somatosensory behavioral measures compared to untreated and vehicle treated mTBI animals without augmenting post-injury neuronal loss. The results indicate that reduced mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake in the surviving populations affect post-traumatic neural activation leading to persistent behavioral deficits. Improvement in sensorimotor behavior and spatiotemporal neurovascular activity

  20. Multi-generational effects of polybrominated diphenylethers exposure: embryonic exposure of male American kestrels (Falco sparverius) to DE-71 alters reproductive success and behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marteinson, Sarah C; Bird, David M; Shutt, J Laird; Letcher, Robert J; Ritchie, Ian J; Fernie, Kim J

    2010-08-01

    Polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs) are additive flame-retardants that are environmentally persistent and bioaccumulative compounds of particular concern to species at high trophic levels, including predatory birds. The developmental effects of in ovo exposure to male birds at environmentally relevant levels of the PBDE technical mixture, DE-71, on reproductive success and behaviors using captive American kestrels (Falco sparverius) were determined. Males were exposed in ovo by direct maternal transfer to DE-71 and unintentionally to low concentrations of hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) at three mean +/- standard error DE-71 concentrations of 288.60 +/- 33.35 ng/g wet weight (low-exposure), 1130.59 +/- 95.34 ng/g wet weight (high-exposure), or background levels of 3.01 +/- 0.46 ng/g wet weight (control). One year following exposure, males were paired with unexposed females. Reproductive success was lower in the high exposure pairs: 43% failed to lay eggs while all other pairs laid complete clutches; they also laid smaller clutches and produced smaller eggs with reduced fertility, parameters that were negatively correlated with paternal in ovo concentrations of all PBDEs, as well as individual congeners and HBCD. Throughout courtship, there were fewer copulations by all in ovo exposed males, fewer mate-calls made by high-exposure males, and decreasing trends in pair-bonding and nest-box behaviors across treatments that continued during brood rearing. The reductions in clutch size and fertility were associated with the reduced frequencies of male courtship behaviors, and were associated with increasing concentrations of the PBDE congeners BDE-47, -99, -100, -53, -138, and HBCD. The results of the present study confirm effects noted in the F(0) generation and demonstrate that exposure to DE-71 affects multiple generations of this predatory avian species at environmentally relevant levels of exposure. PMID:20821627

  1. Ultrastructural and immunohistochemical studies on Trichomonas vaginalis adhering to and phagocytizing genitourinary epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈文列; 陈金富; 钟秀容; 梁平; 林炜

    2004-01-01

    Background Trichomonas vaginalis (T. vaginalis) belongs to a common sexually transmitted disease pathogen causing genitourinary trichomoniasis in both sexes. We investigated the pathogenetic mechanism of genitourinary trichomoniasis.Methods Cultured T. vaginalis bodies were injected into the vaginas of rats, or incubated with genitourinary epithelial cells of female subjects, male subjects, and sperm. The ultrastructural and microscopic changes were observed via transmission and scanning electron microscopy and through microscopic histochemistry.Results Groups of T.vaginalis adhered to PAS positive columnar cells at the surface of stratified epithelium in the middle and upper portions of the vaginas. They also traversed under these cells. The parasites were shown to be PAS, cathepsin D, and actin positive, and they could release hydrolase into the cytoplasm of adhered epithelial cells. In the amebiform T.vaginalis, microfilaments were arranged into reticular formation. Similar phenomena were found during the interaction of T.vaginalis with host cells, both in vitro and in vivo. Usually several protozoa adhered to an epithelial cell and formed polymorphic pseudopodia or surface invaginations to surround and phagocytize the microvilli or other parts of the epithelial cytoplasm. Adhesion and phagocytosis of sperm by the protozoa occurred at 15-30 minutes of incubation. Digestion of sperm was found at 45-75 minutes and was complete at 90-105 minutes.Conclusions T.vaginalis tends to parasitize at the fornix of the vagina, because this is the site where columnar cells are rich in mucinogen granules and their microvilli are helpful for adhesion and nibbling. T.vaginalis possesses some invading and attacking abilities. Shape change, canalization, encystation, phagocytosis, digestion, the cell coat, cytoskeleton, and lysosome all play important roles in the process of adhesion. They have two methods of phagocytosis: nibbling and ingestion. Genitourinary epithelium may be

  2. Nitric oxide regulates antagonistically phagocytic and neurite outgrowth inhibiting capacities of microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheiblich, Hannah; Bicker, Gerd

    2016-05-01

    Traumatic injury or the pathogenesis of some neurological disorders is accompanied by inflammatory cellular mechanisms, mainly resulting from the activation of central nervous system (CNS) resident microglia. Under inflammatory conditions, microglia up-regulate the inducible isoform of NOS (iNOS), leading to the production of high concentrations of the radical molecule nitric oxide (NO). At the onset of inflammation, high levels of microglial-derived NO may serve as a cellular defense mechanism helping to clear the damaged tissue and combat infection of the CNS by invading pathogens. However, the excessive overproduction of NO by activated microglia has been suggested to govern the inflammation-mediated neuronal loss causing eventually complete neurodegeneration. Here, we investigated how NO influences phagocytosis of neuronal debris by BV-2 microglia, and how neurite outgrowth of human NT2 model neurons is affected by microglial-derived NO. The presence of NO greatly increased microglial phagocytic capacity in a model of acute inflammation comprising lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated microglia and apoptotic neurons. Chemical manipulations suggested that NO up-regulates phagocytosis independently of the sGC/cGMP pathway. Using a transwell system, we showed that reactive microglia inhibit neurite outgrowth of human neurons via the generation of large amounts of NO over effective distances in the millimeter range. Application of a NOS blocker prevented the LPS-induced NO production, totally reversed the inhibitory effect of microglia on neurite outgrowth, but reduced the engulfment of neuronal debris. Our results indicate that a rather simple notion of treating excessive inflammation in the CNS by NO synthesis blocking agents has to consider functionally antagonistic microglial cell responses during pharmaceutic therapy. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 76: 566-584, 2016. PMID:26264566

  3. Evidence that leishmania donovani utilizes a mannose receptor on human mononuclear phagocytes to establish intracellular parasitism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pathogenic protozoan Leishmania donovani must gain entrance into mononuclear phagocytes to successfully parasitize man. The parasite's extracellular promastigote stage is ingested by human peripheral blood monocytes or monocyte-derived macrophages in the absence of serum, in a manner characteristic of receptor-mediated endocytosis. Remarkable similarities have been found between the macrophage receptor(s) for promastigotes and a previously characterized eucaryotic receptor system, the mannose/fucose receptor (MFR), that mediates the binding of zymosan particles and mannose- or fucose-terminal glycoconjugates to macrophages. Ingestion of promastigotes by monocyte-derived macrophages was inhibited by several MFR ligands; that is mannan, mannose-BSA and fucose-BSA. In contrast, promastigote ingestion by monocytes was unaffected by MFR ligands. Furthermore, attachment of promastigotes to macrophages, assessed by using cytochalasin D to prevent phagocytosis, was reduced 49.8% by mannan. Reorientation of the MFR to the ventral surface of the cell was achieved by plating macrophages onto mannan-coated coverslips, reducing MFR activity on the exposed cell surface by 94% as assessed by binding of 125I-mannose-BSA. Under these conditions, ingestion of promastigotes was inhibited by 71.4%. Internalization of the MFR by exposure of macrophages to zymosan before infection with promastigotes resulted in a 62.3% decrease in parasite ingestion. Additionally, NH4Cl decreased macrophage ingestion of promastigotes by 38.2%. Subinhibitory concentration of NH4Cl (10 mM) and of mannan (0.25 mg/ml) together inhibited parsite ingestion by 76.4%

  4. Altered behavioral responses of Sindbis virus-infected Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) to DEET and non-DEET based insect repellents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qualls, Whitney A; Day, Jonathan F; Xue, Rui-de; Bowers, Doria F

    2012-06-01

    Changes in the time to first bite (TFB) and the bloodfeeding behavior of adult female Aedes aegypti (L.) mosquitoes following dissemination of Sindbis virus (SINV) were observed after exposure to repellents with the active ingredients (AI) DEET, picaridin, 2-undecanone (2-U), and oil of lemon eucalyptus. Dissemination of SINV significantly decreased (PTFB of DEET (15%) and picaridin (15%) by 46% and 37%, respectively. Significant (PTFB and time to complete the four bloodfeeding stages will lessen the prey-status, and enhance both the chances of mosquito survival and arbovirus transmission. PMID:22289669

  5. Alterations in Corticolimbic Dendritic Morphology and Emotional Behavior in Cannabinoid CB1 Receptor–Deficient Mice Parallel the Effects of Chronic Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, Matthew N.; Hillard, Cecilia J.; McEwen, Bruce S.

    2011-01-01

    Many changes produced by chronic stress are similar to those seen in cannabinoid CB1 receptor–deficient mice. In the current study, we examined both anxiety-like behavior and dendritic complexity within the prefrontal cortex and basolateral amygdala (BLA) in wild-type and CB1 receptor–deficient mice, under basal conditions and following exposure to 21 days of protracted restraint stress. CB1 receptor–deficient mice exhibited increased indices of anxiety in the elevated plus maze under basal c...

  6. Neurological and behavioral abnormalities, ventricular dilatation, altered cellular functions, inflammation, and neuronal injury in brains of mice due to common, persistent, parasitic infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwang Jong-Hee

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Worldwide, approximately two billion people are chronically infected with Toxoplasma gondii with largely unknown consequences. Methods To better understand long-term effects and pathogenesis of this common, persistent brain infection, mice were infected at a time in human years equivalent to early to mid adulthood and studied 5–12 months later. Appearance, behavior, neurologic function and brain MRIs were studied. Additional analyses of pathogenesis included: correlation of brain weight and neurologic findings; histopathology focusing on brain regions; full genome microarrays; immunohistochemistry characterizing inflammatory cells; determination of presence of tachyzoites and bradyzoites; electron microscopy; and study of markers of inflammation in serum. Histopathology in genetically resistant mice and cytokine and NRAMP knockout mice, effects of inoculation of isolated parasites, and treatment with sulfadiazine or αPD1 ligand were studied. Results Twelve months after infection, a time equivalent to middle to early elderly ages, mice had behavioral and neurological deficits, and brain MRIs showed mild to moderate ventricular dilatation. Lower brain weight correlated with greater magnitude of neurologic abnormalities and inflammation. Full genome microarrays of brains reflected inflammation causing neuronal damage (Gfap, effects on host cell protein processing (ubiquitin ligase, synapse remodeling (Complement 1q, and also increased expression of PD-1L (a ligand that allows persistent LCMV brain infection and CD 36 (a fatty acid translocase and oxidized LDL receptor that mediates innate immune response to beta amyloid which is associated with pro-inflammation in Alzheimer's disease. Immunostaining detected no inflammation around intra-neuronal cysts, practically no free tachyzoites, and only rare bradyzoites. Nonetheless, there were perivascular, leptomeningeal inflammatory cells, particularly contiguous to the aqueduct of

  7. Effects of pregabalin on behavioral alterations induced by ketamine in rats Efeitos da pregabalina sobre alterações comportamentais induzidas pela cetamina em ratos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emerson Arcoverde Nunes

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of pregabalin on the behavior of rats under the influence of ketamine, an NMDA receptor antagonist that mimics the symptoms of schizophrenia. METHODS: Rats were injected with saline or 25 mg/kg ketamine intraperitoneally. After that, behavior modifications were investigated by the evaluation of stereotypy and hyperlocomotion, after treating rats with pregabalin (at doses of 30 mg/kg or 100 mg/kg or placebo (saline solution. RESULTS: The administration of pregabalin reduced ketamine-induced hyperlocomotion. However, neither doses of pregabalin had a significant effect on ketamineinduced stereotypy. CONCLUSION: This is the first study to investigate the effects of pregabalin using an animal model of psychosis. Furthermore, our results indicate that behavioral changes induced by ketamine in rats can be reversed with the use of pregabalin, suggesting its potential to treat psychotic symptoms.OBJETIVO: O presente estudo tem como objetivo investigar os efeitos da pregabalina sobre as alterações comportamentais em ratos induzidas pela cetamina, um antagonista do receptor glutamatérgico NMDA, utilizado em modelos animais de psicose. MÉTODOS:Ratos receberam injeção com solução salina ou cetamina, na dose de 25 mg/kg, com posterior avaliação das alterações comportamentais induzidas, através da avaliação da estereotipia e hiperlocomoção, depois destes ratos terem sido tratados com pregabalina (30 mg/kg ou 100 mg/kg ou placebo. RESULTADOS:A administração de pregabalina reduziu a hiperlocomoção nos ratos sob o efeito da cetamina. No entanto, nenhuma das doses de pregabalina teve efeito significativo sobre a estereotipia induzida pela cetamina. CONCLUSÃO: Este é o primeiro estudo que investiga os efeitos da pregabalina em um modelo animal de psicose. Nossos resultados indicam que alterações comportamentais induzidas pela cetamina em ratos podem ser revertidas após uso da

  8. Long-Term Oral Administration of Capsicum baccatum Extracts Does Not Alter Behavioral, Hematological, and Metabolic Parameters in CF1 Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Aline Rigon; Leonardi, Bianca; Zimmer, Eduardo Rigon; Kalinine, Eduardo; de Souza, Diogo Onofre; Portela, Luis Valmor; Gosmann, Grace

    2012-01-01

    Our group showed that crude ethanol (CE) and butanol (BUT) extracts of Capsicum baccatum presented anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Furthermore, the flavonoid and total phenolic contents were positively correlated with both of these properties observed for C. baccatum extracts. The present study demonstrated that 60 days of oral administration of CE and BUT (200 mg/kg) in mice did not cause significant differences in the following parameters evaluated: hematological profile, body weight and relative weight of visceral organs, systemic lipid profile, glucose homeostasis (GTT), kidney and hepatic biochemical markers, and spontaneous locomotion and anxiety-like behavior. Altogether, these results indicate for the first time that the long-term oral administration of C. baccatum extracts does not affect specific aspects of CF1 mice physiology, suggesting their safety, building up the venue to test their efficacy in animal models underlying persistent activation of oxidative and inflammatory pathways. PMID:23320023

  9. Diffusion tensor imaging reveals adolescent binge ethanol-induced brain structural integrity alterations in adult rats that correlate with behavioral dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetreno, Ryan P; Yaxley, Richard; Paniagua, Beatriz; Crews, Fulton T

    2016-07-01

    Adolescence is characterized by considerable brain maturation that coincides with the development of adult behavior. Binge drinking is common during adolescence and can have deleterious effects on brain maturation because of the heightened neuroplasticity of the adolescent brain. Using an animal model of adolescent intermittent ethanol [AIE; 5.0 g/kg, intragastric, 20 percent EtOH w/v; 2 days on/2 days off from postnatal day (P)25 to P55], we assessed the adult brain structural volumes and integrity on P80 and P220 using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). While we did not observe a long-term effect of AIE on structural volumes, AIE did reduce axial diffusivity (AD) in the cerebellum, hippocampus and neocortex. Radial diffusivity (RD) was reduced in the hippocampus and neocortex of AIE-treated animals. Prior AIE treatment did not affect fractional anisotropy (FA), but did lead to long-term reductions of mean diffusivity (MD) in both the cerebellum and corpus callosum. AIE resulted in increased anxiety-like behavior and diminished object recognition memory, the latter of which was positively correlated with DTI measures. Across aging, whole brain volumes increased, as did volumes of the corpus callosum and neocortex. This was accompanied by age-associated AD reductions in the cerebellum and neocortex as well as RD and MD reductions in the cerebellum. Further, we found that FA increased in both the cerebellum and corpus callosum as rats aged from P80 to P220. Thus, both age and AIE treatment caused long-term changes to brain structural integrity that could contribute to cognitive dysfunction. PMID:25678360

  10. Central administration of murine interferon-α induces depressive-like behavioral, brain cytokine and neurochemical alterations in mice: a mini-review and original experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayley, Shawn; Scharf, Jeff; Anisman, Hymie

    2013-07-01

    A role for pro-inflammatory cytokines and their neuroinflammatory signaling cascades in depressive pathology has increasingly gained acceptance. In this regard, several lines of evidence suggested that interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) can provoke neurochemical and hormonal changes akin to those associated with psychological stressors, and that these cytokines also induce sickness behaviors that resemble some of the neurovegetative features of depression. Similarly, human depressed patients often display marked changes of pro-inflammatory cytokine levels and immune cell activity. Perhaps more germane in the analysis of the cytokine-depression connection, reports of humans undergoing interferon-α (IFN-α) treatment for certain cancers or viral infections have indicated that the pro-inflammatory cytokine caused signs of major depression in a substantial subset of those treated. In the present investigation, we demonstrated that acute or repeated infusion of IFN-α into the lateral ventricles provoked depressive-like behavior and concomitant changes in serotonin (5-HT) and mRNA expression of particular 5-HT receptors and pro-inflammatory cytokines. These actions were less evident following administration directly into the prefrontal cortex and not apparent at all when administered to the dorsal raphe nucleus. The data are discussed in relation to the induction of depression elicited by IFN-α, and are presented in the context of a mini-review that highlights potential mechanisms through which the cytokine might act to promote psychomotor and affective disturbances and interact with stressors. PMID:22884959

  11. Low dose exposure to Bisphenol A alters development of gonadotropin-releasing hormone 3 neurons and larval locomotor behavior in Japanese Medaka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, T; Smith, N; Lee, E K; Ramakrishnan, S

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that chronic low dose exposure to Bisphenol A (BPA), an endocrine disruptor, may disrupt normal brain development and behavior mediated by the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) pathways. While it is known that GnRH neurons in the hypothalamus regulate reproductive physiology and behavior, functional roles of extra-hypothalamic GnRH neurons remain unclear. Furthermore, little is known whether BPA interacts with extra-hypothalamic GnRH3 neural systems in vulnerable developing brains. Here we examined the impact of low dose BPA exposure on the developing GnRH3 neural system, eye and brain growth, and locomotor activity in transgenic medaka embryos and larvae with GnRH3 neurons tagged with GFP. Fertilized eggs were collected daily and embryos/larvae were chronically exposed to 200ng/ml of BPA, starting at 1 day post fertilization (dpf). BPA significantly increased fluorescence intensity of the GnRH3-GFP neural population in the terminal nerve (TN) of the forebrain at 3dpf, but decreased the intensity at 5dpf, compared with controls. BPA advanced eye pigmentation without affecting eye and brain size development, and accelerated times to hatch. Following chronic BPA exposure, 20dpf larvae showed suppression of locomotion, both in distance covered and speed of movement (47% and 43% reduction, respectively). BPA-induced hypoactivity was accompanied by decreased cell body sizes of individual TN-GnRH3 neurons (14% smaller than those of controls), but not of non-GnRH3 neurons. These novel data demonstrate complex neurobehavioral effects of BPA on the development of extra-hypothalamic GnRH3 neurons in teleost fish. PMID:26687398

  12. Reactive-transport model analyses of bentonite alteration behavior at alkaline condition generated by cement-water interaction in a TRU wastes repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The maximum dose of ionizing radiation from the geological disposal of TRU wastes will likely be controlled by poorly sorbing soluble radionuclides, such as I-129. Proposed repository designs for the geological disposal of TRU wastes envisage the use of an engineered barrier composed of a bentonite buffer to limit the migration of such radionuclides by impeding groundwater flow. Cementitious materials will inevitably be used for waste packaging, infilling and adding structural integrity to the repository. Using cementitious materials, however, is problematic because they produce highly alkaline leachates which have the potential to cause a complex series of coupled changes in the porewater chemistry, mineralogy and, ultimately, the mass transport properties of the bentonite buffer. To elucidate the consequences of these coupled changes, reactive-transport model analyses have been conducted for bentonite alteration test cases with the use of different combinations of secondary minerals that will likely form in the bentonite buffer. A dissolution rate equation of smectite (a key component of bentonite) applicable to pH 7-13 and 25-80degC was proposed and used in the reactive-transport model analyses. It was found that the amount of dissolved smectite at the center of the bentonite buffer was smaller and those in the vicinity of the cement interface was larger when thermodynamically metastable secondary minerals mainly precipitated as compared with the precipitation of stable phases. The calculated temporal and spatial changes of kinetic smectite dissolution were interpreted as a consequence of the changes in Gibbs free energy and porewater chemistry. Furthermore, the bentonite porewater chemistry was also affected by the stoichiometry and thermodynamic stability of the secondary minerals and the kinetics of smectite dissolution. Except in the close proximity of the cement interface, it was found that regardless of the choice of secondary minerals, the effective

  13. Ethanol modulation of mammalian BK channels in excitable tissues: molecular targets and their possible contribution to alcohol-induced altered behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex M. Dopico

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In most tissues, the function of calcium- and voltage-gated potassium (BK channels is modified in response to ethanol concentrations reached in human blood during alcohol intoxication. In general, modification of BK current from ethanol-naïve preparations in response to brief ethanol exposure results from changes in channel open probability without modification of unitary conductance or change in BK protein levels in the membrane. Protracted and/or repeated ethanol exposure, however, may evoke changes in BK expression. The final ethanol effect on BK open probability leading to either BK current potentiation or BK current reduction is determined by an orchestration of molecular factors, including levels of activating ligand (cytosolic calcium, BK subunit composition and posttranslational modifications, and the channel’s lipid microenvironment. These factors seem to allosterically regulate a direct interaction between ethanol and a recognition pocket of discrete dimensions recently mapped to the channel-forming (slo1 subunit. Type of ethanol exposure also plays a role in the final BK response to the drug: in several central nervous system regions (e.g., striatum, primary sensory neurons, and supraoptic nucleus, acute exposure to ethanol reduces neuronal excitability by enhancing BK activity. In contrast, protracted or repetitive ethanol administration may alter BK subunit composition and membrane expression, rendering the BK complex insensitive to further ethanol exposure. In neurohypophysial axon terminals, ethanol potentiation of BK channel activity leads to a reduction in neuropeptide release. In vascular smooth muscle, however, ethanol inhibition of BK current leads to cell contraction and vascular constriction.

  14. Effect of retinoic acid on the proliferation and phagocytic capability of murine macrophage-like cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, R

    1984-07-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) exerted a variable degree of growth inhibitory activity on the macrophage-like cell lines P388D1, J774.2, WEHI-265, WEHI-3, and PU-5. Comparison of cell proliferation and clonal growth suggests that at concentrations of 10(-9)-10(-6) M the inhibitory activity stems from processes leading to elongation of cell cycle time and not from terminal differentiation processes. RA was shown to be a potent inducer of the development of high-phagocytic phenotypes (assessed by phagocytosis of heat-killed yeast cells) in the P388D1, J774.2, and WEHI-265 cell lines which differ substantially in their proliferative and adherence characteristics. The PU-5 and WEHI-3 cell lines were not induced by RA to express an enhanced phagocytic activity toward heat-killed yeast cells. The augmented phagocytic capability was dose dependent over a wide range of RA concentrations. In P388D1 cells, 2 X 10(-12) M RA already exerted significant phagocytosis augmentation effects, which progressively increased up to 2 X 10(-5) M RA, the highest concentration tested. Retinal, retinyl acetate, and retinol had similar effects to those of RA on both cell adherence and phagocytosis in P388D1 cells, albeit at concentrations four to six orders of magnitude higher. Optimal development of the high-phagocytic phenotype in P388D1, J774.2, and WEHI-265 cells required at least 96 hr of culture in the presence of RA; at 48 hr and 23 hr the effects were already substantial, whereas at 4 hr of exposure to RA no significant enhancement of phagocytosis could be detected. Thus both extended periods of culture in the presence of RA (more than two to three cell cycles) and high concentrations were needed for induction, in more than 90% of the cells, of the expression of a high-phagocytic phenotype. The reversion to a low-phagocytic phenotype upon removal of RA was also rather slow and required several cell cycles. In P388D1 cells RA also enhanced the phagocytosis of latex beads but had no effect on the

  15. Mutation of the maize sbe1a and ae genes alters morphology and physical behavior of wx-type endosperm starch granules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ji-Hong; Guiltinan, Mark J; Thompson, Donald B

    2007-12-10

    In maize, three isoforms of starch-branching enzyme, SBEI, SBEIIa, and SBEIIb, are encoded by the Sbe1a, Sbe2a, and Amylose extender (Ae) genes, respectively. The objective of this research was to explore the effects of null mutations in the Sbe1a and Ae genes alone and in combination in wx background on kernel characteristics and on the morphology and physical behavior of endosperm starch granules. Differences in kernel morphology and weight, starch accumulation, starch granule size and size distribution, starch microstructure, and thermal properties were observed between the ae wx and sbe1a ae wx plants but not between the sbe1a wx mutants when compared to wx. Starch from sbe1a ae wx plants exhibited a larger granule size with a wider gelatinization temperature range and a lower endotherm enthalpy than ae wx. Microscopy shows weaker iodine staining in sbe1a ae wx starch granules. X-ray diffraction revealed A-type crystallinity in wx and sbe1a wx starches and B-type in sbe1a ae wx and ae wx. This study suggests that, while the SBEIIb isoform plays a dominant role in maize endosperm starch synthesis, SBEI also plays a role, which is only observable in the presence of the ae mutation. PMID:17765880

  16. Effects of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans on phagocytic response of Eisenia andrei coelomocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayet Belmeskine

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The immunotoxicological effects of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/dibenzofurans (PCDDs/Fs mixtures on Eisenia andrei earthworms have never been studied. In this work we investigated these effects both for in vitro and in vivo exposure, using the viability and the phagocytic activity of coelomocytes as immunological biomarkers and the flow cytometry was used for analysis. The in vitro exposure revealed a cytotoxic effect of PCDD/Fs mixture (C2 containing 50¥10-3 ng/mL of 2, 3, 7, 8-TCDD and an induction of the phagocytic capacity at the mixture (C1 containing 25¥10-3 ng/mL of 2, 3, 7, 8-TCDD. In the in vivo filter paper exposure, the immunocompetence of earthworms was assessed after 3 h-exposure to mixtures of PCDD/Fs at the levels of C1, C2, C3 and C4 containing about; 0.05, 0.3, 0.5 and 0.83 ng of 2, 3, 7, 8-TCDD/cm², respectively. Morphological observations showed an excessive secretion of mucus and body surface lesions in worms exposed to higher concentrations (C3 and C4, which revealed that these organisms were affected by PCDD/Fs either through skin and/or by feeding. The levels of the extruded cell yield decreased significantly at all the concentrations tested. However, the cell viability was shown to be unaffected by PCDD/Fs concentrations. It was also shown, that exposure to the highest PCDD/Fs concentrations; C2, C3 and C4 inhibited both phagocytic activity and efficiency.

  17. Origin, Localization, and Immunoregulatory Properties of Pulmonary Phagocytes in Allergic Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Franziska; Ender, Fanny; Schmudde, Inken; Lewkowich, Ian P.; Köhl, Jörg; König, Peter; Laumonnier, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways that is driven by maladaptive T helper 2 (Th2) and Th17 immune responses against harmless, airborne substances. Pulmonary phagocytes represent the first line of defense in the lung where they constantly sense the local environment for potential threats. They comprise two distinct cell types, i.e., macrophages and dendritic cells (DC) that differ in their origins and functions. Alveolar macrophages quickly take up most of the inhaled allergens, yet do not deliver their cargo to naive T cells sampling in draining lymph nodes. In contrast, pulmonary DCs instruct CD4+ T cells develop into Th2 and Th17 effectors, initiating the maladaptive immune responses toward harmless environmental substances observed in allergic individuals. Unraveling the mechanisms underlying this mistaken identity of harmless, airborne substances by innate immune cells is one of the great challenges in asthma research. The identification of different pulmonary DC subsets, their role in antigen uptake, migration to the draining lymph nodes, and their potential to instruct distinct T cell responses has set the stage to unravel this mystery. However, at this point, a detailed understanding of the spatiotemporal resolution of DC subset localization, allergen uptake, processing, autocrine and paracrine cellular crosstalk, and the humoral factors that define the activation status of DCs is still lacking. In addition to DCs, at least two distinct macrophage populations have been identified in the lung that are either located in the airway/alveolar lumen or in the interstitium. Recent data suggest that such populations can exert either pro- or anti-inflammatory functions. Similar to the DC subsets, detailed insights into the individual roles of alveolar and interstitial macrophages during the different phases of asthma development are still missing. Here, we will provide an update on the current understanding of the origin, localization

  18. HIV impairs opsonic phagocytic clearance of pregnancy-associated malaria parasites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Keen

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Primigravid (PG women are at risk for pregnancy-associated malaria (PAM. Multigravid (MG women acquire protection against PAM; however, HIV infection impairs this protective response. Protection against PAM is associated with the production of IgG specific for variant surface antigens (VSA-PAM expressed by chondroitin sulfate A (CSA-adhering parasitized erythrocytes (PEs. We hypothesized that VSA-PAM-specific IgG confers protection by promoting opsonic phagocytosis of PAM isolates and that HIV infection impairs this response. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We assessed the ability of VSA-PAM-specific IgG to promote opsonic phagocytosis of CSA-adhering PEs and the impact of HIV infection on this process. Opsonic phagocytosis assays were performed using the CSA-adherent parasite line CS2 and human and murine macrophages. CS2 PEs were opsonized with plasma or purified IgG subclasses from HIV-negative or HIV-infected PG and MG Kenyan women or sympatric men. Levels of IgG subclasses specific for VSA-PAM were compared in HIV-negative and HIV-infected women by flow cytometry. Plasma from HIV-negative MG women, but not PG women or men, promoted the opsonic phagocytosis of CSA-binding PEs (p < 0.001. This function depended on VSA-PAM-specific plasma IgG1 and IgG3. HIV-infected MG women had significantly lower plasma opsonizing activity (median phagocytic index 46 [interquartile range (IQR 18-195] versus 251 [IQR 93-397], p = 0.006 and levels of VSA-PAM-specific IgG1 (mean fluorescence intensity [MFI] 13 [IQR 11-20] versus 30 [IQR 23-41], p < 0.001 and IgG3 (MFI 17 [IQR 14-23] versus 28 [IQR 23-37], p < 0.001 than their HIV-negative MG counterparts. CONCLUSIONS: Opsonic phagocytosis may represent a novel correlate of protection against PAM. HIV infection may increase the susceptibility of multigravid women to PAM by impairing this clearance mechanism.

  19. Phagocytic capability of the kidney: a possible mechanism for renal uptake of colloid in liver--spleen scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guinea pigs were given Trypan blue or India ink i.v. and i.m. to demonstrate whether proximal convoluted tubule cells of the normal kidney have potential phagocytic capability. Circulating colloidal particles of Trypan blue solution accumulated in these cells and the accumulation was related to the particle size, dose injection, and duration of experiment. These studies suggest an explanation for the clinical observation of renal visualization with /sup 99m/Tc-sulfur colloid in patients with congestive heart failure. (U.S.)

  20. Effects of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans on phagocytic response of Eisenia andrei coelomocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Hayet Belmeskine; Pauline Brousseau; Sami Haddad; Louise Vandelac; Michel Fournier

    2011-01-01

    The immunotoxicological effects of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/dibenzofurans (PCDDs/Fs) mixtures on Eisenia andrei earthworms have never been studied. In this work we investigated these effects both for in vitro and in vivo exposure, using the viability and the phagocytic activity of coelomocytes as immunological biomarkers and the flow cytometry was used for analysis. The in vitro exposure revealed a cytotoxic effect of PCDD/Fs mixture (C2) containing 50¥10-3 ng/mL of 2, 3, 7, 8-TC...

  1. ROLE OF MONOCYTE PHAGOCYTIC SYSTEM IN FORMATION OF ANTIVIRAL RESISTANCE IN MICE AFTER PRELIMINARY INJECTION OF CRYOPRESERVED CORD BLOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozhina OYu

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Now the task of preventive maintenance and search of biologically active substances, capable to make active the nonspecific immune response, remains an actual during flu epidemic. It has been previously established, that cryopreserved leucoconcentrate of human cord blood (cLHCB can act as modulator of activity of immunity. In the given work there was estimated influence of preventive injection of cLHCB and its components on functional activity of monocyte phagocytic system cells (MPSC in mice in the conditions of the induced influenzal infection. Preliminary introduction of cLHCB and its components 6 months prior to infection by flu virus makes 2 times increase of functional activity of macrophages, preventing inhibition of a nonspecific link of immunity. Thus, cLHCB inhibit of secondary immune deficiency development. The found increase in phagocytic activity of peritoneal cavity cells and 3 times increasesing of CD11b-marker expression after preventive injection of cLHCB testifies to rise of adherence and protective potential of MPSC that is one of possible mechanisms of formation of resistance to a flu virus. It is shown, that intranasal cLHCB injection before development of viral infection it can be o recommended as the method of preventive maintenance of flu.

  2. Excision of an unstable pathogenicity island in Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is induced during infection of phagocytic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania S Quiroz

    Full Text Available The availability of the complete genome sequence of several Salmonella enterica serovars has revealed the presence of unstable genetic elements in these bacteria, such as pathogenicity islands and prophages. This is the case of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis, a bacterium that causes gastroenteritis in humans and systemic infection in mice. The whole genome sequence analysis for S. Enteritidis unveiled the presence of several genetic regions that are absent in other Salmonella serovars. These regions have been denominated "regions of difference" (ROD. In this study we show that ROD21, one of such regions, behaves as an unstable pathogenicity island. We observed that ROD21 undergoes spontaneous excision by two independent recombination events, either under laboratory growth conditions or during infection of murine cells. Importantly, we also found that one type of excision occurred at higher rates when S. Enteritidis was residing inside murine phagocytic cells. These data suggest that ROD21 is an unstable pathogenicity island, whose frequency of excision depends on the environmental conditions found inside phagocytic cells.

  3. The Use of Selected Biomarkers, Phagocytic and Cholinesterase Activity to Detect the Effects of Dimethoate on Marine Mussel (Mytilus edulis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KHUSNUL YAQIN

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Effects of organophosphorous pesticide, dimethoate on blue mussels, Mytilus edulis using selected biomarkers have been studied. Mussels were exposed to serial dilutions of dimethoate, 7.88, 15.75, 31.35, and 63.00 µg/l including positive and negative controls for 14 days. The suppression effects of dimethoate on phagocytic activity significantly occurred at two lowest concentrations of dimethoate (7.88 and 15.75 µg/l, but stimulation effects significantly emerged at the following highest concentrations (31.35 and 63.00 µg/l. The declining tendency of the cholinesterase (ChE activity (23% lower than the control appeared when mussels exposed to 7.88 and 15.75 µg/l dimethoate. Moreover, the significant inhibition of the ChE activity occurred at 31.35 µg/l dimethoate exposure. This study suggested that the phagocytic and the ChE activity are useful biomarkers for assessing the affects of organophosporous pesticide, dimethoate on neuro-immune system of blue mussels, M. edulis.

  4. Listeriolysin O Membrane Damaging Activity Involves Arc Formation and Lineaction -- Implication for Listeria monocytogenes Escape from Phagocytic Vacuole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Yi; Rezelj, Saša; Bedina Zavec, Apolonija; Anderluh, Gregor; Scheuring, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Listeriolysin-O (LLO) plays a crucial role during infection by Listeria monocytogenes. It enables escape of bacteria from phagocytic vacuole, which is the basis for its spread to other cells and tissues. It is not clear how LLO acts at phagosomal membranes to allow bacterial escape. The mechanism of action of LLO remains poorly understood, probably due to unavailability of suitable experimental tools that could monitor LLO membrane disruptive activity in real time. Here, we used high-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM) featuring high spatio-temporal resolution on model membranes and optical microscopy on giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) to investigate LLO activity. We analyze the assembly kinetics of toxin oligomers, the prepore-to-pore transition dynamics and the membrane disruption in real time. We reveal that LLO toxin efficiency and mode of action as a membrane-disrupting agent varies strongly depending on the membrane cholesterol concentration and the environmental pH. We discovered that LLO is able to form arc pores as well as damage lipid membranes as a lineactant, and this leads to large-scale membrane defects. These results altogether provide a mechanistic basis of how large-scale membrane disruption leads to release of Listeria from the phagocytic vacuole in the cellular context. PMID:27104344

  5. Phenotyping of leukocytes and granulocyte and monocyte phagocytic activity in the peripheral blood and uterus of cows with endometritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodzki, P; Kostro, K; Brodzki, A; Lisiecka, U; Kurek, L; Marczuk, J

    2014-08-01

    This study was a comparative evaluation of selected immunological parameters in peripheral blood and uterine wash samples from cows with a normal postpartum period compared with cows with endometritis. We aimed to determine the usefulness of these parameters in monitoring the puerperium. In total, 40 cows were included in the study: 20 had endometritis (experimental group), and 20 did not have uterine inflammation (control group). Animals were chosen on the basis of cytological and bacteriological test results. The tests were conducted 5, 22, and 40 days postpartum. In both groups, flow cytometric analysis of the surface molecules CD4, CD8, CD21, CD25, and CD14 in the peripheral blood and uterine washings was performed. Granulocyte and monocyte phagocytic activity was determined using a commercial Phagotest kit that was adapted for flow cytometry. The percentage of phagocytic granulocytes and monocytes in both the peripheral blood and the uterine washings was significantly lower for cows in the experimental group compared with the control group (P cows with endometritis. A significant decrease (P endometritis. Knowledge of the immunological mechanisms observed in cows with endometritis might aid in choosing the correct immunomodulating agent-based adjuvant therapy. PMID:24857644

  6. Cytometric analysis of surface molecules of leucocytes and phagocytic activity of granulocytes and monocytes/macrophages in cows with pyometra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodzki, P; Kostro, K; Brodzki, A; Niemczuk, K; Lisiecka, U

    2014-10-01

    Pyometra is a serious problem in dairy cow herds, causing large economic losses due to infertility. The development of pyometra depends mainly on the immunological status of the cow. The aim of the study was a comparative evaluation of selected indicators involving non-specific and specific immunity in cows with pyometra and in cows without inflammation of the uterus. The study was performed in 20 cows, which were divided into two groups: pyometra group and healthy group, each comprising 10 cows, based on the results of cytological and ultrasonographic tests. A flow cytometric analysis was performed for the surface molecules CD4, CD8, CD14, CD21, CD25 and CD4(+) CD25(+) on leucocytes, and the phagocytic activity was determined from granulocytes and monocytes/macrophages in the peripheral blood and uterine washings, respectively. It was demonstrated that the percentage of phagocytic granulocytes and monocytes/macrophages in both the peripheral blood and uterine washings was significantly lower in cows with pyometra compared with the healthy group (p pyometra group, along with a significantly higher (p pyometra may be caused by a bacterial infection and the presence of blocking agents (IL-10), released by the increasing number of CD8(+) lymphocytes what leads to the advanced inflammation of uterus. PMID:25124985

  7. Exclusion of synaptotagmin V at the phagocytic cup by Leishmania donovani lipophosphoglycan results in decreased promastigote internalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinet, Adrien F; Jananji, Silvana; Turco, Salvatore J; Fukuda, Mitsunori; Descoteaux, Albert

    2011-09-01

    Regulators of membrane fusion play an important role in phagocytosis, as they regulate the focal delivery of endomembrane that is required for optimal internalization of large particles. During internalization of Leishmania promastigotes, the surface glycolipid lipophosphoglycan (LPG) is transferred to the macrophage membrane and modifies its fusogenic properties. In this study, we investigated the impact of LPG on the recruitment of the exocytosis regulator synaptotagmin V (Syt V) at the area of internalization and on the early steps of phagocytosis. Using Leishmania donovani LPG-defective mutants and LPG-coated particles, we established that LPG reduces the phagocytic capacity of macrophages and showed that it causes exclusion of Syt V from the nascent phagosome. Silencing of Syt V inhibited phagocytosis to the same extent as LPG, and these effects were not cumulative, consistent with a Syt V-dependent mechanism for the inhibition of phagocytosis by LPG. Previous work has revealed that LPG-mediated exclusion of Syt V from phagosomes prevents the recruitment of the vacuolar ATPase and acidification. Thus, whereas exclusion of Syt V from phagosomes in the process of formation may be beneficial for the creation of a hospitable intracellular niche, it reduces the phagocytic capacity of macrophages. We propose that the cost associated with a reduced internalization rate may be compensated by increased survival, and could lead to a greater overall parasite fitness. PMID:21680635

  8. Ablation of the ID2 gene results in altered circadian feeding behavior, and sex-specific enhancement of insulin sensitivity and elevated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle and brown adipose tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepa Mathew

    Full Text Available Inhibitor of DNA binding 2 (ID2 is a helix-loop-helix transcriptional repressor rhythmically expressed in many adult tissues. Our earlier studies have demonstrated a role for ID2 in the input pathway, core clock function and output pathways of the mouse circadian system. We have also reported that Id2 null (Id2-/- mice are lean with low gonadal white adipose tissue deposits and lower lipid content in the liver. These results coincided with altered or disrupted circadian expression profiles of liver genes including those involved in lipid metabolism. In the present phenotypic study we intended to decipher, on a sex-specific basis, the role of ID2 in glucose metabolism and in the circadian regulation of activity, important components of energy balance. We find that Id2-/- mice exhibited altered daily and circadian rhythms of feeding and locomotor activity; activity profiles extended further into the late night/dark phase of the 24-hr cycle, despite mice showing reduced total locomotor activity. Also, male Id2-/- mice consumed a greater amount of food relative to body mass, and displayed less weight gain. Id2-/- females had smaller adipocytes, suggesting sexual-dimorphic programing of adipogenesis. We observed increased glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in male Id2-/- mice, which was exacerbated in older animals. FDG-PET analysis revealed increased glucose uptake by skeletal muscle and brown adipose tissue of male Id2-/- mice, suggesting increased glucose metabolism and thermogenesis in these tissues. Reductions in intramuscular triacylglycerol and diacylglycerol were detected in male Id2-/- mice, highlighting its possible mechanistic role in enhanced insulin sensitivity in these mice. Our findings indicate a role for ID2 as a regulator of glucose and lipid metabolism, and in the circadian control of feeding/locomotor behavior; and contribute to the understanding of the development of obesity and diabetes, particularly in shift work

  9. Ablation of the ID2 gene results in altered circadian feeding behavior, and sex-specific enhancement of insulin sensitivity and elevated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle and brown adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Deepa; Zhou, Peng; Pywell, Cameron M; van der Veen, Daan R; Shao, Jinping; Xi, Yang; Bonar, Nicolle A; Hummel, Alyssa D; Chapman, Sarah; Leevy, W Matthew; Duffield, Giles E

    2013-01-01

    Inhibitor of DNA binding 2 (ID2) is a helix-loop-helix transcriptional repressor rhythmically expressed in many adult tissues. Our earlier studies have demonstrated a role for ID2 in the input pathway, core clock function and output pathways of the mouse circadian system. We have also reported that Id2 null (Id2-/-) mice are lean with low gonadal white adipose tissue deposits and lower lipid content in the liver. These results coincided with altered or disrupted circadian expression profiles of liver genes including those involved in lipid metabolism. In the present phenotypic study we intended to decipher, on a sex-specific basis, the role of ID2 in glucose metabolism and in the circadian regulation of activity, important components of energy balance. We find that Id2-/- mice exhibited altered daily and circadian rhythms of feeding and locomotor activity; activity profiles extended further into the late night/dark phase of the 24-hr cycle, despite mice showing reduced total locomotor activity. Also, male Id2-/- mice consumed a greater amount of food relative to body mass, and displayed less weight gain. Id2-/- females had smaller adipocytes, suggesting sexual-dimorphic programing of adipogenesis. We observed increased glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in male Id2-/- mice, which was exacerbated in older animals. FDG-PET analysis revealed increased glucose uptake by skeletal muscle and brown adipose tissue of male Id2-/- mice, suggesting increased glucose metabolism and thermogenesis in these tissues. Reductions in intramuscular triacylglycerol and diacylglycerol were detected in male Id2-/- mice, highlighting its possible mechanistic role in enhanced insulin sensitivity in these mice. Our findings indicate a role for ID2 as a regulator of glucose and lipid metabolism, and in the circadian control of feeding/locomotor behavior; and contribute to the understanding of the development of obesity and diabetes, particularly in shift work personnel among whom

  10. Small alveolar macrophages are infected preferentially by HIV and exhibit impaired phagocytic function

    OpenAIRE

    Jambo, K C; Banda, D H; Kankwatira, A M; Sukumar, N.; Allain, T J; Heyderman, R. S.; Russell, D. G.; Mwandumba, H. C.

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1-infected persons are at higher risk of lower respiratory tract infections than HIV-1-uninfected individuals. This suggests strongly that HIV-infected persons have specific impairment of pulmonary immune responses, but current understanding of how HIV alters pulmonary immunity is incomplete. Alveolar macrophages (AMs), comprising small and large macrophages, are major effectors of innate immunity in the lung. We postulated that HIV-1 impairs pulmonary innate immunity through impairment o...

  11. Altered pattern of Naïve and memory B cells and B1 cells in patients with chronic granulomatous disease.

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a rare primary immunodeficiency disorder characterized by a greatly increased susceptibility to severe fungal and bacterial infections caused by defects in NADPH oxidase of phagocytic cells. We aimed to investigate immunophenotype alterations of naïve and memory B cells and B1a cells in peripheral whole blood from Iranian patients with CGD. Flow cytometric analysis was performed on peripheral blood samples from 31 CGD patients and 23 healthy controls (HC...

  12. In vitro studies on the relationship between the anti-inflammatory activity of Physalis peruviana extracts and the phagocytic process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Willington; Ospina, Luis Fernando; Granados, Diana; Delgado, Gabriela

    2010-03-01

    The study of plants used in traditional medicine has drawn the attention of researchers as an alternative in the development of new therapeutics agents, such as the American Solanaceae Physalis peruviana, which has significant anti-inflammatory activity. The Physalis peruviana anti-inflammatory effect of ethanol or ether calyces extracts on the phagocytic process was assessed by using an in vitro phagocytosis model (Leishmania panamensis infection to murine macrophages). The Physalis peruviana extracts do not inhibit microorganism internalization and have no parasiticide effect. Most ET and EP extracts negatively affected the parasite's invasion of macrophages (Infected cells increased.). This observation might result from a down-regulation of the macrophage's microbicide ability associated with a selective reduction of proinflammatory cytokines levels. Physalis peruviana's anti-inflammatory activity described in this model is related to an immunomodulatory effect exerted on macrophages infected, which directly or indirectly "blocks" their ability to secrete soluble proinflammatory mediators. PMID:19678736

  13. The Influence of Periodontal Status, IL-ß Level, and PMN Phagocytic Function as Risk Factors on Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oedijani Santoso

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal status is a periodontal condition evaluated by using plaque index, calculus index, gingival index and pocket index. The main mediator of periodontium inflammation is IL-1ß examined by ELISA method. There is an elevation of PMNs in periodontium inflammation, but the leucotoxin as well as the protease in turn lowers the PMN phagocytic function. Phagocytic function ws measured by flowcytometry. The aim of the study was to evaluate the high risk factors of being type 2 DM. A diagnostic study was conducted by using cross-sectional design on 45 controlled DM (CDM subjects, 45 uncontrolled DM (UCDM subjects in the Metabolic Endocrinology Clinic Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital Jakarta, as compared to 45 non-DM control subjects. The result of multivariate analysis showed that patients of older age (>54 years old, low periodontium status (periodontal index >1.80, high IL-1ß level (>23.70 pg/mL, and low PMN phagocytic function <53.47%, were significantly at high risk of having DM compared to non-DM (p<0.05. Lower periodontium status showed an increase in IL-1ß level, decrease PMN phagocytic function, and consequently, an increase in the risk of being type 2 DM.

  14. Inhibitory Effects of Standardized Extracts of Phyllanthus amarus and Phyllanthus urinaria and Their Marker Compounds on Phagocytic Activity of Human Neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuandani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The standardized methanol extracts of Phyllanthus amarus and P. urinaria, collected from Malaysia and Indonesia, and their isolated chemical markers, phyllanthin and hypophyllanthin, were evaluated for their effects on the chemotaxis, phagocytosis and chemiluminescence of human phagocytes. All the plant extracts strongly inhibited the migration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs with the Malaysian P. amarus showing the strongest inhibitory activity (IC50 value, 1.1 µg/mL. There was moderate inhibition by the extracts of the bacteria engulfment by the phagocytes with the Malaysian P. amarus exhibiting the highest inhibition (50.8% of phagocytizing cells. The Malaysian P. amarus and P. urinaria showed strong reactive oxygen species (ROS inhibitory activity, with both extracts exhibiting IC50 value of 0.7 µg/mL. Phyllanthin and hypophyllanthin exhibited relatively strong activity against PMNs chemotaxis, with IC50 values slightly lower than that of ibuprofen (1.4 µg/mL. Phyllanthin exhibited strong inhibitory activity on the oxidative burst with an IC50 value comparable to that of aspirin (1.9 µg/mL. Phyllanthin exhibited strong engulfment inhibitory activity with percentage of phagocytizing cells of 14.2 and 27.1% for neutrophils and monocytes, respectively. The strong inhibitory activity of the extracts was due to the presence of high amounts of phyllanthin and hypophyllanthin although other constituents may also contribute.

  15. Suppression and recovery of the alveolar macrophage phagocytic system during continuous exposure to 0. 5 ppm ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilmour, M.I.; Hmieleski, R.R.; Stafford, E.A.; Jakab, G.J. (Johns Hopkins University, School of Hygiene and Public Health, Baltimore, MD (USA))

    1991-05-01

    Short-term exposures to ozone (O3) are known to impair pulmonary antibacterial defenses and alveolar macrophage (AM) phagocytosis in a dose-related manner. To determine the effect of prolonged O3 exposure, Swiss mice were exposed continuously to 0.5 ppm O3. At 1, 3, 7, and 14 days, intrapulmonary killing was assessed by inhalation challenge with Staphylococcus aureus or Proteus mirabilis and by comparing the number of viable bacteria remaining in the lungs at 4 h between O3-exposed and control animals. To evaluate the effects of O3 on the functional capacity of the AMs, Fc-receptor mediated phagocytosis was assessed. Ozone exposure impaired the intrapulmonary killing of S. aureus at 1 and 3 days; however, with prolonged exposure, the bactericidal capacity of the lungs returned to normal. This trend of an initial suppression followed by recovery was reflected in the phagocytic capacity of the AMs. In contrast to S. aureus, when P. mirabilis was used as the challenge organism, O3 exposure had no suppressive effect on pulmonary bactericidal activity, which correlated with an increase in the phagocytic cell population in the lungs. Morphologic examination of the lavaged macrophages showed that after 1 day of O3 exposure, the AMs were more foamy, and contained significantly more vacuoles. There was also a significant increase in binucleated cells at 3 days. These studies demonstrate that continuous exposure to O3 modulates AM-dependent lung defenses and points to the importance of the challenge organism and exposure protocol in establishing the adverse effect of O3.

  16. Migration and Phagocytic Ability of Activated Microglia During Post-natal Development is Mediated by Calcium-Dependent Purinergic Signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunkaria, Aditya; Bhardwaj, Supriya; Halder, Avishek; Yadav, Aarti; Sandhir, Rajat

    2016-03-01

    Microglia play an important role in synaptic pruning and controlled phagocytosis of neuronal cells during developmental stages. However, the mechanisms that regulate these functions are not completely understood. The present study was designed to investigate the role of purinergic signalling in microglial migration and phagocytic activity during post-natal brain development. One-day-old BALB/c mice received lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and/or a purinergic analogue (2-methylthioladenosine-5'-diphosphate; 2MeSADP), intracerebroventrically (i.c.v.). Combined administration of LPS and 2MeSADP resulted in activation of microglia as evident from increased expression of ionised calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba1). Activated microglia showed increased expression of purinergic receptors (P2Y2, P2Y6 and P2Y12). LPS either alone or in combination with 2MeSADP induced the expression of Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX-1) and P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels along with MARCKS-related protein (MRP), which is an integral component of cell migration machinery. In addition, LPS and 2MeSADP administration induced the expression of microglial CD11b and DAP12 (DNAX-activation protein 12), which are known to be involved in phagocytosis of neurons during development. Interestingly, administration of thapsigargin (TG), a specific Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitor of endoplasmic reticulum, prevented the LPS/2MeSADP-induced microglial activation and migration by down-regulating the expression of Iba1 and MRP, respectively. Moreover, TG also reduced the LPS/2MeSADP-induced expression of CD11b/DAP12. Taken together, the findings reveal for the first time that Ca(2+)-mediated purinergic receptors regulate the migration and phagocytic ability of microglia during post-natal brain development. PMID:25575683

  17. Induction of a high phagocytic capability in P388D1, a macrophage-like tumor cell line, by 1 alpha, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, R

    1984-01-01

    1 alpha, 25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25-(OH)2D3] was shown to induce a high phagocytic capability in the macrophage-like murine tumor cell line P388D1. Induction of phagocytic capability by 1,25-(OH)2D3 was dose-dependent in the range of 0.2 to 5.0 ng/ml, required the continuous presence of the secosteroid in culture, and was reversible. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D3 was an effective inducer only at about 500 ng/ml, while 24R,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 was ineffective. The induction of the high phagocytic capability was neither accompanied by increased synthesis of lysozyme nor closely associated with an inhibitory effect on cellular proliferation. P388D1 cells bound (without ingestion) nonopsonized sheep erythrocytes (sheep RBC), and the binding increased in 1,25-(OH)2D3-treated cells. Fc-receptor-mediated binding of immunoglobulin G-coated sheep RBC was not modulated in 1,25-(OH)2D3-treated cells, but the cells acquired an Fc-receptor-mediated phagocytic capability that was expressed only when preformed P388D1-sheep RBC rosettes were further exposed to immunoglobulin G. Several differentiation agents of myeloid leukemia cells (including dexamethasone) were not effective in inducing the high-phagocytic phenotype, while retinoic acid was very effective. Different myeloid or macrophage-like tumors (WEHI-265, J774.2, PU-5, and WEHI-3) were variable in their response to 1,25-(OH)2D3. PMID:6546302

  18. Decreasing Smoking Behavior through Subliminal Stimulation Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, Elbert D.

    1979-01-01

    Determines whether subliminal perception can be used as a means for altering cigarette smoking behavior. Smoking behavior was not altered through subliminal perception as carried out in this study. There was evidence that smoking behavior was altered, but it was an unpredicted change. Some subjects decreased smoking patterns. (Author)

  19. Mononuclear Phagocyte-Derived Microparticulate Caspase-1 Induces Pulmonary Vascular Endothelial Cell Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srabani Mitra

    Full Text Available Lung endothelial cell apoptosis and injury occurs throughout all stages of acute lung injury (ALI/ARDS and impacts disease progression. Lung endothelial injury has traditionally been focused on the role of neutrophil trafficking to lung vascular integrin receptors induced by proinflammatory cytokine expression. Although much is known about the pathogenesis of cell injury and death in ALI/ARDS, gaps remain in our knowledge; as a result of which there is currently no effective pharmacologic therapy. Enzymes known as caspases are essential for completion of the apoptotic program and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. We hypothesized that caspase-1 may serve as a key regulator of human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cell (HPMVEC apoptosis in ALI/ARDS. Our recent experiments confirm that microparticles released from stimulated monocytic cells (THP1 induce lung endothelial cell apoptosis. Microparticles pretreated with the caspase-1 inhibitor, YVAD, or pan-caspase inhibitor, ZVAD, were unable to induce cell death of HPMVEC, suggesting the role of caspase-1 or its substrate in the induction of HPMVEC cell death. Neither un-induced microparticles (control nor direct treatment with LPS induced apoptosis of HPMVEC. Further experiments showed that caspase-1 uptake into HPMVEC and the induction of HPMVEC apoptosis was facilitated by caspase-1 interactions with microparticulate vesicles. Altering vesicle integrity completely abrogated apoptosis of HPMVEC suggesting an encapsulation requirement for target cell uptake of active caspase-1. Taken together, we confirm that microparticle centered caspase-1 can play a regulator role in endothelial cell injury.

  20. Propionibacterium acnes induces an adjuvant effect in B-1 cells and affects their phagocyte differentiation via a TLR2-mediated mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambero, Monica; Teixeira, Daniela; Butin, Liane; Ishimura, Mayari Eika; Mariano, Mario; Popi, Ana Flavia; Longo-Maugéri, Ieda Maria

    2016-09-01

    B-1 lymphocytes are present in large numbers in the mouse peritoneal cavity, as are macrophages, and are responsible for natural IgM production. These lymphocytes migrate to inflammatory foci and are also involved in innate immunity. It was also demonstrated that B-1 cells are able to differentiated into phagocytes (B-1CDP), which is characterized by expression of F4/80 and increased phagocytic activity. B-1 cell responses to antigens and adjuvants are poorly characterized. It has been shown that Propionibacterium acnes suspensions induce immunomodulatory effects in both macrophages and B-2 lymphocytes. We recently demonstrated that this bacterium has the ability to increase B-1 cell populations both in vitro and in vivo. P. acnes induces B-1CDP differentiation, increases the expression of TLR2, TLR4 and TLR9 and augments the expression of CD80, CD86 and CD40 in B-1 and B-1CDP cells. Because P. acnes has been shown to modulate TLR expression, in this study, we investigated the role of TLR2 and TLR4 in B-1 cell population, including B-1CDP differentiation and phagocytic activity in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, we have demonstrated that TLR2 signaling could be involved in the increase in the B-1 cell population induced by P. acnes. Furthermore, the early differentiation of B-1CDP is also dependent of TLR2. It was also observed that TLR signals also interfere in the phagocytic ability of B-1 cells and their phagocytes. According to these data, it is clear that P. acnes promotes an important adjuvant effect in B-1 cells by inducing them to differentiate into B-1CDP cells and modulates their phagocytic functions both in vivo and in vitro. Moreover, most of these effects are mediated primarily via TLR2. These data reinforce the findings that such bacterial suspensions have powerful adjuvant properties. The responses of B-1 cells to exogenous stimulation indicate that these cells are important to the innate immune response. PMID:27233619

  1. Public health implications of altered puberty timing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golub, M.S.; Collman, G.W.; Foster, P.M.;

    2008-01-01

    . Altered timing of puberty also has implications for behavioral disorders. For example, an early maturation is associated with a greater incidence of conduct and behavior disorders during adolescence. Finally, altered puberty timing is considered an adverse effect in reproductive toxicity risk assessment...... for chemicals. Recent US legislation has mandated improved chemical testing approaches for protecting children's health and screening for endocrine-disrupting agents, which has led to changes in the US Environmental Protection Agency's risk assessment and toxicity testing guidelines to include puberty......-related assessments and to the validation of pubertal male and female rat assays for endocrine screening Udgivelsesdato: 2008/2...

  2. Phagocytic and signaling innate immune receptors: are they dysregulated in cystic fibrosis in the fight against Pseudomonas aeruginosa?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallenave, Jean-Michel

    2014-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disease that affects mainly the lung and the digestive system, causing progressive disability and organ failure. The most prevalent CFTR mutation dF508 (which constitutes 70% of all mutations) results in an incorrect targeting of the CFTR molecule to the membrane. It is now a well-accepted concept that mucosal innate immune responses are dysregulated in cystic fibrosis through a cycle of infectious and inflammatory episodes. However, although much work has focused on the late consequences of chronic lung inflammation in CF, very little is known on the early events leading to infection and colonization, such as that of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P.a). We review here the involvement of a range of innate phagocytic/signaling receptors in the control of this pathogen (mannose receptor, complement receptor-3, Toll-like receptors, etc.) and evaluate the possibility that the activity of some of these receptors may be dysregulated in cystic fibrosis, potentially explaining the florid infections encountered in this disease. PMID:24508137

  3. TGF-β receptor 1 inhibition prevents stenosis of tissue-engineered vascular grafts by reducing host mononuclear phagocyte activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong-Ung; de Dios Ruiz-Rosado, Juan; Mahler, Nathan; Best, Cameron A; Tara, Shuhei; Yi, Tai; Shoji, Toshihiro; Sugiura, Tadahisa; Lee, Avione Y; Robledo-Avila, Frank; Hibino, Narutoshi; Pober, Jordan S; Shinoka, Toshiharu; Partida-Sanchez, Santiago; Breuer, Christopher K

    2016-07-01

    Stenosis is a critical problem in the long-term efficacy of tissue-engineered vascular grafts (TEVGs). We previously showed that host monocyte infiltration and activation within the graft drives stenosis and that TGF-β receptor 1 (TGF-βR1) inhibition can prevent it, but the latter effect was attributed primarily to inhibition of mesenchymal cell expansion. In this study, we assessed the effects of TGF-βR1 inhibition on the host monocytes. Biodegradable TEVGs were implanted as inferior vena cava interposition conduits in 2 groups of C57BL/6 mice (n = 25/group): unseeded grafts and unseeded grafts with TGF-βR1 inhibitor systemic treatment for the first 2 wk. The TGF-βR1 inhibitor treatment effectively improved TEVG patency at 6 mo compared to the untreated control group (91.7 vs. 48%, P Dios Ruiz-Rosado, J., Mahler, N., Best, C. A., Tara, S., Yi, T., Shoji, T., Sugiura, T., Lee, A. Y., Robledo-Avila, F., Hibino, N., Pober, J. S., Shinoka, T., Partida-Sanchez, S., Breuer, C. K. TGF-β receptor 1 inhibition prevents stenosis of tissue-engineered vascular grafts by reducing host mononuclear phagocyte activation. PMID:27059717

  4. Inhibition of chemiluminescence and chemotactic activity of phagocytes in vitro by the extracts of selected medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantan, Ibrahim; Harun, Nurul Hikmah; Septama, Abdi Wira; Murad, Shahnaz; Mesaik, M A

    2011-04-01

    The methanol extracts of 20 selected medicinal plants were investigated for their effects on the respiratory burst of human whole blood, isolated human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and isolated mice macrophages using a luminol/lucigenin-based chemiluminescence assay. We also tested the effect of the extracts on chemotactic migration of PMNs using the Boyden chamber technique. The extracts of Curcuma domestica L., Phyllanthus amarus Schum & Thonn and C. xanthorrhiza Roxb. were the samples producing the strongest oxidative burst of PMNs with luminol-based chemiluminescence, with IC(50) values ranging from 0.5 to 0.7 μg/ml. For macrophage cells, the extracts which showed strong suppressive activity for luminol-based chemiluminescence were C. xanthorrhiza and Garcinia mangostana L. Among the extracts studied, C. mangga Valton & Vazsjip, Piper nigrum L. and Labisia pumila var. alata showed strong inhibitory activity on lucigenin-amplified oxidative burst of PMNs, with IC(50) values ranging from 0.9 to 1.5 μg/ml. The extracts of Zingiber officinale Rosc., Alpinia galangal (L.) Willd and Averrhoa bilimbi Linn showed strong inhibition on the chemotaxic migration of cells, with IC(50) values comparable to that of ibuprofen (1.5 μg/ml). The results suggest that some of these plants were able to modulate the innate immune response of phagocytes at different steps, emphasizing their potential as a source of new immunomodulatory agents. PMID:21184195

  5. Development, standardisation and application of radiometric assays for measuring interaction of phagocytes, serum substances and fungal organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective radiometric methods for measuring independently opsonisation, phagocytosis and intracellular killing of Candida albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been developed and standardised. Opsonisation and phagocytosis were measured as inhibition of 3H-uridine uptake into the microorganisms caused by phagocytosis. Intracellular killing of C. albicans was measured by 51Cr release assay. The methods are suitable for clinical application. It was shown that using human sera neither antibody nor complement were required for opsonisation of S. cerevisiae required the activation of the alternative complement pathway. Intracellular killing of C. albicans was found to be dependent on the presence of C3. Thus in the absence of C3, C. albicans was normally ingested but not killed. It was therefore concluded that C3 participates directly in the intracellular processes leading to phagocytic killing of C. albicans. Using S. cerevisiae, it was possible to measure selectively the opsonising capacity of the alternative pathway (APOC assay). Preliminary clinical application of the APOC assay suggested that a large proportion (30-40%) of patients with recurrent infection and suspected immune deficiency, without other detectable immunological abnormality, have decreased opsonising capacity of the alternative complement pathway. (author)

  6. Effects of environmental concentrations of atrazine on hemocyte density and phagocytic activity in the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis (Gastropoda, Pulmonata)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Immunotoxicological effects of environmentally relevant concentrations (10, 23, 50, 100 μg/l) of atrazine were studied in Lymnaea stagnalis. Individual hemolymph sampling was performed at 0, 24, 48, 72, 96, 168, 336, 504 and 672 h during exposure. Every atrazine concentration induced a significant increase in the mean number of circulating hemocytes, without any concentration-response relation. A peak (1.6-fold increase) of hemocyte density was observed after 96 h of exposure. After 504 h, the number of hemocytes remained higher only in the snails exposed to the two highest concentrations. Granulocytes contributed most to the increase in hemocyte density in herbicide-exposed snails. Both short- (24 and 96 h) and long-term (504 h) exposures resulted in significant inhibition of hemocyte phagocytic activity upon E. coli. Over the long-term, phagocytosis recovered for the two lowest concentrations. After 504 h of exposure, every herbicide level resulted in a significant reduction of reactive oxygen species production in E. coli-stimulated hemocytes, which was not observed for short-term exposures. - Phagocytosis and oxidative burst of hemocytes may be a functional biomarker for atrazine effects on snails

  7. Effects of environmental concentrations of atrazine on hemocyte density and phagocytic activity in the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis (Gastropoda, Pulmonata)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, Jacqueline; Lagadic, Laurent

    2004-01-01

    Immunotoxicological effects of environmentally relevant concentrations (10, 23, 50, 100 {mu}g/l) of atrazine were studied in Lymnaea stagnalis. Individual hemolymph sampling was performed at 0, 24, 48, 72, 96, 168, 336, 504 and 672 h during exposure. Every atrazine concentration induced a significant increase in the mean number of circulating hemocytes, without any concentration-response relation. A peak (1.6-fold increase) of hemocyte density was observed after 96 h of exposure. After 504 h, the number of hemocytes remained higher only in the snails exposed to the two highest concentrations. Granulocytes contributed most to the increase in hemocyte density in herbicide-exposed snails. Both short- (24 and 96 h) and long-term (504 h) exposures resulted in significant inhibition of hemocyte phagocytic activity upon E. coli. Over the long-term, phagocytosis recovered for the two lowest concentrations. After 504 h of exposure, every herbicide level resulted in a significant reduction of reactive oxygen species production in E. coli-stimulated hemocytes, which was not observed for short-term exposures. - Phagocytosis and oxidative burst of hemocytes may be a functional biomarker for atrazine effects on snails.

  8. Dynamics of mononuclear phagocyte system Fc receptor function in systemic lupus erythematosus. Relation to disease activity and circulating immune complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimberly, R P; Parris, T M; Inman, R D; McDougal, J S

    1983-02-01

    Seventeen pairs of longitudinal studies of mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS) Fc receptor function in 15 patients with systemic lupus were performed to explore the dynamic range of Fc receptor dysfunction in lupus and to establish the relationships between MPS function, clinical disease activity and circulating immune complexes (CIC). Fc receptor function was measured by the clearance of IgG sensitized autologous erythrocytes. At the time of first study the degree of MPS dysfunction was correlated with both clinical activity (P less than 0.05) and CIC (P less than 0.05). At follow-up patients with a change in clinical status show significantly larger changes in clearance function compared to clinically stable patients (206 min vs 7 min; P less than 0.001). MPS function changed concordantly with a change in clinical status in all cases (P = 0.002). Longitudinal assessments did not demonstrate concordance of changes in MPS function and CIC, measured by three different assays. The MPS Fc receptor defect in systemic lupus is dynamic and closely associated with disease activity. The lack of concordance of the defect with changes in CIC suggests that either CIC does not adequately reflect receptor site saturation or that other factors may also contribute to the magnitude of MPS dysfunction. PMID:6839542

  9. In vitro inhibitory effects of Moringa oleifera leaf extract and its major components on chemiluminescence and chemotactic activity of phagocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vongsak, Boonyadist; Gritsanapan, Wandee; Wongkrajang, Yuvadee; Jantan, Ibrahim

    2013-11-01

    The ethanol extract of Moringa oleifera Lam. leaves and its major constituents, crypto-chlorogenic acid, quercetin 3-O-glucoside and kaempferol 3-O-glucoside, were investigated on the respiratory burst of human whole blood and isolated human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) using a luminol-based chemiluminescence assay. The chemotactic migration of PMNs was also investigated using the Boyden chamber technique. The ethanol extract demonstrated inhibitory activities on the oxidative burst and the chemotactic migration of PMNs. Quercetin 3-O-glucoside, crypto-chlorogenic acid, and kaempferol 3-O-glucoside, isolated from the extract, expressed relatively strong inhibitory activity on the oxidative burst of PMNs with IC50 values of 4.1, 6.7 and 7.0 microM, respectively, comparable with that of aspirin. They also demonstrated strong inhibition of chemotatic migration of PMNs with IC50 values of 9.5, 15.9 and 18.2 microM, respectively. The results suggest that M. oleifera leaves could modulate the immune response of human phagocytes, linking to its ethnopharmacological use as an anti-inflammatory agent. The immunomodulating activity of the plant was mainly due to its major components. PMID:24427941

  10. Recombinant interferon gamma augments phagocyte superoxide production and X-chronic granulomatous disease gene expression in X-linked variant chronic granulomatous disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Ezekowitz, R A; Orkin, S H; Newburger, P E

    1987-01-01

    We examined the potential of interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) to ameliorate the physiologic defect of chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) by studying its effects on CGD phagocyte superoxide generation, NADPH oxidase kinetics, cytochrome b559 content, and expression of X-CGD (the gene for the X-linked disease). Granulocytes and macrophages from three patients in two kindreds with "variant" X-linked CGD (i.e., with very low, but detectable, baseline superoxide-generating activity) responded to IFN-...

  11. Thrombospondin-1-N-Terminal Domain Induces a Phagocytic State and Thrombospondin-1-C-Terminal Domain Induces a Tolerizing Phenotype in Dendritic Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Tabib, Adi; Krispin, Alon; Trahtemberg, Uriel; Verbovetski, Inna; Lebendiker, Mario; Danieli, Tsafi; Mevorach, Dror

    2009-01-01

    In our previous study, we have found that thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) is synthesized de novo upon monocyte and neutrophil apoptosis, leading to a phagocytic and tolerizing phenotype of dendritic cells (DC), even prior to DC-apoptotic cell interaction. Interestingly, we were able to show that heparin binding domain (HBD), the N-terminal portion of TSP-1, was cleaved and secreted simultaneously in a caspase- and serine protease- dependent manner. In the current study we were interested to examine ...

  12. Direct and phagocyte-mediated lipid peroxidation of lung surfactant by group B streptococci and other bacteria. Protective effect of antioxidants.

    OpenAIRE

    Bouhafs, Rabea KL

    2002-01-01

    Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), caused by surfactant deficiency, is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in preterm neonates. Further, infants with systemic neonatal infection or pneumonia often have signs of RDS. As neonatal infection and RDS may occur simultaneously, infants with infections may receive exogenous surfactant as treatment. Our hypothesis was that surfactant lipids are peroxidized by reactive oxygen species from phagocytes and bacteria and that Curo...

  13. Accumulation of 14C-5,6-dihydroxytryptamine-melanin in intrathecal and subependymal phagocytes of the rat CNS and possible routes of their elimination from brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    14C-5,6-DHT-Melanin, a labelled synthetic polymer resembling the naturally occurring melanin formed in brain by autoxidation of dopamine, was injected into the left lateral ventricle of adult rats, and its fate followed by autoradiography and by transmission electron microscopy of structures identified as labelled in preceding light micrographs, and by EM-autoradiography. Shortly after injection, melanin particles (easily identified in the em because of their size, structure and electron opacity) were seen ingested by supraependymal and epiplexus cells, by cells residing in the piaarachnoid, i.e. free subarachnoidal cells and perivascular cells, and by subependymally located microglia-like cells with intraventricular processes. Up to day four, an increase in the number of labelled phagocytes in the CSF was noted which transformed into typical reactive macrophages. Beyond this time, many intraventricular melanin-loaded phagocytes formed rounded clusters; cells of such clusters were subsequently found to invade the brain parenchyma by penetrating the ependymal lining and to accumulate in the perivascular space of brain vessels. 14C-Melanin-storing macrophages were found in the marginal sinus of the deep jugular lymph nodes suggesting emigration of CNS-derived phagocytes via lymphatics or prelymphatics that contact the subarachnoidal space compartment. This does not exclude the possibility that some of the macrophages leave the brain via the systemic circulation by penetrating the vascular endothelium; these may be disposed of in peripheral organs other than the lymph nodes

  14. Thrombospondin-1-N-Terminal Domain Induces a Phagocytic State and Thrombospondin-1-C-Terminal Domain Induces a Tolerizing Phenotype in Dendritic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabib, Adi; Krispin, Alon; Trahtemberg, Uriel; Verbovetski, Inna; Lebendiker, Mario; Danieli, Tsafi; Mevorach, Dror

    2009-01-01

    In our previous study, we have found that thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) is synthesized de novo upon monocyte and neutrophil apoptosis, leading to a phagocytic and tolerizing phenotype of dendritic cells (DC), even prior to DC-apoptotic cell interaction. Interestingly, we were able to show that heparin binding domain (HBD), the N-terminal portion of TSP-1, was cleaved and secreted simultaneously in a caspase- and serine protease- dependent manner. In the current study we were interested to examine the role of HBD in the clearance of apoptotic cells, and whether the phagocytic and tolerizing state of DCs is mediated by the HBD itself, or whether the entire TSP-1 is needed. Therefore, we have cloned the human HBD, and compared its interactions with DC to those with TSP-1. Here we show that rHBD by itself is not directly responsible for immune paralysis and tolerizing phenotype of DCs, at least in the monomeric form, but has a significant role in rendering DCs phagocytic. Binding of TSP-1-C-terminal domain on the other hand induces a tolerizing phenotype in dendritic cells. PMID:19721725

  15. Sleep Deprivation Alters Choice Strategy Without Altering Uncertainty or Loss Aversion Preferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Dhaniel A Mullette-Gillman

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Sleep deprivation alters decision making; however, it is unclear what specific cognitive processes are modified to drive altered choices. In this manuscript, we examined how one night of total sleep deprivation (TSD alters economic decision making. We specifically examined changes in uncertainty preferences dissociably from changes in the strategy with which participants engage with presented choice information. With high test-retest reliability, we show that TSD does not alter uncertainty preferences or loss aversion. Rather, TSD alters the information the participants rely upon to make their choices. Utilizing a choice strategy metric which contrasts the influence of maximizing and satisficing information on choice behavior, we find that TSD alters the relative reliance on maximizing information and satisficing information, in the gains domain. This alteration is the result of participants both decreasing their reliance on cognitively-complex maximizing information and a concomitant increase in the use of readily-available satisficing information. TSD did not result in a decrease in overall information use in either domain. These results show that sleep deprivation alters decision making by altering the informational strategies that participants employ, without altering their preferences.

  16. Behavioral and hippocampal cytoskeletal alterations in rats following chronic unpredictable mild stress and fluoxetine treatment%慢性应激及氟西汀治疗后大鼠海马细胞支架的改变

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨灿; 王高华; 王惠玲; 王晓萍; 刘忠纯; 朱志先

    2010-01-01

    目的 探讨慢性不可预见性应激及氟西汀治疗后大鼠细胞支架微管系统的动态性变化及其可能机制.方法 将24只大鼠按随机数字表法分为对照组(空白对照+生理盐水)、慢性不可预见性温和应激(CUMS)组(CUMS+生理盐水)和氟西汀组(CUMS+氟西汀),每组8只.对大鼠进行连续21 d CUMS后,氟西汀组给予氟西汀(10 mg/kg)治疗21 d,对照组和CUMS组给予生理盐水.实验结束后进行行为学观察,并使用免疫印迹法(western blot)检测大鼠海马乙酰化微管蛋白(Acet-Tub),酪氨酸化微管蛋白(Tyr-Tub),微管结合蛋白2(MAP-2)及磷酸化微管结合蛋白2(phospho-MAP-2).结果 (1)CUMS组糖水偏好[(55.13±11.80)%],总行程[(2736.59±511.20)cm],运动平均速度[(5.69±1.08)cm/s]及直立次数[(2.50±2.00)次]均低于对照组,差异有统计学意义(P<0.01);氟西汀组上述指标与对照组比较差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).(2)CUMS组与对照组相比,Acet-Tub表达升高[(171.84±10.34)%],Tyr-Tub[(62.06±9.24)%]和phospho-MAP-2[(68.81±8.93)%]的表达降低,差异有统计学意义(P均<0.01),MAP-2的表达与对照组比较无统计学意义(P>0.05);经氟西汀治疗后,Acet-Tub的表达降低为[(96.18±8.92)%],Tyr-Tub和phospho-MAP-2的表达分别升高为[(95.06±8.00)%]、[(100.60±7.30)%],与对照组比较均无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论 慢性应激后微管动态性减低,神经可塑性受损,氟西汀可以逆转海马的这些损伤,上述过程可能与微管相关蛋白磷酸化水平的变化有关.%Objective To investigate behavior and hippocampal cytoskeletal alterations in rats following chronic unpredictable mild stress and fluoxetine treatment, and explore the possible mechanism. Methods Twenty four male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were divided into three groups, with 8 exposed to 21 consecutive days of chronic unpredicted mild stresses (CUMS) and treated with vehicle, 8 exposed to CUMS and treated with fluoxetine, and 8 as

  17. Dolomite effect on borosilicate glass alteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Dolomite is a common mineral of clayey formations considered for radioactive waste disposals. ► Borosilicate glass/dolomite interaction have been studied by batch tests and solid analysis. ► Mg provided by dolomite combines with Si from glass to yield secondary Mg–silicates. ► This precipitation increases glass alteration, though in a moderate manner. ► Geochemical modeling allows to quantify the alteration mechanisms involved. - Abstract: Dolomite (CaMg(CO3)2) is one of the common rock-forming minerals in many geological media, in particular in clayey layers that are currently considered as potential host formations for a deep radioactive waste disposal facility. Magnesium in solution is one of the elements known to potentially enhance the alteration of nuclear glasses. The alteration of borosilicate glasses with dolomite as a Mg-bearing mineral source was investigated for 8 months in batch tests at 90 °C. Glass composition effects were investigated through two compositions (SiBNaAlCaZrO and SiBNaAlZrO) differing in their Ca content. The Ca-rich glass alteration is slightly enhanced in the presence of dolomite compared to the alteration observed in pure water. This greater alteration is explained by the precipitation of Mg silicate phases on the dolomite and glass surfaces. In contrast, the Ca-free glass alteration decreases in the presence of dolomite compared to the alteration observed in pure water. This behavior is explained by Ca incorporation in the amorphous layer (formed during glass alteration) coming from dolomite dissolution. Calcium acts as a layer reorganizer and limits glass alteration by reducing the diffusion of reactive species through the altered layer. Modeling was performed using the GRAAL model implemented within the CHESS/HYTEC geochemical code to discriminate and interpret the mechanisms involved in glass/dolomite interactions. Magnesium released by dolomite dissolution reacts with silica provided by glass

  18. Public health implications of altered puberty timing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golub, Mari S; Collman, Gwen W; Foster, Paul M D;

    2008-01-01

    sexual debut, potential sexual abuse, and psychosocial difficulties. Altered puberty timing is also of concern for the development of reproductive tract cancers later in life. For example, an early age of menarche is a risk factor for breast cancer. A low age at male puberty is associated....... Altered timing of puberty also has implications for behavioral disorders. For example, an early maturation is associated with a greater incidence of conduct and behavior disorders during adolescence. Finally, altered puberty timing is considered an adverse effect in reproductive toxicity risk assessment...... for chemicals. Recent US legislation has mandated improved chemical testing approaches for protecting children's health and screening for endocrine-disrupting agents, which has led to changes in the US Environmental Protection Agency's risk assessment and toxicity testing guidelines to include puberty...

  19. Body distribution and in situ evading of phagocytic uptake by macrophages of long-circulating poly (ethylene glycol) cyanoacrylate-co-nhexadecyl cyanoacrylate nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min HUANG; Wei WU; Jun QIAN; Dan-jing WAN; Xiu-li WEI; Jian-hua ZHU

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the body distribution in mice of [14C]-labeled poly methoxyethyleneglycol cyanoacrylate-co-n-hexadecyl cyanoacrylate (PEGPHDCA) nanoparticles and in situ evading of phagocytic uptake by mouse peritoneal macrophages. Methods: PEG-PHDCA copolymers were synthesized by condensation of methoxypolyethylene glycol cyanoacetate with [14C]-hexadecylcyanoacetate. [14C]-nanoparticles were prepared using the nanoprecipitation/solvent diffusion method, while fluorescent nanoparticles were prepared by incorporating rhodamine B. In situ phagocytic uptake was evaluated by flow cytometry. Body distribution in mice was evaluated by determining radioactivity in tissues using a scintillation method. Results: Phagocytic uptake by macrophages can be efficiently evaded by fluorescent PEG-PHDCA nanoparticles. After 48 h, 31% of the radioactivity of the stealth [14C]-PEG-PHDCA nanoparticles after iv injection was still found in blood, whereas non-stealth PHDCA nanoparticles were cleaned up from the bloodstream in a short time. The distribution of stealth PEG-PHDCA nanoparticles and non-stealth PHDCA nanoparticals in mice was poor in lung, kidney, and brain, and a little higher in hearts. Lymphatic accumulation was unusually high for both stealth and non-stealth nanoparticles, typical of lymphatic capture. The accumulation of stealth PEG-PHDCA nanoparticles in the spleen was 1.7 times as much as that of non-stealth PHDCA (P<0.01). But the accumulation of stealth PEG-PHDCA nanoparticles in the liver was 0.8 times as much as that of non-stealth PHDCA (P<0.05). Conclusion: PEGylation leads to long-circulation of nanoparticles in the bloodstream, and splenotropic accumulation opens up the potential for further development of spleen-targeted drug delivery.

  20. Mononuclear phagocyte intercellular crosstalk facilitates transmission of cell-targeted nanoformulated antiretroviral drugs to human brain endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanmogne GD

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Georgette D Kanmogne1, Sangya Singh1, Upal Roy1, Xinming Liu1, JoEllyn McMillan1, Santhi Gorantla1, Shantanu Balkundi1, Nathan Smith1, Yazen Alnouti2, Nagsen Gautam2, You Zhou3, Larisa Poluektova1, Alexander Kabanov2, Tatiana Bronich2, Howard E Gendelman11Departments of Pharmacology and Experimental Neuroscience, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, 2Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE; 3Center for Biotechnology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE, USAAbstract: Despite the successes of antiretroviral therapy (ART, HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders remain prevalent in infected people. This is due, in part, to incomplete ART penetration across the blood–brain barrier (BBB and lymph nodes and to the establishment of viral sanctuaries within the central nervous system. In efforts to improve ART delivery, our laboratories developed a macrophage-carriage system for nanoformulated crystalline ART (nanoART (atazanavir, ritonavir, indinavir, and efavirenz. We demonstrate that nanoART transfer from mononuclear phagocytes (MP to human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC can be realized through cell-to-cell contacts, which can facilitate drug passage across the BBB. Coculturing of donor MP containing nanoART with recipient HBMEC facilitates intercellular particle transfer. NanoART uptake was observed in up to 52% of HBMEC with limited cytotoxicity. Folate coating of nanoART increased MP to HBMEC particle transfer by up to 77%. To translate the cell assays into relevant animal models of disease, ritonavir and atazanavir nanoformulations were injected into HIV-1-infected NOD/scid-γcnull mice reconstituted with human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Atazanavir and ritonavir levels in brains of mice treated with folate-coated nanoART were three- to four-fold higher than in mice treated with noncoated particles. This was associated with decreased viral load in the spleen and

  1. Computational Analysis of Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egnor, S E Roian; Branson, Kristin

    2016-07-01

    In this review, we discuss the emerging field of computational behavioral analysis-the use of modern methods from computer science and engineering to quantitatively measure animal behavior. We discuss aspects of experiment design important to both obtaining biologically relevant behavioral data and enabling the use of machine vision and learning techniques for automation. These two goals are often in conflict. Restraining or restricting the environment of the animal can simplify automatic behavior quantification, but it can also degrade the quality or alter important aspects of behavior. To enable biologists to design experiments to obtain better behavioral measurements, and computer scientists to pinpoint fruitful directions for algorithm improvement, we review known effects of artificial manipulation of the animal on behavior. We also review machine vision and learning techniques for tracking, feature extraction, automated behavior classification, and automated behavior discovery, the assumptions they make, and the types of data they work best with. PMID:27090952

  2. Modulation of mononuclear phagocyte inflammatory response by liposome-encapsulated voltage gated sodium channel inhibitor ameliorates myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Emerging evidence shows that anti-inflammatory strategies targeting inflammatory monocyte subset could reduce excessive inflammation and improve cardiovascular outcomes. Functional expression of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs have been demonstrated in monocytes and macrophages. We hypothesized that mononuclear phagocyte VGSCs are a target for monocyte/macrophage phenotypic switch, and liposome mediated inhibition of mononuclear phagocyte VGSC may attenuate myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury and improve post-infarction left ventricular remodeling. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Thin film dispersion method was used to prepare phenytoin (PHT, a non-selective VGSC inhibitor entrapped liposomes. Pharmacokinetic study revealed that the distribution and elimination half-life of PHT entrapped liposomes were shorter than those of free PHT, indicating a rapid uptake by mononuclear phagocytes after intravenous injection. In rat peritoneal macrophages, several VGSC α subunits (NaV1.1, NaV1.3, NaV1.4, NaV1.5, NaV1.6, NaV1.7, NaVX, Scn1b, Scn3b and Scn4b and β subunits were expressed at mRNA level, and PHT could suppress lipopolysaccharide induced M1 polarization (decreased TNF-α and CCL5 expression and facilitate interleukin-4 induced M2 polarization (increased Arg1 and TGF-β1 expression. In vivo study using rat model of myocardial I/R injury, demonstrated that PHT entrapped liposome could partially suppress I/R injury induced CD43+ inflammatory monocyte expansion, along with decreased infarct size and left ventricular fibrosis. Transthoracic echocardiography and invasive hemodynamic analysis revealed that PHT entrapped liposome treatment could attenuate left ventricular structural and functional remodeling, as shown by increased ejection fraction, reduced end-systolic and end-diastolic volume, as well as an amelioration of left ventricular systolic (+dP/dt max and diastolic (-dP/dt min functions. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our

  3. Questions Regarding Alterity in Social Collaborative Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florinela Floria

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The idea of alterity has become important in the last decades, when talking about the Information Age, which provides acknowledgement to the software development specialists about the importance of understanding the other’s behavior, needs, objectives and beliefs.
    Our main purpose is to bring to attention the question of social representation related to the images of individuals as different entities that are integrated in virtual teams, virtual projects and e-activities. Regarding the consciousness about the other’s alterity, we assert that it opens a dialogical perspective about the Information Society, where it is essential to share and communicate knowledge to the others.

  4. Attention Alters Perceived Attractiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Störmer, Viola S; Alvarez, George A

    2016-04-01

    Can attention alter the impression of a face? Previous studies showed that attention modulates the appearance of lower-level visual features. For instance, attention can make a simple stimulus appear to have higher contrast than it actually does. We tested whether attention can also alter the perception of a higher-order property-namely, facial attractiveness. We asked participants to judge the relative attractiveness of two faces after summoning their attention to one of the faces using a briefly presented visual cue. Across trials, participants judged the attended face to be more attractive than the same face when it was unattended. This effect was not due to decision or response biases, but rather was due to changes in perceptual processing of the faces. These results show that attention alters perceived facial attractiveness, and broadly demonstrate that attention can influence higher-level perception and may affect people's initial impressions of one another. PMID:26966228

  5. Ablation of the ID2 gene results in altered circadian feeding behavior, and sex-specific enhancement of insulin sensitivity and elevated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle and brown adipose tissue.

    OpenAIRE

    Mathew, D.; P. Zhou; Pywell, CM; van der Veen, DR; Shao, J.; Xi, Y.; Bonar, NA; Hummel, AD; Chapman, S.; Leevy, WM; Duffield, GE

    2013-01-01

    Inhibitor of DNA binding 2 (ID2) is a helix-loop-helix transcriptional repressor rhythmically expressed in many adult tissues. Our earlier studies have demonstrated a role for ID2 in the input pathway, core clock function and output pathways of the mouse circadian system. We have also reported that Id2 null (Id2−/−) mice are lean with low gonadal white adipose tissue deposits and lower lipid content in the liver. These results coincided with altered or disrupted circadian expression profiles ...

  6. The understanding of the R7T7 glass blocks long term behavior: chemical and transport coupling in fractured media; Comprehension de l'alteration a long terme des colis de verre R7T7: etude du couplage chimie transport dans un milieu fissure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chomat, L

    2008-04-15

    The long term behavior of nuclear waste glass blocks depends highly on chemical reactions which occur at the surface in contact with water. Studies carried out on inactive fractured glass blocks show that fracture networks play a significant part in reactive surface area. Nevertheless, the complexity of results interpretation, due to a weak knowledge of fracture networks and local lixiviation conditions, does not allow us to comprehend the physical and chemical mechanisms involved. Model cracks are a key step to study chemical and transport coupling in fractured media. Crack lixiviation in aggressive conditions (pH{>=}11) show that the crack's position (horizontal or vertical) determines the dominant transport mechanism (respectively diffusion or convection induced by gravity). This gravity driven flow seems to be negligible in lower pH conditions. The convective velocity is estimated by a 1D model of reactive transport. Two other parameters are studied: the influence of thermal gradient and the influence of interconnected cracks on alteration. A strong retroactive effect of convection, due to thermal gradient, on the alteration kinetic is observed inside the crack. These works lead to a complete alteration experiment of a 163 crack network subject to a thermal gradient. The use of the geochemical software, HYTEC, within the framework of this study shows the potential of the software which is however limited by the kinetics law used. (author)

  7. Effects of Glycated Whey Protein Concentrate on Pro-inflammatory Cytokine Expression and Phagocytic Activity in RAW264.7 Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Su-Hyun; Lee, Hyun Ah; Lee, Keon Bong; Kim, Sae Hun; Park, Kun-Young; Lee, Kwang-Won

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the stimulatory effects of Maillard reaction, a non-enzymatic browning reaction on the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and phagocytic activity induced by whey protein concentrate (WPC). Glycated WPC (G-WPC) was prepared by a reaction between WPC and the lactose it contained. The fluorescence intensity of G-WPC dramatically increased after one day, and high molecular weight complexes formed via the Maillard reaction were also observed in the sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis profiles. G-WPC demonstrated immunomodulatory effects, including stimulation of increased nitric oxide production and cytokine expressions (i.e., tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6), compared to WPC. Furthermore, the phagocytic activity of RAW264.7 cells was significantly increased upon treatment with G-WPC, compared to WPC. Therefore, we suggest that G-WPC can be utilized as an improved dietary source for providing immune modulating activity. PMID:26830480

  8. Biochemical and histological alterations induced by fluid percussion brain injury in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toulmond, S; Duval, D; Serrano, A; Scatton, B; Benavides, J

    1993-08-20

    In the present study we have characterized the time-course of the histopathological and biochemical alterations resulting from mechanical brain injury caused by lateral fluid percussion centered over the parietal cortex in the rat. The injury device used was an HPLC pump coupled to a solenoid valve which delivered a constant and short lasting (10 ms) impact pressure (1.6 atm). This traumatic procedure resulted in an accumulation of blood in the subarachnoid space and cortical edema at 4-24 h post-trauma. From 4 h after injury, cortical neurons exhibited a pathologic appearance and phagocytic cells invaded the brain parenchyma. At 3 and 7 days post-injury, complete neuronal loss was observed in the parietal cortex around the impact site. In the ipsilateral cortex, the time-course of histologically assessed neuronal loss and phagocytic/glial activation paralleled the time-course of the loss of omega 1-2 (benzodiazepine) sites (a neuronal marker) and of the increase in p sites (peripheral-type benzodiazepine binding sites; a glial/macrophage marker). Neuronal loss and increase in the density of the glial/macrophage biochemical marker were also observed in the hippocampus but not in the contralateral cortex or in other subcortical structures, suggesting a selective vulnerability of the hippocampus to this traumatic procedure. There was a very good spatial correlation between the histological alterations and the changes in the density of the neuronal and glial/macrophage biochemical markers (as assessed by autoradiography). The volume of the lesion, integrated from the surface of the lesion measured at 10 coronal levels cut at a 1 mm interval and stained with haemalum and eosin, represented 32.9 +/- 1.7 mm3.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7691381

  9. Questions Regarding Alterity in Social Collaborative Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Florinela Floria; Cosmin Ion Tomozei

    2010-01-01

    The idea of alterity has become important in the last decades, when talking about the Information Age, which provides acknowledgement to the software development specialists about the importance of understanding the other’s behavior, needs, objectives and beliefs.
    Our main purpose is to bring to attention the question of social representation related to the images of individuals as different entities that are integrated in virtual teams, virtual projects and e-activities....

  10. Fluoxetine normalizes disrupted light-induced entrainment, fragmented ultradian rhythms and altered hippocampal clock gene expression in an animal model of high trait anxiety- and depression-related behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Schaufler, Jörg; Ronovsky, Marianne; Savalli, Giorgia; Cabatic, Maureen; Sartori, Simone B.; Singewald, Nicolas; Pollak, Daniela D.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction Disturbances of circadian rhythms are a key symptom of mood and anxiety disorders. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) - commonly used antidepressant drugs – also modulate aspects of circadian rhythmicity. However, their potential to restore circadian disturbances in depression remains to be investigated. Materials and methods The effects of the SSRI fluoxetine on genetically based, depression-related circadian disruptions at the behavioral and molecular leve...

  11. Training Children To Be Their Own Behavior Therapists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Paul W.

    1973-01-01

    The author explores the concept of behavior modification through self-reinforcement. This concept allows for greater responsibility for one's own behavior than other strategies. General techniques to alter behavior are presented, along with a detailed case history. (RP)

  12. Suppression of cell-spreading and phagocytic activity on nano-pillared surface: in vitro experiment using hemocytes of the colonial ascidian Botryllus schlosseri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Ballarin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Nano-scale nipple array on the body surface has been described from various invertebrates including endoparasitic and mesoparasitic copepods, but the functions of the nipple array is not well understood. Using the hydrophilized nanopillar sheets made of polystyrene as a mimetic material of the nipple arrays on the parasites’ body surface, we assayed the cell spreading and phagocytosis of the hemocytes of the colonial ascidian Botryllus schlosseri. On the pillared surface, the number of spreading amebocytes and the number of phagocytizing hemocytes per unit area were always smaller than those on the flat surface (Mann-Whitney test, p < 0.05 - 0.001, probably because the effective area for the cell attachment on the pillared surface is much smaller than the area on the flat sheet. The present results supports the idea that the nipple array on the parasites' body surface reduces the innate immune reaction from the host hemocytes.

  13. Comparative genomics analysis of mononuclear phagocyte subsets confirms homology between lymphoid tissue-resident and dermal XCR1+ DCs in mouse and human and distinguishes them from Langerhans cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpentier, Sabrina; Vu Manh, Thien-Phong; Chelbi, Rabie; Henri, Sandrine; Malissen, Bernard; Haniffa, Muzlifah; Ginhoux, Florent; Dalod, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are mononuclear phagocytes which exhibit a branching (dendritic) morphology and excel at naïve T cell activation. DC encompass several subsets initially identified by their expression of cell surface molecules and later shown to possess distinct functions. DC subset differentiation is orchestrated by transcription factors, growth factors and cytokines. Identifying DC subsets is challenging as very few cell surface molecules are uniquely expressed on any one of these cell populations. There is no standard consensus to identify mononuclear phagocyte subsets; varying antigens are employed depending on the tissue and animal species studied and between laboratories. This has led to confusion in how to accurately define and classify DCs across tissues and between species. Here we report a comparative genomics strategy that enables universal definition of DC and other mononuclear phagocyte subsets across species. We performed a meta-analysis of several public datasets of human and mouse mononuclear phagocyte subsets isolated from blood, spleen, skin or cutaneous lymph nodes, including by using a novel and user friendly software, BubbleGUM, which generates and integrates gene signatures for high throughput gene set enrichment analysis. This analysis demonstrates the equivalence between human and mouse skin XCR1+ DCs, and between mouse and human Langerhans cells. PMID:26966045

  14. Comparative genomics analysis of mononuclear phagocyte subsets confirms homology between lymphoid tissue-resident and dermal XCR1(+) DCs in mouse and human and distinguishes them from Langerhans cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpentier, Sabrina; Vu Manh, Thien-Phong; Chelbi, Rabie; Henri, Sandrine; Malissen, Bernard; Haniffa, Muzlifah; Ginhoux, Florent; Dalod, Marc

    2016-05-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are mononuclear phagocytes which exhibit a branching (dendritic) morphology and excel at naïve T cell activation. DC encompass several subsets initially identified by their expression of cell surface molecules and later shown to possess distinct functions. DC subset differentiation is orchestrated by transcription factors, growth factors and cytokines. Identifying DC subsets is challenging as very few cell surface molecules are uniquely expressed on any one of these cell populations. There is no standard consensus to identify mononuclear phagocyte subsets; varying antigens are employed depending on the tissue and animal species studied and between laboratories. This has led to confusion in how to accurately define and classify DCs across tissues and between species. Here we report a comparative genomics strategy that enables universal definition of DC and other mononuclear phagocyte subsets across species. We performed a meta-analysis of several public datasets of human and mouse mononuclear phagocyte subsets isolated from blood, spleen, skin or cutaneous lymph nodes, including by using a novel and user friendly software, BubbleGUM, which generates and integrates gene signatures for high throughput gene set enrichment analysis. This analysis demonstrates the equivalence between human and mouse skin XCR1(+) DCs, and between mouse and human Langerhans cells. PMID:26966045

  15. A primary study on the phagocytic activity of Kupffer cells with superparamagnetic iron oxide particles enhanced MR imaging in a rat nonalcoholic steatohepatitis model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the feasibility of using superparamgnetic iron oxide (SPIO) as MRI contrast agent to assess rat nonalcoholic steatohepatitis Kupffer cells (KC) function. Methods: Twenty male SD rats were randomly divided into A and B groups, group A (n=10) was the experimental group fed high fat diet, group B (n=10) was the control group fed normal diet. After 8 weeks, plain MR and SPIO enhanced MR were performed in all the rats. Blood lipids were measured, and HE and Perl's blue staining in all livers specimen was done. The related results of the staining were analyzed with t test. Results: Group A TC and TG levels [(6.58 ± 1.25) and (1.53 ± 0.23) mmol/L respectively] were significantly higher than group B[(1.64 ± 0.22) and (0.55 ± 0.14) mmol/L respectively] (t=11.716 and 11.588, P1WI, ad statistically significant differences (t=-18.451 and -16.240, P2WI, T2WI and T1WI (t=10.745, 19.800, 39.168 and 92.785, P<0.01). Typical histological hepatic lesions of NASH were observed in group A, Perl's staining-positive particles in group A (2.33 ± 0.50) were fewer than in group B (4) (t=-10.000, P<0.01). Conclusion: The high-fat diet induced model of SD rats was close to the human NASH and was easy to establish. Clinical application of SPIO enhanced MR successfullly assessed the phagocytic activity of KC in the study, and it suggested that the pathogenesis of NASH was related to the decreased phagocytic activity of KC. (authors)

  16. Genetic alterations as determined by quantitative morphological, viability and social behavioral traits in postirradiation generations of an inbred strain of the platyfish, Xiphophorus maculatus (Guenther)(Pisces: Poecliidae), induced by 1000 R of X-rays to spermatogonia and oogonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spermatogonia and oogonia were X-irradiated with 258 mC/kg in neonatal platyfish. This procedure corresponds to an exposure of immature spermatogonia and oogonia. The postirradiation (PI) F2 generation was compared with controls of the same origin regarding viability characters (brood size, postnatal mortality, and sex ratio), quantitative morphological (number of vertebrae, body proportions) and social behavioral traits (cohesiveness of both sexes, male sexual and agonistic behavior patterns). Each of 5 pairs of F2 fish were used as the founders for a one-year lasting population experiment in which the fish had been subjected to either mutation pressure through derivation from irradiated spermatogonia and oogonia as mentioned above or to selection pressure through predation by the convict cichlid, Cichlasoma nigrofasciatum, or to a combination of both in order to compare the outcome of this experiment with that of a control population. The PI F2 exhibited a higher mortality rate than the controls. A unidirectional shift of the mean values of the quantitative morphological characters towards a more compact fish was observed in the postirradiation generations. The social cohesiveness of PI F2 was higher than that of the controls. Male sexual activity was enhanced in PI F2, and there was a similar trend to higher intraspecific aggressiveness among PI F2 males. The single effects of mutation and selection pressures were beneficial in so far as the number of individuals and the biomass were enhanced, while a combination of both was deleterious endangering the population to extinction. Contrary to expectation, the coefficient of variation for the quantitative morphological traits was higher in the controls than in the Pi F2. (author)

  17. Os efeitos das alterações comportamentais das vítimas de trauma crânio-encefálico para o cuidador familiar Los efectos de las alteraciones comportamentales de las victimas de trauma cráneo encefálico para el cuidador familiar Effect of the behavioral alterations of victims of traumatic brain injury for the family caregiver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edilene Curvelo Hora

    2005-02-01

    variación de humor. Los seis primeros comportamientos mencionados fueron los que más incidieron negativamente sobre el cuidador. No se encontró relación entre el tiempo transcurrido y los efectos de las alteraciones comportamentales.This study aimed to identify alterations in the intensity at which the negative behaviors of the victims of traumatic brain injury (TBI affect the main family caregiver comparing the periods before and after the trauma and to verify the relation between the intensity of these alterations and time passed after the traumatic event. Participants were 50 caregivers of victims with different levels of dependence after TBI. The effect of the victim’s behaviors on the caregiver was measured by means of a Likert scale, in view of eleven negative behaviors cited in literature. According to the caregiver, the victim was more aggressive, anxious, dependent, depressed, irritated, and forgetful after the trauma, with a more explosive temperament, more self-centered, impulsive, with greater social inadequacy and mood oscillation. The first six cited behaviors were the ones that affected the caregiver more negatively. No relation was found between the passed time and the effect of the behavioral alterations

  18. Different Candida parapsilosis clinical isolates and lipase deficient strain trigger an altered cellular immune response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata eToth

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Numerous human diseases can be associated with fungal infections either as potential causative agents or as a result of changed immune status due to a primary disease. Fungal infections caused by Candida species can vary from mild to severe dependent upon the site of infection, length of exposure and past medical history. Patients with impaired immune status are at increased risk for chronic fungal infections. Recent epidemiologic studies have revealed the increasing incidence of candidiasis caused by non-albicans species such as C. parapsilosis. Due to its increasing relevance we chose two distinct C. parapsilosis strains, to describe the cellular innate immune response towards this species. In the first section of our study we compared the interaction of CLIB 214 and GA1 cells with murine and human macrophages. Both strains are commonly used to investigate C. parapsilosis virulence properties. CLIB 214 is a rapidly pseudohyphae-forming strain and GA1 is an isolate that mainly exists in a yeast form. Our results showed, that the phagocyte response was similar in terms of overall uptake, however differences were observed in macrophage migration and engulfment of fungal cells. As C. parapsilosis releases extracellular lipases in order to promote host invasion we further investigated the role of these secreted components during the distinct stages of the phagocytic process. Using a secreted lipase deficient mutant strain and the parental strain GA1 individually and simultaneously, we confirmed that fungal secreted lipases influence the fungi’s virulence by detecting altered innate cellular responses.In this study we report that two isolates of a single species can trigger markedly distinct host responses and that lipase secretion plays a role on the cellular level of host pathogen interactions.

  19. Altered fingerprints: analysis and detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Soweon; Feng, Jianjiang; Jain, Anil K

    2012-03-01

    The widespread deployment of Automated Fingerprint Identification Systems (AFIS) in law enforcement and border control applications has heightened the need for ensuring that these systems are not compromised. While several issues related to fingerprint system security have been investigated, including the use of fake fingerprints for masquerading identity, the problem of fingerprint alteration or obfuscation has received very little attention. Fingerprint obfuscation refers to the deliberate alteration of the fingerprint pattern by an individual for the purpose of masking his identity. Several cases of fingerprint obfuscation have been reported in the press. Fingerprint image quality assessment software (e.g., NFIQ) cannot always detect altered fingerprints since the implicit image quality due to alteration may not change significantly. The main contributions of this paper are: 1) compiling case studies of incidents where individuals were found to have altered their fingerprints for circumventing AFIS, 2) investigating the impact of fingerprint alteration on the accuracy of a commercial fingerprint matcher, 3) classifying the alterations into three major categories and suggesting possible countermeasures, 4) developing a technique to automatically detect altered fingerprints based on analyzing orientation field and minutiae distribution, and 5) evaluating the proposed technique and the NFIQ algorithm on a large database of altered fingerprints provided by a law enforcement agency. Experimental results show the feasibility of the proposed approach in detecting altered fingerprints and highlight the need to further pursue this problem. PMID:21808092

  20. 6-羟多巴胺诱导帕金森病大鼠模型行为学评价方法的探讨%Assessment of 6-hydroxydopamine-Lesion Induced Behavioral Alteration as a Rat Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨谦谦; 孙芳龄; 艾厚喜; 张丽; 王文

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To systematically evaluate 6-hydroxydopamine(6-OHDA)-induced behavioral alteration as a rat model of Parkinson’s disease. Methods:6-OHDA was microinjected into the left side of the substantia nigra striatum to damage the dopaminergic neurons in the SD rats. Three weeks later,intraperitoneal injection of apomorphine(APO)to observe the rotational behavior. The motoric function of animals was analyzed with rotarod test and open field test, and the rat’s muslce vibration frequency and amplitude were determined using the myoelectricity test. The severity of the behavioral alterations of the individual animals was also categorized. Results:The time of rats that remained on the rotarod was significantly reduced in model group as compared to sham group. In the open field test,the horizontal travel distance was decreased in the model group. The myoelectricity test result showed that the muscle vibration frequency and amplitude was increased in animals receiving 6-OHDA microinjection. Conclusion:These results provided behavioral evidence in future studies to evaluate and categorize Parkinson-like behaviors in rats.%目的:复制帕金森病(Parkinsonʼs disease,PD)大鼠模型并根据行为学检查结果对此模型进行较为全面的评价,以期建立治疗此疾病的新型实验平台。方法:运用6-羟多巴胺(6-hydroxydopamine)单点定向注射黑质-纹状体的方法,损毁SD大鼠左侧中脑多巴胺能神经元,动物术后3周腹腔注射(intrapertioneal injection,ip)阿扑吗啡(apomorphine,APO)观察是否诱导动物向健侧旋转行为,复制PD模型。分别应用转棒实验和旷场实验分析测定动物的运动功能,应用肌电测试实验测定大鼠的震颤频率和幅度,并据此对动物模型进行评价和分类。结果:造模后,部分大鼠转棒实验在棒时间显著缩短,旷场实验横向跨格次数减少,出现运动功能障碍;肌电检测结果显示部分

  1. Music alters visual perception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Jolij

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Visual perception is not a passive process: in order to efficiently process visual input, the brain actively uses previous knowledge (e.g., memory and expectations about what the world should look like. However, perception is not only influenced by previous knowledge. Especially the perception of emotional stimuli is influenced by the emotional state of the observer. In other words, how we perceive the world does not only depend on what we know of the world, but also by how we feel. In this study, we further investigated the relation between mood and perception. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We let observers do a difficult stimulus detection task, in which they had to detect schematic happy and sad faces embedded in noise. Mood was manipulated by means of music. We found that observers were more accurate in detecting faces congruent with their mood, corroborating earlier research. However, in trials in which no actual face was presented, observers made a significant number of false alarms. The content of these false alarms, or illusory percepts, was strongly influenced by the observers' mood. CONCLUSIONS: As illusory percepts are believed to reflect the content of internal representations that are employed by the brain during top-down processing of visual input, we conclude that top-down modulation of visual processing is not purely predictive in nature: mood, in this case manipulated by music, may also directly alter the way we perceive the world.

  2. Genetic Alterations in Glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gliomas are the most common type of primary brain tumor and have a dismal prognosis. Understanding the genetic alterations that drive glioma formation and progression may help improve patient prognosis by identification of novel treatment targets. Recently, two major studies have performed in-depth mutation analysis of glioblastomas (the most common and aggressive subtype of glioma). This systematic approach revealed three major pathways that are affected in glioblastomas: The receptor tyrosine kinase signaling pathway, the TP53 pathway and the pRB pathway. Apart from frequent mutations in the IDH1/2 gene, much less is known about the causal genetic changes of grade II and III (anaplastic) gliomas. Exceptions include TP53 mutations and fusion genes involving the BRAF gene in astrocytic and pilocytic glioma subtypes, respectively. In this review, we provide an update on all common events involved in the initiation and/or progression across the different subtypes of glioma and provide future directions for research into the genetic changes

  3. 穿心莲对草鱼血液吞噬细胞吞噬活性的影响%INFLUENCE OF CREAT (ANDROGRAPHIS PANICULATA)ON THE PHAGOCYTIC ACTIVITY OF PHAGOCYIES IN GRASS CARP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗琳; 陈孝煊; 蔡雪峰

    2001-01-01

    Nomal phagocytic actvity in vitro in grass carp( C tenopharyngodon idellus ) was detemined in test tubes when the fish were fed with feed stuff enriched with the water extract of creat ( Andrographis paniculata). No signific ant difference was noticed between the tested group and the control group in the normal phagocvtic activity of their phagocytes.%利用体外试管法测定摄食穿心莲药饵的草鱼在不同时刻血液吞噬细胞的正常吞噬活性。结果表明,穿心莲水煎剂对草鱼血液吞噬细胞的吞噬活性没有显著性影响(P>0.05)。

  4. Induction of phagocytic activity and nitric-oxide production in natural populations of Trypanosoma Cruzi I and II from the state of Paraná, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Zalloum

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Twelve strains of Trypanosoma cruzi isolated from wild reservoirs, triatomines, and chronic chagasic patients in the state of Paraná, southern Brazil, and classified as T. cruzi I and II, were used to test the correlation between genetic and biological diversity. The Phagocytic Index (PI and nitric-oxide (NO production in vitro were used as biological parameters. The PI of the T. cruzi I and II strains did not differ significantly, nor did the PI of the T. cruzi strains isolated from humans, triatomines, or wild reservoirs. There was a statistical difference in the inhibition of NO production between T. cruzi I and II and between parasites isolated from humans and the strains isolated from triatomines and wild reservoirs, but there was no correlation between genetics and biology when the strains were analyzed independently of the lineages or hosts from which the strains were isolated. There were significant correlations for Randomly Amplified Polymorphic Deoxyribonucleic acid (RAPD and biological parameters for T. cruzi I and II, and for humans or wild reservoirs when the lineages or hosts were considered individually.

  5. Interactions of Neuropathogenic Escherichia coli K1 (RS218) and Its Derivatives Lacking Genomic Islands with Phagocytic Acanthamoeba castellanii and Nonphagocytic Brain Endothelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousuf, Farzana Abubakar; Yousuf, Zuhair; Iqbal, Junaid; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Khan, Hafsa; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Here we determined the role of various genomic islands in E. coli K1 interactions with phagocytic A. castellanii and nonphagocytic brain microvascular endothelial cells. The findings revealed that the genomic islands deletion mutants of RS218 related to toxins (peptide toxin, α-hemolysin), adhesins (P fimbriae, F17-like fimbriae, nonfimbrial adhesins, Hek, and hemagglutinin), protein secretion system (T1SS for hemolysin), invasins (IbeA, CNF1), metabolism (D-serine catabolism, dihydroxyacetone, glycerol, and glyoxylate metabolism) showed reduced interactions with both A. castellanii and brain microvascular endothelial cells. Interestingly, the deletion of RS218-derived genomic island 21 containing adhesins (P fimbriae, F17-like fimbriae, nonfimbrial adhesins, Hek, and hemagglutinin), protein secretion system (T1SS for hemolysin), invasins (CNF1), metabolism (D-serine catabolism) abolished E. coli K1-mediated HBMEC cytotoxicity in a CNF1-independent manner. Therefore, the characterization of these genomic islands should reveal mechanisms of evolutionary gain for E. coli K1 pathogenicity. PMID:24818136

  6. Interactions of Neuropathogenic Escherichia coli K1 (RS218 and Its Derivatives Lacking Genomic Islands with Phagocytic Acanthamoeba castellanii and Nonphagocytic Brain Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzana Abubakar Yousuf

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we determined the role of various genomic islands in E. coli K1 interactions with phagocytic A. castellanii and nonphagocytic brain microvascular endothelial cells. The findings revealed that the genomic islands deletion mutants of RS218 related to toxins (peptide toxin, α-hemolysin, adhesins (P fimbriae, F17-like fimbriae, nonfimbrial adhesins, Hek, and hemagglutinin, protein secretion system (T1SS for hemolysin, invasins (IbeA, CNF1, metabolism (D-serine catabolism, dihydroxyacetone, glycerol, and glyoxylate metabolism showed reduced interactions with both A. castellanii and brain microvascular endothelial cells. Interestingly, the deletion of RS218-derived genomic island 21 containing adhesins (P fimbriae, F17-like fimbriae, nonfimbrial adhesins, Hek, and hemagglutinin, protein secretion system (T1SS for hemolysin, invasins (CNF1, metabolism (D-serine catabolism abolished E. coli K1-mediated HBMEC cytotoxicity in a CNF1-independent manner. Therefore, the characterization of these genomic islands should reveal mechanisms of evolutionary gain for E. coli K1 pathogenicity.

  7. Runx1 Regulates Myeloid Precursor Differentiation Into Osteoclasts Without Affecting Differentiation Into Antigen Presenting or Phagocytic Cells in Both Males and Females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paglia, David N; Yang, Xiaochuan; Kalinowski, Judith; Jastrzebski, Sandra; Drissi, Hicham; Lorenzo, Joseph

    2016-08-01

    Runt-related transcription factor 1 (Runx1), a master regulator of hematopoiesis, is expressed in preosteoclasts. Previously we evaluated the bone phenotype of CD11b-Cre Runx1(fl/fl) mice and demonstrated enhanced osteoclasts and decreased bone mass in males. However, an assessment of the effects of Runx1 deletion in female osteoclast precursors was impossible with this model. Moreover, the role of Runx1 in myeloid cell differentiation into other lineages is unknown. Therefore, we generated LysM-Cre Runx1(fl/fl) mice, which delete Runx1 equally (∼80% deletion) in myeloid precursor cells from both sexes and examined the capacity of these cells to differentiate into osteoclasts and phagocytic and antigen-presenting cells. Both female and male LysM-Cre Runx1(fl/fl) mice had decreased trabecular bone mass (72% decrease in bone volume fraction) and increased osteoclast number (2-3 times) (P nuclear factor-κB ligand to stimulate osteoclast formation and fusion in female and male mice without affecting other myeloid cell fates. In turn, increased osteoclast activity in LysM-Cre Runx1(fl/fl) mice likely contributed to a decrease in bone mass. These dramatic effects were not due to increased osteoclast precursors in the deleted mutants and argue that inhibition of Runx1 in multipotential myeloid precursor cells is important for osteoclast formation and function. PMID:27267711

  8. In Vivo Tracking of Phagocytic Immune Cells Using a Dual Imaging Probe with Gadolinium-Enhanced MRI and Near-Infrared Fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Joong; Bhuniya, Sankarprasad; Lee, Hyunseung; Kim, Hyun Min; Shin, Weon Sup; Kim, Jong Seung; Hong, Kwan Soo

    2016-04-27

    A novel dual imaging probe for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and optical imaging was developed by combining gadolinium (Gd)-chelating MR probe and a near-infrared (NIR) fluorophore, aza-BODIPY (AB; BODIPY = boron-dipyrromethene). This aza-BODIPY-based bimodal contrast agent (AB-BCA) showed a significant fluorescence emission around the NIR range and an enhanced longitudinal relaxivity in MR modality. The probe was easily delivered to phagocytic cells of the innate immune system, together with macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs), and presented high-performance fluorescence and MR imaging without obvious cytotoxicity. For in vivo visualization of AB-BCA using MRI and optical imaging, bone marrow-derived DCs were labeled and injected into the footpad of mice, and labeled DCs were tracked in vivo. We observed the migration of AB-BCA-labeled DCs into the lymph nodes via lymphatic vessels using NIR fluorescence and T1-weighted MR images. This dual-modality imaging probe was used for noninvasive monitoring of DC migration into lymph nodes and could be useful for investigating advanced cellular immunotherapy. PMID:27058603

  9. INFLUENCE OF LOCAL RONKOLEIKIN TREATMENT UPON CLINICAL COURSE OF PURULENT WOUNDS AND FUNCTIONAL ACTIVITY OF WOUND PHAGOCYTES IN PATIENTS WITH ODONTOGENIC PHLEGMONAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. I. Dolgushin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The aim of the work was to evaluate clinical features of purulent wounds trend and functional activity of local wound phagocytes in the patients with odontogenic phlegmones in the course of local treatment with Ronkoleukin. A randomized clinical study was performed which included sixty-five patients with odontogenic phlegmones. Their age ranged from 18 to 74 years old. The group was divided in two parts, i.e., patients of a comparison group (n = 33 receiving a conventional combined drug therapy, and the persons from study group (n = 32 who were subject to local immunotherapy with Ronkoleukin, applied along with conventional therapy. It was established that the local therapy with Ronkoleikin exerts distinct positive effects, i.e., increase in wound-located lymphocytes and macrophages, acceleration of phasic dynamics of inflammatory events, augmentation of an lysosomal luminescence index (2.3-fold, enhancement of phagocytosis intensity in wound neutrophiles and macrophages (1.9-2-fold, strengthening the reserve abilities of wound neutrophils (1.3-fold. These effects create favorable conditions for elimination of pathogen and optimal healing of purulent wounds in the patients with odontogenic phlegmones.

  10. Activation of Nrf2 by the dengue virus causes an increase in CLEC5A, which enhances TNF-α production by mononuclear phagocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yi-Lin; Lin, Yee-Shin; Chen, Chia-Ling; Tsai, Tsung-Ting; Tsai, Cheng-Chieh; Wu, Yan-Wei; Ou, Yi-Dan; Chu, Yu-Yi; Wang, Ju-Ming; Yu, Chia-Yi; Lin, Chiou-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Infection by the dengue virus (DENV) threatens global public health due to its high prevalence and the lack of effective treatments. Host factors may contribute to the pathogenesis of DENV; herein, we investigated the role of nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), which is activated by DENV in mononuclear phagocytes. DENV infection selectively activates Nrf2 following nuclear translocation. Following endoplasmic reticular (ER) stress, protein kinase R-like ER kinase (PERK) facilitated Nrf2-mediated transcriptional activation of C-type lectin domain family 5, member A (CLEC5A) to increase CLEC5A expression. Signaling downstream of the Nrf2-CLEC5A interaction enhances Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3)-independent tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α production following DENV infection. Forced expression of the NS2B3 viral protein induces Nrf2 nuclear translocation/activation and CLEC5A expression which increases DENV-induced TNF-α production. Animal studies confirmed Nrf2-induced CLEC5A and TNF-α in brains of DENV-infected mice. These results demonstrate that DENV infection causes Nrf2-regulated TNF-α production by increasing levels of CLEC5A. PMID:27561946

  11. Hepatocyte pathway alterations in response to in vitro Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraisier, Christophe; Rodrigues, Raquel; Vu Hai, Vinh; Belghazi, Maya; Bourdon, Stéphanie; Paranhos-Baccala, Glaucia; Camoin, Luc; Almeras, Lionel; Peyrefitte, Christophe Nicolas

    2014-01-22

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is a tick-borne virus responsible for hemorrhagic manifestations and multiple organ failure, with a high mortality rate. In infected humans, damage to endothelial cells and vascular leakage may be a direct result of virus infection or an immune response-mediated indirect effect. The main target cells are mononuclear phagocytes, endothelial cells and hepatocytes; the liver being a key target for the virus, which was described as susceptible to interferon host response and to induce apoptosis. To better understand the early liver cell alterations due to virus infection, the protein profile of in vitro CCHFV-infected HepG2 cells was analyzed using two quantitative proteomic approaches, 2D-DIGE and iTRAQ. A set of 243 differentially expressed proteins was identified. Bioinformatics analysis (Ingenuity Pathways Analysis) revealed multiple host cell pathways and functions altered after CCHFV infection, with notably 106 proteins related to cell death, including 79 associated with apoptosis. Different protein networks emerged with associated pathways involved in inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptosis, ubiquitination/sumoylation, regulation of the nucleo-cytoplasmic transport, and virus entry. Collectively, this study revealed host liver protein abundances that were modified at the early stages of CCHFV infection, offering an unparalleled opportunity of the description of the potential pathogenesis processes and of possible targets for antiviral research. PMID:24184319

  12. Is Obesity Associated with Altered Energy Expenditure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Isabella P; Elliott, Sarah A; Siervo, Mario; Padwal, Raj; Bertoli, Simona; Battezzati, Alberto; Prado, Carla M

    2016-05-01

    Historically, obese individuals were believed to have lower energy expenditure (EE) rates than nonobese individuals (normal and overweight), which, in the long term, would contribute to a positive energy balance and subsequent weight gain. The aim of this review was to critically appraise studies that compared measures of EE and its components, resting EE (REE), activity EE (AEE), and diet-induced thermogenesis (DIT), in obese and nonobese adults to elucidate whether obesity is associated with altered EE. Contrary to popular belief, research has shown that obese individuals have higher absolute REE and total EE. When body composition (namely the metabolically active component, fat-free mass) is taken into account, these differences between obese and nonobese individuals disappear, suggesting that EE in obese individuals is not altered. However, an important question is whether AEE is lower in obese individuals because of a decrease in overall physical activity or because of less energy expended while performing physical activity. AEE and DIT could be reduced in obese individuals, mostly because of unhealthy behavior (low physical activity, higher intake of fat). However, the current evidence does not support the hypothesis that obesity is sustained by lower daily EE or REE. Future studies, comparing EE between obese and nonobese and assessing potential physiologic abnormalities in obese individuals, should be able to better answer the question of whether these individuals have altered energy metabolism. PMID:27184275

  13. Macrophages in Human Atheroma Contain PPARγ : Differentiation-Dependent Peroxisomal Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ (PPARγ) Expression and Reduction of MMP-9 Activity through PPARγ Activation in Mononuclear Phagocytes in Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Marx, Nikolaus; Sukhova, Galina; Murphy, Curran; Libby, Peter; Plutzky, Jorge

    1998-01-01

    Mononuclear phagocytes play an important role in atherosclerosis and its sequela plaque rupture in part by their secretion of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), including MMP-9. Peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), a transcription factor in the nuclear receptor superfamily, regulates gene expression in response to various activators, including 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2 and the antidiabetic agent troglitazone. The role of PPARγ in human atherosclerosis is unexplored. We...

  14. Origins of altered reinforcement effects in ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tripp Gail

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD, characterized by hyperactivity, impulsiveness and deficient sustained attention, is one of the most common and persistent behavioral disorders of childhood. ADHD is associated with catecholamine dysfunction. The catecholamines are important for response selection and memory formation, and dopamine in particular is important for reinforcement of successful behavior. The convergence of dopaminergic mesolimbic and glutamatergic corticostriatal synapses upon individual neostriatal neurons provides a favorable substrate for a three-factor synaptic modification rule underlying acquisition of associations between stimuli in a particular context, responses, and reinforcers. The change in associative strength as a function of delay between key stimuli or responses, and reinforcement, is known as the delay of reinforcement gradient. The gradient is altered by vicissitudes of attention, intrusions of irrelevant events, lapses of memory, and fluctuations in dopamine function. Theoretical and experimental analyses of these moderating factors will help to determine just how reinforcement processes are altered in ADHD. Such analyses can only help to improve treatment strategies for ADHD.

  15. Origins of altered reinforcement effects in ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Espen Borgå; Killeen, Peter R; Russell, Vivienne A; Tripp, Gail; Wickens, Jeff R; Tannock, Rosemary; Williams, Jonathan; Sagvolden, Terje

    2009-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), characterized by hyperactivity, impulsiveness and deficient sustained attention, is one of the most common and persistent behavioral disorders of childhood. ADHD is associated with catecholamine dysfunction. The catecholamines are important for response selection and memory formation, and dopamine in particular is important for reinforcement of successful behavior. The convergence of dopaminergic mesolimbic and glutamatergic corticostriatal synapses upon individual neostriatal neurons provides a favorable substrate for a three-factor synaptic modification rule underlying acquisition of associations between stimuli in a particular context, responses, and reinforcers. The change in associative strength as a function of delay between key stimuli or responses, and reinforcement, is known as the delay of reinforcement gradient. The gradient is altered by vicissitudes of attention, intrusions of irrelevant events, lapses of memory, and fluctuations in dopamine function. Theoretical and experimental analyses of these moderating factors will help to determine just how reinforcement processes are altered in ADHD. Such analyses can only help to improve treatment strategies for ADHD. PMID:19226460

  16. You stole my food! Eating alterations in frontotemporal dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, Marilena; Silani, Vincenzo; Rumiati, Raffaella I

    2016-08-01

    Patients with different types of dementia may exhibit pathological eating habits, including food fads, hyperphagia, or even ingestion of inanimate objects. Several findings reveal that such eating alterations are more common in patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) than other types of dementia. Moreover, eating alterations may differ between the two variants of the disease, namely the behavioral variant and semantic dementia (SD). In this review, we summarized evidences regarding four areas: eating and body weight alterations in FTD, the most common assessment methods, anatomical correlates of eating disorders, and finally, proposed underlying mechanisms. An increasing understanding of the factors that contribute to eating abnormalities may allow first, a better comprehension of the clinical features of the disease and second, shed light on the mechanism underlying eating behaviors in the normal population. PMID:27327171

  17. Oral THC produces minimal behavioral alterations in preadolescent rats

    OpenAIRE

    Dow-Edwards, Diana; Zhao, Ning

    2008-01-01

    Although the oral route has traditionally been used for THC administration during the perinatal period in the rat, most studies administering THC during the postnatal period utilize intraperitoneal (ip) administration. In an effort to utilize the same route of administration in both prenatal and postnatal studies, we administered Δ-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in sesame oil by gavage during postnatal days 22-40 (equivalent to childhood to early adolescence) to male and female rats. We quantif...

  18. Epigenetic alterations in gastric carcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    In-Seon CHOI; Tsung-Teh WU

    2005-01-01

    Gastric cancer is believed to result in part from the accumulation of multiple genetic alterations leading to oncogene overexpression and tumor suppressor loss. Epigenetic alterations as a distinct and crucial mechanism to silence a variety of methylated tissue-specific and imprinted genes, have been extensively studied in gastric carcinoma and play important roles in gastric carcinogenesis. This review will briefly discuss the basic aspects of DNA methylation and CpG island methylation, in particular the epigenetic alterations of certain critical genes implicated in gastric carcinogenesis and its relevance of clinical implications.

  19. Pulmonary alterations in Behcet's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This study aims to demonstrate pulmonary alterations (PA) in patients with Behcet's disease by using CT. Materials and methods: CTs of 50 patients with Behcet's disease and 20 others in a control group have been evaluated retrospectively for PA (septal, reticular, nodular, atelectatic opacities). Results: Eight out of 50 patients (16%) with Behcet's disease showed PA. Three out of 20 (15%) in the control group showed PA. No differences were observed between Behcet's disease patients and the control group regarding pulmonary alterations (p = 0.917). No differences were observed in the disease duration, ages and sex in either group in those with and without PA. Conclusion: Pulmonary alterations can be seen in patients with Behcet's disease, but these alterations are not significant.

  20. Minocycline modulates antigen-specific CTL activity through inactivation of mononuclear phagocytes in patients with HTLV-I associated neurologic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enose-Akahata Yoshimi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The activation of mononuclear phagocytes (MPs, including monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells, contributes to central nervous system inflammation in various neurological diseases. In HTLV-I-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP, MPs are reservoirs of HTLV-I, and induce proinflammatory cytokines and excess T cell responses. The virus-infected or activated MPs may play a role in immuneregulation and disease progression in patients with HTLV-I-associated neurological diseases. Results Phenotypic analysis of CD14+ monocytes in HAM/TSP patients demonstrated high expression of CX3CR1 and HLA-DR in CD14lowCD16+ monocytes, compared to healthy normal donors (NDs and asymptomatic carriers (ACs, and the production of TNF-α and IL-1β in cultured CD14+ cells of HAM/TSP patients. CD14+ cells of HAM/TSP patients also showed acceleration of HTLV-I Tax expression in CD4+ T cells. Minocycline, an inhibitor of activated MPs, decreased TNF-α expression in CD14+ cells and IL-1β release in PBMCs of HAM/TSP patients. Minocycline significantly inhibited spontaneous lymphoproliferation and degranulation/IFN-γ expression in CD8+ T cells of HAM/TSP patients. Treatment of minocycline also inhibited IFN-γ expression in CD8+ T cells of HAM/TSP patients after Tax11-19 stimulation and downregulated MHC class I expression in CD14+ cells. Conclusion These results demonstrate that minocycline directly inhibits the activated MPs and that the downregulation of MP function can modulate CD8+ T cells function in HAM/TSP patients. It is suggested that activated MPs may be a therapeutic target for clinical intervention in HAM/TSP.

  1. Detection and analysis of human serum albumin nanoparticles within phagocytic cells at the resolution of individual live cell or single 3D multicellular spheroid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since nanoparticles (NPs) have shown great potential in various biomedical applications, live cell response to NPs should be thoroughly explored prior to their in vivo use. In the current study, live cell array (LCA) methodology and unique cell-based assays were used to study the interaction of magnetite (HSA-Mag NP) loaded human serum albumin NPs with phagocytic cells. The LCA enabled cell culturing during HSA-Mag NP accumulation and monolayer or spheroid formation, concomitantly with on-line monitoring of NP internalization. These platforms were also utilized for imaging intercellular links between living cells preloaded with HSA-Mag NP in 2D and 3D resolution. HSA-Mag NP uptake by cells was quantified by imaging, and analyzed using time-resolved measurements. Image analysis of the individual cells in cell populations showed accumulation of HSA-Mag NP by promonocytes and glial cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. High variability of NP accumulation in individual cells within cell populations, as well as cell subgroups, was evident in both cell types. Following 24 h interaction, uptake of HSA-Mag NP was about 10 times more efficient in glial cells than in activated promonocytes. The presented assays may facilitate detection and analysis of the amount of NPs within individual cells, as well as the rate of NP accumulation and processing in different subsets of living cells. Such data are crucial for estimating predicted drug dosage delivered by NPs, as well as to study possible mechanisms for NP interference with live cells

  2. Lack of Th1 or Th2 polarization of CD4+ T cell response induced by particulate antigen targeted to phagocytic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlik, C; Dériaud, E; Leclerc, C

    1997-01-01

    Several factors are involved in the selective activation of Th1 or Th2 subset of CD4+ T cells, such as the type of antigen-presenting cells, the dose of antigen, the route of immunization, etc. To analyze the influence of accessory cells on Th1/Th2 cell differentiation, we used a particulate antigen prepared by covalent linkage of hemocyanin (LH) to 1 microns synthetic microspheres. This particulate antigen was efficiently presented to T cells by macrophages but not by B lymphocytes. BALB/c mice immunized either with soluble LH in alum or with particulate LH without adjuvant produced both Th1 (IL-2 and IFN-gamma) and Th2 (IL-4 and IL-5) cytokines. Moreover, mice primed either with soluble or particulate LH secreted higher levels of IgG1- than of IgG2a-specific antibodies. The induction of this cytokine profile response was independent of the route of administration of the antigen, and was observed both in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. In contrast, immunization of mice with particulate LH in the presence of poly(I):(C) or of IL-12 induced a strong activation of Th1 cells, as shown by an up-regulated IFN-gamma production, and by decreased IL-4 and IL-5 levels associated to a greatly enhanced IgG2a antibody response. These results therefore demonstrate that targeting the antigen to phagocytic cells is not sufficient to stimulate a polarized Th response and that environmental cytokines play the major role in the selective activation of Th1 cells. This study provides important conclusions for the development of new vaccines and shows that particulate antigen associated with appropriate cofactor can selectively activate Th1 cells. PMID:9043951

  3. The disintegrin, trimucrin, suppresses LPS-induced activation of phagocytes primarily through blockade of NF-κB and MAPK activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Yu-Chun; Hsu, Chun-Chieh; Chung, Ching-Hu; Huang, Tur-Fu

    2016-07-01

    In addition to antiplatelet activity, disintegrin, a small-mass RGD-containing polypeptide, has been shown to exert anti-inflammatory effects but the mechanism involved remains unclear. In this study, we report that trimucrin, a disintegrin from the venom of Trimeresurus mucrosquamatus, inhibits lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced stimulation of THP-1 and RAW 264.7 cells. We also investigate the underlying mechanism. Trimucrin decreased the release of proinflammatory cytokines including tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), interleukin-6 (IL-6), nitric oxide, and reactive oxygen species (ROS), and inhibited the adhesion and migration of LPS-activated phagocytes. Trimucrin significantly blocked the expression of nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB)-related downstream inducible enzymes such as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and COX-2. In addition, its anti-inflammatory effect was associated with the decreased mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation. Furthermore, trimucrin concentration dependently inhibited LPS-induced phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), PI3K, and Akt. Trimucrin also reversed the DNA-binding activity of NF-κB by suppressing the LPS-induced nuclear translocation of p65 and the cytosolic IκB release. Flow cytometric analyses showed that trimucrin bound to cells in a concentration-dependent manner. The anti-αVβ3 mAb also specifically decreased the binding of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-conjugated trimucrin. Binding assays demonstrated that integrin αVβ3 was the binding site for trimucrin on THP-1 and RAW 264.7 cells. In conclusion, we showed that trimucrin decreases the inflammatory reaction through the attenuation of iNOS expression and nitric oxide (NO) production by blocking MAP kinase and the NF-κB activation in LPS-stimulated THP-1 and RAW 264.7 cells. PMID:27030393

  4. Reduction of the ex vivo production of tumor necrosis factor alpha by alveolar phagocytes after administration of coal fly ash and copper smelter dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broeckaert, F.; Buchet, J.P.; Huaux, F.; Lardot, C.; Lison, D.; Yager, J.W. [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium). Industrial Toxicology and Occupational Medicine Unit

    1997-06-01

    The effect of intratracheally instilled coal fly ash (FA) and copper smelter dust (Cu) on the lung integrity and on the ex vivo release of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) by alveolar phagocyte in mice was investigated. Instillation of tungsten carbide (WC) induced a mild and transient (d 1) inflammatory reaction characterized by an increase of total protein (TP) and an influx of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in the alveolar compartment. Compared to WC, Ca{sub 3}(AsO{sub 4}){sub 2} produced a significant increase of TP content in BALF. Cu particles caused a severe but transient inflammatory reaction, while a persisting alveolitis (30 d) was observed after treatment with FA. Compared to control saline, a marked inhibition of TNF-alpha release was observed in response to LPS in all groups at d 1. Cytokine production was unregulated in WC- and Ca{sub 3}(AsO{sub 4}){sub 2} treated animals after 6 and 30 d respectively. However, a 90% inhibition of TNF-alpha production was still observed at d 30 after administration of Cu and FA. Although arsenic was cleared form the lung tissue 6 d after Ca{sub 3}(AsO{sub 4}){sub 2} administration, a significant fraction persisted (10-15% of the arsenic administered) in the lung of Cu- and FA-treated mice at d 30. It is hypothesized that suppression of TNF-alpha production is dependent upon the slow elimination of the particles and their metal content from the lung.

  5. Detection and analysis of human serum albumin nanoparticles within phagocytic cells at the resolution of individual live cell or single 3D multicellular spheroid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afrimzon, Elena; Zurgil, Naomi; Sobolev, Maria; Shafran, Yana [Bar-Ilan University, The Biophysical Interdisciplinary Schottenstein Center for the Research and Technology of the Cellome (Israel); Langer, Klaus; Zlatev, Iavor [Westfälischen Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Institut für Pharmazeutische Technologie und Biopharmazie (Germany); Wronski, Robert; Windisch, Manfred [QPS Austria GmbH (Austria); Briesen, Hagen von [Fraunhofer Institute for Biomedical Engineering IBMT, Department of Cell Biology & Applied Virology (Germany); Schmidt, Reinhold [Medical University of Graz, Department of Neurology (Austria); Pietrzik, Claus [University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, Institute of Pathobiochemistry (Germany); Deutsch, Mordechai, E-mail: motti.jsc@gmail.com [Bar-Ilan University, The Biophysical Interdisciplinary Schottenstein Center for the Research and Technology of the Cellome (Israel)

    2015-12-15

    Since nanoparticles (NPs) have shown great potential in various biomedical applications, live cell response to NPs should be thoroughly explored prior to their in vivo use. In the current study, live cell array (LCA) methodology and unique cell-based assays were used to study the interaction of magnetite (HSA-Mag NP) loaded human serum albumin NPs with phagocytic cells. The LCA enabled cell culturing during HSA-Mag NP accumulation and monolayer or spheroid formation, concomitantly with on-line monitoring of NP internalization. These platforms were also utilized for imaging intercellular links between living cells preloaded with HSA-Mag NP in 2D and 3D resolution. HSA-Mag NP uptake by cells was quantified by imaging, and analyzed using time-resolved measurements. Image analysis of the individual cells in cell populations showed accumulation of HSA-Mag NP by promonocytes and glial cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. High variability of NP accumulation in individual cells within cell populations, as well as cell subgroups, was evident in both cell types. Following 24 h interaction, uptake of HSA-Mag NP was about 10 times more efficient in glial cells than in activated promonocytes. The presented assays may facilitate detection and analysis of the amount of NPs within individual cells, as well as the rate of NP accumulation and processing in different subsets of living cells. Such data are crucial for estimating predicted drug dosage delivered by NPs, as well as to study possible mechanisms for NP interference with live cells.

  6. Developmental Hypothyroidism Alters Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) Expression in Adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severe developmental thyroid hormone (TH) insufficiency results in alterations in brain structure/function and lasting behavioral impairments. Environmental toxicants reduce circulating levels of TH, but the disruption is modest and the doseresponse relationships of TH and neuro...

  7. Borosilicate nuclear waste glass alteration kinetics theoretical basis for the kinetic law of nuclear glass alteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Work carried out since the early 1980's to predict the long-term behavior of nuclear containment glasses has revealed the inadequacy of existing models, notably in accounting for the fundamental mechanisms involved in some complex systems (e.g. glass-water-clay), inciting us to examine and discuss the theoretical basis for the hypotheses generally assumed in our models. This paper discusses the theoretical basis for the Aagaard-Helgeson law and its application to nuclear glasses. The contribution of other types of kinetic laws is also considered to describe the alteration kinetics of nuclear glasses. (authors)

  8. Aggressive Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stages Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Aggressive Behavior Page Content Article Body My child is sometimes ... type of behavior? The best way to prevent aggressive behavior is to give your child a stable, secure ...

  9. 慢性不可预见性温和应激后大鼠行为及微管相关蛋白tau磷酸化的改变%Behavioral and tau protein alterations in rats following chronic unpredictable mild stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨灿; 王高华; 王惠玲; 刘忠纯; 朱志先

    2013-01-01

    目的 研究慢性不可预见性温和应激所致的动物行为学改变及微管相关蛋白tau磷酸化的改变.方法 将大鼠随机分为慢性不可预见性温和应激抑郁(CUMS)组和对照组,对模型组大鼠进行连续21d的慢性不可预见性应激.进行行为学观察,使用western blotting检测总tau,tau磷酸化(Ser356,Thr231)水平的改变.结果 CUMS组大鼠慢性应激后糖水偏好及自主活动显著减低,与对照组比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05);CUMS组大鼠慢性应激后海马tau磷酸化表达升高,与对照组比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论 慢性应激后微管相关蛋白tau磷酸化水平升高,神经可塑性受损,提示了新的抑郁症和阿尔茨海默病联系的生化机制.%Objective To investigate the behavior and hippocampal microtubule-associated proteins tau alterations.Methods Sixteen rats were divided into two groups,with 8 exposed to 21 consecutive days of chronic unpredicted mild stresses (CUMS) as depression models,and 8 as normal controls.Behavioral changes in these rats were analyzed in sucrose preference and open-field paradigm,and compared to a control group of normal rats.The expressions of hippocampal cytoskeletal microtubule-associated proteins p-tau were analyzed using Western Blot.Results (1)Compared with the normal rats,sucrose preference,total traveling distance,velocity and frequencies of rearing were reduced (P <0.05)in the depressed rats; (2) Compared with the normal rats,the p-tau expression of CUMS group showed a obvious increase (P <0.05) in rats submitted to CUMS,which had statistical significance.Conclusions These findings provide evidence that rats exposed to CUMS showed increased p-tau expression which suggests impairment of structural neuronal plasticity,providing insight into the link between depression and Alzheimer disease.

  10. Altering contingencies to facilitate compliance with traffic light systems

    OpenAIRE

    Jason, Leonard A.; Neal, Angela M.; Marinakis, George

    1985-01-01

    The effects of altering light pattern sequences on driver compliance at a busy, urban intersection were explored. The baseline light timing sequences resulted in only 46.8% of drivers stopping at the yellow or red lights. Using an A-B-C design, we altered light pattern sequences that increased the probability of drivers stopping at the signals to 88.8% and 98.8%. These findings indicate that traffic light contingencies have potent effects in influencing driver behaviors at busy intersections....

  11. Antagonist effects of calcium on borosilicate glass alteration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercado-Depierre, S. [CEA Marcoule, DTCD SPDE LCLT, 30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Angeli, F., E-mail: frederic.angeli@cea.fr [CEA Marcoule, DTCD SPDE LCLT, 30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Frizon, F. [CEA Marcoule, DTCD SECM LP2C, 30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Gin, S. [CEA Marcoule, DTCD SPDE LCLT, 30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France)

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted -- Highlights: •Kinetic study of glass alteration is investigated in calcium-enriched solutions. •New insights into silicon–calcium interactions in glass/cement systems are proposed. •Glass alteration is controlled by pH, Ca concentration and reaction progress. •Evidence of antagonist effects according to the importance of these parameters. -- Abstract: Numerous studies have been conducted on glass and cement durability in contact with water, but very little work to date has focused directly on interactions between the two materials. These interactions are mostly controlled by silicon–calcium reactivity. However, the physical and chemical processes involved remain insufficiently understood to predict the evolution of coupled glass–cement systems used in several industrial applications. Results are reported from borosilicate glass alteration in calcium-rich solutions. Our data show that four distinct behaviors can be expected according to the relative importance of three key parameters: the pH, the reaction progress (short- or long-term alteration) and the calcium concentration. Glass alteration is thus controlled by specific mechanisms depending on the solution chemistry: calcium complexation at the glass surface, precipitation of calcium silicate hydrates (C–S–H) or calcium incorporation in the altered layer. These findings highlight the impact of silicon–calcium interactions on glass durability and open the way for a better understanding of glass–cement mixing in civil engineering applications as well as in nuclear waste storage.

  12. Morphology of altered layers of glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The alteration of the french nuclear waste glass R7T7 has been studied through chemical analysis, thermo-poro-metry and X-ray scattering. Pseudo-dynamic leaching was used, with daily renewal of the leaching solution. The behavior of the R77 glass has been compared to cesium borosilicate glasses with small amounts of Ca and Zr added. As compared to these simplified compositions, the R7T7 glass has a quasi-congruent leaching of Na, B and Si and strongly retains Ca and Zr. The altered layers are very porous (porosity > 40% ). The pore size increases with time to reach a constant value that is independent of the nature of the glass but that strongly depends on the method used for leaching. The pore radii are about 4 nm in pseudo-dynamic mode and 2 nm in static conditions. X-ray scattering indicate that the pores are compact with a sharp interface. Their origin is related to the quasi-equilibrium reaction of hydrolysis redeposition of silica. (authors)

  13. Phagocyte roulette in Salmonella killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenlon, Luke A; Slauch, James M

    2014-01-15

    Salmonella propagates in macrophages to cause life-threatening infections, but the role of neutrophils in combating Salmonella has been controversial. In this issue, Burton et al. (2014) use single cell analyses and modeling to explain the ability of Salmonella to survive in macrophages while being killed by neutrophils. PMID:24439894

  14. Phagocyte Roulette in Salmonella Killing

    OpenAIRE

    Fenlon, Luke A.; Slauch, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella propagate in macrophages to cause life-threatening infections, but the role of neutrophils in combating Salmonella has been controversial. In this issue, Burton et al. (2013) use single cell analyses and modeling to explain the ability of Salmonella to survive in macrophages, while being killed by neutrophils.

  15. Effects of 6-methyl-uracil upon the phagocytic activity in mice following whole-body X-irradiation or 2,4,6,-triethyleneimino-s-triazine treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1. Phagocytic activity measured by means of the intravasal clearence of a soot dispersion in male NMRI-mice was increased six to ten days after whole-body X-irradiation (640 R) and decreased during the same period after i.v. administration of 2,4,6-triethyleneimino-s-triazine (TEM 2.0 mg/kg). 2. By means of 6-methyl-uracil food admixtures (200 to 400 ppm during 2 or 3 weeks) or by repeated intravenous injections of a N-methyl-D-glucosamine-6-methyluracil complex (62.5 to 250 mg/kg daily during five days), a significant augmentation of the phagocytic index being related to time and dosage was obtained in otherwise untreated mice. Comparable results were seen using cytidine and cytidine-5'-phosphate, whereas guanosine-5'-phosphate remained ineffective. 3. Whilst stimulating effects of 6-methyl-uracil or its N-methyl-D-glucosamine complex on X-irradiated mice were suspended, an increase up to supernormal values of the phagocytic index was produced by the pyrimidine base in animals treated with TEM. In accordance to this the survival rate of lethally X-irradiated mice (960 R) could not be increased; with animals given lethal TEM-doses, however, a significantly increased survival rate was obtained. 4. The present investigations as well as former biochemical analyses confirm the assumption that 6-methyluracil produces its regeneration effects, to some extent at least, by specific pathways influencing the reticuloendothelium. Different results from X-irradiated and TEM-treated mice are referring to the different points of attack of the two noxa. (orig.)

  16. Inhibitory effect of immature dendritic cells (iDCs phagocytizing apoptotic lymphocytes on LPS-mediated activation of iDCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-xiang WEI

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the inhibitory effect of immature dendritic cells(iDCs on LPS-mediated maturation of iDCs phagocytizing allogeneic spleen lymphocytes after being treated bypsoralen plus ultraviolet A(PUVA. Methods Bone marrow-derived DCs were obtained from bone marrow cells of C57BL/6 mice by co-cultivation with recombinant mouse IL-4 and GM-CSF. Spleenlymphocytes(SLP of BALB/c mice were isolated and transformed to PUVA-SLP by treatment with 8-methoxy PUVA irradiation.The bone marrow-derived iDCs of C57BL/6 were co-cultured with PUVA-SLP of BALB/c mice to obtain PUVA¬SLPDCs. After incubation, iDCs and PUVA-SP DCs were induced to maturation by LPS(10ng/ml,24h, and then they were analyzed by flow cytometry.At the same time,the concentrations of the immunoreactive proteins IL-12p70,IL-12p40andIL-10 in cell supernatants were determined by ELISA kits according to the manufacturer's recommendations. Results PUVA-SLP DCs and iDCs were compared in terms of LPS responsiveness.The phenotype of iDCs(CD40,CD80, andCD86 was 50.58%, 66.29%, 71.20%, respectively, showed more rapid changes from immature to mature statein response to LPS stimulation compared with PUVA-SP DCs, the phenotype of which was 21.26%,38.50% and 39.78%, respectively(P0.05.PUVA-SPDCs secreted high levels of IL-10(435.6±13.9, but lowlevels of IL-12(p7018.56±1.3,p4015.22±1.2, as compared with those of iDCs (132.6±2.8, p70192.1±5.9, p40999.8±26.9, P<0.01 after LPS stimulation. Conclusions Although PUVA-SLPDCs do not express as immature phenotype, they can be readily induced to differentiate into mature DCs in the presence of antigen or LPS. It may be suitable to use iDCs clinically in autoimmune diseases and transplantation.

  17. Mononuclear phagocyte system depletion blocks interstitial tonicity-responsive enhancer binding protein/vascular endothelial growth factor C expression and induces salt-sensitive hypertension in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machnik, Agnes; Dahlmann, Anke; Kopp, Christoph; Goss, Jennifer; Wagner, Hubertus; van Rooijen, Nico; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Müller, Dominik N; Park, Joon-Keun; Luft, Friedrich C; Kerjaschki, Dontscho; Titze, Jens

    2010-03-01

    We showed recently that mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS) cells provide a buffering mechanism for salt-sensitive hypertension by driving interstitial lymphangiogenesis, modulating interstitial Na(+) clearance, and increasing endothelial NO synthase protein expression in response to very high dietary salt via a tonicity-responsive enhancer binding protein/vascular endothelial growth factor C regulatory mechanism. We now tested whether isotonic saline and deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt treatment leads to a similar regulatory response in Sprague-Dawley rats. Male rats were fed a low-salt diet and received tap water (low-salt diet LSD), 1.0% saline (high-salt diet HSD), or DOCA+1.0% saline (DOCA-HSD). To test the regulatory role of interstitial MPS cells, we further depleted MPS cells with clodronate liposomes. HSD and DOCA-HSD led to Na(+) accumulation in the skin, MPS-driven tonicity-responsive enhancer binding protein/vascular endothelial growth factor C-mediated hyperplasia of interstitial lymph capillaries, and increased endothelial NO synthase protein expression in skin interstitium. Clodronate liposome MPS cell depletion blocked MPS infiltration in the skin interstitium, resulting in unchanged tonicity-responsive enhance binding protein/vascular endothelial growth factor C levels and absent hyperplasia of the lymph capillary network. Moreover, no increased skin endothelial NO synthase protein expression occurred in either clodronate liposome-treated HSD or DOCA-salt rats. Thus, absence of the MPS-cell regulatory response converted a salt-resistant blood-pressure state to a salt-sensitive state in HSD rats. Furthermore, salt-sensitive hypertension in DOCA-salt rats was aggravated. We conclude that MPS cells act as onsite controllers of interstitial volume and blood pressure homeostasis, providing a local regulatory salt-sensitive tonicity-responsive enhancer binding protein/vascular endothelial growth factor C-mediated mechanism in the skin to maintain

  18. Behavioral economics

    OpenAIRE

    Berg, Nathan

    1984-01-01

    Economics, like behavioral psychology, is a science of behavior, albeit highly organized human behavior. The value of economic concepts for behavioral psychology rests on (1) their empirical validity when tested in the laboratory with individual subjects and (2) their uniqueness when compared to established behavioral concepts. Several fundamental concepts are introduced and illustrated by reference to experimental data: open and closed economies, elastic and inelastic demand, and substitutio...

  19. Pemberian Fikosianin Spirulina Meningkatkan Jumlah Sel Darah, Aktivitas Fagositosis, dan Pertumbuhan Ikan Kerapu Bebek Juvenil (ADMINISTRATION OF SPIRULINA PHYCOCYANIN ENHANCES BLOOD CELLS, PHAGOCYTIC ACTIVITY AND GROWTH IN HUMPBACK GROUPER JUVENILE)

    OpenAIRE

    Woro Hastuti Satyantini; Sukenda .; Enang Harris; Nur Bambang Priyo Utomo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate effects of Spirulina phycocyanin on the total  blood cell count,phagocytic activity, and growth of humpback grouper fish, Cromileptes altivelis juvenil.  Fishes were fedwith a diet containing   0, 150, 250, 350 dan 450 mg  phycocyanin per kg diet for four weeks and eachtreatment was triplicates.  Initial body weight  of  grouper was  8.46 ± 0.22 g with a density of 10 fish per56 litre volume. The total count of  erythrocytes and leucocytes increased un...

  20. Phagocytosis and production of reactive oxygen species by peripheral blood phagocytes in patients with different stages of alcohol-induced liver disease: effect of acute exposure to low ethanol concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parlesak, Alexandr; Schäfer, C.; Paulus, S. B.;

    2003-01-01

    resting and challenged phagocytes of patients with different stages of ALD in the presence of ethanol concentrations commonly found in the blood of alcohol abusers. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The release of ROS and the phagocytosis of bacteria by neutrophils and monocytes obtained from 60 patients, who were...... produced significantly more ROS than those of healthy controls. Basal values of ROS production from neutrophils correlated closely to markers of the severity of ALD. ROS formation was depressed dose-dependently by ethanol in the healthy controls but not in alcohol abusers. CONCLUSIONS: Changes in the ROS...

  1. Art as Alterity in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guoping

    2014-01-01

    In education, art has often been perceived as entertainment and decoration and is the first subject to go when there are budget cuts or test-score pressures. Drawing on Emmanuel Lévinas's idea of the primacy of radical alterity that breaks the totality of our being, enables self-transformation and ethics, and ensures community as a totality…

  2. Altered pattern of Naïve and memory B cells and B1 cells in patients with chronic granulomatous disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohsenzadegan, Monireh; Fattahi, Fahimeh; Fattahi, Fatemeh; Mirshafiey, Abbas; Fazlollahi, Mohammad Reza; Naderi Beni, Fariba; Movahedi, Masoud; Pourpak, Zahra

    2014-06-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a rare primary immunodeficiency disorder characterized by a greatly increased susceptibility to severe fungal and bacterial infections caused by defects in NADPH oxidase of phagocytic cells. We aimed to investigate immunophenotype alterations of naïve and memory B cells and B1a cells in peripheral whole blood from Iranian patients with CGD. Flow cytometric analysis was performed on peripheral blood samples from 31 CGD patients and 23 healthy controls (HC) to study naïve (IgD+/CD27-), memory (CD27+) B and B1a (CD5+) cells. Soluble CD27 (sCD27) and immunoglobulins were also measured by ELISA and the nephelometric method, respectively. We found significantly higher levels of naïve B cells and B1a cells but lower levels of memory B cells in CGD patients compared to HC.. There was no significant difference in soluble CD27 (sCD27) alteration between CGD patients and HC. Our findings suggested a role for NADPH oxidase in process of B cell differentiation and impairing conversion of naïve B cells to memory B cells and altered B1a cells in CGD patients. Increased susceptibility of CGD patients to opportunistic infections and autoimmune disorders could be partly explained by the altered phenotype of B lymphocytes in these patients. PMID:24659119

  3. Altered pattern of Naïve and memory B cells and B1 cells in patients with chronic granulomatous disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monireh Mohsenzadegan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD is a rare primary immunodeficiency disorder characterized by a greatly increased susceptibility to severe fungal and bacterial infections caused by defects in NADPH oxidase of phagocytic cells. We aimed to investigate immunophenotype alterations of naïve and memory B cells and B1a cells in peripheral whole blood from Iranian patients with CGD. Flow cytometric analysis was performed on peripheral blood samples from 31 CGD patients and 23 healthy controls (HC to study naïve (IgD+/CD27-, memory (CD27+ B and B1a (CD5+ cells. Soluble CD27 (sCD27 and immunoglobulins were also measured by ELISA and the nephelometric method, respectively. We found significantly higher levels of naïve B cells and B1a cells but lower levels of memory B cells in CGD patients compared to HC.. There was no significant difference in soluble CD27 (sCD27 alteration between CGD patients and HC. Our findings suggested a role for NADPH oxidase in process of B cell differentiation and impairing conversion of naïve B cells to memory B cells and altered B1a cells in CGD patients. Increased susceptibility of CGD patients to opportunistic infections and autoimmune disorders could be partly explained by the altered phenotype of B lymphocytes in these patients.

  4. Brain and Behavior: a Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rivera Urbina, Guadalupe N.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The contribution of many scientific disciplines allows us to know surprising aspects of the relationship between the brain and its functions. Current technology and the convergence of these disciplines are essential to understand the complex brain mechanisms underlying behavior. In this paper will be described some scientific disciplines whose studies help to understand the biological substrates of normal and altered behavior. We will describe some pathologies or neuropsychological disorders and, in addition, we will review some of the known neurobiological mechanisms that control our brain functions. This allows us to conclude that the behavior and brain functions depend on complex biological mechanisms, many of which are still to be elucidated.

  5. Withholding Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Withholding Behavior Page Content Article Body I got upset at ... a specific fear is the reason behind his behavior, demonstrate clearly in several different ways—through conversation, ...

  6. Behavioralizing Finance

    OpenAIRE

    Shefrin, Hersh

    2010-01-01

    Finance is in the midst of a paradigm shift, from a neoclassical based framework to a psychologically based framework. Behavioral finance is the application of psychology to financial decision making and financial markets. Behavioralizing finance is the process of replacing neoclassical assumptions with behavioral counterparts. This monograph surveys the literature in behavioral finance, and identifies both its strengths and weaknesses. In doing so, it identifies possible directions for behav...

  7. Behavioral toxicology.

    OpenAIRE

    Needleman, H L

    1995-01-01

    The new fields of behavioral toxicology and behavioral teratology investigate the outcome of specific toxic exposures in humans and animals on learning, memory, and behavioral characteristics. Three important classes of behavioral neurotoxicants are metals, solvents, and pesticides. The clearest data on the deleterious effects of prenatal exposure to toxicants comes from the study of two metals, lead and mercury, and from epidemiological investigations of the effects of alcohol taken during p...

  8. Chemosensory alterations and cancer therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taste and olfaction provide sensory information and sensory pleasure. Cancer therapies affect both. Chemotherapy has not been shown to produce dramatic losses of taste or smell, but systematic studies on various chemotherapeutic agents and types of cancer are lacking. Radiation therapy does produce clear losses of both taste and smell. Both chemotherapy and radiation therapy alter the pleasure produced by taste and smell through the formation of conditioned aversions. That is, foods consumed in proximity with the nausea of therapy come to be unpleasant. The impact of conditioned aversions can be diminished by providing a scapegoat food just before therapy. Alterations in foods may be beneficial to the cancer patient. Increasing the concentrations of flavor ingredients can compensate for sensory losses, and providing pureed foods that retain the cognitive integrity of a meal can benefit the patient who has chewing or swallowing problems

  9. Altered states: psychedelics and anesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Icaza, Eduardo E; Mashour, George A

    2013-12-01

    The psychedelic experience has been reported since antiquity, but there is relatively little known about the underlying neural mechanisms. A recent neuroimaging study on psilocybin revealed a pattern of decreased cerebral blood flow and functional disconnections that is surprisingly similar to that caused by various anesthetics. In this article, the authors review historical examples of psychedelic experiences induced by general anesthetics and then contrast the mechanisms by which these two drug classes generate altered states of consciousness. PMID:24061599

  10. Classroom Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Carmit

    2008-01-01

    This paper investigates the determinants and malleability of noncognitive skills. Using data on boys from the National Education Longitudinal Survey, I focus on youth behavior in the classroom as a measure of noncognitive skills. I find that student behavior during adolescence is persistent. The variation in behavior can be attributed to…

  11. Behaviorally Speaking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Elias H.; Dutton, Darell W. J.

    1987-01-01

    Consists of two articles focusing on (1) a modern behavioral model that takes cues from Hippocrates' Four Temperaments and (2) use of a behavioral approach to improve the effectiveness of meetings. Lists positive and negative behaviors within the meeting context. (CH)

  12. Buccal alterations in diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negrato Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Long standing hyperglycaemia besides damaging the kidneys, eyes, nerves, blood vessels, heart, can also impair the function of the salivary glands leading to a reduction in the salivary flow. When salivary flow decreases, as a consequence of an acute hyperglycaemia, many buccal or oral alterations can occur such as: a increased concentration of mucin and glucose; b impaired production and/or action of many antimicrobial factors; c absence of a metalloprotein called gustin, that contains zinc and is responsible for the constant maturation of taste papillae; d bad taste; e oral candidiasis f increased cells exfoliation after contact, because of poor lubrication; g increased proliferation of pathogenic microorganisms; h coated tongue; i halitosis; and many others may occur as a consequence of chronic hyperglycaemia: a tongue alterations, generally a burning mouth; b periodontal disease; c white spots due to demineralization in the teeth; d caries; e delayed healing of wounds; f greater tendency to infections; g lichen planus; h mucosa ulcerations. Buccal alterations found in diabetic patients, although not specific of this disease, have its incidence and progression increased when an inadequate glycaemic control is present.

  13. Behavioral and Brain Functions. A new journal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagvolden Terje

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Behavioral and Brain Functions (BBF is an Open Access, peer-reviewed, online journal considering original research, review, and modeling articles in all aspects of neurobiology or behavior, favoring research that relates to both domains. Behavioral and Brain Functions is published by BioMed Central. The greatest challenge for empirical science is to understand human behavior; how human behavior arises from the myriad functions such as attention, language, memory and emotion; how these functions are reflected in brain structures and functions; and how the brain and behavior are altered in disease. Behavioral and Brain Functions covers the entire area of behavioral and cognitive neuroscience – an area where animal studies traditionally play a prominent role. Behavioral and Brain Functions is published online, allowing unlimited space for figures, extensive datasets to allow readers to study the data for themselves, and moving pictures, which are important qualities assisting communication in modern science.

  14. Making Behavioral Activation More Behavioral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanter, Jonathan W.; Manos, Rachel C.; Busch, Andrew M.; Rusch, Laura C.

    2008-01-01

    Behavioral Activation, an efficacious treatment for depression, presents a behavioral theory of depression--emphasizing the need for clients to contact positive reinforcement--and a set of therapeutic techniques--emphasizing provision of instructions rather than therapeutic provision of reinforcement. An integration of Behavioral Activation with…

  15. Pyrogenic organic matter can alter microbial communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masiello, Caroline; Gao, Xiaodong; Cheng, Hsiao-Ying; Silberg, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    Soil microbes communicate with each other to manage a large range of processes that occur more efficiently when microbes are able to act simultaneously. This coordination occurs through the continuous production of signaling compounds that are easily diffused into and out of cells. As the number of microbes in a localized environment increases, the internal cellular concentration of these signaling compounds increases, and when a threshold concentration is reached, gene expression shifts, leading to altered (and coordinated) microbial behaviors. Many of these coordinated behaviors have biogeochemically important outcomes. For example, methanogenesis, denitrification, biofilm formation, and the development of plant-rhizobial symbioses are all regulated by a simple class of cell-cell signaling molecules known as acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs). Pyrogenic organic matter in soils can act to disrupt microbial communication through multiple pathways. In the case of AHLs, charcoal's very high surface area can sorb these signaling compounds, preventing microbes from detecting each others' presence (Masiello et al., 2014). In addition, the lactone ring in AHLs is vulnerable to pH increases accompanying PyOM inputs, with soil pH values higher than 7-8 leading to ring opening and compound destabilization. Different microbes use different classes of signaling compounds, and not all microbial signaling compounds are pH-vulnerable. This implies that PyOM-driven pH increases may trigger differential outcomes for Gram negative bacteria vs fungi, for example. A charcoal-driven reduction in microbes' ability to detect cell-cell communication compounds may lead to a shift in the ability of microbes to participate in key steps of C and N cycling. For example, an increase in an archaeon-specific AHL has been shown to lead to a cascade of metabolic processes that eventually results in the upregulation of CH4 production (Zhang et al., 2012). Alterations in similar AHL compounds leads to

  16. PIE-R[superscript 2]: The Area of a Circle and Good Behavior Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Robert G.; Allday, R. Allan

    2008-01-01

    When teachers consider behavior management issues in the classroom, they often focus primarily on student behavior. Nevertheless, managing inappropriate student behavior can often be improved by altering teacher behavior. Discussed in the present article are four components of teacher behavior that can lead to more effective management of student…

  17. Alteration of dopamine receptor sensitivity by opiates and the subsequent effect of this alteration on opiate tolerance and dependence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine whether there is an alteration of dopamine receptor sensitivity following opiate administration, and whether this alteration has any influence on the development of opiate tolerance and dependence. Behavioral hypersensitivity to direct-acting dopamine agonists was observed in mice following acute or chronic morphine administration. Acute levorphanol administration also resulted in potentiation of dopamine agonist-induced behaviors. An increase in density of dopamine receptors, as measured by (/sup 3/H)butyrophenone binding accompanied the development of behavioral hypersensitivity. This increase was localized to the striatum, an area important in the mediation of dopamine-agonist induced behaviors. Naloxone or LiCl coadministered with the opiates prevented the development of hypersensitivity and the increase in density of dopamine receptors. Coadministration of lithium enhanced the development of acute and chronic tolerance. Lithium enhanced the development of dependence as determined by naloxone-induced hypothermia in chronically morphine-treated mice. Apomorphine enhanced naloxone-induced withdrawal in acutely dependent mice. This enhancement was blocked by coadministration of lithium with the opiates. These results suggest that dopamine receptor supersensitivity influences the degree of tolerance and dependence.

  18. Alteration of dopamine receptor sensitivity by opiates and the subsequent effect of this alteration on opiate tolerance and dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study was undertaken to determine whether there is an alteration of dopamine receptor sensitivity following opiate administration, and whether this alteration has any influence on the development of opiate tolerance and dependence. Behavioral hypersensitivity to direct-acting dopamine agonists was observed in mice following acute or chronic morphine administration. Acute levorphanol administration also resulted in potentiation of dopamine agonist-induced behaviors. An increase in density of dopamine receptors, as measured by [3H]butyrophenone binding accompanied the development of behavioral hypersensitivity. This increase was localized to the striatum, an area important in the mediation of dopamine-agonist induced behaviors. Naloxone or LiCl coadministered with the opiates prevented the development of hypersensitivity and the increase in density of dopamine receptors. Coadministration of lithium enhanced the development of acute and chronic tolerance. Lithium enhanced the development of dependence as determined by naloxone-induced hypothermia in chronically morphine-treated mice. Apomorphine enhanced naloxone-induced withdrawal in acutely dependent mice. This enhancement was blocked by coadministration of lithium with the opiates. These results suggest that dopamine receptor supersensitivity influences the degree of tolerance and dependence

  19. Multiple scenarios of bentonite alteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Performance assessment for TRU waste repositories has shown that soluble and poorly sorbing nuclides such as I-129 and C-14 dominate the dose. These nuclides are expected to migrate with groundwater flow, hence hydraulic conditions and their evolution with time in the repository are key issues for repository safety. Cementitious material will be used for waste packaging, backfilling and structural material in a TRU waste repository. Bentonite is also expected to be used for some TRU wastes to provide the function of a hydraulic barrier in the disposal system. There is concern that the coexistence of cementitious material and bentonite cause the alteration of smectite due to interaction with hyperalkaline leachates and consequent deleterious perturbation of the function of bentonite as a hydraulic barrier. Many research studies have been performed to identify possible mechanisms of cement-bentonite interaction. However, uncertainties still exist in our understanding of the precise chemical scheme of bentonite alteration in highly alkaline conditions, especially the space and time variation of secondary mineral occurrences. In order to reflect this uncertainty, multiple scenarios of bentonite alteration were developed based on the possible mineralogical changes derived from knowledge of both experiments and observation of natural systems. It was focused that the mineral reaction involving hyperalkaline fluids would thermodynamically depend on the variable chemical condition in bentonite buffer and that kinetics would be important as well as thermodynamic stability in controlling their occurrence, i.e., the kinetic controls may operate to remain metastable minerals over the long term. The mineralogical consequences of the interaction between clays and alkaline fluids are summarized as follows. Clay → C-S-H gel and other solids which can rapidly precipitate. Clay and gel → illite. Clay and gel → metastable zeolite. Clay and gel → metastable zeolite → stable

  20. Acid Sulfate Alteration on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.

    2016-01-01

    A variety of mineralogical and geochemical indicators for aqueous alteration on Mars have been identified by a combination of surface and orbital robotic missions, telescopic observations, characterization of Martian meteorites, and laboratory and terrestrial analog studies. Acid sulfate alteration has been identified at all three landing sites visited by NASA rover missions (Spirit, Opportunity, and Curiosity). Spirit landed in Gusev crater in 2004 and discovered Fe-sulfates and materials that have been extensively leached by acid sulfate solutions. Opportunity landing on the plains of Meridiani Planum also in 2004 where the rover encountered large abundances of jarosite and hematite in sedimentary rocks. Curiosity landed in Gale crater in 2012 and has characterized fluvial, deltaic, and lacustrine sediments. Jarosite and hematite were discovered in some of the lacustrine sediments. The high elemental abundance of sulfur in surface materials is obvious evidence that sulfate has played a major role in aqueous processes at all landing sites on Mars. The sulfate-rich outcrop at Meridiani Planum has an SO3 content of up to 25 wt.%. The interiors of rocks and outcrops on the Columbia Hills within Gusev crater have up to 8 wt.% SO3. Soils at both sites generally have between 5 to 14 wt.% SO3, and several soils in Gusev crater contain around 30 wt.% SO3. After normalization of major element compositions to a SO3-free basis, the bulk compositions of these materials are basaltic, with a few exceptions in Gusev crater and in lacustrine mudstones in Gale crater. These observations suggest that materials encountered by the rovers were derived from basaltic precursors by acid sulfate alteration under nearly isochemical conditions (i.e., minimal leaching). There are several cases, however, where acid sulfate alteration minerals (jarosite and hematite) formed in open hydrologic systems, e.g., in Gale crater lacustrine mudstones. Several hypotheses have been suggested for the

  1. Are extremes of consumption in eating disorders related to an altered balance between reward and inhibition?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina E Wierenga

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The primary defining characteristic of a diagnosis of an eating disorder (ED is the disturbance of eating or eating-related behavior that results in the altered consumption or absorption of food (DSM V; American Psychiatric Association, 2013. There is a spectrum, ranging from those who severely restrict eating and become emaciated on one end to those who binge and overconsume, usually accompanied by some form of compensatory behaviors, on the other. How can we understand reasons for such extremes of food consummatory behaviors? Recent work on obesity and substance use disorders has identified behaviors and neural pathways that play a powerful role in human consummatory behaviors. That is, corticostriatal limbic and dorsal cognitive neural circuitry can make drugs and food rewarding, but also engage self-control mechanisms that may inhibit their use. Importantly, there is considerable evidence that alterations of these systems also occur in ED. This paper explores the hypothesis that an altered balance of reward and inhibition contributes to altered extremes of response to salient stimuli, such as food. We will review recent studies that show altered sensitivity to reward and punishment in ED, with evidence of altered activity in corticostriatal and insula processes with respect to monetary gains or losses, and tastes of palatable foods. We will also discuss evidence for a spectrum of extremes of inhibition and dysregulation behaviors in ED supported by studies suggesting that this is related to top-down self-control mechanisms. The lack of a mechanistic understanding of ED has thwarted efforts for evidence-based approaches to develop interventions. Understanding how ED behavior is encoded in neural circuits would provide a foundation for developing more specific and effective treatment approaches.

  2. Are Extremes of Consumption in Eating Disorders Related to an Altered Balance between Reward and Inhibition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierenga, Christina E.; Ely, Alice; Bischoff-Grethe, Amanda; Bailer, Ursula F.; Simmons, Alan N.; Kaye, Walter H.

    2014-01-01

    The primary defining characteristic of a diagnosis of an eating disorder (ED) is the “disturbance of eating or eating-related behavior that results in the altered consumption or absorption of food” (DSM V; American Psychiatric Association, 2013). There is a spectrum, ranging from those who severely restrict eating and become emaciated on one end to those who binge and overconsume, usually accompanied by some form of compensatory behaviors, on the other. How can we understand reasons for such extremes of food consummatory behaviors? Recent work on obesity and substance use disorders has identified behaviors and neural pathways that play a powerful role in human consummatory behaviors. That is, corticostriatal limbic and dorsal cognitive neural circuitry can make drugs and food rewarding, but also engage self-control mechanisms that may inhibit their use. Importantly, there is considerable evidence that alterations of these systems also occur in ED. This paper explores the hypothesis that an altered balance of reward and inhibition contributes to altered extremes of response to salient stimuli, such as food. We will review recent studies that show altered sensitivity to reward and punishment in ED, with evidence of altered activity in corticostriatal and insula processes with respect to monetary gains or losses, and tastes of palatable foods. We will also discuss evidence for a spectrum of extremes of inhibition and dysregulation behaviors in ED supported by studies suggesting that this is related to top-down self-control mechanisms. The lack of a mechanistic understanding of ED has thwarted efforts for evidence-based approaches to develop interventions. Understanding how ED behavior is encoded in neural circuits would provide a foundation for developing more specific and effective treatment approaches. PMID:25538579

  3. Correlated alteration effects in CM carbonaceous chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Lauren B.; McSween, Harry Y., Jr.; Zolensky, Michael E.

    1996-07-01

    Three parameters are proposed to determine the relative extent of alteration in CM chondrites. The mineralogic alteration index monitors the relative progress of coupled substitutions in the progressive alteration of cronstedtite to Mg-serpentine and increases with increasing alteration. To calculate values of this index, an algorithm has been developed to estimate the average matrix phyllosilicate composition in individual CM chondrites. The second parameter is the volume percent of isolated matrix silicates, which decreases with progressive alteration due to mineral hydration. Finally, the volume percent of chondrule alteration monitors the extent of chondrule phyllosilicate production and increases as alteration proceeds. These parameters define the first CM alteration scale that relies on multiple indicators of progressive alteration. The following relative order of increasing alteration is established by this model: Murchison ≤ Bells Cochabamba and Boriskino experienced is less precisely constrained, although both fall near the middle of this sequence. A comparison between the mineralogic alteration index and literature values for the whole-rock chemistry of CM chondrites reveals several correlations. A positive, nearly linear correlation between bulk H content and progressive CM alteration suggests an approximately constant production rate of new phyllosilicates relative to the mineralogical transition from cronstedtite to Mg-serpentine. The abundance of trapped planetary 36Ar decreases systematically in progressively altered CM chondrites, suggesting the wholesale destruction of primary noble gas carrier phase (s) by aqueous reactions. Because low temperature fluid-rock reactions are generally associated with large isotopic mass fractionation factors, we also compared our model predictions with δ18O values for bulk CM samples. Although some of these data are poorly resolved, the order of increasing δ18O values approximates the order of increasing

  4. TWO STAGE FRAMEWORK FOR ALTERED FINGERPRINT MATCHING

    OpenAIRE

    T. R. Anoop; M.G. Mini

    2015-01-01

    Fingerprint alteration is the process of masking one’s identity from personal identification systems especially in boarder control security systems. Failure of matching the altered fingerprint of the criminals against the watch list of fingerprints can help them to break the security system. This fact leads to the need of a method for altered fingerprint matching. This paper presents a two stage method for altered fingerprint matching. In first stage, approximated global ridge orientation fie...

  5. Behavioral Finance

    OpenAIRE

    Hirshleifer, David

    2003-01-01

    Behavioral finance is the study of how psychology affects financial decision making and financial markets. A valuable resource for both academics and practitioners, this authoritative collection brings together the main works in both psychology and finance, dealing with the debate between proponents of the behavioral school and advocates of the efficient market school. The first volume contains works written by leading psychologists that underlie behavioral finance, focusing on general issues...

  6. Behavior modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelham, W E; Fabiano, G A

    2000-07-01

    Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a chronic and substantially impairing disorder. This means that treatment must also be chronic and substantial. Behavior Modification, and in many cases, the combination of behavior modification and stimulant medication, is a valid, useful treatment for reducing the pervasive impairment experienced by children with ADHD. Based on the research evidence reviewed, behavior modification should be the first line of treatment for children with ADHD. PMID:10944662

  7. Altered striatal intrinsic functional connectivity in pediatric anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfman, Julia; Benson, Brenda; Farber, Madeline; Pine, Daniel; Ernst, Monique

    2016-05-01

    Anxiety disorders are among the most common psychiatric disorders of adolescence. Behavioral and task-based imaging studies implicate altered reward system function, including striatal dysfunction, in adolescent anxiety. However, no study has yet examined alterations of the striatal intrinsic functional connectivity in adolescent anxiety disorders. The current study examines striatal intrinsic functional connectivity (iFC), using six bilateral striatal seeds, among 35 adolescents with anxiety disorders and 36 healthy comparisons. Anxiety is associated with abnormally low iFC within the striatum (e.g., between nucleus accumbens and caudate nucleus), and between the striatum and prefrontal regions, including subgenual anterior cingulate cortex, posterior insula and supplementary motor area. The current findings extend prior behavioral and task-based imaging research, and provide novel data implicating decreased striatal iFC in adolescent anxiety. Alterations of striatal neurocircuitry identified in this study may contribute to the perturbations in the processing of motivational, emotional, interoceptive, and motor information seen in pediatric anxiety disorders. This pattern of the striatal iFC perturbations can guide future research on specific mechanisms underlying anxiety. PMID:27004799

  8. Intrinsic Brain Activity in Altered States of Consciousness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boly, M.; Phillips, C.; Tshibanda, L.; Vanhaudenhuyse, A.; Schabus, M.; Dang-Vu, T.T.; Moonen, G.; Hustinx, R.; Maquet, P.; Laureys, S.

    2010-01-01

    Spontaneous brain activity has recently received increasing interest in the neuroimaging community. However, the value of resting-state studies to a better understanding of brain–behavior relationships has been challenged. That altered states of consciousness are a privileged way to study the relationships between spontaneous brain activity and behavior is proposed, and common resting-state brain activity features observed in various states of altered consciousness are reviewed. Early positron emission tomography studies showed that states of extremely low or high brain activity are often associated with unconsciousness. However, this relationship is not absolute, and the precise link between global brain metabolism and awareness remains yet difficult to assert. In contrast, voxel-based analyses identified a systematic impairment of associative frontoparieto–cingulate areas in altered states of consciousness, such as sleep, anesthesia, coma, vegetative state, epileptic loss of consciousness, and somnambulism. In parallel, recent functional magnetic resonance imaging studies have identified structured patterns of slow neuronal oscillations in the resting human brain. Similar coherent blood oxygen level–dependent (BOLD) systemwide patterns can also be found, in particular in the default-mode network, in several states of unconsciousness, such as coma, anesthesia, and slow-wave sleep. The latter results suggest that slow coherent spontaneous BOLD fluctuations cannot be exclusively a reflection of conscious mental activity, but may reflect default brain connectivity shaping brain areas of most likely interactions in a way that transcends levels of consciousness, and whose functional significance remains largely in the dark. PMID:18591474

  9. Radiofrequency treatment alters cancer cell phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Matthew J.; Tinger, Sophia; Colbert, Kevin L.; Corr, Stuart J.; Rees, Paul; Koshkina, Nadezhda; Curley, Steven; Summers, H. D.; Godin, Biana

    2015-07-01

    The importance of evaluating physical cues in cancer research is gradually being realized. Assessment of cancer cell physical appearance, or phenotype, may provide information on changes in cellular behavior, including migratory or communicative changes. These characteristics are intrinsically different between malignant and non-malignant cells and change in response to therapy or in the progression of the disease. Here, we report that pancreatic cancer cell phenotype was altered in response to a physical method for cancer therapy, a non-invasive radiofrequency (RF) treatment, which is currently being developed for human trials. We provide a battery of tests to explore these phenotype characteristics. Our data show that cell topography, morphology, motility, adhesion and division change as a result of the treatment. These may have consequences for tissue architecture, for diffusion of anti-cancer therapeutics and cancer cell susceptibility within the tumor. Clear phenotypical differences were observed between cancerous and normal cells in both their untreated states and in their response to RF therapy. We also report, for the first time, a transfer of microsized particles through tunneling nanotubes, which were produced by cancer cells in response to RF therapy. Additionally, we provide evidence that various sub-populations of cancer cells heterogeneously respond to RF treatment.

  10. Intrinsic Brain Activity in Altered States of Consciousness: How Conscious Is the Default Mode of Brain Function?

    OpenAIRE

    Boly, M; Phillips, C.; Tshibanda, L; Vanhaudenhuyse, A.; Schabus, M.; Dang-Vu, T.T.; Moonen, G.; Hustinx, R.; Maquet, P; Laureys, S.

    2008-01-01

    Spontaneous brain activity has recently received increasing interest in the neuroimaging community. However, the value of resting-state studies to a better understanding of brain–behavior relationships has been challenged. That altered states of consciousness are a privileged way to study the relationships between spontaneous brain activity and behavior is proposed, and common resting-state brain activity features observed in various states of altered consciousness are reviewed. Early positro...

  11. Alterations of pulmonary defense mechanisms by protein depletion diet.

    OpenAIRE

    Jakab, G J; Warr, G A; Astry, C L

    1981-01-01

    Pulmonary defense mechanisms were quantitated in mice that were fed a protein-free diet (PFD) for periods of 2 and 3 weeks. Despite the severe weight loss and emaciation induced by the diet, the bactericidal mechanisms in their lungs were preserved against aerogenic challenges with staphylococcus aureus, Proteus mirabilis, and Listeria monocytogenes. Phagocytic assays of alveolar macrophages that were retrieved by pulmonary lavage from PFD-fed animals showed a decrease in Fc receptor-mediated...

  12. Altered BOLD Response during Inhibitory and Error Processing in Adolescents with Anorexia Nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Christina Wierenga; Amanda Bischoff-Grethe; A James Melrose; Emily Grenesko-Stevens; Zoë Irvine; Angela Wagner; Alan Simmons; Scott Matthews; Wai-Ying Wendy Yau; Christine Fennema-Notestine; Kaye, Walter H.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Individuals with anorexia nervosa (AN) are often cognitively rigid and behaviorally over-controlled. We previously showed that adult females recovered from AN relative to healthy comparison females had less prefrontal activation during an inhibition task, which suggested a functional brain correlate of altered inhibitory processing in individuals recovered from AN. However, the degree to which these functional brain alterations are related to disease state and whether error proces...

  13. General Anesthesia and Altered States of Arousal: A Systems Neuroscience Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Emery N Brown; Purdon, Patrick L.; Van Dort, Christa J.

    2011-01-01

    Placing a patient in a state of general anesthesia is crucial for safely and humanely performing most surgical and many nonsurgical procedures. How anesthetic drugs create the state of general anesthesia is considered a major mystery of modern medicine. Unconsciousness, induced by altered arousal and/or cognition, is perhaps the most fascinating behavioral state of general anesthesia. We perform a systems neuroscience analysis of the altered arousal states induced by five classes of intraveno...

  14. Neurobehavioral Alterations in HIV-1 Transgenic Rats: Evidence for Dopaminergic Dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Moran, L. M.; Booze, R.M.; Webb, K. M.; Mactutus, C. F.

    2012-01-01

    Clinical studies have provided evidence that the progression of HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) involves alterations in dopamine (DA) systems. Drugs of abuse that act on the brain DA system, such as cocaine (Coc), may exacerbate HIV-1 infection and consequent behavioral and neurological manifestations. In the present study, we used the HIV-1 transgenic (Tg) rat, which constitutively expresses 7 of the 9 HIV-1 genes, to assess potential DA system alterations in three behaviora...

  15. Childhood Trauma is Associated with Altered Cortical Arousal: Insights from an EEG Study

    OpenAIRE

    Howells, Fleur Margaret; Stein, Dan J.; Russell, Vivienne A

    2012-01-01

    Background: Childhood trauma is associated with psychiatric disorders, yet the underlying psychobiological mechanisms that account for this link are not well understood. Alterations in cortical arousal may, however, play a key role in mediating this association. We hypothesized that childhood trauma would be associated with alterations in arousal during a task that required sustained attention and behavioral inhibition. Materials and Methods: Fifty-three healthy adults completed the Childhood...

  16. Psychological behaviorism and behaviorizing psychology

    OpenAIRE

    Staats, Arthur W.

    1994-01-01

    Paradigmatic or psychological behaviorism (PB), in a four-decade history of development, has been shaped by its goal, the establishment of a behaviorism that can also serve as the approach in psychology (Watson's original goal). In the process, PB has become a new generation of behaviorism with abundant heuristic avenues for development in theory, philosophy, methodology, and research. Psychology has resources, purview and problem areas, and nascent developments of many kinds, gathered in cha...

  17. Behaviorally inadequate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasperbauer, Tyler Joshua

    2014-01-01

    According to situationism in psychology, behavior is primarily influenced by external situational factors rather than internal traits or motivations such as virtues. Environmental ethicists wish to promote pro-environmental behaviors capable of providing adequate protection for the environment, but...... situationist critiques suggest that character traits, and environmental virtues, are not as behaviorally robust as is typically supposed. Their views present a dilemma. Because ethicists cannot rely on virtues to produce pro-environmental behaviors, the only real way of salvaging environmental virtue theory is...... producing positive results. However, because endorsing behaviorally ineffective virtues, for whatever reason, entails that environmental ethicists are abandoning the goal of helping and protecting the environment, environmental ethicists should consider looking elsewhere than virtues and focus instead on...

  18. Pemberian Fikosianin Spirulina Meningkatkan Jumlah Sel Darah, Aktivitas Fagositosis, dan Pertumbuhan Ikan Kerapu Bebek Juvenil (ADMINISTRATION OF SPIRULINA PHYCOCYANIN ENHANCES BLOOD CELLS, PHAGOCYTIC ACTIVITY AND GROWTH IN HUMPBACK GROUPER JUVENILE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woro Hastuti Satyantini

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate effects of Spirulina phycocyanin on the total  blood cell count,phagocytic activity, and growth of humpback grouper fish, Cromileptes altivelis juvenil.  Fishes were fedwith a diet containing   0, 150, 250, 350 dan 450 mg  phycocyanin per kg diet for four weeks and eachtreatment was triplicates.  Initial body weight  of  grouper was  8.46 ± 0.22 g with a density of 10 fish per56 litre volume. The total count of  erythrocytes and leucocytes increased until the fourth week of rearingperiod. The highest of total erythrocyte and leucocytes were observed in fish treated with 150 mg phycocyaninper kg diet ( 13.17 x  105 cells/mm3 and 8.93 x 105 cells/mm3 respectively which were not significantlydifferent (P>0.05 to those treated with 250 mg phycocyanin per kg diet. The total leucocytes and phagocyticactivity of fish fed diet containing  250 mg phycocyanin  per kg diet (8.49 x 105 cells/mm3 and 59.67%respectively were significantly higher  (P <0.05 to those of control group. The highest of final weight(Wt=14.32 g and weight growth (G=5.89g and lowest of feed conversion ratio (FCR=1.13 were obtainedin fish treated with  250 mg phycocyanin per kg diet which were  significantly  higher  (P <0.05 than thosefed control diet. The data showed that  the addition of  phycocyanin 250 mg/kg diet enhances the totalleukocyte count, phagocytic activity and the growth of humpback grouper juvenil.

  19. Genetic alterations in pancreatic carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmid Roland M

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cancer of the exocrine pancreas represents the fifth leading cause of cancer death in the Western population with an average survival after diagnosis of 3 to 6 months and a five-year survival rate under 5%. Our understanding of the molecular carcinogenesis has improved in the last few years due to the development of novel molecular biological techniques. Pancreatic cancer is a multi-stage process resulting from the accumulation of genetic changes in the somatic DNA of normal cells. In this article we describe major genetic alterations of pancreatic cancer, mutations in the proto-oncogene K-RAS and the tumor suppressors INK4A, TP53 and DPC4/SMAD4. The accumulation of these genetic changes leads to a profound disturbance in cell cycle regulation and continuous growth. The knowledge of the underlying molecular mechanisms will offer new therapeutic and diagnostic options and hopefully improve the outcome of this aggressive disease.

  20. Genetic alterations in pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Muhammad Wasif Saif; Lena Karapanagiotou; Kostas Syrigos

    2007-01-01

    The diagnosis of pancreatic cancer is devastating for patients and their relatives as the incidence rate is approximately the same as mortality rate. Only a small percentage, which ranges from 0.4% to 4% of patients who have been given this diagnosis, will be alive at five years. At the time of diagnosis, 80% of pancreatic cancer patients have unresectable or metastatic disease.Moreover, the therapeutic alternatives offered by chemotherapy or radiotherapy are few, if not zero. For all these reasons, there is an imperative need of analyzing and understanding the primitive lesions that lead to invasive pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Molecular pathology of these lesions is the key of our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the development of this cancer and will probably help us in earlier diagnosis and better therapeutic results. This review focuses on medical research on pancreatic cancer models and the underlying genetic alterations.